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Full text of "Bowdoin Orient"




!ZIl|r (Sift nf 

ARTHUR T. PARKER 
CLASS OF 1876 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation funding 



http://www.archive.org/details/bowdoinorient12bowd 



VOLUME XII. 



EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Arthur J. Russell, '83, Manac/mg Editor. 

Herbert P. Kendall, '88, Business Editor. 
Herbert E. Cole, '83. Oliver W. Means, '84. 

Howard R. Goodwin, '83. Llewellyn Barton, '84. 

Charles H. Stetson, '83. Charles E. Sayward, 84. 

N. Brooks K. Pettingill, '83. 




BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

1882-3. 



INDEX TO VOLUME XII. 



PEOSE. 

PAGE. 

A Day at New Meadows 148 

An Episode of College Life 5 

A Story with a Moral 161 

A. J. 0. Convention 30 

Base-Ball 32, 48, 64 

Boat Race 46 

Colonial Men and Letters 73 

Conservatism 91 

Class Day 78 

Commencement Day 80 

Completed Will in Liberty 132 

Delta Kappa Epsilon Convention 105 

Dedication of Memorial Hall and Longfellow 

Exercises 79 

Detection of Forgery by Means of the 

Microscope 145 

Episode in Teacher's Life 133 

Field Day 47 

Ghost of North Maine, The 149 

Great Eating Match at Harpswell Neck 104 

I. P. A., The 162 

Ivy Day 45 

In Memoriam 6 

Lake George Regatta 81 

Mutton Ghost 120 

Necrology, '81-'82 85 

Origin of the Orient 173 

One of Bowdoin's Boys 60 

Psi Upsilon Convention 30 

Ralph Waldo Emerson 117 

Smoke 90 

Story of a Face, The 17 

Study of Latin and Greek 3 

Sugar Camp 159 



Ten Old Maids 118 

Theta Delta Chi Convention 121 

Tale of Two Princes 147 

Thoughts about Psychology 175 

Thomas Jefferson 16 

Value of an Education 201 

Zeta Psi Convention , 175 

POETET. 

A Thought 160 

Class Day Poem 76 

Ceaseless Echo 90 

Dreaming 104 

Evening 132 

Erster Schnee 187 

Ivy Ode 30 

Ivy Poem 43 

Last Summer 52 

My Evening Cigar , 117 

To A. S. P 159 

Waste Matter 60 

MISCELLANY. 

Chppiugs 11,24,38,55,67,97, 110, 127, 

139, 154, 168, 181, 195, 209, 223, 237 
College Items.. -.8, 20, 34, 49, 61, 82, 92, 106, 121, 

134, 150, 163, 177, 191, 204, 218, 230 

College World 10, 24, 38, 53, 66 

Communications 31, .161, 188, 202, 215, 229 

Editorial Notes. ...1, 13, 27, 41, 57, 71,87, 101, 115, 

129, 143, 157, 171, 185, 199, 213, 225, 227 

Editor's Table 11, 25, 38, 54, 68, 97, 111, 125, 

140, 154, 168, 182, 196, 210, 224, 238 
Personals 10, 23, 37, 52, 65, 84, 96, 109, 124 

138, 153, 167, 180, 194, 208, 222, 236 



Stwisla Often' 



Vol. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 3, 1882. 



No. 1. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



HALL L. DAVIS, 

Books, Monerf, and Paper Hangiogs, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 



FRANK M. STETSON, 



^^^^m^/f 



DC 
W 

CO 

z 
cc 










DEANE BROTHERS &. SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

ly Lowest Prices in the State, 

183 & 185 Middle Street, r -. . Portland, Me, 



VISITORS TO PORTLAND, 

Independent of any intention of pur- 
chasing goods in our line, are invited to 
inspect the Model Clothing and Fur- 
nishing Store of Allen & Co., 470 Con- 
gress St., opp. Preble House, 

LANCASTER BUILDING. 



SPECIAL AaENT. 

0"Dunlap & Co., of New York, Celebrated 
Stiff Hats. 

Also his New Straw Mackinaw, $2.00 and 
$2.50. 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

EHQSAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOE 



474 Congress St., 



ppp. Preble House. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^neid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books ; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Eeal equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Mettiod of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may bo ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study iu the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, ho will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student Luay follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

required— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Khetoric and English Literature, two terras. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, thi-ee terms. 

Mental and .Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three teiins. 

electives — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $1 10. 

Board is obtained iu town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probaV)ly amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lesson the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 3, 1882. 



No. 1. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Robert C. Washburn, "83, Managing Editur. 

N". Brooks K. Pettingill, '83, Business Editur. 
Herbert B. Cole, '83. Charles H. Stetson, '83. 

Howard R. Goodwin, '83. Llewellyn Barton, '84. 
Herbert P. Kendall, '83. Oliver W". Means, '84. 
Arthur J. Russell, '83. Charles E. Sayward,'84. 

Terms — $2.00 a year in adtancb 5 single copies, 15 cents. 
Remittances should be made to the Business Editor, Communications 

in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 
Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 

articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 

writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 
Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XII., No. ].— May 3, 1882. 

Editorial Notes 1 

Literary: 

The Study of Greek aud Latin 3 

An Episode of College Life 5 

In Memoriam 6 

College Items 8 

Personal 10 

College World 10 

Clippings 11 

Editors' Table 11 



It is not our purpose on making our debut 
as collegiate journalists to drop a tiraid 
courtesy and follow with a series of apologies 
and cravings for indulgence. Neither do we 
hold it fitting to signalize our maiden en- 
deavors by claiming allowance for our inex- 
perience, or by humoring with entreaties in 
any way the harsh critic who is ready to en- 
gage with the result of our first labors. A 
fervent outburst of professions and prom- 
ises is to be expected on such an occasion as 



this. And the most soul-stirring expressions 
of devotion to our work, while destined to 
be stigmatized as perfunctory or even ridicu- 
lous in any place except an editorial of salu- 
tation, under these circumstances may be pal- 
liated and given countenance to, merely 
through the right of custom. Such super- 
fluous incantations, however, we propose to 
dispense with in order to give place to an ex- 
pression of honest intentions. 

However becomingly the editorial robes 
may fall over our shoulders, their outward 
appearance, whether grotesque or beautiful, 
should not detract from the worthy motives in 
the minds of the wearers. While we do not 
promise to offer a publication superior in 
many respects to those which have emanated 
from the fertile brains and ready hands of our 
illustrious predecessors, we have a sincere 
hope of being able so to do. This is not an 
unworthy profession, provided worthy en- 
deavors supplement the will and cope with 
the emergency. If we fail of our object, it 
will be because of an overestimate of our 
abilities and not from wilful negligence or 
unpardonable indifference. If, in the judg- 
ment of our readers, the standard of our sheet 
is elevated, it will only be the cariying out of 
the earnest desires of our board ; while the 
delivery of our charge into the hands of our 
successors, if only in as good condition as 
that in which it is received will be a source 
of gratification to us, for even under such cir- 
cumstances we hope to rest assured that it is 
the end of only afaithful performance of duty. 
Thus with unity in our workings, with sincer- 
ity of purpose, and with a becoming faith in 
the result, we shall submit to your criticism the 
fruits of our labors and await your decision. 



2 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The Orient enters upon the twelfth year | 
of its existence with a change in the make- 
up of its board of editors. It is a change 
which, we trust, will work successfully and 
for which no feeling of disappointment can 
be hereafter experienced. However remote 
in the minds of former editors may have been 
the intention of disseminating thought, partial 
to one class in college, the fact of such pro- 
mulgations in the past has been apparent in 
not a few instances. We would not impute 
it to the motives of any of those who have 
gone before us, or charge them with inten- 
tionally taking a too zealous interest in the 
welfare of tlieir respective classes. Much 
rather would we attribute it to a patriotic in- 
fluence unconsciously exerted over them, an 1 
excuse for which could not be looked for or 
even claimed. 

A step which, in a measure will re- 
move the possibility of the existence of 
such a state of affairs, has been taken in the 
addition of three members from the Sopho- 
more class to the usual board of seven. And 
while the innovation does away with the 
probability of giving to the paper an un- 
healthy tone of class importance, it also di- 
rectly expands the bounds of thought to an 
extent that could not otherwise be attained. 
At the same time a judicious blending of the 
ideas of those wlio have reached diffeient 
points in the college course may have a salu- 
tary effect in awakening a greater and more 
satisfactory interest tlian has heretofore been 
manifested in the success of our college jour- 
nal. 

It is a trite saying that the Orient is the 
organ of the students in general and not of the 
editois in particular, and yet each succeeding 
board feels called ui)on to impress the fact 
upon the minds of its readers. Although we 
represent a larger part of the students than 
formerly, the mission of the paper cannot be 
said to have been accomplished unless it rep- 
resents the whole college, and is open to an 



expression of the feeling of all sides and of 
every individual. 



If, at an}^ time, our college has displayed 
a lack of feeling and interest it was at the 
time of, and subsequent to, the death of de- 
servedly our most illustrious alumnus, the 
poet Longfellow. His connection with the 
college in j^ears gone by was of such a nature 
that the honors be gained during his well- 
spent life were particularl}- a source of pride 
to all who are or have been connected in any 
wa}- with his Alma Hater. He was looked 
up to as the most renowned, the most beloved 
of any who have passed from these walls, and 
so invariably did the college first point to 
him, when recounting her distinguished sons, 
she seems, in his death, to be deprived of one 
who, by his pure life, noble cliai-acter, and 
beautiful works, has gained a position which 
few can attain to. 

For these reasons we think we have been 
remiss in paying homage to his name, and 
that our actions have been culpably deficient 
in expressing our reverence for a life which 
has been productive of so much that is good 
and beautiful. While it may not be fitting at 
the present time to take action in memorj^ 
of the one who has been freed from the cares 
and trials of this life, we feel confident that 
on some future occasion, exercises will be 
held, and of such a nature that they will ap- 
propriately commemorate the death of one 
to whose fame tlie college owes so nuicli. 



It should be a cause for congratulation 
that so much interest has been shown in col- 
lege in our sports. We believe that the ex- 
tent to which these are engaged in is not fuU^' 
realized, and that, for tlie size and standing 
of our college, we would rank iiigh for atten- 
tion given to physical exercise out of doors. 
In institutions of the same rank as our own, 
to-day we rarely find interest evinced in more 
than one athletic pastime. To be sure great 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



proficiency may be shown in that branch, but 
it is obtained at the abandonment of work in 
all other directions. In our own case, how- 
ever, we do not find all interest centered on 
one particular venture, for although laboring 
under disadvantages greater than most of the 
New England colleges experience, we have 
been represented abroad in the contests on 
the diamond, and in all probability will meet 
outside muscle on the water during the com- 
ing season. 

It is sometimes held that attention should 
be directed to only one sport, for, if the ener- 
gies of tlie college are scattered and exerted 
in every direction, no satisfactory results can 
be realized in any particular field. 

If the object of college athletics is to 
turn out professional base-ballists and oars- 
men, such an argument may be of some 
weight, but if the sports are engaged in 
merely as an inducement to exercise, and as a 
means of offering amusement to the college 
at large, we think the greater the diversity 
in the character of the pastimes, the corre- 
spondingly greater satisfaction will be derived 
from the interest shown in them. 

It is usually the question of finances that 
raises the issue as to participation in one or 
more branches of athletics, and unless there 
are exceptionally fine natural advantages and 
an unwonted array of good material for some 
special work, we are of the opinion that 
greater benefits and more enjoyment will be 
obtained if a generous diversity is maintained. 



We have no hesitation in saying that the 
result of the trial at Portland was a disap- 
pointment to nearly every, if not every, stu- 
dent in Bowdoin College. For it appeared 
that there was an almost universal desire that 
the defendents in the case be acquitted. 
This desire arose, not from a feeling of sym- 
pathy for fellow-students in trouble, but be- 
cause of an almost unanimous opinion as to 
the innocence of those who were called upon 



to defend themselves. With all the vision- 
ary proofs and subtle theories that the counsel 
for the plaintiff ofl^ered the jury, which, by 
the way, contained but one college graduate, 
we do notbelieveone student present harbored, 
for a moment, the idea that any of the defend- 
ants were instrumental in inflicting the injury 
upon the plaintiff. The act was one, the like 
of which was never known to have been 
committed in the college domain, and we rest 
assured that we are expressing the sentiment 
of the college in saying that no circumstan- 
tial evidence, such as was produced, can ever 
convert us to the belief that any of the de- 
fendants are guilty. The college does not 
believe it; the President and Faculty do 
not believe it ; and the student who was in- 
jured has stated that he did not believe it. 

The most potent influence against which 
the defense has been obliged to battle is prej- 
udice. Inasmuch as hazing is so universally 
denounced by the outside world, it can but 
be a plausible theory that the jury should be 
actuated from public opinion to make an ex- 
ample of this case. The act, however, can- 
not in any way be looked upon as one com- 
mitted with an intention of hazing. The 
student-body would not sanction it ; the most 
brutal Sophomore would not uphold it. And, 
being so decidedly at variance with the haz- 
ing spirit in this college, a verdict against the 
defense, as the judge stated in the charge, 
could not, in accordance with the evidence, 
be construed as a condemnation of the prac- 
tice. Prejudice, therefore, should be allowed 
but little room for action in determining of 
the merits of the case. 



THE STUDY OF GREEK AND LATIN. 

The study of Greek and Latin is of the 
utmost importance and is worthy of the ad- 
vanced position which it holds in the courses 
of study followed in our flrst colleges. The 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



great office of this study is to discipline the 
mind, and in this work it has few equals and 
no superiors. It imparts a breadth and depth 
of learning that can be reached in no other 
way. It renders the mind capable of stud)'- 
ing understandingly all other branches, and 
of culling out tlie principles to commit to 
memory from the chaff of explanations which 
often causes us to forget the whole. The 
study in itself, the mere drudgerj' of repro- 
ducing in pure English a sentence from the 
works of a Greek author gives that mental 
satisfaction which true scholars value so 
highly, and tends to make a person cultured 
and able. No other study so compels concen- 
tration of mental powers and continued ap- 
plication, and the results of no other study so 
reward the deserving student and so crown 
the labor done. 

We should omit a great proof of the use- 
fulness of Greek and Latin, should we fail to 
bring forward the fact that nearly all modern 
tongues are in part, at least, founded on the 
languages of which we speak. Particularly 
is this true of the English language. Our 
best and most noble words, those that repre- 
sent ideas and are purely creatures of the 
mind, are mainly through other languages 
from Greek and Latin roots. In a certain 
great writer's description of a sublime nat- 
ural object two-thirds of the words are of the 
above-mentioned class, while a barn-yard 
scene, depicted by a man of lesser note, is 
composed mainly of Anglo-Saxon words. 
A person, then, desiring to examine our 
words and their meanings fundamentally, 
must, of course, read the works of the classic 
authors, for there are found the roots from 
which our most scholarly words are derived. 

Moreover, in connection with Greek and 
Latin texts, we always learn of the manners 
and civilization of the people wlio formerly 
spoke tliose languages. We are to-day fol- 
lowing witii wonderful closeness in our pri- 
vate and public affairs the forms and customs 



that were originated and followed long ago in 
Greece and Italy. In man}- things our civili- 
zation does not surpass tliat which thev en- 
joyed. Modern governments are patterned 
after those of old. Our social life is only 
theirs improved; our arts, our inventions are 
only theirs carried farther. At best we can- 
not deny that we are imitators of antiquitj", 
rightly so perhaps, but still imitators. How 
then can we better study the lessons of to- 
day ? How can we better examine the great 
problems which our advanced civilization and 
social state present, than by commencing at 
the beginning ages ago and carr3'ing our re- 
searches up to the present time? All must 
concede that this is the only true way. 

Oratory, that gift of the gods, reached its 
height in the days of Demosthenes. Sculp- 
tors to-day strive in vain to equal Phidias. 
Philosophy, in the hands of the Greek 
reasoners, received an impetus that has not 
yet lost its influence. Rome did mighty 
works in war and in peace, but must yield 
first place, in all things, to Greece. In writ- 
ing the Greeks were especially pre-eminent. 
Their inspiring epics and beautiful lyrics will 
be studied and discussed throughout all time. 
Too much appreciation for their writers we 
cannot have. Their productions represent 
the beginnings of literature. To pursue the 
study of literature is one thing, to make a 
commencement of that study is an entirely 
diflFerent thing. Our writers can only justly 
claim to do the first, Greek writers unques- 
tionably did the latter. In Greece, too, was 
freedom born. Where in later times oppres- 
sion held full sway, in early times the Persian 
invader was driven back, and liberty was 
given as a birthright to all. Tlie Grecian 
form of government was of course inferior to 
ours, it was oppressive in various ways and 
did not wholly recognize the rights of all the 
citizens, still it contained within it the germs 
of popular rule. In the light of all three 
things what can interest and instruct us 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



more than the study of Greek? How can 
we thoroughly learn of literature, art, ora- 
tory, government, and civilization unless we 
commence here. 

But it is urged that colleges should give 
instruction only in those branches that will be 
of pratical use in after life ; that Latin and 
Greek are eminently impracticable and there- 
fore should be dropped from college courses. 
People who argue in this way do not under- 
stand the aim of colleges. There are plenty 
of professional and training schools to fit per- 
sons for the various money-making employ- 
ments of life. A college is designed expressly 
to prepare the mind for the reception of 
knowledge in a special direction necessary for 
those intending to enter a professional career; 
to lay a broad and sure foundation, upon which 
the professional superstructure may securely 
rest ; to impart mental discipline, habits of 
study, power of application ; in short to make 
the man from which a true professional orbusi- 
ness man may be fashioned. In this work Greek 
and Latin claims a most important part. The 
so-called most impracticable of all studies 
can justly profess to pave a solid way in 
which practical studies can most safely and 
most profitably travel. History may be cited 
in furtherproof of this point. The colleges of 
this country, in days long since gone, produced 
men whose abilities the graduates of to-day 
can hardly hope to equal. These men who, 
while in college, spent their time in pursuing 
Latin, Greek, Mathematics, and a little logic 
were the first writers, lawyers, and legislators 
of the country. Their opinions are now laws, 
and their works we look upon with reverence. 
Our constitution was framed by men who 
had not spent four years in hastily running 
over the surface of nearl}' all the physical 
and moral sciences, and in committing to mem- 
ory a short vocabulary in three or four mod- 
ern languages. Their minds had been trained 
in the study of the classic authors. 

The universities of England give great 



prominence to the study of the dead lan- 
guages. They carry it to an extent that has 
not been thought of in this country, and yet 
they turn out some of the first scholars of 
the age ; they furnish men who are practical 
enough to manage tiie destinies of the British 
empire. 

It is well, then, to think twice before we 
say that the two first years at Bowdoin are 
nearly thrown away, and it certainly admits 
of a doubt that our alumni are abler men 
than they would have been if even more time 
was given here to the dead languages. 



AN EPISODE OF COLLEGE LIFE. 

One evening in early winter, while the 
storm was raging without and the wind was 
causing the limbs of the old elms to creak 
dismally, I was seated in my room, which was 
made cheerful by a bright fire and student 
lamp. Although the comforts of my situ- 
ation would naturally have made me happy 
and contented, my feelings were far otherwise. 

The despair exhibited in my face and my 
reckless manner would have given rise to the 
belief that suicide was premeditated. A pile 
of odds and ends of paper, a box of drawing 
instruments, and a trigonometry all made it 
plain that a mathematical lesson of unusual 
difficulty was the cause of my trouble. All 
sorts of fantastic figures did I construct in 
attempting to solve the problem, but none of 
them satisfied, in every particular, the neces- 
sary conditions. Then I would vainly try to 
quiet my excited brain by thinking of other 
subjects, of the vacation that was so near, 
and of the many plans for enjoyment which I 
had mapped out in my mind. 

Like a person lost in the forest my 
thoughts would ever return to the dread 
reality which was before me upon the table. 
Tlie magnitude of the undertaking increased 
constantly, and the more I tried to fix my 
thoughts upon it the less I seemed able to 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



understand it. At first I felt angry that I 
was unable to perform the operation, but at 
length a stolid indifference, such as I think 
amanmustfeel thrtt has been sentenced tostate 
prison for life, began to take possession of my 
mind. I doubted vvheiher I had any knowl- 
edge at all of mathematics, and felt sure that 
the simplest question in arithmetic would be 
a puzzle. 

From early evening until the darkness of 
midnight had surrounded the college did I 
work and try every method known to me for 
the solution of the problem, but in vain. Suc- 
cess seemed as far from my grasp as when I be- 
gan the task. My mind became more and 
more bewildered, and I thought that I was 
attending the Medical School and was listen- 
ing to a lecture. The professor held up, to 
the astonished gaze of his class, a skull that 
was entirely covered within by figures, ex- 
amples of every kind, and by queer geomet- 
rical drawings. "This," said he, "is the 
head of a college student. The young man 
was a fine mathematician and the pet of his 
instructors. His thirst for knowledge in 
mathematics was so great that he could study 
nothing else, and he would frequently get up 
during the night to try some problem that 
happened to occur to him. He met with a 
sad fate, for his friends, from his constant 
study and working of problems, supposing 
him to be crazy sent him to a hospital, where 
he died in a few months of grief and disap- 
pointment. The professor then went on to 
say that the reason why the skull held no 
brains was that the mathematical faculties 
were completely worn by excessive use, 
while the other parts of the brain, througii 
lack of exercise, had dwindled entirely awaj'. 

A fall from my chair brought me to my 
senses, and, after an hour's game at cards, I 
retired. The next morning I went to the 
room of a friend who was especially skillful 
in working out all such blind examples, and 
in a few minutes copied his carefully executed 



work. The morning suu was making all nat- 
ure rejoice, and my heart responded in full 
accord, as I vowed never to waste another 
evening in such useless labor. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

[ Below we give the remarks of Dr. D. R. Goodwin on the 
life and character of the late Dr. John Cotton Smith, before the 
Bowdoin dinner, recently held in New York.— EDS.] 

Me. Peesident, — Since our last reuuion one has 
been taken from us who, from year to year, was ac- 
customed to enliven our festivities by his welcome 
presence and his genial fellowship ; and nothing is 
more natural and appropriate than that when we 
thus come together we should pause a moment and 
give to our brothers who have passed away some 
commemoration in words as well as in heart. John 
Cotton Smith is gone, and in him we have lost one 
of our most distinguished men, stricken down in 
the fulness of his strength and in the midst of his 
usefulness. 

Dr. Smith may not have been a great man in 
the highest sense of that word, but he was a man of 
note, of mark, and of merit. There are different 
kinds as well as different degrees, both of greatness 
in general and of intellectual greatness in particu- 
lar. No man is great in every kind and in all de- 
grees, and we arc prone to exaggerate the slight 
difference by which the great man is raised above 
his fellows. As in marksmanship, if one hits but by 
the merest hair's breadth within the circle, and 
another but by a hair's breadth without, he is 
everything and the other is nothing ; or, as in the 
awarding of a prize, half a grain may determine 
the trembling balance of judgment which gives all 
to one and to the other nought. So he who stands 
but the least appreciable fraction above his fellows 
in the struggle of life is as if ho towered in the sky, 
wliile the rest wore but pigmies around him. 

" lugrcditur, victorque vires supereminet omnes." 

Moreover the standards of greatness are differ- 
ent in different times and under dilVoreut circum- 
stances. It is ftir more difficult to bo a great man 
now than it was a hundred years ago. It is said to 
bo characteristic of old men to bo lanclMorcs tern- 
ports acti ; but that is a symptom of old ago which 
I do not feel. I fully appreciate the advantage of 
the present over the past. Never has the world 
advanced so rapidly as in this century and especially 
in the last quarter of a century. Dr. Smith could 



bOwdoin orient. 



boast of an honored ancestry, being a lineal 
descendant of tbe Rev. Jobn Cotton, of early New 
England fame, and a grandson of Dr. Leonard 
Woods of Andover. But he reflected quite as much 
luster upon his ancestry as he received from them. 
If the same John Cotton had remained in England, 
pastor of St. Batolph's Church in Boston, or if he 
had lived at this present time, he would probably 
have been scarcely heard of fifty miles from his 
home or a score of years after his death. 

Dr. Smith was a nephew of our late President 
Woods, and reproduced many of the president's 
personal and intellectual traits in a very striking 
degree. He was not wanting iu great natural 
talents and gifts, but he was distinguished not so 
much by what is called genius as by a certain 
pervading geniality of temperament, mind, and 
character, which brought all his powers into easy 
and effective action. He was distinguished more 
by beauty and grace than by strength ; more for 
readiness and fulness than for depth and precision ; 
more in the art of rhetoric than of logic ; in conciliat- 
ing and persuading by attractive presentation than 
in convincing and compelliug assent by unanswer- 
able arguments. As an orator he was Ciceronian 
rather than Demosthenian ; as a preacher he was 
rather a Chrysostom than an Augustine. Dr. 
Smith was no mean theologian, but his iustincts 
and his forte were rather literary than theological. 
In this connection, I am tempted to indulge in an 
anecdote which is, perhaps, a little below the strain 
of the present occasion. 

Immediately after Dr. Smith was ordained 
deacon, he preached one Sunday at the little Epis- 
copal Church in Brunswick. Among the few who 
were accustomed to gather there was a butcher of 
the village. On the following Monday morning, as 
he went his rounds with his cart, he was loud and 
eloquent in his laudation of the young preacher. 
" The sermon," he said, " was the greatest in the 
liter-rai-ry that had been heard in Brunswick, and 
the young Mr. Smith was a perfect Alma Mater." 
Surely the butcher possessed, in no mean degree, 
insight and prophetic instinct. 

Dr. Smith showed great ability and effective- 
ness as a practical worker for the good of his fel- 
low-men. What he did towards the permanent 
improvement of the tenement houses of this city 
will continue a monument to his memory, the more 
remarkable as a work done by a young son of far 
off Bowdoin here in this great metropolis of the 
nation. But the chief and most distinguishing 



characteristic of Dr. Smith was his ready and 
instinctive adaptation of himself to the drift and 
current of the times. He observed which way the 
stream was running. He threw himself into it and 
worked on with it, instead of wasting his strength 
in struggling against it. This is the key to his 
character and the secret of his success. His was 
not the stuff of which martyrs are made. He aimed 
at present, practical results, and he reached them. 
In full accordance with this trait he endeavored to 
mediate between Christianity and the tendencies of 
modern science, and on this effort he concentrated 
all his well-trained powers, his stores of liberal 
learning, his graceful and winning eloquence. He 
was partially successful ; but neither side was 
entirely satisfied, the one thinking he had yielded 
too much, and the other complaining that he had 
not fully comprehended their positions. The truth 
is that, for the thorough accomplishment of this 
work, more is required than broad views and gen- 
eral outlines though set forth with all the fervor 
and adornments of the loftiest eloquence ; there 
must be a thorough mastery of the modern schools 
of metaphysics as well as of modern science. For, 
whatever it may pretend to the contrary, modern 
science rests upon its own peculiar metaphysical 
basis. In truth, men are more metaphysical in 
their assumptions than the anti-metaphysicians ; no 
men more utterly dogmatic than the anti-dogma- 
tists; none more sure of their points than the 
agnostics and the absolute skeptics ; none more 
negative than the positivists, or more positive in 
their knowledge than the nescients. 

The science of evolution in its anti-Christian 
aspect (for it is by no means anti-Christian in all 
its aspects), rests at bottom upon a pessimistic 
metaphysics, a fatalistic ethics, a materialistic phi- 
losophy, a pantheistic theology, and a bold and 
bottomless skepticism. To grapple with it, whether 
for reconcilement or for conquest, for peace or for 
war, one must master the Logic of Mills, the Psy- 
chology of Spencer, and the Metaphysics of Hegel 
and Schofenhauer and Hartmann, as well as the 
evolutionary doctrines of Darwin, and the seientiflc 
speculations of Huxley and Haeckel. 

For this we need the other Smith, whom we lost 
erewhile, to stand by the side of him who is just 
gone. Had both our Smiths been spared to bring 
into full play and application their rich and ripened 
powers, their vast and varied acquisitions, they 
might have forged for Christianity a shield which 
would have been able to withstand all the weapons 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



and shafts of Troy or of Tartarus, of science or of 
nescience, of positivism or of pessimism. But they 
are gone. Meantime they have shown us where to 
find the materials and how to do the work. Who 
now shall forge the Achillean shield ? Mr. Presi- 
dent, we need more Smiths. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



The foethcoming volume of the Orient 

WILL be sent to all OLD SUBSCEIBEES UNLESS 
AN OEDEE IS EECEIVED THAT IT BE DISCONTINUED. 

Did you attend the trial ? 

The class crews must take a brace. 

Twot knows how to get a free lunch. 

The Sophomores are studying Milton. 

One of '83's solid men is severely boiled. 

New floats are needed at the boat-house. 

About ten students spent vacation in town. 

White, of Bates, '84, has joined Bowdoin, '84. 

Who said that '83 was to have rhetoricals this 
term °l 

The Seniors take kindly to Evidences of Chris- 
tianity. 

Lawn tennis is receiving considerable attention 
this term. 

Prof. Grimmer with his orchestra made a de- 
cided hit. 

The dark green hat and overcoat are seen in 
the land. 

The ambitious athlete daily makes the circuit of 
the campus. 

The spring term opened with prayers on Tuesday 
morning, April J 8. 

" A lobster is an incrustacean," was a recent 
remark of a Senior. 

The Science of Language division is composed 
of good questioners. 

One '85 man always removes his hat upon enter- 
ing the reading room. 

Keep your eyes straight ahead when you go by 
the Latin recitation room. 

Some of the boys talk of producing the drama, 
" Foiled," in a few weeks. 

Expect a call from the collector of the Boating 
Association about this time. 



The medics are on hand with their hght pants. 

The delta has been put in a good condition for 
the season's games. 

The college grounds will stand a great deal of 
cleaning this spring. 

The bills of the apron festival offered some as- 
tonishing inducements. 

Have you bought all the Bugles you agreed to, 
and paid for all you bought '? 

Wanted, by certain B. G.'s, the scalp of the 
man who wrote " Hand-Downs." 

The Senior electives for this term are, German, 
English Literature, and Chemistry. 

All who have not yet paid their base-ball dues 
are requested to do so immediately. 

'83 recently elected E. F. Holden to the position 
of Ivy Poet, resigned last fall by Russell. 

The college was as quiet and peaceful as a grave- 
yard during the first week of the term. 

Prof. L. A. Lee was recently elected to member- 
ship in Natural History Society of Portland. 

The Freshmen are using in their mathematics a 
book on " Mensuration" written by Prof. Smith. 

The Faculty hold their meetings in the praying 
circle room. 

" Wherever God erects a house of prayer, " etc. 

It is said that the bell-ringer gave us a half-past 
sis morning bell recently. That must not occur 
again. 

The Brown University Nine have made bold to 
challenge our boys to play them in Portland, Memo- 
rial Day. 

The point in snatching a bulletin is not apparent 
to a certain Faculty man. Will somebody kindly 
enlighten him "I 

The Juniors are about equally divided on elec- 
tives. Thirteen take Botany; fifteen. Science of 
Language ; and ten, Physics. 

The Sophomore class is without a president. 
Now the cause of the natural and social convul- 
sions so prevalent this year will bo plain to all. 

Headers of the Orient are especially asked to 
examine our advertising colunnis and give their 
trade to the persons who help support our college 
paper. 

Some of the words cm the physics examination 
paper had a strange look about them. Our profes- 
sor in that branch allows his originality to appear 
even in his spelling. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



His eyes are fixed upon the page. 

And with a ghince not meek, 
His brows are knit, his look is sage, — 

The Soph, is hossing Greek. 

One young lady went as high as fifty cents at 
the auction in the Lemont Hall entertainment. At 
this rate in the near future nobody but bank cash- 
iers can afford to have girls. 

Those that understand the art of chinning re- 
ceived unusual recognition for their work, in the 
way of rank last term. Verily, taffy hath charms 
to soothe the tutor's breast. 

It makes a man feel crosser and look meaner 
than the proprietor of the Tontine Hotel to en- 
counter in the dark one of the ashy cones depos- 
ited by Mr. Condon's wheelbarrow. 

A blooming Fresh., suspected of being cheeky, 
was greeted with a copious shower of water as he 
sallied forth for church in gorgeous attire, some 
Sundays since. Let the good work go on. 

How strange that the second division in German 
should complain of last term's examination, while 
the first division called it exceedingly soft. It 
must be that the good scholars end with K. 

The reading room was allowed to take care of 
itself for the first four or five days of the term, and 
papers, files, coal ashes, etc., gave the room a de- 
lightfully homelike and pleasant appearance. 

The members of the college crew are showing 
that they are in every way worthy of the backing 
they are receiving. They take a spin each after- 
noon and sometimes in the morning as well. 

A spittoon cleaning young man, 

An old clothes wearing young man, 

A blacker of shoes, 

A beggar of chews, 

A smoker of stubs young man. 

A third term medic was lately seen showing to 
his companion a swollen neck, and explaining that 
the diseased condition of the lachrymal gland situ- 
ated in that place was the cause of the trouble. 

Bro. Tenney of the Telegraph has said the un- 
kindest thing yet about our new hall. In speaking 
of the stained glass windows just put in, he says 
that " the smaller the windows are the better they 
look." 

The clinic of last Saturday was a long one and 
very skillfully conducted. Prof. "Weeks is filhng his 
difficult position to the satisfaction of all, and is 
showing in all his operations that the knife of Dr. 
Greene has fallen into able hands. 



The bilious looking .specimen, who, by his pathetic 
tale of a suffering mother and sister, induced many 
to buy pins of him at ten cents per paper, was lately 
seen down street under the influence of some CaHeO 
solution, striving to hold the sidewalk down in its 
proper place. 

Scene : The singers' seats in one of our churches. 
Parties : Young lady and student who is obliged to 
quit singing on account of hiccoughs. Young 
Lady — "Dear me, Mr. S., how I pity you; have 
you been taking anything? " That student will be 
more careful next time. 

The medics expend considerable strength in 
kicking the rubber sphere. They claim to be more 
proficient in this than their neighbors across the 
street. Let '84 play them a game, then the medics' 
conceit will vanish and there will be no lack of 
subjects for the dissecting room during the rest of 
the year. 

The mahogany colored individual, who-is at pres- 
ent enjoying a monopoly in the y agger business, evi- 
dently appreciates his high position. The other 
day, upon being ordered to get out of the way by 
one of the Professors, he promptly answered, "I'll 

see you d d first. I've as much right here as 

you have." 

The ball nine, as it is at present working, is 
made up as follows : Knapp, '83, captain, c; 
Wright, '84, p. ; Stetson, '83, 3 b. ; C. Torrey, '84, 
2 b.; Cook, '85, s. s.; Packard, '83, 1 b. ; Phinney, 
'84, 1. f.; Barton, '84, r. f. ; Waterman, '84, c. f. 
Practice hours are from four to six every pleas- 
ant afternoon. 

A Sophomore, while spending his vacation at 
home, asks the fond maidens of his native hamlet 
to call him Mr., adding as a reason for his request 
that the Brunswick girls honor him with that title ; 
but he is told by his blushing admirers that not 
even the overpowering dignity of Sophomore year 
can make him other than Ernest to them. 

The Kennebec Journal has gleaned from the 
reports of the trial valuable information in regard 
to hazing here. It informs its readers that " this 
detestable institution consists in forcing Freshmen 
to scan laten, and to play upon flutes and other in- 
dignities." ( Now we always thought that a flute 
was something of the nature of an indignity, but 
we never dared to say so right out. ) It is too bad 
to give away the secrets of the prison-house in this 
way. This exposure will doubtless keep many men 
from Bowdoin next year 



10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Although rather late we must not neglect to 
notice the Senior and Junior exhibition which 
took place April 6. We would congratulate the 
persons who participated upon their tasty programs, 
the excellent music which they secured, and the 
general success of the exhibition. The Brunswick 
people, desiring to keep up their reputation of at- 
tending free shows in a body, filled Lemont Hall to 
a much greater extent than usual upon such oc- 
casions, and seemed to appreciate keenly the points 
made by the several speakers. As of old the sad 
and mournful portions of the Latin salutatory were 
roundly applauded, while the funny parts brought 
forth no smile. Were we to criticise the entertain- 
ment we should say that while the parts were all 
well written, some of the speakers might profitably 
have spent a longer time in committing to memory 
their parts and in practicing the delivery of them. 



PERSONAL. 



'27. — John Owen, the life-long friend and com- 
panion of Longfellow, died at Cambridge, April 1,5, 
from a cold contracted at the funeral of his friend. 
Born in Portland in 1806, he there commenced his 
intimate companionship with Longfellow which 
lasted through college and through life. After 
leaving college he studied for the ministry, but on 
account of ill health had to give up that profession. 
In 1834 he entered the book business and was Long- 
fellow's publisher until 1848, when he retired on 
account of financial embarrassment. Since that 
time he has assisted his friend principally in read- 
ing proofs. 

'34. — Rev. and Hon. Samuel Clement Fessendeu, 
brother of Hon. Wm. Pitt Fessenden, died in Stam- 
ford, Conn., April 18, aged 65 years. Born in New 
Gloucester, Me.; after graduating from college he 
completed his education at the Bangor Theological 
Seminary. After presiding over several churches in 
this state he established the Maine Evangelist in 
1856. In 1858 ho was admitted to the Lincoln 
County bar and entered upon the practice of law. 
He was Kepresentative from Maine in the Tlnrty- 
Sevonth Congress and was afterwards appointed 
Consul at St. John, N. B. He contributed largely 
to the leading newspapers and magazines of tlio 
day and was known as a vigorous writer and 
speaker. 

'35. — Rev. Isabel Moore, who has lieen in charge 
of the Appleton House in Noedham, Mass., died 



there April 9, of peritonitis. He was born in Gar- 
diner, Me., and was 71 years old. Connected with 
the Methodist Episcopal Church in Maine a period 
of forty years, he filled a number of pastorates and 
also filled the position of presiding elder. He was 
connected with the Wisconsin Conference eight years. 
He was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Portland. 

'37. — Dr. Calvin Seavey of Bangor, has presented 
to the college his private museum, arranged by 
himself and son. It is said to be orue of the most 
extensive and valuable private museums in New 
England. 

,'40. —The Boston Post thinks the Easter hymn, 
composed by President Jackson of the Maine Cen- 
tral Railroad, is as good as anything ever written 
by Dr. Watts. 

'52. — Gen. Chamberlain has appointed A. E. 
Adams, of Waterville, aide de camp on his staff, 
with rank of Captain. Gen. Chamberlain and 
staff will attend the military ball in the Patten Car 
Works, Bath, May 3. 

'60. — Judge Symouds presided, and Mayor Libby, 
'64, was for the defense in the recent trial at Port- 
land, against some of the students for hazing. 

'79. — Sewall S. Stearns, of Lovell, lately admit- 
ted to the Oxford County bar, will probably open a 
law office in New Portland. 

'81.— Briry, who is studying in the Boston School 
of Medicine, is spending his vacation in Bath. 

'81.— Hitchcock has been appointed assistant 
dissector to Dr. Weeks. 

'84. — Sweetser has returned and joined his 
class. 



COLLEGE WORLD. 



HAKVAED : 

This year there has been a great falling ofl' in 
the numbers of the Memorial Uall Dining Associa- 
tion, and unless a rally is made soou it will have to 
bo given up. 

The Sophomores are about to give soino theatri- 
cals for tlie bouelit of the university crow and foot- 
ball team ; tho play is a burlesque, entitled " All 
Baba, or the Thirty-nine Thieves." 

Tho latest enterprise at Harvard i.s a Co- 
operative Association, the members of wliich can 
buy at reduced rates. Already over thirty Cam- 
bridge tradesmen have signed an agreement to 
allow the members discounts ranging from five to 
twenty per cent., at which the dealers who have 
not beou asked to sign are greatly wroth. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



11 



Yale : 

Some of tlie students have in rehearsal an origi- 
nal opera, called " Penikeese." We shall expect to 
hear soon of the establishment of a chair of Poetry 
and the Drama at our leading colleges. 

We learn from the Neivs that the " fence " gath- 
erings have begun ; as far as we can ascertain they 
are occasions for the assembling of the different 
classes at the " fence," to sing and to listen to ex- 
temporaneous speeches, mostly of a humorous or- 
der. Such a custom is well worthy of adoption, as 
a means of strengthening class ties and promoting 
general good fellowship. 
Elsewheee : 

Several colleges are considering the subject of a 
consolidated nine for the purpose of giving the 
regular nine more practice. 

The President and Faculty of Dartmouth have 
been requested by the Alumni Association of New 
York to retain their positions. 

Oscar Fingall O'Flaherty Willis Wilde has vis- 
ited the University of California, and there appears 
to be considerable discussion as to whether a stu- 
dent or a member of the Faculty had the honor of 
showing him off. 



CLIPPINGS. 



Little drops of water, 

Little grains of sand, 
Make the milk and sugar 
Plenty in the land.— JEfe. 

A nation in arms — vacci-nation. — Beacon. 

A motto for young lovers— so-fa and no father. 
— Transcript. 

Ethics. Prof. — " In the next chapter we will 
take up " Future Life." Student— " Not prepared ! " 
— Haverfordian. 

Subscriber— "Why is my paper so damp every 
morning ? " Editor — " Because there is so much 
due on it." — Ex. 

"There are two boating associations here," 
wrote a Japanese student homo, " called Yale and 
Harvard. When it rains the members read books." 
—Ex. 

Father (addressinglhis little boy, who has brought 
home a bad mark from school)— " Now, Johnnie, 
what shall I do with this stick ? " Johnnie — "Why, 
go for a walk, papa." — Collegian. 

Teacher — ^" Class in Geography, stand up. What 
is a strait?" Small Boy (next to the foot) — "A 
straight beats two pair, three of a kind, and gen- 
erally takes the pot— unless some fellow happens to 
have a cold deck slipped up his coat sleeve." 
Teacher — " Let us pray." — Hohart Herald. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



It is with feelings almost of dismay that we 
look upon the pile of exchanges before us and 
around us. Tables, chairs, nay, even the floor it- 
self is covered to such a depth that two of our 
creditors who dropped in the other morning just to 
make a friendly call came to the conclusion that we 
were out. The fact is, we were deep in one of the 
heavy articles of the Niagara Index, and no won- 
der they couldn't find us ; it was with the greatest 
difficulty we could find ourselves. 

In accordance with a time-honored custom we 
shall now, at the beginning of our career, proceed 
to declare our policy, that all may see at the end 
how far short of our standard we have fallen, and 
how frail is human nature, from the editor of a col- 
lege paper to the President of these United States. 
In the first place, we shall, of course, avoid all those 
unseemly brawls into which some of our exchange 
editors unfortunately fall, going our way in peace, 
occasionally to be sure, casting a critical glance on 
either side and stopping perchance as often to heal 
a wound as to iniiict one. And when it is abso- 
lutely necessary for us to go on the war path, it 
shall be with the hatchet in one hand and a case of 
sticking plaster in the other. In short, we are go- 
ing to come the "good Samaritan" racket right 
through. 

But let no one think we are to be assailed with 
impunity, for verily we say unto you that under our 
sheep's clothing we shall be found as " ravening 
wolves." (It may as well be said right here that 
all suggestions of the ass in the lion's skin are out 
of order.) 

Now where shall we begin? Why! the ladies 
first, of course. 

The Vassar Miscellany is one of the most read- 
ble of our exchanges, not only because of the mat- 
ter it contains, but from the interest which we all 
naturally take in the sayings and doings of our 
fellow-students of the weaker sex. The first arti- 
cle of the present number of the Miscellany, " An 
Intercepted Post of the Sixteenth Century," by 
Miss Champury, of '69, is both interesting and in- 
structive, picturing in an easy manner the glorious 
summer time of art in Italy, the days of Raphael, 
Michael Angelo, Leonardo de Vinci. The man- 
ners, foibles, and intrigues of the day are skillfully 
worked in, and the whole production does credit to 
Vassar's alumnae. We have next " A Glimpse of 
Canaan Camp Ground," a thoroughly feminine 
sketch of a camp-meeting, from which we may be 



12 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



permitted to make one quotation, wliicli appears to 
us to "hit the nail on the head": "The good of 
the camp-meeting," says the writer, "seems to me to 
he in the atmosphere of universal brotherhood 
which pervades the place, rather than in the defi- 
nite resolves made or incentives given there." 
" Life in a Country Hotel" is a collection of character 
sketches, rather disjointed perhaps, but true to life. 
The remainder of the literary department consists of 
an incident of the war which, beginning with the 
thrilhng words, " News from the seat of war. . . 
Washington in danger," flattens out into the rather 
commonplace subject, " Walt Whitman." But the 
one distinctive feature of the Miscellany is the per- 
sonal column ; three of the five items composing 
it are marriage notices, a fact which speaks for 
itself. 

Let us now turn to our brethren of the quill, to 
whom we can give space in no way commensurable 
with their merits, but only such as our exhausted 
discussion of the Miscellany has left us. The Nas- 
sau Lit. is full of good, solid matter and well de- 
serves the position it has held in college journalism 
during the management of '82. Its literary arti- 
cles are much above the ordinary run of such pro- 
ductions, which usually smack too strongly of the 
encyclopedia ; especially striking is the short re- 
view of " The Scarlet Letter," and the thorough 
manner in which the writer enters into Hawthorne's 
peculiar style of thought. Perhaps the best criti- 
cism on the Lit. is found in the closing sentence of 
one of its own editorials. Giving advice to its con- 
tributors, it says, "The conclusion of the whole 
matter is, give us less erudition." 

It is really refreshing, after wading through 
dissertations on " Biblical Poetry," " The Universal 
in Art," and that new and strange subject, " Co-edu- 
cation," to take up the Acta, the Banbury News of 
college papers. " What I know about Picnics" is 
certainly the best tiling of its kind we have seen ; 
it is witty, and the wit is not strained, a virtue 
which so few so-called funny articles possess, and 
one which we cannot attribute to T. Carlyle 
Smith's effusion, " A Tale of Death," in wliich he 
endeavors to dispose of Cipaugo, the funny man of 
the Athenaium. 

The Philosophian next catches our eye and we 
open it with the full expectation of being con- 
fronted with a treatise on the immortality of the 
soul and kindred topics ; but, no ! 'tis of immortal- 
ity that the Philosophian man discourses, as shown 
in the failure of the citizens of Bridgton to sup- 
port the cause of temperance. The second edito- 



rial is about— ah I beg pardon — the second edito- 
rial is not an editorial at all, but merely an account 
of a young man's mishaps in the laboratory. The 
South Jersey Institute must be a quiet little family 
school. Come, let us depart from this field of dis- 
appointments, just stopping to note a contributor's 
definition of the slang word "mash," which struck 
us as rather good. We quote: "Mash should be 
added to our vocabulary and defined as a ' Fluctu- 
ating affection excited by beauty or whatever is 
for the moment most pleasing.' " A truly philosophic 
definition. 

We cannot close our notices of this issue with- 
out mentioning our two sprightly dailies, the Kar- 
vard Herald and the Yale News. Both of them are 
newsy and full of interest to the students of other 
colleges as well as of Harvard and Tale, represent- 
ing, as they do, the most daring of college enter- 
prises. We, who sometimes have difliculty in get- 
ting out a paper once a fortnight, can hardly im- 
agine the amount of energy and hard, steady work 
required to keep a college daily paper up to the 
standard. The Herald is at present engaged in a 
lively little "lift"" with the Oberlin Review and, as 
it has a chance to talk pretty much all of the time, 
it is getting rather the better of the representative 
from the town where the beer saloon is not known, 
the click of the ivories is never heard, and the 
apothecaries do not get rich.' The Neics commends 
itself to us at the present time by its good word 
for the Trinity men who have been handled so 
roughly by the other college papers. The aflair 
was not so bad as it appeared from the highly col- 
ored and sensational accounts in the newspapers, 
and, surely, if there is anything to be said in exten- 
uation, it should come from us who appreciate the 
influence of class feeling. 

As we are going to press we receive the ^'Oracle," 
published by the Sophomore class of the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, which we wish to acknowledge. 
The outside is very attractive ; the interior we 
have not bad time to examine. 



Of every kind, Ui till S|)i-ing. SumnuT, and Fall 
cng:ig(>nicnt.s now coming tn hiind. 
Qrndualcs aiul undcrgr'idualcs of any School, 
SeniitiiUT, or College, of little or no ('X|)erience, or 
other persons d(!sii-ing to teach, should not fail to 
address at once, with stamp, tor appliciition form, 

National Teachers' Agency, 

(Cincinnati, Ohio. 
N. B. — Situations in the West awA iSo?(</{a specialty. 
Good pay to local agents and private correspondents" 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



FEME 8MIMT^ 

MADE FrOM MEASURE, 

A F1®F1€T FIT GUillJIlTElD. 

Also a Full Assortment of 

GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 

Orders by Mail Prompfly A f tended To. 

HEW DRUG STORE. 



Tk Palace Clotliinff Store of Maine 




ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

BEUQS, MEDICINES, 

Fancy an j Toilet Articles, Ciprs I Toiiacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAllM STREET. 

13" Prescriptions Carefully Compouiuled. 

(Fo budj, '^mi'c 0i§ur4 and Bi/^ut^eS. 
JUmmfatiutm o/ Urn S^euai Spand 
of "S'omdmn 0oMmje." JliSo, dmk'c 
in 3lu^ Sobuv/co ,^}wmn^ und imok- 

m§. Ji fuU (me o/ Snvojkin/^ Jlui' 

Jftam St., oStunSmck. 




ieiIjXJje: stoh-IE. 

ALL THE LEADING NOVELTIES IN 

Y0UMQ MEM^S CLOTHIIQ 

AND NOBBY FANCY GOODS. 



STRICTI-Y ONE PRICE. 

^^Boys' and Children's Department entirely separate. 

BLUE STORE, 

T4f£ mt-fn^t CiOTiiflEBS, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



;^^<^^^ m'W^Q'B, 



Fine Watches, Jewelry, Silver Ware, &c., 

m GREAT VARIETY, BEST QTJALlTf, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 

PORTLAND, - _ _ _ MAINK. 

A. CABTER. J. W. D. CARTER. 

SPRING ^ND SUMMER, 1882. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clotliino; in complete suits or sing^le garments. White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

On and after December 5th, 

Passenger Trains leave Bruns-wick 

For Bath. 8.10 and 11.50 a.m.. 2 10, 4.40, and 6.25 p.m., 12.42 
night, Saturdays only. 
Rockland. 8.10 a.m., 2.10 p.m. 
Portland. 7.25. 11.48 a.m.. 4.35 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.48 a.m., 12.35 night. 
Lewiston, 8.12 a.m., 2.10, 6.33 p.m., 12.40 night. 
Farmington. 2.10 P.M. 

Augusia, 8.10 A.M., 2.14. 6.35 P.M., 12.45 night. 
Skowhegiin, Belfast, Dexter, and Bangor, 2.14 P.M.. and 

12.45 night. 
Waterville, 8.10, 12.45 a.m., 2.14 p.m. (6.35 Snturdays). 
PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
December 5, 1881. 



Main St., under Town Clock. 
Il^ Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street. - - - Portland, Me. 



J. A. Merrill, 



A. Keith. 



MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 



28 Free Street, Portland, Me. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



©&£i 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Ooal "5Z"a,rca. in Topsla.a,na, 

WHERE NONE BUT 

The Best of Coal is Kept, 

And i.s Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds nl' 

I7r©slx aiid ©alt lySea-fes, 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

49- Special Bate9 to Student Olubs.^SQ' 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



3* C« ^SWW$S0W^ 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 "Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bii-d Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brjen Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlaro;ed from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

POft.TI..A.Nr>, T/LA-TTfE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

CHOICE GROcTrTeS, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B.— Speciul Rates to Students. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 Middle Street, - - - - Port/and Me. 



A.. O. REED, 

BR.XJIlSrS'WICK:, 3VEE. 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bransurick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Viewrs ; also College Views. 

ALL KINDS OF 



^lim.iirpjl^:!;^" 



wmmm 

For Schools and Colleges, 

EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



i=i^ic:es iLiO^^T^r. 





THE FAVORITE A/OS. S03-404-332-l7O-^5l- WITH 

OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 

E. SMITH, Variety Store. Bottom Prices to Students. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 

Office at Central Telephone Office, Brunswick. 
las' All Onlers left at C. E. Towusend's Store will 
be promptly attended to. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Excliaiige Street, Portland. 



GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8j and '^8j Congress St., and 2JJ Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

v^TSe nd fok Pkick List. 

J. H. PETERSON & SON, 

DEALERS IN 



Boots and Shoes, Tobacco and Cigars, 
Main Street, ---.-- - Brunswick, Me. 



Fii^:NrK: e. Roberts 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment ol Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets. 



FIR.ST-CLA.SS 

Bai05, Orgass, and Melodeonsj 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 




COLUfflBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle riding is iinsiirpusscd as ii 
niotlioil of travelinR.wliillier lor speed, 
sport, or renewal of lieiillli. The prnc- 
tii'abilltv of the iiiiiehine has hei'ii 
tliorcni^lily tested, and salisl'aelorily 
proved, beyond (|Ueslion. ThoiisMnds 
lire in daily use, and the niiinher is 
rapidly increasing. 'I'lie exi'reise is 
ree.ornmendedbylheniedieil prolession 
as most benelicial to heallli. briii^iiiif; 
into e.vercise almost every muscle of 
the bodv. 

Send ;!e. stanii) for llll-pajje Illiistr.'iled 
ClltaloKUe eniilalMMi),' iiri<-e lisL^ .-iiid lull 
liifonnatluii. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 W.ishinRton St., BOSTON, MASS, 



ESTABLISHED 18«. 

W. L. Wl LSON & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attenlicn. Send for price list. 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 



The Sixty-Secoiul Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School o"f Maine, will commence Fkbku.vky «tb,lSy3, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— JosHCA L. Chamberlain-, LL.B , President ; Israel T. 
Dana, .M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.B., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frkdehic H, Gerrisd, M.D., 
Anatomy; Charles "W. Goddard, A.M., Medical J ari^prudence ; IIenrt 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Bcrt G. Milder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Week.^, M.D , Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles O. 
Hunt, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics •, Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to th^ Secretarj'. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



^p" Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired Jind warf;)iit(!d. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



Mrs, leal's look-Binderj, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book Work to Order. 

W. B. KNIGHT, 

:i^ (O ^ I <0 3^ i^ M i 1 .1$ « 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

aaj'Transient Orders for Milk or Cream niliil b.v Rivini; suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 

Curtis' Colleo-e Bookstore 



BOOKS. 5taxione:ry. FIOOIVI 
PAPER, PERIODICALS. «StC. 

A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, J Fancy Goods. 

.\lsn Ivi.-lein Muliial Union Tele.L'iaiill (Ullee. 
Undor Town CIoclc, - - - Bruusnriok, Me 




M Of teoti 



Vol. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 17, 1882. 



No. 2. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE AD.TUSTABLE HAKGISG 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "iVloehring" Burners 

rS PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

H^LL L. DA. VIS, 

Books, Stationery, and Paper Hangings, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

FRANK M. STETSON, 



■<^J^%^^fc 



"SO. 



PS 
CO 

Q 




^^•JlIU 25-^* 



t3Cl 



1^^ 
:>2 



DEANE BROTHERS & SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 



First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

B^ Lowest Prices in the State, 

755 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 



VISITORS TO PORTLAND, 

Independent of any intention of pur- 
chasing goods in our line, are invited to 
inspect the Model Clothing and Fur- ' 
nishing Store of Allen & Co., 470 Con- 
gress St., opp. Preble House, 

LANCASTER BUILDING. 



SI'ECIA.L A.aENT. 

IS^Dunlap & Co., of New York, Celebrated 
Stiff Hats. 

Also his New' Straw Mackinaw, $2.00 and. 
$2.50. 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House.. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^Eneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Geeek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books ; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
AifciENT Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular courseprcparatoryforcollegeof at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may bo ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their flnal examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoiii, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to bo 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which ho will bo requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular liual examination, as ho may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

KEQUIHED— iFOUE HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

j^Iathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Hoard is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necossarj' expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lesson the coat of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Voh. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 17, 1882. 



No. 2. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

KoBERT C. "Washburn, '83, Managing Editor. 

N". Brooks K. Pettingill, '83, Business Editor. 
Herbert E. Cole, '83. Charles H. Stetson, '83. 

Howard R. Goodwin, '83. Llewellyn Barton, '84. 
Herbert P. Kendall, '83. Oliver W. Means, '84. 
Arthur J. Russell, '83. Charles B. Sayward,'84. 

Terms — $2.00 a year in advance ; siagle copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the collep:e are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post OfBce at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiaton, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Yol. XII., No. 2.— May 17, ]882. 

Editorial Notes 13 

Literary : 

Thomas Jeflferson 16 

The Story of a Face 17 

College Items 20 

Personal 23 

College World 24 

Clippings 24 

Editors' Table 25 



We had thought some of opening our 
editorial column in this number with a 
"leader" on spring, graphically picturing the 
scenes about us, with all the paraphernalia 
necessary to the presentation — singing birds, 
budding trees, green grass, gentle showers, 
mud, ash heaps, and all, uniting to make up 
that well-known panorama which is annually 
resurrected for the purpose of letting men 
know that the fairest season of the year is at 
hand. We shall desist, however, from expa- 
tiating at any length upon the beauties of 



nature at this period of the year, for the rea- 
son that nearly every one of our honored con- 
temporaries in the field of college journalism 
has brought into use his fruitful imagina- 
tion, keen wit, and power of appreciation, so 
that the result is, as the showman puts it, a 
•'stupendous aggregation" of beautifully writ- 
ten articles, sufficient to meet the wants of 
all. It may seem to some, too, that it is 
rather late to pen a sentiment to a season 
which was ushered in two months ago, but 
if the state of temperature and disagreeable- 
ness of the weather, generally, continue as they 
have been for the last month, we think an edi- 
torial on winter — minus the snow — might be 
quite as appropriate as one on spring. 

Truly, the season with us has been back- 
ward, unpleasantly so, and the raw, piercing 
winds which warn the prudent that it is too 
early to lay aside the well-worn ulster, also 
render it anything but comfortable for those 
who engage in any out-door work or exercise. 
However, let us hope by the time active par- 
ticipation in our sports is begun, the influence 
of the weather will have been thrown off and 
that the mercury of the thermometer as well 
as the spirits of the community will have risen 
to a satisfactory level. 



In our last number we alluded to the fact 
that the Orient is generally looked upon as 
the organ of the students, and that it is not 
supposed to represent any single faction or 
class. It is intended, through its columns, 
to give utterance, not to any particular ideas 
that the editors, individually, may hold, but 
rather to the sentiment which the college as a 
whole would recognize as its own. Unity in 
belief is rarely to be found, and there must 



14 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



be some means for the expression of differ, 
ences of opinion when they exist. Without 
these means, the true representation of col- 
lege thought is an impossibility. It is not to 
be expected that tlie editors will always look 
upon a question or dispute with unbiased 
minds, so they may often take issue with 
those who take opposite views in relation to 
any discussion that may be agitating the col- 
lege mind. And so it is onlj' riglit, that op- 
portunity for presenting one's belief should 
be offered to those who may desire it. 

To read that alone which regularly comes 
from one source is not only unsatisfactory to 
the reader, but in time causes a feeling of dis- 
interestedness to make itself manifest, and 
though the productions which are offered 
may be pregnant with common sense, they 
will not receive theattention that they merit. 
With timely suggestions and worthy prop- 
ositions continually coming from new sources, 
however, and tlie presentation of comments 
from parties outside of the regular board, such 
a feeling as that of indifference, on the part 
of our readers, will not be likely to creep in. 

Consequently we desire that all should feel 
at liberty to ask for space for a communica- 
tion, and that there shall not be a lack of in- 
terest in this particular, as has sometimes 
been apparent in past years. There are con- 
stantly many questions arising as to the man- 
ageiuent of affairs in and about college, and 
no one who has anything to say in relation to 
such matters, should hesitate about bringing 
his thoughts to public notice. We sincerely 
trust that the Faculty uphold and have some 
respect for our paper, and that anything pub- 
lished in the interest of the college or the 
students, will be duly noticed and considered 
by them. Therefore, as many as have any 
question which they wish to discuss " let them 
come forward and declare it and they shall 
be heard." 



At last, after many trials and vain at- 



tempts, Bowdoin is to send her representatives 
away to measure oars with those from other 
colleges, or rather those from at least one col- 
lege. The cause of Bowdoin's non-participa- 
tion in any inter-collegiate aquatic contests 
for the last seven years should not be attribu- 
ted to any lack of interest at home, for she 
has repeatedly manifested great enthusiasm 
in the direction of boating, and with reasona- 
ble inducements offered, would, in all proba- 
bility have answered any call that was extended 
to her. But since the last college regatta at 
Saratoga, many of the New England institu- 
tions have withdrawn entirely from active 
labor in this direction, turning their at- 
tention wholljr in some other. It was extreme- 
ly difficult to awaken any of the colleges from 
the lethargy into which they had fallen imme- 
diately after the discontinuance of the annual 
regattas, in fact, so entirely has boating been 
thrown aside in some instances, there is no hope 
of its ever behig carried on to any extent in the 
near future. It was, therefore, natural that 
Bowdoin should not be heard from in boat 
races, for though she has made repeated at- 
tempts to meet others, arrangements could 
not be perfected, and, disappointed, she has 
been obliged to wait for a more favorable 
opportunity. 

It seems now that the longed-for opportu- 
nity has arrived, and in all human probabilty 
her supporters can have the gratification of 
knowing that the crew will go away with the 
determination of doing all in its power to re- 
flect honor on the institution which it repre- 
sents. The students are giving all the aid 
and encouragement they can muster, and it 
is hoped that the alumni, wlio iiave always 
generously upheld the association, will prompt- 
ly lend all the assistance in their power, for 
there were never brighter prospects for a suc- 
cessful race or higher hopes for a satisfactoi'y 
result. 



The field-daj'^ officers have been elected, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



15 



and but a comparatively short period of time 
intervenes before the day will be at hand. 
Upon a casual glance at tiie state of affairs 
in college, as regards work in this branch of 
athletics, one might have some misgivings as 
to the ability of the students to better the 
records of past years, or even equal those 
made at the last meeting. The reasons for 
the taking of such a stand of conjecture are 
obvious. In the first place, no opportunity 
has been offered during the year for physical 
training. The miniature gymnasium of which 
one of the halls boasts, has not been adequate 
to the wants of the college. All have 
been debarred practically from taking system- 
atic exercise since their arrival in the fall. It 
is, therefore, to be expected that those wlio 
customarily take part in the athletic contests 
should be somewhat backward in rising from 
their long inactivity. But the time for the 
holding of the spring meeting is so near at 
hand that extra endeavors must be made if 
any degree of success is to be hoped for. 
Placed in such a position as the want of a 
gymnasium necessitates, it is only by the most 
strenuous efforts that the interest hitherto 
shown can be maintained. To keep this in- 
terest at its height, records in the various 
contests must excel, or at least equal those 
that have been made on previous occasions. 
To do this will require continual work and 
practice on the part of those who engage in 
the sports, and unless such a plan is followed 
out an interesting field day can not be looked 
forward to. 

In years past, the spring meeting of the 
athletic association has been one of the' most 
worthy and entertaining occasions of the year. 
It can be made so now if the sevei-al con- 
testants will but give some time and thought 
to previous training and physical condition. 
But to undertake to make creditable records 
or interesting exercises with no preliminary 
work whatever will be found an impossibility, 
and that association, which, unlike all the 



others, is self-supporting, notwithstanding 
this point in its favor, will have great diffi- 
culty in maintaining the standard it has here- 
tofore held. 



Those embryonic race-exterminators across 
the way who are preparing themselves for a 
life-work of slaughter, or something as near 
to that as their knowledge will allow, have 
been endeavoring for some time past to dig 
up that false theory that two institutions or 
two departments of one institution can not 
live together harmoniously. That belief has 
been defunct for a long time, and the sooner 
the knife-manipulators of would-be surgical 
fame come to a realization of it, the better it 
will be for all of us. The feeling between 
the students, academical and medical, has of 
late years been gradually becoming of a fra- 
ternal nature, and we can see no just cause for 
a renewal of hostilities, at a time during this 
enlightened era of the universe, when only 
the most barbarous nations look to war for a 
redress of grievances or for satisfaction in any 
dispute. The existence of bitter feelings be- 
tween the two parties in question will result 
in no good to either side, for it is extremely 
unlikely in these times of policemen and bil- 
lies that the unpleasantness will result in an 
open encounter, and to nurse one's pent-up 
wrath day and night, with no likelihood of 
effervescence, in the shape of striking from 
the shoulder, will only be a waste of energy. 
The details of the controversy will not be 
here discussed. We certainly believe our 
medical brethren are in the wrong, and we are 
not actuated at all by prejudice. There is no 
denying that there is just ground for com- 
plaint. But because some person commits an 
unlawful act, an act which college men would 
denounce ; because some person does damage 
to property which does not belong to our 
medical friends, and which has cost them 
neither trouble nor money, that is no reason 
why they, without proving that the malefac- 



16 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



tor was a student, should seek speed}- revenge 
from the students, and, yielding to their bu- 
colic instincts, should en masse do damage to 
property, the expense of repairing which falls 
directly upon one of the college associations. 
If the guilty party can be found, let him suf- 
fer for the crime of arson. It is always un- 
wise to take the law into one's own hands, 
and to carry it out in a way that suits the 
feeling of the hour. We believe our friends, 
the disciples of the pill, upon sober second 
thought will see that strife is unnecessary, 
and even out of place, so we ma}' look for 
peace and kindly feeling between the factions 
that have stood arrayed against each other. 



THOMAS JEFFERSON. 

One of the most interesting paintings in 
the college art gallery, and one that instinct- 
ively attracts the eye of the visitor, is the 
portrait of Thomas Jefferson. As you study 
the lineaments of the face of that illustrious 
personage the conviction is strengthened that 
he was a master of principles, and of the lan- 
guage in which those principles find their ex- 
pression. Born in the Iiumbler walks of life 
it was not strange that he was a bitter op- 
ponent of aristocracy, and a devout de- 
fender of human rights. Like Pitt, the Earl 
of Chatham, he might justly be called the 
" Great Commoner." Reared in the com- 
panionship of such men as Hamilton, Mad- 
ison, Henry, Franklin, and Adams, intel- 
lectual and statesmanlike giants, how could he 
be otherwise than great ? It was while he 
was a student in the historic William and 
Mary's College that young Jefferson became 
acquainted with tlie eloquent Patrick Henry, 
afterwards his companion in many an impor- 
tant work. He was standing in one of the 
lobbies of the Virginia House of Burgesses, 
upon that memorable day in 1675, when the 
news came that tlie famous stamp act was 



passed. He listened to the inspiring words 
of Henry as he said, "Ctesar had his Brutus, 
Charles I. his Cromwell, and George III. 
may profit by their example." The words 
of the eloquent patriot found an abiding echo 
in his young heart, and aroused the slumber- 
ing sentiments that directed all his future con- 
duct. 

At the age of thirty-one he entered public 
life. Immediately, upon becoming a member 
of the House of Burgesses, he proposed the 
act to give masters a right to free their 
slaves, which afterwards became a law. He 
and Henry were members of the famous 
" committee of correspondence" for spreading 
political intelligence among the masses. His 
"Summary of the Rights of Britisii America," 
a masterly exposition of American rights, was 
revised and published in England, by Edmund 
Burke. He was appointed by Washington, 
commander-in-chief of the colonial forces. 
His bold and vigorous reply to Lord North's 
"conciliatory proposals," ranked him among 
the ablest men in Congress. And, when 
Virginia instructed her delegates to urge in- 
dependence, a committee being formed, by 
general consent he was put at its iiead. He 
consented, and wrote the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, the Magna Charta of American 
freedom. 

At the next election he was again chosen 
a member of Congress, but declined, believing 
that he could best serve the cause of liberty 
in liis own State. There his most important 
reforms were bills to establisii religious free- 
dom, to abolish entail, to put an end to the 
right of primogeniture, and to proliibit the 
importation of slaves. Tiirougii the darkest 
hours of the Revolution he was Govenor of 
Virginia, after which he returned to private 
life. But he was not allowed there to remain. 
From the seclusion of private life lie was called 
again to the legislative hall of the nation. 
His first work was an act to establish the pres- 
ent system of coinage, and a bill for the total 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



17 



abolition of slavery after the year 1800. Had 
his wise counsels been heeded then, a half 
century later, four long bloody years of frat- 
ricidal strife would have been avoided. There 
was a prophetic meaning in his words when 
he said, " I tremble for my country when I 
remember God is just." His embassy to Italy, 
Germany, and France gave him a knowledge 
of different nations and peoples that fitted 
him upon his return for the duties of Secre- 
tary of State. This trust having been ful- 
filled he returned once more to his domestic 
affairs. 

But from the peace of "Monticello" he 
once more was called to be the recipient of 
the highest gift of his grateful countrymen. 
Here he displayed that same simplicity and 
detestation of royal pomp and splendor that 
had characterized his former life. An English 
gentleman, present at his inauguration, said : 
"His dress was of plain cloth; he rode on 
horseback to the capitol, dismounted without 
assistance, and hitched the bridle of his horse 
to the palisades." Yet beneath the plain, sim- 
ple exterior of the man, was the heart of a 
philanthropist, and the intellect of a sage. 
The principles upon which the foundations of 
our government rest, were set forth in his first 
inaugural, with a clearness, precision, and force 
that have no parallel. " Equal and exact justice 
to all men of whatever state or persuasion, 
religious or political; peace, commerce, and 
honest friendship with all nations ; the sup- 
port of state governments in all their rights, 
as the most competent administration for our 
domestic concerns, and the surest bulwark 
against anti-republican tendencies; the pres- 
ervation of the general government in its 
whole constitutional vigor, as the sheet-anchor 
of our peace at home and safety abroad ; ab- 
solute acquiescence in the decisions of the 
majority, the vital principle of republics, from 
which there is no appeal but to force, the 
vital principle and immediate parent of des- 
potism ; the supremacy of civil over military 



authority ; economy in the public expense ; 
the honest payment of our debts, and sacred 
preservation of the public faith ; encourage- 
ment of agriculture and its handmaid, com- 
merce ; diffusion of information, and arraign- 
ment of all abuses at the bar of public reason ; 
freedom of religion, freedom of the press, and 
freedom of the person under the protection of 
the habeas corpus. These principles should 
be the creed of our political faith, the text of 
civic instruction, the touchstone by which to 
try those we trust ; and should we wan- 
der from them in moments of error or alarm, 
let us hasten to retrace our steps, and to re- 
gain the road which alone leads to peace, lib- 
erty, and safety." 

His dying words, " I resign my soul to 
God, and my child to my country," showed 
his abiding faith in the perpetuity of those 
principles, and, like Washington, he could 
say, " Mine eyes have grown dim in the 
service of my country, yet I have never 
doubted her justice." And, viewing the life 
of this philanthropist, statesman, and scholar, 
it can truly be said, 

" Wisdom, alone, outbuilds them all, 
Her monuments shall stand when Egypt's fall." 



THE STORY OF A FACE. 

" It was during the winter and spring of 
1868," said my friend settling back in his easy 
chair and knocking the ashes from his cigar, 
" that the only adventure I ever had, that could 
really be called an adventure, happened. At 
that time, as it chanced, I was rooming in 
that old room in Winthrop Hall, of which 
you have so often heard me speak, and with 
a medic as chum. Such a combination as 
this rarely happens, and you will doubtless be 
surprised at it, but when I entered college as 
a Freshman, my chum was a Junior, and so 
in the process of time, completing the last 
two years of his course, he entered upon the 
study of medicine, of which he had always 



18 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



been passionately fond, and as the two col- 
leges were in close proximity, it made it very 
convenient for him to keep his old furnished 
room and his old friend as chum. 

"Well, as I was saying," continued my 
friend, taking up the thread of the story 
where he had left it to knock to pieces a lump 
of coal in the grate which burst into a clear 
colorless flame and then died down again, 
" everything was going first rate during the 
spring of 1868. Stevens, for that was my 
chum's name, Jim Stevens, had settled down 
to study in good earnest. The fair sex and 
all the pleasures Brunswick in the spring sea- 
son afforded, were abandoned for the pursuit 
of knowledge, which was to last him through 
his life as a life-work, and on wliich I did not 
doubt Jim founded the hope of gaining dis- 
tinction. For indeed," said my friend 
stretching out his feet to the blaze, " I never 
saw ambition and power so united in the en- 
thusiastic pursuit of an idol, as they were in 
the person of Jim Stevens in his pursuit of 
medical knowledge." 

"One year had passed over our heads 
already, and I was entering upon my Senior 
Year and my chum well along in his second 
year, when I noticed a change in his demeanor 
and aspect. Nothing to be sure that would 
be noticed, by one that was unacquainted 
with his habits. But there was in fact a 
change to my eyes, and a noticeable one. He 
seemed distracted and nervous, and if I ad- 
dressed him suddenly would look up with a 
start. Now Jim was the farthest from a 
nervous person I ever saw, and in medical 
operations was noted for possessing a cool 
head and steady hand. But something liad 
evidently upset his equinimity, so one day I 
made bold to address him on the subject. 
' You had better leave off smoking, Jim. 
You are getting nervous, and that won't do 
for a doctor.' Jim laughed and made some 
reply about only smoking in tlie dissecting 
room, and as he seemed unwilling to say more 



I did not then press him farther. The next 
day was Sunday, and by Monday morning 
he seemed quite himself again, and I was 
about to drop the subject from my mind, 
when Monday night he came home worse 
than ever, for when I accidentally dropped 
a book that came down on its side with a 
slam, Jim leaped out of his chair all in a 
bunch, with remarks not at all complimentary 
to things in general, and still less so to the 
case in hand. Now this was so unlike him in 
every way, that I stared for a few seconds in 
perfect amazement, and then blurted out: 
' For Gad's sake, Jim, what is the matter 
with you ? Has your girl gone back on you, 
or are you haunted? You are as nervous 
as ' — and here I stopped for want of a simile. 
Jim laughed rather sheepishly, and re- 
plied : ' That's just what is the matter, 
chummie. I am haunted, but not by a ghost ; 
its bj' a face, and not a pleasant one either.' 
I stood with open eyes and distended lower 
jaw to hear him. It seemed so utterly im- 
possible for Jim Stevens to be in any way 
supei'stitious. He laughed again at my 
amazement, and said, ' If 3'ou will sit down 
and care to hear about it, I will tell you.' 
So I drew a chair up to the stove, lighted the 
' old reliable,' and waited for him to begin." 

" ' Well,' said he, ' I suppose you will 
laugh at it, and it makes me hate myself to 
think I am such a fool, but it is all to do with 
my subject at the dissecting room. I was not 
there when the subjects came, so the other 
fellows had got out the body and were pre- 
paring to work on it when I came in. It was 
in a first rate state of preservation and seemed 
to be the body of a man of middle life. His 
face, and this is what I wish to speak of par- 
ticularly, showed him to be a foreigner, prob- 
ably a Portugese, and of all the evil malicious 
faces I ever saw, that seemed to be the worst. 
When I lifted the cloth to look at liim, it 
fairly startled me by its repulsiveness. The 
eyes were open and fixed in a stony stare on 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



19 



my face, the lips drawn back just enough to 
show the teeth, and the whole expression and 
look was of one who might have belonged to 
the damned. Of course I have seen so much 
of that kind of thing,' continued Jim, ' that 
I expected soon to get used to it, and looked 
upon it as an interesting subject, probably as 
good a one, if not the best, there was in the 
lot. But for some reason or other I found 
myself horribly attracted to that cloth, cover- 
ing the face, and once or twice was on the 
point of lifting it to take another look, but on 
second thought restrained myself. I soon 
found I was getting nervous and sort of un- 
strung, and so boldly went up and threw the 
cloth into a corner, that ' familiarity might 
breed contempt,' not doubting I should soon 
get accustomed to the sight and think no 
more about it. And so I worked on the rest 
of the afternoon with that cursed face looking 
at me and calmly watching the dissection of its 
own body. Well,' continued Jim, ' that's 
all there is to it. I have been at work on it 
for a week or so, and it goes on just the same. 
I am not getting used to it at all, and what is 
more, when we divided up the body the head 
and cervical vertebral fell to me, so I shall 
either sell them or clean them and keep them 
for my own use.' 

" I was so much interested in the story that 
I determined to go to the dissecting room the 
next day and see the body. So I acconjpanied 
Jim to that most fearful of places for the 
uninitiated, where death becomes a stupen- 
dous joke, and every better and reverent feel- 
ing with which we have been taught from 
childhood to regard death, a subject of laugh- 
ter. I could have picked out my fiiend's 
subject, I am sure, had he not gone straight 
to it, by the malice and evil expressed in that 
horrible face. He had not at all overdrawn 
the picture when he said ' it was the face of 
one who might have belonged to the damned.' 
I staid just long enough to get the face im- 
pressed on my memory, and then the combi- 



nation of tobacco smoke and that peculiar 
smell that cannot be described coming from 
dead bodies, drove me off. I worked away 
in my room for the rest of the afternoon, not 
particularly thinking of the sights I had seen, 
yet nevertheless that face, with its stony 
stare, would come into my mind. Towards 
five o'clock, Jim had not yet come to the 
room, leaving my books, I went out for a 
walk before supper, as had been my custom 
for some years, rain or shine. As I was 
swinging off at a good round pace I met a 
particular friend who earnestly requested me 
to take supper with him as he was boarding 
with a family in town whom he represented 
as very pleasant people. As another attrac- 
tion he mentioned an old sailor who had just 
come home from sea to 'lay by' for the rest 
of his life, and who was full to overflowing 
with sea stories and anecdotes that would 
have made an ordinary liar hang his head for 
shame. It is needless to say I accepted the 
invitation. After supper the old villain fast- 
ened on me, possibly for the same reason the 
Ancient Mariner did upon the wedding guest, 
' When e'er his face I see 

I know the man must hear me 

To him my tale I teach.' 

And after a few moments he had my will as 
completely as the Ancient Mariner did the 
wedding guest's, and no less terrible were 
some of his stories. 

"It was towards eleven o'clock when I 
found myself again out in the street and on 
the way to the college. It was cloudy and 
very dark, and the road was only lit up here 
and there by a gleam from some window fac- 
ing the street. As I came into the vicinity of 
the colleges I saw the lights were mostly out 
and the end lamps taken in. On passing the 
medical building to enter the campus near the 
north end of Winthrop, for some unknown 
reason that confounded face flashed into my 
mind with startling distinctness. Every 
feature was impressed there as plainly as when 



20 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



I stood in the room and looked down upon it. 
I overcame with some difficulty an unpleasant 
feeling creeping up my spine and tending to 
raise my hair, and entered the hall. Feeling 
my way up stairs to my room, finding the 
key-hole in the dark and throwing open the 
door, occupied but a moment. It was pitch 
dark within, and I saw by the lack of the 
cheerful glow that usually saluted me from 
the stove that the fire had died down, or more 
probably gone out. I closed the door care- 
fully behind me, and with that sort of sense 
of perception which one has in a familiar 
place in the dark, placed my hand upon the 
match-box at the first trial. But to my dis- 
may it was empty. I knew that there were 
two or three bunches in the bureau drawer in 
the bedroom, but I hated to stumble in there 
in the dark, and besides, that ghastly face 
persisted in remaining in my mind's eye. 
But there was no other way, so I felt along 
the wall to the door, threw it open, and had 
hold of the bureau knobs, noticing at the 
same time that it seemed a little lighter in the 
bedroom, possibly from the reflection of a 
light somewhere. I had done all this without 
looking up, but when I saw an increase of 
light, I glanced towards the window directly 
in front of which was the bureau and before 
which I was stooping, holding the knobs of 
the bureau drawer. And there — right in 
front of me — so near that by stretching out 
ray hand I could have touched it, was the out- 
line of a human head. And in what dim 
light did come into the room I recognized 
with that peculiar sinking feeling of the heart 
the features I had seen that day and which 
had so stamped themselves upon my memory. 
I suppose I started back without letting go 
my hold on the bureau drawer, for I remem- 
ber seeing the head begin to nod and fall 
towards me. 

"The next I remember was a blaze of liglit, 
and my chum turning the contents of the 
water-pitcher over me. But never do 1 re- 



member, in all my life, of seeing an3'thing 
that looked so pleasant and life-like as that 
light. life and light ! surely the two are 
closely connected. My chum could never 
forgive himself for his carelessness, although 
no serious consequences came from it. For 
tlie whole explanation of the affair was, that 
my chum had brought home the head to clean 
off the flesh and prepare it for anatomical 
purposes. He had brought it to the room and 
placed it on the bureau, when some one called 
for him and he had gone off and forgotten it 
entirely. It happened that I discovered it 
under unfavorable circumstances, and you 
know the result. I afterwards bought the 
skull of Stevens, and it now adorns my 
library." 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



This NUMBER of the Okient will be sent to 

MANY OUTSIDE THE REGULAR SUBSCRIPTION LIST. 

Those who no not wish to take the paper 

WILL PLEASE NOTIFY THE BUSINESS EDITOR. 

" A. very-boot-licking young man, 
A worship-the-Prols. youug man, 

A stay-after-elass-ery 

Chuck-full-of-gus-ery 
Study-for-nmk youug man." 

" Empty is the Elm House." 

Ivy holidays June 1st and 2d. 

The cold weather makes training uncomfortable. 

The college has been canvassed for Guizot's 
History. 

The hand-organ men are 'round with all the 
modern tunes. 

Boston with variations was the principle feature 
of the May festival. 

Question of the day, " Will my Derby last me 
until straw hat timef " 

A book, entitled " What I know about snakes," 
is soon to be writtou by the Major. 

The order of exercises for licld day is slightly 
dilTcront from that of last year. The changes are 
for iho bettor. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



21 



Ivy day invitations can be obtained of F. E. 
Perbam, 16 Main Hall. 

An upset does not bave a very dispiriting effect 
upon the single scull men. 

Tbe late reviews bave been bound and arranged 
conveniently for use in tbe library. 

We believe it was a Junior wbo wished to know 
what was meant by " discussing " a point. 

The Richmond straight cut, introduced by one 
of the Profs, is, of course, having a big run. 

Prof. Campbell is the author of Campbell's Ger- 
man course, a text-book of recognized worth. 

The reporters are losing caste. Truly aesthetic 
companies now close their doors against them. 

The Freshman crew, if it is a good day for 
them, get around the island in less than an hour. 

Trout flsbing is particularly popular with the 
Seniors. Well, they must kill their time some way. 

A Junior renders und Johanna setzt sich den 
Selm auf, "and Joan sits down upon tbe helmet." 

Skilled workmen have put together and mounted 
upon pedestals the last installment of plaster casts. 

Optional drill calls out but few cadets. Five 
officers and three privates is the average make-up 
of the squad. 

The chap with paper in hand and pencil behind 
the ear is the one to dodge. He wants you to sign 
away some sbeks. 

"And the poor locust lay there on tbe ground 
and slowly cast his eye upward," sounds rather 
good in a sermon. 

The latest thing is to make tbe Juniors take the 
same lesson next time, and to ask them if they 
won't kindly study it a little. 

Now remember this : Tbe college janitor really 
did once upon a time set a pane of glass on the 
day that he promised to do it. 

Watching tbe evolutions of a dove among the 
arches broke the monotony of church service at 
tbe Orthodox house, recently. 

'83 man, looking over the college journals in 
the exchange editor's room: "Say, Boss, where's 
the Harvard Lampoon published ? " 

The two lectures of Mr. C. M. Saford, Secretary 
of the Y. M. C. A. of Massachusetts, before the 
praying circle, were very highly spoken of. 



McCarty, '82, is coaching the college crew. Capt. 
Reed proposes to put his crew over tbe course with 
the class crews on June 1st. 

Perhaps a man don't feel mad after he has said 
" unprepared," when a man across the room, with 
a name sounding bke his, was the person called. 

Does anybody say that time spent at church is 
thrown away ? Examine the fly-leaves in the north 
gallery hymn books before you form your opinion. 

Prof, to Junior— "What is tissue?" Junior — 
"Tissue, sir, is something that is exceedingly thin." 
Prof.—" The same might be said of your answer." 

Tbe ancient book-seller has made his yearly 
visit. "The two-hundred -paged dictionary, with 
fifty thousand words with definitions," was his best 
hold. 

The campus now resounds with the cries of the 
base-ballist. — Bates Student. We bad reasons for 
believing that the crying up there would take place 
later. 

Now, don't you feel a little bit ashamed because 
you went to Muldoon's Picnic and the walking 
match instead of going to tbe Cecilia Quartette's 
concert 1 

It is mighty pleasant to bounce, accidently of 
course, into a maiden's arms while playing rough 
games, but isn't it rather undignified for professors 
to do it ? 

It has great effect and is remarkably consistent 
for a professor to reprimand tbe " funny men" in a 
class, and in so doing attempt to make bis own 
remarks witty. 

The following ball games have been arranged : 
May 17th, with the Colbys at Waterville; May 
24tb, with tbe Bates on the delta ; May 27th, with 
the Bates at Lewiston. 

Gile, ex-'83, appears in the catalogue of the 
University of Michigan Law School as an A.B. 
from Bowdoin, '81. We always thought that the 
Elder possessed some gall. 

A Freshman says that his class is unwilling to put 
forward a crew in the spring race because it would 
certainly come in last. There, young man! you 
have given the whole snap away. 

The Maine members of tbe Delta Kappa Epsilon 
Fraternity held a banquet at the Preble House, 
Portland, on Thursday evening, April 26. An 
Association of Maine A. K. E.'s was formed. 



22 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Prof, (to Senior in Christian Evidences)—" At 
what time were the Xew Testament manuscripts 
prepared'?" Senior— " About two thousand years 
before Christ, sir." Prof, gasps for breath. 

The Juniors have lately held class meetings for 
the distribution of honors and arrangement of other 
affairs relative to ivy day. The results of their 
deliberations will be withheld for the present. 

Bowdoin is one of sis colleges, out of the forty- 
three represented in the American college song 
book, that have received the especial praise of the 
publisher for the excellency of pieces furnished. 

A certain student went without his suppe?, the 
other night, in order to hold sweet converse with a 
young lady in the waiting-room at the depot. 
Some men, you know, do not live by bread alone. 

Men, from different publishing firms, have 
induced some of the most heartless of the boys to 
make life miserable to the inhabitants of the rural 
districts, during the coming summer, by canvassing 
for books. 

The ball nine is to have a new uniform, consist- 
ing of a white hat trimmed with red, tight-fitting 
white shirt, light white blouse trimmed with red, 
and red stockings. It is believed the combination 
will be an attractive one. 

The College Orchestra have frequent rehearsals 
and are making considerable advancement under 
the instruction of Prof. Grimmer of Portland. It 
is feebly rumored that this organization will give 
an entertainment some time this term. 

C. H. Gilman, '82, was delegate from the Bow- 
doin chapter to the Psi Upsilon Convention, held at 
the University of Syracuse last week. A general 
Psi Upsilon banquet was held at the Preble House, 
Portland, Thursday evening, May 11th. 

The following is ■ raked up from trial relics : 
Junior — " Well, S., since you began to receive wit- 
ness fees, I suppose you have smoked twenty-five 
cent cigars" Soph, (indifferently)— " Why, cer- 
tainly, I have smoked twenty five-cent cigars." 

Here's a joke from the Vermont University 
Reveille, "The members of the class of '85 resem- 
ble new-laid eggs in what way? They are Fresh." 
The originator of that stupendous thing has obvi- 
ou.sly mistaken his calling. Flo might make his 
indispcndcnt fortune in a short tiiiin in the epitaph 
business or ou the oililorial board of the London 
Punch. 



A portion of the mineralogy class, with Prof. 
Robinson, took a ten-mile tramp to the Topsham 
quarries on Saturday, May 6th. They succeeded 
in getting quite a quantity of good specimens, only a 
few of the boys were obliged to come back on the 
train. 

There was more than the usual trouble in pro- 
curing books at the commencement of this term. 
If the managers of the college book store could 
increase their capital sufficiently to enable them to 
carry a stock of three or four dozen books, it would 
certainly be appreciated. 

'85 has been discussing the advisability of choos- 
ing directors to manage the affairs of their ball 
nine. Certainly there is no institution in college 
that to-day feels the need of a live board of direc- 
tors so much as the Freshman ball nine, except 
perhaps it be the college nine. 

A South Appleton man, who has a briUiant 
future before him, strove last week to warm his 
room by making a fire on the brick hearth, suppos- 
ing that the smoke would escape through the stove- 
pipe hole. An atmosphere in all that end, dim 
with smoke and sulphurous with profanity, was the 
result. 

At a meeting of the Athletic Association, on 
Friday, May 4th, the following officers were elected 
for the coming year: President, W. C. Winter, '83; 
Vice President, S. W. Walker, '84; Secretary and 
Treasurer, A. Pierce, '84 ; Directors, H. A. Bascom, 
'83 ; B. Sewall, '83 ; R. I. Thompson, '84 ; Master 
of Ceremonies, H. R. Goodwin, '83. 

The classico-medical unpleasantness has about 
disappeared. At one time serious complications 
were threatened, but the better spirit seems sure to 
prevail. The medics have openly displayed what 
we have for a long time given them credit for, — 
superiority in rural pursuits and in using the cheap- 
est of cheap talk. Now the summer is coming on, 
and it is getting too hot to stay mad. Good-bye 
torch. Good-bye plowshare. Doctor, let's shake. 

The program tor field day, June 1 , is as follows : 
1. Mile run. 2. Standing high jump. 3. Sack 
race. 4. Putting shot. 5. One hundred yards 
dash, three heats. 6. Running broad jump. 7. 
Hop, skip, and jump. 8. Wheelbarrow race. 9. 
Two hundred and twenty yards dash. 10. Throw- 
ing base-ball. II. Standing broad jump. 12. Half- 
mile run. 13. Throwing hainmcr. 14. Hurdle race. 
15. Three-legged race. Hi. Bicycle race, two 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



23 



miles. 17. Potato race. 18. Consolation race. 19. 
Tug-of-war. 

Here is a Young man with a Summer Ulster and 
a Square-topped stiff Hat. His Pants are white, 
though it is only May. Is he Trying to Force the 
Season 1 I don't Know. Don't go near him, Child, 
for he has been eating Onions. Is he the Adopted 
Son of the Prosperous Washerwoman ? No, he is 
a Medic. See how Sharp his Eyes are and how 
Long he lets his Hair Grow ! He has just taken 
his Supper at a Bakery and is now Picking his 
Teeth on the Steps of the Tontine. Will he Stay 
in his Eoom this Evening and Plug for To-morrow's 
Quiz ? Not much. He will Walk on the Harps- 
well Eoad with the Box-shop Girl. 



The class races will occur on June 1st, at 10.30 
A.M. Only three crews can participate, as the 
Seniors have furnished three men from their crew 
for the college crew and are, of course, unable to 
fill their places upon so short a notice. The Juniors 
have been obliged to put two new men into their 
boat, still the crew will go into the race in as good 
condition as on previous occasions. The improve- 
ment in their stroke is especially noticeable. The 
following is the make up : 

Name. Age. Height. Weight. 

H. A. Bascom, bow. 21 yrs. 5 ft. 11 in. 152 lbs. 

A. E. Austin, No. 2. 21 yrs. .5 ft. 10"^ in. 152 lbs. 

W. C. Winter, No. 3. 24 yrs. 5 ft. dM in. 16.5 lbs. 

E. W. Chase (Capt.), strolie. 22 yrs. 5 ft. 11 in. 156 lbs. 

Coxswain H. R. Goodwin. 

Average age 23 years. 

Average height 5 ft. 10t4 in. 

Average weight lo6J lbs. 

The Statistics of the Sophomore crew, as at 
present made up, are as follows : 

Name. Age. Height. Weight. 

J. Torrey, bow. 1« yrs. 5 ft. 10 in. 150 lbs. 

C. E. Adams, No. 2. 18 yrs. 5 ft. 9 in. 155 lbs. 

A. F. Sweetser, No. 3. 21 yrs. 5 ft. 9| in. 160 lbs. 

A. H. Brown (Capt.) , stroke. 20 yrs. 5 ft. 9 in. 175 lbs. 

Coxswain J. A. Waterman. 

Average age 19 yrs. 1 m. 

Average height 5 ft. 9^6 in. 

Average weight ; 160 lbs. 

Brown and Sweetser, however, are training in 
the college crew, and it is possible that Capt. Reed 
will not allow them to row in the class races. In 
that case either the crew will be re-arranged, Z. W. 
Kemp and W. H. Cothren making up the four, or 
the Sophomores will decline altogether to put a 
crew upon the water. 

The Freshmen have purchased the boat formerly 
belonging to '82, and their crew appears to be mak- 
ing good progress. Their form is rather bad as yet, 
but that will, doubtless, be in a great measure rem- 
edied before the race. The following is the crew : 



Name. Age. Height. Weight. 

N. B. Ford CCapt.), bow. 18 yrs. 5 ft. 11 in. 165 lbs. 

F. N. Whittier, No. 3. 20 yi-s. 6 ft. 168 lbs. 

L. Hodgkins, No. 3. 20 "yrs. 5 ft. 10 in. 175 lbs. 

F. W. Alexander, sti-oke. 22 yrs. 5 ft. 8 in. 160 lbs. 

Coxswain J. A. Peters. 

Average age 20 years. 

Average height 5 f t. lOJ in. 

Average weight 167 lbs. 



" My great heavens I " cried the student, 

As he jumped up from his bed. 

" The last bell, and I've slept over, 

Fourteen marks, too, o'er my bead. 

I must reach it, I must gain it, 

Quick now, hasten! Where's my vest? 

Where's my pants and my suspfenders? 

Sine qua non : I'll be blest 1 

Thunderation 1 can't I find them? 

Never mind, I'll put her through, 

Rubber boots and linen duster. 

Now my hat, there, that will do." 

So he speedeth toward the chapel 

'Mid a crowd of others late, 

All of whom put forth their utmost, 

As the bell tolls out their fate. 

They have reached it, doors are closing. 

In they squeeze, all else forgotten; 

But our hero does not notice 

He has torn oft" every button 

Of the duster that surrounds him, 

'Neath which nature's covering shines. 

And it quickly yields in summons 

To the surging, pressing Hues. 

Pen and brush both fail in telling 

Of the beauty there displayed. 

Of the shapely limbs belonging 

To that student sore dismayed. 

Folding now the duster 'round him. 

After all have had a look, 

Our poor hero hides his blushes 

In a chapel singing book. 

Muttered curses now escape him. 

Anger bristles in his eye, 

And he swears, " Before next morning, 

An alarm clock I will buy." 



PERSONAL. 



'39. — Rev. Chas. F. Allen has been appointed 
Presiding Elder of Lewiston District. He was 
formerly President of Maine State College. His 
post-office address is Brunswick. 

'48.— Rev. Wm. C. Pond, a son of Dr. Pond, 
was recently installed pastor of Bethany Church, 
San Francisco. 

'71. — The following information concerning the 
nineteen members of the class of 1871, whose 
names appear in the new general catalogue of the 



24 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



alumni, has been sent to us by one of the class : 
Charles E. Clark, physician, 51 Allen Street, Bos- 
ton; Newton F. Curtis, physician, White Plains, 
N. Y. ; Edgar P. Davis, pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Church, Gardiner, Me. ; Wm. S. Dennett, 
oculist. Hotel Pelham, Boston; Edwin H. Lord, 
High School, Lawrence, Mass. ; Wm. P. Melcher, 
physician, Pemberton, N. J. ; Edward P. Mitchell, 
on the editorial corps of the Neiv York Sun; Wm. 
S. Pattee, lawyer, Northfleld, Minn. ; Vernon D. 
Price, in business, Louisville, Ky. ; Chas. L. Shep- 
ard, head clerk of quartermaster's department, 
U. S. A., Helena, M. T. ; Augustine Simmons, 
lawyer. North Anson, Me. ; Everett S. Stackpole, 
pastor of Methodist Church, Woodford's Corner, 
Me.; Wallace R. White, U. S. District Attorney, 
Boise City, Idaho. Monroe and Hussey are dead. 
We learn that Kingsbury Bachelder, formerly 
Principal of the Maine Central Institute, at Pitts- 
field, is at present in the Theological School at 
Bates College; and that Jacob F. Chaney is at 
present a book-keeper, 320 East Fifth Street, 
Leadville, Col. Who knows where Billings and 
Cole are ? 

'73. — A. J. Boardman, a native of Maine, was 
one of the Republican candidates for Alderman, in 
Minneapolis, at the late election. We are sorry to 
learn that he was defeated. 

'73. — E. J. Cramm is studying law in Portland 
with Strout, Gage & Strout. 

74._At Great PaUs, N. H., May 4th, Harry 
Vane Moore of Berwick, Me., was married to 
Emma Frances, daughter of Wm. W. Nason of 
Great Falls. 

'75. — L. A. Rogers, Principal of New Britain 
Seminary, Conn., held appropriate services upon 
the death of Longfellow. 

'76. — Geo. F. Pratt is on the Superintending 
School Committee, Bath. Geo. E. Hughes, '73, 
Principal of High School, resigned. 

'77. — R. E. Peary, Lieutenant Civil Engineer, 
U. S. N., has been ordered to Key West, Fla., to 
superintend the construction of an iron pier at that 
place. 

'78. — Philip L. Paine, after passing an excellent 
examination, has been admitted to the Cumberland 
County bar, at Portland. 

'80.— Ferguson is teaching at Milton Mills, N. H. 

'80. — Edwards is teaching the Topsham High 
School. 

'80. — Thomas P. Jones pastor of the Methodist 
church in Bowdoinham. 



'81.— Rogers, lately appointed trial justice at 
Pembroke. 

'85. — Brown is teaching the Grammar School in 

Topsham. 



COLLEGE WORLD. 



The attempt to admit women to the Harvard 
Medical School has proved a failure. 

The average cost of a four years' course at Yale 
is estimated at $3,825. — Princetonian. 

Fourteen of Ohio's thirty odd colleges and uni- 
versities have formed an organization whose aim is 
to bring about uniformity in the standard of require- 
ments for admission. 

The editors of the paper at the University of 
Cincinnati, who were suspended for casting reflec- 
tions upon the Faculty, have been taken back on 
condition that they renounce all connection with 
the paper hereafter. 

Among the questions prepared by the Senior 
Class Historian at Columbia, to obtain the class 
statistics, are the following: "Who do you con- 
sider the handsomest man in the class?" "The 
cheekiest?" " The cleverest?" "Are you engaged?" 

The Walker building at Amherst, containing 
many valuable specimens, which was recently 
destroyed by fire, was not insured. It is also re- 
ported that the rank of the various classes was 
consumed in the building. " 'Tis an ill wind," etc. 

The Yale men are beginning to make complaints 
against their ranking system. They think it is 
about time for Yale to lay aside her conservatism 
and follow the lead of other colleges which have 
well nigh abolished the marking system, as it is in 
vogue among us. The action of Mr. Gunn of 
Williams in refusing the highest honor of his class, 
on the ground tbat the present marking system is 
pernicious, seems to have awakened interest in this 
subject throughout the country. 



CLIPPINGS. 



Judge— " Officer, what is this man charged 
with?" Officer — " With whiskey, your Honor." 

]$owdoin and Williams will build gymnasiums at 
an expense of $()5,0U0.— £.r. The best joke of the 
season. 

"Who was the great Athenian poetf" asked 
the Schoolmaster. " Periklos," replied the slow 
boy in the farther seat, " he was versed in war, 
versed in peace, and vor — " But the pedagoguo 
interrupted him to say that was the vorst he'd ever 
heard; and just than lightning struck the an- 
tique tower of the village school, and, without com- 
ing to a vote, the house adjourned. — Fn/'SiV^/- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



25 



"Ain't it wicked to rob dis yere hen roost, 
Jim'?" " Dat's a good moral question, Gumbo; 
we ain't got time to consider it now — hand down 
another pullet." — Ex. 

" Can I ask a few questions concerning the cele- 
brated Damascus steel ? " is the way a correspon- 
dent begins his letter. Certainly ; we don't care a 
Damascus anything you want to know. — Emory 
Mirror. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



We always listen with peculiar interest to what 
our neighbors have to say, and so now that we have 
put our house in order, which we assure you was 
no small job, we will turn our attention to the Col- 
Tjy Echo and the Bates Student. The Eclw is con- 
gratulating itself on the increase in the number of 
electives, and expresses the hope " that in the 
' Golden Sometime ' we may become a university in 
fact as well as in name." The literary department 
opens with a poem entitled " Vishnu," which, to 
the uncultured mind, would appear about as mys- 
terious as the matter of Commencement appoint- 
ments. We quote : 

" If the known cloth know the knower, 

If the knower is the known. 
It is not all the mystery 

I come and go and am alone." 

We take the liberty of offering a prize for a 
solution, the Colby Echo for one year. Then follow 
three rather long but quite readable literary arti- 
cles, the tediousness of which is relieved by another 
poem. We may be permitted to quote one line, 

" From thy rifted side the aortal current flows." 
Now " aortal " is a real good word and it fills in the 
line first rate, but it is so seldom that the poet de- 
scends from his lofty flights of fancy to the stern 
realities of physiology, that we can't help expressing 
our admiration of this exception. The Echo is sug- 
gestively silent on the subject of the nine. It merely 
remarks that the men have been put in position and 
are at work. Colby's new President, Dr. Pepper, 
is to be inaugurated next Commencement. The 
Colby men are extremely proud of their new acqui- 
sition, an instructor in gymnastics, and they pro- 
pose to give an exhibition at the end of the term in 
addition to their regular field day. 

The Bates Student has an attractive cover, 
though at first sight we were a little reminded of 
Dr. Ayer's Almanac, and from it we learn that this 
enterprising ( Ahem ! ) publication has reached its 
tenth year, Opening it, we are really startled at 



the first words of the last editorial, " Longfellow is 
dead." We had thought all the poets in the coun- 
try had exhausted their vocabularies on this sub- 
ject, and that we would no longer be harrowed by 
their mournful wails, but the Student has yet a 
wail that must be wailed. Would that we had 
space to give it in its entirety, but we spare your 
tears. Listen : " One by one the names of those we 
early learned to love are passing to the voiceless 
silence of pathetic dust." And again,if some one could 
only answer this we would be relieved : " Was that 
sweet song which charmed our souls naught but the 
echo of a song from out the halls of molecular rev- 
elry, where waltzing atoms play their timeful ditties 
on the brain of genius ? " Oh ! the pathos of 
"waltzing atoms" and " molecular revelry." Ah! 
we choke. We sob. We weep. We can do no 
more. Having dried our eyes we turn to an edito- 
rial placed in the literary department because, as 
the Student remarks, long editorials are objection- 
able; it is called " The Mission of College Journal- 
ism," and from it we clip the following as an ex- 
pression of the StudenVs opinion on the subject : 
" The college paper should express not the thoughts 
of the mass of thoughtless boys whose fathers may 
be rich in purse but poor in the elements of brain 
entailment, but of the thoughtful few who usually 
have the control of the college publication." How 
nice to be the thoughtful few ! Again we quote: 
" To us there seems to be something pecuharly 
beautiful in the idea of the college press becoming 
the mediator between the mass and the great 
thinkers." We fail to see, dear Student, how the 
mass is to be greatly benefitted by a paper which 
has a circulation not much over a thousand. To 
us, too, it would appear "peculiarly beautiful" if the 
mass would only see it in that hght and " ante up." 
The Student's locals are very good and must be of 
interest to all connected with the college. We find 
the same silence, however, which we remarked in 
the Echo in regard to base-ball, but, considering 
the views of the editors on college journalism, we 
should hardly expect much news of that kind. 

One of the best of our exchanges is the Argo, 
from Williams, with a plain, neat cover, good paper, 
and irreproachable typography, it has reason to 
congratulate itself upon its general appearance. 
In the present number we think the editorials are 
most deserving of praise; they are numerous, 
short, and to the point, and treating of matters of 
interest to the reader, present models upon which 
many of our contemporaries could profitably build. 
" A Leaf from the Adamabasis," a parody on the 



26 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Anabasis, is quite funny, and the analogy is well 
carried out. The Argo rather excels in its poetry, 
those shallow waters in which so many journalistic 
harks do run aground. The following " Kondeau " is 
very pretty : 

" Ma chere amie ; — 'tis hard, without 
You at my side, to roam about 
The old pine grove. I did not guess 
That I should feel such loneliness — 
(But that will surely make her pout, 
And I don't want to scratch it out — 
Let's see,— I must sweet nonsense spout,) 
My secret thoughts I will confess. 

Ma chere. Ah rae I 

" How much I fear, at ball or rout. 
Your lover's wishes you will scout; 

And flirting, cause him deep distress. 

Ah ! say this is but silliness ! 
Tell me, I never need to doubt 

Ma chere — Amy ! " 

The Yale Courant gives its readers as much as 
any paper we have seen, and the matter is of a by 
no means inferior quahty. The greater part of its 
space is devoted to light, readable articles, some 
witty, and all intended to be. The latest sensation 
at Yale appears to be the suppression by the Faculty 
of the Freshman class supper. The Freshmen are 
naturally much incensed, but the general opinion is 
that the Faculty were justified in their action by 
the disorder of past occasions of the kiud. As an 
incentive to victory the upper-classmen have forbid- 
den the Freshmen to sit on the fence unless they 
beat the Harvard Freshmen in base-ball. The orig- 
inal comic opera of "Pennikeese" was so success- 
ful that it is to be repeated. The amount realized 
by the Boat Club, in whose favor it was given, is 
upwards of $600. 

