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Full text of "Bowdoin Orient"

THE 



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Published Fortnightly by the Students of 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD. 

W. V. Wentworth, '86, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Bumiess Editor, 

J. H. Davis, '86. 

A. A. Knowlton, '86. 
J. C. Parker, '86. 

H. L. Taylor, '86. 

Levi Turner, Jr., '86. 

C. W. Tdttle, '86. 

C. B. Burleigh, '87. 

E. C. Plummer, '87. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

BRLTNSWICK, MAINE. 

1885-6. 



Index to Volume XV. 



PBOSE. 

PAGE. 

A Freshman Bender Burleigh 126 

A Half Hour with Myself. J. H. Davis 171 

A Letter ; Prof. D. R. Goodwin 182 

A Plea for Mathematics Kno wlton 99 

A Recollection Tolman 208 

A Vision or a Nightmare? Lane 124 

A Visit to the Museum of Superannuated Jokes. .J. H. Davis 134 

A Winter Evening Taylor 210 

Alumni Reunions 162 

Answers to Correspondents Berry 176 

Baccalaureate Sermon Prof. S. G. Brown 58 

Base-Ball J. H. Davis, Editor 8, 20, 35, 49, 66, 79, 91 

Behind the Scenes Burleigh 5 

Boating (Field-Day Race) Wentworth 33 

Bowdoin's Hermit, Diogenes Woodman 211 

Boating Association Accounts 102 

Bowdoin in Literature Prof. H. L. Chapman 195 

Camping Out Austin Cary •. . .137 

Characteristics of Gen. Grant Turner 87 

Choice of Junior Electives .Parljer 18 

Class Day Turner 59 

Class-Day Oration Libby 60 

Class of '75 Circular 39' 

Clippings J. H. Davis, Editor. 

13, 26, 42, 53, 70, 83, 94, 107, 119, 142, 179, 191, 203, 216 

CoLLEGH Tabula C. W. Tuttle, C. B. Burleigh, Editors. 

9, 22, .39, 50, 67, 80, 92, 103, 116, 127, 140, 162, 163, 176, 189, 201. 213 

Commencement Concert Tuttle 64 

Commencement Daj' Wentworth 65 

Communications : 

An Unfinished Work G. T. Packard, '66 91 

Alumni Writings , R. B. Howard 212 

Base-Ball B. Potter 7 

Bowdoin in Boating 139 

College Charter James McKeen 38 

Reminiscences Isaac McLellan 212 

Student Waiters James McKeen 201 

Conventions : 

Theta Delta Chi 126 

Psi Upsilon Ford 34 

Y. M. C. A Goodwin 116 

Zeta Psi H. B. Austin 151 

Daniel Webster's Place in American Literature . .Turner 147 

Dining with President Hyde 186 



I N D K'X..— (Continued.) 

PAGE. 

Does it Pay? Parker 161 

Dr. Samuel G. Brown Prof. H. L. Chapman Ill 

Editorial Notes W. V. Wentworth, Editor. 

1, 16, 27, 43, 66, 73, 86, 97, 109, 121, 183, 145, 157, 169, 181, 193, 206 

Editobs' Table 130, 164, 167 

Evangeline's Land Burpee 209 

Excessive Multiplicity in Athletics Turner 47 

Field Day Parker 32 

Fishing at Bowdoin J. W. Achorn 197 

Flowers as Ilmbleras of Heraldry Hill 150 

Graduating Exercises of the Medical Department. Wentworth 34 

Gray's Elegy Turner 101 

Gymnasium Notes J. H. Davis 185 

History of Bowdoin College Wentworth 4, 17 

In Memoriam 70, 162, 179 

Ivy Day Oration Smith 29 

Ivy Day Tuttle 31 

Ivy Hop Tuttle 32 

Mistakes of Great Men Plummer 46 

My Adventure Owen 135 

My Niece Plummer 147 

My Visitor Verrill 184 

Necrology 69 

One Summer G. S. Berry 138 

Our Summer Visitor Taylor 77 

Parker Cleaveland Hon. P. W. Chandler 159 

Personals J. C. Parker, Editor. 

11, 24, 41, 62, 69, 82, 94, 105, 118, 129, 141, 163, 166, 178, 190, 203, 214 

Phi Beta Kappa Oration Prof. E. C. Smyth 59 

P. L. S. H Verrill 46 

Practical Psychology Burleigh 19 

Prizes for 1884-1885 Parker 67 

Remarks at Bowdoin Alumni Meeting Hon. W. P. Norlhend 49 

Remarks of Rev. F. T. Bayley 163 

Rollins' Transformation Arthur Merrill 199 

Social Element in College J. H. Davis 176 

Some Curious Old Expressions J. H. Davis 125 

Some Phases of College Life Taylor 6 

Suggestions Knowlton 123 

Summer in the Sierras Taylor 113 

Thackeray Verrill 172 

The College Library Knowlton 78 

The Hudson Highlands Burpee 89 

The Labor Question Knowlton 174 

The Modern Gil Bias Taylor 100 

The Prominent Man Plummer 173 

The Pump J. H. Davis 99 

POEMS. 

A College Metamorphosis Burleigh 170 

A Junior's Soliloquy . .Kimball 160 

A Legend Plummer 1 

A Winter Torrent J. H. Davis 169 



1 N D E X .—{Continued.) 

PAGE. 

Absent Minded Burleigh 15 

An Accident Plummer 133 

An Explanation Plummer 90 

Audacity J. H. Davis 205 

Autumn Leaves Plummer 109- 

Bragobert and Belsqueezer 187 

Does it Pay? Burleigh 67 

Eclogues of Virgil Tolman 6 

Euchered J.H.Davis 22 

Falling Leaves Burleigh 87 

Pons Bandusiae Tolman 157 

Fortunat£e Insula; Tolman 45 

Hector's Parting with Andromache Burleigh 146 

In Memoriam Plummer 8 

In the Pines Plummer 47 

Initiation Burleigh 85- 

I'm "Tuff" Burleigh 208 

Life Tolman 17 

Love Plummer 55 

Luna J- H. Davis 181 

My Grate J- H. Davis 146- 

Mistakes of Great Men (No. 2) Plummer 77 

My Mary Plummer 58- 

Obediah Plummer 47 

O Pons Brundusiae J. F. Libby, '82 182 

Owed to '89 Burleigh 90' 

Perennial Youth Burleigh ■. . .121 

Polo Burleigh 28 

Query Plummer 43 

Rondeau J- H. Davis 114 

St. John Temperance Burleigh 21 

Teaching in a Country School Plummer 208 

Tempe Tolmau 193 

The Deserted Isle Burleigh 145 

The First Snow Storm Taylor 137 

The Miracle Marriage G. E. B. J 33 

The Medic Plummer 159 

The Pedagogue's Mash Burleigh 194 

The Pharisee Burleigh 122 

The Ravm(g) Burleigh 37 

The Storm Tolman 87 

The Whispering Rnes Burleigh 97 

Xroy Tolman 136 

Tulip J- H. Davis 208 

Twilight Reverie Burleigh 116 

Whist Burleigh 8 

Wisdom of Ancients Tolman 73 

Wreckage Burleigh 4 



k:vv=^^ 




-^1885. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLKAR, STKADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECKSSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 

"Xj I BIS -^15^2" Xj-^^nyCIPS" 

SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE or THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

Coring, short & harmon, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENSEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE ST7LE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



J^peoial .Bates to Students and (glasses. 



notlianij 


nusinessflollege 


^^B The oldest 


M in^lit in of B " the kind 


^^ ill the Slate. 


^ •iiiui gb In- H _struGtiODlo 


1 emuslilD. 


JooMeeDiMlJomUaw 


M and all the 


H^ collateral ^^^ branches or 


A COMPLETE BUSINESS EDUCATION. 


For further i 


nforniation, address. 


I.. A. GRAY, A.M., Portland, Maine. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE iiaissi mm^mmi 



JSI8. 3 ODD FEIiDOW^' BLOCK, 



Is the place to buy 



SciQ-ki, StaMonePij, § Sanc§ §qocU. 

Telephone Excliange connected witti the store. 



Tlie New Styles in 

111 mU colors, are now ready. An elegant line of New York 
Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

tELLIOTT'S,t 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 



FHOTOGrl^-A-IPHS 



Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

0(1(1 Fellows' Block, Over Bavis' Grocery Store, 



Made at Higgins' Ground-Floor Studio, Bath, MAIN STREET, - - 



BRUNSWICK, ME. 

NE, Peoprietou. 




THE FAVORITE A/OS. S03-404-3S2-/7O-SS/- WITH 
OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vEE. J. MERRTfflAM, PHARMACIST,-:- 

Fancy ana Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Tokcco. 

f>ftxc:E:s :ei.e:.a.so]N'.a.:^Xi:e:. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

UPW Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

OvEiJ Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL EATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 
IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical lostruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 

Wo Bo gli0E®¥, 
Book-Seller, Stationer, Book-Binder, 

AND BLANK-BOOK MANUFACTUKER, 

Opposite City Hall, Center St-, Batii, Maine, 

They do say, and it is a fact, that Lenton & Neagle's is the 
cheapest place in this county. Their assortment of trunks and 
bags cannot be beaten. No shop-worn ii:oods, but direct fi'oni the 
manufacturers. They have the larprest line of whips ever shown 
in this town. Jobbmg of all kinds promptly attended to. 
Trunks and bags neatly repaired. 

HAKWESS MAKERS & CAKKIAGE TRIMMERS, 
MAIN STEEET, Store formerly occupied by Wasliburne. 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

HP^Families. Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

780 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



OVER BOADMAN'S STORE, MAIN STREET. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, iVIAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 

No. 1 O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine stationery ; Portland and Boston Daily Papers; Circu- 
lating Library, 1600 Volumes; Base-Ball and La Crosse; Pict- 
ures and Picture frames ; Frames made to order at short notice 

Dealer in and Agent for 

cox.um:bi a, 

and all the leading American and English Bicycles and Tricy- 
cles. A few good second-Hand Machines in stock. Also Bi- 
cyle Sundries, etc. Portland, Maine. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday IVIorning by A, G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

W^m^h, asad ^alt Meats, 

Vegetaljles, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snovsr's Grocery Store. 

O-Special Rates to Student ClubB..£l 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates tor Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined ii: the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkuess. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Caesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
^neid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Boot, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra, — so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classesare exaraiued in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatoiy course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regular Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and "on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1884). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the HaUowell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Wasliington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fnjeburg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to bo answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED- FOUR HOURS A "WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses areas follows: Tuition, $7.5. 
Room rent (half), average, S25. Incidentals, -SH). 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 29, 1885. 



No. 1. 



bowdoijst orient 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE YEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
W. V. Wentworth, '86, Managing Editor. 
M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 



J. H. Davis, '86. 




Levi Turner, Jr., '86. 


A. A. Knowlton, '86 




C. W. Tuttle, '86. 


J. C. Parker, '86. 




C. B. Burleigh, '87. 


H. L. Taylor, '86. 


'X':BRi.<rs 


E. C. Plummer, '87. 


Per annum, in advance. 


$2.00. 


Single Copies, 




15 cents. 



Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or ou applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
nninic^ations in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and A.lumni are invited to conti'ibute 
literary articles, pei-sonals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to haVe appended. 

Entered at the Post-OfBce at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XV., No. 1.— April 29, 1885. 

A Legend, 1 

Editorial Notes 1 

Wreckage 4 

History of Bowdoin College 4 

Behind the Scenes, 5 

Eclogues of Virgil, 6 

Some Phases of College Life, 6 

Communication 7 

Base-Ball 8 

Whist, 8 

In Memoriam, 8 

CoLLEGii Tabula 9 

Personal 11 

Clippings 13 



A LEGEND. 

A student, a maiden, an angry papa ; 

A meeting, a greeting, a terrible jar; 
Tiien talking 
That's shocking. 
With oath's interlocking. 

And a youth is seen rapidly moving afar. 




The Orient enters upon its fif- 
teenth year nnder circumstances which pre- 
sage a prosperous future, and the new board 
of editors hope to resign to our successors a 
paper whose standing shall at least be not 
inferior to what has been committed to us. 
We are aware that such an aim will require 
for its accomplishment no small amount of 
exertion, for the upward tendency of Bow- 
doin's paper, in common with those of other 
colleges, necessitates that our attempts be 
measured by the standard of the highest col- 
lege periodicals. Still it will be our earnest 
endeavor to issue, by the aid of friends 
among alumni and students, a paper which 
shall meet with the approval of its readers. 
Perhaps the fewer promises made the better, 
but if, as experience lessens our mistakes and 
discloses to us the needs of the Orient, 
changes suggest themselves, we shall be 
ready to adopt such as appear conducive to 
improvement. 



A noticeable feature about contributions 
to the Orient is their scarcity during the 
summer term. In the fall term a few articles 
appear ; the number gradually increasing 
until during the latter portion of the winter 
term the editors are overwhelmed by an 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



avalanclie of abstruse reasoning and thrilling 
narrative from aspirants for fame, who think 
the easiest path to distinction is afforded by 
an election to the editorial board. Perhaps 
some of these writers feel aggrieved that 
their jjroductions are not published, but, not 
being blessed with extraordinary wisdom, we 
know not by what magical art an article 
written next February or March can be made 
to appear in the Orient this term when the 
columns are not over-crowded. 

This difficulty has afforded a theme for 
many an editorial, but stUl we see it con- 
fronting us. Undoubtedly our labors may 
be much lightened and the Orient made 
more interesting if the students outside the 
editorial board will favor us with contribu- 
tions. There are many in college who should 
have sufficient interest in the only paper 
published at Bowdoin to aid us by handing 
in some articles, which they are abundantly 
able to write. To those who aspire to posi- 
tions on the Orient next year we would 
suggest that the one who writes early and 
often will naturally be more favorably re- 
garded than the one who offers a single essay 
the day before the new editors are chosen. 

Hoping to draw out some of the talent 
possessed by the undergraduates, we have 
decided to offer in prizes the sum of thirty 
dollars for the best prose articles written for 
volume XV., divided as follows : 

For the best prose article $16.00 

For the second best prose article 10.00 

For the third best prose article 5.00 

It will be noticed that no stipulations are 
made in regard to the nature of these arti- 
cles. We believe that a person can generally 
succeed best with a subject wMch interests 
him, treated in the style which properly be- 
longs to him. It is desired to publish suffi- 
cient solid matter to give the Orient value 
as a literary paper ; still, as the general tend- 
ency is towards the heavy, there is probably 
more need of suggesting that some light ar- 



ticles help very much to make it spicy and 
entertaining. Do not write too long pieces ; 
a sketch of moderate length will often be 
published and read with relish, when a 
longer one would necessarily be pigeon-holed. 

Bowdoin, as well as other colleges, has 
men enough who can write something enter- 
taining. 

It may be that the piece which you in 
your modesty hesitate to offer, distrusting 
your own abilities, is the very one which 
would be most highly commended if pub- 
lished. Then do not allow diffidence to 
delay your work, and you may have the 
pleasure and honor of obtaining one of the 
three prizes offered. 



In our advertising columns will be found 
a hst of back numbers which are missing 
from the files. It is thought desirable to 
keep the several volumes intact, and it is our 
intention to have bound complete volumes 
of the Orient, so far as they can be ob- 
tained. If any who have copies of the miss- 
ing numbers which they are willing to dis- 
pose of will so inform the Business Editor, 
they will thereby do us a great favor and 
will receive not only our money, but our 
thanks. 

The Orient must necessarily receive a 
large portion of its support, both in a finan- 
cial and a literary way, from the alumni. 
Claiming to be the organ of the college, it is 
important that all interests be represented, 
and it will be our endeavor to make Volume 
XV. one which shall interest alumni as well 
as undergraduates. With this aim in view, 
we cordially invite from such of our gradu- 
ates as are interested in maintaining a suc- 
cessful paper at Bowdoin, contributions upon 
matters of general interest, also personal 
items. 

But on examining the subscription Hst 
we are forcibly reminded that assistance in 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



another direction would materially aid us- 
Of course an increase in tlie number of sub- 
scribers would enable us to make a corre- 
sponding improvement in the Orient itself, 
and we shall therefore mail a large nvimber 
of extra copies of this number, trusting that 
some of those to whom the paper is a stranger 
will hereafter welcome it as a friend bringing 
pleasant recollections of their Alma Mater. 



Truly, change is the order of the day ! 
Established customs are overturned, to be 
replaced by new ones which may be an im- 
provement and — ^may not. Once upon a 
time the Bugle was an autumn publication, 
and the excitement caused by its appearance 
had been forgotten long ere its more modest 
rival had received its new editorial staff. 
We had hoped that the good old custom 
would be kept up, and we expected to salute 
our esteemed contemporary with all of the re- 
spect and veneration due to our seniors. 
But, alas ! it was not to be so, and Ave find 
ourselves assuming editorial duties while the 
Bugle is still to be heard from. 

The editors state that they have met with 
the same difficulty wliicli delayed the publi- 
cation last year, the engraving company have 
not been as prompt as had been expected 
in preparing the cuts. Now something is 
wrong ; either the engravers, if the fault be 
theirs, should not be given a third oppor- 
tunity to delay work, or, if the editors have 
not exercised due care that the work should 
be ready in time, succeeding boards will 
know where improvement is necessary if the 
Bugle is to remain nominally a fall publica- 
tion. But is there not here food for reflec- 
tion? It is rather the exception than the 
rule for it to appear before the winter term, 
and, as with all postponed or delayed matter, 
much of the interest has been lost before 
then. Many, if not most college annuals 
are now published in the spring term, and if 



ours is to be, it would be more consistent to 
call it a spring publication. 



Some merchants who have been accus- 
tomed to advertise in the Orient, when 
asked to renew, decline, feeling, and we can 
but admit that they have some just reason 
for it, that students do not make so much 
distinction as could be desired between those 
who favor us with their advertisements and 
those who do not. Still it seems to us that 
these traders do not make sufficient allow- 
ance for their gain by college advertising. 

In view of this feeling, while fully recog- 
nizing the undoubted right of every indi- 
vidual to make his purchases where he 
pleases, we would request our friends to 
patronize, so far as practicable, those who 
patronize us, because the leading firms of 
Brunswick and neighboring places have ad- 
vertisements in our columns ; because it is 
due to them that students shall not let their 
outlay in this direction be in vain, and be- 
cause, unless students make some distinction 
between those firms which advertise with us 
and those who do not, they will not continue 
with succeeding boards of editors. The Ori- 
ent could not be published in its piresent 
form at any rate, without the patronage of 
advertisers, which fact is fully recognized by 
the editors of last year, as well as those of 
the present volume, and we trust that our 
other friends who have an interest in the 
success of their college paper, especially 
those who hope to wield the pen nest year, 
will be equally thoughtful. 



At length the time has arrived which 
brings to the Senior visions of fame and 
wealth shortly to be acquired ; to the Junior, 
enjoying his wonted " ease," the beautiful 
exercises of Ivy Day; to the Sophomore an 
opportunity to sport a fifteen cent cane, and 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



to the Freshman hopes of fortune, greatness, 
and freedom from restraint. 

But this is not all; this term, the most 
enjoyable of the year, brings also the anuaal 
clearing up. Already the smell of smoke 
the blackened campus, and the repaired 
paths announce the fact. But we sometimes 
wonder whether the Faculty ever realize 
that the student, vainly endeavoring to reach 
his room upon an evening when the moon's 
friendly rays are not, and colliding with tree 
after tree in his waiiderings, is reminded 
with great vividness of the fabled Cretan 
labyrinth. Patiently have we been waiting 
for the guiding thread in the form of rays 
from two or three gas-lights, which would — 
but perhaps we are not supposed to be out of 
doors after sunset. 



The business manager of the last Orient 
wishes to remind many of the subscribers 
that their subscription is still un23aid and 
that a direct dun will be sent them if they 
do not soon pay up. 



WRECKAGE. 

We stood in the gathering twilight 
By the ocean's rugged shore ; 

We watclied its ship sail past us, 
And list to the breaker's roar. 

As we watched, a coming billow 
Threw high on the sandy beach, 

Some broken pieces of wreckage, 
Beyond the water's i-each. 

Battered by storm and tempest, 

' Mid the ocean's ceaseless strife. 
They seemed to us like symbols. 
Of many a human life. 

For life, like a mighty ocean. 

Resounds with the breaker's roar. 

And we struggle amid its billows 
To reach a farther shore. 

And those that steer on wisely 

A heavenly harbor reach ; 
While the others come up as wreckage 

On the eternal beach. B. 



HISTORY OF BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

[In presentiDg this sketch no claim to originality is 
made, but an effort has been made to arrange in a con- 
densed form some of the most important events in the 
history of the college.] 

A century ago, lacking only three years, 
the first movement was made towards the 
establishment of a college in the District, 
now State, of Maine. In 1788 the justices 
of the peace and the Congregational minis- 
ters of Cumberland County presented peti- 
tions to the General Court of Massachusetts 
for the incorporation of a college in that 
county, but it was nearly six years later 
when the friends of the enterprise found 
their labors crowned with success. In 1794 
their petitions Avere granted, and the char- 
ter of Bowdoin College dates from June 
24th of that year. 

Their desires, however, were far from 
being realized, for it was one thing to obtain 
a charter, but quite another to establish a 
college in this sparsely settled country, a 
journey to which from Boston was then as 
much of an undertaking as one to Europe at 
the present day. The boards met for the 
first time in Portland in December, 1794, but 
found numerous obstacles to be overcome, 
not the least among them being the lack of 
money. The State of Massachusetts had 
granted to the college five townships, but the 
best lands had been already taken up, and 
those which the college obtained could not 
be profitably sold at once. A gift of fl,000 
in money and one thousand acres of land 
from the Hon. James Bowdoin furnished a 
nucleus around which after gifts slowly gath- 
ered. 

Another difficulty was found in deter- 
mining the location, several towns desiring 
it, but finally Brunswick was accepted as a 
compromise. Thirty acres of land were given 
by individuals for the site of the college, and 
two hundred acres by the town, the whole, 
at the market price of two shillings per acre, 
being worth 176.67. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Massachusetts Hall was begun in 1798, 
but, owing to lack of funds, four years 
passed before it was completed. Its name 
was formally announced September 2, 1802, 
when a president. Rev. Joseph McKeen, and 
a professor, John Abbot, A. M., were in- 
stalled. The next day eight applicants were 
admitted to the Freshman class, two coming 
from Boston, and Bowdoin College was fairly 
opened. 

As the president's house had not been 
completed, he and liis family, as well as the 
students, at first occupied rooms in Massa- 
chusetts Hall, the upper stories of which had 
been fitted up for dormitories, and the lower 
one for a chapel and recitation room. 

In 1805 a new professorship, that of 
Mathematics and Natural History, was 
founded and filled by the election of Parker 
Cleaveland, who gained great fame for him- 
self and the college by his scientific re- 
searches. 

The first Commencement of the infant 
college, in 1806, was a notable occasion and 
visitors came from far and near to witness 
the exercises, which were unfortunately dis- 
turbed by a terrible storm which continued 
for three days without intermission. The 
exercises were postponed one day, but had 
to be held the next in the unfinished meeting- 
house, through which the rain beat so badly 
that President McKeen used an umbrella. 
The storm caused numerous accidents, and it 
is related that General Knox's coach was 
upset upon the river bank near the bridge. 
(To be Continued.) 



BEHIND THE SCENES. 
The first rays of morning were shining 
in at the study window of a college profes- 
sor. He was not a " care-worn " man. On 
the other hand, he possessed a corpulency of 
form, and a rubicundity of visage, wliich in- 
dicated tastes in common with " the rest of 



the boys." The ecclesiastical look, which 
characterized him in the class-room, had 
faded from his brow, and, as he slowly read 
over the package of papers in his hand, he 
stopped occasionally to give vent to his feel- 
ings in hearty bursts of laughter. The cause 
of his mirth was simple. He was reading 
over the excuses of a large number of stu- 
dents under his charge, for absences from 
" required exercises." " Here is a man," he 
mused, as he selected an unusually long 
epistle, " whom the students call a ' chinner 
for rank,' or, in the more euphonious par- 
lance of the Faculty, a ' Markdown,' " and 
he smiled derisively, as he read the following : 

Dear Prof. Jones, — I am vei-y much pained to 
be obliged to report to you the subjoined absences, 
which I hope you may lind satisfactory. I was eon- 
fined to my room, Sunday, with sciatic rheumatism. 
Monday, De Seve being sicli, I performed on the 
violin in his place. (This was a pecuniary necessity 
and netted me $20.00.) Tuesday, my old friend 
Vanderbilt was in town, and, as a small requital for 
the many favors received at his hands, I was obliged 
to entertain him. Wednesday, the minister from 
home came on the morning train, and spent the fore- 
noon with me. Thursday, I was too tired to attend 
prayers, having sat up with a sick man the night 
before. Friday I had a raging headache. Saturday 
I was called home by the illness of my grandmother. 
I trust that the cold you had the last time I was in to 
recitation is better. Hoping that your wife and little 
boy are enjoying good health, 

I am most sincerely yours, 

BuRKEE, of Rockhand. 

" That youth has evidently a poor opinion 
of my intelligence," soliloquized the Profes- 
sor. The only remedy I see for liis case is 
to deduct something from his rank — but I'm 
afraid there may not be anything left. I 
think I'll try him a month longer, and if . 
during that time another such epistle is re- 
ceived, I shall turn liim out into the world, 
to become a shining light in the fraternity 
of book agents. Ah! this is serious," he 
contiiaued, as he took up another note, which 
read as follows : 

Dear Prop., — I am measly sick. The doctor 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



thinks that with salutiferous treatment I may be con- 
valescent in a month. 

Feebly yours, 

Kindle. 

" Well, I suppose I shall haye to excuse 
this one ; but here is another one," and he 
read the following : 

Prof. Jones,— Please excuse my absences from 
required exercises this week. I row coxswain oar 
on our class crew and am very lame. 

J. V. Line. 

" Rows coxswain oar, and is very lame," 
laughed the Professor. "That being the 
case, and considering the mitigating circum- 
stances of his being lame, I'll not do any- 
thing more than deduct five per cent, from 
his Greek rank. I used to pull coxswain 
oar on my class crew, and I know how it is 
myself." And thus, as the morning wore 
away, the Professor continued his amusing 
task. Fifteen boys had had "severe head, 
aches " ; but the Professor was not at all 
surprised. He had noticed that a number 
of the students looked large-headed, at the 
morning recitation, and he surmised the rea- 
son. Twelve students were " at home," and 
the Professor smiled a grim smile as he 
marked three per cent, off from all their 
ranks for "playing whist on Sunday.'' 
Twenty-four Freshmen acknowledged that 
they had " no excuse," but promised to try 
and do better in future. The Professor 
however, did not heed the plea, for he 
thought they had been in college long 
enough to be able to furnish " sufficient ex- 
cuses." Then the Professor arose. The sunny 
smile faded from Ms face. A -sanctimonious 
solemnity came into his countenance, and 
he went forth to hear a recitation. The stu- 
dents smiled as they beheld him. They 
thought that, in his simplicity, they had 
" fooled " him, for alas ! they knew him not. 



Ohio stands first of all the States in the Union in 
the number of universities and colleges. Illinois 
comes next. 



ECLOGUES OF VIRGIL. 

A voice from Mantua's reed-girt way, 

Where breezes wander free. 
In murmuring accents seems to say 

O hither come with me. 

Where Mincius his banks has fringed 

With rushes tall and green. 
And by reflection emerald tinged, 

Cool waters glide between. 

There stray the flocks o'er verdant fields. 
And flower-wreathed garlands twine ; 

The spreading elm a shelter yields, 
Whence droops the clustered vine. 

When breathless noontide's fervent heat 
With parching thirst draws near. 

Pleasant the shade and cool retreat 
By mossy fountain clear. 

Pleasant in woodland groves to pass 

The summer afternoon. 
Stretched 'neath the beech, on velvet grass. 

Hearing the wild birds' tune. 

The evening shadows lengthening fall. 

Red glows the western sun ; 
The smoking roofs the swains recall, 

My song with day is done. 



SOME PHASES OF COLLEGE LIFE. 

Feeling, as we do, the good of a liberal 
education, we beg leave to submit a few 
words to our readers upon what we think 
are some of the duties attendant upon those 
whom Bowdoin is to own as her foster-chil- 
dren. 

Our college life is rich in incidents which 
are sooner or later woven into the very char- 
acter of the individual. His sports, his 
manner of conversation, his conduct in the 
class-room and before the public, are open 
to the criticism of all ; not only do our col- 
lege associates become aware of what we 
are and how we manage our hves, but the 
world at large passes or approves our ways. 

To all, if they choose, the college is but 
a four-years' resort where, at the end, the 
degree of A. B. is attached to their names — 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



and this is about all they may have to show 
for their course. 

But, it may be, the new members have 
from' the first submitted themselves to severe 
denials, have learned where they themselves 
belong in their relation to those around them, 
have assimilated noble ideas, and helped 
themselves to form a character which will 
wield an influence for the good of men. 
The former usually bring up in the rear 
when called into the service, while the latter 
carry their colors far to the front. 

The so-called "dignity of a Senior," if 
accompanied with the true results of what it 
has been his opportunity to acquire, may 
be, and oftentimes is, one of the most power- 
ful stimuli to the underclassmen. But what 
is more to be detested than the empty show 
which many make of themselves in their 
endeavors to affect dignity ? 

It is and will be that, with our freedom 
here at Bowdoin, in our many and various 
relations with each other, we are brought to 
many a test whether we possess that integritas 
vilae which Horace lays so much stress on 
and whether we can separate the chaff from 
the grain. If a man, while he is in college, 
does not have a lot of temptations presented, 
when will he have an opportunity of meeting 
them and of sustaining himself? 

At the opening of the fall term each 
year, from far and near, from city and coun- 
try, perhaps for the first time, at any rate 
for the first time as members of Bowdoin, 
the material for a new class is brought to- 
gether. Each individual of this class is a 
subject wherein many of the other members 
of the college find something new for study. 
Not infrequently — almost always — a group 
of manners betray his thoughts on college 
life. Weeks go on and perhaps the spark of 
supremacy which may have been lying dor- 
mant within that Freshman's breast may 
kindle and ignition follow. But a reaction 
follows when he finds that no note is made 



of his intrusions except that his deportment 
removes him farther and farther from the 
estimation of his fellows. What more than 
all else will cure such a disorder is the good 
example of those in the college who have 
been Freshmen before. 

We do not mean in the course of these 
remarks to cast a single reproach at any 
member of the Freshman class. On the 
other hand, we think a gentlemaiily consist- 
ency has been maintained throughout. 

To promote the good name of the college 
is only adding to our own good. Surely it 
becomes us all, under our present liberal dis- 
cipline, to do all we can, individually and 
collectively, to cherish and protect the 
former good name of Bowdoin. 



COMMUNICATION. 

To the Editors of the Orient : 

The nine that will represent Bowdoin at 
the approaclring intercollegiate base-ball con- 
test is a strong one, but it cannot afford to 
neglect any available means of success ; and 
the writer thinks it is neglecting such means 
in not practicing regularly with a second 
nine. This method of practice has two su- 
perior advantages. First, it is playing the 
game, and only in playing the game, under 
the supervision and criticism of a competent 
captain, can be acquired steadiness and unity 
of play and familiarity with the now numer- 
ous and complicated rules. Secondly, it dis- 
covers and develops the material from which 
the first nine must be replenished, when va- 
cancies occur by graduation or otherwise. 
For the same reasons occasional class con- 
tests would be useful. But a second nine, 
as an antagonist and feeder for the first, 
ought to be deemed indispensable. Profes- 
sional clubs recognize the importance of the 
second nine, and practice the game by play- 
ing it alternately in the field and at the bat, 
instead of exercising two or tlu-ee batsmen 
through one inning an hour long, with the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



regular nine all the time in the field. It is 
really a question whether such daily practice 
on the " Delta " as is recommended above 
might not wisely take the place of the annual 
trip to Massachusetts. For until discipline 
begets considerable skill and confidence, out- 
side games may do more harm than good. 
At all events, whether or not the nine goes 
abroad, it ought not to slight its opportuni- 
ties at home. 

P. 



BASE-BALL. 

POKTLAND VS. BOWDOIN. 

The first game of the season, for both the 
Portlands and for us, took place Fast Day 
at the Portlands' grounds m Portland. Con- 
sidering that the want of practice, that one 
player has not had any practice this year, 
that another has only had one day's practice, 
and the condition of the grounds, Bowdoin 
surpassed all expectations. Oxley, Fish, 
Annis, and McGlinchy played well for Port- 
land. Dearth, and Bartlett, '85, batted hard, 
and Pushor, Cook, and Talbot fielded splen- 
didly for B(5Avdoin. 

PORTLAiJD. 

A.B. K. E.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Barnes, o. f., 5 2 3 3 1 

Orley, c, 5 1 1 10 2 1 

Annis, l.f., 5 1 1 2 1 

Pope, 2b., 5 2 2 2 1 3 2 

Clark, s.s 4 2 1 1 2 3 

Long, 3b. i 1 2 3 i 2 2 

"Wheelock, r. f 5 2 3 4 

Fish, p. 4 2 3 4 15 4 

McGlinchy, lb 4 1 1 2 11 1 

41 13 17 22 27 25 13 

Wild pitches 0, first base on called balls 1, total called 
balls 61, total called strikes 22, struck out 4, passed balls 
1, two-base hits 5, left on bases 5. 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. B. E.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, 2b 5 4 3 4 1 2 1 

Cook, p., 4 1 1 1 11 2 

Pushor, lb., 5 1 111 

Talbot, 1. f., 5 4 1 

Martin, c, 5 5 1 2 

Larrabee, r. f., . . . . 4 1 1 



B. Bartlett, 3b., 
S. L. Bartlett, c.f., 
Davis, S.S., . . 















39 6 6 9 24 18 10 

Wild pitches 1, first base on called balls 1, total called 

balls 73, total called strikes 19, struck out 10, passed balls 

6, two-base hits 1, three-base hits 1, left on bases 7. Time 

of game, 1 hour 55 minutes. Umpire, Flaherty. 





SCORE BT INNINGS. 












12 3 4 5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


Portland, . 


..31041 


3 





1 


—13 




..00101 


2 


1 





1— 6 









WHIST. 

'Twas in their cosy parlor 
We oft would play at whist. 
I thought her lips the fairest 
E'er college man had kissed. 

I had to bring my chum along. 
As partner for her mother, 
Tho' oft the place of chum was filled 
By her angelic brother. 

I do not know that 1 am sad, 
For what I've been bereft. 
My chum got her, and as for me, 
I got — well I got left ! 



IN MEMORIAM. 

On the Harpswell shore, 

Say a mile or more 
From the turn in the Angel's Lane, 

On a pleasant site 

Is a cottage white. 
The home of Amanda Jane. 

She's a buxom lass 

Of the Langtry class, 
With a face to set one wild; 

As her father shows 

That he plainly knows, 
By the way he guards his child. 

The sea-side youth 

Has tried, in truth. 
To woo her, but tried in vain, 

For a tennis racket, 

With naught to back it, 
Don't pass with Samuel Lane. 

But a grocer)' clerk 
(By name John Burk) 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



9 



Came down to the Merriconeag, 

To seek for quiet 

And change of diet. 
By the side of the " heaving sea." 

He saw the maid 
And was not afraid 
To try for the much-sought prize. 
He met her late 
By the garden gate 
'Neath the calm of the summer skies. 

On the Harpswell shore, 

Where the breakers roar, 
And the mystic mermaids lurk, 

Is a small white stone 

Standing all alone, 
Engraved with the name, John Burk. 




The despairing cry of 
the Sophomore Greek di- 
vision is, "A hoss, a hoss, my king- 
dom for a hoss ! " but rumor says there 
is no "hoss" on " Fernald's Selections 
from the Greek Historians." 
College life does much to metamorphose men ; 
and the Freshman who entered college with a firm 
determination never to use a — a — translation! ! ! now 
sings merrily as he cuts a recitation to play tennis : 

I'll get an education, 

And I'll labor with a will 

To roll my feeble intellect 

Up learning's rugged hill. 

Mount Science and Mount Numbers 

I'll labor up the side; 

But when it comes to classics, 

"Why, then I'd rather ride. 

E. L. Bartlett is rowing on the '87 class crew in 
the place of E. C. Pluramer, who was obliged to re- 
sign his position on account of sickness. 

M. S. Kimball, '87, Business Manager of the Ori- 
ent, is sick with the measles. 

Several attempts have been made to hold a meet- 
ing of the Lawn-Tennis Association, and choose the 



j officers for the ensuing year, but at no time has there 
been a sufficient number present to transact the busi- 
ness. It seems to us with the number of tennis clubs 
there are in college, sufficient interest ought to be 
shown to attend a meeting of this kind. 

The following is a schedule of the games to be 
played by the Maine College League for the season 
of 1885: 

May 9.— Bates vs. Colby, at Lewiston. 

May 13. — Colby vs. Bovvdoin, at Waterville. 

May 14. — Maine State College vs. Bowdoin, at Orono. 

May 16. — Bowdoin vs. Bates, at Brunswick. 

May 16.— M. S. C. vs. Colby, at Orono. 

May 20. — Bowdoin vs. Colby, at Brunswick. 

May 22. — Bowdoin vs. M. S. C, at Brunswick. 

May 23. — Bates vs. M. S. C, at Lewiston. 

May 27.— Bates vs. Colby, at Waterville. 

May 30.— Bates vs. M. S. C, at Orono. 

May 30. — Colby vs. Bowdoin, at Lewiston. 

June 3.— Colby vs. M. S. C, at "Waterville. 

June 3. — Bowdoin vs. Bates, at Lewiston. 

June 6. — Bowdoin vs. M. S. C, at Bangor. 

June 6. — Colby vs. Bates, at Brunswick. 

June 10. — Bates vs. Bowdoin, at "Waterville. 

June 13. — Colby vs. M. S. C, at Bangor. 

June 20.— Bates vs. M. S. C, at "Waterville. 

If report be true, the Blanaging Editor has re- 
cently developed quite a taste for female society. 

It is reported that one of the faculty was seen 
executing a weird and ghostly dance before a small 
dog in front of the college bookstore, to the apparent 
enjoyment of the passers-by. In justice to the Pro- 
fessor, we feel bound to add that he was not afraid of 
the dog, as one unacquainted with the classics might 
naturally suppose. He was simply entirelj' forgetful 
of his surroundings in contemplating the beauty of 
one of those choral passages of such frequent occur- 
rence in Antigone and .3idipus, and took that way to 
give vent to his pent-ujb feelings. 

Several of the Juniors take third term Physics, 
much against their will. It is not as popular a study 
with them as it was before the examination last 
term. 

Notwithstanding the earlier hour for chapel there 
is a much better attendance this term than last. One 
of the class officers last term, in virtue of the small 
attendance, proposed to reverse the order and require 
excuses from those who attended rather than from 
those who were absent. 

The Topsham Fair Hall has been made use of 
this spring for a tennis court. There is just room 
there for one double court. 

The same junior who made such frantic attempts 
to blow out the gas of a Bunsen burner in the labor- 
atory last term, meets with much greater difficulties 



10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



in Physiology. It is incomprehensible to him why a 
man should not see as well with his nose as with his 
eyes. 

The concert Tuesday evening, April 21st, com- 
pleted the Literary Association course. It is mainly 
to their efforts that we are indebted for the activity 
manifested in getting a gymnasium. We give below 
the programme ; 

PAKT FIRST. 

Piano Duet — March, Minuet, Tarantelle. — Tours. 

Misses Berry and Owen. 
Song — " Bid me Discourse." — Bishop. 

Miss Helen Nash. 
Cornet Solo — Ein Vogel. — Hartman. Mr. R. B. Hall. 

Duet— "All's Well."— Braham. 

Dr. C. H. Cumstou and Mr. H. R. Fling. 
Song — " Two Children." — Behrend. 

Mrs. Ada Cary Sturgis. 
College Song — " Old Bowdoin." Double Quartette. 

PART SECOND. 

Piano Solo — " The Chase." — Bheiuberger. 

Miss Stinson. 
Duet — " The Swallows." — Cudger. 

Niss Nash and Mrs. Sturgis. 
Cornet Solo — Fatherland. — Hartman. Mr. R. B. Hall. 

Song — " Fior di Margherita." — Arditi. Miss Helen Nash. 
Song—" Some Day."— Wellings. Mr. H. R. Fling. 

Quartette — " Greeting to Spring." — Wilson. 

Miss Nash, Mrs. Lee, Mrs. Sturgis, and Mrs. Knight. 
College Song — " Ma-ri had a Little Lamb." 

Double Quartette. 
Of the Junior electives this term, four take labor- 
atory work in Physics, one Science of Language, one 
History, and twelve Botany. 

The notice which has been on the bulletin-board 
all the term, requesting that bids should be handed 
in for the scorership, has finally been taken down and 
Eames, '85, appointed. 

" I've been longing to speak," he said softly, 
And I he maiden drew close to his side, 
While in vision already she pictured 
Herself a collegian's bride. 

" I've been longiug to speak," he repeated. 
And, as the maiden nestled her head 
On his bosom so strong and so manly, 

" For the temperance party," he said. 

Barrett, '88, is away at Geneva, N. Y., and does 
not expect to return till the first of May. Dearth, 
'87, has been practicing to take his place on second 
base till his return. 

The man with the subscription paper is to be met 
with at every turn, and fortunate is the one who can 
escape him. They are as sure an indication of the 
approaching mild weather as the hand-organ grinder, 
and far more persistent, since the latter can be got 
rid of for five cents, while the former will grumble 
when five dollars is offered him. 



The lecture on " Nullification," March 27th, com- 
pleted Mr. Stanwood's course of lectures on "Our 
Early Political History." Mr. Stanwood's lectures 
have been listened to with interest by a large part of 
the students, and are among the few bright spots one 
can look back upon with pleasure after the monot- 
onous routine of a winter term. 

Wentworth, '86, brought from his home in Rock- 
land some fine specimens of calcite. The calcite is 
colored by manganese, and presents much the same 
appearance as rose quartz. 

The following men are in training for the Fresh- 
man crew : Meserve, Coal, Woodman, and Lin- 
scott. Goding is spoken of for coxswain. 

No one seems to know when the Bugle will come 
out. Knight, who had the entire charge of it, is se- 
riously ill at his home in Portland. 

The Juniors are reading Faust at sight to Prof. 
Johnson. 

Dr. Sargent last term at the close of his interest- 
ing lecture on " Physical Training," made the gen- 
erous offer to furnish us with all the apparatus needed 
for a new gymnasium, provided sufficient money 
could be raised for such a purpose. The faculty at 
their next meeting raised quite a sum of money, and 
since the term closed Prof. Robinson has been solic- 
iting subscriptions from the alumni at Bangor, Port- 
land, and other cities. Inasmuch as over half the 
sum of money needed has already been raised, there 
seems little room to doubt that in another year we 
shall see the gymnasium, so much needed and so 
long desired. The proposed location is on Harps- 
well Street, east of North Winlhrop. 

In the Ptolemaic days, 

E'er Copernicus had birth, 

Astronomers were all resolved 

That the heavenly orbs revolved 

Round a central Earth. 

Many modern college men 

Bring this theory back again; 

And its fallacies rehearse. 

When they come to think themselves 

Centers of the Universe. 
Every Wednesday and Saturday afternoon students 
are to be seen armed with hammer and chisels, start- 
ing after minerals. There is probably no college in 
New England in abetter location for minerals than 
Bowdoin. The places, however, have been looked 
over so many times, that, till more blasting is done, 
one will hardly get paid for his time. 

E. C. Plumraer and H. B. Austin, of '87, have not 
returned to college on account of sickness. 

The Batigor Whig, speaking of the Colby nine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



11 



says: "E. C. Matthews, '38, has been added to the 
number who are practicing for the vacancy." Our 
neighbors of the Kennebec are evidently determined 
to have a " nine," even if they are obliged to go back 
to the Azoic Age for players. We should think that 
the aspirant from '38 would make an ideal Colby 
umpire. 

Mr. Fisher preached a sermoQ on the Salvation 
Army. He spoke of the good they were doing in 
this and other countries. The next Sunday he fol- 
lowed it by a sermon on the permanent church. 

Last week, when the campus was being burned, 
William was to be seen skipping airily over the 
campus with all his customary grace, and actively 
keeping the fire away from the hedges. 

The Salvation Army seems to be the great attrac- 
tion evenings. Lemont Hall has been hired for a 
year, and is packed full every night by seekers after 
salvation or something else. Already over fift5' of 
the town's people have been gathered into the fold, 
and are shouting hallelujah. 

It was not till several days after the term opened 
that the delta was in a fit condition to play on. The 
nine works under considerable disadvantage in play- 
ing Harvard and other colleges out of the State, 
whose grounds are in good condition early in the 
season. We hope for good luck, however, and the 
crowd will be at the depot, as usual, to send the boys 
off, on their trip to Massachusetts, with the college 
yell. The nine has and deserves the hearty support 
of every man in college. 

Some of the students who remained in Brunswick 
during vacation attended the concert and ball, and 
reported a very pleasant evening. At intermission 
supper was furnished in the court room under the 
hall. 

The provisional list for commencement parts are : 
Alexander, Butler, Bartlett, Cook, Davis, Donnell, 
Folsom, Libby, Peters, Tarr, and Whittier. 

Scene in the Chemistry Recitation. Prof. — "Mr. 
B — , what can you say of water gas?" Mr. B. — "I 
never heard very much about water gas, but I know 
they often water gas stock." 

Dr. F. H. Gerrish paid a visit to Thomaston to 
witness the execution, and obtained, for the use of 
the Medical School, the bodies of the two Italians 
who were hung. No one outside the medical class 
have been allowed to see them. 

The Boston Theatre Co. presented the drama 
" Silver King," in the town hall, April 30th. 

Prof. Robinson makes the medical analj'sis this 
term for Prof. Dana. 



In the recent auction sale of reading-room papers, 
Frank Leslie's brought the highest price, sixty-eight 
cents ; the Somerset Reporter the lowest, five cents. 

The bright and shining light of the Medical 
School scoured the woods the other day, in search of 
material for the clinic, and finally drummed up one 
subject. It would seem as if our neighbors were 
getting short of patients. 

The Senior and Junior Exhibition at the close of 
last term was well attended. Music was furnished 
by Grimmer. 

PROGRAMME. 

MUSIC. 

Salutatory Address in Latin. C. H. Tarr, Brunswick. 

Homoeopathic Treatment of Disease. N. B. Ford, Boston. 
Speech Before the Diet of Worms 

(English Version from Martin Luther). 

t*C. A. Davis, Portsmouth, N. H. 

MUSIC 

Lavoisier. F. W. Davis, Hiram. 

Some Aspects of Socialism, H. N. Dunham, Freeport. 

Eulogy of the Martial Legion (Eng. Version 

from Cicero). * Vf. V. Wentworth, Rockland. 

MUSIC 

A Substitute for Greek. F. N. Whittier, Farmingtou Falls. 
Supposed Speech of Harold before the Battle 

of Hastings. W. R. Butler, Lawrence, Mass. 

Future of France ( from the French of Victor Hugo). 

* J. C. Parker, East Lebanon. 
Ralph Waldo Emerson. t J. A. Peters, Ellsworth. 

MUSIC. 

* Junior. f-A-bsent. 




The editors will grate- 
fully receive any items of 
inteiest that may be furnished by read- 
ers and graduates concerning them- 
selves or their classmates. It not infre- 
quently happens that] many facts in refer- 
ence to old and recent graduates might prove of 
much interest to the readers of the Orient, if placed 
within their reach, and this can be done only by se- 
curing the co-operation of our readers, to the extent 
of furnishing the Orient with personals in regard to 
alumni. Many matters of real interest would never 
reach the editor unless communicated by the gradu- 
ates, and if the latter will kindly bear this in mind 
they may be able to be of much assistance to the 
personal columns of the Okient. 



12 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



From the Pilgrim Press, a monthly paper pub- 
lished at Washington, we copy the following notice 
of the Longfellow Memorial Number of the Orient : 
" The Bowdoin Orient, a hi-weekly, published by tlie 
students of the great poet's Alma Mater, called the issue 
of February 27th (the anniversary of the poet's death) 
the " Longfellow Number." It was chiefly tilled with 
brief articles from Longfellow's classmates and college 
contemporaries. These were fragrant with sweet and 
pleasant reminiscences, all gracefully told. It was a 
beautiful idea thus to remember the poet, and the plan 
was carried out with charming success." 

'44. — In the May number of the North American 
Review is an article entitled, " Why Crime is Increas- 
ing," which is from the pen of President J. L. Pick- 
ard, of the State University of Iowa. President 
Piokard discusses the causes of the increase of crime, 
and his article contains interesting statistics and facts 
in regard to the extent of crime in different localities. 

'50. — Senator William P. Frye is to erect a cot- 
tage on Squirrel Island, which will be, it is said, 
one of the finest on the island. 

'63. — John L. Crosby was elected City Treasurer 
of Bangor for the 13th consecutive time. 

'53. — Kingman F. Page, Esq., died in New York, 
April 23d, from apoplexy. He studied law with 
Caleb Cushing, and was appointed by President 
Pierce special attorney to the Department of the In- 
terior. At President Lincoln's inauguration Mr. 
Page was one of the body guards who rode by the 
carriage. It was in Mr. Page's box at Ford's Theatre 
that Lincoln was shot. 

'54. — John W. Simonds, who was for some years 
Superintendent of Public Instruction for New Hamp- 
shire, is President of the University of Dakota, at 
Vermillion, Dak. 

'55. — Rev. Edward Hawes was installed as pastor 
of the first Congregational Church, Burlington, Vt., 
April 15th. 

'56. — Rev. Edwin B. Palmer was dismissed from 
the pastorate of the First Church, Ipswich, Mass. 
April 7th. ' 

'58. — Col. Franklin M. Drew of Lewiston, will 
deliver the address on Memorial Day, at Bethel, by 
invitation of the Brown Post, G. A. R. This Post is 
named in memory of Harlan P. Brown, class of '60, 
who was killed on the field of Antietam. 

'68. — Edward Bowdoin Neally, of the Board of 
Overseers, was elected Mayor of Bangor, March 9th. 
Mr. Neally succeeded in this office Samuel F. Hum- 
phrey, of the class of '48, also an overseer. Bow, 
doin has previously furnished two Mayors for Ban- 
gor — Augustus C. Hamlin, M.D., of the class of '51 
and William H. Brown, M.D., class of '42, and can 
continue to supply the demand ! 



'69. — Col. John D. Anderson is reported to have 

obtained the signatures of all the leading Democrats 
of this State, to the petition for appointment to the 
otfice of Pension Agent, now held by ex-Governor 
Connor. 

'66. — Dr. Frederic H. Gerrish is President of the 
State Board of Health, recently appointed by Gov. 
Robie, and Hon. S. J. Twing, '69, is one of the 
members of the Board. Dr. Gerrish has been for 
several years one of the most earnest advocates of 
the importance of such a Board, and at the first meet- 
ing of the Board, he gave an address on the work it 
is intended to accomplish, which was highly com- 
mended. 

'68. — At the New Orleans Educational Conven- 
tion, Prof. R. L. Packard, of Washington, D. C, 
gave a lecture on " School Hygiene," illustrated by 
means of the blackboard, and by experimenting 
with chemical apparatus. "He treated the subject 
with great ability, and gave a description of the 
evils resulting from badly-lighted and poorly-venti- 
lated school-rooms, and showed the necessity of 
attention to this matter by those who have the man- 
agement of all public rooms where numbers of peo- 
ple are gathered. Professor Packard displayed a 
number of instruments, and showed various interest- 
ing experiments bj' which the air of a school-room 
could be tested." 

'72. — J. S. Richards is settled as pastor in the 
Congregational Church, at Waterford, Maine. 

'76. — Dr. D. A. Sargent recently delivered a lect- 
ure upon " Physical Training," under the auspices of 
the Bowdoin College Literary Association. It was 
much appreciated. Dr. Sargent treated the subject 
in a very interesting manner, and gave an historical 
sketch of the development of physical culture, from 
the time of the Greeks, and coming down to the 
present, emphasized the importance of securing a 
good degree of bodily training, in order that the best 
quality of mental work may be accomplished. Dr. 
Sargent spoke of the recent improvements in appa- 
ratus, designed for various kinds of exercise, and 
said that some of the apparatus used in manj' of the 
college gymnasiums in this country, had for its model 
the crude forms now in use in Bowdoin's so-called 
gymnasium. Dr. Sargent spoke of the need felt by 
Bowdoin, of an adequate gymnasium, and made an 
offer to that end, that should find a hearty response 
from all graduates who are truly interested in the 
best interests of their Alma Mater. 

'76. — The Merrimack Journal has the following 
in regard to Mr. W. A. Robinson: 

" The schools of Franklin have had no one superior 
to Mr. Kobinson as a thoroughly competent and acoom. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



13 



plished educator, and we very much doubt it his equal 
has been seen here. For tlie past j'ear, in addition to his 
onerous duties of principal, he has acted as Superintend- 
ent of Schools, and discharged his duties in a highly sat- 
isfactory manner to all concerned." 

76. — Arlo Bates, the author of " Patty's Perver- 
sities " and " The Pagans," is soon to publish a new 
novel, through the house of Chas. Scribner's Sons. 

The prograraiue for the [serai-annual meeting of 
the Maine Pedagogical Society at Bangor, May 14th 
and 16th, includes papers on discussion by Rev. Ben- 
jamin P. Snow, '55, President M. C. Fernald, '61, 
Dr. D. A. Robinson, '73, and Charles H. Clarli, '76. 

'77. — Roberts has been teaching at Norway Lake 
Maine. 

'79. — Kimball is in an apothecary shop at Nor- 
way, Maine. 

'81. — E. E. Briry has been appointed city physi- 
cian at Bath. 

'81. — Achorn has been invited to deliver the Me- 
morial Day oration at Damariseotta. 

'81. — E. H. Chamberlain, M.D., lately practicing 
in the West, has returned to Massachusetts and set- 
tled in Chelmsford. 

'81. — Haggerty was recently elected a member of 
the School Committee for three years at Southbridge, 
Mass., his opponent being a prominent Orthodox 
minister of that place. 




\l Pass the butter gently, Mabel, 
Shove it lightly through 
the air , 
In the corner of the dish, love. 
You will find a nut-brown hair. 

What fond mem'ries it awakens 

Of the days ere we were wed, 
When upon my good coat-collar, 

Oft was laid your little head. 

Lovingly I stroked those tresses, 

In the happy days gone by; 
Now I strilte them every meal time 

In the butter or the pie. 
The Harvard Library contJf,ins 184,000 volumes ; 



Yale, 115,000; Dartmnuth, 60,000; Cornell, 53,000 
Brown, 52,000 : Columbia, 6 i,000; Williams, 19.000 
Princeton, 49,000; Michigan, 45,000 ; Iowa, 18,000 
Oberlin, 16,000; Minnesota, 12,000; Delaware, 
^2,000.— Ex. 

A good college paper is worth more for the moral 
and gentlemanly tone of college life than a whole 
library of by-laws and an army of faculty spies. — 
N. T. Independent. 

The average annual expenses of a student at Har- 
vard is $800 ; Amherst, $500 ; Columbia, $800 ; La- 
fiiyette, .$400: Princeton, $600; Yale, $800 and 
Williams, $500. 

Four cribs in his pocket, and three on his cufi, 
Some formulas, rules, and other small stuff 

Tucked up in his sleeve, with the stolen test, 
A text-book buttoned beneath his vest 

And a bookish chum near to assist him — 
Behold the effects of the ranking system. — Ex. 

Oxford University was founded by King Alfred, 
in 886, A.D. Cambridge was founded by Segbert, 
King of Essex, in 604. 

The dairy-maid pensively milked the goat, 
And, pouting, she paused to mutter, 
" I wish, you brute, you would turn to milk," 
And the animal turned to butt her. — Ex. 



MERRY'S 

NOVELTY HAT 

IS THK CORRECT THING TO WEAR. 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 



H. ¥. SMGKPQLiEi, 



iOUDt^ ESOi. O)Ja08Sj 
Next tQ Anierican Express Bffice, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

piiiiifg ill liiiii, 



lltf Mated 

At Lowest Possible Prices. 

French Clocks and Bronzes, Fine Watches 
and Chains, Diamond Rings. 

BATH, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 



CIGARETTE 
Smolders who 

are willing jto 
paya little more 
for Cigarettes 
than the price 
charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, will 
find the RICHMOND STKAIGtHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS. 
They are made from the 'brigJktest, most 
delicately flavored, and higliest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are abso- 
lutely ^viUiout adulteration, or drugs. 



No. 



STRAIGHT CUT 

We use the Genuine Frencli Rice Paper 

of our own direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuiue. IMITATIONS of this 
brand have heen put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
origiDal brand, and to observe that each pack- 



age or box of 
Kichinond 

Straight Gut 
Cigarettes 

bears the 
signature of 



niGARETTES 

ALLEN &CINTER 

MANUFACTTTEER S, 

RiCHIViONO, VIRGINIA. 



n^aine Bentpal R. ^. 



On and after October 20, 1884, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.10, 11.25 a.m., 2.45, 4.40 and 6.2S P.M., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Rockland, 8.10 A.M., 2.45 p.m. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.25 and 11.30 A.M., 4.30 p.m., and 

every night, including Sundays, at i2.35. 
For Lewiston, 8.10 a.m., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.10 A.M. (mixed) and 2.45 P.M. 

For Vanceboro and St. John, 2.45 P.M. and 12.45 every night. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.45 P.M., and 13.45 night. 
For Bangor, Ellsworth and Bar Harbor, 2.45 P.M., 12.45 night. 
For Augusta and Waterville, 8.10 a.m., 2.45 and 6.35 P.M., and 

12.45 every night. 

Note.— The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew. 
istoD, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun- 
day, but do not connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, or 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on 
Sunday morning. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BOOTHBV, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 14, 1884. 



NOTICE. 

BEWARE OF COUNTERFEITS AND IMITATIONS. 
Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and pure Rice Paper, are rolled by the highest 
class of skilled labor, and waiTanted free from flavoring or 
impurities. 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a FAC-SESIILE of KINNET 
Bkos.' signature. 

KINBTEV TOBACCO CO. 

SnCCESSOR TO KISN'EY BEOS. 

NEW YORK. 

The following are our well-known 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Capoeal, Sweet Capokal, St. James 4, Capokal J, ST. 

James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES 

SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very populur. Manufactured bv special request, 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 



JSPf^Ijye M^ ^WJAK^ ^TYIiE^ IN 



2 Odd Fellows' Block, Main Street, Brunswick. 



KEPAIBIITG NEATLY DONE. 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, vrill commence February 7th, 1884, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel 
T. Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, 
M.D., Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children ; Cihrles 
W. GODDARD, A.M., Medicil Jurisprudence; Frederick H. 
Gerrish, M. D., Anatomy; Henrv Carmichael, Ph.D.,Chem- 
isti-y; Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; 
Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; 
Henry H. Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Irving E. Kdiball, M.D., 
Demonstratiir of Anatomy; Everett T. Nealev, M.D., Dem- 
onstrator of Histology. 

ALFKED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretart/. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



COLLEGE SOI]CS 



BY HENEY KANDALL WAITE. 

One is tempted to pronounce this the very best collection of 
songs extant. If not that, certainly none belter of the size ex- 
ist. Mr. Waite, wlio has alreaily compiled three College Song 
Books, condenses into this the cream of other collections, and 
has brought together something that will be welcome in every 
household, as in every college. 

Seventy-four pieces of American, French, German, or " Afri- 
can" origin, nonsensical, comic, patlietic, musical, and all spark- 
lingly bright. Price but 50 Cents. 

Mailed for the Retail Price. 

i OLIVER DITSON & CO., Boston. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



?!lf!11 



HM 



BYRON 



STEVENS. 



We have for sale Mr. May's new Volume of 

Humorous Poems, Entitled "inside the Bar. 

Lovers of the original in literature will find this a 
most entertaining work. Price, $1.50. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Any oue having any of the following back 
numbers of the Orient will confer a great favor 
by sending them to the Business Editor. 

VOIi. II., Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17. 

VOI-. III., Nos. 1, 7, 10, 12. 

VOL. IV., No. 1. 

VOL. VI., No. 7. 

VOL. VII., No. 13. 

VOL. VIIL, No. 11. 

VOL. XII., No. 1 



rcmm 

DUNLAP BLOCK, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT 

niCYCljE 
BASE-BA LL 

TENNIS 
BOATING 

SPECIAL RATES TO CLUBS. 



SHIRTS, 

STOCKINGS, 

JERSEYS. 



OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



D. W. GEANBERY & CO., 




THE SHE ^JS^ RD EOR 1885, 

Is the Best Racket Made. New Equipoise and other Popular Styles of Our Owu Make. JeflFeries, Tate, 
Prince, Alexandra. an<l other Noted Knglish Rackets. All Requisites for Playing the Game. 

Send for lUusti'ated Catalogue and Directions for Playing. Free. 

20 iS; 2-4 JOHN STREET, NEW YORK. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



<& FmiBi.] 



BK,XT3>TS-\7^ICI5:, OVCE. 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 



Interior Views iVIade to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views j also College Views. 




OTTAWA 



Cushing's Island, 
Portland, Me. 



3^/1. S. G-IBSOOSr. 



^F. H. WIKS0H,3ie<- 

DISPENSER OF 

fill Sfi|ij Miildiii, « Okiiiiiils. 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Go to W, B. yiToodard's 

To buy your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME 



Wja. ^. EIEIiD, 



|iI^N^6E^. 



®1AM§M©S, FIME WAf €1ES, 

239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, aiAINE. 

J. A. MERKILL. A. KEITH. 



mm 



DEALER IN 



Fresh aud Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 



#iit«ft- S^lii^rlCTg,. ^ 



2 i|«rt| llntfe, 



|ai^. 



DEALER IN 



CEDAR STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Brancli office three doors north of Tontlue Hotel. 



Successor to A. Eoemer & Son, 
THE LARGEST HISTORICAL 

COSTUMERm»ARMORER 

IN AMEEICA. 

Also Costumer lor all the principal theatres : Pilth Avenue 
Theatre, Grand Opera House, Star Theatre, Madison Square 
Theatre, Niblo's Garden Theatre, Xew Park Theatre, People's 
Theati-e, 14th Street Theatre. 

No. 8 UNION SQUARE, NEW YORK, 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
115° Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BKIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



WM 



It reaches tbe best educated luid wealthiest 
classes of the community. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SITUATIOI^rS FRBE 

To our subscribers only — can be obtained tbrough tlie 
School Bureau department of the 

Chicago Corresj)ondence University, 

An institution firrnishing instruction to "any person 
in any study," THROUGH DIRECT CORRESPOND- 
ENCE WITH EMINENT SPECIALISTS (College 
Professors). To learn of present courses of study and va- 
cancies to teach, send 10 cents for sample copy of our first- 
class Literary and Educational Journal. 

N. B. — Schools and families supplied with teachers 
FREE. Address the 

CORRESPONDENCE UNIVERSITY JOURNAL, 

Agents Wanted. 162 La Salle St., Chicago. 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



!iiE#s.A^ m. miaa^g 



-DEALEK IN- 



Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 
:^ifcri«'S-wicic, ivi.a.xiv:e:. 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



10WPOIM COLLEQi: BOYS 

Will save money by piircliasiag their Tennis Goods, Jer- 
seys, Base-Ball. Bicycle, and Tennis Suits, et.c, of 



J. W. BRINE, 

m€ Harvard Outfii 



Samples of Jerseys, Knee Pants, Caps, and Suitings, may 
be seen at Room No. 10, South Appleton. Call and see 
them and get terms before purchasing elsewhere. 



Successor to Atwood & Wentworth, 

DEALER IX 

DIA^pOrliDS, WA^TCHES, JEWELRY, 

itnd importers of French Clocks, Opera Glassci', etc. 
Fine Watch Repairiiif/ : Gold and Silver Platiiii/. 

509 CONGRESS ST., Portland, Me. 



All the Students Should Buy 

THEIR 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 

Cor. Main and Maso.n Sts., ovf. Town Clock. 



Wo also make a s|)eeiaUy of 

For Schools and Colleges. 

SUOII AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY^ 

Address all orders to tia- 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 




til eiiiiiiiig ee,,, 



ON THE ROAD. 



(Estalilished 1877.) 

Institute Building, Huntington Ave., Boston. 
M&m 'Pufelish to© illusteftki iataloanes, 

ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 
OTHER TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp at above address. 



ALLEN & COMPANY, 



isttB ilirts aii Fiit Firii 



^imiiiSii 



O F - 



And GENTLEMEN'S liVIPORTED NECKDRESSINGS is Complete. 

THE LATEST AND MOS'l DE.SIRAI'.EE GOODS NOW OPEN FOK 
MEN'S STYLISH SFHINCJ FrKNLSHINOS. 



ALLE^ & COMPANY, 
470 Congress Street, - - Market Square, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A GLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDKNT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGES'G 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Trythe new " Harvard"and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACK OF THE OLD KIND.S. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

"^LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENOEAVED IK THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 

All tlie Late Pablirations in stock. Text-Books of all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 




m 



< 



|Ot1iand||ysinessf|olleg6 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



P( 
Tlio oldest H^ \w^W\ ou of ■ '"' the kiml 
in liie Slate. ^^^ < "<" &'>• in- I m struclion In 
emnaiistiiD.Uook-ieeDiiiglJoffll Law 
and nil the ^H^ collnternl ^^^ brunches of 

A COMPLETE BlfSINESS EDUCATION. 

Fov further information, address, 

L. A. GRAY. A.M.. Portland, Maine. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE ma.wm% m^m^ 



]^0. 5 0DD FEIiL0W3' BD0CK, 



Is the place to buy 



Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 

1. m. t@«8ill„ ?EOpJ*F. 



Made at Higgins' Ground-Floor Studio, Bath, 



The New Styles in 

STII^I^ arxd. SOIE^T lai-^TS 

In all colors, are now ready. An elegiint line of Ne^y York 
Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, 'Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

X ELLIOTT ' ©, t 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 



Browne'8 Hair Dressing Rooms, 

Odd Fellows' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. W. BROWNE, PKOi'tUETOit. 




THE FAVORITE NOS.303-404-332-l7O-S5I^WITH 

^HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD.MY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORL 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vffl. J. MERRYMAI, PHARMACIST,-:- 
Fancy ani Toilet Articles, Giprsl ToMcco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

13" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 

Wo go Mm%RMY, 
Book-Seller, Stationer, Book-Binder, 

AND BLANK-BOOK MANUPACTUKEE, 

Opposite City Hall, Center St-, Bath, Maine. 

They do say, and it is a fact, that Lenten & Neagle's is the 
cheapest place in this county. Their assortment of trunks and 
bags cannot be beaten. No shop-worn goods, but direct from the 
manufacturers. They have the lar,icest line of whips ever shown 
in this town. Jobbing of all kinds promptly attended to. 
Ti-unks and bags neatly repaired. 

HARNESS MAKERS & CARRIAGE TRIMMERS, 
MAIN STREET, Store formerly occupied by Washburne. 

]Sd: A^ Y^ isr ^ R D ' s 

Main St., under Town Clock 

Jig-Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

180 Middle Street. - - - - Portland, Me. 



OVER BOADMAWS STORE, MAIN STREET. 

MES. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 

IMo. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery ; Portland and Boston Daily Papers ; Circu- 
lating Library, 1600 Volumes; Base-Ball and La Crosse; Pict- 
ures and Picture frames; Frames made to order at short notice 



Dealer in and Agent for 

C O £. TJ IVr B I A^ , 

and all the leading American and English Bicycles and Tricj;;- 
cles. A few good second-Hand Machines in stock. Also Bi- 
cyle Sundries, etc. Portland, Maine. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A G. Tenney. 

Teems, ----- $1.50 a Tear i a Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

"Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

;e®-Speoial Rates to Student Clubs.-ffil 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, test- 
■books being mentioned iu some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amonnt of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenougli, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Caesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
Mneid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,- first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra, — so much as is included iu Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specilications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatoi-y course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regulae Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1884). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Hallowell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryehurg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine pandidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wi h 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study.. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED- FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terras. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 




Vol. XV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 13, 1885. 



No. 2. 



BO WD O IN ORIENT 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE YEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

W. V. "Wentworth, '86, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
J. H. Davis, '86. Levi Turner, Jr., '86. 

A. A. Knowlton, '86. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. C. Parker, '86. C. B. Burleigh, '87. 

H. L. Taylor, '86. E. C. Plummer, '87. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00. 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
municati'-ns in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to conti'ibiite 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Bruaswiclc as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XV., No. 2.-May 13, 1885. 

Absent-Minded, . 15 

Editorial Notes 15 

Life 17 

History of Bowdoin College, 17 

Choice of Junior Electives, 18 

Practical Psychology, 19 

Tlie Massachusetts Trip, ■ .... 20 

St. John Temperance, 21 

Euchred 22 

Collegii Tabula 22 

Personal, 24 

Clippings, 25 



ABSENT-MINDED. 

