(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Bowdoin Orient"

THE 




m^mtrm 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 



EDITORIAL BOARD. 

John A. Peters, Managing Editor. 

* N. B. Ford, Business Editor. 

Oliver R. Cook, Business Editor. 

Boyd Bartlett, 

t Webb Donnell, 

John F. Libbt, 

Wm. p. Nealley, 

Arnold A. Knowlton, 

Charles W. Tuttle, 

Walter V. Wentworth. 

* Resigned January 28th. f Resigned October Sth. 

I 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

1884-5. 




INDEX TO VOLUME XIV. 



PROSE ARTICLES. 

PAGB. 

Adapted Tales 166 

Alpha Delta Phi Convention S. W. Walker 62 

Alumni of the Northwest 191 

Alumni Reunions 217 

Antilogia 107, 117, 130, 144, 155, 167, 180, 193, 220 

Aphorisms from the Campus 193 

Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, The A. W. Merrill 192 

Base-Ball Boyd Bartlett, Editor 39, 50, 72, 108, 118 

Bowdoin Banquet in Minneapolis J. O. P. Wheelwright 61 

Bowdoin in Journalism Geo. M. Whilaker, 72. .152, 163, 176, 190, 215, 228 

Boat Races, The A. A. Knowlton 66 

Chum Story, A W. P. Nealley 70 

Class Day John F. Libby 92 

Clippings Boyd Bartlett, Editor. 

15, 31, 46, 79, 99, 112, 123, 135, 147, 159, 171, 185, 197, 223, 235 

Collegh Tabula Webb Donnell,* Boyd Bartlett, John F. Libby, f Editors. 

9, 25, 42, 61, 74, 96, 108, 120, 132, 144, 157, 168, 182, 194, 221, 233 

Commencement Concert W. P. ]S^ealley 93 

Commencement Day J. A. Peters 94 

COMMONICATIONS : 

The Alumni and the Overseers 5, 7, 22, 23, 38, 70 

Compulsory Religion 7 

Light Thrown on the Marking System 24 

'85's Bugle 26 

Plea for the B. L. A., A 131 

Need of Action on Gymnasium Question 156 

Pre-Bugle Wail, A 167 

Congratulations from an Alumnus 181 

'25 Memorial Day, A 181 

Delta Kappa Epsilon Convention C. B. Burleigh 164 

Doctor Gideon L. Soule A. A. Knowlton 21 

Editorial Notes John A. Peters, Editor. 

1, 17, 33, 49, 65, 81, 101, 118, 125, 137, 149, 161, 173, 187, 213, 225 

Fall Races, The J. A. Peters 118 

Field Day John F. Libby 55 

Game of Whist, A C. C. Choate 198 

Great Tragedy, A 179 

Graduating Exercises of Medical School C. W. Tuttle 61 

Hawthorne 105 

In Memoriam 12, 234 

Incident of the Late War, An 232 

Ivy Day John F. Libby 67 

Ivy Hop J.A.Peters 68 

Jennie Glow E. C. Pluramer ' 129 

Junior Electives W. V. Wentworth 68 

* Resigned Oct, 8, 1884. fPi'o tern. 



I N D E X..— {Continued.) 

Lawn Tennis J. A. Peters 57 

Literary St)'le of Daniel Webster, The 230 

Longfellow Memorial 199-211 

May Training, The John F. Libby 115 

New York Alumni Reunion 177 

Of a Saturday Afternoon H. H. Emery, 7<t 35 

Old Laws C. VV. Tuttle 36 

Personals Oliver K. Cook, Editor. 

13, 29, 44, 64, 77, 98, 112, 122, 134, 146, 158, 170, 184, 196, 222, 234 

Pointed Tale, A 153 

Prizes for 1883-4 A. A. Knowlton 95 

Psi Upsilon Convention C. E. Say ward 37 

Remarks of Prof. Chapman on Dr. Packard 103 

Romance of a School Teacher, The A. W. Merrill 165 

Saratoga Regatta, The F. N. Whittier 83 

Secret of My Success, The E. C. Plummer 218 

Self-Made Men John F. Libby 4 

Sketch, A W. R. Butler 140 

Stray Leaves from a Diary 180 

Success. — Class Day Oration L. Barton 87 

Sunday Services J. A. Peters 86 

Terrible Tragedy, A 142 

Tour of the Coal-Closet Doors, A A. W. Merrill 218 

Thela Delta Chi Convention F. W. Davis 154 

White Mountain Sunset, A J. Torrey, Jr 19 

What Changed Ludkins C. B. Burleigh 127 

y . M. C. A. Conference 217 

Yacht Race, A 230 

VERSE. 

PAGE. 

Alumnus Among His Memorabilia W. R. Butler 176 

Amo C. B. Burleigh 156 

Apollo and Clytie Anon 5 

Camping Out 231 

Captive B. Bartlett 117 

Drifting 225 

Elbon's Reef E. C. Plummer 220 

Escort, The C. B. Burleigh 130 

Familiar Lines Written in a Country School-House. .B. Bartlett 193 

Fib, A W. R. Butler 128 

Forest Brook, The E. C. Plummer 167 

Frozen Luke, The W. R. Butler 220 

Greeting to the New Year W. R. Butler 161 

Her Brother C. B. Burleigh 194 

Horace: Lib. H., Od. X W. R. Butler 189 

In a Garden Anon 118 

Indecision B. Bartlett 1 55 

Ivy Poem W. R. Butler 53 

Just W. R. Butler 166 

Legend of the Lost City, The (Class-Day Poem) . . . J. Torrey, Jr 91 

Lines B. Bartlett 163 

Little Ann 232 

March Winds W. R. Butler 217 

Memory, A B. Bartlett 127 



I N D E X .— ( Continued. ) 

Montana, 1864 E. B. Neally, '58 166 

Musis Amicus J. F. Libby, '82 4 

My Meerschaum Pipe C. B. Burleigh 113 

My School E. C. Plummer 178 

November Day, A B. Bartlett 142 

October W. R. Butler 125 

Ode B. Bartlett 181 

Ode to Margaret C. B. Burleigh 180 

Oh My 231 

Old Chapel Bell, The J. F. Libby, '82 69 

Opening, An C. B. Burleigh 155 

Orbis Terras W. R. Butler 187 

Picture, A B. Bartlett 152 

Picnic, The E. C. Plummer 68 

Release B. Bartlett 149 

Remedy, The C. B. Burleigh 181 

Retrospection C. B. Burleigh 19 

Sequence, A 229 

Serenade B. Bartlett 144 

Skating B. Bartlett 175 

Sonnet — Paradise Spring B. Bartlett 137 

Sonnet — Prof. Packard E. C. Plummer 103 

Sorrow E. C. Plummer 143 

Sounds from a Country Election W. R. Butler 139 

Souvenir, A C. B. Burleigh 166 

Summer Reverie, A B. Bartlett 115 

To W. R. Butler 192 

Two Impressions E. C. Plummer 22 

Two Seasons C. B. Burleigh 107 

Warning, A E. C. Plummer 105 

Wit, The B. Bartlett 154 



:'sr"s:^K"^~s . - ^,^. x^ N^^g^ 







\ \ \ \ \:a" 



m V0I. xi¥. 



Nq. 1 





* ©r^e 



Wg^ 



-W' 




^ 




0i% %/l» 



^ERMR^WraK,*MaiRB.#- 







CONTENTS. 



Editorial Notes 1 

Musis Amicus (poem) 4 

Self-Made Men 1 4 

Apollo and Clytie (poem) 5 

Communications 5 



CoLLEGii Tabula 9 

In Memoriam 12 

Personal 13 

Inter-Collegiate Notes 15 

Clippings 15 






^PI^IL 30, 188|. # 



t^'-^dr^ 






BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



'•* \^0 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

rs PL.4CE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENaEAVED IN THE MOST PASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOE 



ALieYLieA 



B 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



The only radical internal remedy. Never known to 
fall in a single case, acute or chronic. It expels the poison- 
ous Uric Acid from the blood, which is the prime oau.se 
of Rheumatism, Gout, and Neuralgia.— As a blood puri- 

i THE OLD RELIABLE SPECIFIC 

ENDORSED BY PHYSICIANS AND 
1 THOUSANDS OF PATIENTS. 

I fier it has no equal. Acting on common-sense principles 
it eradicates from the blood all poisonous matter which 
causes disease. — It has been in use many years and 
cured a larger percentage of cases than any other 

POSITIVELY CURES 

I remedy. Send for testimonials from the cured. — Salicy- 
lica strikes directly at the causes of these diseases, while 
so many so-called speci- 

EHETJMATISM 

tics only treat locally the effect. When you have tried 
in vain all the "oils," "ointments," "liniments," and 
"pain cures," and when your 

GOUT, NEURALGIA. 

doctors cannot help you, do not despair but take Salicy- 
lica at once and be cured. — No one can afford to live in 
pain and miser\' when 

GRAVEL, DIABETES. 

Salicylica will relieve him and j)ut him in condition to 
attend to his daily avocations. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE — ; 



JiQ. 5 0DD EEIiItOW^' BLOCK, 



l3 the place to buy 



Sno^^, SiaUomt§, § cFo/ncy, ^noS. 



Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 



DP. 



$1 per box, 6 boxes for $5, 

BLOOD POISONING. 

with full directions in ten languages. Sold by druggists 
everywhere, or sent liy mail, prepaid, on receipt of prioe_ 

■WASHBTJRNE & CO., Prop's, 

287 Broadway, New York. 

Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

Odd Fellows' Block, Over Bavis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. W. BROWNE, Pkopkietor. 
Formerly at Tontine Hotel, 




TME FAVORITB NOS. S03-404-332-l7O-^5l- WITH 
HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORL 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. MERRYMAN, PHARMACIST •:• 

Bl^eS, MEDICIllS, 

FaDCf anJ Toilet Articte, Ciprsl Toliacco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

1113" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PITBLISHER, 

eet Music, Music Boolcs, Musical Instru 
cal Merchaudise, of all kinds, 

124: Excliange Street, Portland. 

SPRING AND SUMMER, 1884. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ileady-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments. White 
Vests, White Neck-ties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neck-wear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 



M:^Y]Sr^RD'S 



Main St., under Town Clock. 

J^^Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



STROUT & WOODARD 

Have recently established in connection with their stock of Choice 
Groceries, a First-Class 

O-eneral I=rovisioii 3^>^ar]set 

Where may be found ,1 full line of Fine Meats, Country Produce, 
&c. Orders receive prompt attention. Give us a call at 



NO. 4 DAY'S BLOCK, 



MAIN ST., BRUNSWICK. ME. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat .ind Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



WHEN' YO IT 'WA.JSfT JL RinJE 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE, 

On Cleaveland Street, ivkere you will find turnouts to suit the most 
fastidious. j^S' -Rates reasonable. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday IVIorning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Tear in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

AS'Special Bates to Student Clubs..Sl 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are e.\amined in tlie following subjects, test- 
books beinp; mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quii'ed. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, Georgics and first six Books 
of the jEneid, including Prosody. 
(Instead of the Georgics, Caesar's Gallic War, 
Books I.-IV., may be offered.) 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodvpin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Georgraphy, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra, — so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regulae Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (July 11 and 12, 1884), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 26 and 27, 1884). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examinations is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Washington Academtf, East 
Machias, and at the Fryebnrg Academy, these 
schools having been made special Fitting Schools 
for the college by the action of their several Boards 
of Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers of the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 
have been fitted at any school having an approved 



preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 
Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A "WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $2.5. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 30, 1884. 



No. 1. 



EOWDOIN" ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OP 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

J. A. Peters, '85, Managing Editor. 

N. B. Ford, '85, Business Editor. 
Boyd Bartlett, '85. W. P. Nealley, '85. 

O. R. Cook, '85. A. A. Knowlton, '86. 

"Webb Donnell, '85. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. F. LiBBY, '85. W. V. Wentworth, '86. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00. 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the boolt stores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by ^\^-iter's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 



EDITORIAL KOTES, 



The Orient h;is completed another year, 
and the editorial mantle falls upon new and 
unaccustomed shoulders. The high standard 
of excellence given the paper by preceding- 
boards, makes the task of their successors 
one of peculiar difficulty. We shall endeavor 
to preserve this standard as far as possible, 
and in all things make the paper a true ex- 
ponent of Bowdoin and her interests. 



The first matter that naturally occupies 
the attention of a new board of editors is 
the subscription list. Our support from the 
alumni is not what might be reasonably ex- 



pected. We have taken measures with this 
issue to remedy this defect by affording 
some two hundred of our graduates the 
opportunity of taking their college paper. 
That our efforts in this direction will be met 
with a hearty response, we have every reason 
to believe. But while calling on our alumni 
for support, it is impossible to overlook the 
fact that the Orient does not receive the 
entire support of the students. There are 
some men in college — happily the number is 
not large — who do not subscribe for the paper. 
We cannot consistently talk to the alumni 
about their duty in supporting the college 
paper, when there are men in college who are 
delinquent in this respect. Now, at the be- 
ginning of the year, is the time to stop bor- 
rowing the Orient and subscribe. 

It will be observed that in this issue we 
introduce a few changes in the established 
method of publishing the Orient. Recog- 
nizing with some of our contemporaries, the 
general uselessness of the Editor's Table, we 
have decided to dispense with that depart- 
ment, till some special occasion arises for 
its revival. Of course the College News and 
the Clippings will be retained. The local 
editor has abandoned the wedge-like form 
generally given to his items, and heads his 
column with a new, or, rather, a very old 
title. It is to be hoped that these changes, 
as welL,as any others that may be made, will 
meet with your approbation. 



The attention of the alumni and other 
friends of the college, is directed to a commu- 
nication in this issue from Geo. E. B. Jack, 
son, of Portland, and from Edward Stan- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



wood, of the Boston Advertiser, on the pro- 
posed change in the government of the college. 
Mr. Jackson opposes the plan advocated by 
Dr. Gerrish in our last number. In our next 
issue we shall publish a communication on 
the same subject from Geo. F. Emery, of 
Portland. We hope to hear from others of 
the alumni. It is well to have the matter well 
ventilated before commencement. 



The Orient is convinced that a college 
paper which claims to be the organ of the 
whole student body, should not be supported 
entirely by the editors. Past boards of edi- 
tors, having the same belief, taking their first 
faltering steps on the journalistic stage, have 
issued tearful appeals to students, faculty 
and alumni, for contributions to their col- 
umns. The result, as far as we know, has 
been that no articles have been contributed 
till near the close of the year, when the floor 
of the Orient ofSoe is generally covered 
knee deep with essays on moral and political 
subjects, written by aspirants for positions on 
the editorial board. Other college papers 
have not been so unfortunate in this respect. 
Many of our exchanges publish in every issue 
articles of more or less merit, written by men 
outside the board. There are men in Bow- 
doin who have ability to write well, but 
apparently no inclination, or, perhaps, no 
time to write for the Orient. We propose 
to make it an object for all such to exert 
themselves : and if we succeed in inducing a 
few good writers to contribute to our col- 
umns with anything Hke regularity, the acme 
of our ambition will have been reached. We 
offer in prizes for literary work, the sum of 
thirty dollars, to be divided as follows: 
For the largest number of published short 

poems $10.00 

For the next larger number 5.00 

For the best light prose article or short 

sketch 10.00 

For the next in merit 5.00 



Unless five poems at least, from the same 
pen, are published during the year, the poeti- 
cal prizes will not be awarded. We think this 
not an unreasonable limit, since the poems 
wanted are short poems, and the time given is 
nearly a year — the award of prizes to be given 
in our last issue. Poems will have more proba- 
bility of being published, if handed in at 
intervals, rather than in large numbers at the 
end of the year. As to the variety of poems 
wanted : we prefer something bright and 
witty rather than heavy. The prose articles 
also must be contributed during the year. 

The advantages resulting from competition 
for these prizes are threefold. First: honor 
and glory ; for we shall publish the names of 
the prize winners in our last number, and 
their names will un<]oubtedly go down to 
posterity in the college catalogue. Second : 
for underclassmen competitors, the possi- 
bility of a position on the next Orient 
board. Third-: he lucre, by no means 
filthy. Write on one side of the paper, sign 
your name and nom de plume, and come early 
to avoid the rush. 



We are sorry to leai'u that the Sophomores 
have nearly abandoned the idea of having a 
crew participate in the class races. Now that 
the Seniors have become too dignified, or too 
lazy to pull, much depends on the enthusiasm 
shown by the three lower clsisses in having 
the spring races a success. The Freshmen 
are working with a will, too — have bought a 
boat and intend to contest the ownership of 
the cup. The Juniors, who are so fortunate 
as to hold the cup at the present time, do not 
intend to give it up without a struggle, 
even when the lassitude of Senior year creeps 
over them. For the Sophmores, with three 
races ahead of them, to give up their boat 
and disband their crew is very dispiriting, to 
say the least, to the other crews, and estab- 
lishes a very bad precedent. There is good 
rowing material in '86, and money enough to 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



back it. Perfect agreement in regard to the 
crew, or its officers, can not be expected, but 
lack of agreement should not prevent a crew 
from being placed on the river. Compro- 
mises are excellent in their way and always 
in order. Let each side, if there be sides, 
yield a little. Now is the time to retrieve 
the defeat of last year. Do not let it be 
said that '86 pulled once — was defeated — 
and never pulled again. 



The Juniors and Sophmores are begin- 
ning to suspect that the Tutor in Rhetoric 
does not fully understand the intricacies of 
the present marking system. Under this sys- 
tem an individual absenting himself entirely 
from a recitation, for whatever reason, suffers 
a certain small reduction in rank. If he is 
absent during a portion of the recitation hour 
he suffers a reduction which varies with the 
time of absence. Beyond this slight reduction 
in rank, there is no penalty for cutting recita- 
tions : a student may remain away from any 
recitation, or from any part of any recitation, 
whenever he choses. The Tutor in Rhetoric, 
apparently unmindful of this fact, is in the 
habit of closely questioning any person who 
asks permission to leave the recitation room. 
Although, as far as we know, no person has 
been refused such permission, yet the mere 
fact of his being obliged by the instructor to 
give a reason, would certainly indicate that 
the instructor had power to refuse his per- 
mission, if the reason should not prove satis- 
factory. The instructor undoubtedly has 
power to regulate his recitation, and can 
prevent a man who has once left the room, 
from returning ; but the act of asking per- 
mission to withdraw from the recitation 
room is a mere act of courtesy. The 
instructor cannot refuse his consent. 



The boom inaugurated last spring in 
lawn-tennis, has lost none of its pristine 
vigor. The courts that were laid out last 



fall have been overhauled, and a large num- 
ber of students is becoming interested in 
the game. 

Tennis at Bowdoin supplies a long-felt 
want. Hitherto the fortunate ones elected 
to serve on the crew, or the nine, have rather 
monopolized the exercise — the multitude be- 
ing obliged to take their gymnastics in look- 
ing on. But tennis is a game for every one. 
It requires neither strength of limb nor 
length of practice : simply a racket and a 
place to play. 

It might be well, considering the small 
number of base-ball games now scheduled 
for the Delta, to arrange tennis matches with 
the other colleges in the State. The games 
would be interesting ; and a benefit to both 
colleges. An objection, however, to having 
outside clubs come here to play, is our poor 
accommodation in the way of grounds. Al- 
though we are especially fortunate in having 
a large number of courts, there is not one 
suitable for a match game. The court on 
which was played the game with Colby last 
fall is not a good one, neither is it in a good 
situation. If the college could be induced to 
lay out a well turfed court on some part of 
the Delta, where* match games could be 
played, the tennis interest would be greatly 
promoted. Let the Association take this 
matter in hand. 



The Oolhy Ucho for March mentions the 
intercollegiate oratorical contests customary 
between the colleges of some of the Western 
States, and asks: "Is there any valid reason 
why we Maine students should not adopt 
some such plan " ? We think there is. Rel- 
ative excellence in oratorj^, especially when 
the contestants are well matched, is purely a 
matter of opinion. It would be next to im- 
possible for the colleges in this State to enter 
upon a contest of this nature, and each be 
satisfied with the decision. Never ending dis- 
putes would arise ; and we are strongly in- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



clined to think that the intellectual advan- 
tages of participation in such contests would 
be more than counterbalanced by the jealous- 
ies that would spring up. The western col- 
leges have these oratorical contests, for tlie 
most part, in lieu of base-ball and boating, 
and are continually getting into broils over 
the results. The Facult}"- of Illinois State 
University has lately requested the students 
of that institution to withdraw from the State 
oratorical contests, and has offered prizes to 
be competed for at home. We think this 
plan much better. If Colby wants other 
contests than base-ball, perhaps we can ar- 
range boat races, the decision of the referee 
in such contests being seldom questioned. 



MUSIS AMICUS. 

HOEACE, I, 26. 

Whoever the king of the icy lands, 
'Neath the arch of the frozen pole, 

Whatever may hold iu terror's bands 
Tiridates's timorous soul, 

Regardless of all, the muse's friend, 

To the swift wingfed winds fear and sorrow 
I lend, 

To be borne where the Cretan waves roll. 

well-beloved muse of the Pimplean spring, 
Who joyeth in fountains sweet, 

Garlands and flowers and sunshine bring 
And a crown for my Lamia pleat. 

Naught are the honors I wear without you; 
That thou and thy sisters, in measures new, 

Immortalize him, it is meet. 

J. F. L. 

Albion, Me., April, 1884. 



SELF-MADE MEN. 
Of all who have lived and died and left 
a record worthy of the age in which they 
lived, few of the number have gained any 
distinction, beyond the results of their own 
efforts. A few have been gifted with natural 
genius, by one flight of which they have 
mounted the highest pinnacle of fame ; but 
those who retained the heights they reached, 
whose names shine with the brightest lustre, 



have won their fame at the price of careful, 
earnest toil, often struggling against hardships 
and many difficulties. 

A little more than a century and a half 
^go, a youth, with torn hat, and barefoot, 
walked the streets of one of our now large 
cities seeking employment. No one recog- 
nized in him one whom the world would in 
after years acknowledge as its benefactor. 
Franklin, by his example and life, thus gave 
dignity to manual labor, and by his services 
in public capacity, and by his pen has ren- 
dered his name imiDortal. Franklin's life, 
and thousands of others, teach us that but 
few of the truly great are the sons of the 
powerful and the rich. Many of them en- 
joyed few educational advantages. Not 
being contented thus to live and die, and 
being spurred on by ambition, they have 
sought for the way to rise as an eagle seeks 
its prey, or as a prisoner strives to escape 
from the dungeon where he is destined to live 
in obscurity and die in disgrace. 

Men with such a purpose do not allow 
themselves to be swayed by circumstances; 
they set to work and make circumstances out 
of the obstacles and difSculties that come in 
their way. As the tree that stands firmest is 
the one that has grown out by itself where 
the winds and stoi'ms beat upon it, so 
these men have stood where they have had 
the difficulties of life to meet, and have made 
for themselves a character, and a place in the 
world ; while their more favored fellows have 
grown up with all the helps that man can 
give, and now, are only shadows of what 
they might be. 

History tells us what others have done 
before us, and how we may do the same ; but 
the world is moving on, and new men are 
wanted at every turn, men who can go beyond 
the dead ways of the past, and help to move 
the world forward. 

The whole mind of the practical man is at 
work upon the living present, to discover 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



what the great majority of mankind of the 
present day need and appreciate most, and 
how he can bring it about. Thus he becomes 
more useful, loved, and distinguished. 

It is said of Napoleon, that " he used the 
difficulties that presented themselves, as so 
many stimulants ; and when one called his 
attention to the almost insurmountable obsta- 
cles in his campaign to Russia, he looked 
upon them as only slight impediments to a 
universal crown." Only in this way will 
obstacles affect the self-made man ; instead of 
dampening his courage and energy, they will, 
like oil poured upon flames, only cause them 
to increase. 

It takes obstacles, difficulties, and rebuffs, 
to make a man. No man was ever truly great 
without them. They lead him to realize how 
much strength he actually possesses, and to 
reason, plan, and think for himself, in devising 
means to surmount the obstacles. This will 
enlarge his capacity for thinking, and 
strengthen his mind to cope with greater 
difficulties in the future. 

Obstacles educate man for positions of 
responsibility. If, failing in his first efforts 
of success, he is ridiculed, let him call that a 
good omen, and try again. If his friends 
turn against him when he tries and fails, let 
him not be discouraged, but go ahead. Fort- 
une favors the brave. 

"The best part of every man's educa- 
tion," says Sir Walter Scott, as quoted by 
another, " is that which he gives himself." 
The education received at school or college 
is but a beginning, and is valuable inasmuch 
as it trains the mind and habituates it to con- 
tinuous application and study. Said the 
noted scientist, Sir Humphrey Davy, "What 
I am, I have made myself." 

As we read the lives of the great men 
that have brought about the greatest reforms 
and that have done most to benefit mankind, 
we will find that, like Sir Humphrey Davy, 
what they were, they made themselves. 



APOLLO AND CLYTIE. 

Apollo would not woo, 
And Mythology doth say 
Poor Clytie, who was true, 
Just mourned and piued away. 

She stood upon one spot 
Until she'd took root there. 
(Surpassing strange it seems 
That Apollo should not care). 

But there she stood and grieved 
While gazing on the sun ; 
Still hoping that Apollo 
Would soon relent and come. 

But Apollo still was blind 
To her very many charms ; 
And she kept on growing less 
Until she lost her arms. 

But she left a pretty face, 
As fair as any flower; 
And Apollo's pretty Clytie 
To charm us still has power. 



COMMUNICATIONS. 



u. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

Gentlemen, — While I have little time to 
devote to a discussion of the change in the 
organization of the college, proposed by Dr. 
Gerrish, I do not like to refuse an expression 
of my opinions in response to your courteous 
invitation. 

Were it proposed to organize a new col- 
legiate institution, and ask for funds for its 
endowment, it might be well to adopt a sys- 
tem of organization more simple than that of 
Bowdoin College, but I do not believe that it 
is well to attempt, by legislation, to change 
the charter of the college, simply because it 
is getting a little old-fashioned. 

The charter, granted in 1794, is similar to 
other collegiate and academical charters of 
that day, and provides two boards, one of 
trustees, and the other of overseers, the 
powers of each being distinctly defined, care- 
fully guarded and limited. These boards 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



constitute a corporation, having within itself 
the powers of self-perpetuation. 

For this organization, Dr. Gerrish would 
substitute a board of trustees, to be elected 
by the suffrages of all graduates of the col- 
lege of over five years' standing. 

However simple and practicable this may 
seem, I do not believe that it would, or should 
receive the assent of either of the boards, 
and I do not think that it ought to be seriously 
considered as affording a remedy for possible 
defects in the present system. 

The endowment of Bowdoin College was 
given to be administered by self-perpetuating 
boards, and for specific objects. It was not 
contemplated that those who had received 
the benefits of its instruction should neces- 
sarily be the ones to whom the selection of 
these boards should be entrusted, or that the 
organization of the boards should be left to 
the chances of an election by the alumni of 
the college; but, on the contrary, the whole 
idea and spirit of the charter was that the 
trustees and overseers, selected originally 
with extraordinary care, should see that their 
successors were men who would carefully and 
jealously regard the views of the founders of 
the college. 

A large proportion of the funds came 
from benefactors, who desired to bestow their 
gifts upon a college of certain religious 
views; and they were received with the dis- 
tinct understanding that they were to be 
administered forever under a charter which 
provided satisfactorily for the perpetuation 
of the institution under like auspices. Leav- 
ing the choice of the trustees of the college 
open to the chances of a general election by 
the alumni would, I fear, thwart the pious 
intentions of the founders; and I would never 
consent to any course which by any possibility 
could lead to this result. This I say the more 
freely because I do not belong to the religious 
body controlling the college, and have very 
little sympathy with it. 



Improvements could be made in the in- 
ternal arrangements of the two boards with- 
out changing the charter, and the present 
organization could be readily made more 
efficient. 

Any suggestions to that end would doubt- 
less be kindly received ; but 1 do not believe 
that Dr. Gerrish's plan can be carried out. 

The alumni for several years have nomi- 
nated gentlemen to fill vacancies in the board 
of overseers, and, so far as I know, their 
nominees have been elected, so that I think at 
least half the present board of overseers 
were originally nominated by the alumni. 

Graduates have no reason to complain 
that tlieir wishes are not heeded, and I should 
be glad to have such a system of ballot 
adopted as exists at Harvard, so that a larger 
number of the alumni might participate in 
these nominations ; but to leave the actual 
election of the trustees directly to the grad- 
uates would seem to me contrary to the in- 
tentions of the founders and benefactors of 
the college. 

I only add that my experience on the 
board of overseers satisfies me that there are 
advantages in having two boards, each with 
a check on the other ; and, while I siiould have 
arranged the details somewhat differently, 
yet I am quite content with the existing 
chartered privileges. 

Geo. E. B. Jackson. 
Portland, April 21, 1884. 



To the Editors of the Orient: 

There appeared in the Orient some time 
ago an account of the meeting of the Wash- 
ington alumni, and some of the remarks made 
on that occasion were reported. Among other 
speakers was a distinguished son of Bowdoin, 
who, for the reason that he holds a notable 
public position, if for no other, should have 
been more careful of his utterances. He re- 
gretted the tendency, as he expressed it, of 
affairs here at Bowdoin toward Unitarianism, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



and he further remarked that he desired to 
see a Christian placed at the head of the col- 
lege. Now, I have no objection to this man 
holding such opinions, but courtesy and good 
sense should have kept him from giving pub- 
lic utterance to them. It is time that some 
protest be made against the linking together 
of things theological and things purely tem- 
poral. The functions of a college are not to 
meddle with religious matters in. any way, but 
to furnish mental pabulum to those who seek 
its assistance. It is purely a business trans- 
action ; the student comes to the college on 
the financial arrangement that if he pays his 
tuition he shall receive its equivalent in in- 
struction ; and for a college to attempt to in- 
fluence its students in matters religious is as 
much out of taste as for a dry goods merchant 
to place a tract in the package of every cus- 
tomer. IMore, it declares by its act that re- 
ligion does not possess enough attractions to 
commend itself to its students, and thus in- 
sults the very thing it wishes to foster. Ideas 
move slowly, it is true, but it is to be hoped 
that some time in the near future college 
overseers will see that religion is abundantly 
able to stand alone — in fact, is most attractive 
wlien standing alone, without the aid of col- 
lege influence and authority. Required at- 
tendance at prayers and chapel, although 
started with the honest idea that it was for 
the best, no doubt, has not as yet paid very 
handsome dividends on the investment. The 
whole observance, which, if it be sought, 
should be from clear delight in it, is now made 
irksome ; and it is likely that something of this 
feeling will cling to some of us when we leave 
college. The efficacy of compulsory chapel 
here at Bovvdoin may be inferred from the 
general stampede which almost precedes the 
"amen" of the prayer. It is a significant 
fact that the largest ' college in the United 
States has placed chapel and church attend- 
ance among the electives, and the President 
of that University declared a short time since 
that they had seen no reason to regret their 



action. The man has yet to be found who has 
received any material or lasting benefit from 
having worship forced upon him in unwilling 
doses. Such rules can but narrow the influ- 
ence of any school. Liberality of thought 
and action is alone consonant with the true 
spirit of learning. Let our schools do the 
work they have to do, and when missionary 
work is to be done, let it be done as mis- 
sionary work, and not by a coercing process. 

* * 



To the Editors of the Orient: 

In response to your request that I give 
you my views upon Dr. Gerrish's plan for a 
new government of Bowdoin College, I will 
say in the first place that I do not regard the 
present constitution of the college as one 
which cannot be theoretically improved, or 
as one which leaves little to be desired. Dr. 
Gerrish has stated none too strongly the mis- 
fortune to which the college is subject from 
the circumstance that there can be but one 
meeting of " the boards " in a year, which 
meeting is interrupted by the various other 
duties and pleasures that attract trustees and 
overseers during a commencement week 
crowded with events. Admitting all that 
without discussion and without reserve, the 
question is : Can the system be practically 
improved ? 

This is b}' no means so easy a question to 
answer, in my opinion, as Dr. Gerrish deems it. 
The real cause why frequent, say bi-monthly, 
meetings of the boards cannot be held, is not 
that the membership of the board of overseers 
is large, but because the members of the 
boards are busy men and live at a distance 
from Brunswick. To illustrate my meaning, 
I will say that I believe it would be as easy 
to get a quorum of fifteen of a board of forty- 
five to attend such meetings, as it would be to 
call together four out of twelve. The better 
the class of governors, — so to designate the 
members of the single board proposed, — the 
more busy they will be. They should be 
chosen from all parts of Maine, and from 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



alumni or friends of the college in other 
States, for obvious reasons. It is quite possi- 
ble for any one of the alumni who has at- 
tended many commencements to pick out a 
dozen men of whom a majority could be de- 
pended upon to attend every meeting. But 
aside from the fact that punctuality — faithful- 
ness, if you will, — is not the only or the great- 
est qualification for a governor of the college, 
what are the chances that the alumni would 
choose governors for so good a reason as that ? 
Very slight, I fear. Other considerations 
would enter into the selection, as they ought. 
At any rate, if the evil to be cured is that 
which arises from the difficulty of holding 
more than one hasty session in a year, let us 
first be very sure that the change which we 
recommend is to cure that evil. 

Another point. I am no believer in the 
system or the theor}^ of " rotation in office," 
whether in politics, in the pulpit, in mercan- 
tile life, or in college government. I do believe 
in long terms where persons are elected, and 
in appointments for an indefinite time. There- 
fore, — I am speaking for myself only, and am 
aware that the principle is not a popular one, — 
I should look upon any change which reduced 
the term of service to four years, or even to 
six years, as a change for the worse. This, 
however, is a matter of detail and I will not 
discuss it. 

As for the proposition, which is Dr. 
Gerrish's main point — his abolition of the 
second board — I should be in favor of it, if I 
could see that it would help matters. But 
will it? Are there any complaints that the 
overseers are an obstructive body ? If it be 
true tliat a quorum of them cannot be assem- 
bled as easily as can a quorum of the trustees, 
that is a reason for making the change ; but 
is it true? Let us ascertain that fact, beyond 
dispute, before we change, in a state of des- 
peration because things do not work accord- 
ing to our wishes, with the idea that any 
change will be an improvement. Some cities 
have abolished the second board of the 



council. Are they any better governed than 
they were before? If I read their history 
aright they are neither better nor worse 
governed. My guess would be that if Dr. 
Gerrish's plan was to be adopted the new 
system would work just about as well as the 
present one does — no better. There would be 
fewer men in the government, but meetings 
would be as few as they are now, in Bruns- 
wick or anywhere else. Those who hoped 
much from the change, in short, would be 
disappointed. 

And while I am about it let me say one 
word about the much-vexed question of a 
direct election of overseers, or trustees, by 
the alumni. The idea is an attractive one 
and I am most heartily in favor of it, provided 
a proper system can be devised. If the 
alumni are to elect overseers in any such way 
as they now designate candidates for overseers 
to the board, I should vote against the change 
as long as I lived. There is a personal 
reason why I can say this without the possi- 
bility of my motives being misunderstood. A 
brief meeting is held in Adams Hall; a com- 
mittee appointed on the spur of the moment 
by the president of the alumni, from those 
present, retires ; and in a few minutes returns 
with a nomination, which the alumni ratify 
by a viva voce vote, in the presence of the 
person nominated! A system less likely to 
result in the best choice being made could 
not be desired. 

Now Dr. Gerrish says, and others have 
said it before him, that the system of a direct 
election would bring alumni to Brunswick at 
commencement. I doubt it. I do not believe 
that five more graduates, on an average, 
would make the journey in order to partici- 
pate in the election. In most cases there 
would be no contest at all, and very rarely 
would the result interest graduates who 
would not attend commencement in any 
case. The interest of Harvard graduates is 
not sufficient to carry many of them from 
Boston to Cambridge on commencement day 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



9 



to vote, although it is but half an hour's ride 
ill the horse-cars. No. We must look at the 
real truth, which is, that it is better to have 
the college well governed than it is to secure 
a large attendance at commencement. If we 
are to elect overseers, or trustees, let it be 
done by the absent, as well as by the present 
alumni. We are a body so much scattered 
that restriction to personal voting is an in- 
justice to those who cannot attend. But this 
part of the subject is not strictly pertinent to 
the discussion you invite, and I reserve what 
I may have to say on the subject until it is 
before us in a practical form. 

Edwakd Stanwood, 

Class of 1861. 
Brookline, Mass. 



COLLEGII TABULA. 



Since the last issue. College life has been 
varied since the Orient last reached its friends by 
the Easter vacation, and the usual "good time" 
was experienced by most of the boys — some of 
them running their holiday into the first and second 
weeks. At the close of last term occurred the cus- 
tomary exhibition by the Seniors and Juuiors, of 
which a more extended notice is given elsewhere. 
The indications at the opening of the present term 
are good both for the physical and mental welfare 
of the students. In the matter of athletic sports 
there is promise of much good work being doue the 
present term. A crew is in active training for the 
Saratoga race, and has much to encourage the hope 
of obtaiuing a good place when that event comes off. 
We would not have the friends of the crew over- 
confident, but surely persistent, honest training 
ought to count for something. Plaisted, the Port- 
land oarsman, is training the crew. While a great 
amount of interest is naturally felt in the represen- 
tative crew of the college, the class crews ought not 
to be neglected. It is to be regretted that the 
Sophomore class do not take sufficient interest in 
boating to put a crew on the river. If they let 
this opportunity slip it is needless to say that they 
can not expect to be a factor in boating matters 
during the rest of their course. The Freshman 
crew are practicing daily, being coached by Brown. 
Base-ball interests are being carefully looked after, 



and a tine etfort to bring the State championship 
to Bowdoin may be looked for. Last of sports 
must be mentioned lawn-tennis which has evi- 
dently come to take up its abode with us. No 
prettier or more graceful exercise could be pro- 
cured. A sport which furnishes just the exercise 
which hard working students need whose tastes do 
not lead them in the direction of base-ball or the 
water. With the opening of the term return the 
rest of the men who have been out teaching. Lon- 
gren, '84, Folsom and Kendall, '85, and also Turner, 
'86, appear again in their accustomed places. 
VMary had a little bang, 

'Twas nice as nice could be, 
The wind it blew a hurricane 
And never a " bang" had she. 
*„* About a dozen Juniors are taking optional 
Chemistry under Torrey, and are at liberty to pursue 
their own pleasure in the kind of work they do. 
The Seniors who elect Chemistry this term, are also 
pursuing whatever kind of work each one may 
choose. 

*,j*The provisional appointment of Seniors for 
commencement parts has been made. The ten fol- 
lowing gentlemen will hand in original articles : 
C. E. Adams, L. Barton, W. H. Cothren, 0. W. 
Means, M. H. Orr, E. C. Smith, C. C. Torrey, 
J. Torrey, Jr., J. A. Waterman, Jr., H. M. Wright. 
From these the eight having the highest rank at 
the end of the year, will be selected to speak at 
commencement. 

***0n the rooflet sat an * owlet. 
Sallied forth a timid Freshlet, 
Cried, exultant, "cruel fowUet, 
I will have you in my meshlet! " 
Swift he grasped the downy snowlet, 
Hurled it giantlike aloftlet. 
Lo! the owl returned the blowlet 
With a winklet and a scofBet. 
* Species know as " stuffed duck." 

*,i,*It is reported in the papers that the committee 
having in charge the uomiuation of a President for 
the college, have decided upon a name, and will 
announce it shortly. We do not know whether 
this is true or not, and it does not particularly con- 
cern us. We seem to be prospering as matters now 
stand, and although a settled state of affairs would 
no doubt be advantageous to the college, it can 
with truth be affirmed, that not for years has col- 
lege life here at Bowdoin run so smoothly. Unless 
the year succeeding shall be like it, it will be long 
remembered as the time when peace and prosperity 
held sway. It has been a year so far in which the 
enemies of Bowdoin have been forced to hang their 



10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



harps upon the willow, for want of anything derog- 
atory to say about us. 

*^*The Seniors at the present time are living 
lives of ease aud leisure, and the cares of this world 
and the deceitfuluess of learning seem to rest lightly 
on their souls. But little change has been made in 
their studies since last term. Of the Juniors— Cook, 
Peters, Rogers, Luut, Thomas, and Freeman elect 
Science of Languages. Bartlett, Morton, Whittier, 
Nealley, aud Ford, Physics, and the rest take 
Botany. 

*j,*The new mineral which was discovered over by 
the " school -house " has been found to be monazite. 
Another mineral, which is uow under examination, 
occurs in small black crystals, associated with 
garnet, and is as yet undetermined. Quite a good 
deal of interest is being taken to "locate" some of 
the minerals with which Brunswick and the vicinity 
adjacent is so richly provided. Probably no college 
in the country is situated in a i3ner locality for the 
study of mineralogy than Bowdoin. 

*^*Wright, '84, having resigned the captaincy of 
theball team, Cook, '85, has been elected to that posi- 
tion. The club is to have new uniforms, white, 
trimmed with blue. The uniforms will be varied 
somewhat from the usual pattern by having a blouse, 
and square topped hats. They will play the first 
game of the season in Portland with the following 
nine men : Cook, Barton, Torrey, Wright, Water- 
man, Moulton, Talbot, Dearth, aud Pushor. The 
schedule of games for the coming season will be 
found elsewhere. The depressions on the home 
grounds have been filled aud other repairs made. 
It is the intention of the management to erect a 
stand on the Delta aud charge a fee for admission 
to the grounds. 

*js*The Bowdoin Quartette has again been on 
the war path. This time they made a trip to the 
western part of the State aud New Hampshire, and 
gave the citizens of these regions a chance to hear 
that peculiar kiud of composition— college songs. 
The quartette, composed of Alexander, Barton, 
Butler, and Longren, left Brunswick Friday, of ex- 
amination week, and gave concerts at Mechanic 
Falls, Norway, Bethel, Gorham, Berlin, Lancaster, 
and No. Bridgton. They report a pleasant trip, 
good houses, splendid treatment, and satisfactory 
financial results. From the newspaper reports 
which we have seen we judge that the concerts 
were very highly appreciated, and the vs-earied 
condition in which they arrived home testified to 
the repeated recalls which they received. The 



quartette intend to give other concerts during the 
present term at points convenient to Brunswick. 
They were assisted during their recent trip by Mrs. 
Sturgis. 

*jj*The students who are interested in having a 
well filled local department are respectfully enjoined 
to hand to the local editor any items of interest which 
may fall under their notice. It is a physical impos- 
sibility for one man to keep track of all that is 
transpiring about college, and to be successful this 
column should make sure that everything worth re- 
membering in the days to come be placed therein 
" for perchance it may be pleasant to remember 
these things even hereafter." This is not a mere 
invitation to all students to contribute matters of 
interest, but is prompted by an earnest desire that 
every one should feel it personally incumbent upon 
himself to help make this department of interest to 
tlie undergraduates. 
***In the spring a lovelier costume comes out on the Yag- 

geriue, 
In the spring the Junior's fancy nightly turns to moons 

serene ; 
In the spring ye serenader preys upon the natives' rest. 
In the spring ye mighty Senior gets liimself another vest. 

In the spring a heautious vision dawns upon the Senior's 

e'en, 
In the spring a duteous mission bids him to the Yaggerine, 
In the spring a dim foreboding clouds tlie quiet of his 

breast ; 
In the spring a *cor's corroding brealis the sweetness of 

his rest. 

* See Allen and Greeiiough. 

*^*A very valuable addition to the department 
of Biology has just been received from Mr. Isaiah 
Trufant of Oxford, Ohio, class of '63. It consists of 
a large collection of Paleozoic fossils including 
trilobites, crinoids, etc., together with many casts 
of rare specimens. The collection is an especially 
important one, as it supplements the present collec- 
tion where it was deficient, as well as for its own 
intrinsic value. Let a few more of Bovvdoin's sons 
remember her in some such manner as this, and we 
will see to it that it is not left to future generations 
to rise up and call them blessed. In this couuectiou 
it may be well to note that the same department 
has lately received one of Hartnack's best micro- 
scopes including several fine objectives, an addition 
that will make this department better equipped 
than ever to afford instruction in microscopic 
work. 

*ii*The Orient does not wish to be regarded as 
sitting in judgment on all matters of college interest, 
but when it sees a chance for improvement in any- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



11 



thing which relates to the best good of all coucerDed 
it will not prove ftilse to its proper work by keeping 
silent. The matter that is preying upon the 
Orient's soul just at present is the appearance of 
the campus. When Nature created and placed in 
the bands of our Overseers the heautiful stretch of 
meadow land and shade trees which now surrounds 
us, she never could have dreamed that it would be 
so sadly neglected. If the worthy Powers that Be 
consider that an annual burning of the dead re- 
mains of last season's growth, will forever cause this 
campus to blossom like the rose, why then they 
must have gained their knowledge of agriculture 
from Young's Night Thoughts or some other equally 
instructive book. It's a colossal shame that a 
campus which might with a little effort be made the 
most beautiful in the country, should be allowed to 
go looking like a neglected pasture, till grieving 
Nature finally, late in the spring, does send up a 
growth of grass as though under protest, and hold- 
ing out an uncancelled bill for past favors in that 
direction. Our campus is beautiful in the summer 
in spite of neglect. What we want is to see it made 
more beautiful. It betokens a careless spirit when 
such natural advantages are not improved. 

*jf*The exhibition by the Seniors and Juniors 
occurred on Friday evening, April 3d, with the fol- 
lowing programme : 

MUSIC. 

Salutatory address iu Latin. 

H. M. Wright, Westford, Mass. 
Objections to the Present Annexation of Canada 

to tlie United States. C. E. Sayward, Alfred. 

Greeli and Latin, tlie Basis of a Liberal Education. 

L. Barton, Naples. 
Extract from the Medea of Eurii^ides, Greek version. 

*C H. Tarr, Brunswick. 

MUSIC. 

The Iconoclastic Tendencies of tlie Present Age. 

E. C. Smith, Augusta. 
Soliloquy of Charles V. at the Tomb of Charlemagne, 

French version. *B. Bartlett, Ellsworth. 

Difliculties in Evolution. 

C. W. Longren, Wirserum, Sweden. 
Supposed Speech of Leonidas, Latin version. 

*F. W. Davis, Hiram. 

MUSIC. 

The Rise of Venice. H. C. Phinney, Tliomaston. 

The Fall of French Industries. C. C. Torrey, Yarmouth. 
Soliloquy of Wilhelm Tell, German version. 

*F. W. Alexander, Richmond. 
The Hanseatio League. tS. "W. Walker, Conway. 

MUSIC. 

* Juniors. t Absent. 

The exhibition was a success in every way— good 
speaking, good music, and an attentive audience. 
The Juniors varied the usual custom by giving their 
parts from the original Latin, Grreek, German, etc., 
a change which seemed to be appreciated by the 
audience. No special mention need be made of 
any particular part, but all acquitted themselves 
creditably. 



*.g* The days of the Medic are numbered— for 
this year at least, " and the place which now know- 
eth him," etc. The Orient notices with pleasure 
the amicable feeling which has existed between the 
medical and literary student during the present 
session. The gentlemanly bearing of the members 
of the medical school could not fail to receive due 
courtesy in return. It is to be hoped that history 
will repeat itself in this particular, in the years to 
come. More account is to be made of the gradua- 
ting exercises in this department at its close, than 
previously. An oration is to be delivered and a 
valedictory spoken, with music interspersed, besides 
the conferring of degrees. After which the grad- 
uates will begin to scan the horizon. 

*.:f*The following is the result of the base-ball 
contests between Bowdoin, Colby, and Bates for the 
last eight years : Whole number of games played, 
41. Bowdoin has won 22, lost 19. Whole number 
of games played with Bates, 21. Bowdoin has won 
11, lost 10. Whole number of games played with 
Colby, 20. Bowdoin has won 11, lost it. During 
the seven seasons in which Bowdoin has met Bates, 
Bowdoin has been victorious in 2 ; Bates, 3 ; drawn, 
2. During the eight seasons in which Bowdoin has 
met Colby, Bowdoin has been victorious in 4; Colby, 
3; drawn,!. By the number of games played each 
season we notice that there has been a steady in- 
crease iu the interest shown in base-ball. By look- 
ing at scores, base-hits, and errors for the last eight 
years, a gradual falling off in the number of each 
from year to year will be noticed, which shows an 
improvement in the playing of the clubs. Yet we 
have not kept pace with the rapid progress made 
toward the perfection of the game, due, doubtless, to 
our being so far removed from professional playing. 
It is not individual playing that wins the game but 
the zeal and unity with which the whole nine plays. 
Often one chance, taken or missed, wins or loses 
the game, and that game wins or loses the cham- 
pionship. Bowdoin saw that demonstrated last 
year. Fielding is only a part of the game. Batting 
and base running is quite the larger part. 

Schedule of games for season of 1884 : 
April 26 — Bowdoins vs. Dirigos at Portland. 
May 5 — Bowdoins vs. Harvards at Cambridge. 
May 6 — Bowdoins vs. Dartmouths at Hanover. 
May 7 — Bowdoins vs. Dartmouths at Hanover. 
May 10— Bowdoins vs. Colbys at Brunswick. 
May li — Bowdoins vs. Dirigos at Brunswick. 
May 17— Bowdoins vs. Colbys at Waterville. 
May 28 — Bowdoins vs. Colbys at Waterville. 
May 31 — Bowdoins vs. Colljys at Brunswick. 
June 7— Bowdoins vs. Colbys at Lewiston. 



12 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



*,* There is now telegraphic communication be- 
tween Maine and South Appleton. Two Freshmen 
are the authors of this outrage on the unoffending 
residents of these Halls. The writer of this could 
tell-a-graphic tale of rest disturbed by the iufernal 
clatter of that machine. 

*ij*Now it came to pass in those days, that 
there dwelt in a classical town in the land of the 
Maniacs, a certain ex-college president, and much 
people of that land did say unto his neighbor, 
'• Why did this goodly man ex-it '? " and for many 
days did they continue to scratch their heads over 
this. But finally, in the fullness of time, the reason 
was made manifest. This ex-college president in 
the land of the Maniacs perceived that the glories 
of his position were as a vain show, and he spake 
unto himself after this wise : " Lo, these many 
years hast thou toiled that thou mightest acquire 
unto thyself fame and the gold that perisheth, and 
now how showeth it up ? Go to. I will establish 
a caravansary in this land, where weary travelers 
may tarry and refresh themselves ; and such an hos- 
telry will I provide that its renown shall dust out 
to all parts of the earth, and in comparison with 
its fame the Tontine, even, shall be as the small 
dust of the balance." Thus did he, and now the 
mighty Jehu with his hack doth nightly unload the 
weary travelers, who have been lured hither by the 
fame of this caravansary in the land of the 
Maniacs. 

*is* The Bowdoin nine met the Dirigos at Port- 
land, Saturday, and were defeated, 8 to 4. The con- 
ditions were not favorable for fine playing on either 
side, rain having fallen during the iirst part of the 
day. Much as we regret this defeat in the first 
game of the season, we hope it may prove of advan- 
tage in the end, in increased endeaver on the part 
of the men to do all that lies in their power to put 
themselves in the best possible trim. Every avail- 
able moment for practice ought to be utilized from 
now oa till the deciding game of the championship 
series. A great deal does depend on the position a 
college takes in athletic sports, croakers to the con- 
trary notwithstanding, and we afOrm without hesi- 
tancy that if our crew win the race at Saratoga 
next July, and if the nine bring home the pennant, 
the effect will be felt on the size of the incoming 
class, and succeeding classes. Vigor in athletic 
sports denotes a manly condition among the 
students, and it is not difficult to see how this 
would attract others. We feel sure that the 



men who are to represent Bowdoin this summer on 
the water and at the bat, will leave no stone un- 
turned to give us an honorable record at the end of 
the season. The following is the score of Satur- 
day's game : 

BOWDOINS. 

A.B. K. B.H. T.B.H. P.O. A. E. T.B. 



Barton, 1. f., 


3 











1 


1 


1 


9 


Torrey, 2b., 


5 





1 


1 


7 


2 





6 


Pushor, lb.. 


5 





1 


1 


9 





1 


1 


Cook, 3b., . 


5 











1 


1 


1 





Wright, p., 


5 











2 


9 








Dearth, c. f.. 


i 


1 


1 


1 








1 


5 


Waterman, s.s 


, ■ 4 


1 








1 


3 


1 


7 


Talbot, r. 1., 


i 


1 


2 


2 





1 


1 


6 


Moulton, c, 


4 


1 








6 


4 





4 


Totals, . 


. 41 


4 


. 5 


5 


27 


21 


6 


38 




DIRIGOS 














A.B. 


B. 


B.H. 


T.B.H 


P.O 


A. 


E. 


T.B. 


Barnes, 3b., 


5 





1 


1 


5 


1 


3 


1 


Riley, p., . 


5 














9 





2 


Dooley, 2b., 


5 





1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


5 


Corrldon, lb.. 


5 


2 








10 





2 


8 


Donovan, c. 


5 


1 


1 


1 


5 


1 





7 


Corrldon, 1. f.. 


5 


1 








2 








4 


MoGlinchey, c 


f., 4 


1 


2 


2 


1 





1 


H 


Morway, r. f., 


4 


1 


1 


1 











5 


Bradley, s.s., 


4 


2 


3 


3 


_^ 


1 





12 



Totals, . . 42 8 9 9 27 13 7 50 

SCORE BT INNINGS. 

123456789 
Bowdoins, ...01030000 0—4 

Dirigos 010005020—8 

Umpire— Mr. G. Batcbelder, Portland. Time of game — 
2 hours. Wild pitches— Wright, ; Riley, 0. Passed 
balls— Moulton, 4 ; Donovan, 2. Struck out — Dirigos, 7 ; 
Bowdoins, 4. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



Hall of Theta Chapter op Delta Kappa Epsilon, ) 
Brunswick, Me., April 28, 1884. j 

Whereas, An ever kind and beneficent Heavenly 
Father has summoned from active life and associa- 
tion, our brother, Edward T. Mcdonald, formerly 
of the class of '85, therefore, 

Besolved, That while mourning the loss of our 
esteemed brother, we feel assured that the All- Wise 
has acted in accordance with His infinite love; 

Besolved, That we extend to the family and 
immediate friends of our deceased brother, our 
heartfelt sympathy in this their great afQiction ; 

Besolved, That copies of these resolutions be 
sent to the family of our brother, to the several 
chapters of our Fraternity and to the press. 
0. W. Means, '84, 
J. A. Peters, '85, 
Boyd Bartlett, '85. 

Committee. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



13 



PERSONAL. 



'.'34.— Judge Amos Morrill died recently in Aus- 
tin, Texas. He was born in Salisbury, Mass., in 
1809. He entered upon the practice of law in Mur- 
freesboro, Tenn., but in 1839 removed to Texas, 
and opened a law office in Clarksville. In 1867 he 
was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court 
of Texas, and in 1872 he was appointed by Presi- 
dent Grant, District Judge for the eastern district 
of Texas, his residence beiug in Galveston. He is 
said to have left an ample fortune. 

'40. — Dr. Ezra Abbot, Bussey Professor of New 
Testament Criticism and Interpretation in the Di- 
vinity School of Harvard University, died at his res- 
idence in Cambridge at half-past five o'clock Friday 
evening, Mar. 21st. He was the son of a farmer, and 
was born in Jackson, Maine, April 28, 1819. Pitting 
for college at the Phillips Exeter Academy, he en- 
tered Bowdoin College in the class of 1840, and se- 
cured there a high reputation as a classical scholar. 
After his graduation he taught school in East Ma- 
chias, Maine, Ave years, removing to Cambridge in 
1847, and becoming a teacher in the High School 
there in 1852. While in this position his first publi- 
cation, a " Classical Catalogue of the Library of the 
Cambridge High School," was issued. This was an 
experiment in bibliography. At this time he was 
familiarizing himself with the Harvard College Li- 
brary, of which he was appointed Assistant Libra- 
rian in 1856, being given especial charge of the 
cataloguing department. From this position he was 
appointed to the professorship which he held at the 
time of his death. The work of his own which 
attracted most attention is the book on the "Au- 
thorship of the Fourth Gospel," published in 1880, 
in which on examination of the controverted points 
he decides in favor of St. John. He was a member 
of the New Testament Company of the American 
Bible Revision Committee, which from 1872 to 1880 
co-operated with the English committee in the re- 
vision of the New Testament. Dr. Abbot edited 
Norton's posthumous "Translation of the Gospels" 
(1855), and the same author's "Statement of Eea- 
sons for Not Believing the Doctrine of Trinitari- 
anism " (1856). In 1866 he edited Orme's " Memoirs 
of the Controversy on the Three Heavenly Wit- 
nesses." He revised and completed Hudson's "Criti- 
cal Greek and English Concordance to the New 
Testament," also co-operated with Dr. H. B. Hackett 
in the American edition of " Smith's Dictionary of 
the Bible" (1860-70), giving special attention to the 



bibliography. In 1880 he published "The Author- 
ship of the Fourth Gospel— External Evidence," 
mentioned above. It had been his intention to com- 
plete and continue this work. He has contributed 
to the Christian Examiner, the Unitarian Review, 
Bibliothcca Sacra, North American Review, Journal 
of the American Oriental Society, the Journal of 
the Society of Biblical Literature and Exegis, and 
also to many encycloptedias. Dr. Abbot received 
the degree of A.M. from Harvard University in 
1861, that of LL.D from Yale in 1869, and from 
Bowdoin in 1878, and that of S. T. D. from Harvard 
in 1872. His health began to fail three or four 
months ago, but he insisted for a long time upon 
doing his accustomed work in the Divinity School. 
He was compelled sometimes to desist while deliv- 
ering a lecture. Dr. Abbot leaves a widow, but no 
children. 

'50. — Gen. 0. 0. Howard has been engaged to 
write for the National Tribune of Washington, 
while abroad. 

'56.— Rev. R. B. Howard, a native of Leeds, has 
been appointed corresponding secretary of the 
American Peace Society, which has been without 
such an officer since the death of Dr. J. B. Miles, 
ten years ago. Mr. Howard has resigned his pas- 
torate at Rockport, Mass., and after June 1st ■n^ll 
devote himself exclusively to the promotion of 
peace, especially to the substitution of arbitration 
for war. 

'57. — Rev. Cyrus Stone, D.D., preached the an- 
nual missionary sermon before the Maine Conference 
of the Methodist Church, at Bath, April 16th, and 
was subsequently appointed chairman of the stand- 
ing committee on education. Other members of 
the committee wore Dr. Stephen Allen, '35, and 
Rev. E. S. Stackpole, '71. Rev. C. F. Allen, D.D., 
'39, was temporary chairman of the Conference. 

'57. — Rev. Lewis 0. Brastow, D.D., has resigned 
the pastorate of the Winooski Avenue Church (Con- 
gregational), Burlington, Vermont. 

'57. — Belcher of this class and Stubbs ('60) ap- 
peared as attorneys in the Somerset and Franklin 
Railroad scheme. 

'59. — Gen. Charles H. Howard of Chicago, a 
native of Leeds, and for eight years editor and pro- 
prietor of the Advance, has resigned the office of 
Government Inspector of Indian Agencies, and 
has become Chicago manager of the National Trib- 
une of Washington, D. C. Mr. Howard has an 
article in a late number of The Independent, in 
which he sets forth the extremities to which the 



14 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Indians are carried for want of food during the 
winter season. ' 

'60.— Symonds of tliis class and C. F. Libby ('64) 
have entered a law partnership to practice in Port- 
land. 

'60. — Congressman Keed lias been invited to de- 
liver an address on political issues before the State 
Republican Convention of New Jersey, which meets 
on the 17th lust. 

'63. — Rev. Newman Smyth, D.D.,in some remarks 
on the subject of college atliletics in a recent num- 
ber of the Independent, says : " For myself I have 
learned to value even more highly in the retrospects 
than I did during my college course, that part of 
my education which I received from my fortunate 
inheritance of a chest of carpenters' tools, and 
which I gained, also, from several courses of boxing 
lessons, which were not provided as a part of the 
regular course, but which I was providentially led 
to take, and pay for myself, in the gymnasium, as 
an optional." "There is," he says, "a certain in- 
tellectual gain in acquiring the dexterous or steady 
command of any set of muscles. The agility and 
firmness, for instance, to be gained in boxing is not 
wholly a physical gain; it has, also, some reactions 
upon the habits of an intellectual man, which are 
u«t to be despised." 

'64.— C. F. Libby was chairman of a recent 
meeting of the Maine Genealogical Society. 

'67. — Jothara F. Clark, the well-known insurance 
agent, died last week at his residence on Mellen 
Street, Portland, Maine, aged 39 years. The 
South Berwick correspondent of the Biddeford 
(Maine) Sentinel says: "The news of the death 
of Jotham F. Clark of Portland was received 
with much regret by his many friends in this vil- 
lage. Mr. Clark was principal of Berwick Academy 
for several years, resigning that position in Jane, 
1872. He was a most popular and eflScient teacher, 
and under his charge the school reached a degree 
of prosperity that it has never since attained. For 
two years he was a member of the Superintending 
School Committee of this town, and his interest in 
the welfare of the place was shown by his efforts in 
behalf of the schools. He was also ready to assist 
in philanthropic enterprises, lecturing at one time 
in aid of a circulating library that had been estab- 
lished here. His scholars evinced their regard for 
him by the bestowal of valuable presents when he 
closed his labors here. The love of study that he 
awakened in his pupils induced many of them to 
enter college, and some have since entered the 
ranks of the learned professions. Wherever they 
may have wandered, it will be with feelings of sin- 



cere sorrow that they learn of the untimely death of 
their kind friend and teacher." 

'68. — Rev. Geo. M. Bodge, at present pastor of 
the Unitarian Society, Dorchester, Mass., is writing 
a history of his native town of Windham. 

'68. — Geo. L. Chandler, now master of the Gram- 
mar School, at Newton, Mass., was in town last 
week. Mr. Chandler has had excellent success as 
a teacher, and has ever in mind the welfare of his 
Alma Mater. 

'69.— Dr. Geo. W. Hale has been appointed as- 
sistant house-surgeon at Manhattan Ear and Eye 
Hospital, 103 Park Avenue, New York City. 

'69.— G. T. Fletcher, Superintendent of the 
Auburn Schools, has accepted a call to the superin- 
tendency of schools in Marlboro, Mass. He com- 
menced his labors there April 7th, Mr. Fletcher 
received a degree here in 1869. He obtains an 
advance of $500 in salary. 

'72.— Mr. John G. Abbott, who during the Vh'- 
ginius trouble in Cuba, was correspondent there 
of one of the Boston papers, and who since then, 
has been practising law in Boston, died of con- 
sumption at his home in Dorchester, aged 36 years. 
During recent Democratic campaigns he was an 
active participant, and made a number of speeches. 
During his college course, Mr. Abbot did much 
toward starting the Oeien't, and was one of its 
first hoard of editors. Most of the time since grad- 
uation he has been connected with some of the 
Boston papers as correspondent. 

'75. — In the March number of Science, an ab- 
stract of a paper read by Shelford Bidwell, M.L., 
LL.B., at a meeting of the Royal Society, criticising 
" Hall's phenomenon" regarding the magnetic cur- 
rent, is given, with Mr. Hall's reply. Mr. Hall is 
now tutor of Chemistry at Harvard. The "Phe- 
nomenon" spoken of, is the action of electricity 
upon the magnetic current. Mr. Hall first observed 
this action some years ago, while studying in Ger- 
many, and has since been at work upon the matter. 
'76. — Clark has been chosen principal of the 
Edward Little High School, Auburn, in place of 
Lowell ('74), resigned. 

'81 . — Towle is studying law at Boston University. 
'81. — E. H. Chamberlain, who recently gradu- 
ated from the Eclectic Medical College, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, has been practicing medicine at Lowell, 
Mass., since about the first of March. 

'85.— Webb, formerly of this class, has been 
appointed one of the editors of the Dartmouth. 
Leigh, formerly of this class, has been appointed 
to compete for the Collins and Morse prize for 
oratory. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



15 



GENERAL GOLLEGE NOTES. 

The Columbia library Is lighted by the electric 
light. 

Tale is to issue, monthly, an illustrated humorous 
paper. The proposed name is Quip. 

The Sauveur College of Languages has been 
removed from Amherst, Mass., to Burlington, Vt. 

The Harvard nine has been granted permission 
to arrange games as before, but not with profes- 
sionals. 

Students of the University of Pennsylvania are 
discussing means to raise $100,000 for a new gym- 
nasium. 

At Dartmouth, two new prizes of $40 each have 
been offered for the best essays on " Free Trade " 
and " Protection." 

Stephens Institute will hereafter admit to the 
Freshman class only the fifty passing the best en- 
trance examination. 

The Dartmouth Faculty have refused permission 
to the students to black up for minstrel perform- 
ances during the term. 

The Harvard trustees propose that most of the i 
present work of Freshman year shall be done at 
the preparatory schools. 

Among the resolutions of the Columbia trustees, 
is one to the effect that smoking will not be per- 
mitted upon the college grounds. 

The trustees of the estate of the late Gardner 
Colby, of Newton, have signified their readiness to 
pay over to Colby University, $120,000 provided 
for in the will of Mr. Colby. 

Two hundred students of Princeton took part in 
the last city election, supporting and electing the 
Democratic candidate. This action was in retalia- 
tion for fines imposed by the Eepublican mayor on 
some of the students for breaking street lamps. — Ex. 
Brown is one of the only two colleges in the 
country, which have more than one graduate in the 
U. S. Senate. — Brunonian. Bowdoin is represented 
in the Senate by two men, Lafayette Grover, of 
Oregon, class of '48, and Wm. P. Frye, class of '50. 
The struggle for the college base-ball champion- 
ship opened Wednesday, at Cambridge, with a 
game between Brown and Harvard. In a recent 
practice game between the two nines, Brown failed 
to secure a base hit off Nichols, the Harvard pitcher. 
The result of Wednesday's game is looked forward 
to with much interest. 



CLIPPINGS. 

A back-hair rush recently occurred between the 
two lower classes at Stalace Female College, in 
Ohio. The novel affair lasted for half an hour, at 
the end of which time the campus was strewn with 
hair-pins and bits of torn skirts. — Targum. 

When Greek meets Greek : Butcher (afflicted 
with an impediment in his speech) — " W-w-w-what 
d-d-do y-you w-w-want?" Small Boy (also 
afflicted) — "I w-w-waut a p-p-pound of b-b-b-beef 
steak." Butcher (very irate) — " You young r-r-ras- 
cal, if you d-d-dou't stop m-m-mocking m-me I'll— 
And he d\d.— Spectator. 

A collection of Princeton undergraduate poetry 
chiefly taken from the Nassau Lit., is shortly to be 
published. The Lit. resurrects the following gem 
from its issue of November, 1854 : 

EPIGRAM ON A YOUNG LADY WITH KED CURLS. 

All thy curls are winding stairs, 

Where my passion nobly dares 

To mount higher still and higher, 

Thoush the staircase be on fire. — Argonaut. 



The new French system of Stenography, re- 
cently introduced into this country, promises to 
revolutionize the art of short-hand writing. It is 
taught and practiced in the common schools in 
France, and children at thirteen years of age often 
become expert verbatim writers. Hundreds of 
different books and periodicals are printed in short- 
hand, and thousands of people read and write it 
who do not read print. Its advocates claim that 
the time required to learn it is not more than one- 
tenth as great as is required by any other system, 
so that verbatim reporting becomes a matter of a 
few months, instead of years, and the correspond- 
ing style, for amanuensis work and taking abbre- 
viated notes, a matter of a few days, instead of 
many months. 



SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION. 
In this age of progress people are constantly 
searching for something new, whether it be in the 
domain of domestic industry, or in the wider field 
of science. Twenty learned scientists have exper- 
imented long and carefully with a new discovery 
called " Salioylica" and have deducted from their 
observations that it is the greatest for Rheumatism, 
Gout, and Neuralgia ever known. Its success has 
been certain in every case. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS wlio are willing to pay a 
little more lor Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No.l 

SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolntely without adulteration or drugs. 

We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 

direct importation, which is made especially for us, ■ivater 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1 , 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLEN <& GINTEB Manufacturers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



New system. Learned in less than onc-quarterthetime 
required by any other. Old reporters throw away old sys- 
tems and learn this for speed and legibility. It can be 
successfully 

TAUGHT BY MAIL. 
The corresponding style can be learned in a few hours, 
and the full verbatim reporting style in a few months. It 
is a marvel of simplicity. 

STUDENTS 

can easily acquire enough to enable them to take notes of 

LECTURES. 

Send for circular. Terms: Corresponding style, five 

lessons, $5. Corresponding and reporting, twenty'less'ons, 

flO. 

R. B. OAPEN, Augusta, Me. 



OF 

flAffi AM© FAMJ^Y fllMUMIi 

neatly executed at the 



►n- gPECI^Ii -f FINE -f Py?Tg ^^ 

A.KE VERY IPOPULiAK. 

PE^^Y ¥PE P^TTE^, PQ^TL^^iD. 



DEALER IN 



No. 2 Odd Fellows' Block, 

MAIN STREET. ... BRUNSWICK. 



The Si.Ktv-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal Scliool of Miiine, will commence FebkuahY 7th, 1884, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alpheus S. PacivAED, Acting President; 
Alfked Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel T. Dana, M.D., 
Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Goddakd, 
A.M., Medical Jurisprudence; Frederic II. Cfrrisii, M.D., 
Anatomy; Henry Carmiohael, Ph.D., Cli'ini-irv , llrirr G. 
Wilder, M.D., Physiology; Stephen H.Wki h>. M.n, surgery 
and Clinical Snrgerv; Charles O. Hunt, M.I)., .\hih rin Mc-dica 
audTherapentics; "Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Di-inoiistrator of 
Anatomy; EVEKETT T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of His- 
tology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



FRANK M. STETSON, 



w 

to 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A^. O. REED, 



tmm 



mMi 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bruns'nrick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vie'nrs ; also College Views. 



MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



WM. K FIELD, 



JAnW^W- 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 



^¥. H. WILSON,*^ 

DISPENSE E OF 

Fit© Smps MediQineSj^Ohsmiiili, 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Go to W, B. VIToodard's 

To buy vour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

Is now prepared to furnish Mnsic for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



TONTINE HOTELi, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Special attention will be given to Class and Reunion Dinners 
and Suppers to order. First-class laundry connected with the 
house. 

S. B. BREWSTER, Proprietor. 

BMM®NSS, FINE WkimU, 

239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, 3IAINE. 

J. A. MEKKILL. A. KEITH. 

DEALER IN 

Fresh, and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 

Washington Market, 

TONTINE HOTEL BLOCK, 

BK,xj:isrs"Vsrioi2:, I!w^.a.ii>te. 

Meats, Vegetables, and Fruits of all kinds. Also Oys- 
ters, Fresh and Smoked Fish. 
Bowdoin College Patronage Solicited. 



^^, 



DEALER IN 



CEDAE STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles aud Eye Glasses, 
Magnifying Glasses. 

|^° Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

J. G. WASHBURK, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PICTURE FRAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

Also Pictures, Cabinet Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, 

etc. Also agent for the celebrated Household Sewing 

Miiciiines, 

In the Everett Store, Main Street, Opposite the Mall, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



HATIOML SCHOOL SUPPLY BHEEAn. 

Beloit, Wis., July 31, 1883. 
National School Siipplij Bureau: 

Last April, bein^ then in charge of a large public school, but 
desiring a position in some good academy or college, I placed 
my name with your Bureau. During the lirst part of the present 
month I received notice from you of a vacancy in such a place as 
I desired. 

Putting myself in communication with the party concerned I 
received the appointment. I am well satisfied with the manage- 
ment of the Bureau, and feel sui-e that it Alls a useful and nec- 
essary place in our school economy. You are at liberty to use 
my name if you wish. 

Kespectfully, 

EDWARD O. FISKE. 
Headmaster Markam Academy, Milwaukee, Wis. 

For application-form and circular, address. 

National School Supply Depot, Chicar/o, III. 
N. B.—We want all kinds of Teachers for Schools 
and Families. Good Pay to Agents and Private Cor- 
respondents. 



ALL KINDS OF 







-DEALER IN- 



Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 

STUDENTS 

Of all classes will find it valualile to consult on all subjects the 



183 SOUTH CLARK STREET, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Full inforniatiou given on receipt of return postage. A union 
of writers, critics, and scholars of the highest order. 

DEALER IN 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

All the Students Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND EUBBERS 



f mik 1. 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Cor. Mainjlnd Mason Stb., opp. Town Clock. 



Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fur- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Work- 
manship, we especially solicit orders for Fine Printing of all 
kinds. 

For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

We also make a specialty of 

FIl^g'F-CIi^gg PRINTING 

For Schools and Colleges, 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 

Prepare original designs for So- 
ciety Badges, Mings, Prizes, and 
Class Caps, uhich ivill be forwarded 
to students on request. 

A SPECIALTY is made of English 
Pewter Seer Mugs, in tivo sizes, with Glass 
Bottoms. 

Society, Book, and Visiting Card Plates 
engraved in proper style. 

Invitations and Programmes in novel 
forms at short notice. 

Shreve, Crump & Low, 

BOSTO:tT. 



BYRON STEVENS, 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



TAPB VirORM. 

In one of the tropical provinces of Germany there has been 
found a root, the exti-act from which has proved an absolute 
SPECFFIC for Tape Worm. It is pleasant to take and is not de- 
bilitatinff or disafii'eeable in its efl'ects on the patient, but is 

fteculiarly sickening and stupefying to the Tajie Worm, which 
ooseus its hold of its victim and passes away in a natural and 
easy manner, entirely whole, with head, and while still alive. 
One physician has used this remedy in over 400 cases, without a 
single failure to pass worm whole, with head. Absolute removal 
with head guaranteed. No pay required until so removed. Send 
stamp for circular and terms. 

HEYWOOD & CO., 19 Park Place, N. Y. City. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



/\ CLUP t\oAD l^/^QE 







til iiiiiiiiii ie., 

(Established 1817.) 

10 BERKELY ST., BOSTON, MASS., 

lew '^iife[lsft to© illnstffaki @atffll©gjii@Sj 

ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 
OTHEK TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp at above address. 



SPECIAL IMPROVED 

AiericaD STAR Bicycle 

Although comparatively a new machine on the mar- 
ket, the Star has made a s|ilendid record, 
having won the 

Twenty-Five Mile Championsliip of 

the United States, 

Breaking the record, iis 83 minutes 10 seconds. 

It has a mile record of 2 min. 50 1-8 sec; 
5 miles, 15 min. 26 3-4 sec.: mile without 
hands, 3 min. 11 sec. It has won the most im- 
portant Hill Climbing Contests, including 
Corey Hill, Boston, Eagle Hill, Orange, N. J., 
and Standpipe Hill, Washington, D. C. This 
is a mere mention of the triumphs of the Star. 

The principles embodied in the Star give the perfect combination for safety, 
maintenance and durability found in no other machine. 

IN ADDITION WE HAVE THE - 




, and comfort with economy of 



VICTOR TRICYCLE, Tk Most Faiiioos Three-flieeler Male Id Tie fGrli. 

A FtiU Line of the Best ENGLISH MACHINES 

Go to complete tlie list and suit all tastes. 

The IDEAL, a cheaper machine for use of boys and youths, is a splendid machine for purpose intended and is 
hiffhly recommended- 

SECOND-HAND MACHINES of all kinds, SUPPLIES and SUNDRIES constantly on hand. 

REPAIRING of most difficult kinds performed at reasonable rates. All machines and parts must be plainly 
marked and be accompanied by instructions by next mail. 

ST^LL & BURT, 

509 Tremont St, and 4 Warren Ave., Odd Fellows' Hall, Boston, Mass. 



i * ©f^e * 



-ni^. 




% 




pM %!» 



-#ERaREWIG;K,*MMrRR^ 




COHTEKTS. 



Editorial Notes 17 

Eetrospection (poem) 19 

A White Mountain Sunset .' 19 

Dr. Gideon L. Soule 21 

Two Impressions (poem) 22 



PAGE. 
COMMDNICATIONS 22 

CoLLEon Tabula 25 

Personal 29 

General College Notes 31 

Clippings 31 



r!£^ 



<^*5L5-8S~^. 



• ©AY «, 1885. ♦ 2r^ 



\^?^^ 



|HV^,i,'',l-^W-^i-^^J^^^^i- ^ 



^ Xs-y^'y" xs^jw \:«v^: 



'Wf^^ 






N vV^ 



^W ii ^i^.\\>^ 






BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OP THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGEAVED IH THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOK 



All the Late Publications in stock. Text-Books of all kinds. LAW 
ana MEBICAL WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PaiCES. 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

JiQ. i 0DD KEIiMW^' BMOK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 

1, m. f ©eiiiii, fffc^'ff. 



The only radical internal remedy. Never known to 
fail in a single case, acute or chronic. It expels the poison- 
ous Uric Acid from the blood, which is the prime cause 
of Rheumatism, Gout, and Neurala'ia. — As a blood puri 

THE OLD RELIABLE SPECIFIC 

ENDORSED BY PHYSICIANS AND 

THOUSANDS OF PATIENTS. 

tier it has no equal. Acting on common-sense principles 
it eradicates from the blood all poisonous matter which 
causes disease. — It has been in use many years and 
cured a larger jiercentage of cases than any other 

POSITIVELY CURES 



remedy. Send for testimonials from the cured. — Salicy- 
lica strikes directly at the causes of these diseases, while 
so many so-called speci- 

BHEUMATI8M 

ties only treat locally the effect. AVhen you have tried 
in vain all the "oils," "ointments," "liniments," and 
"pain cures," and when your 

GOUT, NEURALGIA, 

doctors cannot help you, do not despair but take Salic.y- 
lica at once and be cured. — No one can afford to live in 
pain and miserv when 

GRAVEL DIABETES. 

Salicylica will relieve him and put him in condition to 
attend to his daily avocations. 

$1 per box, 6 boxes for $5, 



BLOOD POISONING. 

with full directions in ten languages. Sold by druggists 
everywhere, or sent by mail, prepaid, on receipt of price, 

WASHBURNE & CO., Prop's, 

287 Broadway, New York. 

Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

Oilil Fclloirs' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Slorc, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. W. BROWNE, Propeietok. 
Formerly at Totiline Hotel. 







THE FAVORITE NOS. S03-404'SS2-/7O-J5/- WITH 
OThmR STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORL 







BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. MERRYMAN, PHARMACIST,-:- 

FaflcyaM Toilet Articles, Ciiars I ToMcco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

113° Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

IRA C. STOOK5RIDGE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal iilercbandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 
SPRING AND SUMMER, 1884. 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West SiJe, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Sliirts, Collars, 
Cuifs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments. White 
Vests, White Neck-ties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neck- wear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

]Sd: ^ Y N ^ R D ' s 
©yste ami See §mttm Empmimm, 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

|I^"Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



TAPB VirORIVI. 

In one of the troiiicnl provinces of Germany there has been 
found a root, the extract from which has pmved an AiiSOLUTG 
SPKCIFIC for Tape Worm. It is pleas:int to tal<e and is not de- 
bilitating or disagreeable in its effects on the patient, but is 
peculiarly sickening and stupefying to the Tape Worm, which 
loosens its liold of its victim ami passes away in a natural and 
easy manner, enti\-ely whole, with iikad, and while still alive. 
One physician has used this remedy in over 400 cases, without a 
single failure to pass worm ^vhole, with head. Absolute removal 
with head guaranteed. No pay required until so removed. Send 
stamp for circular and terms. 

HEYWOOD & CO., 19 Park Place, N. Y. City. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, JFusic, etc., I?ound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Dtscription done to Order. 



'WHEN' TO JJ ^WAJSfT Jl RIDE 

CAIL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE. 

On Clcaveland Street, where you xoUlfind turnouts to suit the most 
fastidious. ^^ Hates reasonable. 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers ; Circulating- Library, 1600 Volumes ; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terus, $1.50 a Tear io Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

.^-Special Kates to Student Clubs..E8 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, test- 
books beinj; mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more e.xactly the amonnt of preparatoi-y work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based uponthe required Orations of Cicero. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, Georgics and first six Books 
of the iEneid, including Prosody. 
(Instead of the Georgics, Caesar's Gallic War, 
Books I.-IV., may be offered.) 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xenophou, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Georgraphy, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry, — first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatoiy course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regdlae Examinatioxs foe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (July 11 and 12, 1884), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 26 and 27, 1884). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examinations is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Washington Acndemy, East 
Machias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these 
schools having been made speciiil Fitting Schools 
for the college by the action of their several Boards 
of Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 
have been fitted at any school having an approved 



preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 
Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQDIEED— FOUR HOUES A "WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terras. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — EDUE HOUES A "WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terras. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $2.5. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $.3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XI V. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 14, 1884. 



No. 2. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

J. A. Peters, 'So, Managing Editor. 

N. B. Ford, '85, Business Editor. 
Boyd Baktlett, '85. W. P. Nealley, '85. 

O. R. Cook, '85. A. A. Knowlton, '86. 

"Webb Donnell, '85. C. "W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. F. LiBEY, '85. W. V. "Wentwoeth, '86. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00. 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Exti-a copies can be obtaiued at the book stores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by \vriter's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 



EDITORIAL . HOTES. 



It is with fear and trembling that we 
venture to introduce a subject, which, on ac- 
count of its vastness, probably has long 
enjoyed immunity from editorial comment. 
When, three years ago, the gymnastic appa- 
ratus were removed from Memorial Hall, in 
order to give the workmen an opportunity 
to finish that structure, it was confidentlj^ 
expected that a gymnasium building of some 
sort would be immediately erected. Vain 
expectation. The hopes of the students have 
been repeatedly dashed. Our crews are now 
obliged to do their winter training in a room 
which, by reason of its dimensions, seems 
best fitted for a bowling-alley — surely for 



nothing else, unless, perhaps, a depository 
for Mr. Booker's biic-a-brac. The feeling of 
the students on this subject has undergone 
a change with each successive fall disappoint- 
ment. Three years ago the class of '84, as 
Freshmen, were decidedly hopeful, and con- 
fident that a gymnasium would soon be forth- 
coming. By Sophomore year, hope had, to a 
great extent, given place to wrath. There 
was a certain proneness to cursory remarks 
whenever the subject was mentioned. As 
Junioi's, they were decidedly cynical, and 
wont to laugh to scorn the least mention of 
"the new gymnasium." And now, as Sen- 
iors, they are chuckling in their sleeves to 
think how, in the dim vistas of the future, 
when they are asked to subscribe for the 
gymnasium, they will effectually squelch the 
committee, by giving long-winded accounts 
of the way in which thej', when they were 
in college, managed to get along without a 
gymnasium. The horizontal bars, put up 
between two pine trees, on which our ances- 
tors used to skin their cats, are indeed respon- 
sible for much. 

Meanwhile, where is the committee that 
has this matter in charge? As we do not 
hear of any startling additions being made to 
the fund, we must conclude that they are on 
the still hunt (or still on the hunt) for some 
well-meaning old alumnus who desires to 
have for his tomb-stone the " Jones " gym- 
nasium. If this is the course they are pur- 
suing, it is a laudable one, but slightly 
uncertain in its results. In the course of 
time, Bowdoin will doubtless have a fine 
gymnasium ; but meanwhile are we to re- 
main cooped up in our present limited quar- 
ters ? A few thousand dollars added to the 



18 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



amount already subscribed would be amply 
sufficient to construct a plain wooden build- 
ing which would answer every purpose, at 
least for a few years. A barn might not be 
an ornament to the grounds ; but for beauty 
we can afford to wait. 



Now that so many bicycles are owned in 
college, steps should be taken toward form- 
ing a more active organization of riders. We 
are informed by the Bugle that a bicycle 
club really exists ; but it is difficult to believe 
this statement without further occular evi- 
dence. If the bicyclists would make excur- 
sions, once in a while, in a body, with neat 
uniforms, much would be accomplished 
toward removing the doubts as to the exist- 
ence of a club from the breasts of a skeptical 
public. The interest in bicycling might be 
somewhat increased if races were arranged 
oftener than at present. One race during the 
year — and that incorporated with the Field- 
Day program — is scarcely enough. It would 
be an interesting feature to have bicycle as 
well as boat races during the fall term. 



There was an item current in the daily 
papers, a short time since, to the effect tliat 
the committee having in charge the nomina- 
tion of a President for the college had 
decided upon a name, which was to be 
announced shortly. In a few days, another 
item appeared, stating that a young professor 
at Amherst had been offered the presidency 
of this college, but had declined the honor. 
Now the gentleman in question undoubtedly 
had very good reasoijs for his declination ; 
but, whatever the reasons were, they were 
not published ; and it injures the college, in 
a certain way, to have items go the rounds 
of the newspapers, headed, in startling type, 
" Declines the Pebsidency oe Bowdoin 
College." If the committee agree upon a 
certain person it would be as well to discover, 
if possible, whether or not he would consent 



to take the position if offered, before making 
the matter public. In this case the parade 
made of the announcement that the commit- 
tee had a name in mind, only gave additional 
emphasis to the gentleman's refusal when it 
came out. 



It has been suggested that a race could 
profitably be arranged between the college 
crew and a crew from Portland composed of 
four well-known single scullers. By the first 
of June our crew ought to be in sufficiently 
good training to pull the Portland men a 
fairly close race. Besides being most ex- 
cellent practice for the crew, such a race 
would add much to tlie attractions of Ivy 
Day. 

The citizens of Brunswick are ceitainly 
to be congratulated upon the near completion 
of one of the finest town halls, judging from 
the outside appearance, in the State. In 
fact, as we have frequently been told, it is 
only surpassed in size by three others. In 
order to speak with certainty as to the inte- 
rior, we determined a few days ago to make 
an assault on the barricaded portals, and 
boldly demand admittance in the name of the 
press; but on making a preliminary circuit of 
the building we were nearly petrified to be- 
hold the doughty editor of the Brunswick 
Herald with his head and shoulders through 
a half-opened window, while a muscular 
workman, with a firm grasp on his coat-tails, 
was inviting him to " come out o' that." 
Concluding that our estimate of the power of 
the press had been altogether too high, we 
discreetly withdrew to wait for the grand 
opening, before forming an opinion on the 
inside decorations. We hope to see some 
first-class theatrical talent visit Brunswick in 
the near future. 



It has become exceedingly popular of late 
to raise a great hue and cry against what is 
commonly called "plugging for rank." De- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



19 



spisable as it is to study for rank, and rank 
only, there are other things connected with 
the " ranking in daily recitation " system 
which are quite as bad, if not worse, — notably, 
reciting for rank. There are students who 
will abuse to the last degree a man suspected 
of keeping his eye too closely fixed on the 
professor's marking book, who will convey 
the impression that they themselves have a 
lordly indifference, or an entire contempt, for 
such things : but these same students, when 
called upon in recitation to answer questions 
or to describe some experiment, are often 
seen to make use of unintelligible guttural, 
mumblings, weird generalities, and, when 
corrected by the instructor, such phrases as 
"that's what I meant. Professor;" "that's 
what I intended to say,'' and for what other 
purpose than the despised (?) one of obtain- 
ing a good mark ? A man has a perfect right, 
in fact he is bound to make as good an ap- 
pearance as possible in recitation, and to tell 
what he may know on the subject in hand ; 
but a person who himself obtains rank by 
false pretenses should be careful about revil- 
■ ing another who obtains rank by studying for 
it, as it is generally conceded that people 
inhabiting glass houses should use caution 
in their manner of throwing stones. 



We print in this number a communication, 
called forth by an editorial in the last Orient, 
from the originator of our present marking 
system. Coming from such a source, it may 
be regarded as authority on the points in 
question. The statement that "a student 
may remain away from any recitation, or 
from any part of a recitation whenever he 
pleases" is practically true, although, as was 
shown when the Freshmen were required to 
make up the time lost on the 22d of February, 
the Faculty have power to enforce attend- 
ance on recitation whenever they see fit, that 
is, whenever the attendance is not "satisfac- 
tory." Of course, in saying that a student 



may remain away from a recitation whenever 
he pleases, we did not mean to have it in- 
ferred that a student is at liberty to remain 
away from an indefinite number of recitations, 
as in the university system, but only within 
certain limits, which, it seems, are left to the 
discretion of the instructor. 

As to the matter of leaving the recitation 
room before the close of the hour, we wish to 
correct a wrong impression given in our last 
issue. An instructor has power to enforce 
attendance during the entire hour, since he 
has the general power to enforce attendance 
on recitations. The power of enforcing at- 
tendance on recitations, however, has only 
been used a very few times, notably in the 
Washington Birthday case. 



RETROSPECTION. 

The eveuing bells have ceased to toll, 
Night shadows hold their sombre sway; 
A mystic stillness seems to greet, 
With silence deep, the end of day. 

Old memories till our mind to-night. 
And fairy forms and airy sprite, 
Like ghosts of truant muses, 
Pass in mazy throngs before our sight. 

Angelic voices till the night, 
Celestial anthems loud and clear, 
Bear softly ou the evening air 
A world of harmony to ear. 

'Tis thus, amid the scenes gone by, 
We love sometimes to live and dream, 
And inspiration find, to meet 
The current of life's rapid stream. 



A WHITE MOUNTAIN SUNSET. 

A few summers ago it was the writer's 
good fortune to spend a few weeks at Glen 
Station, New Hampshire. Glen Station is the 
lower terminus of the Glen House stage route, 
and about the only excitement the sleepy 
little cluster of houses has is when the great 
red or yellow coaches come rolling down to 
the depot to carry that insatiable monster, the 



20 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 



Glen House, its daily mouthful of summer 
visitors. For about ten minutes all is bustle 
and confusion, but the noise is soon over. 
One by one the great coaches are filled out- 
side and in and start off with great flourish 
and cracking of whips, whereupon Glen Sta- 
tion turns over and goes to sleep again. 

Only a short distance from the spot where 
our tent was pitched there was an insignifi- 
cant looking little hill, its slopes all over- 
grown with white birches, but with a summit 
of bare granite. It was, in fact, a foot hill of 
a higher cliff which was originally called by 
the natives Ricket Hill, but the summer 
boarders rebelled, and now the ledge figures 
on the maps in guide-books as Eagle Cliff. 

It was wonderful what a view could be 
obtained from this little foot hill. The 
whole system of mountains was spread 
out like a gigantic ocean before the eye, and 
toward the south lay the beautiful intervales 
of the Saco valley. The sunsets I have wit- 
nessed from that unassuming little height far 
excel anything I can describe, and the thought 
comes to me as it has many times before, how 
often we have to regret the inadequacy of 
human powers of expression when we try 
to describe some simple scene which has 
pleased us. 

I am, however, tempted to try and impart 
to the readers of the Orient some faint idea 
of one sunset I witnessed. 

The sun was about an hour high when I 
reached the summit, and everything was 
beautiful. It had been a warm Indian sum- 
mer day, and the coolness of the place was 
very refreshing. 

As the sun approached the horizon, a 
beautiful, soft, rosy light spread gradually 
over the surface of the mountains and valleys, 
so that even the sternest and most barren 
peaks seemed gi'aceful and even beautiful. 
While this scene was all in its beauty, I was 
conscious of a dark shadow creeping slowly 
up from the deepest valleys and making its 



way up the ragged mountain walls. It ad- 
vanced only very slowl}-. It was hardly 
noticeable at first, but soon it began to shroud 
entirely some of the lowest foot hills. Slowly, 
but surely it crept on. I could not restrain a 
feeling of anger at that cold, dark, relentless 
shadow which seemed to destroy the beau- 
tiful tints as it advanced, leaving behind it 
only silence and darkness. There were the 
old familiar peaks half robed in shadow and 
darkness, the other and upper half all aglow 
with splendor. The sun was now out of mj 
sight. It had sunk behind old Carrigain, a 
lofty, wild peak which now looked like the 
pictures of some of the old saints with the 
halo of glory round their heads. 

All but the highest peaks were now dark 
and lonely looking. Their forms stood out in 
all their stern, lagged outline, relieved by no 
graceful lines or soft tints, but there stood 
grand old Washington and his " staff" — 
Adams, Madison, and Jefferson — with their 
heads all bathed in the same rosy light. 
They seemed like beings of another world. 
There lay the mountains, valleys, and rivers 
below them, all shadow. Their own rugged 
forms were shrouded to the shoulders, but 
their summits looked like the old pictures of 
Bunyan's "Delectable Mountains," and I 
could not wonder for the moment that the 
old Greeks used to think their magnificent 
Mount Olympus the home of the immortal 
gods. 

At last all the peaks were darkened ex- 
cept old Washington ; only his summit was 
bright. On, on came the sliadow, till the last 
bit of rosy light was gone, and all was dark- 
ness and silence. I could not help comparing the 
light to some beautiful bright-winged bird, and 
the shadow to some creature pursuing it. It 
seemed as if the light had taken refuge on the 
mountain and, puisued higher and higher by 
the relentless foe, at last rose in graceful 
flight from its last refuge and flew away, 
leaving its enemy behind. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



21 



Can any one wonder that I thought also 
how much that beautiful time when all was 
light and beauty was like childhood, un- 
touched by the cares and perplexities of life, 
and how like the cares and troubles of man- 
hood the shadows crept along, and how beau- 
tiful to think of the soul, when driven up 
life's rugged slopes, by sorrow and care, as 
springing from eartli, leaving shadow and 
darkness behind, and winging its flight up to 
the Source of all light and beauty whence 
it came? 

L. 



DR. GIDEON L. SOULE. 

The late Dr. Paul A. Chadbourne is said 
to have remarked that he had ha"d but 
two teachers ; one of these was Dr. Soule of 
Phillips Exeter Academy, and the other 
President Hopkins of Williams College. The 
compliment was a high and striking one, paid 
by a discriminating and good man to the in- 
structors of his early boyhood and youth. 
Dr. Chadbourne's estimate of what consti- 
tutes a teacher in the truest sense of the 
term, must have been high indeed to have 
called forth such an expression. 

Dr. Soule was born in Freeport, Me., in 
1796. He entered Phillips Exeter Academy 
in 1813, and there fitted for Bowdoin Col- 
lege, entering the Sophomore class in 1815, 
and graduating in 1818. Dr. Soule for a 
time occupied a room in the north end of 
Maine Hall, together with Professor Pack- 
ard, and the friendship begun in college con- 
tinued throughout Dr. Soule's life. 

Soon after leaving Bowdoin Dr. Soule 
became an assistant teacher in the academy, 
and at the end of a year entered upon a 
course of study elsewhere, but in 1822 he 
returned to Exeter as one of the corps of 
instructors, and subsequently was appointed 
Professor of Ancient Languages. In 1838 
he was elected Principal of Phillips Exeter 
Academy, Dr. Abbot having resigned, and 



he continued to hold this position until 1873, 
when he resigned on account of feeble health. 

For over fifty years this grand old man 
labored for the institution he loved so well. 
He had come to regard it almost as his own, 
and its students as his boys. In 1877 the 
writer entered the academy and used occa- 
sionally to call on Dr. Soule, who always had 
a happy smile and a kind word for all. After 
his withdrawal from active duties as principal 
and professor, one of the chief pleasures of 
our venerable Principal Emeritus was to 
watch from his windows the students, or, 
" his boys," going to and coming from their 
recitations. 

In person Dr. Soule was tall and com- 
manding and very erect. His features were 
handsome, his voice clear and even, his smile 
always genial. Of Dr. Soule's scholarship 
Professor Packard testifies to the soundness. 
" In the Latin language and literature, to 
which he gave special attention, he was pre- 
eminent," says another. 

Dr. Soule closed his long life of useful- 
ness in May, 1879. Few of Bowdoin's many 
distinguished graduates have been more uni- 
versally beloved and respected. The feeling 
manifested towards him by all his associates 
and friends was that of the highest esteem ; 
that shown by his pupils, almost filial affec- 
tion. 

Dr. Soule governed his pupils by asking 
them to govern themselves. He put boys 
on their honor, and expected them to behave 
like gentlemen, and they rarely failed him. 
He was loved and not feared. To this style 
of treatment have been due the high sense 
of honor and manliness that have been the 
distinctive marks of this Rugby of America 
under Dr. Soule, our American Dr. Arnold. 

The same spirit of honesty that stamped 
this school under this eminent teacher con- 
tinues there still. The writer has passed 
more than one examination there when the 
instructor has left the room for a half hour, 



22 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



and tlie class of fifty or sixty students, 
though under no watchful e3'e, to his certain 
belief never took any advantage of this 
absence. Such has been the feeling of truth 
and manliness that tliis great teacher has 
infused into his scholars, and which is handed 
down by memory and will continue to be far 
into the future. 



TWO IMPRESSIONS. 
I. 

That girl ? That's Ethel ; the prettiest miss 
That ever brightened a world like this; 
The full expression of all that seems 
The ideal maiden of Fancy's dreams. 
See the delicate tints of her rounded cheek; 
And those laughing eyes that more than speak, 
As with dainty step she passes by — 
The one bright spot in an evening's sky ; 
For Ethel is all in all to me, 
And a glance from her liquid eye 
Is more than the pearls beneath the sea. 
And sometime we — but you wait and see ; 
You'll envy me by and by. 

II. 

Yes, there's Miss Ethel ; and search the earth 
You'll find few women of lesser worth ; 
With more of a coquette's pohshed art 
With less of feeling for those who smart. 
She may seem fair to a stranger's eyes, 
But I can look through her frail disguise ; 
Can see a being devoid of heart, 
Like marble, lacking the vital part. 
She's chosen another who thinks her true. 
And trusts her deceitful eye ; 
But he'll soon discover the prize he drew 
From me cau be false to another, too, 
And he'll envy me by and by. 

MORAL. 

Young man ; when you thiuk you espy 

A maid who would love you for aye. 

Take heed lest your angel may prove to have 

wings. 
A volatile nature, and other such things, 
And cause you to swear, by and by. 
E. 



Wesleyan has finally decided to send a crew to 
the inter-collegiate regatta at Saratoga, July 4th. 



COMMUNICATIONS. 



To the Editors of the Orient: 

I cheerfully comply with your request for 
my views of the plan proposed by Dr. Ger- 
rish, to dispense with the board of overseers 
of the college and to "vest its government in 
a single board of trustees, but my knowledge 
of the practical difficulties incident to the 
present system is too limited to entitle them to 
much weight in comparison with the opinions 
of those who are familiar with the subject. 

The principal objections urged against a 
board of overseers are : first, that it is an 
unwieldy body incapable of securing a quorum 
except during commencement week; and, 
second, tliat having no prerogative but a 
veto power, it is a positive hindrance to 
effectiveness. 

As to the first, if members of the board of 
overseers neglect their duty, that is their 
fault and not of the system. Furthermore, 
if no remedy exists to secure proper service 
of men who will discharge the duties incum- 
bent on them, it should be provided by suit- 
able amendment of the creative power and 
be judiciously applied without fear or favor. 

With respect to the veto power, it ought 
to exist somewhere, and where better than in 
a board whose membership embraces friends 
of the college representing all classes of 
opinion, social, political, and religious, and a 
broad extent of territory ? 

The analogy invoked in favor of the new 
plan between the board of overseers and a 
board of railroad directors does not seem to 
apply. The term " overseer " well expresses 
the functions of his office. Oversight, close 
and widespread, is the very thing which led 
to the movement for giving the alumni a 
voice in selecting members of the board. 
Why diminish it and reduce the external 
management to a close corporation of twelve 
trustees even though selected periodically by 
the alumni? The board of overseers is some- 
what analagous to the stockholders of a rail- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



23 



road, who occupy an important relation to it 
and with whom the directors are and ought to 
be in close contact. 

The one thing needful for the college is 
an increase of students; every overseer is 
supposed to keep this constantly in view. 
The present system cannot but be more 
effective in this important particular than if 
twelve men, in a single board of trustees, was 
to represent the good will of the friends and 
patrons of this ancient and honored institution. 

Again, want of more money is a constant 
quantity. Can twelve men do more to meet 
the demand than the present board of trus- 
tees with more than forty overseers to aid 
them? Doubted. The tendency of a decap- 
itation of the overseers would be to,»weaken 
their interest in the financial welfare of the 
college, and for others to throw off all respon- 
sibility upon the trustees who, in fact, have 
no more interest in its prosperity than its 
other friends. In the case of railroad 
directors, they usually have large pecuniary 
interests at stake. No such stimulus attends 
college trustees. 

If it were desirable to make the col- 
lege a sectarian institution, the smaller 
the number of managers the better. But 
Bowdoin College better represents a common- 
wealth than a sect, and, for one, I should 
deplore any departure from the idea that it is 
a broad and truly catholic institution. 

The desire to see the college prosper, 
which is the motive power of Dr. Gerrish, 
cannot be too highly commended nor become 
too pervasive, but his plan seems to involve 
too radical a change, and the wisdom of it I 
fail to see. Better " bear those ills we have, 
than fl.y to others that we know not of." 

GEO. F. EMEEY. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

Prof. Jotham Bradbury Sewall, of the 
class of '48, Master of Thayer Academy, 
Braintree, Mass., has written me concerning 



the proposal to abolish the board of over- 
seers, and, at my request, kindly permits me 
to make public use of his letter. That Prof. 
Sewall is one of the warmest friends that the 
college has can be doubted by nobody who is 
familiar with the history of Bowdoin for the 
past twenty years. From 1865 to 1877 he 
filled the chair of ancient languages ; he is 
the founder of the Greek and Latin prizes, 
president of the association of the alumni, 
and an overseer of the college. His utter- 
ances in this discussion must have peculiar 
significance, coming as they do from a promi- 
nent member of the very board whose abol- 
ishment would be effected by the success of 
the movement. He says : 

"I sympathize heartily in the object you 
have in view. Indeed, before I left Bruns- 
wick I advocated, with some of the Faculty 
and members of the boards, the idea of sim- 
plifying the management of the college by 
doing away with the overseers as a worse 
than useless body. I hope you will push the 
matter, and you may rely upon my support 
and assistance to the extent of my ability. 

"My plan differed a little from yours, and, 
as it is well to look at the thing in every light, 
I will mention it. My idea was to get the 
assent of the present members of the boards 
to petition the legislatures to unite the two 
boards, as they now are, in one — a board of 
trust and oversight. No new members 
should then be added until, by natural 
causes^ — resignation, decease, and forfeiture 
of membership by absence— the number 
was reduced to fifteen, — fourteen and the 
president of the college. Then two mem- 
bers should go out of office every year, and 
their places be supplied by members elected 
for seven years. This would keep the body 
fresh and vigorous. Perhaps the election 
might be for five years, which would make 
them go out each year for four years and two 
one year. Or, if the board was reduced to 



24 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



twenty-one — twenty and the president,— a 
term of five years would turn out four each 
year. Your number, twelve, would satisfy 
me, but I ajDprehend it would be more difficult 
to get assent to. Your idea of abolishing the 
overseers out-of-band and reducing the trus- 
tees I would agree to as the best thing ; but 
I am afraid the members will not be ready to 
turn themselves out of office in a heap. They 
might think it too violently revolutionary." 

Ill his note, granting permission to pub- 
lish his views, Prof. Sewall says : 

"I shall be profoundly glad if this begin- 
ning shall be the initiation of a revolution 1 
have long desired to see brought about. One 
board of only ten men (the ex officio Governor, 
etc., were never of any account, never ex- 
erted any influence,) made Yale what she is 
to-day." 

Yours very truly, 

FBBDEEIC HENRY GBKRISH. 

Portland, April 27, 1884. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

In your last issue, after stating the fact 
that absence from recitation during the whole 
or part of an hour reduces a student's rank, 
you say : " Beyond this slight reduction in 
rank, there is no penalty for cutting recita- 
tions ; a student may remain away from any 
recitation, or from any part of a recitation, 
whenever he chooses." If by the first part of 
this statement you mean that there is no other 
specific penalty, you are correct ; but even 
then the second part needs explanation. 

To prevent misunderstanding of our sys- 
tem by those of your readers who are not in 
college, I think your statement ought to be 
supplemented by the following, which I quote 
from the college regulations, section 29 : 
" Every instructor has the right to inquire 
into the causes of unsatisfactory attendance 
or recitations in his department of instruc- 
tion, and it becomes his duty to do so if he 
has reason to believe that a student is im- 



properly out of town or is willfully negligent. 
If the instructor finds occasion he may warn 
the delinquent ; or he may without warning 
report him to the President, who will take 
such action as tlie case may in his judgment 
require." This shows that the matter of 
attendance is not left entirely to the discre- 
tion of the students, as would, I think, be 
inferred from your statement. By awarding 
attendance rank, a small premium is placed 
upon regular attendance, and it is believed 
that this is sufficient to secure substantial 
regularity ; but it would manifestly be unwise 
to depend entirely upon this, so long as the 
university system of voluntary attendance is 
not in vogue here. 

In the matter of leaving a recitation room 
before the close of the hour (which evidently 
comes under the head of " attendance"), the 
act of asking and giving " permission " is 
doubtless largely one of courtesy between 
gentlemen. But beyond that, an instructor 
has the right to ask for reasons, and to pro- 
nounce upon their sufficiency from his point 
of view. If after that his wishes are not 
complied with, he may follow the matter up, 
if he thinks best, as indicated in the regula- 
tion quoted above. 

It can hardly have escaped notice that the 
regulations contain very little in the way of 
prohibition. The reason for this is that they 
are intended mainly for the normal working 
of the college. They give the students such 
information as they need respecting the 
orderly performance of their college duties. 
What the students ought not to do is 
largely left to their sense of propriety. But 
in addition to this they are notified in sec- 
tions 29, 32, 33, and 34 that in cases of delin- 
quency which require attention they will be 
kept to their duty by such reasonable meas- 
ures as the President or Faculty may think 
suited to the emergency. This plainly-de- 
clared right and intention of the Faculty is 
fully as important a part of the system as the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



25 



discretion given to the students. A few occa- 
sions for its exercise have arisen during the 
year, when attendance at recitations has been 
insisted upon, regardless of scholarship rank. 
Some of these occasions are known to all ; 
others perhaps only to those personally con- 
cerned. But aside from such exceptional 
cases, our whole system of administration 
presupposes and depends mainly upon a large 
measure of good will and good sense on the 
part of the students. Whether too much 
reliance is placed upon these qualities, time 
will show. It is believed, however, that they 
can be depended upon in the long run. 

G. H. S. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

Perhaps a few remarks on the subject of 
the Bugle, published by our present Junior 
class, would not be out of place, even if not 
written by any member of '84. 

In perusing a late article in the Orient 
on the above subject, one noticed several 
comparisons between the last Bugle and the 
one preceding. 

In the first place it was mentioned that the 
lead of '84 had been followed in introducing 
something of general interest to the college. 
From this statement one might infer that 
nothing of interest ever came before the no- 
tice of Bowdoin students until the arrival of 
'84's Bugle. Probably the writer referred 
only to the frontispiece, and more particularly 
to a likeness of either college professors or 
college buildings and grounds. 

Now, if we remember correctly, the class 
of '82 had for a frontispiece the likeness of 
Prof. Packard, the class of '80 had an inter- 
esting combination of the likenesses of sev- 
eral professors, and several others before that 
time had a frontispiece well worthy of note. 

The next objection to the article is raised 
against the statement that a large part of the 
draughting was done outside the college. 
This statement is no nearer the truth than the 



following, to the effect that '85 has copied 
from '84 the idea of compiling important sta- 
tistics. So far as we have seen '84's Bugle, 
there have been no statistics and no methods 
of compiling them worth the copying. 

Their last statement concerning statistics, 
although differing in nature from the preced- 
ing statement, contains sufficient to show the 
desire of their writer to establish his class 
Bugle as a standard never to be overthrown. 

It is not that we are jealous of '84 or its 
Bugle that we pen this correction, but for the 
benefit of alumni and friends of both classes, 
who never have seen '84's Bugle, that they 
may not have their expectations too suddenly 
lowered, should they ever chance too see that 
publication. 