The color of tlie Dartmouth is certainly strik- 
ing ; it is green, a sort of a cross between apple 
green and asparagus green, in short the exact shade 
which is characteristic of every third substance in 
the mineralogy. Our poet essayed the remark that 
the cover was a whole spring poem in itself, but 
before he had uttered the last words he laid him- 
self quietly down and died. The Dartmouth lit- 
erary department, which is very creditable, comes 
first, and then we have the editorials, an arrange- 
ment which a number of our exchanges have 
adopted, but of which we fail to see the advantage. 
The editorials are written in an easy manner, but 
they appear to be mostly confined to one topic. 
The revival of "Mrs. Partington" is quite amusing 
although the subject is not quite so refined as it 
might be. The best department is the " College 



Cuts," which show a good deal of care and discrim- 
ination. 

Our readers will doubtless be glad to learn 
something of our opponents at Lake George. We 
clip the following from the Wesleyan Argus : 

" Saturday, April 22d, six men were chosen from 
the University crew, of whom five will be sent to 
Lake George. The men are pulling in the follow- 
ing order: Tyler, '83, bow; Peufield, '83, Xo. 
2 ; Thompson, '8.5, No. 3 ; Brundage, '85, No. 4 ; 
McCarthy, '83, No. 5; McDonald, '83, stroke. 
They are up at 5 a.m. and go to bed at 10 p.m., 
taking a row of five miles before breakfast and 
before supper. Steady practice is producing grati- 
fying results. The crew are boarding at Mrs. 
Skinner's, on Hamlin Street, and eat more than did 
Pharaoh's lean kine. The Boating Association pays 
two dollars a week on each man's board, and the 
men pay the rest." 

DREKA 

FINE STATIONERY and ENGRAVING 
HOUSE. 

Handsomely Engraved Invitations for 

^= Colleges, Weddings, Receptions, &c. 
Fraternity Stationery always on hand. 

Our nnequaled facilities and long practical experience, enable 
us to produce tlie newest styles and most artistic effects, while 
our reputation is a guarantee of the quality of our productions. 

1 121 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 




Q^UTIOM TO SMQKllS. 

Beware of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 

^~=^ ' ^' TRY IT. 

Fine, Mild & Sweet. 

Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 

SOLD ItY ALL DEALERS THliOUtillOUT THE WOKLD. 

Of every kind, to fill Spring, Sunuuor, and Fall 
engagements now coming to hand. 
Qradualcs ami tindcrgnidiialcx of any School, 
Seminary, or College, of little or no experience, or 
other persons desiring to teach, should not fail to 
address at once, willi stamp, for applieation form, 
National Teachers' Agency, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
N. B.— Situations in the West and Southa, specialty. 
Good pay to local agents and private correspondents, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



FEME MMiMTM'\ TkPateClotliiDsSioreoflaiiie 

MADE FROM MEASURE, 

Jl PllFECT FIT QUJIIJIITEE©, 



Also a Full Assortment of 



GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

■iiiiiii & ii.^ 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 

Orders by Mail Promptly A tf ended Jo 




SEW DBOG STORE. 



ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

DllIQS, MEDICINES, 

Fancy aiiJ Toilet Articles, Clprs 1 Toliacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET 

153" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

(F'O i>t(§ i^mi/'c £i-^ur4 and £t§at€ik6. 
Mmmfmiutm -of §i^ S^ecM Snmvd 
of "Sniv4mn Bolk/ije." JlU^ deaM 
m Mu§ Sobucto ,'cfmvm§ mtd ^mok- 
m§. Jl full (me o/ Stimkitt^ JiiM- 
iMi of uU de6i/df}Uaft4. 

Jftcm Si., StmtS/ftpkk. 




i^IjXJic stoh:e. 



ALL THE LEADING NOVELTIES IN 

YOUM© BiiM'S CLOTMIl© 

AND NOBBY FANCY GOODS. 



STRICTLY ONE PRICE. 

oys' and Children's Department entirely separate. 

BLUE STORE, 

THE OWE-f Piat OiOTilfiEta, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Fine Watches, Jewelry, Silver Ware, &c., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QFALlTf, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 

PORTLAND, . _ _ - MAINE. 

A.CARTER. J. W. D. CARTER. 

SPRING AND SUMMER, 1882. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwe.ar, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments. White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be .sold very cheap for cash. 

On and after December 5th, 

Passenger Trains leave Brnnswick 

For Bath. 8.10 and 11.50 a.m., 2 10, 4.40, and 6.25 p.m., 12.42 
night, .Saturdays only. 
Rockland, 8.10 a.m., 2.10 p.m. 
Portland. 7.25, 11.4S a.m., 4.35 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.48 a.m., 12.35 night. 
Lewiston, 8.12 A.M., 2.10, 6.33 P.M., 12.40 night. 
Farmington, 2.10 p.m. 

Augusta, 8.10 A.M., 2.14. 6.35 P.M., 12.45 night. 
Skowhegan, Belfast, Dexter, and Bangor, 2.14 p.m.. and 

12.45 night. 
Waterville, 8.10, 12.45 A.M., 2.14 P.M. (6.35 Saturdays). 
PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
December 5, 1881. 



Main St., under Town Clock. 
I^- Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Sfreet, - - - Port/and, Me. 



J. A. Merrill. 



A. Keith. 






MAIN STREET, 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



fy!i!j]Ti3^s Miti m^fmy. 



28 Free Street, Portland, Me. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A, G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



At^ 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Ooal "5ra,rd. in Topsliaian, 

WHERE NONE BUT 

The Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well preiiarcd and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

l)C!ilei-ln all kimls of 

"^x^&slx arid Salt. »I©at,3p 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store 

«3- Special Bates to Student Clubs.^Gir 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Bi.ock, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 



CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Students. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



A.. O. REED, 



Special Rates to Classes i Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brnns-nrick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 



ALL KINDS OF 




For Schools and Colleges, 

EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 







THB FAVORITE NOS.303-404-332-I7O-S5/-WITH 
'HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORL 




E S\fIITH, Variety Store. Bottom Prices to Students. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



IB* ^. ^sxmtT's^om^ 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 



Office at Central Telephone Office, Brunswick. 
IBS" All Orders left at C. E. Towiisend's Store will 
be promptly attended to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDGE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEB, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical lostruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 



GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

jSj a7id ^87 Congress St., atid 235 Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

.^-Send fob Price List. 



J. H. PETERSON & SON, 



-DEALERS IN- 



Boots and Shoes, Tobacco and Cigars, 
Main Street, ---.-- - Brunswick, Me. 



FJBiANK E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets. 

FIFIST- C L A.S S 

fiaa@s, Oigass, aai 1^ 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 




COLUMBIA BICYCLE, 

Bicycle riding is nnsurpnssed as a 
method of traveling, wliillicr for speed, 
sport, or renewal of health. The prac- 
ticiiliility of the machine has been 
thoroiijj'hly tested, and satisfiiclorily 
provcul, beyond queslion. Thousands 
are in daily use, iind the niiinbcr is 
rapidly iiu-rrMsin^'. The cxiTfisc is 
recomniciulc'illiylliriiiciliciil pmlrssidn 
as most bnnclii'ial In Ik'iMHi, lirinf;iny 
into exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

Scn<l lie. stamp for SO-papte Illiistriiteil 
(:Mlalo;,'iic conlafiiliiK' prl<'o lists ami full 
iiifDnrmllim. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washinglon St„ BOSTON, MASS. 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. WILSON & CO., 

■Wholesale and Retail Dealers ic 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

H2 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 

F. W. STOCKMAN. ? 



l©\f Sell ^'oHe^© ll^^i^al 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 8th, 18S3, 
and continue SIXTEEN AA^EEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshua L. Chamberlain, LL.D., President; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H. Oerrish, M.D., 
Anatomy ; Charles "W. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence ; Hekst 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Bcrt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology j 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D,, Surgery and Cliuicil Surgery ; Charles 0. 
Hdnt, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian \ Irvinq Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



15° Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRCNSWICK, ME. 



If-i. IlSfi IC 



JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book Work to Order. 



W. B. 

^ e ^ 3. 'O r 



KNIGHT, 



Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

.^-Transient Orders for Milk or Creiim fiUcii by piving suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 

Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS. STA^XIONERY, ROOM 

PwA.pe:r. PE:iiiODiCAX.s. <ScC. 

A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, M Fancy Goods. 

Also Eastoin Mutual Union Telegraph Office. 
Under To\m Clock, - - - Brons-nrick, Me. 




#wi#la ®il©att 



Vol. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 31, 1882. 



No. 3. 



W\ 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argancl Library," 

ASD THE AD.JtTSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

H-A^LL L. DAVIS, 

Books, Stationeff, and Paper Hangiop, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLA/VD, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDKR A SPECIALTY 

FRANK M. STETSON, 



•^^i^Se^^ 



^^ ^ 



m 




1 /^r/j///^ 



DEANE BROTHERS &. SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

Cy Lowest Prices in the State, 

755 (& 185 Middle Street. - - - Portland, Me. 



VISITORS TO PORTLAND, 

Independent of any intention of pur- 
chasing goods in our line, are invited to 
inspect the Model Clothing and Fur 
nishing Store of Allen & Co., 470 Con- 
gress St., opp. Preble House, 

LANCASTER BUILDING. 



SPECIA.L ^GENT. 

[®"Dunlap & Co., of New Tork, Celebrated 
Stiff Hats. 

Also his New Straw Mackinaw, $2.00 and 
$3.50. 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGEAVBD IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE ST7LE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



474 Congress St., - - - opp. Preble House 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be esamiued in the 
followiug subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Writ- 
ing Latin {35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^neid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geogeapht. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
■which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may bo ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will bo fur- 
nished a list of toi)jcs on which he will bo requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination lield for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as ho may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which be set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

KEQUIEED— EOUE HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

electives — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 
Latin, two terms. 
Greek, two terms. 
Natural History, three terms. 
Physics, one term. 
Chemistry, two terras. 
Science of Language, one term. 
I-inglish Ijitcrature, two terms. 
Gorman, two terms. 
History of Philosophy, two terms. 
International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (hall), average, $'Zii. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular Cullogc charges, .'isilO. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lesson the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Voj- XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 31, 1882. 



No. 3. 



bowdoijst orient. 



POBtlSHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DnRING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Robert C. Washburn, '83, Managing Editor. 

N. Brooks E. Pettingill, '83, Business Editor. 
Herbert E. Cole, '83. Charles H. Stetson, '83. 

Howard R. Goodwin, '83. Llewellyn Barton, '84. 
Herbert P. Kendall, '83. Oliver W. Means, '84. 
Arthur J. Russell, '83. Charles E. Sayward, '84. 

Teems — S2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Glass mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Vo\. XII., No. 3.— May 3], 1882. 

Editorial Notes 27 

Literary: 

Ivy Ode 30 

Psi Upsilon Convention 30 

Alpha Delta Phi Convention 30 

Communication 31 

Base-Ball 32 

College Items 34 

Personal 37 

College World 38 

Clippings 38 

Editors' Table 38 



The next number of the Orient will be 
issued on Wednesday of next week or on 
Thursday, at the latest. Being the Ivy num- 
ber it will contain reports of the Junior ex- 
ercises of Friday, together with the results, 
of the field-day sports, boat race, and base- 
hall game. Extra copies, with or without 
wrappers, may be obtained from the business 
editor. 



In glancing at the reports of the subscrip- 
tion lists of some of our college journals, one 
will be surprised that certain of those fortu- 
nate sheets should have such a host of sup- 
porters and, presumably, readers. In some 
cases there are three or four times as many 
subscribers as there are students in the col- 
lege by whose members the paper is pub- 
lished. .The conclusion naturally follows 
that there must be a large number of sub- 
scribers outside of college, and just as natu- 
rally is it supposed that the mass of these out- 
siders is found among the alumni. It cer- 
tainly must be gratifying to the editors of the 
above-mentioned fortunate sheets that such 
interest is manifested in their college paper, 
and therefore in the college itself, not only 
because of the acknowledged praiseworthi- 
ness of a patriotic feeling for one's Alma Ma- 
ter, but also from the probabilit}- of a pleas- 
ing balancing of the debt and credit side of 
the account book. 

The influence of having a large number 
of readers among the alumni must necessa- 
rily show itself in the make-up of the paper. 
The character of any journal is determined 
by the standing and desires of its readers. 
The belief of an editorial board, that it is 
catering to the tastes not only of the student 
body, but also of those who have graduated 
and have reached various stations and differ- 
ent ages in life, must, in a measure, be felt in 
the discrimination of matter which is to be 
published. For our part we can think of no 
better method for displaying one's interest in 
the welfare of his college than by subscribing 
for the college paper. He thus keeps in close 
acquaintance with the ups and downs, pros- 
perity and needs of the institution that fos- 



28 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



tered him, and at the same time urges on to 
greater and better endeavors those who feel 
under obligations to him for his patriotism 
and generosity. 



The fact that we have a university crew 
in training, and that undivided support should 
be extended to it must not lead us to foiget 
that our class races are of no slight impor- 
tance this year. The boats will be called 
into position at two o'clock to-mori'ow after- 
noon. If nothing prevents, three crews will 
participate, and there seems every prospect 
for an interesting race. They are as evenly 
matched as ever before, and a close struggle 
at the finish may be expected. Notwith 
standing the lack of gymnasium work in the 
early spring, quite continued practice has been 
engaged in on the river and, with good 
water, creditable time should be recorded. 
The Seniors will not be represented this year 
for the reason that three members of their 
old crew are in training for the Lake George 
race. Their withdrawal will make tlie class 
race more enjoyable, inasmuch as the race 
will not be decided until rowed, a circum- 
stance which in some years past has rendered 
our regattas on the river devoid of interest. 
A large crowd will probably be in attendance, 
for a suitable hour has been selected for the 
start. 



Those who frequent the tables of the 
library where the reviews are kejDt for read- 
ing must liave noticed the absence of the North 
American. Upon inquiry as to the cause of 
its discontinuance it is learned that the Re- 
view some months since contained articles 
which were not in harmony with the ideas of 
those who liave some influence over the man- 
agement of the library periodicals, and tliat 
they, believing tliat the reading of the Review 
would work to the detriment of students' 
minds and morals, caused its removal. It is 
hard to realize that such one-sided views are 



held by those who take part in the govern- 
ment of the college. The North American 
Review holds, beyond dispute, the first place 
among periodicals of that character. It 
numbers among its contributors the leading 
statesmen, professors, journalists, and profes- 
sional men of the country. Its articles are 
always recognizable as coming from tlie most 
able writers and the closest thinkers of our 
land. Because publication was given to the 
religious beliefs of Col. R. G. Ingersoll tlie 
monthly is banished from sight for fear tliat 
the susceptible minds of the students may lie 
touched by the subtle arguments of the 
famous unbeliever. To look with disfavor 
upon the idea of scattering about promiscu- 
ously any theories advanced by atheists or 
infidels, ma}- justly be expected from those 
who uphold Christian principles and doctrines, 
but to deliberately attempt to restrain one 
from following out his inclinations, whether 
from conviction or curiosity, can liut bring to 
view an unwholesome display of bigotry. 
Something that is not lookt'd for in these 
times when a man is fi-ee io think and act as 
his conscience dictates. 



Memorial Hall is fast assuming a more 
finished and attractive appearance. The 
work has been carried on so uninterruptedly 
for some time past that an idea of its intended 
beauty and attractiveness can be gained. 
The upper hall is particularly inviting. 
While not ornamented in a style too magnifi- 
cent or dazzling, the fresco and stucco work 
have that moderate yet rich tone of finish so 
agreeable to the eye, and so fitted to lend an 
air of modest elegance to tiie surroundings. 
The beautiful stained-glass windows gives 
the presence of a subdued brilliancj^ to the 
large apartment, while the wood-work has 
been most tastefully finisiied. When com- 
pleted it will certainly meet the expectations 
of those who have so long desired that it be 
put to use according to the original plans 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



29 



and intentions. A want, long felt, will thus 
be supplied, and we are to be congratulated 
that at last it has been provided against. 
The exercises of dedication will be held dur- 
ing Commencement Week, and Bowdoin can 
then, with feelings of mingled pleasure and 
sadness look upon her beautiful tribute to the 
memory of her brave sons who gave up their 
lives in behalf of their country. 



Our nine has opened the season of ball 
pla3ang, and, we must confess, not very aus- 
piciously. Our hopes, held before any games 
were played, were not extravagantl}' founded, 
for the reason that the appearance of six new 
men upon the diamond, with no previous rec- 
ord, gave no good cause for having great con- 
fidence as to successful results in the first few 
games. For all that, it cannot be denied that 
great disappointment was felt at the termi- 
nation of two of the games. Especially was 
it so, because the mateiial of the nine has 
been shown to be scarcely inferior to that 
which composed the club of last year. It is, 
perhaps, luijust to attribute our defeats to 
the questionable playing of any one individ- 
ual. The cause of them is seen rather in the 
weak points of the nine as a whole. One, 
and perhaps the most important of them, is 
the absence of a common feeling or de.sire to 
work together in perfect harmony, something 
that could hardly be expected thus early in 
the season. It is only after participation in 
several games that such a unity of purpose 
can become apparent, and we confidently 
look for a manifestation of it in the near fut- 
ure. In the matter of base-running, another 
weak point is disclosed, and there must be 
far greater attention paid to this particular, 
than has heretofore been shown. Changes 
for the better, in these two respects, and a 
continuation of the improvement in batting, 
will end in the making of a more satisfactory 
record. The result of the game at Lewiston 
goes to prove it. 



We have oftentimes pondered over the 
past history of our college paper, and from 
that, ran off in our imagination upon its fut- 
ure prosperity, reaching a time far distant 
fi-om us now, but one in which the paper had 
attained to a popularity, a dignity, a useful- 
ness hardly to be believed. To bring about 
such a display of unexampled success, as the 
visionary picture offered, we now are serious- 
ly thinking of taking the first steps. It is 
in the direction of securing a permanent home 
for our charge, and we are determined to 
consummate any plans that will be instru- 
mental in making this advancement. An of- 
fice is something every paper ought to have. 
In our mind's eye we liave pictured many a 
time the pleasure and advantage attending 
the acquisition of such a feature to our now 
excellent facilities. And giving loose rein to 
our thoughts, we have too often drawn reck- 
lessly upon our imagination, and manufact- 
ured that which is as wide from what reality- 
would be, as black is from white. Before us 
were visions of Brussels carpets, elegant roll- 
ing-top desks, beautiful mahogany chairs, 
and glittering chandeliers, all of which, in 
one moment, changes to what we really may 
hope for, — a comfortable room, plenty of 
chairs, with a number of desks, a long table, 
and some other necessaries, so much of em- 
bellishment being allowed as the financial 
standing of the paper would warrant. This, 
however, would satisfy the desire of the most 
particular or capricious man on the board, 
and so enthusiastic are we in this direction 
when making what we believe is a reasonable 
request, it is with no little confidence that we 
look forward to the answer of our petition. 
The latest developements are favorable, and 
we trust that the carrying out of our plans 
will result in our obtaining an office of which 
you, as well as ourselves, will be proud. It 
is useless to enumerate the advantages that 
would be derived from such addition. They 
are many, and so apparent that we wonder 



30 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



why those who have gone before us have not 
carried out the project to a successful issue. 



IVY ODE. 

Under June's glowhig skies, 
Under June's green trees, 

Greet we the hour that flies 
Winged by June's soft breeze. 

Swift have the hours flown by. 
Hours fraught with gladness. 

Now sterner work is nigh. 
Life's sterner sadness. 

Yet we thy praise will sing. 

Ivy and pine tree, 
And here our tribute bring 

Loath to resign thee. 



PSI UPSILON CONVENTION. 

The forty-ninth annual couvention of tiie 
Psi Upsilon Fraternity met with the Pi Chap- 
ter at Syracuse, N. Y., on May 10th and llth. 
There were forty-three delegates present, 
every chapter being represented. Besides 
the regular delegates, many members of the 
fraternity, both graduates and undergradu- 
ates, were in attendance. 

The convention was called to order on 
the morning of the 10th, by H. L. Bridgman 
(Gamma, '66,) of the executive council. 
During the forenoon and afternoon of both 
days, the convention was occupied with so- 
ciety business, mostly of a private nature. 
An application from the University of Min- 
nesota for a chapter, was denied. 

On the evening of the 10th, the members 
of the fraternity, about two liundred in num- 
ber, assembled at the chapter rooms of the 
Pi and marched to the Grand Opera House, 
wliere the public exercises were held, in the 
presence of a large and select audience. Af- 
ter an overture l)y the orchestra, prayer was 
offered by lie v. S. N. Jjattimore (Upsilon, '6<S), 
and the members of the fraternity arose and 
sang, with great effect, the Reunion Song. 



Prof. C. W. Bennett, D.D., of Syracuse, 
president of the exercises, then intioduced 
Hon. Chauncey M. Depew, of New York, 
(Beta, '56,) the orator of the evening. The 
subject of the oration was " The Uses and 
Abuses of a Liberal Education.'.' The large 
audience gave the closest attention to the or- 
ator, and his masterly production was re- 
ceived with much applause. Prof. N. M. 
Wheeler (Pi, '75,) delivered the poem which 
was full of pure wit, and was greatly appre- 
ciated by the audience. After the exercises, 
the visiting members and invited guests were 
received in the hall adjoining the Opera 
House. About four hundred people were 
present, among them man}^ distinguished per- 
sons. 

A promenade concert filled in tlie time 
till eleven p.m., when dancing was indulged 
in, Drescher's Orchestra, of Rochester, fur- 
nishing excellent music. The visitors were 
charmingly entertained by the fair young 
ladies of Syracuse,, and the occasion was 
thoroughly enjoyed by all. 

On the evening of tiie lltli, about one 
hundred and fifty members of the fialernity 
assembled again in the Grand Opera House 
Hall and partook of a magnificent banquet. 
Toasts were responded to by many prominent 
Psi U's, and by delegates from each cliapter. 
Telegrams of congratulation were read from 
all parts of the country, and letters from four 
of the seven gentlemen who founded the so- 
ciety at Union College, in 1833. The ban- 
quet closed tlie forty-ninth convention in a 
most satisfactory manner. 

The semi-centennial of llie fraternity will 
be celebrated next year with the Theta Chap- 
ter, at Union College, where the society was 
founded. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI CONVENTION. 

The semi-centennial convention of Aljilni 
Delta Plii was held in New York City, May 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



31 



16th, 17th, and 18th, under the auspices of 
the executive council. The hall of the 
Grand Commandery, Masonic Temple, was 
placed at the disposal of the society for its 
business sessions. Forty-eight delegates from 
the seventeen chapters were in attendance. 
After the business meetings, Tuesday, the 
convention adjourned to meet in the evening 
at the Academy of Music. The public exer- 
cises consisted of a symposium, by the Hon. 
Jno. Jay, president of the fraternity, and 
speeches on the "Fifty Years' Progress," by 
the following well-known gentlemen: Donald 
" G. MitcheU, Merrill E. Gates, Ph.D., Rev. 
Richard S. Storrs, D.D., Hon. A. Q. Keasby, 
and Rev. Roswell D. Hitchcock, D.D. The 
academy was filled, and the evening was a 
most pleasant and profitable one. The busi- 
ness session occupied Wednesday morning, 
and in the afternoon three hundred of the 
society accepted the invitation from the exec- 
utive council to enjoy an excursion up the 
Hudson. The trip extended above Tarry- 
town, and was enlivened by Cappa's Seventh 
Regiment Band and the Amherst Glee Club. 
After a characteristic "walk-around,"' as the 
steamer approached the Twenty-third Street 
pier, a large number of the men visited the 
Fifth Avenue rooms of the Manhattan Chap- 
ter to attend a reception given by that body. 
The dinner, closing the three days' work of 
the convention, occurred at Delmonico's, on 
the evening of thelStli. It was attended by 
two hundred and sixty gentlemen, and the 
demand for tickets considerably exceeded the 
number of seats it was possible to furnish. 
Joseph H. Choate was master of ceremonies, 
and among the speakers might be mentioned 
John U. Whitney, Algernon S. Sullivan, Rev. 
Percy Browne, George William Curtis, Ever- 
ett P. Wheeler, and Francis Lynde Stetson. 
The speeches were interspersed and enlivened 
by society songs, sung lustily and with exhil- 
arating effect. The next annual meeting will 
be held in Cleveland. 



COMMUMICATION. 



Editors of Orient : 

A crying need of our college is for more 
modern books in our library. Especially rich in 
works that are valuable chiefly because of their 
great age, it contains comparatively few that are 
of use to a person in examining the researches 
and discoveries of the last twentj^ years. 
While the literature of Greece and Rome, 
and of the earlier days of France, England, 
and Germany have representatives upon every 
shelf, that of more recent date is either very 
poorly represented, or wholly wanting. We 
venture to say that many institutions of learn- 
ing, inferior to our own in all other respects, 
offer greater inducements to students, in a 
stiictly literary point of view, in possessing 
libraries made up of books collected during 
the last two decades, and consequently of 
those that treat the subjects considered in a 
way according with advanced ideas of thought. 
Indeed, the Maine Wesleyan Seminary or 
Bates College may, justly, we think, claim su- 
periority over our own college in the respect 
mentioned. But comparisons are proverbi- 
ally odious, and in this case, pei'haps, useless 
as well. The imperfections of the library, I 
will assume, are known and appreciated by all 
the students who are at all acquainted with it. 
Must they always continue to be a source of 
mortification as well as inconvenience to us? 
While we are proud of our library's art treas- 
ures, its relics of antiquity, and its wealth of 
volumes of inestimable value to a student of 
archaeology, we are forced to admit that for 
information on the standard topics of interest 
to us all, we must too frequently look else- 
where. 

The authorities certainly cannot be wholly 
in the dark concerning the theme of our com- 
plaint, but perhaps they are not aware that 
the library is undergoing a starving process 
that will soon complete its work, in making, 
what ought to be in the van of all the means 



32 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



of imparting knowledge used here, simply a 
resort for those who love to study the exist- 
ing monuments of the dead past, unless they 
increase by a large amount the sum annuallj' 
set aside for its support, and even that sort of 
help will not be sufScient- The- library 
should not be obliged to depend solely upon 
the varying dispositions of any body of men, 
however devoted and loj^al they may be to its 
interests. Then, too, the likelihood that the 
sums voted would sometimes, from various 
causes, be made too small to avail much, ren- 
ders this means of supporting it and increas- 
ing its efSciency extremely precarious. It 
should have a permanent fund so large that 
the interest would be sufficient to enable it to 
keep abreast of the times. A spasmodic at- 
tempt was made some time ago to raise such 
a fund, but so far as we are able to learn, it 
was barren of good results. We sincerely 
hope that the originators of the scheme will 
not be discouraged by their first failure, for, 
until the library has some such visible means 
of support, we cannot claim for it, from a 
practical standpoint, what we always could 
claim from a standpoint of intrinsic value — a 
position among the first libraries of the country. 
We are aware that some improvements have 
been made in library affairs during the past 
year. Prof. Johnson, doubtless seeing the 
state of things, is striving very hard, with the 
limited means at his command, to make the 
rooms attractive, commodious and convenient. 
Some reviews have been bound, some new 
books added; but grim poverty still lurks 
among the columns, and makes it necessary to 
swing the heavy doors in the face of the man 
who wishes to effect a sale of Guizot's com- 
plete Histories of France and England. " Ah, 
but that is all riglit," says the man who closes 
his eyes to plain needs, "there is a History of 
England in the library now." Yes, but it was 
written in 1820. " English history preceding 
that date has not changed since then," he adds. 
True, true, perhaps we should be satisfied. 



Great progress has of late been made in 
many departments of college affairs. The 
course of study has been extended and im- 
proved. College laws have been in a measure 
changed for the better in being softened from 
their former state of severit3\ The buildings 
have been improved, and our comforts are be- 
ing most carefully looked after. The next 
thing is to bring the library to the same grade 
of excellence, to modernize it, to eliminate, 
or at least to place in the background the por- 
tion that never has been, and never will be, 
used, and to fill the places thus left vacant 
with recent works of great authors that will 
be eagerly sought by all. SiCEAUX. 



BASE-BALL. 

Colhys, 6 ; Bowdoins, 2. 

Tiie Bowdoins went to Waterville on 
Wednesday, the 17th, and opened the season 
in a game with Colby. The college was not 
overconfident as to the result of the match, 
and, consequently, were not so much dis- 
appointed as they might otlierwise have i)een. 
The game in itself was finely played, being 
for the most part a work of pitchers and 
catchers. The batting was not heavy on 
either side. For the Bowdoins it was by far 
too weak. Improvement in this particular 
will make a decided difference in tiie result 
of future games. Harmony among the men 
in playing could hardly be expected, inas- 
much as this was the first game that six of 
the men had appeared in. Wright's pitching 
was excellent, he striking out eight men, 
while Knapp played finely behind the bat. 
The following is the score iir detail : 

BOWDOINS. 

A.H. li. In. T.lt. I'.O. A. K. 

Stotson.lib 2 1 (I I (I 

Writ'lit, 1> 4 1 ' ' '• '• ' 

Kiiai)i), c 4 (I 1 1 II 11 

WiiU'niuui, l.r ;i CI II II II II 

Cocik, s.s •! II II II 113 

Uartoii, c.r •! H H H I H 

I'liokani, lb 4 d u S 

Tomo', --il) :* " ' ' :' ■' - 

IMiiiuiBy, r.C 3 HI U 

Totals 31 2 3 4 25 19 7 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



33 



COLBYS. 

A.B. R. iB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Doe, c 5 1 2 2 13 2 1 

Andrews, c.f 5 111 

Wright, I.f 5 10 

Ryder, lb 5 11 6 

Garland, 3b 4 4 

Emerscm, r.f 3 10 

■Woddcock, s,.s 4 11 14 2 

Barton, p 4 2 11 18 3 

Boswm-tb, 2b 4 1 ] 1 1 1 

Totals 39 6 7 7 27 14 7 

123456789 

Bowdoins 2 0—2 

Colbys 00002040 0—6 

Struck out — Bowdoins, 7 ; Colbys, 8. First base on 
called balls — Bowdoins, 3; Colbys, 1. Passed balls — 
Knapp, 2; Doe, 2. Balls called— On Wright, 69; on Bar- 
ton, 80. Strikes called— On Wright, 16; 'on Barton, 19. 
Time of game — 1 hour 35 minutes. Umpire — Dennison, 
Colby, '82. Scorers — Washburn, Bowdoiu ; Clement, 
Colby. 

Bates, 9 ; Bowdoins, 8. 

The first meeting between the niues of 
Bowdoiu and Bates took place on Wednes- 
day, May 24th, and a more unsatisfactory 
game was never witnessed on our grounds. 
Play began with a liglit rain falling, and as it 
rapidly became heavier the game was sus- 
pended before the completion of the first 
innings. After a shower of short duration 
play was resumed, and tiien followed one of 
most miserable exhibitions of ball playing 
the Bowdoins have ever engaged in. The 
poor base running of our nine became a feat- 
ure from the first. No runs were scored un- 
til the fourth innings, although man after man 
gained first and was pushed around by base 
hits, or errors on the part of our opponents. 
A great improvement in the manner of run- 
ning bases must be made if any success at all 
is to be hoped for this season. The batting 
record of the Bowdoins was vastly superior 
to that made by them at Waterville, Cook 
securing the only two-base hit of the game. 
The errors on both sides were numerous, 
those of our nine occurring at the most criti- 
cal periods, when several runs were made on 
account of them. The game seemed practi- 
cally settled when half of the ninth innings 
had been finished, and the score stood 8 to 6 
in favor of Bowdoin, but the opportunities 
for putting the last men out were not taken 
advantage of, and, error following upon error, 
three runs were made which decided the game 
against us. Some changes in the make-up of 
the nine would probably tend to bring about 



a more satisfactory result. Following is the 
score : 

BOWDOINS. 
A.B. R. 1b. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Stetson, 3b 5 2 2 1 

Wright, p 5 I I 10 1 

Knapp, c 5 7 3 6 

Waterman, l.f 5 2 1 1 11 

Cook, s.s 5 3 2 3 1 2 3 

Barton, c.f 5 2 2 1 

Packard, lb 5 2 2 9 2 3 

Torrey, 2b 5 11 1 5 3 1 

Phinney, r.f 4 1 

Totals 44 8 7 7 26 23 18 

BATES. 

A.B. R. 1r. TB. P.O. A. E. 

Merrill, S.S 5 2 1115 3 

Tinkham, 2b 5 12 2 111 

Sanford, c 5 2 2 2 7 3 4 

Richards, r.f 5 1112 1 

Bartlett, 3b 4 12 2 12 1 

Douglass, l.f 4 2 1 

Freeleih.p 4 1 1 4 8 12 

Whitmore, r.f 4 

Atwood.lb 4 1 1 10 

Totals 40 9 10 10 27 19 22 

123456789 

Bates 12 3 3—9 

Bowdoins 00033000 2—8 

Two-base hit — Cook. First base on errors — Bowdoins, 
J2; Bates, 7. First base on called balls — Bowdoins, 7; 
Wild pitches — Preeleih, 4. Struck out — Bowdoins, 4; 
Bates, 2. Balls called— On Wright, 44 ; on Freeleih, 139. 
Strikes called — On Wright, 8; on Freeleih, 16. Passed 
balls — Knapp, 5 ; Sanford, 4. Time of game — 2 hours 10 
minutes. Double plays — Wright, Torrey, and Packard; 
Wright, Packard, and Knapp. Umpire — A. H. Perry. 

Bowdoins, 13; Bates, 12. 

The second game between the Bowdoins 
and Bates took place at Lewiston, on Satur- 
day last. About fifty of the students accom- 
panied the nine to lend encouragement. The 
contest proved to be a most exciting one, 
notwithstanding the large number of errors 
recorded to each side. From the first, the 
Bowdoins played an up-hill game, and worked 
better than a Bowdoin nine ever before did, 
under similar circumstances, wresting victo- 
ry out of the very jaws of defeat. The feat- 
ure of the game was Torrey's marvelous stop 
with the left hand, of a hot grounder, which 
seemed far out of his reach. The batting of 
Barton, Cook, and Wright was excellent, 
while Knapp's catching was almost faultless. 
For the Bates, Merrill played an exceedingly 
fine game at short stop, Atwood did well at 
first, and Sanford displayed wonderful pluck 
in facing the wild pitching he was obliged to 



34 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



catch. Mention should be made of the good 
umpiring of Mr. Pingree. Appended is the 
score : 

BOWDOINS. 
A.B. R. iB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Stetson, 3b 5 9 2 2 10 3 

Wright, p 5 2 2 2 3 9 

Knapp, c 5 1 1 7 2 

"Waterman, 1. f. 6 10 2 4 

Cook.s.s 5 112 12 

Barton, c. f. .5 2 4 5 2 4 

Packard, lb 5 1117 11 

Torrey, 2b 4 2 1 2 5 2 3 

Collins, r. f. 5 2 2 

Totals 45 13 12 15 27 13 21 

BATES. 
A.B. R. iB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Merrill, s. s 5 1112 7 3 

Tinkham, 2b 5 2 2 2 2 10 

Sanford, o 5 1 7 2 

Richards, c. f. 5 112 3 6 

Hatch, r.f. 5 1112 1 

Bartlett, 3b 5 3 110 1 

Douglass, 1. f. 5 111112 

Preeleih. p 5 10 2 11 

Atwood, lb 5 11116 5 

Totals 45 12 8 9 20 16 21 

Two-base hits — Barton, Cook, Torrey, Richards. First 
base on errors — Bowdoins, 8; Bates, 10. First base ou 
called balls — Bowdoin.s, 4 ; Bates, 0. Wild pitch — Free- 
leih. Struck (iut — Bowdoins, 2; Bates, 4. Balls called — 
On Wrifrbt, 48; on Freeleih, 89. Strikes called— On 
Wright, 4; on Freeleih, 16. Passed balls — Knapp, 1; 
Saui'ord, 5. Time of game —2 hours 9 minutes. Umpire 
— M. A. Pingree of Lewiston. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



It is never too late to bone. 
Put not your trust in tutors. 
Pop's new suit is a stunner. 
Where are the Junior discussions ? 
Field-day cider in the near future. 
Arrange your bets on to-morrow's race. 
The Main Street sidewalk is a solemn fact. 
'84'8 boat has been repaired and varnished. 
No more grumbling about the chapel choir. 
The Freshmen have got that tug-of-war cold. 
A grand stand for the ball ground is talked of. 

Notice our additional two pages of reading mat- 
ter. 

Several are trying to Iciirn how to rido bicycles. 
The hedges, trees, and solid college walks will 
probably survive the thumping. 



Can't we have an instructor in orthography 
here? 

for the days when we can boast of a gymna- 
sium ! 

Six was a big sail in the last Freshman Latin ex- 
amination. 

An '85 man calls the large sized orchestra fiddle 
a vioUnsolo. 

The term of the Medical School closes ou Wed- 
nesday, May 31st. 

Shooting doves from the windows is the latest 
Sabbath pastime. 

One Sophomore takes field work in ornithology 
as an e.xtra study. 

The third game with the Colbys will probably 
be played in Augusta. 

The Lewiston bridge is a popular resort on 
pleasant Sunday afternoons. 

Bowdoins and Tufts on the delta, to-morrow 
forenoon ; game called at 9.30. 

The directors have decided not to have the boat 
race just after midnight, this year. 

Wasu't there a rumor, last fall, that '84 had de- 
termined to bury Anna at any cost? 

The Senior English literature divisions have 
completed Julius CiEsar and Macbeth. 

The Freshman lougeth for the time to arrive 
when he can carry a cane with safety. 

There are an abundance of entertainments to go 
to now when we care least about them. 

Would-be Book Agent (to a companion in misery) 
— " Have you got jou.v prosjMctivc yet, F ? " 

Who said those fems. had seen every fellow in 
college ? Why, bless you, the Orient was slighted. 

The wood work of the main library room and 
the north wing has been carefully cleaned and 
oiled. 

Prof. Campbell lectured before the B. and T. 
Musical Association, Thursday week, on " An hour 
with Socrates." 

It was a man that don't take the Orient whose 
countenance cracked the large mirror on the out- 
side of the circus advertising car. 

The Faculty of the University of Minnesota 
have commenced shooting mischievous students. 
That college is getting pretty high toned. Wo ex- 
pect to hear soon that the students have blown up 
the Faculty, with dynamite, by way of retaliation. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



35 



Hon. James W. Bradbury, '25, of Augusta, is 
the donor of the lower window in the north end of 
Memorial Hall. 

Fe(e)in(g) notes emanant from the chapel or- 
gan when played by persons not acquainted with 
its peculiarities. 

When a man shouts in his sleep, "Now brace! 
brace! " you may wisely conclude that he is deeply 
interested in boating. 

Lieut. Howe lectures to the Seniors on warlike 
topics in the morning hour, wheu the President is 
unable to meet the class. 

Prof. Carmichael delivered his lecture on " Mole- 
cules," before a large audience, in the chemical lect- 
ure room, last Thursday night. 

Prof. Lee lectured in Westbrook, Tuesday even- 
ing, May 23d, on the last summer's work of the 
United States Pish Commission. 

Score sheets, officially made out, and posted in 
the reading room, are found to be very convenient 
to all in settling disputed points. 

Everybody who could raise fifty cents went to 
the "Jollities." The editors of the last Bugle were 
in their several rooms all that evening. 

More than six hundred dollars have been raised 
this year, by subscription alone, among the students 
here, for the support of boating and base-ball. 

Now the man with the distended calf-skin walks 
up to the man who is never known to have a red, and 
challenges him to put up money on the race. 

A very pleasant German was given by some of 
the students at Dirigo Hall, recently. A strolling 
company of Itahans furnished excellent music. 

The class in physiology rejoice in having learned 
why it is that a person when paralyzed, sees double, 
and kicks without being conscious of the actions. 

Prof, in Greek (to Fresh) — "Almost everyone 
makes a mistake on this word, but you happened 
by some happy thought to get the translation right." 

E. K. Jewett, '82, and E. Thomas, '85, were the 
Bowdoin delegates to the semi-centennial celebra- 
tion of the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity, held in 
New York City last week. 

Princeton, Washington and Lee, and the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania will probably send four- 
oared crews to contend with Wesleyan and our boys 
at the Lake George Regatta. 

Another Senior debate was held last Tuesday 
evening in the Senior room. The proposition for 



discussion was the restriction of voting by an edu- 
cational qualification. Discussed by Mansur and 
Libby in the affirmative, by Chase and Weeks in 
the negative. 

"Nehmen," said the Prof, explaining, "has a 
peculiar use ; for instance, if you were in Germany, 
and wanted to ask a friend to take something, you 
would use ' Nehmen.' " 

The man with the dead rabbit cut on his hair 
must expect to be closely examined by the persons 
who contemplate completing the work that Prof. 
Darwin has just laid down. 

Prof, (conducting Sunday school class, with 
mind somewhat on week-day affairs) — " Mr. H., 
what principles must we bear in mind while study- 
ing the parabola of the sower ? " 

Bowdoin has graduated forty-five Smiths, and 
seven more that spelled their names with a "y " ; 
and yet there are a good many people who think 
that we need more of the same name. 

Prof. Robinson has succeeded in awakening quite 
an interest in mineralogy among the Juniors. Sev- 
eral are making collections of such specimens as 
can be found in this neighborhood. 

The song of "Junior Ease," produced at the 
chapel concert last winter, is exceedingly popular, 
a fact that seems to reflect discredit upon the dis- 
criminating powers of the song committee. 

The Sophomores have accepted an invitation to 
hold class supper exercises together with the Soph- 
omores of Colby and Bates, at the DeWitt House, 
Lewiston, probably on the evening of June 24th. 

About a dozen fellows accompanied the nine to 
Waterville, on May 17th, and saw the boys take 
their warming. They reported good treatment, 
fair play, and entire absence of disagreeable chin- 
ning. 

Go to the circus, June 3d, see some dirty, half- 
starved animals, Garfield's assassinatiou, the Gui- 
teau trial, and some inferior riding and tumbling, 
learn some new songs, and then come home and 
hate yourself. 

Prof, (in science of language recitation)— " Mr. 
W., what are the Glosses?" Mr. W.— " The 
Glosses are interlinear comments written by Celtic 
scholars upon the Greek and Latin manuscripts 
which they studied." Prof —" Right ; I hope none 
of you have ever labored under the mistaken idea 
that it is necessary to do likewise in order to hand 
down our words and phrases." 



36 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The new song book was issued on May 15th. It 
has two hundred pages, and, until June 1st, will be 
sold for $1.30; after that time $2.00 will be charged. 
Send in your orders to Geo. H. Pierce, No. 9 A. H. 

The Sophomore crew, made up as given in the 
last number, will pull in the class race. The two 
men who are training in the college crew have been 
able to take only a few practice pulls in their class 
boat. 

The votes for Sophomore Prize Declaimers were 
handed in by the class, Saturday, May '20th. The 
names confirmed were : Adams, Barton, Child, Kemp, 
Means, Pierce, Say ward, Smith, Sweetser, J. Torrey, 
Walker, and Waterman. 

Sitting down during prayers is getting altogeth- 
er too general. It may be more comfortable to sit, 
toothpick in mouth, and stare aimlessly at a panel 
painting, but it is more respectful to stand up like 
a man and give attention. 

The field-day prizes and boating cups, in the 
window of the college book store, make a good 
show, and doubtless do more toward stimulating 
the boys to do their level best than any amount of 
verbal encoui'agement would. 

The Juniors will pull the race in suits consisting 
of maroon handkerchiefs, sleeveless shirts with '83 
upon the breasts, red knee pants and stockings. 
The Sophomores and Freshmen will content them- 
selves with class color handkerchiefs only. 

Dr. D. A. Robinsou (Gym Rob), of Bangor, our 
former instructor in gymnastics, would doubtless 
smile to know that one who was many terms a 
faithful worker in his department, recently spoke 
of him, in earnest, as Mr. James Robinson. 

Does it not occur to some of the students that 
this custom of yelling " heads out, " and making 
other demonstrations from windows and doorways, 
whenever a lady ventures to walk upon the college 
grounds, is decidedly stale, and in very liad taste ? 

H. (who aspires to be a mineralogist, exhibiting 
a black lump to Prof, in tliat branch) — " What is 
this a specinicn of ? I picked it up down street." 
I'rof. — " 0, that's nothing of importance; you can 
piclv up most anything down street." II. is 
uncertain whether to fuel sat down on or not. 

The program for tlio next two days, Juno 1st and 
2d, is as follows; Basc-l)all on Thursday foi-enoon ; 
in the afternoon at two, the boat race ; and at three, 
the tub race. On Friday morning, athletic sports 
on the fair ground; at 1.30 r.Ji., the presentation 
of prizes in the chapel ; at three the ivy exorcises of 



'83 ; and in the evening the hop. On Saturday even- 
ing, field-day cider. All studying will, without 
doubt, go over until Monday. 

The band have rehearsals in the base-ball room. 
We are authorized to pronounce false all statements 
to the effect that they are soon to commence a se- 
ries of musical ( ? ) struggles with the Grammar 
School Band for the champion.ship of Brunswick. 
They have, however, decided to furnish music for 
the field day exercises. 

The ivy day committee have obviated the diffi- 
culties of dancing on the rough and uneven floor of 
Lemont Hall, by securing a dance covering to be 
spread over all the surface on the evening of the 
hop. It is hoped that, on this account, a more gen- 
eral participation by parties outside the Junior 
class will serve to balance this additional expense. 

Nos. 7, 10, and 11 of Vol. III., and No. 13 of Vol. 
VII., of the Orient are wanted to complete the 
files in the college library. Persons having some, or 
all of the above will confer a great favor by sending 
them to the business editor. When these numbers 
are procured, the papers are to be bound and ar- 
ranged conveniently for reference, upon the shelves. 

The '84 ball nine may poissibly arrange some ball 
games with the Sophomore nines of Colby and 
Bates. We vrould impress up«u the minds of our 
Freshmen, also, the propriety of meeting some club 
upon the dusty diamond. They have good materi- 
al, are putting in some good practice, and would 
doubtless do themselves and the college credit in a 
game. 

The very latest pun comes from the mouth of an 
end woman. She came softly into the Junior's room, 
and while disarranging his belongings and spilling 
ink upon his books and papers, said: "You'll not 
stay here a great while longer, I suppose." Junior— 
" No, my course is drawing to a close. I shall be a 
Senior next year." End Woman— "Ah, shall youf 
Well, I thought I'd seen yer 'round here some con- 
siderable time.'' Junior falls insensible into end 
woman's arms. 

The librarian has dropped the North American 
lieview from the list of periodicals taken by the 
college libraiy, because the uianagers of that month- 
ly see fit to continue to publish Col. IngorsoII's ar- 
ticles, and have, it is said, refused to grant to Mr. 
Jero Black spaee for more answers. The last 
number containing a paper from Col. Ingorsoll, 
thought to be unlit for youths of tendiM' minds to 
read, is kept securely locked up. This course of 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



37 



action in regard, to the library may commend itself 
to " the powers that be," but we venture to state 
that it certainly will never be endorsed by the 
greater part of the students in whose interest the 
library ought to be run. 

We cannot understand why the cleaning of the 
college grounds must always be put off until after 
ivy day. This question comes upon us with more 
than usual force this year, for while some of the 
paths have received their usual superficial attention, 
at the time we write, the green turf around Memo- 
rial Hall is covered for some distance out with un- 
seemly rubbish. A small amount of time and labor 
would have remedied this and rendered the vicinity 
of Memorial Hall one of the most attractive places 
around the college to take our friends during the 
coming holidays. 

The new base-ball suits look well upon the men, 
and give pretty general satisfaction. The impres- 
sion, however, that jackets were to take the place 
of outside shirts, was broad-spread, and consequent- 
ly some disappointment was expressed, when the 
nine first appeared in their new attire, to see the 
upper garment out as of old. The change from 
cap to hat, and from brown to Bowdoin's color, is 
especially to be commended. As ball suits cannot 
be furnished every year, the nine will do well to 
take great care in preserving their uew ones ; the 
persons who gave money to buy them, expect to see 
no part of them worn, when the nine are not actu- 
ally engaged in playing or practicing. 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited 
to send personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Bruns- 
wick.] 

Among the gubernatorial candidates in this State 
before the next RepuWican Convention will be the 
names of Hon. W. W. Thomas, Jr., '60, of Port- 
land; Col. Frederick Eobie, '41, of Gorham; Gen. 
Thomas W. Hyde, '61, of Bath ; and Hon. T. E. 
Simouton, '53, of Camden. Mr. Simonton is also 
mentioned as representative to Congress. 

'37.— Kev. Dr. John 0. Fiske, pastor of the 
Winter Street Church in Bath, left for Germany, 
May 1.5th. On account of faihng health he will re- 
main abroad some time. 

'45.— Judge Wm. B. Snell has been appointed 



Judge of the Police Court, District of Columbia. 
Judge Snell is a native of Monmouth, Me. 

'61. — Dr. H. S. B. Smith is practicing physician 
at Middleboro, Mass. 

'62.— Rev. Edward N. Packard, of Dorches- 
ter, Mass., son of Prof. Packard, preached at the 
Congregationalist church in town, May 22d. 

'72.— Dr. F. A. Mitchell, for two years a mem- 
ber of this class, has recently removed to Bridgton, 
Me. Dr. Mitchell is a graduate of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, New York City ; was one 
of the house physicians of Bellevue Hospital, N.Y., 
a year or more, and afterwards practiced in Flor- 
ida with his uncle, an army surgeon and skillful 
physician. For the past seven years he has been 
practicing in North Fryeburg. 

'72. — Herbert M. Heath, Kennebec County Attor- 
ney, will deliver the address Memorial Day at 
Fairfield. 

'74. — H. W. Philbrook is teaching in the public 
schools at San Francisco and studying law at the 
same time. His address is 1308i Ellis Street. 

'77. — C. W. Morrill is practicing law in Portland. 

'79. — J. P. Huston, of Damariscotta, has recently 
been admitted to the Lincoln county bar. 

'80. -H. B. Wilson is book-keeper for C. M. Rice 
& Co., wholesalers in paper and twine, Portland. 

'81.— C. E. Harding was confirmed Sunday, May 
14th, at the Episcopal church in this place. 

'81. — Harry E. Snow is now at 1113 K street, 
Sacramento, Cal. 

'81. — Hitchcock and Walker will attend the 
Portland School of Medical Instruction immediate- 
ly upon the close of the present term of the medi- 
cal department of this college. 

'81. — Geo. H. Townsend, formerly of this class, 
who has been a U. S. Deputy Marshal, since that 
time, was admitted to the Cumberland bar. May 
12th. On account of ill health, Mr. Townsend has 
gone to New Hampshire to recuperate before com- 
mencing practice. 

'81. — F. E. Smith has been appointed paying 
teller in Maverick Bank, Boston. 

'81.— A. E. Whitteu, principal of Mattanawcook 
Academy, Lincoln, Me., is spending a short time in 
town. 

'81.— J. W. Wilson is with N. M. Perkins & Co., 
wholesale furniture dealers, Portland. 



This is the way a West Pointer informed his pa- 
rents that he had got the g. b. : 

My Dear Father : Fatted calf for one. 

Yours aflectionately, Geoege. 



38 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEGE WORLD. 



A book of three hundred sketches from the Har- 
vard Lampoon has just been pubhshed. 

Cornell is to have a new building, costiuR S15, - 
000, to be used for militai-y drill and gymnastic ex- 
ercise. 

At the inter-collegiate foot-ball convention held 
in New York, a short time since, four colleges were 
represented, — Columbia, Harvard, Princeton, and 
Yale. Quite important changes were made in the 
rules, the tendency being to prevent the " block 
game," and to encourage skillful running, picking, 
and dodging. 

Wc learn from the Tuftonian that " the nine 
are working with a will, and bid fair to do excel- 
lent work." The Institute of Technology retired 
under a score of 14 to 8. A strong nine from the 
Boston Law School was defeated 15 to 8. But 
Tufts was rather badly used up in the game with 
Harvard, by a score of 32 to 2. However, the uine 
played a good fielding game ; the pitching was ex- 
cellent and the catching more than equal to that 
of Harvard. Batting seemed the weak point. 

With respect to the coming regatta at Lake 
George, the Evening Neivs contains the following: 
The University of Pennsylvania has fully deter- 
mined to send a crew to the Lake George regat- 
ta this year, and the men to be sent will be chosen 
by Ellis Ward after the class races in May. On 
Lake George, the University boys will meet some 
of the best college crews in the country, and her 
only chance of winning" is in making up in skill 
what she lacks in weight. She will j)robably have 
to compete with crews from Bowdoin, Connecticut 
Wesleyan University, Columbia, Cornell, Prince- 
ton, Marietta College, and possibly the University 
of Virginia. The majority of these crews are com- 
posed of excellent matei-ial, which is being well 
trained for the regatta, and each has determined 
to make a tremendous struggle for victory. Bow- 
doin is a stranger to the University boys, and bids 
fair to be a hard stranger to handle. Her crew 
this year is considered one of the best she has ever 
sent to a regatta. Wesleyan also has a strong 
crew, as has Cornell and Marietta. If the Univer- 
sity boys this year do as well as the crew of last 
year did on Lake George, it has little to fear from 
the majority of the competitors. — College Olio. 



CLIPPINGS. 



How doth the busy editor 
Work livelong diiy luid night. 
And let his lessons go to— well, 
And read his Deutseh at sight. 

What made the Tower of Pisa lean t The great 
famine in the land. — Tablet. 

One of our Seniors is looking around I'or a pict- 
ure of Apollo with the "beveled ear." — Ex. 



Scene : Young ladies' boarding school. Prof. 
— " What can you say of Pluto*" Aliss D. — "He 
was the son of Satan, and when his father died he 
gave him Hell." — Occident. 

Fresh. (tran.slating Tacitus) — "They protracted 
their sleep till late in the day." Professor—" What 
is the objection to that?" Fresh. — " Well, really, I 
never could see any myself." — Athenaum. 

CH.tNSON. 

I lingered 'neath the chamber, 

Wherein my darling slept. 
While softly up behii'd me 

Her father's bull-dog crept ; 

I sang my bitter sorrow 

That ever we should part, — 

My pants are with the tailor, 
I'm more than sore at heart I 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



To-day we shall invite our readers to a trip 
across the continent. Never mind your baggage, 
just jump upbehindon the chariot of " Sol Oriens," as 
it passes the door of our sanctum, and we promise, 
after an all day ride, which may be rather a hungry 
one if you forgot your lunch basket, for there are 
no stops by the way of "ten minutes for refresh- 
ments," to land j'ou at the setting of the sun on the 
campus of the University of California, where the 
editors of the Occident are waiting to receive you. 
When they have recovered from the delirious joy 
occasioned by our arrival, their countenances as- 
sume a mournful aspect, and they begin the recital 
of their woes. In the first place, we are told, there 
is an utter lack of enthusiasm among the students ; 
they take no interest in anything, they have become 
thoroughly blase, they have "sucked the orange 
dry." The University is possessed of a very fine 
gymnasium, but the instructor in gymnastics has 
been discharged because there is never any cue for 
bira to instruct. Their next sorrow is "unpaid 
bills"; we weep in sympathy. But the strangest 
thing wo hear is, that the Seniors, after receiving 
their diplomas, are obliged to go around and so- 
licit the signatures of the president and each 
member of the faculty. Imagine one of our dig- 
nified Seniors, after the Commencement dinner, 
rushing about the campus in search of the Profs. 
Where, oh, where will he find them i \YhocaatelH 

In pleasing contrast to the mournful wail of the 
Occident, which, by the way, iinnotnices itself as an 
an ti- fraternity pajjcr, are the beaming countenances 
of the licrkcleiian editors, full of joy at the prosper- 
ity of their Alitia Mater. Possibly they are a trifle 
premature when thoy insist " the fact may as well 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



39 



be understood that for solid merit tlie University of 
California raiilis among tlie half-dozen institutions 
which are fairly entitled to be called the best in the 
United States." As the Berkeleyan well remarks, 
"there is such a thing as too much humility." But 
oh, how rare I However, there is cause for congrat- 
ulation; the property owned by the University is 
worth nearly $2,000,000, and their library contains 
20,000 volumes, with a fund of $4,000 a year, devot- 
ed to increasing the number. Considering that it 
is hardly more than an infant, the child is quite 
precocious. The Berkeley an' s literary department 
is good and excites our envy by its two columns of 
poetry. The " Olla-Podrida," which is devoted to 
original jokes and funny paragraphs, is something 
of a departure from the beaten track, and, thus far, 
is not wholly successful. Wit and humor are what 
we want in college papers, but when they are sought 
in poor imitations of the funny (?) paragraph of the 
local newspaper, the attempt is a reflection upon 
the originality and good taste of college students. 

At first glance the Amherst Student strikes us as 
a good, solid, substantial paper, such as every Am- 
herst man would read with interest, and read thor- 
oughly, too. But as we give it more careful atten- 
tion, we are lead to modify our opinion in some re- 
spects. Without doubt it is interesting to a major- 
ity of its readers. The editorials are well consid- 
ered and written in an easy style; the miscellaneous 
columns are up to the average; inter-collegiate and 
sporting news is in abundance ; but for a literary 
department there is absolutely nothing, unless we can 
consider as an apology for one, the sketch entitled 
" Mr. Van Dunk and His Dog," in which figures the 
well-known dog howling at the moon, the number 
eleven boot whizzing through the air, and finally 
the indispensable portion of a young man's trousers 
left behind. We do not believe in all tlie clap-trap 
talk that is made about the mission of college 
journalism, but we do think that no college 
paper that devotes the greater part of its space to 
sporting and local news, can justly lay claim to be- 
ing an exponent of college life. No wonder out- 
siders get the idea that our institutions of learning 
are only training schools for professional base-ball 
players and oarsmen. 

The Oberlin lievietv comes to us this week, with 
an account of the Inter-State Oratorical Contest, 
held at Indianapohs the first of May. There were 
contestants from Ohio, Minnesota, Iowa, Wiscon- 
sin, Illinois, and Indiana; and the judges decided 
in favor of Mr. Hanchett, of Chicago University, 
111. The writer in the Review apparently feels 



pretty sore over Ohio's defeat, for he pitches into 
the Indiana men, with whoui the convention was 
held, most unmercifully, and speaks of them in a 
manner hardly consistent with the spirit of meek- 
ness and charity that we had always supposed was 
characteristic of Oberlin. The Revieiv is certainly 
above the ordinary run of the western college pa- 
pers, and, were it a little more hberal, and a little 
less given to patting itself on the back, while look- 
ing upon the rest of the world as hopelessly aban- 
doned, it would stand well with the college papers 
of the country. 

The Collegian from C. C. N. Y. has reached the 
fourth number of its first volume, and in spite of 
the many predictions of failure, it seems to hold its 
own in the second rank of college publications. 
Strange to say, in New York, too, we find the same 
lack of college spirits and enthusiasm, as was la- 
mented by the Occident. Every enterprise ilrt 
is undertaken for the benefit of the whole college, 
fails of success, because of the violent party spi..; 
that prevents the students from uniting their eftbrfs 
for the common good. " At elections," says the 
Collegian, " and all sorts of other occasions that 
favor the display of such feeling, students are gatli- 
ered in ho.stile swarms, as Ancients and Moderns, 
Fraternity men and Independents, and whatever 
else may be the watchwords of party." Such a 
state of things is truly deplorable, and it should bo 
a matter of congi'atnlation for us, that beyond all 
society feeling there is a true college spirit that 
will ever respond to the call of " Old Bowdoin." 



BREKA 

FINE STATIONERY and ENGRAVING 
HOUSE. 

Handsomely Engraved Invitations for 

J^ Colleges, Weddings, Receptions, &c. 
Fraternity Stationery always on hand. 

Our unequaled facilities and long practical experience, enable 
lis to produce the newest styles and most artistic effects, -n' il: 
our reputation is a guarantee of tlie quality of our productions. 

1 121 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



FINEST Steel Porti'ait ever engraved is Hollyer's 

^ 1 * ^Bi 



i«^: 



The ONLY large one in line and stipple. Endorsed by inti- 
mate personal friends, M. C.'s, V. S. Senators, S. C. Judges, Jlei;.- 
bers of Cabinet, Goveriiors, as " The Best Likeness," and a 
" Perfect Work of Art." Sells quick. Gives perfect t,,::s- 
faction. Extra terms to good agents. 

THE HENKY BILL TUBLISHING CO., Norwich, Ct, 



40 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




ilDBJ 

These Goods are sold under an 

Absolute Guarantee 

That they are the Finest and PUREST 

goods upon the market; 
They ARE FREE from DRUGS and 

CHEMICALS of any kind ; 
They consist of the Finest Tobacco and 

Purest Rice-Paper made. 

OUR SALES EXCEED theproducts 

of ALL leading manufactories combined. 

None Genuine without the trade-mark 
of the BULL. Take no other. 

W.T.BLACKWELL&CO. 



Sole Manufacturers, 



Durham, N. C. 



Of cvci-y kind, to fill SiDi'ing, Sumnior, and Fall 
engagements now coming to hand. 
Oraduate.i and undergraduates of any School, 
Seminary, or College, of little or no cxperienee, or 
other persons desiring to tcarh, shoiilil not fail to 
address at once, with stamp, for application form, 

National Teachers' Agency, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 

N. B. — Situations in the H'e.s^and .S'o?<//ia specialty. 
Good pay to local agents and private correspondents. 



OmUTWM TO SMOKIBS. 

Bevare of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette; see that every wrapper has 




TRY IT. 
'7'C''^. Fine, Mild & Sweet. 



Fac simile Signature on it. No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 
KINNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 



432 Washington St., Boston, 

Invite attention to the largest and finest stock in tlie city, of 

DIAMONDS, RARE GEMS, 

EEPRE.SEXTATn'ES OE THE 

Gorham Manufacturing Company, in Boston. 

Exhiliit a large and complete collection of tlie 

SOLID SILI/ER AND ELECTRO-PLATED WARES 

PHODtrcEl) nV THIS rilMl'AXV. 

The ornamentations now used and the ctTects produced, are 
soniething entirely novel in the cratt of the Silversmith, and will 
interest cVery one by their combination of artistic and useful 
fiualities. 

ADDING TO THIS 

Especial Attention given to Designing Class-Day 
and College Invitations of Every Description. 



*» 



QUEEN & OO 

924 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 




Microscopes, 
Telescopes, 
Field Glasses, 
Opera Glasses, 
Drawing Instrtiments, 
Surveying Instruments, 
Thermometers, 

Barometers, 
Magic Lanterns, 
Apparatus for 

Projection, 
Philosophical and 
Chemical Apparatus. 

\s I <il.l,<i\\s SENT ox AI'I'LICATION: 
.ill Inslnnncnts, Mil imgos. Part 4— Oiillcttl 
ri :i— MnRlc Lanterns, 120 pages. 



ologlcal Apparatus, fio pagoa. 



ents, 1«0 pages. Part n— Motoor- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



FIME SMiMTS 

MADE FROM MEASURE, 

h PllFlCT FIT QOJIIJIITEID. 

Also a Full Assortment of 

GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 

Orders by Mail Promptly Attended To, 

NEW BBIIQ STORE. 



ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

DHUGS, MEDICIilES, 

Faflcy aEJ Toilet Articles, Ciprs I Toliacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 
153" Prescriptions Carefiillj' Compounded. 

cFo 6tftf ^'Oti/i 0i'^apS and £i^aMkS. 
JdwimfxwtiMw- o/#e Sp.'mal ^r^mid 
of "Smv-'dain Bottm^-e. ' ' Jl'U'O, dmkt 
in Mu§ iF'oku'C^o ,^hmmn^ mtd 6mofi- 
m§. cR fiiU Une q/ Smaki/n^ JliU- 
•cM of uU iM^i^iaii4. 



The Palace Clothii Store of Maine. 




:^IjXJ stohie 



ALL THE LEADING NOVELTIES IN 

¥©UMQ lilM'S CLOiTMIl© 

AND NOBBY FURNISHING GOODS. 

STRICTLY ONE PRICE. 

HyBoys'and Children's Department entirely separate. 

BLUE STORE, 

ILiEIATISTOM. IKI.A.INE:. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



OM.w.'P^^ b:^os. 



Fine Watches, Jewelry, Silver Ware, &c., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QITAIlTir, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 



PORTLAND, 
A. CARTER. 



MAINE. 
J. Vf. D. CARTER. 



SPRING AND SUMMER, 1882. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments. White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

On aiul after December 5tli, 

Passenger Trains leave Brunswick 

For Bath. 8.10 and 11.50 a.m.. 2 10, 4.40, and 6.25 P.M., 12.42 
nislit, Saturdays only. 
Kocldand, S.IO a.m., 2.10 p.m. 
rortland. 7.25, 11.48 A.M.. 4.35 P.M., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.48 A.M., 12.35 nigbt. 
Lewiston, 8.12 a.m., 2.10, 6.33 P.M., 12.40 night. 
Farmington. 2.10 p.m. 

Augusta, 8.10 A.M., 2.14. 6.35 P.M.. 12.45 night. 
Skowhegan, Bell'ast, Dexter, and Bangor, 2.14 p.m.. and 

12.45 nigbt. 
WatervillCjS.lO, 12.45 a.m., 2.14 p.m. (6.35 .Sntnrday.s). 
PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
December 5, 1881. 



@j?@lt@iF ami S@@ @ir@oiin liniDo^iuinic, 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

m^" Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 

mmonm, rmt itwtim, 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 



239 Middle Sireef, 
J. A. Merrill. 



Portland, Me. 
A. Keith. 



MAIN STREET, 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



28 Free Street, Portland, Me. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, ----- .$1.50 a Year iu Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



M.Zt 



Purchase your COAL at the 

aoa,l ~52"a.rca. in Topslia-m, 

WHERE NONK BUT 

Tbe Best of Coal is Kept, 

And i.s Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 
J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer In all kiniia of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

JO-Speoial Kates to Student CIubB.-Sir 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily- 
Papers ; Circulating' Library, 1600 Voliunes ; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

CHOICE GROCErTeS, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Students. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

780 Middle Street. - - - - Portland, Me. 



A^. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brans-wick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Vie^vs. 




For Schools and Colleges, 

EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 







^ THE FAVORITE NOS.303-404-3S2-I70-S5/- WITH 

HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




E. SMITH, Variety Store. Bottom Prices to Students. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DEALHIl IN ALL KINDS OK 

Offlce at Central Telephone Office, Brunswick. 
(Il3~ All Onk'i-s loft at C. E. Townsuiur.s Sloi-e will 
be proiniUly iittciulod to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Denier iu Sliect Music, Music Books, Musiciil luslruments, uud Musi- 
cal Mcrcliandise, of nil kinds, 

156 Ezobonge Street, Portland. 



GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

^8s and 5c?7 Congress Si., and 23 J Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

J)9-SaND I'OK I'Kicic List. 

J. H. PETERSON & SON, 

KEALURS IN 

Boots and Shoes, Tobaooo and Cigars, 
Main Street, ---.--- Brunswick, Me. 



FRi>L'NrK: E. ROBERTS 

H119 tlio LnrRcst iiiid Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets^ 

FIRST- CLA.SS 

FianoSj Organs,, and, Mekdeons, 

AT LOW PIUCKS. LAUUK IIUNTINO STOCK. 




COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Hicycli' ridiiip; is nnsurpMssi'd iis 11 
liU'M[Oil(>ri,i-avclins.wh.'llM'i- lor Sliced, 
sport. Of i-clicwal nf IumIiIi. 'I'lie ]ir:u'- 
ticiibilily of tin; niae.luiio Ikis hi'oii 
thoroughly tested, iiiul siitisfaolorily 
proved, beyond question. Thousands 
lire In daily use, and the nuinher is 
rapidly liuMcasin^'. The exercise is 
rocoinnieiuleil liy llieiiu'dieiil iirolession 
as most henelieial to heiillh. liriiij;inK 
inio exercise almost every nuisele of 
tlie body. 

Send .Sc. 8t«mp for .')l! -paKO Illustrated 
CMtaloKiiocontJifnlng prteo lists and full 
liiturmalliin. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washington Sl„ BOSTON, MASS. 



w. 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

L. WILSON & 

Wholesale and Itelail Dciilcrs in 



CO., 



TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & 744 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 




The Si.\ty-Se 
oal School of Mai 



1 Annual Course of Lectures attheMedt- 
:. will commence Fkukuauy 8th, 1888, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— JosnnA L. CnAMBERLAis, LL.D , President ; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., l*atholr>gy and Practice ; Alkrkd Mitcui:i.l, M.D.,0bstctrie3 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frkdebic H. Oerrish, M.D., 
Anatomy, Charles W. Goddard, A.M., MediciilJurisprudence ; Rbhrt 
CAiiMlcuAKi., Ph.D., Chemistry ; Bdrt Q. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen II. Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles O. 
Hunt, M. D., Materia Mcdica and Therapeutics ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.B., 
Registrar and Librarian; Irving Kimball, M.l), Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtjihied on application to 
the Rogistnu', D. F. KLLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITOIIELL, M.D., Secrttary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



O^'Wittches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
pttirod aiul warrtinted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STRKETS, BRUNSWICK, MK. 



JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book Work to Order. 



KNIGHT, 



W. B. 

Special Bates to Student Clubs. 

jUa-Transicnt Orders for Milk or Cream tilled liy giving suitalilc notice. 

Residence, School Street. 

Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS. STATIONERY. ROOM 
PAPER. PE:RI013ICAI.S. <ScC. 



A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, |] Fancy Goods. 

Also l'!a,sterii Mutual Union Telegraph Office. 
Under Town Clook, - - - BrunNwiok, Me. 







'i0DiM^iJ^-.^jM:2i^^^^ 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



QM^m'SMM mmom. 



m% 



Fine Watches, Jewelry, Silver Ware, &c., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QUAUXr, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 



PORTLAND, 
• A. CARTER. 



MAINE. 
J. W. D. CARTER. 



SPRING AND SUMMER, 1882. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at alftimes be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cliffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, AVhite 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

On and after December 5th, 

Passenger Trains leave Brunswick 

For Bath. 8.10 and ll..iO a.m.. 2 10, 4.40, and 6.25 p.m., 12.42 
■ ni^t, Saturdays only. 
Rockland, 8.10 a.m., 2.10 P.M. 
Portland, 7.25, 11.4S a.m.. 4.35 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.48 A.M., 12.35 night. 
Lewiston, 8.12 a.m., 2.10, 6.33 P.M., 12.40 night. 
Farmington, 2.10 p.m. 

Augusta, 8.10 A.M., 2.14, 6.35 P.M.. 12.45 niglit. 
Skowhegan, Belfast, Dexter, and Bangor, 2.14 p.m.. and 

12.45 night. 
Watervillc,8.10, 12.45 a.m., 2.14 p.m. (6.35 Saturdays). 
PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
December 5, 1881. 



Main St., under Town Clock. 

Ipg- Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street, - - - Portland. Me. 



MAIN STREET, 

DUN LAP BLOCK. 



28 Free Street, Portland. Me. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 
Terms, ----- $1.50 ii Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



At* 



Purchase your CO.VL at the 

Ooal "STard. in. Topsliam, 

; WIIKUE NONK HUT 

I The Best of Coal is Kept, 

1 And is Dolivcrcd well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 



J. A. Merrill. 



A. Keith. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

l>,'akT in all kinds ,.r 

Fresh., axxd Salt 1*1, ©a, -bs. 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

flSj-Speoial Hates to Student Clubs.?* 



Vol. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 14, 1882. 



No. 4. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argancl Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "iVIoehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

Books, Stationerj, aod Paper Hangings, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

FRANK M. STETSON, 



<^^^^>i- 




■^5j(,LYZ5.\*' 



DEANE BROTHERS & SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Olass and Medium Furniture, 

I^° Lowest Prices in the State, 

755 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 



VISITORS TO PORTLAND, 

Independent of any intention of pur- 
chasing goods in our line, are invited to 
inspect the Model Clothing and Fur- 
nishing Store of Allen & Co., 470 Con- 
gress St., opp. Preble House, 

LANCASTER BUILDING. 



SPECIAL A^GEISTT. 

I^Dunlap & Co., of New York, Celebrated 
Stiff Hats. 

Also his New Straw Mackinaw, $2.00 and 
$2.50. 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGEAVED IH THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



474 Congress St., - 



opp. Preble House 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^neid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby thoir pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Priucipal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
ondorseinent of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will bo fur- 
nished a list of topics on which ho will bo requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination liold for tlio purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as ho may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will theu pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a "liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

KEQUIEED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (halQ, average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lesson the cost of living. 

Further information on application to tho Presi- 
dent. 



Vol XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 14, 1882. 



No. 4. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PnBLlSHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURrNG THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Robert C. "Washburn, '83, Managing Editor. 

N". Brooks K. PETTisorLL, '83, Business Editor. 
Herbert E. Cole, '83. Charles H. Stetson, '83. 

Howard R. Goodwin, '83. Llewellyn Barton, '84. 
Herbert K Kendall, '83. Oliver W. Means, '84. 
Arthur J. Russell, '83. Charles E. Saywabd, '84. 

Terms — S2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Offlce at Brunswiclj as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Lewlston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Tol. XII., No. 4.— June 14, 1882. 

Editorial Notes 41 

Ivy Poem — The Maid and the Genii 43 

Ivy Day 45 

Boat Race 46 

Field Day 47 

Base-Ball 48 

College Items 49 

Last Summer (poem) 52 

Personal ,'52 

College World 53 

Clipping.s 53 

Editors' Table 54 



The Ivy Day of '83 is a thing of the past. 
It has come and gone, leaving in the minds of 
the members of the class that observed it 
only the pleasantest recollections. The beau- 
tiful day, the large and select attendance, 
together with the perfectly successful filling 
of the program, must have -given satisfac- 
tion to all who were present. Particularly 
to the class under whose auspices the exer- 
cises were held will the remembrance of the 



day be lasting. The bonds of brotherly regard 
existing between thatclassorbetween anyclass, 
can but be strengthened and rendered firm by 
any such impressive ceremonies as the planting 
of the ivy. It is one of those occasions when 
a class with a common feeling commemorates 
the advancement made in the course, and 
leaves a suitable mark of the friendship then 
existing, and which is destined to exist 
through life. It has been only a compara- 
tively few years since the custom of planting 
the ivy was instituted; but it has yearly 
gained in popularity, till now the day set 
apart for it is one of tlie most interesting of 
the year. The exercises, while not yielding 
too strictly to sentiment, are in harmony with 
the respect entertained for the day, and have 
always proved entertaining. Those of last 
week were considered especially so by those 
who attended. 



The participants in the Junior and Soph- 
omore exJiibitions have been selected, and now 
all the oratorical powers of those happy indi- 
viduals will be brought into play and exerted 
until the day arrives for the presentation of 
the declamations. Probably, as is the custom, 
a professor of elocution will be present here 
in due season for the purpose of giving 
instruction. We have heard nothing to the 
contrary, and certainly there is need of such 
instruction if exercises of any merit are to be 
expected. In this connection, we do not 
think it out of place to allude to the present 
state of affairs in college as regards instruction 
in elocution and declamation. It is needless 
to dwell on the importance of training in 
these branches. The advantage derived from 
such instruction, and even the necessity of it 



42 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



are apparent to all. It is something which is 
supposed to claim no little attention in every 
institution of learning. In our own case we 
believe it has been sadly neglected, and. that 
those acquirements which are to be looked for 
in the college student will, in many cases, here 
be found wanting. We cannot give the 
reasons for this lack of compulsory 
practice in waiting, nor do we know to whom 
to attribute the causes for it. It is surely a 
question that calls for immediate attention on 
the part of the Faculty , and we are led to believe 
that due consideration will be given it. 
These spasmodic attempts to become an ora- 
tor within two or three weeks cannot result 
in any great profit to those making them, and 
they should not be disappointed if they fail 
to create the impression that is expected from 
a student who is thought to attain great pro- 
ficiency in speaking while in college- It is 
only continued practice through two, three, 
or even four years in the course that will 
work marked results, and enable one to 
declaim with ease and good effect generally. 



however, was the result of faithful practice, 
and betokened a creditable lecord in the fut- 
ure if the organization should see fit to keep 
on in its work. Nothing could be more pleas- 
ing to the students than to have these sum- 
mer evenings enlivened by a band concert. 
The Bowdoin Band has shown its ability to 
gratify such desires, and if it is well supported, 
as it should be, there is no reason why such a 
plan cannot be carried out. 



On Wednesday of last week the Bow- 
doin Band made its first appearance in pub- 
lic and rendered some fine selections from its 
repertory. Everybody was agreeably sur- 
prised. The band from the first has labored 
under difficulties. It has maintained its ex- 
istence only in the face of opposition and op- 
pression. Its labors have been treated to 
some extent with ridicule. It has received 
no support at all from outside parties, but has 
struggled on, and, as it has recently siiown, 
to good purpose. The music which was 
given, while not free from some defects in 
tone or execution, was such as called for 
praise from nearly all who listened to it. It 
could not be expected that a band of new 
musicians, some of whom were playing on 
brass for the first time in public, should dis- 
course strains of classical music in a perfectly 
correct and finished style. What was given. 



The casts from the antique, recently 
received by the college, have been mounted 
and arranged so that the collection now has 
become quite extensive. The north wing of 
the chapel has undergone some repairing and 
painting, so that the casts may be seen to 
good advantage. The last additions were 
from some of the finest ancient pieces of 
statuar}', and are among the most noticeable 
and striking of any in the collection. At the 
present rate of progress our collection is des- 
tined to assume large proportions, so that we 
may anticipate unusual facilities for studying 
the artistic beauty and refinement of antique 
sculpture. It is certainly a study in wiiich 
no little interest is taken at the present, and 
it is fortunate for one that he has opportu- 
nity for following it out, if his mind is in- 
clined in that direction. The north wing, 
with its casts and array of fine paintings that 
adorn the walls, will now, we predict, be one 
of the favorite resorts for passing a pleasant 
hour. 



We have not as yet learned whether the 
Sophomore class has taken any action to the 
effect of holding the exercises of burial of 
analytics, but we are in hopes that they may 
soon, if they have not already, and decide to 
again carry out the custom which for the last 
two years has been allowed to fall from grace. 
It cannot be considered to the credit of the 
two upper clas.ses that they omitted the exer- 
cises, whatever might have been the circum- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



43 



stances that led them so to act. Anything of 
that nature must have an appreciable effect 
upon the unity of class feeling. It matters 
not just what the custom may be, or what the 
nature of the exercises are. Any project 
which the whole class carries out, or any 
action in which the class as a whole engages, 
is always, in after years, looked back upon 
with pleasure. The following out of the cus- 
tom has as a result not only the binding 
together of the members of the class by 
stronger ties while in college, but also the 
perpetuation of class regard and interest 
years after graduation. Because two classes 
before have not manifested enough interest 
to appropriately celebrate the completion of 
work in mathematics, that is no reason why 
the present Sophomores should be influenced. 
The occasion we refer, to has always been an 
enjoyable one, and, for our part, we hope it 
may be observed this year. 



IVY POEM.— THE MAID AND THE GENII. 

BY B. F. HOLDEN. 

In Persia's distant land, 'tis said, 
There dwelt long years ago, a maid 
Graceful in form, in features fair. 
With starry eyes and raven liair ; 
In each particular, so great 
The beauty that did on her wait. 
To all who saw her well it seemed 
She scarcely could be mortal deemed. 
The music of her sweet voice rang 
So rich and full wliene'er she sang. 
It seemed like heavenly music clear 
Filling with joy each listening ear ; 
And when upon the harp she played, 
Such melody her fingers made 
As great Apollo drew of old 
• From his lyre of shining gold. 
Although so fair in form and face 
And well endowed with every grace 
To please the eye or win the heart, 
The maiden chose to dwell apart 
In solitude ; when suitors came 
Drawn by her beauty's wide-spread fame 
No passion in her bosom burned, 
But she to all a deaf ear turned, 
This maiden's fame so much surpassed 
That of all others, that 'tis said 
'Twas told at last in Eden's bowers 
By spirits of the blessed dead ; 



Her beauty and her virtue were 

By all that e'er had seen her face 

Described as worthy well to have 

Admission to that happy place. 

With darkening brow, the houris heard 

These praises of a mortal maid ; 

And then in sullen tone and low 

They thus to one another said : 

" From this blest place let some one speed 

To earth below and bring back word 

Whether this earth-born maid hath grace 

So great as lately we have heard." 

On speedy wing two genii 

Hasted to heaven's golden gate 

And bade the porter open wide 

The ponderous doors ; he made them wait 

And gave this caution : " Dare not speak 

To mortal ear the sacred name 

That here must ever be pronounced 

Before I sheath my sword of flame. 

Should ye to mortal e'er reveal 

That holy name, from out your mind 

The word will in a moment fade 

And leave no single trace behind. 

So ye can not reenter here 

But upon earth ye must remain, 

For possible it will not be 

E'er to recall the word again." 

Then wide the massive portals swung : 

One backward glance the genii flung, 

Then swift as falls from heaven afar 

Through the thin air, a wandering star, 

Downward they sped on wings of snow 

To distant earth so far below. 

There, in rich merchants' garb arrayed, 

Quickly they sought the beauteous maid 

The praises of whose name were sung 

By earthly and by heavenly tongue. 

When they the maiden fair had found 

They humbly bowed them to the ground 

And said : " From Cathay's land we came 

Drawn by the power of thy fame." 

She bade them to her father's home 

For rest and entertainment come ; 

Supplied their needs with wiUing hand 

As the great prophet gave command. 

Here then the genii tarried long 

Charmed by the music of her song ; 

And felt more strongly every hour 

The magic of her beauty's power. 

At last they could no longer wait. 

But full resolved to know their fate 

They to the damsel said one day : 

" We did not come from far Cathay; 

More distant still, in Paradise 

Our dwelling is ; e'en there our eyes 

Have never seen form so divine 

Nor features beautiful as thine. 

We know the virtues of thy heart, 

That pure as beautiful, thou art ; 

Therefore we choose thy love to gain 

And with thee here on earth remain, 

Rather than with the blest above 

To dwell, and lose fore'er thy love ; 

So choose between us." Then 'tis said 



44 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Strange wonder filled the listeninn; maid, 
And kept her dumb ; at length she broke 
The spell's strong power, and thus she spoke : 

" Fools your home to leave 

Here on earth to rest, 

Evermore shut out 

From pleasures of the blest ! 

But if your words are true 

And me ye truly love. 

Sure I may entrance gain 

To Paradise above. 

Since ou snowy vfing 

From Paradise ye came. 

Ye surely know the word 

The ever-blessed name 

At sound of which the doors 

Of gold are opened wide ; 

And he who tells it me 

May claim me as his bride." 
Both instantly pronounced the name 
That opes the gates of Paradise ; 
The maiden heard it ; quickly then 
She vanished from their wondering eyes. 
To heaven was she borne aloft, 
And there, by Allah's high command, 
They placed upon her snowy brow 
The morning star, and in her hand 
A golden lyre ; evermore 
She leads the music of the spheres, 
The dances of the glittering stars, 
As swiftly speed the flying years. 
The genii strove from earth" to rise. 
But now they found they had forgot 
The word that gave them power of flight, 
And they were fastened to the spot. 
Their wakened mem'ry now recalled 
To them, when 'twas alas ! too late, 
The warning that they had received 
Before they left the golden gate. 
To earth they bowed, their sin confessed. 
And prayed to Allah that he would 
Upon them lay as punishment 
Whatever unto him seemed good. 
And Allah in his grace did grant 
The guilty angels, option free 
To expiate their grievous fault 
In time or in clernUy. 
They chose the punishment in time ; 
Then mighty Allah sternly gave 
Command to shut them far within 
The black depths of a gloomy cave. 
So there, in darkness, damp and drear. 
With sorrow and remorse they wait 
Until the end of time shall break 
The seal upon their prison gate. 
Then may tiicy once more rise again 
And soar to roach their native skies, 
And dwell forever with the blest 
'Mid blissful scenes of Paradise. 

Let us from this siinplo story 
Draw a le.'sson that shall serve 
E'er to load us back to duty 
When we fi'oin the. pathway swerve. 

As amid eternal pleasures 



Dwelt the genii of our tale. 
So the scholar e'er possesses 
Joys that nevermore shall fail. 

As the praise of earthly maiden 
Was in Eden's bowers heard, 
So the breast of many a scholar 
Has \>y pleasure's call been stirred. 

Then impelled by some mad passion. 
Seeking joy in things of earth, 
He forgets his nobler mission 
And the things of greater worth. 

He pursues the glittering bauble 
Which before him ever flies ; 
Never can he quite o'ertake It 
Hovering just before his eyes. 

Maddened more by baffled longings, 
More and more he turns his back 
On those high and noble pleasures 
That the wise need never lack. 

When he thinks by one concession 
He at last his end shall gain, 
Lo ! the bubble fades before hira, 
There is left him naught but pain. 

Then he sees his fatal error. 
Then repents he of his sin. 
Longing, praying, to recover 
Quietness and peace within. 

Happy he, if, by repentance 
He escape the vengeance due 
To his weak and foolish choosing 
False delights instead of true. 

Yet, if he be strong and earnest, 
He may break the heavy chain 
That so long has held him captive, 
And be counted free again. 

As wo now shall plant our ivy. 
May this lesson teach our hearts 
To resolve that we will ever 
Strive to act aright, our parts. 

Long as this fair vine shall flourish 
Warmed by sunshine, wot by showers, 
May it waken in our bosoms 
Mcm'rics of to-day's glad hours. 

When we go hence to our life-work. 
And our places others till. 
May this vine here at old Bowdoin 
Keep alive oiu' raom'ry still. 

When, in after years, some nieniliors 
Of the class back hither couio. 
This vine shall within them wakon 
Thoughts of voices that are dumb. 

Thoughts of those who from our number 
Shall, as yiNirs go flying by, 
]?c calltMl hence by Death's swift nu^ssage 
To a. better home on high. 

If we then from this occasion 
Draw the lessons that wo may. 
Surely it will not bo fruitless 
That we have our Ivy Day. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



45 



IVY DAY. 

The Ivy Day of the class of '83, Friday, 
June 2d, has come and gone, and is now 
written on the page of hi.story. Looking 
back over its occurrences, we think the class 
may fairly congratulate themselves upon its 
success. The weather, after the storm of the 
day previous, was clear and bright, making 
all rejoice that the spring sunshine had come 
again to welcome our Ivy Day. As the class, 
headed by its Marshal, G. B. Swan, entered 
the chapel a few minutes after three o'clock 
P.M., the array of mingled beauty and talent 
which greeted the eyes of its members was 
more than sufficient to stimulate each and 
ever}' man to show himself worthy of such an 
audience. The altar was covered with white, 
the college color, and simply but taste- 
fully decorated with " B. C, '83," worked in 
flowers upon the front, while the seats were 
draped with the class color. After the class 
had taken their positions in the Senior seats, 
the President, R. C. Washburn, in short but 
peculiarly appropriate remarks, opened the 
exercises, which were then continued accord- 
ing to the program following: 
Prayer, B. Sewall. 

MUSIC. 

Oration, W. A. Perkins. 

MUSIC. 

Poem, E. F. Holden. 

MUSIC. 

At the beginning of his oration the orator 
announced that he had seen fit to depart from 
the usual custom of choosing a subject bear- 
ing upon the educational problem, and would 
speak of the " Value of Monuments " as a 
topic forcibly suggested by the exercises of 
the day. He spoke of the difficulty of draw- 
ing a sharp distinction between monuments 
and the records of books ; yet each has its 
own peculiar province. The distinctive 
power of monuments is their power of remind- 
ing — of noble deeds, of noble examples, of 
noble characters. Their silent influence is 
always underrated, ofttimes wholly unrecog- 



nized. Though the abuse of monuments may 
have partly robbed them of significance, yet 
in this they are not inferior to other means 
with like object. But " time has its re- 
venges " ; hence monuments are valuable to 
a nation in bringing to future notice patriots 
whose virtues are not appreciated in their 
own age. Their value depends upon the 
value of that which they commemorate. 
They cannot create ; they can only preserve ; 
hence useless to those who try to pervert 
them. In the light of such conclusions they 
must always possess a peculiar value. Our 
ivy, then, will be valuable to us as a monument 
according to the pleasure and value of the 
memories which it recalls, and it should be 
our duty and privilege to make that value 
ever steadily increase. 

The oration from beginning to end was 
replete with thought and cogent in expression, 
serving to impress upon the class that the 
planting of their ivy should not and would 
not be without its future influence. Of the 
poem, nothing higher can be said than has 
been repeated again and again by those who 
listened to its flowing lines. It speaks for 
itself better than we can speak for it, and we 
recommend for it a careful perusal, as it 
appears in another column. The music by 
Grimmer's Orchestra was of its usual artistic 
character, and served much to render the exer- 
cises enjoyable. At the conclusion of this 
part of the exercises, the class led the way to 
the north side of the chapel where, reclining 
at ease upon the sward, they listened to the 
presentation of the honors to the several 
recipients among their number, as follows : 

Best Moustache, P- M. Fling. 

Lazy Man, A. E. Austin. 

Handsome Man, W. J. Collins. 

Dig, C. H. Stetson. 

Ponyist, J- W. Knapp. 

Popular Man, N. B. K. Pettingill. 

Mr. Washburn was exceptionally happy 
in his many jokes and timely hits, and the 
class may well congratulate themselves that 



46 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



the difficult duties of President were in such 
able hands. The recipients were so well 
suited to the honors given that it was an 
easy matter for them to wax eloquent in 
appreciation of their positions, and the class 
were, in many cases, the suiferers from their 
sallies of wit. The trowel was then presented 
to the Curator, R. Linscott, who earnestly 
professed his determination to perform his 
duties in the most approved manner. He 
then proceeded to plant the ivy of '83, each 
of the class in turn assisting in the use of the 
trowel, and almost burying the poor vine in 
their zeal to do their part. The class then 
gathered around the shrine and closed the 
exercises by singing the following : 

IVY ODE. 

BY J. A. CROWLEY. 

Dear classmates, as we gather here 

Our ivy vine to plant, 
Come let us raise our voices clear 

A tuneful lay to chant. 

We are a happy, joyous band ; 

We rest from care and toil 
To trust this life in Nature's hand, 

To her rich, fertile soil. 

Entwine your branches far and veide 

Upon our chapel wall. 
And when life's tempests dark betide, 

Our ivy we'll recall. 

O Friendship! twine within each breast 
Tour blossoms pure and sweet. 

Never to fade till we shall rest 
In death's unknown retreat. 

As the last notes died away the class 
separated, not yet realizing that what they 
had anticipated so long, one of the mile-stones 
of their course liad at length, come to pass : 
'83 has had its Ivy Day. 

The hop in the evening at Lemont Hall 
was a most enjoyable affair. The canvas 
covering upon the floor made it as good as 
the best and tlie dancers, thougli few in num- 
ber, seemed fully to appreciate the change 
from its ordinary condition. It was declared, 
without hesitation, by all those present to be 
the " best of tiie season." 



BOAT RACE. 

On Fi-iday morning, June 2d, there took 
place on the Androscoggin one of the most 
exciting and hotly contested races ever pulled 
under the auspices of the Bowdoin Boating 
Association. A day more fitted for such an 
event could not have been asked for. Hardly 
a breath of wind disturbed the surface of the 
water, and the large number of people lining 
the banks for some distance suffered no annoy- 
ance from cold. The race was over the 
usual course, commencing at the railroad 
bridge, making the circuit of Cow Island, 
and ending at the bridge, a distance of three 
miles, and was between the class crews of '83 
and '84. A reason before stated, the with- 
drawal of three men from their boat to fill 
positions in the college crew, kept the Sen- 
iors from being represented in the race, while 
the sickness of their stroke-oarsman, at the last 
moment, furnished the Freshmen an equally 
strong cause for staying out. 

The Sophomores were first upon the 
water, and, as they pulled awa}- to their chosen 
position on the Brunswick side where the cur- 
rent was comparatively weak, they presented 
a fine appearance; their broad shoulders and 
prominent muscles showing at an advantage 
as they slid away, inspired confidence in the 
minds of their backers. They wore dark 
trunks, white hose, and class color handker- 
chiefs. The Juniors soon followed and took 
position toward the Topsham shore. Tiiey, 
too, showed up finel}' in their new boating 
suits furnished by their class, consisting of 
maroon handkerchiefs, sleeveless shii'ts with 
'8:5 in red upon the breasts, red trunks and 
stockings. 

The word "go" was given about 10.30, and 
the Sophomores, gettingthe better start, quick- 
ly made good their advantage. Their oars, 
striking the water at the rate of nearly forty- 
four strokes per minute, placed them at the 
end of tlie first half mile a full boat length in 
advance. '83 commenced with hardly any 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



47 



dash, and, taking a long, swinging stroke, 
seemed to scarcely heed the fact that '84 was 
quite rapidly gaining. At the foot of the 
island, however, where the turn must be 
made, the Sophomores had decreased their 
rate of pulling, and '83 had crept up to within 
half a boat length of them; but the Sopho- 
mores, having the inside water at this point, 
found themselves, when the bows were fairly 
pointed toward home, nearly two lengths 
ahead. Great strength and bottom was now 
necessary to drive the heavy barges forward 
against the swift current, and '84 began to 
show the result of expending too much wind 
and muscle at first bj^ slowly losing the 
lead. At a distance of three-quarters of a 
mile from the bridge the boats were abreast, 
and soon after the Juniors took the lead to 
hold it until the close. The Sophomores 
struggled bravely to regain their lost ground, 
and succeeded in the last quarter of a mile 
in getting a few feet nearer the leading boat. 
But their final spurt came too late to avail. 
The Juniors went under the bridge with a 
time of twenty-one minutes and forty sec- 
onds, the Sophomores coming in twelve sec- 
onds after. The time, although far inferior 
to the best record, is nevertheless considered 
to be good, taking into account the turn that 
had to be made, and the rapidity of the cur- 
rent, which was much greater than it has been 
on any similar occasion heretofore. The '83 
men are justly gratified with the race they 
pulled, and certainly '84's crew should not feel 
discouraged. They pulled a stubborn race, 
and that, too, under some disadvantages. It 
is deeply to be regretted that the Freshman 
crew was unable to participate. The time 
that this crew has made in practice pulls 
warrants us in stating that, had it entered, it 
would have done itself and the class credit. 
'85 ought to keep up work and to take pre- 
cautions hereafter against such an occurrence 
as that which caused the struggle to be be- 
tween two crews only. 



The referee was Prof. F. C. Robinson ; the 
time-keeper, F. A. Fisher; starter for the 
Juniors, F. M. Fling ; for the Sophomores, 

D. C. Clark; judges on the island, J. B. 
Reed, '83, and C. W. Longren, '84. In the 
chapel, at 1.30 p.m.. Commodore Plimpton, 
with appropriate remarks, delivered to Capt. 
Chase the college cup, which will wear maroon 
for a year to come, and gave to each of the 
winning crew a cup in behalf of the Bowdoin 
Boating Association. 

We give the names of the winning crew: 

E. W. Chase, Portland; A. E. Austin, Au- 
gusta; W. C. Winter, Bethel; H. A. Bas- 
com, Portland ; coxswain, H. R. Goodwin, 
Augusta. 



FIELD DAY. 

The spring meeting of the Athletic Asso- 
ciation was held on Wednesday afternoon, 
June 7th, at the Topsham Fair Grounds. 
The weather was favorable for the exercises, 
but there was not a large attendance at 
the grounds, owing to the postponement 
of the exercises from June 2d. The college 
band was present in full numbers, and 
discoursed some of their finest airs during 
the afternoon. The number of carriages 
within the inclosure was far below that of 
previous years. In fact, the interest shown in 
the exercises of the day was not such as has 
been seen on previous occasions of a like nat- 
ure. The program was fully carried out, 
however, and proved entertaining to all. 
The records, as a general thing, were better 
than those made last year, some of the con- 
tests proving very exciting, from the fact 
that the competitors were very evenly 
matched. Below we give the winners with 
records for this year and last : 

1. Mile Run— Kemp, '84, 5 minutes 31 seconds; 

last year, 5 minutes 27 seconds. 

2. Standing High Jump— C. C. Torrey, '84, 4.3 

feet ; last year, 4.2 feet. 



48 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 



a Hop, Skip, and Jump— Walker, '84, 36.21 feet ; 
last year, 35.6 feet. 

4. Sack Eace ; 50 yards aud return— Kemp, '84, 

26J seconds. 

5. Putting Shot ; 36 pounds— Collins, '83, 20 feet ; 

last year, 19 feet. 

6. Eunning Broad Jump— Pettingill, '83, 16 feet ; 

last year, 15. 4i feet. 

7. 100- Yards Dash ; 3 heats -Thompson, '84, lU 

seconds; last year, lOi seconds. 

8. Throwing Base-Ball— Cook, '85, 295.4 feet; 

last year, 311.8 feet. 

9. Throwing Hammer— Winter, '83, 64.9i feet; 

last year, 52.3 feet. 

10. Wheelbarrow Eace ; 100 yards— Pettingill, '83, 

131 seconds. 

11. Hurdle Race— Kemp, '84, 131 seconds; last 

year, 15i seconds. 

12. 220-Yards Dash— Thompson, '84, 261 seconds ; 

last year, 27J seconds. 

13. Standing Broad Jump— Goodwin, '82, 10.6 

feet ; last year, 1 1 feet. 

14. Half-Mile Eun— Kemp, '84; 2 minutes 221 

seconds; last year 2 minutes 18 seconds. 

15. TLiree- Legged Eace; 100 yards -Phinney and 

C. Torrey, '84, 13| seconds; last year 14 sec. 

16. Potato Eace — Bascom, '83. 

17. Bicycle Eace ; 1 mile — Sewall, '83, 4 minutes 

511 seconds. 

18. Consolation Race ; i mile run — Stetson, '83, 

1 minute 4i seconds. 

19. Tug-of-War— Class of '83. 



BASE-BALL. 

Colbys, 17 ; Bowdoins, 3. 
The second game between the Bowdoins 
and Colbys was played Wednesday, May 
31st. It was a one-sided exhibition, our nine 
not showing off so well as was expected. 
During tlie fifth innings the}' went to pieces, 
and several runs on errors were scored. The 
batting of the Bowdoins was an improvement 
over that of the first game, but sliould be 
bettered in the tiiird match. Appended is 
the score. 

BOWDOINS. 

A.Ii. R. iB. T. B. 1>.0. A. K. 

Stetson. 3b 4 1110 1 

Wright, p 4 I I 1 :t 1) 

Kuapp, 4 1 I 1 ;i :i :i 

Waterman, l.f. aud s.s 4 1 I 1 1 i! i> 

Cook, s.s. uua l.f 4 (I 14 

Barton, c.f. 4 1 

Packard, lb 4 (i (I U) ii i 

Torrey, 2b 4 2 li :i 

Collins, r.f 4 1 1 1 I (I 

Totals, 30 3 5 5 27 18 1.^ 



COLBYS. 
A.B. R. iB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Doe, c 6 1 1 1 7 1 

Andrews, c.f 6 2 3 5 

Wrifiht, l.f 6 12 2 3 2 

Ryder, lb 6 3 1 1 9 

Garland, 3b 6 2 112 13 

Emerson, r.f 6 3 1 J 2 1 

Woodcock, s.s 5 2 14 2 

Barton, p 6 12 2 17 

Bosworth, 2b 5 2 2-2 2 2 1 

Totals, 52 17 13 15 27 15 9 

123456789 

Bowdoins 00000 2 010—3 

Colbys 2 3 5 2 2 3 0—17 

First base on errors — Bowdoins, 7; Colbys, 13. 
Earned runs — Colbys, 2. Strnck ont — Colbys, 6; Bow- 
doins, 4. First base on called balls — Colbvs, 1 ; Bowdoins, 
1. Passed balls— Knapp, 6. Balls called— on Wright, 
63; on Barton, 59. Strikes called—off Wright, 8; off 
Barton, 4. Time of game— 1 hour 43 minutes. Umpire — 
H. S. Payson, Portland. 

Bowdoins, 12; Tufts, 7. 

The Tufts came down from Massachusetts 
Wednesday, May 31st, but owing to bad 
weather were unable to play till Friday morn- 
ing, June 2d. They are a fine appearing set 
of young fellows, and impressed us all by 
their gentlemanly conduct. The game was 
not so interesting as it might iiave been, our 
men gaining the lead from the start, and 
holding it to the close. The best playing was 
done by Knapp, Wright, and G. R. Howe. 
Ten of the Tufts struck out, while nine of 
the Bowdoins failed to hit the ball when they 
should have done it. Following is the score: 

BOWnOINS. 

A.B. R. 1b. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Stetson, 3b 6 2 2 2 

Wright, p 4 4 1 1 13 

Knapp, 5 1 3 4 12 3 

Waterman, s.s 4 13 

Cook, U 5 2 

Barton, c.f 5 11 

Packard, lb 4 118 10 

Torrey, 2b 4 2 2 2 2 12 

Collins, r.f 4 3 112 1 

Totals 41 12 8 9 27 23 7 

TUFTS. 
A.B. R. 1b. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

F. H. Howe, r.f 5 

Perry, s.s 5 2 1 1 3 

Cro.sby, 3b 5 2 3 4 2 2 1 

Snow, p 4 2 12 12 2 

Currier, l.f 4 2 2 

Eddy, c.f 4 (1 10 1 

G. K. Howe, lb 4 9 

Day, 4 1 1 U 2 

Farrell, 2b 4 11112 2 

Totals 39 7 9 11 24 18 9 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



49 



123456789 

BowdoiDS 2 14 3 2 0—12 

Tufts 0022030 0—7 

Three-ba?e hit— Crosby. Two-base hits — Snow, 
Crosby, Kiiapp. Earned vuus — Tufts, ]. First base on 
errors — Bowdoins, ]3; Tufts, 6. Struck ont — Bowdoins, 
9; Tufts, JO. First base on called balls — Bowdoins, 6. 
Balls called- on "Wright, 70; on Snow, 12. Strikes 
off called— Wright, 14; off Snow, 24. Passed balls— 
Knapp, 1; Day, 6. Time of game — 1 hour 35 minutes. 
Umpire — J. W. Wilson, Portland. 

Bowdoins, 7; Tufts, 5. 

The Bowdoins met the Tufts for the sec- 
ond time on the delta Monday morning, and 
the best game of the season was played. It 
was an exciting contest throughout, especi- 
ally so up to the sixth innings. The score is 
given below: 

BOWDOINS. 

A.B. R. iB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Stetson, 3b 5 12 2 2 2 

Wright, p 4 3 7 

Knapp, 5 115 3 

Waterman, s.s 4 1 12 10 

Cook, l.f 4 10 

Barton, c.f 3 2 1110 

Packard, lb 4 2 1 1 12 1 

Torrey, 2b 3 1113 2 1 

Collius, r.f 4 10 1 

Totals 36 7 7 7 27 15 5 

TUFTS. 
A.B. E. IB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

P. H. Howe, r.f 5 1 1 1 

Perry, c 5 2 

Crosby, 3b 5 2 2 2 2 2 

Suow,p 5 113 4 3 

Currier, l.f. 4 2 

Eddy, c.f 4 110 

Day, s.s 4 4 2 

Parrel), 2b 4 3 3 4 3 10 

G. R. Howe, lb 4 1 2 3 13 

Totals 40 5 10 12 "23 11 9 

* Man out, struck by batted ball. 

123456789 

Bowdoins 02001310 0—7 

Tufts 001030010—5 

Two-base hits — Parrell and Howe. Earned runs — 
Tufts. First base on en-ors — Bowdoins, 8; Tufts, 4. 
Struck out— Tufts, 3. Balls called— on Wright, 41; on 
Snow, 83. Strikes called— off Wright, 5; off Snow, 7. 
Left on bases — Bowdoins, 7 ; Tufts, 7. Passed balls — 
Perry, 4. Wild pitches — Snow, 4. First base on called 
balls — Bowdoins, 3. Time of game — 1 hour 45 minutes. 
Umpire, A. H. Perry, Brunswick. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



Scene at the station : Prof, (who happened to 
be passing, to college bell-ringer, who is standing 
before the railroad clock correcting his time-piece) — 
"Mr. L., do you set your watch every morning?" 
Mr. L.(too much engaged to see who Is speaking) — 
" What's that you say, Captain 1 " Prof, moves on. 



Pay up, and look pleasant. 

Don't shoot those squirrels. 

Did you get left on a team? 

The Mackinaw has come to stay. 

Look out for the latest on Jumbo. 

The yaggers say that times are dull. 

Class-Day invitations at No. 24 Appleton. 

No '68 prize speaking this year. Too bad. 

The upperclassmen are indulging in new plugs. 

A horn concert would sound flrst-rate about now. 

Are you losing your interest in the national 
game ? 

Hazel Kirke at Lemont Hall the last of this 
month. 

The Freshman ball nine were too strong for the 
Medics. 

More than twenty members of '81 were in town 
last week. 

The Seniors went out of chapel, on Saturday, 
June 10th. 

