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Full text of "Bowdoin Orient"




m}t (Sift af 

ARTHUR T. PARKER 
CLASS OF 1876 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation funding 



http://www.archive.org/details/bowdoinorient11bowd 




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VOLUME XI. 



EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Akthur G. Staples, Managing Editor. 
Melvin S. Holway, Eugene T. McCarthy, 

William A. Moody, Warken O. Plimpton. 

Charles H. Gilman, Business Editor. 
/ 




BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

1881-2. 



PRINTED AT THE JOURNAL OFFICE, LEWISTON, MAINE. 



INDEX TO VOLUME XI. 



American Novel, The 166 

Athletic Association Meeting (College Items) 10 

Base-Ball 47, 58, 77, 87' 

Base-Ball Nine, Trip of 18 

Base-Ball Meeting 86 

Boating Meeting 86 

Boat Eaee 45 

Bowdoin Stories 6 

Chapel Bell's Story, The 119 

Choice of an Occupation 82 

Class Day Oration 68 

Class Day Exercises 71 

Clippings... 11, 23, 35, 49, 61, 78,89, 101, 113, 

124, 137, 148, 161, 172, 184, 196 

College Items.. 9, 20, 32, 43, 56, 75, 85, 98, 111, 

121, 135, 147, 158, 170, 183, 194, 207 

College World.. .11, 22, 34, 49, 60, 88, 100, 113 

Commencement, The 79th 73 

Convention, Alpha Delta Phi 42 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 95 

Psi Upsilon 41 

Theta Delta Chi 109 

ZetaPsi 147 

Death of More 107 

Driven to Death 202 

Edgar Allan, Poe 1 78 

Editorial Notes.. .1, 13, 25, 37, 51, 63, 79, 91, 

103, 115, 127, 139, 151, 163, 175, 187, 199 

Editors' Table.. 12, 23, 35, 49, 61, 90, lOi, 114, 

125, 137, 149, 101, 173, 185, 177, 209 

E.xtract.s from Exchanges 28 

Exhibition, Senior and Junior 136, 208 

Field Day 46 

Heart of Gray lock, Tlie 189 

Inter-Collegiate Rowing 156 



Intemperance, Its Causes and Effects 55 

Ivy Day Exercises 44 

Ivy Leavings 43 

Lake George Boat Race, Concerning the 

Proposed 205 

John Lothrop Motley 190 

Modern Rip, A 109 

Mystery of Baroko and Bokardo 167 

Night of Horror, A 181 

Necrology, '80-81 77 

Our Platitudes 204 

Personals 10, 22, 34, 48, 58, 77, 87, 100, 

112, 124, 136, 147, 160, 172, 184, 195, 208 

Race, Bowdoin Fall 

Rank in College 142 

Reading 106 

Reveries 129 

Reviews 50 

Resolutions , 10, 78, 146, 160 

Romance, A 94 

Sophomore and Freshman Games 87 

Spencer 5 

Sphinx of Fate 118 

Sunday Services 71 

Table of Averages 31 

Then and Now 190 

Thoreau 17 

"Two Voyages 142 

Type of College Life, A 131 

Valentine, A 180 

Walt Whitman 54 

When Greek Meets Greek 130 

COMMUNICATIONS. 

Against Music During Study Hours 167 

An Anecdote 31 



IV 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Base-Ball 96 

Boating Prospects 193 

Bugle Editors 110 

Bugle Election 32 

Cast of Byron Offered to the Collection 20 

College Song Book 

Compulsory Chapel 83 

Compulsory Chapel, Reply to 96 

French 133 

Freshmen Excuses 157 

Gymnasium 182 

Gymnasium, Expedients for 121 

Historical Matter in Library 68 

Opening of Library Sunday Afternoons 157 

Orient, Criticism on 206 

Reading Room, Care of 31 

Reading Room, Magazines 8 

Wliat We Would Lilve to Know 8 



PAGE 
POETRY. 

Alpheus Spring Packard 189 

Anna 16 

Auf Wiedersehen 28 

Awakening Life 30 

Class Day Poem 66 

Evening Prayers in Chapel 53 

Golden Rod 81 

Ivy Poem 40 

Miss Vesta 42 

My Messenger 56 

New Meaning to Give and Take, A 5 

"Poem" 93 

Reflection 129 

Rondeau 1 65 

Senior's Vision, The 178 

Soldier, The 118 

Unrest 141 

Opera — •' Hand-Downs " 153 



Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 2T, 1881. 



No. 1. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADOTLTSTABLE HAJfGIXG 

SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new"Oxford" and "iVIoehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



Books, Statiooeff, and Paper Haopgs, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAIVD, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 



*v.«ll§f-*^«. 



* SPRING STYLES * 

OF 

Nobby Stiff and Soft Hats 

JXTST JEt:E;C3:EI"VE!X>. 

NEW STYLES in LINEN COLLARS & CUFFS. 
NEW PATTERNS in NECK- WEAR. 



FINE ASSORTMENT OF 



SPRING OVERCOATS AND SUITS, 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock. 
FRi^N'K: E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Beat Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets. 




CilllTIOli TO SMOKllS. 

Be^vare of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 

New Cigarette, ^.^^ff 
The VETERAN, -^^^' 



TRY IT. 
^^' Fine, Mild i Sweet, 

Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DETLLEES THROUGHOUT THE WOULD. 

FOR YOUR 

NOBBY HAT 

Go or Send to 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 

SIGN OF THE GOLD HAT. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

EKGEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENOY rOR 



UNDER FALMOUTH HOTEL. 



JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, ETC., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QUALITY, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 

PORTLAND, _ _ _ _ MAINE. 
A. CARTER. J. W. D. CARTER. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



A reorganization of the Course of Instruction 
has recently been made, in which the distinction be- 
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main- 
tained, but all academic undergraduates are placed 
on one footing, with the opportunity of following, to 
a considerable extent, such lines of study as they 
prefer. 

All students entering the College proper, are ex- 
amined on the same course of preparatory studies. 
After the second year a liberal range of electives is 
offered, within which a student may follow his choice 
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount 
pursued. 

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated 
as a distinct course, are still, for the most part, re- 
tained either in the required or elective lists. More 
place is also given to the Modern Languages than 
they have hitherto had. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all 
who complete the Academic Course. 

The Engineering Department remaius as here- 
tofore, and facilities are offered for study of the 
various branches of this science. The means of 
theoretical instruction are ample, and the town of 
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen- 
tres in the State, and in the immediate vicinity of 
many important public works, afibrds excellent 
opportunities for the study of actual structures. 
The College also enjoys many favors from the United 
States Coast Survey Office. The admission is the 
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the 
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will 
be taken, if desired, in the place of Latin. 

Tho.se who complete satisfactorily the four years' 
course in engineering will receive tlie Degree of Sc. 
B. Tho.se who complete a two years' course of ad- 
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or 
Mechanical Engineer. Students not candidates for 
a degree will be received at any stage for which an 
examination shall show them to be fitted, and may 
remain for any desired time. Further information 
will be furnished on application to Professor G. L. 
Voso. 

Terms of Admission to the Academic Course. 

Applicants for admission will bo exaiuiucd in the 

following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Writ- 
ing Latin (.T) Lessons in Allen'.s Latin Coniiiosi- 
tion are rccomincnded as indicaliiig the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Gcorgics, and six books of theiEucid; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 

GuKKic — IIa<lley'K Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
book.s; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

Ancient Gkoijuai-iiy. 

Mathematics — Arithmetic, including Connnon 



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 

and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 

I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 

Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission 
will be required to produce testimonials of good 
moral character. The time for examination is the 
Friday after Commencement and the first Thursday 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. Candidates for 
admission to advanced classes will be examined in 
the studies which such classes have accomplished. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrange- 
ments with the Principals of schools and academies 
having a regular course preparatory for college of at 
least three years' duration, whereby their pupils 
may be examined for admission to college at their 
respective schools, in connection with their own 
final examinations. 

The amount of instruction now offered and pos- 
sible to be taken in the several principal lines of 
study is exhibited comparatively, or reduced to one 
scale in the following manner. This is, however, 
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal 
length : 

Latin, eight terms. 

Greek, eight terms. 

Mathematics, eight terms. 

German, four and a half terms. 

English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English 
Literature, three and a half terms. 

French, three terms. 

Italian, one term. 

Spanish, one term. 

Rhetoric (formal), one term. Rhetorical and 
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a 
half terms. 

Natural History studies, five and a half terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, four terms. 

Chemistry, four terms. 

History, Ancient and Modern, two terras. 

Political Economy, one and a half terms. 

Public Law, two terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, including Logic, 
four terms. 

Christian Evidences, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $2,5. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $:i toi $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however,' by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lesson the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 27, 1881. 



No. 1. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE TEAR, BY THE CLASS OF '82, OF 

BOWDOIJNT COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

AHTHtTR G. Staples, Managing Editor. 

Charles H. Gjlman, Business Editor. 

Melvin S. Holway, Eugene T. McCarthy, 

"William A. Moody, Warren 0. Plimpton, 

George G. Weeks. 

Terms — $2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communicationa 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 



CONTENTS. 
Tol. XI., No. ].— April 27, ]881. 

Editorial Notes X 

Literary : 

A New Meaning to " Give and Tal<e" (poem) 5 

Spenser 5 

Bowdoin Stories 6 

The Soldier (poem) 7 

Communications : 

Magazines, etc 8 

What We Would Like to Know 8 

College Items 9 

Personal 10 

College World 11 

Clippings 11 

Editors' Table 12 



EDITORIAL HOTES. 



We cautiously make tlie remark that the 
Orient has with this issue entered upon an- 
other year of intellectual existence. The 
first decennial of the Orient has come and 
gone and we usher in the eleventh volume. 
We propose to make no extended salutatory ; 
no settled number of promises. We don't 
promise to improve the Orient. We don't 
promise even to maintain its present standard; 
but we humbly step into the arena, figura- 



tively roll up our shirt sleeves, and go to 
work. We are sorry for you, but you will be 
obliged to wait to learn the future of the 
Orient. We can't tell you. We only 
promise you our best endeavors, and hope, 
as our lowest aim, to transmit the Orient to 
our successors alive and well, as healthy upon 
its next birthday as it is to-da3% and as true 
an exponent of Bowdoin's interests as it was 
when we received it. To this end we labor. 
If we can make the Orient brighter, we 
shall be happy. If we can make it more in- 
fluential and a better index of our college, we 
shall be happy. But, failing in this, we can 
still lay the flattering unction to our souls 
that we have done the best we could, and 
more we could not do. To this end we earn- 
estly request your aid and co-operation; if 
not these, then your passive good-will and 
above all, your criticism. 

So then, with hands joined to the work, 
with desires and ambitions in unison, the pres- 
ent board of editors salute you. And, as 
they come before the foot-lights with their 
lowest bow, they beg your tenderest care and 
cheeriest good-mornings towards the first- 
born of Vol. XI. 



The world of college publication is new to 
us and presents, apparently, a very pleasant, 
busy world of earnest workers. The only 
evident commotion is between the Acta and 
the Record, but as we are rather late in the 
day and fresh in the business, we refrahi from 
drawing the evident moral. 



In the beginning we wish to be under- 
stood. We don't wish to make the Orient 
the organ of seven, and only seven students. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



You will agree to the reasonableness of this 
desire. The Orient is the property of stu- 
dents, instructors, alumni, for the expression 
of anything worthy of expression, and con- 
tributions, articles, verses, indicative of liter- 
ary ability, will serve to give the Orient a 
"brace" and make it a better representative 
of Bowdoin. 



The present number of the Orient is 
sent to many of our friends and alumni. 
We only represent that the Orient is the 
organ of the college, and that to all who have 
an interest in their Ahna Mater, the success 
of the Orient should be a matter of some 
importance. We would like the assistance of 
the alumni in many ways, pecuniarily and in 
the shape of contributions and articles of in- 
terest; and to this end we hopefully invite 
your attention. 



It cannot be denied that Bowdoin labors 
under a disadvantage. The climate of Maine 
is not tropical, with its snow storms in the 
middle of April, and with a river ice-bound 
and unfit for rowing until the robins come in 
May, almost. The snow storm of April 14th 
had a chilling effect upon sports. It com- 
pletely stopped all base-ball practice, and in- 
sinuated to the ambitious oarsmen that it was 
just as well to sit down and wait until the 
New England climate sliould be propitious. 
As late as April 20th, the base-ball ground is 
entirely unfit for practice, and the water in 
the Androscoggin is of a temperature consid- 
erably less than boiling. 

We notice a remark in a recent issue of 
the Harvard Crimson, to the effect that their 
grounds were in a perfect condition for sports 
of all kinds. The proposed base-ball game 
with the Harvards suggested the above re- 
marks, and in view of this game we only call 
attention to the bad condition of our own 
grounds, as an evident cause for any poor 
playing which the nine may indulge in. 



What will the students say to a new de- 
parture? The Orient, in its new dignity, 
would like to take an office, and with the aid 
of the students sees no reason why it cannot. 
The proposed scheme is not for a private 
office where the board of editors shall sit in 
secret conclave, but for a pleasant room, if 
possible, where every one can have access to 
the Orient file, and where the latest ex- 
changes can be seen and read. There is, and 
always has been, a comi^lete isolation on the 
part of the students from outside news, we 
mean college news, and a plan removing this 
objectionable feature would, we think, be 
very beneficial. The activity in sports ren- 
ders college papers more interesting every 
day. There is a charming room for this pur- 
pose opposite the reading-room, if it could be 
obtained, which, with the pecuniary aid of the 
students, could be fitted up and rendered ex- 
tremely serviceable. 



One of the events of the week was the 
beginning of work on Memorial Hall. The 
approach of a strong force of three stone 
masons, the appearance of a dinner i)ail in the 
vicinity of the building, and the extreme ac- 
tivity of Mr. Booker, could not fail to im- 
press every one that the gigantic work had at 
length begun. We have muchly wondered 
what those four sticks of wood meant that 
lay for some time between Memorial Hall and 
the Cleaveland Building, and this wonder 
was strengthened greatly by the fact tliat 
two weeks ago we saw a seedy-looking indi- 
vidual gazing thoughtfully at the massive 
proportions of this unfinished building. But 
we are settled to-day in our mind that the 
work has already begun. We trust that these 
three stone masons won't be violent with the 
Hall, because we all have very tender emotions 
towards the buildinsr. 



The edict of the Faculty has gone forth 
to the effect that we arc not to be permitted 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



to observe Memorial Day, May 30, as a holi- 
day. The reason for thus depriving us of a 
customary holiday was not stated, onl}' inas- 
much as the Faculty objects to the manner in 
which the day is usually spent by the stu- 
dents. Even this reason, supposing that the 
day be passed in a most objectionable manner 
by a few of the students and in idleness by 
the rest, would not serve to mark it from the 
majority of holidays and would not, we think, 
warrant its denial. 

We are sorry. The students must, with 
honest sorrow, see their holidays float away 
into the unceasing whirlpool of hard work. 
Washington's Birthday and Memorial Day are 
already gone. Fast Day and Day of Prayer are 
rapidly losing their grip, and if the term 
were in session at that time, we should to a 
moral certainty lose our Fourth of July. We 
must be martyrs to the march of progress, 
however. As college youths we must out- 
grow such plebian joys as remembering our 
soldier dead, and attend strictly to business, 
while the great world in general marches rev- 
erently to the cemetery and lays its tributes 
of love upon the graves of the country's 
defenders. 



Mr. Johnson's endeavors to start a col- 
lection of statuary here in Bowdoin have met 
with success. The statuar}- arrived during 
vacation. We were not present when it did 
arrive, but our representative was on the 
scene, and can tell a thrilling tale of the un- 
packing. The collection, as far as it goes, is 
excellent, and we consider that the thanks of 
the college and town are due to Mr. John- 
son for his exertions in thus endeavoring to 
plant here the germ of an art collection. 
We were permitted to view the collection. 
It consists of plaster casts, admirably executed, 
of the following masterpieces, " Apollo Belve- 
dere," " Diana, the Huntress," " Venus of 
Milo," Head of Jupiter, Otricoli, Head of Juno. 
The Oeient is not sufficiently cesthetique to 



attempt to criticise. Our art editor is unwell 
and we couldn't find another,but we are assured 
that the casts are excellent and well worthy 
the earnest study of every one. In fact every 
student in the college should feel it the high- 
est privilege to be thus enabled to see like- 
nesses of the greatest masterpieces. They 
are in the north wing of the chapel, and will 
be ready for inspection in a short time. 



We are happy to be able to state that the 
Faculty has kindly permitted the Junior class 
the two days, Thursday and Friday, June 
2d and 3d, for the ivy holidays. The last 
issue of the Okibnt briefly noted the pro- 
posed change in the usual plan of the spring 
holidays, but failed, we think, to state the ex- 
act reasons why this change was proposed, 
and how it will be of advantage. An exam- 
ination of the last Ivy Number of the Obient 
will bring to light tiie chief reason why this 
change was undertaken. We can't afford to 
treat our friends to an overwhelming defeat 
on every recurring Ivy Day, and this the 
Oeient of that date expressly states. It 
also states that the cause of this defeat is the 
preceding sports, and especially the Ivy Hop, 
which unfit the base-ball men for good play- 
ing. For this reason they must either not 
dance or not play base-ball. It is impossible 
to have the hop Saturday evening, and for 
this reason chiefly the days were changed. 
The plan has other advantages. The sports 
are arranged better and the Ivy Exercises 
and Ivy Hop, coming in afternoon and even- 
ing of the same day, renders the presence of 
ladies and tlieir entertainment better assured 
than formerly, when the most interesting feat- 
ures were sandwiched in between a Field 
Day at Topsham and a Boat Race on the 
river. 

By this means the friends of the class 
from out the state and from " over east," 
can come and go without being compelled to 
remain over the Sabbath in Brunswick. The 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



conclusion that the attendance will be less on 
these two daj^s than on Friday and Saturdaj', 
is open to debate. The ability of business 
men to leave business better on Saturday 
than on Thursday, is open to the gravest 
doubt, and at best a matter of conjecture. 
We think that the Okient is quite unable to 
assert that there will be fewer people here on 
Thursday and Friday than on Friday and 
Saturday, from any such reason. We have 
every faith in this new plan, and trust that it 
will have its desired result in the first Ivy 
Day victory at Base-Ball within the memory 
of the present undergraduates. 



Verily college youths are progressing in 
public esteem. From* grim sarcasm and 
unremittent attempts at extermination the 
Philadelphia American has emerged into a 
better condition. During the past few weeks, 
circulars have been distributed to the various 
colleges, inviting college graduates and under- 
graduates to compete for prizes, as tests of 
practical journalism. The prizes offered are 
twenty-one in number, aggregating $1,500, 
and are given for the best editorials, essays 
and poems. We have been requested to call 
the attention of the college to this plan. If 
any of you have any ability in editorial com- 
position, essay writing, or in versification j^ou 
are requested to lay the fruits of your inspi- 
ration before the thirsting world. You are 
offered every encouragement. If j'ou don't 
draw a prize you are at least made famous, 
since, if your article soars to the standard of 
the American, you are certain of havino- it 
published and paid for. The judges of this 
competition are men eminently fitted for the 
position. With respect to tliis scheme for 
reaching tlie minds and capacities of college 
undergraduates, we have not mucli to say. 
The plan, to our mind, is worlliy of encour- 
agemcnl. In a strictly monetary point of 
view it is somewhat reprehensible perliaps, 
bvit no one can for a moment doubt tliat its 



ultimate object is excellent and that its effect 
upon college men will be in the highest de- 
gree praiseworthjr. 

Any plan which can offer an inducement 
to college men to shake off slothfulness, go 
to work, and endeavor to test the capacity of 
their intellect is, we think, praiseworthy. 
There is too much drifting in college, as there 
is in life. The student, who doesn't display a 
natural aptitude for literature and composi- 
tion, makes no endeavors in that direction, 
and this state is, for the most part, produced 
by college methods. According to the Record, 
a student of Yale recently remarked that he 
could, with a sufficiency of pens, ink, and 
paper, learn to write as well in the Desert of 
Sahara as in Yale College. He ascribed it to 
the fact that they write and receive their 
essays again without a word of comment or 
criticism. Such is not the state in Bowdoin 
to-day, but we are informed that it has been 
in the past. 

In a general sense, custom has made the 
remark of tiie Yale man applicable to Bow- 
doin. Even the customary letters are not 
half written. As the Professor of Rhetoric 
says, you scribble a sheet and sign " Yours 
in haste, etc." Letter writing is not an infe- 
rior kind of composition. Emerson says : 
" The experience of writing letters is the 
modus of inspiration. When we have ceased 
to have any fullness of thought, that once 
made a diary a joy as well as a necessity, and 
have come to believe that an image or a 
happy turn of expression is no longer at our 
command, in writing a letter to a friend we 
may find that we rise to thought and to a 
cordial power of expression that causes no 
effort." Yet in this respect, as in all others, 
man}' of us arc lacking, and it is to obviate 
this difficulty, encourage composition, and 
discover the ability of college men, that the 
American makes tliis offer. To such as liave 
no desire to excel in writing, the proposal of 
the American can have no interest. To such 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



as do, this proposal must remind them of 
their desires and offer a practical inducement 
for exertion. In this exertion the work itself 
will be its own reward. 

Bear in mind, we don't advise, don't en- 
courage, only remark that every one had bet- 
ter uncork his ink bottle, hunt i;p his box of 
pens, write something and then keep ifc. We 
merely take this text, as olfered by the Amer- 
ican, for a little sermon on laziness in writing. 
The Orient will encourage composition. It 
hasn't sufficient lucre to offer $1,500 prizes, 
but it has one transcendent, glittering bait to 
hold forth, viz. : A position on the Orient's 
Editorial Board. 



A NEW MEANING TO "GIVE AND 

TAKE." 

" One kiss," I pleaded ; "just a tiny one, 
For a good-night." 

A" deep carnation swiftly sped 

Across tiie face so pale before. 
And modest drooped the graceful head, 
As the sweet lips, so blushing red. 

Trembled denial that the eyes foreswore. 

" Ah, yes" — still pleading — " see, we are alone ; 
'Tis Love's good-night." 

The crested head reared proudly now, 
And flashed the eye like diamond light ; 

And the white face was purest snow, 

And the red lips they pouted so. 

As the fair lady swept beyond my sight. 

An owl — a philosophic owl he proved to be. 
That saw the whole occurrence from his tree — 
Blinked once, blinked twice, then flapped a lazy 

wing. 
And cracked his bill, and gave one claw a fling : 
" Young silly" — here he paused to stretch his head 
And plume his owlship's gravity, ere he said — 
" To plead for what is yours — if you but make it! 
To give she could not, but wotdd let you take it ! " 

— Acta. 



SPENSER. 

Rare old Geoffrey Chaucer was dead and 

buried and turned to dust, if we can place 

any reliance in the workings of Nature, ere 

England found his successor ; and through all 



this lapse of time our poor, half-formed En- 
glish tongue was stumbling along between life 
and death. It cannot be denied, never was 
otherwise stated, I think, that the time be- 
tween Chaucer and Spenser, produced poets. 
They were abundant, — mere names of men 
who lived and died and in the meantime 
rhymed and rhymed. 

We cannot imagine it otherwise. There 
was and is too much music in Nature for men 
to see it in silence. The rhyme of the sea- 
sons was then as now, and they could not help 
but try to tell in verse the touches with which 
Dame Nature paints the rainbow, and the 
rhythmic music which she ever puts into her 
great unceasing anthem of Spring, Summer, 
Autumn, Winter. 

And so they lived and died, and sung and 
were forgotten, until the master hand came — 
the true King of Poesy — and took up the fal- 
tering song. 

Into this indifferent world of thought and 
diction, then, was Spenser born, but during 
his early life, initil he himself wrote, a great 
and powerful change was breaking in upon 
English customs and English letters. The 
language was becoming less colloquial through 
the influence of continental poets, and at the 
same time freer, more elastic, and more melo- 
dious. The growing sense of the country de- 
manded a literature, while it knew absolutel}'' 
nothing concerning one. The increase of in- 
tellect demanded poetry, while the dying chiv- 
alry decried it as weak and eifeminate. To a 
task like this came Edmund Spenser, bringing 
with him his flowing verse, his graceful poeti- 
cal images, and introducing his countrymen 
into the society of their chosen heroes of fact, 
fancy, and fame ; in short into the very dream- 
land of the age. We need not delay upon his 
earlier poems — upon the " Shepherd's Calen- 
dar," and the rest ; they all are characteristic. 
The monument of Spenser is the " Faery 
Queen," and it was this production that he 
sent forth upon such a community. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



We can easily conceive of the influence of 
such a writing a^ the " Faery Queen," per- 
haps not critically, but to a certain degree 
imagine the influence of this writing in an 
age whe;i new worlds of fabulous wealth and 
adventures were being discovered, and when 
Prince Arthurs might ride for aught they 
knew on every wintry eve all over the rougii, 
dreary face of Old England. 

As a poem, " Faery Queen " will not bear 
description. A labor of love from the writer, 
— "the land of Faery was to him an unreal 
world of picture and illusion, 'the world's sweet 
inn from pain and wearisome turmoil' " — it is 
to a certain extent incapable of being criti- 
cised. We recognize the purity of fancy and 
feel at the same time the unreal, vague sense 
of not understanding. The characters are not 
permanent. One looks to see each character 
fade into the cloud of darkness and reappear 
only when forgotten. The story of the poem 
is apparent enough, such as it is. As a mere 
narrative, according to the best critics, " Faery 
Queen" has every fault. Plot, it has none, 
and as an allegory is far inferior to "Pil- 
grim's Progress." It is not in this way tliat 
Spenser excels. They, his readers, were chil- 
dren of literature — readers of the first lisping 
lines of poetry's great volume, lookers on in 
the ruder pictures of allegory. The poetry 
the masses were incapable of understanding, 
but the allegory they must understand. To 
pander to such taste.s as tliese, and to create 
finally newer and better ones, Edmund Spen- 
ser was sent. As to whether he fulfilled his 
mission, read " Faery Queen." See the true 
thought, spiritual beauty, and true poesy that 
sparkles in every verse and Hne ; witness the 
allegory and story, the myths and satyrs, 
princes and princesses, and notice above all 
that Spenser's verse is true, earnest poetry, 
and you will see that his mission will never 
be fulfilled. He sings for every people im- 
mortally. He sings for poets, as Browning 
does, and show how liis genius was irrepressi- 



ble. Read him as you may, if you read him 
thoughtfully, you will think perchance of how 
Spenser found the English verse and how he 
left it, and in listening to his music will rise 
refreshed. 

Whoever likes ease and quiet, whoever 
likes to pass beyond himself and live in fanci- 
ful lands, whoever admires the music of morn- 
ing, the rhyme and rhythm of poetry, and the 
touches of beauty in Nature, may read " Faerj' 
Queen " and find them ; and he will no longer 
doubt that Spenser accomplished his mission. 
Though the tale of a rude age, it lives to-day 
and can give any one, who will, an easy en- 
trance into his "own realms in land of Faery." 



BOWDOIN STORIES. 

Recent articles in the Orient on Bow- 
doin scenes and incidents have been read by 
me with peculiar interest, awakening recol- 
lections of my college days and memories of 
similar escapades in which I, it must be con- 
fessed on more than one occasion, bore a 
prominent part. One or two in particular I 
recall with especial interest, both of which 
seem to me to illustrate peculiar phases of 
student nature. The first of these, at the 
time of its occurrence, excited no little atten- 
tion throughout the State, and was severely 
condemned as an outrage, etc. The circum- 
stances, which I distinctly recollect, were as 
follows : 

We at that time were subjected to annual 
examinations, and it is needless to say that 
the occasion of these examinations were 
dreaded by the majority of the students. 
During my Sophomore year, on the examining 
committee was one old fellow in particular, 
who, by the peculiar delight he apparently 
took in propounding questions, obviously in- 
tended to disconcert the student, had earned 
our heartiest dislike, and accordingly it was 
resolved, if possible, to be repaid for the 
many painfid hours caused by his instrumen- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



tality. The day appointed for the annual 
examination was the time selected. The ex- 
aminations were held in Massachusetts Hall, 
and through the ceiling directly above the 
chair usually occupied by the object of our 
regard, a hole was bored, over which was sus- 
pended a jug of molasses highly scented. A 
string suitably attached was in easy reach of 
the one elected to work the apparatus. 
With the examination day came the commit- 
tee, and with them our friend gorgeously 
arrayed in long linen coat, stock, high collar, 
and frilled shirt of those days. Many friends 
were in, for the examinations were made 
much of. Scarcely had the old gentleman 
commenced his work, and the peculiar twinkle 
of his eye proclaimed the bent of his mind, 
when the string was loosened. A solid col- 
umn of molasses descended upon the victim's 
head, completely saturating his clothes and 
knocking from his hand the snuff-box which 
generally was present in his inquisitions. 
Astonishment, fear, disgust, and rage spread 
over the old gentleman's face, and amid yells 
of laughter, excited by the ludicrous specta- 
cle, — laughter, joined in by all present, and 
need I say with the heartiest good-will by 
those who had experienced the working of 
his mind, — the old gentleman made his exit. 
We were never again troubled at examina- 
tions by his presence. The perpetrators of 
the joke, I have reason to know, escaped 
punishment. 

Among the students was one in particular, 
who, by his recklessness and utter disregard 
for college laws and regulations, had more 
than once incurred the displeasure of the 
Faculty, and whose many promises of reforma- 
tion apparently produced no good result. Re- 
peated warnings and admonitions not having 
the desired effect, at length pater familias 
was summoned from home, and came in hot 
haste. Our Sophomore, now in the gieatest 
trepidation, endeavored to find a way from 
his difficulties. An interview with the col- 



lege authorities meant a recapitulation of 
offenses hitherto carefully concealed from 
paternal knowledge, and as a consequence 
more than a dim prospect of removal from 
college. In this emergency his natural wit 
came to his assistance. Leading his father 
to the room of a Senior, bearded and digni- 
fied, the latter was introduced as Professor 
So-and-so. It is needless to say that the 
father of our hero received from the pseudo 
Professor a satisfactory account of his son's 
standing and actions, and went off by the 
earliest train to which he was eagerly led by 
the rejoicing student. What made the affair 
more amusing was the fact that the Senior 
was in ignorance of the deception, and had 
answered the inquiries of the anxious parent 
in a manner to quiet his solicitude, and with 
a desire to serve a fellow-student. The orig- 
inator of the trick received by these means a 
new lease of freedom, but did not, I think, 
graduate receiving permission from the Fac- 
ulty to withdraw at the end of his Sophomore 
year. 

Such are two of the many incidents Avhich 
I recall, disclosing perhaps, to those not be- 
hind the scenes, traits not to be admired. 
Yet they serve to illustrate peculiar shades of 
college happiness. To a graduate the men- 
tioning of familiar incidents or scenes serves 
to bring up a host of memories. A word 
leads to dreams of love for the institution, and 
imagination pictures pleasant scenes and hours 
spent under the walls of old Bowdoin and 
within hearing of the murmurs of her softly 
sighing pines. 



THE SOLDIER. 

Arrayed in martial uniform, 
With bayonet and gun, 

He stood before tlie looking-glass 
To view the patriot son. 

The admiration filled his soul 
He would that slie could see ; 

And even sighed in under tone, 
" How proud would Edith be !' 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



He thought of heroes old in song, — 

Atreides, Odysseus, 
Of Menalaus, Ajax too. 

And bold Idomeneus. 

He longed to see the enemy. 
To show what he would do ; 

A perfect Hercules, — his weight. 
One hundred twenty-two. 

At eve with martial step he goes 

To make a part}' call. 
Armed to the teeth with bowie-knife. 

Revolver, toothpicks, all. 

Returning later, quite alone. 
He hears footsteps behind. 

All thouglit of pistols, bowie-knives. 
And lieroes flee his mind. 

He nms for life, each hair erect. 
His brow is drenched with sweat ; 

The country's safe with such as ho, 
'Twas Bowdoin's brave cadet. 



COMMUHICATIOHS. 



MAGAZINES, ETC. 

Editors of Orient : 

There is a matter which, although perhaps 
a rather small point for censure, yet is the 
source of no little inconvenience, and the 
cause of considerable complaint among the 
students : this is the removal of the maga- 
zines from the reading-room. This change 
was made, doubtless, with a laudable end in 
view, and with the belief that such a change 
would be an improvement upon the former 
system. Inasmuch as it protects the maga- 
zines from the rather harsh usage to which 
they were formerly subjected, and obviates 
the difficulty sometimes experienced in caus- 
ing them to remain in the place of deposit, 
the library arrangement is, undoubtedly, an 
improvement. Furllier than this a claim for 
sujjerior merits would meet with but little 
success. 

Aside fi'om the matter of protecting tlie 
property, the question of personal conven- 
ience should have been taken into account. 
As at present conducted, an easy access at all 



times to these books is impossible. The 
library, being opened only at stated hours, 
and then, too, at times when the student is 
generally obliged to be engaged in his studies, 
practically debars one from the free consulta- 
tion, such as is desirable. 

The arrangements, or rather lack of ar- 
rangements, made for the accommodations of 
the reader are certainly noticeable. Accom- 
modations, at least as good as those in the 
old quarters, should be made and some at- 
tempt to consult the convenience of those 
compelled to resort to a place in every respect 
unsuited for such purposes. How nicely our 
peculiar system of lighting this room conduces 
to an easy and enjoyable hour of pleasant 
reading, none need be reminded. Good light 
is not of course necessar}' to a retention of 
good eyesight, but, nevertheless, some of us 
are unreasonable enough to mildlj^ insist upon 
such a provision. 

These are some of the eminent advan- 
tages of the present arrangement, such as 
most strongly present themselves, and most 
urgently appeal to our senses. Is a change 
advisable? V. 



WHAT WE WOULD LIKE TO KNOW. 

Editors of Orient : 

Where all of Bowdoin's poets have fled 
to? Five dollars will be paid to any one dis- 
covering one, and producing him. 

Wliat has become of '82's foot-ball eleven, 

and why Capt. P don't drag them out on 

the delta and train them ? 

Why the inhabitants of the south end of 
Winthrop don't draw up a statement assert- 
ing tiiat tiie best place to practice violin- 
playing is not anywhere in the town pf Bruns- 
wick, but that the Topsliam sliore of Cow 
Island would serve admirably ? 

What is to prevent the Freshmen Greek 
from producing Gi;di[>us Tyrannus, or at least 
sometliing funny ? 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



What is to prevent Bowdoin from getting 
up a religious canvass? Trained manipula- 
tors can be obtained from Harvard. 

Why the Faculty don't invent an accepta- 
ble excuse, good for any emergency and 
capable of elasticity, and present such excuse 
to each undergraduate? 

Who it was that basely stated that the 
last meeting of '81 was to agitate the ques- 
tion of clean shaves ? 

What kind of spiritual food the base-ball 
men propose to take with them, i. e., for read- 
ing matter ? 

Why some one don't produce an enter- 
tamment for Thursdaj' evening, June 2d, 
when everything will be tranquil ; and why 
the Bowdoin Band, witia the addition of one 
and only one tune to its Repertoire, could not 
give a band concert on that evening ? 

The above questions are of interest to the 
undersigned. Pj'izes for correct answers to 
the whole list will be given by them, as 
received. 

W. AND T., Maine Hall. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



The Elder has a new hat. 

" Spring suits." Does it ? 

The assistant organist has returned. 

The next project is to paint the boat-house. 

Waterman, '83, has left college for this term. 

Carpenter is the Sunday man of the Juniors. 

During vacation ten boys remained in college. 

'84 is evidently preparing to meet '85 on the Delta. 

Base-ball men were out on the Delta very promptly. 

The Seniors say they are having an easy time now. 
Shot 

High drill official: "The hind rank will now 
fall in." 

"E. U." intends to go to Oxford when he leaves 
Bowdoin. 

The plan of all working together in the Gym. is 
well liked. 



Mason is to teach the spring term of Bowdoinham 
High School. 

Chapel music on Easter morning was not relished 
by empty stomachs. 

Mason of '81 has been in town, and will join '82 
next September. 

Colby has had a cane rush. Most time for our 
Freshmen to brace. 

First crew on the river, '83. First crew in the 
river — two of '81's men. 

An apparatus which will be of interest to all can 
be seen at No. 6 W. H. 

History recitations to President Chamberlain were 
to begin Tuesday, April 26. 

For one whole week the glass in the college build- 
ings has remained unbroken. 

" Bring out your canes," says an Ex. But we are 
not Abel to sport Eve'n Adam one. 

The new class in Chemistry Arid the laboratory 
has been arranged very commodiously. 

The Seniors began Art and Science of War on 
Friday last, reciting to Lieut. Crawford. 

Fisher has been elected captain of '81 crew. He 
has behind him Mauson, Gray, and Larrabee. 

Cutler, First Lieutenant Company A, has resigned, 
and his place is to be filled by competitive drill. 

Inquisitive Soph (who is just beginning the drill) 
— " What does he mean by ' Company hurch'?" 

Work begun on Memorial Hall, Wednesday, April 
13. Four sticks of timber hauled on the ground. 

Sojjhomore (reading Tacitus) — " Both of his un" 
cles were procreators of the Cassars." Applause. 

Our nine this year is to be Snow, Wilson, Staples, 
Rogers, Haggerty, Wright, Knapp, Smith, and Gard- 
ner. 

Some fine plaster casts of ancient statuary have 
been received from Boston, and are placed in the 
north wing. 

Some one thought the "Jollities" to be the doll- 
darndest show they'd ever been to. This is Twitt- 
ing on facts. 

The class in Italian is growing small. They prob- 
ably prefer the '■'■Dolce far niente^'' to the labor of 
translating it. 

If any one doubts that this college is to become 
co-educational, let them examine the photographs at 
No. 2.5 W. H. 

The Juniors are divided in their elective studies 
as follows ; In Physics five. Botany eight, and Science 
of Language eleven. 



10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A youthful chemist, after completing his "re- 
searches," blew out his gas, and then wondered what 
made these chemicals smell so. 

The drill is now in a prosperous condition. Only 
one man, so far, has become tired of it. He needs, 
he says, more time for his Greelc. 

President Chamberlain has signified his approval 
of the proposed Orient office. If the students do the 
same the project will be carried out. 

The nine will play with Harvard next Monday, 
Brown on Tuesday, and Williams on Wednesday, 
unless some unforeseen change is made this week. 

A certain Bath girl was overheard to say Fast Day 
that she " could always tell a college student by the 
peculiar odor of his breath." Cardamon seeds, prob- 
ably. 

Mr. Johnson has been showing some engravings 
representing the development of the German alpha- 
bet, and illustrating various inscriptions on stones, 
hells, etc. 

The Senior and Junior exhibition at the end of the 
last term passed off satisfactorily, and is the only oc- 
casion of the kind for some time past from which no 
one of the speakers was absent or excused. 

Many of the Seniors are extremely dissatisfied 
with the result of their Saturday's meeting. The 
principal dissatisfaction is among non-society men, 
who, as they themselves say, have been surely and 
decidedly " sat on." 

At a meeting of the Athletic Association the fol- 
ing officers were elected : President, McCarthy ; "Vice 
President,Gannett ; Secretary and Treasurer, Packard, 
'83 ; Master of Ceremonies, Bates ; Executive Com- 
mittee, Reed, '82, Austin and Waterman, '8i. 

The Seniors held a class meeting April 23. The 
result of the meeting was the presentation of a new 
ticket for class officers. The principal change was 
the removal of Donovan from liis appointment to de- 
liver the parting address, and substitution of Rogers. 

Two students bold, who ply the oar 

Upon the Senior crew, 
Set out the other afternoon 

To paddle their own canoe. 

But judging the results thereof, 
They lacked the Indian's skill, 

For while avoiding Scylla's crags 
Charybdis caused a si)ill. 

A cold day 'twas indeed for them, 

But fortune lent her hand, 
And from the frigid IIjO 

Assistance brought to land. 

Tlic Sopliomores liave in their boat, Chase, Gan- 
nett, Wint(u-, and llnlden, witli (ioodwin, coxswain. 
The Freshmen iiavc liad their outriggers lengthened 



during vacation, and have sent for new oars. This 
crew will probably be Brown, Sweetser, Adams, and 
Child, or Torrey, with Waterman coxswain. 



At a meeting of the students of the Maine Medical 
School the following resolutions were passed : 

2?eso?!;ed, Whereas, in Divine Providence, our beloved 
friend and companion in study, Walter Scott Sheldon, has 
been removed from our number by death, we, his fellow- 
students, as we bow in reverent submission and in common 
sorrow, extend to the bereaved family our most sincere and 
heartfelt sympathy in this sad hour of affliction. 

Resolved, That a copy of the above be priuted in the 
Narragansett Times, the Brunswick Telegraph, and the 
BowDoiN Orient. 

D. A. KOBINSON, 

E. A. MCCOLLISTER, 

G. W. Way, 
Committee of the School. 



PERSOKAL. 



[We earnestly solicit commuuicatious to this column 
from any who may have an interest in the Alumni.] 

'23.— W. G. Crosby, LL.D., died in Belfast, March 
21st. 

'24. — William Mason, M.D.,died in Charlestown, 
Mass., March 18. 

'30. — Darius Adams, Esq., died in Rockton, 111., 
Nov. 5th, 1880. 

'34:. — Rev. Dr. Cyrus Hamlin, who left the Bangor 
Theological School to assume the presidency of Mid- 
dlebury College, Vt., is to be inaugurated July 7th, 
as permanent president of tliat institution. 

'30.— Died March 15th, I. PI. Woodman of New 
Gloucester. 

'52. — Walter Wells is lying at the point of death, 
of consumption, at his home in Portland. In 1807 he 
acted as Secretarj' of the Board of Commissioners ap- 
pointed by the Legislature for exploring tlie water 
jjower of the State. He was afterwards appointed 
Superintendent to have charge of tlie matter collected 
by tlie Board, and wrote a compreliensive report en- 
titled "The Water Power of Maine." 

'01. — Edward Stanward, Esq., of the Boston Ad- 
vertiser, is secretary of the class of '01, who celebrate 
the twentieth anniversaiy of their graduation by a 
reunion and dinner during Commencement week of 
1881. The dinner is to bo served at thd Falmouth 
Hotel in Portland, Wednesday evening, July 13th. 

'73. — Dr. Horace B. Hill of Lewiston has been 
elected by the trustees of tlie State Insane Hospital, 
to tlie ))osition of second assistant superintendent. 
He is a graduate of the Long Island Medical College 
Hospital. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



11 



75. — C. L. Clarke has the superintendence of in- 
troducing Edison's electric light, in New York City. 

75. — Frank R. Upton is superintendent of Edi- 
son's works at Menlo Park, N". J. 

'76. — Rev. George Pratt of Bangor has accepted a 
call from Grace Church Society in Bath. He will lo- 
cate, there in June. 

/■^ '.??■• — R. G. Stanwood, who will be remembered 
as disappearing so mysteriously last summer, while 
here at home in Brunswick on a vacation, has recently 
been heard from through a friend of his. He is in 
Brunswick, Georgia, and is slowly recovering from a 
brain fever. The particulars of his case have not 
been learned, except that he has not been conscious 
of his whereabouts since his disappearance, until 
within a few days before his friends heard from him. 
His wife has gone to his assistance. 

'77. — C. W. Morrill has lately been admitted to 
the Sagadahoc Bar as an attorney at law. He has 
been studying in the office of Hon. M. P. Frank of 
Portland. He will practice in that city. He has been 
filling the position of teacher of Mathematics in tlie 
Bath High School. 

'78. — Felch is express messenger on the Fitchburg 
branch of the Old Colony R. R. 

'80. — Bartlett and Edwards are in Louisville, Ky., 
writing Kentucky county histories. Address, 168 
Fifth Street. 

'82. — Lane is in business in Boston. 

'82. — W. W. Curtis was married Saturday, the 
16th. He has gone to Machias as principal of the 
High School. The class extend congratulations, and 
wish him success. 



COLLEGE WORLD. 



Washington University, St. Louis, has 1367 stu- 
dents. 

Columbia has 1494 students, the largest number 
in any American college. 

It costs Harvard $200,000 a year to maintain its 
library. 

Oxford caps have been adopted at Columbia. 
The Seniors are to be distinguished by a button of 
purple, Juniors by dark blue. Sophomores by cardi- 
nal, and Freshmen by dark green. 

President Eliot, of Harvard College, says that 
there are now but 4,512 students in the ten colleges 
of the New England Association, against 4,544 in 
1875-6. The only college showing an increase is 
Williams, 



Five hundred thousand dollars has been given by 
Amasa Stone for the erection of a new college in 
Cleveland. It is to be called Adelbert College. 

Amherst has concluded its students are men, as 
they average twenty-two years of age. They are 
responsible to the authorities for their work, but not 
for personal conduct, unless interrupting their duties. 

The exhibitions of the Greek play CEdipus 
Tyrannus, by the Harvard students, are to take place 
on the 17th, 18th, and 19th of May. As there was 
no limitation to the number of tickets sold to a single 
person, they were all bought by speculation as soon 
as the sale begun. 

The Sophomores at Syracuse University abdutced 
a Freshman, Tipple by name, carried him in a car- 
riage five miles from town, shaved his head, tied 
him to a tree and left him to get out of his fix as best 
he could. He caused the arrest of his tormentors, 
and created a great excitement, but the jury, after less 
than an hour's deliberation, acquitted the prisoners. 

The students at Harvard are greatly interested in 
the filling of the position of Preacher to the Univer- 
sity which Dr. Peabody is soon to vacate. It is the 
universal desire that Rev. Phillips Brooks accept the 
position. He has been invited by the President and 
Fellows of the College, and the largest meeting of 
students ever held in the college has joined in urging 
his acceptance. We are sorry to have to add that Dr. 
Brooks has declined the position. 



oLippmos. 



" Her lips were like the leaves," he said, 
" By autumn's crimson tinted; " 
" Some people autumn leaves preserve 
By pressing them," she hinted. — Ex. 

"Do you sjieak German?" "No; but I have a 
brother Herman who speaks German, and I'm 
lernin'." — Lampoon. 

Prof, in Moral Philosophy — "Mr. K., vvhat end 
has a mother in view when she punishes her child .f " 
Mr. K. blushes and sits down. — Vidette. 

Student — "Professor, what's the best thing to do 
if you get concentrated nitric acid in your eye ? " 
Prof, (laconically) — " Buy a glass one." 

Prof, (to a student who writes, not for the masses, 
but for the educated few)— " You should write so 
that the most ignorant of your audience can under- 
stand all you say." Student (puzzled) — " What part 
of my production is not clear to you, sir ? " — Berke- 
ley an. 



12 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Professor — "Why are you not taking notes, sir?" 
Scholus — "I cannot; the sun shines directly upon 
my paper." Professor — " True, true. Write on the 
other side." — Free Press. 

Tutor (dictating Greelc prose composition) — 
"Tell me, slave, where is thy horse ? " Startled Soph- 
omore — "It is under my chair, sir; I wasn't using 
it ! " — Ada Columbiana. 

First Member (feeling a twinge of conscience) — 
" I say, Tom, what a lot of time a man does waste 
during the term, playing poker." Second Ditto (not 
catching the point) — Yes, especially while shufiling.'' 
— Spectator. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



As we look over the pile of exchanges which, in a 
short time after assuming our editorial duties, litters 
our table (we do not keep them on a table, but dare 
not interfere with the traditions of our predecessors), 
we are surprised at the number of them. And their 
variety is as remarkable ; thei'e are dailies, with their 
telegraphic news and theatrical announcements, 
weeklies and bi-weeklies, telling in various ways the 
story of college life, and monthly magazines of dif- 
ferent and sometimes of indifferent value. 

There are said to be a hundred and fifty college 
papers in the United States, and these by exchanging 
with each other are united together into a great 
whole, a republic of journalism in which each occu- 
pies a position according to its own value. But do 
not think that all is peace and quiet within this circle ; 
it is too distinctively American for that. There is 
much healthy emulation and too much fierce rivalry. 
The competition between different colleges is re- 
flected and magnified by their respective college 
papers. 

It is with considerable timidity that we enter the 
arena to criticise any of our "esteemed contempora- 
ries." We fear the yoke of the clown and the whip 
of the ring-master. But if we turn out as the luckless 
countryman who tried to ride the trick nnile we shall 
not be sorry at our attempt, and if we do anything to 
merit applause wo doubt not we shall get what is our 
due. 

Among our exchanges we are particularly inter- 
ested in some of the literary magazines. Foremost 
among them Is the Yale Lit. Magazine ; the variety 
and value of its contents fully merit the permanent 
form In which they nre placed, 'i'lio first article is 
" The Vision of the Dance of Death," said dance being 
the ordinary college Hie of Yale students. The piece 



is vivid and dramatic, but far too severe. "Brush 
and Pen," besides being carefully written, is in 
thought far beyond ordinary college essays on such 
subjects. The most pleasing thing is No. VII. of the 
"Papers of the Teetotum Club," a rambling discus- 
sion by a number of students on various subjects. 
The following are the closing sentences of it: "A 
somewhat sleepy pause followed this quotation, for it 
was growing late, when Perkins said with a yawn, 
'Well, if variety is the spice of life, I'm sure we must 
breathe an aromatic atmosphere to-night. Just think 
of it, from utilitarianism to co-education, from man- 
ners to matrimony, from man's true end in life to 
woman's — namely, flirtation. It is high time we put 
a stop to such desultory conversation by going to 
bed.' And as the rest folded their tents like the 
Arabs and departed — for it was Perkins' room — the 
recorder has to relate that as Perkins stood alone gaz- 
ing into the ashes, he was heard to say slowly to him- 
self, with a dreamy inflection, 'Rum critters is wim- 
men — Dickens.' " 

The Nassati Lit. Magazine is also very interesting, 
but the literary articles are rather dry, and it contains 
no poetry. The editorial and local departments are 
the best. 

The Hamilton Lit., although perhaps not quite so 
ambitious as the magazines previously mentioned, is 
fully as worthy of notice. The article on "The 
Heroism of Paul" is, from its name, rather repelling, 
but contains more original thought than could be ex- 
pected. " The Gentleman as Portraj^ed in English 
Literature" would be interesting if one had not read 
"Taine's English Literature." Indeed, after a long 
description which must be recognized as second-hand 
by every reader of Taine, he virtually proves to whom 
he is indebted for his idea bj' making a short quota- 
tion from him as if to atone for his extensive pilfer- 
ings. The paragraphs on the Alumni are the most 
complete we have seen in any college journal. 

The Bales Student is a very neat little magazine, 
and we should praise it more if it were not so much 
under the control of the Bates Faculty. The follow- 
ing verses clipped from the last number are very 
graceful : 

O hiippv (lays and golilon, 
O l)iif;lit (liiys of tli(! olden 
Time when lilc! w;is youns inul my licartwas light and free; 
lliis your luifihliii'.ss gone forever, 
Willyonr lieauly return never, , 

Will the liappy days of cliiklliood nevermore eomoback to me? 

O ye warblers of the grove, 
Trilling iiiitos of Joy and love. 
Why does not my hcaii, n'sponil'lo your gay songs as of yore f 
O ye l)i'ool<s that l)al>l>ling run 
Onward, laugliing in llie .sun. 
Why does all your sweet, wild music thrill my being nevei^ 
more? 

—J. Leon W. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Ml 



£^^a^ 



%m 



Finest and Most Select Stock of 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS. 

The Newest and Greatest Variety of Patterns in 

NECKWEAR, GLOVES, HOSIERY, 

UNBERWEAR, BRACES, ETC. 

|^° Custom Shirts from Measure, Six for $9.00. 
A Perfect Fit Guaranteed. 

Goods for the TROY LAUNDRY sent Tues- 
days and. received Saturdays. 

In Percales, Mahrattas, and American Goods. 
Orders by mail promptly attended to. 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 
FRANK M. STETSON, 

JXJSX FtSCEIVSD = 

All the New Styles in Soft and Stiff Hats. 
Best Stiff Hats, $3.75. Best Snk Hats, $3.50 in 



Just opened all the New and Nobby Styles Neck 
Dress, Coll;u-s, Cuflfs, Fancy Plose, Canes, e'tc. 
AU are invited to call and examine goods and prices. 

No. 2 Arcade Block. 



ISAAC H. SNOW, 

DEALBE IN 

gcef, Jork, Jutton, pamb, ^c. 

Special Rates to Stndent Clubs. 

BOARDING AND LIVERY STABLE 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Sts., Brunswick. 

All Hack Orders promptly attended to. 

0. L. Y®^^; C©LLEQE Ba^BE^, 
Two doors north of Post OQice. 




CUSTOM TAILORING 

A SPECIALTY, 

AT 

Fernald's Tailor Emporium 

237 Middle Street, 
PORTLAND, - - - MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DRUG STO R E. 

THE FINEST CIGARS AND SMOKING TOBACCOS. 
THE BEST PERFUMERY. 

THE BEST TOILET SOAPS. 

THE BEST HAIE BRUSHES. 

The Largest and Best Assortment of 

Drngs, Patent Medicines, &c., &c. 

To be found in this market. 

Lemont BlocJc, Brunswick, Maine. 

s. o. ooFFiisr, 

— DEALER IN — 



SSf Special Bates to Student Clubs. .Opff 
CORNER OF MAIN AND ELM STREETS. 



STUDEISTTS 

Desiring Employment, for Season of 1881, 

Enclose Ic. stamp, and ^T^■ite for circular, to 

THE MAI^THATTAI"^ AGENCY. 

733 Broadwas', New York City, N. Y. 

Please mention tMs paper. 



Ili. 



k-im 



JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book "Work to Order. 



-"^77-. B. 



GO TO 

TO BUY YOUR 

Groceries, Canned Goods, Fruits, 

Confectionerv, Tobacco, and Cigars. 

SlKcial Rates to Student Ciuli.s. 

Main Street, Head of the Mall, Brunswick. 



W. B. KNIGHT, 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

flarTninniciit OrilerB fur Milk or Cream flilcd by giving Buitnblo notice. 
Residence, School Street. 



MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 

liltewtll Okiiltil A§tiim,f 



Prepares for Bowdoin and the best New England 
Colleges. Offers, also, a thorough Semikajit Course 
to young ladies, and a shorter course for business 
pui'suits. For Catalogues, address 

Rev. a. W. burr, Hallowell, Me. 

]S4: ^ ^^ ]sr ^ n D ' s 

@jf§le:i? tttti ie@ @peam 1 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

|Il3°F"niilies, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



©^£i 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Ooa,l ~5ra,rd. in Topsliana, 

WHERE NONE BUT 

Tfie Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 



gii^l>;:ii,cla1|§f^ JI.tiiiS.f, 



B.A.Tia:, as/iA-iisrE. 



I. S. BALGOME^ 



-nUALEI! IN'- 



Hardware, Stoves, Crockery, auJ Glassware, 

B RUNS-WICK, nXS. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily- 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Pancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

C. E. TO"^7\7-lNrSDE}:iTi:), 

CHOICE GROcTrTeS, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B.— Special Rates to Students. 

f. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'BiuEN Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

PORTLAND. IVIA-INE:. 

77(/s hdiiac lida hecii tlioroiKjIth/ refilled icilli every re- 
(jfiril tu coiiiforl, ami Ihe aim in lo niak-e it firsl-dans in all 
ils- appoiii tiiieula. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

De\V^ITT HOUSE, 

QUIMBY & MURCH, Proprietors, 



A.. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brnnsw^ick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vietrs ; also College Vietvs. 

ALL KINDS OF 



For Schools and Colleges, 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Kdiai, QriMiiV. 



I';i!EN Mriccir. 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 



W THE FAVORITE NOS.S03-404-3S2-l7O-^5l-WITH \ 

-^HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DEALEK IN ALL KINDS OF 

OFFICE IN IiBMONT BLOCK, Brunswick. 
4^"Telephone connection with Coal Yard. 
1B3" Orders left at Jordan Snow's, Lemont Block, 
be promptly attended to. 



IRA C. STOCCBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEK, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Boolis, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELI' .iCIES A SPECIALTY. 

^8s and ^8/ Congress Ji., and 235 Middle St.. 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

49- Send for Price List. 







Portland, Me 



AMOS L MILLETT & CO., 

JOBBEKS AND RETAILERS OF STANDARD 

Iiiiporled and Eomestic Fancy droceries, 

nvxKKu nil. I. rici<i,i:s a si'kci.m.ty. 



ESTABLISHED 1841. 

W. L. Wl LSON & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders b.v mail will receive prompt attention. Send for prii 




The Sixty-First Aniiuiil Course of Lectures at the Medical 
School of Jliiine. will commence Kebruary lOtli, ISWl, and 
continue SIXTEKN WEEKS. 

FACrLTT.— JoSHDi L. Chajiberiais, LL.D , President ; Israel T. 
Dj.\a, M.D, Pathol'.gy and Practice ; William W. Gkeese, M.D., Sur- 
gery and Clinical Surgery ; Alerbd Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Women and Children, Frederic H. Gerrish, M.D., Materia 
Medica, Therapeutics, and Public Health ; Chari.es .AV. Goddard. A.M., 
MedicalJurisprudeoce ; Hesrt Carmu hael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; iiCRT Q. 
Wilder, M.D., Physiology j Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Anatomy \ Daniel 
F, Ellis, M.D. , Registrar and Librarian 5 AuGCSTUS P. Dudley, M.D., 
Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to th" Secretai-y. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D,, Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Botanical Microscopes, Fancy Goods. AVatches, Clocks, and Jewelry 
primiptly repaired and warranted. 

I^irLe Spectacles a,ii^ E37-eg'la,ssas. 
EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND .MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



G, Fri 

Livery, Boarding, Hack & Sale Stable 

OLD STAND OPPOSITE SAGADAIIOCK HOUSE, 
Front Street. ----- Bath, Me. 



J. M. CURTIS, Proprietor. 

BOOZCS. STA.TIONE:Ft"Sr. ROOM 
PAFER, PHFilODICALS, «9tC. 



FIRST-CLASS 



FiaMs, Organs, and M:elodeonSj ' 'E. S M I T H , . . G R O C E R. 

AT LOW PRICKS. LARGE RHNTINd STOCK. 

f». ^. EmTO'M, Bmw^^wivm, Mm. \ Lowest Prices to Student Clubs._ 
F. 1. WIXSOU, Dispenser of Pure Drugs, Medicines, and Chemicals. 

IMI»OI*.T3DI> .fVIVI} laOlMIDSI'IC! C I CBi- .rt. It S . 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding' of Physicians' Prescriptions a Specialty. 

IMIAIN STREET. ------ BRtJlSrSIVICK, IVIE. 

■KUHINAI. PUKS.S, MSIION .STUKItT, I.KWISTON, MAINK. 




#wi#fa Oitenti 



Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 11, 1881. 



No. 2. 



A GLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AlsT) THE ADJUSTABLE HANGISG 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "iVIoehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

looks, Monefj, and Paper Hangings, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

# SPRING STYLES * 

OF 

Nobby Stiff and Soft Hats 

NEW STYLES in LINEN COLLARS & CXTFES. 
NEW PATTERNS in NECK- WEAR. 



FINE ASSORTMENT OF 



SPRING OVERCOATS AND SUITS, 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock. 
FRA^N^K E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Beat Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets. 



lUTl 

Beirare of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette; see that every wrapper has 




TRY IT. 
'^- Fine, Mild & Sweet. 



Fac simile Signature on it IVo Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or favoring used in our genuine brands. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 



FOR YOUR 

NOBBY HAT 

Go or Send to 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 
SIGN OF THE GOLD HAT. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Glass Cards and Monograms 

ENOEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOE 



All the Late Publications in stock. Text Books of all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL WOEKS at PUBLISHEES' PEIOES. 



UNDER FALMOUTH HOTEL. 



JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, ETC., 

IN GREAT VAEIETY, BEST QUALITY, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 

PORTLAND, . _ - - MAINE. 
A. CABTBR. J. W. D, CARTER, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



A reorganization of the Course of Instruction 
has recently been made, in which the distinction be- 
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main- 
tained, but all academic undergraduates are placed 
on one footing, with the opportunity of following, to 
a considerable extent, such lines of study as they 
prefer. 

All students entering the College proper, are ex- 
amined on the same course of preparatory studies. 
After the second year a liberal range of electives is 
offered, within which a student may follow his choice 
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount 
pursued. 

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated 
as a distinct course, are still, for the most part, re- 
tained either in the required or elective lists. More 
place is also given to the Modern Languages than 
they have hitherto had. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all 
who complete the Academic Course. 

The Engineering Department remains as here- 
tofore, and facilities are offered for study of the 
various branches of this science. The means of 
theoretical instruction are ample, and the town of 
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen- 
tres in the State, and in the immediate vicinity of 
many important public works, aflbrds excellent 
opportunities lor the study of actual structures. 
The College also enjoys many favors from the United 
States Coast Survey OflSce. The admission is the 
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the 
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will 
be taken, if desired, in the place of Latin. 

Those who complete satisfactorily the four years' 
course in engineering will receive the Degree of Sc. 
B. Those who complete a two years' course of ad- 
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or 
Mechanical Engineer. Students not candidates for 
a degree will be received at any stage for which an 
examination shall show them to be fitted, and may 
remain for any desired time. Further iufoimatioii 
will be furnished on application to Professor G. L. 
Vose. 

Terms of Admission to the Academic Course. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in tlie 

following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Writ- 
ing Latin (IW Lessons in Allen's Ijatin Composi- 
tion are reciinuuended as indicating the amount 
rcciuired for (!.\aiuiiiation) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ilOneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 

Gkekk. — Hadloy's Greek Grannnar; Xonophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

Ancient Geogkaimiy. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 

and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 

I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 

Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission 
will be required to produce testimonials of good 
moral character. The time for examination is the 
Friday after Commencement and the first Thursday 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. Candidates for 
admission to advanced classes will be examined in 
the studies which such classes have accomplished. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrange- 
ments with the Principals of schools and academies 
having a regular course preparatory for college of at 
least three years' duration, whereby their pupils 
may be examined for admission to college at their 
respective schools, in connection with their own 
final exaniinations. 

The amount of instruction now offered and pos- 
sible to be taken in the several principal lines of 
study is exhibited comparatively, or reduced to one 
scale in the following manner. This is, however, 
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal 
length : 

Latin, eight terms. 

Greek, eight terms. 

Mathematics, eight terras. 

German, four and a half terms. 

English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English 
Literature, three and a half terms. 

French, three terms. 

Italian, one term. 

Spanish, one term. 

Rhetoric (formal), one term. Rhetorical and 
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a 
half terms. 

Natural History studies, five and a half terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, four terms. 

Chemistry, four terms. 

History, Ancient and Modern, two terms. 

Political Economy, one and a half terms. 

Public Law, two terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, including Logic, 
four terms. 

Christian Evidences, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $2"). Incidentals, $]0. 
Total regular College charges, $110. , 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 11, 1881. 



No. 2. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE CLASS OF '82, OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Arthur G. Staples, Managing Editor. 

Charles H. Gilman, Business Editor. 

Melvin S. Holwat, Eugene T. McCarthy, 

William A. Moody, "Warren 0. Plimpton, 

George G. "Weeks. 

Terms — $2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. ContributioDS must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 



Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mall matter. 



COlfTENTS. 
Tol. XI., N"o. 2.— May U, 1881. 

Editorial Notes 13 

Literary: 

Anna (poem) 16 

Thoreau 17 

The Trip of the Base-Ball Nine 18 

Communication 20 

College Items 20 

Personal 22 

College World 22 

Clippings 23 

Editors' Table 23 



EDITORIAL HOTES. 



Once again we greet you, but not with a 
salutatory. We feel that we are here with 
the intention of remaining, and upon our own 
resources, and things accordingly assume a 
business-like aspect. We, therefore, are not 
in a salutatory mood and have only a few 
words to say, and those, mostly, to extend 
our earnest thanks to every one, friends and 
students, for the kind expressions of good 
will towards the present board. They are 
very encouraging and make us feel better, 



but we wish to mildly suggest to the stu- 
dents that there are, perhaps, other and better 
ways to aid a college paper than by patting 
its editors on the back and cordially admon- 
ishing them to keep their lamps trimmed and 
burning. We never realized it so acutely as 
we do now, and never imagined that subscrip- 
tions and contributions were half so neces- 
sary. We don't intend, at this early hour, to 
complain of hard work, because it isn't work 
to write the Orient. It is only fun, and 
takes only two or three minutes ; but we are 
modest and would really like to make the 
Okient more of a college paper. So, then, 
if you haven't anything better for us, why, 
then pat us ; but if you liave anything better, 
in the shape of contributions, subscriptions, or 
other evidences of interest, send them right 
along, and we shall feel that our desires and 
designs are being in a great measure gratified 
and accomplished. 



High over minor questions, rising impor- 
tant and dignified, comes the question of the 
introduction of mortar-boards. The college 
world is intensely agitated with this moment- 
ous question. Various colleges have the dis- 
ease, and among those first afflicted are Cor- 
nell, Columbia, and Amherst. The Trinity 
Tablet gives its columns to an extremely in- 
teresting discussion of the mortar-board, in 
which the Tablet discovers that Trinity is the 
Oxford of America, — a hitherto undiscovered 
fact, which Trinity deserves great credit for 
settling. At Cornell the caps are distinc- 
tively colored, according to class. Take the 
movement all in all, it deserves especial com- 
ment, and we shall take the opportunity of 
studiously observing the onward progress of 



14 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



a mighty reform and the pleasure of again 
referring to its advancement, in our columns. 



One of the noticeable changes during the 
past week, is the return of magazines to 
their old places in the reading-room. This is 
agreeable to the majority of the students. It 
is difficult to conceive the deeply-hidden 
reason which actuated the Faculty to the 
change in the first place, but inasmuch as 
they were changed and are now returned, 
their re-appearance is doubly pleasant. They 
give a natural, home-like appearance to the 
reading-room, which has for some time really 
looked vacation-like, with the desk bare and 
unattractive. This early compliance of the 
Faculty with the desires of tlie students, as 
expressed in tiie communication in our last 
issue, is especially gratifying and suggestive. 



It has been suggested to us at least a 
dozen times, during the past fortnight, that 
the boat-house should b§ painted. It would 
seem that if the money is in any way to be 
obtained, it should be applied as soon as pos- 
sible toward making this needed improve- 
ment. The boat-house needs it. Its preser- 
vation and better appearance would counte- 
nance a considerable sacrifice in favor of this 
improvement, and the sooner the better. 
The coming boat race will, of course, bring 
the boat-house into prominence, and this is 
the thought that has probably caused so many 
remarks. 

For our part, we would like to see at 
least three coats of paint applied and the 
building appropriately labelled, but this is 
merely a fancy. It is evident to every one that 
the boat-iiouse needs paint. 



Work in the gymnasium is becoming excit- 
ing. It is even amusing sometimes, as now 
and then a brick or window-piece drops to tlie 
floor. It would be a good place for the cadets 
to drill in, since they can experience the dan- 



gers of battle without the consequent confu- 
sion, but it don't quite suit as a gymnasium. 
We fear that some one will soon be hurt, 
which would be a serious matter ; but even if 
not, the continual presence of floating lime 
dust, the extremely and extraordinary low 
temperature of the atmosphere, are produc- 
tive of more harm than good. We submit 
that it would be better to allow the students 
to spend their time for exercise out of doors 
in the pure air, where every one now spends 
his leisure hours, than to keep them swing- 
ing clubs and pulling weights in such an un- 
ventilated old refrigerator as the gymnasium 
now is. 



The officers of the Athletic Association 
have finally been elected, and if this is what 
every one has been waiting for there is now 
no reason for further delay. The charge of 
laziness and lack of spirit in sport has often 
been made with regard to members of this 
college, in respect to our annual Field Daj'. 
Take the institution at its best it is somewhat 
ailing, has not been with us long, and unless 
active measures are taken will not much 
longer lemain, and it behooves every one 
who is able to do anything, or who even 
thinks he can do anytiiing, to present himself 
before the directors of the affair and enter 
his name as a participant. It cannot be de- 
nied that the results of the athletic exercises 
on Field Day go farther and speak more em- 
phatically concerning our college sports, than 
almost any other of our institutions. And 
the better record that is made the better, as 
is evident, is tiie report concerning the col- 
lege sports. It has been reju-esented to us 
that the officers make an attempt to intro- 
duce more novel features. It hasi been re- 
marked tiiat Field Day to the spectators on 
even the front seats of the grand stand, is 
just a trifle tiresome ; that although our vis- 
itors and spectators have been true to their 
trust in the past, and have remained upon the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



15 



field until every athlete has departed, yet we 
cannot always expect the same courtesy. 
And a certain college undergraduate remarked 
that, given his choice between Field Day and 
a recitation in Christian Ethics, he should 
prefer the latter for excitement. We think 
him somewhat biased, but should be very 
pleased to see something new introduced ; 
and if not that, then true work on the part 
of every student to make Field Day some- 
thing to be proud of. To this end every man 
who weighs a hundred, or can lift fifty 
pounds, should carefully select his prize and 
go in and win. And if this be done we shall 
have a more interesting Field Day, more 
records worthy of young, healthy, active men, 
and much better enjoyment of our Ivj' Holi- 
days. These remarks are not unnecessary, we 
think. If any one is of the opinion that they 
are, we invite him to examine and compare the 
record of last year with the record of other 
New England colleges, and draw the obvious 
conclusion. 



The Nassau Lit. is bestowing its pity upon 
our college, and remarks that the military 
drill is creating excitement at Bowdoin. This 
is news. We have for some time felt ex- 
cited but never before appreciated the cause, 
and we immediately, on the first occasion, 
started out to hunt for the excitement. We 
invite the Lit. to come right along and find it for 
us. The aspect of our military was calm and 
peaceful. Not a shade of care or sorrow 
rufiled the countenances of officers or men, as 
with martial air and gleaming bayonets they 
meandered over the campus. We confess 
that for an instant we did feel excited, but it 
wore off as we beheld an officer urge on a 
weak Freshman with the point of his sword, 
and saw a crowd of students calmly, unex- 
citedly, viewing the parade. So we are com- 
pelled to believe that the Lit. was mistaken. 
We had much rather not believe it. We 
rather have the excitement, but we didn't 



find it, and so feel in duty bound to inform 
the Lit. that, although the drill is well and 
healthy, although fairly patrouized, and prob- 
ably productive of much good, yet it isn't 
creating the slightest excitement, not even its 
share. And we are also compelled to add 
that Bowdoin is not "one of those unfortu- 
nate colleges whose students are compelled to 
march around with muskets." 



The world has always liked old songs, 
and the world likes no class of old songs bet- 
ter than it likes the rhyme and music of the 
old college melodies. There is a certain sen- 
timent to college songs that you find else- 
where with difficulty. There is the feeling 
that the love and loyalty and unity of count- 
less men, — some alive, some dead, and some 
immortal, have so many times been sung in 
this self-same way, that the very words have 
become pregnant with melody. There is 
the feeling of unity, of brotherhood, and of 
loyalty, in song ; and every one must feel, as 
he hears a body of college men carol out their 
college song, that the truest love and strong- 
est faith are being thus expressed. Every- 
where, all over the wide world, college men 
are believers and participants in this custom. 
The English students, beneath the ivied walls 
of their own institutions, sing out in their 
sturdy, English voices, their own time-honored 
songs, full of love and of devotion ; and 
out on the waters of the Seine the songs of 
the University of Paris float at eventide 
and die, mingling with the music of its 
waters. It is thus everywhere. The German 
student trolls his drinking song; the Spanish 
student sings his tales of love ; and up over 
the cliffs and craggy nooks of Scotland the 
sound of the sturdy student song is heard. 
Yale sings. Harvard sings, Columbia sings, 
and we sing not at all. Has Bowdoin no 
songs ? Has none of our bards or poets left 
the slightest remnant behind, dedicated to the 
college? Do our gray-haired graduates, as 



16 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



they collect the remnants of the class, sing 
no songs which reunite them in the feelings 
of former days ? If there is such a thing as 
a song distinctive of Bowdoin, we believe 
that we express the wish of many in saying 
that it would be well if we could hear it. 
There are many songs, we believe, in which 
all could unite, and on pleasant evenings the 
sound of " Fair Bowdoin " should lead back 
the college to its former days. Such a prac- 
tice has often been urged unsuccessfully, and 
perhaps always will be, but it can do no harm 
to show wherein Bowdoin falls behind her 
sister colleges in the expression of loyalty to 
Alma Mater, 



The story of the trip of the base-ball nine 
will be seen in another column. As affecting 
the college and the condition of sports, the 
trip is worthy of consideration. The fact 
that for the first time, almost, Bowdoin has 
gone out from her own domains and endeav- 
ored to play the national game, is enough to 
mark the trip as successful, if nothing else 
would ; but the general result is good even 
beyond expectation, and will most assuredly 
work only good to Bowdoin and her institu- 
tions. There are many things to be consid- 
ered apart from two overwhelming defeats, 
chief and primary of which is the fact that 
we have thus shown ourselves alive as a col- 
lege, and second of which is the fact that 
Bowdoin beat Williams. 

We believe that we express the general 
opinion of the college when we say that the 
nine deserves praise for starting ; that the 
students deserve praise for sending them ; 
and that thedirector deserves praise for bring- 
ing them safely home. The nine will un- 
doubtedly experience tlie effects of the trip 
in a steadier metliod of play, in a better bear- 
ing up under unfavorable conditions of the 
game, and in a more confident game in gen- 
eral. If this proves true the desired result of 
the trip will be assured. We sincerely Iiope 



that this may be the case, and that this trip 
may not be the last that Bowdoin is destined 
to make. Taking it all in all the results of 
the excursion are very gratifying, and the 
nine deserves credit for the record that they 
have made. 



a:nna. 

Along the path beneath the pines 
I wandered in an evening fair, 
And near tlie way I saw a pair 
Of lovely creatures making signs 

To me that I should follow them. 
Quick as thought that wings its flight 
From finite to the infinite, 
I turned to trace their steps ; and when 

I gazed upon their wonderous form. 
Their sprightly tread, their lovely grace. 
And marked the sadness of the face 
Of one, who turned to beck me on, 

I thought them spirits freed from clay ; 
I questioned, then, my mortal view; 
I thought that they would lead me to 
The mystic shores and fade away. 

But no ; beneath the lofty shade. 
To where the tombstones grimlj' shine 
Witliin the shadows of the pine. 
To where our sacred dead are laid, 

They led me. Then the moonlight fell 
In checkered shimmers o'er the mounds 
Of dust that once had been the bounds 
Within which animations dwell ; 

And then the moon withdrew its light, 
The shadows, sprinkled here and tliere, 
Grew darker in the heavy air 
And seemed a covering unto night. 

The sad-eyed maid was now alone, — 
The other form had disappeared, — 
And, as she closer to me neared, 
I saw a lighter shadow dawn. 

Beside a granite slab siie knelt. 
And touclied her cheek as if to sleep. 
Iter eyes looked tears — she could not weep 
A sorrow that was not unfeit. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



17 



"Oh! bcautious maid, by sorrow kissed, 
What trouble heaves thy breast?" I cried, 
"Why are thou not deified 
As she who faded into mist ? " 

"A solemn rite remains unsaid, 
And, ere I cross the Stygian brink. 
The sacred earth must ope and drink 
The dust from whence my soul has fled." 

"Kind Junior, but a grain of earth 
Is all my spirit craves from thee ; 
I am your Anna ; give to me 
The power to gain a higher birth." 



THOREAU. 

The world faded away from Thoreau on a 
beautiful spring morning in May, 1862, nearly 
twenty years ago, and yet the world of Amer- 
ican literature discusses his merits to-day even 
more keenly perhaps than when he muttered 
his last broken sentences, turned his face to 
the wall, and closed his blue eyes forever. It 
has ever been a feature of Thoreau as of Poe, 
that his biographers are either earnest, zeal- 
ous friends, or bitter, contemptuous enemies. 
Perhaps it is so with all marked men, assur- 
edly so with Thoreau, and as we search the 
list of his contemporaries and biographers we 
find only words of rhapsody on one hand, and 
on the other marks of deep and utter disdain. 

Thoreau was a man of a character too 
eccentric and decided to allow of passive 
criticism. His idiosyncrasies have marked out 
a line and you must either go across to 
Thoreau, or remain, if you know him, with 
yourself an enemy. A consideration of his 
life, a glimpse at the method of his living and 
writing will reveal the character of the man 
superficially, but the true character is what 
able men and women have been discussing 
for twenty years, and have not yet exhausted. 
His life is an existence merely, — a thoughtful 
existence, however. There is in it, in a 
worldly sense, no excitement, no romance, no 
love. As Emerson says : " He was bred t 



no profession ; he never was married ; he 
never went to church ; he refused to pay a 
tax to the State ; he ate no flesh, drank no 
wine, never knew the use of tobacco, and, 
though a naturalist, used neither trap nor 
gun." It is a character like this, eccentric to 
this degree and yet truly poetical, sometimes 
in prose, sometimes in rhyme, that every one 
has so considered. A character which, not- 
withstanding its eccentricity, yet had that 
within itself which could produce within the 
confines of a little hut on Walden Pond, and 
put forth upon the world a style of writing 
which has never been duplicated. An Emer- 
sonian style transferred to the woods. A 
style which though confined for subjects to 
the squirrel and the chipmunk and the heifer, 
to the changes of the seasons, to the rippling 
and laughing of the brook, and in short to 
the very life and breath of Nature, is yet full 
of thought and romance. It is such a char- 
acter that the world has quite constantly been 
considering, and which it is quite as much 
considering to-day. 

It was on July 12, 1817 that Henry David 
Thoreau was born. The scene of his birth was 
Concord, Mass., and it was here in one of the 
easternmost rooms of an old New England 
dwelling that the poet naturalist first saw the 
light of day. His boyhood was boyhood in 
general, and the first break in a peaceful life 
was his entrance into Harvard in 1833. His 
college life was a life of earnest work, and 
characterized by the dawning, or better the 
strengthening of that love of nature which 
finally absorbed his very existence. Gradu- 
ating from college, he took the most impor- 
tant trip of his life to the White Mountains 
and came home to Concord. It was in 1845 
that he removed to the shores of Walden 
Pond. In his book, entitled " Walden," he 
tells the story of the construction of a build- 
ing at a cost of less than thirty dollars, and 
of a first year's existence therein, at an ex- 
pense of about sixty dollars, — and here all 



1§ 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



alone, with none of the luxuriances or con- 
veniences of modern life, in this hut, on the 
shores of the pond, with no curtain to the 
window, and no lock to the door, that 
Thoreau, the poet and naturalist, spent some 
of the most fruitful years of his life. Here 
he lived and wrote, and this is his life story. 
Do not imagine him a disappointed, disen- 
chanted man. He was as fresh a boy when 
he died, even, as when in boyhood he drove 
the cows to pasture, or when he left the walls 
of Harvard. Far from being a disappointed 
man, — he was a man of love, of thought, of 
iire, and of energy, a tutored Indian, a 
learned, gentle savage. 

Thoreau's writings are peculiar, and show 
first of all how acute an observer he was. 
He loved and saw everything of nature from 
the tiniest bug that crawls to the " great soar- 
ing eagle " which he so often describes. He 
loved nature in her very storms. " We are 
rained on and snowed on with gems. What 
a world we live in, where, in the jeweler's shops, 
there is nothing handsomer than a snow-flake 
or dew-drop." His descriptive powers are of 
the highest order, and his sentences are as 
clearly cut as gems. 

Read him and you will breathe the very 
air of the woods, will smell the fern's sweet 
odor, and will almost tread the mossy carpet 
of the forest. His writings show that he knew 
every shred of Indian forest lore. He knew 
every bird by note, and knew the age of every 
one of his neighbors, the oaks and maples. 
He tells of spring and autumn until you see 
the very traits of nature. He discourses on 
berries and tells that never a huchleherry came 
to him who plucked it not, but that what he 
ate was mere provender. He names the 
flowers and says that it is the " Three o'clock 
of the year when the Water-Marigold ap- 
pears." He loved thus, and described thus, 
everything except the great moving world. 
He looked upon tlic world at large and through 
his books as only a nature on a larger scale, 



and the world's emotions and loves were to 
him no more than the birth, pairing, and flight 
of tlie robins whose nests were at his side. 

His life and writings show, finally, his 
character to be a strange compound of selfish- 
ness and tenderness, with the best of both. 
Judging his life from the world's standpoint, 
it is to be condemned perhaps. You will 
argue, and argue rightly, that no man has a 
right to withdraw himself from the world he 
owes his powers and abilities. He was, as 
Lowell says, a " Diogenes in his tub,'" " and 
committed in his life the sin of artificial civi- 
lization," — but apart from this his life was 
blameless. He harmed no living being, not 
even a bird, and has left us whatever this 
philosophy of life may have been, — a legacy 
of delightful books which have furnished en- 
joyment and food for many. The moral of 
this life is evident. Inasmuch as Thoreau 
was a recluse he erred, but this aside, his life, 
which was what his Creator made it, was 
spent in loving the best in nature, and wor- 
shiping the highest in God. His best recom- 
mendation was his true Christianity, which 
worshiped God in the whispering groves, and 
all who read his books will believe with me 
that Thoreau's life does not deserve entire 
condemnation. It was in 1860 tliat he took 
cold while counting tlie rings upon a tree, and 
the cold developed into consumption. It was 
on a beautiful spring morning. May 6, 1862, 
that Thoreau lay dying. His last words 
were " Moose " and " Indians," and then the 
" shadow deepened " and the world closed in 
upon liim and shut liim out forever. 



THE TRIP OF THE BASE-BALL NINE. 

The Bowdoins arrived in Boston Monday 
morning after a wearisome journey of about 
six hours, and altliough tlie game in the after- 
noon was not called till four o'clock, few 
made up for the sleep that was lost on the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



19 



rail. Arriving at Cambridge, some little time 
was given the nine for practice, and some 
good work done, although a little nervous- 
ness was visible. 

The game opened with the Harvards at 
the bat, and as they were retired iu one, two, 
three order, Bowdoin stock rose a trifle. 
The Bowdoins were blanked in the first two 
innings but scored five runs in the third and 
fifth innings, on safe hits by Smith, Wriglit, 
and Haggerty, assisted by the errors of their 
opponents. The Harvards began their run 
getting in the second innings on safe hits, 
making three scores in the third, on errors 
making six, and nine more during the rest of 
the game. 

For the fielding, Snow's work behind the 
bat was excellent, while Haggerty carried off 
the honors in center field hj capturing a very 
difficult fly after a hard run. The Bowdoins' 
errors were unfortunately costly, while, from 
the newness of the situation, they were at 
the first of the game a little nervous. The 
umpiring throughout was good. 

The next morning the start was made for 
Williamstown, and tlie place reached at one 
o'clock. The grounds were not the best, 
having a little incline from the field to the 
home plate, and the outfielders were obliged 
to stand on the side of a hill near by. 

Our men, however, played a beautiful 
game from first to last, the only questionable 
fielding being in the second innings, when the 
Williams scored one run on errors. After 
that the fielding was perfect, the Williams' 
strikers, for the most part, going out in one, 
two, three order. The catching of Knapp, 
the first-base play of Staples, and the in-field 
work of Wright as pitcher, are worthy of 
special mention. The game was played in 
the remarkable time of one hour and twenty 
minutes, — in fact the stop at Williamstown 
was so l)rief that no time was given to view- 
ing the grounds and buildings. 



Returning to Boston on the same evening, 
at eleven on Wednesday our men left for 
Providence. Unfortunately the men were 
obliged to walk from the hotel to the grounds, 
and as it was no little distance and up a steep 
hill at that, they were somewhat fatigued 
when tlie end was reached. The Browns 
have as fine grounds as were seen on the trip. 
As the diamond was turf our men labored 
under that disadvantage. The reasons for 
the results may be summed, up in the facts 
that our men had traveled over three hun- 
dred miles the day before, and ever since 
leaving Brunswick had not been able to ob- 
tain their full amount of rest and sleep. 
Thus they went into the field somewhat worn 
out. They were unable to bat Greene at all, 
finding him the most difficult man to hit they 
had ever seen. The Browns played a good 
fielding game, and showed the results of good 
coaching and practice. 

Throughout the entire trip our men were 
received by the different collegians with the 
greatest kindness and attention. In every 
place they were invited to remain longer and 
see the town and college, but under existing 
circumstances, it was found impossible to ac- 
cept. The nine have the most pleasing re- 
membrances of the trip, and sincerely hope 
that the several colleges whom they have met 
may return the visit at an early day. Ap- 
pended are the scores : 



Wilson, p . . . 
Rogers, 2b... 4 
Gardner, 3b.. 4 
Staples, lb... 4 

Snow, c 4 

Wright, 8. S..4 
Knapp, r. f...3 
Haggerty, c. f.3 
Smith,!, f.... 3 



4 2 5 



12 2 

4 3 4 

9 

4 1 I 

11113 2 

10 10 

2 112 1 

12 2 3 1 



HARVARDS. 

AB R iB TB PO A 

Coolidge, 2b.. 6 



Totals ...33 5 4 4 27 14 11 



Cutts, lb. 
Nichols, c. ('. .6 

Baker, s.s 6 

Olmstead, 1, f.6 
Kdwards, r. f.6 
Folsom, p. . . .5 

HaU,c.; 5 

Snow, 2b 5 



3 3 4 9 2 

1110 

3 3 3 3 10 

4 4 4 10 1 
2 2 2 
4 4 7 6 4 
1 1 1 10 1 
1 



Totals ...51 18 18 22 27 11 9 



Umpire — T. Donovan, Boston. Earned runs— Harvards, 9 ; Bowdoins, 
3. Strikes called— o£F Folsom, 12 ; off Wilson, 16. Balls called— on Fol- 
som, 40 ; on Wilson, 62. Struck oat— Hall, Staples (2), Snow, and Smith. 
Flies caught— Harvards, 7 -, Bowdoins, 10 ; Wild pitches— Folsom, 2. 
Passed balls— Hall, 1 ; Snow, 1. Fouls struck — Harvards, 36; Bowdoins, 
23. Fouls caught — Harvards, 6 ; Bowdoins, 4. Left on bases— Harvards, 
6 ; Bowdoins, 1. Double play— Baker and Cutta. Time of game— 1 hour 
45 minutes. 



20 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWD0IN3. 

R IB 



WILLIAMS. 

R iB ' 



Wilson, I. f... 5 2 Davis, c 5 118 12 

Rogers, s. s..5 4 Yates, p 6 1 1 4 6 

GarJner,3b..5 113 3 1 Perrv, 3b. ...4 112 3 2 

Staples, lb... 5 1 1 12 Johnston, r. f.4 2 2 

Snow, r. f....4 12 2 111 Fox", lb i 12 6 

Wright, p 4 2 2 2 16 Crowell, 2b. . .4 10 3 1 

Knapp, c 4 1116 Hague, 1. f. ..4 3 

Haggcrty, c. f 4 2 Ponsland,s.s.4 112 

Smith, 2b 4 3 4 Hubbard, c. f.4 110 2 



Totals... 40 4 7 7 27 17 6 Totals... 38 1 7 8 27 11 9 

Two-base hit— Fox. Struck out -Bowdoins, 2 ; Williams, 1. Balls 

called— Wright, 32 ; Yates, 36. Strikes called— Wright, 18 ; Yates, 17. 

Double play — Gardner to Knapp. Passed balls, Knapp, 1 } Davis, 3. 

Time of game, 1 hour 20 minutes. Umpire — W. B. Milick, Williams, *81. 



BOWDOINS. 



BROWNS. 



iB PO A L- AB R 1b PO A E 

Gardner, 3b 4 2 2 Dillz, 8. s 6 3 3 1 2 

Rogers, s. 8 4 15 3 S. Greene, c 6 1 1 12 3 4 

Staples, lb 4 9 1 Ladd, 3b 6 10 3 2 2 

Snow, r. f 2 2 12 Rose, 1. f. 5 2 3 

Haggerty, c.f...4 1 Taylor, c. f 5 10 11 

Wright,p 3 7 2 J. Greene, p 5 2 11 11 

Knapp. c 3 17 2 Barker, 2b 5 1113 3 

SteUon, 2b 2 1 6 3 2 | Gladding, lb 5 1 1 10 1 1 

Smith, l.f. 3 2 2 Doran, r. f 3 10 11 



Totals 29 2 27 20 15 , Totals 46 1112 27 24 11 

Umpire, J. L. Martin, Pawtncket. Passed balls — S. Greene, 2 ; Knapp, 
3. Bases on called balls— Browns, 2 j Bowdoins, 3 ; struck out — Browns, 
4; Bowdoins, 13. Strikes called— ott Greene, 16 ; off Wright, 19. Balls 
called — on Greene, 89 ; Wright, 93. Time of game— 2 hours. 



COMMUNICATION. 



Editors of Orient : 

Seeing, in the last number of the Orient, 
a description of the casts from the antique 
which the college has recently received, I 
immediately felt an interest in the endeavors 
to form a beautiful and valuable collection, 
and in order to encourage this movement I 
desire to make this offer: I have a very fine 
cast of a bust of Byron as he appeared in 
early life when possessing that Apollo-like 
beauty for which lie was famed. The origi- 
nal marble bust was by an eminent English 
sculptor whose name I do not now recall. 
The cast in question has, doubtless, been 
noticed by all, in my shop window. But as 
its dangers from fire or accident are necessarily 
great, I desire to entrust it to the more safe 
keeping of a college so zealous for arts as 
Bowdoin has always shown itself. 

Objectors may say it is improper to intro- 
duce a bust of Byron among statues of Jupiter 
and Venus. But Byron could hardly be in 



more congenial company than that of Venus, 
and if, in your picture gallery, you bring to- 
gether the classical creations of Titiens and 
Rul)ens and paintings of the Bowdoin familj- 
and O. O. Howard, you are not consistent in re- 
fusing admittance to such a genius as Byron. 
Some one also, with no aesthetic taste, may 
object because this buist bears on its pedestal 
the inscription " Celluloid eye-glass," and cus- 
tomarily wears a pair of those really very useful 
articles. But the first difficulty may be obvi- 
ated by smoothing over the lettering, and if 
the expression of Lord Byron's countenance 
is more natural with spectacles, I should be 
very happy to provide a pair. Hoping that 
you may appreciate the importance of your 
collection, and may be encouraged to enlarge 
it, I am 

Very Truly Yours, 

Jeweler. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



Old Phi Chi is a rarity. 

"Phaedos" have been in demand. 

Have you seen the pipe Parnell smoked ? 

Gannett, '83, has joined the Psi Upsilon society. 

Fires on the plains have been attracting notice. 

'84 has been blowing horns. temporal mores! 

The Judge is revising the Felasgiaus for the '68 
prize. 

A variety iu aprons can be seen at the analytical 
laboratory. 

The straw litit appeareth, but the time of the linen 
duster is not yet. 

Tlie Freshmen crew pull to the foot of the island 
in eiglit minutes. 

Even the best crews can't do much when tlie shell 
sinks beneath them. 

You are nowhere with the Brunswick girls unless 
you go May-flowering. 

Several canes have been made from the oar broken 
at the scrub race last fall. 

Tiio river has l)een unusually high the past two 
weeks, and the swi It current lias given considerable 
trouble to ambitious oarsmen. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



21 



Skillings, the base-ballist, has left Bates and is 
willing to join Bowdoin, '82. 

Auburn has declined representation among the 
officers of the Athletic Association. 

The Juniors had their first examination in Psy- 
chology, May 3d, and still survive. 

Those who visited the Art Loan Exhibition, May 
5th, were well repaid for their pains. 

The Seniors are having their pictures taken, and 
are well satisfied with Mr. Reed's work. 

A Junior botanist has been investigating the pecu- 
liar properties of the Symplocarpus fmditus. 

The Freshmen held a class meeting last Tuesday, 
to arrange a game of ball with '84 of Bates. 

Lieut. L. B. Lane far surpassed all other competi- 
tors for the military position which he now liolds. 

Question by Professor in Psychology — "What is 
the critical stage ? " Answer {sub voce) — "Forty-five 
marks." 

A prominent feature of the entertainment, -'Kit,'' 
was the distribution of temperance tracts to the col- 
lege boys. 

During Stetson's absence with the ball nine as 
tenth man, Pearson takes his place at the Topsham 
Family School. 

The Sophomores have caught the spirit of im- 
provement in boating matters, and are fitting their 
boat with new oars and rowlocks. 

The first hand-organ man of the season was mis- 
taken by some one at a distance for the college band 
celebrating the victory at Brown. 

April 30th Professor Vose, with the Senior en- 
gineers, went to Orr's Island to complete surveys for 
the proposed bridge at that place. 

On the non-appearance of books the stationer com- 
plains of being assailed with questions by a grumb- 
ling Faculty and a rejoicing class. 

Tuesday of last week the musical association had 
a formidable rival in the crowd that turned out to 
celebrate the good news from Williamstown. 

Nobody but a Freshman would start before break- 
fast and a rain storm on a May-flowering expedition, 
and bring the meager results thereof into chapel. 

A large piece of quartz, very thickly studded with 
garnets, was recently found by a teamster at the 
Brunswick quarries and offered for sale about college. 

To replace a freight car on the rails it takes the 
combined strength of one engine and a dozen train 
hands, supplemented by the calm superintendence of 
a crowd of students and half-a-dozen Medics. 



Prof. Chapman has given the Sophomores an ex- 
amination upon his lectures on Rhetoric and Logic, 
and last Wednesday began a similar course with tlie 
Juniors. 

The following Seniors have been appointed to 
speak for the '68 prize : C. F. Baxter, W. I. Cole, C. 
H. Cutler, T. B. Lane, D. J. McGillicuddy, and J. 
O. P. Wheelwright. 

The College Glee Club is receiving a special drill 
under Mr. Kotzschmar, and it is their present inten- 
tion to give a concert in a few weeks, at Music Hall, 
Lewiston, in connection with the Bates Glee Club. 

The Sophomore engineers are making drawings 
of the chapel front. If one or two students making 
a spurt during the last alarm could be drawn in free 
hand, it would add to the naturalness of the work. 

The chapel choir and several others interested in 
musical matters met at the house of President Cham- 
berlain on Wednesday evening last, to select the 
books of music that are to be purchased with the 
concert money of last winter. 

One of our professors discovers that his watch 
varies about five minutes per day when compared 
with the college bell. Many students have also had 
the same trouble with their watches. This fact may 
account for frequent tardinesses. 

The only daughter of President Chamberlain was 
married April 27th at the Congregational Church, to 
Mr. H. G. Allen of Boston. Professor Packard per- 
formed the ceremony, assisted by Rev. Mr. Fisher. 
Personal friends in college received formal invita- 
tions, and a large number of students showed their 
respect for the President's family by their presence. 

Tlie order of exercises for Field Day has been 
posted in the gymnasium, and is as given below. 
Very little has been done, as yet, in the way of train- 
ing, beyond a few helter skelter races and a little 
desultory leaping and jumping. Field Day will 
arrive in three weeks. 

ORDER OF EXERCISES. 

1. Mile Run. 

2. St.inding High Jump. 

3. Running High Jump. 

4. Putting Shot. 

5. 100-Yards Dash. 

6. Running Broad Jump. 

7. Hop, Skip, and Jump. 

8. Mile Walk. 

9. 220-Yards Dash. 

10. Throwing Base-Ball. 

11. Standing Broad Jump. 

12. Three Standing Bro.id Jumps. 

13. Half-Mile Run. 

14. Throwing Hammer. 

15. Hurdle Race. 

16. Three-Legged Race. 

17. lOO-Yards Dash Backwards. 

18. Tug of War. 



22 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Our ball nine left Brunswick according to their 
ari'angements, on the midnight train, Monday morn- 
ing. May 2d. It was like the eve of Waterloo, and 
the boys departed with our highest hopes and best 
wishes. By Monday night, however, when the ex- 
citenient had abated, the general feeling pervaded 
the anxious crowd at the telegraph oflice that our 
victory would be measured only by the narrowness of 
Harvard's success. After the news of Harvard's pic- 
nic did come, there was nothing to be done but to 
receive it philosophically, and pay our bets. Tues- 
day evening the first news many heard from Williams 
was the joyful tones of the chapel bell accomiianied 
by a horn obligato. In the evening the college band 
roused itself from a six months' oblivion, and about 
a hundred students showed a proper spirit by march- 
ing to Old Phi Chi, etc., about the campus and 
through the streets. Wednesday morning a meeting 
of the students voted to give the nine a reception on 
their return. This measure was taken not merely on 
account of the slight victory, but because after the 
nine's first meeting with other college nines, the 
students wished to show their appreciation of what 
our boys tried to do, even if without success, and to 
make amends for their negligence in the past. The 
news of the defeat at Brown was not much worse 
than was expected, and excited no' particular feelings 
of joy or sorrow. The boys were expected on the 
midnight train of the 5th, and in anticipation the col- 
lege band held a rehearsal under the old oak. Late 
at night the Great Panjandrum himself turned out, 
and there was no occasion for complaint that the re- 
ception lacked enthusiasm. At the depot a welcome 
to the nine was indica,ted by toast(s) to order, and 
the extensive consumption of beer and soup slightly 
indicitive of the presence of an oyster. On the suc- 
cessful conclusion of the affair the town's people 
were doubtless glad the wanderers had returned, 
hojiing they would remain here in piece for all 
parties. We leave the account of the nine's own ex- 
perience to one of the party. 



PERSONAL. 



[Wo earnestly solicit cimunuiiicationa t(i this column 
from uny wlio iiiuy Imvo iiu interest in the Ahiiiuii.] 

'45. — Kev. J. P. Skeele died in East Bloomfield, 
N. Y., April 2Iid, aged 59 years. He was born in 
Kennebunkport ; graduated from Bangor Theological 
Seminary in 1850, and was pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Churcli in Hallowell, from that date to 1857. 
For seven years from 1858 he was pastor at Wilbra 



ham, Mass. ; District Secretary of the American 
Board C. A. M., residing at Hartford, Conn., from 
1864 to 1870; was then pastor at Hatfield, Mass., 
for three years ; and since has been acting pastor at 
East Bloomfield to the time of his death. 

'52. — Walter Wells, whom we spoke of in our last 
number as lying at the point of death, died at his 
home in Portland, on the 21st inst., aged 51 years. 
He has been suffering from consumiDtion for several 
years. 

'75. — R. G. Stanwood was a member of this class 
instead of '77, as it appeared in the last issue. 

'75. — Dr. Dudley A. Sargent was married, in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., April 17th, to Miss EllaF. Ledj-ard. 
He occupies the position of Professor of Hygiene at 
Harvard University. 

'76. — Mr. Frank Wright has been in town for a 
few days, on a visit. He is practicing law in Boston. 

'79. — H. A. Huston is in Lafayette, Ind., teaching 
in the High School. 

'80.— Mr. Albert Holmes, of Bridgton, was married 
to Miss Lida W. Stone, in St. Paul's Episcopal 
church, in Brunswick, Wednesday, May 4th. Rev. 
H. P. Nichols officiated. Messrs. H. B. Hathaway, 
'81, J. M. Curtis, '82, and C. A. Gibson, '83, acted as 
ushers. The newly wedded couple left on the noon 
train for Washington. 

'80. — R. C. Gilbert is teaching the Grammar 
School in Kennebunk. 

'82. — Mr. A. H. Perry, formerly a member of this 
class, who has been spending the winter in Florida, 
has lately returned home to Brunswick. 

'83. — J. F. Waterman is teaching in the Grammar 
School in Tnomaston. 

'84.— P. W. Charles is teaching the High School 
at Dennysville. 



COLLEGE WORLD. 



Harvaku : 

The Harvard and Yale boat race will be rowed at 
New London. Harvard is to have better quarters 
than last year. 

The Advocate recommends Dr. Storrs, of Brook- 
lyn, as college pastor, and gives as a qualification 
that he belongs to a different denomination than Dr. 
Peabody. 

Seventeen Yale editors have started out in pursuit 
of " Smintheus." New York beer-saloons anticipate 
a lively trade. It is rumored that President P-rt-r 
has offered them their degrees outright, if the}' will 
not return to Now Haven. — Crimson. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



23 



Brown: 

The game with our nine was the first college 
game of the season for the Browns. 

Brown also is complaining on account of the slow 
progress made in finishing her memorial hall. 

Obeklin : . 

The Amherst Glee Club in its western trip visited 
Oberlin, and the Review speaks very highly of their 
musical talent and gentlemanly conduct. 

The Januaiy number of the Fonetic Teacher con- i 
tains an article called " Everi man in hiz own tung," 
written by Prof. Ballantine, which is admirable in 
every respect but the spelling. — Review. 

Yaxe: 

A fund of fifty thousand dollars has been given 
for a laboratory. 

The Record complains of the fielding and base 
running of their nine. 

The Sophomores are to exhibit the "Media" of 
Emihuler. It will doubtless be a success. 

It is said that Phillips Exeter and Phillips Andover 
are each to send thirteen men to '85, here. — Record. 

The Yale Lit. proposes that the bi-weeklies, the 
Courant and Record, be consolidated, as four college 
journals are too many, but the Record does not care 
for fusion. 

Miscellany : 

Dartmouth will not become a co-education college. 

Princeton is to have a new $80,000 chapel. — Ex. 

The Chronicle says it has a thousand and twenty- 
nine subscribers. 

The Trustees of Cornell have voted $100,000 to be 
spent in improvements. — Ex. 

Harvard, Yale, and Washington College (Pa.) 
are represented in the new Cabinet. Mr. Lincoln, 
Secretary of War, graduated from Harvard in 186i. 
Mr. Wayne McVeagh, Attorney General, graduated 
from Yale in the famous class of 18.53. Secretary of 
State, Mr. Blaine, graduated from Washington Col- 
lege in 1847. — Harvard Echo. 

Colby has had a cane rush. About a dozen Fresh- 
men marched round town with canes. The Sopho- 
mores tackled them and after a fight were victorious. 
That night the Sophomores, not wishing to keep up 
the contest, posted bills giving the Freshmen per- 
mission to carry theni as much as they wished, but 
they, still more angry, attempted to tear them down, 
and another battle insued. The Sophomores were 
again successful and the Freshmen had to succumb to 
superior power. 



CLIPPIHGS. 



He was a rough, unkempt scholar; 

While she was fastidious quite ; 
He spolie all tongues — but his collar 

Was— well— hardly the whitest of white. 

" I soon go to Mycenje and Assos," 

Said he, with exuberance of joy. 
Said she, on your way down to Assos, 

Pray, leave, sir, your linen at Troy." 

— Crimson. 

Professor (looking at his watch) — "As we have a 
few minutes, I should like to have any one ask ques- 
tions, if so disposed." Student — " What time is it, 
please ? " — Ex. 

At the close of the sermon the minister became 
impressive. Raising his voice, he said, " Judgment ! 
judgment ! " and a small boy in the vestibule shouted, 
"Out on first! " — Ex. 

Scene : Astronomy class. Professor to Junior — 
" What time does Mars gel full?" Junior — " Don't 
know, sir; never associate- with such company." 
Decided applause. — Ex. 

"My son," said a tutor of doubtful morality but 
severe aspect, putting his hand on the boy's shoulder, 
"I believe Satan has got a hold on you." " I believe 
so, too," replied the boy. 

Prof, in Psychology — " Can we conceive any- 
thing as being out of time and still occupying 
spac'e?" Musical Student (thoughtfully) — "Yes, 
sir; a poor singer in a chorus." 

Soph — " I say, Tom, what's the difference be- 
tween Harvard and Vassar ? " Fresh — " (Jive it up." 
Soph — " Why, Harvard is tht liome of ' culchaw,' 
wliile Vassar is the home of ' gumchaw.' " — Acta. 

Lecture on the rhinoceros: Prof. — "I must beg 
you to give me your undivided attention. It is abso- 
lutely impossible for you to form an idea of this hid- 
eous animal unless you keep your eyes fixed on me." 
— Ilobart Herald. 

Logic class room: Prof. — "All men have life; 
all vegetables have life; all men are vegetables? 
Where is the fallacy?" Mr. B.—" There is no fal- 
lacy." Prof — "Oh! then you think all men are veg- 
etables?" Mr. B.—" I do. The Bible says, 'All 
flesh is grass.' " Applause. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



The Yale bi-weeklies are the Record and the 
Courant. They both have editors from the three 
upper classes, — three from '82, two from '83, and one 
from '84, also a financial editor from '81. We have 
always believed this a good practice, and especially 
since we have tried editorial work ourselves. The 
giving of the subordinate positions to members of 
the lower classes could not but prove advantageous, 
as they would serve an apprenticeship which would 



24 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



be of great value when their own class should take 
charge. Both papers are among the leading college 
journals. The editorials of the last Record are of 
interest. In its literary department is "Failed to 
Connect," a sketch purporting to have been found in 
the library, in which the writer, a college student, is 
haunted by the spirit of his room mate who had re- 
cently died of brain fever, brought on by too great 
excitement over spiritualism. The specter visits 
him at night and foretells his death at one o'clock the 
next day. It vanishes and he awakes as may be sup- 
posed in great agitation and paces the floor the rest 
of the night. His neighbors aroused, rush in and, 
witnessing his excitement, fear that the same disease 
which caused the death of his chum liad attacked 
him. But gradually he became resigned and de- 
termined to await the fatal moment with an appear- 
ance of fortitude. The remainder shall be given in 
his own words : 

"When I entered the dining-room of our club 
most of the fellows were already there. I looked at 
the clock which stood in the room, and saw that it 
lacked but three minutes of the fatal hour. As I sat 
down I felt my strength giving way, and conscious- 
ness actually began to desert me. My will was pow- 
erless. I had no ability to overcome the influences 
in which my senses were steeped. At this moment 
one of the fellows remarked to the waiter: 'I wish 
you would set that clock forward ; it has been late 
now for two or three days.' I took out my watch 
and looked at it. The hands marked seveu minutes 
after one. From that moment until the present day 
the spirits have never molested me." 
" In the Year 721 B. C." is a gorgeous and ornate 
production, after the style of Elijah Kellogg. The 
plot also is deep and the climax in the great base- 
ball game between the Roman and Capuan nines is 
thrilling. The following graphic description must, 
we think, have been taken from life : 

" All was still and quiet, when we see riding 
from behind the c.apitol a solitary horseman. Both 
rider and beast were well worthy of close study. He 
was tall, bold-looking, with an eagle eye that would 
cause the stoutest subscription man to quail and be 
contented with a 1. His ponderous feet were well 
matched bj' the rest of his cadaver ; legs full three 
feet in girth; a body suggestive of an intimate ac- 
quaintance with the city beer vaults, while his noble 
head of red hair was worthy of any son of Erin. 
His costume was botli rich and picturesque. Feet 
encased in gyuuiasiuni slippers of deliciously doubt- 
ful hue, the outlines of his muscular legs dwindled 
gradually away beneath the edge of liis canvas 
jacket, while a hammock hat, jauntily topping ofl" 
his curls, gave him a decidedly rakish appearance." 
The Vourani seems to give more attention to base- 
ball and athletics, but its literary' dej)artuient is much 
weaker. " The Fall of Julius I'ringle" is wretched 
in plot but bettor in description. The Couranl says 



that most Yale men are dissatisfied with their nine 
this year and give a criticism of the playing of each 
member. The locals are very interesting. 

The Columbia Spectator is the most assthetic of 
college papers, — its thick tinted paper, blue and 
white cover, and beautiful typography show it. It 
is also illustrated by sketches on society fancies and 
follies. There were four illustrations in the last 
number and they were very good. If one wanted to 
be critical he could say that the sketches are a feeble 
imitation of Du Manieer, and the jokes which they 
illustrate are rather stale and common place. But 
they are very lair, considering. The Spectator gives 
little space to college afi'airs but is very literary. 
"Wilbur of Williams" is a serial novel of great 
interest, with natural pictures of college life. As the 
writer feels confined by the limited space available 
in a college paper, the work is to be issued in book 
form. It ought to have a large sale. There are 
three short poems, all by the same author, in this 
number, and all are good. 

The Acta Columbiana is also very nicely gotten up. 
Its pages show a high order of talent. Its editorials 
are short and to the point. It originates some of the 
best of the witty sayings that go the rounds of the 
college papers. Its poetry is the daintiest and most 
charming of all college poetry. But there is one 
blot upon its escutcheon ; on its editorial bo.ard is the 
unowned Smintheus, the enemy of Yale, and some 
articles which have recently emanated from his 
rather too flowing pen have stirred up ill-feeling in 
other colleges, and have sullied the Ada's fair pages. 
Yet we would not wholly condemn Smintheus. His 
writings show an originality that is equaled by few of 
his opponents, but he errs iu thinking slang to be 
wit, and indecent personalities, originality. We 
have no doubt but that Smintheus could win an envi- 
able reputation if he would devote himself to a more 
suitable topic than " A Visit to New Haven." 

The Illustrated Scientijic News for May is before 
us, looking handsomer, if possible, than the preced- 
ing issues. Among the various subjects illustrated 
in this issue is a superb specimen of cut glass ware ; 
an exhaustive article on asphaltum and its use in 
streets and pavements ; a new and ingenious hand- 
car, shown iu operation ; a new steel steamer for use 
in shallow rivers ; the new Jobert telescope, and an 
interesting paper on physics without apparatus, also 
fully illustrated. Every number contains thirty-two 
pages full of engravings of novelties in science and 
the useful arts. To be liad of all news dealers, or 
by mail of the publishers, Munn & Co., 37 Park Row, 
New York, at $1.50 per annum; single copies 15 
cents. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



' IP IP ii 



111 



Finest and Most Select Stock of 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS. 

The Newest and Greatest Variety of Patterns in 

NECKWEAR, GLOVES, HOSIERY, 

VNDER'WEAR, BRACES, ETC. 

ly Custom Shirts from Measure, Six for $9.00. 
A Perfect Fit Guaranteed. 

Goods for the TROY LAUNDRY sent Tues- 
days and received Saturdays. 

In Percales, Mahrattas, and American Goods. 

OrcJers by mail promptly attended to. 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 
FRANK M. STETSON, 

JXTST FtSCEZIVSri = 

All the New Styles in Soft and Stiff Hats. 
Best Stiff Hats, $2.75. Best SUk Hats, $3.50 in 
exchange. 

Just opened all the New and Nobby Styles Neck 
Dress, Collars, Cuffs, Fancy Hose, Canes, etc. 
AU are invited to call and examine goods and prices. 

No. 2 Arcade Block. 
ISAAC H. SNOW, 

DEALER IN 

Jeef, Jork, ^utton, Jamb, §c. 

Special Rates to Student Clnlis. 

a^B2ST rJOOIS TO STJ»..3^T77-003D-S. 

BOARDING AND LIVERY STABLE 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Sts., Brunswick. 

All Hack Orders promptly attended lo. 

G. L. Y®^^y CoLLiqE Ba^beb^, 

Two doors north of Post Office. 




-«^?^3-*' m m^Mi m ■*>^ 



CUSTOM TAILORING 

A S PECI ALTY, 

AT . 

Fernald's Tailor Emporium 

237 Middle Street, 
PORTLAND, - - - MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



AT 0. W, JLLLIM'S 

DRUG STORE. 

THE FINEST CIQARS AND SMOKING TOBACCOS. 
THE BEST PERFUMERY. 

THE BEST TOILET SOAPS. 

THE BEST HAIR BRUSHES. 

The Largest and Best Assortment of 

Drugs, Patent Medicines, &c., &c< 

To be found in this market. 

Letnont Block, Brunswick, Maine. 

S. O. OOFFIISr, 

— DEALER IX — 

PROVISIONS AND GROCERIES 

asr Special Kates to Student Cluba.-fflO' 
CORNER OF MAIN AND ELM STREETS. 

