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Full text of "Bowdoin Orient"

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VOLUME XIII. 



EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Oliver W. Means, '84 Managing Editor. 

Charles E. Sayward, '84 Business Editor. 

Llewellyn Barton, '84 Personal Editor. 

William H. Cothren, '84 Exchange Editor. 

John A. Waterman, Jr. , '84 Local Editor. 

Oliver R. Cook, '85 Asst. Local Editor. 

Rodney I. Thompson, '84 Literary Editor. 

Sherman W. Walker, '84 Literary Editor. 

Nehemiah B. Ford, '85 Literary Editor. 

John A. Peters, '85 Literary Editor. 




BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 
1883-4. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation funding 



http://www.archive.org/details/bowdoinorient13bowd 



INDEX TO VOLUME XIII. 

PROSE ARTICLES. 

PAGE. 

Alpha Delta Phi Convention E. R. Jewett 52 

American College Journalism 172 

Attention to Line of Study, The A. W. Donnell 226 

Base-Ball 23, 38, 55, 70, 92 

Boat Race 0. W. Means 54 

Bowdoin Praying Circle, The C. C. Torrey.. 184 

Bu°ie The W. H. Cothren 230 

Chivalry R- I- Thompson 215 

Chum's Love Experience 34 

Class Day W. H. Cothren 90 

Co-Education H. E. Cole 21 

Commencement Day 0. W. Means , 92 

Dream, A S. W. Walker 155 

Duty of Educated Men to the Nation W. V. Wentworth 217 

Edmund Burke R- I- Thompson 187 

Feudalism J- F. Libby 227 

Field Day 0. W. Means 55 

German Universities 1°° 

Glance at Earlier Journalism, A A. W. Donnell 225 

Growth of Popular Liberty in France (Class Day 

Oration) J. B. Reed 8a 

Heterogeneous Character, A F. M. Fling.. - 6 

Hints foraWould-Be Orator W. W. Kilgore 228 

"It Might Have Been" 0. W. Means 114 

Ivy Day S. W. Walker 53 

•'• EuGw Thyself 7 ' •■ . - R- I- Thompson 229 

Last Craze, The W. H. Cothren 244 

Legend of Hasheesh, The S. W. Walker 115 

Lessons from the Character of Peter Cooper 

(Ivy Oration) J- A. Waterman, Jr 49 

Look at the History of Lawn Tennis, A S. W. Walker 115 

Louis Kossuth R- I- Thompson 144 

Martin Luther 0. W. Means 128 

Meeting of Inter-Collegiate Rowing Association R. I. Thompson 174 

Mistake, A l° l 

My Chum's Good Fortune R. I. Thompson 117 

My Ghost 34 

My Little Lesson J- A. Peters. . .■ 67 

My Misfortune W. H. Cothren 33 

My Nocturnal Visitor R. I. Thompson 68 

Old Chapel, The J. A. Peters 212 

Orators of American Revolution, The R- I. Thompson 117 

Our College Buildings (No. 1) J. A. Peters 141 

Our College Buildings (No. 2) J. A. Peters 156 

Our Location 215 

Phi Beta Kappa Oration Rev. Newman Smith 89 

Place of Physical Culture J. A. Waterman, Jr 4 

Poetical Fanatic, A S. W. Walker 18 

Quakers in 17th Century, The J. A. Waterman, Jr 103 

Ramble in Maine, A 242 



I N D E X.— {Continued.) 

PAGE. 

Sad Case, A W. H. Cothren 188 

Sir Moses Monteflore 158 

Story at the Falls, The S. W. Walker 170 

Study of History, The E. I. Thompson 35 

Sunday Services J. A. Waterman, Jr 82 

Theta Delta Chi Convention Z. W. Kemp 145 

Through Thy Protecting Care A. J. Russell 66 

Thorndike Oak, The J. A. Peters 102 

"'Tis True, 'Tis Pity" 0. W. Means 211 

Tradition of Chocorua, A _.S. W. Walker 198 

Two Plates of Beans W. H. Cothren 5 

Unter Weges J. A. Waterman, Jr 22 

Washington Alumni Dinner 197 

Zeta Psi Convention _.R. I. Thompson 174 

Zoological Cruise in Casco Bay, A C. W. Longren 81 

COMMUNICATIONS. 

Alumni and The Overseers, The Dr. Gerrish, '66 239 

Boston Bowdoin Club > 

Cleaveland Cabinet 218 

Greek Letter Societies 7 

Parliamentary Law 159 

Reply to Portland Globe 202 

Sophomore Studies.- 132 

Study of Astronomy 1 21 

Washington's Birthday 218 

POETR Y. 

At Eventide Anon 214 

Close of Day, The S. W. Walker , 184 

Frozen Inlet, A W. R. Butler 169 

Integer Vitae J. F. Libby, '82 ....101 

Legend of The Poplar W. R. Butler 200 

Medic's Last Mash, The Anon 19 

Puritan School, A (Class Day Poem) B. Sewall 87 

Reminiscences of the Carnival 241 

Song of The Morning Star S. W. Walker 66 

Sophomore, The Anon 197 

S.tuart Mill On Mind and Matter (From Blackwood's) 186 

Swift River Valley, The S. W. Walker 142 

Whistling Buoy, The S. W. Walker 66 

Why the Medic Wears a Duster W. K. Hilton, Jr 36 

MISCELLANY. 

Book Notices 14, 29, 62, 110, 124, 137, 165, 179, 194, 208, 236 

College Items 8, 25, 39, 56, 72, 93, 105, 118, 132, 146, 169, 175, 189, 203, 219, 231, 245 

Clippings 13, 44, 60, 76, 110, 124, 137, 165, 179, 193, 207, 236 

Editorial Notes 1, 15, 31, 47, 63, 97, 111, 125, 139, 153, 167, 181, 195, 209, 223, 237 

Editors' Table 13,28, 44, 61, 76, 123, 136, 151, 164, 192, 206, 231, 235, 249 

Inter-Collegiate News 12, 27, 43, 60, 75, 109, 122, 136, 150, 163, 178, 191, 205, 234 

In Memoriam 11, 108, 247 

Necrology 95 

Personal 12, 27, 42, 59, 75, 109, 122, 135, 149, 162, 177, 191, 204, 221, 232, 247 



Vol. XIII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 25, 1883. 



No. 1. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



BURBANK, DOUGLASS & CO., 

(Successors to True, Douglass & Co.) Importers and Wholesale 
Dealers in 

China, Crockery § Glass Ware, 

LAMP GOODS. CHANDELIERS AMD PLATED WARE. 
242 Middle Street, . . PORTLAND, MAINE. 

FRANK M. STETSON, 

St os 
.& , w 



DEANE BROTHERS &. SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers iD 

First-Glass and Medium Furniture, 

EF° Lowest Prices in the State, 




755 & 185 Middle Street, 



Portland, Me. 



VISITORS TO PORTLAND, 

Independent of any intention of pur- 
chasing goods in our line, are invited to 
inspect the Model Clothing and Fur- 
nishing Store of Allen & Co., 470 Con- 
gress St., opp. Preble House, 

LANCASTER BUILDING. 



gPRip HOT3 HP 6IME& 

FLEXIBLE STIFF HATS, 

Laced Gloves for Gents, instead of Button. 



MERRY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGRAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOE 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin.— Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^Eneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books ; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Boot 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools- and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A 'WEEK;. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences ol 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 




ileaft 



Vol. XIII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 25, 1883. 



No. 1. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Oliver W. Means, '84, Managing Editor. 

Charles E. Sayward, '84, Business Editor. 
Llewellyn Barton, '84. Sherman W. Walker, '84. 
William H. Cothren, '84. Oliver R. Cook, '85. 
Rodney I. Thompson, '84. Morrill Ooddard, '85. 
JohnH. Waterman, Jr.,'84. Eichard Webb, '85. 

Terms— $2.00 a year in advance; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should he directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to 
contribute articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by the writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XIII., No. 1.— April 25, 1883. 

Editorial Notes - 1 

Literary : 

The Song of the Morning Star (poem) 4 

The Place of Physical Culture 4 

Two Plates of Beans 5 

A Heterogeneous Character 6 

Communications 7 

College Items 8 

Personal 12 

College News J 2 

Clippings 13 

Editors' Table 13 

Book Notice 14 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



With this number, the Orient enters up- 
on the thirteenth year of its existence. 
The first great problem, presented to its new 
board of editors, is, how to advance upon the 
journalistic stage in the most becoming man- 
ner. To make an editorial bow would be but 
to ape numerous preceding boards that have 



bowed with more or less grace. To make 
superfluous apologies for this our " maiden " 
effort would abase us and show that the fort- 
unes of the Orient had fallen into unworthy 
hands. If an attempt should be made to 
find some hitherto undiscovered way by 
which to make our first appearance, the at- 
tempt would doubtless cause so great a strain 
as to preclude all subsequent usefulness. In 
despair we have given up all hope of making 
use of any of the ways mentioned, and are 
determined to take up our duties as if years 
of experience were behind us. With almost 
prophetic vision we foresee some things that 
the future has in store. The congratulations 
of friends on our election as editors will soon 
cease and never be remembered ; the contri- 
butions of aspirants for editorial honors will 
not be received until near the close of the 
year; communications from alumni on past 
misfortunes will no longer delight us by their 
recriminations; and if by chance an alumnus 
should send us a communication, touching 
upon a live interest of the college, tears of 
joyful surprise will fill our eyes. It may be 
wise to mention some of the signs that will 
assure us of our success. If former editors 
indulge in vague criticism; if, while con- 
scious of doing our duty in pointing out the 
weak points in the management of the various 
interests of the college, the persons censured 
load us with abuse ; if the pile of rejected 
manuscripts becomes large, we shall be con- 
vinced that the Orient is being conducted 
wisely and to the satisfaction of the student 
body. 

The plan of electing three from the Soph- 
omore class to serve on the board, while not 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



fully equalling the expectations of the origi- 
nators of the plan, yet succeeded so well that 
it was deemed advisable to continue the trial 
this year also. It was thought that by so 
doing the Orient would be more representa- 
tive in its character, and that by giving three 
editors a year's experience before filling im- 
portant positions, the standard of the paper 
would be raised. While these results have 
been but partially attained, there is ground 
to believe that they may yet be more fully 
realized. We will not repeat the old saying 
that the Orient is the organ of the students 
and not of the editors alone. A college pub- 
lication can be most truly successful only 
when the students in general take an active 
interest in it. If many of students would 
contribute to our columns, there would be 
far greater variety in the literary matter and 
its average excellence would be much higher. 



From time to time there has been com- 
plaint that the Orient has given but one 
side of a subject, or that it has made one side 
too prominent. This is necessarily the case 
where only the editors give utterance to 
their views. In order that both sides of a 
subject may be fairly represented, the oppos- 
ing advocates should explain and defend 
their positions. We hold ourselves ever 
read}' to publish the opinions of those that 
differ from us. 



It should be unnecessary for us to call at- 
tention to the need of immediate and hearty 
action in regard to sports. The present apa- 
thy in boating matters is deplorable and 
promises failure unless some unexpected turn 
of fortune should favor us. The need of tak- 
ing part in the race next Fourth of July is 
apparent, when it is remembered that partici- 
pation this year is necessary in order that we 
may be retained in the inter-collegiate associ- 
ation. The lack of interest shown by the two 



lower classes, especially by the Freshman, is 
another reason why something should be done 
at once to awaken interest in rowing. It is 
needless to say that material is lacking, for 
there are plenty of men in college from whom 
a crew, of which we would be proud, could be 
composed. Then, too, there is the new boat, 
which was said to be one of the best at Lake 
George last summer, lying in the boat-house. 
It is most foolish to allow such material and 
advantages to remain unimproved. 

If rowing is ever to hold its old place 
among us, or even to be kept from dying out 
altogether, prompt measures should be taken 
to render the coming races a success. It has 
been said that a race could be arranged with 
a crew from Portland, if desired. Such a 
race would be of immense advantage, as it 
would give experience in boat racing, which 
is a point where the most weakness has been 
shown in years past. Our crews have never 
been able to row so well in a race as on prac- 
tice, and it behooves all interested in boating 
matters to correct this error. We do not urge 
the boating men to fight, and if need be to 
die in defense of country and the graves of 
their ancestors, but to vigorously ply the oar 
in imitation of the noted oarsmen of former 
years. 

The prospects for the nine are much more 
promising. The tour to be made in Massa- 
chusetts will certainly be as successful as the 
one made two years ago, and it is hoped that 
the nine will win additional laurels. In any 
case, the practice and experience gained will 
enable them to play much better when the 
time comes for them to match skill with 
Bates and Colby. The series of games 
arranged by committees from each of the 
three colleges will doubtless prove satisfac- 
tory, and is just what should have been 
arranged in former years. In any case, 
the championship of the State will be de- 
cided, a thing which has ever been a subject 
of dispute. The small cost of the trip to 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Massachusetts will doubtless be met in suc- 
ceeding years, if the success of the nine this 
year is such as to encourage it. The name of 
Bowdoin will thereby be brought into promi- 
nence, and students attracted to our college. 
That this result can be brought about only by 
hard work is evident; and the students will 
watch the nine carefully and judge from their 
faithfulness in practice the probable success 
or failure of the season's games. It may be 
timely to suggest that the nine needs solid 
support from the students, and that funds will 
be most cheerfully received by the treasurer. 



We are glad to know that Pres. Cham- 
berlain is as comfortable as could be expected 
after the painful operation of fast Thursday. 
He was shot through the body during the at- 
tack on Petersburg, and has ever since been a 
silent sufferer from his wound. Some time 
before the close of last term he went to Flor- 
ida in order to gain the strength sufficient to 
enable him to undergo an operation made 
necessary by the breaking out of the wound. 
For some weeks great solicitude has -been felt 
in regard to Pres. Chamberlain's condition, as 
the operation was known to be attendant 
with danger, and the result very uncertain. 
The most sanguine of his friends could not 
have hoped for any better news concerning 
the President. It is expected that he will, in 
a few weeks, be able to resume his duties. 
The Seniors, especially, will be glad of a re- 
newal of his instructive lectures. The return 
of Pres. Chamberlain will fill a gap, which 
would be very great, if he was absent at the 
close of the term. 



We congratulate our readers that the 
pleasantest term of the year is now well be- 
gun. We welcome you at the beginning of 
this term, which is regarded, by all classes, 
with the liveliest anticipations. The Senior 
is looking forward with anxious joy to taking 



his farewell of familiar scenes, and then drop- 
ping into the whirlpool of active life. In 
many cases the retrospection of the last four 
years is painful, bringing reminders of lost 
opportunities and wasted time ; while to some 
it suggests only conquests in study, in sports, 
and — in Brunswick. The Junior, in his mod- 
estly important way, awaits with pleasure the 
excitements of Ivy Day and the approaching 
dignity of a Senior. The Sophomore, some- 
what weary of his tender care of the Fresh- 
man, joyfully anticipates Junior ease and the 
relief it will bring from all anxious thought 
concerning the government of the college. 
To the Freshman this term is radiant with 
hopes of future importance. The darkness 
and storms of his first year are beginning to 
break away, and the uncertain glory of Soph- 
omore year beckons him onward. 



This issue has been made considerably 
larger than usual in order that copies might 
be sent to those who are not yet subscribers. 
In its personal department the Orient gives 
information regarding the alumni; in its edi- 
torial columns the interests of the college are 
discussed ; and in the literary columns oppor- 
tunity is afforded the alumni to suggest 
improvements in the management of college 
affairs. As our paper cannot exist without 
the support of the graduates, it is earnestly 
hoped that our endeavors to increase the 
number of our readers will meet with a 
heart}' response. 



We would suggest to the manager of the 
nine that something be done to arrange for a 
game here on Ivy Day. According to the 
schedule of games, no such arrangement has 
yet been made. The game on that day last 
year was especially satisfactory, and one re- 
sulting in the same delightful manner would 
be the correct thing this year. At a time 
when so many friends of the college are pres- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ent, a good ball game adds much to the gen- 
eral enjoyment. 



All who intend to enter the contests of 
Field Day should begin at once to train, for 
nothing is more enjoyable than to see a good 
number of contestants exhibit their skill. It 
is uninteresting to see two or three men, who 
have practiced a week or even less, attempt to 
surpass each other in feats of strength. They 
who expect to run have now a fine opportu- 
nity to exercise, as the ground is in excellent 
condition. 



THE SONG OF THE MORNING STAR. 

A herald of the dawn am I, 
Set in the early eastern sky ; 
And ere the orb of day appears, 
I join the music of the spheres. 

I make the twinkling heavens ring 
With echoes of the strains I sing. 
As toward the West I glide along, 
This is the burden of my song : 

Withdraw, bright Moon, behind the hill, 
If you would keep your brightness still, 
Your gentle task once more is done ; 
Make haste, before your King, the Sun. 

Sink back ! ye Stars, far out of sight, 
No more the glad earth needs your light, 
Nor tarry on your liquid way, 
I herald the approach of day. 

Away ! ye sad-songed birds of night, 
To gloomy caverns, take your flight, 
Arise ! ye larks, on dewy wing, 
And your creator's praises sing. 

Awake ! ye birds and beasts, awake ! 
Your peaceful slumbers roughly break ; 
To pleasant feeding grounds away ! 
I herald the approach of day. 

Sleep on! ye men of earth, sleep on ! 
Your brightest dreams are just begun. 
In phantom scenes let Fancy play, 
Till in the light they melt away. 

Steal up ! gray dawn, my song is sung, 
My eye is dimmed, my harps unstrung. 
I sink ! I fade ! once more I die, 
Behind a glowing morning sky. 



THE PLACE OF PHYSICAL CULTURE. 

It would be a good thing for every one 
that desires to make the most of himself, 
morally, mentally, and physically, to deter- 
mine just what purpose each branch of his 
culture serves. Every one must decide for 
himself whether he has made or will make his 
training itself the object to be gained, or a 
way to something better. Physical culture, 
viewed in this light, has the same character- 
istics as any other kind of culture, and will 
alwa3 r s cause differences of opinion as to 
the place it occupies in thorough education- 

The two classes that pay the most atten- 
tion to physical culture are, first, professional 
athletes, and, secondly, college students. The 
reasons for this are plain enough. The first 
mentioned class makes a living from the re- 
sults of such culture, while the second class 
considers it a part of a complete education. 
The athletes make a specialty of physical cult- 
ure for the purpose of becoming famous, or of 
getting money. 

Suppose a man has entered for a six-days' 
running match. He at once goes into train- 
ing and keeps up this training till the time of 
the race, no matter how far off that time may 
be. He does his thirty or forty miles per day, 
his every motion being, at first, carefully 
watched and criticised by his trainers; he must 
have his diet regulated for him, perhaps for 
months; he must keep just such hours, must 
take just so much sleep, and must spend the 
remainder of his time in just such occupations 
as shall best tend to put him and keep him 
"in condition." All this work and all this 
time spent, all this physical culture is this 
man's means to wealth or fame. Some men 
that make a profession of athletic sports may 
enjoy the work thus spent in preparing for 
them, but even these men do not make en- 
joyment their primary object in engaging in 
these contests, but rather regard them as 
duties which must be strictly attended to, if 
any profit is to be derived from them. This is 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



especially true in the case of professional base- 
ball players, whose training is so necessary for 
first-class playing ; and unless a man does play 
in good style he issoondischarged,and his direct 
means of getting a living is thus taken away. 

Among college students physical culture 
serves, of course, a different purpose. In a 
college that has a good gymnasium the per 
cent, of students that do not take more or less 
physical exercise is very small. The rowing 
men devote most time to active training, and 
their work is certainly performed in order that 
they may win some regatta. The amount of 
grumbling heard among the rowing men and 
the base-ball men shows that the mere train- 
ing itself is not the object they have in view. 
Then, too, there are the students that do not 
care so much about the sports themselves, but 
that feel the need of training and of exercise 
simply to keep themselves in good health for 
the hard mental work that must be done. 
With such persons physical culture is a means, 
— directly to health and strength — indirectly 
to high standing in the class. The instances 
in which weak and sickly fellows have been 
made strong and healthy by a simple, easy 
course of training, and the number of cases 
in which a boy's mind and his mental abili- 
ties have been built up and enlarged by phy- 
sical culture, are too well known and too nu- 
merous to be mentioned here. 

It seems to me, then, that we must attend, 
in some moderate degree, to physical culture. 
One of our plainest duties is to care for our 
bodies in order that we may keep ourselves 
in good condition for the performance of the 
man} r things which we are called on to do, 
and unless we make our physical exercise a 
means to this end we are neglecting what we 
are responsible for. G. 



TWO PLATES OF BEANS. 
It was midnight. All the vast territory 
of Bo Doin, save one spot, was hushed in si- 
lence. That place, so well known and so 



well beloved, was brilliantly illuminated by 
air diluted with gas furnished by the Bruns- 
wick Gas Co. 

Hurrying crowds rushed hither and thith- 
er, and the harsh clang of the engine bells 
mingled with the festive pop of the beer bot- 
tles rose above the din. 

In fact Billfield's Eating Palace was in 
full blast, wringing the customary amount of 
shekels from the pockets of unsuspecting 
travellers and unwary students. 

" Two plates of beans ! " 

The above .order was given by two young 
men who had entered, unperceived among 
the crowd. 

As they thrust their pedal extremities un- 
der the polished mahogany, apeculiarly shame- 
faced air might have been noticed about 
them which needs explanation. 

Tell it not in their respective homes, lisp 
it not where the Faculty will hear of it. They 
were Freshmen ! ! 

For two long terms they had " plugged " 
from early morn till dewy eve and on this, 
the last evening before the spring vacation, 
they had determined to be "hard." It was 
no momentary impulse but a deep laid plot. 
For days and weeks they had meditated upon 
it and now the dark deed was all but accom- 
plished. 

The early part of that memorable Thurs- 
day evening was spent in attending a Senior 
and Junior exhibition. 

They sat side by side ; ever and anon 
one would smile at the other, whereupon the 
other would return the smile with interest. 
They understood each other. They alone 
knew what was to take place in so short a 
time. 

But to return to the beans. 
They were brought on by the polite at- 
tendant, who, deftly bringing into view the 
pickle bottle that had ornamented the table 
for untold eyes, made his salaam and retired. 
The decisive moment had come ! Toying for 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



a moment with their forks which, where the 
covering of base metal had been worn off, 
disclosed the dull gleam of the pure gold un- 
derneath, they made the attack. 

Bean after bean disappeared with aston- 
ishing rapidity. 

They evidently enjoyed themselves, for 
occasionally they would move nervously in 
their chairs and give vent to hysterical chuck- 
les, while they regaled themselves — as Fresh- 
men will — with accounts of the " ten strike " 
that they took in the last examination. 

At last the play was ended and they re- 
turned to their rooms, hardened reprobates, 
having taken the first step in that downward 
course which would so surely lead them to 
Dartmouth College. 

K. K. 



A HETEROGENEOUS CHARACTER. 

Do you see that fellow coming in at the 
door? I mean the one just behind the tall 
man with glasses and white hat. Yes, that's 
the one. 

Just notice how he carries himself, as if 
he had a mortgage on the universe at large, 
and you must consider it a personal favor if 
allowed to occupy a small portion of it for 
your short period of life. 

He is a character, and one worth studying. 
He doesn't care whether school keeps or not 
and often makes you wonder what he's loaf- 
ing round college for anyway. Just see how 
he sits there hanging over the end of the- 
settee, stroking his terra-cotta beard, with 
eyes fixed on the floor, evidently weighing 
the probabilities of his getting even with that 
long-headed youth in the next seat, on bil- 
liards. 

He never takes notes. Oh no ! he knows 
it all. You can't give him any points, and 
when he isn't meditating in future probabil- 
ities he is conversing in a loud tone with his 
neighbor, regardless of consequences. He 



has dark, expressive eyes, and when called 
upon to recite he runs his trembling hand 
through his dark locks, and glances wildly 
about the room as if in search of some writ- 
ing on the wall. 

He is as crafty as a fox, and when the 
professor winds him up, he attempts to get 
the bind on him by a general discussion of 
the subject. 

A large, well developed mouth and power- 
ful jaw are the most prominent features of 
his face, and when a genial smile suffuses his 
countenance a yawning cavern, set with glist- 
ening tombstones, is revealed to the aston- 
ished gaze. He is very sensitive and some- 
times his countenance assumes the hue of the 
western sky when illuminated by the set- 
ting sun. 

His opinion does not carry much weight 
with it, although he sets himself up as an ora- 
cle, and assumes to criticise everything, for, 
while condemning the acts of others, it is the 
delight of his little soul to torture others with 
all manner of petty annoyances. He is a 
champion of all college sports, giving the pow- 
erful aid of his jaw but withholding his purse 
and muscle. 

He thinks prayers a nuisance, and a church 
one of the relics of barbarism. He snoozes 
away the time during services and then crit- 
icises in severe terms the dryness of the ser- 
mon. He denies that he is susceptible to the 
fair sex, but you can't place much reliance on 
what he says, for he is a sly dog. He enjoys 
a joke hugely, i. e., when he is not the sub- 
ject, and it tickles him half to death to origi- 
nate a grind. Well, the recitation is over 
and there he goes, with his hands in his pock- 
ets and braced back like a soldier on parade. 



Our students are almost an indispensable factor 
of the church music in town. Wheeler, Gibson, and 
Calderwood sing at the Episcopal, with J. Torrey, 
organist ; Butler and Barton sing at the Universal- 
is!; Walker and Fling, '86, at the Unitarian. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COMMUNICATIONS. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

At the recent meeting of the Bowdoin 
Alumni Association, of Boston, a communi- 
cation from the Boston Bowdoin Club was 
read, and the question was asked, " What is 
the Boston Bowdoin Club?" As there may 
be many among the alumni who would like 
an answer to that question, I will ask a little 
space to inform them. 

In the winter of 1880-81 a few of the 
younger alumni of Bowdoin, resident in Bos- 
ton and vicinity, decided to take some step 
looking towards the fostering and developing 
of the love and interest for their Alma Mater 
among the sons of Old Bowdoin, and which 
should at the same time increase the acquaint- 
ance and friendships among the alumni by 
bringing them together socially. In pur- 
suance of this idea a number of the alumni 
were invited to attend a dinner and discuss 
the advisability of forming a social club. 

At that dinner it was decided to form a 
club limiting the membership to those persons 
who had been connected with the college, 
either as student or a member of the Faculty, 
or who had received an honorary degree, since 
1860. In accordance with a plan, presented 
b)' a committee appointed for that purpose, it 
was voted to have a dinner on the first Fri- 
day of each month, except the months of 
July, August, and September, to which din- 
ners the members might invite any one who 
should be eligible to membership. It was 
also voted at that meeting, that the only 
officers of the club should be an executive 
committee of three members, who should 
take charge of all arrangements for the din- 
ners and meetings of the club, and that one 
of the three should act as secretary. 

It being one of the purposes of the club 
to keep alive the interest of the alumni in 
their Alma Mater, all questions and matters 



of interest in connection with the college are 
freely discussed, but religion and politics are 
prohibited. 

The club began with a membership of 
less than a dozen and now has upon its lists 
about fifty names, while the average attend- 
ance is between fifteen and twenty. 

The meetings are at present held at the 
Revere House, where the club from time to 
time entertains guests from among the older 
alumni. At the next meeting of the club, 
which comes upon the 6th of April, Mr. 
Cyrus Woodman, of the class of '36, will be 
the guest. 

Any alumnus who may be in Boston at 
the time of any meeting is expected to pre- 
sent himself at the dinner without waiting for 
an invitation, and will receive a cordial wel- 
come from all. 

The address of the Secretary of the club 
is, Arthur T .Parker, 37 South Market Street, 
Boston. c. L. p. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

Without doubt the members of our Greek 
Letter or inter-collegiate societies, receive 
great benefits from their connection with 
those societies, during their college course. 
The opportunity for literary work, for partic- 
ipating in debates, and for witnessing, to some 
extent, the workings of parliamentary law, 
gives to each student, who joins one of the 
fraternities, advantages which we have no 
other means of obtaining in college. The 
societies render intimate and lasting, the 
friendships formed during our college life; 
and I believe those friendships are more nu- 
merous than they would be if the societies 
did not exist, though it may not appear so at 
first thought. So I think all the readers of 
the Orient will readily admit that there is 
much real good in them; but are there not 
some considerations which go far toward neu- 
tralizing this good ? 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



When we come to Bowdoin as Freshmen, 
we are coaxed and argued with by men from 
one or another of the societies, who do all in 
their power to make us believe that their so- 
ciety is perfect, while all the others are en- 
tirely given o\ er to those practices which we 
most abhor, whereas there must be both good 
and bad in each one, since good and bad both 
exist in each member of the college. Finally 
we " pledge " and are initiated into one of the 
inter- collegiate societies. As a rule our 
room-mate is a brother in the same fraternity, 
we take our meals at the society club, and as- 
sociate so constantly with our own society 
men, that we come to think first of society in 
every question that arises about college af- 
fairs. In the competition for college honors, 
. if we cannot gain those honors ourselves, we 
are perfectly satisfied if one of "our boys" 
can win them. I believe that the reason wiiy 
Bowdoin has not been more successful in col- 
lege sports, is this intense society feeling. A 
meeting of one of the college associations is 
called, and each member, instead of working 
and voting for the men best fitted to fill the 
several offices, works for and votes for his so- 
ciety's candidate ; and the society which has 
the most men in that association, or which has 
done the most wire-pulling, succeeds in elect- 
ing the men of its choice, be they well or ill- 
fitted for the place. In consequence of this 
the members of the association from some 
other societ}' feel slighted and lose their in- 
terest in the sports upheld by that associa- 
tion ; and we all know that to succeed, any 
sport needs the united support of the college. 
When the time for class elections comes, 
a similar thing takes place, only the society 
feeling is, perhaps, still more intense. The 
delegations in two or three societies combine 
against the others and agree to divide the 
best offices among themselves. The result is 
a partial or total failure to elect class officers 
for the year, and a great deal of hard feeling 
among classmates, where none but the best 



of feelings should exist. We have seen these 
results both in our college associations and in 
our class elections this year. 

From these few considerations I believe 
that our Greek Letter Societies are the cause 
of much mischief, as well as much good, and 
that radical changes are needed in some re- 
spects. I know that it would be almost im- 
possible for the feeling of rivalry between the 
different societies to be entirely banished 
while those societies remain, but I believe if 
a few of the more prominent men in each fra- 
ternity would use their influence to do away 
with some portion of this feeling, very great 
advances would be made in the right direc- 
tion. I, for one, wish that this society feel- 
ing could become a thing of the past and 
that, in all affairs which interest the entire 
student body, we could be fellow-students and 
not society men. F. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



7.50 is the time now. 

Even a Senior can have too much cheek. 

Oral examinations are the correct thing. 

Kendall, '85, has returned from teaching. 

An '83 man has joined '84— in mineralogy. 

Did any April fool try to play a joke on you ? 

Don't forget the Orient is still run by subscrip- 
tion. 

D. 0. G-. Booker has had a severe attack of the 
cholera. 

The Sophomores have lectures in Logic by Prof. 
Chapman 

Prof. Campbell preached at the Congregational- 
ist Church, April 1st. 

The President's war-horse is to be chloroformed 
and stuffed this spring. 

How the old board will chuckle when they view 
the amateurs' first attempt. 

The prayers of all the boys will attend those 
nine martyrs that go to Massachusetts, next week. 

The boys must hurry up and pay their base-ball 
subscriptions before the 1st of May. The niue will 
need the money on their Massachusetts trip. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The interest taken in athletics has not been so 
great for many years past as now. 

After their long fits of sickness (?), Bradley and 
Clark are able to return to college. 

Every Junior takes botany for an elective, 
with possibly one or two exceptions. 

This is the season when the minstrel show reaps 
a harvest alike from student and yagger. 

Prof. Robinson .made a heartfelt address to the 
Y. M. C. A. the last Sunday of the term. 

Soph, (reading from Bacon's Essays) — "A young 
man travelling should keep a dairy" (diary). 

We have received from A. F. Richardson, '73, all 
of Vol. I., and part of Vol. II., of the Orient. 

Hope the Athletic Association will give us some- 
thing new in the Field Day exercises this year. 

Mr. Barrett Potter, '78, has kindly consented to 
umpire all games played on the delta this season. 

The walks are once more receiving artistic 
touches at the hands of our agricultural professor. 

Rev. Elijah Kellogg preached a very interesting 
sermon at the First Parish Church, Sunday, April 
22d. 

Hurry up and subscribe for the Orient. You 
may lose your chance, and then you would feel 
badly. 

Elliot, '73, Cole, Cutler, Little, and " B." Man- 
son, '8J, Oilman and Plimpton, '82, were in town 
lately. 

Poole's Index to Periodical Literature has re- 
cently been added to the library. It is a valuable 
work. 

Fling, '86, was complimented by the Bath 
Independent .for his fine singing in the " Hay- 
Makers." 

The Sophomore crew are workiDg hard. It 
would be a good idea for the other crews to follow 
their example. 

Kemp, '84, has an old volume that is quite a 
curiosity. It is the " Life and Works of Horace," 
printed in 1734. 

One of the Seniors who took part in the exhibi- 
tion had to shave off his whiskers in order to be 
heard distinctly. 

Since that festive Senior was seen promenading 
about the campus the other morning about 7 a.m., 
with two blushing maidens, there has been a grow- 
ing belief among the students, that early moruing 
walks are healthful. 



Quite a number of the students took part in the 
" Hay-Makers," at Bath, the 28th ult. They had a 
very poor house. 

The first and second nines practice together 
every night. It is an improvement over the old 
method of practice. 

The tutor in Latin says that when he was in col- 
lege the students never used to have so many friends 
coining on the train. 

Prof. Robinson made some very interesting- 
remarks to the Juniors, at the close of the last 
lecture in chemistry. 

We sympathize with Dartmouth. Harvard 
showed her disposition in getting Dartmouth out 
of the college league. 

The Faculty have kindly given the nine permis- 
sion to go to Massachusetts, a favor for which we 
wish to express our thanks. 

In the absence of the regular choir, some of the 
students sang at the Congregationalist church in 
Topsham, the other evening. 

All the boys who had no girls to go and see re- 
mained in town during vacation. It is needless to 
say that almost all went home. 

It was not a Freshman who said that the crews 
would be on the river the first of this terra unless 
the ice remained abnormally late. 

Last year the nine played eight games. Already 
they have fifteen arranged, and a prospect of sev- 
eral more. Go in, boys, and win. 

The sickness was astonishing last term, espe- 
cially to the class officers. We think that a Bruns- 
wick doctor ought to be a millionaire. 

We trust that if there is no special mention of 
the Brunswick girls, Medics, or Freshmen in this 
department, they- will not feel slighted. 

The class officers for this term are : Seniors, 
Prof. Lee ; Juniors, Tutor Atwood ; Sophomores, 
Tutor Little ; Freshmen, Tutor Fisher. 

It is rumored the laboratory building is to be 
remodeled this summer. We hope so ; it isn't in 
keeping with the other college buildings. 

The meetings of the Y. M. C. A., held nightly 
during the last of the term, were quite successful. 
They have the good wishes of the Orient. 

The Freshmen nine want to arrange games with 
the Colby and Bates Freshmen. This would be a 
good plan, if well carried out. It would bring the 
colleges into a better knowledge of each other, and 
would make good feeling all around. 



10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



First game of ball on the delta, Fast-Day, be- 
tween tbe Brunswick High School and Box-Shop 
nines. Score 20 to 9 in favor of B. H. S. nine. 

One of the Seniors believes in cold water on the 
outside, as was demonstrated by the way the Major 
put his foot in it the day the boys cut out the floats. 

As a rule, the examinations at the close of last 
term were considered very fair. The only excep- 
tion we have heard was the Sophs, in mathematics. 

If Bowdoin does not gain in numbers from the 
advertising she has received in the papers of the 
country during the trouble of last term, we miss our 
guess. 

Prof. Robinson gave his illustrated lecture on 
" Minerals " before the students of Bridgton Acad- 
emy, Friday evening, April 3, assisted by Hutchins 
of '83. 

The Freshmen say they are going to beat the 
Sophomores at ball this spring. '85, brace up and 
show '86 that you are a match for her on equal 
ground. 

Tbe local editor respectfully solicits items. He 
cannot be in all places at once, and will be very 
thankful for any bit of news or fun which may be 
handed him. 

Prof, (having given a list of topics to Seniors) — 
"Now, gentlemen, I advise you to get the best au- 
thors, read them carefully, and " Senior (in the 

back seat) — ''Copy." 

The Freshmen are great mashers. If they would 
only put some of their spare energy into boating 
they would not be in such total disgrace when tbe 
time comes for the races. 

The nine is made up as follows : Wright, captain 
and p.; Knapp, c. ; Winter, 1st b. ; Torrey, 2d b. . 
Stetson, 3d b. ; Waterman, s. s. ; Cook, r. f. ; 
Collins, c. f. ; Barton, 1. f. 

Class reviewing history of philosophy : Prof. — 
"Now, Mr. W., passing to the animal kingdom, 
what do you fiud there?" Mr. W. — -"Animals." 
The class comes down heavily. 

The boating men took their exercise one day last 
term, cutting out the floats at the boat-house. By 
the way, did not the association pay a bill of some 
eight dollars to have these same floats cut out last 
fall? 

Will some one inform us whether the mumps 
are elective or not, in the Senior year? Some of 
the Seniors take them and some don't. If they 
are in the regular course we are going to Dart- 
mouth. 



Smokers will find the "Yale" and "Diamond 
Crown" brands of cigars of Johnston & Hatch, 
of Lewiston, just the thing for a good smoke. For 
sale in Brunswick by E. J. Merryman. 

Two of '85's former members were here at the 
close of last term making preparations to join the 
Dartmouth exodus. We are sorry to lose the boys 
but somehow we can't help feeling that it is their 
own choice. 

A more gentlemanly set of Medics have not been 
seen for some years. Why would it not be a good 
plan to show more politeness on both sides? It 
would stop all hard feeling, and we would not have 
to do any farming this year. 

Prof. Lee contemplates a trip of a week or so 
down Casco Bay during the summer term. He will 
be accompanied by several members of the Junior 
class. His object is to obtain zoological and ana- 
tomical specimens for future use. 

It would be much better for the students if they 
were driven to Sabbath school instead of to church. 
If they are compelled to go to three religious exer- 
cises on Sundays, they might as well be compelled 
to go where they could get more good out of it. 

Let the Sophomores and Freshmen send in their 
pieces. Every one in college ought to be trying to 
get on the Obient Board. You have no idea how 
big an editor can feel until you have been there 
yourself. P. S. — This is true of all local editors. 

There is talk of resuscitating the band. If it 
could only accompany the nine to Massachusetts, 
and play before each game the boys would probably 
return victorious with the possible exception of the 
Tufts. The Tufts had some experience with it last 
Ivy Day. 

We should be ashamed to say that the indica- 
tions of a large class the coming year are good, al- 
though it may be true. But the same thing has 
been said every year since the college was estab- 
lished, and has generally failed. Let us say that 
the indications are unfavorable, and see if it will not 
have the desired effect. 

A zoological specimen : " The ilia are greatly 
prolonged forwards; the acetabulum is a ring, not 
a cup ; the ischia and pubes are prolonged back- 
wards; there is no ischial symphysis; there may be 
a prepubis ; a process of the astralagus early anchy- 
losis with the tibia." The student that can thor- 
oughly masticate and digest the above need have 
no fears in wrestling with psychology. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



11 



The returned teachers say that they can make 
up all their studies quite easily except to one pro- 
fessor. The professors should remember that the 
teachers have a hard time any way, and ought not 
to be pushed too hard. The above complaint has 
not been made by either of the two lower classes. 

The retiring Board of Editors should have much 
praise for their faithful work in behalf of the Orient. 
It was chiefly through them that the present Board 
has a cozy room which may be called a sanctum. 
They have done all they could to further the inter- 
ests of the college, and have ever been on the look- 
out for the welfare of the students. In our humble 
judgment they kept the Orient up to its former 
standard, and it comes to us as popular and strong 
as it went to them. We hope to do as well as our 
noble predecessors. 

We had a call the other day from Mr. J. F. 
Elliot, of 73, now supervisor of schools in Hyde 
Park, Mass. He said when he was in college he occu- 
pied the same room we are now occupying and he 
thought he would like to see how the old place looked. 
He was a member of the second Board of Orient 
editors and consequently has ever taken a live in- 
terest in its welfare. He visited the Orient office 
and gave his views as an alumnus on how a col- 
lege paper should be conducted. We hope to hear 
from him in the columns of the Orient. 

The members of the nine start for Massachusetts, 
Tuesday, May 1st, on the 7.30 train. They will, 
dine at the Quincy, and at 3 o'clock receive their 
first dressing down on Jarvis Field, Wednesday 
morning. They go to Amherst, aud at 3 o'clock 
they play with the Amhersts. Stopping at Amherst 
over night, Thursday morning they start for Wil- 
liarastown, play with the Williams that p.m., and 
return to Boston the same night. If in good condi- 
tion they will play the Tufts, Friday. If not, they 
will play the Tufts, Saturday, and start for home 
that night, arriving here on the midnight. They 
play with the Tufts Saturday whether they play 
them Friday or not. 

Senior and Junior exhibition was held in Me- 
morial Hall, Thursday evening, April 5, with the 
following program : 

MUSIC. 

Salutatory Oration in Latin. 

C. H. Stetson, East Sumner. 
Political Duties of Educated Men. 

H. L. Allen, Alfred. 



Character of Washington. — English Version from 
the French of Guizot. 

*W. H. Cothren, Farmington. 
George Eliot. 

A. J. Russell, Hallowell. 

MUSIC 

The Conflict between Church and State in France. 

F. H. Files, Gorham. 
Speech of Calgacus.— English Version from Tacitus. 

*M. H. Orr, Brunswick. 
Public Trusts. 

H. P. Kendall, Bowdoinham. 
Eulogy on Cardinal Richelieu.— English Version 
from the French of Voiture. 

*H. M. Wright, Westford, Mass. 

MUSIC. 

What is to be the Future of the United States? 

H. A. Bascoin, Portland. 
Evolution of Theories. 

tN. B. K. Pettingill, Augusta. 
Extract from the Second Philippic against An- 
thony. —English Version from Cicero. 

*J. Torrey, Jr., Yarmouth. 
Illiteracy and the State. 

W. C. Winter, Bethel. 
*Juniors. tExcused. 

The hall was well tilled notwithstanding it rained 
and was very bad travelling. The composition 
and rendition of the different parts would compare 
favorably with former like exhibitions. The pro- 
grams were neat aud tasty. Perkins' Orchestra 
furnished the music. 



IN MEMOKIAM. 
Resolutions adopted by the Eta Charge of the 
Theta Delta Chi Fraternity, on the death of C. S. 
Andrews. 

Whereas, It has pleased the Allwise and Benefi- 
cent Father to remove from our midst an esteemed 
and beloved brother, Charles S. Andrews, class of 
76, Bowdoin College; therefore: 

Resolved, That while recognizing in his removal 
an act of the Divine Being who doeth all things 
well, we take this method of expressing our sorrow 
for the loss of a brother who, by his kindness and 
upright life, won the respect and love of all with 
whom he associated. 

Resolved, That we extend to the family of the 
deceased our heartfelt sympathy in their sorrow at 
the loss of one whose career promised to be so 
successful. 

Resolved, That copies of these resolutions be 
sent to the relatives of the deceased, to the press, 
to the Grand Lodge ,and the several charges of the 
Fraternity. 

W. C. Winter, '83, 
M. H. Orr, '84, 
L. B. Folsom, '85, 

Committee. 
Bowdoin College, April 18, 1883. 



12 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited to send 
personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Brunswick, Me.] 

'23. — Judge Lorey Odell died at the Preble 
House, Portland, Me., March 24. He was born in 
Conway, N. H., Sept. 16, 1801, and was the son of 
the late Richard Odell, a former resident of Port- 
land. Judge Odell studied law, after his graduation, 
in Fryeburgand later in Portland, practiced a short 
time in Conway, N. H., and then removed to Ports- 
mouth. At the time of his death he was the oldest 
member of the bar in that city. He was Collector 
of Customs in Portsmouth for 1840, 1846, and again 
from 1849 to 1853. He was Police Justice from 1855 
till his 70th year. In the discharge of his duties he 
was always prompt and able, and was kind and 
affable in all his relations to society. 

'35. — Judge George Purington died in Freeport, 
111., on the 9th inst. The deceased was born in 
Poland, Me., Nov., 1809. He studied law in Port- 
land and then removed to Baltimore. In 1840 he 
changed his residence to Freeport, 111. He was 
County Judge for Stephenson County from 1840 
till 1852, but for some time preceding his death had 
returned to private life. 

'56.— Kev. Edward B. Palmer has opened a 
private boarding school for boys in Gorham, Me. 

'66, '68.— Charles K. Hinkley, '66, and John A. 
Hinkley, '68, have returned from abroad. 

'69. — Dr. Charles A. Ring has returned from a 
European trip. 

71. — Prof. Edward S. Morse is on his return 
journey from Japan. 

'72. — Marcellus Coggan, of Maiden, Mass., is 
Professor of Medical Jurisprudence in Bellevue 
Medical College, Boston. 

'73. — John F. Elliot is Supervisor of Schools in 
Hyde Park, Mass. 

'73.— Prof. F. C. Eobinson was recently chosen 
a member of the Portland Natural History Society. 

74. — H. W. Philbrook has lately been elected 
as one of the Board of School Examiners for the 
city of San Francisco. Mr. Philbrook will also re- 
tain his position in the Boys' High School in that 
city. 

75. —Frederic O. Baston has a fine situation as 
a teacher in Wellesley, Mass. 

75.— Deering is principal of Parksburg Acad- 
emy, Parksburg, Conn. He was for several years 
principal of the Essex (Vt.) Classical Institute. 

76. — Charles S. Andrews died in Norway, Me., 



the 12th inst., after an illness of less than a year. 
After graduation Mr. Andrews became principal of 
the High School at Mankato, Minn., then went to 
San Francisco, where he studied law with Mayor 
Blake, and was his private secretary. Mr. Andrews 
lived but two days after his return to his home in 
Norway. He died respected and beloved by all 
that knew him. 

76. — A. H. Sabin is Professor of Chemistry in the 
University of "Vermont, and was lately appointed 
State Chemist. 

'81. — Achorn is principal of the High School at 
South Abiugton, Mass., where he is studying law. 

'81. — Chamberlain is in Magnolia, Fla., and has 
charge of an orange plantation there. 

'83. —Bates is studying medicine at the Long 
Island Medical College, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

'82. —Chase is studying law in Brockton, Mass. 

'82. — Merryman has secured a business situation 
in St. Paul, Minn. 

Ex- '83.— F. H. Gile has returned to his home in 
Alfred, Me. 

'85. — Of the members of this class that have re- 
cently left Bowdoin, Allen, Goodenow, Goddard, 
Hodgkins, Leigh, Manson, and Mooers have joined 
Dartmouth, '85. Phillips has gone to Williams. 
Howard is to study law in Denver, Col. Gould is 
going into business in the West. 



COLLEGE NEWS. 



Yale: 

The students have succeeded in raising $33,000 
for new athletic grounds. 

There is much dissatisfaction because only a lim- 
ited number can take optional botany. 

Harvard-Yale race will occur on June 23. 

The opera " Faust " will soon be prsented by the 
students for the benefit of the Navy. 

A. E. Kent, '53, has given $60,000 for a new 
chemical laboratory. 

Habvard : 

The Freshmen had no Latin or Greek composi- 
tion in their examinations. 

Dr. Sargent has been giving a series of lectures 
on health to the students. 

The Freshman crew is required to meet in front 
of a certain college building at eight o'clock every 
morning to insure early rising. 

Harvard is to have new athletic grounds at a 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



13 



cost of $10,000,— $1, 000 is given outright by the 
Faculty, $2,000 is advanced, to be paid from profits, 
and 7,000 is to be raised from students and alumni. 
Over $2,500 has been raised for the crew; $200 
more is needed. 

Princeton : 

Dr. McCosh has resigned the Presidency of 
Princeton College and will take charge of a School 
of Philosophy. 

The editors of the Princetonian have challenged 
the editors of the Nassau Literary Magazine to a 
game of base-ball. • 

Colby : 

Oue of its most generous friends has presented 
the university with a projecting microscope. This 
instrument, which is valued at one hundred and 
fifty dollars, was made by Tolles of Boston. — Echo. 

The tumults so prevalent in other New England 
colleges have not reached Colby. The strict man- 
ner in which our Faculty have quarantined all ref- 
ugees from the infected regions, will probably pre- 
serve us from the epidemic. — Echo. 

The Freshmen will not carry canes if the Soph- 
omores behave. 

The nine will have a new uniform this year. 
Notes : 

The Faculties of Bates and Williams have excused 
the editors of the college paper from a portion of 
the literary work ; while at Alleghany college an 
editorship on the Campus is considered equal to one 
study. We hope our Faculty will follow the good 
example. 

The following is the number of volumes of some 
of the largest college libraries in the country: Har- 
vard, 185,000 ; Yale, 93,000; Dartmouth, 60,000 ; 
Brown, 52,000 ; Princeton, 49,000 ; Cornell, 40,000 : 
Columbia, 38,000; Bowdoin, 37,500; University of 
Michigan, 29,000 ; Williams, 19,000; Colby, 18,000. 



CLIPPINGS. 



Now the maiden gathers worsted. 

Slippers her best beau she'll send. 
But the man who gets the slippers 

Will get worsted in the end. — Ex. 

" Is any one waiting on you?" said a polite dry 
goods clerk to a young lady from the country. " Yes 
sir," replied the blushing damsel, " that's my fellow 
outside, he wouldn't come into the store." - Ex. 

Teacher—" Why, how stupid you are, to be 
sure! Can't multiply 88 by 24. I'll wager that 



Charles can do it in less than no time." Pupil—'' I 
shouldn't be surprised. They say fools multiply 
very rapidly nowadays." — Ex. 

THE MAIDEN'S ANSWER. 

We were gliding with the skaters 

Out at Roger Williams Park, 
And although my feet were chilly, 

In my bosom glowed a spark. 

For I loved the lovely maiden, 
More than houses, wealth, and land; 

And I asked in tender accents, 
" Will you let me have your hand? " 

Then the maiden answered shyly, 

Purring softly like a kitten, 
" It's too cold to give my hand, sir, 

But I'll let you have my mitten!" 

— Brvnonian. 

Smythe was telling the other day about an 
Uncle Tom's Cabin troupe which he once heard. 
The " Uncle Tom " had imbibed a little too much 
during the afternoon and when the evening came 
was not in that state of simple piety which Mrs. 
Stowe describes. All went well until Eva's father 
tells Tom to carry Eva in the house as the night 
air is bad for her. Tom made several ineffectual 
attempts to lift Eva, and then turning to her father, 
said, with drunken dignity, "Wall (hie!) Eva kin 
walk," and staggered off. — Ex. 

THE PRAYER ANSWERED. 

" Give me the one tiny curl, 

The poisSd sunbeam that strays 
Over the blue-veined temple, 

Flecking the white with its rays. 
Give it for something to hold 

Close to my aching heart, 
Something to cherish as thine, sweet, 

Something to kiss when we part." 

Smiled, then, the blushing maiden; 

Glanced upward with love-laden eyes, 
Lifted her eyebrows a tittle, 

Suggestive of latent surprise; 
Opened her rosy lips slowly, 

Her blushes still on the increase ; 
Said then, in accents half trembling, 

" Get out, Goosie! 'Twould spoil my front-piece." 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



When the duties of this department fell upon 
our shoulders we examined, rather curiously, the 
columns of our E. C.'s. We found them interesting 
and oftentimes witty, but with a few exceptions 
they bore a remarkable resemblance to one another. 
We remembered having seen newspapers printed 
in the rural districts of this State which, with the 
exception of the heading, as far as the outside was 
concerned, were identical with papers published in 
Connecticut, and other foreign lands, but to our 



14 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



benighted minds such a thing as a "patent" ex- 
change column was not to be thought of for a mo- 
ment. Still, as we continued to read, the similarity 
of the majority of the Editors 1 Table was more and 
more noticeable and fin. illy the conviction fairly 
forced itself upon us that they wore written by the 
same pen. One day a letter found its way to this ' 
remote land which read as follows : 

New York, April 2, 1883. 
Exchange Editor, Bowdoin Orient, Brunswick, Me. : 
Dear Sir, — Asit mayncver have come to your no- 
tice that I have established the business of writing 
up Exchange columns for those who, on account of 
press of other work cannot attend to it themselves 
without inconvenience, I take this means of calling 
your attention to the fact : I can furnish you with 
two pages of matter especially adapted to the needs 
of your paper, once in two weeks, for a year, for 
the sura of $— . Please let me know if you wish 
specimens of my work. 

Yours Very Kespectfullv, 

B. S., 
Box II— . New York City. 

Of course we hastened to avail ourselves of his 
offer, and in due time received " copy," of which we 
can only print the following : 

The Acta, with the present number loses Mr. 
J. K. Bangs, better known as the " irrepressible 
T. Carlyle Smith," who is obliged to resign on ac- 
count of outside work. Although it is fashionable 
just now to make little sarcastic flings when speak- 
ing of the Acta, wc shall do nothing of the sort as 
we believe that a variety is needed in college 
journalism as well as elsewhere, and that too many 
of those "nice little stories," which some think are 
needed, would finally become indigestible. 

Jason, the Ex. Ed. of the Argo, in making his 
adieu to bis E. C.'s, burst into song like the dying 
swan. The part referring to the Orient runs as 
follows : 

" From Bowdoin comes -down to us oft the wee Ori- 
Ent, common sensical and never gory." 

Ori, gory ! Ori, gory ! ! Wouldn't it have been 
better for Jason's reputation if his last attempt had 
never been made °l 

We acknowledge the receipt of the following 
new papers : The Imp, The Illustrated World, The 
Amateur Athlete. 

We cannot close without adding the following 
from the Brunonian : 

DISASTER. 

Once I saw a maiden sitting 
'Mid the apple branches knitting; 
All around, below, above her 
Clouds of blossoms seemed to hover 
Just as if they wished to cover 



Her from any daring lover 
Out of sight. 

But her bright eyes shyly glancing 
Framed a question so entrancing, 
How could I resist their power? 
Swift they drew me to their bower, 
Rushing through their crimson shower, 
Soon to greet the pretty flower 
With delight. 

Looking up I there espied her, 
And I longed to be beside her. 
One short climb and then a crashing. 
Through the branches wildly flashing 
Maid and lover earthward smashing, 
All my hopes forever dashing 
In the flight. 

For the girl in scornful fashion 
Hurled at me her direful passion, 
And I lay abashed, submitting. 
But henceforth I deem it fitting, 
When I see a maiden sitting 
'Mid the apple blossoms knitting, 
To take flight. 



BOOK NOTICE. 
Books, and How to Use Them : Practical Hints 
for Readers and Students. By Johu C. Van Dyke. 
12mo, Vellum Cloth. $1. New York: Fords, 
Howard & Hulbert. This valuable little work can- 
not fail to be of importance to all who may read it. 
Although falling in with other authors, in some re- 
spects the ideas are in the main original. The 
universal recommendation and rule to " read only 
the best books " is herein made subject to excep- 
tion, and the reader is advised to "exceptionally 
read badly written, erroneous, and ill- digested 
books," as the analysis of error is one of the most 
important factors in the establishment of truth. 
The information given in regard to "reading up" 
on special subjects is particularly valuable. 



A $-20.00 BIBLE REWARD. 

The publishers of Ru Hedge's Monthly offer twelve 
valuable rewards in their Monthly for May, among 
which is the following : 

We will give $20.00 in gold to the person telling 
us which is the shortest chapter in the New Testa- 
ment Scriptures (not the New Revision) by May 
10th, 1883. Should two or more correct answers be 
received, the reward will be divided. The money 
will be forwarded to the winner May 1 5th, 1883. 
Persons trying for the reward must send 20 cents in 
silver (no postage stamps taken) with their answer, 
for which they will receive the June Monthly, in 
which the name and address of the winner of the 
reward and the correct answer will be published, 
and in which several more valuable rewards will be 
offered. Address, Rutledge Publishing Com- 
pany, Easton, Penna. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



I will reciprocate the favor of any teacher in- 
forming me where certain School Books are in use. 
Particulars on application. I can also suggest 
agreeable and profitable occupation to teachers dur- 
ing leisure or vacation. John R. Anderson, 66 
Reade St., New York. 



Protection to Young Industries, as applied in the 
United States, by F. W. Taussig, Instructor in Political 
Economy in Harvard College, is a handsome volume, 
which was written in competition for the Toppan Prize 
in Political Science at Harvard University, and received 
that prize in October, 1882. The argument for protection 
to young industries is the opening chapter, followed by 
the industrial history of the United States, and the course 
of protective legislation. Then is given a short history of 
the three principal manufactures, cotton, iron and woolen; 
making a valuable book for any one wishing to become 
familiar with the leading-nndustries of the United States, 
and their progress, without reading through hundreds of 
pages of matter, as it is condensed and accurate in its treat- 
ment of the subject. 

The volume is printed on fine laid paper. It is bound 
in cloth, and its price is only 75 cts. It is published by 
Moses King, of Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 



JOHN H. BRACKETT, 



SPRING STYLES, 1883, 

Consisting of Suitings, Overcoatings, and Pant Patterns, made in 
.latest style and good lit guaranteed, at 20 per cent, less than the 
same goods can be bought elsewhere. Also a 

Fine Line of White Shirts, Ties, Braces, Collars, 
Hose, and Under Flannels. 



The Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Coinnaiiy, 

Assets, $51,500,000. Surplus, $6,500,000. 

ESTABLISHED IS 1S4U. 

The New Plan of Cash Value and Non-Fokfeitable 
Policy meets the needs of the public. Send for full informa- 
tion to H jj. FAIRBANKS, Gen'l Agent, 

BANGOR, MAINE. 

S. WALKER & SON, 

Fresh and Corned Beef, Pork, Mutton, Poultry, 



At the Old Stand near corner Main and Centre Streets, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



S. WALKER. 



¥11. H. WALKER. 




rS'3^.g.- 3 g 



S'Bj « >£ 



S^" g^r|^2 5 f'Sm-II SOS'S £'!§!■' 



slic-sfsllf-l 1 "-fusil's §§■§: 
slggi.sf'SSg^M §^1 1 § Hill's £ | 

J= s!°-s^2g'g£S§g §||2« iff-i! ell 



s o ' 



UJ o 






All the Students Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 



Cor. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February Sth,lS83, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshoa L. Chamberlain, IA.D , President ; Iskael T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology anil Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H. Gerrisii, M.D., 
ADatomy ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence ; Henry 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry; Dcrt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D , Surgery and Clinic il Surgery ; Charles O. 
Hcnt, M. D., Materia Medica and 1'herapeutics ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing lull information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, ROOM 
PAPER, PERIODICALS, <5cC_ 



SCHOOL OF MINES, COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 

Eepartraent of Architected.. 

The recently established Course in Architecture occu- 
pies four years, the first of which is occupied with general 
studies, the architectural work beginning with the second 
year. 

Graduates of colleges ami scientific schools can, m gen- 
eral, enter in advanced standing at the beginning of the 
second year. Special students are not received. 

The scientific studies, pursued fn connection with the 
Department of "Civil Engineering, include Chemistry, Phy- 
sics, and Mechanics, with so much of Mathematics as these 
studies require. 

The Architectural studies include the theory and the 
history of Architecture and of the allied arts, drawing and 
modelling, with the constant practice of original design, 
and so much of specifications and practical construction as 
can conveniently be taught in a school. 

The building's now constructing, which will be ready 
for occupation in October, provide, besides the necessary 
drawing rooms and lecture rooms, a special architectural 
laboratory for practice and experiment, and a library for 
study and for the accomodation of the large collection of 
drawings, prints and photographs now in process of form- 
ation. 

For a circular of information containing further partic- 
ulars address, REGISTRAR, SCHOOL OF MINES, 

Madison av. and 49th St., New York city. 



§ta#v#j (frump & I*#w f 

432 Washington St., Boston, 

Invite attention to the largest and finest stock in the city, of 



TONTINE HOTEL, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

S. B. BREW STEM, - - PROPRIETOR. 

Class and Reunion Suppers a Specialty. First-Class Laundry 
Work, equal to Troy, doue at short notice. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE. 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 



DIAMONDS, RARE GEMS, 

REPRESENTATIVES OF THE 

Gorham Manufacturing Company, in Boston. 
Exhibit a large and complete collection of the 

SOLID SILVER AND ELECTRO-PLATED WARES 

PRODUCED BY THIS COMPANY. 

The ornamentations now used and the effects produced, are 
something entirely novel in the craft of the Silversmith, and will 
interest every one by their combination of artistic and useful 
qualities. 

Especial Attention given to Designing Class-Day 
and College Invitations of Every Description. 



J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PICTURE FRAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

From the cheapest to the very best. Also Pictures, Cabinet 

Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, etc A Iso, Agent for 

the celebrated Household Sewing Machine. 

In the Blue Store, Main Street, Second Door from Elm, 

Opposite the Park, Brunswick, Maine. ' 



HMHE €8irr&A& ». ft. 

On and after Oct. 15th, 1882, 

Passenger Trains leave Brunswick 

For Bath. 8.10, 11.25 a.m.. 2.45, 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 
night (Sunday mornings only), 
dockland. 8.10 a.m., 2.45 p.m. 
Portland. 7.25. 11.30 a.m.. 4.30 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 12.35 night. 
Lewiston. 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.33 p.m.. 12.40 night. 
Farmiuglon. 8.10 a.m. (Mixed), 2.45 P.M. 
Augusta, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 p.m., 12.45 night. 
SUowhegun, Belfast, Dexter. Bangor, and Vanceboro, 

2.45 P.M.. and 12.45 night. 
Waterville, S.10, 12.45 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 P.M. (Saturdays 
only). 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 1882. 

DIAMONDS, f|fl£ JEWEt^Y, 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street, - - - Portland. Me. 

J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 

A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, M Fancy Goods. 

Also Eastern Mutual Union Telegraph Office. 
I Under Town Clock, - Brunswick, Me. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



J±. O. REED, 

britn"S"wick:, iveb. 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

W. R. FIELD, Proprietor. 

c. :e. totxt:lts:e:i>t:d, 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B.— Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



ALL KINDS OF 






For Schools and Colleges, 

EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

:f :r, i c :e s lotxt. 



386 Washington Street, BATH, ME. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



£W Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BEIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8j and §8 J Congress St., and 235 Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

,8®- Send fob Price List. 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. Wl LSON & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B.— Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 



Pianos, OfgiiSj 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 

THOMAS E. RILEY, . . . Brunswick, Me. 

Also INSURANCE written in Best Companies, 

at Lowest Rates. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




NEW BBUQ ST011. 

ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

B1TC.S, MIDICIIES, 

Fancy and Toilet Articles, Ciprsi Tobacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

1113 s Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

MAIN STREET, 

llflSWIlIi lit 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 

SPRING AND SUMMER, 1883. 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Cups, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

MAYNARD'S 
Djrstc.!? and Bm Cream Kmpodum, 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

jpg" Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



OOAL 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Coal ~Z"arc5L in Topsliam, 



WIIEUE NONE BUT 



Tfee Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Orders telephoned from Stores of A. T. Campbell 
and W. B. Woodard promptly attended to. 

Office near the Sheds. 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Tear in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

S*resfei asaci Salt Usats, 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

«®-Special Rates to Student Clubs, p? 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



TIFFANY & CO., Union Square, 
New York City, have made prepar- 
ations for the coming season, to of- 
fer original and artistic designs with 
new methods of treatment, for forms 
of Commencement and other invita- 
tions. 

They have also increased their 
facilities for producing articles of 
appropriate design for Prizes, Class 
Cups, Society Badges, etc. 

Drawings, with Estimates, sent 
on application. 

Correspondence invited. 



BEATS THE WORLD. 

Old Judge 

CIGARETTES 
And Smoking Tobacco. 



Endorsed as ABSOLUTELY PURE and free 
from all foreign or deleterious substances what- 
•ever, by 
PETER COLLIER, Chemist of the 

1, S< Dep&rtmsBt if Agriculture, 

Washington, D. C. 
R. ODGEN DOREMUS, M.D., LL.D., 

Professor Chemistry and Toxicology in the Bellevue Hospi- 
tal Medical College, and Professor of Chemistry and Physics 
in the College of the City of New York. 
BENJAMIN SILLIMAN, Esq., 

Professor at Yale College, New Haven, Conn. 
R. A. WITTHAUS, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Buffalo ; 
Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Ver- 
mont; Professor of Physiological Chemistry, University of 
New York. 

And other eminent Chemists in the United States, cop- 
ies of whose certificates we shall be pleased to mail you 
on application. 

GOODWIN Ac CO., 

Foot Grand Street, East River, New York. 



to. 

Beware of Imitations" and Counterfeits. 

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has 




Fac simile Signature on it. No Bogus Patented Sub- 
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y. 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 



ESTERBROOK'S 



STEEL 
PENS 



Leading Numbers: 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers t 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEN CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York, 

RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

"We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 

direct importation, which is made especially for us, water 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1 , 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLElSf & GINTER Manufacturers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Bowdoin College Boys 

"When they visit BATH should call at 

WEBBER'S DRUG STORE. 

A Full Line of Cigars, Toilet Articles, &c. 

Sraoke Smoke 

THE NEW CIGAR, 

^-*YALE.*-^ 

Price IO Cts. Havana Filled. 

&.LSO, 

DIAMOND CROWN. Price 5 Cts. 

JOHNSTON & HATCH, 

LEWISTON, ME. 

Smoke Smoke 




COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle riding is unsurpassed as a 
method of traveling,whether for speed, 
sport, or renewal of health. The prac- 
ticability of the machine has been 
thoroughly tested, and satisfactorily 
proved, beyond question. Thousands 
arc in daily use, and the number is 
rapidly increasing. The exercise is 
recommended by themedical profession 
as most beneficial to health, bringing 
into exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

Send 3c. stamp for 36-page Illustrated 
Catalogue containing price lists and full 
information. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washington St„ BOSTON, MASS. 



FOUND AT LAST!! 

That the place to buy the Very Best 

Groceries and Students 9 Supplies, 

At the Lowest Possible Price, is at 

H. C. MARTIN'S, opposite College Grounds, 

BRUNSWICK MAINE. 



Go to W. B. Woodard's 

To buy vour GEOCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

SPEOIAt, lEJATES to ST-U-DESISTT CitTBS. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

BEST DAIRY IN BRUNSWICK 

THERE ARE TWO PINTS OF THE NICEST MILK IN 
EVERY QUART WHICH I SELL. SPECIAL ATTENTION 
GIVEN TO STUDENT CLUBS. 

m- STEWARDS SHOULD DROP ME A POSTAL WITH 
THEIR LOCATION WRITTEN PLAINLY. 

A. P. WOODSIDE, Brunswick, Me. 



"W- IVC. XvULLER, 

First -Class Hair Dresser, and Colleg 

OVER AMERICAN EXPRESS OFFICE, 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

■**F. H. WILSON,^ 

DISPENSER OP 

Pure Drags, Medicines, <»Cliemifials. 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, . Conibs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

AUGUSTA HOUSE, 

State Street, Augusta, Maine. 

Most desirable location in the city. Good Rooms, Good Table, 

Good Attendance. Free Hack to and from Depot 

and Wharf. Patronage Solicited. 

E. & A. C. MANSON, Proprietors. 

C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

OVER BOARDMAN'S STORE. 

Give Me a Call. 







THE FAVORITE NOS. 303-404-332-I7O-35I- WITH 
'HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




\ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ v v \ \ \ \ \__ \_\ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ s: \ \ \ \ s. \ v 




7<OTS)>y 






F» TO. X11I. 



No. 2. 




'-* 



* ©r^e # 




-#BM.RSWICK,»MHIRE#- 






CONTENTS. 



PAGE. 

Editorial Notes 15 

A Poetical Fanatic 18 

The Medic's Last Mash 19 

Co-Education 21 

Unter Weges 22 

Scores 23 



PAGE. 

College Items ....'... 25 

Personal 27 

Inter- Collegiate News 27 

Editor's Table 28 

Book Notice . 29 



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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new"Oxford" and"Moehring" Burners 

IX PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGKAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



The Only RELIABLE AND STANDARD Bkands of 

Cigarettes and Fine Tobaccos. 

Straight Cuts. yy 

Sweet Caporal 



DEANE BROTHERS &. SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

$3T Lowest Prices in the State, 

183 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Port/and, Me. 
A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, I Fancy Goods. First -Class Hair Dresser, 




St." James, etc. -""i/' Ambassador. 

St. James i, etc. 

Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut Cigarettes. 

Tliis new brand is made of extra fine. seleeUM, prime, niild, golden Virginia 
af, and is the finest Cigarette, as to quality, flavor, and workmanship, ever 

e ,ed tor sale. Kinney Br0S- . straight Cut, Full Dress. 
Sweet Capokal Cokk Mouthpiece. 



50 STEEL 
PENS 




Leading Numbers: 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEN CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St.; New York. 

Go to W. B. Woodard's 

To buy your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

SPECIAL BATES to ST-UM3EKTT CLT7BS. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

BEST DAIRY IN BRUNSWICK. 

THERE ARE TWO PINTS OF THE NICEST MILK IN 
EVERY QUART WHICH I SELL. SPECIAL ATTENTION 
GIVEN TO STUDENT CLUBS. 

«3- STEWARDS SHOULD DROP ME A POSTAL WITH 
THEIR LOCATION WRITTEN PLAINLY. 

A. P. WOODSIDE, Brunswick, Me. 



-W- IIVC. MILLER, 



Also Eastern Mutual Union Telegraph Office. 
Under Town Clock, - Brunswick, Me. 



OVER AMERICAN EXPRESS OFFICE, 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 







THE FAVORITE NOS. 303-404-332-I7O-35I- WITH 
'HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




NEW BRUQ STORE, 



ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

HUGS, MIDICI11S, 

Fancy and Toilet Articles, Cigars 1 Toteo, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

HPJT Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



A. T, WICSOS.S, 



MEW^T+'I^IM^ 



MAIN STREET, 



\mw&:&Wd&Jkf, m) 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



SPRING AND SUMMER, 1383. 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready- Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

M J± Y 1ST .A. R 13 ' S 
@y$t@p ami ie© @e@ami Injipjaifiuim, 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

Upg* Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



Q4L 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Coal Tard in Topsliam, 



WHERE NONE BUT 



Tfee Best of Goal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Orders telephoned from Stores of A. T. Campbell 
and W. B. Woodard promptly attended to. 

Office near the Sheds. 






No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Tear in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

W&e>m%k asid Salt S£©gL.%g P 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

•GSpSpeeial Kates to Student Clubs. -ffl& 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating tbe amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the iEneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books ; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission ro college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A ■WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences 01 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 
Latin, two terms. 
Greek, two terms. 
Natural History, three terras. 
Physics, one term. 
Chemistry, two terms. 
Science of Language, one term. 
English Literature, two terms. 
German, two terms. 
History of Philosophy, two terms. 
International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows: Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 9, 1883. 



No. 2. 



JBOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 
EDITORIAL BOARD. 
Oliver W. Means, '84, Managing Editor. 
Charles E. Satward, '84, Business Editor. 
Llewellyn Barton, '84. John A. "Waterman, Jr. ,'84. 
William H. Cothren, '84. Oliver R. Cook, '85. 
Rodney I. Thompson, '84. Nehemiah B. Ford, '85. 
Sherman W. "Walker, '84. John A. Peters, 'S5. 

Terms— $2.00 a year in advance; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to 
contribute articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by the "writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 
Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, 3Ie. 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



It is hoped that readers of the Orient 
will patronize those that advertise in it. Some 
have said that it did not pay them to adver- 
tise, as they received no more and even less 
trade than those who do not advertise. The 
Orient could not exist if it depended only 
upon its readers for support. Its advertisers 
show that they are interested to get the trade 
of the students, and, as they are all first-class 
dealers in their respective lines of business, it 
is but right that they should receive patron- 
age in preference to those who refuse to 
advertise. 



A short time since a poem (?) was received, 
accompanied by a note that closed in this 
fashion: "I hope that you will not attempt to 
discover my identity, for I prefer not to sub- 



scribe to any of my productions until I am 
sure that some genius of poesy has prompted 
them." We are always glad to receive unso- 
licited communications, but anonymous arti- 
cles, whether produced by a prompted brain 
or not, soon reach a quiet resting place where 
they never again will see the light of day. If 
the disappointed writer will wait until the 
indications of poetic genius are a little more 
distinct and will then sign his name to his 
production, we shall be happy to insert it in 
the Orient. 



If there is one thing which students espe- 
cially dislike to see, it is an exhibition of fa- 
voritism. There is almost nothing that will 
call forth stronger or more general disap- 
proval. We have great reason to congrat- 
ulate ourselves on its entire absence among 
us ; for in the case of the mumps, Faculty and 
students alike enjoy its experience. If it were 
not so, if the Faculty reserved to themselves 
the right of having this ludicrous disease, or 
if it were compulsory for us alone, then would 
there be just ground for complaint. In the 
present instance it is consoling to remem- 
ber that we are all mortals, alike exposed to 
one common enemy. The Orient extends 
most sincere and heartfelt sympathy to the 
sufferers. 



Attention is invited to the communication 
in regard to co-education; and, if its conclu- 
sions are not in accord with the views of our 
readers, we urge them to reply. The subject 
is not as yet a vital question in regard to 
Bowdoin ; but it is impossible to say how soon 
it may be presented to us. No careful reader 



16 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



can have failed to notice the discussion in 
Columbia College in regard to this very thing, 
and it is expected that all have views, which 
some may like to present. An eminent pro- 
fessor once said that when Vassar opens her 
doors to young men, he would have no objec- 
tion to admitting young ladies to Yale. It 
seems to us that this is the right position in 
regard to the question; not, whether ladies 
shall be admitted to Columbia, or to any 
other of our colleges, but rather, whether the 
same course of study is the one best suited to 
both sexes. 



Boating matters have been especially un- 
fortunate this year. At first a general lack 
of interest deferred all training until very late ; 
and now comes word that the only man that 
has had experience in inter-collegiate races is 
to leave college. This has given another 
blow to the already tottering plan of sending 
a crew to Lake George. It behooves the boat- 
ing men to call a meeting at once and decide 
whether they will send a crew or not. If it 
is decided to put in a new man, the crew 
should go to work more vigorously than ever. 
If it is deemed inexpedient, the men now 
training will be relieved from their present 
work and anticipations. At all events imme- 
diate action should be taken in regard to the 
approaching class races. The Sophomore 
crew is the only one yet at work. We. are 
told that the Seniors will give their boat to 
the association, and that the Freshmen can 
buy it at a low price. The Seniors probably 
feel too " tired " to get up a crew, but one could 
be got from the Junior class, and if the Fresh- 
men could be stirred up to their duty, boat- 
ing might take on a new lease of life. Only 
a month still remains, so that whatever is 
done, must be undertaken at once. 



it is usual for the advocates of these sports to 
raise the cry that athletics are declining, and 
the health of students being injured. To a 
careful observer of college life, however, this 
does not appear ; for interest in one branch 
of sports is in general the reciprocal of the 
interest felt in another. As one sport declines, 
some other advances in popular favor, and so 
the general average is maintained. The pres- 
ent interest in lawn tennis will doubtless ac- 
count for the inactivity manifest in other di- 
rections. That this game promotes health 
and is in every way free from objectional feat- 
ures, is attested by many eminent physicians. 
As the play requires quickness of movement, 
a sharp eye, and a good disposition, it is well 
adapted to benefit all that engage in it. It 
would be advantageous if there was opportu- 
nity for more general participation in the 
sport. We would call the attention of the 
nine to the fact that some of the best nines in 
the country prepare, in part at least, for their 
season's work by practicing tennis. If a ten- 
nis tournament could be arranged for Field 
Day, it would add a novel and interesting 
feature to the program. 



When less attention is paid to any branch 
of college athletics, as ball playing or boating, 



The course of lectures, now ended, has 
been one of great profit and enjoyment to 
those who have attended. The idea once 
held that the treasury of the Boating Associ- 
ation would be benefited by the profits accruing 
from the sale of tickets, was long since aban- 
doned, and the only anxiet}^ has been lest 
there should be a deficit, which would have to 
be met by subscription. We now understand 
that the expenses will be met, with a sum ap- 
proaching microscopic proportions left to 
.swell the treasury. From the original point 
of view the lectures have been a series of 
failures, but every one that has attended 
them will say that they have been very in- 
structive and entertaining. There has not 
been a single disappointing lecture ; without 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



17 



exception the audiences have been more than 
satisfied. A good many of the students have 
not attended them, to whom we can say that 
they have missed a very pleasant part of the 
season's instruction. The opening lecture by 
George M. Towle was a surprise to the 
students, so much better than they had ex- 
pected that every succeeding lecture has been 
preceded by high anticipations, which have 
in no case been ill founded. The closing 
lecture by Mrs. Livermore opened a new field 
of thought, and overturned many opinions that 
have long been held. That a lecture on 
"Superfluous Women" should be given to an 
audience largely composed of students, was at 
first regarded as a little strange, but the event 
proved that it was well chosen. The long 
weeks of last term were broken in upon by 
these lectures, and thus the tedium of the win- 
ter months was relieved. It is to be hoped 
that another course of lectures can be ar- 
ranged for next winter. There would prob- 
ably be a larger number of tickets sold, as 
those that attended this year would wish to 
attend next, and others, appreciating their 
loss, would also desire to share the advan- 
tages of a similar course. 



The trip to Massachusetts made by the 
nine last week, resulted in no way discour- 
agingly. While no high expectations were 
raised that the nine would return laden with 
fresh laurels, yet the students were hopeful, 
and believed that the nine would do them- 
selves credit. To say that our hopes were 
fully realized would be exaggeration, but it 
is with justice that we can say that the games 
were satisfactory. The result of the game 
with Harvard was a gratifying surprise and 
gave rise to the hope that the succeeding 
games would be equally fortunate. But 
alas for human hopes ! we did not know that 
in consequence of a limited opportunity for 
practice, this first game of the season had so 



lamed the members of the nine as to render 
them unfit for work on the following day. It 
was conceded that the game with Amherst 
would result in a defeat for our nine ; and 
when we heard of the changes in the arrange- 
ment of the men, made necessary by their 
disabilities, we concluded to take a philosoph- 
ical view of the matter. It is regretted that 
the game with Williams was necessarily left 
unfinished, but, as it was played so loosely on 
both sides, a victory would have brought no 
credit. That the nine won the game with 
Tufts was a matter of no great surprise as 
such a result was confidently expected. 

On Friday evening a banquet was given 
the nine by members of the Bowdoin Club of 
Boston and vicinity, to which about thirty sat 
down. This gave to the week's vicissitudes 
a very pleasant and highly appreciated end- 
ing. 

If any are disposed to say that the nine 
would have been wiser to have remained at 
home, let them bear in mind that the trip cost 
very little in addition to what was received 
from the other colleges, and that this trifling 
expense is more than met by the practice and 
experience they have undoubtedly gained. 



The readers of the Okient are invited to 
admire and to favorably criticise the cover 
that has been added to the paper. The size 
of the paper has been increased by four pages, 
thus giving more value in return for their 
money to our subscribers. The Orient plans 
to keep abreast in college journalism and is 
constantly on the watch for improvements. 
If any feel that they are receiving too much 
in return for their subscription, we cordially 
invite them to pay up all arrears and to send 
the Orient to some friend. We hope that 
all old subscribers will renew their subscrip- 
tions and that many new names may be added 
to the lists in reply to the request contained 
in the preceding number. 



18 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A POETICAL FANATIC. 
" I saj, Jim," said Sam, as he settled back 
in his eas3 r chair, put his feet on the cen- 
ter table, and slung his cigarette stub at the 
stove door, hitting the side of the stove from 
which it glanced sizzling into the punch bowl, 
" did you ever have a poetical fever ? I mean, 
did you ever have a time when your whole 
soul seemed to innate itself, like a dime bal- 
loon, with the desire to burst forth in one 
grand poetic symphony? Did you ever feel 
as if you were soaring off into the ethereal 
space on wings of poetical fancy ? " 

" No," answered Jim, " I don't know as 
ever I had that sort of a sensation. I have 
felt a little queer some mornings after a bust. 
I felt hot, but I couldn't swear it was a poet- 
ical fever. I felt an enormous swelling in 
my head, as if some unseen power were using 
it for a Papin's Digester; but you cannot 
make me believe it was a poetical disorder. 
The most extensive soar I ever took was off 
from the toe of my girl's old man's cowhide. 
I tell you, Sam, there was no poetical fancy 
about that ; it was a sore reality. These are 
all the troubles I ever had, which could by 
any sort of logic come under the head 
of your strange questions." 

"Then pray heaven, Jim," said Sam, ear- 
nestly, " to avert the awful calamity, from 
your experience. You can have no concep- 
tion of what a terrible curse an abnormal 
muse can bring upon a man. I have contin- 
ually to use my utmost will power to keep 
myself down on this mundane sphere. Should 
I relax my energy^, in less than a week I 
should be living in an ideal world, and should 
be considered a raving maniac in this. It is 
dangerous for me to attempt to write poetiy, 
for I might lose my hold on myself and go 
sailing off, in my mental balloon, to some un- 
known corner of the universe of fancy, from 
which I could never find my way back. Now 
I want to write up a poem for the Okient 
and I want you to help vae. I am going to 



get into my mental balloon and I want you 
to take hold of the critical drag rope, which 
I shall throw out to you, and keep me from 
going up very far. If 1 throw out sand bags 
of poetical license and argument, don't be 
frightened but hang on all the tighter and let 
me stay up there till my poetical gas dialyses 
and lets me down." 

" What in thunder are you trying to get 
through you?" said Jim, eyeing him sus- 
piciously. " I should think you were getting 
a little off now. I don't understand what you 
are talking about. What do I know about crit- 
ical ropes, poetical dialyses, and the like ? Tell 
us in human language what you want done." 
" What can be plainer? " said Sam, rather 
exasperated. " You see I want you to crit- 
icise as I go along, and if I try to get in any- 
thing beyond your comprehension, just haul 
me in a little, and don't be influenced by ar- 
guments on a poetical license basis ; just 
hang on to your critical opinion till I exhaust 
my spasmodic struggles. Now do you under- 
stand ? Does the sublime idea illumine your 
misty cranium now ? " 

" Yes, I think I see the point," said Jim, 
in a subdued tone. "I calculate I have some 
small smatterings of poetical talent mixed in 
with my groveling imagination. Last year I 
wrote a short song. The subject was ' The 
Imp with the Unkempt Hair.' Your lofty 
fancy would have called it ' The Gypsy 
Maiden's Lament," or 'The Wandering Child 
of Nature.' But I like to call things by 
their right names. Climb into your phantom 
balloon and go it. You had better dictate 
the concern and I will write it down, then I 
shall have a good chance to keep you down. 
What shall you take for a subject ? " 

" I haven't hardly decided yet," said Sam, 
thoughtfully, as he lighted another cigarette 
to calm his nerves. "I might take 'Sports 
on the Moonbeams,' and tell in liquid num- 
bers how the spirits slide down on them from 
the shores of endless day." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



19 



" Oh, let up on that," said Jim, disgusted, 
" I ain't going to follow you round chasing 
sliding spirits this week. What do you take 
the shores of endless day for, anyway? Do 
you think they consist of an illicit distillery 
and a search and seizure law, so that the 
policemen are forever spilling what they can't 
drink of the precious fluid out on to the 
moonbeams? What do you mean by liquid 
numbers? Are they lines inspired by drink- 
ing the spirits of the moonbeams? You had 
better take something more credible and nat- 
ural. 'The Song of the Unwashed Dish,' 
for instance, or ' The Hairpin's Strange 
Neighbors.' " 

" Well, are you through with your howl- 
ing blizzard of sarcasm?" said Sam, turning 
red with suppressed rage. " If you are I will 
propose another title for you to run through 
your winnowing machine. What do you say 
to 'The Kiss of the Evening Star.'?" 

"What is it going to kiss ? " said Jim, with 
a twinkle in his eye. " Do you suppose it is 
going to come down and rub noses with the 
earth ? I tell you it would he the awfullest 
concussion the face of the earth has ever yet 
experienced. Don't, for mercy's sake expand 
such a horrible conception." 

"Well Jim," said Sam, decidedly, I am 
going to propose just one more subject, and 
I am going to dictate on that subject, and if 
you want to change anything or make any 
criticism, just wait until I am done. Now 
mind you, as long as I keep my genius within 
the most extreme bounds of poetical license, 
don't interrupt me." 

" All right," said Jim. " I have got the 
bind on you just the same. Now just focus 
your expansive fancy on your title and I will 
look out for you." 

Sam took a long whiff from his cigarette 
and sank back into his chair with a resigned 
expression on his face, as if he was allowing 
himself to be mesmerized. Jim got his pad 
in readiness to record the effusions of his 



flighty friend. All was silent as death for a 
moment, then a serene smile lighted up Sam's 
face, and gazing pensively up at the ceiling, 
he burst forth as follows : 

A JOURNEY TO UNSEEN WORLDS. 

" I see my soul up iu the air. 

I see it, so I know 'tis there. 

It waves and bends Most gracefully 

As from the world it beckons me. 

I feel a subtile, potent charm, 

Which gently frees me from alarm ; 

And raising up my mortal clay 

It starts me on my heavenly way. 

I now can sweep through endless space ; 

I now can sleep and keep my pace. 

I feel a thrill " 

He did feel a thrill, but it was caused by 
a glass of water Jim dashed in his face, 
shouting, "How long will it take for you to 
make your blasted journey round the circum- 
ference of space ? You had better come back 
now, and you will get here several centuries 
sooner than you will to go round. You are 
sadly deluded. You have been looking at a 
fly on the wall all this time, and fancying it 
was your departed soul. You had better give 
up poetry and study the laws of gravity." 
And Jim went off, leaving him to his fate, 
and solemnly swore that he would never, a6 
long as he had a sane mind, try to work up a 
poetical spasm, lest he, too, should become a 
poetical fanatic. 



THE MEDIC'S LAST MASH. 

A TRAGEDY IN TWO ACTS. 
ACT I. 

Scene I. 
{Enter a Medic, with a bloiv-pipe in his right hand and 
a piece of charcoal in his left. Sings :] 
I am a festive Medic, 

From distant lands I came 
To study my profession 

In Brunswick, low and tame. 
You know not of the hardships 

Through which we Medics toil 
When we cut up the "stiffles" 
Or burn the midnight oil, — 
But then, there is some pleasure 
Amid this weary pain, 



20 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



For there can be no losses 

Without, at least, some gain. 
So, on some pleasant evening 

When yonder sun is low, 
I'll don my new, white breeches 

And on the pick-up go. 
I know a comely maiden, 

The fairest of the fair, 
With lips as red as cherry, 

With lovely, auburn hair, 
The fairest, prettiest lassie 

That ever you did meet, — 

Her I'll pick up 

And with her stroll 

'Way down on Harpswell Street; 
'Tis then I'll buzz and buzz her, 

To her true love will make 
And ask her if she'd love me 

And suffer for my sake : 
To this one simple question — 

If I can rightly guess 
In my almighty wisdom — 

She'll surely answer, "yes" ; 
So come, my heart, take courage, 

There's joy in store for you, 
And soon to pain and sorrow 

You'll fondly bid adieu. 

[Enter John, another Medic] 

John : Well, David, here you are with the inev- 
itable blow-pipe in hand ; been, I suppose, working 
at the endless chemistry. Well, so have I. I, too, 
have been toiling the livelong day and am almost 
discouraged. In fact, I should be were it not that 
there is one hope which always cheers me on, even 
in the most trying times. 

David : And pray, what is this hope 
Which, when our toils 
Stand ready to devour us 
As beasts of prey their victims do, 
So causes you to take fresh courage on ? 
Tell it to me so that, 
Amid these toils and hardships, 
I like you and like my former self 
A happy Medic may be once again. 

John : Since the true secret of my joy 

You kindly of me ask, 
To tell it to you briefly 

Will be a pleasant task. 
Within this town there lives a maid, 

The fairest of the fair, 
With cheeks as red as ruddy morn, 

With lovely, auburn hair. 



One lovely night when all was still 

Upon the mash I went, 
Having some new white breeches on, 

By my kind room-mate lent. 
This bonnie lass I chanced to spy 

And soon I scooped her in — 
Ah! she was first in all my life 

Whose heart I sought to win. 

How well do I recall the night 

She promised to be mine : 
Spring then her robe was putting on 

And bright the moon did shine. 
Nature was blooming out afresh 

Just as she's blooming now, 
The night when we the sod upturned 

On the Delta with the plow. 

This promise e'er my hope has been 

And, when by " quizzes" pressed, 
To her with joy my heart reverts 

And with new zeal is blest ; 
So, if like me you'd happy be 

And every trouble waive, 
Take my advice, try once or twice 

Your luck upon the pave. 

[Exit John.] 
David [alo?ie] : 

His plan, I see, like magic worked, 

His white pants did the "biz," 
So in mine to-night — though they're awful tight — 

I'll mash, though I cut the " quiz." 

But there's one thing about it 

Which I don't understand 
About John's little daisy, 

" The fairest in the land." 
He says her hair is auburn, 

Her cheeks are rosy red, 
And, if I'm not mistaken 

In all that he has said, 
She must look like the daisy 

That I now have in view, 
And, should she be the self-same one, 
My high hopes would be all undone. 
But, when I think, I fail to see 
How such a thing could ever be, 
For in this town you're well aware 
That all the girls have auburn hair, 
So cheer up, Medic, you're all right, . 
Go, pick her up this very night. 

[Medicus(s) turns and proceeds to pursue his avoca- 
tion, which is — the blow-pipe. Slow curtain.'] 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



21 



Scene II. 
[Curtain rises, and enter several Brunswick street- 
walkers in great excitement and somewhat out of 
breath, but not enough so, however, to prevent 
their talking; so one, the ringleader to all intents 
and purposes, says:] 

Girls, if I understand aright, 
Medics '11 be on the pave to-night, 
And if one comes and scoops you in 
Just cheese him up, 'twill make him grin. 
Chin him, tell him you're in love, 
Fawn on him like a turtle dove ; 
Then will he all the Medics tell 
That he's found one who suits him well, 
That she is fairest in the town, 
In fact, in all the country 'round. 
Thus will he fairly set them wild 
And make each happy as a child, 
So that soon as they've ate their hash 
All will be out upon the mash. 
So mash a Medic, take no chance, 
You'll know them by their old, white pants. 
[Curtain.] 

ACT II. 

[Several days supposed to have elapsed, during which 
time David has, on the night in question, picked 
up John's daisy, not knowing who she was. John 
is, of course, highly indignant, and in such an 
indignant mood meets David in the presence of 
several other Medics. As the curtain rises, John, 
who cannot restrain himself, says :] 

And here thou art, thou villain bold, 

I meet thee once again, 
There is no honor in thy bones* 

Thou vilest, worst of men ! 
Or thou wouldst not, a few nights since, 

Have roped my daisy in. 
Away ! away ! thou worst of men, 

And hide thyself from sin ; 
To thee I nevermore will speak, 

On thee revenge I'll take ; 
Thou cruel, heartless, fiendish wretch ! 

Who didst my pleasure break. 

David : You do not understand, I see, 
So then I must explain 
How 'twas a thoughtless act of mine 
That causes you such pain 

John : But stop — no flimsy, thin excuse 
From you I'll deign to hear, 
You Medic with old cowhide boots, 



With hay-seed in your hair ! 
Revenge is sweet, and so on you 
Happy revenge I'll take. 

[Produces pistol.'] 
Thus speed thy wretched soul away, 
Thou Medic, whom I hate ! 

[Shoots him.] 
In such a wretched, dreary life 

1 cannot longer dwell, 
My spirit longs this earth to quit 
For heaven or for hell. 

[Shoots himself.] 

[As the curtain slowly descends their fellow Medics 
gather 'round the bodies as they lie bleeding and 
sing :] 

"How vein are all things here below." 



CO-EDUCATION. 

Apropos of the co-educational question 
that is now receiving considerable attention 
in intellectual circles, and is being rediscussed 
in many of the journals that are interested in 
education, Prof. Campbell, of Bowdoin, in a 
lecture delivered sometime since before the 
Senior class on the subject of anthropology, 
stated that an experience of some fourteen 
years as instructor in an institution open to 
both sexes (the University of Minnesota) had 
caused him to conclude that the advantages 
arising from the mutual association of the 
sexes in education have been overestimated. 
Prof. Campbell further stated that the ques- 
tion of co-education should be considered as 
an open one. Sexual psychology has been 
but little studied. The question will proba- 
bly be settled philosophically rather than em- 
pirically, because one scandal will influence 
the public mind much more than long con- 
tinued success. In many co-ed. institutions 
there is no genuine association in the class 
room. In the highest orders of animals the 
sexes are the most distinct. Culture tends 
to increase differences of sex. There is a 
marked distinction between equal advantages 
and identical advantages. Women should 



22 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



have equal advantages, but not necessarily 
identical advantages with men. A woman 
may be as thoroughly educated as a man 
without passing through the same curriculum 
of study. In a co-ed. college the young men 
may sometimes be refined at the expense of 
the young women. 



UNTER WEGES. 

Tuesday morning, May 1st, was bright and 
pleasant, and there was every indication that 
the nine would be favored with at least good 
weather for its journey. After rather hurried 
breakfasts (especially so if taken at the depot) 
the boys took the 7 o'clock train for Portland 
and the much-talked-of Massachusetts trip 
was begun. The ride from Brunswick to 
Portland was uneventful. At the latter place 
we took the through train on the Eastern R.R , 
and after a dull and tiresome ride, enlivened 
as much as possible by singing and discussion 
as to our chances for the afternoon's game, 
arrived in Boston at 1.15. 

Arrangements had been made for us to 
make our headquarters at the Quincy House, 
and thither we marched in a follow- ray-leader 
order. Dinner was soon disposed of, and 
about 2.30 o'clock we went by coach out to 
Cambridge. It is hardly necessary to tell 
how much attention the nine attracted during 
this ride, nor how many compliments the boys 
received from the lookers-on. Arrived at Jar- 
vis Field we were surprised, as well as pleased, 
to find so many Bowdoin men, both alumni 
and undergraduates, present as spectators. 
After a little preliminary practice on the 
grounds, which are the finest of any we used 
for our games, the game was called at 3.45 
o'clock. The record of the game will be 
found elsewhere, and all that need be said 
here is that the fellows did themselves credit 
and surpassed the expectations of almost 
everyone. There were not many people pres- 
ent at the game, but it was pronounced by 



the spectators as well worth seeing. The 
evening was spent pleasantly in Boston. 

The next morning, after an early break- 
fast, we started for Amherst via the Fitchburg 
R. R. The route is through a rather rough 
section of the country, and we were whirled 
across bridges and around sharp curves for 
two or three hours, till we reached the beau- 
tiful and populous village of Miller's Falls. 
Here we changed cars, and after a short ride 
reached Amherst at a few minutes after noon. 
We piled into and on top of a conveyance 
which carried us to Woods' Hotel, where we 
took dinner and prepared for the game. As 
we expected we received our worst defeat 
that afternoon. We propose to offer no ex- 
cuses for the score, since the strength of the 
Amherst nine and the circumstances under 
which our boys had to play are by this time 
known to all of us. The ball grounds are 
very good with the exception of right field, 
a hard position for the fielder to fill in a man- 
ner equally agreeable to himself and his 
nine. After the game we had a chance to 
see the college grounds and buildings and to 
get some of the fine views for which Amherst 
is noted. At the advice of the manager the 
boys turned in early, and slept for all they 
were worth. 

At 9 o'clock A.M., Thursday, we went 
again to Miller's Falls, and after waiting 
there an hour, took the cars for Williamstown. 
We wound in and out among the hills and up 
through the valley of the Deerfield River, 
where the scenery is beautiful, through the 
darkness cf the Hoosac Tunnel, whence we 
emerged, bearing on our hands and faces 
about nine minutes' worth of grime and dust. 
At North Adams we took a somewhat re- 
markable meal, consisting principally of beans 
and bananas, and then proceeded towards 
Williamstown which was reached in a few 
minutes. We went to a hotel, made a hur- 
ried change of clothing in a single small room, 
jammed our ordinary apparel into our valises, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



23 



and went to the scene of conflict. The result 
of this game was not exactly what we had 
hoped, though it was what some of us had 
expected. The score shows that the game 
was close and that the two nines were pretty 
evenly matched. The pond behind the catch- 
er's fence served to receive an} r fouls or wild- 
thrown balls that came in that direction. 
After- the game we were hurried back to the 
depot, where we had time to make hasty 
toilets before the train for Boston arrived. 
We reached the Hub about 10.15 p.m., and 
were glad to retire as soon as possible. We 
took our supper that day at Greenfield, and 
astonished the natives by the amount of hard 
work that we did in the ten minutes allotted 
us. 

Friday morning we were disappointed at 
receiving word from the Tufts College nine 
that it could not play us, but the game was 
finally arranged, and the result is well-known. 
There was an endeavor on the part of the 
fellows to catch the train that left for Boston 
ten minutes after the close of the game, but 
the effort was, with one exception, a failure, 
and we were obliged to wait for the 6.39 ac- 
commodation train. That evening we were 
entertained at an excellent supper given at 
the Revere House, b} ? the Boston Bowdoin 
Club. Besides the nine and other members 
of the college, there were present the follow- 
ing Bowdoin men : Judge W. S. Gardner, of 
the class of '50 ; Geo. S. Chandler, '68 ; N. 
D. A. Clarke, '73 ; E. H. Hall, D. A. Sar- 
gent, Geo. R. Swasey, and Dr. A. S. Whit- 
more, '75 ; A. T. Parker, 0. C. Stevens, W. 
G. Waitt, and F. V. Wright, '76 ; S. E. Smith, 
'78 ; 0. M. Shaw and F. E. Smith, '81 ; E. 
U. Curtis and W. G. Reed, '82 ; and R. C. 
Washburn, formerly of '83. After supper 
the manager of the nine gave an account of 
our trip, and some familiar songs were sung. 
The company broke up at an early hour after 
having passed a very pleasant evening. It 
was thought best not to play a second game 



with the Tufts nine, since the fellows were 
tired and not in first-rate condition, so most 
of the boys returned to Brunswick, Saturday. 

The trip has been a success. The nine 
has done about as well as it could do under 
the circumstances, and, though it did not 
score as many runs as may have been desired, 
yet it has gained the object for which the 
trip was made, viz. : experience. We have 
learned something from competition with 
strong nines, and have greatly increased our 
chances of winning the State championship. 

In closing we must express our thanks to 
our fellow-sudents, to our alumni, and to 
the members of the colleges that we visited, 
for the hearty and generous manner in which 
they have supported and entertained us, and 
for all they have done to make our trip both 
pleasant and profitable. 



SCORES. 

As the scores, which we expected, did not 
reach us through some mistake, we are forced 
to give such accounts as could be obtained 
from the Boston papers. 

The game between the Harvards and the 
Bowdoins, of the Maine Inter-Collegiate As- 
sociation, on Jarvis Field, May 1, resulted in 
favor of the Harvards. The Bowdoins have 
a strong battery, and, considering that it was 
their first game, did very well. The Harvards 
batted in a way that presaged unfavorably for 
their chances in the championship race. The 
fielding honors were taken by Knapp, Wright, 
Allen, Lovering, Smith, and Baker. The 
score : 

HARVARDS. 

A.B. E. B. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Baker.s.s 4. 5 

Allen, c 4 .20061 1 

Smith, lb 4 2 2 14 1 

LeMoyue, 1. f. 4 1 1 I 

Nichols, p 4 12 2 2 5 1 

Lovering, 2b 4 1112 5 

Keep.r.f. 4 1 1 o 

Beaman, 3b 4 11110 

White, e.f..--. 4 10 

36 6 7 7 27 18 2 



24 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOINS. 

A.B. R. B. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

"Winter, lb 4 2 2 2 4 

Euapp, o 2 9 5 1 

Torrey,2b 3 1116 13 

Wright, p 4 2 2 3 8 

Cook, r. f. 4 110 

Stetson, 3b 4 113 2 

Waterman, s.s 4 

Collins, o. f. 4 10 

Barton, 1. f. 3 1110 



Totals 



.32 3 



27 16 9 



Innings 1 23456789 

Harvards 2 4 0—6 

Bowdoins 1 2 0—3 

Earned runs — Bowdoins, 2. First base on balls — Bow- 
doius, 5. First base on errors — Harvards, 6. Struck out — 
Allen, Smith (2), Keep, White (4), Cook, Collins (2). 
Double plays — Baker, Smith, and Allen; Baker, Lover- 
ing, and Smith ; Stetson andTorrey. Passed balls — Allen, 
1 ; Knapp, 1. Wild pitch— Nichols, I. Time— lh. 28m. 
Umpire — Mr. Quinn. 

The Bowdoins and Amherst College nines 
crossed bats May 2. The home nine had a com- 
plete walk-away, Harris', the Amherst pitcher, 
work being so effective that the visitors only 
secured two hits ; twelve Bowdoins struck 
out, and very few strikes were called. The 
visitors presented Wright as pitcher for the 
first two innings, and Cook the rest, but they 
were both heavily batted, Amherst getting a 
total of twenty-eight hits. Both nines played 
with very few errors. The remarkable feat- 
ures of the game were the heavy batting of 
the Amhersts, especially Stuart and Harris, 
and the Amhersts' base-running. Below is 
the score by 

1 23456789 

1 4 4 2 1—12 

0000000 0—0 

The Bowdoin club reached Williamstown, 
May 2d, on the 1.30 train. The game was 
called at 2.15. In the first inning the Wil- 
liams gained two runs. The Bowdoins fol- 
lowed at the bat, and the first three were put 
out. In the second inning Williams gained 
two more runs and Bowdoin gained nothing. 
The fourth inning Yates knocked a beautiful 
fly to Bowdoin's centre field, who made a fine 
catch. The Williams team were Crowell, 



Innings. 
Amhersts .. 
Bowdoins.. 



Hubbell, Blackmer, Blackmer, Safford, Tal- 
cott, Safford, Yates, Ketcham. The class of 
'86 furnished three men who were distin- 
guished by their fine playing. The score by 
innings is as follows : 

Innings 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

Williams 2 2 3 4—11 

Bowdoins 2 7 0—9 

The Bowdoin College team met the Tufts 
nine at College Hill, May 4, it being the 
fourth game in their Massachusetts tour. 
The day was cold, but some fine hits were 
made by both teams. The heavy hitters for 
the Bowdoins were Winter and Cook ; for 
the Tufts, Mackin and Perry. Day's catch- 
ing was plucky, considering that his hands 
were in a wretched condition. Only eight 
base hits were made on Snow's pitching, while 
the strikers retired in one, two, three order 
before the difficult pitching of Wright. The 
score : 

BOWDOINS. 

A.B. R. B. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Winter.lb 5 2 3 4 12 3 2 

Knapp, c 5 2 2 10 2 2 

Torrey, o. f. 5 

Wright, p 2 2 18 

Cook.r. f. 5 2 2 3 1 

Stetson, 3b 5 1112 10 

Waterman, s.s 5 10 2 1 

Lindsey,2b 4 10 2 4 

Barton, 1. f. 4 110 

Total 40 9 8 10 27 27 10 

TUFTS. 

A.B. R. B. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Mackin, 3b 5 2 2 2 3 1 1 

Perry, s. s 5 2 12 4 3 

Crosby, 2b 4 2 113 3 1 

Snow, p 5 1 1 12 

Currier, c. f. 5 I 1 

Taylor, lb 5 9 1 

Wellington, 1. f. 4 10 

Day, c 4 8 2 

Beal, r. f. 4 10 2 

Totals 41 8 5 6 27 22 6 

Innings 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

Bowdoins 4 12 11—9 

Tufts 1 2 4 1 0—8 

Earned runs— Bowdoins, I ; Tufts, 2. Two-base hits- 
Winter, Cook, Perry. First base on halls— Bowdoins, 4; 
Tufts, 1. Struck out— Bowdoins, 7 ; Tufts 9. Time— 1 
hour 45 minutes. Umpire— Greene of Cambridge. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



25 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



Spring ? O no ! 

Back in chapel once more. 

" Go West ! " belated sisters. 

Just 270 rods around the campus. 

Where is the chorister nowadays ? 

The mumps are no respecter of persons. 

The Spring sports have begun in earnest. 

" Taffy " aired his " plug hat " the other day. 

Leavitt and Libby, 76, were in town last week. 

The Juniors are reading " Undine " in German. 

Prof. Chapman preached in Augusta the 29th 



ult. 

Lindsey went as tenth man on the Massachusetts 
trip. 

There have been some very interesting clinics, 
lately. 

The President is improving as fast as could be 
expected. 

Wanted : Rare and ancient works on philosophy, 
at 26 A. H. 

Prof. Campbell preached at the Congregationalist 
church, April 29th. 

Merryman, of '82, is stopping a few days at his 
home in Brunswick. 

Did we hear any one say "rush," in connection 
with Levi's death ? 

Child, '84, is doing a good thing in furnishing 
students with text-books. 

The tutor in French has turned over a new leaf 
and is attending prayers. 

The reading-room auction was a fizzle. No fault 
of the auctioneer, however. 

Every man on the nine invested in a new " tile " 
before starting for Massachusetts. 