Another large float has been added to the con- 
veniences of the boat-house. 

Want to advance some money to join the inter- 
collegiate base-ball association next year? 

He would be a public benefactor who would put 
a good five-cent cigar on the market here. 

The campus will be illuminated on Class-Day 
night by the same firm that did the work last year. 

It is possible that the Junior and Sophomore 
prize declamations may be held in Memorial Hall. 

'Rah for the Prof, that pi-oposed to substitute a 
lecture for a recitation on the Saturday after Ivy 
Day. 

Prof. H. L. Chapman presided at the recent 
meeting of the Maine Pedagogical Association at 
Bangor. 

The late pleasant weather has brought out the 
leaves. The Syrioga bushes will soon make the 
air fragrant with their blossoms. 

Why don't somebody write an article for a paper 
on Memorial Hall ? It is wrong for that building 
to be so seldom mentioned in print. 

Fifty backers, with strong lungs, went to Lew- 
iston to see the second Bates game. Those that 
waited until the game was through, came home 
satisfied. 



50 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Colby has got the boss team. 

And we won't take the State championship this 
year. 

One or more instructors will have to be chosen 
at the next meeting of the Boards. Brace up. 
Here's a grand opportunity. 

A good way to apply your mathematics is to try 
to count the swallows, some evening, as they go into 
the unused chimney in Massachusetts Hall. 

Drill has been discontinued for the rest of the 
term from lack of men to drill. A few are taking 
target practice at the range. There vrill be no 
prize shoot this year. 

The praying circle has few members from the 
Freshman class, probably because the class pretty 
generally understands the principle that green 
things will not burn. 

Let us be thankful even for that apology for a 
walk at the north entrance. Coal ashes are better 
than sand. A stone crossing we must not hope for 
in these times of high prices. 

Is not a Freshman getting rather cheeky when 
he throws a ball as nearly in a line with an upper- 
classman's plug as his skill will permit? Wo have 
a prescription for such troubles. 

The orchestra, assisted by a quartet of stu- 
dents and Prof. Grimmer, gave an entertain- 
ment at Freeport, on Friday, June 9th. They 
"exhibit" again at Yarmouth, soon. 

A great deal of house-cleaning was done the 
first of last week. Pipe and fine-cut were retired 
to the bureau drawer, and nicotine flavors were, as 
far as possible, removed from garments. 

What could have been the condition of the stu- 
dent in the mind of the Prof, who remarked: 
"Now, Mr. G., I don't wish to be personal, but did 
you ever see a glass of pure cold water ? " 

The library has lately received a gift of some 
twenty volumes from the Rev. Wm. W. Uand, class 
of '37, and another of twelve volumes, from an 
anonymous source, through Prof. Wheeler. 

The first class in geology from tho Hallowcll 
School made a visit to the Cloavcland cabinet, last 
Saturday afternoon. The Freshmen showed off 
well beside tho feminine portion of tlio class. 

A number of the rooms arc connected by tele- 
phones of simple construction, and you can carry 
on a conversation with them almost as well as you 
could if you addressed your friend directly in au 
ordinary tone. 



The Lewistou horse-car company will be able 
to declare a dividend, providing one of their cars 
can secure another load of Bowdoin students whose 
eyes are in such a condition that they cannot see to 
make change. 

South Main is ahead on journalism ; three 
Orient editors, two BugJe editors, and the college 
representatives of the Portland Press, Argus, and 
Augusta Journal honor that locality by making 
their home there. 

Complaints of the bad quality of the water in 
the college wells come to us. We espected to hear 
some remarks about the water, after the thorough 
testing it has been receiving on early mornings, 
during the past week. 

The Brunswick young ladies attended the ivy 
exercises in large numbers, says an exchange. Of 
course they did, brother; why, the shoe dealers 
here find it wholly unnecessary to keep in stock 
small sizes in ladies' shoes. 

We beg pardon for the item of last week about 
the had condition of the college grounds. Mr. 
Booker and his assistants put things in shape be- 
fore Ivy Day. The same spirit that impelled us to 
write may have inspired the deed. 

The playing of the band before the game, Fri- 
day, surprised even those that were acquainted 
with the talent it contains. Much credit is due to 
the persons who have succeeded in making a brass 
band one of our college institutions. 

The study of physiology has brought forth tho 
fact that '83 has a man whose pulse varies from 65 
to 120 beats per minute. As is proper, the mini- 
mum occurs on Sunday; the maximum, we are 
sorry to add, is reached during recitation hours. 

The following Juniors have been elected by the 
class to speak in the Junior prize exhibition, on 
Monday evening of Commencement week : Allen, 
Austin, Bascom, Cole, Fling, Gibson, Kendall, Per- 
kins, Pettingill, Stetson, Swan, and Washburn. 

Uolden, '63, is meeting with great success in his 
new role of resurrectionist. While digging at 
Friendship the other day, he found an Indian skel- 
eton in a good state of preservation. Prof. Lee 
considers it quite an addition to tho college collec- 
tion. 

Tho Bates Student is trying to come the love 
feast dodge on tho Colby boys, and is ottering tatty 
in largo quantities. For tho honor of Colby, bo it 
said, that tho &lio has thus far shown no disposi- 
tion to reciprocate, or even to accept the unwhole- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



51 



some mixture. Toadyism may worli sometimes; 
but we are satisfied that tMs is not a good year for 
it. 

Tlie death blow was given to Junior ease on 
Tuesday last. The class received two warnings 
upon that day, one in regard to tiie low rank taken 
in physiology, and the other against any more cuts. 
From now until Commencement the grind will be 
incessant. 

The kindness of the Faculty in extending our 
holidays because part of the time originally granted 
was unfitted for out-door sports, certainly deserves 
return on our part. Those who are disposed to 
grumble at hard lessons and strict dealings should 
keep ever green the memory of last week. 

This is an off-year for the Brunswick High 
School. The graduating class consists of only two 
members, and they have unanimously voted to 
hold no pubho graduating exercises or class recep- 
tion. So you can spend for beer that money that 
you were saving up to buy bouquets with. 

On Topsham's fair grounds, last Saturday morn- 
ing ; discussion going on as to the advisabiUty of 
holding field sports, in spite of the weather : Di- 
rector of Athletic Association (to board of time- 
keepers and referees, composed of Profs.)—" Now, 
look here, felloivs, let's have a fair and candid talk 
about this matter." 

Scene in mineralogy recitation : Prof, (to tired 
looking Junior) — "Mr. W., what forms of prisms 
are there in the hexagonal system ? " T. L. J. — 
"First, there's the hexagonal form*" Prof — 
"Yes; do you think of any other?" T. L. J. — "I 
think the six-sided forms are also included in that 
system." Class applaud. 

There is some talk of changing our college 
cheer, because it has been, iu effect, stolen from us 
by a neighboring institution. But if we should 
change, our altered possession would not long be 
ours alone. The Bates men copy our college cus- 
toms as far as they are able, take for their own our 
pet expressions and peculiar slang, and would 
quickly appropriate our new yell if it seemed to 
them an improvement upon the old. Such a mixt- 
ure of good taste and dishonesty, as they present 
in such matters, is rarely seen. 

Our crew starts on Monday next for Troy, N. 
Y., where they expect to find ready for use their 
new boat, which has been built for them there. 
On the 24th they will take up their quarters at 
Lake George, and on July 4th the college regatta 



will take place there. The names of the crew are 
as follows: W. 0. Phmpton, '82, stroke; W. G. 
Reed, '82, No. 2, and captain ; A. F. Sweetser, '84, 
No. 3 ; E. U. Curtis, '82, bow ; A. H. Brown, '84, 
substitute. The Seniors in the crew will take their 
final examinations before they set out. 

The exercises of last week passed off well, and 
were evidently thoroughly enjoyed by all. The 
victory scored by the Juniors in the class race, the 
gratifying result of the ball game which represent- 
atives of '83 so effectually aided in bringing about, 
the carrying out of the ivy program, and the hop 
in the evening, made last Friday essentially an '83 
day. Unfortunately, the threatening weather and 
the bad condition of the track was thought, by 
some, to render it necessary to postpone the Field 
Day sports until Wednesday afternoon of this week. 
In another part of this issue may be found detailed 
accounts of the race, the ball game with the Tufts' 
men, and the ivy exercises. 

Several of the students were present at the 
closing address by Judge Symonds, at the medical 
school, Wednesday last. Those who attended 
were well repaid for their time and the recitations 
which they lost. To say that it was a fine produc- 
tion would but mildly express our opinion of it ; 
and yet it was hastily composed, and the manu- 
script from which he read was the original, written 
with pencil. The speaker's well-known, free-and- 
easy manner of dehvery, enabled every one to com- 
prehend fully the fine thought and noble sentiment 
of his address. The audience displayed its appre- 
ciation of his effort by long-continued applause. 
He was followed by Dr. Kimball, a member of the 
medical class of '69, who, in behalf of the alumni, 
in touching, eloquent words presented the medical 
department with a large portrait of the late Prof. 
William Warren Greene. 

We regret to state that Prof. Johnson has de- 
cided to sever his connection with the college, for a 
time at least, at the next Commencement, in order 
to pursue farther his philological studies in Europe. 
He will sail the last of July, and will soon after 
commence at the University of Upsala, in Sweden, 
a course of study that he has marked out, extend- 
ing through three or four years, or until he has be- 
come thoroughly conversant with those branches of 
the Germanic family of languages spoken in the 
Scandanavian peninsula. Although his sojourn 
abroad cannot be looked upon as a mere tempor- 
ary suspension of his connection with Bow- 
doin, unless the Boards wisely decide that it shall 



52 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



be so held, still we may be permitted to hope that 
he will, upon his retarn, again occupy the chair 
that he has so acceptably filled. His euthiisiastic 
and tireless labors, both in his department of mod- 
ern languages, and in behalf of the library and the 
art collection, are fully appreciated by the students, 
and we know that we voice their sentiments, when 
we say that he is a man that the college cannot 
well aflford to lose. 

The following lines written on manuscript, by 
Longfellow, in 1875, in honor of Prof. Parker 
Cleaveland, " the father of natural sciences in 
Bowdoin," and afterward placed in the vestibule of 
Cleaveland Hall, together with the portraits of 
Profs. Longfellow and Cleaveland, will be read 
with especial interest : 

Among the many lives that I have known, 
None I remember more serene and sweet, 

More rounded in itself and more complete. 
Than his, who lies beneath this funeral stone. 

These pines, that murmur in low monotone, 
These walks frequented by scholastic feet, 

Were all his world; but in this calm retreat 
For him the Teacher's chair became a throne. 

With fond aft'ection memory loves to dwell 
On the old days, when his example made 
A pastime of the toil of tongue and pen; 
And now, amid the groves he loved so well 
That naught could lure him from their grateful shade. 
He sleeps, but wakes elsewhere, for God hath said 
Amen! 



LAST SUMMER. 

One evening she remarked to me — 
How sweet these recollections seem — 

" A kiss without a moustache is 
Like strawberries without the cream." 

I sadly stroked my naked lip. 
She gaily tossed her pretty head ; 

" Now, don't you know, with strawberries 
I never did like cream," she said. 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited 
to send personal items to the Bowdoin Orirnt, Bruns- 
wick.] 

'37.— Rev. Dr. Geo. VV. Field recently delivered 
an eloquent address lu^fore the Bangor G. A. R. 

'48. — Dexter A. Hawkins will deliver an address 
before the alumni of P.ridgton Academy, the last of 
June. 

'48.— T. H. Rich, Professor of Hebrew in the The- 



ological department of Bates College, took part at 
the meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature 
and Exegesis, which met in New Haven, Conn., 
June 1st. 

'52. — Pres. Chamberlain delivered a memorial 
oration. Decoration Day, in Massachusetts. 

'57. — Rev. Cyrus Stone, D.D., lectured before 
the Castine Normal School the evening of May 31st. 

'57. — Dr. R. E. Paine, a graduate of the medical 
department only, died at his residence in Camden, 
Me., May 31st, aged 48 years, of a carbuncle on his 
neck. Dr. Paine was a surgeon in the army during 
the war, and came to Camden in 18ij7, where he 
has had an extensive practice. He was Grand 
Dictator of the Knights of Honor of the State of 
Maine, and a member of several organizations. 
He leaves a wife and son. 

'(50.— Judge J. W. Symonds, of Portland, fa- 
vored the graduating class of the medical school, 
and others, with an exceptionally fine and finished 
closing address, winning the highest praise. Dr. 
John R. Kimball, medical school, '69, the same day 
presented the school, in behalf of the alumni, with 
a fine portrait of the late Prof. William Warren 
Greene. 

'63. — Rev. Newman Smythe has accepted the 
call of the Centre church at New Haven, Conn. 

'73. — Dr. D. A. Robinson took an active part at 
a recent meeting of the Maine Pedagogical Society 
held in Bangor. 

'77.— F. H. Crocker and C. A. Baker, 78, have 
just graduated from the medical department of 
this college. 

'78. — The Indianapolis Daily Sentinel of La- 
fayette, Ind., a city of 15,000 inhabitants of Ameri- 
can birth, says : " James T. Davidson is the pros- 
ecuting attorney. He was born in Oxford, Ohio, 
in 1856. He is ason of Judge R. P. Davidson, well- 
known in Indiana. He prepared for college in the 
Ford High School, and graduated at Bowdoin Col- 
lege with the class of 1878. Soon after his gradu- 
ation he commenced the study of law in his father's 
office. In the summer of 1880 ho was nominated 
prosecuting attorney of this Judicial Circuit on the 
Republican ticket, against seven older contestants. 
He came into otfice Nov. 7, 1881. JNIr. David- 
■son enjoys the distinction of being the youngest 
prosecuting attorney in the State. When a young 
man, twenty-six years of age, is entrusted by the 
voters of a popular city with such a responsible 
office, it is assuredly a demonstration of sni)eri(u-ity 
which is worthy of special mention. During his 
term, thus far, he has brought to justice an muisually 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



53 



large number of criminals. He is administering 
his office regardless of fear or personal motives. 
He has recently made a vigorous war against the 
gamblers of this city, and has caused them to emi- 
grate to other parts." 

'81. — H. D. Staples has gone to Princeton, to 
take a course of physics and chemistry. 

'81. — Henry Goddard, who has been with Hun- 
newell & Co., drapers, Boston, is to return to Port- 
land and study law with his father. 

'81. — Leland B. Lane is iu Dakota. 

'81.— The following eighteen men of this class 
have been in town, the past week : Chamberlain, 
Cutler, Dike, Donovau, Fisher, Greene, Haggerty, 
Harding, Hitchcock, H. L. Johnson, J. W. Mauson, 
Payson, Sawyer, Towle, Walker, Wheelwright, 
Whitten, and Wilson. 

Ex-'82. — Thomas Lane is at present, corner 6th 
and Wyandotte Streets, Kansas City, Mo. 



COLLEGE WORLD. 



At the University of Wisconsin the students 
have an Anti-Tuition League. 

The five performances of " Penikeese" netted 
about $1,000 for the Navy.— Ya^e Becord. 

Seven students at the University of California 
are suspended by the faculty for neglect of duty. — 
Brunonian. 

The Yale Alumni Association of Colorado has 
offered to pay the expenses of any student going to 
Yale from that State. 

The editor of the Knox Student is about to pub- 
lish a book containing a full account of the rise and 
progress of college journalism. 

The co-operative society at Harvard expects to 
number seven hundred members nest year, and it 
has been estimated that the aggregate saving to 
the students will reach $-35,000. 

Bowdoin, Princeton, and Wesleyan surely, and 
probably Pennsylvania, Columbia, Cornell, and Uni- 
versity of Toronto, will row in the Lake George 
regatta, July 4. — Argo. 

The Williams Athenmimi has suggested that 
Harvard, Yale, Amherst, Williams, Dartmouth, 
Brown, and Bowdoin, the leading colleges of New 
England, establish some kind of an inter-collegiate 
publication to be conducted by a board of editors, 
one from each of these seven colleges. 



The new athletic grounds at Yale cover thirty 
acres, with tennis, archery, cricket and foot-ball 
field, three base-ball fields, and a rifle range. The 
college authorities bear half the expense of the 
grounds. 

The Yale Becord asks the Faculty to annul the 
rule foi'bidding the sale of choices for rooms. This 
practice enables every man, who is willing to pay a 
small sum for the privilege, to make a choice of 
his neighbor's for the coming year. 

In the inter-collegiate sports held recently at 
the polo grounds, New York, Harvard won six 
first prizes and six second, out of the tbirteeu 
events, and thus retains the championship. The 
results of one or two of the events beat the previous 
inter-collegiate record. Some of the best records 
were : Final heat of 100 yds. dash, won by Brooks, 
Yale, '85, in 10 1-5 sec. ; final heat of 120 yds. 
Hurdles, won by Jenkins, Columbia, '84, in 17 .3-5 
sec. ; throwing the hammer, won by Porter, Colum- 
bia, '83, who threw it 87 ft. 3 1-2 inches, beating 
the record by 2 1-2 inches ; final heat of 220 yds., 
won by Brooks of Yale in 22 2-5 sec; Jenkins, Co- 
lumbia, '84, in the running broad jump beat the col- 
lege record with 21 ft. 3 inches; Goodwin, Harvard, 
'84, won the half-mile run in 2 min. 2 2-5 sec. beat- 
ing the record. 



CLIPPINGS. 



His father took the shingle, 
Aud made the 5-ouiigster tingle, 

For playing pranl<s in fun. 
Wlien the clouds liad passed away, 
Brollier Charlie heard him say, 

" Dark spots upon'the snn. "—iVews. 

"I leave a vast expanse of territory behind me," 
said the thief as the dog grabbed him. — Princeton- 



Prof. — "What is the technical name for the 
eclipse of Venus by Jupiter?" Rough-and-ready 
student—" Osculation, sir." He probably meant 
occitltation.— .Ba;. 

Medical student (to friend suffering with Loco 
Motor Ataxy) — "Hold your breath if you want to 
cure your hiccups." Invalid — "(Hie,) can't hold it, 
is-sh too (bic) strong." — Princeton Tiger. 

The very latest, nicest little idea is for a young 
lady to decorate a miniature bellows and send it to 
her best gentleman friend. It signifies, " Do not 
mind your poverty; I will raise the wind." — Ex. 



54 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



THAT WRETCH. 

They were talking of the wedding, 

He and she, one Sunday night; 
And his ai-m around the maiden — 

Well, 'twas an impi'essive sight. 

" No one loves me," said she shjly, 

And her blushes came and went; 
" Some one loves you," said he softly. 

As he nearer to her bent. 
" Who?" she murmured with quick glances, 

That from marble words might fetch. 
Nestling close, the maiden waited : 

" God, he loves you," said the wretch. — Ex. 

"Why," said the jesthetic editor as he came into 
the Argo sanctum, "is my cigar intense?" "Give 
it up," said Ephraim. "Because it's too all butt," 
remarked A. E., plaintively. His place is now va- 
cant. — Athenceum. 

"I want to find out," said Petre, " about a quid 
some Freshmen got on me. I asked one of them 
what society he belonged to, and he repHed, 'I'm 
an Oi> Sh and John, here, is a Mr, 3^-^.' Tlien the 
crowd began to yell and 'wood up,' and I came to 
look at your French dictionary to see where the joke 
came in." — Athenceum. 

Johnnie, after having been out playing with the 
boys, came home, and the following conversation 
took place: "Marama, what is the difference be- 
tween a wax figure of a woman and daddy's not let- 
ting me go to the circus yesterday?" "I don't 
know, Johnnie, what is it ?" " Why one is a sham 

dame, and the other is a d Ow! Ow! Let go of 

my ear. Take a feller of your size."— -Ea;. 

This is a Junior. See his Plug Hat. He has a 
Stick in his Hand. Which is the Stick! The 
Junior is not a Stick. Oh.no! He has a Plug, too. 
The Plug is Too-Too. Does he Chew the Plug? 
No, he does not Chews to. The Plug is used to 
ride. When did he get those Kids? Do Juniors 
often have Kids? Tes, yes! The Kids raise Cane. 
Does the Junior ever Cane the Kids ? Tell me what 
is a Junior Good for ? Nobody knows. Perhaps a 
Roman Nose. Maybe he is good for something. 
Who can Tell ?— Wabash. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



There is one branch of college journalism that 
editors have hitherto been rather loath to undertake, 
viz., the illustrated paper. The reason of this hes- 
itation must bo want of support; for surely there 
can bo no lack of ability, and nowhere could more 
abundant material for tlie caricaturist be found than 
within the college walls. For several years the 
Harvard Lampoon has been the pioneer in this vast 
deserted tract, and the success it has mot with 
should give onougli encoin-agemont to other colleges. 
At Columbia, the Spectator lias boon well supported, 



and quite recently the Princeton Tiger has been let 
loose in the arena; Tale's only attempt in this hne 
has been an illustrated supplement to the News 
once a week. 

The latest venture is that of the new board of 
the Williams Athenceum, and, judging from the last 
Issue, it promises fair to take rank with the Specta- 
tor and the Tiger. Three illustrations are all that 
are attempted, but they show originality and good> 
smooth execution; two are of the humorous order, 
the last one representing Vassar as the bone of 
contention between Cipango and the editors of the 
Argo and the Acta. The Athenreiim has taken 
offense at the Cornell Era for " reading a lecture" 
to the Faculty of Williams, because of their action 
in suspending the Sophomores who presented a dis- 
respectful petitiou to them. The petition was di- 
rected against oue of the instructors, and, consid- 
ering the attendant circumstances and the language 
In which it was couched, the Faculty were justified 
in their course, in the opinion of the whole college. 
The Athenanim gives us two or three rather good 
stories and some very good poetry. The local col- 
umn, we think, is hardly up to the average, and 
seems to betoken either a lack of items in the col- 
lege or else a spirit of contentment in the local 
editor. But the Athenceum is one of the most ac- 
ceptable of our exchanges, and now that Gipango's 
howl is heard no more, we trust that it may be one 
of the most peaceable. 

The Princetonian has come out in an osstbetic 
cover. It is extremely difficult to give our readers 
an idea of its appearance. The nearest wo can 
come to it is : imagine the mangled remains of 
Princeton after a foot-ball game with Yale, scat- 
tered about promiscuously in a very artistic burial 
lot. But we like the Princetonian, we admire its 
enterprise, we envy it its iestheticism. This num- 
ber contains two letters, one from an '82, and oue 
from an '83 man, setting forth the objections to the 
grading or marking system; and the intention of 
the editors is to bring the matter boforo the college 
by publishing papers on both sides of the question. 
One of the writers mentions an objection which ap- 
pears to us as forcible as it is common. He says: 
" The student endeavors to master, not the sub- 
ject, but the instructor, knowing that any attempt 
to inform himself by outside reading mjiy cost him 
' points.' In this way all independent thought is 
dwarfed But, after all, the greatest ob- 
jection is that the student is denied that freedom of 
speech and inquiry, both in the class-room and out, 
by the very natural fear that some ono may impute 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



55 



unworthy motives." "Ye Presente and ye Future," 
a poem in the Robert Herrick style, is well done, and 
the versification is exceptionally good. The Prince- 
toman's locals, college news, and clippings are all 
mixed up together under one head, and a very reada- 
ble mixture it makes. 

The Chronicle, coming from the University of 
Michigan, appears to take on the form of the local 
newspaper more than any college publication that 
we have seen. We find politics on every other page. 
The election of editors to the Chronicle has just 
taken place, and there was as much canvassing as 
if Topsham were going to elect first selectman. 
But finally the election passed off quietly, and the 
successful faction celebrated with a banquet. The 
Chronicle has a very apt parody on the " May 
Queen," entitled the "Student's May Day." It is 
apropos of the coming examinations and begins: 

'■If you're waking, call me early, call me early, cliummy 

dear. 
For to-morrow I've the hardest work I've had the livelong 

year." 

The Chronicle's departments are well kept up, but 
the paper as a whole has not the true college spirit 
in it, although it may be a fair exponent of the stu- 
dent's life in the University of Michigan. 

We have to express our appreciation of an ex- 
tended notice of the Oeiext in the last number of 
the Bates Siudent. We believe that we fully appre- 
ciate the spirit in which it was written, and would 
endeavor to reply in the same choice language, but 
the attempt would be useless. Unfortunately we 
have never received the polish and elevating influ- 
ence of that excellent fitting school, yclept Bates 
College. Such an exhibition of coarseness and 
downright billingsgate, as appeared in the exchange 
column, can but be looked upon as a disgrace to even 
the Bates Student, and we have no doubt that its 
editors after cool consideration will make an ample 
apology. 



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our reputjition is a guarantee of the quality of our productions. 

1 121 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



FINEST Steel Porti-ait ever engraved is Hollyer's 



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The ONLY large one in line and stipple. Endorsed by inti- 
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THE HENRY BILL PUBLISHING CO., Noi-wich, Ct. 

HENRY F. GRIFFIN, 

58 Temple Place, BOSTON, 

Wedding Invitations, Business Cards, &c. 
COLLEGE INVITATIONS A SPECIALTY. 

Beautiful Engraved Visiting Cards. 

Plate and Pack, $150 : former price, $3.00. 

GRIFFIN'S WEDDING CARD DEPOT, 

58 Temple Place, BOSTO^^T. 
SOMETHING NEW IN CIGARETTES. 

OUR LITTLE BEAUTIES 

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OUR LITTLE BEAUTIES are made from the highest grade 
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OUR LITTLE BEAUTIES are made with the now celebrated 
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OUR LITTLE BEAUTIES are put up in packages of ten,— so 
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EICHMOJXTD, VIKGIITIA. 



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im 



Biography, Letters, Poems, Anecdotes, Ti-ibutes, &c. 

AGENTS WANTED. 

Agents, women and men, wanted to sell the handsomest and 
most entertaining and comprehensive illustrated biography of 
the poet, Henry W adsworth Lon^t ellow. The book is an octavo 
volume of 368 pages, with two hne porti'aits (profile and fi'ont 
views) , and 12 good illusti'ations. It is printed -with large new 
type on excellent heavy calendared and tinted paper. In addi- 
tion to a thorough life of the poet, there are almost 100 pages of 
anecdotes, a digest of all his writings, a reprint of his early 
poems, general criticism, a full bibliography, a selection of poet- 
ical and prose tributes from this country and Europe, the whole 
completely indexed. It is one of the best books to sell, for every 
family in America ought to have a copy. In every respect it is 
what is usually sold at S2..50 to $3.50, but the retail price is put at 
only $1.50 a copy, with liberal discounts to agents. Single copies 
mailed to any address, postpaid, on receipt of $1.50. Call on or 

n^vliOSES min^TCS-, lE^-U-lolislier 

Harvard Square, CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 



56 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




lOBJ 

These Goods .are sold under an 

Absolute Guarantee 

That they are the Finest and PUREST 

goods upon the market; 
They ARE FREE from DRUGS and 

CHEMICALS of any kind; 
They consist of the Finest Tobacco and 

Purest Rice-Paper made. 

OUR SALES EXCEED the products 

of ALL leading manufactories combined. 

None Genuine without the trade-mark 
of the BULL. Take no other. 

W.TJLACKWELL&CO. 

Sole Manufacturers. Durham, N. C. 



Of every kind, to fill Spring, Suninior, .and Fall 
engagements now coming to hand. 
Oraduales and undergraduates of any Scliool, 
Seminary, or College, of little or no experience, or 
other persons desiring to teach, shonld not fail to 
address at once, with stanij), for a])plii'alion form. 

National Teachers' Agency, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 

N. B. — Situations in the West and So2t</t a specialty. 
Good pay to local agents and private correspondents. 



CAUTION TO SMOKERS. 

Seware of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 




TRY IT. 
■ Fine, Mild & Sweet. 



Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO.. N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 



irimp & 



432 Washington St., Boston, 

iDTite attention to tlie largest anil finest stock in the city, of 

DIAMONDS, RARE GEMS, 

KEPRESEXTATn'ES OF THE 

Gorham Manufacturing Company, in Boston. 

Exhiliit a Lirge and coraijlete collection ol the 

SOLID SILVER AND ELECTRO-PLATED WARES 

PKODUCED BY THIS COJIPAKT. 

The ornamentations now used iind tlie eflfeots produced, are 
something entirely novel in the craft of the Silversmith, and will 
interest every one by their combination of artistic and useful 
qualities. 

Especial Attention given to Designing Class-Day 
and College Invitations of Every Description. 



•» 



924 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

M'croscopes, 
Telescopes, 
Field Glasses, 
Opera Glasses, 

Drawing Instruments, 
Surveying Instruments, 
Thermometers, 

Barometers, 
Magic Lanterns, 
Apparatus for 

Projection, 
Philosophical and 
Chemical Apparatus. 

CATALOCt'KS AS FOLLOWS SENT ON APPLICATION: 
Part 1— JlathcmiillcMl Instruments, Ki'J puses. Piu-t 2— Optical 
Inslrunients, lS(i p^^cs. Part 3— Magic Lanterns, 120 piiges. 
Partd—Philosophli'iil Instruments, IGO pages. Part !>— Sloteor. 
ologlcal Apparatus, 120 pages. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily- 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
■Cutlery; Canes; Bii'd Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
•best hotels in the City. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

C. E. TOTT^riNrSEiJiTXD, 

DEALER IN 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Students. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, EKhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

780 Middle Street - - - - Port/and Me. 



^. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brnnsirick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vievs ; also College Views. 

ALL KI N DS OF 



I 





For Schools and Colleges, 

EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BOE.DERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 







tmX wm% 



THE FAVORITE NOS.S03-40'4-332-l7O-S5l-WITH 
■^l-IIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




E. SMITH, Variety Store. Bottonn Prices to Students. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



^4 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 



Office at Central Telephoiie Office, Brunswick. 
|Il3~ All Orders left at C. E. Townsend's Store will 
be promptly attended to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBIilSHEK, 



156 Exchange Street, Portland. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8j and ^82 Congress St., and 2J§ Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

.^-Send for Price List. 

J. H. PETERSON & SON, 

DEALERS IN 



Boots and Shoes, Tobacco and Cigars, 
Slain Street, ---.--- Brunswick, Me. 

FR^INTK E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corne r of Main and Mason Streets. 

FIFIS5T- CI. A.SS 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 




COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bleycle ridinp; is unsurpassed as a 
mctliod of travel ing,\vliether for speed, 
sport, or renewal of health. The prac- 
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are in daily use, and the number is 
rapidly increasing. The exerci.'ie is 
recommended by the medical profession 
as most beneficial to health, brniging 
into exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

Send lie. sUimji for .'!(!-imKO Illustrated 
('Mliil"i,'iic™nt»"ii"K'l'i'l<'e lists and full 
iiiloriiuitlou. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washington St„ BOSTON, MASS. 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. WILSON & CO., 

"Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES- 

N, B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

H2 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 

F. W. BTOOKMAN. \ 
WM. A. WILSON. S 



^QWioiii §olk|© Jfeliea! ^epapfement 

The Sixty-Secoutl Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence Februaky 8th, 1883, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshua L. Chamberlais, LL.D., President •, Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice -, Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H. Gerrtsh, M.D., 
Anatomy, Charles W. Goddabd, A.M., MedicalJarisprudence ; Henbt 
Oabmicoael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Burt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.B., Surgery and Clioical Surgery j Charles 0. 
Hunt, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information mav be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



^"Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Mag'a2dnes, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book Work to Order. 



W. B. 

^ e a. 1 '0 r 



KNIGHT, 



Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

;0-rraii9icnt Onkrs for Milk or Cream filled by Riving suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 

Curtis' College Bookstore 

PyVPEFt, PE:FtXODICA.X^S. <ScC. 



A. W. TO^VNSEND, 

Books, stationery, |) Fancy Goods. 

Also lOnKloni Mutual Uuiiin Tolograpli Oflioo. 
TJndor To'wn Clock, - - - Brnns-wiok, Me.. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



FIME SMIMTE *IMIE=^S1M)EB.* 



MADE FROM MEASURE, 

H FllFlCT FIT eU^l^lTlll, 

Also a Full Assortment ol" 

GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

■IBBILL & ii.t 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 

Orders by Mail Promptly Attended To. 

MEW B113Q STOBE. 



Largest Clothing House in Maine, 




ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

Fancy iii Toilet Articles, Ciprs I Tokacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

|Il3= Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

So> 'bwj §mit 0i^ur4 and Bi^aldkS. 
J^ami/fadiitm g/ ihe Sp^mial Si^mfd 
of "Sawdmn BoUuje. ' ' JIU'Q, dmki 
in Mii^ (Fobu'C/co ,thmm^ wnd Amok- 
in§. Ji fiitt line c^f Sm^kiM§ JlUi- 
dt6, of uU ik4v/(/ipliQjn6 . 

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Leading iNovelties 

For Young Men's Wear. 

f INE fURNISHING ^OODS 

A SPECIALTT. 



All Goods Marked in Plain 
Figures. Strictly • 
One Price. 



BLUE STORE 



UWISTOH, MAINE. 



CHILDREN'S CLOTHINfi in Every Quality. 



^ 







#tn Oil^nti 



Vol. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 28, 1882. 



No. 5. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AST) THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "iVIoehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

Books, Stationeff, and Paper Hangings, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

FRANK M. STETSON, 



^^ii^tc 



ac 

CO 

s 

fa 

Q 

<; 



DEANE BROTHERS & SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

1^° Lowest Prices in the State, 

755 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 




VISITORS TO PORTLAND, 

Independent of any intention of pur- 
chasing goods in our line, are invited to 
inspect the Model Clothing and Fur- 
nishing Store of Alien & Co., 470 Con- 
gress St., opp. Preble House, 

LANCASTER BUILDING. 



SPECIAL ^GEISTT. 

I^Dunlap & Co., of New York, Celebrated 
Stiff Hats. 

Also his New Straw Mackinaw, $3.00 and 
$2.50. 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monogranis 

ENGEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOE 



474 Congress St., - 



opp. Preble House 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (3.5 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and si.^ books of the .<Eneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books ; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Metiiod of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which ho will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, cither at a 
special oxamination held for the purpo.so, or as a 
part of his regular Onal examination, as ho niay elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnislied, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

KEQDIEED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

electives — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terras. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $2.i. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Hoard is obtained in town at $;J to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good manageinont, very materially 
lesson the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol, XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 28, 1882. 



No. 5. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PtTBLlSHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE TEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Egbert C. "Washburn, '63, Managing Editor. 

N". Brooks K. Pettingill, '83, Business Editor. 
Herbert E. Cole, '83. Charles H. Stetson, '83. 

Howard R. Goodwin, '83. Llewellyn Barton, '84. 
Herbert P. Kendall, '83. Oliver V. Means, '84. 
Arthctr J. Russell, '83. Charles E. Sayward, '84. 

Terms — $2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Lemston, Me. 

0ON'TEN"TS. 
Tol. XII., Ku. 5.— June 28, 1882. 

Ewtorial Notes 57 

Literary: 

Waste Matter (poem) 60 

One of Bowdoin's Boys 60 

College Items 61 

Base-Ball 64 

Personal 6.5 

College World 66 

Clippings 67 

Editors' Table 68 



Tlie custom has been to elect the editors 
of the annual Bugle at the beginning of the 
fall term. The custom is one which brings 
out the conventional grumbling and growling 
about Christmas time, and, on this account, 
calls for a change. From the lateness of the 
season at which the college year opens, it is 
almost impossible for the unfortunate editors 
of the much-abused annual to bring out a 
work wliich attains to the rank expected, i. e., 
better than the last." Each succeeding 



board is inspired with a desire to excel its 
predecessor, and to do this and publish the 
pamphlet on the week before Christmas, the 
time when it should come out, requires hasty 
work, unsatisfactory drawing and engraving, 
and, on the whole, necessitates the making of 
a book which is incomplete and unfinished in 
many particulars. It has been proved that 
Bugles issued after Christmas do not meet 
with the sale that greets tliose appearing 
before the close of the fall term. And it is, 
therefore, a matter of no little importance to 
the editors as to what time they shall turn 
their prodigy out into the world. If board 
after board comes out with the record 
of paying every year for the honor, it will be 
as difficult to elect a board of editors as it 
was to select the Utah Commission. 

Let the Bugle editors be chosen this term. 
Then there will be ample opportunity for 
making that preparation which the publication 
demands. The work need not be hurried. 
The engraver can have time to finish the cuts 
in the best manner, and the publication can 
be brought out at the close of the fall term, 
an occurrence not common and one that 
signifies books that balance and not fifty or 
one hundred dollars on the wrong side. 



Events of late do not augur a bright 
future for our military department. The 
interest manifested in the drill surely has not 
increased in a way that would give gratifica- 
tion to those who look with favor upon the 
giving of a partial military education to 
those who see fit to take advantage of the 
instruction. In fact, what seemed to be the 
dawning of an era of prosperity for the 
department has turned out, we fear, to be the 



58 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



last struggle with the accompanying rally 
before the demise. Were the present indica- 
tions but forerunners of only a temporary lull 
in the enthusiasm for the drill, they would be 
looked upon with no forebodings of unsatis- 
factory results, but they can be viewed only 
as proofs of a dissatisfaction that has existed 
for the last ten years. A dissatisfaction, in 
the face of which it is folly to attempt to 
carry on the work with any hope of satisfac- 
tory conclusions. 

Our military department went into dis- 
favor with the opening of the great rebellion iu 
college some nine or ten years ago, and it has 
never since that time gained a strong foun- 
dation to rest upon with any prospect of per- 
manency. Strenuous as have been the en- 
deavors of its supporters to place it on a sure 
footing, only a spasmodic evincing of interest, 
now and then, on the part of the students has 
rewarded the effort. While the swelling of 
the list of cadets within a year to the number 
of seventy or eighty ma}' have given cause 
for the raising of hopes, the drill of to-day 
with three officers and one private present 
leads one to the belief that it was a delusive 
symptom. To be sure, the fact that it is not 
at present compulsory, may answer in part 
for the scarcity of soldiers in line, but, with 
option allowed between the gymnastic exer- 
cises and the drill, we do not predict a much 
fuller attendance than in the instance men- 
tioned above. It would be with regret on 
our part that we should see the government 
withdraw the instruction which they have 
heretofore allowed us. But because of the 
fascination of our new gymnasium, for the 
building of which, as report has it, the money 
already has been subscribed, and, from the 
evident lack of favor for the drill, we do not 
see any reasons for believing that a military 
instructer will be stationed here much longer. 

The " American College Song Book " has 
been received with a considerable degree of 



favor here, and the offer made for disposing 
of the book at an introduction price seems to 
have been readily accepted. The work is 
well gotten up, nicely bound, and printed in 
an attractive st3'le. In it will be found com- 
positions from some forty-eight or fif t}' colleges 
besides a small collection of miscellaneous 
music and popular airs. We have never 
wished to essay the role of a musical critic 
and, therefore, would not pass an extended 
criticism upon the real worth of the different 
compositions that make up the new book. 
There is no doubt but what some of the orig- 
inal pieces of music are of considerable merit 
and betoken the possession of no little musical 
talent by those who composed them. On the 
other hand, it is not at all improbable that, in 
due time, some grave errors iu harmony or 
composition will be disclosed in some of the 
pieces, while others will be found rough, 
unfinished, and discordant. Some of the 
colleges have furnished sets of music that 
ma}' prove exceedingl}' fascinating, whUe 
others have sent in those i)ieces wiiich never 
can be popular, and which are destined to be 
made use of only by the composers. The 
publishers of the book, in their preface, truth- 
fully say that there is probably no more justly 
popular music than college songs ; not because 
of being artistic in composition or rendition, 
but because of their cheer and the fond recol- 
lections they awaken in so many minds, and 
it is certainl}- true that some of the pleasantest 
memories are those called up by hearing the 
ringing, jolly songs of one's college days. We 
think, however, tiiat some of the composers 
have lost sight of tiie object for which the 
songs of college are published, and, in this 
particular, we hear of more or less dissatisfac- 
tion expressed. It is lield by many that selec- 
tions have been published in the song book 
which, although of considerable worth as musi- 
cal compositions, can never be popular and 
never will be sung by college students. Cer- 
tainly a song or piece of music appropriate for 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



59 



funeral or some similar sad or solemn occasion 
can never find a home in the repertory of a 
college man, even though the piece be one of 
merit. There have been a number of such 
cases of discrimination in deciding as to vs^hat 
should be published and what tiirown aside, 
and while they attest to the good judgment 
of the selecting committee, so far as appreci- 
ating worthy music goes, they seem to be 
inconsistent with the purpose of publishing 
those songs that will be popular and therefore 
handed down from year to year. 



From the Associated Press dispatches we 
learn that the Colby base-ballists, b}^ winning 
the last game with Bates, have won the 
championship of Maine. We do not take 
issue with them, for they have gained an 
indisputable right to the claim, and it is a 
pleasure to know that for once, at least, this 
annually agitated question has been settled. 
It has been an exceedingly easy thing to 
claim the championship in past years, but tiie 
mere announcement of the claim is something 
entirely different from deciding the question 
by base-ball contests. So far as we can see, 
the title of superioiity has, heretofore, right- 
fully belonged to none of the three colleges 
that usually meet on the diamond, for the 
reason that no complete series of games have 
been played. With only three institutions 
sending out their representatives, and with 
but two or three contests with the several 
clubs, it does' not appear practicable to judge 
the strength of the nine from the per cent, of 
number of games won. With the few meet- 
ings that we have during the season, it is far 
better to decide on the worth of the competing 
nines by completing a series, whether it be 
of three or five games, and deciding from the 
results of the series. In case of a tie at this 
point, one contest alone is required to decide. 
To leave a series of games unplayed or to 
come to no conclusions as to superiority, as 
has been the case for some years back, is pro- 



voking, and the result of this yeai^'s work, to 
say the least, will be of some satisfaction from 
the fact that it has been decided and settled 
beyond controversy. 



If there is any matter which demands 
consideration at the hands of the boards at 
the next Commencement, it is in regard to 
the building of a gymnasium. We do not 
know what truth there is in the report that the 
money necessarj' has been subscribed, but 
whether it be true or false, some action should 
be taken speedily to ari'ange plans and look 
to the construction, if the money is available, 
or to form some system or method of raising 
the necessary funds, if they have not already 
been subscribed. It certainly must have 
been shown to the B'aculty and those friends of 
the- college who have visited us that a gymna- 
sium is now the most pressing want of the 
institution, and from its importance it is to be 
expected that definite and decisive measures 
will now be put through, so that the difficul- 
ties arising from the lack of suitable means 
for exercise will be overcome at an early day. 
We have made mention on several occasions 
of the results of discontinuing daily exercise 
and at no time iiave they been more apparent 
than during the present term. Not only does 
the lack of exercise leave tlie system torpid 
and inactive, and the student to some extent 
disinclined to study, but successful participa- 
tion in the out-door sports is rendered impos- 
sible, or at least improbable because of it. 
The good reports that come from systematic 
work in a well-equipped gymnasium should 
lead all to the acknowledgment of the neces- 
sity of such work in college, and we trust 
that steps will be taken at once which will 
result in supplying the need we have so long 
experienced. 



"Bacon says that reading makes a full man," mut- 
tered the Senior. " Now that hits my case exactly, 
it's so cheap. I guess I will spend Senior vacation 
'round college and draw largely on the library." 



60 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



WASTE MATTER. 

We sailed the waste of waters o'er, 
Made love the livelong day, 

The vessel's waist was a retreat 
For me and my sweet May. 

The great circumf rence of the waste 
Of sea we could not measure. 

But I found the circumf'rence of 
The waist of my sweet treasure. 



ONE OF BOWDOIN'S BOYS. 

During my last spring vacation I met an 
old family friend and alumnus of tlie college. 
His stories of life in college, nearly forty 
years ago, were very interesting and showed 
a state of things forming a strange contrast 
with the present. One afternoon, as we were 
taking a drive together, he related his expe- 
rience of the first few years after graduating. 
He said : " I was a little wild during my 
course and did not decide upon any business 
or profession. Consequently, after leaving 
college, I was ' all at sea.' My constitution 
was naturally somewhat worn, so for the first 
few months I rested and looked about for 
some business opening. Then, teaching 
school, clerking in a dry goods store, and 
acting as a drummer for a wholesale boot 
and shoe house occupied my time for two 
years, when the gold fever, that was then 
raging, claimed me as an additional victim. 

"A number of my fellow-townsmen were 
about to set out for California, and with them 
I made arrangement for tiaveling. It was in 
May of 1849 that I packed up my worldly 
goods and started out, with my face towards 
the ' Golden Gate,' to seek my fortune. It 
is needless to dwell upon that long wagon 
trip across the continent. Our adventures 
were sufficiently numerous to enliven the 
monotony of tlic journey. My attention was 
particularly drawn to the different ways of 
working and living of the people through 



which we passed. Sometimes I imagined my- 
self in some foreign land, so strange did every 
thing appear to me. When the snow-capped 
mountains and great western desert were 
reached it seemed as if my old home in New 
England and the country in which I then 
was must be upon opposite sides of the earth, 
so far did I feel from all familiar scenes. 
The constant exposure had transformed me 
from a fastidious commercial traveler into a 
rough, sunburnt man, and I doubt if my old 
acquaintances would have recognized me. 
When we reached the land of promise a 
3'oung man, one of our party, and myself 
joined forces and staked out a claim along the 
side of a small creek that came tumbling 
down from the mountain above. At first we 
met with moderate success and rather en- 
joyed the wild life, so different from that to 
which we had been accustomed. We began 
to feel acquainted with the great mountain 
that stretched its snowy peak far above our 
heads, and at whose base we were slowl3' dig- 
ging in hope of finding the shining dust. 
Soon, however, we found that we wei'e not 
likely to obtain sufficient to repay us for our 
labor and began to look about for something 
more profitable. My chum, or 'parcbier' as 
I should sa^s grew tired of the rough life, 
and, finding a company about to return to 
the East joined them, thus leaving me to my- 
self. 

" My fatiier was a physician and I iiad 
picked up more or less knowledge of medi- 
cine from him. Accordingl3% with a few 
medical books tliat I had clianced to bring 
with me, as stock in trade, I put out my sign 
as doctor and surgeon. I felt some doubt as 
to my success, but determined to put on a 
bold face and comforted myself with the 
thought that, if the patients would die in any 
case my aid could do nothing more than to 
hiisten the event. From the first I was fairly 
successful, and, as the diseases were for the 
most part of a slight natui'c, no great skill or 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



61 



experience was necessary, while at the same 
time I took care that the bill for services 
should be as large as the miner's bag of gold 
could afford. It was not long before I at- 
tained considerable local reputation and, since 
there was no other physician within a radius 
of fifty miles, my practice was sufficiently 
large to keep me constantly at work. I be- 
gan to look forward to a speedy return to my 
beloved State of Maine, and a little home of 
my own seemed not at all improbable. 

"One dreadful night, when the darkness 
was so thick that it might almost have been 
felt, and the rain was pouring in torrents, a 
weather-beaten man came to summons me to 
the bedside of a sick friend. I did not wish 
to go, but the man was so urgent that I had 
not the heart to refuse him. So we set out, 
I upon my trusty horse and lie riding an old 
mule. We rode on through mud well-nigh 
impassable, and across streams that the recent 
rains had greatly swollen, where sometimes 
the water was so deep that I would be 
obliged to draw my feet up on the saddle. 
Thus we kept on for so long a time that I 
began to suspect that I was being led into 
some kind of a trap, until we finally reached 
a small log cabin. On entering I saw a 
young man lying asleep upon a bed in one 
corner. He was very thin, more from expos- 
ure, however, it seemed to me, than from any 
lingering disease. As soon as I had examined 
his face a little more closely I discovered the 
features of my college chum. I had not seen 
him since we graduated, and had not heard 
from him for a long time, while his appear- 
ance was so altered that I did not at once 
recognize him. It was not long, however, 
before recognition followed, and it turned out 
to be especially agreeable to him. He recov- 
ered rapidly and attributed his speedy con- 
valescence more to my cheering society than 
to my medical remedies. By the time he was 
restored to his usual health we had deter- 
mined to leave that part of the country. We 



did so and together returned to our native 

city, where we settled." 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



June days and nights. 

One more Orient this term. 

The field- day cider was the worst yet. 

Celebrate the glorious Fourth in Lewiston. 

Those oral examinations are coming right along. 

The fences have been treated to a coat of white- 
wash. 

Let's chip and have the Brunswick streets 
sprinkled. 

Butler, '85, has been teaching a singing school 
in Topsham. 

The boating man's coat sleeves are becoming 
loose again. 

The fire-cracker has again appeared in the reci- 
tation room. 

Eumor says that '86 will number over 60. We 
hope so, but — 

The Freshmen took another examination in 
Horace on June 13th. 

Where are the settees that we used to have un- 
der the trees last summer ? 

The Oeient was pretty solid for Thomas but has 
concluded to support Eobie. 

The trees, hedges, and grass ground have taken 
their Commencement brace. 

Several Juniors have found the battery in the 
chemical lecture very shocking. 

Professors Packard, Smith, and Campbell were 
present at the Congregational conference. 

The Seniors are away preparing their constitu- 
tions for the strains of Commencement Week. 

Perham, '83, Perkins, '83, and Longren, '84, fill 
places in the choir vacated by departing Seniors. 

Jewett and Pierce took first prizes in Senior 
English composition ; Chase and Curtis, second. 

Reports from the University crew are encourag- 
inn-. The men are in excellent health and spirits. 

The gas fixtures have been put into Memorial 
Hall. This building will be completed in about a 
week. 



62 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Sylvia wasn't impressed with the solemnity of 
the Seniors last chapel exercises. 

The committee of arrangements for the Sopho- 
more Prize Declamation are Waterman, Barton, and 
Pierce. 

Gentlemen of the Boards, don't forget to do 
something about that new gymnasium at your nest 
meeting. 

This is indeed a progressive age. The Bruns- 
wick Herald has, just added a "box shop" depart- 
ment to its other attractions. 

Several students will take examinations before 
the rest of their class in order to begin their sum- 
mer's work as early as possible. 

Why do so many students of late find the gal- 
leries more comfortable than the back pews during 
evening service at the hill church I 

One of the questions in the Junior physics divis- 
ion the other day was, "can you change a ten dol- 
lar bill ? " Every man took a dead. 

The orchestra also gave a concert at Yarmouth 
last week, and on Friday evening furnished music 
for the Masonic ball at Lemont Hall. 

A ball game between our nine and the Bates will 
not be a feature of the Lewiston celebration, large 
posters to the contrary, notwithstanding. 

Several of the undergraduates will spend the 
summer at the G-len House, White Mountains. They 
will be there in the capacity of waiters, however. 

On account of the absence of Prof. Smith the 
Sophomore division in mathematics and the Fresh- 
men as well have had a "pud" for the past week. 

The Orient's advice to the Junior and Sopho- 
more declaimers is to choose for yourselves, if 
possible, the committee who are to award the prizes. 

'82 is going to follow the precedent established 
by '81, of donating to the library an album contain- 
ing cabinet photographs of the members of the 
class. 

The Senior class supper will bo hold at the 
Preble House, Portland, on the evening of July I4t.h. 
The Freshmen will hold theirs at the .same place, 
July 7th. 

The time has now come when the iiKhistrious 
student is disturbed at all hours of the day and 
night by the clamor of the prize declaiuier re- 
hearsing his piece. 

The hitest mineralogy grind. Prof. (Iiolding a 
model and indicating with his linger)—" What are 



these planes called ? " Junior (after some hesita- 
tion)— "Those, sir, are called the lateral sides." 
Some one laughs. 

It was a Freshman who suggested as a reason 
for partially clipping a certain pet canine in town 
that it would greatly facilitate in deciding which 
part was the head. 

One Senior examination was held in Memorial 
Hall. A rough bench served the professor for a 
chair, while the class occupied the seats of honor 
upon the grand platform. 

" He might be a first rate fellow, but they say 
he sometimes drinks beer," is the statement a Colby 
man recently made to a Bowdoiu man concerning a 
mutual friend in Colby, '82. 

Soph, (to roommate, a careless Junior) — "Say, 
chum, what will you give toward having our carpet 
taken up and beaten?" Junior— " What will I 
give ? 0, well, Pll give my consent." 

The Senior extemporaneous writing contest took 
place June 17th. About a dozen took part. The 
subjects to choose from were labor-strikes and 
choice of occupation ; time limited to one hour and 
a quarter. 

Prof (to '82 man, whom he is interviewing about 
a make-up.) —" Now, Mr. G., you are back on or- 
ganic chemistry ; supposing you come in to-morrow 
on alcohol and sugar, they will go well together you 
see." Mr. G. agrees. 

The political status of the college has beeu as- 
certained by an industrious Lewiston Journal cor- 
respondent. It is Republicans, 110 : Democrats, 22; 
and Independents, 2. How lonesome those inde- 
pendents must feel. 

Wanted.— A good mathematician to count the 
whole number of would-be musicians in South Wiu- 
throp and give us the exact per cent, of real music. 
A liberal remuneration for his services is offered. 
None but a proficient need apply. 

At a meeting of the Praying Circle June 10th, 
the following officers were elected for the coming 
year: President, Perkins, '88; Vice-President, 
Scwall, '88 ; Secretary, Waterman, '84 ; Standing 
Committee, KussoU, '83, C. C. Torrey, '8-1, Dunham, 
'85. 

The college band, the orchestra, the university 
crew, the several class crows, the boat-house, and 
the ball nine have been photographed by Mr. Reed. 
Persons desiring any of the pictures can procure 
them at reasonable rates by leaving their orders at 
his studio. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



63 



Mosquitoes are very plentiful this summer. The 
unhappy victim of their assaults, after having spent 
the greater part of the night in combating them, 
exhausted, falls asleep in the early hours of the 
morning, misses chapel, and thus adds two more 
marks to his account. 

Prof. Carraichael's laboratory on Union Street, 
where the professor has spent some time during the 
past six months in superintendiug the construction 
of paper-ware vessels, was badly damaged by Are 
on June 7th. It is understood that the business 
will hereafter be carried on at Waterville. 

" Well, gentlemen," said the Prof, with a sigh to 
the Seniors in the university crew, who had just 
completed an examination preparatory to setting 
out for. Lake George, "I devoutly hope that you 
will show before you return that you know more 
about rowing than you do about moral science." 

"0 Lord, we thank thee for these things for 
which we are thankful," is the way a Harvard, '82, 
man began to say grace at dinner at Wellesley some 
time since. The suppressed laughter arising from 
the fair feasters on all sides caused him to forget 
the rest of his ideas, and the grace was ended with- 
out even an amen. 

The annual Senior ball game took place on Wed- 
nesday last, directly after the close of Senior ex- 
aminations. It was between the first and second 
divisions of the class, and was chiefly interesting 
from the abundance of errors made and the peculi- 
arity of the pitching upon both sides. Won by first 
division ; score, 31 to 9. 

The professors made it warm for the Seniors on 
make-ups just before their examination. The look 
of anguish that would come upon an '82 man's face, 
as he found himself cornered on the chapel steps 
and heard the dreadful tidings that he was expected 
to pass on examination on that Freshman Greek 
condition, was indeed heart-rending. 

Even target practice has been abandoned, Lieut. 
Howe not thinking it profitable to carry it on with 
only two or three men. Unless something is done 
soon to arouse an interest in the drill, it is said that 
probably our military instructor will he taken from us 
and sent elsewhere. Well, build us a gymnasium 
and make the students choose, as we did two years 
ago between working in it regularly and drilling, 
and enough will take the drill to make it a success. 

The following is the assignments of Commence- 
ment parts that are to be spokeu in the class of '82 : 
Salutatory, M. S. Hoi way, Augusta; English Ora- 



tions— G. F. Bates, Yarmouth, H. H. Chase, Unity, 
W. C. Merryman, Brunswick, W. A. Moody, Kenne- 
bunk, A. G. Staples, Bath ; Philosophical Disquisi- 
tions— E. T. McCarthy, Peabody, Mass., C . E. Stinch- 
field, Brunswick; Literary Disquisitions — J. F. 
Libby, Locke's Mills, G. H. Pierce, Portland. The 
first eight received their appointments on general 
rank, the last two on rank in writing. 

It is difficult to understand why the boating 
association dues are not paid more promptly. The 
sum called for from an individual member each 
year is small, and those who have allowed them- 
selves to get behind have been repeatedly reminded 
of their indebtedness, so that the plea of forgetting 
all about the affair can not be urged. It should be 
remembered that the expenses of the association 
this year have been unusually large, and that every 
dollar of the amount justly due is needed to sijuare 
accounts at the end of this term. 

The band gave a promenade concert on the 
public mall Saturday evening, June 17th, by invi- 
tation of several Brunswick gentlemen. The play- 
ing was pronounced good by persons competent to 
judge and was greatly enjoyed by a large assembly 
of towns-people. The disturbances caused by a 
party of yaggers made hearing difficult at times. 
After the concert the boys serenaded Mr. Brewster 
of the Tontine House, and Mr. Gilman on Gilman 
Avenue. At both places a generous treat was pro- 
vided. Verily, it doth pay to be a musician. 

That ancient trick of causing a curtain covered 
with rude pictures and ruder attempts at wit to 
descend during a recitation has been unearthed by 
some members of '84 or '85. We had hoped that 
the curtain joke had been forgotten and that the 
year might pass away without any such display of 
bad taste and want of originahty as that which has 
been made, for all must acknowledge that this 
thing, justly, perhaps, a subject for laughter at its 
first five or six repetitions, has finally become noth- 
ing if not weary, flat, stale, and unprofitable. 

Saturday, June 24th, the Sophomores from Bow- 
doin and Colby had their "exit" supper at the 
Cony House, Augusta, instead of at the DeWitt, in 
Lewiston, as was at first proposed. Bates, '84, were 
invited to participate but the teacher wouldn't let 
them go. A game of base- ball between the two 
class nines was arranged for the afternoon before the 
evening's festivities. The idea was a novel one, and 
must, it seems to us, be productive of great good. 
We hope it may be the initiatory step to a custom 
which will be sustained by coming classes. The 



64 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



game of ball was hotly contested, and at the pnd of 
the ninth innings stood four to four. During the 
tenth innings, after the Colbys had scored three 
runs, when Waterman sprained his finger, and the 
game was suspended on account of the injury. 

Field Day, though successful from a general 
point of view, was financially a failure, and the loss 
has been made up by assessing a small sum upon 
each member of the athletic association. In our 
opinion, had the program been carried out upon the 
day advertised (and a few clouds that were quickly 
dispersed was the only reason assigned for the 
postponement), enough gate money would have been 
taken to more than pay the expenses. The mana- 
gers showed praiseworthy zeal in getting so many 
to participate in the exercises, in spite of the fact 
that the training must be done under the open sky. 
The records made were, under the circumstances, 
good, for the best results iu such sports must not be 
looked for until the boards take pity upon us and 
give us a gymnasium. 

The orchestra, assisted by some outside talent, 
gave a concert in the chapel on the afternoon of 
June 15th, for the purpose of raising money to help 
defray the expenses of the university crew. The 
entertainment was not so fully attended as it de- 
served, considering the object for which it was given 
and the excellency of the music rendered. The 
program : 

1. Overture — " Golden Fleece." Ripley. 

Bowdoin Orchestra. 

2. Eulalie. Taylor. 

Bowdoin Quartet. 

3. Song — " Singing Like a Bird." Buckland. 

L. Barton. 

4. " Baby Polka." Rudolph Biol. 

Bowdoin Orchestra. 

5. " The Bumble Bees." 

Quartet. 

6. Violin Duet — Klange an die Heimath. Gung'l. 

Prof. Grimmer and W. E. Butler. 

7. "Traumerei." R. Sc/mman. 

Bowdoin Orchestra. 

8. Song — " There's nothing like a Pre.sh'ning 

Breeze." Bandogger. 

G. H. Pierce. 

9. " Sara-Neighed," (From Romoo and Juliet). 

G. Wholowws. Bowdoin Quartet. 

10. liaritone Solo — Instrumental. — Poarl of 

Enghien. E. Vcmar. 

J. W. Crosby. 

11. " Come, Quaff the Bowl." La Fitle rlc Madame 

Angot. Bowdoin Quartet. 

12. " Le Diademe." Herman. 

Bowdoin Orchestra. 



BASE -BALL. 

Bowdoins, 11 ; Bates, 6. 
The third game of the series was played 
on the delta June 10th, Saturday afternoon, and 
resulted in a decided victoiT for our nine. The 
Bowdoins led from beginning to end, and ex- 
celled both atthe bat and in the field. The play- 
ing of Winter at first base deserves special men- 
tion, he putting out fourteen men, assisting in 
one double play, and making one himself 
without assistance. Mr. Pingree came down 
from Lewiston, and umpired to the satisfaction 
of all. Following is tlie score : 

BOWDOINS. 
A.B. R. iB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Winter, lb 4 1 2 2 14 I 

Wright, p 5 1113 3 

Knapp, 5 13 4 5 2 

Wateiraan, s.s 5 1112 2 2 

Cook, 3b 5 2 2 2 2 1 

Barton, c.f. 3 2 

Packard, l.f. 4 2 1 1 1 1 

Torrey,2b 3 10 2 4 

Collins, r.f. 4 J 

Totals 38 11 10 11 27 12 7 

BATES. 
A.B. R. 1b. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Merrill, S.S 4 1 1 

Tinkham, 2b 4 1113 1 

Sanford, c 4 2 1 3 (5 1 

Noroross, r.f. 4 11110 1 

Richards, c. f. 4 1 2 3 1 2 

Douglass, l.f. 4 112 1 

Bartlett, 3b 4 2 3-1 

Freligh, p 4 12 2 14 2 

Uorr, lb 4 1119 1 

Totals 36 12 24 II 10 

Three-base hit — Sanford. Two-base hits — Knapp, Bich- 
ards. First base on errors — Bowdoin, 7; Bates, 3. Struck 
out — Bowdoins, 2; Bates,]. Wild pitches — Freligh, 5. 
Passed balls — Sanford, 4; Knapp, 2. Balls called — on 
Wright, 34; on Freligh, 106. Strikes called— on Wright, 
9; on Freligh, IS. Time of game — 1 hour 50 minutes. 
Umpire — Pingree. 

Bates, 5; Bowdoins, 4. 
The Bowdoins played in Lewiston on 
Wednesday, the 14th. The game should 
have been theirs, for they seemed to have it 
well in iiand, and would have won but for the 
usual making of errors in the most critical 
part of the game, errors which result only 
fi'om carelessness, and which are in no sense 
excusable. Tliis gives two victories to each 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



65 



of the two nines, with the fifth and deciding 
contest yet to be played. The score : 

BOWDOINS. 
A.B. R. iB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Stetson, 3b 5 3 12 

Wright, p 5 112 3 2 

Knapp,o 4 116 10 

Wiuter, lb 5 1 1 1 7 3 

Watermau, s.s 5 2 

Cook, 2b 4 1112 3 2 

Barton, 1. f 2 1 1 

Packard, o. f. 4 112 2 1 

Collins, r. f. 4 10 1 

Totals 38 4 5 6 24 10 11 

BATES. 
A.B. K. iB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Merrill, S.S 4 1115 3 

Tinkham,2b 4 114 1 

Sanford,o 4 11 2 

N"orcross, r. f. 4 

Richards, o.f 4 113 1 

Douf;lass, 1. f. 4 1 1 

Bartlett, 3b.' 3 1 1 1 

Preligh, p 3 11114 1 

Dorr, lb 3 100800 

Totals 33 5 4 6 27 11 7 

Three-base hit — Richards. Two-base hit — Packard. 
First base on called balls — Bowdoins, 3. First base on 
errors — Bowdoins, 10; Bates, 7. Balls called — On Wright, 
25; on Freligh, 81. Strikes called— Off Wright, 6; off 
Freligh, 16. Struck out— Bowdoins, 4; Bates, 2. Wild 
pitcji — Freligh. Passed balls — Sauford, 2; Kuapp, 0. 
Time of game — 1 hour 32 minutes. Umpire — M. A. Pin- 
gree of Lewiston. 



FERSOKAIx. 



[Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited 
to send personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Bruns- 
wick.] 

The Bowdoin alumni of Bangor and vicuiity 
held a reunion at the Bangor exchange, June 22. 

Faculty, 73. — The June number of the Chem- 
ical Journal contains an article by Prof. Chas. P. 
Mayberry, Harvard, and Prof. P. C. Robinson, Bow- 
doin. Tlie article is upon a new compound which 
was discovered by them at Cambridge last summer. 
Prof. Robinson will continue these investigations 
at Harvard the coming summer. He has lately 
been made a member of the Berlin Chemical Society. 

Prof. L. A. Lee recently spoke on the U. S. Pish 
Commission at Gardiner. 

'26. — Judge Geo. T. Sawyer died June 15, at his 
residence in Nashua, N. H. He was born in Wake- 
field, N. H., in 1805. After graduating from col- 
lege, he became admitted to the Bar, when twenty- 



five years of age, and began the practice of law in 
Laconia. He represented Nashua in the Legisla- 
ture, and afterwards became Justice of the Supreme 
Judicial Court. He was at one time offered the 
Governorship of one of the Territories by President 
Pierce, but declined. More recently he was one 
of the commissioners to revise, codify, and amend 
the constitution. 

'41. — Hon. Prederick Robie of Gorham, was 
nominated for Governor by the recent Republican 
Convention at Portland. "^^'■■fhomas B. Reed, '60, 
was at the same time nominated for Representative 
to Congress. 

'60. -June 28th, Hon. W. W. Thomas, Jr., of 
Portland, will lecture before the literary societies of 
the New Hampton Literary Institute, which cele- 
brates its 59th anniversary at that time. 

'64. — E. G. Ingersoll, a native of Bangor, coun- 
sel for the plaintiff in the Christiancy divorce suit 
at Washington, has been examined by Drs. Rey- 
burn and Bliss and declared insane. His family are 
quite sanguine that his disability will be temporary 
and believe it has resulted from his too close appli- 
cation to business. 

'68.— John S. Derby, a leading Democrat of Saco, 
and one of'York County's first lawyers has removed 
to New York City, and becomes a member of the 
law firm of Stanley, Clark & Smith. 

'72.— Rev. W. P. Bickford of Breckenbridge, Col. 
recently sent a number of excellent specimens to 
the cabinet. 

'73. — Addison E. Herrick, of Bethel, law partner 
of Enoch Poster, Esq., and Miss Minnie D. Chase, 
only daughter of Capt. M. K. Chase of Bluehill, were 
married in Bluehill, June 19th. 

'73. — D. A. Robinson has formed a xsartnership 
with W. H. Brown, of Bangor, for the practice of 
medicine in that city. 

'74. — S. V. Cole has an excellent poem in a May 
number of the Literary World upon Ralph Waldo 
Emerson. 

'78. — P. L. Paine has established a law office in 
Portland. 

'79.— Geo. W. Johnson, Chas. T. Harris, '76, P. 
A. Wilson, '73, have just graduated from the Bangor 
Theological Seminary. Mr. Johnson has assumed a 
charge at Milford, N. S. 

'32. — D. R. Goodwin, professor and dean in the 
Episcopal Theological Seminary at Philadelphia, 
will deliver an address in Memorial Hall, July 12, 
upon Prof. Longfellow. 

'82. — Of the graduates of the last class at the 
medical department, Clayson has settled in Gardi- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ner, Silsby in Camden, Murch, a house pupil at the 
Maine General Hospital, Meserve, assistant surgeon 
at Maine General Hospital. 

Ex-'83. — S. S. Gannett has left the Boston School 
of Technology and is going West to engage in civil 
engineering. 



The following are the names, with occupation 
and present address, of the members of the class of 
76: 

Alden, physician, 666 Congress St., Portland, 
Maine. 

Andrews, C. S., mayor's clerk, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Atwood, lawyer, Auburn, Me., care Mitchell & 
Atwood. 

Bates, editor Boston Courier, 299 Washington 
St., Boston, Mass. 

Brookhouse, business, -38 Brunswick St., Fitzroy, 
Victoria, Australia. 

Burnham, minister, So. Freeport, Me. 

Clark, teaching, Bath, Me. 

Evans, teaching. Hillside Seminary Norwalk, 
Coim. 

Hall, lawyer, Damariscotta, Me. 

Hawes, theological student, Bangor, Me. 

Hemmenway, business ; address care Ralph Hem- 
menway, Garland, Me. 

Hill, teaching, Dexter, Me. 

Jameson, civil engineer, Mexican Central R. R. ; 
address care Mexican Central R.R., City of Mexico, 
Mexico. 

Kimball, E. H., lawyer; address care John H. 
Kimball, Bath, Me. 

Kimball, F. R., business, room 9 1-2 31 Milk St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Knight, lawyer, Wiscaset, Me. 

Leavitt, business, Gorham, Me. 

Libby, medical student, Portland School of Med- 
icine, Portland, Me. 

McNulty, Kansas City, Kan. 

Merrill, engineer, Waterbury, Conn. 

Millay, lawyer, Richmond, Mc. 

Morrill, lawyer, Auburn, Mo. 

Newcomb, mechanical engineer, Cumberland 
Mills, Ale. 

Parker, business, 215 Franklin St., Boston, 
Mass., care Coylo & Parker ; address, as Secretary, 
17 So. Market St. 

Payne, physician, 680 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 

Payson, lawyer, 38 Exchange St., Portland, Me., 
care Snow & Payson. 



Perry, theological student, Brunswick, Me. 
Box 1171. 

Pratt, minister, Bath, Me. 

Prince, civil engineer, Carlinville, 111., care Burl- 
ington & Ohio River Railway Co. 

Robinson, teaching, Franklin Falls, N. H. 

Rogers, Prof. Modern Languages, Maine State 
College. Orono, Me. 

Rowe, physician. Cape Elizabeth Depot, Me. 

Sanford, lawyer, 17 Doane St., Boston, Mass. 

Sargent, lawyer, Machias, Me. 

Sewall, H. R., electric engineer, 5.51 Broadway, 
Albany, N. Y., care Com'l Gal. Co. 

Sewall, J. E., mariner, Bath, Me. 

Somes, teaching, Salmon Falls, N. H. 

Souther, business, Fryeburg, Me. 

Stevens, lawyer, 53 Devonshire St., Boston, 
Mass. 

Stimson, agent I. & C. Elevator, of the C. I. 
St. L. & C. R. R., Smith St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Sturgis, business, Augusta, Me., care Kennebec 
Land and Lumber Co. 

Taylor, teaching, Goshen, Elkhart Co., Ind. 

Waitt, lawyer, 28 School St., E. 42, Boston, 
Mass. 

Wheeler, literary work, Winchendon, Mass. 

Whitcomb, lawyer, Boston, Jlass. 

White, teaching, Townseud, Mass. 

Whittemore, business, 36 West Bridge St., Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 

Wilson, lawyer, Augusta, Me. 

Wright, lawyer, Salem, Mass. 

Yates, teaching; address Cape Elizabeth Depot, 
Me. 

Marrett, business ; address Brunswick, Me. 

Parsons, business, Cairo, 111. ; address box 79, 
New York City. 

Sabui, Prof. Chemistry, University of Vermont, 
Burhngton, Vt. 



COLLEGE WORLD. 



The Harvard club of San Franoisco is going to 
found a two-thousand-dollar scholarship at their 
Alma Mater. 

The Senior class at Harvard have reconsidered 
their resolution, adopted some time ago, forbidding 
the Freshmen a place at the tree Class Day, and, in 
deference to the wishes of the college in general 
have extended an invitation to them to be present. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



67 



It is said that the lady students in the Harvard 
Annex are as much opposed to co-education as the 
male students. 

The diiflculty between the different papers pub- 
lished at the University of Michigan is to be brought 
into the courts. 

Dilts, of Brown, has signed an agreement to play 
with the Worcesters for the rest of the season, and 
will join them in the course of a week. — Eclio. 

If Yale beats Harvard in the University race at 
New London, it is proposed to send the eight across 
the water to row with Oxford and Cambridge. — 
Princetonian. 

M. H. Goodwin, in the spring athletic meeting 
at Bowdoin, in the standing broad jump, is reported 
to have made 10 feet 6 inches, beating the best col- 
lege record of 10 feet 3 3-8 inches. — Herald. 

A restaurant in the basement is one of the 
striking features of the University of Pennsylvania. 
Grave Seniors may be seen rushing through the 
hall with a piece of pie in one hand, and a philoso- 
phy in the other. — Badger. 

The thirteen hazing Seniors of Trinity Collegek 
were each fined $10 and costs on the 7th, at Hart- 
ford, the result of a prosecution brought at the in- 
stance of the fathers of two of the students who 
were hazed. The hazers who have recently re- 
turned to Hartford after their suspension pleaded 
nolle contendere. 

The nine returned on the 5th from their trip 
to Maine — a trip in one way unsuccessful, and in 
others very successful. The generous hospitality 
of the Bowdoin boys and the courtesy of their Fac- 
ulty will be long remembered on College Hill. The 
boys were also treated well at Waterville. The 
congratulations of all the students are due to the 
nine for the good work done and sympathy for the 
ill fortune that condemned their labors to failure. 
We hope to see the Maine nines at College Hill soon. 
— Tuftonian. 

It is proposed to form a foot-ball league among 
the New England colleges outside of Yale and Har- 
vard; each college to play one game with every 
other, and the one winning the greatest number of 
matches to be champion for the year. Yale and 
Harvard are to be excluded, because the advantage 
they possess in being able to pick their teams from 
a number of candidates greatly in excess of any of 
the other colleges, added to .several years of expe- 
rience, at present practically precludes the possibil- 
ity of others competing with them, with any chance 
of success.— iferaM. 



CLIPPIHGS. 



Together they sat in the parlor alone 

At the dusk of a Sabliath day; 
Her shapely head close to his own 

In a tender, loving way, 

" I like to lay ray head, dear Will, 
'Gainst yours," she murmured low; 

In tones which made their pulses thrill, 
And his face with rapture glow. 

" And is it because you love me, dear ?" 
He asked, and then she coughed; 

No ! dear Will, not that, but love 

Because its nice and soft." — Ex. 

A soft snap — the breaking of a coquette's heart. 
—Ex. 

Jones says his chum is like the moon —gets round 
to his last quarter about once a month. — Ex. 

The lillies of the field have pistils, and every 
citizen of Texas is "arrayed like one of these." — 
Argo. 

A member of the Freshman crew said that he 
liked rowing better than any other branch of athlet- 
ics, because he could sit down to it. — Spectator. 

Teacher (to small boy) — "What does the prov- 
erb say about those who live in glass houses ? " 
Small Boy— "Pull down the bhnds." — Institute In- 
dex. 

Father (looking over report) — " What does this 
mean, my sou — must pass another examination? " 
Son—" Well, you see, several of us are trying for 
first in that branch, and our papers were so nearly 
ahke that we have to try it over." — Princetonian. 

WHO? 

Who coyly twists my tiny 'tache? 

Who pats my downy cheek? 
Who chucks my chin with ardor rash, 

And never lets me speak? 

Who lightly smooths my crumpled hair? 

Who steals a curly lock? 
Who leans so smiling o'er my chair, 

And smothers me with talk? 

Whose linen duster long and gray, 

Is bathed in orient scents — 
" Can't trust you for the shave to-day ; 

You owe us twenty cents." — Cornell Era. 

A FACE. 

Two rosy lips thou hast, my love, 

And a dimple in each peachy cheek, 
Where Cupid, having bent his bow, 
With saucy smiles that come and go. 
Plays hide and seek. 

Two gems, thine eyes are set above; 

And their color is Columbia's hue. 
There Fun and Laughter seem to sleep. 
Or, waking, flash a gay " Bo-peep ! " 

Prom depths of blue. — Spectator. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The Gothic style of handwriting, now so popular 
among young ladies, may have its disadvantages. 
It is said that a young man who recently received a 
specimen of it could not tell, for the life of him, 
whether it was "Yes, with pleasure," "No, thank 
you," or a sketch of a picket fence. — Indianapolis 
Herald. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



The present number of the HainiUon Lit. is an 
exceptionally good one. We are first presented 
with a poem, " Pictures of a Day in the Homeric 
Age," whicli follows the adventures of Hector through 
one day, during the siege of Troy. The meter is 
iambic, and the Homeric style is adopted as far as 
possible. It is really a very ingenious composition, 
and the manner in whicli the ancient customs and 
even historical facts are worked in, shows consider- 
able skill, and much careful research. In one or 
two places clearness of thought is sacrificed to the 
versification, and the figures are not in every case 
faultless; but on the whole it may be considered a 
remarkable production. The author of the article 
on the " Power and Destiny of the English Lan- 
guage " shows himself a better patriot than prophet, 
when he hints at the universality of the English 
language. In this number the present editorial 
board complete their labors, and on their departure 
take occasion to give their readers some good ad- 
vice. Under the heading, " A College Fallacy," 
they aim at the tendency that is so fast becomiag a 
confirmed habit among students, of making preten- 
sions to phenominal smartness, and giving their 
fellows an idea that they can prepare their lessons 
without any studying. If you ask a man if he has 
got his lesson, the chances are he will answer, "Oh, 
I've only looked it over once," when he is perfectly 
aware that you know he has put two or three hours 
of hard plugging upon it. Much worse is the man 
who "might lead his class if he would only try"; 
and the admiration with whicli he is regarded by 
certain of his classmates would seem to indicate 
that indolence is more respected among us than 
faithful, earnest work. Let no man bo ashamed to 
acknowledge that he is doing that for which ho 
came to college, namely, study. The Lit. lias quite 
an extensive alumni department, indeed to us it ap- 
pears almost too (sxtensive for a college ])apcr; 
items about the alumni must always bo of interest 
to undergraduates, but when more space is given to 



" Alumniana" than to locals, it would indicate that 
the editors had to rely upon the alumni mainly for 
their support. 

We were much taken with the attractive appear- 
ance of the Targum from Rutgers, which, we will 
say for the benefit of the uninformed, is situated at 
New Brunswick, N. J. Upon the first page of the 
present number we find a poem, " The Revelers," 
which is as weird and wild as one could wish. The 
sketch called " That Gainsborough," is rather flat 
and strained ; and we would suggest to the author 
of " Self-Control," that he keep to his subject, and 
not turn aside to make a remark which has no 
bearing upon the subject, however valuable it may 
be to his readers. In distinguishing self-suppres- 
sion from self-control, he makes a good point, which 
we should like to quote : " Self-suppression is not so 
hard as self-control; it merely calls for the single 
process of stifling and crushing out. Self-control in- 
volves the constant exercise of judgment; it implies 
observance of the golden mean which it is so difiicult 
yet necessary to observe." Among the editorials we 
find a call upon the alumni for aid, and an earnest 
plea for a dormitory. We can hardly conceive of a 
college without its halls and dormitories, which rep- 
resent, far more than a recitation room can, our 
college life. But such is the case at Rutgers at 
present, in spite of the many attempts that have 
been made to remedy it, which we hope in the fu- 
ture may be more successful. One thing especially 
about the Tnrr/inn pleases us ; it is the large num- 
ber of communications from undergraduates setting 
forth their grievances and suggesting reforms. 
This shows the amount of interest taken in the pa- 
per by the students at large, and the understanding 
that it is the organ of the whole college and not of 
two or three editors. 

We are in receipt of the Knox Student, which is 
a fair sample of the average western college paper. 
At present it is very much agitated over the form- 
ation of a Western College Press Association, which 
was first suggested in the columns of the Student. 
Representatives from twenty or more colleges met 
at Indianapolis and completed the organization, 
and adopted a constitution and by-laws. In those 
it is provided that at the annual meetings all sub- 
jects bearing upon college journalism shall be dis- 
cussed, and also a prize of fifty dollars is otlbrcd for 
the best article that is i)ublislied in any paper 
belonging to the Association. Certainly great 
credit is due our Western brethren foi' their enter- 
prise in starting such an organization, and we trust 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



69 



the day is not far distant, when we of the East may 
have something of the kind, that will he a source 
of pleasure and of profit to us all. The absence of 
everything in the way of literary articles, and the 
meageruess of the other departments of the Student 
can perhaps be accounted for by the fact that the 
editor-in-chief, in addition to the Press Association 
has upon his hands a " History of College Journal- 
ism," which is also confined to the West. 

We are greatly pleased to welcome the Prince- 
ton Tiger upon our table. jEsthetic without, witty 
within, it approaches very nearly to our ideal of the 
"funny," illustrated college paper. The cover is 
done in tan-brown and brick-red (we believe those 
are the proper designations of the colors, at any 
rate they are fashionable and should be the colors, 
if they are not), and the design is a marvel of in- 
genuity. The articles are all good and laughable, 
from the undecipherable poem to the last joke on 
the last page. But we must stop ; such praise must 
be " simply cloying" ; and we would not be thought 
guilty of throwing "sops to Cerberus." 

From the publisher, Moses King of Cambridge, 
Mass., we have received the recently published vol- 
ume on Longfellow, by W. Sloane Kennedy. The 
appearance of the volume is excellent, with its 
heavy durable cover, and large, clear print. The 
illustrations are many and good, the frontispiece 
being a fine engraving of the revered poet. From 
a cursory examination of the subject matter (which 
is all we have had time to bestow upon it) little ap- 
pears to be said except in praise. It is especially 
rich in anecdote and reminiscence and differs from 
anything we have yet seen in that it tells us not 
everything of the poet but much of the man, and 
gives us delicious glimpses of the purity and 
nobility of his every-day life. The author has also 
liberally quoted of what in his judgment is of es- 
pecial beauty in his works. What is of especial in- 
terest to us at Bowdoin, if any part can be more 
interesting than another, is the account .of his tire- 
less labor in the composition of "Morituri Saluta- 
mus," and of his extreme anxiety lest something of 
it should become known before its delivery. The 
following in regard to it is quoted from his publisher : 
"With every new proof takeu of this poem, Long- 
fellow would require the old one returned, that by 
no possibility it should be left about where it could 
be seen or taken away. In the intervals of waiting 
I would sometimes look to see that the dust on the 
type-form had not been disturbed; for I felt more 
than ever before that it would not only be doing 



him a great wrong to allow it to get out, but would 
rob him of the pleasure he had so long contemplated 
of coming before his old classmates fresh with the 
richest treasures of his heart." 



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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




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432 Washington St., Boston, 

Invite attciuion to tlie largest ami linest stock iu the city, of 

DIAMONDS, RARE GEMS, 

IIECKESEXTATIVES OF TnE 

Gorham Manufacturing Company, in Boston. 

Exliiliit a large and complete collection of the 

SOLID SILVER AND ELECTRO-PLATED WARES 

PRODUCED BV THIS COMPANY. 

The ornamentations now used anil the efl'ects produced, are 
something entirely novel iu the craft of the Silversmltli, and will 
interest every one l)y their comhinalinn of artistic and useful 
qualities. 

Especial Attention given to Designing Class-Day 
and College Invitations of Every Description. 



U E E 



• » 



924 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Microscopes, 
Telescopes, 
Field Glasses, 
Opera Glasses, 

Drawing Instruments, 
Stirveying Instrtiments, 
Thermometers, 

B.Trometers, 
M.igic Lanterns, 
Appar.itiis for 

Projection, 
Philosophical and 
Chemical Apparatus. 

\s hOl.MIWS SlsNT ON Al'IM>I('ATION: 
III liislnniiciil-.. Ii;.' li:li,'cs. I'.irl -J-Oiilical 

llislilMnciil>. ISII |.:ii;rs. I':i\-| :!-M,i,L;ic I.Millcviis, f.'O |i.i,ws. 

I'Mrl I -rii.lo,sn|iliic:il Inslrumcnls, \m imgcs. I'lirl, 5— Mclcor- 

ol,>gicMl Appai-iitiis, I'Jd pages. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



MADE FROM MEASURE, 

A PEIFEOT FIT QUJIIJIITEED. 

Also a Full Assortment of 

GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

:>ii mill & ii.^ 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 

Orders by Mail Promptly A ttended To. 



MEW DBOG STOIE. 



ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

HUGS, MEDIWIES. 

Fancy an! Toilet Articles, Ciprs I Tolacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

rescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



§0 io S. c?. ^amim^ 

(F-o ^iMf, ijmi'c Bi^U'Fi and Bi^aieiUS. 
Jdunufadn'cm 'ofifie §p-wial Smnd 
of "Snwdmn 0oUmje." JlU-a dmk/c 
in J^4u4 (F-a'bmw,chemn^ xmd imok- 
m^. Ji fuU Urne 0/ iSmoMi/n^ JlUi- 
tk^' of' uU dMv/ci/pliomS . 



Largest Clothing House in Maine, 



--^31.Ij TI^E- 



Leading Novelties 

For Young Men's Wear. 

Pine f urnishikg §[oods 

A SPECIALTT. 



All Goods Marked in Plain 

Figures. Strictly 

One Price. 



BLUE STORE 



CHILDREN'S CLOTHING in EKry Quality, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



QM,^^l 






^1 

Fine Watches, Jewelry, Silver Ware, &c., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QUAUTf, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casoo, 

PORTLAND, . - - - MAINK. 

A. CARTER. J. W. D. CARTER. 

SPRING AND SUMMER, 1882. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

^est Side, may .it all ttmes be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cliffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Reach'-Made 
Clothino; in complete suits or single garments. White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

Ou and after June ISth, ISS'i, 

Passenger Trains leave Brunswick 

For Bath. 7.2S, 8.05. and 11.18 a.m.. 2 38,4.40, and 6.30 p.m., 
12.42 nisht (Saturdays only). 
Rockland, 8.05 a.m., 2.38 P.M. 
Portland. 7.25, 11.15 a.m., 4.30 p.m., 12.30 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.15 a.m., 12.35 night. 
Lewiston, 8.10 a.m., 2.38, 6.33 P.M., 12.40 night. 
Parmington, 2.38 p.m. 

Augusta, 8.08 a.m., 2.40. 2.45, 6..35 p.m., 12.45 night. 
Skowhegan, Belfast, Dexter, and Bangor, 2.40, 2.45 P.M., 

and 12.45 night. 
Watervillo,8.08, 12.45 a.m., 2.40, 2.45 P.M. (6.35 Satur- 
days). 
Dexter and Bangor, 6.35 p.m. (Saturdays only.) 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
June 18, 1882. 



Main St., under Town Clock. 

ipgr Families, Parties, and Clul)s supplied. 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street, - - - Poiiland. Me. \ 



MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 

28 Free Street, Portland, Me. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH. 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROIVIPTLY EXECUTED. 
Purchase your COAL at the 

Ooa-l ~S"a-rca. in Topsliaaan., 

WHERE NONK BUT 

T&e Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 



J. A. Merrill. 



A. Keith. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

HeaUTinallliinds,.!' 

lr«3r©sh., axid Salt Iiya;©a.-fa©, 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno^A^'s Grocery Store. 

«S-Special Bates to Student Olubs.-ffiff 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circxilating Library, 1600 "Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Croose ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

POFtTr..A.NI3, IVI.A.INE:. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

CHOICE GROCErTeS, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Students. 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



J^. O. REED 



BR,XTISrS"U7"ICI2:, 3VEE. 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunsvirick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vie-ws ; also College Views. 



ALL KINDS OF 



^<£)giiTi^iifSs^!^'^lMSPy^i^ii^ 



me^ 



„, Bjlll^ll 

W 
^1 



MM 



For Schools and Colleges, 



EXECUTED AT THE 



JournarOffice, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BOEDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 




t''£:3'^^tS .< 



t««I »«1I»S 



TT/iT FAVORITE NOS. 303-404-332-I7O-S5I- WITH 
HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




E. SMITH, Variety Store. Bottom Prices to Students. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SJ^^S'0 3»s 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 

Office at Central Telephone Office, Brunswick. 
ja- All Orders left at C. E. Townsend's Store will 
be promptly attended to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDGE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 



156 Ezchange Street, Portland. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

^8 J and ^8j Cojigress St., and 23 j JMiddle St., 



ESTABLISHED 1S44. 



W, 



PORTLAND, 

a^SEND FOB Price List. 



MAINE. 



J. H. PETERSON & SON, 

DEALERS IN 

Boots and Shoes, Tobacco and Cigars, 
Main Street, ---.--- Brunswick, Me. 

FR^MK E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment o< Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets. 



FIRST-CLA-SS 



AT LOW I'llICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 



IS. 




COLniBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle riding; is unsurpassed as a 
method of traveling.whcllier for speed, 
sport, or renewal of liealtli. The prac- 
ticability of the machine has been 
thoroughly tested, and satisfactorily 
proved, beyond quesiion. Thousand's 
are in diiily use, and llic^ mimhIkm- is 
rapidly iiiri-cM^iiiL'. Tin' I'xcrcise is 
recommciidcil by ilicnicilii'iil |ii-(i('i<ssion 
as most benelicial to licallh, bringing 
into exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

.Si'nil Sc. stamp for SO-paKO Illustrated 
(:;ilalo>;nc i-oiitalnlnn prli'o lists and full 
irir.irmallou. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washington St„ BOSTON, MASS. 



L. Wl LSON & CO., 

"Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list, 

142 & H4 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 



,0^aom 



goHe|© Jfelieal 



The Si.xty-Seeond Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 8tli,1883, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— JoSHCi L. Chambeblais, LL.D., President; Iskael T. 
Dana, M.D., Patliology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H. GERRrsH, M.D., 
Anatomy ; Charles W. Goddabd, A.M., Mftiical Jurisprudence 5 Hejirt 
Carmicbael, PIi.D., Chemistry ; Bmi G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles 0. 
Hr.\-T, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Repstrar and Librarian ; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing fUU information may be obLnined on application to 
the Registrai-, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



iy° Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book Work to Order. 

C. L. RICHARDSON, 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

flS-Transicnt Orders for Slilk or Cream fllkd by giving suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 

Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOK9S. SXAXIOrJERY. ROOIMC 
I>A.I»EIt, PERIODICALS, <ScC. 

A. V/. TOWNSEND, 

Books, stationery, M Fancy Goods. 

Also Kastcrn Mtttual Union Telegraph Office. 
Under Town Clock, - - - Brimswick, Me. 






■M*****>M"i'***>Ji'J<*^>f"(t 




,_,___ ^^w^\ /^m. /0mm / X \ /\ \ /\\ ^fis 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



S^S^I"^^ ^^©S 



Fine Watches, Jewelry, Silver Ware, &c., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QUALlTlf, AND LOWEST PRICES, 



521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 

- - - MAINE. 

J. W. D. CABTER. 



PORTLAND, 
A. CABTER. 



SPRING AND SUMMER, 1882. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may .it M times be found a clioice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuflfs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Readj-Made 
Clothino^ in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, Wliite Kids, a superlj assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

On and after June 18th, 1882, 

Passenger Trains leave Brnnswlck 

For Bath. 7 2S, 8.05, iind 11.18 a.m.. 2 38, 4.40, and 6.H0 P.M., 
12.42 nisrht (Saturdays only). 
Hockland, 8.05 a.m., 2.38 P.M. 
Portland. 7.23. 11.15 a.m.. 4.30 p.m., 12.30 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.15 a.m., 12.35 night. 
Lewiston, 8.10 a.m., 2.38, 6.33 P.M., 12.40 night. 
Fannington. 2.38 p.m. 

Augusta, 8.08 A.M., 2.40, 2.45, 6.35 p.m., 12.45 night. 
Skowhegan, Belfast, Dexter, and Bangor, 2.40, 2.45 p.m., 

and 12.45 night. 
Watorvillc, 8.08, 12.45 A.M., 2.40,2.45 P.M. (0.33 Siilur- 

days). 
Dexter and Bangor, 6.35 p.m. (Saturdays only.) 

I'AYSON TUUKEU, Supt. 
June 18, 1882. 



Main St., under Town Clock. 

ipg* Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Sireet. - - - Portland. Me. 
J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 



MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. X 



28 Free Street, Portland, Me. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advaace. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



QM,%t 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Coal ~5ra,rd. in Topsliann., 

WHERE NONE BUT 

Tbe Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prejiared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

neater In all kinils of 

FresK a»d Salt Iffi©a-b,s„ 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

«S-Speoial Bates to Student Clubs. .ec 




Vol. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JULY 12, 1882. 



No. 6. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGISG 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

DJ PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

Book, Staliofieff, and Paper Uaopgs, 

58 Exchange Street, PORJLMD, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

FRANK M. STETSON, 



^^f^iE_M^^ 










DEANE BROTHERS &. SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 



First-Olass and Medium Furniture, 

S^ Lowest Prices in the State, 
755 £ 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 



VISITORS TO PORTLAND, 

Independent of any intention of pur- 
chasing goods in our line, are invited to 
inspect the Model Clothing and Fur- 
nishing Store of Allen & Co., 470 Con- 
gress St., opp. Preble House, 

LANCASTER BUILDING. 



SPECIA.L ^GENT. 

HyDunlap & Co., of New York, Celebrated 
Stiff Hats. 

Also his New Straw Mackinaw, $2.00 and 
$2.50. 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGEAVED IN TEE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



474 Congress St., - - - opp. Preble House. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : ; 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount j 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucohcs, 
Georgics, and six books of the iEneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. I 

Geeek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Senophon's | 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two | 
books ; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. i 

Ancient Geography. ! 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common | 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the l^etric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class wlio wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at I'lDwdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which cacli candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine tlio candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

KEQUIEED— FOUE HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three tenuis. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES— FOUE HOUKS A "WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terras. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terras. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terras. 

Gorman, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terras. 

.International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (haH), average, $2'-). Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges. $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will i)robal>ly amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lesson tlie cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JULY 12, 1882. 



No. 6. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PTTBLISHED EVER'J ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE TEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Robert 0. Washburn, '83, Managiug Editor. 

N". Brooks K. Pettingill, '83, Business Editor. 
Herbert E. Cole, '83. Charles H. Stetson, '83. 

Howard R. Goodwin, '83. Llewellyn Barton, '84. 
Herbert P. Kendall, '83. Oliver W, Means, '84. 
Arthur J. Russell, '83. Charles E. Sayward, '84. 

Terms — S2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor, 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Osace, Lewiston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Tol. XII., No. 6.— July 12, 1882. 

Editorial Notes 7] 

Literary : 

Colonial Men and Letters 73 

Class-Day Poem 76 

Class Day 78 

Dedication of Memorial Hall and Longfellow 

Exercises 79 

Commencement Day 80 

The Lake George Regatta 81 

College Items 82 

Personal 84 

Necrology, 1881-82 85 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



The Commencement just passed was one 
of the most successful known in the history 
of the college. With the exception of Thurs- 
day fine weather prevailed, which rendered 
the exercises exceedingly entertaining, espe- 
cially those held out of doors. There was 
a large attendance of alumni and friends, 
larger perhaps than has been seen for some 



years, and this very fact goes far in account- 
ing for many pleasant occasions of the weeli. 
The attractions this year were perhaps greater 
than have been offered for some years past, and 
for this reason many faces unfamiliar to us 
appeared here after many years' absence. 
Besides the class day and Commencement 
exercises, the dedication of Memorial Hall 
and the Longfellow memorial address drew 
many back who would not otherwise have 
come. Those wlio endeavor to visit the col- 
lege annuall}' were hapjoy in being able to be 
with us again, while those who had never 
returned since graduation, thirty or forty 
years ago, wandered about the old halls and 
by the scenes of their youth with only the 
most pleasant recollections. All in all the 
week was the most enjoyable recorded for 
many years. 



The class of 'eighty-two has passed from 
beneath the careful eye of old Bowdoin and 
no more, as students, will her members 
again look upon tlie cloistered walls which 
have become so familiar and so dear to each 
one of them. 'Eighty-two was never a re- 
markable class, either in respect to numbers 
or otherwise ; but she was made up of ability 
perhaps equal to that which has distinguished 
those who have recently preceded her. It is 
too early now to place her beside any of those 
cla.sses which have gained such note through 
the deeds of some of their members, and yet 
it is perhaps unjust to criticise her work in 
college, whether good or bad, or to measure 
her future by present ability or achievements. 
Years work wonderful changes and it is not 
impossible, even though it may look improb- 
able, that some of the liberally educated young 



72 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



men, who now start out on the work of life, 
may in time attain to great distinction and 
become men to whom the college will point 
with pride and look upon with admiration. 
Fortune cannot cast her lot with all, but she 
is ever read)' to side with those who labor 
diligently and honorably and are true to 
themselves and their fellow-men. One is not 
obliged to judge of a man's future career by 
his course in college. It is rather his work 
after graduation that determines his success 
or failure in life. With faithful endeavors 
on the part of the individual merabeis of tlie 
class that has just joined the ranks of the 
alumni we predict success, even though their 
course here may not have been a particularly 
brilliant one. 



After a lapse of seven or eight years 
Bowdoin has at last seen fit to send her rep- 
resentatives out of the State to contend with 
other colleges at the oar, and with the pro- 
verbial luck which has followed her in similar 
undertakings, has had to content herself with 
the last position in the race. It is needless 
to remark that the result was a bitter disap- 
pointment to all her friends, as well as a com- 
plete surprise to those who were at all ac- 
quainted with the composition of the crew. 
The hopes of Bowdoin's supporters were not 
founded on any visionary or questionable 
grounds. It was from the firm belief that 
they had an exceptionally strong and firm set 
of men to row that rendered tiie confidence 
in them unimpaired even to the last. And 
it is the belief of Bowdoin men to-day that 
their crew will compare favorably with any 
tliat attended the late regatta. Supposed to 
be well-balanced, in fair training, with as good 
a trainer as tiio country affords, and as strong, 
etiff, and fast a boat as could be desired, it is 
not to be wondered at that the expectations 
of the alumni and undergraduates should 
have been raised to the highest pitcii. The 
stroke which they pulled in practice was one 



which they were able to hold for at least two 
miles, and tiieir practice spins over the course 
were made with a record that none of their 
competitors pretended to equal. Why, en- 
tering under such favorable auspices, a better 
position was not taken at the finish in the 
race is a question which for a long time, in 
the minds of many, will remain unsolved. 
By a series of " ifs " and " huts " to apologize 
or make excuse for a defeat is always dis- 
gusting to the listener, provided tiie defeat is 
deserved, but when such confidence is uni- 
versally expressed as was felt in Bowdoin at 
Lake George, it seems as though there must 
be some reasons to w hich to attribute her 
taking of the last position in the race, if 
not her failure to take the first. To 
begin with, by some misjudgment the stroke 
was not' set higher than forty-two or three, 
when it was expected that it would not go 
below forty-four, and at times would reach as 
high as forty-eight. Furthermore, for some 
unexplained reason, one side of the boat was 
manifestly stronger than the other, a state of 
affairs which has never appeared before, but 
which resulted in the pulling of a zigzag 
course, almost from start to finish. The fact 
that the crew had never rowed in a race before 
and had no winter training, may, in a measure, 
account for the result. With all the defects 
remedied, however, it is not claimed tliat 
Bowdoin would have crossed the line in the 
van, but it certainly must be acknowledged 
she might have been relieved from guarding 
the rear. 

Disappointed as all may be, the boating in- 
terest is not deadened by the result of the late 
regatta. No little enthusiasm is already shown 
in favor of sending a crew away next 3-ear. 
One will at least be put in training in the early 
fall, and, with good work and training through 
the winter, it is probable that a showing will 
be made on the river in the spring which will 
warrant the formation of as high hopes as 
were entertained prior to the late race. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



73 



■ ■ The business transacted by the Boards at 
the last Commencement was of considerable 
importance. Tlie resignation of Prof. Wheeler 
Avas accepted, although all would have been 
gratified had the worthy instructor and esti- 
mable gentleman seen fit to tarry with us 
longer. Provision was made for instruction 
in Latin for the coming year. Prof. Johnson 
was elected Longfellow Professor of Modern 
Languages and allowed a two-years' absence 
for travel and study in Europe. Li the mean- 
time instruction in these branches will be pro- 
vided by a committee selected for the pur- 
pose. Prof. Campbell is retained another year 
for the same chair which he has so acceptably 
filled for the last year. Through the gener- 
osity of a kind benefaction the Blake scholar- 
ship was established and the Goodwin Com- 
mencement prize founded. Thirty-three hun- 
dred dollars was subscribed for a new gymna- 
sium, and it is to be hoped that the sum will 
rapidly increase, for there is no need of the 
college which is so pressing as the one which 
a gymnasium will supply. It is absolutely 
necessary that there be some means for exer- 
cise during the coming year. 



COLONIAL MEN AND LETTERS. 

CLASS DAY ORATION. 

BY M. H. GOODWIN. 

The present inhabitants of America are, 
for the most part, direct descendants of those 
Englishmen who came to our shores daring 
the first century of American colonization. 
Born of the same race and under the same 
skies, they differed greatly from each other in 
character, in social standing, and in intent 
and purpose. Two widely-distinct motives 
influenced our forefathers to leave their native 
land to encounter the perils of an unknown 
sea, and to seek for themselves a home in the 
wilds of American forests. One great motive 
which allured the early colonists hither was 



of a material nature. For a century the peo- 
ple of the Old World had been listening to 
the extravagant accounts of a continent newly 
discovered, and to its shores adventurers were 
flocking, expectant of acquiring untold wealth 
almost without exertion. Another great 
motive was of a spiritual nature. It was a 
religious impulse that moved a great body of 
the early settlers. These came not for merely 
temporal emolument. They were actuated 
by a far nobler purpose. In a strange land 
they sought and found freedom of conscience. 
We observe, then, two totally dissimilar 
elements in the formation of the early Amer- 
ican colonies ; and to this dissimilarity, in a 
great measure, America is indebted for her 
present greatness. Like the union of two 
chemical units, which produces a compound 
more useful than either of the simples, so the 
combining of these two diverse types of 
character upon American soil has produced a 
single people superior to either of the individ- 
ual component parts. History and literature 
in America, springing into existence at the 
same moment, date their birth from the year 
1601, the virtual establishment of the first 
colony. That the earliest writers were 
Englishmen cannot be denied; but, trans- 
planted to this country, they became Ameri- 
cans in mind and deed. The very air they 
breathed, the novelty of the scenery, the 
grandeur of the primeval forests rendered 
them American in thought, if it could not 
make them so in blood. The dawn of litera- 
ture in America was at a fortunate moment. 
In England, the splendor of the age of 
Elizabeth had reached its culmination. The 
statesmen, warriors, and poets who sur- 
rounded that sovereign had gathered the 
laurels of world-wide renown. It was, then, 
an auspicious hour when American coloniza- 
tion began ; and it is not to be wondered at 
that a gleam of light shot across the waters 
and illuminated, though with diminished 
radiance, the shores of another world. 



74 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 



No nobler type of manhood is found than 
in the Elizabethan age. Her heroes were 
men of thought and men of action, — the 
bearers of a free lance, and the possessors of 
busy and active brains. For the birthplace 
of American literature we must look to Vir- 
ginia, to the sands of the Chesapeake, and 
near the tide of the James River. It was 
a curious medlej' of humanity gathered to- 
gether into that oldest colony in America. 
Spendthrifts, broken-down merchants, ruined 
gamblers were associated with men of noble 
birth, and with those who had already gained 
a reputation and a name. 

The first writer in American literature 
was Captain John Smith, whose career among 
the Turks and in this country has made liis 
life, to say the least, a romantic one. He was 
a noble representative of the manhood of the 
era — a man of enterprise and a man of let- 
ters. With him chivahy perished. He may 
be said to be the last knight-errant the world 
ever saw. The first book America produced 
was entitled "A True Relation of Virginia." 
This work interests us not only because it is 
the earliest production of our literature, but 
still more because it possesses unmistakable 
merit. Its style is graphic and smooth. It 
is an exact yet picturesque account of early 
Virginian life. As a mere literary product it 
is by all odds worthy to be the pioneer book. 
During the first twenty years six authors, 
worthy of the name, appear in Virginia. Their 
productions were almost exclusively historical 
and descriptive. The first settlers of Virginia 
brougiit with them their true English ideas. 
They desired to reproduce England in the 
American wildeiness, and to carr}' out this 
project tliey created large plantations after 
the manner of English estates. Tiie immedi- 
ate introduction of slaves tended to make life 
easy and labor unnecessary. In a new coun- 
try such an event proves fatal to education, 
and when education is neglected there is a 
corresponding decline in literature. 



After the first generation had passed away 
no writers of note appear until after the Revo- 
lution. With a sorrowful heart at the sad 
condition into whicii Virginia has fallen we 
turn to New England. Here another colony 
of Englishmen has been established, but of an 
entirely different stamp. A^iiginia and New 
England were the two chief sources of litera- 
ture during the Colonial period, but the for- 
mer sinks into insignificance beside the gran- 
deur of the latter. 

What has made New England so much 
superior and its progress so much more rapid 
than the other settlements in America is an 
interesting problem not eas_y to solve. Many 
factors, no doubt, iiave contributed to the gen- 
eral result, — race, climate, motive of coming, 
and many other things have all combined to 
produce a superior intelligence. Tiie early 
people of New England represented the 
Saxon element in the English nation. The 
Saxon was noted for his bold, self-reliant, and 
energetic character, hard to move, but when 
once moved irresistible. To this Saxon ele- 
ment, in a great degree, must be ascribed the 
progressive spirit which has characterized 
New England. The climate of New England 
is especially adapted for the production and 
perpetuation of a hardj^-ace. In warm climates, 
as we have already seen in the case of Vir- 
ginia, life is much more relaxed, and the re- 
sult is, after a certain time, an all-pervading 
enervation of the people. In cold climates 
the struggle for existence is much harder, and 
constant activit)' becomes a part of life itself. 
There is still another factor which enters as 
an imjiortant element into tlie consideration. 
It is the motive which induced tliem to come 
to this country. With them religion became 
a part of their very life. No sects ever had 
such austere and rigid rules of morality and 
religion as did the Pilgrims and Puritans of 
New England, and no sects ever so scrupu- 
lously lived up to their convictions as did 
they. Persecuted themselves, they were even 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



75 



more intolerant toward others. They be- 
lieved their own the only true religion, and 
regarded all other beliefs pernicious, and the 
punishment of the promulgation a command 
divine!}' bestowed upon them. 