STUDEMTS 

Desiring Employment, for Season of 1881, 

Enclose Ic, stamp, and write for circular, to 

THE MANHATTAN AGENCY. 

733 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 

Please mention this paper. 



JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Mag'aziues, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book Work to Order. 



GO TO 

TO IHIY YOUR 

Groceries, Canned Goods, Fruits, 

Confectionery, Tobacco, and Cigars. 

Spi-clul Riitia to Student Clnlia. 

Main Street, Head of the Mall, Brunswick. 



W. B. KNIGHT, 

^ '0 ;a :X 'O :r i ^ 1^ i lit ,» 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

jJ^Tmnsileut OrdcrH Tor Milk or Crcmn flllrd by kIvIiik Hultablc notice. 

Beeidence, School Street. 



MAIN STREET, 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



Prepares for Bowdoin and tbe best New England 
Colleges. Offers, also, a thorough Sejiinakt Course 
to young ladies, and a shorter course for business 
pursuits. For Catalogues, address 

Ret. a. W. BURR, Hallowell, Me. 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

jpg" Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



Purchase your COAL at tbe 

Ooa,l ~Z"a,rd. in Topsliaxxi, 

\VHERE NONK BUT 

The Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well preimred mid in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 

jS Oi Ji' ti^ d ii. li; o^ C' k 1 1. i> \\ s <>)*v 
'■■' '^i ■■ ■■• ■ ' ■■■ ■ ' '-''it 



I. S. BALGOMS^ 

DHAI.KI! IN 

HarSf are, Stoves, Croctery, aiij Glassware, 

BRXTNS'WICK. IMIE:. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers ; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes ; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 



CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B.— Special Rates to Students. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'BiuEN Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

PORTr..A.N^I3. 1MC.A.IIVE:. 

This house has been tlwroughJij refitted with every re- 
gard to comfort, and the aim is to make it first-class in all 
its appoiiitiiieiits. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

De^\^ITT HOUSE, 

QUIMBY & MURCH, Proprietors, 



KOYAL QUIMBY. 



Eben MURCH. 



A.. O. KEED, 



^ ^i^^^^ G,^^ C!^ ^sas&^ ^ 

Bi?,T:T3srs"'cvicis:, a^e. 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College View^s. 

ALL KINDS OF 



' -'UtAj- ^ ^^WW*- ^ 



I® - 

Y„<siiii 



For Schools and Colleges, 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 




7-//£- FAVORITE NOS. S03-404 333 I70-S5I- WITH 
HISOTHERSTYLESSOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORL 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



1* (c» sxiit^seo$r, 

DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 



ESTABLISHED 1S44. 

W. L. WILSON & CO 

^^'llolesille aud Retail Dealers in 



© @ a 1 It at W @ ® t, TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES 



OFFICE IN LEMOUT BLOCK, Brunswick. 

tfg'Telephone counection with Coal Yard. 
([[3=0rJers left at Jortlaii Snow's, Lemoiit Block, will 
be promptly attended to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEK, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, 5iusic Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8j and ^8y Congress Si., and 2Jj Middle St.. 



N. B.— Orders b.v i 



; prompt attention. Send for price list. 



142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 



PORTLAND, 

j(^='Send,fok 1*kick List. 



MAINE. 




^i^riiiii ^®lk|© lleiieal ^©| 

The Sixty-Firsl Annual Course of Lectures ut the Medical 
School of Miiine, will commence Fkbkuauy 10th, 1881, and 
continue SIXTEEN AVEEKS. 

FACULTY.— JosHDA L. Chamberlain, LL.D , President ; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology aud Practice; William W. Greene, M.D., Sur- 
gery and Clinical Surgery ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Women and Children ■, Fbedekic H. GeRRrsH, M.D., Materia 
Medica, Therapeutics, and Public Ile:ilth ; Charles W. Goddabd, A.M., 
MedicalJurisprudence 5 IIexby Carmicuael, Ph.D., Chemistry, Burt G. 
Wilder, M.D., Physiology ; Stephen 11. Weeks, M.D., Anatomy -, Daniel 
F, Ellts, M.D., Registrar and Librarian; Augustds P. Dudley, M.D., 
Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full infonnation may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



I^ine Spectacles a,rLd. ;E3^eg'la,sses. 
EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND .MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



&, Fred ffiitcliell witli Da?ifl B, MitclielL 
Livery, BoardiDg, Hack. & Sale Stable 

OLD STAND OPPOSITE SAGADAIIOl'K UOISE, 
Front Street. ----- Bath, Me. 

Particular attention jjiven to Boardinj: Horses. Al-o, First-Class 
Teams at Reasonable Rates. 

J. M. CURTIS, Proprietor. 

BOOZCS. STA.TIONEFIY. FtOOM 
PAPER, PERIODICALS. «ScC. 



AMOS L MILLETT & CO., 

JoniJEits and 11i:tailers ok STANnAitn 

Iinprlefl and Domestic Faiicf [Iroceries, 

iiuNKiiii iiii.L I'lcKi.Es .1 sriic/.ii/ry. 

FIFIST- CL A.SS ^ 

Pianos, Oigans,, and Melodeons, E. SMITH,.. GROCER. 

I Lowest Prices to Student Clubs. 

I'. H, WliSO:!, Bispenser ol' Pitre Brugs, Medicines, and Chemicals. 

irn IPO XI Til! 13 ..rvivi> laonatESTic c:;i<3-.^vn.s. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions a Specialty. 

IVIAIN STREET, ------ BRtTNS-WiriCK, IVIE. 

.MIimN.M. IMtKSS, I.ISRON STIIKKT, I.ICWlHTdN, MAIM,. 



AT LOW i'llKUiS. LAKUU UENTINII STOCK. 



Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 25, 1881. 



No. 3. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AKD THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

IS PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

Books, Statione[f, and Paper Haogiop, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

* SPRING STYLES * 

OF 

Nobby Stiff and Soft Hats 

JXTSI" it:H:c!:E;i"V":E3z>. 

NEW STYLES in LINEN COLLARS & CUFFS. 
NEW PATTEKNS ia NECK- WEAR. 

A FL\E AjSSORTMI^NT OF 

SPRING OVERCOATS AND SUITS, 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock. 
FRi^lNTK E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets. 



O^UTIOM TO SMOKIBS. 



Beware of Imitations and Connterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 




TRY IT. 

'^- Fine, Mild & Sweet. 



Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 

FOR YOUR 

NOBBY HAT 

Go or Send to 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 
SIGN OF THE GOLD HAT. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENQEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIOKABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



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IN GEEAT VARIETY, BEST QUALITY, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 

PORTLAND, _ - - _ MAINE. 
A. CARTER. J. W. D. CARTER. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



A reorganization of tlie Conrse of Instruction 
has recently been made, in which the distinction be- 
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main- 
tained, but all academic undergraduates are placed 
on one footing, with the opportunity of following, to 
a considerable extent, such lines of study as they 
prefer. 

All students entering the College proper, are ex- 
amined on the same course of preparatory studies. 
After the second year a liberal range of electives is 
ofifered, within which a student may follow his choice 
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount 
pursued. 

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated 
as a distinct course, are still, for the most part, re- 
tained either in the required or elective lists. More 
place is also given to the Modern Languages than 
they have hitherto had. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all 
who complete the Academic Course. 

The Engineering Department remains as here- 
tofore, and facilities are offered for study of the 
various branches of this science. The means of 
theoretical instruction are ample, and the town of 
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen- 
tres in the State, and in the immediate vicinity of 
many important public works, affords excellent 
opportunities for the study of actual structures. 
The College also enjoys many favors from the United 
States Coast Survey Office. The admission is the 
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the 
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will 
bo taken, if desired, in the place of Latin. 

Those who complete satisfactorily the four years' 
course in engineering will receive the Degree of Sc. 
B. Those who complete a two years' course of ad- 
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or 
Mechanical Engineer. Students not candidates for 
a degree will be received at any stage for which an 
examination shall show them to be fitted, and may 
remain for any desired time. Further information 
■will be furnished on application to Professor G. L. 
Vose. 

Terms of Admission to the Academic Course. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 

following subjects: 

Latin. — Latin Grannnar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^noid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 

Grkkic. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xonophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

Ancient GKO(j]i.\pnY. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 

and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 

I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 

Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission 
will be required to produce testimonials of good 
moral character. The time for examination is the 
Friday after Commencement and the first Thursday 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may he examined at other times. Candidates for 
admission to advanced classes will be examined in 
the studies which such classes have accomplished. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrange- 
ments with the Principals of schools and academies 
having a regular course preparatory for college of at 
least three years' duration, whereby their pupils 
may be examined for admission to college at their 
respective schools, in connection with their own 
final examinations. 

The amount of instruction now ofifered and pos- 
sible to be taken in the several principal lines of 
study is exhibited comparatively, or reduced to one 
scale in the following manner. This is, however, 
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal 
length : 

Latin, eight terms. 

Greek, eight terms. 

Mathematics, eight terras. 

German, four and a half terms. 

English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English 
Literature, three and a half terms. 

French, three terms. 

Italian, one term. 

Spanish, one term. 

Rhetoric (formal), one term. Rhetorical and 
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a 
half terms. 

Natural History studies, five and a half terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, four terms. 

Chemistry, four terms. 

History, Ancient and Modern, two terras. 

Political Economy, one and a half terms. 

Public Law, two terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, including Logic, 
four terms. 

Christian Evidences, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lesson the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
deut. 




wi#in 




Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 25, 1881. 



No. 3. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE TEAR, BY THE CLASS OP '82, OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Arthur G. Staples, Managing Editor. 

Charles H. Gilman, Business Editor. 

Melvin S. Holwat, Eugene T. McCarthy, 

"William A. Moody, "Warren 0. Plimpton, 

George G. "Weeks. 

Terms — S2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Easiness Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 



Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 



CONTENTS. 
Yol. XI., No. 3.— May 25, 1881. 

Editorial Notes 25 

Literary : 

Auf "Wiedersehen (poem) 28 

Extracts from our Exchanges 28 

Awakening Life (poem) 30 

Communications 30 

Table of Averages 31 

College Items 32 

Personal 34 

College World 34 

Clippings 35 

Editors' Table 35 



EDITORIAL KOTES. 



The next number of the Orient will be 
the Ivy Number. It may be delayed some- 
what in order to better prepare the account 
of Ivy Day and the sports. There will be, 
however, no delay if it can be prevented. 
Extra numbers can be obtained of the busi- 
ness editor. 



It is requested that we announce that the 
reunion of the class of 1861 will take place 
at the coming Commencement. Thirty-two 
out of the forty-one living members have 



signified their intention of attending. A 
class dinner will be held at Portland, July 
13th, and the next day the class will attend 
Commencement Exercises. We publish else- 
where a list of its members. 



A new departure is breaking in upon us. 
The Faculty, thinking, perhaps, that their 
supply of marks v/ns greater than that of 
almost any other commodity, has generously 
granted the chapel choir the privilege of one 
cut per week. The plan will, undoubtedl}'-, 
■work well. There will never be a lack of 
singers. We forsee a rush for positions, since 
forty marks in a term of thirteen weeks is 
well nigh Utopia. The Orient editors, 
upon consultation, find themselves possessed 
of six marks, and in the spirit of the Faculty 
offer them as rewards for contributions. If 
our suppl}- were larger we should bid for the 
chapel choir to sing in our new Orient office, 
but since we have no more we must forego. 



The treasurer of the Base-Ball Associa- 
tion comes with grievous complaint concern- 
ing unpaid subscriptions. We won't stop to 
remark that every one who has agreed to pay 
should pay, since the remark is unnecessary. 
It is quite needless to urge that honesty and 
manhood and kindred reasons demand a ful- 
filment of promises. It appears oftentimes 
as though a few students delighted in large 
subscriptions on the subscription paper, and 
small ones, extremely small, in the necessary 
collateral. The treasurer is perfectly willing 
to be paid. He is longing to be paid, and all 
those who have delayed till now, would do 
well to call upon him at the earliest opportu- 
nity and convenience and deposit with him 



26 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



the amount which at present is outstanding 
against their names. The nine is in urgent 
need of every cent that can be collected. 



For the remainder of the term gymnasiam 
exercises will be conducted elsewhere than in 
Memorial Hall. The work upon the building 
and the rapid strides towards its completion 
necessitate the discontinuance of work within 
doors, and the old gymnasium, which for so 
many years has developed the muscle and 
laziness of Bowdoin boys, is soon to be a 
thing of the past. In the meantime, until a 
new and better gymnasium is built, work, if 
there be an}^ must be couducted out of doors. 
The change will be beneficial, and we doubt 
not but that interesting exercises can be sub- 
stituted for the former exercises within the 
gymnasium. Remarks of eulogy upon the 
gymnasium are in order, and we hope that a 
few mourners at least, out of respect to what 
the gymnasium has been, will gather at its 
funeral and speak as cheering words as possible 
to all who are grieving at its timely demise. 



Pressing invitations are pouring in upon 
us from every side, to publish in our columns 
an editorial condemning the present brick 
edifice that nestles remotely among the pines. 
The subject is a delicate one. We prefer to 
make no comments, and only suggest to the 
Faculty that an inspection of this building 
will reveal the causes of coinplaint and the 
necessity of action in regard to it. We are 
certain that the Faculty are ignorant of the 
condition of the interior of the building. 
We remember the advice of our instructor in 
Psychology concerning Dr. Wilder's "Health 
Notes" and the following out of his advice 
in every particular. We would truly like to 
liave Dr. Wilder's opinion concerning the ac- 
tion of the Faculty in regard to a certain 
section of his book as illustrated by the afore- 
said building. As it is now, the general 
opinion of tiic studc^nts could bo condensed 



into one universal growl of dissatisfaction, 
and this is, we think, the onl}' existing cause 
of discontent now extant in college. 



The Orient steps to the front again in 
announcing that spring has come. We are 
somewhat late, but come to the task, like 
the man who has almost missed the last train, 
with a determination unconquerable and a 
smiling countenance. Every college journal 
throughout the length and breadth of this 
fair land has made the thrilling statement. 
We have waited, lingering in doubt until we 
saw proofs, until we saw the ash-cart pro- 
duced from the depths of mystery, and saw 
the delightfully suggestive work upon the 
campus walks. It is impossible to doubt that 
spring has come, as one beholds the spring- 
like demeanor of our agricultural professor, 
as with the touch of a master who delights 
to linger, he lovingly applies his rake to the 
ash heap, and with foresight and prudence 
engineers the approach and departure of the 
Roman-chariot of an ash-cart. 

The campus everj'where gives evidence 
of coming summer. The swallows circling 
and twittering above Cleaveland, the sweet, 
sad strains of the seraphic hand-organ, as 
they come tiipping gail}'^ along upon the 
balmy breezes, the evidences of house clean- 
ing in professor's rooms, are all witnesses to 
the fact, and from these we drew the above 
conclusion. We are truly happy. As ease- 
loving Juniors, we have nothing better to do 
than to placidly keep the sunshine from the 
grass and loaf away the leisure hours beneath 
the trees. 



Every one has a pleasant outlook for the 
remainder of this term. The Sojihomore 
shakos hands with his classmate as he sees in 
the near future visions of caucuses and excui^- 
sions, of victories in the lists of love upon the 
tented field, and in numerous opportunities 
in the coming summer evenings for his large 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



27 



abilities to display themselves in his chosen 
occupation. The Freshman relaxes his feat- 
ures as he remembers that time is soon to 
give liim an elevation and secure him a front 
seat in the great list of untamed Sophomores. 
Take it all in all there are abundant causes 
for self-congratulation, and we are certain 
that these remarks are not amiss if they but 
call every reader's attention to the fact that 
there is a pleasant outlook before us in sum- 
mer days and evenings. 



The regatta will occur at five o'clock P.M., 
Thursday, June 2d. It is so near at hand that 
it demands, perhaps, a few words of comment. 
The race promises to be not in the least unin- 
teresting, although, for the most part, there 
is little excitement throughout the col- 
lege concerning it. The past unfavorable 
weather and the unceasing rain have been very 
disheartening, and this, connected with the 
state of the course, will be very prejudicial 
to fast time. The Androscoggin is very high. 
Higher we tliink than ever before during our 
remembrance, at the time of a race ; and 
added to this is an extremely rapid current. 
The current is ruinous to fast time, since it 
is much stronger on the left than on the right 
side of the island, and will, therefore, aid 
less going than it will hinder coming, and 
the course back must be pulled in a current 
so strong that the floats can hardly be kept 
at anchor. The condition of the crews is 
well known throughout the college. The 
Freshmen are pulling extremely well, though 
somewhat young in the Ijusiness. They work 
untiringly. The Sophomores and Seniors 
both have two new men in their boat. The 
former have been much delayed in procuring 
oar-locks and oars, and the rain has seriously 
interfered with their practice. The Seniors 
deserve, and we think receive, the unstinted 
praise of the college for their work towards 
the success of next Thursday's race. They 
could have refused to pull without discredit. 



but as it is they have brought forth a crew 
and will make a determined struggle for the 
cup which they held for the first two years of 
their college course. '82 has the same crew 
and is pulling well. The race is at present 
anybody's race, and promises to be interest- 
ing if no accidents occur. 

The microcosm of theatre goers and the 
intelligent thinking world in general have 
been intensely interested in the recent repre- 
sentation upon the boards of Sanders Theatre, 
at Cambridge, of the Greek Play of ffidipus 
Tj'rannus. No event of so great interest to 
the educated world, and no idea of such 
striking originality of thought, carrying with 
it at the same time the idea of extended 
and pains-taking labor, has ever been placed 
before the American public. 

As college students, the representation at 
Harvard, on May 17th, of Qildipus Tyrannus 
demands more than passing recognition. It 
bore with it a lesson to college students and 
educators, and it is this that interests us. It 
is the ardent wish of many that this represen- 
tation may usher in the glad morning of a 
higher type of rivalry' between colleges, and 
a more extended plan of education. The 
time may come, and the sooner the better, 
when the Greek Drama well performed will 
be worth more practically than a victory on 
the base-ball field. If this be the case then 
CEdipus Tyrannus, to which the most edu- 
cated and refined audience that has for years 
assembled gave unceasing applause, and which 
has, during the past fortnight, been the theme 
of ruling praise, is the forerunner of a higher 
type of education. The times of Greece, to 
the majority of college students, are times of 
mythical, fabulous life. Hellenic customs are 
only vague, uncertain, ill-formed notions in 
the mind of tiie average student, and the 
play presented is the one means of surely 
and imperceptibly picking up the scattered 
notions gained by years perhaps of study. It 
cannot be otherwise. The play as presented 



28 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



at Cambridge, is not an ill-conceived, ill-con- 
ducted affair. Every method known to the 
broadest scholarship and pvofoundest erudition 
has been applied to make this representation 
accurate, faithful, just. No detail of dress, 
armor, architecture, religious rites has been 
left, and in cases where conjecture had to be 
employed the best means of conjecture have 
been used, and the most satisfactory results 
obtained. Scholarship has gone hand in hand 
with labor, and when such a play is presented 
in such a manner before the public and indi- 
rectly before the intelligent world, it de- 
mands, as we said before, more than ordinary 
attention. 

The success of (Edipus was decided. The 
press have scattered encomiums Avith a lavish 
hand, and Harvard must smile with content. 
It is not our object to remark concerning these 
comments further than it interests college 
life." There can be no doubt but that Har- 
vard has by this drama eclipsed her rival uni- 
versities, and there can be no doubt but that 
this undertaking has opened a possible method 
of education. The old obstacle of cost and 
time is insurmountable, and we can never ex- 
pect to behold the classics taught from the 
stage perhaps, but the idea is intact, and it is 
none the less true that this object metliod of 
imparting knowledge is as true of history and 
ethics as it is of fundamental studies. Moral 
problems have for ages thus been taught, why 
not iiistorical and classical ? 

The other view of OEdipus is its moral 
status as a play. Of this we feel ourselves 
incapable of judgment. It demands a pres- 
ence at the presentation to decide. To the 
class to whom it was presented, a class of 
scholars, there is little danger. Tlie story, 
the plot is immoral, but clothed in the sur- 
rounding web of life, custom, and religion. 
As produced in the very judgment hall of 
the gods the play would, we think, bear onl}' 
the lesson of unerring and certain punish- 
ment. Revolting ciime and its punishment 



restrains, not engenders, vice. We would like 
to remark farther. The amount of credit 
due Harvard for this achievement, in some 
respects gigantic, is great, and the only un- 
happy feature is that it cannot be more widely 
witnessed by college men. We cannot soon 
expect to see it imitated, and it is to be feared 
that some time will elapse before other uni- 
versities follow Harvard's lead. 



AUF WIEDERSEHEN. 

IX MEMOKY OF J. T. F. 

Until we meet again ! That is the meaning 
Of the familiar words, that men repeat 

At parting in the street. 
Ah yes, till then ! but when death intervening 
Rends hs asunder, with what eeaseless pain 

We wait for the Again ! 

The friends who leave us do not feel the sorrow 
Of parting, as we feel it, who must stay 

Lamenting daj' by day, 
And knowing, when we wake upon the morrow, 
We shall not find in its accustomed place 

Tiie one beloved face. 

It were a double grief, if the departed. 
Being released from earth, should still retain 

A sense of earthly pain ; 
It were a double grief, if the true-hearted. 
Who loved us here, should on the farther shore 

Remember us no more. 

Believing, in the midst of our alllietions. 
That death is a beginning, not an end, 

We cry to them, and send 
Farewells, that better might be called predictions, 
Being foreshadowings of the future, thrown 

Into the vast Unknown. 

Faith overlea])s tlie confines of our reason, 
And if by faith, as in old times was said, 

Women received their dead 
Raised up to life, then only for a season 
Our partings are, nor shall we wait in vain 

Until we meet again ! 

— Atlantic for Jtme. 



EXTRACTS FROM EXCHANGES. 

Owing to the fact that the members of 
tlie college are debarred from a consultation 
of our exchanges, and as a consequence are, 
in a great degree, ignorant of the questions 
which are agitating the college world, we 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



29 



consider it a duty owed to our readers to 
remedy this defect, so far as we are able. 
With tliis end in view, we quote from some 
of our exchanges on subjects which cannot 
fail to be interesting, interspersing our own 
comments. 

The statement recently going the rounds of the 
college press, purporting to be a quotation from this 
paper representing us as saying that Princeton would 
not engage in foot-ball matches away from this city, 
we characterize as purely and maliciously false. 
What we did say, and we are willing to stand by the 
statement, was, that Princeton possesses rare advan- 
tages for this sport, such as are enjoyed by no other 
college. Owing to our peculiar sanitary arrange- 
ments there are always open and ready for use 
freshly dug graves which could be utilized during 
and after the game, thus avoiding many of the ex- 
penses now incurred. — Princetonian. 

A reference to our exchange file bears out 
the Princeton man in his statements. 

Subscription papers are now in circulation for 
the purpose of obtaining an amount of money neces- 
sary to defray expenses in turning the Charles River 
from its course and forming a pond which shall be 
used for our annual inter-collegiate race. The emi- 
nent advantages of such a course must present them- 
selves to every Harvard man. To be sure the ad- 
vantages would be all on our side, but this would be 
only fair, inasmuch as Yale's oarsmen are larger than 
we and possessed of considerable skill and pluck. 
We hope by holding the race here to develop, through 
home associations and nearness to maternal influ- 
ence, suflicient powers to offset the superiority of our 
opponents. We trust that the undertaking may meet 
with earnest co-operation and that the course may be 
in readiness when the time stipulated for holding 
races at New London shall have expired. — Harvard 
Echo. 

We sincerely hope, dear Echo, that you 
may not be disappointed in your wishes. 

All decent men must rejoice at the news which 
we present them to-day. Smintheus is dead! Ay, 
dead ; and his death is a peculiar manifestation of 
Divine power, which, while suffering the full enjoy- 
ment of powers exercised, it may be, for evil alone, 
in time renders their productions the means of the 
destruction of the originator. Know that Smintheus 
died a fitting death, and in that death, which we 
were instrumental in bringing about, we glory in 



having rid the woi'ld of a miscreant in comparison 
with whom Ingersoll is speechless and Kearney 
sinks into insignificance. — Yale Record Extra. 

We await with much interest the effect on 
Columbia of the murder of their champion. 
The following is from the New Haven Register: 

Probably the full particulars of the murder of 
Smintheus will never be learned, as they are 
known only to the participants in that remarkable 
affair. Plowever, of the closing moments of the vic- 
tim's life, we have the following from an eye-witness : 
"Smintheus, notwithstanding the terrible torture to 
which he was subjected, died game. The dying un- 
known lay in the arms of the Lit. editors, held as in a 
vise; about him danced the editors of the Record 
shrieking in his ears selections from his own produc- 
tions, the only instrument of torture used ; while on the 
floor, overcome by their exertions, with idiotic smiles 
wreathing their faces, betokening incipient insanity, 
lay another group. In the midst of such a scene, 
Smintheus patiently breathed his life away. A fit 
ending to an inglorious career." 

In the same paper occurs the following: 

"The saloon keepers of this city yesterday 
adopted the following : 

Whereas, In the death of Smintheus the trade 
recognizes the working of a wisely shaping hand, in 
thus delivering our business from the stagnation into 
which it had fallen through him, and 

Whereas, This happy state of affairs has been 
compassed through the efforts of the editors of the 
Yale papers, 

Resolved, That in recognition of these services, 
in the future the trade will make a reduction to these 
gentlemen of fifty per cent, on the current price of 
beer per 'schooner.'" 

We regret to say that the gentlemen will 
be unable for some time to come, to enjoy 
their unexpected good fortune, as they have 
succumbed to the extraordinary exertions 
undergone by them in gratifying their hatred. 

It is our sad duty to announce the prospective 
failure of the peanut crop for the season. The news 
must cause a pang in the breast of every loyal Bates 
man, inasmuch as we arc now deprived of our favor- 
ite and only means of celebrating our victories. 
The announcement must carry with it one consola- 
tion, at least, in that the pernicious practice of bet- 
ting, which some of the scholars have contracted, 
will in a measure be done away with. — Bates Student. 

After the present edition, the local department 



30 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



will cease to exist. We have been driven to this 
step by the departure from college of " Skill," who 
furnished the subject for all of our best jokes and 
witty sayings, and whose place we are unable to fill. 
— Bates Student. 

We read this announcement with deep 
regret, as we have enjoyed many a hearty 
laugh over these jokes (?). 



AWAKENING LIFE. 

On the topmost twig of the budding tree. 
The bluebird hails the coming day, 
And the robin in his merry glee 
With joy salutes the welcome May. 

The fields again are clad in green. 

The brooks are loosed from Winter's chain 

And flow along to meet the sea. 

All bubbling forth their sweet refrain. 

The gentle rains of spring descend 
To moisten the awaiting fields ; 
All Nature wakes, as from a sleep, 
And to her Maker tribute vields. 



COMMUNICATIONS. 



Editors of Orient : 

Our reading-room has been the subject of 
many an editorial and communication in the 
Orient, but still there seems to be ample op- 
portunity to again bring this subject before 
the students. 

Let us examine the reading-room as it is 
to-day. We open the door. What a sight 
meets our gaze, and what an odor imposes on 
our sense of smell ! We see a floor covered 
with filth ; papers, ragged and clijjped, scat- 
tered about in promiscuous confusion ; a stove, 
dirty and rusty; lamp chimneys of every sliadc 
of blackness for want of proper care, and an 
enormous cuspadore exhaling ils foul odors. 
Two rickety settees, a few broken cliairs, 
several students occupying tliem, some en- 
gaged in animated discussions, regardless of 
the fact that the reading-room is not tlic place 
for them to display their powers of oratory ; 
and otliers filling tlie atmosphere witli smoke 



from their foul pipes or disgusting cigarettes, 
complete the picture. 

Can we wonder that complaints are fre- 
quent concerning the management of this 
department of our college ? But who are we 
to blame for this state of affairs ? Certainly 
it is the duty of the manager of the reading- 
room to see that it is kept in a respectable 
condition, but can we expect him to do tiiis 
when the body of the students conspire 
against him ? 

Although we acknowledge that the man- 
ager has much to contend with, j'et we must 
confess that we think that during the past 
year the management of the reading-room 
has been, to say the least, a little lax. Too 
often is it the case that the papers are left 
around loose until they are unfit for use, and 
it must be acknowledged by all that very 
little care is taken in regard to the cleanli- 
ness of the room. When the manager is ap- 
pointed he is expected to take proper care of 
the room, and because the students are slov- 
enly in their habits there is no reason that he 
should leave his work half done. 

We all take pride in our librar}-, our art 
gallery, and our cabinet, but how much 
pleasure would it afford us to show our 
friends about these institutions were the 
books, pictures, and specimens scattered 
around regardless of order, and tiie rooms 
filthy and disgusting for want of proper care. 
We are dependent on the reading-room for 
our information respecting tlie daily actions 
of the world, and it is as much our duty to 
keep this in a respectable condition as i\ny 
other part of tiie college. Many papers and 
magazines tire phiced at our disposal, aiul we 
ought, at letist, to show that \ve appreciate 
this by treating them, and the room in wliich 
they are kept decently. We may complain 
about the maiiiigement, but unless we are will- 
ing to exercise a little care ourselves, wc can 
expect no better condition of affairs. It re- 
quires very little I'ffort to hang the papers up 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



31 



when we are through with them, and to re- 
frain from clipping them. We acknowl- 
edge that it would be very difficult for some 
to refrain from using the room like a common 
bar-room. If there are any who are too lazy 
to properly dispose of the papers after they 
are done with them, let some of us kindly 
volunteer to assist them, and let those gentle- 
men (?) who have no respect for themselves 
or anybody else, be supplied with a place 
better suited to their nature and hoggisli dis- 
position. 

By all means let us have the room kept 
in a condition suitable to occupy. *^* 



Malden, Mass., May 17, 1881. 
Editors of Orient : 

The following anecdote is entirely authen- 
tic, and was given to me by my father, a 
member of the class of '31. You can rely 
upon its authenticity as regards Bowdoin. 

About the year 1830, two sportive Bowdoin stu- 
dents removed a sign from the store of a tradesman 
in the town. Taking it to their room, they i-educed 
it to liindling wood and were proceeding to burn the 
fragments, when the well-known step of the re- 
spected president was heard in the hall. A rule of 
the institution at that period was that no college offi- 
cer could enter a student's room while the latter was 
performing his devotions. One of the graceless 
purloiners accordingly placed his chair against the 
door, and engaged in pious (?) exercises, frequently 
quoting from Scripture as follows: "A wicked and 
adulterous generation seeketh after a sign, but no 
sign shall be given to this generation." When the 
last splinter of the sign had been consumed, the 
counterfeit supplication ceased, the door was opened, 
and the president entered, accompanied by the irate 
shop-keeper. After a fruitless search of the prem- 
ises, the visitors retired, commenting upon the smoky 
atmosphere of the apartment. 

Yours Truly, 

A. B. W. 



TABLE OF AVERAGES. 

We print bolow a table, from the Criinson, show- 
ing the best American Records. It is presented for 
the interest and instruction of our zealous athletes. 
The matter of accuracy and honesty in measurement 
of all distances and times cannot be too strongly 



urged. We are indebted to the Crimson also for the 
definition of a college record as a record, which must 
be accomplished by an undergraduate in an event 
ox>en only to college men. We hope the table may be 
useful as a standard of comparison, and as such we 
present it to our readers. 







00 . O .00 






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0000 ' 00 . '.'. 




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SoMMARY. — Harvard, 5; Columbia, 4; Princeton, 
3; Cornell, 1; Dartmouth, 1; McGill, 1; Trinity, 1 ; 
University of Penn., 1 ; Yale, 1. 

*Best American Amateur Record. 



32 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 

Rubber boots again. 

Horn concert, May 10th. 

Adjourns have been abundant. 

Crosby, they say, is spoken for. 

Are you taking Dutch tliis term ? 

Work in the gymnasium ended the 13th. 

Junior physicists have been testing alcohol. 

The naughty Sophs, have been getting marks. 

The largest clinic for years was held the 14th. 

Prof. X. — " Ah ! Phinney, can't you finish it ? " 

C. and M., '82, the last charge in the Aroostook 
War. 

Second examination in Psychology for the Juniors 
the 25th. 

The old colony of swallows has returned to its 
chimney in Cleaveland. 

Und king ihm endlich, has been translated, "And 
they hung him endwise.''^ 

One of the choir uses his extra two marks to cut 
Sunday evening prayers. 

The practising of the Ivy Ode was thought to be 
the Freshmen learning Phi Chi. 

There is suspended in a certain room a half-burned 
cigar, — reminder of a broken pledge. 

"Thus science conquers superstition," the Medic 
said as he smashed the yaggers' jack o' lantern. 

Ottie's remarks on the English Judiciary were 
only interrupted when the President came to his relief. 

Our chapel choir at the close of this terra will 
start for Europe in the private steam yacht of E. It. J. 

As Billy gets up to recite, the Prof, remarks : 
" You will observe, gentlemen, the gas is now turned 
on." 

The latest development of cussedness is the steal- 
ing of an Instructor's oil can and refilling it with 
water. 

This shows the advantages of a classical educa- 
tion, as the student said when he began knowledge 
with gn. 

The college has received a gift of $1,000, to be 
used as deemed best. Why not give a sui)pcr to the 
Okif.nt Board? 

A Freshman has been visiting the French grave- 
yard and wants to know when those old Knglisk sot- 
tiers were buried there. 

The otBcers of the cadets arc anxious to have a 
parade on Memorial Day, but privates seem to view 
the matter in another lij'ht. 



Among other proposals handed in for painting 
the boat-house is that of Blondel and Mansur, of '82. 

Student in Science of War (describing equipments 
of soldiers) — " Some carry knapsacks and some hav- 
ersacks, when they have a sack." 

'83 has shown too much haste in getting out of 
chapel. The upper-classmen, you know, don't like 
to be crowded bj' last-year's-Freshmen. 

There is the usual complaint of bad water this 
spring. Even the wells on the west side of the build- 
ings, it is said, are not in good condition. 

Doc and Plimp will, during the present week, 
give the last (positively) exhibition of their famous 
collar and elbow contest. Tickets free. 

Instructor in Latin — "What is the literal mean- 
ing of inane?" Mr B. (dreamilj') — "It's where 
they used to hire women to mourn at his funeral." 

In the annual convention of the Alpha Delta Phi 
Fraternity, held at Brown University, W. I. Cole, '81, 
and W. C. Merryman, '82, represent the Bowdoin 
Chapter. 

Senior (translating from German Bible) — "Re- 
turn, O Lord," — slight pause — " how long! " Other 
Senior (who is listening) — ''About ton lines further, 
I guess." 

A bicycle race will be anew feature on Field Day, 
and a tub r;ice on the river, before the usual regatta, 
will keep the spectators amused on the afternoon of 
June 2d. 

Prof. L.'s anecdotes of the Rocky Jlountain sheep 
and the sagacious rat, are equal* to tliat of E. U.'s 
man with three rows of teeth, as related in the Phy- 
siology class last winter. 

By the munificence of Mr. E. R. Jewett, the 
Boating Association is to receive a large ensign 
for the boat-house, bearing an anchor and the word 
Bowdoin in blue and goki. 

Those who recite directly after prayers favor the 
idea of singing in chapel ; those, however, who have 
the next hour for study think the morning exercises 
are ordinarily none too short. 

One of the engineers thinks that his department 
is not of so mucli importance but that it gives lone to 
the college. Surveying the matter on this level is 
due to a transitory chain of thought. 

The poem, " Anna," in our last number calls to 
mind the announcement that the Sophomores were 
anticipating the celebration of this anniversary. The 
ancient ceremony has been repeated annually until 
last year when it was annulled for an obvious reason. 
It is to bo hoped that '83's " Anna" will not liave any 
cause for annoyance from her unburied ashes. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



33 



The base-ball game in the south end of W. H., the 
other day, resulted, 108 to 79, in favor of the " Smash- 
everything " against the " Smash-pretty-near-every- 
thing"nine. Umpire, H. Johnson. 

The lyy Invitations have arrived and are for sale 
at No. 6 W. H. '81's invitations were gold finished 
cards. '82's are double sheets with the class mono- 
gram at the top in crimson and gold. 

The Juniors have held a class meeting for election 
of Ivy Honors. The results will appear June 3d. By 
the same class, those contesting at the prize declama- 
tions were voted for last Wednesday. 

So much of the golden ore is taken out of the 
Seniors' pockets to keep their crew supplied with 
cypress wood, that it would be better to suppress the 
latter's destructive propensity or give up the boating 
business. 

The grammatical question has been discussed by 
a number of students of late, whether it is correct to 
say " What am I? " or " What are I ? " It is need- 
less to say that the majority have decided on the 
former, somewhat to their chagrin. 

One Sophomore, " after taking a bird's-ej'e view 
of the class," votes for himself as among the twelve 
best speakers. The result shows that a majority of 
the class don't look at his ability with the bird's-eye 
view, and he is elected to sit among the audience. 

It was expected that our nine would play with the 
Bates at Lewiston last Saturday, and many intended 
to see their first trial of strength with a nine of our 
own State. The weather was not suitable, however, 
and at the time no definite arrangement was made. 

The squirrel usually goes after the acorn, but one 
of the noble Seniors has recently reversed the natural 
order by spending his valuable time and still more 
valuable cartridges in destroying one poor squirrel. 
This may be an amusing business but it is a small 
one. 

The Sophomores voted some time ago for those 
taking part in the usual prize declamations, and last 
week it was announced that the following were 
elected: Allen, Austin, Bascom, Cole, Fling, Gibson, 
Kendall, Perkins, Pcttengill, Stetson, Swan, and 
Washburn. 

The new chapel song books show a very judicious 
selection on the part of the committee, both in re- 
spect to the larger ones exclusively for the choire 
and those for general use in the^j'^. The books were 
first tried last Sunday morning a:nd "Old Coronation" 
sounded as though the boys enjoyed the novelty of 
the new exercise. The singing of the double quar- 
tette on Sunday evening was also very fine. 



Mauy have been wondering what the Juniors are 
singing so much of late. We endeavor to gratify 
their curiosity by the following : 

" The hickory berry vine entwines 

The brown nuts of the turnip tree. 

The cashmere heifer skips and plays 

To the tuneful bleat of the feathery bee. 

On the tall boughs 'mid tlie buckwheat buds, 

We hear the low of the finny plover. 

While the bay bull hitched to the rumbling scythe 

Husks out the golden clover." 
The class odist has in this production closely imitated 
the Bucolics of Virgil. 

The game of ball intended for Wednesday last 
was postponed till Saturday on account of the storm 
and subsequent condition of the grounds. The late 
heavy rains also caused a serious set back in 
the preparation for all our spring sports, and even 
after it was possible to get out of doors the ground 
was soft for walking and running, and the river so 
high and swift as to make boating disagreeable not 
to say dangerous. If tlie records do not come up to 
their usual standard it may be partially attributed to 
the loss of nearlv a week's time in the midst of train- 



The boat crews show, on the whole, the results of 
last winter's work in the gymnasium, and with good 
training are in excellent condition despite the un- 
favorable circumstances which have opposed them. 

The Senior crew has undergone several changes 
which interfere with their progress toward perfec- 
tion. They have been fortunate in having Pettengill, 
their former stroke, as a coach, and Fisher, in his 
change from No. 3 to stroke, has been doing all that 
could be asked. Now that there is a i^rospect of 
losing Larrabee from the bow, Pettengill and Fisher 
are to take once more their old places, and the new 
men in the waist will be obliged to change again, 
Manson to No. 2, and Gray to bow. Whatever the 
arrangement, they form a strong crevy and a hard one 
to beat, as they are likely to exceed their record of 
last year. The class of '81 deserves credit for main- 
taining their boating interests under adverse circum- 
stances and during the last term of their college 
course. 

The Juniors have the same crew in the same 
places as last year and thus have some advantage 
over the others. Aside from this, though the heavi- 
est crew on the river, they have not made propor- 
tionally so much improvement. The time they are 
making, estimated by different persons from diverse 
places (under the bridge, behind the boat-house, etc.), 
varies from 22-30 to 19-10. IMoney is not put up 
so freely against this crew as it was last year, but it 
should be remembered that because a crew wins one 
year it is not sure to do the same the next. 



34 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The Sophomores began work in good earnest at 
the beginning of the terra, but on account of delays 
in repairing their boat, lost much valuable time. At 
present, with their new rigging, they are making up 
for this lost time, and though having two new men, 
they show improvement in stroke and general form, 
promising with ayear's experience to prove as formid- 
able rival as '80 found them in their first race. 

It is not ordinarily expected that the Freslimen, 
with only one season of training, should come up 
with those of longer experience, and although we 
cannot predict the highest honors for '8-1, yet they are 
doing some hard pulling and show fair form and 
style. It is the general opinion that, in some re- 
spects, a better selection could be made from the 
men of their class, but as it is late now for a change 
they await the events of next week with high hopes 
(and not without some foundation), that they may 
surpass the record of previous Freshmen classes. 



PERSONAL. 



[We earnestly solicit ciimniuuications to this eoluiiui 
from any who may have an interest in the Alumni.] 

'18. — Moses Emery, the oldest member of the 
York County Bar, died at his home in Saco, a few 
days since, aged 86 years. He was born in Minot, 
July 16, 1796. He studied law with Judge Jeremiah 
Bailey, of Wiseasset, being admitted to the Bar in 
1821. He remained with the Judge until 1825, when 
he removed to Saco, and has since continued to do 
business in the same oiBce where he first located. 
He was on the Board of School Committee of Saco 
for many years, and has ever been an ardent poli- 
tician, being a member of tlie State Legislature in 
1836 and 1837. Mr. Emery was one of the promo- 
ters of the building of the Portland, Saco & Ports- 
mouth Railroad, and also a memberof the Maine His- 
torical Society. 

'36. — George F. Emery has resigned as manager 
and treasurer of the Boston Post, but continues as 
writer of the political editorials. 

'62. — Hev. J. T. Mugrath, Episcopal minister at 
Battle Creek, Michigan, has removed to Forrisdale, 
Pennsylvania. 

'64. — Kev. Webster Woodbury, Congregational 
minister at Skowhegan, lias resigned and will supply 
the church in Gardiner during the absence of Kev. 
A. L. Park, who is to be away for a few months. 

'65. — Jose])!) E. Moore has been elected as a mem- 
ber of the llosloH I'osL I'ublisliing Company. 



'71. — Wallace R. White has been appointed 
United States District Attorney for Washington Ter- 
ritory. 

'72. — H. M. Heath, County Attorney of Kennebec 
County, has lately been admitted to practice in the 
United States Circuit and District Courts. 

'75. — E. H. Hall is instructor of Physics at Har- 
vard. 

'79. — H. D. Bowker is teaching in the State Re- 
form School at Westhoro, Mass. 

79. — J. C. Tarbox was in town a few days ago. 
He has been stopping in Washington, D. C, during 
the past winter. 

'80. — F. O. Purington is principal of the Topsham 
High School. 



COLLEGE WORLD. 



Harvard : 

The Harvard Bicycle Club is said to contain one 
hundred and thirty members. We should like to 
know the average number laid up by accidents dur- 
ing the season. 

The adaptation of the Greek choruses to modern 
music will necessitate an intermission in the middle 
of the play, in order that the stringed instruments 
may be tuned. This is, of course, a departure from 
the ancient custom, but is unavoidable. — Advocai^. 
Yale: 

The cost of supporting the Yale Navy last yea'' 
was $5,300. 

The Glee Club made three dollars iu Philadel- 
phia. — Record. 

The Couranl is looking up the religious belief at 
Yale, but finds it slow work to determine it. 

Undismayed by the thunders of the college press, 
the dread spectre of " Annuals " is rapidly approach- 
ing. Would that some Luther would arise to free us 
fi'om this inquisition of the nineteenth cciiturj'. — 
liecord. 
Coi.UJlBlA : 

The college has just obtained a large globe four 
feet iu diameter, with the surface in relief to show 
land and water. It came from Berlin, and is one of 
the eleven largest ever made. 

The ylcte complains that Columbia has, no base- 
ball nine and tries to arouse its students to efforts in 
this direction, by the honors won by Harvard in this 
field. 

UNIYKSRITY ok MiCIlIliAN: 

There are 37,000 books and 10,000 pamphlets in 
tli(^ uiiivcrsily libraries. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



35 



The abolition of chapel exercises altogether, 
althouojh they are now voluntary, is being agitated. 

A professor, after listening to an unusual number 
of Monday flunlis, called attention to the fact by say- 
ing : " This class is to be congratulated on one thing, 
it is very evident that the members do not study on 
Sunday." — Chronicle. 
Syeacuse : 

The Syracusan predicts a large Freshman class next 
fall as aresult of the free advertising given on account 
of the recent hazing scrape. After the acquittal of 
the alleged hazers of Tipple the college held a great 
glorificalion, but their rejoicing was quickly stopped 
as the Faculty indefinitely suspended the four charged 
with the act. 
Miscellany : 

Amherst has a Bicj'cle Club of twenty members. 

"Josh Billings " is a graduate of Hamilton, class 
of '37. 

The Cornell Four left New York for England by 
the National Line, May 21st. 

Trinity devotes itself to Cricket to support its 
claim as " The Oxford of America." 

The Princeton Glee Club cleared over $600 at 
their concert in Cincinnati, during the spring recess. 

The average age at which students enter Amer- 
ican colleges is seventeen ; a century ago it was 
fourteen. 

The numerous Oxford caps worn by the students 
give Williamstown quite the air of a university 
town ; the numerous plugs give it the asjaect of a 
fashionable resort; while the bats and rackets and 
LaCrosse sticks add a sporting air to the quiet little 
place. Don't let us lose hope. In another thousand 
years it may be quite a respectable town. — Atheiiaeum. 



CLIPPIKGS. 



She was declaiming "The Launching of the 
Ship," and as with a tender voice she exclaimed : 
" How beautiful she is! how fair 
She lies within those arms that press 
Her form with many a soft caress 
Of tenderness and watchful care!" 
the professor rolled his eyes in eostacy and whispered, 
" Beautiful, beautiful figure !" and the boys held each 
other down in their place, and smacked their Juicy 
lips. Such, alas, are the temptations of co-education. 

A tom-cat sits upon a shed. 
And warbles sweetly to its mate; 
"Oh, when the world has gone to bed, 
I love to sit and mew till late." 

But while the tom-cat sits and sings, 
Up springs the student, mad with hate; 
He shoots that cat to fiddle-strings — 
He also loves to mu-til-ate ! 



Scene at the college : Prep, (to servant at the 

door) — " Miss ." Servant — " She's engaged." 

Prep. — "I know it. I'm him what she's engaged 
to." — Kx. 

A Freshman, slipping on a banana skin as he 
strolled along the broad, icy asphalt walk, exclaimed : 
"Thank Heaven I don't live in the tropics, where the 
ice would be covered with banana skins." 

Harvard is the Fifth Avenue of American colleges. 
Yale the Broadway. — Ex. And Vassar the Maiden 
Lane. — Miscellany. And Princeton the Rotten Row. 
— Ada. And Wellesley the Threadneedle Street. 

"I am translating you from the German," said a 
Senior to the fair one by his side, as they rolled 
away from the dance, the other evening. "Not 
without a horse," she murmured, and quietly fainted. 

A young lady was caressing a pretty spaniel and 
murmuring, " I do love a nice dog! " " Ah," sighed 
a dandy standing near, "I would I were a dog." 
" Never mind," retorled the lady, " you'll grow. — Ex. 
Prof, (in Literature class) — "Can any of you tell 
me the true difference between high and low Ger- 
man?" Smart Soph, (eagerly) — " High German's 
German, and low German's Dutch." He has been 
sent to West Point. 

How did she know it? They were returning from 
a yachting party in the fog. lie (trying to keep up 
a conversation) — "How wet this fog makes my 
moustache!" She — "Yes, so it does." Utter collapse 
of further conversation. — Ex. 

It was their first night aboard the steamer. " At 
last," he said tenderly, "we are alone, out upon the 
deep waters of the dark blue sea, and your heart will 
always beat for me, as it has beat in the past!" 
" My heart's all right," she answered, languidly, but 
my stomach feels awful." 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



The Harvard Crimson is almost the only college 
paper which has approved of the assault of Smin- 
theus on tlie Yale journals. It has constantly en- 
couraged his abusive attacks, has copied largely 
from them and sprinkled its pages with such obser- 
vations as, " It is rumored that the Record has offered 
Smintheus a position on its editorial board, in the 
vain hope of making that paper readable," and "The 
belligerant Courant copies poetry from the Advocate 
now that it no longer exchanges with the Ada. Grand 
old Yale ! " Now, envious of the Ada's notoriety, it 
enters the same field as a rival mudslinger. It stirs up 
a quarrel with its elder brother, the staid and dignified 
Advocale. We are sorry to see such exhibitions on 
the part of the Crimson, as it has too good a reputa- 
tion to need to indulge in such attempts at wit in 
order to win recognition. The last Advocale calls 
the Crimson the brightest and freshest of its ex- 



36 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



changes, and by a courteous explanation of its state- 
ments, laj's open the way to a reconciliation, instead 
of taliing up the gauntlet the Crimson has thrown 
down. It is to be hoped that peace may be declared 
and both parties turn themselves to more legitimate 
literary efforts. 

We acknowledge the receipt of an invitation to 
the annual meeting of the Inter-State Collegiate 
Oratorical Association, held with Illinois College 
eai'ly in May. The program was a confused medley 
of base-ball games, banquets, receptions, and ora- 
torical contests, planned more after the Olympic 
games than anything else we ever heard of, although 
owing to the state of the weather, the out-door part of 
the exercises had to be omitted, — a hindrance more 
likely to be met with in America than in Greece. In 
the grand, oratorical contest six orators took part, — 
one each from the States of Minnesota, Iowa, Indi- 
ana, Illinois, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The orator from 
Indiana obtained the first prize. The subject, of his 
oration was, "The Philosophy of Skepticism." 
Minnesota obtained the second. The contestant from 
Iowa was a young lady. Her article on "Ilypatia" 
was very finely written, but rather too dramatic and 
not thoughtful enough. As a whole the meeting was 
a great success. Such associations would be of great 
advantage to any group of colleges. We should like 
to see a movement made towards forming such an 
organization among our Maine colleges. 

We have often ^vondered what becomes of the 
college jokes which go the rounds of all the papers, 
are misquoted, mutilated, or burdened with addi- 
tional remarks by would-be-funny men. They cer- 
tainly deserve some asylum where, as a recompense 
for their past usefulness, they may be honorably pre- 
served ; and we have found where they go. The 
Philosophian Review, a review published every six 
weeks somewhere in New Jersey, is their final 
resting-place. Its last number contains over four 
pages of clippings which were never of much value, 
which have been worn thread-bare in the service, 
and every one of which an exchange editor could 
easily recite from memory so often has he met them. 
College jokes are queer things any way. No one 
knows where most of them come from. Thoy appear 
labelled "Ex.," and are copied from one paper to an- 
other. It is our opinion that the originators of many 
of them are so ashamed of their productions that 
they will not designate them as their own, Init intro- 
duce them surreptitiously to the world througli the 
medium of their clippings column. 

Experience will establish as a general law, that 
the largest colleges have the best college publicaf 



tions. This is strikingly verified in the case of the 
Chronicle of the University of Michigan. Its last 
number contains sixteen pages crammed full of in- 
teresting matter. Although not pretending to be 
much of a literary paper, it has carefully written 
articles on interesting subjects. As a college paper, 
a reflection of college doings and interests, we do 
not hesitate to give it the highest place. Its edito- 
rials ai'e on matters of the highest importance, its 
locals are spicy, its personals are particularly com- 
plete. It deserves the large circulation it has. 

The Allanlic for June is before us. The follow- 
ing are its varied and valuable contents: " Over on 
the T'other Mounting;" "The Indoor Pauper;" "A 
Spring Opening;" "Bergen Days;" " Felicissiraa ;" 
" Who lost Waterloo ? " " The Portrait of a Lady ;" 
"Chance;" "French Tragedy;" "Friends — A 
Duet ;" " A Taste of Maine Birch ;" " Whittier's Kings 
Missive, and Other Recent Poetry;" "Five Ameri- 
can Novels;" Carlyle's Reminiscences;" "The Re- 
naissance of France;" "The Contributors Club;" 
"Books of the Month;" " Auf Wiedersehen." In 
the first article are some very picturesque descrip- 
tions of mountain scenery. The poem, "Auf Wieder- 
sehen," refers to the well-known incident shortly be- 
fore the death of James T. Fields, "To whose tact 
and ability the magazine is greatly indebted for the 
place it occupies in American periodical literature." 
Scribncr for June is a remarkably interesting and 
timely number. Its contents are: "The Farragut 
Monument;" "Along the North Shore of Long 
Island;" "Sic Semper Liberatoribus ! " "The Sani- 
tary Condition of New York, II.;" "Madame Del- 
phine, II.;" "An August Morning with Farragut;" 
"The Lobster at Home;" "Latitude Unknown;" 
"Practical Floriculture;" " Bastien Lepage;" 
"Poems from a Scrap-Book;" "The AVestminstor 
Play;" " A Rainy Day with Uncle Remus;" "Peter 
the Great as Ruler and Reformer, VIII. ;" "Kecnan's 
Charge;" "Fritz;" "P'arragut;" "Lord Beacons- 
field;" "Some Now Berries;" "The Largest Ex- 
tinct Volcano ;" "A Fearful Responsibility, I. ; " " The 
Revised New Testament;" "Topics of the Time;" 
"Communications;" "Home and Society;" "Cult- 
ure and Progress;" "The World's Work;" " Bric-<\- 
Brac." We clip the following delightfully uncertain 
little explanation from Bric-;\-Brac : 
" IIci- lips were so near 
Thiit— whiit else ooukl I do? 
You'll be liiigry, 1 fear, 
But lier lips were so near- 
Well, I eau't make it clettr. 
Or explain it to you, 
But— lier lips were so near 
TImt— whftf else could I do? " 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



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Fernald's Tailor Emporium 

287 Middle Street, 
PORTLAND, - - - MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT.. 



AT 0. W. ALLEN'S 

DRUG STORE. 

THE FINEST CIGARS AND SMOKING TOBACCOS. 
THE BEST PERFUMERY. 

THE BEST TOILET SOAPS. 

THE BEST HAIR BRUSHES. 

The Largest and. Best AssoFtment of 

Drugs, Patent Medicines, &c., &c. 

To be found in this market. 

Leinont Block, Brunswick, Mahte. 



S. C. COFFIN^, 

— DEALER IN — 

PROVISIONS AND GROCERIES 

asr Special Kates to Student CIubs...ffia' 
CORNER OF MAIN AND ELM STREETS. 



STUDEISTTS 

Desiring Employment, for Season of 1881, 

Enclose Ic. stamp, and write for circular, to 

THE mai^hatta:^ agency. 

733 Broadway, New York Citj', N. Y. 

Please mention this paper. 



Mfg. leaFi i@©k=iliiiiyj 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book "Work to Order. 

00 TO 

TO ni'Y YOUR 

Groceries, Canned Goods, Fruits, 

Confectionerv, Tobacco, and Cigars. 

Spociiil R;itca lo Student Clulis. 

Main Street, Head of the Mall, Brunswick. 



W. B. KNIGHT, 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

)a-Trnn.«lent Orders r.ir Milk or Creuin fllled liy KivinK Builulile notice. 

Residence, School Street. 



MEB(cp;qNT•^T;qIIi0^ 



MAIN STREET, 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



Prepares for Bowdoin and the best New England 
Colleges. Offers, also, a thorough Seiiinaet Course 
to }-oung ladies, and a shorter course for business 
pursuits. For Catalogues, address 

Rev. a. W. BDRR, Hallowell, Me. 

©ystcE' mt See ipeom 

Main St., under Town Clock 

US" Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



Q&t* 



Purchase your COAL at llie 

Ooa,l ~Z"a,rd. in Topslxam, 

WHERE NONE BUT 

Tfie Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 

B % SL ii: d: a li p c Ik 11' 0, 11 s 6)*. 

B, M, M^WBEBSW, Pbopribtor. 
I. S. BALGOIVIS, 

IlKAI.Ei; IN 

Har jware, Stoves, Crockery, anJ Glassware. 

BFITTNS-WICK. ME:. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



No. 1 O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily- 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B.— Special Rates to Students. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

This house has been thorough!!/ refitted tcitli every re- 
gard to comfort, and the aim is to make it first-class in all 
its appointments. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

De^^^ITT HOUSE, 

QUIMBY & MURCH, Proprietors, 



A.. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes S Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brnnsurick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 



ALL KINDS OF 






^''^^cWsiiil^i 



KoYAr. QuiMisv. 



EiJEN Muncil. 



For Schools and Colleges, 

EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 







THE FAVORITE NOS. 303-404-332-l7O'SSI- WITH 
OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



sxavxpso^ 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 



ESTABLISHED 1S44. 

W. L. Wl LSON & CO, 

fl^lok•sale and Retail Deiilers in 



^1 ^ffit W@@.#, TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 



OFFICE IN LEMONT BLOCK, Brunswick. 

ftg~Telephone conuectiun with Coal Yard. 
|Il3"0nlers left iit JonUiii Snow's, Lemoiit Block, will 
be pi-omptly iittPiiiled to. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEK, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Jiusic Books, Miisical Instrumeuts, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELIC JES A SPECIALTY. 

jiSj and ^8y Congress St., and 235 Middle St.. 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

jBS^-SeND KtHi I'KICI,: LibT. 



N. B. — Orders by mail will reCL-ive prompt attention. Send for prii 

H2 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 



Tlie Si.xty-Fii-sl Aniiuul Course of Lectures at the Meilical 
Scliool of Jliiiue, will commeni-e FEUUUAltY lOtb, I8S1, aud 
continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— JosacA L. Chamdeblain', LL.D . President ; Israel T. 
DiSA, M.D , l>ath,il",_'.v and Practice ; WiLLtisi W. Gheese, M.D., Sur- 
gery and (.'liiiicil Suf;.', ry ; Alkred MtTCHELL, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of W,niini ami Chillnoi, Fkedehic H. Gebbish, M.D., Materia 
Medica, Therap utios, aii.l Pul.lic Health ; Chari.es W. Goddabd, A.M., 
MedicalJurispvuili-Kv ; lli:Mtv Carmicuael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Bdrt G. 
Wilder, .\1.T)., t'liysi, '., ;.'y ; Stepues H. Weeks, M.D. , Anatomy; Dasiel 
F. Ellis. M.D. , Kui.'i^crLir and Librarian-, .\itgcstcs P. DcDLEY, M.D., 
Demonstrator of -Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may he obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to th» Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



. \-^;-.«v„,;// 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 




SI>33CIA.Ij :EI. r*. Tins TP'O'El. C;iji.A.SS:E3S8 



:E^in.e Spectacles a,n.d. Eyegrla-sses. 
EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND .MAIN STREETS, BRVNSWICK, ME. 

&, Frefl fflitcliell witli David B, MitclielL 
Livery, BoardiEg, Hack, & Sale Stable 

OLD STAND OPPOSITE SAGADAIIOCK HOUSE, 

Front Street, ----- Bath, Me. 

Particular attention given to Boarding Horses. Also, First-CIilss 
Teams at Re;isouable Rates. 

CO'BI^HGE- BOOKSTO'KH 

J. M. CURTIS, Proprietor. 

BOOK9S. ST'iVTZONE:FtY. ROOna 
PAPER. PEBIODICALB, <ScC. 



AMOS L MILLETT & CO., 

.ToTinuRS AND Uktailkrs of Htanhard 

Implied and Eoiiifistic Fancy CTroceries 

JWNKlCn HILL PICKLES A SPECIALTY. 

^QHTJCtAMt©, . 5 5 MAtrnm. 

F I Ft. S T - C 1. A. S S 

Banas, Organs, and MelodeonSi E. SMITH,.. GROCER. 

AT LOW PIUCHS. LARUE RENTlNd STOCK. _ O 1 J. m 1. 

W. W^ m^SiVQ'M, B'&wf^BWKOK, Me. • Lowest Prices to Student Clubs. 
?. H. WILSON,, Dispenser of Pure Bnigs,, Medicines, and Cliemicals. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomaties, Bath Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions a Specialty. 

niAIN SXR.EET, --...- BRtJNS-IVICK. IWE. 

.lOIIIlNAl. fltl'IH!), I.I.SIION STUItKT, I.KWISTON, MAINl.. 





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Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. JUNE 8. 1881. 



No. 4. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADjnCSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new"dxford" and "iMoehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KISDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



Books, Stationery, and Paper danpgs, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

iiii-Miiiti@a, stiiiiti i-iiei 

* SPRING STYLES * 

OF 

Nobby Stiff and Soft Hats 

NEW STYLES in LINEN COLLARS & CUFFS. 
NEW PATTERNS in NECK- WEAR. 



SPRING OVERCOATS AND SUITS, 

ELLIOT'S, Oppos ite Town Clock. 
FRi^^K E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets. 




C.MTIQM T© SMOKIBS. 

Be^irare of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 

"^^'^^ ' '"' TRY IT. 

Fine, Mild & Sweet. 

Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 



FOR YOUR 

NOBBY HAT 

Go or Send to 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 
SIGN OF THE GOLD HAT. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Glass Cards and Monograms 

ENGRAVED IN THE HOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENOY FOR 



UNDER FALMOUTH HOTKL. 



JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, ETC., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QUALITY, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 



PORTLAND, 
A. CARTER. 



MAINE. 
J. W. D. CARTER., 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



A reorganization of tlie Course of Instruction 
has recently been made, in whicb tbe distinction be- 
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main- 
tained, but all academic undergraduates are placed 
on one footing, witb the opportunity of following, to 
a considerable extent, such lines of study as they 
prefer. 

All students entering the College proper, are ex- 
amined on tbe same course of preparatory studies. 
After the second year a liberal range of electives is 
offered, within which a student may follow his choice 
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount 
pursued. 

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated 
as a distinct course, are still, for the most part, re- 
tained either in the required or elective lists. More 
place is also given to the Modern Languages than 
they have hitherto bad. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all 
who complete the Academic Course. 

The Engineering Department remains as b'ere- 
tofore, and facilities are offered for study of the 
various branches of this science. The means of 
theoretical instruction are ample, and the town of 
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen- 
tres in the State, and in tbe immediate vicinity of 
many important public works, affords excellent 
opportunities for the study of actual structures. 
The College also enjoys many favors from the United 
States Coast Survey'OfiQce." The admission is the 
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the 
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will 
be taken, if desired, in the place of Latin. 

Those who complete satisfactorily the four years' 
course in engineering will receive the Degree of Sc. 
B. Those who complete a two years' course of ad- 
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or 
Mechanical Engineer. Students not candidates for 
a degree will be received at any stage for which an 
examination shall show them to be fitted, and may 
remain for any desired time. Further information 
will be furnished on application to Professor G. L. 
Vose. 

Terms of Admission to the Academic Course. 

Apiilicants for admission will be examined in tbe 

following subjects : 

Latin.— Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Writ- 
ing Latin (3.5 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion iirc rcconiinendcd as indicating the amount 
rf(niirf(l for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
GeorgicK, and six bnf)ks of the /Eneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations : Sallust. 

Gkkkk. — Hadlcy's Greek Grammar; Xcnojihon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

Anciknt GEoiiitAi'iiy. 

Matiiumatics. — Arithmetic, including Coimnon 



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 

and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 

I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 

Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission 
will be required to produce testimonials of good 
moral character. The time for examination is the 
Friday after Commencement and the Friday before 
the opening of the first term. In exceptional cases 
applicants maybe examined at other times. Candi- 
dates for admission to advanced classes will be ex- 
amined in th(! studies which such classes have 
accomplished. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrange- 
ments with the Principals of schools and academies 
having a regular course preparatory for college of at 
least three years' duration, whereby their pupils 
may be examined for admission to college at their 
respective schools, in connection with their own 
final examinations. 

The amount of instruction now offered and pos- 
sible to be taken in the several principal lines of 
study is exhibited comparatively, as reduced to one 
scale, in the following manner. This is, however, 
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal 
length : 

Latin, eight terms. 

Greek, eight terms. 

Mathematics, eight terms. 

German, four and a half terms. 

English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English 
"Literature, three and a half terms. 

French, three terms. 

Italian, one term. 

Spanish, one term. 

Rhetoric (formal), one term. Rhetorical and 
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a 
half terms. 

Natural History studies, five and a half terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, four terms. 

Chemistry, four terms. 

History, Ancient and Modern, two terms. 

Political Economy, one and a half terms. 

Public Law, two terras. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, including Logic, 
four terms. 

Christian Evidences, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual exiienises are as follows : Tuition, S75. 
Room rent (half), average, $2'->. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, ,f 110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $i a week. 
Other necessary oxi)onses will probably amount to 
$4(> a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs inider good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Finthcr information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 8, 1881. 



No. 4. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PTTBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE CLASS OF '82, OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Abthtir G-. Staples, Managing Editor. 

Charles H. Gilman, Business Editor. 

Melvin S. Holway, Eugene T. McCarthy, 

"William A. Moody, "Warren 0. Plimpton, 

George G. "Weeks. 

Terms — $2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor, Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 



Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 



CONTENTS. 
Tol. XI., No. 4.— June 8, 1881. 

Editorial Notes 37 

Literary : 

Ivy Poem 40 

Psi Upsilon Convention 4J 

Alpha Delta Phi Convention 42 

Miss Vesta (poem) 42 

Ivy Leavings 43 

Ivy Day Exercises 44 

Boat Race 45 

Field Day 46 

Base-Bal I 47 

Personal 48 

College World 49 

Clippings 49 

Editors' Table 49 

Keviews 50 



EDITORIAL HOTES. 



We are somewhat late, and come before 
our I'eaders with our fii'st excuse. We don't 
know just how to express it, and would like 
to mix in a touch of pathos concerning the 
distracting tendencies of Ivj^ Day, and how the 
music of the orchestra mingled with visions 
of fair forms and faces, and unfitted us for 
work with a touch of the true reason, viz., 
that we were obliged to wait until Ivy Day 



had passed, and that then the regular time 
of issuing the Orient having gone by, the 
date of this issue was at the printer's con- 
venience. We trust, whatever our excuse, 
that you will pardon our delay and will be- 
lieve us when we promise our best endeavors 
to prevent its recurrence. 



We feel justified in offering a few un- 
sought woi'ds of praise towards Andre-ws' Or- 
chestra for its fine music and gentlemanly 
bearing on Ivy Daj- and Evening. The or- 
chestra was entirely satisfactory and would, 
we think, piove a successful competitor to 
Chandler but for the distance from which it 
must come, and the consequent increase in 
cost. It is pleasant to be able to make terms 
with more than one management in the hiring 
of music, and the recent satisfactoiy engage- 
ment of the above orchestra has proved con- 
clusively that the college is not necessarily 
confined to Portland for its music. 



We never saw a game of La Crosse played 
upon the campus or elsewhere by the stu- 
dents, and yet we are assured that formerly 
the game was very popular and extremely 
well played by members of the Bowdoin La 
Crosse Association. Only a few weeks since 
the secretary of the Bowdoin La Crosse Asso- 
ciation (which ofiicial is entirely a new crea- 
tion) received a letter from Hai'vard desiring 
a game, and offering very generous terms, and 
the new made Secretary answered as tenderly 
for the defunct La Crosse Association as he 
could, and assured the writer that the above 
mentioned La Crosse Association couldn't send 
a team just now, but that the matter would 
be agitated. This is why we agitate it. We 



38 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



fear that La Crosse is dead, painfully defunct, 
and that its remains can only be discovered 
by the few remaining ornaments which for- 
merly were used in the noble red man's sport. 
If there is anything of interest to the students 
in the game it should be pursued, and the 
few interested ones who are left over from 
base-ball and boating might profitably form a 
new La Crosse Association, and elect a legiti- 
mate secretary. We need at least the luxury 
of a secretary ; we can but feel that as a col- 
lege we are defrauded in not having a secre- 
tary, and the sooner the La Crosse sticks are 
produced the better for his election. 



Our Ivy Day has come and gone and left 
only a throng of pleasant memories. We 
have often been met with the question as to 
what is an Ivy Day, and have often wondered 
what the name could suggest to the unini- 
tiated. We plant an ivy, we hold appropriate 
exercises, and we take up the duties of work 
again feeling that we are more closely united 
as a class, and assured that whatever be our 
fortune we shall always have this bright spot 
in our college life to remember with pleasure. 
As we learn from a previous number of the 
Orient, Ivy Day took its beginning in Octo- 
ber, 1865, was held again in 1874, and since 
then uninterruptedly until it has become 
firmly implanted. It is needless to offer sen- 
timent or attempt to expand upon its virtues 
as a college custom. It is also impossible, 
perhaps, to tell the person unacquainted with 
the exercises what our Ivy Day consists in, 
but for our part we are assured that it is a 
custom becoming more deeply rooted with 
every class, and believe that we can safely 
prophecy that this custom of planting an ivy 
in this month of June will never die out from 
among tlie students of this college. The past 
holidays have been very pleasant and satis- 
factory to the college, and especially to the 
Junior class, and we believe tiiat we can 
safely say that '82's brightest and best memo- 



ries of college life and Junior year will clus- 
ter around her Ivy Day. 

The action of the boating meeting of Mon- 
day, June 6, was quite decisive, and resulted 
in the selection of the Junior crew as the 
crew which is to participate, if any, in the 
proposed race at Lake George. The general 
opinion of the meeting was that it is both 
practicable and advisable to send a represen- 
tative Bowdoin crew to some intei'-collegiate 
regatta. Generous terms have been offered 
by the secretary of Lake George Association, 
and the only matters of consideration are 
finances and the procuring of a boat. Both 
these matters are in the hands of committees, 
and we trust that every one who is able will 
encourage the committee on the score of 
financial ability. We have no fear but that if 
other colleges can be induced to enter we 
shall be able to be represented, and it is a 
matter of some moment and worthy of pro- 
found consideration among the students. We 
shall refer to this again. 



Like the celebrated cathedral at Cologne, 
Memorial Hall is moving on to its comple- 
tion. Now and then during the past few 
weeks a workman has appeared at the pump, 
and occasionally we hear them building a 
staging. By untiring toil they have moved 
the staging from the north to the soutli end 
of the building, and they have by unremitted 
exertions almost "pointed up" one side of the 
building. The rain has greatl}^ interfered ; if 
it hadn't we are quite sure that they would 
have entirely finished the east side. There 
is food for sentiment in the contemplation of 
this building, and we often picture how pleas- 
ant it will be in after years to come back and 
shake hands with these same stone masons, 
and recall the pleasant summer term when 
they first began work on the building. At 
the present rate of operations we prophecy 
Christmas, 1900, for its dedication, and in 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



39 



the meantime suggest that it would be well, 
perhaps, to put the building on ice to prevent 
its destruction by too rapid manipulation. 

In our columus elsewhere will be found 
an account of the race. Our spring regatta, 
being our only regatta, is worthy of atten- 
tion. The race on Friday morning, pulled as 
it was under unfavorable circumstances, in 
rough water, and at the unheard-of hour of 
6.30 in the morning, was yet a well-rowed 
race. The Juniors are well satisfied, and they 
have every reason to be when they consider 
the conditions and the time in which the race 
was pulled. The Freshmen, we are sorry to 
say, are not contented. There is a lingering 
belief that they can beat their time, and per- 
haps the Sophomores. The reasons for this 
discontent are good ones, and are that they 
had only a few days previous pulled over the 
course in less time than their time in the race, 
and that the crew through misunderstanding 
had not eaten breakfast. These reasons ren- 
dered them somewhat dissatisfied, but we 
would suggest that they have no reasons 
whatever for discontent, since their time was 
as good as that of any Freshman crew except 
'81, and that there is a difference between 
pulling in rough and in smooth water. Their 
race as pulled on Friday morning was plucky 
and well contested, and only proved the ad- 
vantages of a crew trained by previous races 
over one that has never pulled a race. The 
Sophomores surprised themselves, we vent- 
ure. The last week of their training devel- 
oped more than was expected, and their time 
of 19.57 made both crew and class satisfied. 
The Seniors, finding themselves entirely un- 
fitted to row through unlooked-for obstacles, 
withdrew nearly a fortnight previous to the 
race. Their attempt to enter did much 
towards assuring a race, and by their with- 
drawal much of the interest departed. As 
usual the thanks of the college are due Mr. 
Robinson for the aid which he has given. We 



refer you to the account of the boat race else- 
where. 



The time and occasion demand a few 
words of notice and comment concerning the 
nine and its management. The first and most 
evident fact that can be noticed, notwith- 
standing all remarks to the contrary, is that 
neither the nine nor the director have shunned 
a single game in any way whatever, but on 
the contrary that every endeavor has been 
made, and considerable money expended, to 
make games with other college nines. The 
reason then, why, at the time of present writ- 
ing we have been able to witness but one 
game within the limits of the State, is due to 
entirely other causes than eitlier unwilling- 
ness of the nine or mismanagement of the 
director; and the source of this stagnation is 
foinid entirely in the unwillingness of our 
neighboring nines, and in the unfavorable dis- 
position of the weather. We fear that we 
have lost entire confidence in Bates College 
as a college devoted to base-ball, and can only 
say that we are very pained at the continual 
illness of her men and at her evident unwill- 
ingness to play. The game in Portland on 
Memorial Day was a disappointment. At- 
tended by a good audience and well played 
by our nine, the game resulted in a heavy 
shower and thus ended the Harvard-Bowdoin 
game. With Colby we have witnessed one 
game in Brunswick, and tliis, with the ex- 
ception of the games played upon the trip, is 
the only exploit of our base-ball nine. It is 
needless to urge any mismanagement or lack 
of energy in any direction either, as we said 
before, upon the nine or director, but to 
calmly wait until the weather god becomes 
propitious and until our nearest neighbor 
shall have recovered. 



It is with great pleasure that the Obient 
notes the increasing desire of the college to 
spread its influence more widely, and to make 



40 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



for itself a more stirring name throughout 
the college world. The results of our base- 
ball trip are just apparent. Numerous col- 
leges and college publications that formerly 
had believed Bowdoin somewhat inanimate 
have awakened thereby to an interest in our 
college, and to an evident knowledge of its 
existence. We labor under the disadvantage 
of isolation, but conscious of this there can 
be no reason why every possible means shall 
not be taken to lessen it. 

The boat crew desire to be represented in 
a regatta. It is the duty of the college fac- 
ulty and alumni to aid in the fulfillment of 
this desire, not because it will be a pleasant 
excursion, nor because the crew are certain 
to win laurels on the course, but because the 
world demands evidences of life before it 
acknowledges life, and because this is an ex- 
cellent means of displaying activity. Sports 
are the door by which the student world 
steps out before the world in general, and 
while the college may be conscientious in its 
labor, may teach ably, rear well, and send 
forth able scholars, we believe that that col- 
lege will fail in its highest aims, will be defi- 
cient in students which makes no endeavors in 
the world of college sports. We do not pre- 
tend to ascribe the sum total of college pop- 
ularity to the prominence of sports, but do 
assert that a large part of it comes indirectly 
through the successes of the students in this 
direction. For this reason we are glad to see 
Bowdoin's activity on the increase. We may 
not win a game or a lace, but in every at- 
tempt we acquire confidence, and as we step 
before the world gain no enemies and per- 
haps gain friends. 

Entirely to plead for more frequent inter- 
course with live colleges are these remarks 
made, not to vindicate sporting matters, and 
in view of our boating interest to represent 
the advisability of being represented. Let 
us not become fossilized this siinnner at least, 
however much Brunswick may tend to this 



result. On the contrarj' let us be alive and 
active, and when opportunitj' comes let us 
seize it to create more widely the healthy 
good opinion of our college. 



IVY POEM. 

W. O. PLIMPTON. 

A motto, once it was my lot to hear. 

And thus it read, " Stick to j'our sphere." 

The question which we all would wish to know, — 

How far the limits of our sphere should go, — 

Can fain be answered by one mortal man, 

Or any dozen since the world began. 

The fact is. He who ruleth all things well. 

Has given each, a mind, his mind his to tell. 

So where you find two on one point agree, 

A discord next you will be sure to see. 

Let each one feel his individual task. 

To study self, and find where he may ask, 

Admission in the many walks of life. 

Beset alike b^' toil and rugged strife. 

But lest my friends, I'd seem to have known. 

That I would make the poet's sphere my own, 

I'll tell you frankly such is not ni}' aim. 

For on the poet's honors I've no claim. 

"Then why," you ask, "attempt to play the part, 

When you, and all confess your lack of art." 

The explanation in these words are found. 

That after they had scanned the class all round, 

And none would take the honor for the pains. 

They said, " let contidence supply for brains." 

Such doubtful compliment must needs prevail, 

For, added they, " pray tvy, you can but fail." 

Persuaded thus, subservient to their will. 

Conceit had thought to wield the poet's quill. 

But practice and the theory face about, 

And hence, I saw for me but one way out. 

So, as the student, when with Greek perplexed. 

Looks round for aid, and scanns his Harper's text, 

Or he who would his tired brain relieve. 

Tucks up the well wrought fakir in his sleeve, 

I sought by telephone the Muse to reach : 

" O Muse, divine ! Thy aid I would beseech," 

And quick as telephone dispatch can Uy, 

The lovely fair haired Goddess made reply. 

"Your just petition I must now refuse, 

But lest you'd tliink I willingly would abuse 

The prayers which mortals make, I will explain, 

Tliat you may know of whom you should complain. 

I think, if observation serves you well. 

There is perhaps no need for me to tell 

How Cupid, with his well-directed darts,) 

Has sought of lalo so many human hearts. 

Not only mortals lias he put in love, 

But even Gods and Goddesses above. 

Such aim here on the hill he needs must take, 

Olympus, by the way, lest you mistake, 

That I'm engaged ; and that's the reason why, 

With your request I dare not yet coniply ; 

For Goddesses engaged, should then bo true, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



41 



With students never flirt, as mortals do." 
" Muse ! no flirt am I, besides its clear, 
Apollo having seen me would not fear." 
She angered that I thus should press my cause, 
So dignified, made answer with a pause : 
" With his consent, I will assist this once, 
But never dare to ask again, you dunce." 
I promised her commands I would obey, 
So this is what she gave me for to-day : 

* * * * n^ * 

A LEGEND. 

Somewhere afar, beyond the sea, — 

Imagination roving free, — 

There stands a castle, in whose mein 

An ancient grandeur may be seen. 

Its lofty turrets, towers tall, 

Its courts, its battlements and wall, 

In stern defiance upward rise. 

High towards the blue ethereal skies. 

The ground, with terrace, hedge, and lawn. 

Though much of former beauty gone. 

With gentle slope extends to meet 

The river gliding at its feet. 

Which bends its course, as if in fear 

Of trespassing, perchance, too near, 

And circling round in silent flow. 

Soon hides itself in woodlands low. 

Historic fancy paints to you 

The palmier days these scenes once knew : 

And where, within these vacant halls 

Now oft-repeated echo calls. 

Once kings in royal splendor dwelt. 

Before whose thrones proud courtiers knelt. 

From here brave knights, in armor strong, 

Went forth to meet the hostile throng. 

Here once the merry laugh was heard. 

The festal song, the joyous word. 

But now, in place of such glad sound, 

A solemn stillness hovers rouud. 

And slow decay has ruin cast 

Upon the crumbling walls at last; 

Yet beauty clothes the ruined scene. 

By spreading o'er a mantle green 

Of ancient ivy, sturdy grown. 

From tempests round the castle moan. 

Wherever Time, its havoc brings, 

The ivy tendril closer clings. 

Its history I'd have you know. 

And how it happened here to grow. 

Turn back your thoughts to years gone by, 

'Tis twilight's hour, and shadows lie 

O'erspreading castle, field, and glade. 

With here and there a deeper shade. 

And all is tinged with mellow light, 

While fading day foretells the night. 

Within, you merry voices hear. 

And soon a youth and maid appear; 

Such grace and loveliness combined, 

You'll scarce its rival ever find. 

A lovely maiden princes, she, 

A handsome, brave young knight was he. 

They slowly forth together walk, 

And both engage in merry talk. 

While walking in an ivy dell, 

Her wand'ring eyes, unconscious, fell 

Upon a branch, torn from its place, 



Which she broke with thoughtless grace. 

They wandered on, as you have guessed, 

And then returning, sought to rest 

Tliemselves upon a rustic seat 

Near castle wall, a glad retreat. 

There, flourishing the branch a while. 

She would his pensiveness beguile : 

With all the carelessness of mirth. 

She placed the ivy twig in earth. 

And then, with girlish sort of whim 

She turned her musing to him. 

And asked him if he thought 'twould grow. 

He said, with calm indiff'rence, "No." 

Nor even thought ambitious pride 

Was in that ivy typified. 

Just then appeared, above the trees, 

The moon, and with it sprang a breeze; 

Then starting up they went within, 

And day was done, the night set in. 

***** 
Years passed away, the brave young knight 
In other lands, with valiant might. 
Sought glory in a victor's name ; 
Nor cared he for aught else but fame. 
But while he climbed Fame's ladder tall. 
The ivy climbed the castle wall. 
The maiden princess older grown. 
Now queenly law gave from ber throne, 
While all her subjects loved her well, 
And of her goodness loved to tell. 
The knight returned, his battles through, 
And to the queen would homage do. 
So, as he knelt in meekness there. 
The queen recalled both when and where, 
And what they said long yeais ago. 
And how the ivy clianced to grow. 
She then, with favor bending o'er. 
Her blessings on his head to pour. 
Bestowed on him — his brow beneath — 
The garland of an ivy wreath. 

****** 
We plant our Ivy here to-day. 
Not in the circumstantial way 
The maiden did upon that eve. 
But kindly feelings, we believe. 
Towards classmates and the college, too, 
Inspire us now this act to do. 
And dearer still will be these scenes, 
When we recall, than were the queen's. 
Dear classmates, seek no knightly fame, 
Nor any got through deeds of shame. 
May all our deeds and thoughts as well, 
With noble aspirations swell. 
And higher fix a purpose true. 
As grows the vine of Eighly-two. 



PSI UPSILON CONVENTION. 

The 48th annual convention of the Psi 
Upsilon Fraternity met at Chicago, May 18 
and 19, with the Omega Chapter. The con- 
vention was called to order on the morning of 



42 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



the 18th, at the Palmer House, the large club 
room and several rooms on the grand parlor 
floor being utilized for the session. 

The convention proceedings occupied both 
morning and afternoon of both days. The 
public exercises were held on the evening of 
the 18th, at Central Music Hall, in the pres- 
ence of a large and distinguished assembly of 
ladies and gentlemen. An excellent or- 
chestra rendered some fine musical selections. 
Prof. Edward Olson, president of the North- 
western Association of Alumni gave the ad- 
dress, and Hon. Albion H. Tourgee, the poet 
of the occasion, gave a fine poem on " Yes- 
terday's Dream and Yesterday's Fact." 

After the exercises, Hon. and Mrs. Perry 
H. Smith extended to the delegates, and other 
members of the Fraternity, a reception at 
their residence, one of the handsomest man- 
sions in the city. A large number of young 
ladies graced the occasion withtlieir presence, 
and dancing was indulged in until a late 
hour. Everything was conducted in an in- 
formal manner as possible, and a thoroughly 
good time was enjoyed by all present. The 
convention proceedings occupied both morn- 
ing and afternoon of the next day. In the 
evening the banquet took place in the ele- 
gant and spacious dining hall of the Palmer 
House. The delegates will, in justice to 
Chicago, be likely to linger lovingly over the 
remembrance of the banquet which closed 
the session of this convention. The hall was 
adorned with floral favors, conspicuous among 
which was a splendid piece of workmanship 
bearing the badge of Psi U. It is unneces- 
sary to remark upon the banquet. Suffice it 
to say it was in keeping with that magnifi- 
cent style which characterizes the Palmer 
House. Fine music was dispersed by an ex- 
cellent orcliestra in attendance, and the fres- 
coed ceilings rang witli the songs of Psi. In 
short, the affair was a successful, happy, and 
creditable finale to tlie forty-eighth convention 
of Psi Upsilon. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 

The 49th annual convention of this fra- 
ternity met with the Brown University Chap- 
ter, Providence, R. I., Tuesday and Wednes- 
day, May 24th and 25th. About 150 brethren 
were present, representing ever}' chapter. 

Tuesda}' morning was devoted to a pre- 
liminary business meeting. In the afternoon 
the visiting members, as guests of the Bru- 
nonian Chapter, proceeded down the bay by 
steamer to Silver Spring, where they partook 
of a genuine Rhode Island clara-bake. 

A prolonged business session occupied 
Wednesday morning. The public exercises 
of the convention were held in the evening, 
in the Providence Opera House, before a large 
and brilliant audience. The stage and pro- 
scenium were handsomely decorated in Iionor 
of the occasion. In the absence, on account 
of sickness, of Hon. John Jay, the president 
of the fraternity, Hon Chas. S. Bradley pre- 
sided. The speakers were : Pres. Thos. Chase, 
LL.D. ; Rev. Edward H. HaU ; Hon. Wm. W. 
Crapo, M.C. ; and Edward Everett Hale, D.D. 
Reeves' Orchestra furnished music for the 
evening. 

After the " Symposium " the fraternitj' 
and invited guests marched to Hotel Narra- 
gansett, where a sumptuous banquet was 
served. After the banquet,toasts and speeches 
were in order, and it was well into the morn- 
ing before the brethren finally adjourned. 

Letters of regret were read from Hon. 
John Jay and George William Curtis. 

Next year the semi-centennial of the fra- 
ternity will be duly observed in New York 
City. 

MISS VESTA. 

While pretty Miss Vesta 

Enjoys a siesta, 

Up foiul Charlie slips 

Ami kisses her lips. 

But wluni she awakes 

Ami limls it no dream, 

Confession slie makes 

She wished it had been. H. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



43 



lYY LEAYIKGS. 



Junior ease. 

The white-wash brush is now active. 

The boating men can now smile again. 

Class Day invitations are for sale at 20 A. H. 

Seniors are practicing for their " last chapel." 

Only four men appeared in Dutch, after Ivy Day. 

Quite a number of the '80 men were in town last 
week. 

Many students are having their rooms photo- 
graphed. 

We can no longer give all the credit of midnight 
carousals to the Medics. 

The pictures of '82's crew have been taken and 
can be obtained at Reed's. 

June 4th, Professor Robinson gave an interesting 
lecture to the Juniors on the Histoi-y of Chemistry. 

The next reform movement should be the addition 
to the students' galleries of hymn books and — spit- 
toons. 

Singing on the campus has been revived to a 
small extent and sounds very pleasantly during the 
evening. 

The boating association, by means of the late 
races, has the acquisition of several half-hogshead 
tubs to its_^ee<. 

There has been a special attraction on Wednesday 
and Saturday afternoons at the laboratory in the 
shape of a "coed." 

Wednesday, June 1st, Professor Ladd gave an 
address at the graduating exercises of the Bangor 
Theological Seminary. 

The ivy slip came near being planted too deeply 
by the feet of the large company of friends gathered 
to witness the ceremony. 

At the Chemistry examination some of the Juniors 
succeeded in finding, in pure sodium, quite a portion 
of all the known elements. 

Lost — a comprehensive/rtfciron the next Psychol- 
ogy examination. A liberal reward is offered for 
its return to the proper owner. 

The rustic seat at North Winthrop has been re- 
stored to a suitable condition to accommodate the 
chronic lassitude of that end. 

Those appointed for the Junior Prize Declama- 
tion are as follows : Bates, Belcher, Carpenter, Gil- 
man, Goodwin, Holway, Jordan, McCarthy, Moody, 
Pierce, Plimpton, and Stinchfield. 



'84 has been developing its proficiency in base- 
ball by several games with a crack yagger nine, and 
has met with remarkable success. 

Student (not posted in the classics) to another — 
" Say let's get up a Greek play for Lcmont Hall. 
I'll be Eddyphus and you be Tirranous." 

At the closing exercises of the Medical School 
twenty-nine students received diplomas. In the ab- 
sence of the President the usual address was not 
given. 

The book on " What I Know About Rowing," 
that was to have been published by members of the 
Freshman class, has been postponed since the race 
until the beginning of another season. 

The Freshmen have paid over fifty dollars towards 
their boat, and expect to collect the remainder this 
term. The Sophomores have still a balance of ten 
dollars standing against them on this account. 

The "conundrum" propounded some time since 
on the bulletin-board in relation to base-ball games 
was possibly unjust to the nine, but is one neverthe- 
less that we should like to see satisfactorily an- 
swered. 

Our boat-house with its coat of paint and new 
flag and pole can no longer be mistaken, as it has 
been, for an ice house. It must be acknowledged by 
all to be a nice building for the purpose as we 
could wish. 

It is desired that attention be called to the fact 
that recently one of the painted windows in the 
chapel south wing has been broken by a ball thrown 
through it. It scarcely need be said that such care- 
lessness should be avoided in the future. 

The recently discovered shell deposits at Goose 
Island have been visited by several members of the 
Faculty and some of the students. Many interesting 
specimens and old Indian relics have been discovered, 
showing that the place is well worth visiting. 

May 25th the yaggers held special jfeM day exer- 
cises on the campus near Maine Hall, the prominent 
feature of which were the go-as-you-please race and 
the boxing match. In both contests the " fourteenth 
amendment" was the winner and the favorite of the 
crowd. 

SubscriiDtion papers are now the order of the 
.day, and are being well responded to. It should be 
remembered, however, that the dues to the regular 
associations are somewhat behindhand and ought to 
be promptly settled before the end of the term. 
The Boating Association is especially in need of 
funds to pay for painting the boat-house. 



44 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The bell for Saturday evening lecture was mis- 
taken by some for an invitation to partake of '81's 
field day cider, and several thirsty looking individu- 
als might have been seen wandering thus early to- 
wards Appleton. At a later hour it was decided that 
'81 had lost none of its former hospitality in sharing 
its good things, and the enthusiasm of the festivities 
was only terminated with the speedy exhaustion of 
the spirit of the occasion. 

At the Ivy Hop one of the musicians glancing 
into the dressing room, caught in the looking-glass 
the reflection of a scene that nearly overcame him. 
A beautiful young lady was seen to throw her arms 
about the neck of one of tlie gentlemen present, and 
implant on his lips several osculatory impressions in 
a most loving manner. Names are withheld at^'res- 
ent, but we would suggest that the wicked editors 
sometimes enjoy good cigars. 

The Glee Club gave their proposed concert at 
Lewiston, May 31st. The entertainment vras suc- 
cessful in every respect and well appreciated by a 
cultivated audience. On the following evening the 
program was repeated at Lisbon, but, though up to 
the mark in other respects, the latter aflair was not 
a financial success. Among the other branches in 
which Bowdoin is represented out of town she need 
not be ashamed of her present musical talent. 

The Boating Association held a meeting, June 6th, 
on the receipt, bj- the commodore, of several letters 
from Lake George in regard to an inter-collegiate 
race. It was voted to send a crew, if possible, and 
an invitation to represent the college was extended 
to the present Junior crew. Committees were ap- 
pointed to obtain a suitable boat and to solicit sub- 
scriptions from the alumni and undergraduates. 
Considerable enthusiasm was manifested, and the 
success of the undertaking depends upon the prog- 
ress of the work in the hands of the various com- 
mittees. 



IVY DAY EXERCISES. 

The exercises of Friday afternoon, June 3, 
were entirely successful. The al'ternoon was 
all that could be asked for in the way of 
weather, and for the first time for some years 
the sunlight graced an Ivy Day with its pres- 
ence. The sun therefore was shining brightly 
and the wind just rustling the leaves about 
the chapel door as tlie Junior class, with their 
marshal, W. A. Mood}', marched into chapel. 



The interior of the chapel presented a most 
beautiful appearance. The crowds of ladies, 
with their gay costumes, the assemblage of 
students, friends, and alumni, tlie music of the 
orchestra, and the sunlight streaming up the 
aLsle from door and window, united to pro- 
duce a most pleasing spectacle. The pulpit 
was tastily, even beautifully arranged. The 
drapery consisted of white and tlie Junior 
class color, and upon the white background in 
the lower left-hand corner were displayed the 
figures '82 beautifully wrought in scarlet 
azaleas. The programmes, which had been 
already distributed, were tasty and appropri- 
ate, consisting of an engraved cover tied with 
the class color of ribbon to the printed pro- 
gramme. Andrews' Orchestra of Bangor fur- 
nished music in a most satisfactory manner. 

The exercises opened with a few words 
from the president, Mr. E. T. McCarth}-, and 
then the class and congregation united with 
the chaplain in prayer. After the selection 
from the orchestra the president introduced 
the orator, Mr. G. H. Pierce. • From tlie be- 
ginning Mr. Pierce's manner was pleasing, 
and every sentence increased the attention of 
the audience. The delivery M^as of the first 
order, clear, concise, eloquent. The subject 
of the oration was " The Incentive of Knowl- 
edge," and treated, as its name implies, the 
true life work of young men. The contest of 
to-dajf is not between labor and capital, but 
between men struggling for power. The con- 
test is now sharpness against sharpness, craft 
against craft, intellect against intellect, and 
the aim of the oration was to present as viv- 
idly as possible how great this incentive now 
is, and how great it has ever been. It showed 
tlie tendencies which draw men to college, it 
showed the incentives wiiich should cause 
them to labor actively while in college, and 
showed the demand which the world has a 
right to make upon college graduates. The 
oration is too lengthy to find a place in our 
columns, but we felt upon its delivery, as upon 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



45 



a more careful consideration, that it was appro- 
priate, ably delivered, and indicative of 
thouglit in the highest degree. 

The poem, by W. O. Plimpton, has been 
the subject of much praise. It had been the 
general opinion that '82 was originally slighted 
by the muses. Mr. Plimpton's effort proves 
the contrary. That the audience were pleased 
is evident from the frequent applause which 
broke in upon his delivery, and throughout 
the kindest feelings on the part of the audi- 
ence was manifested towards the poet. We 
feel like congratulating him both on the pro- 
duction and on the deliver)', but are certain 
that we can add nothing to the praise that has 
already been bestowed upon the author, and 
suggest the perusal of the poem, which is pub- 
lished in another column. 

With the close of the poem the class form- 
ing in the aisle, passed out, according to the 
custom with which the weather generally in- 
terferes, and seated upon the grass, with the 
wind softly somewhat coolly blowing by, and 
surrounded by an admiring audience, made 
the presentations. Mr. McCarthj' was ex- 
tremely happy in his remarks. He quite 
touchingly spoke to the recipients of their 
duties in receiving these gifts, and then pre- 
sented the usual class honors. The presenta- 
tions were as follows : 

Moustache Cup, Best Moustache G. F. Bates. 

Arm Chair, Lazy Man I. Stearns. 

Looking-Glass, Handsome Man E. U. Curtis. 

Spade, Dig J. F. Libby. 

Spurs, Ponyist E. R. Jewett. 

Wooden Spoon, Popular Man W. G. Reed. 

The recipients were grateful, and replied by 
short speeches. Mr. Libby was somewhat 
lengthy, but finally finished, and then J. W. 
Crosby received the trowel, the badge of 
curator. Mr. Crosby's beaming countenance 
was never more wreathed in smiles. With a 
lucid remark concerning latent honor in this 
office of curator, he promised to faithfully keep 
the trowel, and with his parting bow turned 
towards the representative Ivy that was as yet 



unplanted. The curator proceeded to plant 
the Ivy, the class assisting in the usual way, 
and then gathering around the " Ivy green " 
the class sang their class ode, and as the last 
notes died away tlie class of '82 separated, 
conscious that their Ivy Day was numbered 
with the past. Below we print the ode, com- 
posed by G. G. Weeks : 

Dear classmates, as we gather round 

Our Ivy planted here, 
O let us feel that we are bound 

By ties that are most dear. 

We raise our voice to this small vine, 
Which leans its tender head 

Against the chapel's sacred wall, 
With mother earth its bed. 

O, sacred walls, O, sacred soil. 

With hidden life replete. 
Give to each bud from out thy breast 

Tlie rage of storms to meet. 

And when the golden sands of Time 

Shall run our numbers few. 
Clothe in thy grace with silver leaves 

The vine of Eighty-two. * 



BOAT RACE. 

Seldom has a larger or more good-natured 
crowd assembled in honor of our sports, than 
that which graced the banks of the Andros- 
coggin on the afternoon of Thursday, June 
2d, the occasion of the annual regatta of our 
navy. Lowering clouds and roughened water 
gave little hopes of their witnessing the race, 
and after a long period of uncertainty, on the 
announcement of the postponement of the 
race until 6.30 on the following morning, the 
crowd dispersed. Previous to this interesting 
and closely contested contest, a tub race 
and swimming match furnished no little 
amusement. The former was won by Bas- 
com, '83, the latter by Collins, '83. The 
garments worn in these contests were cer- 
tainly not patterned after the latest fashion, 
though they may have been in a high degree 
true to nature. 

The water the next morning, while vastly 
superior to that of the preceding evening, 



46 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



was not the most perfect racing water. The 
crowd, for this early hour, was not incon- 
siderable, and it was rewarded by a highly 
interesting race on the part of two of the 
crews at least. But little enthusiasm was 
manifested, the first position being a foregone 
conclusion, and, so far as the Juniors were 
concerned, the race was simply an attempt to 
make a record. The rivalry between the two 
other crews was intense, and it was an open 
question as to the winner. 

The race was started precisely at 6.30, with 
the Juniors on the Topsham side, while the 
Sophmores held the middle. The start was 
as even and as pretty as it has ever been our 
good fortune to witness, '82 and '84 gaining, 
perhaps, a slight advantage in this respect. 
The Juniors, however, in a few strokes began 
to draw away, and at the point had a per- 
c^eptible lead, and when at the head of the 
island had placed a boat's length between 
themselves and. the rear crews. 

The Sophomores soon overcame the slight 
lead which the Freshmen had obtained at 
starting, and for some distance the race was 
rowed with no perceptible advantage to either 
crew. 

The Juniors tuined the island in sight in 
9 minutes 10 seconds, being a much longer 
time than usual, owing to the incoming tide. 
The Sophomores followed 35 seconds later, 
closely pressed by the Freshmen. From this 
point home the race was a beautiful contest 
between the two hind crews, spurt following 
spurt, while the Juniors, maintaining the long 
sweeping stroke which is characteristic of 
them, crossed the line in 19 minutes 9 seconds, 
closing with a tremendous burst of speed. 
The Sophomores finished in 19 minutes 57 
seconds ; the Freshmen in 20 minutes 12 
seconds. 

The race is noticeable for the low lecords 
obtained by all the crews, and it is doubted if 
any preceding race can show such an average. 
The Juniors are to be congratulated on the 



result, Avhich, with the single exception of the 

class of '78, has never yet been beaten b}- any 

class crew. Their achievement shows the 

result of earnest, conscientious work, and had 

the race been rowed at a more favorable time 

of day, and against more evenly matched 

crews, the time, doubtless, would have been 

still more creditable. It is worthy of note 

that the boat in which they rowed is the one 

in which '78 made its famous record. 

Following is the crew : 

Capt. W. G. Reed, No. 2 155 lbs. 

W. G. Moody, No. 3 160 lbs. 

E. U. Curtis, Bow 155 lbs. 

VV. O. Plimpton, Stroke 160 lbs. 

A. G. Staples, Coxswain 110 lbs. 

The record made by the Sophomores was 
certainly remarkable under the circumstances, 
and one for which they deserve no slight 
praise. The manner in which the}' had been 
pulling previous to the race certainly gave no 
promise of such a performance. It was a 
general belief that they would fall victims to 
the Fresiimen, as they certainly were pulling 
with much less grace and finish than the latter. 
We hope this defeat will not damjien the 
ardor of '84 in supporting a crew which gives 
such promise of better performance in the 
future. 

The regatta, as a whole, must be voted a 
success, although lacking in great enthusiasm, 
and although materially injured by the un- 
fortunate circumstances which necessitated 
the absence of one of the crews. 



FIELD DAY. 

In spite of the uupropitious indications, 
Field Day never was more agreeable in re- 
spect to the weather. The large crowd 
gathered early, and was in season for the first 
contests, while the nuisance of several j'ears 
past, caused by teams driving over the track 
and cutting up the ground, was in a great 
measure avoided. The present exercises were 
not so tedious as the last, and seemingl}' gave 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



47 



much better satisfaction and more pleasure to 
visitors. 

In regard to the separate contests there 
was not the desirable amount of competition, 
but the records were, in the most cases, good 
and compare favorably with those of last j'ear. 
The introduction of bicycles was something 
novel, but there was evidently no race in this 
respect, and the time made should have been 
much better. 

If all parties entering their names on the 
order of exercises would appear in the actual 
contest, we should have a Field Day that would 
surprise ourselves, and place our records on a 
better level with other colleges. . 

The money taken at the gate amounts to 
something over fifty dollars, and more than 
covers the cost of the various prizes. 

The order of exercises, and successful 
competitors, was as given below : 

1. Mile-Eun, 

Carpenter, '82, 5 minutes 27 seconds. 

2. Standing High Jump, 

Goodwin, '82, 4 feet 2 inches. 

3. Eunning High Jump, 

H. L. Johnson, '81, 4 feet 6 inches. 

4. Putting Shot, 

Walker, '81, 19 feet. 

5. 100-Tards Dash, 

Haggerty, '81, 10| seconds. 

6. Eunning Broad Jump, 

H. L. Johnson, '81, 15.4i feet. 

7. Hop, Skip, and Jump, 

Haggerty, '81, 35.6 feet. 

8. Mile Walk, 

Achorn, '81, 9 minutes 4 seconds. 

9. 220- Yards Dash, 

Sewall, '83, 27i seconds. 

10. Throwing Base-Ball, 

Kichols, '81, 311.8 feet. 

11. Standing Broad Jump, 

Goodwin, '82, 11 feet. 

12. Half-Mile Eun, 

Payson, '81, 2 minutes 18 seconds. 

13. Throwing Hammer, 

PUmpton, '82, 52.3 feet. 

14. Hurdle Eace, 

H. L. Johnson, '81, 15i seconds. 

15. Three-Legged Eace, 

Smith and Haggerty, 14 seconds. 

16. 100-Yards Dash Backwards, 

Payson, '81, 16 seconds. 

17. Bicycle Eace, 

Sewall, '83, 2 minutes 14 seconds. 

18. Potato Eace, Chamberlin, '81. 

19. Tug of War, Class of '81. 



BASE-BALL. 

The game in Portland, Memorial Day, 
resulted in a score of 4 to in favor of 
Harvard, at the end of the fourth innings. It 
is impossible to judge of the result of the 
game by this. Our nine was playing an 
excellent game notwithstanding the change in 
position of the players, as is evident by Har- 
vard's score, and had not the rain come as it 
did we are quite certain that the result would 
not have been discreditable to our nine. The 
park was crowded, but the proceeds were in- 
suiBcient to meet expenses. 

Bowdoin 7, Colby 5. 
The game with Colby was played on Wed- 
nesday, June 1st, after being once or twice 
postponed. The delta was quite crowded, 
and the game opened at 4.45 with Bowdoin 
at the bat. The first irming resulted in a 
blank for Bowdoin, while Colby, by base hits 
and an error of our nine, were credited with a 
run. This was their only run until the sixth 
inning, the men in the meantime disappearing 
in order, for the most part on easy flies to the 
in-field. In the sixth, by an error of ours and 
sharp hits, they made one run, and in the 
ninth, by a combination of lucky hits assisted 
by a bad error at third, sent in three men 
over the home plate, making a total of five 
runs. For our side Wilson carried off the 
honors in batting by his three baser to the 
left field, and Stetson and Haggerty by their 
singles. Knapp played an excellent game 
at first, considering his lameness, and Snow's 
catching was faultless. The game through- 
out was under the control of our nine, 
and the only slip-up was the three runs which 
Colby put in in their last inning. The game 
was played in the quite unusual time of one 
hour and twenty-six minutes, and was most 
interesting throughout. The umpiring was 
entirely satisfactory. It is noteworthy as 
being the first game of the season, played by 
our nine within the State. 



48 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Appended is the score ; 



BOWDOINS. 

AB. B. iB.TB. PO. 

■Wilson, p 5 2 2 4 2 

Rogers, 2b.... 5 1113 
Gardner, 3b... 5 



Smith, l.f 4 

Wright, s.s. ..4 

Knapp. lb 4 

Haggerty,c.f..4 
Stetson, r.f....4 



,5000600 
10 2 11 

110 3 1 

1 1 1 10 2 

2 2 2 
2 2 



COLBTtS. 

AB. R. iB.TB. PO. 

Worcester, lb. 6 2 2 8 

Doe,c 6 117 

Andrews, c.f.. 5 1112 

Marshall, p...4 1 1 

Wright, r.f...4 2 3 1 

Garland, 3b... 4 110 

Mclntire, s.s. .4 1111 

Trowbridge,l.f.4 1110 

Lord, 2b 4 1117 



Totals. ...10 7 9 1127 15 4 Totals. ...39 6 10 1127 13 11 

123456789 

, 2 10 13 0—7 

1 10 3-5 



Bowdoics 

Colbys 

Three-base hit— Wilson ; Two-base hit— Wright. First base on errors 

Bowdoins, 8 ; Colbys. 4. Base on called balls— Bnwdoins, 1. Struck 

out— Bowdoins, 3 ; Colbys, 2. Balls called— on Wilson, 30 ; on Marshall, 
67. Strikes called— on Wilson, 4 ; on Marshall, 15. Wild pitches- 
Marshall, 2. Passed balls— Snow, ; Doe, 2. Time of game— 1 hour 26 
minutes. Umpire — J. E. Walker, Bowdoin, '81. 

Colby 15, Bowdoin 5. 

The game at Waterville, Wednesday, 
June 8th, resulted very discreditably to our 
nine. It was a game of errors and poor bat- 
ting on our side, and illustrates forcibly the 
chances of base-ball. The appended score is 
very suggestive : 

COLBYS. I BOWDOINS. 

AB. R. iB. TB. PO. A. E. AB. B. iB. TB. PO. A. E. 

Worcester, lb. 6 2 2 2 14 1 2 | Wilson, p 5 14 3 

Doc.c 5 12 2 2 1 , Rogers, 2b. ..4 110 

Andrews, c. r. 5 1110 Gardner, 3b. .4 110 4 2 4 

Marshall, p... 5 2 2 3 7 2 Snow,c,lb..4 6 11 

Wright, r.f... 5 12 2 ,--mith, 1 f 4 10 4 13 

Mclutirc, s. 8 .4 2 1113 2 Wright, s. s.. .4 2 2 2 

Garland, 3b. ..6 12 2 4 2 Kiapp, lb,c.4 2 3 3 4 

Lord, l.f. 5 3 2 2 10 HiVggirty.c. f.4 1112 2 

Wad8worth,2b 5 4 3 3 2 12 Stetson, r. f...3 

Totals.... 45 16 17 17 27 14 9| Totals. ...36 5 6 5 24 1115 
123466789 

Cclbys 5 3 2 3 2 -16 

Bowdoins 0010110 2—5 

1st base on called balls — Bowdoin, 1 ; Colby, 1 . Wild pitch —Wilson. 
Struck out— Bowdoin, 2 ; Colby, 2. Balls called— on Wilson, 33 •, on 
Marshall, 42. Strikes called— on Wilson, 6 ; on Marshall, 8. Passed 
balls- Snow, 5 ; Doe, 4. Time of game, 1 hour 40 minutes. Umpire — 
W..S. Bosworth. 

Boivdom 18, Orono 5. 

Rarely has a worse exhibition of base-ball 
been witnessed on the college grounds than 
the game of Tliursday, June 9th. The 
record of the Orouos had raised expectations 
of a well contested game. We were disap- 
pointed, however. Tlie game was an exhibi- 
tion of poor playing, with very few redeem- 
ing errors. It was cliiefly interesting as the 
fii'st appearance of Wright as a pitclier. The 
batting of the Bowdoins was heavy, and their 
fielding extremely poor. The score follows : 



Wilson, p., 

Rogers, 2b 6 

Gardner, 3b.. 6 
Snow, c. " 

Smith, 1, f 6 

Wright, s.s.,p 5 

Knapp, c 6 

Haggerty, lb. 5 
Stetson, r. f...6 



3 2 2 3 3 2 

1116 3 2 

2 3 3 

2 2 3 2 

3 3 4 16 1 
2 2 3 6 6 
3 11 2 
1110 



Gould, c. f 6 

Patterson, 3b. 5 2 

Keith, 2b 5 2 

Burleigh, l.f. .4 

Berry, r. f 4 1 

Snow, p 4 

Murry, c 4 

Moore, s.s 4 

Howard, lb... 4 



. IB. IB. PC. A. K. 





114 16 

115 3 2 
2 2 2 
10 1 
10 7 3 
4 2 7 
3 3 1 



49 18 16 18 27 22 15 ! 39 5 5 6 24 17 2S 

123456789 

Bowdoins 3 6 3 10 3 3 —18 

Oronos 1 00102010—6 

Two-base hits— Smith, 1 ; Wright. 1. 1st base on called balls— Bowdoin, 
1. Wild pitches— Wright, 1 ; Snow, 2. Struck out— Bowdoin. 3 ; Orono, 
1. 1st base on errors— Bowdoin, 12 ; Orono, 9. Balls called— Oa Wilson, 
55 ; on Snow, 78. Strikes called— on Wilson, 10 ; on Snow, 6. Passed 
balls— Knapp, 3 ; Mturay. 5. Time of game— 1 hour 50 minutes. Um- 
pire— J. E. Walker. 



PERSONAL. 



[We earnestly solicit communications to this column 
from any who may have an interest in the Alumui.] 

'27.— Jolin H. Hillard died in Oldtown a few 
weeks since. 

'33. — President Allen, of Girard College, is one 
of the Board of Visitors to the Naval Academy. 

'34._The late Prof. Henry B. Smith, of New 
York, was one of the Revisors of the New Testa- 
ment. 

'40. — Ezra Abbot, of Harvard, was also one of 
the Revisors of the New Testament. 

'44. — Major John W. Goodwin is prominent in 
developing railroads and other improvements In 
Texas. 

'55. — Geu. B. B. Foster is Chairman of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the Phi Beta Kappa Alumui 
Association, New York City. 

'61. — Abram Maxwell is iu the service of the 
American Homo Missionary Society, at Donpe City, 
Nebraska. 

'(52. — Samuel P. Dame is a Druggist in Sharon, 
Pa. 

'63.— A. K. G. Smith, :M.D., is practicing in 
WTiitofield. 

'66.— Charles A. Boardman is Land Agent for a 
railroad now in progress in Florida. He resides in 
Palalka, Florida. 

'66.— Ezekiol H. Cook is engaged iu mining at 
Teucon, Arizona. 

'00. — S. B. Carter is President of the Young 
Men's Christian Association of Ncwhuryport, and 
was delegate to the rocont National Couvontion of 
Associations at Cleveland, Ohio. 

'66.— II. B. Lawrence is Principid of the Apple- 
ton Street School, Uolyoko, Mass. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



49 



'69. — Thomas H. Eaton is a banker in Iowa. 

'69. — H. B. Quiuby, M.D., is stationed in Mis- 
souri, as Agent for the War Department, U. S. 

'69. — Geo. F. Mosher, Esq., editor of the Morn- 
ing Star, at Dover, N. H., has been appointed 
Consul at Nice, France. He is a native of Kenne- 
bec County. He leaves this country for Nice some- 
time this summer to assume his duties. 