" Yes chum, I called upon her, 
And sent my card above ; 
The time at length had come for me 
To boldly speak my love. 

" A cold, cold note was brought to me 
By one of the servant maids ; 
That card of mine — Ye gods of war ! 
It was the ace of spades I " 




Once more the Orient ventures 
to place before the eyes of its readers a few 
remarks upon the time-honored gymnasium 
question, but tliey will be of a more hopeful 
nature than has been customary, for we are 
happy in being able to say that another year 
will probably find Bowdoin the possessor of 
one of the finest gymnasiums in the country. 
For several years the need of such a building 
has been recognized, and various attempts 
have been made to secure an adequate fund, 
with what success all are too well aware. At 
last, however, a movement, largely inspired 
by Dr. Sargent's lecture in the Literary As- 
sociation course last winter, has been started, 
with every prospect of a favorable culmina- 
tion, though an abundance of hard work is 
still requisite. 

The Faculty have liberally subscribed a 
considerable sum, quite an amount has been 
subscribed by the older alumni, and the sev- 
eral classes from '75 down have entered upon 
a systematic canvass of their members, with 
results thus far which are certainly encour- 
aging. It is to be sincerely hoped that the 
enthusiasm which thej' are manifesting and 
the liberality which inspires them to give 
their aid, may prove contagious and induce 
some of our older and wealthier graduates to 
make the present probability a certainty. 



16 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



To recent graduates and to those now in 
college, a modern gymnasium seems to be 
our most pressing need. This world is pro- 
gressing, and Bowdoin must not be found 
lagging. In the days when wood was burned, 
saw and axe may have furnished all the ex- 
ercise needed for health and muscular devel- 
opment, but there has been a vast change in 
college life and customs, as well as in those 
of the world at large, and what would have 
been at one time of little benefit has become 
an imperative necessity. 

It is desired to erect a brick gymnasium 
of sufficient size and so equipped that it shall 
be a credit to the college, ai}d Dr. Sargent 
has generously offered to give all the appar- 
atus. His class, that of '75, will have a re- 
union at Commencement, when the matter 
will, it is hoped, be pushed to a successful 
conclusion. If it is not it will not be Dr. 
Sargent's fault, for we well know how enthu- 
siastic he is upon the subject, and we hope 
he will be able to make others feel as he 
does. 

When so much money has been sub- 
scribed, it seems as though the remainder 
might be obtained without taking it from the 
college funds, which are none too large ; but 
we are convinced that, however obtained, a 
new gymnasium will prove a great boon to 
Bowdoin. 



The next number of the Oeient will ap- 
pear in three weeks, in order to contain an 
account of Field and Ivy Day exercises. 



Though not present at the temperance 
meeting on Fast Day, we were both surprised 
and grieved to hear from several of our 
friends the remarks which Gen. Neal Dow 
made concerning Bowdoin College and the 
town of Brunswick. We are told that he 
charged the college, professors and all, with 
indifference towards the temperance ques- 



tion ; that he said aid must come from the 
ignorant, as the educated were generally op- 
posed to any progress in the desired direc- 
tion, and that he declared Brunswick to be 
one of the most intemperate towns in the 
State, and its citizens regardless of ihe effect 
of the liquor shops upon youth. 

The Telegraph has clearly and forcibly 
broken the force of the last charge, but when 
Neal Dow goes so far as to say that he was 
obliged to write to a Pennsylvania man, who 
inquired of him whether or not Bowdoin 
would be a safe place to send a son whom he 
desired to have removed from alcoholic temp- 
tation, that Bowdoin College is not a fit place 
to send his boy to, on account of the loose 
moral sentiment in college and town, it seems 
to us fitting for the Orient to notice his re- 
marks. We believe in temperance and tem- 
perance laws, and think that the veteran 
prohibitionist deserves credit for his efforts 
and their good results; still, we cannot 
agree with his apparent idea that every one 
who does not have the same belief as himself 
is an enemy to the cause. We have excel- 
lent reasons for believing that the professors 
and most of the students are opposed to 
drinking, and can but regard it as a malicious 
insult to the college and the lecturer's "edu- 
cated class " to claim the contrary. In short, 
we would respectfully recommend to the 
gentleman, before repeating his speech, to 
acquaint himself with the facts and to ascer- 
tain for himself, first, whether there is not a 
strong temperance sentiment in Bowdoin and 
in Brunswick; second, whether that senti- 
ment is not supported by practice, and 
whether there is not as- little drinking in the 
college as can be expected among so many 
students, though located in a strong temper- 
ance toAvn ; third, whether there is not less 
drinking in Bowdoin than in most colleges 
of the United States. 

Bowdoin has enemies enough who are 
willing to parade her faults, without being 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



17 



publicly assailed by a distinguished probibi- 
tionist without right or reason. The Orient 
maintains that the morals of this college are 
now good, whatever they may have been in 
the past, and that its reputation with those 
who know it well, is excellent, and that a 
knowledge of the facts will convince any un- 
prejudiced person that Neal Dow's atlack 
was uncalled for and unjust. 



In perusing the daily papers, one sees 
frequent mention of Bates and Colby, while 
Bowdoin's name rarely appears, unless in 
connection with the reported refusal of some 
person to accept the presidency. This leads 
to reflection upon the probable reason. Bow- 
doin has undoubtedly a greater reputation 
than either of her rivals, and consequently 
it might be expected that her name would be 
more prominent in the press of the country. 
When a disturbance occurs here the fact is 
heralded by every newspaper in New Eng- 
land, but the improvements made are scarcely 
mentioned. There have been at times vague 
rumors that there were in college sundry 
possessors of pieces of pasteboard technically 
called reporter's tickets. The precise duties 
of these individuals have never been ascer- 
tained with accuracy, though it is often sup- 
posed that a good entertainment in the hall 
reveals their existence. When reading ac- 
counts of -different events at Bates or Colby, 
the idea has sometimes occurred to us that 
Bowdoin also might be benefited by some 
similar advertising. Not that we expect the 
aforesaid gentlemen to become correspond- 
ents — of course not; but we do think that 
the advantages which this college possesses 
should be presented to the public more than 
is the case at present. 



In response to the advertisement for back 
numbers in the last Okient, Messrs. H. G. 
Briggs, '74, F. W. Hawthorne, '73, Prof. 



Little, College Librarian, C. E. Sayward, '84, 
and an iinknown friend have kindly favored 
us with a considerable number of the missing 
Orients, and we are glad to thank them for 
their generosity. The files are not yet com- 
plete, however, though we hope they may be 
soon. 



LIFE. 

Once as I walked o'er pleasant country roads, 
Above, the clear, blue sky, the earth beneath, 
Before me rose a hill from whose high top 
I thought to view the ocean ; straight I gained 
The summit, when behold debarring sight 
Beyond a loftier heiglit upreared its head. 
Thus oft when traversing life's toilsome way. 
One labor overpast, we hope to win 
A prospect of our journey which extends 
To Time's broad ocean, ceasing on Its shores. 
But vain the hope, for ever in our path 
Else up new difficulties to obscure 
The vision ; our desire is never gained, 
Until at length with faltering feet we pause 
Upon the beach-sands of that solemn sea 
Whose waters murmur of Eternity. 



HISTORY OF BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

[Concluded. J 

During the administration of President 
Appleton, who was elected after the death 
of President McKeen in 1807, an experiment 
was tried which caused great dissatisfaction 
in college. The students had been accus- 
tomed to board in private families, but in 
1811, for economy, the college established a 
commons hall, obliging all to board there 
unless they could obtain a physician's cer- 
tificate that the state of their health required 
a change. The disputes constantly arising 
about the quality of the food; those who 
boarded better than at home making the 
most complaint, according to Prof. Packard, 
and the efforts of the students to obtain 
their board elsewhere, prevented the success 
of the system. 

The number of students increased so 
rapidly that the capacity of Massachusetts 



18 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Hall was speedily overtaxed, and in 1807 
Maine Hall was erected, its rooms being 
intended for dormitories. It was burned in 
1822 and rebuilt, to be burned again in 
1836, and was then rebuilt upon a different 
plan, which was more convenient, but af- 
forded less pleasure to the admirer of archi- 
tectural effects. Winthrop Hall was built the 
same year that the first Maine was burned. 

The period immediately succeeding the 
admission of the State of Maine into the 
Union was a critical one for Bowdoin. Ac- 
cording to the provisions of a legislative act, 
the college could no longer obtain state aid 
without first submitting to the control of the 
legislature, and the boards were obliged to 
yield as the endowment was small. 

At once the tenure of office of the presi- 
dent was changed, the number of overseers 
increased from forty-five to sixty, and of 
trustees from thirteen to twenty-five, the 
new members to be appointed by the gov- 
ernor and council, who were unfriendly to 
the college. 

The State, however, did one good thing, 
as a Medical School was established in con- 
nection with the college and aided for some 
years by legislative grants. 

President Allen brought a suit to test 
the constitutionality of these measures in 
the United States Circuit Court before 
Judge Story, whose decision was in favor of 
the college. 

At this time grave doubts were arising 
in Congregational circles respecting the Or- 
thodoxy of Bowdoin, and those churches 
which had been so eager for its founding 
withheld their aid. The result was that the 
famous Declaration of Orthodoxy was sent 
out. The statement of the position of the 
college by that instrviment proved satis- 
factory, and the churches once more gave 
their powerful aid which showed its influ- 
ence in the speedy subscription of more than 
170,000. 



The wooden chapel which had been used 
since the opening of the college was intended 
to be temporary, but never had there been 
sufficient money to build a new one. En- 
couraged, however, by this welcome aid, the 
boards obtained funds enough to warrant 
the laying of the corner-stone of a new 
chapel on the 16th of July, 1845. The 
building was constructed of granite obtained 
near by, and on June 7, 1855, King Chapel 
was dedicated. 

Many students enlisted during the civil 
war, and in 1868 Memorial Hall, the most 
recent and the finest of our buildings, was 
begun in their honor, but was not completed 
until 1882. 



CHOICE OF JUNIOR ELECTIVES. 

After one has emerged from the so-called 
" drudgery " accompanying Freshman and 
Sophomore years, he feels as one born again. 
No longer need he tread so cautiouslj^ among 
Greek and Latin roots. He has no further 
use for his Greek and Latin "Lexicons," his 
logarithmic card and rubbers. Laden with 
this miscellaneous accumulation of two years, 
he anxiously awaits a purchaser. He is not 
obliged to wait long, his victim appears, the 
bargain is made, and then the reflective 
Junior sits down and contemplates. Here is 
need for serious thought. Hitherto he has 
never been perplexed by such questions. He 
has re^Dcatedly heard the subject of Eleetives 
discussed, but with no interest. The time 
has now arrived for action. A choice must 
be made. 

The importance of a right selection can- 
not be overestimated. In the catalogue he 
finds for the first two terms of Junior year 
the following eleetives : Latin, Greek, Eng. 
lish and Natural History. Of these one 
must be selected, the rest discarded. He has 
already received a thorough drill in the first 
two ; he knows, provided he has studied 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



19 



faithfully, all the Latin and Greek whicli 
will be of any benefit to him in after life. 
Then to pursue these studies further, un- 
less one desires a professorsliip in either, 
would be of no avail. The question now 
lies between English and Natural History. 
Provided the student has never received any 
instruction m either, the choice is rendered 
still more difficult. It depends to a great 
degree upon his plans for the future. 

To a prospective lawyer, Enghsh History is 
indispensable, and the course here offered is 
as good as any in our New England colleges. 
Some object to its being studied at all in col- 
lege, it being thought that more can be 
gained by reading it thoroughly after gradu- 
ation, but nine cases out of ten this reading 
never takes place, or if it does, it is done in 
such a manner that no permanent advantage 
is ever derived therefrom. 

To a prospective physician, Natural His- 
tory is of equal value, serving as a foundation 
for Physiology, which comes later in the 
course. The student will probably never 
have access again to Natural History rooms. 
He will never find an opportunity like the 
present. It behooves him, then, to grasp it 
and thus stand prepared to acquire that un- 
derstanding of human life and anatomy which 
cannot otherwise be gained. To all who lay 
claim to the acquisition of a liberal educa- 
tion, Natural History is of the utmost impor- 
tance. 

For the last term our slate of electives is 
still better. Ancient Languages are done 
away with, and we have in their place Sci- 
ence of Language and American History, to 
which are added Botany and Physics. Al- 
ready each student has had an opportunity 
to ascertain to what he is best adapted. The 
question naturally arises, from what can I 
receive the greatest profit? One's taste 
should guide Mm in this selection. We are 
sure to excel in that to which we are espe- 
cially adapted by nature. Then "let all 



study themselves : and most of all, note well 
wherein kind nature meant them to excel," 
and the question of Junior electives is solved. 



PRACTICAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

It was a dismal night. The wind with- 
out was moaning through the pines in 
solemn cadence. In a dimly lighted apart- 
ment of Appleton Hall a number of stu- 
dents were assembled together. There was 
a weird gleam in all their eyes, and as they 
gazed with steadfast countenances upon the 
glowing visage of a young man standing in 
their midst, it was evident to the most cas- 
ual observer that they were in a state of 
psychologization. 

Miraculous metamorphosis ! A few days 
ago that youth of the glowing brow was 
delving amid the intricacies of classic lore 
in serene and monotonous obscurity. Now, 
through the potent influence of one lesson in 
Practical Psychological Dynamics, he stood 
before his awe-struck audience in the con- 
scious power of a far-famed proficiency in 
pneumatology and thaumaturgy. He gazed 
upon the assembled students with a benign 
smile for he knew they were his, and he felt 
towards them that almost parental affection 
born of the consciousness of psychological 
acquisition. Calling forth a student of tow- 
ering height and lion mien he sat him down 
as a little child in their midst. Then, break- 
ing upon the silence of the room, in low and 
measured tones he informed his audience 
that longitude, rather that latitude was a 
sign of " impressibility," and left it to their 
option whether or not he should metaphysic- 
alize him. "Percede," they implored. "Gen- 
tlemen," said the psychologist with impres- 
sive intonation, " I shall now put my subject 
into that halcyon state of catalepsy known as 
the ' third state ' or, in other words, the state 
of phantasmic aberration. From this state 
I shall awaken him into the second state, or 
the state of cabalistic reconditeness." 



20 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Then gazing with mesmeric penetration 
into the eyes of the tall youth, he passed his 
magnetic hands over his brow and muttered 
the talismanic words "sleepy, sleepy," and 
immediately a resounding snore shook the 
rafters of Appleton Hall. Yes, the tall youth 
was asleep, but as that snore died away, and 
his form became stiff and rigid it was evident 
to all that it was a fatal slumber. The psy- 
chologist had underestimated his own power 
and the youth of the Hon mien was dead. 

The pyschologist gazed for a moment 
upon the cold form of his victim and then 
with a wild despairing shriek fled from the 
scene of his operations into the darkness of 
the night. 

An ocean steamer was preparing to sail 
for Austraha. As the shore lines were 
being cast off, a haggard man with snow- 
white hair hastened aboard, bearing on his 
shoulders a bran new hand-organ. Though 
clad in the coarse garb of an Italian peasant, 
he was evidently a person of culture for, 
occasionally, in animated conversation, he 
would break forth in the Greek language, 
but immediately recovering himself would 
return again to his jargon of broken Eng- 
lish. It was the Psychologist fleeing to a 
distant land to forget, if he could, the fatal 
infatuation of youth which had lead him to 
the study of a science beyond the sphere of 



THE MASSACHUSETTS TRIP. 

The nine started on its trip Tuesday, 
April 28th, with the intention of playing Har- 
vard, Tufts, and the Institute of Technology. 

Taking the Boston & Maine we arrived 
in Boston about 1.30 p.m., and, after taking 
dinner at the Quincy House, proceeded to 
Cambridge to play Harvard. 

Holmes' Field was to be the scene of 
conflict, but as it began to rain just as we 
were ready to begin play, Jarvis' was taken, 
it being much drier. 



The game was called about 4.20 with 
Bowdoin at the bat. Bowdoin made a run 
in the first on a base hit by Donovan and a 
three-bagger by Pushor. In the second 
inning Harvard made five runs on an error 
and free batting. The third inning. Harvard 
added one more score to her list. After this, 
goose-eggs were drawn by both teams, except 
in the sixth, when Bowdoin obtained one 
more run, making the final score 6-2 in favor 
of Harvard. 

For Harvard, Winslow, Beaman, Smith, 
and Holden were conspicuous for fielding, 
while Tilden, Smith, and Nichols lead the 
batting. For Bowdoin, Talbot, Pushor, and 
Dearth lead the fielding, and Pushor and 
Donovan the batting. 

HARVARD. 

A.E. R. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Beaman, 31) i 1 1 1 1 3 

Nichols, 0. f., .... 4 1 1 3 2 

Tilden, 1. f., 4 3 3 1 

Foster, r. f., 4 1 1 

Litchfield, s. s., . . . . 2 2 1 1 1 

Smith, 2b., 4 1 2 2-2 5 1 

Jones, c, 4 7 1 1 

Holden, lb. 4 1 114 

Winslow, p., .... 2 1 10 1 

Totals, .... 36 6 10 12 27 19 4 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. K. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, 2b 5 3 1 

Cook, p. 4 1 1 1 8 1 

Donovan, c 4 2 3 3 7 3 1 

Pushor, lb 4 1 3 6 

Talbot, 1. f., 4 1 1 3 

Larrabee, r. f. 4 

Barton, c. 1., .... 3 1 1 1 

Bartlett, 3b., .... 4 1 1 1 

Davis, s. s., 4 2 1 1 

Totals, . . . . 3t) 2 8 10 24 13 3 

Earned runs — Harvard 3. Three-base hits— Nichols, 
Pushor. First base on balls — by Cook 1, Winslow 1. 
First base on errors — Harvard 4, Bowdoin 5. Struck out — 
by Winslow 5, Cook 6. Double plays — Smith and Holden. 
Dearth and Pushor. Passed balls— Donovan 1, Jones 1, 
Umpire— A. L. Grant, Harvard, '8li. Time— 1 hour 40min. 

SCORE BY INNINGS. 

123456789 
Harvard, ....051000000—6 
Bowdoin 100001000—2 

Wednesday was the day set for the game 
with the Technology team, but it proving 
stormy on that day, the game was postponed 
until Friday. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



21 



Tufts vs. Bowdoin. 

Thursday forenoon we took the 11.30 
train for College Hill to play Tufts. There 
we played under a new set of rules, which 
allowed the use of ten men to our nine. 
Handicapped by this situation, which called 
to mind a similar one in one of our State 
League games, no wonder we were unable 
to win. One of his decisions against us 
made a foul a three-base hit. Another was 
a refused double play. 

The game was called at 2.30 p.m., with 
Bowdoin at the bat. Neither side scored in 
the first inning. Tufts scored in the 2d, 
5th, 6th, and 8th innings. Bowdoin in the 
3d, 4th, 6th, 6th, and 8th innings. For 
Tufts, Crosby, Taylor, Cook, and Wescott 
did the best fielding, while Cook did the 
best batting. For Bowdoin, Pusher, Dearth, 
Donovan, and Talbot fielded finely, whUe 
Dearth did the batting. 

TUFTS. 

A.B. R. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Crosby, 2b 5 1 2 2 1 4 

Taylor, lb., 5 1 17 1 

Mackin, 3b. 4 1 1 1 1 2 1 

Wescott, p 4 9 1 

Chapman, 1. f., .... 4 

Bailey, c 4 1 1 1 6 4 

Lewis, c. £., 3 1 1 

Ames, r. f., 3 1 1 3 

Cook, 3. s., 4 1 3 3 1 3 

Totals, .... 36 7 8 10 27 23 2 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. B. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, 2b., 4 1 1 2 2 

Cook, p 4 5 2 

Donovan, o 4 4 1 1 

Pushor, lb., 2 3 12 

Talbot, 1. f., 2 3 1 

Larrabee, r. f 4 

Barton, c. f., .... 3 1 

Bartlett, 3b 3 1 2 4 2 

Davis, s. s., 3 1 1 3 

Totals 29 5 1 1 24 16 6 

First base on balls — by Wescott 6, Cook 2. Struck 
out— Tufts 4, Bowdoin 11. Passed balls— Tufts 1, Bow- 
doin 3. Umpire— A. C. Wellington, of Tufts. Time of 
game — 2 hours 25 minutes. 

Technology vs. Bowdoin. 

The game with the Techs, took place on 

the Boston Union grounds. The game was 

called in the midst of a drizzling rain, 

which continued falling during the whole 



game. Wright occupied the box, and hand- 
led the sphere with his customary ability. 
After Technology had completed five in- 
nings, and Bowdoin 4, the game was called 
on account of the increasing rain, the umpire 
declaring the game ours, the score standing 

4-2. 

technology. 

A.B. E. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Twombly, 3b 3 2 1 

Carleton, s. s., . . . . 2 1 1 1 1 

Douglas, 2b., .... 3 1 1 

Clark, p., 2 6 

Clement, c. 2 4 2 2 

Kirkham, c. f., . . . . 2 1 1 1 1 

Kimball, r. f 2 1 2 

Brainard, 1. f., .... 2 

Sturgis, lb., 2 1 1 4 1 

Totals, .... 20 2 5 6 12 8 3 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. K. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E 

Dearth, 2b., 2 1 1 1 3 1 

Wright, p 2 1 1 1 5 1 

Donovan, c 2 4 13 

Pushor, lb 2 5 

Talbot, 1. f 2 1 2 2 1 

Larrabee, r. f., .... 2 1 1 2 

Barton, c. f 2 1 

Bartlett, .3b., 2 1 1 1 

Davis, s. s., 2 1 

Total, .... 18 4 6 7 15 8 4 

Two-base hits— Kimball, Larrabee. Double plays — 
Techs. 1, Bowdoin 2. Struck out — Techs. 4, Bowdoin 5. 
Passed balls— Techs. 2, Bowdoin 3. Umpire — Sands, of 
Institute of Technology. Time of game — 1 hour 5 minutes. 

Lewiston H. S. vs. Bowdoin. 

Score: Bowdoin 14, Lewi.ston High School 2. Base 
hits— Lewiston 6, total 9. Bowdoin 19, total 27. Errors— 
Lewiston 11, Bowdoin 6. 

SCORE BY INNINGS. 

123456789 
Lewiston H. S., . 1 1 0- 2 
Bowdoin, ...35014000 1—14 



ST. JOHN TEMPERANCE. 

That Harkins is a temperance man 
No student can deny 
For that he voted for St. John, 
The fact will signify. 

He organized a college band, 
And freely led the way 
Toward putting down of whiskey vile 
At once, without delay. 

He gathered all the St. John men 
And whiskey, in the town, 
Then held a meeting in his room 
And helped them put it down. 



22 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



EUCHRED. 

" give me your ' best ' love, dear," said he, 
"You'll never linow liow mucli to me 

'Twill be when time gone ' by ' 

Our love shall try." 

" Oh give me your ' hand,' my love," said he, 
"A token to ' assist' our controversy, 
A bond uniting ' heart to heart,' 
A tie that 'kings' even, cannot part." 

" Better than ' diamonds,' love," said he. 
My love for you shall ever be, 
As time shall ' pass ' in sunny ' bowers,' 
We'll live protected from all stormy showers.' 

This listening maiden coy and cold, 
Made answer thereupon, 
"I love you George, but you have no cash. 
My hand must remain a ' lone. ' " 




if^> 



;^ 

" There's a fair and radiant 

maiden," 
Sighed the man of '88, 
" For wliom I bear a mighty love, 
A love insatiate ; 
But that I ne'er should call on her, 

To hang upon the gate, 

And vigils in the parlor hold, 

Has been decreed by fate.'' 

" The hopes I've fondly cherished, 

Have vanished into air. 
My life seems cold and desolate, 

And clouded with despair. 
I wish sometimes I were a toad, 

Or e'en a taurus frog, 
For then I'd hop in through the gate. 

And past her father's dog ! " 

It is rumored that Prof. Sherman has imparted 
his Psychological science to a certain Sophomore, 
who is said to possess a large amount of animal 
magnetism. Be that as it may, it is a fact beyond 
controversy, that the erudite Seco has been made 
to cleanse his spittoon for a cent, and take his pay 
in cast-off clothing. Persons of truth and veracity, 
willing to submit themselves to practical experi- 
ment, are invited to call at 10 S. A. 



A game of ball was played on the Delta, during 
the absence of the nine in Massachusetts, between 
the Freshmen and a picked nine from the college. 
The game abounded in plays both phenomenal and 
abnormal. The deceptive curves and lightning 
delivery of Smitb, '86, proved very puzzling to the 
Freshmen, wlio only succeeded in getting twenty- 
six runs in three innings, to ten for the college. 
As only three innings were played, the Orient is 
unable to publish what would undoubtedly have 
been the highest score ever attained on the Bow- 
doin Delta. 

The concert in the Town Hall, April 28th, al- 
though prevented by the inclemency of the weather 
from being a financial success, was nevertheless an 
entertainment of high merit, and thoroughly en- 
joyed by those who were present. With such 
singers as Mr. Will H. Stockbridge and Miss Belle 
Bartlett, and such an orchestra as Grimmer's, 
within an hour's ride of Brunswick, it would seem 
as though the Pine Tree State had talent quite good 
enough for a commencement concert. 

The following are the titles of the subjects for 
themes, due May 16th : For the Juniors — " Would 
a War between England and Russia be beneficial to 
the United States?" " College Degrees.'-' Sophomore 
subjects—" The Destruction of American Forests " ; 
" Grant's Entry into Richmond. " 

Scene in the Geology class: Prof. — "Mr. H., 
what do you find in shell heaps ? " Mr. H. (in very 
impressive tones) — " Shells." 

Brunswick had two fires on the same day, last 
week, — one early in the morning in Jackson's store, 
the other just before noon, in Dennison's. The 
second fire came at quite an opportune time and 
gave us all an adjourn. 

Loud the fire alarms were ringing, 

And their clamorous tones were bringing 

All, with scarce a reservation, 

To the scene of conflagration, 

When a Freshman drew attention, 

Of Cyclopean dimension. 

Like a mighty glacier tending 

Where he saw the smoke ascending. 

Long before he reached the flre, 

All had seen its flames expire. 

Though a pleasure quite gigantic 

To observe the flames' wild antic, 

Yet to all the greatest fun 

Was to see that Freshmau run I 
The Physiology class was quite startled at the 
name given by one of its members, to the serum of 
the blood. 

We have heard but little this spring concerning 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



23 



the new base-ball grounds which were talked about 
so much last fall. 

The graduating exercises of the Maine Medical 
School, take place May 27th in Memorial Hall. 
The graduating class numbers fifteen men. Weston 
Thompson, of Brunswick, delivers the opening ad- 
dress. The parting address is by A. C. Gibson, 
formerly of Bowdoin, '83. Music will be furnished 
by Chandler's Orchestra. 

The Juniors have decided on the 28th and 29th 
of May, for Field and Ivy Days. It was thought 
advisable, considering the length of the term and 
crowding together of events, to change the date 
from the 4th and 5th of June, which always has 
been the customary time. 

A small division of the Juniors take Chemistry 
this term, as an extra, Prof. Robinson having 
kindly offered to direct them. It is to be hoped 
that by another year, Chemistry will be among the 
regular electives of the summer term. Many more 
would have liked to take it this year had their 
other studies permitted them to do so. 

There are probably few of us who will ever 
fully appreciate the religious advantages we have 
here at Bowdoin. It certainly would seem as if 
there ought to be quite a sanctified set of fellows, 
especially with all the attractions afforded us on 
Sundays, beginning with chapel in the morning, 
before breakfast, then church; in the afternoon 
chapel again, and Sabbath School ; in the evening 
T. M. C. A., and a choice between the numerous 
church services and the Salvation Army. Yet in 
the present Senior class, there is but one man, so 
far as we know, who has the ministry in view as a 
profession. 

He was mixed in his etiquette lore 
For he thought (it convulsed liim with laughter) 
When with feminine fair he descended the stair, 
The lady should always come after. 

With a maid great in avoirdupois 
(About three hundred they say), 
In descending the theatre stairs, 
He gallantly showed her the way. 

There came a sound as of thunder, 
And the people they scattered around her, 
She struck ! — and the Freshman was under, 
Pressed out as flat as a fiounder. 

The Uuiversalist Church gave a May-Day Festi- 
val at the Town Hall, the afternoon and evening of 
May 1st, consisting of dancing about the May pole, 
winding and unwinding the ribbons, and an oper- 
etta, entitled " Cobwebs." In the evening, after 



the operetta, refreshments were served, and a short 
time was devoted to dancing. Butler, '86, Fling, 
and Kilgore took part. W. R. Butler, '85, had 
charge of the singing. 

Wright, '84, met the nine in Boston, and was 
with them at all the games played. He pitched on 
the game with the Technology, with his usual 
success. 

Mort. expressed his opinion of the umpire in 
the Tufts game, in such euphonious and clear terms 
that none could well mistake his meaning. 

Gummed labels, with " Not to be Removed," 
printed upon them, have been placed on a certain 
number of every issue of the Oeient, on file in the 
office, and it is to be hoped no more papers will be 
taken from the room. Several of the volumes are 
incomplete, the missing numbers of which will be 
found in the advertising columns. Any one possess- 
ing copies of any of these they are willing to dispose 
of, will confer a favor by communicating with the 
business editor. 

There is some prospect that the Medics will put 
a crew on the river for the Ivy Day races, making 
use of '83's boat. 

A kind of police court was held in North Win- 
throp for the benefit of a small yagger, who was 
found in one of the rooms stealing. 

The bodies of the Italian murderers were pre- 
sented before the medical class, in a lecture illus- 
trating the workings of the muscles of the body. 
They were both as fine specimens of muscular de- 
velopment as have ever been before the class. 

Byram, '86, who has been out all the year teach- 
ing, has returned. 

One would judge the Seniors were developing 
quite an interest in the manufacture of bricks, to 
see them digging in the clay at the Topsham brick 
yard. 

The Salvationists have not as yet talked with a 
single college fellow, though there are nearly 
always some present at their meetings. 

The business editor would like to inquire of the 
theme-corrector if he ever indulges in the classic 
pastime of "teetering," during the summer vaca- 
tion. 

The Medics seem to sport an unusual number 
of tall hats this spring. If the present trouble 
with the yaggers continues, the number will prob- 
ably greatly diminish before the close of the 
term. 



24 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The flshway has presented a beautiful sight for 
the past few weelss, with all its mass of water 
splashing and foaming over the rocks. The flsh- 
way, and Sprague's Hill, with its abundance of May- 
flowers, are two as pretty spots for a walk, at this 
time of the year, as one could ask for ; and often 
one passing that way can hear the notes of a col- 
lege song rising above the noise of falling water. 

The May-flowers were never more beautiful than 
they are this year. The snow, instead of retard- 
ing their growth, seemed to make them bloom the 
brighter. Boys come up to the college every day 
with beautiful bunches to sell. 

Prof. Warren H. Sherman has been round the 
college for several days, giving phrenological ex- 
aminations and experiments in practical psy- 
chology. In a seance, Tuesday evening, two stu- 
dents were mesmerized, and made wholly subserv- 
ient to the Professor's will. Sixteen students were 
present at the entertainment, and expressed them- 
selves as being fully satisfied with the genuineness 
of the experiments. 




'37.— Dr. Pordyce Bark- 
er is one of the consult- 
ing physicians of General Grant. 
'49.— Geo. E. B. Jackson, Esq., of Port- 
land, has been appointed Trustee of the 
J. B. Brown estate, by Judge Haskell. 

'57. — "Gen. Chas. Hamlin, of Bangor, has re- 
cently been employed in investigating irregularities 
in connection with the administration of the public 
land by the assessors of plantations." 

'60. — " The class of '60, whose 25th anniversary 
comes this year, numbers among its members Con- 
gressman Thomas B. Reed, Mr. J. H. Thompson, 
of the Neiv York Times, Hon. J. W. Symonds, late 
of the Maine Supreme Court, and Hon. W. W. 
Thomas, who is about returning from Sweden, 
where he has been United States Minister." 

'61.— The sale of the Walcott house, 133 La- 
fayette Street, Salem, Mass., was effected for 
$4,650 to Dr. A. S. Packard, a son of H. S. Pack- 
ard and well-known scientist. 



'73. — P. A. Wilson is called to become settled 
pastor at Billerica, Mass. 

'75.— R. G. Stanwood is practicing medicine at 
Newark, N. J. 

'76. — Dr. W. H. G. Rowe was married April 
30th, to Miss Eva Andrews of Boston. 

'76. — W. G. Waitt was married to Miss Eleanor 
H. Hunt, March 17, 1885. 

^77. — C. A. Perry, who has been abroad since 
the last commencement, has just returned. 

'79.— H. D. Bowker has resigned his school at 
Groveland, and is now employed as book-keeper 
in Emerson's clothing store, at Haverhill, Mass. 

'80. — Franklin Goulding, until recently assist- 
ant paymaster in the Androscoggin Mill, at Lewis- 
ton, has removed to Boston, to engage in business 
with his brother. 

'80.— Roswell Gilbert is now traveling among 
the Southern mills, having completed his prepara- 
tory apprenticeship in the Continental Mill at Lew- 
iston. 

'81. — J. W. Manson has opened a law offlce at 
Pittsfleld, Me. 

'83. — S. T. B. Jackson who was lately East on a 
visit to his home in Portland, is still engaged in the 
railroad business at St. Louis. 

'83.— Cole spent his vacation in Boston, Mass. 

'83.— Bascom is in business at 250 Commercial 
Street, Boston. 

'83. — Wheeler is preaching in the West. 

'84.— S. R. Child is studying law in Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

'84. — M. H. Orr, who in company with E. C. 
Smith, '84, went to Benica, Cal., to take charge of a 
large fitting school, is soon to return to Brunswick, 
to study law in the ofiice of Weston Thompson. 

'84. — R. I. Thompson, who has been quite dan- 
gerously sick, has recovered, and resumed his law 
studies. 

'84. — P. S. Lindsey has gone to Bermuda for his 
health. He is accompanied by relatives. 

'84.— Joseph Torrey, Assistant Professor of 
Chemistry, at Lafayette College, Penn., recently 
received an offer of the position of chemist in a 
large chemical establishment. He dechned the 
position, and will remain at Lafayette. 

'85.— We see in the Dartmouth, that through 
the efforts of Goodenow, '85, formerly a member of 
Bowdoin, '85, a new grand stand has been erected 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



25 



at Hanover, having larger aud wider seats than the 
old one, aud covered with an awning. 

Among the officers elected at the annual meet- 
ing .of the Maine Commandery of the Militarj' 
Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States 
held in Portland on the 7th inst., are the following 
alumni : 

'47.— Lieut.-Col. Chas. B. Merrill, Senior Vice- 
Commander. 

'60. — Brig. -Gen. John Marshall Brown, Junior 
Vice-Commander. 

'59.— Lieut. Edward M. Kand, Recorder. 

'78. — Lieut.-Col. Joseph W. Spaulding, Registrar. 

'57. — Paymaster William H. Anderson, Member 
of the Council. 

'62.— Brig.-Gen. Chas. P. Mattocks, Member of 
the Council. 

'51. — Lieut.-Col. Augustus C. Hamlin, Member 
of the Council. 




On either hand of my good 
friend 
I see a fair new mitten. 
' Did she knit those," I quickly cry, 
' The girl of whom you're smitten ? " 

" And if she did," said my good friend, 
('Twas on his face plain written) 

"You surely cannot give me joy 
For having got the mitten." 

" But you have mittens twain," I say, 

" And that is no negation ; 
Two negatives, as you well know, 
But make an affirmation ! " — Brunonian. 

The largest observatory dome in the world is 
being made in Cleveland for the University of 
Michigan. It weighs ten tons, and has a diameter 
of forty-five feet and four inches at the base. — Uni- 
versity Herald. 

" Eh bien ! " exclaimed Miss Kate to the trades- 
man, " what is the price of your gneiss peaches?" 



" Tufa," he replied, laconically. " That's schist 
what I want. Give me two quartz, strata away, 
I want to catch mica. A doleryte ! " and silicate 
bounded out of the store without paying atoll. — Ex. 

President Porter, of Yale, believes that failures 
of college and university life are due in most cases 
to poor preparatory work. 

The total number of students attending the col- 
legiate department of colleges iu the United States 
is 32,000. 

Prof — " Love may be classed along with heat, 
light, and electricity as a species of force called 
energy." Student — "Y-e-s, its spark is generated 
by pressure." 

" What is the safest way to transfer bees f " asks 
a suburban correspondent. The safest way would 
be to administer chloroform to them. If this 
should be too expensive, he might catch the bees 
and muzzle them. The muzzles, by the way, 
should be worn in the place where the bustle 
usually goes. — Dailt/ Graphic. 

The new rule for pitching is as follows : The 
continuation of this story will be found in No. 17,- 
023 of " Swipes' Magazine," which is especially rec- 
ommended to those who desire a useful family 
paper. — Yale Courant. 



MERRY'S 

NOVELTY HAT 

IS THE CORRECT THING TO WEAR. 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 



Kae Boots asd SlioeSj 

Next Iq American Express Qffice, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

IBIsilfi iii PiiliS. 

Ffest ©malltf Flat@a Wa?©, 

At Lowest Possible Prices. 

French Clocks and Bronzes, Fine Watches 

and Chains, Diamond Rings. 

BATH, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BYRON STEVENS' COLLEGE BOOKSTORE. 

We have on our Bargain Counter a lot of Books which we are selling at the uniform price of 

50 cents, although many of them cost twice that sum. Among them is a set of 

Macaulay's History of England iu five volumes. 

Also a small lot of Box Papers, worth 40 cents, we have marked at 20 cents to close. 



lieSIIi IVMBIIE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Any one having any of the following back 
numbers of the Orient will confer a great favor 
by sending them to the Business Editor. 

VOL. II., Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17. 

VOL. III., Nos. 1, 7, 10, 12. 

VOL. IV., No. 1. 

VOL. VI., No. 7. 

VOL. VII., No. 13. 

VOL. VIIL, No. 11. 

VOL. XII., No. 1. 



DUNLAP BLOCK, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT 



BICYCIjE 
BASES A LL 

TENIfIS 
BOATING 
SPECIAL RATES TO CLUBS. 



SHIBTS, 

iiTOCIilNGS, 

JEBSEYS. 



OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



D. W. GEANBEET & CO., 



LAWM-TENNIS 




DEPARTMENT. 
THE SHEF^RD FOR 1885, 

Is the Best Racket Made. New Equipoise and other Popular Styles of Our Own Make. JefiFeries, Tate, 
Prince, Alexandra, and other Noted English Rackets. All Requisites for Playing the Game. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue and Directions for Playing. Free. 

20 S 22 JOHti STBEET, NEW YOBK. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



MMMB ^ FmElS^l, 



iPft' 



M 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brnnsiirick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Vietirs. 

c-ft.iL.Xj -ftu3iTXi :n':z:.&jiA.X2^-^ ox7i3 T^^oiaic- 




OTTAWA 



Cushing's Island, 
Portland, Me. 



JVC. S. G-IBS0 3Sr. 



DISPENSER OF 

Fit© Siiggj leildies;,«61ie]il§ili, 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Go to W, B. Woodard's 

To buy your GEOCEEIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 
s^E:ci-ft.Xj is.£i.te:s to ST-crx)E:i^TT cxjTt:bs. 
Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



^'iififliii©F|j Jrailj | ^i|ap ^kf©, 

MAIW STREET, BRUBTSWICK, ME. 

WM. 1^. FIEIiD, ■ - ja^N^6E^. 

llAMOMiS, FINE WATCIES, 

239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. MERRILL. A. KEITH. 



•&m 



DEALER IN 



GKIDGEf IIS All PlOflSIIDNS, 

Fresh, and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 



4^ 



2 i|ttr:| '$htkf 



dnil 



^c^» m^ mt^s^mom^i^ 



DEALER IN 



CEDAR STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 
Magnifying Glasses. 

1^= Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



HORSMAN'S 




TEIVIV IS 

' Brighton," " Casino," '■ Elberon," " Championship " 
ad "Bei'keley" are supi'rim- to any ether Rackets in the 

market. The ahnve ilhiitvation repiesents the New Racket, " BRIGHTON," which is unexcdled. 

Send stamp for Tennis and Bicycle Catalotiue. 

E. I. HORSMAN, 80 and 82 William St., Clew York. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 



CIGARETTE 
Smokers who 

are w illin g jto 
paya little more 
tor Cigarettes 
than the price 
charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, wiQ 
find the RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO AIAj OTHERS. 
They are made from the "briglitest, most 
delicately flavored, and bigliest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are abso- 
lutely witliout adulteration or djmgs, 

STRAIGHT CUTi^g: 

We use the Genuine FremcU Rice Paper 

of our own direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT JVo. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIOBfS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
origlDal brand, and to obsers'e that each pack- 
age or box of. 
Richmond 
Straight Cut 

Cigrarettes I 

bears the 1 

signature of " 



R IGARETTES 

allenTcinter 



MANTJFAOTtrREKS , 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



n]aine Gentral R. ^. 



On and after October 20, 1884, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.10, 11.25 A.M., 2.45, 4.40 and 6.2.5 P.M., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Rockland, 8.10 A.M., 2.45 P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.25 and 11.30 A.M., 4.30 p.m., and 

every night, including Sundays, at 12.35. 
For Lewiston, 8.10 a.m., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farioiington, 8.10 a.m. (mixed) and 2.45 P.M. 

For Vanceboro and St. John, 2.45 P.M. and 12.45 every night. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.45 P.>r., and 12.45 night. 
For Bangor, Ellsworth and Bar Harbor, 2.45 P.M., 12.45 night. 
For Augusta and Waterville, 8.10 A.M., 2.45 and 6.35 P.M., and 

12.45 every night. 

Note.— The night ti'ains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
iston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun- 
day, but do not connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, or 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on 
Sunday morning. 

PATSON TUCKEK, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BooTHBY, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 14, 1884. 



NOTICE. 

BEWARE OF COUNTERFEITS AND IMITATIONS. 
Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughlv cured, and pure Eico Paper, are rolled by the highest 
class of skilled labor, and wan-anted free from flavoring or 
impurities. 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a fac-slmile of Kinnet 
Bros.' Signature. 

KINNEY" TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KINNET BROS. 

NEW YORK. 

The following are our well-known 

STAKDARD BRANDS: 

Caporal, Sweet Caporal, St. James J, Caporal J, St. 

James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES 

SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. M.inufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 



3P^IN6 ^ND ^aPJaE^ ^¥YItE3 I]5 



2 Odd Fellows' Block, Main Street, Brunswick. 



KEPAIBING NEATLY DONE. 



The Sixty-Second Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 7th, 1885, 
and continue SIXTKEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel 
T. Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, 
M.D., Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Childi-en ; Charles 
W. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. 
Gekrish, M. D., Anatomy; Henri' Carmichael, Ph.D., Chem- 
istry; Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; 
Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; 
Henry H. Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Irving E. Kisibai.l, M.D., 
Demonsti-ator of Anatomy; EVERETT T. Nealey, M.D., Dem- 
onstrator of Histology. 

ALFEED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



COLLEGE SOI^GS 



BY HENRY EANDALL ■WAITE. 

One is tempted to pronounce this the very best collection of 
songs extant. If not that, certainly none belter of the size ex- 
ist. Mr. Waite, who has already compiled three College Song 
Books, condenses into this the cream of other collections, and 
has brought together something that will be welcome in every 
household, as in every college. 

Seventy-four pieces of American, French, German, or " Afi'i- 
can " origin, nonsensical, comic, pathetic, musical, and all spark- 
lingly bright. Price but 50 Cents. 

Mailed for the Retail Price. 

I OLIVER DITSON & CO., Boston. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



O HO R THE ^^IN r> 



Learned at home 



STENOGRAPH 



This wonderful Shorthand Writing Machine possesses many 
advantages over, and is learned in much less time than other sys- 
tems. Price, $40. Instructions by mail free. Can be learned 
during vacation. Send stamps for Circular. 

U. S. Stenograph Co., St, Louis, Mo. 

F. I^OEMER, 

Successor to A. Roemkr & Son, 
THE LAKG-EST HISTORICAL 

costumer:awarmorer 

m AMERICA. 

Also Costumer for all the principal theatres : Fifth Avenue 
Theatre, Grand Opera House, Star Theatre, Madison Square 
Theatre, Niblo's Harden Theatre, Xew Park Theatre, People's 
Theatre, 14th Street Theatre. 

No. 8 UNION SQUARE, NEW YORK. 



-DEALER IN- 



Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of aU kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 
:^n.XJJVswicit, isa.A.i.T!a:Ei. 

IQWBQIN COLLEGE 1Q)YS 

Will save money by purchasing their Tennis Goods, Jer- 
seys, Base-Ball, Bicycle, and Tennis Suits, etc., of 

J. W. BRINE, 



Samples of Jerseys, Knee Pants, Caps, and Suitings, may 
be seen at Koom No. 10, South Appleton. Call and see 
them and get terms before purcliasing elsewhere. 

Successor to Atwood & "Wentworth, 

DEALER IN 



ES, J EWE 



and importers of French Clocks, Opera Glasses, etc. 
Fine WatcJi Bepairinr/ ; Gold and Silver Platinc/. 

509 CONGKESS ST., Portland, Me. 



All the Students Should Buy 

THEII! 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 

AT 

Frank 1. lebc 



Cor. Main and Mason Sts., opp. To-\vn Clock. 



ALL KINDS OF 



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EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 

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SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 










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(Established 1877.) 



Institute Building, Huntington Ave., Boston. 



ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 

OTHER TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt o( a two-cent 

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ALLEN & COMPANY, 






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MEN'S STYLISH SPRING FURNISHINGS. 



.ALLEN & COMPANY, 
470 Congress Street, - - Market Square, 

P»ORTI.^MD, - - - JVr^IN^E. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KISUS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENEEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE ST7LE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY I'DR 



All the Late Publications in stock. Text-Books of all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 



474 Congress St., - 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

]S[0. a ODD EELIiOW^' BIiGCK, 

Is the place to buy 
1^ 



Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 

FHOTOGrH-A-FIiS 
Made at Higgins' Ground-Floor Studio, Bath, 




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Portiandflusinessfl 
T.,c .Me»t If i..>a, „or|" 
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eiiiaiisliip,|JooM(eeDlBglJoml Law 
and all the IH^ collaloral ^^^ branches of 

A COMPLETE BUSINESS EDUCATION. 

Fov further information, address, 

I,. A. GKAY, A.M., Portland, Maine. 



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In all colors, are now reaily. An eleir;int lineoE New York 
.Neckwear in New Sliapes and Colors just recei\ ed. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, "Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

1 ELLIOTT'S, t 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 



Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

OJil Fellows' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 



S. W. BROWNE, Prophietok. 




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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vEB. J. mmUl PHARMACIST,-:- 

BlUQS, MIDICIIIS, 

Faicy anJ Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Tolacco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 



IRA C. STOCKBRiDCE, 

MUSIC PTTBLISHEK, 

And Dealer in Sheet Mxxsic, Music Books, Musical Instnunents, and Mus: 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



Wo ^o BJMtf KB I9 

Book-Seller, Stationer, Book-Binder 

AND BLANK-BOOK MANUFACTURER, 

Opposite City Hall, Center St-, Bath, Maine. 

They do say, and it is a fact, that Lenton & Neagle's is the 
cheapest pl.ice in this county. Their assortment of trunks and 
bags cannot be beaten. No shop-worn goods, but direct from the 
manufacturers. They hare the largest line of whips ever shown 
in this town. Jobbing of all kinds promptly attended to. 
Trunks and bags neatly repaired. 

HARNESS MAKERS & CARRIAGE TRIMMERS, 
MAIN STREET, Store formerly occupied by Washburne. 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 



CHARLES GRIIMIVIER, 

180 Middle Street. - - - 



Director, 

Portland, Me. 



OVER BOARDMAN'S STORE, MAIN STREET. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magaziues, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat ami Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank BookWork of Every Description done to Order. 



No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily Papers; Circu- 
lating. Library, 1600 Volumes ; Base-Ball and La Crosse ; Pict- 
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Dealer in and Agent for 

C O L XJ ]Sd: B I iL , 

and all the leading American and English Bicycles and Tricy- 
cles. A few good second-Hand JIachines in stock. Also Bi- 
cyle Sundries, etc. Portland, Maine. 



Main St., under Town Clock. 

Og^Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Tear in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetat)les, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

«®-Speoial Bates to Student Club8..£t 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Cak"didates roR Admission to the Preshmau 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar, — Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Caesar, — Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
Mneid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic, — especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,- so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
speciiications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by tlie class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Eegulae Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. II and 12, 188.5). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Halloivell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryehurg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desii'e 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK;. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Meutal and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terras. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



1t^^ 



Vol. XV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 3, 1885. 



No. 3. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE YEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

W. V. "Wentworth, '86, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
J. H. Davis, '86. Levi Turner, Jr., '86. 

A. A. Knowlton, '86. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. C. Parker, '86. C. B. Burleigh, '87. 

H. L. Taylor, '86. B. C. Plummer, '87. 



Per annum, in advance. 
Single Copies, 



. $2.00- 
15 cents. 



Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 



Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. XV., No. 3.- June 3, 1885. 

Editorial Notes, 27 

Polo 28 

Ivy Day Oration 29 

Ivy Day, 31 

Ivy Hop 32 

Field Day 32 

Boating 33 

Tiie Miracle Marriage 33 

Graduating Exercises of the Medical Department, . 34 

The Fifty-Second Annual Convention of Psi Upsilon, 31 

Base-Ball, 35 

TheRavm(g) 37 

Communication, 38 

Class of '75 Circular 39 

CoLLEGn Tabula, 39 

Personal 41 

Clippings ' 42 




One of the things of which Bow- 
doin is justly jjroud is our art gallery, — a 
fine collection of valuable paintings, which, 
however, have been so poorly arranged, that 
their attractions have not been fully mani- 
fest. Last fall. Prof. Johnson made a com- 
mendable effort to have a new arrangement 
made, but for some reasons the work was 
discontinued, leaving things in such a con- 
dition that the room has been closed to vis- 
itors since then. Strangers coming here 
generally desire to see Bowdoin's famous 
art gallery, and we have often been obliged, 
to our regret, to inform friends that it was 
temporarily closed. 

Commencement is now fast approaching, 
when it is fair to suppose there will be pres- 
ent a considerable number of Bowdoin's 
friends, who will wish to see the collection, 
and who will be disappointed if they cannot. 
There is not, it is true, much available time 
remaining, but there is enough to accom- 
plish sometliing, and we hope to see the pict- 
ures arranged sufficiently to allow the ad- 
mission of visitors. 



A large number of entries for the Field- 



28 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Day contests were made this year, but very 
few of the contestants did any training 
worthy of the name, though, as a general 
thing, they worked hard upon that day. 
Under such conditions, phenomenal work 
could not be expected,'but the record was 
broken in the running broad jump and the 
mile run. We have always supposed that 
the athletic exercises were originally de- 
signed to encourage students in their gym- 
nastic training, rather than as a mere exhibi- 
tion of the muscle and abilities of a few 
individuals, but if so, there has been a seri- 
ous deterioration. Now, men without special 
training, go over to the grounds, and work 
to win as many prizes as possible,' having no 
thought of gaining physical benefit. Under 
such circumstances. Field Day cannot be 
expected to yield any very glorious results ; 
but if we get our long-needed gymnasium, 
it may be that students will go into a regu- 
lar course of training, for the sake of the 
good to be derived from it, regarding the 
prizes offered by the Athletic Association as 
incentives to, and encouragement for, a fair 
amount of work, and not merely rewards 
for the display of one's proficiency in cer- 
tain directions. 

In the afternoon, the class crews showed 
the benefit of the training they have had, 
and their pluck and muscle made the race 
a very interesting one. We were disap- 
pointed, however, in not seeing the expected 
race occur between the college crew and 
one from Portland, for it could hardly have 
failed to be exciting, and would have given 
our crew some valuable experience, besides 
enabling us to form some opinion as to what 
they are likely to do when contesting with 
other crews. We know their ability to pull 
against class crews, but have not seen them 
row in a shell with a good crew. 



Since the game which Colby won from 
us on the delta, our nine have realized the 



fact that success could only be obtained 
through proper training, and the result of 
their work, under the able direction of 
Barton, '84, was the winning of the game 
with that college, at Lewiston, last Saturday, 
by a score of seven to six. The game was 
finely played on both sides, and was, we 
think, the closest one ever played by a 
Bowdoin nine. At the end of the eighth 
inning the score was three to three, and so 
remained until the thirteenth, when we ob- 
tained four runs to three for our rivals. 

The most noticeable individual playing 
was the " phenomenal " pitching of Davis, 
who sent the ball to catcher with even more 
than his usual speed and skill, striking out 
fifteen of the Colby men. 

The nine, upon their return, were re- 
ceived with every manifestation of joy, and 
we may well rejoice for that game Avas prob- 
ably the decisive ^one of the championsliip 
series, though our boys must still work hard 
if they do not wish to see the prize elude 
their grasp. We have won five games and 
Colby four ; we have lost one, and Colby 
two ; we are to play one more game with 
Orono, and Colby two, and Orono has a 
strong nine. The Bates games are practi- 
cally certain to be two for Bowdoin and one 
for Colby. 



POLO. 

BEFORE. 

' I've been chosen," said he proudly, 
As he took her snow-white hand, 

'As the captain and first rusher 
Of our college polo band. 
In the skating rink arena, 
In the contest of to-night, 
I will think of you, my dearest, 
And be foremost in the fight." 

AFTER. 

Home they bore him on a stretcher, 
Sadly and with many a tear, 
Bathed his battered limbs with ointment, 
Cut away the mangled ear. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



29 



' Dearest," gasped the dying hero, 
' Do not weep, ire hold the floor," 
Then his face grew cold and rigid, 
And his polo days were o'er. 



IVY DAY ORATION. 

EULOGY OiSr PROF. PACKARD. 
By Fred L. Smith. 

To-day, as we suspend the active duties 
of college life, to plant our ivy vine, and 
hereby to symbolize and renew, not merely 
our friendship for each other, but our loyalty 
to the college, it seems fitting to implant in 
our hearts a lesson from the life of one whose 
love for liis institution was a life growth — a 
lesson that may be as lasting as his love and 
as tenacious as the tendrils of our iv)^ One 
year ago to-day liis presence lent a charm to 
these exercises, and his heart beat in unison 
with ours as he listened to the eulogy pro- 
nounced on his fellow-laborer long since 
called home to liis reward. To-day he, too, 
is in his immortal home. Praises and eulo- 
gies from us can add nothing to his peace 
and joy m that serene sphere into which, in 
company with all the great and good who 
have finished their career, he has passed. 
But such expressions do good to those who 
utter them. They lift us above low cares 
and selfish sorrows, and break the common 
course of life with feelings brought from 
a higher region. The seed of a deep emo- 
tion here planted may ripen into the fruit of 
noble action hereafter. 

We have all seen Prof. Packard in life ; the 
remembrance of his kindly benevolent face 
is so fresh in our minds, as almost to make 
his death seem a delusion. Almost a j^ear 
has passed away, yet we can hardly realize 
that another Commencement must come and 
go without his presence. Indeed, it can 
hardly seem a Commencement to many, who 
saw in him the only living tie that bound their 
early college memories with the present and 
who came back here, that yearly the golden 



chain of associations might be lengthened by 
another link. 

The last Commencement was eminently a 
successful one ; and its success was due in 
no small degree to Prof. Packard, who pre- 
sided at all the exercises with a dignitj' and 
grace remarkable for one who was already so 
far beyond the period usually allotted to hu- 
man life. HoAV startling and sudden, then, 
were the tidings that came to each one of us 
in our several homes, that he, whom we had 
seen only the week before, in the full en- 
joyment of health and strength, was no more, 
that the venerable teacher and beloved head 
of the college was dead. But here, also, came 
to us the thought that a death like his, so 
simply, so serenely great, brightened by faith 
and love, dignified with the perfect posses- 
sion of a glorious hope, is not so much the 
close of one day as the dawn of another ; less 
the putting off of mortality than the putting 
on of immortality. He was summoned from 
us only to enter a new sphere in which the 
spirit enriched with larger powers surveys 
broader fields of action and duty and where 
nobler struggles task the strength, and more 
precious crowns reward the victory. And 
as we have such cause for gratitude for his 
long and useful life, let us be thankful also 
for the divine providence — so in accordance 
with his own wish — that he died of no lin- 
gering and painful decay, but with all his 
faculties unimpaired, and in the presence of 
loving friends. 

But it is not alone of his death that we 
would speak. We would enforce the lesson 
contained in his long and unselfish devotion 
to the interest and welfare of this college. 
Dr. Packard was not the impersonation of 
genius; only a quiet, earnest man, who 
sought in his simple way to better the 
condition of mankind throiigh the chan- 
nels of knowledge and virtue. No man 
knew better than Prof. Packard the in- 
I calculable advantages of education. During 



30 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



his wliole life lie had scrutinized its in- 
fluence in the development and direction 
of our moral and intellectual facu.lties, and 
was aware that it was one of the principal 
sources of his own usefulness. " It is edu- 
cation, indeed," as one writer has remarked, 
" which teaches man to respect the voice of 
reason, and follow her as the guide of his 
conduct — reminds him of the necessities of 
subordination to government laws and ex- 
pands his selfish feelings into virtuous patri- 
otism — ^unites him with friends and the great 
family of mankind, and swells his bosom with 
the purest benevolence. It exalts his 
thoughts to another world and gives con- 
stancy to his virtues amidst the trials of life 
and a serenity to his mind amidst its evils. 
It is, in a word, the mainspring of power and 
pre-eminence — the bulwark of our hajDpi 
ness — the palladium of our liberties." Is it 
any wonder that such a man as Prof. Pack- 
ard shoiild have spent his life in the service 
of Bowdoin, and that, in his last hours, he 
should have breathed the warmest aspirations 
for its prosperity ? 

Prof. Packard was intimately acquainted 
with every phase of college life ; for almost 
seventy years the college was his home, and 
as such he loved and served it. And that he 
was loved by it in return was due to his 
faithful service and to the winning and 
manly qualities that made up his stainless 
character. The kindness of his heart, the 
generosity of his spirit, the freedom from 
every eccentricity, and above all the un- 
affected gentleness of his nature mil never 
be forgotten by those who have gone out 
from the college, nor by us who yet remain. 

In these remarks, brief and hasty as they 
are, I would not wholly overlook the exam- 
ple and influence of Prof. Packard, as a man 
and a friend. Always foremost in the pro- 
motion of all institutions for mental improve- 
ment and for the cultivation of Christian 
character, he will ever be remembered as the 



highest type of a true Christian man. While 
his life-long labors were confined to the col- 
lege walls, the beneficent influence he exerted 
upon all who knew him was, and is bounded 
by no such narrow limits. From the four 
quarters of the globe may be gathered the 
grateful tributes to his memory from those 
who have come under the benign influence 
of his pure and noble life and have tasted 
the sweets of his friendship. 

To trace, step by step, the incidents of 
such a career as his would far transcend the 
limits of a brief discourse like this, and of all 
places it is least needed here. Classmates, I 
will detain you no longer with what I feel 
myself wholly inadequate to express. How 
can we show our respect for his memory so 
well as by remaining firm to the principles 
Avhich guided him, by incorporating into our 
own lives the virtues that crowned his, by 
emulating his examples of faithfubiess and 
scrupulous fidelity in the discharge of every 
duty from the least even unto the greatest. 
The form which we loved to meet has gone 
from us forever, but the lesson of his beauti- 
ful life is an imperishable bequest which 
neither death can remove from us uor time 
diminish, which grows fruitful of good as we 
study it, and precious as we learn the truths 
it contains. In this view, it is fit that we now 
regard him as one who has done much to 
benefit one world, without omitting the higher 
function of pointing the way to another. 
Let us be grateful to a benign Providence for 
all the good which he was able to do ; and 
let us profit by the good examples he has 
given us, and the grave lessons which his 
life, character, and death have taught us. 
Whilst devoting ourselves faithfully, and 
with all our powers, to the discharge of our 
duties, those duties which we fondly flatter 
ourselves are high and important, and which 
do, indeed, touch the dearest earthly inter- 
ests of meji and communities, let us never 
forget that, amidst these, as part of these. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



31 



and necessary to their performance, there 
is one duty never to be overlooked, that 
of a steady and constant regard, and of 
frequent reflections on tlie higher subjects of 
life, death, and ilnmortalit3^ 



IVY DAY. 

The morning of the twenty-ninth opened 
bright and clear, and nature seemed to have 
done her best to make '86's Ivy Day a suc- 
cess. The class, from the very time Ivy 
Day was mentioned, about a year ago, have 
had numerous difficulties to contend with, 
but everj^thing came out all right in the end, 
and the class can congratulate themselves on 
having one of the most successful Ivy Days 
Bowdoin has seen for some years. 

In the afternoon, a little after three, the 
class — all wearing ivy leaves and crimson 
ribbons, the class color, headed by their 
marshal, J. H. Davis — marched into Memo- 
rial Hall and took seats on the platform. 
Mr. Wentworth, the class president, then 
made a few brief and appropriate remarks, 
after which the following programme was 
gone through with : 
Prayer. 



Oration. 
Poem. 



J. C. Parker. 
F. L. Smith. 
C. A. Byram. 



MUSIC. 

Mr. Smith in his remarks spoke in a feel- 
ing and touching way of our esteemed pres- 
ident, Prof. Packard, who, a year ago, was 
present at the ivy exercises of '85, and since 
that time has been removed from our midst. 
Too much cannot be said in praise of the 
poet, Mr. Byram, who, notwithstanding the 
extra work he had to do in his studies, gave 
his whole time to the class, when, scarcely 
four days before Ivy Day, the news came 
that the poet, Mr. Home, had no poem and 
should not be present at the exercises. Mr. 
Byram's poem was well-written, though he 
had but a few days to do it in. 



H. R. Fling. 
P. A. Knight. 
G. M. Nori-is. 

G. S. Berry. 
E. E. Rideout. 

F. L. Smith. 



At the conclusion of this part of the ex- 
ercises, the class marched out, and the exer- 
cises were continued on the west side of 
Memorial Hall. Mr. Wentworth reviewed, 
in a pleasing way, some of the incidents of 
the past years, and presented the following- 
honors : 

Handsome Man— Looking-Glass. 
Popular Man— Wooden Spoon. 
Lazy Man — Arm-Chair. 
Ponyist — Spurs. 

Best Moustache — Moustache Cup. 
Dig— Spade. 

The recipients of the honors responded with 
appropriate remarks. The ivy leaf was then 
unveiled, and the trowel presented to the 
curator, W. "H. Stackpole, who promised to 
make the ivy his especial care. The ivy 
was then planted, each member of the class 
taking the trowel and piling the earth about 
the ivy. 

The exercises closed with singing the 
following Ode, written by H. L. Taylor : 

IVT ODE. 
Air — There's Music m the Air. 

' The sun has rolled again 

His annual course around, 
And spring-time's merry days 

With shouts of joy resound; 
But the day of days to-day, 

When we here together meet, 
Linked in many a friendly tie, 

Our Ivy Day to greet. 

Beside these classic walls, 

Where memory'll ever dwell, 
We consecrate a spot, 

A spot we love so well ; 
And beneath the shadowing trees, 

With the vaulted sky above, 
Plant we here our Ivy vine, — 

Token of our love. 

Our Ivy Day soon o'er, 

The transient spring-time tied, 
Are but the story told 

Of us when we are dead. 
But beside these classic walls, 

Underneath the clear blue sky, 
There'll remain this single spot, 

Whose memory'll never die. 



32 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



IVY HOP. 

The Ivy Hop made a pleasant termina- 
tion to the exercises of the two days. At half 
past eight a concert was given by Grimmer. 
The selections, as usual, were fine, and well 
appreciated by a large audience which filled 
the gallery. At nine o'clock dancing began. 
About thirty couple were present, many of 
whom were from out of town. The floor of 
the hall was in fine condition, far better 
than was expected by those who have at- 
tended dances in the town hall before. The 
order of dances consisted largely of waltzes, 
and there were several extras, during the 
evening, beside. The orders, designed by 
Shreve, Crump & Low, were very neat and 
tasty. On the outside was a raised wreath of 
ivy leaves in which were the letters " B. C," 
and " '86." 

The dresses worn by the young ladies were 
charming, and well deserving of some notice, 
but it lies not in the writer's power to give a 
description of that kind; so suffice it to say 
that every one looked at their best. 

At intermission, ice-cream and cake were 
furnished, after which there were five more 
dances. The company then separated in 
time to give a few hour's sleep to those in- 
tending to go to Lewiston to see the ball 
game. The sentiment expressed by all was 
that the hop was a success, and the only 
thing to regret was that the Ivy Hop came 
but once a year. 



FIELD DAY. 

The exercises of Field Day, under the 
direction of the Athletic Association, took 
place on Thursday forenoon. May 28th. 
The weather was all that could be desired, 
and the attendance good. The entries 
were by far larger than those of last year, 
which may be accounted for from the fact 
that second prizes were offered. 

The first in order was the 220-yards dash. 
This was won by Merrill, '87, in 25 1-2 seconds. 



Cook, '85, coming in second, and Cary, '87, 
third. The poor record may be accounted 
for from the fact that the winner was not 
hard pushed. 

In the throwing of the hammer, Boutelle, 
'87, was an easy winner, his record being 61 
feet 10 inches, Burpee, second, and Pushor, 
third. The next time a hammer is procured 
for this purpose, care should be taken that it 
be a regulation hammer. 

In the running broad jump, Burpee, '87, 
won easily, breaking the best record ever 
made here, jumping 18 feet 2 inches. Berry, 
'86, second, Gahan, '87, third. 

Throwing of base-ball, won by Berry, '86, 
distance 286 feet 7 inches, Norris, '86, sec- 
ond, Pushor, '87, third. 

In the 100-yards dash we witnessed some 
fine running. Dearth, '87, received the first 
prize, Burpee, '87, second, Berry, '86, mak- 
ing a good third. Dearth's time, 10 1-2 
seconds. 

Standing broad jump, won by Burpee, 
'87, by a distance of 10 feet 3 inches, Gahan, 
.a close second, Norris, '86, and Woodman, 
'88, third. 

Eleven entered in kicking the foot-ball. 
Berry, '86, took first prize, Whittier, '85, 
second. Distance 137 1-2 feet. 

In the bicycle race there were only two 
contestants ; their distance was shortened to 
half a mile. Rideout, '86, won iii 2 minutes 
18 seconds, Davis, '86, second. 

The three legged race — 100 yards — con- 
tested by '87 men only, was won by Dearth 
and Burpee in 12 seconds. 

The half-mile walk proved very interest- 
ing. It was easily won by Cook, '85, in 4 
minutes 24 1-2 seconds. Berry, '86, second, 
Merrill, '87, third. 

The standing high jump, which has for 
two years been easily won by Norris, '86, 
was given this year to Burpee, '87; the two 
jumping the same, finally decided by lot. 
Distance, 4 feet 3 inches. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



33 



In the hurdle race — 5 hurdles, 100 yards — 
there were only three contestants : Dearth, 
Kimball, and Means, '87. Dearth easily 
wpn. Means, '87, second. 

Throwing at mark, won by Cook, '85, 
Gahan, '87, second, Larrabee, '88, third. 

In the mile run there were only three 
contestants: Byram, '86, Talbot, '87, and 
Bartlett, '87. Here we were pleased to see 
our best college record again beaten. Talbot, 
'87, winning in 5 minutes 5 1-2 seconds, 
Byram, '86, second, Bartlett, '87, third. 

In the obstacle race, which took the 
place of the potato race of old, Gahan, '87, 
was the happy victor, Burpee, '87, second. 
Means, '87, third. 

In the consolation race — 1-4 mile — Cary, 
'87, was the only contestant ; won in 1 minute 
and 24 1-2 seconds. 

Tug of war, limited to 1,100 pounds, 
given to '88. The other classes failing to 
put in an appearance. 

Burpee, '87, was awarded the prize for 
best average record. 

Field-Day cider won by '87. 



BOATING. 

Considerable interest has been felt in the 
boat races which were to take place Thurs- 
day afternoon. Besides the class race, a 
crew from Portland was expected to com- 
pete with the college crew, but they were 
unable to come. 

The Sophomore and Freshman classes 
were the only ones to jDut crews upon the 
river, but they had been faithfully training. 
As a close race was anticipated there was a 
good attendance. The water was fair al- 
though there was enough breeze to make it 
somewhat rough for a ^^ortion of the time. 