Such were the early settlers of New Eng- 
land, and such were the men wiio have be- 
queathed the firmest ideas to American civili- 
zation. At this epoch of American liistory 
we can look back over our national life and 
safely say, with our own Hawthorne : " Let 
us thank God for having given us such an- 
cestors ; and let each successive generation 
thank him not less fervently for being one 
step further from them in the march of ages." 

The strong affection for home and friends, 
the tendency to settle in communities,- and 
towering over all an extremely devoted re- 
ligious spirit has marked the early settlers of 
New England as a very peculiar people. The 
first settlers of New England were not the 
oifscourings of the Old World, but were men 
of ability and learning. The number of uni- 
versity graduates for the same proportion of 
inhabitants was even greater than in England 
itself. Is it any wonder, then, that the school- 
house arose by the side of the log-cabin, and 
that both were reared by the axe of the pioneer 
woodsman ? In such a condition of affairs the 
early production of literature becomes a mat- 
ter of course; and we find that before the 
sound of the settler's axe dies away, the 
lispings of Ameiican literature awakes into 
new activity the deep and mysterious forests. 
The historical consciousness was the first to 
be developed in New England. With men 
of so devout minds and fully conscious of the 
high and noble purpose for which they came, 
and knowing tlae influence their lives would 
have upon all succeeding generations, they 
thought every fact and incident worthy to be 
recorded. This historical spirit, so early 
cultivated, has gone on increasing in power 
by being transmitted from father to son 
through all the generations of their descend-' 



ants. Six historians stand out prominent as 
such in the first fifty years. Many chapters 
in the histories contain only a record of 
trivial and unimportant events, but anon 
there are passages graphicall}' written dis- 
playing the genius and power of a master. 
Taking everything into consideration, the 
subject-matter, opportunities, and all, the 
early histories of the colonies are remarkable 
productions. Indian wars and massacres are 
the oft-recorded events, and these are written 
generally when the horrors of the scene are 
fresh in the minds of the authors. Living as 
far as we do from earlj^ colonial times, we are 
apt to regard the hardships and trials of our 
forefathers as matters of little consequence, 
but a careful survey will show that life with 
them was no mere child's play. 

There is an interesting and agreeable class 
of writings found in our early literature which 
is descriptive of the country and the Indians 
who dwelt here. Our forefathers, coming 
from a civilized land and beholding for the 
first time the wildness and beauty of hill, 
mountain, and dale, and the awful stillness of 
the primeval forests were naturally moved to 
describe the same in some form or other, 
and, as a result, we have a class of works 
devoted to descriptions of nature. These 
writings are pleasing because they are true 
to life. They describe the beauties of the 
New World as it burst for the first time upon 
the astonished eyes of Europeans with all its 
primitive grandeur. The inhabitant of the 
forest — the red man with his firm and ma- 
jestic step seemed to them a being dark and 
mysterious. He became the subject of many 
a busy pen, both in prose and in rhyme. 

In the early official records of Massachu- 
setts, still extant, there is preserved a list of 
things wanted from the Mother Country on a 
certain time. The list includes, among 
others, the following needed articles : Beans, 
pease, vine-planters, pewter bottles, brass 
ladles, spoons, and ininisters. It is only fair 



76 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



to say that in the original document the last 
mentioned article stood first, but for all that 
it seems a strange classification which jjlaces 
ministers in the same catagory with beans and 
pewter bottles. Curious as the combination 
is, it only shows how closely our ancestors 
were wedded to their religion. To them the 
worship of God seemed more indespensable 
than the necessaries of life. The religious 
spirit of the Puritans was so inwoven with 
their very natures that in the founding of one 
town they built a meeting-house, and made 
arrangements for a minister, before even the 
site of a private dwelling had been marked 
out. The sermons were long spun out, hold- 
ing the audience in rapt attention for hours 
at a time. The prayers were sometimes 
almost as lengthy. Let the present generation 
be silent as regards long sermons ! Let them 
consider what our ancestors had to undergo, 
and thank their stars that things are as well 
as they are. These sermons were often 
printed, and they form a large proportion of 
the literature of the Colonial period. Relig- 
ious controversies were being continually 
carried on, and the arguments and counter- 
arguments on disputed points would fill vol- 
umes. The pulpit of New England contained 
the most brilliant lights of the time. The 
list contains such names as Jonathan Edwards, 
John Cotton, and the three Mathers, men of 
deep learning and profound thought. The 
sermons of the early divines are often spoken 
of with mirth by an age which is wanting in 
their energy, faith, and devotion. The}^ may 
now be laid aside as unreadable, but they had 
tlieir usefulness in their day ; so let us not 
now condemn them as worthless because they 
are no longer practicable. As the character- 
istics of the early settlers of America become 
more and more familiar to the minds of their 
descendants, and as their motives become 
more and more appreciated by them, they 
will apjiear not as that irritable race so often 
ridiculed by us, but a company of noble men, 



with their faults, it is true — and who has 
not? — but possessing also the excellent quali- 
ties of brothers and Christians. The litera- 
ture produced by them maj- now be forgotten, 
but say not on that account it is valueless. 
Though now unread, it has exerted and is 
still exerting a powerful influence upon Amer- 
ican thought. It is these first feeble out- 
bursts that have made American literature 
possible, and, if for nothing else, on this 
account alone, to them the highest tribute 
should be paid. The authors themselves are 
now long since passed away; but their spirits, 
like the spirit of the great Caesar, are mighty 
yet, and still walk abroad throughout the 
length and breadth of the Ameiican nation. 



CLASS-DAY POEM. 



BY J. F. LIBBT. 



Classmates, friends, I'd not essay 

With lofty fliglit to malie my way, 

Midst rosy clmids of upper air 

On which Imagination fair 

Reclines. For there, with powerful sway, 

She rules men's minds, and day by day 

She wantonly herself amuses 

While man's poor senses she abuses. 

Most trivial things beneath her hand 

Assume appearances most grand : 

The massive clouds of summer days. 

Huge pile on pile a billowy maze 

Of vaporous uothingness arise, 

As dark-winged nionstci-s of tlio skios; 

Or else she paints with gurgeous hue 

The broad expanse of lleaviMi's blue; 

And seems to open Heaven's gate 

To show the glories which await 

The weary sojourner of earth 

When he shall leave its care and dearth ; 

Thus then, imagination seems 

To (ill the mind" with changing dreams. 

Which, like the clouds, ere scarce they're born, 

Melting away arc quickly gone. 

Then I would sing in luunhlcr strain, 

And from all lolly lliglits I'clVain : 

If Fancy, tliongh, should taUc the lead, 

I'll follow her with cautious speed; 

If thus, pei'chance, 1 may discern 

Some uschil lesson we may learn ; 

The grandest harmonies of song, 

In human hearts will not live long 

Unless in tune, the heart-cords be 

'['o vibralc with such harmony : 

And oftener far the simpler lays 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



77 



Of happy hours of by-gone days, 

Or, of some theme though old, yet proved, 

The heart's most passionate depths has moved; 

And thrilled the soul with pleasure deep 

Whose memoriesevermore will sleep : 

Thus, then, would I not by the art 

Of poetry, try to move the heart 

To pleasure. But the theme alone 

For lack of art must well atone. 

That theme is Friendship — tried and -true, 

Which binds the hearts of '82. 



In the early light of morning, 

Flushed with rosy hues most fair, 

As the day of youth was dawning, 
Breathing fragrance on the air, 

Aimlessly my feet were straying 

Through life's fairest, happiest bowers. 

But, no nobler thing essaying, 
Plucked I only mortal flowers. 

Life was beauty ; life was pleasure, 
With its joys my heart was glad ; 

For it held no richer treasure. 
It no deeper meaning had. 

But before the dews of morning. 
Heavenward sped like spirits free 

To my soul a gentle warning, 

Spoke, and seemed to say to me : 

"Flowers of earth too soon must perish, 
Sensuous pleasures soon depart; 

There are fadeless flowers to cherish 
In the garden of the heart. 

" Being, simply, is not living; 

Living duties plainly call 
To them all thy ettbrts giving : 

Thou Shalt win the love of all. 

" Hast thou never heard the voices 

Of the trees, the brooks, and flowers ? 

Natui'e evermore rejoices. 

Toiling for these lives of ours. 

" See that tree, with branches bending 
'Neath its weight of golden fruit, 

Willingly its labor lending, 

For the good of man or brute. 

" All its life it gives to others, 
Senseless, soulless though it be, 

Then should men, immortal brothers, 
Live together selfishly ? 

" No. There is a land of beauty; 

To it should thy soul aspire ; 
There, with each accomplished duty. 

It mounts heavenward, ever higher. 

" 'Tis a realm of truest pleasure. 
Where the purest waters flow ; 



Whose bright skies of deep-hued azure 
The dark storm-clouds never know. 

"There, the verdant fields are gladdened 
By the gentlest summer showers; 

There, the air is heavy ladened 

With the perfume of sweet flowers ; 

" Purling streams and shady bowers, 
Leaflets sighing to the breeze, 

Birds beguiling all the hours. 
With the sweetest harinonies; 

" Hillocks like to gentle billows. 

Waving gracefully, arise ; 
Climbing vines and drooping willows, 

All make up a Paradise. 

" Few this happy land discover. 
Fewer still who pass it through ; 

For admitted, are no other 

But the friendly, brave, and true. 

"And yet, all might know the treasures 
Of this tranquil, sunny land ; 

All might feel the depth of pleasures 
Only known to this small baud. 

" But, alas ; with selfish dreaming, 
Mau would win, or wealth, or fame ; 

Truth and friendship have no meaning 
Only as an empty name. 

"Hence he passes by unminded 
All the fairest flowers of life ; 

By his lust for riches blinded. 
Seeing only care and strife. 

" In youth's morn may you discover. 
This fair land where all are blessed; 

Where the hand of each, as brother, 
With fraternal warmth is pressed." 

Classmates, 'neath the branches bending 
Of fair Bowdoiu's stately elms. 

We our happy way were wending. 

Through its brightest, fairest realms. 

Land of friendship, bending o'er us. 
Are thy blue and smiling skies ; 

While in beauty spread before us, 
All thy pleasant landscape lies. 

Here, from every heart is flowing 

Streams of friendship, love, and truth ; 

Which, while on life's journey going, 
Ever green shall keep our youth. 

Here we gather in the roses 

Which adorn the path of life ; 

Here the weary heart reposes. 

Free from wasting care and strife. 

But the time has come to sever. 

We must leave these friendly walls ; 



78 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Dwelling never more together, 
We must go where duty calls. 

Now that life is in its morning, 

Quick the seeds of friendship start; 

Sow them then, thereby adorniug 
The fair garden of the heart. 

From it, pluck all weeds of malice, 
All the noisome tares remove ; 

And from out the soul's fall chalice, 
Water it with showers of love. 

Then, a rich, ripe harvest gleaning, 
When the fall of life draws nigh, 

We shall know the depths of meaning 
Of our college days gone by. 



CLASS DAY. 

Tuesday dawned clear and beautiful, iind 
the exercises of the day, both in the cliurch 
and on the green, afforded great pleasure to all 
the visitors and undergraduates present, and 
certainly must have given great satisfaction 
to the class under whose au,spices they were 
held. As usual they were well attended, 
especially under the oak in the afternoon, and 
with the favorable weather and complete fill- 
ing of the program, must be recorded as a 
success. 

At an early hour the people began moving 
toward the church, and the transepts rapidly 
filled up. By the time the exercises com- 
menced the main body of the church contained 
rather more of an audience than is usual for 
the morning exercises. We think it would 
be advisable hereafter to close the two galler- 
ies and allow tlie audience seats in the body 
of the building. In this way the speakers 
can direct their words to those in front, and 
will not be obliged to address their remarks 
to gallery heights, where the larger portion of 
the hearers seem to be found. 

The class marched in under the leadership 
of Marshal Merryman and took seats on 
the stage, after which the following program 
was carried out : 

MUSIC. 

Prayer W. VV. Curtis. 

MUSIC. 



Oration M. H. Goodwin. 

MUSIC. 

Poem J. F. Libby. 

The exercises were of the most interesting 
nature, and were listened to with great 
attention by all present. President Reed 
officiated with becoming dignity, and the 
speakers were well received, their productions 
calling for hearty applause. The oration, on 
" Colonial Men and Letters," was assuredly 
one which could but be replete with good 
thought, interesting historical fact and theory, 
and the clear delivery with which it was pre- 
sented rendered it all the more entertaining. 
The full text will be found elsewhere, and 
we commend it to the notice of our readers. 

The poem was entitled "Friendship," and 
met with a flattering reception. Besides be- 
ing well written, it contained many good ideas 
and more or less advice to the class about to 
separate. The poet hardly did his production 
justice by his delivery, for it was extremely 
difficult to catch his words in the back part of 
the house. In another column will be found 
the poem entire. 

In the afternoon, as the hour of three 
approached, the platform constructed under 
the oak began to be filled bj' a gay and brill- 
iant throng. All the friends of the chiss, 
young and old, ladies and gentlemen, wended 
their way in the direction of the stately old 
monarch of the campus, and it was soon sur- 
rounded by one of the happiest and most select 
audiences seen at any gala day of tlie college. 
Although the heat of the sun was intense at 
times during the afternoon, considerable com- 
fort was derived from tiie use of many para- 
sols, which formed an almost unbroken canopy 
over the iloor, and a refresiiing breeze rustled 
through the trees, lending its cooling and in- 
vigorating influence to all around. Mr. Reed 
presided and introduced the speakers in 
accordance with the following program : 

MUSIC 

Olioniiig Address E. R. Jowett. 

MUSIC. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



79 



History C. H. Gilman. 

MUSIC. 

Prophecy H. Carpenter. 

MUSIC. 

Parting Address A. M. Goddard. 

The opening address differed, in some re- 
spects, from those delivered in years past. 
It was written in blank verse and from its 
happy import met witli approval. Welcome 
was extended to all and well wishes expressed 
for the class. 

Mr. Oilman's history was one of the best, 
if not the best, productions of the day. It 
was well worded and delivered in an effective 
manner, and with such clearness and force 
that all could hear and appreciate the many 
good points that were made. He endeavored 
to recall the deeds and doings of his class 
from the time when they entered college up 
to date, and that he did it successfully is 
attested by the applause bestowed at the 
completion of the reading. Some vigorous 
blows were dealt on some members of the 
class and certain others, and in some instances 
the facts were moulded to meet the occasion 
rather than the truth, but all in all the history 
was quite complete, sparkling and entertain- 
ing to everybody. 

Mr. Carpenter followed in the well-beaten 
path of prophets, and adopted the old-time 
dream " method." His remarks were short, 
witty, and to the point, and if the class, at the 
end of twenty years, are destined to be found 
under such conditions as their prophet placed 
them, congratulations should be extended to 
them. 

The closing address of Mr. Goddard was 
appropriate to the hour. He wished the class 
success for the future, asking that they ever 
be loyal to themselves, to the class, and to the 
college. He bade farewell to those outside of 
the class who had ever commanded the respect 
of '82, and took occasion to praise whatever 
kindness and favor had been extended to her, 
and to rebuke those who had seen fit to trifle 
with her. 



After the literary exercises, the class seated 
on the ground d la mode Sitting Bull, took 
the customary whiff from the gaily decorated 
pipe, a manoeuver which gave so much sat- 
isfaction that it was passed around a second 
time. The class ode, written by J. F. Libby, 
was then sung. 

After forming in line the march was made 
to the several halls where cheers were sent up 
to the old walls, which had been a home to 
many for four short, happy years. 

The following statistics are gleaned from 
the pages of the history : 

No. entered, 33 ; No. graduating, 28 ; average 
age, 22 years 11 months 4 days ; oldest man, Man- 
sur, 28 years 2 months 11 days; youngest man, 
Crosby, 20 years I month 13 days; average height, 
.5 feet 8 inches ; tallest man, Jewett, 6 feet 1 inch ; 
shortest man, Staples, .5 feet 4 inches; average 
weight, 147 pounds; heaviest man, Phmpton, 177 
pounds; lightest man, Staples, 112 pounds. In- 
tended occupations— Law, 12; medicine, 4; teaching, 
3; ministry, journalism, farming, and business, one 
each. Keligious Preferences — Congregatioualist, 8; 
Unitarian, 7; Uuiversalist, 2; Christ, 2; Epis- 
copal, 2; Roman Catholic and Methodist, 1 each. 
Political Preferences — Republicans, 14; Demo- 
ocrats, 7 ; Independents, 6 ; Stalwart Republican, 1 . 
Favorite Studies— chemistry, 8; philosophy, 5; 
English literature, 3 ; metaphysics, 2; mineralogy, 
mathematics, history, nature, and German, 1 each ; 
no preference, 2. Eleven members of the class use 
tobacco ; 10 have,used it, but do not use it now. 



DEDICATION OF MEMORIAL HALL 
AND LONGFELLOW EXERCISES. 
On the afternoon of Wednesday, the 
alumni in large numbers assembled before 
the chapel, and, at a quarter to three, marched 
to Memorial Hall to the music of Grimmer's 
band. The exercises were held in the newly 
finished hall, on the second floor, and it was 
quickly filled with a lai'ge and select audience, 
the speakers and honored guests being seated 
on the circular seats back of the stage. 

The order of exercises was as follows : 



80 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



After music by tlie orchestra, Hon. J. W. 
Bradbury, in behalf of the committee on 
construction, made a formal presentation of the 
hall to the president and trustees of Bowdoin 
College, stating that it cost $83,000 and was 
delivered free from debt and incumbrance. 
President Chamberlain, in a few well chosen 
words, received the keys in behalf of the 
college corporation. Prayer was offered by 
Prof. Packard. President Chamberlain then 
announced that addresses were in order from 
the various gentlemen, and called upon Gov. 
Plaisted to speak for the State. The gover- 
nor remarked it is fitting to dedicate this hall 
to the young men of Bowdoin who fell in the 
rebellion. They represented the permanence 
of the nation, and it was his belief that this 
monument does not transcend, not even 
approximate, to their worth. 

The president then introduced the follow- 
ing speakers, all of whom spoke ably and 
fittingl_y: Rev. Di-. Newman Smj-th, Hon. 
John H. Goodeiiow in behalf of Mrs. Stone 
of Maiden, Mass., to whom the college is in- 
debted for the means to complete the hall, 
-Judge Hawes of New York, Commo- 
dore Horatio Briilge of Washington, Clifford 
Belcher of Farmington, John Marsliall Brown, 
Gen. Ellis Spear of Washington, Gen. Thomas 
H. Flubbard of New York, aijd Cullen Saw- 
telle of the famous class of 1825. 

The Longfellow memorial exercises were 
held in the large hall in the evening. The 
address of the occasion was given by Prof. 
Daniel R. Goodwin, LL.D., of '32. It was a 
masterly production, and although the speaker 
occupied nearly two hours in ils delivery lie 
was listened to throughout with marked at- 
tention. Following the address Mrs. Ada 
Gary Sturgis sang beautifully Longfellow's 
" Bridge," and the services were thus appro- 
priatcl}' concluded. 



The '83 men are onn^fratulating themselves that 
they have survived the study of mineralogy. 



COMMENCEMENT DAY. 

Thursday opened with a cloudy sky, and 
early in the morning rain began to fall, much 
to the disappointment of the man\^ visitors in 
town. Notwithstanding the unfavorable 
weather, a large assembly could be seen be- 
fore the chapel and there awaited the adjourn- ■ 
ment of the board which was in session 
inside. There were signs of a clearing in the 
heavens at about eleven, and when the pro- 
cession started for the church the rain had 
ceased entirely. Charles H. Gilman of Bruns- 
wick acted as marshal, leading the procession, 
headed by Grimmer's Band, down the north- 
east walk of the campus. Arriving at the 
church, the following program was carried 
out : 

MUSIC. 
PRAYER. 

MUSIC. 

Exercises for the Degrees of Bachelor of Arts 
AND Bachelor of Science. 

1. Salutatory, in Latin. 

Melvin Smitli Holway, Augusta. 

2. The Struggle for Personal Rights. 

Heihert Harrison Chase, Unity. 

3. Kantian Criticism. 

George Howard Pierce, Portland. 
i. Charles I. 

Eugene Timothy McCartliy, Peal)Oily, Mass. 
MUSIC. 
5. Religion and tlm State. 

William Curtis Merryman, Brunswick. 
G. Civilization— A Blessing or a Curse ? 

George Francis Bates, Yarmouth. 
7. Tlie Iniliyidual and Society. 

Cliarles Ehcn Stinehticld, Bridgton. 

MUSIC. 

S. The Query of Pessimism. 

William Albion jNInody, Ivi'iuiebunkport. 
0. Irish Emanoipation. 

Arthur ( i lenwond Staples, Bath. 
lU. MonoiMily. 

.lesse Felt Ijibhy, Locke's Mills. 

MUSIC. 
EXICKCISICS FUK THK DEC.BEKS OF MASTKI! UF A U I'S AND 

Master of Science. 

11. English Oration. 

Mr. .lames ("nsliman Tarbox, Monti(^ello, Minn. 

12. Valodietory, in Latin. 

Mr. .Vlhert Henry I'eniull, Wostbrook. 
conferring of degrees 
prayer, 
iienkdiction. 

After the exercises, which were of unusual 

merit, the procession was again formed and a 

line of march was taken to Memorial Hall, in 

the lower Hoor of which were spread the 

bountifully loaded tables for the Commence- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



81 



ment Dinner. After the bill of fare had been 
severely dealt with a number of after-dinner 
speeches followed. Remarks were made by 
Messrs. Soule and Goodwin of New York, 
Hyde of New Hampshire, Mayor Libby of 
Portland, ex-Professor Chadbourne, Profes- 
sor Packard, and others. At the close of the 
speaking all united in singing the old hymn. 



THE LAKE GEORGE REGATTA. 

The intercollegiate boat race between the 
crews of Pennsylvania, Wesleyan, Princeton, 
Cornell, and Bowdoin, was pulled at Lake 
George on July 4, at about six o'clock in the 
afternoon. The Bowdoin crew arrived at 
the Fort William Henry hotel about ten days 
previous to the race, and were thus allowed 
some time to acquaint themselves with their 
new boat, as well as the new course which 
was one mile and a half in length. Every- 
thing worked well and the good time made 
in practice pulls gave ground for holding high 
hopes as to the crew's ability to make a good 
showing in the regatta. On the appointed 
day the Bowdoin men left their float at the 
appointed hour, and in the midst of a drizzling 
rain, paddled up to the starting line. Arriv- 
ing there, they were obliged to wait for over an 
hour in their thin rowing costumes, while the 
shower and the chilly wind blowing down the 
lake, rendered it anything but comfortable, 
and could not, to say the least, have had a 
bracing effect in fitting them for the struggle. 

The positions taken were : starting from 
the west shore of the lake, Pennsylvania, 
Wesleyan, Bowdoin, Cornell, and Prieceton. 
The word was given at about six o'clock. 
Cornell and Bowdoin at once dashed to the 
front, closely followed by the other crews, 
who were nearlj^ on a level for third position. 
These positions were held up to the end of 
the first half mile, when Bowdoin was seen 
to edge over towards Cornell who was on 
their port side. At a warning given by the 



referee, their boat was put about, but in 
changing the course they fell back several 
lengths. Having again settled down in the 
right course, a rapid gain was made on the 
crews in front, but it was oidy to be followed 
by another turn into the water of Cornell, and 
a second warning from the referee. Pulling 
back into position several boat lengths were 
again lost, and the crew which wore the white, 
in the words of the associated press dispatch, 
" had taken the last place and guarded it to the 
close." The zigzag course was followed up 
nearly to the finish, and by that time a lead 
had been gained by the other crews which 
could not be overcome. During the last 
quarter of a mile the men from Pennsylvania, 
by a magnificent spurt, took first place and 
maintained it to the finish, crossing the line 
about a length ahead of Wesleyan in the time 
of 9 m. 35 s. ; the time for Wesleyan was 
9 m. 40 s. ; Princeton, 9 m. 53 s. ; Cornell, 
9 m. 55 s., with Bowdoin close upon her in 
9 m. 57 s. Here was a surprise. Princeton, 
to whom previous to the race the last position 
had been conceded by all, had maintained the 
lead for over a mile, while Bowdoin, who had 
stood high in the opinion of good judges, and 
whose practice time had been reached by 
none of the others, was compelled to see her- 
self honoring a place behind all of her com- 
petitors. It was attributable, perhaps, to the 
wild course which she had taken almost from 
start to finish, which was caused not so much 
because of poor steering, as from the fact 
that one side of the boat pulled stronger oars 
than the other, and caused the shell to swerve 
to the left, when it became necessary to use 
the rudder, something which cannot be done 
without losing more or less headway. By 
some misjudgment the stroke did not average 
over forty to forty-two to the minute, while 
hitherto a stroke of from forty-six to forty- 
eight had been set. For all this, howevei-, it 
may not have been possible to have taken a 
position nearer to the front, but it is generally 



82 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



5 )1 
5 lOJ 



conceded that Bowdoin's sfanding at the close 
was to be partially explained b}^ the above 
mentioned facts. We give the statistics of 
the five competing crews : 

PENNSYLVAjriA. 



Bow, F. E. Wittberger '85 

No. 2, A. J. Gray '84 

No. 3, T. G. Hunter '82 

Sti-oke, G. Sergeant, Jr ...'8i 

Average 

■VVESLETAJf. 

Bow, W. Tyler '83 

No. 2, F. E. Bnindage '85 

No. 3, J. McCarthy 'Si 

Stroke, W. S. McDonald '84 

Average 

BOWDOIN. 

Bow, E. U. Cnrtis '82 

No. 2, W. G. Reed '82 

No. 3, A. F. Sweetser '84 

Stroke, W. O. Plimpton '82 

Average 

CORNELL. 

Bow, J. F. Tuthill '82 

No. 2, A. H.Cowlcs '82 

No. 3, S. S. Holman '85 

Stroke, H. B. Swartwout '85 

PRINCETON. 

Bow, T. A.C. Baker '83 

No. 2, G. B. Jenuison '83 

No. 3, W. C. Bird '85 

Stroke, G.C.Howell '83 

Average 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



163} 



1573 



A successful Comraeiiceraeut. 

Be on the ground early next fall. 

The clas.s punch must be squelched. 

The quick stroke didn't do the business. 

Winter, '83, has been elected bell-ringer. 

Who was George Washington, anyhow ? 

'85 possesses some adepts at glass smashing. 

The prize declairaers were drilled by Prof. Chap- 
man. 

The ventilation in Memorial Hall is pronounced 
perfect. 

L;iy our licking at Lake George to cold. 15o\v- 
doin's luck. 

The position of Faculty dog, so long vacant here, 
is at la.st admirably filled. 

It is the general opinion that we ought to have 
a series of class ball games next terra. 

"Between you and I" is the way a tutor in 
rhetoric, employed in a college situated not a thou- 
sand miles distant from Bowdoin, recently com- 
menced a sentence. 



Reporters were thick at the Commencement 
dinner. 

'85 did the white thing in petitioning Prof. 
Wheeler to retain his position here. 

Maynard's ice-cream saloon was a much visited 
place on the hot evenings near the end of the term. 

Prof Eobinson entertained bis Sabbath School 
class, made up of Juniors, Saturday evening, July 8. 

The examiners in mineralogy were told by a high 
ranking Junior that ground apatite was used to 
irrigate the soil. 

Bowdoin will be represented in the Lake George 
regatta next year. It is no time to leave off when 
you are in the hole. 

The undergraduates are much pleased that Mr. 
Fisher is to retain his position of tutor in mathe- 
matics for another year. 

The North American Beview, recently dropped 
from the list of library periodicals, will hereafter be 
found in the reading room. 

Thirty-eight men have taken the examinations 
for the next Freshman Class. This number will 
be considerably iucreased in the fall. 

'82 held class supper exercises at the Falmouth 
Hotel, Portland, Friday evening of last week. Olfi- 
cers for their next reunion were elected. 

C. C. Torrey secured the Greek prize also in 
'84; honorable mention, E. C. Smith. The compe- 
tition was small, only these two taking the prize 
examination. 

The Smyth mathematical prize of ,$300, for the 
Sophomore who has excelled in that study, has been 
awarded in '84 to C. C. Torrey ; honorable men- 
tion, W. H. Cothren. 

The Reading Room Association oljicers for the 
next year are as follows : President, Cole. '83 ; Vice 
President, Waterman, '84; Directors, Fling, '83, 
Wright, '84, and Cook, '85. 

Two large and nicely finished black walnut cab- 
inets have laeen placed in the library, in which are 
to be arranged the large number of \-alu,able draw- 
ings that have heretofore been kept in drawers and 
closets. 

Below we give the base 
son. It will be seen that 
and Wright in fielding. 



.stetson, .lb., . 
Wright, p., . 
Knapp, c. 
Waterman, s.s„ 
Cook, 1. f., 8. 8., 
Barton, c. f., . 
I'uckiird, U)., 
Torrey, 21)., 
Collins, r. !., 
Winter, 11)., 
I'hlnncy, r. f. 



1. f., 



-ball rt 


CO 


■d 


for the sea 


Knapi 


le 


ad 


s m 

3.3 


battinf 

ma > 


i ^ 






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t^S 60 












1^ 

Eh ft* 


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c 

b 
w 






5 10 


7 





.l.lii 


.1.56 .651 


8 14 


{» 


4 


.222 


.'3'22 .95. 


18 02 


14 


11 


.207 


..151 .8« 


4 8 


II 


12 


.111 


.111 .01 


8 4 


12 


I.') 


.l(i7 


•222 .51 


(1 7 


1 


7 


.11)1 


.184 .53. 


8 57 


4 


8 


.•2(Mi 


.2;i5 .m 


7 23 


17 


12 


.2;)! 


.269 .76v 


2 5 


2 


5 


.(ISII 


.OffO .58. 


3 21 


(1 


4 


..•B:i 


.:«! .S4( 


1 





1 


.noo 


.00(1 .."iOI 



<1 K 

32 e 

36 9 

37 3 
36 5 
36 8 
31 9 
34 8 
26 7 



8 302 60 67 64 211 133 90 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



83 



The Fourth was a very quiet day around college. 
The rattle of the mowiug machine on the campus 
or an occasional flre-cracker was all that broke the 
silence. 

79 Man (hack to take his A.M., looking over a 
book-case in a friend's room) — "Ah! this book ap- 
pears familiar. I used to admire Cicero's Anabasis 
very much in my youthful days." 

The damage done by the cyclone on the south 
roof and one of the chimneys of Maine Hall was very 
quickly repaired. The nearness of Commencement 
doubtless caused the unseemly haste. 

More than the usual nuniber of examiners were 
present at the examinations of last week. They ex- 
pressed themselves as satisfied at the showing up 
of the classes. The Juniors were especially com- 
phmented. 

The Latin prize was given in '84 to E. C. Smith, 
with honorable mention of Waterman and Kemp. 
Prof. Wheeler stated that these three stood so 
nearly together that it was extremely difficult to 
determine which was the leading man. 

The Bowdoin gymnasium boom is assuming defi- 
nite proportions. A committee, consisting of the 
President, and Treasurer Young, are taking sub- 
scriptions. Three thousand five hundred dollars 
were pledged on Wednesday of last week. 

The students with whom Prof. Wheeler has be- 
come acquainted since his advent here were very 
pleasantly entertained at his residence on the even- 
ing of July 4th. His grounds and those' of Prof. 
Packard's were decorated with Chinese lanterns. 

The second Sopho-Freshman ball game took 
place July 3d, and was easily won by '84 in a score 
of 16 to 2. Had the Freshmen been stronger be- 
hind the bat the result would have flattered them 
more, though even then they could not have hoped 
to win. 

The funny man spent Commencement Week here, 
and inflicted damage to the amount of $-350 upon 
the college by setting fire to one of the out-buildings. 
We hail with rejoicing the report that a squad of 
policemen from Portland will be employed to guard 
the college grounds hereafter during Commence- 
ment Week. 

The first edition of Prof. Packard's history of 
Bowdoin will come from the hands of the printer in 
October or November next. The book will be 
heavily bound and will contain about 900 pages. It 
treats of the years from the founda'tion of the col- 
lege down to 1880. The subscription price will be 
five dollars per copy. 

The Associated Press dispatch did rank injus- 
tice to our crew in its account of the regatta. 
Ninety minutes of weary waiting in the race boat in 
the midst of a cold rain-fall spoiled our chances, 
and not bad steering. Plenty of men were ready 
the next morning after the race to back the White 
against the other crews. 

The officers of the Alumni Association for the 
next three years are as follows : President, Jotham 
B. Sewall, Braintree, Mass. ; Vice President, Hon. 
Josiah Crosby, Dexter ; Secretary, Prof. H. L. Chap- 



man, Bruniswick; Treasurer, Hou. Stephen J. 
Young, Brunswick; Executive Committee, Gen. 
John M. Brown, Portland, Dr. Alfred Mitchell, 
Brunswick, and Gen. Thomas W. Hyde, Bath. 

The playing of our ball nine has given satisfac- 
tion this year, and, had the Bates series been com- 
pleted and the other games played that were ar- 
ranged, there would be no cause for complaint in the 
season's work. It is certainly exasperating that 
year after year series should be left undecided, and 
all the more when we realize that the fault is, as a 
rule, with us. There is no reason, except laziness, 
why our nines should stop all work at about the 
middle of June, when a month of the college year 
most favorable to ball playing yet remains. 

The action taken by the Faculty in regard to the 
alleged misbehavior of certain members of the 
newly graduated class was highly offensive, not only 
to all '82 men but also to the whole body of students. 
That a man, after he has taken his final exami- 
nations, should be watched, reported, and harshly 
dealt with when his offense is a modified form of 
one that has been frequently committed here by 
many students who have escaped scot free, is at least 
surprising, and something that will not tend to 
raise the officers concerned, in this sort of govern- 
ment, in the estimation of those people who love 
fair play. 

At the annual meeting of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society, on Wednesday forenoon, the following were 
chosen as the officers for the coming year : Presi- 
dent, Hon. Josiah Crosby, Dexter ; Vice Presi- 
dent, Hon. Joseph W. Symonds, Portland; Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, Prof. Fraulilin C. Robinson ; 
Literary Committee, Prof. Henry L. Chapman, 
Brunswick, Rev. Edward N. Packard, Dorchester, 
Mass., Daniel C. Linscott, Esq., Boston, Mass. The 
following men from the graduating class were elected 
members of the society : G. F. Bates, M. S. Holway, 
E. T. McCarthy, W. A. Moody, H. H. Chase, A. G. 
Staples, W. C. Merryman, C. E. Stiuchfield, and W. 
E. Mason. 

The Prize Declamations of the Sophomore Class 
were held in the church on the evening of July 5th, 
and were listened to by an audience of good size 
considering the inclemency of the weather. The 
speaking, on the whole, was good ; the abundance 
of heavy pieces, however, made the exercises rather 
dry. Since the committee was unable to name the 
best speaker, the prizes were divided equally be- 
tween Barton and Waterman. Grimmer provided 
music. The program was as follows : 
Sympathy for Greek Revolutionists. Webster. 

Blessings of the Constitution. Webster. 

Declaration of Irish Bights. Grattan. 

J. A. Waterman. 
In Defense of the French Revolution. Fox. 

J. Torrey. 
Cicero Against Mark Antony. Brougham. 

S. W. Walker. 
Social Equality in America. Webster. 

O. W. Means. 
Our Battle Flags. Schurz. 

L. Barton. 



A. Pierce. 
S. R. Child. 



84 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Our Honored Dead. Seecher. 

C. E. Saj-ward. 
Centennial Oration. Winihrop. 

Z. yV. Kemp. 
Speech of Vindication. Emmet. 

E. C. Smith. 
Ajiierican Nationality. Choate. 

C. E. Adam.s. 
Eulogy on Garfield. Blaine. 

*A. F. Sweetser. 
* Absent. 

An audience almcst filling the large cliurch 
greeted the Junior declaimers on Monday evening, 
July 10. The speaking, on the whole, was pro- 
nounced hy many to be as good as any in the his- 
tory of the college. Prof. Grimmer carried out the 
musical portion of the exercises. The awarding 
committee, consisting of Prof. F. C. Eobinson, Rev. 
Alfred Gooding, and Mr. F. A. Fisher, decided that 
the first prize belonged to Fling and the second to 
Stetson. The program : 
Appeal for Judgment upon Hastings. JiurJ.'e. 

F. M. Flmg, Portland. 
"White Murder Case. Webster. 

H. E. Cole, Bridgton. 
The First Predicted Eclipse. Mitchel. 

G. B. Swan, "Waldoboro. 
Icilius. Kellorjr/, 

H. P. Kendall, Bowdoiuham. 
Death of Garfield. Blaine. 

H. L. Allen, Alfred. 
Danger of Conquest. Corwin. 

N. B. K. Pettingill, Augusta. 
Vindication of Ireland. Sheil. 

0. H. Stetson, East Sumner. 
Death of Charles IX. Maud Moore. 

*H. A. Bascom, Portland. 
Great Britain and America. TIall. 

W. A. Perkins, Salem, N. H. 
Nomination of Grant. ConJding. 

R. C. "Washburn, Portland. 
Godfrey de Bouillon. Anonymous. 

A. C. Gibson, Bangor. 
Character of Napoleon. Phillips. 

*A. E. Austiu, Eeadfield. 
* Absent. 

The annual Freshman supper came off at the 
Preble House, Portland, Friday evening, July 7th, 
and the members of '85 state that they enjoyed to 
its fullest extent the carrying out of this ancient 
custom. The class went up to Portland on the 4.30 
train, and the plug hat, cane, and blue ribbon were 
seen on the streets until about 10 o'clock, when all 
repaired to the parlors of the Preble and did ample 
justice to the excellent metm. After supper the 
literary exercises were held in accordance with tlic 
following program, President Thomas in the chair: 

Oration, F. AV. Davis. 

Poem <). DviT. 

History L. HodfjkiMS. 

Prophecy, E. H. Allen. 

All these parts were carefully written and well de- 
livered. The toa.sts were then proposed by Toast- 
master Leigh and responded to as follows: 

Class of 'fWi R. Webb. 

The Ladies N. H. Ford. 

Old Bowdoin <). R. CmAi. 

The Faculty, D. P. Jlowanb 

College Orchestra b. li. Folsom. 

University Crew H. GcmhIciidw. 

The Band M. GnildMrd. 

The Ball Nino, W. iMi»xr,s. 



The responses were in a happy vein. The odes, 
owing to the enterprise of the Committee on Odes, 
were excellent. There was no dism-der, and Mr. 
Gibson of the Preble did everything that he prom- 
ised. The class separated the next morning entirely 
satisfied with the closing event of their first year in 
Bowdoin. 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited 
to send personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Bruns- ■ 
wick.] 

Seventeen members of the graduating class of 
'82 sat down to an elegant spread at the Falmouth 
Hotel, Portland, ou the evening of the 14th. 
Voted to purchase a class cup. The following 
officers were elected : President, Gilraan : Secretary, 
Carpenter ; Committee of Arrangements, Bates, 
Libby, Jordan. 

The Bowdoin alumni of Denver and vicinity 
talk of forming an association. There are several 
graduates in that city ; also in Boulder, Leadville, 
Colorado Springs, and other towns of Colorado. 

'32.— Prof. Daniel R. Goodwin, D.D., LL.D., 
has just given to the college one thousand dollars, 
the interest of which is to be reserved as a prize 
for the person in the graduating class who delivers 
the best oration at Commencement exercises. 

'65. — M. J. Hill is teacher of mathematics in 
Bryant and Stratton's Commercial College, Boston. 

'70. — C. A. Page, principal of Grotou (Mass.) 
High School, formerly principal of Fryeburg Acad- 
emy and later of Calais High School, has been 
elected principal of Leicester Academy, Leicester, 
Mass. 

'7Q. — F. R. Kimball has recently published a 
book, " Signs of the Times." 

The following account of the class of '79 has 
been handed to us by a member of that class : 

Aohoru, moulder and contractor for ship frames, 
Newcastle, Me. 

Bourne, physician, Kennebunk, Me. 

Bowker, teaching high school at Groveland.Mass. 

Byron, ticket agent at Bay City, Mich. 

Careleto'n, graduated at Philadelphia Divinity 
School. Address, Rockport, Mo. 

Castner, reading law at Waldoboro, Mo. 

Corey, treasurer of ColHns Granite Co., East 
Bine Uiil, Me. 

Davies, dispensary clerk. Insane Hospital, Au- 
gusta, Me. 

Davis, manufacturing, and liorny-fisted son of 
the soil, Portland, Me. 

Filield, traveling for A. Little & Co., Portland. 

Henderson, teaching mathematics in High 
School, Bath, Mo. 

Huston, H. .\., principal of Ford Schools, Lafay- 
ette, lii(b 

Huston, J. P., practicing law at Damariscotta. 

■Johnson, C. F., teaching at Macliias, Me. 

Johnson, G. W., preaching at ililford, N. B. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 



85 



Kimball, drug business, Sioux City, Iowa. 

Lumbert, practicing law, firm of Powers & Lum- 
bert, Houlton, Me. 

Page, pension office, Washington, D. C. 

Peiinell, Westbrook, Me. 

Ring, insurance business, 606 Congress Street, 
Portland, Me. 

Stearns, practicing law, Waterford, Me. 

Tarbox, practicing law, Mouticello, Minn. 



NECROLOGY, 1881-82. 

'25. — Henry Wadswortli Longfellow, b. Portland, 
February 27, 1807; d. Cambridge, March 24, 1882, 
aged 75. 

'25. — David Shepley, b. Norridgewock, June 1, 
1804; d. Providence, E. I., Dec. 1, 1881, aged 77. 

'26.— William Tyng Hillard, b. Gorhara, Feb. 
20, 1806; d. Bangor, Nov. 9, 1881, aged 76. 

'26. — George Yetton Sawyer, b. Wakefield, N. 
H., Dec. 5, 1805; d. Nashua, N. H., June 15, 1882, 
aged 77. 

'27.— John Stevens Abbott, b. Temple, Jan. 6, 
1807; d. Watertown, Mass., July 12, 1881, aged 74. 

'27._John Owen, b. Portland, March 28, 1806 ; 
d. Cambridge, Mass., April 22, 1882, aged 76. 

'30.— Jonathan Tilden Moulton, b. Bucksport, 
Oct. 8, 1808; d. Chicago, 111., Dec, 1881, aged 73. 

'34. — Samuel Clement Fessenden, b. New Glou- 
cester, March 7, 1815; d. Stamford, Conn., April, 
1882, aged 67. 

'35. — Asahel Moore, b. Gardiner, Nov. 16, 1811 ; 
d. Needham, Mass., April 16, 1882, aged 70. 

'37.— Albert Ruter Hatch, b. Greenland, N. H., 
Oct. 10, 1817; d. Portsmouth, N. H., March 5, 
1882, aged 64. 

'44.— Samuel Porter Dinsraore, b. Bangor, Oct. 
29, 1823 ; d. New York, March 23, 1882, aged 58. 

'44.— Josiah Howes, b. New Sharon, Sept. 24, 
1819 ; d. Clarinda, Iowa, Dec, 1881, aged 62. 

'45.— Alvab Black, b. Limington, Dec. 3, 1817; 
d. Paris, Jan. 29, 1882, aged 65. 

'47.— George Stevens Peters, b. Ellsworth, June 
2, 1826 ; d. Ellsworth, Oct. 6, 1881, aged 55. 

'47. — John Cotton Smith, b. Andover, Mass., 
Aug. 4, 1826 ; d. New York, Jan. 9, 1882, aged 55. 

'55. — Charles Henry Foster, b. Orouo, Feb. 18, 
1830 ; d. Philadelphia, March 13, 1882, aged .52. 

'55.— John Wingate, b. Ossipee, N. H., Oct. 5, 
1831; d. Nov., 1881, aged 50. 

'57. — Edward Eastman, b. Saco, April 3, 1837; 
d. Saco, July 5, 1882, aged 45. 

NOT BEFORE REPORTED. 

'14.— Winthrop Hilton, b. Deerfleld, N. H., 
Sept. 14, 1794; d. Deerfleld, Aug., 1869, aged 75. 

'23.— William Brown, b. Portland, Nov. 12, 1806 ; 
d. Austin, Texas, 1877, aged 71. 

'32. — Samuel Beamon, b. Bridgtori, Feb. 12, 
1808; d. New York, July 9, 1877, aged 69. 

'35.— Edward St. John Nealley, b. Lee, N. H., 
Dec 16, 1811 ; d. Bath, 1881, aged 70. 

'38. — Amander Barker, b. Waterford, March 23, 
1810; d. date not given. 



'55.— John Farnbam Shaw, b. Greenville, March 

5, 1829 ; d. date not given. 

'58. — John Milton Staples, b. Buxton, April 16, 
1836; d. New Orleans, 1868, aged 32. 

'.59. — Franklin Putnam, b. Ci'ovdon, N. H., Sept. 

6, 1833; d. Kansas City, Nov., 1865, aged 32. 

'71. — Sylvanus Otis Hussey, b. S. Newbury, July 
31, 1844 ; d. Dec. 20, 187:), aged 29. 



FINE STATIONERY and ENGRAVING 
HOUSE. 

Handsomely Eugi-aved Invitations for 

iC^ Colleges, Weddings, Receptions, &c. 
Fraternity Stationery always on hand. 

Our iinequaled facilities and long practical experience, enable 
us to produce tiie newest styles and most artistic effects, while 
our reputation is a guarantee of the quality of our productions. 

II 21 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



FINEST steel Portrait ( 



per engraved is Hollyer's 



The ONLY large one in line and stipple. Endorsed by inti- 
mate personal fi'iends, M. C.'s, U. S. Senators, S. C. Judges, Mem- 
bers of Cabinet, Governors, as " The Best Likeness," and a 
"Perfect Work of Art." Sells quick. Gives perfect satis- 
faction. Extra terms to good agents 

THE HENRY BILL PUBLISHING CO., Norwich, Ct. 

E[E:NrRY F. aRIFFIN, 

58 Temple Place, BOSTON", 

li|ia?©if, ilatiojiiifj mi Filalgf, 

Wedding Invitations, Business Cards, &c. 
COLLEGE IIMVITATIOIMS A SPECIALTY. 

Beautiml Engraved Visiting Cards. 

Plate and Pack, $150 ; former price, $3.00. 

GRIFFIN'S WEDDING CARD DEPOT, 

58 Temple Place, BOSTOliT. 



SOMETHING NEW IN CIGAEETTES. 

OUR LITTLE BEAUTIES 

PRESSED CIGARETTES. 

Our Pressed Cigarettes smoke longer and cooler than round 
made Cigarettes. 

The Tobacco being pressed and interlocked, prevents parti- 
cles from entering the mouth, and causes perfect combustion. 

There is no taste of the paper, as under pressure it becomes 
impx'egnated with tlie tobacco. 

OUE LITTLE BEAUTIES are made from the highest grade 
of Virginia sun-cured leaf, blended with Turkish tobacco of our 
own importation, and smoke mild, with a most agreeable aroma 
and taste. \Ve guaranthe them pore and free from arti- 
ficial FLAVORING OR DRUGS. 

OUR LITTLE BEAUTIES .are made with the now celebrated 
Papier Ambr^, the same as used on our Opera Puffs Cigarettes, 

AND WILL NOT STICK TO THE LIPS. 

OUK LITTLE BEAUTIES are put up in packages of teu,— so 
conipact that they will not break -when toted in the pocket. 
AIiIiEM' & GINTBR, Manufacturers, 

KICHMOKID, VIRGINIA. 



86 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




ilDBJ 

»^^ CIEfflETIES . 

These Goods are sold under an 

Absolute Guaiantee 

That they are the Finest and PUREST 

goods upon the market; 
They ARE FREE from DRUGS and 

CHEMICALS of any kind; 
They consist of the Finest Tobacco and 

Purest Rice-Paper made. 

OUR SALES EXCEED theproducts 

of ALL. leading manufactories combined. 

None Genuine without the trade-mark 
of the BULL. Take no other. 

W.T.BLACKIELL&CO. 

Sole Manufacturers. Durham, N. C. 



Of every kind, to fill Spring, Summer, .and Fall 
engiigements now coming to h.ind. 
Qradualcs and undergraduates of an}- School. 
Semiriiiry, or College, of Utile or no (experience, or 
oth(!r por.sons desiring to teach, should not fail to 
address at once, with stamp, for application form. 

National Teachers' Agency, 

(JiNCINNATI, UllKl. 

N. B. — Situations in the WeslnnA .So!(//taspoeially. 
Good pay to local agents and private correspondents. 



CAUTION TO SMOKEHS, 

Beware of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that ei'eiy strapper has 




TRY IT. 
• Fine, Mild& Sweet. 



Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 
KINNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 
SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 

432 Washington St., Boston, 

luvite attention to tlie largest and finest stock in the city, of 

DIAMONDS, RARE GEMS, 

KErKESENTATI\'ES OK THE 

Gorham Manufacturing Company, in Boston. 

Exliiliit a large and complete collection of tlie 

SOLID SILVER AND ELECTRO-PLATED WARES 

I'KODrCED BV THIS CCIMPAXY. 

The ornamentations now used and the etTects produced, are 
something entirely novel in the craft of the Silversmith, and will 
interest every one by their combination of artistic and useful 
qualities. 

Especial Attention given to Designing Class-Day 
and College Invitations of Every Description. 



•» 



924 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



Microscopes, 
Telescopes, 
Field Glasses, 
Opera Glasses, 

Drawing Instruments, 
Surveying Instruments, 
Thermometers, 

Barometers, 
M.igic Lanti'rns, 
Apparatus for 

Projection, 
Pliilosopliical and 
Chemical Apparatus. 



SKNT ON AI'IM.ICATION: 
iiimcnis. IIM pap'8. Part 2— Opticjil 
I'nrI :!— Magic Lanterns, 120 pages. 
iiMicnts, 100 pages. I'art 5— Meteor- 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. O. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers ; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes ; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

DEALER IN 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Students. 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

780 Middle Street, - - - - Portland Me. 



J^, O. REED, 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vie"ws ; also College Vie"ws, 



ALL KINDS OF 



liloJi lOil 



^:m:Tl 



For Schools and Colleges, 

EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDEE,S, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 




E, SMITH, Variety Store. Bottom Prices to Students. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



C. 



DEALER IK ALL KINDS OF 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. WILSON & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



@ a 1 a Si t W a a €, I TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 



Office at Central Telephone Office, Bruiiswick. 
IS" All Oi-ilers left at C. E. Townsciicrs Store will 
be promptly attended to. 



IRA C. STOCECBRiDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 



156 Exchange Street, Portland. 



GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8j a?id ^8j Congress St.,a}2d 2jj Middle Si., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

4S-SEND FOR PhICK LiST. 

J. H. PETERSON & SON, 

DKALKRS IN 

Boots and Shoes, Tohacco and Cigars, 
Main Street, ---.--- Brunswick, Me. 

FRA.NK E. KOBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets. 

FIRST -CLASS 

Flaao-Sj Ofgansj and Melodeons, 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 




COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle ridin<r is unsurpiissod as a 
melhodof trnvcliii^r.wlii'lliiM- I'orspppd, 
s|i()rt. or rciicWMl of liciill h. The pi-iic- 
tii-!il.ilitv of llic niMcliiiu- li;is hi^i-n 
tliiiroiifjlily li-^l. (1. Mild siilisliiolorily 
pnivi'd, lii'Vond rnii>Mioii. 'riiiiii-iiiurs 
aw in diiily use. iiiid ilie iiiinilHT l.s 
nipidly iiicrciisiii>r. 'I'lii' cxciTisp l» 
rpcdininciidrdliy llii'nu'dk'iil |irofpssion 
iis most hi-iipliciiil lo lip.ilili. Iiiiiif-in;; 
inlo pxpicisc ulniost every muscle of 
till' IhmIv. 

Send ;ic. .sljiliip for llCpilKO lllllslmlcd 
r.-iiiil.i(;iie roiiljiiiiinf.' priix' lists iind full 
Nronimlloii. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washington St„ BOSTON, MASS. 



N. E. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

i 142 & M4 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 



The Sixty-Secoud Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of iVIiiiue. will commence February 8th, 1883, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshua L. Chasiberlaix, LL.D., President; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H, Gerrish, M.D., 
Acatomy ; Charles "W. Goddard, A.M., Mediail Jurisprudence ; Henrt 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Bdrt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D,, Surgery and Cliuical Surgery ; Charles 0. 
HcNT, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics \ Daniel *F. Ellis, M.D., 
Repstrar and Librarian ; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHE'lL, M.D., Secretary, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



5^= Watches, Clocks, and Jeweliy promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



jk-lmitiy, 



JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bovmd in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Rilling and Blank Book Work to Order. 

C. L. RICHARDSON, 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

^Qp-Transient Orders for Milk or Cream filled b.v giviug suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 



Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOXCS. STA-XIONERY, ROOM 
I>A.I*ER, P£:RI0X)IC.A.I.S. <ScC. 



A. V/. TOV/NSEND, 

Books, Stationery, |] Fancy Goods. 

Also Ertstpni Mutual Uniou Telegraph OtBco. 
Under To-nrn Clock, - - - Brunsviok, Me. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



FEME SMiBTS 

MADE FBOH MEASUBE, 

Jl PllFlOT FIT QUJIIJLITEID. 

Also a Full Assortment of 

GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

■IIULL a ii.t 
Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 

Orders by Mail Promptly Attended To. 

MIW BOTQ STOBE. 




ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

DIPOS. EilDICIlES, 

Fancy it Toilet Articles, Ciprs I ToMcco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

|[pg° Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

tFo bit/^ i^nM 0i§uf(i and 0i^utdie6. 
Jiimrnfodii/cm 0/ #?g Sp^tmii (^rrnvd 
■of "Soivdnm Boik^e." JIU^ dmht 



J%am St., SiMn6mck. 



Tie Palace CIoWds Store of Maine. 




^XjXrfi sa?oxt.E;. 



ALL THE LEADING NOVELTIES IN 

YQUMQ MEM'S CLOTHIIQ 

AND NOBBY FURNISHING GOODS. 



STRICTI-y ONE PRICE. 

[^°Boys' and Children's Department entirely separate . 

BLUE STORE, 



M^ 





il><^ 




\ 



.»►- 



t 



-i- 




#wi#lM ©1 l©a^ 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCTOBER 18, 1882. 



Vol. XII. 



No. 7. 



A GLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDKNT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

Hi^LL L. DA. VIS, 

Books, Stationery, aod Paper Hangiogs, 

5S Exchange Sheet, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

FRANK M. STETSON, 



^tt^^SJ^A- 



PC 

w 
en 

Q 

z; 
< 




DEANE BROTHERS & SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Glass and Medium Furniture, 

^P Lowest Prices in the State, 

755 & 185 Middle Street. - - - Port/and, Me. 



VISITORS TO PORTLAND, 

Independent of any intention of pur- 
chasing goods in our line, are invited to 
inspect the Model Clothing and Fur- 
nishing Store of Allen & Co., 470 Con- 
gress St., opp. Preble House, 

LANCASTER BUILDING. 



I^Dunlap & Co., of New York, Celebrated 
Stiff Hats. 

Also his New Straw Mackinaw, $2.00 and 
$2.50. 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 

LORING,* SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENOEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants fnr admission will be examiued in the 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, Including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the Jineid; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Geeek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Keal equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The exiiminatiDUs held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. | 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a - 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- i 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such ca.scs the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the cotu-se of 
study in tlie institution under his charge, togetlier 
with tlie names of those raeraborsof his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next #'reshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which cacli candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon tlio regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to bo 
satisfactory, the I'rincipal sending them will bo fur- 
nished a list of topics on which ho will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as lie may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following talile : 

EQUIEED— IfQUE HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVE.S — FOTK HOtTKS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 
Latin, two terras. 
Greek, two terms. 
Natural History, three terms. 
Physics, one term. 
Chemistry, two terms. 
Science of Language, one term. 
English Literature, two terras. 
.German, two terms. 
History of Philosophy, two terms. 
International Law and I^Iilitary Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 




mm 




Vol. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCT. 18, 1882. 



No. 7. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVER'S ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
Arthur J. Eussell,'33, Mauagiug Editor pro tern. 
Herbert P. Kendall, '83, Business Editor. 
Herbert E. Cole, '83. Oliver W. Means, '84. 

Howard K. Goodwin, '83. Llewellyn Barton, '34. 
Charles H. Stetson, '83. Charles E. Sayward, '84. 
isT. Brooks K. Pettingill, '83. 

Terms — $2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XII., No. 7.-0CT. 18, 1882. 

Editorial Notes 87 

Literary : 

The Ceaseless Echo 90 

Smoke 90 

Conservatism 91 

College Items 92 

Personal 96 

Clippings 97 

Editors' Table 97 



EDITORIAL KOTES. 



The Orient board, back once more from 
the summer's pleasure or work, as the case 
may have been, " bobs up serenelj- " and sa- 
lutes its old friends and patrons. We hope 
you have bad as pleasant a vacation as we, 
and that there still linger in your minds 
those delightful summer evenings, with their 
visions of door-step parties, hammocks swing- 
ing under the trees, where the crowd was not 



unmanageably large. And again, we hope 
you have not forgotten those swingings on 
back gates, over which sweet nothings were 
exchanged. However, such a subject cannot 
be trifled with, and having brought up the 
mental picture, we refrain. 



At the beginning of this college year 
thirty young gentlemen waved affectionate 
adieux to tearful mothers and admiring sis- 
ters, and suddenly appeared upon the stage 
of college life. We did hope that a few 
more "father's joys and mother's prides " 
would help swell the number, but for some 
unexplained reason such was not the case. 
To those that are here, however, the Orient 
wishes, without intending any offense, to 
offer a little advice. It falls in with our 
ideas of the eternal fitness of things, that 
you should subscribe for the Orient. As a 
college publication, it appeals to the college 
largely for its support. And to you now, as 
an integral factor of the college, it makes its 
appeal. In accordance with this idea the 
Orient will be sent to each one of you, and 
those who desire it to be discontinued will 
call upon our genial business editor and so 
state the case. 

As a further word of advice, we would 
suggest that you do not lose your confidence 
in human nature and in the power of the 
upperclassmen's minds to detect mai-ks of 
genius, if, after each society has picked out 
its quota of men, you are not quite so much 
sought after, and the beauties of Memorial 
Hall and the location for the new gym- 
nasium are not quite so assiduously pointed 
out. You will take your turn at that sort of 



BOWDOiN ORIENT. 



business, all too soon; and in the meantime 
comfort yourselves with the reflection that the 
world always has a place for modest merit. 



We desire to call the attention of the two 
next lower classes to the fact that the time 
has come for tliem to hand in articles for 
publication, the merit of which is to be the 
basis of the election of the succeeding board 
of editors. And, in connection with this, we 
must express our astonishment at the ex- 
tremely small amount of literary matter sent 
us by the students. We notice at other col- 
leges that the reverse is true. Some of them 
complain of being overwhelmed by the pro- 
ductions of ambitious writers, and at one col- 
lege we noticed a large proportion handed in 
was poetry. Other college publications are 
full of rondeaux and neat little turns in 
poetry, which are so popular now. There 
seems to be no reason why this should not be 
so here. It is a shame that all the Bowdoin 
talent in that line should " be laid up in a 
napkin"! The old question of the last few 
years, " Where is the Bowdoin poet?" is 
very applicable to the present situation. Col- 
lege yarns more or less founded on fact, usu- 
ally less, are always interesting. We remem- 
ber with what gusto we listened to the stories 
of our uncles, fathers, and brothers, before 
we ourselves were under the cherishing care 
of our Alma Mater. And with what pleasure 
we looked foiw; rd to being a magna pars in 
some of those wonderful jokes! Everything 
favored those old undertakings. Strings tied 
to pails of water up in the capacious fire- 
places always Inirned off and let the water 
down just at the right time. Pans of ashes 
set up on a half-open door always did their 
duty. Stories a! ways gain a great part of their 
romance by being told two or tiiree times. 



Tlio.se who are interested in atiiletics are 
now in the field. Cold weatlier comes on so 



soon after our term opens that it is impossi- 
ble to do much out of doors. It seems al- 
most useless to keep reiterating that a gym- 
nasium is a crying need of the college, but 
we saw by a paper about last Commence- 
ment that the sura of fourteen thousand dol- 
lars was already raised and in the hands of 
the authorities. If this is true there seems 
to be no reason why the building should not 
now be going up. As things are managed 
now, the board at next Commencement will 
vote to erect a gymnasium ; at the Com- 
mencement after that they will submit plans 
to builders; and again, at the Commence- 
ment after that will accept the lowest bid, 
and the gymnasium will be a fact. Not- 
withstanding these discouragements we hope 
the base-ball men will go to work and show 
us some good games next spring. 

As to boating, if there is a college con- 
test anywhere, we know of no reason wliy 
a crew should not be sent to participate. 
There is still material left in college to form 
a good crew. It has been said that wiien so 
good a crew as was sent to Lake George last 
summer was defeated, it was not probable 
that a crew we could raise now would stand 
much show. But a judicious selection of 
men and hard work will give us no mean 
crew. It seemed improbable tliat Bowdoin 
should bring up the rear last summer. But 
the improbable happened tiien, and it may 
happen again, this time, let us hope, more 
favorably . 



The small number of men in the Fresh- 
man class this year has brought up that old 
question of the attitude that a college sliould 
assume to students. There lias been some 
complaint tliat tiie ^'acuity has not been ener- 
getic enough in its attempts lo influence stu- 
dents, who intend to enter college somewhere, 
to come here. Those who hold this view 
argue that, believing as they do that we have 
a fine course of study well-fitted to develop a 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



89 



man on all sides, that every means should be 
taken to get as many men under its influence 
as possible. We ourselves well remember 
that Vi^hen we were thinking of enteiing col- 
lege, and had about decided upon Bowdoin, 
agents from another college came to us and 
offered, in the name of the authorities of that 
college, to give pecuniary aid if we would 
change our decision. On the other hand, 
those who oppose this policy, say that a first- 
class college ought not to be dependent upon 
the number of its students, or upon its stu- 
dents at all ; that those who are connected 
with the college should go on with their work 
toward attaining a broader culture and knowl- 
edge, and if students are attracted to go over 
the ground and go on with them, why so 
much the better. This argument, it seems to 
us, will apply very well to a rich college, as 
all colleges ought to be but unfortunately are 
not. We do not see how it can apply to 
the average American college, as Dartmouth, 
Amherst, Williams, and our own, which in 
the nature of the case are to a great degree 
dependent upon their students, whether they 
ought to be or not. 

We hope that all efforts have been made 
to draw students to Bovi^doin and bring them 
under the influence of our excellent course 
of instruction. Because we have a some- 
what smaller class than usual, we do not be- 
lieve it is so much due to lack of effort on 
the part of the Faculty as to certain other 
causes. 



We learn with regret that there have 
been symptoms of trouble between students 
and town boys. It seems that the trouble 
started on the day of the Sophomore-Fresh- 
man base-ball game. Owing to the promi- 
nence of certain Sophomores on that occasion, 
a prominence which to say the least was 
marked, a few of the small yaggers who in- 
fest the college grounds, took great offense. 



Considering ripe fruit and ancient cucumbers 
a good medicine for such excessiveness, they 
proceeded to administer it. We sincerely 
hope that measures will be taken to prevent 
the feeling from spreading, for it is exceed- 
ingly unpleasant to feel, while walking along 
the street, that one is liable at any moment 
to stop a ripe egg. There is no reason why 
gentlemen living in town and gentlemen in 
the college should not get along together 
without trouble. As for the yaggers, the 
sooner they are excluded from the grounds 
by the college authorities, and kept off en- 
tirely, the better it will be. 



It has been the boast of our American 
institutions that they have been conservative 
towards the good customs and radical toward 
the bad. The truth of this boast has been 
shown here this year. Bowdoin has always 
boasted of her conservatism, and when the 
question of co-education was so strongly agi- 
tated, a few years ago, and it was the popu- 
lar thing to admit women to institutions be- 
fore peculiar to men, she did not give way 
to the feeling, and the issue has proved that 
slie did well. 

The treatment of the Freshmen this year 
is a great improvement over the old manner. 
By it, Bowdoin has shown that she is not 
conservative towards a bad custom. We hai\ 
the fact as the dawn of a better day for the 
college. 



Those who are interested and desirous 
that Bowdoin shall have a good representa- 
tive Bugle this year, cannot be too early in 
their efforts to get a good set of men ap- 
pointed as soon as possible. It is due to 
those who are to be editors that the matter 
should be taken in hand as soon as practicable. 
A few weeks mean a good deal to the success 
of the Bugle^ as previous years' experience 
has shown. 



90 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



THE CEASELESS ECHO. 

There comes the ceaseless echo 
Of a happier day to me, 
Like the forest's dreary murmur, 
Or the surge of the distant sea. 

How softly aud how sadly, 
When fade the stars away. 
It breaks my dreamland fancy 
And brings me back to day : 

And in the busy noontide 
And at the midnight hour, 
I hear its constant whisper 
And feel its fateful power. 

It brings the thought, the saddest 
To every heart in pain, 
That joys once known, departed, 
Will ne'er return again. 

And ever through life's changes — 
Though fitful breezes blow— 
Its every pleasure shadowing 
And deepening every woe. 

Will come the ceaseless echo 
Of a happier day to me. 
Like the forest's dreary murmur 
Or the surge of the distant sea. 

G. C. Cresset, '75. 



SMOKE. 

Tt seems good to sit once more in the old 
room after the summer's fun and pleasure. It 
seems good to sit at the window and look out 
at the statel}' row of elms that runs the whole 
length of the colleges. They are now but 
dimly seen througli the twilight waving their 
arms in the October chilliness ; and the twi- 
light, too, is deepened in the room by the dim, 
barely curling smoke of ray meditative pipe. 
And a meditative pipe it is, too, for in the 
smoke is the mirror of the whole summer, — 
hills rising in the warm sunlight and rivers 
lazily flowing past wooded banks, — but the 
sunlight is over everything as I look back 
upon it. Not a wasted summer at any rate, 
since filled with such scenes, and such food 



for meditation through the winter. Whiff, 
whiff; the room is so still the smoke does not 
curl but rises in along, graceful curve toward 
the ceiling ; 

" Hills going up to Heaven," 

as Robert Browning says, is the scene I can 
see in that smoke. Cape Cod hill, with its 
wooded sides and rocky top, and winding 
along its southern slope a carriage road. Two 
tracks for the carriage wheels and one for the 
horse and the spaces between the two, all 
grown up with grass and wild flowers. The 
adventurous golden-rod has grown on the 
sides of the road in such profusion that it 
sends out pioneers to occupy the road, like 
the overflow of the old countries into the new 
world, risking hardship for the sake of larger 
space and an opportunity to breathe the free 
air of heaven unpolluted. 

On the right going up, the hill slopes 
so suddenly down that the tall hemlocks, not 
a hundred feet below, have their conical tops 
on a line with the road. On the left, sloping 
suddenly up, is a forest of little white birches 
covering the ground with a carpet of wrinkled 
yellow leaves i?i summer as well as fall, (^n 
the sides of the road crowding close to the 
wall is a perfect mass of golden-rod that de- 
light to tangle the sunshine all up in their 
golden crowns. 

Yes, Nellie, the scene is beaut but 

stop, my pipe is out, — why, I was almost 
dreaming. Fizz, sputter, what a fuss a little 
match makes ! Now we are under way 
again. That curl of smoke rises like a smooth 
flowing river. What a summer scene that 
brings up ! We sat one da}' just on the very 
edge of the river, compelled to retreat every 
few minutes by the incoming tide, and made 
an imbecile sketch of the scene. Any sketcli, 
however, would do injustice to that bank, 
deeply wooded with dark firs, whicii make a 
plain background for the white birches. One 
cannot long resist the impulse to plunge into 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



91 



the clear fresh water and look down upon the 
sand and pebbles on the bottom, while floats 
hig seemingly on air and looking into an im- 
mense magnifying glass. But the chill of the 
water or something has disturbed my dreams. 
The pipe is smoked down to a few Avhite 
ashes, the fire hardly flickers, and the world 
has treasures in store for those who work, not 
for dreamers. 



CONSERVATISM. 



To one living in the nineteenth century, 
and especially in America, in the midst of so 
much bustle and push, so much rivalry and 
radicalism in various directions, and seeing as 
a result of these active agencies so much real, 
substantial progress, it may at first seem rather 
absurd to accuse the world of over-much con- 
servatism. But careful study must convince 
him that the imputation is far from being an 
unjust one. 

Conservatism is commendable and neces- 
sary to the extent of holding to established 
usage and theory, so long as there is no sufii- 
cient evidence of the existence of something 
better. Indeed an intelligent, judicious con- 
servatism is indispensable to guard against 
the opposite extreme of radicalism, and to 
prevent the supplanting of present systems or 
ideas by newer ones, having perhaps a spe- 
cious exterior but no inherent merit. But it 
is a false conservatism that maintains and ad- 
vocates long exploded and obviously errone- 
ous theories, that clings to ancient usage and 
administration simply from the fact of their 
general acceptance in the past, and wilfully 
ignores the just claims of new plans wrought 
out by riper thought and wider experience. 
In this extreme development conservatism be- 
comes a serious hindrance to the progress of 
the world toward a perfect civilization. 

As has often been said, nearly all the 
grandest achievements of the human intellect, 
great reforms, discoveries, and inventions, have 



met the most bitter and unreasoning opposi- 
tion, and their just claims have been acknowl- 
edged only after many years. For much that 
we now enjoy in life we are indebted to the 
heroic efforts of noble men who have dared to 
endure the derision, and in many cases the 
persecution, of the world in support of princi- 
ples that later were fully received and incor- 
porated into the life of the world, and have 
become essential elements of our civilization. 
Progress in any direction is generally pre- 
faced by the patient, unrequited toil of a few 
bold spirits, who, living in advance of their 
age, and thus seeing wliat the true interests 
of mankind demanded, have broken away 
from the trammels of ultra conservatism, and, 
daring to act according to their own convic- 
tions, have paved the way which the world, 
at length recognizing its worth, has gladly 
followed. 

In this connection it is sufficient to call to 
mind the lives of Galileo, Martin Luther, and 
the Pilgrim Fathers ; and later the patriots 
of the Revolution and the early advocates of 
the abolition of American slavery. These few 
names will suggest to the thoughtful reader 
of history scores of others, which it were use- 
less to enumerate. 

Happily the extreme phase of conserva- 
tism illustrated in some of the examples cited 
is less often met than formerly. There is 
much less aggressive opposition to progress 
and improvement now than in the past. We 
never expect to see again such persecutions 
and ignominy as were imposed on many of 
these earlier worthies. But though the char- 
acter of this ultra conservative spirit has been 
modified and mollified by the education and 
development of the human family, it is still 
active under a changed exterior, — less pro- 
nounced and less bald, it is true, in its oppo- 
sition to any innovations on time-honored in- 
stitutions, but still existing. 

It is still too often the case that, like the 
storied Dutchman, men will insist on the ne- 



92 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



eessity of putting a stone into one end of the 
meal-bag to balance the grist in the other 
across the horse's back, because " mei'w Vater 
und mein Grossvater''' did so. 

In view of the facts of history, it is idle to 
imagine that reforms will of themselves spring 
up and develop, or that the world will spon- 
taneously rise as a unit and inaugurate them. 
As long as reforms are necessary, so long will 
there be need of the right kind of men to set 
in operation the forces that shall work such 
reforms. 

To enumerate the various fields of effort 
which these thoughts suggest would trans- 
cend the purpose of this article. A few only 
may be briefly alluded to. The domain of 
politics opens up a vast field for effort in this 
direction ; neither do we need to look beyond 
our own country for illustrations. 

Our laws governing the right of suffrage 
are too comprehensive. The grand idea of 
universal equality inherited from our Puritan 
ancestry has taken us too far. The right of 
suffrage should be withheld from all who can- 
not at least read and write with some degree 
of facility, and conviction of capital crimes 
ought to disfranchise the condemned man for 
a longer or shorter period, if not for life, in 
addition to the legal penal tj^ of his crimes. 
Our naturaliziition laws are too easily com- 
plied with and too susceptible of tampering 
by scheming men. War, grim relic of bar- 
barous ages, must give place to the more hu- 
mane method of arbitration in the settlement 
of national and international differences. The 
vexed and vexing question of labor and capi- 
tal still seeks a solution of its perplexing prob- 
lems, and still asks in vain, on wliat ground 
of compromise the two may meet in justice to 
both. 

Man}' abuses in social life arising from ig- 
norance, avarice, or neglect call for action. 
Although many of these and other necessary 
reforms must come only as the result of years 
of education and elevation of the race, still 



there must be the guiding genius of indi- 
vidual men, sagacious enough to see when the 
fit time to usher them in has come, and bold 
enough to carry them forward against the 
apathy, or it ma}' be the active opposition, of 
a large part of their fellow-men ; and it is to 
such men that we must look for the initiation 
of those measures that shall banish the limit- 
less train of present abuses and " ring in the 
new" with its gladder prospects and bound- 
less possibilities. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



Though autumn's frosts with red aud gold 
NoTv paint the leaves, grown old and sere, 
"With joy I seek the silent grove 
That in the moonbeams shows so drear. 

For there I'll meet my darling May, 

As fair as spring's most beauteous flower 

That elf or fairy, sprite or fay 

Has nursed with sun or fed with shower. 

Her little hand, so soft and white, 
Is placed in mine in trusting love. 
Her ruby lips their sweetness yield, 
A nectar fit for gods above. 

And then my arm surrounds her waist — 
But with a bound of startled deer 
I leave behind my darling love. 
With dad and dog hard on ray rear. 

Send in your Autumn Idyls. 

The dormitories are well filled. 

Timo those white hats were in. 

Liudsey, of Colby, has joined '84. 

Goddard, '82, gave us a call last week. 

The Fair at Topsham was the attraction last 
week. 

The Seniors had a writtcMi examination in psy- 
chology last Saturday. 

Billy is undecided whether the human race orig- 
inated from one single pair or from three of a kinil. 

The knowledge of astronomy that the average 
Senior possessed at the conniionccment of this term 
is rapidly departing from him. 

H. E. Cole, '83, and W. K. Hutlor, '84, arc the 
delegates from tlio Bowdoin charge to the Thota 
Delta Chi Convention to be held at Young's Hotel, 
Boston, Oct. 2(! and 27. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



93 



It is reported that '82 has reformed since grad- 
uating. 

The annual scratch race will be held on Saturday, 
Oct. 21. 

The crossing at the north gate has been im- 
proved. 

Rogers, '85, has joined the Delta Kappa Epsilon 
Society. 

The hop was quite a festive occasion for some of 
the boys. 

" Biuey " is loth to break his connection with the 
college (?). 

They say that " The Fish" left matters all right 
at the Glen. 

The Sophs are giving us all the nocturnal music 
we can stand. 

The cigarette has appeared again on the streets 
of Brunswick. 

Reed has a theory that he wants to spring on an 
innocent public. 

Fling, '83, took in the Sagadahoc Fair for the 
benefit of the Argus. 

Wanted by the Orient — more communications 
from the student-body. 

Complaints are quite prevalent concerning af- 
fairs at the reading-room. 

A good time to agitate the question of opening 
the library on Sunday afternoons. 

Is the interest in base-ball so low that even class 
games cannot be arranged this fall ? 

The Freshmen should commence their course 
right by subscribing for the Orient. 

Billiards are not popular this fall on account of 
the increased price at Fields's Parlor. 

The canvassers, with one or two exceptions, 
did not meet with astonishing success. 

The late cold weather caused orders for coal to 
pour rapidly into the treasurer's office. 

The orchestra has held a meeting and voted to 
reorganize and get itself in trim for business. 

A movement is on foot to form a dancing school, 
under the instruction of Gilbert of Portland. 

We hope that all the students will remember to 
give our advertisers a liberal share of patronage. 

The class officers for this term are as follows : 
Prof. Campbell for the Senior class. Prof. Robin- 
son, Junior, Mr. Fisher, Sophomore, and Prof. 
Smith, Freshman. 



The Sophs are getting their razors ready. Fresh , 
take notice. 

The Delta Kappa Epsilon Club has removed to 
Cleaveland Street. 

The Juniors declare that the lectures in Physics 
are as clear as mud. 

Will somebody volunteer to help Howard, '85, 
tend his moustache ? 

Prof. Carmichael attended chapel exercises on 
the first morning of the term. 

The chapel and some of the other buildings have 
undergone extensive repairs since last spring. 

Sophomores say that the upper classes are gi-ind- 
ing them. "Justice may sleep, but never dies." 

To protect his machine, the lung-tester man at 
the Fair was compelled to buy off Whittier, '85. 

Crowley, '83, and Howard, '85, add their voices 
to the general harmony produced by the college 
choir. 

One of the recitation rooms on the ground floor 
of Memorial Hall is to be fitted up for the use of the 
Seniors. 

The yaggers have a less belligerent attitude. 
The Sophomores now dare to go down street in the 
day time. 

The Seniors are using Hickok's Mental Science 
in psychology in place of the more bulky Porter used 
heretofore. 

The Skowhegan ball club have challenged our 
nine. The matter will probably be allowed to stop 
right here. 

H. R. Goodwin, '83, is delegate to the Delta 
Kappa Epsilon Convention held at Providence, R. 
I., this week. 

Prof. Lee's house was broken into dui-ing his 
absence last summer, and a number of valuable 
articles stolen. 

Tutor Cutler has general charge of the library 
this year, assisted by Longren, '84. Library hours 
are from 1 to 3 p.m. 

The rope-pull between '85 and '86 resulted in a 
victory for '86. Some of the Sophomores intimate 
that the Freshmen received help from the upper- 
classmen, but they are doubtless biased. 

One of the accessions to the Faculty was made 
the subject of a Sophomorio joke recently. He 
careles.sly left the key in the recitation room door, 
and after the class had gone found himself locked 
it. His imprisonment lasted for nearly an hour. 



94 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Brown, '84, secured the foot-ball in the scramble 
at the chapel door. 

Subscribers will please take notice that all com- 
nuinications intended for the business editor should 
be sent to Mr. H. P. Kendall. 

The Juniors have elected as follows : Mathemat- 
ics, 2; Greek, 6; Latin, 2; Zoology, 17. Child and 
Cothrcn have not yet returned. 

The ridiculous hazing case is beiug tried again 
in Portland this week. May the trial bring even 
less of profit to the plaintiff this time. 

The class monitors for this term are as follows : 
Senior, A. J. Russell ; Junior, H. C. Phinney ; Soph- 
omore, J. Gould ; Freshman, Wentworth. 

The Seniors throng the meetings of the different 
associations for the purpose of using their newly 
attained knowledge of parliamentary law. 

The hbrary has received from various sources 
during the summer upwards of five hundred vol- 
umes, besides considerable addition to its funds. 

In order to avoid embarrassment to both parties, 
it will be well for the boys to use caution in refresh- 
ing the memory of alumni as to the Prof.'s name. 

Up to this time three of the Bugle editors have 
been elected. We would urge upon the other two 
societies the necessity^of choosing their editor as 
soon as possible. 

The foot-ball men should brace up. The energy 
daily showed by them in kicking pi-omiscuously 
might much better bo expended in regular games 
between regular elevens. 

A Senior explains the word Psychology as com- 
ing from the Greek words i/'"^'?' and Xoyoc;, mean- 
ing a discussion concerning breath or wind, in other 
words a ivindij discussion. 

The Freshmen should immediately take steps 
toward the purchase of a class boat. The boat 
formerly used by '81 is still for sale and can doubt- 
less bo secured at a fair price. 

Prof. Atwood, disliking, probably, to break the 
custom, has concluded to try a new French gram- 
mar with the Sophomore class. It is Keetel's French 
course this time. This is tbe fourth French gram- 
mar that has been in use here since 187!). 

Prof. Geo. S. Atwood, a graduate of Amherst, 
and a teacher of great experience, has charge of tiio 
department of Modern Languago here during the 
absence of Prof. Johnson in EurojJO. Mr. Geo. T. 
Little, Bowdoin, '77, has been made instructor in 
the Latin Languago and LitiM-ature. 



The Juniors who have decided to take physics 
the third term are few. At present only three have 
put in an appearance. 

There are soon to be additional improvements in 
the laboratory in the line of small closets under the 
desks, for convenience in keeping materials in their 
proper places. The Prof, has the right idea. 

We very often hear the occupants of So. W. H. 
enquire why their end woman doesn't finish her 
work as soon as it is done in the other ends. The 
problem is solved. An absent-minded Soph locks 
her in his room so, as the other boys think, that she 
may have time to see all that needs to be done 
there. 

The Faculty have done more than the usual 
amount of grindiug of late, and one of the results is 
that one of the most influential men among the stu- 
dents, the foremost in all literary and sporting en- 
terprises, has been forced, by their unalterable de- 
cree, to sever his college ties. He has the sympa- 
thy of all the students, who would gladly welcome 
him back again. 

The following are the men from '86 pledged to 
the different societies : Psi Upsilon — Butler, Cal- 
derwood, Cornish, Knight, Kuowltou, Palmer, 
Parker, and Smith ; Theta Delta Chi— Home, Kil- 
gore, and Turner ; Delta Kappa Epsilon — Norris ; 
Zeta Psi— Allen, Berry, Hutchins, Rideout, Stack- 
pole, and Wentworth; Alpha Delta Phi — Dike, 
Davis, J. H., Davis, C. A., Tuttle, and Perkins. 

That gallant body of troops called the Bowdoin 
cadets is a tiling of the past. No more can the 
studeut, ambitious to secure military glory, disport 
himself, in garments furnished by the United States, 
before the admiring eyes of yaggors and Brunswick 
girls. Our instructor has been taken from us bo- 
cause of our lack of interest in the drill, and Bow- 
doin is now to cease being one of the institutions 
especially favored by the government. 

At a recent meeting of the Boating Association 
the following oflicers were elected : Commodore, E. 
W. Chase; Vice Commodore, C. E. Adams; Treas- 
urer, Instructor F. A. Fisher ; Assistant Treasurer, 
S.W.Walker; Secretary, Richard Webb; Direc- 
tors, N. B. K. Pottingill, A. F. Swootsir, and L. 
Hodgkins. It was voted to call a meeting of the 
college at an early day for the purpose of choosing 
a captain for tlio University crew and a comuiittoo 
to raise money for tlio support of said crew. 

Within the past few days the question of forming 
a temperance association among the students has 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



96 



been agitated. It is a matter to wliich due consid- 
eratiou should be given by all. Such a step can 
surely work no harm, and may be the means of ad- 
vancing the interests of the students individually 
and of the college as a whole. A preliminary meet- 
ing has been held and a committee appointed to 
draft a pledge aud constitution. The pledge will 
probably be made to cover only the college course. 
One of its greatest advantages will be to incoming 
classes. We hope every one who is at all interested 
in the matter will do his best to effect a permanent 
organization. 

We learn that at the performance of the min- 
strel troupe the other evening, a certain well-known 
yag, who goes under the sobriquet of Bill, got him- 
self iuto trouble. It seems William was offered 
fifteen cents to place a bent pin in a chair on the 
as yet unoccupied stage. The filthy lucre proved 
too great an attraction, aud the business end of a 
pin was soon pointing iunoceatly toward the zenith, 
waiting for some one to attempt the much-tried 
but hitherto unaccomplished feat of balancing him- 
self on the point. But "The best laid plans o' 
mice and men gang aft agley," and so it was in this 
case. It seems that one of the performers near the 
door had the southwest corner of his eye pointed 
at William all the time, aud, with that inherent and 
deep-seated prejudice which seems characteristic of 
our race against empirically investigating the law 
of bent pins, removed the pin and William at the 
same time. 

An attempt has been made by the Faculty this 
fall to suppress the ancient aud harmless custom of 
crying "foot-ball," at the close of chapel exercises, 
for three mornings in succession previous to the 
Sopho-Freshman game, a thing that has been done 
by the three upper classes for a number of years 
past. Although we do not question the right of the 
Faculty to do away with the observance of this cus- 
tom, and at the same time appreciate that our peti- 
tion will amount to but little, still we would hum- 
bly submit that we are not grammar school chil- 
dren, but young men capable in most cases of 
forming our own opinions ; therefore we ask that our 
right to observe certain customs (such as crying 
"foot-ball"), which are not calculated to iujure the 
institution in any way, be respected. Nearly every 
one is willing that hazing should be buried beyond 
hope of resurrection, but we are not yet ready to 
say good-bye to all the thiugs that go to make life 
pleasant, not to say endurable, here. Hazing days 
are gone, we hope. Sophomore class suppers have 



been so discouraged that they are things of the past. 
The periodic sprees that the different classes once 
indulged in have been discarded, and poor Anna's 
ghost has for three years roamed the earth to haunt 
the Sophomores who have been in some way hin- 
dered from burying her body. All these things are 
well as they are, but, kind Faculty, go no farther 
at present. Still allow us to play foot-ball, to row, 
to play base-ball, to celebrate Ivy Day, and to be 
out after 9 o'clock p.m. 

The first of the Sophomore-Freshman contests, 
a game of foot-ball between the two classes, took 
place on the south part of the campus, Friday, Oct. 
6, at 2 P.M., and in accordance with general expec- 
tation resulted in an easy victory for the Sopho- 
mores. The Freshmen took their position a little 
before 2 under the leadership of their captain. Tur- 
ner. They were not kept waiting, for soon a long 
procession of burly Sophs emerged from South Ap- 
pleton, and, after marching around on the walks to 
the vociferous singing of old Phi Chi, until the 
upper classmen showed their impatience by some 
forcible exclamations, they took their places in 
front of the small band of Freshmen, who plainly 
showed the terror that the dress and general ap- 
pearance of the Sophomores were calculated to in- 
spire. After some delay, caused by an ineffectual 
attempt to induce the '85 men to toss up with the 
Freshmen for positions, the game commenced and 
was as quickly ended. The ball was tossed up by 
the referee, immediately seized by the Sophs, 
driven across the campus and beyond the goal be- 
fore the astonished Freshmen could get even a 
chance to struggle for it. The wind, superiority in 
numbers, and position in the field, all favored the 
Sophomores. Gould was the lucky man who drove 
the ball over the main path. This closed the con- 
test proper, but the Sophomores, to satisfy the 
desires of the upper classmen for more fun, took the 
position that the Freshmen held in the first rush, 
and after six rushes, some of which were well con- 
tested, forced the ball beyond the other goal, the 
thick hedge at the lower end of the campus, thus 
making themselves doubly victors. E. W. Chase of 
the Senior class refereed the game ; S. W. Walker, 
'84, was judge for the Freshmen; A. F. Sweetser, 
'84, for the Sophomores. 

The customary base-ball game between the two 
lower classes has come and gone. To say that it 
was one of the most interesting and exciting matches 
of the sort ever witnessed on the delta is nothing 
more than just. The Freshmen, encouraged beyond 



96 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



measure by the two upper classes, entered the game 
with the determination of winning, or, at least, of 
making a hard fight for the victorious laurels. The 
Sophomores, on the other hand, resolved to have 
the game at all hazards. The continuous roar of 
strong-lunged Sophs, the brandishing of canes, the 
systematic bulldozing of all sorts — all gave evidence 
of how firmly this resolution had been stamped in 
the top of each time-honored plug. The game was 
called at 2.30 p.m., with the Sophomores at the bat. 
They scored one run the first inning, and the Fresh- 
men were whitewashed. Soon, however, the novi 
]ioinmes braced, and Capt. Cornish showed the bull- 
dozers what his nine was made of For a time the 
score was pretty close, and would have remained 
so but for the errors which the "mealy-mouthed" 
giants caused the timid Fresh to make. Despite the 
Sophomoric clamor some of the new men showed re- 
markable presence of mind. An example of this is 
the innocent little center-fielder, who had the au- 
dacity to cause the bloodthirsty '85 catcher and the 
elongated pitcher to bite the dust in their vain at- 
tempts to put him out as he stole home from third 
base. The game lasted about three and one-half 
hours, and resulted in a score, at the end of the 
eighth inning, of 26 to 17 in favor of '85. Wright's 
umpiring was excellent. Although the numerous 
hearty cheers of the upper classmen aided the Fresh 
materially, yet the score would probably have been 
even more favorable to the Sophs had not their 
catcher shed blood so freely and retired so early in 
the game. 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited 
to send personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Bruns- 
wick.] 

Faculty : 

Prof. L. A. Lee, during the past summer, has 
pursued his scientific investigations with the United 
States Fish Commis.sion, having their headquarters 
at Wood's Holl, Mass. 

Prof. Geo. L. Voso, formerly of the Faculty, has 
an article in the last North American Ecvieiv upon 
" Safety in American Travel." 

Prof. IF. S. Chapman spent part of his sunnner 
at Jefferson, N. II. 

'22. — John Hubbard Wliito, who died recently 
at Dover, N. II., was formerly postmaster of Dover, 
and representative to the Now Hampshire Legisla- 



ture in 1833-4, register of probate in 1849, and 
the first poUce court judge of Dover in I8.")3. 

'37. — George A. Wheelwright, of Wells, died at 
his residence in that place, September 8th, at the 
age of sixty-four years. Among his classmates 
were the late Gov. John A. Andrew, of Massachu- 
setts, and Hon. L. D. M. Sweat, of Portland. 

'43. — Joseph Darie was defeated as the demo- 
cratic candidate for Congress in the first district, at 
the September election. 

'45.— Moses B. Goodwin died at Franklin, 
N. H., aged sixty-three. For many years he was 
a teacher and correspondent of newspapers. He 
had for a time a position in one of the departments 
of Washington. Mr. Goodwin was a native of Lim- 
ington. Me. 

'76. — Arlo Bates, of Boston, was married at 
Brunswick, September 5th, to Miss Hattie L. Vose, 
of Brunswick. 

'79. — M. K. Page, formerly an editor of the 
Orient, received the degree of LL.M. at the last 
Commencement of Columbian University, Washing- 
ton, D. C, Law Department. 

'79. — Henry B. Carletou, twenty-four years of 
age, son of Hon. J. P. Carletou of Rockport, died 
a few weeks ago at his father's residence, after a 
short illness. He had just completed a three years' 
course in the divinity school of Philadelphia, and 
was to be ordained in a few weeks for the Episcopal 
ministry. 

'81. — A. D. Gray, of Dover, has accepted the 
position of assistant principal in the high school at 
Woonsocket, K. I. 

'82. — W. G. llccd will bo married this (Wednes- 
day) evening, October 18th, to Miss Mary Louise 
Hagar of Richmond. They will reside in Boston 
Highlands. 

'82.— E. U. Curtis and W. G. Reed are to stud^ 
law in the office of ex-Gov. Gaston, Boston. 
McCarthy is studying law at Peabody, Mass.; Jew- 
ett, law at Chicago, 111.; Goodwin, law at Gorhara ; 
Holway, law at Augusta ; Staples, reporter on the 
Bath Times; Stearns, principal of an academy at 
Bluchill, Me. Bates continues to circulate between 
Yarmouth and Brunswick. Ho will study modicino 
in New York this winter. Blondcl is in the insur- 
ance business in Topsham. 

Ex-'82. — Sanliorn is principal of an academy in 
Plainlicld, Vt. 

'83. — Jackson has boon with a surveying party 
on the European & North American Railroad this 
summer. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



97 



'83. — Bascom is teaching Patten Academy, Pat- 
ten, Me. 

'83.— Sewall has been studying French and Ger- 
man, this summer, at Sauveur's College of Modern 
Languages, Amhei'st, Mass. 

'84. — Jesse P. Waterman, formerly of '83, who 
has been assistant secretary of the Y. M. C. A., 
Boston, has joined this class. 

'85. — Butler is teaching in the New Meadows 
district, Brunswick. 

'85. — John Hall, formerly of '84, has joined this 
class. 

'85. — Hodgkius was clerk in a hotel at Bar Har- 
bor this summer. 



CLIPPINGS. 



A billy goat, 

A field Elysian, 
A servant girl, 

A well artesian. 

A water trough, 

A thirsty throat, 
A stooping girl, 

A running goat. 

A billy goat, 

A field Elysian, 
A servant girl 

In well artesian. 

Song for Monday morning — " Let the conquer- 
ing zero come." 

We have at last discovered what Romeo and 
Juliet — it was taffy. 

Prof. — "Now, Mr. T— r, will you " Fresh- 
man — "Don't call me Mr. T— r, please; call me 
Wal -tah." — Princetonian . 

" Ah! maid with laughing, laughing eye, 
For what those tears ? Oh! why that sigh ? " 
She murmurs, as the blushes come, 
" I swoUered a hunk of chewin' gum." - 

Jones—" What did you think of my argument, 
Fogg ? " Fogg—" It was sound, very sound [Jones 
is delighted] ; nothing but sound, in fact." Jones 
reaches for a brick. 

The same man who christened his pig Maud, 
because she went into the garden, and his cat 
Misery, because he loved company, and his wife 
Crystal, because .she was always on the watch, has 
now purchased a brace of fine hunting dogs for the 
sole purpose of baptizing them two for a scent 
and publishing the fact in a comic almanac. 



Here rests his head upon the lap of earth, a 
youth to fortune and to fame unknown. Too much 
benzine crept underneath his girth, and played the 
mischief with his temperatezone. 

Professor (to sleepy student) — " If you wish, I 
will send out for a bed." Sleepy Student (with 
great sang froid)—"'DoiVt go to that trouble, sir, I 
have a crib with me." — Tale Eecord. 

Turning the tables : A student in physiology 
asked the professor a question. The latter began 
his explanation, then hesitated, saying, " I don't 
know as that covers the point you are after." " Oh, 
go on," said the student, encouragingly, " I think 
you were about to answer correctly." 

He was an '85 man; she ablooming college widow. 
He wrote to his father announcing his engagement. 
The reply : 

" My Dear Son: Accept my heartiest congratulations. 
I was engaged to the same Miss Bunter when I was in col- 
lege, and can appreciate the fun you are having. Go it 
while you are young. 

" Your loving Father." 

IN MEMORIAM. 

Again before me comes that girl, 

Again appears her soft, fair beauty. 

With maze of hair in tangled curl, — 
To love but her were easy duty. 

The laughing eyes, the rose-wreathed mouth, 
The shifting, fleeting, dainty dimple, 

A smile as of the sunny South, 
Enough to drive a fellow simple. 

A loveliness of form and face, — 

No wonder that I've sadly missed her; 

But perhaps there'd be more grace 

If she weren't my own younger sister. 

—Advocate. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 

Having cleared a space upon the table to make 
room for our glue-pot, we stand ready, scissors in 
hand, to welcome our old friends, most of whom, 
indeed, have been for some time awaiting our arri- 
val, and a cordial welcome we give you, one and all. 

Our readers can hardly appreciate the interest, 
nay, aifection, we feel for our exchanges ; there are 
no friends so constant, none so jovial, none whose 
conversation is so replete with wit and wisdom. To 
the exchange editor the college world is his world, 
the exchanges his companions. While you, our 
readers, confine your interest to what concerns your 
college alone, the exchange editor, from his lofty 
position upon the table, looks out upon the world 



98 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



and is interested in all its doings. Often he is so 
bewildered by all he sees that he finds the greatest 
difficulty in deciding what particular features to 
make note of for the benefit of bis readers, who, 
doubtless, hang upon the words of wisdom that fall 
from his lips. Such a responsibihty is, indeed, 
wearisome, and it is only by the greatest efforts that 
we succeed iu bearing up. 

Again we welcome you, Acta, Argo, Atlienmum, 
Spectator, Crimson, jRecord,Neivs, Herald,— s\\\ may 
your ads. never be less. Yes, to the Bates Student 
we extend the hand of friendship, and would say, 
" Let bygones be bygones." Space is too short for 
quarrelling. " If we have said anything we should 
be sorry for, we are glad of it." 

All our exchanges are overflowing with good ad- 
vice to "those who have recently come among us," 
as one daintily puts it ; all eager to relate their ad- 
ventures of the summer, and compare notes upon 
the vacation " crushes." They have journeyed far 
and near. The Spectator has been down the Khine, 
and lost his heart in a railway coach ; the Argo has 
been exploring caves in the Alps with young ladies 
in decidedly unconventional costumes; while we, 
without going so far, have all had our little summer 
romances under some discreet parasol. 

From the much good advice that is offered on 
every hand to the class of '86, we clip the following 
from the Yak Neivs, for the benefit of our '86, hop- 
ing they will believe that the sentiments it contains 
are as much those of Bowdoin as of Yale: 

" No man will respect you less for standing for mamly 
principles which you have brought with you. No one will 
look down upon you if you choose to take your place 
among the Christian men, of whom you will soon find 
many among your companions. But when you have once 
taken a high position you must never go hack on it. Sincer- 
ity, above all things, receives a full face value here. In- 
deed, we believe every man in college, whatever his own 
ideas and belief, will bear us out when we s.ay that when 
a class graduates, there are none who command greater 
esteem and respect from every member of the class than 
they who have stood firm from the beginning in unpre- 
tentious, unbigoted Christian life. It may be an intensely 
jolly life we lead, it may be that some few carry that jollity 
to too great an extent, but there is not a man among us 
who fails to respect a manly Christianity." 

The Argo and the Athenceuin are as i'ull as ever of 
good things, and it is greatly to the credit of Wil- 
liams that slio can support two such papers. The 
present number of the Argo contains an indignant 
remonstrance against the hostage system as prac- 
ticed by the faculties of certain colleges; the imme- 
diate cause of the Argo going on the war-path is 
the action of the President of Williams in compell- 



ing the Sophomores, in class meeting, to pass a res- 
olution permitting the Freshmen to carry canes — an 
act hardly in keeping with the dignity of his posi- 
tion. And this was accomplished by threatening to 
expel certain Sophomores if this requirement was 
not complied with. Surely there is nothing that 
would so unite a class in opposition to the authori- 
ties as this, and it can but incite the students to 
further disorder. Such a proceeding is, in fact, a 
declaration of war between faculty and students, 
and the fact that it is often effective iu suppressing 
disorder for the time being cannot be used as an 
argument of its justice and expediency. Similar 
means of discipline have long been used at certain 
colleges, and we can only hope that they will be- 
come obsolete, along with many others that have 
the effect to destroy the good feeling that should 
exist between faculty and students. 

As a healthy reaction from thoughts so condemn- 
atory of the faculty, we find among the editorials 
of the Atlienmum a comment upon the remarks of 
a Yale paper, some time ago, upon the conservatism 
of college students. Wb quote : 

" We as students have been clamoring to our faculty 
to desert some of the conservative notions of past genera- 
tions, and launch out into methods more in accord with 
the tendencies of to-day. We have been constantly de- 
manding, and propose to continue in the demand, that 
Williams keep step with all the progressive movements 
which are now shaking up educational circles throughout 
the country. Where are we students standing ourselves? 
This same impulse of advance demands that we, too, turn 
our backs upon certain customs which only a conservative, 
clinging to the notions of an outgrown past, can keep 
alive. The various forms of mild hazing, the poor apolo- 
gies for cane-rushes which are resurrected to a miserable 
existence every yeai- — in fact, all the puerile animosities 
which hang over Freshman and Sophomore years, belong to 
the past of college life rather than to its present, and read 
more like chapters from the musty romances which our 
grandfathers were brought up on, than tlie doings of to- 
day's Young- America." 

It seems to us that this is the text of a sermon which 
each one of us could with profit read to ourselves, 
especially at this time, the beginning of the college 
year. And whenever we complain, as we often do, 
that the government of our college is too conserva- 
tive, that the Faculty are not as liberal as at some 
other colleges, lot us ask ourselves this question : 
Do not we, liy clinging so steadfastly to our old cus- 
toms, hinder the onward march of Old Uowdoin 1 

From the Uuivorsity of Michigan a now paper 
comes to us, the Argonaut. As wo learn from them, 
this new expedition is in search, not of a piece of 
sheep's wool, but of college news and a gymnasium. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



99 



May success attend you, venturous Argonauts, 
and no doubt in the searcli of the former you will 
he eminently successful ; but of the gym.,— well, we 
don't want to discourage you, but here we have 
been wandering around for the last ten years in 
search of that self-same thing, and still we wander. 
Maybe the glorious climate of Michigan is more 
conducive to the growth of gymnasiums than our 
own spicy variety of Maine. Bat if you do strike a 
field where there are a lot of gyms, lying around 
loose, after you have taken your pick, just send us 
one down here, as that is what we are pining for. 
At any rate the Argonauts have got a tidy little 
craft for their expedition, and apparently a pretty 
lively crew on board ; yet there is a drop of sorrow 
in their cup, as the following will testify : 

" A London newspaper in an article on American, col- 
leges speaks of Ann Arbor and says : ' As the name indi- 
cates, this is a ladies' school, one of the largest and most 
famous in the country.' "We always feared that our ro- 
mantic name would get us into trouble, but expected noth- 
ing so melancholy as this. Imagine Harvard and Colum- 
bia being spoken of as ' famous bicycle schools,' or a New 
York newspaper referring to Eton as ' a famous English 
restaurant, as its name implies.' " 

With such a rival as the Argonaut, the Chronicle 
will have to look to its laurels, likewise to the cor- 
recting of its proof; we shall have to award it the 
palm for getting in more mistakes in two columns 
than even the editor of the — well, we will say rojw- 
ham Courier. 

We have received an addition to the infant class 
from the Farmington High School, called tlie Sole- 
cism. Why it should be called the Solecism we 
have not the most remote id«a ; but it is a real good 
name, and looks well in print. So come on, little 
one ! there is plenty of room for all and no crowd- 
ing. If we do happen to step on anyone's toes in 
passing, it is not that we mean any offense, but we 
generally carry our head so high that we can't see 
where we are .stepping. 

It does not appear to be a very good time for 
poetry, but this, from the Acta, wo thought rather 
good : 

IN HER HAMMOCK. 

In her hammock, she is lying. 
Swayed gently by the breeze, 

That is sighing, softly sighing. 
Through the shading trees. 

In her hammock, she is dreaming, 

Kissed by the setting sun. 
That is gleaming, gently gleaming, 

For day is nearly done. 

The twilight shadows are creeping, 
Around about her bed. 



Still she's sleeping, sweetly sleeping. 
With her arms above her head. 

Sleep sweetly on, fair maiden, 
And dreaming, dream of me. 

Thy lover's heart is laden 

With thoughts of love for tliee. 



DREKA 

FINE STATIONERY and ENGRAVING 
HOUSE. 

Handsomely Engraved Invltatious for 

S^^ Colleges, Weddings, Receptions, &c. 

Fraternity Stationery alwa}-s on hand. 

Our unequaled facilities and long practical experience, enable 
us to produce the newest stj'les and most artistic effects, while 
our reputation is a giiarantee of the quality of our productions. 

II 21 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 
FINEST Steel Portrait ever engraved is HoUyer's 

The OWLY large one in line and stipple. Endorsed by inti- 
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" Perfect Work of Art." Sells quick. Gives perfect satis- 
faction. £jztra terms to good agents 

THE HENRY BILL PUBLISHING CO., Norwich, Ct. 

58 Temple Place, BOSTON, 

ligia?er-, Statloiiei', mi fmim. 

Wedding Invitations, Business Cards, &c. 
COLLEGE INVITATIONS A SPECIALTY. 

Beautitul Engraved Visiting Cards. 

Plate and Pack, $1. 50 ; former price, $3. 00. 

GRIFFIN'S WEDDING CARD DEPOT, 

58 Temple Place, BOSTOIST. 



SOMETHING NEW IN CIGARETTES. 

OUR LITTLE BEAUTIES 

PRESSED CIGARETTES. 

Our Pressed Cigarettes smoke longer and cooler than round 
made Cigarettes. 

The 'Tobacco being pressed and interlocked, prevents parti- 
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There is no taste of the paper, as under pressure it becomes 
impregnated with the tobacco. 

OUll LITTLE BEAUTIES are ra.ade from the highest grade 
of Virginia sun-cured leaf, blended with Turkish tobacco of our 
own importation, and smoke mild, with a most agreeable aroma 
and taste. We guarantee them pore and free fkom arti- 
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OUR LITTLE BEAUTIES are made with the now celebrated 
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AND WILL NOT STICK TO THE LIPS. 

OUR LITTLE BEAUTIE.S are put up in packages. of ten,— so 
compact that tliey will not \n\-.\k ivlu-n toted in the pocket. 
ALLElXr a GINTER, Manufacturers, 

BICHMOWD, VIKGINIA. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




These Goods are sold under an 

Absolute Guarantee 

That they are the Finest and PUREST 

goods upon the market; 
They ARE FREE from DRUGS and 

CHEMICALS of any kind ; 
They consist of the Finest Tobacco and 

Purest Rice-Paper made. 

OUR SALES EXCEED 

of ALL leading manufactories combined. 

None Genuine without the trade-mark 
of the BULL. Take no other. 