'70. — D. S. Alexander, of Indiana, has been ap- 
pointed Fifth Auditor of the Treasury. 

'73. — George E. Hughes delivered the Memorial 
Address at Bath, May 30th. 

'76. — Charles Andrews recently graduated from 
the San Francisco Law School. 



COLLEGE WORLD. 



Yale. 

The "Annuals" extend from Tuesday, June 7th, 
to Thursday, June 23d. 

The following is from the BowDonsr Orient: 
"The Tale Sophomores are to exhibit the 'Media' 
of Emihuler. It will doubtless be a success." Em- 
ihuler for Euripides is the most extraordinary mis- 
print we have ever seen, though it is more natural 
than it has the appearance of being. — Yah Record. 

We think that if the editor who wrote the above 
had been aware of the mental agony we suffered on 
account of those errors of our printer, he would 
not have resurrected them from the oblivion into 
which we bad begun to hope they had fallen. 

The burlesque of the Medea was a success. 
The hall was filled by a very select audience. The 
play, in which the hero, Jason, is a ruember of the 
Yale crew on a trip to England, was full of witti- 
cisms. One gentleman who played a female part, 
was so fortunate as to procure a costume formerly 
worn by Sarah Bernherdt. Airs from many of the 
comic operas were introduced. The proceeds, 
about three hundred dollars, were given to the 
Athletic Association for the Athletic Grounds. 
University or Michigan: 

Prof Tyler has accepted a professorship in Cor- 
nell, and will leave Ann Arbor at the end of this 
year. He is highly esteemed and his loss will be 
gi'eatly felt by every one. His reasons for leaving 
are that his salary is to be increased from .f 2,200 to 
$2,800, that the Cornell library offers great advant- 
ages for the pursuit of the studies to which he has 
devoted himself, and that he will have there more 
leisure for his chosen work. 



CLIPPINGS. 

Scene on Washington Street : Conceited Sopho- 
more sporting a cane and moustache. First Small 
Boy (on opposite corner) — "What is it, Bob?" 
Second Small Boy — "Give it up; gimme a stick till 
I kill it." 

Told by Cuckoo : Not long ago an elderly gentle- 
man made an afternoon call, and kissed the daughter 
of the house, a little miss of five years. " You must 
not do that," said the child, struggling, "I am a re- 
spectable married woman!" "What do you mean, 
my dear?" asked the astonislied visitor. " Oh, that's 
what mamma always says when gentlemen kiss her." 

Sophomore (to a group of Freshmen)— "Did 
you hear about the Senior who got shot?" Fresh- 
men (all at once) — "No! Who? Where? When?" 
Sophomore — "O, he got it over at the city, at ten 
cents a pound ; he's going duck-shooting. — Ex. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 

It seems to be the favorite resort of many of the 
exchange editoi'S whose papers we receive, to fill up 
their space by general remarks on the worthlessness 
of college papers. This shows, more than anything 
else, the negligence of the editors who indulge in such 
observations. Of course if an exchange editor allows 
the papers to accumulate, mostly unopened, on his 
table, and does not examine tliem until the night 
before his paper goes to press, he cannot appreciate 
the value there is in them and the real labor that has 
been put upon many of them. We find the only way 
to keep account of what is going on in the college 
world, and in any way clearly esteem whatever of 
literary merit may be offered, is to look over every 
thing as soon as possible after it comes, when there 
is some freshness and novelty about it. Thus we find 
that what, if neglected, miglit prove a burden, be- 
comes a source of profit and pleasure. 

That reminder of old Revolutionary Times, the 
Washington Jeffersonian, gives the Orient a very 
good puflf, but complains of the lack of literary 
articles. We think that our subscribers are better 
satisfied with such paragraphs on college affairs as 
we give, than with such articles on the "Jesuits " and 
" Disraeli" as filled tlie last number of the Washing- 
ion Jeffersonion. We value good literary articles as 
much as any one, but never give encouragement to 
the writing on what has been treated in a much better 
way before. We leave such subjects to prize essay- 



50 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ists and the ambitious editors of the smaller western 
colleges. 

We are glad to welcome a new venture upon the 
perilous sea of college journalism, and right heartily 
reply to the jovial " Ship Ahoy" of the Argo, Vol I., 
No. 1, hailing from Williams College. This paper is 
most appropriately named and shows that it has at its 
helm, able and experienced hands. We were at lirst 
sight struck by its resemblance to the Acta, in style 
and get up, and its purpose to set forth in its 
salutatory as somevvhat similar, namely, as de- 
voting itself to light, readable literature to the 
exclusion of the heavy articles which weigh down 
so many of our exchanges. We have no doubt 
but what it will succeed. In charge of the exchange 
department we recognize the genial Ephraim, tlie 
former exchange editor of the Athenaeum. Of course 
there will be some rivalry between the Argo and the 
long-established Athenaeum, but we hope that it may 
be of the healthy kind which will be advantageous 
to both instead of diverting them from their true 
aims to unseemly quarrelings. 

The last number of the Tale Lit. is good as ever. 
It contains a plea.sing variety of good articles. 
" Why We Fail" says it is from a lack of earnestness 
and enthusiasm, and that the decrease in this is 
especially evident in recent college life. "The 
Capture of the Esmeralda " is a graphically written 
account on an exciting naval incident in the struggle 
of Chili to rid herself of the Spanish domination. 
No. II., of "Yale Men of Letters," treats of Donald 
G. Mitchell, the writer of tlie exquisite but dreamy 
and monotonous "Reveries of a Bachelor." The 
writer is no eulogist, and does not claim too high a 
place in literature for this son of Yale. The other 
departments are remarkably good. The Editors' 
Table begins with this so egotistic a declaration that of 
course it is intended to be humorous : " Our ' Table ' 
this month is inferior in quality to the one in the 
April issue, for there we were obliged to be original, 
not having purchased a pair of scissors. We are now 
possessed of a good pair, to which fact this ' Table' 
bears witness." Not very complimentary to the iiV.'s 
exchanges altliough the hated Acta is not now among 
them. 

We have lately received a copy of the last Orient 
which returned after long wanderings. By some 
mistake it was directed to Cambridge, Miss., and 
after devious roamings it came back, wrinkled, 
soiled, and with torn wrapper, with "No such office 
in State named," stamped upon it. We are griev- 
ously tempted to compare it to the Prodigal Son, but 
lest you may imagine wc are from Obcrlin we desist. 



REVIEWS. 

We have received a copy of the latest publication 
of the Society for Political Education, " Political 
Economy and Political Science," a pi'actical and 
classified list of books on political, social, and eco- 
nomic subjects, so arranged that the reader can at 
once select the best elementary books from the more 
authoritative and extended works. This list was 
prepared by Prof. Sumner, of Yale College, for the 
use of his classes, but h.as been enlarged to meet the 
wants of the society. It is a valuable book for refer- 
ence, and ought to be in the hands of every Senior. 
This society was founded by the leading authorities, 
on such subjects, in the nation. Its members are of 
different political parties, and from all sections of the 
counti-y. No one will deny that there is a great and 
growing need for such instruction, and the society 
will do a great service to the country if it is success- 
ful in its aims. Orders for this and the other publi- 
cations of the society, may be addressed to Messrs. 
G. P. Putnam's Sons, 27 and 29 West 23d Street, 
New York. 

AVe have received specimen pages of a work 
entitled "The Dictionary of Education and Instruc- 
tion." This work is an abridgment of a Cyclopaedia 
of Education, the principal parts of which it is to 
contain in a convenient form. This smaller work 
will be of essential service to teachers, both in private 
and public schools, for study as well as for reference. 
We would recommend it to those of our students who 
intend to teach at any time during their course. 
Printed and bound in superior style, it will be issued 
during this month, at the low price of $1.50. E. 
Steiger & Co., New York, are the publishers. 

We have received from L. H. Rogers, of New 
York, a " Bird's-Eye View of the English Language." 
Something which will be a great labor saver for 
every writer. The sheet is 22x28 inches, and con- 
tains more information for those who write letters, 
than we ever saw or tliought could be arranged on 
one sheet. The lirst part contains rules for spelling 
and punctuation, also rules for using capital letters 
and letter writing. Next is a bird's-eye view of the 
correct spelling of 26,000 words. Every word is 
before you at a single glance, and is easily found by 
a system of indexing, that is wonderfully full and 
complete. There is also a bird's-eye view of 20,000 
synonyms which is of great assistance to writers. 
The sheet can be used to good advantage by every 
one who writes the English language. Price 25 cents 
each, or live for $1.00. The sheets are sent by mail, 
postage prepaid, by the publisher, L. 11. Rogers, 76 
Maiden Lane, New York City. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



i: 



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110 



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NECKWEAR, GLOVES, HOSIERY, 

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A Perfect Fit Guaranteed. 

Goods for the TROY LAUNDRY sent Tues- 
days and received Saturdays. 

In Percales, Mahrattas, and American Goods. 
Orders hy mail promptly attended to. 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 



FRANK M. STETSON, 

JXJST RECEIVED = 

Ail the New Styles in Soft and Stiff Hats. 
Best Stiff Hats, $2.75. Best Silk Hats, $3.50 in 
exchange. 

Just opened all the New and Nobby Styles Neck 
Dress, Collars, Cuffs, Fancy Hose, Canes, etc. 
All are invited to call and examine goods and prices. 

No. 2 Arcade Block. 



ISAAC H. SNOW, 

DEALER IN 

|cef, pork, Putton, Jamb, 8^<z. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

a:TE3ZT X]OOIS TO ST.A.I^TT^^OO^■S- 



HE. m:. bow^ker, 

BOARDING AND LIVERY STABLE 

Cor. Main and Cleave land Sfs., Brunswick. 

All Hack Orders promptly attended to. 



Two doors north of Post Office, 




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CUSTOM TAILORING 

A S PECI ALTY, 

AT 

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237 Middle Street, 
PORTLAND, - - - MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



I^II^E 0-00X5S, 

AT C. W. J.LLEM*S 

DRUG STO R E. 

THE FINEST CmARS AND SMOKING TOBACCOS. 
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To be found in this market. 

Lernont Block, Brunsivick, 3Iaine, 



S. C. COFFIIS^, 

— DE^ViER IN — 

PROVISIONS AND GROCERIES 

S^ Special Kates to Student Clubs.^SS' 
CORNER OF MAIN AND ELM STREETS. 



gOLDCLip 




TRY THE SEAL-SKIN CIGAR 



Hand-made Cuban £. .-.„. 
SEND $3.75, and we will forward 
by mail, registered, a 50 box of the 
Seal-Skin Cifjar. 

This is a special offer to enable smokers to test this 
celebrated brand. After .1 trial you ^vill smoke no other. 

S.F.HESS A CO- 
rremium Tobacco Works, Rochester, Na Y* 

STUDEHSTTS 

Desiring Employment, for Season of 1881, 
Enclose Ic, stamp, ami nTlte for circular, to 

THE MANHATTAN AGENCY. 

733 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 

Please mention this paper. 
GO TO 

TO 1)['Y YOUR- 

Groceries, Canned Goods, Fruits, 

Confectionery, Tobacco, and Cigars. 

special llatoa to Student Clulis. 

Main Street, Head of the Mall, Brunswick. 



MAIN STREET, 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



Prepares for Bowdoin and the best New England 
Colleges. Offers, also, a thorough Seminaet Course 
to young ladies, and a shorter course for business 
pursuits. For Catalogues, address 

Rev. a. W. BURR, Hallowell, Me. 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

I[3* Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



©i&£i 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Ooa,l "STa-rd. in. TopsHaran, 

WHERE NONE BUT 

T&e Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 



gM-adaliiifl Hoiisos, 



B.A.TI3:, IVdA-iaSTE. 



'. PSOPBIBTOa, 



I. S. BALiGOMX:^ 

DEALKU IN 

Harflf are, Stoves, Croctery, ni Glassware, 

BRUNS-WICK. IVIE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers ; Circulating' Library, 1600 Volumes ; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 



CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Students. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 
M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

poFt-ri:.A.Nri, vo.a.j.ne. 

This house lias heen tliorouglily refitted with every re- 
gard to comfort, and the aim is to make it first-class in all 
its appointments. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

De^\^ITT HOUSE, 

QUIMBY & MURCH, Proprietors, 

Corner Pine aM Park Streets, LEWISTON, IE. 



KOYAL QDIMBT. 



Eben Muucii. 



A., O. REEI3, 

Bi?,xj3srsvtricK:, as/iE. 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswicli and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 

ALL KINDS OF 



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isiii!fiii''iiiiMJi 



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FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 



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DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 

©@iLl ant W@@i.5 

OFFICE IN ISEM.O'NT BLOCK, Brunswick. 

^i^Telephone connection with Coal Yard. 

IgJ" Orders left at Jordan Snow's, Lemont Block, will 
be promptly attended to. 

IRA Q. STOCSCBRBDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 



156 Exchange Street, Portland. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8j and ^8/ Congress St., and 2jj Middle St.. 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

^JSTSend for Price List. 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. Wl LSON & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers id 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders b.v mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list, 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St.. 



The Sixty-Firs^l Annual Courr^e of Lectures at the Medical 
Sciiool of M:iinp. will commen<'e February 10th, 1881, and 
continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 



FACULTY.— Josh CA L. Chambebl 
Daxa, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; 
gery and Clinical Surgery ; Alfred 
Diseases of Women and Children -, Fre 



, LL.D.. President", Israel T. 
LLiAM W. Gree.ve, M.D., Sur- 
TCHELL, M.D., Obstet^ic^ and 
Gerrish, M.D., Materia 



Medica, Therapeutics, and Public Health ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., 
Jlediciil Jurisprudence ; Hexrt Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; BrRT G. 
Wilder, M.D,, Physiology ; Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Anatomy ; Dan'iel 
F. Ellis, M.D„ Registrar and Librarian ; Augcstcs P. Dudley, M.D., 
Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secreti\ry. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY^ 




Portland, Me. 



J^OJfTJ? 



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AMOS L MILLETT & CO., 



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EDWIN F. BROWN, 

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Iff, liiFi l®9k- 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book Work to Order. 

W. B. KNIGHT, 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

^^"Transient Orders for "Milk or Crtim filled I>v fiiviii" suitable notice 
Residence, School Stieet 



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Iffiporiei aid Bniestic Faiicj Groceries. -'--'- , ^tis, Propnetr '"' ' 



HUNKER HILL PICKLES A SPECIALTY. 



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« AT LOW ['KICKS. I.AIHiK KKNTINd STOCK. 

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Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 
The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions a Specialty. 

JSa.A.TN STREET, BRUNTS-WICK, IVIE. 

JOUKNAL PRESS, LISBON STREET, LEWISTON, MAINK. 



Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 22, 1881. 



No. 5. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE AD,nJSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DE5IANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and"lVloehring" Burners 

IS PLACE OFjrUE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS In'vARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



Books, Wonerj, mi Paper Uaopgs, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 



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OF 

Nobby Stiff and Soft Hats 

NEW STYLES in LINEN COLLARS & CUFFS. 
NEW PATTERNS in NECK- WEAR. 

A FLVE ASSORTMliXT OF 

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Has the Largest and Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets. 




CJIUTI0M T© SMOKlia 

Beware of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 



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Fine, Mild &. Sweet, 

Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 
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SOLD BY ALL DBALEES THROUGHOUT THE WOELD. 

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SIGN OF THE GOLD HAT. 



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Visiting, Glass Cards and Monograms 

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521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 



PORTLAND, 

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MAINE. 
J. W. D. CARTER. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



A reorganization of the Course of Instruction 
has recently been made, in which the distinction he- 
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main- 
tained, but all academic undergraduates are placed 
on one footing, with the opportunity of fol!owin<r, to 
a considerable extent, such lines of study as they 
prefer. 

All students entering the College proper, are ex- 
amined on the same course of preparatory studies. 
After the second year a liberal range of electives is 
offered, within which a student may follow his choice 
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount 
pursued. 

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated 
as a distinct course, are still, for the most part, re- 
tained either in the required or elective lists. More 
place is also given to the Modern Languages than 
they have hitherto had. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all 
who complete the Academic Course. 

The Engineering Department remains as here- 
tofore, and facilities are offered for study of the 
various branches of this science. The means of 
theoretical instruction are ample, and the town of 
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen- 
tres in the State, and in the immediate vicinity of 
many important public works, aflbrds excellent 
opportunities for tho study of actual structures. 
The College also enjoys many favors from the United 
States Coast Survey 'Office.' The admission is the 
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the 
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will 
bo taken, if desired, in tlie place of Latin. 

Those who cnm].)lete satisfactorily the four years' 
course in engineering will receive the Degree of Sc. 
B. Those who complete a two years' course of ad- 
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or 
Mechanical Engineer. Students not candidntes for 
a degree will be received at any stage for which an 
examination shall show them to be fitted, and may 
remain for any desired time. Further information 
will be furnished on application to Professor G. L. 
Vose. 

Terms of Admission to the Academic Course. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 

following subjects : 

Latin.— Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
'tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of tho iEucid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 

Grkek. — Hadlcy's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

Ancient GEOGUAPnT. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission 
will be required to produce testimonials of good 
moral character. The time for examination is the 
Friday after Commencement and the Friday before 
the opening of the first term. In exceptional cases 
applicants maybe examined at other times. Candi- 
dates for admission to advanced classes will be ex- 
amined in the studies which such classes have 
accomplished. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrange- 
ments with the Principals of schools and academies 
having a regular course preparatory for college of at 
least three years' duration, whereby their pupils 
may be examined for admission to college at their 
respective schools, in connection with their own 
final examinations. 

The amount of instruction now offered and jios- 
sible to be taken in the several principal linos of 
study is exhibited comparatively, as reduced to one 
scale, in the following uiannei-. This is, however, 
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal 
length : 

Latin, eight terms. 

Greek, eight terms. 

IMathematics, eight terms. 

German, four and a half terms. 

English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English 
Litei-ature, three and a half terms. 

French, three terms. 

Italian, one tei'm. 

Spanish, one term. 

Rbetoric (formal), one term. Khetoriral and 
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a 
half terms. 

Natural History studies, five and a half terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, four terms. 

Chemistry, four terms. 

History, Ancient and Modern, two terms. 

Politic'al Economy, one and a half terms. 

Public Law, two terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, including Logic, 
four terms. 

Christian Evidences, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses arc as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, S25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Boai-d is obtained in town at $:? to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lo.ssen tho cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 22, 1881. 



No. 5. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PtTBLTSHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAT, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE CLASS OF '82, OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Arthur G. Staples, Managing Eclitor. 

Charles H. Gilman, Business Editor. 

Melvin S. Holway, Eugene T. McCarthy, 

"William A. Moody, "Warren 0. Plimpton, 

George G. Weeks. 

Terms — $2.00 a year xn advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompaoied by the 
writer's real name. 



Entered at the Post OiBce at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Tol. Xr., No. 5.— June 22, ]881. 

Editorial Notes 51 

Literary: 

Evening Prayers in the Chapel (poem) 53 

"Walt Whitman 54 

Intemperance; Its Causes and Effects 55 

My Messenger (poem) 56 

College Items 56 

Personal 58 

College World 60 

Clippings 61 

Editors' Table 61 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



The next number "will be delayed till after 
Commencement, in order to give a reasonably 
full account of Commencement exercises. 
Those desiring Commencement numbers 
mailed should leave their addresses with the 
business editor. 



We publish elsewhere lists of the classes 
of '76 and '77. We are indebted for them 
to the kindness of two of our alumni. If the 
alumni would better appreciate the aid they 
could give the paper, and the interest they 



could awaken in the personal column by 
sending in items, we are certain that more 
contributions of this nature would be made. 



If there is any one thing that this college 
needs more than others it is a gymnasium. 
The coming Commencement will undoubt- 
edlj see measures taken towards the erection 
of such a building. The proverbial slowness 
in the completion of college buildings, makes 
us doubtful of ever beholding it, but we 
fondly hope that tliismay pi'ove an exception. 
It is absurd to think of conducting exercises 
out of doors after cold weather sets in in the 
fall, or in fact at any time, and a college with- 
out a gymnasium is lacking in an essential 
qualit3^ We hope that a much better gym- 
nasium than Bowdoin ever knew will step in 
during vacation to fill the wants of the stu- 
dents. 

The last notes from the field of battle as 
we go to i^ress, are the warlike accents of a 
crowd of Physics-hating Juniors assembled to 
repel the march of the invader. A notice 
has been posted requiring the above class to 
review Physics — a hitherto unknown require- 
ment. At the present time the class are feel- 
ing bad. We hope a compromise of advan- 
tage to both parties may be made. 



Our musical ability, recognizing the great 
dearth of musical noises in and about college, 
has organized itself into a band. We heard 
it the other noon at its first rehearsal and 
came away awe struck. We would encourage 
such an earnest organization. We truly hope, 
as one of its members said, that " It is a thing 
that will live." We believe him. It really 
appears healthy. It will never die of lack of 



52 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



breath, and with such determination and wind, 
will, we doubt not, win a high niche in the 
temple of fame. We need a band, and, since 
they are provided with instruments, see no 
prospect but that we shall have one. There is 
only one dark side to the picture, and that is 
that this organization must rehearse, and we 
know what it does when it rehearses. Offer- 
ing every encouragement, hoping that in time 
they may succeed in wafting translucent 
strains of heavenly symphony on every even- 
ing breeze, we humbly suggest that they 
build a band hall on the road to Harpswell, 
and almost down to Harpswell. 



Columbia has had a slight trouble because 
a member of the choir sung out of tune. 
Just think of it ! A member of a college 
choir perhaps suspended for singing a false 
note and thereby disturbing the equanimity 
of the morning exercises. If any of our 
readers, who listen to the oratorios which our 
choir render every morning, should discover 
any discrepancy we beg them to keep it dark. 
Wo should soon have no choir, and the con- 
fines of Lisbon alone would be broken by the 
plaintive music of our college sings. A great 
duty rests upon us. We must bear and for- 
bear, and trust in a merciful providence that 
the divine spirit of music abides forever with 
our choir, or that our undergraduates may 
not acquaint our Faculty with the fault of 
cracked voices and faltering tunes. 



At the time of tiie present writing nothing 
apparently is more lifeless than base-ball. Not 
a game has been played for moie than a week. 
If the fault rests upon our side it should be 
remedied, if it is entirely to be ascribed to 
our rivals in tlic field it is without remedy. 
There should not be an occasion lost which 
might be used for a game. VVhy, is most ap- 
jjareiit. Students like to get their money's 
worth. Tiiey ougiit not to, perhaps, but it is 
a fact that they do, and it is painfully evident 



that sometimes even patriotism will not draw 
a subscription when there is no likelihood of 
obtaining amusement therefrom. The term 
is slipping gradually away, and we have seen 
up to the present two games. 

Next 3'ear, when the subscription paper is 
passed, the remark will be made in a grumb- 
ling way, " I'm not going to spend moue}' and 
not see any games." We hope we are mis- 
taken in the general tenor of these remarks, 
and are willing to believe that the nine is un- 
fortunate in making matches, and, perhaps, 
even before the Oeient sees you the nine will 
have braced. We hope so. 



Every one is desirous to know just how 
our boating fares. A boating man makes the 
remark that the college is inclined to growl. 
Last 3"ear he says the college growled because 
the Boating Association was not represented 
in the Lake George Regatta this year, be- 
cause there is as yet no race settled. We 
think him mistaken. The college is not in- 
clined to growl ; the desire of the students is 
to find an occasion to express the faith which 
they have in our boating material. The case 
rests like this. The college has received 
communications from the Lake George Asso- 
ciation, to the effect that endeavors would be 
made to arrange a race, and inviting Bowdoiu 
to participate. In view of this the college 
has made preparations, has obtained a new 
shell, has put a crew into training, and has en- 
deavored to obtain sufficient funds, and here 
the case rests. If the Lake George Associa- 
tion arranges a race, Bowdoin will enter, if 
not, the crew must stay at home. It is pleas- 
ant to notice that the college for once in her 
life is ready, and this readiness is due to the 
activity of the committees. Finances are 
open to encouragement, and a stricter (raining 
of the crew will undoubtedly go into opera- 
tion as soon as a race is assured. Further 
(ban this nothing can be done. For the col- 
lege to extend challenges would be impolitic. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



53 



since it was only bj' the desire of the Lake 
George Committee that the affair was started, 
and because we are not sufficiently old in the 
business. The most that Ave can do is to 
wait for further developments, and hope ear- 
nestly that occasion maybe given our ci'ew to 
try its muscle with other colleges. 



The bare line of empty seats in chapel, 
the absence of familiar faces, calls to mind 
every morning how, on June 17, to the fa- 
miliar tune of Auld Lang Syne, the Seniors 
marched out the open chapel door. It was 
an impressive sight and a solemn occasion, 
and as they marched out for the last time we 
doubt not but that many of the class regret- 
ted many things, chief of which the close of 
a four years' companionship. We could but 
feel sad to witness '81's last chapel, for various 
reasons, chief of which the departure of so 
many friends. Between '81 and '82 no one 
can deny but that the most pleasant feelings 
exist. Three years ago, in the shadows of '82's 
Freshman life, with tender, motherly hand, '81 
reared them well, caring for their health, pre- 
venting their too late study at night, and 
ever cheering them through the shadow of 
the dark valley by words of brotherly love. 
To-day the Junior class, and we say it soberly, 
hold the most kindly feelings towards the 
departing Seniors. It should be the aim of 
'82 to make as good Seniors as '81 has made, 
and in stepping into her place the Junior 
class must feel that it has an important place 
to till. The class of '81 has the best wishes of 
every one — has marked a course, loyal, de voted, 
true to every college interest, not addicted 
to any section of college work, it has stood 
high in study and given sports a push that 
^ will require determined effort on the part of 
IIP the remaining classes to sustain. We are not 
inclined to eulogize. '81 is bashful and mod- 
est, but evident worth demands praise, and 
we can say heartily for the college, that as 
'81 marched out from the chapel, it was the 



honest opinion of all that one of the best 
classes that Bowdoin ever saw had left its 
place of worship. We are in no hurry to 
preach a funeral oration. We are not inclined 
to bury you, gentlemen of '81, before you 
cease to exist. Our desire is to bid 3'ou a 
good-bye in season, and, as the Oourant touch- 
ingly observes to its Seniors, express our deter- 
mination " that it shall be our aim to make as 
good Seniors as you have been, and that we 
shall try hard to fill your shoes — no reflection 
upon the relative magnitude of pedal ex- 
tremities being intended," — and that finally 
we wish you every success in life, smiling 
homes, peace and plenty without stint, a 
life as happy and fruitful as has been your col- 
lege life, and a final home where you deserve. 



We are glad to see so active an interest man- 
ifested in preparing for the Junior and Sopho- 
more Prize Declamation, by those who are to 
take part. The interest is due not only to the 
generous rivahy for the prizes, but also to the 
fine instructions in elocution, which they are 
now receiving from Prof. Bloch. The col- 
lege is very fortunate in securing his services. 
He is among the best in his department. 
Prof. Bloch teaches not only a clear articu- 
lation and good emphasis, but aims, also, to 
make the student enter into the spirit of his 
piece. The necessity of good instruction in 
this branch is most keenly impressed upon us 
when we listen to many of our clergymen 
and public speakers. We are sorry that only 
those who are appointed for these exhibitions 
are to receive instructions. We hope in 
another year a longer course may be arranged 
and that all may receive its benefits. 



EVENING PRAYERS IN THE CHAPEL. 
June 17, 1881. 

"My son, forget not" — reading thus begun 
The teacher of us all, and then the prayer 
He lifted, in the hushed and hallowed air, 

Tor blessing on the work that had been done. 



54 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



It seemed as if he said, " Thy feet must run 
Hence to the goal through gangers everywhere : 
Honor and wisdom and the Tempter's "snare, 

The journey's end, forget thou not, my son." 

Ah ! as you watched the western splendor fall 
Earthward that night, and fill the open door, 

And Christ anew transfigure on the wall, 

You sorrowed in your hearts, revolving o'er 

So many memories ; but, most of all. 

That yon should see each other's face no more. 
S. V. Cole- 



WALT WHITMAN. 

Among the living characters of American 
literature, perhaps none challenges our admi- 
ration in one particular more than Walt 
Whitman. He is independent. In meeting 
the severe realities of life when first he 
started out upon the path which he has been 
slowly, yet vigorously pursuing, he became 
aware that the prime requisite of success, to 
one of his temperament and design, is inde- 
pendence. In early manhood he laid out his 
course, and in doing this it was his greatest 
desire and chief aim to allow not even the 
.semblance of imitation: it began from no 
one's pfiint of view but his own ; it ran 
through depths never trodden by man before ; 
its anticipated end is that wiiich no other 
author ever attempted to gain, except it be 
the end of the highest human good. 

Whitman is a poet, a master of poetic 
thought, but not a master of rhythm and 
.sj'mmetry ; yet none, however critical, and 
however ragged and irregular his lines may 
appear, will deny to him a prominent place 
among the "makers of verse" in America.. 
In education he was somewhat deficient in 
branches, a knowledge of wliich is demanded 
of the popular poet, but popularity was un- 
thought of. His training was seemingly his 
own, begun and carried out according to his 
own "sweet will." By dint of hard labor lie 
acquired, among the hills of his nativity, such 
understanding as could be gleaned from the 
rude books at his command ; but during all 
tiiese years, when the dream of ambition liad 
faintly flitted across the quiet field of exist- 



ence, now sparkling in the glowing brilliancy 
of morning, nature made him her child and 
communicated to him all her secrets. Fi'om 
her he learned that rigid morality which has 
so stamped itself upon his life ; from her was 
received that striking individuality which we 
find so impressed upon every line of his 
poetry ; and finally from her was communi- 
cated that sense of grandeur which, perhaps, 
too often supplies the place of the beautiful. 

The life of Walt Whitman, for the most 
part, has been that of a recluse ; yet is he not 
a misanthropist. Far from it, — his sympathies 
for man, even in the lowest state of societ}', 
are deep and far-reaching ; and it is this that 
has often led him to portray, in that peculiarlj'- 
irregular meter, the conditions of life in its 
lowest forms; and, too, it is this that has 
prompted him to deal with social questions of 
a somewhat indelicate nature, calling forth 
from delicately constituted critics, many ad- 
verse criticisms of his subject matter. True 
this adversity may be honest and well-founded, 
but we must concede that the poet is honest 
and his material substantial. 

However, passing by all questionable 
characteristics of his productions, let us con- 
sider him as he appears in the work, acknowl- 
edged to be his best, "Drum Taps." In this 
little volume of poems, there is exhibited the 
tenderest sympathy, the most pathetic touch, 
and the loftiest conception of duty to man 
and God. Those scenes of the battle-field, 
with all its sadness and horror, of the hospital 
filled with dead and dying, of the home dark- 
ened by the sorrowful intelligence of a departed 
hero, cannot fail to excite our inmost feelings. 
Who can read the "Dirge for Two Veterans " 
without feeling that there is something therein 
that takes the place of rhythm and symmetry ? 
Who is there that can follow the news of the 
fallen son from the fierce conflict to where the 
quiet family dream ever of peace to come, 
without experiencing that animation which 
true poetry alone can awaken '/ 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



55 



" strong dead-march you please me ! 

0, moon immense, with your silvery face you sooth 

me! 
my soldiers twain ! my veterans passing to 

burial ! 

What I have I also give you. 

" The moon gives you light 
And the bugles and drums give you music : 
And my heart, 0, my soldiers, my veterans, 
My heart gives you love." 

It is in these pictures that we see the poet 
at his best, and. we observe indistinctly, but 
surely, a background unsurpassed in poetic 
magnificence. 



INTEMPERANCE ; 

Its Causes asd Effects. 

[Dear Sir, — Enclosed you will find one thousand 
(1000) dollars, the amount of the first prize offered 
by us for the best literary production by an Ameri- 
can undergraduate. Your article, entitled " In- 
temperance; Its Causes and Effects," and other- 
wise, mostly otherwise, we consider a model for the 
romance writer, being unsurpassed for diction, 
beauty of expression, and fine conception of tone. 
However, in awarding you the prize, we were chiefly 
influenced by the fact that the element of mysticism 
Is preserved throughout, the principal fault in the 
majority of novels, as you are well aware, being the 
shallowness of the plot, whereby one is enabled ere 
he has reached the description of the heroine's hair 
or learned the size of her shoes, to foresee the out- 
come. You would confer a favor by publishing 
your tale. Yours, etc. 

Eds. Philadelphia American.] 

chapter I. 
It was a beautiful morning in early June 
(further date immaterial), when two young 
men might have been seen wending their 
weary way through the sand heaps of B. 
Their appearance was striking, — of stately 
mien, scholastic brow, and soiled shirt front, 
whereon glistened what seemed like gleaming 
diamonds, but which, on nearer approach, 
proved to be but beer stains. The deep re- 
verberating tone of the iron-tongued sleep dis- 
peller was silent, and sweet slumber reigned 



supreme in Bowdoin's classic halls. Above 
the majestic Androscoggin old Sol slowly, 
calmly, and steadily was lifting his glowing 
phiz and wiping away the trickling river mud 
from off his face. The proverbial early bird 
had left the paternal nest and gone in quest 
of the festive worm, which, grown world wise 
from experience, slowly wriggled into its hole 
and whispered defiantl}^, " I am here." 
And the young men moved on. 

chapter II. 

It was indeed a lovely pastoral scene. A 
summer evening in Topsham. Old Sol, weary 
and foot sore, had laid aside his dusty shoes, 
and, with a self-satisfied air, was slowly sink- 
ing from view to his nightly carousals. The 
barking of the house-dog, the crowing of the 
cock, the lowing of the homeward driven 
kine, blending with the intermittent yelling 
of quarrelsome yaggers, formed a pleasing aid 
to nature's beauty ; while the sizzling of fry- 
ing pork, wafted along the evening air, struck 
giatefully upon the nostrils of two travelers 
seen in the distance. Two milkmaids, busily 
plying their vocation, gaze eagerly and curi- 
ously at the approaching forms, while we, 
attracted by the air, an indescribable some- 
thing, of the watching maids, are struck by 
the conviction that they are beneath their 
station, that they are of patrician blood. 
Oan there he a mystery ? But we, like they, 
are awakened from our enraptured gazing by 
a voice within, and they disappear, their voices 
dying away on the evening air, while the 
neighboring hills with sad refrain re-echo, 
" We are here." 

And the young men moved on. 

chapter III. 
The court-house was filled to suffocation, 
and the prophetic voice of the judge rang on 
the still air filling the spectators with awe 
and his vicinity with the odor of gin. '• The 
dignity, glory, and majesty of our republic, 
protection against Csesarism, Cromwellism, 



56 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



and Kearneyism, depend upon a proper exe- 
cution of our laws. Greece, Rome, Portland, 
Bath, where are they ? Kent, Parsons, Black- 
stone, heroes all, well have ye fought the 
fight and given us bulwarks impenetrable, to 
repulse the onset of the vicious. The law 
will and must prevail. Nations ma}' perish, 
but before the downfall of society must come 
the destruction of tyrants; therefore, Henry 
C, I sentence you to thirty days for a com- 
mon drunk." And Henry answered, " Yas, 
I am heah." 

And the young men moved on. 

CHAPTER IV. 

There was sound of revelry by night, 
and noise of squeaking fiddle mingled with 
the sound of pattering feet rung out on the 
midnight air. 'Twas a wedding, and present 
were the knights of the beer-stained front, 
now no longer beery. There, too, were the 
milkmaids of patrician blood — blusliing brides. 
Without, a harrowing scene. Two horsemen, 
plying whip and spur, sunk deep in Bruns- 
wick mud. They are lost. The dance 
goes on, and lost in the ma — but hold, 
" Whence comes that sound ? " " Banish fear, 
'tis naugiit but sound of medic feet departing 
with murderous sheepskin." But ajDrophetic 
spirit speaks otherwise to tlie erring maids, 
and sadly they whisper, "Our jig is up." 
Suddenly, before their anxious gaze, the door 
is driven from its liinges, and, behold, the 
horsemen ! " Hevings ! are we too late ? " 
"Can it be, do we see our own de-ah hus- 
bands?" " Yes, we are here. Young men 
move on." 

And the young men moved on. 



MY MESSENGER. 

A bird came to my window 
Hearing a messaso to mo. 
From far out over the ocean, 
Whoro the f^'ray ruHs Hying i'roo 
Dip and dive in the ajthcr, 
Came my messenger to me. 



It bore no dainty missive 
Penned iu thoughtful lore, 
It was only a message froai Heaven 
Sent on the wings of a dove. 
And there iu my sea-shore home 
It bore the message to me, 
That have ye only patience 
Te may like the birds be free. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



Our university crew, ahem ! 

Who stole the band instruments ? 

Why doesn't '84 brace up on foot -ball f 

Did you throw bouquets to the graduating B. 
H. S. girls'? 

George has a white hat since the old man sent 
some money. 

Stearns says his "Sentimental Journey" was 
when he went over the door. 

Four Seniors did not take advantage of their 
freedom but appeared in church last Sunday. 

A picked nine from college played with the town 
boys last week, and won the game by 15 to 5. 

The catcher on the Bates nine now knows bet- 
ter than to play behind the bat without a mask. 

It is rumored that a Freshman passed iu an ex- 
cuse for absence from the "last chapel" exercises. 

With the deep mud of spring and thick dust of 
summer, Bowdoiu boys are not often complimented 
for shiny boots. 

Freshmen ha\'e been investing in canes and 
smuggling them to their rooms in spite of threats 
from angry Sophs. 

'81 luade a better record than is usual in the 
" Senior game," as quite a per cent, of the regular 
ball players are from this class. 

The Seniors have the "purohasiug power of 
money " illustrated in a most forcible way as they 
proceed to dispose of their old furniture. 

The average Senior has been engaged in pack- 
ing trunks and in looking about his neighbor's 
premises to see if he can borrow a valise. 

The Seniors left chapel together the last time, 
on Friday. The usual ceremony passed ofi" satis- 
factorily. The marching was good and the singing 
excellent. Wo shall hereafter be sorry to miss the 
faces of the class of '8J at our morning exercises. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



57 



i 



The boys shell out well witli money for the new 
boat, yet it is the real spec (c that is wanted and not 
merely an autograph on the subscrii^tion paper. 

Two students, evidently determined to learn to 
"paddle their own canoe," have recently visited 
Bowdoinham by way of Merrymeeting Bay and the 
Cathantic. 

The band booms bravely. The first rehearsal, 
however, called oiit the competition of a horn con- 
cert, which nearly drowned the harmonics of the 
aspiring musicians. 

A Freshman (describing the ancient gladiatorial 
contests) says : " When a man was killed he held 
up his finger, and if the spectators wished him to 
live they held up their thumbs." 

The Juniors made their last recitation in Psy- 
chology the 15th. The examination on this third 
of their term's work will come after the departure 
of the Seniors. The remainder of the term will be 
occupied by lectures. 

The campus never looked more attractive than 
at present. We can justly be proud of its beauty, 
and, as numerous views have been taken, a good 
opportunity is offered for preserving our remem- 
brance of it at this time of year. 

Keviews in all studies are well under way. It 
is rumored that the Juniors are to review their last 
term's German on which they have once been ex- 
amined. The next move, it is expected, will be to 
take up again our Freshman Mathematics. 

The following are the appointments for Com- 
mencement parts. The two last named were ap- 
pointed for excellence in composition and speak- 
ing: Baxter, Cole, Cutler (Salutatory), Fisher, 
Gray, Smith, Staples, Stevens, H. W. Chamberlain, 
Wheelwright. 

Some one has remarked that Memorial Hall was 
hkely to furnish subject matter for the next dozen 
volumes of the Oeient. That's a fact. Now the 
other day it was feared that the force of workmen 
on this building would strike, but — they didn't ; so 
our item fails. 

Professor Bloch has been engaged by the col- 
lege to give instruction in elocution to the gradu- 
ating class and to those appointed for prize exhibi- 
tions. Each speaker is to have four half-hour re- 
heai-sals, and as this work has been begun much 
sooner than last year, considerable individual im- 
provement should be expected. The Professor 
gave the first general lecture upon his subject, 
Monday, June 13th. 



As a Sophomore was standing under a Fresh- 
man's window the other day, a pail of water came 
rustling down upon his head, causing some expres- 
sions that would change the opinion of one of our 
worthy professors in regard to the " morals in 
Bowdoiu College." 

Photographer (explaining cause of delay)— 
" We've been at work on the photographs of the 
Faculty the past week, because we can only work 
on plain pictures during such dull weather." Our 
revered instructors ought to give a week extra 
vacation on the strength of this. 

What is to become of the ball nine after the 
class of '81 has gone, is a question that should oc- 
cupy the attention of all interested in this branch 
of our sports. Those who expect to play next year 
ought to gain all the practice possible while they 
still remain together, before the long vacation. 

On the two last Saturday evenings. Instructor 
Cole has given lectures upon the subject "Virgil," 
and will continue the course, weekly, on this same 
evening. As many students will hereafter teach 
from the works of Virgil, .these lectures are inter- 
esting and practical, and should be well attended 
by all classes. 

We were again disappointed in regard to a ball 
game last Wednesday. Barnum, however, offered 
some consolation to those who had the eighty-five 
cents necessary to take them to Bath, and, judging 
from the noisy return of some, they must have had 
opportunity for "viewing a large species of pachy- 
dermatous animals." 

Mr. Johnson is still further utilizing the north 
wing, into which have lately been moved the por- 
traits of former presidents of the college and some 
of the older professors, together with that recently 
painted of Professor Packard. This place used to 
be a terra incognita to the students but will now be 
one of the most attractive parts of the chapel. 

The fate of a certain collegian is as given below : 
(" Poor thing.") 

" Early on the ' Day of Ivy,' 
Seated by the sweet Belle's side 
With that hired horse and bngiry, 
H sought pleasure iu a ride. 

"Ah ! how soon such dreams are shaded, 
For starred ev'ning'.s eyes frimi o'er 
Saw her liiss the other fellow, 
Soft, behiud her Pa's front door. 

" Now the irate stable keeper 
Clamors loud for promised pay; 

And when H may chance to meet her 

She walks by with naught to say." 



58 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The '68 Prize Exhibition was held at Lemont 
Hall, Tuesday, June 21st. The titles of the ora- 
tions and names of the speakers are as follows : 

Lord Be.iconsfield. Leiaiul B. Lane. 

Corruption in Our Body Politic. Clinton L. Baxter. 

Socrates. William I. Cole. 

Kussian Nihilism. John O. P. Wheelwright. 

The "Spirit of C^sar" in Republican France. 

Cliarlps H. Cutler. 
Louis Kossuth. Daniel J. McGillicuddy. 

The new shell arrived in good order from Port- 
land, Saturday, June 11th, and gives satisfaction in 
ever respect. The crew are practicing twice a day 
and, though the craft acted very uneasily at first, 
they are making improvement and hope soon to 
show some speed. Mr. Robinson is coaching them 
and training at the same time in a single scull. If 
all the intended arrangements are perfected he will 
go as fifth man to Lake George, and be ready to 
take any place in case of emergency. When the 
crews are out on the river the large flag now floats 
from the boat-house, while small flags have been 
placed at each end of the mile and a half course 
as laid out by the engineers. 

The concert given by the Brunswick and Tops- 
ham Musical Association, on Thursday evening, the 
16th, was a success in every particular. The 
choruses were all finely rendered, <ind especially 
pleasing were the opening chorus by Mozart and 
the hymn by Sullivan. The solos were well received 
by the audience and noticeable among these was 
the " Ave Maria," sung in a most pleasing manner 
by Mrs. Lee, and especially deserving the encore. 
which was loudly called for, but for some reason 
not responded to. The piano playing of Miss Morse 
was a pleasing featin'e of the concert, and the au- 
dience showed by its hearty applause how well it 
appreciated her endeavors. The college glee club 
on its appearance was greeted with applause, and 
its members proved themselves wortliy of the 
praise which was lavished upon them. The gentle- 
men of this clul) deserve nuich credit for their ef- 
forts to raise the standard of .singing in college, and 
should have the hearty aid of all students. Ihitcli- 
iiis won tlic favoi- of the audience liy his clarinet 
playing and in answer to the hearty applause 
favored them with an encore. 



Bowdoins 8, Bates li. 

At last, after several weeks of correspondence, a 

game was arranged with the Hales, and on the lltli 

our nine made preijarations for a departure. The 

weather was anvtliing but favorable, the heavens 



being overcast and a drizzling rain falling at 
intervals. The nine, determined to play, rain 
or shine, set out in the face of the inclement 
weather. Arriving at Lewiston, there were signs 
of clearing, and in half an hour it seemed probable 
that the heavens would allow us time to accom- 
plish our purpose. The ground at Bates has been 
graded within the last year and was found other- 
wise greatly improved. The grass having suffi- 
ciently dried the game opened with the Bates at 
the bat. They were retired in one, two, three 
order, while the Bowdoins scored one. After this 
the game proved intensely interesting, the score 
for the greater part of the game being even at the 
end of each inning. In the eighth, with the score 
in favor of our opponents, when two men had 
reached third and second successively. Snow 
stepped up to bat and sent a beautiful hit to right 
field, sending in two men, and as afterward proved 
winning the game. In the fourth inniug Wilbur 
was struck by a foul tip from Kogers' bat, an acci- 
dent which disabled him from finishing the game. 
Miuuahan, a player from the city, was procured 
and played the position very acceptably. 



Wilson, p 5 1 

Rogers, 2b 5 1 

Gardner, 3b. . .5 2 

Sucw, c 5 1 

Smith, l.f 5 

Wright, s. s ..5 

Knapp, lb 4 

Haggerty, c.f..4 

Stetson, r. f. . .4 3 



Foss, 2b 4 1 

Parsons, p.. . .4 



2 2 2 2 1 

3 11 

2 1 



7 
2 1 



Wilbur, c 2 

Sanborn, lb ..4 
Norcross, c. f. .4 
Tinlihttm, l.f...4 
Hatch, r.f.....4 
Merrill, s.s 4 



10 
110 2 
11 



2 

Roberts, 3b... 4 11112 

Total 42 899 27 13 71 

Total 36 6 8 8 24 19 13 

struck out— Bowdcins, 7; Bates, 3. Balls called— On Wilson, 27; on 
P.arsons, 5G. Strikes called — on Wilson, 7 ; on Parsons, 9. Passed balls 
— Snow, 4 \ Wilbur, 2 , Minnalian, 3. Left on bases — Bowdoins, 9; 
Bates, 2. Double play — Rogers. Time of game, 2 hours 6 miuutes. 
Umpire— M. A. Pingree, of LewistOD. 



PERSONAL. 



[Wb enniestly solicit oouimtinications to thi.s column 
from any who niiij- have an interest in the .\lumiii.] 

Class of '/C. 

Aldeii, physician, (iiiO I'ongress Street, Portland, 
Maine. 

Anilii'ws, ('. S., lawyer, 417 ICearney Street, Sau 
Francisco, C'al. 

Atwood, lawyer, linn Mitchell cV; Atwood, Au- 
burn, Maine. 

Hates, editor of the Boston Courier, 2!)1) Wash- 
ington Street, IJostou, Mass. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



59 



Brookhouse, business, Fitzroy, Victoria, Austra- 
lia. Address, 38 Brunswicli Street. 

Burnham, Congregational minister, So. Freeport, 
Maine. 

Clark, law student, oflSce W. L. Putnam (Bowd. 
'55), 30 Exchange Street, Portland, Maine. 

Evans, teaching, Atlantic City, N. J. 

Hall, lawyer, Damarisootta, Maine. 

Hawes, student, Bangor Theological Seminary, 
Bangor, Maine. 

Hemmenway, 

Hill, teaching, Principal High School, Dexter, 
Maine. 

Jameson, civil engineer, Mexican Central Rail- 
road. Address, City of Mexico, Mex. 

Kimhall, E. H., lawyer, Bath, Maine. 

Kimhall, F. E., business, Bowdoin Building, 31 
Milk Street, room 10, Boston, Mass. 

Knight, lawyer, Wisoasset, Maine. 

Leavitt, business, Gorbam, Maine. 

Libby, teaching. Address, Wells, Maine. 

Marrett, business. Address, Brunswick, Maine. 

McNulty, Kansas City, Kan. 

Merrill, civil and mechanical engineer. Water- 
bury, Conn. 

Millay, lawyer, Richmond, Maine. 

Morrill, lawyer, firm N. & J. A. Morrill, Auburn, 
Maine. 

Newcomb, mechanical engineer, Cumberland 
Mills, Maine. 

Parker, business, Bowdoin Building, 31 Milk 
Street, room 10, Boston, Mass. 

Parsons, business, 39 Pine Street, New York 
City. Address, Box 79. 

Payne, physician. Hotel Eliot, Bartlett Street, 
Koxbury, Mass. 

Payson, lawyer, with Snow, 73, 38 Exchange 
Street, Portland, Maine. 

Perry, Congregational minister, Windham, Vt. 

Pratt, Episcopal minister, Bath, Maine. 

Prince, civil engineer on the Toledo, Delphos & 
Burlington Railroad, at Frankfort, Ind. 

Robinson, teaching, Washington Academy, East 
Machias, Maine. 

Rogers, Professor of Modern Languages, Maine 
State College, Orono, Maine. 

Rowe, physician. Cape Elizabeth Depot, Maine. 

Sabin, Professor of Chemistry and Physics, Uni- 
versity of Vermont, Burlington, Vt. 

Sanford, lawyer, 17 Doane Sti-eet, Boston, Mass. 

Sargent, lawyer, Machias, Maine. 

Sewall, H. B., chief operator of the Commercial 
Telephone Company, 551 Broadway, Albany, N. Y. 



Sewall, J. E., mariner, captain of ship Oriental 
of Bath, Maine. 

Somes, teaching. Principal High School, Salmon 
Falls, N. H. 

Souther, business, Fryeburg, Maine. 

Stevens, lawyer, 53 Devonshire Street, Boston, 
Mass. 

Stimson, agent I. & C. Elevator of the C. I. St. 
L. & C. R. R., Smith Street, Cincinnati, 0. 

Sturgis, business, Augusta, Maine. 

Taylor, teaching, Goshen, Elkhart County, Ind. 

Waitt, lawyer, 28 School Street, room 42, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Wheeler, literary work, Winchendon, Mass. 

Whitcomb, lawyer, 95 Milk Street, Boston, Mass. 

White, teaching. Address, Lisbon Falls, Maine. 

Whittemore, business, .36 West Bridge Street, 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Wilson, lawyer, firm Heath (72) & Wilson, Au- 
gusta, Maine. 

Wright, lawyer. Address, either Salem, Mass., 
or 37 Equitable Building, Boston, Mass. 

Yates, teaching, Saco, Maine. 
Secretary's address, 17 South Market Street, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Class of 77. 

William G. Beale is studying in the office of 
Williams & Thompson, attorneys at law, 97 Clark 
Street, Chicago, 111. 

Alvan J. Bolster has formed a partnership with 
Albion Thorne, one of the pioneer settlers of Da- 
kota, for the practice of law under the firm name of 
Thorne & Bolster. Address, Dell Rapids, Dakota 
Territory. 

Osgar Brinkerhofif is teaching and studying law 
in Atlanta, Logan County, 111. 

Phihp G. Brown was admitted Jan. 11th, 1881, 
to the firm of J. B. Brown & Sons, bankers, 218 
Middle Street, Portland, Maine. 

William T. Cobb was admitted to the Knox 
County Bar in December, 1880; did not practice 
but at once entered the partnership of Cobb, Wight 
& Co., wholesale and retail grocers and ship chand- 
lers, 246 Main Street, Rockland, Maine. 

Frank H. Crocker has studied in the Maine Med- 
ical School the past term. 

Rev. Edgai- M. Cousins was married June 10th, 
1881, to Miss Ella N. Burnham of Cherryfield, Me. 

Dr. Fred H. Dillingham is now house physician 
at the St. Francis Hospital, and also has a private 
office at 118 East 17th Street, New York City. 

Charles T. Evans is engaged in a general insur- 
ance business and is also special agent of the New 



60 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



York Life Insurauce Company at 532 Walnut Street, 
Pbiladelpliia, Pa. He was married in October last 
to Miss Susie S. Greene of Philadelphia. 

David B. Fuller has resigned his position as 
Principal of the Greeley Institute, Cumberland Cen- 
tre, and is now studying law in the office of E. F. 
Webb, Esq., Waterville, Maine. 

William A. Golden has opened an office with 
George H. Marquis, for the practice of law, in the 
Centennial Block, Exchange St., Portland, Maine. 

Seropfe A. Gurdjian for the present may be ad- 
dressed at 20 Rue Chonhazi Han, Grand Bazar, 
Constantinople, Turkey. 

Rev. George A. Holbrook was on Tuesday, May 
24th, 1881, advanced to the priesthood by the Rt. 
Rev. G. T. Seymour, Bishop of Springfield, in Trin- 
ity Memorial Church, Warren, Pa. His address i.s 
124 East 5th Street, Erie, Pa. 

Dr. PhineasH. Ingalls, since April l.st, 1881, has 
been chief house surgeon and has had full charge 
of the Woman's Hospital, corner 49th Street and 
4th Avenue, New York City. 

Charles E. Knight was married June 10th, 1880, 
to Miss Carrie B. Dodge of Wiscasset, Maine. 

Samuel A. Melcher is teaching the High School 
at Oxford, Mass. 

Frank A. Mitchell is now engaged in business in 
Glens Falls, N. Y. He was married Jan. 19th, 1881, 
to Miss Annie L. Flint of Bellows Falls, Vt. 

Carroll W. Morrill was admitted to the Sagada- 
hoc Bar in April, 1881, but has continued in charge 
of the mathematical department of the Bath High 
School up to the close of the present school year. 

Charles L. Nickerson is instructor in Mathe- 
matics and Natural Sciences at the Hallowell Clas- 
sical School, Hallowell, Maine. 

Dr. Edwin J. Pratt was graduated from the New 
York Homojopathic Medical College in March last, 
and on the 1st of April was appointed resident phy- 
sician at the Brooklyn Maternity and New York 
School for Training Nurses, 44, 4G, and 48 Concord 
Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

John A. Roberts is practicing law in Norway, 
Maine. 

James W. Sewall during the past spring had 
charge of the drainage survey of Norfolk, Va. Ho 
is now in Nashua, N. II., but will probably go South 
again in the fail. Address care of Col. George E. 
Waring, Jr., Newport, R. I. 

Rev. Addison M. Sherman is assistant minister 
at St. Bartholomew's Church, Madison Avenue and 
44th Street, New York. Address 432 West 20th 
Street, New York City. 



Dr. William Stephenson is practicing medicine, 
with an office at 622 Congress St., Portland, Maine. 

George W. Tillson last fall planned and since 
April 1st has been constructing a system of sewer- 
age for the city of Kalamazoo, Mich. 



COLLEGE WORLD. 



HaBTAED : 

There is some talk of giving a Latin play next 
year. — Crimson. 

President Eliot of Harvard, ilary L. Booth of 
Harpefs Bazar, and the cook of Parker's restaur- 
ant, Boston, receive the same salary, $4,000. 

In the Harvard class races the Juniors won in 
11m. 18s., the Seniors second. Sophomores third, 
and the Freshmen a bad fourth. The course was 
not quite two miles. — Ex. 

Harvard has recently received a gift of $115,000 
for the erection of a physical laboratory, provided 
a fund of $75,000 be raised to defray the running 
expenses. As in the case of tlie Law School, the 
name of the benefactor is not to be made public. 

Univeesity of Michigan: 

The Monthly Bulletin claims to have made a 
canvass of the faculty and students, of all the 
departments, to find out what proportion are pro- 
fessing Christians. Of the faculty sixty-one per 
cent., and of the students thirty per cent., are 
foimd to profess Christianity. — Chronicle. 

The catalogue of class hats to date is as follows : 
Seniors, maroon fez cap with old gold tassel ; Jun- 
iors, white plug ; Sophomores, white Derby; Fresh- 
men, black mortar board with cardinal tassel ; Sen- 
ior Medics, black silk plug ; Junior Jledics, straw 
Derby with the band of class colors, blue and maize ; 
Pharmics, low mackinaw straw with the band of 
class colors, old gold and cardinal. — Chronicle. 

Miscellany : 

In the Yale class races only '82 and '83 took 
part. '83 came in ahead. There seems to be a 
lack of interest in these sports. 

Bowdoin fielder — as he turns a back somer- 
sault up hill after a fly. "What in is this 

place anyhow If " — Argo. 

England has four universities ; France, fifteou ; 
and Germany, twenty-two. Ohio, with that sim- 
plicity which is characteristic of the West, contents 
itself with ihirtv-soven. — Ex. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



61 



Oxford caps laave been adopted at Columbia. 
The Seniors are to be distinguished by a button of 
purple, Juniors by dark blue, Sophomores by car- 
dinal, and Freshmen by dark green. 

The editors of the Brunonian have offered a 
prize bat to the man having the best batting record 
at the end of the next inter-collegiate contest. 

It has been agreed to row the Yale-Harvard 
race on the New London course for the five coming 
years. In consequence of this arrangement, Har- 
vard will have a new boat-house, costing $2,.500. 
$2,000 of this sum has been already pledged. — Ex. 

Mr. Thomas A. Scott has endowed the Chair of 
Mathematics in the University of Pennsylvania 
with a gift of .$.iO,000. He has also given $50,000 
to the Jefferson Medical College, of Philadelphia, 
$30,000 to the Orthopa?dic Hospital, Philadelphia, 
and $20,000 to the Children's Department of the 
Episcopal Hospital of Philadelphia. 



CLIPPIHGS. 



Himdle her gently, 

Lilt her with care, 
She .swallowed a hair pin 

While banging her hair, 
The curling iron slipped, 

And burned her fair brow, 
She uttered a shriek, 

But weeps no more now. 

—Ex. 

" D'you take me for a fool ? " " Oh, no ! not in 
the least ! I never judge by appearances." — Specta- 
tor. 

The Sauveur method in the Sophomore French 

division: Prof. — "Monsieur , why is this 

word in the imparfait 'i^ " Student — "Parceque 
Taction is represented as habituelle." 

'•Isn't your hu.sband a httle bald?" asked one 
lady of another, recently. "There isn't a bald 
hair on his head," was the somewhat hasty reply. 

He asked a Cincinnati belle if there was much 
refinement and cidture in that city, and she replied, 
" You just hot your boots we're a culchahed crowd." 
—Ex. 

Professor, in calling the Senior roll, runs by 
mistake into the Junior class. Senior (correcting) — 
" You are not calling our roll now. Professor." 
Prof, (absently-mindedly) — " Oh, yes ! this will be 
yours next year." 

Horace recitation : Freshman — " And if you 
praise him at the wrong time he kicks back." 
Tutor — " Where does that simile come from f " 
Fresh. — "From the horse." Tutor looks as if he 
though so, and the class applauds. — Courant. 



Law Prof. — ^"What constitutes bin-glaryf" 
Student — "There must be breaking." Prof. — 
"Then, if a man enters your door and takes five 
dollars from your vest pocket in the hall, would 
that be burglary?" Student — "Yes, sir, because 
that would break me." 

Scene upon the street : Senior (speaking of his 
lady love's mother) — " I tell you, boys, she just 
treated me boss; she took me in and showed me 
the new carpets." Cad (innocently) — " They must 
consider you one of the family." "Senior (rever- 
ently) — " I hope to be." — College Olio. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



" It will be utterly impossible for us to do justice 
to our exchanges this week, as we have not the 
time and spirit necessary for a careful consideration 
of their merits and demerits." So we were saying 
to ourselves late one evening only a short time be- 
fore our "copy" must be "sent up." The time 
demanded by Psychology and the mental exhaus- 
tion consequent upon long study had so wearied us 
that our tired brain refused to be spurred on to 
fresh efforts, and our strained eyes could only 
wander meaninglessly over the appalling pile. In 
this predicament, kind sleep, " Sleep that knits up 
the raveled sleave of care," came upon us and pro- 
vided, for a time, freedom from all vexations. But 
even sleep would not afford a refuge, and phantasy 
freed from all restraint brought up quick flitting, 
troubled images of what had occupied our waking 
hours, and out of their sum we are able to recall a 
series which, from their vividness and startling 
nature, strongly impressed themselves on our mem- 
ory. We will preface them by calling attention to 
the psychological consistency in them as dependent 
on what knowledge we at the time possessed. It 
seemed that an Inter-Collegiate Press Association 
had been formed, comprising the leading college 
journals of the country, and for the purpose of 
holding an annual meeting, it was to be enter- 
tained by the editors of the Orient. At the hour 
on which its members were expected to arrive we 
were collected at the station prepared to receive 
them cordially. When the train came roaring in, 
our expectations were great and our inward tremb- 
ling was not small as we comi^rehended that we 
were to entertain such distinguished guests. The 
train arrived. We anxiously looked about to dis- 
tinguish the representatives of our esteemed con- 
temporaries. First, as soon as the train had slack- 
ened up before it had come to a full stop, a yoimg 



62 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



fellow, travel-stained, in a linen duster and slouch 
hat, leaped from the front end of the smoking car 
and had got into the eating saloon heforc we could 
intercept him, for we knew by his general air that 
he must be a journalist. We could, however, par- 
don his haste and welcome him right gladly when 
we found him to be the representative of the Berle- 
leyan, who had crossed the continent to become 
acquainted with his journalistic friends nearer the 
Atlantic. Soon other of our guests came pouring 
forth in abundance. Among the first we saw two 
whom we knew must be from " fair Harvard." The 
representative of the Crimson was a tony looking 
fellow with a quiclc eye and a literary air, — not a 
solemn massive-brained embryo Macaulay but some- 
what of a Bohemian in style. The delegate from 
the Advocate was more sedate looking, and the 
Crimson man seemed to take the lead and guide 
his elder companion. Our Crimson man saluted us 
with a graceful and easy air, while the Ach-ocate's 
representative was more stiff and ceremonious. 
Next came a bustling wide-awake fellow in a Tale 
straw hat, a strong healthy sample of a college 
student who was to present the claims of the Yale 
Neivs as the leading college daily. The Record had 
also sent a delegate to petition for the death of 
Smintheus. A long-haired youth, with a portfolio 
under his arm and an nesthetic costume, came slowly 
from the car, and after making himself known took 
his way to the ladies' room, stationed himself at the 
door, and began to make sketches of its occupants. 
The editor of the Bates Student, a serious and not 
remarkable looking youth, with a well -brushed 
dress coat of no particular style and a ministerial 
white necktie, got off the rear car, for he very rarely 
ventures from home, and has heard that the rear 
car is the safest to ride in, and stiffly introduced 
himself to us. He carried a package of Students 
under his arm and distributed them to whomsoever 
he met in the depot. The YaJe Lit. man was just 
what wo should expect him to be from reading the 
elegant and tasty literature with which the Lit. is 
always filled. Accompanying him was one the 
sight of whom inade us nmster up all our politeness 
and receive in our most gi-accful manner. It was 
an editor of the Vassar Miscellairi/. Sho wore 
glasses and pci-haps was not as vivacious as 
is entirely pleasing, but was completely self-pos- 
sessed and independent. An elegantly dressed 
youth, witli a decidedly English air introduced him- 
self as from " Trinity at 'artford, the Hoxford of 
Hamerica you know," He came from the Pullman 



palace car and had a servant to attend to his lug- 
gage. The representatives of the Brunoniaii, 
Princetonian, Amherst Student, Williams Athe- 
nceum, Nassau Lit., Dartmouth, Si/racusan, and 
others were good representative college men. Of 
course we knew at first sight Capt. Ephraim, skip- 
per of the Argo, for in his trim sailor suit he was a 
prominent figure, but his clothes did not appear to 
fit him perfectly and he seemed somewhat awk- 
ward in them. A man with a wild countenance and 
a fierce eye we thought must be the editor of the 
Niagara Index, until we saw that he had on a strait- 
jacket and was guarded by attendants who were 
conducting him to the insane asylum. We after- 
wards made the acquaintance of the Index man, and 
found him far more agreeable in conversation than 
in his paper. We did not expect to see any editor 
of the Colby Echo, as we understood that their Fac- 
ulty feared that their morals might be contaminated 
by association with unregencrate Bowdoin stu- 
dents, and had forbidden their coming, but one 
came, and we found him a smart fellow. A solemn 
looking youth with a tall beaver, and carrying a re- 
vised New Testament in his hand, was of the Oberlin 
Beview. The Chronicle man was a contrast to him 
in every respect, not at all literary, but a thorough 
Journalist. All these, and more too, had collected on 
the platform, when it begun to be noticed that one 
anxiously looked for by all was absent, and a cry 
for Smintheus went up, and soon that renowned in- 
dividual issued from the palace car, and with a 
proud, disdainful glance of the eye for those around 
and a curling of the lip as he caught sight of a Yale 
editor, stalked towards us, the rest shrinking back. 
We ottered him our editorial hand, but he hesitat- 
ing said: "Has the fiend, who vents his spleen 
through the Wrechvrd, touched with his polluting 
paw that outstretched handf " "He hast." "Then 
will not Smintlicus disgrace his fair fame by grasp- 
ing the hand of one who has welcomed his bitterest 
enemy." At this there was a rush and a cry lor the 
blood of Smintheus, and he was knockeil down, 
kicked about, the Crimson's man who tried to aid 
him received the same treatment, and a general 
quarrel begun, all seeking revenge for the severity 
of past criticisms of dillercnt editors. A burly 
member from some western college ai)proached and 
aimed at us a leriilic blow. We Jumped ([uickly 
aside to avoid it, and awoke to lind our lamp l)urned 
out and hear the whistling of the miihiight train. 
We sat down to write our experience, and what wo 
have written wo have written. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Iff IP TP Tp) 1 



^ 



Finest and Most Select Stock of 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS. 

The Newest and Greatest Variety of Patterns iu 

NECKWEAR, GLOVES, HOSIERY, 

UNDER-WEAK, BRACES, ETC. 

![^° Custom Shirts from Measure, Six for $9.00. 
A Perfect Fit Guaranteed. 

Goods for the TROT LAUNDRY sent Tues- 
days and received Saturdays. 

In Percales, Mahrattas, and American Goods. 
Orders liy mail promptly attended to. 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 
FRANK M. STETSON, 

JXJST RECEIVED! 

All the New Styles in Soft and Stiff Hats. 
Best Stiff Hats, $2.75. Best SUk Hats, $3.50 in 
exchange. 

Just opened all the New and Nobby Styles Neck 
Dress, Collars, Cuffs, Fancy Hose, Canes, etc. 

All are inviied to call and examine goods and prices. 

No. 2 Arcade Block. 
ISAAC H. SNOW, 

DEALER IN 



geef, lork, 



1, pamb, Sfc. 



Special Rates to Student Clubs. 



EC. M. BO^^^KER, 
BOARDING AND LIVERY STABLE 

Cor. Main and Cleave/and Sts., Brunswick. 

All Hack Orders promptly attended to. 



'©^k, 



Two doors north of Post Office. 




CUSTOM TAILORING 

A S PECI ALTY, 

AT 

Fernald's Tailor Emporium 

2S7 Middle Street, 
PORTLAND, - - - MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



AT €. W. ALLEM*S 

DRUG STORE. 

THE FINEST CIGAP.S AND SMOKING TOBACCOS. 
THE BEST PERFUMERY. 

THE BEST TOILET SOAPS. 

THE BEST HAIR BRUSHES. 

The Largest and Best Assortment of 

Drugs, Patent Medicines, &c., &c. 

To be found in this marliet. 

Lemont Block, lirunswich, Maine. 



S. C. COFFIN^, 

— DEALER IN — 

PROVISIONS AND GROCERIES 

jKb" Special Kates to Stadent Clubs. .JE» 
CORNER OF MAIN AND ELM STREETS. 



QOl-DCLg|) 




TOBACCO& CIGARETTES 

EiTHEB Sweet or Plain, aee of the Finest 
Qualities, ALWAYS Uniform and Keliable. 

TRY THE SE^L-SKSN CIGAR 

HAND-MADE CUBAN STYLE. 

SEND $3.75, ami we will forward 
by mail, registered., a 50 box of the 
Seal-Skin Ciffar. 

Thia ia n Ppecial offer to enable sinokerR to tept this 
celebrated brand. After a trial you \vill emoke no other. 

S. F. HESS & CO. 

tromium Tobacco Works, Rochester, N . Y. 



S T U D E ISr T S 

Desiring Employment, for Season of 1881, 

lOnc-loso Ic. sU-uiip, :\ncl write for cli-ciilav, lu 

THE MAiNllATa^AN AGENCY. 

733 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 

Pleaao mention this paper. 
GO TO 

TTv^. B. T7x7-003D .-NISID'S 

TO BUY YOint— — 

Groceries, Canned Goods, Fruits, 

Conj'ecliunery, Tobacco, and Cigars. 

.Spi:ciiil RiiluH to Btudcnt Clubn. 

Main Street, Head of the Mall, Brunswick. 



MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 



Prepares for Bowdoin and the best New England 
Colleges. Offers, also, a thorough Seminaex Course 
to young ladies, and a shorter course for business 
pursuits. For Catalogues, address 

Rev. a. W. BURR, Hallowell, Me. 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

113° Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



Purchase your COAL fit llie 

Coal ~^a,rd. In Topsliam, 



wukkk nonk but 



The Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well preiiared ami in Gooil Onler. 

Office near the Sheds. 



aifii'acSaiboc'K 



M. M. M^TMMMMY* Froprsetqs, 



I. s. balcome;^ 

DKAI.KH IN 

Hardware, Stoves, Crockery, and Glassware, 

bfixjnstvick;, ivee:. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



IB* <U* "SO^MMXS^M* 



1^; 



m§.. 



@ 



•^ 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers ; Circulating' Library, 1600 Volumes ; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

CHOICE GROcTrIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Students. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'BitiEN Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

■PORTT.A.N13, MA.INE:. 

This house has been thoroughly refitted with every re- 
gard to comfort, and the aim is to make it first-alass in all 
its appointments. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

DeW^ITT HOUSE, 

QUIMBY & MURCH, Proprietors, 

Corner Pine and Part Streets, LEW ISTON, IE. 

ROVAL QUIMllY. EUEN MUHCII. 



^. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes i Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Vieiirs. 

ALL KINDS OF 





For Schools and Colleges, 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TTPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 



<'A&-~Gp, 



-c^sephGillott-X 



r 

\y THE FAVORITE NOS. S03-4O4-SS2-/7O-SS/- WITH 

'^HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



^. 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 



\^J 



OFFICE IN LEMONT BLOCK, Brunswick. 

^g'Telephone coDoectioo with Coal Yard. 
113" Orders left at Jortlaii Snow's, Leuiout Block, will 
be promptly atteuiled to. 

IRA C. STOCXBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEE, 



156 Exchange Street, Portland. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

jSs and ^Sy Congress St., and 233 Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

<ffi-SEND FiiK Price List. 



AMOS L MILLETT & CO., 

J(lDHi;uS AND UeTAILERS OF tsTANDABD 

Imprtefl and Eoiiiestic Fancy Groceries. 

BUNKER HILL riCKLES A Sl'KCI.tLTY. 



W 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

L. Wl LSON & CO., 

VTholesale and Retail Dealers ia 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 



^mfhm ^|®lk|© ||e3ieal ^epaplment 

The Sixty-First Annual Course of Lectures at the Medical 
School of Maine, will commence Februauy 10th, 18^1, and 
continue SIXTKKN WEKKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshua L. Chambeblain, LL.D . President 5 Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; William W. Greene, M.D., Sur- 
gery and Clinical Surgery; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Women and Children, Frederic'IT. Gerrish, M.D., Materia 
Medica, Therapeutics, and Public Health ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., 
Medical Jarisprudence ; Henry Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Bcrt G. 
Wilder, M.D., Physiology ; Stephen H. Week>>,M.D., Anatomy ; Daniel 
F. Ellis, M.D., Registrar and Librarian; AuorsTDS P. Dcdlet, M.D., 
Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to th** Secretirv. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEwYlRY^ 

Botanical Microscopes, Fancy Goods. "Watclies, Clucks, and Jewelry 
promptly repaired and warranted. 

I^izi.e Spectacles a,n.d. 
EDWIN F 



E^T^eg-lasses . 
BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BKUNSWIfK, >IE. 

Mrs. leaFs BQ-o-k- Bindery, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book Work to Order. 



W. B. 

(O i^ I 'O r 



KNIGHT, 



Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

4^Tran9ient Orders for Milk or Cream tilled 1«y K"Viu(,' suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 



FIRST-Cr.A.BS 

Flaios, Organs, and M,elodeons,, 

AT LOW I'llICHS. I.AIHIH RKNTINO STOCK. 



J. M. CURTIS, Proprietor. 

BOOXilS. SXA-TIONERY, flOOM 
I»AI»ER, PER IODIC Ar.5. <ScC. 



E.SMITH, ..GROCER. 

Lowest Prices Jo Student Clubs^ 

F. 1. WILSOI, Dispenser o-f Fu,re Drugs,, Medicines, and Chemicals. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions a Specialty. 

MAIN STREET, BRXINSIVICK. ME. 

.IOi;i<NAL PRK8B, M880N BTRKBT, LKWI8TON, MAINIC. 





^*/ 



if 

4^M 





mn 



^^/wig^? ^1>«-yyf^wwj^y/////g g^^ 



OOlMlIOlllif 



' WTrfl 



S' 






^J U L Y,^^ 





*J 'J IJJi lJm»JJ_«JJU l,l m J ■ » JLUJLH w-m-m 



■ ■ ■■ ■ ■ ■■■■■■■■■■■«»J^ 



liiiminmiiinn qua 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 






Oo, 



Finest and Most Select Stock of 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS. 

The Newest and Greatest Variety of Patterns in 

NECKWEAR, GLOVES, HOSIERY, 

TJNDER-WEAR, BRACES, ETC. 

ty Custom Shirts from Measure, Six for $9.00. 
A Perfect Fit Guaranteed. 

Goods for the TROY LAUNDRY sent Tues- 
days and received Saturdays. 

In Percales, Mahrattas, and American Goods. 
Orders by mail promiitly cittended to. 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 
FRANK M. STETSON, 

All the New Styles in Soft and Stiff Hats. 
Best Stiff Hats, $2.75. Best Silk Hats, $3.50 in 
exchange. 

Just opened all the New and Nobby Styles Nock 
Dress, Collars, Cuflfs, Fancy Hose, Canes, etc. 

All arc invited to CiiU and examine goods and prices. 

No. 2 Arcade Block. 



ISAAC H. SNOW, 

. -DEALER IN 

Jeef, Hork, Jutton, fiamb, 8^c. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs, 

XTEZ-ZX DOOI^ TO ST.A.3:TT77-OOX)-S. 

BOARDING AND LIVERY STABLE 

Cor. Main and Cleave/and Sfs.. Brunswick. 

All Hack Orders promptly attended to. 



C L. Yo^k, OoLLEqE Baf^bef^, 

Two doors north of Post Office. 




B* a M m ■». 



CUSTOM TAILORING 

A S PECl ALTY, 

Feniald's Tailor Emporium 

237 Middle Street, 
PORTLAND, - - - MAINE. 




twfl#la 




Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JULY 6, 1881 . 



No. 6. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "iVloehring" Burners 

IS PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



Books, Statione[|, and Paper Hangiogs, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

liil-Mliill©!, iliiiati I4iiil 

* SPRING STYLES * 

OF 

Nobby Stiff and Soft Hats 

JTTS8T H.33C;:E;i"V"E3ai>. 

NEW STYLES in LINEN COLLARS & CUFFS. 
NEW PATTERNS in NECK- WEAR. 



FINE ASSORTMENT 



SPRING OVERCOATS AND SUITS, 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock. 
FRiVN^K E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets. 




O^IITIOM TO SMOKEIS. 

Bevare of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 

^=^5^ ' '"■' TRY IT, 

■ Fine, Mild & Sweet. 

Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or favoring used in our genuine brands. 
KINNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 

FOR YOUR 

NOBBY HAT 

Go or Send to 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 
SIGN 01 THE GOLD HAT. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

BNOEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



UNDER FALMOUTH HOTEL. 



Q^m'smm ^: 



mi. 



JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, ETC., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QUALITY, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 



PORTLAND, 

A. CARTER. 



MAINE. 
J. W. D. CARTER. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



A reorganization of the Course of Instruction 
has recently been made, in which the distinction be- 
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main- 
tained, but all academic undergraduates are placed 
on one footing, with the opportunity of following, to 
a considerable extent, such lines of study as they 
prefer. 

All students entering the College proper, are ex- 
amined on the same course of preparatory studies. 
After the second year a liberal range of electives is 
offered, within which a student may follow his choice 
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount 
pursued. 

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated 
as a distinct course, are still, for the mn.st part, re- 
tained either in the required or elective lists. More 
place is also given to the Modern Languages than 
they have hitherto had. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all 
who complete the Academic Course. 

The Engineering Department remains as here- 
tofore, and facilities are offered for study of the 
various branches of this science. The means of 
theoretical instruction are ample, and the town of 
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen- 
tres in the State, and in the immediate vicinity of 
many important public works, affords excellent 
opportunities for the study of actual structures. 
The College also enjoys many favors from the United 
States Coast Survey Office. The admission is the 
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the 
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will 
be taken, if desired, in the place of Latin. 

Those who complete satisfactorily the four years' 
course in engineering will receive the Degree of Sc. 
B. Tho.se who complete a two years' course of ad- 
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or 
Mechanical JEngineer. Students not candidates for 
a degree will be received at any stage ftu- which an 
examination shall show them to be fitted, and may 
remain for any desired time. Further information 
will be furnished on application to Professor G. L. 
Vose. 

Terms of Admission to the Academic Course. 

Applicants for admission will bo examined in the 

following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Ivatin (3.5 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Goorgics, and six books of the /Eneid ; Cicero, 
.seven Orations ; Sallust. 

Gkkkk. — lladloy'B Greek Grammar; Xonophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Ilomor's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose (^imposition. 

Ancient Geoc.hai'iiy. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 

and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 

I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 

Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission 
will be required to produce testimonials of good 
moral character. The time for examination is the 
Friday after Commencement and the Friday before 
the opening of the first term. In exceptional cases 
applicants maybe examined at other times. Candi- 
dates for admission to advanced classes will be ex- 
amined in the studies which such classes have 
accomplished. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrange- 
ments with the Principals of schools and academies 
having a regular course preparatory for college of at 
least three years' duration, whereby their pupils 
may be examined for admission to college at their 
respective schools, in connection with their owa 
final examinations. 

The amount of instruction now offered and pos- 
sible to be taken in the several principal lines of 
study is exhibited comparatively, as reduced to cue 
scale, in the following manner. This is, however, 
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal 
length ; 

Latin, eight terms. 

Greek, eight terms. 

MatheiBatics, eight terms. 

German, four and a half terms. 

English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English 
Literature, three and a half terms. 

French, three terms. 

Italian, one term. 

Spanish, one term. 

Rhetoiic (formal), one term. Rhetorical and 
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a 
half terms. 

Natural History studies, five and a half terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, four terms. 

Chemistry, four terms. 

History, Ancient and Modern, two terms. 

Political ICconomy, one and a half terms. 

Public Law, two terms. 

Mciitnl and Moral Philosophy, including Logic, 
four terms. 

Christian Evidences, one terra. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $2'y. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Stuilents can, however, by forming 
clubs under good inanagoraont, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JULY 16, 1881. 



No. 6. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE AFEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE TEAR, BT THE CLASS OF '82, OP 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Arthur G. Staples, Managing Editor. 

Charles H. Oilman, Busines.s Erlitur. 

Melvin S. Holway, Eugene T. McCarthy, 

William A. Moody, "Warren 0. Plimpton, 

George G. Weeks. 

Tbrms — $2.00 a year in advance ; sinp;Ie copies, 15 cents. 

RemittaDces should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be dinjcted to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Tol. Xr., No. 6.-JULY 16, ]881. 

Editorial Notes 63 

Literary: 

Class Day Poem 66 

The Influence of Anglo-Saxon Cliaracter ou Amer- 
ica 1 68 

Sunday Exercises 71 

Eiphty-One's Class Day 71 

The Seventj'-Niuth Commencement 73 

College Items 75 

Personal 77 

Necrolofry, 1880-81 77 

In Memoriam 78 

Clippings 78 



EDITORIAL HOTES. 



To you who are distant tlie Oeient comes, 
we hope, laden with lemembrances. Com- 
mencement has come and gone, and while our 
readers have put away all college thoughts, 
have packed and departed, we have been dili- 
gently laboring to present you a record of 
'81's Commencement. It might not be un- 
meet to express to our departed Seniors our 
renewed hope that we may have the pleasure 
of always greeting them through these same 
columns, and that they will still continue to 
find in the columns of the Okient pleasant 



tidings of Bowdoin's welfare. To every one, 
friends, faculty, students, we bid a hearty 
greeting, and send a cordial wish for a happy 
sojourn and a season of pleasant, profitable 
vacation. 



And so Commencement is over. The 
alumni, some gray haired with care and years, 
have come and renewed their youth in the 
genial atmosphere of old-time days, and de- 
parted. The music has ceased, and nought 
but the clatter of workmen in Memorial Hall 
reminds one that there is life upon the cam- 
pus. 

What kind of a Commencement was it? 
Was it worthy the class and worthy the col- 
lege ? The verdict of every one is decidedly 
in the affirmative. '81 has received a glori- 
ous send-off, and the year adds new laurels to 
the college. The number of alumni that 
came to renew their acquaintance has not 
been greater for years, the actions of the 
Boards were never characterized by greater 
liberality, and the graduating classes never 
showed to greater advantage than did the 
class of '81. The class reunions, especially 
of '61, have been unusually large, and every 
reunion was enthusiastic. We trust that Bow- 
doin may know many such Commencements, 
and that she may continue to be ever an ob- 
ject of interest among the alumni; but in all 
the circle of years we believe that the college 
will never see a better Commencement, or one 
tliat will redound more to her interest, than 
the Commencement of 1881. 



We follow the lead of our predecessors in 
printing the class day poem and oration. 
Some one remarks that they are dull reading. 



64 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Perhaps they are, but we hasten to remark 
that the Commencement number hopes rather 
to be acceptable as a true record of Com- 
mencement Week than as light and interest- 
ing reading. 

The promenade concert was much better 
than the usual Commencement Concert. It 
afforded pleasure to a greater number, and 
was quite as cheap for the graduating class. 
It was a good idea, and deserves to be imi- 
tated. 



Last week '82 assumed the dignity of 
Seniors, and the world still moves on regard- 
less. Next terra we come back with the lau- 
rels of three years' honorable labor resting 
jauntily upon our brows, and take yet once 
again the old work and promise ourselves not 
to faint or falter till the year rolls round and 
until the cycle of our college life is done. 
What, witli our numbers and cordial love and 
friendship for each other, cannot be done is 
little, and the class in Senior life must keep 
on in the beaten track of woik for college in- 
terests and not idle in well doing. 



to overcome anything disagreeable by any- 
thing criminal, and the individual who, in the 
stillness of night, illumined the campus with 
the bonfire of this building committed an act 
that if he has any conscience he will be 
ashamed of always. The best instincts of the 
students condemn it, and the deed was neither 
righteous or sensible because it was criminal, 
and because it will be barren in the desired 
results. We are pleased to learn the action 
of the Faculty and hope, as we said before, 
that it was not the act of a student. If it was 
we trust that he perished in the flames. 



The little building that nestled among the 
pines has ceased to nestle, as it were. Tiie 
hand of the incendiary has been abroad and 
the glaring flames shot across the sky and dis- 
turbed the repose of the sleepers, and sent 
the ruddy sparks soaring away through the 
branches of the pines. Was it a chemical 
phenomenon, and did the building lire of life 
and seek an early grave in spontaneous com- 
bustion, or was it " sot"? We incline to the 
latter for various reasons. We feel assured 
that there has been a growing ditilike to this 
building for some time, and that some one, 
stirred up by his own fancied wrongs, rashly 
invested in kerosene and applied the torch. 
We earnestly hope that it was not a student. 
It isn't a gentlemanly. Christian way of over- 
coming an evil. It is never just or expedient 



At this year's meeting of the Boards sev- 
eial important changes were made, some of 
which will materially alter the appearance of 
things about college next year. Prominent 
among them is the retirement of Prof. Pack- 
ard from all college duties. In the chapel 
and library, where he has so long presided, he 
will long be missed. That it is not through 
faihng health, but rather that he may be pre- 
served in an honorable old age for a long time 
to come, is much to be rejoiced. His salary 
remains the same as before. It is to be hoped 
that he will continue to frequent the places 
with which he has so long been familiar, and 
whenever convenient take part in the chapel 
exercises which he has so long conducted. 
Tiie promotion of our popular young instruct- 
ors, Mr. Johnson and Mr. Lee, to tlie incifes- 
sorships respectively of Modern Languages 
and of Geology and Biology, will he parlicu- 
larly pleasing to the students, as it is particu- 
larly deserved. Prof. Juhnson is also to be 
librarian. 

The appropriation for addilional iiistrnc- 
tinn in Oratory is needed. There is no act 
more manifestly proper than the, change in 
the [jrofessorships in the Physical Sciences, by 
which Prof. Robinson becomes Professor of 
Chemistry and Mineralogy, and Prof. Car- 
michael of Astronomy and Physics. The in- 
struction in Chemistry by Prof. Robinson next 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



65 



term will be very pleasing to the class who 
began the work last term, and will make the 
course much more complete. With Prof. 
Carmichael as teacher the instruction in As- 
tronomy cannot but be thorough and satis- 
factory. The impoitant position of Latin 
professor has been offered to Prof. Geo. H. 
Wheeler, Ph.D., of Harvard. 



Base-ball and boating are laid away 
for the present not to be taken up in 
earnest until the spring of 1882. The past 
season's work is satisfactory enough. We are 
unable to criticise base-ball because we have 
seen but two games, but we have heard that 
the nine was an excellent one. We have 
heard that they played with admirable skill 
and coolness, and that they have met very 
excellent success wherever they have been. 
Boating has been thoroughly alive. Fate 
was unkind and permitted our sturdy crew 
no opportnnitj' of going abroad ; but, in class 
races we all know the interest and thorough 
activity. We do not hesitate to say that no 
college in the country has better or more in- 
teresting class races, and that none has better 
appliances and facilities for boating than 
Bowdoin. Oar boat-house is a fine one. It 
is painted and has a flag-staff, two requisites, 
and is the most convenient and roomiest that 
we ever saw. With regard to foot-ball. '82 
formed a foot-ball team. Into oblivion straight- 
way went this foot-ball team upon its forma- 
tion. It has remained in oblivion ever since. 
We don't believe that the team ever knew 
each other. Its captain has forgotten his 
men and the class the child of its adoption, 
and so our foot-ball team rests unwept, un- 
honored, and unsung. Sports in general 
have been, however, as we said above, inter- 
esting and lively, and we see no cause for 
anything but congratulation on the past; as 
for the future we are willing to wait. That 
base-ball is to experience another ciitical 
period, by the withdrawal of '81, is evident. 



We hope, however, that the college may not 
seriously suffer. 



Prof. Ladd has been elected to the Chair 
of Mental and Moral Philosophy in Yale Col- 
lege, and will leave for his new duties before 
the beginning of our Fall Term. It is ex- 
pected that he will relieve President Porter 
of most of his class-room work. While we 
are glad that this exceedingly honorable posi- 
tion has been given him in which perhaps his 
sphere of usefulness will be largei', we ex- 
press the heartfelt sentiment of the college 
and all its friends in saying that Prof. Ladd's 
departure will be a very great loss. As a 
cordial gentleman he has endeared himself to 
all with whom he has been brought in con- 
tact ; as a Christian minister he has won a 
lasting reputation ; and as a professor has 
taught his branches with remarkable earnest- 
ness and vigor. We can safely say that no 
class has had more regard for Piof. Ladd, 
and taken more interest in the studies to him, 
although so brief, than the class of '82. The 
regret that the admirable course laid out for 
next year cannot be conducted by Prof. Ladd, 
is universal. Prof. Newman Smytlie, of 
Quincy, 111., has been elected to fill the va- 
cancy. His election is to some degree a 
guarantee of merit, and it is hoped that the' 
difficult position will be satisfactorily filled. 
Eighty-two will look forward with much in- 
terest to meeting the gentleman who will 
guide so large and important a part of the 
studies of the class next year. 



The recent awards by the Faculty and 
awaiding committees have been frnitful of 
many remarks and we fear some dissatisfac- 
tion. The method of the action of awarding 
committees is, we presume, simple, and con- 
sists in an unbiased vote upon the merit of 
speaking or composition. This is what it 
should consist in. We think ourselves justi- 
fied in asserting that the preacher, who 



66 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



may be upon the committee, has no light 
to reject the claims of him whom he may 
term "stump speaker," because he did not 
assume a tone similar to his own. Such 
an action would not be unbiased or unparti- 
san. We have been assured tliat certain 
committees for the awarding of Sophomore 
and Junior Declamation Prizes have taken 
the first vote upon the question of admitting 
what they termed dramatic pieces to any pos- 
sibility of award. This is too absurd to 
argue. If the possibility of making such 
assertions continue, the prize declamations 
will end in dissatisfaction. As it is, the bet- 
ter after-thought has come to aid in showing 
the justness of the awards, but the possibility 
still remains. There is but one way, and that 
is to allow the speakers the choice of their 
committee. This the Juniors did and were 
entirely satisfied. With regard to the ap- 
portionment of Commencement Parts we have 
nothing to say. Commencement Parts are 
beyond finding out in their apportionment, and 
we are willing to believe justly given. It is 
evident that in such a matter, the result of 
four years' earnest work, every one should 
receive as he deserves and no more. 



The present vacation ought assuredly to 
see the erection of a new gymnasium. Tliis 
is a matter that we have often spoken of 
before, but the necessity remains the same. 
Very many students will expect to see one 
upon their return ; some will not. It is need- 
less to enter into argument concerning tiie 
necessity of one. The Faculty recognizes it 
as well as we, and will as soon as possible 
make the provision. We must wait. 



It is to the regret of all that Processor Ladd leaves 
this colle<;e to relieve President Porter, at Yale, of 
some of his dutii^s. I'rol'essor Ladd has been re- 
speeted by all, and those who were to have his 
instruetion next )'ear had been lookin<j forward with 
considerable int(!rest to that time. Now, of course, 
there is to be a change, and the question arises, who 
is the coming man for tliis department. 



* CLASS DAY POEM. 

BY FRED. L. JOHNSON. 

From spired cities, busy driving towns, 
Rural hamlets, and quiet country downs 
Eighty-one was called, and marching four years 
Down the path of time, we've shared our hopes and 

fears. 
" Long j'ears ? " Well, yes; they seemed so then, 

but now, 
Just passed, they've gone so quick we wonder how. 
Or, mayhap, looking back, one sees and grieves 
" How little hoped-for knowledge one receives!" 
Not disappointed, dissatistied with naught 
Save wasted time, which foolishl}' he'd thought 
Only his books should help him while away ; 
Now night comes down and drives away the day. 

But as we in the evening twilight stand. 

Of these four years whose close is now at hand, 

What multitudes of pleasant times one sees 

Dart up ! as numerous as swarming bees. 

Of just such pleasures, in themselves so small, 

Is life made up, and as we them recall 

New pleasure is derived. 

We've run the race ; 
Each, standing as a victor with flushed face. 
Is to receive his due reward. " Of what? 
Gold?" No ; the store of knowledge he has got, 
However small, will be his crown. 'Tis well 
'Tis so ; each gets what he deserves ; works tell. 
Years hence diplomas of to-day will be 
Of no avail, and merely one's A.B. 
No "stall" of life" will bring. " What can he do?" 
Each one will ask of us — will ask of you! 

Like one who in twilight, at close of the day, 
Sitting at the piano, may not care to pl.iy. 
But engrossed in deep thought, gazing vacant in air. 
Scarce aware what he does, strikes a note here and 

there ; 
So would I, not attempting a masterpiece, give 
A few notes of the life which, at Bowdoin, we live. 

There's a charm about college we nowhere shall find 
Outside of these walls; when we leave them behind. 
And go out in the world, we shall miss the gay 

throng. 
Jolly bojs, full of fun, free from care, the glad song, 
Which none, like a college boy ever does sing — 
It may be the same words but they leave out the ring — 
We shall miss the warm greeting, the games, and 

all 
The fond associations that cling round each hall. 
Ah, these associations! Who has stopped to once 

think 
What a powerful factor in life? how they link 
Us to some seuled course? Like the rock on the hill, 
Which turns from its course the brook or the rill. 
And thus makes it flow here, when it would flow 

down there. 
To a valley more rich, or a plain dry and bare. 
Or makes two streams unite that would else flow 

apart, — 
So the friendships we form may influence the heart 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



67 



And turn it from good or from evil. Alas, 
That so few can the Rubicon see ere they pass ! 

Though each heart be impatient to take part in the 

strife. 
Though it burn to deal blows in the battle of life, 
Though it long to win fame, or power, or gold. 
Though brave it may be as Achilles of old 
There's a twinge of regret that connection must cease 
With Old Bowdoin, and forth from this haven of peace 
He must go to sail over life's st'.'rmy sea. 
There's anxiety doubt with us all. What will be 
The result? Oh! that sea! With a horrible grin 
It will draw him beneath, if he ftil ; if he win, 
It will bear him aloft with a gentle caress, — 
For hovp true it is " Nothing succeeds like success" 
"To him that hath shall be given and from him that 

hath not 
Shall be taken away even that he hath got." 

Of cadueious companions we've slight cause to com- 
plain, 
Most of those who first entered now with us remain. 
But of course there were some who thought they 

were secure. 
So because of their tricks had a somewhat premature 
Graduation. Some left, and went in pursuit of great 

wealth. 
And a few took occasion'l vacations — for health. 
There were two whom the hand of grim Death took 

away 
Requiescant in pace ! In the morn of their day 
They turned out from the caravans' well beaten 

grooves 
And entered that tent whose dark "curtain ne'er 

moves 
Outward", — into that still quiet spirit-land 
They have gone, into th' strange and unknown on 

whose strand 
Lie the wrecks of so many a dream. In that dim 
Mist which hides all from us, we entrust them to 

Him 
Who is willing, and anxious, and mighty to save. 
But we seek not to peer through the mists of the 

grave. 



" 'Tis a -way that we have at Old Bowdoin " : when 

first 
The Sub-Freshmau is seized with a wild parching 

thirst 
For collegiate life, and comes here t' attempt 
Th' entrance examination, he is not exempt 
From th' attacks always made on the credulous. Now 
He is shown the bare panels in Chapel, told how 
Angry Sophomores scraped off the paintings, and so 
Those four panels are bare. And again if they know 
He is wont to be bold, on himself to presume, 
They show him where a bonfire did slowly consume, 
A few evenings before, two Freshmen, — that's why 
The bell tolls, ev'ry day, before prayers. By and by 
He grows wiser when some rainy day he is told 
He must leave his umbrella outside, and a bold 
Burly Sophomore takes it away — by mistake! 
The poor Freshman, however, would most gladly 

break 



That Sophomore's neck, t' keep himself from the 

rain. 
'Tis too late, his thoughts and his wishes are vain. 
So he swears to himself with a terrible oath — 
By all the Gods, and Goddesses, both. 
And the shade of immortal Horatius himself — 
Whose translation he has secretly placed on his shelf^ — 
That he never again will a notice obey 
Which is signed in the Sophomores' usual way 
Of "Per Order." He learns thus, gradatim, toward 
The end of the year, that the bulletin-board 
Is no guide. 

But the great event comes when he hath, 
As is custom, a Freshman Class Supper at Bath. 
With convivial speech, Bacchanalian song. 
Pretty toasts to the ladies and friends, they prolong 
The festivities, bury their grief in the bowl — 
Of their pipes. Feast of reason and flow of the soul ! 

He may have a good time, but he afterwards feels 
The post prandial pains that result from late meals. 
Like the sword of old Damocles, hangs o'er his head 
All the terror of nightmare, a dream's nameless 
dread. 

As the tadpole his caudal appendage doth shed 
And become a great frog, so the Freshman, 'tis said, 
Drops that garlj of simplicity, which makes him an 

ape, 
And becomes a bold Sophomore, from whom to 

escape 
The next Freshmen must try. 'Tis a cycle, you know, 
Where each class settles scores with the class that's 

below. 

As time passes on other changes appear; 
From the boist'rous abuses of Sophomore year. 
He emerges, becomes a spruce Junior, and then 
A calm dignified Senior, whose knowledge of men 
And of things is supposed to be simply unbounded — 
But the same, I am sorry to say, is unfounded — 
Then he goes, an alumnus, out into the world, 
To be tossed about here and there, beaten, and 

whirled 
By the storm-winds of life. 

How many now see. 
Plainly marked, what their pathway in life is to beP 
Some are waiting in doubt, some hope to know soon, 
Some have no more idea than tlie man in the moon I 
Eager longings surge up, like "the unresting dream 
Of father Oeeanus", — surge up and so seem 
To impel him, as eager as love, hot as hate. 
Both to be and to do, that it's irksome to wait. 

We now close our apprenticeship, and forth we must 

go 
To hew out our own fortunes, the best that we know. 
Our terms will be long, and vacations be few, 
And our tasks will be hard and complex in this new 
School of life : to be free from its duties or shirk 
Is impossible; th' world will expect us to work, 
Though we're homesick and heart-sick, discouraged 

and tired — 
For to whom much is given, of him much is required — 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



On account of these o^rand opportunities. Grand, 
For they 2:ive possibilities, which to command 
Many men would now sacrifice uncounted gold. 
All we've learned will be useful before wo are old. 

In the years soon to come, as our ways draw apart. 

May the bonds of true friendship bind closer the heart 

Of each one to the forty-five others ; may 't take 

A deep interest in the advance that they make ! 

Whatever successes lor you now remain, 

May you all an abundant entrance gain 

To the kingdom of God. May your lives have that 

pure. 
Full, and rounded completeness and strength which 

endure. 
May future years ever find us united as one. 
The forty-six jolly boys of our dear Eighty-One ! 
You'll be glad, for right here ray loquacity ends ; 
Many thanks for your kindness, my classmates and 

friends. 



THE INFLUENCE OF ANGLO-SAXON 
CHARACTER ON AMERICA. 

CLASS DAY ORATION, BY JOHN W. MANSON. 

The fatherland of America's political, so- 
cial, and religious character was the land of 
the Anglo-Saxons, a people who inhabited 
that part of North-western Europe, now 
known as Sleswick, during the first few cen- 
turies of the Christian Era. A people whom 
Csesar, in his almost universal Eiuopean con- 
quest must have overlooked, and whom Taci- 
tus, the world's historian, forgets to mention. 
The descendants of this rude and piratic 
tribe, now form the liberal and progressive 
element of England, and the most important 
element of the American people. In the 
fifth century, after the birth of Christ, they 
conquered and almost completely displaced 
the Britons. In the eighteenth, their Puritan 
descendants were most instrumental in estab- 
lishing the government we now enjoy. The 
first home they established was conquered 
and I'uled over by the Norman invaders, but 
their ideas, though checked and held down, 
were not to be crushed out. Tlio Normans 
conquered, but did not seltlo to any extent 
in the adopted land of the Saxons. Tiiey 



formed the aristocratic and lordly class, which 
century after century has steadily lost 
power, until at the present time the Com- 
mons control and guide the affairs of govern- 
ment almost without an opposition. The 
crown is but a figure-head, the House of 
Lords but a cheek upon the action of others. 

Impatient for a more open spliere in which 
to exercise their thought, and a more fertile 
soil in which to plant the seeds of their 
ideas, the}' sought the uninviting and almost 
unknown shores of New England. The suc- 
cess of the Puritans is too well known to 
need narration. What were the elements of 
tlieir success, is the theme which the present 
age demands. It is fitting to pause and look 
back in the rapid development of our exist- 
ence, in hopes to scan the future by a glance 
at the past, for all true prophecy must be 
looked at in the mirror of past experience. 
What has characterized the English-speaking 
people in their unparalleled progress, and 
what has given our nation a position so su- 
perior, in many respects, to her sister nations ? 

This pre-eminence we assign to their mor- 
ality, their untiring energy, their love of jus- 
tice and liberty, and especiall}' to their ideas 
of popular government. To speak of the 
marked moralit}' of this people from tlie first, 
must seem paradoxical as thej' were known 
to their neighbors. A fierce and hardy band 
of pirates, to whom the man-hunt was the 
most ennobling and gratifying, lovers of the 
sea, and scorners of danger, fear to them was 
a thing unknown. Thus ran their rude song : 
" Tlie blast of the tempest aids our oars, the 
bellowing of heaven, the iiowling of the 
thunder, hurt us not ; the hurricane is our 
servant and drives us whither we wish to go." 
Their disposition excited them to fury and 
destruction ; they were brave and obstinate, 
addicted to brutal drunkenness, and of raven- 
ous appetites. Tlieir religion pictured to 
them a future land for the brave warrior, 
where the day siiould be spent in fearful con- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



test, the nitrht consumed in drinking strong 
wine from the skulls of tlieir dead enemies, 
and feasting uiion the ever replenished food 
of the wild boar. ..... 

Under tlie cloak of brutality were con- 
cealed the elements of a more perfect man- 
hood than the Roman world had ever looked 
upon. The same disposition wliicli made 
them cruel, made them brave and energetic. 
They were men in limb and feature, heart 
and mind. Proud they were of their large 
white bodies, proud also of their purity and 
independence. ..... 

The religious character of this people has 
ever been theistic. Their mode of living, the 
country which they inhabited, their broad 
and active intellect, caused them to grasp al- 
most unconsciously the ideas of the Christian 
teachings of Augustine, and the voice of 
Luther did not sound in vain the call of the 
Protestant Reformation. Here Celt and 
Saxon separated ; the one has since remained 
a Catholic, the other a Protestant. 

The political and social ideas of the early 
Anglo-Saxons stand out pre-eminently as char- 
acteristic of their success. A sturdy and 
self-reliant race, they have shown the love 
of justice, of liberty, and popular sover- 
eignty in the nature of their customs and in- 
stitutions. In their township, named from 
the "tun" or rough hedge which surrounded 
it, was to be found the early democracy of 
our modern village. Here, to be sure, was a 
classification of rank, and the lower looked 
up to the higher with respect. But all claim 
to superiority was worthless unless sanctioned 
by the free recognition of the fellow villager. 
He was the basis of society. One man was 
the peer of another in times of peace. " He 
was the .fiee-necked man, whose long hair 
floated over a neck which had never yet 
bowed to a lord." " He was the weaponed 
man who alone bore sword and spear, and 
preserved the right of self-redress." When 
history first records the knowledge of Saxon 



customs and institutions, the right of private 
revenge was already superseded by the estab- 
lishment of the "blood wite," a money com- 
pensation. In their idea of justice, too, was 
recognized the necessity of man's dependence 
upon man for the preservation of any regu- 
lated form of society, and the sacredness of 
family influence was called in as an element 
of restraint. Not the wrong doer, alone, but 
the family of him that did the wrong, must 
answer for the crime to the family of the suf- 
ferer. 

In the village moat, where the Saxons met 
for the administration of government and the 
distribution of justice, was the beginning of 
an institution which, in more recent times, 
has developed into one of the grandest prin- 
ciples of English and American law. Each 
man was guaranteed a trial before his equals. 
Their verdict was the verdict upon which 
alone his guilt or innocence was established. 
Here representatives were chosen to attend 
the kindred court, the court of village ap- 
peal, the arbiter of despute between town 
and town. In their Witenagemote, or the 
council of village leaders, is recognized the 
germ of another custom, which is now the 
fundamental principle of our political organi- 
zation. The custom of representation. The 
four who followed the village reeve to these 
councils, were held to represent the village 
from which they came ; their voice, their ac- 
tion, and their pledges, were the reflected 
sentiments of their constituents. But yet 
higher and more authoritative was the folk 
moot, the supreme appeal of the land. This 
was the gathering of the war host, when the 
entire convention of freemen foretold the 
future of a government of the people, whose 
will should be law, and the individual the 
unit of a popular sovereignty. Add to these 
characteristics that of energy, and we have 
formed an adequate conception of the people 
who have had so vast an influence upon the 
history of our government. Tliis energy had 



70 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



caused them to conquer and settle Britain, 
bringing with them their laws, customs, and 
manners of living. The Normans came under 
"William the Conqueror to rule, not to re- 
model the government. The Saxons contin- 
ued to form under tliem the great industrial 
mass of the people, the backbone of the 
nation. ..... 

The Puritans, whom we boast as our an- 
cestors, were the direct descendants of a 
Saxon people, who, in the pride of their line- 
age, had preserved its purity with the utmost 
caution, and Bancroft estimates that of the 
entire population of the United States, one- 
third, at least, were descendants of the Puii- 
tans. Thus the strength and influence of the 
Anglo-Saxon element of our State, must be a 
topic of ever widening interest to the patri- 
otic student of Ethnology. The race charac- 
teristics which we have inherited from our 
English fathers, have converged toward a 
common center to form the national character 
of our government. These hereditary ideas 
are like the elements which unite in chemical 
affinity to form the most stable compounds, 
in that however widely thej' may differ bj' 
nature, there is a common tendency to unite 
at a given ratio to form a new substance, or a 
new and grand central idea. It is this nu- 
cleus around which national character is 
formed, a national character which is distinct- 
ive, and which carries with it a positive con- 
ception of the people it represents. 

The history of American literature, sci- 
ence, and art, is young; it is yet in the 
" morning twilight" of its existence, but the 
elements which iiave united to give it birth, 
have predicted its character. A character 
which other and older nations have looked 
down upon in silent scorn, if not in open 
derision. We are called a nation of utilita- 
rians. Our nature has made us practical, neces- 
sity has kept us so. Whether to our credit f)r 
discredit, tlie results of our existence upon the 
civilization of the world, within and without, 



must decide. The War of the Revolution was 
the renewal and re-assertion of old Saxon char- 
acter, the second infancy of ideas, which, trans- 
planted from the corrupt soil of Gieat Britain, 
were about to take root and germinate in the 
virgin soil of New England. One by one 
they sprang up anew, and were given form by 
the exigencies of the times. What wonder 
that as they became embodied in our literature, 
they assumed a garb less soft and beautiful, 
than strong and manly. What wonder that 
the pamphlets of Thomas Paine, the satires of 
John Trumbull, the allegories of Francis 
Hopkinson, the verses of Philip Ferman, 
all eminently practical in intent and effect, 
are suited to move the sensibilities of rough 
but warm-hearted men, to kindle their sym- 
pathy, to give impetus to their action ! 
What wonder that such simple but effectual 
literature should be the first to give character 
to American writings. In science, the old 
Saxon love of the good and the useful, has 
not been lost, but takes pride in the names of 
such practical investigators as Franklin, and 
Bowditch, of whom it was said, that " even 
La Place came mended from his hands." 
But in art, our architecture stands above 
everything, as characteristic of our nation- 
ality. Unlike the demand in Eastern cities, 
the demand in our country has been, with 
few exceptions, for pleasant cottages and 
modest homes for the mechanic and the 
farmer, a mark of a more general prosperit}', 
and a nearer relation between man and man, 
than where the elegance of wide spread and 
unutilized grounds, the magnificence of princely 
palaces is to be contrasted with the cheerless 
and uninviting tenantry of the lower classes, 
the aristocracy with the people. 

From literature, science, and art, we 
turn to consider religion and politics, upon 
which, especiall)-, depends the character of a 
people. With sound ide.as upon these two 
main questions, all minor questions are easily 
overcome and made subservient. With un 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



71 



certain and fickle ideas, the future of the 
state becomes also uncertain and fickle. Like 
France, it is ever vacillating between differ- 
ent forms of government, too impatient to 
await fair trial, too prejudiced to give fair 
judgment. Its history shows it twice an em- 
pire, twice a monarchy, and thrice a republic, 
within the course of a single century. In 
our country, all artificial ties between chureli 
and state have been severed, although the 
support of both is derived from a common 
source — a free and unprejudiced people. In 
no other country in the world has the support 
of Christianity met with such flattering re- 
sults in the purity and energy of the clergy, 
or the morality of the people, as in the United 
States, vFhen its success has depended solely 
upon the voluntary contributions and the 
general good will of society. Our political 
organization, so peculiar to ourselves, has 
been the theme of so many eloquent speakers, 
and able v/riters, that it needs no further 
elaboration to portray the influence of the 
early Anglo-Saxon love of liberty and popular 
sovereignty upon the present. A govern- 
ment established by the dangers and hard- 
ships of a pioneer life, resting upon the in- 
tegrity and character of its individual mem- 
bers, at present its future, like its past, will 
be the future of its people. 



SUNDAY EXERCISES. 

PRAYING CIRCLE SERMON AND BACCALAU- 
REATE. 
Although the excessive heat of Sunday 
made sitting in a crowded church very un- 
comfortable, there vv^as an unusually large at- 
tendance at both exercises. The sermon 
before the Praying Circle by ex-President 
Harris was fully equal to what might be ex- 
pected from the reputation of the man. It 
was delivered extemporaneously, in an earnest 
and familiar manner, and was attentively list- 
ened to. The text was Isaiah xl. 2G, " He 



calleth them all by names," and the speaker 
dealt especially with the particularizing care 
of God for individuals. Its full force could 
only be appreciated by listening to it. Only 
a small part of the Praying Circle were pres- 
ent, as at the time many of the under-graduate 
members were out of town. It might be a 
good plan to change the time of the sermon, 
having it possibl}' a week earlier, the last Sun- 
day of the year, proper, when all could be 
present. 

An audience worth}' of the occasion greeted 
Prof. Ladd as he stepped forward to deliver 
the Baccalaureate sermon. The esteem in 
which Prof. Ladd is held and the regret at 
his departure were both shown in the earnest 
faces of the listeners. The usual sombreness 
of the old church was diversified by bright 
dresses and ever-moving fans. The class of 
'81 presented a good appearance as they slowly 
marched in and took seats in the midst of the 
congregation. Prof. Packard aided Prof. 
Ladd in conducting the services, and de- 
livered a touching and comprehensive prayer. 
A murmur of expectation arose from the au- 
dience as Prof. Ladd stepped forward. He 
began his sermon in a plain, business like way, 
and his hearers soon found out that their ex- 
pectations would be fulfilled. The text was 
Acts ii. 22, central clause, "Jesus of Naza- 
reth, a man approved of God among you." 
The subject was dealt with under the three 
general heads of the breadth, syulmetry, and 
loftiness of the character of Jesus. The ser- 
mon was especially characterized by earnest- 
ness and depth of thought. The parting re- 
marks to the class were eloquent, practical, 
and appropriate. 



EIGHTY-ONE'S CLASS DAY. 

With every possible adjunct necessary to 

a good time, the class day of Tuesday, July 

12th, was a success. The fogs and mists of 

morning broke at 9 o'clock and a fresh breeze 



72 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



and cloudless sky lent their charms to the oc- 
casion. At earl}' morning the walks and 
paths up and down the campus were thronged 
with people. Friends and parents, sisters and 
sweeiheai-ts — everywhere they walked up and 
down the walks, and drove about the town. 
At 10 the church transepts were filled with 
the friends of the class, and the body of the 
house fairly taken, and at 10.30 the class 
marched up the broad aisle. Mr. F. B. Mer- 
rill officiated as marshal. 

The exercises of the class were presided 
over very acceptably indeed by the president 
of the class, Mr. H. S. Payson. The music 
of Chandler was excellent — the program was 
carried out as follows : 

MUSIC. 

Prayer A. E. Whitten. 