The household of one of our tutors was darkly 
represented at church last Sunday. 

The pretty clerk of the College Bookstore has re- 
turned from her sojourn in the city. 

The nine has been practicing in overcoats the 
most of the time for the past few weeks. 

The last themes by the Sophomores were on 
"Feudalism" and the " Fortunes of Quebec." 

The season of sports has come, and the corridors 
are redolant of St. Jacob's Oil and Centaur Liniment. 

How much money was won on the games last 
week? They say that he is not a gentleman who 
bets on a sure thing. 



Prof. Robinson has been unable to attend his 
classes for the past two weeks on account of sick- 
ness. 

The man who came out in his spring suit the first 
of the term has had a croupy time of it the last two 
weeks. 

'84's Ivy will be planted at the south end of Me- 
morial, a custom that succeeding classes will proba- 
bly follow. 

We think it advisable for one of the Profs, to 
study the Lord's Prayer before he attempts to quote 
from it again. 

E. A. Scribner, of '77, paid a brief visit to his 
folks in Topsham last week. He is in business in 
New York City. 

There is a game of ball every afternoon on the 
South Appleton grounds between the Muffers and 
the Non-Holders. 

The Seniors are writing themes on philosophical 
and ethical subjects. Four themes are read before 
the class every week. 

The University crew practice every night. They 
must bear in mind that a great deal of hard practice 
must be put in before the race. 

The Y. M. C. Association elected O. W. Means a 
delegate to the International Convention, which is 
held at Milwaukee, Wis., about the middle of May. 

Goodwin, '83, has been appointed scorer for this 
season. Howard is a good man for the place. We 
could win with him when we couldn't with any other. 

The provisional list for Commencement Parts, 
for 1883, is Austin, Bascom, Cole, Dinsmore, Good- 
win, Holden, Packard, Pettingill, Perkins, Stetson, 
and Swan. 

The crews have done little work as yet, and it's 
only four weeks before the races. You must work, 
boys, if you expect to win the applause of the assem- 
bled multitude. 

The second nine is made up as follows : Byram, c. ; 
Davis, '86, p. ; Chase, 1 b. ; Lindsey, Capt. and 2 b. ; 
Folsom, 3 b. ; Crowley, s. s. ; BartleLt, r. f. ; Ward- 
well, c. f. ; Davis, '85, 1. f. 

Field and Ivy Days will be June 7 and 8 this 
year. The Juniors have decided to have Field Day 
come first so as not to have it come the next day after 
the Hop, when those attending would feel tired out. 
The order of exercises will be given later. 

The men who managed the hydrant near Dun- 
lap's Block last week are no respecters of persons. 
A prominent member of the Medical Faculty, as well 



26 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



as many of the "natives," was painfully reminded 
of the fact that at this time of the year water is wet 
and an elm tree is no good protector when the moist- 
ure is descending. 

The choir at the First Parish Church sang a selec- 
tion at the morning services last Sabbath that was 
very generally complimented. It always sings well, 
but the piece referred to merits special praise. 

We were very much surprised recently at hearing 
how freely a prominent member of the Faculty, 
while presiding at a Wednesday evening prayer 
meeting, expressed his belief in the dishonesty of 
nearly all republicans. 

" Does any ghentleman here tink I hev not given 
him back his money's wort? If so, I will continue 
my performance 'ntil each an' every one o' yez is 
satisfied," etc. Can any one say the little piece 
about the " broad canopy of heaven and the bosom of 
Mother Earth ? " 

The interest in boating which the Freshmen have 
succeeded in arousing does them credit. The only 
thing to be regretted is that it was not started before. 
Although the class is small, it has good material 
and is amply able to distinguish itself upon the 
river. " Let the good work go on ! " 

Some one mnst have made a mistake when he 
said that little interest was being taken in boating by 
the two lower classes. At the present writing, '85 is 
the only crew that pretends to practice. The Sopho- 
mores are working well, and intend not to be left 
further behind than last year. 

The last lecture of the B. B. Association was 
given at Memorial Hall, Monday evening, April 30, 
by Mrs. Mary A. Livermore. She is a lady of pre- 
possessing appearance, speaks very fluently, and at 
times eloquently. Though her lecture was quite long 
yet she held the audience to the close. 

We had the pleasure of gazing upon Wheel- 
wright's manly form on several occasions last week. 
He informs us that law is booming, but bids fair to 
bring him to an untimely end unless business slacks 
soon. We have heard it said that there is no rest 
for the weary nor peace for the wicked. 

There were about fifteen or twenty acres of the 
campus burned over the other day. Some one 
carelessly set the grass on fire, and the wind which 
was blowing very hard at the time, swept it across 
the campus into the grove like a race horse. All 
turned out and subdued it after a while without any 
damage being done. 

Butler's concert at Lemont Hall was a decided 
success, financially and otherwise. There was a 



large audience which showed its appreciation of the 
way the different parts were rendered by frequent and 
hearty applause. While the singing of Mrs. Ada 
Cary Sturgis always finds a response in the heart of 
every lover of music. 

" Lost Apr. 23rd 1883. A pare of Silver Bowed 
Spectacles in A iron case Somewhere on maine St. or 
Lincoln St. the Finder will be Rewarded By leaving 

them at Mr. Mountforts Shooe Shop. Signed, ." 

The above is copied verbatim from a notice we saw 
posted the other day. We give it circulation in the 
interests of humanity, not for any mercenary consid- 
erations. 

Information has been received from Sweetser, '8-1, 
that he cannot rejoin his class. Every one in col- 
lege, and especially' in his class, will regret that 
such is the case. His popularity with the students is 
shown by the fact that he held first position in almost 
everything into which he entered, he being captain 
of his class crew, of the college crew, and class 
president. Our best wishes go with him. 

The members of our base-ball nine speak very 
highly of the courtesy and hospitality with which 
they were received by their Massachusetts brethren. 
For instance, the Amherst Record, a local paper, 
published on the afternoon of our nine's annihilation, 
was considerate enough not to publish an account of 
it in that issue. Such extreme sensibility for the 
feelings of others, even in our hour of affliction, was 
not unnoticed. We hope to meet them all again 
under more favorable circumstances. 

One of the Orient Board has been afflicted for 
the past two weeks with that peculiar unsuppura- 
tive inflammation of the parotid glands. During his 
stay within doors he has received notes of condo- 
lence (written in a feminine hand,) and little tokens 
and mementoes to cheer his lonely hours. It is a 
dead give away. It explains why the sociable and 
skating-rink have had such charms for him the past 
few months. 

Oh, we are not forgotten when we are gone, 
There are hearts that feel like lumps 
In the breasts of those who are left alone, 
When their " feller's " got the mumps. 

Lawn tennis seems to precede many of the sports 
in popularity. New sets are being brought out 
daily and our campus presents a lively appearance 
as we sit by the window and puff the fumes of the 
editorial cigar (which, by the way, we always pur- 
chase at the rate of two for five) to the ceiling of the 
sanctum and, to all intents and purposes, get as 
much exercise as if we were participants in the game, 
but in a far pleasanter manner since it would weary 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



27 



our delicate anatomies, should we even look upon a 
racket. Since the game is becoming so prominent 
with the college at large, it may not be shooting too 
wide of the mark to suggest that a lawn tennis 
tournament on Field Day might be a very proper 
addition to the program. 

Rap, rap, rap. " Come in." The door softly 
opens and the well-known voice of the superanuated 
bookseller is heard: "Excuse me. Have I been in 
this room before ? " The answer is almost invariably 
yes. None but a Freshman or a future George 
Washington ever says no. But such questions rather 
put a premium on lying. 

Hereafter the Commencement Parts are to be 
given out in the following way: At the close of 
the second term, Senior year, a provisional list of 
Commencement appointees shall be made, including 
the ten members of the class whose average rank in 
general scholarship is highest. The men thus ap- 
pointed will be required to deposit their parts with the 
President on or before June 1st. Any other member of 
the class wishing to compete for the Goodwin Com- 
mencement Prize will also be required to deposit their 
parts with the President by the same date. After the 
final Senior examinations, the eight members of the 
class whose average rank for general scholarship is 
highest will be appointed on that ground to deliver 
their parts at Commencement. Of the remaining 
parts that shall have been deposited with the Presi- 
dent, the two best shall be selected for delivery at 
Commencement, and their authors will accordingly 
receive ajapointments. 

A meeting of the mauagers of the Colby, Bow- 
doin, and Bates nines was held in Lewiston, Thurs- 
day, the 12th ult., at which the following arrange- 
ments were made for the games this season : 

Rules. — The rules shall be the rules of the 
National Base-Ball League, as amended by the 
American College Association. 

Umpire. — The home nine shall furnish the um- 
pire, who shall he: Bo wdoin. Barrett Potter ; Colby, 
F. R. Woodcock ; Bates, H. S. Roberts. 

Championship. — The championship shall be de- 
cided by the greatest number of games won. In 
case of a tie, one game shall be played by each of 
the tying clubs. 

Postponed Games. — In case of postponed games 
the time of playing shall be settled by the managers 
of the two clubs interested. 

Ball. — The ball shall be the Mann Regulation 
Ball. 

Scoring. — The scores kept by the two scorers 
must agree. The score to be published by the win- 



ning- club. 



(Signed), H. E. Cole, Bowdoin, 

W. R. Whittle, Colby, 
G. M. Beal, Bates. 



PERSONAL. 

[Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited to send 
personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Brunswick, Me.] 

'42. — Thomas Tash, Esq., has for several years 
been Superintendent of Public Schools in Portland, 
Maine. 

74. — A. G. Bradstreet is in Mexico, where he has 
taken two Government contracts, one for building a 
railroad, the other for furnishing supplies for the 
same. 

78. — Paine is said to be having a very successful 
law practice in Heppner, Oregon. 

'80. — Perkins has returned from St. Louis where 
he has been studying law. 

'81.— A. G. Pettingill, now in the Yale Theolog- 
ical Seminary, is to preach at Frankfort, Maine, this 
summer. 

'82. — McCarthy is studying law with Northend 
& Benjamin, Salem, Mass. 

'82. — Mason is teaching the High School in 
Thomaston. 



INTER-COLLEGIATE NEWS. 



Columbia : 

The Commencement this year comes on June 
11th. 

The invitations and programs of '83's Class 
Day promise to be the most artistic things of the kind 
that have ever been issued for a college entertain- 
ment. One thousand will be issued. They will be 
divided among the Seniors, and can only be ob- 
tained from members of that class. — Spectator. 

Dartmouth : 

Two editors of the Dartmouth have been sus- 
pended till Commencement for writing articles disre- 
spectful to the Faculty. 

The Sophs., who some time ago distinguished 
themselves by giving one of the professors a tin horn 
serenade, breaking his windows, pulling down his 
fence, and smearing the chapel seats with lard, have 
been reinstated in their class. 

Michigan University : 

Professor Hennequin proposes to introduce into 
the Teachers' Course in French the plan of having in- 
dividual students conduct recitations. — Argonaut. 

Field Day will be May 12th. 

A course in Modern Meteorology has been estab- 
lished. The graduates will have positions in the 
United States Signal Corps at Fort Myer. 

The average graduate spends $1,750 during his 
course. 

Princeton : 

Princeton's new telescope is by far the largest 



28 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



belonging to any collegiate institution. Its cost was 
$26,000. 

Hereafter the foot-ball or base-ball player at 
Princeton must file with the register of the college 
his parents' or guardian's consent to his connection 
with the team. No conditional student shall in any 
case play in out-of-town games. 

Syracuse University : 

Certainly Syracuse University bids fair of being 
the "toniest" institution in the land. The Seniors 
wear various styles of hats; the Juniors wear silk 
hats: the Sophomores are to wear white plugs; the 
Freshmen are to wear straws with their colors as a 
band. The Co-eds., well, they wear their bangs 
lower and cut their hair short. — Syracusan. 

The college [like some others] is beset by general 
agents of books " of great value," etc. 

Notes : 

Amherst is without salutatories, valedictories, 
the marking system, and without permission from 
President Seelye to join the Inter-Collegiate Athletic 
Association. — Ex. 

According to the Rockford Female Seminary mag- 
azine the following articles have been found in 
chapel : 1 chew of gum, 16 hairpins, 25 pins, 1 hair 
ribbon, handkerchief, i lead pencils, 2 slate pencils, 
3 erasers, 3 peanuts, J apple, 1 qt. orange peel, 2 
doz assorted buttons, and 2 penknives. — Ex. 

The Wellesley girls talk of starting a paper. The 
question has also been agitated at Smith. The Facul- 
ulties of both colleges are opposed to the measure. 

Mrs. A. T. Stewart's new college, in New York, 
will cost $-1,000,000. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



Of late there has been much discussion among 
our E. C.'s about the exchange column. It has been 
said, and truly, we think, that that part of a paper is 
of interest only to those publications whose names 
appear in italics. At present it is the means by which 
a sort of mutual admiration society is kept up among 
the collegiate wielders of the quill The editor who 
has received favorable mention has a feeling of grat- 
itude towards the one who has so signally favored him 
and in his turn feels that the best he can do is to re- 
turn the compliment. All goes merrily as long as 
this sort of thing continues, but the moment some 
one discovers a fault in another what a howl of in- 
dignation goes up. Not one alone but a dozen fol-. 
low in full cry after their leader. After having ex- 
hausted their sarcasm, they leave the unfortunate 
paper with nothing but its advertisements uncriti- 
cised. 01 course all such business is interesting- 



on!} 7 to those concerned, and by the majority of 
readers is voted a bore, but as the custom of review- 
ing our friends' good qualities and foibles still obtains 
with us, we gird ourselves for the contest and begin 
with — with — yes with the Lasell Leaves. 

There is a sort of piquancy about it that is charm- 
ing. The editorials are teeming with little sarcasms 
and from one we learn that the Seniors, after three 
weeks of anxious deliberation, have decided upon 
class rings. For the benefit of our many readers we 
would say that the stone of these rings is a cat's eye. 
Perhaps this accounts for another department which 
rather puzzled us at first. It is headed, Obituary, 
and has the following motto : 

" The cat was selected, 
And then was dissected." 
We cannot quote further but will only say that to be 
eulogized in such terms would make anyone willing 
to give up his — his — well his breakfast at least. 

The first number of the ALhencem, issued by the 
new board of editors, has made its appearance, and 
seems to us to be far in advance of its pi'edecessors. 
They have decided to do away with the practice of 
having illustrations, owing to the unavoidable delay 
they occasioned. 

The last number of the Bates Student is at hand. 
A large part of the literary matter is furnished by the 
alumni, which seems strange to us who are so little 
favored in that direction. We find in one article the 
following gem which is indeed worthy of preser- 
vation : " Any real or practicable standard of value 
is always the same in kind as that of which it is the 
standard. A yard stick has length." Just look at 
it. The idea expressed in the first sentence to bring 
it down to the cold realities of this life is as follows, 
viz. : A standard yard stick, in order to be a standard 
yard stick, has got to be a standard yard stick. The 
conclusion drawn, however, that a yard has length is 
irresilible. 

The Amateur Athlete is a new enterprise. It is 
the official organ of the National Association of Ama- 
teur Athletes, and contains a great deal of matter 
which will be pleasing to all interested in athletics. 
It is meeting with great favor among the colleges, 
Princeton alone having a subscription list of one 
hundred. We should be glad to give any further 
information desired. 

We have said enough, perchance too much, and so 
will end with the following from the Mercury. No 
doubt many of our readers will wish they were equally 
FORTUNATE. 
I called. At ten I rose 
To bid her sweet good-eve, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



29 



Eleven came and yet — 
Somehow I did not leave. 

The massive old hall clock 
Rung out twelve sullen strokes, 
And yet I lingered still, 
Eegardless of old folks. 

At one, a footstep's sound 
I heard with greatest fear; 
Now, louder still it grew, 
Now, dangerously near. 

Then parlor door was oped, 
A face next peered inside. 
My eyes my fear bespoke, 
Yet summon pluck I tried. 

You say, oh reader kind, 
" The same old tale once more; 
The father — maiden — kicks— 
The lover— and — the door." 

No, no, you greatly err, 
My case unusual was — 
No father came and bade 
Me to the door — because — 

It was her brother big 
That saw me and that elf, 
And approving, grunted out 
" I know how it is myself." 



BOOK NOTICES. 

A Dictionary of Electricity. By Henry Greer. 
Octavo $2.00. Published by New York agent College 
of Electrical Engineering, 122 East 26th Street, New 
York. Professors Edison, Brush, Westpp, and Pope 
thoroughly approve of this work. Prof. Weston says 
of it: "It is exceedingly valuable to all interested in 
electrical science. Leaving out the old glass machine, 
sealing wax, amber experiments, etc., etc., and in- 
serting cuts and descriptions of the recent wonderful 
inventions, makes it exceptionally interesting to 
electricians and telegraphers. Nearly every electri- 
cal inventor and manufacturer in the world will find 
a description of their invention or apparatus in it." 



The third edition of " Students' Songs," compiled 
by William H. Hills, Harvard, class of '80, will be 
ready the last of April. It is a choice collection of 
the latest and most popular college songs. This 
book will comprise the songs of both the first and 
second edition, besides more than twenty pages of 
entirely new music. Published by Moses Kino-, 
Cambridge, Mass. 



FRANK M. STETSON, 



e 



UJ 



^^JH^jf 







to 



SX2 



RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No.l 

SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

"We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 

direct importation, which is made especially for us, water 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLEHf <& GIMEli Manufacturers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



MRS. NtlAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description clone to Order. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




lere they await 
s who were to 

foremost of the 
d," and Yonson 
The pace is 
and neck, anc 
whom you ob- 
"light roadster 
ce a tie. 
he asks, 
le reply, 
or ' Yale's' or 


lIi ! that accounts for it," says the captain. 
lerican bicyclers as a body will realize the 
of the captain's last remark, but the thou 
of new riders which the coming year wil 
nee, should each one of them realize that 
nly true economy in choosing a bicycle is to 
ntent with nothing less than the very bes 
noney will procure. Each should find out 
e can about bicycles before making his 
e, and in order to assist enquirers in their 
h for information, we will, on receipt of a 
ee-eent stamp, send to any address, a copy 
r large illustrated catalogue by return mall 

rHE CUNNINGHAM COMPANY, 

Pioneer Bicycle House of America. 

[Established 1877.] 


ilea away, w 
cing member 
utes later. 
3 and the two 
his " Harvai 
ear in sight 
en are neck 

of the club, 
lis "Shadow 
eclares the rr 
Dther men? " 
ewhere," is t 

4 Harvard's ' 
them ? " 


ome twenty m 
rrival of the ra 
ust thirty rain 
e minutes mor 
g men — Fri,on 
s "Yale," app 
ndous: the m 
es, the captain 
is leaning on 
foreground, c 
f here are the 
h, behind, sotc 
re there any 
iow's' among 



^a 



ilsfi-Pi!iar??i?^ minimis 



BURBANK, DOUGLASS & CO., 



(Successors to True, Douglass & Co.) Importers and Wholesale 
Dealers in 

China, Crockery, i Glass Ware, 



LAMP GOODS, CHANDELIERS AND PLATED WARE. 
242 Middle Street, . . PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PICTURE FRAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

From the cheapest to the very best. Also Pictures, Cabinet 

Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, etc. Also. Agent for 

the celebrated Household Sewing Machine. 

In the Blue Store, Main Street, Second Door from Elm, 
Opposite the Park, Brunswick, Maine. 



All the Students Should Buy 

THEIR 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 
Frank I, Botati' Boot I Shot Ston, 

Cor. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO, 

Portland, Maine. 



JOHN 



H. BRACKETT, 

SPRING STYLES, 



1883, 



Consisting of Suitings, Overcoatings, and Paul Patterns, made in 
latest style and goocf fit guaranteed, at '20 per cent, less than the 
same goods can be bought elsewhere. Also a 

Fine Line of White Shirts, Ties, Braces, Collars, 
Hose, and Under Flannels. 



The Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company, 

Assets, $51,500,000. Surplus, $6,500,000. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1846. 

The New Plan of Cash Value and Non-Forfeitable 
Polict meets the needs of the public. Send for full informa- 
tion to h, u. FAIRBANKS, Gen'l Agent, 

BANGOR, MAINE 

S. WALKER & SON, 

Fresh and Corned Beef, Pork, Mutton, Poultry, 

All for the Lowest Cash Prices. Liberal Discount to Clubs 
and Boarding Houses. 

At the Old Stand near corner Main and Centre Streets, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



S. WALKER, 



WM. H. WALKER. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BtWMi fiolleoe Medical fjfepipliieit 

The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 8th, 1883, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshda L. Chamberlain, LL.D , President ; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H. Gerrish, M.D., 
Anatomy; Charles W. Goddabd, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence ; Henrt 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Bcrt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D , Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles 0. 
Hunt, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing tiill inWnmtion may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to th*> Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, ROOM 
PAPER, PERIODICALS, «ScC. 



SCHOOL OF MINES, COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 

Department of Atchlttctutt 

The recently established Course in Architecture occu- 
pies four years, the first of which is occupied with general 
studies, the architectural work beginning with the second 
year. 

Graduates of colleges an 1 scientific schools can, in gen- 
eral, enter in advanced standing at the beginning of the 
second year. Special students are not received. 

The scientific sttidies, pursued fn connection with the 
Department of Civil Engineering, include Chemistry, Phy- 
sics, and Mechanics, with so much of Mathematics as these 
studies require. 

The Architectural studies include the theory and the 
history of Architecture and of the allied arts, drawing and 
modelling, with the constant practice of original design, 
and so much of specifications and practical construction as 
can conveniently be taught in a school. 

The buildings now constructing, which will be ready 
for occupation in October, provide, besides the necessary 
drawing rooms and lecture rooms, a special architectural 
laboratory for practice and experiment, and a library for 
study and for the accomodation of the large collection of 
drawings, prints and photographs now in process of form- 
ation. 

For a circular of information containing further partic- 
ulars address, REGISTRAR, SCHOOL OF MINES, 

Madison av. and 49th St., New York city. 

TONTINE HOTEL, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



S. B. BREWSTER, 



PROPRIETOR. 



On and after Oct. 15th, 1882. 

Passenger Trains leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.10. 11.25 a.m.. 2.45, 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 
night (Sunday mornings only), 
riocklund. 8.10 a.m., 2.45 p.m. 
Portland. 7.25. 11.30 A.M.. 4.30 p.m.. 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 12.35 night. 
Lewiston. 8.10 a.m., 2.45. 6.33 p.m.. 12.40 night. 
Farminglon. 8.10 a.m. (Mixed), 2.45 P.M. 
Augusta, 8.10 A.M., 2.45, 6.35 P.M.. 12.45 night. 
Skowhegan, Belfast, Dexter, Bangor, and Vanceboro, 

2.45 P.M.. and 12.45 night. 
Waterville, 8.10, 12.45 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 P.M. (Saturdays 
only). 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 1882. 

DIAMONDS, flflt J£W£M*Y, 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 



239 Middle Street, 

J. A. Merrill. 



and Reunion Suppers a specialty. First-Class Laundry 
Work, equal to Troy, done at short notice. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 



156 Exchange Street, Portland. 



Portland, Me. 
A. Keith. 



BEATS THE WORLD. 

Old Judge 

CIGARETTES 
And Smoking Tobacco. 



Endorsed as ABSOLUTELY PUKE and free 
from all foreign or deleterious substances what- 
ever, by 
PETER COLLIER, Chemist of the 

U. S. Dtjivtmsiit @l Agrievltut, 

% Washington, D. C. 
R. ODGEN DOREMUS, M.D., LL.D., 
Professor Chemistry and Toxicology iu the Bellevue Hospi- 
tal Medical College, and Professor of Chemistry and Physics 
in the College ol the City of New York. 
BENJAMIN SILLIMAN, Esq., 

Professor at Yale College, New Haven, Conn. 
R. A. WITTHAUS, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Buffalo ; 
Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology. University of Ver- 
mont; Professor of Physiological Chemistry, University of 
New York. 

And other eminent Chemists in the United States, cop- 
ies of whose certificates we shall be pleased to mail you 
on application. 

GOODWIN Ac CO., 

Foot Grand Street, East River, New York. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A.. O. REED, 

BRU'irsrs'wiois:, iivee. 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

PORTLAND, MAINK. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 



DEALKR IN 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B— Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 Middle Street, - - - - Port/and, Me. 



TIFFANY & CO., Union Square, 
New York City, have made prepar- 
ations for tlie coming season, to of- 
fer original and artistic designs with 
new methods of treatment, for forms 
of Commencement and other invita- 
tions. 

They have also increased their 
facilities for producing articles of 
appropriate design for Prizes, Class 
Cups, Society Badges, etc. 

Drawings, with Estimates, sent 
on application. 

Correspondence invited. 



386 Washington Street, BATH, ME. 

E3T C. 1^£. IFX-iTTlVEIbvdIEaK,. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



iy Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREIiTS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8j and $8j Congress Si., and 2J5 Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 



Thick List. 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

L. Wl LSON & CO., 



W 



Wli'ilwalc :uid Retail Dealers 



TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 



C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

OVER BOARDMAN'S STORE. 

Give Me a Call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SHREVE, * 

CRUMP 
# & LOW, 

432 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




XTENSIVE STOCK 
OF CHOICE GOODS. 



STERLING SILVEEWAEE-Tea, Coffee, and Din- 
ner Sets, Forks and Spoons, etc;, of exclusive pat- 
terns ; Old English Silver ; Candelabra ; Carriage 
Clocks; Watches of all grades— Chronograph, Re- 
peating, and Chatelaine, with Chains, etc., etc. 

SELECTED DIAMONDS; Black, "White, and Fancy 
Color Pearls ; Rubies, Emeralds, Sapphires, Cat's- 
eyes, Precious Stones, generally, of highest quali- 
ties; Fine Gold Jewelry of original designs, etc., 
etc. 

ARTISTIC BRONZES of new models— Elegant Man- 
tel Clocks (keyless) ; English Library, Mantel, and 
Hall Clocks, with 'Westminster Chimes, Cathedral 
Gongs, Mantel Sets, in Marble, Bronze, Polished 
Brass, etc. 

DECORATIVE PORCELAIN in Vases, Plaques, Des- 
sert, Coffee and Ice Cream Sets, etc., from the 
Minton, "Worcester Royal, Crown Derby, Copeland, 
Royal Berlin, Dresden, and other celebrated works, 
etc. 

MARBLE STATUARY. NOVELTIES. 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 



Agents Gorham Mfg. Co. 



ALL KINDS OF 




< ; --.-"^ n u;-5_, r rg^X. Vyyr n a^jjr Q ,-V"; ViV r, v^s, *"-.•.- ,. 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fi- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Work- 
manship, we especially solicit orders for Fine Printing of all 
kinds, 



For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

We also make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges, 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

PEICES LOT77. 
Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Bowdoin College Boys 

"When they visit BATH should call at 

WEBBEB'S DRUG STOBE. 

A Full Line of Cigars, Toilet Articles, &c. 



Smoke Smolsze 

THE NEW CIGAR, 



Price IO Cts. 



Havana Filled. 



DIAMOND CROWN. Price 5 Cts. 

JOHNSTON & HATCH, 

LEWISTON, ME. 

|g~ For sale in Brunswick by Ed. J. Merriman. 

Smoke Smoke 

FIRST-CLASS 

Pianos, Organsj and Melodeo'os, 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK, 

THOMAS H. RSLEY, . . . Brunswick, Me. 

Also INSURANCE written in Best Companies, 
at Lowest Rates. 

FOUND AT LAST!! 

That the place to buy the Very Best 

Groceries and Students' Supplies, 

At the Lowest Possible Price, is at 

H. C. MARTIN'S, opposite College Grounds, 

BRUNSWICK MAINE. 



COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle riding is unsurpassed as a 
method of traveling, whether for speed, 
sport, or renewal of health. The prac- 
ticability of the machine has been 
thoroughly tested, and satisfactorily 
proved, beyond qjrsiion. Thousands 
are in daily use, and the number is 
i\tpidly increasing. The exercise is 
recommended by the medical profession 
as most beneficial to health, bringing 
into exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

Send 3c. stamp for 36-pa^e Illustrated 
Catalogue containing price lists and full 
information. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washington St„ BOSTON, MASS. 




IMPORTING TAILORS 

AND 

GENTS' FURNISHERS. 

Novelties in Imported Hosiery, 
Underwear, Gloves, and Neckwear 
for Mens' Wear. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

Market Square, 

PORTLAND, ME. 



OTP FflTJS HP 6L8YEJ3, 

FLEXIBLE STIFF HATS, 

Laced Gloves for Gents, instead of Button. 
MERRY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 

■HcF. H. WILSON,** 

DISPENSE!* OF 

Pare Drags, Medicines, 4»GhsmicaIs. 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



AUGUSTA HOUSE, 

State Street, Augusta, Maine. 

Moat desirable location in the city. Good Rooms, Good Table, 

Good Attendance. Free Hack to and from Depot 

and Wharf. Patronage Solicited. 

E. & A. C. MANSON, Proprietors. 



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BRHRSWICK,»WFIRB. 






CONTENTS. 



IT" 

a/ 



PAGE. 

Editorial Notes 31 

My Misfortune 33 

Chum's Love Experience . . 34 



PAGE. 

College Items 39 

Personal 42 

Inter- Collegiate News 43 



The Study of History 35 ; Clippings 44 

Why the Medic Wears a Duster (poem) 36 ; Editors' Table 44 

Ball Games 38 



X fflAY S3, 1883. X 







BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 

"LIBE^lKT" LAMPS," 

SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new"Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

IS PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Glass Cards and Monograms 

ENGKAVED IK TEE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOB 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



DEANE BROTHERS &. SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

iy Lowest Prices in the State, 

755 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 
A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, I Fancy Goods. 

Also Eastern Mutual Union Telegraph Office. 
Under Town Clock, - Brnnswick, Me. 



The Only RELIABLE AND STANDARD Brands of 

Cigarettes and Fine Tobaccos. 



Straight Cuts. 
Sweet Caporal. 
St. James, etc. 



Caporal. 
Caporal J- 

Ambassador. 
St. James J, etc. 
Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut Cigarettes. 




offered for sale. 



Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut, Full Dress. 

Sweet Caporal Cokk Mouthpiece. 




Leading Numbers: 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEN CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York. 

Go to W. B. Woodard's 

To buy your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGAES, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

SPECIAL SATES to STVDEWT CLVBS. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

BEST DAIRY IN BRUNSWICK 

THERE ARE TWO PINTS OF THE NICEST MILK IN 
EVERY QUART WHICH ,1 SELL. SPECIAL ATTENTION 
GIVEN TO STODENT CLUBS. 

US' STEWARDS SHOULD DROP ME A POSTAL WITH 
THEIR LOCATION WRITTEN PLAINLY. 

A. P. WOODSIDE, Brunswick, Me. 



"W- IvI. MILLER, 

First -Class Hair Dresser, and Colleg 

OVER AMERICAN EXPRESS OFFICE, 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



<& 




-r^sfcPHG'kLrOT'p'sf - 

' * Miml putts ? ■ 

THE FAVORITE A/OS. 303-404-332-170-351- WITH 

HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




NEW BRUG STOIE. 

ED. J. MERRYMAN, 



Fancy ad Toilet Articles, Ciprsi Tobacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

fpW Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



MAIN STREET, 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



SPRINC AND SUMMER, 1883. 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosier}', Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

©jfstep ant See <&m&m impjftpiuim, 



Main St., under Town Clock. 



"Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Coal ~5Ta,rd. In Topsham, 



WHERE NONE BUT 



The Best of Coal is Kept, 



And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Orders telephoned from Stores of A. T. Campbell 
and.W. B. Woodard promptly attended to. 

Office near the Sheds. 



®rao]»jrti®a>a}& Mem 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating- Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A G. Tenney. 

Terms, ----- $1.50 a Tear in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

«®-Special Rates to Student Clubs..fflj 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, ; 
G-eorgics, and six books of the iEneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations -, Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar ; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books ; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
writteu by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED — FOUR HOURS A "WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences 01 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 




twiti 




Vol. XIII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 23, 1883. 



No. 3. 



BO WD O IN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 
EDITORIAL BOARD. 
Oliver W. Means, '84, Managing Editor. 
Charles E. Sayward, '84, Business Editor. 



Llewellyn Barton, '84. 
"William H. Cothren, '84. 
Rodney I. Thompson, '84. 
Sherman W. Walker, '84. 



John A. Waterman, Jr. ,'84. 
Oliver R. Cook, '85. 
Nehemiah B. Ford, '85. 
John A. Peters, '85. 



Terms— $2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to 
contribute articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by the writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



Considerable work is necessary in order 
to make sure of a good program on Field 
Day. Not the least important thing is to se- 
cure an interesting succession of contests. 
Nothing can be more trying than to be 
obliged to wait a long time while needful 
preparations are being made. These delays 
a little foresight would in most cases obviate. 
It is hoped that the committee will not go on 
the supposition that no improvement can be 
made over former years. 

If some of the less pleasing contests could 
be dropped out and some now ones added to 
the list, a very agreeable change would be 
effected. It would not be unwise for the 
committee of arrangements to confer with the 
leading athletes, and to be guided in a large 



measure by their advice. A little study of 
sports as conducted in other colleges would 
doubtless suggest some novel and more en- 
tertaining features. 

Another duty of the committee, one that 
should not, however, belong to them, is the 
thankless task of urging men to enter as con- 
testants. No matter how good a program is 
adopted, it will largely fail of interest if but 
two or possibly three take part. One point 
on which too much stress cannot be laid, is 
that Field Day be preceded by long and faith- 
ful training. If the records of that day are 
to be more than mediocre, careful training 
should at once be undertaken. Quite com- 
monly one can see, during the week preced- 
ing Field Day, a few students playfully prac- 
ticing jumping and the like. Earnest, 
determined work is the first requisite for 
success. A comparison of the records made 
in other colleges of the State would show 
that we are far from taking the lead in gen- 
eral athletics. This is perhaps due to the 
fact that rowing takes so prominent a place 
among us, while it is elsewhere unknown. 
We should not, however, let this considera- 
tion deter us from placing Bowdoin at the 
head of the list in regard to minor college 
sports, as that place is already hers by right 
in all other respects. 



Competition is a great incentive. This is 
well illustrated in all sports where strength 
and skill are brought into play. Ball games, 
bringing together rival nines, are great 
sources of improvement in playing. Why 
could not this principle be carried a little 
farther, and be made to include literary con- 



32 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



tests ? What would cause more general in- 
terest than to have about Commencement 
time, or a little earlier if necessary, an exhi- 
bition of prize speaking, at which an equal 
number of students from the three colleges 
should participate? Or it might be better to 
have the parts original, and to make the com- 
position and delivery of the parts decide the 
question of superiority. That such an oc- 
casion would necessitate previous hard study, 
cannot be denied. The audience at such a 
time would undoubtedly be large and as in- 
terested in the result as the average audience 
at a ball game. At our regular exhibitions 
there is always a large gathering, and it might 
be questioned if a hall could be secured suf- 
ficiently large to accommodate all who would 
desire to attend an inter-collegiate literary 
contest. 



A good deal of interest has centered upon 
the prolonged inactivity in boating matters, 
and the shape in which they will be left this 
year can now be determined. All thought 
of sending a crew to Lake George was long 
since abandoned; and, for a time, the class 
races even were undecided. There are now 
three crews at work, and a race of the usual 
interest may be expected. The Juniors have 
a crew composed of two old men and of two 
that have as yet had no experience in rowing. 
This crew was procured so late that no high 
anticipations are centered upon it, but yet it 
contains solid muscle and, with faithful train- 
ing in the short time that remains, will un- 
doubtedly do itself full justice. The Juniors, 
while possessing an enviable crew, have hith- 
erto been remarkably unfortunate, and it is 
hoped that this year will not be an additional 
disappointment. 

The Sophomore crew has been in training 
a long time and was the first to go on the 
river, where it held undisputed sway for some 
time. The men are as solid a set of fellows 
as are now on the river, and will undoubtedly 



make it difficult for any to go ahead of them. 
They have never been in a race, but will not 
be inferior in this respect to the others. The 
least that can be said is that their chance of 
obtaining the cup is perhaps the best. The 
Freshmen are to be congratulated on putting 
on a crew at last. It was thought, a short time 
since, that they would take no part in college 
sports. Their crew has gone to work with a 
great deal of vigor and evidently means to 
make a good fight. We understand that they 
intend to buy the Seniors' boat, and that the 
money is already partially subscribed. This 
is an excellent plan, and one that we have 
long favored. By so doing there would be a 
small surplus in the treasury with which the 
Boating Association could make some needed 
repairs. 

After seeing all the crews pull, it is evi- 
dent that the Sophomores stand the best 
chance of winning the race, and that the 
closest fight will be between the Juniors and 
Freshmen for second place. It is not ex- 
pected that remarkable time will be made this 
year, but that will not prevent as great an 
interest as ever from depending upon the final 
issue. Attention should be paid to gaining a 
good form in rowing and every opportunity 
for practice should be improved. There is 
no reason to feel at all discouraged in regard 
to boating, and there is great reason why all 
interested in maintaining the sport should do 
what they can to make the approaching race 
a success. 



Ivy Day is now near at hand, and all 
typical Juniors are preparing to launch out in 
some surprising way and astonish their friends. 
Of course a great many will have friends, to 
whom they will show the pleasant side of col- 
lege life. How differently will the same thing 
be regarded by the various classes ! The 
Senior will say that it is far inferior to what 
his class had last year. The Sophomore will 
try to imagine what important place he will 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



33 



fill next year. The Freshman will look on in 
simple wonder and try to make sure of his 
own identity in the midst of so much pleasure- 
While the Junior will be for a time oblivious 
to everything outside of the whirlpool of en- 
joyment in which he then is, and will be 
rudely awakened from his "Dream of Fair 
Women," by the ruthless knock of the class 
assessor, who will leave him penniless and in 
debt. 



else. Their going is but a prelude to our 
own vacation. 



It is with deep regret that we are obliged 
to say that President Chamberlain is not im- 
proving so rapidly as had been hoped. The 
first operation was found to be insufficient, 
and a second one was performed, while a 
third even is now anticipated. The second 
was similar in character to the first, and was 
exceedingly painful. President Chamberlain 
has been a great sufferer, and it is earnestly 
hoped that the result of these succeeding 
operations will be a complete recovery. It 
is now near the middle of the term, and even 
if he should recover very soon, some weeks 
of rest would be necessary to fit him for par- 
ticipation in active college work. It is likely 
that he will be unable to fill his place this 
term, and the Seniors will be compelled to 
miss the advantage they would otherwise de- 
rive from his instruction. The sympathy of 
the college and most earnest wishes for bis 
speedy recovery are with him. 



The time for the departure of the Medics 
is now rapidly approaching. The term of 
their being here has passed, so far, without 
any outbreak to give variety to the hum- 
drum of life. It is best that it should be so, 
and that the unpleasant feelings of last year 
should remain things of the past. In former 
years, they have played ball upon the delta 
a great deal, but this year their attention has 
been so closely confined to their — studies, 
that they have had opportunity for nothing 



As Ivy Dny comes the week in which the 
next Orient is due, that issue will be put off 
until the following week, in order that an ac- 
count of the various sports, and of the Ivy 
exercises may be given. This will not cause 
our subscribers to lose anything, as the same 
number of issues will come out during the 
term as otherwise, and a gain will be made 
in receiving the reports of Ivy week while 
fresh, instead of being obliged to wait three 
weeks. 



MY MISFORTUNE. 



There is an old adage which says that 
" some men are born great, some become 
great, and others have greatness thrust upon 
them." This trite old saying is lamentably 
lacking in one particular. It never mentions 
those who have just missed becoming great. 
I unfortunately belong to this class, not 
through any fault of my own, but on account 
of a combination of circumstances, as the 
following lines will show : 

A few days since, while seated at my desk, 
meditating upon the utter depravity of affairs 
in general, and a few things in particular, I 
heard a knock at my door. It was no ordinary 
knock, but was of a low, persuasive kind 
which made my heart go out to it at once and 
caused me to bid the invisible visitor " come 
in," thinking that at least the dirty face of a 
yagger would be thrust into the room, and 
that I should hear the hackneyed phrase, 
" Wantanythingdone ? " How greatly was I 
mistaken ! Instead of the expected visitor, a 
voung man of pleasing appearance entered, 
shook my hand warmly, divested himself of 
his wraps, and made himself completely at 
home in less time than it takes to describe it. 
All the while he had been firing a stream of 
eloquence at me which nearly took my breath 



34 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



away, and only allowed me to speak in spas- 
modic gasps. Our conversation was nearly as 
follows. For fear of shocking his modesty I 
leave his name a blank. He began with : 

" Good afternoon, Mr. K. My name is 

H — N — , from , . I am the advance 

agent of , & Co., the noted publishers, 

of Hartford, Conn. You have been recom- 
mended to me as a man of literary tastes, 
and I would like to get your opinion on this 
book" (producing a gilt-edged, morocco- 
covered prospectus). 

" But ," said I. 

" I will only detain you a minute," he 
broke in. " You see this is a large book, 
printed on fine tinted paper, elegantly bound, 
nine hundred pages, suited alike for the 
lawyer, doctor, merchant, and farmer. It 
sells as readily in the remote hamlet as in the 
crowded city. Let me read you a few cards 
from mj agents ! " 

" But ," said I. 

" Yes, I know," he went on, " you don't 
like the idea of being an agent, but hundreds 
of the best young men in our institutions of 
learning are to adopt this easy, fashionable, and 
lucrative business this summer. The price of 
this work varies from $3. 50 to #6.00 ; on the 
lowest priced work you get a profit of $2.00. 
Here are some cards : 

Calais, Me., April 6, 1883. 

Dear Sir: Have sold 100 copies of . this 

week. Profit, $225; expenses, $3.50. 

Yours, etc., 

Norway, Me., March 20, 1883. 

Dear Sir : Have sold 50 copies of the 

past week. Cleared $99.49. I want more territory. 
Yours, etc., " 

And thus he went on, until finally he 
hauled out a little red morocco book, gave me 
a long pencil, " well sharpened," and said : 
" If you will consent to canvass for me, just 
put your name down here, and I will furnish 
you with an outfit, give you what territory 



you want, pay your expenses, and guarantee 
you three dollars per day for " 

" But," said I, " I must speak. I have a 
severe attack of the mumps coming on, and it 
would be very disastrous to your business if 
you should chance to catch them from me. 
I should be- " 

But he had fled, and I was left alone. 
Alas ! it is ever thus. Another opportunely 
to obtain fame and fortune had eluded my 
grasp. k. K. 



CHUM'S LOVE EXPERIENCE. 

A few days ago, while looking over an 
old trunk, I came across an old skating rink 



order. What memories it called 



up 



! It 



was in my Junior year that our boys used to 
frequently visit the roller-skating rink in the 
city of B , some ten miles from the col- 
lege. I had often made one of a party to go 
to the rink, but the night on which I got this 
particular order was out of the common run. 
It was on this night that my honored chum's 
first love-experience began. He was a Sen- 
ior, a fine looking fellow, and prided himself 
that no girl could long resist his charms. 

On the night in question, after a cold 
ride, we arrived at the rink, having passed 
through no startling adventures, and little 
dreaming of the events which were destined 
to follow this night's trip. As soon as chum 
got his skates adjusted, he began to look 
around the hall in search of the first female 
whom he should captivate. He soon noticed 
a very pretty girl, sitting in one corner of 
the hall, who did not seem to have many ad- 
mirers, and he determined to embrace the 
first opportunity to request a skate with her. 

In a short time he saw that she was alone ; 
and, approaching her with one of his prettiest 
bows, he made known to her his desire to 
skate with her. Her reply was something of 
a surprise to him : — " No, I thank you, I 
don't care to skate," Chum was far from 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



35 



being a bashful man and he was not in the 
least discouraged. His determination to 
skate with her was only strengthened by her 
refusal. He soon found one of the college 
boys who was acquainted with the lady, and 
secured an introduction. Apparently it was 
a complete success. He skated with her 
several times, and on the way home was un- 
usually silent and thoughtful for him. That 
night, after we retired, every few minutes 
I could hear him mutter to himself: "A 
deuced fine girl! Mighty pretty! Gad! I'll 
have to follow it up and see what will come 
of it," and other remarks of a like nature. I 
had roomed with Frank three years and I 
imagined that I knew him pretty well ; so I 
said nothing, but waited and watched for de- 
velopments. 

For the next few days, chum was entirely 
engrossed in thinking of his new mash, and 
in forming plans for strengthening the ac- 
quaintanceship. He neglected both prepara- 
tion for and attendance at recitations. He 
even lost his usual good appetite, an occur- 
rence the like of which had never occurred 
in his previous experience. 

Time passed on. Saturday after Satur- 
day had chum passed the evening in B , 

and always, on his return, he was more en- 
thusiastic than ever before in his praises of 

the beautiful Miss M , who. was raising 

such havoc with his affections. In short, 
Frank was desperately in love. 

Near the end of the winter term there 

was to be a grand ball in B ; and chum 

had confided to me his intention to know his 
fate before he returned therefrom. His prep- 
arations for the event were of the most elab- 
orate nature. He fairlj' outshone the dandy 
of the college. The night of the ball finally 
came, and chum, never despondent, started 
off as hopeful as though he already knew the 
fair one's reply. 

The next morning, as I was about to start 
for breakfast, chum rushed into the roo m . 



and as soon as he entered, I saw that some- 
thing was wrong. He sat down at his desk 
without saying a word, and I waited for him 
to speak. Finally he burst out, " It's all up, 
Ned." After a few moments I ventured to 
ask, " What's the trouble, Frank ? " " Oh ! 
nothing," he replied. " She said she had 
been engaged two years to a fellow who is 
now at sea as first-mate of a vessel. They 
are to be married when he returns. That's 
all." 

That was the end of chum's first love ex- 
perience. We have now been practicing law 
together three years, and, as far as I know, 
Frank has had no experience of the tender 
passion since we were in college. 



THE STUDY OF HISTORY. 

The importance of the study of history 
can hardly be overestimated. Excepting cer- 
tain scientific ones there is scarcely a study 
which calls for so much care in its perusal as 
does that of history. Read and stored in the 
mind for future use, history becomes at once 
one of the most pleasant, and at the same 
time, one of the most profitable of studies ; 
and, unless so read, it fails to achieve its 
most important results, leaving the reader in 
possession of a few facts, together with a 
vague, transitory idea of what has transpired, 
both of which will be as permanent as some 
pleasant story that has tickled the fancy of 
some passing hour. Men of superior educa- 
tional advantages too often display remarka- 
ble ignorance upon historical subjects, par- 
ticularly upon those relating to their own 
nation. It can be asserted without fear of 
contradiction, that a large per cent, of men, 
upon graduation from college, know less 
about the history of their own land, than 
they do of the histoiy of Greece and Rome, 
for example, while their knowledge of the 
history of these nations is by no means ex- 
tensive. Unfortunately, the student is left 



36 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



to himself to seek the history of his own 
country, while required to study the history 
of another ; hence the reason for this igno- 
rance. Nor is the student the only one at fault. 
Men who are blinded by political prejudices 
too often read the histories of great battles, 
great political revolutions, famous periods of 
political power, -with a view of maintaining 
their own partisan grounds, rather than of 
reading that history for its real worth. How 
many admirers of Napoleon there are who, 
when reading an impartial history of his life, 
fail to notice a single fault, but are quick to 
recognize every virtue ; while others, in read- 
ing the same book, fail to see scarcely a virtue, 
but are quick to magnify every fault. 
Or, how many will continually praise Presi- 
dent Lincoln for every official act of his, not 
admitting even, that he was capable of a fault; 
while others deriving their information from 
the same source, are slow to acknowledge a sin- 
gle good act of his. This is, indeed, a most 
shameful prejudice, and such a study of his- 
tory is unworthy of a man and a disgrace to 
the study. Rather is it to be studied for the 
lessons it teaches to individuals and to na- 
tions, for the pleasures it affords the mind 
in reading and for the delights it brings in 
reflection. Accepting the adage that " his- 
tory repeats itself," it is of the utmost im- 
portance that the administrators of govern- 
ment make a careful study of history, 
learning therefrom the dangers that beset 
and the prosperities that attended the people 
of other days, and thus become more compe- 
tent to discharge the duties which may de- 
volve upon them. 

In short, look upon history as you will, 
it is one of the greatest of studies ; it is the 
most agreeable, and, above all, the safest 
study, for it is man's only guide. . 



Prof. Chapman delivered the Commencement ser- 
mon before the graduating class of Gould's Academy, 
at Bethel, Me., the 13th inst. 



WHY THE MEDIC WEARS A DUSTER. 

Last week, a festive Medic, 

That he might be in style, 
Invested in some clothing, 

Collars, shoes, and "tile." 

Some other things he wanted, 

But these he must forego 
On account of Brunswick price — 

His purse was rather low. 

The same desire seized him, 

Like others whom I know, 
He wished — with flattened pocket-book — 

To make a grand, big show. 

" Cut out" by classic students — 

If he would make a mash, 
He must appear to Brunswick girls 

As well supplied with cash. 

Real worth is not considered here ; 

But students must be dashing — 
Dressed a la mode, supplied with cash — 

If attempts are made at mashing. 

This Medic's cotton " umberil " 
Was getting somewhat faded ; 

His cowhide boots, and ulster, too, 
Were also somewhat " shaded." 

So when he had dissected 

( And robbins then had come ) , 

He gathered up what bones he had 
And sold them to his chum. 

Then, with the proceeds of this sale, 

To which he added more 
From what he earned by peddling smelts 

Last year, from door to door, 

He started for a tailor's shop, 

Intending to be measured 
For a suit to take the place 

Of that he so much treasured. 

He found the shop— inquired the price ; 

Was told : " For forty dollars, 
We'll make a suit and then throw in 

A box of paper collars." 

The Medic's voice stuck in his throat, 

And not a word spoke he, 
For all the dollars he possessed 

Scarce numbered twenty-three. 

He felt his pipe-stem legs give way; 
He fell upon the floor — 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



37 



Recovering, he found himself 
Outside the tailor's store. 

Thinks he, "I'll go elsewhere, perhaps 

For less than half the price 
I can obtain a brand new suit, 

Both stylish, tine, and nice." 

Alas for his credulity — 

He found the price the same, 
Or nearly so, at all the shops, 

So finally he came 

To this most trite conclusion : 

That he, perhaps might find, 
A suit all made and ready, 

More suited to his mind. 

He visited a clothing store — 

Examined many suits, 
And priced their ties and collars, 

Stove-pipe hats, and boots. 

But all the stylish suits he thought 
Were quite beyond his purse ; 

He left the store, burst into tears, 
And then began to curse 

The Brunswick tradesmen, each and all. 

His thoughts were grave and sad, 
For much he loved a Brunswick maid, 

And this quite drove him mad, 

Because a student, finely dressed, 

In nice and stylish clothes, 
Had cut him out. His girl was lost. 

" I cannot bear such woes." 

He uttered this with bated breath ; 

His face was pale but placid, — 
Thinks he, "I'll go into a druggist's shop 

And buy some prussic acid, 

"For Brunswick prices have indeed 

Forced me to suicide, 
As I have lost on that account 
My dear intended bride. 

"Ah! here's the shop, I'll go within ; 

I'll make my purchase here." 
But see, he stops and looks around ! 

His face is blanched with fear. 

" But should I die in Brunswick town, 
Where shall the cash be found 

To buy my coffin and my shroud 
To put me in the ground." 



At length he has a bright idea ; 

His eyes regain their lustre ; 
He hastens to a clothing store 

And buys a stylish duster. 

Now thinks he : " When I go out 

This duster will conceal 
These old worn clothes ; for it will reach 

Almost to my heel." 

He has some money left beside, 

And buys a new tall hat, 
Cuffs and collars, cane and shoes, 

Likewise a new cravat. 

He takes them to his boarding-place, 

And after tea, at night, 
He puts them on and views himself 

With infinite delight. 

With cane in hand and dude-like air 

He goes upon the street, 
And by some lucky accident 

His girl he chanced to meet. 

She tells him that " she hardly knew 

That he could look so nice." 
He bends his head, and her, indeed, 

He kisses in a trice. 

He tells her that he " loves her, 
And thinks it would be prudent 

If she returns his love at all, 
To cut that college student." 

All this she promises to do. 

His duster sealed his fate ; 
For they are to be married 

When he shall graduate. 

For though he courted her before, 
He then did much disgust her ; 

But she was mashed when him she saw 
Enveloped in that duster. 

So when you see a Medic bold, 

With a great long duster on, 
That duster's mashed a Brunswick girl 

As sure as you are born. 

Finis. 



Quotation from Prof. C.'s sermon the other night : 
"Even in the halls of legislation, where man seems 
to think he escapes the recognizance of heaven, he 
cannot escape his religious responsibility." It is 
getting so that a term in a legislature will blast the 
reputation of any man. 



38 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BALL GAMES. 

Boivdoin vs. Bates. 
The game between the Bowdoins and the 
Bates on Saturday, May 12th, was a great 
source of gratification to us all. It was by 
far the best game played here for a long time. 
As it was the first game of the series ar- 
ranged with Bowdoin and Bates, it was looked 
forward to with keen interest. A large 
crowd was in attendance, and the fine play- 
ing on both sides called forth frequent ap- 
plause. For some time no runs were made, 
and each nine appeared to be upon its metal, 
but our nine at last got the better of the 
Bates pitcher, and then ran up a number of 
scores. The following is the official score : 
BOWDOIN'S. 

A.B. R. IB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Winter, lb 5 I 1 1 13 1 

Kuapp, c 5 7 

Torrey, 2b 5 10 3 3 2 

Wright, p 3 1 3 10 

Oook, r.f. 4 2 5 

Stetson, 3b 5 4 

Waterman, s.s 4 2 3 3 4 

Collins, e. f. ...3 3 2 2 10 

Barton, 1. f. 4 2 2 2 

Totals 38 10 10 13 27 21 3 

BATES. 

A.B. E. IB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Bartlett, 3b 4 4 2 2 

Nickerson, 2b 4 114 2 1 

Holden.s.s 4 2 

Sandford, o 4 0.0 5 0.0 

Whitmarsh, p...., 3' 110 4 

Atwood, lb 3 9 

Cowell, o. f. 3 10 1 

Flanders, 1. f. 3 10 

Washburn, r. f. 3 10 

Totals 31 2 2 24 11 4 

Innings 1 23456789 

Bowdoin 2 14 3 —10 

Bates 0—0 

Two-base hits — Cook. Three-base hits — Cook. First 
base on called balls — Bowdoin, 2; Bates, 1. First base 
on errors — Bowdoin, 2; Bates, 2. Struck out — Bow- 
doin, 0; Bates, 2. Balls called— On Wright, 44; on 
Whitmarsh, 78. Strikes called— off Wright, 6; off Whit- 
marsh, 11. Passed balls — Knapp, 0; Sandford, .2. Left 
on bases — Bowdoin, 6; Bates, 5. Time of game — 1 hour 
30 minutes. Umpire — Mr. Potter of Brunswick. 

Bowdoin vs. Colby. 
The first game of the series with Colby 
was played in Brunswick, Saturday, May 19. 



As it was thought that the two nines were 
well matched as to strength, and hence that 
the game would be very interesting, many 
assembled to witness a victory for Bowdoin, 
if possible. About ninety interested in the 
Colbys came from Waterville. Unavoidably, 
the game was not called until nearly 12 M. 
Each side was very sure of a victory, but as 
victory and defeat were the only things to 
choose between, the one must take what the 
other happened to leave. Of course, we 
would rather have had the victory, but did 
not wish to show any disrespect to the feel- 
ings of the visitors, hence we gave them good 
treatment— perhaps too good for our own in- 
terests, i. e., we let them have the game. 
However, we shall visit Colby on Wednes- 
day, May 23, and shall try to be entertained 
and pleased at the expense of the hosts, in 
just the same way as they were here. 

To say that the game was entirely satis- 
factory, would not be stating it as many of 
those who witnessed it would like to hear. 
The errors on both sides were more than there 
was any necessity for. The Bowdoins' errors 
were costly, and but for one or two of them 
the game would have been ours. But for all 
this, our boys did good work, and are to be 
complimented on proving to the visitors so 
conclusively that they must work if they de- 
sire the championship. 

The main points of difference between 
the nines in this game were that the Bow- 
doins did the heavier batting and the Colbys 
the better fielding. Below is the score : 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. R. IB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Winter, lb 5 3 2 3 13 1 

Knapp, c 5 10 4 4 1 

Torrey, 2b 5 12 3 4 3 2 

Wright, p 5 2 3 3 1 11 1 

Cook, r.f. 5 4 4 

Stetson, 3b 5 13 3 

Waterman, s.s 4 2 1 1 

Collins, c. f. 4 10 

Barton, l.f. 4 10 1 

Totals 42 7 11 13 27 22 10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



39 



A.B. K. ]B. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Doe.c 5 112 6 10 

Putnam, c. f. 5 2 2 2 3 2 

Boyd, 3b 5 2 1110 

Mathews, 2b 5 12 2 2 5 

Nowell, 1. f. 5 10 3 

Tilton, lb 4 118 

Barton, p 4 1110 6 

Merrill, s. s 4 112 2 

Emerson, r. f. 4 112 1 



Totals 41 



10 It 27 15 7 



.123456789 
.10 2 10 2 1—7 
.20103001 1—8 



Innings 

Bowdoin 

Colby 

Two-base hits— Winter, Torrey, Doe. First base on 
called balls — Bowdoin, 0; Colby, 0. First base on er- 
rors— Bowdoin, 4 ; Colby, 6. Wild pitch— Wright, 1. 
Struck out — Bowdoin, 4; Colby, 6. Balls called — on 
Wright, 61; on Barton, 37. Strikes called— off Wright, 
12; off Barton, 11. Passed balls — Knapp, 5; Doe, 3. 
Earned runs — Bowdoin, 2; Colby, 0. Left on bases — 
Bowdoin, 8 ; Colby, 6. Time — 1 h. 40 m. Umpire — 
Barrett Potter, Brunswick. 

The second game of the inter-collegiate 

series of Maine, was played at Waterville, 

May 16th, between the Bates and Colbj^. 

The following is the score by innings : 

Innings 1 23456789 

Bates 0020010 6—9 

Colby 2 3 2 4 5 6 5—27 

The fourth game was played between 

the same clubs at Lewiston, May 19, with the 

following result : 

Innings 1 23456789 

Colby ...3 2 1 2 2 4 —14 

Bates 2 3 0—5 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



40, 30, 30, 15. 

" Mascot" was not well patronized. 

Didn't the boys take the Bates into earap ? 

The Ivy Day invitations are little beauties. 

N. Appleton has the best lawn tennis court. 

Did you lose any money on the first game ? 

Tutor Hawes preached at Bath the 13th inst. 

Only one more week for rhetoricals this term. 

We had a pantomime choir last Sunday morning. 

Why don't the choir give us some voluntaries 
Sunday p.m.? 

The Faculty were very obliging about arrano-ino- 
the lessons so that the boys could witness the Colby- 
Bowdoin game last Saturday. 



Applause is said to be out of order in the French 
recitation. 

Didn't they rather rush things at services last Sun- 
day a.m. ? 

The "Count" and "Duke" still live and can 
play tlie dude to perfection. 

The Village Improvement Association is making 
great improvements on the mall. 

Most of the nines are not meeting with much bet- 
ter luck with the Amhersts than we did. 

Any one wishing information as to base-ball will 
do well to give the assistant librarian a call. 

The Orono nine have decided they cannot play 
the game of ball arranged with the Bowdoins. 

The college band meets two or three times a 
week for rehearsal, with J. Torrey, '84, as leader. 

Prof Robinson gave the Juniors a lecture on Min- 
eralogy, illustrated with a calcium light, Friday even- 
ing, 18th inst. 

Contestants for the Field Day prizes are requested 
to hand in their names to the directors at least a week 
before June 7th. 

We do not like to see the delta made into a town 
common. At present the college boys can scarcely 
get it to practice on. 

C. E. Sayward has been elected President of the 
Junior class in place of Sweetser who has been 
obliged to leave college. 

It was a "big head" which suggested that our 
campus is poetical because it is all-over Burns. P. 
S. — We are not responsible. 

Prof. Avery read a paper before the American 
Oriental Society of Boston, week before last, that 
was very highly complimented. 

The second practice game of seven innings, be- 
tween the Bowdoins and Denisons, resulted in a score 
of 17 to 4 in favor of the Bowdoins. 

Well done, '84 ! Better late than never. Now 
brace up, and you can come out as well as the Uni- 
versity crew did last summer, if nothing more. 

Don't bet, boys. Base-ball is mighty uncertain 
business any way. The unexpected is always hap- 
pening, and what you are sure of never takes place. 

A good many of the boys are in training, and the 
indications are now that the number of contestants 
on Field Day will be large, and the exercises inter- 
esting. 

Why can't the campus walks be cemented? If 
not all at one time, a few each year. It would im- 
prove their looks and they would be more service- 
able and durable. 



40 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Has anybody said anything lately about the new 
gymnasium? The present indications are that "the 
summer will soon be past, the harvest ended," and 
we shall have no " gym." 

The first game between the Bowdoin and the 
Denison nine resulted in a score of 29 to 2, in six 
innings. The boys got too near tuckered out to 
strike in on the last three innings. 

The game that was to be played with Bates to- 
day has been unavoidably postponed till Memorial 
Day. On that date the nine will play both Bates and 
Colby, making the round trip by a special train. 

Come, boys, now the evenings are growing 
warmer, why can't we all get together and have 
some old-fashioned, out-of-door sings? If some- 
body would only start it we would all join in. 

About forly or fifty students accompanied their 
nine down from Bates two weeks ago. They seemed 
to enjoy everything except the game. Come again, 
boys ; you will probably have better luck next time. 

A swimming match and tub race have been pro- 
posed to take place just before or after the boat race, 
on Ivy Day. We hope such an arrangement may be 
made and carried out. The more good things the 
better. 

We wish some one could find a theme not quite so 
hackneyed and a little more inspiring than the poor, 
persecuted "Medic" to display his budding, poetic 
genius. Enough is as good as a feast. Too much is 
often nauseating 

Don't be discouraged, Johnny, if your siders and 
moustache don't grow very fast. Remember a 
celebrated philosopher has said: "It is often the 
case that on the soil that a moustache will do the 
best nothing else will." 

The Sophomore nine played with the Bath nine 
at Harding's Park, last Wednesday. At the end of 
the eighth inning the score stood 7 to 4, in favor of 
the Sophomore nine ; but in the last inning a succes- 
sion of costly errors gave the Bath nine the game, 
by a score of 8 to 7. A return game will be played 
on the delta, soon. 

If there is to be no singing at prayers, at any 
time, it seems to us that some one should inform the 
chaplain and not have such an unpleasant experience 
as we had last Sunday. If there is no one to look 
out for such things let some one be appointed. At 
the present time there is a decided lack of interest in 
singing. It ought not to be. It is one of the most 
pleasing parts of the morning devotions and should 
not be allowed to die out. 



Can't we have a new college cheer? Colby, not 
contented with taking away our base-ball prestige (if 
we ever had any) has appropriated our cheer. If any 
aspirant, in that line, wishes to make himself im- 
mortal by inventing a new one we would be most 
happy to publish it. . 

A second nine should be practicing. We expect 
to play ball after this season, and men should be in 
training to take the place of those that the first nine 
lose this year. By such management we could have 
an experienced niue every year. Will the base-ball 
managers look after it? 

Cole, '83, has had the last four volumes of the 
Orient bound in a substantial form, making a very 
pretty book. Why can't all the files be bound in the 
same manner? They would make three or four 
good volumes, and be in a much safer condition to 
keep than now. The cost would not exceed five 
dollars. 

Last week, Davis, '85, Longren and Phinney, '84, 
Pettingill and Kendall, '83, were the Wednesday 
afternoon speakers. This week, Linscott, Stetson, 
and Woodbury, '83, Lunt, Hall, and Harding, '85, 
speak ; and next week, Brown and Bradley, '84, 
Reed and Goodwin, '83, Kendall, Whittier, and 
Thomas, '85. 

Mr. G., who had been appointed to prepare a 
part to speak at rhetoricals, approaching the Prof, in 
Rhetoric, said, "I shall be unable to speak on the 
day appointed as I am obliged to be away with the 
ball nine." " Very well," replied the imperturbable 
Prof., "as it is the last chance you will have you 
may prepare your part and speak it before me." 

Three men drove on to the campus the other 
night inquiring for Cook. One had betted five dol- 
lars that Cook would weigh over one hundred and 
sixty pounds, and the other two had accepted the bet. 
The first won. He said judging from the way that 
Cook struck in the Bates and Bowdoin game, he 
would have betted with any one that he weighed any- 
where from two hundred to half a ton. 

There should be more care taken about setting 
fires on the campus. The other day a fire, thought- 
lessly kindled, killed nearly one hundred feet of 
hedge. It is discouraging as well as impossible for 
the janitor to keep the grounds in any shape, when 
the result of a single wanton or thoughtless act is 
the destruction of what it has taken years to produce. 
If the students would be more careful in relation to 
such things we are assured that the college authori- 
ties would take more pains and pride in beautifying 
the grounds. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



41 



The last Sophomore themes were on the following 
subjects: "The Theatre in the Time of Shakes- 
peare": " Is our Country in Danger from Immigra- 
tion"? "What Good Conies from War"? "Inter- 
collegiate Athletic Contests, — their advantages and 
disadvantages." 

The following -officers for Field Day have been 
elected by the Athletic Association : R. I. Thomp- 
son, '84, Pres. ; J. A. Peters, '85, Vice Pres. ; 
E. Thomas, '85, Sec. and Treas. ; L. Barton, S. R. 
Child, '84, W. M. Eames, '85, Directors; C. E. Say- 
ward, '84, Master of Ceremonies. 

And now a man has been found who is simple 
enough to wonder why the Sunday evening prayer- 
meeting at the vestry has more students than when 
at the church. Why, bless your heart, man, there is 
only one exit at the vestry while there are four at 
the church. At the latter place you stand three 
chances out of four of her going off with some other 
fellow. But at the vestry it is Hobson's choice. 
See? 

The list of exercises for Field Day are : Mile run ; 
standing high jump; running high jump; kicking 
foot-ball ; running broad jump ; hop, skip, and jump ; 
220-yards dash ; throwing base-ball ; standing broad 
jump; half-mile run; putting 'shot; hurdle race; 
three-legged race ; 100-yards dash backwards ; bicy- 
cle race; sack race; tug of war, each team limited 
to ten hundred pounds ; boxing and wrestling; con- 
solation race. 

And so the Colby man tried to be funny when he 
asked Wright to call in his men when some yaggers 
got into his field. Supposing Wright had said that 
he thought they might have been that funny man's 
friends, who stood in a group just over the line, that 
had stepped forward to talk with him. But you need 
not suppose any such thing. Wright is too much of 
a gentleman to notice such an insult, as he doubtless 
thought the fellow did as well as he knew. 

The edict has gone forth that there shall be no 
more lawn-tennis courts on the campus in front of the 
halls. We are not surprised that playing directly in 
front of the halls is prohibited. But it seems that 
there are places on the campus, near the edges for 
instance, to which there could be no great damage 
done if used as courts. It is a sport that is very in- 
teresting and healthful. One in which many of the 
students who could not take part in the other athletic 
sports were participating. There should be, there- 
fore, some place which the boys could use for tennis. 
We have heard that Prof. Young has expressed a 
willingness to fix up a ground for that purpose. If 



the report be true we shall probably have a ground. 
But unless work is begun on it right away it would 
be of no use this season. 

The scene was at a way station, just a few miles 
from Brunswick, where some of the boys had 
been to play ball, and, after the game was over, 
were waiting for the train. A man was sitting on 
the edge of the platform, holding in his hand an ani- 
mal of the Crustacean order, when an inquisitive 
Sophomore approached him from behind and said : 
"What in the devil do you call that?" You can 
judge of his surprise as the gentleman turned around 
saying: "That, young man, is a Horseshoe Crab," 
and the blushing Soph, recognized the well-known 
features of the Prof, in biology. The unfortunate 
youth has treated a good many, but the end is not yet. 

In response to a petition of the Orient Board, 
the Faculty have excused the heads of the different 
departments from theme writing, while the assistant 
editors can hand in, for their themes, the pieces they 
have written for the Orient. They also have ex- 
cused the whole board from attending rhetoricals ex- 
cepting the days when they may have to speak. In 
but very few colleges in the country has any such 
favors been granted the editors of the college paper. 
In one college, editorial work has been called an 
equivalent for any elective, which we think is grant- 
ing too much. While in others, so little has been 
allowed, that there might as well have been nothing. 
But we have received a golden mean, which we con- 
sider fair and just. We trust the columns of the 
Orient, in the future, may show that the favor has 
been fully appreciated. 

Hilton, '84, has one of the best fitted-up and most 
tastily arranged rooms in college. He has quite a 
museum of interesting articles and objects, among 
which is a large collection of autographs and letters 
of prominent men. Among them are the autographs 
of W. C. Bryant; F. E. Spinner, of the U. S. Treas- 
ury Department; Mr. and Mrs. Gen. Sherman ; Chas. 
Sumner; Gen. Hooker; Edward Thornton, ex-Min- 
ister to England ; Salmon P. Chase : and a, facsimile 
of President Lincoln's last dispatch to U. S. Grant. 
He also has arranged in one book all the names, 
with one or two exceptions, of the members of the 
Thirty-sixth Congress, including Henry Clay, Jeffer- 
son Davis, Henry Wilson, Edward Everett, Roscoe 
Conkling, Hannibal Hamlin, and many others whose 
names are familiar. Any one wishing to see them 
can be accommodated by calling at 22 M. H., 
where he will be received with all the characteristic 
urbanity of an '84 man. 



42 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Dudism struck Bowdoin last week in the form of 
an animated outrage, persuading students to canvass 
for books. He visited the room of an '83 man, and 
in soft, pleasing accents began his oft-repeated 
speech. He had scarcely finished the preamble, when 
the '83 man arose and going to his clothes-press pro- 
duced a pair of pants the rear of which looked as 
though the wearer had not heeded that old Roman 
inscription on the threshold, " Cave canem." 
" There," said the '83 man with terrible earnestness, 
"is the wreck of a pair of seven dollar, summer 
pants, the result of a three days' canvass last summer. 
I was induced to enter that campaign by about such 
a looking chap as you are and I registered a solemn 
vow that the next person approaching me for such a 
purpose I'd shoot. I've got a revolver laid up for 
him loaded to the muzzle and — " there was a patter 
of feet on the stairs and the former canvasser was 
alone. The dude is seeking victims elsewhere. 

Below are arranged the statistics of the three 
class crews that will row Ivy Day. Junior crew : 

Weight. Height. Age. 
J. Torrey ( Capt.), No. 1, 150 lbs. 5 ft. 10 in. 21 

A. H. Brown, " 2, 182 " 5 " 10 " 22 

J. F. Waterman, "-3, 168 " 5" 10i in. 24 

C. B. Adams, " 4, 160 " 5 " 10 " 21 

P. S. Lindsey( Coxswain), 126 " 5" 9 " 21 

Average, 157 5 10 21 

The Sophomore crew consists of the following 
men : 

Weight. Height. Age. 

F. W.'Davis, No. 1, 154 lbs. 5 ft. 7 in. 23 

F. N. Whittier, " 2, 174 " 6 " 21 

F. I. Brown ( Capt.), " 3, 176 " 6" 1" 22 

F. "W. Alexander, " 4, 160 " 5 " 8 " 23 

J. A. Peters (Coxswain), 135 " 5" 10" 18 

Average, 160 5 10 21 

The Freshman crew is made up as follows : 

Weight. Height. Age. 
J. W. Calderwood ( Capt.), 

No. 1, 153 lbs. 5 ft. 8£ in. 21 

I. W. Home, " 2, 155 " 5 " 7 " 22 

F. L. Smith, " 3, 158 " 5 " 10 " 18 

G. M. Norris, " 4, 160 " 5 " % " 19 
A.M. Hutchins (Coxswain), 120 " 5" 7 " 22 



Average, 



149 



20 



Two students inspecting the Laocoon. First Stu- 
dent — "Did he drink?" Second Student — "No, 
why?" First Student— " Well, he's got the worst 
case of snakes I ever saw, anyway." 

A new dance has been introduced into Paris. It 
is called "The Boston." Though not described, it 
is presumable that it is one step forward and hitch 
eye-glasses, two steps back and repeat, nose up, toes 
in, all hands round and waltz down stairs to a lunch 
of cold beans. — Ex. 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited to send " 
personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Brunswick, Me.] 

Several of these items have been received from 
F. C. Stevens, '81, to whom our thanks for the same 
are extended. 

'25. — Hon. J. W. Bradbury will soon return to 
Portland, from Charleston, S. C, where he has been 
spending the winter. 

'26. — On the occasion of the donation of the li- 
brary of Hon. Wm. Paine, of the class of '26, to the 
Penobscot Bar Library, Hon. Albert W. Paine, of 
Bangor, made the following remarks, which may in- 
terest our readers: "Hon. Wm. Paine, son of 
Josiah Paine, was born at Portland, Me., Nov. 28, 
1806, graduated at Bowdoin in 1826, and received 
his degree of A.M., three years later. He studied 
law with Hon. Nichols Emery; was admitted to prac- 
tice in 1829 ; settled first in Bridgton, Me., and later 
in Portland, where he became partner of the late 
Josiah S. Little (class of '25). From 1835 to 1848, 
Mr. Paine resided in Bangor. He then removed to 
Portland, where he passed the rest of his life. 
While living in Bangor, he represented that city in 
the Legislature for seven consecutive years. In 
1850 he was appointed U. S. Marshal for Maine; in 
1856 became Recorder of the Municipal Court at 
Portland, and was soon elected Judge of the same 
court. In all places of public trust he served with 
perfect fidelity and gave complete satisfaction. He 
was eminently a man of culture and intelligence, 
possessed of a genial character and courteous man- 
ners, was a great favorite in society and was pojjular 
with all classes of people. He was a great reader 
and possessed a retentive memory. He was married 
in 1835 to Miss Martha Chamberlain of Portland, 
who died in 1838. Mr. Paine remained unmarried 
for the remainder of his life. He died at Portland, 
Aug. 30, 1861." 

'49. — We wish to correct a mistake which occur- 
red in our issue of April 25th. The personal with 
regard to "Edward B. Palmer, class of '56", should 
have read, Edward 8. Palmer, class of '49. E. B. 
Palmer, '56, is a resident of Ipswich, Mass. 

'57. — Edward Parker is principal of the High 
School, in Brockton, Mass. 

'60. — Hon. T. B. Reed has started on a four or 
five months' journey in Europe. 

'61. — Dr. Theodore D wight Bradford died in New 
York City the 10th inst. He was born in Auburn, 
Me., September, 1838, and was the son of Richmond 
Bradford (class of '25). After his graduation, Dr_ 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



43 



Bradford became principal of the High School at 
Cape Elizabeth, and later of the Park St. Grammar 
School for boys, Portland, in which city he pursued 
his medical studies at the Portland School for Medi- 
cal Instruction. He attended lectures at the Maine 
Medical School, and at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, New York, where he graduated in 1865. 
The two years following, he was house physician of 
Bellevue Hospital, and since then followed his pro- 
fession in the city ; was demonstrator in anatomy 
and instructor in surgery in the "City" and the 
"Hahnemann" Hospitals, and was a member of the 
County Medical Society and the Medical Club of 
New York. He had been in poor health for the past 
two years, but his death was sudden and unexpected. 

'70. — C. E. Beale is now engaged in literary 
work with M. R. Gately & Co. (publishers of The 
Universal Educator), Boston. Mr. Beale graduated 
from Washington University Law School in 1872, 
and was for a few years after engaged in Govern- 
mental employ. He was admitted to the practice 
of law and for some time followed his profession in 
Boston, but is now employed as above stated. 

'75. — G. K. Swasey is to be appointed Assistant 
Dean in the Law School of Boston University. 

'79. — D. O. Castner was admitted to the Knox 
County Bar, at the April term of court. 

'80. — Bartlett is in Somerset, Somerset County, 
Penn. 

'81. — Brown has been engaged as Civil Engineer in 
charge of the narrow-guage railroad, now being- 
built from Monson village to Monson depot. 

'81.— Lane is studying law with Kennedy Bros., 
Canton, Dakota Ter. 

'81. — Skill ings, formerly of this class, has charge 
of the manufacturing department in the firm of 
Sheplie & Co., straw goods makers, Boston, Mass. 

'82. — A. F. Belcher is in Portland, Me., studying 
law in the office of Win. L. Putnam, Esq. 

'85.— E. T. McDonald is in business in Philadel- 
phia. 

We have been requested to insert in our columns 
the following notice : 

The next meeting of the Boston Bowdoin Club 
will be held at the Revere House, Boston, Friday 
evening, June 1st, at 6 o'clock. 

By the Committee. 



INTER-GOLIEGIATE NEWS, 



A French engineer, after a series of experiments 
with a loaf of bread baked by a Vassal- College girl, 
now announces that the project of tunneling Mont 
Blanc is entirely practical,.— Heidelberg Journal. 



Amherst : 

Twenty Sophomores are making up last term's 
chemistry. 

Such young things too, and can't they roll over a 
bank gracefully. 

Optionalsare divided among the Juniors this term 
as follows : English Lit., 59 ; Botany, 50 ; German, 
44; Mineralogy, 30; Chemistry, 29; Latin, 20; 
Greek, 13 ; Spanish, 5 : Pure Mathematics, 4 ; San- 
skrit, 1. — Student. 
Brown : 

The Brunonian appears with a new board of 
editors. 

The Liber Brunensis has just been published, 
and is highly commended. 

The ranking system still rankles in the breasts 
of the students. 

The New York alumni are takiug measures to 
form an Association. 
Harvard : 

Harvard takes much interest in Tennis just now. 
They have a Tennis Association with two hun- 
dred and fifty members, and have nearly sixty courts 
laid out. They have available space for seventy- 
seven courts in all. 

FOR MAKING A HARVARD MAN. 

Take a lump of Egotism ; 

Add a slice of Skepticism ; 
Mix them well together with a " culchawed " Boston drawl : 

Add a little Darwinism, 

Just a smack of Positivism, 
And flavor with the essence of unmitigated gall. — Acta. 

Princeton : 

The Boating Association has engaged the services 
of Mr. Geo. Hosmer of Boston, as trainer. 

Princeton is to have a new chemical laboratory. 

The Faculty have not yet given the nine permis- 
sion to play with professionals. 
Williams : 

Williams is agitating the subject of enlarging the 
campus, at an expense of $2,500. 

The Glee Club is thinking of making a tour, this 
summer, among the fashionable resorts, both here 
and in the West. 

The college has acquired "Tables" for Zoologi- 
cal purposes at Naples and Woods Hall. 

'Eighty-three's class tax, for general graduating 
expenses, will be fifteen dollars. 

The Faculty are laying out a flower-garden, in 
the rear of Morgan, to supply the inmates with bou- 
tonieres every morning. — Argo. 



44 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



CLIPPINGS. 

THE BANGING MANIA. 

O see the young girl, 

In beauty rare, 
Sans kink, sans curl — 

Banging her hair ! 

And hear the young man 

At the piano there, 
Hard as he can — 

Banging his air! 

A young mother stands 

Oppressed with care, 
"With slipper in hands 

Banging her heir! 

A grass widow is one whose husband died of the 
hay fever. 

Mr. S. — "Does beer ever occur in crystalized 
form?" Prof. — "No, but it is often found in 
quartz." — Ex. 

Viola Vassar (who is home on her Thanksgiving 
vacation) says she don't object to a man's staring at 
her ; but when she looks back and sees him looking 
back too, it's too presuming for anything. — Aihe- 
nceum. 

Innocence Abroad : iEsthetic Professor (to gay 

and frisky Senior) — "Mr. , can you tell me where 

all the young men get those pretty bands they wear 
in their hats ? I could tind none in the stores." Col- 
lapse of Senior. — Brunonian. 

And it came to pass in those days that the Senior 
wrote home to his parents and said, " Don't come in 
at Commencement, I will stand high in my class, 
but the town will be so crowded that it will be very 
unpleasant for you. — -Dickinsonian. 

ACUTE APHORISMS, 

WITH MODERN APPLICATIONS. 

A crib in the hand is worth two in the nursery. 

All swells don't end well. 

None but the brash conductors deserve the fare. 

Pay the Treasurer his dues. 

It's a long bat that has no turn in. 

It is a wise Faculty that knows its own mind. 

— Chaff. 
Spare the rum and spoil the punch. 
A truthful man gathers no marks. 
Many girls, many bills. 
Straws show where the mint julep goes. 
Don't proverb us any more proverbs. 

— Dartmouth. 
It's a wise student that knows his own professors. 
No use crying over a broken beaker. 
A crib in time saves nine. — Academica. 



The co-ed. who was locked in her lover's arms for 
three hours, explains that it was not her fault; she 
claims that he forgot the combination. — Ex. 

A young lady being told at a recent fire to stand 
back or else the hose would be turned on her, replied : 
"Oh, I don't care, they are striped on both sides any 
way." — College Olio. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



Inasmuch as in our last two issues we have given 
a very comprehensive (?) idea of the college press 
in general and have offered advice which, if taken, 
would sink any paper, we are disposed to be rather 
more lenient in this number and instead of presenting 
to our readers the stereotyped exchange notes which 
we have in stock, or what would be worse, our own 
philosophical disquisitions, we shall give them some- 
thing more readable, a little sketch from our E. C, 
the Athenasum. In this way many of our readers who 
are unable to peruse the exchanges, can see what 
our neighbors are doing and how much their produc- 
tions excel those that appear in our own columns. 

WELLESLEY REACTION. 

Zenas Warnick was puzzled. Not that this was 
an unusual thing, but the conundrum was particularly 
knotty. The soul-stirring question which he was 
striving to settle was this : 

He had promised during the vacation to send a 
young lady-friend at Wellesley some arbutus, as soon 
as he returned to college. But he had delayed so 
long- that now he must go a long distance to secure 
any~of the coveted pink and white blossoms, and the 
one thing to which he was relentlessly averse was 
walking. Should he forfeit the invitation to the ap- 
proaching Junior ball, which he already looked upon 
as his own? Should he torture himself by climbing 
the rough hills where the arbutus lingered? It was 
a painful dilemma. 

But fortunately Zenas was an ardent reader of the 
college papers. He reveled in them. It was a fa- 
vorite saying of his, "Give me a pipe and a couple of 
copies of the New York Ledger, or a file of some col- 
lege paper, and I won't change with Vandeibilt!" 
Naturally enough, so constant a reader was well ac- 
quainted with the fact, patent to every writer of col- 
lege fiction, that no student ever sends away two 
packages on the same day, without confusing the 
addresses. He could prove by the doctrine of chance 
that ninety-nine cases in a hundred must happen so. 
As he labored to solve the problem, this precious 
fact occurred to him. There was the solution in a 
nutshell. 

His impatience would not let him delay. That 
very night the expressman bore up from the station 
at Wellesley a small oblong box neatly wrapped in 
tissue paper. His arrival was eagerly expected, for 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



45 



immediately upon dispatching the box, Zenas has 
telegraphed as follows: "Miss Salina. Don't open 
the box. Terrible mistake somewhere. Address 
confused. Z. Waenick." 

Consequently, she hardly waited to reach her 
room before tearing off the wrappers only to find the 
box packed with arbutus leaves, without a single 
blossom. On the top la3 r a card apologizing for the 
delay by declaring that ho had waited to secure the 
best flowers possible and closing with a few touching 
rhymes such as, "The pink and white from very 
spite, at seeingyou will change their hue, and naught 
but green can then be seen, etc." 

This seemed suspicious, and unfortunately for 
Zenas, Miss Salina had .never read many college 
papers and did not know the peculiar twisting ten- 
dency of the student mind in directing missives. She 
waited some days for an explanation or a second box. 
Neither came, for Zenas considered the matter set- 
tled, supposing his friend would comprehend the 
situation, and take the will for the deed. 

But to her unenlightened ignorance, the matter 
seemed like a hoax, and she resolved to avenge her- 
self. So it was not long before Zenas took from his 
box a square, heavy envelope, stamped with the 
VVellesley monogram, and evidently containing an 
invitation. He was delighted, if not surprised. Of 
course, she had seen how the mistake happened, and 
pardoned it. Tearing off the outside covering, he 
found a second envelope, unsealed. This, too, he 
opened with a smile of satisfaction and read, " Dear 
Sir: Your favor received. I shall need no books 
this term, and you may send my bill " — Zenas paused 
abruptly with a suppressed exclamation, and just 
then heard the voice of the telegraph messenger, 
" Dispatch here for Z. Warnick." A light began to 
dawn upon him, which had become dazzling by the 
time he read, " Don't open the letter. Terrible mis- 
take somewhere. Addresses confused. A. Sai.ina." 

Zenas did not attend the Junior ball at Wellesley. 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School o'f Maine, will commence February 8th, 1883, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshua L. Chambeblais, LL.D , President ; Isbael T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology ami Practice ; Ai.tred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H. Gerrish, M.D., 
Anatomy ; Chables W. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence ; Henry 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Bubt G. Wildeb, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D, Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Chables 0. 
Hunt, M. D., Materia Mcdica and 'l'!icr:i]> aitics -, Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may lie obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, ROOM 
PAPER, PERIODICALS, «ScC. 



— . 


cc 


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j^^l 


K 




C/3 






© 


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CC 






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■T3S. 


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FRANK M. STETSON, 




f<s JUL\ 25 A* 1 



RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

SUPERIOR TO ALIi OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

"We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 

direct importation, which is made especially for us, water 
marked with the name of the brand— 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLEJV & GIMER Manufacturers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Maimer. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



46 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



*3s2< 




BURBANK, DOUGLASS & CO., 

(Successors to True, Douglass & Co.) Importers and Wholesale 
Dealers in 

China, Crockery, § Glass Ware, 



LAMP GOODS. CHANDELIERS AND PLATED WARE. 
242 Middle Street, . . PORTLAND, MAINE. 



J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PICTURE FEAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

From the cheapest to the very hest. Also Pictures, Cabinet 

Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, etc. Also, Agent for 

the celebrated Household Sewing Machine. 

In trie Blue Store, Main Street, Second Door from Elm, 
Opposite the Park, Brunswick, Maine. 



All the Students Should Buy 

THEIR 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 
flank B. Rotate 1 Root I Slot Stoie, 

Cor. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



JOHN 



H. BRACKET!", ^SSSAST 1, 



SPRING STYLES, 1883, 



Consisting of Suitings, Overcoatings, and Pant Patterns, made in 
latest style and good fit guaranteed, at 20 per cent, less than the 
same goods can be bought elsewhere. Also a 

Fine Line of White Shirts, Ties, Braces, Collars, 
Hose, and Under Flannels. 

The Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company. 

Assets, $51,500,000. Surplus, $6,500,000. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1846. 

The New Plan of Cash Value and Non-Fokfeitaele 
Polict meets the needs of the public. Send for full informa- 
Hon t0 H. N. FAIRBANKS, Gen'l Agent, 

BANGOR, MAINE 

S. WALKER & SON, 

Fresh and Corned Beef, Pork, Mutton, Poultry, 

All for the Lowest Cash Prices. Liberal Discount to Clubs 
and Boarding Houses. 

At the Old Stand near corner Main and Centre Streets, 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



S. WALKER. 



VJI. H. WALKER. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SOLICITORS WANTED 

For the Fastest Setting Book of the year. 

GATELY'S 

Universal Educator 

Is an Educational, Social, Legal, Commercial, Histori- 
cal, and Mechanical work of 1160 Pages and 470 Illustra- 
tions. Has received the approval of the press and people. 
Since its appearance in Jan.,'8.'i, 20,0011 copies have been sold. 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Cannot, under our plan, and with our work, fail to make a grand 
success. It is possible for a student to pay his yearly expenses 
by canvassing for this work during vacation ; highest commission 
paid; no responsibility; outfit free; it can be sold either on in- 
stallments or cash. 

For terms, territory, and other information apply to our Gen- 
eral Agent, E. P. Jordan, •!•> M. H.. Bowdoin College, oV to the 
Publisher, M. K. GATELY, 72 Pearl St., Boston, Mass. 

SCHOOL OF MINES, COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 

Department ef AwbitQCtwa. 

The recently established Course in Architecture occu- 
pies four years, the first of which is occupied with general 
studies, the architectural work beginning with the second 
year. 

Graduates of colleges and scientific schools can, in gen- 
eral, enter in -advanced standing at the beginning of the 
second year. Special students are not received. 

The scientific studies, pursued In connection with the 
Department of Civil Engineering, include Chemistry, Phy- 
sics, and Mechanics, with so much of Mathematics as these 
studies require. 

The Architectural studies include the theory and the 
history of Architecture and of the allied arts, drawing and 
modelling, with the constant practice of original design, 
and so much of specifications and practical construction as 
can conveniently be taught in a school. 

The buildings now constructing, which will be ready 
for occupation in October, provide, besides the necessary 
drawing rooms and lecture rooms, a special architectural 
laboratory for practice and experiment, and a library for 
study and for the accomodation of the large collection of 
drawings, prints and photographs now in process of form- 
ation. 

For a circular of information containing further partic- 
ulars address, KEGISTKAR, SCHOOL OF MINES, 

Madison av. and 49th St., New York city. 

TONTINE HOTEL, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

S. B. BBEWSTEB, - - PBOPBIETOB. 

Class and Reunion Suppers a Specialty. First-Class Laundry 
Work, equal to Troy, done at short notice. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi - 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 



On and after Oct. 15th, 1882, 

Passenger Trains leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.10, 11.25 a.m.. 2.45. 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 
nisrht (Sunday mornings only). 
Hoekland, 8. 10 a.m., 2.45 p.m. 
Portland. 7.25. 11.30 a.m.. 4.30 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 a.m., 12.35 night. 
Lewiston, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.33 p.m., 12.40 night. 
Farminglon. 8.10 a.m. (Mixed), 2.45 p.m. 
Augusta, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 P.M., 12.45 night. 
Skowbegnn, Belfast, Dexter. Bangor, and Vanceboro, 

2.45 P.M., and 12.45 night. 
Watervillc, 8.10, 12.45 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 p.m. (Saturdays 
only). 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct, 15, 1S82. 



DIAMONDS, flfl£ JEWEL! 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 

J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 



BEATS THE WORLD. 

Old Judge 

CIGARETTES 
And Smoking Tobacco. 

Endorsed as ABSOLUTELY PURE and free 
from all foreign or deleterious substances what- 
ever, by 
PETER COLLIER, Chemist of the 

I, s. 



ittae&i of Agric-slisf© 



j 

Washington, D. C. 
R. ODGEN DOREMTJS, M.D., LL.D., 

Protessor Chemistry and Toxicology in the Bellevue Hospi- 
tal Medical College, and Professor of Chemistry and Physics 
in the College ot the City of New York. 
BENJAMIN SILLIMAN, Esq., 

Professor at Yale College, New Haven, Conn. 
R. A. WITTHAUS, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Buffalo ; 
Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Ver- 
mont; Professor of Physiological Chemistry, University of 
New York. 

And other eminent Chemists in the United States, cop- 
ies of whose certificates we shall be pleased to mail you. 
on application. 

GOODWIN Ac CO., 

Foot Grand Street, East River, New York. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topshnm 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 
Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 

Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 



c. 



TO^^T-ITSEITD, 



CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B.— Special Rates to Student Clubs. 



i.rinaaaaears 



©E'<5;^L,e,S:%E > @ E 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 Middle Street - - - - Portland, Me. 



TIFFANY & CO., Union Square, 
New York City, have made prepar- 
ations for the coming season, to of- 
fer original and artistic designs with 
new methods of treatment, for forms 
of Commencement and other invita- 
tions. 

They have also increased their 
facilities for producing articles of 
appropriate design for Prizes, Class 
Cups, Society Badges, etc. 

Drawings, with Estimates, sent 
on application. 

Correspondence invited. 



386 WashiDgton Street, BATH, ME. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



ISP Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

§85 and 587 Congress St., and 23 § Middle St., 
"PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

«®-Send for Price List. 

ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. Wl LSON & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 



C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

OVER BOARDMAN'S STORE. 

Give Me a Call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SHREVE, # 

CRUMP 
* & LOW, 

432 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




XTENSIVE STOCK 
OF CHOICE GOODS. 



STERLING SILVEEWAEE-Tea, Coffee, and Din- 
ner Sets, Forks and Spoons, etc., of exclusive pat- 
terns ; Old English Silver ; Candelabra ; Carriage 
Clocks; Watches of all grades — Chronograph, Re- 
peating, and Chatelaine, with Chains, etc., etc. 

SELECTED DIAMONDS ; Black, White, and Fancy 
Color Pearls ; Rubies, Emeralds, Sapphires, Cat's- 
eyes, Precious Stones, generally, of highest quali- 
ties; Fine Gold Jewelry of original designs, etc., 
etc. 

ARTISTIC BRONZES of new models— Elegant Man- 
tel Clocks (keyless) ; English Library, Mantel, and 
Hall Clocks, with Westminster Chimes, Cathedral 
Gongs, Mantel Sets, in Marble, Bronze, Polished 
Brass, etc. 

DECORATIVE PORCELAIN in Vases, Plaques, Des- 
sert, Coffee and Ice Cream Sets, etc., from the 
Minton, Worcester Royal, Crown Derby, Copeland, 
Royal Berlin, Dresden, and other celebrated works, 
etc. 

MARBLE STATUARY. NOVELTIES. 



ALL KINDS OF 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

Agents Gorham Mfg. Co, 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fur- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Work- 
manship, we especially solicit orders for Fine Printing of all 
kinds, 



For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

We also make a specialty of 

FU^T-CL^g POINTING 

For Schools and Colleges, 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Bowdoin College Boys 

"When they visit BATH should call at 

WEBBER'S DRUG STORE. 



A Full Line of Cigars, Toilet Articles, &c. 

Smoke Smoke 

THE MEW CIGAR, 

<&-* YALE. *— ^ 



Price IO Cts. 



Havana Filled. 



DIAMOND CROWN. Price 5 Cts. 

JOHNSTON & HATCH, 

LEWISTON, ME. 

^p*" For sale in Brunswick by Ed. J. Merriman. 

Smoke Smoke 



FIRST-CLASS 

Pianos, _ 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 

THOMAS H. RILEY, . . . Brunswick, Me. 

Also INSURANCE written in Best Companies, 
at Lowest Bates. 



FOUND AT LAST!! 

That the place to buy the Very Best 

Groceries and Students' Supplies, 

At the Lowest Possible Price, is at 

H. C. MARTIN'S, opposite College Grounds, 

BRUNSWICK MAINE. 



COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle riding is unsurpassed as a 
method of traveling.whether for speed, 
sport, or renewal of health. The prac- 
ticability of the machine has been 
thoroughly tested, and satisfactorily 
proved, beyond queslion. Thousands 
are in daily use, and the number is 
rapidly increasing. The exercise is 
recommended by the medical profession 
as most beneficial to health, bringing 
into exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

Send 3c. stamp for 36-page Illustrated 
Catalogue containing price lists aud full 
information. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washington St„ BOSTON, MASS. 




IMPORTING TAILORS 

AND 

GENTS' FURNISHERS. 

Novelties in Imported Hosiery, 
Underwear, Gloves, and Neckwear 
for Mens' Wear. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

Market Square, 

PORTLAND, ME. 



FLEXIBLE STIFF HATS, 

Laced Gloves for Gents, instead of Button, 



MERRY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 

^F. H. WILSON,** 

DISPENSER OF 

. «• Ghradoali 



Fill flflgi, ■NW MMW » r 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc. , in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



AUGUSTA HOUSE, 

State Street, Augusta, Maine. 

Most desirable location hi the city. Good Rooms, Good Table, 

Good Attendance. Free Hack t<> and from Depot 

and Wharf. Patronage Solicited. 

E. & A. C. M ANSON, Proprietors. 







|25H5a5E5ESH5H5H5H5HSHSH52SaSH5asaSH5E5H525aSH5aSH5H5 





J m%%%%0&&m 




%*}? *1* *\* *}* *\* "4* *\* *\* »I* *1* *l* *J* *t* »1* 4* 4* 4* *l* »l» 4* *i* »i* *!*' 

»*1* *l* #l* *[* #{* *j* 4* 4* *{* irl«'irl« 4* «{* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4*' 






BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SOLICITORS WANTED 

For the Fastest Selling Book of the year. 

GATELY'S 

Universal Educator 

Is an Educational, Social, Legal, Commercial, Histori- 
cal, and Mechanical work^of llb'O Pages and 470 Illustra- 
tions. Has received the approval of the press and people. 
Since its appearance in Jan.,'83, 20,000 copies have been sold. 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Cannot, under our plan, and with our work, fail to make a grand 
success. It is possible for a student to pay his yearly expenses 
by canvassing- fortius work during vacation; highest commission 
paid; no responsibility; outfit free; it can be sold either on in- 
stallments or cash. 

For terms, territory, and other information apply to our Gen- 
eral Agent, E. P. Jordan, i-1 M. II.. Bowdoin College, or to the 
Publisher, M. K. UATELY, 7'2 Pearl St., Boston, Mass. 



SCHOOL OF MINES, COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 

Dep&ft&eat of Afthitectwi. 

The recently established Course in Architecture occu- 
pies four years, the first of which is occupied with general 
studies, the architectural work beginning with the second 
year. 

Graduates of colleges and scientific schools can, in gen- 
eral, enter in advanced standing at the beginning of the 
second year. Special students are not received. 

The scientific studies, pursued fn connection with the 
Department of Civil Engineering, include Chemistry, Phy- 
sics, and Mechanics, with so much of Mathematics as these 
studies require. 

The Architectural studies include the theory and the 
history of Architecture and of the allied arts, drawing and 
modelling, with the constant practice of original design, 
and so much of specifications and practical construction as 
can conveniently be taught in a school. 

The buildings now constructing, which will be ready 
for occupation in October, provide, besides the necessary 
drawing rooms and lecture rooms, a special architectural 
laboratory for practice and experiment, and a library for 
' study and for the accomodation of the large collection of 
drawings, prints and photographs now in process of form- 
ation. 

For a circular of information containing further partic- 
ulars address, REGISTRAR, SCHOOL 'OF MINES, 

Madison av. and 49th St., New York city. 



TONTINE HOTEL, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

8. B. BREWSTER, - - PROPRIETOR. 

Class and Reunion Suppers a Specialty. First-Class Laundry 
Work, equal to Troy, done at short notice. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Mu 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 



m&mm «wem a. a. 

On and after Oct. loth, 1882, 
Passenger Trains leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.10. 11.25 a.m.. 2.45. 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 

night (Sunday mornings only). 
Rockland. 8.10 a.m., '-'.45 P.M. 
Portland. 7.25. 11.30 a.m.. 4.30 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 A.M.. 12.35 night. 
Levvistou, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 0.33 P.M.. 12.40 night. 
Farniiugton. 8.10 a.m. (Mixed), 2.45 P.M. 
Auguslii, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, G.35 p.m., 12.45 night. 
Skowhegan, Belfast, Dexter, Bangor, and Vanceboro, 

2.45 P.M.. and 12.45 night. 
Watervillo 8.10, 12.45 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 P.M. (Saturdays 

only). 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 1882. 



DIAMONDS, FINE JEWEipY, 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 

J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 

BEATS THE WORLD. 

Old Judge 

CIGARETTES 
And Smoking Tobacco. 

Endorsed as ABSOLUTELY PURE and free 
from all foreign or deleterious substances what- 
ever, by 
PETER COLLIER, Chemist of the 

TJ. S. Department of 4gii@iltife, 

Washington, D. C. 
R. ODGEN DOREMUS, M.D., LL.D., 

Protessor Chemistry and Toxicology in the Bellevue Hospi- 
tal Medical College, and Professor of Chemistry and Physics 
in the College ol the City of New York. 
BENJAMIN SILLIMAN, Esq., 

Professor at Yale College, New Haven, Conn. 
R. A. WITTHAUS, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Buffalo; 
Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Ver- 
mont; Professor of Physiological Chemistry, University of 
New York. 

And other eminent Chemists in the United States, cop- 
ies of whose certificates we shall be pleased to mail you 
on application. 

GOODWIN Ac OO., 

Foot Grand Street, East River, New York. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new"Oxford" and"Moehring" Burners 

m PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

EHG-RAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STILE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENOY FOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



DEANE BROTHERS & SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

£p° Lowest Prices in the State, 
75c? & 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me, 



A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, M Fancy Goods. 

Also Eastern Mutual Union Telegraph Office. 
Under Town Clock, - Brunswick, Me, 



The Only RELIABLE AND STANDARD Brands of 

Cigarettes and Fine Tobaccos. 

Straight Cuts. /2^P / — *» Caporal. 

Sweet Caporal. SV/i^ f ~j^jr~£}YS3 Caporal J. 
St. James, etc. --~Z7 Ambassador. 

St. James £, etc. 

Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut Cigarettes. 

This new brand is made of extra fine, selected, prime, mild, golden Virginia 
Leaf, innl is the riucst Cigarette, as to quality, Havor, and workmanship, ever 

offered for sale. Kinney Bros- > straight Cut, Full Dress. 

Sweet Caporal Cork Mouthpiece. 



[STERBROOK'S 



STEEL 
PENS 



Leading Numbers: 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEN CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York. 

Go to W. B. Woodard's 

To buy Your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

SPECIAL IK-A-TEIS to STTjMDZEiTT CXjTTEJS- 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

BEST DAIRY IN BRUNSWICK. 

THERE ARE TWO PINTS OF THE NICEST MILK LN 
EVERY QUART WHICH I SELL. SPECIAL ATTENTION 
GIVEN TO STUDENT CLUBS. 

fl®- STEWARDS SHOULD DROP ME A POSTAL WITH 
THEIR LOCATION WRITTEN PLAINLY. 

A. P. WOODSIDE, Brunswick, Me. 

"W- 3VE- MILLER, 



OVER AMERICAN EXPRESS OFFICE, 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



t 



NEW DRUG STOHE. 

ED. J. MERRYMAN, 



Fancy aiifl Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Tobacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

ipg* Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



A» W* CTX<ClS i Ofcft« 



jffi^cpp+wnw^ 



MAIN STREET, 



m^mm^ 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



SPRING AND SUMMER, 1883. 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready- Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

@S?st)@ff aril §e@ §mam Smpofflwm, 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

Jpg*[Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Coal Tard in Topsham, 



WHERE NONE BUT 



The Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Orders telephoned from Stores of A. T. Campbell 
and W. B. Woodard promptly attended to. 

Office near the Sheds. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily- 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A G. Tenney. 
Terms, $1.50 a, Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Wzezmh* agi Bait l£©a%g p 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

4®"Speoial Rates to Student Clubs..® 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
followiug subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics. and six books of the ^Eneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 
The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of bis graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with au 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 
Latin, two terms. 
Greek, two terms. 
Natural History, three terras. 
Physics, one term. 
Chemistry, two terms. 
Science of Language, one term. 
English Literature, two terms. 
German, two terms. 
History of Philosophy, two terms. 
International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 13, 1883. 



No. 4. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
Oliver W. Means, '84, Managing Editor. 
Charles E. Sayward, '84, Business Editor. 
Llewellyn Barton, '84. John A. Waterman, Jr. ,'84. 
William H. Cothren, '84. Oliver R. Cook, '85. 
Kodney I. Thompson, '84. Nehemiah B. Ford, '85. 
Sherman W. Walker, '84. John A. Peters, '85. 
Terms— $2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 
Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to 
contribute articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by the writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 
Printed at the Journal Office, Levriston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XIII., No. 4.— June 13, 1883. 

Editorial Notes 47 

Ivy Oration — Lessons from the Character of Peter 

Cooper 49 

My Ghost 51 

Alpha Delta Phi '. 52 

Ivy Day 53 

Boat Race 54 

Field Day 55 

Base-Ball 55 

College Items 56 

Personal 59 

Inter-Collegiate News 60 

Clippings 60 

Editors' Table 61 

Book Notice 62 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



The time has now come to show the pub- 
lic what sort of a college we have. It is 
quite fashionable in some circles to criticise 
its management, and it happens, all too fre- 
quently, that the students themselves suffer 



such criticism to pass without reply. This is 
perhaps due to a feeling of amusement at the 
absurdity of some statements, but after a 
time forbearance ceases to be a virtue and the 
time comes to take up arms in defense of our 
Alma Mater. No doubt the greater part of 
these slurs upon the college come from a 
feeling of jealousy on the part of friends 
of other colleges. The wide-spread repu- 
tation of Bowdoin has caused a general 
alliance of her rivals, and it behooves us to 
defend the fair name of our college. This 
envious spirit is clearly manifest whenever 
the slightest misunderstanding between Fac- 
ulty and students occurs. As if there was 
never any difficulty in other colleges ! In 
the last three years a large number of stu- 
dents have come here from some of these 
model colleges which always regard us with 
mingled feelings of indignation and pity 
whenever we are equally unfortunate. Some 
newspapers appear to have a chronic desire to 
give prominence to everything real or im- 
aginary that may reflect upon us. It is high 
time to awake to the importance of showing 
the better side of college life. At this sea- 
son of the year a good many visitors come 
here and it is desirable that they carry away 
the pleasantest recollections. This can be 
effected not by bringing into notice the very 
exceptionable features of college life, but by 
encouraging investigations into its daily char- 
acter. 