W.T.BLACKWELL&CO. 



the products 



Sole Manufacturers. 



Durham, N. C. 



Of every kind, to fill Spring, Suninicr, and Full 
engagements now coming to hand. 
Oraduales and undi^grddualcs of any School, 
Seminary, or College, of little or no i'xi)erienee, or 
other persons desiring to te.aeli, should not fail to 
address at once, with staui)), tor application form, 

National Teachers' Agency, 

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N. U. — Situations in the WckImuX .S'o?<//t a specialty. 
Good pay to local agents and private l■()rr(^spondents. 



CAUTIQM TO SMOKEBS. 

Beware of Imitations and Coanterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 




TRY IT. 
Fine, Mild & Sweet. 



Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO.. N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 



ilr®v®p if ramp & lowt 

432 Washington St., Boston, 

Invite attention to the largest and finest stock in the city, of 

DIAMONDS, RARE GEMS, 

REPRESENTATI\'ES OF THE 

Gorham Manufacturing Company, in Boston. 

Exhiliit a large and comijlcte collection of the 

SOLID SILVER AND ELECTRO-PLATED WARES 

PRODUCED BY THIS COMPANY. 

The ornamentations now used and Uie elTects produced, are 
something entirely novel in the craft of the Silversmith, and will 
interest every one by their combination of artistic and useful 
qualities. 

Especial Attention given to Designing Class-Day 
and College Invitations of Every Description. 



QPBEN & CO 



«» 



924 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



Microscopes, 
Telescopes, 
Field Glasses, 
Opera Glasses, 

Drawing Instruments, 
Surveying instruments, 
Thermometers, 

Barometers, 
Magic Lanterns, 
Apparatus for 

Projection, 
Philosopliical and 
Cliemical Apparatus. 




Part I--: 
Instruiiic 
Tart 1—1 

OloglCJll 1 



i;s AS I'DI.I.OWS SlsN'l' ON AITLICATIONr 
iii:ili(:il liisirinii.'iiis, lirj iKiucs. I'.'irl i— Oplioal 
n; p;if;i's. I'Mi'l ;i— MmkIi' l.unlcnis, I'.'d ji:ig08. 
iphi.Ml Inslnnncnla, Kio pages. Tart .V- Meteor. 
iitus, I'io pngci. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



FIME SmiMTS 

MADE FROM MEASURE, 



FIT i 



Also a Full Assortmeut of 



GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 

Orders by Mail Promptly A tiended To. 



NEW BBUG STOll. 



ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

BlU-Q'S. MEDICIIES, 

Fancy aM Toilet Articles, CiprsI Toliacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

JI3" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

(fo, 6mf tfotd 0i^-af4 and ^^ai^fM. 
J^mut/ftmkde'F' ^ Hie S^wiui Si^^wnd 

of ' 'Somchm BoUe^e. ' ' JiiS^ d'^a'l'e/'c 
in J^iu^ (F-ataaw/chmmn^ und imok- 
m§. JJ fuU Une of iStmkin§ JliU- 
tk^ of uU xk^t/d^UiMtS. 

Jd/cm Si., S'Um^mck. 



The Palace Clotliii Store of Maine. 




:^IjXt:ei stohei. 



ALL THE LEADING NOVELTIES IN 

YOBMQ MEN'S CLOTMIIiQ 

AND NOBBY FURNISHING GOODS. 



STRICTLY ONE PRICE. 

|^°Boys' and Children's Department entirely separate. 

BLUE STORE, 

IiEIWISTOIT. IXE.A.INS. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



©.^^'!^^^ MM<i 



Fine Watches, Jewelry, Silver Ware, &c., 

DJ GREAT VARIETY, BEST QUALiXlf, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 

PORTLAND, . _ _ _ MAINE. 

A. CARTER. J. W. D. CARTER. 

SPRING AND SUMMR, 1882. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at .ill times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuifs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments. White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

On and after June 18th, 18S2, 

Passenger Trains leave Brunstvick 

For Bath. 7.28, 8.05, and 11.18 a.m., 2.38,4.40, and 6.30 p.m., 
12.42 night (.Saturdays only). 

Rockland, 8.05 A.M., 2.3S P.M. 

Portland, 7.25, 11.15 a.m., 4.30 p.m., 12.30 night. 

Boston, 7.25, 11.15 a.m., 12.35 night. 

Lewiston, 8.10 a.m., 2.38, 6.33 P.M., 12.40 night. 

Farmington, 2.38 P.M. 

Augusta, 8.08 a.m., 2.40, 2.45, 6.35 p.m., 12.45 night. 

Skowliegan, Belfast, Dexter, and Bangor, 2.40, 2.45p.m., 
and 12.45 night. 

Watervillc, 8.08, 12.45 A.M., 2.40,2.45 P.M. (6.35 Satur- 
days). 

Dexter and Bangor, 6.35 p.m. (Saturdays only.) 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
June 18, 1882. 



Main St., under Town Clock. 
10^ Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 

Biyiivroi^Bs, rmt itwti'^Y, 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle SIreet. - - - Portland, Me. 

J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 



MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 



28 Free Street, Portland, Me. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday IVIorning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, ----- $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTO NS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Coa,l "STa-rd. in Topslisiixa., 

WHERE NONE BUT 

Tbe Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer In all Uliids of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

49-Speaial Bates to Student Clubs.-er 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



M^mm^mhhM^&h Sim® 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers ; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes ; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

PORTLA-ND, JVLA.INE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

CHOICE GROcTrTeS, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
fT. B. — Special Kates to Students. 

Ls now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIIVIIVIER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, IVIe. 



A.. O. REED, 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Branswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Vieiirs. 



ALL KINDS OF 
For Schools and Colleges, 

EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 




)^ THE FAVORITE NOS. 303-404-332 ITO-^SSf-WITH 

HIS 0THE:R STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 



E. SMITH, Variety Store. Bottom Prices to Students. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 

Office at Central Telephone Office, Brunswick. 
jg-AU Orders left at C. E. TowusencVs Store will 
be promptly atteniied to. 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 



IRA C. STOCKBRiDCE, 

MUSIC PtTBLISHEB, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Boolis, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
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156 Exchange Street, Portland. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

^8s and 58^ Congress St., and 233 Middle Si., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

,Qgj= Send for Tkice List. 



J. H. PETERSON «Sc SON, 



-DEALERS IN- 



Boots and Shoes, Tobacco and Cigars, 
Main Street, ---.--- Brunswick, Me. 

FRi^I^K E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment of Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of Main and Mason Streets. 



F"IRST-Cr.A.SS 

AT LOW I'llICES. LARGE EENTINO STOCK. 




COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle riding is unsurpassed as a 
method of triiveling.whetlier for speed, 
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proved, beyond que'lion. Tbon^Mnds 
arc in daily use, and the mimlicr is 
raiiidly increasinf;. The exercise is 
rccdinmcndcd by the medical profession 
as most beneticial to health, bringing 
inlo exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

Send 3c. stamp for ;!(l.paj;c Illustrated 
rataloKue conlaminp; iirlcu lists and lull 
iiilormalicui. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washinglon St„ BOSTON, MASS, 



w, 



L. WILSON & CO., 

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TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N, B, — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

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l%tmm 



The Si.xty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 8th, 1883, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— JosHUi L. CnAMBEBL.iis, LL.D, President ; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children 5 Frederic H. Gebbtsh, M.D., 
Anatomy ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence ; Hbsry 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry i Bdet G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stepuen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles O. 
HtisT, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics -, Dasiel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; Irving Kimball, .M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



I^= Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN .>ND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON. 

Magazines, Mtisic, etc., Bound in a Neat and 
Durable Manner. 

Ruling and Blank Book Work to Order. 



C. L. RICHARDSON, 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

.8®-Tran3ient Orders for Milk or Cream lilled by giving suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 



Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS. STATIONERY, ROOIVI 
I>jft.I>teR, I>ERIOr>ICA.t.S. <ScC. 



A. •^A/■. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, |] Fancy Goods. 

Also Maslcrn Mutual Union 'relojrraph Ollico. 
Under Town Clock, - - - Brunswick, Me. 



B#wi#lQ ®; 



BRUISfSWrCK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 1, 1882. 



Vol. XII. 



No. 8. 






A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," ^^^ 



VISITORS TO PORTLAND, 

dependent of any intention of pur- 
AND thp: adjustable hanging : -^ ^ 

" ^3I^IE^.^i».IES"X" l_i -A. 3yE 1= S," j chasing goods in our line, are invited to 

SATISFV ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners ! inspect the Model Clothing and Fur- 



IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



HALL L. DAVIS, 

Books, Stationeff, aod Paper Hangings, 

53 Exchange Sheet, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 



FRANK M. STETSON, 






DEANE BROTHERS & SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

!^" Lowest Prices in the State, 
183 & 185 Middle Street. - - - Portland, Me. 



nishing Store of Allen & Co., 470 Con- 
gress St., opp. Preble House, 

LANCASTER BUILDING. 




SPECIAL AaENT. 

I^Dunlap & Co., of New York, Celebrated 
Stiff Hats. 

Also his New Straw Mackinaw, $3.00 and 
$2.50. 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 

"lORING, short & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENQEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOK 



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opp. Preble House. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination); Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^neid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xeuophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common ' 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
L and in. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in tlic institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If those papers are found by the Faculty to bo 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will bo fur- 
nished a list of topics on which ho will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination liold for tlio i)urposo, or as a 
part of his leguUir final examination, as ho may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnislied, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extpnt of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EQDIKED— FOUE HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, sis terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terras. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

electives — EOITR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terras. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terras. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, .$7.5. 
Room rent (half), average, $2r,. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular ('dllegecliarges, ,fllO. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to i?4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs imdcr good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



B®w 




Vol. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOV. 1, 1882. 



No. 8. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY AIiTEENATE WEDNESDAY, DTTRIHG THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



EDITORIAL BOARD. 
Arthur J. Russell, '83, Managing Editor ^^j-o tern. 
Herbert P. Kendall, '83, Business Editor. 
Herbert B. Cole, '83. OLrvER W. Means, '84. 

Howard R. Goodwin, '83. Llewellyn Barton, '84. 
Charles H. Stetson, '83. Charles B. Sayward, '84. 
N. Brooks K. PETTrNGiLL, '83. 

Terms — $2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances slioukl be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer^s real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Yol. XII., No. 8.— Nov. 1, 1882. 

Editorial Notes 101 

Literary: 

Dreaming (poem) 104 

TIiG Great Eating Match at Harpswell Neck 104 

Delta Kappa Epsilon Convention 105 

College Items 1 06 

Personal 109 

Clippings 110 

Editors' Table Ill 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



By the time this second number of the 
Oeient has come upon the stage, and made 
its modest bow and demand upon your time 
and for your favor, the college will have set- 
tled down to its usual routine of work, and 
affairs will begin to take on their old aspect. 
The Freshman will soon find out about what 
is required of him, and the consumption of 
midnight oil, in endeavoring to come up to 



these requirements, will delight the hearts of 
our worthy grocers. To him the distinction 
between the Aorist and Imperfect and the 
exact definition of a line, so that it can be 
easily stopped before it runs out through the 
ceiling to infinity, will no longer be hidden 
mysteries. The stoical Sophomore, who has 
been secretly practicing all last year, will 
now bite a small semi-circle out of his plug, 
in the presence of wondering classmates who 
before regarded him as immaculate. The 
Junior, with a far-away look, dons his best 
suit and goes to see his best girl — maidens, 
beware ! While the Senior meditates upon 
the distinction between the Subjecto-objective 
subject as compared with the Objecto-sub- 
jective object, and wonders whether he had 
better, at the present time, let loose upon 
the world a theory which he holds, or wait 
until increasing years have brought increas- 
ing influence. The yagger, who stood under 
a Sophomore's window and intercepted about 
a gill of pure cavendish, has learned to keep 
one eye cocked up at the windows. 

In short, if an old alumnus should come 
back now he would probably see what he saw 
five, ten, or twenty fall terms ago, — -scenes 
which we shall be glad, yet at the same time 
extremely sorry, to leave. 



We feel constrained to speak of the un- 
fortunate ebb in the musical tide at the pres- 
ent time. To be sure there are spasmodic 
intervals of singing by small squads coming 
from meals, and very pleasant evenings passed 
by a few gathered around a piano in some 
room. But there are no evening gatherings 
as of yore on the chapel steps, when half the 



102 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



college was present, and every man anxious 
to do his duty by his country to the full ex- 
tent of his lungs. The welkin used to ring 
in those days, and graduates tell us that some 
of the happiest hours were spent listening to 
and joining in that crash of voices. In. other 
college papers, from time to time, we see 
allusions to a crowd coming up fronj down 
town or sitting on the fence around the cam- 
pus, singing. Let us have a good old-fash- 
ioned chorus some of these evenings ! 



That unfortunate hazing case has reached 
another phase in its career. Last week a jury 
brought in a verdict of damages for the plaint- 
iff. The result was received here with aston- 
ishment and dissatisfaction, and some wonder 
on what grounds the jury saw fit to take this 
action. Of course the case was appealed at 
once by the defendants to the Supreme Court, 
which holds its session in July. It is hoped 
that here a fair trial of the merits of the case 
will be given before an unprejudiced jury, 
and if this can be accomplished the defend- 
ants need have no fears of the result. It is 
evident to those who are at all accustomed to 
college life or college ways, that the whole 
affair of the so-called hazing was only a gigan- 
tic farce undertaken by a ci-owd of fun-loving 
boys, for the sake of frightening the un- 
sophisticated Freshman. About every per- 
son in that crowd had gone through the same 
experience without injury, and no one in- 
tended to carry the affair from jest to earnest. 
Because an accident happened, to claim a 
conspiracy to injure Freshmen seems little 
short of nonsense. All we ask foi, in the 
next trial, is a fair statement of the facts in 
the case and an unprejudiced jury. 



It has been suggested that one of (he mis- 
takes of the base-ball men is in not organiz- 
ing a second nine to keep thein in practice. 
In the method of practice adopted at present. 



a man usualh' knows ten or fifteen minutes 
beforehand that there is a ball coming for him, 
and he takes his time and "lays for it." In a 
game, he hasn't so much time to think it over; 
he sees a small, red-hot comet striking for 
him, and hears a yelling on the part of the 
bystanders. Then there is excellent prac- 
tice in keeping cool and exercising presence 
of mind, which some say did not character- 
ize our nine last year. After every defeat of 
our nine, last j'ear, it was noticed that men 
who were just on the edge of being on the 
nine, were accustomed to remark that they 
could pick up a nine out of the rest of the 
college that would " thump " the college nine. 
But it was also noticed that the " tlunnping "' 
was usually taken out in talk. The advan- 
tages of a second nine would be to show us 
some games and keep the base-ball interest 
up and thus the pocket-books open, and to 
have men in practice for all places that hap- 
pen to be vacated. A substitute may be an 
excellent plaj'er in a certain position, but if 
another position is vacated he may not be 
able to fill it so well as a man who- has been 
constantly practicing that position in a second 
nine. 

The piece of news we heard recently in 
regard to the change of recitation rooms, we 
think will be hailed with acclamation bj^ the 
students generally. The remark of the Pres- 
ident to the Seniors, that one of the recita- 
tion rooms in Memorial Hall would be occu- 
pied by them in a few weeks, was received 
with applause. We have heard it stated also 
that the present Senior room would be used 
as a modern language room, and then possi- 
bly the present modern language room given 
for a reading-room. Tliis would give us an 
excellent reading-room, with plenty of light 
and space. It also ojiens a vista to tliat 
heaven of the Orient board, for wiiich the 
worthies who have gone befiu'u ns have 
worked and fought — an Okient office. If the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



103 



present reading-room is unoccupied, wiiy can 
it not be handed over to the Orient for that 
purpose? Surely a college paper has some 
claim on tlie college for support and assist- 
ance! A certain number of men ai-e elected, 
and for little or nothing give their time and 
efforts to producing a readable college paper, 
aiming to stand by and advance the interests 
of the college in every way possible. We 
hope those who have this matter in charge will 
see the leasonableness of our request, and ad- 
vance the interests of the college b}' advanc- 
ing ours. 



A lipple in the calm surface of college 
life has been caused, by the organization of a 
temperance society known as the Bowdoin 
College Temperance Union. The pledge, 
which is quite iron-clad enough to suit the 
very Neal Dow-est of temperance men, is 
taken for the college course, and prohibits the 
use of alcoholic drinks, including wine, beer, 
and cider. That such a step is advisable, and 
will advance the interests of the college, has 
long been our opinion. The movement does 
not seem to be. confined at all to any class, 
society, or religious organization, but is a 
sort of spontaneous erupting of individual 
opinions that before this have been held down 
by custom, or some similar reason. We 
tliink the movement is timely, and wish it 
the success that it deserves. 



Of coui'se, after our editorial in the last 
number of the Orient, we confidently ex- 
pected to see men with measuring-tape and 
picks breaking ground for the new gymna- 
sium. But for some reason or other such 
was not the case. We must confess to some 
disappointment, yet we still think our position 
was good ; for the other day, in psychology, 
we noticed the sentence, " Energy of muscle 
stimulates to enterprise of mind," and imme- 
diately thought, " What an argument for a 



new gymnasium ! " And on Anthropological 
grounds, too ! It seems almost as if such an 
argument as this ought not to be disregarded 
by an institution of learning that aims es- 
pecially to produce " enterprise of mind," to 
so cultivate the mind on all sides that it will 
be perfectly developed and free to choose its 
best direction of woi'k, and yet be not igno- 
rant of other lines of work and thought. 
And energy of muscle stimulates to this en- 
terprise of thought. It is, then, if we allow 
the authority of Dr. Hickok, as much a fac- 
tor of enterprise of mind, and so of a liberal 
education, as literature and science. In im- 
portance it may stand on a plane below these, 
but still it is a factor, and as such should 
not be neglected. The attitude of the author- 
ities now seems to be that of Mahomet wait- 
ing for the mountain. But as the mountain 
will not come to Mahomet, Mahomet had bet- 
tei go to the mountain. 



It has been suggested to us to ask Pro- 
fessor Packard to repeat that lecture deliv- 
ei'ed two or three years ago to the students, 
on Bowdoin as it was in those good old times, 
that seem to us so far off and to him so near. 
We well remember of attending that lecture, 
and the intense interest with which we list- 
ened to every word, delivered with an elo- 
quence and an earnestness which few who 
were there will soon forget. There have two 
or three new classes entered since the lecture 
was delivered, and we are sure that not a 
single one who heard it before will miss the 
opportunity to hear again that voice so dear 
to every student of Bowdoin, and which has 
been so eloquently and often raised in Bow- 
doin's defense and praise. 



Geniality as an every-day quality is not 
so rare that its presence deserves recognition. 
We cannot, however, resist putting into 
words a universal opinion of the college, 



104 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



that the geniality and kindness of our assist- 
ant treasurer deserve recognition on our part. 
If any mistakes are to be corrected or infor- 
mation sought, his time and efforts are always 
cordially given. Such a quality is readily 
recognized and responded to heartily by the 
students. 



DREAMING. 

When the slowly gathering twilight 
Bathes in purple light the skies, 

Comes a glad and cheering vision 
To my weary, longing eyes. 

In a panoramic vista 

By the fire-light's ruddy glow, 
Fancy sees the scenes repeated 

Of a happy long ago. 

Scenes of joy and scenes of sorrow, 
Scenes of pleasure and of pain, 

Long gone days of sun and shadow 
Seem to circle me again. 

But the sorrow, pain, and shadow, 
Through the mellow light of years, 

Lose their keen and bitter moaning 
In this world which Fancj' rears. 

Vision sweet of days departed ! 

Sister mine, those days recall. 
May their light our lives still brighten, 

Soothing, gladd'ning, chastening all. 



THE GREAT EATING MyVTCH AT 
HARPSWELL NECK. 

"Yes! " said Tom, scratching a match in 
the old style and applying it scientifically to 
his pipe, " it is a fact that of all the eaters I 
ever saw, Dick and Harry of my class could 
pull the hard-tack. It used often to be a 
matter of wonder to the boys that the board 
ran so high, but on a second consideration the 
above fact easily explained it. For a wiiile 
they both sat at one table on one side of the 
room, but it was found by accurate experi- 
ment tliat that side of the room sank four 
inches after each meal. After a time this be- 



came dangerous, and Dick was seated at our 
table, and this equalized the pressure and re- 
moved the fears of the boj^s. Subsequently 
to this they had been eating side by side 
without much livalry, for all the rest had 
been busily engaged in getting something in 
the general havoc ; but now each table backed 
its own man and the rivalry became intense. 
Bets were freelj' offered and taken on a din- 
ner or a supper, but no decision could be 
arrived at, for what Dick lacked on bread he 
made up on doughnuts, and where Harry fell 
short on cakes and pastry, he went over the 
line with flying colors on beans. One was 
known as the Human Shark, and the other as 
the Perpetual Vacuum. " So one day," con- 
tinued Tom, puffing vigorously at his pipe, 
and reaching mechanically for a match, as he 
perceived it had gone out, " I proposed that 
the boys go down to the sea-shore, take pro- 
visions enough for a fair trial, and have the 
thing settled. The proposal was eagerly 
caught at by the boys, and five dollars laid 
on the Shark as against the Vacuum. Tliis 
was promptly taken by the backers of the 
Vacuum, and the coming match was much 
talked about during the week. Both trained 
vigorously and were in prime order, and there 
was every indication of an exciting contest. 

" At 6.30, sharp, Saturday morning, two 
teams started from the campus loaded with 
boys, while a little later, a hay cart heavily 
loaded with provisions. At 8.30 the destina- 
tion was reached, the provision unpacked, and 
everything made ready for the struggle. 
Dick and Harry, loosely dressed, and eager 
for the fray, roamed ai'ound and watciied willi 
hungry eyes the necessary preparations. At 
12 o'clock, sharp, the dinner was prepared, 
the rest of the boys sat round and pretended 
to eat, but anxiously watched the contest. 
By the side of each of the two plates was 
placed one (juart of beans and a loaf of bread, 
with a iialf pint of water optional. At ex- 
actly 12.10 the word 'Eat' was given and 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



105 



the havoc begun. At 12.15 the first heat was 
finished, Dick leading Harry by six and a 
quarter seconds. 

" The next heat was lobster, and here Harry 
showed superior stowage powers, and Dick 
broke badlj'. The men who backed Harry 
were radiant. Three pounds of boiled beef- 
steak, were now set before each man and 
quickly disappeared. But now signs of 
weakness were shown, and it was decided, 
after a consultation of tlie judges, to finish the 
contest on pie. Mince after mince, apple 
after apple, custard after custard, were 
brought on, and disappeared. On the eighth 
pie, however, Dick again broke badly, and this 
time went all to pieces. His friends rolled 
him on the ground and prodded him, but to 
no purpose. Harry was declared to be the 
victor amid shouts of exultation. On at- 
tempting to stand up and walk off uncon- 
cerned, he fell over, owing probably to the 
change in his center of gravity, and was 
picked up and deposited in the hay cart with 
the vanquished Dick. On the way back a 
commotion was heard, and on investigation it 
was found that they had run across an undis- 
covered package of doughnuts, and were 
quickly putting them out of sight. They 
were choked off, however, by their personal 
friends, and slept quietly for the rest of the 
day and night." 

Since then, we learn, Dick has offered to 
eat Harry for fift}' dollars a side, on any ho- 
mogeneous material he may name. We un- 
derstand Harry has accepted his terms, re- 
questing, however, that the material shall be 
Dick's favorite dish. 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON CONVEN- 
TION. 

Fifty-six delegates, representing twenty- 
six chapters of the Delta Kappa Epsilon Fra- 
ternity, met in convention at Masonic Hall, 
Providence, R. I., Wednesday and Thursday, 



Oct. 18th and 19th, with the Upsilon Chap- 
ter of Brown University. Tuesday night, 
the evening before the convention assembled, 
by a long-established custom called " Columbia 
night," was spent in enjoying the hospitalities 
of the Columbia delegates and in becoming 
thoroughly acquainted. 

The convention held business sessions on 
the morning and afternoon of Wednesday ; 
the evening session was shortened so that the 
delegates might attend a lecture by Harry W. 
French, to which they were invited in a body 
by his manager, an alumnus of D. K. E. The 
business sessions were continued Thursday 
morning and afternoon ; and at 6.30, all busi- 
ness having been disposed of, the thirty-sixth 
annual convention was brought to a close by 
adjournment. A game of base-ball had been 
arranged between the Brown University nine 
and a local team, but owing to the inclemency 
of the weather it had to be given up ; how- 
ever, many of the delegates accepted the in- 
vitation of members of the Upsilon Chapter, 
and visited the colleges, where they were 
hospitably entertained. 

Thursday evening, at half-past seven, the 
delegates marched in a body from the Narra- 
gansett House, the head-quarters of the con- 
vention, to Low's Grand Opera-House, where 
the public exercises were held. After the 
Fraternity Ode, written for the occasion by 
Prof. Gilmore, Brown, '58, had been sung by 
the brothers, and prayer offered by the chap- 
lain, Rev. C. Edwin Barrows, D.D., Brown, 
'58, the Opening Address was delivered by 
Gen. Francis A. Walker, Amherst, '60, who 
also officiated as President of the occasion. 
The exercises further consisted of an address 
by John DeWitt Warner, Cornell, '72, Secre- 
tary of D. K. E. Council, the Oration by 
Hon. Andrew J. Jennings, Brown, '72, and 
the Poem by Rev. James S. Good, Lafayette, 
'72. Music was furnished by Reeves's 
Orchestra. The exercises were well received 
and listened to with the closest attention by 



106 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



a large aucHeiice. After singing tiic Fiater- 
nitj' Song, written by F. N. Luther, Brown, 
'84, and receiving the benediction, tiie dele- 
gates proceeded to the Narragansett House, 
where a sumptuous banquet awaited tlieni. 
After the banquet followed the usual order 
of toasts, speeches, and songs till a late hour, 
when the brothers parted, with the unanimous 
sentiment that Upsilon had discharged her 
duties as iiosless in a most admirable niannei-, 
and that the thirty-sixtii annual convcniion 
of D. K. E. was a "lorious success. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



How dotli the busy little Prof. 

Improve each shining hour, 
To gather hull-frogs all the day 

From every fen and bower. 

Class elections are in order. 

Laziness is still at a promiuni. 

Boating is over for the season-. 

" Got anything you want done ? " 

We dosorvo a better reading-room. 

'J'lie melancholy days are right liero. 

The scratch race was a mournful failure. 

How docs your spending money hold out ? 

Fifty cents says you havn't seen the comet. 

Give us a soug entitled " Over the fire wall." 

A gymnasium would be the thing about now. 

F'iing, '86, has joined the Psi Upsilon Society. 

Some folks say that canned goods have advanced. 

n. M. Wright, '84, was also a. dologato to tin' 
J. A. A', convention. 

A noat directory has liccn pul up in llic lnwcr 
entry of South Maine. 

You want to visit the lislnv;iy :it Iriist once lic- 
fore the season clo.ses. 

The oflicors of the liasc-Ball AssdciiUion sjicmlil 
have been chosen long ago. 

In speaking of Brown and Butler in the last 
i)iiiKN'i', '8l> should have been used instead of '8-1. 

It really seems as though I'rof. I'ackai'd was 
growing younger instead of older. Mis good hcallli 
is a source of joy to every Bowdoiii boy. 



Less business than usual done on the pave this 

fall. 

'I'liu Brunswick Skating Rink is to be opened 
soon. 

.Sdutli Wiiitlirop grasps the confection im end 
women. 

'I'he liaziiig case bids fair iievei- to reach a set- 
tlement. 

Now is the time to ''swear ofT" for the rest of 
the year. 

About time to gi\e the entry lauips their ;nnuial 
cleaning. 

The collector of the Boating Association is on 
the war-path. 

Beware of " inesi)onsible pensons with a dispo- 
sition to pilfer.'' 

Prof. Packard's " Hi.story ot Bnwdoin " is nearly 
ready for distribution. 

The Seniors are being iiisiructed in parliament- 
ary law by Mr. Fishei'. 

The band is to be revixed under the lcadersbi|i 
of Mr. C. 0. Hutcbins, 'S:i. 

The local dealers report good sales of room 
furnishings to the Freshmen. 

An " odor of long-forgotten dinners lingers lov- 
ingly " about some of the ends. 

Don't forget to press some of those autumn 
leaves to scud to your best girl. 

A Freshman has been heard asking if Prof Smith 
really owns and drives a trotter. 

"The frog wdio would a-wooing go" has fallen 
to the tender mercy of the Juniors. 

The Sophomores, iu view of ht)lding a class sup- 
per, invested iu a line lot of turkeys. 

The Freshmen have not e\eu been watered. 
What a change from two years ago 1 

The choir made the hair rise in the l)od\ of the 
chapel, on a recent Sabbath afternoon. 

An (Mupt\ coal hod, lurking in a dark ball way, 
ri\als icy ste|)s as a promoter of profaiiilv. 

An auction of books last Wednesday eve caused 
a tein[)orary e.xcitemeut among the literati. 

Why have the Saturday evening prayer-meetings 
in the lUeaveland room been discontinued ? 

Piof. Lee lectures to the Freshmen on " Hygi- 
enic" once each week in the ("leavcland room. 

A certain Senior has decided " to Jliii;/ away 
ambition" and taki^ to the auctioneering block. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



107 



The sportsmen report good shooting in the 
suburbs. 

You uuist answer to your own name only, wlien 
the roll is called. 

The atmosphere is very lVa.L;-rant with the odor 
of class elections. 

The well near Massachusetts Hall is the best 
one on the campus. 

Can't we have a few moi'o games of foot-ball be- 
I'lire it gets too cold? 

The Sophs have discovered symptoms of an 
approaching peanut drunk. 

Prof Campbell occupied the pulpit in the Con- 
gregational church on Sunday, Oct. 22. 

One of our Faculty doesn't have a single recita- 
tion this term, and yet claims to be a bard-worked 
man. 

The Seniors are looking with a stufi'ed club for 
the man that told them that psychology was a soft 
snap. 

The I'emark that Clatj was fire-proof lirought 
appreciative grins to the faces of the Senior astron- 
omers. 

Moody, Goddard, and Bates, '82, and Smith, 
WiKson, and Wheelwright, '81, have been in town 
recently. 

Ninety-nine per cent, of our exchanges headed 
the local column in the first fall issue with " Wel- 
come, '86." 

There is a slight stringency in the excuse busi- 
ness this fall. There are more offered than can 
find takers. 

The Juniors (zoology division) have been very 
successful in obtaining frogs, lizards, and snakes 
for dissection. 

Everybody is complaining of the dullness of the 
term. Isn't it due to lack of enterprise among the 
upperclassmen ? 

A course of lectures and concerts in Memorial 
Hall is one of the delightful possibilities of the im- 
mediate future. 

A Senior suggests that wo ought to have prayers 
twice right off on Sunday morning, and then have 
all the afternoon to ourselves. 

In psychology: Prof. — "Now, Mr. H., when I 
say ' this is a tree,' what do you get from it ? " Mr. 
H. (who is severely practical)—"! don't get any- 
thing from it, and, if you will permit mo, I don't sec 
any sense in your question." Wild applause. 



A three-legged frog is an object of interest in 
the Cleaveland room. It is expected to sprout a 
new leg at an early date. 

These are bracing mornings to those who are 
coming through the entrances of the campus just as 
the last alarm for prayers commences to strike. 

The class in astronomy are taking advantage of 
the pleasant evenings to view the heavenly bodies 
through the opera-glass belonging to the college. 

Many of the college rooms have posted on the 
inside of the closet doors the names of those who 
have successively occupied the rooms for the last 
twenty or thirty years. 

It is a sad thing to see a professor in such a state 
that he solemnly makes the statement that it takes 
light about three and one-half miles to come to the 
earth from a certain star. 

It is considered in the geology class that there 
are no great openings for going into the earthquake 
business. William, who sat down ou a bent pin, 
seemed to work up considerable enthusiasm on the 
subject. 

A Junior, in chemistry the other day, tried to de- 
ternnne the character of a certain solution by tast- 
ing it. He found out what he wanted to, and so 
was somewhat reconciled to go without solid food 
for five days. 

" Why has not Bowdoin been more successful in 
regattas? " was one of the subjects for the Sopho- 
more themes due last week. We have a celluloid 
scarf-pin for the man who has answered that ques- 
tion satisfactorily. 

The Sophomores should agitate Anna in their 
class meeting. They have the largest class in 
college and have no heavy class expenses to pay 
this year. Why can't they give us a good burial of 
analytics next spring ? " 

A gentleman by the name of Milton Whitney, 
from John Hopkins University, has come here, on 
account of ill health, to spend the winter with us 
and to pursue a special course in organic chemistry 
under the direction of Prof, llobinson. 

Another theory has been advanced by a Senior 
in geology : Considering that SO2 gas comes from 
an active volcano, this Senior wishes it distinctly 
understood that the volcano is "all balled up" in not 
sending out frozen lava and chunks of ice. And 
the man who goes to investigate the eruption ought 
to wear rubber boots and several overcoats. The 
theory is good, but for some reason or other the 



108 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



facts don't agree with it. So much the worse for 
the facts. 

An enterprising member of '83 oflBciated at an 
auction sale of books down town, last week. His 
motto was "large sales and small proQts."' But the 
most remarkable feature of the whole thing was 
that his books were printed in " printer's print." 

If there is an organ in the room above yours and 
a piano across the way, you have our profoundest 
sympathy. If the man next door contemplates 
learning to play the cornet, you had better immedi- 
ately engage your rooms in the Maine Insane Asy- 
lum. 

When a man is a Freshman here, he puts iu his 
coal himself; when he is a Sophomore, he helps a 
yagger do it ; as a Junior, he merely bosses the job ; 
and when be has put on Senior dignity, he throws 
over the whole att'air to the Freshman who rooms 
with him. 

An advertisement of Colby University appears 
in the literary department of one of our exchanges, 
the Farmington High School Solecism. Wouldn't 
it have been a little more honorable for the Colby 
man to have put his article among the other ads. 
and paid for it like a little man ? 

We suggest the following as good subjects for 
communications to the Orient : " Our Need of a 
New Reading- Room," " The Present Apathy in 
Sports," "The College Library," "Did It Pay to 
Build Memorial Hall Simply for an Ornament?" 
" What Shall We Do with Our Beardless Tutors?" 
and " The Need of More Light in Astronomy and 
Physics." 

Hasn't the history course of the present Senior 
class been neglected a little ? With the exception 
of one term in ancient history Freshman year, not 
one bit of instruction has '83 had in this direction. 
Time was when a Bowdoin graduate knew some- 
thing about Roman, Medifoval, French, English, 
and American history. Why should such an im- 
portant branch of study be so totally ignored here 
now? 

He was a Junior, and it is said had been trying 
to learn something about physics since term com- 
menced. He was found wandering through the 
streets of Bnuiswick at 1.30 a.m., muttering some- 
thing about "unformed accidental rectangular mo- 
tion." He was borne tenderly to his room, and is 
better now. Moral — never try to learn anything 
about physics hero, unless you want to pass tlirough 
life a raving maniac. 



Scene at table, dignified Senior dining out : 
D. S. — "Yes, as I was saying, Mr. W., while out 
riding with his hitherto unproposed to truly-truly, 
took this a^ccasion to aw-make a proposal." 
Daughter of the house where D. S. was diuing (sud- 
denly) — "Why, what did he do with the reins?" 
D. of H. is covered with confusion by the shout of 
laughter, and has since spent her time trying to find 
out wherein she gave herself away. Fact. 

The auction of '83's Bugles, Wednesday, 
October 18th, was financially more of a success than 
was anticipated. About twenty-five copies were sold 
by Boss F. The auctioneer's efforts on Wednesday, 
October 2.5th, were not crowned with any marked 
degree of success, only a dozen copies having been 
disposed of. As a result, the editors still have a lot 
on hand. The suggestion that each society relieve 
its editor of the financial burden imposed by small 
sales seems to be a good one, and it is to be hoped 
that hereafter, beginning with the volume soon to 
be issued, tbe editors shall lose no more than their 
shares as individual members of the college. 

The Praying Circle, established in 1815, so long 
ago that evei-ybody thought that it was one of the 
lasting institutions of the college, has passed away_ 
Its undergraduate members, iu accordance with the 
advice given them by Mr. Wishard, a representative 
of the College Y. M. C. A., have voted to change it into 
a chapter of the Y. M. C. A. It is claimed by those 
who favored the change, that the usefulness of the 
Christian organization in Bowdoin will be vastly 
increased by giving it a grander name and thus 
making it a part of an association that extends 
throughout the principal colleges. So, perhaps, iu 
payment for the loss of the old Praying Circle, in 
which we have all taken so much pride, we may 
fairly expect to see at once a decided increase in 
religious feeling and work among the students. 

'84's Bugle board consists of Cothron, Adams, 
Clark, Hilton, and Phinney. They have hold a 
meeting and organized as follows: Literary Editor, 
Phinney; Business Editor, Clark. The statistics 
and miscellaneous matter is equally divided among 
the five. Rather an innovation has been made at 
the outset by voting that each class shall furnish its 
own history, which is to be written by some mem- 
ber chosen by his class. The step seems to bo a 
good one, inasnnich as each history will probably be 
enlivened by an ardent desire on the part of its 
writer to have his class stand on the pinnacle of fame. 
So far as known, only the two lower classes have 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



109 



chosen their historians. '85 is represented by 
Bartlett, '86 by Kuowlton. Let us hope that the 
boys will put on the immortal brace and give us a 
Bugle that will find a ready acceptance by all. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



At a regular meeting of the Theta Chapter of 
the Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity, held October 
20, 1882, the following preamble and resolutions 
were passed : 

Whereas, It has pleased Almighty God to re- 
move by death from active Christian hfe our beloved 
brother, A. H. Pennbll, of the class of 1879, 
therefore, 

Resolved, That in his death, the Delta Kappa 
Epsilon Fraternity loses one whose loyalty to her 
dearest interests was never wanting, and whose ex- 
amples and precepts are worthy of our adoption; 
that by his sincerity and devotion, a large circle of 
friends, and especially those who are his brothers 
in Theta Chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon, are 
called upon to mourn his untimely death, by which 
he was cut off in the spring-time of life from what 
promised to be the performance of a Mfe-long 
Christian work. 

Resolved, That we deeply sympathize with the 
relatives and friends of the deceased in this their 
sad affliction. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to his relatives, and that a copy also be sent to 
the press for publication. 

J. F. Waterman, 
C. E. Adams, 
B. Baktlett, 
In behalf of Theta Chapter. 



Whereas, For the first time, "the fatal asterisk 
of death is set " against the names of two of our be- 
loved classmates, Henry Baird Carleton and 
Albert Henry Pennbll, 

Resolved, That while we bow to the All-Wise 
Providence that has denied us the companionship 
of two so universally loved, so worthy of admiration 
and respect, we would comfort ourselves with the 
thought that for them both this was no dreaded 
change, but merely a summons from the Master 
they both were preparing to serve. 

Resolved, That while we cherish the delightful 
memories of our late classmates and friends, we 
should imitate the exemplary Christian lives they 
led among us. 

Resolved, That we tender our heartfelt sympa- 
thy to the afflicted families, and cause a copy of 
these resolutions to be published in the Bowdoin 
Orient and sent to them. 

Horace E. Henderson, 
Geo. W. Bourne, 
Joel P. Huston, 

Committee on Resolutions. 

October ICth, 1882. 



At a regular meeting of Lambda Chapter of the 
Zeta Psi Fraternity, held October 20, 1882, the 
following preamble and resolutions were adopted : 

Whereas, An All- Wise Providence has removed 
by death our esteemed and worthy brother, Henry 
Baird Carleton, of the class of 1879, therefore. 

Resolved, That in his death, the fraternity loses 
a brother who was ever faithful in the performance 
of his duties while an active member of this Chapter, 
and aft&r his graduation, endeavored in every way 
to advance the interests of Zeta Psi ; one who was 
endeared to us by the strongest ties of brotherhood, 
whose early death closed a life of great promise. 

Resolved, That we extend to the family of the 
deceased brother our heartfelt sympathies in their 
great affliction. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to the family of the deceased, to the several 
Chapters, and to the Orient. 

F. E. Perham, 
J. A. Crowley, 
A. C. Cobb, 
In behalf of the Lambda Chapter. 



PEB.SOHAL. 



[Graduates and Undergraduates are earnestly solicited 
to send personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Bruns- 
wick.] 

The many friends of Prof. George T. Ladd will 
be pained to know of the death, Oct. 5, of his 
youngest son, Jesse. 

On Monday, Oct. 23, died Miss Frances A. Pack- 
ard, a daughter of Prof. W. A. Packard, of Prince- 
ton, and a granddaughter of Prof. A. S. Packard, of 
Bowdoin College. 

'53. — MelvilleW. Fuller, of Chicago, declined the 
Democratic nomination for the first district of Illi- 
nois. 

'65. —Harmon is practicing law in Boston. 

'65.— Locke is practicing law in Portland. 

'65.— Weeks is clerk of courts in Wiscasset. 

'65. — Millay is practicing law in Bowdoinham. 

'65.— Swasey is practicing law in Portland. 

73. — p. E. Whitney is in a law offlce with his 
brother in San Francisco. He was for three years 
in Tokio, Japan, and afterwards read law in St. 
Louis. 

73._F. A. Wilson is to be ordained as a Con- 
gregational minister at Orono. After graduating 
he studied at the Bangor Theological Seminary. 

'73. — Bradstreet is enjoying a vacation with 
friends in Bridgton. In 1881 he became Assistant 
Manager of the Tehauutepec Interocean Railway 
Co. After a severe attack of malarial fever, he 



110 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



became thoroughly acclimated, aud last December 
was promoted to the position of General Manager- 

75. — Hatch has obtained a position as teacher 
at Milford, Mass. 

'77. — Bourne, having studied medicine at Phila- 
delphia, has settled in Taunton, Mass. 

78.— Potter is studying law with Weston Thomp- 
son, Brunswick. 

79. — Hastings is practicing law in Fryeburg, 
Me. 

79. — Hanson is a teacher of Latin. 

79.— Ford is teaching school in Lafayette, Ind. 

79. — Fessenden has a position in the Census Of- 
fice, Washington, D. C. 

79. — Bourne is practicing law in Kennebunk, 
Me. 

79. — Brown is an ornithologist at Portland. 

79. — Varney is a civil engineer in Texas. 

'80. — Payson was married to Miss Louise G. 
Thaxter, Thursday, Oct. 12. 

'80. — Harding is in the Columbian Law School, 
Washington, D. C. 

'80. — Giveen is a candidate, on the Democratic 
ticket in Colorado, for Supervisor of Schools. 

'80.— Perkins and Dane are in a law school in 
St. Louis. 

'8L — Pettengill, '81, aud Pierce, '82, are in Tale 
Theological Seminary, New Haven, Ct. 

'81 — Sawyer is teaching the Lindsey High School, 
Shapleigh, Me. 

'81. — Little was married, Oct. 19, to Miss Eila 
Lucia Gray of Portland. 

'81.— F. L. Johnson is in the Signal Service at 
(Jhincateague, Va. 

'81.— Goddard is with Osgood's Hcliotype Co., 
Boston. 

'82. — Mason is teaching a grammar school in 
East Boston. 

'82.— Blondcll is for a shoi't time teacher of the 
grammar School, in Augusta, Me. 

'82.— Merryman is in the Boston Scliool of Tech- 
nology. 

'82. — Holway is at home in .Augusta, and is about 
to begin the study of law. 

'82.— Goddard is studying law with Titcomb & 
Son, at Augusta. 

The following arc in the Law Department of the 
IJoston University: Smith, '78; Martin, '80; Shaw 
and Towle, both of '81 : and Stinson, formerly of 
V,i. 

'81. — Packard is in the .lunior rlass at Am- 
herst. 

'84.— I'eirco is in business in Now York. 



CLIPPINGS. 



A negro tramp stood in a box. 

The captain of tlie station, 
In accents steru and pen in liand, 

Aslied him his occupation. 

AVitli knowing grin and water}- eyo 
The darkey said, " Well, sar ! 

Guess I's a wrecker, lease I hauls 
De schooners off tlie bar." 

— Crimson. 

The nobbiest thing in boots is a bunion. 

When did Washington take his first ride? 
When he took a hack at the cherry tree. —Ex. 

First Division Sophomore (legit) — " 0, home of 
Hades—" Prof. — " Well, you may stop there.'' 
Red lights. — Tale Cnurant. 

Prof, (looking at watch) — •' As we have a few 
moments left I should like to have any one ask a 
question if so disposed." Student—" What time is 
it, please ? " — Ex. 

Professor — " What is the technical name lor 
the eclipse of Venus by Jupiter ? "' Rough-and- 
ready Student — " Osculation, sir." He probably 
meant occitltation. — Ex. 

Little Lottie to her friend: "I have so many 
cares. Yesterday a little baby sister arrived aud 
papa is on a jury. It was only a piece of luck that 
mamma was at home to take care of it." — Y<ile 
News. 

They had been at the masquerade, where she 
recognized him at once. " Was it the loud beating 
of your heart, my darling, that told you I was 
near ? " murtnured he. " Oh, no," she replied : " I 
recognized your crooked legs." — Ex. 

SCENE — BAT OF BISCAY. 

On the ocean, O my darling, 

When it roolcs us to and fro, 
Would it not be better, darling, 

We should both go down below ? 
When the ship is tossing gently 

'Tis some sudden unknown woe 
Prompts me once again to a-sk you 

Would you like to go l)('low '' 
In the gloaming, O my darling, 

Cling not lovingly to me, 
For I often, with short warning, 

Long to view the deep, blue sea. 
Aiul I feci all choked with something 

Longing, struggling to bo [roo ; 
It were best to leave you, darling, 

Best for you and best for me. 

—Lehiyk linn: 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 



111 



EAU MIGH ! 

There was a young girl from Bordeaux, 
"With corns on her little pink teaux ; 

They gave her such pain 

The tears ran like rain 
Down the bridge of her elegant neaux. 

— Cornell Era. 

Jumbo's catching at Brunswick was too much 
for Tufts, and we were caught Knapp-ing. (We 
beg pardon, but our defeat has softened our brains.) 
— Tuftonian. 

Why is a torn umbrella like a small circus ? A 
torn umbrella makes a display of ribs, and a dis- 
play of ribs is a side-show, and a side-show is a 
small circus. — Princetonian. 

YE SWELLE COQUETTE. 

Her Beauty. Her head is most divinely set ; 

Quiek-flashing eyes as black as jet; 
Mirth doth a dimpling smile compel 
O'er face more fair than I can tell, 
Whose lips aye part for saucy threat. 

Her Dress. Her hat, 'twere folly to forget. 

Her claudent scarf and collarette 
She's sure in style are ultra swelle, 
Steal dainty boots and pointed well, 

Prom 'neath her jaunty ulsterette, 

Her CO- This chic brunette, perdie, will bet, 
Will slyly smoke a cigarette. 

Or sip a glass of bright Moselle, 
Ye swelle coquette. 

Her Power. She uses slang, the newest yet; 
Has read the latest novelette ; 
The freshest gossip can re-tell, 
Albeit is the reigning belle : 
A hundred hearts holds in her net, , 
Ye swelle coquette. 

" I never saw a real prize flte, but I saw a fut- 
ball game. First a man kiks the ball; thou the 
boys each each other round the nex and roll in the 
mud; then one man yells hell and they get up in a 
line and the men on the end they danse; then the 
boys on the fens they laf. When a man runs with 
the ball they catch him and sit on his neck ; then 
he goze home and another man takes his j)lace; 
then one man kiks the ball and the other side 
yells fowl ; then they swear. My brother Bill, 
before the game, sed he was laying for one of 
those dam Freshmen. When he came down to 
the feeld in his sute the boys on the fens they 
yelled: 'It came from New York on the breeze.' 
When he came home with his leg broke I asked 
him if he fixed the Freshman. And my sister's 
young mau lafted and said not this eve, and Bill he 
kust." — Collegian. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



The matter which, just at present, appears to be 
agitating the college world, and especially Coluni- 
IMa and Harvard, is the difficulty or misunderstand- 
ing that arose from the proposed race at New Lon- 
don last July. The facts of the case, as nearly as 
we can learn from the conflicting statements made 
in the various papers, are as follows : The race was 
agreed upon for a certain day and time ; both 
crews were in training at New London ; by the 
death of the Columbia coxswain, a postponement 
of the race was necessitated ; the day was agreed 
upon again, but Harvard demanded a change of 
time, to which Columbia would not accede ; there- 
upon the Har^'ard crew went out of training, and 
left New London ; on the appointed day and hour 
Columbia rowed over the course, and was awarded 
the race by the referee. So the race was decided, 
and, one might think, the matter ended. But, 
no ; in the fall some of the Harvard papers took it 
upon them to censure the crew and its manager, 
Mr. Bancroft, and to demand that a suitable apol- 
ogy be made to the Columbia crew for departing so 
abruptly and without giving ofiicial notice of their 
intention. This expression of opinion drew from 
Mr. Bancroft, backed by the Boat Club, a full state- 
ment of Harvard's position and her reasons for 
withdrawing from the race, to which the Columbia 
papers immediately responded with their construc- 
tion of the affair, and so the battle goes on. The 
latest move is the desertion of the Harvard gradu- 
ates from their standards; they went to the ex- 
treme of sending a letter of apology to Columbia 
in behalf of the crew, whom they condemned in no 
measured terms, alleging that they "crawled" from 
the race, either because they were afraid to row 
Columbia, or because they did not care about the " 
race, one or the other, inasmuch as they had already 
defeated Yale, and maintaining that they should 
have remained in training at New Loudon until 
some time could be agreed upon and the race rowed. 
This appears to be as just a view of the matter as 
can well be formed without a full knowledge of the 
particulars. And, indeed, most of the college 
papers seem to take this stand, viz., that for some 
reason Harvard did not want to row Columbia, and 
so took advantage of a slight misunderstanding to 
" crawl." The controversy has gone so far that 
Columbia declares she will never row Harvard 
again, and Harvard reciprocates. The whole affair 
is utterly fruitless of any good to either college, 



112 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



and can only provoke bad feeling ; and, as we un- 
derstand, Harvard does not claim tbe race, there is 
no reason vrliy tbe tbing sbould ever bave been 
brought up at all, nor why should it not be 
dropped. 

From various itenis wbicli have been going tbe 
rounds of tbe college papers, it appears that Presi- 
dent Eliot, of Harvard, has solicited tbe Presidents 
and Faculties of other colleges to take some united 
action so as to prevent the college nines from playing 
with professional teams. Most of the Eastern col- 
leges bave responded favorably, but the Tale Fac- 
ulty refused to interfere in the matter, and the 
Courant gives us to understand that the students 
are perfectly satisfied with tbe action, or rather 
want of action, of the Faculty. Tbe Record, how- 
ever, interprets the sentiment of the college differ- 
ently, and consequently there is a division in the 
press. Curiously enough, this same lack of una- 
nimity of opinion is noticed among the Harvard 
papers. The Herald considers Tale's refusal to act 
as a direct insult to Harva,rd and its President, who 
was the originator of the movement, while the 
Crimson thinks the Tale Faculty knew what they 
were about. And doubtless they both are right. 
By the way, iu speaking of the Courant, we sbould 
not forget to mention tbe wonderful improvement 
that has been made in its appearance by the addi- 
tion of a new cover which, although partaking 
somewhat of the meaningless, ffistbetic jumble 
which has recently become so fashionable, and from 
which it is often a task to decipher tbe name, is yet 
neat and modest. The number at hand contains an 
account of "Journalism at Tale " which, we presume, 
does the double duty of filling space in the Courant 
and of complying with tbe request of the gentle- 
man who has in preparation a complete history of 
college journalism. We would here state that any 
student who feels that ho can fill the bill of "one 
of'your able literary men," and " who can furnish an 
article worthy of your college and paper," as Mr. 
McClure's communication runs, had better devote 
his time to writing up an account of journalism at 
Bowdoin and, no doubt, bo w^ll be amply rewarded 
in some way or other by Mr. McCluro. l?ut to 
return to our article in the Courant. From this 
we learn that the lirst publication at Tale was the 
Literary Cabinet, m 1800; it, however, perished 
the following year. Since this time there have 
been some twelve attempts, of which only five bave 
had a permanent success and become an institution 
of the college, viz.. Lit., Courant, Becord, News, 
and Banner, tlie last being an annual. 



Fault-finding, we suppose, is universal, yet it is 
a sort of comfort to be reminded that we have com- 
panions in misery, even way out in Ohio. Witness, 
a long editorial in the Marietta Olio upon the sub- 
ject of fault-finders, from which we would infer that 
tbe Olio has recently been subjected to this species 
of torture. The exceeding frankness of the article, 
and, .shall we say, the justice of its strictures, strikes 
our fancy and we would quote : 

" The critical student never sees a good thing iu 
tbe Olio, unless be has written it himself. He 
growls at each new number of the Olio. It is dull, 
feeble, silly, and unworthy of perusal. He sneers 
at every article. He ridicules tbe editorials and 
contributions. But does he do anything to improve 
the paper? If he thinks the bterary department 
too heavy, does be write a light sketch for it? 
No, he only growls. He writes nothing. He pulls to 
pieces. If any student does not think the Olio en- 
tertaining, let him quit bis dyspeptic grumbling 
and do something to better it. The grumbler does 
little for the world. He builds nothing. He 
advances nothing. He simply opposes and obstructs. 
We want the students to write for the Olio. It is 
their paper, and if they don't like it let them do 
something to improve it. Don't sit on tbe fence and 
growl. That will do no good. Go to work and 
write, or else take what the editors give you. Sug- 
gest and do something better, or forever hold your 
peace. Ton are making an unenviable spectacle of 
yourself by your melancholy and monotonous 
grumbling. If you don't know it, rest assured that 
everybody else does." 

In this connection we remember the remark of one 
of our exchanges, to the effect that " with all the 
'kickers' there are in college, we ought to have a 
good foot-ball team." 

The Yale News of the 24th inst. presents a cut 
of the new athletic grounds, now in course of prep- 
aration, and a description of the same. There is 
to bo a quarter-mile track, a space for lawu-touuis 
courts, two base-ball fields, a cricket, a la crosso, a 
foot-ball field, and a grand stand facing two ways, 
besides an imposing gate, not to speak of a high 
picket fence surrounding the whole, that will pre- 
vent small boys on the outside from seeing the 
games as effectually as would a high board fence. 
Truly our Yale brothers are to be congratulated 
upon the anticipation of such an arena, so match- 
less in every respect, where thoy may exhibit the 
physical prowess that has always so distinguished 
them. As was stated above, all this is presented 
in the News, which, by the way, we think does not 
deserve the criticism which has been made upon it 
by the exchange editor of the Acta. He says : 

"The Yale News is also on hand. It contains 
the usual remarks about Mary Anderson and Hecrs's 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



113 



Drug Store, or Drug's Beer Store, we forget which. 
But why, oh. News, do you not print some news 
about dear old Yale ? As our parados editor says : 
' The Yale News has arrived, but the news of Yale 
hasn't got here yet.' " 

Another matter which at present occupies the 
editorial mind is college singing, or rather the lack 
of it. We can all remember when the boys used to 
get together and have a good old sing, — perhaps it 
might be called a "howl," — when every man felt it 
his duty and high privilege to take part in a jolly 
chorus. There is nothing that is so strong to 
unite men in the ties of friendship and good 
fellowship as a college song. It always used 
to be and ever ought to be a prominent feat- 
ure of college life. We could make endless 
extracts from our exchanges urging the revival 
of this old custom, for lack of interest in it is felt 
in many of our sister colleges, but it would seem as 
if its value ought to be evident to all. To be sure, 
we do hear a good deal of one song, which often at 
this season fiills upon our ears at the dead of night, 
rendered with an amount of force and ferocity that 
is calculated to strike terror to the hearts of the 
quaking Freshmen ; but surely this is not the only 
song we know, and even if we do not take kindly to 
the new song book, there are some songs that have 
belonged to Old Bowdoin for many years, and which 
are well worth repeating. 

Some kind friend, unknown, has sent us the 
After Supper, a paper for home and school, express- 
ing the wish that we would give it a careful perusal. 
We have perused. The first thing that met our 
eye, on opening this model sheet, was the startling 
information, amoug the "Answers for August," 
that "Bees are provided with a little bag, inside 
their bodies, a kind of second stomach, in which 
the honey designed for storage is carried"; and 
" Steel pens were introduced in 1830." Among the 
"Questions for October'' this conundrum is pro- 
pounded, "Where do flies go in winter?" Now 
what in the world is the use of inquiring where the 
flies go in winter. If some one would find out 
where they don't go in summer, he would prove 
himself a benefactor to the human race, and a good 
man to build a summer hotel. Further on we find 
a list of games, suitable, we presume, for children 
of our age. Just imagine the editorial board play- 
ing " Tom Tiddler's Ground " in the sanctum ; but 
we beg pardon, it would be too much to ask, for 
first, dear reader, you would have to imagine a 
sanctum for the Orient, and that is too much even 
for our powers, which, we assure you, are not weak 



in that direction. However, there is one game men- 
tioned to which, perhaps, the board are most ac- 
customed. It is called "Beauty Made Ghastly," 
and the directions for playing it are, " Take half a 
pint of spirits and some common salt." Now we 
are rather in the habit of taking our salt first, 
whether in the form of fish or otherwise. It 
must be that the salt in this case is designed to get 
up a thirst for the second half-pint. Glorious 
thought! To you, After Supper, we are indebted 
for it. To you shall due credit be given. Here- 
after we shall always carry our vest pocket full of 
common salt, in case of an emergency. 



BOOK NOTICE. 

"The Secret Societv System," byE. E. Aiken; New 
Haven : Briggs & Co., 1882. 

The above pamphlet is upon our table. The 
author is a graduate of Yale, and in his Senior year 
was connected with one of the societies there, and 
so, presumably, has an exceptional stand-point fi'om 
which to judge. The book is a vigorous attack 
upon secret societies in general, college societies in 
particular. The subject is treated under the three 
heads of intellectual, moral, and social effects. The 
arguments are clearly though somewhat fully ex- 
pressed, carefully classified, and to a remarkable 
degree strengthened by the opinions of noted men. 
Any of us, whose college life is so centered in our 
secret societies, would be well repaid by a careful 
perusal of the book; and even, although in our po- 
sition, we cannot admit the truth of the author's 
arguments, yet, through his acuteness in discov- 
ering our weak points, we might learn wherein our 
system needs improvement, and perhaps, in a 
measure, discover the means to attain the perfec- 
tion which we all desire in our fraternities. The 
book can be obtained of the publisher. 



DREKA 

FINE STATIONERY and ENGRAVING 
HOUSE. , 

Handsomely Engraved Invitations for 

|[y° Colleges, Weddings, Receptions, &c. 
Fraternity Stationery always on hand. 

Our unequaled facilities and long practical experience, enable 
us to produce the newest styles and most artistic effects, while 
our reputation is a guarantee of the quality of our productions. 

1 1 21 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




CJinTIQN TO SMOKERS. 

Beware of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 

New Cigarette, " 

The VETERAN. 




TRY IT. 
Fine, Mild & Sweet, 



Fac simile Signature on it. l\lo Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO.. N. Y. 

SOLD I!Y ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 



v^'^CIGSRETTES. 



These Goods are sold under an 

Absolute Guarantee 

That they are the Finest and PUREST 

goods upon the market; 
They ARE FREE from DRUGS and 

CHEMICALS of any kind; 
Tliey consist of the Finest Tobacco and 

Purest Rice-Paper made. 

OUR SALES EXCEED the products 

of ALL. leading manufactories combined. 

None Genuine without the trade-mar!; 
of the BULL. Take no other. 

W.T.BLACKIELL&CO. 

Sole Manufacturers. Durham, N. C. 



FRANK E. ROBERTS 

Has the ^HrRCst iiiul Ilcsl Assortment of Geiitlcnicir,'* 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

iXT Bi^xrxTS-wxcir. 
Corner of Main and Mason Streets. 

FIREST-CLASB 

FlauoiS, Organs, aud, MieloideoEs, 

AT LOW IMUCHS, L.MIUK RlONTINd STOCK. 

EawQM (# ®i&mr, M^wmswi^m, Mm. 



432 Washington St., Boston, 

Invite attention to tlie Inryest ami linest sloi-k in tlie city, of 

DIAMONDS, RARE GEMS, 

RErRESEXTATIVKS OF Tltl-: 

Gorham Manufacturing Company, in Boston. 

Exhibit a hirge ami complete collection ot tlie 

SOLID SILVER AND ELECTRO-PLATED WARES 

TRODUOE!) BY THIS COMI'AXV. 

The oriiamcutations now used and the elTects proiluccd, arc 
something entirely novel in the craft ot the Silversmith, and will 
interest every one by their combination of artistic .ind useful 
qualities. 

Especial Attention given to Designing Class-Day 
and College Invitations of Every Description. 



•» 



ologU 



924 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



Microscopes, 
Telescopes, 
Field Glasses, 
Opera Glasses, 

Drawing Instruments, 
Surveying Instruments, 
Thermometers, 

Barometers, 
Magic Lanterns, 
Apparatus for 

Projection, 
Philosophical and 
Chemical Apparatus. 



I I -> \s lon.OW^ MCNT ON AI'I'LIOATIO.X: 
11 nil il Insiiumouts. KB pages. Part 2— Optlwil 
-I, I u ^ I 'art 3— JIngic Lniitcviis, 120 pngos. 
l>liii il in-iuimonts, ICO pages. I'nrt 5— Sfcteor- 

lIUs, IJdlUgLS, 




I'ui I \i nil 



I Inlo 

Il \P1. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



MADE FROM MEASURE, 

A PEIFECT FIT QM&MMMTEMB 

Also a Full Assortment o( 

GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 

Orders by Mail Promptly A ttended To. 

IIW DBUQ STOBl, 



ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

©lUQS, MilBICIlES. 

Faflcy aM Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Toliacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

IJS" Prescriptions Ciirefiilly Compouuded. 



PIWEST Steel Portrait ever engraved is Hollyer's 



^ 



imw^'^m 



Thf OWLY lai'KC one in lint- aii.l stipple EiHloj'.-uii by inti- 
mate personal trieiids, M. C.'s, U. S. Suualors, S. C. JudK'es, Mem- 
liers of Caljinet, Governors, as " The Best Lilieuess," and a 
" Perfect Work of Art." Sells quick. Gives perfect satis- 
faction. Extra terms to good agents 

THE HENRY BILL PUBLISHmG CO., Norwich, Ct. 



Tlie Palace Clotliiiiff Store of Maine 




ALL THE L]<;ADING NOVELTIES IN 



YOUMQ MEM'S OLOTHIMQ 

AND NOBBY FURNISHING GOODS. 



58 Temple Place, BOSTON, 

Wedding Invitations^Business Cards, &c. j STRICTI.Y ONE PRICE. 

COLLEGE INVITATIONS A SPECIALTY. ! _„ , ,r„,.. ,r^ . . , , 

I i^=Boys and Children's Department entirelj' separate. 

Beautiful Engraved Visiting Cards. ! hlijp<5tore 

Plate and Pack, $1. 50 ; former price, $3.00. B L U E S T O R E , 

GRIFFINS WEDDING CARD DEPOT, TffE OWE-fpiat eiOTIfiE^S, 

58 Temple Place, B0ST03>T. ZiSIVISTOM'. lia:A.INE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Q^m'SMM Mm©i 



Fine Watches, Jewelry, Silver Ware, &c., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QDALrrsT, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 

PORTLAND, 
A. CARTER. 



MAINE. 
J. W. D, CARTER. 



SPRING AND SUMMER, 1882. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may <it .ill times ha found a choice .issortment o( 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 



On and after Oct. loth, 1882, 

Passenger Trains leave BrnnsTvick 

For Bath, 8.10, 11.2.5 a.m., 2.45, 4.40, and 6.35 p.m. (Satm-- 
days only), 12.42 night (Sunday mornings only). 
Kockland, 8.10 A.M., 2.45 P.M. 
Portland. 7.25, 11.30 a.m., 4.30 p.m., 12.35 niglit. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 a.m., 12.35 night. 
Lewiston, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.33 P.M., 12.40 niglit. 
Farmiugton, 8.10 a.m. (Mi.xed), 2.45 p.m. 
Augusta, 8.10 A.M., 2.45, 6.35 P.M., 12.45 night. 
Skovvhegan, Belfast, Dexter, and Bangor, 2.45p.m., and 

12.45 night. 
Watervillo, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 p.m. (Saturdays only), 
12.45 night. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 18S2. 



^fstep ttmd) Sjm §m(tm Iraipjoifluinja, 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

ip^ Families. Parties, and Clubs supplied. 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street, - - - Portland. IMe. 
J. A. MerriU. A. Keith. 



MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 






28 Free Street, Portland, Me. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney, 

Terms, ----- $1.50 ;i Yeai' in AdvuDce. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



Pin-chase yoin- CO.\L at the 



WHERE NON'E BUT 



Tlie Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prejiared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer In all kinds df 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store 

.i^-Speolal Bates to Student 01ubs...e( 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 






A.. O. REED, 



BR,XJKrS"W7"ICK:, 3VCE. 

Special Rates to Classes i Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic VieTO-s ; also College Views. 




No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

w*Mmm%i^ M0t^'Bm. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval ftime, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

I>ORTLA.ND, IVI.A.XNE:. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

CHOICE GROcIrTeS, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rate.s to Students. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- FINE WORK A SPECIALTY, 

menceraents, pjxhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, Fi^iCES lL.'^■^y^ 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland. Me. 



For Schools and Colleges, 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

J/; NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 




THE FAVORITE NOS.S03-404-33S-l7O-^St-WITH 
HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




E. SMITH, Variety Store. Bottom Prices to Students. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 

Office at Central Telephone Office, Brunswick. 
|ia"All Unlers left at C. E. Townseiid's Store will 
be promjjtly attciuled to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MtrSIC PUBLISHES,, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruraeuts, aud Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 

J. H. PETERSON & SON, 

DKALKRS IN 

Boots and Shoes, Tobacco and Cigars, 
Main Street, ---.--- Brunswick, Me. 




PEARL'S 
WHITE 
GLYCERINE 

UEAUTirlES THE COMPLEXION, 

CURES ALL KINDS' OF SKIN DISEASES, 

REMOVES FRECKLES, MOTH- 
PATCHES, TAH, BLACK-WORMS, 

and all Impurities, eltlicr within or un.m the skin. 

For CHAPPED HANDS, ROUGH OR CHAFED SKIN It is 
IndlsiicnslWo. Try one bottle and you wlU never he 
■without It. Use also 

PEARL'S WHITE GLYCERINE SOAP 




w 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

L. WILSON & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B.— Ordei-s by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 

V. W. STOCKMAN, ? 
WAI. A. WILSON. S 




_i(;y(!le rilling is inisiiriiassed as a 
metliod of triivclinf,',\\iiclhcr lor speed, 
sport, or rciifwal of licali li. Tlie prac- 
ticibilitv <if IlK' macliiiic has l)ce>n 
tlioroilKlily toslL'd. and Nalisfarl(irily 
proved, bcvcmd qtieslimi. 'rimiisands 
ai-o in tiaiiy use, and tliu number is 
rapidly incVoHsing. Tin; exercise is 
recommended by the medical ))rofessioii 
as most beneficial to healtli, bringing 
Into exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

StMid iic. stamp for 3(i.paK0 Illustrated 
CatalotriioconlJiiiiinKiivicc lists and full 
infcirniation. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washington Sl„ BOSTON, MASS. 



^OAvUfiB fjolfeoe |lfe(tica! |)epai'liiieii| 

The Sixtv-Scoiind Annual Coursi' of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Mtiine. will conimenee Februai!Y Sth. 1SS3, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— JosHCA L. Chamberlain, LL.D , President ; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H. Oerrish, M.D., 
Anatomy ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence j Henry 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry; Burt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery .and Clinical Surgery ; Charles 0. 
Hc.1T, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Kegistrar and Librarian; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may he obtained on application to 
the Registi-ar, D. F. ELDS, M.D,, or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Bninswick, Maine. _ 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



(1^= Watches, Clocks, and Jewel i-y promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

jcSj and §87 Congress St.,and 2jj Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

;6®"SenD FOU PlilCK Ll.ST. 

C. L. RICHARDSON, 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

.j^Trausicnt Orders for Milk or Cream tilled by ftiving suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 

Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOZ£S. SXATIOTTERY. ROOM 
PA.PEFl, I>ERIODlCA.LS. .ScC. 



A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, |] Fancy Goods. 

Also lOasteni Mutual Union Telejiraph Oliiee. 
Under Town Clock, - - - Brnnswioli:, Me. 



Vol. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 15, 1882. 



No. 9. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE AD.JUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new"Oxford" and"lVloehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF TILE OED KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

HALL L. Di^VIS, 

Books, Stationerf, aod Paper Haogiogs, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, IME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 



FRANK M. STETSON, 




'JULf 25 



DEANE BROTHERS &. SANBORN, 



First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

E3^ Lowest Prices in the State, 

755 & 185 IVIiddle Street. - - - Portland, Me. 



VISITORS TO PORTLAND, 

Independent of any intention of pur- 
chasing goods in our line, are invited to 
inspect the Model Clothing and Fur- 
nishing Store of Allen & Co., 470 Con- 
gress St., opp. Preble House, 

LANCASTER BUILDING. 



SPECIAL AGENT. 

0"Dunlap & Co., of New York, Celebrated 
Stiff Hats. 

Also his New Straw Mackinaw, $2.00 and 
$2.50. 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Glass Cards and Monograms 

ENGEAVED IH THE MOST rASHIOMABLE STJLB. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 



-AGENCY FOR- 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgios, and six books of the jEneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Riad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and IIL of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to bo 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will bo fur- 
nished a list of topics on which ho will l)e requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for tho purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a "liberal range of 
eleotives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EQUIRED— FODE HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, sis terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — EOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terras. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $2n. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 




«lo®ii 




Vol. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOV. 15, 1882. 



No. 9. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERy ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE TEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
Arthur J. Ru.ssell,'83, Managing Editor j»'0 teiii. 
Herbert P. Kendall, '83, Business Editor. 
Herbert E. Cole, '83. Oliver W. Means, '84. 

Howard R. Goodwin, '83. Llewellyn Barton, '84. 
Charles H. Stetson, '83. Charles B. Sayward, '84. 
iST. Brooks K. Pettingill, '83. 

Terms — $2.00 a year in advance 5 single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances slanuld be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alamui of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Oifice at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at ttie Journal Office, Lcwiston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Tol. XII., No. 9.-N0V. 15, 1882. 

Editorial Notes 11.5 

Literary : 

My Evening Cigar (poem) 117 

Kalph Waldo Emerson 117 

"Ten Old Maids" 118 

A Mutton Ghost 120 

Theta Delta Chi Convention 121 

College Items 121 

Personal 124 

Editors' Table 125 

Clippings 127 

EDITORIAL NOTES. 



Once more the Orient extends its hand 
and asks your tolerance. Bear witli us a 
little longer, for like the ghost of Christmas 
present we feel that our time is growing 
short. The leaves have fallen from tlie trees 
on the campus for the last time iu our course, 
and there are strong suggestions of winter in 
the air. The student wlio has been wasting 
his frame grappling with the relics of ancient 



lore, or in vain attempts to " read his soul," be- 
gins to think he deserves a little vacation. So 
he packs his collar-box and starts off Friday 
night to see his — ah ! well — say his sister, 
and stay over Sunday. Monday morning 
you see him fresh and vigorous and readj' to 
pitch in again. In the evening he smokes 
his pipe and gives his chum an account of 
his visit home, and from time to time, exam- 
ines with critical eye a new photograph on 
the mantel-piece. Talk about girls anywhere 
else in the world in comparison with that 
one ! Brunswick is nowhere in point of 
beauty of its 3'oung ladies in comparison with 
Starks or Plantation No. 4 ! But, girls, the 
Orient doesn't think so. It is strongly 
prejudiced in favor of Brunswick girls, all 
reports to the contrary notwithstanding. 
Well ! well ! We started to moralize on the 
shortness of time, and see where we landed ! 
Whether or no we have more than one life 
to live, it is certain that we haven't but one 
college life, so let us make the most of it. 



The gymnasium question has been re- 
cently agitated in quite a practical manner 
by the undergraduates. Despairing of any- 
thing definite from the powers that be, a 
meeting of the students was held and a com- 
mittee appointed to provide for a series of 
lectures and concerts to be held in Memorial 
Hall which thus promises to become useful 
as well as ornamental. The proceeds of this 
course are to be handed over to the authori- 
ties to go towards the new gymnasium. Here 
seems to be a definite, active step in the right 
direction, and it speaks well for the enter- 
prise and pluck of the undergraduates. Even 



116 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



if the proceeds from the lectures are not very 
great, they will form a nucleus around which 
more will gather, and the stirring up of the 
subject will soon serve to keep before the 
graduates and friends of the college the need 
and strong desire we have of that wonderful 
new gymnasium with baths and other con- 
veniences so mucli needed here. As we said 
before, it speaks well for the enterprise of 
the undergraduates, and shows that the pre- 
vailing idea is not to get as much as possible 
out of the college and then go off and forget 
her, but to aid lier as much as possible to go 
on to higher usefulness, and obtain a nobler 
name, if that is possible, than she has now. 
As Professor Packard said at the last Com- 
mencement dinner, " Bowdoin is not in the 
ruts," and it seems to us this action of the 
students goes to show it to be a fact. 



paratively modern, for the old idea put a col- 
lege education as far ahead of its actual value 
as the modern idea does behind it. And this 
character we have been speaking of is re- 
sponsilile, in some part, for this change. 



As loyal sons of old Bowdoin we should 
do what we can to increase her influence. 
And one thing we can do is to speak well of 
the studiousness of her students. There is 
one charactei', unhappily too conunon, which 
we confess we could never understand. The 
pride a person takes in saying he hasn't 
studied the lesson at all, hasn't looked 
at it, while nine chances out of ten that 
same fellow, if called up, will make a good 
recitation. It has been our experience, 
that a person does not usually get up 
and recite on a subject, using the argu- 
ments and coming to the same conclusion as 
the author of a text-book, without having 
looked over the subject. Again, this same 
character goes home, and when asked if he 
doesn't have to woi'k pretty hard at college, 
replies that he doesn't have anytliing to do, 
or has a general loaf, and the questioner goes 
off with the idea that four years at college, 
and especially four years at Bowdoin, are 
wasted. It is surprising liow often we have 
met with this argument. It seems to be com- 



In those good old times, just after our 
"Revolutiouar}' daddies fit for their liberties," 
it was considered not quite the thing to have 
the churches warmed by anything resembling 
a fire. It was the old argument that if their 
religion couldn't keep people warm, they had 
better go cold. A relic of this custom still 
lingers at Bowdoin. The furnaces in the 
chapelmay be ornamental, — no one we can 
find ever descends into the Hades below to 
find out, — but they certainl}' are not to any 
great extent useful. If there is anj' heat — we 
have sometimes thought we detected a vibra- 
tion over the register — it ascends into the 
dim religious light of the vault above, wliile 
those below fall back on their religion for the 
necessary supply of " caloric." In some of 
the classes this supply is rather short, and 
there is a consequent complaint of cold. We 
have heaid it said that during the winter 
prayers would be held in the base of Memo- 
rial Hall. This would offer various advan- 
tages. Besides being comfurtably warm, the 
singing would go ofl' nuieli better. In the 
chapel, owing to tiie great distances and 
echoes, those near the desk often find them- 
selves finisliing up one line about tiie time 
the choir is bracing on tlie next, a fact which 
has rather a tendency lo spoil the effect of 
the harmony. We think the change proposed 
would be very acceptable to the majority of 
professors as well as students. 

Since we wrote our editorial on the so- 
called hazing question, in the last issue, there 
has been revealed to us some differences of 
opinion on the subject, wliich, while tliey do 
not cliange our o[)inion as before expressed. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



117 



yet are so prevalent as to demand recognition 
on the part of the Orieistt, which claims to 
voice the opinion of the students as far as 
possible, while maintaining its own independ- 
ence of judgment. We have received several 
letters from graduates, inclosing slips from 
prominent newspapers of tlie day, referring 
to the result of the trial and commenting on 
it in a way which shows that they know very 
little about the true state of the case. One 
letter received protested against the position 
taken by the Okient, claiming that we up- 
held hazing. Heaven forbid that we should 
for a moment even, seem to uphold that 
practice which has been the bane of so many 
of our American institutions ! The sentiment 
of the college is unanimously, we can fairly 
say unanimously, opposed to any manifesta- 
tion of the old hazing spirit. The general 
idea expressed by the newspaper articles re- 
ferred to, seems to be that we had a sort of 
Whittaker ca^e here, that a few fellows 
started out with the intention of inflicting 
bodily injury on others. Nothing was farther 
from the intentions of the boys than this. 
There was not the least "malice afore- 
thought," simply a crowd enjoying the fun 
of frightening Freshmen. But we have no 
doubt you are as sick of the subject as we 
are. We shall endeavor not to mention it 
again, but let it die a natural death if it will. 



MY EVENING CIGAR. 

The robin's eve-song dies away in bis bi'east, 
The sparrow and swallow are silent in rest, 
A Sabbath-like stillness pervades all the air 
As I sit myself down to my evening cigar. 
My soul has emotions words cannot express. 
Relieved from the trouble, the care, and the stress 
Of every-day life, my fancy takes flight 
In day dreams as flitting as shadows at night. 
My spirit is raised above all things that are 
As I take pleasant ease with my evening cigar. 
The nightingale's song, wafted light on the breeze. 
The swaying and moan of the half-phantom trees, 



The varying peep of the shrill- mouthed frogs, 
The deep-sounding growl of the troubled watch- 
dogs, 
The cricket's sharp chirp, and the Katy-did's tune 
Seem to echo the words of the golden new moon, 
As softly she whispered in accent so fair, 
I envy you now with your evening cigar. 



RALPH WALDO EMERSON. 

Within the last year Ralph Waldo Emer- 
son, the philosopher, essayist, poet, and 
teacher, has passed away, and to those of us 
who have learned to know and love him 
through his writings, it is as if we had lost 
our wisest and kindest friend. It has been 
said, and perhaps truly, that his death will 
be more lamented abroad than at home, for 
the saying, " A prophet hath no honor in his 
own country," has been, in his case, made 
good. For as a matter of fact scarcely any 
American writer has been so extensively 
neglected by Americans in general. The 
reasons are, I think, obvious. He never loved 
publicity, never wrote for fame, never aimed 
to establish any new school of philosophy or 
poetry. He treated principally questions 
which begin to puzzle young men just start- 
ing in life, and in his kind, pleasant way he 
teaches the true aims and ends of life, without 
a trace of any thing like bitterness or cynicism. 
He loves everything and everybody. Few 
writers reveal themselves to the world so 
clearly and none better reward a careful study. 

When a great man dies, and his presence 
no longer graces the world, men turn to his 
writings. They who have known him per- 
sonally find there the same man, — not the 
form and feature, but the thought and emo- 
tions which in life animated them. They 
who liave known him only through his writ- 
ings find him just as they always have known 
him and nothing taken away. They who 
have never known him at all reproach them- 
selves for their neglect. 

Now that this kind friend and teacher of 



118 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



his fellow-men has passed away, we all should 
feel in duty bound to become acquainted with 
his work ; and no one who seeks triitli and 
beauty will go unrewarded away. He is the 
writer who, move than any other, has made 
American thought and literature respected 
and extended abroad. He is the example of 
all men, both in modesty and manliness. His 
writings are not like those of man}- modern 
writers tainted with pessimism. On the other 
hand they are tlie shadow, as it were, of his 
noble life, a life which was in the truest way 
spent in working for his fellow-men. 

The grand doctrine on which he is con- 
stantly touching, and which he so beautifully 
practiced, was that man is his own best ad- 
viser. No one believed more iirmly than he 
that man finds the best answer to the vexing 
questions that beset him, in himself. The 
strongest weapon against pessimism is sincer- 
ity. Let a man speak what his inmost soul 
tells him, unbiased by any outward consider- 
ations. " You are rightly fond," he says " of 
certain books or men that you have found to 
excite your reverence or emulation. But 
none of these can compare with that greatest 
of counsel which is open for j'ou in happy 
solitude. I mean that there is for you the 
following of an inward leader, a slow dis- 
crimination, that there is for each a Best 
Counsel which enjoins the fit word and the 
fit act for every moment, and the path of 
each pursued leads to greatness. How grate- 
ful to find in man or woman a new empliasis 
of their own." 

But space forbids my going into a detailed 
account of Emerson's philosophy. I wish in 
closing to mention some of the best of his 
works, the best for gaining an insight into liis 
ways of thonglit. His books lead to each 
other, and when once started few readers stop. 
I will mention them in the order in wliich I 
read them. First, by all means, the " Letters 
and Social Aims," a volume of short, concise, 
ringing essays upon sncli subjects as "Great- 



ness, " Resources," etc. Next the " Essaj's " 
proper, next the " Conduct of Life," perhaps 
the richest group of essays in all his writings, 
treating such subjects as " Power," " Wealth," 
" Culture " ; students in history should read 
tiie lectures on "Representative Men." The 
rest of his works will readily introduce them- 
selves. 

One word in closing as to the best form 
in which to procure the books. By all means 
procure them in the "Vest Pocket Series" 
if possible. These tiny books can easil}' be 
carried in the pocket, and when on a jour- 
ney or by yourself they will prove most 
charming companions. " Books that j-ou can 
carrj' to the fire and hold readih' in your 
hand are the most useful after all," saj's 
Samuel Johnson, and our experience proves 
anew its truth. Moreover Emerson is always 
new. Some sentences do not show their clear 
cut beauty and finish at a first glance, and it 
is only after reading them again and again 
that they reveal themselves fully. Nor will 
this, I am convinced, prove to anyone a difiS- 
cult or irksome task. So suggestive and so 
enlivening is his style, that from the end of an 
essay we almost involuntarily turn to the 
beginning again, and feel afterwards well re- 
warded for our pains. He draws the mind 
into the healthiest and noblest ciiannels of 
thought, finally, he will do more to build up 
a firm, genuine manliness than iiny other 
American writer. L. 



"TEN OLD MAIDS." 
Chap. I. 

SCRAPING ACQlTAIlSrTANCE. 

" Ten Old Maids." Tiiese words, on a 
bit of board over the door of a cottage, at- 
tracted the attention of Hal and mj-self, as 
we lazily strolled about tiie streets of a little 
sea-side resort one sultry day in August. We 
had just arrived, and, while pulling away at 
pretty fair cigars, exchanged careless remarks, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



119 



or commented with charming frankness on 
the looks of the girls whom we met. Of 
course we stopped and stared. What else 
would students fresh from Bowdoin have 
done ? Hal broke the silence by exclaiming 
in his impulsive way : 

" I sa^', Bob, let's see what kind of vine- 
gar-faced maidens sail under such bold 
colors ! " 

The proposition struck me as somewhat 
startling, but I replied carelessl}' : 

" All right, drive ahead and I'll back 
you." 

This was enough for Hal, who immedi- 
ately sauntered up the steps leading to the 
cottage, I following with serious misgivings. 

In response to our knock, the door was 
opened by a pretty girl of eighteen, whose 
bright, laughing face and sparkling eyes 
showed conclusively that she, at least, was 
no old maid, though a very charming young 
one. 

" Can I see the lady of the house ? " asked 
Hal, lifting his hat politely to the young lady. 

" Oh certainly," she replied, while her 
eyes danced and she seemed to be greatly 
amused at something, much to my disgust. 

She led us into the parlor, where a whole 
bevj^ of young ladies were sewing and chat- 
ting, and before we had recovered from our 
astonishment, said : " Here is the ladj' of the 
house, gentlemen, in ten parts, " and she 
seemed ready to burst with suppressed merri- 
ment, as she bowed to us, the other ladies fol- 
lowing her example. 

I for one did not relish the situation, and 
felt awkward enough in the presence of those 
ten girls who sat there, some demure, others 
laughing, and all as self-possessed as a 
Quaker in church. 

But Hal's Sophomoric cheek did not de- 
sert him even under these ch'cumstances, for, 
drawing from his pocket a Revised New 
Testament (the Lord only knows how he 
happened to have it), he said that he was a 



book-agent, and actually buzzed those girls 

for half an hour, while he explained the 

merits of the book, and insinuated himself 
into their good graces. 

Chap. II. 

FALLING IN LOVE. 

Three weeks had passed since our awk- 
ward introduction to the " ten old maids, " 
and the morrow would see our departure for 
prosaic horsing of Greek and Latin. But we 
were to have one more good time, an old- 
fashioned country ball, as a wind-up to our 
weeks of rowing, riding, fishing, and flirting- 
so decided to put off grave thoughts till morn- 
ing light, for then come woe and care. The 
past few weeks had been extremely pleasant, I 
devoting myself with brotherly care to nine 
of the girls, while Hal concentrated all his 
sweetness on the roguish miss, who, evi- 
dently, was leading him a pretty chase, the 
result of which it was difficult to foretell. 
One thing, however, was certain. Hal was 
head over heels in love, and making such a 
fool of himself that I often strolled down to 
the beach and blushed for him. Why, after 
a moonlight walk he would prowl about the 
cottage like a melancholy Tom-cat, looking 
at the moon and singing some infernal love- 
song. But the worst of it was, the yaggers 
o-ot the run of the business and pelted him 
with ripe eggs, so. that he returned to our 
room as redolent of embryonic chickens as a 
Soph after a game of base-ball. My thoughts 
of departure, therefore, were mingled ones of 
pain and pleasure, but I determined to enjoy 
that ball even if Hal came home with two 
inches of stratified egg-shell deposit plas- 
tered on his clothes. 

Chap. III. 

THE END or IT ALL. 

If I were to picture to myself the abode 
of the blest, so as to find an answering echo 
within W heart, I should imagine a country 



120 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



house where a couple of fiddles filled the air 
with their fascinating music, and pretty 
girls, with coquetish looks and smiles, kept 
beaux in bewildered joy, uncertain, yet inex- 
pressibly sweet. When into such a scene 
you have sandwiched waltzes, lunch, and 
quiet ecstatic love-making in some quiet cor- 
ner, you will have a fair picture of the 
Elysian Fields, Jerusalem the Golden, or 
some place authorized by the new version. 
Into such an earthly paradise Hal and I en- 
tered that evening, and the wee small hours 
found us still whirling in the dizzy mazes of 
the waltz, while we murmured pleasant 
nothings into our companions ears. 

Four o'clock, and I sit in my easy chairi 
pulling away at my favorite pipe, waiting for 
Hal's appearance. It is half-past four when 
at length he comes, and dropping into a 
chair sits in moody silence. At length he 
looks up and there was a quaver in his voice 
as he said, " Well, chum, it is all over. I 
popped to-night, and got all-firedly bounced. 
For, would you believe it" continued he, 
becoming excited, " she is an own cousin to 
that girl I've been with so much in Bruns- 
wick, and the hussies have corresponded reg- 
ularly the past two years, " and terribly crest- 
fallen, Hal commenced to retire, pulling off 
his things with vicious jerks and throwing 
them about the room. I comforted him as 
well as I could with soothing words and dis- 
tilled mountain dew, and rather think I was 
successful, for the last words I heard from 
him that night as he turned on his pillow, 
were " Dum all women, say I." 



A MUTTON GHOST. 

Not far from my hoine is the vilhige cem- 
etery lying along the bank of the river, and 
the path by the water's edge through the 
graveyard to the piece of woods beyond, has 
long been my favorite walk. 

One evening in July, tired with a day's 



idleness, I took my book and wandered up 
the stream to the woods. Finding a pleasant 
place near the water I sat and read while 
daylight lasted, and as the words began to 
grow dim on the page I fell asleep. It was 
dark when I opened my eyes wakened by a 
horrible dream. I picked up my hat, which 
had rolled almost into the water, and started 
for home feeling hardly awake, and the plot 
of my novel mixing with the strange fancies 
of my dream, gave me a rather troubled state 
of mind. I had gone nearlj^ through the 
graveyard when a low moan stopped me, and 
straight ahead on a tomb that I must pass 
was something white. In the dim starlight I 
could not make out its form, but as I looked 
it seemed to move, and I was certain that I 
heard the moan. I moved forward, to con- 
vince myself that it was nothing but a tomb- 
stone or a creature of my imagination, but 
the moanings became more distinct, and tlie 
ghost certainlj' moved. I paused again. 
Suddenly it seem to notice me and to come 
towards me. I ran. 

But it did not follow, and when out of 
sight I stopped. The exercise and excite- 
ment started perspiration from every pour, 
and to help control myself I took a cigar 
from my pocket my hand trembling so that 
I could hardly light it. I leaned against a 
tree and saw ghosts in ever}' direction. I 
shut my eyes and my dream returned with a 
hundred ghosts. But as I smoked I grew 
more calm. I finished my cigar, and bathed 
my hot forehead in the river. As senses re- 
turned I blamed myself for my foolishness 
and putting a couple of stones in my pocket, 
turned again towards iiome. 

When I reached the tomb the object of my 
terror was still there, and conquering my im- 
pulse to run I threw first one stone and then 
the other. A frightened sheep ran down the 
side of the tomb and at tiie tomb door I 
found a drunken num snoring off his pota- 
tions. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



121 



tf'HETA DELTA CHI CONVENTION. 

The thirty-sixth annual convention of 
Theta Delta Chi was held at Young's Hotel, 
Boston, Thursday and Friday, Oct. 26th and 
27th, Upsilon Deuteron acting as hostess. 

Every charge was represented by a full 
quota of delegates. There was also a large 
number of visiting members present, includ- 
ing several old graduates from Boston and 
vicinity. Business meetings were held in 
the forenoon and afternoon of both days. A 
large amount of business was transacted. A 
eh&i-ge has been started at Harvard during 
the'year and it is now in a flourishing condi- 
tion. Reports from all directions showed 
that the Society was never in a better con- 
dition than at the present time. The follow- 
ing officers were chosen for the coming year : 
President, N. LaF. Bachman, Hamilton, '72; 
Tj'easurer, C. Kincaid, Dartmouth, '83 ; Sec- 
retary, Geo. L. Taft, Boston University, '84. 

Thursday evening a large number of the 
delegatest^and visiting members visited 
Lambda charge, Boston University, in their 
Fraternity rooms, and passed a veiy enjoya- 
ble evening. 

Friday evening the members to the num- 
ber of one hundred met in the banquet hall 
of Young's Hotel and listened to the follow- 
ing literary program : Oration, Wm. E. Ho- 
gan, of Bath, Dartmouth, '72 ; Poem, Geo. 
W. Putnam, Dartmouth, '79 ; Biography of 
Marc F. Cook, known in literary circles as 
Vandyke Brown, Hamilton, '74, delivered by 
N. LaF. Bachman, Hamilton, '72. The literary 
exercises received the closest attention though- 
out, and the speakers were frequently ap- 
plauded. After partaking of the sumptuous 
banquet provided, there was the usual order of 
toasts, speeches, songs, etc. Among those that 
responded to toasts was E. H. Capen, President 
of Tufts. All voted it one of the best con- 
ventions ever held by the Fraternity. Omi- 
cron Deuteron has the thanks of all for the 



admirable manner in which she provided for 
the wants of the delegates. 

Saturday a large number of brothers vis- 
ited Tufts College, and enjoyed the hospital- 
ity of the Kappa boys. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



A tiny foot, a shapely ankle, 
A jjretty face all wreathed in smiles; 
A sno'n'y hand, some auburn ringlets, 
A heart replete with woman's wiles. 

A stove-pipe hat, a stand-up collar, 
His upper lip adorned with hair; 
A social dance, some quiet flirting; 
A Junior caught in maidens snare. 

A little ring on taper finger, 
A manly arm around her waist; 
Some cooing words — a sudden pallor. 
An exit from the house with haste. 

For as the little head "bent lower 

And gently rested on his breast. 

Her pearly teeth slipped from their places 

And rolled down his expanse of chest. 

Thanksgiving recess in two weeks. 

Wentworth's algebra is used by '86. 

The Rugby has been revived by '85. 

Sayward, '84, is teaching in Wells, Me. 

These are the nights for good coal fires. 

Holden, '83, has returned from teaching. 

Don't allow Old Phi Chi to be forgotten. 

Not much said about the new gymnasium. 

Lawn-tennis has gone into winter quarters. 

Junior ease has been transferred to Senior year. 

Pity we can't have a regular Cohege Glee Club. 

Keep your hair short or else write poetry for the 
Orient. 

The Sophomores claim to be enjoying a picnic 
in French. 

What is that Temperance Association doing all 
this time 1 

Things around college are being put in shape 
for winter. 

The season of frosty mornings and muddy noons 
is well under way. 

The college catalogue for 1882-3 will be out in 
a few days. Take one from the Treasurer's Office, 
but leave twenty cents on the counter. 



122 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



There is decided evidence of glacial action on 
Mount Condon. 

Perkins, '83, commenced a school in Phipsburg 
on Monday last. 

They say that the Freshmen slept 'round on the 
night of Oct. 26th. 

The ventilation of some of the recitation rooms 
might be improved. 

The skating-rink gets its full share of patron- 
age from the college. 

Prof. Robinson spoke in the Senior room, Sun- 
day evening, Nov. 5th. 

A quartette of students rendered college songs 
at the Unitarian concert. 

Who borrowed a boat-house key on a recent 
Indian summer evening i 

'85 could not be beaten on the turkey issue, 
either by force or strategy. 

An immense amount of mail matter is forwarded 
from the college box on Mondays. 

Why is not the Base-Ball Association organized 
and oificered for the coming year ? 

The man who bet against Ben. B. smokes a 
pipe now, instead of cigars as of yore. 

The Senior and Junior exhibition, at tbe close of 
this term, will be held in Memorial Hall. 

A propensity for agitating the wood-saw is a 
valid excuse for absence from astronomy. 

The work of the newspaper-mutilating fiend is 
quite often apparent in the reading-room. 

A big interest in foot-ball was aroused just in 
time to have playing vetoed by cold weather. 

Religious meetings are held in the Y. M. C. A. 
room, North Maine, every Thursday evening. 

Prof. Chapman preached at the First Congrega- 
tional Church, Farmington, on Sunday, Nov. 5th. 

The number of bicycle riders is on the increase 

We would suggest the formation of a Bicycle Club. 

. The school teachers are departing for their fields 

of labor. The number is not as large as usual this 

year. 

A grave and reverend Senior riding in a dump- 
cart, caused a sensation down street some days 
since. 

As the classics are not elective here Senior 
year, several '83 men have taken to riding a llcsh 
and blood horse. 

An Appleton Sopiiomorc found a cow snugly 
domiciled in his room, upon his return from recita- 
tion, the other afternoon. Now, some might take 
this as an example of the survival of the fittest, 
but the '85 man couldn't see it in that light. 



Prof. Smith talked to the students on religion^ 
topics, in the Senior room, Sunday evening, Oct. 29. 

A Senior who knows sa3TS that this cold weather 
is bringing out the color in the town girls' cheeks. 

The Bowdoiu alumni of Boston have a reunion 
and dinner on the first Friday evening of each 
month. 

Strange that a man, who almost habitually cuts 
forenoon church, should always be on hand at the 
evening service. 

The Brunswick people haven't given us even 
one of those soul-stirring affairs called church 
sociables, this fall. 

This seems to be a good mouth fox^clean sha^s. 
Let the razor do its work thoroughly if you ^pt 
to be in good company. 

A North Appleton Senior owns a first-rate tele- 
scope, and the astronomers in his end have formej 
an association for star gazing. 

A large number of the students, on a receiS 
Sabbath, went to Topsham and listened to a dis- 
course by the Rev. Elijah Kellogg. 

It would be a good idea to revive the " Dorics," 
this winter, and give dramatic entertainments with 
the college orchestra to furnish music. 

The Boating Association propose J^give us a 
lecture course. It would suit the college first-rate 
if they would occasionally give us a ^ace. 

Scene in astronomy: Prof. — "Before clocks 
were invented, how weye the nights measured on 
ship-board?" Aus.— ''"By watches, sir." 

The division in zoology in '84, paid a professional 
visit to the sea-coast, a week ago last Monday. The 
results of their trip were highly satisfactory. 

A class of eleven in optional French has been 
formed from among the Juniors. They read the 
History of Charles II., aud recite twice a week. 

The Bugle is well under way. The editors are 
making a despei-ate attempt to put it in the hands 
of their patrons before the Christmas vacation. 

Farewell old Bowdoin Praying Circle. The re- 
sult of an iniiuest upon you would be, " Assassin- 
ated by its own members in the sixty-eighth year 
of its life." 

The Senior eleven easily defeated the Sopho- 
mores at foot-ball last Wednesday afternoon by a 
score of four goals and ouc touch-down to two goals. 
The Sopbt)mores immediately after played the Jun- 
ior eleven and redeemed their former defeat by 
coming out victorious by a large majority. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



123 



For the benefit of whom it may concern, we will 
state that '83 has had instruction in logic, in spite 
of all reports and indications to the contrary. 

The Sophomores showed good judgment and 
commendable spirit in defending their well-earned 
class supper from the rapacious upperclassmen. 

Very little is said about training the ball nine 
this winter. Gratifying results cannot be expected 
next spring unless solid and seasonable work is put 
in. 

First Fresh to second Fresh (on the way to rec- 
itation)— "Come, J., I'm weak on that review; 
how many places did the Prof, say Homer was born 
in?" 

A dead calm has settled down again upon the 
library, all the more noticeable because of the way 
Prof. Johnson made things brighten up there last 
year. 

President Chamberlain lectures four times per 
week to the Seniors, on Political Economy. The 
" conference " method is used in reviewing the 
lectures. 

A remarkable whirlwind was seen on the walk 
near Maine Hall some days ago; leaves and sticks 
were carried up far above the tops of the highest 
buildings. 

The members of the two lower classes are com- 
plaining of the kind of instruction they are getting 
in Latin. It savors altogether too much of the fit- 
ting school. 

The quadrupeds with the strong smell are cer- 
tainly growing fewer in the upper part of the village. 
One of the Faculty has succeeded in entrapping 
two of them. 

It has been suggested that the musician room- 
ing over the North Maine recitation room ought to 
play " The Dead March in Saul " on his piano dur- 
ing psychology hours. 

The Longfellow Memorial Address, delivered 
last Commencement by Dr. Goodwin, has been 
printed in pamphlet form, aud may be found upon 
the table in the library. 

The outlines of the diamond on the base-ball 
ground are almost obliterated now, and the village 
cows wander over the places where the nimble 
fielders formerly muffed the flies. 

The recitation rooms in Memorial Hall are not 
yet ready to be occupied. well, there's no hurry. 
It would be unseemly to commence to use a hall 
that has been sixteen years in building, directly 
after it was completed. 



Longren and C. C. Torrey, '84, were delegates 
from Bowdoin to the State Convention of the Y. M. 
C. A. recently held in Lewiston. A number of 
other students attended. 

In recitation : Sophs, reading Terence's Andria. 
Prof, (to man who had just rendered a passage) — 
"Well, upon that what did Simo say?" Voice 
from the back seats—" Thumbs up." 

Two or three of the good shots have been prac- 
ticing with the photograph of one of our distin- 
guished Professors as a target. It is possible that 
they took this way to pay off old scores. 

Bowdoin's History is out at last. It is a fine 
large volume, and is so interesting and comprehen- 
sive that no Bowdoin man should be without a 
copy. Prof. Chapman has charge of the books. 

Prof. Chapman presided at the meeting of the 
Maine Pedagogical Society in Portland last week. 
He also delivered an address before the society, on 
" The Duty and Opportunity of the Teacher in 
Respect to the Development of the Character in the 
Pupil." 

" This is what you might call a sidereal mount- 
ing, gentlemen," remarked the astronomy Professor 
to his gasping hearers on a recent evening, as he 
placed the telescope on the top of an empty cider 
barrel in order to get a better view of a certain 
constellation. 

When a man, who has been here nearly four 
years, is heard to declare that he don't know as 
much about writing as he did when he left the 
fitting school, one is naturally led to infer that the 
head of one of our departments of instruction is 
not doing his whole duty. 

It has been discovered (no matter how) that a 
certain Sophomore, who in style is supposed to 
border on the toney, secures the fair proportions 
that his nether limbs ordinarily present, by wearing 
a thick pair of pants under those that are displayed 
before the view of an admiring public. 

The Junior class has held its election with the 
following result: Vice President, Z. W. Kemp; 
Orator, J. A. Waterman ; Poet, C. W. Longren ; 
Odist, S. W. Walker; Chaplain, O.W. Means; Com- 
mittee of Arrangements, F. P. Knight, 2d, S. R. 
Child, 3d. Owing to a disagreement among some 
members of the class in regard to the distribution 
of certain of the offices, the positions of President, 
Secretary and Treasurer, Curator, Marshal, and 
1st on Committee of Arrangements will not be filled 
at present. 



124 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Prof. Chapman spoke in the Senior Room before 
the Y. M. C. A. last Sunday evening. 

We understand that there has been a little dif- 
ference of opiuiou between the Sophomores and the 
Faculty. 

One source of amusement at present to the stu- 
dents is firing revolvers out of windows at old 
tomato cans and glass bottles. It pleases the boys 
and doesn't hurt the bottles. 

A Senior (reciting psychology outside) — " The 
unification of the apparent dualism of things can 
be prognosticated by the sentient susceptibilities 
appertaining to the convergent lines of evident 
damfoolishness." 

Senior (reciting from his personal experience) — 
"I have often noticed the occurrence of rocks of 
this description in the vicinity of the — " Senior 
hesitates. A voice from back seat— " Box-shop." 
Class comes down heavy. 

Bill's face has recently assumed the beautiful 
contour of a baked apple. Small boys shouldn't 
meddle with powder. Some, however, have 
thought that Bill tried to commit suicide on ac- 
count of mortification at having lost all his money 
pitching coppers with a Senior. 

It is high time for the Juuiors and Sophomores, 
who have Oriental aspirations, to send in contri- 
butions for the editors to base their judgments 
upon in choosing the next board. Of two men 
equally eligible, the one who sends in his articles 
most promptly will certainly receive the prefer- 
ence. 

After our worthy Prof of Agriculture had raked 
up a pile of leaves and gone around into a sheltered 
corner to "light up," some vile wretch applied a 
match to the pile. When the Prof, appeared 
around the corner, the leaves were fast becoming 
ashes, and in the distance were seen the flying coat- 
tails and vibrating elbows of the miscreants. 

At last a home for the Orient seems to be an 
established fact, since the Faculty have voted to 
allow the room across the entry from tbe reading- 
room in South Maine to bo u.sed for an office. The 
room is sufficiently largo and is centrally located. 
Treasurer Young will doubtless do something 
in the way of furnishing it. We expect to hand 
over to the next board a convenient and conilbrtable 
office witli files of the Okient and of tlu! |)rinoii)al 
exchanges carefully arranged. 

The workmen who repaired the chapel this fall 
succeeded in doing considerable damage with their 



stagings and their cement to several of the tender 
ivy vines that had just begun to climb the mossy 
walls. The vines planted by '79, '82, and '83 were 
most seriously injured, while '80's and '81's were 
very badly used. More care ought to be taken in 
the future to protect class ivys and promote their 
growth. Each class should delegate one man to 
make their vine his especial care. 

On Monday, Oct. 30th, a meeting of the college 
was held in the Senior room to decide the mooted 
question of putting forward a university crew to 
participate in four-oared intercollegiate races next 
summer. It was voted, after some discussion, to 
immediately organize such a crew. Sweetser, of 
'84, was elected captain, and together with Files, 
'83, and Cook, '85, was directed to select other men 
ehgible for the crew, and to provide a place suitable 
for a system of training during the winter. 

One of the students out gunning, the other day, 
found, south of the village, a long lane made by 
unnatural agencies through the woods. The trees 
were bent over, and the bushes and shrubs broken 
down along this narrow passage, which seemed to 
connect two roads running parallel to each other. 
He was at a loss at first to account for this unusual 
appearance, for he had studied geology and knew 
that the days of mammoths and mastodons had 
long since passed away, but he finally concluded 
that the havoc among the trees and underbrush 
had been caused by a Brunswick girl, who had 
merely taken a walk across lots with her new fall 
boots on. 



PERSONAL. 

[Graduates and Undergraduates are earnestly solicited 
to send personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, JBruns- 
wick.l 

Faculty : 

The History of Bowdoin College finished by 
Prof. A. S. Packard, is just at hand, and is a work 
of rare value to those interested. 

Prof. F. C. Robinson, who has been pursuing 
independent scientific investigations in chemistry 
at Harvard the past .summer, has succeeded in find- 
ing a substance hitherto unknown among chemists. 
It is tetrnbrora propionic acid, which is a substi- 
tuted propionic acid. The result of his researchos, 
which was recently read before an assembly or 
scientific men at Montreal, will soon be published 
in i)aiuphlet form. Prof. Robinson and Prof. Alay- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



125 



berry, of Harvard, are uow communicating with 
each other the results of their experiments in a 
common direction. 

Mr. George T. Little, a graduate of Bowdoin, 
class of 77, has been called as temporary in- 
structor in Latin, to fill the vacancy made by 
Prof. Wheeler, who has assumed the professor- 
ship of Greek in the University of Virginia. Mr. 
Little was a very fine scholar while in college, 
and since that time has been pursuing his studies 
for some time abroad. He has recently been 
teaching in Thayer Academy, Braintree, Mass. 