MDSIO. 

Oration J. W. Manson. 

MUSIC. 

Poem F. L. Johnson. 

The heat of the church especially in the 
transepts rendered these exercises slightl}' 
tiresome. They were quite above standard 
however, in delivery and general excellence, 
and the fact that the audience sat, almost with- 
out exception, to the end is testimony to their 
unflagging interest. We would heartily com- 
mend the distinct delivery of both the oration 
and the poem, and remark tliat the general 
excellence of these productions, which are 
printed in another column, when joined to 
such clear delivery could not fail to counnand 
the earnest attention which was accorded to 
them. 

The cool, fresh breezes shook the branches 
of Thorndike oak and blew the bunting in 
every direction. Tiie class will not soon, we 
think, forget the scene or the circumstances, 
how the i)leasantest class day afternoon they 
ever knew passed so smoothly into tiie 
things of the past. Nearly every one was 
there. The platl'oi'm was crowded with inter- 
ested ones, mothers who beiield witii pride the 
advent of tiieir children, and fathers wiio saw 



their offspring standing where they stood 
years before. The boys came on the ])latfbrm 
at 3, and Pres. Payson from the stand an- 
nounced the speakers and their pirts in a 
most liapjjy manner. The opening address of 
Rogers was suitable. We failed to hear por- 
tions, but were in an unfavorable position. 
In such an address the most that can be said 
is but little, and this address was certainly all 
that could be desired. 

Mr. Wheelwright's"History" wasone of the 
best productions that we ever listened to. It 
was an iionest picture of '81's career, not flip- 
pant, not nonsensical, but picturesque, filled 
with common sense and written gracefully 
and rhythmically. It failed not to do justice 
to the class, and it did no more than justice. It 
expressed the truest beliefs of every one, and 
every one in the audience we doubt not gave 
Mr. Wheelwright the credit of having pre- 
sented not a farcical, foolish production, but a 
carefully prepared, earnest, thoughtful history 
of a class deserving such a history. 

The class prophecy of Mr. E. O. Achorn 
was after the manner of prophecies in general. 
Perhaps prophecies are uatui'al evils and that 
it is necessary for the audience to be pleased 
at the expense of the class, if such is the 
case, Mr. Achorn's prophecy was excellent. 
He had written regardless of feelings evident- 
ly, and if the class could sit uninjured they 
have indeed learned a valuable lesson in their 
college life. The composition was good, and 
various hits were excellent ; but some were 
not in good taste. The best of the prophecy 
was the closing sections. The delivery was 
excellent. 

H. VV. Chamberlain's address was, as was 
expected, approi)riate. He exhorted tlie un- 
der-graduates to prove loyal, to forget enmity 
and stiife, to be willing to live and work for 
Alma Mater. He hopetl that '81 would ever 
1)6 united, and tiuit tiieir college life, just clos- 
ing, miglit be an ever strengthening bond of 
love and affection. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



73 



The class ode, sung under the oak, was 
written by Mr. E. W. Larrabee, and is as fol- 
lows : 

Swiftly has the stream of time 

Brought lis to our Journey's end, 
Gracious Father: thanks to Thee 

For the blessings Thou did'st send. 

Four glad years have passed away 

Fraught with toil with pleasure crowned, 

Dear to us are they, thrice dear. 

For rich treasures we have found. 

Alma Mater, Mother kind ! 

Now tliy blessings on us shed. 
Grant that we forevermore. 

May in wisdom's path be led. 

The good old custom of the pipe of peace 
seemed as ever the fitting thing. We are 
unable to describe the smoke ; it was very in- 
teresting, and the meerchaum, adorned with 
many yards of ribbon, passed finally into the 
hands of Mr. L. B. Lane, as a slight reward 
for his work on the committee of arrange- 
ments. 

The class, headed by the band, marched 
over the campus and cheered every building 
from Appleton to Memorial, and broke up in 
front of Cleaveland. The following are statis- 
tics of the class : 

Largest number ever in the class, 49 ; number 
at graduation, 46 ; average age, 22 years 5 months. 
There are ten under 21. The oldest man is Whitten, 
27 years 10 months 9 days. The youngest man, 
J. W. Manson, 19 years 3 months 21 days. Aver- 
age weight, 155 pounds. Heaviest man is Walker, 
205 pounds ; lightest man, Goddard, 122 pounds. 
Average height, 5 feet 9i inches. Tallest man, 
Achorn, 6 feet 1 inch ; shortest man, E. H. Chamber- 
lin, 5 feet 2i Inches. Occupations chosen : law, 12 ; 
medicine, 10 ; undecided, 8 ; business, 4 ; ministry, 
3 ; teaching, 2 ; money-seeking, 2 ; journalism, 1 ; 
jack-at-all-trades, 1 ; civil engineering, 2 ; cotton 
manufacturing, 1. Political preferences: Republi- 
cans, 31 ; Democrats, 13 ; Greenback, 1 ; no prefer- 
ences, 2. Religious preferences : Congregationalist, 
18; Unitarian, 5; New Church, 4; Baptist, 2; Cath- 
olic, 2 ; Universalist, 2; Episcopalian, 1 ; Methodist, 
1; no preferences, 11. Favorite studies: English 
Literature, 13 ; Chemistry, 13 ; Political Economy, 3 ; 
Greek, 2; Mathematics, 2 ; Psychology,. 2 ; German, 
1; Constitutional Law, 1; Latin, 1; History, 1; 



Human Nature, 2 ; Moral Philosophy, 1 ; no prefer- 
ences, 4. 

The evening was one of the loveliest of the 
season. The atmosphere was warm and 
plea.santly tempered. Themoon cast its light 
everywhere and made the campus splen- 
dent with beauty, and crowds of people 
thronged the grounds, filling the campus with 
life and motion. The dance opened at 9. 
Chandler furnished the music. The committee 
had spared no pains in the way of decorations 
and the result was charming. The floor for 
dancing was excellent, and the light very bril- 
liant. The dancing lasted until 2 a.m., and 
at this hour the dancers departed and left 
only the deserted campus, and few romantic 
couples strolling up and down the college 
walks. 



THE SEVENTY-NINTH COMMENCE- 
MENT. 

Thursday, 81's Commencement day dawned 
clearly and a cool breeze tempering the heat 
rendered this one of the pleasautest and most 
enjoyable days of Commencement week. Ow- 
ing to the important business before the 
Boards the formation of the procession was 
delayed for some time awaiting their adjourn- 
ment, and it was past noon when the proces- 
sion started with Hon. C. J. Oilman, of Bruns- 
wick, as marshal. In the procession, heading 
the alumni, were his Excellency, Gov. Plais- 
ted and his full staff. An unusually large 
assemblage awaited the opening of the exer- 
cises in the church. 

The productions were, without exception, 
highly creditable and iieldthe close attention 
of the audience. They were especially notice- 
able for the clearness and distinctness of 
utterance in the various speakers, and it is 
doubtful if in these respects have been ex- 
celled for years, if ever. 

Owing to the absence of Mr. Burton the 
valedictory address was omitted. The pro- 
gram was as follows : 



74 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Exercises for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science. 

Salutatory, in Latin. 

Charles Herrick Cutler, Farmington. 
Creative Men. Albion Dwight Gray, Dover. 

Can Science Dispense with Faith ? 

Freileric Albion Fisher, Westford, Mass. 
Russian Nihilism. 

John Oliver Patten Wheelwright, Deering. 
Ethics of the American Constitution. 

Frederic Clement Stevens, Veazie. 
Socrates. William Isaac Cole, Brunswicli:. 

Popular Government. 

Henry Loring Staples, Parsonsfield. 
The Problem of Civilization. 

Harold Wyllys Chamberlain, Brunswick. 
Influence of Modern Inventions. 

Frank Eugene Smith, Augusta. 
Corruption in Our Body Politic. 

Clinton Lewis Baxter, Portland. 

Exercises for the Degree of Master of Arts and Mas- 
ter of Science. 

The Golden Age. Mr. Barrett Potter, Brunswick. 
Valedictory Oration. 

Mr. Alfred Edgar Burton, Washington, D. C. 

CONFERRING OF DEGREES. 

PRAYER. 

BENEDICTION. 

It was past four when the compan}', tax- 
ing the large tent to its fullest capacity, were 
seated for dining. Pres. Chamberlain, Gov. 
Plaisted, ex-Pres. Harris, Mr. Blodget, and 
Prof. Packard occupying seats on the raised 
platform. 

After the banquet, which was an unusu- 
ally fine one, the time was spent in listening 
to speeches from the alumni, all the speakers 
meeting with the closest attention, and being 
rewarded at the finish by liberal and hearty 
applause. 

The opening words of President Cham- 
berlain were warml}^ applauded and especially 
that part wherein he declared Bowdoin not a 
creature of the constitution, but a part of 
the constitution itself, and whose privileges in 
the constitution are among those wiiich are 
not sul)ject to amendment. 

Gov. Plaisted, in response to a call from 
the President, emphasized tlie remarks of 
President Cliamberlain, and spoke with vim 
and entliusiasra of old Bowdoin, "a name sig- 



nifying,'' as he said, "in itself, wealth in hon- 
or, glory and intellectual performances." 

The remarks of ex-Piesident Harris over- 
flowed with love and regard for the institu- 
tion, the good deeds done by iier in the past, 
and siucerest wishes for the continuation of 
a work, which the President in introducing 
the speaker had remarked to have been begun 
and set in progress by Dr. Harris. In reply 
to this, the latter, while claiming some credit, 
declared " that whatever had been done by 
me, had now so far progressed that I would 
never have recognized my handiwork." 

Dr. Blodget, who had recently returned 
from China, gave an interesting account of 
literature and methods of examination in that 
country. 

Mr. Thomas, of the class of '31, although 
deaf and blind, amused the audience b}^ the 
wittiest speech of the day, a speech sparkling 
with brilliant gems of wit, and bright sayings, 
delivered in such a manner as attested the 
powers of the speaker as an orator in days 
past. 

Mr. Thatcher, of the same class, followed 
this gentleman with an interesting speech. 

In response to a call for the representa- 
tive of '61, Mr. Emery arose, and although, 
if the gentleman himself is to be believed, he 
is a model of modesty, and of an exceedingly 
retiring nature, yet the audience manifested 
their appreciation of such modesty in the 
close attention they paid to his remarks, 
which consisted chiefly of a review of the do- 
ings of '61 since graduation, and of these he 
made an exceedingly creditable showing, not- 
withstanding, as he confessed witli some mis- 
giving, at least six of them were lawyers. 
The gentleman seemed to take the greatest 
pride in the fact that of those now living, 
twenty-five had wives and were the fathers of 
eighty-five children. 

President Chamberlain alluded feelingly 
to the new departure of Prof. Ladd, and re- 
quested the Professor to come forward. The 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



75 



hearty applause Avliich greeted Prof. Ladd 
more especially from the graduating class, at- 
tested the warm esteem in which the gentle- 
man was held. Prof. Ladd was evidently af- 
fected by the situation in which he found 
himself, and his remarks were of such a nat- 
ure as tended to strengthen the good feeling 
toward him, and to cause all to regret the 
more that a separation was thought necessary. 

Prof. Egbert Smythe, of Andover, as a 
representative of the newly elected profes- 
sor in the ethical branches, spoke a few words 
highly commendatory of the exercises he had 
witnessed, and in praise of the graduating 
class. 

Mr. Palmer and Mr. Howard responded in 
behalf of the class of '56, and the meeting 
was fittingly brought to a close with the re- 
marks of Prof. Packard — long continued and 
hearty applause greeting the grand old pro- 
fessor, as indeed every mention of his name 
had caused during the da}'. 

With the conclusion of Prof. Packard's 
remarks, the audience adjourned, highly 
pleased with the college and the Commence- 
ment, and with that peculiarly kindly feeling 
towards themselves and others which a boun- 
teous and well enjoyed dinner produces. 

In the evening a reception was given by 
the President to the members of the gradua- 
ting class and their friends. Many of the 
alumni and friends of the college were pres- 
ent, the large attendance of ladies being 
especially noticeable. The occasion was, 
even more than usual, an enjoyable one, and 
a fit ending to the festivities of the week. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



The Faculty hat is a light straw. 

Libby, '82, is bell-ringer for next year. 

Hon. W. P. Frye has been elected trustee. 

" Let each new temple nobler than the last," etc. 



The Sophomores, like '82, have not buried "Anna." 

Some of the hay on the campus was cured by a 
new process. 

A second edition of the Class Day invitations had 
to be printed. 

'84 Man — "I never did think much of a Soph- 
omore, till now." 

The stage in the church wasn't large enough to 
accommodate the full Governor's staff. 

The paths and hedges received their annual brace 
and looked very finely during Commencement. 

Prof. — "What is the greatest obstacle an army 
can meet on the way ? " Student. — "The enemy." 

C.L.Baxter, '81, and Anson Morrill Goddard, '82, 
have been awarded Brown Memorial SchoLarships. 

Commencement Dinner, held under a tent, assumes 
the aspect of a lively circus when the grand rush for 
seats is made. 

The Examining Committee were informed by one 
of our Instructors that only one kind of horse was 
known in his recitation. 

Some of the Seniors returned looking as though 
their hands had met a pitchfork handle, and their 
faces the heat of the hay field. 

The town fathers are taking measures to suppress 
"Vandalism." It is high time they understood that 
all mischief cannot be laid to the students. 

The Freshmen have been praised for passing 
their annual examinations so satisfactorily. The 
Sophomores, it is said, did not do so well as last 
year. 

The Greek Prize was awarded to E. A. Packard, 
with honorable mention of Holden. The papers pre- 
sented were very even and the award difiicult to 
make. 

The most ardent cadet cannot complain that the 
military department lacks support. If money can 
bring about the desired end, the drill ought to be 
most popular. 

It cost the Seniors about one hundred dollars to 
present the band concert for the people's amusement. 
Isn't the town of Brunswick somewhat indebted to 
the college for its amusement? 

The prizes for target shooting were awarded as 
follows : The best team shooting, that of Company C. 
Best individual shot, H. P. Kendall, '83. The prize 
for best drill was given to H. L. Johnson, '81, the 
others being dropped from the ranks for what seemed 
to the spectators a stupid blunder on their part. 



76 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



Psychology examination. First Ques. — "What 
is the derivation of Psychology?" Sec. Ques. — 
"Give the derivation of anthropology? " Voice in the 
rear — "This isn't a Greek recitation." 

The newly fledged Sophomores, while celebrat- 
ing their freedom, were stopped by a member of the 
Faculty. They fail, with others, to see where they 
were in the wrong, or where was the harm of the 
demonstration. 

Freshman — "What if the committee ask for my 
cribbed book?" Soph. — "Say you borrowed it of 
the Prof." The exegency actually occurs, the advice 
is followed, and the committee return the book with 
thanks to the Professor. 

'85 makes its bow from the stage of college life, 
at the entrance examination ; its record, as a class, is 
yet to be made, and we wait with curiosity the devel- 
opments of next term. The class promises to consist 
of more than forty men. 

"Now is the time for disappearing." The young 
alumnus departs with his filter-paper, seemingly, 
forever; but at his triennial, we shall see him "bob 
up serenely" and partake in an old-time Bowdoin 
celebration, as if no interim had occurred. 

It is to the regret of all that the prospect of being 
represented in a college regatta had to be given up. 
There is the consolation that it was not Bowdoin's 
fault this time, though it seems hard that when we 
were best prepared there should be no race. 

The last vistage of the old gymnasium was re- 
moved, with the two shells which were placed in the 
grass, near Cleaveland. The six-oar has been taken 
to the boat-house, and the skift', the first boat in Bow- 
doin's navy, has been otherwise disposed of. 

At the annual meeting of the Phi Beta Ka))pa So- 
ciety, held Wednesday A.M., the following were 
elected ofiicers for the ensuing year: Hon. Josiah 
Crosby of Dexter, Pres. ; Hon. Joseph VV. Symonds, 
Porthind, Vice-Pres. ; Prof. F. C. Robinson, See. and 
Treas. 

'84 made a departure from the usual routine, in 
holding their class supper at Augusta instead ol at 
Bath. They feel fully satisfied with the eliange 
themselves, and certainly obtained a very excellent 
bill of fare at reasonable rates. The increase of dis- 
tance to be traveled was the only objection to be 
tliought of. The literary exercises were performed 
with credit to the speakers, and received with ajipre- 
eiation by the class. They were as follows: 
Oration. A. II. Brown 

riiiin. C. W. Lonjircn 

lli:<lory. H. C. I'hiniiey 

Prophecy. O. W. Means 



It is reported that Prof. Carmichael has tendered 
his resignation as a member of the Faculty. We hope 
such may not be the case. Prof. Vose is to remain in 
his old position at an advanced salary. One student 
in '85 is in his department. 

W. A. Perkins, of '83, has taken the Smyth Math- 
ematical Prize. Pettingill and Stetson, honorably 
mentioned. Considerable credit is due to the success- 
ful competitor in this class, as the number electing 
Mathematics has been large, and all have seemed to 
do unusually well in this department. 

Literary Committee : Prof. H. L. Chapman, Bruns- 
wick ; Prof. J. B. Sewall, Braintree, Mass. ; Hon. W. 
S. Putnam, Portland ; Rev. Edward N. Packard, 
Dorchester, Mass. ; D. C. Linscott, Esq., Boston, 
Mass. The following men, from the graduating 
class, were elected members : C. H. Cutler, F. A. 
Fisher, A. D. Gray, H. L. Staples, F. E. Smith, W. 
I. Cole, C. L. Baxter, F. C. Stevens, C. E. Harding, 
W. A. Gardner, and John J. Herrick of Chicago, 
class of '76. 



The Sophomore Prize Dec 

at the church, on Wednesd;iy, 

'83 contains some fine speaker 

spoken of as a verj' fine one. 

awarded to C. H. Stetson, the 

The program was as given : 

The Assault on Charlps Sumner. 
Speerli ol' I{in!;li:iM Galhaize. 
Speeeli of Vindicalion. 
Mi'xiean .\nni'x:iliim. 
William IJovd Garrison. 
.Mirahaiii Linc.ilu. 
jlrrvos ol I 111- LaiiilolPonn. 
■rill" DviiiL' .\li-hriiii>r. 
Rarhai'ilv of N'ntioiial Hatreds. 
How IIc"Savi'(l .SI. Micliael's. 
Viclorv ill Draih. 
Ue^liny of America. 



lamations were given 
July 6. The class of 
3, and the exhibition is 
The first prize was 
second to H. L. Allen. 



II. E. Cole 

C. n. Stetson 

G. B. Swan 

N. B. K. IVItinsill 

II. I>. KeiKlill 

H. L. AH.n 

n. A. Ha-eom 

R. C. Wa-lit.iirn 

W. A. IVrkius 

F. .M. I''lins 

A. C. (iil)-.)U 

A. K. Austin 



One by one old landmarks are constantly disap- 
pearing; places fresh in our memories are changed 
and gradually fade away. Weexpeiience loss, figu- 
ratively speaking, by fire, swoid, and famine. 
Our Professors receive louder calls, from richer 
colleges; the hand of the artisan tnuiaforms the 
crumbling walls into a thing of architectural beauty, 
but no longer fimiliar to student mind or muscle; 
and finally, to consummate the radical spirit of the 
times, the mischievous torch of the incendiary is ap- 
plied to one of our most time-honored edifices, with 
a view of bligliting iho beautiful surroundings of this 
institution. Nothing extra has been chiirgod upon 
our term bills. It has been decided to be the work 
of yaggers. The little brick building is rising, 
sphinx like, from its ashes, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



77 



The Junior Prize Exhibition was given Monday 
evening, July 11. The church was crowded with a 
most cultivated audience, and the exhibition was con- 
sidered one of the best. The committee, after long 
deliberation, gave the first prize equally to E. T. 
McCarthy and C. H. Gilmau ; and the second to W. 
0. Plimpton. The speakers and the selections wore : 



The Pilot's Story. 
On the Irish Famine. 
The Diver. 
Charles Sumner. 
Pericles to the People. 
The Drama of History. 
Death of Benedict Arnold. 
Our Soldier Dead. 
Galileo Galilei. 
Abolition of War. 
Trial of Warren Hastings. 
Toussaint I'Ouverture. 



M. H. (ioodwin 

M. S. Holway 

C. H. Oilman 

W. A. Moody 

Howard Carpenter 

C. E. Stinchfield 

J. R. Jordan 

A. F. Belcher 

W. O. Plimpton 

G. F. Bates 

G. H. Pierce 

E. T. McCarthy 



The following is a summary of the base-ball 
nine's work since the opening of the season. Upon 
examination, it will be seen that Staples leads in 
fielding, with five games played, while Knapp stands 
first on seven games. For the batting Stetson is at 
the head. 



Wilson, p., l.f 6I29| 

Eiigers, 2d h, s.s 7J33 

Gardner, 3(1 b 7|3:3| 

Staples, Istb SilSJ 

Snow, c, r.f 7:301 

Wrifrht. ".s., p 7'29' 

Knapp, 1st b., e.,r.f....l 7 27 

Stetson, v.f., 2d b ; 5 18 

Hajigertv, c.f, lb ■ I 7 28 

Smith, l.f 1 7 29 



7 11 



6 14 
4 23 
1 30 

7 24 

8 .-; 

8 38 
61 8 
4 19 
.5 14 



23 9 
21 10' 
14 16i 

0! ll 



.776 
.698 
.963 
-659 
.791 
.810 
.786 
.731 
613 



Tlie above charges the pitchers and catchers with 
wild pitches and passed balls as errors. 

The followini 
opponents. 



is a comparative summary with 





A.B. 


R. 


iB. 


T.B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Bowdolns . 


.269 


47 


52 


47 


186 


109 


73 


Oppouents. 


.29<i 


61 


74 


82 


183 


106 


85 



PERSONAL. 



[We earnestly solicit communications to this column 
from any who may have au interest in the Alumni.] 

'48.— A recent number of the Journal of Educa- 
tion contained a sketch of Dexter A. Hawkins, Esq., 
of New York City. 



'54. — Joseph Emerson Smith died suddenly in 
Chicago, Illinois, June 16th. The burial was at his 
old home, Wiscasset. 

'57.— The Rev. H. R. Howard, S.T.D., has re- 
signed the rectorship of the Episcopal Church, in 
Pottsdam, N. Y., on account of ill health. 

'60.— Capt. Frederick A. Kendall, U. S. A., has 
been ordei-ed to join his company in Dakota. 

'66. — Rev. George W. Kelley preached the ser- 
mon at the recent meeting of the Washington County 
Conference of Congregationalists. 

'74. — Elbridge Gerry, formerly of Portland, has 
been appointed a member of the Elevated Railroad 
Commission of New York City, by Mayor Grace. Mr. 
Gerry was a member of the Cumberland Bar before 
his removal to New York, and is now a member of 
the law firm of Voorhees, Morrison & Gerry. 

'76. — Rev. George F. Pratt has entered upon his 
duties as Rector of Grace Church, Bath. 

'79. — M. K. Page lately graduated from the Law 
School of Columbian University, Washington, D. C. 

'80. — H. A. Wing is on the editorial board of the 
Lewislon Journal. 



NECROLOGY, 1880-81. 

'18.— Moses Emery ; b Poland, July 16, 1794; d 
Saco, May 12, 1881 ; age 87. 

'19. — James Stackpole ; b Waterville, Nov. 8, 
1798; d Waterville, July 18, 1881; age 82. 

'23. — William George Crosby; b Belfast, Sept. 
10, 1805; d Belfast, March 21, 1881; age 75. 

'24:._William Mason ; b Castine, May 8, 1805; d 
Charlestown, Mass., March 18, 1881; age 76. 

'27.— John Heddle IliUiarJ; b Gorham, Jan. 13, 
1808; d Oldtown, Nov. 30, 1880; age 73. 

'30.— Darius Adams; b Gilead, April 1, 1805; d 
Rockton, 111., Nov. 5, 1880; age 76. 

'32. — Charles Edwards Abbott; b Brunswick, 
Dec. 24, 1811; d Hartford, Ct., July 25, 1880; age 
69. 

'36. — Jabez Howard Woodman; b New Glouces- 
ter, April 10, 1815; d Boston, March 15, 18S1 ; age 
66. 

'38.— Stephen Mounffort Vail ; b Union Vale, N. 
Y., Jan., 1818 ; d Staten Island, N. Y., March, 1881 ; 
age 63. 

'42.— Charles Packard; b Minot, Oct. 14, 1818; 
d Windham, N. H., Feb. 20, 1881 ; age 62. 

'43. — Francis Loring Talbot; b Machias, Feb. 29, 
1824 ; d Machias, Nov. 10, 1880 ; age 57. 



78 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



145. — John Parker Skeele ; bKeunebunkport, Oct. 
11, 1821; dEast Bloomfield, N. Y., April 28, 1881; 
age 69. 

'46. — Charles Stetson Crosby; b Hampden, Oct. 
2, 1824; d Manchester, Iowa, Jan. 23, 1881 ; age 57. 

'52. — Dana Boardman Putnam; b Rumford, Sept. 
19th, 1826 ; d Boston, Mass., Feb. 11, 1881 ; age 55. 

'53. — Joseph McKeen ; b Brunswick, Oct. 15, 1832 ; 
d Topsham, Jan. 15, 1881 ; age 48. 

'54. — Harrison Gray ; b Danvers, Mass., Oct. 18, 
1827 ; d Danvers, Mass., Feb. 13, 1878 ; age 50. 

'54. — Joseph Emerson Smith ; b Wiscasset, Mar. 
13, 1835 ; d Chicago, June 16, 1881 ; age 46. 

'55. — Charles Edwin Shaw; b Portland, Sept. 5, 
1835 ; d Austin, Tex., Mar. 3, 1876 ; age 41. 

'60.— Chas. Wm. Gardiner; b Hallowell, May 19, 
1841; d Cedar Rapids, Mich., April, 1880; age 39. 

'63. — Charles Burnham Shackford ; b Conway, N. 
H., Dee, 28, 1840; d Conway, Jan. 1, 1881; age 40. 

'73.— Reuben Baston ; b Bridgton, Feb. 18, 1850; 
d Cape Elizabeth, Sept. 28, 1880; age 31. 

'7a. — Frank Josselyn Lynde; b Bangor, Oct. 2, 
'1855 ; d Oct. 14, 1880 ; age 25. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Whereas, By the s.ad and untimely death of Frank 
Josselyn Lynde, the class of '77, Bowdoin College, 
has been deprived of a much esteemed member, 
therefore be it 

Resolved, That while we recognize in this sad 
event the hand of Inlinite Wisdom, yet we can but 
deplore the loss of our classmate. 

Resolved, That we would express our high appre- 
ciation of his ability and general worth as a student, 
and of his generous disposition and sterling qualities 
as a man. 

Resolved, That with a feeling of the deepest sin- 
cerity, we would tender our profound and heartfelt 
sympathy to the relatives and friends of our late 
brother, who have realized with sorrow, the sudden 
breaking asunder of the chain that linked their hearts 
in cordial love and trusting friendship. 

Resolved, That a coi)y of the foregoing resolutions 
be sent thH bereaved family and to each member of 
the class and be published in the BoWDOlN OlilENT 
and in the daily papers of Porthind and Bangor. 
ClIAS. E. COBB, ■) 
F. II. 11AR(;RAVES, S committee. 
J. E. CHAPMAN, ) 
Brunswick, July 14, 1881. 



An Irishman having heard that a certain astron- 
omer had discovered an asteroid, remarked: " Bo- 
dad, he may have his asteroid, but for meself, oi 
I)refer a hor.so tcr imiV—Yalc News. 



CLIPPINGS. 

"Hello, thiir! 
Going far?" 
"No; not far." 
"How far?" 
"To the bar." 
"Tm thar." 

"Say, Doc, what is good for sore lips?" Oh, I 
don't know, Vassar-line is pretty fair." 

"However great my fall my spirit is unbroken," 
remarked the overturned bicyclist, feeling in his coat- 
tail pocket. — Ex. 

John — "I can marry any girl I please." Tom — 
"Because you can't please any." Joe — "He had bet- 
ter get a little gal-an-try." — Ex. 

Schoolmistress — "What is the dative of Donum?" 
What? Well? Next? Next? Dunce— "Do'no." 
S. M. — "Correct; go to the head." — Lampoon. 

A teacher in a public school gave a sentence to be 
written and properly punctuated. A boy gave" the 
following as a result of his effort: The quality of 
mercy says, "Shakespeare is not strained." 

A bridal couple from Lost Cove, at bre.akfast in 
Monteagle Hotel, conversed as follows: He — 
"Shall I skin you a pertater, honey ? " She — "No, 
thank you, deary, I have one already skun." 

Prof, (viiomentarily abstracted)— "JNIy mind re- 
verts to a little piece of paper I once saw in — ." 
Soph, (utilizing the time by consulting his crib, 
muses) — "Great minds run in the same channel!" 
University Herald. 

Gilbert Stuart once met a lady in Boston who said 
to him : "I have just seen your likeness, Mr. Stuart, 
and kissed it, because it w:is so much like you." "And 
did it kiss you in return?" said he. "No," replied 
the lady. "Then," said the gallant painter, "it was 
not like me." 

Our exchange editor, after looking in vain through 
the encyclopedia, asks: "Does any one know where 
the Neva?" Printer's devil innocently: "What 
Neva?" And his little brother w:intod to know 
why they put Eddie into that box with briiss but- 
tons all over it. — Ex. 

The feeling of utter loneliness experienced by a 
certain Junior at the late preliminary examination, 
on feeling for his faithful pony only to produce a 
wash-bill from his washerwoman — consequent on a 
change of raiment — was only equalled by the smile 
that encircled his facial area as the professor, who had 
been slyly watching him, gobbled it in. — University. 



BOWDOiN ORIENT. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

C. IE. 'TO"^7^3SrSE2^ID, 

CHOICE GROcTrTeS. CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N". B. — Special Rates to Students. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

This house has teen thoronyhhj refitted with every re- 
gard to comfort, and the aim is to make it first-class in all 
its appointments. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

De^\^ITT HOUSE, 

QUIMBY & BIURCH, Proprietors, 



Royal Quimby. 



Eben Muuch. 



^. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bruns-nrick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Vie^ws. 



ALL KINDS OF 



JV^^^n/v^ 



For Schools and Colleges, 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 



X«if:"9'Ki:S/ 




THE FAVORITE NOS. 303-40'4-332-l7O-JSI- WITH 
'HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



. S3MFS' 

DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 



■*^' '^ «i <?i> ?ai**i'?jSi vv wj '^ '^ii.f) 

OFFICE IN LEMONT BLOCK, Brunswick. 

flS"Telephone connection with Coal Yard. 
113° Orders left at Jordan Snow's, Lemout Block, will 
be promptly attended to. 

IRA C. STOGKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 



156 Exchange Street, Portland* 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

^8j and 5(?7 Co7igress St., and 23^ Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

.eSrSEND FOR Price List. 




AMOS L MILLETT & CO., 

JonuEHs AND Uktailp;rs of Standard 

Imporlefl anJ Doniestic Fancy Groceries. 

BUNKEtt JIILL PICKLES A SPECIALTY. 



ESTABLISHED 1S44. 

W. L. WILSON & CO., 

■Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 

F. W. 6TOCKMAN. > 



FIRST- CI.A.SS 



Timm^ Organs, mi Mielodeoas, 

AT LOW I'llIUKS. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 

T. W. EMWQ'M, B'BW^^wxem, Mm. 



^mtUm (j:@II©|© |f elieal ^spapliaeDl 

The Sixty-Firsi Annual Cour^:e of Lectures at the Jtledical 
School of Maine, will commence February 10th, ISSl. and 
continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

PACULTY. — JosHOA L. Chamberlain, LL.D., President-, Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; William W. Greene, M.D., Sur- 
gery and Clinical Surgery; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Women and Children, Frederic H. Gerrish, M.D., Materia 
Medica, Tberapeutics, and Public Health ; Charles W. Goddabd, A.M., 
Medical Jurisprudence 5 Henry Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Bcbt G. 
"Wilder, M.D., Physiology •, Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Anatomy ; Daniel 
F. Ellis, M.D., Registrar and Librarian j AcorsTca P. Dctdlet, M.D,, 
Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Botanical Microscopes, Fancy Goods. Watches, Clocks, and Jewelr.v 
promptly repaired and warranted. 

nrLe Specta-cles an-ci E37"esrla.sses. 
EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Botind in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Rviling and Blank Book Work to Order. 

W. B. KNIGHT, 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

.^i^TransieDt Orders for Mill; or Cream filled by piving suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 



J. M. CURTIS, Proprietor. 

BOOKS. STA.TXO'dTS.-RnC, ROOIME 
PA.PER, F»ERIOrHCAr.S, <SeC. 



E.SMITH, ..GROCER. 

Lowest Prices^to^tudent Clubs^ 

1. WIL,S,01f, Bispenser 0:f Fire Drugs, M:ediciiies, and C-hemicais. 



Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Batk Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions a Specialty. 

1Sa.A.J.N STREEX. ------ BRUNBIAriCK, AXE. 

JOURNAL FBK88, LISBON STRBET, LKWISTON, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



AT 0. W. ^LLIM'S 

DRUG STORE. 

THE FINEST CI&ARS ANB SMOKING TOBACCOS. 
THE BEST PERFUMERY. 

THE BEST TOILET SOAPS. 

THE BEST HAIR BRUSHES. 

The liargest and Best Assortment of 

Drugs, Patent Medicines, &c., &c. 

To be found in this miirket. 

Leinotit Block, Brunswick, Maine. 

S. O. OOFFIM, 

— DEALER IN — 

PROVISIONS AND GROCERIES 

4®? Special Kates to Student Clubs.,:ga' 
CORNER OF MAIN AND ELM STREETS. 



gOLDCLip 




TOBACCQ&GIGARETTES 

Either Sweet or Plain, are of the Tinest 
Qualities, ALWAYS Uniform and Reliable. 

TRY THE SEAL-SKIN CIGAR 

hand-made CUBAN STYLE. 

SEND $3.75, and we will forward 
by mail, registered, a 50 box of the 
Seal-Skia Cigar. 

This is a special offer to enable smokers to test this 
celebrated brand. After a trial you mil Binoke no other. 

S.F. HESS &CO. 

Premium Totiacco Works, Rochester, N.Y> 



STXJI3EN^TS 

Desiring Employment, for Season of 1881, 

Kncluse Ic. sliinip, ami \vrilc for circular, to 

THE MANHATTAN AGENCY. 

733 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 

Please mention tliis paper. 



00 TO 

TO BUY YOUR 

Groceries, Canned Goods, Fruits, 

Confectionery, Tobacco, and Cigars. 

Sijeciul R;itus to Student Clulib. 

Main Street, Head of the Mall, Brunswick. 



MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 



Prepares for Bowdoin and the best New England 
Colleges. Offers, also, a thorough Seminaet Course 
to young ladies, and a shorter course for business 
pursuits. For Catalogues, address 

Rev. A. W. BURR, Hallowell, Me. 

m: A.^^ ^ ^ R D ' s 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

Jgi" Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Ooal "ITard. in. Topslia-m., 



WHERE NONE BUT 



Tbe Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 






B-A-TH, 3S^A.I1STE. 



I. S. BALGOMi:^ 

DEAIJiR IN 

Harflf are, Stoves, Croctery, M Glassware, 



Bft.XTNS'UriCK. ME. 



Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCTOBER 19, 1881. 



No. 7. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

IX PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

Books, Stationefj, and Paper Hangings, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

leei-Atteniioi iteaeats 14181 

* SPRING STYLES * 

OF 

Nobby Stiff and Soft Hats 

NEW STYLES in LINEN COLLARS & CUFFS. 
NEW PATTERNS in NECK- WEAR. 

A FISE ASSORTMENT OF 

SPRING OVERCOATS AND SUITS, 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock. 
FRA-ISTK E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets 



OmUTMII TO SMOKEHS. 

Beware of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 



New Cigarette, 
The VETERAN. 




TRY IT. 
'^- Fine, Mild & Sweet. 

Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 

FOR YOUR 

NOBBY HAT 

Go or Send to 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 
SIGN OF THE GOLD HAT. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENOEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIOHABLE STTLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOE 



UNDER FALMOUTH HOTEL. 



JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, ETC., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QUALITY, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor Casco, 



PORTLAND, 
A. CARTER. 



MAINE. 
J. W. D. CARTER. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



A renrfjanizntion of the Course of Instruction 
has recently been made, in wliich the distinction be- 
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main- 
tained, but all academic undci'sraduates are placed 
on one footinij, with the opportunity of followinix, to 
a considerable extent, such liues of study as they 
prefer. 

All students entering the Colleff? proper, are ex- 
amined on the same course of preparatory studies. 
After tlie second year a liberal ran^-e of electives is 
offered, within which a student may follow his choice 
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount 
pursued. 

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated 
as a distinct course, are still, for the most part, re- 
tained cilhcr in the required or elective lists. More 
place is also given to the Modern Languages than 
they have hitherto had. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all 
who complete the Academic Course. 

The Engineering Department remains as here- 
tofore, and facilities arc oflerc<l for study of the 
various branches of this science. The means of 
theoretical instruction are am|>le, and the town of 
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen- 
tres in the State, and in the immediate vicinity of 
many important jniblic works, aftbrds excellent 
opportunities for the study of actual structures. 
The College also enjoys many favors from the United 
States Coast Sui-vey Office. The admission is the 
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the 
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will 
be taken, if desired, in the jilacc of Latin. 

Tho.so who complete satisfactorily the four years' 
course in engineering will receive the Degree of Sc. 
B. Those who conqilete a two yoai's' course of ad- 
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or 
Mechanical Engineer. Students nut candidates for 
a degi'co will be i-cceived at any stage for which an 
examination shall show them to lie fitted, and may 
remain f(ir any desired time. Further information 
will be furni.shcd on application to Professor G. L. 
Vose. 

Terms of Admission to tiie Academic Course. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 

following subject.s : 

Latin.— Latin Grammar, including I'rnscidy; ^^'rit- 
ing Lathi (:5.) Lcs.scms in Allcu'.s Ijatiii Coiii|msi- 
tion are recominciiileil as indicating the amonnt 
required for cxaniiiiation) ; \'irgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and ,six books ol' the A^iieid; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 

£)REEK. — Iladlcy's Greek Grammar; Xonophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek i'roso Composition. 

AKCIENT GEOGUArHY. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Roo^ 

and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa" 

tioiis of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 

I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 

Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission 
will be required to produce testimonials of good 
moral character. The time for examination is the 
Friday after Commencement and the Friday before 
the opening of the first term. In exceptiinial cases 
applicants maybe examined at other times. Candi- 
dates for admission to advanced classes will be ex- 
amined in the studies which such classes have 
accomplished. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrange- 
ments with the Principals of schools and academies 
having a regular course preparatory fur college of at 
least three years' duratinn, whereby theii' pupils 
may be examined for admission to cullege at their 
respective schools, in connection with their own 
final examinations. 

The amount of instruction now oflCered and yios- 
sible to be taken in the several iirincipal lines of 
study is exhibited comparatively, as rciluced to one 
scale, in the following manner. This is, however, 
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal 
length : 

I^atin, eight terms. 

Greek, eight terms. 

^lathematics, eight terms. 

German, four and a half terms. 

English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English 
Literature, three and a half terms. 

French, three terms. 

Italian, one term. 

Spanish, one term. 

Rbeiiiric (tbrmal), one term. Rhetorical and 
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a 
hair terms. 

Natural lli.stnry studies, five and a half terms. 

l^liNsies and .Astronomy, foui' terms. 

Cheinistiy, four terms. 

llisioiy, Ancient and Modern, two terms. 

Political Economy, one and a half terms. 

Public. Law, two terin.s. 

Menial and ^h)ral Philosophy, including Logic, 
four terms. 

C:hristian Evidences, one tei'in. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses arc as follows: Tuition, .fs/.'i. 
Uooin rent (half), average, S'.i.>. Incidentals, IJSIO. 
Total regular College charges, !?1 10. 

Board is obtained in town at .*:! to $4 a week. 
Otlier necessar.N' e.xpen.scs will probably amount to 
,'i!4(' a year. Students can, however, liy forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of livinsr. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol XL 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCTOBER 19, 1881. 



No. 7. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE CLASS OF '82, OP 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Arthur G. Staples, Manafriug Editor. 

Charles H. Gilman, Business Editur. 

Melvin S. Holway, Eugene T. McCarthy, 

William A. Moody, Warren 0. Plimpton, 

George G. Weeks. 

Terms — $2.00 a year is A.TtvK'SCB 5 single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be dir'jcted to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Tol. Xr., No. 7.-0CT. 19, 1881. 

Editorial Notes 79 

Literary: 

Golden Rod (poem) 81 

TliB Clioiee of au Ocoupatiou 81 

cojimunication 83 

College Items 8.3 

Personal 87 

College World 88 

Clippings 81) 

Editors' Table 90 



EDITORIAL HOTES. 



It i.s a niiitter of regret, perliaps, tliat our 
college term begins so late as it does, and tlie 
Orient i.-^suing from its long vacation feels 
sadly lonesome. Its fir.st duty, and its pleas- 
ante.st, is to welcome all its readers, and give 
all its best wisiies for a luijipy college year. 
It lias its usual quota of offered advice, its 
usual lack of hearty support, its usual diffi- 
ciilty in picking up tiie scattered train of 
tlionglit wliere Commencement left it, but 
ajiart from these it is really glad to look 
abroad once more over its limited domain. 
To every student the opening of the college 



year is a fruitful period for moralizing. If 
the moralizing results in increased work and 
better attention, then it is profitable ; if not, it 
is a waste of brain power, and better not in- 
dulged in. The Orient has but little advice 
to give to Fi'eshmen because they will learn, 
and they will really be well advised hj their 
instiuctors. The best advice tiiat we could 
give would be : subscribe for the Orient — 
but desist. The lingering dreams of vacation 
rambles, the sweet recollections of summer 
days and nights, and girlish faces, the fond 
remembrances of sad and tearful partings, if 
not quite frozen out can not survive October, 
and we will not advise a S3^stematic uprooting. 
Suffice to say that the Orient comes out 
with its heartiest greeting, claims the support 
of every Bowdoin man, and hopes, as ever, 
to be their property as tiie students' institu- 
tion. It remembers with pleasure our re- 
spected Seniors of last year, and re-echoes its 
best wishes for their welfare. It extends 
especiiilly its welcome to '85, and remarks 
that it is a fine looking class. And with these 
preliminary words tiie Orient glides forth 
into the wide, wide world, tlie last of the 
college journals since vacation. 



Tills number of the Orient is sent to 
every member of '85, and will continue to be 
sent unless otherwise ordered. Tiie earnest 
support of the Freshman class is especially 
necessary to us at this juncture, and we trust 
tiiat tlie class will appreciate that it owes its 
allegiance to the Orient as an institution of 
the college, and that it will respond as heart- 
ily as the preceding classes have done. 



Complaints come to us from the Bugle ed- 



80 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



itors, that money is yet due them. A slight 
appreciation of the position of the editors 
would suggest the payment of these bills, 
and some attempt to lighten tlie difficulties 
of a position by no means an enviable one even 
at the best; nevertheless it is a lamentable fact 
that a certain class has not, as yet, paid for its 
cuts. Due regard for the honor and good name 
of the class would enjoin upon its members tire 
necessity of a prompt attention to this matter. 



It is, perhaps quite unnecessary to make 
the old statement that the columns of the 
Orient are open to contributions from the 
students, but we make it once more for fear 
that the students have forgotten it. There 
seems to be an entire literary stagnation in 
college. We have felt it our duty to assert 
this for some time, 'but have waited in hopes 
that the long vacation might have offered op- 
portunities which were precluded by college 
work. 



being done in boating, without any possible 
chance to do anything at base-ball until sum- 
mer, must relapse soon into complete indo- 
lence unless some sport is introduced. As 
an initiative step the Seniors hoped to intro- 
duce foot-ball, but the attempt seems to have 
fallen still-born ; and as we said before, with 
the exception of a little desultory' kicking 
there has been no activity. The cause has to 
be sought, perhaps, no further than in the 
lateness with which the term begins, but there 
is no reason why, in the montli which remains 
before snow flies, the matter should not be 
agitated and many bona fide games plaj-ed. 
Tlie Orient has a valuable legacy to leave 
to its successors in the protest against this 
lagging in the beginning of the term, but 
there is no reason why some of its inconven- 
iences should not be abated. 



The question of what is to be the type of 
fall athletics is the prominent one. There 
has been in man}' colleges, to a certain extent, 
a revival of cricket, if it can be said that 
cricket was not always prominent. We can 
never remember when this sport was at all 
prominent in Bowdoin, and the thought is 
suggested that there is no valid reason why 
the students should not introduce cricket as a 
sport in lieu of base-ball. The appearance of 
knots of students indulging in desultory foot- 
ball kicking is very well as far as it goes. 
The usual Sophomore-Freshmau game has 
been played it is true, but how played ? We 
will warrant that not a man was aware of tiie 
rules governing foot-ball, and as an inevitable 
consequence the game presented none of the 
aspects of foot-ball. As we witnessed it, it was 
an exhibition of the superior slugging pow- 
ers of the Sopliomores and the timidity of 
the Freshmen. Now a college without a 
gymnasium, without a possibility of anytliing 



Our experienced advice to the Freshmen 
is, form a class organization. Don't be hasty, 
butyou must make the choice soon. It serves 
as a strengthening of class ties, and sets each 
member in a common-sense light before his 
classmates, and insures that the class has been 
drawn into line and is now marching on with 
moie in common. It matters little whom you 
make Vice President, because his office is a sin- 
ecure, and his only dut}^ is to represent the 
dignity and grace of an offijce-holder. It is not 
absolutelj' necessary that the President wear 
ej'eglasses, because he seldom appears in pub- 
lic in his official capacity. Don't neglect to 
take measures to resist aggressions from 
upper classmen, and don't neglect to draw up 
a code of morals for your future guidance. 
Your Treasurer must be honest, and possessed 
of securities tor cash placed in liis possession, 
and must be of a pleasing, beneficent cast of 
countenance in order tinit his a[)pearance may 
be always welcome. Don't neglect to take 
abundant measures to insure activity in col- 
lege sports and enterprises. Buy a boat, 
elect a foot-ball captain, put in a petition 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



81 



to the Faculty for a new gymnasium (you 
will be sure to get it), and keep a bold, aggres- 
sive front until you don the laurels of next 
year. 

The greatest necessity which we now ex- 
perience for the first time is a gymnasium. 
Bowdoin is, we surmise, the only college 
without some appliances for exercise. Owing 
to the destruction of the gj^mnasium, some 
seventy-five men have taken the drill, but the 
drill is not well adapted to the wants of 
boating men or base-ball men. As we have 
said some dozen times previous, it is as well 
known to the Faculty as to ourselves. Some 
one said that why they were throwing biicks 
into the back window of the chemical build- 
ing was to build a gymnasium. Some one 
else proposes that the boys be set to work 
cleaning the college walks for exercise during 
the coming winter. This involves a good idea 
and would develop muscle, but we should miss 
those delightfully crooked paths that we pos- 
sess after the snow-plow has been around in 
winter. The general opinion is that we shall 
be obliged to do without a gymnasium during 
the coming winter. The boating men might 
help themselves some by fitting up rowing- 
apparatus at the boat-house, or in some room 
in college. We fear, however, and say it 
sadlj^ that many will grin with delight as the 
Senior year passes rapidly away without the 
inconvenience of having anything to do. 



There Is no matter more pregnant with 
thought than the attitude which our instruct- 
ors assume towards us in regard to excuses. 
In the main, we are only too happy to echo tlie 
opinion of the college that the attitude of 
the most of our class officers is kind, agree- 
able, and gentlemanly. To this we will make, 
perhaps, not the slightest exception, but there 
are cases, isolated it is true, in which students 
who have passed the years of minority have 
been treated like children. This is a condi- 



tion of things not conducive to respect either 
for the system of excuses or that of class 
officers. No system has ever been more 
bravely fought on the part of the student 
body than the system of excuses, and it is 
marked that the more advanced colleges are 
abolishing it, but we believe that it is a salutary 
law when well administered. It is the duty 
evidently of every class officer to place trust 
in a student as a gentleman. It is poor rec- 
ommendation for the teaching of this col- 
lege when a student, who has passed a length 
of time under its Christian guidance, is not 
believed and trusted. Of course the college 
student is capable of being insulted, and there 
is no easier method known than to question 
the truth of an excuse. As was said above, 
the most successful growing colleges are abol- 
ishing the system. Amherst College pro- 
poses to go a step farther, and admit represen- 
tative students from the various classes to the 
consideration of certain questions intimately 
concerning them. But these facts apart, we 
have no idea of attacking a system for which 
we have an inherent respect. Our wish is 
only to express a hope that our class officers 
will endeavor to make it as pleasant as possi- 
ble, that thej'' will place a belief in the state- 
ment of the student who offers an excuse, 
and that they will remember that the students 
have rights which they are bound to respect. 



GOLDEN ROD. 

T'm sure I cannot tell you what the feeling is 
That's in ray life, which was not known before, 
But when we stood upon the dusty road that led 
Homeward, from out the depths of woodland deep. 
And thou did'st swing athwart the glowing air, 
A rod so tipped with golden fire, that e'en 
The sunlight seemed a moment dimmed, I felt 
A feeling I had never felt before, which grew 
Upon me as we walked, and all around the air 
Was shrill with many voiced insect life. Perchance 
It was the joy that beats in Summer's mighty heart, 



82 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Increased by sunlit hills and verduous woods and 

groves. 
That would have died with Summer's self, but this 

remains 
With thee as its companion thought, — the two are 

joined. 
Sept. 13th, 1881. 



THE CHOICE OF AN OCCUPATION. 

What has this to do with us now, as stu- 
dents, or with our future? In what way can 
it affect us, or why do we need to make such a 
choice ? Our tliouglits and actions depend, 
to quite an extent, upon what our occupation 
in life is to be. If we are to liave a position 
to fill, our natural desire is to be qualified 
to fill that position. We stop ofttimes for 
fear we may not be worthj^ of the charge to 
be entrusted to us. We have need then to 
make a choice, that we may have something 
by wliich to tone our lives and mould our 
characters, something to restrain our headlong 
movements and lasii projects. This choice of 
an occupation tends, then, to regulate our 
lives and characters. 

We also need it to bring our powers to a 
focus. Tlie rays of the sun, wliich fall upon 
us, do not singly afford heat enougli to set 
objects on fire. But where a number are 
brought to a focus by means of the sun-glass, 
their heat becomes so intense that it readily 
kindles a flame. So witii us, our ideas and 
efforts may go this way and that, prtmipted 
by various im[)ulses, without any appaient 
effect. We appear lo possess genius enough, 
but it seems to avail nothing. We ought 
tlierefore to settle upon sometiiing definite, 
and make a ciioice, to concentrate our ideas. 
Then we shall bo al)le to accomplish some- 
tiling, and our abilities will not have been 
wasted. 

But wlien shnll wc clioosc? Shall our 
clioice be made early, or shall we wait unlil 
we get older? Some will tellj'du that it is not 
best to decide too soon. Tiie times may 



change. Also positions may open to you, 
which you would gladly accept if 3-ou had 
not prepa.red your.self for something else. 
Others will tell you that you are not so well 
prepared to judge when young, as when j'our 
mind has in a measure matured \iy the expe- 
rience of years. This last, may perhaps be 
given as one of the strongest reasons why 
we should not decide too early in life. The 
3'outhful imagination is likely to see prospects 
which appear to glow with a brilliancy that 
greatly surpasses their real hue. As years 
add to the store of experience, these pros- 
pects gradually assume their real color. Our 
minds are mature, our ideas enlarged, and we 
stand upon reality, and not a flash of youtii- 
ful imagination. We are prepared then to 
reason candidly, and to fathom the prospects 
and the times, and look upon life as a reality, 
and meet its requirements as such. 

But let us loijk at the other side. We all 
agree that an education is highly important, 
whatever our pursuit in life may be. Also 
that it should be acquired in youth. When 
our minds are developing, we can most easily 
attain to some degree of excellence. Now if 
we choose early in life, we can take such a 
course of study as will fit us for that posi- 
tion. We shall then rise above the ordinar}- 
level of people, who have entered upon the 
same occupation as oin-selves, without the 
proper preparation. 

Again, the habits whicii we form in earl}' 
life will follow us. If we have no true ideas 
of what we are living for, we are likely to 
fall into a state of indifference to the duties 
of life. Because of this, we are given a 
looseness of character which will seriously 
mdit us for the responsibilities entrusted to 
us. Heedless of the power with, which cus- 
tom fastens uijon us, we acquire a habit of 
iudcci.-ion, and drift about from one thing to 
another. We sic sonic people who iiave 
never •^eltlcil diiiuiicly upon anything, but 
have dragged out tiie allotted time of their 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



83 



lives in di'eaming of llie future. So tliey 
dream on until they w<ake up at death's door, 
and declare that life is a farce and only a 
state of existence. 

But I hear you say how shall we. choose? 
First we should consider our natural inclina- 
tions. We are endowed witii different talents. 
Some of us excel in one thing, otiiers in 
anotiier. One may have a taste for mechanics, 
and would excel in that branch, while it 
would be imjjossible for him to make a suc- 
cessful lawyer. Another may have an incli- 
nation for being an artist, and at the same 
time lie could not succeed as a physician. 
The thing which we are inclined towards, 
and whiuh we can enter into with our whole 
soul, and which affords us the most pleasure 
as an occupation, is likely to be the one in 
which we will be most successful. Tiie 
parent too often makes a mistake in choosing 
for his son. He would have him a profes- 
sional man, when, if he but studied his 
natural tendencies, he would find he would 
make a much better farmer. In most cases, 
if the ideas of the son are aspiring, it is bet- 
ter to let him choose for himself. 

The time of life is to be considered. A 
man arrives at the age of thirty. Circum- 
stances have prevented him up to this time 
from deciding upon an occupation. What is 
he to do? Shall he commence and take a 
college course? Shall he choose an occupa- 
tion which will take him several years to get 
a thorough understanding of ? No. Inmost 
cases it would be im[iraclicable. In veiy 
many instances it would be impossible for a 
man iiaving ariived at that age, to pursue a 
course of study successfully. His brain is so 
matured at lliat time of life, that it Avould be 
difficult for him to gnisp those briinches. 
which he might had lie begun young and 
gradually exjianded his mind. In the m;ijor- 
ily of cases, it would Jifudly be worth the 
while, either to lake a course of study, or to 
choose a pursuit, which would take some 



years to get a thorough knowledge of. He 
would better choose something which he 
may enter upon at once. Something that 
would be adapted to his liking, and benefi- 
cient to his pecuniary interests. 

Next we should choose with deliberation. 
The old proverb that "haste makes waste" 
should be heeded. But we should be care- 
ful that our deliberation does not lengthen 
into delay. We should consider our situation, 
and also our opportunities. We should study 
our own abilities as well as the prospects of 
the age in which we live. We should take 
into account our financial outlook. 

Having considered the various conditions 
of this choice, we come now to the key of 
success, determination. Having balanced 
your situation and opportunities with your 
abilit3', say "I will," with determiuation. 
Although clouds of discouragement assail you, 
determination will penetrate tliem, and bring 
back the glorious sun of pi'ospect. In this 
one word you find your expectations realized, 
and upon this j'ou must found your choice. 



COMMUHICATION. 



Editors of Orient : 

There is a matter which has for some time 
furnished opportunity for agitation within the 
college world, and which has, in a mild way, 
been discussed by ourselves. We refer to the 
subject of compulsory attendance at the le- 
ligious exercises of tiie college. Undoubtedly, 
it will at no distmit da}', receive the earnest at- 
tention of our authorities, and in the uieanlime 
we submit tliat criticism and objections are 
entirely in order. Tiie authorities of several 
institutions, with a proper sense of tlie fitness 
of tilings, and recognizing the force of ptiblic 
opinion, as expressed by the student body, 
have made attendance optional, and this is as 
it should be. 



84 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Time was when questions of religion were 
made a matter foi- governmental supervision, 
and appeared in that union of church and 
state, which is so at variance with our repub- 
lican institutions, and which has long since 
met with condemnation. The time has ceased, 
however, when men acknowledge or submit 
to such arbitrary'' and ill-advised intervention, 
and in matters of conscience in this country, 
at least, man acknowledges no superior. This 
change of thought has been accompanied by 
corre.'iponding statutory modifications. Oc- 
casionally, however, some old forgotten law, 
mouldy, and so far as it concerns any good 
purpose, useless, is dragged from its obscurity 
to prove a source of mortification to the in- 
nocent transgressor, and a cause for merri- 
ment and surprise that men could be so blind 
and intolerant. As relics of these past ages 
and intolerant customs, none are more worthy 
of attention than our present objectionable 
college laws. It may be thought to be a 
mark of conservatism, — for be it known we 
pride ourselves that conservatism is distinct- 
ively a characteristic of this institution — this 
being loth to change our customs; but it 
should be remembered that conservatism, 
while implying a cautiousness more than ordi- 
nary, does not necessarily compel one to be 
blind to one's interests, to progress, and to the 
freest and noblest sentiments, regard for re- 
ligious and civil liberty. Sucii a condition of 
things would result rather from a blind policj', 
and from a spirit of old fogyism. 

Such regulations at any time could not 
fail of being obnoxious ; but there are times 
when circumstances lend to them a peculiar 
strength. Enforced in an institution osten- 
sibly established for the purpose of drawing 
from young men all that is best, and teaching 
the highest and broadest development, neces- 
sitating a mutual feeling of trust and appre- 
ciation of responsibility, they are certainly a 
curious commentary upon such professions. 
Our authorities can have but a poor idea of 



student nature and student moialit}'. To 
these latter religious feeling and regard for 
religious institutions must indeed be at a mini- 
mum. Or perhaps it may be students are 
unable as j'et to distinguish the good from the 
evil, or, granted this capability, they willfully 
choose the latter ; and 3'et such is the only 
conclusion we are able to draw from the fact 
that religious exercises are compulsor}-. But 
aside from these objections, which ma\' per- 
haps partake of the abstract in their nature, 
there are sound sanitary reasons why there 
should be a change. The temperature of the 
chapel, from its peculiar heating system, is 
rarely oppressive, and that it is the source of 
numerous colds and no little sickness, there 
can be no good reason for doubt. Of his fit- 
ness, physically, to attend these exei'cises the 
student himself is the best judge, and surely 
the present system takes no account of this. 

Far be it from our purpose to criticise any 
well meant, even though ill-directed, religious 
effoits ; but we submit there is abundant 
room for improvement in this connection. 
Trust less to arbitrary rules and appeal rather 
to the manliness and comiuon sense of the 
students. To be sure this would seem to be 
a radical change — a dejjarture from our con- 
servative policy ; but that is not necessarily 
injurious, which, recognizing anything good, 
gladly embraces it. We believe that no 
marked deterioration would be observed, and 
perhaps there may be an improvement. At 
any rate the experiment is worthy a trial. 
Religious principles were never instilled 
through coujpulsion ; nor is sjiiritual grace an 
offspring of obedience to statutory laws. 
Treat the students more like men, gentlemen, 
and less like irresponsible individuals. 

V. 



When lie returned to his scat in the tliealre, and 
said lie had jiisl stepped out to see some one, she 
gravel}- responilcd, "It must have been the Evil 
One." And when the j'oung man asked "If she saw 
the cloven foot," she turned up her pretty nose and 
said. " No, but I smell the clove in breatli." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



85 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



'Rah, '85 ! 

The drill booms. 

Senior-es last week. 

McCarthy, '82, is bell-ringer. 

Freshmen all take the Orient. 

Hutchins, '83, has charge of the cabinet. 

Geological plum pudding is a new delicacy. 

Professor Vose has been in town for a few days. 

"Village improvement" is slowly climbing the 
hill. 

A graduate translates vale et semper, " Alwa3'S 
the same." 

One of the Seniors was lately asked if he be- 
longed to '85. 

W. W. Curtis, '82, has rejoined his class and is 
living in town. 

Two novi homines got lost the other night in the 
campus woods. 

The monitors at present are Stearns, Russell, 
Hall, and Gould. 

Has '81 degenerated? We hear Cole has been in 
town with a circus. 

Some students in Physics are having trouble with 
" virluoiis velocity." 

Why do the Freshmen alwaj's sit down after the 
first prayer in church ? 

The former engineering room is used for Greek 
and Latin recitations. 

Juniors are taking their dose of Physics with the 
usual bitter complaint. 

Much sought and long desired — a good crossing 
at the noi'tli campus gate. 

The class officers for this term are Professors Leo, 
Robinson, Avery, and Smith. 

Quite a number of the younger alumni were In 
town at the first of the term. 

The country will be startled to learn that J. 
Qould has entered this college. 

Prof. Campbell arrived last week and began reci- 
tations in Psychology on Monday. 

Lennan and Crowley of Bates, and Wheeler of 
Dartmouth, are the new men in '83. 

In Physics: Prof.— " Mr. L., give an example 
of inertia." Mr. L. — " Wood, sir." 

The Delta Kappa Epsilon and Theta Delta Chi 
Clubs have removed to Cleaveland Street. 



A geologist was recently unable to explain the 
formation and location of bars in this vicinity. 

A number of students of this college acted as 
waiters at the Glen House last summer. 

Professor Robinson has been teaching Chemistrj' 
at the Harvard Summer School during vacation. 

There are forty-five nam'es on the Freshman 
monitor's list, and forty-three men have been in 
chapel. 

Prof. Robinson last week gave the Seniors a few 
exercises in Mineralogy, and with them visited the 
cabinet. 

Prof. Chapman now has his study in North W. H. 
Fisher and Johnson have the instructors' room in 
North Appleton. 

Professor Smith still retains the Freshmen in 
Geometry, while Mr. Fisher hears the class in Alge- 
bra during the afternoon. 

The library is now open daily from 11.30 a.m. to 
12.30 P.M., and from 1 to 3 p.m. ; on Wednesday and 
Saturday from 3 to 4 p.m. 

Prof. Lee has called the attention of the Geology 
class to the distinct stratification seen in the sand pit 
in front of Memorial Hall. 

A crowd warming themselves by the reading- 
room stove were much surprised when some one 
noticed that there was no Are in it. 

There is a larger number of students rooming 
alone this fall, than usual, so that the rooms in the 
college buildings are nearly all occitpied. 

With Prof. Vose's departure comes the suspen- 
sion of the engineering denartraent. Students in this 
course of study will finish with the regular classical 
division. 

'84: as yet has had only a few mild cases of nec- 
essary discipline over its jorotegcs, and, on the whole, 
the relations of the two under classes are most 
friendly. 

Back number wanted. — Any one having No. 1, 
Vol. IV., of the Orient, and desiring to dispose of 
the same, will confer a favor by addressing the busi- 
ness editor. 

The attempt of a few Freshmen to hold a peanut 
drunk, on the 14th, was interrupted by the Sopho- 
mores, who proceeded to confiscate the usual mate- 
rial of this festivity. 

A Freshman was recently visited at night by 
members of his own class, "taken out" into an ad- 
joining room and put through the usual routine be- 
fore he discovered the deception. 



8G 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The Seninrs li.ivo purchased ;i foot-ball, and :ire 
relieving the'r oppressive dignity liy some livel}' 
matches. It is expected that a cliallenge will be 
given to other classes. 

'85 has done nothing definitely in regard to boat- 
ing. A orew should be put on the river before 
colder weather, if possible, as there is no place in 
which to train during the winter. 

The Juniors will not pursue exactly the same 
order of study as last year. Analytical Chemistry, 
at ])resent, comes in the Fall Terra, while Astronomy 
will be taken up during Senior year. 

The first two weeks of the term were just suited 
to the majority of Seniors in regard to the amount of 
work to be done, but meanwhile the class have been 
whistling "The Campbells are coming." 

The boat-house was twice broken into during va- 
cation, and all the locks on the dressing-room closets 
were forced open. Nothing of importance was 
missed and none of the boats were injured. 

In '83, Corliss, Day, and Hutchins have elected 
Mathematics; Snow, Woodbury, Wheeler, and Lin- 
scott, Greek; none have yet chosen Latin, and the 
majority of the class are in the Zoology division. 

The drill now numbers seventy-five men. J. W. 
Crosby, Capt. ; E. R. Jewett, 1st Lieut. ; W. E. 
Mason, 2d Lieut. Attendance on this exercise is 
optional, and as there is now no gymnasium it 
promises to be well supported. 

'8-t, as Freshmen, drew the present Juniors over 
the line at rope-pull, but have been paid in their own 
coin by '85. The Sophomores pulled their best but 
were fairly beaten by the force of numbers, and '85 
begins her college course with the rope-pull as her 
first class victory. 

The offices of Senior and Junior Librarians no 
longer exist. In their place Prof. Johnson is to have 
one permanent assistant, Longren, '84. The reasons 
of this change i'rom the old custom are obvious, and 
the advimtageous results are the facilities for work 
in the library and the increase of the hours of access. 

The address of President Chamberlain at the 
chapel, Sunday, the 9th, on the death of Pi-esident 
Garfield and the loss to ihn college by the di'cease of 
Dr. Greene, was received by all present with inicrest 
and attenlion. It was much legretletl that (lie dark- 
ness |)revented completion of the discourse at that 
time. 

'81 did not present their boat to the association, 
but void! to ofier it for sale, intending to devote the 
proceeds to the purchase of some presentation for the 



library. The boat rests in its old place at the boat- 
house, and terms can be obtained of the class 
committee, John Dike, Brunswick, and H. S. Payson, 
Portland. 

Arrangements were made for tlie usual scrub 
race, to be held last Saturday. Some of the crews, 
however, were broken up by the absence of several 
boating men, and unfavorable weather caused the 
final postponement. Under these circumstances 
there will probably be no more rowing until next 
spring. 

A life-size poi-traitof John A. Andrew, by Alfred 
Ordway, after Wm. M. Hunt, has been given to the 
college. The name of the donor is not now made 
public, but the thanks of all are none the less due. 
The painting is intended for the main room in Memo- 
rial Hall, but is placed, for the prese'it, in the north 
wing. In the library is an interesting memoir of 
Governor Andrew which the students ma}' desire to 
read in this connection. 

The Boating Association has elected the following 
officers: W. O. Plimpton, Commodore; A. E. Aus- 
tin, Vice Commodore; H. E. Cole, Treasurer; J. A. 
Waterman, Secretary; E. U. Curtis, E. A. Packard, 
A. H. Brown, Directors. The Treasurer reported 
$9.61 in the treasury, §10 due on the Junior's boat, 
and $6 on that of the Sophomores. A vote of thanks 
was extended to Mr. E. R. Jewett for the presenta- 
tion of the flag to the boat-bouse during the Summer 
Term. 

A base-ball meeting was held October 8lh, at 
which the following officers were elected : President, 
II. Carpenter ; Vice President, E. A. Packard ; Sec- 
retary, Phinney, '84 ; Treasurer, Jackson, '83 ; Assist- 
ant Treasurer, Clark, '84; Directors, Bates and Jor- 
dan, '82, Wright, '83. The Treasurer then reported 
$15.45 in the treasury. The Directors have since 
chosen the first five men of the nine for the coming 
year, viz., Wright, Knapp, Packard, Stetscui, and 
Waterman. 

The difl'erent societies have pledged the follow- 
ing men: Theta Delta Chi: Alexander, Brown, But- 
ler, Chase, Cook, Davis, Dunham, Fiilsom, Harding, 
Kendall, Lunt, Libby, Powers, Wardwell, of '85, 
and Barton, of '84; Delta K;ippa ICpsilon: Bartlett, 
Cutler, Eaines, (ioddard, Ilodgkins, Rlauson, Mc- 
Domiald, Peters, Philips, Stronl, of '85, and F. II. 
Eaines, '82; Psi Upsilon : Allen, Ford, Freeman, 
Gould, Howard, Lee, Mooers, Thornlon, Webb, of 
'85, and Wheeler, '83; Alpha Delta Phi: French, 
Goodenow, Dyer, Nesilley, Thomas, of '85; Zelu 
P,-.i ; Leiman and Crowley, of '83. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



87 



We liave not yet learned ihe conditiun of the 
fund to furnish a niemoriul of Dr. Greene. The 
movement is one of the best for nianj' reasons, for of 
all the teachers that Bovvdoin ever possessed, we are 
certain that none was ever better fitted for this posi" 
tion and none has left deeper feelings of admiration 
in his students than he. The general call for support 
towards the movement has been widely circulated 
throughout the State and New England, and is, we 
hope, favorably progressing. 

A fine album, containing photographs of the entire 
class of '81, has been presented to the college by the 
class, and is placed in the library. The pictures are 
arranged in alphabetical order, and on the first page 
is a list giving the full name of each member. All 
the likenesses are well executed and form a pleasing 
memento of the late Seniors. The gift establishes a 
precedent fur succeeding classes to follow, and it is 
suggested that as Mr. Reed, the photographer, retains 
many negatives it would be easy to make similar 
collections of former graduates, and that the older 
alumni may possess sets of class pictures which they 
would be willing to ofler as permanent loans to the 
college. 

The first of the annual Sopho-Fresh ball games 
was played on Saturday, October 8th. These games 
may not be of so much professional importance upon 
our college record, but certainly seem to excite as 
much interest among the students as the more 
weighty inter-collegiate contests. Without this op- 
portunity to exercise our wit at the Freshmen's e.x- 
pense, the opening of the year would be dull indeed. 
Of the game little can be said, except that it was a 
"walkover" for '84. The Sophomores treated the 
Freshmen at the bat and in the field with the usual 
amount of chin, but did not seem to over-terrify 
them. Five innings, occupying one hour and fort)'- 
five minutes, brought out the most brilliant points of 
'8o's nine. Their best talent was illustrateil by the 
rapid delivery of the pitcher, the frills behind the 
bat and the home-run on a foul ball. The Sopho- 
mores were all right, as usual, in their pitching, and 
were easily able to cook that of the Freshmen. The 
few really good plays on both sides were warmly 
applauded, and at the close of the game considerable 
heartfelt sympathy was manifested lor the benighted 
and crest-fallen Freshies. The score 21 to 1. 

The annual game of foot-ball between the Sopho- 
mores and Freshmen was played on the campus, in 
front of Appleton Hall, Friday p.m., October 7lh. 
It was by far the most interesting and hotly-contested 
game since thai belweeti '8L1 and '81. The Freshmen 



outnumbered the Sophomores nearly two to one ; 
but when the blood-thirsty Sophs, marched out from 
South Appleton, in pugilistic costumes of varicjus 
descriptions, singing that soul-stirring melody, '-Old 
Phi Chi," the heart of the Freshman sank within him. 
In the first rush the Freshmen gained an advantao-e; 
but this only raised the Sophomoric wrath, and hurl- 
ing a volley of strong langu.age at the Freshmen, the 
Sophomores, with a desperate effort, maintained their 
ground in the second rush. Then fed lowed a series 
of rushes in which the Sophs, slowly gained ground, 
although the Freshmen stood them good play, despite 
timidity. After the game had lasted about forty 
minutes, the Sophs, came oft' victorious. Wright 
ended the game by kicking the ball over the line in 
the eleventh rush, and was borne oft' on the shoulders 
of his jubilant classmates. The Sophs, evidently 
struck out from the shoulder in good earnest, with- 
out respect for eyes and noses, judging from the 
looks of some of the Freshmen after the game. E. 
U. Curtis, '82, acted as referee. Swan '83, was 
judge for the Freshmen, and Collins, '83, acted as 
judge for the Sophomores. 



PERSONAL. 



[We earnestly .solicit CdUimunications to this column 
from any who may have au interest in the Alumni.] 

'44. — Louis A. Estes took his degree last Com- 
mencement. 

'47.— Geo. S. Peters died last week at Ellsworth. 

'48. — Dexter A. Hawkins who presented the col- 
lege, last summer, with a fine painting, was in town 
last vacation. 

'57. — Rev. Albert H. Cilrrier, Congregationalist 
minister in Lynn, Mass., has accepted the chair of 
Sacred Rhetoric and Theology at Oberlin College. 

'59. — Horatio 0. Ladd is President of the Univer- 
sity of New Mexico, Santa Fe, N. M. 

'65. — Charles Fish, formerly the successful princi- 
pal of the Oldtown High School, is now principal of 
the Brunswick High School. 

'G6. — John P. Gross died at Plainfield, N. J., 
Sept. 30th. He was Superintendent of Schools at 
that place. 

'68.— Robert L. Packard, a son of Prof. Packard, 
is now at homo visiting his friends. He is connected 
with tlie Ethnological Survey under Major Powell. 

'78. — G. C. Piirington, the former principal of the 
High School here in Brunswick, is now principal of 
the Auburn High School. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



'82. — C. E. Stinchfield is teaching at West Auburn. 
'83. — C. H. Stetson is teaching at New Harbor. 
'84. — S. R. Chikls is teaching at North Turner. 

Class op 1881. 

Achorn, principal of High School at South Abing- 
ton, Mass. 

Baxter, in business with Portland Packing Co., 
Portland, Me. 

Briry, at home, Bath, Me. 

Brown, civil engineer at Bangor, Me. 

Chamberlin, E. H., at home in Westford, Mass. 

Chamberlain, H. W., is taking an advanced coarse 
in Constitutional Law at the college. 

Cobb, reading law in his father's office, 31i Ex- 
change Street, Portland, Me. 

Cole, teaching in Tabor Academy, Marion, Mass. 

Cutler, studying at Cambridge, Mass. He has 
been appointed Tutor under Prof. Chapman, at the 
college. 

Dike, editor of Brunswick Herald, Brunswick, 
Me. 

Donovan, teaching High School at Bristol, Me. 

Fisher, Tutor of Matlaeraatics at the college. 

Gardner, at Bryant & Stratton's Commercial 
School, Boston, Mass. Address, 20 Milford St. 

Goddard, assisting the Commissioner in the re- 
vision of the statutes of Maine. 

Gray, teaching the South Grammar School at 
Bath, Me. 

Greene, at work in Cabot Co.'s Mills, Brunswick, 
Me. 

Ilaggerty, studying medicine at home in Webster, 
Mass. 

Harding, at home in Hallowell, Me. 

Hathaway, at home in Hallowell, Me. 

Hitchcock, studying medicine at home. Strong, Me. 

John.son, F. L., has been appointed to the U. S. 
Signal Service, and will be at Fort Myer for six 
months from the first of January. 

Johnson, H. L., assistant of Prof. Carmichael at 
the college. 

Joyce, at home in Brunswick, Me. 

King, studying book-keeping with Capt. Bates at 
the college. 

Lane, teacher of the Grammar and Higli School 
at Canton, Me. 

Larrabee, clerk in P. O. at Gardiner, Me. 

Little, in bnsincss with Dana & Co., Porlhmd, Me. 

Manson, (J. F., has just returned from his Euro- 
pean tour and is now studying medicine under Dr. 
Packard, Bath, Me. 

Manson, J. W., at Eastman's Business College, 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Address, 70 Garden St. 



McGillicuddy, reading law in office of Frye, Cot- 
ton & White, Lewiston, Me. 

Merrill is civil engineer for the pulp mill at Yar- 
mouth, Me. 

Nichols, at home in Farmington, Me. 

Payson, I'eading law in office of W. L. Putnam, 
38 Exchange St., Portland, Me. 

Pettingill, Principal of Academy, Blue Hill. Me. 

Rogers, at home, Pembroke, Me. 

Sawyer ? 

Shaw, reading law in the office of Hon. Stillman 
B. Allen, o Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 

Smith, at Bryant & Strattan's Commercial .School, 
Boston, Mass. Address, 20 Milford St. 

Snow, at home in Brewer, Jle. 

Staples, in business with^his father at Parsons- 
field, Me. 

Stevens, reading law in the office of A. W. 
Paine, Bangor, Me. 

Towle, reading law in the office of Hastings & 
Son, Fryeburg, Me. 

Walker, studying medicine, Thomaston, Me. 

Wheelwright, reading law in the office of Drum- 
mond & Druinmond, 93 Exchange St., Portland, Me. 

Whitten, Principal of Mattauawcook Academy, 
Lincoln, Me. 

Wilson, bookkeeper for Wheeler & Swift, Port- 
land. Me. Address, 3i2 Spring St. 



COLLEGE WORLD. 



Columbia : 

Prof. H. H. Boyesen is to fill the position as In- 
structor in the Department of JModern Languages. 

It is rumored that H. T. Peck (Smintheus), '81, is 
to receive the appointment of Tutor in the Latin 
Department. — SjKclator. 
Hakvaud : 

The Freshman list numbers 210. 

The interest in foot-ball is increasing and a meet- 
ing has been held in which an association was 
formed. 

Fifteen thousand "blue books" are consumed in 
"annuals" at Harvard, the students paying about 
$600 for them. 

Mr. Moses King, former editor and publisher of 
the llnrvard Hcyisler, lias started a i)ublishing house 
in Cambridge. 

Mr. Ritldle has resigned his position at Harvard, 
and is to play lEdipus in the Greek with an English- 
speaking support. 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



89 



There are to be no class races this fall. 

The last Advocate relates the sudden death of Mr. 
Arthur Orcutt Jameson, who graduated at the head 
of the class of '81. 

Princeton : 

Last year's boat club receipts amounted to $4,611. 

The Princetonian enumerates a total of 177 
Freshmen. 

Yale: 

About 170 Freshmen. 

The oldest existing literary society in the U. S. is 
at Yale. It was organized in 1768. 

Yale is to have fine new athletic grounds. $20,- 
000 has been subscribed towards them. 

The Record announces that ils Board is hereafter 
to devote more attention to the literary and other 
departments and curtail its number of editorials. 

At Yale this year the valedictorian was a Hebrew, 
the salutatorian a German, and the prize declaimer a 
Chinaman ; but the pitcher of the base-ball club was 
an American. — Ex. 

Dr. Porter, of New York, has given §160,000 to 
Yale College, Hon. Lafayette S. Foster $40,000 to the 
Law School, and the late Professor Smith §60,000 to 
the Medical School, all within the past year. The 
last is contingent. 

Elsewhere : 

The Senior clas.s at Cornell numbers 87, of whom 
74 are men and 13 women. 

Williams has 84 Freshmen. 

The Bncnonian says : " '85 numbers about 85." 

Harvard College was named after John Harvard, 
who, in 1638, left to the college £779 and a library 
of 300 books ; Williams College was named after 
C^ol. Ephraim Williams, a soldier of the old French 
war; Dartmouth College was named after l^ord 
Dartmouth, who subscribed a large amount, and was 
President of the first Board of Trustees ; Brown Uni- 
versity received its name from Hon. Nicholas Brown, 
who was a graduate and endowed the college very 
largely ; Columbia College was called Kinss College 
till the close of the War for Independence, when it 
was named Columbia; Bowdoin was named after 
Governor Bowdoin of Maine ; Yale College was 
named after Elihu Yale; Dickinson College was 
named after Hon. John Dickinson, who made a very 
liberal donation to the college and was President of 
the Board of Trustees for a number of years ; Cor- 
nell University was named after Ezra Cornell, its 
founder. 



If you doubt whether you should kiss a girl, give 
her the benefit of the doubt. — Ex. 



CLIPPINGS. 

Oh pulehra puella, 

Do look on a fellah. 

Qui canit under your winder. 

Clara luna lucit, 

Dulce amor ilucit. 

For what the deuce is to hinder. — Ex. 

Fresh. — "May I have the pleasure." Miss Soci- 
ety — "Oui." Fresh.— "What does 'we' mean?" 
MissS.— "O, Uandl!" 

A student objects to another's wearing a plug hat, 
because, he says " It looks so much like a church 
with a grog shop in the basement." — Ex. 

Joe — "Jim, you look twice as well since you 
shaved off your siders." "Jim (blushing) — "Don't 
pay compliments to my face, Joe." — Tablet. 

Prof to Soph, (pointing to a prodigious expecto- 
ration on the class-room floor) — " Quid est hoc ? '' 
Soph, (in quivering accents) — " Hoc est quid." — Ex. 

Professor — "Mr. M., I suppose you have often 
hung around the gate bidding your girl good-night." 
Mr. M. — "Oh, no. Professor, I always hang around 
the girl." 

Boy (to lady visitor)— "Teacher, there's a gal 
over there a-winking at me." Teacher — " Well then, 
don't look at her." Boy — " But if I don't look at her 
she will wink at somebody else." — Oraphic. 

" Mr. Boatman," said a timid woman to the ferry- 
man who was rowing her across the river, " are peo- 
ple ever lost in this river ? " " Oh, no, ma'am ? " he 
replied, " we always find "em again within a day or 
two." — Ex. 

A ladj' with a fatal squint came once to a fashion- 
able artist for her portrait. He looked at her and she 
looked at him, and both were embarrassed. He 
spoke first: — "Would your ladyship permit me," he 
said, "to take the profile? there is a certain shyness 
about your ladyship's eyes which is as difficult in art 
as it is fascinating in nature." — Ex. 

AN OLD RONDO. 

Her scuttle halt ys wondrous wyde, 

All furry, too, on every .xyde, 
Soe out she trippesh daintylye, 
To lett ye youth full well to see. 

How fayre ye mayde ys for ye bryde. 

A lyttle puffed, may be, bye pryde, 
She yet soe lovelye ys that I'd 
A shyllynge gyve to tye, perdie, 
Her scuttle halt. 

Ye coales into yet scuttle slyde, 

Soe yn her halt wolde I, and hyde 

' To stele some kysses — two or three ; 

But synce she never asketh me, 
Ye scornful cynic doth deryde 
Her scuttle hattl 
—Frank D. Sherman (E-editor of Acta) in Scribner. 



90 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



The Orient is somewhat late in greeting its ex- 
changes, owing to the lateness with which our term 
begins. Most of our exchanges show signs of im- 
provement after a summer's recreation. The memory 
of breezes from sea or mountain breathes through 
them, and invigorates them. A disposition is shown 
to take hold of all college work in dead earnest. No 
lack of interest in college sports appears, notwith- 
standing past defeats. An unusual attention to ques- 
tions of importance in college life and discipline is 
manifested, and everj' one seems wide awake and 
confident of success in the future. There have been 
many losses to college journalism, but this leaves 
places to be tilled and offers a chance to rising ambi- 
tion. Much of the literary matter shows in it the re- 
sult of vacation experiences. The light, airy sketches 
which were so successful in some of mir Eastern 
papers last year (for the West rarely |>roduces any- 
thing light) are, apparently, very popular this year. 
A few are good, but most are very commonplace. 
Some very pleasing little bits of poetry im more or 
less sentimenfal subjects, have been put foilli. Edi- 
tors seem to have had a dislike of solid, literary 
work during vacation, if we ma}- judge by the lack 
of critical or historical essays. The death of Pres. 
Garfield has given an opportunity for a wearisome 
outpouring of mediocrity, which can only be toler- 
ated on account of its sincerity. As a general thin" 
the shortest notices have been the best. 

The dailies, the Harvard Echo and Yale ^Jetos, 
reaches us regularly and both show an improvement. 
We endorse the general verdict of the college press 
that the Yale ^'cws is the leading college daily. 

Of course a portion of the space in all college 
papers, has been allotted to the Freshmen. Advice, 
admonition, and ridicule have been showered upon 
them. The Ada contains a few words, sensible as 
well as witty, which will apply to colleges nearer 
home than Columbia : 

"To the I'l-cslinien we give a word of advice. 
Do not be i]| too nmcli of a hurry to elect class 
otBcers. Do not elect a man president oC ytun- class 
because he is six feet tail and has an incipient mons- 
taclie. Do not elect a man vice pi-o.--ideMl because he 
is a • ba-ad man.' Uo not elect a man secretary liu- 
cause he w.-is cnndilinncd in Uli<;|(irie. Ami, ii'ljove 
all, do not elect a nimi treasurer ol' your class bc- 
cau-e he has an alligatoi- skin pocket-book and his 
brother is a cashier in a bank." 

The Spcctalur begins its ninth voUune with a 
very lively number. Its sketches are better than 
usual. The coUeciiou of "'Puck'-ery Poems" is 



the worst abuse of English we ever came across. 
We give one of the best or rather the worst : 

" There was a vouns ni;iii in a brousliam. 

Wliosc f^u'O ill-l)i.'t<.Ueiii-d ilio gluii^liam 
Thiit lie s.iuiht to iisNouuli:iin. 
Wlien 111' CMlli-a U> his !.'r.iii.^'li:Mn. 
Jutiii, ihivc to the fuinily tnugliam." 

Two numbers of the Argo have reached us. Our 
new friend promises to take a high position. It is at 
present regaling its readers with continued Indian 
stories. A long article on the " Poetry of Tobacco " 
shows curious investigation, and is a novelty. 
"Moonshine," by William White, of course a parody 
on "Sunrise," is utterly devoid of point and ought 
not to have appeared in a paper like the Argo. 

The Chronicle, a paper which certainlj' shows as 
\nuch solid ability as any college journal, appears 
decked out in a new and becoming dress, with very 
pretty and ajipropriate engraved headings to the 
dilierent departments. " Co-eds " are on the increase, 
and the Chronicle looks forward to the time when the 
university will become a female seminary. 

The Occident, a new paper, a rival of the Berkeleyan. 
is a cheap-looking afiair. The University of Cali- 
fornia ought to publish one good paper instead of 
two such ones as they do. 

The last Crimson has the following: 

"WHO IS TEDDY?" 

" Who is TetMv ?'• U'liv. ;i curly, 

Sli.'ig,<v puiidi,'. wilh Ills hiiir 
Biin^cd iiilislic.illv l>v n;itiii-e. 

OviM-cvcs til,' liliicW piiir; 
Anil a rililimi r,f likp color 

1)11 lli~ lillle llcc-ii lie W(:iiv, 
And hr's lull of will's ;iiid wilcliinss. 

Full ol diiiuiy d.ig^-y airs. 

"Friends Inis Teddy?" Wliv, 'innst pvory 

One will) ~i"i"- liiiii i-rii's, •• How sweet! 
Just loo iiwliillv I'lit.h I'uiiiiin^! 

Sec ilio~c Kdlinu' liitli' Irci ! " 
"Do I lilcc liiin.aiul. :is oilicrs. 

Dote ii|ioii liis pi'ctiv wiivs;''' 
Liiilc wi'ctcli! r.l like loHioke him, 

Ur ill some w;iy end his diiys. 

Asl< von wlmrcforc? I will tell voii, 

LillU' .Jcssii'. swci'l mid cov, 
Isllic iiilMrcssol ihis Tcldv; 

Ami ii do'li Miv heart iiiuiov. 
When >he lliesiV..in iiiv .elvn'iiccs 

l.llllL'hillg l'M\ :it IIIV dUlress. 

And llieii c'lU'liiii;; up Ihis poodle. 
Fondles him with MdleMies,s. 

"Iliive I told her?" Oft I've told her 

''l'vv;is it cryinj; sin to wmsIc 
On 1111 iiiia;-ihelic piipjiy. 

1.,'ivi' Willi so miicli lic.iiity graced. 
" l'l':iv l:d<e me, ii tiller oliieel." 

1? I ihi-. Willi iiien\ •:lic. 

Oir.-he -Kips Mild I'e.l.U Willi her, 

Leiiviiig hut cliayriii wiili me. 

Does it Iticn so strinifre ii)>nciir 
That 1 hiile Ihia " Teddy Dear"? 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Fiaest and Most Select Stock of 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS. 

The Newest aod Greatest Variety of Patterns in 

NECKWEAR, GLOVES, HOSIERY, 

UNDER-WEAR, BRACES, ETC. 

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A Perfect Fit Guaranteed. 

Goods for the TROY LAUNDRY sent Tues- 
days and received Saturdays. 

In Percales, Mahrattas, and American Goods. 

Orders by mail promptly atteuded to. 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 
FRANK M. STETSON, 

JXJSX RECEXVED = 

All the New Styles in Soft and Stiff Hats. 
Best Stiflf Hats, $2.75. Best Silk Hats, $3.50 in 
exchange. 

Just opened all tlie New and Nobby Styles Neck 
Dress, Colhu-s, Cuffs, Fancy Hose, Canes, etc. 
All are invited to call and examine goods and iiricee. 

No. 2 Arcade Block. 
ISAAC H. SNOW, 

DEALER IN 

feef, iork, gutton, gamb, Sj-c. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

EC. m:. bowicer, 

BOARDING AND LIVERY STABLE 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Sfs. , Brunswick. 

AU Ilnek Onlci's iiroinplly iilti'iidcd to. 

C L. Y®^^y COLLEQE BaF^BEF^, 
Two doors north of Post Office. 




CUSTOM TAILORING 

A S PECI ALTY, 

Fernakrs Tailor Emporium 

237 Middle Street, 
PORTLAND, - - _ MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



^. T C, W. ALLEN'S 

DRUG STO R E. 

THE FINEST CTRiRS AND SMOKING TOBACCOS. 
THE BEST PERFUMERY. 

THE BEST TOILET SOAPS. 

THE best: HAIR BRUSHES. 

The Largest and Best Assortment of 

Drngs, Patent Medicines, &c., &c. 

To be found in this market. 

Leiuont Bloc/r, lirunswich, Mahie, 



S. C. COFFIISr, 

— DEALER IX — 

PROVISIONS AND GROCERIES 

US' Special Kates to Student Clubs. ^ir 
CORNER OF MAIN AND ELM STREETS. 



GOLDCLlp 




TOBACCO& CIGARETTES 



TRY THE SEAL^SKIN CIGAR 

SEND $3.75, and we mYi I forward 
by mail, registered, a 50 box of the 
Seal-Skin Cigar. 

This is a Piiecial otior to enable smokerp to test this 
r^-lebratrd bra}iil. After a trial you will smokeno other. 

S. F. HESS &. CO. 

rremium Tobacco Worlis, Rochester, N.Y. 

S T U D E N T^~ 

Desiring Employment, for Season of 1881, 
Knolosu Ic, ylanip, ami write for circuhir, in 

'nil<: MANHATTAN AGENCJY. 

733 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 

Please mention this paper. 
00 TO 

TO IU:V YIIIIR 

Groceries, Canned Goods, Fruits, 

Confectionery, Tobacco, and Cigars. 

Si>ecial Italia to Student Clubs. 

Main Street, Head of the Mall, Brunswick. 



A. T. NXC80X.S, 

MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 

lallowell Okssical Academj 

Prepares for Bo"WDOiif and the best New England 
Colleges. Offers, also, a thorough Semiij art Course 
to young ladies, and a shorter course for business 
pursuits. For Catalogues, address 

Ret. a. W. burr, Hallowell, Me. 

©ystai? aa9 fee iFeam Eiupepiuiiji, 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

113" Families, Parties, anil Clubs suppliecl. 



M^Zt 



I'uivliase yotii- COAL at I lie 

Coa.1 "STard. In. Topsliaana, 

WHERE NONE liUT 

Tbe Best of Coal is Kept, 

.\.nti is Deliveroil well prepared and in Good OitUr. 

Office near the Sheds. 

$ a g n d a^ 11 o c k 1 1 o ii s ^^ 

#. M, M^Y&EMMT, Propribtor. 
I. S. BALGOME, 

niCAI.KK TN 

Hardware, Stoves, Crockery, and Glassware, 



BRTTN'S'WICK. IVE E. 



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No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circxilating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

CHOICE GROcTrTeS, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B.— Speeiitl Rates to Students. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Bkien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

POft.TI^.A.NI3, JVLA-INE. 

77iw house has been tlioroitplily refitted tiith everi/ re- 
f/arU to comfort, and the aim is to make it frst-class in all 
its appointments. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

De^V^ITT HOUSE, 

QUIJIBY & MURCH, Proprietors, 

Corner Piue and Park Streets, LEWISTOiN, IE. 

KOYAL QUIMBY. EUEX MUliCII. 



^. O. REEr>, 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bruns-nrick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vieurs ; also College Views. 

ALL KINDS OF 









mm 



For Schools and Colleges, 

EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BOBBERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 







TT/iT FAVORITE NOS. ■S0S-404-SJ2'/7O-S5/- WITH 
t OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORL 




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DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 

OFFICE IBT LEMOWT BLOCK, Brunswick. 

fl®=-Telephone coDnection with Coal Yard. 
[[3= Orders left at Jordan Suow's, Lemout Block, will 
be promptly attended to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

AdiI Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 



GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLK DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8s and ^87 Congress St., and 235 Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. WILSON & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B.— Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

14-2 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 

|o\^{fo!n gflle|© Jfelical ^eparliKent 

The Sixtv-Fir>l Aiinunl Course of Lectures at tlie Medical 
School of Maine, will commence FebruauV lOlh, ISiSl, anil 
continue SIXTEKN WEKKS. 

FACULTY.— JosHCi L. CilAMBERL.tis-, LL.D . President j ISEiEL T. 

i- ; William W. Gbeese, M.D., Sur- 

i> ^1. 1 HELL, M.D., Obstetrics, and 

I 11, Gerrish, M.D., Materia 

; I HARLES W. GODDARD, A.M., 

Mill. 1., I'll D., Chemistry ; Bcbt Q . 
: ; ^TEPiiRN 11- Weeks, M.D , Anatomy ; Da 



, M.D., Path 

gery and Cliuica! ^ 
Diseases of Women : 
Medica, TherapeutiL- 
Medical Jiirispriiik.,L 
Wilder, M.D., Phy 



-Send fuk Price List. 




'^^OJII^MT^^ 



F. Ellis, 51. d!, ReVistnir and Librar 
Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may he obtained 
theRestistrar.D. F.ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. __ „ 

° ' ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary 
Brunswick, Maine. 



rrs P. DuDLEV, M.D., 
application to 



Portland, Me, 

AMOS L MILLETT & CO., 

JOBBKTfS ASI) Kr.TAn.KRS Ol- STASUARO 

Iinprtea anOoiiiestic Fancy droceries. 

nVNKICIt HILL PICKLES A Hl-JiV I A l.TY. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Botanical Microscopes, Fancy Go.hIs. Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry 
promptly reiiaire.l and warniuted. 

I^ir>.e Spectacles and. ZE^^eg-lasses. 
EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BBIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRU NSWICK. ME. 

"MrsTleai's Book -Bindery, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book Work to Order. 

^WT^ B.nc N TC H T , 

Special Bates to Student Clubs. 

lent Orders for Milk or Cream lillcd by KiviiiK suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 



«S-Tri 



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BOOKS. STATIONERY. ROOJM 
PAPER. REHIODICALS. <3cC. 



FIRST-CLASS 



Hanos, Organs, and Melodeons, E. SM ITH,.. GROCER. 

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twi#ta Often' 



Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 2, 1881. 



No. 8.. 



i + 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

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53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

ELLIOT 

Has the Finest and Most Stylish Stock of 
Neckwear ever exhibited in Brunswick. 

Tli6 \i\i %\\ in Soli and Siiil Eats. 

HOSIERY, COLLARS, CUFFS, Sec, &c., 
in Great Variety of Styles. 

A FINE ASSORTMENT OF 

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Has the Largest and Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets 




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Be-ware of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

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stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

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Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

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MAINE. 
J. W. D. CARTER. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



A reorganization of the Course of Instruction 
has recently been made, in which the distinction be- 
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main- 
tained, but all academic undergraduates are placed 
on one footing, with the opportunity of following, to 
a considerable extent, such lines of study as they 
prefer. 

All students entering the College proper, are ex- 
amined on the same course of preparatory studies. 
After the second year a liberal range of electives is 
offered, within which a student may follow his choice 
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount 
pursued. 

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated 
as a distinct course, are still, for the most part, re- 
tained either in the required or elective lists. More 
place is also given to the Modern Languages than 
they have hitherto had. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all 
who complete the Academic Course. 

The Engineering Department remains as here- 
tofore, and fiicilities are offered for study of the 
various branches of this science. The means of 
theoretical instruction are ample, and the town of 
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen- 
tres in the State, and in the immediate vicinity of 
many important public works, affords excellent 
opportunities for the study of actual structures. 
The College also enjoys many fovors from the United 
States Coast Survey' Office." The admission is the 
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the 
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will 
be taken, if desired, in the place of Latin. 

Those who complete satisfactorily the four years' 
course in engineering will receive tl'ie Degree of So. 
B. Those who complete a two years' course of ad- 
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or 
Mechanical Engineer. Students not candidates for 
a degree will be received at any stage for which an 
examination shall show them to be fitted, and may 
remain for any desired time. Further inlbrmalion 
will be furnished on application to Professor G. L. 
Vose. 

Terms of Admission to the Academic Course. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 

following subjects: 

Latin.— Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Ijatin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the .ilinoid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 

^KEEK. — Hadloy's Greek Grammar; Xeuophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books ; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

Ancient GEOGKAPny. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 

and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 

I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 

Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission 
will be required to produce testimonials of good 
moral character. The time for examination is the 
Friday after Commencement and the Friday before 
the opening of the first term. In exceptional cases 
applicants maybe examined at other times. Candi- 
dates for admission to advanced classes will be ex- 
amined in the studies which such classes have 
accomplished. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrange- 
ments with the Principals of schools and academies 
having a regular course preparatory for college of at 
least three years' duration, whereby their pupils 
may be examined for admission to college at their 
respective schools, in connection with their own 
final examinations. 

The amount of instruction now offered and iios- 
sible to be taken in the several principal lines of 
study is exhibited comparatively, as reduced to one 
scale, in the following manner. This is. however, 
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal 
length : 

Latin, eight terms. 

Greek, eight terms. 

ISrathematics, eight terms. 

German, four and a half terms. 

English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English 
Literature, three and a half terms. 

French, three terms. 

Italian, one term. 

Spanish, one term. 

Rhetoric (formal), one term. Rhetorical and 
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a 
half terms. 

Natural History studies, five anil a half terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, four terms. 

Chemistry, four terms. 

History, Ancient and Modern, two terms. 

Political Economy, one and a half terms. 

Public Law, two terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, including Logic, 
four terms. 

Christian Evidences, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $^5. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. . 

Board is obtained in town at $H to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lesson the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 2, 1881. 



No. 8. 



J30\VD0IN ORIENT. 

PtJBLlSHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, D0RING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE CLASS OF '82, OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Arthur G. Staples, Managing' Editdr. 

Charles H. Gilman, Business Editor. 

Melvin S. Holway, Eugene T. McCarthy, 

William A. Moody, Warren 0. Plimpton, 

George G. Weeks. 

Terms— S2.00 a year in advasce ; sini;le copies, 16 cents. 
^ Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
m regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied bv the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTElSrTS. 
Vol. XT., So. 8.— Nov. 2, 1881. 

Editorial Notes 91 

Literary : 

Poem 93 

A Romance "' 94 

Delta Kappa Epsilou Convention '" 95 

Communications ]' gg 

College Items ] \ 9g 

Personal _'_'] jqq 

College World .".V.".". j 00 

Clippings ^^q. 

Editors' Table ! .' .' ] j 



EDITORIAL KOTES. 



While the month of October has been 
tripping along on its life-journey, the green 
of the campus trees has been steadily keeping 
it company, and to-day both are gone together. 
Beg pardon for remarking, but the weather 
has been despicably cold during the past few 
weeks, and it gives one sucli a feeling of sad- 
ness to plough his way along the paths through 
the dry and shriveled leaves, while the west- 
wind is singing a lullaby in the tree tops, that 
we stop in our business to remark. We have 
had little of the ordinary beauty of the cam- 



pus this fall, none of the delicate colors in 
autumn leaves, none of the luxuriant, hazy 
autumn days which we usually expect on our 
return to Brunswick, for all of which we are 
truly sorry. Perhaps it is just as well, but 
we often contrast the pleasure which Yale 
Seniors enjoy in their mineralogical expedi- 
tions with Professor Dana, underthe mild New 
Haven method of conducting the weather 
with the hilarity we should find in following 
Professor Lee on similar trips in overcoats and 
mittens. 



We should suggest to the different socie- 
ties that it is time for the various, editors of 
the Bugle to be appointed. The Orient of 
November 10th, 1880, remarks that the JBuc/le 
editors have been around soliciting subscrip- 
tions. Although the term is late this year, we 
should think that this week would not be too 
soon. There is no reason why the Bugle 
should not pay, at least, we can see none. 
We hope that the editors will put in an ap- 
pearance soon, and give our best wishes that 
they may be capable, all of them in love with 
their work, and none of them lazy. The col- 
lege will support a first-class Bugle, as it has 
always done. 



The Harvard Advocate refreshingly re- 
marks: "It is very interesting to a Harvard 
man who has never seen what is termed hazing, 
to read in college papers, articles which lead 
him to believe that at most colleges a Fresh- 
man's life for the first d'dya or weeks is misery 
itself." The writer adds, " The man who hazes 
disgraces himself and his college and should 
be suppressed." This is the common voice of 
the college press and we quote it only to show 



92 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



tlie tendency which the modem college sys- 
tem is taking. That the tendenc}' is towards 
the dawn of a better college life, none will 
attempt to deny. We have no desire to 
pursue a distasteful subject. Hazing with 
us is not a debatable subject, and this the 
events of the past few weeks should show." 
It is impossible to confine it within limits, 
and Bowdoin lias been the sufferer many 
long years through ignorance of this fact. 
We are not alone in being inmates of a 
college in which this half dead element 
has recently arisen. We have reason to 
believe from the Princetonian that hazing 
has appeared at Princeton, and the Princeton- 
ian takes occasion to hope that it will cease 
in the future, and remarks that Princeton, 
with her record in the past, cannot afford to 
injure the good name she is gaining. We 
venture the statement that hazing here is con- 
fined within such limits that the perpetrators 
of every act are known to the majority of the 
students, and that they are considered respon- 
sible for the unenviable name which our col- 
lege is again gaining throughout the State. 
The sentiment of the college is not in favor 
of throwing bricks or injuring Freshmen, but 
in favor of peaceful, every-day, common-sense 
behavior. Hazing is formidable in the degree 
to which it is carried, and, although the per- 
petrators have been unlucky this year, yet we 
can find no excuse in this fact, but are only so 
much the more prejudiced against such dan- 
gerous pastime. If those concerned would 
remember that it is not so funny as it used to 
be, not so much in vogue in the college com- 
munity as formerly, they might be constrained 
to stop if college autiiority found no means 
of prevention. We greatly deplore the un- 
happy beginning of '84's Sopiiomore career, 
and wisli them a better record in the future. 



There are quite a number of plans of the 
Boat Course at Appleton. Any wisliing to 
purchase these as articles of curiosity or 



through desire to aid the boating association, 
can do so by calling at 28 Appleton. It is 
desired that we call attention to the fact that 
relics of the engineering department are 
scarce, and that this is the last opportunity of 
purchasing. 



The past week has developed the need of 
new crossings at the north entrances to the 
campus, and we have reason to believe that 
we shall often experience their need before 
winter is through. We don't know that it 
comes within the province of the college to 
disturb public waj^s by the la3ang of cross- 
ings, but presume that the town would not 
object if they were placed there, and we would 
really like to have them. In summer and 
winter the street is being continually crossed, 
and is just as continuallj^ dusty or muddy. 
Last week, sand and water were mingled six 
inches deep, and nothing availed but rubber 
boots. We presume a petition to the town of 
Brunswick would do the business, but as it is 
we fear that we must stand and wait, or jump. 
If the town were thoughtful it would object 
to this undignified expedient, especial!}^ for 
Seniors, and if this were a co-educational in- 
stitution, regard for the girls' feelings in 
muddy weather would demand a dr^- crossing, 
either of which suppositions are highly improb- 
able. Perhaps the surest way to get a cross- 
ing, however, would bo to petition for co-ed- 
ucation. 



A statement from the manager to the ef- 
fect that the band is actually an existing real- 
ity, surprises us into a few remarks. We wish 
to encourage tlie movement. Tlie other day 
a musician begged us not to remark until the 
band got running, as if romarics of ours 
would prove detrimental. We beg pardon ; 
our chief desire is to aid the movement in 
every possible way. A real live college band 
is a luxury, one possessed by few colleges and 
in every way a pleasant thing to iiave in the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



93 



vicinity. Our active leader deserves praise 
for his efforts. The organization already 
numbers nineteen miisicians, with every like- 
lihood of more. The Freshmen are an 
important factor, numbering more than a 
proportionate part. Time was when the col- 
lege band was a famous institution. From 
the days when it discoursed under Thorndike 
Oak up to the eve when it gaily piped the 
patriotic tunes of "John Brown" and "Yankee 
Doodle " in honor of the newly-elected presi- 
dent, it has been existing more or less ani- 
matedlj- ; sometimes practically defimct, some- 
times defiantly active, until to-day it rises 
from the tradition of the past, prepared to do 
duty or die. Every good wish for the insti- 
tution which Bowdoin claims as distinctive, 
and may it so progress that when the balmy 
zephyrs of the spring-time blow, the band may 
assemble in its old-time place and make the 
evening air swell with harmony. 



The communication in this issue signed 
"N. G." contains an item of advice verj'^ ac- 
ceptable, no doubt, to the majority of base- 
ball lovers, and shows a possible means of 
preventing a recurrence of the condition of 
affairs in which the college nines of the State 
found themselves at the close of last season. 
The writer points out a very feasible method of 
attaining this end, and it is with pleasure 
that every student will welcome any plan by 
which more games may be played in Bruns- 
wick. We would venture to supplement the 
article with the wish that the college will not 
rest content with the simple championship of 
the State. It would be most pleasing to all, 
no doubt, if Bowdoin could extend the circle 
of her base-ball acquaintances, and we con- 
sider that last season's work on the diamond 
was the most successful that Bowdoin ever 
knew, simply because the nine learned some- 
thing, and because the college lifted its voice 
from out the silent circle of its Maine envi- 
ronage. We didn't carry off the somewhat 



abstract championship of the State, but we 
did have a good nine for a nine that had never 
before, in its capacity, mingled in better com- 
pany. Williams College has lately decided 
to apply to the league for admission, and this 
fact will build up a nine and do the college 
no harm assuredly. 

There is only one thing that would pre- 
vent us from following, in application at least. 
It is not lack of time, money, or interest, but 
simply distance — a barrier practically insur- 
mountable. What we are coming to is this. 
Let us repeat the expedition of last 3"ear, and 
on a larger scale if possible, and then time 
will remain to play the State colleges. We 
would, therefore, commend the communication 
and its suggestion as far as it goes, but pro- 
pose that we do not follow in the old and con- 
servative method pursued since Bowdoin's 
base-ball was born. We really do hope that, 
although we have able antagonists within the 
State, the college will once again send their 
representative nine abroad, and inform the 
New England colleges that it is distance 
alone that prevents Bowdoin from learning 
to play modern base-ball from accomplished 
teachers. We urge, then, that the directors 
have constantly in view this end, and that 
the nine, if there be one, make arrangements 
for the winter's work. 



POEM. 

Two students chanced to stroll one day 
Among the woodland bowers, 

Each with a maiden by his side 
To cheer the iieeting hours. 

They wandered through the shady dells 
And talked of Nature's beauties, 

And cooed, as turtle doves oft coo. 
Performing Love's sweet duties. 

A swollen brooklet crossed their path. 
Which stopped their pleasant musing. 

For, while the youths could cross with ease, 
Yet stayed the maids, refusing. 

Then pride inspired the brave young men, 
All thought of self forgetting, 



94 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



They quoth, " We'll play the part of bridge 
And save your feet a wetting." 

" So be it," cried the maidens fair, 

"We'll seek no other passes, 
For, like Pythagoras of old. 

You build a bridge of ««ses." 



A ROMANCE. 

"Yes, George, it was a sad experience; 
and how the falling rain, the soughing pines, 
and general gloom, suggestive of broken vows 
and shattered hopes, recall those old forgotten 
hours. And yet it was not long ago, but one 
short year, and on such a night as this, too, — a 
night fit to be the anniversary of that event- 
ful eve." 

My chum's words set me musing, and an 
uncontrollable spirit seized me to give away 
an incident unknown and unsuspected; an act 
in a fitful drama of love. It was indeed such 
a night as this which brought a climax to my 
chum's delirium of love's young dream. The 
pouring rain, driven by the wind, rattled 
against the windows, the coals glowed red, 
casting fantastic shadows upon the wall, form- 
ing a pleasant contrast to the darkness and 
gloom without. Shivering, I drew my chair 
to the fire, inwardly pitying my chum exposed 
to such a night, for he was absent. I felt a 
premonition of impending evil as I meditated 
upon the surprising change brought to my 
chum in so short a period. 

A moral, modest, studious youth, festive, 
fun-loving, and withal independent, possess- 
ing sometliing above us ordinary mortals, I 
more than respected him. A lofty scorner of 
woman's powers and liater of her wiles, he 
saw more joy about the hearth and table, in 
discussions upon the comparative merits of 
Porter on the intellect and Porter on the stom- 
ach, and at times content to wile away tlie 
time at draw ; and 'twas thus he lived. 

A change came o'er the spirit of his 
dreams, and anxiously I watched its progress, 



for, be it known, I had been there. It is an 
old story. The}^ met at a church sociable — 
he a sturdy youth, a humble, Christian maiden 
she. Yet, strange to say, 'tis such, the strong- 
est charms possess, and my chum yielded. 
Her home was in Topsham, and oft, on starry 
eves, my chum wended his devious waj^ re- 
turning home, not too early to disturb me, 
and generally in time for morning prayers, 
to weary me with liis ravings. I compassion- 
ately bore with him and mused much on what 
he said of the old gentleman, the prospective 
father-in-law, for I, in my capacity, a purchaser 
of field-day cider, had met with, and, be the 
truth told, imbibed with him, a jovial, genial, 
bucolic Topshamite, whose rosy visage and 
rubicund nose proclaimed his fondness for 
the cup that cheers and inebriates. 

To a person of my chum's refined sensi- 
bilities associating with such an old toper, for 
such indeed he was, could not but prove dis- 
agreeable, for my chum was an ardent sup- 
porter and advocate of temperance — in others, 
and especially in old persons. 

Then the symptoms daily grew in strength, 
and vows, personal deprivations multiplied 
untU at last even the strong love for his pipe 
succumbed, and my chum swore off from this, 
rejecting scornfully my proposition that he 
await New Year's, when such vows could 
be made with safety. He no longer contented 
himself with escorting her home, but deemed 
it incumbent upon himself to await the re- 
tirement of the old folks, wliicli early took 
place, with the slight reservation that the old 
man retired to tiie back kileiien, and solaced 
his loneliness with the ardent. 

It was upon such an errand tliat he was 
absent upon the night in question, promising an 
early return. At twelve I retired, not satisfied. 
My sleep was fitful, and more than once I 
was awakened by the violence of the storm, 
and occasionally going to tlic window, tried to 
pierce the darkness witliout. Returning I 
stirred the fire in tlie grate until it glowed 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



95 



again, muttering words by no means com- 
plimentary to my absent chum. At last I 
was roused by strange and startling noises 
upon the stairs without, evidently caused 
by a cripple or an intoxicated person. 
My experience furnished no precedent for 
the former supposition, hence the natural 
inference. It was true, and the cause of the 
uproar was my own chum, my immaculate 
chum. But alas, not the sprightly, natty 
youth of but a few short hours before. 

With the stony, semi-intelligent, semi-idi- 
otic gaze, and foolish smile, my chum began 
a peculiar and ludicrous narrative. His words 
were somewhat unintelligible, through an un- 
accountable thickness in his voice, caused, he 
said, by the fog with which his mouth was 
filled. He stopped now and then to straighten 
his back,and on hands and knees to press down 
the floor, which, he said, "kept rising up." 

It was late when he started for home, as 
he had given the old man, his prospective 
father-in-law, a lecture on temperance. On his 
way, startled by groans, he turned aside, and — 
"never sh'd blieved it" — had found a drunken 
man sunk to his neck in the mud on Main St. 