At about three o'clock the signal was 
given, and the two crews started down river, 
'87 getting a better start than their com- 
petitors, and i^uUing a quicker stroke. How- 
ever, '88 pulled in good form, perhaps better 



than the Sophomores, and until the foot of 
the island was reached the race was a close 
one. At that point, '87 had a lead of nearly 
a boat length, and '88, having chosen the 
Topsham side of the river, were obliged to 
fall behind or go outside in turning. They 
chose the latter course, and in coming around 
met the strong current wliich swept them 
down somewhat. From that point the race 
was virtually decided, the Sophomores pull- 
ing up with a stroke full better than that 
with which they started, and winning in 
twenty minutes, twenty-three and two-fifths 
seconds. The Freshman crew showed signs 
of fatigue, and apparently became somewhat 
disheartened, and consequently did not do 
themselves justice in the latter part of the 
contest. They have a good crew, however, 
and show the effect of their training, although 
on account of the earlier date, and late 
opening of the river, they have had less time 
than usual for rowing. 

The Sophomores have been particularly 
unfortunate about their crew, as two of 
them were sick when they went into train- 
ing, and one of the men who took their 
places withdrew a week before the race. 

However, the race was an unusually in- 
teresting one from the fact that until the two 
crews passed out of sight, near the foot of 
the inland, both were pulling well, less then a 
boat length apart. 



THE MIRACLE MARRIAGE. 

There is a legend told in Brittany 

Of Henri Mordaunt's love for fair Eldine, 

Wlio, in return, pliglited her troth to him, 

Choosing St. Peter's day, in leafy June, 

As that best fitted for the nuptial vows ; 

And, when at length the festal day had come 

And all assembled in the parish church, 

Good Father Jean, just as he rose to say 

That they were man and wife thenceforth, for aye, 

Was, by the lightning, laid the dead among, 

And left them as they were, with that unsaid. 

Which should have made the marriage rite complete. 

But lo ! when scarce the thunder's peal had ceased, 



34 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The altar was jllamed with wondrous light 

And, from its ruidst, came forth the self-same voice 

That erst at Cana blessed the marriage feast : 

" Fear not, my children, all your prayers are heard 

And ye shall wedded be this festal day." 

Then how the choir was thronged with angel forms 

And cherub hands bore tapers, while the church 

Seemed filled with incense, such as the blessed John 

Described in visions of Apocalypse ; 

And, as in awe, Henri and Eldine Ijneeled 

In adoration of the Presence there, 

The priestly form, upborne by angel hands. 

Arose and stood as if endowed with life, 

While from his lips issued the fitting words 

To consummate the rite ; and, as he blessed. 

Suddenly there came sounds of music, such 

As can only by heavenly choirs be sung, 

Resounding glorias, through the spacious nave ; 

While, in the midst of all this pageantry, 

Angelic forms bore to the sacristy 

The stricken priest, chanting his requiem. 

And Henri and Eldine — husband and wife — 

Gave thanks to Him, who, by a miracle, 

Had made their wedded happiness complete 

And hallowed once again the marriage rite. 

This is the legend, as 'twas told to me. 

And that, as each St. Peter's day returns, 

The church is thronged with maidens, kneeling there 

Before the altar tomb of Father Jean, 

Firm in the faith that she who, at that hour. 

Repeats with reverence due the fitting prayers, 

May hear again the angel's marriage song. 

And, ere St. Peter's day again returns, 

A bridal wreath will be her own to wear. 

G. E. B. J. 



GRADUATING EXERCISES OF THE 
MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

The custom, so auspiciously introduced 
by the class of last year, of having public 
graduating exercises in the Medical Depart- 
ment has been continued by the class of '85. 

Wednesday, May 27th, at 9 A.M., the 
members of the Medical Faculty took seats 
upon the platform and in a few minutes the 
class, fourteen in number, headed by their 
marshal, Mr. F. B. Look, marched in and 
occupied the front seats upon the floor. 
Prayer was offered by Rev. W. P. Fisher. 



The opening address was delivered by Mr. 
Weston Thompson. 

Mr. A. C. Gibson, a graduate of the 
academical department, class of '83, delivered - 
the parting address, a brief and well-written 
appeal to the nobler feelings of those who 
are about to enter upon their professional 
duties. 

Before awarding the diplomas, Dr. Mitch- 
ell, spoke a few words to the class, congratu- 
lating them upon their faithful work, which 
caused their rank to be higher than that of 
preceding classes. He then, according to 
custom, gave in order the names of the five 
members of the class who stood highest — 
Harlow, Thornton, Post and Noyes equal 
rank, Stone. 

After singing the parting ode the class 
marched out. Chandler's Orchestra furnished 
music. The officers of the class were : Presi- 
dent, H. M. Post; Vice-President, F. B. 
Look ; Secretary, J. B. Thornton, Jr. ; Treas- 
urer, A. C. Gibson; Executive Committee, 
J. F. Hill, H. W. Harlow, F. E. Stone. 

There was a good audience preseiit and 
it was deserved, for the class did their best 
to make the affair a success, and they were 
not disappointed. 



THE FIFTY-SECOND ANNUAL CON- 
VENTION OF PSI UPSILON. 

The convention was held Thursday and 
Friday, May 7th and 8th, with the Beta 
Beta Chapter, at Hartford, Conn. The del- 
egates began to arrive Wednesday, the 6th, 
and when the convention was called to order, 
Thursday at 11 A.M., every chapter was rep- 
resented. A permanent organization was 
effected, and the usual routine business was 
done. 

The public literary exercises occurred 
Thursday evening, in the Roberts Opera 
House, which was elaborately decorated for 
the occasion. At 7.50 p.m., the delegates met 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



35 



at the Allyn House, tlie headquarters of the 
Convention, and marched to the Opera House. 
The Theta led, followed by the other chapters, 
in _ the order of establishment. The exer- 
cises consisted of the President's address, 
by Hon. Joseph R. Hawley; Oration, by 
Rev. T. T. Munger, D.D. ; Essay, by Rev. 
G. W. Douglas ; and fraternity songs. Dr. 
Hunger's subject was, " The Relation of Ed- 
ucation to Social Progress," and that of Mr. 
Douglas was, " In a Christian College, should 
the Student Choose his Studies." 

At the close of the exercises, the dele- 
gates jaroceeded in a body to Union Armory, 
where the reception was held, beginning at 
about 10.15. About 11 o'clock, dancing- 
began, and lasted until 3.00 A.M. 

Friday was devoted to business meetings. 
In the evening, the banquet took place at 
the Allyn House. Nearly two hundred 
were present. Hon. H. C. Robinson acted 
as president of the banquet. The last re- 
sponse was completed about 2.30 a.m., when 
the usual "walk-around " took place. 

The delegates began to leave on the 5.55 
A.M. train, and Saturday evening saw very 
few of them in Hartford. As is usual with 
conventions, it was a time long to be re- 
membered. The Gamma Chapter had the 
largest delegation present, numbering twen- 
ty-four. Large delegations were also present 
from the Xi and the Eta. 



BASE-BALL. 

Colby vs. Boavdoin. 




The first game of the series in the Maine 
College League took place at Waterville, 
May 13th. The game was well contested 
excent'iii the second inning when Bowdoin 
by^'ljunching Mts ran in four scores. The 
emainder of the game was very prettily 
played, and resulted in one of the quickest 
games on record, being just 1 hour and 80 
minutes in length. For Colby, F. Goodwin 
and Pulsifer did the best batting and fielding. 



For Bowdoin, Pushor, Moulton, Cook, and 
Larrabee fielded well, while Moulton made 
the most hits. The following is the score : 

COLBY. 

A.B. E. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Putnam, c. f., . . . . i 1 1 1 

P. Goodwin, p., ... 4 1 2 2 2 13 

Webber, lb., i 1 13 g 

Larrabee, s. s., . . . . 4 1 1 3 3 2 

Boyd, 3b., 4 2 2 3 

W. Goodwin, 2b., ... 4 1 1 2 

Pulsifer, c. 3 1 2 3 5 3 

Gibbs, 1. f., 3 

Mathews, r. f., . . . . 3 1 

Totals, .... 33 3. 6 7 27 22 11 

BOWDOUSr. 

A.B. R. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, 2b., 5 1 1 1 2 2 3 

Cook, p. 5 1 3 4 

Moulton, 5 2 2 2 5 1 1 

Pushor, lb., 5 1 10 

Talbot, I. f 5 1 1 1 

Larrabee, c. f 4 1 1 1 5 1 

Bartlett, 3b., 4 1 1 1 2 

Wardwell, r. f., . . . . 4 1 1 2 

Davis, s. s., 4 1 1 1 3 

Totals, .... 41 6 S 8 27 13 6 

Total called balls— on Goodwin 63, on Cook 47. Two- 
base hit — Pulsifer. Double play — Dearth and Pushor. 
Left on bases — Colby 2, Bowdoin 8. Total called strikes — 
on Goodwin 15, on Cook 4. Struck out — Colby 5, Bow- 
doin 4. Passed balls— Pulsifer 4, Moulton 1. Umpire — 
M. Pingree. Time of Game — 1 hour 30 minutes. 

Immediately after the Colby game the 
nine took the train for Orono, which was 
reached at 8.30 p.m. Most of the fellows 
stayed at the Orono House over night, and 
the next forenoon, those who were not 
afraid of being scalped by the Indians lo- 
cated a few miles farther on in Oldtown, 
took a drive. In the afternoon a large num- 
ber were present from Bangor to witness the 
game, which was very exciting after the 
second inning. The M. S. C.s are a gentle- 
manly set of fellows, and show that they are 
cap)able of playing a good game of ball. 

M. S. C. vs. Bowdoin. 
m. s. c. 

A.B. E. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Kay, s. s., 5 3 2 3 2 2 

Ruth, p., 5 2 11 

Hull, c, ....... 5 11 1 1 

Burleigh, c. f., . . . . 5 1 1 

Rogers, 2b., 4 1 4 4 

Page, 1. f., 4 1 1 2 

Mason, lb 4 1 9 1 

Vose, 3b., 4 1 1 

Fernald, r. f., .... 4 1 1 1 2 1 

Totals, .... 40 7 3 4 27 19 12 



36 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN. 

A.B. E. E.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, 2b., 5 2 2 2 2 1 3 

Cook, p. & s. s 5 2 1 1 3 2 

Moulton, c 5 1 1 1 9 7 1 

Pushor, lb 5 1 1 14 1 

Talbot, 1. f., 5 1 1 

Larrabee, c. f., . . . . 5 1 2 2 1 

Bartlett, 3b 5 1 1 4 

Wardwell, r. f., . . . . 3 1 1 1 1 

Davis, s. s. & p 4 1 1 16 1 

Totals 43 8 9 9 27 28 14 

Total, called balls — on Ruth 71, on Cook and Davis 59. 
Total called strikes— on Ruth 26, on Cook and Davis 10. 
Two-base hit— Ray. Double plays— M. S. C. 2. Left on 
bases — M. S. C. 7, Bowdoin 6. Struck out — by Ruth 10, 
by Davis 13. Passed balls — Moulton 6, Uull 2. Umpire — 
Mclntire, Colby, '84 Time of game — 1 hour 4.5 minutes. 

Bates vs. Bowdoin. 
The game with Bates, the 16th, was 
characterized by hard hitting on the part of 
Bowdoin. The Bates team has some fine 
material, but sliows a lack of practice, which 
is very necessary for good team work. 
Bates was unfortunate in having her catcher 
hurt during the last part of the game, and 
in having one of her heaviest batters unable 
to play. The following is the score : 

BATES. 

A.B. E. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Cushman, 3b 5 1 1 1 3 1 

Nickerson, s. s., . . . 4 4 2 

Walker, 2b., 4 3 2 4 

Cutts, c. 1 4 1 1 1 1 

Woodman, p., .... 4 1 1 1 9 

Hadley, 1. f., 4 2 1 1 

Atwood, lb., 4 1 2 14 1 

Wentworth, r. f., . . . 4 1 1 2 

Sprague, c, 4 1 1 7 

Totals, .... 37 i 7 8 27 18 9 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. E. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, 2b 7 3 2 2 1 1 

Cook, s. s. & p., .... 7 5 6 10 2 4 

Moulton, c 7 3 3 3 3 

Pushor, lb 7 2 3 5 14 

Talbot, 1. 1., 6 3 2 3 

Larrabee, c. f., . . . . 6 4 2 2 3 

Bartlett, 3b 6 2 1 1 2 3 2 

Wardwell, r. f 5 2 1 1 1 l 

Davis, p. & s. s., ... 5 2 1 1 2 5 1 

Totals 56 26 21 28 27 13 5 

Two-base hits — Bates 1, Bowdoin 4. Home run— Cook. 
Earned runs — Bates 2. Bowdoin 2. Left on bases— Bates 
6, Bowdoin 7. Struck ovit- by Woodman 5. by Cook and 
Davis 2. Total called balls— on Woodman 114, on Cook 
and Davis 53. Total called strikes— on Woodman 11, on 
Cook and Davis 5. Passed balls— Sprague 12. Umpire— 
B. Potter, Bowdoin, '78. Time of game— 2 hours 5 minutes. 

Colby vs. Bowdoin. 
We suffered our first defeat in the games 
of the League, at the hands of Colby, by 



exceedingly loose fielding. It was an off day 
for the boys, but we have good reason to 
expect that it will not occur again. The 
best work for Colby in the field was done by 
F. Goodwin, Webber, Gibbs, and Larrabee. 
F. Goodwin and Mathews did the heaviest 
batting. For Bowdoin, Moulton and Pushor 
fielded well, while Pushor, Dearth, Cook, 
and Larrabee were conspicuous for batting. 
The following is the score : 

COLBY. 

A.B. R. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Putnam, c. f 6 2 1 1 

P. Goodwin, p., .... 3 2 3 4 2 8 1 

Larrabee, s. s., . . . . 6 1 4 1 

Pulsifer, c, 5 1 2 2 3 2 3 

Boyd, 3b 5 3 2 2 2 2 2 

Webber, lb 5 1 2 2 14 1 

W. Goodwin, 2b., ... 5 1 4 2 3 

Gibbs, 1. 1 5 1 1 1 1 2 

Mathews, r.f 5 2 2 3 1 1 

Totals, .... 47 14 13 15 27 20 12 

BOWDOINS. 

A.B. K. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, 2b., 5 1 2 2 1 4 1 

Cook, p. & s. s., .... 5 4 3 5 2 2 2 

Moulton, c, 5 3 1 1 8 1 5 

Pushor, lb., 5 3 5 80 1 

Talbot, 1. f., 5 1 1 2 

Larrabee, c. f 5 1 1 2-0 1 

Bartlett, 3b., 5 2 2 5 

Wardwell, r. f 5 1 1 1 1 2 

Davis, s. s. & p., ... 4 1 3 6 2 

Totals 44 13 13 18 25 15 18 

Two-base hits — Colby 1, Bowdoin 3. Three-base hit — 
Bowdoin 1. Earned runs — Colby 1, Bowdoin 2. Left on 
bases— Colby 5, Bowdoin 9. Struck out — Colby 3, Bow- 
doin 5. 'Total called strikes— on Goodwin 17, on Cook 
and Davis 8. Passed balls — Colby 3, Bowdoin 3. Umpire 
— M. Pingree. Time of game — 2 hours. 

M. S. C. vs. Bowdoin. 
The second game with the M. S. C.s was 
played at Brunswick, May 22d. The game 
was well played, with the exception of one 
inning on each side, and was won by Bow- 
doin's heavy batting. For the M. S. C, Ray, 
Ruth, and Hull did the most batting, while 
McNally and Vose fielded well. For Bow- 
doin, Pushor, Cook, and Larrabee batted 
heavily, and Dearth, Pushor, Talbot, and 
Bartlett were conspicuous for fielding. The 
following is the score : 

M. s. C. 

A.B. B. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Kay, s. s., 5 1 2 2 1 1 2 

Ruth, p., 5 2 2 2 1 9 2 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



37 



Hull, 5 1 3 3 9 5 5 

Burleigh, 1. f., .... 5 1 1 

Rogers, 2b. 5 1 1 1 2 1 2 

McNally, c. t, . . . . 4 1 1 

Vose, 3b., 4 1 1 

Masori, lb., 4 1 1 S 2 

Fernald, r. 1, .... 4 1 1 

Totals 41 6 10 10 24 17 14 

BOWDOIN. 

A.E. K. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, r. f., 5 2 1 1 2 

Cook, 2b 5 2 2 3 2 4 2 

Moulton, c 4 3 3 2 

Pushor, lb 4 2 2 4 15 2 

Talbot, 1. f 4 2 1 1 1 

Larrabee, c. f., . . . . 4 2 1 2 1 1 1 

Bartlett, 3b., 4 1 3 

Gary, s. s. & p., .... 4 2 2 1 5 1 

Davis, p. & s. s., ... 4 1 5 3 

Totals, .... 38 10 9 13 27 21 11 

Two-base hits — Bowdoin 4. Earned runs — M. S. C. 2, 
Bowdoin 3. Double plays — Bowdoin 2. Left on bases — 
M. S. C. 4, Bowdoin 6. Total called balls— on Ruth 71, 
on Davis and Cary 35. Total called Strikes — on Ruth 17, 
on Davis and Cary 10. Passed balls — Hull 4, Moulton 1. 
Struck out — M. S. C. 2, Bowdoin 8. Umpire — Barton, 
Bowdoin, '84. Time of game — 1 hour 45 minutes. 

Colby vs. Bowdoin. 
One of the most interesting and exciting- 
games ever played in this State took place 
at Lewiston, May 30th. Each team had won 
a game from the other, and the team that 
won would virtually get the championship. 
The State Fair Grounds, where the game 
was played, was in very poor condition and 
a loose fielding game was expected, but, on 
the contrary, fine fielding was exhibited by 
both teams, each man knowing that his one 
error might lose the game. It took thirteen 
innings to decide the game, which finally 
resulted in favor of Bowdoin by a score of 
7 to 6. For Colby, F. Goodwin, Putnam, 
Larrabee, and W. Goodwin batted well, while 
F. Goodwin, Webber, W. Goodwin, and Gibbs 
did the best fielding. For Bowdoin, Cook, 
Moulton, Pushor, and Talbot batted heavily, 
while Pushor, Moulton, Talbot, Bartlett, and 
Larrabee fielded splendidly. The game was 
umpired by Mr. Pingree in a manner very 
satisfactory to both teams. 

COLBY. 

A.E. K. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Putnam, c. f., . . . . 7 2 2 2 2 

F. Goodwin, p., ... 5 1 2 4 2 17 2 

Larrabee, s.s 7 2 2 1 1 2 

Pulsifer, c, 7 1 2 14 2 3 



Boyd, 3b 6 1 2 1 

Webber, lb., fi 2 1 1 12 

W. Goodwin, 2b., ... 6 1 2 3 4 5 1 

Gibbs, 1. f., 6 2 2 4 

Carroll, r. f., 5 

Totals 55 6 12 16 38 27 11 

BOWDOIN. 

A.E. R. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, 2b., 6 1 1 1 1 

Cook, s. s. 6 2 2 6 3 1 3 

Moulton, c, ti 1 2 2 12 H 5 

Pushor, lb., e 1 2 2 15 

Talbot, 1. f 6 1 3 3 3 

Larrabee, c. f 0> 1 1 2 

Gary, 2b., 4 2 3 1 

Bartlett, 3b., 6 1 5 1 

Da^-is, p., 6 1 1 1 16 3 

Totals 52 7 12 16 39 31 13 

SCORE BY INNINGS. 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
Bowdoin, .001200000 4^7 
Colby, ...100000110 3—6 

Total called balls— on Goodwin 101, on Davis 103. To- 
tal called strikes — on Goodwin 24, on Davis 22. Struck 
out — by Goodwin 12, by Davis 15. First base on balls — 
by Goodwin 2, by Davis 3. Earned run — Bowdoin 1. 
Home run — Cook. Two-base hits— P. Goodwin (2), W. 
Goodwin, Pulsifer, Cook. Double play — Larrabee, W. 
Goodwin and Webber. Left on bases— Colby 13, Bowdoin 
9. Passed balls — Pulsifer 2, Moulton 3. Umpire, M. 
Pingree. Time of game — 2 hours 55 minutes. 



THE EAViN(G). 

Once upon an evening dreary, 
While my eyes were weak and weary, 
Pondering o'er the musty volume 

Of a vast Hellenic lore, 
Scare I heard the dismal croaking 
Of my chum engaged in smoking, 
Nor the rather limpid joking 

Of a noted college bore. 

For the morrow's " dead " impending 
All my energies were blending, 
To attain the happy ending 

Of a student free once more 
From the everlasting grinding 
Of a thousand duties binding, 
Till aroused at length by finding 

Some one rapping at the door. 

' Come," I cried, in accents haunted 
By a dread of something wanted 
By the wretch who forward vaunted 

'Cross the threshold of my door, 
And with moneyed list extended 
Made a little speech that ended 
With some hieroglyphs appended 
And — a purse devoid of store. 



38 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



When he went I fell in musing, 
The subscription fiend abusing, 
For this noble purpose using 

Oaths I'd never swore before. 
Was there nowhere in the nation, 
Par away from man, some station 
Where secure from this vexation 

I could keep my scanty store ? 

This I asked soliloquizing 
And the matter satirizing. 
When there came a voice surprising 

From the murky realms of night, 
And it plainly said, replying, 
' Cease, vain youth, this wild defying 
Of the forces ably trying 

To inflict financial blight." 

' Polo, tennis, ball, and boating 
Need a good and strong supporting 
Prom all friends inclined to sporting, 

Which of course includes you all, 
And no one can help despisiug 
The abnormal fiend who, rising. 
Should refuse, wretch surprising ! 

To observe their modest call." 

Then I woke, for I'd been dreaming. 
Still I could not help from deeming 
Something real and more than seeming 

In this very strange affair. 
Which soon came to full confirming 
On investigation learning. 
While my soul with rage was burning, 

That my pocket-book was bare. 



COMMUNICATION. 



To the Editors of the Orient : 

I have been urged to call, attention, 
through the courtesy of your columns, to 
the project of changing the college charter 
so as to provide for election, by the Alumni, 
of members of the Board of Overseers. As 
Commencement is at hand, I vrill not take 
time to show how much better it would be 
to devolve such a task uj^n some better 
qualified person, such as Dr. Gerrish, who 
could take up and continue his interesting 
discussion of last year, or such as Mr. F. V. 



Wright, of Salem, who — with the co-opera- 
tion of others in the Boston Bowdoin 
Club — ^has taken the trouble to draw up a 
bill for submission to the Legislatures of 
Maine and Massachusetts. I will briefly 
state what is here understood to be the pres- 
ent stage of the matter. 

As a result of the reports from various 
committees of different local Alumni Asso- 
ciations, the General Association at Bruns- 
wick on July 9, 1884, appointed Messrs. 
Crosby, of 1835, Gardner, of 1853, and No- 
well, of 1859, a committee to confer with a 
committee of Overseers — Messrs. Dodge, 
Adams, and Emery — on the subject. .The 
Alumni Association, by vote, expressed its 
sense to be that the interests of the college 
would be promoted by such change. No 
expression of opinion appears to have been 
made by the Overseers. The Trustees, to 
whose attention the subject was brought, 
simply referred it to the Overseers " who 
have the exclusive right of electing their 
own members." The conference committee 
will no doubt report to their respective con- 
stituents some recommendation on the sub- 
ject. 

It may be remembered that last year Dr. 
Gerrish favored the radical measure of 
abolishing altogether the Overseers, and of 
having the management of the college 
vested in a single board, the members of 
that to be chosen, in classes, by the Alumni. 
The difference of opinion elicited by the 
discussion, shows that such a radical meas- 
ure is not likely to prevail. For, it is con- 
ceded, nothing is likely to be done without 
substantial unanimity of ojjinion. I may be 
allowed here to interpolate my own opinion 
that most of the evils which Dr. Gerrish 
complained of, can be remedied by devolv- 
ing greater power, from each of the Boards, 
upon an Executive Committee. Such a 
committee might be constituted of gentle- 
men, able and willing to meet often, who 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



39 



would keep in hand the routine business of 
the institution, and by formulating measures 
requiring action by the full corporation (for 
each Board is a separate corporation), they 
might get the annual business done so as 
not to keep us "waiting for the Boards " an 
hour or more on Commencement day, before 
the procession can move. 

The conservative objections to the pro- 
posed change seem to have been met by the 
success of the experiment at Harvard. 
The objection that the Alumni meetings are 
insufficiently attended, involves a petitio 
principii, because one chief object of the 
measure is to secure a larger attendance and 
an increased interest. That objection can 
further be met by a system of proxies. And 
it can easily be arranged that no one shall 
be eligible to election, whose name and can- 
didacy shall not have been posted or pub- 
lished a certain length of time before the 
meeting. 

The proposed bill provides for a Board 
of thirty members, to be classified so that 
after the arrangement shall have got into 
operation, only five members shall be elected 
each year. I confess to many doubts 
whether the change, if made, will fulfill the 
expectations of its chief promoters. 

I only venture to write what I believe, in 
the hope of securing for the subject full 
consideration, and of eliciting expressions of 
opinion from others. 

.James McKeen. 

New York, May 23, 1885. 



CLASS OF 1876 CIRCULAR. 

Tbe Decennial Keunion of our class will take 
place this year, and it is hoped that with a reasona- 
ble degree of interest on the part of each one to 
have all the living members present. 

There will be a breakfast partaken of by the 
class on Commencement morning at 9 o'clock. Com- 
mencement day this year is Thursday, June 25th. 

The committee hope to have in readiness for 
distribution a printed Class History. 



Some fourteen members have not as yet replied 
to the inquiries sent out by. the Class Secretary last 
winter, and it is hoped that each member who has 
not previously replied will do so the present week. 

The committee wish also to hear from each 
member, whether he intends to be present or ab- 
sent from the Reunion, as it is desirable to know 
how many to provide for at the breakfast. 

Address all replies to the undersigned, 

Myles Standish, 
6 Park Square, Boston, Mass. 




Who would not be a catcher 
To catch the puzzling curve, 
And get a reputation 'round 
For having lots of nerve ? 
On whom the wondering ladies fair 
Admiring glances scatter, 
As hot foul tips he gathers in 
Close up behind the batter? 

Yet when his broken jaw-bone 

And battered hands we see, 
We envy not his glory, 

He needs it more than we. 
For when the doctors gather 'round 

His shattered limbs to swathe, 
That path of glory leads, we know, 

Too surely to the grave. 

One of the Juniors recently hired a boat for an 
hour and rowed down river several miles. Every- 
thing went smoothly going down and he was much 
pleased with his first attempt at boating, but com- 
ing back things were different. The current proved 
too strong for him and, layiug aside the oars, he 
moved the boat along by grasping the bushes which 
hung over the river bank. Unfortunately he was 
even debarred the pleasure of becoming a hero in 
the eyes of his classmates and friends; for while 
In the midst of a glowing account of the dangers of 
navigation on the Androscoggin, he was interrupted 
by the entrance of a boating man who, while on 
the river in the afternoon, had been attracted by 
the strange sight of a man crawling along in the 
mud on the river Itank dragging a boat after him, 
and had satisfied his curiosity. 

The Congregational society gave an entertain- 
ment in the vestry last week, consisting of readings 



40 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



by Miss Dunlap and music by the '86 quartette. 
After the entertainment ice-cream and cake was 
furnished and every one enjoyed a pleasant social 
time. 

Prof. Carmichael has been perfecting plans for 
a new factory for the manufacture of the pulp goods 
which he invented. 

The Botany division is looking forward anxiously 
to the time when afternoons will be given them for 
practical out-of-door work, but the term is fast 
drawing to a close and no day has yet been ap- 
pointed. 

The result of the second Colby game revealed 
the fact that a number of our students are a great 
deal more liberal with their criticism than they are 
with their money. It was particularly noticeable 
that those who gave least towards the support of 
the nine were loudest in condemning it. Criticism — 
never a costly article at best— is, under such cir- 
cumstances, exceedingly cheap. 

In the Junior prize declamation. Commencement 
week, the following speakers take part : G. S. Berry 
Damariscotta; A. R. Butler, Portland ; H. E. Fling, 
Portland ; I. W. Home, Berlin, N. H. ; W. W. Kil 
gore. No. Newry; G. M, Norris, Monmouth; J. C 
Parker, East Lebanon ; E. E. Rideout, Cumber 
land; F. L. Smith, Waterboro ; W. H. Stackpole 
Bowdoinham ; Levi Turner, Jr., Somerville ; W 
V. Wentworth, Rockland. 

'Twas near our college campus, 

I can not tell you where, 
There dwelt an aged gentleman 

With thirteen daughters fair. 

I called upon the youngest 
And sat with lier one night 

Till pater came and found us 
In the morning's early light. 

Do you think he raised a rumpus 

And kicked me through the door ? 
Oh, no ! " Come 'round again," he said, 
" And bring a dozen more." 

This is the first year that a hop has been given 
by the graduating class in the Medical School, and 
it proved a complete success. The hop was well 
attended, and the music, furnished by Chandler's 
Orchestra, was good. The last class set a good 
example by having regular graduating exercises 
for the first time. The present graduating class 
have further added to the programme by their 
farewell hop. Both of these customs are pleasant 
to look back upon and we hope will be followed by 
succeeding classes. 



Given's Band have given several out-of-door 
concerts in the Mall this spring. They have im- 
proved wonderfully in their playing since last year 
and are said to be one of the best bands in the 
State. 

Most of the college were at the midnight train 
with the Boys' Band, of Brunswick, to welcome the 
nine after their successful trip to Waterville and 
Orono. The campus presented a pretty sight when 
the procession entered the main walk. A large 
bonfire was lighted in front of the chapel and the 
college dormitories were illuminated by red light 
and roman candles. 

The Sophomores have a new set of oars for 
their boat and are using the Davis sliding seat. 

There is some prospect that we shall have a 
summer school in Chemistry and Mineralogy. Prof. 
Robinson has been strongly urged this spring by 
several teachers to give instruction in these branches 
and, if there are a sufiBcient number of applications 
made to him, such a course will be opened. 

The Seniors have decided to have a Commence- 
ment concert. 

One of the Orient board complained of finding 
his key-hole plugged up on returning to his room 
in the small hours of the night, and had to break 
his door down. Such an excuse might pass from 
some, but we did expect a little more originality 
from an editor. 

The following Sophomores have been appointed 
to take part in the prize declamation Monday, 
June 15th : C. B. Burleigh, Augusta ; E. B. 
Burpee, Rockland; A. Gary, Machias; C. C. 
Choate, Salem, Mass.; F. D. Dearth, Sangerville ; 
M. L. Kimball, Norway ; J. V. Lane, Chichester, 
N. H. ; E. L. Means, Millbridge; C. F. Moulton, 
Cumberland ; E. C. Plummer, Yarmouth ; F. 
Pushor, Pittsfield ; L. B. Varney, Litchfield. 

Prof. Carmichael has been making an analysis 
of the stomach of the man recently poisoned in 
Portland. 

This week. Prof. Robinson takes the Mineralogy 
class on an all day trip to the big feldspar quarry 
and the other mineral localities about Topsham. 

There seems to be good reason to hope that 
nearly ten thousand dollars will be raised for the 
gymnasium by Commencement time. The diflerent 
classes seem to take hold readily in raising money. 
'82 have pledged some two hundred dollars already 
and '83 and some of the other classes are not any 
behind them. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



41 



He was a Freshinan and, as he banded us the 
spring poem, he remarked that he could furnish 
us with several others equally as good if we desired 
them. We pubhsh the first verse; there were uine- 
teen of them in all : 

" Seraphic, vernal time of year 

When zephyr winds doth blow 
And budding life doth first appear 

Protruding through the snow. 
"When first the blade of grass we see 

Shoot upward towards the sky, 
And mark the strange analogy 

For it is green and— so am I." 



And now the young and verdant Fresh 
From morn till eve doth train 

For Sophomoric breadth of thought 
And strength to bear a cane. 

The following officers have been elected for the 
Lawn-Tennis Association ; President, G. S. Berry, 
Jr., '86 ; Vice-President, E. T. Little, '87 ; Secretary 
and Treasurer, W. T. Hall, Jr., '68; Executive 
Committee, E. E. Rideout, '86, W. W. Kilgore, '86, 
E. L. Means, '87. 

The one Sophomore who betook himself in soli- 
tary grandeur to the French recitation last Wednes- 
day found the door closed against him. 

We are in receipt of a neat little hand-book 
from Owen, Morse &Co., on •' Progressive Euchre." 
It is a desirable volume. 




'22.— Judge Appleton, 
ex-Chief Justice of the 
Maine Supreme Court, is now 81 
years old, vigorous, and as much in- 
terested in the law as ever. He has a fine 
library, said to be the most comprehensive 
private book collection in the State, which it is 
hinted he may ultimately give to his Alma Mater. 
'30. — Ex-Senator Bradbury of Maine, who con- 
cluded his visit to Washiugton on May 7th, had 
previously been South with ladies of his family. He 
is 80 years old this year. Having always been a 
Democrat, he referred with great pride to the fact 
that all the great acquisitions of territory to the 
original boundaries of the United States had been 



made during Democratic administrations: Louisi- 
ana and the full length of the Mississippi river 
under Jefferson ; California, Texas, and NewMexico 
under Polk ; and each acquisition was opposed by 
the other political party. 

'4L- Governor Robie will be this year a candi- 
date for Master of the National Grange, Patrons of 
Husbandry. He has for several years been Master 
of the Maine State Grange. 

'45. — Dr. J. K. Mason of Fryeburg, is engaged 
to deliver an address at Cornish, on the 30th inst., 
by the Thompson Post, G. A. R. He has also been 
appointed by the Governor a delegate to the " Na- 
tional Conference of Charities and Correction," to 
hold their twelfth session at Washington, D. C, 
June 4-lOth. Prentiss Loring, '56, of Portland, is 
also an appointee. 

'50. — Senator Frye will deliver the Memorial 
Day oration at Lancaster, Ohio. 

'.52.— General Chamberlain delivers the closing 
address before the Lecture Association at Dart- 
mouth College. 

'58. — Mayor Nealley delivered the welcome ad- 
dress at the opening session of the Pedagogical 
Society, recently held in Bangor. 

'ai._Col. Edward Simouton is one of the dele- 
gates-at-largc from Minnesota to the National En- 
campment of the G. A. R. at Portland in June. 

'68.— L. W. Rundlett has been elected City En- 
gineer of St. Paul, Minn., and will have superin- 
tendence of all the public works, including the 
building of two bridges across the Mississippi. 

'73. — D. A. Robinson recently delivered an inter- 
esting lecture on Hygiene before the Maine Peda- 
gogical Society. 

'75.— Dr. L. H. Kimball of Bath, is to remove to 
Boston, where he will continue the practice of medi- 
cine. 

'75.— F. R. Upton will soon sail for Europe, 
where he will spend several months in traveling. 

'77. — F. H. Crocker will deliver the Memorial 
address at Boothbay. 

'77._Married— In Hartford, Conn., May 13th, at 
Church of the Good Shepherd, by Rev. Francis 
Russell, assisted by Rev. Johu N. Watson, Dr. 
Phineas H. lugalls and Mary H., daughter of J. 
Watson Beach, of Hartford. 

'80.— E. W. Bartlett is a member of the firm of 
Lewis & Bartlett, Publishers, 60 West Congress 
Street, Detroit, Mich. 

'81. — Dike will establish a branch office at Booth- 
bay, and start a new weekly sea-side paper there. 

'81.— L. B. Lane was married in April to Miss 



42 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Jennie Stedraan of Galesburgh, Iowa, at whicli 
place Mr. Lane is practicing his profession. 

'82. — M. H. Holway has heen recently admitted 
to the Cumberland Bar. 

'83.— F. L. Fling will edit the Sea Shell at Old 
Orchard during the coming season. 

'83. — H. P. Kendall, cashier of Bowdoiuham 
Bank, has greatly improved in health. 




Gymnasium ! what, art afraid 
To issue from thine ambus- 
cade? 
What the' the gloom is weird and drear, 
In tliis do phantoms e'er appear ; 
Come, reeling spirit, sallow shade ! 
Has dullness in the " punkin " trade 
Thy longed-for presence so delayed? 
When will thy molecules adhere ? 
Gymnasium ! 

Shall we e'er see thy proud arcade. 
And slide upon thy balustrade ? 
If ever Fortune sends thee here, 
We'll drink thy health in foaming b — r, 
Tonnerre ! I mean in lemonade. 

Gymnasium ! — Fortnight. 

Full, parted lips, and laughing face. 

With jet black eyes that gleam. 
Beneath a jaunty cap of lace, 

And locks ne'er seen 

Since Eve, I ween, 

In raven tendrils stream, 
Coquettishly, the merry knave ! 
Why rave ? 
It is an " ad " the tailor gave. — Yale Record. 

THE MUSES. 

Of all the girls whom I've addressed 

I think I like the muse the best ; 
She's economical in clothes. 

And needs no greedy chaperone 

To see she dosen't dine alone 
With me at dear Delmonico's. 

My secrets too, she never tells. 
And as for Huyler's caramels 
And vain, extravagant bouquets, 
She never pines :— an item, which, 



Considering that I'm not rich. 
Beyond all doubt or question, pays. 

She has no tender heart to hurt ; 

She never condescends to flirt, 

And has no strong, decided views ; 
So I'm prompted to confess. 
Though fond of ten girls, more or less, 

The best of all I like the muse. — Lampoon. 

"TO BACCHUS." 

'Twas once I saw within an Indian village 
This curious sign: " 2 Baccus & C. Garz." 

Ha, ha ! thought I, the red men, weary of pillage 
Now swing tlieir shingles, — these fierce sons of Mars. 

" A strange firm this," quoth I aloud, " 2 Baccus 

& C. Garz ! What branch of art or trade 
Or shrewd profes — but hold ! I see ! ' To Bacchus ' — 
A temple 'tis to Bacchus they have made." 

I gazed with swelling heart and pride while musing 
How much to wild men classic thought unbars, 

Until a friend, my revery diffusing. 
Said, " Why, crank, it's ' tobaccos and cigars'! " 



Students who expect to teach at the close of 
their college course will find it to their advantage 
to correspond with us. Especially will those who 
wish to go West find it profitable as we are con- 
nected with an agency in the West, and any appli- 
cant so desiring can be registered in both offices 
without extra charge. Circulars free. 

Northampton Teachees Agency, 

Northampton, Mass. 



MERRY'S 

NOVELTY HAT 

IS THE CORRECT THING TO WEAK. 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 



^iae Soots aad Sioi 

Next Is AmerlGan Express Bffice, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



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First Qnalltf Mated Wase, 

At Lowest Possible Prices. 

French Clocks and Bronzes, Fine Watches 
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BATH, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 



CIGARETTE 
Smokers who 

are willing a to 
paya little more 
lOr Cigarettes 
than the price 
charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, will 
find the RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT 
Wo. 1 SUPERIOR TO AI^Ti OTHERS. 
Ihey are made from the liriglitest, most 
delicately flavored, and lilgliest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are abso- 
lutely ^vittiout adnlt^ratloii or drugs. 



STRAIGHT CUT 



No. 
-1- 



We use the Geimtne Frencli Rice Paper 

of our ottTi direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1 — on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
OFigiDal brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or box of ■ 
Ricbino 
Straight Cut 
Cigarettes I 
bears the I 
signature of * 



niGARETTES 

allenTcinter 



MANUFACnjEERB, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



n|aine Central R. \. 



On and after October 20, 1884, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.10, 11.25 A.M., 2.45, 4.40 and 6.25 p.m., and on Sunday 

momiugs at 12.42. 
For Rockland, 8.10 a.m., 2.45 p.m. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.25 and 11.30 A.M., 4.30 P.M., and 

every night. Including Sundays, at 12.35. 
For Lewiston, 8.10 A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Fannington, 8.10 a.m. (mixed) and 2.45 p.m. 

For Vanceboro and St. John, 2.45 P.M. and 12.45 every night. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.45 P.M., and 12.45 night. 
For Bangor, Ellswortli and Bar Harbor, 2.45 P.M., 12.45 night. 
For Augusta and Waterville, 8.10 a.m., 2.45 and 6.35 P.M., and 

12.45 every night. 

Note. — The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
iston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun- 
day, but do not connect lor Skowhegan on Monday morning, or 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on 
Sunday morning. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BOOTHBV, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 14, 1884. 



NOTICE. 

BEWARE OF COUNTERFEITS AND IMITATIONS. 
Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and pure Rice Paper, are rolled by the highest 
class of skilled labor, and warranted free from flavoring or 
impm-ities. 

-Every genuine Cigarette bears a fac-simile of Kinney 
Bros.' Signatuke. 

KINNEY" TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KINNEY BROS. 

NEW YORK. 

The following are our well-known 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Caporal, Sweet Caporal, St. James i, Capokal I, St. 

James, Ajieassadok, Entke Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES 

SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 



spi^iNe M^ mwj^w ^'pyitE^ in 



mmwM Awm wsmmt 



2 Odd Fellows' Block, Main Street Brunswick. 



RBPAIBIlirG NEATLY DONE. 



The Sixty-Third Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 5th, 1885, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel 
T. DANA, M.D., Pathology and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, 
M.D., Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles 
W. GODDAKD, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. 
Gerrish, M. D., Anatomy; Henry Carmichael, Ph.D., Chem- 
istry ; Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; 
Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; 
Henry H. Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Irving E. Keiibai.l, M.D., 
Deraonsti-ator of Anatomy; Everett T. Nealey, M.D., Dem- 
onstrator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



COLLEGE SOI^GS 



BY HENRY RANDALL -WAITE. 

One is tempted to pronounce this the very best collection of 
songs extant. If not that, certainly none better of the size ex- 
ist. Mr. Waite, "vrlio has alreaily compiled three College Song 
Books, condenses into this the cream of other collections, ana 
has brought together something that will be welcome in every 
househola, as in every college. 

Seventy-four pieces of American, French, German, or '* Afri- 
can" origin, nonsensical, comic, pathetic, musical, and all spark- 
lingly bright. Price but 50 Cents. 

Mailed for the Retail Price. 

OLIVER DITSON & CO., Boston. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BYRON STEVENS' COLLEGE BOOKSTORE. 

We have on our Bargain Counter a lot of Books which we are selling at the uniform price of 

50 cents, although many of them cost twice that sum. Among them is a set of 

Macaulay's History of England in five volumes. 

Also a small lot of Box Papers, -worth 40 cents, we have marked at 20 cents to close. 



iigeiii III] 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Any one having any of the follo^viDg back 
numbers of the Orient will confer a great favor 
by sending them to the Business Editor. 

VOL. II., Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17. 

VOL. III., Nos. 1, 7, 10, 12. 

VOL. IV. No. 1. 

VOL. VI., No. 7. 

VOL. VII., No. 13. 

VOL. VIII., No. 11. 

VOL. XII., No. 1. 



DUNLAP BLOCK, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT 



BICYCLE 
BASE-BALL 

TENNIS 
BOATING 

SPECIAL RATES TO CLUBS. 



SHIRTS, 

STOCKINGS, 

JERSEYS. 



OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, MaIne. 



TEACHERS WANTED! LS'::S^:;I^t 

Music, also Art afld Specialties. Send stamp lor application 
form and circulars of information to 

NATIONAL SCHOOL SUPPLY BUREAU, 

Mention this paper. CHICAGO, ILL. 



D. W. GEANBERT & CO., 



L A W ISl - T E N N I S 




THE SHEF^RD FOR 18 8 5, 

Is the Best Racket Blade. New Equipoise and other Popular Styles of Our Own Make. Jefferies, Tate, 
Prince, Alexandra, and other Noted English Rackets. All Requisites for Playing the Game. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue and Directions for Playing. Free. 

20 S 22 JOHN STREET, NEW YORK. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Special Rates to Classes i Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bmnsisick and Topsliam 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Vievrs. 



MAIN STREET, BRUNS"WICK, ME. 



iiiiunii 

OTTAWA UU L 
3VE- S. G-I 


1 1 ICushing's Island, 
*-'*J Portland, Me. 

BSOIST- 



-^F. H. WILSON,*^ 

DISPENSER OF 

Fifi Sfisi 



IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Go to 1717. B. ITIToodard's 

To buv your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. Tou will save money by so doing. 

SE=ECI-S.Xj ia.^TES to ST-CrUEIlNr'X' CIjTTBS. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



WM. ^. FIELD, 



MW^M 



239 BIIDDLE STREET, PORTliAND, »IAINE. 

J. A. MERRILL. a. KEITH. 



DEALER m 

Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 WATER ST., AUGrUSTA, MAIWE. 



##lt?^ 



2 §|arc^ llntfe, 






.^:e= m^ mt^wmom^i^ 



DEALER IN 



m 



%% 



_J? ®«>isiJii^' 

CEDAR STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
^F° Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 




HORSMAN'S 

CELEBRATED 



TETVTV I^ 

" Brig-hton," " Casino," ' Elberon," " Championship " 
and "Berkeley" ;iro superior to any other Rackets in the 
market The ilnrp ilUistiatinn repiesents tlji New Racket, "BRIGHTON," which is unexcelled. 
Send stamp for Tennis and Biode Catalnirne 

E. I. HORSMAN, SO and 82 William St., New York. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



STENOGRAPH 

This wonderful Shorthand Writing Machine possesses many 
advantages over, and is learned in much less tmie than other sys- 
tems. Price, $40. Instructions by mail free. Can be learned 
during Tacation. Send stamps for Circular. 

U. S. Stenograx>h Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Successor to A. EOEirER & Son, 
THE LARGEST HISTOEICAL 

COSTUMERmARMORER 

IN AMERICA. 

Also Costumer for all the principal theatres: Fifth Avenue 
Theatre, Grand Opera House, Star Theatre, Madison Square 
Theatre, Niblo's Garden Theatre, New Park Theatre, People s 
Theati-e, 14th Street Theatre. 

No. 8 UNION SQUARE, NEW YORK. 



mi=s®^« 



-DEALER IN- 



Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of aU kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 



Will save money by purchasing their Tennis Goods, Jer- 
seys, Base-Ball, Bicycle, and Tennis Suits, etc., of 

J. W. BRINE, 



Samples of Jerseys, Knee Pants, Caps, and Suitings, may 
be seen at Boom No. 10, South Appleton. Call and see 
them and get terms before purchasing elsewhere. 



Successor to Atwood & "Wentworth, 

DEALER LN 

IS, WATCHES, JEW 

and importers of French Clocks, Opera Glasses, etc. 
Fine Watch Repairing ; Gold and Silver Plating. 

509 CONGRESS ST., Portland, Me. 



All the Students Should Buy 

THEIR 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 

AT 

CoK. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 

SnOH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 



FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




ON THE llOAD. 



fit iiiiiiiiii e@«, 

(Established ISTT.) 

Institute Building, Huntington Ave., Boston. 

ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 

OTHER TO TKICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 

stamp at above address. 



ALLEN & COMPANY, 

stiB ilirts anl Fiit Firiislii, 









OF- 



i^li^M ®tt8tta|i» ^^teiwiH^ ^toitoif ! 



And GENTLEMEN'S IIVIPORTED NECKDRESSINGS is Complete. 

THE LATEST AND MOST DESIRABLE GOODS NOW OPEN FOR 
MEN'S STYLISH SPRING FURNISHINGS. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 
470 Congress Street, - - Market Square, 

PORTJL^ND, - - - ]\d:AIN^E. 










-i-t 



1^^ 
» I « M « M '' I '» M « I « I i- I <» W <|!^. 

*t '! 'i ^ "t 1l ^i iT 




"?S^^ 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard " and " Duplex " Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KLNDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 
LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

EHOEAVED IH THE MOST rASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

Ji@. 3 eDD EELII0W3' BII0CK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 

I>I3:OTOC3-H-A.FHCS 
Made at Higgins' Ground-Floor Studio, Bath, 

Special attention 




tbe kiDil 
struction in 

Oil Law 

nd nil the BM^ collatpral ^^^^ branches of 

A COMPLETE BUSINESS EDUCATION. 

For further informatioii, address, 

L. A. GRAY, A.M., Portland, Blaine. 



The New Styles in 

STI^I^ and. SOI^T I3:^a^TS 



111 all colors, are uow ready. 
Neckwear in New Shapes 



Ln elegant line of New York 
ud Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Bro"wns, "Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

— \ ELLIOTT'S, t — 

OPPOSITE MASON STEEET. 

X.IVE: Jsn.-E.-st 

Wanted, to take orders for Trees, Vines, Shrubs, and a general 
liue of Nursery Stock. Only those who ai-e over ifi years of age 
and can furnisli the very best references need apply. To the 
right men we can give employment the year round. Experience 
not necessary. K. G. CHASE & CO.'S, S I'emberton Square, 
Boston, Mass. We pay nil expenses and a good SALARY, 



Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

Olid Fellows' Bloci, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET. - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. fflEREYMAU, PHARMACIST,-:- 

BlUGS, BilDICIllS, 

Fancy ani Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Tolacco. 



DUNLAP BLOCK, 



MAIN STREET. 



rescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL EATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 
IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEK, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical lustruments, and Musi- 
cal Mercliandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



Wo ®o mm-iMmmi^ 
Book-Seller, Stationer, Book-Binder. 

AND BLANK-BOOK MANUFACTURER, 

Opposite City Hall, Center St-, Bath, Maine. 

They do saj', and it is a fact, thnt Lenten & Xeaglc's is the 
clieapest place in this county. Their assortment of trunks and 
bags cannot be beaten. No shop-worn goods, but direct from the 
manufacturers. They have the largest line of whips ever shown 
in this town. Jobbing of all kinds promptly attended to. 
Ti-unks and bags neatly repaired. 

HARNESS MAKERS & CARRIAGE TRIMMERS, 
MAIN STREET, Store formerly occupied by Washburne. 

@sr§kff ami §m §mam 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

H^-Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland Me.' 



OVER BOARDMAN'S STORE, MAIN STREET. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Jlusic, etc.. Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Descrijition done to Order. 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. O. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily Papers; Circu- 
lating Library, lUOO Volumes ; Base-Ball and La Crosse ; Pict- 
ures and Pictiire frames; Frames made to order at short notice- 

Dealer in and Agent for 

and all the leading American and English Bicycles and Tricy- 
cles. A few good second-lland Machines in stock. Also Bi- 
cyle Sundries, etc. Portland, Maine. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday IVlorning by A, G. Tenney, 

Terms, $1.50 a Year iu Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

.^-Special Rates to Student Clubs. .£8 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, test- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amonnt of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenoogh, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Caesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucohcs, and first six Books of the 
jEneid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,- first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatoiy course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Kegulae Examinations foe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the HalloiveU Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers of the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQDIEED— FOUE HOUES A "WEEK. 

Latin, four terras. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, sis terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOtJE HOUES A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terras. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 




MO 




Vol. XV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 17, 1885. 



No. 4. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 

PDELISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE YEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

W. V. Wentworth, '8G, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
J. H. Davis, 'SB. Levi Turner, Jr., 'SU. 

A. A. Knovclton, '86. C. \V. Tuttle, 'SB. 

J. C. Parker, '86. C. B. Burleigh, '87. 

H. L. Taylor, '86. B. C. Plummbr, '87. 

Per annum, in advance, $2. 00 

Single Copies, 15 cents- 
Extra copies can be obtained at tlie bookstores or on applica- 
tion to the lousiness Kditor. 

]?emittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
municatii^ns in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Maiiagini; ICditor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
ho wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at firuoswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XV., No. 4.- June 17, 1885. 

Query, ....".• 43 

Editorial Notes, 43 

Fortunatte Insulte, 45 

Mistakes of Great Men 45 

"P. L. S. H." 46 

Obediali 47 

In the Pines, 47 

Excessive Multiplicity in Athletics, 47 

Remarks at Bowdoin Alumni Meeting, , 49 

Base-Ball 49 

Collegii Tabula 50 

Personal, 52 

Clippings, 53 

Colby Primer, 53 

QUERY. 

Wliiit's the matter with the sky ? 
First it's wet and then it's dry ; 
Now we have a burning sim, 
Then we find a rain begun. 
Though the morn be scorching hot, 
Night will freeze you, like as not, 
While the weather, unconfined. 
Varies like a womtin's mind ! 
Till I ask in angry gloom, 
What ! can this be " balmy June? " 




The success of summer schools of 
science and art, at summer resorts and else- 
where, indicates a desire for that kind of in- 
struction upon the part of many to whom 
the hot months would otherwise bring only 
idleness. Appreciating this fact, and being 
urged to do so, Prof. Robinson has decided 
to offer a course in Chemistry and Mineral- 
ogy, beginning June 30th, and continuing 
five weeks. Quite a number of persons, 
students of Bowdoin and other colleges, 
and others, have already announced their 
intention of taking advantage of this oppor- 
tunity, and we hope that this course may 
prove to be the beginning of a regular sum- 
mer school of sciences at Bowdoin. Our 
location and facilities are certainlj^ good. 
The college is well supplied with apparatus, 
and the laboratories are well fitted for the 
work to be done. As a place for the study 
of Mineralogy, Brunswick can hardly be ex- 
celled — about forty minerals occurring here. 
We are indeed glad that this new venture 
has been determined upon, and we hope it 
may meet Avith the success it deserves. 



At length the championship of the Maine 
College League is decided, and the wearers 
of the white may well rejoice. Each nine 



44 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



was to play three games with each of the 
others, or nine in all. We have won three 
from the State College, two from Colby, los- 
ing one, while Bates, after losing two games 
to us, preferred giving the third to playing 
it. Our nine has thus won every game but 
one, while Colby has lost two, and has not 
yet played the third game with Orono. 
Orono has won one from Bates, and Bates 
one from Orono, their third game being as 
yet unplayed. 

This success has been achieved only as 
the result of continued and patient effort, 
and the nine deserve credit for working 
more faithfully thau any other Bowdoin 
nine for some years. Great improvement has 
been manifest in fielding and base-running, 
and the battery have done excellent work — 
Davis winning great honor in the pitcher's 
box, and Moulton's throwing to second being 
particularly fine. 

That their efforts have been appreciated 
is shown by the receptions at the depot, 
after the two victories over Colby, when, 
despite rain, the students met them with a 
band and barouche, while bonfires illumi- 
nated the campus, the chapel bell and guns 
adding their share to the general rejoicing. 
That this interest is not confined to the col- 
lege, is evident from the reception tendered 
the nine by Capt. Skolfield. 

Our satisfaction is rendered the more 
complete from the fact that the general feel- 
ing has' been, that we were fairly entitled to 
the championship last year, but were de- 
frauded of it by poor umpiring. 



A subject which is just now brought forc- 
ibly to our attention is the financial stand- 
ing of the Base-Ball Association. The As- 
sociation is considerably in debt, on account 
of bills brought over from last year, the 
manager this year having been able to keep 
the exiDenses about equal to the receipts. 
The question is, where is the money to be 



obtained? The boat crew is largely sup- 
ported by the aid of alumni, but the nine 
receives very little from that source. The 
most of those in college have siibscribed all 
they can afford to ; besides, at this time of 
jeav, money is scarce here. Many of us 
have, however, heard several students state 
that if our nine would only get the cham- 
pionship they would gladly give them more- 
Now is the time for these individuals to 
prove their sincerity; the nine has Avon the 
flag, and we confident^ expect to see their 
cash forthcoming. 



At length the time has returned for the 
annual prize declamations by the Junior 
and Sophomore classes, and many a youth 
may be seen poring over a musty volume in 
the endeavor to learn a piece. There are 
some though, who, after being chosen as 
speakers, decline to have anything to do 
with the exhibition. Sometimes these men 
have good reasons for their refusal, but such 
is not always the case. Of course, if a man 
does not choose to do his part, he cannot be 
compelled to, and it does not seem quite 
fair for a certain number of men to be 
selected from a class, and told that they must 
speak, while the rest of the class are free from 
the expense ; still, when one of the appointees 
is in a position to speak, in justice to the 
others it seems as though he should do his best 
and pay his share of the expenses. If it 
comes hard upon twelve fellows to pay for 
music and programmes, it is certainly much 
worse if half of them fail to pay at all. 

The root of the evil probably lies in the 
ambition of each class to excel the one be- 
fore, and no set of speakers has had the 
courage to reduce the cost very much. In 
fact, music is the principal item, and though 
the college allows nothing for that, but 
some thing for programmes, still the Faculty 
would undoubtedly think it strange if it 
were omitted. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



45 



FORTUNATtE INSULiE. 
Westward far the happy islands, 

Homes of blest immortals, lie ; 
Valleys, meadows, wooded highlands, 

Thought traDScending, charm the eye. 

Pine-crowned cliffs, whose wave-washed bases 
Hollowed caverns dark display; 

High up on their rough-seamed faces 
Beats the foaming ocean spray. 

There, beyond base Earth's controlling. 
Stretch the fields with valor won ; 

O'er blue billows, boundless rolling. 
Warmed to color by the sun. 

Freed from turmoil and confusion 

Dwell the brave, the good, the great, 

There in peaceful, sweet seclusion, 
Granted not to mortal state. 

At the side of streams clear flowing, 
Calm they rest, no danger nigh. 

Fanned by zephyrs gently blowing 
From a deep blue western sky. 

In rich halls they, sadness scorning, 
Banquet through the midnight hours, 

Till the earliest ray of morning 
Flashes back from golden towers. 

Strive we then to gain those pleasures, 

Strive undaunted, till success, 
Better far than all vain treasures 

That the kings of earth possess. 



MISTAKES OF GREAT MEN. 

There are many sayings of celebrated 
persons which, on account of their terseness 
and seeming truth at first sight, have be- 
come household words, but contain fallacies 
which a careful analysis brings to light. 

For example, take the declaration of 
Joshua Reynolds, that "Nothing is denied to 
honest labor." This statement may have 
been true enough in Joshua's day, but the 
enlightened civilization of our times has 
left it far behind. To illustrate : A youth 
of " poor but honest parents " (please notice 
the quotation marks, as I wish no one to 



credit me with that expression) is assidu- 
ously striving for the hand of a fair maiden, 
aged nineteen. She makes the remarkably 
original proposition that he go into the 
world to seek his fortune, and then come 
back to claim her for his own. They part 
in tears, and he begins the conflict of life as 
messenger boy in the great metropolis of 
Waterville. Slowly he climbs the ladder of 
prosperity, and the first anniversary of that 
parting finds him a stockholder in the West- 
ern Union. Now he may claim his bride. 
With joyous heart he returns to his native 
village and rides proudly up to the door of 
that well-known farm-house, where last he 
left his love. Alas for woman's affection I 
His Mary has married a retired book agent, 
and is the happy mother of the " steen " 
children playing about the yard. She offers 
to get a divorce, birt his heart is crushed. 
He takes charge of a Fourth-of-July cannon 
and so ends his blighted life. He has lab- 
ored honestly, but has nothing been denied 
to him? 

Another example : A certain base-ball 
pitcher practices three hours per day during 
the winter, besides putting in extra labor on 
Sundays. He declares himself in such per- 
fect condition that he can pitch all day with- 
out fatigue. He enters the box with a smile 
of confidence upon his face, and is batted 
for eighteen base hits, to say nothing of a 
home run made off his pet curve. Truly he 
has labored honestly, but where is his re- 
ward? 

Yet another case : Four men train regu- 
larly during the winter months, and as soon 
as the course is open, practice rowing twice 
per day upon the Androscoggin. All pre- 
dict success for them, "and their bosoms 
swell with pride at the compliments show- 
ered upon them. They have worked hard, 
and truly if the words of Reynolds and T. 
Clark be worthy of their speakers, will they 
not leave their pale and shattered rivals afar 



46 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



in tlie hazy distance? Forsooth their strong 
and hardened muscles will overcome the 
untrained cre^y that opposes them. And 
what is the end? Those men of bone and 
sinew, those disciples of Joshua and T. Clark 
come paddling in an eighth of a mile behind 
their opponents. 

And what is the lesson I would teach in 
this essay, do you ask ? In modern language 
I may express it thus : It is a cold day 
when natural abilities get left by manufact- 
ured ones, and a man of one hundred and 
twenty-seven pounds may wield an influence 
or any other sphere almost as effectively as 
a one hundred and eighty pound production 
of the gymnasium. 



"P. L. S. H." 

Very early in the history of the college 
the students began to feel the need of bet- 
ter opportunities for social and literary cult- 
ure than the curriculum afforded. With 
the view of supplying this want, several so- 
cieties were formed at different times, but 
of these, only two had more than a tempor- 
ary existence. These, however, the Peucin- 
ian and the Athensean, have been inti- 
mately associated with the growth of the 
college, from its infancy down to a recent 
date. 

The Peucinian, the earlier of these, was 
established in November, 1805, and thus 
included some of the first graduates of the 
college. At the time of its foundation it 
was called the Philomethian, but in the fol- 
lowing year its name was changed to the 
Peucinian, adopting the motto, '■'■ Pinos 
loquentes semper habemus," thus indicating 
the source of its peculiar name. 

Eegular meetings were held at least once 
every other week during the spring and fall 
terms, and once a week diu-ing the summer 
term. For a long time, owing to the ab- 
sence of a suitable hall, the meetings were 
held in the rooms of the members, in alpha- 



betical rotation. The exercises consisted of 
original and selected declamations, essays, 
a paper, and a debate. A high literary 
standard was maintained in all the exercises. 
The debates frequently created much en- 
thusiasm. All were encouraged, and felt it 
their duty to take part. 

In 1808 the formation of a rival, the 
AtheiiEean, infused new zeal ino the mem- 
bers of the Peucinian. Previous to this time, 
the Peucinian had not initiated members 
until their Sophomore year. The new so- 
ciety, taking advantage of this fact, and 
establishing a library, increased rapidly, and 
soon surpassed its older rival in numbers. 
The Peucinian, determined not to be sur- 
passed in zeal by its yoiinger rival, amended 
its constitution so as to admit Freshmen, 
commenced the collection of a library, and 
instituted the ciistom of annual meetings at 
Commencement time. The work of collect- 
ing a library was necessarilj^ slow. It was 
kept in the room of the librarian, being 
moved each year after the election of offi- 
cers. It was not until 1825 that the society 
obtained permanent rooms for its library 
and meetings. Nearly all the books were 
contributed by the students, and were thus 
especially adapted to the needs of the society. 
The library, at the time of the dissolution 
of the society, consisted of about seven 
thousand volumes, which remain as a sub- 
stantial reminder of the work of the society. 

The custom of holding annual meet- 
ings Commencement week, was inaugurated 
in September, 1808, by the Peucinian. 
Commencement then occurred in September. 
The example was afterward followed by 
both societies. The exercises consisted at 
first of an oration, but a poem was subse- 
quently added. The first annual oration 
was delivered by Charles S. Davies, then 
an alumnus of one year's standing. It was 
of such merit that it was published in the 
Boston Anthology, a leading magazine of the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



47 



time, tmder an exceedingly flattering intro- 
duction. 

The society elections, which took place 
ann-ually, excited as much interest as the 
annual class elections of the present, though 
they were eutirelj^ free from the unfortunate 
society conflicts and " deals " of such elec- 
tions. Later on, however, after the intro- 
duction of the Greek Letter fraternities, a 
good deal of strife arose over the elections. 
Indeed, this may be regarded as one of the 
causes of the downfall of the general socie- 
ties. 

The catalogues of this society are full of 
interest, because they contain so many 
names of men familiar to us. Prior to 
1860, according to its catalogue, the Peu- 
cinian had included among its members 


Obediah aimed his musket, 
Pulled the hammer b;ick and sighted, 
Till the woodchuck's head he covered. 
Then he pulled the musket's trigger, 
And the fields around him echoed. 

Dead he lay there in the corn field — 
No ! ah, no ! 'twas not the woodchuck, 
But 'twas little Obediah 
That they found among the corn-stalks. 
Near him lay the ancient musket 
That had been since winter loaded. 
And his little broken shoulder 
Witnessed how the gun had kicked him. 
In the corn field dwells the woodchuck; 
In the church-yard Obediah ; 
In the chamber lies the musket ; 
And the sirens of the frog pond 
Chant upon the summer evenings 
This, the song of Obediah. 


three U. S. Senators, fourteen Representa- 
tives, five Governors, seven College Presi- 
dents, seven Attorney Generals, and twenty- 
one Judges of various courts. Since then, 
the numbers have doubtless increased, 
though statistics are not easy to obtain. 


IN THE PINES. 

Mingled light and shadows lie 
On the needles dry and brown. 
Through the tree tops, lifted high, 
Wandering breezes softly sigh. 
With a strangely pleasing sound. 


OBEDIAH. 

[extkact.] 
Then the little Obediah 
Learned to operate the shovel, 
Learned to hoe the young potato 
And to kill the bugs upon it; 
And his little childish fingers 
Often circumvolved the grindstone. 
Then Augustus J. McDuffy, 
He, young Obediah's father, 


Sweetly solemn is the tone. 
So subdued, so soft and clear, 
Like the murmurings of a crone 
Brooding o'er the youth she's known. 
Gone for many a buried year. 

And the music 'mid the trees. 
Wordless, but with thought impressed, 
Coming from the airy keys. 
Which have ever power to please, 
Seems to sweetly whisper, " rest." 


Placed within his hands a musket, 
And his offspring thus addressed he : 
" Go, my son, into the corn field. 
Where the woodchuck roams majestic, 
Caring not for traps or missiles. 
Kill for me that beast destructive." 
Out into the corn field boldly. 
All alone walked Obediah, 
Proudly, with that ancient musket 
That had been since winter loaded ; 
And a smile his face divided. 
As he saw the destined woodchuck. 
Then upon his left knee resting, 


EXCESSIVE MULTIPLICITY IN 
ATHLETICS. 

The columns of the Orient have hereto- 
fore contained many hints and suggestions 
tending to show that we undertake too much 
in athletics. The subject is worthy of still 
further attention and consideration. 

No one can deny that, in the daily exer- 
cise of the students, variety is highly advan- 
tageous, as all tastes and physical conditions 



48 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



are thereby accommodated. B\it when it 
comes to intercollegiate contests in which 
our athletic standing is made, known to the 
college world, then excellence in some one 
thing is the great desideratum. Mediocrity- 
goes for naught. It is the first position alone 
that tells — all others are comparatively 
worthless. 

College athletics generallj^ have been so 
conducted for the past few years that the 
standard of excellence has been continually 
elevated, until at present superiority is an 
extremely uncertain and difficult thing. Yet 
it must be obtained at all hazards, for, as has 
been said, pre-eminence, alone is the only 
thing asked for by those interested in college 
sports. But how shall it be gained ? It can 
be secured only at the expense of the most 
careful, persistent, and scientific training, and 
such training as this involves the expendi- 
ture of considerable money. 

Now, in a small college like ours where 
athletics are entirely dependent for support 
upon the voluntary contributions of the stu- 
dents, it is idle to think of carrying on suc- 
cessfully a great many kinds of sports. Yet 
this is what we are attempting, and the point 
which we wish to make is that our expenses 
for athletics are more than the financial con- 
dition of the students warrants. It must be 
borne in mind that the students of this col- 
lege, as a class, are not wealthy, and that in 
some cases the expenditure of even a few 
dollars is sensibly felt. Still the demands for 
the maintenance of the sports are the hard- 
est to refuse, for the appeal to the student's 
pocket is usually accompanied by an appeal 
to his loyalty. At present we are supporting 
athletics enough for two hundred and fifty 
or three hundred students situated as many 
of us are in respect to means. In short the 
facts of the case are, we cannot properly 
support both base-ball and boating. The 
financial standing of the several associations, 
we think, justify us in saying that all the 



funds that have been actually raised and 
realized this year, could have been judi- 
ciously expended upon base-ball alone. The 
thing to do is to make a choice between base- 
ball and boating, and make a specialty of 
that choice. 

The fact that we have this year secured 
the championship would rather indicate base- 
ball as the proper selection, and outside of 
'85 there is more talent for it in college than 
for boating. Such a method as this would 
give more and better material from which to 
select those who are to represent us in our 
special intercollegiate contest. Very fre- 
quently a good ball-player is kept from the 
nine because he rows, and vice versa. Not 
that Ave would encourage one sport at the 
expense of the other, but let one be prac- 
ticed here at home with as much interest 
and as little cost as possible, and when 
money is to be paid out, concentrate it upon 
the specialty. For the athletes engaged in 
this specialty provide well, and furnish every 
facility jiossible, and in return demand punct- 
ual, systematic, and energetic work. If 
necessary, hire professional trainers. By 
these means alone are good results attaina- 
ble, and with less expense to the students. 

It may be urged that the success and pros- 
pects of the present year confute the above 
statements. It is true that we secured the 
championship, but it was by mere dint of 
persistent grit and favoring luck, both of 
which were notoriously absent, as far as we 
were concerned, in the games of last year 
and the year before. As to our success in 
the race at Worcester, though we shall send 
one of the finest crews that the college has 
produced, the result is highly contingent. 

The expenses of this year have not been 
paid yet, and when they are the treasuries 
of the several associations will be depleted, 
and heavy deficits left on their hands. The 
late historj' of athletics in this college is cer- 
tainly not such as to encourage the contem- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



49 



poraneous practice of so many species of 
sport with a view to intercollegiate contests. 
There isn't ready cash enough, and an 
attempt to do it is a realization of the fable 
of Atlas. 



REMARKS AT BOWDOIN ALUMNI 
MEETING. 