Mr. Geo. S. Atwood, a member of the class of 74, 
Amherst College, is filling the chair of modern 
languages. Prof. Johnson having obtained leave of 
absence for two years, is studying French and Ger- 
man in Leipzic, Germany. Mr. Atwood has been 
abroad some six years, and, although his wife is an 
American lady, his children speak German as their 
household language. He has taught in the English 
High School at Newton, Mass., and recently was 
teaching German to the physicians in the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital. Of his ability to fill 
his position here it is sufficient to say that he comes 
recommended by Bancroft, the historian, Long- 
fellow, and Prof. Boscher of Harvard. 

The following in regard to the members of the 
class of 72, was received from Dr. G. H. Cum- 
mings, the secretary of the class : 

Abbott, Coggan, Heath, and Rogers were the 
original editors of the Oeient. Abbott, it is un- 
derstood, was the prime mover. 

John G. Abbott, lawyer, 19 Milk Street, 
Boston. 

A. V. Ackley, summer hotel, Peak's Island, Port- 
land, Me. 

J. B. Atwood, farmer, St. Albans, Me. 

Chas. B. Benson, lawyer. West Paris, Me. 

Rev. W. P. Bickford, Breckinridge, Col. 

M. Coggan, lawyer, 27 Tremont Row, Boston. 

Geo. H. Cumraings, M.D., 312 Congress Street, 
Portland, Me. 

Frederic G. Dow, lawyer, 145 Broadway, New 
York. 

J. Sumner Frost, teacher, Springvale, Me. 

S. L. Gross, lawyer, Evening Post building, 
New York City. 

Herbert Harris, teacher of music, 10 Claremont 
Park, Boston. 

Herbert M. Heath, lawyer, Augusta, Me. 

Capt. W. 0. Hooker, died at Rio Janeiro, 1879. 

Weston Lewis, banker, Gardiner, Me. 



Rev. Simeon P. Meads, Limiugton, Me. (?) 

Rev. J. S. Richards, Waterford, Me. 

Freeman A. Ricker, died in the Adirondacks, 
1878. 

Rev. 0. W. Rogers, Bridgton, Me. 

Geo. M. Seiders, lawyer. Centennial Block, Port- 
land, Me. 

Wm. C. Shannon, M.D., U. S. A., Fort Thorn- 
burg, Utah. 

Geo. W. Stone, farmer ("?), Livermore Falls, Me. 

Geo. M. Whitaker, editor, Southbridge, Mass. 

Harold Wilder, teacher, Barre, Mass. 

Rev. C. C. Sampson, Pembroke, N. H. 
Connected with class : 

Arthur B. Ayer, invalid, Waltham, Mass. (?) 

Edgar H. Deering, business, Portland, Me. 

Frank J. Goodwin. (?) 

John L. R. Hinks, Insane Hospital, Augusta, 
Me. 

Prank P. Ireland, lawyer, Nebraska City. 

J. Y. McClintock, civil engineer. (?) 

Frank A. Mitchell, M.D., Bridgton, Me. 

Everett Totman, business, Fairfield, Me. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 

Among the new exchanges that grace our table 
is noticeable Chaff, from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. In its " two bushels (that is, its fourteen 
pages,) of chafl'," you do not have to seek all day 
ere you can find " two grains of reason." Nor, 
"when you have found them, do you feel they are 
not worth the search." For the first thing that 
strikes our eye is the prophetic picture of " Co- 
education at the University in 1900," by an Alarmed 
Correspondent. The Professor, in giving out the 
lesson in Juvenal, notes the passages to be omitted : 
"In the first satire from lines 100-150; in the 
second, from 1-100; the whole of the third; from 
the beginning of the fourth to within five lines of 
the end; in the fifth, all but the last five lines; the 
whole of the sixth ; in the seventh—" Here he 
was interrupted by one of the young ladies, who 
asked, "Why do we omit these lines, Professor?" 
Which question we leave our readers to answer for 
themselves. And so the "Alarmed Correspond- 
ent" carries us on through a recitation in chem- 
istry and a class election, depicting with appalling 
vividness the doom that is threatening so many of 
the colleges of our land. You, our afflicted sisters^ 
have our heartfelt sympathy. Thus far Bowdoin 



126 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



has escaped ; but, alas, we cannot foresee what the 
future may have m store for her. The present 
number of Chaff also contains a remarkably good 
satire on the recent bi-centennial celebration at 
Philadelphia, under the guise of an " Athenian 
Celebration of the Twelve Hundredth Anniversary 
of the Landing of the Cecrops." We should like 
to quote it in full for the benefit of our readers, but 
space is valuable (our advertising rates are five 
dollars an inch), and so our quotation must give 
way to the grocer's " ad." Chaff is bright, witty, 
and interesting, and seems to fill a place hitherto al- 
most unoccupied in the field of college journalism, — 
that of an avowedly funny paper. We hope our 
friend from the Quaker City may long continue to 
"chaff," and trust that his success may warrant 
more frequent visits than once a month, in the fut- 
ure. 

In the College Mercurt/ of a recent date, we find 
the following among the items in regard to Bow- 
doin : " Hazing is not yet dead at Bowdoin, discred- 
itable as such performances are now everywhere 
regarded." Now, presumably, the exchange editor 
received such au impression from something that 
appeared in the columns of the Orient, but, after 
a careful search, we are unable to find anything 
that would warrant such an assertion. If the 
Mercury can cite an occurrence of this year that 
can in any way be called hazing, we will — well, we 
will swallow our glue-pot. We should like to feel 
that there was a misunderstanding on the part of 
the Mercury, but it seems determined to play the 
role of mentor towards us, as witness: "The fol- 
lowing item will be astonishing to the law-abiding 
students of this part of the country. It is the bar- 
barism of a hundred years ago, and shows a small 
childishness which we believed to have been totally 
extinguished in colleges of good standing: 'One 
of the accessions to the Faculty was made the sub- 
ject of a Sophomore joke recently. He carelessly 
left the key in the recitation-room door, and after 
the class had gcme, found himself locked in. His 
imprisonment lasted for nearly au hour.' " A few 
lines farther on, we find this: "We receive the 
Haverfordian from Haverford College, which is a 
Quaker institution in Pennsylvania. The Sopho- 
mores recently tossed the Freshman. class, one by 
one, in a blanket. This operation was submitted 
to with the greatest good humor, and it is said that 
the Sophomores did not fully enjoy it. The sport 
was altogether too laborious." So, tossing Fresh- 
men in a blanket is the sport of " the law-abiding 
students of this part of the country," and in a 



Quaker college. The only comment the virtuously 
indignant 3Iercury makes upon it is that the sport 
was rather " too laborious." While locking a Pro- 
fessor in a room, in another part of the country, is 
stigmatized as " the barbarism of a hundred years 
ago." Such inconsistency is really refreshing. 
Barbarians, as we are, we welcome the advent of 
the Mercury as a missionary sent among us to 
enlighten our ignorance, and raise us to that pinnacle 
of self-satisftiction, whence we may look down 
with righteous indignation upon the barbarous 
practices of our less fortunate fellows. 



BOOK NOTICE. 

History of Bowdoin College, by Xehemiah Cleave- 
lan'd. Edited and Completed by Alpheus 
Spring Packard. James R. Osgood & Co. Pub- 
lishers. 

We are much pleased to acknowledge the receipt 
of the History of Bowdoin College. We have had 
hardly sufficient time to give it such a careful 
review as the work demands at our hands. But 
we can have no hesitation iu saying that it is a 
book which every alumnus ought, and every un- 
dergraduate might well have upon his shelves. 
The honor and glory of a college is iu its alumni, 
and their lives; and truly Bowdoin has great rea- 
son to be proud of the roll of her honored sons, 
honored in every path of life — iu literature, in phi- 
losophy, in science, in the learned professions, in the 
State and in the Nation, and not least in the 
defence of their country. 

The main feature of the work is the biographies 
of the alumni of the classes from I80(j to 1879, 
inclusive. These are supplemented by more or less 
extended sketches of the Presidents, Professors, 
and Instructors, together with the earlier Trustees 
and Overseers, to whose labors so great a part of 
the prosperity and welfare of the college is due. 
But to us, perhaps the most interesting, and cer- 
tainly the most curious portion of the work is that 
relative to the founding of the college, and the 
story of its early struggles for existence. The 
Ti'ustees and Overseers iu those days had much 
opposition to overcome, many difficulties to contend 
with; their difficulty in obtaining a charter; in se- 
curing a subsidy from the State; in proving their 
title to a portion of the Bowdoin estate ; in the 
choice of a President; and in the selection of a 
site lor the college; all these were obstacles to be 
met and surmounted. In regard to choosing a 
site for the college, Portland, Gorhani, North Yar- 
mouth, and Frceport wore strongly urged as suit- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



127 



able locations, but finally they determined upon 
Brunswick, as being in Cumberland County, adjoin- 
ing Lincoln, and not far from Kennebec. On tlie 
19th of July, 1796, the two boards met in conven- 
tion at Brunswick, in John Dunning's store, to 
make their final decision. But we will let the 
historian describe it in his own manner: "Here 
they resolved themselves into a committee of the 
whole, and walked out to see for themselves. 
Let us in imagination, go back for a moment 
to that hour. Brunswick has witnessed many 
academical processions, but this was the precursor 
and predestinator of them all. No ordinary prom- 
enaders, those who move down the narrow lane 
from John Dunning's, spread out on the twelve-rod 
road, wind up the little hill, and then wander in 
groups over the open plain and beneath its border- 
ing pines. What dignity, what pictnresqueness, in 
their very costume, — the cocked hat, the white wig, 
and the broad-skirted coat, the tight knee-breeches, 
the large, bright buckles ! Well may they look 
grave, for a grave question is before them. They 
are to determine, for all time, where a great seat of 
learning is to have its home. With them it rests to 
say whether that tame, uninteresting plain shall 
become classic ground, enriched thenceforth and 
hallowed by all delightful associations." 



CLIPPINGS. 

Bold Jesse James' spirit soared 

Beyond this earthly plain ; 
He's gone to see what he can do 

To stop the heavenly train. 

— Hohcirt Herald. 

A Freshman wrote to his father : "I want a lit- 
tle change." The paternal parent replies : " Dear 
Charlie, just wait for it. Time brings change to 
everybody." — Reveille. 

An advertising canvasser was in bathing at Long 
Branch when a huge shark swam in shore. Their 
eyes met. After a moment the shark blushed and 
swam away. — Ex. 

Oscar Wilde says be " pants to meet Roscoe 
Conkling." Now he should "pant" to meet some 
other celebrity, and then he would have a pair of 
pants— an article of dress he sadly needs. — Norris- 
town Herald. 

" Wilt thou?" came the manly voice, as he shed 
an amorous, fire-eating glance into her lustrous 
eye — and she wilted. "Dost thou?" in stentorian 



tones from the owl-eyed car-driver to the adventu- 
ous kid on the rear platform— and he dusted.— 
Detroit Chaff. 

Over the garden wall, 
Apple trees big and tall, 
No apples as yet so hard to get. 
And you may bet, 
I'll never forget 
The night that dog on me was set, 
Over the garden wall. 

— Madison ensU. 

Sometimes it is not judicious to be too particular 
in locating local occurrences, so we will merely say 
that the following conversation was heard in a cer- 
tain store in Oil City. A young lady was looking 
at some hosiery and asked the blushing clerk : "How 
do you sell those ? " at the same time holding up be- 
fore him a long pair of zebra-colored ones. " Those 
are worth five dollars a pair," he answered. " Oh, 
my," twittered the giddy creature, "they come 
pretty high, don't they?" " Y-y-e-s," stammered 
the bashful youth, " th-th-ey come p-pret-pretty 
high, bu-bu-but you're pretty t-tall, you know."' — 
Blizeard. 

CHAUSOM". 
Oh, sarsaparilla and soda fizz, 
Are good enough for thee ; 
But rum, and gum, and valley-tan, 
For a bloated blood like me ; 

The church and Sunday-school for you, 
Oh, church-fair cake is fair to see — 
But Tivoli Export Beer for me — 
Fairest of all is The Tivoli. 

Coffee and doughnuts twain for you, 
Coffee-stands are open late, 
For me a swig of mountain-dew ; 
White, oh white is the bar-keeper's slate. 

For you three girls to take about ; 
Ice-cream when a man is broke — 
For me three times lor a drink to shoixt ; 
[The snakes are awful bad.] 

— Berkeleyan. 

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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




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THE HENRY BILL I'UBLISIIING CO., Nonvich, Ct. 



58 Temple Place, BOSTON, 

lsgfa?erj Btatieuerj tad Fdatii, 

Wedding Invitations, Business Cards, &c. 
COLLEGE INVITATIONS A SPECIALTY. 

Beautiful Engraved Visiting Cards. 

Plate and Pack, $7.50; former price, $3.00. 

GRIFFIN'S WEDDING CARD DEPOT, 

58 Temple Place, BOSTOiT. 




:^XjXj:ei S'X'OEVx:. 



ALL THE LEADING NOVELTIES IN 

Y0UMQ BilM'S CLOTHIM© 

AND NOBBY FURNISHING GOODS. 



STRICTLiY ONE PRICE. 

oys' and Children's Department entirely separate. 

BLUE STORE, 

THE 0|J£-f PJOE ai0T*^i£^a, 

x.S'WiSTON. JVEAinrE:. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 






Fine Watches, Jewelry, Silver Ware, &c., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QtTALlTir, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 



PORTLAND, 
A. CASTER. 



MAINE. 
J. W. D. CARTER. 



SPRING AND SUMMER, 1882. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may .it .lU times be found a choice .issortmeut of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Reacl3--Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

On and after Oct. 1.5th, 1882, 

Passenger Trains leave Brnns-wick 

For Bath, 8.10. 11.2.5 a.m., 2.45, 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 
night (Sundav mornings only). 
Rockland, 8.10 a.m., 2.45 p.m. 
Portland. 7.25, 11.30 A.M.. 4.30 p.m., 12.35 nicilit. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 12.35 night. 
Lawiston, 8.10 a.m., 2.45. 6.33 P.M.. 12.40 niglit. 
Farmington, 8.10 a.m. (Mixed). 2.45 p.m. 
Augusta, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 p.m., 12.45 night. 
Skowhegan, Belfast, Dexter, and Bangor, 2.45 p.m., and 

12.45 night. 
WaterviJle, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 p.m. (Saturdays only), 
12.45 night. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 1882. 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

H^" Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 

Bi/iivroTJus, rmt itv^ti^i, 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle SIreet. - - - Portland, Me. 

J. A. MerriU. A. Keith. 



MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 

^A&wmm @®s©^^ # 0®,, 

28 Free Street, Portland. Me. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Tear in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



At* 



Purchase yoiir CO.VL at llie 

Coal "STard. in Tops]3.ana, 



WHERE NONE HUT 



Tbe Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dc.ilei-inall kinds , if 

Ff©sIx a»a Salt M:©a'fep^ 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's GroceryStore 

/O-Speoial Rates to Student Club3..St 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



m* €* i0^mmts0m^ 



mi^mimm 



mvB 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily- 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Sliort Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

DEALER IN 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Students. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of BrnnswiGk and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College View^s. 




ALL KINDS OF 
For Schools and Colleges, 

EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BOBDEE.S, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 




<OSBPHG't.LOTV^ ^ 



TME FAVORITE A/OS.S03-404-SS2-/7'O-SS/- WITH 
HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




E. SMITH, Variety Store. Bottom Prices to Students. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 

Office at Central Telephone Office, Brunswick. 
|Jpg° All Orders left at C. E. Towuseud"s Store will 
be promptly attended to. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBIiISHEB, 

id Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Mu 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 

J. H. PETERSON & SON, 



-DRALERS IN- 




Boots and Shoes, Tobacco and Cigars, 

Main Street, ---.-- - Brunswick, Me. 

PEARL'S 
WHITE 
GLYCERINE 

BEAUXrFIES THE COMPIEXION, 

CURES AIL KINDS OF SKIN DISEASES, 

BEMOVES FRECKLES, MOTH- 
PATCHES, TAH, BLACK-WORMS, 

and all Impurities, either within or upon the skin. 
I'or CHAPPEO HANDS, ROUGH OR CHAFED SKIN it Is 

Indispcnslble. Try one bottle and you will never bo 
■without it. Use also 

PEARL'S WHITE GLYCERINE SOAP 

It makes the skin 
white. 

PEARL'S WHITE ^<(o 
GLYCERIXECO. ^^^C^. 



COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycli^ ridiiif; is iiiisiirpassed as a 
inetluid of travel inK.whelher I'or speed, 
sport, or renewal of health. The prac- 
ticability of llic inaeliiiie has been 
llioriin<,'hly tested, and satisfaetorily 
))rovcil, Ijc'yond (juesiiiin. TliiniMinds 
arc ill daily iisr, and llic niiinliiT is 
rapidly inci-casiiiK- 'I'he exercise is 
recommended by the medical profession 
lis most beneficial to health, bringing 
into exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

Send lie. sfjinij) for Sri.paRe Illuatvntcrt 
Catalogue coiilnming price lists and full 
inronnatioii. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

59? Washington St„ BOSTON, MASS. 





w, 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

L. WILSON & CO 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list, 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St.. 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will comment-e February 8th, 1883, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshua L. CnAiiBERLAis, LL.D., President-, Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology aud Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H. Gerrish, M.D., 
Anatomy ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence ; Hesrt 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Bcrt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery •, Charles 0. 
Hunt, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics •, Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



([^° Wiitches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BKIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8s a?id j8/ Co7igress Si., and 2jj Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

4®=- Send for Puick List. 



C. L. RICHARDSON, 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

fl^Transieut Orders for Milk or Cream tilled by piviiis suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 

Curtis' College Bookstore 

book:s. stationery, fiooimc 

P.A.PSR, PE:RI0X3IC.A.I.S. «ScC. 



A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, i Fancy Goods. 

Also Kastein Mutual Union Telegraph Ollice. 
Under Tovrn Clock, - - - BrunsTrlok, Me. 




mm 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 29, 1882. 



Vol. XII. 



No. 10. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 

SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "iVloehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

looks, Wooerf, and Paper Hanpp, 

53 Exchange Sheet, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

FRANK M. STETSON, 










*<?.J(;t.Y25A* 




. DEANE BROTHERS & SANBORN, 

Manufacturers am] Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

^W Lowest Prices in the State, 
755 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland Me. 



VISITORS TO PORTLAND, 

Independent of any intention of pur- 
chasing goods in our line, are invited to 
inspect the Model Clothing and Fur- 
nishing Store of Allen & Co., 470 Con- 
gress St., opp. Preble House, 

LANCASTER BUILDING. 



SPECIAL ^aENT. 

l^Dunlap & Co., of New York, Celebrated 
Stiff Hats. 

Also his New Straw Mackinaw, $2.00 and 
$2.50. 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 

"lORING, short & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

EKOEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY fOE 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. \ 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the ] 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- ■ 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the JSneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
An'CiENT Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common i 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be i-equired to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
■with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final oxaraiuations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study iu the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will bo fur- 
nished a list of topics on which ho will bo requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A 'WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Slineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A 'WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Siiulents can, however, by forming 
clul)s inuU'r ixood managomont, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOV. 29, 1882. 



No. 10. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



EDITORIAL BOARD, 
Arthur J. Russell, '83, Mauagiug Editor ^/j-o tem.' 
Herbert P. Kendall," '83, Business Editor. 
Herbert E. Cole, '83. Oliver W. Means, '84. 

Howard R. Goodwin, '83. Llewellyn Barton, '84. 
Charles H. Stetson, '83. Charles E. Sayward, '84. 
iST. Brooks K. Pettingill, '83. 

TBRM3 — $2.00 a year IN advance; single copies, 15 cents. 
Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 

in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 
Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 

articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 

writer's real name- 
Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 
Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Tol. XII., No. 10.— Nov. 29, 1882. 

Editorial Notes 129 

Literary : 

Evening (poem) 132 

"Tlie Completed Will in Liberty." 132 

An Episode in a Teacher's Life 133 

College Items ] 34 

Personal 138 

Clippings ■]39 

Editors' Table 140 

EDITOHIAL KOTES. 



By the time this number of the Orient is 
out, your mouths will, doubtless, be caused to 
water by the anticipation of that Thanksgiv- 
ing turkey. Here's hoping you may enjoy it 
while you are telling admiring mothers, sis- 
ters, etc., about the wonderful exploits of the 
"fellows" at that place of places, Bowdoin 
College ! The Thanksgiving recess comes at 
a peculiarly happy time in the term, — the ad- 



vance work, with its daily " loading up " and 
" unloading," has come to an end, and there 
is a natural weariness that this recess is "just 
the thing " to alleviate, before the more im- 
portant reviews, with their gathering up of 
loose ends and sorting processes, begin. So, 
in a few days, the campus will be dotted with 
the returning fellows, with their valises and 
new winter overcoats, all rested and willing 
to " dig away " again, be it at Greek roots or 
empirical susceptibilities. 

About this time, too, the departing peda- 
gogue shakes the mud of Brunswick from his 
feet. He leaves the campus a boy ; he ar- 
rives, at his distant field of labor an intellect- 
ual giant, looked up to and respected by the 
"horny-handed turners of the glebe," and ad- 
mired and sweetly smiled at by their buxom 
daughters. If you will let us assume the 
prerogative of the good-advice friend, we 
shall say, " Beware of the big girls in the 
back seat." 

Those who pass the recess in Brunswick 
are now anxiously awaiting that hamper of 
good things from home. Invite us round, 
and we will do our best to help you dispose 
of them! We cannot come to an end with- 
out again wishing you a jolly, good Thanks- 
giving. 



The remark by one of our professors that 
he hoped to give a course of half a dozen or 
so lectures to the Seniors, on the fine arts, 
was a very welcome announcement, and re- 
ceived with applause by the class. As was 
stated, one of the urgent needs of our course 
is instruction, to some extent at least, in 
the master-pieces of painting and sculpture. 
Most of our graduates go out into the world 



130 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



with no knowledge of this subject, or at the 
most, an imperfect knowledge gathered from 
miscellaneous reading. Our library has some 
very fine works on this subject, and of the 
excellence of our art collection it is superflu- 
ous to speak, except in .regard to the attic in 
which they are now kept. Crowded together 
so that they almost overlap one another, and 
hung, many of them, so high that stilts would 
be a necessity ia a study of them, one gets 
but a very imperfect idea of the worth of 
the Bowdoin collection of paintings. Last 
spring, happening to be in the room during a 
shower, we ourselves took the liberty to re- 
move a painting from the wall, over which a 
stream of water was trickling. On the top 
of the frame had settled the dust of ages, 
and the cords by which it was suspended 
looked rotten and ready to break. The light, 
too, is extremely bad. The painting, 
"Italian Mother and Child," which was 
recently presented to the college, has lost 
half the beauty it had in the lower room, by 
being hung on the dingy old wall upstairs, in 
a sort of cross light that seems to take away 
from the whole expression of the picture tiie 
wonderful sweetness and grace it formerly 
presented. The remedy is very easy to sug- 
gest. We have always supposed that the top 
story of Memorial Hall was to be used as an 
art gallery. The light would be as good as it 
now is bad, and the paintings could be separ- 
ated enough to stand each by its own merits, 
'and not take the color out of its neighbor. 
We have heard but one objection to this idea, 
and that is that people would not climb so 
many stairs to visit an art gallery! And 
what an objection ! People who would not 
take a few steps to see a supposed Ruhens, to 
say nothing of others as valuable and beauti- 
ful, would not be benefited by seeing them 
any way, or would be lazy enough to think 
that the college ought to furnish a free hack 
from the depot to the campus. 

We have been led a little aside from our 



subject, but wished to say that with the ad- 
vantages we have here, some study of the 
fine arts would be very profitable, and Prof.- 
Campbell's lectures will be very acceptable 
to that part of the class to which anj' part of 
the course is acceptable. 



Owing to the prevalence of slang nowa- 
days, one who does not keep up with the 
times is almost compelled to carry a " Diction- 
ary of Slang" around with him. For the 
benefit of those who used to be at Bowdoin 
" in days of yore " and the sisters, cousins, 
etc., to whom many of our expressions are 
the deepest mysteries, we give a short list 
with explanations. A person " plugs " or 
" swots ', when he studies hard on a lesson. 
If he goes in unprepared and runs his chances 
of being called up he is said to "go in on his 
blood"; when he is prepared on a subject he 
has it "down cold." If he carries in one of 
those little pieces of paper with the greatest 
possible amount of information on the least 
possible amount of space with intent to de- 
ceive the watchful professor, he is said to 
"fakir." If he utterly fails to recite, he 
"flunks" and " takes a dead"; if he goes 
through well, he " makes a sail." If a favor- 
ite with the gentler sex, he is "on the mash." 
If hungry, he is "peckish." These expres- 
sions have the merit of brevity, but an un- 
comfortable way of coming out at unseason- 
able times, if you are in the habit of using 
them. 



A ver}' puerile form of amusement seems 
to be having a run at present, namely, that 
of smashing things, and destroying property 
of more or less value. We should not speak 
of it here,.but leave it to be settled by that 
phenominal mathematical calculation, usually 
known as " average of repairs," did not certain 
of the professors, in or near whose recitation 
rooms these laudable actions take place, con- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



131 



strue the affairs as insults to themselves or 
their branches of study. We think nothing 
is farther from the minds of those who en- 
gage in these enterprises, than to insult or 
imply any disrespect to professors or studies. 
It seems to be an outbreak of youthful ex- 
uberance, not giving the least thought to 
how it will be taken by others till after it has 
come out that some one has taken the action, 
very naturally, as an insult to himself. It is 
not at all confined to the recitation rooms, for 
every little wliile there is evidence of the 
end-lamp fiend, who takes his pleasure in 
smashing lamps that are placed in the hall- 
ways, by the autliorities, for his own benefit 
as well as that of others. 

There is also a specimen of idiot abroad 
who takes intense delight in practicing with 
his revolver at his own door-knob. After 
somebody has " lost the number of his mess" 
by the exertions of this character, this form 
of amusement will probably lose its popular- 
ity. We mention these things to show that 
these outbreaks around the recitations arise 
more from thoughtlessness than any other 
motive, but, of course, are not in the least 
excusable on this account. 



We have pleaded a number of times for 
communications or articles from the "student 
body," but the pleading seems to be in vain. 
Won't you have a little pity on " ye poor ed- 
itor " who has to spend all his Sun beg 

pardon, we mean Saturday afternoons in writ- 
ing up his department? It would seem that a 
college paper deserves more support from the 
students than is given in taking it from the 
office once in two weeks and laughing at its 
jokes. It is not necessary to find fault with 
the lack of warmth in the reading-room or 
chapel, or want of a gymnasium, for these 
are old customs and it won't do to do away 
with old customs, you know. But send us in 
some college stories or, above all things, keep 



away from the barber and send us some 
poems. We pine for poems, that is, good 
ones. And Juniors, now is your time to 
gain fame by sending us some good articles, 
and thus assuring your election to the follow- 
ing Orient board. 



The Orient office is no longer a remote 
possibility, but an actual fact. For several 
years the Orient boards have been trying to 
obtain possession of some room where records 
could be kept and the exchanges placed on 
file. Now, through the kindness of the Fac- 
ulty, such a room has been given us. Doubt- 
less before long, the rubbish will be cleared 
out and you will see our modest shingle on 
the door. We wish to thank the Faculty 
most heartily for their action and express 
our appreciation of tlieir kindness. The 
future Orient boards will not labor under 
the disadvantages we and those before us 
have had to encounter, and we hope they 
will give you a better paper, and a more rep- 
resentative one than we have done. 



The choir, like all mundane things, seems 
subject to change. It is quite a matter of 
interest now, from day to day, to see what 
new faces shed their radiance from the organ 
loft. Allow us humbly to suggest that such 
a course in the long run is rather prejudicial 
to good music. We would suggest that a 
committee be chosen to look after the present 
committee. What is evidently needed in the 
chapel is a strong choir of voices, and espe- 
cially a pronounced air that can plainly be 
heard at the other end of the. chapel to sus- 
tain the mass of bass and tenor which seem 
to be the dominant parts in the body of the 
house. Nothing adds to the chapel service 
like good music in which all can take part. 



We were a little "previous" in our edi- 
torial in regard to the course of lectures. 



132 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The lectures are to be given, and in Memo- j 
rial Hall, we hear, but are for the benefit of 
the Boating Association instead of the new- 
gymnasium. Either object is a good one, | 
but still we have a little tenderness for that 
in embryo gymnasium. We understand that 
a good course, of lectures is to be given, and 
all efforts have been made to make them a 
success. Memorial Hall, itself, will doubt- 
less be somewhat of an attraction and, as 
there has been no course of lectures given in 
town for several years, there will probably 
be a good attendance of town people. 



EVENING-. 
By the light of the fire and its red-glowing ember, 
When the darkness has come and the daylight has 

fled, 
J sit here alone -with my thought, aud remember 
But hopes that are dead. 

The joys that once came with the thought of the 

morro-w, 
That seemed theu ho-w gladsome do tongue can 

essay, - 
Have no-w vanished quite and left but the sorrow 
That naught can allay. 

And so it will be when hfe's work is done with, 
Thoughts gone from their throne and the light 

from our day, 
We turn still a moment to joys life begun -with, 
And then— who shall say? 



"THE COMPLETED WILL IN 
LIBERTY." 

Reader, did you ever dream you were 
under the radical sign ? If not, then pray 
heaven to avert the awful conception from 
your mind! We once had such a dream. In 
the dread stillness of the night we felt tlie 
awful, choking, invisible power of tliat dread 
sign •/ over us, as tliough some niiglitier 
power were trying to extract our root. 
Once, too, when we were Frcsli, wc dreamed 



that we were one of the logarithms in the 
table surrounded by that boundless, eternal, 
surging sea of logarithms, no hope, no limit 
to our imprisonment. O, how we prayed 
that some friendly hand would take us from 
the table and find the number corresponding 
to us. But these harrowing experiences are 
as flea-bites, nay more, are as nothing to the 
awful experience through whicli we passed 
so lately. As we look back on tlie time, that 
night seems years ; and years of experience 
are wrapped up in that awful vision which 
has left us prematurely old. ^Vllow us to 
explain. 

Friday night had come. In olden times 
we would have said, " Happy Friday night, 
with its vision of Saturday's glorious loaf." 
But, alas ! we say thus no longer! View the 
schedule for one moment, and like Niobe dis- 
solve in tears: "Saturday — 10.30, geologj^ ; 
11.30, psychology." Glorious Saturday of 
olden times, thou hast indeed faded into the 
dimness of tlie past, but thy memory is ever 
green in our minds ! With some such tliought 
as tliis we sat down Friday night, and began 
our work. Geology is soon disposed of. We 
take the psychology from its resting place, 
adjust tlie wet towel around our brow, and 
pitch in. The distant town bell strikes nine, 
ten, and soon eleven. " What, chummie, going 
to bed ? Yes ? You wish me a pleasant even- 
ing? There, dodge that diclionary, and see 
how you like it ! " We hear a squeaking of 
the bed, aud in a few moments chum's mel- 
lifluent snore. We groan and turn the page. 
Devil! that can't be twelve o'clock! But it 
is. The lamp burns away with a little 
buz-z-z, and all the end is still. Boom ! One 
o'clock ! Is it possible ! There, we begin to 
catch a fleeting glimpse of what the author 
intendsto assert. Why, it is quite simple, after 
all. Encouraged by this mental feat, we turn 
over a hundred pages at random. Stoj)! 
What is that sentence that catches our eye? 
"The coniplotcd will in liberty." Wonder 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



133 



what that means? Well, we shall come to it 
soon enough, I dare saj'. And slam goes the 
book on to the table. We sit for a moment, 
onr hands clasped on the back of our head, 
the chair tilted back, earnestly regarding the 
fire. 

The completed will in liberty ! The com- 
pleted will in liberty ' ! The completed will 
in liberty ! ! ! Why, what the devil has got 
into us ? This is worse than " Punch, broth- 
ers, punch." Hardly had we made the above 
pious ejaculation when the room seemed full 
of an intense, stifling, overcoming Presence. 
In its effect it was like an immense feather- 
bed, made to fit the room, falling down and 
smothering everything. The light faded 
from the lamp, and the fire sank away to dull 
ashes. Dimly a struggling starlight entered 
at the window, and barely gave their outlines 
to things. We half observed and half did 
not observe the book-case rising to the ceil- 
ing, filled with classic lore and modern 
science, — old foes standing side by side. But 
above all, and brooding over all, we felt that 
Presence. And with what terrors we can- 
not bring ourselTcs for a moment to contem- 
plate. The thought arose in our minds, 
" What is this dreadful, smothering, thing ? " 
And, as if in answer to the thought, a voice 
shaped itself from the space and said, " I am 
the completed will in liberty." Cold sweat 
bathed our every limb, but we managed to 
stammered out, " H-how do you find your- 
self to-night." "Free," the Thing exclaimed, 
suddenly assuming a shape, and pointing at 
us with extended arm and index finger, 
"Free, I am in liberty, and completed. I am 
completed, I tell you," the voice rising to 
a shriek, " completed." Extreme terror so 
overcame us at these extraordinary words 
that we leaped from our chair, and flung the 
coal-hod straight at the head of the "Com- 
pleted Will in Liberty," and — found our- 
selves caught by the throat by our chum, and 
soundly shaken. "Damn you! What do 



you mean," another shake, "by firing that 
coal-hod at me? Wake up ! Any one would 
think you were crazy, howling that way in 
the middle of the night. What are you 
dreaming of?" Slowly we rubbed our eyes, 
and sneaked off to bed, followed by the wrath- 
ful objurgations of our chum, who laboriously 
scraped the coal dust from the carpet. 



AN EPISODE IN A TEACHER'S LIFE. 

Many of the readers of the Orient have 
experienced the emotions of pleasure, not all 
unmixed with pain, however, that come to 
one at the close of a term of teaching. Those 
who have, will the better appreciate this 
little episode ; those who have not, have 
surely missed one of the pleasures of a stu- 
dent's life. One winter, not long since, one 
of my fellow-students and myself were teach- 
ing in adjoining districts, and, as our schools 
were to close the same day, we decided to 
unite our forces, and give a public entertain- 
ment the evening after our winter's work of 
teaching was finished. The scholars from 
both schools entered into the plan with en- 
thusiasm, and, with the expenditure of but 
little time and energy, a pleasing programme 
was prepared. The evening came and with 
it came a storm, — but what cared we? The 
scholars, as scholars always are, were full of 
life, and feared not the inclemency of the 
weather, and the teachers were not behind 
them in that respect, that night at least. 

My school-house was about two miles 
from the hall where we were to have our ex- 
ercises, and, that we might the better enjoy 
ourselves, one of the larger boys put the 
hay-rick, supplied with temporary seats, on 
traverse sleds ; and, with a full complement 
of robes and a pair of good horses, we set 
out, — a lively company indeed. 

At the hall our exercises passed off pleas- 
antly, after which we gave ourselves up to 
social enjoyment. After twelve weeks of 



134 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



teaching, twelve weeks during which we had, 
of necessity, been rather quiet and somewhat 
dignified, we were once more free, — once 
more we were jovial, fun-loving students, and 
what wonder if we entered, with even un- 
wonted zest, into whatever of amusement 
arose ? 

After an evening enjoyed by all, our party 
prepared for the homeward ride. As our 
well-loaded team stood before the door, kind 
wislies and good-byes were exchanged, and 
we rode out into the darkness, singing, be- 
tween our outbursts of merriment, the well- 
known refrain of the " Three Blind Mice." 
That ride home with my scholars, how well 
I remember it! Scholars and teacher no 
longer, but, I truly believe, sincere friends 
and happy ones, though about to part, per- 
haps for years. 

But such an evening can not be described 
in the space' allowed me. Let it suffice to 
say further, that the remembrance of it will 
ever be a pleasant one to me. And I doubt 
not that, after our student-life is ended, many 
of us will look back with pleasure to the 
close of our several schools, as to brighter 
spots upon our pathway, over which but a 
faint shadow is thrown by an occasional cloud, 
which only tempers the brightness of the 
sun. F. 

COLLEGE ITEMS. 



When night lier sable robe lias cast 

O'er mountain, meail, and ocean's wave, 

The Junior dons his Sunday best 
And talies a turn upon tlxe pave. 

Anna is to be buried this time, sure. 

Fling, '86, is canvassing in Boothbay. 

The musicians arc giving us a long rest. 

Brunswick can now boast of an art store. 

What's the attraction down town at 9 p.m. ? 

The Bugk ads. come in rather slow this year. 

Lennan, '83, is teaching a school in Woolwich. 

Double windows, overcoats, and underflannols. 

Chess playiug is indulged in considerably now. 



The Juniors are compelled to write themes. 

One of the Junior chemists calls a precipitate a 
curd. 

Look out for muddy walks after the sun strikes 
them ! 

The '82 men are bound not to get left iu matri- 
mony. 

Folsom, '85, has commenced a school in Clinton, 
Maine. 

The Freshmen are now allowed to sit during 
prayers. 

"About this time look out for church fairs." — 
Almanac. 

Prof Johnson aud lady are spending the winter 
in Leipsic. 

The Home Baptist Society is rapidly increasing 
in membership. 

Did you ever know of its being so quiet 'round 
college before f 

F. M. Fling has been chosen to write the history 
of '8;i for the Bugle. 

The three Graces do not perambulate together 
as much as formerly. 

Quite a number of the recent graduates have 
been iu town of late. 

Some of the wells on the campus are causing 
trouble by giving out. 

A fall from a bicycle has kept Nealley, '85, at 
home for a few weeks. 

Brown, '85, has closed his school at Topsham, 
aud rejoined his class. 

Time to get out those old overshoes that you 
had left over last spring. 

Eamcs, '85, has been laid up a few weeks with a 
bad ankle. ' Foot-ball did it. 

The Seniors took their fourth examination in 
pisychology on Saturday last. 

'84 have their chemistry lectures in the lower 
lecture room in Adams Hall. 

The church sociable at Mr. Martin's was the 
objective point Tuesday evening. 

The new installment of box-shop girls is hailed 
with gladness by some of the students. 

The Freshman can now go home and delight 
the village maiden with the society pin. 

Our readers will please give us credit for not 
attempting a joke on the Thanksgiving turkey. 

Beautiful snow and the rigors of a Maine winter 
are on us a little sooner than they were expected. 

Overheard iu a dark hall way at the church 
sociable last week, " How funny you kiss, Mr. ." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



135 



The trouble with the chapel choir has com- 
menced. 

Now is the time to borrow your neighbor's rub- 
ber boots. 

Wheelwright and Wilson, '81, spent Sunday 
before last in town. 

It has been ascertained that Pop is plugging for 
a Commencement Part. 

Barton, '84, and Butler, '85, sing in the choir at 
the Universalist church. 

S. T. B. J. has brought out the antiquated ulster 
for positively its last season. 

Here's hoping that we sball have some skating 
on the Androscoggin this wiuter. 

The North Appleton left-hand nine has chal- 
lenged the South Winthrop left-hand nine. 

The launching of a large vessel at Bath last 
week attracted a small delegation of students. 

The inhabitants of Winthrop have been going 
lately for water to the well opposite Appleton. 

Certain of the Seniors are taking exceptions to 
the statements in the test-book on psychology. 

There is a feeling among the Seniors that injus- 
tice was done one of their number in astronomy last 
week. 

The Bath men naturally think that their city 
ought to be represented by a paper in the reading- 
room. 

Bound volumes of the late Bevieivs have been 
arranged in the north part of the library, main 
room. 

Some of the boys are taking private waltzing 
lessons in view of Ivy Day and the " Dance on the 
green." 

The Junior Parts are to be delivered by C. C. 
Torrey, 0. W. Means, E. C. Smith, and J. A. Water- 
man, Jr. 

Hutchins, '83, has invented an improvement to 
the spectroscope that prouaises to be of considera- 
ble advantage. 

Prof. Chapman spoke in the Senior room Sun- 
day evening, Nov. 12th, and Prof. Campbell in the 
same place, Nov. 19th. 

It is possible that the roller-skating rink may be 
secured and turned over to the boating and base- 
ball men for a place to train in. 

We should make better progress in our studies 
and have less sickness among us, if the new gymna- 
sium was only in running order. 



Analytical chemistry is a very popular study 
among the Juniors. Many of the class are putting 
in extra work. 

An additional furnace has been put in the base- 
ment of the chapel. There is some hope for us this 
winter after all. 

The week of prayer was observed by the T. M. 
C. A. boys. Meetings were held every night and a 
good deal of interest was aroused. 

Rev. Elijah Kellogg, preaching at Topsham, is 
depopulating the galleries at the church on the 
hill. Get your excuses beforehand, boys. 

The man who can pass through Senior year 
without ruining his handwriting taking notes of 
lectures, is certainly to be congratulated. 

We understand that C. C. Hutchins requested to 
be excused from his Senior Part. The request was 
granted and the part given to A. C. Gibson. 

Mr. Whitney, from John Hopkins University, 
Baltimore, who is taking a special course in organic 
chemistry here, uses the laboratory in Adams Hall. 

It is quite likely that the Base-Ball Association 
will offer prizes next season for the best fielding 
record, best batting record, and best general play- 
ing. 

A specimen of the cup coral of the Silurian age, 
labeled petrified buffalo horn, was added to the 
cabinet some time ago, by an unscientific friend of 
the college. 

It has been suggested that two copies of the 
Leiviston Journal ought to be kept on file in the 
reading-room, the rush for that paper is so great in 
the evening. 

It is stated that the outlook for the next Fresh- 
man class is very good, and that there is no doubt 
of a class of frona sixty to seventy. P. S.— This is 
a good joke. 

The following note was picked up on the cam- 
pus recently : 

Dear , On the Bact Street Bridge at nine 

to-night. Yours, 

Prof Robinson has re-formed his Sunday School 
class of Seniors. The exercise, will be held the 
hour before evening prayers in different rooms of 
the college. 

All the cuts for the Bugle have been sent to the 
engravers, and nearly the whole of the literary 
matter is in the hands of the printer. It really 
looks as though the publication would appear before 
the close of the term. 



136 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



An alDsent-minded Senior (Father W.) sat for 
half an hour on the stone steps, south side of 
Adams, thinking that he had reached his recitation 
seat. 

The chairs and settees for Memorial Hall have 
been ordered. When they arrive and are put in 
place, we are assured that a boom in rhetoricals may 
be looked for. 

The Juniors say that Monday is the hardest 
day of all the week for them. If that doesn't put 
a premium on Sunday studying, will somebody be 
kind enough to inform us what does 1 

The funeral of C. E. Stinchfleld, '82, was held 
here on Sunday, Nov. 19th. His pure life and noble 
character were very feelingly referred to by Prof. 
Packard at evening prayers that day. 

In astronomy: Question — "Mr. J., what is the 
density of Saturn?" Mr. J. (nervously)— " The 
density of Saturn, sir, is so dense that it is not quite 
as dense as water is." Grins go 'round. 

We wonder if the sorrow of one of our demo- 
cratic Seniors, at the departure of the "relict" to 
green fields and pastures new, was to any degree 
relieved by the victory of Widow Butler. 

Juniors complain of the indefinability of the sub- 
ject given out for themes. Several of them bor- 
rowed a psychology of a Senior, read a few pages, 
and crawled away to die. Draw your own moral. 

Mr. Cutler has been called from his duties to 
Florida by the sickness of his father who is spend- 
ing the winter there. Prof. Chapman has the 
Sophomores in rhetoric and theme writing during 
his absence. 

Grounds of church-going : First Junior — "Going 
over to Topsham to church to-day, chum 1 " Second 
Junior — "N-no, I guess not; the girls in Brunswick 
are prettier than the girls in Topsham." First 
Junior groans. 

The Sophomore class election, hold November 
13th, resulted in the following choice of officers: 
Marshal, F. I. Brown; President, Richard Webb; 
Vice President, Daniel Goodenow; Eulogist, J. F. 
Libby; Elegist, D. P. Howard; Panegyi-ist, K. L. 
Manson ; Odist, W. P. Nealley ; Historian, Walter 
Mooers; Secretary and Treasurer, L. Hodgkins; 
Committee of Arrangements, Boyd Bartlett, Eugene 
Thomas, and H. N. Dunham. The class has firmly 
decided to bury Analytics next summer, and so the 
class oflicers of Sophomore year, for a year at least, 
will cease being honors only in name. 



One of the boys in Winthrop recently set a man- 
trap by using the attic floor for fire-wood. A high- 
toned Senior, a few days afterward, slipped down 
through into the hall, accompanied by profanity, 
dust, mortar, and delighted chuckles of witnessing 
underclassmen. 

The following Seniors have been appointed by 
the Faculty to deliver parts in the exhibition at the 
close of the present term: Salutatory in Latin, H. 
R. Goodwin; English Parts, A. E. Austin, H. E. 
Cole, F. M. Fling, C. C. Hutchins, E. A. Packard, 
W. A. Perkins, and G. B. Swan. 

At a recent meeting of the Base-Ball Associa- 
tion the following oflicers were elected : President, 
C. H. Stetson, '83; Vice President, D. C. Clark, 
'84; Secretary, B. Bartlett, '85: Treasurer, C. E. 
Adams, '84: Assistant Treasurer, R. Webb, '85; 
Directors, H. E. Cole, '83, 1st. F. H. Files, '8-3, 2d, 
and C. C. Torrey, '84, 3d. 

Some persons, who were spoiling for some fun, 
took a sign-board the other night that the parties 
down street were done using, and placed it over 
the chapel door. The next morning chapel goers 
were directed to take out their life insurance poU- 
cies inside. Now, fuuny men, the bulletin-board 
trick must be looked after. 

A foot-ball club has been organized at Lasell. 
How we should enjoy seeing the dainty Lasellians 
play the beautiful game of foot-ball. Wonder if 
shin kicking is ruled out. Our curiosity is so great 
that if the club will send down two elevens to give 
an exhibition game on our front campus, the Oriknt 
will agree to pay all the expenses of the trip, and 
set 'um up on spruce gum to an unlimited extent. 

The base-ball directors have chosen the first five 
men of the nine that will represent the college next 
summer. They are : Knapp, '83, Wright, '84, 
Stetson, '83, J. A. Waterman, '84, and C. C. Torrey, 
'84. Wright has been elected captain of the nine. 
The five men will choose the other four probably 
from among tho following named men : Winter, '83, 
Cook, '85, Collins, '83, Packard, '83, Barton, '84, 
Lindsey, '84, Chase, '85, J. H. Davis, '86, and 
Cornish, '86. 'JMiese men are expected to work with 
the first five this winter in the extemporized gym- 
nasium. A second nine will be formcil at the very 
beginning of the spring term from the base-ball 
material not needed for tho first nine, for the pur- 
pose of giving tho first nine practice games. All 
who would hko to become players on this second 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



137 



nine are earnestly recommended to keep tliemselves 
in training for the active worli of next spring. 

"the MODEEN MARIjnEE." 
The mariner gay, says he, " WTiat do ye say," 
And " "What do ye say," says he; 
" I've drank of the rum from ' far Cathay,' 
And rot-gut that came from the Bay o' Biscay 
Has never heen slighted by mfe. 

" But of all the drinks to fill up the chinks 
And lay a man up for the day. 
To tie up his entrails in separate kinks 
And lay him away for his forty winks, 
Is AU-n's vile rot-gut, I say! " 

Tlie Freshmen held a class meeting ou Nov. 
15th, and elected the following officers for the 
coming year: President, L. Turner; Vice-Presi- 
dent, T, W. Dike ; Secretary and Treasurer, J. H. 
Davis ; Orator, G. M. Norris ; Poet, H. R. Fling ; 
Historian, W. V. Wentworth; Prophet, E. E. 
Rideout ; Toast Master, W. A. Cornish ; Committee 
of Arrangements, A. A. Knowlton, A. W. Hutchins, 
C. W. Tuttle ; Committee on Odes, I. W. Home, 
W. H. Stackpole, J. W. Calderwood. 

The first lecture in the Boating Association 
course was given in Memorial Hall last Saturday 
evening by Hon. William Parsons, on "Peter the 
Great, and Napoleon Bonaparte." The beautiful 
hall was quite well filled by students and town's- 
people, who seemed to enjoy intensely the rich 
literary treat. The size of the audience on this 
first evening makes it sure that the Boating Asso- 
ciation will not only pay expenses but will realize 
quite a handsome sum from the enterprise. Other 
lecturers in tbe course (see posters for dates), are : 
Mrs. Mary A. Livermore, subject, " Superfluous 
Women"; President Chamberlain, subject, "The 
Battle of Gettysburg"; Mr. William Blaikie, sub- 
ject, "The Rational Education of Our Bodies"; and 
Mr. George Makepeace Towle, subject, " Gambetta.'' 

Prof. Baird, of the U. S. Fish Commission, ha 
oifered Prof Lee the position of naturalist in the 
scientific expedition that is to be sent by the gov- 
ernment to the Gulf of Mexico about the middle of 
January next. The company is made up of the 
foremost practical scientists in the country, and 
will have at its disposal the new government 
steamer Albatross. The field of operations will be 
in the southern part of the gulf. Prof. Lee has not 
yet decided to accept the flattering ofi'er, but it is 
hoped that his duties here may be so arranged that 
he will be able to do so. If he can in any way be 
spared for a few months this winter, the disadvan- 



tage from his absence will be more than balanced 
by the outside work he will do for the college, and 
the additions to the cabinet that he will be able to 
make. 

A small party of students, coming in late some 
nights since, saw flames and smoke arising beyond 
the pine grove back of Appleton. Thoughts of a 
big conflagration, the Brunswick fire companies, 
and piles of fun generally caused them to seek the 
fire in a hurry, whore they found only a wood pile 
that some funny or malicious person had set fire to. 
The boys set themselves immediately to putting out 
the fire, and after thirty minutes' hard work suc- 
ceeded in accomplishing their purpose. They were 
about to leave, confidently expecting that each 
would be presented with a gold watch by the grate- 
ful citizens, that the Bnmsiviclc Herald would 
notice them in its "varsity" column, and that tbe 
editor of tbe TeUgraph would cease writing about 
something to eat long enough to produce an edi- 
torial on their gallant exploit, when a couple of 
able-bodied and lightly attired men, who owned 
the wood pile and thought that they had struck the 
incendiaries, appeared upon the scene and insisted 
that a fight was necessary. The men were so 
anxious to settle tbe affair vi et armis. that it re- 
quired considerable argument on the part of the 
boys to convince them of their mistake, and thus 
deprive the Maine papers of a cboice article about 
a broil caused by Bowdoin students. But at last 
outraged justice was satisfied. The would-be 
avengers vouchsafed a surly apology for their hasty 
action, and the amateur fire company sought their 
respective rooms, vowing that Brunswick would 
have to be subjected to a temperature several thou- 
sand degrees (centigrade) higher than any fair sized 
conflagration could furnish, before they would again 
exert themselves to preserve life or property. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Died in Patten, Me., of typhoid fever, Chaeles 
Eben Stinchfield, Bowdoin, '82. 

It has never been our lot to chronicle a death 
so sad, or one that has touched the hearts of so 
many. A young man full of hope and vigor, of the 
loftiest aspirations, he had just finisbed his college 
course, which he worked hard to complete, to a 
great extent paying his way by his own exertions. 
In the dawn of his manhood, with the powers of 
his mind developed by study and thought, he en- 
tered upon a course of teaching, the beginning of a 



138 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



literary career which, those of us who knew him 
best never doubted would be crowned with honor 
and success. But the terrible power of the disease 
seized upon him, and on the 16th of November, 
looliiug out upon the rugged sides of Katahdin 
warmed by the glow and glory of the setting sun, 
he passed away without a struggle. As I write, 
his favorite poem, Shelley's " Skylark," is open be- 
fore me. and every line speaks of him who pointed 
out so many of its wonderful melodies. Well can 
be said of him what that sweetest of singers said 
at the death of his brother poet : 

" Green be the turf above thee. 

Friend of my better days; 
None knew thee but to love thee, 

Xone named thee but to praise." 

Whereas, Our dear brother Charles Eben 
Stinchfield has been taken from this life. 

Resolved, That in this manner, we testify to his 
perfect life, his firm faith, and his unwavering 
Christian hope. 

Resolved, Tliat in liis death we, his brothers in 
A. A. il>.j lose a sincere friend and a loyal brother, 
whose life gave promise of usefulness and literary 
excellence. 

Resolved, That while we bow before an inscrut- 
able Providence, we sincerely mourn the death of 
our dear brother and wish to give our heartfelt 
sympathy to the afflicted family. 

Resolved, That these resolutions be printed and 
sent to the several chapters of A. J. il>., to the 
relatives of the decea.sed, and to the press. 
A. J. Russell, 
J. A. Waterman, Jr., 
E. Thomas, 
In behalf of the Bowdoin Chapter. 



PERSONAL. 

[Graduates and Undergraduates are earnestly solicited 
to send personal items to the Bowdoin Okient, Bruns- 
wick.] 

'32.— Rev. C. A. Bartol, D.U., of the West 
Church, Boston, had an article in the Unitarian 
Review for October, on " The Nature of Knowl- 
edge ; Emerson's Way." 

'52. — Gen. James D. Fessenden, of Porthind, 
sou of Senator Fessenden, died Nov. 18th. He 
was with Sherman in his march through Georgia ; 
was on Gen. Hunter's staff, and was engaged in the 
battle of Chattanooga, and Lookout Mountain. 

'ijtf. — Hon. T. li. Simonton, of Camden, has as- 
sumed the editorship of the Camden Herald, 



formerly a greenback but now a republican 
paper. 

'57. — Strickland is practicing law in Houlton, Me. 

'57.— Strout is in the Congressional Library at 
Washington, D. C. 

'57. — Waterman is a clergyman in Dover, N. H. 

'57. — Stone is a clergyman in Farmiugtou, Me. 

'72. — Heath is practicing law in Augusta, and 
was elected Senator to the Legislature last Sep- 
tember. 

'73. — A. F. Richardson is President of the Cum- 
berland County Educational Association. 

'73. — D. A. Robinson, formerly an instructor at 
Bowdoin College, has been appointed city physi- 
cian of Bangor. 

'74.— Lowell read a paper before the Pedagog- 
ical Convention at Portland. 

'74. — Hunter is practicing medicine in Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

'75. — Simmons has been admitted to member- 
ship in the New York Produce Exchange, as sales- 
man for the firm of Charles Haight & Co., one of 
the largest and oldest flour commission firms in 
New York ; olflce, 27 Pearl Street. 

'75.— Cressey is studying in Yale Divinity 
School. 

'76. — Kimball is in the coal business at Lew- 
iston. 

'76. — F. C. Payson, of Portland, has been ap- 
pointed Notary Public by Gov. Plaisted. 

'78. — Potter delivered a Fourth of July oration 
at Calais, which has been printed in pamphlet 
form by the City Government. 

'78. — Jacobs is engaged in cattle rai.'^iug in 
Texas. 

'78. — Davis, of Portland Packing Co., has gone 
to Europe on business. 

'79. — Paine, of Portland, has gone to Portland, 
Oregon, to practice law. 

'80.— A. H. Elolmes has gone to Europe. 

'80.— F. 0. Puringtou is teaching at Meclianic 
Falls. 

'80. — A. D. Holmes has .gone to K.nrope to study 
modicino. 

'80.— Perkins and Dane are studying law in St. 
Louis. Their address is 1725 Washington Avenue. 

'80.— Wing, formerly connected with tha Lewis- 
ton Journal, is to assume the business management 
of The Live Stoclr Monihly, a now magazine to be 
published in Portland. 

'80. — Whitmore is studying law in Gardiner. Me. 

'81.— Greene is at home in Brunswick. 

'81. — E. H. Chamberlain is studying at the Ec- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



139 



lectic Medical Institute, 228 Court Street, Cincln- 
iiatl, Oliio. 

'81. — McGillicuddy has been appointed Trial 
Justice at Lewiston, by Gov. Plaisted. 

'82.— Irving Stearns was married Nov. 21 to Miss 
Minnie A. Littlehale of North Newry. He com- 
mences the winter term at the Bluehill Academy in 
about two weeks. 

'82. — Plimpton is to study medicine in Gardiner. 

'82.— W. W. Curtis is teaching the High School 
at Gorham, Me. 

'82. — Crosby is reading law at Dexter, in the 
office of his father, Hon. Josiah Crosby of '35. 

'82. — Stinchfleld, after a long and severe illness, 
died at Patten, Me., where he had been teaching 
school. 

'82. — Blondel has relinquished his temporary 
position as teacher of the Augusta Grammar School. 

'82. — Jordan is in business with his father at 
Brunswick. 

'83. — Perkins is teaching school at Phips- 
burg, Me. 

'83. — Lennan is teaching school at Woolwich, 
Me. 

'83. — Pettingin is detained at home on account 
of the illness of his brother. 

'84.— Sayward is teaching school at Wells, Me. 

'85. — McDonald is teaching school at Ells- 
worth, Me. 

Of the Portland Law Students' Club, A. C. 
Cobb, '81, is President, J. W. Manson, '81, is Secre- 
tary and A. C. Cobb and Wheelwright, '81, are 
members of the Executive Committee. 



CLIPPINGS. 



" What kind of boys go to heaven 
' Dead ones." — Nassau Lit. 



Johnny — 



They say when a pretty Irish girl is stolen away 
it is supposed that some boycotter. — Ex. 

Prof. — "Mr. P., do you know what you are try- 
ing to prove? Mr. F.— "N-no, sir, but I think I 
can get it." — Ex. 

" The pen indeed is mighty, but the men 
Who wield the shining shears with skill and taste, 
And then so carefully apply the paste. 
Are cognizant of things beyond the ken 
Of those who only wield the pungent pen." 

—Ex. 

Eggs 600 years old have been found in a town 
in France. The mother of those eggs has just 
been sold for a spring chicken. — Dartmouth. 



The first letter sent by a gashing Freshman 
home : " Pater, cani ha veso memore stamps sent- 
to me? Ego spentthe last cent. Tuus studious 
heres, Johannes." — Ex. 

A little boy quietly watched a bee crawling on 
his hand, till he stopped and stung him, when he 
sobbed: "I didn't mind its walking about, but 
when it sat down it hurt awful." — Ex. 

Prof, (explaining workings of gas meter) — " Some 
day you will be at a party, and the lights may go 
out ; you will be the ones expected to know what 
to do." Class comes down, mid sounds of oscula- 
tion.— £'x. 

Stuttering Prof, (at the board)—" If a plana cut 
the figure at an angle of 90 degrees the section will 
be a-ur — ur — be a-ur — " Sleepy Junior — "Nobeer, 
thank you, but I'll have a little plain soda, if you 
please. " — Ex. 

Only as a brother: "My teeth are full of 
sand," said the fairest bather in the surf. " All 
right, hand them out," said an admirer, "and I'll 
rinse them ofl'for you." And now she regards him 
only as a brother. — Index. 

Apropos of the falling leaves : 

" Her lips were like the leaves," he said, 

" By autumn's crimson tinted." 
' ' Some people autumn leaves preserve 
By pressing them," she hinted. 

—Ex. 

" It is not the whichness of the where, nor of 
the when, nor even of the which, but of the what 
that constrains the philosophical do, but is-sing the 
is-ness of the is is a matter of no less difflculty than 
the whatness of the what. — Extract from Concord 
School of Philosophy. 

"When he asked her but " yes " to his question to say,— 

She was a maiden quite winsome and gay ; 
All the four years in the light of his love 
She had fluttered her feathers, the dear little dove, — 

She had answered his glances and never said nay. 

But in this last hour of his very last day, 

When he asked her but " yes " to his question to say, 

She said, looking up in his eyes just above, 
" Why, no ; I could never, oh, never, say that," 
And firmly, but tenderly, passed him his hat. 

—Ex. 

At the Bordertown Female College, the other 
day, a rap was heard at one of the doors, upon 
opening which a seedy looking tramp was brought 
to view. "Is this the college!" "Yes, what 
would you like ? " " Have the students any old 
pants they would like to dispose of?" The inter- 



140 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



view was abruptly terminated by a speedy closing 
of the door. Fact.— JS./-. 

An eloquent Junior in tlie course of an oration 
on George Stephenson, said that " if it had not 
been for George the locomotive would have stran- 
gled in its cradle." — Ex. 

"Lemmy, you're a pig I" said a father to his 
son, who was five years old. " Now, Lemmy, do 
you know what a pig is?" "Yes. sir, — a pig is a 
hog's little boy." — Ex. 

Prof, in Greek Recitation — " Joy has its ebb and 
liow, and nature its sere and yellow leaf as well as 
its vernal bloom." Peek a boo, love, but the spring 
will soon heh&ce.—Princetoniun. 

Prof, of Latin— "Why did the Romans put 
wreaths of celery about their heads ? " Sopho- 
more — " To accelerate their ideas." Professor re- 
marks that it might be advisable to revive the 
custom. 

Base-ball is played by eighteen persons wearing 
shirts and drawers. They scatter around a field 
to try to catch a cannon ball covered with rawhide. 
The game is to get people to pay to come inside the 
fence.— £.r. 

Professor— "Among these may be mentioned the 
wood, the stone, and the iron age." Student (of an 
anxious turn of mind) — " What is our age ?" Pro- 
fessor — "To judge by the cla.ss, one would say the 
age of brass I " — Ex. 

Opera — Billee Taylor ; 

Last week, Friday night. 
She, full dress with lilies, 

Opera cloak of white. 

Only met on Tuesday, 

Impudence ungraced, 
Tries to put, however, 

Aim around lier waist. 

Heavens ! how she shuddered, 

Shivered like a saint. 
Whiter than her lilies. 

Seemed to want to faint. 

He began to stammer, 

Not a word would come ; 
She, " Sir, Oil, how dare you ? 

Wait till I'liniiug lidiiif." 

— Princetonlan. 

Miss Society (idly turning her music) — "Do j 
you know 'When llic Leaves begin to Fall'?" ' 
Fresh, (thoughtfully )— " Why yes, generally along | 
in the first two weeks of Octobei-. It depends [ 
somewhat on the weather." — Ex. \ 



Fashion notes of Adelpliian : Trowsers are lean — 
that's too thin. " Crushed brick-bat " is quite the 
popular shade for suits. Some dresses have a sort 
of rear extension springing from between the 
shoulders, producing a sort of a "star-spangled 
banner, along-may-it-wave eflect " when the wearer 
is in motion. — E.c. 

A MODEKN PAEIS. 
Down the orchard's fruit-arched laue, 

Past its hedge-rows, autumn-gloried. 
Strolled a youth with maidens three, 

Fair as nymphs in fables storied . 

Long they talked on classic themes, 
Till the youth to show his learning, 

Told how Paris gave the prize, 
Venus favoring, Juno spuming. 

Tired at length of sober talk, 

With a huigh one saucy maiden * 

Sprung and caught a ruddy apple, 

From the branch above o'er-ladeu. 

" History repeats itself," 

Cried the maid, with smile the rarest, . 
"Take, Sir Paris, take the prize, 

Aud award it to the fairest." 

Slow he took it from her hand. 
Waiting till the laughter ceases, 

Drew his knife — sly dog ! — and then 
Cut tlie apple in three pieces. 

—Chajff''.$ latest. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



The first thing that catches our eye, this week, 
is The Eightij-Fiie, a class paper published by the 
Sophomores at the University of California. Its 
editorials open in a very Sophomoric manner, by 
saying that the University has degenerated in the 
last five years. It complains of a lack of life 
among the students, and groans because hazing 
and " beer-busts" are made punishable by expul- 
sion, and mourns over the "digs of the present 
classes.'' The best advice we can give is : " Drink 
your beer quietly, and shut up. What if some of 
the students do study hard, it doesn't do any par- 
ticular harm to the university in the eyes of 
tlioughtful outsiders, who are thinking of sending 
their sons to college. You arc still }"oung, my boy, 
and as you grow older will doubtless grow wiser." 
We noticed that some of our exchanges doubted 
the good of establishing class papers, seeing that 
they are at the best but shortlived and liable to take 
patronage from the regular established publications 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



141 



of the college. We concur in this opinion. A col- 
lege paper needs all the patronage it can get, and 
as far as we have heard, many of the editors do 
not get rich from the proceeds. 

The Dartmouth says : 

" We have received the first numher of the Vas- 
sar MisceJkmy, and consider it among the best of 
our exchanges. Both the editorials and the literary 
work are e.'iceptionally good, and the college notes 
and personals are well sustained." 

Ah ! Dear Dartmouth, sort 'o getting into the 
good graces of the girls, are you ? You are a sly 
dog, and no mistake ! Speak a good word for us 
if you go to-visit the charming editresses. We are 
" way down in Maine," you know, and can't get 
avray so easily. And, by the way, we enjoyed 
reading the Dartmouth extremely, this week, es- 
pecially the article, "Gossipy Reminiscences" of 
the time when Webster delivered his speech in the 
celebrated . case of Dartmouth's struggle with the 
State. How we sympathize with you in the follow- 
ing chppiug : 

'• One of the oddest features of college life and 
college morals is the apotheosis of cheek. Among 
a certain class of students this distinctively asinine 
quality is regarded as the chiefest of virtues, and 
one that will atone for a multitude of sins. The 
possessor of this attribute is looked upon with 
envy, as one almost more than mortal. And the 
amount of brass with which some of these heroes 
are endowed is really preternatural. The cheeky 
man is found in all sorts of guises, all kinds of 
places, and in all kinds of company. He appears 
in the recitation room, on the campus, on the 
street, and even (more's the pity) in your sanctum 
sanctorum. He chaffs and worries the instructor at 
every recitation, and bores him with idiotic com- 
ments afterwards. He is the self-appointed critic 
of all that you think, say or do, and is far from 
bashful about letting you know all about it. He 
occasionally has a sort of low-water-mark respecta- 
bility, that only serves, however, to widen his field 
of uselessne.ss and heighten the effect of his impu- 
dence." 

Student Life from Washington University, St. 
Louis, defends the Western college papers in their 
literary departments, which are filled with ex- 
tremely heavy articles, something after the char- 
acter of a review. But we must beg leave to 
disagree with you, for who is willing or cares to 
take boys' ideas for authority, when by a judicious 
use of the library you can go to the masters'? Other 
Western papers are full of this class of literature. 
One contains " Our Duty to the Indians," and " The 
Political Mission of Puritanism," and the "Poemou 
Longfellow," as its sole literary articles. Heaven 
deliver us from reading them. 



|ii|© yfiitii| ! J®i? Jfii©^ 



THE 



lOURNAL iFFICE 



LEWISTON, MAINE, 

Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment, 
furnished with tlie best axipliances of Presses, Type, and 
Workmansliip, especially solicit orders for Fine Printing 
of all kinds, 



a 



TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS, 

AND 

Every Variety of Printing in Use. 

SOMETHING NEW IN CIGARETTES. 

OUR LITTLE BEAUTIES 

PRESSED CIGARETTES. 

Our Pressed Cigarettes smoke longer and cooler than round 
made Cigarettes. 

The Tobacco being pressed and Interlocked, preyents parti- 
cles from entering the mouth, and causes perfect combustion. 

There is no taste of the pajper, as under pressure it becomes 
impregnated with the tobacco. 

OUR LITTLE BEAUTIES are made from the highest grade 
of A'irginia sun-cured leaf, blended with Turkish tobacco of our 
own importation, and smoke mild, with a most agi'eeable aroma 
and taste. We guakantee tiiem poke and free from aeti- 

FIOIAL FLAVOKING OR DRUGS. 

OUR LITTLE BEAUTIES are jnade with the now celebrated 
Papier Ambre, the same as used on our Opera Puffs Cigarettes, 

AND WILL NOT STICK TOTHE LIPS. 

OUR LITTLE BEAUTIES are put up in packages of ten,— so 
compact that they will not break when toted iu the pocket. 
ALLEM" & G-IWTEB, Manufacturers, 

KICHMOBTD, VIRGINIA. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DREITA 

FINE STATIONERY and ENGRAVING 
HOUSE. 

Handsomely Engraved Invitations fur 

}^^ Colleges, Weddings, Receptions, &c. 

Fraternity Stationery always on hand. 

Our unequaled facilities and long practical experience, enable 
us to produce the newest styles and most artistic effects, while 
our reputation is a guarantee of the qualitj' of our productions. 

II2I Cliestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



emUTIQM TO SMOKEBS. 

Benrare of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 




New Cigarette, 

The VETERAnT C//^^^^-^-^^ 



TRY IT. 
Fine, Mild i Sweet. 




.^^CIGSRETTES. 



These Goods are sold under an 

Absolute Guarantee 

Tliat they are the Finest and PUREST 

goods upon the market; 
They ARE FREE from DRUGS and 

CHEMICALS of any kind; 
They consist of the Finest Tobacco and 

Purest Rice-Paper made. 

OUR SALES EXCEED the products 

of ALL leading manufactories combined. 

None Genuine without the trade-mark 
of the BULL. Take no other. 

W.T.BLACKIELL&CO. 

Sole Manufacturers. Durham, N. C. 



Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO.. N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALEKS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 

432 Washington St., Boston, 

Invite altenUon to tlio largest ami tincst slock iu the city, of 

DIAMONDS, RARE GEMS, 

KEPIiESENTATIVES OF TIIK 

Gorham Manufacturing Company, in Boston. 
E.xhibit a large ami coniiilcte collection of the 

SOLID SILVER AND ELECTRO-PLATED WARES 

ruoDUCED BY THIS co.^^■A^'V. 

The ornamentations now used and the efl'ects pi'oduced, are 
something entirely novel in the craft of the Silversmith, and will 
interest every one by their combination of artistic and useful 
qualities. 

Especial Attention given to Designing Class-Day 
and College Invitations of Every Description. 



QPEEM & C 



*» 



924 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

.,. — ., Microscopes, 

V V'-\ Telescopes, 
^^ J Field Glasses, 
Opera Glasses, 
Drawing Instruments, 
Surveying Instruments, 
Thermometers, 

Barometers, 
Magic Lanterns, 
Apparatus for 

Projection, 
Philosophical and 
Chemical Apparatus. 

(JAT.\I.<h;i l> V- lOI IDWs s| NT (IN Ari'LICATlON: 
Part 1 — M:illiciii,'lll illnllMiiunl II pages, r.irl 3— Optical 
Instruiiieiils, ISO puiM 1 111 1--\1 i^ic Lanterns, 120 pages. 
I'art'l— riiilosoplili il Insliuincnts, lOU jiajjes. I'art f)— Slotoor- 
ological Apparatus, 1-0 pages 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



FiME gmiMTM 



MADE FROM MEASURE, 



Jl FllFICT FIT ©imillTElD. 



Also a Full Assortment of 



GENTS' FURNISHINGS 



niBBiiiii # 






Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 

Orders by Mail Promptly A ttended To. 

NEW DBBG STOIE. 



ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

DllQS, MlDICIliS, 

Fancy aiij Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Toliacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

(tpg'Pi-escriptions Carefully Compounded. 

FINEST Steel Portrait ever engraved is HoUyer's 

The ONLY large one in line and stipiile. Endorsed by inti- 
mate personal friends, JI. C-'s, U. S. Senators, S. C. Judges, Mem- 
bers of Cabinet, Governors, as " The Be.st Likeness," and a 
"Perfect Work of Art." Sells quick. Gives perfect satis- 
faction. Extra terms to good agents 

THE HENRY BILL PUBLISHING CO.,Nonvich, Ct. 



HENRY K. GRIFFII^^, 

58 Temple Place, BOSTON, 

Ispav&pj Stationer, m.i frintif. 

Wedding Invitations, Business Cards, &c. 
COLLEGE INVITATIONS A SPECIALTY. 

Beautitul Engraved Visiting Cards. 

Plate and Pack, $150 ; former price, $3.00. 

GRIFFIN'S WEDDING CARD DEPOT, 

58 Temple Place, BOSTON". 



The Palace CIoMm Store of 




ALL THE LEADING NOVELTIES IN 

TOU'MQ MIM'S €L@THIM© 

AND NOBBY FURNISHING GOODS. 

STRICTLY ONE PRICE. 

lyBoys' and Children's Department entirely separate. 

BLUE STORE, 

Jl.E"WriSXON, IttAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



^i^^<^^^ MM^ 



m Mm 



I ^,: ^?- ^ I 

Fine Watches, Jewelry, Silver Ware, &Ci, 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QFALiTt, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 

PORTLAND, - _ _ _ MAINE. 

A. CARTER. J. W. D. CAKTER. 

SPRING AND SUMMER, 1882. 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosieiy, Linen Shirts, Collars, 

iiffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Reaclj--Made 
Nothing in complete suits or single garments. White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold ver}' cheap for cash. 

On and after Oct. 1.5tl], 1882, 

Passenger Trains leave Brunswick 

For Bath. 8.10, 11.2.5 a.m., 2.45, 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 
night (Sunday mornings only). 
Rockland, 8.10 a.m., 2.45 P.M. 
Portland. 7.2.5, 11.30 a.m., 4.30 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Bo.ston, 7.25, 11.30 A.M., 12.33 night. 
Levviston. 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.33 P.M.. 12.40 niglit. 
Farmington, 8.10 a.m. (Mixed), 2.45 p.m. 
Augusta, 8.10 A.M., 2.45, 6.35 p.m., 12.45 night. 
Skowhegan, Belfast, Dexter, and Bangor, 2.45 p.m., and 

12.45 night. 
Waterville, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 p.m. (Saturdays only), 
12.45 night. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 1882. 



Main St., under Town Clock. 

[^"Famiiies, Parties, and Clul)s supiiliod. 



WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street, - - - Poiilnnd Me. 

J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 



MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 

28 Free Street, Portland. Me. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terjis, $1.50 a Year ill Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROIVIPTLY EXECUTED. 



&%t 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Ooal ~Z"£ird. in Topslxaam, 



WHT5U15 NONE HUT 



T&e Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is nelivcrcd well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Doak-r in all Uiiuls nf 

^i-osb- a.x3.d Salt M:ea.'ts, 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, imcter L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

«[»-Special Kates to Student Clubs.-Sl 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fiae Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating^ Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Bj:,ock, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

I>OTfrX.A.NTi, JVLA.INE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

CHOICE GROCErTeS, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Students. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIIVIIVIER, Director, 

750 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



A.. O. I^EED, 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brnns'wick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 

ALL KINDS OF 




For Schools and Colleges, 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 




THE FAVORITE NOS.S03-404-3S2-l7O-^5l-WITH 
HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




E. SMITH, Variety Store. Bottom Prices to Students. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



]@« (a« ssmrs0jf. 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 

Office at Central Telephone Office, Brunswick. 
ja" All Orders left at C. E. Townsend's Store 
be promptly attended to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And De:iler in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical lustruments, and I 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Excliange Street, Portland. 



will 



J. H. PETERSON & SON, 

DEALERS IN 

Boots and Suoes, Toliacco and Cigars, 

Main Street, ---.--- Brunswick, Me. 

FIIA.I«^K E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment ol Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of iViain and Mason Streets. 



F I ir^l S X - C L A. S S 



flaiQSs OigOiiSs mi Md^imm^ 



AT LOW PUICIDS. LAROE RENTING STOCK. 




COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle ridinc ia unsurpassed as a 
niGl.liod of traveling:, vvliether for speed, 
si)ort, or renewal of liealth. The prac- 
ticability of tlie niacliine lias been 
tbiinuiylily tested, and satisfactorily 
proved, beyond queslion. 'Pliousands 
aii^ in daily nsr, and the ninnbcr is 
r,i|iid!y iiu'riMsinj;'. 'I'lu' cxei-i'isi' is 
ri'cciinnu'iidc'dbv I he medical ]inil'i's.sion 
as nic.st beni'lie'iid to health, brin^'ing 
inio exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

.Senil lie. stamp for .'iOpape Illustrated 
CalalcK-ne eontafnln;,' prieu lists and full 
lurnrn.aliou. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 WasWnRlon St„ BOSTON, MASS, 



ESTABLISHED 1644. 

W. L. WILSON & CO., 

AVijulesale and Uetail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by m;iU will receive prompt attention. Seud for price list. 

142 & 1^4 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 



, STOCKMAN. ; 



|§^i011 



elical flepaptmeQt 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commeni-e February 8th, 18S3, 
and continue SIXTEEN AVEEKS. 

FACULTY.— JosuuA L. Chamberlain, LL.D., President 5 Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Patholotry and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of "Women and Children ; Frederic H. Oerrtsh, M.D., 
Anatomy 5 Charles W. Goddard, A.M., MedicalJurisprudence j Henry 
Carmtchael, Ph.D., Chemistry -, Burt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen 11. "Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Cliuical Surgery j Charles O. 
Hunt, M. D., Materia M^dica and Therapeutics ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librari.v.i ; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

V/ATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



B^°W:itclies, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warrnnted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COE. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8j a?id jS/ Congress Si., and 235 Middle Si., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

.8®- Send for Pricb List. 



C. L. RICHARDSON, 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

|®-Timisiciit OrikTs lur Milk or Cream lllloil liy piviiii; suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 



Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS, ST-.A.TI0NE:RY. FtOOIME 
PAPBZR. PE:RI0DXCA.I.S. <ScC. 



A. \V.. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, i Fancy Goods. 

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BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DECEMBER 13, 1882. 



Vol. XII. 



No. 11. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

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aianufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

57£r Lowest Prices in the State, 



755 & 185 Middle Street, 



Portland, Me. 



VISITORS TO PORTLAND, 
Independent of any intention of pur- 
chasing goods in our line, are invited to 
inspect the Model Clothing and Fur- 
nishing Store of Allen & Co., 470 Con- 
gress St., opp. Preble House, 

LANCASTER BUILDING. 



SPECIAL AQEISTT. 

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Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

EHGEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^neid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar ; Xenophou's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
AsrciENT Geogeapht. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and IIL of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 
■ In such cases the Princiiial may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of Ills graduating 
class who wi.sh to enter the next Freshman class 
at Uowdoni, vpith a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them viill bo fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be ro(iuested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special exaininalioii held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular linal examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQUIEED— FOUE HOUES A 'WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

electives — FOtTR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $2'i. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, SI 10. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further Information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DECEMBER 13, 1882. 



No. 11. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
Arthur J. Russell, '83, Managing Editor ^ro tem. 
Herbert P. Kendall, '83, Business Editor. 
Herbert E. Cole, '83. Oliver W. Means, '84. 

Howard R. Goodwin, '83. Llewellyn Barton, '84. 
Charles H. Stetson, '83. Charles B. Sayward, '84. 
K. Brooks K. Pettingill, '83. 

Terms — $2.00 a year in adyance ; sinj^le copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, LeTviston, Me. 

CON'TENTS. 
Tol. XII., ISo. 11.— Deo. 13, 1882. 

Editorial Notes 143 

Literary : 

Detection of Forgery by Means of the Microscope, 145 

The Tale of the Two Princes 147 

A Day at the Meadows 148 

The Ghost of North Maine 149 

College Items 1 50 

Personal 153 

Clippings 154 

Editors' Table 154 



EDITORIAL. NOTES. 

Dear readers, Christmas is coming ! Per- 
haps you hadn't thought of it but among its 
other blessings it gives "ye wearie editor" a 
subject for an editoriah This time we do not 
have to sit down and bite the end of our 
quill waiting for an inspiration, but we 
launch out boldly with the spirit of Christ- 
mas present to back us. We wish we 



could be " a mouse in the wall " and look in 
on you all this Christmas vacation. Ah ! 
the stories, games, charades, and who can tell 
what not ! We can see them in our mind's 
eye ! Later the Freshman hangs his stocking 
by tiie side of the chimney with the other 
children, the Sophomore is telling an old 
crony how they fixed a cheeky Freshman at 
college, the Junior is found to have carried 
off the prettiest girl of the party to a shel- 
tered sofa, and the Senior looking down from 
his dignity upon such things calmly meditates. 
Tliere are various ways of passing a merry 
Christmas, and you all doubtless have your 
own methods and will follow them out in 
spite of the Okient's advice. But if you 
wish our idea of what will constitute a 
happy Christmas, we should say read Dickens' 
"Christmas Carol in Prose " and pay up your 
subscription to the Orient. 



We have lately had the opportunity of 
examining the old files of the Orient in the 
college library and find them very interesting 
reading. In the first number of April 3, 
1871, there is an appeal for a boat-house, and 
an article strongly opposed to the marking 
system. At present we rejoice over the boat- 
house, but still groan under the marking 
system. This number also notes that in 
place of Monday morning recitations the 
Faculty had substituted lectures, and claims 
that it had almost entirely abolished studying 
Sundays, and had entirely prevented " plug- 
ging in church." We are sorry the custom 
of Monday morning lectures has gone into 
disuse at the present day, for Sunday is 
hardly taken as a day of rest now. There 



144 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



is little complaint among the Seniors who do 
happen to have a lecture in the morning and 
an hour before the next recitation. But we 
were recently paralyzed to find that one of 
the Juniors was accustomed to get up Mon- 
day morning at five o'clock and study till 
breakfast. It is our opinion, we may be mis- 
taken, that the majority of Juniors do not do 
this, and to study Saturday afternoon is, we 
know by experience, extremely hard work. 
We doubt if many of them do it. The 
alternative is a " dead " or " Sunday plug- 
ging." " You pays your money and you 
takes your choice." Probably the honors are 
about equally divided between the two 
courses. We also wish to quote one blood- 
curdling local from this first issue before we 
close, and it is this: "Tliisweek the hour for 
morning praj^ers has again readied its mini- 
mum — six o'clock. O, ye who think that 
students lead an easy life, imagine them com- 
pelled, to ' turn out' every morning at half- 
past five." In comparison with the present, 
all we can say is, " Thank Heaven." 



while the Junior or Sophomore, who has the 
key to the room, goes down town to get his 
mail. The Orient has decided not to take 
any exercise this winter. 



We wish to inform the " alumni and 
friends of the college" that the new gynnia- 
sium was not built this fall nor was the 
ground broken for it. Ti>e college having 
astonished itself by completing Memorial 
Hall will now rest on its laurels for the next 
ten years. Meanwhile we hear that the 
'former modern language room will be fitted 
for a temporary gymnasium. This means 
that the windows will be nailed down and an 
old husk bed thrown into the room for those 
who feel so disposed to turn somersaults on. 
Any one who attempts to get on the iiorizon- 
tal bar in that room will break his neck or 
run his head up through the ceiling, while any 
one who swings clubs will be guilty of man- 
slaughtei'. It also means that when the hour 
for exercise conies, four small Freshmen with 
eight big clubs will shiver around the door 



While other college papers are complain- 
ing of the cheeky man and the cigarette idiot, 
we must lift up our voice against that relic of 
barbarism — the cynic. As a thoroughly un- 
comfortable sort of person to get along with, 
we commend the cynic to you. In morning 
prayers he stands out in the aisle with a 
wooden toothpick in his month, gazing aim- 
lessly at a painting on the wall and readj' to 
make a dive for the door when the prayer 
shows symptoms of coming to a close. In 
church he attempts to make Siirca.-^tic re- 
marks to liis neighbor in a voice that can be 
heard within a radius of a rod. After the 
sermon begins lie props himself up in a cor- 
ner and tries to convey the impression tliat 
he is sleepy. Nothing about the college 
pleases him, but it is his opinion that the 
whole concern is going to tiie devil post 
haste. If ihe cap fits «/om, my friend, put it 
on and give us a rest. 



It has been suggested to us a number of 
times during our course that some way 
might be taken to draw Faculty and students 
nearer together. There is no question that 
the students do not feel free with the Fac- 
ulty. Many are deterred from calling at 
their Iiouses by the fact tliat if it is found 
out it is thought that they are " laying 
for rank." In former times, we see b}' old 
Okients, the Faculty used to give receptions 
to a class, after which of course tliose attend- 
ing felt free to call. Sucii a course also, 
when one has enjoyed the iiospitality of a 
professor, takes away that feeling that some 
iiave, tliat a professor in a class-room is the 
natural enemy and prey of tlie student, and 
would, without doubt, be a great step 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



145 



towards attaining that nnicli-desired reform — 
better order in some of the class-rooms. 



There seems to be a reaction at present 
in the college in favor of rooming alone, so 
much so in fact that all the desirable rooms are 
taken. We would not give up our privilege of 
rooming alone for a good deal. To be sure 
there are some advantages in having a room 
mate, you always have company to whom you 
can talki and one person often acts as a restraint 
upon anothei'. Yet if you loom alone you 
can have companj' if you want it by going 
into a neigl'iboring room, or gathering a little 
crowd in your own, or you can have the 
company of books " who give you their con- 
fidences and do not askfor any in return." 
But if two persons occupy a room ycm are 
obliged to say " Come in " to att.knocks, for 
possibly the knocker may be your room 
mate's visitor. If you are reading or study- 
ing, nine cases out of ten youi- chum comes 
in, shuts the door with a slam, and makes 
various remarks complimentary or other- 
wise, as the case maj^ be, about his studies. 
You feel compelled to answer and so lose the 
run of what you are reading, and, if you are 
mortal, probably your temper. If you wish 
to write, you know how impossible it is to do 
that with another person in the room picking 
up and throwing down books, and occasion- 
ally throwing in remarks. For our part give 
us a room by ourselves where we can iiave 
company if we want it and if we don't we 
can shut ourselves up like a clam in his shell 
and enjoy ourselves as the festive clam is sup- 
posed to do at high water. 



During the Thanksgiving recess. Jack 
Frost, thinking probably that he had held off 
too long already, came down on the campus 
in good style. The season of rubber boots 
and comforters has come. The snow-plow 
man drives his beast hitched to a board over 



the campus, under the impression that he is 
cleaning out the patlis, and in the early 
morning can be seen the tracks of the 
man who lost the path in the darkness 
of the night before and wandered off aim- 
lessly in the general direction of the halls 
till he brought up in the cross path. It is the 
time when the kindling wood which the 
authorities caused to be nailed down in the 
attic is put into general use. When the 
singing school starts up and the medic re- 
turns, the place will begin to take on a famil- 
iar look. 



The number of students Avho are to go 
out teaching seems greater than usual this 
year. They all express great regret at hav- 
ing to be out, but lack of funds renders it a 
necessit}'. There has been some discussion 
as to whether the college should not adopt 
a system used in certain inferior colleges, to- 
ward those who are obliged to be out, viz., 
(hat of not requiring of them a part of the 
regular work gone over by the class. We 
should be sorry to see such a s\'stem adopted, 
for it would lower the standard of the col- 
lege and increase the number of those who 
are away from its instruction. We think, 
from observation, that a student loses the 
most by being out during either the Junioror 
Senior year, especially the former. 



THE DETECTION OF FORGERY BY 
MEANS OF THE MICROSCOPE. 

For many years the methods of examin- 
ing imitative writing have beein the object of 
much interest and investigation. Long years 
of the most careful study and experience 
have brought but very unsatisfactory results, 
and the establishment of but few general 
principles. Experts learned, in the first 
place, that no person wrote a signature twice 
of the same length, and that a positive proof 



146 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



of the forgerj' of a name was obtained, if it 
was found to measure in length precisely the 
same as a genuine signature. 

Again, they gradually learned the distin- 
guishing characteristics of every handwriting, 
such as the dotting of Cs, the crossing of fs, 
peculiar flourishes, and the so-called rhythm 
of form. Besides these, experience taught 
that two signatures of the same person rarely, 
if ever, correspond in the minute details of 
flourish, shape and size of each letter, etc. 

But within the past few years the 
use of the microscope has thrown a flood 
of light on former investigation, till it has 
become next to impossible for a signature 
to be forged without detection. 

The first and simplest revelation made by 
a microscope in the examination of a suspic- 
ious signature is the jagged uneven edges of 
the lines as compared with the smooth, clean- 
cut edges in a genuine article. This is, of 
course, for the most part, the result of the 
attempts of a novice or of an ovei'-excited 
and fearful forger. Still a more careful 
examination gives often similar results in the 
case of experts as they stop in an instant here 
and there to glance at the copy and then go 
on. 

A clumsy, but very frequent method of 
forgery is by first imitating in pencil, and 
then retracing in ink. A microscopic exam- 
ination of a signature thus forged reveals two 
proofs of its imitation. First, in erasing the 
pencil marks, the fibres of the paper are dis- 
turbed. This is distinctly seen with a strong 
power under tlie microscope. Again, though 
the graphite be erased witli tlie greatest care, 
portions of it still adhere to the paper, and 
though invisible to the eye, even with the 
aid of a strong lense, are to be seen with the 
microscope. It is further said that the me- 
chanical effect of the point of a pencil upon 
the fibres of the paper can be detected, but 
generally, ordinarily thick ink would cover 
this. 



Another interesting feature of this in- 
vestigation is the fact that the pen leaves 
upon the paper a layer of ink thick enough 
to appear under the microscope like a solid 
lying on the paper and in consequence, when 
two lines are crossed, the microscope reveals 
two solids, one lying upon the other and dis- 
tinctly shows which line was last made. The 
advantage of tliis discovery is great in con- 
nection with the loop letters below the line 
which so often run into the loop letters above 
the line below. Hence if two signatures on 
two successive lines intercross, it can be easily 
ascertained which was written first. Most 
business men always use paper of some fa- 
vorite make, hence another important branch 
of the question is the study of the different 
sorts of papers, and the fibre of which they 
are composed. The microscope tells us 
whether the fibre is linen, eotten, straw, or 
wood, and the directions in which these fibres 
run. In paper made by some of the more 
modern machines, the most of the fibres run 
in but one way. 

A short time ago, in Troy, N. Y., a signa- 
ture was positively proven to be a forgery by 
the discovery, by means of the microscope, 
that the paper used was introduced at a date 
much later than the date on the document. 
This is only one of the many illustrations of 
the importance of the study of paper. In 
the same way, and for the same reason, is the 
examination of inks another important part 
of the study. 

Ordinary black ink is a tannate of iron. 
The iron after a long time, oxidizes, and 
forms a compound much lighter than the 
original ink. Although we cannot from this 
tell the exact age of the writing, it gives us 
a clue to the relative ages of two lines made 
at different times witii similar ink. 

Another ink much in use is made of 
chromate of potash and logwood. Suppose 
tiien a forger adds a mark or two to a genu- 
ine document, whether he used the same ink 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



147 



or a different one, we could in many cases 
ascertain, in the former case, by the different 
stages of oxidation, in the latter, by the dif- 
ferent appearances. 

So far the experiments noted have been 
of a comparatively coarse nature. We now 
come to the last and most subtle test, the test of 
the rhythm of progress, and the rhythm of pres- 
sure. The rhythm of progress is caused by 
the actions of the small muscles in regulating 
the amount of pressure upon the pen and is 
the involuntary and unconscious act of every 
one. The number of these pressures is be- 
tween two and three hundred to an inch, 
and in a naturally written signature are per- 
fectly regular and symmetrical. Now no mat- 
ter how cleverly a signature be imitated, it 
is impossible to overcome this involuntary 
action of the muscles in making the regular, 
rhythmical pressure with the pen. And, as 
this is different with every person, the micro- 
scopical examination of the genuine and 
forged signatures will reveal the difference. 
These differences would, of course, be visible 
only to the most skilful and experienced 
microscopist. 



THE TALE OF THE TWO PRINCES. 

During the reign of Joshua, Sultan of Bo 
Doin, there were two youths present at his 
court, who were receiving instruction in the 
various arts that would fit them for lives of 
usefulness. Both were princes and weie 
highly loved and esteemed by the people in 
the far-off lands in which they dwelt. One 
was tall, with a face like the morning, the 
other, the younger, was of middle height, 
and his beauty surpassed description. These 
two princes, thrown together by accident, 
took a strong liking for each other, and were 
to be seen constantly together, both in the 
presence of Joshua, the Sultan, and on the 
highways of the territory of Bo Doin. 

Thus it happened that they were at an 



evening service in the mosque, which stood 
upon the hill, the one especially beloved by 
the Sultan. The younger prince, wearied 
by the length of the services, looked around 
among the worshipers to see what members 
of the Court of the Sultan were present. 
His glance was arrested by the devout mien 
of two maidens. He paused a moment to look 
at them and was enchanted by their wonder- 
ful beauty. One was dark with a wealth of 
raven hair, and eyes like sloes, the other was 
comety, and her face beamed with an ineffa- 
ble goodness. 

The younger prince, unable to restrain 
himself, said to his companion, " Did those 
maidens yonder, whose beauty surpasseth all 
in the realms of Bo Doin, come hither un- 
attended ? " He replied, " I see neither father, 
nor brother, nor cousin attending them ; they 
came alone." Thereupon the younger said, 
" Would that I were acquainted with them, 
in order that I might protect them on their 
homeward way " (for the roads of the region 
were unpleasant to unpi'otected maidens). 
Then the elder prince spake, " Oh, my 
brother, I am acquainted with these maidens, 
and will give you this proof of my friendship. 
At the doorway of the mosque, after the 
priest has closed the service, I will place the 
maiden whose face beams with ineffable good- 
ness, under your protection, while I will see 
that the maiden whose eyes are like sloes 
reaches her domicile in safety." 

Finally the priest brought the service to 
a close, and the two princes stationed them- 
selves at the doorway of the mosque. When 
the two maidens of surpassing beauty ap- 
peared, the elder prince spoke a word in the 
ear of her whose countenance beamed with 
goodness, and led her to his friend, who re- 
ceived her smiles with downcast eyes and 
quaking knees. Then the elder prince looked 
around for the other maiden ; but alas ! she 
was nowhere to be seen. Another prince 
who was also present at the Court of Joshua, 



148 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



and who had no respect for his superiors, had 
spirited her away in the davl^ness of the 
night. Then the prince, with a face like 
the morning no longer, cursed loud and deep 
at tlie profligate prince whi) had so baselj' 
cheated him ; but as the rauzzein clianted 
the hour, he repented his quickness and said 
softly to himself, " ' Virtue is its own re- 
ward,' I have made my friend happy, and 
that should suffice." Then buttoning his 
mantle close under liis chin, he disappeared 
in the darkness. K. K. 



A DAY AT NEW MEADOWS. 

For several weeks the Seniors in the Zool- 
ogy division had been anxiously watching the 
weather, and hoping for a suitable day on 
which they might make their contemplated 
trip to New Meadows, for the purpose of se- 
curiug specimens for laboratory work. At last 
one morning our professor announced to us 
that he was ready to go, and, after a hasty 
meal to satisfy the cravings of the inner man 
until our return, we assembled at the depot to 
take the 11.30 train. A more picturesque 
group is seldom seen. In view of the work 
we were to engage in, we all had on the 
worst suits of clothes we could find, while our 
pedal extremities were incased in rubber 
boots of enormous dimensions. Some of the 
party had shovels ; some dip-nets ; some old 
pails and glass jars ; and a few, among wliom 
were two dignified Seniors, who Jmd begged 
the chance of accompanying us, had bottles. 

When the conductor came around for our 
tickets he looked at us sharply, and no doubt 
wished he had a second-class car for such 
rough looking specimens of humanity. 

In due season we arrived at oiir destina- 
tion and were divided, by our jjrofessor, into 
squads, to prosecute the different brancims of 
the work. Three were to take the shovel 
and explore for worms, muscles, etc.; two 
were to collect aninialcuhn willi the (hao--n(!t 



from the bridge ; three were to capture as 
many -'free, swimming animals" as possible 
with the dip-net, while the rest were to col- 
lect what they could find on the rocks and in 
the edge of the water. Each squad com- 
menced its allotted part with alacrity, and 
soon all were engaged in the work. It fell 
to our lot to join the squad that were explor- 
ing for worms, muscles, etc.; and so vigor- 
ously did we work, that a long stretch of 
the shore, to use the words of the funny man 
of the party, looked as if "a drove of wild 
hogs had been dining there." After having 
collected a million (^moi'e or less) different 
species, our fingers began to ache with the 
cold, in consequence of pawing around in 
the half-frozen mud ; so one of our number 
proposed a halt and a reconnoisance of the 
other parties. 

When we first looked around, we thought 
the bridge was on fire, for a dense smoke 
was rising from one of the piers, on the 
sunny side of the bridge ; but a sudden gust 
of wind dispersed the smoke, and showed us 
the recumbent forms of two of our class- 
mates, who were working (J) the drag-net, 
basking in the sun, and each vigorously puff- 
ing a T. D. pipe. The two Seniors had long 
before become disgusted with specimen-hunt- 
ing and were seated on a liigh rock, trying 
to lure the finny tribe to make a dinner of 
the tempting bits of mollusk that covered 
their hooks. The party working the dip-uet 
were nowliere to be seen — probably resting 
from their labors on the warm side of some 
projecting rock. 

Scarcely had we noticed these circum- 
stances when a yell, which seemed to be a 
cross between a locomotive whistle and the 
death-howl of a Sioux Indian, caused us to 
glance anxiously toward a small point of 
land which extended some distance into the 
water, left bare by the retreating tide. 
There we saw a group of our classmates 
clustered around one of their number, who 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



149 



was dancing about like a madman, and shak- 
ing his hands in the air, all the while giving 
vent to demoniac yells. On hastening to the 
spot to ascertain the cause of the tumult, we 
found that Mell, for that was his name, had 
stumbled upon a crustacean of the order Be- 
capoda, or common crab, and in trying to 
pick it up, the animal had fastened upon his 
finger, frightening him nearly out of his wits. 
After his fears were somewhat allayed by 
the assurances of his companions that the 
thing wouldn't hurt him, he managed, to get 
a thick paper around the animal, and put 
him into his pocket for safe-keeping ; but 
even then he didn't seem perfectly " easy 
about the creature, for every time he put his 
hand on his pocket the same scared look 
would come back to his face that was noticed 
while he was yelling so vigorously. 

This episode over, the sinking sun warned 
us that it was time to call together our scat- 
tered forces, and make preparations to return 
home. We met upon the bridge and took 
an account of stock. Those who had charge 
of the drag-net had made a fine haul of Pro- 
tozoa, considering the time they had devoted 
to actual work. Among their specimens 
was discovered a new species of the branch 
Infusoria, order Ciliata, which was named 
after its discoverers, Sweetserinus-Bradlio- 
lus. Our professor had secured several rare 
specimens of Porifera of the order Carneos- 
pongiae ; while specimens of Coelentarata, 
Echinodermata, Vermes, Mollusca, Arthrop- 
oda had been secured in great numbers. 
The two Seniors for their share succeeded in 
capturing a vertebrate of the class Pisces, of 
the order Eleocephali, a rave and valuable 
specimen. Having packed up our treasures 
we betook ourselves to the train, and arrived 
home in time for supper, well-satisfied with 
our trip. w. 



Never applaud iu chapel. None of the actors 
are prepared for an encore. — Princeton Tiger. 



THE GHOST OF NORTH MAINE. 

Long ago, soon after the medical school 
was founded, a j^oung student while perform- 
ing his part of the required dissecting, be- 
came attached to his subject and declared 
that he would alone dissect all its parts. All 
his time was required to do this, and he 
worked day and night ; so closely did he con- 
fine himself that he became contaminated by 
the foul odors and after a short sickness died 
in a friend's room in North Maine. His last 
request was that he should be buried with his 
half-dissected subject near the college, but 
his friend thinking little of it, arranged for 
the removal of his remains to his family in a 
distant town. 

Not long after, the students in North 
Maine were at times startled by tappings, 
footsteps ascending the stairs, mutterings, 
shrieks and groans, accompanied by an occa- 
sional fall of a heavy body, then all would 
be quiet; at other times latches would noise- 
lessly lift and doors open, blinds that had 
been securely fastened would slam, and 
tightly fitted windows would jar and rattle 
with a fury that silenced all conversation and 
did not promote study. These remarkable 
disturbances terrified those who roomed in 
that end, and some moved to other buildings, 
but with this change the visitations ceased; 
so for some few years afterward there existed 
only a legend of a former ghost, who had 
long curling brown hair, very white teeth, a 
deep hollow in each cheek, and was altogether 
an unpleasant spectacle to behold. His ap- 
proach was heralded to any mortal creature 
who was unfortunate enough to fall in his 
way by the blowing of an ice cold wind ; and 
nobody who had once felt that the wind had 
the slightest chance of ever feeling warm 
again. 

Gradually the old superstitions wore away 
and slowly the rooms began to be occupied 
once more. But the signs of life about the 
end apparently awoke the ghost, for the tap- 



150 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



pings were renewed and this time the gliost 
seemed to take a malicious pleasure in annoy- 
ing the occupants ; for many a dark night 
have students, coming quietly into this end, 
stumbled and fallen mysteriously at the head 
of the second stair case, felt the cold blast, 
heard a hoarse chuckle and then the patter 
of bony footsteps ascending to the roof. 

Often has the weary student, when half 
asleep over his work, been aroused by tlie 
sudden extinguishing of his whale oil lamp, 
or by the cold breath to discover his fire out 
and his windows open. And even now some 
of the inhabitants of the north end claim that 
on dreary nights when the veind howls from 
the direction of the medical building they 
can hear the stealthy movements of their 
unwelcome visitor. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



And still we have no gymnasium. 

Term closes Friday noon, Dec. 22d. 

Last number of the Oeient for this term. 

Heard anything about a new reading-room 'I 

A club at the Tontine next term is talked of. 

A few of the boys spent the recess in Boston. 

The library is used more than usual this term. 

Kemp, '84, has commenced a school in Harrison. 

Brunswick's new sidewalks are appreciated 
now. 

Wish we could have a series of Germans this 
winter. 

The President is lecturing on capital to the 
Seniors. 

Stackpolo, '86, is canvassing in Brunswick and 
Topsham. 

K. U. Washburne, formerly of '83, has entered 
Tufts, '83. 

Going to tlio depot is about the only excite- 
ment at present. 

The reading-room and mail box are run by 
Thompson, '84, during the absence of Mr. Fling. 

Austin and Fling, of the Senior Class, are hold- 
ing auction sales of books in the larger villages in 
tlie State. They are having good success. 



Three men from the Auburn High School intend 

to enter '87. 

Webb, '85, has been chosen scorer for the college 
nine next season. 

The good skating in the suburbs is causing some 
Sabbath breaking. 

Considerable energy expended with the stove 
shaker these days. 

It takes over 150 tons of coal to run the college 
through the winter. 

Terra reviews are now in order and consequent- 
ly the cutters are few. 

The Seniors ought to know soon who is to be 
the class photographer. 

Almost forgotten how you used to enjoy those 
old Saturday holidays ? 

The new Tontine Laundry seems to be raising 
out the old one, in college. 

Merry, the hatter, Portland, has the genuine 
Bowdoin tile in his window. 

J. F. Waterman is assistant librarian during 
Longreu's absence teaching. 

Accessions to some of the classes are expected 
at the beginning' of next term. 

We have found out what the original land 
league was. It was three miles. 

A delegation from Bowdoin will/ attend the 
opening of the Maine Legislature. 

President Chamberlain lectured three times in 
Aroostook County week before last. 

'86 might find it of advantage to brace up a lit- 
tle on a class crew for next spring. 

Perham, '83, is the President's messenger, and 
also has charge of the Senior library. 

Prof. Lee is as yet undecided in regard to the 
proposed trip to the Gulf of Mexico. 

The Congregationalist pulpit in Farmingtou has 
lately been supplied by Prof. Campbell. 

Strange that the Greek professor should object 
to the Sophomores smoking in recitation. 

As the holiday season draws on apace the youth 
and beauty begin to return to Brunswick. 

The man who swore he couldn't stand it has 
taken a seat and now gets along first-rate. 

It is rumored that another paper, a weekly, is 
to bo started in college. Don't you believe it. 

The Freshmen are complaining of too much 
algebra. " The mills of the gods grind slowly." 

Who are the class-day officers ? is a question 
that should not remain unanswered much longer. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



151 



Don't let her keep you away too long at the 
beginning of next term. 

'84 is to use Thorpe's Manual of Chemistry as a 
reference book next term. 

The janitor grumbles because he has to lug fuel 
from the cellar in South Maine. 

There are a few more " artists" in college that 
ought to have their show in the choir. 

There was a vivid representation of the music 
of the spheres in the astronomy class the other 
day. 

The interior of the post-office presents an intel- 
lectual appearance at the opening of the evening 
mail. 

The Orient office will be ready to be occupied 
early in January. Bill Seco has been engaged for 
devil. 

The gay and festive end-women find it conven- 
ient now to cut two days every week to do their 
washing. 

The "History of Bowdoin" has been widely 
distributed. It gives great satisfaction to all classes 
up to '81 . 

Our readers, when they want fine stationery, 
etc., should remember that Dreka has an ad. in 
the Oeient. 

The path clearer will soon be at work on the 
campus. Hope the work will be done better this 
year than last. 

The yaggers have been saving up their dimes 
all summer in order that they may have good quar- 
ters this winter. 

Dunning, '83, has rejoined his class. He has 
been enjoying a few weeks' shooting in the north- 
ern part of the State. 

Those who are to be absent a while this winter 
and want the address on the Orient list changed, 
should notify the business editor. 

Aren't the Seniors to have some practical exer- 
cises in Parliamentary Law before they forget all 
they learned from the text-book? 

A copy of the Bugle will make rather a good 
Christmas present for your second best girl. Copies 
for sale soon at 8 Maine. 

Senior and Junior Exhibition, in Memorial 
Hall, Thursday evening, Dec. 21st. Music will 
probably be furnished by Grimmer. 