A MEMBEK OF '85. 



COLLEGII TABULA. 



Si^^CE LAST WE MET. — The Work of the term 
has been progressing quietly since our last issue, 
with nothing startling to distract the studiously in- 
clined. The weather has been favorable for sports, 
and the time has been improved in that direc- 
tion. The ball team has played in Massachusetts 
and New Hampshire ; au account of their games 
being given elsewhere. Sweetser, formerly of 
'84, has rejoined his class, aud will pull in the uni- 
versity crew. Three crews are now pulling daily, 
so that Ivy Day will not be without a class-race 
this year. It is probable that a race may be ar- 
ranged between a Portland crew aud the university 
four, to take place here at Brunswick, so as to give 
the crew some better practice than pulling alone 
affords. A race will also be rowed with a Portland 
crew on their way to Saratoga, where they will 
meet fours from Princeton, University of Pennsyl- 
vania aud Cornell. All these crews, with possibly 
the exception of the University of Pennsylvania, 
are being trained by professional oarsmen, — Hosmer 
at Princeton, and Courtney at Cornell, while 
Plaisted coaches the Bowdoins. Lindsey, '84, was 
suddenly called home last week, by the death of his 
father. Taylor, '86, who is teaching at Litchfield 
Academy, appeared in college a few days since for 
a short call. Says he Is prospering. The ball 



26 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



grounds in the vicinity of center- field, bave been 
greatly improved by carting on a different kind of 
soil, and a stand has been erected. Hereafter an 
admission fee will be charged to the games. 

*3,*In the last Orient we mentioned the fact 
that the committee having in charge the nomina- 
tion of a president for the college, would soon 
report a name. They have done so, and the gen- 
tleman is Prof. Garman, of Amherst, who has de- 
clined the position. We have nothing whatever to say 
against the gentleman last nominated, but it seems 
to us fitting that the attention of the committee 
should be called to the fact that there are plenty of 
Bowdoin men who would confer honor upon the 
position ; that a Bowdoin man is better fitted for 
the place than any other ; and finally that in going 
outside of the graduates for a president, an insult is 
practically offered to the whole body of the alumni. 
We all contend, and with good reason, that accord- 
ing to its size, no college in America has such a 
notable alumni record, and if among her sons 
Bowdoin cannot find one worthy and willing to 
guide her fortunes, then are we indeed fallen upon 
strange times. As it seemed good to our fore- 
fathers that none but native citizens should hold 
the highest office in their gift, so equally — though 
in a more limited sense, of course — is it true that 
none but a graduate of our grand old college should 
be called to rule over us, as no other is so pecul- 
iarly fitted to understand all her needs. We hope 
the next selection will be made from among our 
own kindred. 

*^*We are pained to announce that one of the 
Orient board is fatally afflicted with absent- 
mindedness. He appeared before the door of the 
reading-room a few days ago, and courteously 
knocked before essaying to open the door. When 
he was kindly invited to "come in," and the truth 
dawned upon him, he hadn't the moral courage to 
enter, but skulked around the comer with shame 
on his countenance an inch deep. 

*.,j*The Medics played a game of base-ball last 
week with the Bath High School nine, and com- 
pletely routed them, the score standing 18 to 3. 
On the same afternoon the Bowdoin second nine 
beat the Bowdoinhams 20 to 3. The second nine 
will have a game with the second nine of the Colbyg 
some time during the term. 

*.j,*It is a sad commentary ou the power of the 
press, that after the Okient of last year pointed 
out to the youths who choose the reading-room as 
the scene of wordy contests, delivered in a high key. 



the exceeding iniquity of their course, that this 
violation of decency and the rights of others should 
not cease. It seems surpassing strange that any 
one should be willing to make such an unmitigated 
nuisance of himself, and so transgress all the rules 
of fair play as to be guilty of such rudeness in a 
public room, where others are trying to read during 
their few moments of leisure. It is profitable to 
cultivate a few evidences of gentlemanly bearing 
along with the culture that one is supposed to ac- 
quire while in college. 

*,*The life of an editor is not one of unalloyed 
bliss to be sure, although it probably comes as near 
that as can be found in any situation this side the 
Styx. He is continually cheered on his way by re- 
membrances, in the shape of invitations, congratu- 
lations, presents of mustard plasters and tooth-ache 
lotions ; and occasionally there comes in upon him 
advice which causeth his teeth to chatter. Some- 
thing of this last kind has just been received. It 
came from an old graduate, to whom we had sent a 
copy of the Orient, with the information that his 
only hope for a blissful immortality hinged upon 
his immediate subscription. His reply declined the 
offers of mercy, and gave his opinion as to the way 
in which a paper should be run. He thinks we 
ought to make the Orient a medium for the dis- 
semination of statistical, scientific and religious 
information, and winds up with the wish that the 
talents of the editors were not so misdirected. 
Now this brother's ideas look plausible, and we 
have a notion to act upon them. We can leave 
out the account of the base-ball games, which we 
had intended to insert, and thus find room for re- 
ports from China and India, on the progress of 
efforts to induce the heathen to wear knee-breeches, 
and by omitting all reference to what is transpir- 
ing here in college, we can find room for a page or 
two from the Patent Office Reports. However, our 
friend did not mention that he would subscribe if 
we were to make the proposed changes; and come 
to think of it, he appears freer with his advice than 
with his shekels. No, sir, we don't make the 
change till you come down with the cash. 

*.s*The present Senior class in the Medical 
School is composed of thirty-two gentlemen, who 
have elected the following officers: President, L. 
B. Sheehan, Portland; Vice-President, E. H. Trow- 
bi'idge, Portland ; Secretary, C. F. Rideout, Bath ; 
Historian, M. T. Newton, Andover; Committee on 
Music, S. C. Bowker, Jr., C. L. Barnes and F. L. 
Simpson ; Committee on Arrangements, Sheehan, 
Trowbridge, and J. E. Walker. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



27 



*.;e*Tho result of the analysis of allanite, found 
here in Brunswick, has been published in the 
"American Journal of Natural Science." 

*,jf*Se?eral members of the Faculty attended 
the Republican Convention at Bangor, thus afford- 
ing Seniors and Juniors several adjourns. We hope 
the Democratic portion of the Faculty will feel 
patriotic enough to go and do likewise when their 
convention occurs. The Tutor in Rhetoric had re- 
solved to lay aside the *" implied powers" of his 
position, and attend the Bangor affair, but when 
he arrived at the station the train was skipping 
northward, and the convention was obliged to " go 
it alone," as far as his presence was concerned. 

*VicJe McCuEoch TS. State of jsraryland. 

*jf* Despite the small sum which is given solely 
for the purchase of new books, the library continues 
to increase steadily, if not rapidly. The additions 
thus ftir made this year number over six hundred. 
A large portion of these are of course pamphlets, 
which have been made available for use by cata- 
loguing them, not merely by their authors, as cus- 
tomary heretofore, but also by subjects or titles, 
just as though they were bound volumes. The 
amount of valuable reading matter contained in the 
collection of pamphlets belonging to the library is 
much greater than is generally realized. Fortu- 
nately that portion of it contained in the circu- 
lars of information issued for several years by the 
Bureau of Education, which is of special interest to 
college students, is now provided with a key in the 
form of the Q. P. Indes for 188.3, which has full 
references to the subjects treated in them, and will 
often richly repay consultation. 

*** Quite a party of students visited the Tops- 
ham feldspar mine Wednesday afternoon, in search 
of minerals. They brought back quite a number of 
flue specimens, and two youug men got so inter- 
ested in their search that they missed the train and 
had a pedestrian trip of a half dozen miles with 
which to finish up the day. Several garnet crystals 
of almost perfect form and of large size have been 
found near the village here, during the last few 
weeks. 

***We understand that the Professor of Chem- 
istry has made a perfect vacuum pump by con- 
necting a tube with the heads of several of his 
Seniors. The idea is worth patenting. 

*»* The taking up of the dead trees on the 
campus suggests the idea that it would be well to 
have an Arbor Day here at Bowdoiu. When the 
students could immortalize themselves by planting 



trees on those portions of the ranch which are now 
shadeless. It would be a fine plan for each class, 
even, to plant a tree with each returning year and 
care for it while remaining in college, thus leaving 
something more tangible than an ivy leaf to perpet- 
uate its memory. 

*jj,* Among the score or so of books added to the 
college library at the beginning of this term is 
Shields' Life and Times of Sargent S. Prentiss, who 
graduated in the class of 1826. The brief sketch of 
his college life, with its mention of the Spouieroi, 
one of the literary societies of that day, the numer- 
ous and entertaining anecdotes interwoven with the 
story of his subsequent career, and the account of 
the noble fight he made against the repudiation of 
the bonded debt of his adopted State, will alone 
repay one for even a cursory examination of the 
book. Its publication over thirty years after the 
decease of its subject shows how deep and lasting 
an impression his eloquence made upon the minds 
of the generation now passing off the stage, —a fact 
similarly attested by the demand which led to a 
second edition of the book, edited by his brother, 
and first issued in 1855. 

*^* Dinah had a little can, 

'T was filled with kerosene, 
And soon beyond the little stars — 
Dynamite benzine. 
*.:,.* Two exceedingly wise Juniors are working 
with the spectroscope in elective physics, and among 
other things have examined some thallium. The 
professor furnished them with a bottle of the chlo- 
ride of this stuff", and departed. One of them spilled 
about half of it in taking some out for analysis, and 
scooped most of it back into the bottle again, but 
when the professor came and saw the scattered 
powder there arose a mighty cloud above his brow 
and his eyes glov^'ed with excitement, as he informed 
these two wise Juniors that they had wasted thal- 
lium enough to set a man up in affluent circum- 
stances for the rest of his life. The Juniors got a 
point on the expensiveness of this element. ■ 

*.3<*A paper of much interest to Bowdoin men 
and many others, we think, was published in Evert/ 
Other Saturday for April 12th. It is the commence- 
ment oration delivered by Longfellow when he 
graduated in 1825. He was then but eighteen years 
of age, but the oration holds within itself the prom- 
ise of the poet whom the world has learned to love 
and honor. Its subject is " Our Native Writers," 
which, although written when he was still in early 
life, had been preceded by several other efforts. at 
authorship, among which may be mentioned his 



28 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



"Hymn of the Moravian Nuns," "An April Day," 
"Autumn," and "Woods in Winter." The article 
in question opens witli an account of the difficulties 
under which American authors of that time were 
struggling, and the bondage they were under to 
English ideas and influence. He tells us that 
although England may sneer because we have no 
great abundance of polished scholars who are more 
at home in the thoughts of Greece and Italy than 
in the life about them, yet for this very reason our 
American writers are highly advantaged, for thus 
with undivided attention our own hills and valleys 
shall become as widely renowned as those of ancient 
lands, and every rock a chronicle of storied allu- 
sion. Thus, he tells us, the mind shall take color 
from the things around it, and a rich development 
of poetic feeling arise, that shall break forth in song. 
The youthful speaker closed his oration thus : " We 
may rejoice, then, in the hope of beauty and sub- 
limity in our natural literature ; for no people are 
richer than we are in the treasures of nature. And 
well may each of us feel a glorious and high- 
minded pride in saying, as he looks on the hills and 
vales, — on the woods and waters of New England, — 
" This is my own, my native land." 
*„*The Bowdoin club has played two games 
with Dartmouth the past week, with what success 
the scores will show. The game with Harvard had to 
be given up on account of the rain. The first game 
with the Dartmouths was played under exceedingly 
unfavorable circumstances. The boys arrived at 
Hanover at two o'clock on the morning of the day 
the game was played, having had a long ride, and 
so of course were all tired out and in no condition 
to play well. In addition to this, Wright, the pitcher, 
was obliged to leave his position on account of 
lameness, and the rest of the game was pitched by 
Cook, Moulton giving place to Waterman in the 
catcher's position. The first game was character- 
ized by poor playing on the part of some of the 
Bowdoins, although Pushor and the outfielders 
played a fine game, Dearth making a splendid 
catch of a liner, taking it about an inch from the 
ground. Cook did some heavy batting in this 
game. In the second game Cook and Donovan 
were the battery. The Dartmouths by heavy bat- 
ting got four runs in the first inning. The game 
was noted for the good playing shown on both sides. 
Pushor played a perfect game. Wright caught a 
difficult fly by running backward. Dearth made a 
splendid running catch. Waterman and Talbot did 
some heavy batting, and all the boys showed that 
we can safely bet on Bowdoin still. Under more 
favorable circumstances the nine would have brought 



hack a better record even than it did. The fol- 
lowing is the score of the two games : 





MAY 


6th. 












BOWDOIN. 












A.B. 


R. 


IB. 


T.B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Barton, 1. f., . . 


4 





1 


1 


3 


1 





Torrey, 2b., . . 


i 











1 





3 


Pushor, lb. , . . 


i 


1 


1 


1 


7 


1 





Cook, 3b. & p., . 


i 


1 


2 


5 





4 





Wright, p. & S.S., 


4 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


Dearth, c. f., . . 


4 





1 


1 


4 


1 





Waterman, s.s. & c 


, 4 





1 


1 


5 


3 


2 


Talbot, r.f., . . 


4 











1 








Moulton, 0. & 3b., 


4 





1 


1 


4 


2 


3 


Totals, . . 


36 


3 


8 


11 


27 


14 


11 




DARTMOUTH 












A.B. 


R. 


iB. 


T.B. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


Chellis, 2b., . . 


(i 


4 








2 





1 


Springfield, 1. f., 


4 


5 


1 


1 


2 








G. Nettleton, 3b., 


7 


3 


5 


11 





1 





Hale, lb., . . . 


7 


3 


3 


5 


8 








Nutt, r. i., . . 


6 


1 








2 








Fellows, 0. f., . 


6 


4 


3 


3 











McCarthy, s.s., . 


6 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 





Thomas, c., . . 


. 6 


1 


1 


1 


9 


1 





F. Nettleton, p.. 


6 


2 


3 


2 


_^ 


3 






Totals, ... 54 26 18 26 27 7 1 

Wild pitches— Cook 4, Nettleton 1. Bases on balls — 
Cook 4. Balls called— on Cook 97, on Nettleton 43. Strikes 
called— off Cook 10, off Nettleton 14. Struck out— Cook 
2, Nettleton 7. Passed balls — Moulton 5. Two-base hits — 
Cook, G. Nettleton (3), Hale. Earned runs— Bowdoin 2, 
Dartmouth 9. Time of game— 1 hour 55 minutes. 
MAY 7 th. 





BOWDOIN. 












A.B. 


B. 


iB. 


T.B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Barton, 1. f., . . 


. 5 


1 


2 


2 











Torrey, 2b., . . 


. 5 











2 


4 


1 


Pushor, lb., . . 


. 5 


1 


1 


1 


12 








Cook, p., . . . 


. 4 


1 


1 


1 





6 





Wright, 3b., . . 


. 4 


1 








3 


1 


1 


Dearth, c. f.. 


. 2 


2 








2 








Waterman, s.s., 


. 3 


3 


2 


3 


3 


4 





Talbot, r. f., . . 


. 4 





2 


5 


1 








Donovan, c, . . 


. 4 


1 


2 


2 


4 


3 


1 


Totals, 


. 36 


10 


10 


14 


27 


18 


3 




DARTMOUTH 












A.B. 


B. 


iB. 


T.B. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


Chellis, 2b., . . 


. 5 


1 


1 


1 


3 


2 


1 


Springfield, 1. f.. 


. 3 


1 


2 


2 











G. Nettleton, 3b., 


. 3 


3 


1 


1 


1 








Hale, lb 


. 5 


2 


2 


3 


8 





2 


Austin, p., . . 


. 2 














6 





Fellows, 0. f., . 


. 5 


1 


1 


1 





1 





McCarthy, s.s., . 


. 5 





1 


1 





1 





Cunningham, c, 


. 5 











10 


1 


1 


P. Nettleton, r. f.. 


. 3 


1 








J 


3 






BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



29 



Wild pitches — Cook 1, Austin 1. Bases ou balls— Cook 
8, Austin 3. Balls called— on Cook 108, on Austin 94. 
Strikes called— off Cook 11, off Austin 16. Struck out- 
Cook 3, Austin .5. Passed balls — Donovan 2, Cunningham 
3. Two-base hits— Waterman, Hale. Three-base hit— 
Talbot. Earned runs— Bowdoin 2, Dartmouth 2. Double 
play — Dartmouth 1. Time of game — 2 hours 20 minutes. 

*,j,*Last Tuesday afternoon a portion of the 
students were roused by smoke and the janitor's 
shouts for aid, to find a fire raging in the grass 
among the pines behiud the Delta. Wheu discov- 
ered, some of the old limbs and small pines were 
beginning to burn, and had there been more wind 
the whole college would not have sufficed to save 
our noble trees. Too great care cannot be taljen 
in setting these fires, for they easily pass beyond 
control, and the trees, both the pine.s and those on 
the campus, are almost the only ornamental things 
on the college grounds. 

*ji*A week ago or more a certain professor in 
this college went at prayer-time, as is his custom, 
to his room, but he did not go in, that is, not then. 
Nailed across the door posts was a large wooden 
sign, inviting all who read it to go to a certain 
well-kuowu shoe store and purchase some wearing 
apparel for the feet. To add force and beauty, 
the advertisement represented a whole family run- 
ning to get some shoes, evidently following out 
the injunction to "come early and avoid the rush." 
Finally an entrance was effected, and Sanskrit 
roots once more send forth stems. 

*s.*A Senior taking optional Chemistry has dis- 
tinguished himself by trying to heat a substance 
up to 180"^ C. in a water bath. This is the same 
gentleman who tried to jjour hydrogen from one 
vessel to another, a few weeks ago. 

*»* Drowsily, over and over, 
It repeats itself to me, 
The timeless flow of the ocean, 
The endlessness of the sea. 
And always the lesson it teaches — 
Die Ewigkeit. 

Into my restless soul stealing, 
A wistful longing to know, 
To read the mystical meaning. 
To catch the hours, as they go. 
And plead to be told where it reaches — 
Bie jEviif/keit. 



PERSONAL. 



The St. Gothard tunnel, under the Alps, is 9 1-4 
miles in length. The same distance could be meas- 
ured by 334,900 of Esterbrook's Commercial Pens 
extended lengthways. 



f Graduates and uudergraduatesare e.arnestly solicited to send 
personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Brunswick, Me.] 

'25.— At a recent meeting of the Unity Club of 
Augusta, Hon. J. W. Bradbury, who was a class- 
mate of Longfellow, gave a sketch and some rem- 
inisceuses connected with the life of the poet. 

'32. — In The Independent of April 24th, 
Rev. C. A. Bartol of this class, in speaking of 
Emerson, says: "He seems an unsinning Adam. 
He grew innocent from the start. He was trans- 
planted hither from some celestial soil. He is a 
birth out of seven generations of clergy, essence of 
Puritan and Pilgrim. He wiled us away from the 
sin and superstition which he did not attack." 

'34.— A "System of Christian Theology," by 
Henry B. Smith, D.D., LL.D., is pubhshed by 
A. C. Armstrong & Son. " Dr. Smith while living 
exerted an influence on Christian thought second to 
that of no one in this country. And to-day his 
opinions and utterances on points of Christian doc- 
trine are quoted as of the highest authority." 

'42. — Mr. Thomas Tash, accompanied by his 
wife, will spend the summer in Europe. 

'51. — Prof. William A. Packard of Princeton 
College, recently sailed for Europe for a few 
months' travel upon the continent. 

'52. — Ex-President Chamberlain is expected to 
deliver the address at Peabody, Mass., on Memorial 
Day. 

'56.— Eev. Roland B. Howard has resigned the 
pastorate of the Congregational church at Rock- 
port, Mass., to accept the Secretaryship of the 
American Peace Society, with headquarters at No. 
6 Congregational House, Boston, Mass. 

'57. — Hon. S. C. Belcher will deliver the address 
at Dover on Memorial Day. 

'61. — F. M. Ray has been chosen Vice-President 
of the Maine Genealogical Society and F. 0. Conant 
('80), Treasurer. 

'61. — Thomas W. Hyde has been appointed to 
fill a vacancy in the board of managers of National 
Soldiers' Home. 

'61. — In the May number of the Atlantic 
Monthly appeared an article entitled " The Progress 
of Nationalism," by Edward Stanwood. 

'62. — A. J. Blethen, who received a degree of 
A.M. here, removed a short time ago from Portland 
to Kansas City, Mo., to assume position as business 



30 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



manager of the Journal of that place. He has 
lately sold out his interest in the paper for 
$50,000, and will soon conae east again. 

'63.— In the April 24th number of The Inde- 
pendent is an article on the " Methods of Esamina- 
tiou before Councils," by Dr. Newman Smyth. 

'68. — Orville D. Baker was chairman of the 
Republican State Convention at Bangor, April 30th. 

'68.— Prof. George A. Smyth, of Burlington, Vt., 
in a recent pamphlet entitled " Hygienic Insti- 
tutes," presents the development of bj^giene as a 
science, and the importance of its further prosecu- 
tion. 

'71. — Dr. Charles E- Clark of Boston, has pre- 
sented to the Boston Public Library some valuable 
papers giving additional light on the early history 
of Massachusetts and Queen Anne's war. The 
papers have been lying lost in a junk shop until 
they were discovered and rescued by Dr. Clark, 
who is an enthusiastic antiquaiiau, and has a val- 
uable collection of his own. This important dis- 
covery and gift to the public library is described in 
an article in the Boston Advertiser of April 5th. 

'75.— Rev. Chas. W. Hill, recently of Park City, 
Utah, has been called to San Jose, California. 

'75. — Myles Standish is practicing medicine in 
Boston. His office is at 6 Park Square. 

'76. — Wright has made a visit to Brunswick and 
Topsham of late. 

'77.— C. W. Morse was married April 4th to 
Miss Hattie Bishop Hussey at Prospect Heights, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. Miss Hussey is a daughter of 
Erwin A. Hussey, a prominent member of the 
New York Stock E.^ohange, and granddaughter of 
Hon. S. J. Southard of Richmond. The couple go 
to California on their wedding tour and then 
return to take up their residence in Brooklyn. 

^77. — Melcher was married April 4th to Miss 
Julia Harwood of Oxford, Mass. Mr. Melcher has 
lately resigned his position as principal of the 
Oxford High School and accepted a like position in 
the High School at Wbitingsville, Mass., with an 
increase of salary. 

'81. — Cobb and John Manson were lately admit- 
ted to the Cumberland County Bar. 

'81. — Stevens and Lane are in the law depart- 
ment of Iowa College, Iowa City, Iowa. Later 
reports say that they have entered a partnership to 
practice in Iowa City. 



'82.— Goodwin and Carpenter are studying law 
in Denver, Col. 

'83. — Goodwin writes us from Pisa, Italy, what 
a good time he is having. He has lately been 
visiting the World's Fair held at Pisa. From Pisa 
he goes to Rome, thence to Venice, and to Paris in 
May. He spends the summer in Switzerland and 
Germany and intends to come home in the fall. 

'83. — Reed has accepted a position as principle of 
the Gorham (N. H.) High School. The terra began 
April 28th. 

'84.— Kemp is to give the address at Otisfleld 
Memorial Day. 

'84.— Barton is to teach at Lincoln Academy 
next fall. 

'85. — Butler has begun a term of ten weeks in 
the Waldoboro High School. 

The followiug Bowdoin men were noted at the 
Republican State Convention at Bangor : Ex-Gov. 
Chamberlain ('52), who was chairman of the Cum- 
berland County Delegation, F. S. Waterhouse ('73), 
H. M. Heath ('72), F. A. Floyd ('73), Clarence 
Hale ('69), D. A. H. Powers ('74), F. N. Hargraves 
{'77), and A. L. Lumbert ('79). H. A. Wing, '81, 
and E. S. Osgood, '75, were present in the interests 
of the Bangor Commercial and Portland Argus, 
respectively. 

It may be interesting to some of the persons con- 
nected with the college to know the opinion of some 
of its graduates in regard to the proposed prohibi- 
tory amendment to the Constitution. The Boston 
Post has lately sent to many of the influential and 
business men of Maine to learn their ideas on the 
subject. Out of seven graduates of the college who 
expressed themselves, one. Geo. F. Emery ('36), 
was in favor of the amendment. Those who 
opposed it were : Ex-Chief Justice Appleton ('22), 
Judge Barrows ('39), ex-President Chamberlain 
('.52), Hon. Josiah Crosby ('35), F. A. Wilson, ('54), 
and Gen. Charles Hamlin ('57). 



SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION. 

In this age of progress people are constantly 
searching for something new, whether it be in the 
domain of domestic industry, or in the wider field 
of science. Twenty learned scientists have exper- 
imented long and carefully with a new discovery 
called " Salicylica" and having deducted from their 
observations that it is the greatest for Rheumatism, 
Gout, and Neuralgia ever known. Its success has 
been certain iu every case. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



31 



GENERAL eOLLEGE NOTES. 



President Porter, of Tale, is preparing a book 
on tbe " Ethics of Kant."— i^r. 

There will be nine Princeton instructors in 
Europe during the coming summer. 

Dartmouth's new library is to be of brick and 
flre-proof The new chapel will be constructed of 
marble. 

The Priucctou Faculty now numbers thirty 
professors besides a corps of tutors, instructors and 
lecturers.— £■.<;. 

The Amherst Art Gallery received a bequest of 
$5,000 by the will of tlie late L. J. Knowles, of 
Worcester. — Ex. 

The Michigan Argonaut will henceforth devote 
part of its editorial columns to subjects outside the 
range of college news. 

An Amherst Senior has been selected to repre- 
sent South Hadley Falls in tbe State Convention 
at Boston, on the 29th inst. 

Three new athletic organizations have been 
formed at Harvard, this year. They are a shooting 
club, a polo club, and a canoe club. 

Professor Northrop, of Yale, has resigned his 
position in that college to accept a call to the 
presidency of Minnesota University. — Ex. 

At the Cambridge University games, recently, 
the mile run was made in the splendid time of four 
minutes and twenty-seven and three-fifths seconds. 

Several of the candidates for overseers of Har- 
vard, upon being questioned on the subject, have 
expressed themselves in favor of voluntary morning 
prayers. 

Prof Flagg of Cornell, has recently printed a 
" Guide for Students in Greek," in which he severe- 
ly condemns the use of trots in reading the clas- 
sics. —Herald- Crimson. 

Unusual interest is being manifested in the class 
races at Harvard this year, large numbers of the 
students assembling daily at the boat-house to 
watch the crews practice. 

At the annual dinner of the Tale alumni held 
in New York, Mr. Chauncey M. Depew said that in 
New Tork city there were three thousand college 
graduates who could not earn their living. — Ex. 

Cornell University has received from Thebes 
one Mr. Penpi, a mummy of some fame. A great 
distance to send for fossilized humanity, however. 



as excellent specimens may be obtained in some of 
our colleges. A little dearer, perhaps, but better 
fossilized.— .SJ.«. 

Out of Harvard's " Forty Immortals " fifteen are 
graduates or professors at Harvard. — Yale Record. 
And singularly enough, none of Harvard's foot-ball 
players or champion oarsmen are in the list. — Ex. 

In a ch'cular recently issued, the president of 
Bates College says the institution wants more en- 
dowments, more scholarships, more professional 
chairs and more commodious apartments.— Jwdar. 
Is that all ? 

President Eliot of Harvard does not hold a very 
high opinion of base-ball. He is reported to have 
made the following remarks on the subject: "I 
think it is a wretched game ; but as an object of am- 
bition for the youth to go to college, really it is a 
little weak. There are only nine men who can 
play the game, and there are some thousand 
men in college; and out of the nine there are only 
two desirable positions, I understand— that of 
pitcher and that of catcher; so that there is but 
little chance for the youth to gratify his ambition. 
I call it one of the worst games, although I know 
it is called the American national game." 



CLIPPINGS. 



SOME FELLOW S SISTEK. 

Her rosy lips so near to mine, 
More tempting far than rarest wine, 

And so I kissed her. 
The sweetest thing the sun e'er shone on, 
This girl. "Who wouldn't be clean " gone on " 

Some fellow's sister? 

Since Love has murmured in her ear, 
With favorisig mind my suit she'll hear. 

Who can resist her ? 
Assent to me she quickly nods : 
Another kiss— But hold, ye gods ! 

It is my sister ! — Advocate 

"Do you think," asked a college student of a 
professor of theology, " that the lion and the lamb 
have ever yet lain down together?" "I don't 
know," answered the professor, "but if they have, 
I have no doubt the lamb was missing from that 
date." 

" Mein Gott, Isaac ! Mark up eferyding in der 
store dree hundret and fifty per cend. Here comes 
a shtudent vat vants drust." — Ex. 

At a negro ball, in lieu of "not transferable" on 
the ticket, a notice was posted over the door, "No 
gentleman admitted unless ho comes hisself " 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 



STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 j.^.gPECI^Ii^Fip^P??Tg-f:^ 



CIGARETTES. 



CIGABETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No.l 

SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absohitely without adulteration or drugs. 

We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 

direct importation, which is made especially for us, Water 
marked with the name of the brand— 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLEN tE G INTER Manufacturers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



New system. Learned in less than one-quarter the time 
required by any other. Old reporters throw away old sys- 
tems and learn this for speed and legibility. It can be 
successfully 

TAUGHT BY MAIL. 
The corresponding style can be learned in a few hours, 
and the full verbatim reporting style in a few months. It 
is a marvel of simplicity. 

STUDENTS 

can easily acquire enough to enable them to take notes of 

LECTURES. 

Send for circular. Terms: Corresponding style, five 

lessons, $5. Corresponding and reporting, twenty lessons, 

R. B. OAPEN, Augusta, Me. 



OF 

neatly executed at the 

B^UNgWICK pE^^IiD 0FFICE. 



A.KE VERY POPULATE. 



DEALER IN 

c^iiw cSoaU, jShoeS',^ c^h^^'B'fS 

No. 2 Odd Fellows' Block, 

^P1^IN6 ^ND ^apMER ^'pyiiE^ ^IiIj in. 

M^m STREET. . . . 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 7th, 1884, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alpheus S. Packakd, Actiug President; 
Alfred MrrCHELL, M.D., Secretary; Iseael T. Dana, M.D., 
Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, W.D., Obstetrics 
and Dise.ases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Goddaed, 
A.M., Medical Jurisprudence; rKEDEEic H. Gehelsh,M.D., 
Analomy; Henry Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry; Burt G. 
Wilder, M.D., Physiology; Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery 
and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics; IRVING E. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator of 
Anatomy; Everett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of His- 
tology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



FRANK M. STETSON, 






<^^^^^fc 







*i5. JOLY 25-^* 



CO 

CO 



CO 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Diamonds, 



Jeivelry, 



Silver Ware, 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



Prepare Original Designs for Society 
Badges, Rings, Prizes, and Class Cups, 
which will be fortvarded to students on 
request, 

A SPECIALTY is made of English 
Pewter Beer Mugs, in ttvo sizes, with Glass 
Bottoms. 

Society, Book, and Visiting Card Plates 
engraved in proper style. 

Invitations and Programmes in novel 
forms at short notice. 

Shreve, Crump & Low, 



Bronzes, 



Porcelains, 



Fancy Goods. 



BYRON STEVENS, 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the nnost complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



EARS for the MILLION 

Foo Choo's Balsam of Shark's Oil 

Positively Restores the Hearing, and is the Only 
Absolute Cure for Deafness Known. 

This Oil is abstracced from peculiar species of small White 
Shakk, caught in the yellow Sea, known as Carcharotlon Rond- 
eletii. Every Chinese fisherman knows it. Its virtues as a re- 
storative of bearing were discovered by a Buddhist Priest about 
the year 1410. Its cures were so numerous and mamj so seem- 
ingly miracutous, that the remedy was ofllcially proclaimed over 
the entire Empire. Its use became so universal that for over 300 
years no deafness lias existed among the Chinese people. Sent, 
charges prepaid, to any address at $1.00 per bottle. 

imi WimT TMl Bl^F BAY 

It has performed a miracle in my case. 

I have HO unearthly noises in my head and hear much better. 

I have been greaily benelited. 

My deafness helped a great deal— think another bottle will 
cure me. 

My hearing is much benefited. 

I have received untold benefit. 

My hearing is improving. 

It is giving good satisfaction. 

Have been greatly benelited, and am rejoiced that I saw the 
notice of it. 

" Its virtues are unquestionable and its curative character ab- 
solute, as the writer can personally testify, both from experience 
and observation. Write at once to Haylock & Jenuey, 7 Uey 
Street, New York, enclosing $1.00, and you will receive by return 
a remedy that will enable you to hear like anybody else, and 
whose curative effects will be permanent. You will never regret 
doing so."— Kditor of AfercmitUe Review. 

e^To avoid loss "in the Mails, please send money by Regis- 
tered Letter. 

Only Imported by HAYLOCK & JENNEY, 
Sole Agents for America. 7 Dey St., N. Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



NATIONAL SCHOOL SUPPLY BDEEAU. 

Beloit, Wis., July 31, 1883. 
National School Svpphj Bureau: 

Last April, being then in charge of a large public school, but 
desiring a position in some good academy or college, I placed 
my name with your Bureau. During the Jirst part of the present 
month I received notice from you of a vacancy in such a place as 
I desired. 

Putting myself in communication with the partv concerned I 
received the appointment. I am ivcU satisfied with the manage- 
ment of the Bureau, and feel sure that it Alls a useful and nec- 
essary place in our school economy. You are at liberty to use 
my name if you wish. 

Eespecttully, 

EDWARD O. FISKE. 
Headmaster Markani Academy, Milwaukee, Wis. 

For applicatiou-form and circular, address, 

Natimiul School Suppli/ Depot, Chicacjo, III. 
IT. B.— We vi^ant all kinds of Teachers for Schools 
and Families. Good Pay to Agents and Private Cor- 
respondents. 



ALL KINDS OF 



-DEALER IN- 



Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 

STUDENTS 

Of all classes will find it valuable to consult on all subjects the 



183 SOUTH CLARK STREET, CHICAGO, ILL,. 



DEALRR IN 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

All the Students Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 



COK. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fur- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Woi'k- 
manship, we especially solicit orders for Fine Printing of all 
kinds. 



For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

We also make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges, 

— sncH A.S — 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



J^. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views IVIade to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brnus-nrick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Viexsrs ; also College Views. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 
Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 



DISPENSER OP 



IS. 



Egg, «....«...., 

imPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Go to W, B. VIToodard's 

To buy vour GKOCEEIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

Main Street, Head of IVIall, Brunswick, Me. 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



MAIN STREET, BETJITSWICK, ME. 



WM. % FIELD, 



WW^^^- 



TONTIIffS HOTESI«, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Special attention will be given to Class antl Reunion Dinners 
and Suppers to order. First-class laundry connected with the 
house. 

S. B. BREWSTER, Proprietor. 



lit, mtWlll 1 00, JEWEiEB 

FINE WATCIES, 



239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. MEKRILL. A. KKITH. 



DEALER IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 "WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 

Washington Market, 

TONTINE HOTEL BLOCK, 

Meats, Vegetables, and Fruits of all kinds. Also Oys- 
ters, Fresh and Smoked Fish. 
Bowdoin College Patronage Solicited. 



DEALER IN 

CEDAR STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
I^° Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PIOTUEE FRAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

Also Pictures, Cabinet Fr.ames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, 

etc. Also agent lor the celebrated Household Sewing 

Midlines, 

In the Everett Store, Main Street, Opposite the Mall, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 




til iiiillgiii iSi,, 

CEstafelished 1871.) 

10 BERKELY ST., BOSTON, MASS., 



ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSl . ELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 
OTHER TO TKICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free ■<. 'wliere on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp at buove address. 



SPECIAL IMPROVED 



Aierican Sf AR Bicycle 




Althouji:h comparatively a new machine on the mar- 
ket, the Star has made a splendid record, 
having won tlie 

Twenty-Five Mile Championship of 

the United States, 

Breaking the record, in 83 minutes 10 seconds. 

It has a mile record of 2 niin. 50 1-8 sec; 
5 miles, 15 min. 26 3-4 sec: mile mthout 
hands, 3 mln. 11 sec It has Avon the most im- 
portant Hill Climbing Contests, including 
Corey Hill, Boston, Eagle HUl, Orange, N. J., 
and StaiKlpipe Hill, Washington, D. C. This 
is a mere mention of the triumphs of the Star. 

The principles embodied ia the Star give the perfect combiuation for safety, speed, and comfort with economy of 
maintenance and durabilily found in no other machine. 

IN ADDITION WE HAVE THE 



TICTOR TRICYCLE, Tlie Most Faioiis Three-Wlieeler Mafle In Tlie forll 

A Full Line of the Best ENGLISH MACHINES 

Go to complete the list ami suit all tastes. 

The IDEAL, a cheaper machine for use of boys and youths, is a splendid machine for purpose intended and is 
hif/hly recommended- 

SECOND-HAND MACHINES of all kinds, SUPPLIES and SUNDRIES constantly on hand. 

REPAIRING of most difficult kinds performed at reasonable rates. All machines and parts must be plainly 
marked and be accompanied by instructions by next mail. 

ST^T.L & BXJRT, 

509 Tremont St., and 4 Warren Ave., Odd Fellows' Hall, Boston, Mass. 



:«:'\ \ \ \ \: N N \ \ N N N N N ;i,vJ^_Ci_V\ N N N N. 




ii.\ \ \ \ \: 



Vol Xl¥. 



N0. 3. 




t ©F^e * 




-# ERMR^WIGK, * MMIRR^ 



—^ 



ft CONTENTS. 



4€— 



Editorial Notes 33 

Of a Saturday Afternoon 35 

Old Laws ; 36 

Psi Upsilou Convention 37 

Communications 38 



Base-Ball 39 

CoLLEGii Tabula 42 

Personal 44 

General College Notes 46 

Clippings 46 







^ ♦ fflftY 2g, 1885. » 1^ 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

EHGEAVED IH THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

N0. 5 ©DD EEIiIieWg' BMCK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 



The only radical internal remedy. Never known to 
fail in a single case, acute or chronic. It expels the poison- 
ous Uric Acid from the blood, which is the prime cause 
of Rheumatism, Gout, and Neuralgia.— As a blood puri- 

THE OLD RELIABLE SPECIFIC 

ENDORSED BY PHYSICIANS AND 

THOUSANDS OF PATIENTS. 

fier it has no equal. Acting on common-sense principles 
it eradicates from the blood all poisonous matter which 
causes disease. — It has been in use many years and 
cured a larger percentage of cases than any other 

POSITIVELY CURES 

remedy. Send for testimonials from the cured. — Salicy- 
lica strikes directly at the causes of these diseases, while 
so many so-called speci- 

EHEUMATISM 

fics only treat locally the effect. When you have tried 
in vain all the "oils," "ointments," "liniments," and 
"pain cures," and when your 

GOUT, NEURALGIA. 

doctors cannot help you, do not despair but take Salicy- 
lica at once and be cured. — No one can afford to live in 
pain and misery when 

GRAVEL, DIABETES. 

Salicylica will relieve him and put him in condition to 
attend to his daily avocations. 

Si per box, 6 boxes for $5, 



BLOOD POISONING. 

with full directions in ten languages. Sold by druggists 
everywhere, or sent by mail, prepaid, on receipt of price_ 

"WASHBURNE & CO., Prop's, 

287 Broadway, New York. 

Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

Odd Fellows' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. W. BROWNE, PnOPEiETOK. 
Formerly at Toniiiie Hotel. 



<^ — So, 



i^o^rS'Krs^ 



THE FAVORITE NOS.303-404-332-l7O'S5l-WITH 
''H/S OTHEP SryiES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORL 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. lERRYMAN, PHARMACIST,-:- 

Fancy aM Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Totiacco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

jg" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, .D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

OvEit Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

IRA C. STOCKSRIOCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEK, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi • 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 

SPRING AND SUMMER, 1884. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cufifs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments. White 
Vests, White Neck-ties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neck- wear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

Upg'Families. Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



tape: iTiroRiYi. 

In one of the tropical provinces of Germany there has been 
found a root, the extract from which has proved an absoldte 
SPECIFIC for Tape Worm. ,It is pleasant to take and is not de- 
bilitating or disafa'eeable in its effects on the patient, but is 
peculiarly sickening and stupefying to the Tape Worm, which 
loosens its hold of its victim and passes away in a natural and 
easy manner, entii'ely whole, with head, and while still alive. 
One physician has used this remedy in over 400 cases, without a 
single failure to pass worm whole, with head. Absolute removal 
with head guaranteed. No pay required until so removed. Send 
stamp for circular and terms. 

HEYWOOD & CO., 19 Park Place, N. Y. City. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



'V^MEN' YO TJ yVJ^NT A. RIDE 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE, 

On Cleaveland Street, where yoii will find turnouts to suit the most 
fastidious, ^ff' Hates reasonable. 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Dailjr 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday IVIorning by A, G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROIVIPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

«S-Speoial Bates to Student Clubs..£i 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books beintf mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amoimt of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, Georgics and first six Books 
of the .<Eneid, including Prosody. 
(Instead of the Georgics, Caesar's Gallic War, 
Books I.-IV., may be offered.) 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Georgraphy, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loorais. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regular Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commeuce- 
meut (July 11 and 12, 1884), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 26 and 27, 1884). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
■examinations is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
.school years, at the Washington Academy, East 
Machias, and at the Fryehurg Academy, these 
.schools having been made special Fitting Schools 
for the college by the action of their several Boards 
•of Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 
iave been fitted at any school having an approved 



preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 
Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

required— FOUR HOURS A 'WEEK:. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

electives — ^FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $2.5. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 28, 1884. 



No. 3. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGLiTE YEAR, EY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

J. A. Peters, '85, Managing Editor. 

N. B. Ford, '85, Business Editor. 
Boyd Bartlett, '85. "W. P. Nealley, '85. 

O. E. Cook, '85. A. A. Knowlton, '86. 

Webb Donnell, '85. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. P. LiBEY, '83. W. V. Wentworth, '86. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00. 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

P^xtra copies can be obtained at the boolj stores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Eemittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by wi-itcr's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 



Entered at the Post-Ofiice at Bruoswick as Second Class mail matter. 



Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 



EDITORIAL HOTES. 



Our thanks are due Gen. Chamberlain for 
a large group picture of some prominent 
newspaper editors which now adorns the 
Orient office. 



Now that the 'eighty-five Bugle has made 
its debut with so much eclat, it behooves us 
to be looking around for editors from the 
class of 'eighty-six. The college has learned 
from experience that it takes a deal of time 
to publish a paper of this sort, and unless the 
present Sophomore class intends to pursue 
the Fabian policy, which was so characteristic 
of the last board, it would be well by an 
early election to give the editors from 'eighty- 



six an opportunity to push their preliminary 
work before the close of this term. 

A word as to the manner of electing the 
editors. It has heretofore been the c^istom 
for the several secret societies, during the 
latter part of the spring term, to choose a 
man from the Sophomore class to serve as 
Bugle editor. This would seem to indicate 
that the Bugle was a purely society produc- 
tion ; but when it comes out in the fall it 
purports to be the publication of the Junior 
class. Moreover, if the sales are not suffi- 
ciently large to meet the expenses, it is the 
class, not the societ}', that is called upon to 
make up the deficiency. It happened last 
year that one of the fraternities had no mem- 
bers from the Sophomore class, and conse- 
quently was without a representative on the 
Bugle board. Now if the Bugle is a frater- 
nity publication, each fraternity should be 
entitled to a representative on the board, 
regardless of class membership; and should 
expect to be called upon for money in case 
the paper was not a financial success. On 
the other hand, if the Bugle is a class publi- 
cation, as its title-page says, the class alone 
should choose the editors. At present we 
act rather inconsistently. If the different 
fraternities continue to elect Bugle editors, 
they should be allowed to do so at their own 
discretion, and should also be ready to sup- 
port the editors with their purses in case of 
need. 



As an experiment merely, the Orient 
office will be open, for the present, on Satur- 
day, for the first two hours after dinner. 
As we have on file a large number of college 
papers, as well as the Orient itself since its 



34 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



establishment in 1870, the place may be an 
interesting resort for the students. 



Our efficient base-ball manager deserves 
great credit for the energetic manner in which 
he has carried out a plan of which he was 
the sole supporter, and which was regarded as 
impracticable by a majority of the students. 
The new grand-stand (or more correctly speak- 
ing, perhaps, the grand-sit-down) is certainly 
a great convenience, and even promises to be a 
source of revenue. We are made to wonder 
how we have managed to get along for so 
many years without anything of the kind. 

It is slightly exasperating, for those who 
have parted with the admission fee, to see 
the "great unwashed" seated so comfortably 
on the fence. Some have even suggested the 
fence be whitewashed before every game ; 
but the main purpose of keeping the grounds 
free for the players will have been accom- 
plished if the entire audience is outside the 
fence. 

The Delta is not a public common, and it 
is time that this fact be understood, especially 
by tlie young riffraff who are accustomed to 
make themselves so prominent on all occa- 
sions. 

There seems to be a slight misunderstand- 
ing among the students in regard to the 
prizes for literary work offered by the Ori- 
ent in the first issue of this term. We wish 
to have it understood that no one of the edi- 
tors is to be considered a competitor for any 
of the prizes. It would be manifestly im- 
proper for us in awarding the prizes, to sit in 
judgment upon the relative merit of our own, 
as compared with other compositions. 



The latest addition to our exchange list 
is called The Stranger, from North Bridgton. 
The title, however, is a misnomer, as we are 
already familiar with the paper under the 



guise of the BowDOiN Orient. The Stran- 
ger's cover differs from that of the Orient 
in that a bird rampant, on a swinging trapeze, 
is substituted for the word " The." We could 
not at first understand the significance of this 
change, but soon discovered that the bird was 
a parrot, the imitative nature of which is 
well known. We feel very much flattered 
that the Orient should be selected as a 
standard of excellence, but would stronglj^ 
advise any other high-school paper just start- 
ing on its career to go farther west for a 
model. The Occident, for instance, has a 
very dazzling cover. 



It is certainly a great blemish in the ap- 
pearance of the intei'ior chapel that four of 
the panels on the south wall are still incom- 
plete. Eight of the twelve panels have been 
filled by different friends of the college, as 
memorials, and by the class of '66. 

It would be a very graceful act if the 
present Senior class would take some steps in 
this direction. The money derived from the 
sale of a class boat, for instance, would form 
the nucleus of a fund which could be increased 
by succeeding classes. In a very few years 
money enough could be raised in this way to 
warrant the engagement of a first-class artist. 
Deformed angels should be guarded against 
in the future. 



The inhabitants of South Appleton have 
inaugurated a raid on the white waslied fence 
in the rear of the buildings which we should 
like to see continued by Mr. Booker and his 
minions all along the line. The fence is 
really an obstruction, and the appearance of 
the grounds would be greatly improved by 
its removal. It seems to be of no use other 
than to keep Mr. Booker's cows within 
bounds. Old farm-houses, with fine large 
fields around them, are often seen hedged in 
by ridiculous little white fences. This is a 
poor example to follow. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



35 



Base-ball, boating and tennis this year, 
as usual, have so absorbed the attention of 
the college that general athletics have been 
neglected. A few stragglers have been seen 
making the circuit of the campus at inter- 
vals,but other than this, scarcely any training 
for field day has been thought of. It may 
be argued that as long as no one does any ex- 
tensive training the contestants will stand on 
equal ground ; but lack of interest, and poor 
records, are the inevitable results of such a 
course. There is a good excuse for this 
apathy, in that there has been no opportunity 
for any general winter training in a gymna- 
sium ; but if we show pluck and persever- 
ance in working under a disadvantage, the 
sooner will this disadvantage be removed. 



OF A SATURDAY AFTERNOON. 

Had the weather been propitious you were 
intending to take a tramp over to the feldspar 
quarries, but the black clouds which came up 
at noon-time developed into a heavy shower, 
and the wet has caused you to abandon your 
walk and remain indoors. How still old 
Appleton seems! Is it because the Sopho- 
mores overhead have gone on a drive to 
Harpsweir? The noisy fellows below who 
claim the rights of Junior ease as well as 
yourself, have refrained from banging on 
their ancient piano, and are consoling them- 
selves with whist, while the few Freshmen 
who dwell on the lower floor are conscien- 
tiously plugging out their Latin, not yet hav- 
ing learned the art of being prepared for the 
Monday morning recitation without any pre- 
vious mental exertion. The thought of the 
latter leads you to consider whether it would 
not be well to do something on that double 
theme which is already due, but it seems 
rather too much of a grind. True, you do 
pull out a sheet of paper and a quill pen, and 
get so far as the heading, but the opening 
sentence does not run smoothly. You are 



not much interested in King Charles after all, 
although you have a vague idea that some- 
where you have read something rather fine 
touching his career. You take another sheet 
and write down the familiar quotation : 
" By what law fell King Charles'? 
By all the laws he left us." 
and there you stick! The ashes fall out of 
your pipe ; in fact the latter companion seems 
to have gone out. You re-light it, and mean- 
while the pen has been laid aside and the 
theme is forgotten. 

You stare out of the window across the 
campus and say to yourself that the McKeen 
road is a very romantic spot. Perhaps you re- 
call some moonlight nights when you have 
wandered up there ; and just tlien the sun ap- 
pears for a moment, shedding a tender light 
upon the two cottages which stand at the en- 
trance of the woods. You do not often look 
so far ahead, but these low-studded, rambling 
affairs have set you to thinking, and you can 
almost fancy yourself sitting on that old-fash- 
ioned piazza, your pipe and papers handy, 
and, quite likely, a comely young lady at 
your side. You are not sure about the young 
lady, but the pipe and papers are indispen- 
sable. 

You go on and wonder if you are, or ever 
will be worthy of the love of some fair daugh- 
ter of Eve. Yes, you survey yourself with a 
big interrogation mark, and question whether 
you are such a downright good fellow, — as 
manly and honest as you should be ! You 
acknowledge that the record might be fairer, 
but it is with a slight feeling of pride that 
you confess to being no worse than many 
others, and far better than some. Laziness 
has been one of your besetting sins, and 
when you found any branch of learning at 
all difficult you have been inclined to glide 
over it as easily as possible. You realize that 
the friends you have made have kept you out 
of a deal of trouble, and, as you shift your 
lazy body to the lounge, you silently thank 



36 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



God for the friendships that have come to 
you. A bit of religious feeling comes over 
you. Your early training forbids your not 
believing in Him, and way down in jouv 
heart you resolve to be a better fellovs^ than 
ever before, not only for His sake but on ac- 
count of the dear old boys about you. 

How will it be when you are through 
another year and are ready for a plunge into 
the world ? You remember what sad faces 
some of the Seniors wore the last evening 
they went to chapel. Very likely you will 
be a trifle mournful, for your college life has 
been a sunny existence, and yet you cannot 
but be anxious to join in the fiay outside. 
Yes, your brother who was graduated years ago 
has told you that the clever old parties who 
speak at commencement dinners indulge in a lit- 
tle flight of fancy when they sa}' that the world 
is yearning for you. He has discovered that 
the world does not care a picayune — if any- 
thing, the throng will crowd a fellow out 
unless he hammers his way before him. But 
you are not dismayed ! 

Here a piece of muslin which was torn 
from a young woman's gown at a dance in 
Bath, the week before, attracts your attention. 
YoLi have hung it over the edge of a picture, 
and }'ou smile at this, the latest addition to 
your collection of trophies. 

For some strange reason you are sleepy — ■ 
it may be the result of your society meeting 
the evening previous. You throw your pipe 
on the floor, your eyes shut, and in a trice 
you flee into the land of forgetfulness. 
Later you are awakened by your room-mate 
who informs you that it is supper time. You 
cannot exactly understand how it can be so, 
but the rain is over, the sun is clear in the 
west, and your Saturday afternoon has come 
to an end. E. 



A party of ten students of Lehigh University 
are preparing for a walk through Switzerland next 
summer. 



OLD LAWS. 

It is interesting to look at some of the 
early regulations of the college, and to note 
the changes which have taken place. Some 
of the following laws were in force in 1824. 

The regulations for the attendance at de- 
votional exercises were nearly the same as at 
present, with the exception that attendance 
was required at church as well as chapel on 
Thanksgiving and Fast days. There were, 
hovs'ever, regulations for the observance of 
Saturday evening and Sunday, differing from 
anything we have now, as the following clause 
will show : 

" Whereas, some Christians consider the 
evening of Saturday and others the evening 
of the Loid's Da}' as a part of the Sabbath, 
every student shall, on the evening of Satur- 
day retire to his chamber, and not unnecessa- 
rily leave it, and on both those evenings shall 
abstain from diversions of every kind. It is 
enjoined upon all the students carefully to 
apply themselv-es to the duties of religion on 
the Lord's Day. They who profane the same 
by unnecessary business, visiting, or receiving 
visits, or by walking abroad or by any amuse- 
ment, or in other ways, may be admonished 
or suspended." 

Under "misdemeanors,'' several things, 
which to-day we consider as perfectly proper, 
are put down as criminal offences. 

" No person shall eat or drink in any tav- 
ern, unless in company with his parent or 
guardian, nor attend any theatrical entertain- 
ment, or any idle show in Brunswick or 
Topsham, nor frequent any tavern, nor any 
house or shop after being forbidden by the 
President or other Instructor, nor be guilty 
of disorderly behavior, nor occasion disturb- 
ance to any citizen; nor play cards, billiards, 
or any game of hazard, nor at any game 
whatever for money or other things of value ; 
nor shall bring any spirituous licquors into 
college; nor make any bonfire, nor play off 
fire-works, nor be in any way concerned in 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



37 



the same ; — nor, without permission of the 
Executive Government, engage in any mili- 
tarj^ parade, nor keep a gun or pistol or any 
gunpowder in college, nor discharge a gun or 
pistol near the college, nor go shooting or 
fishing, under penalty of admonition, suspen- 
sion, or rustication." 



THE FIFTY-FIRST ANNUAL CON- 
VENTION OF PSI UPSILON. 

This convention was held May 7th and 
8th with the brothers of the Chi C!hapter, at 
Ithaca, N. Y. 

Delegates from many of the chapters ar- 
rived on the afternoon of the 7th, and when 
the convention was called to order at 11 a.m., 
Wednesday, every chapter was represented. 
A permanent organization was effected and 
business was begun at the afternoon session. 
In the evening came the reception, tendered 
by the Chi Chapter to visiting brethren. 
The gymnasium and armory on the college 
grounds had been beautifully decorated for 
the occasion. Tributes to the " Garnet and 
Gold " were profuse. 

When once the exercises had begun every 
one was active, — if not on the floor in an- 
other direction equally pleasant. No one 
knew tliat time was passing, and it was not 
till the "small hours" that a separation was 
effected, each one to carry with him the mem- 
ory of the most brilliant society affair (as it 
was pronounced by old and young) that 
Itliaca ever saw. 

On Thursday morning the business was 
resumed. At the end of this session an invi- 
tation was extended by the delegate from 
Trinity to hold the next convention with the 
Beta Beta Chapter. 

A prominent feature of Thursday morn- 
ing was the arrival of noted brothers, among 
whom may be mentioned Hon. Sterling G. 
Hadley — one of the founders, — Rev. T. T. 
Hunger, Prof. W. W. Goodwin of Harvard, 



Prof. A. S. Hardy of Dartmouth, Hon. F. 
M. Finch, Chas. Dudley Warner and Judge 
Tourg^e. 

Between the hours of two and four Thurs- 
day afternoon. President White of Cornell, 
a member of the fraternity, tendered a recep- 
tion to the visiting brethren. At 4 P.M., 
came the exercises of laying the corner 
stone of the Chi Chapter House, on the col- 
lege grounds. On account of the rain the 
order was varied somewhat. Still the visitors 
had the pleasure of seeing the commanding 
location of what promises to reflect great 
credit upon the chapter. Prayer was offered 
by Rev. T. T. Munger, after which the 
records were deposited by Hon. S. G. Hadley. 
The exercises were completed in the chapel, 
and consisted of an address by C. D. Warner, 
some remarks by President White. B^rater- 
nity songs were sung as part of the pro- 
gramme. 

Returning to the hotels, ample time was 
given to prepare for the public exercise at the 
Wilgus Opera House, and afterwards for the 
banquet. Headquarters being at the Ithaca 
Hotel, all assembled at 7.45 P.M. to march to 
the opera house in a body. The line was 
headed by delegates from the Theta, — the 
mother chapter. Delegations from other 
chapters followed in order of installation. 
The literary exercises consisted of an ad- 
dress by Professor Goodwin, two poems, — one 
by Professor Hardy, the other by Judge 
Finch, — and songs by the fraternity. The 
essayist, Bro. Goldwin Smith, was obliged to 
be absent. Hon. Sterling G. Hadley acted 
as president. 

At the conclusion all repaired to Library 
Hall where Mr. Teall, the caterer from Roch- 
ester, N. Y., had made an elegant spread. It 
is useless to attempt to enter into details. 
About one hundred and fifty partook of those 
things each and all of which are so necessary 
to the existence of the human race. Judge 
Tourg^e presided. Bro. A. P. Jacobs re- 



38 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



sponded to the last toast about 3 A.M. After 
reaching the hotels many of the brothers par- 
ticipated in a "grand walk-around" at the 
Ithaca, much to the discomfiture of some 
guests who were unacquainted with the en- 
thusiasm of a company of the boys. 

Bros. H. L. Bridgman and Albert l-*. 
Jacobs — the fraternity historian — were pres- 
ent during all the exercises. 

A prominent feature of the convention 
was the marked interest of the members from 
the young chapter, about eighteen being pres- 
ent. Large delegations were present from 
the Pi and Psi Chapters. 

Friday noon saw very few of the dele- 
gates in Ithaca, nearly all having taken the 
early trains for home, carrying with them the 
recollection of the pleasantest relations for 
many a day. S. 



COMMUNICATIONS. 



[We are authorized to print the following, which explains 
itself.] 

Salem, Mass., May 16, 1884. 

Dear Sir, — I have read with interest the 
several articles that have been recently pub- 
lished in our college paper upon the questions, 
whether the government of the college shall 
be continued in two boards or consolidated 
into one ; and whether members of the board 
of overseers shall be elected by the board, as 
now, or by the alumni. It is proposed to 
petition for a modification of the charter of 
the college to accomplish the suggested 
changes. I have a very decided opinion 
upon both questions, and I write you my 
views, with permission for you to make any 
use of them you may deem proper. 

I deem the maintenance of two boards as 
very important. It is in accordance with our 
general system of government. The one 
branch may confront and serve as a most 
salutary check to the action of the other. 
It is a very useful and conservative system, 



and I have in my mind an instance in the 
election of a president of the college when 
the system proved to be a most salutary one. 
Upon the question of the election of over- 
seers I am decidedly of the opinion that the 
present mode is by far the best. The large 
majority of the board is, and for a long time 
has been, composed of the alumni of the col- 
lege. From their knowledge of the require- 
ments of the position from actual experience, 
and their sense of responsibility, they are 
much better qualified to select new members 
than even a very much larger number of the 
alumni who may be present at any commence- 
ment, without experience in the boards, and 
with little opportunity for conference upon 
the subject. Besides, would there not be 
danger of combinations for the selection of 
candidates for membership ? 

It is said further that a system might be 
adopted similar to that which exists at Har- 
vard which would permit the alumni to vote 
without being present at commencement. It 
is very doubtful to what extent such permis- 
sion would be exercised, and the different 
circumstances of Harvard are such that the 
results of experience there would give no 
little aid upon the question, if, indeed, it can 
be shown that it is the best jalan for Harvard. 

One writer upon the subject says, " One 
board of only ten men made Yale what she 
is to-day." It is just as easy to say, and 
fully as easy to prove that the success of 
Bowdoin in the past has been the result of 
the system there, as it is that the success of 
Yale has depended upon a different system. 
Yours very truly, 

William D. Noethend. 



[We have received permission to print the following extracts 
from a letter received by us some time since, called forth by Dr. 
Gerrish's article, "The Alumni and the Overseers," which ap- 
peared in a late issue of the Orient.] 

Some fifteen or more years ago I 

was very much possessed with the idea that 
there was too much machinery in the provis- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



39 



ion of trustees and overseers with the mutual 
checks, each on the other, and entered upon 
a correspondence with members of the Fac- 
ulty and other active friends of the college, 
with an idea that a reform could be brought 
about. This was carried far enough to fully 
disclose the many difficulties in the way and 
then, by degrees, all my ardor disappeared. 

But since all that, my views have under- 
gone quite a change. I am by no means sure 
that it would be wise, for the sake of a sup- 
posed good, to undo the legislation and the 
record of the past. It might not be difficult 
to change the legislation, but how would all 
that aff'eet the legacies, the bequests, the 
gifts, etc.? In getting one rock of offence 
out of the way would we not pull down a 
vast amount of superstructure, and in the end 
cause a great deal of harm? I very much 
fear that it would possibly so result. 

Whatever we might do now if we had a 
clear field before us, is not at all of conse- 
quence in this discussion. The sole point is 
whether or no, under present circumstances, 
and w"ith all the besetments and hindrances it 
is worth the while to make a revolution. I 
must say that my views, or rather my impres- 
sions are that the movement would result in 
more harm than good. 

Nor do I think it at all necessary that our 
college should be put under the control of its 
graduates, either for best management or to 
secure loyalty to the Alma Mater. I do 
recognize the wisdom of having a larger part 
of its governing boards composed of its grad- 
uates, and of having some portion of these 
bodies elected by or in accordance with the 
wishes of the alumni. But here I would stop. 
Nor must it be lost sight of in the discus- 
sion that the college was founded with the 
intent that its teachings should have, in a 
large degree, a religious tendency. The col- 
lege motto proclaims this, '■'■Pro Christo et 
ecclesia." Hence those who have a deep con- 
cern that the good old ways should not pass 



into neglect, would assuredly question 
whether or no such a radical change as is 
suggested would not tend to put the college 
even further away from the religious idea 
than it is now I have writ- 
ten you so at length because I am amazing 
glad to find one topic that will fire the Bow. 
doin heart, and to thank you most heartily on 
the discovery, not forgetting in my thanks 
our valued friend, Dr. Gerrish, for his serv- 
ices as an able pioneer. 

Very truly yours, 

L. Deanb, '49. 



BASE-BALL. 



BOWDOIN VS. DIRIGO. 
The second game with the Dirigos oc- 
curred on the Delta, Thursday, May 15th, 
and with the exception of the first two in- 
nings was exciting and well played. The 
game opened with Bowdoin at the bat. In 
the first inning neither side scored, though 
men were left on bases. In the second, Bow- 
doin quickly retired, two men striking out. 
In this inning the Dirigos practically won the 
game, four singles, assisted by two wild 
throws, two passed balls, a fumble, and a 
wild pitch yielding them eight runs. Before 
the inning was finished Wright, on account 
of a lame arm, gave way to Cook who pitched 
magnificently during the remainder of the 
game. After this disastrous inning the boys 
braced up and played a sharp game, the 
Dirigos getting but one more run, in the 
seventh inning. The third was to Bowdoin 
what the second had been to the Dirigos, 
only in a less degree. Singles by Torrey and 
Moulton, assisted by a wild throw, a fumble, 
and a muffed fly bringing in five runs for our 
boys. In the fifth, Talbot struck safely, was 
carried to second by Torrey's single, and 
scored, as did also Torrey, on Cook's beauti- 
ful drive between left and centre field for two 



40 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



bases. Dearth followed with a single, but in 
the meanwhile Cook had been caught nap- 
ping at second. Wright and Waterman both 
ilied out, leaving Dearth at second. At the 
close of this inning the score stood 8 to 7 in 
favor of the Dirigos and excitement ran high. 
Bovvdoin, howevei', failed to score again, 
going out in one, two, three order in the sixth 
and ninth. Torrey being left at third in tlie 
seventh, and Pushor at second in the eighth. 
Barton made a brilliant running catch of 
a fly near the foul line in the seventh inning. 
Cook's pitching was excellent, and Moulton 
played a strong game behind the bat after the 
second inning. The battery of the visitors 
did some fine work though Donovan was not 
very successful in his throws to second. Be- 
low is the score : 

BOWDOIN. 
A.B. K. 1b. t.e. P.O. A. E. 
Barton, 1. f., ... 3 1 1 1 

Talbot, r. f 5 1 1 1 1 

Torrey, 2b., ... 5 2 3 3 1 1 1 

Cook, 3b. & p., . . 5 1 1 2 4 7 1 

Dearth, e.t.,...i 1 1 1 

"Wright, p. &S.S., .4100 
Waterman, S.S.& 3b., 4 Oil 

Pushor, lb 4 1 1 9 1 

Moulton, c. & 3b., .4022320 









5 


2 





3 



Totals, . . 38 7 10 11 24 15 9 
DIRIGOS. 

A.B. E. lE. T.E. P.O. A. K. 

Barnes, 3b 5 1 1 1 1 1 

Riley, p., .... 5 1 10 

Dooley, 2b., ... 5 1 4 1 

Donovan, c., '. . 5 2 1 1 9 3 

Corridon, lb., . . 4 1 1 8 

Griffin, 1. f., ... 3 1 1 1 1 

Morway, r. f., . . 3 1 1 1 

McGlinchy, c. f., . 4 1 1 

Bradley, s.s., . . 4 1 1 1 3 2 2 



Totals, ... 38 9 6 6 27 IG 3 

Wild pitches— Cook 1, Riley 3. Bases on balls— Cook 
2, Riley 2. Balls called— on Cook 64, on Riley 06. Strikes 
called— off Cook 20, off Riley 25. Struck out— Cook 3, 
Riley 8. Passed balls— Moulton 5, Donovan 1. Two-base 
hit— Cook. Earnedruns— Bowdoin 2, Dirigos2. Umpire — 
Barrett Potter. Time of game— 1 hour 53 minutes. 



BOWDOIN VS. COLBY. 
The first game of the championship series 
with Colby, postponed from the preceding 



Saturday on account of rain, was played on 
the Delta, May 17th. The game had been 
anticipated with much interest, as Colby was 
reported to have a strong team and as our 
own nine were confident of success. 

The game commenced promptly at the 
appointed time, with Bowdoin at the bat. 
The first three men retired without reaching 
first base. The Colbys began the game in a 
business-like manner by getting in three runs. 
Doe led with a single ; Mathews followed 
with a swift grounder which passed through 
short-stop, letting in Doe and sending 
Matliews to second. Emerson's safe hit ad- 
vanced Mathews to third and the latter 
scored on H. L. Putnam's single, Emerson 
reaching third. Putnam then went down to 
second, and a passed ball allowed Emerson to 
score and gave Putnam third. Whitten's 
third strike was not held and Putnam scored 
on catcher's throw to put out Whitten at 
first-base. T. P. Putnam struck a hot liner 
toward left field, apparently a safe hit, bat 
Wright captured the ball in fine style with 
his left hand while on the run. The inning 
closed with Larrabee's fly to second. 

In tlie second inning for Bowdoin, Cook 
was given his bases on balls, stole second, 
took third on a passed ball, and scored on 
Dearth's sacrifice hit to second. Wright 
reached first on balls and stole second. Wa- 
terman flied out to center. Pushor struck to 
short, who sent the ball through first, letting 
in Wright. Moulton was fielded out by 
pitcher to first. Colby made no runs in this 
inning. 

Neither side scored in the third inning. 

In the fourth, singles by Dearth, Wright, 
and Waterman, each of whom stole second, 
a passed ball, and a safe hit by Moulton 
yielded Bowdoin three runs, two of them 
earned. For Colby, Whitten reached first on 
an error of short, was sent to second by T. 
P. Putnam's safe hit, took third on another 
error of short, and scored on a passed ball. 
This made the score a tie, 5 to 5. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



41 



III the fifth neither side scored, Bowdoin 
striking out. 

In the sixth, Wright readied first on a 
wild throw, stole second, went to third on a 
fly to center, and came home on a passed 
ball. For Colby, Larrabee made a score on 
two wild pitches and a passed ball, and the 
score was again a tie, 6 to 6. After this in- 
ning Bowdoin succumbed to Doe's swift pitch- 
ing and succeeded in making no more runs, 
but two men reaching first base. 

In the seventh, singles by Emerson, H. 
L. Putnam, Whitten and T. P. Putnam, as- 
sisted by sacrifice hits of Larrabee and Good- 
win, gave the Colbys three earned runs. 
The score now stood 9 to 6 in favor of Colby, 
and so remained to the close of the game. 

H. L. Putnam did some fine work at 
center field, accepting every one of his five 
chances. Doe and Goodwin played well to- 
gether. The fielding of Torrey, Cook, and 
Waterman is worthy of mention. The bat- 
ting was Vi'eak on both sides. Below is the 
score : 

BOWDOIN. 

A.E. R. lE. T.B. P.O. A. E. 



Barton, 1. f., . . 


5 





1 


1 


1 








Talbot, r.f., . . 


5 




















Torrey, 2b., . . 


5 





1 


1 


6 


4 





Cook, p., . . . 


4 


1 








2 


8 


1 


Dearth, o. f., 


4 


1 


1 


1 











"Wright, 3b., . . 


2 


3 


1 


1 


1. 


1 


4 


"Waterman, s.s., 


4 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 





Pusher, lb., . . 


4 











8 





1 


Moulton, c, . . 


4 





2 


2 


4 


1 


3 


Totals, 


3T 


6 


7 


7 


24 


16 


9 






COLBY. 












A.E 


R. 


lE. 


T.B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Doe, p., ... 


5 


1 


1 


1 





13 


1 


Mathews, 2b., 


5 


1 








1 


2 





Emerson, lb., . 


5 


2 


2 


2 


13 





1 


H. L. Putnam, c. f. 


5 


2 


2 


2 


5 








Whitten, 1. f., . 


4 


2 


1 


1 


1 








T.P.Putnam, r.f.. 


4 





2 


2 


1 








Larrabee, s.s., . 


4 


1 











1 


2 


Goodwin, c, . . 


4 











4 


4 





Boyd, 3b., . . . 


4 











2 









Totals, 



40 



27 



20 



"Wild pitches — Cook 2. Bases on balls — Doe 3. Balls 
called— on Cook 41, on Doe 97. Strikes called— off Cook (5, 
off Doe 20. Struck out^Cook 5, Doe 7. Passed balls— 
Moulton 3, Goodwin 5. Earned runs— Colby 3, Bowdoin 2. 
Umpire- Barrett Potter. Time of game — 1 hour 35 
minutes. 



BOWDOIN VS. LEWISTON. 

The game with the Lewistons on Satur- 
day, for the first four innings promised to be 
very close, the score at the end of that time 
standing 3 to 2 in favor of Bowdoin. In the 
fifth, the Lewistons substituted Mann for 
Lord in the pitcher's position and tiiereby 
lost chances of winning the game. In this 
inning, five bases on balls, six wild pitches 
and two base hits enabled Bowdoin to score 
six runs. Three of the Lewistons' four runs 
were made by Wilbur, whose playing was in 
all respects excellent. Wright and Water- 
man formed Bowdoin's battery and played a 
very good game. Lord's pitching was effec- 
tive and Bates' catching was fine. Below is 
the score : 

BOWDOIN. 

A.E. B. iB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Barton, 1. f., ... 3 2 1 1 2 

Talbot, r. f., . . . 4 1 1 1 

Torrey, 2b 3 1 1 1 3 1 

Cook, 3b 4 1 1 3 2 

Dearth, c. f., . . 4 2 3 3 

Wright, p., ... 3 1 2 10 1 

Waterman, c, . . 3 2 6 5 1 

Pushor, lb., ... 4 1 1 11 

Davis, S.S., ... 4 2 

Totals, . . 32 9 8 8 27 20 2 

LEWISTONS. 

A.B. R. lE. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Wilson, 2b., ... 4 2 1 

Nickerson, s.s. &c.f., 4 12 10 

Mann,s.s.,p.,&c.f., 4 10 

Wilbur, lb 4 3 2 2 5 

Coyne, 1. f., ... 4 1 3 3 

Scannell, 3b., . . 3 1 1 3 1 2 

Bates, c, .... 4 1 1 12 2 

Lord, p., .... 4 10 1 

Wright, r. f., . . 3 1 1 

Totals, . . 34 4 9 10 24 14 3 

Wild pitches — "Wright 1, Mann 6. Base on balls — 
Bowdoin 5, Lewistons 1. Balls called — on Wright 51, on 
Lord and Mann 80. Strikes called — off Wright 15, off 
Lord and Mann 11. Struclv out — Bowdoin 8, Lewistons 
6. Two-base hit — Nickerson. Passed balls — "Waterman 
3. Earned runs — Bowdoin 0, Lewistons 0. Umpire — 
Barrett Potter. Time of game — 2 hours. 



*,i,*Colby seems to be trying to act the part of 
the Biblical character, wlio was accustomed to say 
unto one, " go," aud to auother " come," and have 
his wishes obeyed iti botli instances. Far other- 
wise in these degenerate times. The pompous — 

" Come or be " which came thundering down 

from Waterville, the other day, was calculated to 
excite the risibles of the most seriously inclined. 



42 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEGII TABULA. 



The eecoed of two weeks. During the last 
two weeks, attention has chiefly centered in the 
efforts of the ball team to win a victory — efforts 
which up to the present writing, have unfortu- 
nately proved in vain. The return game with the 
Dirigos of Portland, occurred Saturday, and on 
Wednesday the first game of the championship 
series was played with Colby. A full account of 
these games will be found in another column. 
Whittier has been obliged to give up practice in the 
university crew for two weeks, on account of a 
lame wrist. Norris is pulhng in his place mean- 
while. The appointments for Junior and Sophomore 
prize declamations have been made and will be 
found elsewhere. Butler, '85, has left college to 
teach the High School in Waldoboro. Knight, 
'84, is also teaching in Topsham. During the 
games with the Dirigos, Berry, '86, attempted to 
catch a foul ball, which passed near the grand- 
stand, and had one of his fingers split open. The 
grand-stand, by the way, is well patronized, and 
brings quite a revenue to the base-ball treasury. 
Charging an admission to the grounds has the 
effect of keeping the Delta clear, but the major 
part of the audience are content to lean on the 
fence and get up a reputation for economy. A new 
tennis court is being laid out, and the game is as 
well patronized as ever. Burpee, '87, has received 
a new bicycle ; the 'cyclers should get into line for 
a race before the close of the term. 

*a,*The professor of Molecular Science has been 
re-arranging the molecules about his residence on 
Main Street, having due regard in their disposal to 
the workings of Ohm's law and the Parallelogram 
of Forces. 

*3.*In an oration recently delivered by Judge 
Symonds, on Hawthorne, appears an account of 
the fining of that gentleman when in college, for 
indulging in a game of chance with cards. A fine 
of twenty cents was placed upon his term bill and 
sent to his parents. The value of the stakes in 
this game was fifty cents, as given in to the presi- 
dent by Hawthorne. He wrote his mother that in 
reality it represented a quart of wine, but that he 
did not tell the president so, for fear he would 
double the fine ! This incident clearly shows that 
the Institution has always watched carefully over 
the morals of the students. 

*,,*The following Juniors liave been selected by 
the class to participate in the prize declamations at 
the end of the term : Frank W. Alexander, Rich- 



mond; Boyd Bartlett, Ellsworth; W. E. Butler, 
Lawrence, Mass.; Frank W. Davis, Hiram ; Webb 
Donnell, Sheepscot ; W. M. Fames, Bath; L. B. 
Folsom, Bethel ; E. E. Harding, Hampden ; John 
F. Libby, Richmond; James S. Norton, Augusta; 
John A. Peters, Ellsworth; Eugene Thomas, 
Topsham. 

*.;f*A guileless Freshman came in to make the 
" Tabula" scribe a call a few days since, and being 
a youth of a studious turn of mind, he brought his 
book along to grind on while toasting his feet at 
our fire. The book possessing a very ancient and 
care-worn appearance, curiosity led us to investi- 
gate its contents, which brought to light the fact 
that it was a " hoss," which, although old, neverthe- 
less had not outlived the usefulness usually as- 
cribed to such an animal. It bore upon its title- 
ptage the names of previous riders — a long list of 
illustrious men, who, finding the road to learning 
long and weary, had found ease and pleasure 
astride this noble beast. Among the names thus 
recorded, we were electrified to find that of our 
present tutor in Rhetoric, who is so well known to 
us all as authority on Correct Deportment. Truly 
a horse is a vain thing for safety. 

*,*The following Sophomores have been se- 
lected to speak at the end of the present term : 
A. E. Butler, H. R. Fling, J. W. Horn, W. W. Kil- 
gore, G. M. Norris, J. C. Parker, E. E. Rideout, F. 
L. Smith, W. H. Stackpole, H. L. Taylor, L. Tur- 
ner, Jr., W. V. Wentworth. 

*.:t*Tbe Longfellow memorial committee are to 
send a copy of the bust of Longfellow, recently 
placed in Westminster Abbey, to Bowdoin, and 
also to Harvard, where Longfellow was for some 
time Professor of Modern Languages. Ours will 
probably be placed in the north wing of the chapel, 
the present asylum for the lame, halt and blind 
deities of past ages. 

*^*Tfithas been found absolutely necessary to 
curb the exuberant spirits of the undergraduate, by 
the administration of a mild sedative every Sunday 
afternoon — if it is necessary, theu we would re- 
spectfully suggest that Sunday afternoon prayers 
be laid away on the shelf, and some sort of an in- 
quisition other than a religious observance be 
brought out and fired at a long-suffering commu- 
nity; really it isn't the correct thing to "steal 
the livery of Heaven " and make it do police duty. 
For it is very generally understood that this exer- 
cise is maintained for the purpose of keeping the 
students within a gunshot of the campus all day 
Sunday— a sort of apron-string idea that doesn't fit 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



43 



iu well to this enlightened age. It would naturally 
occur to a man, not versed in the infallibility of col- 
lege rules, that a student has about fiilfllled his 
moral obligations when he has cut short his morn- 
ings rest in order to attend the first installment of 
prayers for the day, and thereafter wended his way 
to a sermon, which is good for three bases every 
time, if not a clean home run. As matters now 
stand, there is no let up from one week's end to 
another. There is no idea of rest associated with 
the Sabbath, if we are to be kept on the run from 
morning till night, after some required religious ob- 
servance. A person cannot even take a nap in 
the afternoon without running the risk of missing 
this means of gr— grace, and the day which ought 
to be the most beautiful of the seven, is now cut up 
into a nine hundred and ninety-nine patchwork 
affair, and made to some of us the most disagreea- 
ble and irksome of all, simply that a few antiquated, 
cast-iron ideas may be kept above ground. Let us 
have piece — just a little piece of Sunday that we 
can call our own. 

*.^*Now prepare in your peregrinations to come 
suddenly upon the prize-declamation man, as he 
stands upon some rock and splits a hole through 
space, from the loud-roaring cavern of his mouth, 
while with his arms he cuts circles through the 
astonished air. This fiend is likely to be heard 
from now on, and when you meet with this species 
do not chide him, but drop a tear for his room- 
mate, and pass on. 

*i,*Two Freshmen were overheard in the read- 
ing-room, discussing the 9 to Colbyforfeitnonsense. 
No. 1 inquired of No. 2 why it was stated as 9 to 0, 
when no game had been played. No. 2 looked 
profound, and replied that it was because Colby 
almost always made nine runs in a game, so it was 
put in the Press in that way, on the supposition 
that she would have made nine runs in this game 
if it had been played. 

The announcement of the exercises to be held 
on Field Day has made its appearance. It is hoped 
that many entries will be made in the contest. 

*»*The librarian was observed the other day 
deeply engaged with a volume of Mother Goose. 
He was evidently looking up stories with which to 
regale his class in Freshman Latin. Lacteal fluid 
for the enfants terribles. 

*»*There have been forty-nine distinct smells 
and three able-bodied odors following in the wake 
of Mr. Wm. Condon's ambulance, as it distributed 
nourishment to the hedges and trees on the campus, 
during the past week. A little well-directed effort 



in covering up the departed would keep it from 
" smelling to Heaven," as it has lately. 

*t*The Senior beginneth now to lay wires to 
entrap the public, and drearaeth of the mighty 
swath he will cut, when lie shall sail out upon an 
unsuspecting world, while he writeth his com- 
mencement oration on the " Duty of the American 
Scholar ", or " The Scholar in Politics ", " The Mar- 
ble Stands Waiting", or some other fresh topic; 
and the Junior begins with an eye of faith to be- 
hold the time when he shall take hold and help the 
Faculty run the machine. The Sophomore has 
visions of Physics close ahead, to bring comfort to 
his soul, and the Freshman rejoiceth because he 
will soon lay aside short dresses and put on pants. 
Yea, he panteth to cast off his swaddling clothes. 

*j,*The following is the name, age, weight, 
height and chest measure of the crews now on the 
water : 

UNIVERSITY CREW. 

age. wt. ht. chest ma. 

Sweetser, '84, bow, 23 168 5.10 36 in. 

Whittier, '85, 2(1 22 170 6 38 

Brown, '84, 3d 22 177 5.10 38 

Adams, '84, captain and stroke 30 158 6.10 36 

JUNIOR CLASS CREW. 

age. wt. ht. chest ms. 

F. W. Da-Pis, bow 24 155 5.8 37 in. 

J.C.Hall,2d 25 165 5.7 371-2 

F. I. Brown, 3d, captain 23 178 6 38 

F. \V. Alexander, stroke 24 158 5.8 38 

C. H. Wardwell, coxswain. 

FRESHMAN CLASS CREW. 

age. wt. chest ms. 

A. W. Merrill, bow 21 143 34 in. 

0. F. Moulton, 2d 18 187 38 

M. H. Boutelle, 3d, captain 17 183 37 

L. B. Varney, stroke 19 172 36 

J. V. Lane, coxswain. 

The crews are doing well, notwithstanding some 
serious difficulties in the way of proficiency. The 
university crew is pulling in fine form, and has 
much to encourage it in the hope of obtaining 
a good position at Saratoga. 

*,*A lawn-tennis tournament will take place 
Ivy Day, and several contests with Colby may be 
looked for before the term ends. 

*,*Things one would rather have left unsaid : 
(Miss B., the most charming of young ladies, who 
is receiving a call from Mr. A., a modest college 
youth, is describing her sensations upon ascending 
the stage, for the first time, in some kind of a 
church tableau affair.) Miss B. — " The queerest 
thing was, I didn't feel at all bashful." Mr. A. — 
"Really; I should have thought the contrary." 
Miss B. — " No, I didn't feel as if any one was look- 
ing at me." Mr. A. (very gallantly, meaning to 



44 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



say that none could look elsewhere)—" 0, but they 
were you know, they didn't have anywhere else to 
look." (Miss B. looks icicles, and poor A. goes into 
his boots.) 

*s*'It has been handed down to us in ancient 
lore, that Bowdoin once had a large reputation for 
hazing, and it is pretty generally admitted that 
this is a kind of "lower" that hasn't helped her 
any in the past. We take this occasion, however, 
to inform timid parients that their tender offspring 
need have no fears, — all clouds and hazes have 
given way here to fair weather. We hear encour- 
aging reports in regard to the incoming class, both 
as to size and calibre. It will be gratifying, surely, 
if we can see a large class followed by one of like 
dimensions, and not a relapse, as usually happens 
after one of considerable size has entered. 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited to send 
personal items to the BOWDOIN Okient, Brunswick, Me.] 

We have received the following concerning the 
class of '77, from Chapman, the class secretary. 
Will other class secretaries please follow suit. 

W. G. Beale, lawyer, 38 Honore Buildings, 
Chicago, 111. 

E. H. Blake, lawyer, Bangor, Maine. 

0. Brinkerhoff, teaching, Atlanta, Logan County, 
111. 

P. Gr. Brown, banker, firm of J. B. Brown & 
Sons, Portland, Maine. 

C. E. Cobb, firm of J. P. Cobb & Co., shoe 
manufacturers. Auburn, Maine. 

W. T. Cobb, firm of Cobb, Wight & Co., whole- 
sale and retail grocers, Rockland, Maine. 

E. M. Cousins, pastor of Congregational Church, 
Cumberland Mills, Maine; married, Sept. 26, 1883, 
Miss Ella M. Burnham, Machias, Maine. 

F. H. Crocker, physician, Boothbay, Maine; 
married, June 6, 1883. 

F. H. Dillingham, physician, 118 East 17th 
Street, New York City. 

E. E. Dunbar, editor Herald and Becord, Dam- 
ariscotta, Maine. 

C. T. Evans, insurance agent, 331-333 Walnut 
Street, Philadelphia, Penn. 

D. B. Fuller, lawyer, firm of Clogston & Fuller, 
Eureka, Kansas. 

D. D. Gilman, with Cabot Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Brunswick, Maine. 

W. A. Golden, lawyer, Portland, Maine. 



J. K. Greene, lawyer, 10 Pearl Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass. 

W. C. Greene, lawyer. Sag Harbor, N. Y. 

F. H. Hargraves, with Saco River Woolen Co., 
West Buxton, Maine. 

G. A. Holbrook, rector of St. Paul's Church, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

P. H. Ingalls, physician, 109 Elm Street, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

C. E. Knight, lawyer, Wiscasset, Maine. 

G. T. Little, College Professor of Latin, Bow- 
doin College, Brunswick, Maine. 

0. M. Lord, principal Butler Grammar School, 
Portland, Maine. 

G. H. Marquis, lawyer, Portland, Maine. 

S. A. Melcher, principal of high school, Whit- 
iosville, Mass.; married, April 3, 1884, Miss Julia 
Harwood of Oxford, Mass. 

F. A. Mitchell, druggist, Bellows Falls, Vt. 

C. W. Morrill, lawyer, 199 Middle Street, Port- 
land, Maine. 

C. W. Morse, firm of C. W. Morse & Co., ship- 
ping, 116 Wall Street, New York City; married, 
April 4, 1884, Miss Hattie Bishop Hussey of Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

L. H. Moulton, principal Lee Normal Academy, 
Lee, Maine. 

C. L. Nickerson, superintendent of schools and 
principal of high school. Garden City, Minn. 

P. M. Palmer, with M. G. Palmer, boots and 
shoes, 230 Middle Street, Portland, Maine. 

R. E. Peary, engineer U. S. N. ; in charge of 
improvements at U. S. Navy Training Station, 
Newport, R. I. 

C. A. Perry, studying art, Paris, France. 

W. Perry, lawyer, firm of Perry & White, 94 
Washington Street, Salem, Mass. 

S. R. B. Piugree, firm of R. C. Pingreo & Co., 
manufacturers of lumber, Lewiston, Maine. 

E. C. Pratt, physician, GH Greene Avenue, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

L. H. Reed, general business, Mexico, Maine. 

J. A. Roberts, lawyer, Norway, Maine. 

W. H. Sanborn, principal Judson Institute, 
Marion, Alabama. 

E. A. Scribner, with American Fuel and Light 
Co., 139 Broadway, New York City. 

C. B. Seabury, principal of high school, Gardi- 
ner, Maine. 

J. W. Sewall, sanitary engineer, Oldtown, 
Maine; married, March, 1883, Miss Harriet Sterling 
Moor of Waterville, Maine. 

A. M. Sherman, assistant minister of St. Bar- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



45 



tliolomew's Church, Madison Avenue and 44th 
Street, New York City ; residence 1427 Park 
Avenue. 

H. H. Smitb, physician, Machias, Maine. 

A. Somes, principal Franklin High School, 
Salmon Falls, N. H. 

H. V. Stackpole, boot and shoe dealer, Bruns- 
wick, Maine. 

L. A. Stanwood, lawyer, firm of Huckleberry & 
Stanwood, Van Buren, Ark. 

W. Stephenson, surgeon U. S. army ; stationed 
at Fort Omaha, Nebraska. 

G. L. Thompson, dry goods dealer, Brunswick, 
Maine. 

G. W. Tillson, firm of Rosewater & Tillsou, 
civil and sanitary engineers, 23 Creightou Block, 
Omaha, Nebraska. 

H. D. Wiggin, farmer, Winthrop, Maine. 

'25. — The memorial committee has ordered 
copies of the bust of Longfellow, lately placed in 
Westminster Abbey, to be sent to Harvard and 
Bowdoin. It is expected soou. 

'32.— Nahum Wight, a graduate of the Medical 
School, died at Gilmanton, N. H., May 14th. He 
has practiced in that place for fifty-two years, and 
veas for some years President of the New Hamp- 
shire Medical Society. 

'34. — In the Christian Mirror of May 3d is an 
article by Rev. Cyrus Hamlin, D.D., upon the dis- 
coverer of the tract, " The Teaching of the Twelve 
Apostles." He then goes on to describe the tract 
at length. In the same paper of May 10th, is an 
article entitled " Dr. Smith's System of Christian 
Theology." After speaking briefly of- this work, 
he mentioned the work, entitled "The Philosophi- 
cal basis of Theism," by Dr. Harris. He then 
compares the two men thus: "Bowdoin College 
has reason to be proud of the work of these two, 
Harris and Smith, her most distinguished sons of 
'33 and '34. It is difficult to say which of these 
works is of the greater value. The men and their 
works are so unlike that any comparison is difiScult. 
Harris is calm, steady, clear and logical. He pur- 
sues his line of thought with strong and even 
step. He gathers felicitous illustrations by the 
way, and lays under contribution all stores of 
knowledge. Smith is keenly analytical. He de- 
tects the leading principles involved in the systems 
of theology and philosophy, which the subject in 
hand leads him to consider. Ho states those prin- 
ciples with admirable clearness and compactness. 
His fairness and candor are equally conspicuous. 



His work will have a permanent value, and to 
many theologians will be a reference book, on ac- 
count of this wonderful faculty of analysis and 
condensation." 

'41.— A. W. Knight, M.D., '48, has lately been 
chosen secretary of the Florida Medical Association. 
His address is Jacksonville, Fla. Dr. Knight is 
also health officer of the city, and secretary of the 
board of health for city and county. 

'41 . — Hon. Frederic Robie has been re-nomiuated 
as Republican candidate for Governor of Maine. 

'46.— J. A. Waterman has lately returned from 
an enjoyable trip to Florida. 

'50. — In the Christian Mirror of May 3d, was a 
poem by T. S. Perry of Cumberland. 

'o.'j.— Dr. S. C. Gordon, a graduate of the med- 
ical school, attended the late National Medical Con- 
vention at Chicago. Dr. Gordon sails for Europe, 
July 20th, to attend the Medical Convention at 
Glasgow. 

'60. — A. W. Bradbury was chairman of the 
Democratic Convention in the First Maine District. 

'60.— C. E. Morrill, who has been engaged in 
the tanning business at Deering, is reported failed. 

'70.— The following is copied from the Buffalo 
Medical and Surgical Journal: " We take the 
most sincere pleasure in noticing the appointment 
as Lecturer on Obstetrics in the spring course of 
the Medical Department of the University of Buf- 
falo, of Dr. Joseph W. Keene of this city. Long 
and intimate acquaintance has taught us to look 
upon him as the peer of any of his medical brethren 
in the city, and all that goes to make a man and a 
phj'sician. In his appointment, the college has 
shown its appreciation of his sterling qualities, and 
is to be congratulated in at least equal measure 
with the newly appointed lecturer." 

'72.— Mr. R. H. Tucker, who received a degree 
here, has been appointed to a position in the na- 
tional observatory at Cordova, Argentine Confeder- 
tion, and sailed for that city May 17th. 

'80.— Perkins has located at Cornish, and is 
practicing law. 

'80.— H. W. Grindal was married, April I7th, to 
Miss S. M. Ten Broeck, at Brooklyn, N. T. 

'81.— A. C. Cobb, lately admitted to the Cum- 
berland County Bar, left for Minnesota, May 17th, 
where he will settle and practice his profession. 
The following concerning him is copied from the 
Argus: "The popularity which Mr. Cobb gained 
in college has been kept by him in the wider rela- 



46 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



tions of more active life, and hosts of friends in 
this city will learn of his departure with regret. 
He talses with him letters of recommendation, of 
the highest kind, from some of the best lawyers in 
this city and State." 



GENERAL COLLEGE NOTES. 



The Harvard Crimson condemns the adoption in 
the class races of the quick stroke employed by 
the Seniors in the last race, on the ground that the 
class crews are simply a preparatory school for 
training university oarsmen, and so the stroke of 
the class crews should conform to that of the uni- 
versity crew. 

A chapter of Phi Delta Theta has recently been 
established at Colby. 

The work of Professor Young of Princeton on 
the sun has been translated into four European 
languages — French, German. Russian and Italian. 
In England 8,000 copies of it have been sold. — 
Crimson. 

There are thirty-two general, sixteen local and 
seventeen lady fraternities in the United States, 
distributed over one hundred and seventy-five in- 
stitutions. — Syracusan. 

The struggle for the intercollegiate base-ball 
championship promises to be unusually interesting 
this year. Harvard is doing finely, having won 
four games and lost but one; while Princeton is un- 
fortunate, having scored but one victory to four de- 
feats. Harvard students celebrated the victory 
over Yale on the 17th with extraordinary demon- 
strations. 

There are but three persons in the United States 
who have received the three degrees of Doctor of 
Divinity, Doctor of Laws and Doctor of Literature. 
These are Prof Wilson of Cornell, President Bar- 
nard of Columbia, and President McCosh of Prince- 
ton. — Tech. 

As a reward for their victory over the Yale 
Freshmen, the '87 men at Brown will be allowed to 
carry canes during the rest of the year. — (7/-h»so». 

It is now finally decided that Wesleyan will not 
send a crew to Saratoga next Fourth of July ; so 
that the colleges which will be represented in the 
race are, Cornell, University of Pennsylvania, 
Princeton and Bowdoin. 

A new project at Harvard is the purchase by 



subscription of a large pitcher, to be awarded each 
year to tbe class which has during that year won 
the greatest number of races on the Charles. It is 
proi^osed to have the pitcher large enough to hold 
the record for a hundred years. The object of this 
scheme is to afford the benefits of rowing to a 
greater number of students. Nest year there will 
be established at the University of Pennsylvania 
the rule that all men who have rowed in class or 
college races before, will be excluded from the class 
races. 

Amherst students are marked on gymnasium 
practice, as on any recitation. President Seely 
says of compulsory exercise in the gymnasium : 
"By close statistics, carefully kept for twenty 
years, it appears that the health of an Amherst 
College student is likely to grow better in each 
year of his college course. The average health of 
the Sophomore class is better than that of the 
Freshman, and of the Junior better than that of 
the Sophomore, and of the Senior best of all. This 
average is shown to come from an improvement in 
the physical condition of the individual student, 
and not from a dropping out of the course of those 
who might be too weak to complete it." 

After much opposition on the part of both the 
professors and students of the Canadian universi- 
ties, the Ontario Legislature has decided that 
women shall be admitted as students in the Toronto 
Provincial University, which is the leading seat of 
learning in Canada, and it is looked upon as a cer- 
tainty that most; of tbe universities in the other 
provinces will follow the example. 

A number of Yale students are talking up a 
tour on foot through France, the coming vacation. 

Crushed strawberry color is not now considered 
the correct thing. The newest color in fashion is, 
" the inside of a mule's ear by starlight." The out- 
side of a mule's heel will furnish the starlight at 
short range when the sky is cloudy. — Ex. 



CIxIFPIHGS. 



Sing-Sing overseer's exhortation to his charges — 
" Break, break, break on thy cold, gray stones." — 
Record. 

Professional Trainer (endeavoring to prove that 
a quick stroke is superior to a slow) — " If you pull 
forty-five strokes to the minute, you have to work 
harder than when you pull thirty-six." Capt. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



47 



Crew — " 'm." P. T. — " Well, the harder you work 
the faster the boat will go; therefore a quick stroke 
is better than a slow one." (C. C. is convinced.) 

Instructor — " What is the meaning of the ex- 
pression, 'go to"?" Student — "I do not exactly 
know, sir ; but I think there is an ellipsis of the 
name of the place." (Tableau.)— ^.^ectofo?-. 

Student (translating)— "And — er — then— er— he 
— er — went — er — and— er — " Professor — " Don't 
laugh, gentlemen, to err is human." — Ex. 

SPRING SONG. 
It is splush, splush, splush; 

It is mud, mud, mud: 
And your feet slip with a rush, 

And you go down with a thud ; 
And you grasp with great intensity 
Some dark, imagined density, 
To keep from the propensity 
Of shrieking out: Oh, h — iish/ 

It is duck, duck, duck; 
It is soak, soak, soak; 

And you curse your blasted luck, 
And you hug the fire and croak ; 

Till regaining your urbanity, 

You cease your deej) profanity, 

Kelapse into inanity, 

And fall asleep o'er Puck. 

— Record. 
Precocious Miss— " What does dyspepsia mean, 
grandpapa?" Grandpapa — " Dyspepsia, my dear, 
comes from two Greek words meaning ' hard to di- 
gest.'" Precocious Miss — "Then we might call 
your stories 'dyspepsia,' mightn't we, grandpapa?" 
—Chaff. 

A girl's notion of the national game is called off 
pretty accurately by the letter of a young city lady 
to her girl chum in the country. " You must visit 
me," she wrote, " when the base-ball season opens. 
There is so much skill and grace displayed. The 
pitcher, I think — but, my ! you never saw a game. 
I will explain it to you. The pitcher — a dear little 
thing— stands iu the middle and throws a ball at 
another, who stands in front with a long stick in 
his hand. The thrower tries to hit his stick, and 
the other young man, who is called the knocker, 
tries to so swing the club that it will be impossible 
for the thrower to hit the stick with the ball. 
Some of the knockers become very good at this, 
and some of the darlings could stand there and 
never have their clubs hit once. The catcher 
stands behind the knocker, and is just too brave 
for anything. We girls think he is the nicest one 
in every club. I think the catchers are very cute 
and heroic."— .Ea;. 



EPIGRAM. 
Quoi! est la faculte 
Perdant sa tete ? Non pas! 

Parceque cela etait 
Pedu bien long temps il y a. 

— Coll. Journal. 

The first mate— Eve. She was probably captain 
slso.— Record. 

A miss is as good as a mile, 
A kiss is as good as a smile, 

But four jjainted kings 

Are the beautiful things 
That are good for the other man's pile. 

-—Era. 



A German writer, says one, should every day 
read a fine poem, look upon an excellent picture, 
hear a little good music and speak a few sensible 
words. Esterbrook adds use his Steel Pens. 



,^£gi4 mm^\ 



fMIM AM® FANCY flWTffl^ 

neatly executecl at the 

B^a^^WICK JIE^^LD 0FFICE. 



ESaX': 



►If. gPECI^L ^ FINE ^ PTg -f:^ 

A.KE VERY POPUEAK. 



STUDENTS' ATTENTION! 

Do you wish to earn a large sum of money during the 
summer vacation ? We want three or four more Students 
who are ready to work hard for good pay to secure subscribers 
for our beautifully illustrated magazine, and will give the 
right men very large pay. Write at once to the Cottage 
Heakth Co., 11 Bromfield St., Boston. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No.l 

SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely Avithout adulteration or drugs. 

'We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 

direct importation, which is made especially for us, 'water 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLEN & GlNTEll Mannfuctuvers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



New system. Learned in less than one-quarter the time 
required by any other. Old reporters throw away old sys- 
tems and learn this for speed and legibility. It can be 
successfully 

TAUGHT BY MAIL. 
The corresponding style can be learned in a few hours, 
and the full verbatim reporting style in a few months. It 
is a marvel of simplicity. 

STUDENTS 

can easily acquire enough to enable them to take notes of 

LECTURES. 

Send for circular. Terms: Corresponding style, five 

lessons, $5. Corresponding and reporting, twenty lessons, 

R. B. OAPEN", Augusta, Me. 



JQSTEEL 
PENS. 




Leading Numbers ; 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Sta^^ioners. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEM CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York 



SMOKE THE BEST. 

We beg to inform the nublic and smokers generally, that we 
have secured a large stock of the very choicest grades of thor- 
oughly cured 

GOLDEN VIRGINIA, PERIQUE and TUEKISH 
tobaccos, which we are using in the manufacture ol! our Cele- 
brated brands of cigarette and smoking tobaccos. And 
have added to our stock a large shipment of the finest imported 
French Rice Paper. Such stock, made up by the highest class of 
skillful labor, we feel confident cannot fail to satisfy the tastes of 
all good judges. 

STANDARD BRANDS. 
Caporal— Oaporal *— Sweet Caporal— St. .James J, Kinney Bros.' 
Straight Cut in Full Dress Packages, etc., etc. 

JUST OUT— SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL. 
Manufactured by Special Request, 

jBCln7iey 7'obacco Co., 
Successors to Kinney Bros., New York 



DEALER IN 



No. 2 Odd Fellows' Block, 

3PB(iNe M^ mww^ ^miiE^ nhh in. 

MAIN STREET, - - - BRUNSWICK. 

The Sixt.v-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 7th, 1884, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alpiif.us S. Packard, Aciiug President; 
Ai-FKED MrrciiELL, M.D., Secretary; Israel T. Dana, M.D., 
Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women .and Children ; Charles W. Goddard, 
A.M., Medical .Jurisprudence ; JfREDEEIC H. GEERIsn, M.D., 
Analomy; Henry Cakmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry; Burt G. 
Wilder, M.D., Physiology; Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery 
and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics; "Irving E. Kimkall, M.D., Demonsti-ator of 
Anatomy; EVERETT T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of His- 
tology. 

ALPEED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

FRANK M. STETSON, 



PC 

w 
a: 
en 

cc 

Q 




C Co 



to 
iDd 

|-=l 



C<3 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Diamonds, 



Jeivelry, 



Silver Ware, 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



Prepare Original Designs for Society 
Badges, Rings, Prizes, and Class Cups, 
which will be forivarded to students on 
request. 

A SPECIALTY is made of English 
Pewter Beer Mugs, in two sizes, with Glass 
Bottoms, 

Society, Book, and Visiting Card Plates 
engraved in proper style. 

Invitations and Programmes in novel 
forms at short notice. 

Shreve, Crump & Low, 

BOSTOIbT. 



Sronses, 



Porcelains, 



Fancy Goods. 



BYRON STEVENS, 

BeeKgEIiIiEI^ 1 3THTI0NE^, 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



EARS for the MILLION 

Foo Ohoo's Balsam of Shark's Oil 

Positively Restores the Hearing, and is the Only 
Absolute Cure for Deafness Known. 

This Oil is abstracted from peculiar species of small White 
Shark, caught in the yellow Sea, known as Carcharocion Kond- 
eletii. Every Chinese fisherman knows it. Its virtues as a re- 
storative of hearing were discovered by a Buddhist Priest about 
the year 1410. Its cures were so numerous and many so seem- 
ingly miraculous, that the remedy was officially proclaimed over 
the entire Empire. Its use became so universal that for over 300 
years no deafness has existed among the Chinese people. Sent, 
charges prepaid, to any address at $1.00 per bottle. 

HlAl WHAT THE MMAW SAY 

It has performed a miracle in my case. 

I have no unearthly noises in my head and hear much better. 

I have been greaily benefited. 

My deafness helped a great deal — think another bottle will 
cure me. 

My hearing is much benefited. 

I have received untold benefit. 

My hearing is Improving. 

It is giving good satisfaction. 

Have been greatly benefited, and am rejoiced that I saw the 
notice of it. 

*'Its virtues are unquestionable and its curative character ab- 
solute, as the Avi'iter can personally testify, both from experience 
and observation. Write at once to Haylock & Jenney, 7 Dey 
Street, New York, enclosing $1.00, and you will receive bv return 
a remedy that will enable you to hear like anybody else, and 
whose curative effects will be permanent. You will never regret 
doing so."— Editor o/* Mercantile Review. 

.e®-To avoid loss in the Mails, please send money by Regis- 
tered Letter. 

Only Imported by HAYLOCK & JENNEY, 
Sole Agents for America . 7 Dey St., N. Y 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



HATIOMl SCHOOL SUPPLY BCBEAU, 

Beloit, Wis., July 31, 1883. 
National School Svpply Bureau: 

Last April, being tlien iu charge of a large public school, but 
desiring a position in some g:ood academy or college, I placed 
my name witli yonr Bureau." During the lirstpart of the present 
month I received notice from you of a vacancy in such a place as 
I desired. 

Putting myself in communication v\ith the party concerned I 
received the appointment. lam well satisfied with the manage- 
ment of the Bureau, and feel sure that it fills a useful and nec- 
essary place in our school economy. You are at liberty to use 
my name if you wish. 

Eespectfully, 

EDWARD O. FISKE. 
Headmaster Markam Academy, Milwaukee, Wis. 

For application-form and circular, address. 

National School Supply Depot, Chicago, III. 
M". B. — We want all kinds of Teacliers for Schools 
and Families. Good Pay to Agents and Private Cor- 
respondents. 



DEALE IN 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 
:^xt.xTivsT^rxoi£., ive-A-ixve:. 



STUDElSTTS 

Of all classes will find it valuable to consult on all subjects the 



183 SOUTH CLARK STREET, CHICAGO, ILL. 



C. E3. TO■V^7"I^TS:E]2^TXD, 

DEALER IN 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B.— Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

All the Students Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND EUBBEHS 



Imak 1, Isbifts' lest I ik© Stoft, 



COK. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



ALL KINDS OF 

EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 





NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fur- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Work- 
manship, we especiaDy solicit orders for Fine Printing of all 
kinds. 



For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

We also make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges, 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGtJES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

•PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



J^. O. REED 



Special Rates to Classes i Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bruns-nrick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vie^vs ; also College Views. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

^F. H. WIIxS0K,3!£^ 

DISPENSE E OF 

fit© Siiggj liidlda©ij^GI©iileali, 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath. 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Go to W, B. lAToodard's 

To buy your GEOCEEIES, CANlSTED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGAES, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. Tou will save money by so doing. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

780 Middle Street, . - - - Portland, Me. 



'5 » «-g> .. 
MAIN- STREET, BKUWS"WICK, ME. 



WM. % FIELD, 



M^N^GE^. 



TOItTTIigSl HOTESIj., 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Special attention will be given to Class and Reunion Dinners 
and Suppers to order. First-class laundry connected with the 
house. 

S. B. BREWSTER, Proprietor. 



Fm WATCIES, 

239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. MERKILL. A. KEITH. 



DEALER IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 



Washington Market, 

TONTINE HOTEL BLOCK, 

Bi?,XT3srs"V7"iCK:, as^^A-iisrE. 

Meats, Vegetables, and Fruits of aU kinds. Also Oys- 
ters, Fresh and Smoked Fish. 
Bowdoin College Patronage Solicited. 



DEALER IN 

CEDAR STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Branch ofBce three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 
Magnifying Glasses. 

^"Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



J. G. WASHBURK, 

Manufactiirei- of and Dealer id 

PIOTUKE PKAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

Also Pictures, Cabinet Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, 

etc. Also agent for the celebrated Household Sewing 

Machines, 

In the Everett Store, Main Street, Opposite the Mall, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



yA CLUP i^oAD I^ACE 







li @eiiiiiiii ii 



®l 



(Esta-blished 1871.) 



10 BERKELY ST., BOSTON, MASS., 



ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 
OTHER TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp at above address. 




SPECIAL IMPROVED 

American STAR Bicycle 

Although comparatively a new machine on the mar- 
ket, the STAKhas made a splendid record, 
having won the 

Twenty-Five Mile Championship of 

the United States, 

Breaking the record, in 83 minutes 10 seconds. 

It has a mile record of 2 mln. 50 1-8 sec; 
5 miles, 15 mln. 26 3-4 sec: mile without 
hands, 3 min. 11 sec. It has wonthemost im- 
portant Hill Climbing Contests, Including 
Corey Hill, Boston, Eagle Hill, Orange, N. J., 
and Standpipe Hill, Washington, D. C. This 
Is a mere mention of the triumphs of the Star. 

The principles embodied in the Star give the perfect combination for safety, speed, and comfort with economy of 
maintenance and durability found in no other machine. 