At the annual meeting of the Bowdoin 
Alumni Association of Boston, in February 
last, Hon. William D. Northend, of the class 
of 1843, in expressing the hope that the 
address of the President, Professor Smythe, 
be published, said : " Mr. President, I have 
listened with deep interest to the just and 
beautiful tribute you have just now paid to 
the memory of him who was our instructor 
in our boyhood days, and our friend and 
exemplar in our maturer years. Professor 
Packard, whom we all loved, respected, and 
revered, who for so many years delighted us 
with his presence at each return of this our 
annual festival, and whose words were to 
us a sweet benediction, has passed from 
earth. The silver cord is loosed, the golden 
bowl is broken, the pitcher is broken at the 
fountain, and the wheel is broken at the 
cistern. The dust has returned to the earth 
as it was and the spirit has returned to God 
who gave it. We are all mourners. To-night 
we miss him. There is a vacant chair that 
no one living can fill. There is a memory 
of a presence we never again shall see, and 
of a voice we shall never hear again. Pro- 
fessor Packard is dead. He was the last in 
the train of our immortals. A chapter in 
the history of our college is finished, and the 
records of the lives of the period are made up. 
New men take the places of the departed. 
Great examples are before them, and if as 
we hope and have reason to believe, they 
will show the same devotion and zeal in the 
performance of their duties that those whose 
places they occupy showed, their memories 



will be cherished with equal honor and the 
future of our beloved college is assured." 



BASE-BALL. 
Bates vs. Bowdoin. 
Wednesday, June 3d, the second game 
between Bates and Bowdoin was played on 
the Bates grounds in Lewiston. The game 
was well played up to the sixth inning. At 
this point the Bowdoins began to do some of 
their customary heavy batting, and in the 
remaining four innings piled up eleven 
scores. Thayer of the Nichols Latin School 
was substituted for Sprague of the Bates, in 
the sixth inning. For Bates, the best field- 
ing was done by Atwood, Nickerson, and 
Thayer. For Bowdoin, Moulton, Pushor, 
Talbot, and Gary fielded well, wMle Cook, 
Pushor,' Moulton, Talbot, and Larrabee bat- 
ted heavily. 

BATES. 

A.E. K. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Cushman, 3b., .... 4 1 1 2 1 

Nickerson, s. s i 2 5 2 

Walker, 2b., i 1 2 2 3 

Tinker,!, f i 

Woodman, p., .... 4 1 2 2 1 11 7 

Hadley, c.f., 4 1 1 4 

Atwood, lb 4 1 1 1 13 1 

Thayer, r.f.&c., ... 3 1 1 1 5 2 1 

Sprague, c. &r.f 3 14 1 

Totals, .... 34 4 .5 5 27 25 20 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. B. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, r. f 6 1 

Cook, s. s., 5 3 2 3 1 2 

Moulton, c, 6 1 3 3 3 4 

Pushor, lb., 6 2 1 3 18 

Talbot, l.f., 6 2 2 2 

Larrabee, c. 1., .... 2 2 2 2 1 

Gary, 2b., 5 2 1 1 1 3 

Bartlett, 3b., 4 2 2 2 2 2 

Davis, p., 3 1 6 

Totals 4T 14 13 16 27 17 3 

Two-base hits — Bowdoin 1. Three-base hit— Pushor. 
Earned runs— Bates 2. Struck out— by Woodman 8, by 
Davis 5. Passed ball— Sprague 3, Moulton 3. Umpire— 
M. Pingree. 

M. S. C. VS. Bowdoin. 

The third and last game in the series 

with the M. S. C.s took place at Bangor, 

Saturday, June 6th. The game was played 

at Maplewood Park, and, although the 



50 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



grounds were in very poor condition an ex" 

citing and well played game was the result. 

For the M. S. C.s^Ray, Hull, and Ruth did 

the best fielding, and Burleigh made the 

most hits. For Bowdoin, Pusher, Bartlett, 

Moulton, and Cary fielded well, while Pushor 

led the batting. 

M. s. c. 

A.B. R. B.H. T.E. P.O. A. E. 

Bay, s. s., 5 1 1 2 3 1 

Ruth, p., i 1 11 3 

Hull, c, 3 13 1 2 

Burleigh, c. f., . . . . 4 2 2 2 

Rogers, 2b., 4 2 3 

McNally, r. f., . . . . 4 

Coffin, 3b., 4 2 

Mason, lb., 4 7 1 

Vose, 1. £ 4 

Totals, .... 36 1 3 3 24 15 14 

BOWDOIN. 

A.E. R. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, r. f., 4 

Cook, s. s 4 1 1 1 3 2 

Moulton, c, 4 1 1 1 3 3 2 

Pushor, lb 4 1 2 2 18 1 

Talbot, 1. f., 4 1 1 1 1 1 

Larrabee, c. f 4 

Cary, 2b., 3 1 1 2 1 1 

Bartlett, 3b., 4 2 2 

Davis, p., 3 14 2 

Totals, .... 34 3 6 6 27 23 9 

Time of game — 1 hour 50 minutes. Wild pitches — 
Ruth 1. Bases on balls— Ruth 2, Davis 1. Strikes called — 
on Ruth 27, on Davis S. Struck out — by Ruth 9, by Davis 
6. Passed balls— Hull 2. Left on bases- M. S. C. 9, Bow- 
doin 9. First base on errors— M. S. C. 7, Bowdoin 7. 
Umpire — Jf . Pingree. 




" Can the Bowdoins play 
ball?" "Yes, my child, 
there are nine men on the Bowdoin 
nine who can play ball." "Does it 
pay to hire a fair umpire?" "Oh, 
yes, it pays Bowdoin very well to hire 
a fair umpire." " Did Philhrook umpire any games 
this season ? " " Don't ask such foolish questions, 
my child; do you not see that Bowdoin has the 
championship? " 

Scene in the Senior examinations (topics being 
chosen by lot) : Prof, (explaining to the examin- 



ing committee) — " As these two gentlemen wish to 
be excused, I will hear them first. They know 
nothing at all about the topics they will be called 
on." 

Prof. Robinson took the mineralogy class on an 
expedition to the Topsham quarries. All went in 
one largo team, and every one had a good time, 
though the day was not as pleasant as it might 
have been. On the way, going and coming, the 
musical portion of the class laid themselves out and 
brought all the natives to their doors to see what 
had broken loose. 

The following speakers have been appointed for 
Commencement : Salutatory, Boyd Bartlett ; Eng- 
lish Orations, W. R. Butler, F. W. Davis, Webb 
Dounell, J. A. Peters, and F. N. Whittier; Philo- 
sophical Disquisitions, F. W. Alexander and L. B. 
Folsom. 

At the spiritualistic seance held in the town hall 
last week. Prof. Carmichael was called upon by 
some in the audience to go on the platform and in- 
vestigate, but it is needless to say he was not called 
on to make any report after coming out of the cab- 
inet. The show was evidently a humbug, those 
only being called on to make reports who were of 
that belief already, and so easily deceived by the 
medium. 

J. H. Davis's name has appeared in several of 
the papers in the list of Commenceaient speakers. 
We suppose he must have been promoted a year by 
the Faculty on account of his base-ball record. 

The nine received a hearty welcome on return- 
ing from their successful game with Colby at Lew- 
iston. Nearly every man in college was at the 
depot, where a barouche was in waiting to receive 
the nine. When the train came in the players were 
taken up, midst the noise of the band, horns, and 
cheers for Bowdoin, and placed in the carriage. A 
procession was then formed, which marched through 
the principal streets to the campus, and finally 
drew up before the chapel, whore several speeches 
were made and all dispersed for the night, pleased 
to think the championship had been secured. 

The college crew have been in Portland for the 
past week, training under the direction of M. F. 
Davis. From there they intend going to Lake 
Quinsigamond, where their new shell will be sent, 
and they will be in training till the time of the races, 
July 4th. 

The College Bookstore is to be removed at once 
to Lemont Block. We are all sorry to lose the cosy 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



51 



little retreat so familiar to us, but at the same time 
congratulate Mrs. Stevens on finding better and 
larger accommodations. We hope and expect that 
she will make her new store as profitable as the 
present one. We understand that there is to be a 
tasty little "sanctum sanctorum," from which the 
sterner sex will be rigidly excluded. Members of 
the Orient board, however, are to be excepted 
from this restriction. 

A Colby man sat silent and sad 

In the twilight's gathering gloom, 

And clouds of smoke from his penny pipe 

Completely filled his room; 

And being Fuller than was his wont, 

A horrible whoop he whooped ! 

But the only words that came from his lips 

Were " scooped! by jimminy, scooped ! " 

The Letviston Journal does the Orient the 
honor (?) to quote a book notice which appeared in 
our last issue, leaving out, however, the name of 
the firm which gave us the advertisement. We 
are perfectly willing, friend Journal, tliat you 
should quote from our columns, but please don't 
garble our items. There are things even in your 
advertisements which you would scarcely desire 
copied as editorial sentiments. 

The following is the programme for Commence- 
ment week : 

Sunday, June 21st. — 10.45 a.m.. Sermon before Y. M. 
C. A. by Rev. E. N. Packard of Dorchester, Mass. 4 p.m.. 
Baccalaureate Sermon by Prof. Samuel G. Brown, D.D. 

Monday. —8 p. m., Junior Prize Declamation. 

Tuesday. — Class-Day Exercises and Dance on the 
Green in the evening. 

Wednesday. — 9 a.m.. Phi Beta Kappa meeting. 10.30 
A.M., IMeeting of Alumni. 3 p.m.. Address on late Prof. 
A. S. Packard, D.D., by Prof. Egbert C. Smyth, D.D., of 
Andover, Mass. 8 p.m., Concert in Town Hall, under 
auspices of the Senior Class. 

Thursday. — 9 a.m., Prayer-Meeting in Y. M. C. A. 
Room. 10.30 A.M., Commencement Exercises, followed 
by Dinner in Memorial Hall. 8 p.m.. Reception by the 
Faculty in Memorial Hall. 

Friday. — 8.30 a.m.. Examination of candidates for ad- 
mission to college, at Massachusetts Hall. 9 a.m.. An- 
nual Meeting of Maine Historical Society in Adams Hall. 

Saturday.— 8.30 a.m.. Examination for admission con- 
tinued. 

A Sunday train has now beeu put on the Maine 
Central, so that for the rest of the year the Sundaii 
Herald and Globe can be obtained at Dennisou's 
from 8.30 till 10 a.m. 

The Cloaveland cabinet has been greatly im- 
proved during the past year. The minerals are 
being re-arranged, all of the same group being 
placed together, where before they were scattered, 



in separate collections, in different parts of the 
building. Stands to place the specimens on have 
also been obtained. They are painted a bright 
blue, and show the minerals to the best advan- 
tage. 

W. H. Stackpole, '86, has received the appoint- 
ment of bell-ringer. Even if one did not know of 
his appointment one look at him would give them 
the information, as he usually carries with him 
some emblem suggestive of that calling. 

A certain Junior in Appleton on the same night 
was twice taken for a Freshman, and received an 
amount of water proportionate to his supposed 
cheek. It is bard on a man, when he has struggled 
through the first three years of his college course 
and is about to assume Senior dignity, to still be 
mistaken for a Freshman. 

At a meeting of the Keading-Eoom Association, 
held last week, the following officers were chosen : 
President, H. M. Moulton, '87; Vice-President, H. 
S. Card, '88; Directors— First, 0. D. Sewall, '87; 
second, F. L. Talbot, '87; third, S. B. Fowler, '87. 

The Freshmen have their class supper in Port- 
land at the Falmouth, the evening after their exam- 
inations. Every man in the class, we understand, 
intends to go. 

The summer school of Chemistry and Mineralogy 
promises to have quite a good attendance. Appli- 
cations for admission have already been made by 
members both of this and other colleges. 

Capt. Robert Skolfleld invited the members of 
the ball nine and '87 boat crew to his house, a few 
evenings ago, where he entertained them in a most 
liberal manner, and all had a delightful time. 

Each Senior in the Geology division had to 
bring into class seven specimens of diflerent geolog- 
ical formations. It was a curious coincidence that 
the specimens brought in by the diflerent members 
were all identical. 

In the "Sweet bye-aud-bye," when "Stack" 
learns how to ring the bell, there will probably be 
a larger attendance at chapel. One minute between 
the two alarms is altogether too original for prosaic 
old Bowdoiu. 

B is for Bowdoin, a rival in fame, 

C is for Colby, who scoops every game. 

— Colby Oracle. 

The better way, friend Colby, to arrange the 
"Mother Goose" department of your kindergarten 
pithlication would be : 

B is for Bowdoin, who now has the " bind," 

C is for Colby, who comes in belund. 



52 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



He was fresh from his French avocations, 
And felt himself fully prepared 
To speak it with ease, and to teach it 
To pupils who wanted it bad. 

He took a trip over to Europe 
To converse with the Frenchmen of rank. 
And they found him ahout a month later 
Imprisoned for being a crank. 




'34. — Rev. Dr. Cyrus 
Hamlin, formerly of Ban- 
gor, has submitted his resignation of 
the presideucy of Middlebury College, to 
take effect at the close of the present 
collegiate year. No action has yet been taken in 
reference to his successor. 

'45, — N. P. Godfrey, formerly of Lisbon, died in 
New Orleans, May ]9th, of apoplexy at the age of 
sixty-three. 

'55. — Rev. Flavious V. Norcross, who has been 
settled as pastor at Union for twenty-five years, has 
received a call to Windham in this State. 

'55.— Rev. Benjamin P. Snow, Superintendent 
of Schools at Biddeford, will deliver the address at 
the graduation exercises of Fryeburg Academy. 

At the centennial of the town of Parsonsfield, 
which will be held next August, papers will be read 
by the following men : Prof C. F. Brackett, '59 ; 
Horace Piper, '38. Hon. L. D. M. Sweat, '37, will 
deliver the oration. 

'62.— Rev. Henry 0. Thayer of Woolwich read a 
paper at the meeting of the Maine Historical So- 
ciety, May 28th, on the problem of Hammond's 
Fort, Richard Hammond, his home and death. 

'67. — Rev. Stephen M. Newman, for some years 
pastor of the church and professor in the college at 
Ripon, Wis., was installed over the First Church, 
Washington, D. C, May 20th. 

'68.— Dr. Frank E. Hitchcock of Rockland, has 
been elected one of the Vice-Presidents of the 
Maine Medical Association. 

'70.— Prof. W. M. Barbour, D.D., of Yale, re- 
cently delivered a very interesting address before 
the Rhetorical Society at Bangor Theological Sem- 
inary. 

'72. — Rev. W. F. Bickford has recently secured 



for the Cleaveland Cabinet specimens from the caves 
of Manitou, Col. He is settled over the Congrega- 
tional Church there. 

'73.— Rev. Cassander C. Sampson has received 
and accepted an invitation to the pastorate of the 
Congregational church at Tilton, N. H. 

'73.— Rev. Frederic A. Wilson, after preaching 
for two or three years at Billerica, Mass., has 
finally accepted an invitation to become the settled 
pastor of the church. 

'73. — A. L. Crocker was in town recently. He 
is in the machiue business in Minneapolis. 

'73.— H. B. Hill is assistant surgeon at the Maine 
Insane Asylum. 

'75.— Rev. Charles W. Hill has recently removed 
from Park City, Utah, to San Jose, Cal., where he 
was installed pastor, May 1 Ith. 

'81. — Arthur G. Pettengill was graduated from 
the Tale Divinity School at the recent anniversary 
of that institution. 

'81. — Carroll E. Harding was ordaiued to the 
Deaconate in the Protestant Episcopal Church, at 
the Cathedral Church in Portland, by Bishop 
Neeley, on the 9th inst. 

'81.— Charles H. Cutler, whohasjustfinishedhis 
Middle Year at the Andover Theological Seminary, 
was licensed to preach at a recent meeting of the 
Essex South Association at Salem, Mass. 

'82.— G. F. Bates has been spending a few days 
in town. He recently graduated from the L. I. 
Medical College, N. Y. 

'83.— G. B. Swan has resigned the principalship 
of the High School at Castine. 

'83. — H. R. Goodwin started for Europe agaiu 
June 9th. 

'84. — P. S. Lindsey, who has recently been in 
Bermuda, has returued much improved in health. 
He expects to remain in the State during the com- 
ing year. 

'85. — Goodenow has been chosen manager of the 
Dartmouth nine, for the remainder of the present 
collegiate year. 

'85. — Allen, of Alfred, and Hodgkins, of Ells- 
worth, have received provisional Commencement 
appointments at Dartmouth. 

'85. — Howard will be admitted to the bar in 
Denver, Colorado, in July. He has attended the 
Boston Law School during the past year. 

The class of '60, Bangor Theological Seminary, 
which held its reunion in Bangor, June 2d, has 
among its members: Prof B. W. Pond, '57, of 
Washington, D.C.; Rev. R. B. Howard, '56, Sec- 
retary of the American Peace Society of Boston ; 
Rev. D. S. Hibbard, '57, of Limington, Me. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



53 



H. B. Hathaway, '81, and Z. W. Kemp, '84, 
intend to become members of the summer class in 
chemistry and mineralogy. 




The annual boat race 
between Yale and Har- 
vard is to take place at New London, on 
the 25th iust. 
A party of Amherst College Seniors are 
planning to take a trip on foot through Germany 
and France this summer. 

The new McCormick Observatory of the Univer- 
sity of Virginia was recently dedicated. Its cost, 
together with the telescope, was over $7.5,000. 

By the will of Senator Brown, Brown Univer- 
sity will receive 5,000 volumes of American poetry, 
one of the best collections of American verse in ex- 
istence. 

Three of President Cleveland's cabinet are col- 
lege graduates: W. C. Whitney, Yale, '63; W. C. 
Endicott, Harvard, '47, and W. F. Vilas, University 
of Michigan, '58. 

Among the great Americans who have expended 
their youthful talents in editing college papers arc 
the poets. Holmes and Willis, the statesmen, Ev- 
erett and Evarts, the eloquent divine, Phillips 
Brooks, and the author, Donald J. Mitchell. 

At the intercollegiate sports held last month in 
New York, Harvard won four first prizes, and one 
second ; Yale, four first prizes ; University of Penn- 
sylvania, two first, one second; Lafayette, two 
first; Columbia, one first, six second; Michigan, 
one first, and Princeton, one second. 



COLBY PRIMER. 

LESSON I. 

Do the Bowdoins go down to Lewistou 1 
Yes : the Bowdoins do go down to Lewiston. 
Why do they go down to Lewiston ? 
They go down to play ball. 



Can they play ball? 
They think they can. 

LESSON II. 

Who are those little boys with white rags on, 
sister? 

They are Bowdoin students going down to see 
their nine "scoop" the Colbys. 

LESSON III. 

Did not the Bowdoins scoop the Colbys? 
Hush ! Be still, my child ! ! ! 
Are the Colbys bad boys? 
Yes, my child, they were real wicked to beat 
the little Bowdoins so*. — Colbi/ Oracle, page 128. 

"*"Score: Bowdoin 7, Colby 0. 



Students who expect to teach at the close of 
their college course will find it to their advantage 
to correspond with us. Especially will those who 
wish to go West find it profitable as we are con- 
nected with an agency in the West, and any appli- 
cant so desiring can be registered in both oflflces 
without extra charge. Circulars free. 

NOKTHAMPTON TEACHERS AGENCY, 

Northampton, Mass. 

ELEGANT MACKE^AW 

STRAW HATS, 

THE BEST QUALITY, 

$1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 

MERRY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND. 



me Hoots a3ad SJioi 

Next l0 Anierican Express Sffice, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Pii§iif® ill PM 



D® 



FSffst ©MaMtf Flat@t Waff®, 

At Lowest Possible Prices. 

French Clocks and Bronzes, Fine Watches 

and Chains, Diamond Rings. 

BATH, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND; 



■CIGARETTE 
\ Smokers who 

willing ^to 
paya little more 
I ^^^^^^■■^^■i^^^^H ^^^ Cigarettes 
^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H than the price 
charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, will 
find the RICHMOWO STRAIGHT CUT 
Wo. 1 SUPERIOR TO Alili OTHERS. 
They are made from the Tjriglitest, most 
delicately flavored, and lii&Iiest cost 
gold leaf grown la Virginia, and are abso- 
lutely without adulteration or drugs. 



STRAIGHT CUT 



No. 
-i- 



We use the Genuine Frencli Rice Paper 

of our own direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water m,arked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand have heen put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
original brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or box of ■ 
Ricliinoiul 
Straight Cut 
Cigarettes | 

bears the 
signature of ' 

ALLEN &CINTER 

MANUFACTUltER B, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



CIGARETTES 



n|aine Bentral R. ^. 



On and after October 20, 1884, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.10, 11.25 A.M., 2.45, 4.40 and 6.25 P.M., anfl on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Eockland, 8.10 A.M., 2.15 p.m. 
Fov Portland and Boston, 7.25 and 11.30 a.m., 4.30 p.m., and 

every night, including Sundays, at 12.35. 
For Lewiston, S.IO A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For FariJiington, 8.10 A.M. (mixed) and 2.45 P.M. 

For Vanceboro and St. John, 2.45 P.M. and 12.45 every night. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.45 P.M., and 13.45 night. 
For Bangor, Ellsworth and Bar Harbor, 2.45 P.M., 12.45 night. 
For Augusta and \yaterville, 8.10 A.M., 2.45 and 6.35 P.M., and 

12.45 every night. 

Note.— The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
iston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun- 
day, but do not connect for Skowhegau on Monday morning, or 
lor Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on 
Sunday morning. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BOOTHBI', Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 14, 1884. 



NOTICE. 

BEWARE OF COUNTERFEITS AND IMITATIONS. 
Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and pare Kice Paper, are rolled by the highest 
class of skilled labor, and warranted free from 'flavoring or 
impurities. 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a fac-sijiile of KixxEV 
Bros.' signatuhe. 

''kinbtex" tobacco CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KINNEY BROS. 

NEW YORK. 

The following are our well-known 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Caporal, Sweet Capokal, St. James J, Caporal h, St. 

James, Ambassador, Entre Noiis, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS, STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES 

SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Liitcst and bocociing very popular. Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 



AT IA€KS@M'S. 

2 Odd Fellows' Block, Main Slreel, Brunswick. 

EEPAmiNG NEATLY DONE. 

^iifiwi ^|®llij© J|©ii0ffil ^©f aplmiit 

The Sixty-Third Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 5tli,lSS5, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; ISRAEL 
T.Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, 
M.D., Obstetrics and Diseases of Women .ind Children ; Charles 
W. Goddard, A.m., Jleilical Jurisiiruilcnrc ; Fi;ei>erick H. 
GERRISii, M. D., Anatomy; Hemiv ( akjih ii m;l, Ph.D., Chem- 
istry; Stephen H. Weeks, SI.D., Siir-cry ami <;linical Surgery; 
Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia MciUca and Therapeutics; 
Henry H. Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Irving E. Kimball, M.D., 
Demonstrator of Anatomy; Everett T. Nealev, M.D., Dem- 
onstrator of Histologj^. 

ALFRED MITOHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maiue. 

COLLEGE SOI}GS 



BY HEWKY KABTDALL WAITE. 

One is tempted to pronounce this the very best collection of 
songs extant. If not that, certainly none belter of the size ex- 
ist. Mr. Waite, who has already compiled three College Song 
Books, condenses into this the cream of other collections, ana 
has brought together something that will be welcome in every 
household, as in everv college. 

Seventy-four pieces of American, French, German, or " Afri- 
can " origin, nonsensical, comic, pathetic, musical, and all spark- 

lingiy bright, price but 50 Cents. 

JIailed for the Retail Price. 

OLIVER DITSON & CO., Boston. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLT.EG^E BOOKSTORE. 

We have eoustautly iu stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept iu a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 

BYRON STEVJi;T«fS. 



iiseiii 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Any one having any of the following back 
numbers of the Orient will confer a great favor 
by sending thera to the Business Editor. 

VOL. II., Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17. 

VOL. III., Nos. 1, 7, 10, 12. 

VOL. IV. No. 1. 

VOL. VI., No. 7. 

VOL. VII., No. 13. 

VOL. VIII., No. 11. 

VOL. XII., No. 1. 



'HP ^!H^ tSS^B ^SSr 'SftlBRiT^TR ^HP to^ ^S^ M W ^ 

DUNLAP BLOCK, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT 

BICYCLE 
BASE-BALL 
TENMS 
BOATING 

SPECIAL RATES TO CLUBS. 



SHIJtTS, 
STOCK IS'GS, 
JEIiSEYS. 



OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



TEACHERS WANTED! 



S Principals, 11 Assis 
tants, and a number for 

Music, also Art and Specialties. Send stamp for application 

form and circulars of information to 

NATIONAL SCHOOL SUPPLY BUREAU, 

Mention this paper. CHICAGO, ILL. 



D. W. GEANBEET & CO., 

LAWN-T ENN IS 

DEPARTMENT. 
THE SHE P^ RD FOR 1885, 

Is the Best Racket Made. New Equipoise and other Popular Styles of Our Own Make. Jefferics, Tate, 
Prince, Alexandra, and other Noted English Rackets. All Requisites for Playing the Game. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue and Direetious for Playing. Free. 

^0 & 22 JOHIS STREET, NEW YORK. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Special Rates to Classes! Students 

Interior Views iVIade to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bmnsnrick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vie^rs ; also College Vieirs. 



mi 



OTTAWA 




jCushing's Island, 
Portland, Me. 



:t^. S- C3■IBS01^T. 



^F. H. WILSON,*^ 

DISPENSER OP 

Pit© BfigSj MeilriiiSj^Oleiik-als. 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Go to W, B. Woodard's 

To buy vour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doiug. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



MAIN STEEET, BKTJWSWICK, ME. 



WM. % FIELD, 



M^N^6E^. 



239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. MERRILL. A. KEITH. 



fASSe 



DEALER IN 



GMCEIIES km FIDYISIIINS, 

Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 -WATER ST.. AUGUSTA, MAINE. 






^:^= m^ m^^^wm©M^:^ 



DEALER IN 



m: 



CEDAE STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Eings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
1^= Wiitohes, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN SIKEETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 




ORSMAN'S 

CELEBRATED 



T li: IV TV I s 

1," "Casino,'"' Elberon," "Championship" 
'Berkeley" me siipfrim- to any other Rackets in the 
market The above illustiation repieseiits tht New Backet, " BEIGHTON," which is xwaeceUed. 
Send stamp for Tennis and Birjcle CntTl< »iic 

E. I. HORSMAN, 80 and 82 William St., New York. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



r\ JTC~H-S T^T-T yV T^T) ^^^™s^ *' home 

^ on the 






STENOGRAPH 



This wonderful ShoTthand Writing Machine possesses many 
advantages over, and is learned in much less time than other sys- 
tems. Price, $40. Instructions by mail free. Can be learned 
during vacation. Send stamps for Circular. 

if. S. Steiiof/ftiph Co., St. Louis, Mo. 



F. ROEMER, 

Successor to A. Eoemer & Son, 
THE LARGEST HISTOKICAL 

COSTUMERmARMORER 

IN AMERICA. 

Also Costumer for all the principal theatres : Fifth Avenue 
Theatre, Grand Opera House, Star Theatre, Madison Square 
Theatre, Niblo's Garden Theatre, New Park Theati'e, People's 
Theatre, I4th Street Theatre. 

No. 8 UNION SQUAEE, NEW YORK. 

DEALER IN 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 



lOWBOIM COLLEGE BOYS 

Will save money by purchasing their Tennis Goods, Jer- 
seys, Base-Ball, Bicycle, and Tennis Suits, etc., of 

J. W. BRINE, 



Samples of Jerseys, Knee Pants, Caps, and Suitings, may 
be seen at Koom No. 10, Soitth Appleton. Call and see 
them and get terms before purchasing elsewhere. 



■A^ fflB.8 ^M »»iB"wir®'eas 

Successor to Atwood & "Wentworth, 

DEALER IN 

D!A#OHDS, WATCHES, JEWELRY, 

and importers of French Clocks, Opera Glasses, etc. 
fine Watch Repairing ; Gold and Silver Plating. 

509 CONGRESS ST., Portland, Me. 



All the Students Should Buy 

THEIR 

BObTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 

Frank 1, lobeEts' iset I ShoG StQ,re, 

COK. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Tov\'n Clock. 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &o. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



yA, CLUP i^oAD i^ACE 




Wiik-^'i 



i\\>y\^ ViHs'! 



i I 



(EstabUshed 1S77.) 



Institute Building, Huntington Ave., Boston. 

OWE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 

OTHEK TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 

stamp at above address. 



ALLEN & COMPANY. 




■OF- 



And GENTLEMEN'S IMPORTED NECKDRESSINGS is Complete. 

THE LATEST AND MOST DESIRABLE GOODS NOW OPEN FOE 
MEN'S STYLISH SPRING FURNISHINGS. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 
470 Congress Street, - - Market Square, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGRAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 



-AGENCY FOK- 



JtJTS. 



474 Congress St., - 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

N0. 3 0DD FEIiiiOW^' BII0CK, 

Is the pl.ice to buy 
Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 



mwis'T 



Made at Higgins' Ground-Floor Studio, Bath, 







IH- 

flu 

Ih- 



Portland 


[lusinessf 


iQllege 


^^P The oldest 


£io,U. c^olE 


the kind 


^^^ in tlie State. 


m'Klo/ eb in. ■ 


^ structloD in 


1 enmausMD. 


■ooMecDingl 


■om'l Lai 


■ .nnd all Hie 


m^ collateral H 


" brandies or 


A COMPLETE BUSINESS EDUCATION. 


For further i 


nforniation, addi 


•ess, 


L,. A. GRAY, A.M., Portia 


iKl, Maine. 



The New Styles in 

In all colors, are now ready. An elegant line of New Tork 
Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

— JBLLIOTT'S^i — 

OPPOSITE MASON STKEET. 

x-ive: lyrsN- 

Wanted, to take orders for Trees, Vines, Shrubs, and a general 
line of Nursery Stock. Only those who are over 25 years of age 
and can furnish the very best references need apply. To the 
right men we can give employment the ye.ar round. Experience 
not necess.ary. E. G. CHASE & CO.'S, 8 Pemberton Square, 
Boston, Mass. We pay all expenses and a good SALARY. 



Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

Odd Fellows' Block, Over Bavis' Grocery Store, 
MAIN STREET, - - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 

S. W. BROWNE, Pkoprietok. 




r//e FAVORITE NOS. S03-404-332-l7O-^5l-WITH 

OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



m. J. fflERRTMAN, PHARMACIST,-:- 

DIUGS, HIDICIIIS, 

Fancy ai Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Tolacco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

13° Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 
IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Mnsic Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



Book-Seller, Stationer, Book-Binder, 

AND BLANK-BOOK MANUFACTUEER, 

Opposite City Hall, Center St., Bath, Maine. 

They do say, and it is a fact, that Lentou & Neagle's is the 
cheapest place in this county. Their assortment of trunks and 
bags cannot be beaten. No shop-worn goods, but direct from the 
manufacturers. They have the largest line of whips ever sho^^•n 
in this town. Jobbing of all kinds promptly attended to. 
Trunks and bags neatly repaired. 

HABNESS MAKERS & CARRIAGE TRIMMERS, 
MAIN STREET, Store formerly occupied by -VVashburne. 

©srskff ani See @ff@aia Impoffiuiai, 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

Jg^Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
menceraents. Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 Middle Street. - - - - Portland Me. 



OVER BOARDMAN'S STORE, MAIN STREET. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery ; Portland and Boston Daily Papers ; Circu- 
lating Library, IBOO 'V'olumes ; Base-Ball and La Crosse ; Pict- 
ures and Picture frames; Frames made to order at short notice- 



Dealer in and Agent for 

and all the leading American and English Bicycles and Tricy- 
cles. A few good second-Hand Machines in stock. Also Bi- 
cyle Sundries, etc. Portland, Maine. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday IVIorning by A, G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-sv's Grocery Store. 

.^-Special Bates to Student Clubs. .ffit 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Oreenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of EngUsh sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

CaBsar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust,— Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil,— Buoohcs, aud first six Books of the 
^neid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xenophon,— Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography,— Tozer. 



Arithmetic,- especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra, — so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regular Examinations tor Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 aud 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 183.5). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the HaUoweU Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers of the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by liis pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
mg matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
eleetives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED — FOUR HOURS A "WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, oue terra. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 




#w«#ia 




(SOMMENGEMENT HUMBEr^. 



Vol. XV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JULY 1, 1885. 



No. 5. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE TEAR BT THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

W. V. "Wentwoeth, '86, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
J. H. Davis, '86. Levi Turner, Jr., '86. 

A. A. Knowlton, '86. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. C. Parker, '86. C. B. Burleigh, '87. 

H. L. Taylor, '86. E. C. Plummer, '87. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Kemittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to conti'ibute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 
CONTENTS. 

Vol. XV., No. 5.- Jult 1, 1885. 

Love, 55 

Editorial Notes, 55 

Does It Pay ? 57 

My Mary, 58 

Baccalaureate Sermon, 58 

Phi Beta Kappa Oration, 59 

Class Day 5!) 

Class-Day Oration 60 

Commencement Concert, 64 

Commencement Day, 65 

Base-Ball 66 

Prizes for 18Si-a5, 67 

CoLLEGii Tabula 67 

Personal 69 

Necrology for 188i-85, 69 

In Memoriam 70 

Clippings, 70 

President Hyde Sketched by a College Classmate, . 71 

LOVE. 
A youth and a damsel on rollers I savf , 
'Tvvas the first time they'd ventured within the rink's 
maw, 

But soon their feet started. 

Looked upward and darted. 

And I know you'd died laughing to hear that girl jaw. 

R. 




From at! excliauge, we learn that 
in some colleges, notably Amherst, those 
students who obtain a rank of seventy-five 
per cent, in any branch, are excused from 
taking an examination in that stud}^. 

Whether the information be correct or 
not, it appears as though such a plan might 
be productive of good, if adopted at Bow- 
doin. Those who stand near the head of a 
class seldom feel much concern about ex- 
aminations, knowing that as a result of 
faithful work during the term, they can 
easily pass them, and sometimes feeling that 
their rank has been high enough to j)ass 
them, even though they should do little at 
the end. On the contrary those who stand 
low, especially those who have shirked their 
work as much as possible, generally dread 
examinations, feeling that, unless they ac- 
quit themselves with much-desired, but 
scarcely-to-be-expected credit, they will fail 
to pass, knowing that their term rank has 
not been high enough to carry them through, 
and that as a consequence of inattendance 
to studies, they are unprepared for the final 
test. Naturally enough they endeavor to 
supply their deficiency, by falUng into the 



56 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



habit of " cramming for examinations," and 
the result is that nearly all get through, but 
some with a very superficial knowledge of 
the study pursued. 

If the announcement were made that 
those obtaining a certain minimum rank in 
any study, would be excused from the 
examination in that branch, it seems to us 
that there would be a percejDtible improve- 
ment in recitations. The very ones who 
now attempt to get through as easily as pos- 
sible, — dreading the examinations, and trust- 
ing to luck to avoid a condition, — would, we 
think, feel that an additional incentive for 
honest work and a good standing was offered, 
and we feel confident that many, hoping to 
avoid what they so much dread, would do 
more faithful work during the term, and 
less hasty reviewing during the last two or 
three days. If so, the studies could not fail 
to be of additional benefit. 



It is with great pleasure that we are at 
length enabled to announce that the boards 
have elected a President for Bowdoin. For 
a year, Prof. Packard was Acting President, 
and he was re-elected to that position last 
Commencement, but his death occurred 
within a week. During the last two years, 
the affairs of the college have been excel- 
lently managed by Prof Chapman as Dean, 
but it has been felt that a permanent head 
is needed, having more complete authority. 

Wednesday evening, the boards unani- 
mously elected Rev. William DeWitt Hyde, 
Harvard, '79, President of Bowdoin College, 
and Professor of Mental Pliilosophy. From 
1879 to 1880, he attended Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary, from there going to Andover, 
where he graduated in 1882. He then took 
a post-graduate course in Philosophy, at Har- 
vard, and for the last two years has been 
pastor of a Congregational Church in Pat- 
erson, N. J. 

Although comparatively a young man. 



he is very highly recommended as a zealous 
stiident, of wonderful executive ability, and 
one of the deepest thinkers of his age. 
President-elect Hyde is said to be much in- 
terested in athletics, which will be pleasing 
news to the yoi^nger alumni and to the un- 
dergraduates. 



Of the other action of the boards, a few 
remarks may be made. Rev. W. D. Hyde 
being chosen Professor of Mental Philoso- 
phy, as well as President, Prof. Brown will 
of course retire, after two years of faithful 
work, during which time he has endeared 
himself to his classes, and it is a cause of re- 
gret to us that we have never been favored 
with his instruction. 

Prof. Little did not care to remain longer 
in the chair of Latin, upon which language he 
has put much study, preferring to devote his 
whole time to the library. He has been 
chosen college librarian, and Prof. Avery 
will have both Greek and Latin, being al- 
lowed a tutor. Mr. Potter will leave, and 
his work in the department of Rhetoric will 
be done by Mr. Little. 

It was voted not to remove the Medical 
School to Portland. 

Probably the fact that it was determined 
to build a new gymnasium, will cause more 
rejoicing than anything else that the boards 
did, unless, possibly, the election of a Presi- 
dent should be excepted. It was voted to 
take from the college funds $5,000 for the 
purpose, provided that as much more could 
be raised by subscription. We understand 
that about that sum has been obtained, and 
that Prof. Young has been instructed to 
proceed at once to make a contract for erect- 
ing the building. At length then, we are to 
have that which is so much needed for pro- 
moting the general health of the students, 
and for training those who represent the 
college on the diamond and the water, and 
we are pleased with the prospect. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



57 



•The Commencement just ended has been 
characterized especially by its quietness. 
The G. A. R. Encampment, in Portland, 
di^ew to that city immense crowds, particu- 
larly on Tuesday, and consequently there 
have been fewer alumni and fewer students 
here than iisual. The old-time Commence- 
ment punch has not done its part towards 
making " Rome howl," and two alumni, who 
were so daring as to shout to some students in 
a room, about midnight of Commencement 
evening, reported that they immediately saw 
a couple of watchmen start up from the 
shadows of King Chapel, and view them 
suspiciously. 

On Tuesday, the campus looked almost 
deserted, and even the Class-Day exercises 
failed to draw the customary crowd. The 
poem we hoped to publish, but the poet's 
modesty would not allow it. We were not 
fortunate enough to hear it read, but have 
heard it favorably spoken of. The parting 
address we considered exceptionally fine, 
and liked the prophecy though, if a little 
briefer, it would have been more to our 
taste. The historian displayed the charac- 
teristic class spirit in his reference to '84 
and '86. Notwithstanding his intimation 
that the class of '84 were only a pack of 
rowdies, we still hold to our opinion that it 
was a very gentlemanly and able class, and 
we imagine that the bitterness exhibited is 
due to the fact that with less numbers, '84 
accomplished much more than '85? 

When the historian denies that '86's Bu- 
gle has any merits, and lauds that of '85 to 
the skies, he utters sentiments contrary to 
what we have generally heard expressed. 
Certainly our editors did not fall so low as 
to adopt the contemptible plan of asking a 
class to furnish a history, accepting it with 
profuse thanks and a promise that it should 
be published, and then putting in its stead, 
an uncalled for and unusual attack upon 
that class. The assailed class of '84 did not 



use '85 in that way, when they were Sopho- 
mores, nor did they treat us so even as 
Freshmen. Perhaps some feeling has been 
engendered against '86, from the fact that 
with little more than half as many men, we 
have surpassed them in athletics, in popu- 
larity, and in the success of all our under- 
takings. 

One more thing deserves notice, and 
that is '86's Bugle. After vexatious delays, 
it has finally appeared to speed our depart- 
ure. In its style not so gaudy as the one 
published last year, it is neat in appearance 
and contains some excellent cuts. The sev- 
eral classes were invited to furnish histories, 
and all responded except '85, who perhaps 
felt that no history was the best account 
they could furnish. 

The general aftangement of the Bugle is 
attractive, and it abounds in good hits, the 
Calendar being particularly interesting. 
The literary matter is not what we should 
have been pleased to see, though one of the 
poems, "A Dream," deserves praise both 
for the patriotic motive which inspired its 
writer, and for its metrical beauty. 

But we also find some things to criticise. 
It seems to us decidedly out of taste to at- 
tack the faculty so vehemently. They are 
capable of standing many grinds, but it 
seems to us as though the number were ex- 
cessive, and some of them unjust. 



DOES IT PAY? 

Does it pay to burn your smoking 
On some neighbor's generous soul ? 
Does it pay to run your fire 
From his larger pile of coal ? 
Does it pay to borrow dollars 
Which you know you'll ne'er return ? 
Does it pay to shirk the lessons 
Which you're giving cash to learn ? 
Does it pay to skip the duties 
Which surround your daily life? 
Does it pay to marry money 



58 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



When you're seeking for a wife ? 
Does it pay to be a traitor 
To your honest sense of right, 
Or to sacrifice your honor 
To attain distinction's height? 
Does it pay to say you cannot 
When you know full well you can i 
Does it pay to be a mummy 
When you ought to be a man ? 
Does it pay ? Look on the ruins 
Strewn along life's weary way ; 
And you'll quickly find an answer 
To the question, " Does it pay?" 



MY MARY. 

I met her at the new-year's ball ; 
Then ventured on a friendly call, 
Till soon she was my all in all ; 

My Mary. 
Her form was dignity and grace ; 
Her voice no music could replace ; 
And ah ! the beauty of that face ! 

My Mary. 

Within an arbor's bower we sat, 
My love encouraged by her chat. 
Till I resolved to speak of that 

To Mary. 
But when, with faltering tones and low, 
I asked her if it should be so. 
She sweetly smiled and answered "No " 

Oh Mary ! 



E. 



BACCALAUREATE SERMON. 
We give below an abstract of the bacca- 
laureate sermon, delivered Sunday, June 
20th, at 1 P.M., by Prof. S. G. Brown. It was 
a remarkably fine effort, and was highly ap- 
preciated, and our only regret is that we 
have not space for it, or at least for his part- 
ing address to the Senior class. His text 
was taken from Matt, xx., 26, 27. 

"Whosoever will be great among you, let him be your minister, 
and "Whosoever will be chief among you, let liim be your ser- 
vant." 

Doubtless these words may be considered as en- 
forcing a general lesson of humility, but beyond this 
they imply also the wider truth, that service and 
ministration are duties. Not to be ministered unto, 
but to minister was the conspicuous glory of our 



Lord himself. Let us remember thus, that every 
privilege of culture has added to our obligation, 
every advantage has imposed a duty, every step 
upward, while it has freed us from shackles of igno- 
rance or prejudice, has laid upon us a heavier burden 
of responsibility. The inquiry, what services othei's 
have a right to demand of us, and which it becomes 
us to try to give, will not seem foolish when we 
call to mind the remarkable changes of the last score 
or two of years, the activity and audacity of modern 
thought, the new direction of scientific investigation, 
the gre.^t movements of religious feeling and enter- 
prise, the profound dififerences, and strong opposi- 
tions of philosophical opinions, and the wonderful 
advancement in our knowledge of material forces. 
If any one thinks that all the battles have been 
fought, that all the worlds have been conquered, that 
nothing is left for him but meekly to fold his hands 
and rest, he may be awakened somewhat rudely 
from this dream of optimism. To educated men, let 
us say, in the first place, it naturally belongs both to 
discern, and to preserve sound principle. For the 
safety of society there must be a perceiving eye, and 
a conserving force. The calm, thoughtful, disciplined 
judgment is often necessary to resist the impulses of 
feeling, which, however righteous in some cases, if 
uncontrolled, would defeat their own ends. We 
would not assume for learning a place which does 
not properly belong to it, yet surely educated men, 
in whom the moral as well as intellectual nature has 
been properly instructed and disciplined, are bound 
by their very privileges to special duties. Has not 
society a right to demand of its educated men, in 
jurisprudence, in legislation, in practical life, wis- 
dom in counsel, moderation and fairness in decision, 
probity in administration, energy in action? To 
some such results their studies ought to have led 
them, or they have sadly failed in their aims. In 
the contests of opinion, the scholar is not to stand 
aloof and silent, motionless and indifferent, too 
dainty to soil his hands with rough work, too timid 
to venture into the battle, but rather, holding with a 
firm grasp the standard of justice and truth, he is to 
give all the powers of a cultivated and enlarged un- 
derstanding to the solution. of the new and compli- 
cated problems of life. Much more in the moral 
sphere will it be fatal if the jDrofessed lovers of the 
truth are too timid to utter it, if the defenders of the 
faith hang their bows and shields upon the wall. 
There are responsibilities which the student can 
neither oast off nor evade, and one of the grav«st is 
that of helping to guide the public thought, and to 
quicken the public conscience. And this leads to 
the suggestion, that it is a duty of educated men, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



born of their privileges, by their own example of 
high virtue to lead the public mind to a profounder 
sense of duty and rectitude. They must show in 
their own lives the excellence of truth and goodness ; 
must illustrate everywhere the beauty of high char- 
acter ; in the midst of dishonesty and craft (if there 
be such), in politics or trade, in church or state, they 
should stand conspicuous for simplicity and integ- 
rity ; in danger they must be cool and level headed, 
in emergencies of peril considerate and unselfish, in 
every condition they must strive for whatsoever is 
pure, and lovely, and of good report. What is their 
education good for if it does not help to make them 
cultivated, manly, honorable, just, and brave? 

A privilege is it as well as a duty, to preserve un- 
sullied the finer, purer, and better thoughts and sen- 
timents, all those virtues which dignify and bless 
mankind, which are the life of the individual, and of 
the state, which exalt the soul, and from small peo- 
ple and obscure communities may bring forth the 
enduring example of heroism and honor. 



PHI BETA KAPPA ORATION. 

The following is an abstract of Prof. 
Egbert C. Smyth's eloquent address before 
the alnmui, Wednesday afternoon : 

From the rock by the sea on which our revered 
teacher sat for a moment ere his mortal strength 
failed a monument is rising of stones deposited 
in token of esteem by visitors as they pass. 
The only adequate commemoration of Professor 
Packard's service would be for the thousands of his 
pupils each to testify what he received. He knew 
personally almost every graduate of the college 
from the beginning. He united us all. He was a 
representative of wiiat the college had stood for dur- 
ing the century. It was as natural to expect to 
meet him here as to see the chapel spires or the 
Thorndike Oak. Even while he was with us the 
muse of Longfellow immortalized his " faithful serv- 
ice." Dignum laucle virwn viusa vetat niori. 

The public press, the pulpit, numerous associa- 
tions of alumni have paid just tribute to his mem- 
ory. He left no private records, nothing to be re- 
vealed. But the memory of those we honor and 
love, is an exhaustless fountain. The lightest touch 
is enough where the chord is electric. 

The Germans have a saying that a man cannot be 
too careful in the selection of his parents. Our Pro- 
fessor was well born ; his father was a soldier in the 
Revolutionary War, a graduate of Harvard, where he 
was a Tutor four years, a devoted Christian minister,. 



an early Trustee of Bowdoin, a teacher while a pas- 
tor, a man of great punctuality, industry, method, 
and varied usefulness. His wife was a daughter of 
Rev. Alpheus Spring, of Kittery, a woman of su- 
perior powers. Six of her sons entered Bowdoin. 
Wiscasset, the early home was the most important 
town east of Portland. The homestead was in the 
midst of striking scenery. The old Lincoln County 
was like the marshes of England and Scotland ; no 
other region in this country appeals more power- 
fully to the historic imagination or more distinctly 
reflects the great stages and movements in the 
progress of civilization. It has been the scene of 
wars of races, of thrilling personal adventures. 
Everywhere are suggestions of remote antiquity, of 
dusky populations. With the rise of civilization 
came in the adventurous, the stalwart and brave 
of every commercial nation. The county was a 
school in history, and it is no wonder that our Pro- 
fessor became a promoter of historical studies. 

After sketching these influences of home society, 
and early training. Professor Packard's long service 
to the college was exhibited in connection with the 
chairs he filled, Greek and Latin languages, and 
Literatures, Rhetoric and Oratory, Natural and Re- 
vealed Religion ; also his services in the cause of 
popular and collegiate education as a preacher, 
author, librarian, associate member of the Maine 
Historical Society, acting President of College. His 
most conspicuous moral trait was utter fidelity — 
with this was connected constant growth. His life 
was a whole-hearted consecration to unselfish, and 
noble ends, and the law — he who serves shall reign — 
bore him to his throne. Dr. Nott approached but 
did not equal his term of service. In England the 
famous Dr. Routh slightly exceeded it. Professor 
Packard was an officer of Bowdoin College sixty-five 
years, without absence or interruption. He sleeps 
in the ancient pine-girt cemetery with McKeen and 
Appleton, and colleagues, and friends of many years 

" Where the shade 
He loved will guard his slumbers night and day, 

Fitting close 

For such a life ! His twelve long sunny hours 
Bright to tlie edge of darkness ; then the calm 
Repose of twilight and a cro%vn of stars." 



CLASS DAY. 

In the rapid flight of time another class 
day has come and gone. The day was cool 
and pleasant. 

At 10.30 A.M. the class marched into 



60 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Memorial Hall, where the following pro- 
gramme was carried out : 



Prayer. 

Oration. 

Poem. 



F. W. Davis. 

J. F. Libby. 

Boyd Bartlett. 



The oration was a very finely written 
production, teeming with excellent thoughts 
throughout. The poem was also a very fine 
production and well rendered. 

At 3 o'clock a large audience assembled 
under the ancient Thorndike Oak to listen 
to the remainder of the exercises : 
Opening Address by the President. 

MUSIC. 

History. F. W. Alexander. 

MUSIC. 

Propliecy. W. C. Kendall. 

MUSIC. 
Parting Address. E. R. Harding. 

MUSIC 

The opening addi-ess was a welcome to 
all. The history was a well written review 
of the four years the class has been connected 
with the college. The prophecy showed the 
writer to have a good imagination. Instead 
of the proverbial dream he found his class- 
mates in Hades. The parting address was 
a very happy effort. 

After the close of the literary exercises, 
the class smoked the Pipe of Peace, and 
then formed in line, marched to the dif- 
ferent halls, and gave three lusty cheers. 
The farewells were then said, thus closing 
the exercises of the day. The music was 
furnished by the Salem Cadet Band, whose 
productions were the finest ever heard on 
the campus. There was a strong wind, which 
rendered it difficult to hear all that was said. 

From the historian we have obtained the 
following statistics : 

Number entered, 43 ; number died, 3 ; number 
graduated, 28. 

Oldest — Butler, 29 years 6 months 6 days. 

Youngest— Freeman, 20 years 9 months 10 days. 

Average age, 23 years 11 months 22 days. 



Tallest man — Cook, 6 feet 3 inches. 

Shortest man — Norton, 5 feet 4i inches. 

Total height, 161 feet. 

Average height, 5 feet 9 inches. 

Heaviest man — Brown, 180 pounds. 

Lightest man — Tarr, 123 pounds. 

Total weight, 4,256 pounds. 

Average weight, 152 pounds. 

Intended occupations — Law, 9 ; teaching, 6 ; med- 
icine, 2; business, 2; ministry, 1; artist, 1; imde- 
cided, 7. 

Political preferences — Republicans, 21 ; Demo- 
crats, 6 ; undecided, 1. 

Religious preferences — Congregationalists, 11; 
Universalists, 3 ; Unitarians, 3 ; Episcopalians, 2 ; 
Baptist, 1 ; Free Baptist, 1 ; no preference, 7. 

Favorite study— English Literature, 10; Chem- 
istry, 5 ; Psychology, 2 ; Natural Sciences, 2 ; Amer- 
ican Literature, Latin, Mathematics, History, Public 
Law, Biology, Moral Science, Political Economy, 
Litei'ature, one each. 

The class is almost unanimous in the belief of 
Evolution. 

The dance on the Green in the evening 
was an enjoyable affair. A little shower 
during intermission rendered the floor unfit 
for dancing afterward. There we:re spreads 
in various rooms, so that the remaining time 
was passed very pleasantly. 

The music for dancing was also furnished 
by the Salem Cadet Band. 



INFLUENCE OF LITERATURE IN 
THE AGES. 

CLASS-DAY ORATION BY JOHN F. LIBBY. 

In the mysterious development of this 
wondrous world the fact is jDlainly revealed, 
that it is not governed by rude impulses and 
spasmodic movements but by laws ever con- 
stant in their influence, and harmonious in 
their operation. The ■ rotation and revolu- 
tion of the planets are not the result of a 
storm coming furiously from the depths of 
space by sudden shocks; those sublime 
motions are produced by the enduring prin- 
ciples and laws of attraction and repulsion. 
A tornado springing from the chambers of 
the wind and carrying death and destruction 



BOWDOIN OF?IENT. 



61 



to all in its path does uot bind the needle 
point to the north ; it is the silent but en- 
during power of magnetism which neither 
sleeps nor tires in its action. 

Wliile physical force thus acts in defined 
methods, thought defies gravitation, and is 
not thwarted by space. Like the germs in 
Egyptian tombs, its vitality never perishes ; 
and its fruit will spring up after it has been 
buried for ages. The student of history sees 
it distilling like the dew, and dropping as 
the gentle rain from heaven and everywhere 
diffusmg its potent spell until it becomes 
crystallized in the literature of the age. 
The geologist breaks open the earth like a 
huge sarcophagus and reads its fossil hiero- 
glyphics and finds embalmed ages. The 
astronomer points his telescope to the 
heavens and receives the ray of vision till 
the mind becomes dizzy with the vastness of 
the conception and dazzled by the light of 
knowledge revealed. The historian, on the 
other hand, turns to the quiet records of the 
past and there traces the rise and fall of 
kings and empires. He finds no way in 
wliich the pulse of humanity can be so ac- 
curately felt as through its expression. In 
no place is its expression so well defined 
with all the fluctuations and shades of mean- 
ing, all the various modifications of strength 
and purpose as in its literature tlirough which 
throbs the life and thought of the times and 
age. 

If we turn our attention to the East, the 
question at once suggests itself, why have 
these nations perished? Why have the 
names of Chaldea, Assyria, and Egypt been 
starred upon the catalogue of nations? 
People are still living on the banfe of the 
Euphrates, the Tigris and the Nile, and there 
is abundant evidence that in manual arts as 
well as in arms these people of the East 
were great in their generation, yet their lit- 
erature must have been exceedingly defective, 
otherwise their monuments of thoua;ht no 



more than their masonry could have so 
perished as scarcely to have left a wreck 
beliind. They could embalm bodies, but 
hieroglyphs themselves have failed to embalm 
ideas. One verdict, and one epitaph, will 
answer for them all : 

"They had no poet and they died." 

Leaving the maze of heirogiyphics we 
come to the realities of Grecian literature, 
where Homer could rouse a nation into ecsta- 
sies, and Orpheus could " soothe the savage 
breast " by the music of his harp. Here lit- 
erature and freedom flourished together. It 
was during that brief, but illustrious period 
that Athens shone forth in all its luster. But 
at Chaeronea the spirit of Athens was hum- 
bled before Philip of Macedon. Demos- 
thenes lifted his eloquent voice in tones 
quivering with patriotic feeling, to urge his 
countrymen to oppose Philip, and by every 
appeal to their solicitude for the living, as 
well as their respect for the dead, endeavored 
to arouse them from their lethargy ; but all 
in vain. By the prowess in arms of Philip, 
and by the successors of Alexander, Greece 
was struck down to the earth forever. 

Good men have wept over the wreck of 
Grecian republics and bewailed the sad 
events which wrested freedom fi'om the home 
of knowledge, of heroes and wise men ; and 
have loved to dwell upon the memory of 
those who perished. Yet the calamities of 
Greece may have been an immense gain to 
the world by diffusing abroad that leaven 
which otherwise might have been spread only 
over the surface of her own territory. But 
under the benign influence of literature, the 
thunder of Demosthenes, and the melody of 
Homer, have never yet died away. 

Turning to Rome we find the same influ- 
ence at work there. When the purple was 
assumed by Augustus, Rome had arrived at 
the acme of her pohtical and intellectual 
grandeur. The vulture of ambition had 
carried her triumphant standards around a 



62 



BOWDOIN ORI&NT. 



subjugated world, until at last it retires to 
plume its weary wings and rest from foreign 
flight. Then followed the blessedness of 
that great calm which is imaged in the poems 
of Virgil. 

Events which have caused great excite- 
ment have been succeeded by illustrious 
periods of literature. Thus it is that the 
mind, gathering about her the splendid habil- 
iments of power and glory goes forth like a 
mighty giant in the march of improvement. 
Spain, while fighting for religion and a secure 
nationality, had her Cervantes, Lope de Vega, 
and Calderon. The Dutch people, while 
struggling against Philip II., seemed to find 
a stimulus in the very exhaustion of war. 
A milder conflict carried on by intrigue and 
diplomacy for a peaceable separation from 
Catholicism would never have quickened 
the intelligence and nourished so many 
English exiles to embark on the Mayflower. 

Literature is thus both passive and active 
in its functions ; passive since it stores up 
the thought of its own age ; and active since 
it is the develoj)ing agency between that 
thought and the thought of succeeding gen 
erations. History tells us that the "Dra- 
pier's Letters " of Swift set Ireland on fire, 
cancelled the patent of King William, in- 
spired or kept breathing the spirit which in 
a later day the eloquence of Grattan evoked 
to a national life. Burke's "Eeflections on 
the French Revolution " began that great 
contention of nations that lasted a quarter of 
a century, till the sun went down on the 
drenched field of Waterloo. " The sarcasms 
of Voltaire," says one writer, " had torn away 
its grandeur from the throne, and its sacred- 
ness from the kindred church, or popular 
violence might not have blown them both 
into the air." 

Consequently, the pen can do all that the 
sword can do, besides being able to reach 
into a thousand regions and do a thousand 
things utterly impossible for the grosser and 



clumsier symbol. It was the dash of the pen 
that sent Lady Jane Grey, Mary Stuart, and 
Sir Walter Raleigh to the executioner's 
block. In response to its terrible conjuring, 
the Inquisition rose and floated through 
Christendom in blood. No warrior of that 
age wielded a cross-bow or battle-axe a hun- 
dredth part so terrible as the pen of Dante, 
the little implement which set the thoughts 
and feelings of his soul on the imperishable 
pages of the "Divinia Commedia." Only a 
Dante can interest us in the politics of his 
day. But how vividly the imagination of 
the educated world to-day sees his enemies 
still crouching, and writhing in the purga- 
tory and hell where his pen put them ! 

We can never prophesy the limits of in- 
tellectual power. History warns us against 
attempting it. The genius of a Plato was 
evolved from the capacities of the race. 
But who, in Homer's time, could have con- 
ceived the possibilities of Platonism. It 
would have been a revelation — strange 
enough — in the heroic age. Cultivation and 
civilization prepared the way for him, how- 
ever, and Plato comes, the perfection of 
Grecian genius. There are never facts 
enough in human experiences to foretell the 
development of genius. It may show itself 
at once to the astonished world like a meteor 
in the darkness of midnight. Every genius 
is an impossibility till he appears. Two 
centuries before his time, Shakspeare was a 
poetic miracle ; to-day, he is a poetic wonder. 

" All kinds of genius," says one writer, 
" if cast on a marked and stormy age, are 
tinged and moulded by it. None so hardy, 
none so spiritual, none so individualized, 
none so self-nourished, none so immersed in 
its own consciousness, subjectivity, and self- 
admiration, as not to own and bow to the 
omnipresent manifested spirit of the time. 
Goethe, Byron, Alfieri, the far mightier Mil- 
ton, are ready illustrations. Between them 
and that crisis of the nations, and of the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



63 



race in which they lived, on which they 
looked fascinated, entranced, how influencive 
and inevitable the sympathy ! Into that 
bright or dim dream of enchantment, in- 
vention, ideality, in which was their poet- 
life, how are the shapes of this outward 
world projected, how its cries of despair or 
triumph re-echo there, that new heaven and 
new earth, their dwelling-place ; how they 
give back the cloud and storm, the sunshine 
and waning moon, how they breathe the 
gales, and laugh with the iiowers, and sad. 
den with the wastes of oiir earth and sky ! 

"Topics, treatment, thoughts, characters 
moods, — how they all but imitate and repro- 
duce the real in the ideal, life in immortality. 
Take the extraordinary instance of Milton. 
That heroic individuality, what was it but 
the product of a hard, unaccommodating, orig- 
inal, mighty nature, moulded and tinged by 
the tragic and sharp reahties of national 
revolution ? and it seems to go with him, 
partaking of its mixed original, whitherso- 
ever the song wanders, soars, or sinks, — in 
the paths of Eden, on the perilous edge of 
battle waged for the throne of God, in re- 
porting the counsels of the Infinite in the 
past eternity, in hailing the Holy Light on 
which those orbs, overplied, as he consoled 
himself, in liberty's defense, were closed for- 
ever." 

So, too, of the resplendent names of 
Goethe, Byron, and Alfieri : the spirit of the 
time was as vehement in them as it was in 
the young Napoleon. In their troubled and 
unequalled songs they uttered the voices of 
the times, as he uttered them by the cannon 
of his victories. 

Thus truth, when it reveals itself, can 
never be stilled — it never retrogrades. Af- 
ter, it may be, a long time, that, which one 
far-seeing one has hung up on high for all to 
gaze at, receives the homage of the world. 
This accomplished, a second Hercules severs 
another limb from the monster of absurdity, 



bequeathed by former ages — a Prometheus 
touches it with celestial fire, and at last ap- 
pears, in its place, a faultless angel, bearing 
in its lineaments the impress of heaven. 

It is to such efforts, and to such men that 
we must look for the long-expected litera- 
ture of this nation. Hitherto our literature 
has been but an echo of other voices and 
climes. 

In the history of nations song has pre- 
ceded science, and the feeling of a people 
has been developed sooner than its under- 
standing; but with us the order has been 
reversed. The national understanding is 
fully ripe ; but the feeling, the imagination 
of the people, has found, as yet, no adequate 
expression. We have our men of science, 
our Franklins, our Bowdwitchs, and Cleave- 
lands ; we have our orators and statesmen ; 
but a severer discipline must prepare the 
way for our Dantes, our Shakspeares, and 
our Miltons. " He would write an epic," 
said one of these, "must make his life an 
epic." This touches our infirmity. We have 
no practical poets — no epic lives. 

Whatever may happen to our splendid 
edifices — our arts — our manufactories, the 
principle, for which we have toiled, will not 
be lost to mankind. In this aspect, it is no 
idle curiosity which leads us to pierce the 
future of literature — to endeavor to mark out 
its destiny in the chapter of civilization, 
that opened with the imposing pagentry of 
the northern invasion. 

Let us have sincere, earnest, whole- 
hearted, heroic men, and we shall not want 
for writers and literary fame. Then nothing 
but a mighty flood can destroy all our 
printing-presses and books, without carrying 
to remote generations our ideas, and extend- 
ing our influence while men love to hear of 
the past or improve the present. Then, if a 
horde from some frozen and rock-bound 
coast should overwhelm us, some Tacitus, 
some Livy, some Cicero, some Virgil, some 



64 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Homer, some Plato, some Demosthenes will 
survive the wreck. 

The man who writes successfully for 
America will yet speak to all the world. 
Then there will spring up in every part of 
this republic a hterature such as the ages 
have not known, — a literature commensurate 
with our ideas, vast as our destiny, and 
varied as our clime. 



COMMENCEMENT CONCERT. 
The Commencement Concert was held 
in the Town Hall, Wednesday evening, and 
was one of the best we have had here for 
some years. The evening was beautiful, 
and a much larger audience was present 
than last year, the seats in the body of the 
hall being nearly all taken, and quite a num- 
ber in the gallery. The concert lasted till 
nearly eleven o'clock, as nearly all the per- 
formers were called back once, and some of 
them several times. The following is the 
programme of the evening: 

PART I. 

Overture — Niagara. — Boettger. 



Violia Solo, 



Salem Cadet Band. 
a Romanza Andalousa. — Sarasati. 
J b Fantasie on Gypsy Airs. 

Mr. Leopold Lichtenburg. 
Quartette — Song of the Lark. — Mendelssohn. 
Miss Stewart, Miss Edmonds, Mr. Fessenden, Mr. 

Barnabee. 
Soug— My name is John Wellington 

Wells.— Sullivan. Mr. H. C. Barnabee. 

Recitative and Aria, from La Traviata. — Verdi. 

Miss Rose Stewart. 
Song — Beneath the Hazel Tree. — Suppe. 

Mr. W. H. Fessenden. 
Patria — Mattel. Miss Gertrude Edmonds« 

Selection — La Somnambnla. — Bellini. 

Salem Cadet Band. 
PART n. 

Quartette— Bella Figlia, from Rigoletto. — Verdi. 
Miss Stewart, Miss Edmonds, Mr. Fessenden, Mr. 

Barnabee. 
Violin Solo — Polonaise No. 1 in D Ma- 
jor. — Wieniavvski. Mr. Leopold Lichtenburg. 
J a Solo for Cornet. ^ — Selected. 
I b Solo for Zylophone. — Reed. 

Wm. E. McQuinn and Salem Cadet Band. 



Song — The Tomkins Silver Wedding. — Dow. 

Mr. H. C. Barnabee. 
Aria from Le Pre'aux Clercs. — Herold. 
Violin Obligato, by Mr. Leopold Lichtenburg 

and Miss Rose Stewart. 
English Ballad. — Selected. Mr. W. H. Fessenden. 
Good-bye. — Tosti. Miss Gertrude Edmonds. 

Concert Medley. — Catlin. Salem Cadet Band. 

Mr. Lichtenburg beautifully rendered 
"Fantasie on Gypsy Airs," which was en- 
thusiastically received by the audience. He 
returned and played the " Campbells are 
Coming," in a most pleasing way, bringing 
out the highest notes as clear as a bell. Mr. 
Lichtenburg well deserves the reputation he 
has earned, and his playing was one of the 
most enjoyable features of the evening. 

Miss Rose Stewart has a very clear, sweet 
voice, and graceful and pleasing manner, 
and her selections were finely rendered. 

Mr. Barnabee is a favorite here, as well 
as elsewhere, and was received with applause 
when he came on the stage. He sang sev- 
eral songs of a humorous character, in such 
an amusing way that they could not help 
taking the audience by storm. He was en- 
cored after every piece he sang. On being 
called back the first time he sang the " The 
Disagreeable Man," from the new opera, 
" Princess Ida." 

" Bella Figlia," from Rigoletto, was 
finely rendered by Miss Stewart, Miss Ed- 
monds, Mr. Fessenden, and Mr. Barnabee. 

Mr. Fessenden, it is perhaps needless to 
say, was well received, and sang with all liis 
usual power and feeling. 

Miss Gertrude Edmonds has a very 
strong, rich voice, and sang " Patria " in a 
way pleasing to all. 

The piece most appreciated by the audi- 
ence was a solo on the Zylophone, by Wm. 
McQuinn and Salem Cadet Band. The 
Baud has played very finely, and their se- 
lections have been good, and seem to have 
given as good satisfaction as any music we 



60WD0IN ORIENT. 



65 



have had here Commencement. The con- 
cert closed with a Medley by the band, and 
was certainly most enjoyable to all who at- 
tended. 



COMMENCEMENT DAY. 
The procession was formed with the cns- 
tomary promptness (?), the boards as usual 
transacting considerable business, which 
caused some delay. Headed by the Marshal, 
Hon. Charles J. Gilman, and the Juvenile 
Band, the Trustees, Overseers, Faculty, 
Alumni, and Graduating Class marched to 
the church where the exercises were as fol- 
lows: 

MUSIC. 
PRATER. 

Exercises for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
"Americanized"; with Latin Salutatory. 

Boyd Bartlett, Ellsworth. 
Shall America Increase her Dominion ? 

Wilson Ryder Butler, Lawrence, Mass. 
The Bartholdi Statue. 

John Andrew Peters, Ellsworth. 
Saxon Lifluence in American Civilization. 

Frank West Alexander, Richmond. 

MUSIC 

Impatient Reform. 

Marshall Hagar Purrington, Bath. 
The Scholar in the Republic. 

John Fuller Libby, Richmond. 
Experimental Science in a Liberal Education. 

Frank William Davis, Hiram. 

MUSIC. 

A Plea for Immortality. 

Webb Donnell, Sheepscot Bridge. 
A Substitute for Greek. 

Frank Nathaniel Whittier, Farmington Falls. 
Popular Education. 

Lucius Bion Folsom, Bethel. 

MUSIC. 

Exercises for the Degree of Master of Arts. 
* Mr. Melvin Smith Holway, Augusta. 
Valedictory in Latin. 

* Mr. William Albion Moody, Kennebunk. 

CONFERHING OF DEGREES. 
PRATER. 

benediction. 
* Excused. 



At the completion of these exercises the 
procession re-formed and marched to Lower 
Memorial, where the annual Alumni Dinner 
was in readiness. 