The nine has played well this year, and 
yet if it had done even a little better the re- 
sult of the games would have been much more 
satisfactory. It is quite apparent that the 
nine played better when they went to Mas- 



48 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



sachusetts than they do now. This is no 
doubt due to a failure in practice. The nine 
will sometimes practice in a half-dead-and- 
alive manner and then wonder why they hap- 
pen to slip up in a game. It is only by a 
careful attention to daily work that creditable 
results can be obtained. A crew would not 
expect to do anything in a race if they never 
went over the course previously as quickly as 
possible, and even with this precaution a fail- 
ure to row well is often the result. The 
earnestness of other nines is very noticeable 
and is always a subject of remark. It is not 
too late to correct this error, although the 
championship will not now be affected by it. 
The Orient has watched with great interest 
the season's contests on the diamond. It 
has tried to interest the student-body and en- 
courage support for the nine. It has taken 
pains to give full reports of all games, and 
now it feels it a duty to urge upon the mem- 
bers of the nine the importance of strict at- 
tention to business, and of not looking upon 
daily practice as a necessary evil which is to 
be slipped over as easily as possible. 



The course in rhetoricals is now finished 
for this year and the walls of Memorial Hall 
can rest their aching ears. The practice 
of summoning the student-body to listen to 
a number of speakers chosen from the three 
upper classes was unknown until this year, 
but, though an innovation, it has proved its 
right to become an established custom. Here- 
tofore no suitable place could be obtained, but 
Memorial Hall furnishes just what is needed 
for the purpose. As each one has been ap- 
pointed to declaim he has no doubt felt that 
these rhetorical exercises should be dropped 
altogether, but after the agony has been 
passed, a desire to see his friends go through 
a similar ordeal has caused a change of senti- 
ment. 

The prize declamations at the close of this 



term should show a marked improvement 
over those of last year, as there has been 
much better opportunity to study various 
ways of speaking, some of them highly or- 
iginal. By speaking before a considerable 
audience one is in a measure prepared for the 
larger audience he must face later. It would 
be very far from the truth to say that these 
weekly exercises are a source of great enjoy- 
ment, yet, as an essential part of our educa- 
tion, their importance cannot be denied. It 
is needless to add that a greater degree of 
interest and a less frequent failure to appear 
of those appointed would largely increase the 
efficiency of these exercises. 



One of the pleasantest methods of becom- 
ing familiar with a science is to gain practical 
knowledge of it. Prof. Lee has perfected a 
plan of taking a few of his former zoology 
class for a few days down the Bay. They will 
thus be able to make themselves familiar with 
some forms of animal life which they could not 
obtain last fall. By such a trip the class will 
be taught to look about them as they have 
opportunity and thus to form habits of obser- 
vation. The great object of study is to lead 
men to think for themselves, and of zoology 
to enable one to recognize forms of life as 
they are met in the world around us. It is 
said that misfortunes never come singly, and 
it may likewise be said that in studying any 
useful subject, one is sure to learn something 
of other matters. In the present instance, 
besides gaining knowledge of zoology, it is 
highly probable that the class will learn some- 
thing of practical navigation and — of sea- 
sickness. 



It is gratifying to know that President 
Chamberlain has gained sufficient strength to 
be brought home. His wound is slowly heal- 
ing and will probably heal more rapidly as 
his strength increases. It was not thought, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



49 



when he left last term, that the operation 
would be so severe, or the recovery from it 
so difficult as the event has proved. A short 
time since President Chamberlain's friends 
in this vicinity were quite discouraged, but 
their fears seem not to have been well founded. 
The President has been a great sufferer for 
years, and it is earnestly hoped that he will 
now enjoy that freedom from pain which he 
so much desires. 



The custom of planting an ivy has been 
in vogue for only a few years, and yet per- 
haps no other is more firmly established. In 
the thought of planting an ivy that may live 
long years after its guardians have left college, 
and that may adorn the chapel with its tender 
embraces, there is poetry sufficient to fasci- 
nate the least sentimental Junior. Ivy Day 
comes at the pleasantest season of the year, 
when vegetation has, as it were, just come 
out in a new spring suit, and before the heat 
and dust of summer have had opportunity to 
dim its beauty. It seems not a great while 
since we saw our first Ivy exercises and now 
our own are of the past. The first great land- 
mark in our course has been reached, and 
now the vista stretches forward to gradua- 
tion. The friendships formed during three 
years in college are made firmer and more 
enduring by common participation in the fes- 
tivities of Ivy Day. The importance of the 
day must not be underestimated in its bear- 
ing upon the future of the class. Friends of 
the students are invited to be present, and 
while in some instances the close of the day- 
may find " two hearts that beat as one," in 
other cases it may be but the beginning of 
such a culmination. The members of '84 have 
throughout their course been remarkably 
united and now the bond of union has been 
drawn still closer. They are to be congrat- 
ulated on so successful an Ivy Day. May it 
be but the beginning of a truly happy future 
for them all. 



LESSONS FROM THE CHARACTER OF 
PETER COOPER. 

BY J. A. WATERMAN, JR. 

On Saturday, April 7, 1883, occurred the 
funeral of one of the most philanthropic and 
truly useful men that America has ever 
known. Not only have those that knew him 
personally borne testimony to the nobleness 
of mind and the generous activity of life that 
characterized Peter Cooper, but hundreds 
that never even saw him — recognizing the 
fact that his benevolence did so much for 
their good and general happiness — " rise up 
and call him blessed." In fact people all 
over our country regarded him as a citizen to 
whom was due the highest respect and honor, 
and now join in expressions of honest admir- 
ation for his life and sincere regret for his 
death. And since these feelings of admira- 
tion and regret are so general we may very 
properly inquire what there was in him that 
has prompted them, and how we may profit 
by his example. 

No one can have read of this funeral with- 
out being struck by the impression which his 
career seems to have made on the minds of 
the younger generation. It is said that in 
this particular no such tribute has ever been 
paid to a man that never held high political 
office, and never made any mark in war, in 
literature, in art, or in science. What, then, 
is the reason why so many tokens of honor 
have been paid to this unpretending and ven- 
erable man ? The secret of all this does not 
lie in the fact that he was a remarkably suc- 
cessful business man, shrewd, enterprising,pru- 
dent,who made no great mistakes, always met 
his liabilities, succeeded in all that he tried, 
and,though never speculating, was yet always 
well advanced in the race of industrial prog- 
ress. There have been men in all our cities 
that were as skillful in money-making as he 
was, and that were as truly " self-made " as 
he was; but these men never received such 



50 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



honors, except, perhaps, from their own fam- 
ilies. Two facts combined to make his death 
a public, I may say a national, event and his 
funeral a public occasion. The first of these 
facts is that he had devoted so much of his 
self-earned fortune, and so generously, to live 
public interests that were for the benefit of 
his fellow-men. For this alone he would 
have received deserved praise ; but how much 
more was the interest in his career increased 
by the additional fact, viz., " that," as Mr. 
Collyer said in his excellent address, " Peter 
Cooper never owned a dollar he could not 
take up to the great white throne." From 
these considerations we are able to say, in 
brief, that he was respected and honored be- 
cause he had succeeded throughout his life 
in uniting the most positive uprightness and 
purity with the greatest business prosperity. 
Moreover, he had used this prosperty, when- 
ever an opportunity was presented, in making 
all men that he could reach better and happier. 
All this, however, has been proclaimed 
and dwelt upon in hundreds of pulpits and 
newspapers within the last few weeks. It is 
not for me to spend these few minutes in 
eulogizing him, whose character would, never- 
theless, render such an undertaking compar- 
atively easy. The special point that we are 
lead to notice is the effect that honors paid 
not only to such men as Peter Cooper, but to 
any and every man, have in educating young 
people and those that are just beginning 
active life. I cannot express in better terms 
the lesson that we may learn from such a 
career, than by referring to this strange and 
persistent delusion of our times, that the best 
moral training of young people is or can be 
done merely or mainly by the use of direct 
addresses to the understanding through the 
agency of sermons and books. There is, too, 
this fact connected with this delusion making- 
it all the more strange — every one knows 
from his own experience that it is a delusion. 
We are all sure that next to hereditary influ- 



ences there is nothing that has played so large 
a part in the formation of our characters as 
the associations of our youth and the ex- 
amples that were then before us, and more 
than all things else, as the lives of those 
whom we learned to reverence and admire 
and honor by seeing our parents, friends, and 
neighbors revere, admire, and honor them. 
This is true everywhere, and so true that a 
writer has said, " One can tell almost with 
certainty what kind of men any generation 
will produce, by seeing the kind of men it 
was taught to applaud and imitate in its child- 
hood." Here, then, is a call directly to us. 
From every department of our national in- 
terests, from commerce, trade, profession, 
from every kind of employment comes now 
more urgently than ever before an appeal for 
men that shall be so well fitted for the duties 
to which they may be called that their abili- 
ties and purposes can never be honestly 
doubted, men that shall be able to crown a 
well-spent life with an honored memory. It 
is in our power to furnish such men. Shall 
we do so ? 

There are eveiy where merchants, bankers, 
preachers, teachers, parents, and writers that 
are groaning (and not without some reason, 
we must admit,) over what they call " the 
decline of commercial morals." Such per- 
sons see no cause for the frauds, the defalca- 
tions, and the embezzlements which have 
during the last twenty years so much dis- 
credited many of our American institutions 
and American investments, and, what is still 
worse, have so much discredited the Ameri- 
can name. For all such persons alike there 
is a lesson, perhaps not so easy to be seen, 
but yet very practicable, and that lesson is 
this : If they want to have honest trades- 
men, clerks, and cashiers, it is not sufficient, 
so to speak, to remain uncovered while the 
account of a long, pure life like Peter Coop- 
er's is being read. If our admiration of such 
men as he is to prove an influence for good 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



51 



upon the minds of the young men of this 
country we must make a discrimination as to 
the kind of men upon whom we bestow these 
same marks of respect. It is possible for us 
to treat with tokens of honor men whose 
lives are far from honorable ; who have 
amassed wealth by means that are to be 
loathed ; who have used this wealth to work 
the confusion of their neighbors at home and 
the disgrace of their country abroad, and not 
to open paths of usefulness to the poor and 
helpless. If we recognize such men as 
worthy of our admiration we declare, in 
effect, that the only good quality in Peter 
Cooper's life was the fact that he had suc- 
ceeded in getting hold of an immense amount 
of money and had kept it as long as he 
pleased, and that in our opinion every one 
that contrives to outlive his rascalities with- 
out losing his booty is as welcome to our 
hearts as is the man that never let a dishon- 
ored dollar into his safe, or spent one hour in 
corrupting his countrymen or in bringing 
their institutions in contempt. 

I have thus tried to suggest some of the 
lessons that we may learn from the exarnjiles 
of goodness and honesty of life as shown by 
him whom we have so latety laid to rest. 
His peculiar but venerable person is no longer 
with us, but we have his life to look back 
upon, and he will long be remembered as a 
man that early learned the truth of the text, 
" No man can serve God and mammon," and 
thereafter lived in a manner wholly consis- 
tent with that truth. 

Classmates, — The exercises of this our 
Ivy Day are in general of such a pleasant 
character that I ought not to take to myself 
any more of this afternoon, nor shorten the 
time to which others have a claim. If this 
production has been tiresome to you, you can 
console yourselves with the thought of what 
is to come ; if it has seemed to any of you 
like mere advice, you are free to think of it 
with the suggestion, " Practice what you 



preach." I may, however, make in closing 
this suggestion, feeling that we are all ready 
to comply with it. Let us pray that nothing 
may occur to disturb the good feeling and 
general harmony that has always existed in 
the Class of Eighty-four. 



MY GHOST. 

One evening I locked myself in my room, 
for the last preparation for an examination 
in " Anna," which I had got to take the next 
day. " Busy !" was my reply to all knocks. 
It was not a regular examination ; I was 
"making up." It was in my Sophomore 
year and I had returned from a two months' 
sojourn at home, but a short time before. I 
was tired, sleepy, and cross with myself and 
every one else, and stopped for a moment to 
wonder what Was the use of Analytic Ge- 
ometry, and why we poor mortals were 
obliged to consume our valuable time in 
grinding on its mysteries, when there was so 
large a field in which we might work, which 
would, at any rate, be more agreeable, if not 
more profitable. I was sitting at my desk 
with my head resting on my hand, now and 
then drawing a dreamy cloud of smoke 
through my meerschaum, when, suddenly I 
felt a light touch on my shoulder, and, look- 
ing up, I saw an old man leaning over me 
and gazing intently at some of the formulas 
with which I had tastily decorated several 
sheets of paper. 

"What are those?" said he. "Those," 
I replied, " are mathematical symbols, which 
were invented, as nearly as I can discover, to 
perplex and discourage those students who 
are so unfortunate as to elect Sophomore 
mathematics." The old man looked at me 
sympathizingly for a moment, and then be- 
gan to walk back and forth across the room 
with his hands behind him. Suddenly paus- 
ing in his walk, he said, " I occupied this 
room over twenty years ago. It has a differ- 



52 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ent appearance now from what it had when I 
was here. I had to pay my own way, and 
the old room was rather bare then. Man} 7 a 
cold winter's night have chum and I gone 
to bed with our clothes on to keep from freez- 
ing, and in the morning found a solid cake of 
ice in the water-pail." " Why, sir," said 
the old man, growing excited at the recollec- 
tion, " you can't realize the hardships we en- 
dured here twenty years ago. Times have 
changed some since then. I only lived about 
two years after I graduated." 

At this remark, I began to feel rather 
shaky about holding any further conversation 
with the old gentleman ; but I decided that I 
could stand it for a while at any rate. I had 
said to some of the boys that very afternoon, 
that I had never seen a ghost and did not be- 
lieve that there was such a thing ; but if there 
was, that I should be very happy to make 
the acquaintance of a good, first-class ghost 
sometime. " Well," said the old man, " I 
saw every occupant of the room for about 
fifteen years after I left. There was one 
poor boy, a very smart fellow, who was con- 
sumptive. He had no father, and had to 
scratch pretty close to get along. He was 
his mother's idol. He had to leave in his 
Senior year and soon died. I remember one 
man from some place in New Hampshire. 
He was a great strapping fellow, brawny and 
muscular, but he had inherited a taste for 
rum. He used to drink right along. It 
didn't seem to affect him much for awhile, 
but he finally died, in his Junior year, of de- 
lirium tremens. There was another fellow 
here who had considerable money but was 
subject to fits of melancholy. He would sit 
for hours, looking into the fire or out of the 
window. He shot himself soon after gradu- 
ating." 

" I could tell you of a good many more," 
he continued. "In time I got so that I 
thought that bad luck came with the room ; 
but it is getting late and I must be going." 



He seemed to gradually fade away. I had 
just begun to think that if all ghosts were 
like this one, they were not such bad fellows 
as they were commonly thought to be, when 
I awoke. It was but a dream. My lamp had 
burnt out and my pipe had fallen to the floor. 
In a sudden fit of patriotism, or call it what 
you will, I determined to go to bed and not 
" cram up " any more for the morrow, but 
take my examination on what I knew. I will 
add that the next day I distinguished myself 
by narrowly escaping the "dead." 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 

The fifty-first annual convention of the 
Alpha Delta Phi occurred on the 16th and 
17th of May, under the auspices of the Hud- 
son Chapter of Adelbert College. The del- 
egates from the various chapters numbered as 
many as thirty, and enthusiasm and frater- 
nal feeling probably never reached such a 
pitch before, not excepting the semi-centen- 
nial gathering of last year. 

The delegates assembled in the parlors of 
the Kennard House in Cleveland, at ten 
o'clock, Wednesday morning, May 16th, and 
proceeded to business. Every chapter was 
represented except Harvard, and they failed 
to put in any appearance. After the noon 
recess, the convention again held a secret 
session, adjourning until Thursday morning. 

The public exercises in the Fourth Pres- 
byterian Church were largely attended and 
most interesting. What might be styled 
the main feature of the evening was the sing- 
ing of " Xaipe," by the members of tlie Fra- 
ternity. The address of welcome by Rev. 
Dr. Eels of Cincinnati, and the oration by R. 
R. Bowkerof New York, were enthusiastically 
received and warmly applauded. 

Thursday the convention met at 9.30 A.M. 
in secret session, adjourning at 1 P.M. to meet 
with the Middletown Chapter next year. At 
2 o'clock a special train was in waiting to 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



53 



convey the members to the country seat of 
Mr. Dan P. Eels at River Bank, just outside 
of the cit}\ A most enjoyable afternoon was 
spent in the grounds adjoining the residence, 
and after a collation, in keeping with the ap- 
pointments of the house, the society returned. 
The banquet was served in the Kennard 
House, and was presided over by ex-Governor 
Hayes of Ohio, while on either hand sat the 
brothers of Samuel Eels, the founder of the 
Fraternit}'. Reminiscences from them, and 
from the older members, were productive of 
rounds of applause, and a thoroughly good 
time was enjoyed by all present until the 
party broke up. 



IVY DAY. 

Another Ivy Day has passed, and the class 
of '8-1 looks back upon the pleasant ceremo- 
nies to see if its great anticipations have been 
fully realized. We see not the least chance 
for disappointment to any one. Everything 
has passed off smoothly and in a manner 
highly creditable to all the officers and mem- 
bers. The showers of the forenoon made the 
air cool and delightful. All Nature seemed 
to beam with a benign radiance, which was 
reflected by the happy faces of all present at 
the exercises. 

About 3.15 P.M. the class, lead by their 
marshal, A. C. Cobb, slowly ascended the 
spacious stairway of Memorial Hall. Gazed 
upon by a large and admiring audience they 
moved down the aisle to the front where they 
split ranks and in two single files went to 
their seats on the wings of the stage. The 
officers of the da) - took their positions on the 
front middle seat. Near the front of the 
stage stood the speakers' stand, covered with 
white, the college color, and draped with the 
class color, peacock blue. " '84," in light 
colored flowers, was tastily arranged on the 
front of the stand. 

After an earnest prayer by the chaplain, 



O. W. Means, and a fine selection by Grim- 
mer, the President, C. E. Sayward, with 
brief, appropriate remarks, in which he re- 
ferred to the history of Ivy Day at Bowdoin, 
introduced the other exercises, which pro- 
ceeded according to the following program : 

Oration J. A. Waterman, Jr. 

iirsic. 
Poem C. W. Longren. 

MUSIC. 

The oration, delivered in a distinct, easy 
manner, appears in another column and is 
well worth reading. 

The poem was finely written, displaying 
to good advantage the writer's graceful poet- 
ical conceptions and descriptions. 

The music was given with exceptionally 7 
fine, artistic skill, and added much to the pleas- 
ure of the occasion. After the poem the class 
marched out to the east side of the hall, where, 
reclining on the grass, they listened to the witty 
remarks of the President. At one time a 
thunder cloud threatened, but its loud rever- 
berations by no means drowned out Mr. Say- 
ward's stentorian tones. The class honors 
were there received and gracefully responded 
to by the recipients, as follows : 

Best Moustache S. E. Child. 

Lazy Man W. K. Hilton. 

Handsome Man P. S. Lindsey. 

Dig E. C. Smith. 

Ponyist W. H. Cotlireu. 

Popular Man H. M. Wright. 

The trowel was then given to the curator, 

E. C. Smith, who pledged himself to perform 

his duties faithfully. After all the members 

had clone their share in covering the vine, 

the class closed the exercises of the day by 

singing the following : 

IVY ODE. 

BY S. W. WALKER. 

Beneath the pleasant shadow 
Of our Memorial Hall, 
We plant our sacred ivy, 
To grace the naked wall. 
Though 'tis as yet a plautlet, 
It has the secret power 



54 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



To drink the dew and sunbeams, 
And form a fragrant bower. 

Extend, frail vine, thy rootlets, 
Uplift thy tiny crown, 
And brighten with thy beauty 
The walls' forbidding frown. 
Blow softly winds of autumn ; 
Clothe warmly winter snows ; 
And you, ye gods immortal, 
Watch o'er it as as it grows. 

Blest vine thou art the euibleni 
Of friendships here begun, 
Which ever shall twine firmer 
And bloom in future's sun. 
As on life's rugged journey 
We wander up and down, 
May blossoms of these friendships 
Dispel good fortune's frown. 

When the last note had died away, the 
class departed with feelings of deeper attach- 
ment to each other, and of satisfaction with 
the pleasures of the ever-to-be-remembered 
day. 



BOAT RACE. 

The annual class race came off on Thurs- 
day, June 7th, between crews from '?"4, '85, 
and '86. The afternoon was not the most 
favorable ; ever and anon showers would 
dampen the spirits of the comparatively small 
audience that had assembled. Nature was 
seemingly in tears in anticipation of the ap- 
proaching sorrow of '78 on hearing that their 
phenomenal record was beaten. While ap- 
parently unfavorable, in reality the rain qui- 
eted the water, and when at a little past 3 
o'clock the start was effected, it was in better 
condition than it has been for years. The 
Seniors did not furnish a crew as two of their 
best men were unable to row, and then, too, 
it has been thought, for a few years, not to 
comport with proper dignity for the Seniors 
to engage in any real muscular contest. The 
Freshmen were the first to row out to their 
position under the railroad bridge, and their 
neat form, together with their new suits, 
might have led unknowing ones to think that 
they were long experienced oarsmen. They 



started for position with a vigorous stroke, 
and evidently intended to make an impres- 
sion, which in fact they did. The Sopho- 
mores followed, and, as they moved from the 
float, their fine form and strong stroke gave 
evidence of their long, faithful training. 
Lastly, but by no means least, the Juniors put 
in an appearance. Their old boat was with 
difficulty urged along, and was evidently far 
inferior to the others. The Juniors did not 
put on any of the style with which the pre- 
ceding crews had started out, but, as if there 
were none anxiously watching them, rowed 
to position. They had been in training as a 
crew but three weeks, and very little was ex- 
pected of them but to show that '84 still 
maintained her traditional support of college 
institutions. 

At the start, the Freshmen caught the 
first water, but quickly fell to the rear. The 
Sophomores at once took the lead, and, fol- 
lowed by the other two crews, were soon out 
of sight. At this juncture, the band, which 
had previously delighted the audience -by 
some choice selections, began to play a dirge. 
Its appropriateness was a subject of some un- 
certainty. Soon the Sophomores came in 
sight, with a long stretch of smooth water 
between them and the Juniors, who were a 
short distance ahead of the Freshmen. All 
crews were rowing well and did not appear 
so exhausted as is sometimes the case. To 
the astonishment of all, and temporary dis- 
belief of some, the Sophomores were an- 
nounced as the winners, with the unprece- 
dented time of eighteen minutes fifty 
seconds and a quarter. The Juniors came in 
second, with twenty minutes and three sec- 
onds to their credit. They would have come 
in much sooner if they had not been fouled 
by the Freshmen, and in addition, two of 
their men lost their seats, and in remedying 
this mishap, caused some delay. The Fresh- 
men, who had also lost valuable time by their 
carelessness, gracefully brought up the rear, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



55 



with a record of twenty minutes and twenty- 
two seconds. This race was far more gen- 
erally satisfactory than is usually the case. 
Every one rejoiced that the record of 1878 
had been beaten, because it was shown that 
it was possible to surpass it. We cannot 
believe that the Sophomore crew is superior 
to any crew ever on the river, but must re- 
gard the exceptionable water as combining 
with a very good crew, to bring about a re- 
sult, of which we are all justly proud. We 
congratulate the Sophomores on the result 
of this race, and will add that it shows what 
a long, systematic course of training can ac- 
complish. 

We append the names of' the winning 
crew : F. W. Alexander, Richmond ; F. I. 
Brown, Bethel ; F. W. Davis, Hiram ; F. N. 
Whittier, Farmington. Coxswain, J. A. Pet- 
ers, Ellsworth. 



FIELD DAY. 

The Athletic Association held its annual 
meeting on Friday morning, June 8th, at the 
Topsham Fair Grounds. The weather was 
very favorable until about noon, when a heavy 
shower arose and necessitated the postpone- 
ment of a few contests until the following 
afternoon. The attendance was larger than 
last year, and on the whole the records were 
better. The band furnished some excellent 
music at intervals. Some new features, as 
wrestling and boxing were introduced and 
were highly appreciated. We add the names 
and records of the winners : 

1. Mile Kim. .Byram, '86, 5 minutes 13J seconds. 

2. Putting Shot ; 28 pounds. .Collins, '83, 20 feet. 

3. Throwing Hammer. .Winter, '83, 65 feet 8 

inches. 

4. Standing High Jump. .Norris, '85, 4 feet 6 

inches. 

5. Standing Broad Jump. .C. C.Torrey, '84, 9 feet 

41 inches. 

6. Half-Mile Run..Bascom, '83, 2 minutes 26 J 

seconds. 

7. Bicycle Kace . . Davis, '86, 5 minutes 6i seconds. 

8. 220-Yards Dash. .Thompson, '84, 234 seconds. 

9. Kicking Foot-Ball. .C. C. Torrey, '84, 144 feet. 
10. Hurdle Race. -Folsom, 85, 18^ seconds. 



11. Three-Legged Race; 100 yards. .Phinney and 

C. C. Torrey, '84, 134 seconds. 

12. 100- Yards-Dash. .Thompson, '84, Hi seconds. 

13. Throwing Base-Ball. .Collins, '83, 291 feet 2 

inches. 

14. Hop, Skip, and Jump. .Pettingill, '83, 36 feet 

6 inches. 

15. Boxing.. Whittier, '85. 

16. 100- Yards-Dash Backwards.. Folsom, '85, 164 

seconds. 

17. Wrestling.. Brown, '84. 

18. Sack Race ; 50 Yards and Return. .Ward well, 

254 seconds. 

19. Running High Jump. .Cornish, '86, 5 feet. 

20. Running Broad Jump. .Cornish, '86, 17 feet 

1 inch. 

21. Tug-of-War; Limited to 1,110 pounds, .won 

by '84. 

22. Consolation Race ; J mile run.. Kemp, '84, 58 

seconds. 

23. Prize for the best average record. -C. C. 

Torrey, '84. 

24. Swimming.. Collins, '83. 



BASE-BALL. 
Bowdoin vs. Bates. 
The Bowdoin-Bates game was played on 
the college campus, Lewiston, May 30th. 
The game was close up to the ninth inning 
and one of the best of the series. The 
following is the score : 

BOWDOIN". 

A.B. R. IB. T.B. P.O. A. E- 

"Winter, lb 6 2 2 4 15 I 

Knapp, o 6 1' 2 3 4 ] 3 

Torrey, 2b 6 2 2 2 4 10 

Wright, s. s 6 10 2 2 1 

Cook.p 5 2 3 4 8 

Folsom, r. f. 5 1110 2 

Waterman, 3b. 5 1112 10 

Lindsey, o. f. 5 1110 

Barton, 1. f 5 2 3 3 1 

Totals 49 13 15 19 27 13 8 

BATES. 

A.B. R. IB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Bartlett, 3b 5 2 3 3 2 1 

Nickerson,2b 5 11112 1 

Holden.s.s 5 2 2 

Sandford, c 4 3 2 2 8 10 

Walker, 1. f. 4 2 2 4 2 

Atwood,lb 4 2 2 9 1 

Hadley, e. f. 4 2 

Whitmore, r. f. 4 1 

Whitmarsh, p 3 1110 6 2 

Totals 38 5 10 11 27 13 10 

Innings 1 23456789 

Bowdoin 110 2 9—13 

Bates 2 1 10 10—5 

Two-base hits — Knapp, Cook, and Bartlett. Three- 



56 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



base hit — Winter. First base on called balls — Bates, 1. 
Struck out — Bowdoins, 4 ; Bates, 3. Balls called — on 
Cook, 65; on Whitmarsh, 55. Strikes called — off Cook, 
6; off Whituiarsh, 15. Double play — Wright and Win- 
ter, Waterman and Torrey. Left on bases — Bowdoin, 8; 
Bates, 7. Earned runs — Bowdoins, 2; Bates, 1. Um- 
pire — Mr. Roberts, of Lewiston. Time — 1 hour 40 
minutes. 

Boivdoin vs. Colby. 
The base-ball game at Waterville, May 
30th, between the Colby and Bowdoin nines 
was won by Colby, 9 to 5. The following is 
the official score : 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. R. IB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Winter.lb 5 1 1 1 10 

Knapp, c 5 7 3 5 

Torrey, 2b 5 2 1 2 2 

Wright, p 4 2 110 9 1 

Cook, r. f., 3b 2 12 1 

Folsom, 3b., r. f. 4 112 

Waterman, s. s 3 2 3 2 

Liudsey, c. f. 4 

Barton, 1. f. 4 2 10 

Totals 36 5 4 6 24 17 11 

COLBY. 

A.B. E. ]B. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Doe, c 5 2 2 8 2 1 

Putnam, c. f. 4 2 3 1 

Boyd, 3b 4 2 110 11 

Mathews, 2b 4 1112 2 2 

Nowell, 1. f. 4 2 2 4 3 10 

Til ton, lb 4 1119 1 

Barton, p 4 2 2 7 1 

Merrill, s. s 4 10 2 3 1 

Emerson, r. f. 4 10 

Totals 37 9 9 11 27 17 8 

Innings 1 23456789 

Bowdoin 3 2 0—5 

Colby.. 1 0026000 —9 

Earned runs — Colby, 2; Bowdoin, 1. Two-base hits— 
Nowell (2), Torrey, Conk. First base on errors— Colby, 
7; Bowdoin, 7. First base on called balls — Bowdoin, 3. 

Balls called— on Bart 71; on Wright, 40. Strikes 

called— off Barton, 10; off Wright, 9. Struck out- 
Colby, 2; Bowdoin, 3. Passed balls— Doe, 2; Knapp, 2. 
"Wild pitch— Barton. Double plays— Nowell and Math- 
ews, Merrill and Til ton, Barton' and Winter. Left on 
bases— Colby, 4; Bowdoin, 7. Time— 1 hour 40 miu- 
utes. Umpire— F. K. Woodcock, Waterville. 

Bowdoin vs. Bates. 
The Bowdoins and the Bates met on the 
delta, June 7th, and defeated them for the 
fourth time. The Bates did not see third 
base for the entire game. The game was 
interesting mainly for the few errors on the 
part of the Bowdoins, and the successful 



effort to choke the Bates throughout the nine 
innings. Below is the full score : 
BOWDOIN. 

A.B. R. IB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Winter.lb 5 2 1 I 12 1 

Knapp, c 5 1116 2 

Torrey, 2b 5 3 114 3 

Wright, p 4 11117 

Cook, r. f. 5 10 10 

Stetson, 3b 4 1 10 3 

Waterman, s. s 4 11 112 2 

Lindsey, c. f. 4 1 2 

Barton, 1. f. 4 I 1 

Totals 40 10 7 7 27 17 3 

BATES. 

A.B. R. IB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Bartlett, 3b 4 114 3 2 

Nickerson, 2b 4 5 11 

Holden, s. s 4 11114 

Sandford, c 3 5 

Walker, 1. f. 3 o 

Atwood, lb 3 118 12 

Hadley, c. f. 3 10 

Flanders, r. f. 3 1 

Whitmarsh, p 3 13 2 

Totals 30 3 3 24 10 12 

Innings 1 2 3 456789 

Bowdoiu 7 1 2 —10 

Bates 0—0 

First base on called calls — Bowdoin. 1. First base on 
errors — Bowdoin, 12; Bates, 3. Struck out — Bowdoin, 
1; Bates, 5. Balls called— on Wright, 33; on Whit- 
marsh, 70. Strikes called— off Wright, 7; off' Whitmarsh, 
9. Double play — Whitmarsh, Atwood, and Sandford; 
Wright and Winter. Earned runs — Bowdoin, 1. Left 
on bases — Bowdoins, 7; Bates, 3. Time— 1 hour 28 
minutes. Umpire — Mr. Barrett Potter, of Brunswick. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



B-a-t-e-s, 0! 0! 0! 

The " Diver " lost his hat. 

Who wouldn't be a Junior? 

Did you see the big " bar ?" 

Condon bas been frescoing the fences. 

The mumps still linger in the lap of spring. 

Longren, '84, sings in the TJniversalist choir. 

Chase, '83, is very sick at bis home in Portland. 

Kemp got some consolation out of the last prize. 

If the Ivy Hop wasn't a success it was no fault 
of '84. 

Those Ivy programs were ahead of anything yet 
in that line. 

This is the second year that '84 has won the 
Field-Day cider. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



57 



J. Torrey, '84, plays the clarionet in the chapel 
choir. 

They say it was the best Pield-Day cider for 
some years. 

Professor Packard spoke before the Y. M. C. A., 
last Sunday evening. 

Tutor Hawes spoke before the Y. M. C. A. two 
weeks ago last Sunday. 

The postponed Bowdoin-Colby game will be 
played to-day at Waterville. 

During the recent severe gale some of the trees 
on the campus were injured. 

Grimmer does better every time he comes. He 
never fails to give satisfaction. 

The Seniors march out of the chapel next Sat- 
urday afternoon, at five o'clock. 

Sixteen Japanese ivies have been sent to the 
janitor to set out around Memorial. 

The athletic prizes were on exhibition at Board- 
man's. There were twenty-four in all. 

Prof. Stanley, of Bates College, preached at the 
Pii'st Parish Church, Sunday, June 3d. 

The way the new Town Hall is progressing no- 
body of the present generation will be benefited by 
it. 

Some of the Professors on the south side of the 
chapel must have forgotten where their seats are at 
prayers by this time. 

The students have been fixing up flower beds 
in front of some of the ends. Wo hope the practice 
will become epidemic. 

Quito a number of the students attended the 
baptism at South Freeport two weeks ago. About 
fifty-six were immersed. 

Weren't the young ladies' costumes at the Hop 
pretty? They were little daisies. N. B.— Don't 
mi's-apply the last remark. 

Professor Lee took his botany class to Mount 
Ararat, in Topsham, one day last week, to collect 
specimens for practical work. 

The Seniors seem inclined to find fault with 
everything connected with the Ivy and Field Days. 
Poor fellows, are they envious? 

Given's Band gave a fine promenade concert at 
the mall stand last Wednesday evening. Every- 
body was out to enjoy the fine music. 

Prof. Lee, accompanied by Holden, '83, made a 
visit, a few days ago, to the mounds and shell heaps 
of Frendship. His object was fossil specimens. 



We are all proud of '85's time in the boat race. 
There is good material there for a University crew. 
This seems to be a year for beating the best records. 
At tho recent decennial reunion of Bridgton 
High School, F. W. Davis, '85, delivered the oration, 
and 0. R. Cook, of the same class, was toast-master. 

Chase, '85, has been very sick with the mumps. 
He has now fully recovered. There has been con- 
siderable sickness among the students this spring. 

Let's see, wasn't there a game played not long 
ago with a score something like that one last Thurs- 
day? 

Big Soph, (weighing about fifteen stone, to a fel- 
low-classmate) — " Why I didn't get back at the be- 
ginning of the term was because I was sick." 
" Yes, you do look rather thin," was the sarcastic 
reply. 

The proprietor of the Tontine Laundry has put 
an order slate in the reading-room which is quite a 
convenience. We presume he gets bogus orders 
sometimes though. 

An '84 man, after examining a mineral the other 
day, very intently, said to a fellow-classmate that 
he was sure it was "omentum." He must have 
been troubled with dyspepsia. 

The next class that'has an Ivy Hop not only 
wants to give away the tickets but offer a chromo 
for every couple that will dance. If they do they 
will probably get enough for two sets. 

Memorial Hall is tho place for Ivy exercises. 

Every one could be seated comfortably. The only 

inconvenience was that the speakers could not be 

! heard, at all times, in different parts of the hall. 
i 

A stirring temperance speech was made last 

Saturday evening, by a local orator, on the mall. 

Judging from tho frequent applause of his hearers 

his appeals were effective and his logic irresistible. 

The horse editor asked us the other day the fol- 
lowing conundrum : " Why is a mule like the 
country of Switzerland? " When we gave it up, he, 
edging off out of reach, said •' Because they both 
have mountaineers" (ears). 

Quite a number of sub-Freshmen were here 
during Ivy and Field Days. There is no time in 
the year when the college presents a more favora- 
ble appearance than during its great annual hol- 
iday. 

The Professor in Physiology told the class the 
other day that he always managed to keep cool, 
during hot nights, by sleeping with his feet uncov- 
ered. We have seen people whose pedal extremities 



58 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



were of such dimensions that the experiment might 
prove dangerous especially in a changeable climate 
like ours. But then there is no rule without ex- 
ceptions. 

The following members of '85 have been ap- 
pointed to take part in the Sophomore Prize Decla- 
mations at the end of the term : Butler, Davis, Fol- 
som, Libby, Chase, French, Thomas, Purington, 
Norton, Peters, Bartlett, Eames. 

A down-town lady, evidently an admirer of 
base-ball, has presented the nine with some very 
pretty foul-line flags. With true modesty she de- 
clined to have her name published. This all comes 
about by having such a popular captain. 

A '77 man that was here last week called and 
paid a year's subscription for the Orient iu ad- 
vance. When he paid it we felt like the boy that 
the Sunday-school teacher asked, if a man should 
give him a hundred dollars if he would pray for 
him, and the unregenerate scamp said, " No, but he 
would pray for another just like him." 

Several of the Juniors accompany Professor Lee 
down Casco Bay on a zoological and botanical trip. 
They are to start this afternoon and return Satur- 
day. Kendall, of '85, is skipper. We can doubtless 
give an account of the trip in the next number, as 
one of the party has consented to keep a log. 

At a meeting of the trustees of Washington 
Academy, at Calais, Me., to consider a proposition 
to make that academy a fitting school for Bowdoin 
College, after some discussion, it was voted to ac- 
cept the proposition ; but the necessary arrange- 
ments cannot be completed until the meeting of the 
Board of Trustees at Commencement. 

We noticed the other morning, at prayers, the 
different ways in which the boys parted their hair. 
About five per cent, of them preferred the left side, 
three per cent, the right, two per cent, the medium 
line, a la dude, and the remaining ninety per cent, 
apparently had no preference. N. B. — These ob- 
servations were taken Sunday morning. 

At Colby one of the professors has given a suf- 
ficient sum of money to fix up a lawn-tennis court. 
We noticed that it was being built right in front of 
one of the halls. We would be contented here if 
somebody would fix up a suitable ground in the 
clearing back of the halls. It would require consid- 
erable work but some good courts could be made 
there. 

Is it el? or sis ? We know a Junior who lost 
three cigars by betting with an underclassman that 



the Greek numeral for one had no rough breathing, 
while a grave and learned Senior lost a dollar with 
a Freshman in the same way. That the Senior 
should forget is not so strange, but that the Junior 
should lose on such a bet as that is indeed a sur- 
prise. 

Who says Bowdoin cannot have one of the finest 
campuses in the country ? If in an almost natural 
state it is so beautiful what a change might be 
wrought if money and art could join hands with 
nature. Here is an excellent opportunity for some 
wealthy, benevolent friend of the college to win the 
everlasting gratitude of future students. 

The band gave us a concert on the campus the 
other night. The boys did first-rate considering the 
time they had been practicing — only two weeks. 
The most of the students are friendly to the organ- 
ization, too, and admire the pluck and enterprise 
necessary for such an undertaking. A few of course 
will find fault. Some people wouldn't live if they 
couldn't be growling about something. Give us 
another concert some fine evening. 

President Chamberlain arrived home from Bos- 
ton, Thursday, June 7th, on the 6.30 p.m. train. 
He came in a special car tendered him by the 
Maine Central Directors. He walked very slowly 
and with difficulty from the car to his carriage. 
His looks plainly tell the sufferiug he has endured 
during the few weeks of his absence. He is im- 
proving every day, but he is not expected to be able 
to assume his usual duties at Commencement. 

In the lawn tenuis tournament the winners in 
the singles were the * T and A K E clubs ; in the 
double the A k e club. Although the game is com- 
paratively new, considerable interest was mani- 
fested, and a large audience witnessed the games. 
It will doubtless be more attractable in a year from 
now than at the present time, since it will be more 
generally understood and better played. By all 
means let it form a part of the exercises next year. 

One of the respected citizens of the town was 
returning uot long since from Portland on the mid- 
night. After the conductor came around for the 
tickets he nestled down in his seat for a nap, 
asking the student who sat opposite him to awake 
him when they got to Brunswick. He was soon 
fast asleep and the next thing he remembers, is 
the conductor awaking him and asking for his ticket. 
He informed that official that he gave him his ticket 
just out of Portland. " How far are you going ? " 
asked the conductor. " To Brunswick," said the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



59 



respected citizen. " Well you are almost to Bow- 
doiuham, ten miles beyond," was the reply. Then 
the train was stopped, and our sleepy friend seizing 
his satchel trudged back, reaching home about 
3 A.M. 

The following clipping from the Tech. will doubt- 
less have a significance to members of the two 
upper classes : "For sale, or will exchange for a 
flannel shirt, box of paper collars, and a pair of 
rubber boots, a copper-headed cane in first-rate 
condition, having been little used. The following 
is the reason for selling : The present owner has 
reformed and desires to become a civil engineer. 
The article can be seen daily in third-year drawing- 
room." 

The Field-Day exercises this year were entered 
into with more spirit than before for some time. 
The prizes were more evenly divided among the 
classes than ever before. The Freshmen espe- 
cially did themselves credit and showed what 
we may expect from them in the future. In 
nearly one-half of the exercises there is a better 
record than last year, while some records are 
the best in the history of the association. Those 
winning the same things this year as last, 
in every instance but one, made a better record, 
showing better training. Last year, '82 won one 
prize ; '83, seven ; '84, nine ; and '85, one. This year 
'83 won six ; '8-1, eight; '85, four ; and '86, five. Next 
year it should be even better than this. Although 
there were five prizes more this year than last, yet 
the receipts will very nearly, if not quite, equal the 
expenditures. On the whole, therefore, notwith- 
standing some unavoidable delays and mishaps, we 
can feel satisfied with the records of our athletic 
sports of the present year. 

The Cleavelaud Cabinet has just been enriched 
by the gift of a box of minerals sent from Colorado, 
by Rev. W. F. Bickford, a graduate of the class of 
72. Mr. Bickford was pastor of the Congregational 
Church in Winthrop, Maine, for several years, and 
is now preaching at Breckenridge, Colorado. 
Among the specimens are beautiful crystals of irri- 
descent Pyrites, showing crystalline forms which 
are very rare, and which were not before repre- 
sented in the cabinet. There are also specimens 
of several different varieties of fossil woods, and 
very interesting feldspar crystals and dendrites. 
This is the second box that Mr. Bickford has sent, 
and it would be very desirable if his example should 
be imitated by other graduates and friends of the 
college. Many doubtless think that because we 



have a very fine collection here nothing more is 
wanted. The truth is we would gladly receive 
specimens of all kinds, especially crystals or metal- 
lic ores. The only way the cabinet can grow is by 
such donations, as it has no fund from which to 
purchase specimens. 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduate- ami undergraduates are earnestly solicited to send 
personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Brunswick, Me.] 

'30.— Rev.Le wis Pennell died athishome in South- 
port, Conn., May 22d. Mr. Pennell was born in 
Brunswick, February, 1803. After leaving college 
he pursued a theological course at Andover, Mass., 
where he graduated in 1833. He spent the first 
two years of his ministry as a missionary in Maine, 
and the next two years in the Western States. He 
was then ordained pastor of the Congregational 
church iu Northbridge, Mass. ; subsequently served 
as supply for five or six years at Weston, Conn. ; 
then became pastor of the Congregational churches, 
successively, of New Fairfield, Conn., and South 
Southbridge, Mass. For the last few years he was 
not engaged in active service, owing to ill health. 

'41. -Asa C. Mitchell died in Bellows Falls, Vt., 
May 19th. Hewas born in North Yarmouth (now Yar- 
mouth), Me., August, 1821. On leaving college 
he taught school first in Bath, and later in Well- 
fleet, Mass., in which town he also studied medicine 
with his brother, Dr. Jacob Mitchell. Ill health 
requiring more active business Mr. Mitchell returned 
to Maine, and was employed for a few years as 
civil engineer on the Atlantic and St. Lawrence 
R. R., and subsequently in Kentucky. In 1858 he 
returned to Auburn, Me., employed himself for a 
few years in farming, was clerk in the Portland Post 
Office, was engaged as a druggist with his classmate, 
Henry T. Cummings, and, health again failing, ac- 
cepted the position of chief engineer on the Portland 
& Ogdeusburg Railroad. In 1877 he resumed the 
business of druggist at Bellows Falls, where he 
resided till the time of his death. 

'73.— C. M. Walker of Napa City, California, 
was recently elected County Superintendent of 
Schools, on the republican ticket. He is principal 
and one of the proprietors of the Oak Mound School, 
and has proved himself a successful teacher. 

'76. — William Alden, M.D., has been appointed 
assistant surgeon in the United States Army, and 
has gone to his station at Fort Assiniboine, Mon- 
tana Territory. 



60 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



76.— Edward H. Kimball was married to Miss 
Anna Dike of Bath, the 13th inst. The ceremony 
took place in the New Jerusalem church in Bath. 

77. — Rev. George A. Holbrook has received a 
call totheSt. Paul's Episcopal church in Brunswick. 
Mr. Holbrook is now preaching in Bellevue, Ohio. 

77.— Rev. Edgar M. Cousins has resigned his 
position at Cherryfield, Me., where he has been 
since 1880, and has accepted a call to the West 
Congregational church in Portland. 

79. —Rev. George W. Johnson was married May 
22d, in Milton, N. S., to Miss Jane T. Freeman of 
that town. Mr. Johnson graduated from the Ban- 
gor Seminary in 1882, and has since then been set- 
tled over the Congregational church in Milton. 

'80.— Maxcy is in Fargo, Dakota Territory, en- 
gaged in the boot and shoe trade. 

'80.— F. W. Hall was recently appointed District 
Attorney for Vallejo County, California. 

'80. — H. R. Giveen has been elected principal of 
the schools in Weaversville, Trinity Co., California. 



INTER-COLLEGIATE NEWS. 



Colby : 

The Faculty are grading and laying out tennis 
courts for the students on the front campus. [ Will 
our Faculty, Treasurer, and Boards please make a 
note of the above and compare with the recent action 
of our authorities ? ] They also think their campus 
of sufficient importance to have it clipped regularly 
with a lawn mower. 
Yassar : 

Professor Backus has accepted the Presidency 
of Packer Institute, Brooklyn. 

Founder's Day was May 4th. 

The Junior party to the Seniors was May 18. 

A cat under the pedals has several times ma- 
terially interfered with the working of the organ. — 
Miss. 

A representation of "The Rivals" was given by 
the students, April 21. 
University of Vermont : 

In a little while the land will be invaded by the 
adhesive University book-agents. The U. V. M. 
will furnish her quota.— Cynic. [Adhesive is good. 
Does it mean that they, like stamps, stick when 
licked ?] 

Some of the students have engaged themselves 
for the Summer vacation, as table waiters at the 



Marshall House, York Beach, a famous watering- 
place on the Maine coast. 

Ten lady-students in college— six in the Fresh- 
man class, two in the Sophomore, one in the Junior, 
and one in the Senior. As yet, co-education has 
not fallen very heavily upon the U. V. M. — Cynic. 
Williams : 

Several tennis courts are being staked out on 
west college campus. 

The college is the recipient of a valuable gift 
from Mr. Goodrich, the donor of Goodrich Hall. 
This is nothing less than 360 acres of cranberry 
marsh in N. J. This delicious berry is destined to 
supersede the nutritious prune in popularity at 
Williams. 

The Troy Times of Thursday, the 10th, stated 
that Harry A. Garfield had been invited to deliver 
a Decoration Day address in North Adams. — Argo. 
Yale: 

Some '83 men have been suspended for marks. 

Yale Freshman nine defeated the Harvard 
Freshman, May 19. 

The Y. M. C. A. members of the Freshman class 
have refused to write a composition on Horace. He 
is too hard a subject. 

Two hundred and ten men tried the Freshman 
examinations last June. Only one hundred and 
fifty are now in college. -Courant. 



CLIPPINGS. 



Beastly dude — Dandelion. — Acta. 

A barbarous custom— shaving. — Acta. 

Horace rode along the Sacred Way on a mule, 
but the modern Soph, follows him on a pony. — Ex. 

An amateur editor has just made his fortune by 
his pen. His father died of grief after reading one 
his editorials, and left him $150,000.— Ex. 

Prof, in Logic - " Give an example of undistrib- 
uted middle." Mr. X. — "David Davis, sir!" — 
Transcript. 

A lady and gentleman accidentally touched 
each other's feet under the table. " Secret tele- 
graphy," said she. " Communion of soles," said he. 
— Ex. 

Fascinating Freshman (anxious to make an im- 
pression)—" Why, you are as full of airs as a music- 
box ! " Young Lady (unfascinated)—" That may 
be, but I do not go with a crank." Freshman cuts 
down his calling list by one.— Brunonian. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Gl 



A man, lately married, was asked at the club 
about bis bride. "Is she pretty!" "No," re- 
plied be — "she is not, but she will be when her 
father dies." — Ex. 

Lives of Seniors all remind us 

How to make our own sublime, 
And, departing, leave behind us 
Unpaid wash-bills every time. 

— Srunonian. 
Barber (to Junior who is having bis hair cut)— 
"Will you have it cut long or short, sir?" Jun- 
ior — "Well, just long enough to keep me from 
Calculus, and it will be entirely satisfactory." — Ex. 

Student to maiden lady — " May I-er have this 
waltz?" Maiden Lady — "I fear you don't know 
the old-fashioned step I am accustomed to." Stu- 
dent (encouragingly) — "0, I think so, I can dance 
with my mother." — Lehigh Burr. 

THE COLLEGE WIDOW. 

Ah ! It is painful to watch her 
As she endeavors to win with the air 

That captured our fathers before us, 
As a lion is caught in a snare. 

She's watching and waiting for some one, 
Watching and waiting in vain ; 

To Freshmen she seems like a mother ; 
To Seniors she's homely and plain. 

Can it be that she ever was pretty, 
That her hair was golden and fine, 

And her lips as red as the roses, 
Afar back in the "auld lang syne." 

It is plain as the phantoms surround her 
And her pride approaches its fall, 

That her amor omnia vincit 
Has proven no vincit at all. 

— Ex. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



Well, Jason, we are sorry that you have taken 
so much trouble to explain that little joke about 
boutonnieres to us. In fact you did not see the 
point at all. The truth is, that paragraph was such 
an exquisite bit of humor, such a roaring, side- 
splitting old joke that we couldn't resist clipping it 
entire and giving our readers the full benefit of it, 
so that they might have a hearty laugh over it as 
well as ourselves. If you have any more rich pieces 
of wit, Jason, just order them up on deck and we 
will impress a few. 

In one of the late issues of the College Argus the 
exchange editor devotes considerable of his space 
to an entirely uncalled for and ungentlemanly at- 
tack upon our college. In speaking of the Orient 
he says : "It recognizes the fact that the authorities 



are determined to put their foot on one phase of the 
college rowdyism (to put it mildly) which has be- 
come typical of Bowdoin of late. The only weak 
point about this view is that it rests its hope of an 
increase [in numbers] on this one reform alone." 
In the eyes of our friend from Connecticut, at least, 
we are rather a hard lot. What his grounds for so 
thinking are we are at a loss to determine. As bis 
only acquaintance with our men or institution has 
been through the medium of the Orient, we are 
forced to conclude that the attack was one of pure 
spite urged on by that utterly despicable pusilla- 
nimity of character which, too often we bear, char- 
acterizes the average Middletown man. We leave 
it to others who are personally acquainted with us 
to -toll us what reforms are needed and how we shall 
become better than we are. Not content with 
"slinging mud" at the college, he next takes it 
upon himself to criticise the Orient, and " sits 
down " rather heavily on the Literary Department. 
For the benefit of our many readers (the Argus 
must know itself like a book by this time if it reads 
its exchanges) we will size up this critic and show 
it to them in all its entirety. The inventory is 
something as follows : The size is sixteen pages. 
It is made up mostly of ads., eight and one-half 
pages being devoted to that use. The remaining 
space is filled by a board of fourteen editors, and 
contains the usual departments, but until the last 
number it has not aspired to anything literary. To 
show the general tone of the composition, we clip 
the following locals : 

Signs of summer. 

First straw hat, D e, '84. 

First red waist, Miss P , '85. 

First Sing Sing coiffure, C — pp — 1, '83. 
First lavender pants, D ke, '86. 

In conclusion we can only say : 

Oh would some one the giftie gie them 
To see themselves as others see them. 

We humbly beg our readers' pardon for having 
taken up so much space noting the envious attacks 
of our ex. from the land where embryo ministers 
pitch pennies in preference to other sports. 

The Wheelman for June is before us. We find 
this number more interesting, if possible, than those 
which have preceded it. The stories are well writ- 
ten, and, although relating exclusively to bicycling 
subjects, make one who is not even able to ride the 
"rubber-tired steed" feel as though he were an 
adept at the art. " The Cycle of the Seasons " 
was especially interesting to us, both on account of 
its subject matter and its artistic dress. 

We clip the following from the Brunoniun, as 



62 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



no doubt many will be able to appreciate it after 

Ivy Day : 

GONE-NESS. 

'Tis only a maiden's lips, 

Yet a maiden's lips are sweet; 
And my throbbing breast will not let me rest 

'Till our lips together meet. 

'Tis only a maiden's eyes, 

Yet a maiden's eyes are bright, 
And I scarcely know, they are flashing so, 

How to read their tale aright. 

'Tis only a maiden's voice, 

Yet a maiden's voice is clear 
And my heart stands still, and my eyelids fill 

At the words I've longed to hear. 

'Tis only a maiden's heart, 

Yet a maiden's heart is true; 
And I clasp her tight, while my heart is light, 

For she's mine the whole world through. 



BOOK NOTICE. 

A work is in press and will soon be issued by 
Moses King of Cambridge, Mass., entitled " Exam- 
ples for Elementary Practice in Delineation," by 
Charles H. Moore, instructor in drawing and prin- 
ciples of design in Harvard University. It is in- 
tended to be used as a text-book by schools and iso- 
lated beginners, and will consist of twenty plates of 
designs selected from the works of the ancient and 
mediaeval schools. They will be printed on heavy 
paper and will be loose in a portfolio in order to 
serve better as copies. They will also be accompa- 
nied by a dozen pages or so of explanatory letter- 
press. 

TEACHERS 

Supplied with positions in all grades of Educational work. 
Send stamp for circular. 

BBOCKWAY TEACHERS' AGENCY, 

Times Building, CHICAGO. 



The Sixty-Secoud Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 8th,lS83, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshua L. Chamberlain, LL.D., President 5 Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H. Gerrish, M.D., 
Anatomy ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence ; Henry 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Bdrt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles 0. 
Hunt, M. D., Materia Mt-dica and Therapeutics 5 Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator oF 
Anatomy. 

Circular.- containim; lull iM'i.nnatiun may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, ROOM 
PAPER, PERIODICALS, <ScC. 



FRANK M. STETSON, 



= 



UJ 







RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely 'without adulteration or drugs. 

"We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 

direct importation, which is made especially for us, water 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLEN & GIM'EK Manufacturers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Eyery Description done to Order. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




' members who were to 
later. 

d the two foremost of the 
" Harvard," and Yonson 
in sight. The pace is 
ire neck and neck, and 
the club, whom you ob- 
' Shadow "light roadster, 
res the race a tie. 
r men? " he asks. 
iere," is the reply. 
trvardV or 'Yale's' or 




or it," says the captain, 
s a body will realize the 
ist remark, but the thou- 
ich the coming year will 
ane of them realize that 
1 choosing a bicycle is to 
less than the very best 
. Each should find out 
cles before making his 
assist enquirers in their 
we will, on receipt of a 
1 to any address, a copy 
catalogue by return mail. 

HAM COMPANY, 

e House of America. 
died 1877.] 


rrival of the raciti 
just thirty minute 
e minutes more at 
g men— Fri,on his 
s "Yale," appear 
siidous : the men 
cs, the captain of 
is leaning on his 
3 foreground, decln 
Vhere are the othi 
h, behind, somew 
ire there any 'H 


S 


lIi ! that accounts f 
lericau bicyclers a 
of the captain's 1 
3 of new riders wh 
uce, should each 
lly true economy i 
utcnt with nothing 
■nonuy will procur 
e can about bicy 
e, and in order to 
h for information 
ee-cent stamp, sen 
r large illustrated 

rHE CUNNING 

Pioneer Bicycl 

[Kstubli 






BURBANK, DOUGLASS & CO., 



(Successors to True, Douglass & Co.) Importers and Wholesale 
Dealers in 

China, Crockery, I Glass Ware, 



LAMP GOODS. CHANDELIERS AND PLATED WARE. 
242 Middle Street, . . PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PICTUKE FRAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

From the cheapest to the very best. Also Pictures, Cabinet 

Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, etc. Also, Agent for 

the celebrated Household Sewing Machine. 

In the Blue Store, Main Street, Second Door from Elm, 
Opposite the Park, Brunswick, Maine. 



All the Students Should Buy 

THEIR 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 
huk E, Boberts' Boot I Sisg Btm% 

Coe. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



JOHN 



H. BRACKETT, 

SPRING STYLES, 1883, 



Consisting of Suitings, Overenntings, and Pant Patterns, made in 
latest style and good tit guaranteed, at 20 per cent, less than the 
same goods can be bought elsewhere. Also a 

Fine Line of White Shirts, Ties, Braces, Collars, 
Hose, and Under Flannels. 



Tne Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company, 

Assets, $51,500,000. Surplus, $6,500,000. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1816. 

The New Plan of Cash Value and Non-Forfeitable 
POLicr meets the needs of the public. Send for full iuforma- 
41011 to H. N. FAIEBANKS. Gen'l Agent, 

BANGOR, MAINE 

S. WALKER & SON, 

Fresh and Corned Beef, Pork, Mution, Poultry, 

All for the Invest Cash Prices. Liberal Discount to Clubs 
and Boarding Houses. 

At the Old Stand near corner Main and Centre Streets, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

S. WALKER.. WM. H. WALKEK. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



.A. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes S Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 

CA-XiIj A1TD EI2C^3uEI3iTE: ^£ST -WOXSIEE. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 Middle Stmt, - - - - Portland, Me. 



TIFFANY & CO., Union Square, 
New York City, have made prepar- 
ations for the coming season, to of- 
fer original and artistic designs with 
new methods of treatment, for forms 
of Commencement and other invita- 
tions. 

They have also increased their 
facilities for producing articles of 
appropriate design for Prizes, Class 
Cups, Society Badges, etc. 

Drawings, with Estimates, sent 
on application. 

Correspondence invited. 

S4T@ 80TS5-, 
386 Washington Street, BATH, ME. 

B3r C. 3^. ^XjTTIb^IIbvdlE^. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



ty Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8j and 587 Congress St., and 235 Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

jQST Send for Price List. 

ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. Wl LSON & CO., 

"Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 



C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

OVER BOARDMAN'S STORE. 

Give Me a Call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SHREVE, * 

CRUMP 
• & LOW, 

432 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




XTENSIVE STOCK 
OF CHOICE GOODS. 



STEELING SILVEEWAEE- Tea, Coffee, and Din- 
ner Sets, Forks and Spoons, etc., of exclusive pat- 
terns ; Old English Silver ; Candelabra ; Carriage 
Clocks; Watches of all grades — Chronograph, Be- 
peating, and Chatelaine, with Chains, etc., etc. 

SELECTED DIAMONDS ; Black, "White, and Fancy 
Color Pearls ; Eubies, Emeralds, Sapphires, Cat's- 
eyes, Precious Stones, generally, of highest quali- 
ties; Fine Gold Jewelry of original designs, etc., 
etc. 

AETISTIC BEONZES of new models— Elegant Man- 
tel Clocks (keyless) ; English Library, Mantel, and 
Hall Clocks, with Westminster Chimes, Cathedral 
Gongs, Mantel Sets, in Marble, Bronze, Polished 
Brass, etc. 

DECOEATIVE POECELAIN in Vases, Plaques, Des- 
sert, Coffee and Ice Cream Sets, etc., from the 
Minton, "Worcester Eoyal, Crown Derby, Copeland, 
Eoyal Berlin, Dresden, and other celebrated works, 
etc. 

MARBLE STATUARY. NOVELTIES. 



ALL, KINDS OF 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 



Agents Gorham Mfg. Co. 



Mgs^pstfujjfaasi 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fur- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Work- 
manship, we especially solicit orders for line Printing of all 
kinds, 



For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

We also make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges, 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Bowdoin College Boys 

When they visit BATH should call at 

WEBBERS DRUG STORE. 

A Full Line of Cigars, Toilet Articles, &c. 



Smoke Smo'tee 

THE MEW CIGAR, 

-e— * YALE.*- =3- 

Price IO Cts. Havana Filled, 

.ALSO, 

DIAMOND CROWN. Price 5 Cts. 

JOHNSTON & HATCH, 

LEWISTON, ME. 

SS P *° For sale in Brunswick by Ed. J. Merriman. 

Smoke Smoke 

FIRST-CLASS 

Fiaaos, Organs, and Melciecas, 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 

THOMAS H. RILEY, . . . Brunswick, Me. 

Also INSURANCE written in Best Companies, 
at Lowest Rates. 

FOUND AT LAST!! 

That the place to buy the Very Best 

Groceries and Students' Supplies, 

At the Lowest Possible Price, is at 

H. C. MARTIN'S, opposite College Grounds, 

BRUNSWICK MAINE. 



COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle riding is unsurpassed as a 
method of traveling. whether lor speed, 
sport, or renewal of health. The prac- 
ticability of llic machine lias been 
thoroughly tested, and satisfactorily 
proved, beyond question. Thousands 
are in daily use, and the number is 
rapidly increasing. The exercise is 
recommended by the medical profession 
as most beneficial lo health, bringing 
into exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

Send 3c. stamp for 30-page Illustrated 
Catalogue containing price lists and lull 
iilormatiou. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washington St., BOSTON, MASS. 




IMPORTING TAILORS 

AND 

GENTS' FURNISHERS. 

Novelties in Imported Hosiery, 
Underwear, Gloves, and Neckwear 
for Mens' Wear. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

Market Square, 

PORTLAND, ME. 



FLEXIBLE STIFF HATS, 

Laced Gloves for Gents, instead of Button. 
MERRY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 

->#-F. H. WILSOH,** 

DISPENSER OF 

Fwe Drags, Medicines, «» Chemicals. 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

AUGUSTA HOUSE, 

State Street, Augusta, Maine. 

Most desirable location in the city. Good Rooms, Good Table, 

Good Attendance. Free Hack to and from Depot 

and Wharf. Patronage Solicited. 

E. & A. C. M ANSON, Proprietors- 



t 



»MH« 



I 





■ &£sC? 





\ \ "V \ \ \ \ \ V 






Ns. 5. 




& 




%M ©|# 





iERMROTiaK,#MMIRB. 



-4 CONTENTS. & 



Editorial Notes 63 

The Whistling Buoy ....' 66 

" Through thy Protecting Care." 66 

My Little Lesson 67 

My Nocturnal Visitor 68 

Base-Ball 70 



1* 



PAGE. 

College Items 72 

Personal 75 

Inter- Collegiate News 75 

Clippings 76 

Editors' Table 76 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The u Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moeh ring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGRAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 

m@@3sm:5' GEkssmAfJi© ©boots. 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



DEANE BROTHERS &. SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

gy Lowest Prices in the State, 

755 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 
A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, i Fancy Goods. 

Also Eastern Mutual Union Telegraph Office. 
Under Town Clock, - Brunswick, Me. 



The Only RELIABLE AND STANDARD Beands OF 

Cigarettes and Fine Tobaccos. 

Straight Cuts. 
Sweet Caporal. 
St. James, etc. 




Ambassador. 



St. James 4, etc. 



Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut Cigarettes. 

f extra fine, selected, prime, mild, golden Virginia 
ette, as to quality, flavor, and workmanship, ever 

Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut, Full Dress. 
Sweet Caporal Cork Mouthpiece. 



This new brand i: 
I.t'iil', and is the fin' 
ulti.'i t<1 for sale. 



[STERBROOK'S 



STEEL 
PENS 



Leading Numbers: 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEN CO., 

Worka, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York. 

Go to W. B. Woodard's 

To buy vour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

SPECIAL BATES to STtTDENT CLVBS. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

BEST DAIRY IN BRUNSWICK. 

THERE ARE TWO PINTS OF THE NICEST MILK IN 
EVERY QUART WHICH I SELL. SPECIAL ATTENTION 
GIVEN TO STODENT CLUBS. 

«S- STEWARDS SHOULD DROP ME A POSTAL WITH 
THEIR LOCATION WRITTEN PLAINLY. 

A. P. WOODSIDE, Brunswick, Me. 



OVER AMERICAN EXPRESS OFFICE, 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 







Iff! ty 



ST* » 
THE FAVORITE A/OS. 303-40'4 332-I70-35I- WITH 
I OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




NEW BRU© STC1E. 

ED. J. MERRYMAN, 



Fancy anfl Toilet Articles, Cigars! Totiacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

jpg° Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



A. W* UXOSOliS. 



Jffi^COTT-HF/nM)^ 



MAIN STREET, 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



SPRINC AND SUMMER, 1883. 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 



M^VYN A.RD'S 



©fstte? anl §m &m&m Imp^lum, 



Main St., under Town Clock. 



"Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



OAL 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Coal "Z'ard in Topsnam, 



WHERE NONE BUT 



The Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Orders telephoned from Stores of A. T. Campbell 
and W. B. Woodard promptly attended to. 

«. T, ?JSOMP0<0tr, 

Office near the Sheds. 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. O. 

Fine Stationery ; Portland and Boston Daily- 
Papers ; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Tear in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

W'^^mti, ©,33,4 Oalfe Hea-feg* 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

«®-Special Kates to Student Clubs..ffi& 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the iEneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Geeek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books ; Jones's Greek Prose Composition.} 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his fegular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQTJIEED— FOUE HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOTJES A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 27, 1883. 



No. 5. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
Oliver W. Means, '84, Managing Editor. 
Charles E. Sayward, '84, Business Editor. 
Llewellyn Barton, '84. John A. Waterman, Jr. ,'84. 
"Will ia m H. Cothren, '84. Oliver R. Cook, '85. 
Rodney I. Thompson, '84. Nehemiah B. Ford, '85. 
Sherman W. "Walker, '84. John A. Peters, '85. 
Terms— $2.00 a year in advance; single copies, 15 cents. 
Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to 
contribute articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by the writer's real name. 



Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as sVi'mihI Class mail matter. 



Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



We should like to call attention to the 
advisability of exercising a little more dis- 
crimination in the choice of papers for the 
reading-room. Nothing can be done until 
next fall, but a little forethought could be 
given profitably to the matter. Some papers 
taken are rarely, if ever, read, and of neces- 
sity are of interest to but two or three stu- 
dents, at most. One huge paper in particu- 
lar goes from one week to another with 
uncut leaves, and is, apparently, never read. 
With a little extra care this evil could be 
remedied, and the general good advanced. 
The welfare of the reading-room is something 
in which all are interested, and it is not too 
much to ask that there should be thoughtful 
management. It would be an improvement 
if some plan could be adopted by which to 
retain the papers in their proper places. The 
disorder in which things are left by thought- 



less students, is very trying to persons of an 
orderly disposition. A little care on the part 
of ever}' one would doubtless add much to 
the natural attractiveness of the place. 



It would be well if the editors of next 
year's Bugle were chosen now, before the 
end of the term. Usually they are not 
elected until some time after the beginning 
of the fall term, and this necessitates very 
hurried, and in some cases, imperfect work. 
Occasionally the Bugle is brought out before 
the close of the fall term, and, where this is 
done, its success is far greater. Its prompt 
issue would be insured if its editors were 
chosen a little earlier. As objections to this 
plan do not exist, and its advantages are so 
obvious, it would seem as if it must be acted 
upon ; but where others have failed, we can- 
not feel confident of success. If the editors 
for next year are chosen this term, we shall 
feel that our little word was the straw that 
broke the camel's back of custom. 



The orators for the Junior and Sopho- 
more prize declamations have been appointed, 
and the time, in some respects the " saddest 
of the year," has come. If any wildly un- 
natural and sepulchral tones are heard, let no 
one be alarmed, as it is the effort of some 
poor unfortunate practicing his part. In 
former years an elocutionist was procured for 
a short time, but such services are no longer 
deemed necessary. 

It would be well if more interest was felt 
in declamation, as it is an essential part of a 
good education. If the prizes for speaking 
were increased in amount, the result would, 



64 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



undoubtedly, be an improvement in average 
excellence. It would also be more of an 
honor to participate in these contests if the 
rewards were greater. Two things we 
should like to suggest to the appointees ; 
first, thoroughly commit your part, and sec- 
ond, be as natural as possible in your deliv- 
ery. These two things are often absent, and 
are difficult to attain. 



Boating for this 3 j ear is over, and yet if 
there is thought of sending a crew away 
next year, work upon the river should not 
be abandoned. Early in the season it seemed 
as if boating had a very slight hold upon us, 
but the recent race showed that good boating 
material still remained,. and in a measure re- 
vived the hopes of former years. In other 
colleges, practice is kept up in the fall until 
ice forms, and is begun in the spring as 
soon as possible. It is folly for us to send 
off crews that have trained together but six 
weeks or two months, and expect them to be 
superior to crews that have had long months 
of practice and experience in previous races. 
It would not be impossible to arrange a race 
between our own crews next fall term, or 
perhaps one with a crew from Portland. If 
this were done, and a careful choice made of 
men to compose a university crew, there 
would be a far more probable chance of our 
success in intercollegiate boat races. 



If those persons, whose minds were sad- 
dened last Ivy Day, on hearing that the Jun- 
iors were so tired, could have seen the three 
wagons, filled with members of that class, 
set off the o'.her morning after minerals, their 
hearts would have rejoiced. After long 
weeks of uninterrupted toil, an excursion into 
the surrounding region, to find practical illus- 
trations of the subjects studied, is most help- 
ful. The varied scenery diverts the mind, 
and the oxygen of early morning sharpens all 
the mental faculties. Passing interviews 



with occasional rustics give one full oppor- 
tunity to exercise his power of repartee. 

Such an expedition affords a chance of 
collecting minerals that is invaluable to a 
thorough student. A marked improvement 
over last year, was the substitution of horse 
for man power in locomotion. In this way, 
strength of body and of spirits was reserved 
for investigation at the quarry, instead of 
being expended on the way. The thanks of 
the class are due to Prof. Robinson for mak- 
ing the excursion so entirely successful. 



To a careful observer, perhaps few things 
are more noticeable than the absence of in- 
dependent thought. It might be expected 
that students would be an exception to the 
general rule, but it is all too common to find 
them adopting, without due consideration, 
the opinions and theories of prominent writ- 
ers. A student will get hold of some author, 
new perhaps to him, and after a few hours of 
undirected reading, become a zealous advocate 
of the views expressed. Instead of being in 
the truest sense a student, one thus becomes 
a mere receptacle for the opinions of others. 
It is so much easier to swallow food, or per- 
haps poison, furnished us by others than it is 
to go in search of it ourselves. 

The great object of study is to lead men 
to think for themselves. Only in so far as he 
does this, is study successful. Another way 
in which this lack of independent thinking 
exhibits itself, is the fashion that some have 
of criticising everything. Nothing is, in 
their opinion, worthy of acceptation or even 
commendation. By their continual criticisms, 
they think to secure to themselves the name 
of connoisseur, but in reality an opposite re- 
sult is produced. Shallowness of mind is 
shown as clearly by a carping critic as by him 
who is always on the side of the last speaker. 



Some have thought that the affairs of the 
college would be managed more easily and 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



65 



successfully, if the Boards were composed of 
fewer members, and their numbers were so 
reduced as to enable the Boards to meet 
every term. Thus, necessary changes could 
be provided for, needed improvements dis- 
cussed, and the courses of instruction over- 
looked. The same business would be trans- 
acted more quickly and in fully as satisfac- 
tory a manner, by half the number of men 
that now compose the Boards, as a large body 
is necessarily slow hi its action. The annoy- 
ing delays at Commencement might thus be 
prevented. 

This change could not be effected at once, 
but would require a few years. As the mem- 
bers of the Boards were removed by death or 
resignation, their places could remain unfilled 
until the desired number was reached, when 
it could be maintained, as at present, by elec- 
tion. 



It has been a matter of regret that the 
efficiency of the band was not equal to that 
of last year. The music furnished on a few 
occasions has been quite acceptable, but by 
no means so fine as that of a year ago. A 
lack of interest and the absence of regular 
practice has no doubt contributed to the 
present unfortunate condition of affairs ; but 
the well recognized talent in the college 
should not be discouraged by such trifles. 
As it is now too late to accomplish anything 
this season, it may not be amiss to offer a few 
suggestions in regard to, in our judgment, the 
best plan to be pursued. ■ 

Let each member of the band, while at 
home this summer, practice daily ; then 
when the term begins next fall they will be 
ready, with very little previous plajdng to- 
gether, to delight and instruct the students 
with truly classical selections. 



We shall watch with great interest the re- 



sult of the new departure at Amherst. The 
intention is to have college discipline admin- 
istered by a board consisting of representa- 
tives from all the classes. This novel idea is 
one imported from Germany, as was also the 
plan adopted two years ago in regard to ex- 
aminations. Some time since a Western col- 
lege tried government by the students, but 
did not make a success of it. Whether Am- 
herst will be benefited by this change or not 
remains to be seen. To say the least, this plan 
strikes a conservative mind very strangely. 
However, we may e'er long be favoring the 
adoption of this unique method at Bowdoin ; 
for, while opposed to accepting a thing be- 
cause it is new, we do believe in methods, 
whether new or old, which have proved their 
superiority. 



We congratulate the nine on their recent 
victories over Colby. The dreary monotony 
of the last two years has at last been broken. 
The hopes entertained at the beginning of 
the season were almost forgotten when this 
victory revived them. It has always been 
our opinion that our nine was the better of 
the two ; but a lack of interest in practice 
and a liability to become easily discouraged 
have caused the results to show a seeming 
contrary. If the nine would make up their 
minds, not that they are to win but that they 
will, we should feel confident of a gratifying 
result. What has been done, is generally 
thought possible to be done again, and we 
shall expect the nine to gain additional 
laurels. The nine is batting much bet- 
ter than in preceding years, and is far superior 
to its rivals in this respect. A little better 
playing in the field and an improvement in 
base running on the part of some is advisable. 
We have every reason to be pleased with this 
season's work on the diamond and commend 
the nine to the hearty support of the stu- 
dents. 



66 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



THE WHISTLING BUOY. 

A solitary signal, 

On the ocean's ceaseless swell, 

Scares the ships from unseen dangers, 

With its melancholy knell. 

What a wail of desolation 

Fills the air with weird unrest, 

As the cruel rolling billows 

Beat upon its hollow breast ; 

There it lies and bears the torture 

Of the waves year after year, 

Groaning forth its dismal warnings, 

Which bewildered sailors fear. 

It would seem as if old Neptune 

Angered by some hostile ghoul, 

Shut him in this wooden prison 

Where the storm-beat waters howl. 

There he had him at his mercy ; 

There he tossed him with his swell ; 

Till his shrieks for aid were over, 

Only moans his anguish tell. 

When the storm-winds, driving fiercer, 

Roar the louder round his head, 

Then he sobs and groans more deeply, 

Tossing on his painful bed. 

When the gentle summer zephyrs 

Fan the sea gull's lofty nest, 

Then he sighs with lonesome longings 

For his freedom and for rest. 

Neptune's wrath will ne'er be sated ; 

There the tortured demon moans, 

Till the waves shall break his guy ropes 

Fastened to the hidden stones. 



THROUGH THY PROTECTING CARE. 

Whatever you may say against Brunswick 
weather in general, this afternoon, at least, 
is charming. It is a typical summer day of 
lightest breezes, whitest clouds, and seren- 
est sunshine. Which shall it be ? Shall one 
yield to the more natural inclination and lie 
down under the trees and gaze up through 
their fluttering leaves for the whole afternoon 
together, serenely happy in mere living ; or 
shaking off dull sloth, shall the order of ex- 
ercises demand a trip to Paradise Spring and 
an afternoon of happy vagrant wandering? 
Better yet ! we will combine the two, we 



will sit back at our ease and yet have 
all the pleasure of wandering. The ques- 
tion is decided, a team! and a ride around 
by the Bay Bridge, with just a tantalizing 
sniff of the salt air thrown in to the bar- 



gain 



! and so we start off ; and under 



the inspiration of the time and the de- 
light of youth and health, the clouds are 
whiter, the leaves greener and the sunshine 
brighter than before, if it is a possible thing. 
We have "health and a day " and like Emer- 
son we have made " the pomp of emperors 
ridiculous." And so we jog along over the 
level road lined with rose-purple rhodoras 
who later in the season will abdicate their 
rule in favor of their more royal friends, the" 
golden-rod. Now we let the horse walk past 
a dilapidated shanty and wonder if people 
can be happy with such surroundings. But 
they surely are if happiness can be estimated 
by the number of children, for every loop- 
hole in the patched-up fence has an eye and 
a shock of curly white hair. That's a good 
idea ! Throw a banana to that little parcel 
of humanity ! Did you ever see such sur- 
prise and delight on a countenance before ? 
Why, this is more fun than missionaries ! 
Well, perhaps after all they are happier in 
rags and poverty than many a family in silks 
and riches. Yet we agree among ourselves 
that we will take the riches and run our 
chances. And so before we know it we have 
reached Bay Bridge, and are resting our steed, 
yclept Harmodius and Aristogiton to show he 
is equal to two, in the middle of the bridge 
and are looking to where the bay meets the 
horizon" in the dim distance. The bay is dot- 
ted with islands, Hesperides certainly, and 
the wind ruffles the water just enough to 
make it sparkle and glitter and shine and 
gleam. As we start off again and listen to the 
muffled beat, beat, beat, beat, of the horse's 
feet, we mutually begin to sing, " Through 
Thy protecting care," and ending with " Home, 
Sweet Home," for nothing flippant or sense- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



67 



less strikes our mood now or can by any pos- 
sibility fall into harmony with the glorious 
scene. And now we are off the bridge and 
once more on the road towards Brunswick, 
when, stop ! — can it be — alas, yes ; a fiend in 
human shape demands toll ! ! We fling a sop 
to Cerberus and ride on wiser but poorer. 
And now the Brunswick pines begin to stand 
erect and wave their fan-like branches to the 
evening winds. For although you wouldn't 
believe it, it is getting late. Never has old 
Father Time taken such a brace on this after- 
noon, and never have the sands run so swiftly. 
And so under the starlight with the sighing 
of the pines and shrill staccato of the frogs 
we make a triumphant entry into Brunswick. 
Put a red letter opposite such a day, and if 
the wise gods have any gift to give by all 
means let it be perpetual youth. Those who 
" would not live alway " you may notice never 
say so till they grow old. Our chum, who is 
intensely practical, says as we come in late, 
"Another day wasted ! And, by the way, — 
can you let me have the dollar and a half j t ou 
borrowed of me last week?" 



MY LITTLE LESSON. 

"Come, Ned, sit down and have a smoke." 

" Can't, old man, I've got to go down 
town." 

" Nonsense ! Miss What's-her-name won't 
be expecting you to call the first night of the 
term, I know." 

" You don't know anything about it, but 
it is early yet, give us a light." So saying, I 
located myself in an easy chair, with my feet 
at a comfortable angle on the table, and be- 
gan work on a cigarette. Having been initi- 
ated into the smoker's " Paradise" but a short 
time, I found it convenient to make frequent 
pauses and admire the ease and evident en- 
joyment with which my chum puffed large 
blue rings towards the ceiling. Presently I 
noticed the advance guard of a smile skir- 



mishing around the corners of his moustache, 
and soon his face was illuminated by an un- 
mistakable grin. Somehow my chum's grins 
were contagious, and I found myself laughing 
in spite of nryself. 

" Now Jim, tell me what it was I was 
laughing at," said I. 

" Well, you ought to know that better than 
I; but I will tell you what /was laughing at 
if you wish." 

"All right, if it isn't too long a yarn, fire 
away." 

" Young man, never use mixed metaphors, 
they are as bad as mixed drinks. No, don't 
argue, it's no use, let me go on. I'll warn 
you before hand that the 'youngster with the 
bow and arrow' will play an important part 
in this ' anec.,' so you can profit by my expe- 
rience in your little affair with Miss — Drop 
that ink-bottle or there will be trouble. As 
I was going to say, you can draw your own 
moral and it will save me trouble." 

" Will you go on ?" 

" With great pleasure. As you know, I 
spent the greater part of last summer's vaca- 
tion at that gem of summer resorts — when 
there's no fog — Bar Harbor. Never having 
been there before I enjoyed the first four 
weeks hugely, and thought I should never 
want to leave ; but after a while I got tired 
of the omnipresent buck-board and deter- 
mined to remove my penates to some other 
town. I was rushing up to my room at the 
hotel to get my traps together and to catch 
the next steamer out — " 

"No base-ball puns allowed." 

" I had reached the top of the stairs and 
was turning the corner quickly, when there 
ran plump into my arms the most divine spec- 
imen of fe " 

" Did you say she was plump ? " 

"Of female beauty that it was ever my 
good fortune to grasp. I was overcome. So 
much so in fact that I missed the boat and 
made up my mind to stay another week and 



68 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



see some more of the Indian encampment. 
I managed to become acquainted with the 
fair one, whose name was Amelia, and from 
that moment I was her devoted slave. I was 
continually at her side in spite of the efforts 
of less favored suitors. My head was turned, 
in short — an angle of 860 degrees. Things 
went on this way for two weeks, and I had 
no thought of leaving. One evening 1 was 
leaning against a pillar of the veranda trying 
to decide what sort of engagement ring I 
should buy, when I noticed a rather seed}' 
looking individual who seemed to be taking 
considerable interest in me. After a while 
he approached and inquired the time. I told 
him, when, 'That's all right, you are the 
man I want,' said he. ' I was told you'd be 
leaning on that post at half-past nine with a 
tennis-racket in your left hand. Here's a 
note ; ' and off he slipped. I was astonished, 
as you can imagine. The note was unsealed, 
so I read it to find out what it all meant. It 
was simpky, 

' Will be in the Arbor at ten. 

Amy.' 

Some lover's appointment put in my hands 
by mistake. I had a sort of fellow feeling 
for all lovers, at that time, so I thought I 
would happen round at the place mentioned 
at ten, and see if the seedy man's error made 
any hitch in the proceedings. It was a bright 
moon-light night as I carefully picked my 
way among the trees and underbrush in 
a roundabout route to the 'Arbor.' I had 
got within about fifty yards of the place 
when I distinctly heard voices. I knew there 
was no need of my going farther, but some 
evil genius prompted me to find out who the 
parties were. I walked softly up, concealed 
by the bushes, parted a bough, and looked in. 
The moon shone full on the spot, and I saw 
leaning on the breast of an English tourist, 
Amelia!" 

"What did you do?" 

"Don't ask me. I hardly know myself. 



I think I turned and ran. In the morning I 
packed up all the notes and trinkets I had 
received from her, and left them in care of 
the clerk to give to Miss Amelia Jones with — " 

"WHO?" 

" Good heavens, man, don't faint. What's 
the matter ? " 

" Matter enough ; she's the girl I'm en- 
gaged to." 



MY NOCTURNAL VISITOR. 

It was in the spring of 187-, the last term 
of my Junior year, that I sat alone in my 
room studying my German lesson which was 
to come at nine o'clock on the following 
morning. The base-ball team had gone to 
Waterville to play Colby the game which was 
to decide the championship. My chum, who 
played on the nine, and a large majority of 
the boys, who went to witness the game, 
being gone, I felt doubly lonesome. To add 
to my loneliness, the rolling of distant thun- 
der and flashes of lightning were to be occa- 
sionally noticed, which by their increasing 
frequency, indicated that a tempest of no 
small account was rapidly approaching. 
Though the day had been one of surpass- 
ing beauty, and the Bowdoins, after a hotly 
contested game, had come off victorious, yet, 
owing to the loneliness which at this time 
was so marked about the campus and college 
buildings, and also to the tempest whose 
threatenings had already become louder and 
more frequent, I closed my book as it lay 
before me, and ere I became aware, placed 
one elbow upon the table, rested my head 
upon my hand, and was soon lost in profound 
reverie. I cannot tell how long I continued 
in this state, but suffice it to say, my reverie 
was broken by a loud rap at the door. Rous- 
ing myself, as I imagine, like a startled man, 
I shouted, " Come in ! " The door slowly 
opened, and a man who by his appearance 
indicated that he was at least forty years of 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



69 



age, entered. li Excuse me," said he, as he 
looked in amazement about the room. He 
was about to say something more, when, 
interrupting him, I bade him have a seat, at 
the same time offering him my easy chair. 
He took the chair, thanked me kindly, and 
having seated himself therein, said : " You 
have better rooms than you used to have 
when I was in college." 

"■ O !" I remarked, " then you are a grad- 
uate of Bowdoin, are you?" 

" Yes," said he, " I am happy to say 
that I am. But, my } ; oung friend," he con- 
tinued, " I must certainly beg your pardon 
for thus disturbing j'ou in your studies. You 
see " 

" ! that is all right," I replied ; " I was 
not studying ; besides, I am always glad to 
hear any news from loyal sons of Bowdoin." 

" Well," proceeded my guest, " I have 
seen my share of hardships since I left college, 
I can tell you. I graduated when twenty- 
five years of age, having paid my way through 
college. After graduation I taught a year, 
and as I had always aspired to attain some 
fame, and some property as well, as a news- 
paper editor, I worked two years in the print- 
ing office of a well known New England 
newspaper. I then reported for the same 
paper for one year, when, having received a 
letter from a Texas editor offering me a posi- 
tion similar to the one I then had but with 
better pay, I immediately set out for ' The 
Lone Star State.' I liked Texas much better 
than I did New England, because the climate 
was better suited to me, and because there 
were better chances for success, as I thought. 
But the society of Texas was far inferior to 
that of New England, and beside, I did not 
fancy the Texas cow-boys. Things went on 
smoothly, however, for two years, when the 
editor was suddenly called away and left me 
to conduct the paper. I had acted in this 
capacity about one week, when some of 
the boldest indignities were committed by 



some cow-boys at a village about ten miles 
distant. The next morning our paper came 
out containing a full report of the infamous 
affair, together with an editorial upon the 
same, denouncing, of course, in strongest 
terms the bold outrage and the perpetrators 
thereof. I called them a public nuisance ; 
said that they were worse than the frontier 
Indians and that the President ought to call 
out troops to annihilate them, if possible. 
Late that afternoon I learned from a friend 
that the cow-boys had sworn vengeance upon 
me, and would make me pay dear for what I 
had said. Thinking it prudent to look out 
for myself, I resolved not to stop at my 
regular boarding place for a few days until 
they should have gone away or have some- 
thing of more importance to attend to, there- 
by overlooking me. I accordingly engaged a 
room at another part of the town, in the hope 
of entire immunity, but to no purpose. By 
some means unknown to me they learned 
where I had gone, and at about three o'clock 
that morning I was awakened by a noise at 
my window. Imagine my surprise when I 
saw one man in my room, another in the 
window, and two or three on the ladder 
outside. Of course I could do nothing. They 
took me from my room — they were five in 
number — and conducted me to the edge of a 
forest about a mile away. I will not attempt 
to describe how they used me. I will only 
say that I should prefer death to the repeti- 
tion of that usage. After torturing me for an 
hour or more, they held a council to deter- 
mine what they should do with me. One 
proposed shooting, but the rest proposed 
hanging. So hang I must. They then took 
a drink, had a smoke, and after some little 
time they said they were ready for me. So, 
binding my legs together and my hands be- 
hind my body, and placing the rope around 
my neck, they were on the point of perform- 
ing the execution, when the sharp crack of a 
rifle was heard, and one of their number fell 



70 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



dead. The others sprang for their rifles with 
which to defend themselves ; but it was of no 
use, their foe was too much for them. I was 
speedily released by my friends, — some old 
hunters who were awakened by the reveling 
of the cow-boys. It is needless to relate all 
that was connected with my release, but I 
will end this part of my experience by saying 
that I left Texas. I then came back to New 
England, and am now reporting in this State 
for a Massachusetts newspaper. In my wan- 
derings, I used to hear from Bowdoin occa- 
sionally through the newspapers. Once, in 
particular, I remember of reading an account 
of some terrible outrage committed upon a 
Freshman, which report, as I afterwards 
learned, sprang from an attempt which some 
Sophomores made t<5 cut off a moustache 
which a certain Freshman is said to have 
worn. As the result of a visit that I have 
just made to Lewiston and Waterville, I 
learned that Freshmen have been expelled 
from Bates, and Sophomores from Colby for 
conduct as bad as that of any Bowdoin stu- 
dent, but it did not find its way into the 
newspapers. I think it a gross injustice to 
Bowdoin that every little fault of hers is so 
magnified, while similar ones in her sister 
colleges are entirely overlooked by newspaper 
men and thus entirely escape public criticism. 
But I am digressing. I am now in good 
employment, with better pay than ever. 
Have been in Maine for the past two weeks 
writing up election prospects, and being 
obliged to wait for the Pullman, I thought I 
should like to gaze upon the college at night 
and call to mind once more many pleasant asso- 
ciations. Not suspecting that the rain would 
come so soon, I thought I should have time 
to return to the depot before getting wet, but 
finding that I could not, I made bold to ask 
for a temporary shelter, and this accounts for 
my being here. The shower has ended, I 
see," he continued, "and so I think I must 
be going, as it is getting near train time." 



Then, begging my pardon once more, and 
thanking me for the shelter and kind recep- 
tion, my unexpected but esteemed guest 
wished me success in all my undertakings, 
bade me good-night and departed. After he 
was gone I could not help thinking what a 
lesson I had learned from a worthy, toiling 
son of Bowdoin, and how much truth there 
was in what he said about tarnishing her fair 
name with scandalous stories, while other 
colleges for similar offenses are entirely over- 
looked ; and I could not help exclaiming, 
How long, O Bowdoin, before thou wilt have 
justice done to thee ! 



BASE-BALL. 
Bowdoin vs. Colby — 4 to 3. 
The game with Colby, June 16th, was a 
delightful surprise. Seldom have we wit- 
nessed a more excited crowd than the one 
that cheered, again and again, our nine. The 
day was pleasant and a large number of peo- 
ple were present, as good playing was antici- 
pated. The Colby nine for more than two 
years had retired victorious from every field, 
until many had come to think that nothing 
in this State could beat them. That spell 
has been broken, and we congratulate our 
nine on their merited success. The playing 
was not, however, exceptionable, some bad 
errors being made on both sides. Our men 
did not run bases as they should and as they 
have done heretofore. If their superior bat- 
ting had been aided by proper base running, 
our side of the score would have been much 
larger. The following is the score: 
BOWDOIN". 

A.B. R. IB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Winter, lb 5 2 3 8 J 1 

Kuapp, c 4 1119 3 

Torrey,2b 3 1113 11 

Wright, p 4 2 2 18 

Cook.r.f. 4 3 4 11 

Stetson, 3b 3 13 2 

Waterman, s. s 4 1 14 3 

Lindsey, e. f. 4 1110 1 

Barton, 1. f. 3 12 2 10 1 

Totals 34 4 13 15 27 20 7 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



71 



COLBY. 

A.B. K. IB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Doe, e 4 10 

Putnam, c. f. 4 111 

Boyd, 3b 4 113 10 

Mathews, 2b 4 2 2 2 2 3 

Nowell, 1. f. 4 1110 

Tilton, lb 4 7 1 

Barton,p 4 10 

Merrill, s. s 4 ] 3 3 1 

Emerson, r. f. 4 1110 

Totals 36 3 6 8 24 18 3 

Innings 1 23456789 

Bowdoin 2 0000200 —4 

Colby. 110 1 0—3 

First base on called balls — Bowdoin, 4; Colby, 0. 
Struck out — Bowdoin, 8; Colby, 7. Balls called — on 
Wright, 42; on Barton, 82. Strikes called— off Wright, 
14; off Barton, 22. Wild pitches— Wright, 2; Barton, 2. 
Passed balls — Knapp, 1 ; Doe, 2. Two base hits — Winter, 
Cook. Three base hit — Merrill. Double plays — Putnam 
and Mathews; Merrill, Mathews, and Tilton; Stetson, 
Winter, and Knapp. Left on bases — Bowdoin, 7; Colby, 
6. Time — 1 h. 35 m. Umpire — Mr. Barrett Potter of 
Brunswick. 

Boiodoin vs. Bates — 4 to 1. 

The following score was unintentionally 

omitted in the previous issue : 

BOWDOIN". 

A.B. E. IB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Winter, lb 4 1 2 3 10 2 

Knapp, c 4 9 10 

Torrey, 2b 4 10 5 3 

Wright, p 4 1 1 14 

Cook, r. f. 4 2 2 

Stetson, 3b 4 13 

Waterman, s. s 4 11112 

Lindsey, c. f. 3 1 I 1 1 1 

Barton, 1. f. 3 10 

Totals 34 4 7 8 27 22 5 

BATES. 

A.B. R. IB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Bartlett, 3b 4 12 2 

Niekerson,2b 4 113 2 1 

Holden.s.s 4 10 11 

Sandford, c 4 2 2 9 

Walker, 1. f. 4 2 1 3 1 

Atwood,lb 4 4 10 

Hadley, c. f. 4 

Washburn, r. f. 4 2 2 3 

Whitmarsh, p 4 15 

Totals 36 1 6 6 24 11 5 

Innings 1 23456789 

Bowdoin I 0003000 —4 

Bates 1 0000000 0—1 

Two-base hits — Winter. First base on called balls — 
Bowdoin, 1. First base on errors — Bowdoin, 4; Bates, 
3. Struck out — Bowdoin, 4; Bates, 8. Balls called — on 
Wright, 52; off Whitmarsh, 49. Strikes called— off Wright, 
13 ; off Whitmarsh, 11. Passed balls— Knapp, 2. Wild 
pitches — none. Earned runs — 0. Left on bases — Bowdoin, 
5; Bates, 8. Double play — Nickerson and Atwood. 
Time— 1 hour 20 minutes. Umpire — Mr. Barrett Potter 
of Brunswick. 



Bowdoin vs. Colby — 3 to 1. 

The Bates nine did not appear at Water- 
ville on Saturday last, to play their fifth 
scheduled game with our nine, but Colby 
consented to play a postponed game, the 
fourth in their series with us, on that date. 

A great deal of interest was centered in 
this game, for had Colby won, the champion- 
ship question would have been decided in her 
favor. So anxious were the Colby men to 
secure for themselves every advantage that 
they resorted to means in every way unworthy 
of college ball players. For example, ascer- 
taining that our nine had come to Waterville 
with a small supply of bats, and were intend- 
ing to replenish their bag in town, they at 
once took steps to secure all the available 
good bats, to add to their originally large 
stock, and then openly felicitated themselves 
at the success of their shabby trick. The 
outcome of the game, however, showed that 
poor bats will do the business when our men 
go in for all they are worth, and at the same 
time proved that " corruption wins not more 
than honesty." 

The game was called at 2.30 p.m. Capt. 
Wright lost the toss for the second time this 
season, and Colby took the field. Winter, 
first at the bat, after two strikes had been 
called, sent a rattling two-baser into the left 
field, took third on a balk, and crossed the 
home plate on a passed ball before Knapp 
could get a ball to suit him. Knapp, Torrey, 
and Wright then went out in order. No 
more runs were made by Bowdoin until the 
eighth inning, although a comparatively large 
number were left on bases and only prevented 
from scoring by Colby's sharp fielding. In 
the eighth inning Torrey's single and errors 
by the Colby catcher and short-stop, yielded a 
run for Bowdoin ; and in the ninth, Barton 
gained first on called balls and was brought 
home by Winter's second two-baser. The 
Colby men went out in one, two, three order, 
in the first, second, third, fifth, seventh, and 



72 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



eighth innings. In the fourth, one was left 
on first base ; in the sixth, an atrocious decis- 
ion of the umpire gave a man second, where 
he remained until the next three men were 
retired; and in the ninth a base hit, a passed 
ball, and two of our three total errors allow- 
ed one man to see home, making the score 
three to one. 

While our whole nine deserves the highest 
praise for the magnificent game they played, 
Wright and Knapp should have especial com- 
mendation. Their work was admirable in 
every respect. Lindsey bore off the honors 
for the out field, capturing two flies, one of 
which was a difficult one. Winter added 
brilliancy to his customary reliability, two of 
the three runs being the result of his work 
at the bat. The stops and throws of Stetson 
and Waterman were excellent. 

This game was remarkable for the worst 
display of umpiring that ever the present 
nine played under. We cannot give the 
umpire the credit of meaning to be fair, for 
three of his decisions were palpably wrong, 
and all in favor of Colby. A clear out at 
second, a force out at third, were, to the 
astonishment of the runners themselves, 
called safe, while a passed ball, that would 
have increased our score one, was declared to 
be a dead ball. We can only conclude that 
the umpire was merely carrying out the 
threat that he was heard to make earlier in 
the day, that " the Colby men need not worry 
about the close decisions." 

After the game, our boys were given a 
fine supper at the Elm wood by the Knights 
Templar of Waterville, in consideration of 
the fact that contrary to our arrangements 
the game was not called until 2.30, in order 
that the Templars and their visiting brothers 
from Bath and Lewiston might witness the 
playing. 

There was no end of enthusiasm around 
college when the result of the game came. 
The college bell was rung thirty minutes, 



while tin horns made the campus resound 
throughout the remainder of the afternoon, 
and until twelve at night. The boys reached 
home on the midnight express, and were met 
at the depot and escorted to college by the 
college band and a crowd of classmates and 
town friends. 

The following is the score : 
BOWDOIN. 

A.B. R. IB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Wiuter.lb 5 1 2 4 II 1 

Knapp, c - 5 119 

Torrey, 2b 5 12 2 11 

Wright, p 4 1 1 11 

Cook.r.f. 4 10 1 

Stetson, 3b., 4 112 3 1 

Waterman, s. s....- 3 2 2 

Lindsey, e. f. 4 2 

Barton, 1. f. 3 10 

Totals 37 3 7 9 27 18 3 

COLBY. 

A.B. R. IB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Doe, c 4 10 6 2 

Putnam, e. f 4 10 

Boyd, 3b 4 2 2 6 1 1 

Mathews, 2b 4 3 1 

Nowell, 1. f. 4 

Tilton, lb 3 6 

Barton, p 3 2 5 2 

Merrill, s. s 3 1113 2 

Emerson, r. f 3 2 

Totals 32 1 3 3 27 11 6 

Innings 1 23456789 

Bowdoin 1 1 1—3 

Colby 00000001—1 

Two base hits — Winter, 2. First base on called balls — 
Bowdoin, 2; Colby, 0. First base on errors — Bowdoin, 
6; Colby, 2. Struck out — Bowdoin, 4 ; Colby, 6. Left on 
bases — Bowdoin, 9; Colby, 4. Balls called — on Barton, 
65; on Wright, 25. Strikes called— off Barton, 19; off 
Wright, 4. Passed balls — Knapp, 1; Doe, 4. Wild 
pitches — Wright, 0; Barton, 1. Time — 1 h. 40 m. Um- 
pire — F. R. Woodcock. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



Class Day imitations are out. 

Did you invest in " Dermatine " ? 

Fine evenings to take, your best girl out to a ride. 

Prof. Campbell preaches the Baccalaureate Ser- 
mon. 

Byram, '86, has joined the Theta Delta Chi 
Fraternity. 

The Sophomore prize declaimers speak on the 
evening of July 3d. 

The janitor is doing a good thing in the way of 
trimming up the grounds. 

The Phi Beta Kappa oration will be delivered 
by Rev. Newman Smythe. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



73 



That bat business was a little the meanest yet. 

Even the co-eds. made faces at them. Now that 
wasn't pretty. 

Forepaugh at Bath to-day. Lots of the boys 
will probably take the show in. 

One, two, three, one. "What is that, a 

fire! " " No, that is the score." 

No assessment necessary upon the members of 
the Athletic Association this year. 

That fellow on the square the other night upset 
completely the laws of gravitation. 

Wonder if the Bath Grays want to get hold of 
the Bowdoins as much as they did i 

There was more than one brown face that re- 
turned from the trip among the islands. 

The mall looks its prettiest now, having j ust 
been mown and the walks nicely trimmed. 

Polsom, '85, won the prize for the best average 
in the Field Day sports, with a record of 17. 

The library is to be newly catalogued duriug 
the summer vacation. The card system is to be 
used. 

Rev. A. M. Southgate of Dedham, Mass., delivers 
the address before the Y. M. C. A. at Commence- 
ment. 

Now for the championship in earnest. We have 
the enemy on the run; dou't give him a chance to 
recover. 

In the last Colby game there wasn't any doubt 
which side the umpire sympathized with. But 
" there is a destiny," etc. 

Thompson, in the 220-yards dash, beat the inter- 
collegiate record of this year by nearly nine 
seconds. 

One by one the Seniors are leaving us until Com- 
mencement week. The " vos salutamus " man still 
lingers around. 

One of the Juniors developed a cheek in two 
days last week that must have made a. Freshman 
turn green with envy. 

Where are those boat crews that were going to 
keep up their practice during the summer ! It is 
easier to resolve than execute. 

Some of the boys report a good time at the ger- 
man, at Niagara Hail last Monday night. Good 
music, good company, and everything lovely. 

We received our annual visit from the wandering 
minstrels last week. Their rendition of "The 
Mocking Bird " is better and better every year. 

Next year is the year for a large Freshman class. 
Odd years have always brought larger classes, and 
as near as we can learn next year will be no excep- 
tion. 

" Flying Yankee " ! We wish it would fly fast 
enough to get out of the way of the accommodation 
train, and not have the mail a half-hour later than 
usual. 

In the game between the Bowdoins and Bath 
Grays, last Thursday, the score stood 26 to 3 in 



favor of the Bowdoins. Verily, John, thou art a 
prophet. 

The Knights Templar did the square thing by 
the nine and gave the boys a fine banquet at the 
Elmwood. 

Nothing lost in being accommodating, is there? 

Some of the students are taking their recreation 
by dusting books in the library. It is all done for a 
consideration, however— sort of combining pleasure 
with business. 

They do say that every one of that Zoological 
expedition were over the bay while they were gone. 
Well, that is the way with some; you never can 
trust them away from home. 

Prof. A. S. Packard, as a distinguished alumnus 
of that institution, delivered an address last Wed- 
nesday evening at the centennial anniversary of 
Phillips Academy, Exeter, N. H. 

A friend of the Bath nine, duriug the game on 
the delta, last Thursday, was heard to remark to a 
fellow companion in misery, " I don't think that 
empire gives very good satisfactory, do you ?" 

The Freshman wasn't alone in cheering for him- 
self this time when the Seniors marched out of the 
chapel. But then everybody felt like cheering that 
afternoon. That 4 to 3 business accounts for it. 

The officers of the Y. M. C. A. for next year are : 
President, 0. W. Means ; Vice-President, C. C. Tor- 
rey ; Corresponding Secretary, J. C. Hall ; Re- 
cording Secretary, E. C. Smith ; Treasurer, W. A. 
Cornish. 

In the last number of the American Antiquarian 
and Oriental Journal, are two contributions from 
the pen of Prof. Avery, entitled, "The Hill Tribes 
of India," and " Notes from Oriental Periodicals." 
They are well worth perusing. 

A Bates man was talking with one of our friends 
the other day, and was asked if his nine would play 
any more this season. He said " no." When asked 
why, he dryly said : " If we don't play it is nine to 
zero, but if we do it is ten to zero." 

Adams, Bradley, Brown, Child, Longren, Walker, 
and J. F. Waterman accompanied Professor Lee 
down Casco Bay last week. Kendall, '85, was 
skipper. The trip was very successful, many rare 
and valuable specimens being obtained. 

Student translating from Undine the passage : 
"Beisgt mir der dock audi oftmals meine Damme 
und Netze durch," rendered it thus: "It often 
breaks through my dam nets." A roar from the 
class showed him his ridiculous mistake. 

The following twelve Juniors have been elected 
by the class to take part in the prize declamations 
on Monday evening, July 9th : Adams, Barton, 
Child, Lindsey, Kemp, Means, Sayward, Smith, J. 
Torrey, Walker, J. A. Waterman, J. F. Waterman. 

There ought to be a fine for any one cutting 
pieces out of the dailies or the weeklies in the read- 
ing-room, until they are replaced by the next num- 
bers. It is getting so lately that the papers are 



74 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



mutilated before half of the students have read 
them. If any one wants a piece in any of the pa- 
pers either let him wait a proper time or buy a copy 
at the periodical store. Then no one can have any 
occasion to find fault. 

In English composition, the first prize was divided 
equally between H. E. Cole and N. B. K. Pettingill. 
The second prize was divided between C. H. Stetson 
and A. J. Russell. For extemporaneous composi- 
tion the first prize was awarded E. F. Holden and 
the second to B. Sewell. 

The following members of '83 take part in the 
Class Day Exercises : President, C. H. StetsoD ; 
Orator, J. B. Reed ; Poet, B. Sewall ; Opening Ad- 
dress, H. E. Cole; Parting Address, N. B. K. Pet- 
tingill; Prophet, F. M. Fling; Historian, E. A. 
Packard ; Marshal, F. H. Files. 