IN ADDITION WE HAVE THE 



VICTOR TRICYCLE, Tlie Most fimous Tliree-flieeler laie In Tk forli. 

A Full Line of the Best ENGLISH MACHINES 

Go to complete the list and suit all tastes. 

The IDEAL, a cheaper machine for use of boys and youths, is a splendid machine for purpose intended and is 
highly recommended- 

SECOND-HAND MACHINES of all kinds, SUPPLIES and SUNDRIES constantly on hand. 

REPAIRING of most difficult kinds performed at reasonable rates. All machines and parts must be plainly 
marked and be accompanied by instructions by next mail. 

STA.LL & BTJUT, 

509 Tremont St, and 4 Warren Ave., Odd Fellows' Hall, Boston, Mass. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Diamonds, 



Jewelry, 



Silver Ware, 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 

Prepare Original Designs for Society 
Badges, Rings, Prises, and Class Cups, 
which ivill be forwarded to students on 
request, 

A SPECIALTY is made of English 
Peivter Beer Mugs, in two sizes, with Glass 
Bottoms, 

Society, Book, and Fislting Card Plates 
engraved in proper style. 

Invitations and Programmes in novel 
forms at short notice. 

Shreve, Crump & Low, 

BOSTOISr. 



Bronzes, 



Porcelains, 



Fancy Goods. 



BYRON STEVENS, 

BeeKgEIiliER I gTOTie]\[EE!, 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine, 



EARS for the MILLION 

Foo Choo's Balsam of Shark's Oil 

Positively Restores the Hearing, and is the Only- 
Absolute Cure for Deafness Known. 

This Oil is abstracted from peculiar species of small White 
Shark, caught in the yellow Sea, known as Carcharodon Kond- 
eletii. Eveiy Chinese fisherman knows it. Its virtues as a re- 
storative of hearing were discovered by a Buddhist Priest about 
the year 1410. Its cures were so numerous and many so seem- 
ingly miraculous^ that the remedy wfts ofEicially proclaimed over 
the entire Empire. Its iise became so universal that for over 300 
years no deafness Ims existed among the Chinese people. Sent, 
charges prepaid, to any address at $1.00 per bottle. 

HEAB WMAT TME DEAF SAY 

It has performed a miracle in my case. 

I have no unearthly noises in my head and hear much better. 

I have been greaily benefited. 

My deafness helped a great deal— think another bottle will 
cure me. 

My hearing is much benefited. 

I have received untold benefit. 

M;y' hearing is improving. 

It is giving good satisfaction. 

Have been gi'eatly benefited, and am rejoiced that I saw the 
notice of it. 

" Its virtues are unquestionable and its curative character ab- 
solute, as the writer can personally testify, both from experience 
and observation. Write at once to Haylock & Jenney, 7 Dey 
Street, New York, enclosing $1.00, and you will receive bv return 
a remedy that will enable you to hear like anybody else, and 
whose curative effects will be permanent. You will never regret 
doing so."~Editor o/* Mercantile Review. 

je®"To avoid loss in the Mails, please send money by Regis- 
tered Letter. 

Only Imported by HAYLOCK & JENNEY, 
Sole Agents for America. 7 Dey St., N. Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE AD.TUSTABLE HANGING 

SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGEAVEE IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



All the Late Publications in stock. Tex-t-Books of all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



The only radical internal remedy. Never known to 
fail in a single case, acute or chronic. It expels the poison- 
ous Uric Acid from the blood, which is the prime cause 
of Rheumatism, Gout, and Neuralgia.— As a hlood puri- 

THE OLD RELIABLE SPECIFIC 

ENDORSED BY PHYSICIANS AND 

THOUS ANDS O F PATIENTS. 

tier it has no equal. Acting on common-sense principles 
it er.idicates from the blood all poisonous matter which 
causes disease. — It has been in use for many years and 
cured a larger percentage of cases than any other 

POSmV ELY CURES 

remedy. Send for testimonials from the cured.— Salicy- 
lica strikes directly at the cause of these diseases, while 
so many so-called speci- 

BHEIJMATISM 

iics only treat locally the effect. When you have tried 
in vain all the "oils," "ointments," "liniments," and 
"pain cures," and when your 

GOUT, NEURALGIA, 

doctors cannot help you, do not despair but take Salicy- 
lica at once and be cured. — No one can afford to live in 
pain and misery when 

GRAVEL DIABETES, 

Salicylica will relieve him and put him in condition to 
attend to his daily avocations. 

$1 per box, 6 boxes for $5, 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE BLOOD POISONING. 



]S[0. 5 0DD FEIiIrGW^' BIi0OK, 



Is the place to buy 



Telephone Excliange connected with the store. 

1. m. f ©^liiii, fffo^'ff. 



with full directious in ten languages. Sold by druggists 
everywhere, or sent by mail, prepaid, on receipt of price. 

WASHBURNE & CO., Prop's, 

287 Broadway, New York. 

Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

Odd Fellows' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. \Y. BROWNE, PROPlilETOR. 
Formerly at Tontine Hotel, 



<^ 




THE FAVORITE NOS. 303-404 332-I70-J5I- WITH 
'his OrHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. lERRYMAN, PHARMACIST,-:- 

DIUGS, MlDICffllS, 

Fancy M Toilet Articles, Ciprsl ToMcco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - MAIN STREET. 

Presci'iptions Carefully Compounded. 



J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEK, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



In one of the tropical provinces of Germany there has been 
fonnd a root, the exti'act from which has proved an absolute 
SPECIFIC for Tape Worm. It is pleasant to take and is not de- 
bilitating or disa^'eeable in its effects on the patient, but ia 
peculiarly sickening- and stupefying to the Tape Worm, which 
loosens its hold of its victim and passes away in a natural and 
easy manner, entirely whole, with head, and while still alive. 
One physician has used this remedy in over 400 cases, without a 
single failure to pass worm whole, with head. Absolute removal 
with head guaranteed. No pay required until so removed. Send 
stamp for circular and terms. 

HEYWOOD &. CO., 19 Park Place, N . Y . City . 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Euling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



ysrSEN Y'O TI 'WANT A RTD^E 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE. 



On Cleaveland Street, where yo 



wiUfind turnouts to suit the most 
' Rates reasonable. 



SPRING AND SUMMER, 1884. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment'of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments. White 
Vests, White Neck-ties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neck-wear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

Jpg'Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. O. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating' Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday IMorning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Tear in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, _ 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

«S~Special Bates to Student Clubs..et 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Caxdidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are e.xamined in the following subjects, test- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grrammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, Georgics and first six Books 
of the ^neid, including Prosody. 
(Instead of the Georgics, Csesar's Gallic War, 
Books I.-IV., may be offered.) 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xeuophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Georgraphy, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,- first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
speciiications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
■on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regdlae Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (July 11 and 12, 1884), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 26 and 27, 1884). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examinations is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Washington Acndemij, East 
Machias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these 
schools having been made special Fitting Schools 
for the college by the action of their several Boards 
of Xfustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers of the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 
have been fitted at any school having an approved 



preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a^ list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 
Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either 'by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a studeut may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

required — FOUR hours a week. 

Latin, six terras. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 
Christianity, four terms. 

Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — EOCTR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terras. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terras. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $2.5. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 11, 1884. 



No. 4. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DtTRING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

J. A. Peters, '85, Managing Editor. 

N. B. Ford, '85, Business Editor. 
Boyd Bartlett, '85. W. P. Nealley, '85. 

O. K. Cook, '85. A. A. Knowlton, '86. 

Webb Donnell, '85. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. F. LiEBY, '85. W. V. Wentworth, '86. 



Per annum, in advance. 
Single Copies, . 



. $2.00. 
15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the book stores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Conti'ibutions must be 
accompanied by ^vriter's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at BruDSwick a3 Second Class mail tnatter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XIV., No. 4.— .June U, 1884. 



Editoeial Notes 49 

Alumni Banquet 51 

Graduating Exercises Medical School 51 

Alpha Delta Phi Convention 52 

Ivy Poem 53 

Field Day 55 

Boat Races 56 

Ivy Day 57 

Lawn Tennis 57 

Ivy Hop 58 

Base-Ball 58 

CoLLEGii Tabula 61 

Personal ,, ^ 64 



EDITORIAL HOTES. 



It speaks well for the temperance interest 
in college that, on Saturday evening last, re- 
cruiting agents had to be sent out in order to 
drum up a respectable crowd to partake of 
Field-Day cider(?). The sentiment of the 
college has undergone a perceptible change 
in the last year or two in this respect. 
Drinking is no longer popular. It is not 
" the thing." It is a significant fact that this 
change has been brought about by no action 
or regulation of the Faculty'. The Freshman, 
on entering is no longer, as of old, required 
to " sign the pledge " before matriculation ; 
but the better sentiment of the college has 
gradually worked to the front. 



And now comes the not whollj" unex- 
pected news that we are to be treated to our 
annual dose of Strout trial next fall. The 
exceptions filed by the counsel for the boys 
have been sustained, thus overthrowing the 
last verdict, and giving Mr. Strout his choice 
between another trial and an abandonment 
of the whole affair. lie has decided with 
characteristic perseverance to try it again, 
and, apparentl}', means to piish the matter to 
the bitter end. Although it is to be regretted 
that the matter should have to be stirred up 
again, yet it is now generally believed that, 
in another trial with the conspiracy evidence 
ruled out, and no " pernicious practice of haz- 
ing " to be put down, weighing on the minds 
of the jury, the boys will be acquitted. 



Among the things peculiar to spring is 
the annual wail, which goes out from the 



50 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



college editor who is not excused from 
themes. Of course to excuse a man from 
themes entirely, merely because he is on the 
college paper, would be unfair, as a man may 
be on the editorial board of a paper, and 
yet do very little work ; but what rea- 
sons any fair-minded Faculty could give for 
refusing to receive work on a college paper, 
as an equivalent for an equal amount of 
theme work, it is difficult to see. Possibly 
the editors in question have been running 
anti-Faculty papers. It gives us a comforta- 
ble feeling of pride to think that our own 
Faculty is liberal-minded enough to see the 
question in its proper light, and to recognize 
the value of the paper as an educator. 



Ivy week is a thing of the past, and the 
college has settled down to the regular rou- 
tine of base-ball, tennis and — study. The 
weather on both Field and Ivy days was all 
that could be desired, and, taking the exer- 
cises as a whole, the general verdict seems to 
be that of approval. As it was universall}' 
conceded beforehand that the athletic exer- 
cises were to be a farce, no one expected to 
see any records broken, and, consequently, 
no one was disappointed. The audience, 
though small, was appreciative, and the good 
records made in a few cases were received 
with all the more enthusiasm because unex- 
pected. The fact that a change is not always 
for the better was illustrated in the order of 
exercises, in which several standard events — 
notably the standing broad jump — were 
omitted, in order to give room for such ab- 
surd events as throwing at a mark, — put in, 
probably, because requiring no previous train- 
ing. 

As an exhibition of athletic work, the 
exercises of the day were a failure ; but as an 
exhibition of pluck on the part of untrained 
men, a success. It would have added much 
to the pleasure of the occasion had the Bow- 



doin Brass Band, with its brazen drum-major, 
favored us with its presence ; but that organ- 
ization seems to be defunct — or, perhaps, the 
Brunswick Juvenile Band is too strong a 
rival. It is no fault of the management that 
the spring meetings of the Athletic Associa- 
tion are not more interesting. Even if the 
contestants were all born atliletes they could 
not be expected to make good records with- 
out previous training. 

In a few days, as soon as arrangements 
can be perfected for its reception, the crew 
leaves for Saratoga, there "to labor and to 
wait " till July the Fourth, when it will row 
crews from Cornell, University of Pennsylva- 
nia and Princeton, for the four-oared, inter- 
collegiate championship. 

In selecting the men that we have, to up- 
hold the honor of Bowdoin, we cannot but 
feel, that if the white fails to cross the line in 
the van, or to take a good position at Sarato- 
ga, it will be from no lack of pluck or muscle 
on the part of those who wear it. Our cr^w 
has worked with determination. It trained 
with great perseverance during the winter 
months, in the so-called gymnasium. Since 
its removal to the river it has pulled twice a 
day, a portion of the time under the direction 
of a trainer, with a punctuality which noth- 
ing less potent than Sunday could interrupt. 
If the men remain in their present good con- 
dition, and no accident happens, we shall 
hope for a good position at Saratoga, at least 
to leave the duty of guarding the rear to 
some less fortunate rival. The race last 
Friday with the Dirigos of Portland, the 
champion four-oar of the State, did much to 
inspire confidence in the crew. It was es- 
pecially gratifying to notice the excellent 
steering of our men, a point in which we 
were weak, at Lake George, two years ago. 
But the fact must not be lost sight of that 
in the colleges we are to meet we have par- 
ticularly, strong antagonists. Cornell, with 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



51 



two of her last year's crew pulling stroke 
and bow, with Courtney as a trainer, may be 
expected to send a fine crew. Pennsylvania 
has two of her last year's crew, and by her 
challenge, a short time since, to all American 
colleges, shows that she, at least, has confi- 
dence in her men. Princeton has had George 
Hosmer for a trainer, and from all accounts 
may be relied on to do good work. Should 
we succeed in beating any one of these three 
crews, a result which perhaps would not sat- 
isfy the college, nor can it be said that it is 
all that is expected, — j'et, even in this case, 
we ought to feel that the crew had done well. 
The discovery that the crack Davis shell 
was a number of seconds slower than the old 
one, acted as a damper, rather, to the ardor 
of the boating men, but it is hoped that 
with the aid of the much-enduring alumni, 
who have already contributed so liberally, 
we shall be able to have one to our liking. 
Whatever other disadvantages the crew may 
have to sti'uggle against, it should certainly, 
not be handicapped by a poor boat. Mean- 
while if a crowd of fellows could arrange to 
be at the boat-house every day when the crew 
pull, it would greatly encourage them in 
their efforts, and assure them that they go to 
Saratoga with the heai'ty support and well 
wishes of the college. 



THE BOWDOIN BANQUET IN MIN- 
NEAPOLIS. 

Dr. C. H. and Mrs. Hunter gave a ban- 
quet on Wednesday, May 21st, at their mag- 
nificent residence on Second Avenue South, 
in Minneapolis, Minn., in honor of the Bow- 
doin alumni of that city. 

There were present Hon. F. H. Board- 
man, '69 ; A. F. Crocker, Col. J. E. Badger, 
'73 ; Dr. Hunter, C. M. Ferguson, Thomas 
Kneeland, '74; D. M. Scribner, '75 ; J. O. 
P. Wheelwright, '81 ; C. H. Gilman and John 
Washburn, '82. 

Invitations were extended to other alumn 



in Minneapolis and St. Paul, who were unable 
to be present. 

After doing ample justice to the banquet, 
a permanent organization, to be known as the 
Bowdoin Alumni Association of the North- 
west, was formed, for the purpose of holding 
annual meetings in Minneapolis, the associa- 
tion to include alumni of Minneapolis and 
St. Paul, and other cities of the Northwest. 

It is expected that Hon. W. D. Wash- 
burn, '54, Congressman from Minnesota, will 
be present at the next reunion. 

The officers of the new association were 
elected as follows : 

President, C. H. Hunter, '74 ; Secretary, 
John O. P. Wheelwright, '81. Executive 
Committee, Hon. F. H. Boardman, '69 ; Col. 
J. E. Badger, '73 ; John Washburn, '82. 

A communication was read from Dr. Ger- 
rish in regard to the proposed change in the 
college boards, and it was voted that com- 
munications be sent to Dr. Gerrish and the 
Orient in favor of the new movement in 
that respect. 

After a most delightful evening the asso- 
ciation adjourned, to meet again next winter 



GRADUATING EXERCISES OF MEDI- 
CAL SCHOOL. 

Wednesday, May 28th, at 9 a.m., for the 
first time in the history of the Medical School, 
graduating exercises, attended with appro- 
priate ceremonies, were held in Memorial 
Hall. The large number of alumni, friends 
of the graduates, and towns-people present, 
despite a heavy rain-storm, testified to the 
general interest felt in the exercises. The 
class of '84 have the honor of being the first 
to make this change, which the prime cause 
of was undoubtedly the formation of an 
association of alumni last winter in Water- 
ville. Letters were sent to the alumni in this 
and other States, who responded by a large 
attendance. 

The members of the Medical alutnni were 



52 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



seated on the rear seats of the platform ; the 
members of the Medical Faculty in front. 

Prof. Packard, who as acting President of 
the college, presided, after the class 
had marched in, preceded by their marshal, 
Mr. Walker, made a short address to the class, 
in which he commended their work in setting 
an example which would doubtless be fol- 
lowed by other classes. 

Prof. H. L. Chapman then offered prayer. 
After some selections from the orchestra, 
Prof. Packard introduced Prof. S. G. Brown, 
who delivered the opening address, which 
was listened to with deep interest by all 
present. 

Mr. F. C. Heath delivered the "parting 
address," after which Dr. Mitchell, Secretary 
of the Medical Faculty, announced the names 
of the first four members of the graduating 
class in the order of their standing — Heath, 
Generaux, Simpson, and Shehan. 

Prof. Packard then conferred the degrees. 
The class ode was sung, and the exercises 
concluded with the class marching out to the 
music of the orchestra. 

The graduating class numbered thirty- 
three. The President of the class was L. 
B. Shehan ; and executive committee, J. E. 
Walker, E. H. Trowbridge, and L. B. Shehan. 
The exercises were a success from beginning 
to end. The music was furnished by fifteen 
pieces of Chandler's Orchestra from Portland. 
The programmes from Shreve, Crump & Low 
came up to their usual standard. 

At one o'clock, in lower Memorial Hall, a 
dinner of the alumni was held, at which over 
three hundred were present. An address was 
delivered by Dr. Thayer, the President of the 
Alumni Association, and one by Dr. A. J. 
Fuller of Bath. Dr. S. C. Gordon acted as 
toastmaster. 



The Yale Record says that the Faculty have 
offered the members of its board $400 apiece to 
stop publication. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI CONVENTION. 

The fifty-second annual convention of the 
Alpha Delta Phi Societj^ met Wednesday 
and Thursday, May 28th and 29th, with the 
Middletown Chapter, at Middletown, Conn. 
At the session for organization, Wednesday 
morning, all the chapters but two were repre- 
sented. More delegates arrived on the noon 
trains, and at the regular business session in 
the afternoon delegates from all the chapters 
were present. Phillips Brooks, the president 
of the fraternity, was present and presided 
over all the sessions. Delegates from the 
Washington Alumni Association and several 
noted alumni were present. Considerable 
business of a private nature was disposed of. 
An invitation was received and accepted to 
hold the next annual convention with the 
Peninsula Chapter, at Ann Arbor, Michigan. 
A petition to establish a chapter at Colb}' 
was rejected. Letters of greeting, extending 
the hospitality of their chapter houses, were 
received from the Eclectic (Plii Nu Theta) 
and Psi Upsilon chapters After singing 
' some rousing songs, the convention adjourned 
to nine o'clock Thursday morning. 

The clouds and rain of the afternoon 
cleared away, and fair weather favored the 
public exercises, held in the evening in the 
South Congregational Church. A little past 
eight the delegates marched to their reserved 
front seats, to a grand march by tiie Bee- 
thoven Orchestra of Boston. The church 
was packed full with an intelligent and ap- 
preciative audience. After prayer by Fred- 
eric Gardiner, D.D., the evening's program 
consisted of an opening address by the piesi- 
dent, an oration by A. S. Roe, A.M., and 
a poem by E. O. Flagg, D.D. These were 
plentifully interspersed with rich music by 
the orchestra. The exercises throughout 
were peculiarly appropriate and elegant, 
abounding in eloquence and witticism. Re. 
turning to the hotel, college and society 
songs were sung until a late hour. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



53 



Thursday morning the adjourned session 
was held, and the business of the convention 
completed. In the afternoon the members 
visited the college grounds and buildings, 
where, from the chapel steps, they had a 
group picture taken. They then visited the 
chapter houses of the Eclectic, Delta Kappa 
Epsilon, Psi Upsilon and the unfinished 
building of Alpha Delta Phi. 

After so pleasantly' passing the afternoon 
with the entertainment of their agreeable hosts, 
and with the beautiful scenery of the fertile 
Connecticut valley, the assembly departed by 
a special train for Hartford, where a noble 
feast awaited them. About one hundred 
and fifty gathered around the inviting ta- 
bles at Habenstein's. Letters of regret and 
congratulation were read from John Jay, 
Beecher, Donald C. Mitchell, E. E. Hale and 
several other noted Alpha Deltas. 

With feasting, singing and toasting the 
banquet was prolonged till the eastern stars 
had grown dim. Notwithstanding the length 
of the banquet, the interest and enthusiasm 
remained unabated to the end. During the 
day the delegates bade each other good-bye 
and departed, each one pleased with the 
business success and social entertainment of 
the Alpha Delta Phi convention of eighteen 
eightj'-four. 



*»*To see the Unseen — know the Unknown, 
Forsooth, that were the mightiest lame, 
And he who learns the mystery soulfuUy, 
Doth surely win himself a noble name, — 
To feel out reverently, and full of faith. 
And fasten with soul tentacles upon 
The massive truths, that all the ages past, 
God and the Christ have known alone — 
O ! it were grandly grand I think ! and 
"We, whose petty brains and sightless eyes 
Know only of the known — see only things, 
Fall down before the men more wise. 
Whose faith can reach out confident 
Into the dark, and from its gloom bring Light, 
We bow our lieads, and with all humbleness 
Worship their might. 



IVY POEM. 

By W. E. Bdtler, '85. 
The noiseless tide of time has brought our ship 
To these green shores, where we our emblem plant 
Of rough seas spanned, and stormy dangers passed. 
As once on sandy Mysia's sea-beat shore 
The storm-tossed Argonauts their good ship drew, 
So rest we from the labor of the oars, 
And for a day look out upon the sea; 
But setting up our altar on the strand 
Pray gods and goddesses for prosperous winds 
And fair skies till the golden fleece is ours. 
Many feet have trod these shores before us ; 
Many gallant Jasons bold and fearless; 
Many a Hercules whose stalwart blows 
Have shook the earth, as does the voice of Jove 
When he commands Olympus' glistening hosts, 
Or seals his Stygian compact with a nod, 
And many a Hylas, too, by Naiads lured, 
Here on these shores has left his noble crew 
And plunged beneath the fountain's limpid depths, 
No more to answer to his comrade's shout. 
As on this day we move the earth to plant 
Our living altar here, methinks the hands 
Of heroes of the days gone by touch ours, 
And voices of the past salute our ears. 
Proud Bowdoin's famous dead in legions come 
With low and whispered words whose import, still, 
Goes echoing through the chambers of the heart, 
Even as plume-helmed Hector's voice once rang 
Among the towers of wind-swept Ilium. 

Do you ask me what this mystery ? 
Is it precept ? Is it warning ? 
Are these sileut spirit voices 
Come to cheer us or rebuke usf 
If we listen rightly, comrades, 
Seeking earnestly the meaning. 
In this legend old they whisper it, 
Be it warning, scorn or precept. 

A cobbler on the hills of Kent 

Sat in his cottage one day, 
Sewing and pegging and hammering, 

And dreaming the time away. 

Thought he, " How hard a lot is mine, 

Pegging and hammering away 
I earn the scantiest living. 

And shall till I'm old and gray. 

" Then who will furnish me living ? 

What shelter then shall I find 
But the parish work-house yonder. 

With its aged, crippled and blind ? " 

And he hammered and pegged and sewed. 
Musing, how in this great world 

Our lives like the dead leaves of autumn 
By the breath of fortune are whirled. 

Some must always be poor and mean, 
And some must be rich and great ; 

Palaces and splendor for these. 
For those privations await. 



54 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



And aDon as he worked and mused, 
Came a light knock at his door : 

Heeding not, in deep thought he sat, 
Bending his eyes on the floor. 

Again, a little impatient. 

Sounded the visitor's rap. 
" Come in ! Come in ! " quoth the cobbler, 

And turned his last in his lap. 

And thrice the knocking resounded 

On the panels old and gray. 
But the cobbler crying, "Come in ! " 

Still hammered and pegged away. 

Thought he, " 'Tis some idle gossip, 

Or Gaffer Green for a patch," 
" Pull the string and come in," he cried, 

" Can ye not lift up the latch ? " 

Till at last, when hearing no more. 
Grumbling he laid down his work. 

And, lifting the quaint, wooden latch. 
Opened the door with a jerk. 

And lo ! Just vanishing from sight 
Adown the green-shaded lane, 

A fair lady, whose flowing hair 

Fell like sunlight on ripened grain. 

Her swift feet in slippers of gold. 
Each clasped with a costly gem, 

The wondering cobbler beheld 
Beneath her rich garment's hem. 

Around her shapely neck's whiteness. 
Falling adown her fair breast,. 

Was a necklace of rarest pearls 
That e'er did beauty invest. 

More lovely than mortal woman. 

An angel surely was she ; 
Such beauty of form and feature, 
Such grace he ne'er dreamed could be. 

With modest mien he bared his head 
And cried, " Pardon, lady fair ! 

I was dreaming when you knocked. 
Little thinking who was there." 

But she shook her head with a smile 
That thrilled him like rare old wine 

That has mellowed a hundred years 
Since purpling on the vine. 

Gliding away like a mist-cloud 
By the winds of morning chased. 

She stretclied her hands toward the cobbler. 
Who followed with eager haste. 

She took the bright gems from her hair. 
Stripped the rubies from her breast 

And i-eaclied them out to the cobbler, 
As breathlessly onward he pressed. 

As a shadow glides o'er the lea, 



Faster and faster she flew. 
Till her form in the dim distance 
Was lost to the cobbler's view. 

But hurrying on o'er ditch and hedge. 

Even till the night-shades fell, 
All breathless and bruised and panting. 

O'er hill and vale through wooded dell. 

At last he met an aged man. 

Who, with weak and tottering tread. 
Turning out to give the cobbler way, 

Slowly raised his hoary head. 

With rude salute the cobbler cried, 

" Tell me, I prithee old man, 
Passed you yonder a lovely maid. 

Whose beauty outshines the sun ? 

'' Whose robe is richer than the queen's. 

With diamonds all aglow? " 
" Ah, yes," the aged pilgrim sighed, 

" I passed her long, long ago. 

"Even now she is far beyond 
Our country's remotest bound." 

Exhausted and filled with despair. 
The cobbler fell on the ground. 

Crying, " Alas, what have I lost! " 
Begged the pilgrim of the glade 

Tell him the wondrous being's name, 
Be she goddess, elf or maid. 

" Men call her Opportunity," 

Sadly said the aged man, 
" Living in every country. 

Faring in every clan." 

" She comes to each man once in life, 
Bringing in her hands great wealth. 

She announces not her visit, 

Nor yet does she come by stealth. 

" Some seek her, but cannot find her. 
Though she pass them closely by ; 

Others, being slow to greet her, 
Heed her not when she is nigh." 

" But whoever quick receives her. 

With a loyal heart and true. 
She gives him wealth and happiness 

And leaves a kiss on his brow." 

And, my classmates, as we plant our Ivy, 
A tender sprout, by yon historic wall. 
Let us not, through dreams of past or future, 
Turn a deaf ear to the bright goddess's call, 
But be ready to welcome her coming, 
Gladly receiving the gifts she would give. 
In the present let us earnestly work. 
In the present let us joyously live. 
Launch we now our good ship Argo 
Lest while we linger on these shores 
We lose the prosperous following breeze 
That caps with foam the swelling seas. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



55 



Or rot our good ship's oaken ribs, 
ADd fall her lusty planks apart, 
That, hewn from lofty Peliou's pines. 
Were fashioned by Minerva's art. 
With hearts that beat with one accord, 
Then let us rise upon the oars, 
And gladly chant our vesper hymn, 
As dim and dimmer grow the shores. 
But let the seas be rough or smooth, 
Like the Ivy we plant in love, 
As its branches shall spread and reach 
To the gray rough granite above, 
Shall our hearts in memory joining 
With closer locked branches each day, 
To our dear old Alma Mater 
Cling forever and for aye ? 



FIELD DAY. 

On Thursday afternoon, June 5th, the 
Athletic Association held its annual meeting 
at the Topsham Fair Grounds. The weather 
was very favorable for the exercises, and 
there was a fair attendance. 

In throwing the hammer, Whittier, "85, 
made a pretty throw of 75.1 feet, thus beat- 
ing the records of the last three years. 

The second was a hopping match — 100 
feet and return ; it was one of the new feat- 
ures introduced this year. Kemp, '84, was 
the only participant out of the five entries, 
and easily won the prize in eighteen seconds. 

In the standing high jump, Norris '86, 
made the best record — 4 feet 6 inches, which, 
by the way, is the same distance he jumped 
last year. 

Nealley, '85, won the one-half mile bi- 
cycle race, in one minute and forty-eight 
seconds. The race might have been made 
more exciting by more participating in it ; 
indeed, we were a little surprised in seeing 
but one contestant enter, when there are sev- 
eral good riders in college. 

While the 220-yards dash did not eclipse 
the record of last year, yet it was very 
closely contested, Kemp, '84, Dearth and 
Burpee, '87, reaching the goal almost at the 
same instant. Kemp, however, was a trifle 
ahead. Time, 24 3-4 seconds. 

Eight contested for the prize in kicking 



the foot-ball. Waterman, '84, succeeded in 
sending it 101 feet and 4 inches. 

The hurdle race — 5 hurdles, 100 yards — 
was participated in by Kemp, '84, Lunt, '85, 
Norris, '86, and Burpee, '87. This was also 
sharply contested, but was soon over, Kemp 
winning in 14 seconds. 

Some pretty throws were made with the' 
base-ball ; C. C. Torrey, '84, putting it 316 
feet and 8 inches, and on trial, at the close 
of the contest, he threw it 319 feet and 3 
inches. 

In the 100-yards dash, Burpee, '87, won 
in 10 3-4 seconds, closely followed by Kemp, 
'84, and Means, '87. 

Out of the two trials in throwing a dis- 
tance of fifty feet at a mark. Barton, '84, 
took the prize by hitting both times. 

The sack race — 50 yards and return — 
was won by Kemp, '84, in 38 seconds, no one 
running with him. 

Burpee, '87, and J. Torrey, '84, were the 
only two contestants in the running high 
jump. Burpee won, jumping '4 feet and 9 
inches. 

The three-legged race — 100 j'ards — was 
won hy Dearth and Burpee, '87, in 14 sec- 
onds ; Byram and Horn, '86, coming in sec- 
ond ; Kemp and Barton, '84, taking third 
position. 

Only two entered the mile run, Byram, 
'86, and Kemp, '84. Byram won in 6 min- 
utes and 19 seconds. Doubtless the race 
would have been more exciting and interest- 
ing if more had entered ; and better time 
would have been made, as Byram ran the 
mile last year in 5 minutes and 13 1-4 
seconds. 

Talbot, '87, made the quarter-mile run in 
52 seconds, thus beating the best record 
made on the grounds. 

The tug of war, contested for by eight 
men from each class, was won by the class 
of '84. 

The exercises of the day closed with an 



56 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



obstacle race. This was the most laughable 
contest for the da}', and the spectators seemed 
to enjo\' witnessing the Herculean feats of 
the parlicipants. Burpee, '87, was the first 
to complete his twelve labors, and was de- 
clared the winner. 

Kemp, '84, was awarded the prize for the 
best average record. 

On Friday afternoon, at 1.30 p.m., the 
prizes were presented in King's Chapel. 



THE BOAT RACES. 

The annual class races, crews from '85 and 
'87 participating, and also the race between 
the Bowdoin College crew and the Dirigos, 
of Portland, occurred on Friday forenoon, 
June 6th. The weather was fine, and the 
water was in the best condition for rowing. 

The Sophomores have had no crew in 
training this season, and of course could not 
enter the race. Their limited number, and 
the unwillingness of two of their best men 
to row, have been an effectual bar against a 
Sophomore crew. 

The Seniors furnished no crew, as three 
of their strongest men are on the college 
crew, which is now in active training for 
the coming regatta at Saratoga. 

The Juniors and Freshmen took their 
positions about 11.30 A.M., and at the signal, 
caught the water at nearly the same time. 

The Juniors from the first showed the 
superior training of three seasons, by quickly 
taking the lead, and holding it to the finish, 
although the Freshmen rowed them a hard 
race. The Juniors rowed in excellent form, 
and with the even and powerful stroke that 
marked their rowing in the last race. They 
covered the course of three miles in nineteen 
minutes and nineteen seconds. Their time 
was not so good as in their race last year, 
but this was no doubt due in a great meas- 
ure to the loss of one of their old crew, and 
the substitution of a new man, of compara- 
tively little experience. 



The Freshmen, although beaten, need 
by no means feel at all disheartened, since 
their time of nineteen minutes and forty-seven 
seconds breaks the racing record of any 
previous Bowdoin Freshman crew. This 
single fact is proof that the Freshman crew 
has undergone a vigorous course of training, 
and that it has good " stuff." They should 
feel gratified with the result of their first 
year's experience at the oar, and may with 
good reason look for better success in coming 
years. 

The race between the college crew and 
the Portland crew was of greater interest to 
many than the class race. The Portland 
crew is doubtless the best in the State, and 
from the result of the race, an estimate of 
the merits of the Bowdoin crew can be 
made. It should be borne in mind that the 
college crew had to row against experienced 
oarsmen, who have been winners in several 
races. The distance rowed was one mile up 
the river. The Portland crew got away first, 
and maintained their lead, of about a boat's 
length, for the first half mile. After that, 
the college crew forged ahead, and gradually 
increasing their lead, came in a good hun- 
dred yards in advance of the Portland crew. 
A cleaner and more powerful stroke than 
that of the Bowdoins is rarely seen, and 
their steering was especially fine ; a line 
could not be drawn straighter than the course 
marked out by their boat. 

Bowdoin has a fine crew and one that fully 
deserves all the support that students and 
alumni can give it. 

Nothing occurred to disturb the interest 
of the spectators, and all of the several hun- 
dred that were present, seemed to heartily 
enjoy the annual event of our boating 
seasons. The selections rendered by the 
band were fully appreciated, and added much 
to the pleasure of all. 



*«.*Lo ! the poor Senior whose uncultured mind 
Seeks a situation, but none doth find. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



57 



IVY DAY. 

Friday, June 6th, has come and gone, 
and the class of '85 must now look back 
upon tlie exercises of Ivj' Day, as an event 
belonging no longer to the immediate future. 
Time has tiansferred the theme from pro- 
phetic leaves to the historic page. Review- 
ing its occurrence, we think the class may 
fairly congratulate themselves upon its suc- 
cess. The weather was everything that 
could be desired. 

A few minutes after three o'clock P.M., 
the class, lead by their marshal, J. C. Hall, 
proceeded from Maine to Memorial Hall. 
Marching down the aisle, they took their 
seats upon the stage. Just in the rear of the 
stage, hung a white covering, simply but 
tastefully decorated, with " Bowdoin, '85," 
worked in dark blue, the class color. 

The President, L. B. Folsom, with a few 
appropriate remarks, opened the exercises, 
which were continued according to the fol- 
lowing programme : 

Prayer. M. H. Purrington. 

MUSIC. 

Oration. J. A. Peters. 

MUSIC. 

Poem. W. K. Butler. 

MUSIC. 

The orator, after alluding to the early 
history of the college, went on to speak in 
high terms of Parker Cleaveland's life-work 
at Bowdoin, and his devotion to the college 
in its earlier history ; and in closing, associ- 
ated with the name of Cleaveland, that of 
Professor Packard, whom we have with us 
to-day. 

The poem, which was finely written, ap- 
pears in another column, and needs no word 
from us to commend it to the reader. 

The music by Grimmer, was given with 
his usual artistic skill, and served much to 
render the exercises enjoyable. 

At the conclusion of this part of the ex- 
ercises, the audience were invited to the 
north side of the chapel. Here the Presi- 
dent reviewed, in a pleasing manner, the col- 



lege course, and proceeded to the presenta- 
tion of the following honors: 

Best Moustache W. P. Nealley. 

Dig John F. Libby. 

Lazy Man W. C. Kendall. 

Philosopher 0. E. Cook. 

Dude C. H. Tarr. 

Popular Mao W. M. Eames. 

The recipients responded with short, but 
appropriate remarks. The trowel was then 
presented to the curator, H. N. Dunham, 
who earnestly professed his determination to 
perform his duties faithfully. 

After planting the ivy, the class closed 
the exercises of the day by singing the fol- 
lowing 

IVY ODE. 

BY E. W. FEEEMAN. 

We gather 'round these walls 

To plant our ivy vine; 
0, let us feel that we are bound 
By ties almost divine. 

To thee we raise our song, 

Thou vine with tender leaves; 

May we, as well as thou, hve on, 
God's blessing to receive. 

How sacred are these walls, 

How many the ivies laid here ; 

How tender the mem'ries which each recalls, 
Increasing year by year ! 

When time has passed away 

And years far hence arrive, 
Then mayst thou still be fresh and bright, 

Thou vine of Eighty-Five. 



LAWN TENNIS. 
The lawn tennis tournament, which occu- 
pied a number of days, it was intended to 
finish Friday, but that was found to be impossi- 
ble. The tournament was managed on a 
different principle from that of last year — the 
"dropping out" method being used only in 
the doubles. The doubles, up to the time 
of going to press, had not been played. 
The following is the score for singles up to 
Monday : 

"Won. Lost. Played. 

Bartlett, 3 3 

Eames 2 1 3 

Folsom, 3 1 i 

Freeman 1 1 2 

Phinney, 2 2 

J. Torrey, 2 2 



58 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



IVY HOP. 

A most pleasing termination of the pleas- 
ant exercises of Thursday and Friday was 
the Ivy Hop, of Friday evening, participated 
in by over thirty couples. It was hoped by 
the committee having the matter in charge, 
that the new Town Hall would be ready in 
time to have the dance in that place, but the 
fates — in the shape of workmen — were not pro- 
pitious, and old Lemont had to do duty again. 
The excellent music furnished by Mr. Grim- 
mer and his seven, however, did much to 
distract attention from the surroundings. The 
costumes of the ladies, as usual, were charm- 
ing, and would meiit particular description, 
but the mind of your reporter was in such a 
dizzy whirl that he failed to take notes. A 
long aiid delightful order of dances, with 
numerous " extras " interspersed, was gone 
through with before the orchestra showed 
signs of dissolution. When the company sep- 
arated, in ample time for breakfast, it was 
the general sentiment that '85's hop had 
been a success. 



BASE-BALL. 



LBWISTON VS. BOWDOIN. 
The return game with the Lewistons was 
played at Lewiston, Thursday, May 29th. 
The cold weather made sharp fielding diffi- 
cult. The game was devoid of interest, 
Bowdoin taking a long lead at the beginning 
and maintaining it to the close. Lord's 
pitching, which proved so effective in the 
former game, was hit freely. Barton and 
Dearth led at the bat, the former making 
two two-base hits in one inning. The score : 

LEWISTON. 

A.B. K. lE. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Nevens, c. f., . . 3 1 1 1 1 

Wilson, 2b 5 1 1 1 2 4 3 

Wilbur, lb. & s.s., .5022322 

Coyne, 1. J., ... 5 1 1 1 2 

Nickerson,s.s.&lb., 5 1116 15 

Scannell, 3b., . . 5 1 1 2 2 i 

Wright, r. f., . . 4 1 1 1 1 1 

Bates, 4 2 1 1 7 2 

Lord, p 4 1 1 1 6 2 

Totals, . . 40 8 10 10 24 17 17 



Barton, 1. f.. 
Dearth, c. f., 
Torrey, 2b., 
Cook, 3b., 
Talbot, r. f., 
Wright, p., 
Moulton, c, 
Pushor, lb., 
Dayis, s.s.. 



T.B. P.O. 











Totals, . . 55 22 18 25 27 28 7 

Wild pitches — Wright 2, Lord 1. Base on balls — Lew- 
iston 2. Balls called— on Wright 76, on Lord 49. Strikes 
called— off Wright 18, o« Lord 18. Struck out— Lewiston 
9, Bowdoin 5. Two-base hits — Barton 2, Dearth 2, 
Torrey, Wright, Davis. Passed balls — Moulton 3, Bates 
4. Earned runs — Bowdoin 4. Umpire— Sanford. Time 
of game— 2 hours. 



DIRIGO VS. BOWDOIN. 

The game with the Dirigos at Presump- 
scot Park, Portland, on Decoration Day, was 
not finished on account of a mob which 
pressed on to the grounds and rendered 
playing impossible. Score : 

DIRIGO. 





A.B. 


R. 


iB. 


T.B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 




3 







2 










2 
3 


1 


Bradley, s.s.. 


1 


2 


Dooley, 2b., . . . 


1 


1 











1 


1 


McGlinchy, c. f., 


2 




















Jas. Corridon, 1. f., 




1 


1 


1 


1 





U 


John Corridon, lb. 


2 


2 


2 


2 


8 





1 


O'Brien, p., . . 


1 


1 








2 


4 





Grady, c 


1 


1 


1 


1 





1 


1 


Morway, r. 1., . 


2 











1 





1 


Totals, . . 


15 


6 


6 


6 


12 


11 


7 




BOWDOIN. 












A.B. 


K. 


IB. 


T.B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Barton, 1. f., . . 


3 


2 








1 








Dearth, c. f.. 


3 




















Torrey, 2b., . . 


2 










1 


2 





Cook, p., . . . 


3 




1 


1 





3 





Talbot, r.f., . . 


3 
















u 


Waterman, 3b., 


2 













1 





Moulton, c, . . 


2 










3 


1 





Pushor, lb., . . 


2 




1 


1 


4 








Davis, S.S., . . 





2 














2 



Totals, 



. 20 



10 



Wild pitch — Cook. Base on balls— Dirigo 4, Bow- 
doin 4. Balls called— on Cook 45, on O'Brien 49. Strikes 
called— off Cook 5, off O'Brien 6. Struck out— Bowdoin 
1. Passed balls— Moulton 2, Grady 2. Earned runs— 
Bowdoin 1, Dirigo 1. Umpire — Bachelder. Time of 
game — 1 hour 40 minutes. 



COLBY VS. BOWDOIN. 

The second of the championship games 
with Colby was played on the Delta, Sat- 
urday, May 31st, and resulted in a brilliant 
victor}' for our boys, who outplayed their 
opponents at every point. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



59 



The game opened with Bowdoin at the 
bat. Barton was fielded out by pitcher to 
first. Deaith reached first on Burtt's fumble, 
stole second, took third on a passed ball, and 
scored on Torrey's safe hit. Cook and Talbot 
followed with singles. Torrey scored on a 
wild throw of second, which sent Cook to 
third and Talbot to second. A passed ball 
let in Cook and gave Talbot third, the 
latter scoring on third's fumble of Wright's 
grounder. Another passed ball gave Wright 
second. Waterman's pop fly to second was 
muffed, and another error of second on Push- 
or's grounder gave Wright third and Water- 
man second. Davis' sacrifice to second en- 
abled Wright to score the fifth and last run 
of the inning, and sent Waterman to third 
and Pushor to second, where they were left, 
Barton making the last out by third's assist 
to fiist. 

Bowdoin did not score again till the 
seventh inning, when Cook reached first by 
an error of short, was sent to second by Tal- 
bot's single, took third on a passed ball, and 
scored on Waterman's fly to center. In the 
meanwhile, Wriglit had flied out to left. 
Pushor then made a safe hit to left field, on 
which Talbot, who had reached second on a 
passed ball, attempted to score, but a beau- 
tiful throw by left fielder cut him ofl: just at 
the home plate. This inning was the last in 
which Bowdoin scored. 

Doe opened the game for Colby by strik- 
ing out, and the side retired in order, as was 
also the case in the second inning. In the 
third, fourth, and fifth innings men reached 
third, but sharp play prevented them from 
scoring. In the sixth, Mathews reached first 
on a safe hit ; Emerson struck to short-stop, 
who made an overthrow to first, letting in 
Mathews and giving Emerson third, the latter 
scoring on H. L. Putnam's sacrifice hit to 
second. T. P. Putnam struck safely and stole 
second, but was left there, Larrabee flying 
out and Goodwin going out on short's assist 



to first. In tlie seventh inning, they retired 
in order. In the eighth, Mathews got a base 
hit, stole second, reached third on a passed 
ball, and scored on T. P. Putnam's fly t& 
center. In the ninth, Goodwin reached third 
on a single and two wild pitches, but was left 
there, Whitten striking out, and Burtt send- 
ing an easy fly to first. 

Wright played his old game and was well 
supported by Waterman. The catching of 
Mathews was excellent, considering his want 
of practice. Barton did some fine work in 
left field, catching the unusually large num- 
ber of six flies, three of them in one inning. 
Both first basemen played a perfect game. 
Below is the score : 

COLBY. 

A.B. E. lE. T.B. P.O. A. E. 



Doe, p., . . 


. 4 














6 


1 


Mathews, c, . 


. 4 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


Emerson, lb., 


. 4 


1 








16 








H. L. Putnam, c. 


f., 4 











1 








T. P. Putnam, r. 


E., 4 





1 


1 











Larrabee, s.s., 


. 4 











2 


4 


2 


Goodwin, 3b., 


. 4 





1 


1 





3 


2 


Whitten, 1. f., 


. 4 











2 


1 





Burtt, 2b., . . 


. 4 





1 


1 


4 


3 


5 


Totals, . 


. 36 


3 


5 


5 


27 


19 


11 




BOWDOIN. 












A.B. 


R. 


IB. 


T.B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Barton, 1. £., . 


. 5 











6 





1 


Dearth, c. f., . 


. 5 


1 


1 


1 


1 








Torrey, 2b., . 


. 5 


1 


1 


1 


3 


4 





Coolc, 3b., . . 


. 5 


2 


2 


2 





1 


1 


Talbot, r.f., . 


. 5 


1 


2 


2 











Wright, p., . 


. 4 


1 








2 


6 





Waterman, c, 


. 4 











4 


1 


1 


Pushor, lb., . 


. 4 





1 


1 


11 








Davis, s.s., 


. 4 














2 


2 



6 



27 



14 



Totals, . . 

Wild pitches — Wright 2, Doe 1. First base on balls— 
Bowdoin 1. Balls called— on Wright 36, on Doe 61. 
Strikes called— off Wright 9, off Doe 8. Struck out— 
Bowdoin 2, Colby 5. Passed balls— Waterman 2, Mathews 
4. Earned runs— 0. Umpire — Barrett Potter. Time of 
game — 1 hour 25 minutes. 



BELFAST VS. BOWDOIN. 

The nine won its fifth consecutive victory 
by defeating the Belfasts on the Delta, Thurs- 
day, June 5th. The game was well played 
by both sides and interesting throughout. 
The prettiest hit of the season on these 
grounds was made by Pushor in the fifth 
inning. It would have been at least a three- 



60 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



baser, probably a home run, had the ball not 
been stopped by one of the pines back of 
center field. The score by innings: 

123453789 

Belfast, 10001100 0—3 

Bowdoin, 00005010 —6 

Errors — Belfast 7, Bowdoin 6. Base-hits — Belfast 3, 
Bowdoin 6. Earned runs — Bowdoin 1. First base on 
balls — Belfast 1, Bowdoin 2. Struek out — Belfast 3, 
Bowdoin 7. Left on bases — Belfast 8, Bowdoin 7. Um- 
pire — P. S. Lindsey, '84. Time of game — 2 hours. 



COLBY VS. BOWDOIN. 

At Waterville, Saturday, June 7th, Bow- 
doin suffered a second defeat at the hands of 
Colby, in consequence of a heavy handicap, 
Colb}' taking the field with ten men. A heavy 
shower in the early part of the afternoon put 
the ground in a wretched condition for play- 
ing, and caused the game to be postponed 
until after five o'clock. The game was close 
throughout, and was marked by fine playing. 

In the first three innings no runs were 
made. In the second inning for Colby but 
three balls were pitched. In the third inning, 
for Colby, after Goodwin had fouled out to 
Cook and Lord had struck out. Doe and 
Burtt made base hits, the former reaching 
third, the latter second. At this critical 
point Mathews struck a swift grounder to 
Cook, who fielded the ball beautifully to first, 
thus retiring the side. 

Fourth inning. — For Bowdoin, Dearth 
struck out. Torrey reached second on the 
failure of center-fielder to stop his base hit. 
Cook followed with a single, which sent 
Torrey to third, and stole second. Talbot 
retired on a foul bound to first. Wright 
struck to Doe, who made a wild throw to 
first, giving Wright his base, letting in Tor- 
rey, and giving Cook third, but neither 
Wright nor Cook had a chance to score as 
Waterman fouled out. For Colby, Emerson 
struck a fly to left field, which was prettily 
captured by Barton with one hand. The 
next two batsmen quickly retired. 

No more scores were made by Bowdoin 
after the fourth inning. In the ninth the 



boys made a supreme effort to win, but that 
tenth man of Colby's knew how to play so 
well that the effort was vain. In this inning 
Cook flied out to center field. Talbot then 
got a single and Wright followed with a slow 
grounder along the foul line. Doe waited for 
the ball to roll out, but his expectations were 
not realized, and third baseman picked up the 
ball and threw it to second to put out Talbot, 
who reached the base, as was quite evident to 
the spectators, before the ball did. The tenth 
man, however, whose superhuman vision was 
only equalled by his forgetfulness of balls and 
strikes, did not see it in that light and decided 
Talbot out. Waterman sent Wright to third 
with a base hit and stole second. Pushor 
then came to the bat and struck to first base- 
man, who fielded him out. 

The Colbys got their two runs in the fifth 
in,ning on three wild throws after two men 
had been put out. 

Both batteries played finely. Torrey's 
playing was noticeable for its excellence. 

The games are now two to one in Colby's 
favor, and the next one is to be played at 
Waterville. If we must be defeated, it is to 
be sincerely hoped that we shall not owe 
defeat to the umpire. The score is as follows : 
COLBY. 

A.E. B. lE. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Burtt, 2b., ... 4 1 1 2 

Mathews, c 4 12 1 

Emerson, lb., . . 4 1 1 8 1 

H. L. Putnam, c. f., 4 1 1 2 1 

T. P. Putnam, r. f., 3 

Larrabee, s.s., . . 3 2 

Goodwin, 3b., . . 3 3 

Lord, 1. f., ... 3 1 1 1 1 

Doe, p., .... 3 1 1 1 2 9 1 

Totals, . . 31 2 5 5 27 15 3 

BOWDOIN. 

A.E. R. 1b. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Barton, 1. f 4 2 2 2 

Dearth, c. f., . . 4 

Torrey, 2b., ... 4 1 1 1 3 4 

Cook, 3b., ... 4 1 1 1 1 1 

Talbot, r. f., . . . 4 1 1 1 

Wright, p., ... 3 1 8 

Waterman, c, . . 4 1 1 5 3 1 

Pushor, lb 4 11 1 

Davis, s.s 3 11 1 

Totals, . . 34 1 6 6 24 17 5 

First base on Balls— Bowdoin 1. Balls called— on Doe 

72, on Wright 29. Strikes called— off Doe 18, off Wright 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



61 



8. Struck out — Colby 3, Bowdoin T. Double play — 
Wright, Torrey and Pusher. Left on bases— Colby 5, 
Bowdoin 7. Umpire— W. C. Philbrook, Colby, '82. 
Time of game — 1 hour 20 minutes. 



SCOKE BY INNINGS. 



Colby 

Bowdoin, .... 



S 6 T 8 9 
2 0- 
0- 



COLLEGII TABULA. 



Tabulations akd Taffy. Events of much 
importance to the Bowdoin world have transpired 
during the last two weeks, the first of which was 
the commencement exercises of the Medical School, 
an extended account of which is given elsewhere. 
The event brought hacli many of the former grad 
uates of the school, and many more would doubtless 
have been here had the weather been in a more 
"Sober condition. Another important happening 
was the celebration of Ivy Day by the class of '85, 
and the Field Day sports, together with the races 
on the river, a full account of which will be found 
in another column. The Ivy exercises are begin- 
ning to attract nearly as much attention as com- 
mencement, filling an important place in student 
life and memories. The prospects of the nine have 
taken a decided tend upward since our last issue, 
victories having been won from the Lewistons, 
Dirigos and the Colbys. Much better playing than 
in the first games of the season has been the rule, 
aud a steady continuance in the same will be pro- 
ductive of results which will make B-o-w-d-o-i-n 
smile at the eud of the term. The university crew 
is " plugging for rank " at present, and is very shy 
about taking " cuts." We hope it will stand the 
examination at Saratoga all right, and be able to 
pass up. The rest of the college is lying around 
under the trees or playing tennis. Norris, who went 
home a short tiuae ago on account of an injury to his 
hand caused by rowing, has returned. The port 
side came off victorious after a hard struggle. 
Taylor has returned from his school at Litch- 
field. Cook was struck by a pitched ball, 
duiing the Bowdoin-Colby game, and rendered 
lame for several days. At a meeting of the Base- 
Ball Association, a committee was appointed to 
raise money for the support of the team. A novel 
contest at tennis took place last week between the 
port aud starboard sides of the 'varsity crew. 
Plaisted, the trainer of this crew, has folded his 
tent and departed. Brown, '84, is to enter the 
single-scull race at Saratoga, besides pulling in the 
four-oared race. A graduate of the Medical School 



of several years' standing, is now taking private 
studies with several of the professors here, with 
the view of obtaining a degree sometime in the 
future. The grounds about the college are looking 
exceedingly fine, though at the south end the grass 
is just making its appearance. Bowdoin probably 
has the most beautiful campus in New England. 
We hope she may be rich enough sometime to add 
to her natural attractions. 

*^*The people of Portland furnished a free fight 
for the delectation of the ball team, on the occasion 
of its recent game with the Dirigos. Base-ball is 
particularly interesting to the average American, 
but it has to take a back seat when the crowd sniff 
a row in the air. Portland isn't the only place 
where this disgusting exhibition is shown. Over 
and over again it happens that, in the midst of a 
game here on the home grounds, two small yaggers 
will engage in deadly contest, whereupon the whole 
crowd of men aud boys will start pell-mell across 
the grounds and surround the infants and deem it 
excruciatingly funny to see them pound each other. 
A consideration of this solenin affair ought to con- 
vince a fair-minded person of the absolute truth 
of the evolution theory. But it's hard on the 
monkeys. 

V Plug! Plug! Plug! 
Till the head begins to wheel. 

Plug! Plug! Plug! 
Till the very senses reel; 
" Ologies " — Greek and Dutch, 

Theses and Logic deep, 
Till the plugger nods and doses 

And plugs away in his sleep. 

*j.*The removal of the fence at the south end of 
Appleton, at the request of some of the residents 
of that quarter, was an act of courtesy on the part 
of the Treasurer which is appreciated by the afore- 
said residents. 

*5,'*Thore a rea few men at Colby, who, evidently 
conscious of their own insignificance, endeavor to 
fill up the measure of their vacuity by a good deal 
of inexpensive language. One of them aired his 
httleness in the last Echo by giving a version of the 
first game of ball between Bowdoin aud Colby. 
According to this youth, when the athletes of that 
college desire a mild form of amusement, not re- 
quiring much effort, all they have to do is to play a 
game of ball with us. We do not attach any 
weight to what the Echo thinks or says, but people 
outside the college may as well know the reason for 
the Bowdoins losing the first game in the series. It 
was simply because our pitcher was not able to play 
in his accustomed position. In the second game he 



62 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



did play there, and the Colbys were beateu 6 to 3. 
It is well enough to have a little truth mixed in 
with one's attempt to be jocular. 

*„*Thirty-three young Medics were turned loose 
upon a suffering world last Wednesday, and the 
business of the pill manufacturers, ministers, and 
undertakers was made thirty-three per cent, better 
thereby. The last rites paid to the departed varied 
somewhat from the usual run of graveyard exer- 
cises. It has been the usual custom to bounce the 
elected with very little ceremony, but this year a 
new order of exercises has made its appearance. 
An able address, delivered to the class by Dr. 
Brown, a parting oration by Mr. P. C. Heath, who, 
we are informed, led the class ; the conferring of 
degrees and singing the parting ode, with music 
by Chandler interspersed, completed the exercises. 
Immediately after, occurred the first meeting of the 
Alumni Association. At the conclusion of this, a 
banquet was served in Memorial Hall, Jr., at which 
toasts were given and responses made by President 
Packard, I. T. Dana and Dr. Horr. The whole 
affair was an immense success,, and the best wishes 
for their prosperity from those left behind, go with 
the graduates to their new duties. The class has 
been above the average in ability and scholarship, 
and just now is a good time for the Medical Faculty 
to raise the standard of admission and thus secure 
a little more brain tissue to mix with the physic, 
than has appeared here in years past. It is a dis- 
grace having length, breadth and thickness, that 
students should be admitted to this department 
with no suitable preparation for entering upon the 
most exacting study of modern times. It is no 
honor that men are annually turned away because 
not able to add two fractions together, but a dis- 
grace that the name of Bowdoin should be linked 
with a school that stoops to dealings with such 
ignoramuses. When a candidate for entrance to 
the school on being asked to define a peninsula, 
gives it as his humble opinion that it is an instru- 
ment for measuring temperatures, it is strange that 
^sculapius himself does not appear and hurt 
somebody. Reform in the admission of candidates 
has got to come— an imposed-upon public is getting 
mad, and Bowdoin has the chance to reap the 
distinction of taking the lead. Will she be sensible 
enough to do it ? 

*j,*The conversation between "Miss B." and a 
young manr, elative to her appearance on the stage, 
which appeared in this department in the last num- 
ber, must not be laid to the door of the " Tabula" 
editor. It was sent to the printer by one of the 



other editors, with the request to "break over" 
one of his columns with it. Instead of doing as he 
was told, the printer invaded this department for a 
local of the right length, and then sought to make 
things square by putting in the before-mentioned 
matter with our trade-mark before it. We will 
have his obituary ready in season for our next. 

*s*There is no reason why Bowdoin should not 
send out a team to play tennis with clubs out of 
the State — not at present, perhaps, but sometime 
in the near future. The expense would be light, 
and the result, one may naturally expect, would be 
creditable to us. There is not the slightest reason 
why we cannot send out as good a team as any 
college in the country, while there are good reasons 
for being crippled in other athletic sports. We 
hope to see the present era of interest in manly 
games maintained, and we see no good and suffi- 
cient excuse for our record not being enhanced by 
victories with the racquet. 

*5,*As all sorts of plans are being mentioned to 
the class of '84, by which she can leave behind her 
a monument that shall carry her memory down to 
unborn Freshmen, we beg to offer our little plan. 
We suggest that the class erect a revolving dome, 
to be placed on the top of the building, in the rear 
of Maine Hall, for the better accommodation of our 
magnificent, equilateral, revolving, clock-work-at- 
tachment telescope. In its present position, it is 
of no practical benefit to any one. A person might 
look through it a month, and not see a thing. 
What it needs is to be carried up somewhere near 
the planets— within a couple of miles say,' so that 
some idea of the heavenly bodies can be acquired. 
It needs elevation— and lots of it, and the Senior 
class could not do a thing more perfectly in season 
than to set it up in the above manner. Will it take 
advantage of the opportunity ? 

*j,*We notice that in the proceedings of the 
Maine Historical Society, at a late meeting, men- 
tion is made of a silhouette of Longfellow, which 
was given to the Society. It seems that some one 
of the class of '25 conceived the idea of making 
silhouettes of all the class. These ebonized pho- 
tographs were obtained of all but Hawthorne, who 
was so shy and reserved that one of him could not 
be gotten. The idea is not a bad one to follow, at 
the present time, although it is a day of good pict- 
ures, for there is more character and individuality 
in the outline of a profile view, than in the indefi- 
nite character marks of the present artistic com- 
binations of lights and shade. 

*,f*A number of the sttidents assisted in a very 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



63 



successful concert at the Universalist Church, on 
the evening of Decoration Day. We have heard 
their music very highly spoken of. The quartette 
intend to give a concert at Richmond soon, in com- 
pany with other musical attractions, and also here 
in Brunswick, on the occasion of the G. A. R. en- 
tertainment. 

*3,*Where has that orchestra gone, which is 
mentioned in the Bugle as existing here ? It would 
add a great deal to the pleasure of our out-door 
evenings, if we could occasionally have some music 
on the green. If the orchestra has grown rusty, 
why not have the whole college get together, once 
or twice a week, out on the grass, before some of 
the halls, and sing college songs'? There couldn't 
be a better way of spending an hour. 

*,j(*The Professor of Molecules should start a 
Sunday School or a candy pull, and invite the 
Freshmen, so that they may become acquainted 
with him. It must be embarrassing not to be rec- 
ognized by a Freshman. The Professor of Atoms 
. before mentioned, recently called at the room of 
one of these mild-eyed children and inquired for 
some Senior Orr other, and on being told that he 
was out, asked the Freshman to tell him that he 
wished to see him at the laboratory, whereupon 
the Freshman said, " What name, please? " 

*s*We are glad to learn that the new town hall 
is to be opened shortly. The scenery for the stage 
has been placed in position, and other things put 
in shape for business. We hope that there are 
now inducements enough in Brunswick to attract 
first-class companies, so that the average student 
may have his tender mind formed by something a 
trifle more refined than the remarks of end-men. 

*t*We have been looking about to see what the 
Seniors propose to do with themselves at the close 
of the present year. It goes without saying that they 
all intend to astonish the world— and it occurs to 
us that some of them will. A large number intend 
to teach— if they get a chance ; a few will go into 
business, which will doubtless create business for 
a few other people at the same time— an example 
of wasting two stones on one bird. Several propose 
to take agencies, and of these, one or two, we un- 
derstand, will become soul agents. Quite a num- 
ber will, doubtless, be up in the police court before 
the summer is over, so their future is provided for 
anyway. Whatever they do, we hope they will 
gain all the success they deserve. 

*.;t*The excursion of the class in Mineralogy, 
which was to have taken place Wednesday of last 
week, has been postponed for a week. Small trips 



have, however, been made occasionally by different 
members of the class. Quite a good deal of inter- 
est is being taken in collecting specimens in this 
study, and also in Botany. The great abundance 
of sports at this season of the year, takes away 
somewhat from the general interest which would 
otherwise be felt in them. 

*jt*Tn accordance with an arrangement made a 
year ago, students from those institutions which 
were then made fitting schools for Bowdoin, will 
this summer be admitted to the Freshman class 
without any special examination. One of the pro- 
fessors here will attend the closing examination at 
the schools in question. It is hoped that this ar- 
rangement will be of benefit to the college in in- 
creased numbers, and there seems to be no reason 
why it should not. It has worked well in other 
schools — one of the largest in the country getting 
nearly ninety per cent, of its students in this way. 
It will be likely, too, that a better fit will be ob- 
tained hy this system, than by the ordinary method. 
Too frequently boys are crammed for the entrance 
examination, without spending time enough on the 
preparatory studies. By the present arrangement, 
three years must be taken, we believe, in prepara- 
tion. A limit none too long. 

*«*The case for the reception of the files of the 
Orient having been completely filled with the end 
of volume thirteen, the present business manager 
has just put in a new case for the preservation of 
copies as they appear. All of which leads us to 
the remark that our paper is growing old — thirteen 
years of honorable service being a good foundation 
upon which to stand. Its character has, of course, 
varied somewhat with the changing boards, but 
through all the years, while it may have freely 
criticised and held up to ridicule, certain things in 
college life of which it did not approve, it has been 
steadily loyal to the college, endeavoring to serve 
it and its children, both present and absent. And 
at the present time the Orient is not so much 
concerned over what outsiders and other colleges 
may think of it, as it is about the opinion which 
the undergraduates and alumni hold in regard to it. 

***Did you see how the Colbyites shook and 
shivered on Decoration Day, — how their jaws chat- 
tered, and their knees rapped loudly together? It 
vras simply a case of coming events casting their 
shudders before. 

*ij* Political feeling does not seem to run very 
high here at Bowdoin, though later on in the heat 
of the canvass, we may see the youthful political 
orator giving free rein to his imagination. No can- 



64 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vass, as far as we are aware, has been made as to 
the preferences of the students for President, but 
it strikes us that there is a large class here who 
are thoroughly unbiased as to parties. We will 
not say call them " Independents," for the term is 
an insult, as though a man cannot belong to either 
party and still preserve his independence. The 
cranks who train under that cognomen, have not 
a patent right upon it by any means. The instruc- 
tion here at Bowdoin, in subjects bearing upon 
national questions, has a general tendency to lib- 
erality of political opinion, which can't be said of 
all New England colleges. 



PERSONAL. 

["Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited to send 
personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Brunswick, Me.] 

'33.— Rev. Geo. F. Tewksbury closed his labors 
at Lyman, Sunday, May 26th, after a pastorate of 
eight years. On account of sickness in his family 
and his own need of rest, he will not engage in 
pastoral work at present. 

'37.— Hon. W. H. Clark, of San Mateo, Cal., is 
visiting at Waltham, Mass. 

'45.— Rev. J. K. Mason, of Fryeburg, has been 
appointed by the Governor, as delegate to the In- 
ternational Penitentiary Congress, which is to be 
held at Rome during the summer months. 

'45. — Rev. Lewis Goodrich has resigned his pas- 
torate at Lovell, and is soon to go to Danbury, 
N. H. 

'46. — Stephen Thurston, who received a degree 
here, is dead. 

'49.— John M. Eveleth is President of. theKeu- 
nebec County Medical Association ; and A. E. Bes- 
sey, of the Medical School, class of '70, is one of 
the standing committee. 

'60.— Judge Jos. W. Syraonds was married May 
1 3th, to Miss Stewart, of New York City. They 
have arrived in Portland, where the Judge is to 
resume his law practice. 

'63.— Benjamin Dwight Green, who, after grad- 
uating from the college, graduated from West Point, 
is at present in England on business for the gov- 
ernment. 

'66.— William A. Albee, of the Medical School, 
has been chosen President of the Knox County 
Medical Association, and Benj. Williams ('64), 
Vice-President. F. E. Hitchcock, of the Academi- 
cal department, class '64, and H. C. Levansaler, of 
the Medical class of '56, are the standing commit- 



tee. Williams and Albee are delegates to the 
Maine Medical Association. 

'73.— Hon. A. P. Wiswell, of Ellsworth, was in 
town last week, on his way to the Chicago Conven- 
tion, to which he is a delegate. 

'74.— A very fine sonnet, entitled " Hesperides," 
by S. V. Cole, appeared in a late number of The 
Critic. 

'75. — Dr. Myles Standish has just been appointed 
Assistant Ophthalmic Surgeon on the staff of the 
Boston City Hospital. 

'77.— Scribner is wholesale dealer in phosphates 
in New York City. He has lately patented a pro- 
cess for extracting phosphoric acid from phosphates 
containing alumina. This part in the preparation 
of the superphosphates, was formerly expensive 
and diffloult. By this invention, much of the dif- 
ficulty and cost is removed. 



OF 

neatly executed at the 

B^a]^gWICK pEl^TIIiD 0EFICE. 



^ 'ra *<spjii 



"^ gPECI^L ^ FINE ^ P^T3 ^^ 

AKE VERY POPULAK. 



STUDENTS' ATTENTION! 

Do you wish to earn a large sum of money during the 
summer vacation ? We want three or four more Students 
who are ready to work hard for good pay to secure subscribers 
for our beautifully illustrated magazine, and will give the 
right men very large pay. Write at once to the Cottage 
Hearth Co., 11 Bromfield St., Boston. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more lor Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

SUPERIOR TO Alili OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

"We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 
direct importation, which is made especially for us, water 
marked with the name of the hrand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLEN <e GINTER Manufacturers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



New system. Learned in less than one-quarter the time 
required by any other. Old reporters throw away old sys- 
tems and learn this for speed and legibility. It can be 
successfully 

TAUGHT BY MAIL. 
The corresponding style can be learned in a few hours, 
and the full verbatim reporting style in a few months. It 
is a marvel of simplicity. 

STUDENTS 

•can easily acquire enough to enable them to take notes of 

LECTURES. 

Send for circular. Terms: Corresponding style, five 

lessons, .IfS. Corresponding and reporting, twenty lessons, 

«10. 

R. B. OAPEN, Augusta, Me. 



:STERBROOK' 



CT' 



Leadmg Numbers : 14, 048, 130, 333, 161, 
For Sale by all Sta'-.Mners. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEM CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New Yorii 



SMOKE THE BEST. 

We beg to inform the miblic .ind smokers generally, that we 
have secured a large stock of tlie verr choicest grades of thor- 
oughb- cured 

GOLDEN VIEGIETIA, PEKIQUE and TURKISH 

tobaccos, which we are using in the nianuf.icture of our Cele- 
brated brands of cigarette and smoking tobaccos. And 
have added to our stock a large shipment of the finest imported 
French Hlce Paper. Such stock, made up by the highest class of 
skillful labor, we feel oonttdent cannot fail to satisfy tlie tastes of 
all good judges. 

STANDARD BEANDS. 
Caporal— Caporal i— Sweet Caporal— St. .James J, Kinney Bros.' 
Straight Cut in Full Dress Packages, etc., etc. 

JUST OUT— SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL. 
Manufactured by Special Request, 

Ji'hinej Tobacco Co., 
Successors to Kinney Bros., New York 



i,M, 



DEALER IN 



clim S'O-aU', ShoeS',^ c^uMmS 

No. 2 Odd Fellows' Block, 
MAIW STREET, • - • 



^iWitii ^olleoe j\|e(lical |)ppap|]iieiit 

The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 7th, 1S84, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alpheus S. Packard, Acting President; 
Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel T. Dana, M.D., 
Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Goddard, 
A.M., Medical Jurisprudence; Fkedeeic H. Gereish, M.D., 
Anatomy; Henry Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry; Burt G. 
Wilder, M.D.,PhysioIog3'; Stephen H.Weeks, M^D.iSiu-geiy 
and CUnical Surgery; Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics ; "Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonsti-ator of 
Anatomy; Everett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of His- 
tology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



FRANK M. STETSON, 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



MTIONAL SCHOOL SUPPLY BDREAU. 

Beloit, Wis., July 31, 1883. 
National School Svpply Bnrea^t: 

Last April, bein^ then in charge of a large public school, but 
desiring a j^osition in some good academy or college, I placed 
my name with your Bureau." During the lirstpart of the present 
month I received notice from you of a vacancy in such a place as 
I desired. 

Putting myself in commimication with the party concerned I 
received the appointment. I am well satisfied with the manage- 
ment of the Bureau, and feel sure that it fills a useful and nec- 
essary place in our school economy. You are at liberty to use 
my name if you wish. 

Eespectf Lilly, 

EDWARD O. FISKE. 
Headmaster Markam Academy, Milwaukee, Wis. 

For application-form and circular, address, 

National School Supply Depot, Chicago, III. 
"N. B.— "We want all kinds of Teachers for Schools 
and Families. Good Pay to Agents and Private Cor- 
respondents. 



dealek in 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 

STUDEISTTS 

Of all classes will find it valuable to consult on all subjects the 



183 SOUTH CLARK STREET, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Full information given on receipt of return postage. A union 
of writers, critics, aud scholars of the highest order. 



CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruils, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

All the Students Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 



Imsk 1, l0b@fts' i§0l I %\m Stoie, 



Cor. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fur- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Work- 
manship, we especially solicit orders for Fine Printing of all 
kinds. 



For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

We also make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges, 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A-. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes i Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunsvick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Vie^vs. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

POFt.Tr..A.NJ3. TaAIN-E. 

DISPENSE E OF 

Pifg Diigi, llidl§iri.g§,j^GI©iilgili, 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Go to W, B. 17iroodard''s 

To buy vour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. Tou will save money by so doing. 

SFECI-^Ij I^^<^TES to STTT^EI^T CXjTTSS- 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

180 l\/liddle Street. - - - - Portland Me. 



MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



Wja. % FIELD, 



M^N^6E^. 



TOIVTINK HOTKL, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Special attention will be given to Class and Reunion Dinners 
and Suppers to order. First-class laundry connected with the 
house. 

S. B. BREWSTER, Proprietor. 



hfi,wtmiii^ 






239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. MERKILL. A. KEITH. 



i'«K>« 



DEALER IN 



Fresh, and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 

Washington Market, 

TONTINE HOTEL BLOCK, 

BiiTjasrs^sAT'icis:, 3VE-A.i]srE- 

Meats, "Vegetables, and Fruits of all kinds. Also Oys- 
ters, Fresh and Smoked Fish. 
Bowdoin College Patronage Solicited. 



^3icm 



\%-M,WmOm^ :le^ 



DEALEK IN 



CEDAR STREET, BRUNSW^ICK, ME. 

Branch olEce three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
|^° Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, MB. 



J. G. WASHBURH, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer iu 

PICTURE FRAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

Also Pictures, Cabinet Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, 

etc. Also agent for Hie celebrated Household Sewing 

Jlachines. 

In the Everett Store, Main Street, Opposite the Mall, 

BRUNSW^ICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



1^1 a ^ 




^i'i^LM 


^^"" 


1 ; 1 / 


v^^^i "' 


.-S^S 


^^D 


^5^^ 


^=^=-v_y 



ON THE EOAD. 



tei iiiiiigiii @e,, 

(Established 1877.) 

10 BERKELY ST., BOSTON, MASS., 

ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICTCLES, AND THE 
OTHER TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp at above address. 



ST^LL & BURT, 

509 Tremont St., and 4 Warren Ave., Odd Fellows' Hall, Boston, Mass. 
SPECIAL IMPROVED 

American STAR Bicycle 

Although comparatively a new machine on the mar- 
ket, the Stak has made a splendid record, 
having won the 

Twenty-Five Mile Championsliip of 

the United States, 

Brealiing the record, in S3 minutes 10 seconds. 

It has a mile record of 2 mill. .50 1-8 sec; 
5 miles, 15 miii. 26 3-4 sec: mile T\'lthout 
hands, 3 min. 11 sec. It has won the most im- 
portant Hill Climbing Contests, including 
Corey Hill, Boston, Eagle Hill, Orange, N. J., 
and Standpipe Hill, Washington, D. C. This 
is a mere mention of the triumphs of the Star. 

The principles embodied in the Star give the perfect combination for safety, speed, and comfort with economy of 
maintenance and durability found in no other machine. 

IN ADDITION "WE HAVE THE 




VICTOR TRICYCLE, Tk Most Mm Three-flieeler Mafle la Tk fcrll 

A FuU Line of the Best ENGLISH MACHINES 

Go to complete the list and suit all tastes. 

The IDEAL, a cheaper machine for use of boys and youths, is a splendid machine for purpose intended and is 
highly recommended- 

SECOND-HAND MACHINES of all kinds, SUFPIilES and SUNDRIES constantly on hand. 

REPAIRING of most difficult kinds performed at reasonable rates. All machines and parts must be plainly 
marked and be accompanied by instructions by next mail. 

SEND TWO-CENT STAMP FOR CATALOGUE. 



E5E5HSiSB5HSB5J5E5HSH5H5aH5H5BSHSH52SE£25E5E5JSESH5H5HSE5SSHSi5|i 
W 










EiSWSiSiSiSiSSSSiSiSSlSSSSSiSSiS&iSiSiBiSlSSiSiSiSiSiS 




5H5ES?5HSH5Efe5S5HSH5J5?5E5H5J5J5H525H5H5HS25H5Hn5H5ESJSH5252' 



a5H5HSE5H5ESHSH5HS25S5H5H5E5H5H5E5H5H5HS25E5HSH5E5E5a5H5HSHSE5a| 




&- iira525HSH5H5SSH5Hn5HEHE25H5H5HSHSHSESHSHSESHn5SSHH5E5HSH5E5a 




5HSHSH5E5E5HS2SaSE525HSHSHSH5H5HSH5HSaH5H5HSHSHSHSE5J5ES25 



tf7T^ 'V^^.^-:^-rJ',^'r- ' ,^Ph ' 



'^ \ \ ^^^ 







^>\ \ \ \ \ \ \ "^^"^ ^ ^ 



¥0l. XW. 



N0. i. 





©F^e * 




01% %!» 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Glass Cards and Monograms 

ENGEAVED IS THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOK 



All the Late Publications in stock. Text-Books of all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL WORKS at PUBLISHEES' PRICES. 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

]\[0. § 0DD EELIi0W^' BIi0OK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange coimectecl with the store. 



POP f e 



The only radical internal remedy. Never known to- 
fail in a single case, acute or chronic. It expels the poison- 
ous Uric Acid from tlie blood, which is the prime cause 
of Rheumatism, Gout, and Neuralgia.— As a blood puri- 

THE OLD RELIABLE SPECIFIC 

ENDORSED BY PHYSSCIANS ANI> 

THOUSANDS OF PATIENTS. 

fier it has no equal. Acting on common-sense principles 
it eradicates from the blood all poisonous matter whichi 
causes disease. — It has been in use for mauy years and 
cured a larger percentage of cases than any other- 

POSITIVELY CURES 

remedy. Send for testimonials from the cured. — Salioy- 
lica strikes directly at the cause of these diseases, while; 
so many so-called speci- 

EHEIJMATISM 

Acs only treat locally the effect. When you have tried 
in vain all tlie "oils," "ointments," "liniments," and 
" pain cures," and when your 

GOUT, NEURALGIA, 

doctors cannot help you, do not despair but take Salicy- 
lica at once and l)e cured. — No one can afford to live in 
pain and misery wlien 

GRAVEL, DIABETES, 

Salicylica will relieve him and jjut him in condition to 
attend to liis daily avocations. 

$i per box, 6 boxes for S5, 

BLOOD POISONING. 

with full directions in ten languages. Sold by druggists 
everywhere, or sent by mail, prepaid, on receipt of price. 

\SrASHBTJRNE & CO., Prop's, 

287 Broadway, New York. 

Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

Odd Fellows' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. W. BROWNE, Peopeietor. 
Formerly at Tontine Hotel. 







r//£- favorite: A/OS. 303-404-332-I70-^:SI-WITH 
'HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



-ED, J, lERRYMAN, PHARMACIST,-:- 

Bl^QS, MEDICIIIS. 

luqM Toilet Articles, Ciprsl ToMcco. 

OUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

Jl3" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

•Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

-And Dealer in Sheet Mxisic, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



SPRING AND SUMMER, 1884. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a clioice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
-Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments, White 
"Vests, White Neck-ties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
•ment of Boston and New York Neck- wear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

:^3"Families, Parties, and Chibs supplied. 



TAPS WORM. 

Ill one of the tropical provinces of Germany there has been, 
found a root, the extract from wliich has proved an absolute 
SPECIFIC for Tape Worm. It is pleasant to take and is not de- 
bilitating or disa^-eeable in its efl'ects on the patient, but is 
peculiarly sickening and stupefying to thaJTajje Worm, which 
loosens its hold of its victim and passes away in a natural and 
easy manner, entirely whole, with head, and while still alive. 
One physician has used this remedy in over 400 cases, without a 
single failure to pass worm whole, with head. Absolute removal 
with head guaranteed. No pay required until so removed. Send 
stamp for circular and terms. ' 

HEYWOOD &. CO., 19 Park Place, N. Y. City. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Slusic, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Miinner. 
Ruling and Blank BookWorli of Every Description done to Order. 

TVS^EJ^ YOU yVJ^NT A. RIJJE 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE, 

On Cleaveland Street, lohere you iviUfind turnouts to suit the most 
fastidious. JSST Rates reasonable. 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket , 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and !La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday IVlorning by A. G. Tenney. 
Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

«S-Special Bates to Student Clubs..ei 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, test- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more e.xactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
'quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
iHarkness. 

ILatin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
<of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
'narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, Georgics and iirst six Books 
of the ^neid, including Prosody. 
(Instead of the Georgics, Caesar's Gallic War, 
Books I.-IV., may be olfered.) 



Greek Grammar, —Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Georgraphy, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra, — so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
.specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
.Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
-already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
.authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regulah Examinations foe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (July 11 and 12, 1884), and on the Friday and 
:Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 26 and 27, 1884). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examinations is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
■Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Washington Academy, East 
Machias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these 
schools having been made special Fitting Schools 
for the college by the action of their several Boards 
of Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers of the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 
Jiave been fitted at any school having an approved 



preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 
Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range ot 
electives, witbiu which a student may follow bis 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may bo exhibited approximately iu the 
following table : 

EEQUIEBD— FOUR HOUR.S A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 25, 1884. 



No. 5. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURINO THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



EDITORIAL BOARD. 

J. A. Peters, '85, Managing Editor. 

N. B. Ford, '85, Business Editor. 
Boyd Bae,tlett, '85. W. P. Nealley, 'So. 

O. R. Cook, '85. A. A. Knowlton, '86. 

Webb Donnell, '85. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. F. LiBEY, '85. "W. V. Wentworth, '86. 

Per annum, in advance $2.00. 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the booli stores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Kemittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by \vriter's name, as Tvell as the signature which 
he "wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Bruosn'ick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 

EDITORIAL HOTES. 



Ill sending the coramencement number of 
the Ojeiient, which appears on Wednesday 
after coramencement week, to student sub- 
scribers, the addresses in the catalogue will 
be used unless the business editor be other- 
wise directed. 



The warm weather of the summer term 
together witli the general interest in sport.s 
is responsible for much in the way of neg- 
lected duties. Being aware of this fact, we 
have not been disappointed because of lack 
of competition for the prose article prizes 
offered by the Orient in the first issue of this 
term, but have been content to bide our time. 



It is to be hoped that there will be a revival 
of literary interest next year. 

For some unknown reason the poets, con- 
trary to the accepted belief in such cases, 
have not been overcome by assthetic lassi- 
tude, but have competed for the poetry prizes 
with considerable energy. We would merely 
remind all would-be authors that the long 
summer vacation before them offers a rich 
field for "adventures" and "experiences'' 
which can be written up with profit next fall. 
At the same time, as a word of warning, we 
would advise them to beware of anecdotes in 
which an imaginary room-mate [chum] plays 
a prominent part. "A word to the wise," etc. 



A good wa}' to a man's pocket-book is 
through his stomach. The opportunity given 
by the joyful season of commencement, now 
near upon us, to take a determined stand on 
the gymnasium question must not be neg- 
lected. If some energetic member of the 
Faculty would make a vigorous circulation 
of a subscription paper, much might be ac- 
complished. For our part, we siiould be in 
favor of locking the doors, after the alumni 
dinner is well under weigh, and allowing no 
one to come out without subscribing liberally. 
Something at least must be done. The want 
of a gymnasium is seriously affecting the 
welfare of the college. 



By reason of some unaccountable mis- 
understanding, the arrangements for the 
reception of the crew at Saratoga, were not 
completed in time for them to leave, until 
Monday morning. The time before the race 
is now limited to about ten days, whereas, 



66 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



had arrangements been perfected, as should 
have been the case, weeks ago, the crew 
would have had nearly a month in which to 
work on the lake. As it is, they must make 
the best of the short time allowed them. 

The lateness of our commencement, and 
the distance from the seat of war, will, un- 
fortunately, make it impossible for our men 
to be supported by a strong undergraduate 
delegation on the Fourth. It is hoped, how- 
ever, that all alumni living in or near Sara- 
toga, or who can possibly make it convenient, 
will be at that place on the day of the race, 
and give our men the encouragement of 
their presence. It is rather dispiriting to a 
crew to be friendless in a strange country. 

Meanwhile, we shall watch the papers 
with interest, and only hope that our Four 
will afford us the opportunit)' to receive 
them with an ovation on their return. 



We desire to direct the attention of tlie 
"powers that bo" to a decided nuisance, beHev- 
ing that it needs only candid consideration to 
be i-egarded as such by them. The ringing 
of the so-called rising bell at half-past six in 
the morning, if we were having a continual 
Fourth of July celebration, might be re- 
garded as the proper thing; but since no 
one — with the exception, perhaps, of the 
boating men — ever thinks of arising at such 
an hour, the regulation seems to be rather an 
unnecessary one. "A new broom sweeps 
clean," and since the induction into ofiSce of 
the new bell-ringer we have been forcibly 
reminded that this regulation is not a dead- 
letter. With Prayers at ten minutes before 
eight, a rising bell rung at seven would give 
ample time for breakfast. As it is now, those 
who are awakened by the six-thirty bell are 
the more apt to take a longer nap after their 
interruption ; while those who never hear it 
could be readily aroused a half hour later. 
The result of such a change would be an 



increased attendance at prayers. The custom 
of ringing the early bell seems to have " come 
down to us from a former generation," when 
Prayers were held as soon as there was suffi- 
cient light. If there is any reason for its con- 
tinuation we should be happ3' to make it 
public. 

The old saying, "A prophet is not with- 
out honor save in his own country," seems to 
be as true of this locality as of any other. 
Our prophets are our noted graduates ; and 
although it would be far from the truth to 
assert that they are unhonored by us, yet, in 
some respects, perhaps, do we fail to give 
them the attention which is due their worth. 
We are aware, rather vaguely, that we have 
"big men," and, when called upon to give 
samples of Bowdoin goods, point to their 
names with pardonable pride ; but after all, 
the homage thej' receive from us partakes 
more of blind veneration than of discriminat- 
ing respect. The names of our eminent 
alumni and the reasons for their being on the 
Honor Roll are known to us as much by 
tradition and hearsay, as from any practical 
knowledge gained by investigation. Espec- 
ially is this true in the case of our alumni 
authors. Their names are known and hon- 
ored by us ; but we often fail to pay them 
the compliment of a careful study or thorough 
reading of their works. Not that we carry 
the proverb so far as to neglect Bowdoin 
talent and systematically take up other au- 
thors : we simply fail to give to our own 
authors that prominence in our reading and 
study which their place as Bowdoin men, 
apart from their high position in literature, 
demands. 

These are general remarks. To be more 
explicit: At the University of California 
there is a Longfellow Memorial Association, 
of which meetings are held at intervals, a 
program, consisting of selections, criticisms, 
etc., being acceptably rendered. Would it 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



67 



not be well for us to follow the example of 
our sister institution of tlie West and form 
a Longfellow club at Bowdoin, to meet from 
time to time to study the Bowdoin Poet? It 
would certainlj' be appropriate for us to have 
such a club, and tiie meetings could be made 
enjoyable as well as profitable. The idea is 
in the rough. It may be worth the while of 
some one to elaborate it later on. Our com- 
munication column is open to all. 



The discussion which has been going on 
in our columns for some time in regard to 
certain proposed changes in the government 
of the college is probably brought to an end, 
as far as the Orient is concerned, by a com- 
munication in this issue from Mr. Winfield S. 
Hutchinson, class of '67. The subject is to 
be brought before the alumni at the coming 
commencement, when some definite action 
will undoubtedly be taken. When the some- 
what startling change in the present system 
of government was proposed by Dr. Gerrish 
a few months since, several representative 
alumni, in response to our request, kindly 
furnished us with tlieir views on the question 
for publication. Eight graduates were heard 
from. Of these, one. Prof. Jotham B. Sewall, 
'48, was in favor of the abolition of the Board of 
Overseers and the election by the alumni of the 
Trustees. The remaining seven opposed the 
change. The matter has been thoroughly 
discussed elsewhere, and the general opinion 
seems to be, among those most interested in 
the welfare of the college, that the change 
advocated by Dr. Gerrish is altogetlier too 
radical. Our present system is not without 
defects, but the remedy proposed seems to be 
rather worse than the disease. But whether 
the plan of Dr. Gerrish is adopted or not, the 
benefits arising from a discussion of the 
question by the alumni remain. A proposi- 
tion like the one in question is just the thing 
to arouse slumbering enthusiasm for the 
Alma Mater. Dr. Gerrish has shown that he 
has the best interests of the college at heart, 



and assuredly deserves our thanks, as one of 
the writers on the subject said, for his ser- 
vices as an able pioneer. 



In another column will be found the pro- 
gram for commencement week. At present 
there is every indication that the occasion 
will be unusually interesting and that 'Eighty- 
four's commencement will be long remem- 
bered as a particularly brilliant one. The 
orators that have been secured leave nothing 
to be desired. Tlie Phi Beta Kappa address 
of Edward Everett Hale is looked forward to 
by all with the pleasantest anticipations. The 
graduating class deserve great credit for their 
enterprise in arranging for a commencement 
concert, one of the most enjoyable features 
of the week. The usual number of reunions 
will of course take place, and a large attend- 
ance of alurani is expected. Let all who can, 
come, and launch the college on another year 
with flying colors. 



The base-ball struggle is now over, and 
the championship once more lies in the hands 
of Colby. We congratulate our neighbor on 
the Kennebec. Good, hard work and de- 
termination have triumphed. 

In looking over the record of our nine, 
we find that out of thirteen games played, 
all with strong clubs, seven have been won 
by us. The record is not one to be ashamed 
of, and we can truly say that we have done 
well; but at the same time we cannot help 
feeling that, with the material at our com- 
mand, we ought to have done better. It 
may be urged that the championship by right 
belongs to us ; and it is certainly true that a 
manifestly absurd decision of the Colby um- 
pire, had it been reversed, would have given 
us the pennant; but at the same time, so 
long as places can be pointed out where good 
playing on our part, where a failure to make 
inexcusable errors — would have given us the 
championship, regardless &f the umpire, it 
seems rather weak to talk of our losing the 
championship simply on account of that 
person. With the departure of the Seniors, 
we lose the strongest part of our nine. But 
there are good men left, and our hopes are 
high for next year. 



68 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



THE PICNIC. 

PEOSPECTION. 
I. 

We'll meet in the grove beyond the hill, 
'Mid those grand old trees where all is still 
Save the tremulous notes of the rippling rill, 

As it slips through the light and shade. 
Then we'll wake the echoes with many a song, 
While Mirth and Joy do the day prolong, 
Strolling the woodland aisles among, 

Or out in a verdant glade. 

II. 
But I and another will steal away 
From that merry group at its careless play. 
To a nook secure from the open day. 

Where a lordly beech tree towers ; 
And sit us down by the gray old stone, 
There in the peaceful grove alone. 
And I'll whisper her things she has never 
known; 

hasten the lagging Hours ! 

KETEOSPECTION. 

I'm tired. Just look at that sun-burned face 
Where oft the mosquito hath sheathed his mace, 
While ants worked hard at each other place 

With a diligence truly rare ! 
While I carried those baskets with might and 

main 
Round through the grove like a man insane, 
And finally home again through the rain. 

And Annie — she ivasnH there! c. 



JUNIOR ELECTIVES. 

The subject of elective studies in a col- 
lege course is continuall}' increasing in inter- 
est. Only within recent years has it been 
comoaon to allow students to choose those 
studies which are most congenial to their 
tastes, but now nearly all colleges of promi- 
nence allow the elective principle to modify 
more or less the old curriculum. 

It is not necessary to go so far in this 
direction as Harvard has gone; indeed, it is 
probable that most students will derive more 
benefit if part of their work, especially dur- 
ing the first two years, be selected b}' the 
Trustees and Faculty, with a view to a thor- 
ough mental discipline. 



But if some degree of liberty be granted 
in the selection of studies, the student can 
choose those which are not only interesting 
to him, but of practical utility also, helping 
to fit him for his chosen occupation. 

Complaint is frequently made that our 
colleges are unpractical, and undergraduates 
often feel that their time is not being spent 
upon the most interesting and beneficial 
branches. This objection appears to have 
been recognized here, and Bowdoin's course 
offers a fair proportion of electives. Never- 
theless, there may be room for improvement. 
Nominally, Junior 3'ear opens with three 
required studies, while a fourth is to be se- 
lected from Greek, Latin, Mathematics, and 
Zoology. Practically, however, a student 
has but three electives ofi^ered him, for 
in Sophomore year he has dropped one of the 
three first named. Moreover, most of those 
who have spent two or three years in fitting 
in these branches, with a two years' course in 
college added, have become exceedingly tired 
of them : also Greek and Latin become so 
easy that they do not compel hard work. If 
a difiicult author or long lessons portend, 
translations are printed and not unused. 

If a student have a liking for one of these 
languages, or mathematics, and thinks it will 
be of especial benefit to him in his after life, 
it is perfectly proper for him to pursue that 
study ; but what of those who prefer some- 
thing of another nature; shall not their de- 
sires be noticed ? 

Is answer made that such ma}' elect Zool- 
ogy ? Very true, those who are utterly tired 
of these merely disciplinary studies of the 
first two years may fall back upon Zoology to 
avoid the drudgery of continuing in the same 
old course. 

In practice, then, a large portion of the 
students have little choice. It would be 
about as well were Zoology made compul- 
sory, for now there is only a choice between 
one good branch and one or two which are 
very undesirable to most. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



69 



The studies of Junior year are excellent 
in themselves, but it must be evident that a 
branch in which the student has some inter- 
est has a great advantage over another of 
equal merit which he dislikes. 

As to what, if any, additional elective 
should be offered, there will undoubtedly be 
much difference of opinion, but why would 
not French be a desirable study ? At pres- 
ent only one year is devoted to it, and during 
the past 3'ear other studies have made some 
encroachments upon that short space of time. 
Besides, there is so little variety during Soph- 
omore year that there is not likely to be 
much interest in any language. Excepting a 
score of recitations in English History and a 
term in Spherical Trigonometry, all who did 
not elect Mathematics have had a solid course 
in the languages. 

French is probably as important for us to 
know as any Continental tongue, but a single 
year does not give a sufScient knowledge of 
it to enable one to read even tolerably easy 
articles without frequent reference to a dic- 
tionar3^ 

Political Histor}' and kindred branches 
have also been spoken of as desirable Junior 
electives, the time devoted to such work at 
present not being great. 

Our Facultjr have shown themselves will- 
ing to do anything reasonable to please the 
students, and ready to take any steps for the 
good of the college. If, then, this article 
shall in some degree draw the attention of the 
students to its subject, and cause them to 
make their wants known, its main object will 
have been accomplished. 



An art department is to be added to the Priuce- 
ton curriculum. This is a novel feature in Amer- 
ican college hfe, but its success is assured. A build- 
ing for the school of arts is to be commeuced at 
once, and the first course of lectures will begin iu 
September. Already $60,000 have been given to 
endow a chair. 



THE OLD CHAPEL BELL. 

High in the old chapel tower I swing, 
Load at the morniug hour I riug, ring, ring. 
Frightening the doves from their nests on the beams. 
Rousing mortals from their peaceful dreams, 
Calling mortals from dreamland far away 
To begin again the duties of a new-born day ; 
I swing and I ring in the old chapel tower 
And joyfully I usher in the morning hour. 

Swing, ring, 

I ring and swing, 
And joy is the burden of the song I sing. 

From my lofty home in the tower I knoll, 

With slow, solemn tones I toll, toll, toll, 

And my voice goes out on heaven's pure air, 

To call immortal souls to the house of prayer, 

To the house of prayer where to God above 

The reverend father prays for the blessings of His 

love. 
And I knoll and I toll, and to him of silver hair 
I am music to the soul as I call to prayer. 

Knoll, toll, 

I toll and knoll. 
And love is the song I sing into the soul. 

Up in the gray turret tower I hang, 

And I call to duty with a clang, clang, clang ; 

To life's stern duties I harshly call 

For work is a blessing sent to us all, 

And I mark the hours as they glide away, 

Hours which never in their flight delay. 

I hang and I claug in the gray turret tower. 

Proclaiming the death of each passing hour. 

While 1 hang, 

I will clang, 
And will call with power 
To the duties which arise at each passing hour. 

For many long years on high I've swung, 
Faithfully ever have I rung, rung, rung, 
But many whom I've called in the days gone by 
Have responded to the summons of the bells on 

high ; 
Fainter and yet fainter shall fall on thy ear 
My echoing memories as youth shall disappear ; 
Nearer and yet nearer shall sound the heavenly 

chime, 
As life speeds away on the ceaseless wings of time. 
Live life well, 
That the heavenly bell 
A message of peace to your soul may tell. 
Berlin Falls, N. H. J. f. l. 



70 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CHUM STORY. 

As I was sitting in my room one after- 
noon, cutting Latin on account of "severe 
headache," a disease which Freshmen are 
liable to have quite often, my chum came into 
the room ; and when he learned of mj' headache 
(for this was the afternoon that I really had 
one), he told me that he had engaged to take 
Miss B. rowing that evening, and as she had a 
cousin visiting her he would take me along, 
in order to even up the crowd. 

Now my chum vvas a Junior, while I was 
a Freshman, so you can imagine that I felt 
highly honored, as well as pleased, with the 
invitation. He remarked that it would be 
good for my head. He said it in such a man- 
ner that, had he been a Sophomore, I should 
have mistrusted something. However, even- 
ing came and we called for the young ladies. 
My chum had said that Miss Greeley, for 
that was the cousin's name, was very pretty. 
He was right. The Sunday before, I had 
been reading a summer novel, and my idea of 
love and beautiful girls was raised to such a 
point that I was anxious to carrj' out in fact 
some of the romances which you often read 
about, but seldom experience. 

In our walk down to the boat-house our 
acquaintance rapidly increased, so we felt on 
quite confidential terms when we started 
down the river. The night was beautiful, 
not a ripple on the still-flowing waters of the 
pale, moonlit Androscoggin. Just the night 
for a romance. Miss Greeley did not do 
much talking ; her voice, though fair, was 
not so sweet as her face. She amply made 
up, however, for her lack of conversation by 
her loviug glances and ways in which lay her 
bewitching power. Learning that I suffered 
with a headache, she begged to be allowed 
to cure it. Of course I assented to this 
proposition, for it would bring us nearer to- 
gether. We retired to- the bow of the boat, 
and vphen she had got into a comfortable 
position, she asked me to lay my head in her 



lap while she bathed it. Oh, how I blessed 
that headache ! I thought to myself that I 
would suffer a year, to be cured in this man- 
ner. I will not tell further of the bliss of 
that evening, — how we were left alone in the 
boat while my chum and his girl went to call 
on a friend, and how we passed the time 
while they were gone. But all rackets must 
have an end, and soon the time came to re- 
turn with our fair charges. Miss Greeley 
and I walked ahead, and when Ave arrived at 
the gate I was about to give her the accus- 
tomed farewell, when she said in a gruff voice, 
" Hold on, Freshy, let's go up to college this 
evening, I have given you a lesson," and I 
recognized the Sophomoric voice of Tom 
Greeley. 



COMMUHICATION. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

The letters which have appeared from 
time to time in your columns regarding the 
suggestion of Dr. Gerrish to abolish the 
Board of Overseers of Bowdoin, show pretty 
clearly that the proposition is at least an in- 
teresting one to tlie alumni and friends of the 
college. It has seemed to me that the plan, 
if not positively Utopian, has at least such 
faults as to render it unadvisable. Taking 
up seriatim the objections urged against the 
existence of the Overseers, it may be said: 

1. Is it true that the Board of Overseers 
is too unwieldly to properly attend to its busi- 
ness ? Fifteen members constitute a quorum, 
and if, as Dr. Gerrish contends, there is diffi- 
culty in getting even that number together, 
the working Board is but seldom really un- 
wieldly. Dr. Gerrish would have a single 
Board consist of twelve members, a full at- 
tendance of which would of course be desira- 
ble. There may be something in the sugges- 
tion that important meetings should be held 
at some time other than when commencement 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



n 



exercises are in progress, but the theory that a 
quorum consisting of only one-third could not 
be obtained at other times, and that this is due 
to the size of the Board of Overseers may be 
answered by saying that the fault is in poor 
human nature and would exist in quite as 
great a degree in any Board, however small. 
The Board of Trustees is a much smaller body. 
Is it not true that the same difficulty exists 
there ? And, even if the proposition be grant- 
ed, a simple remedy for the evil would be to 
diminish the number of Overseers. It seems 
rather heroic treatment to cut off the foot for 
the sake of curing a corn. 

2. The fact that the Board of Overseers 
has no power beyond that of veto, by no 
means proves or even indicates that the Board 
is unnecessary. If the cases in which it has 
put a stop to bad legislation have been few, 
they have been, if I am rightly informed, ex- 
tremely important, and justify the wisdom of 
having somebody in the government who can 
obstruct things. 

The argument drawn from the supposed 
analogy of the government of a college to 
that of a railroad or other business corporation 
loses sight of an important distinction between 
the two. Back of the directors of a business 
corporation stand the stockholders, frequently 
a numerous body, who own the business, to 
whom the directors are immediately responsi- 
ble, and who have the power every year to 
make a clean sweep of their board of directors 
and to substitute new men. If this were not so, 
business corporations would speedily be man- 
aged on a different plan. There is no doubt 
that any business could be transacted more 
rapidly and efficiently by a small and compact 
body of men, if only you have the right sort 
of men, than by two bodies of larger size. But 
the capacity of the one smaller body for mis- 
chief is co-extensive with its capacity for good. 
And the danger of its being seduced into 
mischief is immensely greater than in the case 
of two distinct bodies, one of which knows 



that its only excuse for existence is to serve 
as a check on the other, and which is conse- 
quently desirous to justify that excuse upon 
every proper occasion. No doubt with such 
a Board as Dr. Gerrish suggests, the respon- 
sibility for action or inaction could be much 
more easily fixed than now. But suppose a 
case of action, and of bad action, and that the 
responsibility has been fixed, what then? What 
are you going to do about it? When the 
year comes round the alumni can retire one- 
quarter of the Board, but if it turns out that 
the guilty members are in the classes whose 
terms of office are the last to expire, the 
remed}' would be like the mills of the gods — 
altogether too slow to suit the younger alumni. 
The trouble, in short, would be that, while 
the abuse and the responsibility for it might 
be readily determined, there would be no way 
of applying the proper remedy. (I am not 
considering, of coui'se, cases of misfeasance 
so flagrant as to call for the interference of 
the Courts.) All this seems to point out the 
underlying reason for having the college 
managed by two Boards, one of which may 
serve as a check upon the other, and which 
should be chosen by different methods. There 
are many reasons why it would be well to put 
the choice of the lower Board into the hands 
of the alumni. These reasons have already 
been urged upon the attention of the alumni 
in various ways and there is no need to do 
more than to allude to them here. Such a 
change would be feasible and would not be 
revolutionary. 

But no one can be sure how any consider- 
able change of government will work until 
after it has been tried, and where, as here, the 
machinery has been running fairl}^ well from 
the beginning — albeit with some slight creak- 
ing at times — and is still doing reasonably 
good work, progress in the way of change 
ought to be slow and one step at a time. 
The fact, if it be a fact, that our king begins 
to show some slight symptoms of King Log 



n 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



is not a reason for being in a hurry to get a 
substitute before fiuding out wliether he lias 
the attributes of King Stork. 

WINFIELD S. HUTCHINSON", '67. 

BASE-BALL. 



COLBY VS. BOWDOIN. 
What proved to be the deciding cham- 
pionship game came off at Waterville, 
Weduesday, June 11th. Bowdoin was fairly 
out-played, both at the bat and in the field 
and, for the first time this year, failed to 
score a run. For the first five innings both 
nines were blanked, and the game during 
this time was intensely exciting. The aspect 
of afi'airs was changed in the sixth inning 
when, after two men were out, Emerson 
scored the only earned run of the game on 
his own safe hit, a steal, and Mathew's 
single. In the eighth inning the Colbys 
added three more runs to their score by 
errors of Cook and Dearth, a wild pitch, 
good base running, and a base hit by Emer- 
son. Both batteries played magnificently. 
Other features of the game were Mathew's 
wonderful catch of a foul, H. L. Putnam's 
playing at center field, and Torrey's at sec- 
ond. The score: 

COLBY. 

A.B. K. lE. T.E. P.O. A. E. 

Burtt, 2b., ... 4 1 1 1 2 3 

Mathews, c, . . . 4 1 9 2 

Emerson, lb., . . 4 2 2 2 11 2 

H. L. Putnam, c. f., 4 1 1 4 

T. P. Putnam, r. f., 4 

Larrabee, s.s., . . 4 1 1 1 1 

Goodwin, 3b., . . 3 3 

Lord, 1. f., ... 3 1 1 

Doe, p 3 1 10 2 



Totals, 



. 33 



6 27 19 



BOWDOIN. 

A.B. K. lE. T.E. P.O. A. E. 

Barton, 1. f., ... 4 4 2 

Dearth, c. f., . . 4 1 1 1 

Torrey, 2b 4 8 2 

Cook, 3b,, ... 4 1 1 2 

Talbot, r. f., . . . 4 

Wright, p., ... 3 o 

Waterman, c, . . 3 1 1 .5 3 

Pushor, lb., ... 3 6 2 

Davis, S.S., ... 3 1 1 3 1 



Wild pitches — Doe 2, Wright 1. First-base on balls — 
0. Balls called— on Doe 69, on Wright 36. Strikes 
called— off Doe 11, off Wright 5. Struck out— Colby 4, 
Bowdoin 6. Passed balls— Waterman 1, Mathews 1. 
Double plays — Burtt and Emerson ; Wright, Torrey and 
Pushor. Earned runs — Colby 1. Umpire — P. S. Lindsey. 
Time of game — 1 hour 20 minutes. 

SCORE BY INNINGS. 

123456789 
Colby 00000 103 — 4 



COLBY VS. BOWDOIN. 
Colby and Bowdoin played the last game 
of the season at the State Pair Grounds, 
Saturday, June 14th. But little interest 
was felt in the game, as the championship 
had already been decided, a fact which prob- 
ably accounted in part for the playing, which 
was not up to the standard of either club. 
The best of feeling prevailed between the 
two nines. The score was as follows : 

COLBY. 

A.B. B. 

Boyd, .3b., .... 5 3 

Mathews, c, . . . 5 1 

Emerson, lb., . . 5 

H. L.Putnam, c. f., 5 

T. P. Putnam, r.f., 5 1 

Larrabee, s.s., . . 5 3 

Goodwin, 2b., . . 4 1 

Lord, 1. f., ... 4 

Doe, p., .... 4 



T.B. 


P.O. 


A 


1 


3 


?, 





5 


2 





9 


1 


1 


3 





2 








2 





3 


3 


1 


4 


1 


1 








2 


5 



Totals, , 



. 42 



A.B. 

Barton, l.f., ... 5 

Dearth, c. f 5 

Torrey, 2b 5 

Cook, 3b 5 

Talbot, r.f 5 

Wright, p., ... 5 

Waterman, c, . . 4 

Pushor, lb., ... 3 

Davis, s.s 4 



T.E. P.O. 



Totals, 



41 13 10 10 27 22 10 



Wild pitches — Doe 2. First base on balls — Bowdoin 2. 
Balls called— on Doe 82, on Wright 51. Strikes called — 
ofe Doe 10, off Wright 8. Struck out^Colby 6, Bowdoin 
3. Two-base hits — T. P. Putnam, Goodwin. Passed 
balls — Mathews 4, Waterman 3. Double plays — Goodwin 
and Boyd, Lord and Emerson. Earned runs — Colby 1, 
Bowdoin 1. Umpire — P. S. Lindsey. Time of game — 1 
hour 45 minutes. 

SCORE BY INNINGS. 



Totals, 



32 



24 



14 



1 



Colby, . 
Bowdoin, 



7 8 9 
2 2—9 
—13 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



73 



TOTALS AND AVEEAGES FOR 

SEASON OF 1884. 



Players. 



Torrey, 2b 48 13 14 

Pushor, lb 43 3 10 

'Wri5ht,p.,3b.,&s.s... 3S 9 7 

Moulton, c 24 5 6 

Waterman, S.S., 3b. &c. 34 6 9 

Bartou, 1. f 47 1110 

Cook, 3b. & p 49 12 13 

Davis, s.s 24 6 3 

Talbot, r. f 49 8 9 

Deanh, o. f 47 11 15 



+i^ iS .Q tn 



44 25 4 11 .292 .945 2 11 

[09 3 9 11 .233 .933 5 2 2 

13 77 S 10 .184 .918 7 3 4 

25 18 4 6 .250 .915 4 4 3 

28 22 10 10 .265 .833 3 5 3 

22 2 7 11 .213 .774 6 6 6 

17 28 15 11 .265 .750 3 7 4 

3 12 6 7 .125 .700 8 9 8 

4 1 2 11 .184 .714 7 8 7 
3 5 11 .319 .429 1 10 5 



IRRESISTIBLES VS. INVINCIBLES. 