Having spent the night in vain attempts 
to obtain aid, he had at last brought the un- 
fortunate man with him, and left him at the 
door below. "Am tired out." With these 
words he sank in a heap, with an idiotic 
smile wreathing his countenance. 

The storm had ceased ; day was breaking 
as, more than half doubting his words, I went 
below. It was true; there lay his companion, 
and the condition of his clothes justified my 
chum's story. But, beneath the mud and rags, 
I recognized an old friend — there, calmly 
sleeping, lay the bucolic Topshamite — the 
father of my chum's intended. I laughed. 

Need I say my chum no longer crossed 
the river? The incident was kept a secret, 
and thereafter, instead of taking a hand on 
the front door-step, he preferred a hand about 
the festive board at No. . 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON CONVEN- 
TION. 

Delegates from twenty-six chapters of the 
Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity met in con- 
vention at Masonic Hall, Utica, N. Y., Wed- 
nesday and Thursday, October 19th and 20th, 
with the Tau Chapter of Hamilton College. 
Business sessions of the convention were held 
on the morning, afternoon, and evening of 
Wednesday, and on the morning and after- 
noon of Thursday. 

Tliursday evening at half-past seven the 
delegates assembled at the Butterfield House, 
and at eight o'clock marched in a body to 
the City Opera House where the public ex- 
ercises were held. Upon the stage, which 
was elegantly decorated with hot-house plants 
and floral tributes to d. K. £., were the Pres- 
ident, Professor A. P. Kelsey, '56 ; the Chap- 
lain, Rev. B. P. Willoughby, '56 ; the Orator, 
Professor John J. Lewis, '60 ; the Poet, Pro- 
fessor Willis J. Beecher, '58; Hon. M. A. 
McKee, '62 ; and A. Norton Brockway, '56, — 
all graduates of Hamilton College. After a 
song by the brethren and prayer by the chap- 
lain, the oration, on "The Coming Man," a 
model of excellence and worth, was listened 
to by an appreciative audience. The poem, 
entitled " Procrustes," by Professor W. J. 
Beecher, was also well received. The Utica 
Philharmonic Orchestra furnished music for 
the occasion. 

At the close of the public exercises the 
delegates, together with other members of 
the fraternity, formed in column of fours 
and marched with a band at the head to the 
Baggs' Hotel, where a sumptuous banquet 
awaited them. The banquet having received 
proper attention, toasts, songs, and speeches 
furnished amusements till the clock struck 
the hour for retiring. 

Friday morning, by invitation of the rep- 
resentatives from Cornell University, several 
of the delegates took the train for Ithaca, 
where they were received in a most hospitable 



96 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



manner by the Delta Chi Chapter. Friday 
evening a reception to the visitors was given 
at the Delta Chi Chapter House. Saturday 
morning and afternoon were devoted to 
"doing" the University and the beautiful 
little city of Ithaca. Cornell, with its broad 
campus, not unadorned by Nature, is situated 
in one of the loveliest spots in New York State, 
and loth were the visitors to leave for scenes 
less inviting. In connection with the thirty- 
fifth annual convention of J. I(. £., will al- 
ways be remembered the pleasant hours spent 
with Delta Chi. 



COMMUKICATIOMS. 



Editors of Orient : 

It is well known that no little dissatisfac- 
tion arose during the last base-ball season, 
over the arrangement, or rather the fulfill- 
ment, of the season's work; and, although 
there ma}' have been just cause for complaint, 
at whose door it should be placed, no one pre- 
tends to answer. Notwithstanding as man}' 
games as usual were played, it so happened 
that the college was deprived from witnessing 
them, and quite naturally, on this account, 
felt disappointed. 

It is also a well-known fact tliat for a 
number of seasons the base-ball championship 
of the State has yearly been left in a very 
unsettled condition. In truth, it has not been 
decided at all. Although many .substantial 
claims may have been presented by tlie sev- 
eral colleges, it can be fairly said that no su- 
periority has been attained among the Maine 
colleges that has been satisfactory to all, and 
obtained in a manner that should leave doubt 
out of the question. 

In order that this unsettled condition of 
affairs may be overcome, and that 1 he feel- 
ings of discontent so prevalent during the 
last season may have no cause for re-aijpear. 



ance, it is advisable that earlj- in the season 
the necessary arrangements should be made. 
Let the several managers of the base-ball as- 
sociations in our colleges meet and draw up a 
perfect schedule, with games assigned for 
dates as early in the season as practicable. 
By this means ample time will be given for 
the playing of any games that may be post- 
poned on account of unpropitious weather, 
and, in case it should so happen that two 
clubs stand equal on the number of games 
won and lost, for a final and deciding contest. 
The full number having been played, some 
conclusions will be reached which render the 
question of superiority definitel}' settled. 

It is not until some systematic method 
similar to this is adopted, that any satisfactory 
end can be reached in base-ball matters. And 
since such salutary financial effects followed 
the revision of the old and the adoption of 
the new constitution, with a systematic method 
of procedure in the arrangement and play- 
ing of games in the future, our association 
will be placed on a firmer foundation and the 
college will be allowed much additional pleas- 
ure. N. G. 



Editors of Orient : 

I have read with interest the couuuunica- 
tion signed " V.," in your last numberl I 
take it for granted that the writer expresses 
his own honest doubts, and perhaps those of 
others, as to the propriety of requiring at- 
tendance at religious exercises. I therefore 
wish, with your kind peiinission, to present 
the following considerations in the hope of 
throwing some light upon the subject. 

In the first place, we must clearly recog- 
nize the fact that the college avowedly under- 
takes to develop, with some degree of symme- 
try, all the essential powers of manhood which 
can proi)erly come under its inlluence. This 
is its work, rather than tliat of storing the 
mind with facts for special use, as in a profes- 
sional school. To this end it offers the stu- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



97 



dent an extended programme of exercises for 
intellectual drill, ranging from the Ancient 
Languages and Mathematics of Freshmen to 
the Metaphysics of Senior year. It provides 
for his muscular development in the varied 
exercises of g3minasium, drill, boating, and 
ball playing. (I mention the last two because 
the college does, under certain restrictions, 
recognize them practically as electives alter- 
nating with the first two.) In its govern- 
ment, it aims to encourage manly self-reliance 
by reducing specific rules of conduct to a 
minimum — the formation of regular habits by 
requiring punctual attendance at college ex- 
ercises — and truthfulness by accepting a stu- 
dent's statements on all occasions when it can 
possibly do so, preferring to be sometimes de- 
ceived rather than run the risk of provoking 
falsehood by appearing to expect it. By its 
dormitory system it makes him a member of 
a compact community, and so places him 
under most favorable conditions for learning 
one of life's great lessons, that of bearing with 
others and forbearing for the sake of others. 

In all this provision for varied exercise, 
leading to harmonious development of body, 
mind, and character, shall the religious ele- 
ment of his nature, confessedly the most im- 
portant of all, be entirely ignored ? Probably 
few would desire this ; but some claim that 
religious exercises form a class b}'' themselves 
which should be especially exempted from the 
general college law of required attendance. 

Let us see. A sermon which elucidates a 
scripture text, showing how its teaching bears 
upon life and character, is certainly as impor- 
tant and useful as a lecture on an ode of Hor- 
ace. Keeping in mind what the college is 
avowedly trying to accomplish for the student, 
is there any valid reason why attendance 
should be required at one and not at the other? 

Again, the observance of morning prayers 
as a college institution is in perfect harmony 
with the aims and professions of a Christian 
college — the discontinuance of them would be 



in painful contrast to those aims and profes- 
sions. As related to the student's training, 
they (^with the Sunday services) are the only 
occasions which call for the exercise of rever- 
ence — a most important and greatly needed 
element of character, co-ordinate with others 
which the college seeks to cultivate, such as 
truthfulness, honor, and self-respect. Why 
should attendance at prayers be optional so 
long as attendance at other college exercises 
is required? 

Surely no one really believes that the col- 
lege tries to compel worship, or to implant 
spirituality by force. What it does, and con- 
siders its duty to do, is to express its estimate 
of the importance of worship as an exercise in 
the development of a complete manhood, and 
to bring this to the notice of all under its care 
at regular and frequent intervals. This it can 
do effectively only by conforming to the gen- 
eral usage of the college respecting attendance 
at exercises which are considered necessary 
for securing the ends for which the college 
exists. Either attendance at all such exer- 
cises must be required, or all alike should be 
made voluntary. 

I think " compulsion " may excite needless 
and hurtful irritation, not because of any 
fault in the occasion or manner of its exer- 
cise, but because of misapprehension as to its 
legitimate office, and a failure to recognize the 
very great and beneficent part it plays in the 
formation of our characters. From childhood 
to old age we are obliged to do things which 
are distasteful to us, and to abstain from in- 
dulgencies which suit us, and it is only when 
this discipline is cheerfully submitted to that 
we become desirable members of the commu- 
nity. Among the most potent forces which 
constrain us are family influence, the usages 
of society, and public opinion. From the 
pressure of these, the student is, in a large 
measure released, when he exchanges home 
for college life, and it is to supply the lack of 
these that the college steps in with its over- 



98 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



sight and authority. In no sense does the 
college compete with the State or challenge 
comparison with it. Therefore, in determin- 
ing the proper sphere and legitimate methods 
of college requirements, we must compare 
them with those of the family and society, 
rather than with those of the State. Much 
that is cheerfully yielded to the demands of 
the former would properly be resisted as 
tyrannical if claimed b}' the latter. For these 
reasons, the "church and State" argument 
cannot be transferred from the State to the 
college. 

In reply to your correspondent's closing 
sentence, I wish to present what I believe to 
be the correct view, namely, that existing 
college requirements, including required at- 
tendance at church and chapel, are not only 
entirely consistent with respect for a student's 
manhood, but do distinctly recognize the high- 
est attributes of that manhood. 

They are, in fact, most useful helps to him 
in the difficult task of making the most of 
himself, and this not because he is a boy, for 
he may be of age, but because all of us, young 
and old, need to be compelled to do much that 
is for our own highest good. 

C. H. S. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



Dis-band. 

Sophomore supper, when ? 

Harding, '81, has been in town. 

Cold day, when you recite twice. 

No smolving allowed in Greeli recitations. 

Calico on the campus ! Turn out, all stare. 

Knapp has been elected captain of the nine. 

A Senior remarlvs that volcanoes are sometimes 
curious craters. 

'85 cannot be said to be ovcr-frenh, as tlicre is a 
Tarr among its members. 

The Zeta I'si Society has moved from its liall 
down town and occupies that over Smith's store. 



Falling leaves — so does the novice at a skating 
rink. 

Society goats have been rampant since our last 
edition. 

Freshman cider is giving the Sophs a good deal 
of trouble. 

"Fuck" is welcomed once more to its accustomed 
file in the reading-room. 

Topsham boasts of a city meat market. Here is 
your chance, club stewards. 

"From Greenland's icy mountains" is rather a 
chilly tune for the chapel. 

The management of the chapel organ has ex- 
perienced a severe blow-up. 

Cole, Pearson, Pettingill, Swan, and Washburn 
have been elected Bugle editors. 

Kev. Joseph Torrey, of Yarmouth, preached at 
the Congregational Church, Sunday. 

Prof. Lee lectures on Hygiene before the Fresh- 
man class every Wednesday afternoon. 

"In the morning by the bright light," etc., seems 
to have been a popular song for the Juniors. 

The Seniors begin the practical study of Parlia- 
mentary Law, using "Robert's Rules of Order." 

W. G. Reed and E. U. Curtis have attended the 
Delta Kappa Epsilon Convention at Utica, N. Y. 

The Juniors have rhetorical exercises every Wed- 
nesday at 2 P.M. Sophomores the same at 3 p.m. 

The Bi'unswick Herald says the Juniors are hav- 
ing weekly original declamations. The class feel in- 
sulted. 

In English History — "Now the Peers were " 

Whisper from Behind — "O! Where are the rea- 
peers ! " 

The large suspicious looking cask in Cleaveland 
room receives many a wistful glance from thirsty 
students. 

Bai-barism is ever ready to encroach. As soon as 
the ball players leave the delta we see it turned into 
a cow pasture. 

In the Sophomore and Freshman classes Prof. 
Wheeler is introducing the Continental method of 
pronunciation. 

It is expected to have the second story of Memo- 
rial Hall so far completed as to hold the winter ex- 
hibition in that place. 

Back number ivanted. — Any one having No. 1, 
Vol. IV., of the Orient, and desiring to dispose of 
the same, will confer a favor by addressing the busi- 
ness editor. 



I 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 



99 



The members of the chai^el choir are Barton, 
Walker, Longren, Butler, Sewall, Torrey, Stetson, 
and Pierce ; Hilton, organist. 

The bequest of $5,000 from Mrs. Noah Wood is 
for a memorial scholarshiiD in honor of her son, the 
late William A. Blake, class of 73. 

A young lady advises a member of '85 to have 
his pictures taken every year so he can see the im- 
provement he makes after Freshman year. 

Complaint is made that those who agreed last 
spring to take the drill for two years do not pretend 
to be present now that the exercise is optional . 

During Prof. Johnson's absence the German class 
has been conducted by Prof. Campbell. The recita- 
tions in French meanwhile have been discontinued. 

The Bowdoin Cornet Band has the following offi- 
cers : Leader, J. W. Crosby ; Deputy Leader, C. C. 
Hutchins ; Executive Committee, Jewett. Fling, and 
Longren. 

" 1 want to be a soldier 

And with the soldier.s .stand, 

A pompon o'er my forehead 

A musket in my hand." 
Thus sighs the Freshman, and he is atonce taken into 
the ranks of our country's future defenders. 

"Average repairs" are to be dropped from the 
term bills during this year. The students have often 
complained of this item of expense, and now that it 
is experimentally removed should restrain their 
destructiveness as much as possible. 

The singing by the chapel clioir on Sunday even- 
ing was spoken of by all ;is unusually fine. The 
voices of the five singers blended very harmoniously 
and there seemed to be less of the disagreeable res- 
onance in the chapel than usual. 

It has been the intention for some time to use 
steam for heating the laboratory, and pipes have been 
ready for that purpose. A boiler has recently been 
placed in the cellar, and on Monday, 24th, the Sen- 
iors, for perhaps the first time in their course, recited 
by steam. 

An account of the dredging expedition of the 
United States Fish Commission, which Prof. Lee 
accompanied this summer, appears in the October 
number of the American Journal of Science, entitled, 
"Marine Fauna occupying the waters on the south- 
ern coast of New England." 

At Lasell the young ladies have a pleasant custom 
of pasting printed transcriptions of the Lord's Prayer 
upon the head of their beds. The lovely creatures 



after preparing for the night's rest glance up at the 
sacred petition, and exclaiming, "Them's my senti- 
ments," are lost to sight in the downy dephts. Do 
you ask how we know ? 

Prof. — "Mention an oxide." "Student — 
"Leather." Prof.— "Oxide of what?" S.— "Oxhide 
of beef, sir." Prof, (looking round for the eraser to 
throw at him, mutters)— "If I had you alone, you 

young scion, I'd " A deep groan of horror bursts 

from the class. 

The old Freshman i-oom is now only used for one 
recitation daily, and for the assembling of the various 
college associations. The opportunity exists for 
making this into a desirable place for recitations by 
extending it across the hall, like the Senior and 
Mathematical rooms. 

On the 18th the Sophomores kindly endeavored, 
by means of a horn concert, to while away the even- 
ing hours for the benefit of the Freshmen. The lat- 
ter reciprocally entertained their serenaders by com- 
ing to the windows of their apartments and deliver- 
ing choice selections of oratory and music. 

At the Chemical lecture room, Tuesday, Oct. 18th, 
President Chamberlain repeated the address begun 
in the chapel on the 9th. In spite of the stormy 
evening a good audience of students and residents in 
town was present, and appreciated the privilege of 
listening to this memorial under so much more favor- 
able circumstances than on the former occasion. 

Senior (explaining absence) — "I had to have a 
tooth hauled, yesterday." Prof, (much interested in 
Osteology, etc.,) — "Which tooth was it? Could I 
get it for inspection?" S. (who fears he will ex- 
amine his mouth next and smell his breath) — "No, 
sir ; I didn't keep it. It was an eye-tooth that ached, 
but the dentist pulled the wrong one." Prof. — " Oh ? 
how was that?" S. — "He said it was a case of 
mistaken eye-deni-ily ." 

The lenses for the object glass of the proposed 
telescope were completed during the summer. They 
are two beautiful pieces of glass, 4i inches in diam- 
eter and ground to a curvature of 28 inches radius. 
Many difficulties under which the work was accom- 
plished reflect credit upon the ingenuity and perse- 
verance of the maker, C. C. Hutchins, '83. It will be 
remembered also that the first lense, when ready for 
polishing, was cracked during the laboratory fire, 
thus necessitating the grinding of a new piece. 

The musical talent of the college is assuming 
pi'oportions that excite the apprehension of quiet- 
loving students. The Bowdoin Orchestra, Band, 



100 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Freshman Orchestra, and minor atrocities, with fre- 
quent rehearsals, occupy nearly every evening of the 
week. From those students who are tortured on all 
sides by individual practice, also come loud com- 
plaints. Musical organizations in college are de- 
sirable if not necessary, but the point beyond which 
they become an unmitigated nuisance is still open to 
discussion. 



PERSONAL. 



[We earnestly solicit coinmunioatious to this column 
from any who may hare an interest iu the Alumni.] 

'49. — George O. Robinson is a lawyer at Bloom- 
ington, 111. 

'60. — W. W. Thomas has an illustrated article, en- 
titled " A Week in a Dug-out," in the October num- 
ber of Harper's. 

'61. — Chas. O. Hunt, M.D., who lately resigned 
his position as Supei'intendent of the Maine Gen- 
eral Hospital, has withdrawn his resignation. He 
has been elected to the chair of Materia Medica at 
the Bowdoin Medical School. 

'67. — Steven M. Nev^'man has lately been elected 
to a Professorship at Ripon College. He still con- 
tinues his duties as pastor of the church in Ripon, 
where he has been preaching for some time jjast. 

'69. — George W. Hale has recently sailed for Eu- 
rope to spend a year. 

'69. — Charles A. Stevens has recently edited a 
book for boys, entitled " Knock-About Book." 

'70. — A. J. Curtis is principal of the High School 
at Yarmouth. 

'73. — Royal A. Gould, formerly a lawyer at Bid- 
deford, is now principal of a Grammar School iu 
that city. 

'73. — Andrew P. Wiswell was in town a few 
days since. 

'75. — Lincoln A. Rogers is principal of the New 
Britian Seminary. 

'76. — Miles Standish has just returned from Eu- 
rope and intends to settle in Boston or the vicinity. 

'76. — E. H. Hall h:is returned from Europe and 
taken his position as Instructor in Physics at Harvard. 

'76. — C. H. Clurk is First Assistant in the Bath 
High School. 

'76. — J. G. Libby is at Auburndale, Mass., where 
he is studying medicine. 

'76. — George B. Merrill was married, June 27th, 
to Mrs. Vina L. Loring of Freeport, Me. 

'76. — E. B. Nevvcomb, married June 30, to Miss 
Nellie S. Penuell of Cumberland Mills, Me. 



<rp '76. — J. H. Payne has removed his office to 680 
f reraont St., Boston. 

'76. — Charles G. Wheeler has recently finished the 
book, -entitled " Who Wrote It ? " commenced by his 
■teewier, William A. Wheeler, class of '53. 

'76. — George F. Pratt was married, July 27th, to 
Miss Fannie D. Harlow of Brewer, Me. 

'78. — John M. Burleigh is attending lectures at the 
Harvard Law School. 

'82. — Sanborn has entered Dartmouth. 

'83. — Gannett has gone to the School of Technol- 
ogy, Boston, to obtain the benefit of Professor Vose's 
instruction. 

'84. — Cummings has entered Colby University. 



COLLEGE WORLD. 



Columbia : 

After the foot-ball season is over the Hare and 
Hounds Club will come to the front. 

Several members of Eighty-three are soon to 
appear in gowns, thus completing the idea of an 
academic costume which was begun by wearing the 
Oxford cap. 

The Spectator says Columbia made a mistake in 
rowing an eight at New London and a four at Phila- 
delphia, and urges that thej' limit themselves to one 
crew next season. 

As no ground could be discovered on which to 
build the foundation for the eastern end of Library 
Hall, it has been decided to move the building twelve 
feet further west. — Spectator. 

Harvard : 

The Harvard Legislature is dead. 

One of the performers on the horizontal bar at 
the Summer Circus in Paris, is a graduate of '76. 

Both the Crimson and Advocate are to liavc their 
papers delivered at the rooms of their student sub- 
scribers hereafter. 

Mr. Moses King, '81, was married to Miss Bertha 
Cloyes, of Cambridge, at the First Church, Wednes- 
day afternoon. — Advocate. 

The Crimson regrets that Mr. Riddle has under- 
taken to play (Edipus, assisted by an English com- 
pany, and says that it will be little more than a trav- 
esty, and will tend to detract from the success of the 
representation last j'ear. 

The Crimson closes an editorial on the Harvard 
{/m'o»i with the following sensible words: "And if 
each member will only lay aside false modesty, — 
identical in this case with indolence, — aud determine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



101 



to say something at least in every debate, the pros- 
perity of the society this year will be all that could 
be desired." 
Yale: 

The late Dr. Holland's son is a member of '82. 

Only four members of tlie old University crew are 
left this year. 

The students of the undergraduate department are 
divided as follows : Seniors, 158 ; Juniors, 222 ; Soph- 
omores, 167 ; Freshmen, 22-t. 

Yale is afflicted with too great an abundance of 
music. The Faculty allow students four hours a daj' 
and Wednesday and Saturday afternoons in which to 
play pianos, but complaint is made that the limita- 
tions are overstepped. 
In General : 

Diplomas at Princeton cost $14.50. 

The Freshman class at Colby is smaller than that 
of last year. 

Michigan University is to have a new museum 
costing 160,000. 

Phillips Exeter opens with 189 students, and 
Andover with 202. 

Cornell, by the will of the late Mrs. Fiske, of 
Ithaca, receives $290,000.— Ex. 

Cornell has also received $500,000 from the sale 
of western lands, and has $300,000 worth left. — Sun. 

The Senior Class of Williams College have 
elected E. G. Benedict, of Brooklyn, poet. Is that 
our genial friend Ephraim ? 



CLIPPIKGS. 



'• ARMA VIRUMQUE CANO." 

(Modern Version.) 
In the light of the moon they sat on the beach. 

And what was the harm? 
For perhaps he was trying that maiden to teach 
All about the bright stars, and tlie names we give each; 
Or perhaps he was turning his hopes into speech — 

But where was his arm? 
Now that maid seemed to have a rather fair form — 

But what hid her waist? 
Well, perhaps 'twas to shield her from some coming storm, 
Or perhaps 'twas to keep that dear maiden warm, 
Round the waist of that maiden's rather fair form 

His arm he had placed. 

Is life worth living ? That depends on the liver. 

It was a Vassar girl, who, when asked if she liked 
codfish balls, replied : "I really don't know, I never 
attended one." — Brunonian. 

"I think I was absent when that was explained," 
exclaimed the Junior who hadn't been paying atten- 
tion. " Yes, absent-minded," said the tutor. 



Freshman (to Senior, reverentially) — "May I pre- 
sume to ask what you are reading, sir?" Senior — " I 
am reading 'My Novel.' Get out!" Fresh,'(awe- 
struck) — "I did not know 'you had written one." — 
Trinity Tablet. 

"Wouldn't you like to have a bow?" said the 
bold young archer as they sauntered down the field ; 
and she murmured, "Yes," and the ab.sorbed archer 
said, " What kind of a bow would you prefer ? " She 
quivered a little as she replied, archly, "I think I 
should prefer yew," and then the young man "took it 
in. — Ex. 

Anxious Mamma (to impressionable Junior who 
has asked her daughter to go out riding) — "Thank 
you very much, Mr. X., but you know I have to be so 
particular, and I make it a rule that my daughter 
shall never go out with students." Impressionable 
Student — "But you know that I'm not much of a 
student." Tableau. (Fact.) 

Visitor (observing the students as they pass) to 
Professor — "I should think the young ladies of the 
O. S. U. would often feel a little down at the mouth." 
Professor (somewhat puzzled) — " Indeed ! I see no 
reason why they should." Visitor — " Oh, 'tis nothing 
only I see many of the young men are raising mous- 
taches." Professor catches the idea. — Lantern. 

Scene — Front door step. Dramatis personas — 
Milesian maid, adventurous Soph. Soph. — "Aw! 
Miss Frawnces, is she at home?" M. Maid — "No, 
sur, she's out." Soph. — "Mrs. Frawnces?" M. 
Maid — "No, sur, sAe's out." Soph. — "Well, then 
I guess I'll just step in and sit by the fire till they re- 
turn." Biddy — "Faith, sur, and that's out, too." 
(Exit Soph.) — Free Press. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



The subject of college laws and discipline is not 
only a legitimate matter for the consideration of col- 
lege journals, but is eminently practical. In many 
colleges there is beginning to be a complaint of 
statutes as severe and arbitrary as the famous "Blue 
Laws " enacted for the government of students at a 
time when customs were more strict and the average 
age of students much younger than at present. To 
Amherst, an institution which might be expected to 
be very conservative, is due the credit of having 
taken the first decisive steps in recognizing that stu- 
dents are men, and should be treated accordingly. 
There have been many misunderstandings and many 
misrepresentations in regard to the changes made. 



102 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



It has been represented that opportunities for the 
wildest license are afforded, that trips to Europe or 
to the Yosemite may be taken by one nominally a 
student of the college, without injury to his standing, 
or that if a student attends nine-tenths of the college 
recitations he is under no further restrictions. Tlie 
change is not a change of rules, but of the manner of 
executing them. Instead of using the Faculty as a 
police force to execute the laws, the students are 
made to understand their force and spirit, and 
promise on their honor to obey them. On entering 
they sign the agreement, " I do hereby promise and 
engage that I will observe and conform to all the 
rules and regulations made by the government of 
Amherst College for the students." The college 
laws remain as before and the student is made mor- 
ally i-esponsible for abiding by them. Such a liberty 
is a tribute to their manhood, and tliey have shown 
themselves wortliy of it. The law CDnc-eruing attend- 
ance corrects a serious fault in cpUego life, by doing 
away with what must at least be called the great ex- 
aggeration too often practiced by tliose who are held 
to a constant attendance unless actually incapacitated 
for it. The admittance of students into the Faculty 
meeting is now being discussed, but it is doubtful if 
this will be practically a success. 

At the danger of calling down upon us the wrath 
of many of our exchanges, we venture to suggest 
that the light-slietch mine has been worked about, 
long enough. It has reached such a pitch that any- 
thing that is divided into an abundance of chapters, 
each with a piece of poetry at tlie liead, and is gar- 
nished with long and aristocratic names, and embel- 
lished with a choice variety of adjectives and slang, 
is thought to be a work of genius, and is given prece- 
dence of everything else in the columns of the col- 
lege paper. Such emanations may be the natural 
result of summer romances or readings, but it is time 
that they should give phxce to something more worthy 
of the college press. 

If one expects to tind anything frivolous in the 
Vassar Miscellany he will be happily disappointed, 
for there is no college publication tliat sliows a 
greater amount of solid literary work. Tlio litcraiy 
department this month is occupied by two essays, 
both by editors of the magazine. One is "John 
lirown, the Hot- Headed Demagogue," the other 
"John Brown, the Far-Sighted Patriot." Whether 
one is convinced by them one way or the other de- 
pends more on liis prejudices and inclinations than 
on the merit of llic arguments. Holliare vivid narra- 
tions of tlie life and great attempt of the most roman- 
tic figure of American history. 



NowReady : Nos, V, & VI, ofllie Q, P, INDEXES, yiz, ; 

(No, V.)— General IikIox to the Eclectic Magazine, and to 
Vols. 37-14S of The Living Age. 72 three-columu pages, 
price, postpaid, $3.00. 

(No. VI., price $2.00)— General Index to wuoLE of Scribner's 
Monthly. 

"The Indexes which I have received from you have saved me more time and 
labor than can be imagined. I would Dot be without them at auy price." — M. A. 



Sanders. Pawtuckct Public Librarv. 

"Brief as it ('Lippincott' Ind>x) is, I i 
(pportunity of compari 



: just what I want."— H. A. Tcnney, State of Michigan Li- 



THE MONOGRAPH. 

A SERIAL COLLECTION OF INDEXED ESSAYS (embraciug 
the best articles, on the topics choseu, by Anierioan, Eng-lish, 
French, and German authors, iucIuding'E. L. Gorlkiu, T. \V. 
Higjanson, Henry Adams, E. A. Freeman, J. K. Seeley. Karl 
Hillebrand, Goldwin Smith, J. Morley, W. Bagehot, Sainte- 
Beuve, etc., etc.). Published Fortnigluly, at $2 per year. Sin- 
gle numbers, 10 cents. 

Alreadv issued : I.— France, its GroM'th and Consolidation ; 
II.— The CouNTKSS of Aluax V. CiiAHLEs KowAiiD, and Alfieri ; 
III.— The Venetian* Inijuisition : IV.— IIeui'Ei;. Goethe, and 
Caul-Augu8t; v.— Cleopatra : VI. — Puritan and Cromwelliau 
England; VII — Moetke; VIII.— PuixrEs^s Dashkov; IX.— 
Scanderheg; X.— Zinzenooke and ihr :\Ioi;aaians; XI— Gen. 
Kaeb; XII.— Colimiu's; XIII.— Tin- (^rt-atiK'-s of theKOMANS; 
XIV.— The Iron ."Masiv; XV. — TIh' Pkl^onkk uf Chillon; 
XVI.— Dante; XVII.— Erasmus; xviil— Tho German Re- 
formation; XIX.— Pocahontas: XX.— Foequet the Magni- 
ficent ; XXI.— The Assassins ; XXU.- Bonaparte's Political Po- 
sition; XXIII.— Polish History; XXIV.— The British in India; 
XXV.— Christina of Sweden.' 

....The editor intends to choose only those articles that are both 
scholarly and interesting ; and wliere there is a large amount of ma- 
terial he will so condense it that readers with limited time may get all pos- 
sible value from it, instead of reyecting it on account of its quantity.... 
There is no end to the good things of English, French, and Oerman, from 

which the editor may choose. — "Boston Advertiskb," 21, 5, 1881 So 

far as the scope of these is concerned, time will show how wide a class will 
find their interest in the Monograph ; hut the quality will, we apprehend, 

certainly approve itself,— " Tub Nation-," 28, 4, 18S1 It is intended for 

that portion of the public which isfanuliar with the names but not with the 
facts of history, etc., and desires to fill unt this framework with accurate 
knowledge. The editor promises to have the articles published give the 
facts of the ease with accuracy of au encycloptedia, but in a r&idable form. 
On tho other baud he will avoid purely popular articles, and will cut out all 
irrevelant or unnecessary matter, however interesting. The class of readers 
he has in mind includes the vast majority of lilinu y p:itnMis, and it is to be 
hoped that the Monograph will be appreciated. ;iis i, by IimcIilts of history 
in schools.— Library JocKXAL, 6, 1881 Th' ariirls aro evidently se- 
lected wiih great care, and contain much inT iiiiatiiH in a \ ory accessible 
form. I shall take pleasure in recumnicihii!!- tin- ]i\iblic:ui(in lo young 
people who may desire to improve tli-in- Us-^Mm^ f, I'l aiuu.y ,1Iome 
Studies Society).... This is a fortni-hti\ jniblii.-aiinii, nnvcl in siylr and 
purpose. Its purpose is to repubUsh aiaii-lrs nf standard nuTil, selected 
from every source. Some of the Monographs already published are pieced 
from several sources with skill, credit being always given. It is especially 
adapted to the wants of city and school libraries, where infonniitlon upon 
subjects is wanted but not accessible. But for the general render who 
wants cnndensed artii.-lis of scholarly accuracy and Hterary merit, the Mon- 
ograph is MiLTrai ^Li-v ice. ...The enterprise is worthy of all encouragement, 
and every lilnary, n-adiug circle, high school, etc., will do well to subscribe 
for it fluy will ihus have at hand a large collection of important essays, 
which can now he found only by bunting through volumes of magaiines, 
reviews, etc.— Scuoolmaster (Chicago), 15, 8, 1881. 



In preparatii 
vi.i s, b\ IT. \. 



Ki>uEsi'n:uKi;. 1>^ 



vbcl; n 



al r 



i.f thoMo 
id readable discussion of ho 



Nearly 
lOnio., 2r> cents. 
Address 



John ^lorlev: The Cur- 

o; ItM-Lr-aT \^yv.-\ .iC IhO 



I xMlMlion of UuillsH 

\i : 'riie 'Prociia- 

I I N.'is: Tho KxousH 
i»; riu- Coup d'etat of 

Mnli.Tval FeohknCK; 
rilC l.KGEM) of FlllED- 

■ ; I'liii.H- II. 

ph >,dves a simple, untech- 

wuisT should be plaved. 



A Manual of Misi'sed Wohixs, 72 pages, 

Q. P. INDEX, Publisher, 

Bangor, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 






\m m ^' 



Finest and Most Select Stock of 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS. 

The Newest and Greatest Variety of Patterns in 

NECKWEAR, GLOVES, HOSIERY, 

UNDERWEAR, BRACES, ETC. 

^"Custom Shirts from Measure, Six for $9.00. 
A Perfect Fit Guaranteed. 

Goods for the TROY LAtJNDRY sent Tues- 
days and received Saturdays. 

In Percales, Mahrattas, and American Goods. 
Orders by mail promptly attended to. 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 
FRANK M. STETSON, 

JXTST ftSCZEIIVSD = 

All the New Styles in Soft and Stiff Hats. 
Best Stiff Hats, $2.75. Best Snk Hats, $3.50 in 



Just opened all the New and Nobby Styles Neck 
Dress, Colliirs, Cuffs, Fancy Hose, Canes, etc. 
All are invited to call and examine goods and prices. 

No. 2 Arcade Block. 
ISAAC H. SNOW, 

DEALER IN 

Jeef, Jork, button, Jamb, 8^q. 

Special Rates to Student Clnbs. 

1TE2ST XlOOia TO ST-A-iTT^vrOOXJ'S. 

EC. M. BOA^KER, 

BOARDING AND LIVERY STABLE 

Cor. Main and Cleave/and Sts.. Brunswick. 

All Hack Orders promptly attended to. 

C. L. Y®^^J OOLLEQE BaF^BEF^, 
Two doors north of Post Office. 




CUSTOM TAILORING 

A S PECIALTY, 

AT 

Fernald 's Tailor Emporium 

237 Middle Street, 
PORTLAND, - - - MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



AT C. W. ^LL1M*S 

DRUG STOR E. 

THE FINEST CIGARS AND SMOKING TOBACCOS. 
THE BEST PERFUJIEKY. 

THE BEST TOILET SOAPS. 

THE BEST HAIR BRUSHES. 
The Ijargest and Best Assortment of 

Drags, Patent Medicines, &c>, &c, 
To be found in this market. 

Lemont Block, BrunsivicJc, 3Iaine. 



S. O. COFFI]Sr, 

— DEALER IN — 

PROVISIONS AND GROCERIES 

»ii- Special Bates to Student Clubs. ^9 
CORNER OF MAIN AND ELM STREETS. 



(jOLDCLip 




TOBACCO&CIGARETTES 



"N, ABE OF THE FiNEST 

[FORM AND Reliable. 

TRY THE SEAL^SKIN CIGAR 

SEND .$:i.75, and we will forward 
by mail, registered, a 50 bo.v of the 
Seal-Skin Cigar. 

This ia a special offer to enable Bmokers to test this 
celebrated brarid. After u trial you will emoke no other. 

S.F. HESS & CO. 

Premium Tobacco Works, Rochester, N.Y* 

Desiring Employment, for Season of 1881, 

Encloae Ic. stamp, aiiLl write for circular, to 

THE MAITHATTAN" AGENCY. 

7gS"6roadway, New York City, N. Y. 

Please mention tliLs piipor. 
00 TO 

TO BUY YOUR 

Groceries, Canned Goods, Fruits, 

Confectionery, Tobacco, and Cigars. 

Special Kates to Student Chilts. 

Haia Street, Head of the Mall, Brunswick. 



MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 



lilliwill Okiiioiil AoM^mj 

Prepares for BowDOiif and the best New England 
Colleges. Offers, also, a thorough Semixakt Course 
to young ladies, and a shorter course for business 
pursuits. For Catalogues, address 

Kev. a. W. burr, Hallowell, Me. 

M^YIST GRID'S 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

IIl3" Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



QQAt* 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Coa,l "3ra,rd. in Topsliam., 



WHERE NONE BUT 



The Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 



\^ x^ 



.lr= 



i| 



B-A-TIi, I»^A.I3SrE. 



M, M, M^TffMMMT, PROPmETOE. 



I. S. BALGOME^ 

IIEAI.KU IN 

Hardware, Stoves, Crociery, ni Glassware, 

BRTTNS'WICK. ME:. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers ; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes ; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

CHOICE GROcTrTeS, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 

N. B.— Speciiil Rates to Students. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brjen Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

PORTLAND, TVlJiLlNE. 

This limisc has been thoroughly refitted toith every re- 
gard til comfort, and the aim is to make it first-class in all 
its appoiiitiiieiits. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 



De\\^ITT HOUSE, 

QUIMBY & MURCH, Proprietors, 



Royal Quuiin'. 



Eben MtntCH. • 



J^. O. REED, 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vievps ; also College Views. 

ALL KINDS OF 






ffs,^rKiS^e^if7S^<^' 



feifflsyyMii 




For Schools and Colleges, 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 




THE FAVORITE A/OS. S03-404 SJ2-/70-SS/- WITH 
OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORL 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



^i 



'^tmtw'S^n, 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 



©@ifc.l ^a< 



^J 



OFFICE IN LEMONT BLOCK, Brunswick. 

flgg-Telephoue connection with Coal Yard. 
(ig°Onlers left at Jordan Snow's, Lemont Block, will 
be promptly attemled to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBIilSHEK, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal MtTchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8j and ^8'j Congress St., and 2jj Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

.^ff^SEND Fou TiiicE List. 



ESTABLISHED 1S44. 

W. L. WILSON & CO., 

"WLolesale and Retail Dealers id 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

H2 & J 44 Exchange, cor. Federal St, 





The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at tlie Medi- 
cal Scliool of Miiine, will cninmencp FEBH0AltY 9th, 1882, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— JosmiA L. CHAMBcnLAls, LL.D.. President ; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred .Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic II, Gerrish, M.D., 
Anatomy; Charles W. Goddard, A.m., MedicalJarisprudeuce ; Hesry 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Burt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D , Surgery and Cliiiicil Surgery ; Charles 0. 
Host, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; William B. Cushuax, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to th» Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, a"n^"jEWELRY, 

Botanical Microscopes, Fancy Goods. Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry 
promptly repaired and warranted. 

^ixie Spectacles and. '^■ys^lm.ssss. 
EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

Mrs. leaFs Book- Binderjj 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Mv\sic, etc., Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book "Work to Order. 

W. BriCNICHT, 

1^ e ^ I. e r in ^^ 1 1 1$ * 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

.8®*Transient Orders for Milk or Cream lilled by giving suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 



N 

4 



Portland. Me. rom^T5 

AMOS L MILLETT & CO., 

.luBniCUM ANn TlBTAILRrtS OK STANPAHn 

Imprtei aiil Domfistic Fancy droceries. 

nUNKlSn HILL PICKLES A Sl'liVl.-l I.TY. 

V<m,r%.,ATSm^ . ; : MArilE, 

T!" I Ft *5 T ~ f^ Ta /\ ^5 ^5 

FlaMS, Organs,, and Melodeons,, j E. SM ITH, . . GROCER. 

AT LOW I'UICKS. LAUGK KKNTINd STOCK. 

w. W. M'^V'O^M, imw^M-swiem, Mts, \ Lowest Prices to Student Clubs. 
F. H, WILSOK, Dispenser of Pure Drugs,, Medicines, and Chemicals. 

irnr'oi^'riijri ^rviwD idomi-jstxc cxcsi-yvH-S- 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions a Specialty. 

raAIItr STREET, BRUKTSW^ICK. ME. 

.lolHiN.VI IMIUMS, LISBON STRKKT, LKWISTON, MAINK. 



J. M. CURTIS, Proprietor. 

BOOKS. STATIONEFIY. FtOOIMC 
PAPER. PERIODICALS, <ScC. 



Vol. XL 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 16, 1881. 



No. 9. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AlSfD NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

m PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

HALL L. DAVIS, 

Books, Statiooerj, and Paper Hangings, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

ELLIOT 

Has the Finest and Most Stylish Stocl< of 
Neckwear ever exhibited in Brunswick. 

Tk Latest Styles ii M and M Hats. 

HOSIERY, COLLARS, CUFFS, Sec, &c., 
in Great Variety of Styles. 



A FINE ASSORTMENT OF 



FALL AND WINTER OVERCOATS AND SUITS, 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock. 
FRAN^K E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets 



Beware of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette; see that every wrapper has 




TRY IT. 

■ Fine, Mild& Sweet, 



Fac simile Signature on it. No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KJNNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 

SOLD BT ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 

FOR YOUR 

NOBBY HAT 

Go or Send to 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 
SIGN OF THE GOLD HAT. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Glass Cards and Monograms 

EHSEAVEE IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



UNDER FALMOUTH HOTEL. 



@^^7^^ ^m©! 



mi' 



JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, ETC., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QUALITY, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor Casco, 



PORTLAND, 
A. CARTER. 



MAINE. 
J. W. D. CARTER. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



A reorganization of the Course of Instruction 
has recently been made, in which the distinction be- 
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main- 
tained, but all academic undergraduates are placed 
on one footing, with the opportunity of following, to 
a considerable extent, such lines of study as they 
prefer. 

All students entering the College proper, are ex- 
amined on the same course of preparatory studies. 
After the second year a liberal range of electives is 
offered, within which a student may follow his choice 
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount 
pursued. 

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated 
as a distinct course, are still, for the most part, re- 
tained either iu the required or elective lists. More 
place is also given to the Modern Languages than 
they have hitlaerto had. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all 
who complete the Academic Course. 

The Engineering Department remains as here- 
tofore, and facilities are offered for study of the 
various branches of this science. The means of 
theoretical instruction are ample, and the town of 
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen- 
tres in the State, and in the immediate vicinity of 
many important public works, affords excellent 
opportunities for the study of actual structures. 
The College also enjoys many favors from the United 
States Coast Survey Office. The admission is the 
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the 
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will 
bo taken, if desired, in the place of Latin. 

Those who complete satisfactorily the four years' 
course in engineering will receive the Degree of So. 
B. Those who complete a two years' course of ad- 
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or 
Mechanical Engineer. Students not candidates for 
a degree will be i-eceived at any stage for which an 
examination shall show them to be fitted, and may 
remain for any desired time. Further informatioii 
will be furnished on application to Professor G. L. 
Vose. 

Terms of Admission to the Academic Course. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 

following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Goorgics, and six books of the iEneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 

jgREEK. — Hadloy's Greek Grannnar ; Xonophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and llomor'.s Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

Ancient Geogkaphy. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 

and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 

I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 

Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission 
will be required to produce testimonials of good 
moral character. The time for examination is the 
Friday after Commencement and the Friday before 
the opening of the first term. In exceptional cases 
applicants maybe examined at other times. Candi- 
dates for admission to advanced classes will be ex- 
amined in the studies which such classes have 
accomplished. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrange- 
ments with the Principals of schools and academies 
haviug a regular course preparatory for college of at 
least three years' duration, whereby their pupils 
may be examined for admission to college at their 
respective schools, in connection with their own 
final examinatious. 

The amount of instruction now offered and pos- 
sible to be taken in the several principal lines of 
study is exhibited comparatively, as reduced to one 
scale, in the following manner. This is, however, 
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal 
length : 

Latin, eight terms. 

Greek, eight terms. 

Mathematics, eight terms. 

German, four and a half terms. 

English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English 
Literature, three and a half terms. 

French, three terms. 

Italian, one term. 

Spanish, one term. 

Rhetoric (formal), one term. Rhetorical and 
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a 
half terras. 

Natural History studies, five and a half terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, four terms. 

Chemistry, four terras. 

History, Ancient and aFodern, two terms. 

Political Economy, one and a half terms. 

Public Law, two "terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, including Logic, 
four terms. 

Christian Evidences, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $7.5. 
Room rent (half), average, $2'i. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College cbavges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $;5 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$<I0 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the coat of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 




Mn 




BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 16, 1881. 



Vol XI. 



No. 9. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVERY AITERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE CLASS OV '82, OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Arthur G. Staples, Managing Editor. 

Charles H. Gilman, Business Editor. 

Melvin S. Holway, Eugene T. McCarthy, 

William A. Moody, Warren 0. Plimpton, 

George G. Weeks. 

Terms — $2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances siiould be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTEIfTS. 
Vol. XI., No. 9.— Nov. 16, 1881. 

Editorial Notes 103 

Literary : 

Reading 106 

Death of More 107 

A Modern Rip 108 

Tlaeta Delta Chi J09 

Communication 110 

College Items Ill 

Personal 112 

College World 113 

Clippings 113 

Editors' Table 114 



EDITORIAL HOTES. 



We always feel like saying good morning 
as each fortnight brings us around again. 
The past few weeks have been very eventful 
in the history of the college, an era we 
hope, and wliile we have no specifications to 
make or details to present, we are sure that 
none of our undergraduate readers would 
wish them back. The next two weeks will 
see the return of a good old New England 
custom, and our hearty wish is that all our 
readers may be enabled to seek the retire- 



ment of home and engage in the demolition 
of the festive turk around the Thanksgiving 
board. We are sorry for those whom time 
and distance preclude, but it is one of the 
stern realities of life. To the Freshman on 
his first visit home we say, be calm, don't 
paralyze your parents with the tales of your 
exploits, and endeavor to make the college 
appear as decent a place to inhabit as you 
possibly can. 



The business editor requests us to an- 
nounce that subscriptions are due for the 
Orient. These columns are no place for 
such statements, but they never fail to appear. 
We hope that all who are indebted will send 
in the amount of their indebtedness. 



We have placed a number of our ex- 
changes in the reading-room, where the stu- 
dents may, if they desire, see what other col- 
leges are doing in journalism. It would be 
possible for us, if we had a room devoted to it, 
to place exchanges on file as soon as received, 
but as it is now, where the work is done at 
the editor's college rooms, the exchanges are 
retained for consultation. We should think 
that the Orient might have editorial rooms 
like every other college paper inasmuch as it 
is honestly devoted, we think, to the college 
and productive, we hope, of benefit to it. A 
pleasant room open evenings and with a large 
number of college, literary, society and news- 
papers, none of which are found in the read- 
ing-room, would be a pleasant innovation, and 
would give the Orient a local habitation and 
a name. 



The method of pronouncing Latin lately 



104 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



introduced into the Sophomore and Fresh- 
man classes by Prof. Wheeler, is not at all 
the " Continental " method, but the method 
known to recent text-books as the " Roman " 
method. The Orient inadvertently stated 
in its last issue that it was the former of the 
two, but is pleased to make the correction. It 
is needless to add, certainly, that Prof. 
Wheeler is meeting with assured success in 
the Latin department, which, judging from 
the past, is no inconsiderable achievement. 



We heralded the approach of the Bugle 
editors in our last, and now, as we write, they 
are on the spot and at work. " A fellow-feel- 
ing makes us wondrous kind " indeed, and we 
invoke the aid of all in the success of a pub- 
lication, which in no inconsiderable degree 
betokens the abUity of the college in its 
peculiar line. In another column we print a 
communication from an old Bugle editor 
whose remarks we sincerely echo. Tiie Bugle 
needs the support of the students so long as 
they judge its publication suitable. 



Some one has kindly placed boards across 
the road at the northwest entrance to the cam- 
pus, for which said person will please accept 
thanks. The boards are good enough to float 
on, although a line of ievi'y boats would have 
been preferable and safer during most of the 
past week. The boards look more picturesque 
than a stone crossing, but ai-e not so lasting. 
However we are almost satisfied. We wish 
we were sure that credit belonged to the 
Orient, but are somewhat afraid that we 
are like the west wind that claimed the credit 
of blowing out the moon. At any rate some 
one was touched b}"^ our appeal and laid boards 
there, proof of which can be made by witness- 
ing the ends swaying in the air or by digging 
for the remainder in the mud. We shall re- 
mark on tliis frequently until wo get cross- 
ings, and if perchance we don't get them 



shall leave it as a righteous legacy to our 

successors. 



There has been an unprecedented amount 
of sickness at college this term. Disease in 
a peculiar form has been calling the students 
from their avocations. It is Jiothing serious, 
not in the least alarming, only perhaps sug- 
gestive. The Orient has given thought to 
the matter and hit upon it that it is the lack of a 
gymnasium. We believe that we have spoken 
of this matter before, but we see now such 
an admirable text from which to preach that 
we cannot forbear a little sermon. The lack 
of a gymnasium would induce indisposition of 
every sort, and indisposition physicallj^ pro- 
duces the same trouble mentallj', hence the 
aberration so apparent at psychology, and the 
frequent absences in physics. We reallj^ have 
cause to believe that a portion of the preva- 
lent sickness is due to the insufficient exer- 
cise fully as much as to the weather or kindred 
reasons, and the outlook for sports is alarm- 
ing. Most of those who are interested in 
the sports are in need of a means of training, 
and we only ask if some expedient cannot 
be devised to supply this temporary need. 
We are very sure that somewhere in the town 
or college a room can be found suitable to 
train a crew or base-ball nine, and for the ex- 
ercise of those few who prefer exercise to 
the prevailing form of sickness. That the 
college authorities would do all in their. power 
to aid, there can be no doubt, and we suggest 
that the officers of the Boating and Base- 
Ball Associations take action in the matter. 



The coutrovei'sy in the columns of tlie 
Orient concerning compulsory attendance 
at the chapel, has attracted considerable at- 
tention from friends of the college, inasmuch 
as the controversy exists not at Bowdoin 
alone. 

It is reported, in connection with this 
matter, that the Faculty at Harvard have 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



105 



expressed their approval of allowing attend- 
ance at daily chapel to become voluntary, 
although the overseers have not yet delib- 
erated upon the matter. For our part we are 
only too happy to publish the honest opinions 
of all interested in the matter, and- not with 
the conviction or the wish that the chapel 
service will cease to be, as it is, an attendance 
compulsory upon all students. It seems to 
us that if there be any to whom the teach- 
ings of the Christian religion are especially 
repulsive, and who look upon its forced prop- 
agation as an invasion of personal rights, such, 
in our opinion, ought surely to demand as a 
right freedom from attendance. No one 
would, we think, deny this. A right to wor- 
ship as one pleases is a doctrine of the con- 
stitution. It is different with the ordinary 
Christian student, however. For the most 
part his only excuse is laziness, his only plea 
is against the employment of absolute force as 
derogatory to manhood, and his general state- 
ment is that it is impossible to inculcate 
religious teachings by compulsion. It is to 
be remembered that no one is compelled to 
pray. The morning chapel is offered at the 
opening of the day, for the same reason that 
every organized body offers a religious ser- 
vice at the opening of its session, and is com- 
pulsory in the hope that the student who is 
here to be taught, may, perhaps, in his lucid 
moments, recognize that he can learn Chris- 
tian teachings as well as he can learn mathe- 
matics and metaphysics. No student is com- 
pelled to join in the service, he is compelled 
merely to be present, and what valid reason is 
there, except laziness, for the student whose 
principles are not opposed to the reception of 
religious teachings or of the form in whicli 
they are taught? We have no idea of dis- 
cussing this question further and only desire 
to express the Oriekt's opinion on the mat- 
ter. We believe that, within this college, 
the discussion has not extended outside our 
columns, but there is no reason why it 



should not be discussed and the matter be 
rested on a decided basis. We quote the 
following close of a letter written to the 
Harvard Advocate by Rev. Edward E. Hale 
upon this subject : " I may add that institu- 
tions where the students cease to meet 
together as one, soon cease to be colleges. 
The con of collegium A\e& oni oi them. They 
become shops'for teaching specialties, but the 
sympathy and common life, which makes a col- 
lege a college, abandons any institution which 
abandons the word or the idea ' together.' " 
This is especially true of us. The morning 
chapel is no inconsiderable link in the chain 
which binds this small college into a unity. 
We honestly disagree with the opinions ex- 
pressed by previous Orient boards upon this 
subject, but have no wish to enforce our own 
opinions. 

We have but a few words to say in regard 
to the events of the past few weeks. The 
Orient's opinion and the opinion of the col- 
lege was expressed in our last issue. We 
are very sorry, however, to notice the general 
tenor of the daily and weekly press in regard 
to this same matter. They confine them- 
selves in no wise to facts, but let imagination 
run riot in wild hintings, and wind up sever- 
ally with a peroration against hazing in gen- 
eral. In no case have we seen any approach 
to a candid consideration of the case, no at- 
tempt at the truth even, as we see it. We 
feel assured that the more accurately the 
facts are stated, and with due leniency to the 
thoughtlessness of students and to the influ- 
ence of a custom that our fathers made, per- 
haps, and which this generation is trying to 
kill, the more forgiving will be the public 
spirit. The whole affair ' might ordinarily 
have passed unnoticed, except by the over- 
sight of the college authorities, had not the 
accident occurred which did. And that acci- 
dent is by no means, at the time of writing, 
located as the result of any student's act. 



106 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



We read, nevertheless, in a neighboring 
paper, an article which paints the Sopho- 
mores as meeting in the secret conclave of 
their societj' and issuing notes, written in 
blood, threatening death for the non-removal 
of a moustache, and think how much better 
it would have been had the eminent writer 
investigated before he committed himself. 
These things, however, are means to the great 
end of entire abolition of every thouglit con- 
nected with the subservience of Freshmen, 
and when this is obtained, and only then, 
will students cease to obstruct the welfare of 
the college. 



READING. 
Many persons have a very inadequate ap- 
preciation of the value of systematic and 
thoughtful reading, and little know how won- 
derfully the scope of the mind maj' be widened 
and acuteness given to the reasoning powers, 
by taking advantage of the many opportunities 
offered for becoming conversant with the good 
literature of the times. And it is not until 
one does follow out the practice of sound 
reading, and necessarily thinking, that he be- 
gins to see the benefit derived from such a 
course. 

A vast amount of information will be 
gained which, if the subjects are wholesome, 
can but be of inestimable value in after life, 
and it should be so instilled into the mind 
that thousands of subjects which would other- 
wise be overlooked and considered uninterest- 
ing, may be received intelligently and dis- 
cussed with a full realization of their merits. 
The reader comes to a clearer comprehension 
of matters in general, and is led to make 
firmer and wiser decisions on tlie affairs of 
daily life than if he is ignorant of the minds 
and natures, the fancies and follies of men of 
this and by-gone ages. 

To be wanting in a knowledge of the past 



ages, its men, their characters, and standing 
socially and politically, their customs and 
morals ; to have no idea of the advancement 
made in our own times in science, art, and 
religion must, almost necessarily in this en- 
lightened era of the universe, place a person 
in a longer grade with respect to those who 
have come to a comprehension of such truths 
of history. To dwell in thought upon the 
philosophy of the times, man, his mind, soul 
and condition, to be acquainted with the 
physical and metaphysical theories promul- 
gated and agitated at this time, to look at 
political and religious questions with an un- 
biased mind, and giving due consideration to 
the respective arguments advanced, to come 
to firm and sensible conclusions in regard 
to them can only be done by him, who, in 
earlier years, has trained his mind and method 
of thinking to that degree of appreciation 
commensurate with the depth of the topics. 
Proper reading is one of the best, if not the 
best methods of undergoing such a system of 
mental training. 

But in order to derive all the good results 
from reading, it is necessary that the work, or 
rather as it ought to be pleasure, be entered 
into in a studious and meditative manner. It 
is essential that the subjects be such as the 
reader is prepared to give his thought to, for, 
unless his mind be on the work before him, it 
is time thrown away. He should be intent on 
the subject, ready to question the right or 
wrong of this idea and to acquiesce in that 
argument when his beliefs are fully in accord 
with it. It is vain and profitless to engage in 
reading merely for tiie sake of " going through 
the forms." Unless the subject at hand be 
imbedded in the reader's mind by close 
thought, it will have flown before he has fin- 
ished the text. The success in acquiring 
knowledge from reading depends entirely upon 
the condition of the mind of the reader, upon 
the amount of thonglit given to the subject 
at the time, and the subsequent meditation 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



10? 



upon it. It is far better to dwell long upon 
one work, provided it is thoroughly discussed, 
than to run over a long list of subjects and 
leave them all only half digested. When 
the reader has thus entered earnestly and 
conscientiously upon the work, in due season 
it will become a second nature to grasp the 
matter clearly and logically and to consider it 
quite thoroughly at the time. 

Of course it depends somewhat upon the 
character of the individual, his propensities, 
likes, and dislikes as to what particular sub- 
jects he should take in hand. And too, his 
future prospects, intentions and life work 
should, in a measure, have some influence in 
distinguisMng the course he should select. 
But there are history, biography, and the 
sciences which claim the attention of all. 
An inexhaustible supply of literature for all 
to weigh and ponder upon. Some are almost 
necessary for even an ordinary education, 
while the more that one reads the greater the 
desire to proceed farther in research of truths 
and doctrines, so that in time the mind comes 
to that state of maturity that it is ready to 
grasp with the casual subject, and, analyzing 
it, to readily judge of its intrinsic worth. 

A man is repaid fourfold for time given 
to this work, for he soon finds himself elevated 
to a position among that leai-ned class which 
lives to enjoy those intellectual pleasures 
which only an intelligent, well trained, and 
abundantly stored mind can appreciate. 

N. G. 



DEATH OF MORE. 

On the topmost peak of a mountain in 
New Hampshire stands a slender shaft of 
pure granite. Rising from surroundings 
peculiarly gloomy and uninviting it possesses 
a remarkable beauty, and the effect upon the 
observer approaches inspiration. The clouds 
roll about the base, enshrouding its environ- 
ments and casting about the shaft an element 



of mysticism. Above, the sun glitters and 
flashes from the smooth surface of the gran- 
ite. In the conflicts of the elements, the 
lightning circles about its top, forming a 
crown of living fire and bringing into start- 
ling prominence the beautiful qualities of the 
granite. Neighboring peaks, more sturdy, 
have long since yielded to the force of the 
elements, yet despite these it stands alone, — 
a monument grand and simple. 

Out from the ages of the past, with their 
stories of kingly cruelties and nations' crimes, 
where treachery and fickleness seem rather 
the rule than the exception, where loyalty to 
royalty was the one condition of living, arise 
individual examples of sacrifice of property 
and life in defense of a principle. The cycles 
of time and occasional glimpses of sunshine 
in the midst of national disturbances, throw 
increased lustre upon their names and deeds. 
From the dark background of general un- 
worthiness and corruption their characters 
stand forth with remarkable brilliancy, chal- 
lenging at once our admiration and wonder. 
Few pages of history but are in turn dark- 
ened and illuminated, few ages but have their 
martyrs, marking a milestone in human prog- 
ress. The time of Sir Thomas More was 
no exception. It was not that More died in 
defense of a principle that his death is of 
such interest — for fortunately or unfortu- 
nately English history is wonderfully rich in 
such examples — but there was that in the 
man's nature and his surroundings that ren- 
der his death peculiarly melancholy and pa- 
thetic. The picture of domestic happiness, 
of paternal love, of filial affection and devo- 
tion at the home of the chancellor, cause us 
to admire the man who could face the walls 
of a prison and ultimatety death rather than 
make a concession which the times allowed, 
and which, to men in general, would require 
but slight compulsion. And yet the nature 
and mode of life of More gave little or no 
indications of the martyr. 



108 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The joyous, sunny nature longed for life, 
a disposition singularly pleasure-loving and in 
harmony with the bright things of the world, 
a humor, gay, almost volatile, and making 
life's serious business a pastime, yet in the 
highest degree honorable and watchful of 
those interests which were placed under his 
charge, it is, perhaps, in this characteristic we 
find the key to the man's acts. 

He lived at a time when sudden changes 
were not held derogatory to the reputation of 
public men. The marriage of Henry was 
accomplished, and the opinion of his chancel- 
lor — which he had ostentatiously asked — 
could but little affect the public welfare. In 
this light the firmness of the chancellor becomes 
all the more remarkable. It was a time, too, 
when all his interests pointed to a favorable 
reply. More well knew that a human life, it 
mattered not how valuable, rarely weighted 
the balance against the royal whim. Yet, in 
the face of this, he took the position which lost 
to England a life and gained her a martyr. 
Pity it was the lusts of Henry demanded such 
a victim. Even in the face of death the joyous 
humor which characterized the man did not 
desert him. " See me safely up these stairs, 
as for my coming down I will shift for myself." 
Truly, for this man death was without its 
terrors. 



A MODERN RIP. 

APTEK niVJGSTG. 
The modern Rip, like his prototype, awoke 
from his sleep and, true to the instincts of his 
ancestor, hurried to the village inn but it, too, 
was gone. In its place stood a large, preten- 
tious building with curtained windows, and 
over the door was painted "Village Improve- 
ment Hospital." Instead of the ancient inn, 
with its roomy parlor, where he had made 
molasses candy and danced the racquet with 
the box-shop girls, was this dreary building, 
and Rip was astounded. There was, as usual, 



a crowd around the door, and when Rip asked 
where the ancient elm was, and why a hospi- 
tal was there, was answered : " For manj^ 
reasons. Mall brook; large number of Fresh- 
men recently killed and maimed by newspa- 
per accounts ; men drowned by incautiously 
crossing the streets in rainy weather ; unsus- 
pecting people poisoned by drinking well 
water, and besides," added he, " we want to 
supply the medical school with practice, in 
hopes of enticing it back." And Rip knew 
it was Brunswick. He looked around for the 
boys but found them not. Rip was bewildered 
and so were they. The appearance of Rip 
with a pair of lawn tennis shoes and a lawn 
tennis hat, and a pair of bicj^cling pants, and 
a little May-basket on his arm, such as he 
had attired himself with before he rolled 
nine-pins and drank wine with the little men 
on the mountain, attracted universal attention, 
and no one asked him if he was a Freshman, 
which surprised him. 

A feeling of wanness and sadness stole 
over him, and he turned away and walked up 
towards the hill. He was followed by a crowd 
that was taldng in his clothes until he had 
passed up over the hill and viewed the college 
as it was. He went over on the delta and 
stood there. The medical building was gone. 
"Moved to Portland" the sign said, "by a 
new process invented by and knowu only to 
Portland people." The inclosure where it had 
stood was devoted to bovines. One of the 
by-standers, when asked by Rip why it went 
to Portland, said that it followed the Maine 
State Fair and Maine Historical Society. Rip 
sat down on an iron seat that they told him 
the girls used wlien tliey played ball to rest 
themselves, and asked after his friends. " One 
was dead " said an individual. " Used to know 
him well, sah. Cut wood and lugged water 
for him, sah. Knew him well, sah. He's 
dead, sah, sure." Rip thought he knew the 
voice, but continued, and learned that another 
was a college professor, another a dancing- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



109 



school teacher, and poor Rip, like his proto- 
type, was heart-broken. He got up and went 
over to Memorial Hall. Rip, up to the present, 
was unable to account for the change, and 
whjr no one knew him. He looked into the 
building which they were frescoing. Rip 
fell on himself; he understood but only said, 
"How long, how long?" Really, Rip was a 
sight. With tottering footsteps he walked 
on. He saw girls on the campus; he saw a 
new gymnasium — in his mind; he saw cross- 
ings through the mud everywhere; he saw 
ever so many playing foot-ball, and Rip passed 
along and entered the chapel. It looked 
somewhat the same. The cross-legged angel 
with toes ou the wrong side of the foot was 
flying on the wall as it used to fly, but it was 
warmer than it used to be, and the panels had 
pictures in them, and finally Rip fell asleep. 
The bell-ringer came in and woke him and 
brought a troop of students. Rip rubbed his 
eyes and looked around and said in despair, 
"Does no one know Rip?" They pointed 
him out to him and Rip knew him even as 
his ancestor had known the other younger 
Rip, under the shadows of the Kaatskills. 
Rip fell on his neck and called him his own 
dear nephew, and told how he had gone May- 
ing with the girls and had met the little men 
playing nine-pins, and had drank Brunswick 
sherry, and had slept. And his nephew told 
how his father said that Rip was lost and 
never heard from, and he told how the college 
boomed and how they were having a holiday 
in honor of class elections ; how they didn't 
have marks, or morning chapel, or recita- 
tions, only lectures; how they didn't have to 
pay to speak in Senior and Junior exhibitions 
now ; how the dormitories were lighted and 
heated by electricity ; how nice the girls 
were, and Rip decided to graduate. Rip 
graduated and was elected janitor of the col- 
lege, because you know it is quite unnecessary 
that the janitor should do much, and he can 
be real old, and it is only necessary that he 



should appear to be too busy to attend to 
anything. 

Rip did his work so well that instead of 
engaging his services it has become the cus- 
tom to say " Let her Rip," in referring to 
him. He continues to tell his story, how- 
ever, and no one doubts that he has slept 
twenty, nay sixty, years, and some believe 
that he never was awake in his life. He 
loves to wander still in pleasant weather over 
the hills in search of the little men, hoping, 
he says, somewhere " beyond their azure pur- 
ple rim " to find them playing as of yore, 
and with them under the clear, bright sky, 
where the music is the birds' music, and the 
tonic the mountain air, to drink from out the 
mystic flagon as he did so many years ago. 
This is the modern Rip's story. 

Clio. 



THETA DELTA CHL 

The thirty-flfth annual convention of 
the Theta Delta Chi Fraternity was held 
at the Sturtevant Hotel, New York City, 
Wednesday and Thursday, November 2d and 
3d, under the auspices of the Xi Charge of 
Hobart. 

Full delegations from all the chapters 
reported. Business sessions were held dur- 
ing the morning and afternoon of both days. 
The following officers were chosen for the 
ensuing year : Piesident, F. E. Bachman, 
Lafayette, '80 ; Treasurer, J. F. Libby, 
Bowdoin, '82 ; Secretary, C. Kincaid, Dart- 
mouth, '83. 

On the evening of the 3d a large com- 
pany met in the banquet hall of the Sturte- 
vant, completely filling the tables. At 10.30 
the meeting was called to order, and the fol- 
lowing literary programme was carried out: 

Oration, Jacob Spahn, Union, '57 ; Poem, 
Rev. Lewis Halsy, Hobart, '68 ; Biography, 
prepared by W. L. Stone, Brown, '57, and 
Thomas Simons, TSrown, '55, delivered by 



110 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Mr. Stone. The parts were carefully written 
and ably rendered, holding the close attention 
of all to the end. An exceedingly fine ban- 
quet was then disposed of, followed by the 
usual toasts, songs, speeches, and social inter- 
course till the "wae smae hours," when the 
boys retired feeling that the convention had 
been a success, and on every side was heard 
the hope that many, if not all, might meet 
next year for a repetition of convention 
duties and pleasures. 



COMMUNICATION. 



Editors of Orient : 

I notice by your last number that the 
Bugle editors have been appointed by the sev- 
eral societies. I presume that they have already 
entered upon their arduous duties, and as I 
feel no little concern in their success, both 
from a continued interest which I take in 
college affairs, and more especially on account 
of a kind of fraternal regard which I have 
for them, I take the liberty, with your kind 
indulgence, to say a few words in their be- 
half. It is a most deplorable fact that the 
condition of the college finances is such that 
the greater part of the honors, which from 
time to time are received at the hands of the 
Faculty, prove to be a costly burden to the 
recipient, and in some cases cannot be enjoyed 
on account of the expense which they bring. 
But it is by far a sadder fact and one which 
ought to cause greater surprise, and even in- 
dignation, that the honors and duties which 
are received at the hands of the stu- 
dent body, should he the cause of such finan- 
cial loss as the position of Bugle editors has 
been for the last two years. Elected as the 
editors are, not by means of the secret " wire 
pulling " of any one cli<iue, but chosen to be 
the representatives of the different societies 
which make up the social element of the 
whole college life, and expected to get up a 



publication wliich will be a fair exponent of 
Bowdoin ideas and life, and which wiU take 
a good rank among the college publications, 
is it right, is it even fair and honorable that 
they should be obliged to suffer loss on 
account of sheer negligence, and in a few 
cases the lack of honor displaj-ed on the part 
of some ? The poor Bugle editor makes an 
annual complaint before every Commencement 
that not more than two-thirds of the Bugle's 
subscribed for are taken, and that many of 
the cuts remain unpaid, and he begins to 
realize that he is to enjoy the pleasure of 
pajdng dearly for the great honor which it 
was his lot to possess. 

The task itself imposed upon the Bugle 
editor of these days is by no means a simple 
one, and every _year the undertaking becomes 
more difficult and more expensive. There is 
a constant clamor for a better Bugle than the 
one of the year before, and the class senti- 
ment is so strong that there would be an in- 
tense feeling of dissatisfaction if the Bugle 
was not at least above the average. 

There is also a great question whether or 
not the gradual change, which, within the 
last two or three years has come over the 
spirit of college life presents the same ready 
materials for an interesting Bugle as those 
which the editor of former years had at his 
command. And while these facts stare the 
newly elected editors in the face, yet what 
possible inducement can the}' have in striving 
to get up a Bugle which will be worthy of 
themselves and class, if the}' know that when 
they get through the}' will all be poorer than 
they were when they commenced. Let each 
one take these facts home and resolve to help 
the editors in every way that lies within his 
power, and with the present board we shall 
obtain a Bugle of which we all shall be justly 
l)roud. VV. 

Two students in the laboratory at work over some 
noxious substance : " What's the formula of tills stuff 
any way F" " I don't know, but it smells like llELj." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Ill 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



Hall, '83, has left college. 

'84 is groaning over polai* triangles. 

It's getting rather muddy for bicycles. 

Walker, '84, sings in the Unitarian choir. 

Senior examination in Psychology the 19th. 

Wilson, '81, has been visiting friends in town. 

The chm'ch organ was played by Jewett last Sun- 
day. 

Brunswick morality allows its band to play on 
Sunday. 

Stetson, Child, and Winter have returned from 
teaching. 

A Senior mentions Newton's great discovery of 
electricity. 

Stetson has resumed his place at the Topsham 
Family School. 

Jewett, '82, has presented the band with a new 
orchestra drum. 

Books taken from the library are now recorded by 
the card method. 

Bailey, formerly of '84, has been visiting his 
friends in college. 

Z. W. Kemp, who recently entered '84, has joined 
Theta Delta Chi Society. 

Libby has returned from teaching, and resumes 
his position as bell-ringer. 

Austin will probably take Gannett's place in the 
Junior boat crew next spring. 

The bell-ringer ought to get two marks as well as 
any one else when late at chapel. 

Purington, who has been teaching the Grammar 
School at Topsham, has joined '85. 

Who is the student that came off second best in a 
row with a teamster the other day ? 

For the benefit of the uninitiated it is announced 
that the bell is rung by depot time. 

Inquiry has been made about the new Orient 
office that was proposed last term. 

When one of the Sophomores wants a pail of 
water, it is said he speaks " French.''^ 

Prof. Chapman for the present will conduct the 
French recitations of the Sophomores. 

President Chamberlain began lectures to the Sen- 
iors on Political Economy, Tuesday, 8th. 

The Freshman who comes in late at chapel is 
evidently not well posted but gets a warm reception. 



Wanted — A poetic contribution on the correla- 
tions of Beautiful Snow and Brunswick mud. 

It is reported that S. T. White, class of '85, 
•Colby, intends to come to Bowdoin next year. 

E. U. Curtis, '82, has been threatened with typhoid 
fever and was obliged to go home. He is reported 
better. 

The " little Mathematical room " is rather limited 
ground for a foot-ball game, as the broken windows 
testify. 

The Sophomores have started a subscription to 
obtain sufficient funds, if possible, for "Burial of 
Analytics." 

Who says the Orient has no influence? After 
our previous hints we have several boards placed at 
our muddiest crossing. 

Twenty-six couples attend the dancing school. 
Quite a number more have applied for admission, but 
cannot be accommodated. 

There is a rumor that several members of '85 are 
great ladies' men. Freshmen must bear in mind 
that they come here to learn. 

'85's foot-ball eleven consists of Chase, captain, 
Brown, Butler, Davis, Ford, Gould, Harding, How- 
ard, Hodgkins, Kendall, Mooers. 

The class of '61 propose to establish in this col- 
lege a Garfield Memorial Scholarship, to be in 
amount between $1,000 and $1,600. 

A Junior rooming with a Freshman, says — 
"Chum and I agree perfectly. He's willing to do 
all the work and I'm willing he should." 

J. F. Libby and J. W. Knapp were delegates to 
the thirty-fifth annual convention of Theta Delta Chi 
Fraternity at New York City, Nov. 2d and 3d. 

The Bugle editors are getting to work very 
promptly, and are soliciting subscriptions. The 
usual delay of this publication ought to be avoided. 

The wood yard is undergoing some needed im- 
provements. It is yet undecided whether the new 
shed will be of the Gothic or Grecian style of archi- 
tecture. 

The lime barrels in front of Memorial have been 
disappearing very mysteriously, while there is a 
corresponding increase of kindling wood among the 
students. 

In the absence of French recitations the Sopho- 
mores are having four exercises a week under Prof. 
Chapman, and are using a text-book entitled " How 
to write clearly." The usual amount of French will 
be taken in the place of Rhetoric after Prof. John- 
son's return. 



112 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A lawn tennis club has been organized among 
the Sophomores. Is the practice ground located in 
the college woods because they are ashamed of their 
playing ? 

The stucco work on Memorial Hall is nearly 
completed. Some plaster ornamental casts are being 
put in which give the rooms a very fine and finished 
appearance. 

The Freshmen are talking of buying 81's boat. 
The price is -f 125. A committee has been appointed 
to examine the craft and confer with those who have 
it in charge. 

Physics : "Can any of you imagine a place where 
all substances are in a gaseous condition?" An aM- 
dible smi\e from the class. 'Prof, (tumbling) — "Of 
course I mean the surface of the sun." 

The band rehearsed on Wednesday evening last 
week in order to allow its members to attend the 
" Chimes of Corneville," on Friday evening. They 
all can appreciate music. 

The following Seniors have been appointed for 
the December exhibition : Salutatory, M. S. Holway, 
G. F. Bates, H. Carpenter, E. R. Jewett, E. T. Mc- 
Carthy, G. H. Pierce, W. G. Reed, A. G. Staples. 

There is an urgent need of a new chapel organ, 
and the matter is receiving some attention from those 
most interested. The choir have lately given some 
fine selections on Sunday evenings, but have been 
obliged to sing without accompaniment. A chapel 
concert like that of last winter might be a step in the 
right direction toward obviating the present neces- 
sity. 

The following ofiicers of the Sophomore class 
have been elected : Vice President, A. H. Brown ; 
Marshal, H. R. Bradley ; Eulogist, C. E. Sayward ; 
Elegist, C. C. Torry ; Panegyrist, A. C. Cobb ; Odist, 
O. W. Means; Historian, C. W. Longren ; Secretary 
and Treasurer, A. F. Sweetser; Committee of Ar- 
rangements, R. I. Thompson, M. H. Orr, S. W., 
Walker. •I'A'v'--''!' 

The ofiices in the Freshman class have been 
filled as follows : President, E. Thomas ; Vice Pres- 
ident, R. L. Manson ; Secretary and Treasurer, F. 
W. Alexander; Orator, F. W. Davis; Poet, O. Dyer; 
Prophet, E. H. Allen; Historian, L. W. Cutter; 
Toast Master, Thos. Leigh, Jr. ; Committee of Ar- 
rangements, R. Webb, W. M. Fames, R. Cook; 
Odists, T. B. Folsom, A. B. Bartlett, R. S. French. 

After the boating meeting, on the 15th ult., it was 
found that according to the constitution it was neces- 
sary to liave the treasurer aided by an assistant 
treasurer ; also that according to custom the treas- 



urer has been some recent graduate. A meeting of 
the association was held on the 10th, at which Mr. 
Cole, previously elected treasurer, courteously re- 
signed, and Mr. F. A. Fisher, '81, was elected to the 
office. The ofiice of assistant treasurer was then 
tendered to Mr. Cole and accepted. 



PERSOMAL. 



'37. — William H. Clark was in town a few days 
since. He resides in California, where he owns a 
large ranch. His father, William Clark, graduated 
from Bowdoin in 1810. 

'68. — Leonard W. Rundlett was married Thursday, 
October 27th, in Milwaukee, to Bliss Kitty Barry. 
He has the position of City Engineer of St. Paul, Mo. 

'74. — S. V. Cole, the former instructor in Latin 
here, is now Associate Principal of the Greylock 
Institute, South Williamstown, Mass. 

'76. — Charles L. Clarke was married September 
14th, to Miss Helen E. Sparrow of Portland. It will 
be remembered that Mr. Clarke has charge of intro- 
ducing Edison's electric light in New York City. 

'77. — Orlando M. Lord became Principal of the 
Biddeford High School at the opening of the present 
term. 

'77.— Robert E. Peary has left the U. S. Coast 
Survey, having been one of four fortunate competi- 
tors, out of two hundred, for a very good position 
for life in the civil engineering department of the 
navy. He passed a ten days' preliminary examina- 
tion of eight hours a day. He is to take charge of 
all the civil engineering at the Washington navy 
yard. His salary is to be increased from time to 
time, and when he is sixty years old he is to be re- 
tired on three-fourths salary. 

'77. — William G. Beale was admitted to the Illi- 
nois bar in March last. He at present occupies an 
office with UJiaiu & Lincoln ; the latter member of 
which firm is now Secretary of War. Address, 38 
Honore Building, N. W., corner of Dearborn and 
Adams Sts., Chicago, III. 

'78. — D. H. Felch was admitted to practice as an 
attorney in all the courts of tlie State, at the Septem- 
ber term of the Superior Court, held at Worcester, 
Mass. 

'80. — W. II. Chapman h.as charge of making the 
sanitary improvements at the White House. 

'82. — F. II. Pease, a former member of this class, 
is literary editor of the Tuflonian. 

'84. — C. E. Sayward is teaching school in Wells. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



113 



COLLEGE WORLD. 



Columbia : 

The Sanscrit class consists of one. 

Eighty-Three's eight came in a length ahead in 
the fall regatta. 

The vacancy in the chair of English Literature 
is to be filled soon. 

The School of Mines' Sophomores and Freshmen 
had a rush in their lunch room which resulted in a 
general demolition of the lunch counter and its eon- 
tents. Cause, dissatisfaction with the caterer. 

Scene: Junior class in Latin. Prof. — "This word 
Mucins may mean either one of two men named 
Mucins, just as when you hear of what Gen. Johnston 
did in the war you don't know whether Stonewall 
Johnston or the other General is meant." Fact ! 
Dartmouth : 

Dartmouth College receives 1,000 volumes from 
the library of the late James T. Fields, while Har- 
vard is to preserve the manuscripts of his poems and 
books. The noted author and publisher received 
A.M. from Harvard, and LL.D. from Dartmouth. 
Harvakd : 

A late Echo has a plea for the production of a 
negro minstrel show by the students. 

The Crimson states the urgent need of new mem- 
bers in the Chaucer Society and an increase of 
interest. 

It is proposed to repeat the (Edipus at Harvard 
this fall. The money realized will be used in found- 
ing an American School of Greek Archreology at 
Athens. The prominent colleges of the country will 
be invited to contribute. The school will be in 
communication with the Amei'ican Archaeology 
Society and the exploring party at Assos. A house 
is to be secured in Athens and the professors of con- 
tributing colleges will take turns of about two years 
each at Athens, thus having unusual means for orig- 
inal research. — Ex. 
Yale: 

The Banner is the oldest college annual in ex- 
istence. 

Yale students are greatly troubled by thefts from 
their rooms. 

Yale has sent out 9,202 alumni, of whom less than 
half are now living, and has conferred 11,909 regular 
degrees, and 923 honorary. 1707 was the date of the 
first conferred. 

The Yale Faculty are putting in practice the 
hostage system of making one or more men respon- 
sible for the actions of their classmates. It is not at 
all satisfactory to the students. 



CLIPPmGS. 



I stole my arm around her waist, 
For so the Fates had weaved it, 
And murmured nonsense in her ear, 
And she — said she believed it. 

And ah! she seemed to lean on me, 
Hit sweet breath played upon me, 
I've done the same to scores of girls, 
But this had near undone me. 

What's that you say? " Fine thing to tell ! " 
Why, sir, it was entrancing. 
"You don't doubt that— but still 'twas wrong?" 
Oh! Prude! We were but dancing! 

— Lehigh Burr. 

Prof. — "Now, Mr. C, if this experiment proves 
successful, what will the result be ? " Mr. C. — " The 
result? Oh, the result will be inevitable! " 

At Mercer Hospital, there is a man, whose only 
words are: "Next! Next!" The doctors are in 
doubt as to whether he is an old college professor or 
a barber. — College Transcript. 

As our Joe seated himself at the piano, he tipped 
over a vase that stood upon it. "Playing a knocked 
urn?" asked one of the company. "No," said Joe, 
"that is only ajar gone." — Ex. 

A Freshman (describing the ancient gladiatorial 
contests) says: "When a man was killed he held 
up his finger, and if the spectators wished him to 
live they held up their thumbs." 

"We must agitate," exclaimed an earnest political 
speaker, " we must agitate or we shall jjerish." And 
then he agitated it gently with a spoon, and pretty 
soon it perished, all but the sugar. 

Gin Sling is the euphonious name of a Chinese 
student at Yale. Who knows but that at some time 
in the vast future Gin Sling may become one of the 
ornaments of the New York Bar. — Varsity. 

Boarding house brilliancy — " Sweets to the sweet," 
said the funny young man as he handed the waiter 
girl a faded bouquet. "Beets to the beet," returned 
the girl as she pushed him a plate of the vegetables. 

A new play is being written in which the hero is 
found lost and flying in the desert, chained to the 
bare back of a bicycle. His deliverer proves to be a 
princess, who marries him and makes him captain 
of a base-ball nine. — Ex. 

Two bad students who have just been to Som- 
erset, on their way home run into a post and the 
following conversation takes place : First Student — 
"Here stands a post." Second Student — " Chum, ole 
f'ler, pull yourself together! I see two. What we's 
got to do's go between 'em." 



114 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The farmer that " ran rapidly through his prop- 
erty," wore a red shirt and had his brindle bull 
behind him. 

Scene in Junior recitation room. Prof. — " What 
did Wickliflfe write? " Student — "I believe he wrote 
a Bible." — Courani. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



The Chronicle shows the great interest among the 
students at Ann Arbor in the eastern trip of their 
football eleven. Its last issue contains full accounts 
of the games with Harvard and Yale. They appear 
well pleased with the result of their trials of 
strength and skill. The need of a gymnasium has 
long been felt at that university, and tlie Chronicle 
says: "Among the various buildings iu the college 
grounds at Cambridge, none delighted the eleven 
from Ann Arbor more than the Hemenway Gymna- 
sium. They thought if the Board of Regents could 
but be induced to come to Cambridge and pay this 
wonderful institution a visit, that the question of a 
gymnasium at the University would soon be settled 
in the aiflrmative." 

The Tale News is very active this year. It has a 
long string of grievances and does not hesitate to 
mention them. It is diiJicult for the bi-weeklies to 
call attention to any matter concerning college wel- 
fare which has not been treated previously by its 
lively little neighbor. The News has a great abund- 
ance and variety of editorials and is ver}' generally 
used as an organ of those desiring to discuss college 
matters. The Yale Log is always spicy. The con- 
stant insertion of such an item as " To get one of 
those reversible check rubber coats from Brooks & 
Co.'s, Chapel, corner State, is quite the proper act," 
adds variety to its columns, and we presume is profit- 
able, but such a frequently reiterated statement loses 
its force. 

The last Acta is very entertaining. It contains a 
" Short History of the game of La Crosse," in which 
the mode of playing practiced by its Indian origina- 
tors is described. The game was frequcntlj' a great 
contest between tribes in wliich the goals were half a 
mile apart, and as many as a thousand carefully 
trained warriors played on a single side. Loss of 
life was not uncommon. 

The Spectator's sketches are very good, but deal 
too exclusively with society topics. Cannot subjects 
as worthy of the caricaturist's pencil be found in our 
legitimate college life. 



We have received a copy of the Oxford and Cam- 
bridge Ufidergraduates Journal, a dull, ponderous 
weekly, a marked contrast to our lively college 
papers. Its literary matter consists of sermons de- 
livered the previous Sunday in the Oxford and Cam- 
bridge churches. It speaks very intimately of our 
neighbor, the Bates Student, and quotes some st;ile 
jokes from it. We notice that to nearly all of its ad- 
vertisements the signifieant note is added that dis- 
counts of from live to ten per cent, are made on all 
cash purchases. Hereafter when we find our friends 
running up too large bills we shall accuse them of 
apeing English customs. 

In all college poetry we have found nothing more 
worthy of preservation than the following from a 
former number of the Advocate, which has been ex- 
tensively copied by the college press : 

FREE LANCES. 

A riding, a riding, i' the growing morning light! 

The Ijugles blow, and iill a-row our lances glitter bright. 

Along the winding river, be.side the beached sea, 

By lonely tower, or high walled town, or heathy wastes 

of lea; 
Where'er we go, what'er good cause our strong right arms 

may claim, 
God guide us, merry gentlemen, and keep our swords from 

shame. 
We squire to no lad}''s whims, we serve no church, nor 

lords. 
But worship upon God's green hills and love our own 

bright swords. 
Let friars pray, and striplings love, and courtiers bend the 

knee, 
While blood is hot and muscle firm, our heart and hands 

are free, 
A riding, a riding — the east is all aflame ! 
God guide us merry gentlemen, and keep our swords from 

shame. 

G. P. Putnam's sons send us a copy of " Cam- 
bridge TriHes, or Splutteriugs from an LTndergraduate 
Pen," a reprint from the English edition. The 
sketches are light anddiscoimected, but show literary 
skill and a pleasing style, and give a pleasant picture 
of life on the campus. For sale by booksellers ; 
price $1. 

HER BOCKLE SHOE. 

Hondo, 1800. 
Her buckle shoe ye bootman dyd 
Make of ye smoothe, soft skyn'of kyd; 

Cutt low, ye sylk hose to reveale; 

Trymn, taper-toed; and for yo hocl 

A ilayntye, upturned pyramyd. 

Pull lyghtlye o'er yo floor she slyd — 
(When at ye ball ye festyvo f\d— 
Ho called ye couples for ye reel)— 

Her buckle .shoe. 

Yo youth doth love thatt leathern lyd, 
'Neath whychf^'vo small, pynk toes are liyd 
Lyke lyttle myco who never squeale, 
They have some corn, perdie I I feel 
Ye wycked cause of thatt— est id : 

Her buckle shoe. 
—F.D. S., in Argo. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



i^a^i 



Finest and Most Select Stock of 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS. 

The Newest and Greatest Tariety of Patterns in 

NECKWEAR, GLOVES, HOSIERY, 

UNDERWEAR, BRACES, ETC. 

ly Custom Shirts from Measure, Six for $9.00. 
A Perfect Fit Guaranteed. 

Goods for the TROY LAUNDRY sent Tues- 
days and received Saturdays. 

Id Percales, Mahrattas, and American Goods. 
Orders by mail promptly attended to. 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 



FRANK M. STETSON, 

JXJST RECEIVED = 

All the New Styles in Soft and Stiff Hats. 
Best Stiff Hats, $2.75. Best Silk Hats, $3.50 in 
exchange. 

Just opened all the New and Nobby Styles Neck 
Dress, Collars, Cuffs, Fancy Hose, Canes, etc. 
All are invited to call and examine goods and prices. 

No. 2 Arcade Block. 



ISAAC H. SNOW, 

DEALER LN 

geef, Jork, Putton, Jamb, §c. 

Special Rates to Stndent Clabs. 

EC. M. BOAVKER, 

BOARDING AND LIVERY STABLE 

Cor. Main and Cleave/and Sts., Brunswick. 

All Hack Orders promptly attended to. 



^L 



y 'UOLLEqE BAWBEE 
Two doors north of Post Office. 




.^^^,W 



CUSTOM TAILORING 

AS FECI ALT Y, 

AT 

Fernald's Tailor Emporium 

2S7 Middle Street, 
PORTLAND, - - - MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DRUG STORE. 

THE FINEST CIGARS AND SMOKINO TOBACCOS. 
THE BEST PERFUMERY. 

THE BEST TOILET SOAPS. 

THE BEST HAIR BRUSHES. 

The Largest and Best Assortment of 

Drugs, Patent Medicines, &c., &c> 

To be found in this market. 

Lemont Block, Brunswicle, Maine. 



S. O. COFFIN, 

— DEALER IN — 

PROVISIONS AND GROCERIES 

tSr Special Bates to Student Clubs...ffi8' 
CORNER OF MAIN AND ELM STREETS. 



QOLDCLip 




TOBACCO&CIGARETTES 

Either Swket or Plain, are of the Finest 
Qualities, ALWAYS Uniform and Eeliable. 

TRY T|E SEAL JKIN CIGAR 

SEND $3.75, and we \vm forward 
by mail, registered, a 50 box of the 
Seal-Skin Cisar. 

This iB a special offer to enable BinokerB to test this 
ceUbraff^rl brand. After a trial yon Avill smoke no other. 

S.F.HESS&CO. 

Premium Tobacco Works, Rochester, N.Y. 



Desiring Employment, for Season of 1881, 
Encloac lo. stamp, and vrnlo lor circular, to 

TPIE MANHATTAN AGENCY. 

733 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 

Pleaso mention this paper. 



00 TO 

. TO lUIY Yonu 

Groceries, Canned Goods, Fruits, 

Confecfionerv, Tobacco, mid Cigars. 

SiiL-durUaloB ti. Sliulcnt Clubs. 

Hain Street, Head of the Hall, Brunswick. 






MAIN STREET, 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



iiikwiU Okiikiil 4§aii: 

Prepares for Bowdoin and the best New England 
Colleges. Offers, also, a thorough Seminary Course 
to young ladies, and a shorter course for business 
pursuits. For Catalogues, address 

Key. a. W. BURR, Hallowell, Me. 

m: ^^5r ]sr ^ R r> ' s 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

jpg° Families. Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



&ti 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Ooal "^ard. ixi Topsl^aim, 

WHERE NONE BUT 

T&e Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well preiiai'ed and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 






I. S. BALiGOMi:^ 

PEALKU IN 

Hariware, Stoves, Crociery, anfl dlassware, 

BRXTNS-WICK, TOE:. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating liibrary, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

c. E. rro-^XT-iNrsEisT^Z), 

DEALER IN 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B.— Special Kates to Students. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

POF&Tr. AND. naA^iNs:. 

This hutise has been thoroughly refitted with every re- 
yard to comfort, and the aim is to make it first-class in all 
■'■*'■ uppnintments. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 



^. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunsivick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic VieTirs ; also College Vie-nrs. 

ALL KINDS OF 






For Schools and Colleges, 



EXECUTED AT THE 



DeT\^ITT HOUSE, 

QUIMBY & MURCH, Proprietors, 

'ferner Pine anil Park Streets, LEWISTON, IE. 

ROVAL QLI.MI!V. EBEN MUROH. 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 




THE rAVORITE NOS.S03 404-332-l70-~?5l-WITH 

OThieR STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORL 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



^^i 



sxmi^B^m, 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 



OFFICE IN LEMONT BLOCK, Brunswick. 

^^TelephoQK connection with Coal Yard. 
(13" Orilers left at Jordan Snow's, Lemoiit Block, will 
be promptly atteiuled to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PXTBLISHBR, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Excbange Street, Portland. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

jSj and ^Sy Congress SL, and 2J§ Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

.esr*SEND FOR Price List. 




AMOS L MILLETT & CO., 



ESTABLISHED 18H. 

W. L. Wl LSON & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N, B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 

F. W. STOCK.MAN. } 



^mflm ^olIe|© }fe3ical Ijeparlmenl 

The Sixty-Second Annual Couri^e of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Miiine. will commence Fp:bruaky 9th, 18S2, 
aud continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— JosHC A L. CHAaiBERLAis, LL.D., President ; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfkkp Mitchi-ll, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ■, Fkkderk- H. Gerbish, M.D., 
Anatomy; Charles "W. Goddard, A.M., MediealJarisprudeDce -, Hesrt 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry; Bcbt G. AVtldeb, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen- H. "Weeks, M.D , Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles O. 
HcNT, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Daniel F. Ellis, >I.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; William B. Cushmas, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information niav be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to th"" Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Botanical Microscopes, Fancy Goods. "Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry 
promptly repaired and warranted. 

r'in.e Spectacles and. !E3reg'lasses. 
EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND .MAIN STREETS, BRUNS'WICK, ME. 
If 



JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Mag'azines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book Work to Order. 

W. B. KNICHT, 

Special Bates to Student Clubs. 

^ff^Transient Orders for Milk or Crenni lilk'd by pvinj; suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 



JOBBEllS AND IlETAlLKKS OP STANDARD /^ . • ^ /~\ 11 J-J 1 . 

ImporteJ aiii Domestic Fancy Groceries, Curtis tollege Bookstore 



HUNKER HILL PICKLES A SPECIALTY. 



BOOKS. STA.XIONEFIY, FtOOIKI 
PAPER, PEBIODICAr.S, <ScC. 



FIRST-Cr.A.BS 



Fkn,Qs, Organs, and Melodeons, E.SMITH,.. GROCER. 

AT LOW PRICKS. l.AUUE KUNTINd STOCK, ' 

W. W. wi^WQ'M, M'Bw»Bwx€K, mk. \ Lowest Prices to Student Clubs. 
F. 1. WIX,S'0'llj Dispenser of Pure Drugs, Medicines, and Chemicals. 

nvrr^ostTi:!? -rviwr> i>oivii.:s'rTO cic3-.^it.s. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions a Specialty. 

iy[A.II«r STREET, ------ BRXJNS'WriCIt, JMCE. 

.IDUKNAI. IMiKSS, MSHON STUICICT, I.KWISTtfN, MAI.NK. 




la ®ile 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DECEMBER 7,. 1881. 



Vol. XI. 



No. 10. 



A GLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

Am) THE ADJUSTABLE HANGISG 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "iVIoehring" Burners 

m PLACE OF THE OLD KIXDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

HALL L. DA.V^IS, 

Books, Stationerf, and Paper Hangiogs, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

ELLIOT 

Has the Finest and Most Stylish Stock of 
Neckwear ever exhibited in Brunswick. 

Ike Lilesl Styles is M vi M Hils. 

HOSIERY, COLLARS, CUFFS, &c., &c., 
in Great Variety of Styles. 



FINE ASSORTMENT OF 



FALL AND WINTER OVERCOATS AND SUITS, 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock. 
FRAISTK E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets 




QMMTimi T© SMOKlia 

Be-nrare of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 

-■^re^ ' '^' TRY IT, 

Fine, Mild & Sweet. 

Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KJNNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALEES THEOUGHOUT THE WOELD. 

FOR YOUR 

NOBBY HAT 

Go or Send to 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 

SIGN OE THE GOLD HAT. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Glass Cards and Monograms 

ENGEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



UNDER FALMOUTH HOTEL. 



QM.Wi.'^'Mm mmom. 



ImT^ 



JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, ETC., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QUALITY, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor Casco, 

PORTLAND, . - - _ MAINE. 
A. CARIEK. J. W. D. CAETER, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



A reorganization of the Course of Instruction 
has recently been made, in which the distinction be- 
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main- 
tained, but all academic undergraduates are placed 
on one footing, with the opportunity of following, to 
a considerable extent, such lines of study as they 
prefer. 

All students entering the College proper, are ex- 
amined on the same course of preparatory studies. 
After the second year a liberal range of electives is 
offered, within which a student may follow his choice 
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount 
pursued. 

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated 
as a distinct course, are still, for the most part, re- 
tained either in the required or elective lists. More 
place is also given to the Modern Languages than 
they have hitherto had. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all 
who complete the Academic Course. 

The Engineering Department remains as here- 
tofore, and facilities are offered for study of the 
various branches of this science. The means of 
theoretical instruction are ample, and the town of 
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen- 
tres in the State, and in the immediate vicinity of 
many important public works, aflbrds excellent 
opportunities for the study of actual structures. 
The College also enjoys many favors from the United 
States Coast Survey Office. The admission is the 
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the 
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will 
be taken, if desired, in the place of Latin. 

Those who complete satisfactorily the four years' 
course in engineering will receive the Degree of Sc. 
B. Those vvho complete a two years' course of ad- 
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or 
Mechanical Engineer. Students not candidates for 
a degree will he received at any stage for which an 
examination shall show them to be fitted, and may 
remain for any desired time. Further infornjation 
will be furnished on application to Professor G. L. 
Vose. 

Terms of Admission to the Academic Course. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 

following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are rccoinniended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the Jiueid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Salluat. 

QREEK. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books ; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

Ancient Geogkapiiy. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Boot 

and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 

I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 

Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission 
will be required to produce testimonials of good 
moral character. The time for examination is the 
Friday after Commencement and the Friday before 
the opening of the first term. In exceptional cases 
applicants maybe examined at other times. Candi- 
dates for admission to advanced classes will be ex- 
amined in the studies which such classes have 
accomplished. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrange- 
ments with the Principals of schools and academies 
having a regular course preparatory for college of at 
least three years' duration, whereby their pupils 
may be examined for admission to college at their 
respective schools, iu connection . with their own 
final examinations. 

The amount of instruction now ofl'ered and pos- 
sible to be taken iu the several principal lines of 
study is exhibited comparatively, as reduced to one 
scale, in the following manner. This is, however, 
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal 
length : 

Latin, eight terms. 

Greek, eight terms. 

Mathematics, eight terms. 

Gernuin, four and a half terms. 

English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English 
Literature, three and a half terms. 

French, three terms. 

Italian, one term. 

Spanish, one term. 

Rhetoric (formal), one term. Rhetorical and 
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a 
half terms. 

Natural History studies, five and a half terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, four terms. 

Chemistry, four terras. 

History, Ancient and Modern, two terms. 

Political Economy, one and a half terms. 

Public Law, two terras. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, including Logic, 
four terms. 

Christian Evidences, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $:25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. ■ 

Board is obtained iu town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lesson the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DECEMBER 7, 1881. 



No. 10. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DTJRING THE 
COLLEGIATE TEAR, BY THE CLASS OF '82, OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Arthur G. Staples, Managing Editor. 

Charles H. GrLiiAN, Business Editor. 

Melvin S. Holway, Eugene T. McCarthy, 

William A. Moody, Warren 0. Plimpton, 

George G. Weeks. 

Terms — $2.00 a year in advance •, single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 

in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Tol. XI., No. 10.— Dec. 7, 1881. 

Editorial Notes 115 

Literary: 

Sunset (poem) 118 

Tbe Spliinx of Fate: 118 

The Cbapel Bell's Story 119 

Communication 121 

College Items 121 

Personal 124 

Clippings 124 

Editors' Table 125 



EDITORIAL HOTES. 



Tlie present number has been purpose^ de- 
layed in order to prevent too long an interval 
between this and the following number, which 
will be issued at the close of this term. We 
be.speak the patience of our readers, and ac- 
knowledge that the delay has not been wholly 
unpleasant to ourselves. With Christmas in 
the near distance, and under the shadow of a 
Thanksgiving past, we feel within a charmed 
circle and claim indulgence accordingly. 



Two of the current topics demand a word, 
viz., payment of subscription and contribution 



of articles from the Junior Class. We spoke 
of the former in the last issue, and hope that 
at earliest convenience the arrears will be set- 
tled. With regard to the latter we suggest 
that the work of the present board is drawing 
to a close, and that time is short in which ar- 
ticles can be handed in and published. We 
request articles legibly written on one side of 
the paper on topics as fresh and interesting as 
possible, and only regret that we have not 
been more favored in the past. 



We clip the following from the ' Varsity: 
It appears that at Bowdoin College, Maine, the 
terpsichorean art is on the curriculum. The Orient 
announces that twenty-six couples talse the dancing 
lectures, and that quite a number more have applied 
for admission but cannot be accommodated. 

The above is slightly misconceived. We 
really hope that every one will not believe it. 
We doubt if the writer himself would con- 
sider it so apparent if he should pay us a visit 
and endeavor to discover which one of our 
Faculty would be most likely to don the con- 
ventional swallow-tail and lead us in the mazy. 
Fond parents who send their sons here need 
not fear, for we assure them that the Faculty 
does not dance, in public at least. What is 
most alluring in the above is the idea of its 
being on the curriculum in the form of " danc- 
ing lectures," and with a crowded house — 
" standing room only " at every entertain- 
ment. The coolness with which the ' Varsity 
indulges the idea is refreshing, and makes us 
fondly imagine how pleasant it would be if 
our august professors only would put away 
serious affairs, and devote the afternoons to 
leading the faltering footsteps of the debutant 
through the measures of the dreamy waltz. A 
la ' Varsity, what an elysium it would be ! 



116 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



We can but feel that it is a sad fact that 
we are possessed of fewer associations for the 
study of the great authors. What we mean 
is that at every progressive college except 
our own we find various organizations known 
as Shakespeare clubs, Chaucer clubs, and the 
like, and we are convinced that such organi- 
zations, if they serve the end intended, are 
valuable in every way. A critical knowledge 
of Shakespeare is a valuable, almost indis- 
pensable acquirement, and something not at- 
tained in a cursory study of English Litera- 
ture. The time was, we are assured, when 
such an organization existed among certain 
students as a private venture, and where those 
who admire the masters were content to meet 
and discuss their works. There is also no 
reason why we should not be possessed of a 
similar organization to-day, and why the col- 
lege should not carry among its institutions 
means for a broader and more critical study 
of the masters of the English tongue. An or- 
ganization for the study of Shakespeare, for 
instance, with adequate instruction in the 
same from our Faculty, would serve an ad- 
mirable end and give us opportunities which 
we do not now possess. 



The eternal edict of our Down East weather 
prohibits foot-ball, and with the laurels of a 
successful season resting d. la mode upon tlieir 
brows, our captains can go and liave their 
pictures taken. A Freshman says that he 
thinks that they won't play any more because 
their new foot-ball is worn out, whicli is, we 
think, a judicious as well as economic con- 
clusion. Seriously, we think that we have no 
cause to be dissatisfied with this season's work 
in this direction. We have at least as a col- 
lege become interested in the game and have 
reasonable prospects that next year more will 
be done. It is a matter of comment tliat foot- 
ball has been very interesting througliout the 
college community this season. Tiie season 
closes with Yale at the front. We have, as 



we said before, no reason for dissatisfaction, 
and the meagre results of our practice will, 
we doubt not, be evident in no inconsiderable 
degree next year if the college sees fit to take 
the game up where this season left it. The 
game needs none of our championship as a 
game, only our support as a game for this col- 
lege. This it has always had. The season is 
marked at least by the first attempt within 
our knowledge to investigate the game, and 
as such deserves to be remembered. 



We feel that it is a matter of congratula- 
tion that the Senior Class Elections are over. 
The delay and consequent unsettled state of 
feelings in the class were certainly not the 
least factors in the affair, and the sooner the 
business was settled the better for the general 
peace of mind. Now that it is over we feel 
justified in allowing that the elections of this 
year have been made judiciously and well. 
There was very little to disturb the harmony, 
and with a few exceptions no dela}- beyond 
that consequent upon an election of this kind. 

By far the pleasantest feature of the affaii- 
is that the class is not any the worse off for 
the election. It is much better that class day 
be less brilliant and that the class go on as it 
has gone on liitherto, bearing no enmity among 
its members and united in a common cause, 
than that it be broken up into factions and all 
tiie pleasant rehitions of class be destroyed. 
That it is a dangerous era in every class life 
is undoubted, and it is an unfortunate circum- 
stance that it must come up as it does to even 
partially estrange its members. We presume 
that no improvement can be made in the 
method of an election, but believe that we are 
not alone in wishing that elections might be 
conducted without reference to society affairs. 
The morals of a class election are varied. We 
find many who believe, as President Garfield 
believed, that "Things don't turn up in this 
world until somebody turns them up,'' and 
many who exemplify what the Crimson states, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



117 



that "ill the world at large 'estates, degrees, 
and offices' are often purchased with the 
honor of the wearer," but in spite of this we 
can claim that the last Senior election was 
among the happiest that history has recorded. 
What we wish is that class day may be a 
crown of glory to the good sense and a reward 
of merit to the able selection of the class, and 
that the class may in the meantime forget that 
it has had an election. 



It has been represented to us that the con- 
stant playing of band instruments is very an- 
noying to students who are accustomed to 
devote any time to study. Piano playing and 
the like at most colleges are restricted to those 
hours which students are most accustomed to 
devote to pleasure, and while we would not 
plead for any such restriction we would, at the 
suggestion of very many readers, urge upon our 
untiring musicians a more careful and judi- 
cious selection of hours. It is exceedingly 
annoying to attempt to study while above is 
a clarionet player, at the left another, below 
a parlor organ, and through the partition a 
proficient on the bass horn. We are pleased 
to notice that the band is running, and would 
in connection inquire anxiously if it never 
runs down, but we suggest again that more 
attention be paid to the legitimate business of 
students. 



We are always glad to receive communi- 
cations, as through them the spirit of the col- 
lege on matters of importance can be learned 
in a way better perhaps than through edito- 
rial utterances. The general fault, however, 
with the communications we have received is 
their extreme length. It seems to be thought 
necessary that a simple matter cannot be 
treated without a formality and tedionsness 
more worthy of a philosophical discussion. 
Write as you think and feel, and you will not 
use dull, dry words winding out into intermi- 
nable length. If the subject is not important 



do not try to make it so by a formal setting 
forth of it, but if you consider it to be of vital 
interest write as if you were interested in it. 
A few short, vigorous sentences, showing the 
honest opinion of an unprejudiced observer, 
has more influence than pages of personal ar- 
guments. 

A neighboring journal asks the opinion 
of college men in regard to the evil influ- 
ences of college life, and promises a cordial 
reception to their honest reflections. Inas- 
much as the same sheet has been active in its 
inquiries concerning the recent trouble, and 
strong in its denunciation of pernicious prac- 
tices, it would seem that the general tenor of 
the State press was towards a careful scrutiny 
of the college and its work. The article in 
question dilates at length on the evil tend- 
encies of the morale of college life, and avers 
that its general tendency is towards harm. 
While we are convinced that the conclusion 
is erroneous we are not at liberty to discuss 
it in these columns, but are of the honest 
opinion that not tlie slightest harm could 
come from a comparison of the influences of 
college with those of the world at large. 
It is a matter of moment to anxious parents as 
to whether they are sending their sons to all 
the evil influences of the most degrading 
habits and associations, or to the better influ- 
ences of a Christian college and the associa- 
tion with well-bred young men. We presume 
that the honorable record of college-bred 
men is no argument, and the assertion that 
no fewer fall by the wayside in college than 
in the world, will be doubted, and we wish, 
thei'efore, that the matter might be candidly 
discussed, with the same desire after truth 
that the writer of the article evinced, and we 
are quite sure that the work of our colleges 
will not be found unproductive of results 
wholly beneficial. 



Diplomas at Princeton cost $14.50. 



118 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SUNSET. 

At close of clay 
I marked the brazen rim of lio;ht 
Bounding the low horizon's dusky brim ; 
Beheld it melt, and swim, and fade away 
From gold to red, to gray, then vanish quite. 
And leave me gazing on a leaden sky. 

Thought I : 
The eternal, restless years, that hurrying by 
With such impetuous haste, on eagle wing. 
So waste our feeble strength, and sternly flinc 
Us from them ; sad, sad it were, 
If, in the deep abyss, the dreary waste 
Of time, we hailed the dawning 
Of no brighter day than this ; 
The beaming of no rosier morning 
Than to-morrow's. 



THE SPHINX OF FATE. 

The charm with which mankind regards 
works of antiquity, though perhaps not fully 
explicable, is so natural that its existence has 
never been regarded as matter for surprise. 
Admiration for monuments of ages long buried 
in the charnel-house of oblivion is about the 
only sentiment from which modei'ii savans, 
with their skeptic disregard for existing insti- 
tutions, have withheld the touch of their ridi- 
cule. The sentiment is as universal as the 
race, and he who disregards it contradicts 
nature. No wonder man should regard with 
admiration whatever has so long withstood 
the relentless touch of time, which so hedges 
in his own little existence ; that he should 
look with awe upon the few monuments of 
the past over the grave of which all else has 
been leveled ; and read with a hungry inter- 
est the traditions which, originating in ob- 
scurity and preserved through the genera- 
tions, furnish the only account of dead and 
buried ages. They are the ontcroppings in the 
Geology of 'I'ime, representing whole systems 
of which the ages of men are only the lamina;. 

Ruins that are brought to light by the re- 
searches of the antiquarian are deprived of 
much of their grandeur. The fact that they 
perished at the hand of time, and were resur- 



rected hj, and owe their existence to, man, 
robs them of their dignity. But grand above 
all grandeur, worthy of admiration, ay, of 
veneration and awe — dignitj' personified — are 
those few works of man's hand, which, defy- 
ing the power of time, have stood for thou- 
sands of years, linking the present wath the 
past and absorbing into their own existence 
the recollections, associations, and legends of 
the rolling ages. 

Among those works the Sphinx stands 
without a parallel. For thirty centuries it has 
watched the deserts as the winds blow over 
them, and thrown its earnest, awful gaze out 
over those arid wastes. Tourists have ad- 
mired it; painters have tried to catch its in- 
spiration ; and beholders have dreamed their 
waking, destiny-burdened dreams in its pres- 
ence. Let us in imagination stand where 
others have stood in that presence, and see if 
we cannot catch a meaning in the solemnity 
of that face. 

We are in the midst of a desert. In the 
sky the few shreds of down-like clouds ride 
lazily upon the warm breath of the tropics. 
To the northward the blue of the sky seems 
to fade into that of the Mediterranean ; east- 
ward the sluggish Nile bears onward its bur- 
den from equatorial lakes, and beyond, the 
white haze from the Red Sea rises through 
the rifis in the mountain chain ; to the south 
the unknown lands stretch away into obscurity 
and tradition ; while to the west, beyond reach 
of the eye, the imagination loses itself in a 
vast sea of burning sand. What a solitude 1 

Look now at the Sphinx. It seems a thing 
of life in this solitude which it commands. Its 
distant, unbending gaze is fixed upon some- 
thing far out over desert and mountains. 
You would think from those sterti and hard- 
ened features it saw destiny itself. No blow 
from your hammer can change them. For 
thirty centuries it lias worn (hat look of dis- 
tant contemplation, and will wear it. It 
changed not its features when the multitudes 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



119 



that once peopled these plains hurried to their 
mountain tombs, nor relaxed them amid the 
thunders of Sinai. Unmoved it saw the pil- 
grimage, crucifixion, and resurrection. It has 
seen amid the rise and fall of nations a new 
civilization encircle the globe. Through cen- 
turies of darkness and civilization, through 
ages of justice and of crime it has cast that 
same fateful look far out upon the goal of its 
own contemplation. Surely such a creation 
must embody an idea. Whei'e among human 
actions shall we find its counterpart? 