During the summer vacation Professor Lee 
will again accompany the United States Fish 
Commissioners on their midsummer trip. It will 
be remembered that he was invited to join the 
expedition, last spring, on its cruise about the Gulf 
of Mexico, but was unable to leave his classes. 

The Commencement parts have been assigned 
as follows: Salutatory— W. A. Perkins; English 
orations— E. F. Holden, E. A. Packard, N. B". K. 
Pettingill, C. H. Stetson, and G. 13. Swan ; Philo- 
sophical Disquisitions -H. A. Bascom, H. E. Cole, 
and H. R. Goodwin ; Literary Disquisition — H. L. 
Allen. 

Professor Robinson took the class in Mineralogy 
on a trip to the quarry in Topsham last Saturday. 
The different members returned well pleased with 
their success. There is one substance that is pretty 
plenty just now at the quarry, and that is mosquito- 
bite. Most every one brought back a good speci- 
men of that. 

Prof, (discussing voluntary and involuntary mo- 
tion) — "Mr. C, if you should scratch your head, 
would it be a voluntary or an involuntary act?" 
Mr. C— " Voluntary." Prof— " Why?" Mr. C— 
"Because something would have called it to my 
mind." The class smiles audibly at the frank and 
child-Yike answer. 

One member of '84 is doing his best to make a 
fine collection of minerals. He is meeting with 
marked success, having come into possession of a 
large specimen of Appetite; about 130 pounds of 
Hem-her -tight; an abundance of CW-sight, &c, &c. 
Now he is searching for a new mineral which be 
proposes to call Damcite. 

A large number of the students attended the 
graduating exercises of the Topsham High School, 
Thursday evening, June 14th, at the Congrega- 
tional church in Topsham. The school has been 
under the successful instruction of A. M. Edwards, 
of the class of '80, for the past two years. The 
church was very tastily decorated, and the different 
exercises were well given. The crowd was simply 
immense — not even standing room could be ob- 
tained. A quintette of students, led by W. R. 
Butler, '85, furnished some very acceptable music 
during the exercises. 



The Freshmen have a class supper at the Preble 
House, Portland, Friday evening, July 6th. The 
following members have been elected for that occa- 
sion : Pres. L. Turner ; Orator, G. M. Norris ; Poet, 
H. R. Fling; Historian, W. V. Wentworth ; Prophet, 

E. E. Rideout ; Toast-master, W. A. Cornish ; Com- 
mittee on Odes, I. W. Home, W. H. Stackpole, J. 
W. Calderwood. 

The salutatory will be different this year from 
any heretofore. Only the part addressed to the 
patres will be written in Latin. When the speaker 
addresses the plebs he will speak in English. We 
don't know whether this is the custom in other col- 
leges or not, but if it isn't it should be. Nothing 
can be more tiresome to a person than listening to 
a speaker when he is unable to tell whether to 
laugh or cry, to be gay or sad, unless some one, 
whom he thinks ought to know, gives him the cue. 

Let all hands go to Lewiston to see the last 
game played. It will cheer up the nine wonderfully 
to have some good backers. We know the boys 
would like to go if they could spare the time and 
money, to all the games, but foregoing their own 
pleasure, they give their spare change to support 
the nine. Nearly $175 has been raised this season, 
and the last call was responded to as cheerfully as 
the first. If any one had any thoughts that the 
college did not appreciate the work of the nine, the 
demonstration last Saturday night must have dis- 
pelled such thoughts. Students and town people 
alike ( with one or two exceptions) rejoiced at the 
signal victory. 

The class of 1833 have their semi-centennial re- 
union at the next Commencement. The class num- 
bered twenty-six, of whom eleven are now living: 
Rev. Charles Adams, D. D., Washington, D. C; 
Rev. Charles Duren, Granby, Vt., (a brother of E. 

F. Duren, Bangor ); Rev. Alfred Goldsmith, West 
Avon, Conn.; Rev. Samuel Harris, D. D., LL. D., 
ex-President of Bowdoin, now Professor in Yale ; 
Rev. E. G. Parsons, Derry, N. H. ; Rev. John Pike, 
D. D., Rowley, Mass.; Rev. William T. Savage, D. 
D., Quincy, 111., (once residing at Bangor ); Rev. 
Benjamin Tappan, D. D., Norridgewock ; Rev. 
George F. Tewksbury, Lyman ; Nathan Weston, 
Esq., Boston ; N. M. Whitmore, Esq., Bowdoinham. 

In the Senior game, last week, the nines were 
made up as follows : Fats— Files, c. ; Holden, p. ; 
Fling, lb.; Dunning, 2b. ; Pettingill, 3b. ; Jackson, 
s. s. ; Sewall, 1. f. ; Austin, c. f. ; Jordan, r. f. ; Anti- 
Fats— Goodwin, c. ; Cole, p. ; Swan, lb. ; Russell, 
2b.; Pearson, 3b. ; Day, s. s.; Reed, 1. f. ; Hutchins, 
c. f. ; Linscott, r. f. The players worthy of special 
mention among the Fats were Jordan and Fling. 
Jordan made some fine pick-ups (after the ball 
stopped), caught one ball, from the pitcher, on his 
elbow, and hit a foul fly for two bases. Fling backed 
up the first base —backed up because ho was gen- 
erally out behind it hunting for the ball — until the 
eighth inning, when he went to left because he vio- 
lated the rule that any player catching two consecu- 
tive balls should be changed to another position. 
Among the Antis, Reed and Linscott carried off the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



75 



honors. Linscott played a wonderful game in the 
field, not making an error in the entire game. His 
chief business was getting the ball thrown by or 
over the first base man. As he never got it until 
all the base runners had got home, he could hardly 
fail to get it back to the pitcher without an error. 
His batting was fairly up to his fielding. Eeed 
made a remarkable running catch, knocking over 
the center fielder, standing on his head, and ending 
with a complete somersault. But in spite of tbo 
brilliant plays on both sides the score was more un- 
equal than their avoirdupois indicates, standing 30 
to f(i in favor of the Anti-Fats. 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates ami undergraduates are earnestly solicited to send 
personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Brunswick, Me.] 

'30. — Hon. W. W. Thomas, Jr., has been ap- 
pointed Minister to Sweden, in place of John L. 
Stevens, resigned. 

79. — 0. S. C. Davies has been appointed second 
assistant Superintendent of the Maine Insane Hos- 
pital. 

'44.— The class of '44 has decided to hold a re- 
union at the Falmouth House, Portland, at some 
time duriug Commencement week. An unusually 
large gathering is expected. 

'80. — A. H. Harding has completed his legal 
studies at Columbian University, and has been ad- 
mitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia. 

73. — F. M. Hatch has been Minister to Honolulu, 
Sandwich Islands, for about seven years. He is ex- 
pected to return soon. 

'69.— Fred A. Fogg is Secretary of the Board of 
Trade in St. Paul, Minn., with a salary of about 
$4000 per annum. 

'68. — L. W. Rundlett has recently resigned his 
position as City Engineer of St. Paul, Minn., and 
has accepted the position of Engineer of the Water 
Works in that city. 

75.— Charles A. Black is principal of Lincoln 
Academy, Newcastle, Me. 

76.— Howard E. Hall is Register of Probate for 
Lincoln County, Me., and is located at Wiscasset. 

76.— Charles S. Taylor is in Indiana, engaged in 
teaching. 

'82.— John Washburn, formerly of this class, is 
in business in Minnesota. 

73. — Albert J. Boardman was in town the 16th 
inst., and kindly furnished us with several of the 
Personals in this issue. Mr. Boardman is exten- 
sively engaged in farming in Minnesota aud is Treas- 
urer of the Minneapolis Engine and Machine Works. 

'62.— Rev. Charles H. Pope was installed over 
the Congregational church at Farmington, June 5th. 

73. — A. L. Crocker is in Minneapolis. Ho is the 
partner of Boardman, 73. 

74. — C. M. Ferguson is practicing law with F. 
H. Boardman, : 69, in Minneapolis, Minn. Thomas 
Kneeland, 74, has a law office with the above named 
gentlemen. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NEWS. 

Columbia : 

The University of Pennsylvania has challenged 
Columbia to a milc-and-a-half straight-away race, 
to take place at Lake George, July 5th. It will 
probably not be accepted. 

'85 has celebrated its triumph. 

'83's Class Day was June 1st. 

The total assets of the college are about $6,- 
500,000. 

Cornell : 

The Phi Beta Kappa have admitted women. 
The chapter has recently adopted a constitution. 

Mid-course honors have been awarded by the 
Faculty to seven students. 

Princeton : 

The Sophomores are having the Infinitesimals of 
Calculus under Dr. Duffield. This is intended to 
be preparatory to Junior Physics. 

The Faculty has asked a committee of the stu- 
dents to report on the grading system. 

Efforts are being made to raise funds to estab- 
lish a new school of Philosophy. 

The latest dodge — "I'll call the roll over again." 
Princetonian. 

A large attendance of alumni is expectdat Com- 
mencement. 

University of Michigan : 

'86's Oracle Board has been elected. 

The '85's Co-Eds. have had a class supper. 

It is proposed to heat the new library by steam. 

It is expected that the uiue will come East this 
summer. 

Williams : 

Governor Butler will be preseut at Commence- 
ment. 

One of the town's people has recently given $50 
for the support of the nine. 

"Rab and his Friends" has been distributed 
among the students by the protectors of canine 
rights. 
Vassar : 

The Seniors have a two weeks' vacation before 
Class Day. 

Commencement will begin with the Baccalau- 
reate on Sunday, followed by a grand concert on 
Monday evening. 

On Tuesday, Class Day, the class tree exercises 
will consist of "the burial of the records, spade ora- 
tion, history, and prophecy. In the evening there 
will be an illumination and an out-door promenade 
concert. 

After the literary exercises of Commencement 
Day, will come the most solemn occasion of the 
year— the Senior class supper, at which " the smart- 
est, the vainest, the handsomest, the prospective 
old maid, the best walker, the worst flirt, the hard- 
est dig, the biggest eater, and the Faculty's pet, 
receive suitable gifts and make funny or suitable 
replies," 



76 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



CLIPPINGS. 



It is " put up or shut up" with the urahrella. 

Adam missed one of the luxuries of life. He 
could not laugh in bis sleeve. — Ex. 

The first butter of which we have any record in 
ancient times was the goat, which differed from 
modern butter chiefly in having the hair on the 
outside. — Cynic. 

" Papa," said a lad the other night, after atten- 
tively studying for some minutes an engraving of a 
human skeleton, "bow did this man manage to 
keep iu his dinner?" — Ex. 

Polite clerk (who has been showing stockings) — 
"What number do you wear, madame ? " Old 
lady (indignantly) — "Two, you fool; do you take 
me for a quadruped ? "—Ex. 

" My son," said an American father, " how could 
you marry an Irish girl? "Why, father, I'm not 
able to keep two women. If I marry a Yankee girl 
I'd have to hire an Irish girl to take care of her." — 
Ex. 

There is a young lady up in Columbia County 
who is six feet tall, and is engaged to be married. 
The man who won her did it in these words : " Thy 
beauty sets my soul aglow ; I'd wed thee, right or 
wrong; man wants but little hero below, but he 
wants that little long." 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



It was with flushed face and trembling hands 
that we removed the wrapper from the last Vassar 
Miscellany, and eagerly scanned the Exchange col- 
umn to see if we had received honorable men- 
tiou, at least, at the hands of our fair E. C. We 
have read somewhere that it is one of a wom- 
an's characteristics to pity. If this be true, the 
Exchange editress of the Miscellany is a true 
woman, for she sets up the Atlantic, Century, St. 
Nicholas, Orient, Tech., Haverfordian, and sundry 
other papers iu a row, topples them over like bags 
of straw, and then takes the Dartmouth in her 
arms, coddles him and says he is the Miss's own 
boy, and that the other naughty papers shall not 
call him green any more. Such heroism is almost 
unparalleled in college journalism. We are not 
jealous, Dartmouth. Not a bit. Indeed, we con- 
gratulate you for having found as a champion such 
a lively, well-written paper as the Vassar Miscel- 
lany. 

The Colby Echo contains the following concern- 
ing the Orient: "The most striking "feature of 
the paper is the cool complacency with which it 
speaks of 'our cheer,' which Colby, with innate de- 
pravity and characteristic hardihood, had shame- 
lessly appropriated for her own. The contempla- 
tion of our crime has brought tears of contrition 
and remorse to the eyes of many. More especially, 
when we think of the scores, we might almost say 
hundreds, of schools and colleges, who, like our- 



selves, have audaciously appropriated the ' Bowdoin 
cheer,' our hearts bleed for Bowdoin. Try and 
bear up under it brothers — in any case, be sure and 
have copyrighted the next cheer which you ' ap- 
propriate.' " " It made us tired " to read the above ; 
however we went to work on the " cheer " question 
with the following results. We give a list of the 
cheers of nineteen of the principal colleges in the 
United States : 

Columbia, . Hurray ! Hurray ! Hurray ! C-o-l-u-m-b-i-a ! 
Cornell, .... Cor-Cor-Cor-raeK .' I yell ! Cor-NELL ! 
Harvard, 'Rah! 'Rah! 'Rah ! (with a strong, full sound). 
Princeton, 'Rah ! 'Rah ! 'Rah ! S-s-s-t ! Boom ! Ah-h-h ! 
Penn. Univ., Oo-rah ! Oo-rah ! Oo-rah ! Penn-syl-vani-a ! 

Yale, 'Rah ! 'Rah ! 'Rah \ {sharply). 

Wesleyan, 'Rah ! 'Rah ! Wes-ley-AN ! 

Amherst, . . . 'Rah ! 'Rah ! 'Rah ! Am-her-est-i-a ! 
Bowdoin, .... B-o-w-d-o-i-n ! 'Rah ! 'Rah ! 'Rah ! 
Brown, . . . 'Rah-rah ! 'Rah-rah ! 'Rah-rah ! Ti-ger I 
Dartmouth, . . 'Rah ! 'Rah ! 'Rah ! Wah-HOO-wah ! 
College op the City of New York, 'Rah ! 'Rah ! 'Rah ! 

C! C! N-! Y! 

Hamilton, Ham-il-ton ! Z-z-zip-rah-boom ! 

Racine, 'Ra-'ifct-'RA-CINE ! 

Rutgers, . . . 'Rah ! Rah ! 'Rah ! Bow-wow-wow ! 

Trinity, Trin-i-ty ! Trin-i-ty ! 

Union, . . . 'Rah ! 'Rah ! Rah ! U-n-i-o-n ! N-o-i-n-u ! 
Williams, 'Rah ! 'Rah ! 'Rah ! Will-yums ! yams ! yums ! 
Univ. of New York, . . Nl T!U! S-s-s-t ! Boom-m ! 

Ah-h-h ! ! 
As we could find no colleges except Bates and 
Colby that had cheers similar to ours, we next 
sought to ascertain whether we copied from them 
or they from us. We found that B-o-w-d-o-i-n ! 
'Rah ! 'Rah ! 'Rah ! was first made use of in 1875, 
and that it has continued to be the distinctive cheer 
of the college since that time. We also found that 
Bates and Colby previous to that time had no sim- 
ilar cheers. In view of these facts, in all candor, 
we ask Colby unless she wishes to class herself 
among fitting schools (whose prerogative it is to 
imitate larger institutions), we ask her, we say, to 
drop " our cheer," and for once to bo original in 
something. 

Among our new exchauges is the University 
Cynic, published by the students of the University 
of Vermont. Although it has, as yet, only reached 
its third number, it takes a high rank among col- 
lego papers. Among other articles we notice one 
entitled " The Dude." If we were going to advise, 
(which we never do), we should say don't take such 
heavy subjects. 

We clip the following bit of seasonable poetry : 

IMPRESSIONS A LA FIFTEENTH AMENDMENT. 

De sho't-stop wink when de ball comin' hot 
An' say he didn' see it w'en fust it sta't ; 
De fielder he cuss w'en he drop de fly 
An' holler to de cap'en de sun's in his eye ; 
De batter mighty mad w'en he miss de ball, 
But de umpire, he don' never care at all. 

De baseman scowl w'en he hab to jump, 
De ketcher tired w'en de foul tips thump : 
De cap'en weep w'en de men don' slide 
An' de scorer root w'en de base hits tied ; 
De pitcher sad w'en he gib seb'n balls, 
But de umpire leer eb'ry time dat he calls. 

De runner brace w'en de ball am passed : 
De pitcher squirm w'en de hits come fast 
An' fire de ball at de striker's head ; 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



77 



Wen de nine git blanked, de backer am fled, 
De gran' stand cheers w'en de fab'rites win, 
But de umpire look like he made out oh tin. 

De manager swear w'en he hall pass de fence 

An' de dead-beats yell, " Oh, darn de expense ! " 

De scorer fix up de errors at de close, 

An' de nine dat wins, they yell for deir foes, 

But de umpire he neber smile nor frown, 

But seems so big dat he can't look roun'. 

— Athenaeum. 

(Boston Transcript, Dec. 30th.) 
An Instantaneous Light. — Such in a word is the 
unique apparatus on exhibition at the rooms of the Porta- 
ble Electric Light Company, 22 Water street. It occupies 
the space of only five square inches and weighs but five 
pounds, and can be carried with ease. The light requires 
no extra power, wires or connections, and is so constructed 
that any part can be replaced at small cost. The chemi- 
cals are placed in a glass retort; a carbon and zinc appar- 
atus, with a spiral platinum attachment, is then adjusted 
so as to form a battery, and the light is ready. The pressure 
on a little knob produces an electric current by which the 
spiral of platinum is heated to incandescence. The Port- 
able Electric Light Company was recently incorporated 
with a capital of $100,000, under the laws of Massachu- 
setts. Some of the prominent business men of the State 
are identified with this enterprise. In addition to its use 
as a lighter, the apparatus can also be used in connect on 
with a burglar-alarm and a galvanic battery. 

WHEN YO U WANT A RIDE 



ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE, 



TEACHERS 

Supplied with positions in all grades of Educational work. 
Send stamp for circular. 

BEOCKWAY TEACHERS' AGENCY, 

Times Building, CHICAGO. 

|ji^2cin H§lk|© jf elieal Department 

The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures utthe Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 8th, 18S3, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshua L. Chamberlain, LL.D., President ; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H. Gerrish, M.D., 
Anatomy; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence ; Henry 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry 5 Bcrt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D, Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles 0. 
Hcnt, M. D., Materia Medial ami Thc-nipeutics ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demoostrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, ROOM 
PAPER, PERIODICALS, <ScC 



FRANK M. STETSON, 



*m a 




' C v/0LY 25- x * 



RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No.l 

SUPERIOR TO ALL, OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absohitely without adulteration or drugs. 

"We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 
direct importation, which is made especially for us, water 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLEN <B Gift TEH Manufacturers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Euling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



78 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 







53 



§ X o-S 



!sl°-«.So'o£ 2 g g ogJ«> c 2 g-'g a g-| 2g g a 



s o.a'S a gs gm g,i 



igloos"""?"" .si&iiN 






BURBANK, DOUGLASS & CO., 



(Successors to True, Douglass & Co.) Importers and Wholesale 
Dealers in 

China, Crockery, i Glass Ware, 



LAMP GOODS, CHANDELIERS AND PLATED WARE. 
242 Middle Street, . . PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PIOTDEE FRAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

From the cheapest to the very best. Also Pictures, Cabinet 

Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, etc. Also, Agent for 

the celebrated Household Sewing Machine. 

In the Blue Store, Main Street, Second Door from Elm, 
Opposite the Park, Brunswick, Maine. 

All the Students Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 



Iruk I, BofawtB' Boat I Sl§§ Ston. 



Cor. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



JOHN H. BRACKETT, 

SPRING STYLES, 1883, 

Consisting of Suitings, Overcoatings, and Pant Patterns, made in 
latest style and good lit guaranteed, at 20 per cent, less than the 
same goods can be bought elsewhere. Also a 

Fine Line of White Shirts, Ties, Braces, Collars, 
Hose, and Under Flannels. 

The Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company. 

Assets, $51,500,000. Surplus, $6,500,000. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1846. 

The New Plan of Cash Value and Non-Forfeitable 
Policy meets the needs of the public. Send for full informa- 
tion to H- !]■_ FAIRBANKS, Gen'l Agent, 

BANGOR, MAINE 

S. WALKER & SON, 

Fresh and Corned Beef, Pork, Mutton, Poultry, 

All for the Lowest Cash Prices. Liberal Discount to Clubs 
and Boarding Houses. 

At the Old Stand near corner Main and Centre Streets, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



s. walker. 



WM. H. WALKER. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SOLICITORS WANTED 1I1II C8HTOA& ®. & 



For the Fastest Selling Book of the year. 

GATELY'S 

Universal Educator 

Is an Educational, Social, Legal, Commercial, Histori- 
cal, and Mechanical work of llliO Pages and 470 Illustra- 
tions. Has received the approval of the press and people. 
Since its appearance in Jan. ,'«:i, 20,000 copies have been sold. 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE STUDENTS 
Cannot, under our plan, and -with our "work, fail to make a grand 
success. It, is possible for a student to pay Ms yearly expenses 
by canvassing- for this work during- vacation ; highest commission 
paid: no responsibility ; outfit free; it can be sold either on in- 
stallments or cash. 

For terms, territory, and other information apply to our Gen- 
eral Agent, E. P. Jordan, ii M. II., Bowdoin College, or to the 
Publisher, M. R. GATKLY, 72 Pearl St., Boston, Mass. 



SCHOOL OF MINES, COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 

Department of AKbitectwc. 

The recently established Course in Architecture occu- 
pies four years, the first of which is occupied with general 
studies, the architectural work beginning with the second 
year. 

Graduates of colleges an 1 scientific schools can, in gen- 
eral, enter in advanced standing at the beginning of the 
second year. Special students are not received. 

The scientific studies, pursued fn connection with the 
Department of Civil Engineering, include Chemistry, Phy- 
sics, and Mechanics, with so much of Mathematics as these 
studies require. 

The Architectural studies include the theory and the 
history of Architecture and of the allied arts, drawing and 
modelling, with the constant practice of original design, 
and so much of specifications and practical construction as 
can conveniently be taught in a school. 

The buildings now constructing, which will be ready 
for occupation in October, provide, besides the necessary 
drawing rooms and lecture rooms, a special architectural 
laboratory for practice and experiment, and a library for 
study and for the accomodation of the large collection of 
drawings, prints and photographs now in process of form- 
ation. 

For a circular of information containing further partic- 
ulars address, REGISTRAR, SCHOOL OP MINES, 

Madison av. and 49th St., New York city. 



TONTINE HOTEL, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



S. B. BREWSTER, 



PROPRIETOR. 



Class and Reunion Suppers a Specialty. First-Class Laundry 
Work, equal to Troy, done at short notice. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 



On and after Oct. 15th, 1882, 

Passenger Trains leave Brnnswick 

For Bath. 8.10, 11.25 a.m., 2.45, 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 
night (Sunday mornings only). 
Rockland, S.10 a.m., 2.45 P.M. 
Portland. 7.25, 11.30 a.m., 4.30 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 12.35 night. 
Lewiston, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.33 p.m., 12.40 night. 
Fannington, 8.10 a.m. (Mixed), 2.45 P.M. 
Augusta, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 p.m., 12.45 night. 
Skowhegan, Belfast, Dexter, Bangor, and Vaneeboro, 

2.45 p.m.. and 12.45 night. 
Watervillc 8.10, 12.45 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 P.M. (Saturdays 
only). 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 1882. 



DIAMONDS, fiWE j£l 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 



J. A. Merrill. 



A. Keith. 



BEATS THE WORLD. 

Old Judge 

CIGARETTES 

And Smoking Tobacco. 



Endorsed as ABSOLUTELY PURE and free 
from all foreign or deleterious substances what- 
ever, by 
PETER COLLIER, Chemist of the 

U. S. Diputmint of Agriculture, 

Washington, D. C. 
R. ODGEN DOREMUS, M.D., LL.D., 

Professor Chemistry and Toxicology in the Bellevue Hospi- 
tal Medical College, and Professor of Chemistry and Physics 
in the College of the City of New York. 
BENJAMIN SILLIMAN, Esq., 

Professor at Tale College, New Haven, Conn. 
R. A. WITTHAUS, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Buffalo ; 
Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Ver- 
mont: Professor of Physiological Chemistry, University of 
New York. 

And other eminent Chemists in the United States, cop- 
ies of whose certificates we shall be pleased to mail you 
on application. 

GOODWIIV Ac CO., 

Foot Grand Street, East River, New York. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A.. O. KEED, 



BRTTisrswiaic, me. 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 

C-A-XiIj AND EXA1£I1TE 2WE-2" ■WOEK. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 
Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

PORTLAND, MAINE 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 



CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
y. B.— Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



TIFFANY & CO., Union Square, 
New York City, have made prepar- 
ations for the coming season, to of- 
fer original and artistic designs with 
new methods of treatment, for forms 
of Commencement and other invita- 
tions. 

They have also increased their 
facilities for producing articles of 
appropriate design for Prises, Class 
Cups, Society Badges, etc. 

Drawings, with Estimates, sent 
on application. 

Correspondence inv ited. 

3AT8 &OTSE&, 

386 Washington Street, BATH, ME. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



ly Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8j and 587 Congress St., and 235 Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 



for Prick List. 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. Wl LSON & CO., 



AYlmlesak' and Retail Dealers i 



TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 



N. B.— Orders by mail will 1 



: prompt attention. Send for price list. 



742 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 

, STOCKMAN. ? 
A. WILSON. $ 



C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

OVER BOARDMAN'S STORE. 

Give Me a Call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SHREVE, * 

CRUMP 
* & LOW, 

432 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




XTENSIVE STOCK 
OF CHOICE GOODS. 



STERLING SILVEKWAEE-Tea, Coffee, and Din- 
ner Sets, Forks and Spoons, etc., of exclusive pat- 
terns ; Old English Silver ; Candelabra ; Carriage 
Clocks; Watches of all grades— Chronograph, Re- 
peating, and Chatelaine, with Chains, etc., etc. 

SELECTED DIAMONDS ; Black, White, and Fancy 
Color Pearls ; Rubies, Emeralds, Sapphires, Cat's- 
eyes, Precious Stones, generally, of highest quali- 
ties; Fine Gold Jewelry of original designs, etc., 
etc. 

ARTISTIC BRONZES of new models— Elegant Man- 
tel Clocks (keyless) ; English Library, Mantel, and 
Hall Clocks, with Westminster Chimes, Cathedral 
Gongs, Mantel Sets, in Marble, Bronze, Polished 
Brass, etc. 

DECORATIVE PORCELAIN in Vases, Plaques, Des- 
sert, Coffee and lee Cream Sets, etc., from the 
Minton, Worcester Royal, Crown Derby, Copeland, 
Royal Berlin, Dresden, and other celebrated works, 
etc. 

MARBLE STATUARY. NOVELTIES. 



ALL, KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

Agents Gorham Mfg. Co. 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fur- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Work- 
manship, we especially solicit orders for Fine Printing of all 
kinds, 

For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

We also make a specialty of 

FU^T-CI^gg POINTING 

For Schools and Colleges, 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &o. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

PEICES LO"^T. 
Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Bowdoin College Boys 

When they visit BATH should call at 

WEBBER'S DRUG STORE. 

A Full Line of Cigars, Toilet Articles, &c. 



Sirtofee Smoke 

THE JVJEW CIGAR, 



£ 



YALE. 



3* 



Price fO Cts. Havana Filled. 

S.LSO, 

DIAMOND CROWN. Price 5 Cts. 

JOHNSTON & HATCH, 

LEWISTON, ME. 

^^™ For sale in Brunswick by Ed. J. Merrinian. 

Smoke Smoke 



FIRST- 



runes 



CLASS 

and 



STEELS} «M*» *»®*«"WsB«'**!9j 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 

THOIVJAS H. RILEY, . . . Brunswick, Me. 

Also INSURANCE written in Best Companies, 
at Lowest Kates. 



FOUND AT LAST!! 

That the place to buy the Very Best 

Groceries and Students' Supplies, 

At the Lowest Possible Price, is at 

GEO. F. TENNEY'S, opp. College Grounds, 

BRUNSWICK MAINE. 



COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle riding is unsurpassed as a 
method of traveling,whether tor speed, 
sport, or renewal of health. The prac- 
ticability of the machine has been 
thoroughly tested, and satisfactorily 
proved, beyond question. Thousands 
are in daily use, and the number is 
rapidly increasing. The exercise is 
recommended by the medical profession 
as most beneficial to health, bringing 
into exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

Send 3c. stamp for 36-page Illustrated 
Catalogue containing price lists and full 
information. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washington St„ BOSTON, MASS. 




IMPORTING TAILORS 

AND 

GENTS' FURNISHERS. 

Novelties in Imported Hosiery, 
Underwear, Gloves, and Neckwear 
for Mens' Wear. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

Market Square, 
PORTLAND, ME. 



FLEXIBLE STIFF HATS, 

Laced Gloves for Gents, instead of Button. 



MERRY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 

->#F. H. WILSON,**- 

DISPENSER, OF 

Fii-i li-igSj Mi 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



AUGUSTA HOUSE, 

State Street, Augusta, Maine. 

Most desirable location in the city. Good Rooms, Good Table, 

Good Attendance. Free Hack to and from Depot 

and Wharf. Patronage Solicited. 

E. & A. C. MANSON, Proprietors. 



x^^g^^^x^ 



^&&&&z$E3gT^te^&&4&%>3fr$6 ™y£^i&<&> i 



f# 



w 



& 



i3£!T6d *^ 



:* v 







^5^ • © 




«®«<8>4»«»^«8»».<8»«S»«<4^>'*«8»*''i' r ( |S| ' V 







BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SOLICITORS WANTED 

For the Fastest Selling Book of the year. 

GATELY'S 

Universal Educator 

Is an Educational, Social, Legal, Commercial, Histori- 
cal, and Mechanical work of 1160 Pages and 470 Illustra- 
tions. Has received the approval of the press and people. 
Since its appearance in Jan., 'So, 20,000 copies have been sold. 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Cannot, under our plan, and with our work, fail to make a grand 
success. It is possible for a student to pay Ins yearly expenses 
by canvassing for this work during vacation ; highest commission 
paid; no responsibility; outfit free; it can be sold either on in- 
stallments or cash. 

For terms, territory, and other information apply to our Gen- 
eral Agent, E. P. Jordan, 22 M. IT., Bowdoin College, or to the 
Publisher, M. It. GATELY, 72 Pearl St., Boston, Mass. 



SCHOOL OF MINES, COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 

Separtas&t ef Architecture. 

The recently established Course in Architecture occu- 
pies four years, the first of which is occupied with general 
studies, the architectural work beginning with the second 
year. 

Graduates of colleges and scientific schools can, in gen- 
eral, enter in advanced standing at the beginning of the 
second year. Special students are not received. 

The scientific studies, pursued fn connection with the 
Department of Civil Engineering, include Chemistry, Phy- 
sics, and Mechanics, with so much of Mathematics as these 
studies require. 

The Architectural studies include the theory and the 
history of Architecture and of the allied arts, drawing and 
modelling, with the constant practice of original design, 
and so much of specifications and practical construction as 
can conveniently be taught in a school. 

The buildings now constructing, which will be ready 
for occupation in October, provide, besides the necessary 
drawing rooms and lecture rooms, a special architectural 
laboratory for practice and experiment, and a library for 
study and for the accomodation of the large collection of 
drawings, prints and photographs now in process of form- 
ation. 

For a circular of information containing further partic- 
ulars address, REGISTRAR, SCHOOL OF MINES, 

Madison av. and 49th St., New York city. 



TONTINE HOTEL, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

8. B. BBEWSTEB, - - PBOPBIETOB. 

Class and Reunion Suppers a Specialty. First-Class Laundry 
Work, equal to Troy, done at short notice. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC FUBLISHEE, 

in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 



On and after Oct. 15th, 1882, 
Passenger Trains leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.10, 11.25 a.m., 2.45, 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 

night (Sunday mornings only). 
Ttockland, 8.10 a.m., 2.45 p.m. 
Portland. 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 4.30 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 12.35 night. 
Lewiston, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.33 p.m., 12.40 night. 
Farmington. 8.10 a.m. (Mixed). 2.45 P.M. 
Augusta, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 p.m., 12.45 night. 
Skowhegnn, Belfast, Dexter, Bangor, and Vanceboro, 

2.45 p.m.. and 12.45 night. 
Waterville 8.10, 12.45 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 p.m. (Saturdays 

only). 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 18S2. 



D8, Tim J£W£M*Y, 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 
J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 

BEATS THE WORLD. 

Old Judge 

CIGARETTES 
And Smoking Tobacco. 

Endorsed as ABSOLUTELY PURE and free 
from all foreign or deleterious substances what- 
ever, by 
PETER COLLIER, Chemist of the 

U. S. Department ef Agil&nlture, 

Washington, D. C. 
R. ODGEN DOREMUS, M.D., LL.D., 
Protessor Chemistry and Toxicology in the Bellevue Hospi- 
tal Medical College, and Professor of Chemistry and Physics 
in the College of the City of New York. 
BENJAMIN SILLIMAN, Esq., 

Professor at Yale College, New Haven, Conn. 
B. A. WITTHAUS, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Buffalo; 
Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Ver- 
mont; Professor of Physiological Chemistry, University of 
New York. 

And other eminent Chemists in the United States, cop- 
ies of whose certificates we shall be pleased to mail you 
on application. 

GOODWIN Ac CO., 

Foot Grand Street, East River, New York. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



> 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The u Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 

"LIBEAKT LAMPS," 

SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGKAVED IS THE MOST FASHIOHABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOE 



474 Congress St., - 



opp. Preble House. 



DEANE BROTHERS & SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

J3F° Lowest Prices in the State, 

755 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 
A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, £ Fancy Goods. 

Also Eastern Mutual Union Telegraph Office. 
Under Town Clock, - Brunswick, Me. 



The Only RELIABLE AND STANDARD Brands OF 

Cigarettes and Fine Tobaccos. 



Straight Cuts. sp 

Sweet Caporal. 
St. James, etc. 




Caporal. 
Caporal J. 
Ambassador. 



St. James J, etc. 
Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut Cigarettes. 



This new brand is made of extra fine, selected, prime, mild, golden Virginia 
Leaf, and is the finest Cigarette, as to quality, flavor, and workmanship, eve: 

Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut, Full Dress. 

Sweet Capokal Cokk Mouthpiece. 



offered for sale 




STEEL 
PENS 



Leading Numbers: 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEN CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York. 

Go to W. B. Woodard's 

To buy vour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGAES, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

SPECIAL EA.TES to STTyXJENT' OLTJBS. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

BEST DAIRY IN BRUNSWICK 

THERE ARE TWO PINTS OF THE NICEST MILK IN 
EVERY QUART WHICH I SELL. SPECIAL ATTENTION 
GIVEN TO STUDENT CLUBS. 

«®» STEWARDS SHOULD DROP ME A POSTAL WITH 
THEIR LOCATION WRITTEN PLAINLY. 

A. P. WOODSIDE, Brunswick, Me. 

"w. ts/l. 3vci:d:l,e:r,, 



OVER AMERICAN EXPRESS OFFICE, 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 







W THE FAVORITE NOS.303-40'4-332-l7O-35I-WITH 

HIS OTHER 'STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ti 



NEW DRUG STORE. 



ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

DHUG& MEDICINES, 

Fancy ail Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Tobacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

Igf Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

MAIN STREET, 

DUNLAP BLOCK. 

SPRING AND SUMMER, 1883. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

MAYNARD'S 



step ane §m 

Main St., under Town Clock 

'amines, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



OAL 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Coal "STard. in Topsham, 



WHERE NONE BUT 



The Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Orders telephoned from Stores of A. T. Campbell 
and W. B. Woodard promptly attended to. 

Office near the Sheds. 

3rm$uite&®®e>fe Stora 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery ; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

S^esfei asi gait H^a-feg* 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

A®-Special Hates to Student Olubs.^8 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amouut 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the JEneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books ; Jones's Greek Prose Composition.) 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Beal equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opeuing 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Bhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — EOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 
Latin, two terms. 
Greek, two terms. 
Natural History, three terras. 
Physics, one terra. 
Chemistry, two terms. 
Science of Language, one term. 
English Literature, two terms. 
German, two terms. 
History of Philosophy, two terms. 
International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JULY 18, 1883. 



No. 6. 



BO WD 01 1ST ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
. COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE-. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
Oliver W. Means, '84, Managing Editor. 
Charles E. Sayward, '84, Business Editor. 
Llewellyn Barton, '84. John A. Waterman, Jr. ,'84. 
William H. Cothren, 'S4. Oliver K. Cook, '85. 
Rodney I. Thompson, '84. Nehemiah B. Ford, '85. 
Sherman W. Walker, '84. John A. Peters, 'S5. 
Terms— $2.00 a year in advance; single copies, 15 cents. 
Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to 
contribute articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by the writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 
Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Yol. XIII., No. 6.— July 18, 1883. 

Editorial Notes 79 

A Zoological Cruise iu Casco Bay 81 

Sunday Services 82 

Class Day Oration. — Growth of Popular Liberty iu 

France 83 

Class Day Poem. — A Puritan School 87 

Oration Before Phi Beta Kappa 89 

Class Day 90 

Commencement Day 92 

Base-Ball 92 

College Items 93 

Necrology 95 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



Again are we compelled to lose one of our 
most esteemed instructors. In going from 
Bowdoin College, Prof. Campbell leaves va- 
cant a place which it will be most difficult to 
fill. Two years ago Prof. Campbell came to 
us an utter stranger, and now he carries to 
his new field of usefulness the affectionate re- 



gard of the whole student body. From the 
very outset, manifesting a keen interest in all 
college matters, he gradually won the esteem 
and love of all with whom he came into con- 
tact. As an instructor, a counsellor, and 
friend, he will be sincerely missed. The pro- 
fessorship left vacant is one of the most im- 
portant, and the students will watch with 
great anxiety the selection of a new man. 

An article has recently been published in 
one of our leading magazines, in which it was 
asserted that the greatest need of our colleges 
was not the erection of more costly buildings, 
with all the most modern improvements, but 
rather an increase of the professors' salaries. 
It is needless to say that frequent changes are 
a disadvantage. Much time is spent in be- 
coming acquainted with a new man, and we 
sincerely hope that, in the future, measures 
will be taken to retain valuable men. It has 
become noticeable that other colleges regard 
as a sufficient recommendation for a man the 
fact that we have him, and straightway invite 
him to leave us. Experience is a great in- 
structor, and it should be expected that the 
" College Fathers " will profit by the lessons 
of the past. To Prof. Campbell's successor 
we shall extend a welcome made sincere by 
the remembrance of our loss. To Prof. Camp- 
bell himself, in the name of the students, we 
would extend wishes for many happy years of 
fruitful labor. 



'Tis but one short year since we bade 
good-bye to '82, and now '83 has waved a last 
farewell. The old familiar haunts will seem 
the same, and yet not the same, when we re- 
turn in the fall to resume work. Distin- 



80 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



guished for more than mediocre scholarship, 
loyal to the old customs of the college, and, 
above all, possessing an unshaken belief in 
'88, the class will long be missed and mourned. 
It is needless to review in detail its history, 
but it will be sufficient to say that, while not 
in any signal manner conspicuous in college 
sports, they have ever maintained an honora- 
ble part. '83 has seen a great change in col- 
lege sentiment. When they entered hazing 
in a mild form was still maintained and up- 
held by inherited traditions, but in the last 
three years an increased public condemnation 
of the practice has brought about its natural 
result, making hazing as odious in college as 
out of it. We will not urge the members of 
'83 to be loyal to their Alma Mater, for we 
know that a class so firmly attached to the 
college will ever be among its truest friends. 
The many friendships formed by members of 
the lower classes with '83 will long be remem- 
bered, while anxious eyes will watch them as 
they launch upon life's busy ocean. 



It was with great surprise and deep regret 
that we learned of President Chamberlain's 
resignation. Connected with the college for 
so many years as student, professor, and presi- 
dent, his life and that of the college have be- 
come in a large measure the same. The 
anxious interest shown during his recent se- 
vere sufferings, by the students and friends of 
the college, indicates in but a small degree the 
esteem in which he is held. The calm forti- 
tude with which he has endured these many 
years the effects of his wound, has proved him 
to be in the highest sense a hero. As an in- 
structor he has no superior, and, if he does 
not accept the professorship offered him, we 
shall have met with an irreparable loss. The 
college, the state, and the nation have been 
served by him well and nobly. Bowdoin Col- 
lege has been especially fortunate, throughout 
its history, in its choice of presidents, and it 



is hoped that a wisely ordered selection may 
in this instance be made. 



The Commencement of '83 has come and 
gone. Without striking incident, it possessed 
minor characteristics, which lent it a pleasing 
charm. First of all, pleasant weather, with 
cool breezes fanning the excited faces of the 
youthful orators, made attendance very com- 
fortable. The literary merit of the various 
parts was above the average, and caused the 
audiences to lend attentive ears. The noise 
and disturbance of other years was noticeably 
absent, an almost Sabbath quiet continuing 
through the week. Although nothing was said 
or done by the college authorities to produce 
this result, but it was brought about solely by 
the good sense of the students and assembled 
alumni, yet we shall expect to find the noisy crit- 
ics of Bowdoin College taking no notice of the 
remarkably good order maintained, and con- 
tinuing to circulate the mistaken impression 
that disorder runs riot among us. The class 
have reason to congratulate themselves on 
this auspicious beginning of life's battles. 



The object of long expectation has been 
reached and passed. The end of another 
year, towards which we looked with hopeful 
longing, has brought its opportunity for retro- 
spection. Bright in anticipation, the shadows 
of coming events were not sufficiently distinct 
to mar the prospect of the new year of study. 
The inevitable vicissitudes were not long in 
making themselves known. Excited by some 
minor tricks, which, in comparison with those 
of former years, appeared microscopic, the 
neighboring papers sent up one prolonged 
howl against the barbarities of college hazing. 
Our statement that hazing as such did not 
exist, and that the few harmless tricks prac- 
ticed were no worse than those constantly 
happening in many other colleges, was re- 
ceived with incredulity. Believing that no 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



81 



long continuing fire could be maintained with 
so little material, we patiently awaited its 
early extinction. 

In regard to sports, the past year has been 
not without gratifying results. Disappointed 
iu regard to the Lake George regatta, atten- 
tion was more actively given to the class 
races, and an exceptional day, together with 
long and careful preparation on the part of 
some, made the result highly satisfactory. In 
rowing and in some of the contests of Field 
Day, the best records of former years were 
beaten. On the diamond, the work of the 
year has been more generally satisfactory than 
for several years past, although not so gratify- 
ing as was hoped at the beginning of the sea- 
son. The schedule of games was a marked 
improvement over the methods of former 
years. The nine has every encouragement to 
work hard for the championship next year. 

In actual study the past year has doubt- 
less been as fruitful as the average. There 
has been little to call attention from work, and 
much commendable progress has been made 
in the branches pursued. 

To all maj' the vacation bring rest, pleas- 
ure, and renewed strength for the work of 
next year ! 



A ZOOLOGICAL CRUISE IN CASCO 
BAY. 

Wednesday, June 13th, Prof. Lee and a 
party of '84 men, consisting of Adams, Brad- 
ley, Brown, Childs, Longren, Walker, and J. 
F. Waterman, left college for a four days' 
zoological cruise in Casco Bay. Crawford 
conveyed the party and baggage to Mere 
Point, where the yacht Echo of Freeport was 
awaiting. After everything had been trans- 
ferred on board and stowed away, we sailed 
before a light breeze toward the outer end of 
Goose Island. On the way the dip-nets were 
used with excellent results. About 5 in the 
afternoon the anchor was dropped between 



Goose and Goslin Islands. While Prof. Lee, 
with other antiquarians, were digging over 
some Indian shell heaps, another party, 
equipped with hook and line, soon had a good 
supply of dinners for supper. Would that 
space permitted of describing in detail the 
preparation and disposal of that meal. It was 
a great success. One man especially dis- 
tinguished himself, and showed, greater ca- 
pacity for fried dinners than most men pos- 
sess. He had to loosen his belt twice. After 
supper the party returned to the yacht, where, 
after a great deal of merriment, the boys 
"turned in" for the night. Towards 1 in the 
morning one fellow, wishing to get a drink, 
left his berth for that purpose ; but on the 
way to the water cask he stepped on the 
stomach of one and on the ear of another. 
The remarks that naturally followed awak- 
ened the rest. When quiet was again re- 
stored the watch on the forward deck blew 
his fog-horn at every inspiration loud enough 
to be heard at some distance. 

At 4 in the morning there were signs of 
life on board the Echo. When time came to 
weigh anchor a very stiff breeze was blowing, 
and soon the bay was covered by crested 
waves. Two hauls were made by the dredge 
on the east side of Whaleboat Island, with 
excellent result. At 9 A.M., on account of 
the wind which had increased to almost a 
gale, the yacht was anchored on the lee side 
of Whaleboat, where what had already been 
taken was washed out and sorted. While 
here two of the party went to work with hook 
and line and soon had a large quantity of cod 
and pollock secured. A third member of the 
party who had never caught cod, and wishing 
to have the pleasure of saying he had done 
so, desired to try his luck. Much merriment 
was caused when, after a half-hour's patient 
fishing, a large sculpin was hauled out. 

In the afternoon several more hauls were 
made by the dredge, beside some surface fish- 
ing. Toward evening we made harbor in a 



82 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



beautiful cove on Jewell's Island, where the 
cliffs, rising abruptly from the water's edge, 
with the wooded slope above reflected on the 
smooth surface of the water, made a scene 
worthy of an artist's brush. Friday morning, 
after one or two hauls, the yacht was headed 
for Portland. On the way, a landing was 
made on June 16th of Park and the Outer 
Green, where a good collection of sea birds' 
eggs were secured and two petrel were taken 
alive. The afternoon was spent in examining 
the piles of the wharves in Portland Harbor 
for any rare form of animal life. Saturday 
the principal part of the work was done be- 
tween Hog and Long Islands After taking a 
sail out around Half- Way Light, the party, 
with complexion several shades darker than 
when they started, arrived at Me"re Point. 

The trip, of which space has allowed but 
a meagre account, was a success in every way. 
Aside from the pleasant time, which not even 
the customary tribute to Neptune disturbed, 
the cruise was of great value from a scientific 
point of view, in that it gave the students an 
opportunity to observe some of the lower 
forms of life as they exist in their native ele- 
ment. Many valuable specimens were se- 
cured, both of rare and well-known animals' 
as well as some of botanic and geological in- 
terest. The hearty thanks of the members of 
the party are due to Prof. Lee not only for 
undertaking but carrying out so pleasantly 
and successfully the expedition, and it is to be 
hoped that coming classes may have the same 
privilege of observing for themselves some of 
the most interesting facts connected with the 
science of zoology. 



SUNDAY SERVICES. 
The Bowdoin Y. M. C. A. was so fortu- 
nate as to secure Rev. C. M. Southgate, of 
Dedham, Mass., to preach the sermon Sun- 
day morning, July 8th. The members of the 
Association were present in good numbers 



and occupied front seats in the body of the 
house. 

The subject of Mr. Southgate's discourse 
was " The call of God to the young men of 
this nation," and the text was from Ex xix. 5. 
The aim of the sermon was to show the his- 
toric development which has made ours the 
leading nation of the earth, the rapid progress 
of the present generation in material and po- 
litical affairs and in religious discussions, with 
the peculiar problem now before us of assimi- 
lating the enormous and increasing foreign 
element. Educated men should lead in main- 
taining the fact that this is a Christian gov- 
ernment, and in forming a Christian public 
sentiment. This duty can be performed only 
through personal loyalty to Christ. 

The church was well filled in the after- 
noon, and those present listened to an excel- 
lent Baccalaureate sermon by Prof. Campbell. 
His text was from Eccl. x. 15 : " The labor of 
the foolish wearieth every one of them, be- 
cause he knoweth not how to go to the city." 
The following is an abstract of the address. 

" What is life ? " is the problem of the 
world. It excites the child and engages the 
scholar. As the incompetent civilizations of 
the past have waned this is the question with 
which the strongest minds have struggled. 
Even amid the flashing fortunes of to-day, 
whether life is worth living seems to be un- 
determined. Still life's mystery involves, an 
inspiration. Is it not a gleam from above 
that makes man restless? He is seeking a 
city — not man-built, but celestial. 

While man gravitates Godward, world-life 
is a wearying struggle. Is not ignorance the 
mother of calamity, and man's life and peace 
concomitant of his rationality ? Pain and 
penalty have a common root. Harmony with 
the highest is secured by knowledge of the 
highest. The melody of God's personal voice 
plays into the chords of our being, command- 
ing harmonious response. Our intelligence 
of an existing- God is the most immediate and 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



83 



incontrovertible of all our rational possessions. 
More and more clearly the heavens declare 
the glory of God. Not, however, through 
mere world-wisdom. Syllogism and telescope 
can never reach God as God. Who would re- 
fuse to love a friend until he knew the meas- 
ure of his affection ? God, by rational choice 
received into the soul, becomes an absolute 
reality. By rejecting Him we lose Him. The 
choice of error engenders infatuation for er~ 
ror. The calamity of evil action is three-fold, 
(1) incompetency of recovery, (2) nullifica- 
tion of knowledge, (3) aberration of propen- 
sity. Men know more than they practice, 
the practicing, the main tiring, capturing the 
intelligence. Folly takes the throne, and man 
grasps wildly after his needs, not finding the 
object of his affection and his woe. Gold 
perpetuates his illusion ; the fashion world ac- 
cepts sepulchres of exquisite whiteness; 
strong drink increases his thirst ; he has a 
frenzy for pollution ; the very God, the want 
of whom is maddening, he blackens with 
curses ; immortality is replaced by "the agony 
of moments." The greatest possible oppor- 
tunity is linked with the greatest possible 
failure. God has not left the world without 
hope. Man may be rescued. A clear con- 
science will admit the light of the world and 
detect the truth divine. The glare and smoke 
of our inventions ought not to blind the eyes- 
No knowledge can be valid when the morta 
sky is dark. The true life is the divine life" 
There is deliverance, rest for weariness, the 
joy of the Lord for faithful service. 



CLASS DAY ORATION.— GROWTH OF 
POPULAR LIBERTY IN FRANCE. 

BY J. B. BEED. 

On the 18th of June, sixty-eight j^ears 
ago, occurred one of the greatest battles of 
history. On that day Europe's greatest war- 
rior made his last, final, desperate struggle 
for the freedom of his country and for popu- 



lar liberty. Waterloo was lost. The cause 
of despotism triumphed, and the Bourbons 
were, for a time, restored to their ancestral 
throne. 

What had the war accomplished ? Had 
the valiant sons of France fallen in vain? 
England stamped the revolution a failure, and 
no colors could be found dark enough in 
which to paint its enormities, no calumny too 
awful to be hurled against the champions of 
popular liberty. 

In the English writings of the times, 
Napoleon appears as a fiend incarnate, revel- 
ing in the blood of thousands slain only to 
gratify his insatiable ambition. But the ver- 
dict of England at that time is not the ver- 
dict of to-day. To us the great revolution 
with the long period of war which followed 
appears in a very different light. It is a true 
saying that no man is fitted to write a history 
of his own times. Thus the name of Napo- 
leon is honored to-day not only in his own 
country, but the world over ; not only for his 
wonderful victories, but for that spirit of 
patriotism and devotion to country so con- 
spicuous in every act, to those who will but 
view without prejudice the conditions of the 
times. 

Let us, then, consider briefly some of 
the causes which led to the French revolu- 
tion, the feelings and needs which prompted 
those deeds of violence that must ever remain 
a stain upon the history of France ; but, at 
the same time, let us strive to draw from the 
black warp of crime some threads of justice 
and patriotism, while we follow the course of 
the frail bark of future liberty tossing upon 
the raging billows of phrensied faction and 
civil war. 

At the outbreak of the French Revolution 
the people were divided into two great classes. 
On one side, eighty thousand noble families 
living in idleness and luxury ; on the other, 
twenty-four millions of people kept in the 
lowest state of poverty, maintaining by their 



84 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



toil haughty nobles from whom they received 
only outrage and contempt. Taxation had 
advanced beyond all reason, and reduced the 
laboring classes to absolute slavery. Courts 
of justice were wholly under the control of 
the privileged class, and redress of grievances 
through legal proceedings was, for a poor 
man, impossible. Offices of government trust 
were unblushingly sold to the highest bid- 
ders, while the}', in turn, reimbursed them- 
selves as best they could. 

The church, corrupt in the extreme, was 
wholly on the side of the government and 
oppression, but blind to all the needs and 
miseries of the people. In 1785 Thomas 
Jefferson wrote from Paris, " I am of the 
opinion'that nineteen out of every twenty of 
all the people in France, are more wretched, 
more accursedin every circumstance of human 
existence, than the most conspicuously 
wretched individual of the whole United 
States." 

The court of Louis XV. was the most 
corrupt the world has ever known. Through 
all time it will remain the very standard of 
.lust and depravity. The power of the king 
was absolute. Le.ttres de cochet were freely 
circulated among the favorites at court era- 
powering them to drag to dungeons, without 
even the form of trial, any whom they would. 
Virtue, common decency, all the rights of 
citizenship were trampled beneath the iron 
heel of despotism. When, on the 10th of May, 
1774, Louis XV., having closed his career of 
debauchery and crime, passed to his just re- 
ward, his son, Louis XVI., came to the throne a 
man of peculiar virtue and piety for the times 
and society in which he had been reared, but 
lacking in force of character, and totally 
unfit to breast the fearful storm of vengeance 
and popular indignation that had been gath- 
ering for centuries. 

The expenses of his court, the resistance 
of the nobles, a bankrupt treasury, necessi- 
tated a calling of the States General, and at 



length the fettered sons of toil found voice 
to utter their wrongs. It seems a strange 
dispensation of providence that for this in- 
nocent though imbecile king, and for his 
beautiful queen Marie Antoinette, a lady to 
whom the world has ever rendered due trib- 
ute of honor and respect, should be reserved 
those vials of wrath stored by the oppression 
and misrule of ages. In this we but recog- 
nize the operation of that great law of our 
king that men's deeds, good or evil, affect not 
themselves alone. He "visiteth the iniquity 
of the fathers upon the children." 

The time at length had come ! No par- 
tial revolution could accomplish the changes 
needed. It was not a pruning but an up- 
rooting. The phrensiecl people, once aroused, 
swept away the good and the bad in the 
whirlwind of their revenge. 

And yet, what were all the sufferings of 
the revolution compared to that continuous 
" Reign of Terror " under which the people 
had groaned for centuries. Blessed revolution! 
Awful in your phenomena, glorious in your 
final results ! Liberty now born shall never 
wholly perish till despotism is crushed, and 
the people whose right it is to rule shall rule ! 

But it is not my object to bring before 
your minds the blackness of darkness of those 
years while the demon of party vengeance, 
drunken with the blood of its victim, raged 
uncontrolled through the length and breadth 
of devoted France. Their history is too well 
known. The very mention of the great rev- 
olution brings to mind thoughts of the guil- 
lotine and all the horrors of the " Reign of 
Terror." I wish only to show the causes 
which lead to the outbreak, which governed 
its character, and how, from this chaos, order 
and liberty were evolved. 

The first great cause of the revolution 
was the oppression and misrule of the people. 
But in their efforts to be rid of tyranny the 
people themselves became the worst tyrants 
France had ever known. They had been 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



85 



taught by the example of their rulers, they 
but practiced what they had learned. They 
who had known nothing of mercy could not 
show mercy. And yet this view alone does 
not seem adequate to account for that unnat- 
ural spirit which pervaded the French Revo- 
lution. 

When we behold so strange a sight, a 
nation maddened, turning its weapons against 
itself, striving to overturn all its institutions, 
the good with the bad, a people loosened from 
every restraint, every influence for good, we 
must seek for some cause sufficient to pro- 
due these results, some outside agency which 
had planted those germs of discord in the 
popular mind which sprung up and bore fruit 
so terrible. 

Co-existent with the monarchy and equal- 
ly hated by the people was the established 
church ; so corrupt, so utterly lost to every 
thing good and pure that none were found 
bold enough to vindicate its cause. Dungeons 
and chains were the only arguments wielded 
in its defense. Without doubt there were in 
the church worthy and devout men, but these 
by their virtue only rendered more conspic- 
uous the sins of the many. The people, 
learned and ignorant, felt that this was the 
monster guarding the path to popular liberty : 
it must and should be destroyed ! Just prior 
to this time there had sprung up in France a 
class of philosophers bolder in their theories, 
more disastrous in their influence than any 
who had preceded them in any land. Chris- 
tianity was hated by these men not so much 
as a religion as a political institution. The 
high officers of the church were obnoxious, 
not as men assuming to regulate the things 
of another world, but as proprietors and tithe 
gatherers in this. 

France, abandoned by those who should 
have been her teachers in righteousness, be- 
came the disciple of Voltaire and Rosseau. 
Voltaire assailed with keenest sarcasm the 
corruptions of the church, representing it as 



religion itself. These writers of the revolu- 
tion represented religion not only as mere 
superstition but as the greatest curse the 
world had ever known. Christianity vanished 
in a laugh. These philosophers offered a 
simple and seemingly (at least to the unedu- 
cated) wise and equitable system, free from 
all abuses of the time, a speculative political 
paradise. 

But they went too far. In striking at the 
bad they destroyed the good ; in gathering 
out the tares they rooted up the wheat also. 
They tore down, they laid waste the strong 
places, they overturned existing religion, but 
failed to build upon the ruins. All their 
labor was destruction, they failed to construct 
anything worth}' a place in the minds of men. 
They succeeded in eradicating from the pop- 
ular mind all sense of responsibility. Pleas- 
ure was the end of life. There was no God 
before whom humanity must stand in judg- 
ment. " We die even as the flowers and 
shall breathe away our lives upon the chance 
wind even as they." No God, no recom- 
pense, no judgment after death! Every 
man's will a law unto himself. These were 
the very fundamental principles of the French 
philosophy. 

In those days of desperate struggle for 
liberty, the Bible, the only safe guide to true 
liberty, was trampled in the dust. The igno- 
rant masses freed from all sense of responsi- 
bility, all fear of future punishment aband- 
oned themselves to every vice, and the re- 
sult history has called the "Reign of Terror." 
France had but again demonstrated that "a 
free people must be a thoughtful people." 
Ignorance and vice can never rule success- 
fully. The stream cannot be purer than the 
fountain. In a popular government every 
sentiment of the people is stamped in clear 
cut characters upon its legislation. 

To quote the words of Abbot in his His- 
tory of the French Revolution : " There were 
in France at this time five hundred thousand 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



well informed citizens ; too many to submit 
to oppression, too few to control the infuri- 
ated masses when once aroused The 

United States, with a population about the 
same as France in the morning of her revo- 
lution, has four or five millions of intelligent 
and well educated men. These men sup- 
port our institutions. But for them the re- 
public would be swept away like chaff before 
the wind." Were we to change the figures 
to accord with later statistics we should find 
the number of educated men greatly increased 
and our government correspondingly strength- 
ened. 

From the mire of party strife into which 
France had fallen it was impossible for 
her to rise a free republic. The feeble gov- 
ernment of the Directory had no power to 
establish order and suppress the war of fac- 
tions. A strong hand was needed to grasp 
the reins of government and take itself 
the right to rule which the people had so 
shamefully abused. Napoleon Bonaparte was 
a man peculiarly fitted for the task. Military 
glory was the only glory the French people 
could appreciate. Napoleon, a man of the 
people, had, by his unexampled victories 
gained for France the only glory of these 
long and bloody years. 

Bold, energetic, self-confident ; warrior, 
statesman, and scholar, he had won for him- 
self a name at the very sound of which all 
the despots of Europe trembled. His popu- 
larity, both in the army and among the cit- 
izens, was unbounded. Can that man be 
called a usurper who acquires his right to 
rule from an overwhelming majority of the 
people? Without the shedding of blood he 
rescued France from anarchy and gave to 
her a constitutional government. Valiantly 
he fought for his native land against the 
allied forces of all Europe. His zeal for the 
popular cause and constitutional liberty was 
commensurable only with his ambition. 

But aristocratic Europe could never brook 



the growth of popular liberty. Well did its 
rulers know that this plant once allowed to 
take root in France would scatter its seeds 
far and wide. Not without cause did they 
combine again and again to destroy it. 

At Waterloo the struggle ended. Na- 
poleon delivering himself up to the English 
as the most magnanimous of his foes, was 
condemned to imprisonment on a desolate 
rock in mid ocean ; his star of destiny be- 
came shrouded in darkness, but the glory of 
his fame will continue to shine brighter and 
brighter as long as men oppressed long for a 
deliverer. 

Let us contrast the two great revolutions 
of the eighteenth century and see how they 
are related and in what they resemble each 
other. The American Revolution came first 
in time and was largely indebted to the newly 
awakened spirit of liberty in France for its 
success. Without the recognition and sub- 
stantial aid of France the war would have 
proved a failure. Lafayette, to whom Amer- 
icans can give no greater honor than to call 
him the friend and co-laborer of Washington, 
also championed the cause of liberty in his 
own land. In each case England was the 
aggressor and common enemy. Each was an 
uprising against tyranny, the demand of a 
people for their just rights. Patriots of 
France no less than the heroes of our own 
revolution fought to transmit to their poster- 
ity the glorious heritage of ecpaal rights; a 
government in which no privileged class 
should deprive the laborer of the just reward 
of his industry. Nor were they unsuccessful. 
Like Moses of old they were not suffered 
themselves to possess the goodly land, but 
only with the eye of faith to view it as from 
the mountain top. To-day their children, 
enjoying all the blessings of a free republic, 
gather the fruitage of that tree of liberty 
which their fathers planted amid the tears 
and sorrows of the revolution. 

We as Americans, while we rejoice in 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



87 



the prosperity of our sister republic, should 
not fail to profit by the study of her history. 
She lias clearly demonstrated the dangers of 
skepticism and a false philosophy. That 
America is to-day free and happy we owe to 
the bold defenders of her liberty, to a pure 
and pervasive religion, and to the blessing 
and mercy of Almighty God. Skepticism lias 
been the bane of France. It has brought 
upon her citizens untold suffering and misery. 
Let the free thinkers of America be 
warned by her example. Want of reverence 
and disrespect for religion, free thought, so- 
called (which means, in popular language, 
skepticism and infidelity), is the greatest 
danger which to-day threatens American lib- 
erty. Never more than now was there need 
that every thinking man take a firm and de- 
cided stand on the side of truth and religion. 
."Blessed is the nation whose God is the 
Lord." 



CLASS DAY POEM.— A PURITAN 
SCHOOL. 

BY B. SEWALL. 

As we're gathered here by these ancient walls 
To bid adieu to our classic halls, 
It seems but fitting that we should praise 
The eminent worth of those, who raise, 
For the weal of posterity, fountains of lore, 
In Pierian vales, from wbich may pour 
That balm of peace, which De Soto's clan 
Called " Elixir of Life," in courses which ran 
In perennial pleuty, a copious flood, 
Recruiting the mind, and refreshing the blood. 
To extol too highly the noble desires 
Of honor to sons, from their generous sires, 
Were a task as hopeless for us to try, 
As for Hermes' arms to bear on higb 
The globe allotted to Atlas to hold, 
On his brawny neck of Titanic mold. 

A simple scene I wish to unveil 
To your thoughtful minds, in brief detail, 
Of a Puritan village school ; and then 
From its rude and unskillful instruction, again, 
To think of our valued advantages here, 
And laud what is best, and prized as most dear. 

I ask you, then, as companions to stray 
A moment or two, on a country way, 
And allow your fancies lightly to play 
O'er ancestral sketches grave or gay ; 



To picture now as a living act, 
The deeds which so long have lain intact, 
That they seem but mythical,— much more dim 
Thau the stories of danger to life and limb, 
Or of valorous deeds of the hardy and bold, 
Which History paints in letters of gold. 



'Twas the evening hour of a summer's night, 
The moon was up, and the sky was bright; 
The cooling breeze fanned my cheek, all worn 
With the burdens I had, through the noontide borne. 
A halo of silver still gleamed in the West, 
Where the Monarch of day had descended to rest. 
And now he was gone, and the earth was asleep, 
A lonely star trembled, and anon would keep 
Through the azure curtain, timid at first ; 
But soon, at the signal, a host of them burst 
Into sight with the rapture of freedom regained, 
Till now in their glory they joyfully reigned. 

Below me, in meadow, nought was heard 
Save the silver notes of the hermit-thrush, 

Or the bobolink, where the light winds stirred 
The elder leaves, or the waving rush. 
As I stand by the roadside to gaze at the scene, 
There comes o'er the fields which are pillow'd in 

green, 
The monotonous tinkling of cow-bells, and then 

As to prove them realities, the animals come, 
Slowly and dreamily out ou the fen, 

From instinct and habit turning toward home. 
Over the creek where the forest lay 
Much as it was in colonial day, 
Could be heard, in the distance, the household dog, 
Barking duets with the meadow frog. 
While clattering and racing from tree to tree, 
The pretty grey squirrel, saucy and free, 
Was busy fulfilling his Maker's design, 
Collecting supplies for the nest in the piue. 

With companions like these I strayed on my way, 
Half conscious how quickly had vanished the day, 
Till wearied and lonely I sate me to rest 
At the roadside. Near by me, a gentle slope's crest 
Was crowned with that pride of New England's 

boast, 
Which has made us enlightened from center to 

coast, — 
A little red school-house, aDcient, defaced, 
Midway 'twixt the settlements, wisely so placed, 
For our sturdy old forefathers, hardy and strong, 
Would gladly walk many and many miles long 
To learn from the Master enough about life, 
To enable them better to win in its strife. 

As I sate there my thoughts were instinctively 
turned 
To the glorious past ; — yet my heart sadly burued 
In remembering those heroes, who had nobly fought 
For our weal, had so dearly and wearily bought 
The boons which their sons now appreciate less 
For the very abundance they at present possess. 
Then the figures of those who here played long 
ago, 



88 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Their drama of life, in vision appear 

Before me in beautiful plainness; and lo! 
From the haze in the valley, methought as clear 

As the Pleiads on high, comes the " Master," of 
all 
In the village the wisest and best, save one 

Whom the villagers loved in their affection to 
call 
The " Parson," who comforts the needy and lone. 
He was tall and spare, of a wiry frame, 
I saw, as up from the twilight he came, 
Bent with his threescore years and ten, 
Yet sturdier now than many men, 
Who have, by their toil through heat and cold, 
Keplenished their coffers with corruptible gold. 
Prom afar I discern his dark cocked hat, 
And beneath like the silver-edged cloud, there sat 
The hoary peruke. While as white as the foam, 
Which the east winds toss from the billows that 

roam 
On the main, his puff of linen was seen 
To adorn, as the froth, its setting of green. 
For over his doublet the old man wore 
The great coat, which now is seen no more 
Except in our fancies of the Auld Lang Syne, 
Or in silent saloons of historic design. 
His small clothes and shoe-buckles served to cast 
The thought iu my mind, of times long past, 
When the master alone in silence walked, 
Or, followed by children, eagerly talked. 
I see him now as he enters the school, 
And advances with measured tread to his stool. 
The master's approach is the signal for all 
To cease from their sliding and throwing snow-ball. 
In solemn procession the little ones turn 
To their several places, some eager to learn 
What the teacher says that every one can, 
Who is willing to study and work like a man. 
Some stupid ones then, as false prophets of old, 
Who, when praying for fire, were left in the cold, 
At the altar of Baal, so these innocents found, 

That to call on the Muse or the Goddess for aid, 
When their own lazy minds would not rise from the 
ground 

Was an idle petition uselessly made. 

The master sits wisely in his straight-backed 

chair 
Surveying the school-room, cold and bare, 
Save in front, in the fire-place, beside him, roar 
Two sputtering back-logs, yielding their store 
Of sizzling sap, while patches of snow, 
In trickling streamlets downward flow, 
Till a dusty pool collects on the floor, 
To be tracked by the urchins who sit by the door, 
As they come to and fro to the chimney to warm 
Their little red fingers benumbed in the storm. 
But how quaint are the school-boys that meet our 

gaze ; 
How strange and old-fashioned in all their ways ! 
They seem as though they were pocket editions, 
Or anomalous parodies, or mock repetitious 
Of their ancient instructor ; for in every part, 
From the powdered wig, produced by art, 



To the square-toed shoe, the master's last 
Had its counterpart in the striplings' cast. 

Though honored abroad, and respected at home, 
Our venerable Mentor took pride in his tome 
Of Affected Quadratics, much more than it could, 
With justice, be said, in his pupils, who stood 
In a timerous row, regarding their chance 
Of avoiding the sweep of his birch-rod's glance. 
For his maxims then were far from mild; 
They were " Spare the rod and spoil the child." 
At length, in my dream, the hour had come, 
For the children from school to wander home. 
But I fancy there linger a restless few, 
Who wait at the school-house to study anew, 
For the afternoon session, their lessons by rote, 
Which they, in despair, endeavor to quote, 
As if it were words, not ideas that we teach, 
When in hearing a lesson we criticise speech. 
Surrounding the blazing and sizzling logs, 
Which rest on the curious brazen old dogs, 
The children huddle in shivering delight, 
Prattling and giggling with all their might, 
At their noonday meal ; or in scattered groups, 
By the windows, are watching the fluttering troops 
Of twittering snowbirds, gathered to share 
A bounteous feast, with the little ones' care. 



The night-hawk's cry was sounding low ; 
The summer's sky was all aglow 
With the northern lights, which were burning pale, 
While stillness reigned adown the vale. 
Delicious aromas, on zephyrs borne, 
Told me that evening was blooming iu morn. 
The dew, but then an unwelcome guest, 
Had nestled down on my weary breast. 
The chill night air aroused my thought 
From the picture ray fancies so vividly wrought. 
As I rose to take my homeward way, 
To the vale that just before me lay, 
Another vision, sublime and fair, 
Was pictured forth in the chilly air. 
It laid, as on an open page 
Showing the secrets of the keenest sage, 
In striking colors, a revelation, 
Which seemed much more than a mere creation 
Of chaotic fancy ; a view, in brief, 
Brought out in clear and bold relief, 
Of the strongest contrast between the aid, 
Which in modern days, is plainly laid 
Before the student, who makes right use 
Of advantages, which should induce 
A love of letters in the most obtuse; 
And, on the other hand, the picture showed, 
As plainly as before, the barbarous mode, 
Of former times, when the child was ruled 

With an arbitrary and iron will, 

When teachers attempted to instil, 
By threat and rod, in those unschooled, 
A learning developed now far better, 
By spirit, rather than by letter. 
But though careless in teaching and stern in drill, 
Our forefathers laid, with consummate skill, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The groundwork of character, strong and acute, 
Which has honored for ages New England's repute. 

Enduring contact with the manifold, 
And broadening culture, whose plastic mold, 
Has been for years around us laid, 
And has fashioned our growth for the highest grade 
Of a useful life, will at last secure 
The love of all that is high and pure. 
But while we glory in modern advance. 
We must not forget that the deeds which enhance, 
Either now, or in future, our highest estate, 
Are only the deeds of a soul truly great. 
And, classmates, may that life be ours, 
Gladdening the earth like summer showers. 
May the goodly portion we inherit, plight 
Our noblest endeavors in aid of the right. 

By lawful descent we have charge of a trust 
In whose very attraction and grandeur there may 

Rest the leaven of ruin or of lethal rust. 
And this is our hope, that forever and aye, 

We remember the sentence delivered of old, 
" To whom it is given with bounteous hand, 

Much of him is required ; " nor can we withhold 
Our allegiance from such a celestial command. 



ADDRESS OF REV. NEWMAN SMYTH 
BEFORE PHI BETA KAPPA. 

I shall speak to you concerning an art which all 
educational institutions are engaged in preserving 
and perfecting, the art of thinking. There is one 
general condition of perfection in any work which 
is particularly necessary to mastery of the art of 
thiuking, — the workman must have joy in his work. 
The highest joy in thinking cannot be attained by 
the scholar without broad and generous sympathies 
with men. Selfishness in culture is the shadow over 
modern literature in which the singing birds are 
silenced, and glad and noble thought falls into its 
last sleep in pessimism. One common reason of 
failure iu the art of thinking is the lack of the raw 
material of thought. Men cannot make even a 
political platform without a little knowledge of facts. 
To gather information, however, is no more educa- 
tion than to pick cotton is to make cloth. The 
stuffed mind, like the stuffed bird, may be useful 
for purposes of exhibition, but not for flight. Edu- 
cation seeks to give wings to the living mind. It is 
the art of safe and graceful flight. The late Dr. 
Samuel Taylor used to hurl sharp questions at us 
until many a boy resembled St. Sebastian, the 
martyred saint, with his body full of arrows. That 
may not have been the best method of introducing 
us to classic literature, but the habits of study, 
and of close application which Dr. Taylor formed, 
were his best gifts to his pupils. 

Another essential in the art of thinking is ca- 
pacity to grasp things by their ideas. The conver- 
sation of polite society, often shows a tendency to 
retrograde to the linguistic level of that primitive 
culture iu which language consists chiefly of the 
names of persons and things, and lacks the words 



for general ideas. In such society dancing soon 
becomes a mental necessity. The confusions re- 
sulting from lack of power to see things in their 
ideas, and to hold fast abstract conceptions, shows 
the necessity of making clearness of mental vision 
a constant aim of education. Education, however 
classical, fails of the first requisite of practical 
training for life if it does uot develop the too rare 
power of quick mental grasp of the essential idea 
of any occasion. A properly educated mind will 
resemble one of those clear autumnal days after the 
first frosts, when every lofty object stands out upon 
the horizon, and the topmost bows of the elm trees 
before our doors seem etched against the sky. 
One of the most specious of modern errors, how- 
ever, is the great spiritual blunder of making clear- 
ness of definition the test of truth. That abused 
maxim of Descartes has its proper place and use, 
but as the desirable virtue of clear ideas has led to 
attempts to define the undefiuable ; as it has be- 
come the war cry of theological dogmatism and the 
boast of the latest peripatetic presumption, it is a 
maxim hostile to the whole prophetic side of inau's 
spiritual nature. There are some truths so trans- 
cendent and divine that clear ideas of them are al- 
most certain to be false ideas. Truthful vision 
takes notice of the perspectives of the spiritual as 
well as the natural world. Truthfulness requires us 
to see things as they lie before us in their actual de- 
gree of revelation, near or remote ; in their distinct- 
ness or their vagueness, as God has spread before 
the spirit of man the landscapes of his everlasting 
kingdom, and curved around as the horizons of 
reason and faith. The present religious movement 
insists upon the recognition of the religious con- 
sciousness and spiritual life of humanity, and its 
witness to unseen and divine forces. It seeks also 
to bring back theology to a proper recognition of 
the laws of perspective in the study of recorded 
truth. In the old paintings there was no true back- 
ground ; so in the dogmatism of faith the distant 
and the near are defined with equal distinctness. 
We have had systems enough of thought drawn hard 
and clear like the figures on a Japanese fan. The 
Bible is the book of life with the infinite mystery of 
God for its background. I am not saying that the re- 
ligious thinker should not seek to walk on with all pos- 
sible logical straightforwardness. I am not depre- 
ciating systematic thought. But real philosophy is 
more than formal reasoning; Christian thought may 
not be illogical, but it will sometimes be superlogi- 
cal. We are not following the method of inspired 
thought if we lack spiritual imagination ; if we 
do not have the mystic's heart beneath our cool New 
England brains. There is a true and a false mys- 
ticism. The false mysticism is the blur in one's own 
eye ; the true is the recognition not only of the 
general fact of the unknown beyond our reason, but 
also some perception of the degrees and the grada- 
tions in which truths shade off from us into the di- 
vine mystery in which we have our being. Profes- 
sor Tyndall upon one of the Alps took the blue haze 
out of the atmosphere by looking through a Nichol 
prism. He looked thus upon a perfectly clear but 
distorted landscape. One suspected heresy of the 



90 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



present day— certainly our heart's desire— is to 
break all distorting prisms from before the eyes of 
men, and to show to the people the great command- 
ing virtues of the eternal life as they rise before us, 
partially disclosed through the mystery of revela- 
tion, attractive, uplifting, and glorious upon the 
horizons of faith ; not as they have been too often 
artificially brought near in the hard lines and re- 
pellent unnaturalness of the definitions and tradi- 
tions of men. 

Another essential in the art of thinking is the 
power of fitting ideas together in a conclusion. The 
reasoning of many resembles the legendary miracle 
of Spiridion, who, when the hostile bishops had 
sought to delay him by cutting off the heads of his 
mules, put them on again in the dark, and rode 
forth to discover when day dawned the white head 
on the chestnut body. These popular superstitions 
arise from accidental coincidences. The fatal facil- 
ity of human nature for hasty generalization opens 
the door to the quack and the demagogue. There 
are elements of discontent fermenting among the 
people, and we hardly realize the extent of the op- 
position in some quarters against the bank, the 
state, and the church. We need to train men to 
educate the people in sound American principles of 
political thinking. We need less party and more 
scientific legislation. A government of ignorance 
is not a safe government. May we secure forever 
in this couutry a government of the intelligent, by 
the intelligent, for the good of all the people. 

Another illustration of maladroitness in fitting 
ideas together, is the frequent blundering of reason- 
ers when they go out of their own proper fields. 
The only attitude of mind profoundly religious for 
the theologian to cherish toward science, is simple 
willingness to let the facts turn out to be what they 
may. Open all the gates to thought. But the un- 
scientific theologian is not one whit worse educated 
than is the scientific blunderer in morals and re- 
ligion. Materialism confuses things which differ 
qualitatively as carbon and thought ; as the gold of 
the marriage-ring, and the love which puts it on 
the fingers of the bride! Contrast Dr. Maudsley 
and Hermann Lotze. The English positivist has 
put forth his haud in the dark and felt the wheels 
of nature's ceaseless mechanism ; the German phy- 
siologist and idealist, with his finger, too, touching 
the strong wheels of natural law, has opened also 
the eyes of his soul, and had visious of the spirit of 
life within the wheels. 

I would bring out distinctly here what has al- 
ready been implied as the end or perfection of the 
art of thinking. The highest attainment is the 
power of rational and moral divination — true in- 
sight into the heart and soul of things. It is the 
power of moral imagination, the power of inter- 
pretation, the power of seeing aud of showing 
things, not in their accidental or fanciful resemb- 
lances, but in their real relations and essential 
principles. Without this power of imagination 
sympathy and vision, there can be no recreative 
philosophy. Augustine called the creation the 
poem of the Divine ideas, and the mere logician, 
the mental mechanic, never can be the inspiring 



interpreter to the human heart of God's poem of 
the creation. We have had in New England enough 
work done by the scribe and the disputer. The 
new theologian will come to us with something of 
the power of spiritual vision which characterized 
the inspired poet-reasoner who occupied the first 
chair of theology in the Christian church, aud he 
must have, too, something of that profound knowl- 
edge through love iu which St. John understood the 
mind of the Lord. The last word of thought, like 
the first, shall not be a negation. It is the soul's 
affirmation of itself, and all its unseen world of 
truth and love. Materialism itself shall yet be 
found among the prophets. The dispensation of 
the spirit is the coming world-age towards whose 
open gates of promise all the sciences are ■ hasten- 
ing. , Already the English positivism, married to 
the German idealism, has given birth to a philoso- 
phy, strong and growing in favor, which shall be 
the heir both of the treasures of natural science, 
and the immortal faiths of the human soul. 

The speaker referred, in concluding, to an ora- 
tion which he had discovered among his own sere 
and yellow manuscripts, which was delivered 20 
years ago to his class then graduating. But one 
conclusion from any subject then could be spokeu — 
the call to devotion to the country. Bowdoin stu- 
dents are not called to graduate now, as then, into 
the army. Then we fought for the existence of the 
republic; now we must work to save the moral in- 
tegrity of the nation. As scholars, we shall be true 
to the best traditions of our Alma Mater ; we shall 
preserve the memory of the noble manhood of its 
past, only as we think, not for ourselves alone, but 
think, with all the true-hearted and the pure, for 
the good of the people, for the enriching the lives 
of men, for the further advancement of the king- 
dom of righteousness and peace. 



CLASS DAY. 
" Old Prob " was propitious on the morn- 
ing of July 10th, and vouchsafed to the class 
of '83 a day which could not be excelled. 
The morning exercises were for the first time 
held in Memorial Hall. At 10 the class, un- 
der the guidance of the Marshal, Mr. F. H. 
Files, took their places upon the platform, after 
which the following program was carried out: 

MUSIC. 

Prayer J. D. Lenuan. 

MUSIC. 

Oration J. B. Reed. 

MUSIC. 

Poem B. Scwall. 

MUSIC. 

Mr. Reed took as his subject the "Growth 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



91 



of Popular Liberty in France." To say that 
he succeeded in retaining the interest of the 
large audience until the last is the highest 
compliment that can be paid him. After a se- 
lection by Chandler came the poem by Mr. 
Sewall, which was highly complimented for 
its beauty. 

At 3 in the afternoon a large audience, 
composed of alumni and students, with their 
friends, had assembled under the " spreading 
branches " of the Thorndyke Oak to listen to 
the pleasantestyet saddest portion of the day's 
exercises; for even when laughing at the 
pleasantries of the speakers we could but feel 
that, in a few days, we were to part with a 
class with which we connect so many pleasant 
associations, and for whose members we shall 
always cherish a high regard. 

The President, Mr. C. H. Stetson, intro- 
duced the speakers in the following order : 
Opening Address H. E. Cole. 

MUSIC. 

History P. M. Fling. 

MUSIC. 

Prophecy H. S. Pearson. 

MUSIC. 

Parting Address N. B. K. Pettingill. 

MUSIC. 

The parts were of a high order of excel- 
lence, and the sallies of the speakers were fre- 
quently met with applause. The Opening 
Address was one of welcome, and -well por- 
trayed the feelings of the class towards its 
invited guests. The History was well re- 
ceived, but did not do the class justice in that 
one side of college life was given too much 
prominence. The Prophecy took the form of 
a letter from the prophet to a friend. It gave 
a history of the class for some years after 
graduation. Some of the situations were lu- 
dicrous in the extreme. The Parting Address 
was excellent, and although the speaker spoke 
what he felt to be true, we know that his 
views on some points did not coincide with 
those of a majority of his classmates, and we 
are sorry that anything should have been said 



that did not tend to promote harmony of feel- 
ing on such a time as the Class Day of '83. 

When the literary exercises were finished 
the class sang the Ode, and then assumed a 
recumbent position upon the grass. The Pipe 
of Peace was lighted and passed from hand to 
hand. It was interesting to watch it on its 
rounds, and to see with what complacency it 
was welcomed by some who reluctantly let it 
pass from their loving grasp, and to notice the 
few hasty puffs given by others, whose aver- 
sion to the peaceful messenger was apparent 
upon every feature. After smoking, the class 
formed in line, with the band at the head, and 
marched to the various halls, and cheered 
them with the rousing old " Bowdoin cheer." 
Hand shaking was then in order, and the ex- 
ercises of the afternoon were completed. 

In the evening the platform under the oak 
was cleared for dancing. The large audience 
of the afternoon came back increased two- 
fold. Calcium lights were used for the first 
time, and proved a grand success. The dance 
was participated in by a large number, and 
was the most successful ever held here. 

From the historian we have obtained the 
following statistics : 

Whole number in class, 36, the same as at en- 
trance. 

Average age, 22 years 3 months. Oldest man, 
Stetson, 23 years 3 months; youngest, Goodwin, 19 
years 3 months. 

Total weight, 5350 pounds; average, 149 pounds. 
Heaviest men, Knapp and Files, 215 pounds; light- 
est, Goodwin, 105 pounds. 

Total height, 210 feet 1 inch ; average, 5 feet 10 
inches. Tallest meu, Collins, Reed, Corliss, 6 feet ; 
shortest, Dinsmore, 5 feet 6 inches. 

Pursuits— law, 10; medicine, 7; business, 7; 
ministry, 2; natural science, 1; chemistry, 1;- 
teaching, 1 ; undecided, 7. 

Political preference— Republican, 27 ; Demo- 
crat, 6; Independent, 3. Religious preference — 
Congregationalist, 13; Methodist, 2; Episcopalian, 
3 ; Universalist, 1 ; Agnostic, 1 ; Skeptic, 1 ; Bap- 
tist, 1. No preference, 11 ; Unitarian, 3. 

Favorite study — Chemistry, 3; English Litera- 
ture, 5 ; Mathematics, 5 ; Geology, 3 ; Mineralogy, 
3 ; Physics, 2 ; Physiology, 2 ; Greek, 2 ; German, 
1; Ethics, 2; Music, 1; History, 1; Languages, 1 ; 
Astronomy, 1. 

20 use tobacco and 4 are engaged. 



92 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COMMENCEMENT DAY. 

The weather, which had been unusually 
fine throughout the week, was delightful. 
Gov. Robie and Staff, added dignity and 
splendor to the exercises. Headed by Hon. 
Charles Gilman, the procession proceeded to 
the church, where the parts were delivered 
before a large crowd. 

After the clo^e of the exercises in the 
church, an unusually large number of alumni 
sat down to a dinner in Memorial Hall. At 
the close of the banquet the company sang, 
"Let children hear the mighty deeds." Pres. 
Chamberlain then said that this was really 
the " Thanksgiving Day " of the college ; 
that Bowdoin College was older than the 
State, and was, in fact, a part of the constitu- 
tion of the State. Gov. Robie, on being 
introduced, spoke of the important position 
the college holds in relation to the State ; of 
the important positions held by Bowdoin 
graduates; and of the great natural advan- 
tages of the State. Chief Justice Appletoii 
was called upon, but responded by introduc- 
ing Hon. Samuel Blake, of '27. He spoke 
in high terms of the public and private life 
of the Chief Justice; referred to each of the 
six living members of his class ; and closed 
by advising a consolidation of the various 
colleges in the State. Dr. Pike ably re- 
sponded in behalf of the Class of '33, which 
celebrated its fiftieth anniversary. Hon. W. 
W. Thomas made an eloquent speech in 
favor of Greek and Latin, as opposed to the 
modern languages. A. F. Moulton, of '73, 
spoke as the representative of his class, and 
urged a loyal support of the college by its 
alumni. Hon. Dexter A. Hawkins, of New 
York, in behalf of the Class of '48, insisted 
that Congress should retire Pres. Chamber- 
lain with the pay of a major general. Bart- 
lett, of '80, replied for his class. Hon. Mr. 
Knowlton, of Tufts, made a pleasing speech. 

It was announced that Stetson had se- 



cured the Goodwin prize for the best written 
Commencement part. 

The following was the program, inter- 
spersed with music by Chandler's Band: 

Education and Morality, with Latin Salutatory. 

William Abbott Perkins, Salem, N. H. 
Modern .ZEstheticism. 

Herbert Elmore Cole, Sebago. 
The Character of Oliver Cromwell. 

George Benjamin Swan, Waldoboro. 
Political Duties of Educated Men. 

Herbert Lincoln Allen, Alfred. 
Philosophy as a Forerunner of Christianity. 

Charles Henry Stetson, East Sumner. 
Temperance Legislation. 

Howard Robinson Goodwin, Augusta. 
The Search for Truth. 

Henry Albert Bascom, Portland. 
Thoroughness in Education. 

Edward Freeman Holden, East Otisfield. 
The American College in its Relation to American Life. 

Edward Albert Packard, Auburn. 
Extradition with England. 

Noah Brooks Kent Pettingill, Augusta. 

DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS. 

Restriction of Foreign Immigration. 

* Frederic Winslow Hall, Vallejo, Cal. 
Valedictory in Latin. 

* William Higgins Chapman, Newport, R. I. 
Conferring of Degrees. 
Prayer. 
Benediction. 
*Excused. 



BASE-BALL. 

Although Bowdoin failed by one game to 
win the Maine college championship this year, 
yet her nine has made a record of which it 
has just reason to be proud. The season's 
work has consisted of fifteen games, a much 
larger number than has been played in any 
previous year and of these the nine has won 
nine. Four games were played in Massachu- 
setts with strong college nines, one was played 
with the Atlantics of Portland, and the ten 
remaining were played with Bates and Colby 
in the Maine championship series. 

The following is a summary of the games 

played : 

May 1 — Bowdoin vs. Harvard, at Cambridge 3 to 6 

U a y g — Bowdoin vs. Amherst, at Amherst to 13 

May 3 — Bowdoin vs. Williams, at Williamstown.9 to 11 

May 4— Bowdoin vs. Tufts, at College Hill 9 to 8 

May 12 — Bowdoin vs. Bates, at Brunswick 10 to 

May 19— Bowdoin vs. Colby, at Brunswick 7 to 8 

May 26— Bowdoin vs. Bates, at Brunswick 4 to 1 

May 30— Bowdoin vs. Bates, at Lewiston 13 to 5 

May 30— Bowdoin vs. Colby, at Waterville 5 to 9 

June 1 — Bowdoin vs. Bates, at Brunswick 10 to 

June 16 — Bowdoin vs. Colby, at Brunswick 4 to 3 

Juue23 — Bowdoin vs. Colby, at Waterville 3 to 1 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



93 



June 23 — Bowdoin vs. Bates, at Waterville 9 to 

June 27 — Bowdoin vs. Atlantics, at Brunswick 6 to 3 

June 30 — Bowdoin vs. Colby, at Lewiston 8 to 10 

It will be seen by the above that Bowdoin 
has lost one game each to Harvard, Amherst, 
and Williams, and three to Colby, while she 
has won one game from Tufts, one from the 
Atlantics, two from Colby, and five from 
Bates. 

Comparative summary with all opponents 
(14 games) : 



IB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

122 151 363 267 101 
105 128 357 222 99 



Bowdoin 523 9. 

Opponents 513 7. 

Comparative summary with Bates in Maine 

championship series (four games; the fifth 

game with Bates was gained by forfeiture") : 



A.B. 

Bowdoin 161 

Bates. 138 



T.B. 

47 



P.O. 
108 
99 



Comparative summary with Colby in Maine 
championship series : 



A.B. 

Bowdoiu 192 

Colbv .-188 



1b. 
51 
39 



T.B. 

68 
48 



P.O. 

132 
132 



The above tables show that Bowdoin has 
excelled her opponents in the Maine cham- 
pionship, except Colby in fielding. 

Below is the standing in batting and field- 
ing of individual members of the team in all 
the games played (14) : 



CSEhKOHPh^HP* 4 



Winter, lb 14 

Knapp, c, r. f 14 

Torrev, 2b., c. f 13 

Wright, p., s. s H 

Cook, r. f., p., 3b 14 

Stetson, 3b 12 

Waterman, s.s., c, 3b.l4 

Lindsey, c. f., 2b 10 

Barton, 1. f 14 

Collins, c.f 5 

Folsom, r. 1, 3b 2 



36 


146 


3 


15 


.843 


.537 


lb 


KB 


36 


14 


.188 


.234 


18 


45 


21 


12 


.186 


.2S0 


Hi 


IV 


MX 


9 


.Wi8 


.2X6 


27 


4 


2+ 


5 


.351 


.474 


12 


IN 


29 


12 


.204 


.245 


10 


16 


30 


14 


. IS-' 


ls-» 


4 


11 


1 


9 


.103 


.103 


1!» 


10 


a 


4 


.WO 


.300 




7 


i 


2 


.111 


.111 


i 


X 


i 


4 


.111 


.111 



Something should be put up around the ivies 
to protect them when there are such crowds around. 
During the band concert Wednesday evening, some 
one sitting down on the bank around the chapel 
wall mined '79's ivy ; while we noticed '84's ivy 
that had ambitiously begun to put forth its tender 
shoots jambed clear into the ground by somebody's 
No. 11. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



It is Prof. Little now. 

Friday was Auction Day. 

Weren't there a host of them ? 

Colby is happy. Don't blame her. 

Plenty of business for the Boards this time. 

About twelve took the A.M. degree this year. 

The most successful Commencement for years. 

We can mingle our tears with Harvard on base- 
ball. 

The clerk of the weather must be a Bowdoin 
man. 

The Class Day illuminations were an improve- 
ment. 

It cost $23,970.62 to complete Memorial Hall, 
last year. 

The old Senior recitation room has been used 
lately for storing hay. 

Ex-President Chamberlain is to be retained as 
Lecturer on Political Economy. 

L. B. Folsom, '85, has been elected first director 
of the Readiug-Rooin Association. 

The present graduating class has thirty-six 
members, the same number it entered with. 

Base-hits, 25 to 16 ; earned runs, 7 to 1 ; errors, 
12 to 2 ; runs, 8 to 10. Can you reconcile it? 

The reunions of the different Fraternities were 
held Wednesday evening and Thursday morning. 

The reading-room was kept running through 
Commencement. Last year for some reason it was 
not. 

The President of the college will hereafter bo 
Stone Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philos- 
ophy. 

About thirty-five have passed the examinations 
for '87. This number will be increased at the fall 
examination. 

We are sorry to say that the boat crew gets very 
little encouragement from the alumni to go to Lake 
George next year. 

The nine loses Knapp, Stetson, and Winter. 
Their places will be pretty hard to fill— literally, as 
well as figuratively. 

We must have a good class in '87 to make up 
for the loss of '63. We are happy to say that the 
prospects are now good. 

We noticed one of the Profs, hide his head to 
keep from laughing at one of the questions put by 
the examining committee. 

The examinations took place in the following 
order: The Juniors, Monday, July 2; Sophomores, 
Tuesday, July 3 ; Freshmen, Thursday, July 5. 



94 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Iu the game of ball between the Atlantics, of 
Portland, and the Bowdoius, the score stood 6 to 3 
in favor of the latter. 

Boyd Bartlett, of Ellsworth, won the Sopho- 
more Mathematical Prize of $300. W. P. Nealey, 
of Bath, had honorable mention. 

A hundred, by actual count, went up to Lewis- 
ton to see our boys give away the last game of 
base-ball and the championship with it. 

Every available stopping-place was occupied 
last week. Some had to sleep on lounges, some on 
the floor, and some did Dot sleep at all. 

The Bugle editors for next year are : E. R. 
Harding, Literary Editor ; E. W. Freeman, Busi- 
ness Editor ; W. M. Eames, W. P. Nealey. 

A copy of the poem of Mare Cook, " Vandyke 
Brown," has been presented to the library by the 
Theta Delta Chi Society, of which he was a mem- 
ber. 

Lemont Hall was packed at the graduating ex- 
ercises of the Brunswick High School on the after- 
noon of June 26th. Three members of the class 
enter '87. 

Prof. A. S. Packard is made acting President, 
after Oct. 1st, 1883, and Prof. H. L. Chapman, Dean 
of the Faculty, to assist him from the same date, 
until otherwise ordered. 

George Thomas Little was elected College Prof, 
in Latin, and G. H. Atwood, Assistant Prof, in Mod- 
ern Languages. Mr. Little is to act as Assistant 
Librarian for the coming year. 

The Knights of Pythias, of Gardiner, hired '84's 
boat for the Fourth of July celebration. They came 
in second in the race. There seems to be a strange 
fatality about using that boat. 

The boards voted to commend the Hallowell 
Classical Institute, Fryeburg and Bridgton Acade- 
mies as fitting schools for Bowdoin College to the 
generous remembrance of the alumni. 

Barton, Longren, '84, Butler and Alexander, '85, 
sang at the graduating exercises of the Freeport 
High School, last week. Sargent, of 78, has 
charge of the school, and is meeting with tine suc- 
cess. 

Instructor Atwood was the invited guest of the 
Juniors to witness the deciding game in the State 
championship at Lewiston, June 30th. The boys 
probably wanted to show off the nine to him away 
from home. 

Prof. C. C. Everett of Harvard, M. W. Fuller of 
Chicago, J. L. Crosby of Bangor, were appointed 
as a committee to confer with the different alumni 
associations iu reference to electing the Board of 
Overseers from the alumni. 

The second Sopho-Fresh. ball game took place 
July 3. At the end of the second inning, the score 
stood 10 to 3 in favor of the Sophs., when the 
Fresh, catcher got hurt and put a stop to the game. 
Both nines were satisfied. 



A committee from the alumni, consisting of F. 
P. Upton, New York ; Oliver C. Stevens, Boston ; 
E. G. Spring, Portland; D. A. Robinson, Bangor, 
was appointed to act with the committee from the 
boards to procure funds for a gymnasium. 

The officers of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, for 
the following year, are : President, Hon. Joseph W. 
Symonds; Vice-President, Rev. E. C. Cummings; 
Secretary and Treasurer, F. C. Robinson ; Literary 
Committee, Prof. H. L. Chapman, Prof. J. B. Sew- 
ell, Hon. W. L. Putnam, Rev. E. N. Packard, Hon. 
Daniel Linscott. 

The following members of the Senior class were 
elected members : Henry A. Baseom, Herbert E. 
Cole, John E. Dinsmore, Howard L. Goodwin, Ed- 
ward F. Holden, Edward A. Packard, William A. 
Perkins, Noah B. K. Pettingill, Charles H. Stetson, 
George B. Swau, and Mr. George Colby Purrington, 
of the class of 1878. 

Why cannot the Class Day speakers have some 
decency when they refer to the Faculty. They 
always get in some personal feeling. This was 
especially noticeable this year. Certainly the opin- 
ion of the majority of the students was not ex- 
pressed. We hope members of future classes will 
leave out this meanest of all mean traits, personal 
feeling. 

It seems to us that the Trustees are not always 
consistent. Last year they refused to make one of 
our Profs., who had been on trial a year and had 
proved himself fit for the position, a full Prof. The 
result is that this year we lose one of the best 
Profs. Bowdoin ever had. He goes to Dartmouth 
with the rest of the boys. This year the Trustees 
have taken a young man, a graduate but a few 
years, and made him a full Prof. Consistency, 
thou art indeed a jewel. 

An interesting game of ball was played on the 
delta, last Wednesday, between some of the alumni 
and tho Bowdoin team. Among the faces familiar 
to those who watched the games in years gone by, 
were Frank and Harry Payson, Waitt, Sanford, 
Wright, Cobb, Haggerty, Wilson, and YVinship. 
They were somewhat out of practice and made some 
bad errors ; but they did some good fielding. F. 
Payson made some splendid fly-catches in the left 
field. Our boys kind of " goi on" to Wilson's 
pitching and batted him furiously. The result of 
the game was 17 to 5 in favor of our team. Um- 
pire, W. C. Emerson of Colby. 

The honorary degree of Doctor of Laws was con- 
ferred on Hon. Jno. M. Harlan of Washington, D. C. ; 
Doctor of Divinity upon Rev. Albert H. Currier, 
Oberton, 0. ; Doctor of Arts upon Dr. Charles W. 
Packard, New York City ; Bachelor of Arts upon 
Nathaniel Clifford Brown, Portland; Bachelor of 
Arts out of course was conferred on Enoch Foster, 
Jr., Bethel, class of '64; James Austin Burns, class 
of '62; Cassius M. Ferguson, Class of '74; Master 
of Arts out of course on F. 0. Couant and Chas. L. 
Nickerson, class of 77 ; degree of Civil Engineer on 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



95 



William Henry Chapman, class of '80 ; the degree 
of Master of Arts in course was conferred on E. W. 
Bartlett, A. M. Edwards, W. P. Ferguson, A. H. 
Holmes, F. W. Whall, H. B. Wilson, class of '80. 

Instructor Atwood gave the Juniors a reception 
at his house on Page Street, on Tuesday evening, 
June 26th. It was a very enjoyable affair. Be- 
sides the members of the class were all the mem- 
bers of the Faculty, and their wives — excepting 
Prof. Campbell, — and the President, Rev. Mr. and 
Mrs. Nichols, Dr. Mitchell and wife, Mrs. Chamber- 
lain, Misses McKeen, Packard, and other invited 
guests. The time passed very pleasantly, inter- 
spersed with instrumental and vocal music by Mrs. 
Lee, Prof. Chapman, Miss McKeen, and the stu- 
dents. An excellent collation was served, and at a 
late hour the company departed. 

Monday evening, July 2d, Memorial Hall was 
filled with an appreciative audience to listen to the 
Sophomore prize declaimers. It has been many 
years since the contest for this prize was better. 
The first prize was awarded to Bartlett; second, to 
Folsom. Grimmer furnished excellent music. Be- 
low is the program : 

MUSIC. 

Books. — Whipple. 

M. H. Purington, Bath. 
Oration of Mark Antony. — Shakespeare. 

Boyd Bartlett, Ellsworth. 
Speech on American Affairs. — Pitt. 

*Eugene Thomas, Topsham. 
Irish Aliens and English Victories. — Sheil. 

John F. Libby, Richmond. 

MUSIC. 

Capital Punishment. — Heath. 

J. S. Norton, Augusta. 
One Day Solitary. — Trowbridge. 

W. R. Butler, Lawrence, Mass. 
The Present Age. — Bacon. 

F. W. Davis, Hiram. 

MUSIC. 

The Prophet of the Brandywine. — Anon. 

W. M. Eames, Bath. 
Clarence's Dream. — Shakespeare. 

J. A. Peters, Ellsworth. 
Address to the Young Men of Italy. — Mazzino. 

L. Bion Folsom, Bethel. 

MUSIC. 

*Absent. Places chosen by lot. 

The Junior Prize Declamations were given in 
Memorial Hall, Monday evening, July 9th. The 
following is the program : 

MUSIC 

Appeal for Judgment Upon Hastings. — Burke. 

O. W. Means, Augusta. 
Speech in Reply to Hayne. — Webster. 

C. E. Sayward, Alfred. 
Eulogy on Lincoln. — Beecher. 

Z. W. Kemp, East Otisfield. 
The Necessity of Compromise. — Clay. 

*"E. C. Smith, Augusta. 

MUSIC. 

The Dishonest Politician. — Beecher. 

S. R. Child, Rumford. 
Danger of the Spirit of Conquest. — Cor win. 

L. Barton, Naples. 
Justification of New England.— Cushing. 

J. A. Waterman, Jr., Gorham. 
Kossuth.— Webster. 

J. F. Waterman, Waldoboro. 

MUSIC. 



Guatrmazin to the Mexican Council. — Fordick. 

*C. E. Adams, Bangor. 
How He Saved St. Michael's.— Anon. 

P. S. Lindsey, Norridgewock. 
Reply to Mr. Corry. — Grattan. 

*S. W. Walker, Conway Center, N. H. 
Bights and Duties. — Robertson. 

J. Torrey, Jr., Yarmouth. 

MUSIC 

* Excused. Positions chosen hy lot. 

The hall was densely packed, never being so full 
but once and that was at its dedication. The speak- 
ing, by those competent to judge, was considered 
very good. The committee, consisting of Daniel 
C. Linscott, of Boston, Revs. Fisher and Gooding, 
of Brunswick, awarded the first prize to J. A. 
Waterman, Jr., and the second to L. Barton. 



NECROLOGY, 1882-83. 

1822— John Hubbard White, b. Dover, N. H., Nov. 30, 

1802; d. Dover, Sept. 7, 1882, aged 80. 
1823— Lory Odell, b. Conway, N. H., Sept. 16, 1801; d. 

Portland, March 24, 1883, aged 81. 
1825— Charles Jeffrey Abbott, b. Castine, Jan. 9, 1806; 

d. Castine, Aug. 21, 1882. 
1820— George Yeaton Sawyer, b. Wakefield, N. H., Dec. 5, 

1805; died Nashua, N. H., June 15, 1882, aged 77. 
1828 — Horatio Nelson Perkins, b. Kennebunkport, Feb. 8, 

1807; d. of apoplexy, Melrose, July 3, 1883, aged 76. 
1S29— James Thomas McCobb, b. Phippsburg, Jan. 19, 

1812; d. Aug. 21, 1882, aged 71. 
1830— Lewis Pennell, b. Brunswick, Feb. 19, 1803; d. South- 
port, Conn., May, 1883, aged 80. 
1833— William Henry Allen, b. Readfield, March 27, 1808; 

d. Philadelphia, Aug. 29, 1882, aged 74. 
1835— George Purinton, b. Poland, Nov. 30, 1809; d. Free- 
port, 111., April 10, 1883, aged 74. 
1837 — George Albert Wheelwright, b. Bangor, Jan. 8, 

1818; d. Wells, Sept. 18, 1882, aged 64. 
1839— Franklin Davis, b. Bangor, Jan. 24, 1816; d. on the 

train near Ipswich, Mass., Oct. 24, 1882, aged 67. 
1841 — Asa Cummings Mitchell, b. Yarmouth, Aug. 28, 

1821; d. Bellows Falls, Vt., May 19, 1883, aged 62. 
1842 — William Hammond Brown, b. Bangor, June 14, 

1822; d. Bangor, Nov. 23, 1882, aged 59. 
1844— Enoch Perley Fessenden, b. Fryeburg, June 26, 1822; 

d. Augusta, March 6, 1883, aged 61. 
1845 — Moses Bradhury Goodwin, b. Buxton, April 4, 1819; 

d. Franklin, N. H., Sept. 7, 1882, aged 63. 
1848— David Fales, b. E. Thomaston, June 20, 1822; d. 

Biddeford, Jan. 14, 1883, aged 61. 
1852 — James Deering Fessenden, b. Portland, Sept. 28, 

1833; fell dead in street in Portland, Nov. 18, 1882, 

aged 43. 
1854 — George Washington McLellan, b. Monmouth, June 

11, 1826; d. Red Bank, N. J., 1883, aged 57. 
1859— James Tracy Hewes, b. Saco, March 23, 1836; d. 