'Eighty-four's Senior game began on the 
Delta, Friday, June 14th, between nines bear- 
ing the above formidable names. It was a Greek 
versus Greek contest, doubtful to the very 
close. One afternoon did not suffice for its 
completion. The sun went down upon the 
wrath of the contestants, and his early beams 
next day witnessed the end of the fiercely 
fought game. 

To mention all the brilliant plays that 
were made would require much more than 
our limited space, for the game was replete 
with brilliant plays. Manager Child gave a 
practical illustration of how the game should 
be played and was greeted with much ap- 
plause. Means filled right field in a manner 
theoretically perfect as far as posture was 
concerned, and showed a cool head at the bat. 
The boating muscle asserted itself in the bat- 
ting, which as a whole was very heavy, con- 
sidering the phenomenal pitching. 

The large audience on the grand stand 
evinced its appreciative spirit by frequent 
and generous applause. 

It was, indeed, as the posters had an- 
nounced, the event of the season. The full 
score : 

IREESISTIBLES. 

A.B. R. lE. T.E. P.O. A. E. 

Bradley, 3b., ... 7 4 2 2 i 
Adams, r. f., . . . 6 3 4 5 4 



Walker, 1. f., . . 6 4 3 3 2 1 

Phinney, p., ... 7 3 4 4 1 12 2 

Kemp, c, . . . . (i 3 2 2 2 6 

Thompson, lb., . 7 5 1 1 12 4 

Sayward, c. f., . . (i 2 3 5 2 1 

Clark, S.S., ... 5 1 2 3 2 3 

Longren, 2b., . . 5 1 1 1 1 1 4 

Totals, ... 55 26 22 26 24 22 18 

INVINCIBLES. 

A.B. R. iB. T.E. P.O. A. E. 

Child, 3b., ... 6 4 3 4 4 2 1 

Torrey, lb. & p., . 6 2 2 4 7 4 5 

Sweetser, 2b. & lb., 6 3 3 3 5 2 

Brown, c. f. & 2b., 6 3 2 5 3 1 

Lindsey, p. & c, . 6 2 1 1 3 7 

Cothren, c. & c. f., 6 4 3 3 2 2 4 

Smith, s.s. & 1. f., . 5 4 6 

Orr, 1. 1. & c. f., . 5 1 3 

Means, r. 1., ... 1 3 2 

Totals, . . 47 22 14 20 24 19 24 

Passed balls — Kemp 3, Cothren 10. Wild pitches — 
Phinney 5, Lindsey 2, Torrey 4. Bases on balls — Irre- 
sistibles 5, Invinc'ibles 4. Struck out — Irresistibles 3, 
Invincibles 6. Left on bases — Irresistibles 9, Invincibles 
5. Umpire— Prof. Robinson. Time of game— about 3 
hours. 

SCORE BY INNINGS. 

12345678 

Irresistibles 2 3 2 5 2 1 10 1—26 

Invincibles, .... 5 1 2 1 3 1 5 4—22 



BATES, '87, VS. BOWDOIN, '87. 
The Bates and Bowdoin Freshmen nines 
contested for the supremacy on the Delta, 
Monday, June 16th. Both nines, considering 
their want of practice, played well. The 
score was as follows : 





Bj 


i.TBS 


•87. 












A.B. 


K. 


iB. 


T.E. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Cushman, s.s., . 


6 


2 


1 


2 





3 


2 


Sprague, c, . . 


6 


2 








9 





1 


Roberts, c. f., 


5 


1 


2 


3 





1 





Howe, 3b., . . 


5 


1 


2 


2 





2 


5 


Walker, 2b., . . 


5 


1 








3 


2 





Woodman, p., . 


5 


4 


3 


3 


2 


12 


2 


Chase, 1. f., . . 


5 


1 


2 


2 











Whitcomb, lb.. 


5 


1 





(1 


10 





2 


Whitney, r. f., . 


4 








U 











Totals, 


46 


13 


10 


12 


24 


20 


12 




BOWDOIN, '87 












A.B. 


K. 


iB. 


T.B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Moulton, c, . . 


6 


2 


2 


2 


4 


1 





Talbot, 1. f., . . 


5 


1 








1 





1 


Dearth, 2b., . . 


a 


1 




1 


2 


1 


3 


Pushor, lb., . . 


6 


4 




2 


10 





1 


Means, 3b., . . 


3 


3 







3 


3 


2 


Bartlett, r. f., . 


6 


3 




5 








1 


Gahan, s.s., . . 


6 


1 




4 


4 


4 


2 


Little, c. f., . . 


(i 


1 




1 


1 





1 


Torrey, p., . . 


5 


4 




2 


2 


5 






Totals, . . 48 20 12 17 27 14 11 

Wild pitches— Woodman 4, Torrey 6. Passed balls — 

Sprague 8, Moulton 2. Bases on balls — Bates, '87, 1, 

Bowdoin, '87, 5. Struck out— Bates, '87, 3, Bowdoin, '87, 



74 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



6. Two-base liits — Cusliman, Roberts, Pushor, Bartlett, 
Torrey. Three-base hit— Gahan. Earned runs — Bowdoin, 
'87, 1. Left on bases— Bates, '87, 7, Bowdoin, '87, 8. 
Umpire — O. E.. Cook, Bowdoin, '85. Time of game — 2 
hours 10 minutes. 

SCORE BY INNINGS. 

123456789 
Bates, '87, ...42100110 4—1.3 
Bowdoin, '87, ..008114 5 1 —20 



SENIORS VS. THE COLLEGE. 

'Eighty-four, not content with the base- 
ball honors which have fallen to them so abun- 
dantly during the past four years, determined 
to cap the climax of their glory and retire 
from the diamond with <iclat, by challenging 
the rest of the college to meet them on the 
Delta. The challenge was accepted and the 
game was played Wednesday, June 18th. 
The result showed beyond a doubt what a 
bulwark its members from '84 have been to 
the college nine, and how difficult, if possible, 
it will be to suppl}' the places which they 
leave vacant. 

Wright and Waterman formed an insur- 
mountable obstacle to their opponents. The 
college nine was seriously crippled by the 
absence of the regular catcher, first baseman, 
and center fielder. With these in their posi- 
tions the score would have been closer, at 
least. However, we do not grudge '84 their 
victory. The score by innings: 

12345G789 

Seniors 1250000 5 2—15 

College, ....00020000 0—2 

Bases on balls— Seniors 1, College 1. Struck out — 
Seniors 9, College 8. Base hits — Seniors 15, College 6. 
Errors— Seniors 4, College 13. Earned runs — Seniors 3, 
College 1. Umpire — Barrett Potter. Time of game — 1 
hour 50 minutes. 



COLIxEGII TABULA. 



The Plying Weeks. The end draweth nigh 
— there are unmistakable evidences of it. The 
college year is getting narrowed down to a fine 
point, and before the issue of another Orient it 
will not possess position even. The Seniors have 
monopolized quite a good deal of attention lately 
with their final chapel and examinations. The 
latter were attended by the usual number of annual 
Interrogation points. A number of the other boys 



have taken their examinations and departed— some 
to work, and others to other occupations, doubtless. 
Thomas took his, and went home to teach an in- 
fant class iu Sunday School — a position for which 
nature seems to have formed him. A few of the 
members of the class in Mineralogy, together with 
Professor Robinson, made an excursion for minerals 
last week. The most of the afternoon was spent 
in a futile attempt to ignite a charge of powder, 
which was inserted in one of the ledges. A few 
minerals were found by the party, including sev- 
eral fine large specimens of Appetite which the boys 
brought back with them. On the whole they ap- 
peared to have had rather a Gneiss time. The 
boat crew has departed for Saratoga, in order to 
practice on the course there before the race occurs. 
The closing game of the series arranged with 
Colby was played at Lewistou, although the con- 
test with that college was already decided in favor 
of Colby. The game at Lewiston was won by the 
Bowdoius. The annual game between nines from 
the Senior class took place last week. The playing 
was better than is usually exhibited in such con- 
tests between non-combatants. A game between 
the Senior class and the three lower classes re- 
sulted in a walk-over for the Seniors. Eeviews 
have begun, and the ambitious youth begins to 
cram for the examinations, which occur next week. 
Quite a number of the alumni, while waiting over 
here for the train to the Democratic Convention, 
at Bangor, took advantage of the opportunity to 
visit the campus and college buildings. The old 
boys have an interest in Bowdoin yet. Mr. 
Booker and his men have been putting the campus 
in order for commencement, trimming the trees and 
whitening the fences. The long walk in front of 
the grounds has been thoroughly repaired and 
coated with gravel. The grass ought to be cut; 
it is poor policy to try to raise a crop of hay on 
grounds devoted to other purposes. 

*„*The Seniors had their final chapel exercise 
on Tuesday afternoon of last week. The occasion 
which is peculiar to Bowdoin, we think, is one of 
the most touching of all the associations, which 
bind the members of a class together, having an 
element of sadness in it, as is usually the case in 
the performance of last things. '84 formed in line, 
four deep, and with arms closely interlocked, 
marched slowly out, singing " Auld Laug Syne," 
followed in the open air by cheering for the college, 
the Faculty and the undergraduates. 

*ij,*The managing editor of the Orient has 
lately shown marked symptoms of becoming bald- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



75 



headed. This condition of things first came to 
notice immediately after Ivy Day, and the expla- 
nation seems to be, that his oration on that occa- 
sion absorbed all the vital energy of that part of 
his system, consequently his hair had to let go its 

grip- 

*«* We are such busy mortals — we ! and 
Needs must fill our three-score years 
And teu quite to the overflow, with 
Work and petty cares. We go through 
One day — like the rest — with eyes 
That range too low to catch else 
But the mire and dreary sameness 
Of the world. We come down, tired, 
To the day's end — not once having 
Seen God's pure liills, lifting up 
Their everlasting faces to His Heaven. 
— If once — but ouce — in all tlie press 
And weary rush, we might just catch 
One single glance of sometliing high and clean, 
We could go on and never mind tlie 
Outside — God inside — and so. 
In some sweet way, our liumanness 
Would lift itself up into His Divineness. 
***The Tutor in Mathematics a few days ago 
conceived the idea of enlarging his biceps, and 
toning up his system generally, by a pull on the 
river. With this view he wended his steps toward 
the boat-hoQse, and embarked in a very rheumatic 
and porous single, which he found there. A short 
period later, those on the float were treated 
to an exhibition of aquatic gymnastics rarely wit- 
nessed here. The boat e.xhibited an insane desire 
to get up on its ear, so to speak, and in doing this 
it shifted its cargo. A barge was immediately 
launched, which put off to the relief of the ship- 
wrecked mariner, who by this time had landed on 
the island, with a sample of the Androscoggin 
lodged in his anatomy. He would not hear of such 
a thing as assistance, and proceeded to bail out, 
after which he started again, and had reached the 
middle of the river when the boat spilled something. 
It was the Tutor. Nothing daunted, he stood there, 
a la Neptune, and proceeded to bail out again, and 
then essayed to get in. It was lots of fun to see 
him try that. He would put one foot in, and when 
he attempted to put the other one in beside it, the 
boat would start ofl up river. He finally, however, 
got on board and started for the float, considering 
that a life on the ocean wave was not the life in- 
tended for him ; but before he reached it, the water 
rose up and took him in its arms with an embrace 
suggestive of the return of the prodigal son. Bet- 
ting ran high among those on the float as to 
whether he would ever reach the shore,— some 



being willing to stake odds that he would soon be 
a minus quantity. But the fates preserved him to 
still longer mould the Freshman's plastic soul. 

*jj,*The Senior examinations occurred on Mon- 
day and Tuesday of last week, and as a result of 
the rank for this and preceding terms, the follow- 
ing men were appointed to speak at commence- 
ment : C. C. Torrey, Yarmouth, Salutatory ; 
Llewellyn Barton, Naples; W. H. Cothreu, Farm- 
ington ; C. W. Longren, Sweden; 0. W. Means, 
Augusta; M. H. Orr, Brunswick; E. C. Smith, 
Augusta; J. Torrey, Jr., Yarmouth ; J. A. Water- 
man, Jr., Gorham ; H. M. Wright, Westford, Mass., 
Orations. 

*jg*Our reading-i-oom is abundantly supplied 
with papers, if regard is had to numbers alone. 
But it is an obvious fact that three-fourths of them 
are rarely glanced at. Go into the room at any 
time, and it will be found that the dailies, Puck, 
and Harper's Weekly, are about the only papers in 
use, while the rest are allowed to hang on the walls 
from week to week. The trouble must be in the 
selection. The papers which we have are doubt- 
less good, but they do not hit the general taste 
here, and they should be exchanged for something 
that will. It would doubtless be found advanta- 
geous to cut down the list one-half, and invest the 
money thus saved in more dailies. We need more 
variety in these— getting our information almost 
entirely from Boston papers is not the best way to 
get the most catholic ideas. One or two New York 
or Washington dailies should be added to the list, 
and two copies of some of them might be 
taken to advantage, so that so many need not be 
kept waiting, while others are devouring the news. 
And in this connection it may be well to ask why 
we can't have some religious papers other than 
those under the control of the Congregationalist 
Church. Some of the students have widely differ- 
ing beUefs from this body, and as long as they 
help support the room, they should be remembered 
in the selection of religious reading. 

*is*We have no relish for playing the role of a 
moral reformer, or anything of the sort, but when 
our ears are assailed from day to day by a species 
of conversation, in comparison with which, billings- 
gate is elegant and refined, we have no notion of 
keeping quiet. A number of the students seem to 
have the idea that, hemmed in by college bounda- 
ries, they have great freedom and latitude in the 
matter of speech, and so pour forth their vile ex- 
pressions and remarks, which ought to cause a 



76 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



deceat man to blusli for shame, that such rubbish 
clothed io hamaa form should exist. If a decent 
respect for the ears of others cannot keep these 
fellows quiet, then the college had Letter suspend 
operations for a day or two, and attend their fun- 
erals. The moral sentiment of a college cannot 
be well regarded as highly elevated, when it pas- 
sively submits to such an imposition. A little less 
indiscriminate praying for the conversion of the 
world at large, substituted for more practical work 
with a shot-gun, would make the moral atmosphere 
decidedly clearer. 

*s*A game of ball on the delta between a nine 
from Bath and the Bowdoin second nine, Friday 
afternoon, resulted in a victory for the latter, by a 
score of 15 to 4. 

*s,*A second crew, composed of Brown, Alex- 
ander and Davis, of '85, and Varney, '87, have 
gone into practice in the old shell, and are rowing 
daily. 

***It will be remembered that at the first of 
this term we earnestly urged all in the college to 
contribute to this department anything of interest 
to those inside or outside the college. The invita- 
tion has not met with a very gratifying response. 
Whatever has not passed under the notice of the 
editor, which was worth recording here, has inva- 
riably been obtained only at the point of the bay- 
onet. It has been no uncommon thing to see the 
Tabula scribe standing with a club over some luck- 
less youth whom he has met, and of whom he has 
demanded a local or his life— being determined to 
have something to put in here, even if it had to 
be an obituary notice. We regret this lack of 
assistance on the part of the students, for the rea- 
son that it is natural to claim that one set of stu- 
dents receive more mention than others. This 
accusation is often made by those who do not 
reflect that the editor naturally knows more of 
what happens to the residents of his own Hall 
than of the others ; and if no one will take the 
trouble to keep him informed of what transpires in 
other quarters— why the fault is his own. We 
shan't speak of this thing again. If you won't ante 
up, then shut up. 

*»*It seems decidedly foolish to store away in a 
room seldom visited a collection of paintings worth 
a great many thousands of dollars, and at the same 
time be suffering for the common necessities of life. 
It is after the style of a poverty-stricken family 
struggling to make both ends meet and, at the 
same time, hoarding up the family plate. While 



these pictures are of no earthly benefit to Bowdoin, 
except as bric-a-brac to show visitors at commence- 
ment time, we are actually suffering for a great 
many things. If these pictures are worth as much 
as claimed, they ought to be exchanged for a decent 
telescope and observatory, so that some practical 
work in astronomy can be done here as well as at 
other colleges. A gymnasium ought to be built 
with the proceeds of a " Vandyke," and better sal- 
aries paid the professors, so that the best of them 
need not be snatched away by richer colleges when 
they get a reputation here. There are lots of things 
we need, and we clonH need that fossilized, anti- 
quated collection of canvas and brown paint. If 
there are people in the world who are willing to pay 
large sums for curiosities they ought to be abetted 
in their thirst for "early English" and some tangi- 
ble, practical use made of the result A mere matter 
of sentiment ought not stand in the way of the 
advantages to be derived from better means of in- 
struction and physical culture. 

*i,*It may interest zealous Blaineites to learn 
that the library has recently received '' Twenty 
Years of the American Congress," by James G. 
Blaine. 

***The program for commencement week has 
been arranged and is as follows : 

SUNDAY. 

10.45 P.M. Sermon before the Y. M. C. A. by Prof. Eg- 
bert C. Smyth, CD., Andover, Mass. 
4.00 P.M. Baccalaureate Sermon by Prot Samuel G. 
Brown, D.D. 

MONDAY. 

8.00 P.M. Junior Prize Declamation. 

TUESDAY. 

Class Day Exercises. Illumination and dance on the 
green in the evening. 

WEDNESDAY. 

9.00 A.M. Phi Beta Kappa Meeting. 
10.30 A.M. Meeting of the Alumni. 

3.00 P.M. Address before the Alumni by Edward Ev- 
erett Hale, D.D., of Boston, Mass. 

8.00 P.M. Concert in the Town Hall, under the auspices 
of the Senior Class. 

THURSDAY. 

9.00 A.M. Prayer-Meeting of Alumni and Friends in Y. 
M. C. A. room. 
10.30 A.M. Commencement Exercises, followed by dinner 

in Memorial Hall. 
8.00 P.M. Reception by Professor A, S. Packard. 

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY. 

Examination of candidates for admission to college. 

*,.*The contest for the championship in tennis 
playing has not yet been fully decided, the singles 
not having all been played. In the doubles Phin- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



77 



uey and Clark won the game from Folsom and 
Cook, " Joe " and Charlie Torrey heating Freeman 
and Earaes. Phinney and Clark then played with 
the Torreys and won, gaining the championship in 
doubles. In the singles Phinney, Folsom and 
Fames have won four games each, losing one each. 
The deciding games will be played commencement 
week. 

***Two very interesting articles by Professor 
Avery appear iu the American Antiquarian for 
May. Articles from his pen can be found in very 
many numbers of this magazine. 

*„*At a meeting of the Readiug-Room Associa- 
tion the following officers were chosen for the com- 
ing year : Smith, '86, President ; Norris, '86, Vice- 
President; Fling, '86, Wentworth, '86, Torrey, '87, 
Dircetors. 

*j^*Prof. Smith has lately been giving the 
Freshmen some practical work in surveying on the 
campus. 

*g*As a promise of what we may expect in the 
future, the students have been enabled to enjoy 
several excellent entertainments iu the new town 
hall, the most notable of which was the concert by 
the Kellogg company. It was probably as good, 
all things considered, as any concert ever held in 
Brunswick, some of the parts being beautifully ren- 
dered, among which may be mentioned the opening 
duet, by the tenor and bass ; the violin playing of 
Miss Chandler; and the quartet in the scene from 
"Martha." In the G. A. R. entertainment the 
quartet sang successfully, and in the play which 
was presented on one of the four evenings, Folsom 
and Kilgore took part. It is to be hoped that the 
financial result was such as to warrant other con- 
certs in the future. 

*^*We sincerely hope that in making out the 
schedule of studies for next year, some change 
may be made in the present list of Senior work. 
There are excellent arguments in favor of such 
a change. In the first place there is no earthly 
reason why, in the fall term for instance, the Juniors 
should be allowed electives and the privilege 
denied the upper class. One would naturally sup- 
pose that a Senior is as well able to make a wise 
selection of studies as one of less experience. Again 
by making so many ethical and political studies 
required, the year is made an unpleasant one 
to those whose tastes do not lie in these direc- 
tions. Furthermore, there is no provision made 
for the growing desire to make greater advances in 
scientific studies, except in the one branch of chem- 



istry. One who wishes to prepare himself to teach 
the sciences must, as things now are, work alone or 
with but little assistance. The time we spend on 
these studies during Junior year is lost in a great 
measure if we cannot carry them to a proper length. 
An opportunity ought to be granted to those who 
wish to extend their scientific studies, by giving 
such electives during Senior year as will enable 
them to do it. We hope those having the matter 
in charge will, if possible, make this attainable. 



PERSONAL. 



fGraduates and undergi-aduates are earnestly solicited to send 
personal items to the BowDors Orient, Brunswick, Me.] 

The Faculty : 

Ex-President Chamberlain lectured to the Colby 
students, May 16th, upon Political Economy. He 
has lately been in attendance at the Reunion of the 
Army of the Potomac, at the Oriental House, Co- 
ney Island. At the banquet he responded to the 
toast, "The Volunteers." 

Prof. Avery has been appointed by the Faculty 
to attend to the examinations at the fitting schools 
of Fryeburg and Machias. 

'09. — Several erroneous statements concerning 
John Mussey, of Portland, have lately been going 
the rounds of the daily papers. John Mussey was 
born in Portland in 1790, and is 94 years old. He 
is the oldest graduate of the college, the next in 
age being our Prof Packard, who graduated in 
1816. 

'37. — C. F. Allen preached the annual sermon 
before the graduating class of the Bucksport Sem- 
inary, June 15th; subject, "Run, Speak to This 
Young Man." 

'41.— Dr. Samuel Ingalls, of Winthrop, was 
killed Wednesday, June 11th, while walking on the 
railroad. Dr. Ingalls was born in Sandown, N. H., 
in 1818. For a short time he taught, and then en- 
tered the Medical School. After graduation, he 
practiced as a physician in Nashua, N. H., Provi- 
dence, R. I., and Boston. In 1857 he went to Win- 
throp and practiced his profession. Removing 
from there in I860 he went to Sandwich, N. H., and 
soon after entered the Union army. At one time 
he was volunteer surgeon on the medical staff. He 
spent some time in the hospitals at Washington 
and also at Portsmouth Grove. At the formation 
of the 5th Regiment Cavalry, M. V. M., January 



78 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



11, 1864, he was appointed assistant surgeon and 
was honorably discharged the same year. The 
doctor was very much beloved by his fellow-towns- 
men. He ever had the good of the community at 
heart, and leaves many friends, who deeply mourn 
his loss. 

'58.— Osceola Jackson left Boston week before 
last for the west coast of Africa, where he will re- 
main eight months. 

'58. — In the Christian Mirror of May 31st is an 
article by D. S. Talcott, entitled " The Obedient 
Spirit a Discerner of the Truth." There is also 
an article by E. A. Rand ('57), entitled •' He 
Helped Me Find Jesus." 

'60.— In the First Maine District Eepubhoan 
Convention, held at Portland, May 28th, Hon. 
Thos. B. Reed was re-uorainated as candidate for 
Representative to Congress. Being members of 
the college where Mr. Reed graduated, and being 
conversant with the little trouble which has arisen 
between him and the people of Brunswick, we take 
this opportunity to give our opinion of the affair. 
First we will state the facts. For the last four 
years the position of postmaster here has been very 
acceptably tilled by a poor, honest and disabled sol- 
dier. When the time for the appointment of 
postmaster came, a new aspirant appeared in the 
field. The latter had on his i)etition many names, 
but few of the influeutial men of Br..Dswick. He 
was neither poor, nor had he at any time shown 
himself of any value to the government, except 
when it came time to pull in the voters on election 
day. The old veteran had upon his petition more 
names than the other, and most of the leading men 
of Brunswick, including every professor of Bowdoin 
College and many of the students. Mr. Reed says : 
"After comparing the circumstances, I concluded 
it best to advise the appointment I did." In our 
opinion Mr. Reed thus rang his political death- 
knell. He may expect to lose as many as one 
hundred votes in the town of Brunswick, beside 
the votes of the students who are voters in ditferent 
parts of the First Maine District. He completely 
ignored the wishes of the majority, including those 
whose very names should be dear to him through 
college associations. Really we cannot see how it 
was possible for Mr. Reed to act so directly against 
the wishes of the majority of the voters of Bruns- 
wick, and the wishes of his firm friends, who have 
looked at his upward career with pride. 

'70. — Prof. Rolliston Woodbury, of the Eastern 
State Normal School, who received a degree here 



in '70, started for the West on Monday, June 8th, 
where he will spend a few months for rest and re- 
cuperation. His health has failed so much that 
the Trustees will release him part of the coming 
year. 

'70. — At the Democratic Convention, holden at 
Bangor, June 17th, John B. Redman was nomi- 
nated for Governor. The Argus, of June 18th, 
contains the following concerning him : 

" The nominee, John B. Redman, is a gentle- 
man of culture, and a man of alTairs, an excellent 
standard-bearer, young, alert, and energetic, a 
Democrat by breeding and from conviction, and a 
man familiar with the material interests of the 
State. He is a native of Brooksville, where he 
was born June 11, 1848. The year following grad- 
uation he was principal of the Bluehill Academy. 
He then began the study of law with the Hon. 
Arno Wiswell, of Ellsworth, and was admitted to 
the bar in 1873. He opened an ofQce in Ellsworth, 
where he has since been engaged in the practice of 
his profession. He has been a member of the su- 
perintending school committee in that city, and 
was for three years supervisor of schools. He is 
now one of the trustees of Bluehill Academy. In 
1876 he was elected City Solicitor, and was a dele- 
gate at large to the National Democratic Conven- 
tion of 1880. In 1881 he was appointed judge of 
the Municipal Court of Ellsworth. This year he 
was elected Mayor of that city, a position he now 
holds. Mr. Redman possesses a stalwart figure 
and a fine head and face. He is unmarried." 

'71.— Prof. Kingsbury Bachelder, of Hillsdale, 
Michigan, is East, and will attend the graduating 
exercises of the Maine Central Institute. 

'73. — A. E. Herrick has been chosen treasurer 
of the Bethel Savings Bank, in place of Enoch 
Foster, resigned. Mr. Herrick is at present part- 
ner with Judge Foster in law practice. 

'73. —A. F. Richardson passed through here 
last week on his way to attend the graduating ex- 
ercises of the State Normal School at Castine. 
He is a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
Normal School. He delivered the address before 
the graduating class of the State Normal School at 
Farmington. His subject was, " Success in School- 
Teaching." 

'75.— W. A. Deering has been elected secretary 
of the Faculty of the University of Vermont. 

'78.— Clarence A. Baker, of Portland, was mar- 
ried June 4th, to Miss Mary A. Whitimace of Prov- 
idence, R. I. 

'79. — Seward Stearns, now practicing law in 
Norway, made us a short visit week before last. 

'81.— F. C. Stevens will graduate from the Iowa 
Law School, June I9th. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



79 



'81. — McGilliciiddy has been stirring up bad 
blood among the Democrats of Lewiston, simply 
because be will not conform to " Ring " I'nle. 

'81. — Jobn W. Manson is, for the present, stop- 
ping at Pittsfleld, Me. 

'81. — At the end of this term, Tutor Fisher 
leaves the college and enters upon his law studies. 
" Abe " is too honest to make a good lawyer. 

'81. — H. W. Chamberlain is reported sick at his 
father's plantation in Florida. 

'81. — The funny man of the Brunswick Herald 
says : " Wilson and Bates ('82) were in town over 
Sunday, each bent upon the same errand." We 
saw neither of them around the college ; their 
business must have been \evj pressing. Bates has 
been attending a course of lectures at the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, in New York City. 

'81.— F. C. Stevens graduated from the Law 
School of Iowa City last Wednesday. In a class 
of one hundred and thirty-two, Mr. Stevens was 
awarded first honor and the valedictory. He will 
probably go to St. Paul, Minn., and enter the of- 
fice of Edward Simonton, class of 'Gl. 

'82. — Libby is teaching the High School at Ber- 
lin Falls, N. H. 

'84. — Orr and Smith have accepted lucrative 
positions as teachers in a seminary in California. 

'85. — Ford and Knight ('86) are contemplating 
a trip to Europe this summer, in company with 
Prof. Atwood. 

At the annual meeting of the Maine Medical 
Association the following graduates of the school 
here took part : Sumner Laughtou ('34), Presi- 
dent; Abial Libby ('47), 1st Vice President; S. 
W.Johnson ('64), Corresponding Secretary; A. L. 
Hersey ('53) delivered the annual oration. 



GENERAL eOLLEGE NOTES. 



Tufts' new Museum of Natural History is the 
gift of P. T. Barnum. 

More than a fourth of the students in German 
Universities are Americans. 

Every member of the Faculty at Amherst Col- 
lege is a graduate of that institution. — Mirror. 

Oberlin College has received $50,000 for the 
establishment of a school of music. — Crimson. 

Columbia has recently entered for the four-oared 



race at Saratoga, next Fourth of July, so that there 
are now five contestants. 

Two editors of the Dartmouth have been indefi- 
nitely suspended for expressing in that paper senti- 
ments offensive to the Faculty. 

The New York Evening Post now has a regular 
correspondent at Yale, Princeton, Lafayette, Wil- 
liams, Amherst, Cornell, and Harvard. 

a.&& mmM.'mQmmm 



piAiM AMI imvi fimiMIJ 

neatly executed at the 



►n- gPECI^Ii ^ FINE ^ W^^ ^' 

A-KE VERY POPUEATl. 



STUDENTS' ATTENTION! 

Do you wish to earn a large sum of money during the 
summer vacation ? We want three or four more Students 
who are ready to work hard for good pay to secure subscribers 
for our heautifully illustrated magazine, and will give the 
right men very large pay. Write at once to the Cottage 
Hearth Co., 11 Bromfield St.,Boi3ton. 



WHY I AM A REPUBLICAN 

A graphic and reliable presentation of Republican princi- 
ples, and reasons for continuing the party In power, also 
fine portraits and authentic lives of 

hy Gov. GEO. S. BOTJTWELL, of Mass. THE BOOK 
of the party, endorsed by leading Republicans. Price in 
reach of every voter. A rare opportunity for a wide awake 
student to engage in the campaign with profit. 

WM. J. BETTS & CO., Hartford, Conn. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are \¥iUiiig to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No.l 

SUPERIOR TO ALL, OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolntely without adulteration or drugs. 

We tise the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 

direct importation, which is made especially for us, water 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without wliich none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLEN & OINTER Manufacturers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



New system. Learned in less than one-quarter the time 
required by any other. Old reporters throw away old sys- 
tems and learn this .for speed and legibility. It can be 
successfully 

TAUGHT BY MAIL. 
The corresponding style can be learned in a few hours, 
and the full verbatim reporting style in a few months. It 
is a marvel of simplicity. 

STUDENTS 

can easily acquire enough to enable them to take notes of 

LECTURES. 

Send for circular. Terms: Corresponding style, five 

lessons, $5. Corresponding and reporting, twenty lessons, 

SIO. 

R. B. CAPEN, Augusta, Me. 



J^ STEEL 
PENS. 




Leading Numbers : 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Sta'tioners. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEN CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York 



SMOKE THE BEST. 

We beg to inform the nublic and smokers generally, that we 
have secured a Large stock of the very choicest grades of thor- 
oughly cured 

GOLDEKT VIEGIKTIA, PEEIQUE and TURKISH 

tobaccos, which we :u-e using in the manuCarture of our Cele- 
brated brands of cigarette and smoking tobaoocs. And 
have added to our stock a large shipment of the finest imported 
French Kioe Paper. Such stock, made up by the highest class of 
skillful labor, we feel confident cannot fall to satisfy the tastes of 
all good judges. 

STAKTDARD BKAKTDS. 



JUST OUT— SPOETSMAN'S CAPOKAL. 
Manufactured by Special Eequest. 

jLuiney Tobacco Co., 

Successors to Kinney Bros., New York 



-^mUm, M, 



DEALER IN 



No. 2 Odd Fellows' Block, 
gP^IN6 ^J^D RUMMER JSTYIiE^ ^Iilt IN- 

Sr, . . . BRUNSWICK. 



%w^fhm ^joHeile ]\|e(lic(]l j]cp(tp|miiit 

The Sixty-Second .Vnmiiil Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 7th, 1884, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACtlLTY.— ALPHEUS S. PACKARD, Aciing President; 
Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel T. Dana, 31. D,, 
Pathology and Pr.actice ; Alfred MrrciiELL, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women .and Children : Charles W. Goddard, 
A.M., Medical .Jurisprudence; Frederic H. Gkekish, M.D., 
Anatomy; Henry Carmichael, Ph.D., ChemistTy: Burt G. 
Wilder, M.D., Physiology; Stephen H. Weeks, M.'D., Surgery 
and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica 
.and Therapeutics ; Irving E. KuiBALLi M.D. , Demonstrator of 
Anatomy; EVERETr T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of His- 
tologic. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

FRANK M. STETSON, 



•stS 






uc 


m 


w 


r^il 


3: 




GO 






® 


■z. 




rr, 


m 
m 




© 


Q 


^.s- 


^ 




< 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Diamonds, 



Jewelry, 



Silver Ware, 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 

Prepare Original Designs for Society 
Badges, Rings, Prizes, and Class Clips, 
'Which will be forwarded to students on 
request, 

A SPECIALTY is made of English 
Pewter Beer Mugs, in two sizes, with Glass 
Bottoms. 

Society, Book, and Visiting Card Plates 
engraved in proper style. 

Invitations and Programmes in novel 
yorms at short notice. 

Shreve, Crump & Low, 



Jironzes, 



Porcelains, 



Fancy Goods. 



BYRON STEVENS, 

B08KgEIiIiER I gTHTIBNER 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE &. CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



EARS for the MILLION 

Foo Choo's Balsam of Shark's Oil 

Positively Restores the Hearing, and is the Only 
AbsoUite Cure for Deafness Known. 

This Oil is abstracted from peculiar species of small White 
Shark, caught in the yellow Sea, known as Carcharodon Rond- 
eletii. Every Chinese fisherman knows it. Its virtues as a re- 
storative of hearing were discovered by a Buddhist Priest about 
the year 1410. Its cures were so numerous and many so seem,' 
ingly miraculous, that the remedy- was officially proclaimed over 
the entire Empire. Its use became so universal that for over 300 
years no deafness has existed among the Chinese people. Sent, 
charges prepaid, to any address at $1.00 per bottle. 

IIAI W11,T THE DIIF S^¥ 

It has performed a miracle in my case. 

I have no unearthly noises in my head and hear much better. 

I have been greaily benefited. 

My deafness helped a great deal— think another bottle will 
cure mo. 

My hearing is much benefited. 

I have received untold benefit. 

My hearing is improving. 

It is giving good satisfaction. 

Have been gi'eatly benefited, and am rejoiced that I saw the 
notice of it. 

" Its virtues are unquestionable and its curative character ab- 
solute, as the writer can personally testify, both from experience 
and observation. Write at once to Haylock & Jeuney, 7 Dey 
Street, ^'ew York, enclosing $1.00, and you will receive bv retui*n 
a remedy that will enable you to hear like anybody else, and 
whose curative effects will be permanent. You will never regret 
doing so." — Editor nj^ Mercantile Review. 

e®-To avoid loss in the Mails, please send money by Regis- 
tered Letter. 

Only Imported by HAYLOCK & JENNEY, 
Sole Agents for America. 7 Dey St., N. Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



NATIONAL SCHOOL SUPPLY BlIREAn. 

Beloit, Wis., July 31, 1883. 
National School Supply Bureau: 

Last April, beinff then in charge of a large public school, but 
desiring a position in some good academy or college, I placed 
my name with your Bureau. During the iirst part of the present 
month I received notice from you of a vacancy in such a place as 
I desired. 

Putting myself in communication with the party concerned I 
received the appointment. I am well satisfied with the manage- 
ment of the Bureau, and feel sure that it fills a useful and nec- 
essary place in oiir school economy. You are at liberty to use 
my name if you wish. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD O. FISKE. 
Headmaster Markara Academy, Milwaukee, Wis. 

For application-form and circular, address. 

National School Supply Depot, Chicago, III. 
N. B.— "We want all kinds of Teachers for Schools 
and Families. Good Pay to Agents and Private Cor- 
respondents. 



-DEALER IN- 



Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

VioUns, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 



STUDENTS 

Of all classes will find it v.aluable to consult on all subjects the 



183 SOUTH CLARK STREET, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Full information given on receipt of return postage. A union 
of writers, critics, and scholars of the highest order. 



DEALER IN 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Student Clubs. 



All the Students Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND EUBBERS 



ALL KINDS OF 






Tl .''ii p. 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Cor. Main and Mason Sts., off. Town Clock. 



Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fur- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Work- 
manship, we especially solicit orders for Fine Printing of all 
kinds. 

For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

We also make a specialty of 

FIl^gT-CIi^^g P1^I]S[TI]S[6 

For Schools and Colleges. 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A-. O. REED, 

BE,XJ3>TS"V\7"IOIC, 3VLE. 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vie"ws : also College Views. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval feme, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

FOTi.TiMA.NJ3, ivi:a.ine:. 



^F. H. WILS0K,3}H- 

DISPENSER OF 

IMPORTED AND DOIVIESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc. , in Great Variety. 

Tfie Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECDVLTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Go to W. B. VfToodard's 

To buy vour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doiug. 

Main Street, Head of IVIall, Brunswick, Me. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMiVIER, Director, 

180 ll/liddle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



MAIN STREET, BEUNSWICK, ME. 



WP. % FIEIiD, 



WW^^^ 



TOMTIME HOTKLi, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Special attention will be given to Class and Reunion Dinners 
and buppers to order. First-class laundry connected with the 
house. 

S. B. BREWSTER, Proprietor. 



MAIOMBS, FIMI WATCIES, 

239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. JIERKILL. A. KEITH. 



DEALER IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 "WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 

Washington Market, 

TONTINE HOTEL BLOCK, 

Meats, Vegetables, and Fruits of all kinds. Also Oys- 
ters, Fresh and Smoked Fish. 
Bowdoia College Patronage Solicited. 



^^m 






:£^ 



DEALER IN 



fcSi^ 



CEDAR STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Branch office three doors north of Tontiue Hotel. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
^^ Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PIGTUEE lEAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

Also Pictures, Cabinet Frames, Stationery, Cards, Allnims, 

etc. Also agent for the celebrated Household Sewing 

Macliines, 

In the Everett Store, Main Street, Opposite the Mall, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 










fie giiiiiiiAi §§.« 

(Established 1S77.) 

10 BERKELY ST., BOSTON, MASS., 

OWE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 

OTHER TO TEICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 

stamp at above address. 



ST^LL Sd BTJRT, 

509 Tremont St., and 4 Warren Ave., Odd Fellows' Hall, Boston, Mass. 
SPECIAL IMPROVED 

American STAR Bicycle 

Although conlp.^ratively a new machine on the mar- 
ket, the STAEhas inade a splendicirecorii, 
having won the 

Twenty-Five Mile Championship of 

the TJnited States, 

Breaking the record, in S3 minutes 10 seconds. 

It has a mile record of 2 min. 50 1-8 sec; 
5 miles, 15 min. 26 3-4 sec: mile without 
hands, 3 min. 11 sec. It has won the most im- 
portant Hill Climbing Contests, including 
Corey Hill, Boston, Eagle HUl, Orange, N. J., 
and Standpipe Hill, Washington, D. C. This 
is a mere mention of the triumphs of the Star, 

The principles embodied in the Star give the perfect combination for safety, speed, and comfort with economy of 
maintenance and durability found in no other machine. 

IN ADDITION WE HAVE THE 

VICTOR TRICYCLE, The Most Fanious Ttee-fkeleF Male In The forll 

A FuU Line of the Best ENGLISH MACHINES 

Go to complete tlie list and suit all tastes. 

The IDEAIj, a cheaper machine for use of boys and youths, is a splendid jnachine for purpose intended and is 
highly recommended- 

SECOND-HAND MACHINES of all kinds, SUPPLIES and SUNDRIES constantly on hand. 

REPAIRING of most difficult kinds performed at reasonable rates. All machines and parts must be plainly 
marked and be accompanied by instructions by next mail. 

SEND TWO-CENT STAMP FOR CATALOGUE. 




BOWDOiN ORIENT. 



Diamonds, 



Jewelry, 



Silver Ware, 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



Prepare Original Designs for Society 
Badges, Rings, Prizes, and Class Cups, 
which will be forwarded to students on 
request, 

A SPECIALTY is made of English 
Pewter Beer Mugs, in two sizes, with Glass 
Bottoms. 

Society, Book, and Visiting Card Plates 
engraved in proper style. 

Invitations and Programmes in novel 
forms at short notice. 

Shreve, Crump & Low, 



Bronzes, 



Porcelains, 



Fancy Goods. 



BYRON STEVENS, 

B00KgEIiIiER I gTHTiei^EI^, 

:]Bitxji>rs-wic;is., 'aiL.A.i.:ss:Ei. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



EARS for the MILLION 

Foo Choo's Balsam of Shark's Oil 

Positively Hestores the Hearing, and is the Only 
Absolute Cure for Deafness Known. 

This Oil is abstracted from peculiar species of small White 
Shark, caught iu the yellow Sea, known as Carcharoclon Kond- 
eletii. Every Chinese lisherman knows it. Its virtues as a re- 
storative of hearing were discovered by a Buddhist Priest about 
the year 1410. Its cures were so numerous and mavy so seem- 
ingly miraculous, that the remedy was officially proclaimed over 
the entire Empire. Its use became so universal that for over 300 
years no deafness has existed among the Chinese people. Sent, 
charges prepaid, to any address at §1.00 per bottle. 

WgMi WHilT THE DE^F SAY 

It has performed a miracle in my case. 

I have no unearthly noises in my head and hear much better. 

I have been greatly beneiited. 

My deafness helped a gi'eat deal— think another bottle will 
cure me. 

My hearing is much benefited. 

I have received untold benefit. 

My hearing is improving. 

It "is giving good satisfaction. 

Have been greatly benefited, and am rejoiced that I saw the 
notice of it. 

"Its virtues are unquestionable and its curative character ab- 
solute, as the writer can personally testify, both from experience 
and observation. Write at once to Hayloct & Jenney, 7 Dey 
Street, New York, enclosing $1.00, and you will receive bv return 
a remedy that will enable you to hear like anybody else, and 
whose curative effects will be permanent. You will never regret 
doing ao.'*— Editor of Mercantile Review. 

,e®*To avoid loss in the Mails, please send money by Regis- 
tered Letter. 

Only Imported by HAYLOCK & JENNEY, 
Sole Agents for America. 7 Dey St., N. Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGrXG 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard " and" Duplex" Burner 

IS PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Yisiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGRAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 

All the Late Publications in stock. Text-Boolis of all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL "WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

]\[0. 5 ©DD KEIiIiOW^' BII0CK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 



The only radical internal remedy. Never known to 
fail in a single case, acute or chronic. It expels the poison- 
ous Uric Acid froni the blood, which is the prime cause 
of Rheumatism, Gout, and Neuralgia.— As a blood jmri- 

THE OLD RELIABLE SPECIFIC 

ENDORSED BY PHYSICIANS AND 

THOUSANDS OF PATIENTS. 

tier it lias no equal. Acting on common-sense principles 
it eradicates from the blood all poisonous matter which 
causes disease. — It has been in use for many years and 
cured a larger percentage of cases than any other 

POSITIVELY CURES 

remedy. Send for testimonials from the cured. — Salicy- 
lica strikes directly at the cause of these diseases, while 
so many so-called speci- 

BHEUMATISM 

fics only treat locally the effect. When you have tried 
in vaiii all the "oils," "ointments," "liniments," and 
"pain cures," and when your 

GOUT. NEURALGIA, 

doctors cannot help you, do not despair Imt take Salicy- 
lica at once and be cured. — No one can afford to live in 
pain and misery when 

GRAVEL, DIABETES, 

Salicylica will relieve him and put him in condition to 
attend to his daily avocations. 

S8 per box, 6 boxes for S5, 

BLOOD POISONING. 



with full directions in ten languages. Sold by druggists 
everywhere, or sent by mail, prepaid, on receipt of price. 

WASHBURNE & CO., Prop's, 

287 Broadway, New York. 

Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

0(1(1 Fellows' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. VY. BKOWNE, Proprietor. 
Formerlv at Tontine Hotel. 



THE FAVORITE A/OS. 303-404-332-I7O-J5I- WITH 
■^HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORL 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



m J. lERRYMAN, PHARMACIST,-:- 



Fancy ai Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Toliacco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

^FW Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 

Dentist, 

OvEu Post-office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PtIBLISHEK, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi - 
cai Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 

SPRING AND SUMMER, 1884. 

AT 

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock, 

West Side, may at all times be found a choice assortment of 
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Hosiery, Linen Shirts, Collars, 
Cuffs, all sizes of Underwear, Fine Ready-Made 
Clothing in complete suits or single garments. White 
Vests, White Neck-ties, White Kids, a superb assort- 
ment of Boston and New York Neck-wear which will 
be sold very cheap for cash. 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

(Il3"Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



TAPE lATORM. 

In one of the tropical provinces of Germ.iny there has been 
found a root, the extract from which has proved an absolute 
SPECIFIC for Tape Worm. It is pleasant to take and is not de- 
bilitating or disagreeable in its effects on the patient, but is 
peculiarly sickening and stupefying to the Tape Worm, which 
loosens its hold of its victim and passes away in a natural and 
easy manner, entirely whole, with head, and while still alive. 
One physician has used this remedy in over 400 cases, without a 
single failure to pass worm whole, with head. Absolute i-emoval 
with head guaranteed. No pay required until so removed. Send 
stamp for circular and terms. 

HE YWOOD & CO., 19 Park Plac e, N. Y. City. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner^ 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



-WHEJSr TO TJ ^VANT A. HTDJE 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE, 

On Cleaveland Street, where you will find turnouts to suit the most 
fastidious. ^^ Bates reasonable. 




No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday IVIorning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

«®-Speoial Rates to Student Clubs..fiS 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are e.xamiiied in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil,— Bucolics, Georgics and first six Books 
of the iEneid, including Prosody. 
(Instead of the Georgics, Caesar's Gallic War, 
Books I.-IV., may be olfered.) 



Greek Grammar, — Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Georgraphy, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regular Examinations foe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (July 11 and 12, 1884), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 26 and 27, 1884). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examinations is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Washington Academy, East 
Machias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these 
schools leaving been made special Fitting Schools 
for the college by the action of their several Boards 
of Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 
have been fitted at any school having an approved 



preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQDIIIBD— FOUE HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUE HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $2.5. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $.3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JULY 16, 1884. 



No. 6. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE TEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



EDITORIAL BOARD. 

J. A. Peters, '85, Managing Editor. 

N. B. Ford, '85, Business Editor. 
BoTD Bartlbtt, '85. W. P. Neallet, '85. 

0. B. Cook, '85. A. A. Knowlton, '86. 

Webb Donnell, '85. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. F. Libbt, '85. W. V. Wentworth, '86. 



Per annum, in advance $2.00. 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Kxtra copies can be obtained at the book stores or on applica- 
tion to tbe Bnsiness Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by \\Titer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-OflBce at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XIV., No. 6.-,Jt]ly 16, 1884. 



Editoeial Notes 81 

The Saratoga Regatta 83 

Sunday Services 86 

Success. — Class-Day Oration 87 

The Legend of the Lost City.— Class-Day Poem 91 

Class Day 92 

Commencement Concert 93 

Commencement Day 94 

Prizes for 1883-4 95 

Communication 96 

CoLLEGii Tabula 96 

Personal 98 

General College Notes 99 

Clippings ] 00 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



The few students who remained in Bruns- 
wick over Sunday were inexpressiblj' shocked, 
on that afternoon, to learn of the sudden 
death of our most beloved professor, Alpheus 
S. Packard. To those who saw him preside 
at the exercises of commencement with his 
wonted grace and energy, his firm step and 
sparkling eye, his happy vein of humor as he 
introduced the speakers at alumni dinner, all 
seemed to promise a long extension of a life 
already beautifully rounded and complete in 
all its parts. Connected with the college as 
a teacher for sixty-five years, ever found in 
perfect health at the post of dutj', his name 
had become so intimately associated with that 
of the college, and so widely known in con- 
nection with it, that it seemed as if he him- 
self had become a part of the old institution 
he loved so well. In his loss we feel as if 
half the college had been taken from us, — the 
onl}' remaining link which bound us to the 
past. Around his head clustered all the asso- 
ciations and memories of an unusually long 
life spent in truly filial devotion to his Alma 
Mater. The most picturesque figure con- 
nected with the college, it was his fortune to 
see every class that Bowdoin has nurtured. 
The old graduates who have come to com- 
mencement from remote parts of the country, 
looking forward with such pleasant anticipa- 
tion to a sure recognition and friendly greet- 
ing from Professor Packard, will indeed miss 
his kindly presence. 

We have time before going to press but 
for a brief mention of the misfortune that 
has befallen the college. Would that it were 



82 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



possible for us to give a sketch of the life 
and services of this noble man ; but this labor 
of love will be done by master hands. It is 
allotted to all men once to die, but to some, 
favored beyond the common lot, death comes 
in a peculiarly appropriate time and manner. 
So it was with him. In the fullness of his 
age and honors, after successfully conducting 
one of the most brilliant commencements 
Bowdoin ever saw — a commencement abound- 
ing in tributes of affection and respect from 
former pupils, — without a long and painful 
confinement to a bed of sickness (he was 
never sick a day in his life), but quietlj', 
peacefully and suddenly he was taken away. 
With his death Bowdoin loses one of her 
stanchest supports and every student a true 
friend. 



The commencement just passed has been 
one of the most successful ones in the his- 
tory of the college. A large and enthusiastic 
crowd of alumni and students, enjoyable ex- 
ercises, for the most part pleasant weather, 
and a lack of that disturbance which is often 
characteristic of such gatherings, all contrib- 
uted to the success of the occasion. For the 
seventy-ninth time Bowdoin sends out into 
the world a class of liberally educated young- 
men. They bear the trade-mark of a reliable 
firm and one well known for her work in 
times past. It is only to be regretted that 
more raw material is not furnished each fall. 



Of the business transacted by the Boards 
at their annual meeting the change in the 
time of commencement is the only thing at 
all likely to disturb the undergraduate peace 
of mind. 'Eighty-five, unlike its predeces- 
sors, will graduate in June. As a natural 
consequence of this change, the vacation, 
instead of lasting till October, will be cut 
short two weeks, next fall term beginning the 
sixteenth of September. Although there are 
certain advantages in having commencement 



later than other colleges, there are also great 
disadvantages, and nearly every one will be 
pleased with the change. September is a 
pleasant vacation month, but it is also a pleas- 
ant time for the term to begin, and July is 
apt to be too warm for good work. We shall 
no longer enjoy the rather undesirable dis- 
tinction of being the last college to close and 
the last to open. 



We publish in another column a commu- 
nication from Mr. Child, the base-ball mana- 
ger for the year 1883-4, advocating a project 
which in all respects should commend itself 
to the students. The feeling has been gain- 
ing ground ever since the success of the plan 
of charging admission to the Delta, that the 
accommodating railing now surrounding the 
ground should be replaced by a high board 
fence, and the Field-Day exercises held in that 
place. Mr. Child, with his usual energy, has 
petitioned the Boards to that effect, but the 
petition was refused, as it should be. A fence 
such as would be necessary would give the 
college grounds — or part of them, at least, — 
the appearance of a fair ground. Moreover, the 
ground, so the authorities say (let us hope 
that it forebodes a new gymnasium) will 
sooner or later be wanted for new buildings, 
when all the labor and expense of fencing 
and laying out ti'acks would go for naught. 
But Prof Young comes forward with the 
proposition to give up the ground just east 
of the cemetery for a base-ball field. It 
would be a great undertaking, but if a good 
diamond and a running track could be made 
there, and the whole surrounded by a high 
fence, the base-ball and general athletic inter- 
ests would receive a tremendous boom. Mr. 
Child has shown himself to be an efiicient 
manager, and has put his whole soul into the 
work; but in nothing has he shown his in- 
terest in base-ball at Bowdoin so much as in 
staying after commencement and setting this 
plan on foot. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



83 



In many respects tlie year just finished 
has been the most remarkable in the history 
of the college. Prof. Packard said at the 
alumni dinner that he had known no more 
quiet or more orderly year since his connec- 
tion with the college. For the first time in 
years there has been an entire absence of 
hazing. It was feared b}' some that in con- 
sequence of such a sudden change in the 
rSgime the Freshmen would make themselves 
too prominent, carry canes, etc., but there 
has been no such result. The Freshmen 
have shown themselves to be peaceful and 
well-disposed. We are driven to the con- 
clusion that hazing as a method of discipline 
was needless, and that Freshmen, if let alone, 
will conduct themselves in a proper manner. 
It only remains for 'Eighty-seven to carry on 
the good work and a precedent is established. 
It takes very little repetition, unfortunate!}', 
to establish a precedent here, whether good 
or bad. 



In the midst of what purported to be a 
witty account of the various escapades of his 
fellows, the Historian on Class Day not only 
showed surprising and unaccountable ani- 
mosity toward the present Senior class, but 
took occasion to make a most unwarrantable 
and foolish attack on the college paper. It 
is true that the Orient from time to time has 
chronicled " slugs " at the expense, espe- 
cially, of the Senior chemistry division ; and 
we hold that when a Senior attempts to pour 
hydrogen or to undertake such irregular 
measures the fact comes under the head of 
"jokes," and as such, deserves mention. But 
for a class to treasure up all such trifies, and 
on the occasion of its last public exercise as 
a class to pour forth a volume of venomous 
wrath, which appeared the more spiteful as 
the cause was insignificant, was not only 
absurd, but childish. We cannot believe that 
the rantings and ravings of the Historian on 
Class Day expressed the sentiment of the 



class. It was merely an exhibition of indi- 
vidual freshness, or, at the best, poor taste. 



THE SARATOGA REGATTA. 

The Bowdoin crew arrived at Saratoga, 
Monday, June 23d, just two weeks before the 
race. They at once began to work hard and 
soon made great imjirovement in rowing. 
All went well for a few days and then the 
new " Davis shell " suddenly began to fall to 
pieces. The bracings becoming weakened, 
numerous twists appeared in the boat giving 
it somewhat the appearance of the letter S, 
while in consequence of the insufficient sup- 
port given to the outriggers, the whole side 
of the boat opposite each oar was bent in at 
ever}' stroke, and holes were worn in the 
paper by the chafing caused by the racking 
of the framework. The crew, alarmed at the 
condition of the shell, thought seriously of 
sending home for the old cedar shell, but 
were obliged to give up the plan on account 
of lack of time. 

The morning of the Fourth opened fine 
and gave every indication of a good day, 
but about noon a south breeze sprang up 
which so roughened the lake that it was 
thought advisable to defer the race until the 
next day, although Cornell and Princeton 
were strongly' in favor of rowing at the ap- 
pointed time. On Saturday the wind blew a 
gale. The crews waited impatiently, the 
race being put off from hour to hour, in the 
hope that the wind would lessen. Sunday 
the wind still continued to blow, though it 
went down somewhat towards night. Mon- 
day morning found the lake still rough, yet, 
as all the other crews wanted to row, our 
crew did not object, though it would have 
been greatly for our interest to have waited 
for smooth water, both on account of the 
condition of the shell and its peculiar low 
rig. 

The course was a mile and a half straight- 
away. The crews were started in the middle 



84 



BOWDON ORIENT. 



of the lake; the finish being at the head of 
the lake opposite the boat-house, in a little 
inlet which was just wide enough for the five 
crews to enter abreast. 

The drawing for positions resulted in the 
following order, reckoning from the left shore : 
Princeton, 1st ; Pennsylvania, 2d ; Cornell, 
3d ; Columbia, 4th ; Bowdoin, 5th. It was 
generally conceded that Princeton had the 
best position, while Bowdoin's position, being 
farthest out in the lake, was in some respects 
the most unfavorable, especially as it gave 
us rougher water than fell to the lot of the 
other crews. Nine o'clock was the hour ap- 
pointed for the race, but our crew thought it 
best to take advantage of the usual two hours 
of grace, and spent the time in bracing the 
outriggers of the shell with telegraph wire. 
They finally started about half-past ten and 
paddled slowly up to the starting point, and 
arrived there at the same time with Pennsyl- 
vania, the other crews having arrived a few 
minutes before. Our shell shipped consider- 
able water in rowing up, and a few minutes 
were spent in sponging it out. Another 
vexatious delay was caused by the breaking 
of one of our tiller lines while the crew was 
backing up to the starting buoy. At last, 
everything being ready, the word was given 
at a few minutes before eleven o'clock. 

Bowdoin, Cornell, and Pennsylvania at 
once rushed to the front, while Columbia and 
Princeton had a sharp contest for last place. 
Our crew were agreeably surprised by the 
position which they took at first, as they had 
depended mainly for success upon a long 
spurt at the finish. After the short spurt at 
the start, our crew settled down to their 
usual practice stroke of about forty to the 
minute, all saving themselves for the final 
spurt at the finish, j'et they kept close to 
Cornell and Pennsylvania, while they steadily 
drew away from Columbia and Princeton. 

At the end of the first half mile the order 
was Cornell first, Pennsylvania second, Bow- 



doin third, Columbia fourth, Princeton fifth. 
At the mile buoy the three leading crews 
were all in a bunch, though the same order 
could be distinguished. At a little less than 
a quarter of a mile beyond this point there 
was still no clear water between Cornell, 
Pennsylvania and Bowdoin, while our crew 
was at least three lengths ahead of Columbia 
and two ahead of Princeton. Our crew had 
just reached the opening of the inlet, the 
point at which they were to begin their final 
spurt. The water from that point to the 
finish was comparatively smooth. The two 
rival crews, Cornell and Pennsylvania, being- 
side by side, had been urged to their utmost 
endeavors, and, as the event showed, Cornell 
was utterly unable to spurt at the finish, 
while Pennsylvania never spurted more than 
a few rods. It was at this point that the 
captain of the passenger steamer " Lady of 
the Lake," who bears the appropriate name 
of Silliman, wishing to make the mouth of the 
inlet in advance of the crews, in order to give 
his 1,500 passengers an opportunity to witness 
the finish, steamed from his position on the 
right to a position directly in front of our 
crew, thus giving them the entire wash of his 
huge steamer. It was an outrageous piece 
of carelessness, strongly condemned by every- 
body, the more inexcusable on the part of the 
captain, as he had been warned beforehand 
by the referee to keep behind the crews. Of 
course rowing in the swell was impossible; 
indeed, the crew had all they could do to 
keep from being swamped, and as it was the 
shell nearly filled with water. The swell 
did not reach the other crews, since the dis- 
tance between each course was one hundred 
feet. 

A dozen lengths from the finish line, Cor- 
nell was at least a length ahead of Pennsyl- 
vania, but the Pennsylvanians made a magnifi- 
cent spurt and passed the finish line ahead, 
winning by about three feet. 

The following account of the race is 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



85 



taken from the Daily Saratogian, and may 
be interesting as coming from an entirely 
unprejudiced source : " Cornell was the 
first to take water, the rest well together, 
except Princeton, which was fully two 
strokes behind. When well under motion 
Cornell pulled a 36 stroke, the University 
of Pennsylvania 38, Princeton 34, Columbia 
34, and Bowdoin 42. At the end of a 
furlong the Pennsylvanians and Bowdoins 
were bending the ash with the regularity and 
precision of professionals. Cornell and Prince- 
ton were rowing in good form, and while 
Columbia was doing well 3'et it was feared 
that the " blue and white " could not win. 

When half the distance had been rowed 
(three-quarters of a mile) the college athletes 
were pulling for all they were worth. Cor- 
nell led for a few strokes but the Pennsyl- 
vanians soon regained the advance, Bowdoin 
now showing a fine third, and fully a length 
back was Princeton fourth, leading Columbia 
fifth. Before the mile was finished Prince- 
ton fell back and the relative order was the 
University of Pennsylvania, Cornell, Bow- 
doin, Columbia, and Princeton. At the mile 
and an eighth the Cornell crew did some poor 
steering and pulled considerably out of their 
course, and in doing so did not improve their 
position. 

When nearing Point Breeze the steamer 
" Lady of the Lake," lay too near the course 
and the unfortunate result was that the wash 
struck Bowdoin and practically threw her 
out of the race. The wearers of the " white " 
(Bowdoin), the finest developed and heaviest 
oarsmen in the regatta, made a raanly and 
heroic struggle to overcome this obstacle and 
pull through the steamer's wash, but the 
frail nature of their rowing shell would stand 
only a limited strain, and consequently the 
Bowdoins were compelled to slow up and 
move slowly the balance of the way. They 



were not happj', as they were just getting 
ready to spurt home when the wash sealed 
their aquatic fate, as far as this regatta was 
concerned. 

Finally the Pennsylvanians in a magnifi- 
cent spurt shot over the finish line in the very 
fast time of 8.39 3-4 and only three feet in 
advance of Cornell, record 8.41, and two 
lengths farther away was Princeton third, 
8.49, followed at five lengths by Columbia 
fourth, 9.25, while the unfortunate Bowdoins 
came over the line later and were not given 
any ofiicial time. 

Following are the statistics of the crews : 





PENNSYLVANIA. 






Name. 


Position. 


Age. 


Wt. 


Ht. 


Dickersou, 


bow, 


22 


150 


5.9i 


Lindsay, 


. No. 2, 


19 


160 


6.2 


Gray, 


. No. 3, 


19 


163 


5.11 


Sergeant, 


. stroke, 
CORNELL. 


21 


159 


6 


Eaht, 


bow, 


22 


15S 


5.6J 


Cornell, . 


. No. 2, 


21 


165 


5.11i 


Howland, 


. No. 3, 


20 


IGO 


5.7 


Scofleld, . 


stroke, 
PRINCETON 


20 


168 


5.11J 


Green, 


bow, 


22 


135 


5.7 


Smith, . 


. No. 2, 


21 


145 


5.8 


Harris, . 


. No. 3, 


20 


165 


5.9 


Bird, 


stroke, 
COLUMBIA. 


20 


163 


5.8 


Hart, 


bow. 


19 


woi 


5.7i 


Meiklehem, . 


. No. 2, 


19 


158 


5.10 


Beck-with, 


. No. 3, 


20 


158 


5.9 


Peet, 


stroke, 
BOWDOIN. 


23 


143i 


5.8 


Sweetsir, 


. bow, 


23 


168 


5.10 


Whittler, 


. No. 2, 


22 


175 


6 


Brown, . 


. No. 3, 


22 


169 


5.10 


Adams, . 


stroke, 
AVERAGES. 


20 


155 


5.10 


Crew. 


Age. 


Wt. 


Ht. 


Pennsylvania, 


20.3 


158 


5.10^ 


Cornell, . 


20.9 


162.i 


5.9| 


Princeton, 


20.9 


152 


5.8 


Columbia, 


20.3 


150 


5.8i 


Bowdoin, 


21.9 


169i 


5.10.i 



[From the Saratogian.] 
BOWDOIN BEOWN'S WALK-OVER. 
Following the race between the four- 
oared crews, the single scull race was called 
by Referee Garfield. A. H. Brown of Bow- 



^6 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



doin rowed to the starting line when he was 
informed that Mr. Church of Cornell had 
withdrawn. Mr. Brown tlien pulled over the 
course alone and was declared the winner. 
He made the distance in ten minutes, and was 
comparatively fresh considering the fact that 
he had rowed in two races in one day. 



SUNDAY SERVICES. 

The exercises of commencement week 
were auspiciously opened Sunday morning, 
July 6th, by an excellent sermon before the 
Young Men's Christian Association, deliv- 
ered by Professor Egbert C. Smyth, of An- 
dover. Prof Smyth took for his text, Luke 
xii. : 54-56, and Matthew xvi.: 2, 3, — the signs 
of Christ's working among men. The con- 
clusion gained was, that there are special and 
evident signs of the agency of Christ, mak- 
ing these blessings which He gives more ef- 
fective and productive in this than in any 
other period. The signs of our time stimu- 
late to Christian work, and point to the his- 
tory of Him who is the ideal of all Person- 
ality, the Head of the Church, the eternal 
Truth of God revealed to men. 

The church was well filled again in the 
afternoon. At four o'clock the graduating 
class marched into the church, and listened 
to the Baccalaureate sermon by Prof Samuel 
G. Brown. It was an able address, delivered 
in the Professor's best style, and with char- 
acteristic force. He took for his text, John 
iii. : 4, — " Greater joy have I none than this, 
to hear of my children walking in the truth." 

Let me ask your consideration of some of 
the characteristics and rewards of a truth- 
loving spirit. 

1. There is implied in this a hearty love 
of the truth for its own sake, irrespective of 
any possible advantage. The love of truth, 
and the love of success, of profit, of victory, 
are different things, though sometimes con- 
founded ! The kingdom of truth is a spirit- 
ual kingdom over those who render allegi 



ance to her alone, are loyal to her authority, 
and follow without hesitation in the path 
which her unerring finger points out. 

2. Another characteristic of a truth- 
loving mind is that it earnestl}' searches 
for the truth, and can be satisfied with noth- 
ing less than finding it. 

3. A truth-loving spirit is obedient and 
reverent. The real love of truth is proved 
by our receiving and following it to the end, 
— by making it a part of our very life. 

4. The truth-loving soul uses the truth, 
and so far as possible only the truth. Such 
a man supports a righteous cause by right- 
eous means. 

The rewards of such a spirit are not un- 
certain ; they are high, indestructible, and 
sure. 

Mark, first, the inherent beauty of such a 
spirit. In the sight of God there is nothing 
more precious than truth in the inward part, 
unwavering sincerit}', which flinches not, 
which swerves not, which yields not. Here 
truth is beaut}' and beauty is truth. It com- 
mands the respect, the confidence, the trust, 
the admiration of the world. Wherever 
seen, wherever portrayed, there are the same 
lines of ineffable grace drawing us irresisti- 
bly in admiration and love, winning us from 
our coarser pleasures and our earthly ambi- 
tions, pointing ever to the crown of light 
and life. 

Second, observe what strength this imparts 
to the character. It is not of things which 
are weak, tottering, and uncertain, but of 
those which are stable, unerring, and mighty. 
Here is laid the basis of every noble charac- 
ter. How serene, self-poised and well or- 
dered are the movements of a mind that is 
so guided. He whose feet are firmly planted 
on the immovable rock, is ready then to as- 
cend to loftier heights, and to rejoice in a 
wider and more comprehensive vision. The 
truth, be sure of it, will finally triumph. It 
is the truth, harmonious with itself, har- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



87 



monious with nature, illustrated by provi- 
dence, beneficient and strong, that will naove 
on without haste, without rest. 

It is the true spirit of the scholar to love 
the truth ; it is the purpose of his life to search 
for it and to find it, and his reward is to hold 
it as his priceless possession, dearer than 
houses or lands and even his own life. " Buy 
the truth and sell it not " for gold, for honor, 
for power, for any conceivable thing which is 
transitory and perishable. 

The time will come and soon come, when, 
whatever our successes, we shall feel that 
the true value of our lives will be measured 
by our obedience to the truth and " our gen- 
uine fidelity to God." 



SUCCESS.— CLASS-DAY ORATION. 

BY L. BAKTON. 

One night, at a late hour, in the summer 
of 1846, Leverrier, the celebrated French 
astronomer, who had staked his reputation 
with all the implicit trust of science upon 
his mathematical precision of the sky, might 
have been seen, pencil in hand, intently 
studying several papers on the desk before 
him. He was solving the problem of the 
cause of the perturbations in the planet 
Uranus. The next morning the scientific 
world was startled by the announcement 
that if astronomers would turn their tele- 
scopes to a certain part of the heavens, they 
would find an hithei'to undiscovered planet 
in our solar sj'stem. The instruments were 
turned, and sure enough there shone Neptune, 
which until then had escaped the notice of 
mankind. 

If you ask why he placed such implicit 
trust in his scientific knowledge, the answer 
is, that the whole universe of mind and mat- 
ter is under the absolute control of exact 
laws. There is no world too ponderous, no 
floating mote too minute to be beyond the 
reach of these systematic methods of God's 
workings. To the ancients nature seemed 



a chaos of conflicting forces. Knowing com- 
parativel}' nothing of the systematic pre- 
cision of her laws, j^et possessed of an intui- 
tive religious belief, they readily reasoned 
that every external object was but the incar- 
nation of some divinity. 

But a vital change has marked man's in- 
terpretation of nature. Science now boldly 
analyzes what once was worshiped as divine. 
An insatiable curiosity now pries into secrets 
which long escaped examination through an 
undue religious awe. Forces that were sup- 
posed to be in chaotic conflict have been 
found correlated, working by fixed methods, 
and perfecting diff'erent parts of the same 
plan. In short, the vagaries of a supersti- 
tious fancy have given place to the more 
careful discriminations of an informed reason. 

In tlie vegetable kingdom are found the 
workings of these same immutable laws. A 
series of fractions, varying almost with an 
arithmetical progression, determines the po- 
sition of leaves on plant stems ; the peculiar 
arrangement of wood-cells show the veining 
of those leaves, and their green pulp tells 
the climate where they thrive, the average 
moisture of the atmosphere, and the amount 
of sunlight that reaches them. By some 
strange alchemy, fixed by nnerring laws, 
those plants convert invisible gases into 
tinted flames, change starch into sugar, and 
turn carbonic poison into wholesome food. 

So exact are the laws that govern animal 
organisms that comparative anatomists from 
single bones, can determine the species, 
structure, habits, and homes of those they 
once formed a part. 

By a knowledge of these laws chemists 
have unmasked the elements and discovered 
the conditions that unbind their forces. 

Geologists have so studied the leaves of 
the stone record that they have carried the 
lamp of knowledge beyond the drift, past 
the mammals, the reptiles, and fishes, through 
the forests of fern, beyond even the birth of 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



continents to the break of day, — even the 
dawning of life. We account by the law of 
gravity for the rush of the avalanche and the 
tides of the sea. Hydrogen and oxygen 
unite at the touch of fire, and we call it 
chemical affinity. Frost weaves some magic 
spell over the particles in a water-drop, and 
we name it crystallization. In the higher 
scales of existence are found the same sys- 
tematized methods of working. In metaphys- 
ics, philosophy, science, and art, — in short, 
search where j^ou will, among the creations 
of matter or conceptions of mind, and you 
find the same immutable laws reaching and 
ruling all. 

Effective geniuses are they who dili- 
gently investigate and implicit!}^ obey those 
laws. They dazzle the unthinking and un- 
suspecting simply because they alone are 
cognizant of such laws. 

To secure accurate knowledge of these 
hidden laws that underlie phenomena; to ef- 
fectually make practical in ever}' field their 
restless energies, by skillful application, de- 
mands frequently the unremitting industr}' 
of a life-time. 

Indeed, so filled are the biographies of 
the world's successful workers with instances 
of persistent painstaking; so seemingly evi- 
dent is it that their achievements are the 
requital of sleepless toil ; and so uniformly 
has reward followed such persevering effort 
that Buffan, one of the most indefatigable 
and brilliant explorers France ever gave to 
science, unhesitatingly pronounced patience 
to be the true touchstone of success. A 
celebrated philosopher has said if you analize 
the lives of all truly great men 3'ou will find 
that to patience and perseverance is always 
added an enlightened and sustained enthusi- 
asm, into which all the essential elements of 
success can be resolved. There are un- 
doubtedly marked differences in mental en- 
dowments in the same department, but those 
differences prove often more nominal than 



real, and by serving as insentives, secure to 
the less gifted the more frequent victor}'. 

Whipple says : " If we sharply scrutinize 
the lives of persons eminent in any depart- 
ment of action or meditation, we shall find 
that it is not so much brilliancy and fertility, 
as constancy and contiuuousness of effort 
which make a man great." 

Thoroughness, concentration, and courage 
then are the main distinguishing traits of 
great men, qualities rather of the heart than 
of the head, not necessarily exclusive in- 
heritances to be enjoyed by the few, but 
possible acquisitions in reach of the many. 
Grey spent seven years in perfecting his 
Elegy, which you can read in as many min- 
utes. Into it he poured the ripest scholar- 
ship, an intimate acquaintance with the rules 
of rhj'thm, and an exhaustive study of English 
and Latin classics. Copped says : " The 
grandeur of its language, the elevation of 
its sentiments, and the sympathy of its pa- 
thos, commend it to all classes and to all 
hearts ; of its kind it stands alone in English 
literature." And yet it was not revealed to 
him by any Delphian oracle, nor, like Xeno. 
phon, was it portrayed in a morning dream, 
but, little by little, like the coral reef, it was 
built. The complete mastery of detail was 
secured by the most protracted concentra- 
tion of effort. By resolutely chaining his 
thought to his theme and surrendering him- 
self completely to its guidance, the inexora- 
ble laws of suggestion led him back through 
the faded and forgotten scenes of the past, 
in the humble lives of the sleeping cottagers, 
until the scenery and personages of every 
picture at last brightened and bi'eathed be- 
fore his mental vision, with all the outlined 
vividness of real life. This intense vividness 
of vision, the sure outcome of mental con- 
centration, is absolutely indispensable to suc- 
cess. The Greek Slave stands before us 
now with no more clearly defined symmetry 
of form, than she did ere Powers, long since, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



with chisel, his master hand threw off her 
rough mantle of marble. 

A celebrated French actor, in order that 
he might, on the stage, successfully imper- 
sonate the d3'ing, frequented Paris hospitals, 
and narrowly watched each spasm of agony 
'that passed over the faces of those in the 
very act of dissolution, thus gaining a vivid- 
ness of conception that never left him. Ma- 
cauley says: "Dante is the very eye and 
ear witness of that which he relates. He is 
the very man who has heard the tormented 
spirits crying out for the second death ; who 
has read the dusky characters on the portal, 
within which there is no hope. His own 
hands have grasped the shaggy sides of 
Lucifer ; his own feet have climed the mount- 
ain of expectation, and his own brow has 
been marked by the purifying angel." 

Inseparable from these traits of thorough- 
ness and concentration is that of unfaltering 
courage, — courage to undertake great enter- 
prises, " to scorn delights and live laborious 
days," to brave public sentiment in a faithful 
performance of duty — courage that will not 
fail even in the dark hours of adversity. 

Tlie quiet walks of literature demand this 
courage equally with the stirring scenes 
of national battle fields. Wordsworth's sub- 
lime adoption and advocacy of his own de- 
liberately-formed judgment of true taste 
against the adverse criticism of the entire 
world of letters, his jeopardizing every pros- 
pect of earthly preferment rather than vio- 
late his convictions of poetic excellence, 
demanded as great moral bravery as is re- 
quired to climb a ship's mast in a storm or 
face the fire of an enem}' in the roar of bat- 
tle. These traits, — thoroughness, concentra- 
tion and courage — are the three essential 
requisites of greatness. Without them no 
alertness of intellect has ever achieved a 
work which bears the impress of immortality ; 
with them rarely need any one despair of ac- 



complishing " that which the world will not 
willingly let die." 

Yet these gifts are but different manifes- 
tations of some master passion enkindling 
and controlling every faculty. This passion 
must be the mainspring of every action, the 
inspiration of every thought. It must flood 
the whole life with an irresistible and perpet- 
ual influence. Through it, unlettered and ill- 
balanced minds have worked wonders in the 
world. With it, men of enlightened com- 
mon sense have made obstructing walls of 
adamantine opposition crumble at their touch. 
The more we extend our researches into the 
private histories of those who have acquired 
eminence through intrinsic worth, the more 
shall we be convinced that an enlightened 
and sustained enthusiasm has been their real 
source of strength. Through its influence 
have been developed the mighty mental 
forces that have moulded the character and 
controlled the destiny of any era. 

No wonder the world has ever persisted 
in calling its geniuses madmen. Prescott 
spent twenty years in the libraries of Europe 
collecting from musty manuscripts and neg- 
lected letters material for his Spanish history. 
During a large part of the time he was 
stricken with blindness so that he had to 
make use of the ej^es of another. Gibbons 
re-wrote his " Memories " nine, Newton, his 
" Chronology," fifteen, and Addison his in- 
imitable essays, twenty, times. Spinoza and 
Buckle each spent more than twenty years 
in carefully forming and maturing their judg- 
ment before they published their systems of 
thought. For Spinoza those were j'ears of 
the most intense self-study ; for Buckle, the 
most exhaustive research into literatures of 
all ages and peoples, embracing every con- 
ceivable theme. Those years, by both, were 
spent in profoundest obscurity, and bore 
witness to a patient confidence in the final 
triumph of a self-trust and self-mastery that 
were absolutely sublime. 



90 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Burke, who did not enter public life until 
thirt}' and was one of the most indefatigable 
of students during those years, on one occa- 
sion, after holding the Parliament of England 
for over two hours with one of his masterly 
arguments on an important national theme, 
impressively pausing an instant — for five min- 
utes — spell-bound every heart with bursts of 
eloquence. A friend congratulating him, re- 
marked : " I thought you had finished, but 
you extemporized such eloquence as I never 
expect to hear again." "Ah," said Burke, 
•■' that extemporaneous passage, as you were 
pleased to term it, cost me four days' hard 
labor, nearly two of which were expended on 
the closing sentence." 

There were thirteen years of untiring 
effort, of the outpouring of princely fortunes 
and of disastrous failures before the tele- 
graphic cable rested successfully beneath the 
waters of the Atlantic, binding together the 
continents of the world. Thirty-three times 
Field crossed the ocean and fought with tides 
and tempests. The accumulations of a suc- 
cessful mercantile life went down, and naught 
but an unrealized ideal, sustained by an un- 
conquered will, was left him. Thrice and 
four times had seeming victory been turned 
into bitter disappointment. Again he thought 
to grasp the prize, but the imperfect cable 
parted and in an instant buried itself and 
seemingly, too, all the hopes of its projector in 
the depths of the sea. For a moment hot tears 
fell on the deck of the Great Eastern. " It is 
but the mad attempt at the impossible," was 
the judgment of mankind. But one year 
more of dauntless striving, and science 
claimed one of her proudest triumphs, and 
history recorded the name of another hero. 

I have but touched upon the romances of 
enthusiasm with which the pages of the 
world's history abound. We need not speak 
of Hayden and Huber, Milton and Beethoven, 
who, despite defects in sight and hearing, 
sufficient to have discouraged any but those 



of unconquerable spirits, have left acknowl- 
edged masterpieces in painting, poetry, sci- 
ence and music, the highest departments in 
human achievements. For it is beyond all 
controvers}' that to the enlightened, persis- 
tent, painstaking enthusiasts this world be- 
longs and the fullness thereof. 

The world is steadily progressing from 
the uniform to the complex. The employ- 
ments of men, their wants, their capacities, 
and their tastes have been multipljing and 
will still multipl}' as long as the evolution of 
a perfect individualism remains unattained. 
It is now generally conceded that those who 
would command success must become special- 
ists and choose those callings for which they 
have marked aptitude and taste. The in- 
creasing competition in trade and the broad- 
ened culture of modern times are demanding 
with emphasis the most skilled products of 
hand and brain. With us there is an ever- 
growing need to intensify thought and to 
train our faculties by long practice on some 
specific thing. The fruits of others' labor 
can be of benefit only as they are thoroughly 
mastered and assimilated by us, only as they 
are passed through the alembic of our own 
minds. They must serve as stimulants to 
independent thinking. If we ever strike out 
new paths, it will be through discoveries of 
new facts or through independent courses of 
reasoning. The latter can be reached only as 
we cultivate an unobtrusive, yet firm self- 
reliance in thought. This demands a certain 
self-abandonment and a certain self-assertion. 
An abandonment, in that the attention must 
be completely absorbed in the pursuit. A 
certain selfassertion, in that we must habitu- 
ally exercise and positively assert a greater 
reliance on our own conclusions than on those 
of others, and a courage to state and stand by 
them whatever may betide. 

Onl}', then, by maintaining unswerving 
loyalty to our individuality, our natural tastes 
and aptitudes, and our own independent con- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



91 



victions of truth and duty, can we attain or 
permanently possess that impetus of zeal that 
becomes inspiration and commands success. 



THE LEGEND OF THE LOST CFTY. 
Class-Day Poem. 

BY J. TORREY, JK. 

Classmates and Mends, had I the pen 
Or tongue of poet at command ; 
This day, this honr I'd raise my song- 
And some great theme expand. 

I'd dwell with joy on college days, 
I'd point with pride to what we've done, 
Our trials and our triumphs, too, 
In days that now are gone. 

I'd show the way that onward leads, 
And point the path that leads to fame ; 
I'd sing the graces that surround 
A great and honored name. 

Then sacred Truth should be my theme, 
That glass transparent, pure, and clear. 
Through which all doubtful, misty forms 
In their true light appear. 

But poet's pen can ne'er be mine ; 
A clearer eye the way must see, 
A steadier hand must point the way 
Than ever mine can be. 

One evening, while I sat alone. 
Perplexed for words to speak to-day, 
A strange old legend came to me 
From Iran, far away. 

Hundreds of years have heard the tale, 
And yet the truth it tells to me 
Is strong, and full, and clear to-day, 
And shall forever be. 

One day, long years ago, o'er Iran's plain 
There rode a monarch with his courtier train ; 
Proud was his spirit, mighty was his sword, 
And o'er the land he ruled the sovereign lord. 
With kindling eye he gazed along the plain, 
And checked his charger with impatient rein. 
No glaring waste of desert met his gaze, 
Eeflecting noonday's heat with cruel blaze. 
But verdant meadows, sparkling brooks and rills, 
And palm-trees, shading gently sloping hills. 
What wonder that his proud eye glistened keen 
Who, halting there, beheld the lovely scene? 



"Why does this lovely spot deserted be?" 

Cried he, at length, with ever-kindling eye ; 

" Call here my craftsmen, each and every one, 

Let no man wait, but leave his task undone. 

Here I will build a mighty citadel, 

One that shall guard my chosen empire well ; 

Hewn from the rock its bulwark shall be laid, 

Nor heaven, nor earthly power shall it invade." 

Thus spake the monarch proud, and turned his steed, 

And toward the palace urged his fiery speed. 

The craftsmen heard the monarch's proud command, 

And gathered at his palace in a band. 

" Go forth ! " he cried, " and build my city strong ! 

Who works not well does me, his monarch, wrong." 

Slowly, but surely, as the palm-tree grows. 
From the fair plain the mighty walls arose. 
Frowning upon the meadows far below. 
Arching the river with impetuous flow. 
Proudly its watch-tower pointed to the sky. 
As if the very heavens to defy. 
From north to south a sparkling river ran, 
With waters pure as ever gladdened man. 
Athwart the stream a massive bridge they made. 
With glittering gold its arch they overlaid. 
From the East Gate a golden street there ran, 
To where the bridge's brazen floor began. 
Across the bridge a stately palace lay. 
Whose towers glittered at the dawn of day ; 
And in the evening, when the sun was low. 
Stood bathed in twilight's softened, rosy glow. 

The task is done, the craftsmen seek the king. 
And thus their leader spake with humble mien : 
" O king, most powerful, most wise, most great! 
Here, at thy feet, thj' humble servants wait. 
All thou commandest us, O king, is done : 
On prouder palace rises not the sun 
Than that w'ithin your walls. Long live, O king! 
May the whole world to thee their tribute bring ! " 

Next morn the monai'ch called his courtier train, 

And rode, impatient, o'er the grassy plain ; 

And, as they rode, he cried, " What monarch high 

Can mightier be in word or deed than I ? 

Yonder, my fortress proudly meets the sky. 

All kings of earth and heaven I defy ! " 

E'en as he spake, the color left his cheek. 

His voice was hushed, he could not farther speak. 

With nervous, trembling hand he checked his steed, 

His strong frame shook and trembled like a reed. 

Gone was the mighty city he had reared. 

No ti'ace or vestige anywhere appeared. 

The plain where once that proudest city lay 

Is barren, and desert, to this day. 



92 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Classmates! the truth this legend tells 
Is one we all have heard before. 
'Tis wi-itten o'er and o'er again 
In books of sacred lore. 

Prometheus braved the King of Heaven, 
And chained to jagged rocks he lay, 
Rent by the Thunderer's fearful darts 
For many a dreadful day. 

Belshazzar mocked the Lord of Hosts — 
And ne'er beheld another day ! 
That very night, a ghastly corpse 
The mighty monarch lay. 

Fix for yourselves a purpose true. 
Follow where great examples lead. 
Angels and fellow-travelers 
Will bid you all God speed. 

But in ambition's fevered race 
Remember Him who rules on high. 
Who searches every human heart 
With His all-seeing eye. 

High though the fabric you may rear, 
Be ever this the corner stone — 
"Render to Caisar Casar's dues. 
And unto God his own." 

CLASS DAY. 

One by one the years of college life speed 
swiftly by, leaving, as it seems, but little time 
for reflection till the}' have gone. Indeed, 
the time from Freshman to Senior year has 
passed in almost geometrical progression, till 
the class of '84 may now look back upon 
their class day to see if the fond hopes of 
Freshman year have been realized. 

The morning exercises of Tuesday were 
held in Memorial Hall. At 10.30 o'clock, the 
class were marshaled in, and took their 
places upon the platform, after which the 
following program was carried out : 

MUSIC. 



Prayer. 
Oration. 
Poem. 



J. A. Waterman, Jr. 

L. Barton. 

J. Torrey, Jr. 



" Success,'' and the orator secured the clos- 
est attention of the audience at the com- 
mencement, and held it till the close. The 
full text of the poem appears in another col- 
umn, and will commend itself to the reader 
without any word from us. 

At 3 o'clock a large audience assembled 
under the time-honored Oak, to listen to the 
latter part of the day's exercises. The 
weather was everything that could be de- 
sired; just clouds enough obscured the sun 
to keep it from pouring its rays directly upon 
the alumni and friends assembled. 

The president, Mr. H. M. Wright, with a 
few appropriate remarks, introduced the 
speakers in the following order : 

C. E. Sayward. 



MUSIC. 

The oration was a well-written and mas- 
terly production, replete with thoughts on 



Opening Address 
History. 
Prophecy. 
Parting Address. 



E. I. Thompson. 
Z. W. Kemp. 
O. W. Means. 



The opening address, like those of former 
years, was one of welcome to all, and well- 
wishes for the class. The history was well 
received, as the historian reviewed the strug- 
gles and trials of the class, from the time of 
entering till graduation. That some facts 
were a little distorted and moulded to meet 
the occasion, rather than the truth, only 
shows how difiScult a thing it is to write a 
concise history of the times in which one 
lives. 

Mr. Kemp followed in the well-known path 
of soothsayers and prophets, by relating a 
" dream." Twenty years will have to elapse 
before the truth or "falsity of his prophetic 
voice can be questioned. 

The closing address, by Mr. Means, was 
very appropriate, easily and pleasantly writ- 
ten, and was well received by the audience. 

After the literary exercises were finished 
the class seated themselves upon the ground, 
and the Pipe of Peace was lighted and passed 
around. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



93 



The following ode by W. K. Hilton was 
then sung: 

Just as the sunset gilds the west, 
E're there the evening dwells, 

So this glad hour will cheer the heart. 
Before our last farewells. 

But we must part ; the hour draws near 

When we must bid adieu 
To these familiar scenes, so dear. 

And friends, so kind and true. 

We now must battle with the world. 

Our college days are o'er — 
Whate'er we do, may Fortune aid 

The deeds of 'eighty-four. 

But should we never gather here, 
And grasp each classmate's hand. 

We trust that we shall meet above 
In that far happier land. 

After singing the ode the class formed in 
line, with the band at the head, and marched 
to the various halls and gave three rousing 
cheers at each one. 

The farewells were then said, thus closing 
the exercises of the afternoon. 

From the historian we have obtained the 
following statistics: 

Number entering, 44; number graduating, 24. 

Average age, 22 years 10 months and fifteen days. Old- 
est man, Barton, 29 years; youngest man. Smith, 20 years 
2 months. 

Total height, 137 feet; average, 5 feet 8J inches; tallest 
man, Hilton, 6 feet | inch; shortest men, Bradley and 
Waterman, 5 feet 5 inches. 

Total weight, 3G06 pounds; average, 150^ pounds; heav- 
iest man. Brown, 177 pounds; lightest men. Means and 
"Wright, 135 pounds. 

Pursuits — law, 4; medicine, 3; business, 4; teaching, 
4; ministry, 3; chemist, 1; undecided, 5. 

Political preference— Republican, 18; Democrats, 4; 
Independent Democrat, 1; Independent, 1. 

Religious preference — Congregationalist, 9; Baptist, 
2; Free Baptist, 1; Episcopal, 2; Unitarian, 3; Agnostic, 
1; Free thinker, 1, Universalist, 1; no preference, 4. 

Favorite study — Psychology, 6; Chemistry, 4; Physics, 
2; Mathematics, 2; Natural History , 1 ; History, 1; Zoolo- 
gy, 1; Mineralogy, 1; Physiology, 1; Botany, 1, Geology, 
1; Latin, 1; Human Nature, 1; no choice, 1. 

18 do not use tobacco. 

The dance on the green in the evening, 
was, in every respect, a decided success. A 
good floor had been placed around Thorn- 



dike Oak, and the decorations of calcium 
lights and bunting produced delightful effects. 

The costumes of ladies were pretty and 
attractive, surpassing in taste and beauty 
those of other years. Spreads were served 
during the intermission, in different college 
rooms, and the whole aifair passed off in a 
delightful manner. 

Grimmer's Orchestra, of Portland, fur- 
nished music for the da}', to the satisfaction 
of all. 



COMMENCEMENT CONCERT. 

The commencement concert was held on 
Wednesday evening in the new Town Hall. 
In spite of the bad weather there was a very 
good attendance. The novelty of the new 
hall has not worn off, and undoubtedly the 
audience was larger than it would have been 
if the concert had been held in Memorial 
Hall. The following was the program of 
the evening: 

Artists: Madame Amy Sherwin, soprano; Mr. Chas. 
R. Adams, tenor ; Miss Carrie Wells, contralto ; Mr. H. 
L. Cornell, basso; Miss L. K. Vannah, accompanist. 
Overture — Franz Schubert. Suppe. 

Grimmer's Orchestra. 
The Two Grenadiers. Schumann. Mr. H. L. Cornell. 

Song — Masks and Faces. Molloy. Miss Carrie Wells. 

Selection — Fantasia, Dream Pictures. Lumbye. 

Grimmer's Orchestra. 
Valse Song — Lady Moon. Bishop. 

Madame Amy Sherwin. 
German Song. Sucher. Mr. Charles R. Adams. 

Selection — La Gazza Ladra. Rossini. 

Grimmer's Orchestra. 
Overture to " Faust." Grimmer's Orchestra. 

INTERMISSION. 

The second and third acts of Gounod's Faust, with the 
following cast : 

Marta,! Miss Carrie Wells. 

Mefistofeles Mr. H. L. Cornell. 

Faust, Mr. Charles R. Adams. 

Margharita Madame Amy Sherwin. 

The first part of the program lasted an 
hour. There is no need of our praising the 
productions by Grimmer's Orchestra. The 
name itself implies excellence. Number four 
on the program was especially well ren- 
dered. During this piece there was a flute 



94 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



solo which was very pretty and also a pizzi- 
cato solo on the violin by Grimmer. This 
number was encored and the last part was 
repeated. 

The bass, Mr. Cornell, did fairly, but the 
pianist did not seem to support him as well as 
she did the other artists, yet perhaps our ear 
was not educated enough to appreciate it. 

The song, " Masks and Faces," was prettily 
rendered by Miss Carrie Wells, who has a 
sweet voice and graceful manner. The crown- 
ing feature of the evening was the Valse Song 
by Madame Sherwin, the prima donna. Her 
easy manner and pure, rich voice captivated 
the audience, and the selection was well cal- 
culated to show her powers. She was very 
well supported by the orchestra, which ac- 
companied her perfectly and added much to 
the beauty of the piece. On being encored 
she sang a very pretty song with piano 
accompaniment. 

Mr. Adams' German song was well re- 
ceived, the only trouble found with it being 
that it was too short. He received an encore. 

After the intermission, which lasted about 
twenty minutes, the curtain rose and the 
second part of the program was gone 
through with. All the characters were taken 
creditably and the songs were well accom- 
panied by the orchestra and piano. Mr. 
Adams and Madame Sherwin proved to be 
fine actors as well as fine singers. 

The concert closed a little after ten 
o'clock, and all seemed well satisfied. 



COMMENCEMENT DAY. 

On Thursday morning the weather proph- 
ets shook their heads, and the outlook for a 
pleasant day was rather gloomy, but the tre- 
mendous storm of the day before had appar- 
ently exhausted the supply, and at the be- 
ginning of the exercises in the church, the 
weather was all that could be desired. The 
Boards met at an early hour in the morning, 
and transacted the usual amount of routine 



business. By half past ten, a large crowd had 
collected in front of the chapel, and at eleven, 
the procession of alumni, trustees and over- 
seers with a band at the head, formed on the 
main walk and marched to the church, where 
the following order of exercises was carried 
out: 

MUSIC . — PRAYER. — MUSIC . 

(Exercises for the Degrees of Bachelor of Arts and 

Bachelor of Science.) 
Language and Thought; with Latin Salutatory. 

Charles Cutler Torrey, Yarmouth. 
Abuse of the Ballot. 

John Anderson Waterman, Jr., Gorham. 
Heroism. Ernest Charles Smith, Augusta. 

The Classics in Modern Thought and Learning. 

Llewellyn Barton, Naples. 

MUSIC. 

Some Difficulties in Materialistic Evolution. 

Clas Wilhelm Longren, Wirserum, Sweden. 
England's Treatment of India. 

Melvin Horace Orr, Brunswick. 
College Athletics. 

Henry Merrill Wright, Westford, Mass. 

MUSIC. 

A Correct Philosophy Essential to Correct Life. 

Oliver William Means, Augusta. 
Man's Mastery Over Nature. 

William HoUey Cothren, Parmington, 
Prayer a Positive Power. 

Joseph Torrey, Jr., Yarmouth. 

MUSIC. 

(Exercises for the Degrees of Master of Arts and Master 

of Science.) 
The Naturalized Citizen in the Kepublic of Letters. 

* Charles Herrick Cutler, Farmington. 
Valedictory, in Latin. 

* Frederic Alvan Fisher, Westford, Mass. 
Conferring of Degrees. 

PRAYER. 
BENEDICTION. 

* Excused. 

The parts, as a whole, were well rendered. 
It was announced that C. C. Torrey had se- 
cured the Goodwin prize for the best written 
commencement part. 

At two o'clock the exercises in the church 
being completed, the long procession formed 
again, under the marshalship of Hon. Chas. J. 
Gilman, and marched to Memorial Hall, where 
the alumni dinner was served. John Mussey, 
of Portland, the oldest living graduate of the 
college, was present, this being the seventy- 
fifth anniversary of his graduation. 

After the banquet had been disposed of 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



95 



and the ancient hymn, "Let children bear the 
mighty seeds," sung, Prof. Packard, in a short 
speech, in which he mentioned the year past 
as the most noticeably quiet one in the his- 
tory of the college, introduced the Governor 
who made a short speech complimenting 
Bowdoin on her record. He paid a well- 
deserved tribute to Prof. Packard, which was 
received with great applause. Dr. E. E. 
Hale, on being introduced, made a brilliant 
plea for the scholar in the government and in 
the administration. 

Mr. Blaine's speech was tlie feature of 
the day. It was a very able and dignified 
address. He referred to tiie fact tliat Bow- 
doin had more distinguished sons in propor- 
tion to her numbers than any other institution 
in the land. He was in favor, he said, of 
conservative methods in education. "Sciiools 
for technical education are good, but I be- 
lieve in walking the same old trodden path of 
college education.'' He closed with a pleas- 
ant reference to Prof. Packard. Senator 
Frye made a bright speech, closing with 
some eloquent remarks to the graduating 
class. -He was followed by Rev. Cyrus 
Hamlin, '34, and Dr. Green. Hon. L. Deane, 
'49, of Washington, D. C, made a speech 
which won the hearts of the undergraduates. 
He referred to the interest in athletics and 
the good it does the college. He spoke of 
the crew going to Saratoga, their gentle- 
manly bearing while there, and of the fact 
that they would have won honors for them- 
selves and the institution they represented 
had they had half a cliance. 

The president's reception in the evening 
was a pleasant affair enjoyed by a large 
crowd of alumni and their friends. 



If a pretty girl's mouth is an osculating circle, 
is kissing it a method of differential calculus ? 

His arm was on the back of the seat, but when 
the train came out of the little tunnel it was there 
no longer, and every one in the neighborhood was 
laughing. — Argo. 



PRIZES FOR 1883-4. 

It may be interesting to some of our 
readers to learn who have received the 
prizes offered by the college during the past 
year. 

The Goodwin commencement prize, which 
is awarded each year to the author of the 
best written commencement part, was received 
by C. C. Torrey, of Yarmouth. 

The first prizes for English composition 
were awarded to 0. W. Means, of Augusta, 
and C. C. Torrey. The second prizes were 
awarded to J. A. Waterman, Jr., of Gorham, 
and C. W. Longren of Wirserum, Sweden. 

The Brown prizes for extemporaneous 
composition were given as follows : First 
prize, of thirty dollars, to 0. W. Means; sec- 
ond prize, of twenty dollars, to L. Barton of 
Naples. 

The Junior Declamation prizes were re- 
ceived by W. R. Butler, Lawrence, Mass., 
and J. T. Libby of Richmond, Butler receiv- 
ing the first prize, of twenty dollars, and 
Libby the second prize, often dollars. 

The Sophomore declamation prizes were 
awarded to H. R. Fling of Portland, first, and 
second to W. W. Kilgore of No. Newry. 

The Sewall Greek prize was given to 
F. L. Smith, Waterboro'. 

The Sewall Latin prize was awarded to 
Levi Turner, Jr. 

The Smyth mathematical prize, of three 
hundred dollars, was awarded to W. I. Horn, 
Berlin, N. H., and W. V. Wentworth, Rock- 
land. This is the first year since this prize 
has been given, that two competitors for it 
have taken exactly the same rank. 



Perhaps it is safe to say that one-half of the 
translations made in the classics are hohna fide. — 
Chaff. 

Kind Auntie — " So you have Prof. X., and how 
do you like him?" Tough Soph.— " Hate him." 
Kind Auntie — " Indeed, whom of your instructors 
do you like best?" Tough Soph. — "Oh, well, old 
X., I guess." — Becord. 



96 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COMMUKICATIOK. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

Permission has been asked from the col- 
lege authorities, that the Base-Ball Associa- 
tion be allowed the privilege of enclosing the 
Delta with a fence high enough to make it 
practicable to collect gate money. For good 
reasons, 1 think, the request was not granted. 
But at the request of Treasurer Young, who 
always has an eye to the interests of the 
students in sports, a committee was ap- 
pointed to see what could be done about 
selecting grounds which could be enclosed, 
suitable for base-ball and other athletic 
exercises. This committee, of which Mr. 
Young is chairman, is given full power to 
take definite action in laying out the grounds 
at its pleasure. 

I think that we may feel assured that this 
scheme will not sleep till it is forgotten, as 
many of such a nature do, but that if the 
students show energy in carrying out the 
plans proposed, we may next year have good 
grounds that can be made a source of income 
rather than expense, and then we shall not be 
obliged to go to Topsham with our Field- 
Day sports. 

Just beyond the cemetery, in the pine 
woods, not a quarter of a mile from the col- 
lege buildings, is a piece of land suitable in 
all respects — when cleared — for such a field 
for sports as has long been needed. It can 
be made perfectly level, and is large enough 
to afford a one-third mile track and a base- 
ball ground with ample room in the field, 
which is not the case with the present 
grounds. It is not far enough removed from 
the college so that the distance would de- 
tract in the least from the attendance at the 
games. If this committee will clear the 
land of trees and stumps, as Mr. Young 
thinks they will, it behooves the students to 
enclose it and put it in condition for the 
base-ball games next season. That the ex- 



penses of preparation would be large, must 
not be overlooked, but with energy in ask- 
ing aid from the alumni and with the income 
of the grounds, it can be done the first year. 
The value of such a scheme to sports 
here can hardly be overestimated. Instead 
of the base-ball team being a tax upon the 
students of about $300 a year, it would sup- 
port itself better than it has ever been sup- 
ported. More than twice the number of 
games could be played here than have been 
played in the past years, as each game would 
pay for itself. 

S. R. Child. 



COLLEGII TABULA. 



Going, going— gone.— The last few weeks 
have been filled with the closing exercises of the 
year, and Bowdoin has once again seen her children 
go out into the world, to keep alive her memory 
there. A full account of the exercises of com- 
mencement week will be found in another part of 
the Oeient. The examination of the three lower 
classes was atteuded by many of the examining 
committee, who asked the same old questions and 
got the same old answers. Verily, what does all 
this amount to ? Those remaining in town over the 
Fourth were " quiet, law-abiding " students, and a 
quiet celebration was the result. Quite a number 
of the undergraduates remained during commence- 
ment week. The decorations and illuniinations on 
Class Day were very pretty, and the commence- 
ment concert was a success in spite of the pouring 
rain. The different fraternities held their reuuions 
on Wednesday evening, immediately after the con- 
cert. The graduating class took their supper at 
the Falmouth Hotel, Friday evening. 'Eighty-oue 
held their reunion at the Falmouth on the same 
evening. Several old ball-players represented the 
alumni on the diamond Wednesday forenoon. The 
result, however, was a victory for the Bowdoin 
team, the score standing 1,5 to 4. The nine loses 
four men, Bartou, Torrey, Waterman and Wright, 
and their places will be hard to fill. The fall term 
will open Tuesday, September 16th, two weeks 
earlier than usual. Don't get left ! 

*,f*The Juniors were treated to a trip with Prof. 
Robinson to the feldspar quarry in Topsham, near 
the end of the term, and jjassed a very prosperous 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



97 



day. A large number of minerals were obtained, 
Prof. Robinson securing about six pounds of colum- 
bite, while otliers obtained a smaller quantity. 
Besides this, specimens of gahnite, allanite, garnet, 
monozite, and quartz crystals were found. It was 
said to be the most successful trip that has occurred 
for years, mineralogically speaking. 

*^*The Freshman class, after finishing their 
class examinations on Wednesday, July 2d, took 
the " Flying Yankee " to Portland. In the SFeuing 
they took their Freshman dinner at the Falmouth 
Hotel. The spread was a flue one, and the tables 
looked elegantly. The class united in extending a 
vote of thanks to Mr. Martin for his very hospit- 
able entertainment. After the dinner toasts were 
given and responded to, H. B. Austin of Farming- 
ton acting as toast-master. They were as follows : 

Responded to by E. C. Plummer, 



-Responded to by O. D. Sewall, Farm- 



" Class of '87, 
Yarmouth. 

" The Faculty, 
ington. 

"The Boat Crew." — Responded toby Freeman Dearth, 
Jr., Sangerville. 

"The Brunswick Belles."— Responded to by C. C. 
Choate, Salem, Mass. 

"The Past." — Responded to by C. B. Burleigh, Au- 
gusta. 

The class then adjourned to the parlor, where 
the following exercises took place : 

Ode. 
Air — " Tramp, tramp, tramp." 
Oration. E. B. Torrey, Yarmouth. 

Ode. 

Air — "Michael Roy." 
Poem. C. B. Burleigh, Augusta. 

Ode. 

Ate — " Fta Diavolo." 
History. A. W. Merrill, Farmington. 

Ode. 

Air — " Lord Lovell's Daughter." 
Prophecy. M. L. Kimball, Norway. 

Ode. 
Air — " Chiming Bells of Long Ago." 

After a season of social converse, music, etc., 
the class broke up, all voting the affair a brilliant 
success. Tbe following committee had charge of 
the affair, and worked hard for its success : E. B. 
Burpee, 0. D. Sewall, W. L. Black. 

*js*The Junior class was entertained on the Sat- 
urday evening before examinations at the house of 
Prof, and Mrs. Robinson, and, it is needless to add, 
enjoyed the occasion thoroughly. Every member of 
the class feels the warmest regard for Prof. Robin- 
son, for his unfailing kindness to each one of us 
during the past year, and the only regret is that, 



as a class, we shall not meet him again in the 
lecture room. 

*jj.* The Herbarium has lately received an addi- 
tion of five hundred mounted specimens, the gift of 
Joseph Baker, D.D,, of the class of '35. We are 
always pleased to make mention of any addition of 
this sort, and hope we shall have occasion to do the 
same in regard to gifts to the other departments. 
We should like to mention pretty soon that some 
one had given the college a gymnasium, but hope 
deferred has already caused a pathological condi- 
tion in our heart. 

*5<*How many times Humanity wakes up, 
After long rest and quiet silences, 
To find its happy world grown sorrowful 
With sudden mists and dreariness: 
Some heavy curtain covers all the sun. 
And then it is so hard, — we being blind. 
To call it yet our world — so dark a one. 
We quite forget the needfulness of gloom 
To make the after bright more beautiful. 
We make our moan, — and lo ! before 
Its dismal echo is full liuslied and still. 
The cruel mists are lifted and our world 
Is bright again. — Allah knows best. 

*s*The '86 Bugle editors have been chosen, and 
are as follows : Levi Turner, Jr., Managing Editor ; 
Herbert T. Taylor, Business Editor; Percy A. 
Knight ; John H. Davis ; Elmer E. Rideout. 

*s*The visiting committee uiade the usual visit 
just before commencement, and we think got an 
idea that a gymnasinm is very much wanted here. 
We are indebted to the Faculty for the unanimity 
with which they second the reqirest of the students 
for this much-needed means of physical improve- 
ment. 

*jf*It is a painfully-evident fact that one ill- 
disposed person can do a college more harm than 
can be counterbalanced by the correct and manly 
living of a score of others. Students do not seem 
to reflect that they, individually, hold the reputa- 
tion of the college in their hands, for by the ill- 
advised action of one, a whole college is often 
judged. An instance of this kind occurred on the 
ball ground recently. Two small yaggers had begun 
to fight, as is their wont, when one of the profes- 
sors, who was standing by, very properly separated 
them, whereupon a student arose in the grand 
stand and proposed three cheers for the professor, 
which was responded to by a few others as thought- 
less as himself. A person having the instincts of a 
gentleman could not well help feeling shame at the 
occurrence. It is of no use splitting hairs. Those 
who are guilty of such a rudeness give undisputa- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ble evidence of poor breeding, and show such a 
marked lacli of refinement as to betray the inferior 
clay of which they are made. 

*»*The following is the program of the Sopho- 
more prize declamation contest, which occurred 
June 30th : 
Speech of Ringan Gilhaize. Gait. 

"W. V. Wentworth, Rockland. 
Toussaint L'Ouverture. Phillips. 

F. L. Smith, Waterboro. 
The Old Sargent. «G. M. Norris, Monmouth. 

Appeal to a Jury. Crittenden. H. R. Fling, Portland. 
Extract from Eulogy on Lafayette. Hillhause. 

H. L. Taylor, North Fairfield. 
Selection from Henry VTTI. Shakespeare. 

*Levi Turner, Jr., Somer^^lle. 
Extract from an Historical Address. "Webster. 

W. W. Kilgore, North Newry. 
Eulogy on Lafayette. Everett. J. C. Parker, Lebanon. 
Centennial Oration. Brown. 

E. E. Rideout, Cumberland. 
American Battle-Flags. Schurz. 

W. H. Stackfiole, Bowdoinham. 
Character of Napoleon Bonaparte. Phillips. 

*A. R. Butler, Portland. 
Republicanism. Garfield. I. W. Horn, Berlin, N. H. 

Places chosen by lot. 
*Excused. 

The first prize was awarded to H. R. Fling; the 
second to W. W. Kilgore. 