After the wants of all had been satisfied. 
Rev. Egbert Smyth made a few opening re- 
marks, in the course of which he spoke of 
the newly chosen President and read some 
letters of recommendation. He then in- 
troduced Chief-Justice Peters, who said that 
he fitted for Bowdoin, but went to Yale, 
because of the trouble here at that time. 
There he found that Bowdoin had a national 
reputation, and he believes that Maine boys 
should go to Maine colleges. He thought 
there was room enough for all college gradu- 
ates, and that with honor and industry they 
can succeed. He emphasized the need of 
universal education as the only safeguard for 
this country. 

Pres. Smyth called upon Prof. Chapman 
to speak of the condition of the college, re- 
ferring to him as the Senior member of the 
Faculty, upon whose shoulders has fallen the 
mantle of liis predecessors, who labored with 
our late Acting President Packard, and who 
during the past year has so successfully con- 
ducted the affairs of the college. 

Prof. Chapman, who was greeted with 
hearty and long-continued applause, referred 
to the liigh positions held by BoAvdoin grad- 
uates in all departments of life. He spoke 
in high terms of the Senior class, and de- 
clared that the past year has been free from 
those disturbances which once injured the 
college so much. He also mentioned our 
securing the base-ball championship, and 
spoke encouragingly of the boating pros- 
pects. 

Rev. Dr. Prentiss, class of '35, a Pro- 
fessor in Union Theological Seminary, and 
Mr. H. V. Poor, of the same class, made 
some interesting remarks, and were followed 
by Mr. W. E. Spear and Hon. J. B. Redman, 
'70, and Mr. C. U. BeU, '63. 



66 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BASE-BALL. 

Our base-ball record for tliis year is one 
of remarkable brilliancy. In the Massachu- 
setts games the nine made a good showing, 
and in the intercollegiate contests the 
work was splendid — losing but a single 
game. 

The prize cup offered by H. E. Cole, of 
'83, for general record, was won by Pushor. 
Below is a record of all the men who played 
on the nine during ths season of '85, fol- 
lowed by a record for the intercollegiate 









*s 


S 






rS 


a 


g=tb 








M 


a 


%==" 




< 


Sjii 


*3 




Name. 


S 




s 


-2- 


1 


R 




p;.2 




















K 






H 


o 


a, 




o 


f^ 


<<« 


1 


Wright, p., . . 


1 


2 


1 


.500 


B 


5 


.833 


.666 


'i 


Cook, p. & s. s., 


12 


Kll 


ffi 


.417 


Kl 


KB 


.815 


.616 


■4 


Pushor, lb., . . 


in 


HO 


IB 


.233 


ll« 


l.iS 


.969 


.601 


4 


Talbot, 1. 1., . . 


IH 


Kll 


17 


.283 


27 


24 


.888 


.585 


fi 


Donovan, c, . . 


X 


10 


8 


.300 


25 


20 


.800 


.555 


(i 


Gary, 2b., . . . 


4 


IK 


4 


.250 


21 


IK 


.857 


.553 


7 


Larrabee, c. £., 


in 


Kll 


12 


.200 


21 


ISI 


.905 


.652 


K 


Moulton, c., . . 


H 


4B 


15 


.326 


103 


SO 


.776 


.551 


» 


Dearth, 2b.&r.l. 


in 


K.i 


IS 


.277 


4il 


3S 


.775 


.476 


Id 


Martin, c 


1 


iy 





.000 


K 


7 


.875 


.438 


II 


Barton, c. f., . 


n 


H 


1 


.135 


3 


2 


.666 


.395 


1'/ 


Wardwell, r. f., 


5 


22 


.5 


.325 


H 


3 


.333 


.329 


Vi 


B. Bartlett, 3b., 


111 


.■iK 


S 


.143 


BO 


30 


..500 


.321 


14 


E.L.Bartlett, ct 


1 


3 





.000 


2 





.000 


.000 



BATTING. 

Nos. 

1. Wright. 

2. Cook. 

3. Moulton. 

4. Wardwell. 

5. Donovan. 

6. Talbot. 

7. Dearth. 

8. Cary. 

9. Pushor'. 

10. Larrabee. 

11. B. Bartlett 
13. Barton. 

13. E. L. Bartlett. 

14. Martin. < 



FIELDING. 

Nos. 

1. Pushor. 

2. Larrabee. 

3. Talbot. 

4. Martin. 

5. Cary. 

6. Wright. 

7. Cook. 

8. Donovan. 

9. Moulton. 

10. Dearth. 

11. Barton. 

12. B. Bartlett. 

13. Wardfl-ell. 

14. E. L. Bartlett. 



KECORD OF THE MEN WHO PLAYED ON THE NINE, 
SEASON OF 1885. 







1 


B 


H 


'^"J. 




•^ 


i,^•n 




1 


Name. 


P.1 


s 


1 
.a 




i 

9 


II 


11 


B.2 


M 




o 


H 


O 


^ 


o 


o 


fi^ 


,=j^J 


1 


Pushor, lb., . . 


8 


42 


13 


.309 


117 


112 


.957 


.633 


3 


Cook, p. & s. s., 


8 


42 


IV 


.404 


47 


81 


.787 


.595 


3 


Larrabee, c. f.. 


8 


411 


III 


.2.50 


IK 


IB 


.888 


.569 


4 


Cary, 2b., . . . 


4 


16 


4 


.250 


21 


IS 


.857 


.553 


!) 


Moulton, c, . . 


8 


40 


13 


.325 


94 


71 


.7.55 


.540 


B 


Talbot, 1. f., . . 


8 


41 


U 


.268 


13 


10 


.769 


.519 


7 


Davis, S.6. &p.. 


8 


33 


4 


.121 


88 


77 


.875 


.498 


8 


Dearth, 2b.&r.f. 


8 


4X 


III 


.232 


24 


IB 


.666 


.449 


8 


Bartlett, 3b., . . 


8 


38 


i) 


.131 


41 


27 


.658 


.394 


10 


Wardwell, r. f., 


4 


17 


4 


.235 


8 


2 


.250 


.242 



BATTING. FIELDING. 

Nos. Nos. 

1. Cook. 1. Pushor. 

2. Moulton. 2. Larrabee. 

3. Pushor. 3. Davis. 

4. Talbot. 4. Cary. 

5. Cary and Larrabee. 5. Cook. 

6. Dearth. 6. Talbot. 

7. Wardwell. 7. Moulton. 

8. Bartlett. 8. Dearth. 

9. D.avis. 9. Bartlett. 

10. Wardwell. 

Record for the intercollegiate games. 

F. L. Talbot. 

Bo"WDOiN vs. Alumni. 
The game of ball between the college 
and alumni nines on Wednesday was the 
most interesting of the kind ever played 
here. For the first time since the custom 
was established the alumni were victorious 
by the close score of 10 to 9. The cham- 
pions were handicapped by the absence of 
three of their regular players. The alumni 
nine consisted almost to a man of the old 
college nine of '83, which is regarded by 
many the strongest nine the college ever had. 
The principal features of the game were 
several double plays, the heavy batting of 
both nines, and Cook's home run. Below is 
the score : 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. R. iB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Cook, s. s. & p., ... 5 2 2 6 1 11 3 

Moulton, c, 5 1 1 1 i 2 

Talbot, 1. f., 5 2 2 3 1 1 

Larrabee, c. f., . . . . 5 1 1 1 1 

Gary, p. & s. s., .... 5 3 3 3 

Wardwell, lb 4 2 i 8 2 

Bartlett, r. f i 2 1 1 1 1 

Harding, 2b., .... 4 1 1 4 1 2 

B. Bartlett, 3b., ... 4 1 3 1 

Totals 41 9 10 10 24 20 13 

ALUMNI. 

A.B. K. iB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Barton, I. f., 5 1 2 2 1 1 1 

C. Torrey, 2b., .... 5 1 6 2 1 

Wright, p .5 2 1 1 2 12 4 

Stetson, 3b., 6 1 2 3 4 1 

J. Torrey, c. f 4 1 2 2 1 

Waterman, s. s 4 1 1 1 1 2 

Knapp, c 4 2 1 1 9 5 4 

Packard, lb., 4 1 1 2 9 3 

Lindsey, r. f 4 

Totals, 40 10 10 12 27 25 17 

Two-base hits — Stetson, Packard, Cook. Three-base 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



67 



hits — Wardwell. Home run — Cook. First base on balls — 
Alumni 1, Bowdoin 2. First base on errors — Alumni 10, 
Bowdoin 11. Struck out — Wright 2, Gary 1, Cook 2. 
Double plaj'S — Barton and C. Torrey, Moulton and Ward- 
well. . Wild pitches — Wright 2, Gary 1, Cook 2. Passed 
balls— Knapp 3. Balls called— on Wright 102, Gary 36> 
Cook 32. Strikes called— oif Wright 15, Gary 9, Cook 4' 
Umpire — Barrett Potter, Bowdoin, '78. Time of game — 
2 hours 5 minutes. 



PRIZES FOR 1884-5. 

The recipients of the prizes offered by 
the college during the past year are as fol- 
lows : 

The Goodwin Commencement Prize, 
which is awarded each year to the author of 
the best written Commencement part, was re- 
ceived by F. W. Davis of Hiram. 

The first prizes for English Composition 
were awarded to M. H. Purrington, of Bath, 
and A. W. Alexander, of Richmond ; second 
prizes to J. F. Libby, of Richmond, and A. 
W. Rogers, of Bath. 

The Brown Prizes for Extemporaneous 
Composition were given as follows : first 
prize of tliirty dollars to F. W. Davis, 
Hiram ; second prize of twenty dollars to M. 
H. Purrington, Bath. 

The Junior Declamation Prizes, the first 
of twenty dollars and the second of ten dol- 
lars, were awarded to W. V. Wentworth, 
Rockland, and J. C. Parker, Lebanon, re- 
spectively. 

The Sophomore Declamation Prizes were 
given to J. V. Lane of Chichester, N. H., 
first, and second to L. B. Varney, Litchfield, 
Corner. 

The Sewall Greek and Latin Prizes of 
twenty-five dollars each, were awarded to C. 
J. Goodwin, of Farmington. 

The Smyth Mathematical Prize of three 
hundred dollars was awarded to Austin 
Cary, East Machias. 

C. H. Verrill, of Auburn, received hon- 
orable mention. 



At the annual contest of the class glee chibs, at 
Princeton, '86 was judged the best. 




It seems there is still a 
chance for the bell-ringer to 
get a few points. At all events not to 
leave his keys in the door while ringing 
the bell for Sunday afterqoon chapel. 
Had it not been for the tender mercies 
of the Professor, he would have spent the night within 
those holy precincts in sweet communion with the 
pigeons. 

The Freshman class, all equipped with tall hats 
and canes, after finishing their examinations, Wednes- 
day, June 17th, took the train to Portland. In the 
evening they had their class dinner at the Falmouth 
Hotel. The spread was a good one, one of Mr. 
Martins's best, and was done full justice by the mem- 
bers of the class. After dinner toasts were given 
and responded to, H. L. Shaw acting as toast-mas- 
ter. They were as follows: "Class of '88," re- 
sponded to by E. S. Barrett, Sumner. " The Presi- 
dent," responded to by H. S. Card, Gorham. "The 
Bird," responded to by A. C. Dresser, Standish. 
"The California Delegation," responded to by H. C. 
Hill, Cape Elizabeth. "The Ladies of Brunswick," 
responded to by F. K. Linscott, Boston. The class 
then adjourned to the parlor where the following ex- 
ercises took place : 



ODE. 

' Twas off the Blue Canaries.' 



Okation, 



History, 



E. S. Thomes. 



ode. 
' Co-ac-che-lunk." 



ODE. 

' Nellie Gray." 



J. H. Ayer. 



ode. 

Air—" Vive I'Amour." 

Prophecy, A. W. Tolman. 

ODE. 

AiK— "Chimiug Bells of Long Ago." 
The class then gave themselves up to having a good 
social time, and all pronounced the evening one of the 
pleasantest spent together as a class. The committee 
of arrangements were E. S. Barrett, F. K. Linscott, 
and Joseph Williamson. The committee on odes : 
H. S. Card, M. P. Smithwiok, and C. T. Carruthers. 
The Sophomore Prize Declamation took place 
Monday evening, June 16th, and was an unusually 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



good one. The first prize was awarded to J. V. 
Lane, the second to L. B. Varney. The following is 
the programme : 

MUSIC. 

Employment of Indians in Civilized 

Warfare. — Chatliam. H. B. Austin, Farmington. 
Keti'ibutive Justice.— Bancroft. 

F. D. Dearth, Jr., East Sangerville. 
Eulogy on Andrew Jackson. — Corwin. 

A. Gary, East Machias. 
Mona's Waters. — Anon. C. B. Burleigh, Augusta. 

MUSIC. 

El Conquistador.— Anon. M. L. Kimball, Norway. 

Declaration of Irish Eigiits. — Grattan. 

F. Pushor, Pittsfield. 
Toussaint L'Ouverture. — Phillips. 

J. V. Lane, Chichester, N. H. 
Irish Aliens and English Victories. — Shiel. 

C. P. Moulton, Cumberland. 

MUSIC. 

Eulogy on O'Connell. — Phillips. 

li. B. Varney, Litchfield. 
Shall the Army be Recalled ? — Garfield. 

E. L. Means, Millbridge. 
Shamus O'Brien. — La Fanu. C. C. Choate, Salem, Mass. 

MUSIC. 

At a recent meeting of the Base-Ball Association 
the following officers were chosen for next year : 
President, C. W. Tuttle ; Vice-President, E. L. 
Means ; Secretary and Treasurer, F. L. Talbot : Di- 
rectors, P. A. Knight, J. H. Davis, and R. S. Thomes. 

The '86 Bugle has at last appeared and is, we 
think, fully up to those of former years. Many im- 
provements have been made both in the arrangement 
and presentation of matter, and notwithstanding the 
late date of publication is having as good a sale as 
those of other classes. 

The '87 Bugle board have been chosen and are as 
follows : E. C. Plummer, Managing Editor ; Morti- 
mer H. Boutelle, Business Editor ; C. M. Austin, J. 
V. Lane, E. R. Torrey. 

The fossils, as usual, were present in large num- 
bers at the examinations, and filled the heart of the 
inexperienced Freshman with awe and reverence by 
the depth of learning shown in the questions asked. 
The Juniors, even, were rendered speechless when 
asked if the centre of the sun could be looked into 
by means of a spectroscope. 

The Junior Prize Declamation took place Wednes- 
day evening, June 22d, in Memorial Hall. The class 
were unfortunate in having no music, owing to an 
accident on the railroad, yet notwithstanding the dis- 
advantages they had to work under, the exhibition 
was quite a success. The committee who awarded 
the prizes were Rev. E. N. Packard, Prof. S. J. 
Young, and Rev. Mr.' Gould. The following is the 
programme ; 



Massachusetts and South Carolina. — ^Webster. 

George S. Berry, Damariscotta. 
Speech on Seminole War. — Clay. 

John C. Parker, Lebanon. 
Speech on Greek Revolution. — Clay. 

Walter V. Weutworth, Rockland. 
Rienzi's Address. — Mitford. 

George M. Norris, Monmouth. 
Heroes of the Land of Penn. — Lippard. 

Elmer E. Rideout, Cumberland. 
Mark Antony's Oration. — Shakespeare. 

« Irwm W. Home, Berlin Falls, N. H. 
Selections from Henry VIII. — Shakespeare. 

Levi Turner, Jr., Somerville. 
Speech on the American War. — Chatham. 

Wallace W. Kilgore, North Newry. 
* Excused. 

The first prize was awarded to Wentworth, second 
to Parker. 

The Y. M. C. A. had the front row of seats re- 
served for them when Rev. E. N. Packard delivered 
an address before that organization, and were to 
have marched in and taken their places, but only 
four or five assembled in the place appointed for 
meeting, and they came into church late and took 
seats in the gallery. 

The reception of the Brunswick High School, 
June 19th, proved to be quite a success. The hall 
was tilled with the parents and friends of the class. 
At 8.30 dancing began. The orders were very neat 
and tasty, pencils and ribbons attached being the 
class color. At intermission, refreshments were 
served, after which thei-e were six more dances. 
The music furnished by Given's Orchestra was good, 
and all pronounced it a most enjoj^able time. 

We are in receipt of the July number of Ouling. 
It contains several interesting articles, among them 
one on the history of the " Hai-vard-Yale Races"; 
also others on athletics at Amherst and at Yale ; an- 
other on " Scientific Whist," is excellent. Outing is 
rapidly taking a place in the first rank of American 
magazines. 

Prof. Carmichael has lately received the lamps 
and other apparatus necessary for electric lighting, 
and next year we may expect to see Adams Hall a 
blaze of light. 



Preparations for the "Junior Celebration," at 
Brown, are very elaborate. All the classes will 
take part, — the Seniors riding ahead in carriages, 
the Juniors parading in complete Indian outfit, the 
Sophomores in costumes satirical of college life, 
and the Freshmen representing, with all possible 
accuracy, " Zes diables^ Thirteen hundred tickets 
have been issued , 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



69 




'47.— F. B. Merrill, M. 
D., lives in Alfred, Me. 
Dr M.'s health has for several years 
been failing, until now he can give 
little attention to the practice of his pro- 
fession. He has been a successful physi- 
cian. 

'47, — Albert N. Williams, for the first three years 
of the course a member of this class, is a retired sea- 
captain, residing at Kennebunk, Me. 

'60. — Samuel M. Came is practicing law at the 
York County Bar, in this State. His residence is 
Alfred, Me. 

'60. — Amos L. Allen was for twelve years clerk 
of the Supreme Judicial Court, for the County of 
York. He is now in the United States service as 
Special Pension Examiner for Worcester County, 
Mass., and Cheshire County, N. H., with headquar- 
ters at Worcester. 

'68. — John S. Derby is practicing law at 160 
Broadway, New York City, with the firm of Stanley, 
Clark & Smith. Edwin B. Smith, of '56, is a mem- 
ber of the firm. 

'71. — Augustine Simmons, formerly principal of 
the Fryeburg Academy, will take charge of the 
academy at North Anson. 

'76.— St. Albans, Vt., June 10th, at the Congre- 
gational Church, Oliver Crocker Stevens ('76) and 
Miss Julia B., daughter of ex-Governor J. Gregory 
Smith. 

'82. — J. Willis Crosby has been taken into part- 
nership by his father, Hon. Josiah Crosby, who has 
been practicing law in Dexter for over forty-five 
years. 

'83. — Gile, once of this class, is at home in Alfred, 
enjoying his family. 

'83. — Allen has been teaching near Rutland, Vt. 
In company with his brother, Edwin H., formerly of 
'85, he will attend the Summer School of Languages, 
at Burlington, Vt. 

'84. — Sayward has accepted the position of 
teacher of Commercial Arithmetic, in the Bryant & 
Stratton Commercial School, 608 Washington St., 
Boston, — duties to begin Sept. 7, 1885. 
The following degrees were conferred : 
D-D., Rev. Sylvester Burnham. 



LL. D., John A. Peters, Chief Justice of Su- 
preme Court of Maine, and Chas. W. Walton, As- 
sociate Justice. 

A.M. in course, Edward R. Jewett, Warren O. 
Plimpton, Arthur F. Belcher, Melvin S. Holway, 
William A. Moody, William C. Merryman, Freder- 
ick H. Fames, William G. Reed, Edwin W. Curtis, 
William W. Curtis, Irving Stearns, J. Willis Crosby. 

A.M. out of course, George F. Manson, 1881 ; 
Clarence A. Baker, 1878 ; Phineas H. Ingalls, 1877 ; 
James A. Roberts, 1870 ; Granville C. Waterman, 
1857 ; William E. Hatch, 1875 ; Ph.D., James Austin 
Burns, 1885. 

A.B. on graduating class: Frank West Alexan- 
der, Boyd Bartlett, Frank Irving Brown, Oliver 
Richmond Cook, Frank William Davis, Webb Don- 
nell, Hermon Nelson Dunham, William Morse 
Fames, Nehemiah Butler Ford, Eben Winthrop Free- 
man, Ralph Spofford French, Edwin Ruthvin Hard- 
ing, John Fuller Libby, Howard Leslie Lunt, Wil- 
liam Pope Nealley, James Saiford Norton, John 
Andrew Peters, Alfred Wilson Rogers, Charles 
Henry Tarr, Eugene Thomas, Jesse Francis Water- 
man, Frank Nathaniel Whittier. 



NECROLOGY, 1884-85. 



1816— Alpheus Spring Packard, born Chelmsford, Mass., 

17!)8; died Squirrel Island, Me., July 13, 1884. 
1827— Isaiah Preble Moody, born York, Me., 1804; died 

Newton, Mass., Feb. 1, 1SS5. 
1828 — Luther Dearborn Sawyer, born Wakefield, N. H., 

1803 ; died Wakefield, July 10, 1884. 
1834 — William Stinson Sewell, born Sangerville, Me., 

1807 ; died St. Albans, Me., Sept. 28, 1884. 
1837— John Rutledge Shepley, born Saco, Me., 1817 ; died 

St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 11, 1884. 
1839— Benjamin Apthorp Gould Fuller, born Augusta, 

Me., 1818 : died Brooklin, Mass., Jan. 24, 1885. 
1841- Daniel Fox Potter, born Augusta, Me., 181'J ; died 

Brunswick, Me., Sept. 17, 1884. 
1853— Kingman Fogg Page, born Rochester, N. H., 1832 ; 

died New York City, April 23, 1885. 
1854— John Wesley Simonds, born Franklin, N. H., 1829 ; 

died Vermilion, Dakota, June, 1885. 
1863— Benjamin Fuller Smith, born Wiscasset, Me., 1842 ; 

died Wiscasset, March 23, 1885. 
1876— Hardy Kopes Sewell, born Newton, Mass., March 

18, 1856 ; died Apr. 17, 1884. 
1877 — Freemont Manning Palmer, born Portland, Me., 

Feb. 29, 1856 ; died Portland, June 22, 1885. 
1880— Richard Lewis Swett, born Brunswick, Me., 1858 ; 

died Brunswick; Dec. 26, 1884. 

MEDICAL. 

1828— Richard Moody, died at Belfast, Me., Oct. 2, 1884, 

aged 81. 
1828— Wm. Swazey, died 1884. 
1830— Stephen G. Martin, died at Janesville, Wis., Mar., 

1885, aged 80. 



70 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



1830— George Parcher, died at Ellsworth, Me., Dec. 29, 

' 1884, aged 82. 

1831— Noah Gilman, died 1884, aged 79. 
1832— Nahum "Wright, died at Gilmanton, N. H., 1884. 
1843— Joseph Sturtevant, died Dec, 1884. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



Whereas, We, the class of 1880, have learned 
with deep regret the death of our beloved classmate, 
Richard L. Swett, in whose death we recognize the 
manifestation of Divine Providence, therefore be it 

Resolved, That in his death we have lost a class- 
mate whose quiet and unassuming manners, and ster- 
ling integrity, endeared him to the hearts of his 
fellow-students ; 

Eesolved, That his classmates sympathize deeply 
with his family and friends in their great afHiction ; 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be 
spread upon the records of the class, and that a copy 
be conveyed to his family. 

Warren Stephen Whitmore, 
■* Frederick Odell Conant, 

CommiUee. 




Pi of. to Soph (who is 
somewhat puzzled as to 
what an isonieuc body is) — "What is a 
simple body ?" Soph^" One that is alone, 
by itself." Prof. — "Then if I am alone, I 
am simple. That would lead one to the 
rather unpleasant conclusion, that when one is alone 
he is a fool." 

The following touching lines are dedicated to our 
friend "Bottle" : 

As sinks the orb of day to rest 

And clouds are blushing in the west. 

Upon the stairway pensive stands 

A youth who wields with skillful hands 

His new and shining tooth-pick. 

Two rows of dental organs bright 
Flash back the gleam of evening light. 
While glancing with a magic twist 
That no stray viand dare resist. 
Plays evermore the tooth-pick. 



And students passing bow in awe. 
Pausing a while and then withdraw. 
For 'tis a most imposing sight, 
To see this brave and gallant knight, 
The knight of the festive tooth-pick. 

— Haverfordian. 

OWLISMS. — RULES FOR THE SEMI-ANIMALS' EXAM- 
INATIONS. 

1. The semi-animals will show the effects of 
their good training by appearing jjunctually, and 
taking their respective stations. 

2. Hats, tennis-balls, and neck-ties will be left 
outside. 

3. Nobody shall wear any marked linen into the 
hall. If any one does it will be coufisoated at once. 

4. The paper shall not be soiled, scratched or 
inked. 

5. The Yale Telegraph Company, the Yale Tel- 
ephone Company, and the Co-operative Association 
shall not introduce their lines into the hall. 

6. Each student must write his name and ad- 
dress on each sheet, in order to facilitate the mail- 
ing of conditions. 

7. Students should write their cribs in pencil, 
that they may not be read, if seen, by the examiner. 

8. All the entries must remain till the examina- 
tion is completed. 

N. B. — A detachment of the Woolsey Battalion, 
with loading guns, will be posted in the doorway to 
punish all offenders. — Yale Record. 

SONNET. 

Trained in the mould of nature, free from stain. 
Guided by beauty through thy budding Spring, 
Queen of the virgin world, for months thou'st lain 
Hid in my heart : To thee my love I bring. 
Long have I sought with evil fate to strive, 
Oft in thy sight I've wandered day by day, 
Many a time in vain did I contrive 
To meet thee on thy walks ; thou look'dst away. 
And if perchance thou smiledst thy dimpled chin 
Invited kisses as a tender rose 
Invites us often to breathe its fragrance in. 
And then witholds the sweets, its leaves enclose. 
Would that I might with loving freedom seek 
The sweets of joy that bloom in thy fair cheek. 
— Yale Secord. 

"Muckers," at Dartmouth, cut the tennis nets 
left out over night. 

At Dartmouth, a stone tower is to have its foun- 
dation laid by '85. Each year hereafter the walls 
will be added to, as a part of the class-day exercises. 

Announcement has been made of the Darlmoulh 
Stylus, a literary monthly, to begin publication next 
fall. 

Next year is the 250th i^nniyersary of the found- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



71 



ing of Harvard College. The Crimson suggests 
that, instead of any celebration, the money be used 
in hunting up the exact facts regarding John Har- 
vard. 

'The lacrosse team, in the tournament held on 
Decoration Day, at Harvard, secured the college 
championship, and the Oelrich's cup for the cham- 
pionship of the United States. 

The Harvard nine was banqueted at Princeton, 
and the favor returned at Cambridge. 

An association of New England school alumni 
has been formed, in order to continue school friend- 
ships, and to increase the New England represen- 
tation at Princeton. 

Tracy H. Harris, of foot-ball fame, will be man- 
ager of the Princeton nine next year. 

The Yale bicycle tournament, was the largest 
ever held outside of Springfield. A good share of 
the profits of the tournament is to be given the navy. 

A detective bureau has been established, at Yale, 
to give parents knowledge of the conduct of their 
sons. 

A telephone, for the use of members, has been 
placed in the co-operative store, at Yale. 



PRESIDENT HYDE SKETCHED BY A COL- 
LEGE CLASSMATE. 
From pastor of a little church of 150 members in 
Paterson, N. J., to President of Bowdoin College and 
Professor of Philosophy is quite a 2)romotion for a 
young man of twenty-seven, only two years out of 
a theological seminary, and but six years out of col- 
lege ; but the ability and acquisitions of Rev. Wm. 
DeWitt Hyde seem to merit this honor; and those 
who know Bowdoin and who know Mr. Hyde are of 
the opinion that the college has made no error in her 
choice. Mr. Hyde entered Harvard from Exeter 
Academy in 1875, a country boy from Globe Vilhige, 
Massachusetts, with the hayseed, as it were, still in 
his hair, but with already a good reputation for schol- 
arship and for what is rarer at Harvard, fticility in 
public debate. He won honors all along his course, 
both from faculty and students. By the end of his 
Senior year, though one of the youngest members, 
he was considered intellectually as perhaps the most 
"solid" man in his class; physically, also, he was 
athletic, especially at base-ball. He was one of the 
founders of the Harvard Philosophical Club, presi- 
dent of the two Senior literary societies, the "O. 
K." and the "Signet," and also president of tlie 
evangelical religious society, " The Christian Breth- 
ren," in which latter position he exerted a most 
marked influence on the religious life of his associ- 
ates. Graduating with honors in philosophy, he was 
given a place on the Commencement stage. His 
Commencement Oration, on " The Modern Worship 
of Culture," was a brilliant and caustic arraignment 
of those tendencies at Harvard which militate against 
the higher life ; and created almost a sensation. In- 



deed, at the dinner following. Rev. Dr. H. W. Bel- 
lows, of New York, devoted himself to replying to 
the attack of the young graduate. Mr. Hyde next 
passed two years at Union Seminary; then, after a 
year's further study, was graduated at Andover in 
1882, his Commencement Thesis there being " Tauler 
and the JSIystlcs." He pursued a post-graduate 
course in theology at Andover, and also in Philos- 
ophy at Harvard, under Prof Palmer. 

During his pastorate of two years, at the Auburn 
Street Congregational Church, Paterson, N. J., a 
debt of $5000 in his church has been extinguished, 
largely by his eflbrts, and he has found time to pub- 
lish two articles in the New Englander, which have 
attracted notice. These are entitled: "The Meta- 
physical Basis of Belief In God" (September, 1883) ; 
"An Analysis of Consciousness in Its Relation to 
Eschatology" (November, 1884). Theologically, he 
is believed to be, in the main, in sympathy with ad- 
vanced views of the so-called Andover type. While 
without practical experience in teaching, except as a 
private tutor, Mr. Hyde's influence on the boys of 
Phillips Academy, while at Andover, warrants the 
prediction that In the recitation-rooms he will be a 
positive force. Personally, Mr. Hyde will attract 
attention for his winning face and dignified bearing. 
Bowdoin students will find in him, should he become 
their President, an enthusiastic sympathizer in their 
sijorts, for he is a good base-ball player, and an 
adept in the manly art of self-defense. — Spring 
Republican. 



ELEGANT JIACKINAW 

STRAW HATS, 

THE BEST QUALITY, 

$1.00, $1.25, S1.50, 

MEEET THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND. 



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Next l0 ArneriGan Express Qffice, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

ISiSilfi iii PilliS. 

Flp St ©naUty Plated Wa*e, 

At Lowest Possible Prices. 

French Clocks and Bronzes, Fine Watches 
and Chains, Diamond Rings. 

BATH, 3IA1NE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 



CIGARETTE 
Smokers "who 
are wiUingato 
pay a little more 
for Cigarettes 
than the price 
charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, will 
find the RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT 
>o. 1 SUPERIOR TO ATiTi OTHERS. 
They are made from the "briglitest, most 
delicately flaTored* and lilelnest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are abso- 
lutely ^Tllboii^ adulteration or drugs. 



STRAIGHTCUT 



No. 
-I- 



We use the Genuine Frencli Rice Paper 

of our own direct importation, which Is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1 — on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 



ori^iDal brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or box of ■ 
Kicliiiiond 

Straight Cut I 

Cigarettes 

bears the I 
signature of ' 

ALLEN &CINTER 

MANTIFA0TUBER8, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



P.IGARETTES 



n|aine General R. ^. 

On and after June 27th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 7.-lo, 11.45 A.M., 1.50, 4.50 and 6.30 p.m., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.25 and 11.40 A.M., 4.25 and 4.50 

P.M., and 12.35 (night). 
For Eocldand, 7.45 A.M., 1.50 P.M., and Saturdays at 6.30 P.M. 
For Lewiston, 7.45 and 11.40 A.M., 1.48 and 6.35 P.M., 12.40 
(night) . 

For Farmington, 7.45 a.m. and 1.48 P.M. 
For Augusta at 7.48 and 11.45 A.M., 1.40, 1.49 and 6.35 p.m., and 

12.45 (night). 
For Waterville at 7.48 A.M., 1.40, 1.49 and 6.35 p.m., 12.45 (night). 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 1.49 P.M., and 12.45 (night). 
For Bangor at 1.40, 1.49, and 6.35 P.M., and 12.45 (night). 
For Ellsworth, Mt. Desert Ferry and Bar Harbor at 1.40 P.M., 

and 12.45 (night). 
For Vanceboro and St. John at 1.40, 1.49 P.M., and 12.45 (night). 

Note. — The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
iston, and Bangor run every night. Including Sundays, but do 
not connect for Skowhegan on Sunday morning, or for Belfast 
and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, except Bar 
Harbor, on Sunday morniug. 

PAYSON TDCKEE, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BOOTHBY, Cen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, June 20, 1886. 



NOTICE. 

BEWARE OF COUNTERFEITS AND IMITATION-S. 

Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and pure Rice Paper, are rolled by the highest 
class of skilled labor, and waiTanted free from flavoring or 
impurities. 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a FAC-siMiLE of Kinney 
Bkos.' signature. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KINNF^' BROS. 

NEW YORK. 

The following are our well-known 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Caporal, SivEET Caporal, St. James J, Capobal J, St. 

James, Ambassador, tIntre Nons, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES 

SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. Manufactured bv special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 



3P1^IN6 OTD gUjajaEl^ ^JFYIiE^ IJi. 



2 Odd Fellows' Block, Main Street, Brunswick. 

KEPAIKING NEATLY DONE. 



I®^#i§w 



The Sixty-Third AnnualCourseof Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 5th, 1885, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel 
T. Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, 
M.D., Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles 
W. Goddard, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. 
Gerrish, M. D., Anatomy; Henry Carmichael, Ph.D., Chem- 
istry ; Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgeryand Clinical Surgery; 
Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; 
Henry H. Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Irving E. Kdiball, M.D., 
Demonstrator of Anatomy; Everett T. Nealey, M.D., Dem- 
onstrator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



COLLEGE SOI^GS 



BY HENKY EANDAIiL WAITE. 

One is tempted to pronounce this the very best collection of 
songs extant. If not that, certainly none better of the size ex- 
ist. Mr. Waite, who has already compiled three College Song 
Books, condenses into this the cream of other collections, ana 
has brought together something that will be welcome in every 
household, as in every college. 

Seventy-four pieces of American, French, German, or "Afri- 
can " origin, nonsensical, comic, pathetic, musical, and all spark- 

lingiy bright. Price but 50 Cents. 

Mailed for the Retail Price. 

OLIVER DITSON & CO., Boston. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEGE BOOKSTORE. 

We have constantly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. Colleoe Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 

BYRON ©TliVi^lVS. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Any one having any of the following back 
numbers of the Orient will confer a great favor 
by sending them to the Business Editor. 

VOL. II., Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17. 

VOL. m., Nos. 1, 7, 10, 13. 

VOL. IV. No. 1. 

VOL. VI., No. 7. 

VOL. VII., No. 13. 

VOL. VIII., No. 11. 

VOL. XII., No. 1. 



DUNLAP BLOCK, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT 

BICYCLE 
BASE-BALL 

TENNIS 
BOATING. 

SPECIAL RATES TO CLUBS. 



SHIRTS, 

STOCKINGS, 

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OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



TEACHERS WANTED! 



8 Principals, 11 Assis- 
tants, and a number lor 
Music, also Art and Specialties. Send stamp lor application 
form and circulars of information to 

NATIONAL SCHOOL SUPPLY BTJREAXr, 
Mention this paper. CHICAGO, ILL. 



D. W. G-EANBEET & CO., 



LAWN-TENNIS 




DEPARTM ENT. 



THE SEEEP^RD F O R 1 8 8 5, 

Is the Best Racket Made. Nbtv Equipoise and other Popular Styles of Our O^vn Make. Jefferies, Tate, 
Prince, Alexandra, and other Noted English Rackets. All Requisites for Playing the Game. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue and Directions for Playing. Free. ^ 

20 & 22 JOHN STREET, NEW YORK. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Special Rates to Classes f Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brnms-wick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vie-ws ; also College Vienrs. 



i^ i. 



.L. i .i 




Immm 

n-r-r n \ki n lllll llllCushing's Island, 
OTTAWA IHJUUIJ Portland.Me. 

Tsj!L. S- G-IBSOISX. 

dispenser of 

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MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Go to Vfl. B. ITIToodard's 

To buy vour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
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sFEzci-A-X/ :ss,.&.t:ss to sT-crxJEiNrrr cxjTTBs. 
Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



MAIN STKBET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



Wja. ^. FIEIiD, 



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239 3IIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. MERKILL. A. KEITH. 



'ASSI 



DEALER IN 



«(G)GEIIIiS AND PIOYISIOHS, 

Fresli and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 "WATEK ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 






2 iljurc^ Potfe, 



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^ m^ Q. PIM^'^Q^, :j5<^ 

DEALER IN 

CEDAR STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Branch oifice three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 
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|^° Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BEIEN AND MAIN SIKEETS, BEUNSWICK, ME. 




HORSMAN'S 

CELEBRATED 



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and "Berkeley" iic snjicrior to any other Rackets in the 
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Send stamp for Tennib and Tk \(_le Catilo^nc 

E. I. HORSMAN, 80 and 82 William St., New York. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



on the 



«^ 



STENOGRAPH 



This wonderful Shorthand Writing Machine possesses many 
advantages over, and is learned in much less time than other sys- 
teiQs. Price, $40. Instructious by mail free. Can be learned 
dui-ing vacation. Send stamps for Circular. 

U, S. stenograph Co., St, Louis, Mo. 



F. ROEMER, 

Successor to A. EOEMEK & Son, 
THE LARGEST HISTOKICAL 

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No. 8 UNION SQUAKE, NEW YOKE. 



^DEALER IN 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 
i^TVXTiurs wicit, ■sjl.a.:x.ts:ei. 



lOWBQIM C0LL1Q1 10YS 

■Will save money by purchasing their Tennis Goods, Jer- 
seys, Base-Ball, Bicycle, and Tennis Suits, etc., of 

J. W. BRINE, 



Samples of Jerseys, Knee Pants, Caps, and Suitings, may 
tie seen at Eoom No. 10, South Appleton. Call and see 
them and get terms hefore purchasing elsewhere. 



Successor to Atwood & "Wentworth, 

DEALER IN 

D1^|^0|4.DS, WATCHES, JEWELRYt 

and importers of French Clocks, Opera Glasses, etc. 
Fine Watch Repairing ; Gold and Silver Platinc/. 

509 CONGRESS ST., Portland, Me. 

All the Students Should Buy 

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Cor. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



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— such as 

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FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

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OS THE ROAD. 



fie iiiiii@iii ii», 

(Established 1877.) 

Institute Building, Huntington Ave., Boston. 

ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 

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Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 

stamp at above address. 



ALLEN & COMPANY, 

isttii SMrts iii Fiit Finisiiii & 



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ALLEN & COMPANY, 
470 Congress Street, - - Market Square, 

r^ORTL^^lSTD, - - - ]VrA^I]SrE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE AD.JtTSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and "Duplex" Burner 



IN PLACE OF THE OLD 



ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

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Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

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FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

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Telephone E.xcliaage connected witli the store. 



Made at Higgins' Ground-Floor Studio, Bath, 







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For Self-Instruction. Containing all the late improve- 
ments. Price Sl.oO. Special Instruction by Mail, $6.00. 
Senil Stamp for Specimen Pages and Illustrated Pamphlet. 



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M^SI 



The New Styles in 

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Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, "Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

— t ELLIOTT'S, t 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 



Wanted, to take orders for Trees, Vines, Shrubs, and a general 
line of Nursery Stock. Only those who are over 25 years of age 
and can furnish the vei-y best references need apply. To the 
right men we can give employment the year round. Experience 
not necessary. E. G. C HA SE & GO.'S, S Pembertou Square, 
Boston, Mass. We pay all expenses and a good SALARY. 



Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. MEEEYMAN, PHAEMACIST.v 

Fancy aiJ Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Totiacco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

153° Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

OvKR Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Book-Seller, Stationer, Book-Binder, 

AND BLANK-BOOK MANUPAGTUEEK, 

Opposite City Hail, Center St., Bath, Maine. 

They do say, and it is a fact, that Lcnton & Neagle's is the 
cheapest place in this county. Their assortment of trunks and 
bags cannot be beaten. No shop-worn jroods, but direct from the 
manufacturers. They have the larp:est line of whips ever shown 
in this town. Jobbing of all kinds promptly atteuded to. 
Trunks and bags neatly repaired. 

HAKNESS MAKEES & CAEKIAGE TRIMMEES, 
MAIN STREET, Store formerly occupied by Washburne. 



J. S. TOWITE, 
PHARMACEUTIST. 

PURE DRUGS, MEDICINES, FANCY AND TOILET AR- 
TICLES; ALSO A FINE LINE OF CHOICE CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES. PRESCRIPTIONS a Specialty. 

Main Street, Near Bowdoin College. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Coneei'ts, Cora- 
mencenaents, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 Middle Street, - - - - Port/and, IVIe. 



OVER BOAEDMAN'S STOEE, MAIN STREET. 

— t- B. G. DENNISON, -1— 

Brunswick Book - Store, 

No. I O'Brien Blooic, Just North of P. 0. 

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lating Librai-y, 1600 Volumes ; Base-Ball and La Crosse ; Pict- 
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Special Styles and Pkices to meet the Requirements of 



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Inquiries and Orders by Mail Promptly Answered. Express Free to any Place. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshmau 
Class are examined in the following subjects, test- 
books beinp; mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Graramar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Csesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
jEneid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophou, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included iu Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined iu the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regulae Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, iu Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 188.5). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the HalloweU Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers of the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately iu the 
following table : 

EEQUIEED— FOUlt HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terras. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

electives — FOUR HOURS A VfEEK. 

Mathematics, two terras. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terras. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terras. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows: Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 




mm 




Vox.. XV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, SEPT. 30, 1885. 



No. 6. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE TEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

W. V. AVentworth, '86, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
J. H. Davis, '8(5. Levi Turner, Jr., '80. 

A. A. Knowlton, '86. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. C. Parker, '86. C. B. Burleigh, '87. 

H. L. Taylor, '86. E. C. Plummer, '87. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obUiinciI at the bookstores or ou applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
inuniciitifns.in regard to all other matters shoidd be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and A.lumui are invited to contTibiite 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signatui-e which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Bniuswick as Second Class mail matter. 



CONTENTS. 

Vol. XV., No. 6.— September 30, 1885. 

AVisdom of the Ancients 73 

Editorial Notes, 73 

Mistakes of Great Men— No. U 77 

Our Summer Visitors, 77 

The College Library, 78 

Base-Ball, 79 

CoLLEGn Tabula 80 

Personal, 82 

Clippings, 83 



WISDOM OF THE ANCIENTS. 

To die is evil ; thus the gods decide ; 
For were it good, then they themselves had died. 

— Sappho. 
If to plan harm against a friend I'm led, 
May it o'ertake my own devoted head ; 
But if toward me his impulse shall be such, 
Let the base ingrate suffer twice as much. 

— Theognis. 




Since the Orient last greeted its 
readers a long vacation has passed; a vacation 
whicli we hope has been as enjoyable to our 
fellow-students individually as it has been 
cheering to all Bowdoin men. As members 
of the college we have certainly had occasion 
to rejoice. Tlie race at Lake Quinsigamond 
resulted in a victory for our crew, who broke 
the record for four-oared intercollegiate con- 
tests, winning much favor from those who 
were pleased to see the best time claimed to 
have been made by Cornell in practice beaten 
by Bowdoin's more gentlemanly crew. 

But the encouraging work has not been 
limited to athletic contests. The election of 
a new President has iiispiied confidence in 
many friends of the college, who have re- 
garded the vacancy in that office as an ele- 
ment of weakness, notwithstanding their sat- 
isfaction with the management of affairs. 
Our brief acquaintance with President Hyde 
has strengthened the favorable impressions 
received from those who recommended him, 
and among the students there is a general 
feeling of hope and confidence for the future, 
mingled with a genuine desire to so behave 
as to avoid giving rise to perplexing difficul- 
ties. 

Considerable progress has been made dur- 
ing the vacation in re-arranging the library, 



74 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



an account of which work will be found in 
our literary columns. 

To crown all, we see here a Freshman 
class one-third larger than those of the tliree 
years preceding. 

It was with regret that we learned of the 
resignation of Prof. Garmichael, whose learn- 
ing and ability made him one of Bowdoin's 
best known professors, but we would congrat- 
ulate '86 and '87 that so able a scholar as Mr. 
Hutchins has been secured in his place at 
such short notice. 

The illness of Prof. Robinson also deserves 
mention. It is the earnest hope of all who 
know him tliat a speedj' recovery may enable 
him to soon resume his college duties. 



A new class has entered Bowdoiu, to 
whom, in behalf of the upper classes, we ex- 
tend a cordial welcome. For their benefit we 
shall re-announce the prizes offered in the first 
number of the current volume. As an addi- 
tional inducement to undergraduates to con- 
tribute to our columns, the Okient offers 

For the best prose article $15.00 

For the second best prose article 10.00 

For the third best prose article 6.00 

Articles may be upon any subject and prefer- 
ably not more than three columns in length. 
We renew our appeal to write early. Contri- 
butions are desired this term as well as next, 
and no article leceived after No. 15 goes to 
press will be considered as competing for a 
prize. During the last two or three weeks 
of the winter term a large amount of classic 
literature floods the Okient office, but it is 
too late to be of service, and our purpose in 
offering these prizes is to improve the paper. 
The present number of the Orient has 
been sent to every member of the Freshman 
class, and succeeding numbers will be so sent 
unless notice to discontinue is received. For 
the remainder of Vol. XV. the price will be 
only fl.50, and it is hojDed that all will mani- 



fest their interest in the college paper by aid- 
ing it to that extent. 

A few cases of failure to receive the Com- 
mencement number have been reported, and 
as a few copies of that edition are in the office, 
we shall be pleased to furnish them to those 
who desire. The Okient was sent to all 
subscribers as usual, but most of the students 
failed to leave their addresses with the Busi- 
ness Editor, consequently the college cata- 
logue was used as a directory. 



A perusal of the June number of the Colby 
Echo caused us mingled feelings of sadness 
and amusement — sadness that our athletic suc- 
cess last spring had brought such bitter dis- 
appointment to our Kennebec friends, amuse- 
ment at the naivete of our contemporary. Ac- 
cepting, with remarkable credulit3',the greater 
portion of one of our literary articles, which 
in fact referred largely to other events, as ap- 
plying to a well-known Colby man, the Echo 
refers to one sentence of that essay in a 
manner which seems on a par with an attempt 
to prove that " Mark Twain " and " Josh Bil- 
lings " have slightly misrepresented facts. 

But the would-be critic caps the climax by 
disputing our writer's statement that a cer- 
tain pitcher was batted for eighteen bases 
in one game. If our neighbor chooses to as- 
sume that the whole article applies to their 
pitcher, a reference to the score will show 
that in the second game with Colby our nine 
pounded Mr. Goodwin for a total of just 
eighteen bases. 

Our contemporary also appears envious of 
Bowdoin's reputation; but, friend _E'e/io, which 
is safer, to speak of what a college has done 
and is accomplishing in education and athlet- 
ics, or to devote half a column to boasting of 
what we shall do next year ? 

One word more as to " Bowdoin's baby 
wail" and cry of "poor umpiring." The 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



75 



Orient, in speaking of thatj referred, as must 
have been evident, to a game at Waterville 
which cost us the championship and which 
was given to our rivals, as confessed at the 
titne by some of their best players, by wretched 
umpiring bj' a Colby man. 



Bowdoin's victory at Worcester this sum- 
mer has been talked of so much that to give 
an account of the two races seems like repeat- 
ing a time-worn tale, but it is not every sum- 
mer that the wearers of the white have an 
opportunity to welcome their crew as victors. 
It certainly seems that, though necessarily 
long after the race, a brief account of that 
event should be published in the college paper. 

It will be remembered that on the 4th 
of July crews from Bowdoin, Brown, Cornell, 
and the University of Pennsylvania started 
on Lake Quinsigamond. The work done by 
our crew in practice justified the expectation 
that they would lead their opponents, and in 
the race they proved that our hopes were well 
founded. Cornell, finding our four too able 
oarsmen to be out-rowed, deliberately fouled 
them, thus being able to cross the line first. 
Brown second, Bowdoin third, Pennsylvania 
fourth. 

The referee ordered a new race and ex- 
cluded Cornell on account of the fouling ; 
Pennsylvania was out of the contest, having 
finished last. As Bowdoin led, with Brown 
behind, at the time of the foul, those crews 
were ordered to race on the 13th. Brown 
refused to pull then on account of other en- 
gagements, and the referee said he should 
give the race to Bowdoin ; but our crew gen- 
erousl}' refused to accept it until they had 
proved their ability to defeat their rivals. 
Accordingly the 16th was chosen as tiie date 
for the final race. The following extracts 
from the Boston Glohe furnish the best ac- 
count of that event that we have seen : 

It was about 4.15 when the four Brown oarsmen 
eanie down the float with their paper shell over then- 



heads, and placed it in the water as gently as though 
they were afraid it would sink if they took their 
hands from it. Their caps and tights showed their 
college color, and their sleeveless shirts exposed a 
shade of brown which would have been sufficient. 
They rowed straight to the causeway, passed through, 
and then paddled slowly down the lake towards the 
starting point. Meanwhile the young Herculeses 
from Maine had taken their seats in their cedar craft, 
and when they had wiggled themselves into just the 
proper spots on their slides, Fred Plaisted pushed 
them ofi' and they floated through the culvert and fol- 
lowed down the lake to their starting buoy in Brown's 
wake. It could be seen at a glance that the Bow- 
doins had been taught to get there without regard to 
whether they looked pretty or not. No two men in 
the boat had tights which bore the slightest resemb- 
lance to each other. The oarsmen were bareheaded, 
and wore white shirts cut low. The great knots of 
muscle around their shoulders looked fully equal to a 
mile and a half spurt. Two hundred feet apart, but 
directly abreast, sat the eight oarsmen. The Bow- 
doin shell carried a big weather board and rested 
lightly in the water on the last course, while the 
paper boat that held the Providence boys settled 
badly on the west side and was evidently too heavy 
for the crew. The age and "beef" were in the 
Maine craft, as will be seen by the following sta- 
tistics : 

BOWDOINS. 

^Height.-, 
Age. Ft. In. "Wght. 

F. W. Davis, bow, 25 5 8 150 

F. N. Whittler, No. 2 (captain), .23 GO 168 

F. I. Brown, No. 3, 24 6 171 

F. TV. Alexander, stroke, ... 25 58 158 

BKOWNS. 

^Height.^ 

Age. Ft. In. Wght. 

W. H. Beattie, liow (captain), .21 5 ll 159 

W. W. Wliitten, No. 2 23 5 8^ loli 

C. A. Eeed, No. 3 21 5 &% 143 

C. Littlefleld, stroke 23 5 llj li2 

Not a man in either boat could see the referee, 
but no response came to his preliminary " are j'ou 
ready," at 4.45 o'clock, and hardly before the word 
" go " was out of his mouth Brown's oars disappeared 
in the water. They were just fairly out of sight 
when the white-tipped blades dropped and the eight 
backs came up simultaneously. With the first stroke 
the bow of Bowdoin's boat went the farthest. Both 
crews were evidently making a supreme eft'ort to 
take the lead at the start. The men in both boats 
were making simply short gr.abs at the water, and 
were rowing at a terrific rate. Alexander was cut- 
ting the work out at fortj'-eight for his men. who 
were breaking the water over their backs in a shower 



76 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



of spray, while in the Brown boat fifty strol^es were 
measured off in the first minute. The oars were 
fairly pounding the water. With every stroke 
Plaisted's farmers were drawing away from the oars- 
men with the brown tights, and only for a minute 
did they keep up their spurt when they slowed down 
to a forty-two pace. The Browns, however, were 
working desperately to hold their opponents and 
were fast pumping themselves at a forty-eight stroke 
and traveling slower than the Bowdoins, who were 
traveling very fast and only pulling forty-two to the 
minute. When a half-mile had been rowed and the 
boats were off Coal Mine brook the Bowdoins were 
nearly two lengths ahead and making a spurt at for- 
ty-six, while the Brown's oars were still flashing 
forty-eight times to the minute. Both crews had 
steered well so far, and were holding their courses, 
but as Bovvdoin veered towai'ds the east side Brown 
followed suit for a few seconds, and the two boats 
were almost in a line, but they were quickly straight- 
ened out again with the Providence boat in the mid- 
dle of the lake. 

Well in the rear the " Bone Yards" were strug- 
gling along and keeping the referee so that he could 
see the racing oarsmen. Just half down the course, 
opposite Wigwam hill, the leaders were taking things 
easy, being content with a forty stroke, while three 
lengths in the rear the Browns were rowing pluckily 
at forty-four, and pulling in much better style. The 
Bowdoins were taking a very peculiar course at this 
jjoint, and seemed to be making straight for a 
cove in the east bank about a mile from the starting 
point. Suddenly they made a turn, shot by the 
point which they seemed in danger of running into, 
and took a straight line for the finish, hugging the 
shore most of the way. The shells were still half a 
mile from the end of the course, but the race was vir- 
tually settled. There were four boat lengths of clear 
water between the crews. Bowdoin was rowing 
strongly at fort3'-two, while Brown was pulling two 
strokes per minute faster. 

Opposite Regatta point, a quarter of a mile from 
the finish, both fours spurted in response to a very 
weak wave of applause along the shoi-es. The sup- 
porters of the white ran their stroke to forty-six, 
while, as usual, the defeated oarsmen went them a 
little better, and swung their bodies at a forty-eight 
pace. The spurt was only for a few seconds, how- 
ever, and down the course to the finish line, Bovvdoin 
crossing it very prettily at forty-one strokes to the 
minute. The Browns were four boat lengths behind, 
and shooting by the judges' boat they made straight 
for the sluice-way, and as they disappeared under the 
bridge, a faint cheer floated across from a few of 



their admirers on the east bank. The fleet of small 
boats crowded around the shell of the victors, and as 
they paddled to the referee to receive their medals, 
they were greeted with B-0-W-D-O-I-N Rah! 
Rah ! Rah ! from their few supporters who had 
gathered under a huge tree at the water's edge on the 
west shore. The number was small, but they man- 
aged to get considerable noise out of their college 
cry. 

Down on the float, in front of the boat-house, Fred 
Plaisted was awaiting his crew, and as they stepped 
out of their shell, beaming with smiles and appar- 
ently as fresh as when they had entered it an hour 
before, his salutation was, " Well, boys, it's too bad 
the Cornells were not here." The winners, of course, 
appeared pleased because they had secured the med- 
als, but the thought uppermost in their minds was 
that they can go home to-morrow. The members of 
the defeated crew had nothing to say. They had 
been out-rowed. There had been nothing like a foul, 
and the race had been won on its merits. The ref- 
eree was Waldo Lincoln of the Quinsigamond Boat 
Club. There was but one judge, Edward Brown, 
who was at the finish. No provision seemed to have 
been made for keeping the time, and Referee Lincoln 
adopted as the oificial, 8 minutes 26 seconds, the 
time made by several members of the press, who 
were the only persons following the crews besides 
the referee. 

This signal victory, in which our crew 
beat the best time which Cornell claimed to 
have made in practice, besides breaking the 
intercollegiate lecord, and the editorial com- 
ments of leading papers, make sufficient reply 
to Cornell's unkind attack, and we content 
ourselves with printing the following editorial 
notice from the Bangor Commercial : 

The news that Bowdoin had won the intercol- 
legiate boat race reached this city about 6.30, July 
18th, and was received with a great degree of pleas- 
ure, not only by the Bowdoin men, but by the citi- 
zens o-enerally who were interested to have the 
Maine boys win. The older men of the alumni were 
as enthusiastic as the younger members. The Bow- 
doin men have good reason to feel proud of the 
victory, and to have admiration for their crew. It 
will be remembered that in the race on the ith of 
July Cornell fouled the Bowdoins, and that crew was 
ruled out. Bowdoin and Brown were then ordered 
to row over. The date set by the referee was not a 
convenient one for Browns, and the Bowdoin boys 
allowed them to change it to the 16th. During the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



77 



time the Bovvdoins were at Worcester, by their 
gentlemanly couduct they made many friends, and 
were the favorite crew with the people of that city. 
Their time, 8 minutes and 2(5 seconds, was fast, but 
if neeessary they could have rowed over the course 
several seconds quicker. In practice pulls they had 
rowed over the course in 8 minutes and 20 seconds, 
and some say even faster. The action, by Cornell 
in attacking the Bowdoin boys through the columns 
of the press has very justly been condemned on all 
sides. The Cornell men have shown themselves to 
be uiiwortli}' of the name of gentlemen. The truth 
is they knew they could not out-row Bowdoin and so 
resorted to the disreputable means of fouling them. 

Bowdoin has been extremely fortunate iu sports 
this year, and the winning of the college league 
base-ball championship, and the intercollegiate re- 
gatta will do the college no detriment. This is a 
Bowdoin year and her sons have good right to 
rejoice. 



MISTAKES OF GREAT MEN. 

NUMBER TWO. 
I. 

My friend, have you heard of the clown 
Who chanced to be stopping in town 

When politics raged 

And people engaged 
In horrible wrangles and wisely presaged 

The ills that would fall 

On the lives of us all 
If such a man chanced to be pushed to the wall, 

And when they expressed 

The thoughts in their breast 
By saying that they would be da — no, be blest — 
If e'er they consented to help into power 
A rascally fool and a murdering giaour ? 
If you haven't, pray listen to this little tale, 
For the moral's as plain as a hen on a rail. 

II. 
One day, as he sat in the park, 
He heard a man near him remark : 
"I say he's a clown, 
A miserable hound, 
A wart on humanity, stain to the town, 
Who, fresh from the plow, 
And milking his cow, 
Has boldly come into the sight of us now ! 
A jiitiful knave 
Who'd steal from the grave 
His grandmother's body a hair-pin to save ! " 
Now, as our clown listened to what the man said. 



A sudden suspicion popped into his head — 
When he saw himself painted so truly and trim — 
That lie must be certainly speaking of him. 



At once he got up on his feet 
Like a boy with a tack on his seat 
And, shaking liis fist 
With a dangei-ous twist 
'Nealli their noses, he said to the disputants : 
"List! 
I'd have you to know 
I happened to grow 
On as good solid ground as there is here below ! 
It's been a week now 
Since I handled the plow 
And I make my wife see about milking the cow ; 
So, what do you mean by sassing me so 
And saying I'd steal ? That's what I want to know!" 
Then one of them said, as he smothered a roar: 
'I referred to that candidate, Jonathan Moor!" 



OUR SUMMER VISITORS. 

Tuesdajr morning finds us again on tlie 
campus, breathing the wliolesome air of a 
Maine September. As one steps from the 
train and walks up the half-paved walk to 
the entrance to the campus near Memorial, 
the south wind brings the odor of the ocean 
which, as he walks on, is exchanged for the 
sweet smell of the fall flowers growing be- 
tween Memorial and Cleaveland. He passes 
on and, as formerly on his entrance into the 
darkness of the " ends," exclaims : " end 
lamps I " — but darkness still, and no foot- 
steps are heard except the silent footsteps of 
last year. He unlocks the door of his room — 
vacancy and silence greet him. A hunt for 
a match is begun and a light reveals the 
relics of the latest feast of the academic year 
of 1884-85 ; paper bags litter the floor, 
orange rinds in a puckered condition are 
bescattered here and there over the table 
and floor, and unwashed crockery chaotically 
disposed plainly bespeaks the Bacchanalian. 
Numerous programs of the gala days of last 
June are about, telling where the room's 
latest occupant was when he bade good-bj'e 



78 



BOWbOIN ORIENT. 



for a vacation : and, after a general survey, 
the conclusion is that revelry was the pre- 
siding feature of Commencement week. A 
pensive silence holds dominion over the 
little abode ; nothing but one's own footsteps 
fall on the ear. 

Preliminaries are in order for a nap and, 
on going into the bedroom, a chaotic lot of 
bedspreads and sheets present themselves 
piled up on the mattresses. Proceeding to 
arrange the motley mass, he finds the room 
has been a summer resort for some of the 
brute creation. Genus homo, it appears, 
only abdicated in favor of genus mus. The 
possession, if not comialete, has at least been 
such as to leave not only a lasting impression 
on the bedding, but a profound hatred toward 
his intrusive neighbor in the mind of the 
student lately returned. 

With due precaution he hunts about for 
the highway of the intrusive mouse and 
stops up all the chinks and crannies, prepara- 
tory to the work of annihilation. He sets to 
Avork shaking up the sheets and quilts, rap- 
idly approacliing the foundation of his couch. 
In the mattresses is the retreat of the mice. 
Finding they are the objects of destruction, 
they repair to safer quarters. Bidding good- 
bye, exeunt omnes followed by whatever is 
most available as a weapon of destruction. 
By a circuitous route around wash-stand and 
imder bureau to beguile their enemy, and 
then back, the mouse dodges down through 
a hole under the mopboard and is gone for- 
ever, sequuntur deprecationes. 

Later on discovery is made that this sin- 
gle hole, the most convenient of all for the 
mouse, was the only one the precautionary 
assailant failed to secure with a stopper. 
After the family, or families, of the late 
guests have made their escape, their avenue 
of approach is made fast, of course. Satisfied 
that he is now the sole possessor of his 
sleeping room, the tenant doffs his raiment 
and lies down to his repose. Sleeji shuts 



his eyelids, but time is nothing in sleep, and 
right away the bell tolls for him to arise. 
The eventful night gone, he, with the rest, 
enters upon the new year with its new, 
almost revolutionary features which will 
find their way into the columns of the 
Orient, from time to time, as the term and 
year advance. 



THE COLLEGE LIBRARY. 

Under the personal superintendence of 
Prof. Little a very gratifying and much- 
needed change has been wrought in the 
arrangement of some portions of the college 
library. The greater part of the summer 
vacation was consumed in an effort to make 
certain departments more available, and an 
examination of the nature of the work done 
can not fail to make it appreciated by all who 
have occasion to use the library and who 
desire to reach what will be to their purpose 
with the least expenditure of time. Up to 
this summer none but the books in the 
south wing were catalogued by the card 
system which, in many important respects, is 
b}' far the most convenient. All who have 
had occasion to use the old book catalogue, 
which embraced the main library, will clearly 
remember the feeling of disappointment and 
annoyance in finding that a large number of 
the books contained there were without any 
location, and hence inaccessible. 

The entire library is now in the card 
catalogue and any book may be quickly and 
easily found. In many cases an effort was 
made, so far as was expedient, to group 
works of the same class as, for example, 
works on Chemistry will now be found in a 
body. In like manner were placed works on 
Botany, Geology, Mathematics, etc., etc. 

Until this summer it was well-nigh impos- 
sible to reach the greater portion of the valu- 
able pamphlets contained in the pamphlet 
room. These also have been carefully cata- 
logued and will prove of great value to those 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



•79 



wishing to consult them. One of the most 
welcome changes is that in reference to the 
periodicals referred to in " Poole's Index." 
A large number of these periodicals have 
been previously located in the south wing 
remote from the index. They will now be 
found in the main library in close proximity 
to Poole and may be readily referred to. 

The new library regulations and method 
of charging books are decided improvements 
over those hitherto in use. A copy of the 
regulations, which are so plain as to require 
no explanation, is at the service of all per- 
sons entitled to use the library, and no one 
need feel any doubt as to the conditions upon 
which books are loaned. The new method 
of charging will enable the libi'arian to ascer- 
tain in a moment who has a certain book, and 
will largely obviate the liability of being fined 
for retaining books longer than the rules 
permit. 

Many have hitherto felt the need of more 
light in the library, especially in the south 
wing. The stained glass, although it may 
have contributed a little to the beauty of the 
library, was certainly a failure so far as 
lighting purposes were concerned, and we 
are glad to see that it has been removed and 
that plain glass windows iiave taken its place. 
It is to be hoped that the library will, after 
so many beneficial changes, prove a stronger 
factor in our college life than ever before. 



BASE-BALL. 
M. S. C. vs. BowDoiN. 

The first of the fall practice games took 
place Friday, Sept. 25, with the genial play- 
ers from the Maine State College. The jM. 
S. Cs. played a good game and conducted 
themselves in their usual gentlemanly man- 
ner. Ciianges have been made in both teams 
since the championship games, the M. S. Cs. 
having three new men, Small, Page, and Elwell, 
and Bowdoin four, Boutelle, Wilson, Fogg, 



and Russell, of whom the last three are '89 
men. The game was interesting throughout 
and good plays were numerous. For the M. 
S. Cs., Ray played finely at short, and Ruth, 
Rogers, and Page filled their positions well. 
Ray led the batting for his side. For Bow- 
doin, Dearth, Talbot, Moulton, Gary, and Bou- 
telle fielded well, while Dearth, Talbot, and 
Moulton were conspicuous for batting. 

M. s. c. 

A.B. R. iB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Small, c, 4 6 1 i 

Ray, s. s., 4 2 2 3 1 5 

Burleigh, c. f 4 1 1 

Ruth, p., 4 1 8 3 

Rogers, 2b., 3 1 2 1 

Page, lb. 4 Oil 1 

McNally, r. 1., .... 4 1 1 1 

Elwell, 3b., 3 2 

Vose, 1. f., 3 1 

Totals, 29 3 3 4 24 17 9 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. K. iB. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, c. f., 4 1 2 3 3 

Talbot, 3b 4 2 2 1 

Moulton, 0., 4 1 1 1 6 2 5 

Fogg, 1. f., 4 1 

Wilson, -s. s 4 3 2 

Russell, r. f., 4 1 

Cary, 2b., 3 1 1 2 

Boutelle, lb 3 14 1 1 

Davis, p., 3 1 1 2 1 11 3 

Totals, 33 4 6 8 27 20 10 

Earned Runs— M.S. C, 1; Bowdoin, 2. Two Base Hits — 
Dearth, Davis, Ray. First Base on Errors — M. S. C, 3; 
Bowdoin, 3. Passed Balls — Moulton, 5; Small, 3. Wild 
Pitches— Davis, 2; Ruth, 3. Base on Balls— M. S. C, 1. 
Double Play — Davis, Boutelle, and Moulton. Struck 
out — by Ruth, 6; by Davis, 6. Umpire— C. C. Torrey, 
Bowdoin, '84. 

SCORE BT INNINGS. 

123456789 
M. S. C, . 1 2 0—3 
Bowdoin, .100020010—4 



The Sophomore-Freshman game was no- 
ticeable for the unusually good playing for 
such a contest. The victory of the latter 
class was due mainly to the excellent work 
of their pitcher, who struck out twenty-eight 
men in nine innings, though his catcher 
muffed six third strikes, leaving twenty -two 
put out. 



80 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




I'm a Colby Universitj' young 

man, 
A very ajsthetic young man, 
I go to the show and take the front row, 
And mash all tlie girls * that I can. 
*A la French. 

— Colby Echo. 

The revised version of this very 
modest squib reads as follows : 

I'm a Golby University young man, 
A very conceited young man, 
I go to the show and take the front row, 
Because it is cheap young man. 

Yes, Coi'nell, when you cast j'our eyes on the 
best intercollegiate time for four-oared crews, you 
may console yourself with the solemn reflection that 
they were " beef-eaters " that made it. 

Championship of the "Maine Intercollegiate 
League," championship of the " Intercollegiate Row- 
ing Association." This is indeed a " Bowdoin 
year." 

At the last Commencement of the St. Lawrence 
University, Canton, N. Y., the degree of Ph.D. was 
conferred on Prof. Leslie A. Lee, of the class of 72, 
after satisfactory examination in accordance with the 
rules of the college. A sister of Prof. Lee was in 
the graduating class. 

The Lewiston Journal of July 11th copies a poem 
which was first published in the Bowdoin Orient of 
March 25th, and credits it to the Boston Saturday 
Evening Gazelle. The Orient is printed at the Jour- 
nal office. 

The Quinsigamond correspondent of the Boston 
Herald thinks the Bowdoin cheer " unnecessarily ex- 
asperating." We have heard that the Herald corre- 
spondent is a Cornell man, which fully explains his 
" exasperation." 

It (Bowdoin's time) is thirteen seconds better 
than the best intercollegiate record made last year at 
Saratoga by the University of Pennsylvania crew. 
In conversation after the race Fred Plaisted said his 
crew had beaten that time in practice by sixteen 
seconds. His statement is doubtless trustworthy as 
they liave been caught over the course by outsiders 
in eight minutes, eighteen seconds. — Boston Herald. 



The Oracle board have been anxiously awaiting 
the appearance of the Bowdoin Bugle, which has 
been repeatedly advertised to appear for several 
months past. It will probably be a good issue as 
tlie Bates boys say that the Bowdoins have kept close 
to their strong point houting the fiiculty. — Colby 
Echo. 

Colby students know from bitter experience the 
danger of even insinuating — in jest or earnest — any- 
thing which reflects upon the action of that venerable 
body, the Colby fecultj', which sits in solemn judg- 
ment upon their publications. There is probably no 
college in the country where the gag-law is more 
efl'eetually applied to the expression of opinion by 
the students than at Colby University. 

There seems to have been a pretty radical change 
this year in the proverbial "Bowdoin luck," but the 
" oldest inhabitants" claim to have discovered a cor- 
responding change in Bowdoin pluck. 