Fitchburg, Mass., November, 1882, aged 47. 
1860— Samuel Stillman Boyd, b. Portland, May 16, 1838; 

d. St. Louis, Mo., March 5, 1883, aged 45. 
1861— Theodore Dwight Bradford, b. Auburn, Sept. 1, 1838; 

d. New York, May 10, 1883, aged 45. 



96 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



1863— Adoniram Judson Piokard, b. "West Hampden, Dec 

24, 1838; killed on railroad at Carmel, Dec. 26 

1882, aged 44. 
1874— Charles Edwin Smith, b. Monmouth, July 20, 1844 

d. Crookston, Minn., June 5, 1883, aged 38. 
1876— Charles Sewall Andrews, b. Otisfield, Dec. 19, 1852 

d. Norway, April 12, 1883, aged 30. 
1879— Henry Baird Carleton, b. Rockport, Feb. 1, 1858; d. 

Rockport, Sept. 10, 1882, aged 24. 
1879— Albert Henry Pennell, b. Saccarappa, Dec. 5, 1853; 

d. Saccarappa, Sept. 12, 1882, aged 29. 
1882— Charles Eben Stinchfield, b. Sandwich, N. H., May 

2, 1860; d. Patten, Nov. 26, 1882, aged 22. 

NOT BEFORE REPORTED. 

1861— Abram Maxwell, b. Sweden, Dec. 6, 1832; d. "West 

Andover, O., Jan. 30, 1882, aged 49. 
1800— John Parshley Gross, b. Brunswick, May 1,1841; 

d. Plainfield, N. J., Sept. 30, 1881, aged 40. 
1867— Stephen Calvin Horr, b. North Waterl'ord, Nov. 18, 

1835; d. Cumberland Mills, April 29, 1875, aged 40. 



~WHEN~ XO TJ WA.NT A RIDE 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE, 

On Cleaveland Street, where you wilt, find turnouts to suit the most 
fastidious, zjsp Rates reasonable. 

TEACHERS 

Supplied with positions in all grades of Educational work. 
Send stamp for circular. 

BEOCKWAY TEACHERS' AGENCY, 

Times Building, CHICAGO. 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School o"f Maine, will commence February 8th, 18S3, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshua L. Chamberlain, LL.D., President; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice 5 Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children j Frederic II. Oeurish, M.D., 
Anatomy, Charles W. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence ; Henry 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Burt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles O. 
Hunt, M; D., Materia Mediea and Therapeutics ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing lull infnnnalion may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, ROOM 
PAPER, PERIODICALS, <9cC. 



FRANK M. STETSON, 




RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more lor Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No.l 

SUPERIOR TO AIjIj OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
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"We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 

direct importation, which is made especially for us, -water 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 
ALLEN <6 GI1STER. 



Manufacturers, 



RICHMOND, VA. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



V 



"• a. bd 

M ^ W 



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b, Hi|||'g-||i||»ifei|^§i||f|§ : l , f| 
m Ii- 111 -i"Igssiils|l| I" &|^il| 

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BURBANK, DOUGLASS & CO. 



(Successors to True, Douglass & Co.) Importers and Wholesale 
Dealers in 

China, Crockery, M Glass Ware, 



LAMP GOODS, CHANDELIERS AND PLATED WARE. 
242 Middle Street, . . PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer iu 

PIOTUKE FRAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

From the cheapest to the very best. Also Pictures, Cabinet 

Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, etc. Also, Agent for 

the celebrated Household Sewing Machine. 

In the Blue Store, Main Street, Second Door from Elm, 
Opposite the Park, Brunswick, Maine. 

All the Students Should Buy 

THEIR 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 

AT 

Ruth I, Rotate 1 Boot I Slo© Store, 

Cor. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



JOHN H. BRACKETT, 



SPRING STYLES, 1883, 

Consisting of Suitings, Overcoatings, and Pant Patterns, made in 
latest style and good lit guaranteed, at 20 per cent, less than the 
same goods can be bought elsewhere. Also a 

Fine Line of White Shirts, Ties, Braces, Collars, 
Hose, and Under Flannels. 



The Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company. 

Assets, $51,500,000. Surplus, $6,500,000. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1846. 

The New Plan of Cash Value and Non-Forfeitable 
Policy meets the needs of the public. Send for full informa- 
tion to H . ET. FAIRBANKS, Gen'l Agent, 

BANGOK, MAINE 

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Fresh and Corned Beef, Pork, Mutton, Poultry, 

All for the Lowest Cash Prices. Liberal Discount to Clubs 
and Boarding Houses. 

At the Old Stand near corner Main and Centre Streets, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 
s. walker. wm. h. walker. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



^V. O. REED 



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Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 
Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 
Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Speci al Rates to Student Clubs. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



TIFFANY & CO., Union Square, 
New York City, have made prepar- 
ations for the coming season, to of- 
fer original and artistic designs with 
new methods of treatment, for forms 
of Commencement and other invita- 
tions. 

They have also increased their 
facilities for producing articles of 
appropriate design for Prizes, Class 
Ctips, Society Badges, etc. 

Drawings, with Estimates, sent 
on application. 

Correspondence invited. 



BATH ^OTHIi f 
386 Washington Street, BATH, ME. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



[^"Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COE. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8j and s8y Congress St., and 235 Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

|®-Send for Price List. 

ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. Wl LSON & CO., 

Wholesale aud Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 



142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 

IAN, ? 

ON. $ 



. HTOl.-K.MAN. 



C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

OVER BOARDMAN'S STORE. 

GrvE Me a Call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SHREVE, # 

CRUMP 
» & LOW, 

432 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




XTENSIVE STOCK 
OF CHOICE GOODS. 



STEELING SILVEEWAEE— Tea, Coffee, and Din- 
ner Sets, Forks and Spoons, etc., of exclusive pat- 
terns ; Old English Silver ; Candelabra ; Carriage 
Clocks; Watches of all grades — Chronograph, Re- 
peating, and Chatelaine, with Chains, etc., etc. 

SELECTED DIAMONDS ; Black, White, and Fancy 
Color Pearls ; Rubies, Emeralds, Sapphires, Cat's- 
eyes, Precious Stones, generally, of highest quali- 
ties; Fine Gold Jewelry of original designs, etc., 
etc. 

ARTISTIC BRONZES of new models— Elegant Man- 
tel Clocks (keyless) ; English Library, Mantel, and 
Hall Clocks, with Westminster Chimes, Cathedral 
Gongs, Mantel Sets, in Marble, Bronze, Polished 
Brass, etc. 

DECORATIVE PORCELAIN in Vases, Plaques, Des- 
sert, Coffee and Ice Cream Sets, etc., from the 
Minton, Worcester Royal, Crown Derby, Copeland, 
Royal Berlin, Dresden, and other celebrated works, 
etc. 

MARBLE STATUARY. NOVELTIES. 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 



Agents Gorham Mfg. Co. 



ALL KINDS OF 

mail 




fftfi'l 



■ ' ■ ,'/:,— r-T_r<~ "L-*.-^ ■- -swrr. : r "-' r ; ;-^ r ^1^^ Vv 1 ^ ^ ^XP /: '" : 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fur- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Work- 
manship, we especially solicit orders for Fine Printing of all 
kinds, 



For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

We also make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges, 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &o. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

PBICES LO"W. 
Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Bowdoin College Soys 

When they visit BATH should call at 

WEBBER'S DRUG STORE. 

A Full Line of Cigars, Toilet Articles, &o. 

Sran.olre Smoke 

THE MEW CIGAR, 



Price IO Cts. 



Havana Filled. 



DIAMOND CROWN. Price 5 Cts. 

JOHNSTON & HATCH, 

LEWISTON, ME. 

Jgp™ For sale in Brunswick by Ed. J. Merriman. 

Sznolse S233.ol£e 



FIR. ST ■ 



Piuos, Ofgass, 



CLASS 

and Melodeons, 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 

THOMAS H. RILEY, . . . Brunswick, Me. 

Also INSURANCE written in Best Companies, 
at Lowest Rates. 

FOUND AT LAST!! 

That- the place to buy the Very Best 

Groceries and Students' Supplies, 

At the Lowest Possible Price, is at 

GEO. F. TENNEY'S, opp. College Grounds, 

BRUNSWICK MAINE. 



COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle riding is unsurpassed as a 
method of traveling.whether for speed, 
sport, or renewal of health. The prac- 
ticability of the machine has been 
thoroughly tested, and satisfactorily 
proved, beyond question. Thousands 
are in daily use, and the number is 
rapidly increasing. The exercise is 
recommended by the medical profession 
as most beneficial to health, bringing 
into exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

Send 3c. stamp for 36-pnge Illustrated 
Catalogue containing price lists aud full 
information. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washington St., BOSTON, MASS. 




IMPORTING TAILORS 

AND 

GENTS' FURNISHERS. 

Novelties in Imported Hosiery, 
Underwear, Gloves, and Neckwear 
for Mens' Wear. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

Market Square, 

PORTLAND, ME. 



gPI^ip WW HP GIi0YE& 

FLEXIBLE STIFF HATS, 

Laced Gloves for Gents, instead of Button. 



MERRY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 



->#F. H. WILSON,** 

DISPENSER OF 

fire BtigSj Medici&es, «■ Chemicals. 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc. , in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

AUGUSTA HOUSE, 

State Street, Augusta, Maine. 

Most desirable location in the city. Good Rooms, Good Table, 

Good Attendance. Free Hack to a ml from Depot 

and Wharf. Patronage Solicited. 

E. & A. C. MANSON, Proprietors. 



«► ■ ■»■ 



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W43)^ 



» Vol. XIII 



Ne. 7. 



= -i^ 



-#BRaRSWrCK,.MfiLIRB. 



=& CONTENTS. S= 



Editorial Notes 97 | College Items 

Integer Vitae (poem) 101 Personal 

A Mistake .' 101 , Inter- Collegiate News . 





105 

109 
109 



The Thorndike Oak 102 | Clippings 110 

The Quakers in the Seventeenth Century. 103 Book Notice 110 







r r .^s^SP^:. ^^ T ^|j>v 



:«+X»y 



\t 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and"Moehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGRAVED IN TEE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



DEANE BROTHERS &. SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

B° Lowest Prices in the State, 

755 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 



THE Only RELIABLEiAND STANDARD Brands of 

Cigarettes and Fine Tobaccos. 

Straight Cuts. /?/? ^tn Caporal. 

Caporal 4- 

Ambassador. 
St. James i, etc. 
Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut Cigarettes. 

This new brand is made of extra fine, seleeted, prime, mild, golden Virginia. 
Leaf, and is the finest Cigarette, as to quality, flavor, and workmanship, ever 

offered for sale. Kinney Br0S- > straight Cut, Full Dress. 

Sweet Caporal Cork Mouthpiece. 




[STERBROOK'S 



STEEL 
PENS 



Leading Numbers: 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEN CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York. 

Go to W. B. Woodard's 

To buy vour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

SPECIAL EATES to STTjrnSEJ^TT CLT7BS- 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



BEST DAIRY IN BRUNSWICK. 

THERE ARE TWO PINTS OF THE NICEST MILK IN 
EVERY QUART WHICH I SELL. SPECIAL ATTENTION 
GIVEN TO STUDENT CLUBS. 

«3- STEWARDS SHOULD DROP ME A POSTAL WITH 
THEIR LOCATION WRITTEN PLAINLY'. 

A. P. WOODSIDE, Brunswick, Me. 



A. W. TOWNSEND, 


"W- HJL- MILLER, 


Books, Stationery, $ Fancy Goods. 


First -Class Hair Dresser, and College Barter, 


Also Eastern Mutual Union Telegraph Office. 


OVER AMERICAN EXPRESS OFFICE, 


Under Town Clock, - Brunswick, Me. 


MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 







THE FAVORITE NOS.303-404-332-I7O-35I-WITH 
: SS^HIS OTHER 'STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




NEW BBUQ ST01E. 

ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

B1UQS, MEDICINES, 

Fancy aufl Toilet Articles, Cigars! Tolacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

H3" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

MAIN STREET, 



a; 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 

SPRING AND SUMMER, 1883. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

13° Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



OAL 



Purchase your COAL at the 

Coal "2"ard in Topsham, 



WHERE NONE BUT 



The Best of Coal is Kept, 

And is Delivered well prepared and in Good Order. 

Orders telephoned from Stores of A. T. Campbell 
and W. B. Woodard promptly attended to. 

U* 3p* THOMPSON, 

Office near the Sheds. 

®ra»sui©fe®®@fe 8Eo>ra 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily- 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 u Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Wsm&'k, aaad Salt m>®es,%m„ 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

fl®*Speoial Kates to Student Clubs. «®s 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin.— Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating tbe amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, tbe Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the iEneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will bo required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may bo ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of bis graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course aud 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to bo 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will commuuicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a studeut may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A. WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

Intel-national Law aud Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCTOBER 17, 1883. 



No. 7. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
Oliver W. Means, '84, Managing Editor. 
Charles E. Sayward, 'S4, Business Editor. 
Llewellyn Barton, '84. John A. Waterman, Jr.,'84. 
William H. Cothren, '84. Oliver B. Cook, '85. 
Rodney I. Thompson, '84. Nehemiah B. Ford, '85. 
Sherman W. Walker, '84. John A. Peters, '85. 
Terms— $2.00 a year in advance; single copies, 15 cents. 
Remittances should tie made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications iu regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to 
contribute articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by the writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Oflice, Eewiston, Me. 



EDITORIAL HOTES. 



The Orient welcomes back to the old 
familiar scenes many former friends, and 
extends to those, whose faces are for the 
most part strange, a cordial greeting! 

At Commencement time we separated, 
glad that a long vacation was at hand, sad 
that friendships formed with members of '83 
must in a great measure cease ; and now we 
meet again ready to form other friendships 
which will strengthen the tie that binds us to 
the college. A long vacation possesses many 
opportunities for enjoyment, and perhaps 
none is more real than the pleasure with 
which one looks forward to meeting friends 
and resuming study. 

To the Seniors we would say, the most 
important year of the course is before you. 
If the hopes and aims of Freshman year are 
not yet attained, now is the time to redeem 



them, unless " Junior ease " has rendered you 
incapable of so great exertion. These " whis- 
pering pines " will not long witness your 
moonlight walks, and hear the tell-tale throb- 
bings of your heart. Do not be alarmed, if 
the dignity incident to your rank as Senior, 
and prolonged study of the earth's axis should 
lead you to think that the earth revolves 
about you as a center. You will soon get 
over it, as thousands have felt as you do, and 
afterwards discovered that they were nothing 
more than mortal. 

To the Juniors, a word of warning; do 
not let the fascination of "Junior ease" lead 
you to neglect the fine opportunities you now 
have of becoming acquainted with some im- 
portant branches of science. In no year can 
a little close application be more profitably 
exercised than in the third year of your 
course. 

To the Sophomores we wish to give a 
word of congratulation. You will not be 
expected to take upon yourselves the sole care 
of the Freshmen. Recent events have shown 
that they can in a measure take care of them- 
selves. The burden of responsibility, which 
has in former years been the cause of the pre- 
mature graduation of some, will no longer 
weigh upon your minds. 

To the Freshmen, we would extend a 
hearty greeting. There is no " royal road " 
to an education, as you may have already 
discovered. Hard study during your first 
year will prepare you for the more interesting 
branches, that come later in the course. You 
will not at first apprehend the breadth and 
variety of college learning, but you will prob- 
ably learn soon enough. It is hoped that you 
will identify yourselves as soon as possible 



98 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



with all the true interests of the college. 
The Y. M. C. A., and the various depart- 
ments of athletics all claim your attention 
and support. In no way can interest in the 
college be more easily and permanently devel- 
oped than by a hearty participation in all 
forms of true activity. 



This number of the Orient will be sent 
to every member of the Freshman class, and 
will continue to be so sent unless notice to 
the contrary is given to the Business Edi- 
tor. Although there are many other things, 
that rightly claim the support of the students, 
yet the claim of the Orient is of paramount 
importance. In no other way can general 
college news be more easily and correctly 
obtained than by reading the columns of the 
Orient. Then, too, it is the voice of the 
students, and, as such, it demands careful 
attention. The Orient is always desirous 
of receiving communications in regard to 
matters pertaining to the common weal, and 
will endeavor to act with perfect fairness 
towards all concerned. 



No one, who is at all acquainted with col- 
lege management and customs, can fail to 
have noticed the great changes that have 
taken place in the last few years. The hard 
and fast distinctions, between classes, and the 
bitter antagonism which existed between 
secret societies, have in a great measure given 
place to feelings of respect and kindliness. 
It is not perhaps strange that a corresponding 
change should have taken place between 
teachers and students ; that their interests 
should have been found to be identical. 

The new system of college discipline, 
which was drawn up by the Faculty, and 
accepted by them and by the students is a 
great advance over the old method. In brief, 
all matters of discipline are to be submitted 
to a jury, composed of members chosen, one 



each, from the four classes, and the five secret 
societies. This jury will have power to im- 
pose but not to enforce punishment. The 
president will have authority to enforce pun- 
ishment and to remit it in whole or in part, 
hut none whatever to increase it. No one 
can deny that this is a radical change. The 
opportunity for criticism in matters pertain- 
ing to college discipline, which formerly ex- 
isted, is now removed. Although this plan 
differs, in some respects, from that of other 
leading colleges, yet it must be granted that 
conservative Bowdoin in regard to college 
government is in the van. One advantage 
to be derived from this system is the experi- 
ence which students will gain in matters 
belonging to deliberative and advisory bodies. 
The fact, that a college is composed of 
both Faculty and students, and that their in- 
terests are the same, will be brought out and 
emphasized. The very fact that students are 
to be the arbiters between students will 
greatly lessen the need of such arbitration. 
It is significant that these " articles of agree- 
ment," as they are called, were adopted by 
a unanimous vote of the whole student body. 
As the voting was done by ballot, there was 
ample opportunity for an expression of dis- 
sent. A great essential, to the success of the 
scheme, is the hearty co-operation of the 
students. Without this it will be worse than 
useless. As Bowdoin students have always 
hitherto upheld, whatever has met with their 
approval, so in this instance, it is hoped that 
they will ratify these " articles of agreement " 
by acts as well as by words. 



We are glad to know that the position, left 
vacant by the resignation of Professor Camp- 
bell, has at last been filled. Dr. Samuel G. 
Brown, formerly Professor of Mental Philos- 
ophy at Dartmouth, and more recently Pres- 
ident of Hamilton College, has accepted an 
invitation to come to Bowdoin, and will arrive 
about the middle of next month. Dr. Brown 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



is reported to be an able and thorough scholar. 
He has made the study of Mental Philosophy 
a specialty, and resigned his place at Dart- 
mouth only because of an invitation to 
become the President of Hamilton. The 
onerous duties incident to his position as 
President caused him, a short time since, 
to resign. He was thus rendered able to 
accept a call to come among us. It is said 
that Dr. Brown will fully maintain the stand- 
ard of former years. The students in toto, 
and especiallj' the Seniors, will extend to him 
a hearty welcome. 



The Seniors are to be congratulated on 
having so good a prospect of a successful 
year. At Commencement time there was 
a feeling of uncertainty in regard to the 
course of instruction for this year; but now 
we can look forward with confidence and 
pleasure to a year of solid work. Gen. Cham- 
berlain is in his old place, and will give a 
course of lectures in — -we hardly know how 
to designate the study, but for want of a 
better name, we will use the old one of " Polit- 
ical Economy." There is every prospect that 
the course in Psychology will be fully up to 
the highest standard of former years. Thus 
equipped, with so competent a corps of in- 
structors, Bowdoin College offers exceptional 
advantages for obtaining a liberal educalion. 



The traditional contests between the two 
lower classes were duly celebrated the~~~first 
week of the term. Now that the smoke of 
battle has rolled away, one may dare to utter 
some conclusions, which naturally present 
themselves. A striking contrast, between 
this and former years, was in the fact that 
intimidation was entirely done away. The 
foot-ball game was fought with the same 
fairness as would be a game between the two 
upper classes. The advantage of sujjerior 
numbers compensated for whatever lack of 



boldness the Freshmen may have had, and 
placed the opposing parties on nearly equal 
footing. After an exciting game of an hour 
and a half, during which the same positions 
as at first were repeatedly taken, the Fresh- 
men succeeded in winning. But once before 
has a Freshman class done such a thing; and 
never before has the game lasted so long. 
Both classes deserve great credit for their 
playing. It is to be hoped that there ma}' 
now be a revival of interest in foot-ball, 
which will place the game on better footing 
than it has had for several years. We hope 
that any fancied irregularity in the rope-pull 
will not disturb the minds of the Freshmen. 
As a well-known Senior said, it was the 
"fairest pull" ever seen upon the campus. 
There are many college customs which at 
first seem strange, but later the necessity of 
their existence becomes apparent. The re- 
sult of the base-ball game was a surprise to 
no one. The unusual talent shown by the 
Freshmen presaged the defeat of the Sopho- 
mores. 

The utmost of good feeling has, so far, 
existed between the two classes, and it may 
not be unreasonable to say that a new era of 
college life has been begun. 



The present outlook for athletics is un- 
usually good. The Freshman class gives 
evidence of being possessed of sufficient 
muscle, skill, and willingness, to in time re- 
place the vacancies made by '83. 

One of the most cheering and helpful 
signs is to see a class at once take hold of all 
legitimate interests. Careful training is the 
only rational preparation for success in any 
department of activity, and the lack of it is 
nowhere more painfully apparent than in a 
time of emergency. There are plenty of 
men in college that have had experience in 
training, and now, in the absence of a regular 
instructor, they should assume charge of the 
gymnasium this fall and winter. It is not 



100 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



the correct method to first select the men, 
either for the nine or the crews, but to first 
train a large number from which a selection 
may be made. 



One lack, which is especially noticeable 
in the first two years, is in time for outside 
reading." Often have we wished that it might 
be possible to supplement a study by some 
reading upon the subject. The fine library 
offers superior advantages, which all might 
avail themselves of witli great profit. Much 
time which is spent in many seemingly neces- 
sary ways, could be obtained for leading. 
Few things are more easily acquired and 
more enjoyable than a taste for good, solid, 
healthful literature. By the study of stand- 
ard authors, a knowledge of correct English 
is acquired, and one's vocabulary enlarged. 
These direct results, aside from the immedi- 
ate knowledge gained, would be sufficient of 
themselves to induce such a study. It is 
useless to attempt to read everything. The 
need of some system is at once acknowledged. 
The advice of some person of experience, 
coupled with one's own taste for such things, 
will assist in making a wise selection. 



One great annoyance, to which the 
Orient is subjected, is that afforded by 
subscribers, who change their residence with- 
out giving us any notice of such a change. 
It cannot be expected that we shall give our 
time to the thankless task of looking up the 
whereabouts of every subscriber. It would 
be a favor if all changes of address could be 
communicated to. us. 



At this time of the year, when elections 
are the rule, it may not be amiss for us to 
offer a simple suggestion. Let the members 
of the nine and the various crews, together 
with other important officers, be chosen with- 
out regard to societies. There is no greater 



element of weakness than this division of so- 
called honors, without reference to individual 
worth. It would be much more to the credit 
of a society to have a member chosen on ac- 
count of his peculiar fitness for the place, 
than if it fell to him in a blind scramble for 
office. 



The Orient would kindly invite a few 
communications. We would not have our 
readers imagine that we are flooded with 
matter, for it is far otherwise. Last term 
there were many outside matters which fur- 
nished material for our columns, but we are 
now dependent upon our own exertions and 
the favors of our friends. If there is any 
one who thinks that the literary standard of 
the Orient should be raised, we would give 
him a most cordial invitation to write any 
article for us. If any are desirous of becom- 
ing our successors, it is high time that they 
began to send us specimens of their composi- 
tion. The literary work of the Orient is 
very pleasant, as all of its editors will testify; 
and, while not less exacting than the task of 
writing themes, it affords greater freedom in 
the choice and treatment of subjects. 



It was witli pleasure that we learned last. 
term of the election of the Bugle editors. 
There can now be no doubt but that the 
Bugle will be issued before the end of the 
term. The advantage of this certainly can- 
not be overestimated. It is more and more 
difficult to issue a Bugle that will win the 
approval of the students, as it is expected 
that each succeeding number will surpass the 
one preceding it. As this fact necessitates 
considerable work, it is hoped that the pres- 
ent Board will undertake the task with vigor, 
and so win the reward of faithful endeavor. 



The annual fall race came off this year, 
without the difficulties that have beset it in 
former years. The great aim in having it, is 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



101 



to develop the boating talent in the Fresh- 
man class, so that there ma}' be a better 
selection of men in the spring. Another 
advantage is, that the interest in sports is 
kept np by such contests. The race was not 
so closely contested as it was hoped ; but yet 
it was not without interest. The time was 
not at all remarkable, but, considering the 
fact that the men had had no training and 
that the water was so low, it was very satis- 
factory. 

From all we have seen, it is evident that 
there is a great deal of muscular abilit}' in the 
Freshman class, and that a very little practice 
will increase it. It is to be hoped that a 
large number will avail themselves, this win- 
ter, of the advantages offered by the tempo- 
rary gymnasium. 



INTEGER VITAE. 
Horace, Ode I., 22. 
One pure in life and free from sin 
Needs not the Moorish javelin 
Nor bow nor poisoned shafts to slay 
The foes he meets upon his way ; 

E'en though through Syrte's sultry sands, 
Or through Caucasus' hostile lauds, 
Or where Hydaspe's waters flow 
O'er golden sands, about to go. 

For while I sing my Lalage 
In Sabine woods and carelessly 
Beyond th' accustomed paths I stray, 
A wolf flees me, unarmed, away ; 

A monster such as ne'er was seen 
Midst Dannia's oaks of spreading green 
And Mauritania, arid nurse 
Of lions, ne'er produced a worse. 

Place me on plains which bear no trees 
To be refreshed by summer breeze, 
Where clouds, witb misty wreaths unfurled, 
And evil skies oppress the world; 

Or 'neath the sun's bright chariot 
In lands where man abideth not, 
I still will love most fervently 
My sweet voiced, smiling Lalage. 

— Alumnus. 



A MISTAKE. 

When we were in college, chum and I 
were both strong advocates of bachelorism. 
On graduating, we parted with the usual 
protestations of life-long friendship, promis- 
ing to keep up a regular correspondence with 
each other. For about a year I heard from 
my old chum frequently. He was studying 
medicine, while I did not care to enter on a 
professional life and passed most of my time 
in my father's office helping him about his 
books. About a year after leaving college, I 
secured a situation as runner for a large dry 
goods firm in New York. From this time 
our correspondence was very irregular, as my 
whereabouts at any particular time was ex- 
tremely uncertain. 

Chum had several times invited me to go 
out and visit him, writing me that he and his 
sister were living at home while the rest of 
the family were in Europe, and that they 
would both be very glad to have me visit 
them ; but my business had never carried me 
near the city in which he lived, and I did not 
feel like taking the necessary time. 

In the summer of 1878, my employers 
ordered me to take a trip through some parts 
of the West, with a view of securing a new 
commercial route. As I was to go within 

forty or fifty miles of C , where Frank 

lived, I decided to lengthen my trip by run- 
ning down to C and staying with him a 

few days. So I wrote him that I would 
probably be at his house some time during 
the second week in August. I confess that 
one of my reasons for visiting him was to see 
his sister Nellie, in whose praise Frank had 
often grown eloquent during our college days. 

In due time I reached C , and was 

soon driven to Frank's house. I was ushered 
into the parlor by the colored servant, who 
informed me that "Missus '11 be clown direc'ly, 
sah." My curiosity as to who " Missus " was, 
was soon satisfied by the entrance of a young 
lady who advanced toward me and handed 



102 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



me a card reading "Nellie L. Bates." "I 
suppose this is Mr. Clark," said she. I re- 
plied that I was the gentleman in question. 

"Frank was obliged to go to R this 

morning," naming a city some fifty miles 
distant. "He does not expect to return for 
several days, and when he left, he told me to 
be sure to entertain you until he returns." 

Imagine my feelings, if you can. I was 
surprised, disappointed, even provoked to 
think that Frank should have gone away 
when I had written him that I was coming. 
For days preceding I had been recalling the 
hundred and one things I wanted to tell 
Frank when we met, and now he had gone 
away for several days. However, there was 
nothing to do but to make the best of it, and 
here was one of the loveliest women I had 
ever seen, ready to devote her entire time to 
my amusement and entertainment. 

I was accustomed to lively times, but 
never before had I been entertained as I was 
for the next few clays. There were drives, 
lawn parties, and sails during the day, and 
theatres and balls in the evening. I thought 
I was getting up quite a flirtation, and I began 
to congratulate myself that perhaps in time 
1 might take Frank's lovely sister away from 
him. 

To make a long story short, Frank did not 
return for a week, and when he did return 
our meeting was such as might be expected 
of two college chums who had not seen each 
other for three years. There were old col- 
lege yarns to spin over again, all the boys to 
be inquired after, and many other topics of 
a kindred nature to occupy our attention. 
After we had been conversing for some time, 
Frank's sister, as I had supposed her, en- 
tered the library. 

" George," said Frank, " this is my wife. 
I suppose you have thought her my sister 
Nellie. I thought she would entertain you 
as well if you thought she was my sister; so 
I did not write you. You see I have changed 



my views on some subjects since we were in 
college." 

To say that I was surprised, would be too 
mild a statement of the case. I thanked my 
lucky stars that I had not been betrayed into 
a premature avowal. At first, I thought of 
leaving town on the first train, but on second 
thought decided not to do so. I remained at 
Frank's several days longer, and finally de- 
parted well satisfied with my visit. Since 
then, my own views on some subjects have 
come to resemble Frank's, as you will readily 
see when I say that I am to be married in 
three months. My future wife is Frank's 
sister, Nellie Bates, who, at the time of my 
visit, was with some school friends in Cin- 
cinnati. 

THE THORNDIKE OAK. 

In the middle of our campus stands a 
noble tree, under the broad, spreading 
branches of which the members of the gradu- 
ating classes have now for many years been 
accustomed to meet, to bid farewell to each 
other and to the college. Through its leaf} r 
top has many a time been wafted the fragrant 
smoke of the decorated " peace-pipe," and 
often have its limbs reverberated with the 
parting cheer, by which the well-beloved 
halls were thus, for the last time greeted. 
Few, perhaps, of those who see it most are 
acquainted with the facts in the history of 
this old tree, and it may not be out of place 
to give a short account of its origin, con- 
nected as it is with Massachusetts Hall and 
with the early life of the college. 

The first Thursday in September, 1802, 
was a great day for the District of Maine. 
It was the birthday of a college. The 
labors of a struggle into existence, which had 
lasted for eight years, Were crowned on the 
sandy plains of Brunswick by the inaugura- 
tion of the first president and the first pro- 
fessor of Bowdoin College. The ceremonies 
took place in the open air, and were con- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



103 



ducted, says the records, for the most part in 
Latin. When they were over, the whole 
company returned. to Massachusetts Hall and 
partook of a banquet there provided. The 
entertainment was given in the west room, 
at that time used for a chapel. To grace the 
festivities the room was decorated with gar- 
lands of oak. Four weeks later, near the 
last of September, a class of eight young 
men, or rather boys, was admitted. One of 
these was George Thorndike, a lad of thir- 
teen, who had come down from Beverly with 
President McKeen. His father was Col. 
Israel Thorndike, a staunch friend and great 
admirer of Dr. McKeen. On the morning 
of the first prayers of the term, these eight 
students of the college were standing on the 
steps, and around the door of the Hall, mak- 
ing observations on the appearance of things 
around them. Young Thorndike picked up 
a solitary acorn, which had been swept out 
of the room of the banquet four weeks 
previously, and wondered where it came 
from. To preserve it he dug a small hole 
near the steps and buried it. Here it reposed 
all winter. The next spring the president, 
who was like a father to the students, gave 
the class a small plot of ground to cultivate 
for their own amusement. He appropriated 
for this purpose the north-eastern corner of 
his own garden. Thorndike remembered his 
acorn. He succeeded in .finding it, dug it 
up, and found that it had lived and burst its 
shell. He transplanted it to the northern 
portion of the students' plot, and carefully 
looked after it while he was in college. The 
slender shoot continued to grow and flourish. 
It was cared for by the president, try his suc- 
cessor, President Appleton, and by Dr. Allen, 
till it became a great tree, and got beyond 
the need of care. 

Young Thorndike died, four years after 
leaving college, in St. Petersburg. The fact 
that of Bowdoin's graduates George Thorn- 
dike was the first to wear the fatal star, adds 



a side of peculiar pathos to the story. He 
seemed to feel that he was not destined to 
live to make his mark in the world when he 
so tenderly nourished a tree that was to bear 
his name down to future generations. 

Col. Thorndike, after the death of his son, 
continued to visit the eastern part of . the 
country for many years. He always visited 
Brunswick and noticed the growth of the 
tree. 

What changes this old oak has seen ! 
When first it pushed its slender stem from 
beneath the sandy soil of Brunswick, the 
campus was a blueberry plain, one-quarter its 
present size. The president, professors, and 
students made one family, all living together 
in Massachusetts Hall. This, the only build- 
ing of the college, served for the president's 
house, chapel, recitation rooms, and dormito- 
ries. The location of the president's kitchen 
is easily recognized to this day by the old- 
fashioned fire-place in the Cleaveland Lecture- 
Room. The students were summoned to 
prayers by the rapping of the president's 
cane on the stairs. A heavy rapping called 
to prayers, and a lighter one to recitations. 

And thus it appears that the college oak 
grew from an acorn dropped from the oaken 
garlands used to decorate the dining hall on 
the day on which the college sprang into ex- 
istence. It has grown up side by side with 
the college ; and so long as it shall stand it 
will mark the exact age which the college 
has reached. 



THE QUAKERS IN THE SEVEN- 
TEENTH CENTURY. 

The manner in which the majority of 
people now spend days appointed for "fast- 
ing and prayer," would have shocked our 
Puritan ancestors of the seventeenth century. 
They were accustomed to refrain on such 
days from all labor and all amusements, and 
to devote themselves wholly to the purposes 



104 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



for which this time had been set apart. Had 
we been living in Massachusetts on June 
11, 1656, we should have seen no oxen 
toiling at the plow, nor heard the black- 
smith's hammer ringing on the anvil. It was 
a day appointed by the Governor for fasting 
and for prayer that " The Lord would save 
England from the Ranters and Quakers." 

The sect to which this peculiar title has 
long been applied, originated in England, and 
owes its birth to a young shoemaker, by 
name George Fox. Fox's guiding principle 
was the belief that the Lord told him every- 
thing he ought or ought not to do. In ac- 
cord with this belief he deserted his business 
before he was twenty-one years old, and 
roamed alone in the country, wearing a 
broad-brimmed hat and sheep-skin garments, 
and sleeping at night in some hollow tree or 
under some hay-stack. He conceived the 
idea that it was wrong for him to remove his 
hat as a mark of respect; that he must not 
say "good morning," or "good evening"; 
that he ought to say " thee " and " thou " 
when speaking to the people ; that it was 
always wrong to fight, or to take an oath, 
even when commanded by a judge. To him 
the churches were "steeple-houses," and the 
ministers "hireling priests," because they 
were paid ; and he felt called upon to " testi- 
fy," in opposition to them, what the Lord had 
revealed to him. 

Men are often honest and firm in their 
ideas that they are called by conscience to 
perform some strange and unwonted acts, but 
are as often unwise in the fulfillment of these 
calls. Such was the case with George Fox. 
He was, beyond doubt, sincere in his beliefs, 
and he seemed to grasp great truths which 
the people of his time could not comprehend; 
but in his actions he was too often indiscreet. 
The name "Quaker," originated, and was 
applied to him under circumstances that were 
brought about by one of his own perform- 
ances. He entered a church on Sunday and 



began to talk, in the midst of the service, 
without taking his hat from his head. Such 
an action was not to be tolerated. The 
constable hurried him off to jail, and on the 
following day Fox was brought before a 
magistrate. Without any ceremony, and not 
biding his time to speak, the prisoner con- 
fronted the justice with the command, "I bid 
thee tremble before the word of the Lord." 
" I bid thee quake before the law ! " was 
the reply ; and from that time the people 
had a name for Fox and his followers. The 
more agreeable title of " Friends," by which 
the " Quakers " of to-day are known in relig- 
ious circles, was adopted by themselves. 
One of this sect never refers to his fellow- 
believer as a " Quaker," but alwaj's as a 
" Friend." 

Why this particular name should have 
been chosen, is a matter of some wonder to 
all that know the strange actions of these 
people in the seventeenth and early part of 
the eighteenth centuries. In a short time 
after the imprisonment of Fox there were 
hundreds of men and women travelling 
through England, preaching in the fields or 
entering churches, disturbing the congrega- 
tions, and getting themselves into prison. 

Within four years' time the number in- 
creased to eighty thousand, all impressed with 
the belief that their imaginations were direct 
revelations from God. William Simpson felt 
that he was " moved of the Lord " to take 
off all his clothing and go into the streets 
and churches to preach. Robert Huntington 
wrapped himself in a white sheet and went 
into Carlisle Church " to testify." Sarah 
Goldsmith laid aside her clothing, and, with 
dust on her head, walked through the streets 
of Bristol, saying that the Lord had told her 
thus to testify against the wickedness of the 
people. The mayor, however, thought it 
was indecent behavior, and sent Sarah to jail. 
Some of the best men and women of 
England believed that the Quakers were de- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



105 



hided by the devil ; and one minister seems 
to have been sure of it, for he wrote a book 
on the subject, entitled i; Hell Let Loose." 

The news of these unseemly actions soon 
spread. Every vessel arriving in Boston, 
brought intelligence of the unaccountable 
behavior of men and women who seemed to 
have lost all sense of shame. Is it to be 
wondered that the people of Massachusetts, 
when they heard of it, were sincere in their 
belief that Satan was indeed let loose, and 
that it was their duty to fast, and pray that 
the Lord would circumvent the wicked one ? 

In order to prevent the Quakers from 
coming to America, one law after another 
was passed by the Massachusetts Legislature, 
each more severe than the one preceding it. 
The first one, decreeing punishment by whip- 
ping and imprisonment for any one who 
should attempt Quaker preaching, had no 
effect whatever on the missionaries and 
preachers who were constantly arriving in 
Boston from England. The Governor and 
Council, believing that the emissaries of the 
devil were getting a foothold in the colony, 
in spite of the law, determined to make it 
still more severe. It was accordingly enacted 
that whoever entertained a Quaker should 
pay a fine of forty shillings for every hour of 
entertainment, and be imprisoned till the fine 
was paid; that every Quaker entering the 
colony should have his right ear cut off, and 
if he came back after being sent away, must 
lose his other ear. Women were to be whip- 
ped, put in the House of Correction, and if 
they came into the colony a third time, have 
their tongues bored through. We are at first 
at a loss how to justify these laws, but a sec- 
ond thought shows us they were not passed 
in malice, but in the conviction that they 
were for the protection and well-being of the 
community. Under the charter, the people 
of Massachusetts had the right to make such 
laws as they pleased for the preservation of 
the Commonwealth, and were actuated in so 



doing by the belief that God would hold 
them responsible in the last great day, if they 
did not do all in their power to protect the 
colony from the wiles of Satan. 

The enactment of such laws displayed, 
however, a very limited knowledge of human 
nature. The people failed to see that the 
determination to cling to their religious con- 
victions, the same motive that had impelled 
the Pilgrims themselves to leave England, 
would stimulate the Quakers to brave every- 
thing for what they believed was the truth. 
In passing rigorous laws, the colonists be- 
lieved that they were doing God's service. 
The Quakers, on the other hand, believed 
they were serving God by violating such laws, 
and were ready to take the consequences. 

The truth had not come to the world that 
convictions of right and duty can never be 
forcibly extinguished. The apostle Paul 
once tried this method, and failed. He was 
sincere in his conviction that Christians 
ought to be put to death. Those that perse- 
cuted the Quakers were equally sincere, but 
were terribly mistaken. Time alone has 
cleared away the haze, and opened men's 
eyes to what is really right and true. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



It is a cold season for '86. 
Did you take in the Fair? 
Thirty-three Freshmen so far. 
Punch and Judy had quite a run. 
How are you boys, glad to get back ? 
Davis, '85, has charge of the laboratory. 
Big time at the Topsham Fair, as usual. 
More rooming alone this term than usual. 
Old ? She wasn't a day under thirty- five. 
'84 elected J. A. Waterman, Jr., as juror. 
Gahan thinks he can fling him every time. 

And when she turned 'round and smiled 

There is prospect of a good nine next season. 
Better attendance under the new regulations. 



106 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Only two rooms in South Winthrop occupied this 
year. 

The Juniors are taking their annual dose of 
Physic. 

Why don't that committee od music straighten 
out things? 

Taylor, '80, Colby, has entered the present Soph- 
omore class. 

Is the word '■ Rhetoricals" only for the purpose 
of filling out f 

Not even a horn concert yet. How different 
from last year. 

Lots of "fun for the boys" at the station last 
Thursday night. 

It has been three years since we have had any 
boat races in the fall. 

The reading-room papers sold for the first term 
for almost six dollars. 

Prof. Lee looks as though he had enjoyed his 
trip with the Fish Commissioners this summer. 

E. C. Smith, '84, is bell-ringer and also janitor 
of Cleaveland cabinet. 

York, the barber, has moved from Boardman's 
to over the Post-Office. 

Can't '86 pull rope "? That seems to be her 
strong point in the sports. 

Kemp, '84, has presented the college with some 
rare (?) specimens of fish. 

The "marking system" is done away with and 
rank attendance substituted. 

'84 will have to look well to her base-ball laurels 
now. '87 is a dangerous rival. 

South Appleton has every room full. It is a 
regular bee-hive of Freshmen. 

The Juniors managed to get out their usual 
number to church last Sunday. 

Come, boys, why not have some foot-ball con- 
tests between the different classes ? 

Who said " gymnasium " ? It was nobody but a 
Freshman; he will learn better soon. 

E. E. Chase, '85, died of typhoid fever, Sept. 23d, 
at the Homeopathic Hospital, Boston. 

Barrett Potter, of 78, has recently been ap- 
pointed tutor in History and Rhetoric. 

Only three dissenting voices at the meeting for 
the ratification of the " Articles of Agreement." 

A witty Freshman at Sabbath School last Sun- 
day, doubtless hearing for the first time how Elijah 
was translated, was led to remark that he under- 
stood now the relation of a "horse" to translation. 



They say that "plugging" Sanskrit is hard 
work. 

Did you lose any money on the races, or don't 
you ever bet ? 

The referee did most of the kicking for the 
Sophomores. 

Speaking about size — it must have been as largo 
as the kettle. 

The Juniors cannot understand why " madchen" 
should be neuter. 

How much will cover the loss of things from 
your room during vacation ? 

Prof. Lee has some rare and valuable specimens 
collected on his summer trip. 

Talk of Junior ease when you have to study 
Physics under Prof. Carmichael. 

Colby got beaten on account of poor fielding. 
She can now sympathize with us. 

It was a shame that " parallelopiped " was un- 
able to trot. Better luck next year. 

The library is open two hours additional Wed- 
nesdays and Saturdays, from 9 to 11 a.m. 

Not very bad time for "scrub races,"— a mile in 
seven minutes and fifteen seconds, with a turn. 

The Bnsiuess Editor is in Athens. Not the fa- 
mous Athens of Greece, but Athens among the 
sandy plains of Somerset County. Wonder if he is 
introducing any OEiBNT-al customs there? 

" Lo, the poor Indian," sprained his kuee at the 
fair and was obliged to keep his wigwam for two 
days. 

The "Prof's" horse got left again, as usual. 
Freshmen will learn by and by not to bet on strange 
horses. 

All the Juniors take Zoology as an elective. 
That last summer's " trip down the bay "did the 
business. 

Subscribers desiring their Post-Office address 
changed are requested to send a card to the Busi- 
ness Editor. 

By the Treasurer's report the Base- Ball Associ- 
ation raised and expended four hundred and fifteen 
dollars the past year. 

'87 may justly feel proud of her beginning. 
There is good material in that class. May she al- 
ways command the respect of her associates. 

The "Sargcant" got a dead. Strange, under 
the new rules, that a "graduate" can't come back 
and go into recitation as a visitor without having to 
recite. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



107 



Butler, '35, began a singing school at Bunganuc 
last week. He has several more prospective ones. 

The way a Fresh tumbled into church the first 
Sunday was enough to make a horse laugh— and a 
number laughed. 

Anyone desiring to find out whether a cat has 
" nine lives " can get information by calling upon a 
member of the Faculty. 

Over half of '63 have positions as teachers. All 
the rest had chances, but chose pursuits more 
fitted to their ambitions. 

Mr. Fisher is the only minister now in Brunswick 
who has preached here for five successive years. 
Surely this speaks well for him. 

" Whitney," the man who "saw a game on the 
Boston grounds," did not make a great showing on 
the day of the Sopho-Frcsh game. 

There ought to be guide-boards put up bearing 
the inscription, "This way to the Freshman gal- 
lery " for some of the unfortunates. 

The. efforts of the manager of the reading-room 
arc commendable. It is to be hoped that now the 
monthlies can be found once in a while. 

Henry Clay has returned from his summer vaca- 
tion. Henry was giving the boys some wholesome 
advice the other night down at the station. 

The class officers for the present term are : Sen- 
iors, Prof. Lee ; Juniors, Prof. Eobinson ; Sopho- 
mores, Prof. Avery; Freshmen, Prof. Smith. 

There is talk of starting a Debating Society 
among the students during the fall and winter 
terms. Such a thing would be desirable, we think. 

There never was more interest shown in the 
sports,— something unusual in the fall.- There is 
no reason why we should not make a good showing 
nest spring. 

Among the familiar faces noticed at the begin- 
ning of the term were those of Cole, Bascom, Reed, 
Perkins, Crowley, Kendall, Chase, '63, and Wheel- 
wright, '81. 

Dr. Brown, formerly a professor in Dartmouth, 
and more receutly President of Hamilton College, 
has accepted the chair of Mental and Moral Philos- 
ophy. He will begin his labors here about Novem- 
ber ]5th. 

The action of the students in crying " foot-ball" 
in the chapel, after the President requested them 
not to, not only shows their good judgment, but 
also the strong hold our venerable President has 
upon the hearts of the students. 



The Colby Exchange editor has donned his war- 
paint and is after the scalp of the Bowdoin brave. 
Vide last number of the Echo. 

How is this for a prospective nine? Moulton, 
c. ; Wright, p.; Cook, lb.; Torrey, 2b.; Dearth, 
3b.; Waterman, s. s. ; Barton, 1. f. ; Talbot, c. f. ; 
Means, r. f. 

Prof. Robinson's Bible class is in a most flourish- 
ing condition. Certainly the Professors ought to 
meet with success in that direction, for they have 
worked faithfully. 

Prof. Little has issued a book on Latin Compo- 
sition, which he is using in his classes. It really 
begins to look like olden times when Bowdoin pro- 
fessors used to make many text-books. 

If Sunday p.m. prayers were abolished we be- 
lieve more students would attend Sabbath School. 
Church three times a day is too much with Sunday 
School thrown in. We notice by an exchange that 
evening prayers at Williams have been discontinued. 

At the Sopho-Fresh game wo noticed one of the 
graduates of the college upholding the "yaggers" 
in their rowdyism. We arc sorry to see anything 
of this sort; but if the fellow wishes to be classed 
with Brunswick yaggers ho can of course keep on 
in this direction. 

How some people will let their prejudice run 
away with their judgment. Now you will find some 
who really believe that some of the upperclassmen 
helped the Sophs in the rope-pull. Can't they 
learn any from past experience? Why, '86 always 
won the rope-pull. 

The following officers have been elected for tho 
Bowdoin Boating Association : Commodore, C. E. 
Adams ; Vice Commodore, F. I. Brown ; Treasurer, 
F. A. Fisher ; Assistant Treasurer, C. H. Ward well; 
Secretary, A.R. Butler, '86; Directors, D.C. Clark, 
F. W. Davis, '85, W. P. Nealley. 

The "Articles of Agreement" between the Fac- 
ulty and students that have been adopted here are 
not the ones in vogue at Amherst, as has been erro- 
neously stated in the papers. On the contrary they 
are quite different, and were formulated by ouc of 
the Faculty during the past vacation. 

A certain Freshman set out to attend church 
last Sunday. Ho took a seat first in tho body of 
the church back by tho door. But noticing that he 
had got in the " wrong pew" he started to change 
his seat. So, quietly withdrawing, he went around 
to the south entrance. Here, instead of going up- 
stairs, he entered the door at the right and again 



108 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



found himself among the people in the south wing 
under the desired gallery. Once more backing out 
he climbed the stairs only to find himself in the 
Senior and Sophomore gallery. The poor fellow 
spent the rest of the forenoon in finding his own 
room. 

If the Orient voices the wish of the students, it 
is now a good place to say that it is about time for 
the Faculty to take some action to keep the yaggers 
off the delta. It is certainly outrageous for the 
boys to stand anything similar to the aggravations 
of a week ago last Saturday. Perhaps the "jury " 
may take it in hand. 

At the annual meeting of the Base-Ball Associ- 
ation the following officers were elected for the en- 
suing year: President, L. Barton, '84; Vice-Presi- 
dent, W. M. Eames, '85; Secretary, W. V. Went- 
worth, '86; Treasurer, E. W. Freeman, '85; As- 
sistant Treasurer, J. Davis, '86 ; Directors, S. R. 
Child, D. C. Clark, '84; 0. R. Cook, '85. 

Prof. Robinson has just published a text-book 
on Chemistry. It contains his lectures in the regu- 
lar college course. Every other page is left blank 
for the student to take notes upon. It has already 
been adopted in some of the public schools, includ- 
ing Portland High School. It bids fair to have a 
large sale as it most assuredly deserves. 

We cannot say too much in praise of the new 
method of heatiug the chapel. A large furnace and 
boiler have been placed in the cellar for the pur- 
pose of making steam. The steam is then carried 
through the chapel by means of large iron pipes, — 
a pipe running the length of the chapel under each' 
row of seats. At present the temperature of the 
chapel is, "mirabile dictu," rather too warm. 

The foot-ball game between the Sophomores and 
Freshmen was the most hotly contested of any since 
that between 72 and 73. It lasted an hour and a 
half, and finally resulted in a victory for '87. This 
is the second time, in the history of the college, that 
the Freshmen have beaten, the other time being 
when 79 was beaten by '80. Adams, '84, acted as 
umpire, Cook aud Ford referees for the Sophomores 
and Freshmen respectively. 

'83 was really a teacher's class, notwithstanding 
the historian's report to the contrary. The follow- 
ing members are teaching, a larger number than 
ever before from one class : Allen, the High School 
at Alfred ; Cole and Perkins, Bath High School ; 
Files, Westbrook Seminary ; Fliug, Biddeford High 
School; Holden, Bangor Grammar School; Pettin- 
gill, Augusta Grrammar School; Reed, Woolwich 



High School ; Stetson, Lewiston High School ; 
Swan, Castine High School ; Winter, Kilbourne 
City, Wis. ; Hutchins, somewhere in Massachusetts, 
we were unable to find out; Sewell in New Hamp- 
shire; and Dinsmore in eastern Maine. Why, they 
are just beginning to appreciate Bowdoin. 

The manager of the reading-room has considera- 
bly improved the looks and convenience of the 
reading-room. He has had new placards for all the 
papers printed, a dozen or more new sticks, hooks, 
and fastenings for the different periodicals ; and a 
general air of neatness and order pervades the 
whole resort. The most imperative need now is 
more seats. We hope he will not rest until that de- 
ficiency is made good. 

The Sopho-Fresh base-ball game was won by 
the Freshmen iu one of the most hotly contested 
games ever held between the two lower classes. 
The score was very even throughout the game, the 
Freshmen taking the lead from the beginning. The 
game was called at the close of the eighth inning 
on account of darkness. Score, 17 to 14. The 
Freshmen have some good players, who will be a 
valuable addition to the college nine. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Whereas, It has pleased the Giver of all things 
to remove from this life our classmate, Elmer E. 
Chase, 

Resolved, That in his death we have lost a zealous 
member aud beloved classmate ; 

Resolved, That to the sorrowing friends and rela- 
tives of our departed classmate we extend our 
heartfelt sympathy ; 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be 

sent to the family of the deceased, and to the press. 

W. R. Butler, ) In behalf 

E. Thomas, V of Bowdoin, 

W. M. Eames, S Class of '85. 

Whereas, the Infinite and Supreme Ruler of the 
Universe has seen fit to take to Himself another be- 
loved and esteemed brother, Elmer Ellsworth 
Chase, therefore, 

Resolved, That while we humbly bow before an 
All-Wise Providence, we sincerely mourn the death 
of our dear brother whose career promised to be so 
successful : 

Resolved, That we extend our heartfelt sympa- 
thy to the afflicted family and mourning friends; 

Resolved, That copies of these resolutions be 
sent to the relatives of the deceased, to the press, 
to the Grand Lodge, and to the several Charges of 
this Fraternity. 

For the Fraternity, 

E. R. Harding, ) 

L. B. Folsom, \ '85. 

F. W. Davis, ) 
Theta Delta Chi Hall, Brunswick, Me., Oct. 5, 1883. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



109 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited to send 
personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Brunswick, Me.] 

The following statistics of the class of '80 have 
been kindly furnished us by Mr. H. A. Wing: 

Bartlett. Editor, and compiler of subscription 
books at Somerset, Pa. Intends soon to eugage in 
journalism as a permanent occupation. 

Burbank. At present canvassing in Minneapo- 
lis, Minn., but will soon engage in teaching. 

Chapman, civil engineer, in the employ of Col. 
Waring of Newport, K. I. 

Collins. Although diligent inquiries have been 
made, it is impossible to ascertain anything in re- 
gard to Mr. Collins. 

Conant. Partner in the firm of Conant, Pat- 
ricks & Co., wholesale grocers, Portland, Me. 

Dane. Studying law at his home in Kenne- 
bunk, Me. 

Edwards. Lately principal of the High School, 
Topsham, Me., and engaged in the study of law. 

Ferguson. Has taught school most of the time 
since graduating. Address, Shaplcigh Corner, Me. 

Gilbert. Is employed in the office of the Conti- 
nental Mills, Lewiston, Me. 

Giveen. Principal of the schools in Weaverville, 
Trinity Co., Cal. 

Goulding. Paymaster in the office of the An- 
droscoggin Mills, Lewiston, Me. 

Griudal. Practicing law in New York City, 
office 59 Wall Street, room 27. 

Hall. Practicing law in Yallejo, Salono County, 
Cal. Is District Attorney for the County. 

Harding. Graduated in June, 1883, at the Co- 
lumbia Law School, Washington, D. C, where he 
has also been clerk in the pension department. 

Holmes, Alvin D. Graduated from the Maine 
Medical School at Brunswick, April 30, 1883. 

Holmes, Albert H. Since graduating has been 
engaged in the study of law. 

Jones. Settled as minister over the Methodist 
church at Gorham, Me. 

Maxcy. Senior partner of the firm Maxcy & 
Goding, boot and shoe jobbing house, Fargo, 
Dakota. 

Payson. Partner in the Banking House of H. 
M. Payson & Co., Portland, Me. 

Perkins. Studying law at his home in Kenne- 
bunk, Me. 

Purriugton. Principal of the High School at 
Mechanic Falls, Me. 

Scott. Practicing law at Puget Sound, Wash- 
ington Territory. 

Spring. Partner in the importing firm of E. G. 
& W. B. Spring, doing business betweeu the River 
Platte and the United" States. 

Swett. Graduated from the Maine Medical 
School at Brunswick, May 30, 1883. Will continue 
his studies at the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, New York City. 

Weil. Has been admitted to the bar and is 
practicing law in Lawrence, Mass. 



Whitraore. Is practicing law at Gardiner, Me. 

Wilson, Henry B. Is employed in the firm of 
C. M. Rice & Co., Portland, Me. 

Wilson, Virgil C. Employed in the office of the 
Union Mutual Life Insurance Company, Portland, 
Me., and is reading law with Drummond & Drum- 
mond. 

Wing. Has a position on the Editorial Staff of 
the Bangor Daily Commercial. 

Winter. Superintendent of Schools and Princi- 
pal of the High School at Black River Falls, Wis. 



INTER-60LIEGIATE NEWS. 



Amherst : 

The Freshmen are allowed to carry canes. But 
very few, however, make use of the privilege granted 
them. 

Mr. S. E. Packard, '85, has been elected to the 
position on the Student board made vacant by the 
resignation of Mr. Buck. 

The local tennis tournament which lately closed 
had about fifty single entries and forty doubles. 
The two or three best players will go into training 
for the University team. 

The corner stone of the new gymnasium was 
laid Oct. 13. The building will be 87 x 121 feet. It 
will cost about $50,000. 

Brown : 

'87 has sixty men. Botany is a very popular 
elective with the Juniors. 

A higher fence around the ball ground is talked 
of. 

A room directorv for the use of strangers is called 
for. 

The tennis courts upon the lower campus have 
been placed at the disposal of the association. 

Next summer the south middle campus will be 
laid out in courts for the association. 

Columbia : 

'85's Columbia committee have made some little 
advance in their work. 

The annual fall games will be held on Saturday, 
Oct. 27th, under the auspices of the C C Athletic 
Association. 

Prof. Boyesen will soon resume his Friday morn- 
ing lectures or " talks" on German literature, prose, 
and poetry. 

Harvard : 

Harvard has 305 Freshmen. 

The Weekly Crimson and Harvard Daily Herald 
have been discontinued and in their stead a new 
daily, the Herald-Crimson, is published by a con- 
solidated board of nine editors. 

The Foot-Ball Association has a surplus of nearly 
$1,000. 

A set of electrotype reproductions of the ancient 
coins now in the British Museum has been received 
by the Greek department. 



110 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Williams : 

Evening chapel has been omitted. 

Steps have been taken to form a Tennis Associa- 
tion. 

It is not deemed advisable for the ball nine to 
enter the inter-collegiate arena this fall. 

Williams : 

Thirty-four Seniors have chosen English litera- 
ture as an elective, 11 French, 13 German, 10 His- 
tory, 12 Chemistry, 2 Biology, 1 Greek, 11 Astron- 
omy, 2 Calculus, 5 Latin, and 1 Sanskrit. 

A great improvement has been made in the 
chemical laboratory. 

Yale: 

The Yale Banner will appear about the 20th of 
the present month. 

The Record offers the following prizes : Ten dol- 
lars for the best story or sketch ; ten dollars for the 
largest number of published verses ; ten dollars for 
the best light essay, humorous or otherwise. It 
also offers a silver cup valued at $50 as a prize in 
the half-mile run. 



CLIPPINGS. 



First Freshman—" There goes Miss Van Saut. 
Do you know her ? 

Second Freshman — genns cad—" Yes I've been 
introduced, but I intend to cut her. Fortunately, 
whenever I meet her, she's looking the other way." 
— Ex. 

Sophomore (before the Faculty for throwing 
water on a Freshman) — " Did you aim directly at 
the Freshman ? " Sophomore — Yes, sir ; as well as 
I know how." — Princetonian. 

Ignorance in high places. A Senior to a Tlieo- 
logue : " Who is this Bill Tell 1 Has he written 
anything else besides 'Schiller?'" Theologuc faintly 
answers, " Yes." " Well, I must read those Tell's 
works." — Ex. 



During the strike of the telegraph operators, a 
worthy deacon who "got left" telegraphed home 
as follows : "Awful ! Missed the train. Will be 
home to-morrow." Somewhere along the line there 
must have been a green hand, for when that inno- 
cent little message reached the loving wife it read: 
"Am full ! Missed the train. Will bo homo to- 
morrow." — Ex. 

" I am so alarmed, Lizzie," exclaimed a St. 
Louis girl, who was engaged to be married to a 
young army officer. " He hasn't written mc in 
'three days." " There isno occasion to get excited," 
was the reassuring reply ; " he is out of the reach 
of the Indians, there is no epidemic prevailing whoro 
he'is stationed, and when he last wrote he was in 
perfect health." " Oh, yes, I know all that, Lizzie," 
said the timid, agitated creature, " but then- there's 
the army worm." — Ex. 

A newspaper says Boston has a colored man 
named Yale College. When he shall have a largo 
family, imagine Mrs. College standing on the front 
porch and yelling to her offspring : " Now-, see heah, 
Dartmouf, how many times mus' yo' po' mudder tell 
you to frow dat base-ball 'way an' stay in do house 
an' larn your A, B, C's % Cornell, quit dabbliu' in 
dat watah, an' come heah dis instant. An' you, 
Vassar, yo' do worse nigger in do pack. Take dat 
ekewin' gum out ob yo' mouf, or I'll choke yo' till 
yo'rc brack in the face ! " — Ex. 



BOOK NOTICE. 
Health Notes for Students. By Burt G. Wilder, 
M. D., Professor of Physiology, etc., in Cornell 
University, and the Medical School of Maine. 
New York : G. P. Putnam's Sons. Price, 20 
Cents. 

This little book forms the basis of four of tho 
six lectures delivered yearly before tho Freshmen 
at Cornell. It covers much tho samo ground as 
tho lectures on Hygiene, delivered here. It is ad- 
mirable supplemental reading to that course, and 
should be in tho hands of every student. 




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liglil^-Solxa l|||i||s*|iS:I 

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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



'WHEN' YOZ r WANT A RIDE 



ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE, 

On Cleaveland Street, where you will find turnouts to suit the most 
fastidious, u^p Hates reasonable. 



RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more (or Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

SUPKRIOK TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 
direct importation, which is made especially for us, water 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

AI.LEN «(■ GIMEIt Manufacturers, 



RICHMOND, VA. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc, Hound in a Neat and Durable .Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Cook Work of Every Description done to Order. 

Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, ROOM 
PAPER, PERIODICALS, <ScC. 



TO P1ESE1YE TIE HEALTH 

Use the Magnetion Appliance Co.'s 

Magnetic Lung Protector. 

They are priceless to Ladies. Gentlemen, and Children 
with Weak Lungs; no case of Pneumonia or Croup is ever 
known where these garments are worn. They also pre- 
vent and cure Heart Difficulties, Colds, Rheumatism. 
Neuralgia, Throat Troubles, Diphtheria, Catarrh, and all 
kindred diseases. Will wear any service for three years. 
Are worn over the under-clothing. 

fiTARR H ** * s lleea ' ess to describe the symp- 
y-'n- A rV JA rv 1 1. toms of this nauseous disease that is 
sapping the life and strength of only too many of the fair- 
est and best of both sexes. Labor, study, and research in 
America, Europe, and Eastern lands have resulted in the 
Magnetic Lung Protector, affording cure for Catarrh, a 
remedy which contains No Drugging of the System, 
and with the continuous stream of Magnetism permeating 
through the afflicted organs, must restore them to a 
healthy action. We place our price for this Appliance at 
less than one-twentieth of the price asked by others for 
remedies upon which you take all the chances, and we es- 
pecially invite the patronage of the many persons who 
have tried drugging their stomachs withovt effect. 

Hnw TO nVlfcnn tins Appliance. Go toyourdrug- 
nUW LU UUldlll gist and ask for them. If they 
have not got them, write to the proprietors, enclosing the 
price, in letter at our risk, and they will be sent to you at 
once by mail, post-paid. 

Send stamp for the " New Departure in Medical Treat- 
ment without Medicine," with thousands of testimoni- 
als. THE MAGNETION APPLIANCE CO., 

218 State Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Note. — Send one dollar in postage stamps or currency (in let 
ter at our risk) with size of shoe usually worn, and try a pair of 
our Magnetic Insoles, and be convinced of the power residing in 
our Magnetic Appliances. Positively no cold feet when they 
are worn, or money refunded. 

SCHOOL OF MINES, COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 

Department of Architectoe, 

The recently established Course in Architecture occu- 
pies four years, the first of which is occupied with general 
studies, the architectural work beginning with the second 
year. 

Graduates of colleges ami scientific schools can, in gen- 
eral, enter in advanced standing at the beginning of the 
second year. Special students are not received. 

The scientific studies, pursued fn connection with the 
Department of Civil Engineering, include Chemistry, Phy- 
sics, and Mechanics, with so much of Mathematics as these 
studies require. 

The Architectural studios include the theory and the 
history of Architecture and of the allied arts, drawing and 
modelling, with the constant practice of original design, 
and so much of specifications and practical construction as 
can conveniently be taught in a school. 

The buildings now constructing, which will be ready 
for occupation in October, provide, besides the necessary 
drawing rooms and lecture rooms, a special architectural 
laboratory for practice and experiment, and a library for 
study and for the accomodation of the large collection of 
drawings, prints and photographs now in process of form- 
ation. 

For a circular of information containing further partic- 
ulars address, REGISTRAR, SCHOOL OF MINES, 

Madison av. and 49th St., New York city. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




BURBANK, DOUGLASS & CO., 



(Successors to True, Douglass & Co.) Importers and Wholesale 
Dealers in 

China, Crockery, I Glass Ware, 



LAMP GOODS. CHANDELIERS AND PLATED WARE. 
242 Middle Street, . . PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PICTURE FEAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

From the cheapest to the very best. Also Pictures, Cabinet 

Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, etc. Also, Agent for 

the celebrated Household Sewing Machine. 

In the Blue Store, Main Street, Second Door from Elm, 
Opposite the Park, Brunswick, Maine. 

All the Students Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 



flask E, BobertB* Boot I Shoe Stm, 



Cob, Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



|®fl§§§ Jfelieal fj« 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 8th, 1SS3, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshua L. Chamberlain, LL.D., President; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H. Geriush, M.D., 
ADatomy ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence ; Henry 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Burt Q. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles 0. 
Hcnt, M. D., Materia Medica and Therai" utics ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the' Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



JOHN 



H. BRACKETT, M ¥2S5A£ T 



SPUING STYLES, 1883, 



Consisting of Suitings, Oyercoatings, and Pant Patterns, made in 
latest style and good lit guaranteed, at 20 per cent, less than the 
same goods can be bought elsewhere. Also a 

Pine Line of White Shirts, Ties, Braces, Collars, 
Hose, and Under Flannels. 

The Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company, 

Assets, $51,500,000. Surplus, $6,500,000. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1846. 

The New Plan of Cash Value and Non-Forfeitable 
POLicr meets the needs of the public. Send for full informa- 
tion to H N FAIRBANKS, Gen'l Agent, 

BANGOR, MAINE 



S. WALKER & SON, 

Fresh and Corned Beef, Pork, Mutton, Poultry, 



At the Old Stand near corner Main and Centre Streets, 



s. WALKER. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

WM. H. WALKER. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DISEASE CURED 

WITHOUT HEDICIHE1 

A Valuable Discovery for Supplying Magnetism to 

the Human System. Electricity and Magnetism 

utilized as never before for Healing the Sick. 

THE MAGNETION APPLIANCE CO.'S 

Mmgm^ti€ Kidney JB^li 

FOR MEN IS 

\Af 9 rV9 T\\ oH \c\ PurO ()r Monov Refunded, the fol- 
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icine: Pain in the Back, Hips, Head or Limbs, Nervous Debil- 
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ralgia, Sciatica, Diseases of the Kidneys, Spinal Diseases, Torpid 
Liver, Gout, Seminal Emissions, Impotency, Asthma, Heart Dis- 
ease, Dyspepsia, Constipalion, Erysipelas, Indigestion, Hernia 
or Rupture, Catarrh, Piles. Epilepsy, Dumb Ague, etc. 

"When any debility of the GENERATIVE ORGANS occurs, 
Lost Vitality, Lack o'f Nerve Force and Vigor, Wasting Weak- 
ness, and all those diseases of a personal nature, from whatever I 
cause, the continuous stream of Magnetism, permeating through 
the parts, must restore them to a healthy action. There is no 
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Ta tViO T Qrllt-»C If you are afflicted with Lame Back, | 
\ U lilG ljClUiCO. Weakness of the Spine, Falling of j 
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of the Womb, Incidental Hemorrhage or Flooding, Painful, Sup- 

£ressed, and Irregular Menstruation, Barrenness and Change of 
ife, this is the best Appliance and Curative Agent known. For 
all forms of Female Dilliculfies it is unsurpassed by anything be- 
fore invented, both as a curative agent and as a source' of power 
and vitalization. 

Price of either Belt, with Magnetic Insoles, $10. Sent by ex- 
press C. O. D., and examination allowed, or by mail on receipt of 
price. In ordering send measure of waist, and size of shoe. Re- 
mittances can he made in currency, sent in letter at our risk. 

The Magnetion Garments are adapted to all ages, are worn 
over the under-clothing (not next to the body like the many Gal- 
vanic and Electric Humbugs advertised so extensively), and 
Should be taken off at night. They hold their POWER FOR- 
EVER, and arc worn at all seasons of the year. 

Send stamp for the " New Departure in Medical Treatment 
WITHOUT Medicine," with thousands of testimonials. 



On and after Oct. loth, 1882, 

Passenger Trains leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.10, 11.25 a.m.. 2.45, 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 
night (Sunday mornings only). 
Rockland, 8.10 a.m., 2.45 P.M. 
Portland. 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 4.30 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 12.35 night. 
Levviston, 8.10 a.m.. 2.45. 0.33 p.m.. 12.40 night. 
Farmington, S.10 a.m. (Mixed), 2.45 P.M. 
Augusla, S.10 a.m., 2.45, G.35 p.m., 12.45 night. 
Skowhegan, Belfast, Dexter, Bangor, and Vaneeboro, 

2.45 p.m., and 12.45 night. 
Watervillc 8.10, 12.45 a.m., 2.45, G.35 P.M. (Saturdays 
only). 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 1SS2. 



Note. — Send one dollar in postage stamps or currency (in let- 
ter at onr risk) with size of shoe usually worn, and try a pair of 
our Magnetic Insoles, and be convinced'of the power residing in 
our other Magnetic Appliances. Positively no cold feist when 
they are worn, or money refunded. 



Tontine Hair Dressing Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 
S. W. BUO tVXE Proprietor. 

Formerly of University Hair Dressing Rooms, Cambridge, Mass- 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDGE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 



diamonds, nnt jEwixfnf, 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 

J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 

BEATS THE WORLD. 

Old Judge 

CIGARETTES 
And Smoking Tobacco. 

Endorsed as ABSOLUTELY PURE and free 
from all foreign or deleterious substances what- 
ever, by 
PETER COLLIER, Chemist of the 

U, S. Department of Jkgdoiltifi, 

Washington, D. C. 
E. ODGEN DOREMUS, M.D., LL.D., 
Professor Chemistry and Toxicology in the Bellevue Hospi- 
tal Medical College, and Professor of Chemistry and Physics 
in the College of the City of New York. 
BENJAMIN SILLIMAN, Esq., 

Professor at Tale College, New Haven, Conn. 
K. A. WITTHAUS, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Buffalo; 
Professor of Chemistry and Toxicolegy, University of Ver- 
mont; Professor of Physiological Chemistry, University of 
New York. 

And other eminent Chemists in the United States, cop- 
ies of whose certificates we shall be pleased to mail you 
on application. 

GOODWIN Ac OO., 

Foot Grand Street, East River, New York. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topshani 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 

Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

choice grocTrTesVcanneo goods, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B— Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

780 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



TIFFANY & CO., Union Square, 
New York City, have made prepar- 
ations for the coming season, to of- 
fer original and artistic designs with 
new methods of treatment, for foi'ms 
of Commencement and other invita- 
tions. 

They have also increased their 
facilities for producing articles of 
appropriate design for Prizes, Class 
Cups, Society Badges, etc. 

Drawings, with Estimates, sent 
on application. 

Correspondence invited. 

BATH $£OTl£& 9 
386 Washington Street, BATH, ME. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



EP Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

385 and 587 Co?igress St., and 2JJ Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

SST Send for Price List. 

ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. Wl LSON & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 



C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

OVER BOARDMAN'S STORE. 

Give Me a Call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SHREVE, # 

CRUMP 
# & LOW, 

432 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




XTENSIVE STOCK 
OF CHOICE GOODS. 



STEELING SILVERWARE— Tea, Coffee, and Din- 
ner Sets, Porks and Spoons, etc., of exclusive pat- 
terns ; Old English Silver ; Candelabra ; Carriage 
Clocks; Watches of all grades — Chronograph, Re- 
peating, and Chatelaine, with Chains, etc., etc. 

SELECTED DIAMONDS ; Black, White, and Fancy 
Color Pearls ; Rubies, Emeralds, Sapphires, Cat's- 
eyes, Precious Stones, generally, of highest quali- 
ties; Fine Gold Jewelry of original designs, etc., 
etc. 

ARTISTIC BRONZES of new models— Elegant Man- 
tel Clocks (keyless) ; English Library, Mantel, and 
Hall Clocks, with Westminster Chimes, Cathedral 
Gongs, Mantel Sets, in Marble, Bronze, Polished 
Brass, etc. 

DECORATIVE PORCELAIN in Vases, Plaques, Des- 
sert, Coffee and lee Cream Sets, etc., from the 
Minton, "Worcester Royal, Crown Derby, Copeland, 
Royal Berlin, Dresden, and other celebrated works, 
etc. 

MARBLE STATUARY. NOVELTIES. 



ALL KINDS OF 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 



Agents Gorham Mfg. Co. 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fur- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Work- 
manship, we especially solicit orders for Pine Printing of all 
kinds, 

For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

We also make a specialty of 

FII^T-CjWg PITTING 

For Schools and Colleges, 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

n^ICES LO"77". 
Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Bowdoin College Boys 

When they visit BATH should call at 

WEBBER'S DRUG STORE. 

A Full Line of Cigars, Toilet Articles, &c. 



Smoke Smoke 

THE MEW CIGAR, 



Price IO Cts. 



Havana Filled, 



liLSO, 

DIAMOND CROWN. Price 5 Cts. 

JOHNSTON & HATCH, 

LEWISTON, ME. 

jjgp" For sale in Brunswick by Ed. J. Merriman. 

Smoke Smoke 



FIRST-CLASS 

Pia&GS, QrgaoSi and Meiodeo&s, 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 

THOMAS H. RILEY, . . . Brunswick, Me. 

Also INSURANCE written in Best Companies, 
at Lowest Bates. 

FOUND AT LAST!! 

That the place to buy the Very Best 

Groceries and Students' Supplies, 

At the Lowest Possible Price, is at 

GEO. F. TENNEY'S, opp. College Grounds, 

BRUNSWICK MAINE. 



COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle riding is unsurpassed as a 
method of traveling.wliether lor speed, 
sport, or renewal of health. The prac- 
ticability of the machine has been 
thoroughly tested, and satisfactorily 
proved, beyond question. Thousands 
are in daily use, and the number is 
rapidly increasing. The exercise is 
recommended by the medical profession 
as most beneficial to health, bringing 
into exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

Send 3c. stamp for 3G-page Illustrated 
Catalogue containing price lists and full 
inlormation. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washington St., BOSTON, MASS. 




IMPORTING TAILORS 

AND 

GENTS' FURNISHERS. 

Novelties in Imported Hosiery, 
Underwear, Gloves, and Neckwear 
for Mens' Wear. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

Market Square, 

PORTLAND, ME. 



WHY, GIVE 



A Call, in PORTLAND, MB. 



-HlcF. H. WILSON,*^ 

DISPENSER OF 

Drags, Medicines, <» Chemicals. 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 
Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



TONTINE HOTEL, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

S. B. BREWSTER, - - PROPRIETOR. 

Class and Reunion Suppers a Specialty. First-Class Laundry 
Work, equal to Troy, done at short notice. 



:N ii#- VNXV 




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M. XTI1. 



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^M- 







■#BRaRSWICK,.MMIRE|^ 



:-f CONTENTS, i 



Editorial Notes 

" It Might Have Been " 

The Legend of the Hasheesh. 



Ill Personal 122 

114 Inter- Collegiate News 122 

115 Editors' Table 123 



My Chum's Good Fortune 117 Clippings 124 

College Items ' 118 Book Notice 124 

Communication 121 



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& 






OCT. 31, 1883. 



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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and"Moehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGRAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY JOB 

&@@ERS 5 CELEBRATE© SEQOTS. 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



DEANE BROTHERS & SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

JSP Lowest Prices in the State, 

755 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 
A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, i Fancy Goods. 

Also Eastern Mutual Union Telegraph Office. 
Under Town Clock, - Brunswick, Me. 



The Only RELIABLE AND STANDARD Brands of 

Cigarettes and Fine Tobaccos. 



Straight Cuts. 



veetCnporal.^^ 
St. James, etc. 




Caporal. 
Caporal J. 

Ambassador. 
St. James i, etc. 
Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut Cigarettes. 

This new brand is made of extra fine, selected, prime, mild, golden Virginia 
Leaf, andis the finest Cigarette, as to quality, flavor, and workmanship, ever 

offered for sale. Kinney Br0S- > straight Cut, Full Dress. 
Sweet Cap-oral Cork Mouthpiece. 



I 



STERBROOK'S 



STEEL 
PENS. 



Leading Numbers : 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEM CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York, 



Go to W. B. Woodard's 

To buy Your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

SP20IAL BATES to STUXIENT C3LT7BS. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

BEST DAIRY IN BRUNSWICK. 

THERE ARE TWO PINTS OF THE NICEST MILK LN 
EVERY QUART WHICH I SELL. SPECIAL ATTENTION 
GIVEN TO STUDENT CLUBS. 

m- STEWARDS SHOULD DROP ME A. POSTAL WITH 
THEIR LOCATION WRITTEN PLAINLY. 

A. P. AYOODSIDE, Brunswick, Me. 



MILLER & POWERS, 

First-Class Hair Dressers, and College 

Two Doors South of Post Office, 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 




<^ sep H O ' L k o Tr'Sf 



THE FAVORITE A/OS. 303-404-332-I7O-35I- WITH 
HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



M1W DRUG STORE, 



ED, J. MERRYMAN, 

DHUGS, WEDICINES, 

Fancy an i Toilet Articles, Ciprs § Tobacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

Jgf Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. • 

a. &, sriesoi.©, 

MAIN STREET, 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



SPRINC AND SUMMER, 1883. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

M A. Y 1ST A R 13 ' S 
@F$t@? atti See iffeam Impjoplunn, 



Main St., under Town Clock. 

"Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



SCHOOL OF MINES, COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 

Department of Arehltsetue. 

The recently established Course in Architecture occu- 
pies four years, the first of which is occupied with general 
studies, the architectural work beginning with the second 
year. 

Graduates of colleges and scie ntific schools can, in gen- 
eral, enter in advanced standing at the beginning of the 
second year. Special students are not received. 

The scientific studies, pursued fn connection with the 
Department of Civil Engineering, include Chemistry, Phy- 
sics, and Mechanics, with so much of Mathematics as these 
studies require. 

The Architectural studies include the theory and the 
history of Architecture and of the allied arts, drawing and 
modelling, with the constant practice of original design, 
and so much of specifications and practical construction as 
can conveniently be taught in a school. 

The buildings now constructing, which will be ready 
for occupation in October, provide, besides the necessary 
drawing rooms and lecture rooms, a special architectural 
laboratory for practice and experiment, and a library for 
study and for the accomodation of the large collection of 
drawings, prints and photographs now in process of form- 
ation. 

For a circular of information containing further partic- 
ulars address, REGISTRAR, SCHOOL OF MINES, 

Madison av. and 49th st., New York city. 

Mfvmsml®h®mh Store 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery ; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A G. Tenney, 

Teriis, ----- $1.50 a Tear in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Wzmmh, aail Salt S£@ai§ 7 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

J9®-Special Rates to Student Clubs. -IBs 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
followiug subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^Eneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations -, Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar ; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books ; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoio, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set ou the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soou after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution uuder his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics aud Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 



ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 
Latin, two terms. 
Greek, two terms. 
Natural History, three terms. 
Physics, one terra. 
Chemistry, two terms. 
Science of Language, one term. 
Euglish Literature, two terms. 
German, two terms. 
History of Philosophy, two terms. 
International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses, 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCTOBER 31, 1883. 



No. 8. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OP 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
Oliver W. Means, '84, Managing Editor. 
Charles E. Sayward, '8-1, Business Editor. 
Llewellyn Barton, '84. John A. "Waterman, Jr. ,'84. 
William H. Cothren, 'S4. Oliver B. Cook, '85. 
Rodney I. Thompson, '84. Nehemiah B. Ford, '85. 
Sherman W. Walker, '84. John A. Peters, '85. 
Terms— $2.00 a year in advance; single copies, 15 cents. 
Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should he directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to 
contribute articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by the writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Levriston, Me. 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



An unusual feature of last Commence- 
ment was the substitution of an English ora- 
tion for apart of the customary Latin address, 
or rather salutatorj'. To say the least, it was 
a little amusing to hear the honored guard- 
ians of the college addressed in the traditional 
Latin, and then to see the astonishment of 
the audience when the speaker turned and 
spoke to them in common English. Perhaps 
a few, who were acquainted only with their 
" mother tongue," may have thought that 
Latin bore a strong resemblance to the Eng- 
lish ; and, too, there may have been a few 
students who were more accustomed to the 
English rendering of the classics ; but, to 
most of us, the change from the old tradi- 
tional custom was not pleasant. 

It would be idle to say that the majority 
of an audience, on such an occasion, could 



follow a Latin part. Nor would, we be war- 
ranted in saying that the greater proportion 
of the students could do so. But we do 
mean to say that enough could be understood 
to make a Latin salutatory as interesting as 
any other part. People generally expect 
more of students than of others. They sup- 
pose that the four years of a college course 
are sufficient to give one a knowledge of all 
languages, and sciences, and so expect to hear 
at commencement time much that they can- 
not comprehend. A Latin part gives a pleas- 
ing variety to the programme upon such an 
occasion, and also serves to distinguish the 
foremost man of a class. There has been of 
late a great endeavor to throw aside the in- 
terest taken in classical literature, and to 
make the study of physical sciences more 
prominent. The argument is, that we need 
a practical rather than a useless education. 
So we do : but who will say that a study of 
the springs of the English language, by which 
one is able to have a larger command and 
understanding of the English tongue, is not 
practical? One effect of the partial doing 
away of the salutatory will probably be to 
lessen the interest felt for the study of Latin. 
We earnestly hope that the arrangement of 
last summer was but an experiment, and that 
we may speedily see a return to the good old 
ways. 

A noticeable feature of most other colleges 
is the attention paid to music. In Yale and 
Amherst, glee clubs are formed, which travel 
about and earn large sums. Perhaps in no 
way can enthusiasm and love for a college be 
increased more easily than by social " sings." 
i It is not very pleasant to meet students from 



112 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



other colleges and find out how small is your 
own repertoire. There are a number of good 
singers in college, and much might be accom- 
plished by massing forces. Two years ago 
we had some enjoyable concerts, and there is 
no reason why there should not be some this 
year. The fall and winter will be dull indeed, 
unless something of the kind is done. The 
great difficulty in the way is the fact that 
nearly all of the most popular songs are not 
contained in any book, but a little effort will 
accomplish a great deal. If the orchestra is 
started up again this fall, there is no reason 
why an interesting programme could not be 
made out for a concert the last of this term. 
We hardly dare to offer the prospect of large 
pecuniary returns as an incentive ; but — as all 
the members of the Senior class will under- 
stand — will appeal to a far higher and stronger 
motive, that of pleasing and instructing the 
student body. Perhaps an easy way of get- 
ting at the matter would be to call a meeting 
of those interested, and then to take whatever 
action may seem best. 



for a long time, and there is no reason why 
the same should not be the case in musical 
affairs. 



It is now fully time to begin to gather to- 
gether the materials for an orchestra. Two 
years ago this fall, one was organized, which 
gave eminent satisfaction through the year. 
There is no question as regards ability, for 
there is plenty of talent among the students. 
If some of the more experienced would only 
take hold of the subject and encourage the 
rest, an orchestra of ten or a dozen pieces 
could be raised easily'. The practice which 
the members would themselves receive, and 
the enjoyment which the students would de- 
rive, would be a double benefit. We will not 
mention, as an inducement, the musical taste, 
to which the students would be educated, but 
it ought surely to enter into the considera- 
tion. If there is need of a room, in which to 
practice, there would probably be no difficulty 
in obtaining a suitable place. In many re- 
spects college life looks brighter than before 



It will be remembered that last winter we 
had a course of five lectures. These lectures 
were very interesting and eminentl}' instruc- 
tive. Why can there not be something of 
the kind this year? To be sure the Boating- 
Association did not make anything by the 
course, but yet every one that attended felt 
more than repaid. As it is next to impossible 
to attend any desirable lectures outside of the 
college, it is necessary for us to provide our 
own entertainment. A course of lectures 
would be an excellent addition to the studies 
of this winter. It would not be advisable to 
attempt to obtain high-priced talent alto- 
gether, as the audience would then be neces- 
sarily small. Some local and neighboring 
talent might be secured to add to the series 
and make it more attractive. If the orches- 
tra could be formed beforehand, and then in- 
vited to furnish music for these lectures, an 
exceedingly helpful and diversified course of 
entertainments would be insured. The money 
received, over and above the necessary ex- 
penses, could be well appropriated to the uses 
of the Base-Ball or Boating Associations, or to 
the Library. As so much money is already 
secured for the soonrto-be-gymnasium, it would 
probably be unnecessary to do anything for 
that object. It may seem a Utile early to 
plan for these things now, but the earlier our 
plans are matured the move likely it is that 
they will be successful. 



It is now time for class elections to be fill- 
ing the minds of aspirants for office. If there 
is one thing which, more than everything 
else, will develop bitter society feeling, it is 
class elections. And yet the evil resulting 
from them will hardly be thought necessary. 
In the first two years the offices amount to 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



113 



very little, and it would naturally be consid- 
ered foil)' to quarrel about nothing. The 
offices of the last two years in many eases re- 
quire men peculiarly qualified to fill them, 
and it would appear most reasonable to choose 
the men best fitted to occupy those positions. 
But alas, for the perversity of human nature ! 
The results of these elections too often show 
that society feeling has triumphed over every 
other consideration. One marked change of the 
last few years has been the increase in friendly 
feeling between classes and societies. It is 
not too much to hope that a better choice of 
participants for public exercises will be the 
result of this increase of harmony. 



It is hoped that, amid the excitements in- 
evitably attending the beginning of a college 
year, the request of the Orient for contribu- 
tions will not pass unheeded. In ancient 
times men were influenced almost entirely by 
orators, but during the last century a great 
change has been wrought. People are no 
longer swaj'ed by the utterances of public 
speakers as formerly. Writers of ability now 
form and control public sentiment. By writ- 
ing one can reach many times the number 
that could hear his voice. It is becoming 
more and more necessaiw for one to be able 
to write well, and in no case can it be done 
without long continued practice. 

More attention is now paid to composition 
in our schools, but its importance is not yet 
realized, or at least recognized as it should be. 
For the attainment of facility of composition 
and gracefulness of style, nothing is more 
helpful than the habit of writing upon topics 
of real interest for the columns of the Orient. 
Do hot be discouraged by the thought that 
press of matter may crowd out your modest 
contribution, for it is our desire and firm de- 
termination to give to all full opportunity to be 
heard. Then, too, a prospective place upon 
next year's board of editors should be of itself 
a sufficient incentive. 



Quite a number of very noticeable and 
gratifying improvements have been made in 
the library. Several changes in arrangement 
make it much more convenient to move about. 
A pleasing feature is that of having directions 
in regard to the position of different authori- 
ties and lists of new books and their where- 
abouts posted up in prominent places. It is 
now possible to consult the library in the 
morning on Wednesdays and Saturdays. 
These are but few of the signs of a progres- 
sive spirit in the management of college 
matters. 



It is to be hoped that the temporary gym- 
nasium will be put into condition for use 
before a great while. A very slight expense 
of time and labor would make a truly service- 
able room out of it, although it could not 
properly be called a gymnasium. The suc- 
cess or failure of next year's sports must de- 
pend upon careful, systematic work this win- 
ter. While all interested in athletics should 
avail themselves of its advantages, it is ex- 
pected that as many as the room can accom- 
modate will embrace the opportunity of 
strengthening and developing themselves. 



We would urge upon the Freshmen the 
advisability of taking immediate action in re- 
gard to purchasing a boat. It will be much 
easier to attend to the matter now than to 
put it off until other things claim their time 
and attention. Of course they will wish to 
maintain the custom of class races, and in order 
to do so, a boat is necessary. The excellent 
boating material possessed by the class will no 
doubt be a great incentive in the matter. In 
no way can a college career be made more 
successful than by following on in the well- 
tried paths of former years. We have not 
yet been disappointed in the class, and we 
believe that in this respect they will do their 
duty. 



114 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



'•IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN." 
We were Juniors, Tom and I. 'Twas 
long ago ; and yet those scenes come before 
my mind as fresh as if it were but yesterday. 
Many sad years have I spent since then ; and 
the memory of them haunts me like some 
dreadful dream. Three years of college life 
were almost past, and never have I seen 
years more full of truest pleasure. Tom and 
I knew each other well, and each felt that 
the other was dearer, as the years went by. 
Tom was the most bashful fellow I ever saw. 
So very bashful that he never dared to raise 
his eyes from the ground, when passing a 
pretty girl. His extreme modesty was often 
a source of great amusement to me, and of 
inconvenience to him. I, on the contrary 
had gone into Brunswick society considerable, 
and had made many pleasant acquaintances 
among the local belles. Of the society of one 
young lady in particular I was especially 
fond, and she, on her part, seemed to be not 
at all averse to accepting my attentions. 
This acquaintance had existed for some time, 
and had ripened into a degree of intimacy 
that was, to say the least, delightful. As I 
had a fine business opportunity in waiting, 
until my course should be completed, it 
seemed quite proper that I should press my 
suit and learn the fate that awaited me from 
my fair one's lips. I was waiting for a con- 
venient time to declare my love, when an 
event occurred, which changed the whole 
course of affairs. 

Sometimes in midsummer, when there is 
a x;lear sky and warm sunlight, when every 
living thing is busily enjoying the care of 
Providence, and even inanimate nature seems 
vocal with gladness, there will suddenly 
come up a furious storm and tempest, bear- 
ing sorrow and desolation in its path. Sub- 
sequent events appeared to me, not unlike this 
picture. One Saturday morning Tom sug- 
gested that we should walk down to Harps- 
well and spend the day. So off we started, 



and e'er long, had reached the place, not then 
so well known as now, yet dear to many 
of Bowdoin's sons We called at the house 
of Rev. Elijah Kellogg, who has since won the 
esteem and affectionate regard of so many, 
by his entertaining and instructive writings. 
As we had seen him often before he received 
us cordially, and insisted on our taking one 
of his boats for our proposed sail. Soon 
after we set out in a large row boat, taking 
turns at pulling. In a little while, we reached 
a small island, where it was decided that we 
should stop for lunch. As Tom was not 
strong, the exercise of the morning had made 
him very tired, so that he went down to the 
boat and, after placing the oars upon the 
beach beyond reach of the tide, he lay 
down upon his coat and went to sleep. The 
opposite side of the island offered many at- 
tractions, so that I spent some time in wan- 
dering about. Thinking that we ought to 
return, I went back to where the boat was 
left, when, to my horror, I saw that the un- 
usually high tide, which ran in upon the 
island, had torn the boat from its fastenings, 
and was fast carrying it out to sea. Tom, I 
knew, could not swim, and the thought came 
tome, that even if he could it would be certain 
death for him to jump into the water. 'Twas 
not long before the boat was lost to view, and, 
after frantically rushing about the island, in 
the vain hope of seeing some approaching as- 
sistance, I lay down for the night. The next 
morning Mr. Kellogg, who knew where we 
had intended to go, came over in a small boat 
and carried me back to the mainland. 

The next few days were spent in fruitless 
searching and inquiry. Nothing could be 
learned of the lost boat, and I was fast losing 
my reason in an agony of grief, when it oc- 
curred to me to leave college and home and 
never to return. I at once packed up what 
necessary things I wished to take and made 
my way to Bath, where I found a schooner 
bound for Baltimore, on which I took pas- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



115 



sage. It would be uninteresting if I should 
recount all the ups and clowns which I ex- 
perienced during the next twenty years. 
Sufficient to say that I at last succeeded in 
acquiring a large fortune. 

After so many years my thoughts turned 
with ever increasing frequency to the friends 
and familiar scenes of by-gone years. As I 
had not, during all this time, heard a word 
from home, my parents being ignorant of my 
whereabouts, I determined to visit the place 
of my boyhood and the college of my youth. 
One fine morning in early summer I found 
myself once more enjoying the beauties of the 
campus and recalling to mind the many pleas- 
ant recollections connected with it, when 
there approached me a tall, dignified gentle- 
man, in whose face I discovered, as he drew 
near, the unmistakable features of my old 
chum, Tom. Our meeting, after so many 
years, when each had supposed the other to 
be dead, can well be imagined. Tom's story 
was soon told. He had floated off until 
picked up by a passing vessel bound for New 
York. He returned home as soon as possible 
only to find that I had gone. After gradua- 
ting he spent several years in Europe, and 

then accepted the position of Professor of 

in his Alma Mater. Becoming acquainted in 
Brunswick, he met my early love and after- 
wards married her. 

It is sufficient to add that I spent some 
time at their home, where I was delightfully 
entertained by my old friends, and also by a 
young maiden, who was the very image of 
her mother. 



THE LEGEND OF THE HASHEESH. 

[ Not long ago, while traveling, I had the pleasure of 
making the acquaintance of a man who had been a mer- 
chant in Calcutta for several years. Iu the course of our 
conversation the Oriental hasheesh was mentioned, and, 
to pass the time away, he gave me the legend of the origin 
of the hasheesh, current among the tribes of Bengal. It 
is as follows :] 

Many ages ago, in a powerful tribe in 

India, there suddenly appeared a man whom 

every one regarded as a stranger. In fact, 



he was such to the most of them ; but it 
seems that, in his early youth, his parents 
had been killed by the order of the cruel 
chief, and that the youth had barely saved 
his life by fleeing secretl}' from the country. 
For a while he wandered about with the 
Arabs, until he came near the isthmus lead- 
ing to Egypt. Here he deserted the Arabs, 
and crossed the isthmus into the land of 
alchemists and conjurers. The idea of aveng- 
ing the death of his parents had been always 
the ruling power in his career. For years he 
remained in Egypt, acquiring the shrewdness 
and learning of a highly civilized people. 
He obtained an extensive knowledge of herbs 
and their qualities. He also learned the rudi- 
ments of will power; though mesmerism was 
then an undiscovered art. When he had 
acquired all the uncanny knowledge of his 
time, he did not give up his studies, but still 
pursued them with a bitter zeal, by himself. 
When he considered himself prepared, he re- 
turned to his native tribe in a valley of the 
Ganges. No one recognized him as the 
youth who had disappeared years before. 
He pretended to be a medicine man and a 
conjurer, come to heal and amuse the chief 
and his people with his herbs and strange 
tricks. He soon obtained employment in the 
royal court. With his knowledge of herbs, 
he might easily have concocted a poison and 
given it to the chief, thus disposing of the 
object of his hatred. But he was shrewd, 
and while waiting an opportunity for re- 
venge, be found out that the people of the 
tribe upheld the chief in his cruel murder of 
all he had loved in his youth. This fired the 
heart of the medicine-man with an intense 
hatred for the whole tribe, and he resolved 
to have a universal revenge. 

In his pursuance of the black-art, he had 
accidentally discovered the power of mesmei- 
ism, which he learned to practice with a skill 
never since equalled. By a few trials he 
could keep any number under control for any 
length of time. 



116 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



With the intention of getting the tribe 
into his power, he began to exercise his skill 
on the people. The subjects, while under his 
control, would see continually the most de- 
lightful visions, rendered more entrancing by 
sweet strains of music. They were thus 
rendered impotent ;is long as he wished to 
keep them so. Crowds came to Mm daity to 
be treated. They regarded him as a divine 
being, who could beslow the power of seeing 
into the land of bliss, without having to pass 
the painful preliminary of death. At last 
the chief, influenced by the wonderful re- 
ports, came to investigate the matter and to 
satisfy his curiosity. He went back to rule 
in a fantastical realm. 

In this state of things the tribe was fast 
coming to a universal destruction. His in- 
tention was to keep them under his control 
until they starved, by their own impotence, 
or were destroyed by hostile tribes. But the 
strain on his mind became greater than he 
could endure and live. One day he mysteri- 
ously disappeared from a crowd of suppli- 
ants. Search was made for him throughout 
the land, but no trace of him was found. 
All supposed him to have been spirited away 
by the supernatural power he possessed. 
Those who were under his control found the 
spell snapped soon after his disappearance, so 
all considered him as dead. They fell from 
their fantastical heaven into actual torment. 
Then they discovered that the effect of the 
spell was evil. Their minds did not fully 
recover from the charm, but remained in a 
weakened, half-insane state, rendered more 
horrible by the awful despondency, which 
tortures a mind in such a condition. Hostile 
tribes soon attacked and defeated the tribe of 
the Ganges, killing the chief, and slaughter- 
ing the people. Thus the revenge of the 
man-of-magic was wrought, even beyond his 
fondest hope<. Some years after this event, 
an Indian hunter, while wandering about one 
of the remote mountains around the source 



of the Ganges, came unexpectedly upon a 
cave, which gave evidence of being in- 
habited. (Tver a smouldering camp-fire, in 
front of the cave, hung a vessel containing a 
liquid of a fiery-red color, which sparkled 
strangely in the sun. He at first regarded it 
curiously ; but soon he found his attention 
strangely fixed upon the glittering fluid. The 
bright spot seemed to fascinate him as the 
eye of a serpent. Urged by an irresisti- 
ble desire, he approached and was about to 
taste the tempting nectar,, when he was horri- 
fied by the appearance of a hideous face in 
the vessel. It seemed to be a lurking demon 
whose strangely brilliant eye had fascinated 
him. Trembling with horror, he let the ves- 
sel fall, breaking it and spilling its contents. 
While he was gazing at the fragments and 
shuddering to think of his escape, — from, 
he knew not what, — he heard a deep groan 
from the interior of the cave. He cautiously 
penetrated the darkness, and came upon a 
man, who cried out in alarm at the intrusion. 
The hunter bore him to the light, when he 
saw that the man was in one of the last 
stages of a fatal disease. The man was re- 
assured by the tender assistance of the hunter, 
and addressed him in the language of the 
then obsolete tribe. The hunter understood 
the language, having known the tribe well. 
The man inquired eagerly after the affairs of 
his tribe. His eyes sparkled with intense 
delight as the hunter told him of the calam- 
ity which had befallen it. When he was 
done, the sick man sank back exclaiming, 
" Make haste, O Death ! I am prepared. 
The hopes of my life have been realized. 
My work is done. No longer is there need 
of my searching the forest for pungent herbs, 
and invoking the demons from their revels. 
My vessel contains the results of my labors 
for years. Take that as a reward for your 
kindness, good hunter. Give it secretly to 
your enemies and you will have them in your 
power." " Behold," interrupted the hunter, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



117 



"I have broken the vessel, and the contents 
are lost." 

The sick man, with difficulty, raised him- 
self up and gazed sadly upon the ruined 
vessel. Then raising his eyes to the sky, he 
uttered an incantation too weird for pen to 
write or tongue to speak. When he was 
through, a rough voice from the surrounding 
atmosphere startled the ear of the hunter 
with these words: 

"Come here, next year at change of wind, 
and you shall find a plant growing from the 
soil now moistened by this liquid. The seeds 
you must plant in well tilled soil. The bark 
shall clothe you, and from the stalks you can 
extract a substance which will place your 
strongest enemy in your power. Mark well 
the spot; forget it not."' The voice was still. 
The hunter looked at the strange man and 
saw that he was dead. Filled with supersti- 
tions awe he returned to his tribe. The next 
year he again went to the cave, and found the 
predictions of the voice to be true. He did 
as directed, and introduced the Indian Hemp 
(for such it is now called) among his people. 
The extract has since been named hasheesh. 
His people were wise, and touched it not, but 
reserved it for their enemies, and soon be- 
came a mighty nation. 

Such is the Legend of the Hasheesh. 
The plant has since lost much of its potency; 
but it still has enough of its dangerous quality 
left to produce sad effects. Either people of 
to-day are not all as wise as were the tribes of 
the legend, or else they consider themselves 
their worst enemies, for they put the poison 
in their own mouths and weaken their own 
brains. 



MY CHUM'S GOOD FORTUNE. 

It was a stormy night in midwinter, the 
snow was blowing and the wind howling 
through the elms, as my chum, Jack, and my- 
self sat alone in our room studying our les- 
sons. The clock upon the mantel had just 



struck ten when chum, throwing down his 
book, said : " Well, Ned, I've got my lesson 
and I guess you have yours, so let's draw up 
around the stove and have a little talk before 
going to bed." " All right," I replied, at the 
same time throwing down my book and draw- 
ing my chair toward the fire. Jack got up, went 
into the bedroom and brought out his box of 
cigars, took one for himself, gave one to me, 
and having lit them we took a position as 
comfortable as possible about the stove, when 
Jack began : 

" I am going to tell you a true stoiy, Ned, 
one that will surprise you. Nobody about 
here knows anything about it, and very few 
know it completely. You know I have never 
told you a word about my parents nor about 
my brothers and sisters, — whether I ever had 
any or not. In fact whenever you have men- 
tioned a word about family relations you 
have noticed that I never was free to talk. 

" I do not remember very much about my 
parents as they died when I was quite young, . 
leaving me and my little sister, aged seven. 
Accordingly we were both taken to live with 
our guardian and uncle, who, from the first, 
was very unkind to us and gave us con- 
stantly rude treatment. After living with 
him for four years my sister was taken far 
away, to some western city, to a place no bet- 
ter than the one in which she was before. I 
lived with my uncle one year longer, after 
which I unceremoniously, one eventful night, 
took my departure, and have heard very lit- 
tle — nothing directly — of him since. Mean- 
while I had kept up a secret correspondence 
with my sister, who, a short time after our 
separation fell into better hands. Being thus 
encouraged at the good fortune of my sister, I 
determined to try fortune for myself, and, 
having a disposition for study and for attain- 
ing some honorable position, I set my mind 
on college, though I hardly expected to 
reach it when I started out with that purpose 
in view. Now, Ned, about the only bad 



118 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



habit that I had formed, although left to such 
bringing up, was the habit of smoking." 

" O ! Jack," I cried, " that isn't a very 
bad habit ; lots of fellows — and good ones, 
too, — have worse habits than that ; I'd swear 
by you any day." 

" Well, Ned," he continued, " far away 
from here I met a man — a graduate of this 
college — who used to tell me all about col- 
lege life ; of the recitation rooms, halls, the 
famous pines and the elms, so that, long be- 
fore coming here, I could draw in my mind a 
perfect picture of college, campus, professors 
and all. I had an eager, impatient desire to 
become a student of the college, and that is 
how I happened to come here. You bet I 
am not sorry I came, and I wouldn't swap 
this place for any that I ever saw. You see, 
if I had gone to any other place I should not 
have had such a good old chum, hey Ned? " 

" O ! don't be foolish, Jack," I said, " there 
are plenty of fellows whom, you would like 
just as well and better than you do me, be- 
sides, you know, I get vexed occasionally and 
speak out cross at you before I think, and 
that isn't pleasant." 

" What if you do, Ned," Jack replied, " I 
think all the more of , you when it is over, and 
if I have to go out of my way to do you a 
favor I am going to do it. But Ned, I am 
forgetting my story. 

" In my native town I have, indeed, some 
true Mends, from whom I have lately learned 
that my parents left some property to myself 
and sister, and, after a long struggle, the 
greater part of it has been restored to us — its 
rightful owners. To be sure there is not 
enough to make us very rich, but we are now 
in exceedingly comfortable circumstances." 

" Well done, Jack, I congratulate you," I 
cried, " but it's a pity that property didn't 
come sooner, or that you haven't got what 
is due you." 

"But hold on, Ned," he continued, "I 
have not told you the best part yet. You 



remember that young lady whom you met 

last summer at , don't you? that one 

whom you admired so and talked so much 
about? " 

" Well, I guess I do ; wasn't she nice, 
though ? " 

" Well, Ned, that young lady was my sis- 
ter. I have not seen her for ten years, but 
expect to next summer when she will be here 
at Commencement. She has often written me 

about that young gentleman she met at , 

and has spoken highly of him by the way, 
too, Ned, and was greatly surprised, when, 
after some time, I informed her that he was 
my old chum, Ned. She congratulated me on 
having such a chum and has sent her regards 
several times, which, for obvious reasons, I 
have withheld until now. And now, Ned, as 
I said before, if there's anything I can do for 
you I'm going to do it," said Jack slapping 
me on the knee. "Come on, old boy, let's 
go to bed.". 

" All right, Jack, I'll go, but by Jove I 
congratulate you on your good fortune, and 
thank you for the services you propose to 
render me. Jack, I'll swear by you any day." 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 

Foot-ball is all the rage. 

Cothren, '84, has returned. 

Fling must hate that '87 class. 

Lawn-tenuis is a booming just now. 

The Bugle will be out during the term. 

" Rip" was well attended by the students. 

The " Jury" have to take it from all sides. 

All the Juniors take " Conversational Dutch." 

'87 needs to give a hearty aid to all the sports. 

Brown, '85, is teaching the Topsham High 
School. 

The boat crews are taking a little practice on 
the river. 

Somehow that tidal wave of base-ball enthusi- 
asm is at a low ebb. It is a great sight easier to 
resolve than to execute. This aphorism has always 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



119 



been strikingly exemplified in base-ball matters 
liere. 

The Seniors are taking another course in Phys- 
ics. 

One of the Juniors says, " Throw Physics to the 
dogs." 