Sleighing is good but the Brunswick stable men 
are planning to be millionaires in the near future. 
If you patronize them you are merely encouraging 
the accumulation of vast wealth. 



The Brunswick girls declare that the present 
Senior Class hasn't the average number of society 
men in it. Too bad. 

Nearly fifty students spent the Thanksgiving 
recess in town. So many ought not to have ex- 
perienced much lonely loneliness. 

Quite a party of the students went to Lewiston 
last week and saw the "Pirates" played by local 
talent. They saw a mighty poor show. 

A member of the chemistry class having finished 
his examination of the element mercury, concluded 
that he would take up quicksilver next. 

We should fall short of our aim to faithfully 
chronicle the events of the day if we failed to 
notice the fact that a certain jovial Junior has 
lately purchased a hat that is emphatically a la 
mode. 

Occasionally things get into this department of 
the Orient without the knowledge or consent of 
the local man. An item in last issue is a case in 
point. 

Prayers will be held in the chapel during the 
whole winter, contrary to the general impression 
that they would be held in Memorial Hall in the 
coldest weather. 

It was rude for that student to say when he 
heard that a Brunswick girl had one foot in the 
grave, that she was all right, for there probably 
wasn't room for both feet. 

Everybody knows that we are sadly in need of 
an observatory and a full set of astronomical in- 
struments, but we won't urge the matter while the 
gymnasium question is pending. 

It was a Sophomore, who, upon being told last 
Tuesday night that the commencement of Venus' 
transit might be seen next day at 9 o'clock, asked 
whether 9 a.m. or p.m. was meant. 

Scene : Two Sophomores on a stroll passing a 
farm-house. Great scattering of poultry as they 
go by. 1st Soph.—" What makes those hens run 
so!" 2nd do. — " Instinct I guess, they recognize 
their enemies." 

" Harry dear," she said as they strolled along 
arm in arm and gazed upon the starry firmament, 
"you are a Senior and have studied astronomy; 
now won't you please point out to me which is 
Venus and which is Adonis ? " 

F. H. Piles, '83, A. E. Austin, '83, and W. K. 
Hilton, '84, are the delegates from the Bowdoin 
Chapter to the general convention of the Zeta Psi 
Fraternity, to be held at Young's Hotel, Boston, 



152 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Jan. 4th and 5th. Several other members of the 
Chapter here will also be present at the convention. 

^here are as many as six difterent brands of 
tobacco in the market that the dealers recommend 
as being the varieties especially favored by those 
of the Faculty who fiud comfort in using the nox- 
ious weed. 

A North Winthrop man announces that he has 
discovered what a perpetual motion is. His gas- 
meter went ahead registering all last summer, 
although his room was locked up at the beginning 
of vacation. 

Moody, '82, teacher in the Auburn High School, 
spent his winter vacation in town. He is pursuing 
further his studies in mineralogy and so wished to 
be where he could have access to cabinet and 
laboratory. 

A Freshman was one of a party of fox hunters 
in his native town Thanksgiving week. They 
chased a shepherd dog eighteen miles across the 
Country before they found out that he was not the 
game they were after. 

In view of the fact that even a temporary gym- 
nasium has not yet been provided, the janitor must 
not swear very much if considerable glass is smashed 
in the end windows by boys who wish to keep up 
their base-ball practice. 

The transit of Venus awakened considerable 
enthusiasm among the astronomers. A number of 
good observations were made through the college 
instrument and the one lately constructed by C. C. 
Hutching of the Senior Class. 

A certain Junior, who had been to the skating 
rink, passed the remainder of the night iu writing 
a sonnet to the fair one whom he escorted home. 
This is the result : 

Whoii Greek meets Greek, 

Then comes the tug of war; 
When lip meets lip, 
Then comes tlie tug of jaw. 

A man who was there, thus reports a lecture 
on English literature at one of the neighboring col- 
leges (?) : [Prof from his rostrum]. "Gentle- 
men, please come to order. Milton was a great 
poet. Ho wrote Paradise Lost. Schiller was 
also a great poet. His works were good. There 
were also many other great poets. At my next 
lecture I will treat of the great prose writers. 
Please go out quietly, gentlemen." 

An un.succcssful attempt was recH^nlly made to 
veto the ringing of the seven o'clock bell. 'I'he 



only result was the spoihng of several locks. One 
wpuld suppose that the persons who persist iu en- 
gaging in such asinine enterprises would see that 
the spirit of the college is against them, and that if 
they keep on they will not only be severely dealt 
with by the authorities, but will secure the disfavor 
of the best and largest part of the students. 

Prof. Campbell states that '83 has had more 
difficulty with the text-book in psychology (Hickok) 
than any other of the fifteen classes who have used 
the hook under his instruction. We look upon this 
as anything but a compliment to the members of 
the fifteen classes. We supposed that every class 
found out ultimately the entire unfitness of Hickok 
as a text-book, and so took no especial credit to 
ourselves for recognizing it early in the term. 

The subject of Mr. Parson's lecture iu the B. A. 
course two weeks ago, was changed from "Peter 
the Great and Napoleon Bonaparte," as advertised, 
to "Homeric Heroes." The change was on the 
night of the lecture, too late to have the notice 
appear correctly in the last Orient. The lecture 
was very interesting and instructive. Some listen- 
ers were unkind enough to say that they got a 
better insight iuto the manners, customs, and in- 
stitutions of ancient Greece in the hour and a half 
than the two years' course iu Greek here iu college 
gives. The next lecture in the course will be given 
on Tuesday night of this week, in Memorial Hall, 
by President Chamberlain. Subject, " The Surren- 
der of Lee." 

It is highly important that the Senior Class 
election should be held soon. The unlucky feeling 
that exists in the class in regard to the distribu- 
tion of ofQces should not be allowed to endanger the 
success of the class-day exercises, and the success 
of those exercises will certainly not be assured un- 
less the men who have literary parts are chosen at 
an early date, in order that they may have time to 
fully prepare themselves. No Senior will for a 
moment think of allowing disagreement in regard 
to a few petty oflicos to load to the abolishing, for 
this year, of the pleasant and endearing customs 
observed in the celebration of class day. It would 
bo childish to harbor such a thought. The election, ' 
then, will ultimately be held. Why not hold it at 
onco? If a ticket cannot be agreed upon in cau- 
cus, let the whole class meet and hold the election 
without previous arrangement. We would suggest 
that the class assemble in their recitation room on 
some half-holiday, and vote upon each ollice sep- 
arately until the whole affivir is decided. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



153 



We have been allowed the privilege of examin- 
iug a portion of tbe proof-sheets of the Bugle that 
is to be thrown upon tbe college public in a 
short time, and are very much pleased to. be able 
to give the assurauce that the publication promises 
to be one that will reflect credit upon the board of 
editors, and be worthy of the class and of the col- 
lege. All the cuts are appropriate and are well 
executed. They are put on the paper in much 
better shape than has been tlae case in times past. 
The engraving has been done by the Moss Engrav- 
ing Co., New York. Ttie frontispiece is especially 
excellent, and to many will be worth more than 
the cost of the whole book. Tt consists of a gen- 
eral view of the college, with views of Memorial Hall, 
the chapel, Massachusetts and Adams upon the 
several corners. The literary matter is perhaps 
hardly up to the standard of former Bugles, but 
cannot be severely criticised. The editorial is 
gracefully written, and gives a history of last year's 
sports and general college events in a very enter- 
taining manner. It is evident that the class his- 
torians have not allowed themselves to be seriously 
impeded by truth in preparing the class histories 
for the Bugle readers. The introduction of consid- 
erable poetry is a new and pleasant feature. The 
miscellaneous matter is well gotten up and ar- 
ranged, and cannot fail to place the book high in a 
humorous aspect. The thrusts are keen ones but 
are given in good part and should be taken in the 
same way. Moreover the book is entirely free 
from vulgarity and steep allusion. In our estima- 
tion it is almost a model college annual. The 
editors have done themselves proud and must not 
be allowed to lose money ou their enterprise. We 
cannot expect as good a publication next year un- 
less we are willing to pay for this one. The '84 
editors have done their work well ; let us do ours 
as well by taking copies enough to insure them an 
even balance sheet. 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates and Undergraduates are earnestly solicited 
to send personal items to the Bowdoik Okient, Bruns- 
wick.] 

The following has been kindly sent us in regard 
to membens of the class of '57 : 

Adams is in business in Ossipee, N. H. 

Andei'son is in the insurance lousiness at Port- 
land. 

Bean is a clergyman at Gray, Me. 

Belcher is a lawyer in Farmington, Me. 

Cole is practicing medicine at Bangor. 

Brastow is a clergyman at Burlington, Vt. 

Currier is a professor in Oberlin College, Ohio. 



Dame is teaching in Boston, Mass. 
Fairfield is practicing law in Saco, Me. 
Fuller is teaching in Beatrice, Neb. 
Hamlin is a lawyer in Bangor. 
Hewes is a clergyman in Cambridge, Mass. 
Hibbard is a clergyman in York, Me. 
Howard is a clergyman in Potsdam, N. Y. 
Hubbard is practicing law at No. Ill Broadway, 

Kingsbury is practicing law at Defiance, Ohio. -ffT* */ 

Mclntyre is teaebtng-at-Harfeford-- Ey. % -^^^-l-v 

Merrill is a lawyer at No. 56 Wall Street, New'^'^''''^ 
York City. l4t^hC/1ift 

Moses is a professor in Urbana University, 
Urbana, Ohio. 

Newbegin is practicing law at Defiance, Ohio. 

Nichols is a clergyman at Brownville, Me. 

Parker is teaching in Brockton, Mass. 

Pickard is a publisher in Portland, Me. 

Pierce is living at West Baldwin, Me. 

Pond is in the Patent Office at Washington, D.C. 

Rand is a clergyman at Watertown, Mass. 

Robbins is in the Treasury Department at Wash- 
ton, D. C. 

Sanborn is a lawyer at Lawrence, Mass. 

Smith is a clergyman in Illinois. 

Stanley is practicing law in Pensacola, Pla. 

Stewart is a clergyman in Lynn, Mass. 

Stockin is in buisiness at 47 Franklin Street, 
Boston. 

'68. — Orville D. Baker, of Augusta, Me., has 
been admitted to practice in the United States 
Supreme Court. 

'73. — Moulton, for a time instructor in Latin at 
Bowdoin College, is now practicing law in Portland. 
He represented Scarboro in the State Legislature 
for two years. 

'79.— Stearns, who is practicing law in Water- 
ford, was admitted last March and has already 
secured one divorce, besides having several other 
cases now on the docket. 

'82. — Holway is to study law in the Office of W. 
L. Putnam, Portland, Me. 

'82. — Moody is teaching in the Auburn High 
School. 

'82.— Jennings, formerly of '82, is in the office of 
the Superintendent of the Sandy River Railroad at 
Farmington, Me. 

'83. — Fling is a traveling book salesman. 

'83.— Bascom is teaching at Patten, Me. 

'83.— Washburn has entered the Senior Class at 
Tufts College. 

'84. — Cobb is teaching at Damariscotta, Me. 

'84. — Poland, formerly of this class, is studying 
civil engineering at Newj)ort, under Col. Waring. 

'84.^-Phinney is teaching the High School at 
Union, Me. 

'84. — Orr is teaching in Brunswick. 

'84. — Knight is teaching in Brunswick. 

'84. — Barton is teaching at Naples, Me. 

'84. - Lougren is teaching at Pownal, Me. 

'85. — Hall is teaching at South Orrington, Me. 

'8.5. — Bartlett is teaching at Ellsworth, Me. 

'85. — Fling is teaching at Boothbay, Me. 



154 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



CLIPPmGS. 

Suspenders for college breaches, is a Junior's 
definition of FacaMy.— Dartmouth. 

What kind of ears reach the highest? Mount- 
aineers (ears) ? No, arr (air) ears. — Ex. 

" Oh ! George," a Boston girl intensely ex- 
claimed while gazing at the comet, " how tran- 
scendently beautiful and rapturously precious it is ; 
I should love to study botany."— Yate News. 

Forewarned is /oio'-armed. "Why didn't you 
tell me you two girls were going ? A fellow can't 
drive a span of skittish horses with his teeth. — 
Tale Becord. 

First Soph — " Say, fellows, have you heard the ! 
latest on a corset?" Second Soph— "No, what is 
it?" First Soph — " Why, a zvaist basket." Third 
Soph, (of journalistic inclination) — "The only 
difference is, that what gets into the waste- 
basket never gets into the press. See ? " — Prince- 
tonian. 

Scene in French class from 9.30 to 10.30 a.m. : 
Mr. G., reading a description of a Highland Scotch- 
man's dress, runs on to a word meaning that part 
of the apparel which supports the stockings. Mr. 
G., being possessed of maidenly diffidence, hesitates 
to translate the word into our expressive vernacu- 
lar. Prof. " class." Feminine voice, " I think it 
must mean suspender." — Chronicle. 

MT FOUNTAIN PEN. 
My fountain pen, in case so neat. 
With bi-isht blue lining all complete 

With couch for it, a cover too, 

A canopy, its kingship due — 
To my fond gaze, indeed's a treat. 

But you must leave your snug retreat 
And wing across the stainless sheet 
■ Thy way, this blank with life imbue, 

My fountain pen. 

How, what! not go I I do entreat, 

My pride avvai'd with action meet. 

Alas I must I all faith eschew 

Ih things that seem so fair to view? 

A fount thou ait with woes replete, 

My fountain pen. 

Ncatli an o-penumhra-\\-<!L they sat in tlic .sun. 
In her grief ho tried to cow- solar : "iMy dear, 
can't you planet o'er father to comet somehow by 
as/r«-tegctn bolder. Node-owhi you shadow some 
allegiance to him, yet tlio way to ■a\)i\-nrbil I'll (ix." 
At such talk from iho par-(a)-sol hid his head and 



gave them a chance to s^eclipse. The above was 
written by an '83 man, insane from polling astron- 
om V. —Princetonian. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



There is nothing in college journalism that is 
more noticeable, since we have taken our seat at 
the table, than the change that has come over the 
college muse, or perhaps it might better be said, 
over her costume. She has fallen in with the 
fashion of the day and now her garb must be cut 
and made only according to the French mode. To 
be sure, it is not always best to follow implicitly the 
fashions, and it may be that her graceful move- 
ments are hampered, as, learned men tell us, are 
those of the fashionable young lady of the day, by 
her dress, and she is rendered powerless to soar 
away on those wonderful flights into the realm of 
fancy for which college poetry is so notorious ; yet 
wo cannot but think that, clothed in her new dress, 
the college muse is more attractive than she has 
ever been before in her state of beauty unadorned. 

Of all sad things, that best calculated to bring 
the tear to every eye, is the sight of a young man 
trying to express himself in sickly rhyme, by an 
ode to the ocean or to night, by a wail of desola- 
tion or something equally suggestive of indigestion. 
Such was formerly the prevailing character of col- 
lege poetry, but, thanks to free, enlightened minds 
and healthy bodies, there is now a change for the 
better in the adoption of the less pretentious French 
style of verse. The pioneer in this movement was 
P. D. S. who published last year in the Ada Co- 
lumbiana the first rondeau that ever appeared in a 
college paper. Since then, the suggestion has been 
accepted by many others, and the Acta, the Argo, 
the Spectator, the Record, and the Athemrum have 
from time to time given us very creditable verses of 
this form. So now in place of long poems in high- 
sounding hexameters to Pegasus and labored versi- 
fication, we have the charming little chanson, the 
rondeau, the vilancllc, the triolet with its delightful 
repetition of every third line, all having a graceful- 
tripping movement that is very fascinating. The 
beauty lies not so much, perhaps, in the thought as 
in the form of versification ; yet there is plenty of 
room for originality in the happy turn of thought or 
cxi)ression, and success is attainable without such 
throes of ))ootical agony as are painful to the reader. 
Many specimens of those kinds of verso have been 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



155 



printed in these columns, most of them clipped 
from the Acta; one particularly we remember, 
which we would recall to the minds of our readers, 
"Te Scuttle Hatte," by F. D. S. It was copied 
extensively by other papers and, we believe, ap- 
peared in the Orient. The latest thing of this 
kind is from Chaff: 

TKIOLETS. 
For a moment or two 

We"ve been both very quiet — 
And, between me and you, 
For a moment or two 
I've not known what to do, 

But my thoughts have run riot. 
For a moment or two 

We've been both very quiet. 

Her eye looks askance. 

But her smile is siispicious. 

Were it not for that glance 

Her eye darts askance 

I should think I'd a chance — 
Is the moment auspicious ? 

Her eye looks askance, 

But her smile is suspicious. 

Her glance is subdued. 

But her lips are a^pouting. 
There's a change in her mood, 
Her glance is subdued — 
I was not very rude. 

Will she give me a flouting ? 
Her glance is subdued, 

But her lips are a-pouting. 

Hush ! she's going to speak. 

I've a penitent forehead ; 
I appear very meek. 
Hush ! she's going to speak. 
How she dimples her cheek ! 

" Jack, I think you are horrid ! " 
Hush ! she's going to speak — 

I've a penitent forehead. 

This, however, is not the only manner in which 
the college muse disports herself. We still have 
many of the lofty flights, and much, too, that is 
decidedly of the earth, earthy. If the reader 
thinks we are too much aping foreign manners, he 
may be propitiated by such an offering as this, 
which is so universal among us that it might be 
called a sample of English versification : 
They sat by the tower at Pisa, 
And he did what he could to plisa; 
He looked in her eyes. 
He heard many seyes. 
Then stuck out his arm for to squisa. 

Then we have the most unsatisfactory, the 
suggestive type, wherein the poet sails along beau- 
tifully for the first few lines, then comes to a dead 



stop, leaving the rhymes for the reader to fill in 
the lines. But the following is so complete in 
itself that there is no need of any imaginative work 
on the part of the reader : 

A sxtmmer-day's spoet. 

A POEM IN TWO CANTOS. 

Canto I. 
Boy, 
Gun, 
Joy, 
Fun. 

Canto II. 
Gun, 
Bust, 
Boy, 
Dust. 

—Ex. 

In short, we would suggest that it is fully as 
profitable and certainly more entertaining to the 
reader, for the college poet to refrain from reach- 
ing out after that which is unattainable without 
inborn genius or many years of hard study, and to 
confine himself to that in which success is at least 
possible. To us, an unexpected thought, a happy 
turn of expression is worth more than lines upon 
lines of burning genius, such as one finds in 
the ordinary college paper. AVe will close our 
homily on poetry with the following from the 
Becord, which is rather good : 

A COMPARATIVE DEGREE. 
Miss Emma Blank, tutor at Vassar, 
Once said to a Cornell Professor, 

"I should like a degree, 

And I think that M. D. 
Would make me a happy possessor." 

The Prof, like a bold chevalier. 

As he drew up his chair somewhat near, 

Said, " Of greater degree. 

Shall you be than M. D., 
I confer the degree, Emma Dear." 

The Athenceum announces that " at last the Inter- 
collegiate Press Association is beginning to assume 
a tangible form." We learn that the Acta, the 
Amherst Student, the Vassar Miscellany, the Dart- 
mouth, the Brunonian, the University Magazine, 
the Argonaut, and the Harvard Herald have all 
expressed approval, and we wish that the Orient's 
name might be enrolled in the number of support- 
ers. When the idea was first proposed, we believe it 
was favorably commented upon in our columns; 
at any rate, we wish now to express our hearty 
co-operation in the scheme, and the hope that we 
are not so far out of the world that we may not do 
our share towards carrying it out. We wish all 
success to the I. P. A. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DREKA 

FINE STATIONERY and ENGRAVING 
HOUSE. 

Hamlsomely Engraved Invitations for 

Sy Colleges, Weddings, Receptions, &c. 
Fraternity Stationery alwa3S on hand. 

Our UDeqnaled facilities iinrt long practical experience, enable 
us to produce the newest stj'les and most artistic etl'ects, while 
our reputation is a guarantee of the qiialitj- of our productions. 

II2I Chestnut Street, Piiihidelphia. 




[IDBJ 

^ CIGfflETTES . 

These Goods are sold under an 

Absolute Guarantee 

Tliat they are the Finest and PUREST 

goods upon the market; 
They ARE FREE from DRUGS and 

CHEMICALS of any kind ; 
They consist of the Finest Tobacco and 

Purest Rice-Paper made. 

OUR SALES EXCEEDtheproduct, 

of ALL leading manufactories combined. 

None Genuine without the trade-mar'; 
of the BULL. Take no other. 

W.TJLACKWELL&CO. 

Sole Manufacturers, Durham, N. C. 



CilllTION TO SMOKEHS. 

Beware of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 




TRY IT. 
Fine, Mild & Sweet. 



Fac simile Signature on if. No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO.. N. Y. 

SOLD liY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 



432 Washington St., Boston, 

luvilL- attention lo (he lar^'est and fine.^l slock in the city, of 

DIAMONDS, RARE GEMS, 

KKrRESEXTATIVE.S OF TIM-: 

Gorham Manufacttiring Company, in Boston. 
Exhibit a large and complete collcclion of the 

SOLID SILVER AND ELECTRO-PLATED WARES 

ruODUCED BY THIS COJIPANY. 

The ornamentations now used and tlie eD'ects produced, are 
sonietlnns entirelv novel in the craft of the .Silversmith, and will 
interest every one by their cnnibinidion ot arlislic and useful 
qualities. 

Especial Attsntion given to Designing Class-Day 
and College Invitations of Every Description. 



QUEEN & CO^ 

924 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



S»?) 




M croscopes, 
Telescopes, 
Field Glasses, 
Opera Glasses, 
Drawing Instruments, 
Surveying Instruments, 
Thermometers, 

Barometers, 
Magic Lanterns, 
Apparatus for 

Projection, 
Philosophical and 
Chemical Apparatus. 

rcii.i.ows sKN'i 



Pari 1^ 
ologl 



rbibi,s,,|ibbal Inslrunu 
AiJiiaratus, I'Jl) pages. 



IN APrLKWTlON: 

tcs. I'arl •:— OjitlcAl 
i— :Mai;ic l.anlcrns. I'.'ll iiaROS. 
,s, Kill oaKVs. I'art .'i— Jfoleor- 



156 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



FEME 8MIMT8' The Palace Mini store of Maine 



MADE FROM MEASURE, 

H PllFECT FIT GUJJIIJIMTEED. 



Also a Full Assortment ol 



GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

■lEMll # ii.^ 

Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 

Orders by Mail Promptly Attended To. 

MIW DBXJQ STOBE. 




ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

DllJGS. MEBICIliS, 

Fancf aflj Toilet Articles, Ciprs I Toliacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

Hg* Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

FR^ISTK E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment ol Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

iKT BI^■c^x<rs■V7•IC23:. 
Corner of Main and Mason Streets. 

HENRY F. aRIEFi:^^, 

58 Temple Place, BOSTON, 

lagi-afifj Btati@,ii,&r, tii Piiitgi, 

Wedding Invitations, Business Cards, &c. 
COLLEGE INVITATIONS A SPECIALTY. 

Beautiful Engraved Visiting Cards. 

Plate and Pack, $1.50 ; former price, $3.00. 

GRIFFIN'S WEDDING CARD DEPOT, 

58 Temple Place, BOSTOl^T. 




ALL THE LEADING NOVELTIES IN 

Y0IJMQ MIM'S CLOTMIl© 

AND NOBBY FURNISHING GOODS. 

■w&mw.M mAnrnw,® km »'3labm Fi©wssi. 

STRICTLY ONE PRICE. 

I^^Boys' and Children's Department entirely separate. 

BLUE STORE, 

I.S'W'ISTON'. ia.A.iNs:. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



,<^^^ m\ 



Fine Watches, Jewelry, Silver Ware, &c., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QUAliT^, AND LOWEST PKICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 



PORTLAND, 
A. CARTER. 



MAINK. 
J. W. D. CARTER. 



SPRING AND SUMMER, 1882. 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosierj', Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Readj'-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments. White 
Vests, White Neokties, Wliite Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

On and after Oct. loth, 1882, 

Passenger Trains leave Brunsurick 

For Bath, 8.10, 11.25 a.m., 2.45, 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 
night (Sunday mornings only). 
Eockland, 8.10 a.m., 2.45 P.M. 
Portland. 7.25, 11.30 A.M., 4.30 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 A.M., 12.35 night. 
Lewiston, 8.10 a.m., 2. 4.'), 6.33 P.M.. 12.40 night. 
Farmington, 8.10 a.m. (Mixed), 2.45 p.m. 
Augusta, 8.10 A.M., 2.45, 6.35 P.M., 12.45 niglit. 
Skowhegan, Belfast, Dexter, and Bangor, 2.45 P.M., and 

12.45 nigiit. 
Waterville, 8.10 A.M., 2.45, 6.35 P.M. (Saturdays only), 
12.45 night. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 1882. 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

HP^* Families. Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street, - - - Portland Me. 

J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 



MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 

28 Free Street, Portland, Me. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terjis, ---.-- $1.50 a Year ill Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



^£! 



Pureha.^e your COAL at the 

Ooa-l ~^a,rd. iri Topsliaxn., 

WHEKH NONK BUT 

Tbe Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Uoalor in :ill kinds ,>r 

S?«qr©©b. axxd. Sali^ iS^Seats, 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

*i)-Speoial Rates to Student Clubs. -S« 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Mwmm^mhhW)Q>^h Store 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating' Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Pictiire Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Bi,ock, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 
Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

POFlTr.A.ND. ivx.A.zz>rE:. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 



^. O. REED, 



MW% 






BI?,XJ3SrS"Vv7"ICIC, IS.^E. 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bruns-roick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 



ALL KINDS OF 








CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 

N. B. — Special Riite.s to Students. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

750 Middle Street - - - - Port/and, Me. 



For Schools and Colleges, 

EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 




THE FAVORITE NOS.S03-404-3S2't7O-^5/-WITH 
2U!ESJIXi£S,S2!z5.31^'-'- ^^•^Z.f/^S THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 

E. SMITH, Variety Store. Bottom Prices to Students. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 

Office at Central Telephone Office, Brunswick. 
jg-All Orders left at C. E. Townsend's Store \ 
be promptly attended to. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEB, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical instruments, and 1 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 



J. H. PETERSON & SON, 



-DEALERS LN- 



Boots and Shoes, Tobacco and Cigars, 

Main Street, ---.--- Brunswick, Me. 

FIRST-CI.A.SS 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 



TONTinrB HOTESL^ 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

S. B. BREWSTER, - - PROPRIETOR. 

Class and Reunion Suppers a .Specialtj-. First-Class Laun(b-y 
Work, equal to Tvo\-, done at short notice. 



J. G. WASHBURN, 

IMnnurac-tiinn- of and Dealer in 

PICTURE FRAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

From llif clH'Miii-sl. 1" IIk' very lic-sl. Also ricturcs, Cabinet 



Alsc, Agent for 



In the Blue Store, Main Street, Second Door from Elm, 
Opposite the Park, Brunswick, Maine. 




COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle vidiiiR is unsurpassed as a 
MH'I lii>d of travcling.whether for speed, 
sporl, or renewal of liealth. Theprac- 
lieahility of the machine has been 
tlioroughly tested, and satisfactorily 
proved, beyond question. Thousands 
itn: in daily use, and the number is 
rapidly increasins. The exercise is 
rccomnii'iidcci hy llienioilieal profession 
as most benellcial to lieallh, bringing 
into exercise almost evtny iiuiscle of 
the body. 

Send 3c. stanii) for 3C-paE0 Illiislratcd 
(;alal<)guo containing price lists and full 
inriirnultlon. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 W.nsliiiigton St„ BOSTON, MASS, 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. WILSON & CO., 

Wholesale and Ketail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & 144- Exchange, cor. Federal Si., 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 8tb, 1883, 
and continue SIXVEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— JoSHCA L. CHAiiBERLAis, LL.D., President; Israel X. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H. Gerrish, M.D., 
Anatomy ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence ; Hbsry 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Burt G. "Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D,, Surgery and Clinical Surgery, Charles 0. 
HcNT, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics -, Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary, 
Brunsvnck, Maine. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



H^" Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BKIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLK DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8j and ^8" Co7igress Si., and 235 Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

jBS^Send for Pkick List. 



C. L. RICHARDSON, 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

insicnt Orders for Milk or Cream tilled liy piving suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 



Curtis' College Bookstore 

B00K:S. STA.TIONERY, ROOIMC 
PAPER, I»ERIOr>ICA.ll.S. <ScC. 

A. ^^^. TOWNSEND, 

Books, stationery, i Fancy Goods. 

,Ms() KasliTii Mutual Union Teloixrapli Oflioe. 
Under Toiru Clock, - - - Bruii!i\iriok, Me. 




IffiM 




BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JANUARY 17, 1883. 



Vol. XII. 



No. 12. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ^'Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moeh ring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



HALL L. DAVIS, 

Book, Statiooerf, and Paper flaogiop, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

FRANK M. STETSON, 



X 

CO 

CD 

(J-( 

Q 

< 










tDCJ 



CO 



DEANE BROTHERS & SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

IW Lowest Prices in the State, 
755 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland, iVIe. 



VISITORS TO PORTLAND, 

Independent of any intention of pur- 
chasing goods in our line, are invited to 
inspect the Model Clothing and Fur- 
nishing Store of Allen & Co., 470 Con- 
gress-St., opp. Preble House, 

LANCASTER BUILDING. 



SPECIAL AOENT. 

t^Dunlap & Co., of New York, Celebrated 
•Stiff Hats. 

Also his New Straw Mackinaw, $2.00 and 
$2.50. 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monogranis 

ENOEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AUENCy FOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for jidmission will be examined in tlie 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (3.5 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^neid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Ha'dley's Greek Grammar ; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. ■ 
Ancient Geography. _ 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Pi'iucipiils of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' iluration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the iustitutimi under his charge, together 
with the names of those incinliers of liis graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time wliich eacli candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and (piality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, tlie Principal sending them will bo fur- 
nished a list of topics on which ho will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, cither at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
aprt of his regular linnl (>xamination,as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. , 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQOIEED— l'"O0R HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 
Latin, two terms. 
Greek, two terms. 
Natural History, three terms. 
Physics, one term. 
Chemistry, two terras. 
Science of Language, one term. 
English Literature, two terras. 
German, two terras. 
History of Philosophy, two terms. 
International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $2.i. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary oxponsos will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. Xir. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JANUARY 17, 1883. 



No. 12. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PHBtlSHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BO^A^DOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
Arthur J. Russell, '83, Managing Editor. 
Herbert P. Kendall, '83, Business Editor. 
Herbert B. Cole, '83. Oliver W. Means, '84. 

Howard R. Goodwin, '83. Llewellyn Barton, '84. 
Charles H. Stetson, '83. Charles E. Sayward, '84. 
S. Brooks E. Pettingill, '83. 

Terms — S2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 
Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Tol. XII., No. 12.— Jan. 17, 1883. 

Editorial Notes 157 

Literary: 

To A. S. P. (poem) 159 

The Sugar Camp ]59 

A Thought (poem) 160 

A Story with a Moral 160 

Communication 161 

The I. R. A 162 

College Items 163 

Professor Packard 166 

Personal 1 67 

Clippings 168 

Editors' Table 168 



EDITORIAL HOTES. 



The Orient extends its greeting to you 
once move at the beginning of this its last 
term under the present board of editors, and 
wishes you a successful term. The winter 
session is pre-eminently a time devoted to 
study, because there are so few attractions 
out of doors. The pines, indeed, after every 
snow-fall, present a beautiful sight, but not 



one which calls, as they dg in summer, for 
one to throw himself at full length on the 
turf and gaze up through their brown 
branches into the sky. Winter has every 
thing to himself at this season, and we gladly 
hie ourselves to our genial rooms and seek 
comfort in pines of former ages, which have 
come down to us in the shape of coal. Now 
is the time for books and good solid work, if 
one is ever going to do it. To be sure nobody 
objects to a social game once in a while, and 
doubtless every one finds himself the better 
for such little relaxments. These are good 
long evenings, too, to spend in some cozy 
parlor down town, if you are not true-blue 
to the "girl you've left behind you." You 
will never have a better opportunity either to 
improve the library privileges you now enjoy. 
You may not be able to find just the modern 
works you want, or the ones you do want in 
good editions, but on this account we are not 
yet willing to see all the books pitched out of 
doors and the library started over again as 
some seem to want it. This is the term, too, 
when the Senior lays himself out for a Com- 
mencement Part. Go in and win, my boy, 
and if you get it the Orient will mention 
your name, and on Commencement day the 
north and south galleries at the church will be 
filled with one extended smile of admiring 
mothers, sisters, cousins and aunts. 



We do not know who has charge of the 
walks on the campus, but it would be inter- 
esting to find out. Their present disgraceful 
condition is the cause of much bad blood and 
remarks that will not bear repeating. Two 
or three days after a storm some person or 



158 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



persons, unknown, drag around a snow-plow 
edgewise, which is supposed to indicate the 
general direction of the path. They are 
cleared out about as they would be if Bow- 
doin were a western fort on the plains, and all 
coming and going were hunters or trappers 
prepared to " go in " breast deep. We wish 
the Faculty would give us credit for thin 
boots, and look after the man who does not 
look after the paths. 



The Bugle editors were successful in get- 
ting their publication out the last of the term, 
and we wish to congratulate them on that 
fact, and likewise on the excellence of the 
Bugle generally. There is a manliness of 
tone about it, and an absence of low wit that 
is refreshing. The Senior cut is quite a 
"daisy," and is doubtless what Prof. New- 
comb had in mind when he entitled his work 
"■Popular Astronomy." According to the 
class histories, Bowdoin has four most re- 
markable classes. We do not wish to quar- 
rel with that statement, but wish that the 
Bxujle would lend us its poet, if it has no 
further use for him, to write for the Okient 
awhile. Some of the cuts are pretty sharp, 
but doubtless '85 will make it about square 
when the Bugle comes into its hands next 
year. Some of the puns are pretty bad, but 
since we have come to college we have be- 
come sort of callous to that kind of thing, 
and we read them through without experienc- 
ing any other bad effects, except a slight 
nervous prostration. On the whole it is a 
good Bugle, and one we are willing to send 
to our friends as a fair exponent of college 
life at Bowdoin. 



The first college exercise ever held in 
Memorial Hall was the Senior and Junior 
Exhibition held there at the close of last 
term, and the beautiful hall was well 
christened. The usual "large and intelligent 
audience filled the hall," and the music and 



speaking were generously applauded. Prof. 
Grimmer is a general favorite, and always 
gives the greatest satisfaction. In the ren- 
dering of a medley of familiar tunes, the 
orchestra struck upon one that always goes to 
the heart of eveiy Bowdoin boy of the last 
twenty years, and there were probably but 
few there who did not want to join in on the 
chorus with a hovrl that would have made 
the rafters ring, and raised the hair of the 
Freshmen. But politeness "repressed their 
noble rage," and they contented themselves 
with an encore. The speakers rendered their 
parts well, and showed original thought and 
work above the average exhibitionists. 



The skating-rink seems to be one of the 
attractions nowadays, and we vouch for it 
that it is one of the most pleasant places to 
pass an afternoon, or evening especially. The 
music makes one skim along without thinking 
of the effort, and the exercise is excellent. 
Indeed, so much so that some one has sug- 
gested that the Faculty furnish the students 
free tickets in place of a gymnasium. We 
understand that the genial manager, Mr. 
Crawford, has offered to make a reduction to 
the students, namely, to sell them five tickets 
for a dollar, and we do not doubt that many 
will take up with the offer, and the result 
will be an increased attendance. 



There has been a good deal of complaint 
about not leaving the ends open during the 
short vacations, and rightly. Students that 
come from a distance, or those who have any 
special woik to do often want to stay in the 
rooms which they have paid for, and studj- or 
work during the vacation. There seems to 
be no reason why they should not do so. 
But no! i\\e fiat has gone forth and the ends 
shall be shut, reason or no reason. Students 
are obliged to hire rooms in town or go home, 
however expensive the trip ma}' he, and thus 
fail to do the work planned, or fail to do it 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



159 



as well as is possible in the solitude and quiet 
of their own rooms. 



We shall be very glad to receive communi- 
cations from tlie alumni or others interested 
in the college. We find in talking with re- 
cent graduates and otliers that they express 
vigorous opinions as to the government and 
general tone of the college. We shall be 
glad to give all a hearing, for a thorough agi- 
tation of the subject will, doubtless, in the 
end, be for the best interests of the college. 



We have recently received a communica- 
tion, which, after some hesitation, we have 
decided to publish in this number. Although 
it may be objectionable to a few, yet it ex- 
presses the thought of a great many of the 
students, and we believe is a more general 
opinion than is thought. We are sure that 
the communication has been handed us in 
good faith, and was not written for the sake 
of finding fault, or of getting into print. 
We hope before you condemn it, or us, you 
will give the subject candid consideration. 



At last the recitation rooms in Memorial 
Hall are finished, and the Seniors occupied 
their room on the south-west corner for the 
first time at the beginning of this term. The 
rooms are commodious, well arranged, and 
fitted for comfort. By the side of each per- 
son is a little stand suited for an arm-rest, or 
for taking notes. The rooms each accommo- 
date a class of fifty, which is probably as 
large a class as Bowdoin will have for some 
years. In looking over the old files of the 
Oeient we see much complaint of small, 
badly-ventilated recitation rooms. Now Bow- 
doin can point with pride to its rooms in Me- 
morial Hall and the two in Maine Hall, all of 
which have been fitted up within the last four 
years. We are glad to see .signs of progress, 
and hail this as a happy omen of the future. 



TO A. S. P. 

[Read at the meeting of the Maine Histoi-icai Society in cele- 
bration o{ Prof. Paclcard's eighty-fourth birthday, Dec. 23, 1883.] 

The kindly years — more khidly for the deeds 

That he hath daily wrought, whose tranquil age, 
Disclaiming wisdom, still reveals the sage, — 

Confirm the truth, enshrined in all the creeds 

Inspired and uttered by our human needs. 
That who life's conflict worthily doth wage, 
With patient toil illuminates a page 

Whose beauty is a boon to him that reads. 

Resting at length beneath the evening's glow. 
The healthful flush of victory on thy cheek, 

The snowy wreath of reverence round thy brow. 
Of such a conflict, waged from long ago. 
The kindly years permit thy lips to speak, 

And ours to answer with a " Long live thou." 

H. L. C. 



THE SUGAR CAMP. 

As one comes upon a New England sugar 
orchard in a pleasant morning in spring-time, 
he cannot help being impressed by the beauty 
of the scene. Clinging to the protecting 
slope of the hill-side stand the clean-limbed 
maples, clusteied close together, with here 
and there a lovely evergreen. The crust of 
the snow glistens in the sun as though 
studded with diamonds, while among the 
trees one sees the gleam of tin buckets hang- 
ing a few feet from the ground by rusty 
nails. Over them are rude spouts, termed in 
the parlance of the woods, " spiles." As one 
approaches he hears the steady drip, drip of 
the sap, which set in motion skyward by the 
warmth of the sun has abandoned, through 
necessity, its original intention of forming- 
maple leaves and has concluded to become a 
bearer of sweet things to man. 

Nestled in some quiet corner of the grove 
is the " sap-house," so-called, a low, weather- 
beaten building, sending up into the sky a 
column of white, fleecy vapor. Arranged 
about it is the paraphernalia of the spring 
campaign, — the ox-sled with a huge hogsliead 
lashed thereon, piles of buckets drying in the 



160 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



sun, and last, but not least, the wood-pile, a 
collection of choice tit-bits culled from the 
family supply during the long winter before. 
The wood-pile is the sugar-maker's especial 
pride, comprising as it does the light wood 
from the neighboring swamps and the sturdy 
"chunks" that have successfully resisted the 
attacks of axes and beetles and wedges, and 
are calmly waiting their final dissolution at 
the hands of Dame Nature herself. 

As we enter the structure filled with 
steam, and at times, too, with blinding 
smoke, we see collected on one side the vats 
for holding the sap, while in the center is the 
"evaporator," under which a brisk fire is 
blazing. The evaporator is nothing more 
than an overgrown sap-pan of the olden time, 
measuring, perhaps, five feet by twelve and 
partially crossed by numerous strips of metal 
like the wing dams that one sometimes see 
upon our rivers. At one corner is the 
apparatus for regulating the flow of the sap, 
an instrument akin to a Mariotte bottle. 
Here the sap, which has hitherto been a very 
peaceful fluid, seems angry at its imprison- 
ment and rushes from side to side of the pan, 
venting its wrath in white foam which is 
carefully skimmed off by the watchful at- 
tendant. After it has passed the greater 
number of the wing-dams it becomes more 
quiet, assuming the well-known amber tint 
and becoming slower in its movements. 
Finally it reaches the end of its bounds and 
;s drawn off, either to be further maltreated 
by being made into " candy " or to be stored 
in casks which it quietly sets to work to en- 
crust, from bung to chime, with large, trans- 
parent crystals. 

As we leave the "sweet" sjiot the gonial 
sugar-maker bids us good morning, and bids 
us come some other day when he is niakiini- 
candy. K. K. 



Bowdoin is well rnprosontcd in tlio Maine L(>j 
islature. 



A THOUGHT. 

In the wreath of the smile, 

In the glance of the eye 
Lies the power to beguile 

And the strength to defy; 
But each natural grace 

As each gift of the mind 
Has its own worthy place 

In the worlv for mankind. 



A STORY WITH A IVIORAL. 

One cold stormy night in the winter of 
18 — a number of boys were collected around a 
nice warm fire in No. 25. It was one of those 
nights when the wind howls and roars around 
the corners of the building, making one think 
of the old battles of the gods pictured by 
Milton (or of the time when he was a Fresh 
and played foot-ball with the Sophs) ; when 
the wind creeps in under the door and gently 
induces one to put his feet upon the stove 
and draw himself down into his easy chair, 
thanking his lucky stars that he is not a sailor, 
or an engineer on a night express, or any of 
those horrible things, — just the night to make 
old friends thoughtful and confidential. 

Representatives from each of the four 
classes were present. From the beginning it 
was evident that the thoughts of those pres- 
ent were not upon the lessons of the next day 
nor even in Brunswick, but were wandering 
away to the scene of many a pleasant time 
past. I was then a Senior, full of that quiet 
dignity which so much becomes the members 
of the class when put on ; it is never nat- 
ural. After talking a little while over some 
of their many youthful experiences, one of 
the boys, a Sophomore, turning to a member 
of the next lower class, said : 

" Irving, do you write to (hat girl of yours 
now'/ " 

Irving replied that he did, regularly. 

" Don't you find it an awful bore lo have 
to write every week?" again asked the inquis- 
itive Soph. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



161 



" No," replied Irving, " I find that to 
spend a little while Sunday afternoon writing 
to the lady in question, is a very pleasant way 
to pass my time. It keeps me out of mischief 
and at the same time I find that I am receiv- 
ing a great deal of good. It is the only good 
way we have to associate with the ladies, and 
you yourself will acknowledge that that is a 
most desirable part of life." 

" Yes," replied the Sophomore, " but I 
think that I can associate with them during 
vacation all that is needful for me." 

Just here the grave and reverend Senior 
broke forth. "Boys," said he, "I want to 
relate my experience in that direction. When 
I entered college I used to write to a young 
lady of my acquaintance once a week regu- 
larly. At first we wrote two sheets a week. 
Since in love as in everything else we cannot 
stand still, but must go backward or forward, 
we followed in the footsteps of others and 
advanced. By the end of my second term we 
got so that we wrote four sheets a week. 
Now there is a limit to everything. So after 
things had gone on in this way a month or 
so, I began to feel as if I should like to have 
a Sunday afternoon to myself once in a while. 
After a fejlow has studied hard all the week 
he does not care to spend all day Sunday 
writing letters. Sometimes he wants to read, 
or, if he be of a religious turn of mind, to go 
to Sabbath School. Although I did not care 
to go to Sabbath School, I did like to read a 
good book. I used to think with myself: 'If 
I only had my Sundays to myself, I could 
read a lot and perhaps profit by it.' 

" The more I tiiought of this, the more I 
wished that I did not have to write letters. 
Matters went on in this way for some little 
time. During that time I committed more 
sin in the way of swearing than I could con- 
fess in a week. I got so I really dreaded to 
have Sunday come around. It nearly spoiled 
my temper ; indeed, I have not fully got over 
the surliness brought about by that dreadful 



year. For the first part of the week I would 
be in very light spirits, but by the time Thurs- 
day got around I would begin to grow ugly, 
and by Saturday night there was no such 
thing as living with me. I. soon found that 
something must be done. Well, boys, the 
upshot of it was that some other fellow wrote 
the letters, and I was left in peace. Take 
the advice of one older in years and experi- 
ence, and write no more letters." 

I am glad to say that this advice had its 
effect upon some six or seven of the boys 
present, and six hearts were broken thereby. 
Dear reader, from this a moral may be 
drawn, — but I will leave that to you. 



COMMUHICATIOK. 



To the Editors of the Orient : _ 

All who are acquainted with our Faculty 
acknowledge their great worth. They are 
always ready to do anything in their power 
for the students and also for the graduates. 
Of course it would be very presumptuous for 
me to try to advise the Faculty as to their 
duty; and, even if I should try, I should fail. 
But does tlie Faculty do all within its power 
to help the college along? Hazing and a 
good many things which happen every year 
have done a great deal to hurt the college. 
Last term, after certain persons got so they 
vt'ould do almost anything in the shape of 
"deviltry," three of them were advised to go 
home hefore they were sent home. In a 
few weeks they were allowed to come back. 
Now there is no one in college more sorry 
to see any of the boys sent home than the 
writer of this article. But after such 
actions as were carried on here last fall, some- 
body ought to have gone home and stayed 
there. To my certain knowledge there are 
quite a number of boys who will do all they 
can to stop actions which, outside of college, 
are punishable by law, provided they could get 



162 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



an}' help or encouragement from the "powers 
that be." The Faciilt}' say, and it is one of 
the most humane of human ideas, " We treat 
the students as gentlemen and appeal to 
their own idea of right in our government." 
This is all right as long as they are dealing 
with gentlemen ; but when the students cease 
to be such, what must be done ? It is cer- 
tainly discouraging to those who are trying 
to help the college along and doing every- 
thing in their power to further its interests, 
to see the Faculty wink at misdemeanors. 
If they would only take some stringent 
measures to stop them, Bowdoin College 
would have more students and a better class. 
That is, more who now go to other colleges. 
where such things are not countenanced, 
would come here, and those who now come 
would lead a different life. 



THE I. R. A. 

In response to the call of Wesleyan, del- 
egates from Columbia, Cornell, University of 
Pennsylvania, Princeton, Rutgers, Wesleyan, 
and Bowdoin met at the Hoffman House, 
New York City, December 28th, and formed 
the Inter-collegiate Rowing Association. The 
constitution of the old Inter-collegiate Ath- 
letic Association was so revised and amended 
as to answer the purpose of the new organi- 
zation, and a committee was appointed to 
revise further the constitution, so that by 
next December, when there is to be another 
meeting of delegates, the association may 
have a complete constitution. 

It was voted to hold the next regatta at 
Lake George,-'July 4, 1883, in which there 
will certainly be a niile-and-a-half, straight- 
away, four-oared shell race, and possibly an 
eight-oared and a sfngle. All further matters 
pertaining to the next race were left to the 
regatta committee, of three graduates, 
Charles Francis of Cornell, Reginald Hart 



of University of Pennsylvania, and John E. 

Eustis of Wesleyan. 

The qualifications for members of the 
crews are attendance of at least five lectures 
a week in a course of study requiring two 
years to obtain a degree or certificate ; such 
attendance to have begun at least six months 
befoie the date of tlie i-ace. As regards 
membership in the association, any college 
that fails to send a crew to the regatta two 
years in successiori forfeits its right of mem- 
bership. 

The minutes of the meeting have not yet 
been published, and as the time was limited 
and business was dispatched in something of 
a hurry, we are able at present to give only 
the most important features of the constitu- 
tion ; but we hope soon to present it more 
fully to the readers of the Orient. The 
greatest enthusiasm was manifested at the 
meeting, and all were anxious for an associa- 
tion by which a race would be guaranteed 
every year. It would seem as if a new era 
in college rowing was about to be in- 
augurated, and it is certainl}' the earnest 
wish of every alumnus and undergraduate 
that Bowdoin should come to the front. So 
let the crew get to work and deserve the 
support which we trust they will get from 
all. 



Tlie two recitation rooms in tlie liasement of 
Memorial Hall are completely furnished and are 
now in use. The room on the west side of the 
vestibule is for the Seniors exelusivel.v : the one on 
the opposite side is called the classical room, and is 
used by the two lower classes in their recitations in 
Greek and Latin. Both rooms are thoroughly 
equipped with patent settees with rests attached, 
blackboards, raised platforms and desks for the 
instructor, and arc heated by furnaces below. The 
walls are richly tinted, and the windows provided 
with curtains. The Senior room has also neat and 
substantial cases for the volumes composing the 
Senior library. Indeed, it would be dillicnlt to find 
more commodious and finely a])poinii'd rooms for 
recitations or lectures in any insiitution in the 
country, than those provided tor u.s by those friends 
of the college who have erected tlu' grand Bowdoii; 
Memorial Uall. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



163 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 

TRIOLETS. 
The gas is turned low, 

We're sitting together, 
'Tis jjast time to go. 
The gas is turned low, 
"We speali of, you know, 

Little else but the weather. 
The gas is turned low. 

We're sitting together. 

I speak in her ear. 

She bends her head slightly. 

She is now very near, 

I speak in her ear, 

I have no idea 

She'll think of it lightly. 

I speak in her ear. 

She bends her head slightly. 

She looks in my face, 

Can it be she's enraged ? 
I think I've a case, 
She looks in my face, 
And answers with grace, 

" No, thanks, I'm engaged." 
She looks in my face, 

Can it be she's enraged ? 

9, 14, 17, 23. 

Let's have a Senior class election. 

Fling, '83, is canvassing in Portland. 

The book auctioneers didn't get rich. 

Certain men of mark — class monitors. 

Chase, '85, spent the vacation in town. 

How would a weekly Orient strike you f 

Didn't the rooms warm up slowly though ? 

Broken that New- Year's tobacco pledge yet ? 

Great deficiency of water in the campus wells. 

A number of bad colds were contracted duriug 
vacation. 

The Senior chemistry division use the laboratory 
in Adams Hall. 

Prof. Robinson's Senior Bible Class is studying 
the life of Paul. 

The winter term opened with chapel exercises 
on Tuesday morning, Jan. 9. 

The Dutch-loviug men from '83 are reading the 
last part of the Maid of Orleans. 

As far as can be learned the Bugle is doing well 
the work to which it was dedicated. 

The Alpha Delta Phi eating club is now located 
at the house of Mr. Hill on Page Street. 



Usual delay about starting up the reading- 
room. 

The Freshmen have tackled the Greek lyric 
poets. 

Some new books have been received at the 
library. 

The standard papers of Maine appreciate the 
Orient. 

Arrangements are being made for a series of 
Germans. 

Four men from North Bridgton Academy will 
enter '87. 

Auction of reading-room papers last Saturday 
afternoon. 

The Juniors ought to complete their hst of Ivy 
Day officers. 

Lecture hours are arranged very conveniently 
for the Seniors. 

The heating apparatus in Memorial Hall needs 
more attention. 

Prof. Chapman is now librarian, in addition to 
his other duties. 

The jovial H. Clay is once more a feature in 
Brunswick society. 

An appeal to the understanding — wipe your 
feet before entering. 

Austin, '83, has charge of the reading-room and 
mail-box at present. 

Why don't the Freshmen take steps toward pur- 
chasing a class boat? 

An able-bodied y agger would find considerable 
to do round college now. 

Prayers in Memorial Hall accommodates the 
clubs on Cleaveland Street. 

Liability to take cold won't save a man from at- 
tending prayers this winter. 

Early rising is a good thing this winter, that is, 
as far as bread is concerned. 

Perkins, '83, has completed his school at Fort 
Popham and rejoined his class. 

A bulletin-board in Memorial Hall is essential 
now that prayers are held there. 

Communications for the Orient may be dropped 
into the letter-box at the office door. 

The bell-ringer has a standing excuse from 
prayers. Some men are born lucky. 

The Seniors will finish geglogy under Prof. Lee 
in the President's intervals of absence. 

Mr. Cutler has been obliged to resign his posi- 
tion as tutor in rhetoric. We understand that the 
vacancy thus made will not be filled at present. 



164 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A Senior says that the maid of Orleans was a 
brunette, for wasn't she Joan d' Arc ? 

Seen those Turkish rugs, reclining chairs, and 
inlaid desks iu the new Okient office? 

Senior and Junior " exs. " are a httle less ex- 
pensive to the participants than formerly. 

The old Senior room in North Maine is to be 
used hereafter as a modern language room. 

Child, '84, is working up quite a business in 
procuring text-books for the several classes. 

The Colby boys are to have the pleasure of 
listening to a lecture by Pres. Chamberlain. 

The " Electric Spark" didn't draw well. There 
is such a thing as too much of a good show. 

The boating and ball men are vainly waiting 
for a place in which to keep their muscles up. 

The Bugle editors are feeling a little shaky. 
Won't you help them out by taking another copy? 

We are sorry to see decided evidence of flirting 
in the organ loft during service at the hill church. 

Eating onions keeps the lips from chapping and 
the chaps from lipping. Spread this among the 
girls. 

The Greek division of '85 is reading the Olyn- 
thiacs ; the Latin division the Tusculan Disputa- 
tions. 

Elective mathematics is becoming more popu- 
lar. Fifteen from '85 take it. Bowser'.s Analytics 
is used. 

Eighteen Seniors have elected English literat- 
ure for this term, fourteen chemistry, and five 
German. 

Notice that mail matter fur midnight trains 
must be dropped into the box in South Maine 
before 6 p.m. 

Won't some Brunswick girl kindly give us one 
of her cast-off overshoes to use as a waste-basket 
in the Orient office ? 

Prof. Campbell dedicated tlio new Senior room 
by a lecture on the " History of Phildsuphy," Tues- 
day morning, January Dth. 

A select class in optional modern geometry has 
l)een formed among the Freshmen. The test-book 
used is by Prof. McDonald. 

Prof Lee is in demand as a lecturer. IJis re- 
cent lecture before the students on the " Physio- 
logical Effects of Alcoholic Stimulants," and his ad- 
dress in Portland on tin; " Metamorphoses of Ani- 
mals," have been very favorably commented upon. 



The Seniors' rank bills showed that one of our 
Professors was bound to have his revenge iu some 
way for certain proceedings. 

" Furnished Eooms," by a good company, ap- 
pearing in Lewiston this week attracted quite a 
number of students to that city. 

A Freshman was lately heard bewailing the 
hard fortune that gave him only 9.16 in rank last 
term. Age will improve that youth. 

"The same remorseless old feud," sighed a 
Soph, at one of the clubs, as he accepted his plate 
of hash on the first morning of tiie term. 

The advantages of the new office ought to 
encite the Juniors and Sophomores to greater 
efforts in trying to get on the next Board. 

The armory has been changed into a base-ball 
room. The old ball-room will be occupied by 
Walker and Child, '84, the rest of the year. 

We hear that comet parties have been popular 
at Bath. By Jupiter, some fellows are bound to 
planet so as to get the girls away from their Mars. 

It is hoped that a schedule of the ball games 
to be played next spring with the Colby and Bates 
nines may be arranged in time to appear in our next 
number. 

The Medical Department opens on Thursday, 
February 8th. The opening lecture will be deliv- 
ered at 3 P.M., by Prof Hunt. A large entering 
class is assured. 

Class officers for the term are as follows: For 
the Seniors, Prof. Lee ; for. the Juniors, Prof. Rob- 
inson ; for the Sophomores, Mr. Little ; and for the 
Freshmen, Mr. Fisher. 

Prof. Cleavelaud, known and admired upon 
both sides of the Atlantic, served a part of the 
time, while a member of the Bowdoin Faculty, as 
captain of a Brunswick fire company. 

How our temperance association booms the good 
cause here in college. The new names on the pledge 
must average as many as two a month. Those 
meetings are such interesting affairs, too ! 

Details of a Hirtation between a student return- 
ing to college on a midnight train and a young lady 
from St. Katie's, Augusta, have reached the edito- 
rial oar, but will be withheld for the present. 

First Junior (to second do., who is groaning and 
executing peculiar facial contortions while acting 
as his own barber) — " Don't your razor take hold 
well, D — P" Second Junior— "0 yes, it takes 
hold well, but it don't let go worth a cent." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 



165 



The Mendelssohu Quintette Club, of Boston, 
would like to assist in the class exercises at Com- 
mencement this year. Guess they don't know how 
'83 is fixed in regard to that important event. 

The Brunswick and Topsham Musical Associa- 
tion has reorganized, and a class has been formed 
under the instruction of Kotzschmar of Portland. 
Several of the students are members of the class. 

A contributor to our last number complains 
that his piece appeared with some important 
punctuation marks omitted. He should remember 
that the average compositor is not a pointer, but a 
setter. 

President Chamberlain spoke before the Y. M. 
C. A., in the Senior recitation room, on the last 
Sunday afternoon of the fall term. He gave his 
lecture on the " Surrender of Lee," at Fryeburg, 
during vacation. 

Lecture in history of iDhilosophy. Prof. — 
" Thales maintained that water was the foundation 
and necessary principle of all things. He left no 
works behind him." Loud whisper from the out- 
skirts, "Thank God!" 

The next lecture in the B. A. Course will be de- 
livered on the 15th of February by Mr. George 
Makepeace Towle, on Gambetta. The recent death 
of .the great French statesman will give to this ad- 
dress a peculiar importance. 

Question has been raised as to the significance 
of the word " rhetoricals " on the schedule of Senior 
studies for this term. From past experience we 
should infer that the word was placed upon the 
paper merely to fill up space that would otherwise 
be blank. 

It is stated that one or two of the Sophomores 
have refused to take the Bugles that they pledged 
to take, because '85 got rather more than her share 
of notice in the volume. A man that willingly 
gives himself away as badly as that is certainly to 
be pitied. 

Great consternation was aroused among the 
Seniors the other day by the President's remarks, 
"Now, gentlemen, I am going to give you four 
marks." Fears were allayed, however, when he 
went on to say that the marks were to be merely 
points in a line of argument. 

Goodwin, '83, represented Bowdoiu at the meet- 
ing of delegates from the colleges making up the 
Inter-collegiate Rowing Association, at the Hoff- 
man House, New York City, on the 28th of last 



month. A four-oared race at Lake George on July 
4, 1883, was determined upon. The record of the 
other transactions of thisLmeetiug may be found in 
another column. 

It would be a real pleasure to everybody if we 
could have a Hugle free from mistakes. In the 
current number, Longfellow's class is given as 1824 
instead of 1825, and Mr. Stetson's name is omitted 
in the notice of the present Orient Board, beside 
a number of blunders of less importance. These 
blunders, however, were not made by the printer, 
but were in the copy. 

The Okient Board are now ready to receive 
congratulations upon the culmination of their 
hopes, schemes, and labors, a pleasantly situated, 
well-furnished, and comfortable offlce for our col- 
lege journal. To the '82 Board is due the concep- 
tion of the idea of such a convenience, and had it 
not been for several drawbacks, chief among which 
were the objections of that important personage, 
our Prof, of Dust and Ashes, they would have seen 
the consummation in their time. But we may be 
pardoned when we say that we are not sorry that 
to us was reserved the carrying out of the project 
which they originated, and thus of marking an im- 
portant era in journalism at Bowdoin. The '82 
men will always be held in most grateful remem- 
brance for their share in the work, but we should 
be overmodest if we did nofr claim some credit for 
the accomplishment of the part left for us to do. 
And now a word in description of the offlce. As 
has been before stated in these columns, it is 
situated on the ground floor in South Maine, 
directly across the hall way from the reading-room. 
It is 15x16 feet in size, has a high ceiling, and is light- 
ed by three large windows. The college treasurer 
has caused it to be newly papered and painted, and 
furnished it with a good base burner for heating. 
The present Board have provided it with ample 
cases for the files, chairs, tables, a chandelier, and 
side lamps, and all other apparatus necessary to 
editorial work. A neat sign over the door outside 
marks the location. More furniture will be added 
from time to time during the remainder of '83's 
regime, until the room is elegant as well as con- 
venient and comfortable. It is the intention of the 
Board to have the offlce open to the college public 
every afternoon and evening, except on occasions 
when the transaction of Geient business demands 
the exclusion of outside parties. Of course the 
room cannot be thrown open to everybody at all 



166 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



times as the reading-roora is, but abundant oppor- 
tunity will be given for an examination of the ex- 
change table. The thanks of the Board and of the 
whole college is due tu 'President Chamberlain, 
Treasurer Young, and, indeed, to all the Faculty, 
for the kindness they have shown in encouraging 
and substantially helping along a project which, 
in its present consummation, we believe cannot fail 
to result in profit and pleasure to us all. 

The first Senior and Junior Exhibition of the 
present college year was held in the upper hall of 
Memorial, on Thursday evening, December 21st, 
the last night of the fall term, with the following 
program : 

MUSIC. 

Salutatory Oration in Latin. 

H. K. Goodwin, Augusta. 
Protection of American Shipping. 

A. C. Gibson, Bangor. 
Eulogy on the Martial Legion.— English Version from i 

Cicero. * J. A. Waterman, Jr., Gorham. 

The Evolution of Theories. 

tA. E. Austin, Reaflfield. 

MUSIC. 

The Modern Type of Oiipression. 

E. A. Paclcard, Auburn. 
Wallenstein to his Soldiers. — English Version from Schil- 
ler. *C. C. Torrey, Yarmouth. 
The Future of the Democratic Party: 

tF. M. Fling, Portland. 

Funeral Oration on Cond(!'. — Englisli Version from the 

French of Bossuet. *0. W. Means, Augusta. 

MUSIC. 

False yEstheticism. 

H. E. Cole, Sebago. 
Oration against Philip. — English Version from Demos- 
thenes. *E. C. Smith, Augusta. 
Obligations of Educated Men. 

tW. A. Perkins, Salem, N. H. 
What is Truth ? 

G. B. Swan, Waldoboro. 

MUSIC. 

* Juniors. t Excused. 

A larger audience has not listened to Senior and 
Junior speaking for many years than that which 
nearly filled the spacious auditorium. Most excel- 
lent music was furnished by Prof. Grimmer's Or- 
chestra. It is to be regretted that so many were 
compelled, by absence from college, to be excused 
from speaking, although the length of souie of the 
parts delivered made the exercises sullicii-'ntly Imig. 
All pronounced the exhibition a good oiu\ 

Where shall the new organ be placed," seonis to 
be a question of paramount importance to our 
genial brother of the Telegraph. As the organ is 
for the Congregational church wo would suggest 
that it be placed exactly in the center of the body 
of the church, and then, since the audience will be 



situated where it can command all sides of the In- 
strument, perhaps we sh:dl hear no more hints of 
unorthodox actions in the choir. 

The lower hall in Memorial is now used for the 
college devotional exercises. This room can be 
heated much more effectually than the chapel, and 
on this account the change for the present is a 
good one. We are glad to learn, however, that as 
soon as the weather permits we shall return to the 
old place, for somehow the impressiveness of the 
esercLses is impaired by holding them in any other 
place than where the saints and worthies of Bow- 
doin have listened to Professor Packard for so many 
vears. 



PROFESSOR PACKARD. 

THE CELEBRATION OF HIS EIGHTY - FOURTH 
BIRTHDAY. 

The hall of the Historical Society, Portland, was 
well filled Saturday evening, Dec. 23, 1882, to do 
honor to that grand old Professor who has served 
the college so long and faithfully. The daily papers 
gave so full accounts at the time that we refrain 
from going into details. President Chamberlain 
delivered the principal address of the evening, an 
eloquent tribute to Professor Packard, full of pathos, 
yet relieved at times by flashes of humor. 

Professor Packard, in reply, adopted the lan- 
guage of Dr. Guthrie on receiving a testimonial 
from the churches of Scotland : " Some may think," 
said Dr. Guthrie, "that this has blown me up, but 
no, it has caused me humiliation " : and he went on 
to say that he regarded the distinction of the meet- 
ing as due rather to his advanced years than to 
anything he had done. But it seems to us that an 
editorial in the Portland Advertiser of the next day 
gives the true reason of the love and veneration felt 
for the noble old man. We cannot forbear quoting : 

Professor Packard said Satiu-day evening that the His- 
torical Society observed liis birthday, not on account of 
what he had done but as a mark of respect for his ad- 
vanced age. There are older men than he to whom no 
such tribute would lie awarded. The true explanation 
would never occur to him. It is not wliat he has done but 
what he is, that draws all hearts toward him. Neither 
great deeds nor many years can commaiul affection, whicli 
is after all the possession best wortli having in this world, 
and is the natural reward of an affectionate disposition, 
like attracting like in this as in other respects. 

Among the literary treats of the evening was a 
sonnet read by Professor Chapman, which we give 
in another column. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



167 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates and Undergraduates are earnestly solicited 
to send j)ersonal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Bruns- 
wick.] 

The following in regard to the members of the 
class of '60, has been kindly sent us by H. H. Bur- 
bank, of Saco, the class historian : 

A. L. Allen was clerk in U. S. Treasury Depart- 
ment ; was admitted to the York County Bar in 
1866; has been Clerk of Courts of the same county 
since 1871, and has recently been appointed Clerk 
of the Judiciary Committee, Washington, D. C. 

J. F. Appletou died at Bangor, Aug. 31, 1870. 
After reading law a year, he joined the 12th Me. 
Regt., and participated bravely at the seige of Port 
Hudson. He was made Colonel of a negro regi- 
ment, was subsequently brevetted Brig. Gen., and 
after the war was admitted to the bar at Bangor. 

N. E. Boyd, taught school for a time and served 
for about a year in the 2.5th Me. Regt. He was in 
the Portland Custom House for four years, then 
studied at the Meadville (Pa.) Divinity School; 
preached in various places until ill health drove 
him to California, where he is now engaged as 
agent of a San Francisco publishing house. 

S. S. Boyd, read law in Portland, afterwards 
being admitted there, and then practiced in St. 
Louis, where he has largely confined his work to 
patent law. 

A. W. Bradbury, traveled south and then read 
law at Eastport. He entered the U. S. service in 
1861, and was finally promoted to Lieut. Colonel 
and Chief of Artillery. He was in the Maine 
militia for five years upon the staff of Maj. Gen. 
Chamberlain. 

J. M. Brown, entered the army ; was present at 
the battles of Autietam, Shepardstovvu Ford, and 
Fredericksburg; was appointed Aid to Gen. Ayers; 
was commissioned Lieut. Col. 32d Maine, and was 
in the Virginia campaign until discharged on ac- 
count of wounds received at Petersburg, being 
brevetted Brig. Gen. He is an Overseer of Bow- 
doin College; was sent as a Commissioner to the 
Paris Exhibition in 1867; is now Colonel of First 
Maine Regiment, and is engaged in the banking 
business at Portland. 

H. P. Brown, was killed at Antietam, Sept. 13, 
1862. 

A. P. Bucknam, taught for a time in Maine and 
in Texas ; served in the army ; received his M. D. 
degree from the Medical School in 1864, and lias 



been engaged in a large medical practice at 
Warren, III. 

H. H. Burbank, taught school for a while; read 
law at Harvard ; was two years in the army ; 
practiced law fur ten years in Limerick, Me., and 
since 1875 has practiced law in Saco, Me. He 
held the oflSce of Judge Advocate on Gov. Connor's 
Staff for three years. 

S. M. Came, read law at Alfred and at Harvard 
Law School, and has since practiced in Alfred. 

George Cary, was in the army two years; was 
State Senator from Aroostook in 1869, and is now 
practicing medicine in Houlton. 

Robert Cash, went to San Francisco soon after 
graduating and embarked in the enterprise of ex- 
tracting gold from the ore by modern appliances. 

M. D. Chaplin, practiced law in Auburn, and 
was burned to death, Dec. 13, 1869. 

P. G. Clifford, served for a time in the army, 
and, although partially blind, carries on a farm in 
Edgecomb. 

W. T. H. Craig, died two years after graduat- 
ing, a patient sufferer from consumption. 

W. L. Crowell, read law ; taught school ; edited 
a paper, and died at San Francisco in 1867. 

A. H. Davis, was Professor of Latin at Bowdoin 
College in ]87.'5, and in 1876 accepted the position 
of Head Master of the High Schools in Salem and 
Worcester, Mass. 

L. G. Downes, traveled through England and 
France, and since has practiced law in Calais. He 
is an Overseer of Bowdoin College. 

G. B. Emery, began the practice of law in Port- 
land, but is now settled in Gorham. 

S. A. Evans, was on the Scientific Expedition 
to Labrador and Greenland in 1860, and is now a 
physician at Conway, N. H. 

R. E. Farnham, since 1862 has been employed 
as civil engineer in Chicago. 

S. C. Farrington, served in the army, and later 
acted as civil engineer at Fryeburg. Five years 
ago he went to Wisconsin and nothing later has 
been heard from him. 

'76 — Parsons was married to Miss A. B. Scarritt, 
at Cairo, 111. He is in the brokerage business in 
New York City. 

'77.— Tillson is a civil engineer at Omaha, Neb. 

'79 — Lumbert, of Houlton, Me., was married, 
Nov. 26th, to Miss Gertrude Horton, of Houlton. 



An American took first prize in mathematics at 
the University of Heidelberg, Germany. 



168 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



CIxIPPIKGS. 



Man proposes and the girl weighs his pocliet- 
book and decides.— J?*. 

The father of a two-weeks' old baby called her 
Ma's newly discovered satellite.— £^i;. 
Song of the Salvation Army : 

If you can't get in at the golden gate, 
Get over the garden wall. — Ex. 

"Nothing but leaves," said Eve pleasantly, when 
Adam praised the taste shown in her new polo- 
naise.— i)fa?ic7tester Union. 

It rains alike on the just and the unjust— and 
on the just mainly because the unjust have bor- 
rowed their umbrellas. — Ex. 

Viola Vassar (who is home on her Thanksgiving 
vacation) says she don't object to a man's staring 
at her ; but when she looks back and finds him 
looking back too, it's too presuming for anything. 
— AthencEum. 

■' Did Mr. B — call in my absence, John ? '' " No 
mum! but Mr. Thank Heavens did, leastways when 
I told him you were oat, and asked what name to 
give you he said kind of low like," " Missed her, 
thank heavens ! " — Ex. 

''Violet, dearest, do you play that tune often f " 
asked Hugh Montressor of his affianced. "Yes, pet, 
and when we are married I'll play it all the time." 
Then Hugh went out and shuddered himself to 
death. — Midland Sem. 

Junior (on the train, to young mother with a 
noisy baby) — " I beg pardon, madam, but can I be 
of a.ssistance to you?" Young Mother — "No, I 
thank you. " (More squalling.) Junior — " You had 
better let me try, I think I can quiet it." Young 
Mother (innocently)—" No, I guess not, thank you, 
the poor little darling is hungry, that's all." — 
Cornell Sun. 

FORTUNE TELLING. 

Her little liand lay soft in mine, 

Wliilo, ii'cT its ])inl< ji.alni bonding, 
Itrarcd Willi ciliv i;i(U wavv line 
In hoiii- llic sr.ivts l,Mli\inr 

Hid in tlii'ir yi-acclnl lilcndinj;. 

I spoke of fortune's gifts in store; 

Of prospects briglit and pleasant; 
Of wealtli, ease, travels, sea and shore. 
Discarded suitor.s, full a score, 

Of him who sighed at present. 

" His Mrilcnl wdnin^^r must succeed," 

.Siiiil I, '■ ;i-i |il:iinly written"; 
But sill'. Muilr iiilil.'ss, indeed: 
Softly ri'iiliril, ■■ rr;iy, I'lui you read 

Tlio inuaniiiH in tliis niilten ? " 

—Athenoiiiin. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 

Ye jolly editor has not sufficiently recovered 
from his frolics of the holidays to settle down to 
wearisome work ; for it is sometimes weari- 
'some indeed, in spite of the exhilaration he feels 
in giving vent to the great thoughts that shall mold 
the minds of his little world of readers ; and conse- 
quently our exchanges are few that bear the date 
of 1883. What a thrill of pride and expectation 
'83 awakes in the bosom of the Senior ! This 
is our year, the year we have looked forward to 
ever since we entered as Freshmen. It seems as if 
the whole world ought to feel that it is to be 
invaded by thirty-five young men before '83 draws 
to a close, and subdued, too, for when we leave Bow- 
doin's walls, it is our firm intention to conquer the 
world and bring it in subjection to our feet. How- 
ever, this glow of pride is quickly cooled by the 
chilly blasts that sweep across our campus, and we 
return to our exchanges. 

Chaff's January number is before us, but we sus- 
pect that, like the magazines, it is dated half a month 
ahead. But Chaff, whether early or late, is always 
welcome, and the only fault we find is that he does 
not come oftener. He has opened up a new mine 
in the shape of a column headed " De Aliquibus," 
a sort of Personal column. Among its items we 
find the following interesting ones: "Mr. Jay 
Gould is engaged "— " Chester A. Arthur is Presi- 
dent of the United Stfites" — "Mr. Ulysses S. 
Grant, who acquired some notoriety as President of 
the United States, is at present doing nothing in 
particular." 

We are always pleased to welcome a new ex- 
change from "our female sisters," and the latest is 
the Abbott Courant from the Female Senlin;^ry at 
Audover, Mass. Their papers are particularly in- 
teresting, as being the only weapon with which tlie 
much-abused girl of the period can defend herself, 
one which she readily avails herself of. Tliis num- 
ber of the Courant contains an article on American 
girls which is a most eloquent protest against the 
manner in which our authors seize upon the weak- 
est and coarsest types of girls and parade them 
before the public, both hero and abroad, as fair spec- 
imens of their species. It is from the works of 
these authors and perhaps its own observation of a 
few girls who make themselves conspicuous by 
their indifference to its code of propriolies, that 
England, for instance, forms its opinion of the 
American girl ; as is apparent to any reailor of an 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



169 



English novel, where the girl from America is rep- 
reseoterl as an untutored savage and a thorough 
barbarian. Henry James' "Daisy Miller" was 
heralded as a fair type of the American girl abroad, 
but the Courant's con-espondent thinks foreigners 
would have a better idea of what the American girl 
really is and'aims to be, if they read "Avis," or 
" Doctor Zay," or " Aunt Serena." Thus does the 
Courant take up the cudgels to vindicate our girls. 
May victory crown its labors and the cause 
never lack champions among the sterner sex. 
Another contribiitor points out the claims of the 
Pilgrim Mothers to a place in history. It never 
occurred to us before how prominent a part these 
matrons must have played in the early history of 
New England, and what a far-reaching influence 
they have had upon the characters of our forefath- 
ers. We never tire of estolling the perseverance, 
the self-denial, the religious zeal of the Pilgrim 
Fathers, but it is seldom we have a thought for 
those noble women who, giving up all the comforts 
of civilization, followed their husbands to this bar- 
ren shore; who bore unflinchingly all the dangers 
and hardships of those times ; and who raised up 
such generations of men as have made this country 
what it is. If the men were actuated by religious 
zeal, how much stronger must it have been in the 
women who, too, transmitted it to their children, 
for it is at the mother's knee that the child gets its 
first instruction. So let the Pilgrim Mothers have 
all honor, and let us always have an attentive ear 
to what our sisters of the quill have to say either 
for themselves or their mothers. 

The Holiday Number of the Bates Student closes 
the labors of the present board, and they certainly 
go out with flying- colors. It is by far, we think, 
the best number they have produced, and would 
be a credit to any college. The Student, speaking 
from its experience of the past year, takes occasion 
to sketch its ideal of a college paper, and predicts 
a most brilliant future for college journalism. A 
future which, we are afraid, will not be realized 
till the millennium ; however, it is always a good 
thing to aim high. The Student would have the 
college paper the medium that shall convey to the 
common mind in a simple form the great thoughts 
of the day, and confidently predicts that the begin- 
ning of the twentieth century shall find the college 
journal the living exponent of living ideas. We 
are glad to see the Student take a more pop- 
ular and, as we would think, a more sensible view 
of co-education. Hitherto, the columns of the Sti(- 
dent have teemed with the most absurd and fan- 



tastic ideas on the subject, but now it appears that 
there is considerable difference of opinion among 
its editors, and one of them comes forward and 
recognizes the possibihty of a turn in the tide of 
public sentiment which, he avers, has for several 
years flowed in favor of co-education ; and he 
wisely concludes that "its future career will be a 
matter to be decided only by the coming years." 
The Student also presents us with an article on 
" The Useless in Education," in which the author 
raises the old cry of less time to ancient languages 
and mathematics and more to modern languages 
and the sciences ; a cry that is very little heeded by 
college faculties who stand more firmly upon the 
narrow platform of conservatism than did the walls 
of Jericho when assailed by the trumpets of Joshua. 
The StudenVs poetry is hardly up to the standard of 
its literary articles, but there is one thing certainly 
that the Student is to be congratulated upon, and 
that is the interest the alumni appear to take in its 
success. The present number contains two exten- 
sive communications from alumni, such as would 
delight the editorial heart of the Orient to receive.. 
The Tech. is, as usual, bright and entertaining, 
in spite of its occasional heavy scientific articles, 
which, however, we suppose is what its readers 
demand. The Tech. has the following simple and 
touching ballad : 

ONLY ONE. 

There's a name upon our books — 

Only one, it cannot fade; 
Innocent enough it looks, — 

'Tis the snide that never paid. 

As we turn those pages o'er, 

Thinking; how we'd hoped and prayed 

For the money or the gore 
Of the beat that never paid, 

'Tis with anguish we recall, 

Cold and stark our bulldog laid ; 

And he could not overhaul 

That vile wretch that never paid. 

(We have another dog.) 



DREKA 

FINE STATIONERY and ENGRAVING 
HOUSE. 

Handsomely Engraved Invitations for 

ly Colleges, Weddings, Receptions, &c. 

Fraternity Stationery always on hand. 

Our uuequaled facilities and long practical experience, enable 
us to produce the newest stjles and most artistic effects, while 
our reputation is a guarantee of the quality of our productions. 

II2I Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



L. C. YOUNG, 

WOODFORD'S, - - - MAINE, 

Will visit Bowdoin College with a larr/e line of 

Samples, to take orders for Spring, Wednesday, 

Feb. 21s/, and Wednesday, Feb. 28ih. 

B^WILL SHOW SAMPLES AT 15 M. H.^i 




S^IBL&CKWELLSC?^, 

lOBJ 

These Goods are sold under an 



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goods upon the market ; 
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They consist of the Finest Tobacco ar.d 

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of the BULL. Take no other. 

W.TJLACRWELL&CO. 

Sole Manufacturers. Durham, N. C. 



QBUTIQM TO SMOKIBS. 

Beirare of Imitations and Connterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 

^^=^ ' ^-^^ TRY IT. 

^^ Fine, Mild & Sweet. 

Fac simile Signature on if. IVo Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




432 Washington St., Boston, 

Invite attention to tlie largest and finest stock in the city, of 

DIAMONDS, RARE GEMS, 

KEPRESENTATIVES OF THE 

Gorham Manufacturing Company, in Boston. 

Exliibil a large and complete collection of the 

SOLID SILVER AND ELECTRO-PLATED WARES 

PUODUCED BY THIS COSIPAXV. 

The ornamentations now used and (he effects produced, are 
something entirely novel in the craft of the Silversmith, and will 
interest every one by their combination of artistic and useful 
qualities. 

Especial Attention given to Designing Class-Day 
and College Invitations of Every Description. 



»» 



924 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.. 




Pan I 
ologieal 



Microscopes, 
„^ , Telescopes, 
~'t \ Field Glasses, 
Opera Glasses, 
Drawing Instruments, 
Surveying Instiurnents, 
Thermometers, 

Barometers, 
Magic Lanterns, 
Apparatus for 

Projection, 
Pliilosopliical and 
Cliemicnl Apparatus. 

)l,l,ii\VS SKNT ON .\1'1'1,10ATION: 
ininuMils, KB liases. Part '2— Opllcnl 
I 'art ;!— Magic Lanterns, 120 pngoa. 
iiiineius, 100 pages. Part 5— Jfoteor- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



FIME SMiMFM 



MADE FROM MEASURE, 



1. PllFlCT FIT GOAI^ITEID. 



Also a Full Assortment ot 



GENTS' FURNISHINGS 



Vmf 



Under Preble House, Portland, Me. 

Orders by Mail Promptly A ftended To. 



MIW BB«G STORE. 



ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

BlUGS, MllICffiES, 

Fancy ani Toilet Articles, Giprsl ToMcco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIIM STREET. 

ja" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

FRAISTK E. ROBERTS 

Hns the Largest and Best Assortment ol Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Corner of IVIain and Mason Streets. 



The Palace Clotliiiis: Store of laiBe 




he:^^ry f. griff j]n^, 

58 Temple Place, BOSTON, 

lupaveTj Stationer-j and Friatei'-, 

Wedding Invitations. Business Cards, &c. 
COLLEGE INVITATIONS A SPECIALTY. 

Beautitul Engraved Visiting Cards. 

Plate and Pack, $1.50 ; former price, $3.00. 

GRIFFIN'S WEDDING CARD DEPOT, 

58 Temple Place, BOSTOibT. 




:^IjXJe; s'ron.:Ej. 



ALL THE LEADING NOVELTIES IN 

YOU'MQ MIM'S OLOTMIl© 

AND NOBBY FURNISHING GOODS. 



STRICTLY ONE PRICE. 

ll^=Boys'and Children's Department entirely separate. 

BLUE STORE, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



@^^?^^ mM<> 



Fine Watches, Jewelry, Silver Ware, &c., 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QUALlTi", AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casoo, 

PORTLAND, - _ _ - MAINK. 

A. CARTER. J. W. D. CARTER. 

SPRING AND SUMMER, 1882. 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times iDe found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiefy, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Ciiflfs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Readj'-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

On ami alter Oct. loth, 1882, 

Passenger Trains leave Brnns-wick 

For Bath. 8.10, 11.25 a.m.. 2.45, 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 
night (Sunday mornings i)nly). 
Eockland, 8.10 a.m., 2.45 p.m. 
Portland. 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 4.30 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 A.M., 12.35 night. 
Lewiston. 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.33 p.m., 12.40 night. 
Parmington, 8.10 a.m. (Mixed), 2.45 p.m. 
Augusta, 8.10 A.M., 2.45, 6.35 P.M., 12.45 niglit. 
Sliowliegan, Belfast, De.vter, and Bangor, 2.45 p.m., and 

12.45 night. 
Watervillc, 8.10 a.m.. 2.45, 6.35 p.m. (Saturdays only), 
12.45 night. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 1882. 



m:^y]>t^rd'S 



Main St., under Town Clock. 

"Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street. - - - Portland Me. 
J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 



MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 

28 Free Street, Portland. Me. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, ----- $1.. so a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROiyiPTLY EXECUTED. 



0^£« 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Coal ~2"a,rd. ixi Topsliain., 

WIIEUK XONF. BUT 

Tbe Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Ur.'iliT in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

.K^Speoial Bates to Student Clubs.-ffit 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



®MHi^®tei| 




^. O. REED 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brnns-nrick and Topshant 
Stereoscopic Vieirs ; also College VieTO-s. 



ALL KINDS OF 




No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged fVoni the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

C. IE. 1'0-'C\7'lNrSE3Sr3D, 

CHOICE GROcTrIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Riites to Students. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- jFINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, :e= li I c IE s X-, o ^xr 

750 Middle Street. - - - - Port/and Me. 



For Schools and Colleges, 



EXECUTED AT THE 



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The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
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and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY. — Joshua L, Chamberlain, IJj.D , President; Israel T. 
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Stephen- H. Weeks, M.D , Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles 0. 
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ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

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Vol. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JANUARY 31, 1883. 



No. 13. 



/te-V T^^R 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
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BOWDOIN ORtB 




BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin.— Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the jEneid : Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Geeek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar ; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Fre-shnian class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to bo 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them \v\\\ bo fur- 
nished a list of topics on which ho will bo requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination hold for the purpose, or as a 
aprt of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOrR HOCTRS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terras. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terras. 
Latin, two terms. 
Greek, two terms. 
Natural History, three terms. 
Physics, one term. 
Chemistry, two terms. 
Science of Language, one terra. 
English Ijiterature, two terms. 
Gorman, two terms. 
History of Philosophy, two terms. 
International Law and Military Science, two 
terras. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, .$25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very nuitorially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



ffitwitla ®: 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JANUARY 31, 1883. 



Vol. XII. 



No. 13. 



BOWDOIN OKIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
Arthur J. Eussell,'83, Managing Editor. 
Herbert P. Kendall, '83, Busiuess Editor. 
Herbert B. Cole, '83. Oliver W. Means, '84. 

Howard R. Goodwin, '83. Llewellyn Barton, '84. 
Charles H. Stetson, '83. Charles B. Sayward, '84. 
iSr. Brooks K. Pettingill, '83. 

Terms — $2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Eemittances siiould be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
In regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. ContriWtions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 



Entered at the Post OflQce at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 



Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 

COKTENTS. 
Yol. XII., No. 13.— Jan. 31, 1883. 

Editorial Notes 171 

Literary: 

Origin of the Orient 173 

Zeta Psi Convention 1 75 

Thoughts About P.sychology 175 

College Items 177 

Personal 180 

Clippings 181 

Editors' Table 182 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



This term has been marked by various 
interesting and historically important events, 
not the least of which is the entrance of the 
Orient into its new office. Notwithstand- 
ing the fact tliat the Orient has at times, 
contrary to the judgment of a part of the 
board, spoken its mind quite freely concern- 
ing members of the Faculty and of the ad- 
ministration of the college, the Faculty 
kindly forgave and voted us the office. We 



liave before expressed our thanks and we 
cannot resist doing so again, as we apply our 
editorial key to tlie editorial lock and enter 
the sanctum. No arrangements have yet 
been made for regular hours of opening the 
office and permitting students and others to 
examine the exchanges. Measures will soon be 
taken to haveitopen at a regular hour, or hours. 
The room is not to be made a general loaf- 
ing place, nor will any conduct not befitting a 
private room be allowed, contrary to the 
opinion of one connected witli the col- 
lege, who tried hard to prevent us obtaining 
the use of the room. We soon hope to wel- 
come you all in the new room and receive 
your congratulations. 



We have been impressed more and more 
lately with the usefulness of the old society 
libraries in the south wing of the chapel. 
Many books that are called for and cannot 
be found in the old library are dug out, after 
some search, in the libraries of these old 
societies. They " builded better than they 
knew " in accumulating so many thou- 
sand volumes which are now so useful, not 
to say indispensable, to the college. But 
there is great need of cataloguing these 
books as soon as possible before any of them 
are lost, and also that one may know what 
is there. At present, in searching for a 
book, one has to look over shelf after shelf 
and so loses much time. We wish the boards 
would appropriate money sufficient to cata- 
logue these books in good shape. Professor 
Johnson began this work two or three years 
ago, but was obliged to stop from want of 
funds and time. These libraries contain 



172 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



many valuable works and form a good com- 
plement to the other library. It seems 
strange that the college got along without 
them as long as it did, for the majority of 
books taken from the library now are from 
the south wing. We confess we have 
not much hope of anything from the boards. 
The first of last term, one of the Seniors 
came into the library, looked around, and 
remarked with a sigh, " I heard last Com- 
mencement that the boards had appropriated 
fifty thousand dollars for a library fund, but 
since I have come back and inquired into the 
facts, I find they appropriated fifty dollars for 
repairs." 

Here is a magnificent opportunity for 
some rich alumnus, or " friend of the college," 
to hand his name down to posterity by send- 
ing the library a sum of money, the interest 
of which shall go towards the purchase of 
new books or, if that is too much, enough to 
make a good catalogue of both parts will be 
joyfully received. 



For the last few weeks there have been 
many attractions for the society man. 
Church fairs. Grand Army fairs, church socia- 
bles, card parties, and not the least of them, 
the skating rink. Week before last there 
were three attractions of this sort in one 
night, and a good many of the boys tossed up 
cents to determine which to " take in." We 
know of one fellow so callous, so hardened, 
so utterly abandoned, that he preferred to 
cut them all and go to a country gathering 
about (wo witlihold the number) miles out, 
where those glorious old games of our ances- 
tors, Copenhagen, post-office, etc., are still 
popular. 



We hear reports from time to tinu; of l.lie be- 
havior 1 f Sophomores in recitation. We can 
appreciate fun as well as any one, but when it 
comes to organized attempts to disturb a recita- 



tion or bully a professor, we feel that there is an 
injury being done to the class and to the col- 
lege. We are assured, too, that the better 
sentiment of the class is against this spirit 
and in sympathy with whatever measures 
may be taken to check it. Several of these 
young bloods took occasion to disfigure the 
seats of the Senior room in Memorial Hall 
during a recitation there, week before last. 
The seats had not been touched by a knife or 
pencil till the outbreak of the country-school- 
house spirit in this class who do not belong 
in the room at all. 



The recent act of the Fi-eshmen, which is 
quite unprecedented in college affairs, has 
called out man}- strong expressions of opinion. 
Some defend their position and others as strong- 
ly condemn it. There is no doubt in our 
mind but that in taking this step they were 
not actuated by a desire to revenge theirgriev- 
ances, but by an honest wish to check this 
mean spirit that is always trying to invade 
their rights and thus to provoke resistance 
and cause hazing to break out again. For 
this reason we are willing to overlook what 
appears a breach of college honor, for the end 
justifies almost any means. The class by this 
action has placed itself in such a position 
that any attempt to invade the rights of the 
Freshmen next year will con)e very badly 
from them. This is the good there is in 
the movement, they have placed themselves 
squarely on i-ecord, while if they had waited 
till next year there is a strong probabilitj' 
that things would go on about as tiiey have 
bef(ue. 



We iuvve recently received a copy of the 
Boston Courier, containing an article compiled 
from the recently published "History of Bow- 
doin." It is extremely interesting to Bow- 
doin men, and readers generally, to note the 
changes during the present century, in age 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



173 



and profession of the graduates. It is to be 
noticed that the age of students has been 
increasing till the last decade when the advance 
in age is checked. As to professions, the hiw 
offers the strongest attraction, and the number 
of students entering this profession has been 
quite regular. From 1831 to 1840, the 
ministry held the first place in the prefer- 
ences of students; now it is fifth, falling 
from twenty-four per cent, in the first de- 
cade, to eight per cent, in the last. There 
is, also, a decided tendency of late years to- 
wards the medical profession. This is also 
true of teachers, and a still stronger tendency 
towards a mercantile and business life shows 
itself. The day has gone by when a college 
course is necessarily followed by a profes- 
sional career. The article goes on to say 
that it would be extremely interesting to 
trace some of the social influences of which 
the shifting college sentiment is at once the 
cause and the result. A study of the " His- 
tory " from which these facts were drawn will 
well pay the reader if he is at all interested 
in education, or the course of thought of ed- 
ucated men. 



the judgment of posterity on their work and 
character. 



We have recently received an article 
which we shall publish in this number on the 
"Origin of the Orient." The author has 
evidently taken some pains to get at the facts 
in the case, and gives them in a clear, concise 
manner. We had occasion, a few weeks since, 
to go over the same ground and with nearly 
the same results. We were inclined, how- 
ever, to give the more prominent place in the 
work to Abbot, while our correspondent gives 
it to WhitaTier. It would be hard to tell, 
probably to which to give the greater promi- 
nence, as both were so closely connected with 
the work. There is added to the article a 
short sketch of the characters of these men, 
and it will probably be interesting to them, if 
any of them happen to see the paper, to read 



Tlie newspapers, from time to time, keep 
us informed of President Chamberlain's 
whereabouts. Last week, we noticed by the 
daily papers that he was present at a gather- 
ing of the New York City Alumni. Many 
distinguished men, active in business a,nd lit- 
erature, were gathered at the tables, showing 
the prominence of Bowdoin's sons in all 
walks of life, a prominence of which we may 
justly be proud. It was stated that the mem- 
or3' af Longfellow was drunk in silence. Of 
that fnmous class of '25, Cullen Sawtelle, 
whose eloquent and touching address was 
heard by so many of us at the dedication of 
Memorial Hall, last Commencement, was 
present. We understand that there is soon 
to be a meeting of the Portland Alumni. 
These gatherings show the grateful interest 
which Bowdoin still inspires in her sons, and 
serve to keep the college prominently before 
the public. We hope that while the alumni- 
are so universally acknowledging her worth, 
that nothing may be done by her students to 
tarnish her fair name. 



ORIGIN OF THE ORIENT. 

During the last four or five years there 
has been more or less controversy in regard 
to the originators of the Okient. I wish to 
give the readers of said paper a few facts in 
regard to the matter. What I say, I have 
learned from those who know, and I can 
therefore speak with great confidence. In the 
class of 1872 were two persons who had con- 
siderable natural ability in the direction of 
journalism — Abbot and Whitaker. Abbot, 
during his college course, was correspondent 
for several papers, among others, the Boston 
Eerald. Whitaker entered college with the 
intention of becoming a journalist. He had 



174 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



learned the mechanical part of the business 
and had had some little editorial experience. 

These two persons roomed together. Out 
of their conversation grew the Orient. It 
is hard to tell which of these iirst conceived 
the idea of starting a paper at Bowdoin ; but 
it probably was Whitaker. After they had 
done all they could in arranging their plans, 
the subject was bi'ought before the class — 
then the Junior. The idea was favorably 
received. A committee was appointed to 
devise a mode of procedure and arrange 
details. This committee made two reports 
to an adjourned meeting of the class — a ma- 
jorit}' and a minority report. Whitaker was 
tlie author of the former. It recommended 
the election of five editors to manage the 
paper and be collectively responsible for its 
character and conduct. Abbot was the au- 
thor of the minority report. This recom- 
mended the election of one editor-in-chief, who 
should have full authority and responsibility, 
and four assistant editors. Abbot ^rgued 
that this was after the plan of all great news- 
papers. On the other hand, Whitaker argued 
that the case under consideration could not 
be compared with that of large newspapers; 
tiiat the paper was a voluntarj^ affair among 
classmates, where all should be equal ; that 
each editor should have his share of the 
honor and responsibility; that tiie paper 
could lie I'un with less friction to have all 
equal ; that the success of the paper demanded 
a union in ideas of all the editors. As one 
would naturally suppose, the majority report 
was the more pleasing to the class and was 
almost unanimously accejjted. 

The ol)jectof tiie Orient, as intended by 
the originators, may for the most part be 
gleaned from the following, which is taken 
from an editorial of the first number: " Wliile 
the Orient is to be strictly in under-gradu- 
ate control we desire that it shall be tiie 
connecting link between the students, tlie 
alumni, and the Faculty; that here all may 



bring their wounded hearts and here tell all 
their sorrows. All shall at least have a fair 
hearing and, in this way, perhaps, complica- 
tions and revilings may be avoided." I 
would further state that it was the idea of 
the first board of editors to have it purely 
local and not of a literary character. 

The first board of editors was chosen by 
the class and consisted of the following per- 
sons: Abbot, Coggan, Heath, Rogers, and 
Whitaker. Harold Wilder was also chosen, 
but resigned soon after the appearance of the 
first number. Of these, Whitaker attended 
to all the business and was what we now call 
the business editor, although he was not 
then so denominated. Besides this he fur- 
nished his share of the editorials. During 
the summer vacation of 1871 he was called to 
edit the SoutJibridge Journal. Through the 
next college year, by haid studj' evenings, he 
managed to keep up his studies and grad- 
uated with his class. During the fall term 
of 1871, fifteen members of the Senior class 
were sent home oii account of some little 
misunderstanding which they had with the 
Facultj-. Three of the four editors were of 
this number. This left the whole duty of 
editing the Orient on one man — Rogers. 
He had to furnish most of the copy for three 
numbers. This task only those who have 
had experience can appreciate ; for then it 
was not the custom as much as now for 
any except the editors to write for the paper. 

The name. Orient, was suggested by 
Mitchell, of '71, Bowdoin being the most 
easterly college of any importance. The 
names of the editors did not a[ipi'ar in (he 
first three numbers. They wanted to see 
how it would be received before tiiey com- 
mitted themselves publicly. As soon as 
they were assured of the success of their 
project, the names of the editors were pub- 
lished. The money made the first year was 
exj)ended by the first board of editors in a 
sui)per to the second board. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



175 



I wish to give just a little sketch of these 
five men who did so much for the good of 
old Bowdoin. Abbot was very energetic and 
a fine writer. He is well remembered for 
his strong democratic principles. He was 
nicknamed the " Judge." During his college 
course he nearly paid his way by correspond- 
ing for different papers. Coggan was a 
sailor before entering college, and was dis- 
tinguished for that joviality which marks 
every sailor. He was a general favorite and 
a great believer in hazing. He always went 
by the name of " Cog." Heath was remark- 
able for his great debating abilities. It 
would naturally follow that he was a readj^ 
writer. Rogers was one of those quiet plod- 
ders who are always ready to work whenever 
there is anything to be done. Whitaker was 
a ready writer and nearly paid his way 
through college by corresponding for papers. 
He was nicknamed " G. Whitaker." 

All who knew these five persons during 
their college course know how different they 
were in their characteristics. It would have 
been difficult to pick out five persons who 
displayed so great a dissimilarity of genius. 
The combination of these different traits of 
character did very much for the success of 
the Orient. Since that time it has been 
recognized among leading college papers of 
the United States, and to-day it stands as 
high as it has at any time since its foundation. 

Etjkope. 



ZETA PSI CONVENTION. 

January 4th and 5th, the Grand Chapter 
of the Zeta Psi Fraternity, met by invitation 
of the Tufts and Bowdoin chapters, at 
Young's Hotel, Boston. The large number 
in attendance, eighteen of our nineteen chap- 
ters being represented by delegates, includ- 
ing tlie chapter at McGill University, Mon- 
treal, then but a few weeks old, showed that 



the Fraternity is growing, and her members 
are greatly interested in her welfare. 

From Bowdoin, Bi'others Simmons, Whit- 
temore, Totman, Chandler, Achorn, Smith, 
and Gardner of the alumni, and Files of the 
class of '83, and Lindsey of the class of '84, 
were present. The two days were devoted 
to business, there being a great amount to 
attend to. Among other things of equal im- 
portance, a Fraternity Journal, to be edited 
by J. Bruen Miller, was established. 

Thursday evening was devoted to an ora- 
tion bj' Brother Gunnison, D.D., of Brook- 
lyn, and a poem by Brother McElroy, of the 
Tribune; also an address by past 1 A, 
Brother Van Wyck of New York, all of which 
were received with much applause and were 
well worthy of it. After these exercises, a 
collation was served by the hosts, followed 
by singing, and "a good time generally." 

The grand officers, for the ensuing year, 
are : 1 A, Max Shwerene of Union College 

2 A, Parker P. Simmons of Bowdoin College 

3 A, 'J. Bruen Miller of Rutgers College 

4 A, D. Cady Gere of University at Syra- 
cuse ; 5 A, Chas. B. Everson of Cornell Uni- 
versity ; 6 A, Fred. A. Tibbetts of Tufts 
College; 7 A, Albert C. Anbury of Uni- 
versity at New York. 

The convention was concluded Friday 
evening, by the customary banquet, and very 
pleasing toasts, to meet January 3d and 4th, 
1884, at New York, with the Delta Chapter, 
where, judging from this convention, a very 
pleasant time may be anticipated. 



THOUGHTS ABOUT PSYCHOLOGY. 

It seems almost cruel to disturb the ghost 
of Psychology hj any reflections at this late 
day ; yet it may be not whoU}^ unprofitable 
to make sjich reflections. 

Psychology — the science of our inner be- 
ing — is a subject that may well demand ear- 



176 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



nest, thoughtful study, and be at once a source 
of pleasure and profit. But if thought on I 
the part of the student be either disregarded 
or positively discouraged, then the studj' of 
Ps3'chology is both iriisome and unprofitable. 

Empirical Psychology professes to be 
founded entirely on the facts of conscious 
mental experience. So far, then, as its state- 
ments conform to the student's individual 
consciousness, they are valid, and he is bound 
to accept them. If thej' transcend or seem- 
ingly contradict his consciousness, he is not 
bound to accept them until they are simpli- 
fied, or the seeming contradiction is explained. 
This point is, I think, forgotten by most 
writers on Mental Science, and many teachers 
who seem to think that the statement of a 
principle in general, abstruse, and often ob- 
scure language is sufficient to insure its im- 
mediate reception by every mind. 

Another fact, overlooked by man3s is that 
mental processes and phenomena are as yet 
so imperfectly undei'stood in all their bear- 
ings and relations, that teachers, on this sub- 
ject, disagree in many particulars. Each Psy- 
chologist may construct a sytsera perfectly 
logical in itself, but as his fundamental propo- 
sitions differ more or less from those of all 
others, so his conclusions will be also dif- 
ferent. 

Notwithstanding all this, we are taught 
Psychology from some book that states posi- 
tively certain so-called facts of common con- 
sciousness, and we are required to recite the 
substance of the teaching of the text-book, 
whether we believe it or not. Many a man 
will liave to recite statements concerning mat- 
ters of common consciousness that are con- 
trary to his own mental experience. If the 
student dare express a doubt concerning any 
statement of book or instructor, lie is looked 
upon as one whose only purpose is to delay 
and disturb the recitation. Instead of having 
his questions fairly answered, and liis doubts 
and difficulties cleared u[), he is often merely 



told to " think of it," as though no other help 
were needed. If the point in question is ethical 
in its bearings, the questioner is very likely to 
be so answered as to hint slyly that his own 
moral perversity is the only hindrance to his 
seeing the truth. Then the class Ijursts into 
a guffaw as though some rich joke had been 
perpetrated, and the inquirer is silenced if 
not convinced. 

Another fault of Psychologists is the ob- 
scurity that thej' seem to think it necessary 
to throw around their subject. The text-book 
that we liave recently used, for example, is, 
in some parts, so obscure that it takes as long 
to find out the meaning of the author as to 
master the difficulties of the subject itself. 
To tell the class, by way of encouragement, 
that the book will not seem so difficult after 
they have mastered the subject, is rather cold 
comfort to most of them. It is equivalent to 
saying, " This book is not obscure because 
when you know all about the subject you will 
know what the author means, or at least what 
he ought to mean, in every case." 

As an illustration of the unsatisfactory 
way in which questions were often turned off, 
I mention one case : The Divine Being was 
often spoken of as eternal and self-origmat- 
ing. One day it was asked how the Eternal 
could have any origin either in self or any 
other source. The answer was that He must 
be stf^-originating since no other being could 
have originated him, thus dodging the point 
of the question, which was whether the Eter- 
nal can have any origin at all. 

Sucii things as those I have mentioned are 
not conducive to the faithful, honest thought, 
the frank, manl}' expression of opinion, the 
respectful inquiry for light that are especially 
needed in a study st) difficult as Mental Sci- 
ence. 

1 do not expect Psychology to be made so 
simple that it shall require no study to grasp 
all its teachings, but I do expect it to be so 
slated (bat the average student can, by a rea- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



177 



sonable amount of study, master the greater 
part of it. 

One more point and I am done. 

It is a common assumption that our Men- 
tal Science is complete, or very nearly so, yet 
there is not perfect agreement on the very 
first axioms of the science, and some state- 
ments of the ordinary text-books are contrary 
to the consciousness of many persons. 

Let us not assume too much for Psychol- 
ogy. Let us remember the extent of the field 
that is to be investigated, its range in time 
and place ; for we must stud}^ not the modern 
and cultured mind alone, if we would have a 
complete science, but the human mind in all 
ages and under all conditions so far as we are 
able to do so. Why not say of Psychology as 
of the other sciences, "it has still many de- 
fects," and, instead of trying to hide or ex- 
cuse those defects, strive, by patient, thought- 
ful effort, to remedv them ? Enquiebe. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



TO MY PIPE. 



President Chamberlain attended the annual din- 
ner of the Bowdoin Alnmni of New York City, held 
at Delmonico's on the 19th. Other distinguished 
Bowdoin graduates present were Prof. Dunn of 
Rutgers, and Hon. Cullen Sawtelle of the famous 
class of '2.5 ; Eev. Kewman Smythe of New Haven ; 
Prof. Goddard, of the Bowdoin Medical School ; 
President Goodwin, of Trinity College, Philadel- 
phia ; Prof. Brackett of Princeton, and Gen. J. B. 
Brown of Portland. President Chamberlain re- 
sponded to the toast on "Alma Mater"; Gen. 
Brown, on the "Pine Tree State " ; Dr. Smythe, on 
" Theology a Progressive Science " ; and Prof. 
Brackett, on "Science the Handmaid of Religion. " 
The memory of Longfellow and other graduates 
that have died during the year was drunk in si- 
lence. The following officers were elected for the 
ensuing year: President, Dr. Fordyce Barker ; Vice 
Presidents, Dr. Daniel E. Goodwin, Gen. Foster, 
Mr. E. B. Merrill, and Mr. Curtis Jewett ; Treas- 
urer, Mr. James McKeen ; Corre.sponding Secre- 
tary, Mr. Charles E. Soule. 



Prof. Chapman's lectures on the Celts, Saxons, 
Danes, and Normans are among the best of those to 
which '8."J has had opportunity to listen. 



Let martial songs inspire the breast 
Of whomsoe'er they can; 
As songs of love, the spirit of 
The sentimental man. 