And now the college poets turn 
Their muse from things divine, 
To paint the emerald virtues 
Of the class of 'eighty-niue. 

Several of the Bowdoin ball nine have been doing 
excellent work on various nines during the past 
vacation. Dearth and Davis played on the Queen 
Citys of Bangor. Moulton was second baseman for 
the Belfasts the first part of the season and after- 
wards catcher of the Yarmouths. Cary and Talbot 
formed the battery of the Machias nine. Larrabee 
and Cook played on the Bridgtons, and Wilson made 
an excellent record as pitcher of the Yarmouths. 
With the material now in college and a sufficient 
amount of hard work the prospect for a good nine 
next season is excellent. 

When Cornell men observed the fact 
Of Bowdoin's faster* pace. 
They gave up hope of winning fair 
And fouled them in the race. 

And when the referee declared 
This shabby trick in vain, 
They gave themselves to sneering at 
The " sturdy boys from Maine.'' 

Now, Cornell, we will tell you why 
Your crew thxis came to grief, 
Of " form " and "style " they had enough, 
But lacked, alas, the " beef." 
*Best practice time, Coraell 8 m. 39 sec, Bowdoin S m. IS 
sec Racing time, Cornell 9 m. 10 1-2 sec, Bowdoin 8 ni. 26 sec. 

It could not be decided Saturday morning in the 
rope-pull which class was the stronger, as the rope 
used was too small and broke as soon as the men 
began to pull, but Monday morning a larger rope 
was procured and, after some delay caused by the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



81 



rope breaking, it was conclusively proved that the 
Freshmen were the stronger class. 

The following are the class officers for the ensuing 
year: '86, Prof. Smith; '87, Prof. Johnson; '88, 
Prof." Avery; '89, Mr. Moody. 

The foot-ball rush at the chapel door was one of 
the longest we have had here for some years, and 
the hats and clothing of those who took part in it 
showed plainly the effects of the contest. Linscott 
finally secured the ball and escaped with it to his 
room. 

Owing to a misunderstanding about the use of 
the base-ball grounds some trouble occurred down 
by the post-office last Friday evening between the 
students and town boys, it certainly seems as if the 
town nine ought to be willing to leave the grounds 
when they are needed by the college without making 
any disturbance, such as took place the other evening. 
If the use of the grounds by outside parties is going 
to give rise to such troubles, it would be well for the 
college to take such action as will secure the delta 
entirely to the use of the nine and exclude all out- 
siders from the grounds. 

Much to our regret the gymnasium has not as 
yet been begun, but, if report be true, work will be 
begun in a few weeks and it will be in a condition to 
use before the winter is over. 

The summer school of chemistry proved to be a 
decided success. All that could be well provided 
for were present and a number of colleges were 
represented. There were in all about twenty-five, 
three ladies being among the number. Prof. Robin- 
son was assisted in his work by Prof. Torrey, at 
that time assistant professor in Lafayette College, 
now professor of Chemistry in Iowa College. 

Sophomore (to a Freshman who has been buying 
some Latin text-books of him)^" Do you ever use a 
horse?" Freshman — "No. I go home on the cars 
every night and walk to and from the depot." 

The foot-ball game took place Friday afternoon 
on the campus. The Freshmen were promptly on 
the grounds at the appointed time, mustering about 
forty men. They were not kept waiting, for soon a 
long procession of Sophomores emerged from North 
VVinlhrop, headed by the solid men of the class, 
singing old Phi Chi, and presenting a sight which 
might well strike terror to the hearts of the unso- 
phisticated Freshmen. After some slight delays the 
game was called at 2.30 by Mr. Knight, the referee. 
In the first rush the Sophomores gained considerable 
ground, but for some time the ball was kept in the 



same part of the field, being constantly fouled in the 
hedges and brought out again. The Freshmen made 
one successful rush and brought the ball back to 
about the starting point, but the vantage was only 
momentary and the ball was driven back on the 
Freshmen's ground and, from that time on, the Soph- 
omores gained steadily till, by a successful kick, 
Thomes sent the ball completely over the bounds, 
winning the game. A foul was claimed by Mr. 
Boutelle, the Freshman judge, but as it was seen 
neither by Mr. Pushor, the judge of the Sophomores, 
nor by Mr. Knight, the referee, the game was de- 
cided in favor of the Sophomores. 

In the fall the grewsome melon, 
E'er It has ripened well, 
Causes little children round al]Out 
To " with the angels dwell." 

In the fall the Colby ball nine, 
E'er their "gym." has furnislied inusele, 
By the Bowdoin boys are wallojied. 
In an equal-sided tussle. 

In the fall is Mr. Booker 

Fencing round the campus line. 

To keep his Jersey (?) cows from biting 

Verdant sons of 'eighty-nine. 

Parker and Davis made a very successful mineral- 
ogical expedition during vacation and brought back 
to college with them some beautiful crystals of vesu- 
vianite, one fine specimen of which has been placed 
in the Cleaveland cabinet. 

The fact that Sunday morning chapel has been 
abolished is a matter of rejoicing to all. It was 
never a pleasant thing to feel obliged to rise at an 
early hour on Sunday morning, and we all fully 
appreciate the kindness of the faculty in acceding to 
a request we have so often made and giving us that 
time for rest. 

There have been quite a number of changes made 
in the faculty since last year. Prof. Little has been 
made college librarian, a position held last year by 
Prof. Johnson. C. C. Torrey, '83, has been ap- 
pointed tutor in Latin. Prof. Carmichael's place 
has been filled by Tutor Hutchins, '83, and Prof. 
Smith takes the Seniors in Political Economy, which 
last year ex-President Chamberlain had. President 
Hyde takes the Seniors in Psychology, which last 
year Prof. Brown had charge of. 

It has been a matter of regret to all that Prof. 
Robinson has been unable to be with us at the begin- 
ning of the term, and we hope for his speedy re- 
covery. W. H. Cothren, '84, has charge of the 
Juniors in Chemistry till Prof. Robinson is in a con- 
dition to take the class. 



82 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The customary base-ball contest between the two 
lower classes has come and gone, and was one of the 
most interesting we have had here. The Freshmen 
showed they had some good base-ball material in 
their class, especially in the battery, though the 
playing in the field was fully up to the average. 
One noticeable feature of the game was the absence 
of bulldozing on the part of the Sophs., though the 
Sophs, were there decorated with the time-honored 
plugs and armed with canes. They made but one 
feeble attempt to sing Phi Chi, and only at long in- 
tervals did some of the bolder spirits of the class get 
up courage to address the Freshmen. The score 
stood 15 to 11 in favor of the Freshmen. H. M. 
Moulton, '87, umpired the game. 

We are pleased to announce to our readers that 
J. A. Harrington, the well-known Boston hatter, 
will visit the college about Oct. 6th. Mr. Harring- 
ton carries one of the finest stocks of goods in the 
country, and students will do well to patronize him. 

The proprietoi's of the Lewiston Exchange would 
like to meet an H. M. Muldoon, Bangor, Me., who 
registered at that hotel Wednesday night of the Fair 
week and has not since been heard from. The man 
was supposed to be a noted "crook" traveling 
under an alias. 

On the arrival of the victorious boat crew from 
Lake Quinsigamond the citizens of Brunswick turned 
out, headed by the Juvenile Band, and escorted them 
through the principal streets .to the college grounds, 
where speeches were made by Prof. Robinson and 
members of the crew. In the evening Prof. Robin- 
son gave the crew a reception at his house where, 
together with many of their friends, they had a very 
enjoyable time. 




'2.5.— J. W. Bradbury 
delivered an able oration 
the occasion of the Centennial cel- 
ebration at Parsonsfield , August 29th, 
sketching the history of its earlier inhabi- 
tants. Mr. B. is now enjoying a green old 
age. He is and has been for several years President 
of the Maine Historical Society, which has been en- 
riched by many valuable papers from his pen. 



Although passed the limit of threescore he is still 
active and vigorous in mind and body. 

'37. — Hon. L. D. M. Sweat, who so ably repre- 
sented Maine in Congress, resides in Portland and 
still takes an active part in public affairs. 

'38. — Horace Piper, of Washington, D. C, read a 
paper on the schools, at Parsonsfield. 

'44. — Hon. Samuel Farnham, of Auburn, Me., 
died Aug. 18th. He was a native of Woolwich. He 
resided for many years in New York. 

'59. — Prof. C. E. Brackett, of Princeton, whose 
health has been failing for the past year, by order 
of his physician sailed for Em-ope, Aug. 22d. 

'69. — M. E. Wadsworth, formerly tutor and in- 
structor in the Natural Sciences at Harvard, has ac- 
cepted the position of Professor of Natural History 
at Colby University. 

'77. — Hargraves is a very successful agent in the 
Saco Woolen Mills. 

'78. — W. E. Sargent, for the past five years the 
principal of the Freejiort High School, has accepted 
a similar position at Hebron Academy. 

'81. — H. L. Staples, now studying medicine at 
the Maine Medical School, recently contributed an 
admirable descriptive paper on the mineralogy and 
geology of the town of Parsonsfield. 

'82. — Married, in Kennebunkport, Aug. 25th, by 
Rev. J. D. Emerson, Will. A. Moody, and Miss 
Jennie L., daughter of the late Capt. John F. Mason. 

'83. — C. H. Stetson, formerly sub-master in the 
Lewiston High School, has accepted the position of 
Instructor in the Natural Sciences at Leicester 
Academy, Leicester, Mass. 

'88. — G. B. Swan was mai'ried to Miss Fannie 
Talbot, of Castine, Aug. 17th. Mr. S. immediately 
left for Victoria, Vancouver's Island, where he will 
establish an high school. 

'84.. — Barton is reading law in McGillicuddy's 
oflBce at Lewiston. 

The following facts have been ascertained of the 
class of '85 : 

Alexander is principal of the high school at 
Eastport. 

Bartlett, principal of high school at Castine. 

Brown, principal of Norway High School. 

Butler, teacher of music in the public schools at 
Lewiston. 

Cook was married Sept. 1st to Miss Kate F. Stone, 
of Bridgton. He now has charge of the Freeport 
High School. 

Davis, principal of Gorham High School. 

Donnell, instructor of the Ancient Languages in 
Yonkers High School, Yonkers, N. Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



83 



Dunham, isrincipal of Greeley Institute, Cumber- 
land, Me. 

Eames, in business at Boston, Mass. 

Folsoni, sub-master in the Lcwiston High School. 

Ford, at his home in Boston, Mass. 

Freeman, studying law in Portland. 

French, studying law in Thomaston. 

Hall, teaching in Minnesota. 

Harding, at his home in Hampden, Me. 

Kendall, teaching in Iowa. 

Libby, principal of Waldoboro High School. 

Lunt, principal of Patten High School. 

Nealley, at his home in Bath. 

Norton, at his home in Augusta. 

Peters, studying law at Waltham, Mass. 

Purrington, principal of high school at Keune- 
bunk. 

Rogers, at his home in Bath. 

Tarr, at his home in Brunswick. 

Thomas, studying law in Portland. 

Wardwell, assistant teacher in Bath High School. 

Waterman, secretary of Boston Y. M. C. A. 

Whittier, at home in Farmington Falls. 




Bowdoin's boy President 
will be a success. Make 
, note of it. — Boston Globe. 
The Cornell boys impudently call the 
Bowdoin boat crew, "beet-eaters." There 
is nothing bad in that name, but the way in 
which it was said, told the story of Cornell's unkindly 
feeling. The Bowdoin "beef-eaters" have now 
twice won the intercollegiate rowing race— the last 
time by sheer muscle and skill without the aid of a 
referee's ruling, putting four lengths of clear water 
between themselves and the Brown crew. — Leivislon 
Journal. 

Well done, Bowdoin. Yesterday's victory was a 
triumph worth having. By the way, we presume 
this is one of the happy results of electing a vigorous 
young man for President of the college. — Boston 
Globe. 

While the friends of the Bowdoin boat-crew were 
confident that they would have won a signal victory 
in the first race in the intercollegiate regatta, had 
it not been for the disgusting action of the Cornell 



crew, which deliberatelj' left its own course and 
fouled the Maine boys, still the fact that the Bow- 
doins did not cross the line first left the result of the 
race decidedly unsatisfactorj'. The result of the 
contest yesterday, however, fully confirmed the 
opinion that Bowdoin had the strongest crew in 
the regatta. The Maine boys not only defeated 
the Browns by several lengths but covered the dis- 
tance twelve seconds quicker than the best time 
made by the Cornells during their practice before 
the first race. 

The Bowdoins have acted throughout the con- 
test in a most gentlemanly manner, and their will- 
ingness to change the date of the final trial — already 
fixed by the referee — to accommodate the Brown 
crew, made them many friends. The Cornells, on 
the other hand, have supplemented their unseemly 
conduct in the race, which very properly caused 
them to be ruled out, by a bitter attack upon the 
Bowdoins in the public print, but the latter can 
well afford to ignore all such attacks which only 
reflect upon the writers. Bowdoin men in this city 
were naturally feeling very much elated last evening 
and had on the the white ribbon, the college color. — 
Bangor Whig. 

The Bowdoin crew in the race at Lake Quinsiga- 
mond, Thursday, beat the best intercollegiate record 
by thirteen seconds. In their practice spins they 
have made even better time than this. — July 18, Ban- 
gor Whig. 



ELEGANT MACKINAW 

STRAW HATS, 

THE BEST QUALITY, 

$1.00,. $1.25, $1.50, 

MEEEY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND. 

H. V. STACKPOLE, 

FINE BOOTS AND SHOES, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOOTS AND SHOES, 

ALL STYLES AND PRICES, 

*AT JACKSON'S.* 

LAWN-TENNIS SHOES CONSTANTLY 
ON HAND. 

REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 

No. 2 Odd Fellows' Block, 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 



CIGARETTE 
Smokers who 

are wUling^to 
paya little more 
lor Cigarettes 
than the price 
charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, will 
find the RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO AL.I. OTHERS. 
They are made from the l}rlglitest, most 
delicately flaT'ored, and liigliest cost 
gold lea^ grown in Virginia, and are abso- 
lutely Tvlthon^ adixlteratfloii or dxu^St 



No. 



STRAIGHT COT 

We use the Genuliie French Rice Paper 

of our own direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No, 1 — on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 



original brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or box of ■ 
Kichii 
Straight Cnt I 
Cigarettes 

bears the I 
signature of ' 

ALLEN 4&,CINTlR 

MANTTTACTnEEBS, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



RIGAREHES 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL KATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

H|aine Bentral R. 1^. 

On and after June 27th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 7.4.5, 11.45 A.M., 1..50, 4.50 .and 6.30 p.m., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.35 and 11.40 A.M., 4.25 and 4..50 

P.M., and 12.35 (night). 
For Eocklaud, 7.45 A.M., 1.50 P.M., and Saturdays at B.SO p.m. 
For Lewiston, 7.45 and 11.40 A.M., 1.48 and 6.35 P.M., 12.40 
(night). 

For Farmington, 7.45 A.M. and 1.48 P.M. 
For Augusta at 7.48 and 11.45 A.M., 1.40, 1.49 and 6.35 p.m., and 

12.45 (night). 
For Waterville at 7.4S A.M., 1.40, 1.49 and 6.35 P.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 1.49 P.M., and 12.45 (night). 
For Bangor at 1.40, 1.49, and 6.35 p.m., and 12.45 (nighl). 
For Ellsworth, Mt. Desert Ferry and Bar Harbor at 1.10 p.m., 

and 12.45 (night) . 
For Vanceboro and St. John at 1.40, 1.49 p.m., and 12.45 (night). 

Note.— The night ti-ains to and fi'om Boston, Portland, Lew- 
iston, and Bangor run every night, including Sundays, but do 
not connect for Skowliegau on Sunday morning, or for Belfast 
and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, except Bar 
Harbor, on Sunday morning. 

PATSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BOOIHBY, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, June 20, 1885. 



NOTICE. 

BEWARE OF COUNTERFEITS AND IMITATIONS. 

Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and pure Rice Paper, are rolled by the highest 
class of skilled labor, and warranted free from flavoring or 
impurities. 

Every genuine Ci.garette bears a fac-.simile of Kinney 

BKOS.' SIGNATURE. 

KINNEY^ TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KINNET BROS. 

NEW YORK. 

Tlie following are our well-known 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Caporal, Sweet Caporal, St. James i, Caporal i, St. 

.Tames, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES 

SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and beeoming very popular. Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 



Tlie Sixty-Third Annual Course of Lectures attbe Medi- 
cal Scliool of Maine", will commence February 5th, 1885, 
and continue SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Alfred MiTCtiELL, M.D., Secretary; IsisAEL 
T. Dana, M.D., Pathology and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, 
M.D., Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children ; CiIjVRLES 
W. CODDARD, A.M., Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. 
Gerrish, M. D., Anatomy; Hexry Carmichael, Ph.D., Chem- 
istry; Stephen H. Weeks, M.D., Surgery ami Clinical Surgery; 
Charles O. Hunt, M.D., Materia Med'ica aud Tlierapeutli's ; 
Henry H. Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Irving E. Klmrall, M.D., 
Demonstrator of Anatomy; Everett T. Nealev, M.D., Dem- 
onstrator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

IRA C. STOCKBRlbCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEK, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

M.agazines, JIusic, etc.. Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 

IVl ^ Y N^ ^ R D ' S 

Main St., under Town Clock. 

ig-Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Tear in Advauce. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROIVIPTLY EXECUTED. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEG^E BOOKSTORE. 

We have coustantly io stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept iu a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods iu variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer In all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

.^-Special Kates to Student Cluba.-ffis 



'mzins^isinm* #- 



2 i|urt| Ifotfe, 



|at^. 



DEALEK IN 

CEDAR STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Branch office tliree doors north of Tontine Hotel. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Bye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
^i= Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COE. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



Successor to AtwoocT & Wentworth, 

DEALER IN 

DIA^pOHlDS, WATCHES, JEWELRY. 

and importers of French Clocks, Opera Glasses, etc. 
Fine Watch Repairing ; Gold and Silver Platin;/. 

509 CONGRESS ST., Portland, Me. 

ALL THE STUDENTS SHOULD BUY 

THEIE 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 

Frank E, Roberts' Boot & Shoe Store, 

COR. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



^s@KAe m. mii^s^. 



-DEALER IN- 



Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 



DUNLAP BLOCK, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT 



BASE-BALL 

TENAIS 

BOATING 

SPECIAL RATES TO CLUBS. 



SUIItTS, 

HTOVKISGS, 

JEliSEYH. 



OWEN, MOORE &. CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



WM- ^. FIEIfD, 



ja^N^gE^. 




OTTAWA 



Cushing's Island, 
Portland, Me. 



Is/C. S- C3-IBSOI>T. 



239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. MERRILL. A. IvEITH. 



DE.\LER IN 

IJIOCIIISS AND PIOYISIONS, 

Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 "WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PURITY SWEET CIGARETTES. 

THE PUREST, MILDEST, AND BEST CIGARETTE ON THE MARKET. 

PURE, BRIGHT VIRGINIA TOBACCO AND PUREST RICE PAPER. 



FOR THE FINEST MADE TRY OUR 

STRAIGHT WEB CIGARETTES. 

MANUFACTURED FROM THE FINEST BRIGHT TOBACCO GROWN. WITH 

TURKISH MIXTURE. 



PURITY SMOKING TOBACCO. 

THE FINEST, PUREST, AND BEST SMOKING TOBACCO MADE. 

RALEIGH CUT PLUG SMOKING. 

THE ORIGINAL, PUREST, AND THE BEST. 



We guarantee all not injurious. Only a trial and you mil be convince d 

PACE & SIZER, Manufacturers, Richmond, Va. 



THE 



^ TRAVELERS # 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HERTFORD, COlSriSr., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCT $1 1)000,000) and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 

A r^PT'm7"\rT' "P("kT TPTTT^ indemnifying tbe Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
-HlV^V^XJ-^XjI^ X JC l-/iJ±V_yJLlLO Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidental Injury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only .fo.OO a year to Professional or Business Men, for each $1,000, with .f 5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Kesidence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 1861 have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. 

Issues T TT7T? TD/^T Tr^TT?Q oi every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 
also JUl-TJCi i VJJUlV^±±!jk5 Personal Benefit. 

On ALL our iilans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of jiremiums paid. 

Assets, $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Office at Hartford. 
JAS, G. BATTERSON, President, RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary, JOHN E, MORRIS, Asst. Secretary, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



^ FmE®£.] 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of BrnnsMrick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Viewrs. 



F. ROEMER, 

Successor to A. Eoemek & Son, 
THE LAKGEST HISTORICAL 

COSTUMERa^ARMORER 

IN AMERICA. 

Also Costumer for all the principal tiieati'es; Fifth Avenue 
Theatre, Grand Opera House, Star Theatre, Madison Square 
Theatre, Niblo's Garden Theatre, New Park Theati-e, People's 
Theatre, 14th Street Theatre. 

No. 8 UNION SQUARE, NEW YOEK. 



Go to W, B. Woodard's 

To buy vour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doiug. 
si'Eci-ft-Xj ^^J\a^E:s to ST-crx)EicrT cxjTtbs. 
Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

C. E. TOA^^ISrSEIS^D, 

DEALER IN 

CHOICE GROCERIES, 

Canned Goods, State Prison Harnesses, Fruits, Confec- 
tionery, Tobacco and Cigars, 
Corner Main and Cleaveland Streets, BRUNSWICK. 

N. B.— SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENT CLUBS. 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



C. L. York, Old CoUege Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 



SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



/K CLuo t^oAD i^^CE 







IIKNISMmi ii 



(Established 1877.) 



Institute Building, Huntington Ave., Boston. 



I® m 



imm^ 



ONE DEVOTED EXCLTJSIVEL"£ TO BICYCLES, AND THE 

OTHER TO TKICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 

stamp at above address. 



A, ATKiif»#: 



Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Sts., PORTLAND, ME., 

WOULD RESPECTFULLY CALL THE ATTENTION OF 



Biiyeis ol Furiilture, GaMs, Beitilli, Pailoi Stoves, Mi%, ki, 



To the Enormous Stock of House Furnishings at the Portland Store. Being Manufacturers, 

intending purchasers can see the styles and select their own coverings for Parlor Furniture, and ha\'& it made 

to order for the same price. "We keep enormous quantities of Upholstery Goods in the Boston Store, and 

full lines of Samples. Here our prices on Parlor Suites range from 5p33.00 in Hair Cloth to 

$375.00 in Silk or Mohair Plushes. 



CHAMBER FURNITURE. 

We have in stock in our three stores 87 different i^at- 
terns of Chamber Suites, manufactured from all the popu- 
lar woods, viz.: Pine, Ash, Walnut, Cherry, Basswood, 
and Mahogany, ranging in price from .JrlS.OO to .S400.00. 
We also have all kinds, sizes, and quantities of Bedsteads, 
Bureaus, Commodes, etc. Spring Beds, Cot Beds, Lounge 
Beds, Sofa Beds, Mantel Beds, etc. Mattresses of every 
kind and quality, from an excelsior at .i?2.00 to a pure 
hleached South American curled horse hair at 3j25.00. 

CARPET DEPARTMENT. 

5f75,000 worth of Cottons, Cotton and Wools, All-Wool 
Extras, Tapestry, Brussels, Body Brussels, Velvets, Wil- 
tons, etc., at our usual Eock-Bottom Prices. Any of these 
can be selected at the Portland store. SHADES and 



DRAPERY of every description made to order id the 
Boston store. Orders taken here and designs and samples 
shown. 

PARLOR STOVES. 

Special attention is requested to our Parlor Stove De- 
partment, as we believe we have the best line to select 
from in Maine. Prices .S4.00 to S40.00. 

STOVES AND RANGES. 

Our line of Ranges comprises all the latest and best in 
the market, including the " New Tariff" and " Quaker," 
which are considered superior to anything yet produced. 
AVrite for cuts of these two Ranges. Prices $15.00, $20.00, 
!S22.50, $25.00, $27.50, $29.00, $33.00, $35.00, $38.00, and up- 
wards to $65.00. These prices include all the ware, pipe, 
and zinc. 



Any of the above goods sold, for Cash, or on our Special Contract System, at 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Streets, Portland, Me. 

Branch of the Great Nassau Hall House Farnisldng Store, 827 Washington Street, Boston. 

B. A. ATKINSON & CO. 

ISA.A.C C. A.T?ICIlVSO]V, Manager. 



r 






BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AXD THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENQEAVED ni THE MOST PASHi:HiBLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY t'UR 

RQ,GE,B,S» aELKBaATEiO GROUPS. 



474 Congress St., - 



opp. Preble House. 




< 






(ft 



P 



HONETIC SHORTHAND. °1««e°t%^'^ 

For Self-Instruction. Contaiuing all the late improve- 
ments. Price $1..")0. Special Instruction by Mail, SS.OO. 
Send Stamp for Specimen Pages and Illustrateil Pamphlet. 

W. W. OSGOODBY, Publislier, Rochester, N. Y. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

N0. 5 0DD EELIiGW'^ BIieCK, 

Is the place to buy 



Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 



mrnxm,: ifeop/iF, 



mOTOG-H-A-DPHS 
Made at Hi.ggins' Ground-Floor Studio, Bath, 



The New Styles in 

In all colors, are now ready. An elegant line of New York 
Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

1 ELLIOTT'S, t 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 



Wanted, to take orders for Trees, Vines, Shrubs, and a general 
line of Nursery Stock. Only those who are over 25 years of age 
and can furnish the very best references need apply. To the 
right men we can give employment the year round. Experience 
not necessary. E. G. CHASE & CO.'S, 8 Pemberton Square, 
Boston, Mass. We pay all expenses and a good SALARY. 



Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

0(1(1 Fellows' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 

Main Street, Brunswick. S. W. BROWNE, Proprietor. 







m 

THE FAVORITE NOS. 303-4d4-3S2-l7O-S5l- WITH 
HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. lERRYIAN, PHARMACIST,-:- 

DllGS, MIDICINiS. 

FaflCf aiil Toilet Ariicles, CiprsI Totacco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

IS" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 

Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Wo ®o ^tttfS^faig 

Book-Seller, Stationer, Book-Binder. 

AND BLANK-BOOK MANUFACTUKEB, 

Opposite City Hall, Center St., Bath, Maine. 

They do say, and it is a fact, that Lcnton & Neaglc's Is the 
cheapest place iu tliis countj'. Their assortment of trunks and 
bags cannot be beaten. No shop-worn goods, but direct from the 
manufacturers. They have the largest line of whips ever shown 
in this town. Jobbing of all kinds promptly attended to. 
Trunks and bags neatlv repaired. 

HARNESS MAKERS & CAKRIAGE TRIMMERS, 
MAIN STREET, Store formerly occupied by Washburne. 



J. S. TOWNE, 

PHARMACEUTIST. 

PURE DRUGS, MEDICINES, FANCY AND TOILET AR- 
TICLES; ALSO A FINE LINE OF CHOICE CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES. PRESCRIFTIONS a Specialty. 

Main Street, Near Bowdoin College. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music lor Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

J80 Middle Street - - - - Portland, Me. 



OVER BOARDMAN'S STORE, MAIN STREET. 



— H B. G. DENNISON, -i— 

Brunswick Book - Store, 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just Nortti of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery ; Portland and Boston Daily Papers ; Circu- 
lating Library, laOO Volumes; Base-Ball and La Crosse; Pict- 
ures and Picture frames; Frames made to order at short notice. 



F. W. BAEEON, 

Dealer in MM M FaBcy Groceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 

MASON STREET. 



HARRINGTON the HATTER 

14 School Street, BOSTON, 

Special Styles and Prices to meet the Requirements of 

STTJDE:NrT s. 

Inquiries and Orders by Mail Promptly Answered. Express Free to any Place. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshmau 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books beinfj mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar, — Allen and Greenougb, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

CiEsar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
^neid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Joues. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry, — first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regulae Examinations foe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the .Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Halloivell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryehurg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EBQUIEED— FOUE HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A "WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terras. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terras. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms.. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCT. 14, 1885. 



No. 7. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE YEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

W. V. Wentwobth, '86, Managing Editor. 

M. Ij. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
J. H. Davis, '86. Levi Turner, Jr., '8f 

A. A. Knowlton, '86. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. C. Parker, '86. C. B. Burleigh, '87. 

H. L. Taylor, '86. E. C. Plummer, '87. 



Per annum, in advance, 
Single Copies, 



$2.00 
15 cents, 
on applic.^- 



Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
municatifns in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to conti'ibute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 



CONTENTS. 

Vol. XV., No. 7.- October 14, 1885. 

Initiation, 85 

Editorial Notes 85 

Falling Leaves, 87 

The Storm 87 

Characteristics of General Grant, 87 

Hudson Highlands, 89 

Owed to '89, 90 

An Explanation, 90 

An Unfinished Work (Communication), 91 

Base-Ball 91 

CoLLEGn Tabula, 92 

PKRSONALj 94 

Clippings, 94 

INITIATION. 

The night is still, the breezes blow 
Across the campus soft and low, — 
And Nature dons her mask of crape 
To help the Greeks initiate. 

Rash neophyte that thoughtless goes 
Blindfolded to — Lord only knows. 
Fo rNature gives no explanation 
To mysteries of initiation. 




Among the agreeable changes about 
the college this j^ear, we would give an im- 
portant place to the new departure of the 
facultjr, whereby Monday evening of each 
week, between the hours of eight and half- 
past nine, is set apart for the informal recep- 
tion of students. Each member of the 
faculty is " at home " at that time, and, if 
the invitation so cordially extended to us is 
not responded to in as cordial a manner, we 
shall certainly be the losers. 

It is a self-evident fact that a hearty sym- 
pathy and cooperation betAveen instructors 
and students, which can follow only as the 
result of acquaintance and mutual under- 
standing, are essential to the highest welfare 
of the college ; yet it is equally manifest 
that our relations to those who should be 
regarded as friends have been too largely 
confined to the class-room. The Freshman, 
impregnated with fitting school ideas, regards 
any talk with a professor as evidence of that 
baby spirit, of which he hears so much; the 
Sophomore, at least until the establishment 
of the Jury System, has been prone to asso- 
ciate an invitation to visit a member of the 
faculty with a prospective "Leave on the 
next train and do not return until sent for." 

Among upperclassmen there has been 



86 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



more, yet far too little, inclination to profit 
by a closer acquaintance. 

The faculty have now indicated the way 
to more friendly relations, and may their 
attempt prove successful. 



Those of the alumni who were not 
ardent admirers of the system in vogue here 
in regard to Sunday services, if not envious, 
will doubtless feel like congratulating us 
upon the abolishment of morning prayers 
on that day. The change Avas made at the 
beginning of the term, and the appearance of 
the transepts during church, indicates that 
the cause of religion has lost nothing. 

During Sunday afternoon prayers, Presi- 
dent Hyde devotes the greater portion of 
the time to some brief remarks which are 
interesting and appreciated. A little com- 
mon-sense advice and such recommendations 
as he makes will, it seems to us, prove far 
more beneficial than the old-fashioned 
method, which was indeed very . good, but 
which was characterized by a decided same- 
ness. 



What is fame ? This query thrust itself 
upon us after reading the following from 
one of Amherst's correspondents : 

One feature there is about the College life at Am- 
herst which is diiferent from any other college in the 
country. Harvard excepted, where the innovation has 
lately been made. This is the self-government of 
the students. 

The correspondent is evidently not aware 
that this is the third year of self-govern- 
ment at Bowdoin, and that the success of 
the experiment here, was one of the argu- 
ments used in favor of its adoption at Har- 
vard. The system in use at Bowdoin has 
been often spoken of in the Orient, and in 
other college papers, and the leading dailies 
of the country have often spoken of it. 

This ignorance of our college, however, 
brings to mind the oft-recurring thought 



that our correspondents do not send a super- 
fluity of letters to the press. Doubtless they 
are of an economical turn and wish to save 
paper and postage ( provided by the paper 
for which they are supposed to write ), but 
Bowdoin's fame can hardly be expected to 
increase in a geometrical ratio while our own 
students neglect to furnish news from here • 
to their papers. 



The success of our crew at Lake Quin- 
sigamond has created such an interest in 
boating here that the scrub race this fall 
attracted more than the usual amount of at- 
tention. The race, which occurred Friday 
afternoon at three o'clock, was participated 
in by three crews in working boats. The 
course was one-half mile down river from 
the Augusta railroad bridge and return. A 
flying start was taken and the three crews 
started in good shape. At first the '88 boat 
worked ahead, but the '87 boat, on the 
Topsham side, being in a stronger current, 
began to crawl up and turned the flag first. 
One of the oars of the '88 boat escaped from 
the rowlock and caused No. 2 to lose several 
strokes. 

Lane kept his crew, in '87's fast boat, 
hard at work and crossed the line first in 
seven minutes fifteen seconds. 

Butler's crew, though hampered by '86's 
slow boat, began to work ahead and crossed 
second. 

The race Avas a good one and plainly 
showed that '89 has brought some good boat- 
ing muscle into the college. One of the 
principal objects of these fall races is to 
bring out the material for boating in the 
Freshman class, and afford those men who 
pull, a little training previous to entering 
upon the winter's work in the gymnasium. 
This race has certainly done that, and given 
evidence that the incoming class will ma- 
terially strengthen the 'varsity. 

The prospects are excellent for getting 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



87 



a good crew next year, and with the memorj^ 
of this summer's victory to spur on, and the 
attractions of a new gymnasium, already 
begun, to incite to more earnest effort, we 
hope to see a crew chosen soon who will 
work well during the Avinter and next sum- 
mer again win renoAvn for the white. 



We are pleased to present a communica- 
tion from Mr. Packard, '66, calling attention 
as it does to an omission which many, if not 
all of us, have noticed in Memorial Hall. 
His ideas must certainly commend themselves 
to all Bowdoin men who have ever thought 
of the noble devotion and self-sacrifice of 
those who exchanged the pleasures of a col- 
lege course and their bright prospects for the 
privations of camp and rebel bullets. 



FALLING LEAVES. 
Withered and sere in the closing year, 

The leaves to earth are falling. 
Blown from the trees, each passing breeze, 

A summons of death is calling. 

A far different thing was the joyous spring, 
When nature to life was starting, — 

Now the landscape's sheen then colored with 
green. 
Is brown with autumnal parting. 

All Nature breathes to the fading leaves, 

A solemn and sad adieu, 
For soon it knows cold winter snows 

Will hide them away from view. 

Yet death's decay is hidden away 
By the touch of an artist's hand. 

And the scarlet and red of the leaves that are 
dead. 
Transfigure the somber land. 

' Dead " did we say ? So it seems to-day, 
Yet a death that is not vain. 
For dying they'll bring, with the opening 
spring, 
New forms of life again. 

The hopes of life e'er battered by strife 
Are as fair as the landscape round. 

Yet withered and sere in the closing year, 
They fall at last to the ground. 



But their sad decay is hidden away. 
By the touch of a Master's hand. 

And a Heavenly voice bids death rejoice, 
In the life of a farther land. 



THE STORM. 

On the grim mountain, clad in sombre pines. 
From heavy skies moist hurrying clouds descend. 
And swift uniting indistinctly blend. 
Blotting in misty drifts the clear-cut lines 
That stood against the blue, familiar signs 
In pleasant weather. Now the fog-banks lend 
A thick white garment, and their wreaths extend 
Continually down the steep inclines 
Until the mount is hidden, and around 
On field and wood and hill the sad mists lie ; 
The circle ever narrows, soon the ground 
Feels the first drops from out the lowering sky ; 
Fast falls the rain, down sweep without a sound 
The clouds ; all lies in damp obscurity. 



CHARACTERISTICS OF GEN. GRANT. 

A few weeks ago the people of this na- 
tion joined in according to one of its citizens 
the grandest funeral pageant and most elab- 
orate demonstrations of sorrow that have 
ever been received by any citizen of any 
land. This homage was general and spon- 
taneous. 

In the presence of so great national sor- 
row and universal grief, it is natural that we 
should 23ause to inquire its meaning. Is it 
sentiment or is it solidity ? Is it the tempo- 
rary flush of the over-stimulated sensibilities 
of the people, or is it the calm and candid 
estimate placed by this nation upon one of 
its citizens. Many are accustomed to look 
upon Grant's greatness as the creation of 
circumstances entirely, inclining to believe 
that, had it not been for the war of the re- 
bellion, he would have most notably exem- 
plified what Gray has so strikingly expressed 
in his Elegy : 

Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, 
And waste its sweetness on the desert air. 

However this may be. Gen. Grant was un- 
questionably possessed of certain mental 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



traits and endowments wMch marked him as 
a man of an extraordinary type, and as one 
having unusual and almost incomparable 
genius. It is worth while to inquire what 
were the mainsprings of his actions and the 
source of his power. 

Many of the motives which actuated him 
and the real sources of strength employed in 
the putting forth of his singular powers, 
will never be fully imderstood ; for his na- 
tive modesty seemed to make him shrink 
from speaking of a matter so personal to him 
as the analysis of his own mental powers. 

Yet the leading characteristics of his nat- 
ure are well known. His individuality was 
most intense. This was the secret of his 
strength, the controlling influence in his 
actions, the distinguishing feature of his 
achievements. He acted with a spontaneity 
that was his own. 

If we ask for the elements of his charac- 
ter, we find him endowed with an extraor- 
dinary intellect of wonderful capacity, calm 
judgment, clear ,quick, and accurate imagina- 
tion, and memory with an iron grasp. Kea- 
son was his uppermost faculty. In every- 
thing he was naturally logical. He could 
grasp the minutest details, and rise to the 
highest generalizations. His immense men- 
tal reservoir seemed never exhausted. His 
fertility of resource was visible on every oc- 
casion. He possessed, in a remarkable de- 
gree that genius of common sense which 
enables men to judge with accuracy what is 
true, useful, proper, expedient. Hence came 
his seriousness, thoughtfulness, penetration, 
and firmness. Where others imagined suc- 
cess, he saw defeat ; where they beheld de- 
spair, he discerned hope. Hence he often 
stood alone in his judgments and plans. 

He could forecast the enemies' plans with 
almost as much precision as though he had 
participated in their councils. By the su- 
premacy of his will he forced all obstacles 
to yield to his bidding. The promptitude of 



his action precluded possibility of contra- 
vention. With mathematical accuracy he 
comprehended dates, locations, and persons. 
Nothing was beyond his penetration. So 
calm was his intellect that he could transact 
the most important affairs in the rage and 
storm of battle. In the presence of the 
unforeseen, in the culmination of a crisis, in 
an unexpected emergency when most needed 
he was at his best. His latent resources 
were seemingly without limit. He reasoned 
out his victories, and it is surprising to see 
how nearly his conclusions coincided with 
the actual results. As a writer and speaker 
he has hardly had the credit his due. It is 
true that he talked but little for the sake of 
talking, yet in addressing a small circle of 
friends on general subjects, he was a charm- 
ing conversationalist. His ideas upon a sub- 
ject to which he had given special considera- 
tion, were thoughtful, philosophical, and 
original. He had great aversion to public 
speaking, and whatever he said was invari- 
ably impromptu. His success on public oc- 
casions may be attributed to his great faculty 
for clear expression. 

He wrote with great rapidity and clear- 
ness and seldom hesitated for an expression 
or recast a sentence. His style was lucid 
and terse, with but little ornament. When, 
however, he did indulge in tropes, they were 
apposite, original, and expressive, as when 
he spoke of our armies at one time, moving 
" like horses in a balky team, no two ever 
pulling together." He could concentrate 
his thoughts under any and all circumstances. 
Nothing that was going on, either in his own 
quarters, or on the field, could distract him. 
There has been quite a general misunder- 
standing and misrepresentation of General 
Grant's personal manners, tastes, and mental 
attainments. 

History, in a certain measure, has repre- 
sented him as one whose chief characteristics 
were the bluntness of the soldier, lack of 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



89 



personal accomplishments, and total disre- 
gard for culture and the amenities of life. 
This is in no sense true. It would be injus- 
tice not to make mention of his goodness of 
heart, and his puritj^ of moral character. 
He had nothing of hatred or of vindictive- 
ness in his heart. Though exposed for five 
years to all the ruinous and enervating influ- 
ences of camp life, he returned to his home 
without a stain upon his character. Such 
was the purity of liis thought he would not 
permit himself to hear a salacious story. In 
short, however, though his personal traits 
were not so conspicuous as in many cases, 
though his salient points were not so clearly 
visible, though parallels between him and 
other great men in some respects disappoint 
us, yet, viewed all in all, he possessed those 
attributes which marked him, no less than 
Washington, a typical American. 



THE HUDSON HIGHLANDS. 

To him who, in the love of nature, holds communion 
with her visible forms, she speaks a various language. 

After a sea-trip of six weeks, during 
which I had seen much of Nova Scotia, we 
cast anchor at New York. The vessel was 
bound for Newburg, and on a pleasant sum- 
mer evening, just as the reflected rays of the 
setting sun lit up the sky and sea, our 
"tow" started on its slow journey up the 
Hudson. The Palisades, boldly outlined 
against the crimson sky, extended as far as 
the eye could reach, presenting a grand and 
impressive appearance. 

When descending night hid the land- 
scape from view, I looked back upon the 
city, and saw its scattered lights twinkling 
like the starry heavens. Then I lay in my 
hammock, "lost in that involuntary musing " 
which the beauty of the night induced. 

I was to be awakened at day-break, and 
as soon as the first faint streaks of dawn 
stole over the heavens, I was on deck. There 
was perfect quiet over nature, and the at- 



mosphere was tliick with the dim twilight. 
" The dawn was stealing up into the sky on 
its gray feet," and I quoted Wordsworth's 
" Star on the mountain top, silence in the 
sky, sleep among the hills, gentleness of 
heaven on the sea." 

We were just entering the Highlands, and 
I stood awed by the solemn grandeur of the 
scene. The hour with its unbroken stillness, 
the place teeming with memories of the 
great struggle for Independence, and the 
awful majesty of nature, all deeply impressed 
me. 

The rugged peaks of Dunderhead and 
Manito rose on either bank of the river, 
rearing their dizzy heights far into the sky. 
Soon we passed Anthony's Nose, its bald 
peak wreathed with circling mists, while its 
sides were covered with forests. Beyond 
was a chain of broken hills, some rising ab- 
ruptly from the immediate bank of the river, 
their shaggy breasts and huge gray forms 
towering sternly above us, enveloped in the 
darkest shadows ; others ascending gradually, 
their peaks clothed with tall, waving pines, 
whose stately tops had caught the first faint 
glimpses of the morning sun as it broke forth 
from the east. 

As morning advanced, the eastern hills 
were more "sharply outlined against the red- 
dening sky," until the sun was quite up, 
breaking over the gray cliffs into a thousand 
rays, and bathing the rejoicing foliage of the 
mountain sides with a flood of golden light. 
The heavy mists went hurrying up the 
craggy steeps, like guilty ghosts retreating 
to their shades. 

A sudden bend in the river brought us in 
sight of West Point, resplendent in the 
morning light. The day was charming, and 
the view, which at this point is, doubtless, 
the most beautiful and picturesque to be 
seen on any river in America, burst upon us 
in all its glory and grandeur. 

On the left, projecting back from the 



90 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



high bluff overlooking the river, lies the 
Parade Ground, a iine plateau delightfully 
set off by the hill in the background. At the 
foot of this hill stand the military colleges, 
while near the river, on the northern side of 
the Parade Ground, rises West Point Hotel. 
All around are strewn mementos of the 
Revolution, and the many beautiful and ro- 
mantic places in this neighborhood are 
thronged with the memories of important 
historic events. 

Beyond West Point "Old Cro' Nest" 
and Storm King rise up fifteen hundred feet 
or more, and on the other bank Mounts Tau- 
rus and Breakneck extend off to the north- 
east. Between these the mighty river rolls 
its majestic tide, bearing on its bosom the 
commerce of the North. From West Point 
the white buildings of Newburg, the port of 
our destination, were plainly visible, glitter- 
ing brightly in the sunlight, and a little 
later we lay at anchor under the shadow of 
its stately terraces. 



OWED TO '89. 
Ye come oh verdant Freshman, 
And your young and guileless face 
With an air of early spring-time 
All the region seems to grace, 
While your ignorance colossal 
And your wildly rolling eye 
Would invoke the gods to laughter 
Or make a statue sigh. 

In your grip-sack there are cookies 
And a good supply of cake, 
These, and half a pound of spruce gum 
Which your mother made you take. 
There's the testament and psalm book 
That your " granny " gave to you. 
And hoped you oft would read them 
When you'd " nothing else to do." 

There's a jack-knife uncle Joseph gave 

And told you to beware 

Not to whittle off your fingers 

When you carved your " 'nitials " there ; 

And the jew's-harp from aunt Hannah, 



Which she hoped you'd learn to play. 
Thus the hours left from " studyin'" 
In pleasure while away. 

There's a bran new pair of " glasses " 

From your own Eliza Jane, 

Which should rest your weary optics 

Overcome by study's strain ; 

And you have from cousin Moses 

A nice new line and hook 

With which to catch the speckled trout 

That populate the bi'ook.* 

Verdant Freshman, young and simple. 

Boy who never told a lie, 

Soon the eai-nest light of childhood 

Will have faded from your eye. 

Soon your mind will grow developed 

And enriched with classic lore. 

Soon you'll " Hoss" and smoke and swagger. 

Soon you'll be a Sophomore." 



AN EXPLANATION. 

My son you will know 

When you come to grow 
That it's hard to endure defeat. 

That the average man 

Always has a plan 
That would work if " they didn't cheat.' 



You'll find as a rule 

That the boy at school 
Who's wipped and retiring in sorrow 

Will stifle his crys 

As he homeward flys 
To tell how he'll "lick him to-morrow. 



There ne'er was a case 

Of a yachting race 
When the wind didn't favor winners. 

There ne'er was a court 

But some would report 
That the judge was a miserable sinner. 

And I haven't a doubt 

When Gabriel's shout 
Shall quicken the good men's powder 

That many bereft 

Will swear they're left 
Because he didn't yell louder. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



91 



AN UNFINISHED WORK. 

To the Editors of the Orient : 

Boston, October 5, 1885. 

In looking at an old scrap-book, I noted 
an account, taken from the Brunswick Tele- 
graph, of the ceremony when ground was 
broken for Memorial Hall. 

On the morning of Friday, November 15, 
1867, Professor William Smyth turned the 
first sod, after addresses had been made in 
the chapel. Prof. Smyth's last moments of 
work were given to the Memorial Hall un- 
dertaking, and in months and years before 
he died his methodical and enthiisiastic mind 
had dealt steadily with this patriotic yet per- 
plexing problem of erecting a suitable memo- 
rial to sjDlendid devotion. In his address on 
that projjhetic morning, Professor Smyth 
pictured the hall as it rose before his pro- 
phetic vision. One paragraph ought to be 
reproduced as revealing the unfinished por- 
tion of the memorial plan. Following is 
what he said : 

Conspicuously in the hall proper we shall record 
on tablets of marble the names of the alumni and un- 
dergraduates of the college who sacrificed life for 
their country in the late war. Next, and in connec- 
tion with these, we shall place the entire Roll of 
Honor, embracing the names of all the alumni and 
undergraduates who served in the war. The group, 
with appropriate emblems and surroundings, will 
represent "Bowdoin in the War." 

Whoever enters the Harvard memorial 
building, unless he be insensible in the ex- 
treme, has been touched by the tablets on 
either hand bearing the names of the Har- 
vard dead of the civil war. No sneer in this 
sneering generation is directed against that 
branch of the Harvard elective system which 
led devoted men to choose wounds and death 
when home and safety were open to their 
preference. Who doubts that Bowdoin walls 
bearing witness to Bowdoin courage as Pro- 
fessor Smyth had planned, may thus be fine 
teachers of unselfishness and courage ? 

The forms and faces of our college asso- 



ciates who died in the war, would seem even 
fairer and nearer to us were their names 
graven on the walls which stand as their 
memorial ; while the service of those happily 
surviving also deserves the lasting recogni-. 
tion portrayed by the teacher who " being 
dead yet speaketh." 

G. T. Packard, '66. 



BASE-BALL. 

Yarmotjth vs. Bowdoin. 
A practice game with the Yarmouths, 
champions of the Cumberland County League, 
was played Saturday, October 10th, on the 
Delta. The game was rather uninteresting- 
owing to its being so one-sided. Bowdoin 
took the lead from the start and held it to 
the end of the game. The errors were made 
mostly by the two batteries. The best field- 
ing for Yarmouth was done by the Burns 
battery, Loring and Goding. For Bowdoin, 
Moulton, Pushor, Wilson, and Larrabee bat- 
ted heavily, while Pushor, who played a per- 
fect game, Moulton, Gary, and Russell fielded 
well. 

YARMOUTH. 

A.B. R. B.H. T.E. P.O. A. E. 

Goding, lb -4 2 7 2 2 

Merrill, 3b 3 1 

Ayer, 2b., 4 1 1 

Loring, s. s 4 1 1 

Frye, r. f., 4 

C.Burns, p 4 1 1 1 19 15 

Blanchard, 1. f 4 

Wilson, c. f 3 1 

O. Burns, c, 3 1 18 3 8 

Totals, 33 4 2 2 27 24 27 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. B. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. S. 

Dearth, o. f., 3 2 

Moulton, c 4 3 2 3 9 5 6 

Pushor, lb 5 2 2 3 10 1 

Talbot, 1.1 4 

Wilson, s. s., 5 2 3 4 2 1 

Russell, r. f., 4 1 1 

Cary, 2b 4 1 2 5 2 

Larrabee, 3b., .... 4 2 2 3 1 

Davis, p., 4 1 Oil 6 

Totals, 37 12 9 12 27 22 16 

Two-base hits— Moulton, Pushor, Wilson. Wild 
pitches— Davis 4, C. Burns 6. Passed balls— Moulton 4, 
Burns 6. Bases on balls— by Burns 6, by Davis 1. Struck 
out— by Burns 16, by Davis 11. Umpire— Mr. Potter. 



92 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




Now the farmer in the autumn 
Garners in his crops of grain, 
'Gainst the time when cold 

'Nor-Easters 
Scream along the wintry main. 

And the largest squash and pumpkins 
Ears of corn and apples rare, 
He lays aside— with careful pride 
To take them to the Fair. 

So the Junior in new raiment 
Dresses with laborious oare 
And with all his charms embellished 
Like the farmer seeks " the fair." 

Looking over the membership of the classes at 
Colby, as given in the Oracle, one is struck with the 
unusually large number of " Some-time members," 
or members who for some reason have failed to com- 
plete their course. There are sixteen such members 
in '85, thirteen in '86, three in '87, and one in '88. 
Thirty-three students who have dropped out either 
voluntarily or unvoluntarily — when they were Oracle 
editors — in the last four years. Such a record is more 
eloquent than many words. 

In the fall the verdant Freshman 
Paints the college campus green, 
And the tall hat of the Sopho' 
More than e'er before is seen. 

In his carriage is a swagger 
And he speaks with mighty hoot, 
Making Freshmen think a dagger 
Is concealed within his boot. 

But when he comes upon a man 
From out an upper class. 
He pulls the tall hat from his head 
And waits for him to pass. 

Several brainy Freshmen were observed to be 
making copious notes on President Hyde's remarks 
in chapel, last Sunday, on " The Choice of Litera- 
ture." It was a good indication, and we sincerely 
hope these students will at once consign to the flames 
the stock of dime novels brought from home, and 
feed upon those "notes" until sufficient acumen is 
accumulated to enable them to follow out their sug- 
gestions. 

C. A. Davis, '86, has charge of the Cleaveland 
Cabinet this year. W. V. Wentworth, '86, assists 



Prof. Kobinson in the Chemical Laboratory. J. C 
Parker, '86, assists Prof. Lee in Zoology. 

The library has been greatly improved during 
the summer, both in arrangement and cataloguing. 
Prof. Little was assisted in the work by Libby, '85, 
A. A. Knowlton, '86, and E. Little, '87. The library 
hours this term are from twelve till six. 

The Seniors complain loudly of the work re- 
quired of them in Political Economy. Besides being 
obliged to have an examination every few weeks, 
they are required to write out and hand in an abstract 
of the work gone over, requiring at least five or 
six hours to write out. 

The faculty have kindly set apart from eight till 
nine-thirty Monday evening, when they will be at 
home and receive students, answering any questions 
which may come up during the week relating to col- 
lege work. 

Work has at last been begun on the new gymna- 
sium. The ground was broken September 30th, and 
since then the work has rapidly been progressing. 
The building is to be 83x53 feet, of brick. The 
contract was awarded to Philbrook Brothers, of 
Lisbon Falls. 

The crews chosen to take part in the scrub races 
are as follows: '86 boat— Butler, '86, coxswain; 
Cole, '87, bow ; Harriman, '89, No. 2 ; Boutelle, '87, 
No. 3; Smith, '86, stroke. '87 boat— Merrill, '87, 
bow; Adams, '89, No. 2 ; Jackson, '89, No. 3; Sew- 
all, '87, stroke ; John Lane, '87, coxswain. '88 boat 
— Smithwiok, '88, bow ; Lynam, '89, No. 2 ; Wood- 
man, '88, No. 3 ; Meserve, '88, stroke ; Coding, '88, 
coxswain. 

He stole beneath her window 

■With his banjo on his knee. 

He struck the strings with royal twang 

And sang right merrily. 

He sang about a mighty love, 

As bright as opening day, 

And ended all his verses with 
" My charming Fairy Fay." 

The window just above him rose 
Up softly in the night. 
His palpitating bosom throbbed 
With feelings of delight. 
He ceased his ringing anthem 
Looked upward at the place, 
And fainted when he gazed upon 
Old Dinah's dusky face. 

There are sometimes to be found on college fac- 
ulties men who labor under the hallucination that 
the branch they teach constitutes the greater part of 
the student's work. When several of these men get 
to instructing the same class it often happens that 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



93 



they assemble together at the close of a term and 
wonder why that class has not done better work. 
It is an intellectual as well as agricultural fact, that 
considerable dressing on a little land is better than 
the same amount spread out thin over many acres. 

The Modern Language room has seen some 
changes since the days of " Beine." The old settees 
which always showed such a tendency to fall over 
backward have been replaced by more comfortable 
seats, more like those in Memorial Hall. The I'oom 
has a cheerful and comfortable look now and would 
never be taken for the same place that Beine ruled 
over. 

F. Dearth has been elected captain of the base- 
ball nine for the coming season. The five men 
chosen are as follows : F. Dearth, Talbot, Moulton, 
Davis, Pusher. Dike, '86, is scorer for the nine 
this year. 

Rugby foot-ball has had but a short existence 
here. Last year two elevens were chosen, and one 
or two practice games played in which it was amply 
demonstrated that there was good material in the 
college for a first-class foot-ball team. It seems a 
pity that a game so well deserving our attention 
should occupy so small a place in our athletic sports. 
Where is the man to send the ball a rolling? 

It is sad that the Prex played third base on the 
nine when at Andover. 

The low water in the river lately has allowed 
one to pass over to the island over the dam, and 
large amounts of molybdenite for mineralogical 
specimens have been taken from the ledge and rocks 
in the river bed below the lower dam. 

Every man in the class of '86 was present in the 
Psychology recitation last week when the names 
were called. It is almost the first time since the 
class entered college that all have been here at the 
same time. Some one has always been absent 
through sickness or out teaching. 

At a recent meeting of the Boating Association 
the following oflScers were chosen for the ensuing 
year: Commodore, G. M. Norris, '86 ; Vice-Commo- 
dore, E. B. Torrey, '87 ; Treasurer, Tutor W. A. 
Moody; Assistant Treasurer, H. S. Shaw, '88; Di- 
rectors— 1st, C. F. Moulton, '87, 2d, , 3d, 

V. W. Cole, '88. 

The valuable collection of chalk and crayon 
sketches in the collection of the college have been 
arranged and classified during the summer and 
placed in the college library in cases, where they 
will be accessible to all. The collection numbers a 
hundred and forty-two, all by the old masters, and is 



one of the most valuable collections in the country. 
Prof. Johnson has been compiling a catalogue which 
will be out in four or five weeks. 

We have received the first number of the Cadet, 
a paper published at Orono, by the students of the 
State College. It is a bright and pleasing paper, 
and bids fair to take a good stand among college 
publications. 

If the bell-ringer still persists in ringing the 
chapel bell at seven o'clock Sunday mornings he 
will call down on his head all the pent-up wrath of 
a long-suffering community. We would say for his 
benefit that Sunday morning prayers have been 
abolished. 

The mysterious shaking of windows and doors 
which has given the people of Brunswick so much 
trouble of late, has been explained by some as due 
to vibrations of the air, caused by Sophomores blow- 
ing horns on the college campus. 

Mr. Gould, of Bangor, recently paid a visit to 
the college, and delivered an address before the 
Young Men's Christian Association. 

President Hyde's talk on "Books; and What to 
Read," at the Sunday chapel, was extremely inter- 
esting. The time of chapel service on Sundays will, 
hereafter, be devoted to talks on such subjects, and 
one who has attended once will not fail to be there 
again. 

North Winthrop is blessed or, as some might say, 
cursed with the greatest number of musical instru- 
ments of any end in college. Nearly every room has 
some kind of an instrument, and when all are going 
at once, as they often are, study is an impossibility. 

Several of the magazines in the reading-room 
will be discontinued as the new library hours give 
ample time, to those wishing it, to read them there. 
Several new pei-iodicals, however, are to be added 
in place of those discontinued. 

Scene in Psychology recitation : Prof. — " What do 
you call those imaginary, grotesque forms which flit 
before the imagination and have no reality ? " Sen- 
ior (evidently recalling the days of Freshman math- 
ematics) — "The mathematical imagination." 

Prof. Robinson returned from his visit to Bangor 
and the Senior division in Mineralogy began work 
Tuesday, Oct. 13th. 



The collegiate year at Dartmouth commenced 
September 3d, and Rollins Chapel welcomed to its 
services a Freshman class of 108. Of these 77 take 
the Academic course ; 15 enter the Chandler Scien- 
tific Department; and 18 the Agricultural College. 



94 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




'30.— Hon. Bion Brad- 
bury has been appointed 
Surveyor of the port of Portland, and 
has entered upon the duties of the 
office. 

'34. — Cyrus Hamlin, D.D., LL.D., has 
taken up his residence at Lexington, Mass., since his 
resignation, at the recent Conimenceinent, of the 
Presidency of Middlebury College. On tlie evening 
of September 22d, a reception was given in his 
honor, attended by the people of Lexington, of Bos- 
ton, and neighboring towns. He has passed a labo- 
rious and most useful life as a missionary of the 
American Board in Turkey, as President of Robert 
College of Constantinople, the founding of which 
was due to his efforts, as Professor of Systematic 
Theology at Bangor Seminary, and as President of 
Middlebury College. At the reception, speeches 
highly complimentary to Dr. Hamlin were made by 
Dr. N. G. Clark, of tlie American Board, Ezra Farns- 
worth, Esq., of Boston, and others. 

'35. — Rev. Charles Dame, of Andover, Maine, has 
accepted an invitation to supply the church at Acton, 
Me. 

'43. — Hon, Joseph Titcomb has been warmly rec- 
ommended to President Cleveland for the position 
of Collector of Customs at Portland. Other prominent 
applicants for the office are Gen. Samuel J. Ander- 
son, '44, Hon. Nathan Cleaves, '58, and Hon. John B. 
Redman, '70. 

'46. — Rev. Edwin B. Webb, D.D., has tendered 
his resignation of the pastorate of the Shawmut Con- 
gregational Church, Boston, a position which he has 
filled with marked success for a quarter of a century. 
"During that time," says the Boston Journal, 
"Shawmut Church has grown to its greatest pros- 
perity and influence, and its pastor has been one of 
the marked forces in the religious circles of Boston 
and New England." 

'49. — Hon. William S. Gardner has been ap- 
pointed a Justice of the Supreme Court of Massachu- 
setts by Gov. Robinson. He has filled with great 
honor a position on the bench of the Superior Court 
of that State since 1876. 

'55. — Hon. Wilmot W. Brookings has been nom- 
inated for a Senatorship from Dakota in anticipation of 



its admission as a State during the coming session of 
Congress. He has been district attorney. Speaker of 
the House, President of the Senate of Dakota, 
and Governor of the Territory. In 1869 he was ap- 
pointed by President Grant an Associate Justice of 
the Supreme Court of Dakota. 

'66. — Prof. H. B. Lawrence, A.M., of Boston, late 
principal of Woodstock Academy, Connecticut, has 
been elected principal of a large academy in the city 
of Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

'70. — Mr. B. Redford Melcher, Superintendent of 
Schools at Saoo, has accepted the position of Eastern 
Manager of the Provident Life Insurance and Trust 
Company, with headquarters at Boston. 

'73. — Rev. Frederic A. Wilson was installed as 
pastor of the Congregational Church in Billerica, 
Mass., September 23d. 

'76. — Mr. Charles A. Whittemore of Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich., was married September 24th to Miss 
Emma F. Melcher, of Brunswick. 

'77. — Mr. William G. Beale has been admitted to 
the law firm of Isham & Lincoln, of Chicago, of 
which Hon. Robert T. Lincoln, late Secretary of 
War, is a member. His admission to the firm was 
in recognition of his ability and valuable services 
while Mr. Lincoln was in Washington. 

'81. — A. D. Gray, late principal of the high school 
at Wnonsocket, R. I., has been elected teacher of 
Physics in the Springfield High School, Mass. Mr. 
Gray is an excellent teacher, and a critical scholar. 
He will win golden opinions in Springfield, as he 
has done in Rhode Island. 

'82. — W. O. Plimpton has resigned his position 
as principal of the Rochester (N. H.) High School, 
and will study medicine in New York. 




The custom which the 
editors used to have of 
presenting us with their own portraits is 
going into disuse, and only those of the 
Oracle, Bugle, JEgis, Melange, Scarlet Let- 
ter, Onondaga. Reserve, and Cornellian have 
conquered their scruples and shown their faces. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



95 



which oti the whole are not unpromising. But far 
more interesting and valuable are such group photo- 
graphs as that of the twenty successive incumbents 
of the. much-prized student office of grand marshal, 
given by the Transit, and those respectively of the 
nine and crew of Bowdoin, the latter afloat in the 
shell, furnished by the Bugle. The Oracle's " Autumn 
in the Forest," the Mirror^s " The Misses Blithe and 
Bold," the Eccentric's "Three Roses," and the Bugle's 
" Sum Sentiments," are each excellent in a line dif- 
ferent from the others. In epitaphs the Bugle takes 
the funereal cake. The Liber Brunensis is the best 
balanced as a book; and the Bugle, on the whole, 
the pick of the series, though in each of its good 
points it is equaled or excelled by others. 

— Delta Kapjja Epsilon Quarlely. 

it's YANKEE, TOIT KNOW. 

Oh, a loug time ago, the Queen of Great B 

That's England, you know. 
Old England, you know — 
Missed a cup which came out to this side of the sea ; 
Though 'twas English, 

Quite English, you Icnow. 
In Boston, New England, tliey've just built a boat. 
Which now we all know is the fastest afloat. 
And the cuplet's still here, on which we all dote. 
Notwithstanding 

It's English, you know. 

Oh ! Some boats can sail, and others cannot — 
They're English, you know, 
Quite English, you know — 
While the boats of Nev) England can beat the whole lot. 
For they're Yankee, 

Not English, you know. 

— Lehic/h Burr. 
Amherst opened her doors on the 10th inst. to a 
thronging horde of 102 Freshmen. The number of 
upperclassmen has been also augmented by 15, so that 
the whole number of students is 357 against 334 last 
year. 

so GOES THE WORLD. 

I asked a loan of fifty cents 

From him, the other morning; 

I wore my oldest clothes that day. 

All fashion's dictates scorning. 

My coat was worn, in spots was torn, 

My shoes indifferent matches, 

My trousers bagged, and in the seat 

Diversified by patches. 

He bristled up in great offense 

As rough as an echinus. 

He hadn't any fifty cents, 

His pocket-hook was minus. 

He'd left it home — most sad to say — 

Upon his desk — or table ; 

He'd like to lend me all he had, 

But really wasn't able, 



I wore my newest suit next day, 

My boots were polished brightly, 

My linen was immaculate. 

My tie adjusted rightly. 

My hat was new, and round my neck 

The stlffest of fresh collars, 

I borrowed of the self-same man 

Fifty — not cents — but dollars. 

So don't depend upon a friend, 

At least in money-lending. 

Unless you're very sure your clothes 

Are not in need of mending. 

And just be sure that he'll be poor 

If your coat is not new. 

And if your hoots have need of soles, 

His soul is wanting, too. 

— Williams Fortnight. 

Whitelaw Reid, of the N. T. Tribune, gives as 
the indispensable requirements of the journalist: 
A thorough familiarity with the party history of the 
country, and with the general history of the country 
and the world, together with a knowledge of com- 
mon, constitutional, international law, political 
economy, logic, principles of criticism, English 
literature, and the French and German languages. — 
Ex. 

ELEGANT JtACKINAW 

STRA\T HATS, 

THE BEST QUALITY, 

$1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 

MEEET THE HATTEE, 

POETLAND. 



H. V. STACKPOLE, 

FINE BOOTS AND SHOES, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOOTS AND SHOES, 

ALL STYLES AND PKICES, 

#AT JACKSON'S.* 

LAWN-TENNIS SHOES CONSTANTLY 
ON HAND. 

REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 

No. 2 Odd Fellows' Block, 

MAIN ST BEET, BRUNSWICK, 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



IGHMOND 



CIGARETTE 
Smokers who 

are williDg jto 
paya little more 
lor Cigarettes 
than the price 
charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, will 
find the RICHMOMD STRAIGHT CUT 
Wo. 1 SUPERIOR TO AT.T. OTHERS. 
Ihey are made from the brlglitest, most 
delicately flavored, and filgbegt cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are abso- 
lutely wiihoat adulteration or drags. 



TRAIGHTCUT 



No. 
-I- 



We use the Gemnine Frendi Rice Paper 

of our own direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water maxked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT Sfo.l— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIOJIS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that tMs is the old and 
original brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or box of « 
Richmond 
Straight Cat i 
Cigarettes 

bears the I 
signature of ' 



niGAREnES 

allenTginter 

MAITUFAOTDKEBB, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

njaine Central R. ^. 

On and after June 27th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

Tor Bath, 7.45, 11.45 A.M., 1.50, 4.50 and 6.30 P.M., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.25 and 11.40 a.m., 4.25 and 4.50 

P.M., and 12.35 (night). 
For Rockland, 7.46 A.M., 1.50 P.M., and Saturdays at 6.30 P.M. 
For Lewiston, 7.45 and 11.40 A.M., 1.48 and 6.35 p.m., 12.40 
(night). 

For Fannington, 7.45 A.M. and 1.48 P.M. 
For Augusta at 7.48 and 11.45 A.M., 1.40, 1.49 and 6.35 P.M., and 

12.45 (night). 
For Waterville at 7.48 a.m., 1.40, 1.49 and 6.35 p.m., 12.45 (night). 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 1.49 P.M., and 12.45 (night). 
For Bangor at 1.40, 1.49, and 6.35 P.M., and 12.45 (night). 
For Ellsworth, Mt. Desert Ferry and Bar Harbor at 1.40 p.m. 

and 12.46 (night). 
For Vanceboro and St. John at 1.40, 1.49 P.M., and 13.45 (night). 

Note.— The night ti'ains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
iston, and Bangor run every night, including Sundays, but do 
not connect for Skowhegan on Sunday morning, or for Belfast, 
and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, except Bar 
Harbor, on Sunday morning. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Gen'i Manager. 
F. E. BooTHBV, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, J«ae 20, 1885. 



NOTICE. 

BEWARE OF COUNTERFEITS AND IMITATIONS. 
Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and pure Rice Paper, are rolled by the highest 
class of skilled labor, and waiTanted free from flavoring or 
impurities. 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a fac-simile of Kinney 
Bros.' Signature. 

KINNEiT TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KINNEY BROS. 

NEW YORK. 

The following are our well-known 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Caporal, Sweet Caporal, St. James t, Capokal J, St. 

James, Ambassador, Entke Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES 

SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish aucl Virginia. 

'§@¥'i®iQ |®Ile|© ||©ii6il ^@f iFlmgil 

The Sixty-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi 
cal School of Maine, will commence FebkuarY 4tli, 1886, 
and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Rev. Wm. DeWitt Hyde, President: Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obsteti-ics and 
Diseases of Women and Children; CUARLES W". Goddard, A.M., 
Medical Jurisprudence ; Frederick H. Gerrish, M. D., Anat- 
omy; FuAMvLiN C. Robinson, A.M., Chemistry; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henry H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G.Young, Public Hygiene ; 
Irving E. Kijibai.l, M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealey, MD., Demonstrator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDQE, 

MUSIC PtTBLISHEK, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



M: ^ Y ]N^ ^ R D ' S 



Main St., under Town Clock. 

la-Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday IVlorning by A. G. Tenney. 
Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTWY EXECUTED. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



OOLLEGTE BOOKSTORE. 