***The Junior prize declamations occurred in 
Memorial Hall, Monday evening, July 7th. A 
large audience were in attendance, and the speak- 
ing was unusually flue. Grimmer furnished excel- 
lent music. The following is the program : 

MUSIC. 

Speech in Republican National Convention. Long. 

L. B. Folsom, Berlin Falls, N. H. 
The Dome of the Republic. White. 

*"Webb Donnell, Sheepscot. 
Commemoration Ode. Lowell. J. A. Peters, Ellsworth. 

MUSIC. 

Nomination of Blaine. West. F. W. Davis, Hiram. 

The Loves of the Nations. Carleton. 

E. R. Harding, Hampden. 
Speech on the American War. Chatham. 

W. R. Butler, Lawrence, Mass. 

MUSIC. 

Extract from Julius Caesar. Shakespeare. 

P. W. Alexander, Richmond. 
Parrhasius. Willis. *Boyd Bartlett, Ellsworth. 

Barbarity of National Hatreds. Choate. 

J. F. Libby, Richmond. 

MUSIC. 

Places chosen by lot. 
*Absent. 

The committee, consisting of Prof. C. H. Smith, 

Rev. A. Gooding, and W. E. Sargent of Preeport, 

awarded the first prize to W. R. Butler, and the 

second to John F. Libby. 



PERSONAL. 



[Graduates and undergraduates are eai'nestly solicited to send 
personal items to the Bowdoin Orient, Brunswick, Me.) 

The following has been ascertained concerning 
the class of '84. Bradley intends to travel abroad. 
Brown, Clark, and Lindsay, will study medicine, 
Kemp goes to the Norway High School, and Knight 
to the Topsham High School. Adams, Cothren, 
Hilton, Phinney, Child, Fogg, Thompson, and 
Wright, will go into business. Longren goes to 
Andover to study for the ministry, and will be fol- 
lowed in a year by C. Torrey and Means — Torrey 
the meanwhile teaching at the Lewiston High 
School. Orr and Smith have good positions as 
teachei'S in California. Walker will probably go 
west and enter some kind of business. J. Torrey 
goes to Lafayette College as assistant Professor in 
Chemistry. 

'83. — Cole has received an appointment to the 
principalship of the Bath High School, in place of 
Hughes ('74), resigned. 

'83. — Packard has been attending the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, N. York City, and will 
return there in the fall. 

'83. — During the summer. Reed will be clerk at 
the Mt. Pleasant House, Randolph, N. H. 

'82. — Blondel has been Superintendent of Schools 
in What Cheer, Iowa, and will return in the fall to 
teach. 

'82. — Eames is attending the College of Pharmacy, 
Boston. 

Among the noted men present at the Commence- 
ment exercises, were J. G. Blaine, Wm. P. Frye, 
Gov. Robie, Congressman Rice, of Mass., Cyrus 
Hamlin, D. D., W. W. Thomas, Sr., Gen. John M. 
Brown, Egbert C. Smyth, E. E. Halo, Judge Gard- 
ner, of Mass., Judge Appleton, Judge Barrows, Judge 
Waterman, Judge Emery, W. L. Putnam, Enoch 
Foster, D. C. Linscott, and Bungernuc John. 

'33. — Hon. Wm. L. Putnam, Vice-President of 
the Board of Overseers, has been elected Trustee, to 
fill the vacancy made by the death of John T. 
Gilman, M.D., of Portland. 

The honorary degree of Doctor of Laws was con- 
ferred on Hon. J. G. Blaine, Hon. W. L. Putnam, of 
Portland, Prof. John H. C. CofBn, of Washington, 
D. C, and Hon. Morris C. Blake, of San Francisco. 

The honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity was 
conferred on Rev. Joseph K. Green and Rev. George 
M. Adams, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



99 



The honorary Degree of Master of Arts was con- 
ferred on Kev. Preston B. Wing. 

The degree of Master of Arts in the course was 
conferred on E. E. Spring, H. W. Chamberlain, W. 
I. Cole, F. A. Fisher, R. H. Greene, H. B. Hatha- 
way, F. L. Johnson, J. W. Manson, William King, 
H. S. Payson, H. L. Staples, W. W. Towle, J. O. P. 
Wheelwright, A. F. Rogers, O. M. Shaw, F. H. 
Little, all of the class of 1881. 

The degree of Master of Arts out of the course 
was conferred on O. Crocker Stevens, class of 76, 
H. B. Fifield, class of 79, H. Giveen, class of '80, 
and James A. Beniis, class of '62. 

NECROLOGY, 1883-84. 

1823 — Hiram Hayes Hobbs, b. North Berwick, Jan. 13, 

1802; d. South Berwick, March 9, 1884, aged 82. 
1826— John Taylor Gilman, b. Exeter, N. H., May 9, 1806; 

d. Portland, Jan. 16, 1884, aged 78. 
1826— Jame.s Samuel Eowe, b. Exeter, N. H., October 27, 

1807; d. Bangor, March 2;!, 1884, aged 77. 
1827— John Hodgman, b. Weare, N. H., Oct. 8, 1800; d. 

Dubuque, Iowa, Aug. 27, 1883, aged 83. 
1829 — Harrison Otis Aptliorp, b. Boston, Mass., June 7, 

1809; d. Cambridge, Mass., Sept. 18, 1883, aged 74. 
1829— John Quinby Day, b. Portland, June 24, 1809; d. 

Portland, March 5, 1SS4, aged 75. 
1830- James Merrill Cummings, b. Boston, July 27, 1810; 

d. Portland, July 20, 1883, aged 73. 
1834— Amos Morrill, b. Salisbury, Mass., Aug. 25, 1819; d. 

Galveston, Texas, March, 1884, aged 75. 
1835^Thomas Newman Lord, b. Newburyport, Mass., 

Aug. 10, 1807; d. Oshkosh, Wis., March 25, 1884, 

aged 77. 
1836— Joseph Baker, b. Bloomfield, June 7, 1812; d. Au- 
gusta, Nov. 29, 1883, aged 71. 
1836— Stephen Titcomb, b. Farmington, Sept. 16, 1809; d. 

Farmington, Jan. 20, 1884, aged 75. 
1838— Charles Copeland Hale, b. Hallowell, Jan. 1820; d. 

Boston, June 16, 1884, aged 64. 
18.39— Samuel Johnson, b. Jackson, Sept. 23, 1815; d. Ban- 
gor, Cal., Feb. 13, 1884, aged 69. 
1840— Ezra Abbott, b. Jackson, April 28, 1819; d. Cam- 
bridge, Mass., March 21, 1884, aged 65. 
1843— Joseph Dane, b. Kennebunk, Feb. 21, 1823; d. 

Kennebunk, March 16, 1884, aged 61. 
1843— John Oliver Means, b. August 1,1822; d. Boston, 

Dec. 8, 1883, aged 61. 
1853 — Henry Richard Downs, b. Calais, Sept. 17, 1832; d. 

Aurora, 111., Nov. 12, 1883, aged 51. 
1855— Thomas Henry Clark, b. Bristol, Nov. 16, 1829; d. 

Aurora, 111., Nov. 12, 1883, aged 54. 
1857 — Gustavus Augustus Stanley, b. Farmington, June 

15, 1832; d. Pensacola. Florida, Jan. 16,1884, aged 

52. 
1858 — Daniel Coifin Burleigh, b. Sanbornton, N. H., April 

8, 1834; d. Dresden, Sauorp, Jan. 10, 1884, aged 50. 
1859 — Charles Edwin Hilton, b. Bridgton, March 12, 1830- 

d. Washington, D. C, Sept. 19, 1883, aged 53. 
1859 — Franklin Freeman Hutchins, b. Fryeburg, Sept. 21 

1835; d. Fryeburg, Nov. 1, 1883, aged 48. 
1867— Jotham Franklin Clark, b. Wells, Oct., 1846- d 

Portland, March 14, 1884, aged 37. 
1872 — John Getchell Abbott, b. Windsor, AprU 17,1848- 

d. Boston, April, 1884, aged 36. 



GENERAL GOLLEGE NOTES. 



Contracts for building the new Dartmouth 
chapel and library have been respectively awarded 
to Mead, Mason & Co., Boston, and Curier, Pea- 
body & Russell, Lawrence. The corner stone of 
both buildings will probably bo laid this week. 

By a gift from the estate of the late Henry 
Morgan of New York City, four new fellowships 
have been founded for the encouragement of ad- 
vanced liberal studies. The income from each of 
these fellowships will be $500 ; and the term is one 
year. However, the incumbent is eligible for a 
second appointment. — Era. 

Cornell complaius that the other nines belong- 
ing to the New York State luter-collegiate League 
employ professionals. It is said that Hamilton and 
Union even advertised for professionals in New 
York papers. On May 22d, Manager Bering, of 
Cornell, made an affidavit, and the University 
Registrar signed a certificate, that all the members 
of the Cornell nine are regular college students. 

The twenty-first annual inter-university (Ox- 
ford-Cambridge) games were held on April 8th, at 
the Liilie Bridge athletic grounds. The track was 
in fine condition for the runners and the attendance 
was large, about fifteen thousand spectators being 
present. Of the twenty-one annual contests that 
have been held, Cambridge has won eleven and Ox- 
ford nine, while one year there was a tie. It is in- 
teresting to note that only four of the records 
made at these games are better than the American 
college records for the same events, namely, the 
one and three mile runs, the hurdle race, and 
throwing the \i.a.m\nBv.— Spectator. 

Kenyou and Amherst excuse students, who ob- 
tain a term mark of seventy-five per cent, in any 
branch, from the usual examination on the subject 
at the end of the term. We think a plan similar to 
this would vastly improve the scholarship of the 
colleges and do away with the evils of " cram- 
ming " for examinations. The facts show that stu- 
dents who obtain a good term mark seldom have 
any trouble in passing their examinations. More- 
over, under such a system each one would try to do 
his best on every lesson, and thus learn far more of 
the subject. — University Courier. 

The statue in bronze of Rev. John Harvard, the 
founder of Harvard, which is to be given by Gen- 
eral Samuel J. Bridge to the University, is being 
cast and will probably be dedicated about Sep- 
tember 26th. — Crimson. 



100 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



There was recently performed at Cornell the 
strange and interesting ceremony of unveiling the 
Egyptian mummy, presented to the college some 
time ago by Mr. Pomeroy, consul general to Cairo. 

Eliphalet Nott Potter, president of Union Col- 
lege since 1872, has resigned and will accept the 
presidency of Hobart College, to which position he 
has been unanimously chosen. 

Princeton is to have a Latin comedy presented 
by the students in the near future. 

At Amherst hereafter, no student shall enter any 
athletic games, base-ball or foot-ball, without the 
permission of the department of physical education 
and hygiene. 



CLIPPINGS. 



DISAPPOINTM ENT. 

I received it in rapture. 

This promising capture, 
'Twas an envelope decked with a feminine scrawl; 

In appearance light bluish. 

With a handwriting skewish. 
And the monogram vainly I tried to recall. 

I handled it shyly, 

While praising it highly. 
And, blessing the maiden who'd made my heart glad, 

I tore off the cover. 

Like an impatient lover. 
And read — would you think it?— a stationer's " ad." 

A fashion item says : " Tanned kids are coming 
in fashion again." It will be harder than ever now 
to coax boys to go to school. " Tanned kids " went 
out of fashion when the old style pedagogue stepped 
down and out with his rattan. — Ex. 

" A little nonsense, now and den 
Is just the things for efery man ; 
It makes the vomans laugh and shout, 
And all der ohil'ren smile out lout." 

— Shakshere. 



f if piiiii iiiti, 

A Superb, lUustrated, $1.00 Monthly Will be 
Sent, on Trial, 



To all who wiU enclose this ad. to us NOW, with 12 2c. stamps 
to pre-pay postage. The Indiana Farmer says : "Contents in- 
teresting and to flower-lovers well worth the price— $1.00 per 
Year." Sworn subscription list over 13,000 in everv State, Terri- 
tory, Canada, Great Britain, South America, Africa, India, and 
Austi-alia. 

Mrs. E. A. Houk, Bingen, Ind., says: "It is the best floi-al 
paper I ever saw." Mrs. .1. W. Fay, Big Beaver, Mich. : "It is 
magnificent." Mrs. E. G. Stambach, Perth Amboy, N. J. : 
"Have never seen anything hall' so good." Mrs. .J. L. Shankin, 
Seneca City, S. C. : "It is just splendid!" Address 

THE FLORAL WORLD, HIGHLAND PARK, LAKE CO., ILL, 



muiuihntne, 



2 §|ur£| liwfe, 



h% 



-OF 

fMlM AM® FANCY 

neatly executed at the 

B^aNgWICK PEJ^^DD 0FFICE. 



►^ gPECI^Ii ^ FINE ^ P^Tg -1^^ 

A.KE VERY fOPUEA-Xt. 

jaE^^Y ¥KE H^TTE^, P0^TIi^ND- 



STUDENTS' ATTENTION! 

Do you wish to earn a large sum of money during the 
summer vacation ? We want three or four more Students 
who are ready to work hard for good pay to secure subscribers 
for our beautifully illustrated magazine, and will give the 
right men very large pay. Write at once to the Cottage 
Hearth Co., 11 Bromfield St., Boston. 



WHY I AM A REPUBLICAN 

A graphic and reliable presentation of Republican princi- 
ples, and reasons for continuing the party in power, also 
fine portraits and authentic lives of 

IBL.A.IIVE A.]Vr> LOGA.IV 

by Gov. GEO. S. BOUTWELL, of Mass. THE BOOK 
of the party, endorsed by leading Republicans. Price in 
reach of every voter. A rare opportunity for a wide-awake 
student to engage in the campaign with profit. 

WM. J. BETTS S( CO,, Hartford, Conn. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 
direct importation, which is made especially for us, water 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLEN .D GLNTER Vldnufacturers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



S'anE'W^Ja.jO^ 



New system. Lcarneil in less than one-quarter the time 
required by any otlier. Old reporters throw away old sys- 
tems and learn this for speed and legibility. It can be 
successfully 

TAUGHT BY MAIL. 
The corresponding style can be learned in a few hours, 
and the full verbatim reporting style in a few months. It 
is a marvel of simplicity. 

STUDENTS 

can easily acquire enough to enable them to take notes of 

LECTURES. 

Send for circular. Terms: Corresponding style, five 

lessons, f5. Corresponding and reporting, twenty lessons, 

$10. 

R. B. CAPEN", Augusta, Me. 



JO STEEL 
PENS. 




Leading Numbers ; 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEN CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York 



SMOKE THE BEST. 

We beg to inform tlie niiblic and smokers generally, that we 
have secured a Large stock of (he very choicest grades of thor- 
oughlv cured 

GOLDEN VIKGIKTIA, PEBIQUE and TURKISH 
tobaccos, which we are using in the manufacture of oui- Cele- 
brated brands of cigarette and smoking tobaccos. And 
have added to our stock a large shipment of the finest imported 
French Rice Paper. Such stock, made up by the highest class of 
skillful labor, we feel coufldent cannot fail to satisfy the tastes of 
all good judges. 

STANDARD BRANDS. 
Oaporal— Caporal J— Sweet Caporal— St. James \, Kinney Bros.' 
Straight Cut in Full Dress Packages, etc., etc. 

JUST OUT— SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL. 
Manufactured by Special Request. 

jS'iniiey Tobacco Co., 
Successors to Kinney Bros., New York 



DEALER IN 



9, 



No. 2 Odd Fellows' Block, 



^i^f iili ^ilk|© jf ©iieil ^©piplniit 

The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence Febkuauy 7th, 1884, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alpheds S. Packard, Acting President; 
Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel T. Dana, M.D., 
Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Goddard, 
A.M., Medical Jurisprudence; Frederic H. Gerrish, M.D., 
Anatomy; Henry Carmichael, Ph.D., Cheniisti-y; Burt G. 
Wilder, M.D., Physiology; Stephen H.Weeks.M.D., Surgery 
and Cluneal Surgery ; Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics; Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator of 
An.atomy; Everett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of His- 
tology. 

ALFEBD MITCHELL, M.D., 
Brunswick, Maine. 



FRANK M. STETSON, 



m 
m 







tTTJ 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



NATIONAL SCHOOL SUPPLY BOREAU. 

Beloit, Wis., July 31, 1883. 
National School Siipply Bvreau: 

Last April, being then in charge of a large public school, but 
desiring a position in some good academy or college, I placed 
my name with your Bureau." During the iirst part of the present 
month I received notice from you of a vacancy in such a place as 
1 desired. 

Putting myself in communication with the party concerned I 
received &e appointment. I am well satisfied with the manage- 
ment of the Bureau, and feel sure that it fills a useful and nec- 
essary place in our school economy. Ton are at liberty to use 
my name if you wish. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD O. FISKE. 
Headmaster Markam Academy, Milwaukee, Wis. 

For application-form and circular, address. 

National School Supply Depot, Chicago, III. 
N. B. — "We want aU kinds of Teachers for Schools 
and Families. Good Pay to Agents and Private Cor- 
respondents. 



DEALER IN 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also Insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 
:iBfc.XT:ivs'W'ioi£., i\!L.A.iva:£s. 

STUDENTS 

Of all classes will find it valuable to consult on all subjects the 



183 SOUTH CLARK STREET, CHICAGO, IliL. 



c E. a:oTxrj>TSEi>TJZ), 



CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B.— Special Rates to Studeut Clubs. 

All the Students Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 



Cor. Main and Mason Sts., opf. Town Clock. 



ALL KINDS OF 





EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



Having a very extensive Job Printing Establishment fur- 
nished with the very best appliances of Presses, Type, and Work- 
manship, we especially solicit orders lor Fine Printing of all 
binds. 

For Manufacturers or Business Men. 

TAGS, LABELS, 

PAY ROLLS, 

BLANK BOOKS. 

We also make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges. 

sncH as 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address aU orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



J^. O. REED, 

BI?,XJ]SrSAA7"ICI2:, IS/IE. 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bruns-nrick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

POFt.TI.AMX), IVI.A.IME:. 

DISPENSER OP 

Pit© 3f igij Midk-iaes, ^ Blmlgiii, 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc. , in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Go to JKF, B. ITIToodard's 

To buy vour GEOCEBIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 
sfsci-^uXj k-^teis to STTTiD^iisra? ci-.-cr:Bs. 
Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswicl<, Me. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 H^iddle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



5 %, 

MAIN STKEET, BRUBTSWICK, ME. 



Wja. % FIELD, 



ww^^% 



TONTIIffE HOTSL, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Special attention will be given to Class and Reunion Dinners 
and Suppers to order. First-class laundry connected with the 
house. 

S. B. BREWSTER, Proprietor. 



239 »IIDD1jB STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. JIERKILL. A. KEITH. 



&iii»i 



DEALER IN 

ill PlI/l'ISKDNS 

Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 "WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAIITE. 



Washington Market, 

TONTINE HOTEL, BLOCK, 

BB,xj3srs"V\7-ici2:, i^.A.insrE. 

Meats, Vegetables, and Fruits of all kinds. Also Oys- 
ters, Fresh and Smoked Fish. 
Bowdoin College Patronage Solicited. 



-s-^jc; 



DEALEK IN 



CEDAR STREET, BRUNTSWICK, ME. 
Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
I^^ Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BKIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PICTURE FEAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

Also Pictin-es, Cabinet Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, 
etc. Also aa'ent for the rulebratcd Household Sewing 

:\l:irliillL's. 

In the Everett Store, Main Street, Opposite the Mall, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




ON THE EOAD. 



til iiiiiitiii ii,, 

(Established 18T7.) 

10 BERKELY ST., BOSTON, MASS., 

leii (^iferjsh too mim^tmUU gaiaUofflMs, 

OBTE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 

OTHEK TO TEICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 

stamp at above address. 



ST^LL & BURT, 

509 Tremont St., and 4 Warren Ave., Odd Fellows' Hall, Boston, Mass. 
SPECIAL IMPROVED 

American STAR Bicycle 

Although comparatively a new machine on the mar- 
ket, the Star has iiiade a splenfUd record, 
having won the 

Twenty-Five Mile Championship of 

the United States, 

Breaking the record, in 83 minutes 10 seconds. 

It has a mile record of 2 miii. 50 1-8 sec; 
5 miles, 15 min. 26 3-4 sec: mile Trithout 
hands, 3 min. 11 sec It has Avon the most im- 
portant Hill Climbing Contests, including 
Corey Hill, Boston, Eagle HUl, Orange, N. J., 
and Standpipe Hill, Washington, D. C. This 
is a mere mention of the triumphs of the Star... 

The principles embodied in the Star give the perfect combination for safety, speed, and comfort with economy of 
maintenance and durability found in no other machine. 

IN ADDITION WE HAVE THE 




VICTOR TRICYCLE, Tlie lost FaiBOUS Tiiree-fheeler Mafle In The WGrli. 

A Pull Line of the Best ENGLISH MACHINES 

Go to complete the list and suit all tastes. 

The IDEAL, a cheaper machine for use of boys and youths, is a splendid machine for purpose intended and is 
highly recommended- 

SECOND-HAND MACHINES of all kinds, SUPPLIES and SUNDRIES constantly on hand. 

REPAIRING of most difficult kinds performed at reasonable rates. All machines and parts must be plainly 
marked and be accompanied by instructions by next mail. 

SEND TWO-CENT STAMP FOR CATALOGUE. 



SSSaSESESaSHSasaSHSESHSHSaSESESHSESHSJSaSaSESESaSHSBSESESHSSEH 




E5ESHSHS2SEH2SESHSESESH5H5E5H5E5E5HHSE5H5H5H52SH5a5H5H5H51 








SESESE:,HSES5HSeSHSaSHSH5H5HSSSH5aSHSH5E5E5H5JSE5H5H5ESHSa5E5S5 


















"-^5^ 188 4.««<^^<- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLKAR, STKADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECKSSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

ASD THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENOEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

Ne. i 0DD EEIiMW^' BItGOK, 

Is the place to liiiy 



;_, § c/ancif §a'od6,. 



Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 



The only radical internal remedy. Nevejc known to 
fail in a single case, acute or chronic. It expels the poison- 
ous Uric Acid from the blood, which is the prime cause 
of Rheumatism, Gout, and Neuralgia.— As a blood puri- 

THE OLD RELIABLE SPECIFIC 

ENDORSED BY PHYSICIANS AND 

THOUSANDS OF PATIENTS. 

fier it has no equal. Acting on common-sense pmiciples 
it eradicates from the blood all poisonous matter which 
causes disease. — It has been in use for many years and 
cured a larger percentage of cases than any other 

POSITIVELY CURES 



remedy. Send for testimonials from the cured. — Salicy- 
lica strikes directly at the cause of these diseases, while 
so many so-called speci- 

BHEUMATISM 

fics only treat locally the effect. When you have tried 
in vain all the "oils," "ointments," "liniments," and 
"pain cures," and when your 

GOUT, NEURALGIA, 

doctors cannot help you, do ]iot despair but take Salicy- 
lica at once and be cured.— No one can afford to live in 
pain and misery when 

GRAVEL, DIABETES, 

Salicylica^ will relieve him and put him in condition to 
attend to his daily avocations. 

$1 per box, 6 boxes for S5, 

BLOOD POISONING. 

with £ull directions in ten languages. Sold by druggists 
everywhere, or sent by mail, prepaid, on receipt of jjrice. 

WASHBURNE & CO., Prop's, 

287 Broadway, New York. 

Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

Odd Fellows' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. W. BROWNE, Propkietok. 
Formerly at Tontine Hotel. 







THE FAVORITE NOS. 303-404-332-I7O-J5I-WITH 

'HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORL 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. MERRYMAN, PHARMACIST,-:- 

MUGS, BiiDICIlIS, 

Fancy M Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Toliacco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

IRA C. STOCiCBRgDCE, 

MITSIC PUBLISHEE., 

A lid Dealer iu Sheet Music, Music Boolis, Musical Instruments, and Musi ■ 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 £xcliaiige Street, Portland. 



The New Styles in 

STI^^E^ and. SOiFT ^^..Z^T'S 

Iu all colors, are now ready. An elecjant line of Ncay York 
Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, "Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

i ELLIOTT'S, I 

OPP. TOWN CLOCK. 



©ptep ami ie@ ^mam Emtymlmm, 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

|Il3"Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



TAPE IT^ORIVI. 

In one of the tropical provinces of nerniauy there has been 
fonnd a root, the extract from which, has proved an absolute 
SPECIFIC for Tape Worm. It is pleasant to take and is not de- 
bilitatin": or disagreeable in its effects on the patient, but is 
peculiarly sickening and stupefying to the Tajie Worm, which 
loosens its hold of its victim ami passes away in a natural and 
easy manner, entirely whole, with head, ana while still alive. 
One physician has used this remedy in over 400 cases, without a 
sin,2:le failure to pass worm whole, with head. Absolute removal 
with head guaranteed. No pay required until so removed. Send 
stamp for circular aud terms. 

HEYWOOD & CO., 19 Park Place, N. Y. City. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 

WSEN iron ViTANT A RIDE 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE, 

On Cleaveland ijtreety lohere you loW find turnouts to suit the most 
fastidiotcs. is^ Rates reasonable. 




Mm% 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating' Library, 1600 "Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys iu great variety ; Pocket 
Cvitlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short KTotice. Agency for 
Bruns"wick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday iViorning by A. G. Tenney. 

TERiis, $1.50 a Tear in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

J8S»Special Bates to Student Clubs.^ffis 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates tor Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in tlie following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amoant of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin G-rammar,— Allen and G-reenoiigh, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, Georgics and first six Books 
of the iEneid, including Prosody. 
(Instead of the Georgics, Caesar's Gallic War, 
Books I.-IV., may be offered.) 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Georgraphy, — Tozer. 



Avithmetic, — especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,- first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through. Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginuiug of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regdlae Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (July 11 and 12, 1884), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 26 and 27, 1884). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examinations is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Washington Academy, East 
Machias, and at the Fryehurg Academij, these 
schools having been made special Fitting Schools 
for the college by the action of their several Boards 
of Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 
have been fitted at any school having an approved 



preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list "of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who "will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow bis 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— four HOURS A "WEEK. 

Latin, six terras. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terras. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

electives — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terras. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $7.5. 
Room rent (half), average, $2.5. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol.. XIV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCT. 1, 1884. 



No. 7. 



BOAVDOIISr ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGU.TE YEAR, BY THE STtlDENTS OP 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

John A. Peters, '85, Managing Editor. 

K. B. Ford, '85, Business Editor. 
Boyd Bartlett, '85. W. P. Nealley, '85. 

O. R. Cook, '85. A. A. Knowlton, '86. 

Webb Donnell, '85. C. W. Tdttle, '86. 

J. F. Libey, '85. W. V. "Wentworth, '86. 



Per annum, in advance. 
Single Copies, . 



. $2.00. 

15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the book stores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-OfEce at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Me. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XIV., No. 7.-0ct. 1, 1884. 



Editorial Notes 101 

Sonnet.— Dr. Packard 103 

Remarks of Prof. Chapman 103 

A Warning (poem) 105 

Havrthorne 105 

Two Seasons (poem) 107 

Antilogia 107 

Base-Ball 108 

CoLLEGii Tabula 108 

Personal 112 

Clippings 112 




pleasure, and 
not a little pride, that the Orient comes be- 
fore its readers in its present guise. Always 
noted for its neat make-up and correct typog- 
raphy', during the fourteen years of its ex- 
istence, it has never, till now, aspired to a 
cover more elaborate than a printed page of 
white paper, or, perchance, one of green or 
brov^n, in honor of the festivities of Ivy Day 
or Commencement. But other college papers 
have not been so unassuming. The contem- 
poraries of the Orient have, one by one, 
donned gay costumes of terra cotta or gray, 
till the OfiiENT itself began to feel quite con- 
scious of its humble appearance. Then, again, 
the body of any paper is more attractive if 
served up in artistic style. The present high 
standard in college journalism, and the fact 
that we owe it to our supporters to put the 
paper before them in the best possible shape, 
have demanded this change in the Orient. If 
it meets your approbation we shall consider 
ourselves ampl}' repaid for whatever trouble 
or expense we have incurred. The editors 
have been especially fortunate in having one 
of their number both able and willing to fur- 
nish appropriate designs for the engravings. 
Thanks are due Mr. Webb Donnell, whose 
nimble pencil has been employed so success- 
fully in behalf of the paper. 



102 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



But the Oeient, though changed in ap- 
pearance, is the same old paper still, and we 
extend a most hearty greeting to all our old 
friends, and a cordial welcome to all those 
whom we hope to count as such. 



This number of the Oeient has been sent 
to every member of the Freshman class, and 
the paper will continue to be so sent unless 
the business editor receives notice to the 
contrary. We are happy to say that in the 
matter of subscriptions, at least, the Orient 
receives the support of nearly every man in 
college, and we have no doubt that 'eighty. 
eight will show itself as patriotic in this re- 
spect as an}' of its illustrious predecessors. 
But we would impress upon the minds of 
the Freshmen the necessity of dispossessing 
themselves of the idea, if any such 1ms been 
formed, that the only support demanded of 
them by the Orient, is that of a financial 
nature. The matter that appears in these 
columns is by no means the exclusive pro- 
duction of the editors. The Orient is the 
organ of the students, supported and con- 
tributed to by thera, and published by their 
representatives. 

We invite and expect specimens of your 
work in the way of poetry, tales, communi- 
cations on any subject, or to any of the de- 
partments. Even if not published, such at- 
tempts will be remembered to your advantage. 
At the beginning of the year we offered 
prizes for literary work. We republish the 
offer for the benefit of those who were not 
here at that time. The sum of thiity dol- 
lars is divided as follows : 

For largest number of published short poems, . 5fl0.00 

For the next larger number, 5.00 

For the best light prose article or short sketch, . 10.00 

For the next in merit, 5.00 

The paper is published under the super- 
intendence of the present board for two 
terms longer, at the close of which time this 
offer expires. We hope to hear frequently 



not only from the Freshmen, but from all 
those who have not yet favored us. 



Not the least of the forward steps taken 
by Bowdoin lately is the change in the time 
of commencement. The immediate advan- 
tages of this change are noticeable this fall 
in the increased interest in athletics. The 
additional two weeks for work on the river 
is appreciated by the boating men, who im- 
prove their opportunities every afternoon 
from four till six. The crews in training for 
the fall races are working with determination, 
the Freshmen showing great enthusiasm for 
the sport. It looks as if the race would be 
a close one, each crew, in imagination, seem- 
ing to feel the flags already in its grasp. 
After the race an effort will be made to man 
a six-oared shell in order to give the men in 
training for the college crew a chance to 
show their mettle. The base-ball men have 
been on the Delta for some time and mean to 
stay there till snow falls. A short series of 
games with the Colby and other nines 
is a new feature of tlie fall term, and one 
much to be commended. The nine is work- 
ing well and the prospect for the spring sea- 
son is good. The interest in tennis and foot- 
ball has been somewhat absorbed by the two 
more prominent sports. 



So far as we have been able to discover— 
and the statement will not be a surprise to 
many — no gymnasium has made its appear- 
ance here during the summer montlis. What 
little training the crews and base-ball men 
condescend to take will have to be done in 
the same cooped-up and ridiculous quarters 
as last year. It seems that the visiting com- 
mittee are at least aware of the fact that we 
have no gymnasium, for they have recom- 
mended to the Boards to appoint a committee 
to select a man to act as agent to procure 
funds to build a gymnasium with, This 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



103 



sounds like "The House that Jack Built." 
It is to be hoped that the gymnasium will 
some day be more of a reality than the house 
of Jack. It seems scarcely credible that we 
have been allowed for so long a time to 
be without an element so essential to the 
welfare of a college as a gymnasium now is. 
The lack of means for physical culture here 
will, in a great measure, account for the small 
classes which have fallen to Bowdoin's lot for 
the last few years. It has been estimated by 
one most competent to judge that if a first- 
rate gymnasium should be erected on this 
campus the number of students would in a 
short time be doubled. Our great need in 
this respect is fully realized by the members 
of the Faculty. We are informed that the 
Visiting Committee were told by several of 
the professors that no appropriation would 
be asked for their departments, if by so doing 
the cause of a gymnasium could be at all fur- 
thered. Meanwhile the movements of the 
agent who has the matter of collecting funds 
in charge will be anxiously watched by all 
friends of Bowdoin. 



It is with mingled feelings of pleasure 
and sorrow that the Seniors greet Prof. John- 
son's return to his labors — pleasure, to see 
the chair of Modern Languages once more 
filled by so able a gentleman ; sorrow, to 
think that they alone will have lost the bene- 
fit of his instruction for the entire course ; 
for, though German is oifered the Seniors as 
an elective during the last two terms of this 
year, not many will consider themselves suf- 
ficiently well grounded to go on with the 
study. The return of Prof. Johnson to the 
faculty of instruction, after two years of 
travel and study in Europe, will be a highly 
desirable infusion of new blood. We con- 
gratulate the underclassmen upon the ex- 
cellent opportunity afforded them for study 
of the modern languages under a professor 



whose ripe scholarship gives such value to 
his instruction. 



We were fortunate enough to secure for 
publication the remarks of Prof. Chapman 
at prayers, on the first morning of the term. 
It was with a feeling of peculiar sadness that 
the students entered the chapel on that first 
morning, and Prof. Chapman, in his remarks, 
seemed to strike just the right chord. We 
think the remarks will prove interesting to 
graduates and students as well. 



SONNET.— PROF. PACKARD. 

Like to the authem of a master miud 

Made vocal through the organ's metal throats, 

Where sweetly winnhag and strong-sounding notes 

Are all in perfect harmony combined ; 

And seem a wave of beauty undefined, 

Which sinking into silence leaves the heart 

Of him who listens moved in every part 

With strange emotions which it leaves behind ; 

And lingers like an echo in the breast, 

When long the notes have ceased to breathe in 

sound ; 
A sense of something beautiful and hest. 
Like unseen incense breathing all around. 
Was that pure life which went away to rest 
With days completed and with labors crowned. 



REMARKS OF PROF. CHAPMAN. 

A year ago, when, at the opening of a^ 
new college year, we were gathered for the 
first time in these seats, you received the 
welcome of the college from one who gave 
to that welcome an added value because he 
uttered it. Many of you doubtless remember 
the eager interest and the hopeful spirit with 
which Dr. Packard spoke on that occasion, 
as he told us of the new illustrations which 
the preceding commencement had furnished 
him of the profound and far-reaching influ- 
ence of college associations. That which 
fell from his lips had, then, as always, the 



104 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



charm of his own kindliness, and the weight 
of bis revered character. 

Fitly, also, could he speak for the college, 
who had given to it a long life-time of loving 
and loyal service. Student and teacher the 
college was his home for sixty-nine years, 
within one year as long as the time usually 
allotted to human life. He served it gladly 
with his best powers ; he honored it always 
in bis thoughts, bis purposes and his acts; it 
was enshrined in bis deepest affections; it 
was never forgotten in his prayers. What- 
ever assailed its good name, or threatened its 
prosperity, touched him as quickly and as 
keenly as if it were aimed at himself, or at 
those who were dearest to him. Whatever 
added to its renown or promised to increase 
its usefulness was to him a source of evident 
and inexpressible satisfaction. 

Class after class entered these doors, drew 
nearer, year by year, to the voice of his sup- 
plication until they sat in his immediate pres- 
ence, and then, with their hearts and their 
voices full of the melody of "Auld Lang 
Syne," went slowly down the aisle and out 
into the world, carrying with them the mem- 
ory of a beautiful and benignant presence 
that ministered at this desk, and carr^'ing 
with them also the priceless treasure of his 
sincere and affectionate interest in their 
welfare. 

And so it was that in every quarter of 
. the globe men were to be found, doing ac- 
cording to their ability the various work of 
the world, whose eyes would kindle and 
whose hearts would beat quicker at the men- 
tion of his name. They came back, when it 
was possible, more gladly to the annual com- 
mencement of the college because they ex- 
pected to meet once more their beloved 
friend and teacher ; and they were always 
sure to receive from him a glad and affec- 
tionate greeting. For many years it was a 
matter of pride and pleasure to him that he 
knew every living graduate of the college. 



and they, with an ever-increasing cordiality 
and enthusiasm gave him the reverence and 
love which were his due. 

The secret of his beautiful and useful life 
is not hard to find. Indeed it is not a secret, 
for it was clear to all who knew him. It was 
his modest and scrupulous fidelity to every 
duty and trust, however small ; he belonged 
to those accepted ones whose title to reward 
contains the shining words " faithful in that 
which is least." It was his kindly but un- 
bending integrity in all things. It was his 
genuine and unobtrusive piety which made 
him anxious above all things to do the will 
of his father in heaven. These qualities, 
joined with that courteous and genial spirit 
that always distinguished him, gave a 
strength and a symmetry to his character, 
and a beauty and dignity to his countenance, 
which made it a pleasure to look at him, and 
an unspeakable privilege to know him. 

Scarcely had our late commencement 
passed, and those who had participated in its 
pleasures gone to their homes, when, with- 
out warning and almost without pain, this 
faithful and beloved head of the college was 
called to enter into his rest. The bereave- 
ment was sudden and sad, but it may give 
us a feeling of thankfulness, even in our 
bereavement, to remember that he was spared 
the weakness and pain of lingering disease ; 
that he died in the full enjoyment of his 
powers; and that his last conscious look was 
into the fiices of loving friends. Nor should 
it be forgotten, for it was a source of the 
deepest pleasure to him, that during the pre- 
ceding week he had received such manifold 
and eager tokens of respect and love from 
so many of his former pupils. It almost 
seems as if they had come up to the college 
in such numbers in order to pour the fra- 
grant tribute of their love upon his head 
against the day of his burial. 

And while we recount the things to be 
grateful for in connection with his death, this, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



105 



certainly, should be among them, that his 
last year was in some respects one of pecu- 
liar pleasure and satisfaction to him. Never 
before, lie said, during an acquaintance of 
more than seventy years with the college, had 
he known a year so free from the unfavora- 
ble influences and disorders that too often 
bring reproach upon college life, and had 
often in previous years been a burden of 
anxiety and sorrow to himself Both in 
public and in private he spoke of the pleasure 
he had received from this fact, and from the 
promise it afforded for the years to come. 
It was a pleasure of his declining days that 
only the students of the college could give 
him, and it is a grateful privilege to mention 
it in this presence. 

Tlie college can no longer speak through 
his lips, but it would not therefore fail to bid 
you welcome once more to these walks and 
halls, — both those of you who return to 
scenes that have already become familiar, 
and to old friends, and those who come 
among us as strangers to be hereafter friends. 
It is a welcome to hard study and honest 
attainment; a welcome to friendly rivalry in 
the recitation room, in the field and on the 
river ; a welcome to the opportunities for 
mental and moral growth which a college life 
so abundantly affords ; a welcome to the 
good fellowship and cordial friendships which 
give a charm to the passing years, and re- 
main a treasured possession through all the 
years to oome. It is a welcome that carries 
with it the charge to be faithful and quit 
you like men, that the year opening before 
you may be full of the most satisfying hap- 
piness, and fruitful of large attainments in 
both knowledge and wisdom. 



Chicago boasts of a lady, now ninety-four years 
old, who used to sit on George Washington's lap. 
It is comforting to know that, even if George couldn't 
tell a lie, he used to have some fun with the girls. — 
Collegiate. 



A WARNING. 



I saw within a garden's pleasant bower, 

Two youthful forms among the roses seated. 
And scarcely yet had passed a single hour 

Since they beside the garden gate had greeted 
With such affectiou, that methought — '• No Power 

Can cool that love on Cupid's altar heated." 
(The moon was shining in a cloudless sky. 

And may be thafs what made my thoughts so 
tvrp.) 

II. 
I watched them chatting in the evening light, 

And saw that they were growing animated ; 
I wondered if the " Voices of the Night" 

Had to them future joys anticipated ; 
I wondered if love's mystic second-sight 

Had caused — 
When, suddenly, the maid my thoughts corrected 

With this strange cry — " No ! Blaine should 
be elected." 



Alas for love, where politics are found ! 

Alas for that young man who tries to weigh 
them I 
The winged god flies at the very sound. 

His tiny arrows ever seem to stray them; 
This one who seemed in logics to abound. 

Soon learned the cost of trying to display 
them, — 
A crafty youth came round, who talked for Blaine, 

And he was left — to pohtics and pain. 



HAWTHORNE. 

Every author has among his friends those 
who think him the wonder of the age. Every 
reader has a favorite author. An admirer of 
Scott once said, " This must have been a 
dreadful world to live in before it had a 
Walter Scott." An admirer of one of our 
own writers ventures to say " This world 
must have been a very different place to live 
in before it had a Hawthorne." He shines 
alone in the literary heavens. Entirely dif- 
ferent and far removed from all others he 
has not even a single satellite, but moves 
along unattended, gleaming out in intense 



106 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



splendor through the haze of mystery and 
unearthliness with which as an author he 
surrounded himself. His characters do not 
belong to this world, or to heaven, or to 
hell, they live in a world of liis own mak- 
ing, — one which is neither material nor imma- 
terial, neither physical nor spiritual, — un- 
known except as we enter it with him, dim 
and dreamlike but altogether unique and 
fascinating. 

To read with keenest appreciation what 
Hawthorne has written, one needs to be, not 
exactl}' in the state where he does not know 
whether he " is in the body or out," but 
where if he thinks of it at all he is pretty 
sure he is out, where no jars or " disagreea- 
bles " shall remind him of this mortal exist- 
ence, but he be able to live for the time in 
that other world, that shadowy land where 
Hawthorne lived, and lives perhaps, who 
knows? 

His creations are no more distinctively 
his than is the choice of words in which to 
clothe and present them to our human e3'es. 
His words are evidently chosen, not for 
themselves but for their use. Every sentence 
is formed as it is, not because it sounds well, 
but because it gives to readers just the pict- 
ure which was before the writer's eyes. As 
is true of every means perfectly adapted to 
its end, by virtue of that very fitness, the 
style has a matchless charm of its own. 
Somewhere in print ma}' be found the idea 
that reading Hawthorne is like gazing at the 
moss and pebbles down througli the trans- 
parent waters of a mountain brook. One 
sees the meaning — the soul of the words as if 
looking through clearest crystal — without 
realizing that there is any intervening, grosser 
medium of crystal, or of words. Still, when 
we stop and look closely at each sentence 
and the general st3de of writing, how beau- 
tifully simple, and simply beautiful it is ! As 
graceful and as free as that same mountain 
stream his thoughts glid on, now and then 



with a quick little splash, a sparkle and 
shimmer of sunlight, where his quaint fancies 
or quiet humor breaks the evenness of the 
flow. Most it noiselessly glides among shadj' 
nooks, where the sunshine onlyfaintl}' strikes 
its surface here and there in the sombre 
shade. But when the current of his thought 
makes its way through noxious weeds, stifl- 
ing thickets, choking filth and rubbish, how 
terrible he is ! It hardly seems possible that 
so quietl}' and so simply one could call up 
such pictures of horror and dread and crime. 

For before all other American writers, 
Hawthorne has true poetic instinct, what in 
the " House of Seven Gables " he himself calls 
" the gift of discerning in this sphere of 
strangely mingled elements the beauty and 
majesty which are compelled to assume a 
garb so sordid." Did any body ever see the 
soul of things so plainly as he? In illus- 
tration of his clear-sightedness in that direc- 
tion, some one of his biographers has told us 
an incident of his boating with a friend on 
the Connecticut river. They had let the 
boat drift into a retired place where a nar- 
row stream made its way into the river. The 
autumn foliage of the trees coming down 
close to its banks was mirrored in the water 
below, and Hawthorne, leaning over the side, 
gazed at the gold and crimson of the quiver- 
ing leaves, and said to his friend that this 
reflection of beauty in the liquid depths was 
more real than the grosser material leaves 
above their heads ; that the gleams of color, 
etherialized by reflection had all the essence 
of the other's beauty and grace, were as 
visible to the human eye, and appealed more 
directly, with the magic of all lovely things, 
to the human soul. 

He sees, and makes us see, that the idea 
which the material substance embodies is 
more tangible than that substance itselt; 
that the ideal is the true, real. And is it not 
so ? The ideas of warmth, shelter and com- 
fort which a house symbolizes, are they not 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



107 



more understandable, more get-at-able than the 
boards and nails and mortar of which the 
house is made? 

This outside world is a great mystery, a 
far greater mystery than the spiritual world, 
the sphere of mental life, and it seems in 
one sense farther awa}'. A thought, though 
we may not be able to fathom or wholly 
know it, is not as unapproachable, as incom- 
prehensible as is the actual substance of 
wood or stone. 

Mental activity, the thinking and feeling 
of which man is capable, is wonderful, but 
material motion, the eartli, air, skj', time and 
space are more wonderful. Amid all the 
questionings whicii alwaj's arise when people 
think, it is a great help to feel that material 
things are only the shell of the real life, that 
they are simply the media through wiiich in 
our present existence we hold communica- 
tion witii realities. Believing that, solemnly 
believing in the realness of the unseen, must 
make dying comparatively easy, just dropping 
the shell, throwing aside the husk. We may 
well believe that Hawthorne found it so. 
He, more than any other writer of our age, 
has lifted the veil which hides from duller 
eyes the inner ideal essence which all matter 
envelopes. He more than any other writer 
of any age has shown us beauty and meaning 
in the most common-place objects, has made 
us see that something immaterial and unper- 
ishable is in all material and perishable things. 
He knows now even more clearly than when 
he was here that the things which are seen 
are temporal, but the things which are not 
seen are eternal. d. 



TWO SEASONS. 

LAST. 

Oft through the summer vacation. 
We played — the fair Clara and I — 

Love games o'er the net of our tennis, 
With glances enticingly shy. 



THIS. 

This season again we play tennis 
Together through many a set ; 

But now we always play double, 

'Gainst the world lust over the net. 




" 'Tis true, 'tis pity, 
Pity 'tia 'tis true; " 

That the laying of the corner-stone of the new 
gymnasium has been delayed for a short time— that 
is, short as compared with eternity. 

That the list of reading-room papers has not 
yet been revised. 

That the Professor of Molecules, for a long, long 
time, has not been seen to stalk up the chapel aisle 
with military precision, and turn in the arc of a 
circle to his seat. 

That virtuous slumbers should be deferred by 
the horn blowing of fools who pretend to be wise, 
and curtailed by seven o'clock chapel bell. 

That the " Tabula " scribe has a room-mate, a 
harmless imnecessary— kitten! Not unnecessary, 
perhaps, after all ; his elective is Comparative 
Anatomy. 

That "Bill" is getting rich by sub-letting his 
contracts in coal-lugging. 

That Aleck's tuneful soul must needs find utter- 
ance one teuth of a second before the rest of the 
choir strike up. 

That the majority of the Faculty are anti-Reed- 
mugwumps. 



In the spring the London drapers advertised a 
shade of color called " elephant's breath," and for 
the autumn tint is announced "whipped baby," 
which is supposed to be a delicate shade of pink. — 
Ex. 



108 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BA.SE-BALIx. 



POKTLAND vs. BOWDOIN. 

The game at Portland last Saturday was 
a surprise to no one who is acquainted with 
the two nines. The Portlands are athletes 
and fine ball players who have been in con- 
stant practice during the summer, having 
played against strong professional clubs. 
Our nine, on the contrary, went into the 
field crippled by the loss of two of its best 
players, their places supplied by new and 
untried material, while the remainder were 
quite out of practice after the long vacation. 
Considering the unequal terms on which the 
contestants met, the game was creditable. 

The presence in their old places of the 
veterans of '84, Torrey and Waterman, sea- 
soned the nine and gave it character. The 
latter showed a lack of practice, while the 
former brilliantly played a perfect game. A 
beautiful stop of a terrific grounder made by 
him in the seventh inning was greeted with 
prolonged applause. The pitching of Fish 
was quite beyond the comprehension of the 
boys, two doubtful base hits being the result 
of all their attempts to bat him. Cook's 
pitching was by no means of an inferior qual- 
ity. He had to face hard hitters. Moulton 
supported him in good form, making some 
fine catches of fouls. Means played well at 
center field. The Portlands' work in the 
field was light, but what they had to do they 
did well. The score : 

PORTLAND. 

A.E. R. 1b. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Barnes, c.f., 6 2 

Abbott, c, 6 2 3 3 14 2 

fish, p 3 1 1 14 

Malloy, lb., 5 2 1 111 1 

Hatch, 3b., 5 1 1 1 1 2 

Gulliver, 2b., 4 1 2 2 1 1 

Freligh, s.s., 4 1 1 1 3 

Callahan, 1. f., .... 5 1 3 3 

Chatterton, r. 1., ...5 2 2 6 

Totals, 43 13 13 17 27 22 2 



BOWDOIN. 

A.B. K. 1b. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Cook, p., 4 1 1 1 I 5 1 

Moulton, c, 4 4 2 1 

Torrey, 2b., 4 1 1 1 7 

Pushor, lb., 4 16 2 

Waterman, s.s., .... 3 1 4 3 

Larrabee, r. f 3 

Means, c. f 3 2 1 

Cary, 3b 2 1 1 

Talbot, 1. f., 3 1 

Totals 26 1 2 2 27 20 7 

Earned runs — Portland 1, Bowdoin 1. Wild pitches — 
Cook 4. First base on balls — Portland 2, Bowdoin 2. 
Balls called— on Cook 58, on Fish 66. Strikes called — off 
Cook 5, off Fish 24. Struck out— Portland 1, Bowdoin 15. 
Three-base hits — Chatterton 2. Double plays — Moulton 
and Pushor, Means and Pushor. Passed balls — Moulton 
1. Time of game — 1 hour 55 minutes. Umpire — W. C. 
Emerson, Colby '84. 




" v'Uponthepen whose du- 
ty is to chronicle the events 
which transpire from one number of 
the Bowdoin Orient to another, 
rests the expression of our sorrow, 
that as we return to " these familiar 
scenes— these groves of pine," we no longer behold 
the face of him who had become to most of us the 
soul of Bowdoin. Elsewhere in this paper will be 
found a fitting tribute to his memory, but a record 
of college life would he incomplete did it not make 
some reference to the great loss which each of us 
personally has sustained, since last the Orient and its 
readers talked together, in the death of him who 
though dead, still lives in the hearts of all who 
have passed beneath the sunlight of his smile, and 
the beauty that radiated from his manly character. 
In the death of Professor Packard, Bowdoin has 
lost the last of that illustrious company of men 
who made her reputation world-wide, and we who 
still remain beneath her fostering care— we have 
lost our friend. 

The new year has opened about two weeks 
earlier than usual. Notwithstanding this, nearly 
all the students were in their seats at chapel Tuesday 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



109 



morning. Heretofore the late date on which the 
fall term began has prevented much attention to 
sports during that term, but this year we hope to 
see a change in this respect. Tennis, for some 
strange reason, seems to be laid on the shelf. 

The injunction of the commencement number 
of the Orient to its subscribers, not to " get left " 
on account of the change of time in beginning the 
college year, seems to have been needed. One of 
our gray-haired professors did not arrive till the 
second week, through misapprehension of the time 
of beginning. The Seniors were thereby treated 
to a short period of leisure. Some changes appear 
jn the college Faculty. Messrs. Fisher, Atwood 
and Potter have retired. Mr. Moody, '82, takes the 
vacant tutorship in Mathematics, while the Modern 
Language department is filled by the return from 
Europe of Prof. Johnson. The position of Instruc- 
tor in Rhetoric has not yet been filled. Prof. Smith 
has handed over several of his classes to Mr. 
Moody, and takes the department of History. 

*jj,* We cannot too highly express our approval 
of the work of the Faculty in the revision of the 
course of study, and we are quite certain that we 
voice the opinion of the student-body, when we say 
that no such forward step has been taken here for 
many years. It is not simply the change and the 
addition of more electives, — that is good, — but the 
courteous consideration of a request for particular 
lines of work, and the ready accession to the re- 
quest, show that our professors are quite wiUiug to 
meet the students half way in their desire for ad- 
vanced work. We congratulate the students now 
in college that they are to enjoy many privileges 
and advantages not enjoyed by classes already de- 
parted. 

*js* The customary game of foot-ball, between 
the Sophomore and Freshman classes, was played 
Friday of the first week, and was won by the Soph- 
omores, after an unexciting contest of half an hour. 
The rope-pull occurred on the following morning, 
and was won by the Freshmen. The game of 
base-ball, on the same afternoon, was stopped by 
the rain at the end of the fourth inning, the 
score at that time being 21 to in favor of the 
Sophomores. All of these games, if played strictly 
on their merits, would not have resulted differ- 
ently, we think. Yet while commending the spirit 
which actuated the upperclassmeu in their efforts 
to encourage the Freshmen, we are of the opinion 
that non-interference in any way with these games 
would be the wiser plan. It embitters defeat on 



the one side, and dulls the edge of victory on the 
other, to have assistance afforded to either of the 
contestants. 

*.j,*The jury for the administration of justice 
in the college, for the following year, is as follows : 
Senior class, Webb Donnell, Sheepscot ; Junior 
class, Percy A. Knight, Portland ; Sophomore 
class, Henry M. Moulton, Cumberland; Alpha 
Delta Phi, 0. D. Sewall, Farmington ; Psi Upsilon, 
James S. Norton, Augusta; Delta Kappa Epsilon, 
Boyd Bartlett, Ellsworth; Theta Delta Chi, 
Howard L. Lunt, Durham ; Zeta Psi, Walter V. 
Wentworth, Rockland. 

*** At a meeting of the Boating Association, the 
following officers were elected : Commodore, J. S, 
Norton, '85; Vice-Commodore, W. V. Wentworth 
'86; Secretary, C. M. Austin, '87; Treasurer, W, 
A. Moody, '82 ; Assistant Treasurer, C. B. Bur 
leigh, '87 ; Directors, 1st, J. A. Peters, 2d, A. A 
Knowlton, 3d, L. B. Varney. 

*»*How tirelessly the still, swift moments glide away ! 
How changelessly they grow until the wee small things 
Are years. And we — all helpless — do just wistfully 
Look on, and wish them back again. We count them 
Over hungrily, and even while we count 
Another one slips by and makes our reckoning wrong. 
We fail to make the mighty hands retrace their way 
One jot or tittle on the dial-plate of time. 
We only grow full weary and discouraged with our 

task, 
And sit down tired, while the busy hands move on. 
Such foolish ones ! Why not take up our lives afresh 
And bravely meet the restless years unflinchingly ? 
*s* The usual pail of white paint has been the 
rounds during vacation, and some of the recitation 
rooms have been slightly repaired— otherwise the 
college looks very much as usual. 

*5.* Many of the students have not yet returned. 
Of the Senior class, Dunham, Rogers, Purington, 
and Kendall are teaching. Harding is at home 
sick. Bowdoin is particularly fortunate in the large 
increase to her numbers, having just entered a class 
of 88. 

*s,* We have watched in vain for some change 
to be made in the matter of papers for the reading- 
room. The new year has begun and the same old 
list of papers — some good, some bad, and a major- 
ity indifferent— still hang upon the walls. How 
long, Lord, how long ! 

*;„* Since the beginning of last term, the library 
has come into possession, by gift and purchase, of 
three hundred and sixty-nine volumes and pam- 
phlets. Among these is a set of historical works 



110 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



issued by the Hakluyt Society, and considered 
very valuable. 

*«* But three of the Senior electives have been 
called for this term : Alexander, Eames and Davis 
take Mineralogy ; Ford, Brown, Norton and Don- 
nell take Anatomy, while all the rest take English 
Literature. 

*jj* While we are aware that some advantages 
are likely to accrue from the changes of time in 
beginning the college year, yet the disadvantages, 
as far as the students are concerned are greater. 
As matters stood hitherto, a student, who felt it 
necessary, could teach a fall term of school and 
lose but a small part of the fall term here in col- 
lege, thus making up his loss quite readily. But 
that plan is very nearly spoiled by the change of 
time. This ought to have been taken into consid- 
eration surely, considering that so many of the stu- 
dents are obliged to stay out during sonae part of 
their course, and the winter and spring vacations 
are too short to be of any practicable importance. 

*,* It is probably too much to expect that when 
boys come to college they should at once become 
men, but it is a cause for extreme regret that it 
should be necessary for them to take a retrograde 
movement and gravitate back toward long clothes 
and the nursery. It is a peculiar epoch in a young 
man's life when he passes from the Freshman to 
the Sophomore year. He begins immediately to 
thank Heaven that he is not as other men are, and 
we are thankful too. We refer to the conduct of 
the Sophomore class ou the occasion of the recent 
ball game between that class and the Freshmen. 
A large number of them congregated on the 
grounds and poured forth a steady torrent of abuse 
toward the Freshmen nine during the greater part 
of the game. There would be some excuse for this, 
had not the Freshmen, since their advent here, be- 
haved themselves in a highly modest and gentle- 
manly manner. Coming here as strangers, they 
are entitled at least to respect as long as they show 
themselves worthy of it, and the simple fact that 
they are Freshmen is no reason whatever why 
others should make themselves odious. Nor is it 
an excuse that it is the custom. The sentiment iu 
college is steadily changing in this regard, and it 
cannot change too rapidly. 

*jg* At the very commencement of the new year 
we wish to impress a few things ou the minds of 
all who are interested in athletics. If we are to do 
anything in this line the coming year, why now is 
the time to begin doing it. It is the height of folly 



to wait till the year is half gone before men are put 
in training, and then expect them to compete with 
others who have trained the entire year. If a 
crew is to be sent away nest year, a number of 
men should be put at work at once, either on the 
river or in the seven-by-nine apartment which is 
dignified with the name gymnasium. We are glad 
to notice the ball-men at practice ou every favora- 
ble opportunity. As soon as possible the first nine 
should be selected, together with substitutes, and 
they should practice together from now until they 
briug us their victories next summer. Bowdoin's 
great trouble iu former years has been the lack of 
pi'actice. The unfortunate mishap to our crew last 
summer should be no excuse for apathy. The col- 
lege has always shown herself willing to assist both 
the boating and base-ball interests, and she is still 
willing, but she has a right to demand that her 
representatives on the water and in the field should 
not hazard their chances by lack of training. A 
number of races should take place this fall, so that 
we can discover, if possible, new material among 
those just entered. We hope" to be able to report 
a lively condition of athletic interests in our next. 

*^'' The following are the officers of the Base- 
Ball Association for the coming year: Manager, 
Thomas, '85 ; Second Director, Freeman, '85 ; 
Third Director, Dearth, '87; Treasurer, Home, '86. 
At a recent meeting of the Directors, five men 
were chosen for the first nine — Cook, J. H. Davis, 
Talbot, Pushor and Moulton. The last named to 
be captain for the fall term. These five are to 
choose the rest of the nine. A game will be played 
in Waterville, Wednesday, October 1st, with the 
Colbys, and the return game here, Saturday, Oct. 
4th. It is the intention of the manager to arrange 
other games during the term. 

*\,*Mr. Robinson, formerly of Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, has joined the Sophomore class. 

*,.*We present below a list of the electives of- 
fered this year to the Senior class. It will be seen 
that quite a notable step in advance has been taken, 
and we hail it as evidence that Bowdoin intends to 
keep abreast of the times, and offer to her un- 
dergraduates the best that is going. The next 
step should be to relegate the study of Greek to a 
back seat, and fill its place with something which 
savors more of the things of this world. The fol- 
lowing are the electives offered this year : A 
course in English and American Literature, lasting 
throughout the entire year; an advanced course 
in Mineralogy, a course in Vertebrate Anatomy 
and Physiology, Anglo-Saxon, Sanskrit, to run 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Ill 



through two terms, and Quantitative Chemistry 
also occupying two terms, together with advanced 
study of the German language. 

*is* The base-ball nine will have played their 
first match game of the year before this paper 
reaches our subscribers, as they go to Portland 
Saturday to play with the nine which hails from 
that city. Whatever may be the outcome of the 
game, the experience will prove of value to our 
team, as the Portlands have been playing a strong 
game for the last few months. 

*sf* We have elsewhere alluded to the change of 
sentiment which is apparent in the college, regard- 
ing the way in which a Freshman should be treated. 
Formerly to swear at such as made their appear- 
ance here for the first time was considered a part 
of one's moral obligations, and to take advantage 
of their newness to college life on all occasions, as 
a heaven-ordained duty. But with other changes 
of sentiment here, which are to be highly com- 
mended, has come a radical change iu the feeling 
of the upperclassmen toward this much-abused 
class. We note this as the growth of a healthy 
tone among the students. Setting aside the 
coarseness and brutality of the common attention 
paid to these new-comers, which is surely some- 
thing to be deprecated, there is still another 
evil— the influence on the victims. As a natural 
consequence of such attention, they, in their turn, 
pass it down to the next class, and the evil is 
indefinite. To the members of the present Fresh- 
man class, we extend hearty and cordial congrat- 
ulations that they have chosen to be honored by 
associating themselves with the fair fame of Bow- 
doin, and we trust that this fair name will not be 
tarnished the present year by the injudicious act 
of any undergraduate. 

*is* Does it ever occur to you when you take 
your knife out of your pocket and cut out from the 
papers in the reading-room the items which please 
you, that the next reader will be like to grind his 
teeth when he comes to that vacant space, and im- 
agines that something choice has been stolen from 
him? It is not a fair thing to do; the papers are 
for all and should not be mutilated. It is good 
theology to have respect unto the rights of others. 

*^* We are to have more light on the subject — 
or rather on the campus. Lamps are to be placed 
at each of the entrances on the north side of the 
grounds. 

* J,* Arrangements have been begun looking to 
the acquirement of a fenced field in which to hold 



the athletic contests of the college. The place 
selected is the field east of the cemetery, which, 
when cleared and put in order, will bo adequate to 
the needs of the students. We hope to be able at 
an early date to announce that work has been be- 
gun on it. The enterprise will need the co-opera- 
tion of the students, and we are quite sure that 
will be afforded. Such a ground has long been 
needed here. Its presence would give athletic in- 
terests a great advance, and make an income to the 
ball team possible. 

*^* The offlcers of the T. M. C. A. for the com- 
ing year are as follows : President, J. C. Hall ; 
Vice-President, A. W. Rogers; Recording Secre- 
tary, E. B. Torrey ; Corresponding Secretary, W. 
H. Stackpole ; Treasurer, 0. D. Sewall. Nine new 
members have joined from the Freshman class. 
There are at present fifteen active members in the 
Association, and thirty associate members. 

*,,* The library has been closed during the first 
few weeks of the term, while repairs were being 
made. This portion of the advantages which the 
college offers is not patronized as it should be- 
only fourteen hundred volumes being taken out 
last year. 

*jt*The two new courses in science which have 
been added this year are particularly valuable, as 
affording a more complete and symmetrical ground- 
work in studies already pursued. The course in 
Vertebrate Anatomy, although intended especially 
for such as intend to study medicine, is still fitted 
for the general student who wishes to secure some- 
thing more than a mere shell of knowledge in 
Physiology, while the course in Mineralogy offers 
a chance to carry that study to more satisfactory 
results than one term of study allows. 

*,t* Ye gentle Freshman has received the usual 
amount of cordial and sincere attention— has been 
made to feel that every one, who warmly seized his 
hand, was hungering and thirsting for his com- 
panionship—has been made to see clearly that he 
is by all odds the most important man on the 
campus, and as the result, the several societies have 
gathered unto themselves the men of 'eighty-eight 
as follows: Zeta Psi— Merrill, Shaw, Thomas, 
F. L. Smithwick, M. P. Smithwick, Chapman ; 
Delta Kappa Epsiloo— Cary, Williamson; Theta 
Delta Chi— Bartlett, Card, Marston, Larrabee, 
Shorey, Ingalls, Meserve, Spaulding, Hall, Hill, 
Linscott, Cole; Psi Upsilon— Tolman, Godding, 
Dingley ; Alpha Delta Phi — Robie, Woodman, 
Ayer, Barrett, Barrows. 



112 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



*jf* Three crews are on the river in training for 
the fall races, which, by the way, promise to be 
unusually close and exciting. The race will prob- 
ably be rowed on Wednesday next. The crews are 
made up as follows : 

Ckew No. 1. Crew No. 2. Ceew No. 3. 

Stroke, Alexander. Norris. Whittier. 

No. 3, Smith. Brown. Varney. 

No. 2, Eoble. Moulton. Meserve. 

Bow Men-ill. Diugley. Davis. 

Coxswain, .... Wardwell. Butler. Lane. 

An attempt will be made to have a six-oared 
shell race a day or two after the four-oared. 

*".:f* On Monday afternoon it was voted, in an 
enthusiastic meeting of the college, to send a crew 
to the inter-collegiate regatta. Mr. Frank N. Whit- 
tier of Farmington Falls was elected captain of the 
crew. Boating is surely booming. 



[Graduates and undergraduates are earnestly solicited to send 
personal items to the BowDOiN Orient, Brunswick, Me.] 




84.- The following addi- 
tions and changes are 
made to the account in the last num- 
ber of the Orient concerning the 
class of '84: Barton is assistant in the 
Bath High School. Child was married 
July 13th to Miss Alice Webber, and is now in Chi- 
cago, looking for some business. Sayward intends 
to study law with S. M. Carne ('60) of Alfred. 

'74. _H. K. White is teaching the Damariscotta 
High School. 

75. _C. A. Black has been chosen principal of 
Washington Academy, East Macbias. Thus Black 
and White have changed places. 

73. — Geo. E. Hughes was married to Miss Susan 
M. Neally, daughter of E. S. Neally of Bath, July 
15th. 

»50. — 0. 0. Howard has arrived in Paris, having 
traveled through the East and Greece. 

'61.— Prof. A. S. Packard has taken a tramp 
through the Aroostook woods, to examine into the 
ravages of the spruce insect. 

'48.— Mr. C. A. Packard started for Europe the 
Wednesday before the death of his father on 
Sunday. 




5 As they were trudging 
along to school a five- 
yeai old Boston miss said to her compan- 
ion, a lad of SIX summeis "Were you 
ever affrighted at the contiguity of a ro- 
dent?" "Nay, forsooth," he replied; I 
fear not the juxtaposition of the creature, but dis- 
hke its alarming tendency to an intimate propin- 
quity. — Univ. Press. 

Washington and Lee University has lately re- 
ceived $52,000. 

Harvard holds the inter-collegiate and national 
championship in lawn-tennis. 

The Freshman class at Colby numbers thirty- 
three, that at Bates, thirty-seven. 

The Faculty of Amherst have decided to make 
Sunday afternoon church service optional. 

" What a dreadful old nuisance that woman is," 
said Maxwell Bean to a young man at a party the 
other night; "she talks me to death.'' "Sir! "said 
the young man, "I will inform you that that woman 
you speak so disrespectfully of is the mother that 
bore me." " Well, I am sorry ; but that's no reason 
why she should bore me," said the confused Beau. 
— Cap and Gown. 



fMiM AM© imiY mmum 

neatly executed at the 

B^UN^WICK pE^^IiD 6FFI0E. 



A-RE VERY POPUEAtl. 

MEP^^Y TPE p^TTE^, PQl^TIi^ND. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

SUPERIOR TO AIjL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and hig;hest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

"We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 
direct importation, which is made especially for us, ivater 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLEN <e GINTER Mitnufactiirers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



New system. Learned in less than one-quarter the time 
required by any other. Old reporters throw away old sys- 
tems and learn this for speed and legibility; It can be 
successfully 

TAUGHT BY 3IAIL. 
The corresponding style can be learned in a few hours, 
and the full verbatim reporting style in a few months. It 
is a marvel of simplicity. 

STUDENTS 

can easily acquire enough to enable them to take notes of 

LECTURES. 

Send for circular. Terms: Corresponding style, five 

lessons, 55. Corresponding and reporting, twenty lessons, 

R. B. OAPEIN", Augusta, Me. 



CSTERBRQOK'S 



JO STEEL 
PENS. 



Leading Numbers : 14, 048, 130, 333, 161, 
For Sale by all Sta'^ioners. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEM CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York 



SMOKE THE BEST. 

We beg to inform the public and smokers generally, that we 
have secured a large stock of tlie very choicest grades of thor- 
oughly cured 

GOLDEN VIRGINIA, PERIQUE and TURKISH 

tobaccos, which we are using iii the manuf.ictin-e of our Cele- 
brated brands of cigarette and smokine tobaccos. And 
have added to our stock a large shipment of the finest imported 
French Hice Paper. Such stock, made up by the highest class of 
skdlful labor, we feci conlldeut cannot fail to satisfy the tastes of 
all good judges. 

STANDARD BRANDS. 
Caporal— Caporal i— Sweet Caporal— St. James i, Kinney Bros.' 
Straight Cut in Full Dress Packages, etc., etc. 

JUST OUT— SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL. 
Manufactured by Special Request, 

£^inney Tohacco Co., 
Successors to Kinney Bros., New York. 



'mmk6,Q.n, M, 



DEALER IN 



No. 2 Odd Fellows' Block, 
MAIM STRBBT. - - . 



The Sixty-Second .\nnual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 7th,lS84, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alpheus S. Packard, Acting President; 
Alfred Mitchell, jNI.D., Secretary; Israel T. Dana, JI.D., 
Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children; Charles W. Goddakd, 
A.M., Medical Jurisprudence; Frederic H. Gerrish, M.D., 
Anatomy; HENRY Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry; Burt G. 
Wilder, M.D., Physiology; Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery 
and Clinical Surgerv; Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics ; "Irving E. Kimeall, M.D., Demonstrator of 
Anatomy; Everett T. Nealev, M.D., Demonstrator of His- 
tology. 

ALPEED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

FRANK M. STETSON, 



^^}^l^^tt 







^^•^^ulf^^' 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Diamonds, 

Jewelry, 

Silver Ware, 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 

jfrepare Orighuil Designs for Society 
Badges, Rings, Prizes, and Class Cups, 
tvhich tvill be forwarded to students on 
request. 

A SPECIALTY is made of English 
Peivter Beer Mugs, in ttvo sizes, tvith Glass 
Bottoms. 

Society, Booh-, and Visiting Card Plates 
engraved in proper style. 

Invitations and Programmes in novel 
forms at sJiort notice. 

Shreve, Crump & Low, 

EOS'X'OI^^. 



Bronzes, 



Porcelains, 



BYRON STEVENS, 



Fancy Goods. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE &. CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



EARS for the MILLION 

Foo Choo's Balsam of Shark's Oil 

Positively Restores tlie Hearing, and is the Only- 
Absolute Cure for Deafness Known. 

This Oil is abstracted from peculiar species of small White 
Shark, caught in the yellow Sea, known as Carcharodon Eond- 
eletii. Every Chinese fisherman knows it. Its virtues as a re- 
storative of hearing were discovered hy a Buddhist Priest about 
the year 1410. Its cures were so numerous and mamj so seem- 
ingly miraculous, that the remedy was officially proclaimed over 
the entire Empire. Its use became so universal that for over 300 
years no deafness has existed among ilie Chinese people. Sent, 
charges prepaid, to any address at $1.00 per bottle. 

HEill WlUT THE DIJIF S1.Y 

It has performed a miracle in my case. 

I have no unearthly noises in my head aud hear much better. 

I have been greaily benefited. 

My deafness helped a great deal— think another bottle will 
cure me. 

My hearing is miich benefited. 

I have received untold benefit. 

My hearing is improving. 

It is giving good satisfaction. 

Have been gi-eatly benefited, and am rejoiced that 1 saw the 
notice of it. 

"Its virtues are unquestionable and its curative character ab- 
solute, as the A^Titer can personally testify, both from experience 
and observation. Write at once to Haylock & Jenney, 7 Dey 
Street, "New York, enclosing $1.00, and you will receive by return 
a remedy that will enable you to hear like anybody else, and 
whose curative effects will be permanent. You will never regret 
doing so."— Editor of Mercantile Review. 

«®-To avoid loss in the Mails, please send money by Regis- 
tered Letter. 

Only Imported by HAYLOCK & JENNEY, 
Sole Agents for America. 7 Dey St,, N. Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



NATIONAL SCHOOL SUPPLY BUREAD, 

Beloit, "Wis., July 31, 1883. 
National School Supply Bureau: 

Last April, being then in chai'ge of a large public school, but 
desiring a position in some good academy or college, I placed 
my name with your Bureau.' During the lirstpart ol tlie present 
month I received notice from you of a vacancy in such a place as 
I desired. 

Putting myself in communication with the party concerned I 
received the appointment. 1 am well satisfied with the manage- 
ment of the Bureau, and feel sure that it fills a useful and nec- 
essary place in our school economy. You are at liberty to use 
my name if you ^vlsh. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD O. FISKE. 
Headmaster Mai-kam Academy, Milwaukee, Wis. 

For applicatiou-form and circular, address. 

National School Supply Depot, Chicago, III. 
US. B. — "We want all kinds of Teaoliers for Schools 
and Families. Good Pay to Agents and Private Cor- 
respondents. 

DEALER IN 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound, companies at low^ rates. 



STUDENTS 

Of all classes will Und it valuable to consult on all subjects the 



183 SOUTH CLARK STREET, CHICAGO, ILI;. 

Full information given on receipt of return postage. A union 
of writers, critics, and scholars of the highest order. 



E. rro-^7s7-iT3E:^XD, 



\k 1.. 1 



CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

All the Sttidents Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 



ALL KINDS OF 






EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 



CoE. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



For Schools and Colleges. 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 

WHY I AM A REPUBLICAN 

A graphic and reliable presentation of Republican princi- 
ples, and reasons for continuing tbe party in power, also 
fine portraits and authentic lives of 

BLA^UVE AlVD L.OGJA.TV 

by Gov. GEO. S. BOITT'WELL, of Mass. THE BOOK 
of the party, endorsed by leading Republicans. Price in 
reach of every voter. A rare opportunity for a wide-awake 
student to engage in the campaign with profit. 

WM. J. BETTS & CO., Hartford, Conn. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A^. O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

^F. H. WILS0H,3i£^ 

lllSPKNSER OF 

Pit© Biigij M©dicmgSj«'Oliiii:§ili, 

IMPORTED AND DOIVIESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Go to W. B. Woodard's 

To buy vour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save luoDey by so doing. 
SFECi^s^X/ k,.£..te:s to STxriD^:i^i7 cxjTTes. 
Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, I'lalls, Pai-ties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

750 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



MAIN STKEET, BKUBTSWICK, ME. 



Wja. % FIEIiD, 



ja^]\I-^6E]^. 



TONTINE HOTEIii, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Special attention will be given to Class and Reunion Dinners 
and Suppers to order. First-class laundry connected with the 
house. 

S. B. BREWSTER, Proprietor. 



©MMUMIIS, f HE WATCIES, 

239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. MEREILL. A. KEITH. 



DEALER IN 

Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 ■WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 



2 §\}nn\} IktK - - - - 






m- 



DEALER IN 

CEDAR STREET, BKUNSW^ICK, ME. 
Branch office three doors north of Tontine. Hotel. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 
Magnifying Glasses. 
|^° Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

J. G. WASHBURN, 

Jlamifacturcr ot .Tiid Dealer in 

PICTURE FEAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

Also Pictures, Cabinet Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, 

etc. Also agent for the celebrated Household Sewing 

Machines. 

In the Everett Store, Main Street, Opposite the Mall, 

BRUNSW^ICK, MAINE. 







mnmm 



i®i 



(Established 1817.) 

10 BERKELY ST., BOSTON, MASS., 

low '^uMlsb too ilJu§t'Mt@i galttlogu^s, 

ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 

OTHEK TO TKICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 

stamp at above address. 



STA-T^L & BURT, 

509 Tremont St., and 4 Warren Ave., Odd Fellows' Hall, Boston, Mass. 
SPECIAL IMPROVED 

Aierican STAR Bicycle 

Although coniparativclj- a new machine on the mar- 
ket, the STAKhas made a splenrUd record, 
liaving won the 

Twenty-Five Mile Championship of 

the United States, 

Breaking the record, in 83 minutes 10 seconds. 

It has a n\ile record of 2 min. 50 1-8 sec; 
5 miles, 15 min. 26 3-4 sec; mile without 
hands, 3 min. 11 sec It has won the most im- 
portant Hill Climbing Contests, including 
Corey Hill, Boston, Eagle Hill, Orange, X. J., 
and Standpipe Hill, Washington, D. C. This 
is a mere mention of the triumphs of the Star. 

The principles embodied in the Star give the perfect combination for safety, spaed, and comfort with economy of 
maintenance and durability found in no otiier machine. 

IN ADDITION WE HAVE THE - 

VICTOR TRICYCLE, The Most Faiiiofls Tliree-flieeler Maie Ii Tlie Wcrll 

A Full Line of the Best ENGLISH MACHINES 

Go to complete the list and suit all tastes. 

The IDEAL, a cheaper machine for use of boys and youths, is a splendid machine for purpose intended and is 
highly recommended. 

SECOND-HAND MACHINES of all kinds, SUPPLIES and SUNDRIES constantly on hand. 

REPAIRING of most difficult kinds performed at reasonable rates. All machines and parts must be plainly 
marked and be accompanied by instructions by next mail. 

SEND TWO-CENT STAMP FOR CATALOGUE. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STKADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINU.S. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

EITCEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



i^LieYLieA 



All the Late Publications in stock. Text-Books of all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL "WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



The only radical internal remedy. Never known to 
fail in a single case, acute or chronic. It expels the poison- 
ous Uric Acid from the blood, which is tlie prime cau.se 
of Rheumatism, Gout, and Neuralgia.— As a blood puri- 

THE OLD RELIABLE SPECIFIC 

ENDORSED BY PHYSICIANS AND 

THOUSANDS OF PATIENTS. 

fler it has no equal. Acting on common-sense principles 
it eradicates from the blood all poisonous matter which 
causes disease. — It has been in use for many years and 
cured a larger percentage of cases than any other 

POSITIVELY CURES 

remedy. Send for testimonials from the cured. — Salicy- 
lica strikes directly at the cause of these diseases, while 
so many so-called speci- 

RHEUMATISM 

fics only treat locally the effect. When you have tried 
in vain all the "oils," "ointments," "liniments," and 
"pain cures," and when your 

GOUT, NEURALGIA, 

doctors cannot help you, do not despair but take Salicy- 
lica at once and be cured. — No one can afford to live in 
pain and misery when 

GRAVEL. DIABETES, 

Salicylica will relieve him and put him in condition to 
attend to his daily avocations. 

$1 per box, 6 boxes for $5, 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE BLOOD POISONING 



]\[0. 5 0DD FEIiLGW^' BIi0CK, 



Is the place to buy 



c^O'Q^i, StaM'on€'t§, § d'mtt^ §'ao'(M. 



Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 



i;B)'!?. 



with full directions in ten languages. Sold by druggists 
everywhere, or sent by mail, prepaid, on receipt of price. 

"WASHBURNE St CO., Prop's, 

287 Broadway, New York. 

Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

Olid Fellows' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. W. BROWNE, Propkietor. 
Formerlv at Tontine Hotel. 




THE FAVORITE NOS.303-404-332'I70-S5I-WITH 
■! OTHITR STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



m J. MERRYMAN, PHARMACIST,-:- 

DllQS, MEDICIllS, 

Fancy anfl Toilet Articles, Ciprsl ToMcco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

m^ Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

OvEii Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

IRA C. STOCKBREDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEK, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



The Xew Stylos in 

lu all colors, are now ready. Au elegant line of New York 
Neckwear in New Sbapes .and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, "Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

1 ELLIOTT'S, t 

OPP. TOWN CLOCK. 



M^YISr^RD'S 



TAPB WORM. 

In one of the tropical provinces of Germany there has been 
found a root, the extract from which has proved an absolute 
SPECIFIC for Tape Worm. It is pleasant to take and is not de- 
bilitatin": or disa^'eeable in its effects on the patient, but is 
peculiarly sickening and stupefying- to the Tape Worm, which 
looseus its hold of its victim and passes away in a natural and 
easy manner, entirely whole, with head, and while still alive. 
One physician has used this remedy in over 400 cases, without a 
siufjle failure to pass worm whole, with head. Absolute removal 
with head guaranteed. No pay required until so removed. Send 
stamp for circular and terms. 

HEY WOOD & CO., 19 Park Pl ace, N. Y. City. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



'WHEJSr YO U y^JLNT A RIDE 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE, 

On Cleaveland Street, where you wiUfind turnouts to suit the most 
fastidious. S^^ Rates reasonable. 



S« C« 2DSI^WSS0W 



®MHlg]ptefe 




Main St., under Town Clock. 

m^Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating' Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday IVIorning by A, G. Tenney. 

Teems, $1.50 a Year i a Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

j6®-Speeial Rates to Student Cluba.-ffiS 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are e.xamined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar, —Allen and G-reenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, Georgics and first sis Books 
of the ^neid, including Prosody. 
(Instead of the Georgics, Cesar's Gallic War, 
Books I. -IV., may be offered.) 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophou, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Georgraphy,— Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry, — first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included In Loomis 
thi'ough Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined In the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as In the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regular Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Satui'day after Commence- 
raeiit (July 11 and 12, 1884), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 26 and 27, 1884). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examinations is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Washington Academy, East 
Machias, and at the Fryehurg Academy, these 
schools having been made special Fitting Schools 
for the college by the action of their several Boards 
of Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 
have been fitted at any school having an approved 



preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 
Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

required— four hours a "WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — EOUE HOURS A TVEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terras. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terras. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows: Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $2.1. Incidentals, $J0. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCT. 15, 1884. 



No. 8. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING THE 
COLLEGIATE YEAR, BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BO"WDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
John A. Peters, '85, Managing Editor. 
N. B. Ford, '85, Business Editor. 
Boyd Bartlett, '85. W. P. Nealley, '85. 

O. R. Cook, '85. A. A. Knowlton, '86. 

J. F. LiBEY, '85. C. "W. TUTTLE, '86. 

W. V. Wentworth, '86. 

Per annum, in advance $2.00. 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XIV., No. 8. -Oct. 15, 1884. 

My Meerschaum Pipe 113 

Editorial Notes 113 

A Summer Reverie 115 

The May Training 115 

Captive 117 

Antilogia 117 

In a Garden 118 

Fall Races 118 

Base- Ball 118 

Collegii Tabula 120 

Personal 122 

Clippings 1 23 

MY MEERSCHAUM PIPE. 
Bring out the ancient pipe, chum, 
I smoked in days of yore ; 
She's jilted me, and now by Jove 
I'll di-iuk and smoke once more. 

'Twas in my freshman year, chum, 
I laid this pipe away ; 
And promised her I'd give it up 
" Forever and for aye." 

But now I'll,— gracious heavens, chum, 
Bring me some water, quick, 
I'm feeling faint, my head whirls round, 
I really think — I'm sick! 




>-e 



is with sincere regret that we 
announce the resignation of Mr. Webb Don- 
nell from the editorial board of the Orient. 



That the parental system of college gov- 
ernment must "go" is becoming moi's and 
more tlie opinion of our best educatois and 
advanced thinkers. Mr. Charles F. Thwing, 
the author of an instructive little book on 
American colleges, has an article in the Con- 
tinent of Jul}' 2d on the self-government of 
" College Students," which eveiy one who 
has not already done so, should read. Mr. 
Thwing, after mentioning late disorders in 
several prominent colleges, says: "These 
facts indicate that the customaiy metliods of 
college government are a failure." He a.sks: 
" Is it not possible to displace the monarchial 
method, and the 'parental' fiction, by some 
form of self-government ? Is it not possible 
to make some form of self-government pleas- 
ant to students, and satisfactory in the views 
of the professors ? I venture to believe that 
in this democratic method lies a great hope 
for our colleges." The different systems of 
the three colleges that have tried the demo- 
cratic method, Illinois Industrial University, 
Amherst and Bowdoin, are mentioned and 
compared. At the close of the last college 



114 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



year the students of Illinois University re- 
turned to the faculty the power which they 
had received, the duties of self-government 
being too heavy for them to bear. Of the 
two systems, that of Amherst and that of 
Bowdoin, Mr. Thwing prefers the former, 
Bowdoin's being " at once more elaborate and 
narrower." It is his opinion, moreover, that 
the Bowdoin plan may meet the same fate as 
that of the University of Illinois. " The 
machinery may prove to be too cumbrous and 
heavy for the care and strength which the 
students may be able to devote to it." Ex- 
perience alone, however, as Mr. Thwing says, 
can indicate its worth as a working system. 
Meanwhile we are especially fortunate in 
not having had a chance to test its Avorking 
value, unprecedented good order having fol- 
lowed its introduction. 



We are informed that there is a Blaine 
and Logan Club in college. If there is one 
it must have gone into winter quarters, for 
we have seen nothing of it. The enthusi- 
astic Blaineites who went to the station, on 
the occasion of the passing through of tlie 
California delegation, and yelled J-i-m- 
B-1-a-i-n-e, Rah, Rah, Rah with such gusto, 
shouldn't let their support of the Favorite 
Son stop here. We presume that it would 
be impracticable to organize a regularly 
drilled company, even if any one of sufficient 
energy to engineer the thing could be found ; 
but a club can at least be organized and pro- 
vided with banners suitably inscribed, so that 
when the day of torch-light procession comes 
the college may be represented. The Cleve- 
landers, though faithful in spirit, are small in 
numbers and a club Avould be out of the 
question. 



The Lawn-Tennis Association, so ener- 
getic in its conduct of affairs last year, has 
been singularly apathetic this fall. It was 



expected that after the expensive court on 
the Delta was completed, championship games 
with Colby and Bates would be in order. 
But so far as we know neither college has 
been challenged. The expense cannot be 
alleged as an excuse, as the fare of two 
men, the principal cost, would quickly be 
subscribed ; the players we have, and the 
court. It seems a great pity that interest in 
the sport should be allowed to languish 
through the inaction of the association. 
Games should be arranged next spring if 
nossible. 



It has been remarked of late that some of 
the Maine papers have failed to give our 
doings and concerns the space which they 
have always occupied and which they cer- 
tainly deserve. Rather than be held up 
before the public gaze in an unfavorable 
light — the custom of the newspapers a year 
or two ago — we should prefer to be ignored ; 
but so long as we have reporters in college 
for all the prominent dailies there is no rea- 
son why we should be driven to these dis- 
agreeable alternatives. It is charitable to 
believe that the papers will not publish dis- 
reputable rumors wlien they can get substan- 
tial news items, and it is tiie fault of their 
correspondents if they are not pro\ ided with 
such. Perhaps it would be well to call the 
attention of the different correspondents in 
college to the fact that their whole duty does 
not lie in the line of attending itinerant en- 
tertainments gratis. They should see to it 
that the papers represented by them are sup- 
plied with all the college news. It is fair to 
say that there are a number of correspond- 
ents who are particularly zealous in the per- 
formance of their duties. 



Now that the freshmen have developed 
such good boating material we would sug- 
gest to them the advisabilit}' of taking steps 
this fall toward procuring a boat. It has 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



115 



been the custom of the freshmen to buy the 
boat of the outgoing seniors, but 'eighty- 
four's boat would not be a desirable acquisi- 
tion to the freshmen, and its purchase is out 
of the question, as parties in Portland ah-eady 
own it. A new boat costs but a little moie 
than a good second-hand one, and the ad- 
vantages to be derived are certainly worth the 
extra outlay. If 'eiglity-eight decides to buy 
a new boat — and there ought to be no doubt 
on this point — it would better be ordered as 
soon as possible, both to give the builder 
ample time to turn out a good piece of work 
and to give the boat itself a chance to season 
before being put on the river. 



Somewhat to the surprise and much to the 
gratification of the college the nine succeeded 
in beating Colby in the short series arranged 
this fall. It is evident that if we should play 
for the championship immediately we should 
be in a fair way to beat our old rivals of the 
Kennebec ; but it is equally evident that if we 
expect to win next spring we must improve 
at least as much as the other nine. That the 
Colby men have a wonderful amount of 
" brace " and determination has been proven 
to us several times, and it behooves us now 
to fully understand this fact and work corre- 
spondingly hard. 



A SUMMER REVERIE. 

I stood upon a shore with pebbles paved ; 
Before me stretched a wide-extending bay, 
Whose beauty might compare with Naples' 

pride. 
So blue its waters, and so fair the scene 
Traced on its broad expanse by island, 
Cape and wooded shore, and many a sail 
That glistened in the sun and then passed 
Away, their place supplied by others still 
That glided into view unceasingly. 
Behind me, straight toward the sky, uprose 
A massy cliff of the primeval roclc, 
Scarred with huge seams like face of mariner, 
Imprints of time and warring elements; 



Its high head's hoary loclss of clinging moss 
Bound with rude coronet of knotty spruce. 
Its base, within the waters' utmost reach, 
Showed the mad ravages of hostile hands- 
Neptune's sluggish hosts urged ou to conflict 
By the winged messengers of Boreas. 
Battered by fierce assault the stubborn rock 
Had yielded, till iu the lapse of ages, 
There were hewn caverns of fantastic shapes, 
Wherein the waters beat with thund'rous roar. 
And from the arched roofs retreating swift, 
Fall in myriad streams of snowy spray. 
But when the waves their wrath have satisfied, 
And their huge, heaving breasts unruffled 

quite, 
In summer noonday's sun, those deep clefts 

form 
A pleasant resting place and a cool retreat. 
As on this scene of nature long I gazed 
And deeply mused upon the work there wrought, 
I thought of time, dim centuries ago, 
When man was not, and in this solitude 
There dwelt no living thing, on earth, in air. 
Save alone that Presence all divine 
That always was and evermore shall be. 
In that far time storms raged as they do now. 
And flung the waters high against the cliff. 
Does man's conception strive to span the years 
Since these caverns' forms were dimly traced. 
His weak gaze is blinded by eternity. 



THE MAY TRAINING. 

Although the quick military step is no 
longer heard upon the campus, yet there was 
a time when the "Bowdoin Militia" had an 
actual existence. 

Out of the pomp and ceremony of its 
proceedings arose the time-honored May 
Training — -that long-established college cus- 
tom, which for twenty-one years was annually 
observed — but which has long since been for- 
gotten ; its blazoned banners have faded in 
ignominious obscurity till no traces of its 
existence can be found, save among the 
musty relics of the past. 

As we lift the curtain of the past, and re- 
view the scenes, before we enter the inner 
portals of college life, we learn that it was as 
early as 1820 that the students were annually 



116 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



warned to appear "armed and equipped as 
the law directs." They, accordingly, were 
incorporated into the town company and im- 
proved the good nature of the inhabitants by 
choosing students as chief officers. It is 
credible, also, judging what is past by what 
is present, that there was no lack of practi- 
cal jokes. Besides this, "highly unbecom- 
ing and indecorous tricks" were indulged in 
till at last, it being rather too much for the 
town's-people to endure, the legislature passed 
a bill exempting students from military duty. 
"Then did peace, like the dews of evening, 
settle once more upon Brunswick." In the 
meantime the military spirit was on the in- 
crease throughout the State. Brave individ- 
uals talked of war and of glory won on 
tented fields. " Our people must become 
citizen soldiery. It is the only safety for a 
free people ; the only bulwark of our free 
institutions." 

As a result of all this, the legislature, in 
1836, passed a law requiring students to 
train. This caused no little commotion in 
college. Every orator, in firm and deter- 
mined tones, gave vent to his feelings ; but 
all this was of no avail. The efficient and 
determined selectmen sacrificed all things to 
duty. The students finding oratory of no 
avail, held a meeting and finally determined 
to train. From that time it seemed as if 
" Forward March " and " Right and Left 
Oblique" were the only sounds to be heard. 
" At dinner," says one, " instead of a peace- 
ful request to pass the potatoes, rang the war- 
like command to march down that detach- 
ment of beefsteak, or order out that platoon 
of potatoes, or squadron of pie. l\Ieantime, 
active preparation went on behind the scenes. 
Only sometimes by glancing at the windows 
you might see 'hideous forms shrinking from 
sight,' and fancy college had turned menag- 
erie, and all the animals got loose." 

The eventful day at length came, heralded 
by the roar of artillery and the roll of war 



drums. From the summit of the village spire 
waved a flag, on which you might read the 
soul-inspiring, foe-disheartening, " Bellum." 
The motley crowd assembled from all sides. 
On this momentous occasion there was an 
amazing diversity of uniform, from the com- 
mander down to the meekest freshman in 
the extreme rear ranks. All nations and 
tribes were mimicked and caricatured to per- 
fection. The bands led the van, marching 
beneath a flag inscribed, " The De'il cam' fid- 
dlin' through the Town." Behind the bands 
came the medical class, with a banner bear- 
ing an armed skeleton surrounded by the 
motto, " Magna est Medieina et Prevalehit." 
The seniors and juniors also carried a flag. 
Upon a ground of white was a bristling 
swine, done in dubious brown. Astride this 
fierce animal, holding on by the ears, was a 
full-uniformed military officer. Above his 
head was the inscription, " Bowdoin's First 
Heat." The goddess of victory and death 
cheered on the sophomores, and the fresh- 
men were cheered on by a rampant jackass, 
and beneath him, " The Sage Ass, what made 
the Law." 

Having completed their line of march, 
they were at last drawn up before their cap- 
tain to listen to the roll-call. " Attend," 
commanded he, " and answer to your names." 
As the clerk called the names, " Here ! " 
" Here ! " was shouted from all sides. After 
order was restored and the roll-call finished, 
then began the examination of equipments. 
They stepped forward, one by one. " Mark 
him down — no equipments," shouted the cap- 
tain. The spectators nearly split their sides 
with laughter, while rage was filling the 
hardened bosom of the man of war. This 
ended, they were ordered to form a line. 
" We've formed a line, but we can't keep 
it," mourned the valiant defenders of their 
country. " Form a line, or march off the 
field," roared the despairing and discomfited 
captain, biting his lips. The conquerors left 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



117 



the field, wreathed with the eariiest victory 
and laureled with latest renown, their swords 
unsheathed, and their guns nnfired. When 
home again, the oi'ator thus eulogized their 
noble deeds upon the college grounds : 

" Fellow-students and soldiers, you have earned 
for yourselves and your country never-fading 
laurels. When dangers and perils thickened 
around your devoted country, when her hardy yeo- 
manry were no longer able to defend her soil and 
her liberties, you have nobly stepped forth to her 
rescue. Tou have doffed your students' gowns and 
assumed the mailed dress of war. You have ex- 
changed the badges of literary distinction for the 
toils and dangers of the battle field. You have ex- 
tinguished the midnight lamp, and lit in its place 
the fiery torch of Mars. If you have followed 
Minerva in the flowery paths of literature; if you 
have toiled with her up the rugged steeps of 
science; you have also followed her in the ranks of 
war and glory. If you have twined about your 
brows the prizes of poetic distinction, you have 
also encircled your temples with the wreaths of 
military glory. Yes, fellow-students, side by side 
we have followed in the career of literary fame, 
and shoulder to shoulder will we advance in the 
cause of liberty, law, and our country. 

" Soldiers, you have deserved well of your 
country, and thiuk not but that she will fully dis- 
charge the debt. Students and soldiers, let this be 
our motto, ' War and Science, Military Glory and 
Literary Distinction, Now and Forever, One and 
Inseparable.' " 

" Of its consequences," says one writer, 
" it suffices to say, that it was the prime cause 
of that utter contempt into which general 
musters have sunli within the bounds of 
Maine. As to its immediate effects, no pen 
can do it justice; for no pen can bring back 
the quaint antics of the actors, the jolly 
laughter of staid professors, or fill again the 
windows with the giggling groups, or line the 
sidewalks with the grinning sovereigns." 

Whoever, in the future, shall dig down 
through the strata of college history, will 
find the present period marked b}' a thick 
sediment immediately overlying the fossil re- 
mrtins of an extinct brood of grotesque forms, 
generated by prolific jollity, and " Laughter 



holding both his sides." But a higher type 
of organization is beginning to take their 
places, for in morals, as well as in science, all 
change is progressive. And we may well 
say farewell, old friend, farewell ! 



CAPTIVE. 

Why in thy presence do I feel 

As ugly as a satyr. 
And all my thoughts go on a reel 

That sets my heart a-patter? 

Why do my lips their oflace shun 
Whene'er I strive to speak? 

Would they their duty know, fair one. 
If pressed against thy cheelc ? 

Thou all the while dost brighter shine, 

In loveliness most rare. 
As if thou didst (what's true) divine 

Thou hast me in thy snare. 




'Tis true 'tis pity, 
And pity 'tis 'tis true : 

That Bates doesn't get up a ball-nine. 

That the fall poets are making an unusual 
brace. 

That those lamps have not appeared on the 
campus. 

That tall hats do not adorn seniors' caputs as 
in days of yore. 

That the price of admission to the ball grounds 
has been raised. 

That the college has not witnessed a drill by the 
Bowdoin Bicycle Club. 

That 'eighty-four should so unanimously take 
to corn-canning as a vocation. 

That more men don't encourage the -crew by 
going down to see them practice. 



118 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



That two professors aud one tutor were present 
at prayers the other morning. 

That the §30,000 picture hasn't been sold for 
the benefit of the gymnasium. 

That a certain freshman hasn't yet found out 
"How to get into Brunswicli society." 

That the sophomores are not preparing a turl^ey 
supper. Hold on. Perhaps they are ! 

That the corrector of themes should give out 
for a subject, " Incidents of a Summer Vacation." 

That the Bowdoin nine should stoop so low as 
to claim a friendly game of ball because the oppos- 
ing nine was not exactly ou time. 



IN A GARDEN. 

'Twas a half-blown rose in a garden fair, 

A bud that would blossom in beauty there. 

With the delicate tint of the flowers of May, 

And a perfume sweet as the summer's day. 

I waited to see the flower reveal 

The secret sweet, it would fain conceal 

So closely guarded, and fondly kept 

In its folded leaves. The night dews wept. 

And wooed with pitying love the while. 

Till the warm, glad sun should win its smile. 

For, should it open to meet that ray. 

The deepening bloom would her heart betray. 

Then what would the simple blossom do 

To hide her blush from his royal view ? 

The sunlight shone, and its warmth was felt 

(Tbe bud in its sweet seclusion dwelt) 

It could not resist the potent spell. 

Though it knew its fate, alas ! too well. 

For tbe open heart was read one day. 

But the dew and the sunshine went their way. 

And it shed its leaves, and drooped its head, 

'Twas softly whispered, " The rose is dead ! " 

Ah ! no one knew that its heart was riven, 

As its breath exhaled to its native heaven, 

But earth, as she folded it to ber breast, 

Said, " Life is sorrow, but Death is rest." 



THE FALL RACES. 
On Thursday last came off one of the most 
successful fall races that has been seen on the 
Androscoggin for some time. The crews, 
picked from the different class crews, were 
exceptionally well trained and, as the event 
showed, evenly matched. The course was a 
mile and a quarter with a turn- — starting and 
finishing at the railroad bridge. At 3.30 p.m., 



wind and water propitious, a good flying start 
was effected under the superintendence of 
referee Brown. The crew consisting of 
Whittier, stroke, Varney, Meserve and Davis 
took the lead for a moment, but quickly gave 
place to the 'eighty-five boat, manned by Alex- 
ander, stroke. Smith, Robie and Merrill, '87, 
which was in turn passed by Norris, Brown, 
Moulton and Dingley in 'eighty-six's fast 
boat. From the start to the turn the crews 
were all pulling in good form, nearly together 
with Alexander, wbo,had succeeded in again 
passing Norris, slightly in the van. Alex- 
ander was the first to turn the stake, fol- 
lowed in quick succession by Norris and 
Whittier. As the men settled down for the 
home stretcli it was evident that Norris and 
his men had determined to guard the rear, 
having laid out their allowance of strength 
on the first half of the race. From this point 
the struggle was between Whittier's crew and 
Alexander's, there being no clear water be- 
tween the two boats till the finish. Alexander 
succeeded in keeping the lead from the ttirn, 
although at one time it appeared to those on 
the bank as if Whittier had passed him. 
Making two splendid spurts to which Whit- 
tier's crew were unable to respond, lie passed 
the line tlie winner by about a half boat- 
length. Time, seven minutes and twentj^- 
eight seconds. 

The main object of these races is to arouse 
the interest of the freshmen, and give them 
some experience in boating. Li this respect 
the races this fall have been decidedly suc- 
cessful. 



BA.SE-BALIx. 



COLBY vs. BOWDOIN. 

The series of games with Colby this fall, 
as being something unusual, and as showing 
the relative strength of the two nines after 
the loss of their valuable members from '84? 
awakened no little interest. 

The first game was played at Waterville, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



119 



Wednesday, Oct. 1st. The conditions of 
weather were good witli the exception of 
quite a strong wind which blew across the 
field fi'om the direction of first base. The 
game opened in a manner decidedly unfavor- 
able to Bowdoin, the first inning yielding 
four runs for Colb}^, who was first at the bat, 
and a blank for the visitors. Defeat seemed 
certain until the eighth inning when the tide 
of conflict was turned and a victory won by 
a scoring of six runs. Both nines batted 
heavily and fielded well. Pusher's batting 
I'ecord was remarkable. The catching of 
Pulsifer was excellent. The score was as 
follows : 

COLBY. 

A.B. R. iB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Boyd, 3b., 5 .3 2 1 

Putnam, lb., 5 1 6 1 

F. Goodwin, p., .... 5 2 2 3 1 9 

Webber, c. f 4 1 2 i X 

Gibbs, 1. f 3 1 3 1 

Larrabee, s.s., .... 4 2 3 3 2 1 

W. Goodwill, 2b., ... 4 1 2 3 2 1 

Pulsifer, c 4 7 1 1 

Drummond, r. f., . . . 4 



Totals, 



38 S 9 13 24 14 5 



Cook, 3b., p 5 

Moulton, c., 5 

Pushor, lb., 4 

Barrett, 2b., 5 

Talbot, 1. 1 5 

Larrabee, r. f., .... 5 

Means, c. f., 3 

Bartlett, s.s., 3b., ... 3 

Davis, p., S.S., .... 4 



A.E. K. iB. T.B. P.O. A. 



4 7 12 1 
3 3 110 

2 2 2 

110 

113 

3 12 

4 



Totals, 



39 11 14 18 27 13 



INNINGS. 

12 3 456789 

Colbv 40001210 0—8 

Bowdoin 00020216 —11 

Earned runs— Colby 2, Bowdoin 5. Wild pitch- 
Cook 1. First ba.se on balls — Colby 1, Bowdoin 3. Balls 
called — on Goodwin 102, on Davis and Cook 52. Strikes 
called— oiT Goodwin 15, off Davis and Cook 13. Struck- 
out— Colby 3, Bowdoin B. Passed balls — Pulsifer 2, Moul- 
ton 5. Two-base hits — F. Goodwin, Webber (2),\V. Good- 
win, Cook, Pushor (3). Time of game — Ih. 40m. Umpire 
—Garland, Colby, '82. 



BOWDOIN vs. COLBY. 

The return game was played on the Delta, 
Saturday, Oct. 4th. In point of excellence or 
interest it was not equal to the game of 
Wednesday. The features were the batting 
of Cook and Larrabee, and the catching of 
Pulsifer and Moulton. The score : 



COLBY. 

A.B. R. lE. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Boyd, .3b., 5 1 1 1 3 2 1 

Putnam, lb., 5 1 1 6 1 2 

F. Goodwin, p., .... 5 2 2 1 11 1 
Webber, c. 1., .... 5 

Gibbs, 1. f., 1 

Larrabee, s. s., . . . . 4 1 2 5 3 2 

W. Goodwin, 2b 4 1 1 3 2 

Bowman, r. f 4 

Pulsifer, c., 4 1 3 3 9 2 



112 2 




Totals, 



4 11 14 27 20 8 



Cook, s. s., 5 

Moulton, c, 5 

Pushor, lb 5 

Barrett, 2b 5 

Talbot, 1. f., 5 

Larrabee, r. f., . . . . 5 

Means, c. f., 3 

Bartlett, 3b., 4 

Davis, p., 4 



1b. T.B. P.O. 



3 4 8 2 

1 3 3 11 1 

2 116 
1113 3 2 
112 10 
1110 

1115 1 
10 7 3 



Totals, .... 41 10 12 17 27 13 6 

INNINGS. 

123456789 

Colby, 01000010 2—4 

Bowdoin, ....31100102 2—10 
Earned runs — Colby 2, Bowdoin 2. Wild pitches — 
Goodwin 4, Davis 3. First base on balls — Colby 3, Bow- 
doin 1. Balls called — on Goodwin 75, on Davis 81. 
Strikes called — off Goodwin 14, off Davis 22. Struck out — 
Colby 7, Bowdoin 6. Three-i)ase hits — Cook, Larrabee. 
Two-base hits — Cook (2), Talbot, Larrabee. Passed balls 
Pulsifer 1, Moulton 1 . Time of game — one hour and forty 
minutes. Umpire — C. C. Torrey, Bowdoin, '84. 



AUGUSTA vs. BOWDOIN. 

A game was played with the Augustas 
on the Delta, Monday, Oct. 6th. It was char- 
acterized by its length and monotony. The 
fact that the Augusta pitcher was hampered 
by the college rules may account in part for 
their defeat. Below is the score : 

AUGUSTA. 

A.E. R. lE. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Wood, 1. f., i 1 

Shean, 2b., 4 1 4 3 

Barbour, p 4 1 2 2 1 8 8 

Lower, c 4 1 1 9 2 1 

Lombard, lb., .... 4 11 2 1 

Kumnev, s. s 4 1 4 2 

Getchell, r. f., . . . . 4 1 2 

Gardner, c. f., . . . . 3 1 1 1 1 

Tacey, 3b 3 1 1 4 1 

Totals 34 2 5 5 27 21 20 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. K. 1e. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Cook, s. s.,p 5 2 2 4 1 9 

Moulton, c., 1 2 2 14 2 1 

Pushor, lb., 6 1 1 1 8 

Barrett, 2b., 6 1 1 2 2 4 1 

Talbot, 1. f 5 1 2 4 1 

Larrabee, r. f., . . . . 5 1 2 2 

Bartlett, 3b., 3 2 1 2 1 

Davis, p., s. s 5 1 2 2 6 

Means, 0. f., 4 1 1 1 1 

Totals, 45 11 13 18 27 23 4 



120 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



INNINGS. 
123456789 
Augusta, ....00 110000 0—2 
Bowdoin, ....02900000 0—11 
Earned runs— Augusta 1. Wild Pitches — Barbour 2, 
Davis 1. First base on balls — Bowdoin i. Balls called — 
on Barbour 108, on Davis and Cook 51. Strikes called — 
off Barbour 22, off Davis and Cook 14. Struck out— Au- 
gusta 13, Bovvdoiu 4. Passed balls— Lower 5, Moulton 1. 
Three-base hits— Cook, Talbot. Two-base hit— Barrett. 
Time of game — Two hours and ten minutes. Umpire— 
Wardwell, '85. 

The following are the averages of the 
nine in the games played this fall : 

If I I I « 

<» ^ ^ M B E 



4 19 7 9 16 4 21 1 .474 



4 19 7 6 9 4-2 3 .316 .474 .933 2 



Cook, . . 
Moulton, 
Pusher, 
Barrett, 
Talbot, . 
Larrabee, 
Bai-tlett, 
Davis, . 
Means, . 



Total, 146 33 40 54 105 57 17 

Opps., .... 162 27 38 49 105 71 35 



.300 .952 4 5 3 



10 .222 
9 3 4 .100 
17 3 .153 



.375 .824 

.444 1000 

.222 1000 

.100 .750 8 8 8 

.153 .850 7 7 6 



1 1 .153 .153 .857 7 



.369 .911 
.302 .834 




Before me on the table stand, 
Their necks placed brink 
to brink. 
Two bottles — not of beer or wine. 
But mucilage and ink. 



A poem I would frame ! 



The lamp burns low, 
Thoughts come and go. 
Like mollis before its flame. 

Strange fantasies. 
Many a sprite 
Pass through my brain 
On pinions light. 

My weary head by Somnus pressed. 

Nods gently to and fro, 
Until it strikes against the lamp, 

Which causes me to know, 

The poem I did start to write 
Does not adorn the page. 