The Juniors are dissecting and drawing am- 
phibia. 

The "Jury" is full — of what? Not business, 
certainly. 

The inter-collegiate lawn-tennis tournament is 
a good idea. 

J. Torrey, '84, is teaching at the Franklin School 
in Topsham. 

Butler, '85, is about to open a singing school at 
Waldoboro, Me. 

There ought to be a hospital here during the 
foot-ball seasou. 

Now Bates if you want to get revenge, challenge 
the Bowdoiu nine. 

Why not start up that College Orchestra? There 
is plenty of good talent. 

It is a solemn fact that the Greek Professor 
sometimes carries a cane. 

Ex-President Chamberlain lectures hi the Thorn - 
aston High School course. 

J. F. Libby, '85, is serving as assistant librarian 
during C. W. Longren's absence. 

The new Town Hall is to have a good stage and 
scenery— two things much needed. 

J. A. Waterman was elected foreman of the 
jury, and Boyd Bartlett, secretary. 

Wilson, '81, and several members of '83, have 
been in town during the past week. 

Our Exchange editor has returned from his vaca- 
tion and is now ready for business. 

It is about time for class elections, before so 
many members go out for the winter. 

We hope the subjects for the next themes will be 
susceptible of more study than the last. 

J. Torrey, '84, has just completed a fine spectro- 
scope. Success is the reward of industry. 

The college cheers as printed in the Orient 
have appeared in some of the leading papers. 

"Muldoon" didn't scare worth a cent. '86, you 
must do something besides write notices to scare 
him. 

■ Lately Prof. Robinson has been showing the 
Juniors, by means of the calcium light, the color 
and position of the lines which different metals give 
through the spectroscope. 



The Sophomores and Freshmen enjoyed their 
adjourn occasioned by the absence of Prof. Avery. 

Verily, Berry, your labors are crowned with 
success at last and we have had one old-fashioned, 
horn concert. 

The smaller ivies ought to be covered up during 
the winter with leaves. Will the janitor see that it 
is done ? 

There will be a rise in ready-made clothing if 
the mania for kicking that rubber sphere don't sub- 
side pretty quick. 

Well, Instructor, we should divide that class 
into twenty-six divisions, and then you would have 
the bind on them. 

Junior translating German : " Keine Eosen ohne 
Dornen" — translated it, " No horses without horns." 
Class comes down. 

The introduction of History in the place of 
French would, under ordinary circumstances, be a 
very poor change. 

Bowdoin's correspondent to the Argus is always 
about two days ahead of time. How unlike the 
correspondent of last year. 

Prof. Lee is testing the lungs of the students by 
means of hi_s spirometer. Whittier has blown the 
highest — 350 ; 260 is the average capacity. 

The tutor in Rhetoric should be careful how he 
writes the first letter of his name; for mistakes, 
like comparisons, are sometimes " odorous." 

And now "Gus" is happy. He has found an 
old Indian pipe, with some strange hieroglyphics on 
it, down among the shell heaps on the coast. 

Profs. Chapman and Smith now have their Sun- 
day School classes at their own houses. It gives a 
sense of freedom, which would otherwise be lacking. 

Don't forget those "floats" this fall, Mr. Com- 
modore. Judging from some of the nights we have 
had, it is rather risky leaving them in the river any 
longer. 

The Juniors and Sophomores have been writing 
themes upon " The Kind and Amount of Physical 
Exercise Needed in College." We wish the boards 
would put in practice some of the high ideas and 
give us a chance to exercise. 

The base-ball games " fushed out" as usual. 
Whose fault ? Nobody knows. Everybody blames 
everybody else, and nobody in particular is to 
be blamed. We notice, however, that those, who 
least wish to practice, don't play as well as they did 
last spring. Does that hit any one ? 



120 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Some ministers have queer notions about boys. 
If there was not so much mistrusting there would 
not be so much deception. Our minister please 
take notice. 

Barton, '84, and Butler, '85, have been chosen 
delegates to the annual convention of the Theta 
Delta Chi Fraternity, held in New York, Nov. 23d, 
24th, and 25th. 

It was lucky for us that it rained the day set for 
our game with the Dirigos. Torrey was laid up 
with a sprained ankle, and Wright was sick from 
internal commotion. 

It is about time for the enthusiastic lover of 
Astronomy to be out on the campus some of these 
cold nights trying to look the moon out of counte- 
nance with a telescope. 

Smithy, the bell-ringer, evidently thought the 
" new time regulations " had gone into effect the 
other night, only he got it changed about and rang 
a quarter earlier instead of later. 

It is expected that the "Jury" will soon be 
called upon to decide a breach of promise suit 
brought by an innocent and unsuspecting Fresh- 
man against a certain Sophomore. 

The many admirers of the distinguished novel- 
ist will be interested to know that William Black 
has entered the Freshman class, and contemplates 
the study of law, after graduating. 

Butler has charge of the singing at the Congre- 
gational Sunday School. It is scarcely credible that 
the Congregational Society should allow a singing 
school taught in their vestry on Sunday. 

Prof. Robinson's Sunday School class is non- 
held in the Y. M. C. A. rooms. It is certainly more 
convenient for the students; and it is hoped that 
more will accept this opportunity and attend. 

Some of the boys have reckoned (?) it up and 
found out that it is better for their rank to cut than 
to go in and .take a "dead.'' If they cut many 
times, they will find some mistake in their reckon- 
ing. 

Class in Zoology : Prof, (discussing the seg- 
mentation of the egg) — " What is the first layer 
of the egg?" Student (promptly) -" The hen." 
Whether accepted or not his answer was an (eggs) 
act one. 

The poem in a late number of the Transcript, 
entitled "The Sail," was written by Plummer, '87. 
The meter is not very original, but the subject mat- 
ter is quite unique. Buy a copy and read it ; home 
industries should be patronized. 



Ex-President Chamberlain's lectures in Political 
Economy are very interesting as well as instructive. 
He makes a special point of clearness — a thing 
which cannot be overestimated in a lecturer. 

Steam and water pipes have been laid from the 
laboratory to Adams Hall, for the Senior laboratory 
room. A new furnace has also been put in the 
medical lecture room. Let the good work go on. 

The officers of the Lawn-Tennis Association are : 
President, D. C. Clark ; Vice President, Boyd Bart- 
lett; Secretary and Treasurer, E. R. Harding; Ex- 
ecutive Committee, W. M. Eames, W. P. Neallcy, 
P. S. Lindsey. 

The Seniors have been grappling with "The 
Irregularities of the Moon," " Lunar and Solar 
Eclipses" for the past few days. If there is any- 
thing that will try the Christian virtues of a young 
man that will. 

Frogs must be scarce next spring if that '85 
brigade met with even ordinary success that we 
saw returning the other day from their amphibian 
crusade. Nothing short of an Egyptian plague could 
satisfy their morbid ambition. 

We wish the authorities would see their way 
clear to have some gas lights on the campus among 
all the other improvements they are making. A 
half dozen lamps even could be placed along the 
main walks in such a manner that any one could 
get about the grounds with some comfort those 
dark evenings. It is really a necessity and we hope 
to see it done. 

The following are the list of jurors from the 
different classes and societies : '84, J. A. Waterman ; 
'85,C.H. Tarr; '86, C. A. Davis; '87, Dearth; Alpha 
Delta Phi, S. R. Child ; Zeta Psi, R. I. Thompson; 
Psi Upsilon, E. C. Smith ; Delta Kappa Epsilon, 
Boyd Bartlett; Theta Delta Chi, L. Barton. There 
are five Seniors, two Juniors, and one Sophomore 
and Freshman each. 

An '84 genius thinks he has found out why the 
ground by Adams Hall is called a " delta." It is 
not because it resembles the Greek letter but be- 
cause it was a "terminal moraine" of the ancient 
Androscoggin. Oh shade of the mound builder ! 
None but a geographical, geological, enigmatical, 
ideographical, hierographical, paleontological mind 
would ever have entertained such a thought as 
that. 

We would call the attention of members of the 
Senior class to the following extract taken from the 
preface to Loomis's Astrouomy : " I have dwelt 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



121 



more fully than is customary in astronomical text- 
books upon various physical phenomena, such as 
the constitution of the sun, the condition of the 
moon's surface, etc. It is hoped that the discussion 
of these topics will enhance the interest of the sub- 
ject with a class of students, who might be repelled 
by a treatise exclusively mathematical." 

We had the pleasure of meeting B. G. Northrop, 
LL.D., the other day, and showing him about the 
grounds. He was just returning from the eastern 
part of the State, where he had been lecturing. He 
gave several lectures before the students of Colby, 
at the request of President Pepper. The Williams 
Lecture Bureau has him booked for the following 
lectures : " Rural Life and Homes" ; " Memory, and 
How to Train It"; "The New Era in Japan"; 
"The Reading of our Boys and Girls." His terms 
are very reasonable, and he is highly recommended 
by the leading papers. If there should be a course 
of lectures here this winter it might bo well to cor- 
respond with him. 

The following is a list of the Freshmen, with the 
society to which each belongs: C. J. Goodwin, A. 
W. Perkins, and 0. D. Sewall of Farmington, E. T. 
Little, Auburn, G. W. Parsons, Brunswick, E. B. 
Torrey, Yarmouth, L. B. Varuey, Litchfield, and 
C. H. Verrill, Auburn, have joined A J * ; 
W. L. Black, Hammonton, N. J., C. B. Bur- 
leigh, Augusta, Austin Cary, and F. L. Talbot 
of East Machias, F. D. Dearth, Jr., East San- 
gerville, E. M. Gay, Frank Gay, and E. L. 
Means of Millbridge, J. V. Lane, Chichester, 
N. H., F. Pushor, Pittsfield,. A. W. Merrill, 
Farmington, L. G. Gehan and H. B. Skol- 
field of Brunswick, have joined A K E; E. L. 
Bartlett, East Dixmont, M. H. Boutelle, Ban- 
gor, E. B. Burpee, Rockland, S. B. Fowler, 
Augusta, and C. C. Choate, Salem, Mass., have 
joined '/'')'; C. M. Austin, Mexico, and M. 
L. Kimball, have joined & J -V; H. B. Austin, 
Farmington, C. F. Moulton, and H. M. Moul- 
ton of Cumberland Centre, and E. C. Plummer, 
Yarmouth, have joined Z 'F. 



Junior, who is " crushed " on a pretty school- 
ma'am, calls her " Experience," because, as he says, 
she is a dear teacher.— Ex. 

Prof. — "Smith may recite." One of the three 
Smiths hesitatingly rises. Prof, (rapidly) — "Does 
porphyritic syenite contain more " Smith (in- 



terrupting him haughtily)—" Excuse me, sir ; who 
do you think I am ? " — Ex. 



COMMUNICATION. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

It is not to be expected that any study, 
text-book, or method of instruction will con- 
form to the notions of every member of a 
class. But when a study, to which all have 
looked forward with pleasure, in the thought 
of the practical good and the gratification, to 
be derived from it, finally proves a bore to 
nearly every member of the class, then the 
thought that something is wrong and could be 
made better, will suggest itself. The study 
of Astronomy is generally looked forward to, 
with the expectation of receiving both pleas- 
ure and profit. That this study thus far has 
been neither pleasant nor profitable, is the 
opinion of the Senior class, almost to a man. 
Some of the reasons for this dissatisfaction 
are evident. In the course we are taking, as 
thus far made evident, more time and atten- 
tion is given to Mathematics and questions of 
Physics, than to all other phases of the science. 
Since the study is Astronomy, we believe 
that we should make Astronomy the study, 
and not be drawn aside to those difficult prob- 
lems that do not directly affect the most nec- 
essary phase of the science, and which at 
best serve only as a discipline. 

The study of the higher Mathematics is 
designed chiefly for discipline, and for that 
reason is placed in the first two years of the 
course; and we protest against being drawn 
back into them again under the pretext of 
studying Astronomy. If we might be allowed 
to pass our judgment, we should say the text- 
book which we use may be a success as a 
Mathematical treatise, but as a text-book in 
Astronomy it is a decided failure. From one 
term's work, would not better results be shown 
by giving more attention to Spherical, and 
i less to Physical Astronomy? 

Seniok. 



122 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited to send 
personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Brunswick, Me.] 

'27.— Gen. John Hodgdon died at Dubuque, 
Iowa, the 27th day of August last, at the advanced 
age of nearly eighty-three years. He was horn in 
Hillshoro County, N. EL, Oct. 8, 1810, and spent 
the early years of his life on his father's farm. At 
the age of nineteen he entered the academy at 
Gilmanton, and soon after went to Phillips Exeter 
Academy where he prepared for college. Imme- 
diately after graduation he commenced the study 
of law in Bangor. Being admitted to practice he 
at once plunged into active politics, and held many 
prominent offices in this State, till he removed to 
Dubuque in 1853. In 1859 he was Mayor of this 
city, and was always recognized as a leading and 
influential citizen. He was an earnest member of 
the Episcopal church. He leaves a widow and an 
adopted daughter. 

'37.— Rev. John Orr Fiske has resigned his 
pastorship over the Winter Street Church, Bath, 
after a pastorate of forty years. He resigns on 
account of his health. 

'53.— Hon. Henry E. Downes died at Presque 
Isle, Me., the 24th inst. Judge Downes was born 
at Calais, Me., September, 1832. He studied law 
in the Law School, Harvard, and in the office of 
John Q. A. Griffin, Charlestown, Mass., was admit- 
ted to the bar and commenced practice in Sioux 
City, Iowa, but soon removed to Presque Isle. He 
was one of the prominent men of Aroostook County, 
having held the office of Judge of Probate for thir- 
teen years, and was everywhere respected for his 
integrity and kindly impulses. 

'61. — Hon. L. A. Emery has been appointed As- 
socate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of 
Maine, to fill the vacancy caused by the expiration 
of Chief Justice Appleton's term of service. Mr. 
Emery has been the law partner of Hon. Eugene 
Hale, was Attorney General of Maine in the years 
1876, 1877, 1878, and was a Senator from Hancock 
County in the Legislature of 1881-82. 

'73. — A. F. Eichardson, who was principal of the 
Bridgton High School for ten years, is now princi- 
pal of the Academy at Fryeburg, Me. 

'74. — Dr. D. 0. S. Lowell has been elected prin- 
cipal of the Edward Little High School in Auburn, 
Maine. 

'75.— Dr. E. G. Stan wood has taken up his resi- 
dence in Newark, N. J., where he is getting into a 
good practice. 



76. — J. M. Hill has resigned the principalship of 
the Dexter High School, to become principal of the 
High School in Bangor. 

76.— Sanborn was married September 20th, to 
Miss May C. V. Gardiner, at Acushnct, Mass. 

76. — Chas. H. Clark has been elected principal 
of the Rockland Fligh School. Mr. Clark has 
taught during the last year at Bath, with excellent 
success. 



INTER-GOUEGIATE NEWS, 



No college papers are published by students in 
England. 

The University of Pennsylvania had $50,000 
given it to investigate spiritualism. 

Dartmouth is to have a new chapel, to cost 
$30,000. Work will be begun on it in the spring. 

The Sophomore class at the University of Wis- 
consin, have adopted the mortarboard with a black 
tassel. 

Harvard was founded in 1639; Yale in 1701; 
Columbia in 1739; Princeton in 1746; University 
of Pennsylvania in 1749; Brown in 1666, and Dart- 
mouth in 1769. —Dartmouth. < 

It is said that the sum of $30,000, and one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land have been pledged by 
the people of Mitchell to establish the University 
of Dakota.— Harvard Herald. 

Of eight of the principal colleges, the only one 
strongly advocating a protective tariff is the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. At Williams the free trade 
theory is taught ; likewise at Yale, Harvard, and 
Amherst. Princeton is in an undecided state as to 
which to uphold. At Columbia, in the school of 
Political Science, all the instruction has a leaning 
toward free trade. — University Quarterly. 

The following statistics have been going the 
rounds in regard to the circulation of the leading 
American college papers: The Dartmouth, 1,030; 
Tuftonian, 1,000; Yale Courant, 850 ; Yale News, 
650; Lampoon, 700 ; Harvard Advocate, 450 ; Athe- 
nceum, 600; Princetonian, 725 ; Amherst Student, 
625 ; Madisonensis, 600 ; Orient, 550. 

The Princeton College Faculty has adopted the 
following rules for the restraint of undue indulgence 
by the students in college sports: 1. Lists of men 
expected to participate in contests to take place 
out of town in term time must be filed in the Eeg- 
istrar's office, and each of these persons must also 
file the written consent of his parents or guardian 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



123 



to such participation. 2. Leave of absence to play 
inter-collegiate base-ball or foot-ball games will be 
granted, such leave not to exceed four days in the 
year for the base-ball team and two days for the 
football team. 3. Other organizations which de- 
sire to play match games out of town shall do so 
only in vacation or on holidays, or on Saturday after 
twelve o'clock. 4. No student shall be allowed to 
play upon a team or to accompany it in any official 
capacity while under examination conditions. .3. 
No student shall belong to more than two college 
organizations which would require his absence from 
town in term play. 6. No games shall be played, 
either in Princeton or elsewhere, with any organi- 
zation not composed of students, except in cases 
specially authorized by the committee on outdoor 
sports. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



As we once more begin the work of mutilating 
our exchanges we are pleased to meet a new face, 
that of the Classical from the Hallowell Classical 
Academy. As a first attempt it is good, better in 
fact than one would expect, but in common with all 
college and fitting school papers it has its defects. 
There should be more editorials, and some of the 
literary work ought to be more interesting. A 
good test of the value of a literary article is: Will 
it be read with pleasure or from a sense of duty by 
the majority of those who see it. However, as we 
arc not altogether faultless, we will leave further 
criticism to other hands. 

There seems to have been a craze for new cov- 
ers during the summer vacation, and as we gaze 
upon the gorgeous suits of the Record, Burr, Mad- 
isonensis, Dartmouth, Chronical, Tech., Argus, Echo, 
and others, we sink into nothingness as it were. 
Perchance the feeling of awe will soon wear away 
and under those brilliant exteriors we shall recog- 
nize the same old friends as of yore. 

The Colby Echo with its new cover takes on a 
new Exchange editor, who by the way commences 
his labors in a decidedly fresh manner, probably 
owing to the saltless condition of the atmosphere 
in the region of Waterville. Sometime during last 
term we had occasion to make it clear to Colby that 
she had appropriated "our cheer." Since that time 
the Echo has evidently "soured on" us, and at 
last has devoted nearly a page to a mixture, in 
which the B. 0. is frequently meutioned, of bully- 
ing, braggadocio, misstatements, and poor rhetoric. 



Were it not that two or three things need a little 
elucidation we should pay no attention to the scur- 
rilous attack, but as it is we would like to ask the 
Ex. Ed. a question or two. He says in relation to 
the bat question, which has already been fully dis- 
cussed, " the only good bats in town were a dozen 
which Manager Whittle had ordered, and he had 
the unprecedented kindness to give them bats from 
these." This must mean that for the first time in 
the history of Colby University the ball nine had 
been gentlemen enough to accommodate a visiting 
nine in so small a matter as that of bats. We also 
can not see the point, of the word "bats" in the 
latter part of the clause, as Mr. Whittle only gave 
us one bat, and that after his men had had their 
choice from the dozen. We have read somewhere 
that the Echo was a "funny" paper, but we did 
not think that they would attempt to be witty about 
such a serious matter as this. ■ " Will you listen f " 
He says: " Manager Whittle gave them bats." Our 
manager informs us that the bat in question cost 
him sixty-five cents and that the retail price thereof 
was twenty-five cents. Why, that is the richest 
thing we have seen for some time. The Colby nine 
gives away one bat and realizes a net profit of forty 
cents thereon. We can all afford to be philanthrop- 
ists at that rate. He goes on : " The B. 0. man, 
who never saw a good umpire except outside of his 
own grounds," etc. Such pitiless self-depreciation, 
such Spartan fortitude, as it were, commands our 
highest esteem, for it is well remembered that 
W. C. Emerson but a short time ago umpired a 
game upon " our " own Delta. One more thing and 
we are done. He says in regard to the "cheer" 
question : " As near as we can find out Bowdoin 
has a cheer exactly like Harvard, Yale, Amherst, 
Colby, College of the City of New York, Union, and 
Bates." Walter!! your eyes must indeed be 
blinded by prejudice to see any similarity in the 
following list, which we print again for your sake : 

Harvard — 'Rah ! 'Rah ! 'Rah ! (with a strong , full sound). 
Yale — 'Rah ! 'Rah ! Rah ! (sharply). 
Amherst — 'Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! Am-her-est-i-a ! 
C. C. N. Y.— 'Rah ! 'Rah! Rah! C! C! N.! Y.! 
Bowdoin — B-o-w-d-o-i-n ! 'Rah ! 'Rah ! 'Rah ! . 
Union— -'Rah ! 'Rah ! 'Rah ! U-n-i-o-n ! N-o-i-n-u ! 

In order to relieve the monotony we will give 
our readers a "Serenade " from our lively contempo- 
rary, Chaff: 

SERENADE. 

Love, the stars are shining brightly, 
(Phew, its cold ! I'm sure of that.) 

Evening's breeze is blowing lightly, 
("Wonder if she'll think me flat.) 



124 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Come, all nature's softly calling, 

(I believe that I shall freeze.) 
'Midst the shadows, darkly falling, 

Now to wander 'neath the trees. 

Dearest, leave thy peaceful slumber, 

(Wish I knew which was her room) 
For the stars, in countless number, 

Shine like diamonds, through the gloom. 
(If papa hears, and not his daughter) 

Oh, my darling, dost thou hear 
(I know he'll deluge ine with water) 

Thy own lover ling'ring near ? 

Dost thou hear me softly singing ? 

Come, my love, the silver moon 
O'er the lake her light is flinging, 

(I really hope she'll wake up soon.) 
And the crystal water 's sleeping 

Glistening 'neath her kindly beams, 
And the silent stars are keeping 

Midnight vigils o'er thy dreams. 

On the lake my boat is lying, 

Darling, listen to my song. 
(What's that ? did I hear her sighing ?) 

O'er the waves we'll float ere long, 
(Ha ! I hear the window lifting, 

Soon I'll see my love, my pet.) 

While overhead soft clouds are drifting 

Hang it ! I'm all dripping wet ! 



CLIPPINGS. 



" Dear me," said a gond old lady on Fifth Street 
Avenue, the other evening, "how this craze for 
china is growing. Here's a New York club that is 
paying $3,000 for a pitcher." 

Younger sister answers the bell for caller. Young 
Man— "Is Miss Mabel in ?" Y. &.— " Yes, Mabel's 
in, and she's not very well to-day ; but you'll make 
her feel better, I guess." — Ex. 

Professor in Political Economy —''Mr. , is 

not your mind fully convinced of the fact that the 

purchase of lottery tickets is wrong?" Mr. 

(who Jias recently invested)—" Yes, sir." 

Scene at the Salvation Army: Evangelist, en- 
deavoring to persuade Junior to " come up to the 



altar " : Junior — " Are you a sinner ? " Evangel- 
ist — " I am glad that I can stand up here to-night 
and confess I am a sinner." Junior — " Well, my 
Bible says, ' My son, when sinners entice thee, con- 
sent thou not. ' " 

There are different ways of getting through col- 
lege. Some shout their way through, some pony 
through, some fiddle through, some taffy through, 
some " my-fathcr-is-a-preacher" their way through, 
some "studying- for-the-ministry" their way through, 
and a few work through. — Ex. 

A PROFITLESS DISCOVERY. 

Abou Ben Hassan one day read 

A holy tract, and thus it said : 

" Oh man! where are the prophets gone ? 

Where is Mohammed, holy one? 

Where are they all, the small and great? 

As they have gone, thus is thy fate. 

They toiled, and smiled, and wept like thee, 

Faded are they, as thou shalt be, 

A few brief years remain thy share 

Ere tottering age shall bleach thy hair : 

A few brief years of joy, and ills — 

Mehemmet Ali's ' liver pills ' " 

Abou Ben Hassan bowed his head, 

Tears fell upon the book he read, 

The pilgrim thus received a fall, 

His stumbling block 's the great cure-all. — Ex. 



BOOK NOTICE. 

Copp's United States Salary List and Civil Service 
Rules. By Henry N. Copp, a lawyer, of Wash- 
ington, D. C. Published by the same. Price, 
35 cents. 

This book gives all the Government salaries 
down to Postmasters with $500. It also contains 
specimen examination questions for admittance to 
the civil service throughout the country. It is valu- 
able, both as a curiosity and as a book of reference. 



We would advise all in need of a stylish, well- 
made Suit to call and inspect the line of Suitings at 
the store of A. F. Nichols, Dunlap Block. 




;^5 = ^; 3 ES?i;i, 

^1 -E | ac'S 2§,!a' Q 



gg-S = Iff ]8l£ 

5"; e gjico 3 ^ g £■•; 

liilBi^-sl&i 1 ill I s If 1-114 
fig'jfppfl |.ll^lls||l|l 

fl =s Iff jj^o-3 JI3J gli 1 1 ! *f 1 J § 
l fe 2g|fili = "™* : £ I lutein i-*s 



2< 

■^ o 



^a 



<M' 

X o 



:mS 



i-» 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ROOM OVER BOABDMAN'S, 
BRUNSWICK, 3VC A. I INT E_ 



Washington Market, 

TONTINE HOTEL BLOCK, 

BRXJ]SrS"WICK, IMI A-IIISrE- 
Bowdoin College Patronage Solicited. 

WHEN YOZT WANT A RIDE 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE. 

On Cleaveland Street, where you wilt find turnouts to suit (he most 
fastidious, fl^p Rates reasonable. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, ROOM 
PAPER, PERIODICALS, <StC. 



TO PRESERVE THE HEALTH 



Use the Magnetion Appliance Co.'s 



Richmond Magnetic Lung Protector. 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 



CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 
direct importation, which is made especially for us, water 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

A L L EX A OI iV TEB. Mann fact it revs, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



if'IRIcie; o:isrx_r5r $5. 

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with Weak Lungs; no case of Pneumonia or Croup is ever 
known where these garments are worn. They also pre- 
vent and cure Heart Difficulties, Colds, Rheumatism, 
Neuralgia, Throat Troubles, Diphtheria, Catarrh, and all 
kindred diseases. Will wear any service for three years. 
Are worn over the under-clothing. 

PATARRH ^* ' s neea " ess *° describe the symp- 
yjn- i- A IV r\ IT. toms of this nauseous disease that is 
sapping the life and strength of only too many of the fair- 
est and best of both sexes. Labor, study, and research in 
America, Europe, and Eastern lands have resulted in the 
Magnetic Lung Protector, affording cure for Catarrh, a 
remedy which contains No Drugging of the System, 
and with the continuous stream of Magnetism permeating 
through the afflicted organs, must restore them to a 
healthy action. We place our price for this Appliance at 
less than one-twentieth of the price asked by others for 
remedies upon which you take all the chances, and we es- 
pecially invite the patronage of the many persons who 
have tried drugging their stomachs without effect. 

Hmxr rr\ nVi-fain this Appliance. Go to vour drng- 
UW LU UUldlli gist and ask for them. If they 
have not got them, write to the proprietors, enclosing the 
price, in letter at our risk, and they will be sent to you at 
once by mail, post-paid. 

Send stamp for the " New Departure in Medical Treat- 
ment without Medicine," with thousands of testimoni- 
als. THE MAGNETION APPLIANCE CO., 

218 State Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 

NOTE.— Send one dollar in postage stamps or currency (in let 

ter at our risk) with size of shoe usually worn, and try a pair of 

our Magnetic Insoles, and be convinced of the power residing in 

our Magnetic Appliances. Positively NO COLD feet when they 

' are worn, or money refunded. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



FRANK M. STETSON, 



s § Q 







BURBANK, DOUGLASS & CO. 



(Successors to True, Douglass & Co.) Importers and Wholesale 
Dealers in 

China, Crockery, i Glass Ware, 



LAMP GOODS, CHANDELIERS AND PLATED WARE. 
242 Middle Street, . . PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PICTURE FRAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

From the cheapest to the very best. Also Pictures, Cabinet 

Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, etc. Also, Agent for 

the celebrated Household Sewing Machine. 

In the Blue Store, Main Street, Second Door from Elm, 
Opposite the Park, Brunswick, Maine. 



All the Students Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 



1. M©i-ts ! Boot I Shu Stoxi. 



Cor. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



f wrifoia Qollefe Meftied DepaFtmeet 

The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February Sth, 1883, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshda L. Chamberlain, LL.D., President; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H. Gerrtsh, M.D., 
Anatomy; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence ; lIenrt 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Burt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D , Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles O. 
Hcnt, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing lull information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



JOHN 



H. BRACKETT, M ¥285S£T 

SPRING STYLES, 1883, 

Consisting of Suitings, Overcoatings, anil Pant Patterns, made in 
latest style and good fit guaranteed, at 20 per cent, less than the 
same goods can l)e bought elsewhere. Also a 

Fine Line of White Shirts, Ties, Braces, Collars, 
Hose, and Under Flannels. 



Tiie Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company. 

Assets, $51,500,000. Surplus, $6,500,000. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1846. 

The New Plan of Cash Value and Non-Forfeitable 
Policy meets the needs of the public. Send for full informa- 
tion to h. N. FAIRBANKS, Gen'l Agent, 

BANGOR, MAINE 

S. WALKER & SON, 

Fresh and Corned Beef, Pork, Mutton, Poultry, 



At the Old Stand near corner Main and Centre Streets, 



s. WALKER. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

WM. H. WALKER. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DISEASE CURED 

WITHOUT H1DICIHEI 



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utilised as never before for Healing the Sick. 

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Price of either Belt, with Magnetic Insoles, $10. Sent by ex- 
press C. O. D., and examination allowed, or by mail on receipt of 
price. In ordering send measure of waist, and size of shoe. Re- 
mittances can be made in currency, sent in letter at our risk. 

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Note.— Send one dollar in postage stamps or currency (in let- 
ter at. our risk) with size of shoe usually worn, and try a pair of 
our Magnetic Insoles, and be convinced of the power residing in 
our other Magnetic Appliances. Positively NO cold feet when 
they are worn, or money refunded. 

Tontine Hair Dressing Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 
S. W. BRO WNE Proprietor. 

Formerly of University Hair Dressing Rooms, Cambridge, Mass. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

eet Music, Music Books, Musical Instri 
ual Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 



Cm and after Oct. loth, 1882, 

Passenger Trains leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.10, 11.25 a.m.. 2.45, 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 
night (Sunday mornings only). 
Rockland, S.10 a.m., 2.45 p.m. 
Portland. 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 4.30 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 12.35 night. 
Lewiston, 8.10 a.m., 2.45. 6.33 P.M., 12.40 night. 
Farmington, 8.10 a.m. (Mixed), 2.45 P.M. 
Augusta, S.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 p.m., 12.45 night. 
Skowhegan, Belfast, Dexter, Bangor, and Vanceboro, 

2.45 P.M.. and 12.45 night. 
Waterville 8.10, 12.45 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 P.M. (Saturdays 
only). 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 1882. 



m f flfl£ JEW£l1lY, 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 

J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 



BEATS THE WORLD. 

Old Judge 

CIGARETTES 
.And Smoking Tobacco. 



Endorsed as ABSOLUTELY PUKE and free 
from all foreign or deleterious substances what- 
ever, by 
PETER COLLIER, Chemist of the 



of Agricnitan, 

Washington, D. C. 
R. ODGEN DOREMTJS, M.D., LL.D., 
Protessor Chemistry and Toxicology in the Bellevue Hospi- 
tal Medical College, and Professor of Chemistry and Physics 
in the College ol the City of New York. 
BENJAMIN SILLIMAN, Esq., 

Professor at Yale College, New Haven, Conn. 
R. A. vVITTHAUS, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Buffalo; 
Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Ver- 
mont; Professor of Physiological Chemistry, University of 
New York. 

And other eminent Chemists in the United States, cop- 
ies of whose certificates we shall be pleased to mail you 
on application. 

GOODWIN Ac CO., 

Foot Grand Street, East River, New York, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A. O. REED 



lAINfeO 



Special Rates to Classes S Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 

C-^-XjXj A.WD EXAMINE MT "WOEK. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

POR.TI, A WD, MAINE. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 



DEALER IN 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
W. B.— Special Rates to .Student Clubs. 

Is now prepared to famish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 Middle Sireet, - - - - Poriland, Me. 



WATCHES. 

TIFFANY 8f CO., 
Union Square, New York, 

Particularly request attention to their line of 
low-priced Watches, just completed, which they 
confidently recommend as the best yet produced 
for the money. The movements are sound, stem- 
winding' anchors, and are cased in 18-kt. gold 
in variety of styles. 

Each Watch is stamped with the name of the 
house, thereby carrying its guarantee. 

Large size, for Gentlemen $75 

Medium size, for Gentlemen ».. 65 

Large size, for Ladies 60 

Small size, for Ladies 50 

Cuts showing sizes and styles of the Watches, 
and patterns of Chains suitable to be worn with 
thern, sent on request. 



386 Washington Street, BATH, ME. 

:B3r c :m:. ^t-iTTzmuveeie?,. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



OP Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

385 and 38 J Congress St., and 235 Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

bst Send for Price List. 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. WILSON & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B.— Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & J 44 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 

F. W. STOCKMAN, t 



C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

OVER THE POST OFFICE. 

Give Me a Call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SHREVE, # 

CRUMP 
# & LOW, 

432 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




XTENSIVE STOCK 
OF CHOICE GOODS. 



STERLING SILVEKWAEE-Tea, Coffee, and Din- 
ner Sets, Forks and Spoons, etc., of exclusive pat- 
terns ; Old English Silver ; Candelabra ; Carriage 
Clocks; Watches of all grades— Chronograph, Re- 
peating, and Chatelaine, with Chains, etc., etc. 

SELECTED DIAMONDS ; Black, "White, and Fancy 
Color Pearls ; Rubies, Emeralds, Sapphires, Cat's- 
eyes, Precious Stones, generally, of highest quali- 
ties; Pine Gold Jewelry of original designs, etc., 
etc. 

ARTISTIC BRONZES of new models— Elegant Man- 
tel Clocks (keyless) ; English Library, Mantel, and 
Hall Clocks, with "Westminster Chimes, Cathedral 
Gongs, Mantel Sets, in Marble, Bronze, Polished 
Brass, etc. 

DECORATIVE PORCELAIN in "Vases, Plaques, Des- 
sert, Coffee and Ice Cream Sets, etc., from the 
Minton, "Worcester Royal, Crown Derby, Copeland, 
Royal Berlin, Dresden, and other celebrated works, 
etc. 

MARBLE STATUARY. NOVELTIES. 



ALL KINDS OF 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

Agents Gorham Mfg. Co. 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fur- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Work- 
manship, we especially solicit orders for Fine Printing of all 
kinds, 

For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

We also make a specialty of 

Fl^-CWg PITTING 

For Schools and Colleges, 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

PEICES LOT77". 
Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Bowdoin College Boys 

When they visit BATH should call at 

WEBBER'S DRUG STORE. 

A Full Line of Cigars, Toilet Articles, &c. 



Smoke Smoke 

THE NEW CIGAR, 

Price IO Cts. Havana Filled, 

DIAMOND CROWN. Price 5 Cts. 

JOHNSTON & HATCH, 

LEWISTON, ME. 

jy For sale in Brunswick by Ed. J. Merriman. 

Smoke Smoke 



FIRST-CLASS 

Pianos, Organs, and M * 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 

THOMAS H. RILEY, . . . Brunswick, Me. 

Also INSURANCE -written in Best Companies, 
at Lowest Kates. 



FOUND AT LAST!! 

That the place to buy the Very Best 

Groceries and Students' Supplies, 

At the Lowest Possible Price, is at 

GEO. F. TENIMEY'S, opp. College Grounds, 

BRUNSWICK MAINE. 



COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle riding is unsurpassed as a 
method of traveling, whether for speed, 
sport, or renewal of health. The prac- 
ticability of the machine has been 
thoroughly tested, and satisfactorily 
proved, beyond question. Thousands 
are in daily use, and the number is 
rapidly increasing. The exercise is 
recommended by the medical profession 
as most beneficial to health, bringing 
into exercise almost every muscle of 
the body; 

Send 3c. stamp for 36-pagc Illustrated 
Catalogue containing price lists and full 
information. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washington St„ BOSTON, MASS. 




IMPORTING TAILORS 

AND 

GENTS' FURNISHERS. 

Novelties in Imported Hosiery, 
Underwear, Gloves, and Neckwear 
for Mens' Wear. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

Market Square, 

PORTLAND, ME. 



A Call, in PORTLAND, MB. 



•*%¥. H. WILSON,** 

DISPENSER OF 

Pate Drugs, Medicines, <m 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 



S, 



Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 
Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc. , in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



TONTINE HOTEL,, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 
S. B. BREWSTER, - - PROPRIETOR. 

Class and Reunion Suppers a Specialty. First-Class Laundry 
Work, equal to Troy, done at short notice. 



\ \ \_v s: \ .'V * N N 

III Vol. Xlll 





* ©F>e # 1 




BR@RSWIGK,*>MAIRR 



-•■■!*> r f nAT T FTT f 'KT 1 T r Q 4i~ 



CONTENTS. 



4S-- 



PAGE. 

Editorial Notes 125 

Martin Luther 128 

Orators of the American Revolution... 129 

A Look at the History of Lawn-Tennis. 131 

Communication 132 

College Items 132 



Personal 135 

Inter- Collegiate News 136 

Editors' Table 136 

Clippings 137 

Book Notice 137 




k«3 



Hoy. % 1883. 



<b-«s 






BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 

"LIBEAET T_i^^2^I=S," 

SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

IX PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY' FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGKAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



DEANE BROTHERS &. SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers iu 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

$W Lowest Prices in the State, 

755 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 
A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, B Fancy Goods. 

Also Eastern Mutual Union Telegraph Office. 
Under Town Clock, - Brunswick, Me. 



The Only RELIABLE AND STANDARD "bands of 

Cigarettes and Fine Tobaccos. 

Straight Cuts. yy 

Sweet Caporal.^^^. 

St. James, etc. 

St. James \, etc. 

Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut Cigarettes. 




offered tor sale. 



Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut, Full Dress. 
Sweet Caforal Coek Mouthpiece. 



SQ STEEL 
5 PENS. 




Leading Numbers : 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEN CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St,, New York, 



Go to W. B. Woodard's 

To buy Your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

SPECIAL ZR-ft-TSS to STTJ7:D:i2:c<rT CXjTj-BS. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



BEST DAIRY IN BRUNSWICK. 

THERE ARE TWO PINTS OF THE NICEST MILK IN 
EVERY' QUART WHICH I SELL. SPECIAL ATTENTION 
GIVEN TO STUDENT CLUBS. 

J6SP STEWARDS SHOULD DROP ME A POSTAL WITH 
THEIR LOCATION WRITTEN PLAINLY. 

A. P. WOODSIDE, Brunswick, Me. 



MILLER & POWERS, 

First-Class Hair Dressers, and College 

Two Doors South of Post Office, 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



<*&- 






THE FAVORITE AIOS.SOS-404SJ2-IZO-3SI- WITH 
''HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




MEW DBUG STOME. 



ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

B1UGS, MEDICINES, 

Fancy and Toilet Articles, Cipro! Totacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

rcscriptions Carefully Compounded. 



a, r. w»c»ot»! 



TOCflflP-HPflllie^ 



MAIN STREET, 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



SPRING AND SUMMER, 9883. 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
le sold very cheap for cash. 



MAYNARD'S 
©ysteff an! See §mttm Broil opium, 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

jg" Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



SCHOOL OF MINES, COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 

Doputment of Ascbiteetwo. 

The recently established Course in Architecture occu- 
pies four years, the first of which is occupied with general 
studies, tlie architectural work beginning with the^seeond 
year. 

Graduates of colleges an 1 scie ntific schools can, in gen- 
eral, enter in advanced standing at the beginning of the 
second year. Special students are not received. 

The scientific studies, pursued fn connection with the 
Department of Civil Engineering, include Chemistry, Phy- 
sics, and Mechanics, with so much of Mathematics as these 
studies require. 

The Architectural studies include the theory and the 
history of Architecture and of the allied arts, drawing and 
modelling, with the constant practice of original design, 
and so much of specifications and practical construction a3 
can conveniently be taught in a school. 

The buildings now constructing, which will he ready 
for occupation in October, provide, besides the necessary 
drawing rooms and lecture rooms, a special architectural 
laboratory for practice and experiment, and a library for 
study and for the accomodation of the large collection of 
drawings, prints and photographs now in process of form- 
ation . 

For a circular of information containing further partic- 
ulars address, REGISTRAR, SCHOOL OF MINES, 

Madison av. and 49th St., New York city. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily- 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, ----- $ 1. 50 a Tear i a Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Wg&mh, ami ^al% ^©a-feg,, 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

«srSpecial Kates to Student Clubs. .S& 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the iEneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Hoot 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies havius a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range ot 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A "WEEK. • 

Latin, six terras. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 
Latin, two terms. 
Greek, two terms. 
Natural History, three terms. 
Physics, one term. 
Chemistry, two terms. 
Science of Language, one term. 
English Literature, two terms. 
German, two terms. 
History of Philosophy, two terms. 
International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 14, 1883. 



No. 9. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
Oliver TV. Means, '84, Managing Editor. 
Charles E. Sayward, '84, Business Editor. 
Llewellyn Barton, '84. John A. Waterman, Jr., '84. 
"William H. Cothken, 'S4. Oliver R. Cook, '85. 
Rodney I. Thompson, '84. Nehemiah B. Ford, '85. 
Sherman "W. "Walker, '84. John A. Peters, '85. 
Terms— $2.00 a year in advance; single copies, 15 cents. 
Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should he directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to 
contribute articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by the writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 
Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 

Lawn-tennis has increased in favor very 
rapidly. A year ago one set and a corre- 
spondingly small number of players were 
almost unnoticed. But now, one ignorant of 
the game is hardly to be found. Perhaps 
some may think that the interest formerly 
given to boating and to base-ball has propor- 
tionately decreased ; but such is not the fact. 
On the contrary, the prospects for athletics 
next spring are unusuallj 7 good. Tennis has 
served to greatly increase the interest felt in 
general athletics. 

As a mode of exercise lawn-tennis cannot 
be equalled. It is free from the excessive 
strain incident to many other sports, and yet 
is sufficiently active to keep one's mind and 
muscles constantly employed. One benefit, 
derived from this form of exercise, has per- 
haps escaped general observation, and that is 



the enlarged lung capacity. The unnatural 
development of a few muscles, so often the 
result of other forms of exercise, is here 
avoided. 

From the work now being done upon the 
grounds, it is likely that next spring will see 
a number of good courts. Although some of 
the leading papers have said that lawn-tennis 
is fast going out of fashion, we have as jet 
failed to see any evidence to support the as- 
sertion. It is expected that another spring 
will find the field in the rear of the dormitories 
thickly covered with nets, and the game 
more popular than ever. 



One of the hardest tasks in the manage- 
ment of a college paper is to obtain suitable 
articles for the literary columns. For some 
time we have had in view a series of histori- 
cal articles which should be of general inter- 
est to the students and alumni. A short time 
since there appeared an account of the origin 
of the " Thorndike Oak." The ignorance of 
students in regard to matters intimately con- 
nected with the college is remarkable, and it 
is hoped that the contemplated articles may 
meet witli general approval. The subjects 
treated will probably be the founding and 
early history of the college and also of the 
various literary and secret societies. In re- 
gard to the existing societies, these articles 
will not serve as advertisements, but will con- 
tain only their early history. It is desired 
that all facts, which would be of interest, 
may be sent in, that the accounts may be as 
complete and interesting as possible. 



It is a matter of great regret that we have 



126 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



no suitable gymnasium. No intelligent per- 
son will deny that regular exercise is neces- 
sary for the maintenance of physical and 
mental health. What is needed is a substan- 
tial building, large enough to accommodate 
all the students. There should be bath- 
rooms, and other conveniences for the benefit 
of the boating and base-ball men. Such a 
building as we need could be built and fitted 
up for about seven thousand dollars. There 
is already a conditional fund of over three 
thousand, so that about four thousand more 
is all that is necessary. This need of the 
college is imperative. How can the health 
of the student body be maintained without 
such facilities as a good gymnasium would 
offer? Under the present system of attend- 
ance a student is expected to attend every 
exercise ; but how can he do so unless he has 
opportunity for exercise? The regulations 
say that a suitable care of the health will 
prevent college sickness; and yet, this asser- 
tion is made in the face of the fact, that there 
is no place where all the students can work. 

If there is any benevolent friend of the 
college at a loss in what way he can best lay 
out his money, we would most earnestly call 
his attention to this urgent want of ours. 
At Williams they have a really fine gymna- 
sium, that was built for about five thousand 
dollars. A similar structure is what we would 
like to see on our campus. It is not desired, 
nor would it be wise for one to think of put- 
ting up an expensive building; but a modest, 
conveniently arranged gymnasium is what we 
greatly long to see, and believe we shall see 
before many years. 



The question now is, whether the time of 
college exercises shall be changed to accord 
with the railway time. On Sunday, Novem- 
ber 18th, Philadelphia time, which is about 
twenty minutes slower than Brunswick time, 
will be made the standard. If the time of 



college exercises should be put at the same 
hours as in the summer term, it would cause 
an absolute change of ten minutes, necessi- 
tating so much earlier rising. Undoubtedly 
the change will be made one way or the other, 
as great annoyance will be caused if it is not 
done. The benefits arising from this uni- 
formity all through the country will be many. 
Travelers will not be subject to the frequent 
necessity of changing their time, as is now the 
case. There will not be the uncertainty that 
now often results from ignorance as to 
whether railway or local time is meant in 
making appointments. After some great im- 
provement has been effected, it is often a 
cause for wonder that it was not brought 
about before. We believe that this change, 
which now appears to many so strangely rad- 
ical, will prove to be most useful and satis- 
factory. 

The great event of the past week has 
been the celebration of the four hundredth 
anniversary of the birth of Martin Luther. 
Various as may be the opinions regarding 
him, it cannot be denied that lie was one of 
the greatest men of modern times. Certainly, 
few have ever exerted a greater power on 
the minds of men. Of poor parents, he 
showed that one can rise from the lowest 
positions, to be in the truest sense famous. 
There can be no doubt that he possessed un- 
usual personal courage and independence, 
for it was a serious matter in those days to 
oppose the Church of Rome. Although to a 
man of his remarkable talents there lay 
open the way to ecclesiastical preferment, 
yet he dared to follow what his conscience 
told him was right, even if it led to death 
itself. His work could not be rightly judged 
in his own day, for neither friend nor foe 
could speak impartially, but it has been left 
for later years to estimate the good he 
wrought, and by their verdict to enshrine 
him as one of the noblest and truest men. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



127 



It was inevitable that lie should perhaps go 
too far in his opposition, or that he should 
make too dogmatic assertions on some points. 
But we should remember the time in which 
he lived ; the cruel and mercenary practices 
of the Catholic leaders, towards which he 
felt the most intense hatred, and the great 
love that he felt for all mankind, a love that 
urged him on to work unceasingly for their 
welfare. His translation of the Bible into 
German, besides being a great benefit to the 
people, had [lie effect in a large degree of 
fixing the language. He had his enemies, 
for what man of genius and ability has not? 
History herself has accorded him a place 
among the benefactors and defenders of 
humanity. 



The custom established last year of hold- 
ing weekly exercises in Rhetoricals has been 
renewed. Every candid student will admit 
the value of practice in declamation. The 
great lack of our educational institutions is, 
that too little attention is paid to this branch. 
A great advantage of the present sj^stem is 
that it provides an audience for the declaim- 
ed. It is comparatively easy to repeat a part 
in private, but to stand up before their fellow- 
students is well calculated to try the nerves 
of all, but the most brazen. It is proverbial 
that the first essay to perform known duty is 
the most trying, and perhaps that will account 
for the apparent reluctance of the Seniors to 
deliver their first original oiation, especially 
before so critical an audience as assembles in 
Memorial Hall. We earnestly hope that the 
students will realize the inestimable advan- 
tage that can be derived from this exercise, 
and that the end of the year will see a marked 
improvement in delivery. 



tices of the past few y r ears. This term has 
so far been entirely free from those innocent 
jokes that are sometimes played upon Fresh- 
men, things which would never be called 
hazing. 

The new system of government has seemed 
to bring about a change of feeling in many 
ways. Sports are promising well for another 
year. There seems an earnest desire, on the 
part of all, to make the coming year a suc- 
cess. New schemes in regard to music and 
debating are being considered. A number of 
improvements about the buildings and grounds 
are being carried through. Thus in many 
ways there are signs of life and progress, and 
it behooves us to keep in the van and aid in 
every way possible these legitimate interests 
of the college. 



The tennis tournaments with Colby 
proved to be very interesting and satisfactory. 
As tennis has obtained such a hold upon us, 
it was hoped that some games might be 
played with Colby. To say the least we 
have nothing to regret as regards the result. 
The doubles were won by us on both occa- 
sions, while the single game that was begun 
here, and finished at Waterville was won by 
them. We hardly see why the tennis club 
should not play inter-collegiate games as well 
as the nine ; and we earnestly hope that other 
contests may be held next spring. Our rep- 
resentatives deserve praise for the very cred- 
itable manner in which they maintained the 
prestige of the college. 



In many respects this is a remarkable 
term. The entire absence of everything like i 
hazing is in marked contrast to the mild prac- 



We should like to call the attention of the 
readers of the Orient to the fact that our 
office will be open every Saturday and Wed- 
nesday afternoons, with the exception of the 
days on which the Orient is issued. The 
exchanges of the Orient are very numer- 
ous, and afford a pleasant way of spending a 
leisure hour. We are glad to receive callers. 



128 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



and, in truth, became a little irregular in our 
office hours last term, because so few seemed 
to care to look over the exchanges. The busi- 
ness editor is always ready to accommodate 
people with extra copies of the Orient, and 
will pocket all cash that he can lay hands 
upon in his own inimitable way. 



There has been an earnest desire, of late, 
to perfect some plan, by which a course of 
entertainments might be secured for the win- 
ter. This wish took definite shape, in the 
calling of a meeting to consider the matter. 
Although nothing definite has as yet been 
settled upon, it seems probable that a society 
for the encouragement and advancement of 
the literary and social life of the college will 
be the result. This society is expected to 
provide a series of lectures and meetings for 
debate and music. Suitable measures to 
secure an organization are already under con- 
sideration. The determined way in which 
the leaders of the movement have taken hold 
of it, leaves no doubt but that the end will 
be accomplished. It has been our hope that 
something would be done this fall to make 
the dull routine less wearisome ; and it may 
be that this proposed society will have such 
an effect. It certainly will succeed in making 
the winter months pass more pleasantly, if 
the students generally only unite in its sup- 
port. If a course of lectures is decided upon, 
it will not be necessary to secure the most 
expensive talent. More of the students will 
attend, if the cost of admission is not too 
high. We hope that the committee to decide 
this subject of lectures will be carefully se- 
lected, as there will be a need of much taste 
and discrimination, as well as experience. 
We welcome this idea of a society as the only 
thing, at present, likely to awaken interest in 
music. The objects of this society are suffi- 
ciently varied to enlist the cordial support of 
all. It is needless to say that a few of the 



students will be unable to make a success of 
this scheme. Last winter we had a fine 
course of lectures, and the only reason that it 
was not a success financially was because so 
few of the students felt interested enough to 
attend. After the lectures many regretted 
that they had not attended. Greater interest 
is manifested in other branches of college life, 
and we confidently expect that this new or- 
ganization will receive the support that it so 
justly merits. 



At the beginning of last term, the Orient 
was sent to a large number of alumni that 
were not previously subscribers. At the 
same time a card was sent them urging them 
to subscribe. As a good many have not yet 
replied to the invitation, it is supposed that 
they wish to become subscribers. At any rate 
we shall assume such to be the case, and con- 
tinue to send the paper unless otherwise in- 
formed. 



MARTIN LUTHER. 

This wonderful man was bom at Eisleben, 
in Thuringia, on the 10th clay of November, 
1483. The name Luther has various forms, 
as Lyder, Liider, Ludher, and even Lothar. 
The parents of Martin Luther were free 
peasants. His father was by trade a slate- 
cutter, but, when Martin was six months old, 
removed to Mansfield, and set up a forge, 
the profits of which enabled him to send his 
son to school. Martin showed such remarka- 
ble ability, that his parents determined to 
give him the education necessary to become 
a lawyer. At Eisenacho Martin used to go 
singing about the streets in order to obtain 
alms. He possessed a fine tenor voice, and 
thus became a great favorite. He received 
his degree in 1502, from the school at Erfurt, 
where the preaching of Weisemann had made 
a great impression upon his mind. The 
death of a dear friend, together with some 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



129 



other circumstances, caused him soon after to 
give up his intention of being a lawyer and 
to become a monk. 

In 1505 he entered the monastery at 
Erfurt, where he spent several years in hard 
stud}', and in rigorous discipline of mind and 
body. He was continual^ at war in his own 
mind, not knowing what it was his duty to 
do. In 1507 he was ordained priest, and ap- 
pointed professor in the University of Witten- 
berg. He had always been a most profound 
student, and began his career as an instructor 
by some lectures on Aristotle. In 1509 he 
gave lectures on the Bible, and his room was 
crowded both by students and professors. 
His marvelous eloquence and evident earnest- 
ness served to attract crowds. 

In the year 1511 he went on business to 
Rome. He had looked forward to the help 
and inspiration that he would receive from 
this journey to solve his doubts, but he was 
bitterly disappointed. While ascending upon 
his knees the sacred stairs, the text, " The 
just shall live by faith," came to his mind, 
and he arose and walked down to begin 
against the abuses of the Romish Church a 
battle that was to make him one of the 
world's heroes. His opposition to the sale of 
indulgences first placed him squarely counter 
to the Pope. He published at this time a 
series of short treatises on practical subjects, 
which caused great excitement. The Pope 
tried to conciliate him by sending men to 
argue with him, and to flatter him, but was 
unsuccessful. In a public discussion with 
John Eck, Luther denied the superiority of 
the Pope, and claimed that the Pope had more 
need of the church than the church of the 
Pope. Luther was told that his views were 
those of Wickliffe and Huss, and that they 
proved him to be an heretic. The papal bull 
condemning Luther was published July 15, 
1520. In 1521 he was summoned before the 
Diet at Worms. Here he refused to recant, 
as he was urged to do, and closed his speech 



with these words: "I can do naught else. 
Here stand I. God help me. Amen." As 
Luther had been assured of a safe conduct to 
and from the Diet, he was returned in safety, 
but was immediately concealed by his friends 
for fear that he might be assassinated by an 
enemy. While in confinement he translated 
into German the New Testament, which ap- 
peared in 1522. From this time on, until his 
death in January, 1546, he worked with un- 
tiring earnestness. Aided by a number of 
friends he succeeded his translation of the 
New Testament by a translation of the Old, 
so that the Germans had the whole Bible in 
their common tongue. This work was of 
great value in determining the language. 

Luther was a \oluminous writer, and the 
products of his pen were scattered all over 
the German empire. His life was one of 
unceasing toil and anxiety. Even when 
most successful he was surrounded by those 
that did not sympathize with his views. He 
was eminently conservative and did not at 
first intend to place himself in opposition to 
the Pope, but the natural course of events 
forced him to take such a stand. The Re- 
formation begun by him was carried on by 
many men, whose opinions were far too rad- 
ical for Luther, and he was made to appear 
sometimes as if fighting what he had before 
defended. But, surrounded by difficulties, 
that to a man of weak purpose would have 
seemed insurmountable, he began a work 
that has made his name honored and beloved 
all over the civilized world. 



ORATORS OF THE AMERICAN REV- 
OLUTION. 

In these days of business and of pleasure, 
when every one seems to be in a hurry and 
apparently unmindful of all save himself, 
how few there are who realize the benefits 
they are enjoying, or stop for a moment to 
inquire whence or how they came. It not 



130 



BOWD01N ORIENT. 



unfrequently happens that the greatest bless- 
ings receive the least thought. Particularly 
is this true in the case of our liberties and 
more especially of their authors and advo- 
cates. 

Of course the services of those who bore 
arms in our Revolutionary struggles are not 
to be underestimated. There was one class, 
however, whose services were particularly 
valuable, and this class was that of the ora- 
tors. Unlike most orators of the present day 
they did not hesitate to speak boldly in the 
presence of their enemies, — and enemies were 
far more formidable then than now — when pol- 
icy rather than principle is the watchword. 
Ready to defend their position by force of 
arms, they were zealous even to enthusiasm, 
and aggressive and clamorous in their de- 
mands for popular freedom. Their field of 
labor was large, their duties unmistakable, 
and the results of their labors far-reaching, 
whether American independence should stand 
or fall. In their case, however, the path of 
duty was not sure to be the path of safety, 
as they would have seen, had their cause 
been lost. But earnestness is persistent and 
effective, its spirit inspiring, and in the spirit 
with which they entered into the struggle lay 
the success of these — our early orators. 
Though actuated by a common spirit there 
was a difference among them in the way 
they dealt with their antagonists, as their 
biographies show. 

Patrick Henry has been called the incar- 
nation of Revolutionary zeal, — a term which 
quite fully characterizes him. A man of 
the people who loved liberty and hated op- 
pression, ready to sacrifice his life for that 
liberty, he was undoubtedly one of the fore- 
most men of his time in awakening his coun- 
trymen to a full realization of their position. 
Springing from obscurity lie suddenly became 
one of the most formidable enemies to the 
cause of the mother country, and so continued 
throughout the struggle. But every man for 



his place. All were not Henrys ; all could 
not be ; they did not need to be. The in- 
trepid spirit of Henry would not, doubtless, 
have reached and aroused the minds of every 
class. Hence the necessity for men of a dif- 
ferent make up from that of Henry; and 
these men were not wanting. 

In Samuel Adams we find an orator of 
undoubted integrity and patriotism but not 
of that aggressive, impetuous style which we 
find in Henry. Adams did not arouse the 
passions by his eloquence but rather con- 
vinced the judgment by his logic; he plead 
the cause of America with his people and Ins 
influence was incalculably great. 

In Alexander Hamilton are found the 
qualifications of an orator and statesman. 
Early imbued with the spirit of liberty he 
took up arms for the defense of the American 
cause at the age of nineteen, and at the early 
age of twenty became a leader and defender 
of popular rights. His first appeal to his 
countrymen at this time is remarkable for its 
eloquence, and on this occasion he made an 
enviable reputation for himself which he ever 
maintained. Distinguished for his sublime 
eloquence, patriotism, integrity, keen knowl- 
edge and foresight in political affairs, he came 
to be an acknowledged leader in our early 
struggles for independence, and in the early 
trials of our political history his judgment 
was thorough^ reliable and his opinions well 
founded. 

Such, in brief, are the leading character- 
istics of a few of our early orators of Revo- 
lutionary fame. But these are by no means 
all of those whose daring spirit and fiery elo- 
quence did so much for American independ- 
ence. Otis, Ames, Hancock, and many others 
who did so much to achieve our independ- 
ence, stand as mighty monuments in the field 
of our early eloquence. The credit due 
them, one and all, can be hardly overesti- 
mated, and their patriotism and earnestness 
are fit models for our later statesmen. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



131 



A LOOK AT THE HISTORY OF 
LAWN-TENNIS. 

Lawn-tennis is rapidly becoming the 
most popular out-of-door game in New Eng- 
land, and in fact in the United States, and if 
its popularity retains the present ratio of in- 
crease, it will soon crowd out and take the 
place of the " national game " It certainly 
has the virtue of being of noble ancestry. It 
is really a modern adaption of the old game 
of tennis as played by the French and Eng- 
lish royalty of the sixteenth and seventeenth 
centuries. The history of tennis shows it 
also to be of the most noble and ancient origin. 
There is good reason for supposing it to have 
descended from the Roman Susio Pilaris, or 
hand-ball, which was the national game when 
the Latin language was still alive. It passed 
down from the Romans, through the Italian 
game called Pallone to the tennis of the Mid- 
dle. Ages. 

At any rate our method of counting 
strokes as 15, 30, 40, game, was used in Pal- 
lone, also in the ball games of the Romans 
who say they got it from the Greeks; and 
the Greeks say it came from the East. So 
probably we are using a system which was 
founded on some " Asian mystery," or super- 
stition veiled in the mist of the early morning 
land of history. The game did not get the 
name of " tennis" until it appears in France 
in the fifteenth century ; the name being 
derived from the French tener, to hold, 
because the raquet has to be firmly grasped 
in play. The term." deuce " comes from the 
French deux, and not, as has been suggested, 
from the exclamation of some hasty person 
who missed his " serve " when he was "40 "— 
" 30." No one has advanced any ideas as to 
the origin of the term " love," perhaps it is 
too delicate a subject to be investigated. 
Soon after the appearance of veritable tennis 
in France, early in the sixteenth century, 
England adopted it and made it the amuse- 



ment for her Kings and their guests. One 
reason why it was so peculiarly a royal game 
was that no one, except those who had the 
'keys to the public treasury, could afford to 
build a " court," or rather hall, such as was 
then used. The "court" was 95x36 feet, 
and was cut up into peculiar strips which 
were used to complicate the method of deter- 
mining the value of a stroke. There were 
galleries for the spectators and recesses for 
the scorers ; such a building cost something 
like §20,000. The presence of walls on all 
boundaries, and the lines in the courts, made 
quite a complicated system of determining 
strokes, considerably different from the pres- 
ent system. They used a hard ball wound of 
shreds of cloth, two and one-half inches in 
diameter, and weighing about two and one- 
half ounces. This when struck smartly by 
their heavy raquets was a formidable mis- 
sile. 

When the royal game was "turned out to 
grass," in the country where no court could be 
afforded, they were obliged to change for a 
rubber ball because the grass dampened and 
overweighted the cloth ball. The influence 
of the old game of "raquet" is seen in the 
soft, light balls now used. These probably 
were adopted to make it a fit game for 
ladies. There is record of a game called 
"tennis" which was plaj^ed upon smooth 
grassy lawns in England as early as the first 
quarter of the sixteent/h century. During 
the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries sev- 
eral species of " lawn-tennis " sprang up in 
different countries; but they are, doubtless, 
all the offspring of the French tennis. The 
most interesting of these, being the most 
closely allied to the present game, was called 
" Sphairistike." This probably is the real 
father of our game. The lawn-tennis of to- 
day with its peculiarly marked courts, soft 
rubber balls, one or two persons on a side, 
has not been played more than twenty-five 
years. Its merits are shown by its wonderful 



132 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



increase in popularity. As anexercise of skill 
and muscle it is to be preferred to base-ball, 
and the danger of accident is reduced to a 
minimum. Now, when a good "set" can be 
procured for about twenty-five dollars, the 
game is available to all who wish for a contin- 
uous, healthy exercise for their bodies and 
minds. 



COMMUNICATION. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

The number of studies which can be 
pursued profitably at one time, is a subject 
which at present greatly concerns the Sopho- 
more class. They appear to hold the, idea 
that an important end of study, especially in 
the modern branches, is the acquisition of a 
fair knowledge of the things studied, and on 
this account they are unable to comprehend 
the advantages of the course offered this fall. 

Mathematics and Latin hold their ac- 
customed places while Greek History has 
been substituted for Greek text for this term, 
and in each of these studies four hours a 
week are required, leaving but four hours for 
the modern branches. And what are they? 
At the beginning of the term there were 
three recitations a week in French and one in 
Rhetoric, but soon English History took the 
place of one of the French lessons. The 
result must be obvious. With four hours a 
week spent on French, the knowledge ac- 
quired would not probably be excessive, but, 
at present, progress is almost imperceptible. 
Greene's English History, a volume of eight 
hundred closely printed pages, is to be com- 
pleted in two terms, — about twenty lessons. 
To be sure some of the less important sec- 
tions are omitted, but it is nearly impossible 
to obtain a thorough knowledge of the re- 
mainder in so little time. In all three of 
these studies one lesson is half forgotten be- 
fore the next recitation. 



Now it is not desired to unduly criticise 
the trustees who are understood to have de- 
cided upon this extra .work, but it does seem 
as though more than can well be accomplished 
has been attempted. English History is ex- 
cellent in» itself, and of course essential to 
even a fair education, but it does appear 
rather unfortunate that it must crowd out 
French, especially at the beginning of that 
study. Later in the year, after some progress 
had been made, it would not matter so much, 
for a good start, if not everything, is surely of 
great importance. 

If these three studies must be taken at 
one time would it not be preferable to sacri- 
fice one or two of the hours spent on ancient 
languages and thus give French a fair show? 

Student. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



Orr is Senior librarian. 

Did you see " Adeline ? " 

Turner, '86, has returned from teaching. 

We can beat Colby on tennis if nothing more. 

Aud now the side-whisker mania has struck us. 

The Seniors tried to finish astronomy last week. 

Sayward, '84, has finished teaching and rejoined 
his class. 

Brown, '85, has returned from teaching in 
Topsham. 

Lots of boys went home last week to see their 
—folks. 

They say "Brad" is "chinning" for rank in 
astronomy. 

How would it seem to have an old-fashioned 
adjourn once ? 

Kimball, '86, has begun a school at Rumford 
Point, Oxford Co., Me. 

You could tell a Massachusetts man anywhere 
last Wednesday morning. 

They say the Juniors took a " dead" in German 
all around, November 8th. 

This is the season when the skating rink and 
church sociable hold sway. 

Verily tennis is a-booming. No less than a half 
dozen new courts are being fitted up. 

Prof. Carmichael has constructed a hydraulic 
press capable of exerting a pressure of forty tons. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



133 



The annual school teachers' exodus has already 
commenced. 

Couundrum. — Why does "Guss" take a back 
seat now in geology ? 

New shelves have been added in the south wing 
for books from the main library. 

Detachments of Seniors are out most every night 
now viewing the heavenly orbs. 

Gould, formerly of '85, but now of Dartmouth, 
made a short visit here last week. 

Several of the students atteuded the teachers' 
convention at Saccarappa last week. 

The library has been re-catalogued as far as the 
Letter U. The card system is used. 

Ex-President Chamberlain has recently given 
several volumes to the Senior library. 

Skiuner, the special student, preached last Sun- 
day evening at the First Parish Church. 

Some of the boys are learning the Terpsichorean 
art under the instruction of Prof. Gilbert. 

Richardson, 72, delivered the address of welcome 
at the teachers' convention held at Saccarappa. 

We have learned one thing in astronomy, that 
the tide has to " hump " to keep up with the moon. 

The editors of the Bates Student are chosen by 
the faculty except the business editor and his assis- 
tant. 

We hope the delta will be fixed up this fall 
so that it won't have to be meddled with in the 
spring. 

Prof. Carmichael sprained his ankle severely 
the other day while moving his hydraulic press 
down stairs. 

Some of the Freshmen should be reminded that 
the backs of the pews in chapel are not intended for 
mud scrapers. 

South Maine is the noisiest end in- the whole 
college. But there is one thing, they can't lay any 
of it to Berry. 

'86 is better on solos or duets than on choruses. 
She has some good singers, but as a class their 
voices don't blend. 

Why don't the Sophs let the Freshmen have one 
of their row of seats in the chapel ? They would 
have room enough then. 

There was one power that Gough didn't speak 
of in his lecture and that was the power of John B. 
Gough to hold an audience. 

The skating rink opened Saturday, November 
10th, with a large crowd. Lots of the students 
lent their presence to the occasion. 

Some of the students make themselves obnox- 
ious by their unnecessary noise in the reading-room. 
They should remember that the reading-room is no 
place for gymnastics or a display of loquacity. 



There were no end women in Luther's time. 

Prof. Carmichael now lives on Main Street, .op- 
posite ex-President Chamberlain's. 

One of the Sophomores told the professor iu 
Greek the other day that Herodotus was "the 
father of lyric poetry." 

We would state for the benefit of a certain '86 
man that Bonney and Robinson have moved from 
over the express office. 

Prof. Robinson was chosen chairman of the 
executive committee at the Cumberland County 
Teachers' Convention last week. 

The subjects for the Sophomore themes were, 
" Lord Coleridge on the Classics," and " The Unity 
of England iu the Time of Dunstan." 

The '83 men make frequent pilgrimages to their 
Alma Mater. It is hard breaking off the ties of 
friendship formed in a college course. 

Strayed — on to the premises of Berry, '86, a 
large maltese cat, which the owner can have by 
proving property and paying damages. 

Can't we have a course of lectures again this 
winter? If the receipts can be made to pay the 
expenses by all means let us have them. 

Rev. W. F. Bickford, 72, lectured at the Con- 
gregational vestry, Tuesday evening, October 30th, 
subject : " In the Heart of the Rocky Mountains." 

The air is resonant most any time of day with 
"Fault," "Love fifteen," "Thirty all," "Deuce," 
"Our ad," " Game," and other mysterious ejacula- 
tions. 

The new town hall has been engaged for the 
first night by the Village Library Association. 
There will doubtless be a big time when it is dedi- 
cated. 

The last themes for the Juniors were, " Shall 
there be a Sixteenth Amendment for the Negro ?" 
and, " Is Character an Element of Oratorial Suc- 
cess ? " 

A large number of the students atteuded the 
lecture by John B. Gough at Lemont Hall, November 
1st. He had a full house and a very appreciative 
audience. 

A carboy of H:S0 4 that was a month coming 
from Boston here, was so badly smashed that when 
the janitor moved it into the laboratory it collapsed 
and was all lost. 

The madchen that tends the lower book-store 
says she thinks that the most of the students are 
too homely to enjoy good health. Wy-att that rate 
she will lose custom. 

There ought to be some kind of a knob or handle 
on the gallery door in the chapel. It will persist 
in staying shut and the only way to open it is by 
hooking your finger into a keyhole. The iudex 
finger of every member of the choir begins to look 
as though there had been a felon ou it. 



134 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



We are glad to note one thing, that a lady can 
come on to the campus now without being insulted 
by the cry " heads out," or some other ill-bred 
remark. 

The 400th anniversary of the birth of Martin 
Luther, was appropriately observed at the First 
Parish, last Sunday. The exercises were very in- 
teresting. 

The Orient office will be open hereafter every 
Saturday afternoon and Wednesday afternoon except 
the Wednesday it is published. Persons wishing to 
see the exchanges can govern themselves accord- 
ingly. 

The Letviston Daily Journal has been enlarged 
so that now it is second to none of the metropolitan 
dailies in size. No paper in the reading-room is in 
greater demand by the students than the Evening 
Journal. 

Thursday, November 1st, Prof. Lee, with Seniors 
Adams, Bradley, Brown, and Walker visited the 
shell heaps of Goose Island in Casco Bay to obtain 
some fossils. They say they were quite successful 
in their research. 

The speakers last Wednesday were C. C. Torrey, 
Wright, '64; Thomas, Cook, '85 ; Norris and C. A. 
Davis, '86. For this afternoon the speakers are 
Means, Thompson, '84 ; Alexander, Rogers, '85 ; 
Berry and Smith, '86. 

The bell not ringing, only three of the Juniors 
went into zoology, the other day. There was no 
adjourn, all the same, and those three had a mighty 
interesting session. Each one of them had to recite 
twenty minutes apiece. 

The first rhetorical exercises of the year were 
held in the lower hall, Memorial, Wednesday p.m., 
October 31 st. The following were the speakers: 
Seniors, Smith and Waterman ; Juniors, Libby and 
Peters ; Sophomores, Butler and Eideout. 

Sophomore (the irrepressible B , entering a 

Prof.'s room) — "Halloo! plugging Sanskrit?" 
Prof. — "Yes." Soph.— "Is it hard? I should 
think you would want a horse ou it." Prof, looks 
at the artless youth in open-eyed wonder. 

When the professor announced the other morning 
that if fair there would be no recitation in geology 
the next day, immediately there was a grand rush 
to see what the weather indicatious \yere. The 
omens were propitious. 

The files of the Orient ought to be bound. 
For a small sum they could be bound in two 
volumes and put in a safe and convenient form. 
Some such thing will have to be done after the 
present volume, as there are only apartments for 
the numbers of that volume. 

One of the professors says if a fellow " cuts" he 
gets a zero on attendance and recitation. That is 
well enough if he would be called upon to recite if 
he had been there. But if he would not have been 
called upon, we don't think it is just or in accord- 
ance with the spirit or letter of the new regulations. 



The Necturus, commonly called mudpuppy, in 
the aquarium in the Cleaveland cabinet room is 
dead. He has fasted ever since a year ago last 
March and he died a violent death after all at the 
hands of a turtle. Dr. Tanner will have to take a 
back seat. 

The recent action of Treasurer Young in fixing 
up the tennis courts shows that the college author- 
ities are willing to grant the students any reasonable 
demand if it is within their powev- We are sure 
the students are beginning to look at it in that 
light more and more every day. 

The " funny " man has been around again, re- 
moving gates, steps, and other things not securely 
fastened. Now that is a sport too funny for any- 
thing. It is so new and original. What a fertile 
brain, what a mighty intellect it requires to plan 
and execute, in the dead of night, a crusade 
against such formidable things as old door steps 
and gates. 

- Down at the depot the other day, when the 
Portland train came in, a rather seedy looking in- 
dividual stepped off the smoking car on to the plat- 
form with a cigar box under his arm. By some 
mishap he dropped the box when out rolled three 
dead rats. In stooping down to pick them up a 
whiskey flask fell out of his pocket. Without stop- 
ping to take account of stock he made a frantic 
grab for the defunct rats with one baud and seizing 
the empty box with the other, took a B line for 
the car, amid shouts of laughter from the by- 
standers. 

The meetings of the Y. M. C. A. for this term 
are as follows: Nov. 1st— To Every Man His Work, 
Eph. xvii. 8-13, Z. W. Kemp; Nov. 8th— Mission- 
ary Meeting, J. A. Waterman ; Nov. 15th — Assur- 
ance of Salvation, 1 Thess. v. 10, J. C. Hall; Nov. 
22d— Grieve Not the Spirit, Acts v. 9, Eph. iv. 30, 
1 Thess. v. 19, W. A. Cornish; Nov. 29th— Conse- 
cration, Rom. xii., W. Y. Wentworth ; Dec. 6th — 
Missionary Meeting, C. W. Longren ; Dec. 13th — 
Necessity for Watching, Mat. xxiv. 35-51, F. W. 
Alexander ; Dec. 20th— Worthy Christian Ambi- 
tion, Phil. iii. 12, H. N. Dunham. 

In the lawn-tennis tournament held here Satur- 
day, November 3d, Colby was represented by A. L. 
Doe and W. C. Emerson, and Bowdoin by H. C. 
Phinney and D. C. Clark. Bowdoin won in the 
doubles, two out of three series. In the singles 
Phinney beat Doe, and Emerson beat Clark in the 
first set. best two out of three. The second single 
set between Phinney and Emerson was postponed at 
the end of the first series on account of darkness, it 
standing in favor of Emerson. In the return games 
at Colby, Wednesday, November 7th, Bowdoin 
again won the doubles, four scries out of five. In 
the unfinished single sot between Phinney and 
Emerson the latter won by a score of two series out 
of three. So the result is, by sets, two doubles aud 
one single for Bowdoin and two singles for Colby. 

At an adjourned mass meeting of the students 
held in the modern language room, last Saturday 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



135 



night, decisive action was taken in relation to form- 
ing a permanent organization of the students for 
literary, musical, and other entertainments. The 
object of the society is in no way to interfere with 
the existing organizations of the college, but de- 
signed for the mutual improvement of all and to 
furnish a place where all, without regard to sect or 
class, cau publicly meet and cultivate a closer bond 
of friendship and mutuality. The meetings are to 
be held every two weeks during the fall and winter 
terms. Child, Thompson, '84, and Folsom, '85, were 
chosen to draft a constitution and by-laws, and 
Sayward, Liudsey, Clark, Kemp, '84, Howe, Berry, 
'86, and Dearth, '87, were appointed to select a 
name and motto for the proposed society. The 
committees are to report at the next meeting on 
Saturday evening, November 17th, at 7.30 o'clock. 
Let all be present .and lend a hand in the good 
work. 

The following magazines and periodicals are on 
the table of the current literature in the library : 
American Naturalist, The Edinburgh Bcvieiv, 
The Quarterly Review, The Journal of the Frank- 
lin Institute, Bibliotheca Sacra, American Journal 
of Science, Unitarian Review, British Quarterly 
Review, Science, New Englander, New England 
Historical anil Genealogical Register, The Ameri- 
can Antiquarian, The Literary World, Blackwood's 
Edinburgh Magazine, American Journal of Philol- 
ogy, Princeton Review. Every one ought to find 
something here suited to his taste, however fastid- 
ious. 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited to send 
personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Brunswick, Me.] 

The following are the addresses and occupations 
of the class of '83, as far as we have been able to 
ascertain them : 

Allen, teaching the High School at Alfred. 

Austin, teaching at Greenville. 

Bascom, iu Maiden, Mass. 

Chase, at home, Portland. 

Cole, teaching the High School at Bath. 

Collins, baggage-master on steamer " Star of 
the East." 

Corliss, teaching the High School at Rangeley. 

Crowley, in the employment of King & Co., 
Springfield, Mass. 

Day, teaching in the Hallowell Classical Insti- 
tute. 

Dinsmore, teaching at Madison, Maine. 

Dunning, at home, Brownville. 

Files, teaching Latin and mathematics in West- 
brook Seminary. 

Fling, teaching in the Biddeford High School. 

Gibson, teaching in the Bangor High School. 

Goodwin, abroad in Paris. 



Holden, teaching one of the Bangor Grammar 
Schools. 

Hutchins, teaching in the academy at Leicester, 
Mass. 

Jackson, in Portland. 

Jordon, in Lewiston, agent for King & Co. 

Kendall, in Bowdoinham. 

Knapp, at home, So. Briclgton. 

Lennan, with Jordan & Marsh, Boston, Mass. 

Linscott, at home, Boston, Mass. 

Packard, studying medicine at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, N. Y. City. 

Pearson, in the Bangor Post Office. 

Perkins, teaching mathematics in the Bath High 
School. 

Pettingill, teaching the East Side Grammar 
School, Augusta. 

Reed, teaching the Woolwich High School. 

Russell, on the editorial staff of the Portland 
Advertiser. 

Sewall, teaching the academy at Shoreham, Vt. 

Snow, studying law at Bucksport. 

Stetson, sub-master in the ■ Lewiston High 
School. 

Swan, teaching the Castine High School. 

Wheeler, at home, Woburn, Mass. 

Winter, teaching in Kilbourne City, Wis. 

Woodbury, studying law with Hon. Nathan 
Cleaves, Portland. 

'44. — Hon. H. G. Herrick of Lawrence, Mass., 
was the Democratic candidate for Sheriff of Essex 
County. 

'74. — A. G. Bradstreet has returned from his 
Mexican tour. 

76. — Rev. Chas. T. Hawes is to supply the pulpit 
at the Congregational church in Searsport for one 
year. 

'78. — George C. Puriugton is principal of the 
State Normal School at Farmingtou, Me. 

78. - Barrett Potter has been elected Instructor 
in Rhetoric and History in this college. 

78. — Dr. George W. Phillips was'married Octo- 
ber 24th to Miss Flora Hurd of Harmony. 

'80. — F. 0. Conant was married October 13th to 
Miss Eva Merrill of Yarmouth. 

'80.— Perkins has removed from" Kennebunk to 
Minneapolis, Minn., where he intends to practice 
law. 

'81.— Cutler is studying in the Theological Semi- 
nary, Andover, Mass. 

'81.— Sawyer has bought out the professional 
practice of Dr. Pierce of Freeport, and will practice 
medicine in that town. 

'81. — Joyce has gone to Ann Arbor, Mich., to 
pursue the study of law in the University of Mich- 
igan. 

'82. — Goddard and Holway are studying in the 
Harvard Law School. 

'84.— Longren is teaching at Waldoboro, Me. 

'86.— Stackpole is teaching in Bowdoinham. 



136 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



INTER-GOLIEGIATE NEWS. 



AMHEEST : 

The ball nine has been generously supported. 
The Freshmen bave not yet organized a foot-ball 
team. 

The corner-stone of tbe Pratt gymnasium was | 
laid on the 13th of October. 

S. E. Packard, '85, has been elected manager of I 
the Glee Club. 

The college has voted to bold a series of class | 
games for the foot-ball championship. 

Morrill, of the Boston ball nine, is training the 
men for two weeks.— Student. 

Columbia : 

The Boat Club has apologized to Princeton and 
the University of Pennsylvania for Columbia's re- 
missness in regard to the Child's Cup Regatta last 
June. 

Never have the entries of the athletic games 
been so numerous as this year. 

'86 has received a challenge from '86, Princeton, 
to a match game of foot-ball. 

The contest for the class championship cup in 
foot-ball this year promises to be unusually close 
and exciting. 

'87 as yet has made no attempt to carry canes 
or wear beavers on the college grounds. 

At the last regular meeting of the Chess Club 
at Delmonico's, Wednesday, October 24th, moves 
were exchanged in the corresponding game with 
Cornell, Princeton, and Bowdoin Colleges. — Spec- 
tator. 

Cornell : 

The annual " cider raid " has been held. 

Professor Kriiger, Instructor in German, has or- 
ganized a class in German conversation. 

The Cornellian board has been elected. 

The following paragraph shows the superiority 
of our library regulations over those at Cornell : 
"At the last meeting of the library council steps 
were taken toward opening the alcoves to Juniors 
and Seniors. The plan is not to allow the students 
to roam at pleasure through the library, but to allow 
them to enter the alcoves under certain restrictions. 
A student can only enter the alcoves containing 
works on the subject on which he is reading, and 
only by permission from the professor under whom 
he is studying the subject. No plan has yet been 
decided upon, but it is to be hoped that while mak- 
ing a move in the right direction the committee will 
not make so many restrictions as to bave it practi- 
cally valueless to tbe student." — Era. 

Princeton : 

Matthew Arnold will lecture before the students 
on "Literature and Science," Nov. 22d. 

In nearly every department printed notes of 
lectures are furnished the classes. 

The Tiger will again make its appearance about 
Nov. 1st. 

The Princetonian has had a brush with the Fac- 
ulty. 



Yale: 

The following is taken from the Yale News: 

Will the editors of the News, please publish for the 
benefit of the Freshmen, a list of the clubs, etc., for which 
they are likely to be called on for subscriptions ? 

A Freshman. 

The News encourages the Freshmen with this list 
given in the order of their claims to support : Uni- 
versity Boat Club ; Yale Athletic Field; University 
Foot-Ball Club; University Base-Ball Club; Uni- 
versity Lacrosse Club ; Yale Athletic Association ; 
Junior Promenade Concert ; Senior Promenade 
Concert; Class Foot-Ball Club; Class Base-Ball 
Club ; Class CAw ; Trophies for eleven, nine, or 
crew if victorious. The college publications : Lit., 
Courant, Record, Neivs, Banner, Pot-Pourri, Index, 
G. U. N.; University Praise Service ; Organ for 
Class Praver Meeting. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



The University Press in a recent editorial upon 
the new jury system at Bowdoin seemed to feel con- 
siderably grieved because the Y. M. C. A. and other 
organizations did not have representatives upon the 
august body of Jurors. From the tone of his article 
our E. C. evidently does not clearly understand the 
condition of affairs here, and as there may be others 
who do not we will endeavor to elucidate a little. In 
no other college in the United States have the Greek 
Letter Fraternities taken so deep and strong a hold 
as here. There are five societies represented here 
at present, some of which have been in existence 
over forty years. Their popularity has been so 
great that they have entirely killed out two strong 
literary societies after they had been in existence over 
half a century, and had amassed libraries aggregat- 
ing thirteen thousand volumes. There are in col- 
lege now not more than half a dozen " oudens," or 
men who belong to no society. If there should 
chance to be ten of them their welfare is provided 
for by a clause in the regulations which says: " If 
the ' Oudens' are ten in number they shall be en- 
titled to represeutation on the Jury." So our friend 
will see that as the Y. M. C. A. aud other organiza- 
tions are made up almost wholly of society men, they 
are not entitled to representation as distinct bodies. 

Every one is familiar with the sad story of the 
man who wagered that he could eat a partridge 
each day at dinner for thirty successive days. At 
first all went well, but as time passed on the cus- 
tomary partridge seemed to increase in size till 
flually it seemed as large as a full grown turkey. 
Something similar has happened to the miserable 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



137 



being who writes these words. Sometime ago on 
looking over an exchange he noticed this sentence, 
" Bowdoin has done away with Saturday recita- 
tions." It surprised him somewhat, but on exam- 
ining the schedule of recitations he found that the 
usual quota of work was laid down for that day. 
Another and yet another exchange said the same 
thing so that now that one baneful sentence, when 
it meets his eye, seems to cover the entire page, and 
has caused him, in moments of distraction, to con- 
sign to the devouring flames many an artistic cover, 
with its included contents, which otherwise would 
have excited wonder and admiration in the minds 
of those who frequent the editorial sanctum. 

The Yale Courant, "the best of college papers," 
has sprung on us a new sort of story to which as 
yet no special name has been given. It is, however, 
the same old story that has been popular for years 
among the college press, disguised under the form 
of a correspondence. The elements of this quasi 
new story are somewhat as follows : First, the time 
must be during vacation, this, however, is self-evi- 
dent as nothing ever happens to a student except 
during vacatiou. Next you have a student, a more 
or less confirmed woman-hater, who is camping out 
at No-where-in-particular. The inevitable young 
lady, seasoned to taste, must be stopping in the 
neighborhood. The story takes the form of a 
series of letters from the student to a real or sup- 
posed chum, at any rate it must be a chum. The 
letters vary in number according to fancy, but can 
never be less than four. Letter number one gives 
a description of the camp. The student sees the 
young lady at a distance and gets interested. In 
letter number two some fortunate accident throws 
them together. The accident is a variable quantity. 
Letter number three gives full description of the 
fair one. The course of love runs smooth. In 
epistle number four comes the climax and the 
reader is let down hard or easy according to the 
ability or inclination of the writer. 

We appropriate the following from the Athenae- 
um : 

MY UNKNOWN" COUSIN. 

A Soph in Smith, so much I know 

From cataloguing pages. 
She longs, no doubt, replete to grow 

"With thoughts of buried sages; 
Plays tennis with the Profs — sometimes — 

Counts lovers by the dozen, 
Cares naught for sentimental rhymes, 
My unknown distant cousin. 

She's slender, tall, or else petite, 
Perhaps the mean called golden. 

Her eyes — blue — hazel — black ? — well, sweet 
And kind one to embolden; 



She paints, methinks, and sings beside, 

And like a Dryad dances, 
Or — if by church' this joy's denied, 

Kegret her charms enhances. 

I wonder if she'd be annoyed 

Should I some verses send her, 
Would she " such impudence ' ' avoid, 

Think me affected, tender ? 
I'll try it anyhow, here goes — 

Work lots of dizzy " buzz "in, 
Ask for a photo, sign — in prose — 

Your would-be most aff. cousin. 



CLIPPINGS. 



Why is a Freshman like a telescope ? Because 
he's easily drawn out, seen through, and shut up.— 
Princetonian. 

He gazed in evident embarrassment at the bill 
of fare printed in French, and finally said, pointing 
to the word " menu" at the top : " You may bring 
me some ' menu,' and be sure to have it well done.'' 

"Look heah, Thomas Jefferson, dis heah's a 
nice time fo' you to be getting home ! " growled 
Aunt Polly, as her boy came in long after midnight. 
" You dunno nuffin' ! " retorted Thomas. " Habn't 
you neber beam dat de darkey's hour is jes' befo' 
day?"— Ex. 

Teacher—" ' David slew Goliah ' ; Johnny, what 
jpart of speech is ' slew ' ? " Johnny—" Preposition, 
mum." Teacher — " Why, what is a preposition "? " 
Johnny — "Preposition is a word showing the rela- 
tion between a noun and some other word or 
words." Teacher — " Well, what relation does 
' slew ' show between David and Goliah ? " Johnny 
—"An unfriendly relation, mum." — Tech. 

A Wellesley episode of last winter has just 
leaked out. A party of Sophomores bad just re- 
turned from an afternoon's skating on the lake, 
and rushed into the study of a favorite instructor 

with the greatest enthusiasm. " Oh, Miss , we 

had a perfectly lovely time. The ice was as glare 
as glass, and we found some splendid buoys to sit on 
as we put on our skates. "Girls!" replied the 
shocked instructor. "Yes, aud they were per- 
fectly divine, and we sat on the buoys and " 

" Why, girls, I am shocked. Do you mean to say 
you sat down on a boy to put on your skates ? " 
"Why, yes, those great wooden posts that come up 
through the ice." " Girls, it is time to get ready 
for the bread makiug optional." — Ex. 



BOOK NOTICE. 

We have received a copy of " Legends, Lyrics, 
aud Sonnets," by Mrs. Frances L. Mace. The book 
is gotten up in a very neat aud tasty style, with 
thick paper and a soft binding. The author has 
written quite extensively for various publications, 
and has evidently made a partial collection of them 
in this volume. The poems show a variety in the 



138 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



choice of meter, and the rhythm is for -the most 
part easy and musical. Some of the poems deserve 
special mention for their graceful stylo and beauty 
of conception. " Kineo " is a legend connected with 



Moosehead Lake. "The Bowdoin Oak" is our 
own " Thorndike." "The Heliotrope " is an East- 
ern legend. The book is published by Cupples, 
Upham & Co., Boston. 




STROUT 



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Where may be found a full Hue of Fine Meats. Country Produce, 
&c. Orders receive prompt ai tention. Give us a call at 



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ROOM OVER BOABDMAN'S, 
BRUNS-WICK, MAIKTE. 

Washington Market, 

TONTINE HOTEL BLOCK, 

Brunswick, avc^iiixrE. 

Bowdoin College Patronage Solicited. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 

~W3EN YOU ~WA.NT A RTDJS 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE, 

On Cleaveland Street, where you will find turnouts to suit the most 



fastidious. 



•Rates reasonable. 



Use the Magnetion Appliance Co.'s 

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with Weak Lungs; no case of Pneumonia or Croup is ever 
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Hnw -rn HVvTain this Appliance. Go toyourdrug- 
nUW LU ULRdlll gist and ask for them. If they 
have not got them, write to the proprietors, enclosing the 
price, in letter at our risk, and they will he sent to you at 
once by mail, post-paid. 

Send stamp for the ''New Departure in Medical Treat- 
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our Magnetic Insoles, and be convinced of the power residing in 
our Magnetic Appliances. Positively NO COLD feet when they 
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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



WANTED. 

A GENTLEMAN to take orders for "Dante's Inferno," 
"Purgatory and Paradise" (The Divina Corn- 
media); Milton's "Paradise Lost," and Dore Gallery, 

all complete; uniform in price and size, containing 50 to 
100 full-page illustrations by Gustave Dore'; beautifully 
bound, gold and ink side, and back stamp, gilt edges. 
Size 101-2 x 131-2 inches. Price $6.00. Also, Don 
Quixote, 854 pages, 400 illustrations by Dore', the price 
of which has just been reduced one-third. The fall and 
winter canvass of these books must prove very lucrative ; 
good terms to students. Address. CASSELL & COM- 
PANY, successors to CASSELL, PETTER, GALPIN 
& CO., 18(i Washington St., Boston, Mass. 



RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



Stationery Department. 



WRITING PAPER, PENS AND INK. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

"We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 

direct importation, which is made especially for us, water 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLEN & GIXTEIt Manufacttirers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



" FAIR PRICES," QUALITY " THE BEST." 

We desire to call attention to several new 
varieties of First-Class Paper for Ladies' Corre- 
spondence. 

"ULSTER LINEN" and "OLD FASHION 
NOTE," from Marcus "Ward & Co., London. 

"YE CHAUCER NOTE" and "VELLUM 
PARCHMENT," from Thos. De LaRue, London. 

" IMPERIAL TREASURY" Note, from Chas. 
Goodall & Sons, London. 

A beautiful assortment of American Paper, of 
many varieties, including 

"BUCKRAM," "ANTIQUE," "BOND," and 
the complete list of novelties in tints. 

VISITING and CORRESPONDENCE CARDS 
of new patterns, colors, shapes, and sizes. 

Our Stationery Department will 
supply SUidents with CLASS IN- 
VITATIONS, PROGRAMMES, 
SOCIETY DEVICES, on paper and 
envelopes, promptly and in right 
good style. 

Shreve, Crump & Low, 

Agents Gorham Mfg. Co. 

432 Washington Street, BOSTON. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



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China, Crockery, I Glass Ware, 



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Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PICTURE FEAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

From the cheapest to the very best. Also Pictures, Cabinet 

Frames, Stationer}', Cards, Albums, etc. Also, Agent for 

the celebrated Household Sewing Machine. 

In the Blue Store, Main Street, Second Door from Elm, 
Opposite the Park, Brunswick, Maine. 



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frank I, Rents' Boot I Sloe Store, 



Cor, Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



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811 



The Sixty-Second Annua] Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 8th,18B3, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshua L. Chamberlain, LL.D., President ; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Chil.lren ; Frederic H. Gerrish, M.D., 
Anatomy ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence ; Henry 
Oarmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry j Burt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D , Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles 0. 
Hunt, M. D., Materia Mcdica and Therap uties ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; Irving Kimball, M.D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



JOHN H. BRACKETT, 



SPRING STYLES, 1883, 

Consisting of Suitings, Overcoatings, and Pant Patterns, made in 
latest style and good fit guaranteed, at -20 per cent, less than the 
same goods can be bought elsewhere. Also a 

Fine Line of White Shirts, Ties, Braces, Collars, 
Hose, and Under Flannels. 



Curtis' College Bookstore 



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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



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1 U WIG tiauiCO. Weakness of the Spine, Falling of 
the Womb, Leucorrhcea, Chronic Inflammation and Ulceration 
■of the Womb, Incidental Hemorrhage or Flooding, Painful, Sup- 
pressed, and Irregular Menstruation, Dirrcnness and Change of 
Life, tris is the best Appliance and Curative Agent known. For 
all forms of Female Diincultics it is unsurpassed by anything be- 
fore invented, both as a curative agent and as a soiirceof power 
nud vitalization. 

Price of either Belt, with Magnetic Insoles, $10. Sent by ex- 
press C. O. D., and examination allowed, or bymail on receipt of 
price. In ordering send measure of waist, and size of shoe. Re- 
mittances can be made iu currency, sent in letter at our risk. 

The Magnetiou Garments are adapted to all ages, are worn 
over the under-clothing (not next to the body like the many Gal- 
vanic and Electric. Humbugs advertised so extensively), and 
should be taken off at night. They hold their POWER FOR- 
EVER, and are worn at all seasons of the year. 

Send stamp for the " New Departure in Medical Treatment 
without Medicine," with thousands of testimonials. 



Note.— Send one dollar in postage stamps or currency (in let- 
ter at our risk) with size of shoe usually worn, and try a pair of 
our Magnetic Insoles, and be convinced'of the power residing in 
our other Magnetic Appliances. Positively no cold feet when 
they are worn, or money refunded. 



SEAItfS -GEN* &AS. a. ®. 

On and after Oct. loth, 1SS2, 

Passenger Trains leave Brunswick 

For Ball). 8.10, 11.25 a.m.. 2.45. 4.40, anil 6.25 r.M. 12.42 
night (Sunday mornings only). 
Rockland, S.10 a.m., 2.45 p.m. 
Portland. 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 4.30 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 12.35 night. 
Lcwiston, 8.10 a.m., 2.45. G.33 p.m.. 12.40 night. 
Farminglon. 8.10 a.m. (Mixed), 2.45 p.m. 
Augusta, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 0.35 p.m., 12.45 night. 
Skowhegan, Belfast, Dexter. Bangor, and Vaneehoro, 

2.45 p.m.. and 12.45 night. 
Watcrvillc S.10, 12.45 a.m., 2.45, 0.35 p.m. (Saturdays 
only). 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 1S82. 



Tontine Hair Dressing Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 
S. W. BRO WNE Proprietor. 

Formerly of University Hair Dressing Rooms, Cambridge, Mass. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 



DIAMONDS, Tim J£W£i1?Y, 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 

J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 



BEATS THE WORLD. 

Old Judge 

CIGARETTES 

And Smoking Tobacco. 

Endorsed as ABSOLUTELY PURE and free 
from all foreign or deleterious substances what- 
ever, by 
PETER COLLIER, Chemist of the 

U. S. Bep&ftms&t of Agtlcoitut, 

Washington, D. C. 
R. ODGEN DOREMUS, M.D., LL.D., 
Protessor Chemistry and Toxicology in the Bellevue Hospi- 
tal Medical College, and Professor of Chemistry and Physics 
in the College of the City of New York. 
BENJAMIN SILLIMAN, Esq., 

Professor at Yale College, New Haven, Conn. 
R. A. WITTHAUS, A.M., MJX, 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Buffalo; 
Professor of Chemistry ami Tuxieologv, University of Ver- 
mont; Professor of Physiological Chemistry, University of 
New York. 

And other eminent Chemists in the United States, cop- 
ies of whose certificates we shall be pleased to mail you 
on application. 

GOODWIN Ac CO., 

Foot Grand Street, East River, New York. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A.. O. REED, 



I # 



Special Rates to Classes S Students 

Interior Views BVlade to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 

CALL ./^IfcTID EXr^^IllTE: ^TIT -WORK. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 
Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 



J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 



TO^sT-iTSElNri^, 



CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 
Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B.— Special Rates to Student Clubs. 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 Middle Street - - - - Portland, Me. 



WATCHES. 

TIFFANY Sf CO., 

Union Square, New York, 

Particularly request attention to their line of 
low-priced Watches, just completed, which they 
confidently recommend as the best yet produced 
for the money. The movements are sound, stem- 
winding anchors, and are cased in 18-kt. gold 
in variety of styles. 

Each "Watch is stamped with the name of the 
house, thereby carrying its guarantee. 

Large size, for Gentlemen $75 

Medium size, for Gentlemen 65 

Large size, for Ladies 60 

Small size, for Ladies 50 

Cuts showing sizes and styles of the Watches, 
and patterns of Chains suitable to be worn with 
them, sent on request. 



bath aof$^ 

386 Washington Street, BATH, ME. 
WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



(ST Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

385 and 58J Congress St., and 233 Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

jOST Send fou Pkick List. 

ESTABLISHED 1S41. . 

W. L. Wl LSON & CO., 

^VtlolesaIe and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 



C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

OVER THE POST OFFICE. 

Give Me a Call- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SHREVE, * 

CRUMP 
* & LOW, 

432 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




XTENSIVE STOCK 
OF CHOICE GOODS. 



STERLING SILVEB.WABE— Tea, Coffee, and Din- 
ner Sets, Forks and Spoons, etc., of exclusive pat- 
terns ; Old English Silver ; Candelabra ; Carriage 
Clocks; Watches of all grades— Chronograph, Re- 
peating, and Chatelaine, with Chains, etc., etc. 

SELECTED DIAMONDS ; Black, White, and Fancy 
Color Pearls ; Rubies, Emeralds, Sapphires, Cat's- 
eyes, Precious Stones, generally, of highest quali- 
ties; Fine Gold Jewelry of original designs, etc., 
etc. 

ARTISTIC BRONZES of new models— Elegant Man- 
tel Clocks (keyless) ; English Library, Mantel, and 
Hall Clocks, with Westminster Chimes, Cathedral 
Gongs, Mantel Sets, in Marble, Bronze, Polished 
Brass, etc. 

DECORATIVE PORCELAIN in Vases, Plaques, Des- 
sert, Coffee and Ice Cream Sets, etc., from the 
Minton, Worcester Royal, Crown Derby, Copeland, 
Royal Berlin, Dresden, and other celebrated works, 
etc. 

MARBLE STATUARY. NOVELTIES. 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 



Agents Gorham Mfg. Co. 



ALL KINDS OF 



rapffltSB' 



*3^^y>?ri-? r - '-* w ~<-^ ^ .-yw-r i 



j-o.y^r^- A v^tj. ,:■';- '-■,, - 4 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Tlnving a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fur- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Work- 
manship, wc especially solicit orders for Fine Printing of all 
kinds, 



For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAT ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

Wc also make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges, 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &o. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

PRICES XjO-Vv^. 
Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Bowdoin College Boys 

When they visit BATH should call at 

WEBBER'S DRUG STORE. 

A Full Line of Cigars, Toilet Articles, &c. 

Sisiolsze Smoke 

THE MEW CIGAR, 

Price IO Cts. Havana Filled. 

DIAMOND CROWN. Price 5 Cts. 

JOHNSTON & HATCH, 

LEWISTON, ME. 

JSP" For sale in Brunswick by Ed. J. Merriman. 

Snn.ols:e Smoke 

FIRST-CLASS 

Hum, Organs, 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 

THOMAS H. RILEY, . . . Brunswick, Me. 

Also INSURANCE written in Best Companies, 
at Lowest Kates. 

FOUND AT LAST!! 

That the place to buy the Very Best 

Groceries and Students' Supplies, 

At the Lowest Possible Price, is at 

GEO. F. TENIMEY'S, opp. College Grounds, 

BRUNSWICK MAINE. 



COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle riding is unsurpassed as a 
method of traveling.whether for speed, 
sport, or renewal of health. The prac- 
ticability of the machine has been 
thoroughly tested, and satisfactorily 
proved, beyond question. Thousands 
are in daily use, and the number is 
rapidly increasing. The exercise is 
recommended by the medical profession 
us most beneficial to health, bringing 
into exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

Send 3c. stamp for 36-pngc Illustrated 
Catalogue containing price lists and lull 
information. 

THE POPE MFG. CO. 

597 Washington St., BOSTON, MASS. 




IMPORTING TAILORS 

AND 

GENTS' FURNISHERS. 

Novelties in Imported Hosiery, 
Underwear, Gloves, and Neckwear 
for Mens' Wear. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

Market Square, 

PORTLAND, ME. 



For Yoicr Mew Fail Hat, 



WHY, GIVE 



A Call, in PORTLAND, MB. 

->#F. H. WILSOH,** 

DISPENSER OF 

Fine Brags, Medicines, «» Chemicals. 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 
Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc. , in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

TONTINE HOTEL, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

8. B. BREWSTER, - - PROPRIETOR. 

Class and Reunion Suppers a Specialty. First-Class Laundry 
Work, equal to Troy, done at short notice. 



\ s \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \v \\\\\\\\ v \ v \ \ \ \ \ v v vrvjs: v sa 




m m. xm. 



Ne. 10. 




V3ffts= 



• ©f>g < 



* 



1 - 1 
▼ I 







-# BRHR&WICK,.MAIRE.#- 



— s*. 



CONTENTS. 



Editorial Notes 

i 
Our College Buildings. — 1 141 I Personal 



PAGE. I PAGE. 

139 I College Items 146 



149 



The Swift River Valley (poem) 142 j Inter . Co llegiate News 150 

Louis Kossuth 144 j 

I Editors' Table 151 

Theta Delta Chi Convention 145 






* Dbg. g, 1883. * 









^fw^v 



^ 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 

"LIBE^-K"2" LAMPS," 

SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and" Moehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGRAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR- 

m@©KRS" GSLSMBlAxX® <£R©Ug S. 



The Only RELIABLE AND STANDARD Brands of 

Cigarettes and Fine Tobaccos. 



Straight Cuts. 
Sweet Caporal. 
St. James, etc. 



Caporal. 
Caporal £. 

Ambassador. 
St. James J, etc. 
Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut Cigarettes. 




474 Congress St., - 



opp. Preble House. 



DEANE BROTHERS &. SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

ESP Lowest Prices in the State, 
755 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 

A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, M Fancy Goods. 

Also Eastern Mutual Union Telegraph Office. 
Under Town Clock, - Brunswick, Me. 



Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut Full Dress. 

Sweet Capokal Come Mouthpiece. 



JO STEEL 
W PENS. 




Leading Numbers : 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEN CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York 



Go to W. B. WoodarcTs 

To buy your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

SPECIAL EATES to STt7DElTT CXjTTIQS. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

BEST DAIRY IN BRUNSWICK. 

THERE ARE TWO PINTS OF THE NICEST MILK IN 
EVERY QUART WHICH I SELL. SPECIAL ATTENTION 
GIVEN TO STUDENT CLUBS. 

fl®- STEWARDS SHOULD DROP ME A POSTAL WITH 
THEIR LOCATION WRITTEN PLAINLY. 

A. P. \YOODSIDE, Brunswick, Me. 



MILLER & POWERS, 

-Class Hair Dressers, anil College 

Two Doors South of Post Office, 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 







THE FAVORITE NOS. 303-404-332-I7O-35I- WITH 

H/S OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORL 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




HEW DBTO STORE. 



ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

DHWGS, MEDICffiES, 

Fancy and Toilet Articles, Ciprsi Tobacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

J£l~Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



a, w, mi>G«<Q%.#, 



jmisfwt+wnM 



MAIN STREET, 



r SX ) 



SCHOOL OF MINES, COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



SPRING AND SUMMER, 1883. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

©ystep cut! §m ipgam Irapjo^ujH, 



Main St., under Town Clock. 

Upg*Families. Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



The recently established Course in Architecture occu- 
pies four years, the first of which is occupied with general 
studies, the architectural work beginning with the second 
year. 

Graduates of colleges and scie ntific schools can, in gen- 
eral, enter in advanced standing at the beginning of the 
second year. Special students are not received. 

The scientific studies, pursued fn connection with the 
Department of Civil Engineering, include Chemistry, Phy- 
sics, and Mechanics, with so much of Mathematics as these 
studies require. 