Search the pages of history — the chequered 
career of men and nations. Notice the alter- 
nate triumph of right and wrong ; the pro- 
gress of the race, its zigzag course, its halts, 
its retrogressions. See the meaningless waste 
of human endeavor; the collision and mutual 
destruction of opposite waves of human ac- 
tion ; the equipoise of contrary opinion ; the 
progress of ages lost in a day ; the destruction 
of life ; the loss of happiness ; the wailing of 
misery. Is it, after all, a meaningless medley ? 

Look again. We see amidst it all a figure 
calm and dignified, towering above the desert 
of human action. It is the Sphinx of Fate. 
Regardless of the surging and struggling 
around, it fixes its gaze afar off upon the 
goal of history. The meaning of its calm eye 
none can interpret, and the lineaments of the 
stern features no human endeavor can change. 
While the panorama of human action passes 
in ever changing scenes across its vision, it 
sees only destiny in the background. It has 
grown old with the world. It saw the peo. 
pling of the earth, the advancement and re- 
generation of man. It has been present and 
witnessed all the mutations since the creation. 
It has seen the standard of right raised only 
to be overthrown by the force of wrong. It 
has seen the same old spirit of oppression 
slain a thousand times only to be a tliousand 
times reborn in new and more specious forms. 
It has seen desire put as a substitute for right, 
and intolerance, fanaticism, and prejudice 



stand as the inevitable accompaniments of 
progress. All those things it has seen with 
that same calm indifference, but it has re- 
garded them only in their relations to that 
course upon the goal of which the eye has 
ever rested. Let us then think that success 
and defeat, pleasure and pain are not what 
they seem, but only necessary parts of one 
symmetrical whole. Let us liope that when 
at the end of the rolling ages that- goal is 
finally reached, the features of Fate may relax 
into a look of approval. 



THE CHAPEL BELL'S STORY. 

I was sitting alone by the fire weaving a 
day dream, thinking why boys will smoke and 
what all this great busy crowd of young men 
will do when they emerge into the unclassic 
world, and as the tones of the chapel bell came 
in upon me I reached up and took from the 
shelf the quaintest, sweetest bit of biography 
in the world, Hawthorne's Bell's Biography, 
and read while the fire glowed. 

It was dark, and I was alone. I missed 
the fire and the book, and found myself in the 
vestibule of the chapel. It was very still 
around me, but up above the murmur of the 
wind around the chapel bell, as it sang its 
never-ending song, playing among the dusty 
rafters for a moment in its eternal life, 
joining and again winging itself away to the 
unknown, sounded to me as if all the many 
voices of the bell, all the tones and tunes it 
had ever sung were alive once more and hold- 
ing high carnival. Up by the rickety ladders, 
waking the doves and stirring up a tempest of 
cooing noises, I passed and stood by the bell. 
A flood of the night mist, a twinkle of star- 
light, a view of the college walks, and then 
the bell began to creak and groan again, and 
turning from the slatted window I hearkened 
to its life history. The lurid flames leaped 



120 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



iind jrlo\V(!(l wlici'c it, WHS Ixirii. A Imly lady 
cast lioi' gold inlo IIki iiUilliiiL;' caldron, and 
the bell slioiic, willi prides a(, Ihc rccollrction. 

Tlic peopli) f^atlicrud at ils liiiMi i'listivai, 
and I recalled liow tlio swarlliy num stood hy 
and watched its glowing face. Jt was in 
snnny France, where the hills were vine-clad, 
where the blue waters of a winding river 
lounge along to meet the sea, and where a 
haj)py iiamlet clusters secure upon its l)aid<s, 
that it first saw tlus light of da.y, and at close 
of day, as the light was fading from the hills 
that, mute and silent, it was borne into the 
open air. Marked it was indeed. It had the 
imperial crest and the imprint of the pojjo, 
and with duo solenuiily was iiung in the bel- 
fry of the village church. It swung there ten 
happy years. It swung until the people loved 
it for its clear, sweet tones, loved it because 
it had rung jubilantly at the marriage day, 
and tolled at the funeral, and pealed forth at 
the christening until it had linked itself with 
their holiest thoughts. The end came when 
its clear, pleasant tones met the king's ear. 
The boll told mo with many a creak and groan 
how sad the parting was, how with muflled 
voice it journeyed away from the winding 
river of its birthplace over the sunny roads of 
France, through valleys shut in by hills in 
harvest time, and how at length it left the 
dusty road and, seated on its chariot, clattered 
up the stony i)avements of the royal eil,y. For 
years it pealed forth in the carillons of Paris, 
tolled at St. Bartholomew's day, saw the 
streets run red at the sight of the guillotine, 
until the city grew, until the little shrine over 
which it i)rcsided fell a prey to the ])rogress 
of iniprovenusnt, and one day it found itself 
on earth once niorc. It was in the days of 
the awakening of our young republic, when 
Now England ships dotted every sea, and 
when New England town magistrates visited 
the cities of the continent and purchased mar- 
ketable relics, and this is how it was bought. 
The village squire paid ovor the price in shin- 



ing onglos, and so it cauKi over the sea to 
swing ill the hellVy of the little building on 
the clearing that s(MV(;d as town hall and 
churcii for the growing little town on Massa- 
chusetts coasl. Thus it came to continue its 
life work, looking out on the heaving sea, and 
breathed on by the salt breezes of the Atlan- 
tic. Oft in winter it longed for its fatherland, 
thought of the humble French peasantry who 
came at its bidding and knelt at the shrine 
within its call, but it grew also to love the 
sturdy sea and to listen to its wave notes, and 
fling back the harmony of its grand old an- 
tlu:ni. 

And so it lived till its surroundings again 
outgrow it, and when the little village had its 
bank and factory, the bell in the town hall 
was removed from its hangings and consigned 
once more to the tender mercies of the world. 
The precursor of the bell, in New England, 
was the triangle suspended from a beam and 
when struck vigorously emitted a sound loud 
enough to be heard any Sabbath over a vil- 
lage ; but bolls were as necessary in Maine as 
in Massachusetts, so in a certain puritan col- 
lege in New England a bell was a desider- 
atum. The town magnate above was an 
alumnus, and a religious one, and so he sent 
the bell as a present to his Alma Mater, and 
packing it on a horse sent it through the 
Maine wilderness and suspended it in the 
chai)el tower. 

The bell lold me of its journey in sum- 
mer time, how proud it was of its elevation, 
and how ol' late years oidy its shame had 
come upon it-, 'lold, with many groanings, 
how incompatible it was with its past history 
that it should be so hung, that it is impossi- 
ble to bo decently rung, and how it longs for 
its sunny biithplaee and its home by the 
heaving sea, and earnestly, (^X])ectantly awaits 
il,s final rest. 

The chapel bell's story was over and I 
was by my lire again, but 1 honestly believe 
the boll's story had a moral. 1 thought how 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



121 



much better it would be if the most constant 
attendant upon our studies, the herald of our 
opening college life, the siimmons to the cor- 
dial lessons from our gray-haired teacher, could 
be rejuvenated and made a more pleasant 
musical reminder of the never-ending flight 
of time. Clio. 



COMMUNICATION. 



E'Wors of Orient : 

In the last few numbers you have suffi- 
ciently agitated the mattei of a gymnasium, 
and fully expressed the need among us stu- 
dents of some regular system of exercise. 
As we are not likely, however, to have our 
wishes fulfilled, at least during tTie corning 
winter, it rnay be well to offer through your 
columns some substitute for the old gymna- 
sium which will obviate the present necessity. 

We understand that all the machinery of 
the former gymnasium has been removed and 
placed in safe keeping. Now, as there are 
several unoccupied rooms in college, it seems 
as though sfjme of the appliances, such as the 
parallel bars, Indian clubs, and sliding weights, 
might be placed in one of these, sfj that those 
desiring \ji) do so could, under proper direc- 
tion, take regular exercise in the usual manner. 

It may be objected that inmates of the 
same building would be disturbed by even the 
unavoiflable amount of noLse, and that the 
room would be injured, or some of the clubs 
etc., be horrovjed. But, if we remember tliat 
the time of day when we used to exercise in 
the gymnasium ha devoted to study by very 
few students, as almost all are about the 
campus, in the rea'ling room, or down town 
at that hour, the first objection will seem less 
obtrusive. We think, further, that no more 
damage to the building would be done, in the 
way suggested, than by some of the nocturnal 
festivities lately carried on in these rooms, 



and overlooked in silence on the part of the 
Faculty. The students, too, appreciating the 
advantage gained, would be inclined to more 
than usual care of the surroundings. Then, 
if charge of the whole matter was given to 
some competent person, there would be no 
more danger or loss of the property than in 
the old building, which was often necessarily 
left open and unattended. 

As matters seem to be running now, the 
records of our next spring sports will show a 
lack of thorough training during the winter. 
Therefore, if it is not deemed advisable for 
all to occupy a college room for this purpose, 
at least some such ariangement ought to be 
made for the boating men and ball nine. 

If those interested among the students, 
will take hold of this project, or any other 
having the same object, we feel sure that the 
Faculty will glaflly accede to the proposal. 

O. N. E., Jk. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



Seniors complain of overwork. 

Holden, '83, is tea<;hing in Friendahip. 

Jewett, '82, lia« gon'; home on atnynint of sickriesB, 

There was Borne skating on the river during 
reee»». 

The Sophomores decided to har'; their turkey at 
home. 

Purington, '8-7, has plc<Jge<l to Alpha Delta I'hi 
Society. 

Prof. Campbell began a course of lectures Xovem- 
ber 29th. 

The Commencement moustache is visible in the 
.Senior class. 

The first exercise in Parliamentary Law was held 
last Wc^Jncsday. 

Twenty-two students remained in college over 
Thanksgiving. 

The new picture in the library was presented by 
Bev. A. L. Park of Gardiner. 



122 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Recitations were begun promptly on Monday morn- 
ing after recess. 

Tlie Senior and Junior Exhibition will be on the 
evening of December 22d. 

While Longren is out teaching, Perkins, '83, has 
taken his place in the library. 

There is a rumor that the lamp chimneys in the 
reading room have been cleaned. 

The Musical Association, under Mr. Kotzschmar, 
held the first meeting on the 29th. 

Prof. — "Is this element a gas?" Student — 
"N-a-w, sir, I g-a-s not." Correct. 

Reviews of the classes having examinations at 
the end of the term, begin this week. 

Stinchfield, '82, has finished his school at West 
Auburn, and returns to college this week. 

A number of the alumni from '80 and '81 paid a 
visit to the college just before Thanksgiving. 

The Freshmen appeared out in force at the last 
sociable. '85 promises to be quite a society class. 

The trench dug for gas pipes was mistaken by 
several for the beginning of the desired crossing. 

Student (dating excuse blank) — "Let's see, this 
is the last day of November." Prof. — " Yes, tlie 
31st." 

Hard on the boys. "I wish this class vs^ould re- 
cite as though they knew what they were talking 
about." 

There was some mistake about the exercises on 
Sunday before last, and consequently non-attendance 
by the students. 

One of the Professors is reported to have pur- 
chased Dirigo Hall, intending to convert it into a 
tenement house. 

The windows are being fitted in Memorial Hall, 
and it is expected as soon as this is completed that 
the frescoing will begin. 

The membei-s of '83 appointed for llie Senior and 
Junior Exhibition are A. E. Austin, W. A. r<!rkins, 
G. B. Swan, and C. 11. Stetson. 

The Juniors in Physics liave been divided, so that 
those who elect this study in the spring term recite 
separately from the rest of the class. 

Mason, '82, has finished his term in (he Howdoin- 
ham Higli School and returned to college. Cliild, 
'84, takes charge of this school for tiio next term, 
beginning in a few weeks. 



A member of '85 has learned that the skeleton 
hanging in Cleaveland was obtained from the re- 
mains of a former victim of Plii Chi. 

Logic : Senior (giving an example of the syllo- 
gism) — "All men are animals. I am an animal, 
therefore I am a man." Class applaud. 

Fresh to Soph. — "How time slips away here at 
college ! " Soph. — " That's so, it goes so last a fel- 
low don't get time to study hardly any." 

For perhaps the first time in the history of the 
college /ree heer, which was found so mysteriously 
Saturday evening, seemed to go a begging. 

The Freshman Orchestra seems to exist as an 
undeniable fact. It has nine pieces, and meets for 
rehearsal on Wednesday and Saturday afternoons. 

Sawyer, '81 , has been in town to arrange for a 
club of medical students during the winter, and is 
intending to attend lectures at the medical school. 

Some one recently thought several recitation 
rooms were improperly ventilated and therefore re- 
moved the windows to a safe distance in the woods. 

President Chamberlain begun extra lectures to 
the Senior class last Friday, holding the exercise at 
4.15 P.M., in order not to interrupt the regular reci- 
tations. 

Lieut. Crawford will resign his position in con- 
nection with this college, and leave town within a 
few weeks, though his term does not expire until 
next summer. 

Wanted. — Cox)ies of the '• Boiodoin Bugle'''' for 
years 1873, 1874, and 1876, and of the " Bowdoiti- 
ensia". Also a copy of No. 1, Ko?-. IV. Bowdoin 
"OuiENT." Address to "Orient." 

The students appeared very anxious to take in the 
temperance lecture and the sermon on the evils of 
dancing, delivered on Sunday last. Both the ad- 
dresses came at a time wlien they could be appre- 
ciated. 

The following is related of Prof. Cleaveland on 
receiving a gold-headed cane from the students: "I 
might be a man of many faults and failings, but I 
did not know tliat 1 was going to got a cane-in from 
the students. 

We neglected to mention in oiu- last number the 
visit paid to Levviston by several members of this 
college, in order to attend the prize declamations at 
Bates. The boys have since spoken of the attention 
they received and were highly gralilied by the cour- 
tesies shown them by the Bates students. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



123 



Next spring the Freshman nine will play in the fol- 
lowing positions : Mooers, catcher ; Cook, pitcher ; 
Chase, first base ; Harding, second base ; Folsoni, 
third base ; Goodenow, short-stop and captain ; 
Bartlett, left field; Wardvvell, centre field; Hodg- 
kins, right field. 

A quintette of students consisting of Barton, 
Butler, Dike, Pierce, and Stetson, was present at the 
closing exercises of the Bowdoinham High School, 
Saturday evening, ISTovember 26th, and assisted by 
selections of college music. On the following 
Monday evening, a number from college attended a 
dramatic entertainment in that village. 

We learn from the daily papers of the death of 
Richard E. Johnson at his home in Farmingdale, 
Dec. 4. He was formerly in business at Gardiner 
and was the father of Prof. Henry Johnson of this 
college. Prof. Johnson, who was called home a 
number of weeks ago by his father's illness, will re- 
turn at once and resume his position in college. 

The result of the Junior class election is as fol- 
lows : President, R. C. Washburn ; Vice-President, 
J. B. Reed ; Marshal, G. B. Swan ; Poet, A. J. Rus- 
sell ; Odist, J. Crowley; Orator, W. A. Perkins; 
Chaplain, B. Sewall ; Curator, R. Linscott ; Secretary 
and Treasurer, A. C. Gibson ; Committee of Arrange- 
raents, F. E. Perham, S. T. B. Jackson, C. H. Dun- 
ning. 

A company of cadets attended the funeral of Mrs. 
Crawford, and accompanied the procession to the 
depot. As the train left the station the cadets saluted 
with raised caps. The escort was conducted in an 
appropriate manner, and was designed to express 
the respect and sympathy entertained toward Lieut. 
Crawfoi'd by the members of his department in this 
college. 

Articles on "Hazing at Bowdoin College" have 
found their way into the New York papers. We ex- 
pect next to see the pictorial publications adorned 
with cuts depicting several Freshmen writhing in the 
agonies of an eyeless and maimed condition, a circle 
of blood-thirst}' Sophs, in war paint, while in the 
rear appears the President accompanied by a posse 
of policemen. 

A class meeting of the Seniors was held Novem- 
ber 23d, at which the following ofiicers were elected : 
Marshal, W. C. Merriraan ; President, W. G. 
Reed; Orator, M. H. Goodwin; Poet, J. F. Libby; 
Historian, C. H. Gilman ; Prophet, H. Carpenter ; 
Chajjlain, W. W. Curtis; Odist, A. W. Mansur; 



Address under the Oak, E. R. Jewett; Parting 
Address, A. M. Goddard; Committee of Arrange- 
ments, I. Stearns, G. H. Pierce, W. A. Moody ; Com- 
mittee on Pictures, J. R. Jordan, F. H. Fames, F. H. 
Blondel. 

A letter has been received from the publishers of 
the Carmina Collegensia desiring the college to be 
represented in a new college song book. At a meet- 
ing, called by the president of the Senior class, the 
following committee was appointed to take charge 
of the matter: Pierce, '82; Sewall, '83; J. Torrey, 
'84; Butler, '85. 

Just as the season for out-door sports was closing, 
an unusual activity, particularly in the direction of 
foot-ball seemed to possess the college. The game 
between the picked elevens from '82 and '83 was the 
first real attempt to conform the rules of our ordinary 
foot-ball to those in use among other colleges. Of 
the game little can be said, except that it was an im- 
provement on the old style of playing. The elevens 
were very evenly matched, '82 being, perhaps, the 
better in a rush and '83 having more skill in driving 
the ball by fair kicks. At one time the Juniors lead 
by two goals and one touch-down, but the Senioi'S 
made some gain, so that when the time expired, the 
former were victorious by only one goal. It is now 
too late in the season to do anything further in this 
direction, but when the spring opens foot-ball can 
well be established among our permanent sports. 



Major Sanger was once Military Instructor at 
Bowdoin. The following laughable anecdote about 
him we clip from a western paper : " Major Sanger, 
who is known in military slang as a ' bantam,' was 
returning, one day recently, from Bismarck to Fort 
Lincoln, which is across the river, and the ambulance 
in which he was riding was delayed by a team and 
wagon driven by one of the class known as mule- 
whackers in this country. The driver of the ambu- 
lance and the mule-whacker got into a wordy alter- 
cation, and Major Sanger got very indignant at what 
he believed to be impertinent language and un- 
warranted interference in his journey. He jumped 
from the ambulance, a Tom Thumb in size but a 
Goliah in fury, and exclaimed, ' Get that wagon out 
of the way.' The mule-whacker looked at him 
quizzically, and asked, 'Who the devil are you?' 
' I am Major Sanger of the army, sir, and I want you 
to get that wagon out of the way.' The mule- 
whacker ejected a mouthful of tobacco into the road, 
and remarked, ' Do you know what I will do with 
you, Major Sanger, of the army, sir, if you don't 



124 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



make less noise with your mouth ? ' ' What will you 
do?' inquired the major, looking as large and as 
fierce as possible. 'I'll set a mouse-trap and catch 
you, Major Sanger, of the ai'my, sir, and give you to 
my puppy to play with.' " 



PERSOKAL. 



'69. — M. E. Wadsworth is assistant in the Aggas- 
siz Museum at Cambridge. He is one of the best 
lithologists in the country. The papers issued by 
him on this subject, may be found in the college 
library. 

'70. — D. T. Timberlake, for several years past 
principal of Gould's Academy, Bethel, is at present 
teaching in Colebrook, N. H. 

'73. — A. L. Crocker was in town a few days since, 
visiting friends. He was for two years assistant en- 
gineer in the construction of Steel Plant and Roll- 
ing Mills of the Springfield Iron Co., Springfield, 111. 
He was also engaged one year in the same business, 
at the Vulcan Steel Works, St. Louis. He is now 
about beginning business on his own account in 
Minneapolis, Mo., under the firm name of Crocker 
& Pell, Founders, Machinists, and Mechanical 
Engineers. 

'73. — A. J. Boardman is doing a business in real 
estate and loans in Minn., Mo. Has lately become 
the father of a second son. 

'74.— D. O. S. Lowell is Principal of the High 
School in Ellsworth. He was in town a few days ago. 

'77. — J. K. Greene is practicing law in Worces- 
ter, Mass. 

'77. — J. A. Roberts, who is practicing law in 
Norway, was recently married to Miss Carrie A. 
Pike of that place. 

'79. — Frank Kimball was recently married to Miss 
Gerrish, of Mechanic Falls, and has gone to Iowa 
City. 

'79. — Achorn is engaged in filling a contract for 
ship frames in Linkwood, Ind. 

'81. — Sawyer is studying medicine with Dr. Dolly 
in Cumberland. 

'81. — Harding is teaching at Fort Fairfield. 

'81. — D. J. McGillicuddy, represented Levviston at 
the Land League Convention at Chicago, last week. 

'81. — Lane is here to visit his friends for a few 
days. Has been teaching at Canton. 



'81. — Staples spent a few days here just before 
Thanksgiving. He has been teaching. 

'81. — Joyce is teaching in Massachusetts. 

'82. — E. U. Curtis has returned to college after 
six weeks' absence on account of sickness. He has 
not fully recovered, but is convalescent. 

'82. — Stinchfield has just returned to college, 
having taught a successful term of school at West 
Auburn. 

'83. — Fling is teaching at Gray. 

'84. — The following members are now out teach- 
ing: Alexander, Butler, Dunham, Folsom, Kendall, 
Purington, Rogers, and Whittier. 



CLIPPIHGS. 



LEFT. 

Meet me, she said, by the orchard wall, 
To-morrow night, as the sun goes down ; 

And this is to-morrow, and here am I, 
And there's the wall, and the sun's gone down. 

—Ex. 

First student to second — "He that giveth to the 
poor, lendeth to the Lord. Have you got any to- 
bacco ? " 

Professor — "Suppose j'ou were hit on the head 
with a stick, where would the sensation be?" Sen- 
ior — "In the stick." Professor — " Sufficient ! " 

Student (translating rather indistinctly) — "The 
Greeks were fond of having girdles about them." 
Prof. — "Yes, be careful not to omit the d sound." — 
Round Table. 

A Senior boasted to his fair one "that the hatter 
gave him his hat for an advertisement." She repl ed 
"that is a good idea, because if you look well in a 
hat, any one will." That Senior wears his silk. — Olio. 

Student (under examination in physics) — "What 
planets were known to the ancients?" "Well, sir, 
there were Venus and Jupiter, and," — after a pause, 
— "I think the earth, but I'm not quite certain." — 
The Forlfolio. 

Two Juniors out calling (old gent answers ring) — 
Juniors — "Good evening, sir." Old Gent — "Good 
evening." Juniors — "Are the young ladies in?" 
Old Gent — "Yes — in bed." Exeunt duo Juniors. — 

Ulio. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



125 



WHY? 
Why does it haunt me, haunt me like this?— 

Two or three frecliles, the sauciest nose, 
Lips like cherries and made to kiss. 

Kissed by others since, I suppose. 

Kissed by others since, I suppose. 

What does it matter? I had my share. 
Breezes and breezes fondle the rose, 

Tell me, for that is the rose less fair? 

Tell me, for that is the rose less fair? 

One wind comes as another goes, — 
Ordo saeclorum, why should I care? 

Breezes and breezes fondle the rose. 

Lips like cherries and made to kiss, 

Two or three freckles, the sauciest nose, — 

Out on it! why does it haunt me like this? 
Kissed by others since, I suppose. 

— Advocate. 

Professor of Rlietoric — "The figure is a faulty 
one ; we cannot conceive a man taking arms against 
a sea of troubles, but it is possible to dyke a sea — 
yes, the most natural thing to do is to dam a sea of 
troubles." Confusion reigns. 

It was Saturday night in Leadville. Six rough 
miners were playing poker. But as the clock struck 
the hour of twelve, proclaiming that the Lord's day 
had come, with one accord they threw down their 
cards and left the saloon. They went across the 
street to see a dog fight. 

Dashing Beauty to Verdant Freshman — " What 
is the difference between an appleand ayounglady?" 
Freshie (diffidently) — "Don't know." Dashing 
Beauty (blushingly) — "Why, you see, you must 
squeeze an apple to get cider, but, as to the young 
lady, you must get side her to squeeze her." Freshie 
sides up. — Ex. 

" Suipee," said Dingus, recently, " Why is the 
Columbia College press like a performance at Tony 
Pastor's?" " Because a bird in hand is worth two in 
a bush," replied Suipee. " Wrong," said Dingus, 
"it's because it is composed of Actors and Specta- 
tors." Suipee swept the floor. Dingus was the 
broom. — Ada Columbiana. 

"Beautiful silken hair!" Phillip murmured 
fondly, toying lovingly with one of her nut-brown 
tresses, "soft as the plumage on an eagle's wing; 
light as the thistle down that dances in the summer 
air; the shimmer of sunset, the glitter of yellow 
gold, the rich red brown of autumnal forests blend 
in entrancing beauty in its — " and just then it came 
off in his hands and he forgot just what to say next. — 
Ex. 



"The rain falls upon the just and the unjust," 
remarked the Sophomore editor as he left the sanctum 
with the editorial umbrella. " Upon the just, prin- 
cipally," commented the chief, "because^the unjust 
have gone olf with the umbrella." 

.Slsthetic young lady : "By the way, Mr. Gosoftly, 
have you read Bascom's 'Science of Mind?'" 
" N-n-a-w. Pm not reading much nowadays. I 
pass my time in original thought." iEsthetic young 
lady (with sympathy) : "How very dreary, to be 
sure." — Ex. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



This week we give you a glance at a number of 
our exchanges. 

The last Athenaium concludes "Violas Vassar 
Venture,''^ a tale in fourteen chapters. It is themost 
ambitious attempt in recent college literature. In it 
thCj following is sung by a New England College 
Glee Club at Vassar : 

AlK. — A WAKRIOR BOL0. 

The basso bold 

Had caught a cold. 

And could not reach low B ; 

The tenor, shrill. 

Seemed to be ill. 

Whene'er he tried for C. 
The youth so young and fair. 
Who tried to sing the air. 
Yelled out so loud, he broke the crowd 
And gave them quite a scare. 
For what cared he for melody. 
Who was so " oil' the key." 

The Argo says : "Therefore once again we would 
respectfully, — nay, with tears in our eyes, request the 
Athenceum to bottle up, and to chain up their rabid 
exchange editor, or we shall be reduced to the neces- 
sity of forsaking our declared position and returning 
slur for slur." 

The Brunonian says "Psychology is proving to 
be the most popular study of Senior year." 

The Oberlin Review continues to be poorly printed 
with too fine type. The essay on Charlotte Bronte is 
well written, but contains nothing but what can be 
found in almost any cj'clopaedia. 

At Oberlin, athletics have been laid aside for the 
winter, and the spare time and strength is devoted to 
debating societies, a number of which are in active 
operation and holding very enthusiastic meetings. 
The "Oberlin plan" of allowing students chances to 



126 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



teach in the preparatory department is objected to by 
a writer who says it takes too much time from the 
other studies. We did not suppose that anytliing at 
Oberlin was capable of improvement. 

The last Crimson tries to "brace up" the Echo by 
" sittin<^ on it " severely. An editorial hints that there 
is not enough hard work put upon it, a fact which is 
very evident. Its locals add : " The Echo is evidently 
the child of the college, because it has not learned to 
spell." " So far as careful printing and general good 
style are concerned, the Yale News is a pleasant con- 
trast to the Echo:' This has too much truth in it, but 
we had rather see the Crivison stand up for its own 
colleo-e daily and leave criticism to outsiders. It is 
probrWe, however, that the Crimson's advice will be 
heeded more than that of any other of the Echo's ex- 
changes. We do not consider the Darwinian sketch, 
"Our First Families," at all a success, and are sur- 
prised that the Crimson devotes so much space to it. 
The College Olio, of Marietta, Ohio, relates the 
sad death of a Chinese student of the college, who 
settled up his worldly affairs, left a note directing 
that a few small debts be paid, and committed suicuie 
by the use of chloroform. Cause : an attachment for 
aservant girl whom his friends advised him to giveup. 
We would not encourage such articles as that on 
"Goethe," which appears in the Chronicle. Such 
pieces ought to be considered "not available." 

The University of Michigan wants to join the 
foot-ball league, facuUale volenie. 

The Chronicle's sole editorial discusses civil ser- 
vice reform. 

Our own professors may take a hint from this : 
"A very fine, large size portrait of Victor Hugo, 
taken from a painting made in 78, has been hung in 
Prof. Waller's recitation room. Other portraits of 
such authors as Goethe, Schiller, and Lessing, are to 
be obtained as soon as possible."-~C/M-0M4c;e. ^ 

The Colby Echo says in regard to base-ball : "At 
the last Commencement a number of the alumni, 
pleased with its brilliant history, suggested the idea 
of sending the nine during the ne.vt base-ball season 
on a tour to the New England colleges, and expressed 
a willingness to share tlie expenses. With the last 
o-raduating class the nine lost a few good players, but 
There are seven old players left. There is every rea- 
son to believe that we shall be able to hold the champ- 
ionship of the State next season, and also to hold a 
respectable position by the side of other college 
nines. If Uiis plan is to be executed, operations can 
not bo begun too early, either in arranging the nine 
or in testing the interest and gi^ncrosily of the alumni ." 



The Niagara Index in its leading literary article 
on "Religious Institutions," makes such statements 
as that the Catholic religion is the fountain head 
whence flows everything beneficial to mankind. 

The Hpedator gives an account of further hostilities 
between '84 and '85. '84 blockaded '85 as they were 
holding a class meeting and kept them shut in over 
an horn-. A fierce rush <iccurred after tbey were out- 
side in which '85 was successful, after a long struggle. 
On a later day they had a cane fight, in which one 
man was badly hurt. 

The Lehigh Burr starts out under favorable au- 
spices. The exchange department of its second num- 
ber is principallv tilled with the friendly notices it 
has received from the college press. This seems 
somewhat like self-flattery, but it gives as an excuse 
the fact that its exchanges have not as yet been opened 
to the public. 

The literary department of the Bales Student is as 
dry as ever. The Student wants to become a bi- 
weekly paper instead of a monthly magazine. An 
'83 man at Bates has invented an electrical steel pen 
warranted not to corrode. The exchange department 
of the Slude7it is managed unusually well. 

The recent fire in Dartmouth Hall causes the 
Dartmouth into expressing the necessity of new and 
more safe college buildings, especially for the library 
which it says contains 60,000 volumes, and is the 
third in value of the college libraries of the country. 
The Amherst Student pleads for a musical profes- 
sorship and for the abolition of the Sunday afternoon 
service. 

The Yale Record says that the Senior's petition for 
less work has been rejected by the Faculty. The 
Becord begins an alphabetical mention of its ex- 
changes. 

The Rutgus Targum, a new exchange, discusses 
college matters in a common-sense way. 

The Yale Becord lately had tlio following Hudi- 
brastic stanza : 

ONE DAY. 

Wlien fiery Lucifer with mighty senitch 
Upon the mountain's back litis lit his mntuli ; 
Ana when old Zephyr wiih his bellows guy 
Has puffed the biKlding moin lo full-blown day; 
When Sol has driven past the midday goal 
And down the westward eourse begun to roll; 
When creatures of a day have three times drunk, 
And Morpheus has lucked each in his bunk: 
When Madam Night at bashful Vesper's call 
Has thrown about our heads her old black shawl ; 
And when the last deep stroke of twelve is done; 
One day is finished, and one more begun. 



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be promptly attended to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEE, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8s and ^87 Co}igress St., and 235 Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

as- Send for Fkick List. 



14-2 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St.. 



. STOCKMAN. } 



FORTLiAK©, MK. 




fmhm fJolle^© MeSieal !|eparlmeDt 

The Si.xtv-Secoud Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 9th, 1SS2, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshua L. CHAMHEBLiis, LL.D., President ; Israel T. 
Dasa, M.D., Patholngy and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Freperic H. Gebrish, M.D., 
Anatomy; Charles W. Goddaeh, A.M., .MedicalJarisprudence ; Hesry 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chcmistrv ; Bcrt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D , Surgery and Cliiiic:il t^iirgcry ; Charles O. 
Hest, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Hasiel F. Ellts, .M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; Wiluam B. Cushman, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to th» Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Miiine. ^ _ 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY", 

Botanical Microscopes, Fancy Goods. Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry 
promptly repaired and warranted. 

I^in-e Spactacles and. ^J^reg-lasses. 
EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND .MAIN STREETS, BRrNSWICK, ME. 



f>OT\TJ{Mn 



Portland, Me. 

AMOS L MILLETT & CO., 

Jobbers asd Retailkhs of STANUAun 

Imported aiift Eomestic Fauci droceries, 

nVNKER IIir.L I'lCKLES .1 SPKVI.IhTY. 



JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book Work to Order. 

W. B. KNIGHT, 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

«J-Trnnsicnt Orders for Milk or Crciim lillid liy gi\ing suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 



Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS!. STA.XIONERY. ROOAI 
PA-PER, I>Er»IOr>ICA.I..£S, «ScC. 

FiaMs, 'o^^ansT^'and^^Melodeons,, E. SMITH,.. GROCER. 

AT LOW PIIICES. LARGE KENTINd STOCK. Oj. J J. Ol 1, 

r. W. BMWQM, j^'&uj^swt€M, Me. Lowest Prices to btudent llubs. 
F. 1. WILSOH, Dispenser of Pure Drugs, Medicines, and Chemicals. 

i]Mci»oii'ri3i:> .^iwt> oDotMCKSTic c;i<3t-A.aEi.s. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades. Bath Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions a Specialty. 

IMEA.XN STREET, BRUNS-WICK. ME. 

.lOmtNAI. IMIKHS, I.ISIIIIN 8TUKKT, I.KWiaTIlN, MAINK. 



Btwi#la ®f teati 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DECEMBER 21, 1881. 



Vol. XI. 



No. 11. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argancl Library," 

AXl) THE AD.TUSTABLK II.\X(;IX(; 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

IX PLACE OF THE OLD KISD.S. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



HALL L. DAV^IS, 

Books, Statiooerf, and Paper Haogiogs, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

ELLIOT 

Has the Finest and Most Stylish Stock of 
Neckwear ever exhibited in Brunswick. 

Tlis Laissi \\]\\i in \i li Siif E^ls. 

HOSIERY, COLLARS, CUFFS, &c., &c., 
in Great Variety of Styles. 

A FINE ASSORTMKNT 01'" 

FALL AND WINTER OVERCOATS AND SUITS, 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock. 
FRAISTK E. ROBERTS 

rias the Largest iind Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

IIT :BIiTT3.T.~-J"7"IC:i-3:. 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets 




New Cigarette, 

The VETERAN. C/^^^^'^e^, 



•fy:^. 



CilllTIOlI TO SMOKllS, 

Beware of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that' every wrapper has 

^=^^ ' ''^' TRY IT, 

Fine, IVIiid& Sweet. 

Fac simile Signature on It. No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used In our genuine brands. 

KrNNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 
SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THKOUGHOUT THE WOULD. 

FOR YOUR 

NOBBY HAT 

Go or Send to 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 
SIGN or THE GOLD HAT. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards nd Monograms 

ENOEAVED IH THE MOST FASEIONiBLE STYLE, 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



UNDER FALMOUTH HOTEL. 



JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, ETC., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QUALITY, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor Casco, 

PORTLAND, . _ _ _ MAINE. 

A. CARTER. J. W. D. CARTER. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



A reorganization of the Course of Instruction 
has recently been made, in -which the distinction be- 
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main- 
tained, but all academic undergraduates are placed 
on one footing, with the opportunity of following, to 
a considerable extent, such lines of study as they 
prefer. 

All students entering the College proper, are ex- 
amined on the same course of preparatory studies. 
After the second year a liberal range of electives is 
offered, within which a student may follow his choice 
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount 
pursued. 

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated 
as a distinct course, are still, for the most part, re- 
tained either in the required or elective lists. More 
place is also given to the Modern Languages than 
they have hitherto had. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all 
who complete the Academic Course. 

The Engineering Department remains as here- 
tofore, and facilities are offered for study of the 
various branches of this science. The means of 
theoretical instruction are ample, and the town of 
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen- 
tres in the State, and in the immediate vicinity of 
many important public works, affords excellent 
opportunities for the study of actual structures. 
The College also enjoys many favors from the United 
States Coast Survey Ofiice. The admission is the 
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the 
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will 
be taken, if desired, in the place of Latin. 

Those who complete satisfactorily the four years' 
course in engineering will receive the Degree of Sc. 
B. Those who complete a two years' course of ad- 
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or 
Mechanical Engineer. Students not candidates for 
a degree will be received at any stage for which an 
examination shall show them to be fitted, and may 
remain for any desired time. Further information 
will be furnished on application to Professor G. L. 
Vose. 

Terms of Admission to the Academic Course. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 

following subjects : 

Latin.— Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Gcorgics, and six books of the yEneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 

i^REEK. — Hadloy's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System : Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission 
will be required to produce testimonials of good 
moral character. The time for examination is the 
Friday after Commencement and the Friday before 
the opening of the first term. In exceptional ^cascs 
applicants maybe examined at other times. Candi- 
dates for admission to advanced classes will be ex- 
amined in the studies which such classes have 
accomplished. 

The Facultv are also ready to make arrange- 
ments with the' Principals of schools and academies 
having a regular course preparatory for college of at 
least three years' duration, whereby their pupils 
may be examined for admission to college at their 
respective schools, in connection with their own 
final examinations. 

The amount of instruction now ofl'ered and pos- 
sible to be taken in the several principal lines of 
study is exhibited comparatively, as reduced to one 
scale, in the following manner. This is, however, 
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal 
length : 

Latin, eight terms. 
Greek, eight terms. 
Mathematics, eight terms. 
German, four and a half terms. 
English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English 
I Literature, three and a half terms. 

French, three terms. 
Italian, one term. 
Spanish, one term. 

Rhetoric (formal), one term. Rhetorical and 
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a 
half terms. 
Natural History studies, five and a half terms. 
Physics and Astronomy, four terms. 
Chemistry, four terms. 
History, Ancient and Modern, two terras. 
Political Economy, one and a lialf terms. 
Public Law, two "terms. 
Mental and Moral Philosophy, including Logic, 

four terms. 
Christian Evidences, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $H to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lesson the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 




Ma 




BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DECEMBER 21, 1881. 



Vol XI. 



No. 11. 



BO WD O IN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE CLASS OF '82, OP 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Arthur G. Staples, Mauaging Editor. 

Charles H. Gilman, Business Editcir. 

ilELViN S. Holway, Eugene T. McCarthy, 

William A. Moody, "Warren 0. Plimpton, 

George G. Weeks. 

Terms — S2.00 a year in advance 5 single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Easiness Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Bntered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XT., No. II.— Dec. 21, 1881. 

Editorial Notes 127 

Literary: 

Reflection (poem) 1-29 

Reveries 129 

When Greek Meets Greek 130 

A Type of College Life ] 31 

Communications 132 

College Items 135 

Personal 136 

Clippings 1 37 

Editors' Table 1 37 



EDITORIAL KOTES. 



Before another number of the Orient 
shall greet our readers, they will have eaten 
tlieir Christmas goose and made their New- 
Year's resolves. We hail with pleasant emo- 
tions a two weeks' respite from our troubles, 
and hope to return fully recuperated and with 
renewed courage to finish our arduous edito- 
rial duties. We review with pleasure the 
events of the term, and only regret that the 
hazing trouble should have arisen to mar the 
progress of a term, in other respects perfectly 
satisfactory. We would suggest to our 
Junior aspirants for Orient honors, to 



resolve with the new j^ear to make better 
known their aspirations through communica- 
tions and contributions, and to our subscrib- 
ers in general, that a resolve to pay subscrip- 
tions will be in order. 

With visions of a pleasant vacation we 
wish you all a " Merry Christmas " and " Happy 
New Year." 



The effort of the publishers of the Car- 
mina CoUegensia to produce a new college 
song book, ought to be heartily supported by 
every college man. Tiie old songs have been 
literally sung to death, and it is lu'gh time for. 
new ones with which we can show tiie beau- 
ties of our voices and charm our lady friends. 
The prizes offered for the be.st song, and also 
for the best words, may serve as incentives to 
spur many on to the work. Bovi^doin should 
not be behind in this matter. That we have 
good musicians in our college no one will 
deny. Let them concentrate their energies 
and produce something which the college may 
well be proud of. The poetic element in col- 
lege seems to be soundly sleeping, and only 
to awake when there is a prospect for class 
honor in this line ; but we imagine that the 
thoughts of a four dollar bill will sufficiently 
arouse it to produce the necessary article. 



We notice that the authorities of Colby 
University have recently made a special 
arrangement by which students, who are 
obliged to be out teaching, can make up their 
back work. Although we don't know just 
what the arrangment is, yet we cannot help 
thinking that it is a step in the right direc- 
tion. There is much need of such an arrange- 
ment here at Bowdoin. Many of our num- 



128 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ber are obliged to be out during the winter, 
and, under the present system of making up, 
lose nearly all tlie benefit to be derived from 
the studies pursued during their absence. 
As it stands now, the back work is, in the 
majority of cases, simplj' " crammed " and 
put out of the way with the least [jossible 
trouble, and consequently with the least pos- 
sible good resulting from it. It would seem 
that the college work is considered of little 
importance when a man can be out three 
months, and in the next three months, 
at tlie very most, can easily make up his 
back work and keep along with his class. 
Would it not be a good idea for our author- 
ities to investigate this question, and see if 
some improvement cannot be made in this 
direction ? 



We are pleased to report that there is a 
movement on foot to establish a permanent 
library fund of about -$20,000, the income of 
which is to be used for the purpose of increas- 
ing the number of books in our librar}*. 
Subscriptions to some amount have already 
been received and it only remains for the 
friends of the college to swell the subscrip- 
tion list to the I'cquired amount. Although 
wo have a very large number of valuable 
books in our library, yet we have compara- 
tively few recent works. Our almnni and 
friends should remember that a good libi'ary 
is a very necessary part of our college, and 
that it is as essential to keep this in good run- 
ning order as the various professorships, etc. 
We trust that this project will receive the 
attention of our alumni, and that we ma}' 
soon have the jJeasnre of seeing our library 
made equal to the best. 



Suggestions have frequently^ been nuide 
about the cai'e of the reading room. But the 
critical student should not lose sight of tlie 
fact that there is some responsibility resting 
upon him, as well as on the one who has 



charge of it. We i-efer to the disorderly wa}" 
in which the papers are dropped here and 
there, after being read, instead of being hung 
in their proper places. The janitor of the 
reading room cannot be entirely responsible 
for the confusion of the room, as it is not his 
duty to be present all the time just to keep 
the room in order. We do not wish to com- 
plain, but would kindl_y suggest to those who 
read the papers that it would add ver}' much 
to the appearance of the room if they would 
take the slight pains to hang the papers up 
after thej' have finished reading. And not 
only this, but it would obviate the incoil- 
venience often experienced in having to hunt 
around on the settees, desk, or floor, for a 
paper which has been carelessly dropped. A 
little care would not only prevent the papers 
from being unnecessarily torn and soiled, but 
would add much to the orderly api)earance 
of the room. 



It is to be regretted that the editors of the 
Bugle are unable to produce their publication 
before the first of next term. We have 
learned to look for the Bugle at the end of 
the fall term, and when it fails to appear at 
that time there seems to be a loss of interest 
in it and of support given to the editors. 

When we take into consideration the fact 
that the editors were appointed about two 
weeks later this term than usual, and tlie 
constantly increasing difficulty in the produc- 
tion of a Bugle fully up to the requirements 
of the term, we cannot wonder that they are 
a little behindhand with their work. Of 
cour.se the editors could have rushed ahead 
willi their work and produced a Bugle this 
term, but the I'atc of their publication would 
have been uncertain. We are all ready to 
condemn a poor publication of any kind, and 
ceitaiidy if with a longer lease of time the 
present editors are enabled to produce a 
Bugle of superior merit, we certainly ought 
not to couqilain. Wc trust that every man 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



129 



in college will support the present editors in 
their work, and that in after time, reminded 
of the unchai'itableness of their college 
friends by empty purses, they maj'' not curse, 
as many of their predecessors have, the day 
on which thej'' took upon their shoulders the 
arduous and thankless duties of editors of 
the Bowdoin Bugle. 


REFLECTION. 

Often times are we reminded 
That this life is passing by, 

And as New- Year's day approaches 
We reflecting breathe a sigh. 

Breathe a sigh yet all unconscious, 
For the heart its secrets keep, 

Still the sigh's an index fiiiger 
Pointing to emotions deep. 

Such perchance may be repentant 


We feel like shaking hands with Yale 
and congratulating her on her remarkable 
success in the athletic arena during the sea- 
son. In boating, base-ball, and foot-ball she 
stands at the head, and has every reason to 
be proud of her victories since they have all 
been gained by hard work and diligent train- 
ing. Slie has found opponents of no mean 
calibre in the other colleges, but has steadily 
held her own, and now stands forth crowned 
with the laurels of success in every depart- 
ment. 


For some careless word or deed, 
For some golden moment wasted 
E're we thought its worth to heed. 

Lite indeed is far too scanty 
To permit us time to waste, 

For the good we do is little 

How'er much we would make haste. 

Hence review the year that's passing. 
See in what your fault's abound. 

And resolve that in tlie New Year 
Such mistakes shall not be found. 

Let reliection be a beacon 

That shall point where dangers be. 
So that you may thus escape them 

As the mariner at sea. 






Among the various needs of Bowdoin is 
that of a chemical lecture room in connection 
with the laboratory. The laboratory is at 
present arranged in a very convenient way 
for practical work in chemistry. It is, how- 
ever, too small to be convenient, both for a 
lecture room and laboratory. It is too much 
crowded to meet the requirements of a suit- 
able room. In this particular it is not con- 
venient for the students, besides the profes- 
sor is cramj)ed for room to properly manipu- 
late the apparatus in the performance of ex- 
periments to illustrate his lectures. It is al- 
most impossible to prevent jostling some of 
the apparatus in going in or out of the room. 

The only way to remedy these inconven- 
iences would be to either build on an addition 
to the laboratory, or a new building in con- 
nection with it. We would invite the atten- 
tion of those interested in the college to this 
matter, hoping that a generous spirit may 
open their hearts and pocket-books to supply 
this need. 


REVERIES. 

I don't know how it is, I am sure, but 
somehow or other the hour just before bed- 
time is most litly given up to meditations and 
reveries. The cares of the day have fallen 
from you like a garment laid aside to be re- 
sumed on the morrow, and the mind is all 
ready to travel whither you will. If of "gen- 
erous creed," "brave Sir Walter's dream-com- 
pelling weed" is now a fit companion. The 
glowing coals are just beginning to ash over, 
the bright light of the lamp barely drowns the 
moonbeams on the floor, but leaves their white 
ghosts in triangles and parallelograms of light. 
If you dwell, as the writer, on- the fourth 
story, the situation too is favorable. You are 
"next to the stars," as Geo. McDonald so pleas- 
antly puts it, and all the noise and bustle is 
below you, and you feel it well that you are 
above it. 

The associations are good, also. On the 
next floor Longfellow roomed and Hawthorne's 



130 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



name is cut deep on the granite window sill. 
We have often wondered if it was the real 
Hawtliorne or some one who came after him. 
At any rate he had a right to be proud of 
the name and to leave it carved in granite, as 
Hawthorne himself did on that more enduring 
granite, the hearts of men. How many boys 
doubtless have looked upon that carving there 
and been aroused to better effort and greater 
ambition, and how many will look upon it and 
be made stronger, though the world may never 
know it by such euduring monuments as the 
bearer of the name himself left. 

We often think of Hawthorne's college 
days, of his not attending to his studies quite 
as well as he ought perhaps, but never neg- 
lecting those studies which made his name 
immortal, — Nature and his own thoughts. 
Doubtless he-looked out of these very win- 
dows and watched the moon rise over the 
pines, shining through the green chinks in 
their branches, but at last heaving herself up 
into the clear blue and throwing her light 
down the avenues of trunks in the near woods. 
These, too, were the times of open fires and fire- 
places. How the wood crackled and snapped, 
throwing coals out into the room to attract 
him from his books and prevent him from 
studying by its very cheerfulness ! 

How associations such as these make ns 
love a place ! Tlie very rooms we live in for 
three or four years become homes. We have 
sufficient company in the names written with 
diamonds on the glass and cut on the sills. 
We come to know them and have favorites 
among them, and can almost guess at their 
thoughts. Out of the embers of the fire 
comes a face which we associate with a name 
cut on the window pane ; and it tells us of 
the uselessness of iuiman endeavor and effort, 
of ungratified ambitions and noble thoughts 
unrealized. Quickly is it crowded from its 
place by anotlier, and we learn that as we 
grow older does life become liappier, and tliat 
our rosiest dreams can be surjjassed. Otliers 



flock by and in turn yield their places till the 
space is occupied by smiling faces and beck- 
oning hands, when, — heigh-ho! what is this? 
The fire has gone out with an expiring flicker, 
and we are watching the dead coals. The 
pipe is only half smoked by our side, and its 
dreamy fragrance just lingers in the room. 
Our tlioughts have carried us a little farther 
than we meant. Yes, it is quite midniglit, for 
the town clock is striking. We will seize the 
poker with a vain hope and stir the coals, wish 
you good-night, and as pleasant reveries and 
dreams. 



WHEN GREEK MEETS GREEK. 

We three were seated around a table. 
Phil on one side with his back to the fire and 
Dan on the other. I was at one end. The 
student lamp was my vis-a-vis. Its jaundiced 
rays gave a yellow hue to our countenances. 
The room was filled with the fumes of our 
cigars. We were playing cards, or rather it 
was sometliing more than play. It was a 
man's game. We were playing poker. Poker 
has been called the great American game. It 
has no affinities with those friendly card games 
in wliich tlie two opposites are partners. In 
it can be exhibited more phases of character 
than in any or all other well-known games. 
For success in it is required a proper balance 
of opposite qualities. Boldness and discre- 
tion are equally necessary. In playing it a 
man lays open his mind. A careful observer 
of a game can read the players' idiosyncrasies 
better than any phrenologist. Its indpend- 
ence suits Americans. " Each man for himself 
is our idea of liberty. Tliere is an element 
of chance about it, but who does not like 
good fortune. If fortune is against one, he 
attempts to beat bad luck. This, if success- 
ful, is more agreeable than good luck itself. 
Poker, however, cannot be considered a pro- 
ductive industry. Neither does it promote 
industry. There is none the less interest in 
it for that however. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



131 



Phil was the champion of the coterie of 
players which met in the north section of the 
college. Dan had " cleaned out " every one 
in the southern part. The friends of each 
had long wished to bring them together, and 
it was understood that on this night was to 
be a great trial of strength. I played because 
willing to bear ray losses for the sake of wit- 
nessing the contest. The cards went round 
and the piles of chips in front of us changed 
their dimensions. Dan looked sober, not like 
one sad, but like one in deep thought. He 
smoked his cigar moodily, and as he paused 
twirled his moustache. Phil was gay or at least 
apparently unconcerned; he puffed his cigarette 
jauntily, made light remarks, and accepted 
good or bad fortune with good grace. As yet 
there had been no decisive results. The hands 
were small and the play monotonous. It was 
the calm before a storm. The all-important 
hand had come. Dan, after a serious scanning 
of his cards, discarded one. Phil tossed aside 
one of his cards and took another to fill its 
place. I had nothing of value and did not 
come in. As Dan received a fifth card into 
his hand he appeared to start a little and then 
to look more excited than before. He twirled 
his moustache faster and tried to look uncon- 
cerned. Phil carelessly looked over his hand 
and made his bet. Dan saw him and did not 
hesitate to raise him largely. Phil noncha- 
lantly covered it and pushed forward all the 
pile of chips he had beside him. Dan ex- 
hausted his supply of ready money in seeing 
it and raising it a good amount. Phil was 
out of money but borrowed all of mine. The 
cash all staked and neither being willing to 
stop, they added to the pile their watches. 
Books, clothing, furniture, etc., followed, 
neither being willing to yield. Dan was so 
excited that he could hardly keep his seat. 
Phil's manner had entirely changed and lie 
seemed older, and hard lines not before ap- 
parent appeared in his face. Since neither 
would call the other they had a truce and 



talked it over. At last Dan, in his frenzy, 
said, "I will agree to leave college if my 
hand won't beat yours." " And I will agree 
to do the same if beaten," said Phil. They 
laid open their hands on the table. They 
were both flushes. Both were on inspection 
royal flushes. Ace, king, queen, jack, and 
ten spot were in the hands of each. The 
hands were equal and it was a draw. The 
excitement over they shook hands with tears 
in their eyes. I was as nerved up as they. 
We did not go on with the game. 

You may say that the probability of 
chances is very much against such an occur- 
rence.- To subject chance to laws is like 
chaining the wind, but if ever you chance to 
have a great apparent advantage do not push 
it too far for fear that Fortune may balk you. 



A TYPE OF COLLEGE LIFE. 

In college, more th^n in almost any other 
place are admirable opportunities for the 
study of character. College life may be called 
a microcosm, a little world resembling greatly 
the world outside for which it tries to fit us. 
In this little world there are a multitude of 
experiences, and one way or another, one's 
character is pretty sure to be accurately read 
by his associates. In the long, tedious, disa- 
greeable weeks of a large part of Freshman 
year there are chances for displaying endur- 
ance, persistency, and reconciling one's self to a 
certain sense of inferiority. In the more ac- 
tive scenes of Sophomore life, there are still 
greater opportunities for studying the charac- 
tei- of one who may have been kept by timid- 
ity from displaj'ing himself in his true light 
before. It is invariably the case that some 
who have previously kept themselves in the 
background come to the front as the loudest- 
mouthed aggressors of the unfortunate Fresh- 
men. In the Junior and Senior years, with 
the greater freedom which they bring, are 
still more valuable occasions for showing what 



132 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



one trulj' is. Often, many who, owing to a 
poor fit or a disinclination for the earlier stud- 
ies of the coai'se have been lauglied at as 
dunces, exert themselves and far surpass more 
brilliant Imt less profound fellow-students. 
Also in life outside the class-room a decided 
character begins to be shown. Some who 
have sat quietly in the corner and listened to 
the conversation of upperclassmen desire to 
emulate those who liave been leaders in col- 
lege affairs, and set themselves up as oracles 
are constant in their attendance at the places 
where students congregate, and are always 
full of advice for underclassmen. Others, 
but it is useless to go on enumerating differ- 
ent varieties, for they are as numerous as the 
students themselves. 

There is one type of character, however, 
which can always be easily distinguished, — 
always is prominent and claims a good share 
of attention. This is the self-important man. 
He never is at a loss what to do, for if he does 
it, it must be right. He comprehends that he 
is one of the most remarkable men in college, 
and that the college would have hard work to 
get along without iiim. He wants his impor- 
tance to be recognized and genei-ally thinks it 
is. Wiienever he joins a group of students 
he comes up to tliem " witii a Hourish of 
trumpets," as processions used to enter in old 
plays, and inunediately makes himself the 
center of it. He influences or changes the 
conversation ; always likes to have something 
important to communicate, and enjoys telling 
it deliberately in order that liis iiearer may 
duly esteem its importance, and the impor- 
tance of the bearer of it. He always likes to 
leave at sticii a time that the coinpany may 
miss him, and nniy liave reiison to talk al)out 
him when he is gone, for he ilocs not. doubt 
but that their verdict will ho cumiiiimcntary 
to sucii a |)(Mson as hinisi^H'. Ili' never is 
nioie in liis element than when a n)ecting of 
some one of the college associations iias been 
called to act upon matters needing tiic decis- 



ion of the college. Then he is proud to give 
the meeting the sanction arising from his 
presence, and to let his voice be heard au- 
thoritatively for or against tlie sciieme. On 
none do the varying circumstances of college 
life have so little influence as on him. He is 
himself, and knows what he is about. Fresh- 
man or Senior, he always thinks himself 
worth} to take the lead, and is ready to do it. 
The force of circumstances cannot overcome 
him. In the society of his fellows, under the 
inquisition of the severest professor, he is 
equally at home. Addressing a crowded 
audience in words of original or selected elo- 
quence, or mingling in gilded parlors with daz- 
zling throngs of beaut}^ and wit, calm, self- 
possessed he pursues the even tenor of his 
way, conscious that he is making a sensation, 
and perfectly satisfied with the world and 
himself. Spec. 



COMMUNICATIONS. 



Editors of Orient : 

It would seem from the experience of 
preceding years tliat one term is not long 
enough in which to prepare and cause to be 
printed oin- annual publication, the Biigle. 
This year, contrary to all expectation, promises 
to be no exception to the rule. Only one 
board of editors, in a period of five years. 
have succeeded in producing their publication 
at the proper time, namely, at the close of the 
fall term. We believe that tliis is not due to 
the lack of work on the part of the editors or 
their assistants, the printers and artists, but 
can only be attributed lo the fad that the 
time between the elei'tidU df llic editors and 
the begiiniing of the Chiislinas Holidays is 
too sluirl for (he produciion of a, publication 
(if such a dcn'ii'c of oxri'llcnce as llic college 
demands. 

The only way to oliviatc (his dillimlty, 
then, is for the several societies to elect tlicir 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



183 



repiesentative on the Bugle board at an earlier 
date than has been customar)' in the past. 
Why miglit not this election take place some 
time in the summer? Could the matter be 
arranged in this way, there would be ample 
time for the editors to do their work withont 
slighting their other college duties. 

Muzzle. 



EtVilors of Orient : 

That all the students may know wliat 
many do already about the new " American 
College Song Book," I, on the part of the 
committee, will explain. 

The publisher of the Carniina OollegeiiHia 
proposes to edit a book of entirely new col- 
lege songs. For this purpose he has selected 
fifty leading American colleges to be repre- 
sented in the work. Each college is to have 
four pages in the book, or more, if that col- 
lege wishes, at the rate of $10 a page. 
The novelty of the enterprise is in the fact 
that all four poems and two of the four 
pieces of music must be composed by under- 
graduates. The college, tiu'ough its com- 
mittee, is to select the two remaining tunes. 

The only condition we are under in con- 
tributing our songs, is that we promise to 
take forty copies of the book at $1.30 apiece, 
payable on receipt of the same. ( omparing 
the merits of the proposed volume with those 
of the Carmina at fiS, I think there will be a 
large number taken. 

It is proposed to have a chapel concert 
early next term in which a public trial will 
be given for a few of the best songs handed 
ill to the committee. B}^ this means, and by 
the decision of competent judges from among 
the students and others, the four chosen 
pieces will fairly represent the college. A 
shght stimulus to the exertions of our poets 
and musicians will be a prize of 14 for the 
best poem, and one of i6 for the best music. 
All compositions are to be handed in by the 
first of next term, to give time to the quar- 



tettes to practice them. Immediately after 
the concert the chosen songs will be forwarded 
to the publisher, so as to be ready for the 
press by the first of February. 

The work is entitled to the best help we 
can give it, as promoting among us a deejier 
interest in good college music as well as the 
desire that our college retain her place among 
otiier colleges in the department of music. 
Though our isolation may, in part, injure our 
athletics, we should see to it that we do not 
let it stagnate our ambitions in other respects. 

S. 



! Ediotrs of Orient : 

The curriculum of our college, within 
the last few years, has undergone revisions 
which certainly call for commendations for 
those who instituted them. The liberal 
views which the Board and Faculty are com- 
ing to take in respect to option allowed the 
student, have met with favor on every hand. 
And that the conservative ideas of our by- 
gone educators are fast passing away is a 
matter of congratulation for those who have 
an interest in our institution, and desire her 
to stand in a favorable light when compared 
Avith others. 

Believing Bowdoin to be classed among 
those whose course of study will have a 
broad and generous range, with sufficient 
freedom to meet the wants of the most aspir- 
ing student, we beg to suggest a particular in 
which an indisputably progressive step can 
be taken. 

It is unnecessary to dwell upon the im- 
portance of a thorough knowledge of the 
modern languages at the present day. It is 
a well-known fact that they are now consid- 
ered essential to the popular education. And 
that the student may become proficient in 
this branch, our leading institutions are 
making, or have already made, adequate pro- 
visions. In our own college we believe in 
this particular, our curriculum is deficient. 



134 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



and more especially in regard to the instruc- 
tion in the French language. According to 
the present apportionment one yearisallowed 
for obtaining that knowlege of French which 
is deemed sufficient for practical purposes in 
after life. Such a view we believe to be al- 
together too constrained, and by looking at 
other institutions of learning it will be seen 
that far greater importance is attached to the 
language, and consequently more time given 
to the study of it. 

In a hurried course of a year, by gaining 
some of the fundamental principles and most 
important idioms at the completion of the 
instruction the easiest text may be translated 
at sight, while some of the more difficult au- 
thors may be mastered after some hard think- 
ing and unpardonable guess work. From 
this state of affairs we hold that one year is, 
without doubt, too short a time in which to 
become so intimately acquainted with the 
language as to derive those satisfactory bene- 
fits which ought to be experienced before 
graduation. The preliminary and elementary' 
work which is essential to a profitable pursuit 
of the study must necessarily be hastily gone 
through with so that a vague, uncertain, and 
incomplete idea of the first and sine qua non 
principles must accompany the whole work. 
We believe that should more time be allowed 
for mastering the elementary work, a far 
more varied and extended course in transla- 
tion could be carried out. As it is, on a 
year's course, too much time must be given 
to the formation and syntactic relations of the 
language, so that long and continued trans- 
lations, through wiiich alone one can become 
an easy and ready reader, are to any extent 
out of the question. 

Another phase of this discussion to which 
attention must he drawn, is in regard to the 
speaking of the language. No little consid- 
eration of this important part of a French 
education is giv(Mi in other colleges. In fact, 
in some, instruction in this particular is not 



completed until a proficiency in conversa- 
tional French is attained. This acquirement 
is considered as certainly equal to all others, 
if not paramount in importance. To be un- 
able to understand even the most common 
by-words and phrases, must show a very low 
estimate of the studj' and is destined to be a 
disreputable acknowledgment for a college 
graduate. 

As to the usefulness of a ready knowledge 
of the French for conversation, there is hardly 
room for question, for the introduction of 
quotations, by-words, and phi ases from this lan- 
guage into the English is becoming more and 
more prevalent. As for one traveling abroad, 
the wantof a knowledge of conventional words 
and idioms must be severel}' felt, if not reck- 
oned almost as a misfortune. The method 
of obtaining such a command of the language 
would require daily recitations, to be con- 
ducted entirely in French, and therefore calls 
for greater opportunities for pursuing the 
study than are now offered us. 

Instruction in reading and conversation, 
therefore, cannot; be carried to an}^ success- 
ful end with only the j'ear which our curricu- 
lum allows, and there is therefore shown to 
be an unmistakable discrepancy in the appor- 
tionment of time in respect to this work. 
To meet this discrepancy it is necessary to 
devote another year to French,* which does 
not appear at all to be an unreasonable 
change. It is only necessary to add another 
optional to those now offered in the Junior 
year. Two years are allowed for German, to 
those wlio desire it, and tliere seems to be no 
reason why the same freedom should not be 
granted in respect to French. To many the 
latter study is the more preferable of the 
two, and the continuation of the stwdy of it 
during the Junior year as an optional, would 
obviate what now must be looked updn as a 
deficiency, while engaging in it under the 
above conditions with freedom offered in its 
selection would have a salutary effect in re- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



135 



moving that spirit of disinterestedness which 
sometimes arises from compulsion. N. G. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



Home on Friday. 

'84 gets but eighteen men into chapel. 

The term opens Tuesday, January 10th. 

Prof. Campbell has his study in South Appleton. 

Prof. Carmichael has been appointed State Assayer. 

Prof. Campbell preached at Gardiner on the 27th 
ult. 

Free lunch is strictly prohibited in the Geology 
class. 

Jewett returns from Chicago to take part in the 
exhibition. 

Goodwin, '82, has left college for a time on ac- 
count of sickness. 

The Seniors have written examinations in Chem- 
istry and Geology. 

The dancing school closed Tuesday, the 6th, after 
a very pleasant term. 

Mr. K , in explaining a musical passage, says 

" That C is high. See?" 

A student speaks of ancient statutes found buried 
in the deposits of the Nile. 

Those who attended the Hutchinson Concert were 
entertained by very fine singing. 

The Sophomores will use Bowser's Analytical 
Geometry as a text-book next term. 

Dike has moved the Herald office to the rooms, 
formerly occupied by Robert Robertson. 

Rev. F. E. Clark, of Portland, preached at the 
Congregational church Sunday before last. 

The drill equipments have been called in as the 
cadets are to have no more exercises until spring. 

Cutler, '81, returns at the first of the term, to 
assume his duties in Prof. Chapman's department. 

About twenty students attended, by invitation, the 
sociable at Mr. Smith's school, on Saturday evenino- 
last. 

The students will have a dance after the exhibi- 
tion on the evening of the 22d. Music furnished by 
Perkins' Orchestra. 

The Sophomores are having, in connection with 
Greek, essays by members of the class on subjects 
taken from the Greek Antiquities. 



In spite of the stormy weather of Wednesday last, 
the student's Qerman, at Dirigo Hall on that evening, 
was a decided success. 

A Professor says that the word right, by deriva- 
tion means set up, therefore the students conclude 
that after class supper they will be all right. 

The Seniors are evidently overtaxing their minds. 
One of them has been discoursing on Tribolites; 
another places seals among the Amplubeans. 

The Juniors are to be examined on the first book 
in Physics. The examination on the remainder of 
their work will come at the end of next term. 

Some complaint is made that the 7 a.m. bell is 
occasionally either late or omitted. Not being used 
to unseasonable hours we cannot speak from expe- 
rience. 

A bulletin posted the 12th, announced that on 
account of absence of members, meetings of the 
band would be discontinued for the remainder of the 
term. 

In connection with their laboratory work, next term 
the Juniors are to use Thorpe's Manual of Chemistry, 
a work in two volumes, on the metals and on the 
non-metals. 

At an entertainment inLemont Hall, given by the 
Universalist Society, on Thursday last, a quartette of 
students contributed to the program by selections of 
familiar college music. 

The Geology class recently gained an adjourn by 
means of the " five minute rule," but found that their 
interpretation of this regulation differed somewhat 
from that of the Faculty. 

Last Wednesday the Sophomores had an exercise 
to Prof. Chapman in reading selections without pre- 
vious preparation, instead of the practice in vocali- 
zation with which they have been occupied on the 
two preceding Wednesdays. 

A pleasant gathering was held at Prof. Carmich- 
ael's on Wednesday evening, the 7th, consisting of 
the Hutchinson family, several members of the Fac- 
ulty, and our chapel choir. Selections of music were 
given by the Hutchinsons and the students, so that 
the evening passed very informally and enjoyably to 
all. 

Senior electives for next term are announced as 
English Literature, German, Mineralogy, and Chem- 
istry. The last two are practically considered as one 
elective, as it is the intention that Chemistry shall be 
taken up during the winter, and Mineralogy during 
the spring term, unless some desire to continue one 
only of these two studies for both terms. 



136 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A boating meeting was called on the 19th, to con- 
sider a comniunication received from the secretary of 
the Lake George Rowing Association. The letter 
desired to know if this college would send a delegate 
to New York to meet those from other colleges in 
order to arrange for an inter-collegiate race during 
the coming season. The meeting voted to send W. 
G. Keed, '82, as a delegate, and to enter a crew if 
possible to make suitable arrangements. 

A subscription has been started to obtain a perma- 
nent library fund, the income of which is to be ap- 
plied to the purchase of such works as will keep the 
library up with the times. At present there is no 
definite fnnd fur this purpose, the support given to 
the library being an annual appropriation out of the 
general college treasury. The effort now undertaken 
is to obtain a fund of i§20,000. It is understood that 
$4000 of this sum has been already pledged but will 
not be available until the whole amoixnt proposed is 
subscribed. 

Five inteileetUiil youths were tliey 
AVlioin rarapaiU appetites led awiiy 
From galling study ftntl haunting care 
To quiet scenes ol' the " Congo " fair. 

Too late for supper they stalk around 

With measured gait and looks profound. 

But duty calls them one by one, 

While each wouders much where the other has gone. 



Led on by some mysterious call 

They meet 'ueath the depot's sheltering wall. 

Cotl'ce they order and beans and 

Their drooping spirits to strengthen and cheer. 

One " got left" at chapel next day, 
Another felt "just a little out of the way," 
The others took deads. — The moral is clear: 
Look not on the coffee the beans or the . 

The program of the Senior and Junior Exhibi- 
tion Thursday evening is as follows: 
Salutatory in Latin. 

M. S. Hohvay, Augusta, Me. 
James A. Garfield. 

Howard Carpenter, Houlton, Mo. 

* Selection from the French of Victor Hugo. 

\Y. A. Perkins, Salem, N. H. 
The Land Act of 188L 

A. G. Staples, Bath, Me. 
Government and Civilization. 

G. F. Bates, Yarmuulh, Me. 
Woman and the Ballot. 

W. G. Iteed, Waldoboro, Me. 
♦Speech of Calgacus— Translation from Tacitus. 

('. U. .Stetson, East Sumner, Me. 
Charles the First. 

10. T. McCarthy, I'eabody, Mass. 
♦Selection from the l''iench of Mirabeau. 

A. 10. Austin, Jteadlield, Me. 
Jiihn Hampden and the Ship-money. 

G.iL Pierce, rnrllnnd, Me. 

♦ lOnglfsh Version of Speech of Ciosar. 

G. B. Swan, Waldoboro, Mu. 
Federal Supremacy. 

K. K. .Jewott, Chicago, III. 
♦Juniors. 



Eleotives in '84 for next term have been chosen as 
follows: Greek and Mathematics, C. C. Torrey; 
Latin and Mathematics, Cothren, Phinney, J. Torrey, 
Walker; Greek and Latin, Adams, Bradley, Brown, 
Cobb, Fogg, Hilton, Means, Pierce, Thompson, 
Waterman, Wright. 

The college has recently received a gift of the 
Cleaveland Herbarium. The herbarium contains 
2f)00 specimens, many of which are not in the regular 
college collection. There are some foreign species, 
also many from Texas, New Mexico, and other local- 
ities of the south and west. It is arranged with 
great care, and is remarkable for the neatness of the 
mountings. The gift came from Mrs. Peleg W. 
Chandler as distinct from the many favors the col- 
lege has received from her husband, and was almost 
the last act before her death. Mr. Ch;indler has since 
drawn up a written presentation so that the bequest 
to the college may be in strict legal form. Previous 
to her decease Mrs. Chandler retained the herbarium 
at her home in Brunswick, as a chei ished memento 
of her father, Parker Cleaveland. It was one of his 
last works, and though practically complete was re- 
ceiving at the time of his death continued attention 
and labor. The collection is placed for the present 
in the south corner of the Cleaveland Cabinet. It 
will be of value to the college both as of scieutific 
importance and as a relic from the hands of the dis- 
tinnuished Professor whose name it bears. 



PERSONAL. 



'25. — Rev. David Shepley, D.I)., died at Provi- 
dence, 11. I., Dec. 1st, 1881. He was pastor of the 
Congregational Church at Yarmouth lor twenty 
years. He afterwards preached at Vass;ilboro for 
some years. The last year of his life he lived in 
Providence, R. I. He was an Overseer and then 
Trustee of the college. 

'27. — Hon. Alpheus Kelch, a former Democratic 
Governor of Michigan, and U. S. Senator from 1847 
to 1853, is 75 years old and still actively engaged in 
the practice of his profession at Ann .A.rbnr, in that 
State. He is a native of Limerick. 

'54.— John W. Siraonds is principal of the Burr 
and Burton Seminary, in Manchester, Vt.. but has his 
home in Franklin, N. II. 

'55. — John Wingate, a lawyer in Si. Louis, Mo., 
died in November, 1881. 

'57. — Andrew Goodwin died at Chicago, in 1874. 

'GO. — Hon. Thomas B. lleed is spoken of as prob- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



137 



able Chairman of the Committee on Appropriations 
in the House of Representatives. 

'60. — A. L. Allen, clerk of courts in Yorli County, 
was in town a few days since. 

'62.— Charles Widgery Milliken, M.D., was in the 
practice of medicine at Shwellsbery, Wis., for some 
years. He was seized with a disease of the brain 
and died in 1880. 

'62. — Major Melville A. Cochran, major of the 
12th U. S. Infantry, is stationed at Whipple Barracks, 
Prescott, Arizona Territoi'y. 

'61. — Henry Tucker F. Merrill, a lawyer, died re- 
cently in Washington, D. C. Date of death not 
ascertained. 

'61. — Rev. Webster Woodbury, who was pastor of 
the Congregational Church at Skowhegan, and after- 
wards went to Gardiner to supply in the absence of 
Rev. Mr. Park, has accepted a call from the church 
at Foxboro, Mass., and has moved to that place. 

'68. — J. S. Derby, of the law firm of Burbank & 
Uei'by, Saco, was in town a few daj's since. 

'72. — Marcellus Coggan, a councilor at law, 13 
Maple Street, Maiden, Mass.. and 27 Treniont Row, 
Boston, of the law firm of Child, Powers & Co., has 
been chosen on the .School Committee of Maiden for 
the current year. 

'76. — Arlo Bates is editor of the Boston Sunday 
Currier. He has lately written a novel entitled 
" Patty's Perversities." Residence, 13 Chestnut St., 
Boston, Mass. 

'77. — E. A. Scribncr, formerly of Topsham, is at 
work, as a chemist, on the Weston Electric Light, in 
Newark, N. J. 

'79. — Seward S. Stearns is studying law with 
Judge Walker, at Bridgton. 

'80. — F. O. Conant was in town Dec. loth and 16th. 

'81. — H. B. llatlmwy is reporter for the Kennebec 
Journal. 

'82. — Mansur is out teaching. 

'84. — Childs is teaching at Bowdoinham. 



CLIPPINGS. 

John Brown's musket has been found in the river 
at Harper's Ferry. It was badly oxidized : union of 
oxygen and carbine. 

A Sophomore astonished his table companions 
yesterday by the startling announcement that the 
quince sauce "tasted like the juice the girls put on 
their hair." The innocent Freshman demanded au- 
thority, but the Senior, who is above such things, 
frowned severely, and the Junior laughed. — Cor- 
nell Sun. 



" Put Dingus on the fire — don't you see it's going 
out ? — said Snipee last Monday. " What are you 
giving us," said Dingus. " I should have said the 
blower, but it's all the same, anyhow, said Snipee, 
dodging a copy of the Chronicle and making for the 
door. — Ada. 

She whispered softly, as they sat locked in a fond 
embrace, gazing at the stars. " I have been told 
that each star in the heavens is a bright, pure, noble 
soul! Is it so, dearest?" "Yes, I have heard so," 
pressing a kiss on her lips. " And do you, darling," 
she continued. " do you — do you think I will become 
a star when I die?" " Oh, pshaw! you're too fat to 
be a star." He protests that he said it without think- 
ing, but she refuses to accept his apology, and the 
engagement is off. She is riding horseback to get 
down to star weight. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 

To decide exactly what an exchange editor should 
consider in giving a judgment on the general char- 
acter of a paper under criticism, is a very difficult 
question, and one on which there would be a great 
variety of opinions. The literary department is cer- 
tainly the easiest to pass judgment upon, and some 
exchange editors seem to take this as the sole founda- 
tion for their criticisms. For many reasons this is 
unfair. In most of the college journals of our active 
colleges, there are college interests that require as 
careful thought as formal essays or other literary 
productions,' and are of much more vital importance. 
Again the editoral work on the paper is not generally 
concentrated on the literary department, but, on the 
contrary, the contributions of ambitious but unprac- 
ticed aspirants for literary honor, almost always 
are intended for this department. The proper way 
to criticise poetry is to copy, with proper acknowl- 
edgment, the good and overlook the mediocre. 
There is such a thing as writing a local column that 
is attractive to outsiders, but this is very rarely done. 
Where such is the case witicisms are abundant, 
perhaps to the exclusion of important but more com- 
mon-place college matters. Some exchange or other, 
we don't remember which one, has complained of the 
dryness of the "Personal" column of the Orient. 
We do not consider this a legitimate subject for crit- 
icism. We are not to blame if our worthy alumni do 
not commit any crimes, give rise' to any scandal, or 
do anything else out of the ordinary course which 
will satisfy a morbid desire for excitement. Edito- 
rials deserve to be read carefully before passing 
judgment. Paper and typography have a mislead- 
ing influence. When both are very fine they seem to 
impart a tone to the articles contained, and it seems 



138 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 



to us incredible that such fine clear letters on thick 
tinted paper can express anything that is not valuable. 

We have received the first number of the Swarth- 
more Phcenix, heralded by a pleasant note asking us 
to exchange. We shall be glad to do it, for we like 
the spirit and pluck of the paper. Phcenix is a re- 
markably appropriate designation for it, as Swarth- 
more College was laid in ashes last September. It 
is at present accommodated in two large boarding 
houses, and the work of rebuilding has been begun. 

We like so well to glance over the exchanges and 
pick out a trifle here and a trifle there, that we shall 
continue it. The Acta says that as the college course 
becomes more and more elective, and Columbia takes 
on more of the character of a university, the marking 
system, in its present form, must lose ground. By 
the bequest of Stephen Whitney Phoenix, of Colum- 
bia, '59, the college has received a valuable collection 
of books, and funds to the amount of $600,000. 

The last Sjxctator has this : 

TO GUSSIE. 
A snowflake on her dimpled face, 

As through the driving storm she trips. 
Alights, and finds a resting place 

Kight welcome, on her ruby lips. 

And meeting there the ])errect bliss. 
That naught on earth can e'er alloy. 

It melts to tears, steals one sweet kiss. 
Then dies— for very joy. 

And, dying on those pretty lips. 
Where even death has lost its pain. 

With failing breath their nectar sips. 
Sighing for life to kiss again. 

The Yale Neivs is lively as ever, but it seems to 
us as if it was turning itself into too much of a 
theatrical advertising sheet. 

The Beacon has a " Holiday Number," with a gay 
cover. It is also the last issue of its present board 
of editors. Its last number is its best. 

The last Record is a very fine number — coiuplete 
in all its departments, except that it .seems to us the 
exchange department is rather meager. Among its 
editorials is a compliment on Prof. Ladd's method of 
conducting lectures. Favorable notices of our old 
Professor are very common in the Yale papers. Tlie 
Record utters a groan over the way in which Seniors 
have been ground this term. It also complains that 
Mr. Freeman's lectures on history are too little at- 
tended by the students. The opportunity to liear 
this eminent man is a rare one and ought to be 
appreciated and improved. The literary part of the 
Record is well worth reading. The brightest tiling is 
"Conversations (from the German)." 

The Coup d'Elat shows the advantages of (compe- 
tition. Its editorials are numerous and very readable. 



The sketch, " The Story of a Name," is better than 
the average of such things. It does not relj' upon 
slang for its interest. 

The Crimson urges that more contributions be 
signed, at least with initials, real or assumed, and 
says that veiy often an article or a poem, in a college 
paper, derives additional interest from the reader's 
acquaintance with the writer, and it is not absolutely 
necessary that this acquaintance be a personal one. 
The Crimson complains that the gallery of Memorial 
Hall is frequented by far Loo many strangers during 
meal time. The installment of "Our First Families" 
has, at its close, the cheering news "To be con- 
cluded." 

The Student denies that the Oxford cap is worn at 
Amherst. Two-thirds of the contributions the Stu- 
dent receives are in the form of poetry. We do not 
believe any otiier paper can say the same. 

The following is of interest to higli-stand men : 

Mr. Justin Winsor, of Harvard, lias been elected 
secretary of the committee appointed to form a 
national council of the Phi Beta Kappa. The com- 
mittee met in New York on the 18th ult., and drafted 
a proposed form of constitution for a national council 
of the society, to consist of twenty members chosen 
at large, and of three delegates from each chanter; 
and it was voted to convene this council at Saratoga, 
in September, 1882. Action was taken looking to 
secure uniformity of condition of membership, of 
laws governing the difi'erentchapters,and to strengthen 
the fraternity as an association of scholars in their 
relations to the education of the country. — Harvard 
Echo 

The Argo contains a picture of President Carter, 
and a glowing account of his administration. The 
Argo is better than ever. "A Thanksgiving Story" 
is a good take oft' on ordinary Thanksgiving stories. 
The following is after the style F. D. S. has made 
so popular : 

HYS M0KTAR-B0.\HD. 

Cap-rice, 18S4. 
Hys mortar-hoard ye halter made 
From dark-hued cloth, of fyiiest grade; 
Tyght lit, his luassyve br'ayn to show. 
And e'en hys fan-like enr.s" below, 
Thatt well hys brawny shoulders shade. 

He rydoth forth on many a rayde, 
He niaslipih many a bloomiiigmayd, 
As he uplyfteth, bowing low. 

His mortar-board. 

It roHseth much ye deacon stayde. 
It makelh ye urehine sore afrayde, 

Wheiiere it passetli, grand and slow. 

It causeth ye Freslimanne secret woe, 
And he voweth that he too will parade 

Hys mortar-board. — Carl. 

The Hamilton Lit. is in mourning for Prof. Mears. 
The essay on "The Rhetoric of the Bible" is too 
ponderous, and nine pages of "Alnnniiana" is far 
too much of a good thing. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



mff H IP ]© Jf ¥. ' 



m w 



Finest and Most Select Stock of 



MENS' FURNISHINGS. 

The Newest and Greatest Variety of Patterns iu 

NECKWEAR, GLOVES, HOSIERY, 

UNDERWEAR, BRACES, ETC. 

E;y° Custom Shirts from Measure, Six for $9.00. 
A Perfect Fit Gu.aranteed. 

Goods for the TROY LAUNDRY sent Tues- 
days and received Saturdays. 

In Percales, Mahrattas, and American Goods. 
Orders by mail promptly attended to. 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 



FRANK M. STETSON, 

JXJST RECEIVED: 

All the New Styles in Soft and Sttfif Hats. 
Best Stiff Hats, $2.75. Best SUk Hats, $3.50 in 
exchange. 

Just opened all the New and Nobby Styles Neck 
Dress, Collars, Cuffs, Fancy Hose, Canes, etc. 
AU are invited to call and examine goods and prices. 

No. 2 Arcade Block. 




MEW DRUG ST0BE. 



ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

DIWQS, MIDICIIES, 

Fauci ani Toilet Articles. CiEars I Toliacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

153" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



BOARDING AND LIVERY STABLE 

Cor. Main and Cleave land Sts., Brunswick. 

All Hack Orders promptly attended to. 




CUSTOM TAILORING 

A S PECI ALTY, 

Fernald 's Tailor Emporium 

237 Middle Street, 
PORTLAND, - - - MAINE. 



T^J.1<T^} O-OOIDS 



AT C. W. ALLEN'S 

DRUG STORE. 

THE FINEST CIGARS AND SMOKING TOBACCOS. 
THE BEST PERFUMERY. 

THE BEST TOILET SOAPS. 

THE BEST HAIR BRUSHES. 

The Largest and Best Assortment of 

Drngs, Patent Medicines, &c., &c. 

To be found in this market. 

Lemont Block, Brnnsivich, Maine. 

— DEALER IX — 

PROVISIONS AND GROCERIES 

^'- Special Kates to Student Clubs. JSir 
CORNER OF MAIN AND ELM STREETS. 



gOLDCLip 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




TOBACCQ&CIGARETTES 

Either Sweet or Plain, are of the Finest 
Qdalities, ALWAYS UNiFOR:\r ANii Keli.vble. 

im TIJI S|AL;SKIN CIGAR 

SEXD $3.7.'5, and we wiil forward 
l)y mail, registered, a 50 bo.\ of the 
Soul-Skin Cifjar. 

This is ;i special nll'cr to enable sniolters to test this 
crUbralr'lhr'uid. .\ lu^r a trial you will emobe DO Other. 

S. F. HESS & CO. 

tremium Tobacco Works, Rochester, N.V« 



ISAAC H. SNOW, 

DEALER IN 

peef, Eork, ^utton, gamb, 6^c. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

Two doors north of Post OfTice. 



'IM lllIV YOUR 

Groceries, Canned Goods, Fruits, 

Confectionery, Tobacco, and Cigars. 

Special Rales In Student Clubs. 

Slain Street, Head of the Mall, Brunswick. 



MAIN STREET, 
DUNLAP BLOCK. 

lalbwill Okiikil Academj 

I'repares for Bowdoin aud the best New Eugland 
Colleges. Ofl'ers, also, a thorough Seminart Course 
to .young ladies, and a shorter course for business 
pui-suits. For Catalogues, address 

Rev. a. W. BURK, Hallowell, Me. 

(iS'slep ani fee §i?eara iiuiroiMUHi, 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

113° Families, Parties, and Clubs siipplled. 



©Wi.£a 



Piirehase your COAL at tlie 

Ooal '52"a,rd. in Topslaa,m, 

WHERE XONK HUT 

Tbe Best of Coal is Kept, 

Ami is Dclivereil well ii|-e|iiii'cil iiiul in Goiul OnliT. 

Office near the Sheds. 






I. S. BALGOMS;, 

DICALEK IN 

Hariware, Stoves, Crociery, and Glassware. 

BRUNSWICK. WIE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. O. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily- 
Papers ; Circiilating Library, 1600 Volumes ; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

a. IE. rro^sTT-iNTSEirxD, 

CHOICE GROCErTeS, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N". B.— Special Elites to Students. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

This house has been tUoroughhj refitted loith evert/ re- 
gard to comfort, and the aim is to make it first-class in all 
its appoinUiients. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

DeTV^ITT HOUSE, 

QUIMBY & MURCH, Proprietors, 

Corner Piue ni Pari Streets, LEWISTON, IE. 

ROYAL QUIJIISY. EBEN MURCH. 



^. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bruns-wick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vie\irs ; also College Vie-ws. 



ALL KINDS OF 



J'l-'-C-u- -^'Huw' 



iJcSa^l 



'C;flv-^PjiS5£-Hj 



For Schools and Colleges, 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BOE.DEE.S, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 




'^:y THE FAVORITE NOS. 303-404-333-170'SSI'- WITH 

'^HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



]|:« (CS* SXWtW*St>My I W. L. wTrsON''& CO., 

DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF IVholesnle and Retiiil Dealers hi 

®@al aat W @ @ €, I TEAS AND FANCY GRqCERIES. 

^ N. B, — Orders bv mail will receive ]>rompt attention. Send for price list. 

OFFICE IN LEMOWT BLOCK, Brunswick. 1 /i n jp 1 /I A c i r j i oj- 

«S-Teleptane connection with Coal yard. ^ ^^. 2tL^ ^^^ ExchangB, CO)'. Federal St.. 

(53° Orders left lit Jordan Snow's, Lemout Block, will wm. a. milbok.'s 
be promptly attended to. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music. Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

5^5 and ^8/ Congress Si., and 2jj Middle St.., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

.OS" Send fob Price List. 



^Q^^^Som (^loUel© Jfeiieal ^eparlment 

The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School o"f Maine, will commence Februauy 9th, lStS2, 
and continue SIXTEEN AA'EEKS. 

FACULTY.— JosncA L. Cfiajiberlaix, LL.D., Presirtent ; Israel T. 
Dasa, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of AV omen and Children-, Fkederic H. Gebrish, M.D,, 
Anatomy; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., Medic4ilJarisprudence ; IIesrt 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; BrRT G. AVilder. M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D , Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles *0. 
Hunt, W. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Daniel *F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; Willlam B, Ccshman, .M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information mar be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to th« Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 







Portland, Me. 

AMOS L MILLETT & CO., 



r'in.e Spectacles an-d. lEyeg-lasses. 
EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book Work to Order. 

W. B. KNICHT, 

Special Bates to Student Clubs. 

j^S*Transient Orders for Milk or Creiiin filled h.v giving suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 



at! 



Faici" Groceries. Curtis' College Bookstore 



nUNKEIl HILL riCKLES A SPIiCLilTY. 



BOOKS. STATIONEFIY. ROOIM 
PAPER. PE:FtIOI3ICAI.S. &C. 



FXRST-Cr.A.SS 

BaMs, Organs, and MeMeoins, E. SMITH,.. GROCER. 

AT LOW IMtri'KS. LARGE RRNTlNd STOCK. ' 

f . W. E^UFQM, Mmw;^&w£€K, Mm, Lowest Prices to Student Clubs. 
f. H. WIISOF, dispenser of Pure Drugs,, Medicines, and Chemicals. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath Towels, Toilot Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions a Specialty. 

IVIAIN SXft.E:E:T. ------ BRXJNB-WTICIt, WLIE.. 

JOUKNAI. PKUS8, LISBON STREET, LKWISTON, MAINE. 




twi#ia Often' 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JANUARY 25, 1882. 



Vol. XI. 



No. 12. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AJJD THE AD.JUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

d; place of the old kinds. 
ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

HALL L. DA^VIS, 

Books, Mooefj, and Paper Hangiogs, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

ELLIOT 

Has the Finest and Most Stylish Stock of 
Neckwear ever exhibited in Brunswick. 

\\\ laiest Mm in Soli li \i 



HOSIERY, COLLARS, CUFFS, &o., &c., 
in Great Variety of Styles. 

A FINE ASSORTMENT OF 

FALL AND WINTER OVERCOATS AND SUITS, 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock. 
FRAISTK E. ROBERTS 

Haa the Largest and Best Assortment of Gentlemen*a 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets 




Bev^are of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 

-■=■^5^ ' '^' TRY IT. 

Fine, Mild& Sweet. 

Fac simile Signature on it. No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KTNNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THEOUGHOUT THE WOKLD. 

FOR YOUR 

NOBBY HAT 

Go or Send to 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 
SIGN OF THE GOLD HAT. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENOEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STILE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOE 



UNDER FALMOUTH HOTEL, 



JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, ETC., 

IN GEEAT VAEIETY, BEST QUALITY, AND LOWEST PEICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor Casco, 

PORTLAND, . - - - MAINE. 
A. CAETEE. J. W. D. CAETEB. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



A reorganization of tlie Course of Instruction 
has recently been made, in which the distinction be- 
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main- 
tained, but all academic undergraduates are placed 
on one footing, with the opportunity of following, to 
a considerable extent, such lines of study as they 
prefer. 

All students entering the College proper, are ex- 
amined on the same course of preparatory studies. 
After the second year a liberal range of electives is 
offered, within which a student may ifollow his choice 
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount 
pursued. 

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated 
as a distinct course, are still, for the most part, re- 
tained either in the required or elective lists. More 
place is also given to the Modern Languages than 
they have hitherto had. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all 
who complete the Academic Course. 

The Engineering Department remains as here- 
tofore, and facilities are offered for study of the 
various branches of this science. The means of 
theoretical instruction are ample, and the town of 
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen- 
tres in the State, and in the immediate vicinity of 
many important public works, affords excellent 
opportunities for the study of actual structures. 
The College also enjoys many favors from the United 
States Coast Survey OflSce. The admission is the 
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the 
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will 
be taken, if desired, in the place of Latin. 

Those who complete satisfactorily the four years' 
course in engineering will receive the Degree of Sc. 
B. Those who complete a two years' course of ad- 
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or 
Mechanical Engineer. Students not candidates for 
a degree will be received at any stage for which an 
examination shall show them to be fitted, and may 
remain for any desired time. Further information 
will be furnished on application to Professor G. L. 
Vose. 

Terms of Admission to the Academic Course. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 

following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Writ- 
ing Latin (3.5 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) -, Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the .<Eneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 

QEEEK. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 

and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 

I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 

Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission 
will be required to produce testimonials of good 
moral character. The time for examination is the 
Friday after Commencement and the Friday before 
the opening of the first term. In exceptional cases 
applicants maybe examined at other times. Candi- 
dates for admission to advanced classes will be ex- 
amined in the studies which such classes have 
accomplished. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrange- 
ments with the Principals of schools and academies 
having a regular course preparatory for college of at 
least three years' duration, whereby their pupils 
may be examined for admission to college at tlieir 
respective schools, in connection with their own 
final examinations. 

The amount of instruction now ofl'ered and pos- 
sible to be taken in the several principal lines of 
study is exhibited comparatively, as reduced to one 
scale, in the following manner. This is, however, 
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal 
length : 

Latin, eight terms. 

Greek, eight terms. 

Mathematics, eight terms. 

German, four and a half terms. 

English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English 
Literature, three and a half terms. 

French, three terms. 

Italian, one term. 

Spanish, one term. 

Rhetoric (formal), one term. Rhetorical and 
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a 
half terms. 

Natural History studies, five and a half terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, four terms. 

Chemistry, four terms. 

History, Ancient and Modern, two terms. 

Political Economy, one and a half terms. 

Public Law, two terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, including Logic, 
four terms. 

Christian Evidences, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
.$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lesson the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 




MD 




Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JANUARY 25, 1882. 



No. 12. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED ETERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE CLASS OF '82, OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Arthur &. Staples, Manafring Editur. 

Charles H. Oilman, Business Editor. 
Melvin S. Holway, Eugene T. McCarthy, 

"William A. Moody, "R^arren 0. Plimpton. 

Terms — S2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Basioess Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Tol. XI., No. 12.— January 25, 1882. 

Editorial Notes 139 

Literary : 

Unrest (poem) 141 

Kank in College 142 

Two Voyages 142 

Zeta Psi Convention 1 44 

Communication 144 

College Items 145 

Personal 147 

Clippings 148 

Editors' Table 149 



EDITORIAL HOTES. 



The long term upon which we are enter- 
ing, it is unnecessary to state, closes the con- 
nection of the present editors with the Ori- 
ent. We shall take occasion at a later date to 
offer our opinions as to the advisability of con- 
tinuing the present method of electing editors. 
Why the Orient should pursue a custom ob- 
solete elsewhere, satisfactorily proven unfair 
to the college, the editors, and the stand of 
the publication itself, is not evident. The re- 
mark is stale that the Orient is the students' 
publication. We believe that we present the 
spectacle of a few patient workers, semi-mar- 



tyrs, every two weeks, and, since a desire 
to aid in the accomplishment of editorial 
work with less difficulty to editors and less 
interference with college work is certainly 
commendable, we shall, with this end in view, 
hope to make worthy suggestions. 



The representation of Bowdoin in the 
Carmina Collegiensa bids fair to be excellent. 
That musical abilit}- soars here, is evident. We 
were far more doubtful of the poetical ability, 
but we are assured that the efforts so far are 
very acceptable. A new Qarmina Collegiensa 
will be received with thanks by every student 
in the country, and the work done is certainly 
done in a good cause. Some half-dozen of 
the words and music of the songs will be 
produced at the chapel concert, which will 
soon be given, and from those, selections be 
made. The opportunity for contributions is 
offered now, and abundant time given for 
fame and cash to be acquired. 



If class officers are surprised at the agility 
with which excuses on account of sickness 
are coming in, the cause need be sought no 
further than the weather. It is impossible 
to keep recitation rooms at an even tempera- 
ture, and often one sits through recitation 
with his overcoat on, and goes immediately 
out into a freezing atmosphere. Charity for 
mortal flesh will command our instructors to 
hearken attentively to all such excuses. 



The death of Capt. Bates, who for years 
has served in the honorable connection of 
assistant treasurer of the college, is in no 
inconsiderable degree a matter of regret to 
the students. From the nature of his posi- 



140 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



tion it is to be inferred that few of us would 
have been intimately acquainted with him, 
but all had become so accustomed to seeing 
him in his customary place that the appear- 
ance of a new face makes his absence ever 
recurring. He has been a faithful officer 
through a long term of years, and we are 
assured was always devoted to the interests 
and welfare of the college, and the college 
can ill afford to lose any such. 



The posting of such notices as the one 
that appeared on Tuesday of last week, 
deserves the utmost that can be said against 
it. The tone of the writing was certainly 
reprehensible in the highest degree. To be 
charitable we are compelled to call it a joke, 
but a very ill-conceived joke, at best, and 
made in a direction in which it is certainly 
unnecessary. To the one concerned, we 
would only say that he should endeavor to re- 
strain his jovial tendencies, or at least be less 
deadly in his playfulness. Such manifes- 
tations surely do not meet the approval of 
the students, and while we are prone to com- 
miserate the author on account of the evident 
youthfulness of his college life, we are com- 
pelled to think that something must be radi- 
cally wrong in his moral or intellectual being. 
A novelty of that kind must be deserving to 
be perpetuated, and we hardly think this will 
become a custom. 



An act of vandalism, which, b}' the rarest 
chance, escaped doing serious damage, has 
been perpetrated by some person, ^^zumschad- 
enfroh gewandt." Quite a large piece of coal 
has been thrown through the rose window in 
the rear of the chapel, which opens into tlie 
picture gallery. Besides the mere breaking, 
no damage was done, but if the missile had 
gone through any of the figures in the 
stained glass, of course the injury would 
have been almost irreparable. The height of 
the window was such that it was not thought 



necessary to protect it by a screen, but now 
the glass and the far more valuable paintings 
inside will be made wholly secure from the 
dastardly attempts of mischief-makers. We 
cannot believe that au}' student threw this 
piece of coal. 

The Civil Service Reform Association is 
obtaining signatures throughout the country 
to a petition to Congress praying for legisla- 
tion which shall make open competitive ex- 
aminations the means of entrance to all cleri- 
cal positions in the U. S. service. Especial 
efforts are being made among the college men 
of the countrj', and we have been asked to 
undertake the work in this college. There 
ought to be little need among college men of 
urging the necessity of such agitation. An 
opportunity will be given to all to sign. 
Copies of the petition will be left in the 
treasurer's office and circulated in the different 
ends of the college dormitories. We presume 
that with no difficulty signatures enough can 
be obtained to do credit to the spirit of Bow- 
doin in this matter. 



The aiuiual return of the medic is fore- 
shadowed by the animated preparations for 
his reception. His coming is certainly one of 
the most evident reminders of the flight of 
the years, and very many of us who watch 
his return for the last time, will certainly 
view him more criticall}^ and with a kindlier 
spirit. In view of the proposition, which we 
have heard earnestly advocated, to move the 
Medical School from Brunswick to Portland, 
we have first to say that such a move would 
be, at least, sincerely regretted hy the student 
body. Friends and former companions are 
found among tiiem abundantly, and, indeed, 
every one would miss them and their foot- 
ball and feel sad not to hear the dulcet tones 
of the school-bell, as Mr. Booker calls them 
in. We presume that it is on grounds rather 
of convenience to themselves tiiaii of benefit 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



141 



to the students, that the Medical Faculty 
have contemplated such a move, if indeed 
they have, for certainly it would seem that 
the Maine Medical School draws no small 
share of its healthy existence from the college 
under whose wing it exists. Why it can not 
pursue the course in the future that it has 
made honorable in the past, here as well as 
elsewhere, we are not informed, but presume 
that better opportunities for practice are 
desired, which the hospital at Portland 
affords. We are quite certain that the de- 
partment would lose a certain amount of 
dignity in the change, inasmuch as it is 
connected with the college, as are the med- 
ical departments of the chief colleges of the 
country. However, perhaps we are arguing 
against a possibility barely probable and 
scarcely thought of, and, at any rate, we 
should be sorry to lose our busy crowd of 
doctors, and hope that the proposition will 
not be sustained. 



The endeavors of the editors of the Bugle 
were fairly represented in their prologue, and 
we are free to say that the result must cer- 
tainly be pleasing to themselves. Their 
endeavor was to present a " sharp, fresh, and 
interesting Bugled It certainly is fresh, — 
one of the freshest we ever saw — and sharp 
certainly, and interesting, we hope, to all. It 
is possible, however, to mistake and miscon- 
ceive what will be interesting to others, and 
if the B^igle editors meet with adverse crit>- 
icism, it will be solely from the fact that such 
misconception is apparent in the Bugle. 
Typographically, the Bugle deserves every 
commendation ; and in arrangement and gen- 
eral structure is a decided innovation. Every 
one is pleased to see a Bugle which is new 
from the first cover to the last. The chief 
objection to the Bugle, and one too apparent 
to be passed by, is the general standard of 
taste that the Bugle adopted. To speak 
plainly the standard is not an aesthetic one. 



It is slightly inclined to vulgarity, as if the 
" silver lining of fun and good fellowship " 
was found in the vulgar side of college life. 
It is not this side of college life that we care 
to display at home, and we are afraid that 
many will object to sending the animated 
picture of the ballet girl home to their 
mothers and sisters. This is our only crit- 
icism. A misconception it certainly is of 
what is interesting to us all, except the edi- 
tors of coui'se, and as such an innovation 
decidedly to be regretted. The writing in 
the Bugle shows marked taste and ability, 
and we regret that there is not more of it. 
The prologue is most graceful, and the class 
histories eminently satisfactory, and the poem 
lacking among its poetical attributes only the 
necessary quality of truthfulness. We hope 
the editors will see in this mild criticism only 
its mildness, and find the approbation which 
cannot be withheld. 



UNREST. 

In pensive mood upon the shore, 
Where breaks old Ocean's solemn roar, 

Alone I stand. 
The waves, still high from recent storm. 
With cloud-crowned cliflf conspire to form 

A picture grand. 

Wave after wave, in ceaseless flow, 
The foam-capped billows come and go. 

Nor rest can find. 
Their hollow murmurs, as they break. 
Within my soul a sadness wake 

But half defined. 

Clear mirrored in their seething crest, 
I see portrayed my heart's unrest 

With vivid power. 
For, like those waves, tossed to and fro, 
My heart no soothing rest may know. 

Nor peaceful hour. 

Oh waves, in madd'ning fury tossed ; 
Oh heart, bewailing hopes long lost, 

By fears oppressed ; 
He, whom the tempests wild obey. 
Who rules the hearts of men, can say, 

" Peace, be at rest." 



142 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RANK IN COLLEGE. 
That men of high rank seldom win distinc- 
tion in professional life, is a very prevalent 
opinion. That "salutatorians are seldom 
heard from," is an argument often used to 
calm the disquietude of a son. To many 
persons to be a scholar of high rank in college 
means four years of midnight toU, and that, 
too, at the expense of success in life. But, 
however widely this opinion may prevail, an 
examination of the records of scholarship and 
an inquiry after those who have won distinc- 
tion will show its groundlessness. 

The large majority of those who have 
attained eminence in after life were, in col- 
lege, students of the highest rank. It is 
seldom that a student of low rank attains 
special eminence. Of the graduates at Har- 
vard, in the first half of this century, who 
have distinguished themselves, at least four- 
fifths ranked in the first quarter of the class 
to which they belonged. Nine-tenths of all 
the distinguished graduates at Yale, between 
1819 and 1850, were among the first scholars 
of the class to which they belonged. At 
Amherst, between 1822 and 1850, the twentj^- 
five most eminent men were, with one or two 
exceptions, excellent scholars. The statistics 
of scholarship at Bowdoin, from the gradu- 
ation of its first class in 1806 to 1850, reveal 
the same conclusion. Its best scholars have 
become, as a rule, its most noted men. 

Their first honors won were in college. 
Their success in college seemed to be a fore- 
runner of their success in life. Courses of 
study started tiiere ended only with their lives. 
It is difficult to find an eminent professor in 
any college who was not an excellent scholar. 
Not only those who have gained distinction as 
teachers and scholars, but also tliose who have 
gained distinction as writei's, clergymen, states- 
men, and lawyers, were students of high 
standing. Beecher is probably the most 
familiar exception. Altliougii considered as 
the most distinguished graduate of Amherst, 



he had an average of but fifty-eight. Indeed, 
the scholarship of clerg3-men has not generally 
been as high as that of teachers and writers. 

The cause of the fact that a student high 
in rank usually wins distinction may be traced 
to the physical, moral, and mental character- 
istics of that student. He must have good 
health, for that is at the foundation of every 
successful effort. His morals must be good, 
for the power to endure continued hard work 
is weakened if not destroyed bj' evil indul- 
gence. A good mind, and the power of 
studying eight or ten hours a day are the 
chief mental characteristics of the highest 
scholar. It is continued hard work that wins 
fame for the writer, statesman, lawyer, or 
doctor. . A man of genius is usualh' distin- 
guished in only one study. 

The superior benefits accruing to the high 
scholar are two in particular, viz. : Acquired 
knowledge and mental discipline. These 
heights are a fortune in themselves, and must 
be gained before that true far-stretching fame 
is realized. The conclusion is, therefore, that 
the same influences that prevailed in the 
struggle for honors in college, prevailed also 
in winning the first honors in professional life. 

The reason of the common error that 
"high scholars seldom achieve success in pro- 
fessional life," is chiefly due to certain saluta- 
torians whose principal aim in college was 
rank, and who have not, therefore, acquired 
that true culture wliich is the element of 



TWO VOYACxES. 



The religious disturbances in England and 
in Continental Europe, of several centuries 
ago, form an intei'esting picture to us even at 
this late day. That fanatical intolerance 
wliich could not brook the holding of opinions 
contrary to those of general acceptation, led 
to numerous unreasonable disseixsions, many 
of which iiad results widely diverse from the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



143 



expectations of those cherishing them. It is 
an interesting study to trace in their count- 
less windings the many phases of these quar- 
rels, and to watch for their outcome. One 
is to ns, however, of absorbing interest as 
exemplifying an unchanging faith in the 
justice of a cause, and embodying in a strik- 
ing degree that spirit of liberty which exists 
to-day as a characteristic wherever its work 
has left its impress. It is of interest, too, 
from the wonderful though unlooked for re- 
sult of these quarrels. 

The great underlying principle was a desire 
for freedom. Such, certainlj^, was the motive 
which formed the moving spring of the ac- 
tions of those whose fortunes were committed 
to the pity of a wintry ocean voyage, and 
which are so intimately connected with the 
voyage of the May-flower. The wintry 
weather and ocean storms found an answering 
element within ; ties of home and country 
held but a secondary position in the midst 
of the religious fervor which was agitat- 
ing their minds, and everything was sub- 
ordinated to the one grand absorbing idea 
which lends to their acts the element of 
heroism. 

The vessel reached its destination, meet- 
ing with the stormy waves and the inhospit- 
able shores of our New England coast — turbu- 
lent and uncompromising, a fit counterpart to 
the stern severity of the minds which guided 
the enterprise. These formed the nucleus 
of the great republic which was upbuilt, af- 
fording ultimately a haven for the oppressed. 
The difficulty of ridding themselves of the 
prejudices which association had engendered, 
was not small, but with advancing prosperity 
political and religious toleration went hand in 
hand, and unjust laws and discriminating 
statutes were eradicated. The end was not 
uncertain, and their liberality fructified in the 
New England of to-day, a happy consumma- 
tion of a quarrel so unwillingly begun, so 
bitterly contested, and so hopefully prolonged. 



Such was the grand result of one ship's 
voyage ; let us look at another. 

The view is not so bright. The name of the 
first American slave-ship is retained in history 
with no great degree of veneration, nor do 
men boast of descent from its inmates. Yet, 
unquestionably, royal blood flowed in their 
veins. Their departure from home scarcely 
possessed the element of stoicism. Their 
sunny, native lands and genial climes had left 
a deep impress upon the simple hearts that 
beat without an answering throb of hope, 
and whose future offered no brighter pictures 
than those presented by utter gloom and de- 
spair. From these, too, arose a system, an 
empire if you will, as lowly as the other was 
exalted, and founded upon sentiments as 
debasing as those of the other were en- 
nobling. 

A different phase of human nature is 
illustrated ; yet this ship's voyage and its un- 
happy inmates form a no less interesting 
study, and the results which sprung from 
them are no less weighty, and concerned the 
welfare and happiness of as great a multitude 
of human beings. It is a surprising fact that 
two such systems, wholly contradictory in 
their nature, could exist side by side, and at 
times intertwined, the latter subsisting upon 
and dependent for its very existence upon the 
former — a republic ostensibly established 
upon principles whose perpetuity was in direct 
contradiction to the existence of the other. 

In the logic of events it was but a ques- 
tion of time when the inevitable collision 
should arise. The war which resulted in the 
destruction of slavery, while not undertaken 
with that end in view, was yet the result of 
the progress of, and outgrowth from, those 
sentiments which are typified in the voyage 
of the May-flower. The destruction of slav- 
ery was plainly a recognition of the firmness 
of these principles, and a justification of their 
merits as a foundation for individual and 
national prosperity. 



144 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ZETA PSI CONVENTION. 

The 35th annual convention of the Zeta 
Psi Fraternity was held at tlie Vanderbilt 
House, Syracuse, N. Y., Wednesday and 
Thursday, Jan. 4th and 5th, under the auspi- 
ces of the Psi and Gamma Chapters. All 
except two chapters were represented Ijy 
delegates. Business sessions were held during 
the forenoon and afternoon of both days. 

The newly elected Grand Officers are : 
Augustus VanWyck, class of "64, of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina ; Edwin N. Benson, 
class of '59, of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania; L. A. Chapiii, class of '79, of the 
Univei'sity of California; D. Cady Gere, 
class of '79, of the University of Syracuse ; 
Charles B. Everson, class of '78, of Cornell 
University. 

Wednesday evening a reception was given 
to the visitors in the Gamma Chapter rooms. 
On Thursday evening, at 10.30, the members 
of the convention assembled in the dining 
hall of the Vanderbilt House to attend the 
annual banquet. The tables were hand- 
somely decorated with flowers and fairly 
groaned under a profusion of edibles. The 
usual toasts were responded to and the festiv- 
ities continued until a late hour. 

The convention was in every way a suc- 
cess and will always be remembered bj' frater- 
nity men as a memorable event in the epoch 
of Zeta Psi. The convention will meet in 
Boston next year with the Lambda and 
Kappa chapters. 



COMMUNICATION. 



[Tlie following, addressed to the Bowdoin 
Orient, Bowdoin, Mc., was lecenlly received 
by us. The writer is evidently from tlie rural 
districts and thinks the Oeiknt to be the 
local paper of a country town. The communi- 
cation is of so serious a nature that we print 
it, iiopiiig that tinough our means relief may 
come to the unfortunate individual. — Eds.] 



Editors of Orient : 

I am an afflicted sufferer in an uns3'mpa- 
thizing world. My trouble is of such a nature 
that while it does not receive the compassion 
it deserves, it has constantly annoyed me, 
made me lose the most precious opportunities, 
and promises to continue to blight the weary 
remnant of a wasted life. From some reason 
or other I have been since early life a subject 
to periodic eruptions of boils. I seldom am 
afflicted with more than one at a time, but 
that one always compels recognition by taking 
a prominent position, and I am impelled to 
court retirement until it has subsided. They 
say that troubles never come singly, but mine 
always have. I think that life would be bet- 
ter worth living for me if the}' would contrive 
to have a unity in their actions,, and if there 
were any well defined periods of eruption, 
whose appearance I could forecast by calcula- 
tions, or by any manifest signs. Many times 
in my life has my happiness been turned into 
shame and my most prosperous plans thwarted 
by these cruel stings of fortune. One of the 
saddest memories of my early boyhood is the 
way I was made fun of by the others, on ac- 
count of appearing at school with m}' face 
badly disfigured by a cause over which I had 
no control. As I grew up, I was always sure 
to be afflicted whenever anything which I 
wanted to attend was to take place. I studied 
six long weeks on a piece to speak at the close 
of our school, and was then unable to speak 
it. The reason need not be told. 

If I was going to a party and had a par- 
ticular desire to appear well, I was sure to 
have to stay away. Lately I had not been 
afflicted much and began to hope that I had 
outgrown the period of my allliction. I was 
engaged to be married. The lime had been 
decided upon ; everything was ready. The 
invitations were out ; the services of the min- 
ister were engaged. On the evening before 
the wedding, as my intended was bidding me 
good-bye, she said, "Job, dear, does not your 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



145 



face look a trifle red on one side ? " I flew 
to the mirror. The fatal sign was there. I 
rushed from the house in a rage. The night 
was devoted to attending to the budding boil, 
but it seemed to thrive under my care, 
and in the morning was blossomed out beau- 
tifully. I came to the conclusion that the 
wedding was out of the question and deter- 
mined to put an end to my miserable exist- 
ence. I took a dose of rat poison, and 
sank into a painless oblivion. When they 
found me ray worst enemy wouldn't have rec- 
ognized me, my countenance was so blooming 
with the unhealthy excrescence. They brought 
me to, however. I have not yet got over re- 
gretting it. True happiness can never be 
mine until this Job's affliction is taken from 
me. 