We have coustaDtly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book, and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno^fv's Grocery Store. 

45~Special Bates to Student Clubs. .SS 



M&rchmmi Tmiior., 

DUNLAP BLOCK, BRUNSWICK, ME. 






*■ ^ 



% ^\mi\ Potiv 



|3i|. 



^^» o- w^m.wm'^'m^%^ 



DEALER IN 



®E immM 



CEDAB STEEET, BBUNS"WICK, ME. 
Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Bings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
^^ Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, MB. 



Successor to Atwood & Wentworth, 

DEALER IN 

DI^^OrlDS, WATCHES, JEWELRY. 

and importers of French Clocks, Opera Glasses, etc. 
Fine Watch Repairing ; Gold and Silver Platin;/ . 

509 CONGBESS ST., Portland, Me. 

ALL THE STUDENTS SHOULD BUY 

THEIE 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 

Frank E. Roberts' Boot & Shoe Store, 

Cor. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



DEALER IN 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 



EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT 

BICYCLE 
BASE-BA LL 

TENNIS 
BOATING 
SPECIAL RATES TO CLUBS. 



SHIRTS, 

STOCKINGS, 
JERSEYS. 



OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



MAIN STEEET, BBUNSWICK, ME. 



Wja. ^. FIEIiD, 



ja^]V[^6E^. 




jOushing's Island, 
Portland, Me. 

3VC. S. C3■IBS01^T- 



MAMiMSS, Fffll WAT€1ES, 

239 MIDDIjE street, PORTLAND, BIAINE. 

J. A. MERRILL. A. KEITH. 



DEALER IN 



Presh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 WATEE ST., AtJGUSTA, MAINE, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PURITY SWEET CIGARETTES. 

THE PUREST, MILDEST, AND BEST CIGARETTE ON THE MARKET. 

PURE, BRIGHT VIRGINIA TOBACCO AND PUREST RICE PAPER. 



FOR THE FINEST MADE TRY OUR 

STRAIGHT WEB CIGARETTES. 

MANUFACTURED FROM THE FINEST BRIGHT TOBACCO GROWN. WITH 

TURKISH MIXTURE. 



PURITY SMOKING TOBACCO. 

THE FINEST, PUREST, AND BEST SMOKING TOBACCO MADE. 



RALEIGH CUT PLUG SMOKING. 

THE ORIGINAL, PUREST, AND THE BEST. 



We guarantee all not injurious. Only a trial and you tvill be convinced. 

PACE & SIZER, Manufacturers, Richmond, Va. 

THE 



* TRAVELERS ♦ 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HERTFORD, COI^TN^., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCB* $1 1,000,000, and is now paying them $4,00O a day. Issues 

A r^r^TTiT^MT T>/"^T Tr^TT7Q Indemnifyina; the Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
il.VyV>J--L'X!iil ± JT WJUlV^JLJDO Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidental Injury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only ^5.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each f 1,000, with .f5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

o"^":E3n. oi»a":E3 isr 2s»Bri»rEs 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since lS6i have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. „ . ^ ^ , 

Issues T TT?T? T)/^T Tr^TT?Cl of every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 
also Jull: X!i X VjJLlV^iXliO Personal Benefit. 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will he issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, - $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Office at Hartford. 
JAS, G. PATTERSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E, MORRIS, Asst. Secretary 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brnns^irick and Xopsham 
Stereoscopic Views i also College Views. 

F. ROEMEK, 

Successor to A. Rokmer & Son, 
THE LARGEST HISTORICAL 

COSTUMERanFARMORER 

IN AMERICA. 

Also Costumer fov all the priucipal theatres: Fifth Avenue 
Theatre, Grand Opera House, Star Theatre, Madison Square 
Theatre, Niblo's Gartlen Theatre, New Park Theatre, People's 
Theatre, 14th Street Theatre. 

No. 8 UNION SQUARE, NEW YORE. 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 



Go to W. B. lAToodard's 

To buy vour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save aioney by so doiiDg. 

SE'ECI.^Xj ia.^TES to STtTXJEKTT CXjTT^S. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



C. E. TO^^^NSE]S^D, 

nEALEK IN 

CHOICE GROCERIES, 

Canned Goods, State Prison Harnesses, Fruits, Confec- 
tionery, Tobacco and Cigars, 
Corner Main and Cleaveland Streets, BRUNSWICK. 

N. B.— SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENT CLUBS. 



C. L. York, Old CoUege Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 



For Schools and Colleges. 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



\ ATParkfe 

164 High St 




ON THE ROAD. 



til eiiiiigiii m.,' 

(Established 1877.) 

Institute Building, Huntington Ave., Boston. 

ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 
OTHER TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp at above address. 



A»KlIf»#H A 0((©w 



Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Sts,, PORTLAND, ME., 

WOULD RESPECTFULLY CALL THE ATTENTION OF 

Boprs of Furniture, Garnets, Beunii, Parlor Stoves, Ranges, &g.. 

To the Euormous Stock of House Fiii-nisliin.i;s at the Porthmd Store. Beins JIanut'acturers, 

intending purchasers can see the styles and select their own coverings for Parlor Furniture, and have it made 

to order for the same price. We keej) enormous quantities ot Upliolstery Goods in the Boston Store, and 

full lines of Samples. Here our prices on Parlor Suites range from .fiW.OO in Hair Cloth to 

.1?.:i75.00 in Silk or Mohair Plushes. 



CHAMBER FURNITURE. 

We have in stock in our three store* 87 different pat- 
terns of Chamber Suites, manufactured from all the popu- 
lar woods, viz.: Pine, Ash, Walnut, Cherry, Basswood, 
and Mahogany, ranging in price from S18.00 to .8400.00. 
We also have all kinds, sizes, and quantities of Bedsteads, 
Bureaus, Commodes, etc. Spring Beds, Cot Beds, Lounge 
Beds, Sofa Beds, Mantel Beds, etc. Mattresses of every 
kind and quality, from an excelsior at $2.00 to a pure 
bleached South American curled horse hair at $25.00. 

CARPET DEPARTMENT. 

5?75,O0O worth of Cottons, Cotton and Wools, AU-Wool 
Extras, Tapestry, Brussels, Body Brussels, Velvets, Wil- 
nons, etc., at our usual Kock-Bottom Prices. An.y of these 
tan be selected at the Portland store. SHADES and 



DRAPERY of every description made to order in the 
Boston store. Orders taken here and designs and samples 
sliown. 

PARLOR STOVES. 

Special attention is requested to our Parlor Stove De- 
pax'tment, as we believe we have the best line to select 
from in Maine. Prices .S4.00 to $40.00. 

STOVES AND RANGES. 

Our line of Ranges comprises all the latest and best in 
the market, including the " New Tariff " and " Quaker," 
which are considered superior to anything yet produced. 
Write for cuts of these two Ranges. Prices .ffl.5.00, $20.00, 
$22.50, $25.00, $27.50, $29.00, $33.00, $3.5.00, $38.00, and up- 
wards to $05.00. These prices include all the ware, pipe, 
and zinc. 



Any of the above goods sold for Cash or on our Special Contract System, at 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Streets^ Portland, Me. 

Branch of the Great Nassau Hcdl House Furnishing Store, 827 Washington Street, Boston. 

B. A. ATKINS'ON & CO. 

ISA.A.C C ATItllVSON, IHanager. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLKAR, STKADY LIGHT the STUDKNT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE AD.JUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 



IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 



ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENOEAVED IK THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



All the Late Publications in stock. Text-Books of all kinds, 
and MEDICAL WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 



474 Congress St., 



Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

NO. i 0DD EELIiGW'^ BIi0CK, 

Is the place to Ijuy 

Sonfi^j Staihnei§, § Sumy, So^di. 

Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 



ffOlD ffe 



FHOTO O-Xi-A-FI^: s 




mi 

su 






& 



HONETIC SHORTHAND. 



OSGOODBY'S 
METHOD 

For Self-Instruction. Containing all the Uite iraprove- 
loits. I'rice $l.oO. Special Instruction by Mail, §li.OO. 
Send Stamp for Specimen Pages and Illustrated Pamphlet. 

W. W. OSGOODBY, Publisher, Itochester, N. Y. 



P 



The Xew Styles in 

30711=^:^ and. soi^rr I^^a^TS 

In all colors, are now ready. An elegant line of New Y'ork 
Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in aU Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, 'Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

1 ELLIOTT'S, t 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 



■L.I-VE IVEErN 

Wanted, to take orders for Trees, Vines, Shrubs, and a general 
line of Nursery Stock. Only those who are over 25 years of age 
and can furnish the very best references need apply. To the 
right men we can give employment the year round. Experience 
not necessary. E. G. CHASE & CO.'S, 8 Pembcrton Square, 
Boston, Mass. We pay all expenses and a good SALARY. 



Made at Higgins' Ground-Floor Studio, Bath, BrOWne'S Hair DreSSlllg RoOmS 



Cannot be excelled in stv-le and finish. Special attention 
given to view work 



Fellows' Block, Over Tavis' Grocery Store, 

Main Street, Brunswick. S. W. BROWNE, Proprietor. 







r/¥£- FAVORITE NOS. S03-404 SS2-/ZO-SS/-W/rH 
OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORL 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vffl. J. fflERRYMAIf, PHASMACIST.v 

DIUGS, MIMCIIIS. 

Fancy an J Toilet Articles, Cigars! Toliacco. 



DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

J£^ Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Wo io gH#El¥9 
Book-Seller, Stationer, Book-Binder. 

AND BLANK-BOOK MANTJFACTUKEE, 

Opposite City Hall, Center St., Bath, Maine. 

They do say, and it is a (act, that Lenten & Neagle's is the 
cheapest place in this county. Their assortment of trunl^s and 
bags cannot be beaten. No shop-worn goods, Ijut direct from the 
manufacturers. They have the larg:est line of whips ever shown 
in this town. Jobbing of all kinds promptly attended to. 
Trunks and bags neatly repaired. 

HABNESS MAKERS & CARKIAGE TKIMMBES, 
MAIN STREET, Store formerly occupied by Washburne. 



J. S. TOWI^E, 
PHARMACEUTIST. 

PURE DRUGS, MEDICINES, FANCY AND TOILET AR- 

TICLES; ALSO A FINE LINE OF CHOICE CIGARS 

AND CIGARETTES. PRESCRIPTIONS a Specialty. 

Main Street, Near Bowdoin College. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 Middle Street - - - - Portland Me. 



OVER BOARDMAWS STORE, MAIN STREET. 

—J- B. G. DENNISON, -i— 

Brunswick Book - Store, 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery ; Portland and Boston Daily Papers ; Circu- 
lating Library, 1600 Volumes ; Base-Ball and La Crosse ; Pict- 
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CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 

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Designer ;> MmnMfmeiMr&r^ and Ifmporier. 

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Inquiries and Orders by Mail Promptly Answered. Express Free to any Place. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates tok AdmissiOjST to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation iuto Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Csesar, — Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil,— Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
jEneid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xeuophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic, — especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Eoot, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry, — first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra, — so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and j 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination | 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regulae Examikations foe Admission i 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the HaUoiveU Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQUIEED— POUTE HOUES A "WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms.- 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELEOTIVES — FOUE HOUKS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terras. 

Science of Lauguage, one term. 

Euglish Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to .$4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCT. 28, 1885. 



No. 8. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE "WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE TEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

W. V. "VVentworth, '86, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
J. H. Datis, '86. Levi Turner, Jr., '86. 

A. A. Knowlton, '86. C. ^Y. Tuttle, 'S6. 

J. C. Parker, '86. C. B. Burleigh, '87. 

H. L. Taylor, '86. E. C. Plummer, '87. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to tlie Business Editor. 

Kemittances sliould be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
municaticns in regard to aU other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Oflace at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 

Vol. XV., No. 8.— October 28, 1885. 

The Whispering Pines, 97 

Editorial Notes, 97 

A Plea for Mathematics, 99 

The Pump, 99 

The Modern Gil Bias, 100 

Graj''s Elegy, 101 

Boating Association Accounts, 102 

CoLLEGn Tabula, 103 

Personal, 105 

Clippings 107 

THE WHISPERING PINES. 

Tall whispering pines across my window front 

Their solemn shadows cast, 
And the night breezes through their branches come 

Like voices of the past. 

Strange thoughts they bring with them 

Of those who used to lie 
And woo the tuneful muse beneath their shade 

In years gone by. 

So in the years to come will others by 

Their cooling shade be blest 
And others woo the muses here 

When we are laid at rest. 




percili- 

ousuess of our Cornell friends, as exhibited 
by the ^ra, it is with diflSculty that we mus- 
ter courage to once more speak of the Quin- 
sigaraond race. We would thank our con- 
temporary for its condescension in offering us 
information in regard to the race, such as 
"No one looked upon Bowdoin as a possible 
winner," and " The sympathy of the crews 
and the people was with us." 

We also return thanks for using no harsher 
terms tiian " The bigotedness and unfairness 
of Bowdoin's remarks." Humbly begging 
your pardon, friend Ura, for presuming to 
disagree with such an aristocratic body of 
students who have haughtil}' informed us 
that " Knowing themselves how little signi- 
ficance may be attached to the fact of their 
having won the intercollegiate regatta, thej"- 
are striving to impress their friends with the 
idea that they have accomplished a big thing," 
we venture to take exception to the initial 
statement that " The Bowdoin Orient de- 
votes nearly its entire space to discussing the 
Quinsigamond race, and Cornell." Besides 
the newspaper quotations we had about the 
same space devoted to the matter as the 
Ura employs in crushing us out of ex- 
istence. Our intellect is not so astute as to 
enable us to see but one point to " The num- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ber of people who are ready and willing to 
confess a wrong, or acknowledge a defeat, is 
small indeed," and that point is that Cornell 
is not willing to admit the manifest fact that 
Bowdoin was able to outrow her. 

If they had the " Fastest and best trained 
crew that ever entered the intercollegiate 
contest," why did they not challenge Bow- 
doin ? 

Again, how do they " know we had the 
fastest?" 

Our contemporaries accuse us of inaccu- 
racy and resorting " To all sorts of means." 
Our statement of the time was taken from 
the Boston Herald, whose reporter of the race 
was, we are informed, a Cornell man. To 
avoid the cliarge of misrepresentation and 
the suspicion of partial judgment, we took 
our account of the race from the Boston Griobe, 
and instead of extended editorial comments 
quoted from the editorial columns of various 
dailies to show how the people felt. 

We have not yet seen any reason to dis- 
card these reports for Cornell's pet theory of 
the race as it should have been, even though 
they claim a practice time of 8 minutes 15 
seconds. 



" Misfortunes never come singly," and in 
behalf of the University of Pennsjdvania 
crew we find the University Magazine attack- 
ing our crew for their conduct in the first 
race. 

The editorial comments are comparatively 
moderate, but their account of the race is 
far different from what we have seen and 
heard. Bowdoin men, who were present, say 
that our crew did not admit the fouls claimed 
by Pennsylvania, that both Cornell and 
Pennsylvania steered into Bowdoin's water 
bringing our crew into the apex of a V. As 
we understand it, Pennsylvania was not 
forced to stop rowing by our crew, who could 
not have fouled in the manner claimed. The 
confusion by the writer of starboard and 



port, conflicting ideas expressed in different 
portions of the article, and the declaration 
that Brown won the final race, lead us to the 
conclusion that the author was misinformed, 
or else wrote his account without exercising 
due care. 



In years gone by Bowdoin has supported 
a very good orchestra, but of late, interest in 
the matter has not been very great. At pres- 
ent there appears to be considerable musical 
talent in college, the Freshman class having 
added materially to our strength in that line, 
and we think that a little well-directed effort 
would result in an organization that would 
be a success. Undoubtedly it would be very 
pleasant to have once more a Bowdoin or- 
cliestra, while opportunities for a display of 
tlieir talent would be afforded, both in college 
and iu town. 



Considerable improvement has been and 
is being made in the opportunities for work 
in Physics and Chemistry. The Medical 
hiboratory has been opened into the Senior 
quantitative laboratory and will be used both 
as a private laboratory by Prof. Robinson 
and to afford additional room when needed. 
The small room is to be used as a store room. 

The Medics will hereafter do their chem- 
ical work in the Junior laboratory, to which 
most of the chemicals and apparatus they 
use have been carried. 

The new Edison dj'namo for electric light- 
ing and electrolysis will be at once set up in 
the basement of the qualitative laboratory. 



We trust our fi-iends will pardon us for 
again reminding them that the best success 
of the Orient depends upon their co-opera- 
tion. Not for the first time do we request 
contributions from those who desire to be- 
come members of the next editorial board, or 
to whom the prizes offered may be an induce- 
ment to write, or who regard the benefit to 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



99 



their college paper and themselves as a suffi- 
cient recompense should neither the editorial 
" vfe " nor the cash reward them. 

We are always pleased to receive commu- 
nications from alumni or the faculty, and 
should be pleased to have them make a free 
use of the Ojrient. 



A PLEA FOR MATHEMATICS. 

I have of late heard from many members 
of the Freshman and Sophomore classes tlie 
usual expressions of dislike for the study of 
Mathematics, and I venture to offer a few 
suggestions coming from my own experience. 
I believe that if any earnest student could 
gain a right apprehension of the importance 
of having a working knowledge of the 
brandies of Mathematics usually offered in 
the course of study, he would gladly make a 
strong effort to gain such a knowledge. 
Mathematics would acquire a new interest 
for him, and would not be viewed with the 
aversion that so often accompanies tliis study. 
By a working knowledge I mean, in brief, 
an acquaintance with the branches of Math- 
ematics, both required and elective, that will 
enable him to apply them in future advanced 
studies. Such an acquaintance is, I believe, 
within the reach of most hard-working stu- 
dents. Mathematics is not an easy study, but 
it is one in which every step carefully taken 
and firmly grounded, in which every new 
truth clearly understood, makes further ad- 
vance possible and new truths of greater in- 
terest. It seems to me that Mathematics has 
had none too much claimed for it as a disci- 
pline for the mind, and further, that for ab- 
solute utility in ti'aining the mind to correct 
and exact methods of thought it stands very 
high. 

The difficulty in dealing with our college 
Mathematics largely lies in a lack of concen- 
tration and mental courage. It has become 
almost the proper thing to "cry down" this 
subject, and to groan over somewhat difficult 



problems. The writer has found from ex- 
perience that the wisdom that mapped out 
his Freshman and Sophomore course . was 
better than his. Three years have taught 
liim the value of this part of the curriculum, 
and it is one of the chief regrets of his course 
that he did not pay all possible attention to 
the subject in view. 

Any student who cares to get that which 
will be of great future use in many lines of 
study will do well to avail himself of all pos- 
sible advancement in the science of Mathe- 
matics. If he does so he may spare himself 
keen regrets that certain avenues of study are 
barred against him, and that subjects of the 
greatest interest and those, too, calling for 
only a good knowledge of the college Mathe- 
matics to be clearly understood, are as if 
written in an unknown language. 

The foregoing has been dictated by an 
experience of the lack of a knowledge upon 
some subjects formerly within the reach of 
the writer, and daily does he find himself 
confronted by questions readily solved by 
such branches of Mathematics as are offered 
b}' our course in Bowdoin. 

So keenly is this brought to mind that we 
would offer a caution to those who may fall 
into the same mistakes that have proved such 
stumbling-blocks to a member of '86. 



THE PUMP. 

One night as I was going into the "end," 
feeling thirsty, I walked to the pump to get 
a drink. Just as I was about to grasp the 
handle, what was my surprise to hear a 
wheezy voice, apparentl}^ proceeding from 
the interior of the pump. 

I hesitated a moment, almost doubting ray 
senses, but I soon made out to understand; 
"Easy, easy, my son, I'm getting old and 
can't stand as much as I used to when Booker 
was a boj', although he takes good care of me. 
He put a new head on me the other day and 
it makes me feel a little younger in the upper 



loo 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



story, but my insides are as ancient as ever." 

Here a wheezy cough stopped its utter- 
ance, but after I had moved its arm back and 
forth a moment, it seemed relieved and went 
on: "I've labored hard for the boys in my 
day, my son, and how am I repaid? By hav- 
ing ni}' arm nearly wrenched off and my nose 
pulled off, just as thougli I had no feeling 
at all. 

"I won't complain, however, as I know 
the boys don't mean anything, but they don't 
stop to think that my joints are old and stiff 
and need to be handled carefull3^ 

"I've always been popular with the Soph- 
omores, and have assisted many a time in 
ducking the poor little Freshmen. 

"Consequently I am never popular with 
Freshmen and they often wish I was not a 
member of the faculty. I've picked up lots 
of points from my intimacy with professors 
and students, and when Booker gets too 
familiar, I spring off some of my science and 
literature on him so that he respects me as 
an educated pump. 

"I used to be very familiar with all the 
boys who have since become celebrated. 
Will Fessenden, I remember, was a small lad 
but he sometimes used me rather roughly. 
He was a good speaker and often gave me 
specimens of his eloquence. 

"And there was Frank Pierce. He was 
rather lazy in college. One night, at the end 
of his Junior year, discouraged because he 
stood lowest in his class, he told me he should 
not attend recitations any more. He finally 
turned over a new leaf and graduated third 
in his class. 

"Abbot, Cilley, and Biadbury often used 
to come to see me and shake hands. 

" Prentiss was a bright, handsome fellow. 

" My best friends were Hawthorne and 
Longfellow. Hawthorne was a shy lad, but a 
great friend of mine. I knew he had some- 
thing in him from hearing him recite short 
passages which he had written. He always 



used me well, too. He did not pull and bang 
my arm around like some of the boys. I've 
never read any of his books because my col- 
lege duties keep me pretty busy, but I know 
they are good for many have told me so. 

"Longfellow and I were great chums. 
He would come out to me at all times of day 
and ask my advice about some article which 
lie was writing. Very often he whispered in 
my ear snatches of poetry which were flitting 
in his mind. I am glad he became so cele- 
brated because I always liked him." 

A gurgle, at this point, ran down the 
pump audit seemed choked again, but it soon 
partially recovered and proceeded: "How 
I have been running on! I hope my gossip 
lias not made you very tired." 

I went to my room with more respect for 
the pump than I had ever had before. 



THE MODERN GIL BLAS. 

PABT I. 

One fall morning of a day not long since 
flown, from one of the towns in our State, 
and from a home in that town to which he 
had returned periodically for the three years 
previous at the end of vacations, from the 
fitting-school, there was seen going through 
the good-bye and adieu of leaving home, a 
youth of eighteen summers. Pride flushed 
his cheek, and the bright twinkle of his eye, 
and his sprightly movements betokened that 
his knight-errantry was off on some sort of a 
high mission. 

Domestic tendency and paucity of years 
are unfavorable to the traveler. On reach- 
ing the depot our hero deposits himself in 
the ladies' room, where, though now there 
were few of them, soon they began to con- 
gregate in numbers, as the time for departure 
by i-ail approached. 

He had few ideas, indeed, of the needs 
of the rules and regulations of the traveler. 
In his endeavors to oblige a lady who had be- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



101 



come almost exhausted by standing, in offer- 
ing her his seat, the poor boy trod on the 
toes of a large, doughty Irish woman, who made 
great pretensions to a position in the aristo- 
cratic circles of society where she lived. 
Among so many women — a thing which to 
him was so unaccountablj' singular, so many 
women, and no man but himself, and himself 
not a man — and brought thus suddenly- to 
notice by the unfortunate occurrence just 
mentioned, he was a being abashed. So it 
was immediately decreed, on the motion and 
second of the Irish woman and some of the rest 
of the female travelers who sympathized with 
her, that it was a nuisance that a man should 
be hanging around in a waiting-room for 
ladies, treading on tlieir corns. 

Thereupon a policeman is called in, and 
without why or wherefore, the intruder is 
made to retire and be acquainted with the 
fact that a gents' waiting-room had been pre- 
pared for his kind. 

Soon the train arrives and "all aboard for 
Brunswick," is off again. Our passenger 
struts through the train, taking in all the 
cars, and then back into the smoking car, 
seats himself in a sprawling way on vis-a-vis 
seats. 

Here he bethinks himself of a bunch 
of cigarettes he has equipped himself with, 
preparatory to the journey, and with a flourish 
draws from his pocket his case of any tiling else 
than " Sweet Caporals," for the fumes of one of 
them filling his neighborhood with mephitic 
blackness, begins to depopulate his surround- 
ings. He has had a present of a gold watch 
not long before his departure from home, and 
with frequent withdrawing from his watch- 
pocket, he hopes to restore the former equi- 
librium between himself and his fellow-jour- 
neymen. 

The sequel to this, — our Part I, — is "do 
but look at him and he is contented." Fuller 
developments of our subject will follow in 
subsequent issues. 



GRAY'S ELEGY. 

In this poem we have something which 
has stood the corroding effects of time and 
the withering influence of adverse criticism 
and personal malignity. 

At the time of its publication its popu- 
larity was immediate and extensive, and for 
nearly a century and a half it has been a 
source of almost universal delight. It seems 
to possess certain elements which serve to 
perpetuate its acceptance and appreciation. 
It is interesting to inquire what these self- 
perpetuating forces are, and what gives to 
this poem its universality of interest. 

In the first place it was universally under- 
stood, and though it abounded in poetical 
beauties, its popularity was chiefly due to 
the fact that it uttered sentiments which are 
common to all mankind, but difficult to ex- 
press. Yet with such exquisite skill and 
consummate taste did Gray give voice to the 
heretofore unexpressed feelings and emotions 
of the human heart, that every reader felt 
that he was looking into a mirror that re- 
flected his own soul. The poem abounds 
with images which find a likeness in every 
mind, and with emotions to which every 
bosom returns an echo. 

Again, the elegy owes much of its popu- 
larity to its strain of verse ; the strain of 
thought alone, natural and touching as it is, 
would never have impressed it upon the 
hearts of thousands and tens of thousands 
unless the diction and metre in which it was 
embodied, had been in perfect unison with 
it. Neither cause would have sufficed for 
producing so general and permanent effect, 
unless the poem had been in the full import 
of the word harmonious. An interesting 
subject connected with the elegy is the num- 
ber of translations of it which have been 
made in various languages. It is the same 
kind of tribute which has been rendered to 
"Robinson Crusoe," and to "The Pilgrim's 
Progress," and is proof of the universalitj' of 



102 



BOWDOiN Orient. 



interest which transcends the limits of lan- 
guage and race. It has been published in no 
less than seven languages. 

The eulogy of Gen. Wolfe is almost too 
well known to bear repetition. The night 
before the attack on Quebec, in wliich he 
lost his life, he declared to his fellow-soldiers, 
" Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the 
author of that poem than take Quebec." 
Little did he suspect that on the morrow he 
should so perfectly exemplify one of its most 
striking lines. 

The paths of glory lead but to the grave. 



BOATING ASSOCIATION ACCOUNTS. 



1884. 
Oct. ( 



Nov. 27. 

" 27. 

" 27. 

1885. 

Feb. 22. 

" 22. 

" 23. 

" 23. 

" 23. 
April 15. 

" 16. 

" 16. 

" 17. 

May 18. 

" 19. 



B. B. C. to J. A. Peters, Dr. 



To cash paid for flags, 
2 lbs. nails, 
seat frames, 
advertising race, 
lubricating oil, . 
screw-driver, 

tickets to Portland and r., 
meal for crew, . 
telegraphing, 



19. 
19. 



rope, 

staples, .... 
repairing boat-house, 
wood for gym., 
repairing shell, 

rope, 

shackle bolt, 

tools 

vaseline 

pd. M. F. Davis for demands 

express on suit, 

paid Ast. Treas. for I. E. A. fee 

paid Rufus Smith, . 

cash to C. H. Colby, 



telegraphing and ans., 

staple, 

i pairs knee trousers — making, 

cloth for same, . 

telegraphing, 

boat hire, . 

repairs on floats (H. Doughty), 

cups (5 silver for winning crew ), 

express on samples, 

cash to Capt. of crew, 



telegraphing, 

fare to Portland and r., 



92 29 

08 

1 22 

1 25 

18 

15 

8 00 

1 80 

25 

75 

16 

75 

1 50 

1 00 

67 

15 

1 30 

15 

12 00 
25 

5 00 
3 50 

13 82 
50 
50 
03 

5 80 

5 42 

25 



70 

11 00 

16 88 

50 

35 00 

50 

73 

37 

2 00 



June 12. 


To dinner at Portland 


" 12. 


telegraphing, 


" 13. 


fare to Bath and r., . 


" 17. 


cash to Varney for fare, . 


" 20. 


check to Capt. "Whittier, 


" 18-20. 


trip to Boston and r 


" 24. 


telegraphing, 


" 24. 


advertising race, .... 


" 27. 


Lewiston and r., .... 


" 25. 


check to Ruddock, .... 


" 25. 


cash to Capt. Whittier, 


" 30. 


carriage in Boston (4J hours to look 




up Alumni) 


" 23. 


cash to Capt. Whittier, 


July 4. 


cash to T. C. Rice, for board, . 


4. 


cash to Fred Plaisted, 


5. 


telegraphing, 


5. 


hoard for Plaisted, .... 


5. 


cash to O'Leary, for keeping boat, 


5. 


to additional board, 


" 1-8. 


fare to Worcester and r 


" 7. 


dummy tickets, .... 


" 7. 


cash paid telegraph boy for mes- 




sages to lake, .... 


7. 


stamps, 


" 10. 


cash to Plaisted, .... 


" 11. 


telegraphing, 


" 14. 


fare, Waltham to liake, . 


" 16. 


cash to T. C. Rice, for board, . 


" 16. 


casli to O'Leary, .... 


" 16. 


cash to Capt. Whittier, 


" 16. 


fare, Lake to Waltham, . 


" 16. 


telegraphing 


" 17. 


paper and envelopes, 


Sept. 5. 


cash to Plaisted, .... 


Aug. 30. 


Reed & Curtis, on account for Rud- 




dock, 


" 25. 


expenses. New York and r., in- 




cluding carriage fare, . 


Total— Dr 


, 


•• -Cr 


, 




Cash on hand, 



$0 50 

25 

60 

2 00 

35 00 

6 75 

43 

75 

1 60 
350 00 

28 00 

4 50 

2 00 
51 00 
30 00 

1 00 
8 80 

5 00 

3 06 

2 00 
1 00 



The following is a specimen of Victor Hugo's 
English poetry : 

Quand je me sens du spleen, 
J'entre dans un inn ; 
Et je hois du gin — 
God save the Queen. — Ex. 
Here is another, but not by Hugo : 
Le garfon se tenait sur le deck, 
Mangeant les pea-nuts par le peck ; 
Tout pres etait une fiUie in bhie, 
Qui dit, "I'll take apeck ou two." 



Columbia has decided that the studies of the 
Senior year shall be entirely elective. This plan 
takes effect this year. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



103 




The Freshman sat in the par- 
lor fine, 
While the fairy maid he wooed 
And she leaned her head on his manly 

breast, 
And gushed, and gurgled and cooed. 



But the whistle shrill of the midnight train 

On his happiness brought a blight. 
" I mxist bid you adieu," she blithely said, 
" For my ' hubby ' comes home to-night.'' 

The manipulator of the types came to the front 
in our last issue, and by neglecting to put in a simple 
little i, made us responsible for the extraordinary 
statement that it was sad (said) that the Prex played 
third base on the nine while at Andoyer. That the 
Prex did play third base on the Andover Theological 
nine is undoubtedly true, but the profoundest reflec- 
tion has utterly failed to show us anything particu- 
larly melancholy in this fact. 

The average Junior's course in Zoology is di- 
vided, like ancient Gaul, into three parts, viz. : Bi- 
ology, Cussology, Nonology. 

If a sufficient number express a desire to take 
lessons in dancing. Prof. Gilbert will consent to 
come down here and hold a school. It is said that 
every other winter is dull, and if such is the ease, 
this winter ought to be a lively one, for last year 
there was no dancing school and only one series of 
germans in the winter. 

The nine has been unfortunate this fall in finding 
nines to play with them. Games were arranged 
■with Colby and with the Yarmouth nines which had 
to be given up. 

The Cornell Era claims that their crew made the 
remarkably fast practice time of 8 minutes 15 sec- 
onds previous to the race at Quinsigamond. We 
have looked the Worcester and Boston dailies over 
pretty thoroughly, but have failed to find any such 
time given. We are inclined to think that it had its 
origin in the fertile imagination of the Era's ex- 
change editor. 

It was noticed that the door to the chapel had 
been broken open Sunday morning and many theo- 
ries have been advanced to explain it. The one 



most generally believed is that it was the work of an 
upperclassman, vyho, during his college course has 
never failed to be present at morning chapel. Since 
the new regulation abolishing Sunday morning 
chapel has gone into effect, he has been noticed by 
those of his companions who chanced to be up at 
that hour, wandering aimlessly about the campus in 
an apparently dazed condition. It is supposed that 
so strong had this habit of attending morning prayers 
become with him that finding the door locked at the 
customary time, he broke it down by main strength, 
and, as usual, spent ten minutes in devotion. 

The Era is decidedly " oft'" when it states that no 
one thought Bowdoin had any show in the first race 
at Quinsigamond. Several days before the race the 
Boston Journal's, correspondent stated that Bowdoin 
was undoubtedly the " dark horse." 

The following members of the Freshman class 
have been initiated into the different secret societies : 
Alpha Delta Phi — Watts and Shirley ; Psi Upsilon — 
Lynam, F. A. Adams, Stearns, Gilpatrick, Files, Neal, 
Prentiss, 0. H. Fogg, Freeman ; Delta Kappa Epsi- 
lon — Emery, Preston, Owen, Rogers, Manson, E. 
L. Adams, Jackson, E. A. Merrill, White, Doherty ; 
Zeta Psi — S. L. Fogg, Smith, Phelan, Rideout, Sta- 
ples, Crocker, Wilson; Theta Delta Chi — Mitchell, 
Hill, Stacy, H. Merrill, Bodge, F. M. Russell, F. C. 
Russell, Clark, Harriman, Hersey, Little. 

The Juniors complain of being kept in over the 
hour at the German recitations. The time usually 
occupied in hearing the last man recite might be em- 
ployed much more profitably in gaining a careful 
knowledge of the pronunciation of the advance les- 
son. 

The insurance on the boat-house expires Nov. 
11th. The Association should take some action in 
regard to its renewal. 

As usual the faculty gave us an adjourn Thursday 
afternoon to visit the Topsham Fair. Some of the 
Freshmen felt rather disappointed at being unable 
to see the famous horse, "Triangle," which was so 
extensively advertised before the Fair as one of the 
chief attractions, but his owner thought it best not to 
put him on the track this year, as old age is beo'in- 
ning to tell on him. 

We notice, by the Portland papers, that the 
Biigle has come out several weeks earlier this year 
than usual. 

It was noticed that sundry chickens that had been 
loafing around the campus prior to the Sophomore's 
pseudo supper, were missed from their accustomed 
haunts. Strange rumors were afloat to the efieot that 



104 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



their bodies, well cooked and stuffed, but emitting 
horrible miasmata, were subsequently carried off in 
the offal barrel of a certain swine raiser. This is 
another proof of the ancient adage that hope long 
deferred maketh the chickens sick. 

Any student possessing knowledge of " Murphy " 
will please communicate the same to G. S. B., 
Orient office. 

The time which we gave for the Bowdoin and 
Cornell crews, in our issue of Sept. 30th, was taken 
from the Boston Herald, a paper far from friendly to 
Bowdoin. 

When Juniors tafee Zoology 

The wonders of the world they see, 

Actinic aniinalculae, 

Biscophic lucernariae 

Chitinous sertulariae 

And thundering aequoridae. 

And if they push their studies far 
They come to radiolaria 
Antipathes Arboria 
Mellepic hydractinia 
Cephalic brachiolaria 
And mighty iynorantia. 

The door to the boat-house was broken into again 
and all the tools and clothes taken. 

M. F. Davis, of Portland, was here last week and 
went out as coxswain with some of the men training 
for the crew. The crew will probably be chosen 
from the following men : Smith, '86, Boutelle, '87, 
Varney, '87, Woodman, '88, Merserve, '88, Lyman, 
'89, and Jackson, '89. 

The first rhetorical exercises of the term come 
Wednesday, Oct. 28th. The following speakers 
have been appointed : J. H. Davis, '86, A. A. Knowl- 
ton, '86, E. B. Torrey, '87, S. B. Fowler, '87, Lins- 
cott, '88, Hall, '88, Williamson, '88. 

Scene in English Literature. Prof. — " Mr. Jones, 
should you consider Bede as one of the learned men 
of that jjeriod of literature?" Mr. Jones — "Yes, 
sir, he was so learned that he was always spoken of 
as the " venerable." 

The Era thinks that Bowdoin will have to wait 
before she can claim the honor of beating Cornell. 
There was plenty of opportunity after the first race 
for Cornell to have tried conclusions with either 
Bowdoin or Brown. Bowdoin's crew stood ready and 
anxious to accept a challenge from Cornell at any 
time, but none ever reached them. It was not the 
place of either Bowdoin or Brown to challenge a 
crew defeated by the result of the first race. If Cor- 



nell thought she had the best crew in the regatta 
and that the decision of the referee was unjust, she 
should have taken measures to have proved it in a 
second race. Such action would have settled conclu- 
sively the relative merits of the two crews and 
saved the Era considerable boastful composition. 

The Freshmen, in compliance with a notice posted 
on the bulletin-board, left their umbrellas outside 
the chapel door the other morning and, on coming 
out after the chapel exercises, were unable to find 
them. The Sophs say that some small yaggers must 
have carried them away with them. 

A hole dug in McKeen woods just the dimensions 
of a grave and three and a half feet deep, has at- 
tracted a good deal of notice about town and caused 
some excitement. Some of the towns-people con- 
nected it with the initiation of the college societies. 
Such an inference would have had some ground in 
the palmy days of the old Phi Chi, but the only relic 
of that famous society in college now, is the song. 

A new floor is being laid in the small room open- 
ing out of the chemical lecture room where the jars 
of an electric battery used to be kept. The room is 
to be fitted up with shelves and used to store a part of 
the apparatus in, and the rooms upstairs where the 
apparatus has formerly been kept will be used by those 
working in third term physics. Those who have 
elected this branch in years past have alwaj'S felt the 
need of some place where they could pursue their 
work in quiet and not be delayed every day by 
moving the instruments with which they were work- 
ing, and the changes now being made will meet the 
requirements of the case exactly. 

A challenge has been received from the Princeton 
College Chess Club to play a game of chess by mail, 
but where is the Bowdoin Chess Club P There for- 
merly was such an organization, but for the past year 
or so we have not heard the game of chess mentioned 
by any one in college. 

In conversation, after the race with Brown, Fred 
Plaisted said his crew had beaten that time (eight 
minutes twenty-six seconds) by sixteen seconds. 
His statement is doubtless Irustworlhy , as they have 
been caught over the course by outsidei's in eight 
minutes eighteen seconds. — Boston Herald. 

Although Plaisted's statement can be substantiated 
by prominent oarsmen who witnessed Bowdoin's 
practice in Portland harbor ; yet in our statement of 
time we gave Bowdoin's best practice time as eight 
minutes eighteen seconds, preferring to take the 
testimony of disinterested parties. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



105 



A Sopliomore at a fine French fair, 

Some hand-grenades observing, 
Asked of a learned Junior near 

"What purpose they were serving. 

Tlie Junior, with great patience, 

Fast holding in his ire, 
Replied : " Those things are used, my boy, 

To quench incipient fire." 

The Soph was satisfied, and then. 
His hat politely doffing, 
"I'll buy a gross," he said, " and have 
Them buried in my cofiin." 

Certain wild-eyed Sophs cl:iim that the barrel of 
uider with which the upperclassmen regaled them- 
selves Tuesday evening, October 20th, was only half 
of the supply which the munificent class of '88 had 
provided. We have suspected for some time that 
" things were not what they seem" with '88, but we 
confess that the knowledge that it takes eighty-four ! ! 
gallons of cider for their turkey (?) supper fills us 
with ineffable sadness. 

One of the Freshmen was overheard telling his 
father about the wonderful horse owned by Prof. 
Smith. 

President Hyde preached in Augusta on Sunday. 

The first entertainment of the Stookbridge course 
took place in the Town Hall, Thursday evening. 
The Gypsy Band have been here several times before 
and always draw a good house. 

Perkins, '87, has returned to his home in Farm- 
ington, where he will remain till the small-jjox 
ceases to rage in Brunswick. 

The knowledge which the Juniors gained Mon- 
day, October 19th, in regard to the principle of the 
siphon was put to a pretty practical test Tuesday 
evening, in tapping the "Sophomore cider." The 
upperclassmen are now decidedly of the opinion 
that the study of Physics has superior advantages. 

The Gymnasium promises to be of great benefit 
to the college this winter in the facilities which it 
offers in raising weights. One student assures us 
that he has already wonderfully improved his mus- 
cular development by simply raising blocks of 
wood. 

The dynamo bought last year bas been moved 
from Adams Hall and jjlaced in the qualitative 
laboratory. Wires will be brought into the quantita- 
tive laboratory and electrolysis will be one of the 
features of the chemical work next term. The 
dynamo is one of Edison's make and has the power 
of supplying twenty-five lights. 




'42.— Rev. Charles M. 
Blake was commissioned 
chaplain in the U. S. Army in 1861. 
Some yeai-s after the close of the war, 
while suffering from mental aberration, the 
result of wounds received in active service, 
he resigned his commission. The resignation was 
accepted, and another chaplain was appointed to the 
vacancy, but President Hayes afterward restored him 
to the service on the ground that his resignation was 
the act of an insane man. The judicial authorities 
have not admitted the validity of this re-appointment, 
and he has therefore been refused the salary con- 
nected with the position. He will apply for relief to 
Congress at its approaching session, and it is to be 
hoped that the justice of his claim will be recognized. 

'42. — Mr. Thomas Tash has been elected Presi- . 
dent of the Maine Pedagogical Society for the com- 
ing year. He has been one of its most active and 
honored members ever since its formation. 

'42. — W. L. Hyde, formerly at Ovid, N. Y., is now 
teaching in Jamestown, N. Y. 

'44. — Gen. S. J. Anderson, recently appointed to 
the coUeotorship at Portland, now fills the most lit- 
erati ve ofiice in Maine. The Lewislon Journal fur- 
nishes the following brief sketch of his life: "The 
General was born in Portland in December, 3824. 
He studied his profession at the Dane Law School, 
and was elected County Attorney in 18f>5 ; he after- 
wards was appointed Surveyor of Customs by Presi- 
dent Buchanan. Since 1868 he has been President of 
the Portland and Ogdensburg Railroad, and for a 
number of years President of the Portland Board of 
Trade. In 1868 he was chairman of the Maine dele- 
gation at the Democratic National Convention at New 
York, and by request of the Hancock men presented 
General Hancock's name. He was again chairman 
of the Maine delegation at the Democratic National 
Convention of 1876, and voted for Governor Tilden. 
He was the Democratic candidate for Congress in the 
First District in 1878 and 1880. In 1882 he was again 
nominated, but declined the nomination." 

'48.— C. D. Fessenden has been transferred from 
the U. S. Marine Hospital at St. Louis to the Hospi- 
tal service at the Custom House at Norfolk, Va. 



106 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



'50. — Rev. Henry F. Harding has accepted an in- 
vitation to tiie pastorate of the Congregationalist 
church in East Machias, and entered upon his labors 
there on the 18th inst. 

'51. — John S. H. Frink, a successful lavvyer at 
Portsmouth, N. H., has been appointed United States 
district attorney for New Hampshire. 

'60. — The New York Tribune, speaking of Judge 
Hawes, says: "The term of Judge Granville P. 
Hawes, of the City Court, is about to close. It has 
been a record of conscientious, useful, and honorable 
service. Judge Hawes has shown fitness for the 
bench, and all the lawyers who have practiced in his 
court and become familiar with his devotion to duty 
will agree in the opinion that he has the qualities 
necessary for success in a higher and more responsi- 
ble position. Such judges deserve promotion." 

'61. — Mr. Edward Stanwood, who delivered a 
very interesting course of lectures at the college last 
winter on " Early Party Contests in the United 
States," has an article in the current number of the 
Atlantic Monthly, on "An Old-Time Grievance, in 
which he introduces some letters from impressed 
sailors, the originals of which were discovei'ed by 
Professor Lee among some imported rags at the 
paper mill in Brunswick. 

'62. — Rev. Charles H. Pope, of Farmington, Me., 
is engaged in the pi-eparation of a history of the 
Pope family, and in the collection of material for the 
work he will be grateful for any information that 
may be sent him. 

'62. — Rev. Daniel W. Waldron proved himself 
very efiticient as the chairman of the Committee on 
Entertainment at the great meeting of the American 
Board in Boston. Between four and five thousand 
guests were hospitably entertained in the homes of 
Boston and the neighboring towns. 

'66. — Rev. F. B. Thatcher, of Massachusetts, has 
accepted a call to the North Church at Farmington, 
and will assume the duties of his pastorate the first 
Sunday in November. Mr. Thatcher is a graduate 
of the Cambridge Divinity School, and is a preacher 
of power and ability. He is a nephew of Henry W. 
Longfellow, the distinguished poet. 

'73. — Mr. Royal E. Gould, principal of the Bid- 
deford Grammar School, spent a night in town, re- 
newing his old college associations, on his way to 
the meeting of the pedagogues at Waterville. 

'76. — C. H. Wells recently obtained control of 
the Qreat Falls Free Press, published at Great Falls, 



N. H. Since he has been its editor the paper has 
been much improved in literary style, and now bids 
fair to equal any of its rivals in that section of the 
State. 

'75.— The marriage of Dr. Albion S. Whitmore 
and Miss Maud H. Swan (formerly of Augusta, Me.) 
took place on Wednesday last, in Boston. 

'76. — Rev. C. G. Burnham, formerly pastor of the 
Congregational church at East Freeport, has accepted 
a call to the Congregational church at Wilton, N. H. 

'76. — Mr. Jere M. Hill, the efiScient principal of 
the Bangor High School, presented a paper on 
" Aims and Methods of Discipline in High Schools" 
at the meeting of the Pedagogical Society at Water- 
ville. 

'78. — Mr. Geoi-ge C. Purington read a paper, at 
the recent meeting of the Maine Pedagogical Society, 
on the "Study of History," which was highly com- 
mended. Mr. Purington is meeting with most grat- 
ifying success as principal of the Farmington Normal 
School. 

'79. — Rev. G. N. Johnson has accepted a call to 
the Congregational church at Buxton, Me. 

'82. — Edward U. Curtis, Esq., of Boston, who 
was judge for the Bowdoin Crew at the Worcester 
Regatta, and to whom the crew and the college are 
indebted for his services on that occasion, was in 
town on the 15th inst. He is a staunch friend and 
supporter of the boating interests of the college. 

'82. — M. H. Goodwin has recently accepted a 
jjermauent position in Rockland College in New York 
State, at Nyack-on-Hudson, as instructor in Ancient 
Languages. Mr. Goodwin is a native of Gorham, Me. 

'82. — Melvin S. Holway, Esq., has opened an 
ofiice for the practice of law in Augusta, and has re- 
ceived a flattering notice from the Lewiston Journal 
on the occasion. 

'83. — A. J. Russell, formerly connected with the 
Portland Advertiser, has acceisted a position on a 
Minneapolis jsaper. 

'83.- — Mr. John E. Dinsmore is an assistant teacher 
in the Hallowell Classical and Scientific Acadeiu}'. 

'83. — Dr. Arthur C. Gibson, who graduated at 
the Maine Medical School last year with high honors, 
sailed, on Sept. 15th, from New York for Germany, 
where he will pux'sue a special course in medicine. 

'83. — C. H. Dunning is principal of the high 
school at Brownville, Me. 

'83. — F. L. Fling again returns to Biddeford, Me., 
as sub-master in the high school. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



107 




When Eve brought woe to all mankind, 
Old Adam called her loo-man, 
But when she vjoo'd with love so kind. 
He then pronounced her looo-man. 

But now with folly and with pride, 
Their husband's pockets trimming, 
The ladies are so full of whims 
The people call them whim-men.— Ex. 

TAKING. 

He took her fancy when lie came. 
He took her hand, he took a kiss. 
He took no notice of the shame 
That glowed upon her face at this. 

He took to come of afternoons, 
He took an oath he'd ne'er deceive. 
He took her father's silver spoons, 
And after that he took his leave. 

— Student Life. 

"I say, Bobby," whispered Featherly, "was 
your sister pleased to learn that I had called upon 
her?" "Yes, indeed, she was," replied Bobby. 
"When mother told her thatMr. Featherly had called 
while she was out, she said, ' Thank heaven !' " — Ex. 

A COMPLAINT. 

My name is John Sebastian Brown, 

I want to earn a living, 
But, having spent a month in town. 

Begin to have misgiving. 

I can't for money nor for love, 

Secure a place or station — 
The fact is, I'm a victim of 

A college education. 

I've tried ; they haughtily refuse 

To let me do reporting; 
I'm too polite for interviews 

And too well bred for sporting. 

They won't engage me as a clerk 

For want of early training; 
Why, all you do is add— and smirk — 

And starve without complaining. 



I've even tried for vacancies 
As porter on a Pullman ; 
They quote at me — 'Tis Bacon says 
" That ' reading makes a full man.' " 

Could I but find the " Sesame " 
To some fair heiress yearning, 

I'd play James to her Jessamy 

And vindicate my learning. — Life. 

Colleges which offer scientific courses report a 
lai'ge increase in the number of those taking civil, 
mechanical, and electrical engineering. 

There was a young lady from Vassar, 
Who allowed no young fellow to sassar, 
When she met any heaus 
She would turn up her neaux 
And thereby allow them to passar. — Cadet. 

Yale College opened with the largest Freshman 
class on record, — 160 entered the Academic and 90 
in the Scientific departments. 

Hush-a-by, Thomas, upon the back fence ; 
I have not a missile to banish you hence. 
Last night my last weapons I threw at the wall; 
My boot-jack and bottles and hair-bush and all. 

—Sat. Evenini] Gazette. 



ELEGANT MACKINAW 

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$1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 

MEEET THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND. 

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FINE BOOTS AND SHOES, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOOTS AND SHOES, 

ALL STYLES AND PRICES, 

*AT JACKSON^S.* 

LAWN-TENNIS SHOES CONSTANTLY 
ON HAND. 

REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 

No. 2 Odd Fellows' Block, 

MAIN STEJEJET, BBUNSWIGK. 



B WDOIN ORIENT. 



(■CIGARETTE 
Smokers "who 
are willlngato 
paya little more 
for Cigarettes 
I than the price 
charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, will 
And the RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT 
Wo. 1 SUPERIOR TO AT.T. OTHERS. 
rhey are made from the liriglitest, most 
delicately flavored, and filgllest cost 
gold leaf grown in Vlrgliiia, and are abso- 
lutely TVitiioiitk adulteration or di-ugs. 

STRAIGHT CUTT 

We use the Gemiliie Frenob Rice Paper 

of our own direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1 — on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIOWS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
original brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or bos of k 
Kichiiiond 
Straight Cut I 
Cigarettes 

bears the I 
Bignature of ' 

ALLEN &GINTER 

MANtTFAOTtlBEES, 

RICHMOND, VIRCINiA. 




Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

On and after Oct. 12th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.15, 11.25 A.M., 2.38, 4.45 and 6.25 P.M., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Eockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.38 P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.40 P.M., and 

12.35 (night). 
For Lewiston, 8.15 A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every uight at 

12.40. 
For Farmiugtou, 8.15 A.M. (mixed), and 2.45 P.M. 
For Augusta and Waterville, 8.20 A.M., 2.40 p.m., 12.45 every 

night, and on Saturdays only at 6.35 P.M. 
For Skowhcgan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 (night). 
For Bangor, Ellsworth, Mt. Desert Fen-y, St. Stephen, Houlton, 

Vanceboro, and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Bar Harbor, 12.45 (night). 

Note. — The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
iston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun. 
day, but do not connect lor Skowhegan on Monday morning, or 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sun- 
day morning. 

PATSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BOOTHBT, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 6, 1885. - • 



NOTICE. 

BEWARE OF COUNTERFEITS AND IMITATIONS. 

Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and pure Eice Paper, are rolled by the highest 
class of skilled labor, and waiTanted free from flavoring or 
impurities. 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a fao-simile of Kinney 

BliOS.' SiGNATOKE. 

K.INNEY TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KINNEY BBOS. 

NEW YORK. 

The following are our well-known 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Caporai,, Sweet Caporal, St. Jajies J, Caporal J, St. 

James, Ameassadok, Entre nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIG.'iRETTES 

SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. Slanufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 



The Sixty-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures atthe Medi- 
cal Scliool of Maine, will commence February 4th, 1886, 
and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Rev. Wm. DeWitt Hvde, President ; Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Women and Children ; CH^iRLES W. Goddard, A.M. , 
Medical Jurisprudence ; Frederick H. Gerrish, M. D., Anat- 
omy; Franklin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemistry; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henry H 
Hdnt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Young, Public Hygiene 
Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealei', MD., DemoDsti'ator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary 
Brunswick, Maine. 



IRA C. STOCKSRIDGE, 

MUSIC PT7BLISHEK, 

.iad Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instriunents, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



©I'steff asJ See ^reem 

Main St., under Town Clock 

jpg'Families, Parties, and Clubs supplied. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Tear iu Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



OOLLEaE BOOKSTOI^E. 

We have constantly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept iu a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds ot 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno"w's Grocery Store. 

;eS"Speeial Kates to Student Clubs. ..©6 









2 @|«rc| Ihtk, 



dnil 



-HJC- 



m^m.wm.QM^ ai?^ 



DBALER IN 



^M§ BB ^n^m 



CEDAK STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
Ey Watches, Clocks, and Jewelr}' promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWS^ F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



^•^m eUs Wis? >^6i»«ii@Lis, 
Successor to Atwood & Wentworth, 

DEALER IN 

DS, W\1CHBB, JE¥IELRY, 



and importers of French Clocks, Opera 

Fine Watch Sepairing ; Gold and Silver Plating. 

509 CONGRESS ST., Portland, Me. 

ALL THE STUDENTS SHOULD BUY 

THEIR 

BOOTS, SHOES, AlB EUBBSRS 

AT 

Frank E, Roberts' Boot & Shoe Store, 

Con. MAINANl) JiASON STS., OPP. TO'IVN CLOCK. 



DEALEK IN 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Mualo, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 



DUNLAP BLOCK, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT 

BICYCLE 
BASE-BALL 

TENNIS 
BOATING 

SPECIAL RATES TO CLUBS. 



SHIRTS, 

STOCKINGS, 
JEBSEYS. 



OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, MB. 



Wja. 1^. FIEIsD, 



jajIN^gE^. 




Cushing's Island, 
Portland, Me. 



©lAMOMSS, FIM£ WATCIES, 

239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. MERRILL. A. KEITH. 



Ss 



DEALEK IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PURITY SWEET CIGARETTES. 

THE PUREST, MILDEST, AND BEST CIGARETTE ON THE MARKET. 

PURE, BRIGHT VIRGINIA TOBACCO AND PUREST RICE PAPER. 



FOR THE FINEST MADE TRY OUR 

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MANUFACTURED FROM THE FINEST BRIGHT TOBACCO GROWN. WITH 

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PURITY SMOKING TOBACCO. 

THE FINEST, PUREST, AND BEST SMOKING TOBACCO MADE. 



RALEIGH CUT PLUG SMOKING. 

THE ORIGINAL, PUREST, AND THE BEST. 



We guarantee all not injurious. Only a trial and you tvill be convinced. 

PACE & SIZER, Manufacturers, Richmond, Va. 



ON SALE AT FIELD'S. 



-T'^SEl 



^ TRAVELERS # 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF H^RTFOUD, COTsTISr., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCr $! 1,000,000, and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 

A r^r^TTVXTXrnr' T>/'^T TP'TTrQl indemnifying the Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
ii.V7V7xJ_-'-rji> ± JL\J±j1.Kj1-11iO Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidental Injury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. ■,. , 

Only S5.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each $1,000, with $5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 1864 have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. „ . t < i. j. 

Issues T TT7T7 "D/^T Tr^TX?C of every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 
also JLiii: Ht j:\JljLKjLlhiJ Personal Benefit. 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Office at Hartford. 
JAS. 6. BATTERSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



FmEBi.] 



^H© 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Briiustirick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vievirs ; also College Views. 



F. ROEMER, 

Successor to A, Roemer & Son, 
THE LARGEST HISTORICAL 

COSTUMER^^ARMORER 

IN AMERICA. 

Also Costumer foi' all the principal theatres : Fifth Avenue 
Theatre, Grand Opera House, Star Theatre, Madison Square 
Theatre, Niblo's Garden Theatre, New Park Theati-e, People's 
Theatre, Uth Street Theatre. 

No. 8 UNION SQUARE, NEW YORK. 
Go to W. B. VIToodard^s 

To buy vour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



C. E. TOAVISrSEND, 

DEALER IN 

CHOICE GROCERIES, 

Canned Goods, State Prison Harnesses, Fruits, Confec- 
tionery, Tobacco and Cigars, 
Corner Main and Cleaveland Streets, BRUNSWICK. 

N. B.— SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENT CLUES. 



ALL KINDS OF 



kNiH 



B.XECUTED AT THE 



C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give ine a call. 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 

FlJ^gMIi^g? PRINTING 

For Schools and Colleges. 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &o. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



J 64 Hi, 







til iNiiiiiii ie», 

(EstabUshed 18T7.) 

Institute Building, Huntington Ave., Boston. 



OKTE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AlfD THE 
OTHEK TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-eent 
stamp at above address. 



Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl anu' Middle Sts., PORTLAND, ME., 

WOULD RESPECTFULLY CALL THE ATTENTION OF 

Buyers of FurQiliire, Carpets, BeSiUQg, Parlor stoves, Haiiges, &g., 

To the EDormous SK^ck of House Furnisbiiif^s at the Portland Stoi-e. Beiiij^' JMaiRitaeturer.s, 

intending purchasers can see tlie styles and select their own coverings for Parlor Furniture, and have it made 

to order for the same price. We keep enormous quantities of Upliolstery Goods in the Boston Store, and 

full lines of Samples. Here our prices on Parlor Suites range from IrSo.OO in Hair Cloth to 

$375.00 in Silk or Mohair Plushes. 



CHAMBEK, FURNITURE. 

We have in stock in our three stores 87 different pat- 
terns of Chamber Suites, manufactured from all the popu- 
lar woods, viz.: Pine, Ash, Walnut, Cherry, Basswood, 
and Mahogany, ranging in price from .IflS.OO to .S4uC/.-'j. 
We also have all kinds, sizes, and quantities of Bedsteads, 
Bureaus, Commodes, etc. Sirring Beds, Cot Beds, Lounge 
Beds, Sofa Beds, Mantel Beds, etc. Mattresses of every 
kind and quality, from an excelsior at .1f2.00 to a pure 
bleached South American curled horse hair at 3f2u.OO. 

CARPET DEPARTMENT. 

.^75,000 worth of Cottons, Cotton and Wools, All-Wool 
Extras, Tapestry, Brussels, Body Brussels, Velvets, Wil- 
tons, etc., at our nsual Eock-Bottom Prices. Any of these 
can be selected at the Portland store. SHADES and 



DEAPERY of every description made to order in the 
Boston store. Orders taken here and designs and samples 
shown. 

PARLOR STOVES. 

Special attention is requested to our Parlor Stove De- 
partment, as we believe we have the best line to select 
from in Maine. Prices .§4.00 to 140.00. 

STOVES AND RANGES. 

Our line of Ranges comprises all the latest and best in 
the market, including the " New Tariff " and "Quaker," 
which are considered superior to anything yet produced. 
Write for cuts of these two Ranges. Prices .1515.00, .S20.00, 
.1ii22.50, $25.00, $27.50, .f 29.00, .§33.00, $35.00, $38.00, and up- 
wards to $65.00. These prices include all the ware, pipe, 
and zinc. 



Any of the above goods sold for Cash or on our Special Contract System, at 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Streets, Portland, Me. 

Branch of the Great Nassau HaW House Ftihiishing Store, 827 Washington Street, Boston. 

B. A. ATKINSON & CO. 

i ISAuAC C A.TI5LI1VS01V, aianager. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



■^ 



S -K 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HAJ>;GDsG 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGRAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



All the Late Publications in stock. Text-BooliS of all kiads. LAW 
and MEDICAL WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

]\I0. 3 eDD EEIiIieW'3 BII0CK, 

Is the place to l)uy 
Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 

Made at Higgins' Ground-Floor Studio, Bath, 




< 






P 



HONETIC SHORTHAND. ""^^^^S^r 

For Self-Instruction. Containing all the late iniiirove- 
nients. Price $1.50. Special Instruction hy Mail, SG.UO. 
1 Stamp for Specimen Pages iind Illiistrateil Pamphlet. 

\Y. \V. OSGOOD BY, Publisher, liochester, N. IT. 



The New Styles in 

STII^IF' and. SOIFT H-^TS 

In all colors, are now ready. An elegant line of New York 
Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves In all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

1 ELLIOTT'S,! 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, 
cat Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

Odd Fellows' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 

JIaiu street, Brunswick. S. W. BROWNE, Proprietor. 



K'^ — So 




THE FAVORITE NOS.S0S-404-3J2-/ro-J^S/- WITH 
'HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. fflERRYlM, PHMACIST-:- 

BllQS, M1DICI118, 

Fancy aiii Toilet Articles, Ciprsl Toliacco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

US' Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Book-Seller, Stationer, Book-Binder. 

AND BLANK-BOOK MANUFACTUREE, 

Opposite City Hall. Center St., Bath, iflaine. 

Tbey do say_, and it is a fact, that Lenton & Neagle's is tlie 
cheapest place in tliis county. Their assortment of trunks aud 
bags cannot be beaten. No shop-worn goods, but direct from the 
manufacturers. They have the largest line of whips ever shown 
in this town. Jobbing of all kinds promptly attended to. 
Ti'unks and bags neatly repaired. 

HARNESS MAKERS & CARRIAGE TRIMMERS, 
MAIN STREET, Store formerly occupied hy Washburne. 



J. S. TOWITE, 
PHARMACEUTIST. 

PURE DRUGS, MEDICINES, FANCY AND TOILET AR- 

TICLES; ALSO A FINE LINE OF CHOICE CIGARS 

AND CIGARETTES. PRESCRIPTIONS a Specialty. 

Main Street, Near Bowdoin College. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exliibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIIVIIVIER, Director, 

750 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



OVER BOARDMAN'S STORE, MAIN STREET. 



— t- B. G. DENNISON, -i— 

Brunswick Book - Store, 

No. ! O'Brien Blocic, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine StatloneiT ; Portland and Boston Daily Papers ; Circu- 
lating Library, 1600 Volumes; Base-Ball and La Crosse; Pict- 
ures and Picture frames; Frames made to order at short notice. 

F. AY. BAEEOiN", 

Dealer in StaiiiarS aiii Fancy [Iroceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 




ON THE ROAD. 



til iiiiiiiiii %%n 

(Estalblislied 1877.) 

Institute Building, Huntington Ave., Boston. 
m^m <Fttfellsfe too mmlmM% iGt!all©aues» 

ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 
OTHER TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp at above address. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candibates foe Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books beinf; mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Grreeuough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Csesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
^neid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar, — Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient GeograxDby, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,- especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,- first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Eegulae Examinations foe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinatious for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Halloivell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryehurg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers of the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be aiforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
iug matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQUIEED— FOUE HOUES A 'WBEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUE HOUES A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOV. 11, 1885. 



No. 9. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 

PUBLISHED EVKRT ALTEKNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLIiEGIATE TEAK BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

W. V. Wentwokth, '86, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
J. H. Davis, '86. Levi Turner, Jr., '8( 

A. A. Knowlton, '86. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. C. Parker, '86. C. B. Bukleioh, '87. 

H. L. Taylor, '86. E. C. Plummer, '87. 



Per annum, in advance, $2.00 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
municatii'ns in regai-d to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to conti'ibute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Eotered at the Post-OBBce ut Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 

Vol. XV., No. 9.— November 11, 1885. 

Autumn Leaves, 109 

Editorial Notes 109 

Dr. Samuel G. Brown, Ill 

Summer in the Sierras, 11,3 

Kondeau, 114 

Y. M. C. A. Convention 115 

Twilight Eeverie, 116 

CoLLEGii Tabula, 116 

Personal, 118 

Clippings, 119 



AUTUMN LEAVES. 

The maple stands in bright array. 
And through the pleasant autumn days 

Is queen of all the woods. 
Around in contrast to her fires 
The fir-trees stand like solemn friars 

Close wrapped in sombre hoods. 

Yet all this brilliant foliage sheen 
Is but a moment's flimsy screen 

Which fails to hide the end, 
Like smiles which seek to cover grief 
But make it clearer by relief 

Where pain and pleasure blend. 
For snows shall find the maple bare 
But firs will still be green and fair, 




While reading in many of our re- 
cent exchanges comments upon the estab- 
lishment of an elective course at one college, 
or its extension at another, we have felt 
ourselves fortunate io being members of a 
college so near the van. For some years 
Bowdoin has recognized the value of the 
elective system, the bounds of which were 
practically extended a year ago, and the 
tendency here is evidently to make it broader, 
in which the students are naturally much 
interested. 

But are not more changes both practi- 
cable and advisable? We fully appreciate 
the fact that our instructors know far better 
than the undergraduates what branches are 
best adapted to secure the highest mental 
training, yet in some respects the course 
appears to us so far from the ideal that it is 
impossible not to think an improvement 
might be made. It is not our intention to 
make an onslaught upon Greek and Latin, for 
probably all who are now here will admit the 
advantage of studying them, but we would 
like to see increased time given to some of 
the more advanced branches, taking that 
time in part from the classics, if necessary. 
At present, after three years of preparation, 
at least two terms must be devoted to the 
study of Greek and Latin in the Freshman 



110 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



and Sophomore years, wMle only one, or 
rarely, two terms are devoted to any one of 
the natural or mental sciences, though sup- 
posed to be entirely new subjects, and the 
arrangement of electives is such that even 
that limited amount of time cannot be given 
to all of the sciences. The result is that 
several important and interesting courses 
must be omitted. During this term studies 
in the elective course are being pursued by 
the Senior class, with all of which a college 
graduate should be familiar, but evidently 
too much time is required. Also, Literature 
and Mineralogy come at the same time of 
day ; hence, although some of us have de- 
sired to take both, it has been impossible. 
In Junior year this difficulty is less notice- 
able ; perhaps it is avoided, so far as possible. 
The modern languages are also seriously 
crowded out, one year each for French and 
German being so inadequate for obtaining a 
knowledge of them that even the best schol- 
ars in college know practically nothing of 
those tongues. It has sometimes seemed to 
us that it would be fortunate if one of those 
languages could replace in part either the 
Greek or the Latin now required, or be made 
an elective along with the present studies. 



It is not our purpose to, weary our readers 
by a long continued quarrel about the race 
of July 4th, but it seems to us that, in the 
past, attacks upon Bowdoin have not re- 
ceived sufficient notice. We consider it to 
be the Orient's duty to, so far as possible, 
assist in upholding Bowdoin's honor, and, 
therefore, when the Cornell J/?-a haughtily bids 
us be quiet, cannot refrain from a brief reply. 
In the first place, a moment's examination of 
its files will show our contemporary that we 
did not begin the "tirade." We merely 
gave an account of the race, with fcAV com- 
ments upon our rivals, to which they replied 
in a characteristic vein. The "c^ear Orient'''' 
has not kept up a " continual harping " upon 



the demerits of their crew, not denying that 
they were able and well trained, but only 
claiming that we had a faster four, and that 
they prevented our winning at the first trial 
by fouling us. 

The Ura may have the proof claimed 
about time, but it is a mystery to us why 
the eight minutes fifteen seconds was not 
claimed in July. So far as we have been 
able to learn, eight minutes thirty-nine sec- 
onds was the best time their crew claimed 
then. 

Their final point appears to be the weak- 
est of all. The Ura says : " In reply to the 
question of the Orient, ' Why did they not 
challenge Bowdoin ? ' we will say that such 
an act would have placed us on record as 
denying the legality of a referee's decision, 
and this the intercollegiate rules prevent." 
We fail to see why Cornell could not have 
challenged our crew to a friendly race at 
any time before the final race with Brown, 
to settle the speed of the two prews, if they 
had more than an assumed doubt of the capa- 
bility of Bowdoin's representatives. That 
would not have involved a denial of the le- 
gality of the referee's decision and would 
have been a more manly way to settle the 
matter than the course actually adopted. 



We learn from the Colbz/ Echo that our 
columns display " evidences of meanness and 
pettiness " and are disfigured by " malicious 
perversion, ugly bigotry," and " ill-natured 
and intemperate exultations " in the Sep- 
tember issue. The Echo can do us a favor 
by referring to some of the statements which 
have stirred up such feelings in the heart of 
their exchange editor. We think our state- 
ments cannot be proved to be other than true, 
and, as for the exultations, we would suggest 
a comparison with the Echo and Oracle for 
the two or three years preceding. The 
trouble with our neighbors appears to be 
that defeat sits heavily, consequently they 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Ill 



accuse us of manifesting the same spirit 
which has so often animated their columns. 
We would also suggest that we consider 
the Era and Orient capable of managing 
oiir own discussion without regard to whether 
our references to each other please Colby or 
not. 