So now I reach my pen for ink — 
It strikes the mucilage ! 



The freshmen shovp praiseworthy enthusiasm 
in their support of college organizations. The 
class has joined the Boating Association unani- 
mously. 

And DOW it came to pass in the time of " Sara- 
toga George," that two freshmen went out for to 
row, and when they had rowed and were about 
to disembarli tliey concluded that it was their 
duty (?) to 1)6 baptized ; so they quietly and unos- 
tentatiously were immersed in the flowing waters 
of the Androscoggin. When they arose the divine 
name was heard to escape from their lips, and they 
proceeded to their abode cleaner if not better boys. 

Wanted : five thousand students to stand in 
groups around the college to be photographed. 
Address Prof. Robinson. 

Ex-President Chamberlain meets the seniors 
every Tuesday evening for the purpose of talliing 
upon any important subject. The ideas upon every- 
day matters from such a mind as his well pay for 
the time thus spent. 

Prof. Robinson is making experiments in a new 
method of photography by artificial light. Instead 
of the old-fashioned " Drummond light " of oxygen 
and hydrogen, he is using the light made by burn- 
ing oxygen gas which has been saturated by pass- 
ing it over ether. The light thus obtained is 
superior to the old light, and some very satisfactory 
experiments have been made. 

Butler has begun his annual singing school 
craze. 

Many of the boys are seen to have new shoes 
since the fire. Looks suspicious ! 

Stanwood ('61) has presented the library with a 
copy of his worlc mentioned in the personal column. 

One junior to another after listening atten- 
tively for an hour to a lecture in physics — " Say, 
Stack, did you manage to find out what he was 
talking about ? " 

One of the seniors upon returning to his room 
one day last week found a splendid new overcoat 
at his door and has not yet been able to find the 
sender. A contrast to him was a junior, who, going 
to his room from recitation, saw his overcoat pa- 
rading down street upon the arm of a stranger. 

Prof. Robinson has just received a large piece 
from a meteor which fell at Northport some forty 
years ago. The spot where the piece struck the 
water was noted and the fragment obtained by 
diving. 

Of the juniors this year, C. A. Davis, J. H. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



121 



Davis, Dike, Flius, Kilgore, Parker, Stackpole 
aud Tuttle elect Zoology ; Berry, Kuigbt, Norris, 
Eideout and Smith, Greek; Butler and Knowltou, 
Latiu ; Hoi'iie and Wentworth, English History. 
Byron, Taylor and Turner bave not yet returned. 

The reading-room fiend has added to his re- 
nown (?) by removing entire one of the papers upon 
the morning of its arrival. Is it possible that a 
detective has got to be stationed there °l 

The first director of boating has expressed a 
decided preference for single life. Fortunately at 
this time of year the bottom of the Androscoggin 
is very high, so we have no " resolutions" to print. 

Freshmen are getting brash. On the day of 
the highly interesting ball game with the Cumber- 
lands, one was observed seated on the grand stand, 
next the professor of hygiene, calmly smoking a 
long-stemmed pipe. 

Mr. J. Torrey, '84, assistant Professor of Chem- 
istry at Lafayette College is pursuing investigations 
in a scientific field with great assiduity. — (Per- 
sonal.) It is presumed that a lawn-tennis court is 
laid out in the above mentioned field, as one of our 
authorities in that game recently received a postal 
from Joseph asking for information as to the 
legality of voleying over the net, etc. 

Since the rise in the price of admission to the 
Delta many have discovered that the fence is a 
highly desirable location from which to view the 
game. We would suggest that the fence be white- 
washed at short intervals, or perhaps sharp spikes 
would serve as an effectual antidote. 

The interest in tennis this fall is not so marked 
as could be wished. If we don't look out, Colby 
will get ahead of us in this sport. 

When all the little stars come out, 

And eke the smiling moon. 
The senior puts his slippers off, 

Puts on his pointed shoon; 

And quickly hies him to that street — 
By some the pave 'tis styled — 

Where he doth meet some damsel sweet 
By Luna's light heguiled. 

The junior doeth much the same 

{To tell on them is rough). 
It were a shame to skip the name 

Of sophomore so " tough." 

Perhaps you think the freshman grinds 

Himself into the grave; 
He warning takes from nobler minds 

And likewise seeks the pave. 

One of those youths of the town who are omni- 



present at the ball games, has the bellowing of a 
calf reduced to such a state of artistic imitation 
that his talents deserve to be recognized by some- 
thing more than the ephemeral plaudits of an ad- 
miring crowd ; in short, as Mr. Micawber would 
say, he deserves a leather medal. 

A noticeable feature of the boat race was the 
entire absence of ladies, 

whose bright eyes 

Rain influence and judge the prize. 
We are sorry for their want of enthusiasm, but will 
kindly attribute their non-appearance to the rather 
unpleasant weather. 

The recent fire has brought to light a relic fiend 
within our borders. We happened to be in a sen- 
ior's room the other day. Without any encourage- 
ment from us, he tenderly took from a shelf a 
crooked piece of what seemed to be old iron, but 
which we were informed in tones of subdued excite- 
ment, was the hour-hand of the town clock which 
once told the flying hours from the steeple of the 
ruined church. After we had expressed our un- 
bounded admiration for such a treasure, he laid it 
back as though it were something sacred that 
would be polluted by mortal touch. Next, with the 
same carefulness, he held up before our wondering 
eyes what appeared to be a fragment of a gilded 
cuspidor. This was, he said, a part of the ball that 
had adorned the top of the spire of the ill-fated 
church. With looks of mingled surprise and awe, 
we beheld the gem. Then he showed us a junk of 
similar material, which he fondled in his hands, 
and our eyes must have glowed with envy as he 
told us that this was a part of one of the letters 
which had been on the face of the clock. Happy 
man ! We left him to the rapt contemplation of 
his treasures, feeling that we were intruding upon 
a joy that it was not for us to share. 

The inspiring cry of "foot-ball" was heard on 
the campus a day or two ago, and something of a 
game is reported. Now that the boat races are 
over aud the close of the base-ball season so near, 
it is to be hoped that foot-ball will be entered into 
with all the zest of former years. 

The fruit- dealers had a big trade the night of 
the boat race. A pound of grapes was the stand- 
ard of payment of obligations arising from the un- 
certainties of the result of the race in the minds of 
enthusiastic admirers of rowing. 

The position of a base-ball umpire is not pleas- 
ant, in more ways than one. French is to be con- 
gratulated upon his fortunate escape from what 



122 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




might so easily have been a serious injury. As it 
was he received a painful hurt. 

Prof. Robinson was at the boat race armed and 
equipped for " taking" the crews as they shot out 
from between the piers at the signal for the start. 

The Bowdoin Y. M. C. A. sent Hall and Sewall 
as delegates to the State Convention held at Bidde- 
ford, Monday-Thursday. 

Wright, 76, had the nine out on the Delta last 
Saturday afternoon for a little practice, so that he 
might notice their play and make suggestions. 
Nothing does more towards promoting athletics in 
college than the interest manifested by the alumni. 
We wish more of them were like Wright in this 
respect. 

Gen. Chamberlain made some interesting re- 
marks before the T. M. C. A., Sunday evening. 

The graduates elected to the legislature were : 
C. P. Mattocks, '62; Clarence Hale, '69; H. M. 
eath, 72; D. J. McGillicuddy, '81; L. Barton, 



It looks as if the college were destined to occupy 
a place in campaign literature as exalted as that 
now held by Mes.srs. Fisher and Mulligan. A few 
days ago a letter was received directed to " The 
Capt. of the Boat Club, Bowdoin College, Mass.," 
which proved to be from an admirer of Mr. Blaine 
in New Jersey. The letter enclosed a slip cut from 
an independent newspaper, to the effect that Mr. 
Blaine, while attending the commencement of 1875, 
was induced to subscribe $100 toward building a 
new boat-house, but never could be induced to pay 
up. The letter asked as to the truth of this state- 
ment, which, if found to be false, the gentleman 
desired to "brand as a campaign lie." In answer 
to our inquiries, one of the professors said that it 
was his impression that when the subscriptions 
were made the understanding was that the gentle- 
men subscribing should be written to when the 
money was wanted. A few years after, affairs 
being in a conditiou to warrant building, the com- 
mittee notified the subscribers. No answer being 
received immediately from Mr. Blaine, another let- 
ter was sent in which the sending of a previous 
letter was mentioned. A reply was at once received 
in which Mr. Blaine apologized for his seeming 
neglect, mentioning that he had not received the 
first letter, and enclosing a check for .f 100. This 
looks like scanty material from which to build a 
lie. The college is satisfied with Mr. Blaine's con- 
duct in this affair — possibly the democratic news- 
papers may not be. 




'30 —Hon. Thomas Drum- 
mond, LL.D., of Chicago, 
nho has jast lesigned his position on 
the bench of the United States Cir- 
cuit Court, is a native of Bristol, Me., and 
has recently been visiting in Lincoln County. 

'41.-Daniel F. Potter died at Brunswick, Sept. 
17th. He was born in Augusta, Feb. 22, 1819. 
After graduation he studied law for three years, 
but did not enter upon the practice. He then pur- 
sued a course of theology in Bangor, graduating in 
1848, and spent the following year in the Theolog- 
ical Seminary, Princeton, N. J. He then served 
under a commission from the Maine Missionary 
Society in Houlton and its vicinity, and at Dexter 
and Newcastle. In 1852 he was ordained pastor 
over the Congregational church at Union ; in 1856 
he became acting pastor over the Congregational 
church at Topsham, where he remained nearly 
twelve years, when, in consequence of bronchial 
troubles, he was compelled to suspend all labor in 
the pulpit. He has represented Topsham twice in 
the legislature, and has served under commission 
from the Governor as supervisor of schools in his 
county, which position he resigned after two years 
service, on account of ill health. Since 1874 he has 
resided in Brunswick. He leaves a widow and 
three children, one of the latter being our respected 
tutor in Rhetoric. 

'48.— Dr. C. A. Packard has returned home after 
spending ten weeks in Europe. 

'58.— Judge Lysander Hill, of Chicago, made the 
elaborate argument in the Bell-Drawbaugh tele- 
phone suits, which have been attracting so much 
attention on account of the large amount of money 
involved. 

'60.— Prof. C. H. Feruald, of the Maine State 
College, was in attendance at the recent session of 
the association for the advancement of science in 
Philadelphia. 

'61. — Edward Stauwood, formerly editor of the 
Boston Daily Advertiser, has written a work on the 
" History of Presidential Elections," which will be 
pubUshed this autumn by James R. O.sgood & Co. 

fe— Rev. Newman Smyth, who is one of the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



123 



most scholarly and eloqueut of modern theologians, 
has published a new volume of sermons, entitled 
" The Reality of Faith." 

70.— DeAlva S. Alexander was a few months 
since elected Commauder of the Department of 
Potomac G. A. E. He has lately been attending 
the national encampment at Minneapolis, Minn. 
A communication to one of the leading papers says 
of him : " He is a lover of good literature, and has 
a handsome library. He is not exactly a ' straw- 
berry blonde,' but his hair and full beard are of de- 
cided Auburn hue. He weighs over two hundred 
pounds, but is not at all corpulent." 

70. — Lncian Howe has gone to Heidelberg, 
Germany, to study in the University. 

74.— We wish to correct a statement made in 
the last number of the Orient. H. K. White is 
teaching Lincoln Academy instead of the Damaris- 
cotta High School. He owns a farm there upon 
which he resides. 

76. — Tascus Atwood was elected County Attor- 
ney in Androscoggin County, on the democratic 
ticket. This county is republican by 500 majority. 

'80. — Edwards is principal of one of theLewiston 
Grammar Schools. 

'82. — Moody has resigned his place in the Au- 
burn High School to accept the tutorship of .Mathe- 
matics at Bowdoin. 

'83. — Goodwin, who spent last year in Europe, 
has returned home. 

'84. — Cothren has lately been to New York pros- 
pecting. He intends to soon go there and enter a 
machine shop. 

'84. — Waterman is teaching Latin and Political 
Economy in the Portland High School. 

The following graduates of Bowdoin were elected 
to the State senate at the late election : Stephen J. 
Young, '59 ; P. H. Stubbs, '60 ; T. R. Simonton, 
'53 ; J. L. Cutler, '37. 

S. L. Larrabee, '75, was elected Register of 
Probate, and Geo. M. Seiders, '72, County Attorney 
for Cumberland County. 

The following members of college are teaching- 
Rogers ('85) at Woolwich; Kendall ('85) at Upton 
Byram ('86) at Patten ; Horn ('86) at Waldoboro 
Dearth ('87) at Litchfield. 

Cobb and J. F. Watermau, formerly of '84, will 
join '85. 
The Faculty: 

Prof. Chapman has been to the mountains with 
his family during the summer. 



Prof. Avery and family have been stopping at 
Fryeburg. 

Prof. Lee has been at Wood's Holl, Mass., with 
U. S. Fish Commissioner. 

Prof Johnson has returned from Europe, and 
will resume his classes. 

Prof. Smith has been studying at home. 

Prof. Carmichael has been to Philadelphia to 
attend the Scientists' International Convention. 

Prof. Robinson has been studying photography. 
He has been to Philadelphia to attend the meeting 
of the American Association for the Advancement 
of Science. 

Prof. Johnson has leased the bouse formerly oc- 
cupied by Prof. Packard. 

Prof. Avery has hecome a frequent contributor 
to the American Antiquarian. In the May num- 
ber he has two articles, — " Notes on Oriental Ar- 
chfeology," and " Notes on Oriental Periodicals." 
In the September number he has an article on 
" The Hill Tribes of India." 




At Pimceton College 
students are allowed 
twenty h^ e unexcused absences in each 
term. 

Lehigh has a freshman class of 132, al- 
most double the number which entered 
that college three years ago. Each class has been 
larger than the preceding one since that time. — 
Crimson. 

The Echo reproaches the sophomores for allow- 
ing the sopho-freshman rope-pull to be given up 
this year. 

The Merrill Prize (of more than $800) at Colby 
was won this year by a young lady. A triumph for 
the co-eds. 

A magazine poet declares that he never reads 
one of his own poems in print. His confession cuts 



124 



BOWDON ORIENT. 



down his supposed list of readers one-half, and the 
other fellow gets paid for it. He is the proof reader. 

Over 224 students have thus far applied for 
admission to the class of '68 at Cornell, or 60 more 
than last year's entering class. There will be over 
500 students enrolled in the institution ; two new 
instructorships have been created, and there is 
strong probability that there will he others estab- 
hshed. It is stated that a friend of the university 
has recently donated $50,000 for the endowment of 
a professorship of moral philosophy, and that a man 
prominent in that department, has been tendered 
the position. As regards buildings, the additions 
to Sibley College have been pushed on during the 
summer mouths, and tliose at Cascadilla place have 
been begun, but the latter will hardly be finished 
before winter.— £.r. 

"Yes," said the tramp, as a tear glistened like 
a gum-drop on his sun-stained face, " I served 
during the entire war." After stowing away the 
comfortable breakfast that was given him, he fin- 
ished the sentence, " I was waiter in a Canadian 
restaurant." — CVy; and Gown. 

One of the most exciting cane rushes ever seen 
at Amherst occurred on the green last week. The 
sophomores had been having their class elections, 
and on coming out were met by a number of fresh- 
men bearing a cane. The struggle immediately 
commenced, and the pusliing, excited crowd had 
gone nearly the whole length of the common, with 
the advantage now on one side, now on the other, 
when suddenly President Seelye appeared upon the 
scene, and forcing his way into the midst of the 
struggling mass, he possessed himself of the cane 
and calmly walked off with \t.—Ex. 

Last Monday night occuiTcd the first rush of 
the season, and for the first time in the history of 
the college, there could be no doubt as to the 
result. After a well contested rusli, the class of 
'49 bore away the cane. — Amherst Student. 

Of eight of the principal colleges, the only one 
advocating a protective tariff is the University of 
Pennsylvania. At Williams, the free-trade tiieory 
is taught, likewise at Yale, Harvard, and Amherst. 
Pi inceton is in an undecided state as to which side 
to uphold. At Columbia, in the school of political 
science, all instruction has a leaning to free-trade. 

The Nassau Lit. complains that Princeton is 
becoming a training scliool for professoi-s. The 
institution loses, this year, two valuable instructors: 
Prof. McMaster, author of a History of the People 



of the United States, who has accepted an invita- 
tion to fill the historical chair at the University of 
Pennsylvania; and Prof. Halstead, well-known as 
an able mathematician. The latter has become 
connected with the University of Tesas. 

Some of the freshman classes this year are as 
follows: Harvard, 230; Cornell, 220; Institute of 
Technology, about 200; Princeton, 130; Amherst, 
102; Dartmouth, 98; Williams, r)5; Union, 46; 
Trinity, 32. 

It is a significant fact that the eastern colleges 
which favor scientific education instead of classical 
bave received the greatest gain in the number of 
pupils. The Institute of Technology and Cornell 
University ai'e particular illustrations of this ten- 
dency, the former reporting one hundred more stu- 
dents than last year, and the entering class of the 
latter being larger than that at Yale, and, according 
to reports, equal to that at Harvard. — Ex. 

Now doth the weary editor 

With mind insatiate, 

Fill np a half a column 

With gags on '88. — Record. 

Charles L. Colby has given $1,000,000 to estab- 
lish a new university in Wisconsin. It was his 
father, Gardner Colby, who endowed Colby Uni- 
versity. 



fLkm AMI FAMCY fUMIJMS 

neatly executetl at the 

B^llJigWICK JIE^^M 0FFICE. 



►^ gPECI^Ii -f FINE ^ p;^Tg 4^^ 

AKOE VERY POPULATt. 

Wine Boots aad SioeSj 

Nexl \q ImeriGan Express Office, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 

direct importation, which is made especially for us, 'water 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

A LLEN <e GINTER JIaiiiifacturers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



New system. Learned in less than one-quarter the time 
required by any other. Old reporters throw away old sys- 
tems and learn this for speed and legibility. ' It can be 
successfully 

TAUGHT BY aiAIL. 
The corresponding style can be learned in a few hours, 
and the full verbatim reporting style in a few months. It 
is a marvel of simplicity. 

STUDENTS 

can easily acquire enough to enable them to take notes of 

LECTURES. 

Send for circular. Terms: Corresponding style, five 

lessons, S5. Corresponding and reporting, twenty lessons, 

R. B. OAPEN, Augusta, Me. 



E 



STERBROOK'S 



STEEL 
PENS. 



Leading Numbers ; 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PE"1 CO., 

Works, Camaen, N. J. 26 John St., New York 



SMOKE THE BEST. 

We beg to inform the pubhc and smokers generally, that we 
have secured a large stock of the very choicest grades of thor- 
oughly cured 

GOLDEN VIRGINIA, PEEIQUE and TURKISH 

tobaccos, which we are using in the manufacture of our Cele- 
brated brands of cigarette and smoking tobaccos. And 
have added to our stock a lai'ge shipment of the finest imported 
French Rice Paper. Such stock, m.ade up by the highest class of 
skillful labor, we feel coufldent cannot fail to satisfy the tastes of 
all good judges. 

STANDARD BEANDS. 

Kinne}' Eros.' 
iress i-acKages, etc., etc. 
JUST OUT— SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL. 
Manufactured by Special Request, 

JTinneji Tobacco Co., 
Successors to Kinney Bros., New York. 



t,M, 



DEALER IN 



3im cSoo'l^, jShod/j SctMm^ 

No. 2 Odd Fellows' Block. 
^P^I^G ^ND RUMMER ^TYIiE^ nhh IN- 



tt^fiom 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of M;cine. will commence FebkuaiiY 7th, 18S4, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alpheus S. Packaed, Acting President; 
Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel T. Dana, M.D., 
Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
.tnU Diseases of Women and Cliildreu; Charles W. Goddard, 
A.M., Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick. Gkrrish, M.D., 
Anatomy; HENKV CARMICHAEL, Ph.D., Chemisti-y; Burt G. 
Wilder, M.D., Physiology ; Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery 
and Clinical Surgerv; Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica 
ami Therapeutics; Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator of 
Anatomy; Everett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of His- 
toiogv. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



FRANK M. STETSON 



"X, 

GO 

cc 
:=> 

Q 

< 







^<S.JULX i5.\* 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Diamonds, 



Jewelry, 



Silver Ware, 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



Prepare Original Designs for Society 
Badges, Rings, Prizes, and Class Cups, 
tvhich will he forwarded to students on 
request. 

A SPECIALTY is made of English 
Peivter Beer Slugs, in two sizes, tvith Glass 
Bottoms. 

Society, Book, and Visiting Card Plates 
engraved in proper style. 

Invitations and Programmes in novel 
forms at short notice. 

Shreve, Crump & Low, 

Eosa?oiNr. 



Bronzes, 



Porcelains, 



Fancy Goods. 



BYRON STEVENS, 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the nnost connplete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE &. CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



EARS for the MILLION 

Foo Choo's Balsam of Shark's Oil 

Positively Restores the Hearing, and is the Only- 
Absolute Cure for Deafness Known. 

This Oil is abstracted from peculiar species of small White 
Shark, caught in the yellow Sea, known as Carcharodon Rond- 
eletii. Every Chinese fisherman knows it. Its virtues as a re- 
storative of hearing were discovered by a Buddhist Priest about 
the year 1410. Its cures were so numerous and many so seem- 
ingly miraculous, that the remedy was oflicially proclaimed over 
the entire Empire. Its use became so universal th.at for over 300 
years no deafness has existed amona Ike Chiiiese people. Sent, 
charges prepaid, to any address at $1.00 per bottle. 

HEAR WHAT THE Dl^F SAY 

It has |>iTlonii(Nl a mirach; in i 

I have no iiniMiilily noises in 

I have been greatly beneliteil. 

My deafness helped a great deal— think another bottle will 
cure me. 

My hearing is much benefited. 

I have received untold benefit. 

My hearing is improving. 

It is giving good satisfaction. 

Have been gi'eatly benefited, and am rejoiced that I saw the 
notice of it. 

" Its virtues are unquestionable and its curative character ab- 
solute, as the writer can personally testify, both from experience 
and observation. Write at once to Ilaylock & Jenney, 7 Dey 
Sti-eet, New York, enclosing $1.00, and you will receive by return 
a remedy that will enable you to hear like anybody else, and 
whose curative efl'ects will be permanent. You will never regret 
doing so." — Editor of Mercantile Review. 

«ffi"To avoid loss in the Mails, please send money by Regis- 
tered Letter. 

Only Imported by HAYIiOCK & JENNEY, 
Sole Agents for America. 1 Dey St., N. Y, 



■ head and hear much better. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



J^, O. REED, 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bruusiirick and Xopsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views, 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 
Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

PORTI<.A.NX3, IVIAINE:. 

^F. H. WIIxS0H,3{E^ 

DISPENSER OF 

Fifi ifi|ij llidMai§s«Gliiilgili, 

IMPORTED AND DOIVIESTIC CIGARS. 
Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc. , in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Go to JKF, B. Woodard's 

To buy your GEOCEEIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. Tou will save money by so doing. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, IVIe. 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIIVIIVIER, Director, 

750 H^iddle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



MAIN STREET, BEUNSWICK, ME. 



Wja. K FIEIiD, 



]W^N^6E^. 



TOIffTIIffB HOTSI.7 

BE,UNSWICK, MAINE. 

Special attention will be given to Class and Reunion Dinners 
and Suppers to order. First-class laundry connected with the 
house. 

S. B. BREWSTER, Proprietor. 



MAMOMiS, FINI WATCIIS, 

239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. MERKILL. A. KEITH. 



DEALER IN 



Fresli and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 



'^JiiawUmf'm, 



%\xx^ Potfe, 



I*- ^ 



-Hi:^= 



w^^Lwm<^m^ %<. 



DEALER IN 



CEDAR STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Branch oflice three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
1^° Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

J. G. WASHBURN, 

Hanufacturer of and Dealer in 

PIOTUEE FRAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

Also Pictures, Cabinet Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, 

etc. Also agent for the celebrated Household Sewing 

Jlachiues, 

In the Everett Store, Main Street, Opposite the Mall, 

BKUJSrSWICK, MAIISTE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



HATIOHAL SCHOOL SUPPLY BDREAn. 

Bbloit, "Wis., July 31, 1883. 
National School Siipply Bureau: 

Last April, beings then in charge of a large public school, but 
desiring a position in some good academy or college, I placed 
my name with your Bureau. During the iirst part of the present 
month I received notice from you of a vacancy in such a place as 
I desired. 

Putting myself in communication with the party concerned I 
received the appointment. I am well satisfied with the manage- 
ment of the Bureau, and feel sure that it fills a useful and nec- 
essary place in our school economy. You are at liberty to use 
my name if you wish. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD O. FISKE. 
Headmaster Markam Academy, Milwaukee, Wis. 

For application-form and circular, address, 

National School Supply Depot, Chicago, III. 
N. B. — 'We want all kinds of Teachers for Schools 
and Families. Good Pay to Agents and Private Cor- 
respondents. 



DBALEK IN 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

VioUns, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 



STUDENTS 

Of all classes will find it valuable to consult on all subjects the 



183 SOUTH CLARK STREET, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Full information given on receipt of return postage. A union 
of writers, critics, and scholars of the highest order. 



CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

All the Stttdents Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 



f mik 1, Mills' iiife I 



COK. Main and Mason Sts., opp. town Clock. 



ALL KINDS OF 



e^jjs Tp^'i^n^ Cf? v'^'i^i® 







EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &e. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



WHY I AM A REPUBLICAN 

A graphic and reliable presentation of Republican princi- 
ples, and reasons for continuing the party in power, also 
fine portraits and authentic lives of 

I3LA.INE A.1VD LOGATV 

by Gov. GEO. S. BOUTWELL, oi Mass. THE BOOK 
of the party, endorsed by leading Republicans. Price in 
reach of every voter. A rare opportunity for a wide-awake 
student to engage in the campaign with profit. 

WM. J. BETTS & CO., Hartford, Conn. 




ON THE EOAD. 



til eeiifii@eii li., 

(Established 1877.) 

10 BERKELY ST., BOSTON, MASS., 

M&w <^iifeIB§te to© Sllusteoki ialaI®gjiiSs 

ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 
OTHEK TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp at above address. 



ST^CL & BURT, 

509 Tremont St., and 4 Warren Ave., Odd Fellows' Hall, Boston, Mass. 
SPECIAL IMPROVED 

Aniericaii STAR Bicycle 

Althoug-h comparatively a new machine on the mar- 
ket, the STAKhas made a splenrlici record, 
having won the 

Twenty-Five Mile Championship of 

the United States, 

Breaking the record, in 83 minutes 10 seconds. 

It has a mile record of 2inin. 50 1-8 sec; 
5 miles, 15 min. 26 3-4 sec.; mile ^vitllout 
hands, 3 min. 11 sec. It has won the most im- 
portant Hill Climbing Contests, including 
Corey Hill, Boston, Eagle Hill, Orange, N. J., 
and Standpipe Hill, Washington, D. C. This 
is amere mention of the triumphs of the Star. 

TThe principles embodied in the Star give the perfect combination for safety, speed, and comfort with economy of 
maintenance and durability found in no other machine. 

IN ADDITION WE HAVE THE 

yiCTOE TRICYCLE, The Most Famous Tliree-flieeler Made In Tie Worll 

A FuU Line of the Best ENGLISH MACHINES 

Go to complete the list and suit all tastes. 

The IDEAIj, a cheaper machine for use of boys and youths, is a splendid machine for purpose intended and is 
highly recommended- 

SECOND-HAND BIACHINES of all kinds, SUPPLIES and SUNDRIES constantly on hand. 

REPAIRING of most difficult kinds performed at reasonable rates. All machines and parts must be plainly 
marked and be accompanied by instructions by next mail. 

SEND TWO-CENT STAMP FOR CATALOGUE. 





-^^i^. 188 ^.'^^f-'' 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE AD.JUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard " and" Duplex" Burner 

IX PI,ACE OF THK OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

EHSEAVED IN THE MOST FASEIOKABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 



ALIOYLieA 



■ AGENCY Jf'JR- 



WS, 



All the Late Publications in stock. Text-Books of all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL WOEKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



\m 



The only radical internal remedy. Never known to 
fail in a single case, acute or chronic. It expels the poison- 
ous Uric Acid from the blood, which is the prime cause 
of Kheumatism, Gout, and Neuralgia.— As a blood puri- 

THE OLD RELIABLE SPECIFIC ' 
ENDORSED BY PHYSICIANS AND 
T HOUS ANDS O F PATIENTS. 

fier it has no equal. Acting on common-sense principles 
it eradicates from the blood all poisonou.s matter which 
causes disease. — It has been in use for many years and 
cured a larger percentage of cases than any other 

POSITIVELY CURES "~ 

remedy. Send for testimonials from the cured. — Salicy- 
lica strikes directly at the cause of these diseases, while 
so many so-called speci- 

BHEUMATISM 

fics only treat locally the effect. When you have tried 
in vaiii all the "oils," "ointments," "liniments," and 
"pain cures," and when your 

GOUT, NEURALGIA. 

doctors cannot help you, do not despair but take Salicy- 
lica at once and be cured.— No one can afford to live iu 
pain and misery when 

GRAVEL, DIABETES, 

Salieylica will relieve him and put him in condition to 
attend to his daily avocations. 

Si per box, 6 boxes for $5, 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE BLOOD POISONING. 



]S[0. 3 0DD EEIiIiOW^' BMOK, 



Is the place to buy 



with full directions in ten languages. Sold by druggists 
everywhere, or sent by mail, prepaid, on receipt of price. 

WASHBURNE & CO., Prop's, 

287 Broadway, New York. 



Telephone Exxhange connected with the store. 

1, m. tcsraiiiis. ^pa^'iF. 



Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

Olid Fellows' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. W. BROWNE, Proprietou. 
Formerlv at Tontine Hotel. 



■ci& — So- 






n'^. 



THE FAVORITE NOS.303-404-332I7O-S5I-WITH 

■^HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. MEERYMAN, PHARMACIST,-:- 

IIUQS. MEDICIIES, 

Fancy aM Toilet Articles, CiprsI ToMcco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

jpy Prescriptions Carefully Compouuiled. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MITSIC PTTBLISHEK, 

Aud Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



The Xew Styles in 

In all colors, are now rcadj-. An elegant line of New York 
Neckwear in New Shapes autl Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, 'Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

% ELLIOTT'S, I 

OPP. TOWN CLOCK. 



Main St., under Town Clock. 

|Il3"Farailies, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



TAPE IWORM. 

In one of the tropical provinces of Germany there has been 
found a root, the extract from which has proved an absolute 
SPECIFIC for Tape Worm. It is pleasant to take and is not de- 
bilitating? or disasi'ceable in its eflects on the patient, but is 
peculiarly sickening and stupefying to the Tape Worm, which 
loosens its hold of its victim and passes awny in a natural and 
easy manner, entirely whole, with head, ana while still alive. 
One physician has used this remedy in over 400 cases, without a 
single failure to pass worm wliole, with head. Absolute removal 
with head guaranteed. No pay required until so removed- Send 
stamp for circular and terms. 

HEY WOOD & CO ., 19 Pa rk Place, N. Y. City. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTOIM, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Euliug and Blank BookWorkof Every Description done to Order. 



WHEJSr JTO TJ ^VANT A. RID^E 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE, 

On Cleaveland Street, where you xoiUfind turnouts to suit the most 
fastidious, e^ Rates reasonable. 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno^w's Grocery Store. 

jes-Special Bates to Student Clubs.-SI 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are e.xamined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, Georgics and first six Books 
of the iEneid, including Prosody. 
(Instead of the Georgics, Csesar's Gallic War, 
Books I.-IV., may be olJered.) 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Georgra]Dhy, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Eoot, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra, — so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the prej)aratory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginuing of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regular Examinations toe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Fi'iday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (July 11 and 12, 1884), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 26 and 27, 1884). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examinations is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshn^an 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Washington Academy, East 
Machias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these 
schools having been made special Fitting Schools 
for the college by the action of their several Boards 
of Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 
have been fitted at any school having an approved 



preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range oi 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

required- FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terras. 

Natural History, three terras. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry, two terras. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $2.o. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol.. XIV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCT. 29, 1884. 



No. 9. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED FORTNIGHTLY BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
John A. Peters, '85, Managing Editor. 
N. B. Ford, '85, Business Editor. 
Boyd Bartlett, '85. W. P. Nealley, '85. 

O. E. Cook, '85. A. A. Knowlton, '86. 

J. F. LiBBY, '85. C. W. TUTTLE, '86. 

W. V. Wentworth, '86. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00. 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Students and alumni are invited to contribute matter for any 
of tlie departments. Contributions must Ise accompanied by 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 
Printed at the Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XIV., No. 9. -Oct. 29, 1884. 

October 125 

Editorial Notes. 125 

A Memory 127 

What Changed Ludkins 127 

A Fib 128 

Jennie Glow _ : 1 29 

The Escort 1 30 

Antilogia 1.30 

Communication 131 

CoLLEGii Tabula 132 

Peesonal 1 34 

Clippings 135 

OCTOBER. 

All aflame the maples stand by the brookside. 
Bright gold and crimson the fluttering leaves fall ; 
The wild bird's cry rings sad through the woodhtnd. 
And echo alone responds to the call. 

But, beauteous wine month, in thy wanton joy, 
Thou coverest with thy bright robe, fold on fold, 
A funeral feast, 'gainst the time Nature weeps 
O'er the pale, cold corpse of the year grown old. 




The middle poiut of the term has 
been reached — startling as the fact may be — 
and in a comparatively short time the voice 
of the Senior and Junior Ex. orator will be 
heard in the land. In connection with the 
coming exliibition we should like to offer a 
suggestion. The question of the expense 
incurred by the participants in one of these 
public exhibitions has become a serious one. 
The tax levied by the committee of the last 
Junior Declamation amounted to over seven 
dollars, and this after the college itself had 
contributed a sum — small enough to be sure — 
toward paying for the music. The ex- 
cessive proportions which the figures have 
reached is a natural outcome of the senseless 
spirit of emulation in which each exhibition 
is made to surpass, if possible, in the quality of 
music and programs the one just preced- 
ing. If the emulation were confined to the 
speakers in the rendering of their parts, no 
fault could be found ; but as it is, each 
speaker knows that it would have been money 
in his pocket had he never been appointed, 
and is not at all sure that the honor is worth 
half the money which it is probable he will 
be called upon to pay. 

The remed}' is simple, but it requires a 
little moral courage. Let the next exhibition 
men adopt some simple, plain, inexpensive 



126 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



program, well printed. This will serve 
every purpose except that of a high art orna- 
ment for a mantel, for which purpose pro- 
grams were not invented. The craze for 
old-fashioned things is not past ; it would be 
an excellent idea to reproduce some of the 
old programs used here when the century 
was in its infancy. Have it understood that 
Grimraer's six is the correct thing in the way 
of music. These changes for the better once 
made, succeeding exhibitioners, should they 
return to the old-time extravagance would be 
laughed at. It is evident that a change in 
the method of conducting these exhibitions 
must be inaugurated — and that soon. The 
first class to make the innovation will deserve 
great credit. 



We publish in another column a communi- 
cation from an evidently enthusiastic member 
of the Literary Association, which is well 
worth the attention of the students — the 
freshmen in particular. Anything which 
serves to relieve the tedium of the long 
winter months now before us should, and un- 
doubtedly will, be met with encouragement. 
The musicals and lectures given under the 
management of the association last year 
were successful in every way and highly en- 
joyable. The society is well able to stand 
alone, as is shown by the condition of the 
treasury, but an increase of members is de- 
sirable, and will insure the success of its 
enterprises. 



Now that the spirit of improvement and 
reform has taken possession of the estimable, 
selectmen of this town, it might be a fitting 
opportunity to hint that a crossing at the 
north entrance of the campus would be a 
highly desirable thing, in its way. For gen- 
erations past the students have been obliged, 
at certain seasons of the Brunswick year, to 
effect an egress from the college grounds by 



wading. It is barely possible that the au- 
thorities, aware of this fact, think that any 
attempt on their part to break the precedent 
established, would be looked upon with hor- 
ror. We would carefully assure them that 
such is not the case. We have no desire to 
follow in the footsteps of a Hawthorne or a 
Longfellow — when those footsteps lead across 
an atrocious mud puddle. We are aware 
that the value of rubber boots is slightly en- 
hanced by the absence of legitimate means 
of crossing; but think, Brunswickers, of the 
goodly profits that have accrued to you from 
tho presence of the student, and rejoice that 
you have a way pointed out by which you 
can make his stay yet a little more pleasant— 
and long. A short time remains before win- 
ter. A word to the wise selectman is suffi- 
cient. 



Having given the words of the stump- 
speaker ample time to take effect, and sup- 
posing that the undergraduate mind was as 
nearly made up as it would be before election 
the Orient has made a canvass of the political 
preferences of the college. The result, printed 
in another column, is not surprising. Three, 
quarters of the students sa}' they will vote, 
or would like to vote, for Mr. Blaine. The 
statement that the remaining quarter are 
bona fide Cleveland men is, in our opinion, to 
be taken with a grain of salt. There is a 
certain percentage of John Bull in the aver- 
age college man which leads him to side with 
the under dog. It is probable that a large 
number of those who were really undecided 
put themselves down for Cleveland. 



It has been a source of no little surprise 
to the college that the sophomores should 
prove to be so far forgetful of themselves 
and the honor of the college as to allow their 
vicious conduct in some of the recitation 
rooms to continue. The least that can be 
said of such conduct is that it is in the high- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



127 



est degree iingentlemanly — and this should 
be enough. The very basis of our new sys- 
tem is that the student is mature enough to 
have a share in his own government: that 
such is true of the sophomores would cer- 
tainly be doubted by a casual observer. It 
is inconceivable that men can so lower them- 
selves as to take a mean advantage of the 
absence of any special regulation in regard 
to conduct in recitation. The Orient dis- 
likes to call attention to petty disturbances 
in college, as the public, if it hears the slight- 
est hint of friction, is apt to think the whole 
machine is out of order ; but it is certainly 
time that the sentiment of the college in this 
matter should be voiced. 



A MEMORY. 

A summer afternoou, 

Witbiu a crowded ball I sate, 
My raiud and thoughts intent 

Upon grave interests of state ; 

For stump- speech eloquence. 

With lioDied phrase and pompous air, 
Dealing in sophistries, 

Maintained its sway triumphant there. 

While thus deep lost in thought. 
Before my eyes a vision passed 

Of rarest loveliness, 

That set my heart a-beating fast. 

Refreshing as the breeze 

That sweeps across the summer sea. 
In her sweet innocence; 

Dazzling as flash of diamonds be, 

Unto my side she came, 

And bending, whispered in the ear 
Of one who sate in front, 

And smiled,— ah, sight to me how dear ! 

And then she fled away. 

Nor since my eyes her face have seen, 
Never shall see, doubtless, 

But mem'ry of it still is green. 

These passing incidents. 

Momentary phases of our life 
Great influence may have, 

And in the soul breed endless strife. 



WHAT CHANGED LUDKINS. 

Ludkins was a confirmed cynic. By a 
peculiar, but original course of logic he had 
convinced himself that the misanthrope was 
the ideal type of humanity ; and that man- 
kind, as a class, were intended to be complete 
in themselves. Following out this idea he 
had become known in the college as a recluse, 
and his fellow-students, with rare unanimity, 
conceded to him the seclusion and quiet 
which are supposed to render the cynic's life 
enjoyable. 

Nothing interfered with the practical work- 
ings of his theory, and j'et, mirabile dictu, 
Ludkins was not happy. The gay songs and 
convivial laughter of his fellow-students 
awoke in him feelings of what, if he had not 
been a cynic, might have been called envy. 
As it was, he endeavored to look down upon 
them with lofty compassion, but the result 
was far from satisfactory. The fact was, 
Ludkins was morbid. In addition to this, he 
was imaginative. These things, combined 
with a naturally bilious temperament, had 
made him a stranger even to himself 

Ludkins, although a cynic, was not a con- 
sistent one. Despite his belief that every 
man was complete in himself, he had made 
an unconscious exception in his own case,' 
and, in his imagination, had already pictured 
the future Mrs. Ludkins with vivid distinct- 
ness. She was to be tall, stately, and hand- 
some (even a cynic's imagination couldn't 
picture a homely wife). But his ideal pos- 
sessed not the beauty of a warm-hearted 
Venus ; but the cold and queenly charms of 
a haughty Juno or Minerva. She was self- 
possessed and self-sufficient; in short, a 
woman who would neither be frightened at a 
thunder shower or given to demonstrative 
affection. The ideal woman had not been 
found, and as yet Ludkins lived in single 
blessedness. Thus the summer vacation of 
his junior year found Ludkins more confirmed 
than ever in his pet theory. 



128 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



He had received an invitation to pass the 
summer with an aunt who lived in a secluded 
country retreat, and his inclinations led him 
to accept it. Here, at least, he would be free 
from interruption, and amid the quiet, but 
instructive scenes of " Nature unadorned,'' 
he might draw the inspiration for a book 
which he contemplated writing. 

He arrived in due season and was greeted 
by his aunt with a warmth wliich he thought 
altogether too effusive, but considerately for- 
gave. He viewed his quiet apartments with 
complacent satisfaction, and by the time the 
tea-bell rang he had mapped out, in his 
mind, a whole summer's work. On entering 
the dining-room, his fond hopes were cruelly 
crushed. At the table opposite him sat a 
slight, good-looking young lady of the blonde 
type, whom his aunt introduced as her niece 

Miss Deane, of L Seminarj-. Ludkins 

was in a predicament. One look into the 
vivacious face and mischievous eyes of his 
fair neighbor and his opinion was irrevocabl)' 
formed, — a giggling, gushing school-girl, un- 
doubtedly bent on conquest. Ludkins groaned 
inwardi}', but externally managed to make 
himself passably affable. 

We will not go into details. The summer 
passed rapidly, and strange to say, Ludkins' 
book was not written. He was obliged, on 
numerous occasions, to act as escort for his 
quasi cousin ; but he had nerved himself 
against her wiles until he felt that he was 
"bomb proof." He commiserated her mis- 
taken views of life; and endeavored, under 
the influence of her example, to write a 
caustic article on " Modern Optimists," but 
the muse was absent and he failed ignomin- 
iously. 

The vacation was drawing to a close, and 
Ludkins was engaged one morning in reading 
the monthly magazine, when loud screams 
from the adjoining kitchen brought him to 
the scene of action. His aunt and fair cousin 
were standing upon chairs, and with blanched 



faces ejaculated the fearful truth, a mouse! 
Ludkins was equal to the emergency. Armed 
with the broom he chased the intruder round 
the room with unparalleled agilit)', and at 
length driving it into a corner was about to 
dispatch it, when with lightning rapidity the 
rodent eluded his blow and darted up his 
trousers leg. What ensued Ludkins could 
never distinctly recall. He had a dim im- 
pression of leaping about in a most ridiculous 
manner, and uttering undignified expressions 
which he had never before made use of. And 
when at length the crushed and mangled 
cause of his mishap fell upon the floor, he had 
a most vivid remembrance of a fair face 
striving in vain to appear sober, and a voice 
convulsed with laughter saying, " Oh, I'm so 
sorry, Mr. Ludkins." And then the cynic 
vanished, and the stern Ludkins, overcome 
bj' the ludicrousness of the occasion, joined 
heartily in the general laugh. 

When Ludkins returned to college he was 
no longer a c\'nic. He joined heartily in 
the enjoj'ments of his fellow-students, and 
was known and appreciated as " one of the 
■boys." 

And now when Ludkins pictures to him- 
self his future better half, she always assumes 
the laughing face and mischievous eyes of 
his aunt's fair niece ; and he smiles a happy 
smile, for he has evidence in his pocket that 
the picture is not all imaginarj'. 



A FIB. 

" Tom kissed yon at the door last night, 
Marie," said sancy blue-eyed Nell. 
" Wliat fibs," tlie blusliing maid replied, 
"Some wicked people tell." 

" But he did, for some one saw you, — 
You on the step, he on the ground — " 
" That's a story, I tell you, Nell, 
For — 'hem — we looked all 'round I " 



Of eight $200 scholarships recently awarded at 
Cornell, four went to lady students. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



129 



JENNIE GLOW. 
I met her at Cape Cottage, and it hap- 
pened thus. While on a cruise along shore 
our part}^ four young men and a yacht, had 
anchored in Ship's Cove near Portland Plead, 
for the purpose of spending a few days near 
this resort and visiting the city. The sails 
being furled, the question arose as to who 
should be " ship keeper," and Fate (by the 
means of a five-cent piece) bestowed that of- 
fice on me, while my three companions 
started for the city. Thus I was left alone, 
and to while away the time I started on a 
stroll along the shore. The day was almost 
perfect, and as 1 was meditating on the beau- 
ties of the place and planning to astonish 
some editor with an " Ode to Summer," my 
wandering eye was arrested by a figure which 
I saw slowly coming along the beach. She 
was apparently engaged in meditation, and I 
had a good opportunity to observe her care- 
fully, which, it is unnecessary' to remark, I 
improved. She was about twenty, and a 
pretty blonde. I resolved to speak to her. 

And here I wish plainly to deny any in- 
tention on my part to seek an acquaintance 
with the young lady merely because she was 
a young lady. Such is not my nature. In- 
deed, I am often rebuked by my friends for 
the way in which I shun all female society ; 
but 1 was a " stranger in a far land," and as 
she was the first person I had seen since 
landing it was perfectly right to seek infor- 
mation from her. Therefore I feel that all 
fair-minded persons will acquit me of any at- 
tempt at flirtation, which is a thing I abhor. 

Revolving these ideas, and strong in the 
knowledge of my righteous intentions, I vent- 
ured to approach her, and with profuse apol- 
ogies explained my purpose. She had been 
so lost in reverie that I had almost reached 
her before she became conscious, and the 
startled look that flashed through her blue 
eyes and colored her delicate face sent a pe- 
culiar thrill through my frame. Oh 1 I wasn't 



" struck," as the boys say ; not at all. I have 
a sister very much like her, and I have no 
doubt that the resemblance was what caused 
my peculiar sensations. 

I shall not relate our conversation as it 
would not be interesting to the " outer 
world," but will simply say that so much did 
she seem like my sister that I quite forgot 
my natural reserve and enjoyed myself veiy 
much. When I reflect on the number and 
variety of subjects on which we talked, the 
distance we walked, and the friendly terms on 
which we parted, I am forced to believe that 
my first impression was wrong in regard to 
the time, and that more than five minutes had 
elapsed before I stood alone on the shore, 
watching the retreating form of my fair en- 
tertainer. Slowly I came to myself and be- 
gan to arrange the information which I had 
received from her. Somehow I recollected 
little in regard to the locality, but I did re- 
member that she was stopping at the Cottage, 
that none of her folks were present, that she 
loved to stroll among the rocks and read 
Tennyson in the early twilight. As the sun 
worked over toward the west (and I sol- 
emnly assure you, dear reader, that it never 
worked more slowly since I first beheld the 
light of day) I somehow became conscious 
that I, too, was an admirer of Tennyson, and 
especially when served up by twilight ; and 
in this way it happened that as the sun 
dropped behind the cape I wandered away on 
the beach, armed with a large edition of the 
Laureate's poems. Thus we met again, and 
I soon found myself at her " favorite seat," 
a large rock hidden by projecting cliffs. As 
she turned the leaves of her book I saw her 
name written in neat, feminine hand, Jennie 
Glow, and I once more thought of my sister, 
and threw off all reserve. Yes, we passed a 
very pleasant evening; and so much did the 
scenery delight me that I insisted on keeping 
my office as ship keeper for the whole visit, 
which I urged should be continued for a 



130 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



week at least. To this my companions as- 
sented, and — 1 continued my study of Ten- 
n3'son. 

One evening I accompanied her to the 
Cottage. The night was most beautiful and 
the soft tones of the water among the rocks 
but made the quiet more intense. It may be 
that the full moon, which so transfigured the 
bay and distant city that they seemed parts of 
another world, drew me also within the circle 
of her mystic influence and led us both 
astray. I onl}' remember the most exquisite 
pleasure as we sat in the summer quiet and 
looked out on the shining sea. I heard my- 
self, in a strangely distant voice, talking of 
matches made in heaven, and Cupid's airy 
darts ; of the hopes which burned in my 
bosom and which, like the stars above us, 
should never be extinguished. And she 
bowed her head on my shoulder, and I was 
fast wandering into the realms of " true 
hearts broken " and " love's undying flame," 
when I heard a step on the piazza and 
a woman's voice called out: " Come quick, 
nurse, Charlie is very ill ! I've been hunt- 
ing for you an hour." 

The truth came upon me in all its harsh- 
ness. My beautiful heiress, my " fjady of the 
Lake," the fond object of all my dreams was 
a nurse in one of the boarder's famil}'. 

I cast a look of heartfelt horror on the 
beautiful object of my thoughts, which had 
fallen on the veranda in a swoon, and clam- 
bered over the railing. The silvery moon 
shown brightly on the cliffs as a wild being 
was, or could have been, seen traveling 
toward a certain yacht with most remarkable 
activity. The next day we weighed anchor, 
and none of our bo3"s ever knew of my ac- 
quaintance with Jennie Glow. 



THE ESCORT. 

Yes, Cluim, I'm liome again at last. 

I siezed upon my chance ; 
And saw the lovely Clara home 

From mazes of the dance. 

I thought the fellows envied me 
This charming " Fairy Fay" ; 

But, Chum, I've lately changed my mind, 
She lived three miles away ! 



Bowdoin, not disheartened by her ill luck of last 
year, will send another crew to the inter-collegiate 
regatta this year. Give Bowdoin a new boat in 
place of her ante-diluvian craft and Pennsylvania 
and Cornell will have to look out. — Ura. 




' Tis true 'tis pity, 
And pity 'tis 'tis true: 

That Wednesday afternoon rhetoricals are 
no longer a myth. 

That a six-oared shell-race hasn't been 
arranged. 

That the interest in Rugby has died out. 

That the older alumni can't be made to 
see the need of a gymnasium. 

That the caterwauling of the college or- 
chestra isn't heard in the land. 

That " Pow " and " Guava" have intrench- 
ed themselves in the college vocabulary. 

That Gilbert's dancing class is not better 
attended by the underclassmen, who may 
Hke to take in the germans this winter. 

That the Orient hasn't an exchange col- 
umn in which to return the many compli- 
ments received on its improved appearance. 



And now the society man, who hath been fond- 
lino- and caressing the gentle freshman, passelh him 
by with a cold stare, and knoweth him no more. — 
Era. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



131 



COMMUKICATIOK. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

Through the Orient, I would like to lay 
befoi'e the students, and especially before the 
freshmen, just at tiie commencement of its 
second year the claims which the Bowdoin 
Literary Association has upon them. 

The association was founded a year ago 
by the students, having in view the following 
objects: "To encourage extemporaneous 
speaking and practice in parliamentary law; 
to develop musical and literary talent; to 
bring the members of the different classes 
and societies into closer literary contact, and 
to promote a general feeling of good-fellow- 
ship among the students." The season for 
holding meetings was fixed within the limits 
of the first week of November and the second 
week of April ; and they were to be fort- 
nightly. 

The first j^ear of the association was very 
successful. The literary work of the mem- 
bers, though not developed as much as was 
hoped, was excellent; the musicals were 
highly successful; and a good course of lect- 
ures was secured. The finances were so 
well managed that there are now nearly 
twenty-five dollars in the treasury. 

But what is of great value beyond the 
work done, the past year has demonstrated 
that the association fills a long-needed want; 
that it can be made to develop a part of a 
student's education little touched upon) 
that it can be made to stimulate literary' 
ability and bring into close union those who 
wish to cultivate literature ; that it can give 
the students, every winter, a good course of 
lectures, and that it can be made, financially, 
successful. 

Against the association the same objec- 
tion is raised that is brought against many 
other projects: that there is too much going 
on here alread}'. But it will be noticed that 
this has been provided against, first by limit- 



ing the course to the most leisurely portion 
of the year, and second by holding meetings 
only ever}' other week. 

Another objection is tliat the class of 
literary work is not to one's liking. To this 
I reply that the association will be what its 
members make it ; and therefore that objec- 
tion will not hold. To be sure, the aim of 
the association is general ; but generalit}' is 
made up of specialties. And so, while one 
should take an interest in the whole work of 
the association, he can yet devote himself to 
his own specialty. 

The possibilities of the association are 
almost infinite. The debates, which are 
perhaps the dullest part of the meetings, 
might be enlivened and increased, both in 
excellence and interest, by occasional public 
prize debates. The literary ability of the 
college might be developed to a much greater 
extent than it now is, by systematic effort 
toward that end. The association might 
form a dramatic company, to present some 
of the Greek and Latin plays, for which, in 
Memorial Hall, we have exceptional facilities ; 
and in addition they would be important 
adjuncts to the study of those languages. 
Or, at all events, English plays could be 
successfully presented. These are but a few 
hints. 

It is to be hoped, then, that the student- 
body will apply themselves to this interest- 
ing and important part of their education 
and make the work of the association as 
successful as possible. A Member. 



At the recent annual meeting of the members of 
the Reading-Room Association, it was decided that 
it was for the interest of the association, in future, to 
k-eep the reading-room door locked, and allow only 
members to hold keys. — Bales Student. 



Colby. — The editors of the Oracle have been 
elected. A tennis tournament for the championship 
of the college in singles and doubles has been held. 



132 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




Simple Simon 

Met a pieman 

Going to the fair. 

— Mother Goose. 
After a little habituation it is notdifli- 
cult to sleep over the seven o'clock 
alarm ; but when the bell of the church 
just outside the campus "chimes in" the hubbub 
is disturbing. By the time one gets accustomed to 
this jangle, the new town bell will have been put 
in place, and then the change to comparative still- 
ness at seven o'clock will for a time produce its dis- 
turbing effect. 

Quite a large class, consisting of seniors and jim- 
iors, has been formed under Prof. Johnson for the 
study of Italian. The course is to continue through 
the year. Atjiresent thereis to be one recitation per 
week, but the number will probably be increased. 

The Sagadahoc Fair was unusually successful 
this year notwithstanding the cold weather and snow 
storm. As usual the students showed their interest 
in the progress of agriculture and horse trotting by 
attending in large numbers. Those who didn't go 
evidently " missed it." They missed seeing lots of 
cattle, hens, geese, turkeys, pumpkins, abnormal 
vegetables, tempting displays of apples, grapes, 
jellies, rugs, quilts, plows ; they missed being 
jammed and elbowed by the crowd ; they missed the 
funny incidents about the venders' carts, lifting ma- 
chines, striking machines, fortune wheels, and all 
the contrivances for squeezing money out of a good- 
natured and unsuspicious crowd ; they missed seeing 
the pretty girls ; they missed standing about with 
blue nose and chattering teeth, watching the races, 
which were really good ; they missed tlie bicycle 
race, in which a Bowdoin freshman showed the Port- 
land wheelmen how to ride a bicycle, though he was 
debarred from any share in the prize ; they missed 
"pea-nuts, five a quart," " gum drops, five a quar- 
ter," "pears, five a dozen"; yes, indeed, they 
" missed it." 

Hall and Stackjiole were chosen as delegates to a 
Y. M. C. A. Convention to be held at Biddeford, sup- 
posedly on Oct. 13th, 14th, loth, and 16th. Arrived 
at that place on the above date, they found, much to 



their siu-prise, no convention. There had been some 
mistake, and those who but a moment before had 
firmly believed themselves delegates, found they 
were not delegates at all, but simply wanderers in a 
strange land. They retreated in good order. Their 
friends were surprised at seeing them returned so 
quickly, and were admiring the executive ability of 
a convention that could transact its business so 
promptly, when, after some reluctance, the truth was 
told and the joke made manifest. 

At a meeting of the Directors of the Boating As- 
sociation and the captain of the crew, the college 
four was chosen as follows : Whittier, '85, (captain) 
stroke; Brown, '86, No. 3 ; Norris, '86, No. 2 ; Davis, 
'85, bow. Smith, '86, and Varney, '87, were elected 
substitutes. The old shell has been stiffened so that 
it can be used as a practice boat. It is expected that 
a new shell will be ordered of Ruddick shortly. The 
men are working well, and with the training they 
will get before the next inter-collegiate regatta will 
develop into a strong crew. 

Black, '87, has been stopping with friends in Au- 
gusta on account of ill-health. 

A canvass of the college for presidential prefer- 
ences resulted as follows : 'eighty-five, twenty-seven 
per cent, for Cleveland ; 'eighty-six, twenty per cent, 
for Cleveland; 'eighty-seven, thirty-two per cent, for 
Cleveland ; 'eighty-eight, twenty-six per cent, for 
Cleveland; college, twenty-six per cent, for Cleve- 
land. There are no Butler, St. John, or Lockwood 
men, and only two undecided. 

A sliort time ago Wentworth, '86, obtained from 
the Topsham quarry a fine specimen of feldspar 
crystal weighing about forty pounds. By the time 
he had extracted it, with a good deal of labor, from 
the rock in which it was imbedded, he was too late 
for the train, and was obliged to lug his heavy 
" find " all the way back, a distance of some five 
miles. 

Irrepressible Junior translating Greek, suddenly 
comes to a standstill — "That's as far as I learned, 
Professor ; I got to talking politics and forgot the 
lesson. Politics are more important than Greek 
now." Class applaud ; the Professor smiles curious- 
ly and calls up the next man. 

These warm days make one inclined to doubt the 
reality of the snow storm two weeks ago. It is grat- 
ifying to notice that under the influence of the beau- 
tiful weather tennis is having a decided run. Some 
attempts have been made to start a tournament, but 
thus far without much success. 

On clear evenings. Prof. Carmichael has the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



133 



seniors out star gazing. This is a more pleasant 
phase of astronomy than reciting from the text-book. 

At the college bookstore there is a fragment of 
the rock of Point Lepreaux, on which the " State of 
Maine " was wrecked last summer. The fragment 
was imbedded in the hull of the steamer. 

There are evidences, by no means obscure, of an 
annual boom in beards. This is proper. There is 
nothing like a good thick covering for the face dur- 
ing the cold weather. We remember how astonished 
we were on returning from a few weeks' absence two 
winters ago, at seeing almost every other student 
face hidden under a hairy mask. Let us see the 
same thing this winter. But, for appearance's sake, 
O that these manly adornments, like the mushroom, 
might spring into full development in a single night. 

Prof. Smith is a member of the class in Italian. 
It is to be hoped that the Prof, will not be found 
guilty of that practice which is known as " chinning 
for rank." 

At the opening of the evening mail the post-office 
is in the hands of the students, of whom as many as 
possible crowd onto the seats, while the remainder 
support the walls. The superior advantages of the 
new olfice over the old are fully appreciated by the 
students. 

Now is the season of the falling leaf, 

Of frosty morn, of fields all sear and brown, 

When O, — alack! some freshman comes to grief 
Througli water from o'erhanging window thrown. 

Now is the season when the attic floor, 

Well seasoned through the sultry summer drought, 
Doth strangely vanish to be seen no more, 

Save in the smoke the chimney tops about. 

Now is the season of the broken shin, 
Of toes tender trod on and knuckles peeled, 

In madly striving who the game shall win 
That's played upon the merry foot-ball field. 

We noticed at the Topsham Fair, last Friday 
week, Barton, '84, and Gould, ex-'85, the latter con- 
spicuous under a Blaine white tall hat. 

Prof. Lee's anatomy division have completed their 
researches on the cat and frog, and are tackling the 
" Midiculus Mus" or common mouse; tickling his 
ear and pulling his tail to see what they are made 
of It is probably safe to say that the anatomy di- 
vision will have performed the work of one mouse 
trap in good running order, in the same amount of 
time, and under ordinary conditions. 

It is provoking when one sits down to eat a good 
square meal, to have two fellows at the other end of 
the table begin a red-hot discussion of the political 



situation, each of them having implicit confidence in 
the tenableness of his ground of argument, neither 
of them open to conviction. The rush of controversy 
not only will distract you, if you are a politician, 
from the business at hand, but may even draw you 
into its vortex, and there you are. 

We notice from the Dartmouth that among the 
Bowdoin ex-'86 men, Webb has been elected Presi- 
dent of the Athletic Association; Goodenow, Presi- 
dent of the Bicycle Club; Leigh, President of the 
Cleveland and Hendricks Club; and Goddard and 
Allen members of a senior library committee. 

The value of the Okient as an advertising me- 
dium is getting to be appreciated. A certain firm in 
New York offered on receipt of a copy of our paper 
with their " ad" inserted, to send us a pair of their 
patent, self-acting, etc., corsets. It is needless to say 
our business editor didn't care to give himself away 
by accepting the offer. The firm is respectfully re- 
ferred to Colby or Bates. 

With conscious bearing on the street, 
With languid gait or mincing feet, 
A backward glance, a drooping eye, 

A studied shyness, 

A smiling slyness, 
A fascination no one can deny. 

But Where's her heart, you'd like to know ? 
I think she lost it long ago; 
Scattering it in many places, — 

Part to one mister 

When he kissed her; 
The rest was won by other faces. 

Or else she's kept it to herself, 
Has laid it by " upon the shelf," 
And forgotten all about it, 

Don't you believe me ? 

You'd underceive me ? 
Try her affections if you doubt it. 

Under the direction of Prof. Johnson, the walls 
of the Art Gallery are being tinted and the paintings 
rearranged. 

Taylor, '86, has just returned from canvassing on 
Long Island, where he spent the summer. He 
reports a pleasant and successful tramp. Work on 
the Bugle will now begin in earnest. 

Several good specimens of magnetite, allanite 
and feldspar crystals have been found lately at the 
quarry on Sprague's Hill, Topsham, which is at 
present being worked. There is hardly a more 
pleasant way of combining healthful exercise with 
study of a most profitable kind, than to start ofi" with 
hammer and chisel for a trip to some of the quarries 
and rock-heaps in the neighborhood of Brunswick. 



134 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The college four went to Portlaucl, Monday, to 
pull the winners in the Dirigo Regatta ; but much to 
their regret were obliged to return without having 
had a chance to show their muscle. The race was 
to have been called at 3.30, but on account of the 
rough water was postponed so late that after the 
Portland crews had rowed, it was too dark for further 
racing. Arrangements were made to pull the win- 
ning crew next Saturday at 10 a.m., in Portland. 
The winning crew was not the one that pulled in 
Brunswick lAst spring. Saturday is a convenient day 
for a race and it is hoped that all who can, will 
make it a point to encoui'age our men by their 
presence. 

The Public Library Concert on Monday evening, 
was an entertainment of a high order of merit. 
The Lotus Glee Club by itself would have furnished 
an excellent concert ; but with Camilla Urso as the 
star, tbe musical treat was delightfully flavored. 
Some of Madame's mellow, flute-like tones were en- 
trancing and her light touches exquisite products of 
finished art. The voices of the quartette blended 
finely. As soloists Messrs. Brigham and Lewis 
excelled. Among the audience, which was select 
and of fair size, were noticed quite a number of stu- 
dents, but not so many as such an entei'tainment 
should call forth. 

Rumors, as also voices, in the air lead us to be- 
lieve that Wednesday afternoon rhetoricals are about 
to be resumed. 




'37. — John Rutledge 
Shepley died at St. Louis, 
I Oct. 11th, after a lingering illness. He 
was born at Saco, June 17, 1817, son of 
Hon. Ether Shepley, formerly chief justice 
'^ of Maine. He studied law and had devoted 
himself to his profession in St. Louis, where he had 
become one of the leading lawyers in the State. 
He declined offers of a seat on the bencli of the Su- 
pi-eme Court of Missouri and on that of the U. S. 
Circuit Court, as also of political positions. In 1868 
he received the degree of LL.D. from the college. 
'34.— William Stinson Sewall died Sept. 27th, 
at St. Albans, Maine. He was born in Sangerville 
in 1807. After graduating, he entered the Bangor 



Theological Seminary whence he graduated in 1838. 
He then began his labors in Clinton and Fairfield as 
a missionary. He was then pastor of a church at 
Brownville for twenty-three years. Since then he 
has been "stated supply" in St. Albans, his labors 
continuing till his death. He has also supplied pul- 
pits in some of the neighboring towns. He leaves 
a wife and four children, three sons and a daughter. 

'37. — At the recent meeting of the American 
Board of Commissioners of Foreign Missions in 
Columbus, Ohio, the resignation of Rev. J. O. Fiske 
of Bath was reported. 

'4.5. — Dr. J. K. Mason, of Fryeburg, has just re- 
ceived appointment from the Governor to represent 
Maine at the National Conference of Charities and 
Correction, to meet in St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 13 to 20. 

'59. — H. O. Ladd, President of University of 
New Mexico at Sante F6, has prepared and is deliver- 
ing a series of four lectures on Mexico, old and new. 
They are founded on personal observation and are 
warmly commended. 

'61. — Prof. A. S. Packard, of Brown University, 
has recently been elected honorary member of the 
London Entomological Society, this organization ad- 
mitting only ten honorary members. He has also 
been elected corresponding member of the Imperial 
Leopold-Cleopatra Academy of Sciences at Halle, 
the oldest scientific society in Germany. 

'69. — David H. Knowlton, agricultural editor of 
the Farmington Chronicle, has been invited to give 
an address before the State Board ot Agriculture at 
a session sooti to be held at Houlton. 

'70. — Leroy Z. Collins has recently established a 
private school of high grade, preparatory to college, 
at No. 23 Temple Place, Boston. 

'73. —A. F. Richardson has been in the eastern 
part of the State on Masonic business. 

74;. — Samuel V. Cole contributes a poem, entitled 
"The Song of Silenus," to the November Atlantic. 

'74. — Henry G. White has accepted an appoint- 
ment as Instructor in Elocution and Military Tactics 
at Greylock Institute, South Williamstown, Mass. 

'75. — George C. Cressey graduated at the An- 
dover Theological Seminary last summer, and has 
since decided to enter the ministry of the Unitarian 
church. 

'81. — Three of the members of the class have 
graduated the past year from the Law Department 
of the Boston University, and hung out their shingles 
at the "Hub." They are O. M. Shaw, W. W. 
Towle and E. O. Achorn. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



135 



'83. — Mr. E. F. Holden, principal of the West 
State Grammar School in Bangor, has been elected 
teacher of Natural Sciences in the Porthind High 
School. 

'83. — Winter is teaching in Kewaunee, Wisconsin. 
He says the place to live is not the West. 

'84.— Means is now at tlie Theological Seminary 
at Hartford. His address is " Hosmer Hall." 

F. C. Heath of the Medical School, class of '84, 
has been appointed assistant surgeon at the United 
States Marine Hospital, Deering. 

The following graduates will lecture before the 
law students' club of Portland: C. F. Libby, '64; 
W. L. Putnam, '65; J. W. Symonds, '60; Nathan 
Cleaves, '60; Clarence Hale, '69; A. F. Moulton, 
'73; A. W. Bradbury, '60. 
The Faculty : 

Prof. Lee has lately presented the library with a 
copy of that excellent work, "The Royal Path of 
Life." 

Prof. Smith takes Italian with the rest of the boys. 

Profs. Lee, Smith, Chapman and Robinson were 
present at the meeting of the Maine Pedagogues, 
held in Portland the first of the month. 




The introduction of se 
ciet societies is being agi 
\ted at Bates 

The Vassal guls do not swear. They 
only say " buy gum." — Ex. 

The last mortar-boards are beginning to droop 
their edges, and they will soon be seen no more at 
Columbia. — Spectator. 

Why is it th^t wh''n'"°r I m'=°t, — 
Wh^n^'^r I p'ss vp°n y" ftr=<^t, — 
On° (i'lnti^ m'id'n th't I kn°w 
My little'^ wits d'f rt m= f ? 
Is it y= dimpP in h=r ch'^k, 



Th"t h°lds 111° f I c^nn-t fp'^^k? 
Is it h'r ribb°u, or h°r pin 
Th"t prickPs f° my h™rt within? 

Is it "n" °r ''11 °f th^f^ 
Th"t f° my 'wild'r'd br''in d°th t"f=? 
WhH c''n I fy— whH c^n I do? — 
O d™r, I c''nn''t tell — c'n y^v? 

— Bates Student. 
At Princeton the game of base-ball between the 
freshmen and sophomores, resulted in a victory for 
the freshmen, for the first time in eleven years. 

The bronze statue of John Harvard, the gift of 
Mr. S. J. Bridge to Harvard College, was unveiled 
October 15th. The address was delivered by Dr. 
Ellis. The statue stands in the enclosure to the 
west of Memorial Hall, and faces westward. 

Yale has changed her requirements for admission 
by demanding one book less of Caesar, the Anabasis 
and the Iliad, and tv/o orations less of Cicero. The 
time thus gained must be spent on French and 
German. 

Dr. McCosh, of Princeton, under whose few years' 
administration more than a million dollars have been 
added to the strength of the college of New Jersey, 
says he has never directly asked any man for a dol- 
lar. — Amherst Student. 

OF 

fMM AM© FANCY flMIffit^ 

neatly executed at the 

B^aN^wicK HEr(^iiD ©ffice. 

A.KE VERY POPUEATl. 



Boots asd SioeSj 

Mexl l0 Americari Express Sffice, 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more lor Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 
direct importation, which is made especially for us, water 
marked with the name of the brand — 



Richmond Straight Cut No, 1 



oil each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

A LLEN <e GIN TElt Maniifactnrers , 

RICHMOND, VA. 



New system. Learned in less than one-quarter the time 
required by any other. Old reporters throw away old sys- 
tems and learn this for speed and legibility. It can be 
successfully 

TAUGHT BY MAIL. 
The corresponding style can be learned in a few hours, 
and the full verbatim reporting style in a few months. It 
is a marvel of simplicity. 

STUDENTS 

can easily acquire enough to enable them to take notes of 

LECTURES. 

Send for circular. Terms: Corresponding style, five 

lessons, $5. Corresponding and reporting, twenty lessons, 

R. B. OAPEN, Augusta, Me. 



E 



BI/IQ STEEL 
l\ d FENS. 



Leading Numbers ; 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Sta'/ioners. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEN CO., 

Works, Camdea, N. J. 26 John St., New York 



SMOKE THE BEST. 

We beg to inform the public and smokers generally, that we 
have secured a large stock of the very choicest grades of thor- 
oughly cured 

GOLDEN VIRGINIA, PERIQUE and TURKISH 

tobaccos, which we are using in the manufacture of our Cele- 
brated brands of cigarette and smoking tobaccos. And 
have added to our stock a large shipment of the finest imported 
FrenchHice Paper. Such stock, made up by the highest class of 
skillful labor, we feel confident cannot fail to satisfy the tastes of 
all good judges. 

STANDARD BRANDS. 



JUST OUT— SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL. 
Manufactured by Special Request, 

JiCinney Tobacco Co., 

Successors to Kinney Bros., New York. 



m. wmM'ajt, M, 



DEALER IN 



No. 2 Odd Fellows' Block, 

MAIiY STREET. . . ■ 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 7th,lS84, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alpheus S. Packakd, Acting President; 
Alfred MrrCHELL, M.D., Secretary; Israel T. Dana, M.D., 
Pathology and Practice ; Alfred SIitchell, Jl.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Goddard, 
A.m., ^Medical Jiu-isprudence; Frederic H. Gereisii, M.D., 
Anatomy; Hekry Carmiciiael, Ph.D., Chemistry; Burt G. 
Wilder, M.D., Physiology ; Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery 
and Clinical Surgerv; Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics ; Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonsh-ator of 
Anatomy; Everett T. Nealev, M.D., Demonstrator of His- 
tology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



FRANK M. STETSON, 







BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Diamonds, 

Jewelry, 

Silver Ware, 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 

Prejiare Oriffintil Designs for Society 
Badges, Rings, Prizes, and Class Cups, 
which will be forivurded to students on 
request. 

A SPECrALTV is made of English 
Pewter Beer Mugs, in two sizes, ivith Glass 
Bottoms. 

Society, Booh, and Visiting Card Plates 
engraved in proper style. 

Invitations and Programmes in novel 
forms at short notice. 

Shreve, Cramp & Low, 

BOSTOlsT. 



Bronzes, 



Porcelains, 



BYRON STEVENS, 



Fancy Goods. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



EARS for the MILLION 

Foo Choo's Balsam of Shark's Oil 

Positively Restores tlie Hearing, and is the Only- 
Absolute Cure for Deafness Known. 

This Oil is abstracicd from iieculiar species of small White 
Shakk, caught in the yellow Sea, knowu as Carcharodon Eoiid- 
eletii. Every Chiuese fisherman knows it. Its virtues as a re- 
storative of hearing were di.scovered hy a Buddhist Priest about 
the year 1410. Its cures were so numerous and mcmy so seem- 
ingly miraciilmis, that the remedy was officially proclaimed over 
the entire Empire. Its use became so universal that for over 300 
years no deafness lias existed amonc/ the Chinese people. Sent, 
charges prepaid, to any address at §1.00 per bottle. 

HlAl WHAT THE QEiiF SJk¥ 

It has performed a miracle in my case. 

I have no -unearthly noises in my head and hear much better. 

I have been greatly benefited. 

My deafness helped a g-reat deal— think another bottle -will 
cure me. 

My hearing is much benefited. 

I have received untold benefit. 

My bearing is improving. 

It is giving good satisfaction. 

Have been greatly benefited, and am rejoiced that 1 saw the 
notice of it. 

*' Its virtues are unquestionable and its curative character ab- 
solute, as the writer can personally testify, both from experience 
and observation. Write at once to Haylock & .lenney, 7 Dey 
Street, New York, enclosing $1.00, and you will receive by return 
a remedy that will enable you to hear like anybody else, and 
-whose curative efifects will be permanent. You will never regret 
doing so." — Editor of Mercantile Review. 

«®-To avoid loss in the Mails, please send money by Regis- 
tered Letter. 

Only Imported by HAYtiOCK & JENNEY, 
Sole Agents for America. 7 Dey St., N. Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



J^. O. REED 



!•*• 



mi 



iSSl 



brxj^sts'v^ick:, :]vce. 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 



Interior Views IVIade to Order. 



A Good Assortment of Bruns-nrick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 



C.A.IjIj .Ji.2<J^i EISC^f^Ii.CIM'E Ji/LS' TT^OXa^- 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval f inie, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the Cit}'. 



DISPENSER OF 

Pill Bfiggj Msdleiies, ^ Oiiemieals, 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
»IAIN STRKET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Go to 1A7. B. Woodard's 

To buy vour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save tuoney by so doing. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

Is now prepared to fm-nish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



MAIN STEEET, BR0NS"WICK, ME. 



Wp. ^. PIEIiD, 



M^N^6E1^. 



TONTINE HOTEIm^ 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Speci.ll attention will be given to Class and Reunion Dinners 
and Suppers to order. First-class laundry connected with the 
house. 

S. B. BREWSTER, Proprietor. 

mmmM%, f ime watcies, 

239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. MERKILL. A. KEITH. 



^©^a-sa, 



DEALER IN 



m 



Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 "WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 



#1 Uf^ ®^lii5«flCT0»^ 



2 ii^«r:]^ llotfet 



m- 



^: 



mt^^wmom^, ^^ 



DEALER IN 



CEDAR STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
I^° Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BEIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PICTURE lEAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

Also Pictiires, Caljinet Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, 

etc. Also agent tor the celebrated Household Sewing; 

I\[acliine.s, 

In the Everett Store, Main Street, Opposite the Mall, 

BKUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



NATIONAL SCHOOL SUPPLY BUREAU. 

* Beloit, Wis., July 31, 1883. 

National School Supply Bureau: 

Last April, being then in chavse of a large public school, but 
desiring a position in some good academy or college, I placed 
my name with your Bureau." During the lirst part of the present 
month I received notice from you of a vacancy in such a place as 
I desired. 

Putting myself in communication with the party concerned I 
received tlie appointment. I am well satisfied with the manage- 
ment of the Bureau, and feel sure that it fills a useful and nec- 
essary place in our school economy. You are at liberty to use 
my name if you wish. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD O. FISKE. 
Headmaster Markam Academy, Milwaukee, Wis. 

For application-form and circular, address, 

Nittlonal School Supptf/ Depot, Ckwar/o, III. 
N. B.— "We want all kinds of Teachers lor Schools 
and Families. Good Pay to Agents and Private Cor- 
respondents. 



S5 ffit?. 

DEALER IN 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

■Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also Insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 

STUDENTS 

Of all classes will find it valuable to consult on all subjects the 



183 SOUTH CLARK STREET, CHICAGO, IIjL. 

A union 



CHOICE GROCnES, cTnNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main, and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B.— Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

All the Students Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 



Ii-ask 1.. Milts' Mmi I Slise Stsroj 



Cor. Main and Mason Sts., opp. To'vvn Clock. 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges. 

SUOII AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



WHY I AM A REPUBLICAN 

A graphic and reliable presentation of Republican princi- 
ples, and reasons for continuing the party in power, also 
line portraits and authentic lives of 

I3L. VIIVE ArVD LOGATV 

by Gov. GEO. S. BOUTWELL, of Mass. THE BOOK 
of the party, endorsed by leading Republicans. Price in 
reach of every voter. A rare opportunity for a wide-awake 
student to engage in the campaign with profit. 

WM. J. BETTS & CO., Hartford, Conn. 



/K QLup RoAD f^ACE 







tee iiiiii@iii @i.« 

(Established 1S77.) 

10 BERKELY ST., BOSTON, MASS., 

lero '^uMlsft to© iUustFalei iat'ffllojgjuis, 

ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 

OTHER TO TEICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-oent 

stamp at above address. 



^ T ^ T^ L & BURT, 

509 Tremont St, and 4 Warren Ave., Odd Fellows' Hall, Boston, Mass. 
SPECIAL IMPROVED 

Afflerican STAR Bicycle 

Although comiiaratively a new machine on the mar- 
ket, the Star has made a splendid record, 
having won the 

Twenty-Five Mile Championship of 

the United States, 

Breaking the record, in 83 minntes 10 seconds. 

It has a mile record of 2 mln. 50 1-S sec; 
5 miles, 15 min. 26 3-4 sec; mile without 
hands, 3 min. 11 sec. It has won the most im- 
portant HUl Climbing Contests, including 
Corey Hill, Boston, Eagle HUl, Orange, N. J., 
and Standpipe Hill, Washington, D. C. This 
is a mere mention of the triumphs of the Star. 

The principles embodied in the Star give the perfect combination for safety, speed, and comfort with economy of 
maintenance and durability found in no other macliine. 

- IN ADDITION WE HAVE THE 

VICTOR TRICYCLE, The lost Faious Tliree-Wheelef Maie \i Tlie WorU. 

A Full Line of the Best ENGLISH MACHINES 

Go to complete the list and suit all tastes. 
The IDEAL, a cheaper machine for use of boys and youths, is a splendid machine for purpose Intended and is 
highly recommended. 

SECOND-HAND 3IACHINES of all kinds, SUPPLIES and SUNDRIES constantly on hand. 
REPAIRING of most difficult kinds performed at reasonable rates. All machines and parts must be plainly 
marked and be accompanied b.y instructions by next mail. 

SEND TWO-CENT STAMP FOR CATALOGUE. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE AD.JUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMjVNDS. 

Try the new " Harvard " and " Duplex " Burner 

IN PLACE or THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

EITOEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



The only radical internal remedy. Never known to 
fail in a single case, acute or chronic. It expels the poison- 
ous Uric Acid from the blood, which is the prime cause 
of Rheumatism, Gout, and Neuralgia. — As a blood puri- 

thie~oId reliable specific 

endorsed by physicians and 

thousands of patients. 

tier it has no equal. Acting on common-sense principles 
it eradicates from the blood all poisonous matter which 
causes disease. — It has been in use for many years and 
cured a larger percentage of cases than any other 

"" POSITIVELY CURES 



All the Late PuWications in stock. Text-Books or all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 



474 Cong^^ess St., 



opp. Preble House. 



remedy. Send for testimonials from the cured. — Salioy- 
lica strikes directly at the cause of these diseases, while 
so many so-called speci- 

RHEUMATISM 

ties only treat locally the effect. When you have tried 
in vain all the "oils," "ointments," "liniments," and 
"pain cures," and when your 

GOUT, NEURALGIA, 

doctors cannot help you, do not despair but take Salicy- 
lica at once and be cured. — No one can afford to live in 
pain and misery when 

GRAVEL, DIABETES, 

Salicylica will relieve him and put him in condition to 
attend to his daily avocations. 

$1 per box, 6 boxes for $5, 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE BLOOD POISONING 



]\[e. 5 0DD EEIiIiGW^' BII0OK, 



Is the place to buy 



Telephone E.xcliange connected Avith the store. 

1. m. f ©Wliillr fifO'pj'ff. 



with full directions in ten languages. Sold by druggists 
everywhere, or sent by mail, prepaid, on receipt of price. 

"WASHBURNE & CO., Prop's, 

287 Broadway, New York. 

Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

0(1(1 Fellows' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. W. BEO^¥NE, Proprietok. 
Formerlv at Tontine Hotel. 



THE FAVORITE NOS. 303 404-332-I7O-S5I- WITH 
OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 





BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. lERRYMAN, PHARMACIST,-:- 

Fancy M Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Toiiacco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

Jgi" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

OvEii Post-Offxce, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MtrSIC PUBLISHEK, 

And Dealer io Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 liXcliaiige Street, Portland. 



The New Styles in 

S'TX^F^F and. SOIPT H^^TS 

In all colors, are now ready. An elosant line of New Yorl; 
Neckwear in New Sliape.-^ ami Colors just receiver!. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

1 ELLIOTT'S, t 

OPP. TOWN CLOCK. 



©yskff ffltti See ^m(tm EmpmMmt 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

JpyFamilies, Parties, and Club.s supplied. 



TAPE VVORM. 

In one of the tropical proviuces of Germany there has been 
found a root, the extract from which has proved an absolute 
SPECIFIC for Tape Woi'm. It is pleasant to take and is not de- 
bilitatini^ or disa^TCeable in its efl'ects on the patient, but is 
peculiarly sickening and stupefying to the Tape Worm, which 
loosens its hold of its Tictini and passes away in a natural and 
easy manner, entirely whole, with head, and while still alive. 
One physician has used this remedy in over 400 cases, without a 
single failure to pass worm whole, with head. Absolute removal 
with head guaranteed. No pay required until so removed. Send 
stamp for circular and terms. ' 

HEYW00D_&^C0^,I9 Pari^Haoe, N. Y. City. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTOIM, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and Dnr.able Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



WHBN- TOZT -WANT A. RIDE 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE. 

On Cleaveland Street , laJiere you wiUfind turnouts to suit ike most 
fastidious. ^^ Hates reasonable. 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Paj)ers ; Circtdating- Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Ordex- at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terjis, $1.50 a Year iu Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

«^Special Kates to Student Clubs...ffi8 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are e.xamined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, Georgics and first sis Books 
of the ^Eneid, including Prosody. 
(Instead of the Georgics, Csesar's Gallic War, 
Books I. -IV., may be offered.) 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomoi-e, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wisli to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Clas.s after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Eegdlak Examinations foe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Coinnieiico- 
ment (July ]1 and 12, 1884), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Tei-m 
(Sept. 26 and 27, 1884). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examinations is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Washington Academy, East 
Machias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these 
schools having been made special Fitting Schools 
for the college by the action of their several Boards 
of Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 
have been fitted at any school having an approved 



preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by liis pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 
Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topnrsue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow bis 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited appro.ximately in the 
following table : 

EEQUIEED— FO0R hours A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek; six terms. 

Mathematics, six terras. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ele(;tives — FO0E hours a week. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one terni. 

English Literature, two terras. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75, 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol.. XIV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOV. 12, 1884. 



No. 10. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED FORTNIGHTLY BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
John A. Peters, '85, Managing Editor. 
N. B. Ford, '85, Business Editor. 
Boyd Baktlett, '85. W. P. Nealley, '85. 

O. R. Cook, '85. A. A. Knowlton, '86. 

J. F. LiBBY, '85. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

"W. v. "Wentworth, '86. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00. 

Single Copies 15 cents. 

Students and alumni are invited to contribute matter for any 
of the departments. Contributions must be accompanied by 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post -Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 

Vol. XIV., Nn. 10. -Nov. 12, 1884. 

Sonnet 137 

Editorial Notes - 137 

Sounds from a Country Election 139 

A Sketch 1 40 

A November Day 142 

A Terrible Tragedy 142 

Sorrow 143 

Antilogta 1-30 

Serenade 144 

CoLLEGii Tabula 144 

Personal 1 46 

Clippings 147 



SONNET.— PARADISE SPRING. 
O fountain clear, 'raid grove of fragrant pines, 
Whose waters gush from side of mossy bank 
And wander down the slope to meadow rank. 
Near where the mirrored Androscoggin shines. 
When PhcEbus' car at close of day declines; 
As here I stand upon thy foot-worn brink. 
And of thy limpid, sparkling freshness drink 
A draught more sweet more rare than choicest wines. 
Thou Fons Castalia of the Bowdoin muse — 
Haunt of her minstrels, sacred to her lyre — 
Me may thy guardian genius deign to choose 
One of the favored, whom thy gifts inspire 
To join pure thoughts to words without abuse. 
And kindle in the heart a noble fire. 




■3- graceliilly ac- 
ceded to the expressed wish of the student.*, 
and on Tuesday, election day, granted an 
omission of the regular college exercises. 
For the liberal course pursued by them the 
facult}' certainly deserve the thanks of the 
students. 



As the next number of the Orient is not 
due till the evening of the 26th, when many 
of the students will have already started for 
home to spend the Thanksgiving recess, we 
have decided to postpone the publication of 
that number till one week from that date, 
Dec. 3d. 



As the end of the term approaches, the 
time draws near which usually marks the 
appearance of our much-feared contempo- 
rary, The Bugle. Either before or just after 
the Christmas vacation has heretofore been 
the regular time of publication, though last 
year, owing to unfortunate delays. The Bugle 
did not appear till spring. It makes no great 
difference whether a college annual comes 
out in the fall or spring. — indeed, the greater 
number of annuals are spring publications, 
but it is important that a time should be set 
for publication, making due allowance for 
accidental delays, and the magazine produced 



138 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



not later than that date. The experience of 
last year will probably be a warning to the 
present Bugle board to have their production 
out on time. 



Since the last issue of the Orient the 
college crew, as organized this fall, has made 
its maiden effort in a race in Portland, with a 
crew from that city. As Bowdoin had never 
met this crew before, the skill of our compet- 
itors was entirel}' a matter of conjecture, and 
the race excited interest only so far as it 
afforded the friends of Bowdoin an opportu- 
nity to form a judgment of the men who will 
represent the college in the next intercolle- 
giate regatta. Our men were beaten — fairl}', 
but they pulled a plucky race, in remarkably 
good form, and greatly encouraged the faith- 
ful few who accompanied them on their trip. 
If good, conscientious work is done from 
now till next July there is no doubt that w(^ 
shall be represented by a crew fully as 
strong as that of last year, and this, as every 
one knows, is saying a good deal. 



The Colby Echo seems to be fascinated 
with the idea of an intercollegiate oratorical 
contest in this state, and wants to know 
whether the Orient has changed its opinion 
on that subject. To be frank, we haven't. 
We hope we are open to conviction, but as 
yet have failed to see any sufficiently good 
reasons for the inauguration of an oi'a- 
torical contest in Maine. These peculiar 
contests, which seem to largely take the 
place of athletics among the Western col- 
leges, are necessarily so doubtful in tlieir 
results that, in cases where tiie contestants 
are evenly matched, it is purely a matter of 
taste or prejudice as to whom the prize shall 
be awarded ; and in such cases one side is 
sure to be dissatisfied. We think it would 
be better policy for the Maine colleges to 
cultivate orator}" at home and to confine their 



contests to such as are not often doubtful in 
their results. 



In the course of study as revised for 
this year there is no provision for in- 
struction in parliamentary law. To be 
sure, the present course of study does not 
differ in this respect from preceding ones; 
but it would seem as if a knowledge of the 
rules of procedure of parliamentary bodies 
were of sufEcient importance, at the present 
da}', to insure the study of these rules a 
place in the modern curriculum. As the 
study of parliamentary law seems to come 
naturally under the head of no particular de- 
partment, whatever instruction former classes 
have had in this branch has been through 
the courtesy of one of the instructors. 
'Eighty-two and 'eighty-three had some 
practice under the supervision of Mr. Fisher. 
'Eighty-four is presumably ignorant that 
there ever was such a man as Roberts. We 
do not know whether it is tiie intention of 
the authorities to give the present seniors 
an opportunity for learning something of 
this necessary part of a liberal education : 
certainly they would feel sorry to leave col- 
lege without a more intimate knowledge of 
the Rules of Order than is afforded them 
in their class or society meetings. 



The Poole's Index which has been placed 
in the library is a model of convenience in 
its way, and really indispensable to one look- 
ing up any subject on which to write or 
speak ; but its usefulness would be greatly 
increased if it were possible to have access 
to a greater number of the periodicals men- 
tioned in its pages. It is extremely provok- 
ing, on finding one's subject treated appar- 
ently in exactly the right way, to discover 
that the magazine referred to is not in the 
possession of the college. It is to be hoped 
that the librarian will devote a good portion of 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



139 



the fundfe at his disposal to the purchase of 
complete files of the different periodicals. 
But without any outlay of money it is pos- 
sible to greatly increase the facilities for 
consulting the periodicals now in the library. 
At present they are scattered to the four 
winds of heaven. A few volumes of one 
review will be found, after a protracted 
search, tucked away in some obscure corner, 
and the remainder seemingly as far removed 
from that place as possible. Certainly the 
volumes of one review can be shelved to- 
gether, and it would be a great convenience 
if the whole number of periodicals could be 
placed by themselves in one part of the 
library. 

In the last year or two this college, in its 
policy and methods, has made great progress, 
and now counts itself among the first in ad- 
vanced and liberal ideas. One by one the 
old customs — kept alive simply because they 
are old, and are customs — are passing away. 
No custom should be tolerated which, on 
being challenged, cannot show a reason for 
existence. One custom that we should like 
to see " go " now is that of printing the tri- 
ennial catalogue in so-called Latin. Whatever 
was the origin of this barbarous custom — 
whether it was intended to give the old 
farmers, whose turkeys were annually butch- 
ered to make a college holiday, the impres- 
sion that a college man was something 
superior to the common run of mortals, 
for whom Anglo-Saxon was not good enough; 
or whether it was thought to be a good way 
to help the graduate keep up his Latin, 
makes no difference now : the custom is an- 
tiquated and has no good reason for exist- 
ence. It seems a little odd that a catalogue, 
which is generall}' supposed to give informa- 
tion to any one that asks, should be so ma- 
nipulated as to give information to college 
men only, and even to them in an exceedingly 
cumbersome way. How many men who have 



never studied Latin, or how many of those 
who have, are able to get any information 
from the long list of abbreviations that fol- 
low Mr. Longfellow's name, for instance, 
in the present catalogue? Looking further 
along, out of the domain of letters, what 
short of a surgical operation will enable a 
man to understand, " In Har. Cur. Corp. 
Adjut. et gymnasiarch ?" But still if the 
compilers would be consistent in their Latin 
the result would not be quite so exasperating. 
Seth, Noah and Oscar are metamorphosed 
into Sethus, Noachus and Oscarus, while 
David, Enoch and Edgar remain unchanged. 
The question of printing the triennial in 
English has been agitated in some of the 
other colleges, and in all probability a change 
will soon be inaugurated. If we are the first 
to leave the old rut. so much the better. 



SOUNDS FROM A COUNTRY ELEC- 
TION. 

" How d'ye do neighbor ! How goes it ? " — 

" Bill Smith's a liar an' he knows it ! " 

"0, Betsy? She's smart's a cricliet." — 

" 'Ere's yer straight Dimicratic ticliet ! " — 

"Bet ye two ter one Ohio goes " — 

"Give us a chew " — " Dug yer early Rose ?" — 

"The Herald says Blaine's a coward 

An' run" — "Hullo there, Sam Howard!" 
" Goin' to clear that back field o' stumps ? " — 
" Who cares for Schurz an' them mugwumps ! " 
" See Tom Hill ! — Acts kinder funny ; 

Humph ! plain 'nough — Republican money." — 
" Guess't '11 rain." — " How's 3'er pertaters ? " — 
"Now 'bout them Mulligan letters" — 
"There's them preachers, James Freeman Clark 

An' Beeoher" — "Order gen'lemen!" — "Hark!" 
"I hereby now declare the polls" — 
" More money'n politics than 'n savin' souls." 
"Votes here !" — " What's the news'n your section ?" — 
" Come on ! " — " Mighty quiet 'lection." 



There was recently held at Princeton a grand 
missionary meeting, which aroused a great deal of 
interest among the students, as well as outsiders- 
Fifteen men offered themselves as workers in foreign 
missionary fields. 



140 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A SKETCH. 

At no place on our rugged New England 
coast is one more struck with the grandeur 
of the scenery than on the southern and east- 
ern coast of Mt. Desert. If Italy can give 
fairer skies, and Switzerland grander views 
of valley and peak, no place can afford finer 
combinations of sea and mountain scenery 
than this bit of the coast of Maine. The tree- 
clad foot-hills fall abruptly to the sea and, 
far up the mountain ravines where the brooks 
tumble noisily over the moss-grown rocks, 
thunders the voice of Neptune as he assaults 
those mighty ramparts of nature beside 
which the fabled walls of Laomedon were as 
a child's miniature mounds of sand. 

Years ago, when the solitarj' eagle circled 
about the cliffs where now the palatial sum- 
mer cottage stands, and the gray gull and 
sea-mew woke the echoes that now bring 
back with a hundred repetitions the laughter 
of the pleasure party or the tourist's halloo, 
at the close of a dreary autumn day, on a 
little grass-plot by a cove that makes up not 
far from the now celebrated Spouting Horn, 
stood two persons watching a ship whose 
white sails showing dimly against the heavy 
clouds that hung above the horizon seemed 
to indicate that she was making for the 
harbor on the eastern side of the island. 
The brassy glare was dying out of the west, 
and the rising wind with sudden gusts shook 
the dark spruces that covered the steep 
shores. The watchers were a young man, 
perhaps twenty-five years old, stoutly built, 
and browned by exposure, and a woman 
whose face, though pale and somewhat sad, 
proclaimed her to be his mother. 

How Geoffrey Vincent and his mother 
came to the island no one knew; for besides 
being able to speak but little English they 
were verj' reticent, and no one cared to 
question them. But a Spanish pirate ship a 
few years before had been chased to this 



coast and sunk by a man-of-war; and'though 
all the pirates were supposed to have perished 
with their vessel, it was whispered that the 
_young Spaniard and his mother were the son 
and wife of the pirate captain who. finding 
that escape or victory would be impossible, 
left the battle for a moment to put his wife 
and boy into a boat, bidding them row for 
the nearest land. 

However this might be, Geoffrey Vincent 
lived like a pirate, — as did most of his neigh- 
bors for that matter, — and the days that he 
spent in hunting and fishing were often inter- 
spersed with more exciting work, when some 
well-laden ship would make for the harbor as 
a storm drew on and, lost in the fog or be- 
trayed by false signal fires, would go to 
pieces on the rocks. It was nothing strange 
that few of the mortals on those ill-fated 
ships were ever saved or that the quasi-fish- 
ermen's huts were filled with goods and 
utensils from all parts of the world. 

The woman turned an inquiring look 
toward the young man as he took his spy- 
glass from his eye. " By Heaven 1 " said he, 
"the gods favor us; " and unmindful of his 
mother's appealing and terror-stricken face, 
again put the glass to his eye. " A fair 
prize ! " he cried. 

The woman laid her hand on his arm. 
" 0, Geoffrey, must we live by the death of 
our fellow-mortals always?" 

The Spaniard turned from his scrutiny of 
the distant ship with a surprised start and 
said somewhat rudely, but with an underly- 
ing tenderness in his voice, " How now, my 
mother? Are you getting squeamish ? You 
used to look with pride upon my father — " 
" But, Geoffrey,'' she interrupted, " 'twas 
wrong, and lately, too, I have had strange 
forebodings. I beseech you, have nothing to 
do with that ship." 

The young man shrugged his shoulders, 
saying, " Why should we not take the goods 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



141 



the gods send us? If they mistake our 
beacon fires, is it our fault? and," added he 
more to himself than to his companion, "I 
think there will be no need of a decoy 
to-night for, with the storm and darkness 
fast approaching and the wind swinging to 
the east, 'twould be a good pilot that could 
make the harbor to-night." And straining 
his eyes toward the horizon again, he mut- 
tered under his breath, " I wish I could make 
out — . She appears to me like a Spanish 
barque." 

Being no longer able to discern the ship, 
and the fast rising gale beating into their 
faces the rain th.at had begun to fall, Geoffrey 
and his mother went into the hut that stood 
a little back from the shore, and soon the 
light from the candles that stood in curiously 
wrought candlesticks, and the glow from the 
blazing hearth bade defiance to the storm 
without. Looking into his mother's pale and 
distraught face, Geoffrey said : 

" A merry storm, to-night, my mother ; 
but you seem not to enjoy it as of old 1 Not 
as when, with mj' father, we stole on board 
the noble ship whose timbers are rotting be- 
neath yonder waves, and you clapped your 
hands with glee, and laughed outright as the 
rough storm, through which none dared give 
chase, piped on the stronger, driving us from 
the shores of Spain." But some other 
thought seemed to link itself with his mem- 
ories, and a shade came over his face as he 
sat gazing into the fire. 

Boom ! Crash ! Roar ! The storm was 
fast reaching its climax. Old ocean, fretted 
by the ever increasing gale, like a giant roused 
from sleep, " shook his invincible locks." 
One has but to visit this spot on a calm day 
to imagine what it must be in a storm. The 
moan and rush of the wind through the 
writhing trees, the beating of the rain, and 
the thunder of the waves as they crash upon 
the rocks lend an awful sublimity to nature's 
symphonies that art can but faintly imitate. 



Geoffrey looked out into the stormy darkness. 
" The saints preserve us," he cried, " what a 
storm ! The very mountains tremble with 
the tumult." 

His mother having prepared the supper, 
they sat down to the table. Hark ! Boom — 
boom. The ominous voice of tlie signal gun 
came faintly through the din of the tempest. 
Geoffrey sprang from his seat, and hastily 
putting on his oiled fisherman's coat, was 
rushing out into the storm when he per- 
ceived that his mother was preparing to follow. 

"What!" he cried, "are you crazy, 
mother ? " 

" Let me go, Geoffrey, I cannot stay 
here.'' 

The Spaniard checked an impatient ex- 
clamation on seeing the strange look of ter- 
ror in his mother's face, and they took their 
way to the shore. The men from the few 
huts along the shore were already there and 
from the sound of the signal gun they knew 
the ship had gone aground on the sunken 
rocks off the promontory. Clambering out 
on the wet rocks, or watching on the little 
beach for pieces of the wreck or floating 
casks and bales of goods, everywhere Geof- 
frey found his mother's pale face beside him. 
But, alas ! There was no need for that be- 
seeching face to keep so close to him, for not 
a soul came to shore that night in the corpses 
that the angry waves threw upon the sand or 
rock. 

As the gray dawn crept up from the east 
no trace of the ship was left on the rocks. 
The wreckers were departing for their homes. 
The Spaniard and his mother were clamber- 
ing along the slippery rocks, when suddenly 
Geoffrey stopped, and bent an eager look 
down upon the sand}' beach at the head of 
the cove. The form of a woman lay among 
the sea-weed and shells, and pieces of the 
wreck that the waves had thrown up. The 
face that Geoffrey turned toward his mother 
was as pallid as that upturned face from 



142 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



whose brow the dark hair fell in wet tresses 
among the sea-weed. With a wild cry he 
sprang down, and,, raising the fair torni as 
though it had been a child's, laid it upon the 
grass, and seating himself beside it, covered 

his face in his hands Ah, the 

sorrow, the remorse! Never again would 
come the dream of a fair face awaiting him 
on the sunny shores of Andalusia. The next 
day there was a new-made grave where the 
grass-plot ran back to the perpendicular cliff, 
and on the face of the cliff was chiseled a 
rude cross which may still be seen ; but 
Geoffrey Vincent and his mother were gone. 



A NOVEMBER DAY. 

An envelope of clouds shuts in the earth, 

And casts a sombre shadow over all, 
Frowns on the exercise of joy and mirth 

And rests upon the hill-tops like a pall. 
A humid chilliness pervades the air, 

Tlie fallen leaves lie mould'ring in the grass ; 
The wet that is collected everywhere, 

Seems Nature's tears for what has come to pass. 
Seems Nature's tears for what resembles death, 

Yet is not so, in truth, for nothing dies, 
But is transformed, to feel again the breath 

Of a new birth 'neath other, fairer skies. 



A TERRIBLE TRAGEDY! 

THE PARTICULARS JUST MADE PUBLIC. 

The Corrector of Themes sat alone in his 
study. 'I'be solemn bells had tolled the hour 
of midnight. The cold north winds swept 
by with a desolate moan, but the Corrector 
of Themes heeded them not. With a nervous 
chuckle he heaped a fresh supply of coal upon 
his glowing grate, and, rubbing his hands to- 
gether, turned with an exultant, almost de- 
moniac smile, to the stack of manuscripts upon 
his table, representing, or supposed to repre- 
sent, the accumulated mental acumen of the 
junior and sophomore classes. A lurid gleam 
shone from the deep-set eyes, and lit up the 
marble brow of the Theme Corrector, and his 



thin and bloodless lips were drawn into an 
expression of ineffable contempt, as he mut- 
tered between his clinched teeth, " ' Vanitj', 
vanity, all is vanity under the sun.' These de- 
luded mortals doubtless dream that their airy 
minds are imbued with the same lofty genius 
that animated Webster, Hawthorne and Irving. 
Many of these men," he sighed sadly," are 
attaining a literary reputation, not on their 
own, but ray ability. Quite often, in my 
readings, I come upon articles which closely 
resemble those I have corrected, and show 
me, alas too plainly, that the labor I expend 
oi:ly enhances the value of these nearly 
worthless productions, and gives them a sale 
among editors and publishers, which they 
would otherwise never find. " Here the Cor- 
rector of Themes drew a weighty document 
from the pile upon the table, and his scorn- 
ful expression grew more intense as he read 
the following : " I have not allowed myself to 
look beyond the Union, to see what might lie 
hidden in the dark recess behind. I have not 
coolly weighed the chances of preserving 
liberty when the bonds that unite us together 
shall be broken asunder." 

The Corrector of Themes could read no 
longer. "Barbarous! an inexcusable slaugh- 
ter of the English language !" he ejaculated, 
and with a few swift strokes of his pencil 
he changed the objectionable passage into 
the following euphonious language : " I have 
not permitted myself to gaze outside the 
Union to observe what might be concealed in 
the shadowy realms beyond. I have not de- 
liberately considered the possibilities of main- 
taining freedom when the bonds that bind us 
together shall be severed." 

"There" soliloquized the Theme Correct- 
or, as he laid the wretched production on 
the table " that, I trust, is a little more intelli- 
gible, but Heavens ! what is this?" he added 
taking another manuscript from the table. 
"Worse and more of it " he continued as his 
practiced eye lit on the following passage : 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



143 



" Methinks I see it now: that one solitarj', 
adventurous vessel, the Mayflower of a forlorn 
hope, freighted with the prospects of a future 
state, and bound across the unknown sea." 
The Corrector of Themes smiled audibly. 
" Such ignorance," he muttered, " would be a 
disgrace to a primary school scholar." For 
a few moments the pencil of the Theme Cor- 
rector moved busily, and then, with a sigh of 
relief, he laid the theme aside corrected as 
follows: "I imagine I perceive her now — 
that one fearless ship, the Mayflower — a for- 
lorn hope — loaded with the probabilities of a 
future nation, and traversing an unexplored 
ocean." 

As the Corrector of Themes drew forth 
the next article he leaned back in his 
chair and burst into a peal of unrestrained 
laughter. " A poetical crank ! " he ejaculated. 
" Strange how every young and gushing stu- 
dent — especially if he has a girl on his mind 
— imagines himself a poet." If I should re- 
member but a half of the effusions given me 
for correction, forsooth 'twould drive me 
mad," and the Corrector of Themes sighed 
wearily as he read the following: 

" The curfew tolls the knell of parting day, 
The lowing herd wind slowly o'er the lea. 
The ploughman homeward plods his weary way, 
And leaves the world to darkness and to me." 

For a few moments the Theme Cor- 
rector labored industriously, and a smile of 
satisfaction overspread his classic features as 
he laid the above miserable rhyme aside, 
metamorphosed by his genius into the follow- 
ing superb verse : 

" The town-clock strikes the hour of closing day, 
The bleating flocks skip swiftly o'er the hill, 
The farmer homeward hastens on his way, 
And leaves to me all nature hushed and still." 

The next article the Theme Corrector 
took up caused him to groan in anguish of 
spirit. " This is the worst yet," he moaned. 
" It will take me at least two hours to correct 
it," and with compressed lips and stern de- 



termination he set to work. The small hours 
of the night found him still at his task, and it 
was not until the town clock tolled out the 
solemn hour of three, that he arose from his 
chair, and laid aside his work. Something 
in the closing sentence caused him to take it 
up again. With feverish eagerness he re- 
read the article. His treacherous memory 
returned to him, and he recognized in the 
piece an ancient and cherished production of 
his own, contributed to the columns of the 
college paper while he was one of its editors. 
The whole past rushed back upon him; his 
blindness vanished, and he saw it all. In his 
short-sightedness and eagerness to find im- 
perfections, he had been, for years, correcting 
the master-pieces of the English language. 
The students, knowing his weakness, had 
duped him, and now, Oh horrors ! he had 
corrected, in three hundred and fifty-two 
places, a production of his own. With a wild 
despairing shriek the Theme Corrector fell 
upon the floor. His death struggles were 
terrible. When the dim morning dawned, 
the first faint rays that shone in the window 
of that study fell on the rigid form and white 
face of a corpse. His hair was tinged with 
gray. His lips, thin and bloodless, were 
tightly compressed, and his fingers firmly 
clinched, were driven deep into the flesh, as 
if the last great spasm had wrung him sore. 



SORROW. 

We were standing by the gate 
And, although 'twas only eight, 
She had told me that she 

Could no longer stay ; 
Yet I would not then depart. 
But still clasped her to my heart 
And besought her that she 

Would not go away. 

So I held her little hand 
And continued yet to stand. 
Though I saw that she began 

To nervous grow ; 
But I felt a little pained 
When she suddenly exclaimed : 
' Here's my other fellow coming, 

You must go.^'' 



144 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




' Tis true 'tis pity, 
And pity 'tis 'tis true: 

That some of the faculty voted for St. 
John. 

That the trees on tlie proposed athletic 
grounds are still standing. 

That the base-ball men aren't allowed the 
use of the upper floor of Memorial during 
the winter — as long as we have no fit gym- 
nasium. 

That the library can't be opened in the 
evening. 

That the Professor of Psycliology should 
draw such a long bow. 

That we still have that abomination — Sun- 
day afternoon chapel. 

That the npperclassmen are too weary to 
stand up in chapel. 

That, amid the political excitement, 
A dignified instructor tooteth on a hornlet, 
And aideth the small yagger to fire off his bomblet. 



SERENADE. 

The stars are in the sky, 

The dews are falling, 

My voice is calling 

Thee, love ; hear thou my cry. 

The pale moon's rim is seen 
O'er yon eastern hill. 
And the night is still, 
Bathed in her silver sheen. 

Still, but for my heart's song 
To thee aye pleading. 
While it receding 
Is lost the shades among. 

The stars and moon are gone. 
The birds are singing. 
The bells are ringing : 
My song ends with the dawn. 



O chapel bell, O chapel 

bell, 
The pangs thou causest 
none can tell ; 
At drowsy morn, alas! thy warning floats 
Through the open window in awful notes. 