Can you not recommend to me some cure 
that will remove from me this curse and thus 
enable me to become a useful and contented, 
even though humble member of society ? By 
thus lifting up a human soul from the dark- 
ness of despair, you will gain the heartfelt 
blessing of 

Your afflicted subscriber, 

Job Gkben. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



1882. 

Oh ! that Sophomore supper. 

Sweetser, '84, has left college. 

Bowdoinham has great attractions. 

Our band seems to have frozen up. 

The snow-plow man has been full of business. 

Prof. Chapman preached in Auburn last Sunday. 

A copy of Guiteau's book, "Truth," is in the 
library. 

Cutler hears recitations of the Sophomore class in 
Rhetoric. 

The library will be open hereafter only during the 
afternoon. 



What shall we do for exercise and training is still 
an open question. 

Seniors are informed that large stories can be told 
of fossils and fish. 

Recitations began promptly on Tuesday at the 
opening of the term. 

E. P. Jordan, from Bates, has entered the Junior 
class of this college. 

Freshmen will petition the Faculty for tall hats to 
keep their ears warm. 

Prof. Campbell preached at the Congregational 
church, January loth. 

Dike has set up a press in the Herald oflB.ce and 
will do his own printing. 

The students were well represented at Theodore 
Tilton's lecture last week. 

The Bugle is for sale at 13, W. H., 9, M. H., 16, 
M. H., 3, A. H., and 18, A. H. 

Belcher, '82, has left his class on account of sick- 
ness, but will probably enter '83. 

The Juniors recently gained an adjourn at the ex- 
pense of their lectures on physics. 

The medics have better accommodations nowa- 
days than the classical department. 

A lecture was delivered in Boothbay, January 
16th, by Prof. Carmichael, on "Flame." 

It is reported that another musical organization 
has been consummated — a flute club. Alas! 

The catalogue of the alumni is out. This publi- 
cation takes the place of the former triennial. 

Some of the students are starting a course of as- 
sembly dances at Dirigo Hall, to begin this week. 

The expected singing books have been placed in 
the church galleries and are evidently appreciated. 

Several daily papers report President Chamber- 
lain as engaged in business enterprises in Florida. 

The position of the late Capt. Bates in the treas- 
urer's office is occupied by H. Caiwel of Brunswick. 

The skating rink has been re-opened, but is not 
patronized as well as last j'ear, at least not by the 
students. 

A small steam engine, about 4J horse power, has 
been placed in the basement of the laboratory. It 
will be used for pumping and other work which was 
formerly quite a tax on those who have charge of 
the building. 



146 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



F. H. Files, '83, was the Zeta Fsi delegate to the 
Fraternity Convention at Syracuse, N. Y., January 
4th and 6th. 

Prof. Chapman has given eight lectures on Logic 
to the Senior class and will have an examination on 
the course. 

One of our youthful chemists says that the tradi- 
tional church sociable compound is made mostly of 
H stew 0. 

Prof. Chapman has removed his study to North 
Winthrop, and Cutler occupies his former room in 
North M. H. 

The musical association will hereafter hold its 
meetings at Dirigo Hall, which has been purchased 
by Prof. Carniichael. 

Sunday morning found the chapel door labeled 
with several notices, apparently belonging to a 
neighboring grocery store. 

Prof. Lee will continue the course in Geology with 
the Seniors for a few weeks, occupying the first hour 
in place of political science. 

Examination of the Seniors was held last Saturday 
on their work in Psychology, for the past term and 
for the two weeks extending into this. 

Thursday is the day of prayer for colleges, and 
there consequently will be no recitations. Services 
will be held in the Congregational lecture room. 

The class ofScers for the present term are as fol- 
lows : Senior, Prof. Lee ; Junior, Prof. Robinson ; 
Sophomore, Prof. Avery ; Freshman, Prof. Wheeler. 

A brass tube has been obtained for the new tele- 
scope. With the eye-piece of the old one tempora- 
rilly added, the instrument gave very satisfactory 
results. 

There will be no '68 Prize Exhibition this year, 
as that class has voted to suspend the prize until the 
sum of $1000, necessary for its jjermanent support, 
shall be obtained. 

The edifice which appeared so suddenly in front 
of the churcli, Sunday before last, was variously 
regarded as a stand for the Fresliman Orchestra, or 
an observatory for llie telescope. 

Prof. Lee gave a lecture on the work of the Fish 
Commission before tlie Society of Natural History 
in Portland, January IGlli. Prof. Carmichael was 
elected corresponding member of the Society. 

The chapel concert, for the choice of tunes and 
Bongs for the new college song book, will be held on 



Tuesday next. The committee state that quite a 
number of excellent compositions have been handed in. 

The small book on modern geometry used by mem- 
bers of '84, has been given out by Prof. Smith to 
some of the Freshmen. Those having the book will 
recite every week in place of the weekly review, and 
at examination will be allowed two optionals from 
this work. 

An address was given on Sunday evening in the 
praying circle room by Prof. Campbell, which was 
well attended by the students. The opportunities for 
hearing our professors under such circumstances 
seem to be well appreciated, and would be enjoyed 
by all if they occurred more frequently. 

At last, the new college catalogue is out. It 
reports 146 classical and 112 medical students. 
Among other donations of scientific interest, thei-e 
are acknowledged specimens, given by several 
undergraduates. The course of study, as here given, 
is considerably different from that of last year. 

One of the best American artists, Wj"att Eaton, 
of New York, who has furnished numerous illustra- 
tions in Scribner^s Magazine, recently visited the art 
gallery of this college, and was much pleased with 
the paintings, expressing the opinion that some com- 
pared very favorably with those in the metropolitan 
collection. 

The members of '82 in college are divided among 
their electives as follows : English Literature — Blon- 
del, Curtis, W. W., Chase, Crosby, Goodwin, Jor- 
dan, IMcCarthy, Pierce, Stearns, Stinchlield, Weeks. 
Chemistry — Bates, Curtis, E. CJ., Gilman, Goddard, 
Jewett, Libby, Mason, Merrynian, Moody, Plimpton, 
Reed. German — Fames, Holway, Staples. 

A meeting of the graduates ol Bowdoin college 
residing in Washington, D. C, was held January 
5th, 1882, at which the following officers were elected: 
President, Commodore Horace Bridge, class '25; 
1st Vice President, Israel Kimball, Esq., class '39; 
2d Vice President, Judge W. B. Snell, class '45; Re- 
cording Secretary, J. C. Strout, Esq., class '57; Cor- 
responding Secretary, Prof. J. W. Chickering, Jr., 
class '52 ; Treasurer, Major J. N. Whitney, class '64 ; 
Executive Committee, Gen. F. D. Sewell, class '46, 
Col. D. S. Alexander, class '70, S. Y. Kimball, Esq., 
class '65, Charles Chesley, class '52. 



IN MEMORIAM. 
At a regular meeting of the Kappa Chapter of the 
Psi Upsilon Fraternity, held Jaiuiary 20th, 1882, the 
following preamble and resolutions were adopted : 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



147 



Whereas, It has pleased the Supreme Ruler of the 
universe to remove from this life our brother, 

Rev. John Cotton Smith, D.D., 

a member of the class of 1847, and 

Whereas, The intimate relations held by him with 
the society vphile in college, render it proper that we 
should express our appreciation of his merits as a 
brother and a man ; therefore. 

Resolved, That in his death we experience the loss 
of one who was always zealous and active as a mem- 
ber, ever loyal to the interests of the fraternity, and 
devoted to its welfare and prosperity ; one whose 
pure life and exalted station could but inspire the 
noblest aspirations as well as adorn the fraternity 
with whicli he was associated. 

Resolved, That while we bow in liumble submis- 
sion to the will of the Most High, we do not the less 
mourn for him, who has been called from earthly 
labor to his final rest. 

Resolved, That we extend to the family and friends 
of the deceased our heartfelt sympathy in this their 
deep affliction. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent 
to the family of the deceased, to the several chapters 
of the fraternity, and to the press. 

W. O. Plimpton, ~^ In behalf of 

H. L. Allen, > the 

W. J. Collins, ) Kappa Chapter. 

Bowdoin College, Jan. 20, 1882. 



PERSONAL. 



'30. — Jotham Tilden Moulton, a native of Bucks- 
port, son of Dr. Jotham Moulton, practiced law some 
years in Cherryfield, and then removed to Chicago, 
where he died December, 1881. 

'47. — Rev. John Cotton Smith, D.D., died in New 
York, Jan. 9th, 1882. He was born Aug. 4th, 1826, 
at Fall River, Mass., and was descended from the 
Cotton family, ftimous in New England annals. He 
was also nephew of ex-President Woods, fourth 
president of the college. His father was Thomas M. 
Smith, D.D., president of Kenyon College, and pro- 
fessor of Theology in the Theological Seminary of 
Ohio. He studied for the ministry in the Theological 
Seminary at Gambler, Ohio, and was ordained deacon 
by Bishop Mcllvaine, of Ohio, in 1849, and priest by 
Bishop Burgess in 1850. He was first rector of- the 



St. John's Church, Bangor, after which he was assist- 
ant minister in Trinity Church, Boston. Since 1860 
he has been rector of the Church of the Ascension, 
New York. 

'60. — Hon. Thomas B. Reed's photograph appears 
in the last number of Frank Leslie^s. He is chairman 
of the House Committee of Judiciary. He has served 
in the following ofiices since graduating from college : 
Assistant Paymaster in the Navy, one term in the 
State House of Representatives, also one term in the 
State Senate, was for three years Attorney General of 
the State, after which he was elected to Congress. 
He ranks among the half dozen really conspicuous 
members of the present House. 

'61. — Edward Stanwood, Esq., is senior editor of 
the Boston Advertiser. 

'68. — Thomas J. Emery is among the members of 
the Common Council of the City of Boston. 

'71. — Augustine Simmons, Esq., is practicing law 
at Noith Anson. At the last Commencement he 
received a diploma conferring on him the degree of 
A.B., thus making him a graduate of the college. 
He left college in the third year of the course, but 
subsequently passed the examinations in the remain- 
ing studies of the course. 

'71. — Prof. Edward S. Morse, of the Lowell Insti- 
tute, has invented a device by which he can utilize 
the rays of the sun to assist in warming dwelling 
houses and places of assembly. 

'71. — Charles L. Shephard is Chief Clerk in the 
Quartermaster's Department, U. S. A., at Helena, 
Montana Territory. He has a fine situation. 

'72. — Alden J. Blelhen, formerly of Portland, is 
manager of the Kansas Cili/ Journal. The last issue 
of Frank Leslie's, in giving a sketch of the Journal, 
says: "Alden J. Blethen, the manager of the 
Journal, came from Portland, Me., and is a business 
man of the best New England make, under whose 
able management the Journal has made grand prog- 
ress during the past year. 

'74.— A. G. Bradstreet, Esq., late representative 
to the Legislature from Bridgton, has been appointed 
acting general manager and chief engineer of the 
Tehuantepec Inter-Ocean R. R. Co. This company 
is composed of heavy capitalists of New York, and 
is a large and important organization. Their rail- 
i-oad is in Mexico, across the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, 
near the route of Ead's proposed ship railway. 

'80. — R. C. Gilbert has lately been seriously ill at 
Kennebunk where he is teaching, but at last accounts 
he was slightly better. 

'80. — F. O. Conant has been taken into the firm 
formerly known as Conant & Rand, but now as 
Conant, Patrick & Co. 



148 



BOWDOJN ORIENT. 



'81. — J. W. Maiison is studying law in the office 
of Strout & Gage of Portland. 

'81. — C. L. Baxter has been taken into the firm of 
the Portland Packing Co. 

'81. — C. E. Harding is teaching in Fort Fairiield. 

'81. — Henry Goddard is with the firm of Doe & 
Hunnewell, Drapers, Boston. 

'81. — E. H. Chamberlin is teaching in Webster, 
Mass. 

'82. — A. W. Mansur is teaching at Houlton. 

'82. — Fred Lally, a former member of the class, 
who left college during Sophomore year, and has 
since been in business in Chicago, has lately been 
visiting at his home in Augusta. He spent a few 
days here with his classmates, on his return West. 

'84. — A. F. Sweetser has left college. 

'8.5. — L. W. Cutter has left college and gone to 
the Orono State College. He enters the class of 
'Si with the intention of taking the Engineering 
Course. 



CLippmas. 

" Ye pigge is a handsome fowl, 

And wond'rous good to eat; 
Hys cheek is good, likewise hys jowl. 

And eke hys little feet. 

But if you try a thousand year, 

I trow you still will fayle 
To make a silk purse of hys ear, 

Or a wissel of hys tayle." 

School-mistress (to dull little boy) — "Johnny, 
I'm ashamed of j'ou. When I was your age I could 
read twice as well as you." Johnny — " Yes'ni, but 
you had a different teacher from what I got." — Ex. 

A Western paper says : " Col. Richards was shot 
three times, once in the arm, once in the side, and 
once in the drinking saloon adjacent." This is nearly 
as bad as the cavalry officer who was shot in the 
horse. — Tablet. 

"Yes, gentlemen," says an exceedinglj- nervous 
young tutor, who has cauglit a Fre.shman in the act 
of "cribbing." "You may not think so now, but 
you will find that honesty answers best in the wrong 
lung." (Class begin to cough.) — TableL. 

The Harvard Annex in 1900. Miss Martingale — 
" Say, Julia, old girl, you ought to go down to New 
Haven and back up the foot-ball team— you ought 
now, really." Miss Hasbleu — " Why, 1 think it is 
perfectly brutal! Last fall those horrid Yale girls 



threw Tootie Peters right down flat on the ground, 
and pinched Daisy Tompkin's arm so that it's been 
black and blue ever since." — Lampoon. 

I Scene, Psychology recitation : " Now, Mr. S., how 
[ is the existence of the desk here made a reality in 

your mind?" Mr. S. — "By the something which is 

behind it." Loud applause. 

Snodkins — "Have you read " The Pale, Pale Moon, 
Miss Amy?" Miss Amy Southslope — "Yes, I began 
it ; but it wasn't lovey enough. I like real blind love, 
don't you know ?" — Lampoon. 

An old gentleman stepped on Nook's foot in the 
horse-car the other day. " Beg pardon," said 
he apologetically. " Oh, never mind," replied 
Nook ; " my feet were made to walk on ! " And he 
gave one of those sweet smiles for which he is so 
famous. — Ex. 

This is an examination. See how Sad these Boys 
look ! Look at That Boy in the Corner. He will 
Pass. He has studied hard. He has all his Knowl- 
edge at His Finger-ends. See, He puts his knowl- 
edge in His Pocket Because the Tutor is looking. 
Come Away Children ! — Record. 

Is that a man ? No ! that is not a man, that is an 
ajsthetel What has he in his hand ? He has a lily in 
his hand. Will the lily die? Yes, the lily will. 
Poor lily! Why does he look so wild at the horse- 
car ? Of course he looks wild at the horse-oar, for he 
is Oscar Wilde. — News Primer. 

"Where did you dine jesterday, Fwed ? " " O, at 
the kvvub." "Good dinnah?" " Yasse, O yasse, I 
dined on such a lovely pwimwose, with a gewanium 
for dessert. With those I dwunk in the delicious 
fwagwance of a sweet and tendah wiolet." "How 
pwecious!" "Yasse, it was evah so uttahly soul- 
satisfying and supw^eme." — Ex. 

Matter-of-fact Freshman to go-as-you-please Fresh- 
man on the morning of the Physios examinations — 
" Say, Ned, got this down pretty fine? " Go-as-you- 
please Freshman — " Well, about as tine as I could 
get it, and still have it legible," as he shook out a lit- 
tle piece of cardboard from his coat-sleeve. — Ex. 

Two Irishmen were talking about the moon and 
sun. " Sure," says Pat, " the sun gives a stronger 
light." "But the moon is more sensible," replied 
Mike. "How will 3'ou prove that?" cries Pat. 
"Oh, aisy enough," says Mike. "Prove it," cries 
Pat. "Faith," replies Mike, "the moon shines at 
night, when we nade it. But the sun shines in 
broad daylight, whin a men wid one eye could see 
widout it." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



149 



Mental Science ; Student — " And is tliere no smell 
or taste without some one to perceive them ? " Prof. 
— "No." Student — "Then there was no sweetness 
wasted on the desert air." — Ex. 

An aged negro was one day showing the scars of 
the wounds inflicted by the lash when he was a slave. 
" What a picture ! " exclaimed a sympathizing looker- 
on. "Yes," responded the colored brother, " dats de 
work ob one ob de old masters." — Ex. 

Proof positive. Wife (who has been "sitting 
up") — "Well, this is a pretty time to come home! 
Four o'clock !" Husband (who has taken nothing 
but one glass of a curious compound spoken of, by 
himself, as " Whiskanwarra ") — " Wha' you mean, 
madam, by ' forklock ? ' Unfort'nly for you, madam, 
it sho 'appens, courioulenuff, I parsh'd Trinity, 
madam, and heard it strike one (hie) several times, 
madam ! " — Ex. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



The first paper wliich we particularly noticed on 
tearing the wrappers from our vacation mail was the 
Harvard Herald, a new daily. Its general appear- 
ance is much like the Yale News; indeed, we can 
fancy that the editors started with some such idea as 
this: "The Echo has been found fault with very 
much ; even the Crimson, which has such a general 
good opinion of everything pertaining to Haiward, 
has joined in setting on it. On the contrary the Yale 
News has received universal praise, and has been 
held up before the Echo editors as a personification 
of college daily journalism. Now suppose we start 
a paper which shall very nearly resemble the News, — 
a paper with a fancy heading, printed with clear 
type, on fine paper. Shall we not easily run the 
Echo into the ground? " The Herald has not, as yet, 
however, shown the ability and the solid worth which, 
and not the fine typography, has brought merited 
success to the News. The department which is most 
fully represented and most ably filled is that which 
gives the dramatic news. We think, however, that 
there is no doubt that Harvai-d needed something new 
in the daily line, and the question is now whether 
both can survive. 

The last Record speaks of the financial and musi- 
cal success of the Yale Glee Club in its recent west- 
ern ti-ip. It also says that Mr. Buel, '83, who wrote 
the burlesque of "Medea," has been writing an op- 
eretta called "The Bells of Penikeese," which will be 



presented for the benefit of the Yale navy the latter 
part of April. The Record editorially condemns 
cigarette smoking. There are prospects of disagree- 
ment on the time of holding this year's Harvard-Yale 
boat race. It is claimed that Yale would do better 
not to hold athletic games with Harvai'd, as she has 
enough to do now. We see that Prof. Ladd has been 
delivering lectures at Andover Theological Seminary 
during the vacation. 

Conversation at the rink. She — "What a horrible 
noise this band makes." He — " I beg your pardon? " 
She — "Excuse me?" He — " Pardon me. Did you 
spe.ak?" She — "I didn't catch your last remark?" 
Both relapse into silence. — Record. 

The fortunate Princelonian has twelve pages of 
advertisements, not counting the two-column criticism 
on the Nassau Lit. The Princelonian says of the 
Freshman class: "It will never be said of the pres- 
ent Freshman class that it has not lived up to old tra- 
ditions. Not content with conscientiously observing 
all such, it has set about inaugurating some of its 
own, thereby making for itself a name which we sin- 
cerely hope succeeding classes will not emulate." 
Their latest trick has been that of impeding travel by 
greasing the rails of the Pennsylvania Railway Com- 
pany, and there are indications that they will have to 
pay dearly for it. 

A contributor of the Speclator has visited " Wild 
Oscar, the sesthete," at the Hotel Brunswick, desiring 
to learn from his " early English " lips his opinion of 
American colleges and their possibilities a3sthetically 
considei'ed. The reporter asked what the possibili- 
ties of sesthetic growth in American colleges were. 
" Suiall," he replied ; "it cannot grow in Harvard. 
.33stheticism and co-education cannot be co-existent. 
They could never understand it at Yale. At Prince- 
ton it would probably be forbidden by Dr. McCosh, 
as being too worldly. You do not need it at Colum- 
bia. It seems to me that Trinity is the only place 
where it would prosper. They are fond of lawn ten- 
nis suits there, their hair is long, and their legs gen- 
erally thin. Those are two indispensable attributes 
of aestheticism. Then out here in the country they 
can grow sunflowers. What more do you want?" 
" Nothing," we said; "exactly so." "Did I under- 
stand you to say that you wanted anything more ? " he 
asked. "No, nothing more." " Oh, you don't," said 
the poet, displaying considerably more energy than 
before. " Oh, you don't. Well, then, as I want to 
take a nap, may I trouble you to close the door from 
the outside ? " 

The Campus of the University of Wisconsin has 
changed its name to the Badger. We presume tlie 
last named appellation was selected because it has 



150 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



the same number of letters as the word Campus, and 
because the possibility of any other papers ever 
sporting that euphonious title is very doubtful. The 
Badger is a weekly, and makes no pretensions to a 
literary department. 

The Student calls attention to the I'emarkable fact 
that all the officers of instraction at Amherst are 
graduates of that college, and protests against it, as 
some men pre-eminently fitted for positions may be 
rejected simplj- for the unfortunate accident of their 
not being graduates of Amherst. It, however, may 
only be a custom and not be allowed to become a law. 
An editorial in the Student speaks of a salutary infiu- 
ence of the new system in its bearing upon the teach- 
ers and methods of instruction. It is found that an 
instructor, disliking to have his department slighted, 
and not being able to compel attention by wielding 
the power of the marking system, aims to make his 
department popular by adapting it to the wants of 
the student. A special reporter of the Student has 
been getting the opinion of typical members of the 
college on the New System. The following is one of 
the calls : 

"Mr. Digg, the famous rank man. was next vis- 
ited. He was engaged in memorizing the Greek 
lexicon, and suggested that the reporter make haste, 
as he was anxious to get to work again. Question 
by reporter — 'What is your view of the New Sys- 
tem ? ' Answer — ' The same as of the Old one. I do 
my duty. It is wrong to cut, and besides it grieves 
the Faculty. I propose to attend until tlie close of 
the term.' " 

The event narrated in the following rhymes hap- 
pened at Brown just before the Christmas recess : 
" A Freshman legation 
Went for a collation 
To be held above Tillinghast's store; 
But when they got there 
. The tables were bare, 

The Sophs— they had been there before. 

Those horrid Pi-Psi-ers 

Had left the Mu Pi-ers 

For their banquet but plain bread and butter; 

The eat ices and all 

'Twas what you might call 

A trick just loo ' utterly utter.' " 

The following are from the "Queen's Jester," a 
department of the American Queen, an exchange of 
ours which we would earnestly recommend to all 
society dogs : 

" My nose is red, but not with years. 

Nor grew it red in a single night, 

As men's have done from sudden beers." 

— Biron. 

" Not handsome," exclaimed little Pepperpod, 
surveying himself in the glass, "dimmd genteel." 



We have had the pleasure of inspecting a very 
fine group which has just been executed by a young 
sculptor. It represents a plumber, an ice-man, and 
an undertaker giving thanks to the gods for a pros- 
perous season. 

" If the good do not die early," asked a cynic in 
the Philadelphia Times, " where in the world are 
they ? " 

If the above cynic will drop in at our sanctum 
any lawful day between the hours of 9 and 4, his 
curiosity can be gratified. Photographs exchanged ; 
strictest confidence. 

After the new cover, the first " midwinter issue" 
of the Century is chiefly distinguished by its unusual 
range of popular contributors, whose names of them- 
selves awaken in the reader the desire to see their 
contributions. Of these are Ralph Waldo Emerson, 
Henry W. Longfellow, the late Dean Stanley, Mrs. 
Burnett, Mr. Howells, Frank R. Stockton, " H. H.," 
E. C. Stedman, and H. C. Bunner, each of whom has 
his special audience. Add to these attractive names 
the other features : a fine frontispiece portrait of Geo. 
W. Cable, author of "Old Creole Days" and "The 
Grandissimes," engraved by Cole, with a sketch by 
Col. Waring ; another of the unique and amusing 
" Tile Club" papers, illustrated by ten of the mem- 
bers of the club ; the text (somewhat abridged) of 
Mrs. Burnett's play of "Esmeralda," now running 
successfully at a New York theatre ; an illustrated 
account of the growing sport of lawn tennis, with full 
directions; a review of " Significant Features of the 
Atlanta Exposition," by Edward Atkinson, Esq., who, 
we believe, was the prime luover in that enterprise ; 
and a beautifully illustrated paper on "The Phidian 
Age of Sculpture" — and it will be seen that the num- 
ber contains rare elements of popularity. 



School of Political Science, 

COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 



Instruction given in all branches of Philosophy, 
History, Political Economy, Social Science, Constitu- 
tional, International, and Administrative Law, Roman 
Law, and the comparative Jurisprudence of the 
Common and Civil Law. Next term begins Oct. 2, 
1882. For I'urthcr particulars address 

REGISTRAR OF COLUAHilA COLLEGE, 
Madison Av. and 49th St., New York City. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



iSSI 



Finest and Most Select Stock c 



MENS' FURNISHINGS. 

The Newest and Greatest Variety of Patterns in 

NECKWEAR, GLOVES, HOSIERY, 

XJNDER-WEAR, BRACES, ETC. 

^ Custom Shirts from Measure, Six for $9.00. 
A Perfect Fit Guaranteed. 

Goods for the TROY LAUNDRY sent Tues- 
days and received Saturdays. 

In Percales, Mahrattas, and American Goods. 

Orders by mail promx)tly attended to. 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 
FRANK M. STETSON, 

All the New Styles in Soft and Stiff Hats. 
Best Stiff Hats, $2.75. Best Silk Hats, $3.50 in 
exchange. 

Just opened all the New and Nobby Styles Neck 
Dress, Collars, Cuifs, Fancy Hose, Canes, etc. 

All are invited to call and examine goods and prices. 

t^o. 2 Arcade Block. 



TOIE. 




ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

BllJQS. MIBICIIIS. 

Fancy an! Toilet Articles, Ciprs I Toliacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

Il3"Pi'e8criptions Carefully Compounded. 

H. M. BOAVKER, 

BOARDING AND LIVERY STABLE 

Cor. Main and Cleave land Sis., Brunswick. 

All Hack Orders promptly attended to. 




CUSTOM TAILORING 



A S PECI ALTY, 



Fernald's Tailor Emporium 



287 Middle Street, 



PORTLAND, 



MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



I^IIlT^: O-OOIDS, 



AT 0. W. 



LLIM*: 



DRUG STORE. 

THE FINEST CIGARS AND SMOKING TOBACCOS. 
THE BEST PERFUMERY. 

THE BEST TOILET SOAPS. 

THE BEST HAIR BRUSHES. 
The Largest and Best Assortment of 

Drugs, Patent Medicines, &c., &c. 
To be found in this market. 

Leniont Block, Brunsivich', Maine, 



S. C. OOFFIISr, 

— DEALER IN — 

PROVISIONS AND GROCERIES 

4S- Special Bates to Student Clubs.WES' 
CORNER OF MAIN AND ELM STREETS. 



COlDGLlp 



MAIN STREET, 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 





TOBACCO& CIGARETTES 

Either Sweet or Plain, are of the Finest 

Qualities, ALWAYS Uniform and Reliable. 

TRY THE SEAL-SKIN CIGAR 

hand-made CUBAN STYLE. 

SEND $3.75, and we will forward 
by mail, registered, a 50 box of the 
Seal-Skin Cigar. 

This 1b a Bpecial offer to enable BmoberR to test this 
celebrated brand. After a trial you ^^^ll Bmoke no otlier. 

S. F.HESS & CO. 

tremium Tobacco Worka, Rochester, N. Y. 

ISAAC H. SNOW, 

. —DEALER IN 

teef, fiork, Mutton, fiamb, 8cc. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

WESET XJOOI2. TO ST.i^iTT7^00X)'S. 

C. L. Y'^'H.^? .CoLLEqE BaF\8EP^, 
Two doors north of Post Office. 

no TO 

TO IIUY Yorii 

Groceries, Canned Goods, Fruits, 

Confectionery, Tobacco, and Cigars. 

Spcciiil Riitcs tn gtu.lflit (!lul)». 

Idain Street, Head of the Mall, Brunawick. 



Prepares for Bowdoix and the best New England 
Colleges. Offers, also, a thorough S-EiinrAET Course 
to young ladies, and a shorter course for business 
pursuits. For Catalogues, address 

Rev. a. W. burr, Hallowell, Me. 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

jg" Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Ooal "STarci in. 'X'opsl:La,ian., 

WHERE NONE BUT 

Tlie Best of Coal is Kept, 

Ami is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 



S a ^ a (1 a li o c k IT 



B^^TK, Iv^A-IISTE. 



; FEopmsTQBt, 



I. S. BALGOMi:^ 

nKAI.KK IN 

Hardware, Stoves, Croctery, aui Glassware, 

BftUNSIVICK. ^Ba^E.. 



BOWDOiN ORIENT, 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

CHOICE GROcTrTeS, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Students. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



$>B€^X.S H 



'^ ^^# 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

PORT£..A.NX3. IVTAIKTE:. 

This house has been thoroiighlij refitted wWi every re- 
gard to comfort, and the aim is to make it first-class in all 
its appointments. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

De^^^ITT HOUSE, 

QUIMBY & MURCH, Proprietors, 

Comer Pine aM Parl[ Streets, LEI ISTON, IE. 



A- O. I^EED, 
f H T G R AP MMM% 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brnns-nrick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vienrs ; also College Views. 

ALL KINDS OF 

For Schools and Colleges, 

EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 



a'l_ „. 



KOYAL QUIMUV. 



EliE.N MUUCH. 






^Ifil 



'^ ^^ ma^ ■^.' ■'m[w T^/ ▼/▼ e^. a, 
THE FAVORITE NOS. 303-404 332-l70-S5/-WIThr 
''HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 

OFFICE IN LEMONT BLOCK, Brunawiok. 

.^^Telephone connection with Coal Yard. 
Ipg" Orders left at Jordan Snow's, Lemont Block, will 
be promptly attended to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

jSj and 5c?7 Congress Si., and 2J5 Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

,^-Send for Prick List. 



^ 



ESTABLISHED ISM. 



AMOS L MILLETT & CO., 

Jobbers and Retailers of Standard 

ImporteS aEi Boniestic Fauci Groceries. 

BUNKER HILL I'lCKLES A SI'ECIALTY. 



w 



L. WILSON & CO., 

ATholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 d 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 

F. W. STOCK.UAS. t 
WM. A. WILSON. > 



^e^Soitt |olle^e Jf e3ical Ijepaplmeat 

The Si.\tv-.Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 9th, 18S2, 
and continue SIXTEEN -WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— JosncA L. CHiMBEBLiis, LL.D., President ; Israei. T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H. Gerrish, M.D., 
Anatomy ; Charles VT. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence ; Henrt 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Bcet G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles O. 
Host, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics 5 Da.siel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; William B. Ccshmas, .M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to th» Secretarj-. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, .M.D., Secretarg. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AfTo^J EWE LR Y, 

Botanical Microscopes, Fancy Goods. M-atches, Clocks, and Jewelry 
promptly repaired and warranted. 

I^iiie Speota-oles a-n-d. ^:ye=rla.sses. 
EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book "Work to Order. 



W. B. 

1^ (O a 1 'e r 



KNIGHT, 

im. mills* 



Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

flS-Transicnt Orilers for Milk or Cream fillid by giving suitalJle notice. 

Residence, School Street. 

Curtis' College Bookstore 



BOOKS. STA.TIOI^?E:Fl'V. ROOIVI 
P/^PER. PER IODIC A.X<S. <StC. 



FIFtBT-CX.ASS 



FiaMs, Organs,_ __an£JeIodeoiig, E. SMITH, ..GROCER. 

Lowest Prices to Student Clubs. 



AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 



F. H. WILSOH, Dispenser of Pure Drugs, Medicines, and Chemicals. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions a Specialty. 

TaAlN STREET. ^ BRUNSWICK. ME. 

.lOURNAI. PRK«S,~UflBONTlTRKRT, I.KWISTON, MAINK. 




©wi#ta ®il©: 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEBRUARY 8, 1882. 



Vol. XI. 



No. 13. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "iVIoehring" Burners 

rs PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FDR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



H^LL L. DAVIS, 



ionery, and Paper 



53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

ELLIOT 

Has the Finest and Most Stylish Stoci< of 
INeckwear ever exhibited in Brunswiclc. 

Tiis \i\i \\]\\i in \i \i 

HOSIERY, COLI.AB,S, CUFFS, &c., &c., 
in Great Variety of Styles. 

A FINE ASSORTMENT OF 

FALL AND WINTER OVERCOATS AND SUITS, 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock. 
FRAISTK E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of IVIain and Mason Streets. 



Q^UTIOM TO SMOKEia 

Beware of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 




TRY IT. 

'^- Fine, Mild& Sweet, 



Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THKOUGHOUT THE WOKLD. 

FOR YOUR 

NOBBY HAT 

Go or Send to 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 
SIGN OF THE GOLD HAT. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENSEAVED IH THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOE 



AU the Late PublicatioDS in stock. Text Books of all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 

UNDER FALMOUTH HOTKL. 



JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, ETC., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QUALITY, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor Casco, 

PORTLAND, , - - - MAINE. 

A. CARTER. J. W. P. CARTER. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



A reorganization of the Course of Instruction 
has recently been made, in which the distinction be- 
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main- 
tained, but all academic undergraduates are placed 
on one footing, with the opportunity of following, to 
a considerable extent, such lines of study as they 
prefer. 

All students entering the College proper, are ex- 
amined on the same course of preparatory studies. 
After the second year a liberal range of electives is 
offered, within which a student may follow his choice 
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount 
pursued. 

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated 
as a distinct course, are still, for the most part, re- 
tained either in the required or elective lists. More 
place is also given to the Modern Languages than 
they have hitherto had. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all 
who complete the Academic Course. 

The Engineering Department remains as here- 
tofore, and facilities are offered for study of the 
various branches of this science. The means of 
theoretical instruction are ample, and the town of 
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen- 
tres in the State, and in the immediate vicinity of 
many important public works, affords excellent 
opportunities for the study of actual structures. 
The College also enjoys many favors from the United 
States Coast Survey Office. The admission is the 
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the 
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will 
be taken, if desired, in the place of Latin. 

Those who complete satisfactorily the four years' 
course in engineering will receive the Degree of Sc. 
B. Those who complete a two years' course of ad- 
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or 
Mechanical Engineer. Students not candidates for 
a degree will bo received at any stage for which an 
examination shall show them to be fitted, and may 
remain for any desired time. Further information 
will be famished on application to Professor G. L. 
Vose. 

Terms of Admission to ttie Academic Course. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 

following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's I^atin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the A'^neid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 

QKKKK. — Hadloy's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Comi)ositiou. 

Ancient GEOGitApnY. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 

and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 

I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 

Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission 
will be required to produce testimonials of good 
moral character. The time for examination is the 
Friday after Commencement and the Friday before 
the opening of the first term. In exceptional cases 
applicants maybe examined at other times. Candi- 
dates for admission to advanced classes will be ex- 
amined in the studies which such classes have 
accomplished. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrange- 
ments with the Principals of schools and academies 
having a regular course preparatory for college of at 
least three years' duration, whereby their pupils 
may be examined for admission to college at their 
respective schools, in connection with their own 
final examinations. 

The amount of instruction now offered and pos- 
sible to be taken in the several principal lines of 
study is exhibited comparatively, as reduced to one 
scale, in the following manner. This is, however, 
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal 
length : 

Latin, eight terms. 

Greek, eight terms. 

Mathematics, eight terms. 

German, four and a half terms. 

English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English 
Literature, three and a half terms. 

French, three terms. 

Italian, one term. 

Spanish, one term. 

Rhetoric (formal), one term. Rhetorical and 
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a 
half terms. 

Natural History studies, five and a half terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, four terms. 

Chemistry, four terms. 

History, Ancient and Modern, two terras. 

Political Economy, one and a half terms. 

Public Law, two terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, including Logic, 
four terms. 

Christian Evidences, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $7.5. 
Room rent (ball), average, .*'2.>. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $1 10. 

Board is obtained in town at $.1 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$-10 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very nuitorially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Farther information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XL 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEBRUARY 8, 1882. 



No. 13. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVERV ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DDRING THE 
COLLEGIATE TEAR, BY THE CLASS OF '82, OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Arthur G. Staples, Mana.giug Editor. 

Charles H. Gilman, Business EdiUir. 
Melvin S. Holway, Eugene T. McCarthy, 

"William A. Moody, "Warren 0. Plimpton. 

Terms — $2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances siinuld be made to tlie Business Editor, Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordinlly invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Olfice at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XL, No. 13.— February 8, 1882. 

Editorial Notes 151 

Literary: 

Hand-Downs (opera) 153 

Inter-Collegiate Rowing 156 

Communications - 157 

College Items 158 

Personal 160 

Omppings 161 

Editors' Table 1 61 



EDITORIAL KOTES. 



While most of our New England con- 
temporaries are convulsed by the pangs of 
the true London article, and indulging in rash 
puns upon the name of the Apostle of tlie 
same, we find ourselves quietly wandering 
along oblivious of everything except the ex- 
ceeding beauty of mid-winter. Though not 
" secluded among the everlasting hills," as the 
Argo has it, we are yet sufficiently removed 
to escape the prevailing distempers of sesthet- 
icism and varioloid, for both of which we are 
truly thankful. We must be excused, how- 



ever, if we delay to give Dame Nature a 
tribute for her considerate beneficence. Tiie 
historic Maine winter, when the snows buried 
the fence posts and made the visible world 
only a barren wasteof snow, has departed and 
left us just winter enough to set the sleigh- 
bells jingling and to give us, now and then, 
the picture of a perfect morning. The pleas- 
ant season makes the weeks go much faster, 
and already we can foresee the end. 



We notice that at this time last year the 
Senior class had commenced to sit for the 
class pictures. Although the present class is 
not so large in numbers, yet surely it is not 
too early to take definite action, and, at least, 
go through the formality of selecting a pho- 
tographer. 



The continued absence of President Cham- 
berlain, presumably in the land of orange 
groves, has been greatly deplored by the Seniors 
who fail to see just liovv tiiey are to recover 
the lost time. Tlie rumor has been circulated 
that President Chamberlain meditates a with- 
drawal from his relation with the college, but 
we hope and believe that it is without the 
shadow of a foundation. We cannot bring 
ourselves to discuss a possibility, which, if true, 
would entail such an incalculable loss to the 
college. We are not surprised at his ex- 
clianging Maine for Florida for a season, at 
least, but we shall all be glad to see him back 



The communication signed " A Member 
of '85," we print because the Orient is- nec- 
essarily a medium of expression for all, and 
for no other reason. It would seem that a too 



152 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



rigid adoption of the letter of the rule has 
disagreed with the ])istoric smoothness of 
Freshman existence and spoiled the dream 
of years, but the communication speaks for 
itself. 



It is not with a desire to be fashionable 
that we request a payment of subscriptions, 
although it tends to that end. We would be 
really pleased if all indebted would kindly 
favor us with the amounts. It is unnecessary 
that we should tell you how much we need 
money. The tale would be harrowing. 
Suffice it to say that every day adds inconven- 
ience, and that a sudden and decided move- 
ment in the sending in of subscriptions would 
please us greatly. Will all indebted consider 
the matter and favor us at their earliest 
convenience? 



The petition for civil servica reform has 
evidently fallen on somewhat uninterested 
hearers. Tliere can be no class of young men, 
certainly, more able to judge of the necessity 
of such a movement tlian college men and 
none whose names represent a more judicious 
mixture of ability and possibility than theirs. 
We had hoped, and still liope, that the move- 
ment will meet a share of success here corre- 
sponding to what it has received in other 
colleges, but have no desire to induce any one 
beyond their convictions. 



The matter has been suggested, not once 
but many times, concerning the possibility of 
introducing improved heating apparatus into 
the dormitories. We were sitting, not long 
since, by the open wood fire in one of the 
ends, and could not help contrasting how very 
superior it is to the unwholesome coal stove 
with all ils inconveniences of every sort. 
Notliing but economy, and that too in tiie 
land of forests, could ever have commended 
the change from tlie pleasant open fii'o-placo, 
\vith all its hcaltii-giving influences of every 



kind, to the present abominations of coal 
stoves. We would at this time welcome any 
improvement. There can be no reason, we 
are assured, why steam heating can not be 
introduced into the dormitories, and means 
of heating furnished as economicall}^ and with 
incalculably less inconvenience than now. It 
certainly is not beyond tiie limits of possibility, 
and the times demand it. Perhaps, however, 
the Faculty object to steam inasmuch as it is 
not introduced into Memorial Hall. We 
should be pleased to know whetiier the intro- 
duction of steam heating apparatus into the 
dormitories is possible. 



We should like to call the attention of 
every one to the exact status of the college as 
regai'ds the suit now pending. We cannot 
undertake to correct misrepresentations, or 
inform the one or two papers in the country 
who have not yet printed the item that " Seven 
Bowdoin students were arrested," etc., of the 
fact, because both would be impossible. We 
would onl}' like to impress upon those who are 
just printing the item to the effect that " great 
excitement exists at Bowdoin in regard to the 
matter,"that such is not wholly the case. It is 
true that the trial is looked forward to anx- 
iously with the sincere hope that the tribunal 
of justice, supposed to reside in Portland, will 
do its duty to both parties. The Columbia 
Spectator contains the statement that the 
whole Sophomore class will be summoned, 
possibly the wliole college, which is, we think, 
higiily improbable, because the college knows 
comparatively notliing concerning the affair. 
Tiie Spectator also remarks that six students 
were recently jugged for liazing. Tlie storj' 
has been an extremely' long time in its flight 
from Maine to New York. We admire the word 
"jugged," and if tiie Spectator would define 
we would pass upon tlie trutli of tiie s'tateuient. 
If it moans that they were actiiall}^ as Noah 
Webster has it, "incarcerated," the Spectator 
is wrong again. We have only to say that the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



153 



affair is working out its own salvation, and, 
although almost unprecedented in the history 
of the college, and indeed in the history of 
all colleges, will surely set a limit which many 
of our sister colleges would do well to respect 
also. 



We have received a very excellent com- 
munication, which only lack of space pre- 
vents our publishing, regarding the relations 
of the students and Faculty. The writer 
complains that members of the Faculty are 
not sufficiently neighborly, and recalls the 
good old times which held so many pleasant 
customs, — when it was the expected thing 
that the professors would frequently drop in 
and while away an evening around the open 
fire-place. One can easily see that this would 
be the pleasantest thing imaginable, especially 
if the visitor would send in his card the even- 
ing previous. There would be, to say 
nothing of the pleasure of conversation with 
superior minds, a larger love, as the writer 
expresses it, and more cordial and more mutual 
interchange of opinions and a better insight 
into the correct method of college life. 

Anything certainly to create a fellow- 
feeling, to make student and teacher aware 
that they are co-workers, is commendable. 
We fear, however, that some good reason 
caused the death of this custom. The country 
parson hangs to the calling system as a means 
of benefit to both parties, and generally calls 
previous to the evening meal, and remains. 
Various of our "young men" call on New- 
Year's, and many on Sunday evenings, but 
these are exceptions. We opine that some 
would object to receiving without notice pre- 
vious. It ought not to be so, but we fear it 
is. The sudden appearance of a professor at a 
whist party, or where the "American game " 
is in progress, would not be conducive to 
many novel literary acquirements, or develope 
brilliancy in conversation. The situation 
would, we fear, be painful. 



Yet there is room for a decided improve- 
ment in the sociability of professors. Why 
the acquaintance may not be carried further 
than the class-room, and especially here where 
numbers do not interpose, develop into an 
intimate acquaintance, to the evident advant- 
age of the student certainly, and perhaps of 
both, is not evident. While it is certain that 
we, here in Bowdoin, are not behind other 
colleges in this respect ; yet, as the writer 
asserts, it might be bettered. 



HAND-DOWNS. 

A TEADITIONAL TEAGICAL OPEEA. 

Dramatis Personae. 
Jack Love-em-all (a Student). 
E. NiPPEE, Je. (a typical Trader). 
Maeia (a very diezy young Blaid). 
Liz L. Oeing (a typical Hand-Down). 
Chorus of gushing Maidens and brash Students. 

ACT I. 

Scene : A boudoir. Mirrors, rouge, lily white, 
false hair, dresses, etc., scattered around. A crowd 
of gushing maidens, of doubtful ages, discovered in 
the apartment. 

Chorus of Maidens : 

Poor unhappy maidens we, 

Maids forever, probably. 

Many years we've laid for students, 

Sacrificing pride and prudence; 

Mashing Freshmen, green and silly, 

Praising Sophomores' wicked folly. 

Petted, loved (f), engaged to Juniors, 

Left, at last, by cruel Seniors. 

Handed down from one to other, » 

Till our age, 'tis bard to cover. 

Now no hope we have to marry, 

But our aching hearts must carry 

Till some trader, prof., or tutor 

Takes us in the distant future. 

Woe to us ! Uubappy misses ! 

Curse the students aud their kisses ! 
Enter Maeia, B, with a hop, skip, and a jump. 

Maeia: 

Oh ! cease your sorrow, 
For on the morrow 



154 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Our time will come, 

The day'll be won. 

We'll bare them yet, 

ily heart I'll bet. 

But list to me 

And you shall see 

How I expect 

To win the bet. 
Maeia sings : 

To-morrow night, at half-past eight. 

Be all on hand, let none be late, 

The Brunswick band plays on the mall, 

The boys will come, both great and small. 

And while the band plays sweet and soft. 

Why, pick them up and trot them off. 

Buzz them, no matter what you say. 

Ask them to call some other day. 

Invite them in to take some feed. 

Ice cream and cake, and all they need. 

Through students' stomachs, so they say. 

To touch their hearts, is the best way. 

This we must do, and I will bet 

We'll break their hearts and win them yet. 

Chorus of Maidens : 

'Tis true! 'tis true ! The day is ours, 
Now students brash, beware. 
And never think again that you 
Can lose us maidens fair. 
Exit Maeia and Maidens, frolicking gayly, R. 
Enter Liz L. OEiNG/row door R. C. Liz solil- 
oquizes : 

Alas, poor foolish girls ! you little know what 
cruel Fate has in store for you. I once could sing, 
and once was young and gay. But I have stood the 
racket of many a year. I, too, was vexed and 
troubled by those horrid students. For twelve long 
years I was loved and jilted by them, and led a 
dizzy life. To each new class I was but sweet six- 
teen. But no hopes now have I except to niari'y 
that old Nipper whom father kicked from out our 
house so long ago. [Maidens heard singing " 'Tis 
true, 'tis true," etc.] Hark ! they sing. Their song 
brings back afresh the memories of my youth. I 
freeze! I burn! My nerves are all unstrung! 
Help! Water! 1 faint! Oh! Ah! Alas! (Faints.) 
Tableau, red lights, and sloiv curtains. 

ACT n. 

FiE.ST ScKNE: Main Street, near the college. 
Brass bund playing in the distance. The fainter the 
music the belter the effect. 



Enter E. Nippee, Je., R. Sings: 

I am a jolly vender 

Of calico and silk. 

Of pork and beans, tobacco. 

Of rum and sour milk, 

Of dogs and cats and sausage. 

Of cabbages and beets. 

Of cigarettes and matches. 

Of tough and stringy meats; 

In fact, I deal iu all things 

From hair-pins to a saw, 

And when occasion asks it 

I peddle out the law. 

I always cheat the students, 

To cheat them is my aim, 

I hate the pesky rascals. 

Yet through them money gain. 

I'm growing gray and aged, 

And must a helper wed. 

To wash my dirty dishes 

And make my pies and bread. 

I know a buxom maiden 

Whom I courted once before. 

But then she loved a student 

And kicked me out of door. 

But now she's lost her beauty, 

And has had so many jilts 

That, for the sake of marriage. 

She'd wed a pair of stilts. 
BLxit : 

Yes, yes ; I'll go to her to-night, and this time I 
will warrant her father will not iill me with boots as 
I descend the steps. Ha ! ha I my pretty maid, I'll 
get even with you yet. 

Exit, L. 

Enter Students, R. 

STUDENTS' SONG. 

In us behold the students bold. 
Whose lives are gay and merry, 
Wo know no fear, of wine or beer. 
Of ale, or Tom and Jcri-y, 
Of ale, or Tom and Jerry. 

A bold bad band, we cannot stand 
The Hi'unswick band's fierce rattle, 
'Twould .stop a train, tiii-n milk to rain, 
Or turn the tide of battln. 
Or turn the tide of battle. 

Wo roam the streets, in .search of sweets 
From blushing maidens' kis.ses. 
We flirt and love like turtle doves, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



155 



With dear confiding misses, 
Witli dear confiding misses. 

Enter Jack Loye-em-all, B. Sings : 
As I was coining down the street 
A crowd of girls I chanced to meet. 
I thinl£ that they mean business, boys. 
So cease your clatter, stop your noise. 
If I'm not wrong they seek a mash. 
So separate and malje a dash. 
To follow up some pretty maid, 
And pick her up, be not afraid. 
Make love to them and bill and coo 
Until they think they've captured you. 
Tell them your life is dull and sad, 
Their love you need to make it glad. 
You'll find that they'll not take it ill, 
For they've been often through the mill. 
If they can win a college boy 
They'll be so glad they'll burst with joy. 

Exit Jack and Students, R. 

Second Scene : A magnificent vieiv of Bruns- 
wick bg moonlight, sltowing the centre of the citg and 
mang side streets. A brass band playing on the 
mall. People promenading. Jack and Students 
discovered, each with a gushing maiden, on the side 
streets.* 

Duet : Students and Maidens. 

Students to Maidens : 

Music fills the quiet air, 

Luna shineth pale and fair; 

Our hearts fierce beat and flutter 

"With a passion too, too utter. 

If you our suit refuse. 

Death will take us, life will lose. 

Maidens to Students : 

Oh ! you students, bad and bold, 

Half the tale we've never told; 

For we love with such devotion 

We cannot conceal emotion. 

Take our hearts and give us bliss, 

Seal the contract with a kiss. 

(Action suited to ivords.) 
Chorus' of Maidens : 

Oh, joy ! Oh, rapture ! we are saved. 

Our aching hearts made glad, 

No more will we be handed down 

By students bold and bad. 

*ThiB scene can only be well represented on the mammoth 
stage at Lemon t Hall. 



Slow curtain. As the curtain descends the band 
plays softly, and the maidens flop over serenely into 
the students' arms. 

ACT III. 

FiEST Scene : The R. R. station at Brunswick. 
A train waiting at the station. 

Enter Nippee, Je., and Liz, R., bound to Free- 
port on their ivedding tour. Liz with a bandana 
valise. Nipper, Je., with a little hair trunk. 
Duet : Liz and Nippee. 
Liz to Nippee : 

my darling little Nipper, 
What a happy couple we, 
What a shame that daddy's slipper 
Used you once so cruelly ! 

Nippee to Liz : . 

Never mind my little duckie. 

You sweet apple of my eye. 

With the students, if we're lucky, 

We'll get even by-and-bye. 
Both : 

Let all others fret with sorrow, 

While we celebrate this day. 

We will never trouble borrow. 

As we go our happy way. 
They get aboard the train. 
Enter Jack and Students, R., bound home. 
Chorus of Students : 

Through with troubles, tribulations. 
Fakirs, books, examinations. 
Through with cuts and poor excuses. 
Consultations with the muses, 
We must leave our darling mashes 
For the future coming classes. 
They will miss our sweet embraces. 
And our dear beloved faces. 
But they'll strive with all their cunning 
Some to catch from those forthcoming. 
Year by year they're handed over 
From one student to another. 
Yes, poor girls, your lot we pity. 
As we leave your charming city. 

Students get aboard the train. As the train leaves 
the station Students sing: 

Fare ye well, ye halls of learning, 
With your pleasures and your grinds ; 
Fare ye well, ye dizzy maidens. 
Whom we have to leave behind. 



156 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Second Scexe : Boudoir, same as scene in 
Act I. Maidens diseovered with hlood-sliot eyes, 
disheveled hair, etc., each having in her hands a 
pistol, a dagger, and a vial of poison. They moan 
pitiously as the curtain rises. 
Chorus of Maidens : 

Poor unhappy maidens we. 
But no more we'll maidens be, 
Broken-hearted by our sorrow, 
We will die before the morrow. 
Fooled, betrayed by students' kisses, 
Jeered at by our townsmen's hisses, 
Life for us has naught but sadness. 
Banished all our former gladness. 
Now our hearts, all scarred by mashes. 
Cut, cold steel, with cruel gashes. 

(Stab themselves.) 
Now our brains, if you can find, 
Scatter, pistol, to the wind. 

(Shoot themselves.) 
-Now our spirits, poison, fell, — 
Take to heaven or to hell. 

(Drink the poison.) 
Curtain. As the curtain descends their spirits 
are ivafted away on perfumed breezes to the happy 
hunting grounds. 

The End. 



INTER-COLLEGIATE ROWING. 

We are pleased to be able to give our 
readers the latest news concerning the pro- 
posed iiiter-collegiate boat race the coming 
season. Tlie secretary of tlie Lake George 
Association lias kindly placed at our disposal 
replies from the different colleges, selections 
from wliich we publish. Tlie majorit}^ are in 
favor of a regatta. Further — 

Princeton writes: 

E.\ciiso delay in answering. Our men arc in ac- 
tive training, and, having found the gymnasium in- 
adequate, have taken a track in the public highways 
and arc bu.sily engaged in removing the lamp-posts 
and greasing the railroad tracks. Unfortunately 
the men are obliged to practice chioHy in the night, 
hence wo have not been ablo to judge of their prog- 
ress. Wo will not row if ITart of Pennsylvania 
rows. 

Later. Owing to the expenses ineuiTed in these 
works it is doubtful what action we shall lake. 



P^rom Oberlin : 

We do not approve of boat races. We have 
found more congenial labor at home. A dram-shop 
has been discovered in the village, and the students 
are actively laboring for its destruction with won- 
derful enthusiasm. This we consider the proper 
exercise for muscular Christianity. Should we finish 
in season we have hopes of coming east on a similar 
mission. 

Later. Impossible to come East. Two horrible 
cases of tobacco chewing have been found right in 
our midst. These will require all our attention. 

Pennsylvania writes : 

Saratoga is too far. We want to row at home — 
on the Schuylkill. It is unfair to ask us to bear any 
expenses. Have the race on the Schuylkill, pay our 
expenses, guarantee us a prize, let us select our own 
judges, and we will consider your proposition. We 
wish to serve notice on several colleges that we 
shall not row without Hart. 

From Columbia: 

Will be on hand. We have Freshmen in active 
training, and their brilliant display in saloons re- 
cently was peculiarly gratifying. Columbia is once 
more desirous of exhibiting her peculiar style of 
manning a boat— four men to row, and the remain- 
der for passengers and ballast. We will guarantee 
no fainting this time. 

Cornell writes: 

Is your proposal made in jest or in earnest! 
Rowing is a poor subject for a joke with this insti- 
tution. Know you not that boating is a thing of the 
past at Cornell ? and yet it is but one short year, 
and no crew equalled ours (in our minds). Then 
we went abroad and at once we were at sea— be- 
yond our depth. You know the rest. You have 
touched a tender place— a spot that is yet raw. Ah, 
well ! 

From Harvard : 

Will Yalo row ? If so, count us in. 
And Yale : 

Will Harvard row ? If not, count us out, 
Williams laments thusly : 

Did you say boat race to us, or was your letter 
misdirected f Old inhabitants and college tradi- 
tions tell of Williams's furniei' prowess with llio oar, 
and, too, tliere are old landmarks which skilled an- 
tiquarians pronounce the rcniains of a bnat-houso — 
nothing fuillier. Wo are forbidden to Juiu assucia- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



157 



tions. Can j'ou inform us if Garfield was an oars- 
man ? 

And Bates meekly whispers: 
You confer a great honor, at the same time you 
frighten us. How we should like to row with real 
college crews? But then the long distance and the 
expense— ah, there's the rub. Our authorities say 
we shall need all we can raise for home consump- 
tion, as some cruel people are disposed to take ad- 
vantage of our position as a weakling. Then again 
we have no boat, and in fact we never rowed, but 
of course we should not consider the last any draw- 
back. 

" Considering the above facts I would ur- 
gently advise the Bowdoin crew to go into 
training at once." 

We emphatically endorse the advice of the 
secretary. 



COMMUHICATIOKS. 



Editors of Orient : 

We are glad to see the "Infusion of 
Harvard blood into the Faculty," and hope 
that the changes that the Latin professor has 
commenced to make will meet with success. 
The manner of conducting recitations and the 
method employed to familiarize us with the 
Latin phrases and idioms are agreeable to us 
as students and surely approved by all, but as 
a class officer we would beg to suggest that it 
would be much more agreeable if the manner 
of receiving excuses were more in accordance 
with that of the other class officers. What- 
ever may be the duties of a class officer else- 
where it does not devolve upon a class officer 
at Bowdoin to dwell too much on trivial 
points and technicalities. A too rigid exac- 
tion of the letter of the law makes it most in- 
convenient, and while we know that compari- 
sons aie odious yet we are sure that pi'evious 
Freshman classes have got along well enough 
to warrant an equal disciimination now. We 
only wi.-^h to be lieard through your columns, 
and make the suggestion ]io[)ing for tJie most 
pleasant results. A Membkr of '85. 



Editors of Orient : 

However unwelcome the thought may 
be, it must be admitted that the manner in 
which many of us pass Sunday is, to say the 
least, not more elevating than our week-day 
occupations. For each week-day we have 
some appointed task upon which it is necessary 
to sjjend more or less time ; but when Sunday 
comes the average student communes with 
himself to this effect : " This is not a day for 
study " (probably since inclination coincides 
with principle (?) he comes to this conclusion 
the more quickly), "and I have not a name- 
able thing to do." He therefore passes the 
day in sheer idleness, or, even worse, takes 
refuge in pastimes not too suitable for a 
week-day. 

That such is the habitual routine of many 
in college is a lamentable fact, and the query 
arises. What can be done about it? Immedi- 
ately some of the more zealous cry out, " We 
must have more religious services." Very 
plausible in theory, — but experience and 
observation testify that that will accomplish 
nothing. The regular meetings of the Pray- 
ing Circle are not so crowded as to call for 
more frequent ones. The fact stares us in the 
face that but few members of the college are 
professing Christians, and that a majority are 
not to be reached by religious influence. 
What then ? Are we immediately to conclude 
that there is no help since the highest means 
has been found to be useless ? Some, perhaps, 
will say, " Yes, there is no other cure." It is 
truetliat such means, could they produce any 
effect, would work the most radical change, — 
a change from positive evil to positive good. 
But as such a change is, at least, improbable, 
will it not be profitable to turn our minds in 
search of means, less radical' to be sure, but 
capable, perhaps, of some elevating influence? 

One thing suggests itself wliicli would, in 
my opinion, be a strong step in the right 
direction, and that is tlie opening of the col- 
lege library on Sunday. It will be urged that 



158 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



full opportunit}- is given, on every afternoon 
in the week, for the students to procure books 
and take them to their rooms. Ver}' true ; 
but could not some, who had neglected to 
procure them, by this arrangement remedy' 
their neglect ; and would not others, who had 
not, periiaps, interest enough to take out 
books, come to the librar}^ on Sundaj^ driven 
by the absolute want of something profitable 
to do, and thus kept from doing something 
entirely unprofitable ? 

From an impartial point of view there 
would seem to be but two questions necessary 
to be answered in order to decide the subject. 
First, will it do any harm ? second, will it not 
do so7ne good ? No good reason occurs to me 
why the first question should not be answered 
in the negative. I have tried to suggest some 
reasons why the second shall be answered 
in the afBrmative. At any rate it is a subject 
worthy of earnest consideration. Dis. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



A sound steals tliro' the silent hall, 

A rustling, muffled sound, 
Approachiug footsteps thro' the vvall, 

Loud tumult echoes round. 

From top to lower floor they come, 

Like tread of cloven hoof. 
No 1 Yes I I know it must be — some — 

A junior on the roof. 

Hatchings phxyed both ereuiugs at the G. A. R. 
Fair. 

President Chamberlain returned from the South 
last week. 

One of the students has been trying his bicycle 
at the skating rink. 

Science even may now be expressed in a'sthetic 
terminology. We speak of {N0i)2. 

One of the professors thinks the Senior class 
more than usually delicate in health. 

The Snplioninres in their rhetorial exercises have 
been discussing the merits of '83. —Bur/le. 

The result of our compulsory attendance system 
was very obvious at church last Sunday. 



The Seniors are having required reading in con- 
nection with the study of history of philosophy. 

The opening exercises of the medical school are 
held on Thursday of this week. Dr. Mitchell gives 
the address. 

It is understood that Mr. Booker has had an 
offer of S.")000 for " Jack " since his advertisement 
in the Bugle. 

Prof. Robinson gave a lecture at Boothbay, Tues- 
day, 31st, on the subject, " Gold, Silver, and the 
Precious Stoues." 

The assemblies that were to be held in Dirigo 
Hall by the students have been given up on account 
of small atteudance. 

The College Glee Club will give a concert at Rich- 
mond, Saturday, February 18th. They expect a 
cordial support from the students. 

A huudred yards dash for the chapel on the 
slippery paths is a very amusing spectacle, though 
undignified for an upper classman. 

Just now there is a corner in the kindling wood 
market. Attic floors still firm at old rates. Neigh- 
boring fences shaky with a tendency to fall. 

The parallel bars from the old gymnasium have 
been placed in-the little mathematical room, South 
Winthrop, and are waiting for some one to try them. 

On account of the severe storm last Sunday the 
audience at church was small, and composed mostly 
of students. Prof. Campbell preached the sermon. 

The chapel quintet sang at the second evening 
of the fair on Thursday last. College musical talent 
seems to be in demand at the various entertainments 
about town. 

Several projects have been discussed for gaining 
more time for access to the library. The plan of 
lighting and opening the library during the evening 
has been considered. 

The class in geology have finished their course 
in that study and have begun reviewing in order to 
have the examination before the president takes the 
class in his department. 

The Cougi-egational sociable at the house of Mrs. 
Thompson, hist Thursday, was well attended by the 
students, in spite of attractions in othei' parts of the 
village. . The evening passed very pleasantly. 

Lieut. Crawford, since ho has been in Washing- 
ton has been a member of Guiteau's body fifuard. He 
has written an interesting letter to friends in town 
giving the result of his observations in regard to the 
criminal. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



159 



On the day of prayer, services were held by the 
college in the Chemical lectnre room. Prof. Camp- 
bell preached from the text II. Corinthians iii.]7, 
and deeply interested the audience by his instruct- 
ive and scholarly discourse. 

A number of trees in the campus woods are be- 
ing cut down, apparently for fire wood. A year or 
so ago, however, the college authorities were much 
opposed to removing a couple of trees which inter- 
fered with the ball ground. 

An address was given to the students in the 
Praying Circle room, Sunday evening, by Prof. Rob- 
inson. It is hoped that these lectures may be con- 
tinued by our Faculty, as they seem to be of inter- 
est to the students in general. 

At the Alpha Delta Phi dinner in Boston, Janu- 
ary 31st, President Chamberlain was elected dele- 
gate at large, and Edward Stanwood and Arlo 
Bates delegates from Bowdoin to the convention to 
be held in New York nest spring. 

The high wind about a fortnight ago, blew over 
one of the chimneys on North Appleton. The other 
chimneys about the college may be built as strongly 
as practicable, but the idea of being greeted with a 
shower of bricks in every gale is not a pleasant one. 

The Orient has received from the college a 
copy of the general catalogue. This publication is 
no longer called the Triennial, as it has not ap- 
peared regularly. A copy will be sent to the offlcers 
of the college and the alumni, whose address can be 
obtained. 

Prof, (to student) — " Describe the sternum in this 
species of bird." (Hesitation on the part of stu- 
dent.) " What is the shape of the sternum in the 
turkey?" (Further hesitation.) "Do you know 
what the sternum is?" Student — "It's the bone 
the tail feathers grow out of." Class all have the 
colic. 

On the evening of Wednesday before last, the 
Juniors had an interesting lecture in connection 
with their Chemistry, showing the crystalization of 
different substances by the evaporation of solutions 
The process of crystalization was beautifully illus- 
trated on a white screen, by means of a calcium 
light and lantern. 

A. F. Nichols, formerly well known in Boston, 
has one of the handsomest and best equipped tail- 
oring establishments at Brunswick to be found east 
of Boston. It is located on the ground floor of the 
new brick Dunlap block, and is the acme of con- 
venience, utility, and elegance, in all its appoint- 



ments. Mr. Nichols imports his own goods and 
carries in stock an extensive and varied assortment 
of the best English and Scottish suitings, which 
are manufactured to order into nicely fitting gar- 
ments by competent journeymen tailors, at moder- 
ate prices. He has been in Brunswick only a few 
months, but is rapidly acquiring the reputation of 
being the most fashionable and popular tailor in the 
State of Maine. — Boston Post. 

The fourteenth annual reunion of the Bowdoin 
Alumni in Boston, was held at Young's Hotel, Wed- 
nesday, January 25th. About seventy gentlemen 
were present, among whom were many notable 
men of the State. Judge Gardner presided, and 
highly commended the history of the college and 
the standing of its graduates. Prof. Chapman was 
introduced to represent the college, and in his ad- 
dress acknowledged the many favors Bowdoin had 
received from the Alumni, and spoke of its present 
encouraging condition. Other distinguished speak- 
ers were introduced, and all expressed their interest 
in the prospects of Bowdoin. 

The program of the chapel concert is as follows : 

PART FIRST. 

1. Original Part Song. " Alma Mater." 

Quintet. 

Quintet. 

Prof. Ctiapman. 
Moonlight Sonata." 

Ml s. Carmiuliael and Prof. Saucier. 

5. Original Part Song. " Ivy Ode." . 

Quintet. 

6. Original Part Song. " Senior's Last Cliapel." 

Quintet. 

7. Piano Solo. Sclaerzo, Bb. 

Prof. Saucier. 

8. Original Part Song. " Music of the Elms." 

Quintet. 

PART SECOND. 

9. Piano Solo. " Halte Des Chasseurs." 

Miss Forde. 

10. Song. " The Snow Lies White." 

Mrs. Lee. 

11. Duet, Piano and Claronet. Figaro's Hochzeit. 

Mrs. Carniiuhuel and Mr. Hutchins. 

12. Original Part Song. " The Thorndilie Oali." 

Quintet. 

13. Baritone Solo. (Instrumental.) " Silver Stream t'ull<a." 

Mr. J. W. Crosby. 

14. Original Part Song. '• Senior's Farewell." 

Quintet. 

15. Piano Solo. " Norma." 

Prof. Saucier. 

16. Original Song and Chorus. "Bowdoin Crew." 

Quintet. 

The judges chosen to decide as to the merit of 
the original college songs rendered at the chapel 
concert, submitted their decision Friday afternoon. 
Before naming the successful competitors, it should 
be stated that the selection of the best pieces was 



2. Original Song and Chorus, " Junior Ease." 

3. Song. " The Toung Mountaineer." 

4. Piano Duet 



160 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



by no means easily made. Seven out of the eight 
(the eighth coming second) received a vote for first 
place, either on account of excellence in musical 
composition, or for words, or as a college soug. 
Careful criticism was given, and the aptness of each 
composition considered. Below is given the result 
of the decision: Best musical composition, "Ivy 
Ode," E. R. Jewett, '82; best words, "Ivy Ode," 
C. E. Stinchfield, '82. The foitr best songs were : 
1st, " Ivy Ode," music by E. R. Jewett, words by 
C. E. Stinchfield; 2d, "Alma Mater," music by J. 
Torrey, Jr., '84, words by C. C. Torrey, '84; 3d, 
"Bowdoiu Crew," music by J. W. Crosby, '82, 
words, Anonymous ; 4th, " Music of the Elms," 
music by J. A. Crowley, '83, words by J. F. Libby, 
'82. The following persons acted as judges : From 
the Faculty — Professors Chapman, Campbell, and 
Johnson; From the students — E. T. McCarthy, '82, 
C. C. Hutchins, '83, C. W. Longreu,'84, N. B. Ford, 
'85 ; From town — Mrs. Lee, Mrs. Carmichael, Mrs. 
H. P. Nichols, and Miss Smith of Topsham. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

At a regular meeting of the Kappa Chapter of 
the Psi Upsilon Fraternity, held February 3, 1882, 
the following preamble and resolutions were 
adopted : 

Whereas, It has pleased Almighty God to re- 
move from this life our esteemed and beloved brother 

Alvah Black, 
of the class of 1845, therefore. 

Resolved, That in his death the society loses a 
brother who was faithful and zealous in' the per- 
formance of his duties, while an active member of 
the Chapter, and who, after graduating from college, 
was always loyal to the inrerests of Psi Upsilon, 
and devoted to its welfare and prosperity, one who 
was wise in counsel and fearless in action ; an hon- 
est and upright man, whoso virtues endeared him 
not only to the fraternity, of which he was a mem- 
ber, but also to bis large circle of friends. 

Rcsolrcd, That we tender to the famil)' of the 
deceased brother, our heartfelt sympathy in this 
their deep aflliction. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to the family of the deceased, to the several 
Chapters, and to the press. 

W. 0. Plimpton, ) In behalf of 
H. E. Allen, [ the 

W. J. Collins, ) Kappa (liapter. 
Bowdoin College, February 3, 1882. 



1st Senior — " Do you like going to the 'mission'?" 
2d Senior—" Certainly, I would not shun the Miss 
I saw there the other day for a horse on Anacrcon." 
1st Senior is sent homo in a carriage. — Targum. 



PERSONAL. 



'34. — Mr. John C. Dodge, president of the board 
of overseers of the college, spoke at the dinner of 
the Bowdoin Alumni in Boston, held January 25. 

'44. — Winthrop Tappan has been traveling in 
Europe since 1872. He has no permanent residence, 
his last being at Florence, Italy. 

'45. — Alvah Black died at his residence in Paris 
a short time since. He was one of the first lawyers 
of Oxford County. He held the position of clerk of 
the judicial courts from 1856-9, and was a member 
of the Maine Legislature in 1860. He was a man 
of fine ability and will be greatly missed at the 
Oxford bar. 

'47.— Henry G. Neil is contractor for wood and 
ties for U. P. R. R. Company, Tie Siding, Wyo. Ter. 

'50. — Hon. Wm. S. Gardner was re-elected Pres- 
ident of the "Bowdoin Alumni Association" in 
Boston at the reunion and dinner held January 25. 

'51. — J. C. A. Wingate, United States Consul at 
Foochow, China, has recently sent Prof Packard a 
Chinese book on Anatomy. It is quite a curious 
volume. It may be seen at the library. 

'55. — W. L. Putnam was nominated, February 3, 
by Gov. Plaisted to fill the vacancy which will exist 
on the supreme bench by the expiration of Judge 
Libby's term, April 23d. Mr. Putnam is one of the 
first lawyers in the State. 

'66. — Rev. George T. Packard, who has been 
living here in town until of late, has accepted a 
temporary position on the editorial staflf of the 
Boston Daily Advertiser. 

'66.— John J. Herrick has a chapter devoted to 
his biography in the Chicago Alliance, which is 
publishing sketches of the Illinois bar. In closing 
it speaks of him as follows : " Many a man who has 
grown gray at the bar would be glad of the position 
which Mr. Herrick has attained almost at a bound." 

'68. — Mr. T. J. Emory is secretary of the Bow- 
doin Alumni Association iu Boston for the ensuing 
year. 

'79.— 0. S. C. Davies, who has been disponsory 
clerk at the insane hospital at Augusta for the past 
year, has resigned that position to outer the Medical 
School here this coming term. 

'81. — J. O. P. Wheelwright spent a few days 
with us last week. He finds an occasional recrea- 
tion beneficial, lest the study of law sluadd weigh 
too heavily upon him. 

'84.— Longron has returned from teaching. 

'84. — Sayward's stentorian voice is again heard 
on the campus. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



161 



CLIPPIHGS. 

student (translating) — '' Instruxi tripUcem aciem 
— he drew three aces." 

"Get thee behind me, Satin," said the young 
lady with a long train. — Lampoon. 

A gamecock ought to be good eating. Does not 
the poet say, " The bravest are the tenderest"? " — Ex. 

It is reported that President McCosh intends to 
prohibit Princeton students from being on the streets 
at mght.— Echo. Why not spank them and put 
them ""to bed ? — Cornell Era. That's the way they 
do at Cornell, McCosh [—Acta. 

Scene (Recitation Room). Bell has just rung 
and the class becomes impatient to leave. Prof. 
N. — " Now gentlemen, I have a mortgage on you for 
a few minutes yet." Mr. H.— " And, sir, you don't 
get much interest from us, either." — Spectator. 

The ibllowing tale is being circulated about 
" Wild Oscar." One day, while at lunch, he noticed 
some lilies on Ihe table which were somewhat faded. 
After gazing pensively at them for a while lie said, 
"Poor things! They are very, very weary." Then 
turning to the waiter : "Come take them to rest." 
What a beautiful sentiment ! —Spectator. 

— " By George ! " said the local ed., rushing into 
the office, " Here's a good one; just made it up. If 
a certain young lady with large hands .should say 
her gloves were a mile too big, would you be justified 
in telling her that she was drawing it niildl Do 
you tumble? Ha! Ha!" He tumbled. The manag- 
ing ed.'s aim was sure, and the inkstand did its 
work, and his gore mingled with its contents in one 
pool on the floor. —ie/n(//t Burr. 

"I assure you, gentlemen," said the convict upon 
entering the prison, " that the place has sought me, 
and not I the place. My own affairs really demand 
all my time and attention, and I may truly say that 
my selections to fill this position was an entire sur- 
prise. Had I consulted my own interests, I should 
have peremtorily declined to serve; but as I am in 
the hands of my friends, I see no other course than 
to submit." And be submitted. — Ex. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



The exchange editor of the Amherst Student has 
taken a new departure in the management of his 
columns. He says : " Why we college papers 
should regularly devote a page or so to dealing out 
taffy that is often unmerited, or censure, perhaps, 
equally undeserved to the other members of the col- 
lege press, is a matter we never thoroughly under- 
stood." He, therefore, has determined to make of 
his colurfjns a, sort of foreign department, iu which 



the news from the other colleges can be systemati- 
cally given. If such a radical change as this should 
be generally adopted, it would, iu a great degree do 
away with the element of personality, which is now 
shown, but this might be a good result, as it would 
lessen the sharp-shooting and slang-slinging now 
indulged in. It seems that they have a six o'clock 
bell at Amherst. A case of varioloid has appeared, 
and the house at which the afflicted student boarded 
has been strictly quarantined. A correspondent of 
the Student claims to have interviewed Oscar Wilde. 
The Glee Club is not equal to what it was. The 
Oiio is out and the Student thinks it a tame affair, 
however, in its local columns, it says that the entire 
edition of the Olio is exhausted, and still there is a 
cry for more. 

The Columbia Spectator is undoubtedly the most 
attractive of our exchanges, and its contents are 
always on a par with its get-up. Its full page car- 
toon in its last issue is quite clever. An expensive 
introduction is very ingenius. " Memoirs of a 
Tutor," by Cornicula is concluded. The individual 
whose autobiography is given had a checkered 
career, and finally became tutor in Whiskey Univer- 
sity (colored). South Carolina. 

" The course of study is quite high and embraces 
for the degree of A. B. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Reading, Spelling, Writing, Agriculture (care of 
the Pea-nut and Water-Melon). 

SOPHOMORE TEAR. 

Dancing and Belles Lettres, Klu-Klux Target 
Practice. 

JUNIOR TEAR. 

Anatomy— Lectures on the Bones, Irish (op- 
tional). 

SENIOR YEAR. 

(Optional). (Optional). 

Now I must close with an appeal for help. We 
are in a suffering condition. The Fi-eshraan class 
fortunately caught a 'conn one night last week, 
which will keep us in meat for the present. If any 
Columbia students have any old clothes, will they 
please put them in a box and give them to the 
Columbia Spectator for Whiskey University. Money 
we also need, although it would be safer to send it 
direct to us. If there are any caps and gowns they 
ai'e acceptable, if not for the day, in the night 
season. 

How linppy are Columbia boys, 

Who study by the fire, 
While Southern studpnt.", tired with toil, 
To CiitcU the 'cooii per.spirc." 

The Williams papers greet us again. The 
Athenaeum comes first, and kindly calls attention to 



162 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. ^ 



the delay in the appearance of the Argo. We learn 
from its columns that Mr. Blaine was invited to de- 
liver the Commencement oration before the Adelphic 
Union, but was unable to accept. Hon. Wendell 
Phillips was the second choice, but he has not yet 
been communicated with in regard to the subject. 

" How a wrong was righted," setting forth how 
the Actor did penance for leaving out from one 
number all mention of the Argo may be very funny, 
but we think the insertion of such an article was 
equally inadmissible. It causes the suspicion that 
the Atlienaum, by resorts to such witticisms, aimed 
at more or less well-known personalities, tries to pull 
down the Argo from a position which it has not 
merit enough to reach. " Colonel Pete" is the best 
written piece in this Atheneeum, and the delusion is 
well kept up to the end. 

The Argo begins a series of three articles on 
tobacco. They are to consist principally of selec- 
tions of poetry on the subject and are illustrated. 
Ephraim treats of aestheticism among the ex- 
changes. 

And now for Yale. The question of track ath- 
letics with Harvard has been given up. Mr. Battell, 
who built Battell Chapel, is to furnish it with a 
chime of bells. The literary editors have been 
chosen and the selection seems to be on the whole 
very satisfactory. A position on the literary is 
rightfully considered the highest literary honor of 
the course. The Glee Club is to sing in Boston, 
February 15th. In some of the college buildings 
great fault is found with the steam heating arrange- 
ments. Prof. Ladd's optional class is said to con- 
tain three men. $33.5,000 in the way of gifts have 
been paid into the college treasury during the past 
year. 

The Courant editorial board is to be announced 
in the issue of February 18th. The Courant has 
the following statement of the position of the Sen- 
iors : "The 'victim of great expectations,' as the 
Senior class has been aptly dubbed by one instruct- 
or, finds its fondest hopes blasted once more. We 
labored on last term, hoping and waiting for the 
ease which tlienew terui would bring, but our antic- 
ipations are brought to a most unfortunate end. Wo 
do not call for reform, for that is hopeless; we do 
not even pi'otest, for wo should get no answer save 
the echo of our own cry returning to us. We 
merely endure." 

"Belgrade'.s Sensation," evidently a Maine story, 
is a vei-y good sUotch, light and luimorous, without 
using slang or abuse. iEstheticism has evidently 



taken root at Harvard, as is attested by this little 
effusion in the Crimson : 



HE.\RT'S PASSION. 

O, lily, drooping from thy languid stem 

(Tliouglits of my love like precious suitors woo me). 
My darling touclied me witti her g;irmenl's hem. 
But touched and passed; yet from her garment's hem 

A yearning thrill intense as fire went through me. 

0, lily, basking in tlie sun's warm ray 
(Thoughts of my love like precious suitors woo me), 
From mv love's eyes there came a light like day, 

A liglit thiit shamed the duller light of day. 
Thrilling to passion, threat'niug to undo me. 

O, lily, fainting at the approach of night, 

(Thoughts of my love like precious suitors woo me). 
Thy sun has set indeed; but my delight 
Lives in my darling's smile and glances bright; 
Only her frown brings night and sorrow to me. H. R. 

A PERSIAN DANCING GIRL. 

Jasmines tangled in her hair — 
Ebon hair that loosely hangs, 
Tipped with silver serpent's fangs, 

Swaying in the scented air. 

Silken sandals on her feet — 

Tiny feet that trip in lime 

To the tamborine and rhyme 
With the tinkling music sweet. 

On her olive-tinted breast. 

Turquoise trinkets, jewels, rings- 
Lover's tokens— gifts from kings, 

Jingle gaily, never rest. 

Now she gives a dizzy twirl 

To the measures of the dance — 
Quicker than a stolen glance. 

Glides the dainty, graceful girl. 

Just beyond the eager throng 

Lazily her lover smokes 

With Ills rivals, telling jokes 
Spiced with strains of Persian song. 

Idly waiting— well he knows 

How they hate him, every one. 
In the garden of the Sun 

He has picked the fairest rose. F. D. s. 

— Acta Columbiana. 



School of Political Science, 

COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 



Instruction given in all hraiu-lu's of Pliilosophy, 
History, Political Economy, Social Science, Constitu- 
tional, Interniitional, and Administrative Law, Roman 
Law, and Iho comparative .Turispruilence of the 
Common and Civil Law. Next term begins Oct. 2, 
1882. For further particniars mldre.ss 

llECilSTRAR OF COLUMBIA COLLEGE, 
Madison Ay. and 4S)tli St., JS'ew York City. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



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Goods for the TROY LAUNDRY sent Tues- 
days and received Saturdays. 

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In Percales, Mahrattas, and American Goods. 
Orders by mail promptly attendeil to. 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 
FRANK M. STETSON, 

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All the New Styles in Soft and Stiff Hats. 
Best Stiff Hats, $2.75. Best Silk Hats, $3.50 in 
exchange. 

Just opened all the New and Nobby Styles Neck 
Dress, Collars, Cuffs, Fancy Hose, Canes, etc. 

All are invited to call .and ex.amine goods and prices. 

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Cor. Main and Cleave/and Sts., Brunswick. 

All Hack Orders promptly attended to. 





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A SPECIALTY, 

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237 Middle Street, 
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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DRUG STORE. 

THE FINEST CIOAF.S AND SMOKING TOBACCOS. 
THE BEST PERFUMERY. 

THE BEST TOILET SOAPS. 

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The Liargest and Best Assortment of 

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To be found in this market. 

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«®» Special Rates to Student Clubs. JBff 
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by mail, registered, a 50 box of the 
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This is a special offer to enable STnokem to teet this 
celebrated brand. After u trial you will Buiokc no otlier. 

S.F. HESS&CO. 

Premium Tobacco Works, Rochester, N . V. 



ISAAC H. SNOW, 

DEALER IN 

Ipeef, Jork, ^utton, Jamb, ^fc. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

C L. Y^^^f CoLLEqE BAf^BEF^, 
Two docs north of Post.OfTice. 

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Colleges. Offers, also, a thorough SEJinfAET Course 
to young ladies, and a shorter course for business 
pursuits. For Catalogues, address 

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Purchase your COAL at the 

Coal "2"a,rca. in Topslxam, 

WHERE NONE BUT 

Tbe Best of Coal is Kept, 

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Office near the Sheds. 
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Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
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Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

CHOICE GROcTrTeS, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Students. 

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Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

PORTIiiA.ND, IVI.A.INS. 

This house has been thoroughly refitted with every re- 
gard to comfort, and the aim is to nutke it first-class in all 
its appointments. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 



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Corner Pine anil Park Streets, LEWISTON, ME. 

KOYAI, QUIMBV. 



^. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunsw^ick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vieirs ; also College Views, 

ALL KINDS OF 



uiri 




feGrSME ^nf^^&'S^dWM' 




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II 

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EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

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FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 




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OWER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




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ESTABLISHED 1844. 

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Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



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OFFICE IN LEMONT BLOCK, Brunswick. 
4Eg"Telephoue connection with Coal Yard. 

|Il3"0rJers left at Jordan Snow's, Leiuout Block, will 
be promptly attendeil to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MtrSIC PUBIilSHEK, 



156 Exchange Street, Portland. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

jSj and 5(?7 Congress St., and 235 Middle Si., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

j8®=-Send fob Pkick List. 




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Jobbers and Uetaileus ov Standarh 

IinporteJ aiifl Boiiiestic Fauci Groceries. 

BUNKER niLl PICKLES A SPECIALTY. 



FIRST-Cr.A.SS 



N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 

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lofSoin (jollel© if e3ical 



The Sixty-Socond Annual Course of Lectures attlieMetli- 
cal School oY JIaine. will commence FkbkuarY 9th, 1882, 
and continue SIXTEKN AVEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshua L. Chamberlain, LL.D., Presirlenr ; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D.,0bstetric3 
and Diseases of Women and Children 5 Fredf.kic H. GeBBrsn, M.D., 
Anatomy ; Charles "NT. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence ; Hesry 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry; Bcbt G. 'Wilper, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. WEEKi:, M.D , Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles "O. 
HcNT, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian -, William B. Cushman, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to th*- Secretarv. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. . 

WATCHESTC LOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Botanical Microscopes, Fancy Goods. "Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry 
promptly repaired and Wiurauted. 

IF^ine Spectacles arid. lE^T-eg-lasses. 
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COK. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRrNSWICK, ME. 



JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book Work to Order. 

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Special Kates to Student Clubs. 

as-Transient Orders for .Milk or Cream (illrd liy t-ivin.s suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 



Curtis'College Bookstore 

BOOKS, ST.A.TIONSFtY. FtOOIMC 
PAPER. PE:RIOriICAI.S. <ScC. 



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AT LOW PRICHS. LAKUU IIKNTING STOCK. ' 

f. w, E^WQM, Mmw;^sw£€K, Mm. • Lowest Prices to Student Clubs. 
F. 1. W1L.S0I, Dispenser of Pure Drugs, Medicines, and Chemicals. 

iBa:r'Ox*.'r:Ei5 j\.Taiy xionvusiSTic ciC3r.i?s.n.s. 

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Btwitla ®il0 



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Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEBRUARY 22, 1882. 



No. 14. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE AD.JUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

IS PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



HALL L. DAVIS, 

Books, Mone[f, and Paper Haogiogs, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAIVD, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 



ELLIOT 

Has the Finest and Most Stylish Stock of 
Necl<wear ever exhibited in Brunswick. 



HOSIERY, COLLARS, CUFFS, &c., &c. 
in Great Variety of Styles. 



FINE ASSORTMENT OF 



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ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock. 
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Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

i3iT :BI^"c^lTST77"Ic:K. 
Corner of Main and Mason Streets. 



Beirare of Imitations and Connterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette; see that every wrapper has 




TRY IT. 
Fine, Mild& Sweet. 



Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

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237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 

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Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

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PORTLAND, , .. - - MAINE. 
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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



A reorganization of the Course of Instruction 
has recently been made, iu which the distinction be- 
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main- 
tained, but all academic undergraduates are placed 
on one footing, with the opportunity of following, to 
a considerable extent, such lines of study as they 
prefer. 

All students entering the College proper, are ex- 
amined on the same course of preparatory studies. 
After the second year a liberal range of electives is 
offered, within which a student may follow his choice 
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount 
pursued. 

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated 
as a distinct course, are still, for the most part, re- 
tained either in the required or elective lists. More 
place is also given to the Modern Languages than 
they have hitherto had. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all 
who complete the Academic Course. 

The Engineering Department remains as here- 
tofore, and facilities are offered for study of the 
various branches of this science. The means of 
theoretical instruction are ample, and the town of 
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen- 
tres in the State, and in the immediate vicinity of 
many important public works, affords excellent 
opportunities for the study of actual structures. 
The College also enjoys many favors from the United 
States Coast Survey Office. The admission is the 
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the 
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will 
be taken, if desired, in the place of Latin. 

Those who complete satisfactorily the four years' 
course iu engineering will receive the Degree of Sc. 
B. Those who complete a two years' course of ad- 
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or 
Mechanical Engineer. Students not candidates for 
a degree will be received at any stage for which an 
examination shall show them to be fitted, and may 
remain for any desired time. Further information 
will be furnished on application to Professor G. L. 
Vose. 

Terms of Admission lo the Academic Course. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 

following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Ijiitin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the jEneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 

£)REEK. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

Ancient GEOGiiArnY. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 

and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 

I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 

Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission 
will be required to produce testimonials of good 
moral character. The time for examination is the 
Friday after Commencement and the Friday before 
the opening of the first term. In exceptional cases 
applicants maybe examined at other times. Candi- 
dates for admission to advanced classes will be ex- 
amined in the studies which such classes have 
accomplished. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrange- 
ments with the Principals of schools and academies 
having a regular course preparatory for college of at 
least three years' duration, whereby their pupils 
may be examined for admission to college at their 
respective schools, in connection with their own 
final examinations. 

The amount of instruction now offered and pos- 
sible to be taken in the several principal lines of 
study is exhibited comparatively, as reduced to one 
scale, in the following manner. This is, however, 
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal 
length : 

Latin, eight terras. 

Greek, eight terms. 

^Mathematics, eight terms. 

German, four and a half terms. 

English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English 
Literature, three and a half terms. 

French, three terms. 

Italian, one term. 

Spanish, one term. 

Rhetoric (formal), one term. Rhetorical and 
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a 
half terms. 

Natural History studies, five and a half terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, four terms. 

Chemistry, four terms. 

History, Ancient and Modern, two terms. 

Political Economy, one and a half terms. 

Public Law, two terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, including Logic, 
four terms. 

Christian Evidences, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as Ibllows : Tuition, $7.5. 
Room rent (half), average, $'.i."i. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, gllO. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good managoniont, very materially 
lesson the cost of 1i\iug. 

Further information on application to tho Pi'osi- 
deut. 




mm 




BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEBRUARY 22, 1882. 



Vol. XI. 



No. 14. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAT, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE CLASS OF '82, OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Arthur G. Staples, Maiiagicg Editm-. 

Charles H. Gilman, Business Editdr. 
Melvin S. Holway, Eugene T. McCarthy, 

William A. Moody, Warren 0. Plimpton. 

Terms — $2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Bemittances siinuld be made to the Business Editor. (Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students .and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 



Entered at the Post Office at Brunsmck as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTElfTS. 
Vol. XI., N"o. 14.— February 22, 1882. 

Editorial Notes 163 

Literary : 

Roudeau-Jelian Froissart 1.34 — ? (poem) 165 

The American ISTovel 166 

The Mystery of Barolio aud Bocardo 167 

Communications 169 

College Items 170 

Personal 172 

Clippings 172 

Editors' Table 173 



EDITORIAL HOTES. 



The mild days which have succeeded the 
long monotony of cold and snow-storms, 
remind us that the time is coming when the 
melodious shaking down of coal stoves at all 
hours of the night will no more be heard ; 
when the campus, its coat, or rather blanket, 
of snow gone, will be laid bare in all its naked 
ugliness ; when Brunswick streets will run 
rivers to the mall ; and — we find ourselves 
reduced for a climax to something about 
house cleaning or tlie organ grinder, but will 
desist from putting it into words. You all 



know what we mean, that that somewhat 
elastic season which the poets sing about is 
almost upon us. Seriously, we wish to urge 
that measures be taken for properly' emplo}'- 
ing it. There are few who are so absorbed 
in their books as not to be open to its benign 
influence. As the days grow longer there is 
felt an increased desire for exercise, especially 
out-of-door exercise, which is in this climate, 
unfortunately, in advance of the means of 
fulfilling it. The lack of a gymnasium has, 
of course, cherished inactivity, but we hope 
that when the weather becomes suitable, as 
well as the exercise necessary, as much spirit 
as usual will be shown. The diminutive 
gymnasium in the soutli of Winthrop is 
crowded every afternoon with an admiring 
audience, chiefly Freshmen, while a half a 
dozen men work on the parallels. It will 
require careful training from now on, if 
our field day and boat race is to be made 
creditable. 



We are reminded that it is useless to seek 
a paradise here below, by reading such a bit 
of sarcasm coming from Harvard, — that sup- 
posed Utopia for those desiring a life of lux- 
urious ease : 

Despairing Freshman,— No, we don't think it 
unreasonable that your examination in physics 
should consist almost entirely of problems and 
formulas. The college expects that you are all 
going to become engineers or scientists. It is, more- 
over, a splendid disci pliue for the mind, to cram a 
mass of formulas, and to neglect the general prin- 
ciples of the subject. And it is really silly to ob- 
ject because so large a proportion of the class get 
marks under .50 per cent., and that so many men 
get conditioned in this subject every year. Your 
course otherwise is so easy and simple that it needs 
some heroic toqic, like your physics as now taught, 



164 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



to give it cliaracter. Macle virtiite, Puer. The 
faculty approve of cramming and fosters the sys- 
tem. So go in and cram. PerJiaps you will dig 
through to China. — Harvard Herald. 



The disciples of Sullivan are showing 
unusual activity in the pursuit of the "noble 
art," and the attendant nymph, wrestling, is 
in favor among the broad-backed. If dull 
thuds or sudden falls are heard in a distant 
room no surprise is manifested, for it is known 
that the sluggers are at it again. Care has 
to be taken in regard to contests among 
Freshmen, for they manifest such a blood- 
thirstj' spirit that the results of tiieir un- 
bridled fury may be serious. 



In our last number we congratulated our- 
selves on being so far removed from the cen- 
ter of civilization that we had escaped the 
prevailing distempers of sestheticism and 
varioloid. We have, however, come in for 
our share of affliction, and at present writing 
a pest, which seems uncontrollable, holds high 
carnival in our midst. Lest we may excite 
in our friends undue apprehension, we will 
say that neither the red flag or the sun flower 
are the signs of it. Whatever be its exact 
nature, on the certainly unimpeachable au- 
thority of the sufferers themselves, it is called 
the pink eye. This will be recognized as the 
disease with which horses have been affected 
in many places. Yet, with the exception of 
the lower classes, few of the students have 
much to do of late with anything of that ilk. 
The symptoms are varied, but in all cases the 
attack has been sudden. Our reporter has 
interviewed several of the principal sufferers. 
Mr. Batkins, of '82, was apparently well at 
supper time on the evening of the 14th. He 
went to tlie post-office and took from his box 
what, from the stamp, he thouglit was a val- 
entine. He opened it hastily and found that 
it was a bill from one of our best-known local 
firms, Kind friends gui4ed him to his room, 



but it will undoubtedly be a long time before 
he will be able to return to his studies. Mr. 
Samson, of '85, got his Greek lesson as usual 
on the night before, but the next morning 
his eyes looked as if he had been practicing 
to take part in Qidipus. Mr. Schluff, of '82, 
celebrated the conclusion of geolog}-, and is 
able to look at the world with one e3'e, and 
then only through the medium of blue glasses. 
In other cases we find that the sudden proxim- 
ity of a boxing glove to the individual's eye 
has provoked an attack of the disease. 



Among modern inventions there is none 
which is more likely to influence poetrj'' and 
literature, as well as practical life, than the 
stylograph. Poets have always looked with 
peculiar veneration on the pens which have en- 
abled them to transcribe their flowing thoughts, 
and the stylograph is a much more proper 
object for poetic inspiration than the vulgar 
goose quill or commonplace steel pen. A 
more poetical name might, perhaps, be in- 
vented for it, and we can easih^ imagine a 
poet addressing an ode to his stylograph, and 
introducing some simile such as, that as he 
carried stored up in the treasury of liis brain 
the poem which is to be produced, so the 
servant stylograph contains within itself the 
hidden reservoir from which, at his will, ink 
sufficient for the writing will flow. Then, 
again, the stylograph is destined to pla}' an 
important part in histor}'. Think of the 
value that fortunate pen would possess which, 
after having in the hands of some future 
President, signed the treatj^ for the annexa- 
tion of Canada, should be preserved for long 
ages, perchance yet containing tiie original 
ink. Demosthenes is said to have com- 
mitted suicide by taking poison wliich he 
carried in tlie tip of his pen in readiness for 
an emergency. We hardly dare to suggest 
the superior facilities whicli a stylographic 
pen offers for such a purpose lest the bjood 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



165 



of a throng of imitators my be on our own 
head. 

Back numbers of the Orient can be ob- 
tained of the business editor. Those espe- 
cially of the Senior and Junior classes who 
desire full files of the Orient during their 
college course can be accommodated reason- 
ably by the present board at vevy reasonable 
prices. It will not be long before full files of 
the Orient will be unobtainable. 



We would not commend the manner re- 
cently taken by one of the classes of inform- 
ing the professor of the too great length of 
lessons. It is an admirably suggestive way, 
perhaps, and we should think would always 
serve its end, but it lacks in straightforward- 
ness what it possesses in intrinsic result and 
worth. We have no idea of making these 
remarks personal with any one class or section 
of a class. The " class cut," as an institution, 
is aged, but the grace of added years comes 
not with it. It remains to-day, as ever, one 
of the most despicable of the possible ways 
of showing dislike either to professor or to 
study pursued, and the class that drops it first, 
especially as a means of conveying the knowl- 
edge of a grievance which a few manly words 
would eradicate, will deserve every praise as 
a reformer. 



The general catalogue of the alumni of 
the college is in the active process of distri- 
bution. It is sent to alumni everywhere. 
The whole number of alumni as given by the 
catalogue is two thousand twenty-eight, and 
of the medical school twelve hundred eighty- 
four. The lists of classes are from 1806 to 
1881, inclusive. 



The Freshmen have begun to circulate a 
subscription paper among the members of 
their class calling for funds towards the pur- 
chase of a class boat. The movement is 
timely and demands every encouragement 



from the members of the class in the way of 
subscription and co-operation. To the Fresh- 
men will be due in no slight degree the inter- 
est and success of every spring regatta, and at 
this period the future perhaps of boating. 
We may be wrong, but boating seems to us 
in a critical pei'iod, and very little in opposi- 
tion would well nigh bring it back into the 
condition of six years ago. The purchase of 
a boat and a decided and determined stand will 
do as much for the record of the class as any 
action they can take, and the aid they can 
give to boating should be their peculiar grat- 
ification to offer. 



We have noticed a remark in some of our 
exchanges in regard to the German method of 
delivering lectures which we are certain it 
will not be out of place to reproduce here. 
This method, which is delivering a continued 
discourse occupying the first three-quarters of 
the hour or more, and allowing the remainder 
of the hour in dictating the heads and salient 
points of the lecture, has numerous advan- 
tages corresponding to its practicability. The 
rapid delivery of our lectures in political 
economy, for instance, leaves no time for 
notes, and if notes are taken much of the 
lecture is lost. In this case the whole lecture 
could be listened to, but little abbreviated by 
the five, ten, or even fifteen allowance at the 
end and enjoyed both as a finished whole, 
unbroken by note-taking, and at the same 
time by judicious hints from the lecturer be 
retained in all its leading features. 



RONDEAU-JEHAN FROISSART, 134—? 

Come back, my love ! Too long dost thou delay; 

It giveth me such grief and pain. 
My heart doth seek thee every hour of day. 

Come back, my love ! Too long dost thou delay. 

For none doth cheer, when thou art far away, 
Nor shall till thou shalt come again. 

Come back, my love ! Too long dost thou delay ; 
It giveth me such grief and pain. 



166 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



THE AMERICAN NOVEL. 

We discover the standard of the novel as 
we discover its birth and growth. For the 
genesis of the American novel, as a growth 
in a new soil and apart from the influences of 
other novels in the English tongue, we must 
look to the days of the Spectator and the 
Tatler. No one doubts to-day that the 
essayists of Queen Anne's time moulded 
helles lettres in the uncultured colonies as 
surely as they quickened the letters of their 
native land by the diffusion of graceful, easy 
writing. 

Addison and Steele find readers to-da}', 
although it is quite unlikely that to-day if the 
true Addisonian pen existed, it would confine 
itself to tlie essay, or if it did that people 
would read so eagerly as in the good old days. 
Our American Addison, from whose corner in 
the great magazine emanate, each month, so 
many polished and graceful essays, must yet 
call to his aid the poet and the story teller, and 
feast the ej'e and mind with illustration, tale, 
and poem, while he offers his finished studies. 
So we find the essay, the first cultivated in the 
line of lighter literature, relegated to a, per- 
haps, subordinate position. It was this essay, 
and the time in which it appeared, that first 
gave the impetus to the American novel. To 
understand the possibility of the truth of this 
statement it is necessary to go back to the 
days of the Spectator and the Tatler. It 
was in 1672 that Addison was born, and in 
1709 when the first number of the Tatler 
appeared. The instant success of this sheet 
was unexampled. Every coffee house, and 
they were common in those days, and every 
tea table received the Tatler and read it with 
aviditj-. Every caste of people, from prince 
to peasant, in the reading world, read Addi- 
son's graceful style and Dicky Steele's skillful 
pen pictures, and every reader became so 
much the improved thereby. They saw 
another way to amuse than by invoking muses 
and treading the empty boards and moutliing 



vulgar dramas. Here was something in the 
family, and gossip, too, about one's neighbors. 
The Tatler gave place to the Spectator, 
the most celel)rated of the publications, which 
I'an through some six hundred or more num- 
bers, giving way to the Gruardian. 

Here in America, literature lacked that 
stolidity and respectability of age of which 
the mother country could boast. The liabit 
of looking to the fatherland for intellectual 
nourishment was prevalent in everything ex- 
cept religion. That the settlers brought as a 
biithright and free discussioia nourished. Re- 
ligious discussions and writings were the first 
siiowings of American literature. Next, more 
directly in the line of the novel, we find the 
newspaper, and this newspaper early in the 
eigliteenth centur}' publishing fresh reprints of 
the Spectator. Certain it is, then, that " Roger 
de Coverly " came over the sea and entered 
every home almost and sat at every table, 
with every reprint or invoice of the Spectator. 
This cannot be disregarded in its effect. 
Barely a century before the cold bleak shores 
of Massachusetts had received the Pilgrims, 
and yet at this day the same sketch amused 
them both. Next Dennie publishes his "Lay 
Preacher," and the American Novel almost 
can be seen in its infancy. This influence cul- 
minated almost, or at least produced its most 
direct results, in the series of letters signed 
"Jonathan Oldstyle, Gent.," which appeared 
in the New York Chronicle, and which were 
the introduction to the remarkable career in 
letters which is marked by "Knickerbocker" 
and " Sketch Book," and the otliers of Irv- 
ing's literary life. Irving is the essayist, the 
Addison of America. Irving's writings could 
not evade the influence of the times, and are 
the link l)etween the essay and the novel. 
One hardly knows whether his "Sketch Book" 
is a novel in ciiapters or a book of essaj-s in 
his inimitable style. 

Tiie American novel, properly speaking, 
dates from Charles Brockden Brown's ro- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



167 



mance called " Wieland," published in 1798. 
His other works are " Edgar Huntley," " Ar- 
thur Mervyn," " Ormoiid," " Jane Talbot," 
besides an immense amount of miscellaneous 
matter. Brown was of a dreamy, poetic, 
intensely nervous temperament. His books 
abound in incident, and are strange and 
unreal. He had a temperament morbid, per- 
haps inclined like Poe's to the supernatural. 
" He delighted to analyze the phenomena of 
consciousness, and bring nature under mystic 
or extraordinary results, and mark the conse- 
quences." Such agencies as pestilence and 
somnambulism are the subjects of " Arthur 
Mervyn " and " Edgar Huntley," and his 
psychological insight and subtle analysis 
make him a marked writer of the English 
tongue, — Godwin, in England, was most like 
him. He lacked much in artistic grace and 
unity. If Brockden Brown was the pioneer, 
to Cooper does the American novel owe its 
most lasting blessing for the infusion of blood 
which made it a living thing. Indeed the 
whole field of American literature owes to 
him its first recognition abroad. It is unnec- 
essary to remark upon his works or writings. 
The world read of strange lands and strange 
men, of the prairie and sea-coast, and came 
to believe that the aborighial lands possessed 
wonders in everything, novelists included. 

It is not possible to overdraw the influence 
and success of Cooper. His style is national 
and under him became, perhaps, more the 
American novel than before or since. The 
third in disthictive traits, is Hawthorne. 
We admire his artistic grace and his psy- 
chological insight. He has almost passed 
our pathway. The whole world reads the 
" House of Seven Gables " to-day, and most 
of those loved friends who saw him laid 
away under the wreaths of apple-blossoms, 
are yet alive. He painted characters as 
Cooper never dreamed of, and combined the 
acme of artistic grace with the utmost nicety 
of style and psychological knowledge. 



We find these three eras adorned by 
these three representatives. Cooper is by far 
the most distinctively American in location. 
Salem can as well be in England as in Amer- 
ica, and the scarlet A as well upon the breast 
of an erring sister across the sea, but Haw- 
thorne still is linked to our hearts far closer 
by ties that prevail everywhere and forever. 
The question is often asked. Have we an 
American novel? Whether to-day will find 
among its mass of fiction anything worthy of 
preservation? It is asserted that the inde- 
pendence of American letters is not yet half 
achieved. It remains for the great novelist 
to cease, as the great novelist must, to be a 
humble imitator, and seek and find and culti- 
vate his own especial field. 



THE MYSTERY OF BAROKO AND 
BOCARDO. 

These two gentlemen were college stud- 
ents, yet do not think that these euphonious 
names, in close proximity, grace the pages of 
any catalogue. They are merely nom de 
plumes, given as a veil for the real persons, 
lest the humble chronicler should see the 
fist of the aforesaid authentic personages in 
dangerous proximity to his features if undue 
publicity were given to this dark and direful 
tale. They entered college at the same time, 
became shining ornaments of the same secret 
fraternity, and occupied rooms together. 
They were, of course, the recipients of Soph- 
omoric visits, and went over the door at very 
nearly the same time. They studied together, 
one running the horse while the other cribbed 
the lesson. They sat side by side in recitations 
and mutually helped each other out. Together 
they learned to puff the fragrant cigarette, 
and together they went on tares. By all this 
you will understand that the closest ties of 
friendship bound them together, and had not 
fate determined to the contrary the names 



168 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Baroko and Bocardo miglit have been synon- 
omous with Damon and Pythias. 

At about the same time, each began to cast 
longing eyes towards the pleasures of societ}^ 
Hfe in that gay college town, and hand in hand 
they entered upon its fascinating paths. As 
a prime requisite to success, the}' saw that it 
was necessary to learn to dance, and together 
they practiced the complex movements of the 
waltz. It is useless to trace carefully their 
history. Suffice it to say that they both be- 
came mashers of the most approved pattern, 
although not losing their interest in the proper 
life of the college. 

But, my mystery-loving reader, attracted 
by a title suggestive of dime novel or blood- 
curdling melodrama may ask, " Where is the 
mystery ? " My dear sir, j'ou must allow me 
time to conduct you to the climax. As the 
light of day penetrates a short distance into 
even the deepest cave, making everything 
look commonplace and not at all romantic, so 
are you now only at the brink of the cavern, 
in the depths of which unknown wonders are 
larking. 

My heroes, with the politeness of true 
gentlemen had not in public shown especial 
attention to any of their lady friends, but had 
tried to make themselves favorites with all. 
A winter had passed away and the time 
" when young men's hearts lightlj' turn to 
thoughts of love" had come with all its quick- 
ening powers. Both Baroko and Bocardo 
gaily disported themselves among the fair 
ones, and while Bocardo continued to be very 
general in his attentions, Baroko manifested 
a settled preference. 

Hypatia was the daughter of one of the 
most learned college professors, and held a 
leading position among the young ladies of 
the town. Her father had given her this 
■name in liopes that she would equal her noble 
but unfortunate namesake. In graces of body 
she did, and if you want a glowing descrip- 
tion of her many beauties, I will refer you to 



the rich pages of Kingsley, where they are 
depicted. She was, however, far from show- 
ing the serious mind of that one who was the 
most philosophical of her sex and had a gen- 
uine New England girl's love for a good time. 

Hypatia was the object of Baroko's desire 
and vice versa. Innumerable were the rides 
they took, and long walks, or sails on the 
river, until it was generally understood how 
matters lay between them. In order, how- 
ever, not to make too great a topic of conver- 
sation among the village gossips, it was agreed 
that they should see each other only at the 
remote intervals of alternate days, and so on 
the evening of these days Baroko started out, 
regardless of threatening deads on the mor- 
row, certain of meeting his Dulcinia at the 
appointed place, and of enjoying a long moon- 
light walk. And on the off evening he was 
content to remain at home and meditate on past 
pleasures, or plan future ones. He noticed 
that on the evening that he was at home his 
chum was away and came home late. He 
thought nothing about it, but one evening 
Bocardo came home wearing in his button- 
hole a flower strikingl}' similar to one which 
Baroko had received from the fingers of his 
loved one, on the evening before. This 
naturally awakened some disquieting queries, 
but there might easily have been more than 
one rose bush like the one from which he had 
received the flower, and his room-mate, when 
asked about it, said, in an apparently straight- 
forward manner, that he had received the 
favor from a person not the one whom Baroko 
had suspected. He kept on the watch, how- 
ever, and, with alarm, noticed that his room- 
mate was out on every evening on which 
he was in, and although Hypatia was -ever 
kind, he fancied that she was less affectionate 
than before. 

It was on a day after Baroko had made 
his customary visit and he was feeling more 
and more dissatisfied with the way things 
were going. His chum had been burning on 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



169 



the glowing coal fire a note he had just 
received. Baroko chanced to open the stove 
door and saw on the coals the white ashes, 
and on them were faint marks as it were, the 
skeletons of the letters which iiadbeen thereon. 
He saw traced, in a feminine hand, words 
which he had just time to read before the 
ashes were all whirled up the chimney. They 
were: "To-night at nine. Lovingly yours, 
Hyp." He had seen the evidences of her 
duplicity, but now they were scattered to the 
winds, and it was necessary to find additional, 
proof. Baroko resolved to keep dark, which, 
on the whole, was a wise determination, as well 
as to keep cool. All day long he evolved plans 
for exposition and revenge. He remembered 
the Avords, " To-night at nine," and resolved 
that an uninvited guest should be at their 
meeting. He put on his oldest clothes, took 
with him a mask which had done good service 
in the midnight visitations he had participated 
in during his Sophomore year, and also a dark 
lantern which had shone surreptitiousl}' on 
many a turkey hunt, and sought for vengeance. 
He tracked his unsuspecting chum to the 
trysting place, where so oft he had been 
greeted, and soon became sure that his suspi- 
cions were in strict accord with the truth. 
As the guilty pair, oblivious of the danger 
near, were enjoying a loving tete-d-tSte (this 
is to be taken literally), Baroko suddenly 
flashed the light of his lantern in their faces 
and they stood astounded and transfigured in 
its rays. Bocardo made a leap at the unseen 
interloper, and they rolled together on the 
turf. Hypatia, womanlike, ran away under 
cover of the night, and left them to fight it 
out. After pommeling each other for a time 
Bocardo found out who his opponent was and 
besought an armistice. They lay panting in 
the grass until they were cooled off, and they 
began negotiations. After talking the matter 
over, and after acknowledgments and con- 
fessions were made on both sides, they con- 
cluded that the best thing to do would be to 



make up and be friends again, and arm in arm 
they walked home and agreed to call every- 
thing square. Hypatia, however, experienced 
the just reward of her own fickleness, and was 
ever afterwards most decidedly left. 

Empiricus. 



COMMUKICATIOKS. 



Editors of Orient : 

It would seem as if some people in this 
world, and particularly in this college, had no 
other occupation than that of making misera- 
ble the lives of those around them. Such 
are some of the inhabitants of the South End 
of Winthrop, who practice from morning to 
night, and often far into the night, on clario- 
nets and other similar screeching instruments, 
beating time with feet that would do credit 
to a plantation negro. 

The non-musical men of said end have 
been patient and long-suffering, hoping against 
hope that the time would come, when either 
from lack of wind or muscle the musicians 
would give them a short season of quiet. 
But alas for their hopes, wind and muscle still 
hold out. It may be that musical men have 
a happy faculty of going through college 
without study, but all of us are not so fortu- 
nate. We must study or write occasionally, 
and at such times it is not conducive to quick 
understanding or deep thought to hear your 
neighbor try in vain and repeatedly to reach 
the high notes in a new piece of music, gain- 
ing new courage at each failure. Or, per- 
haps, for a little distraction, he adjourns to 
the front of the building, in company with a 
few kindred spirits, and for an hour or so 
throws snow-balls or coal at the hall windows. 
Of course, this innocent amusement costs 
nothing, but do they ever think that it makes 
the buildings look badly, or that the sound of 
falling glass disturbs any one ? 