The Architectural studies include the theory and the 
history of Architecture and of the allied arts, drawing and 
modelling, with the constant practice of original design, 
and so much of specifications and practical construction as 
can conveniently be taught in a school. 

The buildings now constructing, which will be ready 
for occupation in October, provide, besides the necessary 
drawing rooms and lecture rooms, a special architectural 
laboratory for practice and experiment, and a library for 
study and for the accomodation of the large collection of 
drawings, prints and photographs now in process of form- 
ation. 

For a circular of information containing further partic- 
ulars address, REGISTRAR, SCHOOL OF MINES, 

Madison av. and 49th St., New York city. 



S* <£l* 2DS3?!ff2'<$<03?i 



nwM 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily- 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, ----- $1.50 a Year in A-dvance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

«®-Speoial Rates to Student Clubs.-ffi8 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the JSneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books ; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
■of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools aud academies haviug a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course aud 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, ho will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, aud will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics aud Astrouomy, three terms. 

Chemistry aud Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental aud Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law aud Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 




MB 




Vol. XIII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DECEMBER 5, 1883. 



No. 10. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
Oliver W. Means, '84, Managing Editor. 
Charles E. Sayward, '84, Business Editor. 
Llewellyn Barton, '84. John A. "Waterman, Jr.,'84. 
William H. Cothren, '84. Oliver R. Cook, '85. 
Rodney I. Thompson, '84. Nehemiah B. Ford, '85. 
Sherman W. "Walker, '84. John A. Peters, '85. 
Terms— $2.00 a year IN advance; single copies, 15 cents. 
Remittances should l)e made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to 
contribute articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by the writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 
Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 



EDITORIAL HOTES. 



We have been surprised and gratified to 
see the amount of labor expended this fall 
in preparing ground for tennis courts, and in 
improving the delta. No doubt the results 
of this work will be appreciated, when the 
time comes round again for activity in sports. 
There is considerable interest manifested just 
now in improvements, and, before it is too late, 



we should like to offer a suggestion. Would 
it not be a good thing to remove the fence in 
the rear of the college buildings? If it were 
done, a clear space out through the pines 
would be left. In our opinion, such a change 
would add greatly to the general appearance 
of the campus. To be sure, some, peculiarly 
interested in maintaining a fence, mightobject; 
but would not the great improvement obvi- 
ously resulting from its removal be sufficient 
to outweigh all objections? We shall cer- 
tainly hope to see this change brought about 
before a great while. 



This issue of the Orient is delayed one 
week to enable us to bring out a number the 
last week of the term. Then, too, the regu- 
lar time was on the day before Thanksgiving, 
when it would have been impossible for many 
to have received their copies before leaving 
town. It is hoped that this arrangement will 
meet the approbation of the students, as it 
was done to accommodate them. 



The orchestra has been reorganized, and 
it is hoped that the end of the winter will 
find it in good practice. Although the indi- 
viduals composing the orchestra may all be 
first-class performers, as is likely, }'et some 
time must necessarily elapse before they will 
be able to play together in good time. An 
orchestra is able to furnish so much pleasure 
and entertainment, that it is most earnestly 
hoped that there may be enthusiasm sufficient 
to induce careful and persistent practice. Of 
course there is a proper as well as an improper 
time to play the comet or other instruments, 
and it is believed that the students generally 
will be willing to put up with some slight 
annoyance, if such forbearance is necessary. 
It may, perhaps, be possible to have a con- 
cert or two, a little later, if only the musical 
talent present in college is organized and 
directed. 

After some necessary delay the Senior 
class has fairly entered upon the study of 
psychology. One of the most prominent 
and important studies of the course, its depths 



140 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



are now beginning to be appreciated. To 
Dr. Brown, as representing the class and also 
the student body, we would extend a most 
cordial welcome. From what we have heard 
and ourselves seen, we feel confident that his 
instruction in mental philosophy will com- 
pare most favorably with that of preceding 
years. Dr. Brown has had large experience 
as an instructor, and brings to us the fruit of 
years of profound study. The most friendly 
relations have existed between Dr. Brown's 
predecessors and their classes, and the present 
Senior class is ready and desirous of co-oper- 
ating to make this year's work a success. 



The Bugle work is progressing, but not 
so fast as might be wished. Its editors have 
had many hindrances, and have been obliged 
to devote a great deal of time to the work. 
It is hoped that all, who have contributions 
for the Bugle, will see that they are presented 
in good season. It is expected that the 
Bugle will be out this term, but, as matters 
now stand, nothing definite can be staled. 
■Last year the Bugle came out the last week 
of the term, and that time lias been found to 
be in former years most advantageous. If the 
issue is delayed until the winter term there 
will probably not be so large a sale. So, for 
a variety of reasons it is hoped that its issue 
will be this term. 



be selected from them to fill out the nine, and 
to compose their crew. There are some of 
experience in athletics that can advise and 
otherwise aid those ignorant of proper modes 
of exercise. 



As the Literary Association has got fairly 
established, we shall hope to see something 
clone to secure a course of lectures. The 
subject has been fully discussed in former 
issues, and all we now desire is to keep it 
before the minds of the students until ex- 
pectation is changed to reality. A little 
active effort, on the part of a few, substan- 
tially aided by all the students would result 
in securing a profitable and interesting series 
of lectures. 



Now that the temporary gymnasium is in 
running order, opportunity for exercise is 
offered all who desire it. It is generally 
understood that daily exercise is necessary 
for the maintenance of good health. So it 
behooves the student to take advantage of 
facilities, however limited. Without doubt 
there will be room for all wishing to work. 
Those, who anticipate a place on the nine or 
the class crews, ought especially to begin at 
once. The Freshmen need to go to work 
immediately, in order that suitable men may 



At thought of the coming exhibition, the 
minds of some are filled with alarm. The 
Senior feels the importance of the occasion, 
which is to witness his first public attempt 
at an original oration. While the Junior 
mentally sinks into insignificance after a 
comparison of his own feeble effort with the 
profundity of knowledge exhibited by those 
above him. To all we would say, let your 
preparation be careful and timely, and let 
the reception of your part by the audience 
not in the least trouble you. The help one 
gains from the discipline of preparing and 
delivering a part, more than compensates 
him for the labor and anxiety involved. 



At the beginning of the last spring term, 
the Orient was sent to a large number of 
non-subscribers. An editorial called their 
attention to the fact and urged them to sub- 
scribe. At the same time a postal card was 
sent to each one asking him to become a sub- 
scriber, and, in any case, to reply. The sur- 
prise of the Business Editor can better be 
imagined than described, when, a few days 
ago, he received, from an alumnus, a letter 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



141 



asking the name of the "kind friend" that 
had been sending the Orient to his address 
for nearly two terms. We can with difficulty 
think of a graduate so rusty in all college 
learning as to be unable to read ten lines of 
simple English. Still more difficult is it for 
us to imagine one so entirely forgetful of 
even primary instruction as to be unable to read 
a postal card, for we supposed every one read 
" postals." As most of the alumni are com- 
placently receiving the Orient, as it is sent 
them, we trust they recognize their " kind 
friend" and will see that he is rewarded in 
due season. 



OUR COLLEGE BUILDINGS.— I. 

" OLD MASSACHUSETTS." 

The only one of our buildings which 
owes its origin to another century than our 
own, or which can be truly called venerable, 
is .Massachusetts Hall. From its central posi- 
tion in the college grounds it has seen spring 
up around it, one after the other, the' six 
larger Halls which we now have ; from 
Maine, in 1807, to Memorial, the newest and 
noblest of them all. By looking over the old 
college records, which date as far back as 
1794, many interesting facts concerning the 
founding and development of .the college 
can be gleaned. It appears that no sooner 
was the charter granted, and this blueberry 
covered knoll in the sandy town of Bruns- 
wick chosen for the location of the new col- 
lege, than its friends began to exert them- 
selves to provide a Hall. In the spring of 
1796, before the deeds of the land on which 
the college was to be erected had been ob- 
tained, before there were any funds in the 
treasury, and when the only property in the 
hands of the trustees was a number of acres 
of land, almost unsalable at two shillings an 
acre, it was voted to build a brick structure 
one hundred feet long by forty wide and 
four stories high. But this project, so ambi- 



tious for so young, and so poor, a college, was 
wisely dismissed by the Boards of 1797 ; and 
it was voted instead to build immediately a 
" House for the use of the College," of less 
pretentious dimensions, and finished " after 
the finishing of Hollis Hall at Cambridge." 
In the autumn of 1798, with four hun- 
dred dollars in money, the Boards caused 
bricks to be hauled from Portland and began 
work on the first college edifice. So little 
progress was made, however, that by the 
spring of the next year the walls only had 
risen above the ground. And then, unfortu- 
nately, both the money and the credit of the 
young institution became exhausted ; and the 
workmen, after finishing the outside and 
making it safe from the elements, were dis- 
charged. For the next two years the build- 
ing remained with windows boarded up, a 
desolate object to behold, furnishing a retreat 
for bats and for such wandering vagabonds as 
might prefer its shelter to that of the neigh- 
boring forest. During this time it appears 
from the records that various trespasses were 
committed on the apparently abandoned shell, 
and that some persons " did cut and cany 
away the lead from the chimneys." A com- 
mittee was appointed by the Boards to in- 
quire out and prosecute those guilty of this 
misdemeanor ; but as no report of this com- 
mittee is on record it is to be presumed that 
the item went to swell the " average of 
repairs " charge on the term bills of the first 
class. But, although it certainly looked as if 
the building had been abandoned, such was 
not the case ; for by the summer of 1801 the 
friends of the college had succeeded in col- 
lecting the sum of two thousand dollars, and 
in one year from that date the two lower 
stories of the college house were finished. 
The interior of the structure was planned 
after a somewhat remarkable fashion ; for it 
must be remembered that it was intended to 
make this one building serve for chapel, reci- 
tation, and lecture rooms, dormitory, and 



142 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



President's house. The door, on the south 
side, then, as now, opened into a small pas- 
sage way from which stairs rose to the second 
floor. The eastern portion of the building 
was occupied by the President and family. 
The south-eastern corner was his parlor, the 
north-eastern his kitchen. A projection, now 
an entry way to the Cleaveland Cabinet, 
served for a pantry. Over these rooms were 
chambers. The western lower portion was 
one large room for chapel and hall ; over this 
were two rooms for students. 

The first Thursday in September, 1802, 
witnessed the installation of Joseph McKeen 
the first President, and John Abbot, the first 
Professor of the college. On that day the 
Boards met at eight o'clock in the morning 
and formally conferred the name of Massa- 
chusetts Hall upon the new edifice. At noon, 
say the records, a procession was formed in 
which were displayed, for (he first time in the 
district of Maine, the college insignia, the 
cap and the gown, the seal and the keys. 
This procession marched directly south from 
the hall to a tent and a stage erected in the 
woods, where the ceremonies of inauguration 
took place, for the most part in Latin. 

It is related in this connection that a 
negro named Huston, being elbowed some- 
what by the crowd, and in order to get a 
better chance to see and hear, took a position 
directly beneath the platform, calmly seated 
himself on a log and placed his upturned eye 
--at a convenient knot-hole in the floor. The 
President, while delivering the most eloquent 
part of his Inaugural, happened to catch 
sight of this dilated eve fixed upon him, and 
completely broke down. It was only after 
bethinking himself of the expedient of plac- 
ing his foot over the knot-hole . that he was 
able to proceed. After the exercises were 
over the whole company returned to Massa- 
chusetts Hall and there partook of a sub- 
stantial banquet. Four weeks later, about 
the last of September, the first class of eight 



young men was admitted, and lodged in the 
rooms over the chapel. The President and 
family took possession of their apartments 
and we have a most curious, as well as a 
most pleasing mingling of domestic and aca- 
demic life. Prayers were held every morn- 
ing and evening. There was no pulpit in the 
chapel, — merely a table and chair at one end 
of the room. Here, on Sunday afternoon, 
the President was accustomed to hold public 
worship which was attended by town people 
as well as students. Recitations were held 
in the students' rooms three times a day, 
rotating from room to room on successive 
weeks, each student being obliged to borrow 
chairs enough from his neighbors while his 
turn lasted. But this economical arrange- 
ment of crowding a college into one small 
house did not meet with the approval of 
President McKeen, who, in the first part of 
the year 1803, moved into a separate house 
provided for him by the Boards, thus leaving 
a little more liberty to the students, who had 
previously been prevented from having a full 
quota of midnight suppers through fear of 
having the Faculty, who lived so near, sud- 
denly appear on the scene with the veritable 
cane which summoned them to recitations. 

[To be concluded.] 



THE SWIFT RIVER VALLEY. 

In the bosom of the mountains 
Of the dear old Granite State 
Nestles close a lovely valley, 
Clad in green immaculate. 

Here, of old, in unknown ages, 
When dark chaos reigned supreme, 
Was a vast unbroken mountain, 
Brightened by no sparkling stream. 
Naught but awful, dismal demons 
Visited the lofty plain ; 
Cold, bare rocks groaned back an echo 
Of the winds' mournful refrain. 

Ceres ne'er as yet had entered 
This fantastic king's domaiu, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



143 



Needing soil her life to nourish, 
Needing warmth, and flew, and rain. 

Once from out his star-girt chariot 

Zeus surveyed the gloomy scene, 

And a sad dissatisfaction 

Settled on his brow serene. 

Quickly then he sped his horses 

Till his dazzling stars had come 

O'er the center of the mountain 

Where the darksome demons roam. 

Calling then his faithful servant, 

Who had followed in his wake, 

Said he : " Hermes, to Olympus 

Haste thee. From my quiver take 

The largest thunder-bolt you find there ; 

Bring it me with speed. 

I this barren mass will shatter. 

Go ! for thus have I decreed." 

Hermes, on his winged sandals, 

Swiftly flew through ether bright 

Into the blest realms of heaven, 

Into lands of pure delight. 

Soon he found the golden quiver 

Pilled with awful bolts of fire, 

And he chose one of proportions 

Much exceeding others there. 

Back he flew with speed surpassing 

That of some erratic star 

Which, from vast unknown recesses, 

Falls and fuses in the air. 

Zeus received the bolt of thunder 

And his hand omnipotent 

Hurled it forth with mighty power : 

To the earth it whirring went. 

With a stunning, fierce explosion, 

Thunders upon thunders roared. 

Crashing, crushing, rending, smashing, 

Through the rocks the missile bored ; 

All the mass, convulsed and shattered, 

Took on forms of shapeliness, 

Mountain peaks and rounded hill-tops 

All about the landscape grace, 

On the mountains, in the valleys, 

Soil began to form and grow. 

Ceres, having found her daughter 
In dark Hades far below, 
Leaving her celestial dwelling, 
Came and dwelt forever there, 
Caused the earth to bloom and blossom 
With a fragrant verdure fair. 

From a crevice in the hill-side, 



From a deep, concealed source 
Burst a little sparkling streamlet, 
Forming soon its winding course. 
This was joined by many others 
Rippling with sweet melody 
Till they, in a brimming river, 
Followed valleys toward the sea. 

Here, the agile sprites and wood-nymphs, 
Happy children of the moon, 
Loved to come in pleasant evening 
Tripping light to mystic tune. 
Here, the sportive echoes, flitting 
Ever from the mountain steeps 
Back and forth with form of spirit, 
Sought Narcissus where he sleeps. 
When they saw the ponds and fountains 
From whose mirrored depths reflect 
The beauties of the grand old forest 
With its graceful tops bedecked, 
Then they sighed among the pine trees, 
Murmuring in a sweet, low voice, 
" I don't wonder that Narcissus 
Took his image for his choice 
For his sweetheart, if he ever, 
Gazing in this flattering pool, 
Saw his loveliness reflected 
In the water, clear and cool." 

Here in after years, the Bed Man, 
Loving well grand Nature's work, 
Used to come to fish and wander 
Where the fleet deer like to lurk. 
Names he gave to those huge mountains, 
Pleasant names and musical ; 
But most all have long since faded 
As the flowers in the fall. 
There is yet old Passaconuaway, 
And Chocouria still remains, 
But the rest have names more modern 
Fashioned by less fertile brains. 

And the Red Man— where now is he ? 

Where goes he to fish and hunt I 

Comes he not in gentle spring-time ? 

Comes he not in harvest month 1 

Ask the wind that from the westward 

Bears a tale of grief and woe, 

He from his loved laud was banished 

In those sad years long ago. 

Who can tell what grief his heart-strings 

Rent as, from a western height, 

Sadly took he one last survey 

Of the vale of his delight. 



144 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Now he's gone. No more his moose-call 

Echoes back from old Owl's Head, 

Nevermore he climbs Bear Mountain 

Where his boyhood's footsteps led. 

Yet Swift River rushing ever 

Over smooth rock, glistening, bright, 

Goes to join tbe peaceful Saco 

In its never-ceasing flight. 

Thanks be to a kind Creator 

That, though modern men efface 

The beauties of the stream and mountain, 

They can not their forms erase. 

Now the Pale-face from the city 
Comes with patent poles and hooks, 
With his high-top boots and dress coat, 
Seeking the Swift River brooks. 
But alas ! his vain precautions 
Prove a failure, at the best, 
For he soon falls in all over, 
As if by bad luck possessed. 
Then he turns his footsteps homeward 
Wetter, but a wiser fop ; 
While the river, mirthful ever, 
With gay laughter bubbles up. 

But the soul that loves the forest 
And in pathless woodlands roves 
With their silence solitary, 
With their pleasant vales and groves, 
Finds sweet pleasure in communiug 
With itself at such a time, 
As it sees the God of Nature 
In his handiwork sublime. 



LOUIS KOSSUTH. 

The report that Kossuth, the Hungarian 
patriot, is dying at Turin, where he has been 
living in retirement for several years, will 
bring to the recollections of many the visit 
of this remarkable man to the United States 
in 1851-2, and the hearty reception given 
him by our people who have always been in- 
terested in the story of his life. Louis 
Kossuth was born at Monok, a town in 
northern Hungary, on the 27th of April, 
1802. 

His father, who had been active in de- 
fending the cause of nationality, had suffered 
in the struggle, and Hungary still lay in 



bondage, though the spirit of her people was, 
as yet, unsubdued by royal power. Hence it 
was that Kossuth came to cherish a great love 
for his people, and a great hatred for nobility, 
at a very early age. 

Determined to make the most of his op- 
portunities he prepared for college, and at an 
early age entered Calvanist College, from 
which he graduated in due season with the 
highest honors. After graduation and at 
the age of 17 he commenced the study of 
law which he completed in three years. In 
1822 lie was appointed honorary attorney to 
the count}' of Zemplin, — a position corre- 
sponding somewhat to that of our district 
attorney. Thus, owing to his great abilities, 
he was brought to the notice of his country- 
men, — a youth though he was. 

On account of certain philanthropic ser- 
vices rendered by him during the great 
plague of 1831, and on account of which he 
won many friends and admirers, Kossuth, 
in accordance with a long-established custom, 
was nominated to fill the place of absent 
magnate in the Diet of 1832. It was in this 
assembly that he gained the confidence of his 
people, and incurred the bitter enmity of the 
nobility by advocating popular rights and ex- 
pressing sympathy for the oppressed peas- 
antry. He not only advocated but he de- 
manded those rights in behalf of his country- 
men, claiming that rights were natural and 
common to all men, and that they were not a 
gift to be bestowed by any royal power. To 
add to the hostility of the government toward 
him, he began to publish the proceedings 
of the Diet of which the people had, hitherto, 
been kept in ignorance, — spreading the rec- 
ords as extensively as possible among the 
peasantry who read in amazement the pro- 
ceedings of the Diet whose tyranny they had 
long felt. Such revelations speedily aroused 
the spirit of revenge among them, and the 
nobility saw that their power lay, not in the 
enlightenment, but in the ignorance of the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



145 



masses ; hence further publication must be 
suppressed. 

But despotic laws had no terror for Kos- 
suth, he gained courage from opposition and 
became more active in publishing the pro- 
ceedings of the Diet. Hence, for defiance of 
law and on account of the alarm he caused 
the nobility, Kossuth was seized without any 
forms of law, and hurried to jail where he 
was confined for a year, at the expiration of 
which he was brought forth for trial, — to be 
tried at a court of justice where justice was 
unknown. He was found guilty of treason 
and was sentenced to four years' imprison- 
ment within the walls of a loathsome dun- 
geon. While suffering this confinement he 
became familiar with the English language, — 
having as his teachers an English grammar, 
a dictionary, and a Shakespeare. 

Thus in his solitude was he preparing 
himself to enlist the sympathies of a great 
people by portraying to them, in matchless 
eloquence, the story of his country's wrongs. 
After serving out three years of his sentence 
he was released, but his devotion to his 
country was undiminished. As soon as he 
had restored his strength lost by imprison- 
ment, he began to attack the government as 
fearlessly as before through the medium of a 
newspaper, of which he was editor. In 1817 
Kossuth was elected to the Diet, not this 
time in place of an absent magnate but as 
representative of his people, — chosen by their 
suffrages. Here he again renewed his de- 
mands in behalf of his oppressed people, — 
demands that were granted, but only for a 
short time. The duplicity of the King soon 
proved to be a more formidable enemy to 
Kossuth and to Hungary than was the opres- 
sion of her tyrants. From this time the his- 
tory of Kossuth and Hungary is sad and 
blood}', for Austria was perfidious and Russia, 
fearing that the spark of liberty kindled in 
Hungary would burn over all Europe, sent 
a portion of her troops to help conquer those 



who were fighting for liberty. But Hungary 
could not successfully combat with the vast 
armies of two powerful nations and was 
therefore compelled to give up the struggle, 
and on August 18, 1819, Kossuth bidding an 
affectionate farewell to his native land sought 
and found refuge among the Turks. By in- 
vitation of our government he visited the 
United States, landing at New York, Decem- 
ber 5, 1851. During his short stay here he 
won the admiration of the American people 
not alone by his eloquence, but by his earnest, 
untiring devotion to the cause of down- 
trodden Hungary, and the tender welcome 
given him by our people was a gratifying tes- 
timony of the love of American citizens, not 
only for popular rights, but also for him who 
dared defend such rights even though it be 
in the presence of despotism. No true Amer- 
ican can read the history of Kossuth and of 
Hungary without being moved ; for it is the 
sad story of a struggle for freedom, a strug- 
gle more dreary than our own. 

Though Kossuth failed to secure the free- 
dom he had hoped to obtain from the tyranny 
of Austria, yet he was a terror to the nobility 
who feared that the eloquence of the Hunga- 
rian patriot would be more disastrous to their 
throne than all the armies of Europe. Among 
all the records of the history of those whose 
lives have been devoted to this struggle no 
name is more illustrious than the name of 
Louis Kossuth. 



THETA DELTA CHI CONVENTION. 

The thirty-seventh annual convention of 
the Theta Delta Chi Fraternity was held at 
Martinellis Hotel, New York, Thursday and 
Friday, Nov. 22d and 23d, under the aus- 
pices of the Phi Charge of the College of 
the City of New York. 

Every charge was represented by a full 
quota of delegates. There was also a large 
number of visiting members present from 



146 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Cin- 
cinnati. 

Business meetings were held in the fore- 
noon and afternoon of both days, and a great 
amount of business transacted. 

Reports from all directions showed that 
the Fraternity was never in a more flourish- 
ing condition, and that it was steadily in- 
creasing in numbers and influence. The 
charge established at Harvard last year re- 
ported that it was prospering finely and the 
prospect was good for its becoming one of 
the strongest charges in the Fraternity. 
During the year a charge has been established 
at the Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N. Y., 
and reports itself in prosperous circum- 
stances. 

The following officers were elected for the 
ensuing year : President, Geo. Simons of 
Columbia Law School ; Treasurer, Geo. L. 
Taft, Boston University, '84 ; Secretary, C. 
Sawyer of Hamilton College, '84. 

Friday evening the delegates and visiting 
members to the number of seventy-five, met 
in one of Martinelli's spacious dining rooms 
and listened to an oration by Hon. John W. 
Griggs, College of the City of New York, 
'68. The oration received the closest atten- 
tion, and from time to time was heartily ap- 
plauded. After the speaking all devoted 
their energies to a sumptuous banquet, and 
for an hour merriment held sway. After the 
banquet there were toasts, speeches, songs, 
etc. At a late hour the company broke up, 
all agreeing that the thirty-seventh conven- 
tion was one of the most successful ever held 
by the Fraternity. 

The Phi Charge merits the thanks of the 
Fraternity for the admirable manner in which 
it provided for the wants of the Fraternity 
delegates. 



The singing at the church on the anniversary 
of Luther's birthday was very fine. There was a 
triple quartette consisting of the best local talent. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



Have you seen the comet ? 

Lots went home to thanksgiving. 

Got the hang of the new time yet ? 

Class elections have been all the rage. 

The boat crews have gone into training. 

First snow of the season November 14th. 

Twenty-eight spent their Thanksgiving here. 

'87 was quite an element in the organ concert. 

The bell-ringer needs to be a little more punctual. 

The Freshmen take to their extra row of scats 
kindly. 

Cole, '83, and Wilson, '81, passed Thanksgiving 
in town. 

Barton has charge of the reading-room at 
present. 

The new time improved the Faculty attendance 
at prayers. 

Adams, '84, has been elected director of the 
gymnasium. 

Orr, '84, is to help Prof. Carmichael in his lab- 
oratory work. 

Don't dump the ashes and rubbish right close to 
the door this winter. 

Charles came pretty near taking a " dead " the 
other day in geology. 

C. M. Austin, '87, played a piano solo at the 
First Parish concert. 

Longren, '84, has returned from teaching the 
Waldoboro High School. 

All of the Senior class were present November 
26th, for the first time this year. 

Good enough, Mr. Janitor ! Those storm doors 
in the chapel are just the thing. 

The Spanish Students were not liked. Too 
much sameness in their selections. 

The lawn-tennis players were decidedly " nipped 
in the bud " by the late cold snap. 

W. W. Curtis, '82, principal of Gorham, Me., 
High School, was in town last week. 

The text-book in psychology is "The Elements 
of Intellectual Science," by Noah Porter. 

Dr. C. F. Allen, '39, preached an able sermon at 
the First Parish church, Thanksgiving day. 

Prof. Lee has been making expeditions in search 
of worms and other specimens for dissection. 

B. College — "School-teachers may come and 
school-teachers may go, but I go on forever." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



147 



Cook, '85, is teaching at Cornville, Me. ; Folsom, 
at Berlin Falls, N. H. ; Kendall, at Upton, Me. 

Prof. Little has presented the library with 
Wilhelm Ipne's History of Rome iu five volumes. 

The treasurer has ordered new rowing seats and 
new weights to be put into the so-called gymnasium. 

Kemp, '64, teaches at Harrison Village this 
winter. It is his third consecutive winter term 
there. 

There has been a delightful uncertainty about 
Dr. Brown's hour of recitation, but it is a little bet- 
ter now. 

Walker and Barton, '84, Fling and Davis, '86, 
sang at the G. A. R. outertaiument at Bowdoinham 
last week. 

A number of the students attended the sociable 
at Mrs. Stevens's, Thursday week. All report a 
good time. 

Prof, in German— "Mr. W., how would you de- 
cline gutes, alter, rather Weinf" Mr. W. — "I 
shouldn't decline it." 

The Junior themes due last Saturday were upon 
the subjects, "Matthew Arnold," and "Standard 
of Political Leadership." 

Ecclesiastical history is cheap nowadays. One 
of the students bought quite a quantity the other 
day at five cents a pound. 

How this new time business will make the patent 
medicine men swear if they had got their annual 
dose of almanacs struck off! 

Last Tuesday evening, no less than a half dozen 
different entertainments were going on in town. 
No need of anybody being left. 

On the new schedule of lessons for the Seniors 
there is one square that is left blank. There must 
have been a mistake somewhere. 

Fling, '86, is teaching at Bowdoinham ; Davis, 
'85, at Cape Elizabeth ; Turner, '86, Vinalhaven ; 
Byram, '86, Pattau High School. 

The Freshmen and Sophomores have been try- 
ing to get up courage enough to play a game of 
Rugby, but have not succeeded yet. 

The Freshmen are doing their share in the 
burden of college sports by paying the required 
admission fee to the different associations. 

The case for the catalogue cards of the library 
came last week. The south wing is all re-cata- 
logued, and the librarian has begun in the main 
room. 

The three schools adopted by Bowdoiu as fitting 



schools are Fryeburg Academy, Hallowell Classi- 
cal Institute, and Washington Academy, East 
Machias. 

Some of the boys recently visited the shell 
heaps on Goose Island in search of fossils. It is 
said they took some alcohol to insure preservation — 
not of the fossils, however. 

Some of the boys were sarcastic enough to hint 
that the choir sang the best they ever heard it a 
week ago last Sunday morning. They should 
extend their thanks to the organist. 

The Reading-Room Association voted to have 
an extra fifty cents put upon the present term bill 
of each student to meet some outstanding bills that 
have been accumulating for the past year or two. 

Nipper's Socratic porch will no longer resound 
to the tread of scholastic feet. It has been laid 
away iu its winter quarters. It was either the want 
of kindling wood or esthetic taste that prompted 
the act. 

The festive Medic has begun to come already. 
Last Friday morning, bright and early, one strayed 
into the campus and inquired for the secretary. 
He doubtless came early to avoid the rush and se- 
cure a good — cat. 

New apparatus has been put into the gymna- 
sium. It is now fitted up quite well for the boating 
men, but it has practically debarred the baseTball 
men from practice. But perhaps we shall not play 
ball any more. 

The Freshmen, in coming out of recitation 
before time, should remember to tread lightly. 
They have got in the habit of bringing down their 
brogans in the hall-ways with a noise resembling 
juvenile thunder. 

Martin Luther was professor in college for two 
years and had only one coat. We can account for 
that easy enough. There was no ready-made 
clothing in those days and Wittenberg was con- 
trolled by Brunswick tailors. 

Dr. Brown, the new Prof, in Psychology, arrived 
last week. He is an elderly gentleman of very 
pleasing address and has already created a very 
favorable impression among the students with 
whom he has come in contact. 

Gough received about two hundred dollars for 
his recent lecture here. His audience was not suffi- 
cient to pay the expenses by about fifteen dollars. 
If it had been a burnt cork show the hall would 
have been crowded. Such is life ! 

Many curses and maledictions dire fall on the 
head of the kindling-wood fiend. All through the 



148 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



last cold snap at early dawn and dewy eve, yea, 
even in the silent watches of the night, the everlast- 
ing whack of his little hatchet was heard. 

It is lucky that the Commissioner of Pensions 
shut down on the pension counterfeiters just as he 
did, as they would have had a pension claim against 
the government for our celestial visitor, the comet, 
on the plea that it was present at the war of 1812. 

Speakers two weeks ago were: Thompson, Means, 
'84 ; Rogers, Alexander, '85 ; Dike, Smith, '86. 
Last week, Walker, '84; French, Whittier, '85; 
Wentworth, Home, '86. This week, Cobb, Phinuey, 
'84 ; Bartlett, Tarr, '85 ; J. H. Davis, A. P. Knight, 
'86. 

We think the idea of a new uniform for the nine 
nest season is ill-timed. If boating takes a strong 
hold next year as is now probable, it will be hard 
enough work to get money for the imperative 
expenses without taking up anything that may be 
omitted. 

The new society has adopted the name, " The 
Bowdoin Literary Association." Its motto is 
" otium sine Uteris mars est." The time for the 
regular meetings is on Tuesday evening ; at present 
fortnightly, from the first week in November to the 
last week in April. 

The Professor in political economy said the other 
day at the Paris Exposition in 1878 that under 
extractive industries they placed manufactures, the 
cultivation of vegetables, etc. They omitted one 
important extractive industry, and that is dentistry. 
It is extractive in more than one phase. 

Scene : A sedate Senior's room into which his 
room-mate had conducted some lady friends. A 
Lisping Miss (noticing the piano) — "Do you thing, 
Mr. EL?" Mr. H. — "Oh yes, sometimes." L. 
M.— "Do you thing 'The BividgeV" Mr. H.— 
" I— I — I'm not sure, but 1 don't think I do." 

The orchestra will play next week at the K. of 
P. celebration at Freeport. It consists at present 
of W. R. Butler, leader and 1st violin ; E. B. Torrey, 
2d violin ; E. B. Burpee, 3d violin ; C. W. Longren, 
1st cornet; H. L. Lunt, 2d cornet; E. Thomas, 
trombone ; J. Torrey, Jr., clarionet ; C. C. Torrey, 
flute ; N. B. Ford, bass viol. 

Officers of the Literary Association are : Presi- 
dent, S. R. Child, '84 ; Vice-President, J. F. Libby, 
'85 ; Secretary and Treasurer, W. V. Wentworth, 
'86 ; Executive Committee, Thompson, Adams, '84, 
Knowlton, '86 ; Committee on Music, Walker, '84, 
Alexander, '85; Committee on Membership, Water- 
man, '84, Folsom, '85, Merrill, '87. 



The officers of the Sophomore class are : Presi 
dent, G. M. Norris; Vice-Presideut, A. M. Hutch' 

ins; Marshal, P. A. Knight; Eulogist, 

Elegist, J. H. Davis ; Panegyrist, W. H. Stackpol e 
Odist, W. W. Kilgore; Historian, F. L. Smith 
Secretary and Treasurer, H. L. Taylor ; Committee 
of Arrangements, C. A. Davis, E. E. Rideout, I. W. 
Home. 

Appointments for Senior and Junior exhibition, 
December 20th, are : Salutatorian, W. H. Cothrcn ; 
English Orations, C. E. Adams, S. R. Child, Z. W. 
Kemp, 0. W. Means, M. H. Orr, J. Torrey, J. A. 
Waterman, Jr., Seniors, and W. R. Butler, J. A. 
Peters, F. N. Whittier, M. H. Purriugton, Juniors; 
Committee of Arrangements, Adams, Kemp, '84, 
Purriugton, '85. 

The Juniors have elected the following class 
officers : President, L. B. Folsom ; Vice-President, 
R. S. French; Marshal, J. C. Hall; Orator, J. A. 
Peters; Poet, W. R. Butler; Odist, E. W. Free- 
man; Curator, H. N. Dunham; Chaplin, M. H. 
Purrington; Secretary and Treasurer, H. L. Lunt; 
Committee of Arrangements, N. B. Ford, W. P. 
Nealley, A. W. Rogers. 

Class officers of '87 are : President, E. L. Bart- 
lett ; Vice-President, C. M. Austin ; Secretary and 
Treasurer, F. Pushor ; Orator, E. B. Torrey ; His- 
torian, A. W. Merrill ; Poet, C. B. Burleigh ; Toast- 
Master, H. B. Austin; Prophet, M. L. Kimball; 
Committee of Arrangements, E. B. Burpee, 0. D. 
Sewell, W. L. Black ; Committee on Odes, E. C. 
Plummer, C. M. Austin, L. B. Varney. 

A certaiu '87 man mustered up courage enough 
to ask permission to accompany a certain young 
lady home from the sociable the other night. She 
of course assented. But, good heavens ! when too 
late he found that the home he sought was two 
miles away across the river in Topsham. We are 
willing to bet something that the youthful swain 
cursed his temerity on the homeward voyage. How 
he sighed for the herdic ! 

The programme for the first meeting of the Lit- 
erary Association was a discussion of the resolution : 
Resolved, that the giving away of the public lands 
of the United States for private enterprises is a 
dangerous policy. Disputants : affirmative, L. Bar- 
ton, I. W. Home ; negative, J. A. Waterman, N. 
V. Wentworth. Reading by J. F. Libby, and five- 
minute speeches by different members of the so- 
ciety. Next regular meeting in lower Memorial 
Hall, on Tuesday evening, December 11th, at 7.30 
o'clock. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



149 



The Senior class has elected the following offi- 
cers for the ensuing year : President, H. M. Wright ; 
Vice-President, C. W. Longren ; Marshal, C. E. 
Adams ; Opening Address, C. E. Sayward ; Ora- 
tor, L. Barton ; Poet, C. C. Torrey ; Prophet, Z. 
W. Kemp ; Historian, R. Thompson ; Odist, W. 
K. Hilton ; Chaplain, J. A. Waterman, Jr. ; Closing- 
Address, 0. W. Means ; Committee of Arrange- 
ments, H. R. Bradley, C. C. Clark, A. H. Brown ; 
Committee on Pictures, S. R. Child, A. C. Cobb, 
E. C. Smith ; Committee on Music, H. C. Phinney, 
S. W. Walker, F. P. Knight. 

Quite a number of the students attended the 
First Parish concert. The audience was not large 
but appreciative. Each participant received a 
generous share of applause. There was variety 
enough in the programme to meet the tastes of all. 
Mr. Murray's organ selections were appropriately 
made and well rendered. Miss Brown sang in a 
happy and pleasing manner and received several 
encores. But the most pleasing part, to us, was 
Mr. Pennell's singing. He sings without affectation, 
has a fine tenor voice, and his selections were such 
as to display the qualities of his voice at their best 
advantage. Mr. Austin's solo didn't do him justice, 
We have heard him execute the same piece on a dif- 
ferent piano in such a manner that you would 
scarcely think the two pieces were the same. 

An elderly lady, two young misses, and a youth 
of perhaps a dozen summers, accosted a studen 
the other day, on the Main walk, with : " Say, stu- 
dent, will you tell us the names of these build- 
ings ? " With the characteristic politeness of a 
Bowdoin man he replied : " Certainly, madame. 
The one on the extreme right is Appleton Hall ; the 
next with the towers is the Chapel ; the one at the 
left, near the street, is Winthrop Hall; the one be- 
tween that and the Chapel is Maine Hall ; the large 
three-story building across the way, in line with 
those just named, is the Maine Medical Building ; 
the one to the north of us, at the head of the broad 
walk, is historic Massachusetts Hall, the oldest of 
all the buildings; and the one to the left of that, 
with massive structure, is the newest, our pride, 
Memorial Hall." " Yes, I see," replied the lady, 
but where is Bowdoin College?" 

The work of leveling up the delta has begun. 
We wish the treasurer might see his way clear 
to enlarge the field a rod or two in the direction of 
the cemetery. A dozen or fifteen trees cut along 
the edge of the woods would do the business. 
Then the grounds could be laid out differently so 



that it would give the players a better chance and 
leave more room for the spectators. There would 
be a chance there for some seats and everything 
would be more convenient. The trees that we have 
reference to will never be worth any more for 
timber than at present, some of them even having 
begun to decay, and the janitor knows what could 
be done with the lumber, or it might serve as a 
nucleus for the gymnasium. But, methinks, I bear 
the authorities say that "the more we do for the 
students, the more they demand," so we won't urge 
the matter too strongly at present. But we would 
chant their praises and hand their names down to 
future generations and unborn ages if such a thing 
could happen. 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited to send 
personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Brunswick, Me.] 

'43. — We are informed that H. G. Herrick was 
the regular republican candidate for sheriff of Essex 
County, Mass., and not the democratic candidate, 
as stated in our last issue. Mr. Herrick was elected 
to the office of sheriff. 

'61. — Edward Stanwood has resigned his posi- 
tion as editor-in-chief of the Boston Daily Adver- 
tiser. 

76.— George T. Prince has accepted a position 
in connection with the construction of the new 
Water Works at St. Paul, Minn. 

'59.— Charles E. Hilton died in Washington, 
D. C, a few weeks since. Mr. Hilton was born in 
Bridgton, Me., March, 1830. After graduation he 
was principal of the Bridgton Academy for seven 
years, then of a preparatory school for the Poly- 
technic College, Philadelphia, and later took charge 
of a soldiers' orphans' home in that city. In 1870 
he was appointed to a position as principal of a 
large public school in Washington. At the time of 
his death he was serving as Superintendent of the 
Washington Schools. His remains were brought to 
his native place for interment. 

'81. — Wheelwright has gone to Minneapolis, 
Minn., where he will practice law. 

'60.— Hon. Thos. B. Reed has returned from his 
European trip. 

'69.— Thos. H.Eaton sailed for London, Octo- 
ber 31st, to accept a position in the Banking House 
of Lombard Bros. 

'55. — Thomas H. Clark died at Aurora, 111., 



150 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



November 12th. He was born in Bristol, Me., 
Nov., 1829. His life work was that of an educator, 
and he held a leading position in this work in 
Illinois for more than a quarter of a century. He 
was principal of the High School in Ottawa, in that 
State, for sixteen years, and at the time of his 
death was principal of the Aurora High School. 
He was a highly respected citizen and an honored 
teacher. 

We are requested to insert the following notice : 

Boston Bowdoin Club. 
The next meeting will be held at the Revere 
House, on Friday, the seventh day of December, 
1883, at six o'clock. Dinner will be served promptly 
at quarter past six. 

F. V. Wright, 
A. T. Parker, 
J. H. Payne, 

Committee. 
Arthur T. Parker, Sec, 

164 High Street, Boston. 



INTER-GOLLEGIATE NEWS. 



Amherst : 

Mathew Arnold will soon lecture before the stu- 
dents. 

The Sophomore Cremation of Mathematics oc- 
curred Nov. 12th, between 2 and 5 a.m. It was an 
imposing pageant. 
Princeton : 

At a recent trustees' meeting, the standard of 
admission was raised. In Greek, four books of 
Anabasis will be required instead of three. In 
English, the chapter on Sentences, in Hart's Rhet- 
oric, will be required. In Mathematics, the second 
book of Euclid and Quadratics of Two Unknown 
Quantities have been added. 

A pamphlet containing ninety pages of Professor 
Bracket's work on Physics is now being used by 
the Juniors. 

A dozen '85 men have organized a Shakespeare 
club. They meet every Saturday evening and read 
critically for about an hour. 

Mrs. R. L. Stuart has visited Princeton, and left 
the promised $150, OOOfor the new School of Philos- 
ophy. 
Tufts : 

The Tuftonian makes an appeal for an office. 



The new gymnasium is fast approaching com- 
pletion. 

A canvass of the several classes in college re- 
veals the following political facts : The two upper 
classes are unanimously republican, the Sophomore 
class has one democrat, and the Freshman two. 

At a meeting of the Reading-Room Association 
it was voted to subscribe for the monthly magazines 
for the year, instead of nine months as formerly, 
and that these should be placed in the library, sub- 
ject to the care of the librarian, and to become the 
property of the college at the end of each month. 
University of Michigan : 

The total amount of the salaries of the profes- 
sors, officers, and employes of the University is 
$131,000; for completion of library building, $15,- 
732 will be required ; for fuel and lights, $10,000 ; 
for general library, $11,710; $65,000 will be re- 
ceived from fees, $40,500 from state tax, and 
$30,000 from interest on lands. 

There were 1440 students in attendance last 
year, of which 170 were ladies. The University 
orchestra has been reorganized with a membership 
of twelve. 

The base-ball team will not be as strong this 
year as last. 

The Argonaut prints more matter than any 
other college paper. — Argonaut. 

About $4000 has been subscribed by the stu- 
dents and others to a fund for the erection of a new 
gymnasium. 

The Chronicle and Argonaut gave prize rackets 
to the winners in the tennis tournament. 
Gleanings : 

Williams College received its name from Colonel 
Ephralm Williams, a solder of the old French war. 
Dartmouth College was named after Lord Dart- 
mouth who subscribed a large amount and was 
president of the first board of trustees. Brown 
University received its name from Nicholas Brown, 
who was a graduate of the college, went into busi- 
ness, became very wealthy and endowed the college 
very largely. Bowdoin College was named after 
Governor Bowdoin of Maine. Yale College was 
named after Elihu Yale, who made very liberal 
donations to the college. 

Washington, Jackson, Van Bhren, Taylor, Fill- 
more, Lincoln, and Johnson did not go to college. 
Jefferson and Monroe entered William and Mary 
College, but did not graduate. Grant was educated 
at West Point. Madison graduated at Princeton, 
Polk at the University of Carolina, the Adamses at 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



151 



Harvard, Harrison at Hampden Sidney College, 
Pierce at Bowdoin, Buchanan at Dickinson, Hayes 
at Kenyon College, Garfield at Williams, and Arthur 
at Union. Polk, Buchanan, and Hayes graduated 
with first honors. — Ex. 

The son of Gardiner Colby, founder of Colby 
University, has given $1,000,000 to establish a new 
university in Wisconsin. — Sun. 

The undergraduates at Cornell number 407. 

The six prizes for literary excellence at Williams 
this year were all awarded to the editors of the 
college papers. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



As we have looked over our exchanges for the 
past few weeks it has gradually dawned upon us 
that the Oriext is mentioned less frequently than 
of yore. Even our friend the exchange editor of 
the Echo has ceased his writings and has betaken 
himself to the more salubrious employment of gath- 
ering statistics, while the Vassar Miscellany, who 
used to have quite a " mash '' on the Orient, has 
scornfully refused to even criticise us. Is it possi- 
ble that we have come to a stand still, and have 
become stranded on the banks of the literary whirl- 
pool, or is it because " chum stories" are no longer 
admissible in current college literature? * 

The following paragraph is being extensively 
copied : " Of eight of the principal colleges, the 
only one strongly advocating a protective tariff is 
the University of Pennsylvania. At Williams the 
free trade theory is taught, likewise at Tale, Har- 
vard, and Amherst. Princeton is in an undecided 
state as to which to uphold. At Columbia, in the 
school of Political Science, all the instruction has a 
leaning toward free trade." Protection is taught 
here. No text-book is used as the instruction takes 
the form of a course of lectures. 

The mania for statistics seems to be increasing 
as the following item will show : " Rev. D. Hamlin, 
President of Middlebury (Vt.) College has intro- 
duced a new feature in the college boarding-house. 
A set of scales has been placed in the diniug-hall 
and the students are weighed monthly. A record 
of weight is kept, and by this means the students 
are enabled to tell what effect the college board 
has upon them." We should object to the introduc- 
tion of such a plan, for the President might say : 
" You do not come to college to live in luxury but 

* A valuable book will be given as a prize for the first correct 
solution of the above. 



to study. Taking on adipose tissue is not condu- 
cive to mental and moral growth." So it becomes 
possible that by a logical course of reasoning he 
could prove to the unsuspecting students that they 
ought to live largely upon oat-meal, cracked wheat, 
and other nutritious cereals. Thus making it pos- 
sible to say with pride in the annual catalogue that 
" under the new management the cost of living has 
been largely reduced." The craze for statistics has 
struck us and now one recitation room is blessed 
with a spirometer. This is both interesting and 
useful as it relieves the classes reciting in that 
room of the painful duty of yelling " adjourn " for 
five minutes before the recitations begin. We 
would suggest that some kind hearted individual 
invent a machine by which micrometric measure- 
ments of the beard raising capacities of various 
individuals could be made. Thus any one by know- 
ing the ratio T-B, in which B represents the length 
of beard, and T the time of its growth, could deter- 
mine whether or no he could raise a beard or mous- 
tache of the prescribed length in an ordinary life- 
time. In this manner the public would be spared 
the heartrending sight of so many futile attempts 
at raising hirsute appendages which are daily wit- 
nessed in every community. It would also be of 
incalculable benefit to the class statistician, as in ad- 
dition to his other valuable information given on 
class day, he would be able to correctly inform a 
beardless Senior's admiring friends (among whom is 
supposed to be his " best girl ") how many years 
will elapse before his moustache becomes visible, 
and how long a period it will be before it will begin 
to " tickle." 

We have heard much about the advantages of 
co-education but have never known of its utility in 
assisting the editor, weary with his arduous toil, 
until the last Syracusan came into our hands. It 
seems that they have a number of co-eds at Syra- 
cuse University and as a matter of course the- Syra- 
cusanis exceedingly proud of them. This is espec- 
ially apparent in the local department. Out of thirty- 
eight " locals" eighteen treat of the wiles and win- 
ning ways of the fair ones. The following is a fair 
sample : " A Senior is standing in front of a Profes- 
sor's door. Thesecond bell rings and a Freshman 
co-ed hastenstowardherrecitation. The Seniorem- 
braces the — opportunity to skip, the co-ed murmurs 
' excuse me,' and passes on." 

The announcement of the new Correspondence 
University is at hand. Perhaps no better idea of 
the enterprise can be given than by using in part 
the words of the circular. 



152 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



" The Correspondence University is an associa- 
tion of experienced instructors, who have been 
carefully selected, not only for their knowledge of 
the subjects assigned to them, but for their skill 
and ability in teaching. Its purpose is to enable 
students to receive at their homes systematic in- 
struction, at a moderate expense, in all subjects 
which can be taught by means of correspondence ; 
whether the studies be collegiate, graduate, or pro- 
fessional, or preparatory for the higher institutions 
of learning. 

"As the Correspondence University is designed 
to supplement the work of other educational insti- 
tutions, by instructing persons who from any cause 
are unable to attend them, it hopes to be cordially 
welcomed by the authorities of the schools and col- 
leges in the United States and Canada. It is not 
to be conducted for or against the interests of any 
other organization, but its members desire to be 
helpful to all. It will doubtless stimulate to me- 



thodical study persons who otherwise might find no 
opportunity for intellectual work, and is thus likely 
to increase the number of worthy applicants for 
admission to good schools. Instructors will always 
be selected for their special qualifications, without 
regard to the institutions with which they happen 
to be connected." 

" Informal examinations by correspondence will 
be held at intervals by each instructor, at his dis- 
cretion ; they will involve no extra expense and will 
be required of every student." 

" Teachers and students, not wishing to take a 
systematic course of instruction, but desirous of 
occasional assistance on points of special difficulty 
in any subject, will receive the needed help on ap- 
plication to the Secretary." 

Further information can be obtained of the Sec- 
retary, Professor Lucien A. Wait, Cornell Univer- 
sity, Ithica, New York. 




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^4W f/ie Students Should Buy 

THEIR 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 

AT 

Fiask E. Bobnts 1 Boot I Shoo Sten, 

Cok. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 

& t Q e JIU11HS, . . B&11EB, 

ROOM OVER BOARDMAN'S, 
BRUNSWICK, Ivl A. I 3KT IE. 



BURBANK, DOUGLASS & CO. 



(Successors to True, Douglass & Co.) Importers and Wholesale 
Dealers in 

China, Crockery, I Glass Ware, 



LAMP GOODS, CHANDELIERS AND PLATED WARE, 
242 Middle Street, . . PORTLAND, MAINE. 

STROUT & WOODARD 

Have recently established in connection with their stock of Choice 
Groceries, a First-Class 

Crexieral Provision n^Ta,r3s:et 

Where may be found a full liue of Fine Meats, Country Produce, 
&c. Orders receive prompt attention. Give us a call at 

NO. 4 DAY'S BLOCK, - - ■ MAIN ST„ BRUNSWICK, ME. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



FRANK M. STETSON, 



— 

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&*£j££**- 





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TO PEISEBVE TIE HEALTH 

Use the Magnetion Appliance Co.'s 

Magnetic Lung Protector. 

They are priceless to Ladies. Gentlemen, and Children 
with Weak Lungs; no case of Pneumonia or Croup is ever 
known where these garments are worn. They also pre- 
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fATAR RH * t ' s ueet " ess to describe the symp- 
^" I r\ JA f\ n. toms of this nauseous disease that is 
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est and best of both sexes. Labor, study, and research in 
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Magnetic Lung Protector, affording cure for Catarrh, a 
remedy which contains No Drugging of the System, 
and with the continuous stream of Magnetism permeating 
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less than one-twentieth of the price asked by others for 
remedies upon which you take all the chances, and we es- 
pecially invite the patronage of the many "persons who 
have tried drugging their stomachs without effect. 

Hnw fn OMcun this Appliance. Go to your drug- 
nUW LU UUldlll gist and ask for them. If they 
have not got them, write to the proprietors, enclosing the 
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Send stamp for the " ISlew Departure in Medical Treat- 
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Note. — Send one dollar in postage stamps or currency (in let- 
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our Magnetic Insoles, and be convinced of the power residing in 
our Magnetic Appliances. Positively no cold feet when they 
are worn, or mone}* refunded. 



Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, ROOM 
PAPER, PERIODICALS, <3cC 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 7th, 18S4, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshua L. Chamberlain, LL.D., President ; Israel T. 
Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetric* 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Frederic H. Gerrish, M.D., 
Ar.atomy; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., MedicalJurisprudence ; Henrt 
Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry ; Bcrt G. Wilder, M.D., Physiology; 
Stephen H. Weeks, M.D , Surgery and Clinical Surgery ; Charles 0. 
Hunt, M. D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Daniel F. Ellis, M.D., 
Registrar and Librarian ; Irving Kimball, M .D, Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to the Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO , 

Portland, Maine. 



JOHN H. BRACKETT, 

SPRING STYLES, 1883, 

Consisting of Suitings, Overcoatings, and Pant Patterns, made in 
latest style and good lit guaranteed, at 20 per cent, less than the 
same goods can DO bought elsewhere. Also a 

Fine Line of White Shirts, Ties, Braces, Collars, 
Hose, and Under Flannels. 



The Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company, 

Assets, $51,500,000. Surplus, $6,500,000. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1846. 

The New Plan of Cash Value and Non-Fokfeitable 
Polict meets the needs of the public. Send for full informa- 
tion t0 H. N. FAIRBANKS, Gen'l Agent, 

BANGOR, MAINE. 

J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PICTURE FEAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

From the cheapest to the very best. Also Pictures, Cabinet 

Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, etc. Also, Agent for 

the celebrated Household Sewing Machine. 

In the Blue Store, Main Street, Second Door from Elm, 
Opposite the Park, Brunswick, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Washington Market, 

TONTINE HOTEL BLOCK, 

BRUNSWICK, IVC^A-IISJ-E- 

Bowdoin College Patronage Solicited. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEW1STOIM, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



WHEN YOU WAJVT A. RIDE 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE, 

On Cleaveland Street, where you will find turnouts to suit the most 



Stationery Department 



WRITING PAPER, PENS AND INK. 



fastidious. 



- Hates reasoii<tl>h>. 



RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will And the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No.l 

SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the- brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

"We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 

direct importation, which is made especially for us, water 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 
ALLEN & GINTEB. 



Manufacturers, 



RICHMOND, VA. 



"FAIR PRICES," QUALITY "THE BEST." 

We desire to call attention to several new 
varieties of First-Class Paper for Ladies' Corre- 
spondence. 

"ULSTER LINEN" and "OLD FASHION 
NOTE," from Marcus Ward & Co., London. 

"YE CHAUCER NOTE" and "VELLUM 
PARCHMENT," from Thos. De LaRue, London. 

" IMPERIAL TREASURY " Note, from Chas. 
Goodall & Sons, London. 

A beautiful assortment of American Paper, of 
many varieties, including 

"BUCKRAM," "ANTIQUE," "BOND," and 
the complete list of novelties in tints. 

VISITING and CORRESPONDENCE CARDS 
of new patterns, colors, shapes, and sizes. 

Our Stationery Department ivill 
supply Students with CLASS IN- 
VITA TIONS, PB OGBA MMES, 
SOCIETY DEVICES, on paper and 
envelopes, promptly and in right 
good style. 

Shreve, Crump & Low, 

Agents Gorham Mfg. Co. 

432 Washington Street, BOSTON, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DISEASE CURED 

WITHOUT HEBIGIHE! 

A Valuable Discovery for Sup-plying Magnetism to 

the Human System. Electricity and Magnetism 

utilized as never before for Healing the Sick. 

THE MAGNETIOX APPLIANCE CO.'S 



FOR MEN IS 

AAf CI rV9 n+Prl fn PhtP Or Money Refunded, the fol- 
YValXaillCU LU UUIC lowing diseases without med- 
icine: Pain in the Back, Hips, Head or Limbs, Nervous Debil- 
ity, Lumbago, General Debility, Rheumatism, Paralysis, Neu- 
ralgia, Sciatica, Diseases of the Kidneys, Spinal Diseases, Torpid 
Liver, Gout, Seminal Emissions, Impotency, Asthma, Heart Dis- 
ease, Dyspepsia, Constipation, Erysipelas", Indigestion, Hernia 
or Rupture, Catarrh, Piles. Epilepsv, Dumb Ague, etc. 

When any debility of the GENERATIVE ORGANS occurs, 
Lost Vitality, Lack o*f Nerve Force and Vigor, Wasting Weak- 
ness, and all those diseases of a personal nature, from whatever 
cause, the continuous stream of Magnetism, permeating through 
the parts, must restore them to a healthy action. There is no 
mistake about this appliance. 

ir\ tVi O T QfllAC If you are afllicted with Lame Back, 
1 U LI1C J-iaUlCO. Weakness of the Spine, Falling of 
the Womb, Leucorrhcea, Chronic Inflammation and Ulceration 
of the Womb, Incidental Hemorrhage or Flooding, Painful, Sup- 
pressed, and Irregular Menstruation, Barrenness and Change of 
Life, this is the best Appliance and Curative Agent known. For 
all forms of Female Dillicullies it is unsurpassed by anything be- 
fore invented, both as a curative agent and as a source'of power 
and vitalization. 

Price of either Belt, with Magnetic Insoles, $10. Sent by ex- 
press C. O. D., and examination allowed, or by mail on receipt of 
price. In ordering send measure of waist, and size of shoe. Re- 
mittances can be made in currency, sent in letter at our risk- 

The Magnetion Garments are adapted to all ages, are worn 
over the under-clothing (not next to the body like the many Gal- 
vanic and Electric I-fumbugs advertised so extensively), and 
should be taken off at night. They hold their POWER FOR- 
EVER, and are worn at all seasons of the year. 

Send stamp for the " New Departure in Medical Treatment 
without Medicine," with thousands of testimonials. 

THE MAGNETION APPLIANCE CO., 

218 State Street, CHICAGO, ILL 

Note.— Send one dollar in postage stamps or currency (in let- 
ter at our risk) with size of shoe usually worn, and try a pair of 
our Magnetic Insoles, and he convinced' of the power residing in 
our other Magnetic Appliances. Positively no gold feet when 
they are worn, or money refunded. 

Tontine Hair Dressing Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 
S. W. BROWNE Proprietor. 

Formerly of University Hair Dressing Rooms, Cambridge, Mass. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDGE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 



hue «»a« a. a. 

On and after Oct. 15tb, 1882, 

Passenger Trains leave Brunswick 

For Bath. 8.10, 11.25 a.m., 2.45, 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 
night (Sunday mornings only). 
Rockland, 8.10 a.m., 2.45 P.M. 
Portland. 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 4.30 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 12.35 night. 
Levviston. 8.10 a.m., 2.45. G.33 P.M.. 12.40 night. 
Farmington. 8.10 a.m. (Mixed), 2.45 P.M. 
Augusta, S.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 p.m.. 12.45 night. 
Skovvhegan, Belfast, Dexter, Bangor, and Vanceboro, 

2.45 P.M., and 12.45 night. 
WatervillcS.10, 12.45 a.m., 2.45, 0.35 p.m. (Saturdays 
only). 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 1S82. 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 
J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 

BEATS THE WORLD. 

Old Judge 

CIGARETTES 
And Smoking Tobacco. 



Endorsed as ABSOLUTELY PURE and free 
from all foreign or deleterious substances what- 
ever, by 
PETER COLLIER, Chemist of the 



irtment of Agriovltnio, 



Washington, D. C. 
R. ODGEN DOREMUS, M.D., LL.D., 

Professor Chemistry and Toxicology in the Bellevue Hospi- 
tal Medical College, and Professor of Chemistry and Physics 
in the College of the City of New York. 
BENJAMIN SILLIMAN, Esq., 

Professor at Tale College, New Haven, Conn. 
R. A. WITTHAUS, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Buffalo; 
Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Ver- 
mont; Professor of Physiological Chemistry, University of 
New York. 

And other eminent Chemists in the United States, cop- 
ies of whose certificates we shall be pleased to mail you 
on application. 

GOODWIN Ac OCX, 

Foot Grand Street, East River, New York. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A. O. REED, 



EF.fto 



$• 



Special Rates to Classes S Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 



rssssu sou*** 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 



J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 



rroTxr^TSiEiTZD., 



CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 
Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B.— Special Rates to Student Clubs. 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



WATCHES. 

TIFFANY # CO., 
Union Square, New York, 

Particularly request attention to their line of 
low-priced Watches, just completed, which they 
confidently recommend as the best yet produced 
for the money. The movements are sound, stem- 
winding' anchors, and are cased in 18-kt. gold 
in variety of styles. 

Each Watch is stamped with the name of the 
house, thereby carrying its guarantee. 

Large size, for Gentlemen $75 

Medium size, for Gentlemen 65 

Large size, for Ladies 60 

Small size, for Ladies 50 

Cuts showing sizes and styles of the Watches, 
and patterns of Chains suitable to be worn with 
them, sent on request. 

386 Washington Street, BATH, ME. 

H33T C. 2x<£. ZFHiTTA^IvnE^. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold Pens, Pencils, etc, PRIZE CUPS, GOBLETS, etc., 
furnished to order. 

$3T Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COE. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

385 and 38 J Congress St., and 23 j Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

.8®= Send for Price List. 

ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. Wl LSON & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 
wm w a 8 ™,n n 1 #®mTOAM®, MS. 

C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

OVER THE POST OFFICE. 

Give Me a Call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SHREVE, * 

CRUMP 
* & LOW, 

432 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




XTENSIVE STOCK 
OF CHOICE GOODS. 



STEELING SILVERWARE— Tea, Coffee, and Din- 
ner Sets, Forks and Spoons, etc., of exclusive pat- 
terns ; Old English Silver ; Candelabra ; Carriage 
Clocks; Watches of all grades— Chronograph, Re- 
peating, and Chatelaine, with Chains, etc., etc. 

SELECTED DIAMONDS ; Black, White, and Fancy 
Color Pearls ; Rubies, Emeralds, Sapphires, Cat's- 
eyes, Precious Stones, generally, of highest quali- 
ties; Fine Gold Jewelry of original designs, etc., 
etc. 

ARTISTIC BRONZES of new models — Elegant Man- 
tel Clocks (keyless) ; English Library, Mantel, and 
Hall Clocks, with Westminster Chimes, Cathedral 
Gongs, Mantel Sets, in Marble, Bronze, Polished 
Brass, etc. 

DECORATIVE PORCELAIN in Vases, Plaques, Des- 
sert, Coffee and Ice Cream Sets, etc., from the 
Minton, Worcester Royal, Crown Derby, Copeland, 
Royal Berlin, Dresden, and other celebrated works, 
etc. 

MARBLE STATUARY. NOVELTIES. 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 



Agents Gorham Mfg. Co. 




ALL KINDS OF 



1 ^W'ffiiTrfvrS 1 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fur- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Work- 
manship, we especially solicit orders for Fine Printing of all 
kinds, 



For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

We also make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges, 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

PRICES LO"W. 
Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Bowdoin College Boys 

"When they visit BATH should call at 

WEBBER'S DRUG STORE. 

A Full Line of Cigars, Toilet Articles, &c. 



SirncOse Smoke 

THE MEW CIGAR, 

Price IO Cts. Havana Filled- 

iiLSO, 

DIAMOND CROWN. Price 5 Cts. 

JOHNSTON & HATCH, 

LEWISTON, ME. 

ijg 5 ™ For sale in Brunswick by Ed. J. Merriman. 

Smoke Smoke 



FIRST-CLASS 

Pianos, Organs, and Melodeo&s, 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 

THOMAS H. RILEY, . . . Brunswick, Me. 

Also INSURANCE written in Best Companies, 
at Lowest Kates. 

FOUND AT LAST!! 

That the place to buy the Very Best 

Groceries and Students' Supplies, 

At the Lowest Possible Price, is at 

GEO. F. TENNEY'S, opp. College Grounds, 

BRUNSWICK MAINE. 



COLUMBIA BICYCLE. 

Bicycle riding is unsurpassed as a 
method of traveling,whether 1'or speed, 
sport, or renewal of health. The prac- 
ticability of the machine has been 
thoroughly tested, and satisfactorily 
proved, beyond question. Thousands 
are in daily use, and the number is 
rapidly increasing. The exercise is 
recommended by the medical profession 
as most beneficial to health, bringing 
into exercise almost every muscle of 
the body. 

Send 3c. stamp for 36-page Illustrated 
Catalogue containing price lists and full 
information. 

THE POPE MFC. CO. 

597 Washington St„ BOSTON, MASS. 




IMPORTING TAILORS 

AND 

GENTS' FURNISHERS. 

Novelties in Imported Hosiery, 
Underwear, Gloves, and Neckwear 
for Mens' Wear. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

Market Square, 

PORTLAND, ME. 



*Y, GIVE 



A Call, in PORTLAND, 



->*F. H. WILSON,*^ 

DISPENSER OF 

Pare Drags, Mediciass,a» Chemicals. 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath. 
Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



TONTINE! HOTEL, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

S. B. BREWSTER, - - PROPRIETOR. 

ClaBS and Reunion Suppers a Specialty. First-Class Laundry 
Work, equal to Troy, done at short notice. 




\ V \ N \ V \ \ \ \ \ 








BR&ROTIGK,*MMIRR^ 



=8 CONTENTS. S= 



PAGE. 

Editorial Notes 153 

A Dream (poem in prose) 155 

Our College Buildings. — II 156 

Sir Moses Montefiore 158 

Communication 159 



PAGE. 

160 



College Items 

Personal 162 

Inter- Collegiate News 163 

Editors' Table 164 

Clippings 165 



I^Vt-^-i- -;- -:->.-><- ~\~ x.x\^. ^ ^^^.^.x.^^.^^ ^ x x x <? ^x.^ < .~x~~~^x < ^~;x;< > x .^A A ~ x x x\x.^x.j > ,x ;^j^x x^x^s&r-. 

.^^^ ^'^wy \'>^w/ \'f<£i^" ^ 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




MEW B1UO ST01E. 

ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

DBUGS, MEDICI! ES, 

Fancy anfl Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Tobacco, 

DUIMLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

||pif* Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



A, W. WXCHOX.S, 

MAIN STREET, 

iiiiiwiiii mm% 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



SPRING AND SUMMER, 1883. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, G-loves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
•Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 



MAYNAED'8 
©ysteff ami %m ®$mm ImpjOffiumt, 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

;fl£g"Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



SCHOOL OF MINES, COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 

Department ef Architecture. 

The recently established Course in Architecture occu- 
pies four years, the first of which is occupied with general 
studies, the architectural work beginning with the"second 
year. 

Graduates of colleges and scie ntific schools can, in gen- 
eral, enter in advanced standing at the beginning of the 
second year. Special students are not received. 

The scientific studies, pursued fn connection with the 
Department of Civil Engineering, include Chemistry, Phy- 
sics, and Mechanics, with so much of Mathematics as these 
studies require. 

The Architectural studies include the theory and the 
history of Architecture and of the allied arts, drawing and 
modelling, with the constant practice of original design, 
and so much of specifications and practical construction as 
can conveniently be taught in a school. 

The buildings now constructing, which will be ready 
for occupation in October, provide, besides the necessary 
drawing rooms and lecture rooms, a special architectural 
laboratory for practice and experiment, and a library for 
study and for the accomodation of the large collection of 
drawings, prints and photographs now in process of form- 
ation. 

For a circular of information containing further partic- 
ulars address, REGISTRAR, SCHOOL OF MINES, 

Madison av. and 49th St., New York city. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

?rssh dtaa'd Salt ^©ats,. 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

*®-Special Rates to Student Clubs. -ffls 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 

"XjUBZEe^IEr^- LA.MPS," 

SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and "Moehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGRAVED IH THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 

K@©3IKS' OEJUBBEA'E'i;© ©KOTOS. 



474 Congress St., - - - opp. Preble House. 
DEANE BROTHERS &. SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

iy Lowest Prices in the State, 

755 & 185 Middle Sheet, - - - Portland, Me. 
A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, M Fancy Goods. 

Also Eastern Mutual Union Telegraph Office. 
TJnder Town Clock, - Brunswick, Me. 



The Only RELIABLE AND STANDARD Bkands of 

Cigarettes and Fine Tobaccos. 



Straight Cuts. 
Sweet Caporal. 
St. James, etc. 




Caporal. 
Caporal J. 
Ambassador. 



St. James J, etc. 
Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut Cigarettes. 



This now 
Leaf, and is 
offered for s 



Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut Full Dress. 

Sweet Caporal Cork Modthplece. 



JQ STEEL 
PENS. 



[STERBROOK 



Leading Numbers : 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers. 

THE ESTEHBROOK STEEL PEN CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York, 



Go to W. B. Woodard's 

To buy your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

SP3CIAL EJiTSS to SO?TJ"X)EiTT OLT7BS. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

BEST DAIRY IN BRUNSWICK. 

THERE ARE TWO PINTS OP THE NICEST MILK IN 
EVERY' QUART WHICH I SELL. SPECIAL ATTENTION 
GIVEN TO STUDENT CLUBS. 

«S- STEWARDS SHOULD DROP ME A POSTAL WITH 
THEIR LOCATION WRITTEN PLAINLY. 

A. P. WOODSIDE, Brunswick, Me. 
MILLER & POWERS, 



Two Doors South of Post Office, 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 





THE FAVORITE A/OS. 303-404-332-170-351- WITH 
'HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 



B0WD01N ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects: 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the iEueid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants Cor admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
■with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 



ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DECEMBER 19, 1883. 



No. 11. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Oliver W. Means, '84, Managing Editor. 

Charles E. Say-ward, '84, Business Editor. 
Llewellyn Barton, '84. John A. "Waterman, Jr.,'S4. 
William H. Cothren, '84. Oliver R. Cook, '85. 
Rodney I. Thompson, '84. Nehemiah B. Ford, '85. 
Sherman W. Walker, '84. John A. Peters, '85. 

Terms— $2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should he directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to 
contribute articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by the writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



This term, now practically over, affords a 
marked contrast to former years. Studious 
quiet has prevailed from the very outset. 
It has been demonstrated that the two lower 
classes can get along, for one term at least, 
without resorting to warfare. The jury has 
met from week to week, and in lieu of any- 
thing better, has occupied itself in Utopian 
plans for the future. This harmless amuse- 
ment is, however, much to be preferred to the 
task of sitting in judgment upon the case of 
an unfortunate fellow-student. Now is a 
good time to indulge in retrospect, to look 
back upon the work done this term, and, if 
unsatisfactory, to resolve to work more faith- 
fully the remainder of the year. If any have 
come to college hoping to take high rank as 
scholars, it is most certainly time to begin, if 



a beginning has not been made already. If 
some, in the Junior and Sophomore classes, 
have looked with mingled admiration and 
longing upon a place on the next Orient 
Board, there is yet nearly a term in which 
they can strive to merit an election. The 
coming vacation will give a much-desired rest 
and change of scene, and it is hoped that all 
will return with increased health and spirits. 
For all the Orient would wish a Merry 
Christmas and a Happy New Year. 



A prevailing tendency among students is 
to find fault. Rarely is it possible to find 
one that is avowedly satisfied with the course 
of study and the method of instruction. Too 
often, in passing judgment upon some branch 
of study, its object is overlooked, so that a 
wrong conclusion is reached in regard to the 
advantage gained from the subject. In the 
sciences especially, the introduction of a 
technical portion, perhaps mathematical, will 
at once raise a cry of dissatisfaction. Now a 
college course is not designed to give one an 
education in some specialty, nor is it intended 
to give a merely superficial idea, such as 
could be derived from the newspapers. On 
the contrary, it is designed to give as thorough 
a knowledge as possible of a good many sub- 
jects. If this fact was kept in mind it would 
prevent the often heard criticism of methods 
of instruction. 



One thing of which the college stands in 
need, is a permanent library fund. The in- 
ability to purchase seasonable books greatly 
hampers the librarian. To be sure, there is 
a small sum that is laid out every year, but it 



154 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



is not nearly so large as it ought to be. 
While some imperatively needed works are 
purchased, a large number of standard liter- 
ary and scientific books cannot be obtained. 
If a few interested alumni would take the 
matter upon themselves, others would be 
found to contribute to a fund large enough 
to insure a generous amount for annual ex- 
penditure. Of course no one will care to 
question the immense advantage that would 
result from such a condition of things. A 
good library is one of the most valuable aids 
to a good education, and its importance can- 
not be overestimated. The library is large 
enough, but many of the volumes are old 
and need to be replaced ■ by more modern 
works. 

There are two things that seem to us nec- 
essary for the welfare of the college : a 
library fund and a gymnasium. Some may 
weary of seeing these subjects so often men- 
tioned, but it is the determination of the 
Orient to keep them before the minds of its 
readers, in the hope that the near future may 
see these needs supplied. 



Human inconsistency is a hackneyed 
theme for discussion, and yet we feel called 
upon to draw attention to an illustration that 
lately has been brought to our notice. A 
few weeks since the boating men were anx- 
ious to work. They were eager for the small 
gymnasium to be fitted up that they might 
go to work at once, in order that a well 
trained crew might be chosen next spring to 
represent the college at Lake George. The 
room has been furnished with everything 
essential to practice, but where are the men? 
They have neglected to put in an appearance. 
It is impossible for untrained men to row a 
race ; and it is imperative, if anything is to 
be done next year, that a number of men 
should go to work at once. Patient and long- 
continued training is necessary to success, 



and it should be borne in mind that without 
such careful preparation it would be uttei 
folly to think of sending away a crew. It 
is hoped that no further urging will be neces- 
sary to induce a good number to begin 
earnest thorough work. 



There are times and places for everything, 
it is said, but there are some things for which 
we feel sure there is no time or place in col- 
lege. We enjoy music ; the harmonious 
voices of our neighbors are pleasant to us ; 
but when discordant we dare not express the 
true inwardness of our feelings. Of course 
every man has a right to sing, if he chooses, 
but we do question his right to bring to- 
gether a dozen or more friends to join him. 
Imagine, if you can, a room full of healthy 
young fellows energetically keeping time with 
their feet upon the floor, each trying to make 
his individual voice heard above the general 
roar. This practice is becoming altogether 
too prevalent, and ought to be stopped imme- 
diately. It is absurd to think of being inter- 
rupted in the middle of an afternoon by such 
a racket, but it has repeatedly happened. 
Sometimes in the reading-room we have been 
annoyed by what seemed to be a free fight 
overhead, and sounds, as if, to use a familiar 
illustration, a Chicago girl had brought her 
feet down hard upon the floor, are distinctly 
audible. We sincerely hope that there will 
be an improvement in this direction, as we 
know that we voice the sentiments of a large 
number of the students. 



While the Orient holds itself responsible 
for everything that may appear in its editorial 
columns, it is not responsible for whatever 
appears in its communications. The Orient 
aims to represent the student body, and in- 
vites contributions on all important subjects. 
We may or may not agree with the sentiments 
expressed. If any think that a subject has 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



155 



been unfairly considered, it is hoped that they 
will not hesitate to send us an expression of 
their opinion. Only in this way can the 
views of all be rightly set forth. 



We understand that two gentlemen have 
been engaged to address the Literary Associa- 
tion next term. It is gratifying to know this, 
and we hope that others may be secured. A 
series of lectures has been our wish, and this 
beginning of realization is certainly encourag- 
ing. The management of the Association has 
been so far very successful, and we trust that 
much profit and enjoyment will be derived 
before the close of the winter season. 



A DREAM. 

A dream is a sort of spirit which is beck- 
oned from the unknown realms of the future 
by the magic wand of sleep. It enters the 
secret halls of memory and is there sealed up 
with the throng of recollections. In passing 
the threshold it leaves its mystic footprint, 
which is sometimes too lightly pressed, to be 
detected by the grosser intellect, and the soul 
is not conscious of its presence until revery 
breaks the seal on the recollections with 
which the spirit has taken up its abode. 
Then the dream bursts forth bathed in the 
solemn light of reality and its form, which 
has been gradually changed by the trans- 
forming power of time, is become the image 
of a recollection. Often it is with difficult}' 
that the mind distinguishes a dim image of 
reality from a somnolent phantom. 

In such a case there is a fascinating un- 
certainty, either pleasant or horrible, when 
the mind summons before its exacting 
tribunal these misty memories of the past. 
Sometimes the form of the dream is so 
changed that it deceives the judgment and is 
sent back to its place as an impression of a 
reality, and often, when the imagination 



pleads the case, by virtue of its fanciful 
charge the dream is sent back clothed in a 
thin film of suspicion. How eagerly would 
mortals grasp the power to endow all their 
dreams with reality ! 

Years ago I had a dream which left an 
impression never to be obliterated by the 
countless tracks of time. I seemed to be 
half reclining on a moss-covered rock on the 
shore of a tranquil lake which reflected in 
magnificent beaut)' the picture of the frost- 
stained foliage along the shore, all being 
bathed in the mystic splendor of a full Octo- 
ber moon. All objects were harmonized and 
blended by the moonlight which often har- 
monizes things of which the daylight only 
shows the contrast. As I gazed, enrapt by 
the scene of nature's beaut}', I heard a gentle 
soughing in the tree-tops behind me, accom- 
panied by a stiffled moan as of a child sob- 
bing in its troubled sleep. A sort of pleas- 
ant melancholy stole softly over me as I 
gazed in ecstasy on the picturesque water. 
Soon I heard a nearer waving of the branches 
and a deeper moan which seemed to come 
from a spirit in intense sorrow. Suddenly a 
form appeared on the shore before me. I 
could see that it was a maiden clad in a robe 
of white which revealed a form that Venus 
would have envied. Her dark hair, uncon- 
fined by art, hung in luxuriant freedom over 
her neck and shoulders. Her eyes, dark as 
a Houri's, seemed to shed a soft incandescence. 
Her features were beyond my limited powers 
of description. They possessed more angelic 
beauty than any that I expect ever to behold, 
unless in the painting of a dream. She ap- 
peared beautifully sorrowful as she gazed 
with reverent admiration on the scene which 
had so entranced me. From my position I 
could see her image in the mirror of the lake. 
My heart yearned for power to fix the reflec- 
tion ineffaceably in the bosom of the flatter- 
ing mirror so that I, fleeing from my cares, 
might refresh my soul with the enrapturiug 



156 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



picture. Unobserved I watched her with 
intense delight, subtly interwoven with a 
strange, sympathetic sadness. She soon 
seemed unconscious of her surrounding and 
kneeling there on the shore she bowed her 
head. Her lips moved in a silent prayer as 
she wrung her hands as though trying to 
wrench some unhappy thought from her soul. 
She become more calm and lifting her eyes 
to the stars she seemed to hold silent com- 
munion with her Creator. Suddenly a light 
zephyr sprang, as it seemed to me, from the 
region of the stars, and wafted from the dis- 
tance came strains of unearthly music. The 
melody was so sweet yet so mournful that it 
filled my soul with a weird influence. No 
mortal could produce such harmony. Had 
the blended notes of all the feathery song- 
sters been wafted to m}' soul on wavelets of 
sadness they could not have produced a 
deeper effect than did the music of my dream. 
As a more violent strain swept over my 
nerves the maiden seemed to be borne by the 
weird symphony upward toward the source 
of the zephyr. I gazed with inexpressible 
sadness at her swiftly vanishing form which 
appeared, at last, to fade away into the 
moonbeams, giving them, to my imagination, 
a more hallowed radiance. 

The strange music was softly dying away. 
The bright hued leaves seemed to have a 
sadness in sympathy with .mine as they 
drooped in graceful sorrow for their fallen 
kindred. As the softest imaginable strain 
lingered in my soul I awoke. Every 
nerve was tingling with an unnatural 
delight, and I felt more forcibly than ever 
the merciless power of my waking conscious- 
ness, dispelling the forms of beauty and har- 
mony which had come at the command of my 
pleasant master, sleep. Often now, when in 
the sweet elysium of solitary revery, I hear 
the same weird strains which waft into a sea 
of silvery moonbeams a form kneeling in 
angelic supplication. 



OUR COLLEGE BUILDINGS.— II. 

"OLD MASSACHUSETTS" (CONCLUDED). 

As the acorn, planted in a friendly soil, 
expands, bursts its shell, and in time becomes 
a stately tree, so this college, finding in the 
District of Maine all favorable surroundings 
and the fostering care of many friends, began 
to expand as soon as it was fairly started on 
its course, and burst its shell in the spring of 
1803, when President McKeen, leaving his 
narrow quarters in Massachusetts Hall, moved 
with his family into a separate house. The rooms 
thus vacated soon lost their domestic appear- 
ance ; for the kitchen and pantry were trans- 
formed into a laboratory, and the parlor was 
devoted" to philosophical apparatus and min- 
erals. There may be some doubt whethe r 
the college was in possession, at such an early 
date, of any very extensive apparatus ; but 
there are on record several appropriations 
made for repairing a certain air-pump ; and 
about this time the President was directed by 
the Boards to purchase " a reliable eight day 
clock for the use of the college." In 1805, 
Parker Cleaveland was called from a tutor- 
ship in Harvard to the chair of Mathematics 
and Natural Philosophy at Bowdoin. Soon 
after his arrival he became deeply interested 
in the study of chemistry, and finding the 
old kitchen too small for his purposes, he 
caused the partition to be removed, thus 
throwing the two rooms into one large labo- 
ratory and lecture room. Here for fifty-three 
years, the worthy Professor performed his 
experiments, and delivered his able lectures, 
to as many successive classes. Here he pre- 
pared that work on chemistry which did more 
than anything else to make Bowdoin College 
known to the world ; and here also, unless 
tradition is at fault, he was accustomed to 
leave his classes, and seek the seclusion of an 
inverted hogshead in the cellar, whenever 
that phenomenon of nature known as a thun- 
der-storm appeared. Of the different rooms 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



157 



in Massachusetts, this old laboratory is the 
only one that has been used for the same pur- 
pose from the beginning. For although it once 
served as the President's house, it was only 
for a few months, and merely as a temporary 
provision. It is still used for laboratory work 
and for recitations, and rightly is it called the 
Cleaveland Lecture Room. 

The western lower portion of the building 
was used for a chapel and hall till 1805, when 
a small, separate chapel of wood was built. 
.The room answered very well for a hall for 
some years after; but the increasing size and 
business of the college demanded an office 
for the treasurer, and this room was taken for 
that purpose. The office has been renovated 
several times since, and is now a credit to the 
college. The rooms in the second story were 
occupied by the members of the first class. 
Those in the third were finished in the sum- 
mer of 1803, and assigned to the students en- 
tering that fall; and these two suites of rooms 
accommodated all the students until the 
larger dormitories were erected. 

The primitive method of announcing the 
hours for recitation by rapping with a cane 
upon the stairs, was superseded, after a while, 
by a bell placed in a small square tower on 
the middle of the hall roof. This bell was 
removed to a similar tower on the chapel in 
1818. Both these towers, the house of the 
President, and Maine Hall as it was originally 
built, are shown in an old picture of the college 
now in the possession of Professor Packard. 

The second and third stories of Massa- 
chusetts Hall were left vacant in 1807, by 
the removal of the students to the new domi- 
tory erected in that year. The third story 
was then converted into a summer recitation 
room ; and in two of the rooms below were 
placed the Bowdoin paintings, and the few 
minerals then belonging to the college. 

And so it happened, that on the estab- 
lishment of the Medical School in 1820, these 
rooms were used for no other purpose than 



that mentioned. The college therefore, hav- 
ing been instrumental in bringing the school 
into existence, felt bound to do anything 
reasonable for its support, and passed the 
following resolve, viz., that, "for the en- 
couragement of the Medical School, the 
upper story of Massachusetts Hall is hereby 
placed at the disposal of the Faculty of 
Medicine, until otherwise provided, to be 
fitted into rooms for the lecturer and for the 
deposit of books and preparations." More- 
over, a provision was made for the medical 
students to attend the chemical lectures of 
Prof. Cleaveland, in common with the students 
of the college. And thus the Medical School 
gained its footing in Massachusetts Hall. 
The arrangement at the time was regarded 
as merely a temporary one, and no one 
dreamed that after the lapse of more than 
forty years the school would still be found in 
the same narrow quarters to which it was as- 
signed on its establishment. But such was 
the case ; and as year after year passed, and 
it was not " otherwise provided," the hall 
gradually came to be designated as the 
" Medical College." Although the location 
of the school was most unhealthy, and after 
twenty years became too small to accommo- 
date the classes, yet a deaf ear was turned 
to all complaints by the venerable Professor 
of Chemistry who thought that the seats 
which had been occupied by so manj r fine 
classes were good enough for any that might 
come after them. 

The Medical School held possession of 
Massachusetts Hall from 1820 to 1861, when 
the present Medical building was erected. 
After the hall was vacated by the Medical 
School, it was neglected for some time, and 
allowed to fall into partial decay. A propo- 
sition to remove the old hall to give place to 
a more ambitious structure was happily 
frowned down, and this sacrilege was averted. 

In 1872 the Boards appointed a commit- 
tee "with full powers to authorize repairs and 



158 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



alterations of Massachusetts Hall, so far as 
to fit a portion of the same for a museum of 
natural science," provided the expense be not 
borne by the college treasury. At the first 
meeting of this committee, Mr. P. W. 
Chandler, of Boston, submitted a plan which 
he offered to cany out at his own expense. 
His project was to make the building a me- 
morial to Professor Cleaveland, by throwing 
the second and third stories into one, and 
fitting them up as a cabinet for those branches 
of natural science to which Professor Cleave- 
land devoted the greater part of his life. 
The plan was carried out in a veiy liberal 
manner, and at Commencement, 1873, the 
Cleaveland Cabinet was formerly opened. 

We have two Memorial Halls on our camp- 
us, — one to the brave sons of Bowdoin who 
gave their life for the Union, and one to Park- 
er Cleaveland, who in more than half a cent- 
ury of faithful labor has done more than any 
other one man to place Bowdoin College 
where she is. 



SIR MOSES MONTEFIORE. 

Although we often read or hear of cen- 
tenarians, it is seldom that we hear of one 
who is so widely known throughout the civ- 
ilized world, and who is regarded by all with 
such kindly feelings as is the subject of this 
sketch. 

Sir Moses Montefiore was born at Leg- 
horn, October 24, 1784, his parents being 
Italian Jews. He received commercial train- 
ing, and at an early age entered active com- 
mercial life. In 1812 he married Judith 
Cohen, whose sister afterward married one of 
the Rothschild family. He was closely con- 
nected with the founding of the Alliance 
Insurance office in London, in 1824, of which 
he was elected the first president, a position 
which he has held to the present time. 

Let us now briefly review a few of his 
most widely known works of philanthropy. 



During the plague in Syria in 1837, he and 
Lady Judith consumed an entire clay at Safed 
in giving alms -to all who applied, giving to 
each adult a Spanish dollar, and to each child 
half that sum, except orphans who received 
the same amount as adults. This charity he 
repeated in several other cities, remaining one 
day in each. In 1840, at Damascus, a Roman 
Catholic priest mysteriously disappeared. It 
was asserted by some that the Jews had killed 
this priest to obtain blood for their Passover 
festival. Persecutions of the severest nature 
followed, and Sir Moses was sent to the East 
by a Hebrew society in England to endeavor 
to bring them to an end. He obtained a 
personal interview with Mehemet Ali, who 
granted his requests, and became a strong 
friend to him. Sir Moses then went to Con- 
stantinople and obtained many privileges for 
the Jewsfrom the Sultan. In 1842 there was 
a great deal of sickness at Jerusalem, and 
this was greatly increased by lack of proper 
hospital accommodations. Sir Moses estab- 
lished a hospital there, and sent out a physi- 
cian at his own expense. In the winter of 
1846, he and Lady Montefiore obtained the 
repeal of a decree of the Czar of Russia 
whereby thousands of Jewish families were 
ordered to remove into the interior of Russia. 
Of all his many philanthropic deeds, the 
only one in which he has failed to accomplish 
his purpose was the celebrated Mortara case, 
of which the following is a brief outline : In 
1852 Edgar Mortara, the year-old son of a 
Jew living at Boulogne, while very sick, was 
secretly baptized into the Romish Church 
through the agency of his fourteen-year old 
nurse. This fact was kept a secret for six 
years. When at length it leaked out, the 
boy was kidnaped by the bishop's guards, 
and hiddened in a convent at Rome. At this 
period Sir Moses went to Rome to remon- 
strate against this act, so contrary to all laws 
of humanity. He was unable to obtain a 
personal interview with the Pope, but did 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



159 



obtain one with Cardinal Antonelli. The 
Cardinal promised to lay before the Pope the 
testimonial which Sir Moses had brought from 
England, but informed him that it had been 
determined that Edgar Mortara should be 
educated in the Romish faith, and that when 
he was sixteen or seventeen years of age, he 
would be " set free to follow his own judg- 
ment." So in this case Sir Moses failed, but 
public opinion was influenced and was greatly 
alienated from the church of Rome. 

Sir Moses has a strong hold on the hearts 
of Americans, from the fact that in 1881 he 
telegraphed to Palestine, requesting that 
prayers might be offered for the recovery of 
President Garfield, in all the synagogues of 
Jerusalem, Hebron, Tiberias, and Safed. He 
is now in his hundredth year, and retains his 
full mental faculties, and sympathy for suffer- 
ing among whatever class it may be. He is 
a tall man with handsome and firm features. 
He always directs prayers to be offered in 
the schools of Jerusalem on the birthdays of 
the Queen of England and the Prince of 
Wales. He has received innumerable testi- 
monials, among which may be mentioned a 
miniature monument of solid silver, weighing 
2000 ounces, presented to him in 1840. In 
1837 he was knighted by Victoria, and in 
1846 was made a Baron. As his centenary 
approaches, preparations are being made for 
special celebrations of it at Leghorn, Rome, 
and New York. 



COMMUNICATION. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

That the study of parliamentary law has 
been removed from the curriculum, is a dis- 
appointment to many in the Senior class, and 
thequestion naturally arises " Why should such 
a change be made? Why should parliamen- 
tary law be thus set aside and some other 



study made to replace it ? " There is no 
better study in Senior year because there is 
none more practical, and certainly there is 
none better calculated to accustom and prac- 
tice the mind for prompt, decisive action. 
Beside the discipline thus acquired there is 
the practical benefit to be derived. The 
necessity for the study on this score is so 
obvious that any discussion thereon would be 
useless. Admitting, then, the importance of 
this study and considering that, for the last 
four years at least, it has held the place in 
the course which it has merited and still mer- 
its, it seems strange (and to us altogether too 
arbitrary ) that such a study should be removed. 
Of course if the study were of no special 
importance the change would seem perfectly 
justifiable, but at present it seems quite 
otherwise. 

It can hardly be possible that the time 
given to parliamentary law is a just reason for 
removal, when two hours per week during 
the fall term would not sensibly interfere 
with all the other studies from which this 
time might be taken. Moreover there is no 
study in the year, nor in the whole course, in 
which a few lessons and a few hours' practice 
would impart so much discipline and so 
much practical benefit, so on this account 
alone, if on no other, is the absence of this 
study to be regretted ; nor in our opinion 
would any or all the studies from which these 
two hours per week might be taken, be less 
profitable or less interesting. 

Where, one may ask, has the time gone 
that has been taken from the study in ques- 
tion ? The answer is easy and unsatisfactory. 
Astronomy, geology, political economy, and 
psychology have each been benefited (?) to 
the extent of two or three recitations each 
for the whole term, and the benefit thus de- 
rived, when compared with that which would 
have come from parliamentary law, may 
very properly be called in question. 

An '84 Man. 



160 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



Wish you a Happy New Year. 

Beautiful evenings last week. 

The fun has begun again in the papers. 

Dunham, '85, is teaching in Harpswell. 

The general cry is, "When is the Bugle coming 
out. ? " 

Eternal vigilance is the price of a coal fire now- 
adays. 

One term more of the Orient under the present 
regime. 

Oliver evidently was confused at the roll call the 
other morning. 

We have got so that we light up now for after- 
noon recitations. 

Capita] is now the subject of discussion in 
political economy. 

Freeman. '85, is called the best skater on 
ice that there is in college. 

Don't forget to back and stamp your letters be- 
fore you put them in the mail box. 

Colby bears off the palm in the number of stu- 
dents out teaching, — almost a third. 

Monday night, Bowdoin chivalry and Brunswick 
beauty held sway at the skating rink. 

Pour new members were admitted to the 
Literary Association at the last meeting. 

Walker, '84, will spend his Christmas vacation 
at Tale with his brother who is a member of Yale, 
'87. 

No snow sufficient for sleighing has fallen yet, 
and the middle of December, — a thing worthy of 
note. 

Three lecturers have been engaged for a course 
of lectures this winter. Two more are to be 
engaged. 

Dr. Brown gave a lecture before the Seniors on 
the object and the advantages of the study of 
psychology. 

Thompson, '84, has been elected a delegate to 
the Inter-collegiate Rowing Convention in New 
York, the 27th inst. 

Playing lawn-tennis on the delta the thirteenth of 
December with good dry footing is something that 
you don't often see. 

Prof, in Astronomy — " Mr. K., is Mercury ever 
visible? " Mr. K.— " Yes, sir." Prof.—" Where ? " 
Mr. K. — " When it is seen." 



The Bugle will be printed at the Lewiston 
Journal Office. It will not be out until the first of 
next term. 

President Packard said the other day that he 
was never sick a day in his life. He is now eighty- 
four years of age. 

Some of the Seniors say they prefer psychology 
to astronomy. They must have a mortal dread of 
things celestial, then ! 

Quite a number of the boys took in the Masonic 
Carnival at Bath last week. It was a big time and 
there was a large crowd. 

The " locals " machine will be run by another 
power behind the throne after this number. May 
success attend his efforts. 

The old Roman inscription on the threshold, 
" cave canem," might have been used appropriately 
the other morning at the chapel. 

Barton and Longren, '64, Alexander and But- 
ler, '85, sang at the Harvest Concert, at the ves- 
try, a week ago last Sunday morning. 

The base-ball men ought to have a trainer of 
some kind. The Colbys are to have Morrill of the 
Bostons to coach them some this winter. 

Quite a number of the students, together with 
the youths and maidens of the town, enjoyed the 
brief season of skating on the river last week. 

Speakers last week were Hilton, '84, Nealey, 
'85, Parker, Taylor, '86. Two weeks ago Phinney, 
Cobb, '84, Tarr, Bartlett, '85, P. A. Knight, J. H. 
Davis, '66. 

Hilton, '84, has played the chapel organ almost 
three years without any grumbling or finding fault. 
Surely such unremunerated and voluntary services 
ought not to go unrecognized. 

A grave Senior is taking private lessons of his 
room-mate who trips the light fantastic toe. He 
evidently has the ivy hop and class day festivities 
iu prospective. 

The man who sent that dispatch to last Tues- 
day's Journal was either no friend of Bowdoin or a 
very careless one. His statement was misleading 
iu several respects. 

Means, '84, was called away last week to attend 
the funeral of his uncle, Rev. J. 0. Means, D.D., of 
Boston. He was a noted preacher and missionary 
worker, graduating from Bowdoin in 1843. 

Next meeting of the Literary Association will 
be Tuesday evening, January 15th, at 7.30 o'clock. 
The program will consist of vocal and instrumental 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



161 



music entirely. In other words, a concert by the 
best local talent. 

We are under the necessity of begging pardon 
for so many typographical error in the locals of the 
last number through carelessness in proof-reading. 
The job was let out for the first time, hence these 
tears. 

Professor in Psychology (discussing Presenta- 
tive Knowledge) — " Mr. K., when you know do you 
doubt that you know you know what you know?" 
Mr. K.— "No." Is phonology embraced in psy- 
chology ? 

Why not ask the members of the Faculty that 
may be present at the literary meeting, to speak 
upon the question, or on any subject they might 
select? They certainly would be listened to with 
pleasure. 

Thomas M. Given, Esq., has made the Base-Ball 
Association a present of a book containing the rules 
for base-ball in 1860. Then there were two games, 
so called, the Boston and New York. It is quite a 
curiosity. 

One of the typographical errors of the last 
Orient made the motto of the Literary Association 
read otium sine Uteris mars est, instead of otium 
sine litteris mors est. It conveys altogether a wrong 
idea. It is not a warlike assembly at all in any 
other sense than logomachy. 

A number of the students went down to the 
Skolfield ship-yard to witness the launch last Thurs- 
day forenoon. They were, however, disappointed, 
as the launch took place an hour earlier than was 
supposed. President Chamberlain and Dr. Brown 
were also among the disappointed ones. Time and 
tide, etc. 

William Seco got into the river one day last 
week. If you could hear him relate his exploit you 
wouldn't doubt that " truth is stranger than Ac- 
tion." It was suggested that Bill write up the 
account in his own vernacular for the Orient, 
but as he didn't have a chum with him the idea was 
abandoned. 

We are well aware that papers and magazines 
will get soiled and torn the best that we can do, 
but the one that has charge of the reading-room 
asks that if leaves of the magazines become loose 
the members would take a little pains to preserve 
them. From one of the magazines, of the present 
month, several leaves are lost from the first part, 
thus of course preventing its being turned over to 
the library as is customary. 



The Bowdoin College Polo Club consists of the 
following members : H. C. Phiuuey, Captain and 
Cover Point ; W. A. Cornish, Goal ; N. B. Ford, 
Goal Cover; H. M. Wright, Center; W. M. Earaes, 
1st Rusher; E. W. Freeman, 2d Rusher; E. C. 
Smith, 3d Pusher. 

Mr. G. H. Pray, a disciple of legerdemain, gave 
an entertainment in Lower Memorial, Monday even- 
ing, Dec. 3d. There was not a very large audience, 
but it received the wizard's attempts with due ap- 
preciation. There was nothing low or coarse about 
the entertainment. All Mr. Pray's tricks were well 
performed, and many of them were quite clever. 

Scene: Greek recitation room. Prof. — " Mr. K., 
how did Solou divide the people of Athens?" Mr. 
K. — " Into Demes, sir." Prof. — " Yes. But, 
Mr. B., why did Solon make that division?" Mr. 
B. — " Well, I suppose he deemed it necessary be- 
cause — Prof. — "There, there! Mr. B., you are 
carrying the subject a little too far. You may be 
seated." 

When Lindsey, '84, returned from the sleight-of- 
hand entertainment the other night he found his 
room full of smoke and a large hole burned in the 
sofa. It was fortunate that he came just as he did, 
as ten or fifteen minutes more would doubtless have 
ended in a serious conflagration. The origin of the 
fire is unknown, but must have been from a spark 
or match. 

We are iuformed, upon good authority, that two 
of the present Freshman class, and possibly a third 
will leave at the end of the present term. The 
reason is that they wish to attend a scientific col- 
lege. We think that some time in after life they 
will regret that they did not avail themselves of a 
classical education, or one, at least, broader than a 
scientific. 

One of the students was heard to ask another 
the other day " Who is this Carlisle any way, a 
republican or a democrat ? " And yet in heated 
campaigns we frequently hear of how the students 
of colleges stand for the different candidates. They 
must be able to give an intelligent reason for the 
faith that is in them, if the above is a fair exponent 
of a student's political knowledge. 

The fire at the grist mill last Saturday noon 
served to relieve the monotony of every day life, 
for a few minutes. Although it was just at dinner 
time everybody of course had to go, for a fire is 
something that you see only once in a life-time if 
you live in Brunswick. This is doubtless due to 



162 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



the efficiency of the fire department ? And what 
fire wouldn't succumb when Niagara and the Ken- 
nebec play upon it. 

The second meeting of the Bowdoin Literary 
Association was held in Lower Memorial, Tuesday 
evening, Dec. lltb. The following program was 
well carried out : A selection, " Far Away the 
Camp-Pires Burn," by a male quartette. Discus- 
sion of the following resolution : Besolved that im- 
migration (disregarding the Chinese) to the United 
States should be restricted. Aff., C. C. Torrey, 
A. W. Merrill. Neg., Z. W. Kemp, G. S. Berry, Jr. 
The question was decided on its merits in the af- 
firmative. Essay by S. W. Walker. Selection, 
" The Foaming Sea," by the quartette. Critique by 
R. I. Thompson. 

We have been asked to give the names of the 
Faculty of the Medical College. They are as 
follows: Alfred Mitchell, A.M., M.D., Professor of 
Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children; 
Israel Thorndike Dana, A.M., M.D., Professor of 
Pathology and Practice of Medicine ; Charles Wil- 
liam Goddard, A.M., Professor of Medical Jurispru- 
dence; Stephen Holmes Weeks, M.D., Professor of 
Surgery; Burt Greene Wilder, M.D., Professor of 
Physiology; diaries Oliver Hunt, M.D., Professor 
of Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; Frederic 
Henry Gerrish, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy 
and Public Health; Henry Carmichael, A.M., Ph.D., 
Professor of Chemistry ; Irving Ellis Kimball, M.D., 
Demonstrator of Anatomy; Everett Thornton 
Nealley, M.D., Demonstrator of Histology. 

An '86 man says he has seen the comet of 1812 
and every other that has existed for the past six 
thousand years, and it was wholly unexpected, too. 
He went down to the rink last Weduesday p.m., 
and put on some skates for the first time. He had 
in mind the carnival of the students on the follow- 
ing Monday night and he wanted to take it in. At 
first he sculled around the shore not venturing out 
into deep water. But soon he weighed anchor and 
struck boldly into the open sea. He circumnav- 
igated the rink once and was under full headway 
for a second trip, when suddenly he paused in his 
mad flight, the floor rose to meet him more than 
half way and he came down like a pile driver. 
Instantly a grand display of celestial pyrotechnics 
shot across his mental firmament. Planets, 
meteors, comets, asteroids, and satellites came with 
startling distinctness and rapid succession before 
his mind, not alone from the regions of mortal kin 



but far beyoud in the realms revealed by the facul- 
ties of the suffering ego. It may not be necessary 
to add that the carnival was not graced by his pres- 
ence, but astronomical knowledge has been in- 
creased. 

Several of the students were in the reading- 
room the other morning when a rap was heard at 
the door. "Busy," "Not at home," "Come in," 
and several other cries were head all at once. The 
door softly opened and the plaintive voice of a 
wandering chiropodist was heard. " Have any of 
you gentlemen got any corns on your feet ? " 
There were various answers and a running conver- 
sation was kept up betweeu the students and the 
visitor, sometimes at the expense of one and then 
of the other. At last the salve vender, seizing his 
little trunk, started, remarking that he supposed 
the rest of the students were at recitation then. 
He was informed that the most of thera were but 
lie would probably find a patient ahead, on the 
same floor at the end of the hall. He was heard 
to go softly along the hall-way and rap gently at 
the door. As itopened he said, " Have you got any 
cor — " Ho stopped short, for through the half 
open door he saw the class in mathematics reciting, 
and at the same time he heard a shout from the ad- 
joining room and it dawned upon him that all he 
had sold was himself. He returned to the reading- 
room, acknowledged the corn, and went on his way 
a sadder and wiser man." 



A secret of success is iu the careful and persist- 
ent use of printer's ink. Copy should always be 
written with one of Esterbrook's Steel Pens. 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited to send 
personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Brunswick, Me.] 

'36.— Hon. Joseph Baker died at his home in 
Augusta, Nov. 29th. The deceased was born at 
Bloomfield (now Skowhegan), Me., June 23, 1812. 
He fitted for college partly at China Academy, but 
chiefly without an instructor. In both his prepar- 
atory and his college education he was obliged to 
rely for support wholly upon himself. After grad- 
uation he went to Augusta, taught school for two 
years, studied law during this time, and was ad- 
mitted to the Kennebec bar in 1839. Ever since 
that time he continued his practice in Augusta. 
Iu 1854 he was associated with Hon. James G. 
Blaine in the editorship of the Kennebec Journal. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



163 



Mr. Baker held many public offices. In 1847 he 
was in the State Senate ; in 1856 arid 1870 was 
commissioner to revise the statutes of Maine ; was 
city solicitor for Augusta in the years 1858-'59-'60 
and '68 ; was county attorney in 1864 ; and was a 
member of the House of Representatives in 1870. 
He was for several years on the Board of Overseers 
of this college. His son, Orville D. Baker, grad- 
uated from Bowdoinin 1868, and now alone survives 
him. 

'43.— Rev. John Oliver Means, D.D., died at his 
home in Roxbury, Mass., the 8th inst. Dr. Means 
was born in Augusta, August 1, 1822. After leav- 
ing college, where he took a high rank as a student, 
he pursued his studies in the Theological Semina- 
ries at Andover, Mass., and Bangor, Me. He was 
principal of the High School in Augusta for a time. 
From 1845 to 1848 he was purser in the United 
States Navy and then resumed his theological 
course at the Andover Seminary, graduating in 
1849. He was ordained pastor of the First Church, 
East Medway, in 1851. In 1857 he was installed 
over the Vine St. Church in Roxbury, where he re- 
mained twenty years. In 1875 he was chosen Sec- 
retary of the Massachusetts Sunday-School Pub- 
lishing Society. In 1879 he was appointed one of 
the secretaries of the A. B. C. F. M. and took 
charge of the work in Africa and the Microuesian 
Islands. For many years he was one of the Boston 
School Board, and at the time of his death was 
President of the Roxbury Athenaeum and also of 
the trustees of the Roxbury Latin School. Last 
July he was obliged, by overwork, to retire from his 
active labors and try to regain his health. This he 
seemed to be doing until the middle of November, 
when he caught cold and grew rapidly worse. The 
funeral services took place Wednesday, the 12th 
inst., at Immanuel Church, Moreland St., Boston 
Highlands. 

We acknowledge the receipt of papers contain- 
ing obituary notices of the late Thomas H. Clark 
('55), kindly sent in by some friend. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NEWS. 

Columbia : 

Anglo-Saxon is the only subject the students 
have to recite standing. 

Six students have elected Sanskrit this year 
under Dr. Perry. 

At the November meeting of the Trustees, the 



Treasurer reported that the estimated expenses for 
the present academic year, ending October 1, 1884, 
would nearly equal estimated revenue. 