Striking the ear ol the sleeping youth, 
"Who starts and mutters in words uncouth, 
Rubs his eyelids and stretches his arms. 
While the bell peals forth its stern alarms. 

This monster as ruthless as time and tide^ 
The pleasure of students cannot abide. 
The hapless j'outh by necessity pressed, 
Takes his place in chapel but partly dressed. 

With unwashed lace and kinky hair, 
A gloomy and dejected air, 
No collar, no tie, no coat, no vest. 
But an ulster buttoned over chest. 

Thou art a tyrant not only at morn, 
Seven times in the week and then have done ; 
In the after part of the day of rest 
We needs must answer thy loud behest. 

If, haply, we're strolling among the fields, 
Seeking from nature the beauty she yields. 
And our index of time has lagged its pace. 
Thy distant tones ring us out of grace. 

chapel bell, O chapel bell, 

1 wish it well, I wish it well. 

That thou mightst be forever and ever 
Deep sunk in the Androscoggin river. 

The college was to a large extent depopulated on 
Monday and Tuesday of last week by the exodus of 
the voters to their homes. 

The time for class elections draws near. It is 
already later than is usual for such elections to take 
place. 

The class in Italian now has two recitations per 
week. The progress of the class is remarkable ; 
they are already reading Dante's Inferno. 

Gen. Chamberlain talked with the seniors two 
weeks ago, upon the question of the Panama Canal. 
He exhibited a number of maps and charts showing 
the different routes proposed, and discussed the prac- 
ticability of each in an entertaining manner. It 
seems unfortunate that there is not a larger attend- 
ance at these talks. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



145 



The November Century, after a long delay, has 
made its appearance in the reading-room. Jingo 
and Munseifs Illuslrated Weekly are an attractive 
addition to the list of papers. 

The number of volumes taken from the library 
during the past year was 2,200 instead of 1,400, as 
previously reported. 

In accordance with a petition signed by the stu- 
dents, the faculty granted a suspension of recitations 
on election day. 

The first rhetorical exercises of the term took 
place Wednesday, November 5th. The speakers 
were Libby and Whittier, '85; Butler and Smith, 
'86 ; 0. M. Austin and Lane, '87. 

It is reported that there is a certain youth in town 
who, whenever he meets Prof. Chapman, bows 
politely and says : " How do you do, Mr. Despeaux." 
The said youth undoubtedly stands in such terror of 
the exponent of the law, that his senses are not suffi- 
ciently calm to allow him to distinguish differences 
when he thinks he is in that awful presence. 

Rogers, '86, Turner, '86, and Dearth, '87, have 
recently returned from teaching at Woolwich, Weeks' 
Mills, and Litchlield, respectively. Merrill, '87, has 
just begun a school at Farmington. 

The students made themselves manifest at the 
watch (for returns) meetings on the night of elec- 
tion, both at the Republican and Democratic head- 
quarters. They took the place of a band with great 
success, and when it came to cheering they left noth- 
ing to be desired. 

The Professor of Agriculture, with^wheelbarrovv, 
dry goods box, and rake, has at length harvested tlie 
leaf crop. The professor deserves much praise for 
his dispatch in a work of such an arduous nature. It 
must have been tiresome, as he has often been seen 
leaning over the dry goods box breathing forth 
smoke, which undoubtedly arose froili friction of the 
tissues caused by great exertion. After all, though, 
he might have been posing for effect. 

A week ago Saturday, Small and Perkins came 
down from Colby to play tennis with Bowdoin. In- 
asmuch as at that time nearly two inches of snow 
covered the ground, their arrival was a great sur- 
prise. It seems that the snow-fall at Waterville had 
been very light, and that when they started there 
were prospects of a good day. By two o'clock in the 
afternoon the ground was nearly bare, but wet and 
heavy, the new court on the Delta being quite unlit 
for playing. Nevertheless, a series of games was 
played on the court opposite Appleton, with the 
following result : Eames and Bartlett, '85, vs. Small 



and Perkins, 6-2, 6-4; Eames vs. Small, 6-1, 6-4. 
The Colby men played well, but showed lack of 
experience. Few witnessed the game, as it was 
unexpected, and many were out of town. 

No more the Androscoggin's patient breast 
Is rudely hacked by the fierce rower's blade; 
Across its waste sweep tempests from the nortli 
And whistle tlirough the cracks, which numberless 
Infest the boat-house floor. The Delta where 
Not many days ago the classic tones 
Of base-ballistic rivalry were heard, 
Now is discordant with plebeian yells 
Of youthful yaggers indiscriminate. 
Who scarce to wield a bludgeon have the strength. 
Yet emulate the sport of cultured minds, 
In mimic contest. 
The campus has been resonant for the past week 
with 'Rah for Blaine! and 'Rah for Cleveland! 
striving for the mastery. The raising of either cry 
was a challenge to the opposition and then it was 
a matter of who could yell the louder. Hoarseness 
is a prevalent affection. 

The presidential outlook on Thursday night was 
the occasion of a small Republican demonstration. A 
number of students and yaggers formed a procession, 
of which Say ward, '84, was the primum mobile, and 
to the tune of horns marched to the homes of Prof. 
Chapman and Prof. Lee, who in response to calls 
made short speeches of congratulation on the election 
of Blaine and Logan. 

It seems queer that from all the students a com- 
plete chapel choir cannot be selected and maintained. 
Sino-ing is such an important part of chapel exer- 
cises that it should not be suffered to languish for 
want of numbers in the choir. 

Both parties in town seemed to have " nailed 
their flag to the mast," as, through storm and sun- 
shine they continued to flap in the breeze. On the 
morning after election, that unique patchwork gon- 
falon, composed of a broad strip of sheeting elabo- 
rately inscribed with Blaine and Logan, to which 
were added two flags sewed together side by side, 
was seen to be rent in twain. To a believer in 
omens the circumstance looked bad for the candi- 
dates which it published. The ominous effect was 
somewhat neutralized, however, by the fact that the 
Cleveland and Hendricks flag was " hung up." The 
injury to the first mentioned banner was triumphantly 
remedied by removing one of the component flags, 
and sewing the other sidewise to the strip of sheet- 
ing, the resulting combination being nearly square 
in shape, and of an appearance even more unique 
than the original. 

A week ago Saturday the crew went to Portland 



146 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



to pull the postponed race with the winners in the 
Dirigo Regatta. Quite a heavy snow storm the night 
before seemed to have had a soothing eflfect on the 
water, which was found to be in perfect condition. 
Promptly at 10.30 the referee's boat steamed up to 
the Union boat-house and took on board the repre- 
sentatives of the pres.s and the friends of the crews. 
The course was a mile and a half straight away, with 
the finish opposite the boat-house. Our men won the 
choice of position, but, for fear of being crowded 
into the wharves, took the outside course — the least 
desirable on account of the tide. Both crews started 
well, the Portlands pulling a stroke of over 40 to the 
minute. Our men pulled a longer stroke of about 
38 to the minute. From the start the lead was taken 
by the Portland men, and increased by them to about 
three lengths when the finish line was crossed. They 
pulled finely, and can steer one of their working 
boats to perfection. Our crew rowed in splendid 
form and with great steadiness, but not being accus- 
tomed to the whale boats they rowed in, steered a 
little wildly. A race with this crew will be rowed 
on our own water next spring. 

Cave canem. Dogs should be entirely excused 
from attendance at prayers. 

It is with sincere pleasure that we note the return 
of Harding after his long and severe sickness. 

Stackpole has commenced a school at Bowdoin- 
ham. 

A return game of tennis was played at Waterville 
on Saturday forenoon. A low thermometer and a 
high wind produced a combination exceedingly un- 
favorable for accurate playing. The contest was 
much more evenly matched than the former one, as 
the score shows. The singles were particularly 
close and hard fought, the score at one time during 
the second set being five to four and advantage, in 
favor of Small. It had been expected that the tour- 
nament would take place in the afternoon, and in 
consequence there were but few spectators. The 
score was : Small and Perkins vs. Eames and Bart- 
lett, '85, 3-6, 6-4, 2-6. Small vs. Bartlett, 8-6, 5-7, 
1-6. 

The crowning mark of Sophomoric state, 

The " wise-fool's " index of a change of late; 

That adds a full culiit to his stature 

And fixes hauglitiness in ev'ry featnre; 

That changes stride into a strut, 

Makes him a liero and all but 

A god (in his estimation) — 

The nourisher of his elation- 
Well, tell me what is that. 
Why yes, 'tis a plug hat. 




'45. — W. W. Rice is re- 
elected to Congress from 
Eleventh District, Massachusetts. 

ranklin Woodside has met with a 
in the death of his son. The 
latter was drowned at Newton while bathing, August 
23d. He was a member of the junior class of Har- 
vard, and in many resjjects a promising young man. 

'68. — George M. Bodge has accepted a call to be- 
come pastor of the Unitarian church at East Boston. 

The following interesting, though unreliable, 
article we clip from a paper: Timothy W. Stone 
graduated at Bowdoin about 1822. While there, 
was a promising student and carried oft' several 
prizes. From college, he went to Alfred, entered 
the law office of John Holmes, and during his 
term there, he became engaged to be married 
to a young lady who is now better known as 
Mrs. Valeria G. Stone. Soon he found that he should 
occupy an early grave, and made his will, devising 
to his lady love some $6,000. Consumption took 
him off. Hon. John Holmes was in Boston, found 
Daniel P. Stone in the dry goods business unable, for 
want of capital, to much more than make both ends 
of the year meet. Mr. H. informed him of this young 
lady and her foitune, and advised him to come down 
and marry her, which he did. This capital was his 
stepping stone to wealth. Mrs. Stone devised thou- 
sands to benevolent objects, among which was a me- 
morial hall at Brunswick. Within gunshot of that 
building is the ^-ave of her early lover. 

Thursday evening, Oct. 30th, by invitation of 
Maj. S. Clifford Belcher, of the class of '57, the Bow- 
doin College alumni of Farmington enjoyed a very 
pleasant annual reunion at his residence on Court 
Street. The alumni present were Rev. Jonas Burn- 
ham, class of '22, Major Belcher and Rev. Cyrus 
Stone, class of '67 ; Rev. Charles H. Pope, '62 ; D. H. 
Knowlton, '69 ; George C. Purington, '78 ; and W. H. 
Cothren, '84. A few other invited guests were pres- 
ent. Many pleasant incidents of college life were 
recalled, a sumptuous feast served, and just before 
seisarating, several college songs were sung. 

'84. — Means has been obliged to leave the Hart- 
ford Seminary on account of ill health. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



147 




The Peisian language 

IS now taught at Cornell. 

A Oliinese girl is studying English 

branclies at the Ohio Wesleyan UniFersity. 

She intends to become a physician for the 

sake of the women of her native country. 

The new Tufts gymnasium has btien completed, 
but the fee for admission to its benefits is such that 
it is well nigh deserted by the students. 

The students of Dartmouth College are about to 
build an observation tower on the hill north-east of 
the Astronomical Observatory. The design is by 
the architect of Rollins Chapel, and is after the man- 
ner of a medieval fortification town. — Ex. 

Johns Hopkins Universitj' opened two weeks ago, 
with an attendance of 273, of which 160 were grad- 
uate students. 

It is reported that out of o96 graduates of Vassar 
only 188 are married. The 408 still in a state of 
single blessedness uiay be able to answer the query, 
why don't the men propose? but they don't. — Tufl- 
onian. 

No wonder Belva was so overwhelmingly de- 
feated if her own sex did not sympathize with her 
more generally than did the young ladies of Welles- 
ley. A ballot for presidential preferences " at the 
instigation of a student of more than ordinary politi- 
cal inclinations," gave the woman candidate but one 
votp. out of a total of 398. Blaine was the leading 
candidate with 270 ; Cleveland and St. John had 63 
each, and Butler 1. 

The grand torch-light procession of the Harvard 
students, which had so long been anticipated and for 
which such elaborate preparation had been made, 
occurred Monday evening, November 3d. In mag- 
nitude and magnificence it surpassed anything of the 
sort ever before attempted. One of the transpar- 
encies bore the legend, "The World, the Flesh, and 
the Devil," inscribed under portraits of Blaine, 
Cleveland, and Butler. 

The "Harris Collection of American Poetry," 
bequeath to Brown University by the late Hon. 



Henry B. Anthony, LL.D., has lately been placed 
upon the shelves of the library. It numbers 5,720 
bound volumes, in addition to unbound pamphlets, 
and a large number of duplicates. The value of the 
collection is estimated at .$2.5,000. 

The first A. M. degree ever taken by a lady in 
England has recently been conferred Dy the Univer- 
sity of London upon Miss Mary C. Dawes. 

One of the Bates College students who is at home 
in Massachusetts, recently applied for registration. 
He was asked his business and replied that he was 
a student in ihe senior class of Bates College in 
Lewiston, Me. " Can you read? " was asked, "Yes," 
was the reply. He was required to read from the 
constitution and write his name. — Ex. 

The Chicago College of Pharmacy, which opened 
its new building costing f.50,000, a few days ago, 
claims to have the finest laboratory in the country. 

A new organization at Harvai'd is the Shakes- 
peare Club. The object of this club is " to promote 
the study of elocution, oratory, and the classical 
drama." It is proposed to have a course of lectures 
under the auspices of the club by some of the mas- 
ters of the art which it is its purjiose to foster. 

The Princeton faculty liave declared that after 
January 1, 1886, no game shall be played with any 
other college by any Princeton team, on grounds 
other than those of the contesting colleges. 

OF 

fiAiM AM® imtY mmiim 

neatly executed at the 

B^lipi^WICK HER^M 0FFICE. 



, (Jifl eJstj cirti <JL ^ 

►n- gPECi^ii ^ FINE ^ WW ^' 

A.KE VERY POFUEATl. 

Wine Boots aad SIbLoeSj 

Next \b AmeriGan Express Qffice, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGARETTE SMOKEKS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No.l 

SUPERIOR TO ALL; OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 
direct importation, which is made especially for ns, Avater 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

A LLEHf i& GIJSTTEB Manufacturers, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



New system. Learned iu less than one-quarter the time 
required ijy any otlier. Old reporters throw away old sys- 
tems and learn this for speed and legibilitj'. It can be 
successfully 

TAUGHT BY MAIL. 
The corresponding style can be learned in a few hours, 
and the full verbatim reporting style in a few months. It 
is a marvel of simplicity. 

STUDENTS 

can easily acquire enough to enable them to take notes of 

LECTURES. 

Send for circular. Terms: Corresponding style, five 

lessons, $5. Corresponding and reporting, twenty lessons, 

.«10. 

R. B. CAPEN, Augusta, Me. 




iSS 



Leading Numbers : 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Sta'tioners. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEM CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York, 



SMOKE THE BEST. 

We beg: to inform the public ami smokers g'encrally, that we 
ha^■e secin-cd a lar^e stock of the very choicest grades of thor- 
oughly furc-d 

GOLDEN VIKGINIA, PEEIQUE and TUKKISH 
tobaccos, which we are using in tlie manufacture oC our Cele- 
brated Ijrands of cigarette and smoking tobaccos. And 
have added to our stock a barge shipment of the finest imported 
French Rice Paper. Such stock, made np by the highest class of 
skillful Labor, we feel conlideut cannotl'ail to satisfy the tastes of 
all good judges. 

STANDARD BRANDS. 



JUST OUT— SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL. 
Manufactured by Special Rectuest, 

^innej> Tobacco Co., 

Successors to Kinney Bros., New York. 



FOR FALL AND WINTER, 

AT JA.CKSON'S. 

All Goods Warranted as Represented. 
S. E.- J-A^CKlSOlSr, SID, 

2 Odd Fellows ' Block, Main Street, Brunswick. 



The Sixtv-Sicdud Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Jliiine, will commence FebkuakY 7th, 1S84, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACIILTY'.— Alpheus S. Packakd, Aciing President; 
Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel T. Dana, M.D., 
Pathology and Practice; Alfred MrrcHELL, M.D., Obstetrics 
anil Diseases of Women and Children; Charles W. Goddard, 
A.m., Medical Jurisprudence; Frederic H. Gerhish, M.D., 
Anatomy; Henry Carmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry; Burt G. 
Wilder, M.D., Physiology; Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery 
and Clinical Surgerv; Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics ; Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator of 
Anatomy; Everett T. Nkaley, M.D., Demonstrator of His- 
tology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

FRANK M. STETSON, 



^^]^lM^Ji- 



I / 



3 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Diamonds, 



Jewelry, 



BYRON STEVENS, 

B00KgEIiIiER I gTHTie^E^, 



Silver Ware, 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 

Prepare Orlglnul DesUjns for Society 
Badges, Itings, Prizes, and Class Cups, 
ivhich will be forwarded to students on 
request. 

A SPECIALTY is made of jEnfflish 
Pewter Beer Mujjs, in. two sises, with Glass 
Bottoms. 

Society, Booh, and f^isitiiig Card Plates 
engraved in proper style. 

Invitations and Programmes in novel 
forms at short notice. 

Shreve, Crump & Low, 



Bronzes, 



Porcelains, 



Fancy Goods. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine, 



EARS for the MILLION 

Foo Choo's Balsam of Shark's Oil 

Positively Kestores tlie Hearing, and is the Only 
Absolute Cure for Deafness Known. 

This Oil is abstracied from peculiar species of small White 
Shark, caught in the yellow Sea, known as Carcharodon Roiid- 
eletii. Eveiy Chinese fisherman knows it. Its virtues as a re- 
storative of hearing were discovered by a Buddhist Priest about 
the year 1410. Its ciu-es were so numerous and mavy so seem- 
ingly miraculous, that the remedy was officially i^roclainicd over 
the entire Empire. Its use became so universal that for over 300 
years no deafness has existed among the Chinese people. Sent, 
charges prepaid, to any address at $1.00 per bottle. 

i" 



It has performed a miracle in my case. 

I have no unearthly noises in my head and hear much better. 

1 have been greatly benefited. 

My deafness helped a great deal— think another bottle will 
cure me. 

My hearing is much benefited. 

I have received nntold benefit. 

My hearing is improving. 

It is giving good satisfaction. 

Have been greatly benefited, and am rejoiced that I saw the 
notice of it. 

" Its virtues are unquestionable and its curative character ab- 
solute, as the writer can personally testify, both from experience 
and observation. Write at once to Haylock & Jenney, 7 Dey 
Street, New York, enclosing $1.00, and you will receive by return 
a remedy that will enable you to hear like anybody else, and 
whose curative effects will be permanent. You will never regret 
doing so." — Editor of Mercantile Review. 

,e®=To avoid loss in the Mails, please send money by Regis- 
tered Letter. 

Only Imported by HAYIjOCK & JENNEY, 
Sole Agents for America. Tf Dey St., N. Y. 



BOWDQIN ORIENT. 







Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brnnswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vie\irs ; also College Vieisrs. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 
Enlarged from tlie ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

POItTX. A.ND, MA-INE. 

^F. H. WILSON.^lE^ 

DISPENSER OF 

Fm© BiigSj MedieineSi^ Gheiakals, 

IMPORTED AND DOWESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc. , in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STRRET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Go to W, B. VIToodard's 

To buy vour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save mouey by so doing. 

SFS!CX-a-X, I5..i^TE:S to STXTX^EIITT cx,-crES- 

Maln Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRUVIMER, Director, 

WO Middle Street, - - - - Portland Me. 



MAIN STKEET, BEUNSWICK, ME. 



^i^ ' WP. K FIELD, 



TONTINE HOTEX«7 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Special attention will be given to Class .ind Keuuion Dinners 
and Suppers to order. First-class laundry connected with the 
house. 

S. B. BREWSl'ER, Proprietor. 



239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. JIERKILL. A. KEITH. 



DEALER IN 

GI®GE1I1S All P1®¥ISI©KS, 

Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 "WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 



wb 



2 ©^urt| pntfe, 



- - - - iat%. 



DEALER IN 

CEDAK STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Branch olSce three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses, 
jy Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COB. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

PICTURE FEAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

Also Pictures, Cabinet Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, 

etc. Also agent for the celebrated Household Sewing 

Machines, 

In the Everett Store, Main Street, Opposite the Mall, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



NATIONAL SCHOOL SUPPLY BUREAU. 

Beloit, "Wis., July 31, 1883. 
National School Stipph/ Bm-eav: 

Last April, being then in charge of a large public school, but 
desiring a position in some good academy or college, I placed 
my name with your Bureau.^ During the ilrstpart of the present 
month I received notice from you of a vacancy in such a place as 
I desired. 

Putting myself in communication with the party concerned I 
received the appointment. I am well satisfied with the manage- 
ment of the Bureau, and feel sure that it fills a useful and nec- 
essary place in our school economj^ You are at liberty to use 
my name if vou wish. 

Eespectfully, 

EDWARD O. FISKE. 
Headmaster Mai'kam Academy, Milwaukee, Wis. 

For applicatiou-form and circular, address. 

National School Snppli/ Depot, Chicago, III. 
N. B.— "We want all kinds of Teachers for Schools 
and Families. Good Pay to Agents and Private Cor- 
respondents. 



-DEALER IN- 



Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

"V"iolins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 

:^H.-CT:U8'S"V«7"ICIi, Bd-flLlITi;. 

STUD!E]SrTS 

Of all classes will find it valuable to consult on all subjects the 



183 SOUTH CLARK STREET, CHICAGO, ILL,. 



CHOICE GROcHlES, cTnNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B.— Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

All the Students Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



COR. Main and Mason St.5., opp. Town Clock. 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NE"W TYPE, 

NE"W BORDERS, 

NE"W DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 

WHY I AM A REPUBLICAN 

A graphic and reliable presentation of Republican princi- 
ples, and reasons for continuing the party in power, also 
fine portraits and authentic lives of 

BLAIIVE ATVJD L.OGAIV 

by Gov. GEO. S. BOTJT"WEIiL, of Mass. THE BOOK 
of the party, endorsed by leading Republicans. Price in 
reach of every voter. Arare opportunity for a wide-awake 
student to engage in tlie campaign with profit. 

"WM. J. BETTS & CO., Hartford, Conn. 




(Established 18T7.) 



10 BERKELY ST., BOSTON, MASS., 



ON THE EOAD. 



OWE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 

OTHER TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 

stamp at above address. 



ST^T. L & BURT, 

509 Tremont St, and 4 Warren Ave., Odd Fellows' Hall, Boston, Mass. 
SPECIAL IMPROVED 



Afflerican STAR Bicycle 




Although comparatively a new machine on the niav- 

liet, the Star has nniLle a splendid record, 

having won tlie 

Twenty-Five Mile Championship of 

the United States, 

Breaking the record, in S3 minutes lu seconds. 

It has a mile record of 2 min. 50 1-8 sec; 
5 miles, 15 min. 26 3-4 sec; mile -ivithout 
hands, 3 min. 11 sec ir has -won the most im- 
portant Hill Climbing Contests, including 
Corey Hill, Boston, Eagle Hill, Orange, N. J., 
and Staudpipe Hill, 'Washington, D. C. This 
is a mere mention of the triumphs of the Star. 

The principles embodied in the Star give the perfect combination for safety, speed, and comfort with economy of 
rnuinienance and durability found in no other machine. 

IN ADDITION WE HAVE THE 

TICTOfi TRICYCLE, Tlie Most Fainons Tliree-fheeler Male In Tlie Wcrli. 

A FuU Line of the Best ENGLISH MACHINES 

Go to complete tlie list and suit all tastes. 

The IDEAL, a cheaper inaohine for use of boys and youths, is a splendid machine for purpose intended and is 
hif/hly recommended, 

SECOND-HAND MACHINES of all kinds, SUPPLIES and SUNDRIES constantly on hand. 

REPAIRING of most difficult kinds performed at reasonable rates. All machines and parts nnist be plainly 
marked and be accompanied by instructions by next mail. 

SEND TWO-CENT STA3IP FOR CATALOGUE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard" and" Duplex" Burner 

Df PLACE OF THE OLD IvINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENaEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIOUABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 

All the Late Publications in stock. Text-Books of all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 



474 Cong^ress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

Ji0. § 0DD EMl£li01<?g' BLOCK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 



S4LI©¥LI©A. 

The only radical internal remedy. Never known to 
fail in a single case, acute or chronic. It expels the poison- 
ous Uric A'cid from the blood, which is the prime cause 
of Rheumatism, Gout, and Neuralgia. — As a blood puri- 

THE OLD RELIABLE SPECIFIC 

ENDORSED BY PHYSICIANS AND 

THOUSANDS OF PATIENTS. 

fier it has no equal. Actin" on common-sense principles 
it eradicates from the blood all poisonous matter which 
causes disease. — It has been in use for many years and 
cured a larger percentage of cases than any other 

POSITIVELY CURES 



remedy. Send for testimonials from the cured. — Salicy- 
lica strikes directly at the cause of these diseases, while 
so many so-called speci- 

EHETJMATISM 

fics only treat locally the effect. When you. have tried 
in vain all the "oils," "ointments," "liniments," and 
"pain cures," and when your 

GOUT, NEURALGIA, 

doctors cannot help you, do not despair but take Salicy- 
lica at once and be cured. — No one can afford to live in 
pain and miserj' when 

GRAVEL DIABETES, 

Salicylioa will relieve him and put him in condition to 
attend to his daily avocations. 

$1 per box, 6 boxes for S5, 

BLOOD POISONING. 

with full directions in ten languages. Sold by druggists 
everywhere, or sent by mail, prepaid, on receipt of price. 

WASHBTJRNE & CO., Prop's, 

287 Broadway, New York. 

Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

Odd Fellows' Block, Over lavis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - " " BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. W. BROWNE, Propkietor. 
Formerly at Tontine Hotel. 




'^ ^\ml Pi**'*""' 



THE FAVORITE NOS. 303-404-332-I7O-JSI- WITH 

'HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J, MERRYMAN, PHARMACIST,-: 



Fancy aiil Toilet Articles, CiprsI ToMcco, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

Jgi" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

OvEu Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDGE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 

The New Styles in 

STII^IF and. SOIFT KC.i^'X'S 

lu all colors, nve now ready. An elegant line of New York 
Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors jnst received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, "Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

tELLIOTT'S,t 

OPP. TOWN CLOCK. 

M: A. Y IST ^ R D ' S 
©pl@p diti fee ^mam lin^oirlunt, 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

([^"Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



TAPS 17VORM. 



In one of the tropical provinces of Germany there has been 
found a root, the extrcact from which has proved an absolute 
SPECIFIC for Tape Worm. It is pleasant to take and is not de- 
bilitating or disa,e:i'eeab]e in its eflfects on the patient, but is 
peculiarly sickening and stupefying to the Tape Worm, which 
loosens its hold of its victim and passes away in a natural and 
easy manner, entirely whole, with head, ana while still alive. 
One physician has used this remedy in over 400 cases, without a 
einftle failure to pass worm whole, with head. Absolute removal 
with head guaranteed. No pay required until so removed. Send 
stamp for circular and terms. 

HEYWOOD & CO., 19 Park Place, N. Y. City. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAIIME. 

Magazines, Mnsic, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



V^JSEJsr ^OTJ WANT A. RIDE 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE, 

On Cleaveland Street, loUere ijou wiUfind turnouts to suit the most 
fastidious. £!f^ Rates reasonable. 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A, G. Tenney. 

Terms, ----- 1 1. 50 ti Tear io Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetablesj Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-vs^'s Grocery Store. 

«9-Special Bates to Student Clubs..ffil 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar, — Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, Georgics and first six Books 
of the .zEneid, including Prosody. 
(Instead of the Georgics, Csesar's Gallic War, 
Books I.-IV., may be offered.) 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic, — especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric i 
System. j 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. I 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above i 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regular Examinations foe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (July 11 and 12, 1884), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 26 and 27, 1884). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examinations is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Washington Academy, East 
Machias, and at the Fryehurg Academy, these 
schools having been made special Pitting Schools 
for the college by the action of their several Boards 
of Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 
have been fitted at any school having an approved 



preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 
Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who^wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

required- FOUR HOURS A "WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terras. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — EO0E HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), avei'age, $2.5. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 




twdtu 




Vol. XIV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DEC. 3, 1884. 



No. 11. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED FORTNIGHTLY BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGK. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
John A. Peters, '85, Managing Editor. 
N. B. FoKD, '85, Business Editor. 
Boyd Baktlett, '85. "W. P. Nealley, '85. 

0. R. Cook, '85. A. A. Knowlton, '86. 

J. F. LiBBY, '85. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

"W. V. Wentworth, '86. 

Per annum, in advance $2.00. 

Single Copies 15 cents. 

Students and alumni are invited to contribute matter for any 
of tlie departments. Contributions must he accomp.iDied by 
\vTiter's real name. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XIV., No. 11. -Dec. .3, J884. 

Release 149 

Editorial Notes - 149 

A Picture 152 

Bowdoiu in Journalism 1.52 

A Pointed Tale 1.53 

The Wit 1 .54 

Contentions: 

A. K. E 154 

Theta Delta Chi : 154 

Antilogia - 155 

Indecision 155 

An Opening 155 

Amo 156 

Communication 156 

CoLLEGii Tabula 157 

Personal 1.58 

Clippings 159 

RELEASE. 

Athwart the moon like prison bars 
Some shreds of cloud obscure her light, 
Till gliding by them in her flight 
She calmly shines among the stars. 

My soul, receptive of the scene. 

But lately hid in clouds of care. 

Emerges into clearer air; 

Leaves the dim world for heights serene. 




ppy and joj'ous 
seasons of the j'ear — the Thanksgiving recess, 
with its savory odors, merry games, and — 
loving glances ?-^an oasis in the weary des- 
ert of a fourteen weeks' term, has come and 
gone leaving only pleasant memories behind. 
The Orient greets its readers, after a neces- 
sary delay of one week, and wishes them re- 
newed strength to journey on to the end of 
the term, now so near. 



We print in this number the beginning 
of an exhaustive article on"Bowdoin College 
in Journalism," by Mr. George M. Whitaker 
of Southbridge, Mass. Mr. Whitaker, a grad- 
uate of 1872, was one of the prime movers 
in founding the Orient, and is now editor 
and proprietor of the Southbridge Journal. 
This article is intended to be the forerunner 
of a series of articles on the part taken b}'' 
Bowdoin men in the different professions, in 
politics, literature, the army and navy, etc. 
They can hardly fail to be interesting to 
every Bowdoin man, and will be valuable 
records in the future. Bowdoin probably 
has more prominent graduates in proportion 
to the whole number than any other college 
in the country, and this fact will give an 
added interest to the series. Prof. Chapman 



150 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



has promised to contribute an article on 
" Bowdoin iu Literature," and Edward Stan- 
wood, '61, so well known in political and 
journalistic circles, the author of " Presi- 
dential Elections," just published, will prob- 
ably write on " Bowdoin in Politics." 



At last, Eugby foot ball has been fairly 
inaugurated with an association to back it. 
The game seems to meet with the warm sup- 
port it deserves, and has clearly come to 
stay. Tile onl}' variety of foot ball worthy 
the name, it is a wonder that it has not been 
taken up in earnest before. There is a time 
between the freezing up of the regulation 
fall sports and the coming on of winter, 
which is spleudidlj^ adapted to foot ball ; and 
in future, our contests with other colleges 
should not be confined to the spring. The 
game will also serve the excellent purpose of 
keeping our boating men and other athletes 
in training till it is time to go into the gym- 
nasium room. The blood-thirsty account of 
the last foot ball fight between Yale and 
Princeton should not alarm our novices, as 
this is a highly evolved form of the game 
which we cannot hope to reach for some 
3'ears. 

We would remind the juniors that the 
election of Orient editors to succeed the 
present senior members of the board will 
take place the latter part of next term, and 
that we have received scarcely anything on 
which to bas(i a judgment of the qualifica- 
tions of would-be editors from their class. 
As we intend to elect to the board only those 
who have previously shown by their contri- 
butions their fitness for the position, we 
would advise the juniors to bestir themselves 
and give us some specimens of their work. 
Verses, stories, locals, personals, communica- 
tions will all be gladly received and set down 



to the credit of the contributor, even if not 
published. The freshmen, too, have been 
rather backward about favoring us with their 
contributions. To be sure, it has never been 
the custom to elect freshmen editors; but it 
certainly never will be till they indicate their 
ability and their desire to serve on the paper. 
We hope to see greater activity among the 
literarj' inclined during the long winter term 
before us. 



The Brunswick Htrald, in some valuable 
space which we really fear the " Business 
Interests'" department was wrongfully de- 
prived of, has taken up the cudgels in 
behalf of the chapel choir. The Herald 
thinks that the efforts of our choir are not 
fully appreciated, and says that the only re- 
ward received b}' this oppressed body for 
their extra work is "continual criticism, both 
at the hands of the students and even 
through the columns of the Orient itself" 
The Herald must have gained a wrong im- 
pression from an item in our last issue. The 
fact is, Herald, we admire our choir exceed- 
ingly. We regard them as choral daisies 
and symphonic prodigies individually and 
collectively, and we think we give them great 
credit for their efforts ; but the trouble is, 
that like all musical wonders they are modest, 
and we do not see enough of them. We 
appreciate their efforts so well that we want 
to hear them oftener. It is not the qualit}' 
of the choir, but the quantity that we com- 
plain of. We are frequently treated to 
samples of their individual melodizing pow- 
ers ; but we yearn to hear the whole band, 
clearing away tlie cobwebs on the rafters 
with their vigorous melodies. We often go 
into chapel all equipped with our stock of 
appreciation for the whole choir when only 
a single member of it shows up, and then 
what are we to do with our extra apprecia- 
tion? We have more than enough to go 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



151 



round. We can bestow a good portion of it 
upon the soloist and the organist, but we still 
have some left which we cannot seem to 
dispose of. You see, Herald, we are in 
something the same fix that the United States 
government is — we are troubled with a sur- 
plus — a surplus of appreciation, and the item 
in our last issue was meant as a wild wail for 
some more singers on whom to bestoAV this 
surplus. We would not for the world have 
you think that we do not appreciate our 
choir: we are running over with apprecia- 
tion, and want a larger choir to take the extra 
amount off our hands. 



After a long period of silence the fire on 
the gymnasium question has been opened by 
a communication which we publish in another 
column. The interest and enthusiasm of the 
writer are praiseworthy; but he has plunged 
somewhat recklessl}' into a subject which 
has, perhaps, a greater depth than he ex- 
pected. He strikes at the root of the matter 
by asking, " Why have we not a gymna- 
sium?" and wants to know what has become 
of the money subscribed. Luckily these ques- 
tions are easily answered. The immediate 
occasion of our lack of a gymnasium is want 
of money. The prime cause is somewhat 
more obscure, and lies in the fact that there 
is great difiiculty in persuading our collegiate 
ancestors that we really need a gymnasium. 
They did not have any in their day, and now 
say to the committee on subscriptions, " Why 
don't they go out and saw wood ? '' You 
might argue that there is no wood to saw : 
but it would make no difference — they would 
tell you to get a job as coal-heaver. As to 
what has become of the money already sub- 
scribed for a gymnasium, we have no reason 
to doubt that it is in a safe place drawing 
interest. The sum was small in the first 
place, and unless it has been " rolled over " 
by a process little short of speculation it can 



hardly have reached a size suflScient to war- 
rant the building of the most humble gym. 
But this opens up the question whether it 
would be well to put a comparatively small 
sum of money into a gymnasium of a tempo- 
rary character. The Orient has been in favor 
of erecting a temporary building; but it is 
true that, unless the temporar}' building were 
glaringly inconvenient, we should in all prob- 
ability become saddled with it permanently. 
It is reported that the committee is not in 
favor of building till they can erect a sub- 
stantial and permanent structure. Our zeal- 
ous correspondent gives the " authorities " a 
poke for their seeming apathy. We should 
be as gratified as any to see an active cam- 
paign instituted; but the fact that we do not 
see a member of the faculty at ever}' street 
corner "laying" for the wealthy passers-by 
with a subscription paper does not conclu- 
givelj' show that the " authorities " are not at 
work. The members of the faculty are as 
anxious for and realize the need of a gymna- 
sium full}' as much as the students. The 
gentleman who is chairman of the committee 
on procuring funds for a gymnasium is with- 
out doubt doing all that can be done to fur- 
ther the desired object, although his efforts 
may not be proclaimed from the house-tops. 
The plan for the college to invest money in a 
gymnasium, deriving the interest from a tax 
on the students, would be an excellent one 
were it feasible. We are inclined to think 
that the college would find difiiculty in scrap- 
ing together the money ; and then it must be 
remembered that, unless a very heavy tax for 
the use of the building were levied, the small 
number of students would render the interest 
inappreciable. It is a good thing to have 
this matter agitated, and our correspondent 
has written in a most commendable spirit. 



The Athletic Committee at Harvard propose to 
request the faculty to prohibit foot ball after the close 
of the present season. 



152 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A PICTURE. 

A face whose features lie in sweet repose. 

The lips relaxed in sober lines, 

Eyes gazing pensively where shines 

The blue of summer skies in liquid deeps. 

A cheek all round and fair and tinged with rose, 

Brown hair that on the forehead lies 

So prim that it quite plain denies 

Coquettishness, or that its owner keeps 

Company with jollity, or mirth knows. 

But I at other times have seen that face 

When those calm lips were wreathed with smiles. 

Those pensive eyes were filled with wiles 

That set their azure depths aglow with light ; 

When bright red roses all the cheek did grace ; 

When in confusion that brown hair 

Was tossed about upon the air ; 

When ev'ry feature fair proclaimed a sprite 

In whom no soberness could find a place. 



BOWDOIN IN JOURNALISM. 
The preparation of an article on Bow- 
doin College in journalism has been attended 
by some troubles peculiar to the subject. 
In tlie first place journalism has been recog- 
nized as one of the educated professions — 
requiring men of culture, wide information, 
and highly trained intellect — for only a com- 
paratively short time, consequently the list 
of real journalists is much shorter than that 
of any of the other professions. For the 
same reason there has not been tliat care on 
the part of the college historians in preserv- 
ing the newspaper record of those who might 
adopt journalism for a few years and then 
drift into some other profession, that there 
has in the records of the ministr}', for instance. 
All will admit, with our present light tiiat this 
is wrong, for it is impossible to estimate the 
importance of even a single year's work on 
any well circulated newspaper. But there 
are many, many years of such work for which 
Bowdoin College gave the preparation and 
the inspiration, of which the records are very 
vague. Another trouble has arisen over the 
word "journalism," which has no close, ac- 



curate definition. It is too modern to have 
crystallized into positive lines and boundaries. 
The journal of to-day has such a wide field 
of operations ; includes so many classes and 
kinds; and calls upon the skill and talents of 
so many writers, that many have a connection 
with journalism who are not what is under- 
stood by the modern word journalist.* 

Among those prominently identified with 
the college, not graduates, who have been 
connected with journalism. Rev. Asa Cum- 
mings, D.D., a trustee, edited the Christian 
Mirror for nearly thirty years, closing his 
connection in 1855. " His eminent ability 
and rare skill gave it a name and rank among 
the first religious papers of the land." 
Arthur Ware, LL.D., another early trustee, 
and a verj^ eminent man in his time, edited 
the Eastern Argus, for a few years following 
1817. Ex-President Leonard Woods, D.D., 
edited the Literary and Theological Review in 
New York City, from 1834 to 1837. 

Among the alumni, the first class to have 
a journalist was 1818. Seba Smith traveled 
a while after graduation and then became an 
editor and afterwards one of the proprietors 
of the Eastern Argus. In 1830 he started 
the Portland Daily Courier, the first daily 
published east of Boston, which flourished 
seven years under his management. Taken 
by a spirit of land speculation he went south, 
lost his mone}', returned to New York, and 
at different times edited the Rover, the Bunker 
Hill, the Budget, the American Republican, a 
daily, the United States Magazine, and Put- 
narn's Monthly. Mr. Smith had much literary 
ability aside from his excellent journalistic 
tact. Edward Theodore Bridge of the same 
class edited the Augusta Patriot for some 
time after graduation. 

Rev. Dr. Adam Wilson, of the class of 
1819, established Zion Advocate at Portland, 
with which he was connected for twenty 

* The writer while aimiug to have this accurate, realizes the 
human liability to err, aud would be glad to correspond with 
those who notice errors or omissions in this article. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



153 



years as editor and proprietor. Such a life 
must have been very influential. 

Wm. Cutter, of the class of 1821, was at 
one time " editor and publisher of a maga- 
zine in New York." 

Moses Parsons Parish, of the class of 
1822, "conducted for sometime a temperance 
journal in Woodstock, Vt.," and subsequently 
was publisher and editor of Plough, Loom and 
Anvil. Silvanus Waterman Robinson, of the 
same class, for a short time edited the Amer- 
ican Advocate in Hallowell. 

[To be conliuued.J 



A POINTED TALE. 

[Sunrlny morning — George's father has come on the mid- 
night to stay ooer Sunday with him.'\ 

" George, what is that bell foratthis time of 
the morning, and why this unseeming haste ? " 
" It is the bell for chapel, father." 
" That is right, my son, always be prompt." 

" Chapel over ? And what now, George ? " 
" Breakfast, father." 

" My son, now breakfast is over, suppose 
you prepare yourself for meeting, and then I 
will have a short talk with you on your pros- 
pects." 

"Yes, father." 

"As you are ready, George — but what is 
that bell ?" 

" For meeting, sir." 

" Oh, yes ; I hope j'ou attend all the exer- 
cises of the Sabbath, George? " 

"Yes, father, 1 try to." 

"I am glad of that. It is one's duty to 
do so." 

" What now, George, meeting being over?" 
" Dinner, father." 

" Then let us go, and after dinner I will 
have my talk with you." 



" Now, my son, we are through dinner ; 
and here we are settled in your room — but 
there is another bell ! what is that for ? " 

" For the Bible class, father." 

"So soon as this? Well, go, my son, and 
after that we shall have the afternoon to our- 
selves." 

" Here you are back again ! Why do you 
not take off your things, George?" 

" It is most time for afternoon chapel, 
father— and there is the bell ! " 

" Well, my son, I will wait for you here." 

" Come, father ! " 
"What now, George?" 
" Supper." 

"I see your day is pretty well taken up, 
but we have the evening." 

"Well, George, evening at last, and — but 
there is another bell ! is there another chapel 
now ? " 

" It is the evening meeting, father." 

" Then I suppose we shall have to go — - 
and after meeting, what more is there then ? " 

" Then I am so tired I go to bed, father." 

" My son, the train is about here. I did 
not have my talk with you, after all. By the 
way, how many of those exercises are not 
compulsory' ? " 

" The Bible class and the evening meet- 
ing, father." 

" Then j'ou need not go to those two ex- 
ercises any more. The Sabbath is a day of 
rest as well as of worship. But if you can, 
you might ask to be allowed to substitute the 
Bible class for afternoon chapel. It would 
be a much greater benefit to you. The 
faculty are a considerate body. Good-bye, 
my son." 



Williams College broke the ball throwing record 
this year by Carse's throw of 373 feet. 



154 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



THE WIT. 

Ned Simpkins is a funny man, 
He cracks his jokes where'er he goes ; 
To see their point one seldom can, 
Yet laughter always greets their close. 

And here in private be it known 
This laughter mostly is his own. 

The share that's furnished by the rest— 
A seeming tribute to his wit — 
Is hardly owing to the jest, 
But Simpkins' way of treating it. 



COHYEKTIONS. 



J. h'. E. 

The thirty-eighth annual convention of 
the Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternitj' met 
Nov. llth and 12th with the Beta Phi Oliap- 
ter of Rochester, N. Y. 

Twenty-six chapters were represented by 
eighty delegates. At the regular business 
sessions, Tuesday and Wednesday, a large 
amount of private business was, thanks to the 
executive abilitj' of the council, transacted 
with thoroughness and dispatch. An invita- 
tion to hold the next convention with the 
Wesley an Chapter was accepted. 

Tuesday evening a reception was given 
the delegates and their friends in the Powers' 
Art Gallery. Upwards of 1000 were present. 

Wednesday afternoon the delegates were 
given a drive through the city and suburbs, 
and made a visit, by special invitation, to the 
Warner Observatorj'. Wednesday evening 
the literary exercises occurred in the Cor- 
inthian Academy. The delegates occupied 
the seats in front of the auditorium, and the 
large audience completely filled the remainder 
of the house. The exercises consisted of 
prayer, by Prof. C. H. Toy, D.D., LL.D. 
Introductory remarks, by the president, Judge 
Rumsey. Tenor solo, by Charles W. Paine. 
Oration, by Julian Hawthorne. Poem, by 



Hon. George H. Harden, Speaker of the 
Massachusetts House of Representatives and 
editor of the Lowell Courier. 

Prom the academy thedelegates adjourned 
to the banquet at Powers' Hall. Hon. George 
Raines ofliciated as toast-master, and respon- 
ses were made to a large number of toasts. 

Much credit is due the Beta Phi Chapter 
for their hospitable treatment of the delegates, 
and also the alumni of Rochester for their 
cordial assistance in making the 38th conven- 
tion a success in every respect. 

THBTA DELTA CHI. 

The thirty-eighth annual convention of 
the Theta Delta Chi Fraternity was held 
under the auspices of the charge at Dickinson 
College, at Windsor Hotel, New York City, 
November 19th to 21st. 

The first meeting of the convention was 
called to order at 10.30 a.m., the 19th, with 
President Simons in the chair. Only routine 
business was transacted at the morning 
session. 

The afternoon meeting was called at 2,30. 
The report of the committee on credentials 
showed complete delegations present from 
every charge, and the roll-calls showed a 
full attendance at each of the subsequent 
meetings. The reports of the charges 
showed that the fraternity was never in a 
more prosperous condition. 

During the three days' meeting of the 
convention an unusual]}^ large amount of 
important business was transacted. Dele- 
gates who have been in conventions for fif- 
teen years say they never attended a more 
business-like or more harmonious meeting of 
the fraternity. 

The officers of the Grand Lodge for the 
ensuing year are: President, Seward A. 
Simons, Buffalo, N. Y. ; Treasurer, George 
Lawyer, Clinton, N. Y. ; Secretary, C. A. 
Harstrom, Hobart College. After a most 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



155 



profitable meeting the convention adjourned — 
so far as business is concerned — to meet in 
New York in November, 1885, under charge 
of the chapter at Hamilton College. 

At 8 P.M., November 21st, eighty-five 
members of the fraternitj' sat down to a most 
bountiful banquet in the private dining hall 
of the Windsor. Tiiose younger members of 
the fraternity who were present will long 
remember the happy vein of the remarks of 
the master of ceremonies and the eloquent 
speeches of the older members. At midnight 
the festivities closed and, with many a fra- 
ternal hand-clasp and many a good wish for 
the future, the delegates separated to return 
again to the duties of active life or the pur- 
suit of classical lore. 




'Tis true 'tis pity, 
And pity 'tis 'tis true : 

That the tawny cur seen about the campus 
lately is the satellite of a senior. 

That the foot ball association was not 
formed earlier. 

That the catalogue has not yet appeared. 

That one of the end women lost thirty 
dollars on the election. 

That there are some persons — not fresh- 
men — who have never taken a book from 
the library. 

That the reading-room magazines do not 
appear till the articles are all stale. 



INDECISION. 

Tlie hour was late. 

And yet I lingered still, 
Like one whose fate 

Has chained him 'gainst his will. 

I would to go, 

And yet I would to stay, 
I hardly know 

How passed that hour away. 

I could not solve 

A question all so grave, 
But did resolve 

Its answer then to waive. 

For now, look here. 

It was so hard a place 
The doubt to clear 

While looking in that face. 

I heard at last 

A step upon the stair; 
The doubt was passed. 

The question solved just there. 

I would to go. 

And went with all my might, 
For I did know 

To stay would not be right. 



AN OPENING. 

' I've an opening for you Perkins," 

Said the old man earnestly, 
As he came into the parlor 

At the early hour of three. 
Where his fair and blithesome daughter, 

And young Perkins, 'eighty-eight, 
Beguiled the early morning 

In a blissful tete-a-tfite ; 

' I've an opening, large and worthy. 
For a man of your estate, 
It will cause you little labor. 
Neither will it keep you late." 
' Here's the opening," said the old man. 
And a placid smile he wore. 
While his long and bony finger 
Pointed toward the oj)en door. 



156 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



AMO. 

" I love," the radiant maiden said. 

The freshman gave a start ; 
A thousand fancies filled his mind. 

He clasped her to his heart. 

It seemed to his bewildered sense 
As if 'twere all a dream ; 

But as he pressed her closer still 
She only said, " ice-cream.'''' 



COMMUNICATION. 



[The opinions expressed iu tiiis departmeut are not necessa- 
rily tliose of the editors.] 

To the Editors of the Orient : 

Gentlemen, — Not being an undergi-aduate 
of long standing I feel as if I should offer 
an apology for trespassing upon your valu- 
able space. My excuse would be, if nothing- 
more, the existence of the rhyme beginning, 

" Who can tell what a freshman thinks?" 
for I wish to indicate what a freshman thinks 
on one point at least. 

I entered Bowdoin because of her high 
reputation, and because I wanted a college 
that would give a man culture — not " cul- 
chaw," with eye-glasses — but an education, in 
every sense of the word. It is needless to 
say that I was not disappointed. I am satis- 
fied with my choice. But I find that an edu- 
cation in one important branch is only pursued 
under great difficulties. Surely no college 
can be called well balanced without a better 
course in gymnastics than is possible here at 
present. I am told that a few years ago, be- 
fore Memorial Hall was completed, when Dr. 
Sargent reigned in the gymnasium, our ath- 
letes used to give exhibitions in Portland and 
elsewhere, and no college in the land was 
thought to offer a better course in physical 
training than Bowdoin. This makes it seem 
all the more pitiful that we should be obliged 
to put up with our present contemptible quar- 
ters. But why have we not a gymnasium? 
I understand that a sum of money — not large 



to be sure, but a good sized nucleus — was 
subscribed toward the erection of a gymna- 
sium, before Memorial was completed. What 
has become of this? It should have been 
rolled over enough before now to have 
reached a size sufficient for the erection of a 
wholly plain building with the necessary 
equipments, at least. Is it possible that the 
authorities do not realize our needs in this 
direction? Their apparent apathy would 
indicate as much. 

Fortunately the condition of the college 
has been so healthy that it has not yet been 
perceptibly injured by the lack of a gymna- 
sium ; but the importance of this branch of 
education is such that parents will soon be 
sending their sons elsewhere unless we offer 
better facilities for physical instruction. 

It is possible that the money subscribed 
is harnessed to some conditions. If so, why 
would it not be a good and safe investment 
for the college itself to put a few thousand 
dollars into a gymnasium? If a fair tax for 
the use of the building were put upon the 
students, who would bear it without grumb- 
ling, the money would pay good interest. 

It is evident that some vigorous action 
must soon be taken on this question ; the 
sooner the better. It is to be hoped that 
not many more men will be allowed to leave 
these classic halls without having had a 
chance to become strong, in every sense of 
the word. m. e. 



The Columbia College Library has been opened 
to graduates of Columbia, and to thejjublic by cards. 
The library is open every day from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., 
and is lighted by electricity in the evenings. 

The Nassau Lit. presents a College Constitution, 
"which shall embody and harmonize the usages of 
former years" "in the matter of summoning and 
conducting mass-meetings." The object of such a 
constitution is to remove the "evils attendant upon 
government by precedents capable of violation or of 
false and interested construction." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



157 




The gladsome feast is 
o'er, 
And quickly on the 
heels of Greeting, 
Ere yet had passed the joy of meeting. 
Came Parting to the door. 

And now do we return 

To college halls and days of study. 
In gloomy Brunswick town all muddy. 

The midnight oil to burn. 

But often to our thoughts will come 
The memory of friends at home ; 

And soon ere yet we are aware 

Will "Merry Christmas! " fill the air. 

Davis, '85, and Turner, '86, represented Bowdoin 
Theta Delta Chi, at the oonvenlion of that fraternity 
recently held in New York. 

Obtrusive cheek is not becoming in a senior. 
According ^ye are glad to see that Libby, having 
found wisdom (tooth), has sobered down. 

A Rugby Foot Ball Association was recently 
formed. At a meeting held on Thursday, Nov. 20, 
the following officers were elected : Whiltier, '85, 
President; Kilgore, '86, Vice-President; Choate, '87, 
Secretary, and Gary, '87, Treasurer. It is to be re- 
gretted that the matter of Rugby foot ball was not 
taken up earlier. However, with an organization 
jDerfected and a start made, there is no reason why, 
next fall, the game should not be established on a 
firm basis. 

The appointments for the senior and junior 
exhibition to be held Dec. 18th are as follows : from 
'85, Alexander, Bartlett, Cook, Donnell, Folsom, 
French, Libby, Wardwell ; from '86, Butler, Horn, 
Smith, Turner. 

Prof. Johnson offers an optional exercise in French 
every Thursday afternoon. Special attention is paid 
to pronounciation. 

The citizens of Brunswick are to be congratulated 
on the purchase of the line new bell that has been 
hung in the tower of the town hall. Its tones as we 
hear them, mellowed by the distance, are very 
pleasing. 

Leigh, Bowdoin, ex-'85, has been appointed orator 
for class-day at Dartmouth. 



The Congregational sociable at the house of Mrs. 
J. D. Lincoln, on Thursday, the 20th ult., was a 
pleasant occasion, and was much enjoyed by the 
considerable number of students who attended. 

R. C. Washburn, formerly of Bowdoin, '83, and a 
graduate of Tufts, '83, is at Berlin, Germany. 

The general demoralization attendant upon a 
presidential campaign has reached even to the wells 
on the campus. Only one remains untainted, and 
that is the one farthest removed from the heart of the 
town. Those who are obliged to walk half tlie 
length of the campus for a pail of water, must 
experience the depth of misery. 

In English Lit. Prof. — "W , what was the 

third period of Wycliffe's life?" W.— "The 
period of transubstantiation, I think." The apathetic 
look worn by the class up to this point of the recita- 
tion is " transubstantiated" into an eudible smile. 

In many a rural district doth there live 

Poor unsuspecting youth, blind to the fate 

Which soon shall place them 'neath the tyrant sway 

Of one of those strange mortals who do dwell 

Within the.charmed circle of a college; 

Beings profound in wisdom of this world. 

Bold, auilacious, 'bove the common race of men. 

O youth, we pity thee. 

Bowdoin sends out an unusually large number of 
teachers this winter. Those who have recently begun 
schools are: from '85, Dunham and Bartlett; '86, 
Berry, Fling and Kilgore; '87, C. F. Moulton, H. 
M. Moulton, Lane, Plummer and Sewall ; '88, 
Bartlett and Cole. 

After the completion of the few remaining lect- 
ures of this term's Political Economy, by Gen. 
Chamberlain, the seniors will take a course in 
Mediasval History, under Prof. Smith. The book is 
Stille's Studies in Mediasval History. 

Leaf from the life of a Bowdoin senior. A senior, 
in the course of his travels, met a charming young 
lady on a stage-coach. In the progress of the 
journey the two became quite confidential, and the 
following is a bit of the conversation : Miss X. — 
"What is your business, Mr. K. ?" Mr. K. (with 
dignity) — "I am a senior at Bowdoin college." Miss 
X. (looks surprised; then musingly) — "Bowdoin 
college? — Bowdoin college? — where is that?" Mr. 
K. (considerably nonplussed, but not quite crushed) 
— "O, that's at Brunswick, down in Maine." Miss 
X. (looking a world of thanks for the information) 
"I have a brother at Harvard." Mr. K. (who has 
regained his composure)— "Indeed! at Harvard? 
Beg your pardon, did you say Harvard ?" Miss X.— 



158 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



"Yes, sir." Mr. K. (with ignorance in liis face) — 
"Harvard — Harvard — where is Harvard?" The 
senior is revenged. 

Kendall, '85, has recently rejoined his class after 
teaching. 

The cost of Bowdoin's new gymnasium will be 
%?:9>,0QQ.— Tuflslonian. 

Will he, you say: "Ay, there's the rub; " 

For how far on into futurity 

That little wiWs about to carry us, 

Ere we behold the new gymnasium, 

Must give us pause. 

The democrats of the town, assisted by the Free- 
port drum-coriDS, held a demonstration celebrating 
their victory, on Tuesday evening, 18th Nov. There 
were some fine illuminations and displays of fire- 
works at many private residences. A torch-light 
procession, large in numbers and multiplex in step, 
paraded the principal streets to the music of two 
bands, interspersed with selections by the vigorous 
di-um-corps. A number of transparencies were borne 
in the procession, among which we noticed one 
inscribed as follows : "We've got our heels on their 
necks, and we'll keep them there. (Signed) Prof. 
Chapman." Another bore these words: "We've 
made James G. Blaine the Idle (idol) Son of Maine.'' 

Norris, '86, and Burleigh, '87, were delegates to 
the Delta Kappa Epsilon Convention at Rochester, 
Nov. 11th and 12th. 

The college bookstore has become a palace of 
enchantment. It is so difficult to pass by such a 
tempting display of goods that one finds himself 
seeking pretexts for calling. In looking at so many 
pretty things one sighs to think he has no more 
money. 

Now is the time when Prof. Lee vs^ants to see the 
seniors, and the seniors don't care to see Prof. Lee — 
about those marks for cuts. 

The tennis players stick to the courts with un- 
abated zeal, notwithstanding the frozen ground and 
low temperature. We noticed a game played recent- 
ly in a snow-storm, when the participants wore 
mittens, and had to jump about to keep warm, in 
addition to the exertion required in playing. 

In the last number of the Orient the statement 
was made that Means, '84, had been obliged to give 
up his studies at Hartford on account of ill health. 
Mr. Means calls our attention to the above as a mis- 
take. He has been attending to iiis studies as usual. 

Prof, calls up Mr. W., and by a lapsus Hnguce 
says: "You may describe the planet W." The class 
smile, and the Prof., recognizing his mistake, con- 



tinues; "Well, there is nothing very remarkable 
about that; planets, you know, are named for almost 
anything." The class roar, and Mr. W., who is a 
boating man, mentally resolves to run into the Prof, 
on the next dark night. 

In his talk of a week ago. Gen. Chamberlain 
discussed the question of presidential elections. 

It is reported that Prof. Robinson is to spend two 
years in Europe, after the close of the present college 
year. 





'34 — President Cyrus 
Hamlin of Middlebury Col- 
J ltgp> and his wite, have lately cele- 
brated their silver wedding. The Doctor 
gave an amusing account of their wedding 
trip through the north of Turkey on horse- 
back. 

'40. — John B. L. Soule has lately edited a volume 
of beautiful poems. We hope to be able to publish 
some of them, if the editor will be kind enough to 
send us a cop}'. 

'49. -We have the catalogue of this class com- 
piled last commencement. If any of the readers of 
the Orient wish to know anything about any mem- 
ber, will he please write to us and we will print it. 

'65. — Rev. Edward Hawes, D.D., recently of New 
Haven, Ct., will supply for the present the Pilgrim 
church in St. Louis, Mo. 

'50. — Rev. Americus Fuller of Minneapolis ex- 
pects to return to Turkey, where he was formerly 
missionary under the American Board. 

'61. — In the Ailmitic Monthly for December is an 
article entitled "Canada and the British Connec- 
tions," by Edward Stanwood. 

'62. — Isaac B. Choate publishes, through the 
house of D. Appleton & Co., a book entitled "Ele- 
ments of English Speech." 

'63. — Rev. Addison Blanchard has been appointed 
Home Missionary Superintendent in Kansas. 

'81. — Walker has gone to Clyde, Kansas, to prac- 
tice medicine. 

'88. — Goodwin has gone to Harvard Law School. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



159 



Class of 1881. 

Edgar O. Achoi'ti was elected principal of tlie 
Soutli Abington High School in August, 1881, and 
resigned in 1883 ; in October of that year he entered 
the Boston University Law School. In March, 1884, 
be was elected a member of the South Abington 
School Committee, in which place he now resides. 

Clinton L. Baxter after graduating, went into the 
Portland Packing Co., and was admitted as a part- 
ner by Davis & Baxter, in January, 1882. Since 
that time has been, with others, actively engaged in 
superintending their vast enterprises, both in Maine 
and the Provinces. Was married February 8, 1882, 
to Miss Dana, of Portland. 

Edward E. Briry passed the summer of 1881 in 
recreation and pleasure at his home in Bath, Maine. 
In October, 1881, was matriculated at the Boston 
University School of Medicine and there attended 
a full course of lectures. He graduated and took 
his degree of M.D., in June, 1884, standing second 
in point of scholarship. 

William M. Brown since graduation has been 
employed as a civil engineer on the Bangor & Piscat- 
aquis, the Franklin & Somerset, and the Bangor & 
Katahdin Iron Works Railroads. Is at present em- 
ployed as engineer by the Bangor & Piscataquis 
Railroad Company. 

Harold W. Chamberlin in 1881 and 1882, pur- 
sued post-graduate studies in political economy, in- 
ternational and constitutional law at Bowdoin Col- 
lege. Since tlie spring of 1883, has been attending 
to various land interests in Florida, spending the 
greater part of his summers in Brunswick, Me. 

Edward H. Chamberlain writes: " Since gradu- 
ating have put in most of my time in acquiring the 
degree of M. D. "Took my lectures at the Eclectic 
Medical Institute, of Cincinnati, Ohio, and graduated 
January 15, 1884. Have just opened an office in 
Lowell, where I shall locate if I can make a living." 

Albert C. Cobb since graduation has been en- 
gaged in the study of the law in Portland, Me., with 
his father. Col. J. C. Cobb. Assisted Hon. Charles 
W. Goddard, Commissioner, in the fourth revision 
of the Revised Statutes of Maine. Was admitted to 
the Supreme Judicial Court of Maine, April 22, 1884, 
and to the Federal Courts May 6, 1884. Is practic- 
ing his profession at Minneapolis, Minn. 

William I. Cole writes: "The first year after 
graduating was assistant teacher in Tahoe Academy, 
Marion, Mass. Since then I have been elected prin- 
cipal of the high school at Calais, Me., where I am 
at present located. Expect to teach for some years 
to come." 




Thieenewpiizesareof- 
feied at Rutgeis one of 
for the best article on Foreign Missions, 
the other two for excellence in extempora- 
neous speaking among the seniors — $30 for 
the first prize, $20 for the second. 

Donald G. Mitchell has been lecturing to the Yale 
seniors and juniors on English Literature. 

Adelbert College, in Cleveland, has declared in 
favor of co-education. The action has caused a 
revolt, and eighty students have refused to attend 
recitations. — Ex. 

At a recent meeting of the college senate at 
Amherst, it was stated by the president that all mat- 
ters of college discipline would hencefortli be re- 
ferred to that body for its decision. 



flAIN AM© f AM€Y MIITIMS 

ne.xtly executed at the 

Bl^fipi^WICK pE^^IiD 0FFICE. 



ARE VERY POPUEAK. 

j^El^^Y ¥]IE P^TTE^, PeJ^TL^J^D. 



H. ¥. SMGKP8Iifi, 

°SiwB Boots Esd Sioi 

Next l0 Rnierican Express Qffice, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 
STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

CIGARETTES. 



CIGAKETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT No. 1 

SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brigiitest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 

direct importation, which is made especially for us, water 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. 1, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLBN cC- GINTElt }l<iuiifac1urer.<i, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



New system. Learned in less than one-quarter the time 
required by any other. Old reporters throw away old sys- 
tems and learn this for speed and legibility. It can be 
successfully 

TAUGHT BY MAIL. 
The corresponding style can be learned in a few hours, 
and the full verbatim rei^orting style in a few months. It 
is a marvel of simplicity. 

STUDENTS 

can easily acquire enough to enable them to take notes of 

LECTURES. 

Send for circular. Terms: Corresponding style, five 

lessons, |5. Corresponding and reporting, twenty lessons, 

«;io. 

R. B. OAPEN, Augusta, Me. 



;Q STEEL 
M PENS. 




SMOKE THE BEST. 

We beg to intovm the public and smokers generally, that we 
have secured a largo stock ol' the \'erv choicest grades of thor- 
oughly cured 

GOLDEN VIEGIWIA, PEKIQUE and TUEKISH 
tobaccos, which we are using in the manufacture "of our Cele- 
brated brands of cigarette and smoking tobaccos. Awl 
have added to our stock a large shipment of the finest imported 
French Eiee Paper. Such stock, made up by the highest class of 
skillful labor, we feci confident cannot fail to satisfy the tastes of 
all good judges. 

STANDARD BRANDS. 
Caporal— Caporal i— Sweet Caporal— St. .James i, Kinney Bros.' 
Straight Cut in Full Dress Packages, etc., etc. 

JUST OUT— SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL. 
Manufactured by Special Request, 

Ji^inney Tobacco Co., 
Successors to Kinney Bros., New York. 



Leading Numbers ; 14, 048, 130, 333, 161, 
For Sale by all Sta-^.ioners. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEM CO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New Yori« 



FOR FALL AND WINTER, 

^T JACKSON'S. 



All Goods Warranted as Represented. 

s- I?,. jA-CK:soisr, si3, 

2 Odd Fellows ' Block, Main Street, Brunswick. 

The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Leclincs ai the Jledi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence FebkUauV 7th,lSS4, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alpheus S. Packaed, Acting President; 
Alfred MrrcHKr.i., M.D., Secretary; Iseael T. Dana, M.D., 

Patholoi;v :mii1 T'i;irii(e; Ai.fi;ki> ZMitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
anil Di.~i:i-"^ .-t W.iinrii and fliiMi'i'ii ; CHARLES W. GODDAIfD, 
A.M., ^Iriliral .1 mi^|i|-udclllc : l-l.-lMiEKir: H. GEKRISH,M.D., 

Analoiiiv; lIiNnv (ahmk iiAii,. I'h.n., Chemistry: BuUT G. 
Wilder, M.l)., Physiology ; Stephen II. Weeks, M.D., Surgery 
and Clinical Surgery; CHARLES O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics; 'IR^^NG E. Kimpall, JI.D., Demonstrator of 
Anatomy; EvePvETT T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of His- 
tology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

FRANK M. STETSON, 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Diamonds, 



Jetvelry, 



Silver Ware, 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 

Prepare Original Designs for Society 
Badges, Rings, Frizes, and Class Ctips, 
which will be forivarded to students on 
request. 

A SPECIALTY is made of English 
Peivter Beer Mugs, in two sizes, with Glass 
Bottoms. 

Society, Book, and Visiting Card Plates 
engraved in jtroper style. 

Invitations and Programmes in novel 
forms at short notice. 

Shreve, Crump & Low, 

BOSTOliT. 



Bronzes, 



Porcelains, 



Fancy Goods. 



BYRON STEVENS. 

We iuvite from the Studeuls an inspection of our display of 

Xmas Goods, 

And solicit tlieir patronage for tlie coming season. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



EARS for the MILLION 

Foo Choo's Balsam of Shark's Oil 

Positively Restores the Hearing, and is the Only- 
Absolute Cure for Deafness Known. 

, This Oil is abstracted from pecnhar species of small White 
Shark, caught in the yellow Sea, kno^^^l as Carcharodon Kond- 
eletii. Every Chinese" fisherman knows it. Its virtues as a re- 
storative of hearing were discovered by a Buddhist Priest about 
the year 1410. Its cures were so lu^merous and manij so seem- 
ingly miraculous, that the remedy \vas officially proclaimed over 
the entire Empire. Its use became so universal that for over 300 
years no deafness has existed amonij the Chinese people. Sent, 
charges prepaid, to any address at Sl.OO per bottle. 

HE^l WH1,T TMl BIHF BKl 

It has performed a miracle in my case. 

I have no unearthly noises in my head and hear much better. 

I have been greatly benefited. 

My deafness helped a great deal — think another bottle will 
cure me. 

My hearing is much benefited. 

I have received untold benefit. 

My hearing is improving. 

It is giving good satisfaction. 

Have been greatly benefited, and am rejoiced that I saw the 
notice of it. 

" Its virtues are unquestionable and its curative character ab- 
solute, as the \vi-iter can personally testify, both from experience 
and observation. Write at once to Haylock & .Tenney, 7 Dey 
Street, New York, enclosing $1.00, and you will receive by return 
a remedy that will enable you to hear like anybody else, and 
whose curative effects will he permanent. Tou will never regret 
doing so." — Editor of Mercantile Review. 

«®-To avoid loss in the Mails, please send money by Regis- 
tered Letter. 

Only Imported by HAYIiOCK & JENNEY, 
Sole Agents for America. 7 Dey St., N. Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



^ FMEBI^] 



BE,XJ3SrS'^?i7'ICIS:, IVCE. 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 



Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bruns-nrick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Viettrs ; also College Views. 

M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 
Enlaro^ed from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

POFITLA.ND, JVIJS.INE. 

^icF. H. WILS0N,3te^ • 

DISPENSE t{ OF 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Go to W, B. Woodard's 

To buy vour GEOCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save aioney by so doiug. 
srs:ci.a.Xj ia.^TE:s to si'-crxJEWT ci4"cr:BS. 
Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIIVIIVIER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland. Me. 



|piltj I ^i|ap ^t®F©, 



|©Dteeiijii( 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



Wja. % FIELD, 



M^N^gE^. 



TONTINE HOTSL, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Special attention will be given to Class and Rennion Diuners 
and Suppers to order. First-class laundry connected with the 
house. 

S. B. BREWSTER, Proprietor. 



\,n 



WAT€1IS, 



239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. MERRILL. A. KEITH. 



DEALER IN 



Presli and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 






2 %ri| llocfe, 



lA- 



DEALER IN 

nil MiiPMi fii^ ^nm,M 

CEDAR STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
1^ Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COE. O'BEIEN AND MAIN SIREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

J. G. WASHBURK, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer iu 

PICTURE FRAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

Also Pictures, Cabinet Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, 

etc. Also agent for the celebrated Household Sewing 

Machines, 

In the Everett Store, Main Street, Opposite the Mall, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



NiTIOHAL SCHOOL SUPPLY BDREAU. 

Beloit, Wis., July 31, 1883. 
National School Siipply Bureau: 

Last April, being tlien in cliarse of a large public school, but 
desiring a position in some good academy or college, I placed 
my name with your Bureau.' During the lirstpartot the present 
month I received notice from you of a vacancy in such a place as 
I desired. 

Putting myself in communication with the party concerned I 
received the appointment. I am well satisfied with the manage- 
ment of the Bureau, and feel sure that it fills a useful and nec- 
essary place in our school economy. Tou are at liberty to use 
my name if you wish. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD O. FISKE. 
Headmaster Markam Academy, Milwaukee, Wis. 

For application-form and circular, address. 

National Scliool Supply Depot, Chicago, III. 
IT. B. — We want all kinds of Teachers for Seliools 
and Families. Good Pay to Agents qpd Private Cor- 
respondents. 



DEALER IN ■ 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

violins. Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 



STUDENTS 

Of all classes will find it valuable to consult on all subjects the 



183 SOUTH CLARK STREET, CHICAGO, ILL. 



DEALER IS 

CHOICE GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. B. — Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

All the Students Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 



f mik 1, l@b©i-te' i@@t I Shi@ Stei-g, 



COK. Main AND Mason Sts., opp. To\vn Clock. 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 

WHY I AM A REPUBLICAN 

A graphic and reliable presentation of Republican princi- 
ples, and reasons for continuing the party in power, also 
fine portraits and authentic lives of 

I3L.A.I1VE: AlVD LOO^IV 

by Gov. GEO. S. BOTJTWELL, of Mass. THE BOOK 
of the party, endorsed by leading Republicans. Price in 
reach of every voter. A rare opportunity for a wide-awake 
student to engage in the campaign with profit. 

WM. J. BETTS & CO., Hartford, Conn. 



/K CLUfJ i^oAD l^ACE^ 







til iiiiliilil ii,, 

(Established 1877.) 

10 BERKELY ST., BOSTON, MASS., 

ONE DEVOTED EXCLtTSIVBLY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 
OTHEK TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp at above address. 



STA^LL & BURT, 

509 Tremont St., and 4 Warren Ave., Odd Fellows' Hall, Boston, Mass. 
SPECIAL IMPROVED ^) 



Auerican STAR Bicycle 




Although comparatively a new machine on the mar- 
ket, the STARhas made a splendid record, 
having won the 

Twenty-Five Mile Championship of 

the United States, 

Breaking- the record, in S3 minutes 10 seconds. 

It has a mile record of 2 min. 50 1-8 sec; 
5 miles, 15 min. 26 3-4 sec; mile -o'lthoiit 
hands, 3 min. 11 sec It has won the most im- 
portant Hill Climbing' Contests, including 
Corey Hill, Boston, Eagle Hill, Orange, N. J., 
and Standpipe Hill, AVashington, D. C This 
is a mere mention of the triuinplis of the Star. 

The principles embodied in the Star give the perfect combination for safety, speed, and comfort with economy of 
maintenance and durability found in uo other machine. 

IN ADDITION WE HAVE THE 



VICTOR TRICYCLE, The Most Faims Tliree-ftieeler Made In Tlie WGrtl 

A FuU Line of the Best ENGLISH MACHINES 

Go to complete the list and suit all tastes. 

The IDEATj, a cheaper machine for use of boys and youths, is a splendid machine for purpose intended and is 
highly recommended- 

SECOND-HAND MACHINES of all kinds, SUPPWES and SUNDRIES constantly on hand. 

REPAIRING of most difficult kinds performed at reasonable rates. All machines and parts must be plainly 
marked and be accompanied by instructions by next mail . 

SEND TWO-CENT STAMP FOR CATALOGUE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGDv'Ci 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OK THE OLD lilNUS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENOEAVED IN THE MOST FADHI:KABLS STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCy fUR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 



N0. i 0DD EEIiMW^' BLOCK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange connected witli the store. 

1, m. f d^ieoi®, tffo,pj'i?. 



The only radical internal remedy. Never known to 
fail in a single case, acute or chronic. It expels the poison- 
ous Uric Acid I'rom the blood, which is the prime cause 
of Rhennuitism, Gout, and Nenralsia.— As a lilood puri- 

THE OLD RELIABLE SPECIFIC 

ENDORSED BY PHYSICIANS AND 

THOUSANDS OF PATIENTS. 

tier it has no equal. Acting on common-sense principles 
it eradicates from the blood all poisonous matter which 
causes disease. — It has been in use for many years and 
cured a larger percentage of cases than any other 

POSITIVELY CURES 

remedy. Send for testimonials from the cured . — Salicy- 
lica strikes directly at the cause of these diseases, while 
so many so-called sijeci- 

BHEUMATISM 

fics only treat locally the effect. When you have tried 
in vain all the '*oils," "ointments," "liniments," and 
"pain cures," and when your 

GOUT, NEURALGIA. 

doctors cannot help you, do not despair but take Salicy- 
lica at once and be cured. — No one can afford to live in 
pain and misery when 

GRAVEL DIABETES, 

Salicylica will relieve him and jnit him in condition to 
attend to his daily avocations. 

$1 per box, 6 boxes for $5, 



BLOOD POISONING. 

witli full directions in ten languages. Sold by druggists 
everywhere, or sent Ijy mail, prepaid, on receipt of price. 

"WASHBURNE & CO.. Prop's, 

287 Broadway, New York. 

Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

OJd Fellows' Block, Over Bavis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. W. BROWNE, PitoPRiETOH. 
Formerly at Tontine Hotel, 







THE FAVORITE NOS. 303-404-SJ2-/7O-SS/- WITH 
HISOTHBRSrnES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. MERRYMAN, PHARMACIST,-:- 

D1¥QS, MEDIWllS. 

Faicy aiij Toilet Articles, CiprsI ToMcco. 

i»n.iCES8 :Ei.E3-i».soi>a"ja.:^ij:E. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

153° Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MtrSIC PUBLISHEB, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Blerciiandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



The New Stj'les in 

In all cnlors, are nnw ready. An elesant line of New York 
Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just receiveil. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, 'Wiues, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

1 ELLIOTT'S, t 

OPP. TOWN CLOCK. 



]VL _A.^^ ^ ^ R D ' S 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

JI^Farailies, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



tape; viroRiYi. 

In one of the tropical provinces oi; Germany there has been 
found a root, the extract from which has proved an absolute 
SPECIFIC for Tape Worm. It is pleasant to take and is not de- 
bilitatiuff or disa;2ri-eeable in its effects on the patient, bnt is 
peculiarly sickening and stupefying to the Tape Worm, which 
loosens its bold of its victim and passes away in a natural and 
easy manner, entirely whole, with head, ana while still alive. 
One physician has used this remedy in over 400 cases, without a 
single faihire to pass worm whole, with head. Absokite removal 
with head guaranteed. No pay required until so removed. Send 
stamp for circular and terms. " 

HEYWOOD & CO., 19 Park Place, N. Y. City. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Jrusic, etc., Bonncl in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank BookWorkof Every Description done to Order. 

W^JSEJSr TO JJ W^JLNT JL ItTJD^E 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE. 

On Cleaveland Street, where you wiU find turnouts to suit the most 
fastidious. ^^ Hates reasonable. 

Sraffismleft iS®afe Mum 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney, 

Terms, $1.50 a Tear ia Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Ws^mh. aad Bait IS^atg^, 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

4^Special Kates to Student Cluba...ffis 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, Georgics and first six Books 
of the jEneid, including Prosody. 
(Instead of the Georgics, Caesar's Gallic War, 
Books I.-IV., may be offered.) 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System . 

Geometry,- first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory coarse. 

No one is aduiitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The KeCtUlae Examinatioxs for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (July 11 and 12, 1884), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 26 and 27, 1884). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examinations is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Washington Academy, East 
Machias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these 
schools having been made special Fitting Schools 
for the college by the action of their several Boards 
of Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 
have been fitted at any school having an approved 



preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered iu 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GKADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 
Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

required— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

electives — FOUR HOURS A "WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Furftier information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 







f 



Vol. XIV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JAN. 14, 1885. 



No. 12. 



BOV^^DOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED FORTNIGHTLY BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
John A. Peteks, '85, Managing Editor. 
N. B. FoKD, '85, Business Editor. 
Boyd Bartlett, '85. W. P. Nealley, '85. 

O. R. Cook, '85. A. A. Knowlton, '86 

J. F. LiBEY, '85. C. W. T0TTLE, '86. 

"W. T. Wentworth, '86. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00. 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Students and alumui are invited to contribute matter for any 
of the departments. Contributions must be accompanied by 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post-OSice at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XIV., No. 12.-Jau. 14, 1885. 

Greeting to the New Tear 161 

Edixoeial Notes - 161 

Lines 163 

Bowdoin in Journalism (continued) 163 

The Romance of a School Teacher 16.5 

Montana— 1864 166 

Adapted Tales. 1 166 

Just 166 

A Souvenir 166 

Antilogia ] 67 

The Forest Brook 167 

Communication 167 

COLLEGii Tabula 168 

Personal 170 

Clippings 171 



GREETING TO THE NEW YEAR. 

Welcome, New Year, with thy bright train of months ; 
Gladly we greet you in winter's white plain ; 
Come thou with joys or come thou with sorrows. 
With bright to-days or cloudy to-morrows, 
Right welcome thy reign. 

Thy magic wand turns future to present, 
Bids us press on and no obstacles fear, 
Brightly thy jewels of frost crystals shine, 
I^oigeless thy car with its swift wheels of time, 
O, kingly New Year. 




lire of greeting our readers precisely on the 
first of Jauuarj', we venture to hope that our 
wish of a Happy New Year — hearty, though 
somewhat late — will be none the less accept- 
able. The beginning of the new year, an 
important time in the business world, and a 
season generally of calendars, diaries and re- 
solves, marks no especial epoch in the col- 
lege calendar other than the renewal of duties- 
interrupted for a short period by the delight- 
ful festivities of the Christmas vacation. A 
long and arduous march of fourteen weeks 
has been finished, a brief halt made, and here 
we are on the way again, almost before we 
realize it, refreshed in body and mind for the 
journey before us. The mistakes and neg- 
lected duties of last term may have been 
many ; but crying over spilt milk is a waste 
of time, and we have the future before us. 
Hoping that it may bring nothing but joy 
and happiness to all — including ourselves — 
we resume our duties for another term. 



We print in this issue a communication 
from one who is evidently expecting to be 
finely "ground" by the next Bugle. The 
wail that he sends up is heart-rending, and 
if he will present his name to the Bugle 



162 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



editors we are inclined to think that he will 
be spared — provided he wails no more. But 
seriously, the point raised is a good one. 
The Bugle is fast deteriorating into a collec- 
tion of witless " grinds." The publication 
was founded with the intention of making it 
something after the nature of a supplement to 
the annual catalogue, giving, in addition to the 
classes and college ofBcers, the class and college 
organizations and societies. It was meant to 
be a compact manual of statistical informa- 
tion on college affairs, with an editorial re- 
view of the year. The addition of cuts and 
literary matter, later, was a pleasant departure 
and served to make the whole less dry; but 
when it comes to personal allusions which, 
from the nature of the case, are highly offen- 
sive to the person alluded to, the departure 
has been carried too far. However, we pre- 
sume that it is now too late for the present 
Bugle board to adopt suggestions even if 
they should look with favor upon them. 

We are glad to see that our communica- 
tion department, as a medium for the expres- 
sion of opinion, is being taken advantage of 
more and more by the students. It is a good 
sign and one we like to notice. The editors 
have DO desire that their opinions should stand 
for the sentiment of the college. Our columns 
are always open to those who wish to declare 
their views on any college topic ; and we 
are especially glad to hear from those who 
take exceptions to our own opinions. The 
truth can surely be more readilj' reached if 
both sides of the question be presented. 
We should be sorrj- if no one ever disagreed 
with us, as in that case the usefulness of a 
paper, here in college, would be confined to 
the drill obtained by the editors. 



The sound of the woodman's ax at work 
among the pines has become a familiar one 
during the fall ; but this year the men seemed 
to stay a longer time, and the result was a 
greater array of fallen giants, than usual. The 



grove is now so thin that we can ill afford to 
lose even a small number of the trees, and if 
they continue to die as rapidly as they have in 
the last few j'ears the time will soon begin to 
look unpleasantly near when Bowdoin will be 
without her famous pines. This is a melan- 
choly prospect, but there is no way to 
brighten it unless some elixir of life can be 
found which will enable the pines to withstand 
the general aridity of Brunswick sand. 
There are a few scraggy young pines, to be 
sure, and they might, by careful coaxing and 
transplanting, in time fill up the gaps; but 
they would be for a long time but sorry sub- 
stitutes for their noble ancestors, and they 
will never have that wealth of historic asso- 
ciation which is so characteristic of the pres- 
ent grove. It is useless to urge upon the 
authorities the necessity of taking measures 
for the preservation of the trees, as they are 
without doubt doing all that can be done in 
that direction. 



Some extremely modest person has re- 
cently formed the habit of sending us verses 
without his signature. We will state for his 
benefit, and for the benefit of others who may 
be contemplating such a course, that unless 
contributions are acknowledged by the writ- 
ers, we do not care to print them. The name 
is not asked for to publish, of course, but 
merely as a guarantee of good faith. 



The number of religious exercises re- 
quiring our attendance on the Sabbath is 
so large that, for one at all disposed to regard 
the day as one of rest, it is hard to find time 
for the " optional " Bible class. For this 
reason, doubtless, the seniors have failed to 
respond, in the manner that they should, to 
the kind invitation of Prof. Robinson to meet 
him on Sunday afternoons in the Y. M. C. 
A. room. But they can hardly have realized 
how slight their apparent appreciation of that 
gentleman's kindness has been, for the attend- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



163 



ance of late has been allowed to reach such 
a low ebb as to put the existence of the 
Bible class in jeopardy. It would certainly 
be a melancholy thing if enough men inter- 
ested to know something of the Scriptures 
should not be found in '85 to at least make 
the existence of a Bible class assured. To 
be sure, we already have too many exercises 
on Sunday ; but a single half-hour's talk on 
the Bible, such as is offered, is worth so much 
more than either of the two chapel services 
that it seems a pity to neglect it, even if the 
day is pretty closely crowded with required 
exercises. 



A gentleman who is familiar with our 
course of study once remarked that, in his 
opinion, our instruction tended to turn tlie 
minds of the students towards politics after 
graduation. A glance at the statistics printed 
in another column would seem to be a sur- 
prising confirmation of this view; for Bow- 
doin, besidiis having all the state officers who 
are college graduates, has more than three 
times as many men in the present legislature 
than all other colleges together. As these 
very men are the most prominent and "solid'' 
members of that bodv, — sure to inaugurate 
and support the most healthy legislation, — it 
would seem to be a fortunate circumstance 
that our course is shaped as it is. An infu- 
sion of college blood into practical politics 
cannot but have a purifying elTect. But in 
point of fact we do not believe that our course 
tends to turn the mind disproportionate!}' to 
politics. In the case of the present Bowdoin 
men in the legislature, politics, in the lan- 
guage of the sophomore rhetoric division, is 
not their vocation but their avocation. They 
are men influential in other walks of life who 
have taken upon themselves legislative duties 
for the time being. An examination of the 
records will show that Bowdoin stands as well 
in the different professions, including litera- 
ture and journalism, as in politics, so called. 



LINES. 
Though nature did not deign, with partial hand, 
On thee rich gifts of beauty to bestow, 
Nor seemed to mould thy features in the glow 
Of striving to surpass what she had planned 
Herself, before, assisted by the band 
Of graces who her inclinations know 
And cause the buds of loveliness to blow 
Till they in perfect fullness do expand. 
Yet dost thou own a greater charm than these, — 
A charm, without which, vain is beauty's boast, — 
And that is true gentility, a grace 
That springs from a good heart, and is heart's-ease ; 
'Tis often rarest, yet becomes one most. 
And puts to shame a merely pretty face. 



BOWDOIN IN JOURNALISM. 

[Contiuuecl. ] 

In the class of 1823 ex-Gov. William 
George Crosby was at one time editorially 
connected with some of Littell's publications. 
But Nathaniel Haynes, of '23, is probably 
the second real journalist in the list. About 
1830 he became editor and proprietor of the 
Bangor Eastern Repiiblicaa, and being a 
writer of great strength and perspicuity he 
made the paper one of the most efiScient 
supporters of the democratic party in New 
England. 

During the next few years there were no 
"journalists" among the alumni, although a 
number had a brief connection with news- 
paper work. Eev. Dr. Calvin E. Stowe, of 
the class of 1824, iiad editorial charge of the 
Boston Recorder in 1830. Of the famous 
class of 1825, Hon. James W. Bradbury for 
a time edited the 3Jaine Patriot ; Rev. Dr. 
Geo. B. Cheever, in 1847 was editor of the 
New York Evangelist; Rev. Dr. Patrick 
Henry Greenleaf started the Children's Guide 
at Portland, and at Burlington edited the 
31issionary and tlie Spirit of English Maga- 
zines; and Geo. W. Pierce did political work 
on the Portland Argus during Jackson's ad- 
ministration. In Charles A. Lord, of the class 
of 1826, we come to another alumnus whose 



164 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



life work was very largely upon newspapers 
and deserves to be placed in the ranks of 
simon-pure journalists. He was editor of a 
temperance paper for four years, and from 
1849 to 1874 was connected with the Chris- 
tian Mirror, as associate editor and editor 
and proprietor. He had good literary taste, 
cherished an interest in whatever concerns 
the welfare of man, and did excellent news- 
paper work. 

In this same class of 1826, Isaac Mc- 
Clellan was for a while associate editor of the 
Boston Daily Patriot, afterwards the Adver- 
tiser ; Jonas Merriam edited a small Millerite 
paper, P. A. Brinsmade had for a while a 
newspaper connection in San Francisco, and 
John B. Russwurm edited an abolition paper 
for a short time after graduation, and from 
1830 to 1834 the Liberia Herald. Of the 
members of the class of 1828, Rev. Dr. 
Edward F. Cutter did some editorial work 
on the Christian Mirror, and Wm. C. Larra- 
bee, a frequent contributor to the press, was 
at one time editor of the Ladies^ Repository. 

Phineas Barnes, of the class of 1829, 
edited the Portland Advertiser six years, do- 
ing excellent work. The record aggravat- 
ingly says of Richard S. Evans of the same 
class : " He has edited some newspapers." 
John F. Hartley, LL.D., in early life was con- 
nected with the Portland Argus and Standard. 
Moses Soule, also of the same class of 1829, 
was for several years editor and proprietor 
of the Terre Haute, Ind., Daily Express. 

The class of 1830 had three members who 
entered the ranks of journalism: Jotham I. 
Moulton, who in 1852 was connected with 
the Chicago Tribune; Nathan Monroe, who 
for five years succeeding 1858 was an editor 
and one of the proprietors of the Boston Re- 
corder ; and Rev. Dr. Joseph Stockbridge 
who has done much writing for various papers, 
and was at one time assistant editor of the 
New York Recorder. 

Of the class of 1831 Joseph T. Huston 



managed the Bath Times a few years and 
then for a time was editor of the Portland 
Journal of Education; John Patch for a 
short time engaged to edit and publish the 
Literary Museum; while George Robinson 
possessed superior journalistic ability, and 
would have made a creditable mark in the 
profession but for his untimely death. He 
became editor of the Augusta Age at the age 
of 19, and remained in charge till near the 
time of his death, at the age of 27. 

Rev. Benjamin P. Barrett, of the class of 
1832, for a time edited a monthly devoted to 
the New Church. 

The class of 1834 was unusually rich with 
journalistic talent, although none followed 
the profession for a life business. Hon. John 
Appleton on being admitted to the bar be- 
came an editor of the Portland Argus, which 
position gave his talents scope for general 
notice, and he was in public life for many 
years, when in consequence of failing health 
he returned to Portland and become principal 
proprietor of the Argus. Peleg W. Chand- 
ler, LL.D., while a law student was a reporter 
of the Boston Daily Advertiser, and originated 
the practice of reporting the proceedings of 
the courts. Later — in 1838 — he established 
the Law Reporter, a novelty in journalism 
which he continued with success for ten 
years. John M. Clement edited a newspaper 
in Portland a while after graduation. Hon. 
C. C. Fessenden in 1856 established the Maine 
Evangelist, an anti-slavery organ. Reuben 
Nason in leaving college went South, and in 
1853 he edited a paper in Okalona, Miss., and 
afterwards the Jackson Clarion. He has since 
been engaged in several journalistic ventures 
in Mobile, Ala. Geo. M. Weston edited the 
Augusta Age for four j'ears. He became 
prominent politically, and removed to Wash- 
ington, D. C, where he edited for some time 
the Washington Republican. John D. Smith 
went South to Alabama for his health and 
became an editor and proprietor of the Liv- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



165 



ingston Sumter Gazette. He was developing 
much ability when he died in his twenty- 
third year. The distinguished theologian 
Rev. Dr. Henry B. Smith was the editor of 
the periodical known at different times as the 
American Theological Revieio, the American 
Presbyterian, and the Presbyterian Quarterly. 

[ since the manuscript of the earlier part of this record 
was prepared for publication, I have learned that Rev. 
Charles Packard, of the class of 1817, for two years edited 
the Androscor/c/in Free Press, and always regarded the ex- 
periences of those years as of great value to him in his 
later career.] 



THE ROMANCE OF A SCHOOL TEACHER. 
\_Tdken from Life.'] 
Scene I. 
The golden days of autumn had fallen, 
fast as the forest leaves, and were now almost 
gone. He was a college student and stood 
waiting for the outgoing train. Thus far he 
had been garnering and not sowing. He 
possessed all that a college could give him in 
a year ; and in addition, he had a large stock 
of general information. But there were in 
him those two fundamental elements of a 
great man, genius and poverty, and he now 
felt it incumbent upon himself to teach. He 
started out in buoyancy and hope. The last 
recitation had been attended ; the last " cut " 
had been indulged in ; the last partings had 
been exchanged ; the last society gi-ip had 
been given. He was now about to become a 
positive element in the world, and do his 
little part in moulding the destiny of a great 
nation. 

Scene II. 

The beams of the rising sun were lighting 
up the dazzling hill-tops of District No. 14, 
and encircling the broken chimney top of her 
school-house with a halo of glory, as a weary 
and care-worn teacher plowed his way slowly 
through the drifts and up to the door of that 
corner-stone of the republic. Soon the broken 
and wheezy stove was puffing and smoking, 
and he sat down in the chill warmth of a sun- 



beam, to wait for the stove to get warmed 
through. Thirty times had he built that fire 
and thirty times had he sat in the warmth of 
that self-same sunbeam. The way seemed long 
behind, and ho looked forward. Forty-five 
times more must he enter that bare and cheer- 
less room ; forty-five times more must he wait 
and freeze, and freeze and wait ; fort3'-five 
mornings more would fifteen counti'y louts 
and wenches stand shivering round that old 
decrepit stove ; forty-five days more would 
he impart that knowledge which they could 
not comprehend — and then would come the 
dawning of the long-looked-for day. Before 
him lay "desolation and great darkness, but 
he did not quail." Instead, with a cast-iron 
countenance he arose to ring the morning 
bell, when a denizen of the District rode up 
and wished to speak with him. Going out, 
the teacher was handed a paper which read 
as follows : 

B , — 19, 18—. 

To the Superintending School Com., greeting: 

We, the inhabitants, &c., consider the pres- 
ent term of school unprofitable to the scholars and 
desire the present Teacher discharged. 



Tears of gratitude filled the eyes of the 
teacher as he read it. The denizen thought 
they were tears of sorrow, but they were 
not. The document was an unexpected ray 
of sunshine in the teacher's arctic night. He 
assured the denizen that the will of the dis- 
trict should be complied with without delay. 
Going back into the school-house he called 
the scholars to order, and selected for the 
morning reading, Matthew xxiii., 25-39 inclu- 
sive. Then looking solemnly over the scene 
of his late labors for a few moments, he said : 
"This term of school is finished." With dif- 
ficulty he suppressed a double shuffle of de- 
light, and as he left the portals of that school- 
house for the last time, not a wave of trouble 
rolled across his peaceful breast. 



166 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



MONTANA— 1864. 

[ The following poem was written by Jlr. E. B. Nealley, '58, 
for Longfellow's " Foems of Places," but handed to Mr. Long- 
fellow too late for publication. Mr. Nealley is the author of 
" A Pralrie-Uog Village." in the "Poems of Places."! 

" A PRAIRIK-DOG VILLAGE." 

A land of mountains ! like stern sentinels 

The lowering ridges guard the vales between ; 

Brown barren peaks encircling fairy dells 

And meadows green. 

I stand upon the high divide and view 

The straggling regiment of hills in sight, 

Now dull in rebel gray, now lo3'al blue. 

Now plumed in white. 

No sound I hear in all these solitudes 

Save brooklets tinkling on their beds of stone. 
Where westward " rolls in the continuous woods 

Tlie Oregon;" 
Or eastward falling from the self-same steeps, 

Two oceans drinking from the self-same source, 
Where "the Nebraska precipitate leaps 
In devious course." 

I ponder legends weird and marvelous tales 

Round miner's camp-fires by old trappers told. 
Peopling with fairy lile the enchanted vales 

Where lurks the gold; 
Regions where Indians tell of travelers lone 

And trees whose fi uit is many a priceless gem, 
But straightway turneth the rash hand to stone 
That graspeth them. 

I half believe these legends strange and rude, 

I feel their witching influence in the breeze, 
The mystery of the sombre solitude 

Of brooks and trees ; 
And half repent the golden dream of gain 

That hither led my vagrant wanderings, 
And almost deem my search a theft profane 
Of sacred things. 



ADAPTED TALES.— I. 
[for youthful minds.] 
A Doughty junior, being exceeding full 
of Wind, was looked up to by a coterie of 
younger friends as a Tin god ; but having 
taken a soft Snap in Greek (as well as many 
Deads in Physics) be fell into Disrepute with 
his companions who began to regard him as 



no great Shakes. Displeased in the falling 
off in the number of his Admirers, he cast 
about him for some way to expand his 
bubble Reputation otherwise than by his own 
Wind. Having borrowed large quantities of 
Oil with a Mysterious air, and ordered a great 
Measure of coifee in a Loud voice, he shut 
himself in his room and caused it to be noised 
abroad that he was about to Plug all night. 
He thought in this way to get up a Name for 
Industry and Nerve. On the morrow he went 
about with an Unkempt air, but Proud step, 
for he saw by the groups of wliispering people 
that he was an object of Remark. But it 
turned out that his exultation was Previous, 
for his Chum had given away the fact that 
he had spent tiie day before in Sleep in order 
to sit up all night to Grind. 

INFERENCES. 

I. — A man who tries to gain Reputation by 
false pretenses gets Left in the long Run. 

n. — To form a True estimate of a man go 
to his Chum. 



JUST. 

Just a wicked crossing ; 

Just a little ice ; 
Just a little windy ; 

Just a maiden nice ; 
Just two tiny boot-heels 

Flying toward the sun ; 
Just two shapely ankles ; 

And my story's done. 



A SOUVENIR. 
'Tis a hair-pin ancient and bent, 
That over my mantel appears ; 
'Tis one of a score or more, 
Of antique souvenirs. 

Who speaks of love or a maiden? 
Why do you a conquest assume? 
This is only a worn-out hair-pin 
The end-woman left in my room. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



167 




'Tis true 'tis pity, 
And pity 'tis 'tis true : 

That onl}' the sophomores took the cake. 

That the New York Tribune and the Bos- 
ion Advertiser are not taken in the reading- 
room. 

That several fires occurred here during 
the vacation. 

That the class crews do not show up in the 
gymnasium. 

That Harvard and the Maine Historical 
Society got the only two busts of Longfellow 
sent to this country by the Longfellow me- 
morial committee of England. 

That there should be any dead-lock in the 
class elections. 



THE FOREST BROOK. 
I. 

'Tis a little forest streamlet 

Lilie a tiiousand other rills, 
And that walk is but a winding 

Foot-path down among the hills ; 
But the ripples of those waters 

Slipping by the polislied stones, 
Have a meaning in their murmurs 

Plain to me as human tones. 

II. 

Oft adown that shady pathway 

I have wallved at twilight's hour, 
There to meet that blue-eyed damsel 

In the woodland's sacred bower; 
For our parents' hearts opposed us 

And they strove to break our love. 
But we still would meet in secret, 

In the silence of the grove. 



At the stepping-stones we greeted, 

At the stepping-stones did part. 
With the words which seem so idle, 

Save when from a loving heart ; 
And 'twas by those stones I won her, 

There it was her hand I took. 
But the ring I otfered to her 

Slipp'd and vanish'd in the brook. 

IV. 

Ah! th.at omen since is proven ; 

She has broken from her vow. 
And I often wander hither. 

To those stepping-stones, as now; 
But 'tis not those pleasant fancies 

Which so oft me hither bring; 
No, I've won another maiden, 
And I want to find Ihal ring. 



COMMUHICATIOK. 



To the Editors of the Orient ; 

A Word of caution, even to those who 
know their danger, is not always out of place. 
Allovkf me to direct the attention of your 
readers — or at least the Brunswick portion ot 
them — to an evil which, though not so colossal 
as a Western cyclone, or our present system 
of Sunday afternoon chapel, is, in my estima- 
tion, fully as far-reaching and lamentable in 
its results. We are now under the close and 
constant surveillance of a number of persons 
whose chief object in living is to blacken our 
reputations in the eyes of a credulous public. 
Our daily life is now undergoing careful 
scrutiny, and before long all our little foibles 
and peculiarities, imaginary and otherwise, 
will be graphically set forth, much to the 
edification of our friends and the consolation 
of our fellow-sufferers. Every slip or mis- 
take that we have ever made — and a goodly 
number that we have never made — garnished 
with some scurrilously applicable quotation, 
will be served up as a delicious joke. It is 
merely a question of time when the best of 
us will be humbled to the dust and be obliged 
to cut out large portions of the college an- 



168 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



nual before placing it in the hands of our 
several " best girls." The most righteous of 
us cannot hope to escape, for are not the 
elders in the Y. M. C. A. the very ones who 
are held up to the public gaze as bar-tenders 
and horse thieves? Yet a little while and 
the members of our much-abused faculty will 
appear under various beastly disguises, and 
be heavily " sat on " both in prose and rhyme. 
Even the charming Brunswick young ladies 
cannot hope to escape. The senior, who 
from taste, or necessity, or both, wears an 
antiquated hat, or a prominent nose, would 
better shield the same with an umbrella, or 
else glide quietly around a corner when one 
of the proprietors of this slugging publica- 
tion appears on the horizon. It is painful to 
think of the consequences of failing to treat 
a junior when the opportunity^ offers. Every 
time a freshman forgets to lift his hat to one 
is a brass-headed tack in his coffin. Woe to 
the man who is not a friend to a Bugle 
editor! Woe, a thousand times woe, to the 
luckless man who has incurred his displeas- 
ure 1 ! It were better for him that an article 
from the Colby Echo were hanged about his 
neck and he be cast into the Androscoggin 
river. a sufferer. 



The Tuftonian is agitating ttie question of co- 
education. 

Tlie faculty of Harvard College has decided by a 
vote of 24 to 5 to prohibit the Harvard College eleven 
from engaging in any more intercollegiate football 
games. 

Bowdoin and Cornell having done away with 
recitations on Saturdays, there is no longer an Amer- 
ican institution that inflicts upon its students this 
flagitious custom. — Ex. 

Hon. Thos. A. Hendricks of Indiana, Vice-Presi- 
dent elect, has consented to deliver the annual ad- 
dress before the Yale alumni and graduating classes 
at commencement, June 23, 188.5. 

Five colleges in the United States, Harvard, Co- 
lumbia, Oberlin, University of Michigan and Yale 
have over a thousand students. Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology stands next with 679. 




The winter term opened 
with chapel exercises on 
Tuesday morning, January 6th. 
Who are the class-day officers ? 
Alexander, Butler and Davis, '85, 
remained in town during a part of the 
Cliristmas vacation. 

The sophomores realized a horizontal reduction 
in rank last term. It was a " tidal wave." 

Gen. Chamberlain's recent lecture has been very 
favorably commented upon by the papers. 

We are not going to ask when the Btigle is com- 
ing out, but would like to inquire if any one has 
seen the advance sheets of '86's Bugle. 

Lunt, '85, reports a pleasant school at Bethel, 
where he has been teaching for a few weeks. 

Butler, '85, is teaching at Mere Point ; Turner and 
Wentworth, '86, at Cooper's Mills and Damariscotta, 
respectively. Shaw, '88, is also teaching. 

Harding, '85, has charge of the senior library. 
Spaulding, '88, is at work in Rochdale, Mass. 
He will be absent from college a few weeks. 

The recitation hours are arranged very coven- 
iently for the seniors. The freshmen, however, are 
not well satisfied with theii's. 

The reading-room papers were sold at auction 
Wednesday afternoon. 

The freshmen are reading selections from the 
"Lyric Poets." 

Are there no admirers of Sanskrit or Dutch-lov- 
ing men in the senior class ? 

Chase, '82, was in town Tuesday, January 6th, 
en route to Brockton, Mass. 

This year the library has added to its list of pe- 
riodicals : the Anglia, Nature, Contemporary Review, 
North American Review, Fortnightly, and Every Other 
Saturday. 

In Astronomy: Prof. C. — "Mr. F., how would 
you locate the position of a star?" Mr. F. — "By 
right ascension." Prof. C. — "And what else?" 
Mr. F. (after hesitating) — '■^ By left ascension." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



169 



Mr. Fish, principal of tlie Brunswicli High School, 
is taking quantitative analysis with the senior di- 
vision in Chemistry. 

The members of '85, are divided among their 
electives as follows: English Literature — Bartlett, 
Butler, Cook, Dunham, Folsom, Freeman, French, 
Hall, Harding, Libby, Lunt, Nealley, Peters, Rog- 
ers, Tarr, Thomas, Wardwell, Whittier; Chemistry 
— Alexander, Brown, Davis, Donnell, Fames, Ford, 
Kendall and Norton. 

Peck's Analytical Geometry is used by the Math- 
ematical division of '87. Mathematics seems to be 
a very popular elective with the class. The follow- 
ing are the men electing it : Austin, Black, Boutelle, 
Burpee, Carey, Dearth, Fowler, Little, C. F. Moul- 
ton, Plummer, Sewall, Torrey, Varney and Verrill. 
The Greek division is reading Demosthenes' orations, 
and the Latin division the Tusculan Disputations. 

The senior division in Chemistry will use the 
laboratory iu Adams Hall. It has been re-arranged 
since last year and made more convenient by an 
additional table. 

The result of the junior class election is as fol- 
lows : President, L. Turner, Jr., Somerville ; Vice- 
President, C. W. Tuttle, Hancock, N. H. ; Marshal, 
J. H. Davis, Bangor; Orator, F. L. Smith, Water- 
boro; Poet, I. W. Horne, Berlin, N. H. ; Odist, H. 
L. Taylor, North Fairfield ; Chaplain, J. C. Parker, 
East Lebanon ; Curator, W. H. Stackpole, Bowdoin- 

ham : Secretary and Treasurer, ; Committee 

of Arrangements, , H. R. Fling, Portland, 

W. W. Kilgore, North Newry. 

The prizes ought to excite the juniors and soph- 
omores to greater efforts in trying to get on the next 
Board. 

Horne, '86, has been in college the past week, 
but left Saturday for Waldoboro to commence his 
second term in the Waldoboro High School. 

The Telegraph, speaking of some sort of a jam- 
baree over in Topsham, at which there were 
speeches, says: "The Rev. gentleman then drew 
off — and introduced A. G. Tenney." The people of 
Topsham have our sincere sympathy. If the Rev. 
gentleman had only drawn off and struck the people 
of that sleepy hamlet the law might have fiven them 
some redress ; but as it is their case is hopeless. 

A wicked senior, on observing our estimable 
Professor of Modern Languages hastening toward 
Memorial to hear a recitation in Dante's Inferno, 
remarked, " There goes the prof., hell bent! " 

The literary young ladies of Brunswick are rap- 
idly forming themselves into clubs, each of which 



has one objectionable feature in its constitution — no 
gentlemen members allowed. It is reported that 
strenuous efforts will be made to have this clause 
repealed. 

The following officers for the coming year have 
been elected by the sophomore class : President, C. 
F. Moulton, Cumberland ; Vice-President, C. H. Ver- 
rill, Auburn ; Secretary and Treasurer, E. L. Means, 
Millbridge ; Orator, F. D. Dearth, East Sangerville ; 
Poet, C. C. Clioate, Salem, Mass. ; Prophet, E. C. 
Plummer, Yarmouth ; Historian, E. T. Little, Auburn ; 
Toastmaster, M. H. Boutelle, Bangor; Committee 
of Arrangements, F. L. Talbot, East Machias, H. M. 
Moulton, Cumberland, I. H. Robinson, East Machias ; 
Committee on Odes, M. L. Kimball, Norway, E. B. 
Torrey, Yarmouth, S. B. Fowler, Augusta. 

Prof. Brown supplied the pulpit of the Congrega- 
tional church, during the pastor's absence in western 
New York. 

The 83d Annual Catalogue of the College, which 
is out, tells us that we have 113 undergraduates, of 
whom 29 are seniors, 20 juniors, SI sophomores, and 
32 freshmen. There is one special student. The 
medical students given number 99. 

The class officers for the term are as follows : Sen- 
ior, Prof. Lee ; Junior, Prof. Robinson ; Sophomore, 
Prof. Avery; Freshman, Tutor Moody. 

The freshman class have elected the following 
officers: President, R. W. Goding, Alfred; Vice- 
President, J. Williamson, Jr., Belfast; Secretary and 
Treasurer, G. F. Carey, East Machias ; Orator, R. S. 
Thomes, Cumberland Center; Historian. T. H. Ayer, 
Litchfield Corner; Poet, D. M. Cole, Fryeburg Cen- 
ter; Toastmaster, F. G. Merrill, Foxcroft; Prophet, 
A. W. Tolman, Portland ; Committee of Arrange- 
ments, E. S. Barrett, Sumner, F. K. Linscott, Boston, 
Mass., J. Williamson, Jr., Belfast; Committee on 
Odes, H. S. Card, Gorham, C. T. Carruthers, Free- 
port, M. P. Smithwick, New Castle. 