We do not wish to discourage musical 



170 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



talent or athletic sports, but believe there 
is a proper time to practice and other ways of 
exercise for would-be base-ball players than 
breaking windows. It is strange that some 
of these men, professed Christians, and men 
who make it their business to attend to the 
affairs of others, do not remember and prac- 
tice that saying of our Loi'd, " Do unto oth- 
ers as you would be done by." Z. 



Editors of Orient : 

Probably few are aware of the vast amount 
of valuable printed matter relating to the re- 
cent and remote history of the college, con- 
tained within the library. In drawers and 
closets in various parts of tire main room are 
hundreds of catalogues of the college and 
medical school, triennials, catalogues of the 
Alpha Chapter, of the Phi Beta Kappa society, 
and of the Peucinian and Athenian societies, 
ranging from ] 802 to the present time ; also 
nearly complete files of the Oriekt and 
Bugle, which are soon to be bound and placed 
upon the shelves of the library. Formerly, 
commencing in 1849, two catalogues of the 
college were printed each year, one at the be- 
ginning of the college year by the students, 
and tlie other by the authorities during the 
spring term. It is noticeable that the book 
published by tlie students, called forth by 
their need of some record of classes, etc., be- 
fore the appearance of the official catalogue, 
is much the handsomer of the two. In the 
year 1858 the students made some additions 
to their catalogue and published it in news- 
paper form under tlie name of the Bowdoin 
Bugle, with two editions each year. In 1867 
this was changed to a yearly and was printed 
in the form whicli it now, with many improve- 
ments, has. In addition to the publications 
mentioned above, there are in the library a 
great number of pamphlets containing ad- 
dresses by distinguished persons l)efore the 
alumni association, and eulogies of the dead 



presidents and professors of Bowdoin, pro- 
grammes of different exercises, class records 
and poems, prize essays, printed speeches de- 
livered at the dedications of the newer college 
buildings, doings of the alumni, etc., — in fact, 
an inexhaustible mine of information for those 
to explore who are interested in the history of 
the college and in the names and deeds of 
those who have been from time to time con- 
nected with it since its foundation. All this 
printed matter has lately been carefully ar- 
ranged, and is open to inspection during all 
library hours. It is hoped that all missing 
numbers of the publications will soon be pro- 
cured, as extraordinary endeavors are being 
made with that end in view. Muzzle. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



The choir went back on -us last Sunday morning. 

A Senior in his note-book spells ecstasi/ with 
an ex. 

A few of the boating men have begun work with 
the clubs and parallel bars. 

A very convenient staud for holding the large 
catalogues is now used in the library. 

It is singular how many cases of severe colds 
this college can have and yet siuwive. 

Rev. Mr. Rogers, of the Methodist church, 
preached for the First Parish, hist Sunday. 

Prof Wheeler is giving the Sophomore Class a 
course of lectures on Thursday afternoons. 

Last Siuiday the evening address was given by 
Prof Carmicbael, and on the week before by Prof. 
Smith. 

One of the students is getting so far behind time 
that he was seen taking his breakfast in the church 
gallery. 

The latest is from one of the Freshmen who ad- 
dresses their class oHioor in an excuse as " Dear 
Friend." 

The medical school is not so large in nitmbers as 
last year. Tlie presence of the festive Medics is 
none the loss palpable, however. We recognize the 
familiar faces of recent graduates, but they seem 
out of place among new associates. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



171 



Again we have an old complaint about breaking 
up the reading-room fnmiture. It is scanty enough 
as it is. 

The feet of '82 seem to have a special aversion 
to following the paths V7hich lead in search of the 



A student going about the hall with a lantern, 
said he was looking for the honest man who had 
borrowed his note-book. 

On receiving an envelope with a one cent stamp 
we are uncertain at this time of year whether it is 
a valentine or a gas bill. 

We observe that a new lock has been placed on 
the Freshman room. Perhaps Mr. Booker missed 
too much kindling wood. 

That pile of coal which was left out and buried 
by the big snow-storm, won't trouble its owner 
much with dust before spring. 

Prof. C. made a very good hit when he com- 
pared the restless spirit of some members in the 
class room to that of Aristotle. 

German script did not agree with the Juniors' 
desire for modern languages, so they gave the 
obnoxious recitation a class cut. 

The only way in which the Sophomores can now 
haze the Freshmen is to go around and drink up 
their cider in a friendly manner. 

The Seniors had an examination on their course 
in geology, Friday the 17th, and are looking for 
easy work the remainder of the term. 

A Freshie leaned over the counter in a neigh- 
boring store and inquired for a valentine that was 
" comic, kind of sentimental, and cheap." 

Prof. — "To what does Aristotle compare the 
totality of existence?" Student — "To a ladder." 
Prof. — " Very well. Now you may begin to climb it.'' 

We do not like to praise public characters 
unduly, but must say that of the parts in "Mother 
Goose's Melodies, the most naturally taken were 
"Jack" and the " pig." 

Prof. Robinson gave another evening lecture to 
the Juniors, on Thursday last, particularly illustrat- 
ing the light bearing properties of phosphorus. A 
number of students from other classes were present. 

Lieut. E. W. Howe, who has been ordered to 
take charge of the " Bowdoin Military" until July, 
recently arrived in town. The Lieutenant is a grad- 
uate of West Point, and comes more recently from 
Dakota. 



In order to be fashionable you must now be 
vaccinated and go about tenderly nursing the left 
arm. One of the boys has adopted the suggestion 
of a daily paper and pinned to his coat the sign, 
" Hands off! I've been vaccinated." 

While the zoology class is left alone a few 
moments some of its members amuse themselves by 
filling the Prof. 's overcoat with a suspicious looking 
bottle, several clam shells, etc. Nest day Prof. L. 
remarks that the gentlemen who left the remains 
of their lunch in his coat could have them on ap- 
plication. The few who did not laugh rather gave 
themselves away. 

In the entertainment of " Mother Goose," etc., 
given last week, a number of the characters were 
taken by college boys. The choir furnished the 
vocal and comh music, while the instrumental was 
supplied by the Freshman Orchestra, assisted by 
several upper-class men. The affair was a decided 
success, and well attended both on the first evening 
and at the matinee. 

The portrait of President Woods has been 
received, and is placed for the present in the " north 
wing." It was painted during the past year by 
Frederic P. Vinton, of Boston, from photographs 
taken in 1860. The portrait is disappointing to 
some who knew the former President, since it repre- 
sents him as in comparatively good health rather 
than as he was last remembered. 

The Cincinnati Commercial has a letter from a 
correspondent in Brunswick, Me., giving an account 
of "down East" life. The town is very pleasantly 
described, and a sketch of the college relates 
numerous anecdotes of its history in connection 
with professors and students. The writer speaks, 
in closing, of the intimate relations of Dr. Packard 
to the college from his graduation to the present 
time. 

Scene : Primer geology class, 3333, A.D. Object 
lesson. Prof. — " What is this which I hold in my 
hand?" Class — "We are not prepared." Prof. — 
" It is the tooth of a cat given to the college in the 
19th century. How long tails had the cats in that 
age?" Class — "Seven and one-half feet." Prof.— 
" Yes, this tooth proves that some were over twenty 
feet in length. What else may we learn from this?" 
Class—" That's as far as the lesson went." Prof.— 
" Well, it also shows that cats could once drink 
milk. Now, man sometimes drinks milk. There- 
fore man descended from a cat. You will, without 
review, be examined to-morrow morning for one 
hour on the last 4,000 pages of your text-book." 



172 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The night was cold, the wind was high, 

The snow was tliickly falling, 
When through the depot came a cry 

Heart-rending and appalling; 
And all were wondering whence it came, 

When on the air nocturnal 
More plainly came that doleful cry 

Of" Lewiston Evening Journal." 

A youth came pushing through the crowd, 

He heeded naught around him. 
His eyes were fixed on vacancy 

As if a spell had bound him ; 
And in them glowed a hidden fire 

Like that of orljs supernal, 
As rushing madly on he shouts, 

"Lewiston Evening Journal." 

Now many gazed upon the youth 

And pitied his condition, 
While others thought that he must be 

Some wicked apparition ; 
But I have heard that printers have 

A deal with imps infernal. 
And this must be the " devil" of 

The " Lewiston Evening Journal." 



PERSONAL. 



'37. — John L. Cutler is landlord of a cotton 
plantation and water mill in Quitman, Georgia. 

•44. — Henry K. Bradbury is counselor at law in 
HoUis, Me. 

'45. — James H. Deering is a retired merchant. 
No. 819 Gala Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

'51._Wm. H. Owen is civil engineer at San 
Antonio, Texas. 

'60.— Jacob H. Thompson is journalist in the 
New York Times office. New York. 

'61.— Abram Maswell recently died in Andover, 
Ohio. 

'62. — William E. Donnell is on the Tribune staff, 
N. Y. 

'62.— George A. Mark is assistant in the library 
of Congress, Washington, D. C. 

'64. — Thomas FI. White is general agent for the 
Boston Marine Insurance Co., and also for the Shoe 
and Leather In.surance Co., Boston, Mass. 

'64. — Charles A. Robbins is engaged in trans- 
portation. Summit, N. J. 

'69.— Frederic A. Fogg, 401 East 8th Street, St. 
Paul, Minn., is a teacher. 

'76.— Andrews is clerk to Mayor Blake, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

'76. — Arlo Bates, editor of the Boston Courier, 
has gone on a three months' vacation to Cuba for 
his health. 

'76.— G. T. Prince, of Carlinvillo, 111., is cliief 
engineer of the lUirlingtou & Ohio River Railway 
Company. 



'76.— G. B. Merrill is in the office of Welton & 
Bonnett, city engineers, Waterbury, Conn. 

'76. — Perry is at the Yale Theological Seminary, 
New Haven, Conn. 

'76.— W. A. Robinson is principal of the High 
School at Franklin Falls, N. H. 

'76.— Oliver C. Stevens is one of the editors of 
the Civil Service Becord. 

'76.— Whitcomb is connected with the Duluth & 
Winnepeg R. R. Co. 

'78.— G. W. Phillips, M.D., is practicing medi- 
cine in Lewiston. Office at No. 9 Pilsbury Block. 

'78.— P. L. Paine, V. C. Wilson, '80, and F. H. 
Little, '81, passed through towu February 9th, on 
their way to Hallowell to take part in a concert 
given by the Weber Club, a musical association of 
Portland. 

'79. — Charles F. Johnson was married to Miss 
Abbie W. Britton of Winslow, December 20, 1881. 

'81.— C. L. Baxter was married t^ednesday, 
February 8th, to Miss Carrie I. Dana of Woodford's 
Corner. 

'81. — R. H. Green, a resident here in towu, has 
gone South on a pleasure trip. 

'81. — J. G. Manson and Cobb, two law students 
from Portland, spent Sunday in towu. 



CLIPPINGS. 



The Boston boy, with vague fears of the small- 
pox scourge, translates Arma virumquc cano, " I 
sing of arms and the virus." 

Lesson in political economy : " Is time money ? " 
"Yes, sir, it is. "Prove it by an illustration." 
" Well, if you give twenty-five cents to a couple of 
tramps it is a quarter to two." — Tablet. 

Conversation overheard in a horse-car : " When 
you call for beer do you say, 'A glawce of Bawse' or 
'A glass of Bavvcc,' or 'A glass of Bass,' or merely 
'A glass of Bass ? ' " "I say, ' One boor.' " 

Two well-dressed ladies were examining a statue 
of Andromeda, labelled, " Executed in terra-cotta." 
Says one, "Where is that?" "lam sure I don't 
know," replied tlie other, "but I pity the poor girl, 
wherever it was." 

Reeitatione Latiiia lio>iiinori(iii virilium. Prof. 
— " Well, Mr. B., explain that reference in the nest 
line. What do you know about Euterpe ? , H. V. — 
" Nothing, sir, further than that he was a celebrated 
musician ! " — [Clamosc snichrriiiit oinnes.] —Har- 
vard lleruld. 

The Squire (who married for money, and is be- 
ginning to repent)—" What do you thinlc of that new 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



173 



horse of mine?" His Lady— " Yomj- horse! It was 
bought with mp money. " The Squire— "Yes, I 
know, my dear; and (with a sigh) it's not the only 
thing yoin' money's bought." 

Extract form a recent negro sermon : " Beware, 
my hearers, how you fall asleep, lilie that young 
woman in the third gallery while Paul was preach- 
ing and was smashed all" to smashes. And they 
took her up twelve baskets full! And, brethren, 
whose wife shall she be in the resurrection V — Col- 
legiate. 

A Toronto schoolmistress was putting a company 
of juveniles of the gentler sex through their facings 
in the spelling-book, and came to the word, " lad," of 
which, according to custom, she asked the significa- 
tion. "For courtin' wi," was the prompt reply; 
and I place the definition on record for the benefit 
of future lexicographers.— 'Farsi/j/. 

Yale's "Golden Treasury" is called "Elm 
Leaves." The following are among the most beau- 
tiful of its many touching verses : 

" John Jones, while out walking with Hannah, 
Slipped and fell on a frozen banana. 
And she came down kerslap, 
Right square on his lap. 
In an awkward, embarrassing manner. 

But yet, though she ruined her pannier, 
Hannah seemed rather pleased with the manner, 

For after a while 

She said with a smile, 
' John, let's find another banana.' " 



EDITORS' TABLE. 

We have received a copy of Pallette Scrapings, 
an illustrated magazine, to be published occas- 
ionally by the St. Louis School of Fine Arts of 
Washington University. It is very artistically got- 
ten up. 

The Cou2J <V Etat continues to show the good 
effects of composition. Its editorials are good, al- 
though somewhat lengthy. A writer on college 
journalism takes an extremely pessimistic view of 
the subject. We think that a careful observation of 
the good results of work on a college paper, even 
although it may often become mere drudgery, will 
convince him of being mistaken in iiis conclusions. 

We unhesitatingly give to Harvard the head 
place In college jouruahsm, for it has been able to 
give to Harvard what no other college has in so 
high a degree, a certain literary personality. The 
constant stream of sketches of Harvard life as well 
as the general tenor of the editorials on Harvard 
manners, all go to set forth a certain well defined 
kind of life, which may be called an embodiment 
pf good fellowship. Not only the si?e of the uni- 



versity contributes to make such a thing easy and 
possible, but the style of life in itself, as being some- 
thing more than a mere struggle after scholarship, 
is a powerful aid to success in athletics. With the 
recent number, the Senior editors of the Crimson 
abandon active work on the paper and give place 
to their successors. With it comes an index to the 
volume just completed. In this index are the 
names of the contributors to the volume. We no- 
tice that one, the president of the editorial board, 
has, besides a presumably good share of editorial 
work, contributed twenty articles, eight in prose 
and twelve in verse. Harvard students have to pay 
a high price for a low quality of coal, and are agi- 
tating a combination to secure a reduction of rates. 
The annual Crimson dinner took place Friday, 
February 17th, at Young's Hotel. The last Crim- 
son contains a number of sketches, all good, and 
one in particular, " Uncle George," very laugha- 
ble. This is one of the twelve pieces of poetry 
spoken of above : 

MIGNONETTE. 

" Mignonette, Mignonette, 
At her vine-hid lattice set, 
When she bends her dimpled face 
O'er thine own, in youth's fresh grace, 
Breathe my secret to her ear, 
So that she alone may hear. 
Wliisper low of love, for yet 
Love is wounded by regret. 
Mignonette, Mignonette, 
Little brown-capt Mignonette, 
Diamonded with dew-drops wet, 
Fann'd by summer's morning air, — 
Fairer she than fairest fair. 
Sweeter she than sweetest sweet. 
Tell her, tell her. Mignonette, 
Love is mighty, time is fleet; 
Love dotb ever conquer time ; 
Love doth never pass his prime ; 
Love doth grieve, if we forget. 
Mignonette, Mignonette. 
Little star-faced Mignonette, 
At her vine-hid lattice set. 
When she bends her dimpled face 
Blushing fair with youth's sweet grace 
O'er thine own, — do not forget 
What 1 tell thee, Mignonette." 

The Argo has the second number of its illus- 
trated "Nicotiana," poems by Lowell, Byron, and 
several miscellaneous pieces are given. "The 
Parental Theory " is a fair and careful discussion of 
the methods of discipline as in force in most Amer- 
ican colleges. The conclusion is that colleges are 
behind the times, and that unnecessary and child- 
ish restraints are put upon those who are too old to 
be compelled to submit to such guardianship. The 



174 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Argo's private highwayman captured a mail bag on 
St. Valentine's Day and secured a batch of valen- 
tines addressed to Smith College, by college journals. 
The last one found was as follows : 

"EPHRAIM TO THE VASSAR MISS. 

" A drop of ink is on her lip, 

Left by her gold pen's slender tip, 
When, hunting wildly for a rhyme, 
In deep abstraction all the time. 

She waved it, careless of the drip. 

" Were I that rhyme, straight would I slip, 

A partner in her authorship, 

Into the Verse, complete the chime, 

Oh, drop of ink! 

" But ink ! thy boldness doth outstrip 

All boldness yet. Yet I'll equip 
Myself in boldness, too, for I'm 
Most anxious to avenge thy crime. 

I'll blot out quickly, with ray lip. 

That drop of iuU." 

The Hamilton Lit, in an editorial on that much 
discussed subject, "College Journalism," says: 

" College journalism has been graced with some 
of the most illustrious names in literature. Poets, 
orators, statesmen, and historians have been its sup- 
porters. Besides Thackeray at Cambridge, Daniel 
Webster at Dartmouth, Edward Everett, Oliver 
Wendell Holmes, James Russell Lowell at Harvard, 
many illustrious men at Tale, Amherst, Williams, 
and Hamilton first showed the world the power of 
their genius by their contributions to the college 
press." 

The Tale News has the following novel propo- 
sition : 

"The college world are in search of novelties, 
and novelties wo must have to vary the monotony 
of the present system of study. The novelty we 
have to propose is that in the place of one of the 
ordinary recitations we have an hour's lecture on 
the matter contained in one of the best New York 
morning papers, the Trilnme, for instance. A really 
good newspaper is the best common educator 
known, and with a competent man to discuss 
thoroughly the topics contained in the issue, no 
better training in«tho science of government and 
foreign policy, and in modern and contemporaneous 
history and literature could possibly be oljtaincd. 
We .shall soon lie out in the world, and therefore it 
is highly important that we have a thorough under- 
standing of its ways and its doings, and this method 
would, in our opinion, greatly aid us in being fnlly 
equipped for the trial to come, beside making us 
far more practical and independent than we can 
ever hope to become under the depressing routine 
we are at present following." 

The Berkelei/an is a live ])ai)er and shows an 
enterprise which, while it is typical of tbo West, 
is very rarely shown by western college papers. It 
says that the University of California consists, 



besides the five buildings at Berkeley, of a depart- 
ment of Law, Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmacy in 
San Francisco, and the finest observatory in the 
world only sixty miles farther. The Berkeleyan 
urges that they be more closely imited in spirit. 

ELF TO MATTIB. 

Dear Mattie,— I'm home from the " Crawford" 

With Aunt. I'd the loveliest time! 
Why, no less than three men have offered — 

Well, no matter, I'll tell you next time. 
But the reason I send you this note, dear, 

Is to give you the news about Nell, 
And the desperately flirtatious monsieur 

She mashed with her ''figure si belle." 

He really was very devoted. 

She encouraged him shockingly, too. 
They flirted, they " rocked" and they boated. 

(This is strictly, of course, " eiitre nous.") 
He told of the swells, high and mighty, 

" Ton " dinners, receptions, and balls. 
And the fol-di-derol of society, — 

(Which Auntie " vain hollowness " calls). 

"Familee" was the chevalier's hobby; 

And Nelly, as usual, a goose. 
Thought he really must be some one nobby. 

So she played with his heart fast and loose. 
But Tommy came down from the city. 

He's my cousin, well known about town, 
(And really, 'twas rather a pity 

That Nell should be so taken down). 

But the instant he spied her devoted. 

He whispered, with heartlessness mean, 
" Why (hat, Nelly dear, is the noted 

Delmonico's chef-cle- cuisine." 
Give my dear love to Emily Randall, 
But keep a great deal for yourself. 
And, hoping you won't think this scandal, 
I remain. 

Your affectionate. 

Elf. 
a — Crimson. 



School of Political Science, 



COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 

Inslrncticin given in all branches of rhilosophy, 
History, Political Economy, Social Science, Constitu- 
tional, International, and Administrative Law, Roman 
Law, and the comparative Jurisprudence of the 
Common and Civil Law. Next term begins Oct. 2, 
1882. For fnrtlicr partieular.s address 

11E(HST11AII OF COLUMBIA COLLEGE, 
Madison Av. and 49tli St., New York City. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 






Finest and Most Select Stock of 



MENS' FURNISHINGS. 

The Newest and Greatest Variety of Patterns in 

NECKWEAR, GLOVES, HOSIERY, 

UNDERWEAR. BRACES, ETC. 

ly Custom Skirts from Measure, Six for $9.00. 
A Perfect Fit Guaranteed. 

Goods for the TROY LAUNDRY sent Tues- 
days and received Saturdays. 

Sprinc^ |j Summer Ehirtini^si 

In Percales, Mahrattas, and American Goods. 
Orders by mail x^romx^tly .attended to. 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 
FRANK M. STETSON, 

aXJSX RECEIVED = 

All the New Styles in Soft and Stiff Hats. 
Best Stiff Hats, $3.75. Best Silk Hats, $3.50 in 
exchange. 

Just opened all the New and Nobby Styles Neck 
Dress, Collurs, Cuffs, Fancy Hose, Canes, etc. 

All are invited to call and examine goods and prices. 

No. 2 Arcade Block. 



HIW BlU© STOIE, 



ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

ll^GS. MlDICIlia 

Faiicy M Toilet Articles, Ciprs I Toliacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

IS" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

H. ]VE. BOAVKER, 

BOARDING AND LIVERY STABLE 

Cor. Main and Cleave land Sis., Brunswick. 

All Hack Orders promptly attended to. 





■A'W 



CUSTOM TAILORING 

A SPECIALTY, 

AT 

Fernald's Tailor Emporium 

237 Middle Street, 
PORTLAND, - - - MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



i^ii<t:e: g-oox^s, 

AT €, W, ALLlli*S 

DRUG STORE. 

THE FINEST CIGARS AND SMOKING TOBACCOS. 
THE BEST PERFUMERY. 

THE BEST TOILET SOAPS. 

THE BEST HAIR BRUSHES. 

The Largest and Best Assortment of 

Srngs, Patent Medicines, &c., &c> 

To be found in this market. 

Letnont Block, Bruustvick, Maine, 



S. C. COFFIISr, 

— DEALER IX — 

PROVISIONS AND GROCEBIES 

^' Special Kates to Student Clubs. JS)' 
CORNER OF MAIN AND ELM STREETS. 



COLDCLip 




TOBACCO&CIGARETTES 



Either S^VEET or Plain, are of the Finest 
Qualities, ALWAYS Uniform and Reliable. 

TRY THE SEALSKIN CIGAR 

SEND $3;75/and we will forward " 
by mail, registered, a 50 box of the 
Seal-Skin Cijrar. 

This is a special offer to enable fmolters to test this 
celebrated braiid. After a trial you ^\ill smoke no other. 

S.F. HESS & CO. 

t'remium Tobacco Works, Rochester, N.Y> 

ISAAC H. SNOW, 

DEALER IN 

Seef, fiork, Sutton, Bamb, Src. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

WESCT XJOOia TO ST.^lTT77-OOr)'S. 

0. L. Y®"^^? OoLLEQE BaF^BE^, 
Two doors north of Post Office. 

(10 TO 

TO lllIV YOUR 

Groceries, Canned Goods, Fruits, 

Gonfectioneiy. Tobacco, and Cigars. 

S]iiciiil 'itiilcs (11 Stuileiil Clulw. 

]yiain Street, Head of the Mall, Brunswick. 



PEi^cp^p-fT;qiii0i^ 

MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 

lalkwill Okislcal icaiemy 

Prepares for Bowdoin and the best New England 
Colleges. Offers, also, a thorough Semik'aet Course 
to young ladies, and a shorter course for business 
pursuits. For Catalogues, address 

Rev. a. W. burr, Hallowell, Me. 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

jg" Families, Parties, ami Clubs supplied. 

Purchase your COAL at the 

Ooa.1 "S"a,rd. in Topsliam, 

WHERE NONE BUT 

Tbe Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared luid in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 



M. M. M^YBEMMT, Psoprietqs. 



I. S. BALtGOME, 

1>K.VI.KR IX 

Hardware, Stoves, Croclery, and Crlassf are 

BRtrNSIVICK. IVtE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



30* € 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circiilating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

O. IE. TO"^7^lNrSE3STID, 

CHOICE GROCErTeS, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 

N. B.— Special Rates to Students. 

y. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Bi.ock, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



IVl. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

PORXr..A.ND. IVI.A.INE:. 

Tliin hiiiise has been tlioroiif/hlij refitted with- every re- 
yard to comfort, and the aim is to make it first-class in all 
its appointments. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

De^V^ITT HOUSE, 

QUIMBY & MURCH, Proprietors, 



A^. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College View^s. 

ALL KINDS OF 




For Schools and Colleges, 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 



Royal Quimht. 



Eben MuiiCH. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SJWrS03», 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 



0j©) 



OFFICE IN LEMOETT BLOCK, Brunswick. 

i^f'Telephone connection with Coal Yard. 
(Il3°" Orders left at Jordan Snow's, Lemont Block, will 
be promptly attended to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Mercbandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

^8j and ^8 J Congi-ess Si., and 235 Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

je®-SEND FOE Price List. 



AMOS L MILLETT & CO., 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. WILSON & CO., 

"Wholesale and Retail Dealer? in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

H2 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 



lo^faom 



[e3ieal ^epaptmenl 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the 'Medi- 
eal School of Maine, \A-ill commence Fkbhuary 9th, 1SS2, 
and continue SIXTEEN AVEEKS. 

FACrXTY.— JosnuA L. Chamberlain, LL.D., President ; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice 5 Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children 5 Frederic H. Gerbish, M.D., 
Anatomy ; Charles VT, Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence ; Hexry 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry, Bcrt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiologry j 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Cliiiiciil Surgery ; Charles O. 
Hunt, M, D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Daniel F, Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; William B. Cushman, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED 5UTCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Botanical Microscopes, Fancy Goods. Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry 
promptly repaired and warranted. 

^i2n.e Spectacles and. lEsT-eg-lasses. 
EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book Work to Order. 

W. B. 

20 (0 ^ J '0 *- 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

.O^Transient Orders for Jlilk or Cream tilled by piving suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 



KNIGHT, 



JOBBEKS AND ReTAILEES Of STANDARD /~\ i.*'/^ll F) 1.4- 

Imprtei ant BoEstlc Faoc? Groceries, ^-urtis tollege bookstore 



HUNKER niLL PICKLES A SI-ECIALTY. 



BOOKS. STA.T10NEFIY, ROOIVI 
PAPER, PERIODICAI^S. <ScC. 



FIFIST-CI^ASS 



Fiaaois, Organs, and Mlelodeons, ! E. SMITH,.. GROCER. 

AT LOW PRICES. LAR(3E RBNTINO STOCK. ' 

F. W. EMTQ'M, B^iFNswiem, Mm, \ Lowest Prices to Student Clubs. 
XiSOls Dispensep ol Pure Drugs, Medicines,, and Chemicals. 



F. H. 



unison. t:h3i> js^sxiy aDonmsmc c;x<3tA.n.s. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions a Specialty. 

IVIA.IN STFtEEX, ------ BRUNSWICK. ME. 

.lOURNAI. PRK89, I.ISHON 9TRKKT, t.KWISTON, MAINK. 



Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MARCH 8, 1882. 



No. 15. 






A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

Books, Stationerf, and Paper Hangiogs, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLA/VD, iVIE. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

ELLIOT 

Has the Finest and Most Stylish Stock of 
Neckwear ever exhibited in Brunswick. 

The U Sijles is M vi M Hits. 

HOSIERY, COIiLARS, CUFFS, &c., &c., 
in Great "Variety of Styles. 



. FINE ASSORTMENT OF 



FALL AND WINTER OVERCOATS AND SUITS, 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock. 
FRi!^ISJ^K: E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets. 




C^UTMM T@ SMOKlia 

Beirare of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 

'^^^'^ ' -"" TRY IT. 

Fine, Mild & Sweet, 

Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 

FOR YOUR 

NOBBY HAT 

Go or Send to 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 
SIGN OF THE GOLD HAT. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENaEAVED IH THE MOST FASHIONiBLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENOY FOR 



UNDER FALMOUTH HOTEL. 






JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, ETC., 

IN GREAT VAEIETT, BEST QUALITY, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor Casco, 

PORTLAND, , - _ _ MAINE. 
A. CARTER, J. W. D. CAETER. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



A reorganization of the Course of Instruction 
has recently been made, iu which the distinction be- 
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main- 
tained, but all academic undergraduates are placed 
on one footing, with the opportunity of following, to 
a considerable extent, such lines of study as they 
prefer. 

All students entering the College proper, are ex- 
amined on the same course of preparatory studies. 
After the second year a liberal range of electives is 
offered, within which a student may follow his choice 
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount 
pursued. 

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated 
as a distinct course, are still, for the most part, re- 
tained either in the required or elective lists. More 
place is also given to the Modern Languages than 
they have hitherto had. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all 
who complete the Academic Course. 

The Engineering Department remains as here- 
tofore, and facilities are offered for study of the 
various branches of this science. The means of 
theoretical instruction are ample, and the town of 
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen- 
tres in the State, and in the immediate vicinity of 
many important public works, affords excellent 
opportunities for the study of actual structures. 
The College also enjoys many favors from the United 
States Coast Survey Office. The admission is the 
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the 
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will 
be taken, if desired, iu the place of Latin. 

Those who complete satisfactorily the four years' 
course in engineering will receive the Degree of Sc. 
B. Those who complete a two years' course of ad- 
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or 
Mechanical Engineer. Students not candidates for 
a degree will be received at any stage for which an 
examination shall show them to be fitted, and may 
remain for any desired time. Further information 
will be furnished on application to Professor G. L. 
Vose. 

Terms of Admission to the Academic Course. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 

following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^Enoid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 

Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

Ancient Geogkapuy. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Coraraou 



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 

and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 

I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 

Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission 
will be required to produce testimonials of good 
moral character. The time for examination is the 
Friday after Commencement and the Friday before 
the opening of the first term. In exceptional cases 
applicants maybe examined at other times. Candi- 
dates for admission to advanced classes will be ex- 
amined in the studies which such classes have 
accomplished. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrange- 
ments with the Principals of schools and academies 
having a regular course preparatory for college of at 
least three years' duration, whereby their pupils 
may be examined for admission to college at their 
respective schools, iu connection with their own 
final examinations. 

The amount of instruction now offered and pos- 
sible to be taken in the several principal lines of 
study is exhibited comparatively, as reduced to one 
scale, in the following manner. This is, however, 
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal 
length : 

Latin, eight terms. 

Greek, eight terms. 

Mathematics, eight terms. 

German, four and a half terms. 

English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English 
Literature, three and a half terms. 

French, three terms. 

Italian, one term. 

Spanish, one term. 

Rhetoric (formal), one term. Rhetorical and 
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a 
half terms. 

Natural History studies, five and a half terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, four terms. 

Chemistry, four terras. 

History, Ancient and Modern, two terras. 

Political Economy, one and a half terms. 

Public Law, two terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, including Logic, 
four terms. 

Christian Evidences, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $U5. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $:i to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however," by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent;. 



Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MARCH 8, 1882. 



No. 15. 



BOVYDOIN OKIE NT. 



PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE TEAR, BY THE GLASS OF '82, OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Arthur G. Staples, Managiug Editur. 

Charles H. Gilman, Busine.ss Editor. 
Melvin S. Holway, Eugene T. McCarthy, 

"William A. Moody, Warren 0. Plimpton. 

Terms — S2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor, Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, jjersonals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Ofi&ce at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Tol. XL, No. 15.— March 8, 1882. 

Editorial Notes 175 

Literary : 

The Seniofs Yision (poem) 178 

Edgar A. Poe 178 

A Taleatine 180 

A Night of Horror 181 

Communication 182 

College Items 183 

Personal 184 

Clippings 184 

Editors' Table 185 



EDITORIAL KOTES. 



Longfellow's 75th birthday was not ob- 
served by the college further than a congrat- 
ulatory telegram, and the delivery of a paper 
by Prof. Packard at Portland. The expres- 
sion of so much interest was certainly com- 
mendable. 



The mildly beaming face of Lydia Pink- 
ham is not more self-satisfied and contented 
in its expression of mild beneficence than the 
faces of our choir as they look down upon us 



and sing. Far be it from us to shatter the 
conceit that they really do sing. We would 
not do it if possible. We would far rather 
picture the rolling melody as it glides in upon 
us with all its holy influences and quells all 
unholy passions; how the waves of harmony 
echo from the vaulted roof and carom on the 
walls and die in melody from very excess of 
purity, alas ! too soon. We should much 
prefer this taffy to the truth, sure. It would 
be foolhardy to criticise. When we consider 
how widespread has been its influence, how 
it lias sung " The Mermaid " and " King of 
Cannibal Islands," from Lisbon to Bowdoin- 
ham, inclusive, we are compelled to remain 
silent before recognized talent and say noth- 
ing concerning the rumor of a discord that 
was heard last week. Further, "one sliould 
not look a gift horse in the mouth" even 
though the animal is serene of countenance 
and gives promise of great worth. 

A parchment, bearing the names and win- 
ning times of the victorious contestants for 
the prize cup at the spring regatta, is soon to 
be placed in the library above the cup. It 
has been much regretted in the past that no 
adequate reward in the way of lasting honor 
has been bestowed upon the winners. By 
the display of such a record as the above, 
this fault is of course removed. 



We have noticed the statement that Bow- 
doin, among other colleges, is to be excluded 
from the Inter-collegiate Athletic Association 
unless delegates are sent to the next conven- 
tion. The convention which was held in New 
York, Feb. 25th, was notable from this reso- 
lution chiefly. Many were surprised that 



176 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Bowdoin was considered a member, inas- 
much as the relations of the college to any 
such association have been exceedingly weak. 
The connection has been alive, however, 
only slumbering. A member of '76 rescued 
the college from oblivion by winning a walk- 
ing match some half dozen years ago, but 
since then, as we know, the burden has be- 
come tiresome. We have no possibility of 
knowing the future action of the college in 
this matter, but think that at present the loss 
would not be great to either part}', although 
we are liable at any time to find it desirable 
to seek an opportunity for the display of some 
athletic genius. 



We have matter of interest for the secre- 
tary of the Bowdoin College Chess Club or any 
member of the college interested in chess. 
Chess playing by correspondence, the writer 
assures, is an interesting diversion, and to 
this end he forwards a prospectus of a Corre- 
spondence Chess Tourney which he proposes 
to inaugurate. We shall be pleased to hand 
these over to any chess player in college. 



This college delays not for the funeral or 
the christening. Neither Memorial Day nor 
Washington's Birthday are sufficient to stop 
it in its mad rush for learning. The rubicon 
once essayed in the golden-leafed September, 
it swims serenely on until the further shore is 
reached amid the thunders of Commencement 
oratory. We often wonder if the college 
cares a snap for Washington, or libeit}', or the 
American eagle. It is not evident. What is 
evident is that it is averse to allowing us legal 
holidays either from a belief that the holidays 
devoted to the idea of patriotic veneration 
for our institutions are of no account, or 
through fear that our own spirit of veneration 
is in danger of being worn out by handling. 
We do not make these remarks with a desire 
to gain holidays, but because we are convinced 



that it is unsafe to disregard our national 
holidays of thanksgiving for great national 
blessings in order to save time. The one 
hundred and fiftieth anniversar}' of Washing- 
ton's birth should be enough to make any 
institution lift its head and recognize that it 
owes something, if not its very existence, to 
his life work. 



The quotation in the communication in 
our last issue is so admirable a heading for 
these remarks that we put it as a text, " Do 
unto others as you would be done by." We 
would preach a sermon from this text to 
classes in general upon the behavior of classes 
in general, were sermons not distasteful, and 
were it not necessary for a preacher to be 
more nearly immaculate than his unregen- 
erated hearei's. We have in mind, however, 
to make a few remarks concerning the antics 
of the Senior class in history of philosophy, 
and call attention to the text above. No one 
would doubt that the golden rule is especially 
applicable to this matter, who sliould witness 
the evident discomfort that arises to many 
from the continual talking aloud, and 
general ill-behavior of many. This com- 
plaint concerning Senior classes is rife in 
nearly every college to-day. It seems that 
Senior classes, or certain members of them, 
everywhere have arrived at the private opin- 
ion that the privilege to act ungentlemanly 
has come to them with the advent of Senior 
year, and that the grace of their presence in 
recitation compensates for the discomforts 
which they do not fail to cause. In this col- 
lege it is due of course entirely to tiiought- 
lessness. Students forget to sit up, and not 
talk aloud, and not to throw rubbers, and not 
stamp continually, but in many instances 
thoughtlessness is wrong and ought always to 
bo amended. It is this thoughtlessness that 
has caused so many com|)laints to be handed 
to us, and as a remedy for wiiich we quote 
the above text, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



177 



With the first number of the present term 
■we remarked that we should endeavor to 
present certain modifications in the number 
and source of our successors, and certainly a 
proper respect for both our honored prede- 
cessors and successors demands a word or 
two in explanation of the step. Our prime 
motive is towards the benefit of the Orient. 
Anything short of this would have been 
highly reprehensible. A brief connection 
with the duties of a college paper will con- 
vince any one that they are highly onerous, 
and cease to be beneficial when support is 
lacking. This support must always be lack- 
ing, — not from the inefficiency of the board, 
but from the excess of work, — when the num- 
ber of editors is as small as is that of the 
Oeient. To this end we propose to increase 
the number of the next board by the addition 
of three members. Again, Bowdoin is an 
almost if not entirely isolated example of a 
college supporting a class paper. At present 
the Orient is ostensibly published by the 
class of '82, but nothing is more evidently the 
opinion of the college than that such a plan is 
not for the best. To meet the hearty support 
of the students, without which a college paper 
cannot live, and what is better to be welcomed 
by every student as touching some interest 
peculiarly his own, it must present a diversity 
of interests correspondingly great. To secure 
this in a limited degree, at least, we desire to 
elect the three additional editors from the 
present Sophomore class. The next hoard 
will then consist of seven from the present 
Junior class assisted hy three from the Sopho- 
more class. We have naturally shi-unk from 
introducing this change because the success 
of a paper, like everything else, depends in no 
small degree upon the stability of its consti- 
tution, but necessity knows no law. We 
shall look for articles from the Sophomore 
class during the following month, and shall 
announce the board in our last issue. The 
constitution as revised, with information upon 



minor points, we shall be pleased to offer to 
any desirous. We only hope that the Sopho- 
more class will be pleased to contribute, and 
that our successors in '83 will consider it as a 
blessing, that possibly the work of conduct- 
ing the Orient may be made a pleasant pas- 
time, certainly less of a burden. 



To the average man, in any station, the 
ability to speak his mind understandingly is 
an absolute necessity. This much a college 
education ought of itself, assuredly, to give. 
The most of us, however, aspire higher, and 
would wish that college might give cultiva- 
tion in the higher branch of oratory. The 
question is a pertinent one, whether college 
tends to improvement in this line. We have 
no further to look than the columns of a cer- 
tain great daily to find an argument to prove 
that colleges do not by themselves turn out 
good speakers, but that their influence tends 
to give them a bent towards the unnatural 
and artificial in oratory, and delays rather 
than hastens the progress of a natural incli- 
nation. The coming Senior g,nd Junior Ex- 
hibition gives food for reflection. Here, at 
least, are almost the only opportunities af- 
forded of indulging in oratory. Declamations 
have nothing of originality about them be- 
yond the mechanical and elocutionary, but 
here the lucky student has the chance to say 
something of his own as well as he can. 

A hurried rehearsal, and the debutant 
speaks his piece. It is ofteti the sublime ora- 
torical effort of his college life. In many 
cases it is the song of the dying swan. He 
will never sing again, in college at least. 
Now comes the question, is this enough ? It 
is doubtful, and doubly doubtful for those 
whose standing precludes the Commencement 
oration, and whose oratorical endeavors are 
summed up in one speech. What shall we 
say then of those, even worse off, who are not 
chosen at all, whose tickets are still, figura- 
tively, in the hat ? Some of them have never 



178 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



been offered an opportunity. To come to the 
point, then, ought we not to have more origi- 
nal spoken productions, — more exhibitions if 
you please ? Give every one a chance, and 
one difficulty is removed. Apropos of exhi- 
bitions, the thought arises as to style indulged. 
Here we find the origin of the assertion that 
college education hinders the progress of 
natural inclination in oratory. The world 
recognizes an abnormal growth, known as 
" college oratory." Popularly it is something 
dead to the present classical medieval dealing 
with " Rome on her seven hills," and Athens 
and Sparta, abnormal, if containing original 
thought, not " college oratory," if comprehen- 
sible in style. There is truth in this, as far as 
students are of the opinion that it is hurtful 
to dignity to fail to talk over the heads of the 
audience and not to prance over the seven 
hills of Rome and display their historical 
lore. But is the remedy not easily found bj' 
any student who has not sunk his individu- 
ality in books, who takes the opportunity of 
saying what he himself has wrought out by 
himself in plain simple language on a topic 
within the limits of his thinking powers? 



THE SENIOR'S VISION, 

ON THE EVE AFTER GEOLOGY EXAMINATION. 

In "Mesozoic" times it must have been, 

That such unheard of vision could begin. 

To unknown lands, perchance, I know not where, 

I seemed transported high above in air. 

With quick descent, which caused my hair to stand, 

I found myself once more upon the land. 

I gazed around with wonder at the sight. 

And saw what seemed a river on my right ; 

While on ray left, as far as eye could reach, 

A boundless ocean with its sandy beach. 

1 started forward at a furious rate. 

Since novp my curiosity was great, 

To ascertain what land I'd found, 

And thus take in the objects all around. 

While scrambling heedless over rocky jags 

And " uucouforuiable Triassic" crags. 



I, all unconscious, caught my foot and fell 

Across some huge great bones, which I knew well 

Were skeleton remains of reptile life 

Long years before man's mind was rife. 

Some hand-like tracks, by chance, I noticed here, 

And these I followed closely, till quite near 

The river, I beheld, to my surprise, 

A " Labyrinthodon " of monstrous size. 

Outstretched he lay, in length full fifty feet. 

Serenely basking in the midday heat. 

I, stooping, seized a fossil " Trilobite," 

Which I hurled forth at him with all my might. 

He still seemed quite unmindful of the blow, 

So T seized " Brachiopods " and let those go. 

Just then a spla.shing from the other shore, 

Perchance suggested that there might be more. 

I quickly turned with sudden glance that way, 

And there beheld some "Rhyncosaurs " at play. 

I started then to search for " Ceratites," 

" Lamellibranchs," "Criuoids," and " Belemnites." 

Had just picked up some "Ganoid" plates, when, 

" hark ! 
A whirring sound ! It suddenly grew dark. 
With terror I was overcome well-nigh. 
A bat-like monster swept across the sky. 
I started up to see what this might be. 
A " Pterosaur " lit on a " Cycad " tree. 
At this the earth sent forth a groaning sound ; 
It quaked and trembled, then uprose the ground, — 
And here it suddenly occurred to me, 
" Le Conte " is wrong about " Catastrophe." — 
I looked, and like molasses in its flow. 
The viscous glaciers regelating go. 
The " terminal Moraine " was now in view, 
And I beheld a half-thawed " Mammoth " too. 
A sudden noise fell sharply on my ear; 
I turned and saw a " Megatherium " near. ' 

He, cat-like tried his claws upon a tree, 
Then quickly stiu-ted in pursuit of me. 
I tried in vain to run. No tongue can tell — 
I started up. It was the chapel bell. 



EDGAR A. POE. 

About the year 1840 there appeared, in 
different American magazines, certain strange, 
fascinating stories, graceful in style, rich in 
imagination, and vivid in coloring. They at 
once attracted attention, were read and re-read, 
and translated into different languages. Of 
these " Tales" I could say much if I would, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



179 



but at present I shall confine myself to a few- 
words concerning their author, — a man who 
was not understood, while living, is not under- 
stood now, and probably never will be. His 
many enemies far underestimated him, and his 
few friends, on the other hand, have, perhaps, 
overestimated him. It may not be an entirely 
thankless task, therefore, to attempt a brief 
estimate of his true character as far as is 
possible. 

Poe's intellectual make-up was very pecul- 
iar. It was keen and analytic. He plays 
with mysteries as a child plays with a puzzle. 
He reasons with the air of an accomplished 
mathematician. He criticises keenly, though 
not always fairly. His imagination is weird 
and fanciful. " He leads us through the vast 
regions of the obscure and terrible with a 
fascination sometimes painful." He paints his 
strange word-pictures so minutely and with 
such consummate skill as to make them almost 
seem real, and relieves the sometimes oppres- 
sive tension of the mind with that humor, 
which, bright and keen as a dimond, sparkles 
in almost all his works. 

Poe's poetry has been severely criticised, 
and with considerable justice. He was not a 
true poet. He has smoothness of versification 
and the same wonderful skill in the use of 
words as everywhere else, but true feeling is 
lacking. We look for it in vain. Once in a 
while, however, we find here a line, there a 
verse, in which lies hidden a glimpse of i-eal 
feeling, a feeble flame of poetic spirit. 

But it is not by his poems that Poe must 
be judged, — it would be unfair to do so. He 
was not at home in poetry. Much of it was, 
as he himself tells us, mechanical. His 
"Tales" are his best works. These differ, 
however, in excellence. Perhaps the best are : 
"The Gold Bug," "The Fall of the House 
of Usher," and the " Murders in the Rue 
Morgue." The last has a tinge of the horrible 
about it, but Poe draws attention from that 
by the ingenuity of the plot. The first is one 



of the few which have nothing horrible about 
them. 

As a man Poe is a pitiful sight. His 
moral sense is verj^ deficient, and moral cour- 
age almost entirely wanting. All facts seem 
to show that he was dissipated, although in a 
letter written to a friend in 1846 he most 
solemnlj' and indignantly denies it. The let- 
ter is almost an autobiography in itself. His 
later works, however, are against him. No 
man not on the verge of delirium tremens 
could have written " The Black Cat," or the 
" Masque of the Red Death." They are the 
fruits of a diseased brain and an excited imag- 
ination, — inevitable results of intemperance. 

Poe has, perhaps unconsciously, told his 
own story in verse. All who have read the 
" Fall of the House of Usher," remember the 
strange, yet beautiful, little poem which is 
put into the mouth of Usher. It is, perhaps, 
one of the most pathetic things he ever wrote. 
It runs as follows : 

In the fairest of our valleys, 

By good angels tenanted, 

Once a fan- and stately palace — 

Radiant palace — reared its head. 

In the monarcli thought's dominion 

It stood there. 

Never serapli spread'a pinion 

Over fabric half so fair. 



But evil things, in robes of sorrow, 
Assailed the monarch's high estate ; 
(Ah ! let us mourn, for never morning 
Shall dawn upon him desolate). 
And round about his home the glory, 
That blushed and bloomed, 
Is but a dim remembered story 
Of the old time entombed. 

And travelers now within that valley, 
Through the red little windows, see 
Vast forms that move fantastically 
To a discordant melody ; 
While, like a rapid ghastly river 
Through the pale door, 
A hideous throng rush out forever, 
And laugh — but smile no more. 



180 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A VALENTINE. 

The influence of sentiment, as a potent 
force in moulding human events, has met 
with recognition in all ages. In olden times 
a spirit of war animated the knight, and chiv- 
alry flourished. Another and more interest- 
ing form inspired the troubadomr, and the 
lover breathed burning love songs in the mid- 
night air, and dedicated admiring odes to his 
mistress' eyebrow. The very air was re- 
plete with sentiment, and every lover was his 
own poet. In these prosaic days, although 
the pulse of humanity beats no less warmly, 
and to deny the superiority of the subjects 
were a crime, both opportunity and inclina- 
tion are lacking to men for such modes of 
protestation. The art of the rhj^me is rarely 
considered essential to education and the 
spirit of poetrj' is strangely stagnant ; hence, 
as a natural recourse, men turn to the val- 
entine. Here the comic poet and sentimental 
rh3'mster revel in pleasant brain-created fan- 
cies; albeit the pressing need of realizing 
from these productions forms the strongest 
incentive and the brightest scenes are the 
stern realities of an attic room. Through 
contrast, rather than from association, are the 
brightest dreams evolved, and to the pen of 
the starving Bohemian the lover turns for the 
expression of those sentiments which he so 
strongly feels but can ill express. 

A homily? by no means — observations 
rambling, and it may be unfitting, suggested 
by tlie sight of an old valentine, quaint and 
curious, embodying the hopes of tlie lover in 
the art of the designer, consigned to the 
changing fortunes of a long wai-, and then to 
the lot of all things human, forgetfulness. 
Now, by chance biought to light, it had 
returned, a strange guest from the past, a re- 
minder of the early life of the Nation when 
the struggle for independence was yet unac- 
complished, and men's hearts beat high with 
bright liopes. 

The ancient theory that the souls of mor- 



tals did not depart with death but took on 
other shapes of existence, although repulsive 
in its radical form, has yet in it something 
pleasantly suggestive. It is pleasing to be- 
lieve that objects may be so strongly stamped 
with the spirit of an age or individual, as to 
possess a personality of its own, and brought 
into contact with beings of another time, 
stands apart entirely distinct. So the old 
valentine, torn and soiled, seemed to possess 
something strangely pathetic, and while 
mutely apologzing for its appearance, de- 
manded respect for the memories enshrined 
within it. A silent participant in many of 
the shifting scenes of the long struggle be- 
gan on that bright April morning. Dazzled by 
the bright noonday sun of the present, its 
very appearance was a sad commentarj- upon 
the story which it told, — short and common- 
place enough, but viewed at this distance not 
without interest. 

The postal service in those daj^s was far 
from perfect, and the changes of the troops 
and unforeseen movements of the enemy made 
the fortunes of objects committed to the mail, 
at best, uncertain. Consigned, to the mails, 
with many fond wishes by its mistress, the 
valentine went in search of the lover. A 
member of one of the many roving bands of 
horsemen, subject to no military rules, that 
roamed from the swamps and everglades of 
the South to the pine-clad hills of Northern 
lands, the soldier moved from place to place, 
unconscious of the mute messenger that so 
patiently sought him. At length the mail 
bag fell into the hands of the enemy, and 
the course of the valentine was apparently 
checked. The fortunes of war, however, 
were not 3'et exhausted, and the same troops, 
later, captured the soldier. A kind officer, 
into whose hands the valentine had fallen, 
learning his name, placed it in his possession. 
Freighted with love, after four years the val- 
entine had accomplished its mission. Escap- 
ing from confinement, the soldier joined his 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



181 



company and, engaging in battle, lay dead on 
the field. Placed nearest his heart, the bul- 
let, which had taken his life, had pierced the 
valentine, and stained with his life blood, it 
was left the sole means of identifying his 
remains. The body was returned to its 
Northern home and the valentine to the 
hands of the sender. 



A NIGHT OF HORROR. 

Truth is stanger than fiction. If the 
doubting reader will pursue the thread of 
this story he will be convinced that the fol- 
lowing facts, as related, will cause even the 
dime literature plots to grow pale. 

In the fall of 187 — , young S. entered this 
college as a Freshman. He was a young man 
of promising ability and, but for the untimely 
blighting of all his life prospects during his 
first term in college, might now have been a 
rising star before the American people. The 
first few weeks of college life passed quickly 
and pleasantly, as the Sopliomores were held 
under restraint by the Faculty, who had 
taken two of their number as hostages. The 
Freshmen had, however, been informed by 
the Sophomores that they must stand up at 
prayers in chapel. S., one morning, ventured 
to remain seated, and ever after received the 
blackest looks and many secret threats from 
the upper classes. Soon after he started a 
moustache, thinking to present a manly appear- 
ance on his return to his mother and sisters. 
This act elicited several threatening postal 
cards, written in blood, which, on examina- 
tion, proved to be red ink. Being some- 
what timid, he wrote to his father asking 
advice as to his course of action. A reply 
soon came in the shape of a shot gun with 
instructions to shoot the first man who 
troubled him. The Faculty, also, informed 
him that he would be justified in self-defense. 

Time passed on. One evening he at- 
tempted his first cigarette, and, feeling a little 



dizzy, retired earlier than usual, with the gun 
standing by the bed, loaded with powder and 
rock salt. Probably from the effect of the 
narcotic, he slept deeply until awakened by 
a crasii of the broken door and blinded by the 
flash of a " 1 mil's eye.'' Dragged from bed 
b}^ a score of masked tyrants, he requested 
to be allowed to put on more clothes, but was 
greeted by curses and blows. His gun in 
the hands of the enemy, he was obliged to 
submit to being placed on the table. An old 
fiddle, with most of the strings supplied by 
twine, was produced, on which he was com- 
pelled to play, ending by having it smashed 
over his head. Next, the obnoxious moustache 
was removed by means of a jackknife and a 
pieCe of soap, while its place was supplied by 
a full beard of blacking laid on with the 
shoe brush. Gymnastics were then in order, 
and our hero tried his skill in climbing the 
door and crawling through the "tunnel." 
In fact, every cruelty which his tormentors 
could devise was practiced upon him. At 
length, after repeating a dictated speech 
eulogizing the honor and courage of the 
Sophomore class, he was thrown on the bed 
and drenched with a pail of water. 

As the maskers departed a sigh escaped 
him, " I'm glad they are through at last." 
"You are, eh?" said the rough voice of one 
listening behind the door, and at the word 
back trooped the fiends in human form. The 
unfortunate Freshman was forced upon his 
knees and commanded to say his prayers. 
At the remark that he should not be compelled 
to pray for the Sophomore class, some of 
the crowd were with difficulty restrained 
from shooting him with his own weapon. 
The cry of " String him up," arose on all 
sides. Cord was produced, noosed around 
his thumbs, passed over the door, and he was 
thus drawn up till his toes barely touched the 
floor. In a few moments the agony became 
intense, but not a murmur escaped the youth- 
ful martyr. Presently one of the wretches 



182 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



heated the poker to redness in the coals. As 
the glowing metal approached, the victim felt 
his senses reel. It was applied to his person 
amid cries of, " That's right," " Roast the 
Fresh-meat." A sickening odor arose. Slowly 
the scene faded before him and — he awoke. 
It was a dream. 

Indulgent reader, at this point you may 
doubt, but continue and be assured of the 
adage with which we began. It was a dream. 
Not of the Freshman, however, but of the 
editor of a religious paper, in a neighboring 
city, who proceeds to write up the account as 
an exposS of the true condition of hazing in 
Bowdoin College. 



COMMUKICATIOK. 



Editors of Orient : 

There have been published quite recently 
in all the papers, glowing accounts of the 
new gymnasium at Harvard, and of the new 
system of athletic training adopted by Dr. 
Sargent, which is based on the requirements 
of each individual. In connection with this, 
perhaps, it will be well to consider briefly the 
advance made from the earliest times, in this 
all-important, though often neglected, branch 
of our education. Among the first to de- 
velop any system in such training were the 
Lacedaemonians, who established gymnasia 
and compelled their young men, as well as 
their young women, to devote a part of their 
time to athletic pursuits, while some of them 
were obliged to undergo the most severe tests 
of strength. A gymnasiarch, or director, 
presided over each gymnasium, whose duty it 
was to examine each person, to adapt his 
exercise to his requirements, and to see that 
no one was injured by overwork. The Athe- 
nians soon adopted gymnastics, and regarded 
them as one of the three great branches of 
study. For, said these old philosophers, the 



mind and the body must develop together, 
else the one will reach an abnormal growth 
and predominate over the other. The prin- 
cipal methods of muscular training were run- 
ning, wrestling, boxing (either with the 
coestus or without it), and throwing quoits. 
These quoits resembled very much the dumb- 
bells of the present day, and were thrown 
from one to another, who in turn caught them 
and threw them to the next. Very simple 
these seem in comparison with our more im- 
proved methods of exercise, but there was 
the same general result, the hardening and 
strengthening of the muscles. 

The Romans also adopted .the gymnasia, 
but they had not that fixity of purpose which 
the Greeks possessed, exercising for pleasure, 
and to counteract the effects of their indolent 
habits, rather than with any definite view to 
improve themselves physically. After the 
Roman era athletics fell into a decline, to- 
gether with other pursuits of this kind, and 
not until the close of the eighteenth century 
were they revived bj^ Jahn, an enthusiastic 
German, who established turnvereins, as 
they were called, or schools for physical train- 
ing. Indeed, every phj-sician was obliged to 
have some knowledge of tlie best modes of 
physical development, for thej^ argued that 
every physical defect led to some disease, and 
by the judicious exercise of certain parts of 
the bodj'- this disease could be avoided. But 
the turnvereins existed for a comparatively 
short time, as they soon became places for the 
discussion of civil rights, and were suppressed 
by the emperor, while their founder was 
thrown into prison. However, their influence 
remained and, having been transmitted to 
America by the immigration of the Germans, 
has given us in every college, and in almost 
every city, gymnasiums, properly fitted up 
and containing the most approved devices for 
the thorougii training of the body. X. 



Stearns, 'S2, who has been absent at bis home 
ou business, returned to college last week. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



183 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



Barton, '84, has returned from teaching. 

Midnight suppers at the depot seem to be in 
fashion just now. 

The Sophomores think the Freshmen are too 
officious in wooding up at prayers. 

The attendance of students at church was notice- 
ably better than usual last Sunday. 

The first examination in physiology at the Med- 
ical School was held last Thursday. 

The members of the quintet have given up for 
the present the proposed entertainment at Richmond. 

The bell-ringer needs to brace. Several times 
last week the morning and evening bell was omitted. 

During the good sleighing some of the students 
were driving on the streets some very tony turn- 
outs. 

The skating rink is booming among the students 
just now. It is said to be a great place for a 
"mash." 

The collection of Bowdoin songs has been highly 
complimented by the publishers of the " Carmina 
Collegensia." 

The Sophomores, in their recitations to Cutler, 
have been divided into two divisions and have 
essays every week. 

Prof. Packard read a paper before the Historical 
Society in Portland on the " Reminiscences of Long- 
fellow's College Days." 

A dignified upper- classman was recently mis- 
taken for a Medic by a yagger, who tried to induce 
him to purchase a cat. 

A Freshman says that the morning vesper so 
disturbs his midnight slumbers that he is obliged to 
get up before breakfast. 

The key-hole in the chapel door was found to be 
stopped up Sunday morning. The 7 a.m. bell was 
consequently not to be heard. 

The class in history of philosophy, occupying 
eight hours per week, will now take four hours 
each in ethics and higher logic. 

President Chamberlain informally received mem- 
bers of the second division of the Senior class at his 
residence on Thursday evening last. 

Mr. B. thinks that if the college gives a tutor 
his room rent and fuel, he ought to be able to pre- 
vent the boys from breaking glass in the end 
windows. 



Chandler's concert a fortnight ago was a decided 
success. The students who attended all speak 
highly of the entertainment. 

Some one has suggested that the compulsory 
system be applied to our professors to secure their 
more regular attendance at chapel. 

The optional German class now recite to Prof. 
Johnson in the library from three to four o'clock, 
after the building is closed for the afternoon. 

Came very near, it seems, losing our military 
instructor, as, through some mistake, he was sent to 
Orono and the order was only countermanded just 
before he reached Brunswick. 

The rules for admittance to the dissecting room 
in the Medical School are more strict than last 
year. Several of the college boys have gained an 
entrance only to be " fired out." 

Prof. Wheeler has the Italian class this winter 
instead of Professor Johnson. The number of stu- 
dents taking this study is quite small and recita- 
tions occur but twice each week. 

The chapel choir has an unfair advantage, for 
beside their extra marks they have a chance to 
come in when tardy and a good opportunity for 
study in the gallery. We object. 

Prof. Robinson was severely burned in removing 
a vessel of blazing paraffine from the laboratory. 
He has been confined to his house for a fortnight, 
but is now able to resume his duties. 

The appointments for the Senior exhibition are : 
Salutatory, C. H. Gilman, W. W. Curtis, M. H. 
Goodwin, J. F. Libby, W. E. Mason, W. A. Moody, 
W. 0. Plimpton, and C. E. Stiuchfleld. 

President Chamberlain, it is said, has accepted 
the offer of a business situation in Florida, but it is 
not known, at least publicly, whether he will, for 
the present, sever his connection with the college. 

Snow-balling the doors in the different ends 
seems to be a favorite pastime with some. It is not 
over pleasant on suddenly stepping out to receive a 
blow on the head, and this nuisance ought to be 
ended. 

The first lecture for the benefit of the Musical 
Association was given last Thursday evening at 
Dirigo Hall by Dr. Wilder. The second will be by 
Prof. Wheeler, on the subject, "Reminiscences of 
Haley." 

The Seniors held their first exercise in the prac- 
tice of parliamentary law last Wednesday. The 



184 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



question under discussion was that of Chinese immi- 
gration and was referred to a committee to report 
in one weeli. The class will hold these exercises 
on each Wednesday. 

The old and stale trick of greasing blackboards 
still survives. The neat and cheerful appearance 
of the new mathematical room was recently con- 
siderably injured by some one who tried to be smart 
in this manner. 

It was with some surprise that the students 
ascertained the college was to make no public 
recognition of the birthdays of Washington and 
Longfellow. On the occasion of the latter, congrat- 
ulatory telegrams were sent by the Faculty and 
members of the English Literature class. 



PERSONAL. 



The following three alumni took part in the 
Longfellow celebration, held at Portland, week 
before last: Hon. W. G. Barrows, judge on the 
supreme bench, class of '39, presided and delivered 
the opening remarks, which were among the best, 
on that occasion ; Prof. A. S. Packard, class of '16, 
delivered an interesting account of " Longfellow as 
a Student and Professor at Bowdoin College " ; 
Hon. George F. Talbot, class of '37, discoursed on 
"The Genius of Longfellow." 

The graduates of the literary department in the 
Medical School the present term are : W. A. Rob- 
inson, '76; F. H. Crocker, 'IT; C. A. Baker, '78; 
0. S. C. Davies, '79 ; R. L. Swett, '80 ; A. Hitch- 
cock, '81 ; Carlton Sawyer, '81 ; J. E. Walker, '81. 

'55. — W. L. Putnam has declined his appoint- 
ment to the supreme bench. 

'56. — Rev. R. B. Howard was in town a few days 
since. He is pastor of a church in New Jersey. 

'67. — Stephen C. Horr died at Cumberland Mills 
in April, 1875. He had formerly been a very suc- 
cessful teacher in Michigan. 

'75. — Charles A. Black is teaching Lincoln Acad- 
emy. He has eighty-fivo scholars. 

'76. — Arlo Bates has arrived safely at Havana, 
after a fine voyage. 

'78. — P. L. Paine has applied for admission to 
the Cumberland bar, at the April term of the su- 
preme court. He is, at present, taking the place 
of one of the teachers in the Portland High School, 
who is absent. 



'81. — Pettingill is teaching at Blue Hill. 

'81. — W. M. Brown was in town a few days since. 

'81.— Smith is in the Mavrick Bank, Boston, 
Mass. 

'81.— Gardner is with John Pray, Sons & Co., 
wholesale carpet dealers, Boston, Mass. 

'82. — E. U. Curtis has gone home for a few days. 

'82. — Mansur, who has been teaching at Houlton, 
has returned. 

'82. — Stearns has returned from a few weeks' 
absence. 

'83. — Knapp has returned from teaching. 

'83. — Fling has resumed his college duties. He 
has been teaching in Gray. 

'84. — Knight's school, in one of the suburban 
districts of this town, has closed. 

'84. — Kemp has returned to join his class. 

'85. — Folsom has again joined his class, after 
having taught a term of school at Bethel Hill. 



CLIPPIKGS. 



Now, as I don my " dress suit" for the fray, 
What subtle perfume stealeth to my braiu? 

Recalling dim another scene not gay, 
Where through the flowers came the music's strain, — 
Not gay, but soothingly romantic. 

No! Memory plays me false, — I'm off the track; 

'Twas at a supper and we'd grown quite merry, 
And as I from the board reeled laughing back, 
Upon my dress-coat I upset the sherry, 
In some wild bacchanalian antic. 

— Lehigh Burr. 

" What did Csesar die of ? " Roman punches. 

Prof. — "Gentlemen, this class would proceed 
better if there were more use of the head and less 
of the feet." — Nassau Lit. 

"My daughter," exclaimed a fashionable mother, 
" is innocence itself. You can't say anything in her 
presence that will make her blush." — E.r. 

Judging from the Monday night's noise, there 
must have been a free imbibition. Does a certain 
Sophomore remember that he called out gratefully 
to a supporting lamp-post as ho left it, " Good 
night ! Don't give it away ! " — Ncirs. 

Student — "I don't know." Professor — "Oh, 
yes you do." Student — "Then I know more than 
I think I do." Professor declares that to be impos- 
sible.— £c. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



185 



Prof, in Psychology — " It is no uncommon 
thing for a man to wake in the morning and find 
himself unable to move — paralyzed in the night." 
[Laughter.] — Becord. 

Professor — "Mr. X., can you tell me why the 
days are longer in summer and shorter in winter f " 
X. (with alacrity)— " Yes, sir, it's because heat ex- 
pands and cold contracts." — Tecli. 

" I don't quite like that rendering, Mr. T.," re- 
marked the Professor. " Well, that's what the 
translation says. Professor. Oh— Ah — Egad ! No 
sir, I meant the notes." The man goes into the 
second division. — Argo. 

Classic Slang. Frigidus dies when I get sinis- 
trum. Quinquagesima sestertii aU around. Non 
ad novus, justus-don't be afraid we won't say it, 
but you must remember that when Latin was 
spoken, jokes of this kind must have been compar- 
atively new. — Becord. 

Professor -" Has any one seen Mr. H. to-day?" 
Silence. Professor — "Is he sick? Does any one 
know?" Chorus of Class — " Yes, sir, yes, sir, he's 
sick." Ten minutes later, Mr. H. enters just from 
laboratory, redolent with cigarette fumes. Pro- 
fessor — " Are you better now, Mr. H. ? " Sensa- 
tion.— ^cto. 

Two men discussing the wonders of modern 
science. Said one : " Look at astronomy, now ; 
men have learned the distances to the stars, and 
with the spectroscope they have even found out the 
substances they are made of" " Yes," said the 
other, " but strangest of all to me is how they found 
out all their names ! " 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



The Harvard Herald shows a good spirit and 
earnest work, and we hope has come to stay. A 
recent editorial discusses the present examination 
system, calls it unsatisfactory, and hopes, that as in 
other progressive measures Harvard has taken the 
first start, so in this she will make improvements. 
The Herald says that Prof Tyler, of the University 
of Michigan, has allowed his students in English 
Literature to escape the terrors of an examination 
on all the work done, by doing some collateral read- 
ing as a substitute if preferred. 

The Yale Becord has recently elected a new 
Ipoard of editors, They are thus divided among the 



classes : in '83, four members, and '83 Sheffield, one ; 
'84, two, and '84 Sheffield, one ; '85, one. It says 
that " owing to the large number of contributors to 
the Becord during the past year and the few places 
to be filled, the appointment of the new board has 
been a matter of the greatest difficulty." There is 
a great amount of sickness in Yale at present, and 
it is suspected that the sewerage has something to 
do with it. The Glee Club had a successful and en- 
joyable trip to Boston. The Becord and the Crim- 
son are at sword's points about the conduct of the 
Yale students at Oscar Wilde's lectures in New 
Haven. The Crimson said that he was grossly in- 
sulted. The Becord asserts that the statement is 
" glaringly false and that the conduct of Harvard 
students in Boston theatres is a constant source of 
complaint." The following from the Becord speaks 
for itself: 

If, indeed, there are not more fools than wise 
men graduated from Yale College this year, it will 
not be the fault of the present system of instruc- 
tion — of this fact the Senior class is perfectly con- 
vinced and has been since the beginning of the year. 

This complaint about the excessive burden put 
upon the Seniors is so unanimous that its truth can- 
not be doubted. Such lamentations do not sound 
well to outsiders and cannot but injure the college. 
It is our belief that a radical change both in princi- 
ple and practice must be made if Yale is to hold in 
the future the high position she has enjoyed in the 
past. 

The Sophomore class at the University of Michi- 
gan is to present a Latin play, and rumors of French 
and Greek plays to be given in the near future are 
heard. The Chronicle has the most complete "Clip- 
pings" department of any of our contemporaries. 

Over forty-five per cent, of the living male grad- 
uates of Monmouth College, one of the multitudinous 
Illinois colleges, are in the ministry, and the College 
Courier says of its present Senior class: 

Monmouth College has some reputation abroad 
as a place where preachers are manufactured. The 
present Senior class will perhaps furnish half its 
members to this profession. We would not speak 
irreverently, but we sincerely hope that we shall 
never be called upon to listen to some of them 
preach. . . . Year after year we see men leave 
college and enter the ministry with about as much 
natural adaptation for the work as has the ordinary 
blacksmith for the business of watch making. 

The following from the Amherst Student shows 
something of the sentiment in regard to the pro- 
spective college song book : 

The committee appointed to consider the matter 
of accepting the offer of Mr. Brewer of Chicago to 



186 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



assign Amherst a place in the new song book he is 
about to publish, unanimously reported against the 
scheme for the following reasons: 1st, the time, 
which is limited to March 10, is too short for the 
preparation of words and music ; 2d, the pledge 
of forty dollars demanded must be given upon 
too slight knowledge of what the work is to be; 
3d, the leading Eastern colleges, Tale, Harvard, 
Columbia, and Princeton will probably not accept 
the offer, though Dartmouth, Brown, Rutgers, and 
Williams may and doubtless will ; Amherst would 
much prefer to act with the larger colleges ; 4th, too 
little is known about the standing of this firm to 
submit a matter of so much importance to it. 

Amherst has received a bequest of about tifty 
thousand dollars from the Giles' estate, to be kept 
as a fund in trust, to use the net income thereof for 
the procuring of books of the highest merit in 
science, literature, and history, for the increase of 
the college library, and for occasional lectures on 
methods of study and the use of books. "My 
desire being to aid the students of the college in 
acquiring exact knowledge, high character, and 
capacity for self-government. A fund of fifty 
thousand dollars is also being raised for a gymna- 
sium. One person has already given twenty-five 
thousand and another five thousand dollars. About 
a hundred thousand dollars will be received from 
the Williston mill property. 

A brand of cigars has been named after the 
Harvard Daily Herald. 

The Courant has the following unkind slur on 
the sentiments of the Herald towards its rival : 
"The Harvard Herald's song— ' Answer, Echo, 
dying, dying.' " 

The Argo and the AthencBum are, at the present 
time, issued on the same day. The Faculty at 
Williams gave the students Thursday afternoon as 
well as Wednesday morning, since Washington's 
Birthday fell this year on Wednesday. This may be 
stretching the question of the rights of students to 
holidays rather far, but the spirit shown is as com- 
mendable as it is rare. Williams' peculiar and 
unique grievance is the lack of a campus, a lack 
which certainly ought not to be long allowed to be 
complained of The return of spring was fittingly 
celebrated by a negro minstrel performance given 
by the Junior class on the evening of the Ist of March. 
Harvard has liad a Greek play and it ought to re- 
joice the heart of every lover of his country, that 
Williams has given the sanction of scholarshi|) to 
an art which has arisen, grown, and reached 
perfection on American soil. The cuts for the pro- 
posed paper on "Nicotiana" in the present number 
of the Argo were destroyed by an accident in the 



rooms of the Photo-Engraving Company, rendering 
impossible the publication of the piece. Conse- 
quently the space left vacant had to be very hastily 
filled and we can readily excuse any shght deteri- 
oration in the merit of the contents of the number 
before us. A decree has gone forth at Williams that 
all students be vaccinated. 



We consider the following 
recent college poetry : 



the best examples of 



EASTERN WINDOWS. 

We sat beside the casement high 

That opened on the eastern sea. 
Thy thoughts were on the star-lit sky, 

But mine were still on thee. 

And as I watched thy fine, brave face, 
I wished my heart were more like thine; 

As full of hope and tender grace. 
As full of light divine. 

Thy windows ope on eastern skies, 

Undimmed by sadness or regret. 
Thou see'st fair stars and planets rise. 

But never see'st them set. — Advocate. 

A LITTLE MAID. 

A little maiden, out of snow, 

A man is gaily making; 
Beneath her hand his features grow, 
The cool air lends her cheeks a glow, 

To grace the undertaking. 

But suddenly she deals a blow. 

The snow man sadly breaking, 
Then hurls him to the ground below; 
Has he some insult offered? No, — 

•Tis but some vvliim awakening. 

Ah ! maid ! treat'st thou a snow man so, 

I fear that, soon, forsaking 
Real, living men — at whim, much woe 
Thou'll make thy lovers undergo. 

" Coquette," they'll cry, hearts aching. 

—Argo. 



School of Political Science, 

COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 



Instruction given in all branches of Philosophy, 
History, Political Economy, Social Science, Constitu- 
tional, International, and Adminislrativo Law, Roman 
Law, and the comparative Jurisprudence of the 
Common and C'ivil Law. Next Uu-iu begins Oct. 2, 
1882. For further particulars address 

REGISTRAR OF COLUMBIA COLLEGE, 
Madison Av. and 49th St., New York City. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 






Finest aod Most Select Stock of 



MENS' FURNISHINGS. 

The Newest and Greatest Variety of Patterns in 

NECKWEAR, GLOVES, HOSIERY, 

rWDERWEAR, BRACES, ETC. 

ly Custom Shirts from Measure, Six for $9.00. 
A Perfect Fit Guaranteed. 

Goods for the TROY LAUNDRT sent Tues- 
days and received Saturdays. 

In Percales, Mahrattas, and Anaerican Goods. 
Orders by mail i^romptly attended to. 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 
FRANK M. STETSON, 

JXTST RECEIVED = 

All the New Styles in Soft and Stiff Hats. 
Best Stiff Hats, $2.75. Best Silk Hats, $3.50 in 
exchange. 

Just opened all the New and Nobby Styles Neck 
Dress, Collars, Cuffs, Fancy Hose, Canes, etc. 

All are invited to call and examine goods and prices. 

No. 2 Arcade Block. 



MIW BBUQ STOIE. 



ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

Fancy aiJ Toilet Articles, Ciprs I Toliacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

Jf^" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

H. M. BOWKER, 

BOARDING AND LIVERY STABLE 

Con Main and Gleaveland Sfs., Brunswick. 

AH Hftcl? Orders promptly attended to. 





►^^f If 



CUSTOM TAILORING 

A S P EC I ALT Y, 

AT 

Fernald's Tailor Emporium 

237 Middle Street, 
PORTLAND, - - - MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



AT €. W. AiLLlM'S 

DRUG STO R E. 

THE FINEST CIGARS AND SMOKING TOBACCOS. 
THE BBST PERFUMERY. 

THE BEST TOILET SOAPS. 

THE BEST HAIR BRUSHES. 

The Largest and Best Assortment of 

Drugs, Patent Medicines, &c>, &c> 

To be found in this market. 

Lemont Block, Brunswick, Maine. 

s. c. ooFFiisr, 

— DEALER IN — 

PROVISIONS AND GROCERIES 

im- Special Bates to Student Clubs.. ffi» 
CORNER OF MAIN AND ELM STREETS. 



0OI.DCLIP 




T0BACC0&CI6ARETTES 

Either Sweet ou Plain, are of the Finest 
Qualities, ALWAYS Uniform and Reliable. 

TRY THE SEALJKIN CIGAR 

SEND .$3.75, aiid we will forward 
by mail, registered, a 50 box of the 
Seal-Skin Oiffar. 

This l8 a ppecial oll'cr to enable BmolierB to toRt this 
celebrated brmtd. A tU-r a trial you will Bmoke no other. 

S. F.HESS &. CO. 

tremium Tobacco Works, Rochester, N.Y. 



ISAAC H. SNOW, 

DEALER IN 

\zz% gork, iHutton, gamb, ^z. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

ITESCT X>OOia TO ST.A.IT'V'^OOJS'S. 

). L. Y®^^r OoLLEqe Ba.F|BEB\, 
Two doors north of Post OfTice. 



(10 TO 

TO BUY YOUR 

Groceries, Canned Goods, Fruits, 

Confectionery, Tobacco, and Cigars. 

S] lal Hat.'ii li> Stuileiit ('lnl>a. 

Main Street, Head of the Mall, Brunswick. 



MAIN STREET, 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



Prepares for Bowdoin and the best New England 
Colleges. Offers, also, a thorough Seminary Course 
to young ladies, and a shorter course for business 
pursuits. For Catalogues, address 

Kev. a. W. burr, Hallowell, Me. 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

113" Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



&£i 



Purchase your COAL at tlie 

Ooal ~Z"a,xcL in Topsliam, 

%VHK1!E NONE BUT 

The Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prejiared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 






I. s. balgome:, 

DKAI.ER IN 

Hartware, Stoves, Crockery, ail J dlassf are 

BRUMSvrxcK. axe:. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. O. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volvunes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

DEALER IN 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Students. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



^M^'BZ'M WC 



«9 ^^4 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

POrt.TLiA.NX3. JM.J\.J.NE. 

This house has been Ihoroufjhhj refitted leith every re- 
{/cird to comfort, and the aim is to make it first-class in all 
its appointments. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 



De^^^ITT HOUSE 

QUIMBY & MURCH, Proprietors, 

Comer Pine and Par][ 

Royal Quimev. 



A.. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes S Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 

ALL KINDS OF 

For Schools and Colleges, 

EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



2@4 



ssmrsois', 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 



m) m 



OFPICE IN" LEMOWT BLOCK, Brunswick. 

^^Telephone connection with Coal Yard. 
|[pg° Orders left at Jordan Snow's, Lemout Block, will 
be promptly attended to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDGE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEK, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical lustrxunents, and Musi- 
cal Mercbaudise, of all kinds, 

156 £zcliaiige Street, Portland- 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8j and ^8/ Congress St., and 2^5 Aliddle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

;S®=-Send for Prick List. 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. WILSON & CO., 

TTholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send tor price list. 

14-2 & H4 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 

P. W. 6TOUK,MAN. ? 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Miiiue. will commence February 9th, 1SS2, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— JosHUi L. Chabiberlais, LL.D., Presideur ; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Patholngv and Practice ; Alfked Mitchell, M.D.,ObstetriCa 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic II. Gebrish, M.D., 
Anatomy; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence 5 IlENRy 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Bcrt G. "Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D,, Surgery and Cliuical ;:?urgery ; Charles 0. 
Hunt, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Dasiel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian; Willlam B. Ccshmas, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 




Portland. Me. T'^JP^'' 

AMOS L MILLETT & CO., 

Its ov Standard 



r'in.e Spectacles and. E37-eg-lasses. 
EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, JIE. 



i 



JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTOIM. 



Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book Work to Order. 



W. B. 



KNIGHT, 



Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

li^Trausient Orders for Milk or Cream filled liy giving suitable notice. 

Residence, Sch.ool Street. 



Iffiporiei aiil Doiiiestlc Fane! Griceries, *-urtis College Bookstore 



llUNKlCn HILL l-ICKl.ES A SPECIALTY. 



BOOKS. SX.A.T-ION£:ilY, ftOOlM 
PAPSR. PE:FtIOI3IC.A.I.S. <ScC. 



FIRST- Cr.A.SS 



Flanos,, Organs, and Melodeons,, : E. SM ITH, . . G ROGER. 

AT LOW I'lUCES. I.AIIUK RKNTING STOCK. ' 

W. W. E::(iWQ'M, M'Mii?MBwi€M£, Me. . Lowest Prices to Student Clubs. 
f, 1, WIL,SO:li'i Dispenser of Pure Drugs,, Medicines, and Chemicals. 

iivii:-*c>iii"iiJi3 -iVKTu laoTwraBSTiC! C!ic3r.a.n.s. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions a Specialty. 

IKIAXN STREET. BRXJNSIAriCK. IVIE. 

.mUllNAI, rilKSS, I.ISHON STRK.KT, I.KWISTON, MAINK. 



Vol. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MARCH 22, 1882. 



No. 16. 



.^^ 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGIKG 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new"Oxford"and"lVloehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF T^ OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

HALL L. DAV^IS, 

Book, Wonerj, aod Paper Haogiop, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAI\ID, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

ELLIOT 

Has the Finest and Most Stylish Stock of 
Neckwear ever exhibited in Brunswick. 



Tli6 Latest Stylss in Solt anl Sti 

HOSIERY, COLLARS, CUFFS, &c., &c. 
in Great Variety of Styles. 



FINE ASSORTMENT OF 



FALL AND WINTER OVERCOATS AND SUITS, 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock. 
FRA.N^K E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets. 



C^1ITI©M TO SMOKlBa 

Be^rare of Imitations and Connterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 




TRY IT. 
Fine, Mild & Sweet. 



Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands, 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 

FOR YOUR 

NOBBY HAT 

Go or Send to 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 
SIGN OF THE GOLD HAT. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Glass Cards and Monograms 

ENOEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



UNDER FALMOUTH HOTEL. 



JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, ETC., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QUALITY, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

52! Congress Street, cor Casco, 



PORTLAND, 
A. CARTER. 



MAINE. 
J. W. D. CARTER. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



A reorganization of the Course of Instruction 
has recently been made, in which the distinction be- 
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main- 
tained, but all academic undergraduates are placed 
on one footing, with the opportunity of following, to 
a considerable extent, such lines of study as they 
prefer. 

All students entering the College proper, are ex- 
amined on the same course of preparatory studies. 
After the second year a liberal range of elcctives is 
offered, within which a student may follow his choice 
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount 
pursued. 

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated 
as a distinct course, are still, for the most part, re- 
tained either in the required or elective lists. More 
place is also given to the Modern Languages than 
they have hitherto had. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all 
who complete the Academic Course. 

The Engineering Department remains as here- 
tofore, and facilities are offered for study of the 
various branches of this science. The means of 
theoretical instruction are ample, and the town of 
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen- 
tres in the State, and in the immediate vicinity of 
many important public works, affords excellent 
opportunities for the study of actual structures. 
The College also enjoys many favors from the United 
States Coast Survey Office. The admission is the 
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the 
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will 
be taken, if desired, in the place of Latin. 

Those who complete satisfactorily the four years' 
course in engineering will receive tlie Degree of Sc. 
B. Those who complete a two years' course of ad- 
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or 
Mechanical Engineer. Students not candidates for 
a degree will be received at any stage for which an 
examination shall show them to be fitted, and may 
remain for any desired time. Further information 
will be furnished on application to Professor G. L. 
Vose. 

Terms of Admission to the Academic Course. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 

following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^neid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 

Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books ; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 

and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree; Geometry, Books 

I. and in. of Loomis's Gcorac'. :y. 

Real equivalents for any of tbe foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission 
will be required to produce testimonials of good 
moral character. The time for examination is the 
Friday after Commencement and the Friday before 
the opening of the first term. In exceptional cases 
applicants maybe examined at other times. Candi- 
dates for admission to advanced classes will be ex- 
amined in the studies which such classes have 
accomplished. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrange- 
ments with the Principals of schools and academies 
having a regular course preparatory for college of at 
least "three years' duration, whereby their pupils 
may be examined for admission to college at their 
respective schools, in connection with their own 
final examinations. 

The amount of instruction now ofi'ered and pos- 
sible to be taken in the several principal lines of 
study is exhibited comparatively, as reduced to one 
scale, in the following manner. This is, however, 
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal 
length : 

Latin, eight terms. 

Greek, eight terms. 

Mathematics, eight terms. 

German, four and a half terms. 

English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English 
Literature, three and a half terms. 

French, three terms. 

Italian, one term. 

Spanish, one term. 

Rhetoric (formal), one terra. Rhetorical and 
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a 
half terms. 

Natural History studies, five and a half terms. 

Pliysics and Astronomy, four terms. 

Chemistry, four terms. 

History, Ancient and Modern, two terms. 

Political Economy, one and a half terms. 

Public Law, two terras. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, including Logic, 
four terms. 

Christian Evidences, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $7.3. 
Room rent (half), average, $-2i'i. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regidar College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen tlie cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol.. XI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MARCH 22, 1882. 



No. 16. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE TEAR, BY THE CLASS OK '82, OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Arthur G. Staples, Mauagiii>r Editcir. 

Charles H. Oilman, Business Ertitnr. 
Melvin S. Holwat. Eugene T. McCarthy, 

■W"illia.\i a. Moody, TVarren 0. Pli.mpton. 

Terms — $2.00 a year is adva.vce ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing lilditor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 



Entered at the Post Office at Brunsmck as Second Class mail matter. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. XL, No. 16.— March 22, 1882. 

Editorial Notes 187 

Literary: 

Alpheus Spring PackardCpoem) 189 

" The Heart of Greylock" 189 

Johu Lothi'op Motley 190 

Then and Now 192 

Communication 193 

College Items 194 

Personal 195 

Clippings 1 96 

Editors' Table 197 



EDITORIAL KOTES. 



We would call attention to the communi- 
cation in this issue, in regard to boating. 
Although perhaps premature in its inference 
that there is an apathy in this sport, it cer- 
tainly shows a very possible condition of 
things which would need united effort to im- 
prove. 

The treasurer of the Base-Ball Association 
requests the immediate payment of subscrip- 
tions. Some two hundred dollars more are 



necessarjr to start tlie nine, and the most of 
this can be obtained if all who have sub- 
scribed will settle. The nine needs a " brace " 
decidedly, and it should be the pleasure of 
all to aid in giving it. 



We hope that the rooms in memorial hall 
which are to be used constantly, and indeed 
all of them, may be well ventilated. A wail 
of discontent is going up all over the col- 
lege world against ill-ventilated recitation 
rooms. The Crimson devotes a column to a 
reiteration of the stock arguments against 
poor ventilation, which are woefully true, 
and we are led to the conclusion that it is 
better to recite out of doors than to breathe 
foul air within. It is the duly of every in- 
structor to look after his own health, certainly, 
and we wonder how many can continue to 
teach in ill-ventilated rooms and survive. 



The college correspondent of the Portland 
Globe, who is presumably an undergraduate, 
shows so much candor and argumentative 
ability in the management of his column that 
we are forced to recognize his merit. It must 
be remembered, however, that it is not al- 
ways expedient to carry family grievances 
or college grievances before the world, and 
we are of the opinion that devoting such a 
considerable portion of the valuable space of 
the above named Portland Globe to argu- 
ments against morning chapeland the chapel 
choir is injudicious, and we fear uninterest- 
ing. The remarkable candor and self-com- 
placency with which the statement is made 
that the next Senior and Junior exhibitions 
will not be as good as usual, since the speak- 
ers are very poor, is also notable. Take jt 



188 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



all in all it seems that the college is being 
" sat on" in a quiet way. The liberty of the 
correspondent to conduct his column as he 
pleases is undoubted, but we should think that 
pride for his Alma Mater and a desire to 
make everything in the college appear at its 
best, would restrain him from the expression 
of such radical sentiments. The billingsgate 
indulged in against the chapel clioir is, at 
best, disgraceful. 



The pure maliciousness of the recent dis- 
figuration of recitation rooms can hardly be 
too strongly discountenanced or punished. 
What could induce any sane person to ex- 
pend so much labor for the sake of commit- 
ting such a wholly criminal act, especially 
when it can result in no benefit to any one, is 
one of the mysteries of our daily life. In 
the outside world the perpetrator, if discov- 
ered, would be likelj^ to be compelled to don 
a striped suit and for a time, at least, expend 
his energies in labor for the public, and the 
difference between the liabilities of college 
students to such punishment and those of less 
favored people is certainly fading rapidly 
from the public mind. In this case, since the 
cost of repairs is no longer apportioned among 
the students, the college must directly bear tlie 
expense, and from this point of view the act 
is, if possible, even still more itiexcusable. 



Sidewalks in Brunswick! "At last," ex- 
claimed many a weary pilgrim, and the sigh 
of content expanded into a smile and the 
smile extended throughout the two counties, 
and Brunswick is figuratively crowned with 
laurel. What a gem of a town the village 
of broad streets and shady avenues will be 
when one can walk in comfort. Add to this 
a $40,000 town hall and we have Brunswick 
infuturo as it should be. Many of us have 
seen the snows of more than one winter meet 
and mingle in familiarity with Brunswick 
gand; have beheld the mild and gentle influ- 



ence of spring leave the tracery of its handi- 
work in mud, the inevitable ; and have com- 
pleted the round of the seasons by breath- 
lessly pursuing our several ways through the 
historic dust of Main Street. We should be 
derelict in our duty, therefore, did we fail to 
drop a tear to this only original feature of 
the town, and sigh with regret as we glance 
into a future illumined by pictures of a town 
hall worth i40,000, and a brick sidewalk, that 
time did not sufficiently delay our entrances 
upon the stage of life, or that the light of 
wisdom had not sooner penetrated the veil 
that has hitherto enshrouded Brunswick 
voters. 



Examinations and cramming for their 
preparation are just now pointed out as one 
of the dangers of modern society. An inter- 
ested public is prone to doubt the value of 
examinations when the drain made upon deli- 
cate nervous systems is too great in man}" in- 
stances to be repaired. It is not to be won- 
dered at when, throughout the great body of 
public schools and colleges, we find scholars 
of all grades and ages undergoing the almost 
incessant preparations, and worry and labor 
of difficult examinations, and in many in- 
stances emei'ging incalculably' injured. It is 
this fact and the testimony that the one great 
evil of the competitive examinations, re- 
quired by civil service reform, offers, that has 
directed so much attention to this phase of 
modern education. The proposal is not to 
abolish examinations as such, but to present 
modifications which, in some way, may lessen 
the amount of cramming in preparations. As 
to the evil, we quote the following from a re- 
cent essay by Professor Iliixle}': " The edu- 
cational abomination of desolation of the 
present day is the stimulation of young peo- 
ple to work at high pressure, by incessant 
competitive examinations." " The vigor and 
freshness which should liave been stored up 
for the purposes of the hard struggle for ex- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



189 



istence in practical life, have been washed 
out of them by precocious mental debauch- 
ery, by book gluttony and lesson building." 
The remedy for us is, of course, honest labor 
every day and less reliance upon spasmodic, 
and for the most part futile cramming upon 
the eve of examination. Apart from the fact 
that one retains but little of such knowledge 
is this evil of overwork, and while thousands 
of college students await their own particular 
ordeals, the individual remedy lies, to a certain 
extent, witliin each one's grasp to be used or 
not. 



Mr. Geo. M. Whittaker, a Bowdoin grad- 
uate of the class of '71, and one of the pro- 
jectors and first editors of the Oeibnt, at the 
request of some friends of tlie college, has 
undertaken to prepare an article on " Bowdoin 
College in Journalism." He asks for infor- 
mation from or concerning all graduates who 
are or have been engaged in this profession. 
We believe that Bowdoin graduates, in the 
past, have shown more than ordinary bent 
towards journalism, and that such a work as 
the one proposed will do honor to the college. 
The manner of publication will doubtless 
depend on the amount of material procured. 
The post-office address of the gentleman is 
Southbridge, Mass. 



With another number we shall be making 
an exit. We fear that other matters will 
then preclude the statement of an opinion, 
strengthened every day and hour of our edi- 
torial connection. We have before spoken of 
the matter of the Orient's indulging in an 
editorial sanctum, and again take the oppor- 
tunity to reiterate it. There is no possible 
reason why the college paper, if it is worthy 
of publication, is not likewise worthy of hav- 
ing a suitable place for a habitation, a place 
where, among other things, the business can 
be conducted, where its files can be kept, and 
where matter can be left for publication. 



There are rooms in abundance in college and. 
money enough to furnish such a room, and 
this college surely can support one such office 
as well as many of our colleges support two. 
It is our candid opinion, therefore, that in 
this direction certainly a marked improvement 
can be made in the lessening of inconveniences, 
and we can see no reason why all such im- 
provements should not be attempted. We 
hope, therefore, that before the fateful sum- 
mer day that ushers us as alumni into the 
world, we may have the pleasure, through 
the labors of our successors, of glancing over 
the files of our old friends in the college 
world, and perchance reclining in an arm- 
chair in a commodious " Orient Office." 
There can be no doubt but that our successors 
will appreciate this lack, and we sincerely 
hope, out of justice to themselves, will make 
a move in this direction. 



ALPHEUS SPRING PACKARD. 

Who may uuawed gaze ou thy pensive form, 

Or see they reverend head bent down in thought 
Of things not here, thy memory richly fraught 
With images of days of calm or storm 
Long past — when hearts now dust beat quick and 
warm, 
Or do these crowding shapes still live for thee 
As real as that of Him thou soon shalt see ? 
The years be many ere the Touch transform 
Thy faith to sight to rob us of that voice 
Whose accents made us, thoughtless, to revere 
The legacy of Time and to rejoice 
In hopes that perfect scatter every fear. 
aged Prophet of the Better Choice, 
Pardon the needy who would keep thee here ! 



"THE HEART OF GREYLOCK." 

Within the last ten years, near one of our 
New England colleges, has appeared, as it 
were, an almost unknown bit of Alpine scen- 
ery. In a secluded spot, shielded by a thick 
growth of trees, is the ravine, so aptly styled 



190 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



"The Heart of Greylock." Few have seen 
this spot and few know its beauty. 

From the vale in which nestles the little 
college town, rise on every hand the slopes of 
tlie hill formerly called Saddleback. It re- 
mained for some appreciative soul to picture 
the mountain as an old man and the snowy 
sides as the hoar}' head, before it donned its 
rightful name of " Greylock." 

We are at the new camping ground, about 
a quarter of a mile below tlie summit. Here 
on our left is a brook that wells a few rods 
above us. Looking toward the sunset we see 
a distant range of hills, and between, a thriv- 
ing valley. A pasture stretches out before 
us for a few rods, wliere it ends in a steep, 
wooded incline. Crossing the pasture to the 
right, and following for some distance a foot 
path, we can get far out on the edge of a 
prominent cliff. Full five hundred feet be- 
neath us, down a slope that barelj' gives hold 
to the small birches, we hear a brook laugh- 
ing along its course. Up toward the left is 
seen the grand old mountain standing guard 
over the graceful foot hills which lean upon 
him as the vine upon the oak. Opposite us 
is a wooded buttress reaching toward the 
right far out into the valley. 

A hard scramble downward brings us, at 
length, to the stream, the main artery of 
Greylock's heart. From what a pure source 
must this crystal blood flow ! Walled in by 
dense wood and cliffs on either hand, we 
wind our solitary way upward, now on this 
side of the brook, now on that. Intent on 
the difficulties and beauties of the path, we 
hardly notice the music of a cascade, as it 
comes round the edge of a protruding emi- 
nence. A slippery stone, a wet foot, a leap 
upon the bank, and we are free to look around. 
Here we are, standing on a small tongue of 
land formed by the meeting of two streams. 
From the top of the triangle rises a cliff of 
considerable heigiit, while from either hand a 
brook, splashing from the cliff, dances along, 



till, at the point of the peninsula, beneath 
the branches of a great birch, they join hands 
and trip merrily down the ravine. On every 
part we are surrounded by the sides of the 
mountain. Here seems to be perfect seclu- 
sion, perfect cidmness. Here is the beginning 
of an artery whose pulsations are in the vale 
below, the very movements of industry and 
progress. Well named, the Heart of Grey- 
lock ! Could one possibly come nearer the 
beauties of nature than in approaching them 
in such a grand, solitary spot ? From the 
majesty of the scene, one's thoughts cannot 
but be raised to a higher pitch, to be attuned 
to the chords struck by Nature. The love of 
Nature is the elevating power for the mind. 
Well may "The Heart of Greylock" compare 
with Hawthorne's " Great Stone Face," as the 
means of raising some one's life to a higher 
and nobler field of action. 



JOHN LOTHROP MOTLEY. 

With this versatile and entertaining histo- 
lian we have spent many delightful hours. 
He is the one above all others sure to interest 
the mind and enchain the fancy of youthful 
readers. It is always profitable as well as 
pleasant to us to recall the story of his college 
career and early manhood ; of the disappoint- 
ments and costly lessons which modified the 
formation of his receptive mind, and rendered 
possible those rich fruits of his maturer years 
that gave him a place in the front rank of his- 
torians. 

He entered Harvard at the early age of 
thirteen with a reputation as a linguist 
already established, especially in the German 
language. His course while there was char- 
acterized by the same wide scope in reading 
and literary labor which has marked that of 
the majority of men destined for a brilliant 
future. He maintained high rank in his class 
without at all devoting his energies to that 
object; indeed, that was to liim but a subor- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



191 



dinate part of his labors. His mind was 
already teeming with extravagant dreams of 
ambition in his future career which cannot 
be better expressed than by himself, speaking 
through the liero of his first novel, " Mor- 
ton's Hope": "My ambitions anticipations," 
says Morton in this story, "were as boundless 
as they were various and conflicting. There 
was not a path which leads to glory in which 
I was not destined to gather laurels. As a 
warrior, I would conquer and overrun the 
world; as a statesrrian, I would reorganize 
and govern it ; as a historian, I would con- 
sign it all to immortality ; and, in my leisure 
moments, I would be a great poet and a man 
of the world. " 

There can be no doubt but that in this 
and many other places in this story, Motley 
portrays his own youthful feelings and aspira- 
tions in the conduct of his hero ; and from 
that consideration must spring the main inter- 
est in his first work which, from a literary 
point of view, is certainly crude and common- 
place and deserves the full measure of con- 
demnation that it received. One more at- 
tempt sufficed to satisfy him that his honors 
and fame were not to be won in the crowded 
field of fiction. Yet even in these failures 
there were many indications of the destiny of 
their author. Many of the descriptions are 
remarkable for their vivid and realistic effects. 
Urged on by the advice of friends, as well as 
by his own inclination, he soon plunged 
deeply into the minute examination of that 
exciting period beginning with the reign of 
Philip II., of Spain, which he was soon to set 
forth in such glowing colors. As soon as the 
first part of this work appeared, under the 
title of the "Rise of the Dutch Republic," 
it was received with such universal favor as 
left no doubt but that its author had found 
his proper sphere and had attained fame at a 
single leap. It is difficult to give too high a 
meed of praise to his historical works. By 
their entertaining and vivacious style and 



simple arrangement the}' attract and interest 
a large class of readers that Prescott with all 
his genius could never touch. As in the case 
of all writers of history who are not mere 
annalists, his works savor strongly of his own 
opinions and beliefs ; but these opinions are 
so generally founded upon exhaustive inves- 
tigation and sound judgment that there is lit- 
tle room for complaint. Wherever he has 
erred, it has been on tlie side of freedom and 
toleration. In the words of Prescott, whose 
criticism is in many ways peculiarly valuable: 
"Far from making his books mere registers of 
events, he has penetrated deep below the sur- 
face and explored the cause of these events. 
He has carefully studied the physiognomy of 
the times and given finished portraits of the 
great men who conducted the march of 
revolution. Every page is instinct with the 
love of freedom and with the personal knowl- 
edge of the working of free institutions 
which could alone enable him to do justice to 
his subject." 

Not less worthy of admiration was his 
private character. Intensely loving the 
favored few who had won his friendship, his 
was not a nature to seek a very extended in- 
tercourse with the world in general. His 
life was wrapt up in his narrow circle and his 
literary labors, and the lamented death of the 
partner of his joys and sorrows doubtless 
greatly shortened his life. He was beloved 
by all who knew him intimately, with that 
strength of affection inspired only by such 
natures as his. 

Although dying away from his native 
country, tender and loving hands bore him to 
his resting place, and among the tributes to 
his genius none can be more fitting or beauti- 
ful than the following, by Bryant : 

" Sleep, Motley, with the great of ancient days, 
Who wrote for all the years that yet shall be. 
Sleep with Herodotas whose name and praise 
Have reached the isles of earth's remotest sea. 
Sleep, while defiant of the slow delays 



192 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Of time, thy glorious writings speali for thee, 
And, in the answering heart of millions, raise 
The generous zeal of Right and Liberty. 
And should the days o'ertake us, when, at last. 
The silence that — ere yet a human pen 
Had traced the slenderest record of the past — 
Hushed the primeval languages of men 
Upon our English tongue its spell shall cast, 
Thy memory shall perish only then." 



THEN AND NOW. 



Forty years ago a young man, seated in a 
hard wooden chair before a plain deal table, 
his head resting wearily upon his hand, his 
eyes staring fixedly at a Greek text before 
him. The fire upon the hearth has gone out; 
the wind roars down the chimney and rattles 
through the craclcs of the windows, compell- 
ing the occupant to button his well-worn coat 
more closely about him and chafe his be- 
numbed hands, that they may perform the 
mechanical office of turning over the leaves of 
a lexicon. 

Now and then his eyes, tired of gazing 
tipoii the long line of words and letters that 
seem to push and jostle each other till they 
are transformed into a disorderly crowd of 
grinning, mocking faces, turn from his book 
and looking around he sees notliing but bare 
walls, devoid of any picture or ornament. 
He rises from his chair and walks about the 
room, meeting little to obstruct his progress. 
One or two rickety chairs set close to the 
wall as if to prevent their falling in pieces, 
a single pine wood shelf, covered with a few 
books, make up the sum total of the furni- 
ture. The only signs of ornamentation that 
can be discovered are the names of former 
occupants cut upon tiie doors and wood-work, 
suggesting a deplorable lack of amusement. 
Sucli a cheerless and dreary prospect has 
a dismal effect upon the young man and he 
turns his thoughts inwardly, if by chance 
there he can find something pleasant and 
cheerful. His memory, perhaps, goes back 



to the pleasant fireside at home and the dear 
ones gathered round ; and now he experiences 
that awful sensation of loneliness, the sinking 
of the heart, symptoms of homesickness. 
But suddenlj' the thouglit of the wood pile 
tliat must be disposed of before breakfast, or, 
if he is lucky, he has some work to do about 
the President's house, bieaks in upon his bit- 
ter reverie and sends him ofi" to bed shivering 
with cold and sick at heart. 

The foregoing may be a slight exagger- 
ation, but it is not far from describing the 
situation of many a student in Bowdoin Col- 
lege forty years ago. 

Now let us take a glance at a student's 
room of to-day. The occupant is sitting, or 
rather reclining, in the easiest of easy chairs 
before a cheerful coal fire, from whose sur- 
face points of flame dart forth and play about. 
In his hand he holds a Cicero, so attrac- 
tive in its cover and general make-up that one 
might take it for a book of poems, were it 
not for the voluminous notes. Now and then 
his attention wanders from his book and he 
glances around the room. Wherever his e3"e 
lights, it brightens at the sight of some 
pretty, tasteful object. The table, covered 
with a cloth of rich color and pretty design, 
is littered with books, magazines, and news- 
papers, containing such food for the mind as 
will offer a pleasant relief to the regular diet 
of Greek and Latin. In the corner stands a 
handsome desk, where those remarkable effu- 
sions are produced that are to astonish the 
world through the cohimns of that famous 
periodical which shares its name with a still 
more famous stove polish. The walls are 
covered with pictures, Japanese screens, and 
brackets loaded with memorabilia. Every- 
where one sees tokens of a mother's or sis- 
ter's love, in lambrequins, tidies, and pieces of 
fancy work of every description. Nor do the 
surroundings appeal to the eye alone ; there 
are eas}' chairs so soft that they seem to ca- 
ress the occupant, and lounges ready to re- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



193 



ceive the student, weaiy with study. Indeed, 
all is comfortable, almost luxurious. 

Now let us ask what is the eifectupon the 
mind of the student of surroundings so widely 
different? At first sight it might appear as 
if the former were calculated to turn out 
men of strong character, well fitted to fight 
their way in the world, and that the student 
of to-day would graduate a weak, indolent, 
effeminate boy. And there are many examples 
to support this view, for the great men of to- 
day were educated under circumstances almost 
as severe as those of our young men of forty 
years ago, while those who have some faith 
in the future of to-day necessarily are unable 
to bring forward such examples. But I be- 
lieve these changes in college life from sever- 
ity to luxury, if you will, liave merely kept 
pace with the wonderful changes that society 
has undergone in this country. There was a 
time in her struggles for existence when she 
demanded men of muscle, men of physical 
endurance, who were educated in wielding an 
ax and swinging a scythe, but now culture 
and refinement are recognized, if not neces- 
sary, at least, as important components of a lib- 
eral education. And how are these better ob- 
tained than from proper suri'oundings during 
this the formative period of our life? People 
ma}^ talk as much as they please about "rough 
diamonds," yet their main value lies in the 
cutting and polish. Some would think that 
too much polish would destroy the innate 
properties of the stone ; but, in our country's 
time of peril when she called for brave men, 
who responded more readily, who showed 
greater courage, or endured greater privations 
than the "lazy, indolent" students of our 
colleges, or the "pampered children of wealth," 
reared in the midst of luxury and indulgence? 
So let us look upon the young man of the 
easy chair with lenient eyes, and have faith 
that, when the time comes, he will throw aside 
his embroidered smoking sacque and don his 
armor, ready to do battle with the world. 



COMMUNICATION. 



Editors of Orient : 

The boating outlook for the coming sea- 
son is indeed a gloomy one. Our oarsmen 
are not in practice, and if regular work is not 
soon commenced they will be in no condition 
to row in the class races next June. Few 
can bear the thought of giving up these races, 
but, unless abundant preparation is made for 
them, they will fall below the standard of 
previous ones, and so might as well be aban- 
doned. 

The Seniors, aside from the necessity of 
breaking in a new man, labor under the diffi- 
culty of training for a race during the last 
few months of their course, when their time 
is especially occupied with other matters. It 
has been said, and experience certainly bears 
out the statement that Seniors cannot row ; 
still, we have confidently expected that this 
year would prove the opposite. 

The Juniors have likewise to break in a 
man, and it is not probable that, in so short a 
time, he can reach the excellency of the one 
they have lost. Moreover, the sturdy men of 
'83 are compelled by the neglect of their 
class to drive through the water a boat laden 
with a long-standing debt, which of course dis- 
courages them. 

The Sophomores must add one green hand 
to their crew, and the Freshman crew will be 
composed entirely of novices, who will, of 
course require a vast amount of training to 
bring them to any degree of perfection in the 
art. The last named class, indeed, have not 
yet purchased a boat and the money for that 
purpose is not being gathered very rapidly. 

This is the condition of boating affairs, at 
present, and it is certainly bad enough. It 
can be safely said that an immediate awaken- 
ing is necessary, if we do not wish to concede 
to our predecessors superiority in this depart- 
ment of college sports. Some have said, how 
truly remains to be seen, that '81 took with 



194 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



her, upon graduating, all the base-ball men of 
the college, and left Bovvdoin naked to her 
enemies in this direction. Shall it appear 
that she took with her, also, all those inter- 
ested in boating ? 

There is no good reason for a decline in 
this interest. It develops physically, as no 
other exercise can, those who participate in 
it, and must be a great source of manly satis- 
faction to them. It furnishes a most excit- 
ing pleasure to all, and were it allowed to lan- 
guish, a great charm would be taken from our 
college life. We have a good boat-house with 
appurtenances adapted for supplying all the 
needs of boating. The association is out of 
debt, with a considerable balance in the treas- 
ury. Each of the three upper classes owns a 
boat. There are many to encourage and 
plenty to ply the oar. We only need a re- 
vival of interest. 

It is true that the lack of a gymnasium is 
a great drawback to us, but to it cannot be 
justly attributed all our apathy in sporting 
matters. Ave we then lazy and growing more 
so ? It would seem so. Let us arouse our- 
selves. We must not for a moment seem to 
show that we have less energy than those who 
have gone before us. There are still bone, 
muscle, and rowing ability in Bowdoin ; let 
us demonstrate it. Muzzle. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



A German was held iu Dirigo on Wednesday, 
March 8th. 

It is rumored that Jevvett was present at a lect- 
ure recently. 

Recitations in ethics from the text-boolc were 
begun last week. 

Who is the one that got left at the church door 
Sunday evening? 

Dr. Weeks, of Portland, the succossor to Dr. 
Green, recently performed the operation of 
lithotrity with very marked success. 



The new board of Oeiejjt editors will be an- 
nounced in our nest number. 

Prof. Campbell possesses a library containing up- 
wards of two thousand volumes. 

A Freshman declines to sign his name to an ex- 
cuse on the ground that he is not of age. 

Frescoing will shortly be commenced in memo- 
rial, and the windows are expected daily. 

With the return of warm weather we are again 
threatened with rehearsals by the band. 

The Bowdoin brand of cigars is the latest. 
Truly the college is receiving recognition. 

The students were more than usually interested 
in the church choir on Sunday beibre last. 

The Seniors will soon begin a course of United 
States History, using a text-book by Elliot. 

Prof.— " Well, Mr. J., what is the next step?" 
Mr. J. — "You take au empty hollow tube " 

Prof. Campbell again spoke before the students 
iu the Praying Circle room last Sunday evening. 

Following are the Juniors appointed fur the 
exhibition: Bascom, Holden, Packard, and Pet- 
teugill. 

Prof. Robinson has so far recovered from his 
injuries as to be able to attend to his work in the 
class room. 

Samples for Commencement programmes, etc., 
are pouring iu on the committee in large numbers 
thus early. 

Prof. Ladd, now of Tale, is the author of an im- 
portant work just published on " Principles of 
Church Polity." 

About this time the beautiful system of grading 
our walks will be put into operation, and the ash 
heap will prevail. 

Stevens, who built the '81 class boat, will shortly 
remove from Bath to Jjo\y&\\, where he will engage 
in boat building. 

The unpleasaut odor in the vicinity of the medi- 
cal building during the warm days of last week was 
delightfully suggestive. 

There is au article iu the October number of the 
American Antiquarian by Prof. Avery, on " Poly- 
andry in India and Thibet." 

On Friday morning the seats iu a munbor of the 
recitation roon:s wore found to be decorated with 
fresh black paint. Several of the classes gained an 
adijourn, others occupied chairs or retreated to some 
room uot favored by the miduight artists. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



195 



The Easter souvenir from Fernald is something 
neat, yet unpleasantly suggestive of our desires and 
our inability to gratify them. 

The chapel choir formally resigned on Tuesday 
morning and posted a call for a meeting of the stu- 
dents to select other singers. 

J. W. Kelly, of Bath, has been trying to intro- 
duce a telephone system into the college to be in 
connection with this town and others. 

A number were unable to gain admittance to 
the rooms of the Praying Circle on Sunday even- 
ing, — certainly an unusual circumstance. 

The third and fourth divisions of the Senior 
class were informally entertained at the house of 
President Chamberlain during the past vfeek. 

The remark of a Sophomore reciting on Bacon's 
essay, "Youth and Old Age," to the effect that "a 
young man should not embrace more than he can 
hold," was well appreciated by the class. 

The directors have decided to replace the walk 
and float at the boat-house by more efficient and 
substantial ones. The inconvenience experienced 
at high tide renders such action advisable. 

The announcement that Brunswick is to have a 
new sidewalk is startling and decidedly novel. The 
rumor that the