Let passion rage of iaugliing eyes, 
And pearls 'twixt ruby lips ; 
Let Bacclius chant the praises of 
The nectar which he sips; 

But me the lieavenly muse inspires 
Thy praise alone to sing. 
Who dulcet peace in measure full 
Through troubled hours dost bring. 

Full many an hour in raj)ture deep, 
From care and trouble free, 
Long whiffs of purest bliss I've drawn 
From thee — my own T. D. 

And as the fragrant incense rose 
In azure, circling crest, 
It seemed to wake the odors there, 
Of Araby the blest. 

Fade from my mind Geology 
And Psychologic lore. 
Philosophy and Pol. Econ. 
Attend my way no more. 

Still shall thy graces be my theme 
Of calmest peace the type, 
Thou remedy for all my woes — 
Reliable old pipe. 

The orchestra rehearses once a week. 

Port of Brunswick — Sweetened water. 

College Catalogues for this year are out. 

Pearson, '83, has returned from teaching. 

A new bulletin-board has appeared at Memorial. 

What should we do if it was not for excitement ? 

Kendall, '85, has commenced a school at Berlin, 
N. H. 

A debating society here would fill a long-felt 
want. 

Hope the Seniors will have a crew in the class 
races. 

Cole is Senior class mouitor, vice Russell, re- 
signed. 

The newspapers have struck another Bowdoin 
bonanza. 

Lennan, '83, is back from his teaching sojourn in 
Woolwich. 

The collegian in "Furnished Rooms" was a 
libel on the name. 

Sewall, '83, holds the position of assistant libra- 
rian for the present. 

TheOniENT feels like congratulating the citizens 
of Brunswick for the admirable manner in which 
the affairs of their post-office are conducted. 



178 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Coppee's manual is used by the Senior English 
" Lit." division. 

Chase, '85, has one of the most tastily decorated 
rooms in college. 

The " Police measure " is something unique in 
college government. 

A good way to get the sense of a meeting is to 
pass around the bat. 

Manson, J. W., Cobb, and Wilson, '81, have re- 
cently made us a visit. 

" When the cat is away the mice will play" — 
Facultorially speaking. 

The new end-woman in North Appleton is nick- 
named Sara Bernhardt. 

The proper way to keep your room warm is to 
keep your stove coaled. 

Butler, '85, is running seven singing schools in 
Brunswick and vicinity. 

Prof. Lee comphments the Juuioi-s for the inter- 
est they take in Zoology. 

Is there any reasonable doubt as to whom the 
cake should be given now f 

There is a strong probability that the band is 
dead. May it rest in peace. 

The Delta Kappa Epsilou boarding club has se- 
cured rooms on Page Street. 

Sayward, '84, has closed his term of school at 
Wells and returned to college. 

English " Lit." is the daisy study — unanimous 
verdict of the Senior division. 

The T. M. C. Association boys are holding some 
interesting meetings this winter. 

How large we should feel if the Bowdoin fort- 
nightly Bevieiv should be revived. 

A good organ has been placed in Memorial, 
lower hall, for the use of the choir. 

The skating-rink continues to entice some of 
the students away from their books. 

And now we have some more of " the Decline 
and Fall of the Freshman's Moustache." 

If the steps were kept well ashed there would 
bo a decided moral reaction round college. 

Probably the Freshmen look witli great satis- 
faction on the glorious thing they have done. 

A class in Anglo-Sa.xon (extra), under Prof. 
Chapman, has been formed among the Seniors. 

The man who has to hang his tluM-rnometcr on 
his stove to induce the mercury to tra\'el up to (JO 
degrees, cannot boast of very comfortable quarters. 



Prof. Campbell calls the period in which the 
Sophists flourished, the Sophomoric age of Philoso- 
phy- 

Something in the 11.30 Senior lecture (Hist, of 
Phil.) reminds one '83 man of a walking match 
against time. 

The students who pre-empted the front seats at 
" Furnished Rooms " are said to have received their 
money's worth. 

Kemp, '84, is given in the catalogue as the win- 
ner of the Sewall Latin prize, last spring. It 
should have been Smith, '84. 

The Bowdoin alumni of Boston hold their an- 
nual reunion and dinner at Young's Hotel, on 
Wednesday evening, Feb. 14th. 

It is considered the correct thing now among the 
alumui to call them " the old girls of the Andros- 
coggin" instead of " the old maids of Brunswick." 

Rector Nichols of St. Paul's Church holds Shake- 
spearian readings at his house quite frequently. 
Some of the students are lucky enough to get invi- 
tations. 

Day of Prayer for Colleges was observed last 
Thursday. Services conducted by Rev. Mr. Clark 
of Williston Church, Portland, were held in Memo- 
rial at 1 1 A.M. 

It is said that Mr. Fisher is to resign his posi- 
tion as tutor in mathematics nest Commencement, 
to enter upon the study of law. We earnestly hope 
that such may not be the case. 

A Freshman lately told a member of the Faeulty 
that he had lost a half pint of peanuts from his 
room, and that he had many reasons for believing 
that a Sophomore stole them. Now what do you 
think of that f 

'8(5 is a class with a mission. It has been made 
plain to its members by direct revelation that it has 
been reserved for such as they to raise from our 
necks the yoke of error and to shape the future of 
Bowdoin. Bab ! 

The first German was held last week in the hall 
over the Niagara engine room. Fifteen couple 
participated. This number will be cousiderably in- 
creased at the next evening. lUitlor, "85, and Cald- 
orwood, '86, furnished music. 

A student recently received a letter from a grad- 
uate, one of his own society men, in which this sen- 
tence occurred, "Candor compels me to denomi- 
nate you an ass." The writer, naturally enough^ 
igued himself " Vours fraternally." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



179 



The ball given by the Bath Cadets, last week, 
gave the boys a chance to show off their waltzing. 

Let us hope that while our alumni, with knees 
under the mahogany at reunion dinners, discuss the 
affairs of Bowdoin, they will not forget to consider 
our greatest of all needs at present, a new gymna- 
sium. 

The art criticism class of the Brunswick High 
School looked over the college collection of casts in 
the chapel, north wing, one afternoon last week. 
The Oeienx had no representative on the spot, and 
so cannot give particulars. 

We understand that the 2it«(7?e board are going 
to be about $50 out of pocket. We contemplate 
publishing the names of the students who have re- 
fused to give any support to the admirable present 
number of our college annual. The list will be 
quite a long one. 

Some of the Freshmen say that they are deter- 
mined to find out whether the Faculty or the class 
of '85 runs this college. The case is different with 
us. We are anxious to know whether it is the Fac- 
ulty or the class of '86 before whom we must bow 
down and worship. 

The first division of '85 (French) was dismissed 
one day last week, long before the hour was up, on 
account of flagrant misbehavior on the part of some 
members. About half a dozen of the Sophomores 
seem to be engaged in building up a somewhat un- 
envial)le reputation for the whole class to shoulder. 

A Brunswick girl has kindly indulged our whim 
and forwarded one of her cast-off overshoes to serve 
as an editorial waste-basket. We extend thanks ; 
still when we made our humble request we had iu 
mind an adult Brunswick girl and not one of those 
little young things that have only got as far as num- 
ber elevens. 

The fourteenth annual dinner of the Bowdoin 
Alumni Association, of Portland, was held at the 
Falmouth Hotel, on Tuesday evening, January 
30th. The literary exercises consisted of an ora- 
tion by Mr. Geo. F. Emery, '36, and a poem by Mr. 
E. H. Thomas, '31. Mr. F. W. Hawthorne, '74, 
officiated as toast-master. 

Those who are disposed to complain that the 
Orient is deficient in literary matter should re- 
member that it is the object of the editors to make 
the paper intensely local, in other words a Bowdoin 
newsiKiper. A periodical devoted chiefly to literary 
articles containing the undergraduate's ideas on the 



great questions of the day would be a grand thing 
here and would doubtless be well supported. 
Whether the students of the future will decide to 
work this mine or not the Orient will keep right 
on in the course it has marked out for itself, deal- 
ing with local matters as extensively as possible 
and making the literary department a secondary 
issue. 

The Freshmen may thank their lucky stars that 
they became members of Bowdoin in these later 
times. Had they appeared upon the scene of action 
here in that whoop-la sort of a way that they indulge 
in now during any of those palmy days from '64 to 
a few years ago, we tremble at the thought of the 
direful punishment that would surely have been 
visited upon them. 

Some person wanting in taste, and having no 
eye for the beautiful, has ventured to assert that 
the Business Editor must have been a httle off when 
he selected that work of art, the Orient office sign, 
that from its commanding position over the door of 
our sanctum in South Maine seems to shed a poetic 
glamour over all its surroundings, not even except- 
ing the pail, duster, and broom belonging to the ar- 
tist that puts rooms in order in that favored end. 

" Ehetoricals " on the study schedules of the 
several classes can no longer be considered a dead 
letter. - Commencing this week, speaking is to be 
held in Memorial on every Wednesday afternoon at 
two, throughout this term and the next. On this 
Wednesday afternoon original declamations are to 
be delivered by Winter, Wheeler, and Allen, '83; 
and selected declamations by Child and Thompson, 
'84, and Chase, Libby, and Peters, '85. The whole 
college must attend these exercises. 

The annual reunion and banquet of the Wash- 
ington Association of Bowdoin Alumni was held at 
the Riggs House, Washington, on the evening of 
January 23d. Commodore Bridges, '25, presided. 
Twenty-six graduates were present, among whom 
were President Chamberlain, General Whittlesey, 
Senators Frye and Grover, General Sewall and 
Israel Putnam of the Treasury Department, Pro- 
fessors Coffin and Chickering of the National Ob- 
servatory, and Fifth Auditor Alexander. 

It always delights us to hear of the success of 
Bowdoin graduates. This time it is Crosby, of '82, 
who comes to the front. He is pursuing law stu- 
dies with his father, aud some weeks since appeared 
in a legal capacity for the first time and as counsel 
in a somewhat complicated ease at Dexter, his 



180 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



home. As would seem/c«sible upon sucli an occa- 
sion, Crosby (altliough he rleclared one night while 
in college that he had not the sliglitest regard for 
"gold and silver") laid himself out and won the 
suit for his client. 

If there is anything that the Seniors take, espe- 
cial pride in, at present, it is their new recitation in 
Memorial ; hence it is no wonder that the average 
Senior's serenity of mind is disturbed when he 
views the ravages that the pocket-knives and lead 
pencils of the Sophomore rhetoric division are mak- 
ing among the seats and desks in this room. We 
would suggest to the Faculty that if this class of 
'85 cannot be induced to refi'ain from disfiguring 
one of the adornments of the college, and thus 
abusing a privilege that has been granted them 
through kindness, that they be made to recite un- 
der the chapel or in some other place equally well 
suited to the disposition that they are constantly 
showing. 

If the Freshmen had really desired to do away 
with whatever shadowy remnant of that institution 
that our fathers founded and fostei'ed, hazing, they 
should have acted this year in a way becoming their 
station ; they should have rebuked any undue as- 
sumption on the part of their individual members, 
and next year as Sophomores, with the moral back- 
ing of the college, they would be in a condition to 
emphasize the position that they claim to have 
taken by allowing the class under them to be on an 
equality in all things with themselves. Then we 
should have been spared the disgusting exhibition 
that has been the talk of the college for the past 
few days, and should not have known that any Bow- 
doin student could show us that " tell-the-teacher'' 
spirit that we all so thoroughly and instinctively 
detested in the primary school long ago. 

The drawing and oki aiodern language rooms in 
Wiuthrop, having been made available for the pur- 
po.se by the opening of the new recitation rooms in 
Memorial, have been thrown into one and fitted up 
for the use of the boating and base-ball men in their 
training. Of course all the conveniences of a gym- 
nasium are not given hero, but the room is large 
(100 feet in length by 20 in width), well lighted and 
warmed, and completely furnished vvitii dnnib-bells, 
Indian clubs, parallel bars, and rowing weights. 
As it is, it ali'ords the men a good chance for devel- 
oping their muscles. The candidates for the col- 
lego crew and the crews of the throe lower classes 
went into training here on Jan. 22d, and from 4 to 
5.30 P.M. each day they go through a regular course 



of exercise under the leadership of Capt. Sweetser. 
The ball men under Capt. TVright weut to work a 
few days later. They have the room from 3 to 

4 P.M. 

The long agony is over. The Seniors held a very 
harmonious class meeting on Wednesday last and 
succeeded in electing the '83 class-day officers. The 
list : Marshal, F. H. Files ; President, C. H. Stet- 
son ; Vice President, E. P. Jordan ; Orator, J. B. 
Eeed; Historian, F. M. Fling: Prophet, W. S. 
Pearson ; Odist, A. J. Russell ; Opening Address at 
the Oak, H. E. Cole ; Parting Address at the Oak, 
N. B. K. Pettingill : Chaplain, J. D. Lennan : Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, G. B. Swan ; Committee of 
Arrangements, H. E. Goodwin, W. C. Winter, and 
F. J. Day ; Committee on Pictures, E. W. Chase, J. 
W. Knapp, and E. A. Packard. The office of Poet 
will not be filled at present. 



PERSONAL. 

[Graduates and Undergraduates are earnestly solicited 
to send personal items to the BowDOUf Orient, Bruns- 
wick.] 

'41.— Frederick Kobie was inaugurated Gover- 
nor, January 4th, at Augusta, and delivered a fine 
inaugural address. 

'42. — Hon. W. H. Brown, a prominent physician 
of Bangor, died November 23, after a long illness. 
He graduated from Harvard Medical School in 1859: 
and was Mayor of Bangor in 1880. 

'45. — I. N. Wadsworth of Manchester has been 
appointed clerk in the office of Superintendent of 
Schools at Augusta. 

'48.— David Fales was at one time principal of 
the high school in Augusta, read law there and 
then removed to Biddeford, where ho was for a 
long time a partner of Hon. J. M. Goodwin. In 
1863 he engaged iu busiuess in New York City, 
until his death, a little while since. 

'.50. — Hon. W. P. Frye was re-elected United 
States Senator by the State Legislature. 

'.57. — IJov. James T. Hewes for a time taught 
the High School iu Topsham, and afterward pur- 
sued theological studies at Cambridge. He was 
settled at South Boston, Portland, Salem, and at 
Fitchburg, Mass., where ho died the last of Xovoni- 
ber. 

'57. — Charles Hamlin, of Bangor, is a member 
of the Legislature. He served through the war; 
has been City Solicitor of Bangor, and is the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 



181 



author of the Law Book, entitled "Insolvent Laws 
of Maine." 

'59. — Stephen J. Young, of Brunswick, and the 
Treasurer of Bowdoin College is in the State Senate. 

'60.— P. H. Stubhs of Strong, Franklin County, 
is a member of the State Senate. He graduated 
from Harvard Law School in 1863, and has since 
practiced law where he now resides. ~ 

'62. — E. C. Barrows, of Vassalboro, served 
through the war and graduated at the Law School 
in Albany, N. Y. He is now a representative in the 
Legislature. 

'62. — W. G. Frost is a physician in Dan vers, 
Mass., having practiced in Brunswick, Bath, and 
Portland. He taught school for some time after 
graduating. He served as a surgeon in the United 
States Navy for some time during the war, receiv- 
ing his diploma from the Maine Medical School 
in 1866. 

'62. — Chas. P. Mattocks, of Portland, is in the 
State Legislature. He entered the army as lieuten- 
ant, and participated in all the battles of the 
Potomac. He was for nine months a prisoner ; and 
for gallant conduct was breveted Brigadier Gen- 
eral. After the close of the war he entered Har- 
vard Law School, and graduated in 1867. He has 
ever since practiced law in Portland. Besides being 
the owner of fine imported thoroughbred stock, he 
is President of the Winslow Packing Company. 

'62. — Chas. W. Gardiner served through the 
war, twice made extended journeys through 
Europe, on one occasion carrying United States 
securities to London. He was connected with sev- 
eral Western railroads, and general agent of the 
Burlington and Cedar Rapids. After a lingering 
illness, he died of consumption, at Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa, in 1880. 

'65.— J. E. Moore studied law with Hon. A. P. 
Gould, and has since been his partner. He is a 
member of the Legislature, and was a delegate to 
the Cincinnati Convention in 1880. 

'69.— Clarence Hale, of Portland, is a member of 
the Legislature. He studied law with Hon. Eugene 
Hale at Ellsworth, and has since practiced in Port- 
land. 

'70. — C. E. Beale, A.M., LL.B., is the supervis- 
ing editor of the Universal Educator, a cyclopedia 
recently published in Boston. 

'73. — Wiswell, of Ellsworth, has been appointed 
Bank Examiner for Maine. 

'73.— A. P. Richardson has been appointed a 
Trustee of the Normal School at Gorham. 



'73.— A. L. Crocker, of Minneapolis, was mar- 
ried to Miss Clara T. Peabody of Princeton, N. Y. 

'75. — Standish is a surgeon at the Massachusetts 
Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston. 

'78. — Felch is principal of the academy at Cheney, 
Washington Territory. 

'80. — Bartlett, employed by a Chicago publish- 
ing house as editor and compiler of subscription 
books, is at present located at Bedford, Pa. 

'80. — Purington is principal of tiie high school 
at Mechanic Falls, Me. 

'80. — Burbank was married, November 29th, to 
Miss Nason. 

'81.— Lane is teaching in Colesburg, Iowa. 

'81. — Nichols is a clerk in the freight office at 
St. Paul, Minn. 

'81. — Stevens is teaching in Searsport, Me. 

'81. — H. L. Johnson is teaching in Augusta, Me. 

'82. — Chase is studying law in Unity, Me. 

'82. — Gilman is in the insurance business in 
Portland. 

'82.— Jewett is studying law in Chicago. 

'82.— McCarthy is studying law with Northend 
& Benjamin, Salem, Mass. 

Ex-'82.— Crawford is on the staff of the Bloom- 
ington Leader, Bloomington, 111. 

Ex-'82.— J. M. Curtis is in business in New York 
City. 

Ex-'82. — Lally is in business in Chicago. 



CIxIPPIKGS. 



How many swallows make a lark ? — Ex. 

Who first said " Cxive us a rest?" Archimedes. 
—Ex. 

Teacher—" Miss S., with what do you breathe 1 " 
Miss S. (who is a Junior, replies)— " With my epi- 
gram." Teacher — "Oh, no! you are thinking of 
the epiglottis." Miss S. — "Oh, yes, I mean my 
diagram." — Ex. 

"And what do you call that?" asked the inquisi- 
tive visitor, xDointiog to a mutilated statue. " That 
is a torso," replied the sculptor. " H'm," muttered 
the I. v.; "but how did it become torso?" He 
was tenderly kicked out. — Boston Transcript. 

Seminarian (who has an asthmatic dog at home) 
is calling on a young lady. As a suspicious sound 
issues from an adjoining apartment he remarks, 
" How homelike it sounds to hear the old dog 
snore." A few moments later the young lady ob- 



182 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



served that " Papa seems to be sound asleep in the 
other room." — Targum. 

Examination! 
Termination? 
Jubilation ! 
Vacation! 
Consternation! 

upon beholding the wrath of The-Old-Man-on-His- 

Ear about the last month's report. — Dickinsonian. 

Scene, recitation room, Wellesley College, class 
in Latin. Professor (who is a Harvard graduate, 
and consequently bashful)—" Miss A., will you de- 
cMne the pronoun hie?" Miss A. — "Sic, hcec, 
hoc, hug-US, hug-iis, hug-us." Exit professor amid 
great excitement. — Tech. 

Pretty little maiden, 

On the mountain top, 
Plucking a flower's petal, 

" Love or love me not." — Cf(»'p»s. 

Pretty little maiden, 

Handling of a mop. 
Knock the stuflSn' out of 

A man who writes such rot. 

— Argonaut. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



We have read with much interest the accounts of 
the first meeting of the Inter-collegiate Press Asso- 
ciation in the columns of the various papers that 
were represented, but we must confess to a very 
hazy idea of what the I. P. A. really is, and what 
are its aims. Delegates from some twelve of the 
best papers upon our table were present, and " the 
Vassar Miscellawj was represented by letter"; 
they adopted a constitution ; they had a dinner ; 
they appointed a committee to choose a Vice Pres- 
ident ; they assigned literary parts to be read at 
the next meeting, among them an essay by the 
Vassar MisceUany, by letter, of course ; they 
adjourned. Such is the report of the Ada, the 
father or mother of the promising infant. The 
Argonaut tells us more : "The object of the asso- 
ciation is to build up a social and professional 
friendship among the members of the college press, 
and to elevate the standard of college journalism." 
. . . . " Each paper in the association is ex- 
pected to treat its follo\vs with courtesy, aud to 
maintain a good literary standing; in case it fails 
in these particulars it is subject to expulsion." 
Now if any association can put an end to these 
unbeconjing, not to say disgraceful controv(>rsies 
that have filled the columns of many of our papers, 



it is indeed doing a good work. It is a most sur- 
prising thing that any paper, which professes to be 
the mouthpiece of the students and to express their 
opinion, should commit itself to such language in 
speaking of its contemporaries, as no individual 
student, who considers himself a gentleman, would 
use towards the student of another college. The 
inevitable result of any friendly contest between 
two colleges, appears to be loud boasting on one 
side and wild charges of unfairness on the other. 
Soon we shall hope to surpass in interest the 
journals of our professional brothers, to whom a 
match between professional oarsmen is a godsend, 
with all its charges and counter-charges of bribery 
and corruption, and letters of explanation from 
this and that gentleman, " well-known in sporting 
circles." No wonder people declaim against the 
prominence of athletics in our colleges, if it is to 
make rowdies of the students, and to fill their 
papers with billingsgate. So the Press Association 
has a wide and a clear field for its work, and if it 
goes in with earnestness and determination, may 
all success attend it. 

However virtuously indignant the Ex. Ed. may 
become over the petty quarrels of our E. C.'s, there 
is never anything said to excite his wrath among 
our dear contemporaries. We never hear them en- 
gage in a fierce contest as to the superior merits of 
this or that brand of chewing-gum. To be sure 
they generally let each other severely alone, per- 
haps recognizing the weaknesses of their sex, but 
let it be said to their credit that they reserve the 
thunderbolds of their wrath for their brethren who 
offend them. 

The Lasell Leaves has just undergone a radical 
change, as we are told by the new editor-in-chief, 
which, liowever, is particularly noticeable only in 
the somewhat lengthy list of department editors. 
In addition to the editor-in-chief, there arc editors 
for the Local, Art, Political, Scientific, and Liter- 
ary departments, together with a publisher and 
two assistants. We shall be much interested in 
the work of the Political Editor, her contributions 
should be most valuable, as indicating the " Point 
of View." Taking the Political Editor aud an an- 
nouncement in the same paper of a course of lect- 
ures on the " Principles of Connnon Law," it would 
seem as if man must make a hard struggle in the 
near future to maintain his prerogatives. Tlu^ 
Leaves has a remarkably good sketch of a " Conn- 
try Sewing-Circle," and an eti'usion, called " Long- 
fellow's First Poem," which, at the age of nine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



183 



years, the poet wrote for Ms school " composition." 
The subject was " Mr. Finney's Turnip." We pre- 
sent the first stanza : 

" Mr. Finney had a turnip, 

And it grew behind the barn; 
And it grew, and it grew, 

And tire turnip did no harm." 

It may be interesting to our readers to hear 
what the members of the Inter-collegiate Rowing 
Association say in regard to themselves, and the 
prospects of the next regatta at Lake George. 
Columbia's position is given in the following edi- 
torial from the Ada: "Columbia has uot decided 
whether to join the new rowing association or uot. 
The matter has not even been considered by the 
Directors of the Boat Club. Before this is done we 
can hardly consider this association as one in which 
we are interested, and though we wish it all suc- 
cess, we intend to leave it alone for the present at 
least." 

The Princetonian says : " In mass meeting, the 
college has decided to raise a crew. An entertain- 
ment has been promised, for its benefit, in New 
York. Princeton will probably row at Philadelphia 
and at Lake George. Duties, therefore, devolve. 
Material should be forthcoming, at once. If enough 
shows itself, Princeton may yet boast an eight. 
But, four or eight, work is needed from a dozen or 
more men." 

Tlio Cornell Era sees a siguificencc in the elec- 
tion of Mr. Swartout (of Cornell) to the presidency 
of the association. "It is plain," the Era goes on 
to say, " that the college men present at the meet- 
ing felt a sympathy for Cornell in regard to the re- 
cent troubles which have somewhat tarnished our 
aquatic reputation." It is stated in another column 
that it is thought Brown and Amherst will soon 
join the association. 

The University Magazine indicates the enthu- 
siasm that is manifested at the University of Penn- 
sylvania. It says : " Aspirants for aquatic honors 
have been trainiug for the past month, and if the 
enthusiasm that now exists among the men con- 
tinues, we will be able to put as good a crew upon 
the water this season as last. We can congratulate 
ourselves tliat we still have with us three of the 
old crew that has already done such good service: 
a fourth man is to be selected from the class crews 
after the races in the spring. Now that the Inter- 
collegiate Rowing Association is formed, we may 
expect to meet some of the best crews of American 
colleges, and it behooves us to put forth every 
eflbrt, muscular and financial, to sustain our good 



record in this branch of athletics." Now what is 
Bowdoin doing? 

"l HELD HER HAND." 
RONDEAU. 

I lield her liand — 'twas years ago: 
She loved me then, and told me so; 
As, lingering by the lattice gate, 
Slie pressed my arm, and bade me wait. 
She can't forget it all, I know. 

"We spoke in whispers, sweet and low ; 
I begged a kiss, and then, although 
She sighed, and seemed to hesitate, 
I held her hand. 

'Tisstrange that love so cold can grow, — 
That Time can deal so keen a blow. 

Her love, alas! is turned to hate. 

Perhaps I held the hand of Fate. 
Ah, well! I can't forget — heigh ho! 
I held her hand. 



DREKA 

FINE STATIONERY and ENGRAVING 
HOUSE. 

Handsomely EngTaved Invitations for 

{^^ Colleges, Weddings, Receptions, &c. 

Fraternity Stationery always on hand. 

Our unequalcd facilities and long practical experience, enable 
us to produce the newest styles and most artistic effects, while 
our reputation is a guarantee of the quality of our productions. 

II2I Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



BURBANK, DOUGLASS & CO., 

(Successors to True, Douglass & Co. ) Importers ami Wholesale 
Dealers in 

China, Crockery f Glass Ware, 

LAMP GOODS. CHANDELIERS AND PLATED WARE. 
243 Middle Street, . . PORTLAND, MAINE. 



DO YOU WANT TO WRITE A LETTER, A PUESCRIP- 
tion, endorse a check, or take notes? If so, you cannot 
afford to be without the "NEWLY PKRFKCTED" CROSS 
STYLOGRAPHIC PEN— the greatest luxury of modern times. 
This really indispensable article holds Ink loi- a fortnight's use, 
is always ready, never leaks or blots, and will last for years; 
being now maile exclusively of gold, rubber and platinum, sub- 
stances entirely indestructible. Enclose $2 to THE CROSS PEN 
COMPANY, 7!) Franklin St., Boston, and you will receive this 
Pen by registered mail, in a neat box, with liller and directions 
complete, together with a liberal supply of ink lor use in the 
same. . 



FR^N^K E. ROBERTS 

Has the Largest and Best Assortment ol Gentlemen's 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers 

Copner of Main and Mason Streets. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



L. C. YOUNG, 

» OODFORD'S, - - - MAINE, 

Will visit Bowdoin College with a large line of 

Samples, to take orders for Spring, Wednesday, 

Feb. '2\st, and Wednesday, Feb. 28th. 

!^-WILL SHOW SAMPLES AT 15 M. H.^- 




ilDBJ 

These Goods are sold under an 

Absolute Guarantee 

T'lat they are the Finest and PUREST 

goods upon the market; 
Tliey ARE FREE from DRUGS and 

CHEMICALS of any kind; 
They consist of the Finest Tobacco and 

Purest Rice-Paper made. 

OUR SALES EXCEED the products 

of ALL leading manufactories combined. 

None Genuine without the trade-mark 
of tlic BULL. Take no other. 

W.TJLACKWELL&CO. 

Sole Manufacturers. ~ Durham, N. C. 



QMMTmm TO SMQKIBS. 

Beware of Imitations and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 

■^^=^ t ,yj, TRY I J 

]^ Fine, Mild & Sweet, 

Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

itiNNEY TOBACCO CO.. N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




Ste#v®^ ©rump 4 l©Wt 

432 Washington St., Boston, 

Invite attention to tltc largest and finest stock in the city, of 

DIAMONDS, RAHE GEMS, 

REPKESENTATIVE.S OF THE 

Gorh.am Manufacturing Company, in Boston. 
T'-xluliit a large and complete collection ot the 

SOLID S/Ll/ER AIVD ELECTRO-PLATED WARES 

PRODUCED BY TIII.S COJIPANY. 

The ornamentations now used .and the eiTects produced, are 
something- entirely novel in the craft of the Silversmith, and will 
interest every one by their combination of artistic and useful 
qualities. 

Especial Attention given to Designing Class-Day 
and College Invitations of Every Description. 



•» 



924 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Microscopes, 
Telescopes, 
I J Field Glasses, 
Opera Glasses, 

Drawing Instruments, 
Surveying Instruments, 
Thermometers, 

Barometers, 
IVIagic Lanterns, 
Apparatus for 

Projection, 
Pliilosopliical and 
Cliemical Apparatus. 

( \'r \ I 111,1 I \-- I III 1 (i\\ s s| \ I (IN AIMM,I('.\TK)N: 

II 1 M. nniKiits IIJ |,igrs. I'mvI -J-OpHcal 

.|riini,iii ,1 I III 1-M uii I.anlcnis, I'JO jiagvs. 

rl I I'll. Ill- I h il III liiiiuuits, li.O pigcs. I'art ."i— Meteor- 
gical Appai lUis, IJUp.igcs. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A PLACE FOR YOUR DICTIONARY, 
A PLACE FOR YOUR NEWSPAPERS, 
A PLACE FOR YOUR PERIODICALS, 

And aa orli im( lit 1 r \ i i 1 im^c, all in one. 



THE NOYES 



^RY HOLDER. 





NEW BBOG STOIE, 



ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

Fancy anj Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Tol)a,cco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET- 

j-cscriptions Carefully Compounded. 



58 Temple Place, BOSTON, 



ligiifii. ilitl@ne:|, 



Pilatei, 



Wedding Invitations, Business Cards, &c. 
COLLEGE INVITATIONS A SPECIALTY. 

Beautiful Engraved Visiting Cards. 

Plate and Pack, $150 ; former price, $3.00. 

GRIFFIN'S WEDDING CARD DEPOT, 

58 Temple Place, BOSTOIsT. 



The Palace ClotMns Store of Maine. 




:^IjXTb s^fOECx:. 



ALL THE LEADING NOVELTIES IN 

YOUMQ MEM'S CLOTHIl© 

AND NOBBY FURNISHING GOODS. 



STRICTLY ONE PRICE. 

^Boys' and Children's Department entirely separate. 

BLUE STORE, 

X.S'WXSTON, WLAXSfE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



'iM^m^MM mM©m, 



Fine Watches, Jewelry, Silver Ware, &c., 

IN GKEAT VAKIETT, BEST QUALITY, AND LOWEST PRICES, 

521 Congress Street, cor. Casco, 

PORTLAND, . _ - _ MAINK. 

A. CAKTER. J. W. D. CARTER. 

SPRING AND SUMMER, 1882. 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a clioice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Lineu Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments. White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

On and after Oct. 15th, 1882, 

Passenger Trains leave Brnns-nrick 

For Bath. 8.10, 11.25 a.m.. 2.45. 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 
night (Sunday mornings only). 
Rockland. 8.10 a.m., 2.45 P.M. 
Portland. 7.25, 11.30 a.m., 4.30 P.M., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 a.m., 12.35 night. 
Lewiston, 8.10 a.m., 2.45. 6.33 P.M., 12.40 night. 
Farmington, 8.10 a.m. {Mi.Kcd). 2.45 P.M. 
Augusta. 8.10 A.M., 2.45, 6.35 P.M., 12.45 night. 
Skovvhegan, Belfast, Dexter, and Bangor, 2.45 P.M., and 

12.45 night. 
Watcrvillo, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 P.M. (Saturday.s only), 
12.45 night. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 18S2. 



Main St., under Town Clock. 

I^- Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Sireet, - - - Porlland. Me. 
J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 






MAIN STREET, 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



fy^BUJTii^s hm mf^fmi. 



E3 



28 Free Street. Portland. Me. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Pubhshed every Friday Morning by A, G. Tenney. 

Terms, ----- §1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



QA%t 



Pureliuse your CO.\L at the 

Ooa,l "■2'ard. in TopsHarci, 

WHERE NONE BUT 

Tfee Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Dolivoi'cd well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer In all kin.l.^* of 

^E'srepK a»d ©©.It laea-fe©^ 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

as-Speoiol Bates to Student Clubs.-Sl 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating^ Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

$* ${ 'S ^ I> S 3^ o ^ s ^« 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 
Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

P O ft. 7 1< .A. IT D . IVIA.INE:. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 



CHOICE GROcTrTeS, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Students, 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

WO Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



A.. O. REED, 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Vie^ws. 



ALL KINDS OF 




For Schools and Colleges, 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 



NEW DESIGNS. 



FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 



i=i^ioe;s x^o-\Kr. 







THE FAVORITE A/OS. S03-404-3S2-/rO-SS/-W/TM 
'HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




E SMITH, Variety Store. Bottom Prices to Students. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



2©* tl* ^tW^^BOm^ 

DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 

Office at Central Telephone Office, Brunswick, 
jpg* All Orders left at C. E. Townseiid's Store will 
be promptly attended to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer iu Slieet Music, Music Buolcs, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 

J. H. PETERSON & SON, 

DEALERS IN 



ESTABLISHED 18«. 

W. L. Wl LSON & CO., 

■Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Onler:? I'V mail mil receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 

K. W. STOCKMAN. > 



Boots and Shoes, Tobacco and Cigars, 

Main Street, ---.--- Brtmswiok, Me. 

FIR.ST-CLiA.SS 

fliffiss, Orfins, aii lil@ij©si, 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

S. B. BREWSTEB, - - FBOPBIETOB. 

Class and Reunion Suppers a .Specialty. First-Class Laundry 
Work, equal to Ti'oy, done at short notice. 



^®^3ili |©lIeoe ^eiieal |)epaFfemeit 

The Sixtv-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School o'f Maine, will commence Februaky 8th, 1883, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

■ FACULTY.— Josni-i L. Cuuibeklais. LL.D . President ; ISRiEL T. 
Daxa, .M.D., Pathologv and Practice ; Ai,fi;ed Miti'hell, M.D., Obstetricj 
and Diseases of Women and Chiliher. ; p];rrEr.ic U. Geueish, M.D., 
Auatomv ; Chahles W, Godpard, A.M., Medical .lurisprudence ; Henry 
CARMicriAEL, Ph.D., Chemistry; Bert G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stepue.n- 11. Weeks, M.D-, Sm-gery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles 0. 
He.n-t, M. D.. Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Daxiel F. Elds, M.D., 
Rejristrar and Librarian; Irving Kimball, .M.D, Demonstrator of 
.\natomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. P. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCKELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



J." G. WASHBURN, 

.Maiuilactuivr n[ ami Dealer in 

PICTURE FRAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

From tlie clicaijesl tn llie verv Ijcst. Also Pictures, Cabinet 
Frames, siaiii>nerv, Canls, .\lbums, etc. Also, Agent for 

llie crleliraiecl 1 L.uscliolil Sewing Maeliiue. 
In the Blue Store, Main Street, Second Door from Elm, 

Opposite the Park, Brunswick, Maine. 

COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle riding is unsurpassed tis a 
method of travcling,whether for speed, 
sport, or renewal of health. The prac- 
ticability of the machine lia.s lieen 
thoroughly tested, and salisl'aetorily 
proved, beyond queslinn. 'I'liousands 
are in daily use. and the number is 
rapiillv inereasinp. The exercise is 
rec(.in'iiirniledlivlhemedical profession 
as ni(i>l benelie'ial to health, bringing 
into exercise almost every muscle of 
the l)ody. 

Send :«•. slamj) for SG-paRC Illustrated 
(:alalii!.'uc eonUilnluK price lists and full 
■■M Inl'onnalion. 

JMTHE pope MFC. CO. 

ILrW-W' 59; v/ashinKlon St„ BOSTON, MASS. 




WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold Pens, Pencils, etc, PRIZE CUPS, GOBLETS, etc., 
furnished to order. 

(^"Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and wairanted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAM STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8j ar/d jSy Congress St., a?ni 2J^ Middle Si., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

.^•Send for Pkice Li»t. 



C. L. RICHARDSON, 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

^-Transient Orders for Milk or Cream tilled by giving suitable notice. 

Residence, Scliool Street. 



Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS. SXA.TIONEFIY, FtOOM 
PAPER, PERIODICALS, «ScC. 



A. ^A^. TO^A^NSEND, 

Books, stationery, M Fancy Goods. 

Also Kaslevn .\hilnal Union Tclt^grajih (Xiice. 
Under To'wn Cloch, - - - BrunsTO-icli. Me. 



B#wi#ta 




Vol. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEBRUARY 14, 1883. 



No. 14. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The '^Argancl Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 

"XjIBI5.^iwIB"2" L^A^ 2^/1: IP'S," 

SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

IN PL.ICE OF THE OLD KIKDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

HALL L. DAVIS. 

Books, Monerf, and Paper Haopgs, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

FRANK M. STETSON, 



w 

X 
en 

cc 

Q 
< 







*fe. JOLY Z5-\* 









DEANE BROTHERS & SANBORN, 

Miinufactiirers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

^Sf Lowest Prices in the State, 
755 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 



VISITORS TO PORTLAND, 

Independent of any intention of pur- 
chasing goods in our line, are invited to 
inspect the Model Clothing and Fur- 
nishing Store of Allen & Co., 470 Con- 
gress St., opp. Preble House, 

LANCASTER BUILDING. 



SPECIAL AGENT. 

I^Dunlap & Co., of New York, Celebrated 
Stiff Hats. 

Also his New Straw Mackinaw, $2.00 and 
$2.50. 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

EHGEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENOY FOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 

following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (3.5 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the jEneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 

Geeek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books ; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

AlfCIEXT GeOGRAPHT. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Eeal equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
■Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the aniount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination hold for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnislied, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated lionorabjy from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUE HOURS A "WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and ilineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 
Latin, two terras. 
Greek, two terms. 
Natural History, three terms. 
Physics, one term. 
Chemistry, two terms. 
Science of Ijanguage, one term. 
English Literature, two terras. 
German, two terms. 
History of Philosophy, two terms. 
International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

Tiie annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $:25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
les.sen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEBRUARY 14, 1888. 



No. 14. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD, 
Arthur J. Ru.ssell,'83, Managing Editor. 
Herbert P. Kendall, '83, Business Editor. 
Herbert E. Cole, '83. Oliver W. Means, '84. 

Howard B. Goodwin, '83. Llewellyn Barton, '84. 
Charles H. Stetson, '83. Charles E. Sayward, '84. 
N. Brooks K. Pettjngill, '83, 

Terms — S2.00 a year in advance ; siugle copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communications 
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute 
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 
Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Tol. XII., No. 14.— Feb. 14, 1883. 

Editorial Notes 185 

Literary: 

Erster Sohnee (poem) 187 

Communications 188 

College Items 19] 

Personal T. 194 

Clippings 19.5 

Editors' Table 196 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



We have been looking forward for some 
time to the advent of spring, which furnishes 
the Okibnt with an annual editorial on the 
condition of the walks, the ash heaps, and 
kindred pleasant subjects, but as we sit down 
to work up this number, it could well be 
called the mid-winter number, for Winter 
doesn't show any signs of allowing his back- 
bone to be broken. The snow-plow man still 
goes through his farce of clearing off the 
walks, and the struggles of the uninitiated 



with the icy door-steps form a pleasant amuse- 
ment to the lookers on. One thing, however, 
has occurred since we last slung the editorial 
ink, that has made a profound ripple on the 
usually placid surface of Brunswick societ}', 
and that thing we cannot neglect. It is the 
advent of the festive Medic, clothed with im- 
poi'tance and with incipient hair on cheek and 
jowl. Look out maidens and cats ! Not- 
withstanding that the season ought to grow 
warmer, it may be still a cold day for ye both. 
Tenderness boasts not a place in the Medic 
heart. Here's hoping that conflagrations and 
agricultural exhibitions will not occur again 
this year. 



We notice in one of our exchanges a com- 
plaint that the library books are disfigured by 
annotations and markings, criticisms and com- 
mendatory adjectives written in the margin. 
We are not so much troubled bj that at Bow- 
doin, although it does exist in a mild form, 
as by the ravages of the reading-room fiend. 
During the late " onpleasantness" this was 
especially noticeable. Almost every paper 
that had a notice of the affair was mutilated 
before it had been in the reading-room twelve 
hours. A person who will do this will steal 
end-lamps. It does not seem to occur to 
them that anybody has any interest in these ar- 
ticles but their own miserable selves. If any- 
body will hand us the names of those who have 
been guilty of this, we shall be strongly 
tempted to publish them. 



One of the recent numbers of the Am- 
herst Student contains something so rich that 
we cannot refrain from mentioning it. It 



186 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



seems that a short time ago the Olio, which 
corresponds to the Bugle at Bowdoin, came 
out. It was a racy publication, quite out- 
spoken, and immediately sold like hot cakes. 
There were grinds on the Faculty in it which 
it was thought would get the editors into 
trouble. And for several days after the issue 
the board awaited a " summons " with fear 
and trembling. Sure enough, one day it 
came, and the board in a body wended their 
way to the President's, with thoughts of sus- 
pension and The-Old-Man-Oii-His-Ear floating 
before their minds. The President received 
them calmly, listened to their explanations, 
remarked that no summons had been sent 
them, and that probably their consciences had 
been troubling them, and dismissed them. 
Five minutes later, four figures were seen 
upon the campus, raising their right hands to 
heaven, and swearing to devote the rest of 
their college course to hunting up the man 
who sent that bogus summons. 



We understand that a new edition of the 
American College song book is soon to 
be issued with corrections and additions. The 
first edition is nearl}' exhausted. The book, 
it seems, is fairly popular at some of the col- 
leges. At Bowdoin it has never received 
popular favor, most of the selections being 
strained and in praise of the colleges whence 
they eminated. A song book to be good can 
not be gotten up in a few months, it must be 
the result of a growth. 



It is rather late in the day to annoiuiue 
the birth of the Inter-collegiate Press Asso- 
ciation, which, by this time, is quite a healthy 
infant. Nine papers from leading colleges are 
members of the association, and others will 
doubtless join. There are many advantages 
in belonging to such a league, among whicli 
have been mentioned the cultivation of a 
spirit of courtesy and good-fellowship among 



the papers represented, and a community of 
interests which gives strength by union. 
Bowdoin is so far " down east " that it is al- 
most isolated from colleges of its kind, and 
to her any membership with such a league 
would be of great advantage. The time of 
the present board of editors has so nearly 
expired, that probably no action »■. ill be taken 
towards asking for .admission to the associa- 
tion. 



Our attention lias recently been called to 
a discussion at the last meeting of New Eng- 
land College Presidents, namel}", as to estal)- 
lishiug a Chair of Pedagogy in our colleges. 
We can all see how much this affects us, since 
so man}' of our students teach winters while 
in college, and so man}- make it a work for a 
few years, at least, after leaving college, if 
not a life-work. It has been a matter of re- 
mark that so few of the students who are new 
at that kind of work fail in teaching, and come 
back without finishing out tiieir schools. 
Every year from six to a dozen from each 
class are out teaching, and it doubtless will 
be so for years to come. It would be a great 
advantage to those who are oul, and those 
who intend to teach, ever to have instruction 
in this department. It would raise up better 
professors for the next geneiation of students, 
also. There is no doubt but that teaching is 
quite a science in itself and needs quite as 
much if not more thorough, honest, hard work 
and thought than the other professions. And 
Bowdoin, from (he verj' fact that so many of 
her students teach at some time in tlieir lives, 
would have her standard j'ai.sed hy endowing 
such a professorship and sending out men 
better fitted to do their work. 



It is not too earljr to begin a boom in 
spinis, if we intend to make any kind of a I'ec- 
ord next spring and summer. The base-ball 
men and oarsmen have already begun to work 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



187 



in the rooms fitted for the purpose, but there 
is not that regularity in attendance and work 
that insures success. We understand from the 
committee that the series of games for next 
spring has already been arranged, and that 
the schedule will appear in this number. A 
series of five games will be played with each 
of the colleges in the State, and games with 
other colleges and clubs will doubtless be. 
sandwiched in. One of the rules adopted by 
the committee, and ratified by the committees 
from the other colleges, is that when a club 
fails to appear on the ground at the appointed 
time they shall forfeit the game. This is an 
excellent rule, and will prevent a club back- 
ing out of a game because their center fielder 
has a sore toe, as has sometimes been the case. 
There has never been a series of games looked 
forward to with such interest as the coming 
games with Bates and Colby, and those who 
have the matter in charge ought to feel the 
responsiljility of keeping the men up to their 
work. There has never been much danger 
of overtraining at Bowdoin, at least for the 
last few years. In regard to rowing there 
seems to be no reason now why four crews 
should not participate in the class races next 
June. The Sophomores were unable last year 
to enter a crew, and ought this year to work 
doubly hard to secure a good showing. The 
Freshmen for this very reason are about on 
an equality with them, and have some excel- 
lent material ; if they will only brace they 
may astonish themselves. It is well known 
with what eager interest the students and 
many of the alumni look to the selection of 
the University crew, and how willing all are 
to help along the cause by their influence and 
pocket-books. Surely there never was a time 
when these interests called for greater exer- 
tion and support from the college. 



We have recently received several long 
communications from alumni bearing on the 



general management of the college and the 
conduct of such as are now her students. We 
shall publish these as we have space, giving, 
however, sufficient space for undergraduates 
to be heard from if any are anxious to stand 
a show for the next Orient. As yet we 
have received very few articles from the class 
which is to hold the power during the com- 
ing year of the Orient. It is almost time 
for the polls to close,' and we entreat you to 
write before it is too late. We shall endeavor 
to make the selection of the best men regard- 
less of all other things. 



The majority of the Sophomores have 
been taking an enforced vacation. They 
took a position from which it was inevitable 
that they must recede sooner or later, viz.: 
that they would not attend college exercises 
till five of their class who were sent home to 
await the action of the Faculty should be 
ordered back. At the return of the Presi- 
dent they were given the option of going into 
exercises as usual, or going home. Nine of 
the class had the good sense to see that their 
position was wrong, and returned to their 
allegiance to the college. The rest started 
for home, where, at the hour of writing they 
still remain. Meanwhile the college goes on 
just the same as usual. It is reported that 
some of them are missed at the rink. 



ERSTER SCHNEE. 

FROM THE GERMAN OF MOEITZ HARTMANN. 

The trees but now in glorious green 
Droop with the early snows, 

The dreams wrought out in childish faith 
Droop with the early woes. 

The glowing sun sends forth his rays, 
And vanished are the snows, 

But deeper wounds cannot be healed, 
The wounds of early woes, 



188 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COMMUNICATIONS. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

" The Annual Side Show of Bowdoin 
College has begun," was what the writer was 
led to exclaim on reading in the daily papers 
an account of the recent " stir " in your 
midst. "Annual" might here be modified so 
as to include the last few years, for it is only 
until recently that the college has been in- 
creasing an unenviable notoriety through the 
columns of the daily papers. From the 
amount of free advertising the college has 
lately had, one might be led to think that the 
Faculty were in league with the " devil " and 
hazing was on the increase. 

Is this a fact, is hazing practiced more 
now than it was five years ago? Anyone 
who was in college then and has kept run of 
it since can truthfully sa}', " No, liazing is 
nothing now to what it was then." Why 
then this increasing notoriety? If the prac- 
tice of publicly putting Freshmen over the 
door and making them dance on tables has 
been given up, why should it appear that the 
college iseach year losiiigground? Five or six 
years ago did accounts of hazing scrapes appear 
as frequently as during the last two years? 
Ten years ago could you take up a morning 
paper and read an account of a hazing scrape ? 
Very seldom. Wliy? Was there less done 
then than now, or was it rather because such 
things were then winked at, unless they be- 
capie too glaring, and the Facultj^ were just 
as willing then not to hear a horn concert, as 
they are onlj' too willing now to put on their 
coats and rush for the campus at the sound of 
a single horn. 

Wouldn't it do for the members of the 
Faculty to renew their youtli sufficiently to 
practice winking? Methinks I hear one 
member exclaim : "Oli ! My ! We can't wink, 
we are members of tlie Faculty."' Ah! But 
you have winked. You winked when '78 



were Sophomores, and again when '79 took 
her turn, and when '80 came to the front you 
were kept winking so fast }"ou couldn't see a 
single thing. 

Was the outside world any wiser for that 
winking? On the other hand did not the 
opinion gain ground, backed as it M^as bj' the 
declaration of the Faculty, that hazing was 
dead? 

You winked at '81, but only with one eye- 
Since then you have allowed the "good old 
custom "to die out. If you could wink at 
such practices why is it necessary to parade 
before the public (ever eager to magnify the 
smallest wrongs) the petty tricks that are 
now practiced ? 

(Do I hear some one exchiim, "Is the pos- 
sible losing of an eye a petty trick?" No ; but 
it is taken for granted that all unprejudiced 
minds do not look upon that unfortunate af- 
fair as a premeditated attempt at liazing.) 

Because a Freshman loses a "pint of pea- 
nuts " is it necessary that all the papers from 
Maine to Texas should publish tiie fact, 
heading the item, "Another Case of Haz- 
ing in Bowdoin College "? If a Freshman's 
effort to raise a moustache is not appreciated, 
need an account of the " outrage "(?) be 
made public ? 

Wh}' not let such matters between classes 
settle themselves. The members of tiie Faculty 
will live just as long and the college longer if 
such things are kept quiet. 

If any member of tiiis same Faculty has 
"slight breezes" in liis own family does he 
acknowledge and pioclaim the fact to all tlie 
world? Does he not rather strive to conceal 
such troubles and use eveiy effort to make 
things appear pleasant ? 

Into till' care of the Faculty more than to 
any other bodv of mon are the fortune and 
good name of tlie college entrusted. Why 
should not tliey, its guardians, be as careful 
to guard its reputation and keep quiet tiie 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



189 



slight difference between classes as they would 
the petty troubles of their own household? 

A majority of the alumui will applaud 
every honest effort to suppress hazing, but 
many fail to appreciate the methods employed 
and the results attained during the last few 
years. x. 

To the Editors of the Orient : 

There is a certain family feeling, born of 
college associations, which every man has for 
his, Alma Mater, — a term which I use in its 
widest sense, as including everything neces- 
sarily connected with college life. This feel- 
ing is difficult to describe. It is a pride. In 
what? In those features of the institution 
for which the man would personally vouch as 
being sound, honest, fair, promotive of that 
gi'owth toward true manhood for which col- 
leges are presumably established. It is often 
a devotion. To what? To the best inter- 
ests of the college ; to the" advancement of 
its standard, not merely in boating — although 
that offers a wide field in Bowdoin — but in 
its curriculum, its government, etc. 

Besides the sterling qualities of honest 
pride and devotion, tliere is another trait 
which the great body of college students 
have in common with members of all associ- 
ations which make devotees. It is the dispo- 
sition to conceal, actively or tacitly, the faults 
of their parent head. By some catechisms 
this would be regarded as a sin. If it be a 
sin, we must agree that the Bowdoin Faculty 
for the past five or six years has exhibited 
tremendous energy in resisting the devil in 
this form. 

I have used the term Alma Mater in a very 
general sense — as a name for the memories 
which an alumnus has of his college course, 
to include the tree-fringed, green-spread cam- 
pus ; the cozy interiors — seen through nar- 
cotic smoke wreaths — with their groups of 
nick-named chums telling, around the cheer- 
ful open fire, the tales of hideous deeds of 



blood-thii'sty Sophs, who are now judges of 
the Supreme Court, doctors of divinity, or 
college professors. Include, also, the class- 
rooms, the ball-field, the river and the boat- 
house, your favorite professors, everything 
which in your memory is necessary to make 
the picture an agreeable reproduction of your 
college life. I would even, in the fullness of 
my heart, include that annually ephemeral 
session of Commencement dinner postponers, 
"The Board," if they should apply for ad- 
mission while the filial frenzy is upon me. 
To this collection of memories with their 
labyrinthine suggestions I wish to apply the 
term Alma Mater. It probably does not 
mean that, but I waive the question. 

Now, every alumnus, in thinking of his 
Alma Mater, does not stop to enumerate to 
himself all these things which make those two 
words so expressive to him. If he did, his 
aforementioned pride and devotion would 
involuntarily stumble at some of them. You 
will notice that I did not allude to the Fac- 
ulty as a whole, although I mentioned " your 
favorite professors." 

I remember a passage in a speech of Hon. 
T. B. Reed, '60, in which he emphasized the 
moral indifference shown in the acts of cor- 
porate bodies as compared with the personal 
moi'al worth of tlie corporators. 

This, I think, is pertinent to the Bowdoin 
Faculty during the time for which I have the 
presumption to criticise it. I know that 
many alumni will agree that its government, 
for five or more years past, has been charac- 
terized by a series of acts toward the stu- 
dents placed in its cliarge, such as has made 
many a true friend of Bowdoin heartily 
ashamed for it. Taken individually, it is sel- 
dom that any number of alumni or students 
will criticise the members of the Faculty ad- 
versely, but taken together, the sentiment 
which they currently inspire could be ex- 
pressed, somewhat profanely, by a few lines 
written in the Morse alphabet with the dots 



190 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



left out. Seemingly without any collective 
compunction, it lias set examples of very 
doubtful honesty in its dealings with the 
youth who were ardently gazing upward into 
its many-faced countenance, to receive from 
its lips the elements of true moral manhood. 

It has depi-ived innocent students of a 
chance to get an education by indefinite sus- 
pensions, to justify which it would make no 
specific charges. Students thus treated have, 
sometimes, gone to other colleges, but have 
usually abandoned tlieir college career in dis- 
gust. 

It has frequently held single individuals 
responsible for the acts — to he committed — of 
his whole class or any members theieof. 

It has generally sided against the students 
when complaints have beeu made against 
them, on the good old principle of believing 
every man guilty until he is proved innocent, 
which proof offers some peculiar difficulties 
when a man does not know with what he is 
charged, and besides, is not allowed to an- 
swer the charge. What is the use of con- 
tinuing this catalogue? Are these things 
doubted by recent graduates, or by present 
students? Ask them. Take a vote of the 
college on their truth or falsity. If they are 
true, are they "sound, honest, fair, promotive 
of that growth," etc., etc. ? 

Altiiough the moral aspect of the Faculty 
shows atrophy, its grimly-humorous side is 
abnormally developed. It has frequently 
taken great credit to itself in the assertion, 
expregiiis verbis, that, "We treat the students 
as gentlemen, and put. them on tiieir honor ! " 
Tills Delphic utterance, so oft repeated and 
so confusing when viewed througii tlie me- 
dium of Webster's Unabridged, was never 
solved until some one suggested that "honor" 
was Faculty slang for ".second stage." 

"How to abolish ha/.ing" is a vexed ques- 
tion, Imt I wisii to touch one piiase of it — a 
business view. Allliougli some severe inju- 
ries have resulted from lawlessness in Bow- 



doin within a few years, yet every recent 
graduate will agree that there has been very 
little hazing there for the period of time of 
which I speak, and most will agree that — 
with the lielp of a few judicious stabs from 
the Faculty — it would have died an easy 
death, for the college sentiment was and is 
strongly against it. 

But the policy of tlie Faculty has been 
to magnif}' every pett}' offense against the 
rules of the college into a worship of Phi Chi 
and other Sophomoric gods, by inflicting a 
punishment entirely disproportionate to the 
offense. In its high humor, it has furnished 
the newspapers with sensational paragraphs, 
with which to shock the prosaic minds of our 
elders, the better to laugh at their surprise 
when on visiting Brunswick, the}' were re- 
minded by its general aspect, more of Mount 
Vernon than of Gettysburg. And what is 
the average size of the offenses which are 
used to advertise Bowdoin as "the worst col- 
lege for hazing in the countr}- " ? Two-Boys 
go into One-Boy's room and make One-Boy 
undress, blow out liis light and get into bed ! 
They perhaps anticipate the promptings of 
nature by an hour or two. I would not be 
understood as condoning sucli a crime, but is 
there no way of punishment to express its 
proportionate enormity, nrerel}' for the pro- 
tection of the college against the newspapers? 

Let us suppose Bowdoin College to be a 
business house seeking customers for its 
goods, tlie students being tlie customers, the 
quality of its goods being represented by its 
desirability as a residence for a young man in 
search of a "liberal education." Is it husi- 
ness-llke to represent your goods (o be worse than 
they really are ■' It is hardsiiip enough to 
most meroiiants to rate them as poor as they 
actuall}- aie. ^Vrc the members of the Bow- 
doin Faculty paid for using business-like 
means for reducing the volume of their trade, 
i. e., lessening the size of their classes — that 
tiiey may have, according to the law of av- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



191 



erages, fewer black sheep in their not over- 
crowded pastures? How does this sound for 
an advertising circular ? " Parents ! We, 
the Bowdoin Faculty, assembled in solemn 
conclave, hereby warn you that Bowdoin is 
not a safe place to send your darling boy who 
is about to enter college. Send him to Bates 
or Colby, and give us a few years longer that 
we may purge our classes of their lawless ele- 
ment, — which we are determined to do if we 
reduce their membership to monitors only, — 
and b}^ the time your now toddling infant is 
ready to be inoculated with wisdom, we can 
conscientiously advise you to send him here, 
if the buildings by that time are not occu- 
pied as box-shops." 



This article was not inspired by any per- 
sonal grudge against the Faculty, past or 
present, but is merely an attempt to express 
opinions which the writer holds, in common 
with many others, upon a subject which 
alumni of several years' standing should be 
able to regard without prejudice. To show 
the absence of prejudice as a motive for the 
article, the writer avers that he never was in 
any way reprimanded by the Faculty, and 
that he never deserved to be. He has great 
admiration and respect for its members — indi- 
vidually. He never assisted at " hazing" or 
encouraged it. If this article is an offense 
against the Bowdoin Faculty, it is his first one 
— " and we won't count it." 

Indignus Filius. 



We would mildly suggest to the members of the 
Chess Club, which has lately sprang Minerva-like 
into full vigor, and as its maiden effort accepted a 
challenge from the Columbia champions, that they 
play at least one game among themselves before 
maldng such a risliy venture as the aforesaid. 

About the usual number of would-be disciples of 
Esculapius were "plucked" at the recent entrance 
examination at the medical school, for insisting that 
Boston is the capital of Tennessee, and that Behr- 
iug's Strait lies between Calais and Fort Popham. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



Lo, the poor " Medic " ! whose untutored mind 
Seeks light in chemistry, but no light can find. 

The Idea of Plato bothered '83. 
The Sophomores drop back slowly. 
The chapel bell is rung on Boston time. 
Nothing ethereal about the weather lately. 
The recent graduates are getting stirred up. 
The Brimswick cats had better lay low now. 
Expect a dun from the Business Editor soon. 
The deuce of diamonds is, they cost so much. 
Champion light weight — a Topsham ton of coal. 
The course of " germans " is a blooming success. 
The Okient Board has procured a reliable dog. 
The ball men can see what they have got to do. 
The chapel is the place to hold prayers in, after 



all. 

Plant cells— mulleins dealt out as pure Havana 
leaf. 

Prof. Campbell is being more and more appre- 
ciated. 

Harding, 'S.^, has closed his school and rejoined 
his class. 

Slip ! Thud ! • ! ^ ! ! (Fill in to suit 

yourself.) 

Several Colby men were seen around college 
last week. 

You can't say that our janitor is not a hard- 
worked man. 

The Mann base-ball will be used in our games 
nest summer. 

Holden, '83, has been having some trouble with 
his lower jaw. 

A. .0. Keed, of Brnuswiek, will serve as photo- 
grapher for '83. 

The walk clearer has apparently gone into 
winter quarters. 

The Bangor Alumni hold their annual reunion 
and dinner soon. 

Our last number was the innocent cause of 
trouble to one man. 

The Catholic Fair worked in well as an enter- 
tainment, last week. 

Sweetser, '84, is to have charge of the Patten 
Academy this winter. 

"Know thyself" was the motto of Socrates. 
" No beer" is the motto of the Bowdoin Temper- 
ance Association. 



192 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 



Them Medics have arrived and the paper collar 
trade is booming again. 

Tvcelve Juniors take optional conversational 
German to Mr. Atwood. 

A feve of the examining comaiittee showed up 
'round college last vreek. 

Do the admirers of the Orient intend to swamp 
us with communications '? 

The photograph of Mrs. Langtry adorns many 
a mantel-piece in college. 

It is about time that the Boards looked into the 
system of government here. 

Nine-tenths of the students complain of being 
" short." The rest soon will. 

Don't believe that the Faculty want to see over 
twenty-five men in each class. 

Bowdoin's Library, as given in the current cata- 
logue, contains 37,500 volumes. 

Two marks is the penalty for absence from 
Wednesday afternoon rhetoricals. 

The Sergeant came near being scooped in down 
street the day before his departure. 

The proprietors of the skating-rink sell season 
tickets at reduced I'ates to students. 

The ball men will probably have to make their 
Massachusetts trip the tirst of May. 

Mr. Charles T. Hawes, class of '76, has entered 
upon his duties as 'I'ntor in Rhetoric. 

It will be difficult for '8.5 to enter a crew for the 
class races. Her best muscle is gone. 

The " Prologue of the Canterbury Tales " is 
being read by the 'English " Lit." men. 

Woodbury, '83, is to read law next summer, in 
the office of Attorney General Cleaves. 

The abundance of unsbaved faces gives the col- 
lege a sort of logging-camp appearance. 

With what withering contempt a barber regards 
a person who is trying to raise a full beard ! 

Another unpretending structure for the Medics 
to protect has been reared near Adams Hall. 

Associated press dispatches assure us that per- 
fect order and quiet reign about college now. 

A denizen of South Winthrop calls his periodic 
melancholy fits, attacks of the azure distemper. 

The Seniors are more than pleased with the line 
lectures they are having in History of Philosophy. 

The Orient is coming into use as a card to 
leave when you call anil don't fii\(l anybody at home. 



There is sale even now for the number of the 
last Board's Orient that contains " Hand Downs." 

The President entertains the Seniors, in sections 
of five or six, at his residence every Tuesday even- 
ing. 

One man tells us that the Fresh mean well. 
That is the word to use in speaking of them, any 
way. 

The Senior English "Lit." division had an ex- 
amination on tbe Sa.\on and Norman periods, last 
week. 

A kind friend has provided the Orient sanctum 
with 1883 calendars. That isn't exaggerating it a 
particle. 

Mr. Geo. M. Towle's lecture on " Gambetta,'' 
drew a good sized audience to Memorial last Satur- 
day night. 

The local editor was confined to bis room from 
the effects of the fell swoop of the Brunsicick 
Herald quill-driver. 

Twenty-three of the Sophomores concluded that 
the wintry atmosphere of Brunswick is too bracing 
for their constitutions. 

Tbe Medical Department opened on Thursday 
with about ninety-six students in attendance. The 
opening lecture was by Prof. Hunt. 

A good many people think that the '86 men who 
caused all this trouble richly deserve the heartiest 
execrations of all true Bowdoin men. 

The arrangement of the Bowdoin collection of 
paintings in the loft above tbe library, is an ex- 
ample of " the art that conceals art." 

Profs. Avery and Robinson, Instructor Atwood 
and Tutor Fisher represented the Faculty at the 
recent dinner of the Portland Alunnii. 

There is no more need of Diogenes and his 
lantern. The object of his search has been found 
in '86. He should be lent to Barnum as a curiosity. 

Perhaps the events of tbe last few weeks will 
teach future upperclassmen not to bolster up and 
encourage Fresbmen so extensi\ely during tbe fall 
term. 

We know a man (but we won't give him away) 
who lias some dozens of packages of Old Judge 
smoking tobacco laid by for a rainy day. And yet 
he is not happy. 

President ('hamlierlain is to bold exercises in 
political economy from four to five p.m., for the 
benefit of the Seniors who were absent the latter 
part of last term. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



193 



Some additions to the college library, beside 
several valuable volumes for the Senior library, 
were procured by the President during his recent 
trip to New Yorli. 

Mr. Winiiley, of Philadelphia, who recently so 
generously endowed our Latin Chair, has presented 
to the college a fine painting of himself. It is hung 
in the chapel (north wing). 

In imagination we hear the greeting of alumni 
to '86 : 

" By corpus donimi, I will have thy knife, 
And thou shalt have a distaff and go spin." 

Rather takes the courage out of the men who 
fondly hoped that Bowdoin was going to do some- 
thing in sports this year, to see ten of the most en- 
ergetic men in '85 go away. 

The men who occupy fourth floor rooms in the 
dormitories, read the accounts of the late hotel 
catastrophes, then glance out of the windows at 
the hard walks far below and sigh. 

Attention is called to communications in this 
number. We believe they state the sentiments of 
the vast majority of our alumni. But why don't 
the vast majority do something besides talk? 

Faculty meetings are now held in the north- 
east corner room on the ground floor of Memorial. 
Seclusion seems to have been aimed at in making 
the change from the Cleaveland lecture room. 

It appears rather bad to see so many men who 
are longing for the day to come when they can walk 
from under the control of this institution. But 
they certainly have some reason for acting as they do 

A real live Governor of Maine loafed for half an 
hour in the reading-room the other day, while wait- 
ing for a train. Judging by the smell of his cigar 
the " Gov." does not smoke the Brunswick variety 
of cabbage. 

It is too bad that we cannot have a better col- 
lege catalogue. The current number tells the same 
old story in the same old way. We do not believe 
that it fairly describes the condition and advantages 
of Bowdoin. 

A good sized delegation from Bowdoin occupied 
front seats in the balcony while McCullough played 
"Virginins" at the Portland theatre, last Friday 
night. Don't ask us where this delegation was 
between the acts. 

The Chess Club is flourishing like a green bay 
tree. It has upwards of twelve jnembers at present. 
Mr. E. A. Packard, of '83, is President. A series 



of games by mail has been commenced with the 
club at Columbia. 

Some one was cruel enough to remark that the 
Prex's messenger, while performing his unusually 
arduous duties after the big snow storm, was scar- 
cely an image of the ideal Mercury. Perhaps he 
had mislaid his wings. 

The Y. M. C. Association uses the Senior room 
for its meeting. Probably the janitor will soon 
commence to store fuel in that room in North Maine 
that the college fitted up so well for the use of the 
now disbanded praying circle. 

The students do not duly appreciate the privil- 
ege of having access to the Oeient's exchange 
table. It hardly pays for the editors to run a fire 
in the room, and delegate one of their number to 
spend his afternoons there when only one or two a 
week call in. 

Why don't the members of '84 severally re- 
strain their greed and come to an agreement in 
regard to class matters? We hope they will save 
themselves the disgrace of considering personal or 
society preference before the importance of a suc- 
cessful Ivy Day. 

Mr. Fisher has signified his willingness to meet 
the Seniors one evening per week for the practical 
application of parliamentary law. It would be very 
profitable to hold such meetings, and if the exer- 
cises could be extended by debate, so much the 
better. The matter is left for the class to decide. 

The rhetorical exercises in Memorial, last Wed- 
nesday, consisted of original declamations by Files, 
Hutchins, and Sewall, '83; and selected ones by 
Cothren and J. A. Waterman, '84, and Butler, '85. 
This afternoon Bascom, Jordan, and Snow, '83, 
declaim original pieces ; and Clark and Wright, '84, 
and Brown and Cook, '85, selected ones. 

As will be seen in another place, the ball games 
which our nine is to play with the other college 
teams of Maine have been arranged. The dates 
are as favorable as we had right to expect, although 
perhaps not as favorable as we could wish. The 
number of games (five with Bates, and the same 
with Colby) is larger than usual ; a thing that will 
tend to test most thoroughly the strength of the 
several nines, and to satisfactorily settle the ques- 
tion of the Maine championship for 1883. It will 
be noticed that five of the games are to be played 
on our own delta. 



194 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



How is this for a way to look at : '85 was a 
pretty large class for Bowdoin. Its instructors had. 
to make two divisions of it in some studies. Now 
it is so reduced in size that it can be handled very 
nicely in one division. Saves work, don't you see ! 

The following schedule of ball games have been 
arranged, to be played in the Maine inter-collegiate 
season of 1883 : 

May 12, Bates vs. Bowdoin, at Brunswick. 

May 16, Bates vs. Colby, at TVaterrille. 

May 19 (a.m.), Bowdoin vs. Colby, at Brunswick. 

May 19 (p.m.), Bates vs. Colby, at Lewiston. 

May 23 (a.m.), Bowdoin vs. Bates, at Lewiston. 

May 2.3 (p.m.), Bowdoin vs. Colby, at Waterville. 

May 26 (a.m.). Bates vs. Bowdoin, at Brunswick. 

May 26 (p.m.), Bates vs. Colby, at Waterville. 

May 30, Bowdoin vs. Colby, at Waterville. 

June 2, Colby vs. Bates, at Lewiston. 

June 6, Bowdoin vs. Bates, at Lewiston. 

June 9, Bowdoin vs. Colby, at Brunswick. 

June 16, Colby vs. Bates, at Brunswick. 

June 23, Bowdoin vs. Bates, at WatervDle. 

June 30, Colby vs. Bowdoin, at Lewiston. 

This arrangement of games is subject to change, 
only, on account of unfavorable weather and ad- 
verse decrees of the Faculties of the several insti- 
tutions represented. 

'86 will go down to fame as the meanest class 
that Bowdoin or any other college, indeed, ever 
saw. By the most detestable means, that of in- 
forming the Faculty of a harmless joke played upon 
one of their number, the men of this class have 
crippled us in sports for this year, and have de. 
pleted our numbers at a time when we cannot 
afford to lose a man. And they have done this in 
face of all the favor that has constantly been shown 
them by upperclassmen ; in face of the fact that 
they have never experienced even a taste of hazing. 
They claim to have been hazed because one man 
lost a half pint of peanuts, and another's box of 
boot blacking was boned upon by a Sophomore. 
In -fact they don't know what hazing is ; that custom 
died before they saw Bowdoin. In short the ma- 
jority of this class (for there were a noble few who 
opposed the policy of the many) have broken faith 
with the rest of the college. Tlicy have done 
some things that wecan never forget or forgive. Let 
then] expect no more favors from upperclassmen. 
They are deserving of contempt and they will prob- 
ably get their deserts in full measure during the 
remainder of their course. 

The following was read by I'ldwiird 1'. I'ayson, 
'69, in rosponso to the soiUiuient, " The Memory of 



Longfellow," at the recent dinner of the Bowdoin 
Alumni of Portland : 

The world's remembrance guards thee in that fane 
Where coffined glory sleeps by Thamis shore ; 
Thy people's praise is voiceful evermore 

Throughout this land to call thy ghost in vaia. 

This State wliose motto speaks thy record well. 
This city, cradle of thine earliest songs. 
Each holds a memory that to each belongs, 

As doth the hearthstone where thy numbers fell. 

These memories are ; yet other thought have we 
Who, too, his Alma Mater mother call, — 
A singer's voice is mute within our hall, 

A chieftain of our house hath fallen; he 

Who highest bore the silken flag we prize, 
Hath wearied, and hath passad unto his rest; 
Within our hearts that meniory is blest, 

And bids, unchecked, our whispered homage rise. 



FERSOKAIx. 



[Graduates and Undergraduates are earnestly solicited 
to send personal items to the Bowdoin Orient,. Bruns- 
wick.] 

The following in regard to the class of '62 has 
been received from Mr. Hill, of Chelsea, the class 
secretary. 

Albion Burbank has been Principal of the Exetor 
(N. H.) High School since 1872. 

Sylvester Buruham is Professor of Hebrew and 
Old Testament Exegesis in the Baptist Theological 
Seminary, Hamilton, N. T. 

Joseph W. Chadwick is a Master in the Boston 
Latin School. He resides in Maiden, Mass., where 
in numerous public positions he leads an active and 
useful life. 

Isaac B. Choate is in a private school in Boston. 
He lives and studies in Cambridge. He is an accu- 
rate and vigorous writer, contributing freely to the 
public press. 

Melville A. Cochrane ranks as Major, U. S. A. 
He was at Prescott, A. T., iu 1881, with 12th In- 
fantary. 

Samuel P. Dame is a druggist, Sharon, Pa. 

William E. Donnell is on the editorial staft" of 
the New Yoric Tribune. 

Ellis R. Drake is pastor of the Congregational 
Church in North Held, Mass. 

Alnion Goodwin belongs to the law linn of 
Vanderpoel, CJreon & Cuming, New York City. 

Frank A. Hill has been Principal of the High 
School, Chelsea, Mass., since 1870 ; is a writer for the 
press, and in demand as a lecturer. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 



195 



Henry H. Hunt is a physician, Gorham, Me. 

Frederic N. Huston practices medicine in Kook- 
land, Me. 

Dorville Libbey represents tlie San Francisco firm 
of A. T. Bancroft & Co., having control of the law 
publications of that house in its Eastern busi- 
ness. 

Augustus N. Linscott is a lawyer in Chicago- 
He was for . some time the prosecutiog attorney for 
that city. 

John T. Magrath is pastor of the Episcopal 
Church, Hyde Park, Mass. 

George A. Mark is in the Congressional Library 
at Washington. 

Joel Marshall practices law at Buxton, Me. 

Charles P. Mattocks is a lawyer in Portland, Me., 
is colonel of the First Maine Volunteer Militia, and 
a member of Gov. Robie's Staff. 

Joseph Noble is in the U. S. Treasury Depart- 
ment, Washington, D. C. 

Edward N. Packard has charge of the Second 
Church, Dorchester, Mass. He is a writer for the 
press. 

Samuel W. Pearson's address is Brunswick, Me. 

John M. Pease is pastor of the Congregational 
Churcb, North Lebanon, Me. 

John E. Pierce represents the Am. B. C. P. M. 
as a missionary in Nicomedia, Asia Minor. He has 
charge of twenty-four native teachers and pastors, 
thirteen out-stations, fourteen common schools, a 
liigh school, and a girls' boarding school, containing 
over six hundred pupils in all. 

Howard L. Prince is in the Police Court, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Isaac W. Starbird received the degree of M. D., 
Dartmouth, in 1877 ; is in Eichmond, Me. 

Henry O. Thayer is a Congregational Clergy- 
man, Woolwich, Me. He is a member of the Maine 
Historical Society. 

Albion L. Varney ranks as Captain, U. S. A., 
and is stationed at the Watervliet Arsenal, West 
Troy. 

Charles H. Verrill is Principal of the Delaware 
Literary Institute, Franklin, N. Y. 

Daniel W. Waldrou, as City Missionary of Bos- 
ton, has charge of an important work. He has 
been chaplain of the Massachusetts House of Rep- 
resentatives for several years. 

Marcus Wight is with the firm of J. C. Ayer & 
Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Charles H. Pope has been for some years pastor 
of the Congregational Church, Thomastou, Me. 



'69. — F. H. Boardman, now of Minneapolis, is a 
representative in the Minnesota Legislature. 

'76.— Charles Andrews, on account of ill health, 
is spending the winter at Nordhoff, Ventura County, 
Southern California. 

'80. — H. A. Wing has lately secured a position 
on the Bangor Commercial, having resigned bis 
place in Portland on the Live Stock Monthly. 



CLIPPIKGS. 



It rains alike on the just and the unjust— and 
on the just mainly because the unjust have bor- 
rowed their umbrellas. —Ex. 

A prep, closes his patriotic oration thus : " Yes, 
our country shall remain till Gabriel plays his last 
trump, and orders up the universe." — Ex. 

Here is one from one of our theological semina- 
ries. Professor in Systematic Theology — " Where 
is the lesson to-day, gentlemen?" Student — "It 
begins at good angels and goes to the devil." — 
Monmouth Courier. 

Innocent Little Freshie (passing by a manufac- 
turing establishment with his maiden aunt) — 
"Auntie, do old maids live here?" Aunt — "I 
don't know. Why?" Freshie — "Don't you see 
that sign — ' Men Wanted?'" — Ex. 

The Ex. Ed. of the Kansas Bevieiv has things 
a little mixed when he speaks thus of our E. C, 
the Colbt/ Echo: "Withal if your brown satin 
comes out but once a year. Miss Colby, we hope 
for the same pretty appearance next Christmas 
tide." 

Arthur Crayon—" Miss Rosebud, I have brought 
a little picture that I painted especially for you. 
It has proved a very pleasant task during the 
month that I have worked on it." Pinky Rosebud — 
"Oh! thanks, Mr. Crayon, you are very kind. 
But I'm afraid I must return the frame, as my 
mother never allows me to accept presents of ant/ 
value from gentlemen." — Spectator. 

THE MAIDEN PAIE. 

Oil Maiden Fair ! you scoop the jumble ; 
Your honeyed speech doth surely crumble 

To vitter nothingness the sug 

"Which the bee, the busy bug 
Known to most of us as bumble, 

By day into his hive doth tumble, 
And when it's gone, doth never grumble. 
Tie up with silken cord the pug, 
Oh Maiden Pair ! 

And listen to your servant humble, 

While he soft words of love doth mumble 

And asks you soon to share his jug, 

And to his home your traps to lug. 

To rule him well with ten-pound dumb-bell, 

Oh Maiden Fair. — Acta. 



196 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



The solid part of the banquet which is weekly 
spread upon the Table for the delectation of the vo- 
racious Ex. Ed., is comprised in the Lits. They are 
a nourishing food, and. as w-e know, nourishing food 
if not more difficult of digestion, at least requires 
more time for the process. So when a Lit. arrives 
we get out our strongest pipe, pack it hard, and pull 
with that "universal solvent" of care and trouble, 
draw our snuggest chair to the fire, elevate our ed- 
itorial feet to the proper angle, and, must we say it, 
often go comfortably to sleep with the Lit. in our 
hand. 

The colleges are few in number that can support 
a purely hterary magazine, in addition to the more 
popular college paper; at present we have before 
us three, which we believe are the only real repre- 
sentatives of this class among our exchanges, viz., 
from Yale, Princeton, and Hamilton. The more 
usual course is to attempt a combination of the lit- 
erary, the humorous, and the news-paper,— indeed, 
the only course that' is open to smaller colleges. 
The Lit. represents the student phase of college hfe, 
and if it were more widely circulated might disa- 
buse the public mind of the somewhat prevalent 
ideas that all that is needed to found a college is a 
gymnasium and a boat-house. It may seem to some 
that these magazines are mere relics of those bar- 
barous days when triolets and villanelles were un- 
known, and when our friend, T. Carlyle Smith, of 
the Acta, would have been kicked down stairs had 
he offered any of his efiuisions to the serious-minded 
editor; but if they are relics, they should be cher- 
ished all the more to lend the dignity to college lit- 
erature that bag-wigs and black gowns do the dig- 
nitaries of the State. 

The present number of the Yale Lit. is fully up 
to its standard ; its articles are not only thoughtful 
but readable. The question of annexation of Can- 
ada is somewhat fully discu.ssed, together with two 
other plans by which England may dispose of her 
colonies. (1no of these, which at first might appear 
a trifle .startling, is believed by the writer to be the 
most practicable, viz., "th(> consolidation of all Eng- 
land's colonies into one vast Federation, the sepa- 
rate factors of which shall enjoy absolute local self- 
rule, yet at the same time yield obedience in all 
truly national matters to the decrees of an Imperial 
Parliament whose members shall represent every 
State in the Union." In this, lie is confident, will 
be found the only possible solution of the Irish dif- 
ficulty. Another correspondent, writing of Thoroau, 



the " Walden Recluse," asks the question : " Was he 
bigoted or broad ? a philosopher or a cynic ? " And 
although he would suggest that the proper estimate 
lies between the two extremes, yet from his treat- 
ment of the subject we would certainly conclude 
that Thoreau was a " bigoted cynic." The sketch 
entitled " My Uncle." is one of the best things we 
remember to have seen in any college publication. 
Among much good advice that " Uncle Dick" gives 
his nephew is tbe following, on hearing that he had 
become an editor of the college paper : " Don't be 
discouraged if adverse winds meet you. College 
criticism is generally keen, but quite as generally 
unfair. You will find your severest critics to be 
those who have never written a line, and who, if 
given the helm of your little vessel, would run it on 
the rocks in no time. I would not advise you either 
to imagine that because you are editor of a college 
paper (perhaps you dignify it by the name of jour- 
nal), a position on any paper in the land awaits you 
at the end of your college course." 

The Nassau Literary Magazine, from Princeton, 
contains this month a prize essay, "The Scarlet 
Letter," in which the writer gives us a most deep 
and thoughtful analysis of Hawthorne's greatest 
work. It seems to us that he strikes tbe very core 
of Hawthorne's subject, when he says: "In its 
broadest sweep it is erpiation. It is the highly im- 
aginative history of nothing less tremendous than a 
sin. The prevailing motive of the story is confes- 
sion." " Colleges and Civil Service Reform" is a 
repetition of the oft-repeated call upon students to 
interest themselves in this subject ; but farther 
than setting forth the great influence college gradu- 
ates ought to exercise in politics, it gives us no ideas 
how far this reform is practical. Another contribu- 
tor gives us an exhaustive paper on " Matthew Ar- 
nold as a Literary Critic," and finally arrives at the 
assertion that "it is safe to affirm that new life 
must be put into Protestantism. Its spirituality 
must bo revived." ..." The strongest part of 
our religion to-day is its unconscious poetry." And 
quoting from Sidney Lanier, " Music already occu- 
pies one end of the church ; tbe same inward need 
will carry poetry to the other." This rather re- 
markable number closes with a very superficial 
criticism of Howell's " Modern Instance." 

The Hamilton Lit. is a modest-looking pamphlet 
of a light gray persuasion. Indeed, it is noticeable 
that the Lits. affect the more subdued colors in 
marked contrast to the bright reds and greens of 
some of our exchanges — and, if we may so express 
ourselves, its contents rather borch-r on the light 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



197 



gray. The author of " Lessons from Shakespeare's 
Portraiture of Henry V." takes rather a charitable 
view of Priuce Hal's character, when he says that it 
consists of " piety, honesty, and modesty." We 
perhaps have the secret of the author's x^urpose 
when he suggests that, " This lesson in the por- 
trayal of Henry's character might well be com- 
mended to the public men of to-day for their can- 
did consideration." 

The Lits. do not seem to run much to poetry ; 
perhaps it is inconsistent with their severe and solid 
tone. The following from the HnmiUon Lit. is so 
suggestive that we can almost hear in its movement 
the remorseless stroke of the chapel bell : 

AN EARLY RISER. 

VILLANELLE. 

While the cbapel bell is ringing, 
Calling all within the kirk, 
I am on my clnds aflinging. 

Oh, the trees are sadly singing, 
I'm as wild as any Turk 
"While the chapel bell is ringing. 

All about the room I'm swinging, 
Quicker did I never work, 
I am on my duds aflinging. 

All the while my conscience stinging 

Is a wee regretful quirk 

"While the chapel bell is ringing. 

Now its tolling notes are dinging 
In my ears; but not a shirk, 
I am on my duds aflinging. 

Now my way I'm kirkward winging ; 
Tho' in bed I love to lurk, 
"While the chapel bell is ringing, 
I am on my duds aflinging. 



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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



L. C. YOUNG, 

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AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a ciioice assortmeut of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, Wliite Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

On aiul after Oct. 15th, 1882, 

Passenger Trains leave Brnns-wick 

For Bath. 8.10. 11.25 a.m.. 2.45. 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 
night (Sunday mornings only). 
T{oel<Iand. 8.10 a.m., 2.45 p.m. 
Portland. 7.25. 11..S0 a.m.. 4.30 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 12.35 night. 
Lewiston, 8.10 a.m.. i.i."!. (i 33 p.m.. 12.40 niglit. 
Farminglon, 8.10 A.M. (.Mixed), 2.45 p.m. 
AugiLSIa, 8.10 A.M., 2.46, 0.35 p.m., 12.45 night. 
SUowliegan, Bellast, Dexter, and Bangor, 2.45 p.m., and 

12.45 night. 
Watervillc, 8.10 A.M., 2.45, 6.35 p.m. (Saturdays only), 
12.45 night. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 1882. 

M A.YlSr A.RD'S 
@yst^p ant See §mtim Impodum, 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

Jg^ Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 

D]/nvroTiiis,, rmt itwti-m, 

\A/ALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street. - - - Portland, Me. 

J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 



MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 

28 Free Street, Portland Me. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. 6. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Year iu Advauce. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 
Pui-chasc your C0.\4| at the 

Ooa.1 -^Tard. in. Topslxaian., 

WIIKRK NOXK BUT 

Tbe Best of Coal is Kept, 

.\nd is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Office near the Sheds. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

! Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

I Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

1 .^"Special Bates to Student Clubs...£| 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Si?mg®ltfe®0)0)fe M&m 



-A.. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of BrunsTtrick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 



ALL KINDS OF 




No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily- 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien B1.0CK, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

CHOICE GRoSrIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Students. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- FINE WORK A SPECIA LT Y. 

menceraents, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMJVIER, Director, IF IBICES x_, o "VsT- 

780 Middle Street, - - - - Portland Me. 



For Schools and Colleges, 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 




E, SMITH, Variety Store. Bottom Prices to Students. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



2@« €« St^mW^<0My 

DE.A LER IN ALL KINDS OF 

Office at Central Telephone Office, Brunswick. 
(ig= All Orders left at 0. E. Tovvnsend's Store will 
be promptly attended to. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEB, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Boolis, Musical lustruments, anil Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

158 Exchange Street. Portland. 

J. H. PETERSON & SON, 

DEALERS IN 



ESTABLISHED 1S44. 

W. L. Wl LSON & CO., 

Wbolesiile and Retail Deiilers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B.— Orders by mail will receive prompt attentiun. Send for price list. 

H2 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St. 



Boots and Shoes, Tobacco and Cigars, 

Main Street, ---.--- Brunswick, Me. 

FIRST- Cr.A.SS 

PkiOiSj Oiginsj mi Mtlsieongj 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 



TOIffTIIffB HOTEII«7 

BBUNSWICK, MAINE. 

S. B. BREWSTEB, - - PROPRIETOB. 

Class and Reunion Suppers a Specialty. First-Class Laundi-y 
Work, equal to Ti'oy, done at short notice. 

"""'j. G. WASHBURN, 

Manul'actuivr ot and Dcalor in 

PICTURE FEAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

From llie cheapest to the very best. Also Pictures, Cabinet 

Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, etc. Also, Agent for 

the colebrated Jlnnscliolil Sewing machine. 

In the Blue Store, Main Street, Second Door from Elm, 

Opposite the Park, Brunswick, Maine. 



COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle riding is unsurpassed as a 
method of traveling,wliether for .speed, 
sport, or renewal of health. The prac- 
ticability of the machine has been 
thoroughly tested, and satisfactorily 
proved, beyond queslion. Thousands 
are in daily iisn, and tl\f miniber is 
rapidly incri-asiuf;. Tlif exercise is 
recommended liv IlicmrdiiMl pmlossion 
as mo.st benclicial lo heullb, bringing 
into exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

Send 3c. stjinin for .30-pnge lUiistrated 
(;alalo.j;iie contaming price lists and full 
inliirnialion. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washington St„ BOSTON, MASS, 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School (if Maine, will commence February 8th, 1883, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY .—Joshua L. Cilimberlais, LL.D , Presidenl ; Israel T. 
Dana, .M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Ob3tL-tric3 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H. Gerhish, M.D., 
Anatomy; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., MedicalJurisprudeuce ; Hen'RT 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Bdbt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology, 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D,, Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles 0. 
HoNT, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatom.v. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Sea^etary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold Pens, Pencils, etc, PRIZE CUPS, GOBLETS, etc., 
furnislied to order. 

^^ Watches, Clocks, ttiid Jewelry promptly re- 
paireil and warrttnted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

jiSy and ^8/ Congress Si., and 2J^ Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 




C. L. RICHARDSON, 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

fl®*Transieut Orders for Milk or Crenni filled by giving suitable notice. 

Residence, School Street. 



Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS. ST-A-TIONEIR-y. ROOM 
P.A.PE:Ft, PE:FtIOX3IC.A.I.S. <ScC. 

A. W. TO^VNSEND, 

Books, stationery, i Fancy Goods. 

.Usd MmsIciii Miilnal Uniim Tclci;ra|ih Office. 
Under Town Clock, - - - Brnnswiolj:, Me. 



B#wi#ln #itent« 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEBRUARY 28, 1883. 



Vol. XII. 



No. 15. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE jU).JUSTAJ5LE HiVNGDCG 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new"Oxford" and"lV!oehring" Burners 

IX PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

HALL L. Di^VIS, 

Book, Stationerf, and Paper Hangings, 

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAND, ME. 

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

FRANK M. STETSON, 



fa 

Q 




•^JOLYZS-^* 



DEANE BROTHERS & SANBORN, 

Manufacturers anr] Dealers iu 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

!3^ Lowest Prices in the State, 
755 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 



VISITORS TO PORTLAND, 

Independent of any intention of pur- 
chasing goods in our line, are invited to 
inspect the Model Clothing and Fur- 
nishing Store of Allen & Co., 470 Con- 
gress St., opp. Preble House, 

LANCASTER BUILDING. 



SPECIAL AQENT. 

l^"Dunlap & Co., of New York, Celebrated 
Stiff Hats. 

Also his New Straw Mackinaw, $2.00 and 
$2.50. 

MERRY, The Hatter, 

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

EITGEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONiBLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 

following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the JSneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 

Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

AlfCIENT GeOGEAPHY. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Keal equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examiuation is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
Pfesident of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent iu 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as ho may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQUIEED— EOPE HOUES A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

j^Iathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Khetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOTTR HOUKS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 
Latin, two terms. 
Greek, two terms. 
Natural History, three terms. 
Physics, one term. 
Chemistry, two terms. 
Science of Language, one term. 
English Literature, two terras. 
German, two terms. 
History of Philosophy, two terras. 
International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $2r>. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen tiie cost of living. 

Further inlormation on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol.. XII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEBRUARY 28, 1883. 



No. 15. 



Entered at the Post Oifice at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 
Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XII., No. 15.— Feb. 28, 188;^. 

Editorial Notes 199 

Literary : 

The Talue of au Education 201 

Communications 202 

College Items 204 

Personal 208 

Clippings 209 

Editors' Table 210 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



One of the editorials in a recently pub- 
lished Cornell paper complains of the tirade 
of abuse against the college by the news- 
pajjers, who are charging it with atheism and 
complaining that it harbors all the evil tend- 
encies of the times; and against this attack 
the Era is trying to defend the college. We 
feel that we are standing in this same posi- 
tion. Papers far and near are " pitching 
into " us for iiavboiing an obsolete and dis- 
graceful custom known as hazing. It seems 
impossible to make people outside believe 
that Bowdoin is not a sinner above all other 
colleges in this regard. Why is this feeling 
abroad that raises a hue and cry against every 
little squabble at Bowdoin? A year or so 
ago there was a cane rusii at Colbj'. The af- 
fair was carried on with a good deal of gusto, 
and finally got into the papers. But instead 
of raising a great cry, about " ruffianism," 
and " disgraceful conduct," it was simply 
taken for what it was worth and considered 
a good joke, — a working off of superfious ani- 



mal spirits. If the affair had occurred here 
we venture to say these same newspapers 
would have had a different notice of it. 
What is the reason of this willingness td 
make so much out of any little affair at Bow- 
doin, which at any other college wtjuld be 
passed over with merely a statement for read- 
ers to laugh at? We confess that we are not 
able to give the reason. It may lie partly in 
the fact that when students go home they 
meet with questions and statements about 
Bowdoin so utterly false and ludicrous, that 
they merely laugh at them, and do not take 
the trouble to deny them up and down as 
they should. And so repoi-ts get current, and 
people are willing to believe anything, pro- 
vided it is bad, about Bowdoin. We are well 
able to stand all the truth, and shall not be 
worse off for it, but we must protest against 
this eagerness to make a sensational story out 
of what would be considered at any other 
place than Bowdoin as a good joke. 



At Harvard has arisen again the question 
of compulsory attendance at church. An 
undergraduate recently wrote to the Nation a 
criticism of the practice now in vogue, viz., 
of requiring of each man at the end of the 
year a written statement that he had attended 
services at some church every Sunday during 
the year unless excused. The author of the 
communication contended that many men 
never saw the inside of a church from one 
year's end to another, yet handed in their 
statements annually, and on this ground con- 
tended that attendance at church should not 
be compulsory. We do not ask a doing away 
of compulsory attendance at church, although 
it is probable that if it were done away with 



200 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



the majority of students would still attend, 
but the present cumbrous system of requiring 
reasons and blanks tilled out every time a 
person prefers to attend some other church 
than the Congregational seems a waste of 
time and labor. It would be much better for 
all concerned if instead of every week a blank 
could be handed in say once a term. 



The recent action of the Freshmen is 
stirring up the question of what " college 
honor " is, whicli their action is said to have 
violated. Outside of college a man wlio al- 
lows his personal rights to be violated con- 
tinually, is not considered much of a man if he 
does not take some steps to check the aggress- 
or. He can take the law into his own hands 
or he can appeal to the rightful authorities 
for protection. If now a man, sa}^ of twenty- 
five years of age, comes to college the whole 
aspect of things is suddenly changed. He is 
a Freshman, and as such he must be subject 
to the class above him. He must without 
objection allow water to be poured upon him, 
or if he has aspirations to raise a moustache 
he must diligently stifle them. If he does 
not wish to submit there are two ways he can 
take, one is to take the matter into his own 
hands, the other is to call upon the rightful 
authorities for protection. This latter course, 
college honor says he cannot take. It is dis- 
honorable, mean, sneaking, are some of the 
adjectives applied to it. He then must sub- 
mit, or by opposing create a disturbance that 
will advertise the college far and wide as the 
abode of lawlessness. If he refuses to take 
either of these alternatives and goes accord- 
ing to common right by appe.iling for pro- 
tection to the proper authorities, we ourselves 
cannot blame him. And this is the position 
we have taken in this subject during the re- 
cent troubles. It is no more than fair to 
state that the Orient Board is evenly di- 



vided on this matter, 
position. 



We have stated our 



We have seen by the papers that Prof. 
Campbell has recently been called to the Chair 
of Mental and Moral Philosoph}' at Dart- 
mouth, and this furnishes us with a text for a 
suggestion. Bowdoin has been remarkably 
fortunate in her choice of professors. How 
many men from Longfellow down have begun 
a celebrated career by being appointed Pro- 
fessor at Bowdoin ! But at the same time 
Bowdoin has been remarkably unfortunate in 
losing her best professors. Few, indeed, are 
willing to say, as did Parker Cleveland, when 
more than double his salar}' was offered him 
at several other colleges, that he thought lie 
should " stay by old Bowdoin." Is there not 
some way of keeping desirable professors 
here when they receis'e flattering offers from 
other colleges? The college is now in a pros- 
perous condition financially. Is it impossible 
for the Boards to take some action like rais- 
ing a professor's salary for the sake of keep- 
ing him ? If not we fear Prof. Campbell's 
name will have to be added to that long list, 
beginniTig witii Longfellow and ending with 
Professors Ladd and Wheeler. 



It is with a deep sense of satisfaction that 
we chronicle the fact that nothing has been 
heard from the band this term. We hail it 
as a good omen that the loom formerly occu- 
pied b}' them in their nefarious praclicings is 
occu[)ied now by peaceable, law-abiding citi- 
zens. Those rooming in the immediate vicin- 
ity of the band last jear may have been 
slightly prejudiced. Doubtless they were. But 
in our opinion the filing of circular saws and 
the " dripping of a thousand water-butts" 
were far preferable to that baud. 



We were button-holed at the depot a few 
days ago by an old man who asked us if a 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



201 



man would make a better farmer if he had a 
college education. He evidently thought 
the question was a poser for he struck an 
attitude and waited for an answer. We 
were anxious to answer in the affirmative, 
for we believe that there is nothing a person 
can enter upon, in which he will be as well 
off without a college education as he would 
be with it. So we overhauled the contents 
of our mind to see where we should be better 
off on a farm for having come to college. 
The first two years didn't offer much en- 
couragement but there was some help in the 
third year. Chemistry, mineralogy, botany, 
physiology, zoology, surely a man on a farm 
would he practically better off from a knowl- 
edge of these. He would know better than 
to send iron pyrites to New York under the 
impression that he had found gold on his 
farm. Chemistry would teach him better 
than to take from the land all the time with- 
out adding to it the necessary compounds to 
make a fertile soil. So we staggered the old 
gentleman by firing off at him the names of 
these studies. 

We mention the question, however, 
because it is a representative one nowadays. 
People are asking, does a college education 
pay? It is astonishing how often we meet 
the question. Well, if it does not pay in a 
money-getting point of view it certainly does 
in satisfaction. It seems to us that an 
educated farmer would derive an immense 
amount of satisfaction in feeling that he was 
abreast of the times, in taking an interest in 
the discovery of a new comet, or in follow- 
ing the progress of a theory, perhaps help- 
ing to establish it by his own observation and 
experiment. It would break up the monot- 
ony of working, eating, and sleeping, to read 
a bucolic of Virgil or an ode of Horace. We 
are quite near the end of our course now 
and however willing we might have been at 
the end of the first two years to have dropped 
it, these last two years we would not lose for 
any reason. 



THE VALUE OF AN EDUCATION. 

Of late much has been spoken and written 
about the value of a college education; es- 
pecially has the former been true when the 
student has been confronted on his return 
home by a miscellaneous collection of words 
and phrases from all the languages under the 
sun — more or less — which have been carefully 
culled for his perusal by his father, anxious to 
know how he is getting on in the acquirement 
of knowledge. 

Some even have gone so far as to say that 
the time spent in college is thrown away and 
worse than wasted; but that this statement 
is groundless is amply proved by a practical 
application of the knowledge obtained within 
old Bowdoin's walls, lately made by two of 
our fellow-students. 

The young men in question, a few even- 
ings since, wended their way to a Catholic 
Fair, held in the hall of which Brunswick 
is so proud. They entered its portals and 
were struck with astonishment. The myriad 
gas lights cast a halo of beauty over the hall 
with its red and white streamers and made 
the checkered quilts, hung upon the walls, 
seem fit coverings for royalty. 

As our heroes stood " taking in " this scene 
of surpassing loveliness, with open-mouthed 
amazement, they were approached by a young 
lady evidently of French extraction with a 
pass-book and pencil in her hand, her whole 
make up d la book agent. She addressed them 
in flowing accents " Voulez vous prendre has- 
ards en une parure." 

Our friends were entirely unprepared for 
this emergency, but with that keen mother- 
wit, which Bowdoin students possess to such 
a marked degree, they answered " Wir hahen 
heine Frauen" To say the young lady was 
astonished would be to draw it mild. She 
gave one last reproachful look at them 
from the depths of her liquid eyes, silently shut 
her pass-book and stole away to find some one 
who could at least answer in "Yankee." 



202 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



But a few minutes had passed before our 
friends were accosted by another young lady 
who wished them to take chances in a silver 
ice pitcher. They had not fairly said "■ JVous 
vous aimons,'" before she, too, faded away into 
the crowd. 

At last a fair maiden came who under- 
stood French, and for whom low Dutch had 
no terrors. Our friends were in a hard 
place and would undoubtedly have been 
vanquished if the spokesman had not told the 
lady, with great firmness, h-sbOsv i'uXam;!. 

r^aijairdyYU.^ zptdy.iivra. ThiS WaS tOO mUCb, and 

she 1-etreated precipitately. 

Space forbids making further mention 
of how one church fair, at least, was brought 
low. It is sufficient to say that a close cal- 
culation on their return showed that the 
value of an education to them, for one even- 
ing, was three dollars and twenty-five cents. 

K. K. 



COMMUHICATIOKS. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

In your last issue the course pursued by 
the class of '86 was severely and, it seems to 
me, unfairly criticised. In view of the at- 
tendant excitement it is perhaps inevitable 
tiiat misapprehension should exist as to the 
facts of the case. I ask your permission to 
place these in what I believe to be their Inie 
light. 

1. The Freshmen did not base their action 
on the loss of a few pea-nuts, as has been in- 
timated in I lie papers. 

When the class spoke to me, tliat circum- 
stance was mentioned incidentally as a trivial 
matter and was at once dismissed. It can- 
not, with any fairness, be said to have entered 
into the case at all. The surreptitious use of 
boot blacking was not mentioned, nor did I 
hear of it except as college talk a few days 
after. 



2. They did mention certain real indigni- 
ties which had been practiced upon tlie per- 
sons of some of their number at various times 
since the opening of the college year. It has 
since been ascertained that these indignities, 
so far from being exaggerated, were really 
understated. I refrain from naming them, 
not because I wish by an air of mystery to 
convey the impression that they were more 
serious than they I'eally were, but simply be- 
cause enough of that sort of information has 
already been given to the public. 

The last personal assault which consisted 
in an attempt hy masked men to remove a 
Freshman's moustache is so well known that 
I will speak of that. It is well known that 
those who attempted the renioval of the 
moustache did so because they understood 
that the Freshman, in permitting it to grow, 
intended to " challenge " the Sophomores. 
In my opinion the real challengers were those 
who gave to an act, proper and harmless in 
itself, the wholh' artificial character of a chal- 
lenge by deliberate!}' resolving early in their 
Sophomore year that no Fresliman who came 
here with a smooth face should be allowed to 
raise a moustache. 

With regaid to this resolution it is no 
more than fair to say for those who are not 
here to speak for themselves that they re- 
solved at the same time not to inteifere with 
any nioustaciie which was worn by its owner 
at the time of his coming to college, and tiuit 
they claim to have acted in a conciliatory 
spirit in thus permitting any liair to remain 
on Freshmen's faces. Yet it would seem as 
though any one with even a slight knowledge 
of human u.aiure must have known that the 
proiiibitory part of the resolution, coming as 
it did from an illegitimate source of authority, 
was just the thing to promote the growth of 
moustaches, and could be enforced only by a 
I resort to violence. So that the desire to 
avoid trouble, though doubtless to some ex- 
tent genuine, was culpably weak and worthy 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



203 



of little if any consideration, since it did not 
lead the authors of the resolution to adopt 
the only manly and consistent course, that of 
letting other people's faces entirely alone. 
(It should here be said concerning a part of 
the Sophomore class that they distinctly re- 
pudiate the whole miserable business of " reg- 
ulating " Freshmen.) 

As to the true nature of the offence com- 
mitted by the attacking party, it may not be 
out of place to say that a Judge of our State 
Supreme Court on hearing of it declared that 
if the Freshman had shot his assailants he 
would be acquitted in court. I mention this, 
not as intimating in any way my own or any- 
body's desire for any possible, or rather let us 
all hope henceforth impossible, bloodshed, but 
simply for the enlightenment of 3'our para- 
graph writer who affects to regard the offence 
as a " harmless joke." 

3. In laying the case before the Faculty 
the class of '86 acted in a straightforward, 
honorable way, and clearly within their rights. 
Being students at college they brought a 
charge of assault and battery before the col- 
lege authorities as they would have done 
before a justice of the peace or a police court 
had they been citizens at home, and this is by 
common consent in all civilized communities 
what every one is free to do without incurring 
odium as an "informer." That students 
should exercise this right on the occasion of 
every little squabble I would be the last to 
maintain, and indeed there is not the slightest 
danger of that being done. But in view of 
the history of hazing in this college I am con- 
vinced that their action on this occasion was 
rational and manly. They submitted (with 
more or less impatience) to Sophomoric " leg- 
ulation "^during the first three months of the 
college year for the sake of peace. Then 
they concluded to submit no longer, and be- 
tween the two alternatives of fighting it out 
or placing the matter in the hands of the 
proper authorities they chose the latter in the 



interest of good order. The fact that their 
course in doing so has been approved by some 
of their fellow-students in the upper classes 
is to me an indication that they acted directly 
in the line of a healthy public sentiment which 
is growing here, as it has grown in others of 
our best New England colleges, in favor of 
proper co-operation between students and 
Faculty in preserving order and correcting 
grave abuses. 

4. With regard to hazing, I understand 
the position of '86 to be this : they decided, 
first that they would not haze next year; 
second, that they would not be hazed this 
year. (I understand the word " hazing " to 
be used here in its generic sense so as to in- 
clude " visitation," " regulation," and all those 
minor invasions of the rights of others which 
keep alive the hazing spirit and easily fan it 
into a flame.) 

Having ai-rived at the first decision, I do 
not see how they could well avoid reaching 
the second in order to make the first effective. 
The two go logically together, and together 
make thorough work. To have resolved to 
submit to hazing this year and then try to 
stop it next year would have been a half-way 
measure, and would probably have failed, 
partly because such measures are apt to fail, 
and partly for local reasons which I need not 
point out to any one who has been a Sopho- 
more here within the last few years. 

C. H. S. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

The query in your last number, " Why 
don't the alumni do something besides talk?" 
is a pertinent one, but unfortunately under 
the present system governing the election of 
officers the alumni are d