Dr. Hopkins lectured lately to the Sophomores 
on the classic phrase, " I should smile." 

Hereafter, any student having passed a college 
course equal to the Columbia curriculum, can be a 
candidate for degree of Master of Arts. 

Notice ! Notice ! The so-called Columbia Foot- 
Ball Eleven actually made one point during the 
past season. — Acta. 

Dartmouth : 

Corcoran, of the Chicagos, has been engaged to 
train the nine this winter. 

Dartmouth does not expect to re-enter the Col- 
lege League. 

The meeting of the Dartmouth Scientific Asso- 
ciation, of November 21st, was occupied with special 
reports on the following subjects: " Two Injurious 
Insects,— the White Ant and the Spruce Bud 
Louse"; "Williams' Mineral Resources of the 
United States"; "Freezing the Ground for Foun- 
dations in Quicksand"; "Lenticular Trusses in 
America"; "The New Niagara Bridge and the 
Cantilever System of Trusses"; "Mechanical 
Motors"; "Insect, Man, Steam-Engine, and Can- 
non Compared" ; " Exhibition of a chart for Ana- 
lytical Reactions of Acids"; "Electric Gas Light- 
ing"; " A Patent Egg Preserver " ; "Dr. Siinms." 
Princeton : 

Prof. R declares that he can improve Matthew 

Arnold's delivery one hundred per cent, in five 
lessons. 

The Committee on Athletics informed the di- 
rectors of the Foot-Ball Association that the Trus- 
tees have been seriously considering the advisability 
of abolishing intercollegiate athletics in Princeton, 
and have been dissuaded from doing so only at the 
request of the Faculty. 

The Faculty and Trustees of the college are at 
present considering the expediency of making a 
course in the gymnasium compulsory for the two 
lower classes. — Princetonian. 
Williams : 

German will eventually be made a compulsory 
study during Sophomore year. 

Recitations at four and five o'clock are in order 
at Williams. 

The Seniors have finished the outline study of 
Man, under Dr. Hopkins, and are now taking the 
Law of Love. 

The prospects seem excellent for Williams hav- 



164 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ing a good eleven in the field next season. Some 
valuable men have consented to play, and a few 
enthusiastic players have already commenced to 
train. 

From all appearances, the "Gul" will not be 
finished before the Christmas holidays, in which 
case they will be ready for delivery at the reassem- 
bling of the college, January 10th. 

Notes : 

We give in the following, the number of Fresh- 
men in the different colleges, as far as we are able 
to ascertain from our exchanges : Harvard, 300 ; 
Yale, 257; Ann Arbor, 191; Cornell, 140; Alle- 
ghany, 156 ; Princeton, 150 ; Lehigh, 122 ; Syracuse, 
100 ; Dartmouth, 99 ; Haverford, 56 ; Union, 50 ; 
Bates, 40 ; Rochester, 38 ; Colby, 34 ; Bowdoin, 
33; Asbury University, 98; Columbia, 95; Williams, 
86; Lafayette, 82; Hamilton, 75; University of 
Chicago, 70 ; Amherst, 62 ; Brown, 60 ; Wesleyan, 
59 ; Rutgers, 27 ; Tufts, 26 ; University of Ver- 
mont, 23 ; Madison, 23 ; Middlebury, 16 ; Marietta, 
16.— Syracuse Herald. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



Often, as one after another of our exchanges has 
burst out in song, we have wished that we, -too, 
could produce something worthy of being immor- 
talized by publication in the columns of the Oeient. 
But never had we that feeling to a greater degree 
than after we had read the following delicate bit of 
verse from the ever welcome Lasell Leaves : 

" Oft in a stilly night, 

Ere slumber's chain had bound me, 
I heard a whizzing sound, like 

The buzzing of a bee. 
But 'twas only the snore 
Of a friend next door ; 
'Twas only that, and nothing more." 
It was with pain that we learned the solemn 
fact that Lasell girls snore as well as eat sardines, 
but that they ( i. e., the snores) should be of far- 
reaching, all-pervading kind was simply terrible. 

For heaven's sake, girls, don't continue to give 
yourselves away in this manner or— but we will re- 
frain from giving the horrible picture, and instead 
clip the following bit of news from the same source : 
" Michigan was lately visited by a hail storm so 
severe that it took the horns off a cow. That is 
mild, however, in comparison with one in New York 
State, which actually broke acake a Vassar girl had 
made." 



The preceding stanza is almost equaled by this 
gem from the Madlsonensis : 
" The sun did flare, 
The ice did glare, 
The portly Prof, was passing there, 
He slips, he slode, 
He glides, he glode, 
But safely over the treacherous road. 
' Of all sad words of tongue or pen, 
The saddest are these, it might have been.' " 

The Wooster Collegian perpetrates the following 
which we are utterly unable to understand. We 
hope our readers may be more fortunate : 
"The Junior class, 

Alas ! alas ! ! 

Made a display, 

But oh ! the way ! 

A turkey got 

( Taylor's is not ). 

Andy is glad ; 

But borroioing , s bad. 

The Junior class, 

Alas ! alas ! " 

Lest these effusions may be wearisome we in- 
sert a few which are undoubtedly better : 

" TWO TRIOLETS. 

" 'Tis but a pretty girl 

Of whom I wish to speak ; 

My mind is in a twirl. 

'Tis but a pretty girl ; 
But yet — well, here's a curl 

Her heart I dare not seek. 

'Tis but a pretty girl 

Of whom I wish to speak." 

" He's such a modest boy ! 
If he would only speak, 
What bliss I would enjoy — 
He's such a modest boy, 

Afraid he might annoy. 
Perhaps 'tis but a freak — 
He's such a modest boy ! 
If he would only speak." — Acta. 

"A SOUVENIR. 

" A souvenir with dainty bands, 
Wrought by a pretty maiden 's hands, 
During the happy days of old, 
In silks and ribbons manifold, 
Upon my study table stands. 

" It tells of shining glinting sands 
Where oft we walked in foreign lands, 
Although 'tis only, so I'm told, 
A souvenir. 

'• The limit of my room expands, 
And heeding memory's commands, 
The dancing shades of eve unfold, 
The girl with hair of trembling gold, 
Who gave me once, on distant strands, 
A souvenir." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



165 



CLIPPINGS. 

Types of ancient beauty — Daguerreotypes.— 
Tech. 

Taking a negative — Photographing a Numskull. 
—Chaff. 

A word in due season : The treasurer's reminder 
that assessments are now payable. 

A lady says the difference between a silk dress 
and a calico gown is material ; but that's all stuff. 
— Leaves. 

The weakening of the chemical market has 
enabled the telegraph companies to reduce their 
nitrates. 

Prof. — " Tropic is from the Greek. By the way, 
the same root is found in heliotrope. What does 
that mean ? " The Infant — " Love." 

We used to hear of the power behind the 
throne, but in these days of dynamite and Nihilists 
it is the power underneath the throne that does the 
business. — Chaff. 

An Irishman while watching a game of ball, was 
knocked down by the ball. Being told that it was 
a foul, he replied : " A fowl indeed, and I thought 
it was a mule by the kick on him." 

A little peach in an orchard grew, 

Of emerald hue— so rare, 
Our baby on that peach did chew 

And climbed the golden stair. 

Mr. Tralala (to barber, after enjoying a hair 
cut and his first shave and receiving his check) — 
"I think you've made a mistake. Isn't a shave 
twenty cents ? " Barber (deprecatingly)— " Really, 
I couldn't think of charging for that, sir." 

" What's the matter with my darling boy, 
doctor?" agonizingly asked the fond mother, gaz- 
ing upon the youngster as he lay doubled up like 
the letter W. The physician felt of his pulse, 
looked at his tongue and then sententionsly ob- 
served, " Watermelons." He had seen the rinds in 
the woodshed when he come in. 

" By the way, Brown, did I ever show you this ? " 
said Jeuks, as he fumbled in the inner breastpocket 
of his coat for something or other. " I don't 
know," replied Brown, turning a shade paler, " but 
if it's your tin-type taken out at Bar Harbor, with a 
racket in your hand, please don't ; I can't stand any 
more of that sort." 

Depends on the intention : Professor of Math- 
ematics (endeavoring to demonstrate to obdurate 



Freshman how straight lines may differ) — " Sup- 
pose Mr. A., Mr. B., and Mr. C. leave this room, go 
down stairs, and one goes up the street, one goes 
down the street, and the third goes across the street. 
In what respects would they differ?" Obdurate 
Freshman — " It depends, sir, upon the intentions 
of the third man." — Chaff. 

College students don't please as table waiters. 
When you call one a miserable jackass for spilling 
the soup down your back, and giving you a salt- 
cellar filled with sugar, he of course can't answer 
back, but he can say something in Greek which 
you can't understand, but which you feel sure is a 
horrible abuse of yourself, and it's awful madden- 
ing. — Peck's Sun. 

Another of those dreadful mistakes : Mr. 
Sprightly and Miss Singleton had driven over to 
see a mutual cousin of uncertain years. The 
mutual cousin, delighted to see them, has embraced 
Miss Singleton and now approaches poor Sprightly. 
" I will give you Miss Singleton's kiss," she says, 
with lively banter. Sprightly — " Ah ! but I'd 
rather have it more directly, don't you know ? " 
The mutual cousin suddenly becomes so icily re- 
served that their call is of very short duration. It 
is reported that the mutual cousin had thought of 
bequeathing a neat, round sum to Sprightly. Poor 
Sprightly. 

UNDESERVED EEPKOOF. 

The voice of the old Judge was choked with 
emotion as he went on speaking: "Miserable 
creature ! six times have you appeared before me 
at this bar. Drink has drowned in you all sense of 
shame ; made you insensible not only to disgrace, 
but to any feeling of humanity. Your children are 
branded with the stigma of a drunkard's name, and 
starved by a drunkard's appetite. Rum shows 
itself in your trembling limbs, and in your bleared 
and watery eyes ; it has made of your nose a warn- 
ing beacon" — " Chudge, toudt you gall no names 
to dot nose. Dot nose was a pig, high doned nose 
as you nefer see ; unt, Chudge, dot nose was fearful 
ashamed of me. Chust you vatch him plush."— 
Life. 



BOOK NOTICES. 



American Colleges. By Charles F. Thwing. 
New York : T. P. Putnam's Sons. This well-known 
work has met with so much public favor that it has 
passed into its secoud edition. It has been thor- 



166 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



oughly revised aud three new chapters on " Wealth 
and Endowment," "A National University," and 
" Woman's Education " have been added. The 
chapter on "College Journalism" was especially in- 
teresting and has caused us to unearth some of 
Bowdoin's earlier publications, extending as far 
back as 1825. We shall soon give our readers a 
more extended notice of them from the pen of our 
Archaeologist. The book is filled with information 
which is well worthy of a careful perusal. 

The " City of Success," and other poems. By 



Henry Abbey. New York. D. Appleton & Co. 
Price $1.50. One cannot fail on taking up this* 
attractive volume to be enchained and drawn on 
by the smooth, easy flow of the verse. Mr. Abbey 
does not attempt to ascend to the realms of the un- 
known and unknowable, but taking mostly subjects 
of historic interest handles them with consummate 
skill. The publishers have admirably seconded Mr. 
Abbey, making it a very appropriate gift book to a 
lover of poetry. 




jSS'S.a „ 3 S.S »*- S-a s 



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-DEALER IN- 



111 mas sp nit! 

CEDAR STREET, 

Branch office over Boardman's Store. Telephone communi- 
cation with coal yard; also with all parts reached by central 
office. 

All the Students Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 



Fra&k E. Bftbtiti' Boot I Slot Store, 



COR. MAIN AND MASON STS., OPP. TOWN CLOCK. 



BURBANK, DOUGLASS & CO., 

(Successors to True, Douglass & Co.) Importers and Wholesale 
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Where may be found a full line of Fine Meats, Country Produce, 
&c. Orders receive prompt attention. Give us a call at 



NO. 4 DAY'S BLOCK, 



MAIN ST,, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



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our Magnetic Appliances. Positively NO COLD FEET when they 
are worn, or money refunded. 



Curtis' College Bookstore 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, ROOM 
PAPER, PERIODICALS, <3cC 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 7th, 1884, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Joshua L. Chamberlain, L.L.D., President; 
Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel T. Dana, M.D., 
Pathology and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
anil Diseases of Women and Children; Charles W. Goddard, 
A.M., Medical Jurisprudence; Frederic II. Gerrisii, M.D., 
Anatomy; Henry CaujiIchael, Ph.D., Chemistry; Burt G. 
Wilder, M.D., Physiology; Stephen H. Weeks, M.I)., Surgery 
and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Mediea 
and Therapeutics; Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator of 
Anatomy; Everett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of His- 
tology. 

Circulars containing full information may be obtained on application to 
the Registrar, D. F. ELLIS, M.D., or to th» Secretary. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



JOHN H. BRACKETT, 



SPRING STYLES, 1833, 

Consisting of Suitings, Overcoatings, and Pant Patterns, made in 
latest style and good lit guaranteed, at 20 per cent, less than the 
same goods can "be bought elsewhere. Also a _ 

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Hose, and Under Flannels. 



The Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Compij. 

Assets, $51,500,000. Surplus, $6,500,000. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1S46. 

The New Plan of Cash Value and Non-Forfeitable 
Policy meets the needs of the public. Send for full informa- 
tion to h, u. FAIRBANKS, Gen'l Agent, 

BANGOR, MAINE. 



J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PICTURE FRAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

From the cheapest to the very best. Also Pictures, Cabinet 

Frames, Stationery, Cards. Albums, etc. Also, Agent for 

the celebrated Household Sewing Machine. 

In the Blue Store, Main Street, Second Door from Elm, 
Opposite the Park, Brunswick, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Washington Market, 

TONTINE HOTEL BLOCK, 

B:EtTT3srs"wio:K:, DvcA-iasrE. 

Bowdoin College Patronage Solicited. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Workof Every Description done to Order. 

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CALL AT 

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CIGARETTES. 



Stationery Department. 



WRITING PAPER, PENS AND INK. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more tor Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

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They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
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We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 

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marked with the name of the brand— 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1 , 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLEX & GISTER Manufacturers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



"FAIR PRICES," QUALITY "THE BEST." 

We desire to call attention to several new 
varieties of First-Class Paper for Ladies' Corre- 
spondence. 

"ULSTER LINEN" and "OLD FASHION 
NOTE," from Marcus Ward & Co., London. 

"YE CHAUCER NOTE" and "VELLUM 
PARCHMENT," from Thos. De LaRue, London. 

" IMPERIAL TREASURY " Note, from Chas. 
Goodall & Sons, London. 

A beautiful assortment of American Paper, of 
many varieties, including 

"BUCKRAM," "ANTiaUE," "BOND," and 
the complete list of novelties in tints. 

VISITING and CORRESPONDENCE CARDS 
of new patterns, colors, shapes, and sizes. 

Our Stationery Department will 
supply Students with CLASS IN- 
VITATIONS, PROGRAMMES, 
SOCIETY DEVICES, on paper and 

envelopes, promptly and in right 
good style. 

Shreve, Crump & Low, 

Agents Gorham Mfg. Co. 

432 Washington Street, BOSTON. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DISEASE CURED 

WITHOUT MEDJCI1EI 

A Valuable Discovery for Supplying Magnetism to 

the Human Si/stem. Electricity and Magnetism 

utilized as never before for Healing the Sick. 

THE MAGNETION APPLIANCE CO.'S 



FOR MEN IS 

XRTa vrarrfar] tn fliro Or Money Refunded, the fol- 
VVdlldlUcU LU UUIC lowins dUeases without med- 
icine: Pain in the Hack, Hips, Head or Limbs, Nervous Debil- 
ity, Lumbago, General Debilitv, Rheumatism, Paralysis, Neu- 
ralgia, .Sciatica, Diseases of I lie Kidneys, Spinal Diseases, Torpid 
Liver, Gout, Seminal Emissions, Impotency, Asthma, Heart Ihs- 
ease, Dyspepsia, Constipation, Erysipelas", Indigestion, Hernia 
or Rupture, Catarrh, Piles, Epilepsv, Dumb Ague, etc. 

When any debility of Hie GENERATIVE ORGANS occurs, 
Lost Vitality, Lack of Nerve Force and Vigor, Wasting Weak- 
ness, and all those diseases of a personal nature, from whatever 
cause, the continuous stream of Magnetism, permeating through 
the parts, must restore them to a healthy action. There is no 
mistake about, this appliance. 

T/-, +Via T ofliQC If you are afflicted with Lame P,ack, 
J. U LIIC LidUICa. Weakness of the Spine, Falling of 
the Womb, Leucorrhcea, Chronic Inflammation and Ulceration 
of the Womb, Incidental Hemorrhage or Flooding, Painful, Sup- 
pressed, and Irregular Menstruation, Barrenness and Change of 
Life, this is the best Appliance and Curative Agent known. For 
all forms of Female Ditlicullies it is unsurpassed by anything be- 
fore invented, both as a curative agent and as a source of power 
and vitalization. 

Price of either Belt, with Magnetic Insoles, $10. Sent by ex- 
press CO. D., and examination allowed, or by mail on receipt of 
price. In ordering send measure of waist, and size of shoe. Re- 
mittances can be made in currency, sent in letter tit our risk. 

The Magnetion Garments are adapted to all ages, are worn 
over the under-clothing (not next.to the body like the many Gal- 
vanic and Electric Humbugs advertised so extensively), and 
should be taken off at night. They hold their POWER FOR- 
EVER, and are worn at all seasons of the year. 

Send stamp for the " New Departure in Medical Treatment 
without Medicine," with thousands of testimonials. 



Note. — Send one dollar in postage stamps or currency (in let- 
ter at our risk) with size of shoe usually worn, and try a pair of 
our Magnetic. Insoles, and be convinced of the power residing in 
our other Magnetic Appliances. Positively no cold feet when 
they are worn, or money refunded. 



Tontine Hair Dressing Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 
S. W. BROWNE Proprietor. 

Formerly of University Hair Dressing Rooms, Cambridge, Mass. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 



WMMW* «Sff E&& &. &. 

On and after Oct. 15th, 1882, 
Passenger Trains leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.10, 11.25 a.m.. 2.45, 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 

night (Sunday mornings only). 
Rockland, 8.10 a.m., 2.45 P.M. 
Portland. 7.25. 11.30 a.m.. 4.30 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 12.35 night. 
Lewiston. 8.10 a.m.. 2.45. 6.33 P.M.. 12.40 night. 
Farniinglon. 8.10 a.m. (Mixed), 2.45 P.M. 
Augusta, 8.10 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 p.m., 12.45 night. 
Skowhegan, Belfast, Dexter, Bangor, and "Vaneeboro, 

2.45 P.M.. and 12.45 night. 
WatervillcS.10, 12.45 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 p.m. (Saturdays 

only). 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 1S82. 



WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 

J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 

BEATS THE WORLD. 

Old Judge 

CIGARETTES 
Rxid. Smoking Tobacco. 

Endorsed as ABSOLUTELY PURE and free 
from all foreign or deleterious substances what- 
ever, by 
PETER COLLIER, Chemist of the 

U, S. Etepsurtsneitt if Agrlraltwa, 

Washington, D. C. 
E. ODGEN DOREMUS, M.D., LL.D., 

Professor Chemistry and Toxieology in the Bellevue Hospi- 
tal Medical College, and Professor of Chemistry and Physics 
in the College ol the City of New York. 
BENJAMIN SILLIMAN, Esq., 

Professor at Yale College, New Haven, Conn. 
R. A. WITTHAUS, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Chemistry ami Toxicology, University of Buffalo; 
Professor of Chemistry anil Toxicology, University of Ver- 
mont; Professor of Physiological Chemistry, University of 
New York. 

And other eminent Chemists in the United States, cop- 
ies of whose certificates we shall be pleased to mail you 
on application. 

GOODWIN Ac CO., 

Foot Grand Street, East River, New York 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SHREVE, * 

CRUMP 
* & LOW, 

432 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




XTENSIVE STOCK 
OF CHOICE GOODS. 



STERLING SILVERWARE— Tea, Coffee, and Din- 
ner Sets, Forks and Spoons, etc., of exclusive pat- 
terns ; Old English. Silver ; Candelabra ; Carriage 
Clocks; Watches of all grades — Chronograph, Re- 
peating, and Chatelaine, with Chains, etc., etc. 

SELECTED DIAMONDS ; Black, White, and Fancy 
Color Pearls ; Rubies, Emeralds, Sapphires, Cat's- 
eyes, Precious Stones, generally, of highest quali- 
ties; Fine Gold Jewelry of original designs, etc., 
etc. 

ARTISTIC BRONZES of new models— Elegant Man- 
tel Clocks (keyless) ; English Library, Mantel, and 
Hall Clocks, with Westminster Chimes, Cathedral 
Gongs, Mantel Sets, in Marble, Bronze, Polished 
Brass, etc. 

DECORATIVE PORCELAIN in Vases, Plaques, Des- 
sert, Coffee and Ice Cream Sets, etc., from the 
Minton, Worcester Royal, Crown Derby, Copeland, 
Royal Berlin, Dresden, and other celebrated works, 
etc. 

MARBLE STATUARY. NOVELTIES. 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 



Agents Gorham Mfg. Co. 



ALL KINDS OF 






iV'-TT'l^'AKi 



IWHPilSB 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fur- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Work- 
manship, we especially solicit orders for Fine Printing of all 
kinds, 



For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

We also make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges, 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, «fec. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

PRICES TjOTTvT. 
Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



^. O. REED, 



BRTJnxrs'wiciK:, ivee. 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., - 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

c. :e. TcrsXT-iNrsiEisrnD, 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Port/and, Me. 



WATCHES. 

TIFFANY $ CO., 

Union Square, New York, 

Particularly request attention to their line of 
low-priced Watches, just completed, which they 
confidently recommend as the best yet produced 
for the money. The movements are sound, stem- 
winding anchors, and are cased in 18-kt. gold 
in variety of styles. 

Each Watch is stamped with the name of the 
house, thereby carrying its guarantee. 

Large size, for Gentlemen $75 

Medium size, for Gentlemen 65 

Large size, for Ladies 60 

Small size, for Ladies 50 

Cuts showing sizes and styles of the Watches, 
and patterns of Chains suitable to be worn with 
them, sent on request. 

386 Washington Street, BATH, ME. 

E37- C- 3^- FTJTJ^rfllnZ^Ztt. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold Pens, Pencils, etc, PRIZE CUPS, GOBLETS, etc., 
furnished to order. 

EF° Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

585 and 587 Congress St., and 2J5 Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

.8®- Send for Pkice List. 

ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. WILSON & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 

N. B. — Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. Send for price list. 

142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St., 



C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

OVER THE POST OFFICE. 

Give Me a Call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Bowdoin College Boys 

When they visit BATH should call at 

WEBBER'S DRUG STORE. 

A Full Line of Cigars, Toilet Articles, &c. 

Smoke Smoke 

THE MEW CIGAR, 

Price IO Cts. Havana Filled. 

DIAMOND CROWN. Price 5 Cts. 

JOHNSTON & HATCH, 

LEWISTON, ME. 

j$SP" For sale in Brunswick by Ed. J. Merriman. 

Smoke Smoke 

FIRST -CLASS 

Fianos, Organs, and Ifelodeoni, 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 

THOMAS H. RILEY, . . . Brunswick, Me. 

Also INSURANCE written in Best Companies, 
at Lowest Rates. 



FOUND AT LAST!! 

That the place to buy the Very Best 

Groceries and Students' Supplies, 

At the Lowest Possible Price, is at 

GEO. F. TENNEY'S, opp. College Grounds, 

BRUNSWICK MAINE. 



PATENTS 



Marks, Copyrights, fur fJio UmLed Suites, Canada, 
England, France, Germany, etc. Hand Book about 
Parents sent free. Thirty-scvn v ;ns' experience. 
Patents obtained throush MUNN & CO. are noticed 
In the SciENTi pic American, the largest, best, and 
most widely circulated scientific paper. $3.20a year. 
"Weekly. Splendid engravings ana Interesting in- 
formation. Spt'iiinu't) rupy of . !]■"' Scientific Amer- 
ican sent free. Address MUNN & CO., SciENTlflO 
American Office. 201 Broadway, New York. 



IMPORTING TAILORS 

AND 

GENTS' FURNISHERS. 

Novelties in Imported Hosiery, 
Underwear, Gloves, and Neckwear 
for Mens' Wear. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

Market Square, 

PORTLAND, ME. 



WHY, GIVE 



A Call, in PORTLAND, ME. 

^*F. H. WILSOH,** 

DISPENSE K OP 

igs, Medicines, «■ Glenicak, 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 
Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

TONTINE HOTEL, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

S. B. BREWSTER, - - PROPRIETOR. 

Class and Reunion Suppers a Specialty. First-Class Laundry 
Work, equal to Troy, done at short notice. 



\ \ \ \ :\ N N \ \ \\ X:.N.N.\V.>i;.NAVVN \ 

" jfffjL %&Wgj%" 




m vei. xra. 



N \ V \ V V V 



Ne. 12. 



mm 



yM- 



* s*?e 




JiBRaRiBWICK,»MaiRRi 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE. 

Editorial Notes 167 

A Frozen Inlet (poem) 169 

The Story at the Falls 170 

American College Journalism 172 

Meeting of Inter-Collegiate Rowing 

Association 174 



Zeta Psi Convention 1 74 

College Items 1 75 

Personal 177 

Inter- Collegiate News 178 

Clippings 179 

Book Notices 179 






2£ 



dff * (3AN. 23, 1884. 



'«** 






BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The u Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 

"LIBB^KT" Hi -A- :m: IPS," 

SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new "Oxford" and"Moehring" Burners 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGKAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



All the Late Publications in stock. Text-Books of all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



DEAIME BROTHERS & SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

First-Class and Medium Furniture, 

{ST Lowest Prices in the State, 

755 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 
A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, & Fancy Goods. 

Also Eastern Mutual Union Telegraph Office. 
Under Town Clock, - Brunswick, Me. 



The Only RELIABLE AND STANDARD Brands op 

Cigarettes and Fine Tobaccos. 

Straight Cuts. 



Cap oral. 
Caporal J. 

Ambassador. 
St. James %, etc. 
Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut Cigarettes. 



Sweet Caporal. 
St. James, etc. 




This Hew brand ia made of 
Leaf, and is the finest Cigarett 

Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut Full Dress. 

Sweet Caporal Cork Mouthpiece. 



offered for sale. 



JO STEEL 
W PENS. 




Leading Numbers : 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEN CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York, 



Go to W. B. Woodavd's 

To buy your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

SPECIjS-Ij EATES to STUDENT CLXTSS. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

BEST DAIRY IN BRUNSWICK. 

THERE ARE TWO PINTS OF THE NICEST MILK IN 
EVERY QUART WHICH I SELL. SPECIAL ATTENTION 
GIVEN TO STUDENT CLUBS. 

JJffi- STEWARDS SHOULD DROP ME A POSTAL WITH 
THEIR LOCATION WRITTEN PLAINLY. 

A. P. WOODSIDE, Brunswick, Me. 

MILLER & POWERS, 



Two Doors South of Post Office, 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

D1UQS, MEDICINES, 

Fancy and Toilet Articles, Cigars! Tolacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

fipw Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

MAIN STREET, 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



SPRING AND SUMMER, 1883. 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 



MM, 



Main St., under Town Clock. 

JgfFarnilies, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



SCHOOL OF MINES, COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 



The recently established Course in Architecture occu- 
pies four years, the first of which is occupied with general 
studies, the architectural work beginning with the second 
year. 

Graduates of colleges and scie ntific schools can, in gen- 
eral, enter in advanced standing at the beginning of the 
second year. Special students are not received. 

The scientific studies, pursued fn connection with the 
Department of Civil Engineering, include Chemistry, Phy- 
sics, and Mechanics, with so much of Mathematics as these 
studies require. 

The Architectural studies include the theory and the 
history of Architecture and of the allied arts, drawing and 
modelling, with the constant practice of original design, 
and so much of specifications and practical construction as 
can conveniently be taught in a school. 

The buildings now constructing, which will be ready 
for occupation in October, provide, besides the necessary 
drawing rooms and lecture rooms, a special architectural 
laboratory for practice and experiment, and a library for 
study and for the accomodation of the large collection of 
drawings, prints and photographs now in process of form- 
ation. 

For a circular of information containiug further partic- 
ulars address, REGISTRAR, SCHOOL OP MINES, 

Madison av. and 49th St., New York city. 



B. 



Srans^tehSocih Store 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Tear in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

WecdA a&d Salt SSeats, 

"Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

^®*Special Rates to Student Clubs. JSS 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin". — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
G-eorgics, and six books of the ^Bneid ; Cicero, 
seven Orations ; Sallust. 
Greek. — Hadley's Greek Grammar ; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
. and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
cass who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range ot 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 
Latin, two terms. 
Greek, two terms. 
Natural History, three terms. 
Physics, one term. 
Chemistry, two terms. 
Science of Language, one term. 
English Literature, two terms. 
German, two terms. 
History of Philosophy, two terms. 
International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals-, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JANUARY 23, 1884. 



No. 12. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
Oliver W. Means, '84, Managing Editor. 
Charles E. Sayward, 'Si, Business Editor. 
Llewellyn Barton, 'S4. John A. "Waterman, Jr. ,'84. 

WILLIAM H. COTHREN, 'S4. OLIVER R. COOK, '85. 

Rodney I. Thompson, 'S4. Nehemiah B. Ford, '85. 
Sherman W. Walker, '84. John A. Peters, '85. 

Terms— $2.00 a year in advance; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications iu regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to 
contribute articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by the writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as SecoDd Class mail matter. 
Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston. Me. 



EDITORIAL HOTES. 



The encouragement given bj r the Literary 
Association to our local musical talent, will 
undoubtedly meet with general approval. 
The apparent displeasure exhibited two years 
ago by some, served to kill all activity in 
musical affairs. The generous attention paid 
in other colleges to music, has had the effect 
of making our own lack of interest more 
prominent. Hardly anything will serve more 
effectually to create in a student love for his 
alma mater, or to revive this feeling in alumni 
than some good old college song. One cause 
why music has held so small a place among 
us may perhaps be that there are so many 
objects to divide attention. Lack of time is 
pleaded as an excuse. But surely it might 
be better to sacrifice some other things than 
this. One object of the Literary Association 
is said to be the development of music, and it 



is to be hoped that this object will be made 
prominent. 

Such an entertainment as that of last even- 
ing will surely afford more enjoyment than an 
evening spent in debate. Very few students 
care to meet and discuss some dry subject, 
while the advantage to be gained is at least 
doubtful. It is to be hoped that another 
concert at no distant date will be arranged. 
If the Association accomplishes no other re- 
sult than to permanently awaken an interest 
in music, it will have earned a right to live. 



It may not be out of place to offer a few 
suggestions appropriate to the beginning of 
this term, seemingly the longest of the year. 
This term does not possess the excitements in- 
cident to the opening of the college year, nor 
the delights of the summer; its attractions 
are in the opportunities it offers for study and 
preparation. In these long weeks one can 
make greater advances in study than at any 
other season. One gladly turns from the 
cold without to the text-books that lie so in- 
vitingly on the table. These long winter 
evenings can be spent advantageously in read- 
ing. The library possesses works on all sub- 
jects and should be well patronized. Then, 
too, preparations should be made for sports 
next spring; definite plans should now be 
formed, and everything done to facilitate work 
and to insure success. This term is generally 
considered dull and in many respects unim- 
portant, but if one is zealously at work it will 
not be dull, and if success in sports is aimed 
at it will certainly not be unimportant. 
Whether reputation as a scholar or distinc- 
tion in athletics is the object, it is better to 
do with our might what we can do now, 



168 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



In view of our unexpected success at the 
meeting of the Inter-collegiate Rowing Asso- 
ciation in respect to the number and import- 
ance of offices obtained, the present apathy 
in boating circles is certainly remarkable. It 
would be foolish to postpone our decision, as 
to whether we shall send a crew or not, un- 
til just before the time for the race, and then 
to hope for success, with a crew only half 
trained. Such a procedure would be but a 
repetition of past experience. The most 
natural thing to do would be to call a meet- 
ing of those interested, and then to decide 
definitely in regard to the matter. The pres- 
ent room used for a gymnasium, is supplied 
with all the essentials for work, and is made 
comfortable. If it is voted to send a crew, 
a captain should be chosen, and some six 
or eight men put under his care. By the 
time the river is open, a crew could be 
selected, and then carefully trained, until 
the time for the race. It is unreasonable 
to suppose that a crew after only six 
weeks' training can compete with one that 
has been in training four or five months. 
The inducements offered at Saratoga are 
such, that, if properly managed, the expenses 
need not be large. If a crew is to be sent, 
delay in coming to a decision is simply valu- 
able time and money thrown away. The 
lack of interest shown by the boating men 
in regard to daily work in the •gymnasium 
is a natural outcome of the unsettled con- 
dition of affairs. It is hoped that some ener- 
getic measures will at once be taken to bring 
matters to a focus, and thus to revolutionize 
the present state of things. 



The subject of college athletics is just 
now exciting considerable attention. Oppo- 
sition to some of the methods employed has 
arisen in unexpected quarters. While athlet- 
ics pure and simple are looked upon with 
approval, yet many of its modern attendants 
are regarded with disfavor. Some of our 



leading instructors take the ground that vari- 
ous practices commonly employed, such as the 
services of a professional trainer, receiving 
part of the gate money, and accepting favors 
from hotels and railroads are all subversive 
of the true purposes of a college. The 
existence of these evils may not strike 
us so forcibly, removed as we are in so 
great a measure from the larger centers, yet it 
must be admitted that there is just ground 
for the recent expression of dissatisfaction. 
In some instances inter-collegiate contests 
have differed in no essential respect from a 
professional contest, with all its betting and 
"kindred vices. 

The true spirit of college sports is the 
amateur element. They should serve to cre- 
ate a friendly rivalry, rather than as a means 
of obtaining a livelihood. The evils resulting 
from the present fashion are many. Atten- 
tion is drawn away from study to athletics. 
It may have been noticed that some papers, 
representing our most influential colleges, 
rarely devote their space to any literary or 
educational subject, but fill their columns al- 
most entirely with sporting news. . Only the 
largest colleges can afford the great expense 
necessary for modern sports and the result 
will be that none but wealthy men will be 
able to bear the cost of a college course. 
The standard of college sports will be greatly 
lowered and the men engaging will be simply 
roughs. In view of all these considerations, 
it is not at all surprising that the necessity of 
a radical reform should have forced itself on 
the minds of some. If a change could be ef- 
fected it would place our smaller colleges, 
that are unable to bear heavy expenses, more 
nearly on a level as regards prospects of suc- 
cess, with the larger colleges. The progress 
of the movement will be watched with inter- 
est, and it will have whatever slight assist- 
ance we shall be able to extend. 

Now that the season for alumni dinners 
has returned, it may properly be expected 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



169 



that some plans for supplying pressing needs 
will be inaugurated. As our alumni gather 
at these banquets it is to be hoped that they 
will remember our lack of a suitable gymna- 
sium, and will take measures at once to se- 
cure funds for this object. If a movement of 
this kind were started it would not be a very 
formidable undertaking to bring about the 
desired result. The united gifts of a consid- 
erable number, while not taxing any one 
severely, would be sufficient. It is all very 
delightful to sit down to an elaborate dinner, 
and afterwards to listen to an exchange of 
compliments. It would, however, be much 
more to the point, more helpful to your 
alma mater, if active measures for her in- 
creased support and usefulness were deter- 
mined upon. Deeds, not words alone, prove 
one's loyalty. 



Considerable has of late been said in the 
papers in regard to college government, and 
the general principle of admitting students to 
a share in it has been commended. Although 
there a"re local differences in the general plan 
of giving to students a share in the discipline, 
yet the practical result is the same. There is 
no longer the delight of escaping the eyes of 
the Facult}-. The spice that formerly gave to 
wrong doing its attractiveness is now taken 
away. It is believed that the whole question 
of college government, one that has for years 
been the cause of anxiety to college faculties, 
is to be settled in this natural and effective 
way. The past term has certainly encour- 
aged us to hope that the dawn of a new era 
in college life has at last appealed. To be 
sure, there has been no great crisis to test the 
strength of the arrangement, but was not the 
unusual quiet of last term due to the new 
system ? It may reasonably be supposed that 
under the old system of government, last 
term would have witnessed the familiar scenes 
of former years. The success of the present 
method is undoubtedly due in great measure 



to a changed college sentiment. A few years 
ago failure would naturally have resulted 
from this experiment. To a graduate of a 
few years back the contrast must be both 
striking and pleasing. It is to be hoped that 
this improvement will be permanent, and 
that the old customs will never be revived. 



A pleasing feature of some of our ex- 
changes is their publication of short, bright 
poems. It is surprising to note the attract- 
iveness that is added. To omit from some of 
the most interesting college journals their bits 
of poetry would be to deprive those papers of 
half their charm. We have occasionally been 
able to publish a short poem, and our only re- 
gret is that an opportunity is so seldom af- 
forded. An epic is not most desired ; nor so- 
called poems having the skating rink, coal- 
hod, or polo-stick as subjects. Samples of 
that sort of thing have been sent us, but they 
will probably never greet the public eye. 
What we want is a poetical idea expressed in 
fairly poetical language. That there is talent 
in college equal to this we well know. The 
trouble is that it is not developed and culti- 
vated as it might be. We sincerely trust 
that this term will see a great improvement 
in this direction. If any author is too modest 
to let his efforts be known, the communication 
can easily be sent through the mail. The 
Oeient is not the severest of critics, as its 
readers will testify from past experience, and 
will promise every encouragement possible to 
all true disciples of the Muse. 



A FROZEN INLET. 
A snow-clad stretch of level ice ; 
An arching heaven whose pale blue 
Reflects the dead white lustre of 
Dead nature's snowy winding-sheet ; 
A dark setting of wooded shores, 
Whose emerald topped hemlocks 
And leafless, drooping-branched willows, 
Friugiug the ice-locked shores about, 



170 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



In silent mourning, lean over 

What so late was glassy mirror 

Reflecting in its limpid depths 

Every nod of waving tuft, 

Or flinging back the yellow light, 

But more obedient to the touch 

Of the gray frost-king's chilling breath 

Than were the Tyrrhenian billows 

To stern Neptune's angry trident, 

The waters, whose glistening wavelets 

Played hide and seek with summer's sun. 

Fast bound in icy cerements, yield 

No fair images ; nor murmur 

In soft response among the rocks 

When winter's brisk breeze whispers through 

The gloomy piues and darkling firs, 

No song of bird nor cricket's chirp 

Startles the dead cold silence. 



THE STORY AT THE FALLS. 
About a year ago, a bright winter after- 
noon found me standing on a rock which the 
wind had bared of snow, admiring the scen- 
ery of the Androscoggin at the falls situated 
a little ways above the bridge on the Topsham 
side. Only a small portion of the river 
flows over this part, which is separated from 
the main stream by a ledge, but the channel 
below is narrow and the seething and roar of 
the crowded water gives it a grandeur and 
interest greater than .that of the wider part. 
The effect was, at that time of the year, in- 
tensified by massive columns and tables of 
ice which, were it not for the spray, would 
dazzle One with their brilliancy. I was so 
occupied with the scene that I heard no ap- 
proaching footsteps and was not aware that 
any one was near until a stranger stood be- 
side me. He did not seem to notice me but 
gazed intently on the water and spray below. 
I could see that his face was scarred by some 
disease and that one eye had an unpleasant 
blemish. Two fingers of his glove hung 
limp for half their length showing that he 
had lost the members which should have filled 
them. His general appearance could not 
have been called coarse, neither was it prepos- 



sessing. I ventured some remarks about the 
weather and the surroundings to which he 
replied in a sort of distracted manner. Find- 
ing him so absorbed my curiosity was aroused 
to know what motive brought him there ; 
so I said, " Sir, you seem particularly attracted 
by this scene. May I have the impertinence 
to ask what has brought you here and why 
this interest in the place?" With a sudden 
impulse turning toward me he asked, " Would 
you know the history of an unfortunate 
man?" I replied in the affimative and, seat- 
ing himself upon the rock, he related the 
following curious narrative. 

" Until I saw these falls my life was a 
failure. I was born under an unlucky star 
which seemed for years too far north to ever 
set. My history was a series of discourage- 
ments and misfortunes. Success was to me 
either a Will-'o-the-wisp or if fairly captured 
it invariably burned my fingers. I seemed 
cursed with the fate of bringing misfortune 
to myself and every one around me. My 
mother died in giving me birth. When only 
a week old I was afflicted with a severe colic 
caused by the chalk in my milk, and my 
father while trying to soothe my pain dropped 
a spark from his pipe into my right eye, 
which accident injured my eyesight and dis- 
figured my looks as you can see. To please 
my father I had just stopped crying and 
opened my eyes when the spark fell in. Had 
I not tried to be obliging I should not have 
been seriously hurt. At school I was con- 
tinually getting thrashed for other's misde- 
meanors and always got caught at my own 
tricks. At that early age my ill-luck was so 
apparent that my schoolmates, for fear of 
getting injured, shunned me in their play, 
and I was left alone to gloomily ponder on 
my mission in this unhappy world. When 
out in a field with some boys one day I saw 
a gentleman drop his handkerchief as he 
passed. I ran and picked it up and playfully 
whisked it round in the fellow's faces, and 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



171 



theD ran with it to the owner. At my 
question : ' Is this your handkerchief, sir ? ' 
he seemed astonished and quickly snatched 
it away from me. ' Why you unfortunate 
fellow,' he exclaimed, ' that cloth has been 
used about a small-pox patient. I was carry- 
ing it out to destroy it. I am rather 
absent-minded and didn't know I had dropped 
it. I fear you have already caught the 
disease.' I and my companions had the 
small-pox. My companions all died ; but my 
fate could not give me up, so I lived to carry 
these ugly scars all my life as souvenirs of 
the disease. Scarlet fever, measles, and other 
contagious diseases I managed to catch and 
distribute pretty freely among my acquaint- 
ances ; but an unkind Providence let me live 
through them all. When I had finished a 
very limited education my father decided to 
send me to the city and apprentice me to a 
plumber; 'for,' said he, 'as a plumber you 
can turn your ill-luck to your own account ; 
because everything you mend will soon break 
again and give you another job.' I learned 
the plumber's trade and set up for myself. 
But I couldn't thus pervert fate. For two 
years I struggled with fortune. Everything 
went against me. My solder was firm and 
my work (what little I had) was proverbially 
enduring. Even nature was against me. 
The temperature was remarkably even. No 
sudden winjtry change came to burst the 
water pipes. No heavy storms broke the 
roofs or misplaced the gutters. At last I had 
to sell out my stock of tools to pay my board 
and I gave up the business in despair. My 
father was dead, leaving me nothing, so I was 
entirely afloat in the world. Finding no em- 
ployment I drifted about for a while till I got 
to be a regular tramp and set out into the 
country. 

" In seeking shelter in a barn, in a small 
town above here on this river, I was caught by 
a farmer and charged with robbing his hen roost 
the night before, and as I had neither friends 



nor money I was sent to jail. Just before 
my time was out, the real thief was caught 
and confessed his crime. The farmer who 
owned the plundered chicken roost took pity 
on me and hired me on his farm. At this 
time I resolved to exert all my energies to 
help him and to regain my self-respect. I 
labored industriously getting in the crops, and 
for a while nothing especially unfortunate 
happened to me. I suppose the reason was 
that there was no chance for misfortune to 
strike me. It didn't last long. The first time 
I tried to cut up feed I chopped these two 
fingers off," — and he held up his mutilated 
member. 

" The cattle grew poor under my treat- 
ment, and, one after another, three choked to 
death on the potatoes I gave them till, in mid- 
winter the farmer thinking I was to blame for his 
loss, dismissed me and refused to pay me any 
wages. Once more I was homeless and pen- 
niless. My thoughts were gloomy enough, 
I can assure you. I at length determined to 
get to the ocean and embark as a sailor, 
thinking that if my luck did not turn 1 
should be likely to fall into the sea and thus 
end m} r miserable existence. Tired and dis- 
couraged I came along this road, and attracted 
by the noise of the fall I came out here and 
sat down to rest on this rock. 

" There were great masses of ice hanging 
back under the fall and round the rocks just 
as you see it now. It looks as if the bluff 
were trimmed with a white tie, and the 
water was thin, glossy hair falling down over 
it. All glistened in the rays of the sun, mak- 
ing a picture of beauty seldom surpassed. In 
spite of my surroundings my thoughts were 
gloomy and morose. I, I thought, am like 
the icicle hanging in the shadow of yonder 
rock. It sees its natural flood rushing past 
but is unable to join it. The rays of the sun 
which would tend to melt it are shut off; so 
I am frozen by cold fate in the gloomy shade 
of disappointment. The whole busy world 



172 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



is rushing past me to success, but I am left to 
my despair. For some time I sat here, I 
know not how long, looking at the restless 
foam and spray, my imagination abnormally 
excited, peopling both with weird shapes and 
fantastic scenes. But they tended rather 
to irritate than to soothe my melancholy feel- 
ings. Suddenly a shape appeared within the 
ice on the cliff opposite me. With as little 
effort as if it were a shadow, it moved slowly 
through the ice toward the surface till it 
seemed to partially emerge from the mass. 
It remained there immovable, glistening and 
sparkling in the sunbeams. Immediately I 
heard a voice (I could not tell whether the 
shape spoke with its own voice or whether it 
modulated the roar of the falls to convey its 
message to me) which said in tones that 
thrilled through my whole body : ' Unhappy 
mortal ! listen to the Genius of the Andros- 
coggin. Why do you sink down in despair 
when the good fortune you have been a life- 
time seeking is almost within your grasp ? 
Across my domain, in yonder town is a 
medical school. Cross over and enter it. Be- 
come a physician and you can defy your hos- 
tile fate, because whether you kill or cure 
you can claim your pay. You have no money. 
Dig at the jutting root of yonder pine and 
you will find gold. Believe these words and 
win success.' 

"I roused up but the shape had gone. I 
hardly believed my senses till I dug as di- 
rected and found to my surprise enough gold 
to put me through the school, by working at 
odd jobs to help myself along. 

"I entered the school and got my degree. 
From that time on my fortune improved. I 
went back into the country to practice. My 
cures were few, but as I gave large doses of 
medicine I got a good reputation among the 
people there. I made money and am now 
well enough off to be independent. Every 
year since 1 have come to this place in the 
winter to visit the spot where I got my first en- 



couragement, and to pay my respects to the riv- 
er of my benefactor. Whether my experience 
was an illusion, a dream, or a reality, I know 
not, but whatever it was it made my fortune 
and I am come to show my gratitude." His 
story ceased; and, as he seemed again 
em-apt with the noise and rush of the falls, I 
left him to his reflections. 

Now, when I am discouraged and dis- 
heartened, I go over and stand on that rock, 
half expecting to see the form appear and 
change the falls into an encouraging voice. I 
have never yet seen or heard anything un- 
natural ; but the scenery, and the rush and 
hurry of the water tend to brighten my hopes 
and to renew my courage. 



AMERICAN COLLEGE JOURNALISM. 

An interesting little book is a " History 
of American College Journalism," edited and 
published by J. F. McClure, of Cambridge, 
Mass. For the arrangement of the following 
extracts, we are largely indebted to The Col- 
lege Mercury. Its statement in regard to 
Bowdoin was so obviously incomplete that 
we have made the necessary additions : 

In the older colleges journalism began very 
early. At Tale The Literary Cabinet was published 
in 1806; at Harvard, The Lyceum in 1810; at Bow- 
doin, The Escritoir in 1826 ; at Columbia, Academic 
Recreations; at Williams, the American Advocate in 
1827; at Brown, the Brunonian in 1829 ; at Prince- 
ton, the Chameleon in 1831 ; at Amherst, the Sprite 
in 1831 ; at Dartmouth, The Independent Chronicle 
in 1835; and at the University of Pennsylvania, the 
Zelosophic Magazine in 1834. These magazines 
were all of a severely literary character, and often- 
times very heavy, abounding in subjects such as 
the " Rauk of Poetry," " National Unity," and the 
like. 

Various attempts have been made at Bowdoin, 
The Escritoir, published anonymously by the stu- 
dents in 1826, being the first. Later, the Rambler 
and the Bugle appeared, the latter continuing as 
an annual publication of considerable size. The 
Orient, founded in 1871, principally by John G-. 
Abbott, is the only paper that has proved a success. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



173 



For the first paper, Longfellow contributed several 
short poems. 

Of all the colleges, Yale has, in this branch, the 
most brilliant record. Between 1806 and 1836, eight 
papers were published, and failed through want of 
support. But in 1836 was issued the Yale Literary 
Magazine, which is consequently now in its forty - 
eighth year. At first it excluded college topics 
from its columns, but gradually, though containing 
its literary complexion, it added many sprightly 
departments — as, for instance, " The Editor's Ta- 
ble" and the "Memorabilia Yalensia"— which 
tended to make it a thoroughly excellent student 
publication. 

To Yale is also due the credit of founding the 
University Quarterly, whose first number appeared 
in January, 1860. This was an inter-collegiate 
magazine, managed by boards of correspondents 
chosen from thirty-three colleges and universities, 
among them Cambridge (England), and Halle, 
which were all on equal footing. Eight numbers 
were issued with success, but the enterprise was 
brought to a close by the war. 

Other efforts were made in various directions, 
till to-day Yale successfully supports the Yale 
News, a daily; the Yale Courant and the Yale 
Record, fortnightlies, and the Yale Literary Maga- 
zine, a monthly ; also The Banner, the Pot-Pourri, 
and the Lnclex, which are annuals much of the 
character of our Microscosm. 

At Harvard the first effort of undergraduate 
journalism is made memorable by the fact that Ed- 
ward Everett was " one of the prime founders of 
the Harvard Lyceum and its most frequent con- 
tributor." This — "which lived scarcely a year — was 
followed in 1827 by The Harvard Register, ed- 
ited chiefly by Cornelius Conway Feltou. Though 
the Register was discontinued in 1828, it numbered 
amongst its contributors Seth Sweetser, Robert C. 
Wiuthrop, and James Freeman Clarke. In 1830 
the Collegian was published, numbering among its 
contributors John Lothrop Motley and Oliver Wen- 
dell Holmes ; the latter wrote many sparkling 
verses for this sheet, among which were " The 
Spectre Pig," " The Dorchester Giant," and "The 
Height of the Ridiculous." 

Many other attempts were made at success and 
men like James Russell Lowell, Jones Very, and 
Franklin R. Sanborn tried journalism ; but it was 
not till 1866 that a truly permanent journal was 
established. The Harvard Advocate, a fortnightly, 
is still published, and being the oldest paper at 
Harvard, represents the conservative element of 



the student. In 1873 the Magenta, afterwards the 
Crimson, was published as a weekly, which this 
year consolidated with the Harvard Herald, a 
daily, and is now published daily under the title of 
the Herald- Crimson. 

The remaining publication at Harvard is the 
Lampoon, a humorous and satirical fortnightly, of 
which Life is the outcome. " The illustrations," it 
is said, " were made by the heliotype process and 
many of them would do credit to Punch. 

At Williams, very creditable work has, also been 
done. The Quarterly (founded 1853), is remarka- 
ble for the excellence of its supporters. Most of 
the articles were essays worthy of more experience 
than an undergraduate is expected to have. 
Among the contributors to the Quarterly were 
James A. G-arfield, Senator Ingalls, President Car- 
ter, Professor Dimmock, Horace Scudder, Wash- 
ington Gladden, S. G. W. Benjamin, Professor 
Perry, Paul Chadbourne, and John Bascom. As 
is stated, "it is interesting to notice in the pages 
of the Quarterly the many articles which foreshadow 
the future tendency of the writer's thought and 
style." Thus Garfield writes on the " Province of 
History," Perry on "Alexander Hamilton," Bascom 
on "Modes of Mental Action," and Chadbourne on 
" Hugh Miller." In 1872 the Quarterly was dis- 
continued. Later on the Review was issued by the 
faculty and the students conjointly, and was aided 
by contributors from noted college alumni, among 
whom were Presidents Mark Hopkins, Chadborne, 
Carter, and Bascom, Professors Dimmock and Rein- 
sen, and Garfield, Bryant, Longfellow, Rev. E. E. 
Hale, James Parton, and Erastus C. Benedict. 
Finally the Review and the Vidette were combined 
into the present Athenceum which, together with 
the Argo (founded 1881), represent more the bright- 
ness and activity of the student than his soberer 
side. 

At Princeton, the first magazine of merit was 
founded in 1842. This was the Nassau Literary 
Magazine, which has occupied one of the most dig- 
nified positions in college journalism. Among its 
first contributors are found the names of Theodore 
Cuyler and Charles G. Leland. Many others of 
more or less note have been identified with the 
Lit. during the forty-two years of its existeuce. In 
1876, the Princetonian, now a weekly, was pub- 
lished for the first time. This is now the only 
other representative from Princeton, the Tiger, 
which was of the Harvard Lampoon style, being no 
longer issued. 

At Amherst, the efforts of journalism have not 



174 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



been so numerous nor so noted as at those colleges 
just mentioned. Still, among other names we 
see those of Horace Hayuard and Richard S. Starrs 
and President Seelye. The Amherst Student 
(founded 1868) is the only student organ now- 
issued. 

At Brown, among other names we notice that 
of Col. John Hay, author of " Castilian Days" and 
the rumored author of the " Breadwinners." 

At Columbia, journalism is also of comparatively 
late date. The Acta Columbiana and the Columbia 
Spectator (fortnightly), and the School of Mines 
Quarterly, and the two annuals, the Columbiana 
and Miner, .are the only publications now representing 
the students. Among the early editors of the Acta 
were Mayor Low, of Brooklyn, and Senator Ec- 
Clesine. 



MEETING OF INTER- COLLEGIATE 
ROWING ASSOCIATION. 

Pursuant to adjournment, the second an- 
nual meeting of the Inter-collegiate Rowing 
Association was held at the Fifth Avenue 
Hotel, on Thursday, Dec. 27th, where the 
following colleges were represented: Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, Cornell, Bowdoin, 
Wesleyan, and Princeton.- After reading 
the minutes of the last meeting, the first busi- 
ness was the election of officers for the en- 
suing year. They are : President, C. W. 
Bird, of Princeton ; Vice-President, R. I. 
Thompson, of Bowdoin; Secretary, C. Jones, 
of University of Pennsylvania ; Treasurer, 
F. G. Sohofiekl, of Cornell. Regatta Com- 
mittee, W. G. Reed, of Bowdoin ; R. L. 
Hart, of University of Pennsylvania; W. W. 
Downes of Wesleyan. It was voted to 
leave the choice of referee and time-keeper 
in the hands of the regatta committee, and 
that the championship race should be a mile- 
and-a-half straight-away course in a four- 
oared shell. 

A committee from Saratoga, representing 
the railroad and hotel interests there, offered 
to give free transportation and board for the 
crews, if the race should be rowed at Sara- 
toga, July 4, 1884. The offer was accepted. 



It was then decided to have a single scull 
race. After some debate as to whether there 
should be an eight-oared race, the matter 
was finally left to the regatta committee. 
The committee were also authorized to ad- 
mit any college crew to the regatta,'provided 
that thirty days' notice be given, and the reg- 
ular dues be paid by the applicant, such an 
entry to be regarded as equivalent to that 
college joining the association. The meeting 
then adjourned to meet at the Fifth Avenue 
Hotel, Dec. 27, 1884. 

We take this opportunity to say we hope 
that Bowdoin will be represented in the 
coming race. There was never a better op- 
portunity than the present for sending out a 
crew ; the expenses will be comparatively tri- 
fling, and we have some promising men. There 
is a great interest manifested by many of our 
alumni, who hope to see Bowdoin send a crew 
to participate in the coming regatta, and if 
the proper interest is manifested among the 
students, we see no reason why their hopes 
may not be realized. 



ZETA PSI CONVENTION. 

The thirtj'-seventh annual meeting of the 
Grand Chapter of the Zeta Psi Fraternity 
was held at the Fifth Avenue Hotel in New 
York, Jan. 3d and 4th, under the auspices of 
the Delta (Rutgers College) Chapter. Be- 
sides the full chapter representation, many 
of the older members were present, thereby 
making the largest and most representative 
gathering of the Fraternity ever held. 

Brothers Simmons, Past 2 ^, Whitmore, 
Harriman, Williams, Pettengill, Crowley, and 
Jordan of the alumni, and Brothers Hilton 
and Thompson, of the class of '84, were pres- 
ent as representatives from Bowdoin. 

The two days were devoted to the trans- 
action of business, of which there was the 
usual amount. The Fraternity Journal, 
which has hitherto been published monthly, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



175 



will hereafter be published quarterly, and 
will be double its present size. 

Thursday evening the delegates and pa- 
triarchs were entertained by a theatre party 
at the Casino, after which an admirable col- 
lation was served in the buffet rooms of the 
theatre. 

On Friday evening the public literary 
exercises were held at Hotel Brunswick, 
where Hon. Charles J. Noyes, ex-Speaker of 
the Massachusetts House, delivered a fine ad- 
dress on " The Debt and Duty of the Amer- 
ican Scholar." This was followed by a poem 
by the Rev. Wm. R. Duryea of New Jersey. 
Each in his delivery was interrupted by fre- 
quent and hearty applause, which showed 
how well the parts were received. The 
grand officers for the ensuing year are : 1 A, 
Liberty E. Holden, of University of Michi- 
gan ; 2 A, John A. Miller,- Jr., of Rutgers 
College; 3 A, Henry Brock, of University of 
Toronto ; 4 A, Gustavus Remak, Jr. ; 5 A, 
Charles B. Emerson, of Cornell ; 6 A, Charles 
G. Belden, of Syracuse University ; 7 A, Al- 
bert C. Aubury, of New York University. 

After conclusion of the literary exercises 
the brothers adjourned to the spacious dining- 
room of the hotel, where, according to cus- 
tom, they participated in a sumptuous ban- 
quet and in pleasing and fitting toasts until 
the approach of morning indicated that it was 
time to part. 

The convention then adjourned to meet 
with the Sigma Chapter at Philadelphia, Jan. 
8 and 9, 1885, but not without first agreeing 
that the thirty-seventh convention of Zeta Psi 
was the most successful ever held. 



COLLEGE ITEMS. 



The orchestra was re-organized near the close 
of last terra and is made up as follows : Leader, W. 
R. Butler, 1st violin; Burpee and E. Torrey, 2d 
violins; J. Torrey, clarionet; C. Torrey, flute; 
Longren, 1st cornet; Lunt, 2d cornet; Thomas, 
trombone; Kilgore, 'cello; Ford, bass; C.M.Aus- 
tin, piano. We now expect some fine concerts, etc. 



The knot is tied, 
The groom and bride, 

Without an earthly care, 
Sail up the lake 
Where they can take 

A little sun and air. 

A year goes by, 
Again July 

Comes with its heat and glare ; 
They seek the lake, 
But now they take 

A little son and heir. 

— Life. 
5.51 or 7.95 ? 

Seen the comet ? 

L-e-a-p Y-e-a-r ! 

Is your room thawed out yet? 

Brad is taking quite a vacation. 

'84 believes iu " mind aud matter." 

Magnificent sleighing. Better try it. 

Donnell, late of Wesleyan, has joined '85. 

Bad colds seem very fashionable just now. 

Sewall, '87, is teaching at West Farmington. 

Those storm-doors are quite the proper thing. 

The Medics " begin" Thursday, February 7th. 

Prof. Lee spent the vacation in Washington, 
D. C. 

Wanted.— -At 25 W. H., No. 11 of Vol. XL, of 
the Orient. 

The chapel is rather too cold for comfort at 
morning prayers. 

The Juniors have exercises in conversational 
German twice a week. 

The janitor reports very low calls for attic 
floors. Brace up, boys ! 

Prof. Robinson's Bible class now meets in the 
Senior room, Memorial Hall. 

Have the Freshmen taken any action with 
regard to buying a class boat? 

The new card catalogue of the library is com- 
pleted and is a great convenience. 

Most of the boys went home in a snow storm, 
but they were a very jolly crowd. 

Only two Seniors are absent teaching : Kemp 
at Harrison, and Longren at Waldoboro. 

The Bugle editors expect that their publication 
will be ready in about a week. " Patient waiters, 
etc." 



176 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The auction sale of articles at Curtis' "bookstore 
was not profitable enough to last as long as adver- 
tised. 

Constitutional History has been made one of the 
Junior electives for this term, and is.quite popular 
with '85. 

Only 20 degrees below zero last Wednesday 
morning, but after this we may expect some cold 
weather. 

Only four of the Sophomores, viz. : C. A. Davis, 
Home, Smith, and Weutworth take Analytical 
Geometry. 

They say that the Brunswick skating rink is 
deserted by the students, now that the Alameda at 
Bath is opened. 

Goodenow, Leigh, and Mooers, Dartmouth, '85, 
and Collins, Cole, and Perkins, Bowdoin, '83, were 
in town lately. 

The man that cuts recitation and finds out later 
that the Prof, gave the class a very interesting 
lecture is wofully left. 

The University of Pennsylvania men seem to be 
very anxious to row. It is to be hoped that they 
can be accommodated. 

There should be a better and more regular 
attendance at the gymnasium. It is a poor place, 
but better than no place at all. 

Prof. Robinson delivered a lecture at Farming- 
ton, December 28th, on the subject : " Common 
things as a chemist sees them." 

The number of students present at the opening 
exercises of the term was unusually large. What 
brought the boys back so early 1 

Prof. Carmichael gave a very interesting exhi- 
bition of Astronomical (and a few " other ") views, 
before the Seniors, December 19th. 

A large and excellent specimen of pudding-stone 
has lately been received for the Cleaveland cabinet. 
The piece came from Hard wick, Vt. 

Sunday evening, January 13th, Prof. Chapman 
gave an informal talk before the students in the Sen- 
ior room, taking as his subject, Jainesi., 26, and hi., 2. 

The new college catalogue is a much better and 
neater one than the previous issues. Several news- 
papers have commented favorably on its appear- 
ance. 

One hundred and six pages of psychology at a 
single lesson, even when in review, are not calcu- 
lated to fill the mind of the average Senior with 
extreme pleasure. 



The Brunswick High School has now but one 
session per day, so don't waste your valuable time 
tramping down town at 4.30 p.m. Bight after 
dinner is the proper time. 

The reading-room papers were sold at auction, 
as usual, Saturday, January 12th. Puck brought 
the highest price, $1.09, and the Brunswick Herald 
the lowest, .02. The whole amount realized was a 
little more than $6.00. 

There is some doubt in the minds of the two 
upper classes as to whether the thirteen States 
were ever sovereign. Better settle that question, 
young men. It may decide whether or not you will 
be elected President of the United States. 

The General Committee on Instruction of the 
Maine Pedagogical Society held a meeting in this 
town, December 31st and January 1st. Prof. Chap- 
man read a report on "Instruction in Language," 
and Prof. Smith a report on " Geometry as a Study." 

Scene in astronomy recitation. Prof. — " Mr. B., 
was the world created five thousand years ago 1 " 
Mr. B. (with confidence)— " Yes, sir!" Prof. — 
" Well, that has always been a disputed question ; 
we are glad to have it settled now." Mr. B. is 
encored by the class. 

The Seniors are divided in their electives as 
follows: English Literature— Adams, Barton, Child, 
Cobb, Fogg, Hilton, Kemp, Knigbt, Phinuey, Say- 
ward, C. C. Torrey, Walker, Wright. Chemistry — 
Bradley, Brown, Clark, Cothren, Lindsey, Thomp- 
son, J. Torrey. German — Longren, Means, Orr, 
Smith, Waterman. 

It would be well for the directors of the Base- 
Ball Association to keep in mind the games to be 
played with other colleges next season, and to 
arrange a schedule of the State games as soon as 
possible. Tempus has been known to fugit and, 
though the delta won't be free from snow before June, 
the season really opens with May, and will be here 
almost before we know it. 

Last week was well supplied with entertain- 
ments. The Odd Fellows held a three days' fair in 
Lemont Hall, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. 
Friday night there was a costume party at the rink ; 
and Saturday evening ''Arch-duke Joseph's Hun- 
garian Gypsy Band" gave a concert. The music 
was well worth listening to, although strikingly pe- 
culiar. Some readings were also given by Miss 
Emma G. Greenleaf. 

The Polo Club played its first game Monday 
night, January 14th, in the Bath skating rink, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



177 



against the Deuuisons of this town. The college 
team was made up of Phinuey, captain and cover 
point ; Cornish, goal ; Ford, cover goal ; B. Bart- 
let, half-back ; Wright, 1st rusher; Freeman, 2d 
rusher ; E. C. Smith, 3d rusher. Eames was injured 
in a practice game and obliged to withdraw from 
the team. The Bowdoins won by a score of three 
goals to one. Freeman made two of the goals for 
his side, the third being given on account of a foul 
by the Dennisons. Prof. Ball acted as Referee, 
and Dike and Nealley as Judges. 

The Senior and Junior exhibition at the close of 
last term passed off well. Prof. Packard presided 
at the exercises. Glimmer's Orchestra sustained 
its reputatation by furnishing excellent music. The 
following is the x programme : 

music. • 
Salutatory Oration in Latin. 

W. H. Cothren, Farmington. 
Ivan Toure'gneff. 

C. E. Adams, Bangor. 
Catiline to his Soldiers (English version from Sallust). 

* W. R. Butler, Lawrence, Mass. 
The Sepoy Rebellion. 

J. A. "Waterman, Jr., Gorham. 

MUSIC. 

Tenant Farms in the United States. 

S. B. Child, Rumford. 
Causes o£ the Fall of Borne (English version from 
Montesquieu). 

*J. A. Peters, Ellsworth. 
The English in India. 

M. H. Orr, Brunswick. 
Improvisation of Corinna (English version from 
Madame De Stiiel). 

*M. H. Purrington, Bath. 

MUSIC. 

Is the Present Age Degenerate ? 

Z. "W. Kemp, East Otisfield. 
Selection from Alexander der Weis (English ver- 
sion from Lessing). 

* F. N. Whittier, Farmington Falls.f 
The Philosophy of Positivism. 

O. "W". Means, Augusta. 
What We Owe to Pure Science. 

J. Torrey, Jr., Yarmouth. 

MUSIC. 

* Juniors, t Absent. 



Washington Irving.— The writings of the 
most honored of American authors are at last made 
accessible to all readers, aud in such varied and 
beautiful forms as to delight the most fastidious 
taste, and at prices so low as to be an astonishment 
to book-buyers, and a consternation to book-sellers, 
of whom the "Literary Revolution" makes no ac- 
count. As examples, we have "The Legend of 
Sleepy Hollow" for 3 cents, " Wolfert's Roost" 10 
cents, "The Sketch Book" 20 cents, — these in pa- 
per binding, but larger type ; in neat or elegant cloth 
or half Russia bindings, his "Choice Works" are 
published at prices varying from 30 to 45 cents, and 
his complete works (excepting "Life of Washing- 
ton") in the superb Caxton Edition, six volumes, 



over 5,000 pages, choice typography, elegant bind- 
ing, for only $4. Specimen pages or large descrip- 
tive catalogue are sent to any applicant on request, 
and orders over $5 in amount are filled to be paid 
for after arrival and examination, on reasonable 
evidence of good faith being given. Address John 
B. Alden, Publisher, 18 Versey Street, New York. 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited to send 
personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Brunswick, Me.] 

'69. — Geo. F. Mosher has been transferred from 
Nice, France, and is now U. S. Consul at Sonne- 
berg, Germany. 

'80.— Harry L. Maxcy, of Portland, Me., was 
married to Miss Caro E. Hazelton, of Pittston, Me., 
Saturday, Dec. 30, 1883. He is engaged at present 
in the boot aud shoe trade at Fargo, Da. 

'82. — W. G. Reed was chosen chairman of the 
executive committee of the Inter-collegiate Rowing 
Association, at the convention in New York the 
26th ult. 

'83.— E. W. Chase is attending the Portland 
Medical School. 

'83. -E. F. Holden, of East Otisfield, was mar- 
ried Dec. 22, 1883 to Miss Mamie H. Parsons of 
Friendship. 

'84.— R. I. Thompson was chosen Vice-President 
of the Inter-collegiate Rowing Association last 
month. 

'70. — D. S. Alexander has kindly furnished the 
following information and interesting list : 

The Bowdoin Alumni Association at Washing- 
ton, D. C, is one of the largest associations of the 
kind at the National Capital. Its President is 
Commodore Horatio Bridge of the Class of '25. 
The date of its annual issues is not yet fixed, but 
it usually occurs in January. The following are 
members : 

CLASS. NAME. OFFICE. 

1825— Com. Horatio Bridge, Pay Director, TJ. S. N. 

1829— Bichard S. Evans, Lawyer, Hyattsville, Md. 

1831— Prof. Joseph Packard, D.D., 

Theological Seminary, Fairfax, Va. 
1833— Rev. Charles Adams, D.D., Post Office Department. 
1834— Prof. John H. C. Coffin, U. S. Navy. 

1835— Edmund Flagg, Falls Church, Va. 

1838— Horace Piper, 203 E Street, N. W. 

1838— Gideon S. Palmer, M. D., Practicing Physician. 

1839— Israel Kimhall, 

Chief of Div. Int. Rev., Treasury Department. 
1S42— Rev. Charles M. Blake, Chaplain, U. S. A. 

1843— George W. Dyer, Lawyer, 1310 12th Street, N. W. 
1845— Hon. William B. Snell, Judge of Police Court. 

1846— Hon. William W. Rice, M. C. from Massachusetts. 
1846— Frederic D. Sewall, 

Chief of Div. Int. Rev. Treasury Department. 



178 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



1846— Christopher N. Thorn, Real Estate Agent. 

1846— H. Starr Wattles, Alexandria, Va. 

1847— Col. Henry D. Whitcomh, 

Eng. James River Water Works, Richmond.Va. 
Hon. Hugh McCulloch, Banker, 912 loth Street. 
Endicott King, Chief of Div., Treasury Department. 
184S— Hon. LaFaveite Grover, U. S. Senator from Oregon. 
1848— George A. Fairfield, TJ. S. Coast Survey. 

1S49— Llewellyn Deane, Lawyer, 222 3d Street, N. W. 

1850— Hon. William P. Frye, U. S. Senator from Maine. 
1851— John W. Butterfield, Lawyer, 419 4th Street, N. W. 
1851— Rev. William S. Southgate, Annapolis, Md. 

1852— Charles Chesley, Solicitor of Internal Revenue. 

1852— Prof. John W. Chickering, Jr., 

Deaf Mute College, Kendall, Green. 
1854— Henry Dunlap, Clerk of Com., H. of R. 

1854— Lieut. Col. J. H. Oilman, Asst. Com. Gen., U. S. A. 
1854— Hon. William D. AVashbum, M. C. from Minn. 

1855 — Sumner I. Kimball, 

Gen. Supt. Life Saving Service, Treas. Dept. 
1855 — Samuel S. Gardner, 

Second Auditor's Office, Treasury Department. 
1857— Rev. Benjamin W. Pond, Exaniner, Patent Office. 
1857— Nathaniel A. Bobbins, 

Secretary's Office, Treasury Department. 
1857 — James C. Strout, 

Assistant Librarian, Library of Congress. 



INTER-GOLIEGIATE NEWS. 



Lawyer, Chicago, 

Patent Attorney. 

S. Fish Commission. 

Teacher. 

M. C. from Maine. 

Clerk of Police Court. 

Treasury Department, 



1858— Lysander Hill, 

1858— Ellis Spear, 

1S58— Rufus W. Dearing, U 

1859— Charles E. Hilton, 

1860— Hon. Thomas B. Reed, 

1862 — Howard L. Prince, 

1862 — Joseph Noble, 

1862— Geo. A. Mark, Copyright Office, Library of Congress. 

1862 — George G. Kimball, Manager, Associated Press. 

1863— Alexander D. Willard, 

Second Auditor's Office, Treas. Dept. 
1863— Horace L. Piper, 

Second Auditor's Office, Treas. Dept. 
1S64— Joseph N. Whitney, 

Chief Clerk, Bureau of Statistics, Treas. Dept. 
1864— Edward C. Ingersoll, Lawyer. 

1867— Stanley A. Plummer, Treas. Dept., Philadelphia. 
1868 — Robert L. Packard, Chemist. 

1S70— De Alva S. Alexander, Fifth Auditor. Treas. Dept. 
1877— Robert E. Peary, 

(Scientific Dept.) Civil Eng., U. S. Navy. 
1879— Millard K. Page, Pension Office. 

1879 — Stephen D. Fessenden, Census Office. 



Resolutions adopted by the Eta Charge of the 
Theta Delta Chi Fraternity, Dec. 14, 1883 : 

Whereas, An All-Wise Providence has re- 
moved by death our brother, Charles Edwin Hilton, 
a member of the class of '59, therefore, 

Resolved, That in his death the Fraternity loses 
a brother who was faithful and zealous in the per- 
formance of his duties, while an active member of 
the charge, and whose noble and philanthropic life 
endeared him to all. 

Resolved, That we tender our heartfelt sympa- 
thy to the family and friends of the deceased in 
their great affliction. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to the family of the deceased and to the press. 
F. W. Alexander, 

W.- W. KlLfiORE, 

C. M. Austin, 

For the Eta Charge. 



Harvard : 

In addition to his salary of $5,000, the President 
is to receive the benefit of a fund recently invested, 
but at no time is his salary to exceed $10,000. 

The " University Catalogue " has appeared, its 
publication having been undertaken by the Faculty. 
There are 972 students in the college proper, and 
1,522 in the whole university. 

A new elective system is wanted ; one by which 
the inexperienced student will have some aid in 
making his choice. 

The Harvard Total Abstinence League is show- 
ing signs of a renewed vitality. 

The reading-room will start very soon, with 
headquarters at the old law school building. 

The Freshman class in the school of Veterinary 
Science, numbers nine students. 

The Memorial Hall waiters have organized a 
foot-ball eleven. 

One of the boat-houses has been condemned. 

The shooting club has had a glass ball match 
for prizes. 

The question of allowing students to choose be- 
tween Greek and the modern languages is approach- 
ing a decision. President Eliot, Prof. Aggassiz, and 
of course Chas. Francis Adams, Jr., favor the re- 
form. It is said that the Faculty are so much 
pleased with the elective system, that it will shortly 
be extended to the studies of the Freshman class. 
Princeton : 

It is rumored that the Faculty will not permit 
the Princeton nine to play the usual exhibition 
game at Cambridge. 

The Faculty have forbidden the re-issue of the 
Tiger, on the ground that it would divert too much 
time from that which should be devoted to studies, 
and perhaps even to the entrance examinations. 

The receipts of the base-ball club of last season 
were about $4,600. 
Tale : 

There are two Senior secret societies at Yale, 
the " Skull and Bones," and the " Scroll and Key," 
which, according to the New York Nation, among 
other evil influences, absolutely control the college 
press, allowing nothing to appear in any way re- 
flecting upon thera, or connected with their names. 
Many wealthy Tale men have determined not to 
give her a dollar while these fraternities exist. 

Tale's athletic grounds contain twenty-nine 
acres. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



179 



Some Sophomores have been threatened with 
suspension for merely passing a foot-hall on the 
campus. 

The estimated value of the old Howard gymna- 
sium has been turned into a scholarship, and yields 
$150 a year. 

There are 1,075 students in all departments. 
Williams : 

Four members of the eleven have announced 
their intention of passing the summer vacation on 
a farm, so as to be in good condition for foot-ball 
next season. 

Efforts are being made to organize the Hare and 
Hound Club. 

The Sophomores are required to hand in origi- 
nal orations. 

Tennis courts are to be laid out in the gymna- 
sium during the vacation. 

Gul will be ready about January 10th. 

The new catalogue gives the number of students 
as 275. 

The Foot-Ball Association came out free of debt 



Eureka/ — I have fouud it — the panacea for all 
writers, — Esterbrook's Pens.. Ask your stationer 
for them. 



CLIPPINGS. 



If we possess an aching void, 

By proper medicine taking 
We can the aching void avoid, 

And thus avoid the aching. — Argo. 

. Apropos of the Drummer— "His face is his fort- 
une." — Ex. 

" Know anything about life in the West? " said 
Mr. Polecat Stone. " I should say I do. I was tarred 
and feathered twice in Missouri, and rode on a rail 
in Kansas. " — Ex 

It was not a Princetonian editor who, it is said, 
when the tailor presented his bill, returned it with 
the superscription — " The manuscript is respectfully 
declined." — Princetonian 

Mysteries of Mathematics. Prof. — "Mr. Smith 
what is your result?" Mr. Smith (hopefully)— " I 
get 10506, sir. " Prof, (with much severity) — " Wil' 
you please decipher that result?" Mr. Smith 
(doubtfully) — "Yes, sir (strikes out two zeros). 
That makes it just 156. "Spectator. 



BOOK NOTICES. 

Virginia: A History of the People. By Austen 
Cooke. 1 vol. pp. 523. Cloth, $1.25. Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co., New York. This work is one of a 
series of volumes, entitled: "American Common- 
wealths," edited by Mr. Horace E. Scudder. The 
following lines will clearly show the importance of 
the motto contained in this book: "Virginia and 
New England were the original forces of American 
society, and shaped its development. To under- 
stand the history of the couutry, it is therefore nec- 
essary to study the Virginia and New England of 
the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In the 
case of New Englaud, this study has been prose- 
cuted with enthusiasm ; in the case of Virginia, it 
has been very much neglected." Under three gen- 
eral heads are treated, the Plantation, the Colony, 
and the Commonwealth. Beginning with the set- 
tlement of Jamestown in 1607, it portrays the 
struggles of the Colonists and the dangers which 
surrounded them. Then the colony composed of 
hardy, energetic men is depicted, and their resistance 
to tyranny and oppression. The third part includes 
the part Virginia took in the Revolution as well as 
a description of affairs since the Rebellion. 

A Great Treason : A Story of the War of Inde- 
pendence. By Mary A. M. Hoppus. Macraillan 
& Co., New York. This book combines two quali- 
ties which are too often lacking in an historical 
novel, a readable book and good historical informa- 
tion. The reader will be interested in the charac- 
ters so vividly portrayed, and charmed by the diction. 

History of American College Journalism. Ed- 
ited and Published by J. F. McClure, Cambridge. 
Price, 50 cents. This very readable little book con- 
tains the histories of journalism in twenty-four of 
the leading colleges and schools in the land. In 
order to insure accuracy the histories have been 
written by students in the various colleges. 

Modern French Readings. By William I. Knapp, 
Professor of Modern Languages at Yale College. 
Ginn, Heath & Co., Boston. Price, $1.50. The 
popularity of this work can not be doubted as it 
has gone into its second edition. No better proof 
of its excellence can be given than the fact that it 
is used as a text-book in this college. 

Robinson Crusoe : The famous English Classic. 
Edited, for Supplementary Reading in Schools, by 
W. H. Lambert, Supt. of Schools, Maiden, Mass. 
Bound in boards, 263 pages. Introduction price, 
30 cents. Ginn, Heath & Co., Boston. " The 
original work has been abridged by omitting a few 
of the more uninteresting episodes, and by condens- 



180 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ing many of the lengthy moral reflections, where 
they seem to impede the onward flow of the story. 
All the gross terms and allusions, which render the 
complete text unfit for schools, have been removed ; 
and the long and involved sentences, which charac- 
terize the writers of the age of Defoe, have been 
cast into simple form, while the diction of the 
author has been carefully preserved. The story 
has been divided into chapters, and judicious notes 
have been added, sufficient to explain the text." 



Gunnison, Colorado's Bonanza County. By 
John K. Hallowell. Published by the Colorado 
Museum of Applied Geology and Mineralogy, Col- 
orado. Price, 5(1 cents. If one wishes to read of 
mineral wealth and resources surpassing even the 
most vived imagination, we advise them to read 
this pamphlet. Like all western publications it 
promises large profits to investors, and furthermore 
predicts that Gunnison will be the wealthiest of all 
counties in Colorado. 




5 3-r?'S x^ ~ir >.§ . .--i §•= J 5;2 o o '■= ~ -S .2* a . g z q 

Isfjll I §1 gi-s o^f a ">.t Ill 2 1 if g 3 i 
■Sg , S|Jsiaa:|«--;ai:-?fi^-=-'3 3^i: s .":§rxB 

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-DEALER IN- 



III KINGS §| till, 

CEDAR STREET, 

Branch office over Boardman's Store. Telephone communi- 
cation with, coal yard; also with all parts reached by "central 
office. 



All the Students Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 



hank E. Starts' loot I Shoe Store, 



Coe. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



BURBANK, DOUGLASS & CO., 

(Successors to True, DOUGLASS & Co.) Importers and Wholesale 
Dealers in 

China, Crockery, M Glass Ware, 



LAMP GOODS. CHANDELIERS AND PLATED WARE, 
242 Middle Street, . . PORTLAND, MAINE. 

i, Q, AUBENS, . . 1&1BI!* 

ROOM OVER BOARDMAN'S, 



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Have recently established in connection with their stock ot Choice 
Groceries, a First-Class 

General Provision Z^arfeet 

Where may be found a full line of Fine Meats, Country Produce, 
&c. Orders receive prompt attention. Give us a call at 

NO. 4 DAY'S BLOCK, - - - MAIN ST,, BRUNSWICK. ME. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



FRANK M. STETSON, 



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The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 7th, 1884, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Altiieus S. Packard, Acting President: 
Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel T. Dana, M.D., 
Pathology and Practice; ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children; Charles W. Goddard, 
A.M., Medical Jurisprudence; Frederic H. Gerkjph, M.D. 
Anatomv; Henry Caioiichael, Ph.D., Chemistry; P.urt G. 
Wilder", M.D., Physiology; Stephen II. Weeks, M.D.. Sm-ciy 
and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. Hint, M.D., Materia Medic;.', 
and Therapeutics; Ikvim. P.. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator d 
Anatomy; Everett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of His- 
tology. 

ALFEED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE &. CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



JOHN H. BRACKETT, 

SPRING STYLES, 1883, 

Consisting of Suitings, Overcoatings, and Pant Patterns, made in 
latest style and good lit guaranteed, at 20 per cent, less than the 
same goods can be bongh~t elsewhere. Also a 

Fine Line of White Shirts, Ties, Braces, Collars, 
Hose, and Under Flannels. 



ranee Company. 



Assets, $51,500,000. Surplus, $6,500,000. 
ESTABLISHED IN 1816. 

The New Plan of Cash Value ami Non-Forfeitable 
Policy meets the needs of the public. Send for full informa- 
tion to H , N . FAIRBANKS. Gen'l Agent, 

BANGOR, MAINE. 



J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PICTUEE FEAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

From the cheapest to the very best. Also Pictures, Cabinet 

Frames, Stationery, Cards. Albums, etc. Also, Agent for 

the celebrated Household Sewing Machine. 

In the Blue Store, Main Street, Second Door from Elm, 
Opposite the Park, Brunswick, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Washington Market, 

TONTINE HOTEL BLOCK, 

BKUNSWICK, IvIA-insrE. 

Bowdoin College Patronage Solicited. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



WHEN TO II WA.NT A. RIDE 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE, 

On Cleaveland Street, where you loid find turnouts to suit the most 
fastidious. 4£eT Rates reasonable. 

RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



Stationery Department. 



WRITING PAPER, PENS AND INK. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No.l 

SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

T7e use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 

direct importation, which is made especially for us, water 
marked with the name of the brand— 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1 , 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLEN & GINTER Manufacturers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



"FAIR PRICES," QUALITY "THE BEST." 

We desire to call attention to several new 
varieties of First-Class Paper for Ladies' Corre- 
spondence. 

"ULSTER LINEN" and "OLD FASHION 
NOTE," from Marcus Ward & Co., London. 

"YE CHAUCER NOTE" and "VELLUM 
PARCHMENT," from Thos. De LaRue, London. 

" IMPERIAL TREASURY" Note, from Chas. 
Goodall & Sons, London. 

A beautiful assortment of American Paper, of 
many varieties, including' 

"BUCKRAM," "ANTIQUE," "BOND," and 
the complete list of novelties in tints. 

VISITING and CORRESPONDENCE CARDS 
of new patterns, colors, shapes, and sizes. 

Our Stationery Department will 
supply Students with CLASS IJY- 
VITA TIOJYS, PROGRAMMES, 
SOCIETY DEVICES, on paper and 
envelopes, promptly and in right 
good style. 

Shreve, Cramp & Low, 

Agents Gorham Mfg. Co. 

432 Washington Street, BOSTON. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DISEASE CURED 

WITHOUT MllJOTII 

A Valuable Discover!/ for Supplying Magnetism to 

the Human System. Electricity and Magnetism 

utilized as never before for Healing the Sick. 

TH» MAGNETIOX APPLIANCE CO.'S 

r mgM@ii€ Kidmey Belt 

FOR MEN IS 

Warranted to Cure %J8$£2Z%a&& 

icine : Pain in the Back, Hips, Head or Limbs, Nervous Debil- 
ity, Lumbago, General Debility, Rheumatism, Paralysis, Neu- 
ralgia, Sciatica, Diseases of the' Kidneys, spinal Diseases, Torpid 
Liver, Gout, Seminal Emissions, Iniptitency, Asthma, Heart Dis- 
ease, Dyspepsia, Constipation, Erysipelas*, Indigestion, Hernia 
or Rupture, Catarrh, Piles. Epilepsv, Dumb Ague, etc. 

When any debility of the GENERATIVE ORGAN'S occurs, 
Lost Vitality, Lack of Nerve Force and Vigor, Wasting Weak- 
ness, and all those diseases of a personal nature, from whatever 
cause, the continuous stream of Magnetism, permeating through 
the parts, must restore them to a healthy action. There is no 
mistake about this appliance. 

Tn 4- \\ q T orllAC If vou are alllictod with Lame Back, 
1 V LI1G JjaUlCO. Weakness of the Spine, Falling- of 
the Womb, Leucorrhcea, Chronic Inflammation and Ulceration 
of the Womb, Incidental Hemorrhage or Flooding, Painful, Sup- 
pressed, and Irregular Menstruation, Barrenness and Change of 
Life, this is the best Appliance and Curative Agent known. For 
all forms of Female Diiliculties it is unsurpassed by anything be- 
fore invented, both as a curative agent and as a source" of power 
and vitalization. 

Price of either Belt, with Magnetic Insoles, $10. Sent by ex- 
press C. O. D-, and examination allowed, or by mail on receipt of 
price. In ordering send measure of waist, and size of shoe. Re- 
mittances can be made in currency, sent in letter at our risk. 

The Magnetion Garments are adapted to all ages, are worn 
over the underclothing (not next to the body like the many Gal- 
vanic and Electric Humbugs advertised so extensively), and 
should be taken off at night. They hold their POWER FOR- 
EVER, and are worn at all seasons of the year. 

Send stamp for the " New Departure in Medical Treatment 
"WITHOUT Medicine," with thousands of testimonials. 

THE MAGNETION APPLIANCE CO., 

218 State Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Note.— Send one dollar in postage stamps or currency (in let- 
ter at our risk) with size of shoe usually worn, and try a pair of 
our Magnetic Insoles, and be convinced of the power residing in 
our other Magnetic Appliances. Positively no cold feet when 
they are worn, or money refunded. 



Browne's Hair Dressing Booms, 

Odd Fellows' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. W. BROWNE, Proprietor. 
Formerly at Tontine Hotel. 

\ 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi • 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

156 Exchange Street, Portland. 



nil! oHf &&& a. a. 

On and after Oct. 15tb, 1882, 

Passenger Trains leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.10, 11.25 a.m.. 2.45, 4.40, and 6.25 P.M. 12.42 
night (Sunday mornings only). 
Rockland. 8.10 a.m., 2.45 p.m. 
Portland. 7.25, 11.30 a.m.. 4.30 p.m., 12.35 night. 
Boston, 7.25, 11.30 A.M.. 12.35 night. 
Lewiston. 8.10 a.m., 2.45. 6.33 p.m.. 12.40 night. 
Fannington, 8.10 a.m. (Mixed), 2.45 P.M. 
Augusta, 8.10 A.M.. 2.45, 6.35 P.M., 12.45 night. 
Skowhegan, Belfast, Dexter, Bangor, and Vaneeboro, 

2.45 P.M.. and 12.45 night. 
WatervilleS.10, 12.45 a.m., 2.45, 6.35 P.M. (Saturdays 
only). 

PAYSON TUCKER, Supt. 
Oct. 15, 1882. 

DIAM01HD8, FINE J£WEM*Y, 

WALTHAM WATCHES, 

239 Middle Street, - - - Portland, Me. 

J. A. Merrill. A. Keith. 

BEATS THE WORLD. 

Old Judge 

CIGARETTES 
And Smoking Tobacco. 

Endorsed as ABSOLUTELY PUKE and free 
from all foreign or deleterious substances what- 
ever, by 
PETER COLLIER, Chemist of the 

U. S. Departmsat of Agiicuitars, 

Washington, D. C. 
R. ODGEN DOREMUS, M.D., LL.D., . 

Professor Chemistry and Toxicology in the Bellevue Hospi- 
tal Medical College, and Professor of Chemistry and Physics 
in the College ot the City of New York. 
BENJAMIN SILLIMAN, Esq., 

Professor at Yale College, New Haven, Conn. 
R. A. WITTHAUS, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Buffalo; 
Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of Ver- 
mont; Professor of Physiological Chemistry, University of 
New York. 

And other eminent Chemists in the United States, cop- 
ies of whose certificates we shall be pleased to mail you 
on application. 

GOODWIIV Ac CO., 

Foot Grand Street, East River, New York 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A.. O. REED, 

BiR.Tjasrs'wiaiK:, ivce. 

Special Rates to Classes S Students 

Interior Views ftfiade to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 



J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

O'Brien Block, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 



d. IE. T0^77-lsrSElTD, 



CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
y. B.— Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



WATCHES. 

TIFFANY # CO., 
Union Square, New York, 

Particularly request attention to their line of 
low-priced Watches, just completed, which they 
confidently recommend as the best yet produced 
for the money. The movements are sound, stem- 
winding anchors, and are cased in 18-kt. gold 
in variety of styles. 

Each Watch is stamped with the name of the 
house, thereby carrying its guarantee. 

Large size, for Gentlemen $75 

Medium size, for Gentlemen 65 

Large size, for Ladies 60 

Small size, for Ladies - 50 

Cuts showing sizes and styles of the Watches, 
and patterns of Chains suitable to be worn with 
them, sent on request. 



386 Washington Street, BATH, ME. 
WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 



53*= Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BKIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



GEO. C. SHAW & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. 

CHOICE TABLE DELICACIES A SPECIALTY. 

j8j and 587 Congress Si., and 2jj Middle St., 
PORTLAND, : : MAINE. 

,6®- Send for Price List. 



ESTABLISHED 1844. 

W. L. WILSON & CO., 

"Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

TEAS AND FANCY GROCERIES. 



N. B. — Orders by mail will 1 



j prompt attention. Send for price list. 



142 & 144 Exchange, cor. Federal St, 



. STOCKMAN, 



C. L. York, Old CoSSege Barber, 

ODD FELLOWS' BLOCK. 

Give Me a Call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DEALER IN 



3<im SmU>, sShwS,, § cfctMwti 

No. 2 Odd Fellows' Block, 
MAIN STREET, . - . 



ffeag'- Student's Patronage Solicited. 

SHREVE, # 

CRUMP 
# & LOW, 

432 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




XTENSIVE STOCK 
OF CHOICE GOODS. 



STEELING SILVEEWAEE-Tea, Coffee, and Din- 
ner Sets, Forks and Spoons, etc., of exclusive pat- 
terns ; Old English Silver ; Candelabra ; Carriage 
Clocks; Watches of all grades — Chronograph, Re- 
peating, and Chatelaine, with Chains, etc., etc. 

SELECTED DIAMONDS ; Black, 'White, and Fancy 
Color Pearls ; Rubies, Emeralds, Sapphires, Cat's- 
eyes, Precious Stones, generally, of highest quali- 
ties; Fine Gold Jewelry of original designs, etc., 
etc. 

AUTISTIC BRONZES of new models— Elegant Man- 
tel Clocks (keyless) ; English Library, Mantel, and 
Hall Clocks, with Westminster Chimes, Cathedral 
Gongs, Mantel Sets, in Marble, Bronze, Polished 
Brass, etc. 

DECORATIVE PORCELAIN in Vases, Plaques, Des- 
sert, Coffee and Ice Cream Sets, etc., from the 
Minton, Worcester Royal, Crown Derby, Copeland, 
Royal Berlin, Dresden, and other celebrated works, 
etc. 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fur- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Work- 
manship, we especially solicit orders for Pine Printing of all 
kinds, 



For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

We also make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges, 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

IP IE*, ICES JLiOTTsT. 
Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Bowdoin College Boys 

When they visit BATH should call at 

WEBBER'S DRUG STORE. 

A Full Line of Cigars, Toilet Articles, &c. 



Smoke Szaaolse 

THE NEW CIGAR, 

-e--YALE.*— =s- 

Price IO Cts. Havana Filled. 

DIAMOND CROWN. Price 5 Cts. 

JOHNSTON & HATCH, 

LiEWISTON, ME. 

Jf For sale in Brunswick by Ed. J. Merriman. 

Smoke Smoke 



FIRST-CLASS 

Fiuos, Organs, 

AT LOW PRICES. LARGE RENTING STOCK. 

THOMAS H. RILEY, . . . Brunswick, Me. 

Also INSURANCE written in Best Companies, 
at Lowest Bates. 



FOUND AT LAST!! 

That the place to buy the Very Best 

Groceries and Students" Supplies, 

At the Lowest Possible Price, is at 

GEO. F. TENNEY'S, opp. College Grounds, 

BRUNSWICK MAINE. 



PATENTS 



tinue Loaeu 113 solicitors i<>r 1 :urn 13, v aveaus. .luiuo 
Marks, Copyrights, for the United States, Canada- 
England, France, Germany, etc. Hand Book about 
Patents sent free. Thirty-seven years' experience. 
Patents obtained through MUNN & CO. are noticed 
In the ScrEXTi fic American, the largest, best, and 
most widely circulated scientific paper. $3.20a year. 
Weekly. Splendid engravings and interesting in- 
formation. Specimen copy of I he. Scientific Amer- 
ican sent free. Address MUNN & CO., Scientific 
American Office, 2U1 Broadway, New York. 



IMPORTING TAILORS 

AND 

GENTS' FURNISHERS. 

Novelties in Imported Hosiery, 
Underwear, Gloves, and Neckwear 
for Mens' Wear. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

Market Square, 

PORTLAND, ME. 



WHY, GIVE 



A Call in PORTLAND. ME. 



**F. H. WILSON,*^ 

DISPENSER OF 

igi, Medicines, « Chemicals. 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 
Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

TONTINE HOTEL, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

S. B. BBEWSTEB, - - PBOPBIETOB. 

Class and Reunion Snppere a Specialty. First-Class Laundry 
Work, equal to Troy, done at short notice. 



HP vol. xm 




<&T}£ 



tfM % 



BRHRSWIGK,.MRIRB. 




•> \ \ \ \ \ v \ \ ,v 



Re. 13. 





d& CONTENTS."" ft 



Editorial Notes 181 

The Close of Day (poem) 184 

The Bowdoin Praying Circle . . - : 184 

Stuart Mill On Mind and Matter (poem) 186 

Edmund Burke 187 

A Sad Case 188 



German Universities. .. 

College Items 

Personal 

Inter- Collegiate News. 

Editors' Table 

Clippings 

Book Notice 



• Feb. 6, 1884. 






BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The u Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 

"LIBEAET T_j^^3^I=S," 

SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard " and" Duplex" Burner 

Hi PLACE OP THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGEAVED IS THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



All the Late Publications in stock. Text-Books of all kinds. LAW 
and-MEDICAL WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



DEAIME BROTHERS &. SANBORN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

Pirst-Class and Medium Furniture, 

jy Lowest Prices in the State, 

755 & 185 Middle Street, - - - Port/and, Me. 
A. W. TOWNSEND, 

Books, Stationery, M Fancy Goods. 

Also Eastern Mutual Union Telegraph Office. 
Under Town Clock, - Brunswick, Me. 



THE Only RELIABLE AND STANDARD Brands of 

Cigarettes and Fine Tobaccos. 

Straight Cuts. .o, 

Sweet Caporal. /^fc? 
St. James, etc. ■^"is Ambassador. 

St. James \, etc. 
Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut Cigarettes. 

s made of extra fine, selected, prime, mild, golden Virgin 
est Cigarette, aa to quality, flavor, and workmanship, ev 

Kinney Bros.' Straight Cut Full Dress. 

Sweet Caporal Cokk Mouthpiece. 




E 



STERBROOK'S 



STEEL 
PENS. 



Leading Numbers : 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEN CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York. 



Go to W. B. Woodard's 

To buy vour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

SPECIAL EATES to STTrDEKTr CXjTJ"ES- 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



BEST DAIRY IN BRUNSWICK. 

THERE ARE TWO PINTS OF THE NICEST MILK IN 
EVERY QUART WHICH I SELL. SPECIAL ATTENTION 
GIVEN TO STUDENT CLUBS. 

m- STEWARDS SHOULD DROP ME A POSTAL WITH 
THEIR LOCATION WRITTEN PLAINLY. 

A. P. AVOODSIDE, Brunswick, Me. 



MILLER & POWERS, 

-Class Hair Dressers, ana College 

Two Doors South of Post Office, 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



HEW BBUG STOBE. 

ED. J. MERRYMAN, 

BHUQS, MEDICINES, 

Fancy ana Toilet Articles, Cigars! Tobacco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, MAIN STREET. 

Jpg* Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



P^CPN'M/HM)^ 



MAIN STREET, 



DUNLAP BLOCK. 



SPRINC AND SUMMER, 1883. 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
Vests, White Neckties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neckwear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 



M ^lY N" A. R 13 ' S 

Qjuley ami See Cream Emporium, 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

]pg~Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



SCHOOL OF MINES, COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 



leprtiMJit of 



The recently established Course in Architecture occu- 
pies four years, the first of which is occupied with general 
studies, the architectural work beginning with the second 
year. 

Graduates of colleges and seie ntific schools can, in gen- 
eral, enter in advanced standing at the beginning of the 
second year. Special students are not received. 

The scientific studies, pursued fn connection with the 
Department of Civil Engineering, include Chemistry, Phy- 
sics, and Mechanics, with so much of Mathematics as these 
studies require. 

The Architectural studies include the theory and the 
history of Architecture and of the allied arts, drawing and 
modelling, with the constant practice of original design, 
and so much of specifications and practical construction as 
can conveniently be taught in a school. 

The buildings now constructing, which will be ready 
for occupation in October, provide, besides the necessary 
drawing rooms and lecture rooms, a special architectural 
laboratory for practice and experiment, and a library for 
study and for the accomodation of the large collection of 
drawings, prints and photographs now in process of form- 
ation. 

For a circular of information containing further partic- 
ulars address, REGISTRAR, SCHOOL OF MINES, 

Madison av. and 49th St., New York city. 



8ramsmi@h®o>Gh Stora 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

J9®-Special Rates to Student Clubs.-ffls 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; Writ- 
ing Latin (35 Lessons in Allen's Latin Composi- 
tion are recommended as indicating the amount 
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^Eneid ; Cicero, 
seve n Orations ; Sallust. 
CjtRbek:. — Hadley's Greek Grammar; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two 
books; Jones's Greek Prose Composition.; 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including Common 
and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root 
and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books | 
I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry. 
Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require- 
ments will be accepted. Candidates for admission 
to advanced classes will be examined in the studies 
which such classes have accomplished. All appli- 
cants for admission will be required to produce tes- 
timonials of good moral character. 

Time of Entrance Examination. 

The time for examination is the Friday after 
Commencement and the Friday before the opening 
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants 
may be examined at other times. 

Method of Examination. 

The examinations held at the college are mainly 
upon written answers to questions prepared by the 
Professors in the respective departments. 

The Faculty are also ready to make arrangements 
with Principals of schools and academies having a 
regular course preparatory for college of at least three 
years' duration, whereby their pupils may be ex- 
amined for admission to college at their respective 
schools, in connection with their final examinations. 

In such cases the Principal may send to the 
President of the college a schedule of the course of 
study in the institution under his charge, together 
with the names of those members of his graduating 
class who wish to enter the next Freshman class 
at Bowdoin, with a statement concerning the 
time which each candidate has actually spent in 
attendance upon the regular preparatory course and 
the amount and quality of his work, and with an 
endorsement of his character as worthy of admis- 
sion to college. 

If these papers are found by the Faculty to be 
satisfactory, the Principal sending them will be fur- 
nished a list of topics on which he will be requested 
to examine the candidates in writing, either at a 
special examination held for the purpose, or as a 
part of his regular final examination, as he may elect. 



At his earliest convenience he will send to the 
President of the college a copy of the questions 
which he set on the topics furnished, and the papers 
written by the candidates in answer to them. At 
the same time, or as soon after as possible, he will 
certify to the fact that the candidates have gradu- 
ated honorably from the institution under his charge. 

The Faculty will then pass upon the examina- 
tion, and will communicate the result as soon as 
possible to the Principal, and to the several candi- 
dates. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences oi 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK:. 

Mathematics, two terms. 
Latin, two terms. 
Greek, two terms. 
Natural History, three terms. 
Physics, one terra. 
Chemistry, two terms. 
Science of Language, one term. 
English Literature, two terms. 
German, two terms. 
History of Philosophy, two terms. 
International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Voi- XIII. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEBRUARY 6, 1884. 



No. 13. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE TEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 
EDITORIAL BOARD. 

Oliver W. Means, '84, Managing Editor. 

Charles E. Satward, '84, Business Editor. 
Llewelltn Barton, '84. John A. Waterman, Jr.,'84. 
William H. Cothren, '84. Oliver B. Cook, '85. 
Bodnet I. Thompson, '84. Nehemiah B. Ford, '85. 
Sherman W. Walker, '84. John A. Beters, '85. 

Terms— $2.00 a year m advance; single copies, 15 cents. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students and Alumni ot the college are cordially invited to 
contribute articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by the writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



It has been suggested that a return might 
be made to the old custom of having a 
concert, commencement week, without the 
former financial loss. Undoubtedly a great 
deal of enjoyment was obtained from the 
concerts that have been held, but the fact 
that in every case a large assessment had to 
be made upon each member of the graduat- 
ing class has served to discourage the last 
three classes from the undertaking. Before 
accepting, however, the common conclusion 
that it is impossible to have a concert without 
the inconvenience of an emptiness of pocket, 
it may be well to consider the way in which 
former concerts have been managed. In the 
first place, fifty dollars were paid for the use 
of the church ; and then an expensive band 
from a distance, together with one or two 



celebrated vocalists swelled the expenses to a 
large amount. In order to cover the expenses 
the price of the tickets was usually made so 
high that many were debarred from attend- 
ing. Circumstances are now somewhat dif- 
ferent. Memorial Hall could be secured 
without cost. Then if a committee of some 
business tact should engage a good vocalist 
and Grimmer's Orchestra, the tickets could 
be put at such a price as to insure a full 
house. The large number of visitors in town 
at commencement time together with the 
town people and students would certainly 
make a good audience. One trouble of 
previous years has been that each class 
wished to surpass its predecessor in the 
amount of talent, both as regards quality and 
quantity secured. Naturally there would be 
nothing of that spirit this year. The fact 
that no concert has been held for several 
years would add novelty and increase the 
probability of success. The choice does not 
lie, however, between this concert and no 
expense at all, as the band concert on the 
campus costs considerable, and is not free from 
many objectionable features. It seems likely 
that a real good concert, if properly managed, 
would not be a source of expense at all, but 
would on the contrary be a saving of expense. 
It is even possible that something might be 
cleared from such a concert. A certain gen- 
tleman has expressed a willingness to make 
all necessary arrangements and guarantee sat- 
isfaction, if the class wish to make the 
change. To say the least, it would not be 
unwise to take the matter under considera- 
tion, and see if in this way the coming com- 
mencement cannot be made additionally in- 
teresting. 



182 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



As the Seniors have decided upon their 
photographer, they should begin to sit as soon 
as possible. It would be inconvenient for all 
concerned, if this work should be put off 
until next term. Moreover, in view of the 
low rates obtained, sittings should be begun 
immediately in order that the work ma.y not 
be hurriedly done. Arrangements should be 
made so that Mr. Reed need not be obliged to 
put off any of his other customers. It is a 
satisfaction to know that this work of taking 
pictures can be done so well and so cheaply 
here in town. No better advertisement could 
be wished than the patronage of succeeding 
classes. 

The schedule of ball games of last year 
proved so eminently satisfactory that a similar 
schedule should be made out for this coming 
season. Until last year the result of the 
summer's work on the diamond was always 
left in uncertainty. While the State cham- 
pionship was not decided as we had hoped it 
would be, yet it was much more preferable to 
know where it did belong. 

As some time will be necessarily con- 
sumed in delays before a date can be assigned 
for the meeting of the directors of the several 
ball nines, it would be well to begin at once 
to stir in the matter. 



It is a cause of regret that the Freshmen 
have thus far done nothing in regard to the 
purchase of a class boat. The longer this 
matter is put off the more difficult will it be 
for them to arouse the interest requisite for 
success. In years past the college has had 
excellent crews, and great enthusiasm has 
been awakened in regard to boating. The 
boat-house, built a few years ago. stands a 
constant reminder of the former interest 
taken in aquatic matters, and a