Prof. Robinson is in considerable demand as a 
lecturer. He has recently lectured at Fryeburg and 
Lewiston. 

It is reported that the movement for the placing 
of a memorial window in the Congregational Church 
in honor of the late Prof. Packard, is progress- 
ing successfully, and that the sum needed is likely 
to be soon obtained. 

Merrill, '87, has returned from his school in Farm- 
ington, and resumed his studies with the class. 

Prof. Robinson has received from Germany, re- 
cently, a very fine microscope provided with all mod- 



170 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ern appliances and especially adapted to work in 
mineralogy. 

English versions are sometimes quite free. A 
junior going over a French selection recently, with 
the professor renders the phrase, "£< c'est cela queje 
iermine,'''' thus : "And this is why I tremble." 

The senior and junior exhibition came off Thurs- 
day evening, Dec. 18, 1884, at Memorial Hall. There 
was a very good attendance. Glimmer's Orchestra 
furnished the music. The following is the pro- 
gramme : 

Mirsic. 
Salutatory. Boyd Bartlett, Ellsworth. 

Edmund Burke and the American Revohition. 

John F. Libby, Richmond. 

Extract from Second Philippic Against Antony. (Englisb 

version form Cicero.) *F. L. Smith, Waterboro'. 

Alpheus Spring Packard. O. K. Cook, Bridgton. 

MUSIC. 
Invective Against Antony. Cicero. 

*t L,. Turner, Jr., Somerville. 
Evolution of Human Destiny. 

C. H. Wardwell, Berlin, N. H. 
Unshackled. Webb Donnell, Sheepscot. 

Extract from the Dlvlna Comedia. Dante. 

*A. E. Butler, Portland. 

MUSIC. 

The Saxons in Civilization. F. W. Alexander, Richmond. 

Speech on the Amnesty. (English version from Gambetta.) 

*I. W. Home, Berlin, N. H. 

Popular Education. L. B. Folsom, Bethel. 

MUSIC 

* Juniors, t Absent. 
This unique " Notice" appeared on the door of the 
reading-room, some little time since : 

" If when these classic walks you tread, 
"With busy brain and downcast head, 
A right-baud glove you chance to see, 
Please return to G. S. B., 

11, M. H." 

Prof, in Mediseval History, reading from some old 
authority, says "It was no uncommon thing for 
Charlemange to eat at one meal, besides bread and 
wine, a peacock, large roasts of pork, several ducks, 
geese and a hare." A man in the back seat mutters, 
"Lucky to get only one hair in all that food!" 

Goodenow, Leigh and Webb, Bowdoin, ex-'85, 
were in town last week. 

The skating on the river Saturday was unusually 
good. 

Quite a number of the students went to Bath Sat- 
urday evening to witness the polo game between the 
Alamedas and the Granite Citys. 

Bowdoin is well represented in the new State 
Government. Slie has the governor, Frederick 
Robie, '41 ; the only two councillors who are college 
graduates, A. R. G. Smith, '63, and J. A. Locke, '66 ; 



and the attorney-general, O. D. Baker, '68. The 
following table shows how the college men in the 
two branches of the legislature are divided : 

SENATE. 

BOWDOIN. COLBY. 

T. R. Siniouton, '63. H. M. Bearce, '63. 

S. J. Young, '59. 
F. M. Ray, '61. 
P. H. Stubbs, '64. 
A. L. Lambert, '79. 

HOUSE. 

BOWDOIN. COLBY. BATES. 

Chas. Hamlin, '57, speaker. F. Charles, '66. A. M. Spear, '75. 

C. P. Mattocks, '63. C. E. Staples. 
J. E. Moore, '65. 

G. T. Sewall, '67. 

R. H. Tucker, '68. OKONO. 

Clarence Hale, '69. D. S. Jones, '78. 

H. M. Heath, '73. 

D. J. McGillicuddy, '81. 
L. Barton, '81. 

F. A. Powers. 
I. W. Dyer. 

E. E. Chase. 

SUMMAKY. 

Whole number of college men 3S 

Bowdoin 17 

Bates S 

Colby S 

Orono X 




'25.— Hon. J. W. Brad- 
bury has given $200 to the 
rirls' Industrial School at Hallowell. 
'30. — Dr. Geo. Parcher, one of the oldest 
graduates of the Medical School, died De- 
cember 29th, aged 82 years. 
'40. — A gift of 4000 volumes from the Theological 
library of the late Ezra Abbot has been made to 
the Harvard Divinity School. 

'48. — Dexter A. Hawkins has been appointed one 
of a committee to advance the educational bill in the 
present Congress. 

'49. — Geo. E. B. Jackson has opened a law office 
at No. 28 First National Bank, Portland. 

'57.— Rev. David S. Hibbard of Eliot, Me., has 
accepted a call to the pastorate of the church in 
Limington, Me., and has entered upon his work. 
'62. — In a late number of The Chrislain at Work 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



171 



is a line story, entitled "A Cousin for Christmas 
Remembrance," by Isaac Choate. 

'64. — McKeen lias been appointed by Mayor Low, 
of Brooklyn, one of tlie Board of Education. 

'69. — O. P. Cunningham has been elected Judge 
of Probate in place of Parker Tuck, deceased. 

'71. — N. P. Potter, Bridgton, a graduate of the 
Medical School, is manufacturing a Catarrh Cure, 
which has proved a great success. 

'75.— George C. Cressey writes us that he has 
not joined the Unitarian ministry. He had some 
thought of so doing. Later. Mr. Cressey has ac- 
cepted a call as pastor of the Unitarian church at 
Bangor. 

'76. — Rev. Charles T. Hawes, formerly Instructor 
in Rhetoric in the college, was oi'dained to the min- 
istry, December 3d, at Searsport, where he is the 
acting pastor of the First Church. 

'77. — Little was married to Miss Lillie Lane at 
Braintree, Mass., Dec. 18th. The sophomores pre- 
sented the couple with a fine silver ice pitcher; in 
return for which, each member of the class received 
a box containing a piece of the wedding cake. 

'77. — Peary, Lieutenant in the United States Navy, 
left for Nicaragua, December 20lh, to conduct a gov- 
erment survey. 

'80. — R. L. Swett died at his home in Brunswick, 
December 26th. Since his graduation from college, 
he has applied himself very closely to study, gradu- 
ating from the Medical School last spring. His con- 
stant application brought on his sickness. 

'81. — F. L. Johnson has a position in the Library 
of the Signal Service at Washington. 

'81. — Dr. Walker, of the Bowdoin Medical School, 
'84, who left Maine for the West, about a month ago, 
had the misfortune to lose his trunk in which were 
all his instruments and clothing, amounting to up- 
wards of $300. The trunk was in a railroad station 
which was destroyed by fire. The climate does not; 
agree with him and it is probable that he will re- 
turn to Maine which is the wish of his many friends. 

'81.— Married— Nov. 27th, A. D. Gray, of W^oon- 
socket, R. I., to Miss Hannah Lane, of East Sanger- 
ville. 

'82. — McCarthy is practicing law at Salem, with 
good success. 

'82. — Goddard has been admitted to the Bar. 

'82. — Goodwin has been teaching at Berlin Falls. 

'83. — At Denmark, Iowa, December 6th, Pearson 
was united in the mystic bands of wedlock to Miss 
Belle Stinchtield, sister of Stinchfield, '82. 

Upon the docket of the " Portland Law Students' 
Club" we notice the names of Woodbury ('83), Pres- 
ident, Holway, Belcher, and Sanborn ('82) . 




A large number of stu- 
dents of the University of 
Michigan spent their vacation at the New 
Orleans Exposition. They started from Ann 
Arbor on the Monday before Christmas. 
The Amherst Student complains of the high 
charges for the use of the Gymnasium billiard-tables. 
Plans have been drawn upforthe new gymnasium 
at Exeter, and it is expected that ground will be 
broken in the spring. The building is to cost 
$50,000. 

The friends of C. H. Dunn, ex-'87, were evidently 
delighted to see him when he recently visited this 
city. As he entered the Sunday-School room at 
Grace church the congregation arose and sang 
"Hallelujah 'tis Done." — Rambler. 



,£dXj) ^ ^il, , 



i^^l 



neatly executed at the 

Bl^lipi^WICK PE^^M 0FFICE. 



►^ gPECI^L ^ FINE ^ P^Tg -1^^ 

A.RE VERY POPULATl. 

H. ¥. STAGKPGIiEi, 



Next l0 American Express Sffice, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




OcviM io numerous /mO' iase'.imi^aaeias of' 
t/aspepiUar.fmnd' t^pieiUc arecaeMoneO' 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

Richmond Straight Cut No. I, 

SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf groTvn in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 
direct importation, which is made especially for us, ■water 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. I, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

ALLEN S GINTER Munufactiirers. 

RICHMOND, VA. 



New system. Learned in less than one-quarter the time 
required by any other. Old reporters throw away old sys- 
tems and learn this for speed and legibility. It can be 
successfully 

TAUGHT BY 3IAIL. 
The corresponding style can be learned in a few hours, 
and the full verbatim reporting style in a few months. It 
is a marvel of simplicity. 

STUDENTS 

can easily acquire enough to enable them to take notes of 

LECTURES. 

Send for circular. Terms: Corresponding style, five 

lessons, S5. Corresponding and reporting, twenty lessons, 

R. B. CAPEN, Augusta, Me. 



STEEL 




Leading Numbers ; 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEM CO., 

TVorks, Camden, N. J. 26 John St., New York 



NOTICE. 

BEWARE OF COUNTERFEITS AND IMITATIONS. 

Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly ciu-ecl, and pure Eicu Paper, are rolled by the highest 
class of skilled labor, and warranted free from flavoring or 
impurities. 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a FAC-SIJIILE of KINNET 
Begs.' Signatore. 

KINNEX" TOBACCO CO. 

S0CCESSOB TO KINSET BROS. 

NEW YORK. 

The following are our well-known 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Caporal, Sweet Caporal, St. Jauies 4, Caporal J, St. 

James, Ambassador, Entre Ngus, Spgkt. 

KINNEY BROS, STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS' CIGARETTES 

SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. Miinufactured bv special request. 

A delicious blend ol choice Turkish and Virginia. 



FOR FALL AND WINTER, 

iVT JA.CKSON'S. 

All Goods Warranted as Represented. 
S- E,- J-^A-CICSOlSr, SID, 

2 Odd Fellows' Block, Main Street, Brunswick. 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 7th, 1884, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alpheus S. Packard, Acting President; 
Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel T. Dana, M.D., 
Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children; Charles W. Goddard, 
A.M., Medical .Jurisprudence; Frederick. Gerrisii, M.D., 
Analomy; Henry Cakmichael, Ph.D., Chemistiy; BuuT G. 
Wilder, M.D., Physiology ; Stephen II. Weeks, M.'D., Sm-gery 
and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics; Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator of 
Anatomy; Everett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of His- 
tology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



FRANK M. STETSON 



Q 

< 




^<^JUL.y 25. \^ 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Diamonds, 

Jewelry, 

Silver Ware, 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 

Prepare Original Designs for Society 
Badges, Rings, Prizes, and Class Cups, 
tvhich will be forwarded to students on 
request. 

A SPECIALTY is made of English 
Pewter Beer JSItigs, in two sizes, with Glass 
Bottoms. 

Society, Book, and Visiting Card Plates 
engraved in xtroper style. 

Invitations and Programmes in novel 
forms at short notice. 

Shreve, Crump & Low, 

BOSTOl^. 



Bronmes, 



Porcelains, 



Fancy Goods. 



BYRON STEVENS. 

We invite from tlie Stutlents an inspection of our display of 

Xmas Goods, 

And solicit their patronage for the coming season. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



EARS for the MILLION 

Foo Ohoo's Balsam of Shark's Oil 

Positively Kestores the Hearing, and is the Only 
Absolute Cure for Deafness Known. 

This Oil is abstracted from peculiar species of small White 
Shark, caught in the yellow Sea, known as Carcharodon Kond- 
eletii. Every Chinese fisherman knows it. Its virtues as a re- 
storative of hearing were discovered by a Buddhist Priest about 
the year 1410. Its cures were so numerous and vimiy so seem- 
ingly miraculous, that the remedy was officially proclaimed over 
the entire Empire. Its use became so universal that for over 300 
years no deafness has existed amonff the Chinese people. Sent, 
charges prepaid, to any address at $1.00 per bottle. 

f 

It has performed a miracle in my case. 

I have no unearthly noises in my head and hear much better. 

I have been greatly benefited. 

My deafness helped a great deal— think another bottle will 
cure nie. 

My heai-ing is much benefited. 

I have received untold benefit. 

My hearing is improving. 

It is giving good satisfaction. 

Have been greatly benefited, and am rejoiced that I saw the 
notice of it. 

" Its virtues are unquestionable and its curative character ab- 
solute, as the writer can personally testify, both from experience 
and observation. Write at once to Haylook & Jenney, 7 Dey 
Street, New York, enclosing $1.00, and you will receive by return 
a remedy that will enable you to hear like anybody else, and 
whose curative effects will be permanent. Ton will never regret 
Aoiagso."— /editor nf Mercantile Review. 

S®-To avoid loss in the Mails, please send money by Regis- 
tered Letter. 

Only Imported by HAYLOCK & JENNEY, 
Sole Agents for America. 7 Dey St., N, Y, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bruns-nrick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Viexirs ; also College Viexvs. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 
Enlaro;ed from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

POFtXX^.A.N'Xl, IVIA.INE. 

DISPEXSER OF 

Pin impi Mediemeis^Cheiaieals, 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc. , in Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Go to W, IB. Woodard's 

To buy vour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

SE'ECI-^X, Xa^ft.TE:S to STXJ-DSiTT CXjTTES- 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

780 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



WP. K FIEIiD, 



j8l^N^6E^. 



TONTIIffB HOTEL, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Special attention will be given to Class and Reunion Dinners 
and buppers to order. First-class lauDdry connected with the 
house. 

S. B. BREWSTER, Proprietor. 



MAWmm, FIMI WATCIIS, 

239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. MERRILL. A. KEITH. 



DEALER IN 



^EocEMiEs Am fmimmm. 

Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 "WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 




^Iii5rltt0 






2 i|«r:^ llatk, 



|al|. 



DEALER IN 

CEDAR STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
1^° Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

J. G. WASHBURN, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer iu 

PICTURE FEAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

Also Pictures, Cabinet Frames, St-ationery, Cards, Albums, 

etc. Also agent for the celebrated Household Sewing 

Machines, 

In the Everett Store, Main Street, Opposite the Mall, 

BEITNSWICK, MAINE, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



NATIONAL SCHOOL SUPPLY BDREAD. 

Beloit, "Wis., July 31, 1883. 
National School Svpph/ Bureau: 

Last April, beiug then in charae of a large public school, but 
desiring a position in some nood academy or college, I placed 
my name with your lUu-eau." During the lirstpart of the present 
month I received notice from you of a vacancy in such a place as 
I desired. 

Putting myself in communication with the party concerned I 
received the appointment. I am well satisfied with the manage- 
ment of the Bureau, and feel sure that it fills a useful and nec- 
essai-y place in our school economy. Ton are at liberty to use 
my name if you wish. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD O. PISKE. 
Headmaster Markam Academy, Milwaukee, Wis. 

For application-form and circular, address, 

Natirmal School Supply Depot, Chicago, III. 
N. B.— "We want all kinds of Teachers lor Schools 
and Families. Good Pay to Agents and Private Cor- 
respondents. 



DEALER IN 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

"Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 



STUDKNTS 

Of all classes will iiud it valuable to consult ou all subjects the 

iWQfl LITSaiEY BUEIM, 

183 SOUTH CLARK STREET, CHICAGO, IliL. 

Full iuformatiou giveu on receipt of return postage. A uuiou 
of writtTS, critics, and scholars of the highest order. 



ALL KINDS OF 






EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



CHOICE GROCERIES, cTnNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 
N. U.— Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

All the Students Should Btiy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 



ik 1. l@b©r-|§' i@@l I eii®g Stoff 



CoK. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 




NE"W TTPE, 

NE"W BORDERS, 

NE"W DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges, 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



WHY I AM A REPUBLICAN 

A graphic and reliable presentation of Republican princi- 
ples, and reasons for continuing the party iu power, also 
fine portraits and authentic lives of 

BL.A.IIVE ATVO L.OGATV 

by Gov. GEO. S. BOtrT"WELL, of Mass. THE BOOK 
of the party, endorsed bj' leading Republicans. Price In 
reach of every voter. A rare opportunity for a wide-avpake 
student to engage in the campaign with profit. 

"WM. J. BETTS & CO., Hartford, Coud. 




ON THE ROAD. 



11 eiiitiiiii @i. 



(Established 1877.) 

10 BERKELY ST., BOSTON, MASS., 

leu <FiifelJsb too illustpaki iataloiu@s, 

OWE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 

OTHER TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 

stamp at above address. 



ST^LL & BURT, 

509 Tremont St., and 4 Warren Ave., Odd Fellows' Hall, Boston, Mass. 
SPECIAL IMPROVED 

American STAR Bicycle 

Although comparative!}- a new machine on the mar- 
ket, the STAEhas niade a splendid record, 
having won the 

Twenty-Five Mile Championship of 

the United States, 

Breaking the record, in 83 minutes 10 seconds. 

It has a mile record of 2 min. 50 1-8 sec; 
5 miles, 15 min. 26 3-4 sec; mile without 
hands, 3 min. 11 sec It has won the most im- 
portant Hill Climbing- Contests, including; 
Corey Hill, Boston, Eagle Hill, Orange, X. J., 
and Standpipe HUl, Washington, D. C. This 
is a mere mention of the triumphs of the .Star. 

The principles embodied in the Star give the perfect combination for safety, speed, and comfort with economy of 
maintenance and chirabiUty found in no other machine. 

IN ADDITION WE HAVE THE 

VICTOR TRICYCLE, Tlie Most Faiiiois Tliree-flieeler Male In Tlie Worli. 

A Pull Line of the Best ENGLISH MACHINES 

Go to complete the list and suit all tastes. 
The IDEAL, a cheaper machine for use of boys and youths, is a splendid machine for purpose intended and is 
highly recommended- 

SECOND-HAND MACHINES of all kinds, SUPPLIES and SUNDRIES constantly on hand. 
REPAIRING of most difficult kinds performed at reasonable rates. All machines tind parts must he plainly 
marked and be accompanied by instructions by next mail. 

SEND TWO-CENT STAMP FOR CATALOGUE. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Glass Cards and Monograms 

EHQSAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STTIE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY rOR 



All the Late Publications in stock. Text-Books of all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

]S[0. 5 0DD FEIiLGW^' BIi0CK, 

Is the place to buy 

S'a^M, SiuU'Oneiif, § cFuncp ^nod6. 

Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 



^LieYLIC^ 



The only radical internal remefly. Never known to 
fail in a single case, acnte or chronic. It expels the poison- 
ous Uric Acid from the blood, which is the prime cause 
of Rheumatism. Gout, and Neuralsia- — As a blood puri- 

THE OLD RELIABLE SPECIFIC 
ENDORSED BY PHYSICIANS AND 
THOUSANDS OF PATIENTS. <- 



tier it has nu equal. Acting on common-sense principles 
it eradicates from tlie blood all poisonous matter which 
causes disease. — It has been in use for many years and 
cured a larger percentage of cases than any other 

POSITIVELY CURES 



remedy. Send for testimonials from the cured. — Salicy- 
lica strikes directly at the cause of these diseases, while 
so many so-called speci- 

BHEUMATI8M 

ties only treat locally the effect. When you have tried 
in vain all the "oils," "ointments," "liniments," and 
"pam cures," and when your 

GOUT. NEURALGIA, 

doctors cannot help you, do not despair but take Salicy- 
lica at once and be cured. — No one can afford to live iu 
pain and misery when 

GRAVEL. DIABETES, 

Salicylica will relieve him and put him in condition to 
attend to his dally avocations. 

$1 per box, 6 boxes for $5, 

BLOOD POISONING. 

with full directions in ten languages. Sold by druggists 
everywhere, or sent by mail, prepaid, on receipt of price. 

WASHBURNE & CO., Prop's, 

287 Broadway, New York. 

Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

Odd Fellows' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. W. BROWNE, Proi>kieT01!. 
Formerly at Tontine Hotel. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. MERRYMAN, PHARMACIST,-:- 

Dines, MElICIilES, 

Fancy anfl Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Toliacco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

Ipg" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi' 
cal Mercliandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



The New Styles in 

STII^I^ and. SOI^T I^u^TS 

In all colors, are now ready. An eleg-vnt line of New York 
Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

1 ELLIOTT'S, t 

OPP. TOWN CLOCK. 



IVt^YI^^RD'S 



TAPE VgORM. 

In one of the tropical provinces of Germany there has been 
found a root, the extract from which has proved an absolute 
SPECIFIC for Tape Worm. It is pleasant to take and is not de- 
hilitatin^ or disa^-eeable in its effects on the patient, but is 
peculiarly sickening and stupefying to the Tape Worm, which 
loosens its hold of its Tictim and passes away in a natural and 
easy manner, entirely whole, with head, and while still alive. 
Oue physician has used this remedy in over 400 cases, without a 
single failure to pass worm whole, with head. Absolute removal 
with head guaranteed. No pay required until so removed. Send 
stamp for circular and terms. " 

HEYWOOD &. CO., 19 Park Place, N. Y. City. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



WJELEN YO TJ V^JLJSfT JL RIDE 

CALL AT 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S LIVERY STABLE, 

On Cleaveland Street, where you loiUJind turnouts to suit the most 
fastidious. ^^ Rates reasonable. 



Main St., under Town Clock. 

([^•Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 






No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery; Canes; Bird Cages; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

49~Special Bates to Student Clubs..£t 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates foe Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, Georgics and first six Books 
of the ^Eneid, including Prosody. 
(Instead of the Georgics, Caesar's GaUic War, 
Books I. -IV., may be offered.) 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loouiis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wisli to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Kegdlae Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (July 11 and 12, 1884), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 26 and 27, 1884). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examinations is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Washington Academy, East 
Machias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these 
schools having been made special Fitting Schools 
for the college by the action of their several Boards 
of Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 
have been fitted at any school having an approved 



preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topursue their studies after graduation eitlier with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range oi 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQ0IEED— FOUR HOURS A "WEEK. 

Latin, six terms. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terras. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terras. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FODE HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terras. 

Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terras. 

German, two terms. 

History of Philosophy, two terms. 

International Law and Military Science, two 
terras. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $7.'i. 
Room rent (half), average, $2.5. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JAN. 28, 1885. 



No. 13. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED FORTNIGHTLY BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
John A. Peters, '85, Managing Editor. 
N". B. Ford, '85, Business Editor. 
Boyd Bartlett, '85. "W. P. Nealley, '85. 

0. R. Cook, '85. A. A. Knowlton, '86 

J. F. LiBEY, '85. C. W. Tdttle, '86. 

"W. V. Wentworth, '86. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00. 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Students and alumni are invited to contribute matter for any 
of tlie departments. Contributions must be accompanied by 
writer's real name. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XIV., No. 13. — January 28, 1885. 

Alumnus Among His Memcrabila, 173 

Editorial Notes, 173 

Skating 175 

Bowdoin in Journalism (continued), 176 

Alumni Reunions, '. . . 177 

My School 178 

Greek Tragedy, 179 

Stray Leaves from a Diary 180 

Ode to Margaret, 180 

Antilogia 180 

The Remedy, • .... 181 

Ode ISl 

Communications 181 

COLLEGH Tabula, 182 

Personal, 184 

Clippings, 185 

ALUMNUS AMONG HIS MEMOEABILA. 

'Tis only a dainty ringlet 

There, only a thread of gold ; 

Only a dream of college days. 
Gone like a tale that is told. 

But it takes me back twenty years, 

And I seem to see again 
The roguish eyes and ruby lips 

Of the girl that wore it then. 

The fire shall have you, ringlet, 

For from out its elfin blaze 
Peeps the face whose golden tresses 

Haunts my dream of college days. 




Some one has said that a college 
paper is the pulse bj' which the governors of 
the college know the condition of the stu- 
dent-body. This is true enough e.xcept when 
the freedom of the college press is abridged, 
as is the case in one New York college, when 
the pulse is not to be relied on ; and when 
the editors are appointed by the facultj^, as 
they are in one Maine college, in which case 
the pulse becomes a second-liand faculty 
pulse. But allowing the metaphor to be 
true with these exceptions, what an aspersion 
it casts on the doctoring ability of some of 
our Trustees and Overseers who presume to 
enter upon an elaborate treatment of our case 
without once feeling of the pulse ! As patients 
who want the best possible treatment, we pro- 
test against such an irregular course of pro- 
ceedings. Not long ago we received a letter 
from a prominent member of the Visiting 
Committee saying that he would be glad to 
take the Orient, but he alread}' had so many 
papers — etc., etc. This gentleman is one of a 
committee which, on account of its supposed 
familiarity with the needs of the college, has 
great influence on the legislation of the 
boards ; but his acquaintance with the college 
and its needs is not likely to be greatly fur- 
thered by refusing to read the college paper! 



174 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



He is neglecting the readiest means of acquir- 
ing that knowledge which is indispensable to 
an intelligent membership of the committee. 
Unfortunately his is not an isolated case. 
There are others whose apparent interest in 
the proper fulfillment of their duties is no 
stronger. We repeat that we object to being 
treated by such negligent physicians. 



It seemed best to the venerable founders 
of most of our colleges and other seats of 
learning, in fixing upon a site for the future 
institution, to choose that place which, other 
things being equal, appeared least likely by 
worldly allurement to draw the student from 
his midnight lamp; in other words, that place 
most poky and out of the way. But the es- 
tablishment of a college in this place, we 
would hasten to add, was a happy exception 
to the rule. For Brunswick, though not itself 
a whirling metropolis, is certainly not remote 
from civilization ; and as for being pok}' — 
think what it would have been to have 
attended college in North Yarmouth, Free- 
port or Turner, places which hotly contested 
with Brunswick, the latter part of the last 
century, the honor of being the seat of this 
institution ! In the last few years especially, 
Brunswick has taken some vigorous strides 
forward. A spirit of progress animates its cit- 
izens, and the town has grown. This growth 
is noticeable in the large number of new build- 
ings erected, and in other improvements — 
such as sidewalks — in which students and 
towns-people have equally rejoiced. Bruns- 
wick has reason to congratulate itself on its 
prosperity. But it appears that the place, 
having been a success as a town, is ambitious 
to become a city. The Orient would welcome 
the proposed change, as in case of any little 
matter like a lack of crossings one man would 
take to himself all the tears which now have 
to be divided among so many ; but we reall}' 
hope that the people of Brunswick, before 



taking this step, will carefully consider the 
fable of the frogs who clamored for a change 
of rulers. 



A man of patriotic spirit proposes in the 
communication department that one day in 
each 3'ear be set apart in which to honor, by 
appropriate exercises, the memory of our 
illustrious predecessors in these halls. Ttie 
idea is a good one, and if carried out there is 
no reason wh}' Alumni Memorial Da}', or 
whatever it may be called, should not become 
as important and interesting a day as there is 
on the college calendar. Such a commemo- 
ration would be nothing more than the out- 
ward expression of a feeling common to all, 
and could not but have a beneficial effect 
upon all who should participate. It seems as 
if our prophets had more honor in other lands 
than at home. Even at Colby they celebrate 
Longfellow's birthday. It only remains for 
some class to take the initiative, and success 
will be assured. As seniors have commence- 
ment before them, and juniors Ivy Day, the 
sophomores, as proposed, could well make 
this their peculiar day. The sophomoric 
energy which used to be given to a proper 
interment of Anna, if turned into this channel, 
would no doubt give gratifying results. Let 
them appoint a committee to discuss ways 
and means. 



A man in college leads such an independ- 
ent, free-and-easy sort of life that he is apt to 
fall into habits, especially in financial matters, 
which, to say the least, are not in strict ac- 
cordance with business principles. In a col- 
lege with a small number of students, where 
the dormitory system is in vogue, and each 
student is one of a family in which there are 
no strangers, it is not surprising that little 
or no attention is paid to those technicalities in 
business transactions, the neglect of which 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



175 



in tlie outside world would not be thought of 
nor allowed. But a certain laxity has of late 
years been allowed to creep into the financial 
management of the different organizations 
which is sure in the long run to be injurious 
to the interests of the college. A' man may 
be as careless as he pleases in the handling of 
money — provided it is his own — but when it 
happens to belong to other people he cannot 
be too careful in his attention to details. This 
principle would seem to be so much of an 
axiom as to make the mention of it absurd, 
yet it is by no means always taken as a rule 
of action. To be more definite: it is so 
arranged that the treasurer of man}' of the 
associations in college does not have the 
spending of the money ; and the person who 
does spend the money — call him manager if 
you will — often neglects to keep a detailed 
account of his expenditures. The treasurer, 
when called upon, then makes a beautifully 
simple and lucid report to the association. 
It is: " Paid the manager so much." Such 
a report is not only in reality no report at all, 
but it leaves room for unjust suspicions, is 
most unbusiness-like and injures the associa- 
tion, as men are naturally unwilling to put 
money into such a blind pool. Now a manager 
is often out of pocket at the expiration of his 
term of office, and a case of a dishonest man- 
ager has never been known ; yet by just so 
much as he neglects to publicly explain where 
every cent has gone, does he fail to perform 
his whole duty. Any such loose method of 
doing business would not be tolerated for a 
moment outside of college walls; why should 
it within? The association should take a de- 
cided stand in this matter and demand the 
most explicit information from their officers 
in regard to all outlays of money. 



We have inserted in this issue a some- 
what complimentary private letter to the 
editor^ because: First, the writer has taken 



interest enough in the paper to offer a sug- 
gestion; and second, he mentions the fact that" 
be incloses his " subscription." As to the 
suggestion that our personal column be 
enlarged, we would merely say that ever}' 
item that falls under the observation of the 
personal editor is published; but as he has 
not that "Observation" which 

" with extensive view 
Surveys mankind from Cliina to Peru," 

the number of items is limited. If alumni 
who are interested in having a well-filled 
personal department in the Orient would take 
the trouble to send us from time to time such 
graduate items as they may happen to notice, 
and also keep us posted in regard to their 
own whereabouts, we should have a column 
that would leave nothing to be desired. 

We would have our subscribers take note 
of the fact that one person has sent in the 
price of subscription. We regret to say that 
there has been a general hesitancy in this re- 
spect, — a hesitancy greatly to be deplored, as 
it puts us in an extremely unpleasant position; 
but now that one person has broken the ice 
and set such a worthy example, we sincerel}' 
hope that the rest of our readers will ovei'- 
come their natural reserve and favor us with 
a remittance. 



SKATING. 

A long stretch of ice that is glassy, 

And the wind from the north blowing free, 

And close by your side some fair lassie ; 
In this world what more pleasant can be ? 

Go talk of your wine to another, 

For with me would be useless your task ; 

I don't care my noddle to bother 

With a thought of j'our bottle or flask. 

Can your wine show a red more delightful 
Than the cheek of the girl by my side ; 

Can your wine make the blood flow more 
sprightful 
Than the air that we breathe as we glide ? 



176 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



When King Winter his might doth recall, O 
And doth order Jack Frost on a raid. 

With steel sharp and ringing, we'll follow 
The track that bold minion hath made. 



BOWDOIN IN JOURNALISM. 

[Continued.] 

Edrannd Flagg, of the class of 1835, " has 
edited several newspapers in the South and 
West," Henry V. Poor, of the same class, 
edited the American Railroad Journal for 
fourteen years, and William Williams in 1851 
edited the American Cabinet, a literary and 
scientific paper. 

A. G. Tenney, of the class of 1835, is 
another in the brief list of genuine journal- 
ists, having given the best of his life to 
creditable newspaper work. He was one 
of the founders of the Baltimore (Md.) 
Transcript about 1838. In 1840 he came 
North, and in 1841 edited the Boston Daily 
Times, and was connected with the Boston 
Daily Journal for seven years. He edited 
the Bath Daily Times from 1855 to 1857. 
Since then he has been editor and proprietor 
of the Brunswick (Me.) Telegraph. He has 
a good literary taste, wields an incisive pen, 
is animated by high ideals, and exerts an in- 
fluence for good in the community. 

Of the members of the class of 1836, 
Hon. Joseph Baker in 1854 was associated 
with Hon. James G. Blaine in the editorship 
of the Kennebec Journal; Thomas S. Harlow 
edited the Piscataquis (N. H.) Herald; Hon. 
Alonzo Garcelon was the founder of the 
Lewiston Gazette, and its editor for four years ; 
James Drummond was for a time editor of 
the Maine Evangelist, and Nathan Dale had 
charge of the Journal of Missions and the 
Youths'' Day Spring, in Boston, from 1850 
to 1854. 

Hon. George F. Emery, of the class of 
1836, is another of the real journalistic 
spirits. After practicing law in his native 
town in 1846 he moved to Portland and con- 



tributed the leading editorials to the Eastern 
Argus during the Wilmot proviso contro- 
versy, in support of the doctrine of freedom 
in the territories. He next was editor of the 
Oxford Democrat, during the sharp contro- 
versy which resulted in the election of Mr. 
Haralin, then a democrat, to the Senate. He 
was a supporter of Mr. Hamlin. In 1876 he 
purchased a controlling interest in the Boston 
Post, and from that till 1881 the control and 
management of that journal devolved upon 
him. He supervised the business and con- 
tributed largely to the editorial department, 
directing its political policy. 

Albert Merrill, of the class of 1837, ed- 
ited the Northern Tribune of Bath during 
Fillmore's administration. Rev. Smith B. 
Goodenovv, of the class of 1838, " spent three 
years as an editor," and his classmate, Isaac 
N. Felch, foi' some 3'ears edited the Progres- 
sive Age, the Waldo Signal, and afterwards 
the Portland Evening Courier. Dr. Gideon 
S. Palmer edited and published the Gardiner 
Ledger one year. Judge Wm. G. Barrows, 
of the class of 1839, edited the Brunswick 
Telegraph from 1853 to 1855. Benjamin A. 
G. Fuller, of the same class, had charge of 
the Augusta Age in 1855 and 1856. Edward 
P. Weston, a classmate, was once an editor of 
the Maine Teacher. Nathan Cleveland, of the 
class of 1840, was for some years on the edi- 
torial corps of the Boston Daily Advertiser. 
Rev. John B. L. Soule, of the same class, had 
editorial charge of the Terre-Haute (Ind.) 
Daily Express for two or three years, and 
with such success that he received flattering 
offers for the same position elsewhere, but he 
preferred to return to the ministry. Henry 
T. Cummings, M.D., of the class of 1841, for 
a time, when first beginning the practice of 
his profession, assisted his father on the 
Christian Mirror. Hon. Frederick Robie, ol 
the same class, was business manager of the 
Portland Press in 1871 and 1872. 

Of the class of 1842, Rev. Charles M. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



177 



Blake was for a year editor of the Pacific 
News, the second newspaper established in 
San Francisco ; for seven years he was Cali- 
fornia correspondent of the New York Trib- 
une ; and Samuel R. Thurston, of the class 
of 1843, about 1848 edited the Gazette of 
Iowa City. 



ALUMNI REUNIONS. 

NEW YORK. 

The Association of the Alumni of the Col- 
lege in the city of New York held its annual 
meeting, with its annual dinner, at the Mur- 
ray Hill Hotel on the evening of January 21, 
1885. There were about thirty members of 
the association present. 

Dr. Fordyce Barker, '37, presided at the 
dinner and opened the intellectual entertain- 
ment, after the coffee, with one of his bright 
and felicitous speeches for which he has so 
long been known. The toasts as read by 
the toast-master were as follows : 

The College. To the toast of " The 
College " Prof. Chapman, dean of the faculty, 
responded urging the claims of the institution 
upon the graduates and directing special at- 
tention to the success which has attended 
the experiment of self-government by the 
jury system among the undergraduates. He 
believed that students could govern them- 
selves better than they could be governed, 
and claimed for the college which he admin- 
istered in the absence of a president, a broad 
and liberal educational policy thoroughly 
abreast of the times. He spoke of the needs 
of the college, the chief wants being a new 
gymnasium and a library and a larger bene- 
ficiar}' fund. 

The Memory of Professor Alpheus S. 
Packard. Responded to by the toast-master 
reading the following poem : 

IN MEMORIAM. — ^T. 86. 
If spring and youth are lovely, yet 'tis true 
Autumn is lovely, too ; 



The promise of the germ is not more svreet, 
Than wealth of ripen'd wheat. 

I knew him in his sunny summer's days, 
When Wisdom's ripening rays 

Beamed on his soul's rich glebe, where, plain to view, 
The finest fruitage grew. 

What doth prevail in man's best soil to grow, 

For man's best uses ! Lo ! 
Sweetness of soul, and what, in cultured fields, 

The tree of knowledge yields. 

And these, — who had them in abundance more 

Than he who, through the Door 
Of Time, has pass'd beyond us ! Sweet and pure 

His soul, — sweetly mature 
The fruitage of the tree that he had grown 

Within his field alone. 
His thoughts and deeds so shining were and bright, 

That Heaven's King saw their light 
And beckon'd him to stay his constant quest, 

And in his Halls to rest. 

His life was lovely. In pursuit of truth 

He found perpetual youth ; 
His purity laugh'd at the Psalmist's feai's 

That limited life's years 
To but three-score and ten, and lightly ran 

Beyond that little span. 
From earliest years walk'd Wisdom as his nurse : 

Daily he held converse 
With who had been and were the wise and great 

That shared in human fate. 

I know not of the Hereafter, — if there be 

More than the life I see ; 
I know not if, with higher births allied. 

Life may be sanctified. 
The Saints, — if there be Saints of heavenly bii'th, — 

Must first be Saints on Earth. 
I know that in him saintliness did dwell 

And him became so well, 
That he did seem a well-beloved son, 

The world might look upon. 
And hear a voice descend from Heaven high, 

" In him well pleased am I." 

He walk'd in reverence by the summer sea, 
Elated by its moving majesty. 

He knew its Maker, worship'd, and beside 
The ever-flowing tide, 

Heeded the summons that he, only, heard. 
With no repining word. 



178 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



And pass'd beyond, and left for you and me 
A sad, sweet memory. 

Beside his grave we walk with reverend tread. 

Not tearful for the dead, 
For his fine spirit to each heart doth reach, 

And constantly doth teach. 

Gkorge B. Merrill (H. W., '59). 
Boston, Jan. 17, 1886. 

Rev. Dr. Newman Smyth, '63, of New 
Haven, then read an exceedingly interesting- 
paper upon the life and services at Bowdoin 
of Professor Packard which it was afterwards 
voted to have published in pamphlet form. 

The New College Fetich. Starr H. 
Nichols. 

The Old College Fetich. Dexter A. 
Hawkins, '48. 

The Old Pine Tree State. Prof. Wm. 
A. Packard, '51. 

The Press. Hon. Granville P. Hawes, 
'60. 

The Doctors and the Medical Pro- 
fession. Dr. Charles Packard, '48. 

The Diplomatic Representatives from 
Bowdoin College. Hon. Chas. A. Wash- 
burn, '48. 

The Girls prom the Annex. Prof. 
Chas. A. Brackett. 

The Boys. Almon Goodwin, '62. 

The following gentlemen were chosen 
the ofiScers of the association for the next 
year: President, Edward B. Merrill, '57; 
Vice-Presidents, Rev. Newman Smyth, D.D., 
'63, Hon. Chas. Washburn, '48, Almon 
Goodwin, '62, D. A. Easton, '65 ; Treasurer, 
William J. Curtis, '75 ; Recording Secretary, 
F. R. Upton, '75 ; Corresponding Secretar}', 
William A. Abbott, '58 ; Executive Commit- 
tee, Hon. Granville P. Hawes, '60, Dexter 
A. Hawkins, '48, Charles E. Soule, '42, Wil. 
liam S. Dennett, '71, Charles A. Robbins, '64. 

PORTLAND. 
The sixteenth annual meeting and dinner of the 
Bowdoin Alumni Association of Portland and vicinity 



was held at the Falmouth Hotel, Wednesday evening, 
Jan. 21. Thirty-four members were present. The 
Faculty of the College was represented by Prof. H. 
Carmichael, Prof. F. C. Robinson, Prof. S. G. Brown, 
and Tutor W. A. Moody. The dinner was well 
served, to the satisfaction of all present. Hon. W. L. 
Putnam presided at the literary exercises, and intro- 
duced H. H. Emery, who read a poem reviving pleas- 
ant memories of college days. A. Moulton was 
toast-master. Toasts were responded to as follows : 
Old Bowdoin. Response by Rev. E. C. Cummings. 
The Faculty. Response by Prof. Carmichael. Our 
State. Response by Hon. Bion Bradbury. Our City. 
Response by Ira S. Locke, Esq. Our Association. 
Response by George M. Seiders, Esq. College Rem- 
iniscences. Response by George A. Thomas and E. 
H. Thomas. Our Absent Alumni. Response by 
Seth L. Larrabee, Esq. The Deceased Alumni. Re- 
sponse by Hon. George F. Emery. The following 
ofiicers were elected : President, P. H. Brown ; Vice- 
Presidents, Charles B. Merrill, Mathan Cleaves, 
George P. Emery, A. F. Moulton ; Secretary, F. H. 
Gerrish; Treasurer, F. S. Waterhouse ; Executive 
Committee, C. E. Webster, C. A. Ring, F. O. Co- 
nant; Dinner Committee, F. H. Little, C. G. Hainse, 
George F. McQuillan; Orator, W. M. Paysou ; Poet, 
A. J. Russell ; Toast-master, H. W. Ring. 

BOSTON. 
The Bowdoin Alumni of Boston and vicinity will 
have their annual reunion and dinner at Young's, on 
Wednesday evening, Feb. 18th. It is understood 
that Prof. E. C. Smyth, of Andover, the president of 
the association, will give an address on the late Prof. 
Packard at that time. 



MY SCHOOL. 

I. — The Dream. 
A village hiding, 'mid the hills. 
With shady walks and tinkling rills. 
Where ruddy health the air instills 

From Nature's fount ; 
And children, laughing gloom away, 
With cheeks as red as opening day, 
Haste from their simple rural play 

To Learning's mount. 
I saw them busy at their books, 
And eager joy was in their looks. 

II.— r/te Reality. 
A mill with shanties placed in front 
Along a road where doth the grunt 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



179 



Of promenading pigs confront 

The stranger's ear ; 
And urchins cased in dirty rind, 
At which all soap may well repine, 
Cease playing with the wandering swine 

To greet me here. 
My very soul they wear away 
Before I reach the final day. 



A GREEK TRAGEDY 

IN THREE SCENES. 



It was the evening after the term had 
closed. In the dim recesses of a scholastic 
cloister, around which were scattered "pon- 
derous volumes written in quaint hieroglyph- 
ics, sat a care-worn man. There was a weird 
gleam in his coal-black eye, and ever and 
anon he leaped with feverish impulse from 
his chair and tore his raven locks and hissed 
forth strange oaths in a still stranger tongue. 
It seemed as if some deep-seated and hered- 
itary insanity were moving with volcanic 
fury a " deceased nature " to "strange erup- 
tions." 

A smile of demoniac exultation wreathed 
his thin lips as, going to his book-case, he 
took down a time-worn volume marked 
" Rank," from the covers of which a grinning 
skull looked forth in hideous glee. Well, in- 
deed, might this emblem of death adorn the 
covers of that book from whose musty pages 
had come the records which had consigned 
the hopes of many an aspirant for college 
honors to a sad and early burial. A miasma 
emanated from the book itself and filled the 
room ; but the man of raven locks heeded it 
not. The volume was an old friend and he 
loved it with a mysterious affection. Through 
its potent influence he had been enabled in 
years past to bring ruin to his enemies and 
elevate his friends to Olympian heights 
where, to the common throng who wandered 



up and down the tearful valleys, they seemed 
but motes, yet 

" Pygmies are pygmies still, though perched on Alps, 
And pyramids are pyramids in vales." 

With nervous energy he turned the pages 
and a fiendish chuckle echoed through the 
silent apartment as he laid open a page 
marked " Sophomores " and, with a stack of 
blanks before him, commenced the arduous 
task of " making up the ranks." The first 
thing on the page was entitled " Daily Schol- 
arship of ," from which we take the 

following extract: 

"Monday, 10. — Came in two minutes late. 
'Tuesday, 11. — Stamped on floor. 
' Wednesday, 12. — Looked insolent and 

winked viciously. 
'Thursday, 13. — Cornered me on a verb. 
' Friday, 14. — Translation not hoss ; but 

grossly original! 
'Saturday, 15.^Detected me giving a 

wrong construction. 
'Sunday, 16. — Didn't stop to Sabbath School." 

" Well, my young friend," sneeringly solil- 
oquized the man of marks as he finished 
reading the record, "this makes your rank 
about 5.50, and relieves you of the impending 
necessitv of writing a Commencement part," 
and unable to restrain his wild mirth he 
leaped about like an acrobat, and gave vent 
to paroxysms of laughter that would have 
done honor to a Cyclops. Thus through the 
watches of the night he pursued his weary 
task. 

II. 

Through the crowd awaiting their mail at 
the Brunswick post-ofiSoe, the closely muffled 
figure of a mysterious man threaded his way, 
and, dropping a package of letters into the 
box, turned upon the wondering throng, and 
burst into a laugh so wild and weird that it 
caused the hair of youth to whiten, and made 
the blood of age run cold. When the be- 
numbed people awoke from their stupor he 
was gone. A small lump of brimstone alone 



180 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



remained to bear testimony of his visit, which 
was placed away in the archives of the town 
as a thing of prophetic import. 

III. 
A college class were assembled together. 
Silence reigned. Their brows were knotted 
with the workings of a mighty anger. The 
stillness was becoming oppressive, when sud- 
denly upon the air there broke a chorus of 
groans and mingled oaths and tears that 
would have rivaled a pandemonium, and as 
the echoes died away in the distance a concert 
of voices caught up the sad refrain, " It was 
a tidal wave that swept over our class." 



STRAY LEAVES FROM A DIARY. 

Tuesday, Jan. 3. — College began to-day. 
Thought I would begin right by not taking 
in chapel. Cut Greek as boss hasn't come. 
Played whist instead. Bed at 11. 

Wednesday, Jan. 4. — Had to cut Greek 
again as boss has not got along yet. I'm in 
mourning — no boss on French to be had. 
Pay Ezik twenty-five cents a week to read 
the lessons out to me. Fire went out. 

Thursday, Jan. 5. — Up at 9, so did not 
get any breakfast. Went into Greek. Was 
pulled first thing. Got a dead. Was ground 
bad. Latin easy. Loafed in evening. Bed 
at 12.37. 

Friday, Jan. 6. — Ditto, except I was up 
in time for breakfast. Just managed to get 
in to chapel. One Prof, there, — the one that 
reads. Fooled away the evening. Bed 
11.40. 

Saturday, Jan. 7. — Up at 8.30. Lost 
breakfast again. Also lost first recitation, 
and took a dead in the others. In p.m., wrote 
a theme on " Marituri Salutamus." (I wish I 
was dead.) Wrote one page and then spread it 
over three. Played poker till 12. 

Sunday, Jan. 8.— Up just in time for 



dinner. Read Puch and plugged Greek. 
Took in the prayer-meeting, but got left on 
going home. Bed at 8.45. 



"ODE" TO MARGARET. 

A SENIOR'S OUTLOOK. 
Seraphic maid witli golden hair, 

And eyes of heaven's blue, 
( I ought to say red-headed girl, 

To make my picture true.) 

Accept the mighty love I bear, 
A love thou can'st not measure, 

(It reaches clear beyond you, Mag, 
And takes in pater's treasure.) 

May kind fates hasten the moments 

When thou and I art one ; 
( And your father, instead of a daughter. 

Supports a daughter and son.) 




'Tis true 'tis pity, 
And pity 'tis 'tis true : 

That one of the Trustees was not aware 
till lately that we were in need of a gymna- 
sium. 

That both Washington's Birthday and 
Decoration Day come on Sunday this year. 

That the college orchestra lies dormant. 

That the chapel is infested with draughts. 

That Mr. Booker does not get a man of 
more weight to stand on the snow-plow. 

That the Professor of Agriculture is ab- 
sent from his regular duties without leave. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



181 



THE REMEDY. 

(For those affected with snow-blindness.) 
He a Freshman young and blushing, 
She a maiden fair and gushing; 
Side by side they rode together, 
Talked of poetry and the weather. 

"Charlie dearest, do you know," 
Quoth the maiden soft and low, 

"Why it is this horrid snow 
Doth affect my optics so ? " 

Charlie answered with a kiss, 
"The philosophy of this 

Wholly in the color lies. 

Green alone will rest the eyes." 

Then she gazed at him again 

With expression most inane ; 

And the answer softly came, 
" Charles, your remedy is vain." 

ODE. 

Kin the olden days of Greece, 

Tobacco had been known. 
And all the joys that spring therefrom. 

The Greeks had made their own ; 

In faith I think among their gods. 

Of whom we're wont to read. 
There would have been another one — 

The god that loved the weed. 

For why, if honor fell to him 

Who went on many a spree ; 
Should not more praise have been bestowed 

On him, who soberly 

Filled up his pipe with fragrant leaves. 
Then stretched at careless ease. 

Blew forth thick clowds of filmy smoke 
To wanton with the breeze. 

While all his thoughts their courses ran 

With method and design. 
And were not in a maze, like those 

Of him who quaffed the wine. 

Then take a cup from Bacchus, boys, 

And fill it to the brim. 
And when we've drained it to the weed. 

We'll smoke a pijie to him. 

And thus with equal honor, boys. 

From us shall praise proceed 
To Bacchus and his brother twin. 

The god that loves the weed. 



COMMUKICATIOKS. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

During my college course it was my pleas- 
ant lot to be connected with the Orient, and 
I have ever since taken great interest in the 
welfare of the paper. As one who "knows 
what it is," allow me to extend to you my 
sympathy and cordial congratulations. I am 
much interested in your articles on " Bowdoin 
in Journalism," and hope they will be followed 
by others of the same nature. Your depart- 
ments are ably conducted. If I were to oifer 
a suggestion, it would be that the Personal 
column be enlarged and matters of every-day 
occurrence inserted. 1 am inclined to think 
that this would please the graduates and 
enlarge your subscription list. Inclosed you 
will find two dollars, my subscription for this 
year. Wishing you a continuance of your 
success and a Happy New Year, I am 

Yours sincerely, 



A '25 MEMORIAL DAY. 

To the Editors of the Orient : 

Though sons of Bowdoin have become 
illustrious in every department of life ; though 
thej' have become known and honored in 
every part of the civilized world, j'et at Bow- 
doin there is no day to commemorate them. 
While schools and associations all over the 
land commemorate their lives and labors, 
at their own Alma Mater they receive no 
recognition. 

Outside the fitness and beauty of having 
some day in which to remember those of our 
alumni who have become renowned, to our- 
selves there would be inestimable benefit. 

The celebration of such a day, it seems 
to me, since it so nearly accords with sopho- 
more spirit, would most fitly devolve upon 
them. 

I have entitled the communication "A '25 
Memorial Day," thinking it a worthy and 



182 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



fitting tribute to that class, biit "Alumni Day," 
or some other such name, might be, perhaps, 
as appropriate. 

But before this project can be realized, it 
must be agitated ; and it is to be hoped that 
the students will take enough interest in it 

to do so. ALPHA. 




"How doth the little husy 
tooth 
Improve each shining min- 
ute, 
To keep a man awake all night, 
Because no iilling's in it. 



"How doth the swelled neuralgic jaw, 

Delight to pain and grumble. 
And cause a man to sulphvrate, 
Or else feel deuced humble." 

The " Shakespeare Water Cure" was the event 
of the season. 

Thursday, January 29th, is the Day of Prayer for 
schools and colleges. 

After the usual delay in obtaining text-books at 
the beginning of the term, the classes have settled 
down into the regular routine of work. 

" Junior ease " one week before last. 

Jordan, '83, and Gould, Bowdoin ex -'85, were 
in town recently. 

Lost the other morning at C , the choir. 

Stackpole, '86, has closed his term of school at 
Richmond and returned to college. 

The freshmen, besides reading Livy, are trans- 
lating Cicero's De Senecluie at sight. 

The Library is open every day (Sundays ex- 
cepted) from 11.30 a.m. to 3 p.m., and on Wednes- 
days and Saturdays from 3 to 4 P. m. in addition. 

Donnell, Harding, Kendall and Wardwell, '85, are 
taking some extra work in Anatomy this term, under 
Prof. Lee. 

There are six students and one member of the 
faculty who take their meals at the Elm House. 

There has been considerable complaint about the 
chapel organ among the admirers of good music. If 



a new organ could be obtained by subscription, or a 
concert, it would meet a long felt want. 

Prof. Avery has an article in a recent number of 
the American Antiquarian on "The Races of the 
Pacific Ocean." 

Sewall, '87, was in town recently; he is teaching 
at South Freeport. 

A movement is on foot to purchase an organ for 
the Y. M. C. A. room. 

Goodwin, '87, returned to college last week. 

Torrey, '87, has constructed a galvanometer, 
which he uses in connection with his telegraph line. 

Scene in freshman recitation : Prof, in Latin — 
"Now Mr. L — , in the passage that you have just 
rendered, what side do you understand to be referred 
to in the "ultra HiberumV Mr. L. — "The other 
side." 

Prof. Robinson lectured at Franklin Falls, N. H., 
last week. 

The juniors are using Deutsch's German Reader. 

" The Observance of Sunday," and "The Prospects 
of Civil Service Reform under the next Adminis- 
tration," were assigned as topics for junior themes ; 
they were due Saturday, Jan. 24th. On Jan. 31st 
the sophomore themes are due. "The Game of Polo," 
and "The Yalue of Arctic Explorations," are the 
topics assigned. 

Folsom, '85, attends the lectures in Physics with 
the juniors. 

Prof. Chapman addressed the Portland Club of 
Congregationalists at the hall of the Y. M. C. A., on 
Monday evening, Jan. 12th. He gave a very inter- 
esting and exhaustive essay on the topic : " Wycliffe, 
Chaucer and Langland ; their relations to the reform 
movement of the Fourteenth Century." Selections 
from the writings of each author were read, in the 
dialect of these times, as well as a rendering into the 
English of to-day. It was called a "scholarly and 
able address"; and one that was closely followed, 
and frequently applauded. 

It is reported that the Maine State College base- 
ball nine will probably enter the State League this 
year. 

A good piano has been placed in lovver Memorial 
Hall by the Literary Association. 

The library has recently received as a gift from a 
number of the alumni the Cyclopaedia of Biblical, 
Theological and Ecclesiastical Literature, by Mc- 
Clintock & Strong. Additions to the periodicals, 
also, have been made by the purchase of eleven 
bound copies of the Contemporary Review, and ten 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



183 



of the Nineteenth Century. The Nineteenth Century 
is now complete up to July, 1884, and will be a very 
helpful reference to the students. 

Prof. Brown, on resuming his duties, Friday 
morning, Jan. 16th, gave a very instructive and 
highly entertaining lecture on " Art," to tlie senior 
class. 

Prof. Geo. T. Ladd, of Yale, formerly professor 
of Mental and Moral Philosophy at Bowdoin, has two 
articles in the January number of the New Eng- 
lander: "The Life of Frederick Denison Maurice," 
and, "The Recent Change in the Academic Curricu- 
lum at Yale." 

The Bowdoin Literary Association held its first 
meeting of the term in lower Memorial Hall, Tues- 
day evening, Jan. 13th. The following programme 
was carried out : Discussion of the resolution : Re- 
solved, That the present ranking system of this col- 
lege is detrimental to the best interest of the student 
at large. Aflf.— E. Thomas, A. W. Merrill ; Neg.— 
C. B. Burleigh, E. S. Barrett. After the debate, 
Prof. Smith made a few remarks. The question was 
decided ou its merits in the negative. Instrumental 
music by C. M. Austin. 

Marston, '88, has returned from teaching. 

Gen. Chamberlain was chosen president of the 
Webster Historical Society at its recent meeting held 
in the Old South. 

Prof. Johnson, who was called away recently by 
the death of his father-in-law, Geo. I. Robinson of 
Thomaston, returned on Monday, the 19th. 

The medical department opens on Thursday, Feb. 
5lh. The opening lecture will bo delivered at 3 p.m. 
by Prof. Carmichael. A large class is expected. 

The sophomores are divided into two divisions in 
Latin ; one take the regular course, and the other are 
reading at sight. There are nine in the latter 
division. 

Prof. Chapman attended the annual reunion of 
the Bowdoin Alumni at New York, Jan. 21st. 

Some things that are done to be funny are not 
after all so very funny, when one takes a second 
thought, and perhaps striking the steam-pipes in the 
chapel might be classed under this head. If any one 
has a desire to establish an unenviable reputation by 
so doing, it is a free country, and he is at liberty to 
do so ; but there seem to be some good objections to 
making such free use of the feet in such a place as 
the chapel. 

The Literary Association proposes to have a 
course of five lectures and two concerts, coming 



about once a week for the remainder of this term. 
It is hoped that the committee, having the matter of 
selecting lecturers under consideration, will com- 
plete the arrangements very soon so that the course 
can begin immediately. A course of lectures cannot 
fail to be interesting, and ought to be well patronized 
by the students and towns-people. 

A sei-ies of germans, arranged by some of the 
students, is talked of. Several have already signified 
a desire to attend. 

An entertainment was given by the Literary Asso- 
ciation in lower Memorial on Thursday evening, 
Jan. 22d. There was a fair attendance. The fol- 
lowing is the pi'ogramme : 

College SoBg. 

Readings. Prof. J. M. Chapman. 

Solo. F. W. Alexander. 

Readings. Prof. J. M. Chapman. 

College Song. 

Readings. Prof. J. M. Chapman. 

Piano Solo. C. M. Austin. 

Readings. Prof. J. M. Chapman. 

College Song. 

All who were so fortunate as to hear Prof. J. M. 
Chapman's readings, must have gone away feeling 
that they had spent a delightful hour, and enjoyed a 
rare literary treat. 

Washington's birthday comes this year on Sun- 
day. The question now is : will the zealous under- 
classmen, admirers of ihe Father of his Country, 
refuse to attend church on that day ? 

The Rev. Elijah Kellogg takes a flattering inter- 
est in the welfare of the students and sometimes hon- 
ors his particular friends with a call ; but in the future 
he will look with suspicious eye upon a certain sen- 
ior. This senior, who is evidently an ardent admirer 
of the author of " Spartacus to the Gladiators," — a 
piece that he has often flunked on in the days of his 
youth — had occasion to be in the same room with Mr. 
Kellogg, a while ago, and on leaving deftly changed 
hats with that gentleman. He then retired in good 
order and doubtless in great triumph, to his room ; 
but he was not to be left in quiet possession of his 
relic, for the Rev. gentlemen, it seems, was not sat- 
isfied with the "swap." In short, the senior was 
obliged to disgorge an hour later. It is needless to 
say that he denies having any intention in the matter. 

The Collegian, a new monthly magazine, in size 
and appearance like a college paper has been estab- 
lished in New York and is to be devoted to the inter- 
ests of colleges in general. It will be managed by an 
advisory board chosen from fifteen prominent col- 



184 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A prominent third-term-Physics senior has lately- 
been laying violent hands on Ihe covers of our 
exchanges for the manufacture of an induction coil. 
He seems to be a rising young Physicist. He has 
already developed enough electricity with his ma- 
chine to " shock" clams. 

The professor of Biology has got his eye on a 
hitching post down town, which, to his practiced vision, 
shows symptoms of glacier markings. We would 
advise the owners to drive the post a foot or two far- 
ther into the ground unless they are willing that it 
should adorn the Cleaveland Cabinet collection. 

According to the sophomores the professor of 
Rhetoric shuffles his little cards like a practiced 
pokerist; but then how in the world should they 
know ? 

The Y. M. C. A. library consists of one volume — 
the Bible. Here is a good opportunity for any one 
who wants to show his friendship for the Y. M. C. A. 

"The survival of the fittest," remarked the only 
man who was left running at the end of a mile in 
the gym. room. 

The Columbia College men wait ten minutes for 
the Prof, before they think themselves entitled to a 
lawful " adjourn," according to the Spectator. The 
Columbia men seem to be somewhat anxious to get 
their " money's worth." How disappointed they 
must be when the Prof, doesn't show up ! After wait- 
ing three minutes, hereatBowdoin, the most credulous 
man will be convinced that the Prof, does not intend 
to come. 

We received the other day what we took to be 
a notice of discontinuance, written on a postal card 
in Oreek. No abuse is too bad for the perpetrator of 
such an outrage. We hereby give notice that we 
have no money to hire paid interpreters, and that no 
"discontinuances" will be heeded unless written in 
our language — United States. 



Brown University has organized a boat club and 
intends to send a crew to the intercollegiate regatta. 

Princeton has informed the University of Pennsyl- 
vania that her crew will no longer be a competitor 
for the Childs cup. In view of this the cup will 
probably be awarded to the winner of the intercol- 
legiate regatta. — Crimson. 

Young Mr. Wiyoheyatawicasta, an Indian, is get- 
ting an education at Dartmouth College. If Mr. W. 
does not learn to spell better than some graduates, 
he will come out of school with a very indistinct idea 
as to how his own name should be got together. — Ex. 




'49.— Geo. E. B. Jack- 
son has refused the use of 
his name as candidate for mayor of 
Portland. 
'49. — Cothren 2d has been appointed 
on the Board of Education in Brooklyn. 

'50. — O. O. Howard was President of the Army 
Retiring Board which met at Omaha, Januai-y 12th. 

'60. — Senator Frye will build a summer residence 
at Squirrel Island this coming season. 

'55. —Dr. S. C. Gordon delivered a lecture before 
the Pythagorean Lodge, F. A. M., at Fryeburg, 
January 26th. 

'60. — President Fernald has received a call to a 
Western college with a large increase of salary, but 
will not accept. 

'74. — E. S. Hobbs is agent for the Aragon Cotton 
Mills, at Aurora, 111. 

'75. — F. B. Osgood at the fall election was chosen 
Solicitor for Carrol County, N. H. Mr. Osgood lives 
at North Conway. 

'80. — Bartlett is in business at Detroit, Mich. 

'80. — Chapman was married Jan. 1st to Miss Ada 
G. Kimball of Bridgton. Mr. and Mrs. Chapman 
will reside for the present at Newport, R. I. 

'81. — Medorem Crawford, who received a degree 
here, and who was military instructor here for a few 
years, was married January 14th to Miss Lola Good- 
all of Washington, D. ('. 

'81. — Geo. F. Manson has been admitted to the 
Suffolk Bar. 

'82. — Reed and E. U. Curtis have been admitted 
to the Suffolk Bar. 

'8.3. — Knapp has been appointed Justice of the 
Peace and Quorum. 

'84. — Barton had the good fortune to be appointed 
on the Committee on Mines and Milling. 



Peterhouse College, the oldest of the seventeen 
colleges in Cambridge University, England, has just 
celebrated the six hundredth anniversary of its 
founding. It was founded in the reign of King 
Edward I. — Ex. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



185 




Vassar College has re- 
cently received a sum of 
money for a fund to provide prizes for the 
best essays on Shakespeare or the Elizabeth- 
an period. — Crimson. 
The University of Penns3'lvania is endeavoring to 
raise $50,000 for a gymnasium. $10,000 has already 
been secured. 

First Soph, (suddenly taking out his Water- 
bury) — "Great heavens! I've lost my train." Sec- 
ond Ditto (sympathetically)—" What train ? " First 
Soph.—" Train of reflections. Ta-ta ! "—Ada. 
TRIOLETS. 

TO ALGERNON. 

I. — Reverie. 
Those little splinters of pine 

With a sleeping Hades at the end, 
They give us a taste, I opine, — 
Those little splinters o£ pine,— 
Of the home ol that sick muse of thine, 

"Who dares such poor verses to send. 
Those little splinters of pine 

With a sleeping Hades at the end. 

II. — A Belapse. 
This is a triolet : 

Start the machine again. 
This is nonsense, but yet 
This is a triolet ; 

Mine is a busy pen. 
Rhyming is fun, you bet ! 
This is a triolet ; 

Start the machine again. 

— Argonmtt. 

Prof, (describing an ancient Greek theater) — 
"And it had no roof." Junior (sure he has caught 
Prof, in a mistake) — " What did they do, sir, when 
it rained?" Prof, (taking off his eyeglasses and 
pausing a moment)—" They got wet, sir." 

The most powerful argument yet produced in 
favor of more light late in the evening in the halls 
of the main buildings is a little incident that hap- 
pened there not long since. An upper classman 



while coming down stairs from a late recitation 
rushed up to a co-ed. and with a swoop of his right 
arm encircled her neck, saying, "Hello Bill, old 
boy. How de do." When the time for red tire and 
slow music came he might have been seen hanging 
from the window-sill of the fourth story hall blush- 
ing like a house afire. — Michigan Chronicle. 

Wesleyan has changed her college color from 
lavender to cardinal and black. 

It is carrying things a little too far when a stu- 
dent is so reticent that he won't even tell the pro- 
fessors what he knows about a lesson. — Scholastic. 

Snobberton — " Ah, Dudley, I understand you are 
to be congratulated. Is the fair one pretty?" Dud- 
ley — "N-n-no; can't say she is." "Good figure?' 
" Y-ye-es ! 'bout a million." — Ex. 

Dropped men at Yale are called chestnuts. 

Princeton and Yale have begun a chess tourna- 
ment conducted by postal card. 



.^^ m: 



'Qmm\ 



neatly executed at the 

Bl^UNgWICK pE^^IiD 0FFICE. 



Jgo cEti) i}S%> & <^ 

A.KE VERY POPUL.A.K. 

J^E^^Y ¥PE p^f f E^, Pe^TIi^ND. 

H. ¥. SMCKP9liEi, 

Kae Boots asd StoeSs 

Next l0 ftmerican Express Bffice, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



THEY HAVE NO EQUAL 



kRICHMONDSTI^AIGHTCUTNQl 
CIGARETTES. 



ALLENStGINTERMY-S 
. RICHMOND Vfl. 



fyetjen-e lAaiaiu-sifiiafa/ec^fiears 0/1/ I 



ever/ />acfyz^ 



CIGARETTE SMOKERS who are willing to pay a 
little more for Cigarettes than the price charged for the 
ordinary trade Cigarettes will find the 

Richmond Straight Cut No. I, 

SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 

They are made from the brightest, most delicately 
flavored, and highest cost gold leaf grown in Vir- 
ginia, and are absolutely without adulteration or drugs. 

We use the Genuine French Rice Paper, of our own 

direct importation, which is made esjjecially for us, water 
marked with the name of the brand — 

Richmond Straight Cut No. I, 

on each Cigarette, without which none are genuine. Base 
imitations of this brand have been put on sale, and Cigar- 
ette smokers are cautioned that this is the Old and 
Original brand, and to observe that each package or 
box of 

Richmond Straight Cut Cigarettes 

bears the signature of 

A LLEX ce GINTER Mitnufacturers. 

RICHMOND, VA. 



NOTICE. 

BEWARE OF COUNTERFEITS AND IMITATIONS. 

Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and irare Rice Paper, are rolled by the highest 
class of skilled labor, and warranted free from flavoring or 
impurities. 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a FAC-siMiLE of KiNNEr 
Bros.' signature. 

KIETWEr TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KI.VNEY BROS. 

NEW YORK. 

The following are our well-known 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Capoeal, Sweet Caporal, St. James ^, Caporal J, St. 

James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS, STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES 

SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very populdr. Manufactured bv special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 






New system. Learned in less than one-quarter the time 
required by any other. Old reporters throw away old sys- 
tems and learn this for speed and legibility. It can be 
successfully 

TAUGHT BY MAIL. 
The corresponding style can be learned in a few hours, 
and the full verbatim reporting style in a few months. It 
is a marvel of simplicity. 

STUDENTS 

can easily acquire enough to enable them to take notes of 

LECTURES. 

Send for circular. Terms: Corresponding style, five 

lessons, $5, Corresponding and reporting, twenty lessons, 

R. B. OAPElSr, Augusta, Me. 




Leading Numbers : 14, 048, 130, 333, 161. 
For Sale by all Stationers. 

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEM OO., 

Works, Camden, N. J. 26 John St,, New York 



FOR FALL AND WINTER, 

All Goods 'Warranted as Represented. 
S- E.- OTA-CEZSOISr, SID, 

2 Odd Fellows' Block, Main Street, Brunswick. 



frii*# 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Miiine, will commence February 7th, 1S84, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alpiieus S. Packard, Acting President; 
Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel T. Dana, M.D., 
Pathology and Practice ; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women and Children; Charles W. Goddard, 
A.M., Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick. Gekrish, M.D., 
Anatomy; Henry Cakmichael, Ph.D., Chemistry; Burt G. 
Wilder, M.D., Physiology; Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery 
and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics ; Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator of 
Anatomy; EVEKETI T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of His. 
tology. 

ALFKBD MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



FRANK M. STETSON, 



'>fe£3> 


oc 


esi 


w 


^^ 


ac 




C/3 






® 


z 




cc 


SI 


C3 





Q 




^C. JULY 25 .^''^ 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Diamonds, 



Jewelry, 



Silver Ware, 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



Bronxes, 



Porcelains, 



Fancy Goods. 



BYRON 



STEVENS. 



We have a bow line of 



College Paper in Blocks with Envelopes to Match 

very tastefully printed in colors, on fine linen paper, and 
at moderate prices. 



Prepare Original Designs for Society 
Badges, Rings, Prizes, and Class Cups, 
which will be fortvarded to sf.udents on 
request. 

A SPECIALTY is made of English 
Pewter Beer Mugs, in two sizes, ivith Glass 
Bottoms. 

Society, Book, and Visiting Card Plates 
engraved in proper style. 

Invitations and Progrutnmes in novel 
foi'ms at short notice. 

Shreve, Crump & Low, 

BOSTOInT. 



GENTLEMEN wishing Reliable 
and Fashionable Furnishings, at Rea- 
sonable Prices, will find our stock 
extensive and desirable. Flannel and 
Colored Cambric Shirts a Specialty. 
Our Glove stock is the most complete 
in Maine. 

OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



EARS for the MILLION 

Foo Choo's Balsam of Shark's Oil 

Positively Kestores tlie Hearing, and is the Only 
Absolute Cure for Deafness Known. 

This Oil is abstracied from peculiar species of small White 
Shark, caught in the yellow Sea, known as Carchnroilon Eond- 
eletii. Every Chinese fisherman knows it. Its virtues as a re- 
storative of hearing were discovered by a Buddhist Priest about 
the year 1410. Its cures were so numerous and mnvy so seem- 
inghj miraculous, that the remedy was ofllcially proclaimed over 
the entire Empire. Its use became so universal that for over 300 
yeiirs no decifness has existed among the Chinese people. Sent, 
charges prepaid, to any address at $1.00 per bottle. 



It has performed a miracle in my case. 

I have no unearthly noises in my head and hear much better. 

I have been greatly benefited. 

My deafness helped a great deal— think another bottle 'Will 
cure me. 

My hearing is much benefited. 

I have received untold bt-uefit. 

My hearing is improving. 

It is giving good satisfaction. 

Have been gi-eatly benefited, and am rejoiced that I saw the 
notice of it. 

*' Its virtues are unquestionable and its curative character ab- 
solute, as the writer can personally testify, both from experience 
and observation. Write at once to Haylock & Jenney, 7 Dey 
Sti'eet, New York, enclosing $1.00, and you will receive bv return 
a remedy that will enable you to hear like anybody else, and 
whose curative eflfects will be permanent. You will never regret 
doing so."— /editor of Mercnntile Review. 

(iarTo avoid loss in the Mails, please send money by Eegis- 
tered Letter. 

Only Imported by HAYXiOCK & JENNEY, 
Sole Agents for America. T Dey St., N. Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



WmmB ^ FEMIS^M, 



MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Vie-nrs. 



Wp. :^. FIELD, 



P^N^gE^. 



M. S. GIBSON, Proprietor. 

Enlarged from the ancient mansion of Commodore 
Preble, of naval fame, and now known as one of the 
best hotels in the City. 

^F. H. WILlSOH,:!£^ 

DISPENSER OF 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 

Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Pomades, Bath 

Towels, Toilet Soaps, etc., in. Great Variety. 

The Compounding of Physicians' Prescriptions 

A SPECIALTY. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Go to W. B. Woodard's 

To buy votir GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 
SE^ECi^a^Xj ^^J;^T'ES to s'X'"U"x>e2TX' ci-."U"^s. 
Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, E.xhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

750 llfiddie Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Special attention will be given to Class and Reunion Dinners 
and Suppers to order. First-class laundry connected with the 
house. 

S. B. BREWSTER, Proprietor. 

239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. MERRILL. A. KEITH. 



DEALER IN 

GMGEIIES AHB Ft@¥.ISI®NS, 

Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 "WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 



m 






'In^ir ^ 



2 %\nvt\ llotk, 



lat^. 






DEALER IN 



Ell Sl'lP^g HE ^^'ti^^x 

CEDAR STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
j^° Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BEIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

J. G. WASHBURK, 

Manufap.turer of and Dealer in 

PICTURE FRAMES OF ALL KINDS, 

Also Pictures, Caliinct Frames, Stationery, Cards, Albums, 

etc. Also agent for the celebrated Household Sewing 

Mnchines, 

In the Everett Store, Main Street, Opposite the Mall, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



MATIONAL SCHOOL SUPPLY BDREAn. 

Beloit, "Wis., July 31, 1883. 
National School Svpply Bureau: 

Last April, being then in chars:e of a large public school, but 
desiring a position in some good academy or college, I placed 
my name with your liureau. During the lirst part of the present 
month 1 received notice from you of a vacancy in such a place as 
I desired. 

Putting myself in communication with the party concerned I 
received the appointment. 1 am well satisfied with the manage- 
ment of the Uurean, and feel sure that it fills a useful and nec- 
essaiy place in our school economy. You are at liberty to use 
my name if you wish. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD O. FISKE. 
Headmaster Markam Academy, Milwaukee, Wis. 

For application-form and circular, address. 

National Hchool Supply Depot, Chicago, III. 
M". B.— AATe want aU kinds of Teachers for Schools 
and Families. Good Pay to Agents and Private Cor- 
respondents. 



DEALER IN 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

VioUns, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 
iiBH.XTUirs'Wids., ■a/L.A.T:va:si. 

STUDENTS 

Of all classes will find it valuable to consult on all subjects the 



183 SOUTH CLARK STKEET, CHICAGO, ILL. 



CHOICE GROCERircTNNED GOODS, 

Fruits, Confectionery, Tobacco & Cigars, 

Cor. Main and Cleaveland Streets, Brunswick. 

N. B. — Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

All the Students Should Buy 



BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 



Ifaik 1, 



Cor. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 



NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 



PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



WHY I AM A REPUBLICAN 

A graphic and reliable presentation of Republican princi- 
ples, and reasons for continuing the ijarty in power, also 
fine portraits and authentic lives of 

by Gov. GEO. S. BOUTWELL, of Mass. THE BOOK 
of the party, endorsed by leading Republicans. Price in 
reach of every voter. A rare opportunity for a wide-awake 
student to engage in the campaign with profit. 

WM. J. BETTS & CO., Hartford, Conn. 



/> CLUI3 i\oAD i^/\CE 







10 BERKELY ST., BOSTON, MASS., 
Sera <^iiMr8li Iro© SIlustFalei ©atalcaues, 

ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 

OTHER TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 

stamp at above address. 



ST^LL & BTJRT, 

509 Tremont St., and 4 Warren Ave., Odd Fellows' Hall, Boston, Mas.s. 
SPECIAL IMPROVED 

Ainerican STAR Bicycle 

Although comiiar.itivcly a new machine on the mar- 
ket, the STAlthMs nindu a sjileudid record, 
having won tlic 

Twenty-Five Mile Championsliip of 

the United States, 

Breal;lDg the record, in 83 minutes 10 seconds. 

It has a mile record of 2 min. 50 1-8 sec; 
5 miles, 15 min. 26 3-4 sec; mile without 
hands, 3 min. 11 sec It has ^von the most im- 
portant Hill Climbing Contests, including 
Corey Hill, Boston, Eagle Hill, Orange, N. J., 
and Standpipe Hill, Washington, D. C. This 
is a mere mention of the triumphs of the Star. 

The principles embodied iu the Star give the perfect combination for safety, speed, and comfort with economy of 
maintenance and durability found in no other machine. 

IN ADDITION WE HAVE THE 




VICTOR TRICYCLE, Tlie lost Eamoiis Tliree-flieeler MaJe Ib Tlie Worll 

A FuU Line of ttie Best ENGLISH MACHINES 

Go to complete the list and suit all tastes. 
The IDEAL, a cheaper machine for use o£ boys and youths, is a splendid machine for purpose intended and is 
hiffhly recommended- 

SECOND-HAND MACHINES of all kinds, SUPPLIES and SUNDRIES constantly on hand. 
REPAIRING of most difficult kinds performed at reasonable rates. All machines and parts must be plainly 
marked and be accompanied by instructions by next mail. 

SEND TWO-CENT STAMP FOR CATALOGUE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY, 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard " and " Duplex " Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Glass Cards and Monograms 

ENGEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



All the Late Publications in stock. Text-Books of all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL "WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

fiQ- 5 eDD FEIiIi0W^' BMCK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Excliauge. connected with the store. 



,^LIC¥LieA= 



The onlj' radical internal remedy. Never known to 
fail in a single case, acute or chronic. It expels the poison- 
ous Uric Acid from the blood, which is tlio prime CHiise 
of Rheumatism, Gout, and Nenralsia.— As a blood puri- 

THE OLD RELIABLE SPEcIIfIc"' 
ENDORSED BY PHYSICIANS AND 
THOUSANDS OF PATIENTS. 



tier it has no equal. Acting on common-sense principles 
it eradicates from the blood all poisonous matter which 
caitses disease. — It has been in use for many years and 
cured a larger percentage of cases than any other 

POSITIVELY CURES 



remedy. Send for testimonials from the cured. — Salicy- 
lica strikes directly at the cause of these diseases, while 
so many so-called speci- 

BHEUMATISM 

lies only treat locally the effect. AVhen you have tried 
in vain all the "oils," "ointments," " liuiments," and 
"pain cures," and when your 

GOUT. NEUKALGIA. 

doctors cannot help you, do not despair but take Salicy- 
lica at once and Ije cured. — No one can afford to live in 
pain and misery when 

GRAVEL, DIABETES. 

Salicylica will relieve him and put him in condition to 
attend to his daily avocations. 

$1 per box, 6 boxes for $5, 

BLOOD POISONING. 

with full directions in ten languages. Sold by druggists 
everywhere, or sent by mail, i^repaid, on receipt of price. 

WASHBURNE & CO., Prop's, 

287 Broadway, New York. 

Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

Odd Fellows' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. W. BKOWNE, PEOPKIETOR. 
Formerly at Tontine Hotel. 




THE FAVORITE NOS. 303-404-332-I7O-SSI-WITH 

HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORL 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. MERRYfflAN, PHARMACIST,-:- 

IIWS, M10ICI1I8, 

Fancy anl Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Toliacco. 



DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

13° Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 
GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEB, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi' 
cal Merctiandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



The New Styles in 

STII^iF and. SOI^T laZuf^TS 

lu all colors, are now ready. An elegfiint line of New York 
Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

1 ELLIOTT'S, I 

OPP. TOWN CLOCK. 



Main St., under Town Clock. 

([^"Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



TAPE VirORlYI. 

In one of the tropical provinces of Germany there has been 
found a root, the extract from which has proved an absolute 
SPECIFIC for Tape Worm. It is pleasant to take and is not de- 
bilitating or disagreeable in its effects on the patient, but is 
peculiarly sickening and stupefying to the Tap) e Worm, which 
loosens its hold of its victim and passes away in a natural and 
easy manner, entirely whole, with head, and while still alive. 
One physician has used this remedy in over 400 cases, without a 
single failure to pass worm whole, with head. Absolute removal 
with liead guaranteed. No pay required until so removed. Send 
stamp for circular and terms. 

HEY WOOD &. CO. , 19 Park Pl ace, IM. Y. City. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



'WHEN ^O TJ ^VA.NT A RIDE 

— calTj at 

ROBERT S. BOWKER'S Lll/ERY STABLE. 

On Cleaveland Street, where you wiUfind turnozits to suit the most 
fastidious. J^^ Bates reasonable. 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily 
Papers; Circulating' Library, 1600 Volumes; 
Fancy Goods and Toys in great variety ; Pocket 
Cutlery ; Canes ; Bird Cages ; Base-Ball and La 
Crosse ; Pictures and Picture Frames ; Frames 
Made to Order at Short Notice. Agency for 
Brunswick Laundry. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Tear in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds o£ 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

«®-Special Bates to Student Clubs.>ffi8 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates foe Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, Georgics and first six Books 
of the JSneid, including Prosody. 
(Instead of the Georgics, Ctesar's Oallic War, 
Books I.-IV., may be offered.) 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Boot, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,- so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after tho 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regulae Examinations eoe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
meut (July 11 aud 12, 1884), and on the Friday aud 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 26 and 27, 1884). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examinations is chiefly in writing. 

Examinatious for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Washington Academy, East 
Machias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these 
schools having been made special Fitting Schools 
for the college by the action of their several Boards 
of Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers of the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 
have been fitted at any school having an approved 



preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination aud notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 
Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or m 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQUIEBD— FOUE HOUES A WEEK. 

Latin, six terras. 

Greek, six terms. 

Mathematics, six terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, four terras. 
Political Science, three terras. 

ELECTIVES — FOUE HOUKS A "WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, two terms. 

Greek, two terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry, two terras. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, two terms. 

German, two terras. 

History of Philosophy, two terras. 

International Law aud Military Science, two 
terms. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, .$10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 

Further information on application to the Presi- 
dent. 



Vol. XIV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEB. 11, 1885. 



No. 14. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED FORTNIGHTLY BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

John A. Peters, '85, Managing Editor. 

O. R. Cook, '85, Business Editor. 
Boyd Baetlett, '85. A. A. Knowlton, '86 

J. F. LiBBT, '85. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

W. P. Nealley, '85. "W. V. "Wentworth, '86. 



Per annum, in advance. 
Single Copies, . 



. $2.00. 
15 cents. 

Stucleuts and .alumni are invited to contribute matter for any 
of the departments. Contriliutions must be accompanied by 
writer's real name. 



Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. XIV., No. 14.— February 11, 1885. 

Orbis Terras, 187 

Editorial Notes, 187 

Horace, 189 

Bowdoin in Journalism (continued), 190 

Alumni of the Northwest, 191 

To , 192 

The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table 192 

A Game of Whist, 193 

Familiar Lines, 193 

Antilogia 193 

Aphorisms 193 

Her Brother, 194 

CoLLEGii Tabula, 195 

Personal, 19f; 

Clippings, 197 

ORBIS TEERAE. 

Whirling, whirling, the lovely earth goes round. 
Spinning and spinning but never a sound. 
With her zones of white and her zones of green, 
With sombre belt of ocean's blue between. 
She sweeps the vaulted arch of heaven about, 
While wondering planets gaze and stars peep out 
From their nebulous clouds to watch her spin, 
Wooing the beauteous dame that none can win. 
O prithee, stars of heaven, is it true 
That she's singing a wondrous song for you ? 




resignation of Mr. N. B. Ford from the edi- 
torial board of the Orient. Mr. 0. R. Cook 
has consented to manage the financial depart- 
ment of the paper for the remainder of the 
year. 

The rumor was ciin-ent last term that we 
were to be treated to a course of lectures, 
under the auspices of the Literary Associa- 
tion ; but, up to the time of writing, the rumor 
has shaped itself into nothing more definite. 
With so naany interesting lecturers right at 
hand on the faculty, and others easily obtain- 
able—thanks to our modern system of lect- 
ure bureaus — we ought not to be deprived of 
the usual winter course, which of late years 
has proved such a pleasant break in the mo- 
notony of the term. The Literary Associa- 
tion deserves great credit for taking hold of 
the matter, and for offering — as we under- 
stand it has offered — to intersperse lectures 
with musical entertainments ; but the delay 
in beginning the course is unfortunate, and, 
if continued, cannot but mar the success of 
the project. The Association has been uni- 
formly successful in everything it has under- 
taken thus far: let us hope that the arrange- 
ment of this lecture course will not prove an 
exception. 



188 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



It is an old complaint : it dates back to the 
founding of the college; and, having done duty 
off and on for such a goodly number of years, 
is pretty well worn out ; but it is necessary 
once more to patch it up and drag it out for 
inspection, — for the last time it is to be hoped. 
The temperature of the chapel and some of 
the recitation rooms has several times within 
a week been so low as to be positively 
dangerous to health. The mercury seldom 
reaches the comfortable figures of the ther- 
mometer, — in the chapel especially, — but once 
or twice of late it has been suffered to fall to 
a point at which forbearance on our part 
certainly ceases to be a virtue. Either the 
heating apparatus of the college is wofully 
wanting in power, or the janitor's method of 
running it is, to say the least, unsound. In 
either case the remedy is the same — removal, 
and the substitution of a better machine. 



The opening of the Medical School, as 
usual, gave us of the classical department an 
opportunity to make a brilliant display of 
wit at the expense of supposed-to-be rustic 
Medic. For some reason or other the au- 
thorities have utterly failed to perceive the 
point of our customary jocular reception of 
the Medics, which is the occasion of such an 
ebullition of pleasantry on our part, and were 
so presuming as to say that the doors of the 
lecture room should not be opened till a cer- 
tain time. But how can men just bursting 
with fun and wit be expected to quietly wait 
the convenience of the authorities ? The 
Medics, too, seem to be entirely wanting in that 
fine sense of humor which alone could enable 
them to appreciate the delicate and subtle 
flow of wit which sparkles and bubbles forth 
so freely on the occasion of their welcome 
by the students. It is somewhat remarkable, 
too, so many of them being college graduates, 
that they should fail to recognize original 
wit; but the fact is, we are ahead of our 
time in this respect ! 



Although the secretary of the Intercol- 
legiate Rowing Association did not see fit to 
give Bowdoin notice of the annual meeting 
of delegates from the different colleges in 
time for us to be represented ; 3'et, strangely 
enough, the place fixed upon for the race — 
Lake Quinsigamond — could not have been 
more fortunate for us. Bowdoin has pre- 
viously labored under great disadvantage in 
participating in this regatta, — disadvantages 
so great that there has always been more or less 
doubt on the part of many as to the advisa- 
bility of keeping a place in the Association ; 
but this year there is such a happy combina- 
tion of circumstances that all are united in a 
hearty support of the crew. The lake where 
the race is to be rowed being but a compara- 
tively short distance from Boston, where we 
are especially strong in alumni, and the time 
of commencement having been changed to 
the last week of June, which will enable 
students and professors to attend who other- 
wise could not leave the college, there is no 
reason why the wearers of the White should 
not predominate at the regatta next Fourth 
of Julj'. As to the crew itself, time will 
show the quality of the material. There is 
no doubt that it will be the strongest crew 
that Bowdoin has sent to a regatta for a num- 
ber of years. The one thing lacking now is 
a boat; and that, it is confidently hoped, the 
alumni will provide. 



It is true of the Freshman as a genus that 
he enters college with a receptive spirit. He 
has forcibly broken the ties of the apron- 
string, and enters upon a strange mode of 
life which his imagination has already vividly 
colored, readj^and anxious to absorb unlimited 
quantities of ready-made knowledge. Looking 
upon all above him with an admiring and 
trustful eye, and being in an humble and 
acquisitive state of mind, he seizes upon any 
fact or opinion that may be held out to him 
as eagerly, and swallows it as hastily as, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



189 



doubtless, Oliver Twist would have swallowed 
'■ more " pudding had he been given a chance. 
Among the many morsels that he swallows 
without chewing are numerous second-hand 
opinions, — good, bad, and indifferent, — many 
of which, if analyzed, would be found to be 
notiiing more than unreasonable prejudices. 
Among this " swallowed " class of opinions is 
frequently found a large, hard lump of preju- 
dice against some person — too often a mem- 
ber of the faculty. If, when we come here, 
we would inquire into the authenticity of 
some of the ready-made judgments offered us, 
and discriminate between those formed on 
good grounds and those formed on no grounds 
at all, we should be prevented from doing a 
great deal of thoughtless injustice. 



For the last two years we have been 
alternatel}' delighted and disgusted by cer- 
tain vague rumors that have reached us 
respecting the Presidency of the college. 
At one time we would hear that some well- 
known man full worthy of the place had been 
invited to fill it; at another we would learn 
that some obscure person had had that honor 
" thrust upon him." To say that we were 
not delighted with the former report would 
be accusing us of lacking interest in our 
college, for we all recognize Bowdoin's great 
need. To say that we were not disgusted 
with the latter report would involve the same 
accusation. We would not have it appear 
that we decry the abilities of those "obscure 
men " — far from it. They are worthy men 
and capable. But it seems to us who are 
now in college and have opportunity to 
judge of the internal workings that, unless 
we can have some man who will bring new 
honor and dignity to our college, it is un- 
necessary to look outside of our own efficient 
faculty for the desired man. Certainly the 
affairs of the college have never glided more 
smoothly along than during the last two 
years ; and this is greatly due to the good 



management of those who have the guidance. 
It seems to be the general opinion of the 
students that the President should be a Bow- 
doin graduate. This idea may arise more 
from a feeling of pride than from an analysis 
of what would be for the welfare of the col- 
lege. To be sure, Bowdoin has graduates 
who would fill the position as well or better 
than any other men ; but since it seems that 
these will not accept, we see no reason why 
a graduate of some other college may not be 
very acceptable, provided he has equal quali- 
fications. To repeat somewhat : If we can- 
not get a graduate from some other col- 
lege who will bring the desired honor and 
dignity, it seems to us almost like nonsense 
to go beyond our own faculty for the required 
person. 



HORACE: LIB. II., OD. X. 

More rightly shaft thou live, Licinius, 
Ne'er launching out too bold upon the deep, 
Nor yet, with caution, shuddering at the blasts. 
By pressing close the shore's too hostile steep. 

From him who wisely seeks a golden mean 
Is far removed grim want and sordid cell. 
And strange to him fell envy's fiendish troop 
That knows, forsooth, the palace halls so well. 

The winds attack the loftier pines more oft ; 
The highest towers in mightiest ruin fall, 
And oftener strike the flashing bolts of Jove 
On heaven-kiss'd peaks of mountain summits tall. 

A well provided breast, though fortune frown. 
Still hopes, anon her winning smile distrusts. 
And fears, when borne along by prosperous breeze. 
The hidden reef and shock of treacherous gusts. 

The same great Jove brings hideous winter back 
And taketh it away. Not always so. 
Though evils now oppress : Apollo strikes 
The silent lyre, nor always bends his bow. 

Be brave when by misfortune hard beset, 
Then shall appear the greatness of thy soul ; 
And prudently contract in prosperous gale 
Thy swelling sails, and thus thy ship control. 



190 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN IN JOURNALISM. 

[Continued.] 

The class of 1844 was somewhat richer in 
journalist talent tlian some of its immediate 
predecessors. Joseph Bartlett edited the 
Bangor Jeffersonian for some time, and Arthur 
Swaze}' for three years edited the Interior, a 
religious paper in Chicago. Samuel P. Dins- 
more, of this class, is another bright name in 
the list of real journalists. On graduation 
he studied law, but his tastes were more in 
the direction of journalism and he became 
editor of the Bangor Mercury. In 1857 he 
removed to New York, and after an officinl 
career in the War Department, under Presi- 
dent Lincoln, he accepted the position of 
financial editor of the New York Uvening 
Post. In 1866 he founded the WeeUy Stock- 
holder, and was its editor to the time of his 
death. He was a talented, cultivated man, 
and his capabilities as an editor are spoken 
of in the highest terms. 

Wm. L. Avery, of the class of 1845, was 
another excellent journalist. He published 
and edited the State Signal, at Belfast, six 
years. Then he I'emoved to New York, and 
in 1854-5 edited the Troy Daily Times. He 
was afterwards connected with other New 
York papers. In 1877 and 1878 he edited a 
paper in Mechanicisville, Pa., continuing the 
work till his sudden death. Charles P. Rob- 
erts, of the class of 1845, in 1850 became 
associated with S. P. Dinsmore (1844) in the 
editorship of the Bangor Daily Mercury, 
which Mr. D. had just purchased and en- 
larged. It was devoted to the support of 
Gen. Taylor's administration. In 1854, as 
the Whig party began to disintegrate pre- 
paratory to merging into the Republican 
party, the straight Whig started the Bangor 
Daily Journal, which Mr. Roberts edited till 
1857, when it was merged with the Democrat 
— the Union being the name of the united 
papers. This paper was edited by Maroellus 
Emery (1853) and Mr. Roberts for six 



months; when the latter left through disa- 
greements over Buchanan's policy. And in 
1858 the Bangor Daily Evening Times was 
established, which Mr. Roberts edited till 
1862, when failing eyesight compelled him to 
relinquish a journalistic position, although 
he has since done considerable occasional 
newspaper work. The Times favored Doug- 
las for the presidency, and after the attack 
on Sumter gave an earnest support to Lincoln. 
Moses B. Goodwin, another classmate, at one 
time edited a Washington daily, and after- 
ward the Merrimack Journal at Franklin, 
N. H. Of the class of 1847, Rev. Dr. Joiin 
Cotton Smith, the eminent preacher and 
thinker, was at one time editor-in-chief of the 
Ghurch and State. 

Charles B. Stetson, a former member of 
the college, of what class we cannot learn, 
but not a graduate, was at one time editor 
of the Democratic Advocate, afterwards of 
the Portland Advertiser and the New York 
Express. 

The Orient, on June, 1878, announced the 
election of Hon. Geo. B. Goodwin to an edi- 
torial position on the Boston Post, and the 
college history reports his death the same 
month. 

George G. Poindexter, of the class of 
1850, settled in Washington, D. C, and in 
1858 became editor of the Union and Amer- 
ican. He had great talent and vigor as a 
writer and gave promise of much distinction; 
but he became involved in a political con- 
troversy which resulted in his being shot 
down in the streets of Nashville in 1859. 

Joseph A. Ware, of the class of 1851, 
was a good journalist, having "quick percep- 
tion and a facile, brilliant pen." He was for 
a time managing editor of Forney's Press, 
Philadelphia, Pa., and later assistant editor of 
the Washington Chronicle. 

Of the class of 1852, Henry Stone edited 
the State of Blaine for three years ; then he 
accepted a position on the American Railroad 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



191 



Journal, New York, and afterwards on the 
Evening Post, of the same city. Since 1872 
he has edited Poor^s Bailroad Manual. He 
has always been a frequent contributor to 
various periodicals. 

M. W. Fuller, of the class of 1853, was 
at one time an editor of the Augusta Age. 
Marcellus Emery, of the same class, was one 
of the most eminent of Bowdoin's journalistic 
sons, and a man of much influence through 
his profession. Soon after 1856 he became 
editor of the Bangor Daily Union and also 
of the Democrat. In 1872 he established the 
Bangor Daily Comniei-cial. He was a polit- 
ical journalist, and wielded a sharp, incisive 
pen, at a time wlien feeling ran high. T. R. 
Simonton is now editing the Camden Herald, 
and doing good work. He is a vice-presi- 
dent of the Maine Press Association, and 
has been an essayist at some of its annual 
reunions. 

Of the class of 1854, Henry L. Hatch was 
an editor of the Charleston, S. C, Courier 
until his death, from yellow fever, in 1858. 
James R. Osgood, the noted publisher, was a 
member of this class. Mr. Osgood is not a 
journalist, strictly speaking, but he has had 
such an intimate connection with periodical 
literature, as a member of several large pub- 
lishing houses, which have published a num- 
ber of literary, juvenile, and technical publi- 
cations, that we could not omit his name from 
our list. 



ALUMNI OF THE NORTHWEST. 

The second annual banquet and meeting 
of the Bowdoin Alumni Association of the 
Northwest was held at the West Hotel the 
other evening. The organization was per- 
fected last year with Dr. C. H. Hunter, Presi- 
dent and J. 0. P. Wheelwright, Secretary, on 
similar plans and for the same object of pre- 
serving college friendship and memories, as 
in view by the Bowdoin Associations of Bos- 
ton, New York, and Chicago. The coming 



together was in one of the handsome private 
parlors of the house, with the following of 
the alumni present : Judge W. W. Brookings, 
Sioux Falls, Dak., '55, A. J. Blethen, Minne- 
apolis, '72, L. W. Rundlett, St. Paul, '68, Hon. 
F. H. Boardman, Minneapolis, '69, A. J. 
Boardman, Minneapolis, '73, Col. Joseph E. 
Badger, Minneapolis, '73, C. M. Ferguson, 
Minneapolis, '74, Dr. C. H. Hunter, Minneap- 
olis, '74, Thomas Kneeland, Minneapolis, '74, 
D. M. Scribner, Minneapolis, '75, A. 0. Cobb, 
Minneapolis, '81, J. 0. P. Wheelwright, Min- 
neapolis, '81, John Washburn, Minneapolis, 
'82, C. H. Oilman, Minneapolis, '82, S. R. 
Child, Minneapolis, '84. 

The head of the table was taken by the 
president, with the alumni seated according 
to class. With a few preliminary remarks by 
Dr. Hunter, expressive of the pleasure at 
again meeting, the banquet was entered upon 
and a most elaborate menu gone through 
with. During the serving, selections in har- 
mony with the social and happy spirit of the 
gathering were rendered by Danz's Orchestra. 
The toasts were : 

"Reminiscences of College Days," re- 
sponded to by A. J. Boardman, with a hu- 
morous poem; "Alma il/aier,'' responded to by 
L. W. Rundlett; the "Alumni,'' responded to 
by F. H. Boardman ; " Bowdoin in Journalism," 
response by A. J. Blethen. The election of 
officers for the ensuing year resulted in the 
choice of W. D. Washburn, Minneapolis, for 
President ; Judge W. W. Brookings, Sioux 
Falls, Dak., First Vice-President; L. W. 
Rundlett, St. Paul, Second Vice-President ; 
J. 0. P. Wheelwright, Minneapolis, Secretary ; 
A. J. Boardman, C. M. Ferguson, C. H. Gil- 
man, Minneapolis, Executive Committee. 

The Minneapolis Tribune says of the re- 
union : "A jollier set of 'boys' never sat 
down at the festal board to talk over their 
college pranks or relate reminiscences of the 
great men who have been honored by Bow- 
doin, and have honored her in return. The 



192 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



evening was spent in telling anecdotes and 
amusing reminiscences of the Alma Mater, 
and in discussing a most elegant repast. To 
paraphrase a familiar quotation, doubtless 
there could have been a happier reunion, but 
doubtless there never was. 



TO . 

"Riches," do you say, my fair one? 
Ne'er man was richer than I : 
My wealth all the jewels of India 
Nor Croesus' red gold could buy. 

My wealth? 'Tis thy golden tresses ; 
My jewels, thine eyes so bright, 
And never fabled Kohinoor 
Flashed out such witching light. 

And behind the ruby portals 
Of thy lips hide gleaming pearls, — 
O, how can I but be rich, then. 
Thou fairest of all fair girls ? 

THE AUTOCRAT OP THE BREAKFAST 
TABLE. 
Among the books pre-eminently deserv- 
ing to be read, I think should be numbered 
Holmes' " Autocrat of the Breakfast Table." 
It may not be a book that will, at first glance, 
attract the reader; but let him spend a half 
hour in a perusal of its pages, and I think at 
the end of that time he will not willingly lay 
it down. There is, to be sure, something 
about the book that, at first sight, is likely to 
repel the reader ; but they are the very 
things which later enhance his delight and 
interest. Its style is so unique, so out of the 
ordinary run, that one has to accustom him- 
self to its oddities and create a taste for it. 
But when he has once done this, he never 
tires of reading it; for it is not a book to be 
read once and then laid aside. It is one of 
those rare volumes which grow dearer as 
usage and time imprint their ineffaceable 
marks upon them. From hidden springs are 
ever gushing new beauties and new truths. 
How often have I wandered musing among 
its pages, stopping here to read the almost 



effaced inscription on some moss-covered slab) 
plucking a flower by some woodland path, or 
lingering in the shade of some ancient, wide- 
spreading elm ! 

Dr. Holmes is a true autocrat. At each 
breakfast table he introduces whatever sub- 
ject his humor or fancy may suggest. So we 
have in this book a responsive chord for every 
feeling. Yet all the while there pervades 
every subject a unique and subtle humor that 
never fails to illumine his most pathetic ut- 
terances. It is this humor, I think, which 
gives the book much of its charm, — a humor 
never creating boisterous mirth, but rather a 
glow of feeling, freshening and brightening 
even the most common topic. Prose and 
poetry blend and intermingle, giving fresh- 
ness and vivacity to every page. The 
humorous and the pathetic are ever inter- 
changing, just as the sunshine and the shad- 
ows of life. We pass directly from wit and 
mirth through the sombre portals over which 
ever 

" Floats the Great Leveler's crimson fold ; " 

but more than likely as we repass those 
portals we are met with wit and mirth again. 
Even as we are exclaiming at the festal board : 
" Come ! fill a fresh bumper, for why should we go 
While the nectar still reddens our cups as they flow ? " 
There comes pealing through the open 
window the adjuration: 
" Build thee more stately mansions, O my soul. 

As the swift seasons roll ! 

Leave thy low vaulted post ! 
Let each new temple, nobler than the last 
Shut thee from heaven with a dome more vast 

Till thou at length art free 
Leaving thine outgrown shell by life's unresting sea ! " 
Dr. Holmes not only has a profound 
knowledge of human nature, — its beauties, 
eccentricities, and flaws, but he is always show- 
ing them under new and captivating lights. 
The interest of the reader never hesitates or 
flags. Some new beauty or unique character 
or original idea is ever appearing when least 
expected, giving perpetual delight. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



193 



A GAME OF WHIST. 

During the Xraas vacation a remarkable 
hand of whist was played at the house of the 
writer, the particulars of which may be of 
interest to some of the whist players in col- 
lege. 

Three persons were playing with a " dum- 
my " for fourth hand, and it was agreed before 
dealing that, contrary to the usual custom, 
dummy's hand should not be turned face up 
but face down, and that the cards should be 
played on the different tricks as they were 
picked up, regardless of suit. 

Dummy's partner opened the game with 
a low diamond which was taken by dummy 
with the queen. Dummy then led the queen 
of hearts, which, being the highest out, took 
the trick. Dummy's cards were then led in 
such a manner that he took every trick. 
After the game the tricks were picked up sep- 
arately and examined, and the taking cards 
proved to have been the ace, king, queen 
of hearts ; the ace, king, queen of diamonds ; 
the ace, king, queen, jack, nine, seven, and 
four spades (trumps). As dummy took every 
trick, the above were the cards he held. 
The hand in itself was very remarkable, and 
the fact that none of the dummy's cards were 
seen, until plaj'ed, makes it still more inter- 
esting. 

The facts in the case can be vouched for, 
and it seems worthy to rank with the hand 
which we sometimes hear of, when the four 
suits were dealt one to each of the four 
players. K. K. K. 



FAMILIAR LINES WRITTEN IN A 
COUNTRY SCHOOL-HOUSE. 
A precious relic of a former age, 

Within the shadow of the village spire ; 
A temple builded to protect the flame 
Once lit from education's cherished fire. 

A temple not like those of ancient Greece 
In most respects, and yet in one the same, — 



As far as hoar antiquity's concerned, 
This edifice can urge a powerful claim. 

Without, as unadorned as well could be — 
Of "beauty unadorned," you've doubtless 
heard ; 

No beauty here, though, was implied, 

When I unthinking used that simple word. 

Within, though claim to art it none doth make, 
Yet hath it plaster casts that art defy ; 

And lo ! the work of masters now grown old, 
Full many a fresco meets the seeking eye. 

While I these straggling lines attempt to write, 
A deafening clamor that I know quite well, 

No Bacchanalian orgies could surpass ; 

Drives me perforce to ring the tuneful bell. 




'Tis true 'tis pity, 
And pity 'tis 'tis true : 

That everything is running so smoothly 
that we have no Antilogia this week. 



APHORISMS FROM THE CAMPUS. 

As one star dififereth from another star in 
glory, so the laziness of one student differeth 
from the laziness of another student. 

Of all creatures, college students are the 
most likely to see the mote that is in another's 
eye, but overlook the beam that is in their 
own eye. 

It is considered a mark of greatness to be 
able to look beyond one's own failings and 
contemplate those of others. 



194 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



It is the patriotic student who saith he 
will not work in the gymnasium because 
another doth not. 

The successful general is he who saith 
" come," and not " go." The conclusion to 
this is likewise applicable to the faculty and 
chapel exercises. 

It has now come to that pass that laziness 
is overleaping itself. 

Those students who alwa3's lay back in 
the breeching whenever they cannot have 
their own way are usually called pig-headed ; 
and they seldom effect anything by so doing. 

It is a too common failing among men to 
let victory escape when it is at length within 
their grasp — as among sundry base-ball and 
boating men. 

Those who do least are the ones who com- 
plain most of their overwork. 

It has now come to that pass that if a 
student exerts himself beyond what Booker's 
lieutenant is accustomed to, that one is con- 
sidered amazingsmart, and tn danger of dying 
from overwork. 

He is considered as remarkably active 
who is not more than six months behind 
Diogenes. 



HER BROTHER. 

Who, when I call upon my dove, 

Sits by the register above 

And listens to our tales of love ? 

Her brother. 

Who, 'ere my last sweet call was o'er, 
Had water lugged around the door, 
Where ice soon formed an inch or more? 
Her brother. 

Whose soul will shady Tartarus claim 
For all my sinful oaths jsrofiine 
When sliding down those steps I came ? 
Her broiher^s. 




The course tickets for the 
entertainments to be given 
under the auspices of the Bowdoin Lit- 
erary Association are now ready. The 
first will be a musical entertainment on 
Monday evening, Feb. 16th. This will 
be followed by lectures, readings, and another con- 
cert, making in all seven entertainments. With 
such talent as Dr. Brown, Prof. Robinson, Dr. Sar- 
geant of Harvard University, and Miss Nella F. 
Brown, the well-known reader, the course cannot 
fail to be interesting and instructive to the towns- 
people as well as to the students. 

This is the time when he who has been lavishing 
his energies in the instruction of the youthful mind 
for the past two or three months, wends his way 
back to Alma Mater. The hard-earned fruits of his 
labors he sees nearly, if not quite, swallowed up by 
sundry unpaid bills that watchfully await his return. 
Again taking up his books he finds a mountain of 
back work to be removed. These are unpleasant 
realities to face, but for all that he is glad to get back. 

The attendance at the gymnasium is not such as 
would delight the eye of the lover of athletics. The 
college crew are to be seen there every afternoon, 
and fragments of the class crews more or less regu- 
larly, but base-ball men are exceedingly scarce. 
This is deplorable. Have ye, O students, no ath- 
letic pride within your breasts ? 

The seniors in English Literature are soon to 
read Macbeth. 

The town hall is converted into a skating rink 
every Saturday. It makes a good I'ink, but for all 
that we hardly see how the authorities can feel rec- 
onciled to its being thus perverted. Many of the 
students avail themselves of these opportunities for 
trying the rollers. 

This year's medical class turns out to be much 
smaller than was expected. Is the profession over- 
stocked or is the price of cats too high P 

Bartlett and Lunt, '85, Lane and Bewail, '87, and 
Cole, '88, have recently returned from teaching. 

An inundati