The BowDOiN Orient, a representative of the 
small eastern college whose crew was awarded first 
place in the Quinsigamond regatta, uses more than 
half the space in its fall issue in hurling the vilest of 
language at the Cornell crew and its supporters. 
The value of our space and the insignificance of the 
attacking party prevent our answering these petty 
assaults. — Cornell Sun. 

Our college may not have six hundred 
students, but the Sun would do well to in- 
crease its fund of information before express- 
ing too great contempt for a college with a 
noble record of nearly a century, and which 
was classed among the first colleges of the 
United States before Cornell University 
existed. As Hon. J. G. Blaine has stated, 
in proportion to numbers, Bowdoin has had 
more famous alumni than any other Ameri- 
can college. How many men can Cornell 
produce equal to Longfellow and Hawthorne, 
William Pitt Fessenden, George Evans, Sar- 
geirt S. Prentiss, Franklin Pierce, Gov. J. 
A. Andrew of Massachusetts, and Gen. 
Joshua L. Chamberlain ? 

The Orient did not devote nearly one- 
half of its space in the sixth number to the 
race, and said little against Cornell as the 
Sun well knows. We did give enough news- 
paper extracts to show the feeling of leading- 
dailies. 

The Orient defies the Sun to substan- 
tiate its claim that we hurled the " vilest of 
language " at their crew. Resting firm in 
the knowledge that our crew fairly and 
honorably won in the regatta, we can afford 
to calmly watch our rivals writhing in the 
throes of defeat, leaving our readers to deter- 
mine from which side the more insults have 
emanated. The Cornell boys clearly recog- 



nize the weakness of their case, or they 
would not resort to such shadowy substitutes 
for argument. 



It was with deep and sincere regret that 
we learned of the death of Prof. Samuel G. 
Brown, D.D., upon the fourth of November. 
During the two years of his professorship at 
Bowdoin he won many friends by his kindly 
interest and unostentatious devotion to duty, 
and when he left last Commencement he 
bore with him the respect and love of the 
students. 



DR. SAMUEL G. BROWN. 

REMARKS BY PROFESSOR CHAPMAN IN THE COLLEGE 
CHAPEL, SABBATH EVENING, NOV. EIGHTH. 

Within these few days we have received 
intelligence of the death of one whom many 
of us have had reason to regard with sincere 
respect and affection, and whose death 
touches us with a sense of personal loss. 
It seems fitting that in this place, where he 
has so often led our Sabbath-evening devo- 
tions, joining with us in our hjanns of praise, 
and presenting our common needs and aspi- 
rations at the throne of grace, — it seems 
fitting that we should devote a few moments 
this evening to the grateful remembrance of 
his association with us, and to the recogni- 
tion of his personal virtues, and of his serv- 
ices to the college. 

Dr. Brown, as you know, was not a grad- 
uate of this college, and the service to which 
he was called here was understood from the 
first to be a temporary service. It is with 
special feelings of gratitude, therefore, that 
we may recall his varied and unselfish labors 
in behalf of all the interests of the college. 
He could not have exhibited more genuine 
solicitude for the welfare of his own Alma 
Mater, than he exhibited for that of the col- 
lege which called him to a brief service in 
the very evening of his days. Without abat- 
ing, so far as could be seen, one jot of the 
loyalty that he owed to other institutions 



112 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



with which he had been more closely con» 
nected, he nevertheless espoused the inter- 
ests of this institution with a generosity and 
heartiness that could not fail to win our 
affectionate regard. 

Not content, as many might have been 
in similar circumstances, with performing, 
however faithfully, the duties of his depart- 
ment of instruction, he was always ready to 
do what lay in his power to further the gen- 
eral interests of the college, and to contrib- 
ute what was always a most important and 
deUghtful element to the social and intel- 
lectual life of our little community. 

Those who enjoyed the benefit of his 
regular instructions have gone out from 
among us ; but we who remain will certainly 
bear willing witness to the value of his 
thoughtful and manly discourses in the 
pulpit, of his stimulating and eloquent lect- 
ures before the Literary Association, of his 
earnest and reverent ministrations at this 
desk. By these labors of love, wrought 
with a cheerfulness that added to their 
charm, he made us all his debtors, and the 
remembrance of the debt renews our rever- 
ence for his memory. 

It may well give us satisfaction also to 
know, from his own hand, that his residence 
among us was a source of pleasure to him- 
self, as well as to us. In a letter received 
from him shortly after his departure, a letter 
filled with the kindliness which always char- 
acterized his intercourse with others, lie uses 
these words, which it is a pleasure to repeat 
in this presence : " In aU my experience of 
college hfe I cannot recall any two years 
which have passed more agreeably, with 
classes more diligent and faithful, or with 
less to interrupt the steadfast and constant 
labors of the department. I shall always re- 
call those classes with affectionate interest." 

And these very words give us a glimpse 
of one of the winning characteristics of our 
departed friend. He was quick to perceive 



what was good in those about him. It is 
the mark of a generous and a Christian 
spirit. A selfish and suspicious nature 
misses the good in its eagerness to detect 
the weakness and the Avickedness of men. 
But Dr. Brown was eager to respond to every 
sign of friendliness, of courtesy, of faithful 
effort, and of personal worthiness in those 
Avith whom he came in contact. The breadth 
and fineness of his culture did not separate 
him from men, but gave a certain gracious- 
ness to his intercourse with them, which is 
the most attractive fruit of culture. 

With a heart that never seemed to feel 
the touch of age, with sympathies that broad- 
ened as his years increased, with tastes that 
were sensitive to every form of beauty, pow- 
ers that were consecrated to the service of 
truth, and affections that were fixed un- 
changeably upon the good, — he went in and 
out among us for two brief years, respected 
and beloved, and has now passed beyond all 
earthly associations. His work was done. 
He had passed a most honored and useful 
life, and was ready to hear the sentence, the 
anticipation of which robs death of all its 
terror, — " Well done, good and faithful ser- 
vaiit." "Above all," says Lord Bacon, "be- 
lieve me, the sweetest canticle is ' JVunc dom- 
ittis,^ when a man hath obtained worthy ends 
and expectations." 

And let us receive tliis lesson of God's 
providence, of our own mortality, and of the 
opportunities of human life, with reasonable 
and reverent minds, and in the exercise of a 
humble faith. 

Directly in the respective pathways we 
are following, somewhere in the uncertain 
future, lies the shadow of death into which 
we shall enter and straightway be lost to 
earthly eyes. Every returning Sabbath, every 
setting sun, nay, every fleeting breath brings 
us nearer to that shadow. Shall we enter it 
to-night, or to-morrow, or after manj^ days? 
Will it be in the spring-time, when Nature is 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



113 



waking to new life, or in autumn, when the 
fading leaf teaches us the lesson of our mor- 
tality ? Will it be this year, or next, or are 
there many years to come, each laden for us 
with its pleasures and its cares ? 

Certainly no one can answer these ques- 
tions, nor need we greatly care to answer 
them. There are other questions of graver 
import that press upon us. Is that shadow 
something to shrink from and to fear ? Is it 
the end of our being and all our hopes ? Are 
we really lost when we enter it ? Is it the 
great misfortune of our lives, which, as long 
as possible, we are to avoid at whatever cost 
of other things, and to yield to, at the last, 
in utter despair? 

There is an answer to these questions. 
The revelation of our Lord Jesus Christ, to 
him who will receive it, makes that shadow 
as harmless, and as little to be feared, as the 
mist that closes around one who climbs some 
high mountain in the assured faith that he 
wiU find sunlight at the top. 

We may live, as he of whom we have 
been thinking lived, in the light and comfort 
of that revelation, doing our work humbly 
and faithfully, as good stewards of the mani- 
fold grace of God. Like him, realizing the 
familiar and beautiful words of one of our 
own poets, we may 

" So live, that when our summons comes to join 
The innumerable caravan, that moves 
To that mysterious realm, where each shall take 
His chamber in the silent halls of death. 
We go not, like the quarry-slave at night. 
Scourged to his dungeon, but, sustained and soothed 
By an unfaltering trust approach the grave. 
Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch 
About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams." 



SUMMER IN THE SIERRAS. 

Who of us has not had, at one time or 
another, some little experience in camp life ? 
And what more wholesome recreation can be 
had than a few weeks of rest of this kind 
among the mountains and lakes of our own 



State? It was our fortune, or misfortune, 
to spend not only a few weeks, but a few 
months, of a summer not long ago in the 
California Nevadas. 

From the quiet seclusion of a college 
•room to the wilds of a remote and isolated 
mountain wilderness would fill the mind of 
many a mere school-boy with a desire to try 
such a venture for himself. Yet we would 
not incur the blame of wronging any of our 
readers by placing before him anything that 
would tend to lead his steps astray from the 
work he has, with so much earnestness and 
determination, entered upon here at Bowdoin. 

To one who has passed his days, be they 
many or not so many, on the soil of our good 
old State of Maine, when brought face to 
face with the untamed life and regions of 
the western mountains a singular feeling of 
his own insignificance and humility is pres- 
ent. Everything here is on a grand scale 
and he recognizes himself smaller than ever 
before — reduced almost to an absolute atom. 

The summer season is there a continual 
succession of sunny days with an almost 
unvarying temperature. The nights are 
cool and clear and, as one lies down on his 
couch made of the evergreen twigs of some 
hardy mountain cedar, with a pair of blank- 
ets for a covering, no marauding mosquito 
or whizzing beetle hovers around his head 
with weird and menacing melody, to fill his 
dreams with fantastic and ever-fleeing ogres. 

No wind is there except a quiet and un- 
varying draught which breathes through the 
pines overhead in undisturbed progress, just 
enough to make a pleasing sensation on the 
ear as if of far-distant water flowing in gentle 
cadence over the pebbly bottom of some 
streamlet which has been swollen by the 
melting snow and early rains of spring-time. 
Sleep here is far different from those five 
hour snatches of alternate nightmare and 
night-howls which, intermingled with the 
nocturnal hurdy-gurdy, pulsate with every 



114 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Avave of the night zephyr upon our poor ears. 
The new clay brings with it the new man. 
Rising with tlie sun, you take your towel 
and go clown the trail to the creek, following 
along until you come to a place where the 
water is for a while delayed in its dash and 
plunge down its rocky bed by a small clam 
of stones which the spring torrents have 
crowded together. It is the crystal-pure 
element formed only a few hours before 
from the melting snow of the upper heights, 
and, I think, might bear a respectable com- 
parison with the distilled Avater of our chemi- 
cal laboratory in respect to clearness and 
jDurity. You kneel down beside this wash- 
basin which Nature has so artistically fringed 
with a border of lily leaves, in the midst of 
which rise up half a dozen or so stalks, each 
bearing a beautiful spotted flower, and, ap- 
plying a few handfuls of the water, blush 
hand and face like a peach-blossom, after a 
few brisk rubs of the towel. Then, Avith a 
cup of coffee, three or four toasted rolls, and 
a morsel of venison, you are prepared to pass 
the day in utmost enjoyment. 

Toward the middle of the day it Avas often 
my grandest pleasure to " cinch " the saddle 
on my " pinto," — a name they called my lit- 
tle natiA'e mountain pony by, — which looked 
as if his sides and breast had been painted in 
white spots on a bay background, and Avith 
a pair of shining spurs fastened to my heels 
and a rifle on my shoulder, start off for a 
stroll up among the canyons and lakelets 
Avhich lie imbedded in the mountain vales 
some six or eight miles from camp. 

The rock of which the mountains are 
composed is all of an igiieous formation, 
mainly basalt, and through this, numerous 
streams have Avoru their way down, leaAdng 
huge canyons with room oftentimes for only 
a footpath and the creek's channel. Thread- 
ing oiu- way up among these rocky chasms, 
at times a side trail would lead out among 
the open hills Avhere a stunted growth of 



mountain heather and chaparral grows in 
the loose gravel and decomposed rock. 

Here is the unmolested-lurking place of 
mountain grouse and the coyote. The nim- 
ble deer browse here until the deep snows 
of winter bury the shrubberj^ Avith its depth 
of ten or tAvelve feet, compeling him to seek 
other feeding grounds further doAvn the 
mountain side. 

Further on, and over a gentle slope, is 
set a little lake of about three-quarters of a 
mile in circuit, Avith rugged, rocky heights 
rising in the background on whose saddle- 
shaped summit rests a miniature glacier of 
snow and ice, dripping aAvay at its loAver 
extremity to form a little gurgling rill Avhich 
supplies the lakelet beloAV with its Avater. 
Hither to the edge of the water, from far- 
aAvay copse and purple-hued forest depth, 
many a secret trail leads where the deer, 
when he had finished his morning feast of 
sprig and grass, finds his way along to slake 
his thirst in the cool Avater of the lake and 
then paces off to his resting place doAvn 
among the pines. 

At sunset, on looking northward, you 
behold beautiful Shasta, Avith his fifteen 
thousand feet of altitude, covered a quarter 
of the way doAvn with a mantle of snow ; 
and, as the sunlight now falls on only one 
side, the other deepens off into a greenish 
blue. It seems a perfect world, gilded on 
one side with the flames of a vermilion sun, 
Avhile the other is darkened into somber 
night. The great luminary sinks behind 
the Avestern mountain piles and leaves be- 
hind his twilight gloaming which soon 
gives way to a darkness . that bathes a slum- 
bering: Avorld beloAV. 



RONDEAU. 

The moon rose over the hammock, 

We sat my love and I. 
The moon shed its rays full upon us, 

The shadows flitted by. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



115 



We plighted our troth o'er and o'er, 

Our vows swore ne'er to break. 
None e'er should come between us, 
A quarrel nought should make. 

The murmuring trees in the distance. 

Approval seemed to waft : 
The whippoorwill singing gently, 

A greeting softly laughed. 

The moon rose over the hammock. 

We sat my love and I, 
The hook which held the hammock broke, 

When'ere now we sit, we sigh. 



Y. M. C. A. CONVENTION. 

The Nineteenth Annual Convention of 
the Young Men's Christian Association of 
Maine was held with the Bangor Associa- 
tion, October 22-25. Seventy-nine dele- 
gates, representing many of the forty As- 
sociations in the State, and several promi- 
nent Association workers from outside the 
State, were present. A welcome meeting 
was given to the delegates Thursday even- 
ing, at the First Congregational Church, 
when addresses were made by President 
Dole of the Bangor Association, Mayor E. 
B. Nealley, and Rev. Mr. Griffin. The exer- 
cises were varied by excellent vocal and in- 
strumental music. At the close of the ses- 
sion the delegates were assigned to various 
homes, where they were entertained with 
the greatest hospitality. 

Friday morning, at the organization ses- 
sion, the following officers were elected for 
the ensuing year : President, Moses Gid- 
dings of Bangor; Vice-Presidents, W. S. 
Corey of Portland, J. W. Fairfield of Bid- 
deford, C. J. Goodwin of Bowdoin College ; 
Secretary, E. F. Weston of Augusta ; Assis- 
tant Secretary, J. Bailey of Bates College. 
Reports were made from all the Associations 
represented, almost all showing a prosjjerous 
and active condition, and in several cases 
many conversions as the result of their 
work. 



Friday afternoon the following subjects 
were treated by papers and discussions : 
" Social Agencies," by L. D. Wishard, Gen- 
eral Secretary of the college Associations ; 
" Educational Features," P. A. Wieting of 
New York; "Financial Management," W. 
C. Douglass, State Secretary of Massachu- 
setts ; " Physical Education," Dr. Robinson 
of Bangor. 

In Pine Street Methodist Church, Friday 
evening. Rev. G. B. Ilsley, of Bangor, de- 
livered an able address on " Personal Study 
of the Bible Necessary for Spiritual Power." 
Mr. Wishard gave some interesting facts re- 
lating to the history and growth of the 
work. 

Saturday morning the following topics 
were presented : " Boys' Work : How shall 
it be sustained ? " G. F. French, Portland ; 
" Day and Week of Prayer," G. W. E. Bar- 
rows, Bangor ; " Bible Study," Mr. Wishard. 

Saturday afternoon the report of the 
State Executive Committee was presented 
by F. A. Curtis of Bangor. The subject of 
"State Work" was opened by I. A. Gould, 
General Secretary of Bangor. $400 was 
pledged during the afternoon and evening 
for the State work, and it is hoped that a 
State Secretary will be put in the field. 
Rev. A. S. Ladd, of Bangor, gave an address 
on the subject, "Association Work in its 
Peculiar Adaptation to the Wants and Temp- 
tations of Young Men." 

The session Saturday evening was de- 
voted to College Work, and was conducted 
by Mr. Wishard. F. W. Sandford, of Bates 
College, read an excellent paper on " College 
Work ; its Importance and Value." He was 
followed hj Mr. Wishard and Mr. Douglass. 

The meetings of Sunday were a Conse- 
cration Meeting for the delegates, a Mass 
Meeting for men only in Norombega Hall, in 
which many rose for prayers, and the Fare- 
well Meeting in the evening. At the last 
the great hall was packed. Rev. Dr. Field, 



116 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



of Bangor, delivered an able address on " The 
Bible," considering it in the light of the tes- 
timonies of modern cultured unbelievers. 
The farewell exercises were very impressive, 
and showed that the Convention had aroused 
new courage and energy in all who had at- 
tended it. 



I'-t^*^'^ 



TWILIGHT REVERIE. 

Slowly the sombre shadow^s creep 
Across the darkening sky, 

And myriad insects softly hum 
Tired natm'e's lullaby. 

Few sounds break on the silence now 
That steals upon the main. 

The stars shine forth upon the eartli 
And night begins her reign. 

We sit alone amid this scene, 

In solemn reverie. 
The soul shakes off its bonds of flesh 

And once again is free. 

No longer sordid thoughts impel 
To worldly toil and strife. 

The spirit leaves its narrow cell 
And views an ampler life. 

Impelled by nobler, better thoughts 

It softly steals away. 
And for a moment leaves behind 

Its tenement of clay. 

An ideal world its portals ope 

Upon a wider sphere, 
And low celestial melodies 

Come softly to the ear. 

The spirit free from thralldom 
Seeks to solve this mystery. 

When lo ! upon its vision come 
Faith, Hope, and Charity. 

The spell is o'er — we wake again, 
And worldly pleasures seek. 

The soul of man may oft look up. 
But human flesh is weak. 



President Hyde gave a very interesting talk, in 
Chapel, Sunday afternoon, Nov. 1st. He took for 
his subject "The Responsibility of Individuals in an 
Organic Whole," and spoke of how the good name 
of the college rested on the conduct of each individ- 
ual member. 





Prof. Avery recently pub- 
lished in the Transactions 
of Victoria Institute of 
Great Britain, an article on the " Relig- 
ion of the Aboriginal Tribes of India." 
It was warmly spoken of by the mem- 
bers of the Institute who discussed it. 



Such a witching face had sh-ee 

Such unique simplicit-ee 

Eyes of blue that looked at m-ee 

Saucil-ee. 
And I felt myself h-ee 
Caught in wiles of aorcer-ee ; 
Felt I loved devotedl-ee 

Mary L-ee. 

When I asked if mine she'd h-ee, 
Said that maid coquetishl-ee, 
" I fear my spouse would ne'er agr-ee, 

Honestl-ee." 
Left I then full hastil-ee, 
Homeward plodded drearil-ee. 
Sang the frogs in noisy gl-ee, 

Merry L-ee. 

The dancing school began Friday, Nov. 6th. 
Most of those going are Freshmen and Juniors. 

A memorial window has been placed in the Con- 
gregational Church, on the north side, over the 
Freshman gallery, in memory of our late President, 
Prof. Packard. 

We would suggest to the liberal Sophs, that the 
supply of cider in college is getting quite low again. 

The interest in lawn-tennis seems to have gone 
down for the past year. But little playing was done 
last summer, and this fall in the tournament there 
were but few entries, considering the number of ten- 
nis-players there are in college. 

North Winthrop still keeps up its reputation for 
sportsmen. Nearly every room in the end possesses 
some kind of a sporting implement, all the way from 
a muzzle-loading shot gun to a Winchester repeating 
rifle. 

The last haud-organ of the season passed through 
Brunswick, last week, in its flight to the South. 

The Princelonian complains that the students are 
not allowed, by the new regulations, to have access 
to the books in the college library. The advantages 
afforded us by the college library here, probably few 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



117 



of us appreciate now. We may, in after years, be 
where we can obtain books from a larger library, yet 
it is scarcely probable that any of us, even if we have 
the time, will be able to browse about among the 
books as we do here, picking up a volume here and 
there. 

Prof. Carmichael has of late been making some 
experiments with materials suitable for covering the 
roofs of buildings. Last summer he roofed his prop- 
erty on the Bath road, with duck soaked in a prep- 
aration used in the manufacture of pulp goods, and 
thus far it has proved a success. 

All lovers of good (?) music will be pleased to 
know that a great interest has been taken of late in 
the chapel choir. The numbers have been largely 
increased, and we noticed with pride the faces of sev- 
eral of the Orient board among the warblers. 

The Stockbridge Course of Entertainments had to 
be given up, as not a sufficient number of tickets 
were sold to pay expenses. An expense of about a 
thousand dollars would be incurred in having the en- 
tertainments, and only four hundred dollars was taken 
in the sale of course tickets. 

The Freshmen were not the only ones who trem- 
bled on seeing a line of Sophs, when coming out of 
North Winthrop a few nights ago. One upperclass- 
man and prominent member of the ball nine, prob- 
ably remembering his experience of Freshman year, 
hid behind the end door. A tutor was also mistaken 
for a Freshman and was only allowed to pass on 
proving his identity. 

Emery Crawford has arranged for a lecture by 
the Rev. Joseph Cook, Nov. 19th. 

The subjects for themes due Nov. 11th are " Com- 
pulsory Vaccination," and the "Needs of Bowdoin.'' 

Cornets have again come into vogue. South Win- 
throp has two cornets now where last year was only 
one. These two cornetists have played duets with 
such success that we understand they have already 
received urgent invitations to go to some warmer 
clime. 

The fact that the upperclassmen had free cider 
seems still to rankle in the breasts of '88 men. Why 
should they be so concerned about it, if, as they say, 
they had nothing to do with paying for it? 

Tutor Cothreu, and Wentworth, '86, have been 
employed for the past few weeks in manufacturing 
C. P. chemicals, and have met with good success. 
Quite an amount of nitric acid and sodic hydrate 
have been made, besides other chemicals. 

Butler, '86, Sewall, '87, Goodwin, '87, and Hersey, 
'89, attended the Y. M. C. A. Convention held in 



Bangor. C. J. Goodwin was elected one of the Vice- 
Presidents. 

'89 held a pea-nut drunk, the first that any class 
has had since '84, though some of the Sophs, pre- 
tend to have had one last year, just before Commence- 
ment, under the Thorndike Oak. 

The following Seniors have been appointed to 
take part in the Senior and Junior Exhibition at the 
close of the term : Salutatory — Butler ; Orations — 
Berry, Byram, Norris, Parker, Smith, Stackpole, and 
Tuttle. 

The Sophs, have done their best to impress on the 
minds of the Freshmen the truth of the old saying, 
" Cleanliness is next to godliness," and to wash away 
all remembrance of a pea-nut drunk. 

Those who saw him say Johnnie presented an im- 
posing appearance, posing before the end door in 
the attitude of Hercules, with a club in hand, but not- 
withstanding a number of Sophs, went boldly past 
him and still live. 

" I'm engaged," the maiden whispered, 
And I knew, as ne'er before, 
All the snares that crafty Cupid 
Had been laying at my door. 
Bjiew alas ! that the confession 
I had hoped to make that night 
Must remain forever buried, 
In my bosom, far from sight. 
Little guessed that smiling maiden 
All the pains those words presaged, 
As she smilingly and lightly 
Whispered to me, " I'm engaged." 

In a voice constrained and trembling, 

Spite of all that I could do, 
" Accept," I said, " the happy wishes 

I so freely tender you." 

Ope'd that maiden's eyes in wonder, 

While the color mantled high. 

As smilingly and brightly then 

She hastened to reply : 
" Why, you goose, what is the matter ? 

What strange freak possesses you ? 

I'm engaged upon some slippers 

For a birthday gift to you." 

I loved her with an earnest love, 
My charming little wife, 
And tenderly I called her 
The "sunshine of my lite." 

The years gone by have proved to me 

That marriage is a sell, 

That " sunshine " since has hotter grown 

Than — I have words to tell. 
Among our exchanges from preparatory schools 
and academies, the Hampionia, from the New Hamp- 
ton Literary Listitution, holds a very prominent posi- 
tion, excelling, both in matter and typographical ap- 



118 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



pearance, many of our college exchanges. The last 
issue comes to us ■with a new and tasty design on the 
cover, while a change of type has added very much 
to its internal appearance. 

The Juniors are having a tine drill in German 
this terra. The method of carefully reviewing the 
preliminary lessons, giving special attention to the 
conversational parts is an excellent one. With a 
thorough understanding of the grammar, the worii 
for the remainder of the year will be pleasant and 
easy. 

"Music hath charms to soothe the savage breast," 
but the " savage breasts " of Bowdoin students have 
ceased to be "soothed" by the Orphean strains of 
the chapel choir. With so many good singers in 
college, this feature, at least, of our chapel exercises 
should not be lacking. 

The following Juniors have received appoint- 
ments for the exhibition at the end of this term : 
Gary, Goodwin, Kimball, and Burpee. 




'35. — Rev. Stephen Al- 
len, D.D., of Augusta, is 
engaged in writing a history of Maine 
Methodism. The volume is expected 
to contain about 500 pages. Dr. Allen has 
been a minister in the Methodist church for 
more than forty years, and is at present a presiding 
elder. He has been deeply and unselfishly interested 
in the educational work of the State, having been a 
Trustee of the Kent's Hill Seminary for about forty 
years, a member of the Maine Wesleyan Board of 
Education ever since it was organized in 1850, and 
for more than twenty years an Overseer of his Alma 
Maler. No one, certainly, is better fitted than he to 
record the labors and achievements of the Methodist 
church in Maine. 

'43.— Hon. William R. Porter, of Cambridge, 
Mass., in honor of the twentieth anniversary of his 
summers in Camden, the beautiful town on Penob- 
scot Bay, gave a sumptuous dinner, October 24th, at 
the Bay View House in that village to his gentleman 
friends and representative business men of Camden. 
It was reported to be a most successful and enjoya- 
ble occasion. 



'46. — Hon. John A. Waterman, of Gorham, Me., 
married Miss Mary E. Smith, also of Gorham, Sep- 
tember 23d. 

'66. — Dr. Frederic H. Gerrish, President of the 
State Board of Health, was in attendance at the re- 
cent meeting in New York of the American Academy 
of Medicine, of which he is a Fellow. 

'72. — Marcellus Coggan, Esq., of Maiden, Mass., 
was in town Monday, the 2d instant. He is engaged 
in the practice of law, having ofiices both in Boston 
and Maiden. 

'72. — Captain and Assistant Surgeon William C. 
Shannon, U. S. A., who has been stationed at Omaha, 
Neb., the past year, recently made a short visit at 
his home in Portland. 

'73. — B. T. Deering has been pursuing studies in 
Paris for two years past. 

'73. — Dr. Robinson recently published a valuable 
pamphlet on "Stimulants and Narcotics," for the 
teachers of Bangor. 

'75.— Dr. William E. Rice, of Bath, Me., has gone 
to New York to spend some time in special study of 
diseases of the throat and lungs, with Dr. Williams, 
the renowned specialist. 

'75.- — W. A. Deering still continues as Dean of 
the Faculty of the University of Vermont. 

'76. — Rev. Geo. F. Pratt is rector of the Episcopal 
church in Clinton, Mass. 

'76. — A. H. Sabine, late Professor of Chemistry 
in the University of Vermont, resigned at the be- 
ginning of the college year, to give his whole time 
to the development of an important industry. He 
has recently discovered a valuable process by which 
sugar can be made from whey. The small cost of 
its manufacture guarantees a great demand. Some 
of the leading business men of Burlington have 
formed a stock company, of which Prof. Sabin is 
President, for carrying on the business. 

'81 . — F. A. Fisher has opened a law office in 
Lowell, Mass. 

'81. — C. E. Harding was married to Alice W. 
Philbrick, at St. Lukes Cathedral, Portland, on No- 
vember 4th. 



With sadness we note the death of our esteemed 
and venerable Professor, Dr. Brown, who died at 
Utica, N. Y., on November 4th. The Lewiston 
Journal furnishes the following sketch of his life : 

Rev. Samuel G. Brown, D.D., was born at North 
Yarmouth, Me., in 1813, graduated at Dartmouth, class of 
'31, and from Andover Theological Seminary, class of '37. 
He was Professor of Oratory and Belles-Letters at Dart- 
mouth from 1840 at 1863, of Intellectual Philosophy and 
Political Economy from 1863 to 1867, when he resigned to 
accept the Presidency of Hamilton College. He took the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



119 



place of Professors Sanborn and Noyes at Dartmouth from 
1881 to 1883, and from 1883 to 1885 was Professor of Philos- 
ophy at Bowdoin College. Dr. Brown has published 
varipus addresses and contributed to reviews, his " Life 
of Eufus Choate " being the most notable. He was writ- 
ing a " Life of George P. Marsh " at tlie time of his death. 
His son Robert is a member of the present Senior class at 
Dartmouth. 




'i' Coinell stiuck over into 
Bowdoin's water, and Pennsylvania drew 
away from its place on the east shore toward 
Bowdoin. The Bowdoin captain yelled to 
the Cornell men to "Take care," but on 
they came, and in a moment the oars struck. — Siui- 
day Herald, Jiily 5. 

Brown and Bowdoin remained apparently in a 
straight course, but Cornell struck over into Bow- 
doin's water and Pennsylvania drew away from their 
position on the Shrewsbury shore, locking the Maine 
men in a V pocket. The Bowdoin captain yelled 
to Cornell to "Take care," but the Umbers spurted 
on, and in a moment the oars struck, the shock caus- 
ing a split in the bottom of the Bowdoin shell, 
through which the water oozed for the remainder of 
the race. 

Mr. Lincoln's own opinion, aside from the testi- 
mony given by others at the hearing on Saturday, is 
that the Bowdoin crew kept very nearly a straight 
course during the entire race, and were probably in 
their own water at the time of the foul with Cornell. 
He thinks the claim of Pennsylvania against Bow- 
doin for an alleged foul superficial, particularly be- 
cause the Pennsylvania crew admit they lost nothing 
by it, and the Bowdoin men are positive no such 
foul ever occurred.— IForcesfer Gazette, July 6. 

The professionals to a man say the Maine boys 
will vim.— Worcester Spy, July 3. 

Their (Bowdoin's) quiet, modest bearing makes 
them favorites among the lookers-on, who freely ex- 
press the hope that they will cross the line first.— 
Boston Journal, June 30. 



One of Bowdoin's men thought it funny, as the 
Maine giants had gone over the course last night in 
exactly 8 m. 13 s. This was a nut to crack and Cor- 
nell offset it by assuring somebody that their practice 
had been 8 m. 40 s. — i^. Y. Herald, July 6. 
The mellow days of autumn are here, 
A haze rests on the woods and hills, 
And about this time the student begins 
To pay a fraction of his last year's bills. 

JDSTITIA FIAT. 

We sat on a rock, that is, she did, 

At her feet I in silence reclined, 
For in thinking of lier I scarce heeded 

Lest she my abstraction should mind. 
On a sudden slie spoke to me laughing, 

" On what, pray, are you so intent ? 
If you'll tell me the truth without chaffing, 

I'll give for your thoughts, sir, a cent." 

Tlien I told her, which oldest of stories, 

Your feelings I need not abuse 
By repeating, but glorj' of glories. 

She did not seem quick to refuse. 
So I asked " will you take me ? " grown bolder. 

She whispered " although I repent 
'Twas a bargain." Then head on my shoulder 

She gave what she promised, as-sent. 

— Courant, 

ELEGANT MACKINAW 

STRAW HATS, 

THE BEST QUALITY, 

$1.00, $1.25, $1,50, 

MERRY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND. 

H. V. STACKPOLE, 

FINE BOOTS AND SHOES, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOOTS AND SHOES, 

all STYLES AND PRICES, 

*AT JACKSON^S.* 

LAWN-TENNIS SHOES CONSTANTLY 
ON HAND. 

EEPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 

No. 2 Odd Fellows' Block, 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



R 



CIGARETTE 
Smokers who 

are wiUingato 
paya little more 
for Cigarettes 

than the price 



charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, wfll 
find the RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO AX.I. OTHERS. 
They are made from the Ijrlglitest, most 
delicately tla-vored, and blgliest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are abso- 
lutely VFltbont adulteration or drugs. 

lAIGHTCUTi^g: 

We use the Ctenulne Frencb Rice Paper 

of oijr own direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
COT No. 1 — on each Ci gare tte, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
original brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or bos of ■ 
Hicliinoiid 
Straight Cat 
Cigarettes 

bears the I 
signature of " 



R IGARETT 

allenTginter 



BIANUFACTUBBEB, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO . E. WOO DBURY, Proprietor. 

I1]aine Ceni^ral R. ]^. 

On and after Oct. 12th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, S.lo, 11.2.5 A.M., 2.38, 4.45 and 6.25 p.m., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.43. 
For Rockland, 8.15 a.m., 3.38 p.m. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.40 P.M., and 

13.35 (night). 
For Lewiston, 8.15 A.M., 3.45 and 6.33 p.m., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. (mixed), and 3.45 p.m. 
For Augusta and Waterville, 8.20 A.M., 3.40 P.M., 12.45 every 

night, and on Saturdays only at 6.35 p.m. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 (night). 
For Bangor, Ellsworth, Mt. Desert FeiTy, St. Stephen, Houlton, 

Vanceboro, and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Bar Harbor, 12.45 (night). 

Note.— The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
iston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun- 
day, but do not connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, or 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sun- 
day morning. 

PATSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BooTHBY, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 6, 1885. 

C. L. York, Old CollegeBarber, 

Over Jq,olison's Store, Give me a call. 



NOTICE. 

BEWARE OF COUNTERFEITS AND IMITATIONS. 
Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and pure Rico Paper, are rolled by the highest 
class of skilled labor, and wan-anted free from flavoring or 
impurities. 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a fao-simile of Kinney 
Bros.' signatuee. 

KINWEY^ TOBACCO CO. 

StrCCESSOR TO KINNET BROS. 

NEW YORK. 

Tlie following are our well-known 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Caporal, Sweet Caporal, St. James k, Caporal J, St. 

James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES 

SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

ing very popular. Manufactured by special request. 



§®¥'i®ii |@11®|0 ||iiliil ^'©pifflmeit 

The Sixty-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 4th, 1886, 
and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Eev. Wji. DeWitt Hyde, President: Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obsteti-ics and 
Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M. , 
Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. Gerrish, M. D., Anat- 
omy; Franklin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemistry; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinica] Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henry H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Young, Public Hygiene ; 
Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealey, MD., Demonstrator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



MIXTURES FOR PIPE OR CIGARETTE- 
THREE KINGS, Turkish, Perique and Virginia. 
iVIELLOW MIXTURE, Turkish and Perique. 
TURKISH and VIRGINIA. 
PERIQUE and VIRGINIA. 
GENUINE TURKISH. 
Flake Cuts Especially Adapted for the Pipe. 
VANITY FAIR. OLD GOLD. 

Fragrant Vanity Fair, Superlative, and Cloth of Gold Cigarettes 

ALWAYS FRESH, CLEAN AND SWEET. 

Our cigarettes were never so fine as now, they cannot he sur- 
passed for purity and excellence. Only the purest rice paper 
used. 14 FIRST -PRIZE MEDAXS. 

WM. S. KIMBALL & CO. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A, G. Tenney. 
Teems, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



OOLLEGTE BOOKSTORE. 

We have constantly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 

BYRON STEVJBIVS. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Wsm^h. astd ^alt Meatus 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snov^-'s Grocery Storo 

«WSpecial Kates to Student Clubs.-ffiS 






2 m^nni} Ihtk, 



Inil 



^£^= o, mt^^wmow^:^ 



DEALER IN 



m§ ©E ^®mm 



CEDAE STREET, BKUNSVPICK, ME. 
Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 
Magnifying Glasses. 

^= Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



Successor to Atwood & Wentworth, 



-DEALER IN- 



Dl^t^O^IDS, WATCHES, JEWELRY, 

and importers of French Clocks, Opera Glasses, etc. 
Fine Watch Repairing ; Gold and Silver Platinc/. 

509 CONGRESS ST., Portland, Me. 

ALL THE STUDENTS SHOULD BUY 

THEIR 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 

AT 

Frank E. Roberts' Boot & Shoe Store, 

COK. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Totvn Clock. 



-DEALER IN- 



Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 



Merehmmi Tmiior., 

DUNLAP BLOCK, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT 



BICYCLE 
BASES A LL 

TEN-NIS 
BOATING 

SPECIAL RATES TO CLUBS. 



SHIRTS, 
STOCKINGS, 
fEIiSEYS. 



OWEN, MOORE & CO.. 

Portland, Maine. 



i«,,„j* ® nii 



MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



Wja. % FIEIiD, 



M^N^6E1^. 




OTTAWA 



Cushing's Island, 
Portland, Me. 

3!-I. S- GIBSOIST. 



239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. MERKILL. A. KEITH. 



DEALEK IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 WATER ST., AUGITSTA, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PURITY SWEET CIGRAETTES. 

THE PUREST, MILDEST, AND BEST CIGARETTE ON THE MARKET. 

PUBE, BRIGHT VIRGINIA TOBACCO AND PUREST BICE PAPER. 



FOR THE FINEST MADE TRY OUR 

STRAIGHT WEB CIGARETTES. 

MANUFACTURED FROM THE FINEST BRIGHT TOBACCO GROWN. WITH 

TUBKISH MIXTURE. 



PURITY SMOKING TOBACCO. 

THE FINEST, PUREST, AND BEST SMOKING TOBACCO MADE. 



RALEIGH CUT PLUG SMOKING. 

THE ORIGINAL, PUREST, AND THE BEST. 

We guarantee all not injurious. Only a trial and you will be convinced. 

PACE & SIZES,, Manufacturers, Richmond, Va. 

ON SALE AT FIELD'S. 

rr^^E 



* TRAVELERS * 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 



OF HA-RTFORD, CON^N^., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCf $1 i, 000, 000, and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 

Indemnifying the Business or Professional Man or Farmer for h: 
Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidental Injury, 



A PPTT^'F^IVT' "POT Tf^TTi^S indemnifying the_Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 



and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only $;5.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each $1,000, with $5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDKNT policies since 1864 have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. ^ ^ . , 

Issues T TT?T? T)/^T T<^TT?d of every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 
also Jui-C -Ej X vJJUiVyiJjJO Personal Benefit. 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Oflice at Hartford. 
JAS. 6. BATTERSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary, JOHN E, MORRIS, Asst. Secretary 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



!»• 



BK.xjisrs"v^ici2:, i»ie. 



Special Rates to Classes i Students 



Interior Views Made to Order. 



A Good Assortment of Bruns^irick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vie^srs ; also College Vieitrs. 



ca-IjXj .^m-13 :e:2s:.a.3s^I3^e o-cris -^xroia^- 



Successor to A. Eoemer & Son, 
THE LAKGEST HISTOEICAL 

COSTUMER^ARMORER 

IN AMERICA. 

Also Costumer for all the priucipal theati'es : Fifth Avenue 
Theatre, Grand Opera House, Star Theatre, Madison Square 
Theatre, Nlblo's Garden Theatre, Mew Park Theatre, People's 
Theatre, 14th Street Theatre. 

No. 8 UNION SQUARE, NEW YOEK. 



Go to W. B. Woodard's 

To buy your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 
sfeci-A-Xj xs-^tss to ST-cr:n>E:iTT cij"cr:BS- 
Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

c. E. TOAv:NrsEisrD, 

DEALER IN 

CHOICE GROCERIES, 

Canned Good.s, State Prison Harnesses, Fruits, Confec- 
tionery, Tobacco and Cigars, 
Corner Main and Cleaveland Streets, BRUNSWICK. 

N. B.— SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENT CLUBS. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat .and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blanli Book Work ot Every Description done to Order. 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 
' NEW DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, IVIaine. 



ATParker 

J 64 High St 



ALLEN & CO., Portland, 

Having moved to their new store, 204 Middle Street, Cor. of Plum, are constantly opening 
rich and elegant goods for gentlemen's wear. 

ihoicG lorGign fabrics low iisplapd lij iur tailoring iepartment. 

The finest-made up Clothing to be seen in the State now exhibited in our 



Novelties for Gentlemen 's Dress in Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves, Neckwear, Canes, and Silk Umbrellas 
, ' in Seasonable Styles to be found in our 

Furnishing D^partm snt. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

204 MIDDLE STREET, CORNER OF PLUM, PORTLAND. 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Sts., PORTLAND, ME., 

WOULD RESPECTFULLY CALL THE ATTENTION OF 

Bnyers ol Furniture, fiemets, Beiiqg, Parlor Stoves, Mes, &g., 

To the Enormous Stock of House Furnishings at the Portland Store. Being Mauufacturers, 

intending purchasers can see the styles and select their own coverings for Parlor Furniture, and have it made 

to order for the same price. We keep enormous quantities of Upholstery Goods in the fJostou Store, and 

full lines of Samples. Here our prices ou Parlor Suites range from $35.00 in Hair Cloth to 

S;375.00 in Silk or Mohair Plushes. 

CHAMBEK rURNITUBE. DRAPERY of every description made to order in the 

, „ Boston store. Orders taken here and designs and samples 

We have in stock in our three stores 87 rtitferent pat- shown, 
terns of Chamber Suites, manufactured from all the popu- ' -n a -dt nu aTn-wipa 

lar woods, viz.: Pine, Ash, Walnut, Cherry, Basswood, tr^a,u<ji& GiUVJiO. 

and Mahogany, ranging in price from $18.00 to .15400.00. Special attention is requested to our Parlor Stove De- 

We also have all kinds, sizes, and quantities of Bedsteads, partment, as we believe we have the best line to select 

Bureaus, Commodes, etc. Spring Beds, Cot Beds, Lounge from in Maine. Prices .jJl.OO to $40.00. 
Beds, Sofa Beds, Mantel Beds, etc. Mattresses of every 

kind and quality, from an excelsior at $2.00 to a pure STOVES AND RANGES. 

bleached South American curled horse hair at $25.00. „ .. , „ . ,, , , ,, . 

Our line of Ranges comprises all the latest and best in 
("•ATj-DTPT •mrT> 4 13 fnwPTMT the market, including the " Kew Tariff " and "Quaker," 
CA±t±'±.J. UJiJ-AJtimJiiNJ.. which are considered superior to anything yet produced. 
§75,000 worth of Cottons, Cotton and Wools, All-Wool AVrile for cuts of these two Ranges. Prices $15.00, $20.00, 
Extras, Tapestry, Brussels, Body Brussels, Velvets, Wil- .$22.50, $25.00, .$27.50, .$29.00, -$30.00, $35.00, $38.00, and Up- 
tons, etc., at our usual Kock-Bottom Prices. Any of these wards to $05.00. These prices include all the ware, pipe, 
can be- selected at the Portland store. SHADES and and zinc. 



Any of the above goods sold for Cash or on our Special Contract System, at 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Streets, Portland, Me. 

Branch, of the Great Nassau Hall House Furnishing Store, 827 Washington Street, Boston. 

B. A. ATKINSON & CO., 



ISA.A.C C. A.TICINS01V, IManager. 




•=-^»iS*1885. ««5«f-.- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY AIAj demands. 

Try the new " Harvard " and " Duplex " Burner 

IS PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENQEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



All the Late Publications in stock. Text-Books of all kinds, 
nd MBBICAL WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 



474 Congress St., 



opp. PreWe House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

]i%. 5 0DD EELIiGW^ BLOCK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 




m 

® 

IH 
O 

S— 

P- 



HONETIC SHORTHAND. %^e°t°h°o«d^'^ 

For Self-Instruction. Containin^' all the late improvc- 
niems. I'rice !j;l..W. .'^ijccial Instruction liy Mail, S'J-WI. 
.Senil stamp lor Specimen I'ases and Illustrated I'.amplilet. 



P 



\V. W. OSGOODIiY, Publisher, Uochester, N. Y'. 



The New Styles in 

In all colors, are now ready. An elegant line of New York 
Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

1 ELLIOTT'S, t 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 



124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



E» H O T O G- E- A. I' :e3: S 
Made at Higgins' Ground-Floor Studio, Bath, BrOWne'S Hair Dressing ROOHIS, 

0(1(1 Fellows' Block, Over Davis' Grocery Store, 

Main street, Brunswick. S. W. BROWNE, Proprietor. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. MERRYMAB, PHARMACISTv 

lllOS, MIDICIIIS. 

Fancy afll Toilet Articles, Clprsl Toliacco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Book-Seller, Stationer, Book-Binder, 

AND BLANK-BOOK MANUFACTUREK, 

Opposite City Hall, Center St., Bath, Maine. 

They do say_, and it is a fact, tliat Lenten & Neagle's is the 
cheapest place in this county. Their assortment of trunks and 
bags cannot be beaten. No shop-worn poods, but direct from the 
manufacturers. They have the largest line of whips ever shown 
in this town. Jobbmg of all kinds promptly attended to. 
Trunks and bags neatly repaired. 

HABNESS MAKERS & CAKBIAGE TRIMMERS, 
MAIN STKEET, Store formerly occupied by Washburiie. 



J. S. TOWI^E, 

PHARMACEUTIST. 

PUKE DEUGS, MEDICINES, FANCY AND TOILET AK- 

TICLBS; ALSO A FINE LINE OF CHOICE CIGARS 

AND CIGARETTES. PRESCRIPTIONS a Specialty. 

Main Street, Near Bowdoin College. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
menceraents, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIIVIIVIER, Director, 

WO Middle Street, - - - - Portland, IVIe. 



OVER BOARDMAN'S STORE, MAIN STREET. 

— h B. G. DENNISON, H— 

Brunswick Book - Store, 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily Papers; Circu- 
lating Library, l(iOO Volumes; Base-Ball and La Crosse; Pict- 
ures and Picture frames; Frames made to order at short notice. 



Dealer In MM ani Fancy (Jrocerles. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 



/\ CLUP I^OAD i^^CE 







til iiiiiiii 



(EstaliUshed ISTT.) 



Institute Building, Huntington Ave., Boston. 

ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 
OTHER TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp at above address. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

CfEsar,- Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
^neid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography,— Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Eegdlae Examinations fok Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commeuce- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Hallowell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ol the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQUERED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terras. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DEC. 2, 1885. 



No. 10. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE TEAR BT THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

W. V. Wentworth, '86, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
J. H. Davis, '86. Levi Turner, Jr., '86. 

A. A. Knowlton, '86. C. W. Tuttlb, '86. 

J. C. Parker, '86. C. B. Burleigh, '87. 

H. L. Tatlor, '86. E. C. Plummer, '87. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Busiuess Editor. Com- 
municati'^ns in regard to all other matters should be dii-ected to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 

Vol. XV., No. 10.— December 2, 1885. 

Perennial Youth 121 

Editorial Notes, 121 

The Pharisee, 122 

Suggestions, 123 

A Vision or a Nightmare? 124 

Some Curious Old Expressions, 125 

A Freshman Bender 126 

Theta Delta Chi 126 

CoLLEGii Tabula, 127 

Personal, 129 

Editors' Table, ! . 130 



PERENNIAL YOUTH. 

She v^as a college widow, 

And I a verdant green. 
Who thought her quite the fairest fay, 

E'er mortal man had seen. 

For four long years I lugged her round 

To every ball and show ; 
Our plighted faith I thought the height 

Of happiness below. 

Yes, that I never married her, 

Perhaps is quite as well, 
For though I'm getting old and gray 

She's still a college belle. 




For many years the Bowdoin collec- 
tion of valuable drawings, one hundred and 
forty-two in number, has been kept in two 
portfolios. That they may be in a condition 
to be examined without injury, Prof. John- 
son has had them mounted and placed in 
mahogany frames, which are kept in the two 
large walnut cases recently given to the col- 
lege for that purpose. The same gentleman 
has also prepared a catalogue, from the in- 
troduction to which we quote : 

The Bowdoin drawings consist exclusively of the 
collection made in Europe before 1811, by the Hon- 
orable James Bowdoin, Minister Plenipotentiary to 
the Court of Spain and, later, Associate Minister to 
the Court of France. No catalogue of the collection 
has ever existed, so far as can be learned, and the 
pi-esent one, the first to be published, is merely an 
account of the drawings in their present condition. 
Every mark and signature is recorded, as well as the 
materials used and the dimensions in inches. 

A large-paper edition of a few copies has 
been issued, illustrated by photographs of 
twelve of these drawings. The catalogues 
may be obtained for twenty-five cents, the 
illustrated issue for three dollars, net, at the 
library or Treasurer's office. 

It is hoped to publish soon Parts II. and 
III., paintings and casts. 

Probably all who have seen the collection 
of paintings belonging to the college, have 



122 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



regretted that they were not so arranged, 
that their merit might be better appreciated. 
Prof. Johnson, curator of the art collections, 
has placed the choicest of these paintuigs in 
the north Aving of the chapel, where the 
entire collection was some years ago, first 
protecting the windows by a heavy wire 
screening. The Stuart portraits are in the 
small room, among them those of Jefferson 
and Madison. These were painted from life, 
and the great artist came here to copy from 
them. 

TMs change is a vast improvement. The 
light is much better in the wing than in the 
old gallery, and the increased room thus af- 
forded obviates, to a great extent, the crowd- 
ing which has caused many of the paintings 
to be placed where they could with difficulty 
be seen. 

This summer Tutor Moody was so fortu- 
nate as to obtain two lithographs represent- 
ing Bowdoin as it appeared in 1828 and 1840. 
Photographs have been made from these 
pictures, and are now in the possession of 
the college. 



President Hyde has inaugurated what we 
believe to be a new custom at Bowdoin, by 
inviting the Senior class to a reception at his 
house. About as many Brunswick ladies 
were present, and the unanimous verdict of 
the class is that it was an exceedingly en- 
joyable evening. 



Ever since we entered college, and we 
know not how much longer, there has been 
manifest among the students a strong desire 
that the Thanksgiving recess should extend 
until Tuesday morning, instead of Monday 
morning. At the last Jury meeting the mat- 
ter was brought forward, with the result that 
the Faculty granted the extension requested, 
much to the gratification of the undergradu- 
ates. Under the old order a student who re- 



sided near Brunswick could remain at home 
Sunday, returning upon the Monday morn- 
ing train, while the less fortunate ones were 
required to return Saturday and attend di- 
vine services here Sunday. Many, however, 
have always felt that their vacation should 
be as long as that of the few, and have not 
returned until Monday noon. This year all 
have been treated alike, and practically but 
half a day has been lost. 



At this time of year the fact becomes 
painfully evident that mud is not, in Bruns- 
wick at least, an imaginary article. Until 
we can have some different material for the 
college paths, it is of course useless to hope 
for improvement on the campus, but some of 
the street crossings are in a disgraceful con- 
dition. One of the worst is that from the 
campus to Adams Hall. Mud holes and a 
depression about a hundred feet long, which 
is always filled with water in wet weather, 
combine to make the place nearly impassable 
except with rubber boots. If the town will 
do nothing in this case, the two upper classes, 
who have recitations in Adams Hall, and, 
probably, several of the Faculty, would be 
thankful if the college would do enough to 
enable us to reach the Chemical Lecture 
Room without wet feet. 



THE PHARISEE. 
An urbane smile his face adorns, 

He walks with languid ease, 
The universe was made for him 

As every mortal sees. 

To find aught good in other men 
He's surely not the man, 

But sees in every one he meets 
A " sinner and a publican." 

The evils of his brother men 
With him are virtues rare. 

Where other minds are prejudiced 
His mind is always fair. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



123 



He thanks the Lord he's not as weak 

As his poor fellow-man, 
He always sees the right of things 

Though others never can. 

Poor fool ! the mists of life shall soon 

Be lifted round your head, 
When with the vulgar throng you sleep 

Amid the myriad dead. 

When resurrection's trump shall wake 
The souls of slumbering man, 

The Pharisee may then be found 
" A sinner and a publican." 



SUGGESTIONS. 

It seems to be the fashion to find fault 
with, and pick flaws in the college curricu- 
lum. We have no intention of doing 
either in the strict sense, but we wish merely 
to give an opinion growing out of our per- 
sonal experience during Junior, and the part 
of Senior year, tints far gone over. Junior 
year is of very great interest and value, and 
it is iipon entering it that one seems to 
emerge from the basis studies, and to ad- 
vance into those that have a more practical 
bearing and application. It is in Junior 
year that one begins his studies in the 
sciences, and with good work gains solid and 
useful acquisition. So far, so good. 

At the end of Junior year if a student 
has created a live interest in Chemistry, 
Mineralogy, or Physics, he is happy in the 
anticipation of another year, viz., his Senior, 
in which he may carry on advanced work, 
and gain a much more extended knowledge 
of the subject most interesting and most use- 
ful to him. In his Senior year one may, if 
he is of the right stuff, do a good deal 
towards finishing off the rough skeleton 
formed during Junior j-ear. 

How is it with Senior year? In a large 
measure the studies of this year are entirely 
different from those of the course hitherto 
passed over. We wish to speak especially 
of Mental Philosophy. English Literature, 



and Political Science. No one, if he be at 
all thoughtful, can fail to see the great good 
derived from a careful study of all of these 
branches of the college curriculum. Can 
one get what he ought out of them in one 
academic year? It seems as though our 
course might be so arranged that some one 
or more of these studies could be entered 
ujjon during Junior year. Let us take as an 
illustration the course in English Literature. 
Granted that our lectures on this subject 
cover all of the ground that is of value, and 
that they embody all that is of possible in- 
terest to the student, then they are sufficient, 
and one year is enough time to place upon 
English Literature. Our course in Literature 
is one of the greatest interest, and every 
lecture is looked forward to by those who 
have been so fortunate as to elect this sub- 
ject, with eagerness, but it is impossible to 
gain any adequate knowledge of the study 
in hand in one year. Indeed, it requires 
many years. However, be that as it may, if 
this course were begun during Junior year 
the student might, in his Senior year, follow 
some of the walks, and linger along some of 
the delightful paths that are pointed out in 
the inimitable manner that characterizes our 
lectures in Literature. 

What we have tried to say in regard to 
the literature we think is equally true of the 
courses in Mental Philosophy and Political 
Economy. Can the student hope to hardly 
enter upon the field of philosophy in a few 
months' course? He may go over the 
ground, covered by an ordinary text-book, 
but he will have little time to carry out even 
a limited course of reading upon the most 
subtle branch of human knowledge. 

Political Economy is intended to teach 
lessons that will be of the greatest practical 
value to men after they have completed the 
college course. It is crowded with the two 
subjects before mentioned, and with others 
besides, into nine months. Is justice done 



124 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



then, and might not some change be made 
that would improve matters ? 

It seems to be absurd to argue that the 
mind of a Junior is not mature enough to 
grasp the truths of Mental Philosophy, or 
Political Economjr, or to appreciate the 
beauties of the English Literature. As 
though the student's mind is changed so 
during the idle, sultry months of the vaca- 
tion intervening between Junior and Senior 
years, that he suddenly becomes possessed 
of new mental energies, and can better ap- 
prehend the subjects we have in view ! The 
mental powers are not strengthened in such a 
jerky way, but are the gradual development 
of a careful course of training. Can we not 
have some of the labor of Senior year profit- 
ably come earlier in the course ? 



A VISION OR A NIGHTMARE? 

Say, I wish to talk with you a minute. 
I had a deuced queer dream last night, and 
I want to know what you think of it. You 
see I'd been reading a little in the evening, 
and my thoughts were running on these 
lines from Southey's " Battle of Blenheim " : 

"But what good came of it at last? " 

Quoth little Peterkin ; 
" Why, that I cannot tell," said he ; 
" But 'twas a famous victory." 

I thought I saw a beautiful apartment, in 
which was situated a throne of exquisite 
workmanship. On the throne sat a lovely 
woman. Her well-rounded form was clothed 
with artistic taste, while the dazzle of beau- 
tiful gems added brilliancy to grace. By 
her side stood another female whose form 
lacked the symmetry of youth. Her gar- 
ments, too, showed less of taste and more 
of wear. Instead of the piquant expression 
of the former, her features bore traces of 
care and disappointment, and she looked 
years older than the one occupying the 
throne, with Avhom she conversed in tones of 



reproof. While the two women were thus en- 
gaged, an old gray-haired man in military 
habit was ushered into the room. His face, 
despite the bronze of exposure, showed livid 
scars that gave evidence of dire warfare. 
Addressing the fairer of the two women as 
Fame, he told of campaigns, of arduous duty 
in deadlj^ swamps, he told of a family depend- 
ent on his slender income and besought ad- 
vancement whereby they might be benefited. 
With a half contemptuous toss of the head, 
fair Fame spoke, " I've not heard 5^011 men- 
tioned by the Hon. Mr. So and So, nor have 
j'ou shown me as your patron, any person of 
aristocratic or financial repute, audit wouldn't 
be quite tlie proper thing to promote you 
under such conditions." The veteran turned 
to the other woman who stood near, and 
addressing her as Justice, entreated her for 
the sake of those he loved, to interpose in his 
behalf. " Alas," replied Justice, with a 
mournful shake of the head, " I can do noth- 
ing. On hearing this, Fame laughingly said. 
" Do you not see, dull sir, that she is grow- 
ing old ? " "I am still young and retain my 
charms, for I have the secret of 3^outh." 
" She, poor thing, has lost her charms, and 
with them the power to sway men." Just at 
this moment a young stripling was admitted 
to the apartment. He bore himself with ease 
and well-bred conceit. Fame greeted him 
with a smile of welcome, and asked him if 
his father, the Senator, was well. The youth 
said that he was, and that he sent his greet- 
ings to her, hoping that she would give his 
son a prominent position in the army. " Have 
you received a military education ? " asked 
she. " Well, j'ou see, said the youth, " I 
attended West Point for a time, but I wasn't 
used to being bossed, it doesn't run in the 
blood, you know ; and so having a little dis- 
agreement with the ofiicer in charge, I left 
the second month of my course." "Oh," 
replied she, "if that's all, you shall have 
your wish." She then, in the presence of 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



125 



the poor old veteran, conferred the desired 
degree. These parties had no sooner left the 
room, than a care-worn yonth entered, whose 
heavy eye-lids and bowed form bespoke the 
midnight toil of stndent life. . " Whence came 
you, sir, and for what purpose ? " said Fame, 
with a frown; "I wish to receive no more 
callers." " But," said the youth, " I bring 
papers from a certain college, saying that my 
toil should receive honorable award." " Well, 
I suppose you can have your wish, but I shall 
give you an old second-hand one for impos- 
ing your ghoul-like face upon me at this un- 
seemly hour. Pompey, show this person out, 
and admit no more this evening." Soon 
words were exchanged outside between the 
servant and a new caller. " You can't go in 
dar," said the servant, " and if you doan git 
out ob dis, I'll kick yer out froo de door." 
The caller still importuned and Pomp was 
heard to execute his threat. All was still 
for a time. Fame indulged in a little yawn, 
while poor Justice hung her head in dejection. 
Just then a whisper issued from the key-hole 
of a back door behind the throne. Fame 
started to her feet. " Who's there ? " she said. 
"Dear Fame," said the whisper, "I am Mr. 
Billings, of Billingsgate. You know Bil- 
liugs-ur. I've received certificates from a 
neighboring coUege-ur, and I wish you to see 
them. Your servant was very rude-ur^" 
but Fame interrupted him with, " No, I don't 
know Mr. Billings, but such perseverance 
deserves reward," and turning to Justice, she 
said: "Perhaps he's nice looking." Then, 
unlocking the door out of woman's curiosity, 
she admitted a person who wore a stereo- 
typed smile as he clasped one of Fame's fair 
hands in his, and squeezed it with a clinging 
pressure. " Ah, this is Mr. Billings, isn't it ? " 
she said. " You surely don't bring proofs of 
scholarship. I doubt not you have some 
ability, but, judging from your looks, the 
Muses would refuse you their presence, for 
fear of being wheedled out of their ear-rings, 



to say nothing of portemonnaies. I always 
said these old college professors got near- 
sighted with hard study, ha ! ha ! I see it all. 
Fakirs at examination, opening your book 
behind another man in recitation, getting a 
ten-strike instead of a dead by means of a 
little cool suavity. Well that's too good, 
you shall receive a bran new award set in 
jewels. Such nerve is admirable, ha! ha!" 
I awoke in my easy chair with a merrj^ 
laugh ringmg in my ears. " Say, old fellow, 
should you call that a vision or a night- 
mare?" 



SOME CURIOUS OLD EXPRESSIONS. 

Old King Coggnack of Wrummery was 
a fat, jolly monarch, and a jolly, fat man was 
he. At the banquet and feast he ruled pre- 
eminent, distinguished alike for bluff good- 
humor and for his ability to store up under 
his " vescut " more hard cider than any 
other person in the realm. He it was who 
first instituted the famous " drinking bout," 
since become so popular. 

King Coggnack, at the time of which we 
write, was the champion, having defeated 
the former champion by a keg and a half 
and four touchdowns. 

For a good many years he held the cham- 
pionship against all comers ; but at last was 
defeated by a little neighboring prince who 
didn't measure half as much around the 
waist as he did. 

In this contest, the old king, finding his 
former nerve deserting him, Avas compelled 
to seek the under side of the table round. 

Crestfallen, the king called to his Lord 
of the Bunk, Mourzouk, "Ho! Ah, there, 
ingrate ! " " Stay there I " said Zouky, as 
tenderly depositing the king in the coal-hod 
he carried him to bed. 

Lycurgus is responsible to a suffering 
humanity for the phrase " come off." When 
he introduced that hearty and sinew-produc- 



126 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ing chowder known as the "black broth" 
among the Greeks, he was accustomed to sit 
at the head of the mess (so called from the 
"broth") and view the table through an 
opera-glass. 

The time for eating was limited to four 
three-minute rounds, Marquis of Queensbury 
Rules. Being inclined to gorge themselves 
with the broth, an overseer was necessary. 
Exactly at the expiration of the time limit 
Lycurgus would say, " Come off, boys, you've 
had enough." They came. 

One day as William the Silent (familiarly 
known as " Bill the Mum " ) was riding by a 
newly plowed field, wet and muddy by a re- 
cent rain, his new Derby was blown off his 
head directly into the middle of it. The " Si- 
lent" had paid |3.50 that very morning for 
the hat and didn't like to lose it, so he sent 
one of the body guard after it. The guard 
obtained the hat but returned somewhat 
worse for wear, his boots having the appear- 
ance of having snow-plow attachments. 

William is said to have laughed at his 
plight and said, "What do j'oii want, the 
earth ? " 

King Pinchem, of Weighbak, was a very 
bad king. He oppressed and ill-treated his 
subjects and wouldn't allow them even to 
gather chestnuts in his forests. A great re- 
bellion was the result and the king was 
obliged to flee to the woods. There he re- 
mained concealed subsisting on herring. At 
last, feeling the need of a change of diet, he 
sallied forth to see what he could find. 

He was caught stealing a minced-pie from 
the pantry of a neighboring castle, and was 
sentenced to be beheaded. At the execu- 
tion, it being noticed that he was no ordi- 
nary thief, he was asked how he came to be 
in such a plight. 

"Chestnuts," laconically murmured the 
king, as his head rolled into the gutter. 



A FRESHMAN BENDER. 

Tavo Freshmen were regaling themselves 
at the midnight train. " Let's have some 
cranberry pie," suggested one. The other's 
face grew pallid, and his teeth chattered, as 
he shudderingiy replied : " No, thanks, I ate 
a piece the other night, and I had a terrible 
dream. It makes my blood run cold to think 
of it." 

" What did you dream ? " 

"Don't ask me. It was perfectly hor- 
rible. I dreamed I got er— er — " 

" Murdered? " 

"No; a Bead in Grreek!/" 

" Great Scott ! Is that so ? Then I guess 
I won't finish this pie. Do you s'pose I've 
eaten enough to make me dream that?" 

"I don't know. I hope not." 

"Let's get a cigarette and go out and ex- 
ercise a while." 

"A cigarette!!!" 

"Yes, come old boy, you know it isn't 
often we go on a bust." 

" Well, seeing we're in for a spree, I'll 
take one, but really chummy, we musn't go 
it so steep again." 

And, leaving the pie paid for but uneaten , 
the two reckless j'ouths wandered out behind 
a neighboring barn — where no man could see 
them — and gave themselves up to the reck- 
less dissipation of a cigarette, which they 
smoked by turns. 



THETA DELTA CHI. 

The thirty -ninth annual convention of 
the Theta Delta Chi Fraternity was held un- 
der the auspices of the Psi Charge of Hamil- 
ton College, at Windsor Hotel, New York 
city, November 18th, 19th, and 20th. 

The delegates were called to order at 
10.30 A.M., the 18th, with Seward A. Simons, 
President of the Grand Lodge in the chair. 
The business of the first session was of a 
preliminary kind. 

At the afternoon meeting the roll-call 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



127 



showed a full attendance, which was charac- 
teristic of all the siibsequent meetings. A 
good number of visitors were also in attend- 
ance. 

The amount of business transacted during 
the three days' meeting of the convention 
was exceedingly large. Many of the dele- 
gates who were present considered it one of 
the most basiness-like meetings in the his- 
tory of the fraternity. 

At 8.30 P.M., November 20th, upwards of 
ninety members attended the thirty-ninth 
annual banquet at Delmonico's private din- 
ing hall. 

The Hon. Willis S. Paine, of New York 
city, presided over the post-prandial exer- 
cises, and his lieutenants were : Orator, the 
Hon. Austin A. Yates, of Schenectady; Poet, 
the Eev. Lewis G. Halsey, Farmer's Village, 
N. Y. ; Historian, William L. Stone, of New 
York city; and Biographer, the Hon. Frank- 
lin Birdge, also of New York city. 

There Avere something like a dozen formal 
toasts drank and responded to, and it was 
late when the jolly assemblage dispersed, to 
meet again in 1886, at Boston, under the 
auspices of the Eta Charge of Bowdoin Col- 
lege. 




' ' I have a father, "hummed the 
Maiden, soft and low ; 
" A father ! " thought the Freshman, 
And he started up to go. 

She scarce could keep from laughing 
When he kissed her lily hand, 

And, as he passed into the night. 
Sang, " in the promised land." 

H. R. Fling, '86, has begun a singing school at 
Bungernuck. 

Professor (explaining to the class the intense 
heat on the planet Mercury) — "The heat is so great 



that on the hottest days in summer the temperature 
would be sufficient to melt lead. The inhabitants — " 
Student (interrupting him) — " Would Mercury be 
melted?" 

Joseph Cook delivered an interesting lecture in 
the Town Hall last week. He made a reply to the 
materialists and took for his subject: " Does Death 
End All?" Mr. Cook was the guest of President 
Hyde while in town. 

The following officers have been chosen by the 
Senior class : President, C. W. Tuttle, Hancock, 
N. H. ; Marshal, W. W. Kilgore, North Newry; 
Orator, W. V. Wentworth, Rockland; Poet, J. H. 
Davis, Bangor; Historian, F. L. Smith, Waterboro : 
Chaplain, A. R. Butler, Portland ; Opening Address, 
L. Turner, Jr., Somerville ; Parting Address, P. A. 
Knight, Portland; Odist, C. A. Byram, Freeport. 

Committee of Arrangements : 1st, 

; 2d, W. J. Home, Berlin, N. H. ; 3d, J. C. 



Parker, East Lebanon. Committee on Pictures : 0. 
A. Davis, Portsmouth, N. H. 

The following verse, from Lord Byron's "Don 
Juan," is respectfully dedicated to the musical (?) 
members of '88 : 

Place me on Suuium's marbled steep. 
Where nothing save the waves and I 
May hear our mutual murmurs sweep ; 
There, swan-like, let me sing and die. 

The class of '88, we understand, are intending to 
have a supper at the end of the year. Such has been 
the intention of a number of other classes before 
them, but when the time came there was no one to 
go. We hope '88 will be more successful. 

The Thanksgiving recess has been somewhat 
lengthened this year so as to allow students to spend 
Sunday away from town. The vacation extends 
from Wednesday till the following Tuesday. 

The number who go to the dancing school seem 
to promise a lively winter in the way of germans, 
dances, etc. The York seems to be all the r.age this 
year and several new figures are introduced into the 
square dances. There are now twenty-five couples 
at the dancing school, and several more have signi- 
fied their intention of going the last half. 

'Tis now the social Freshmen hie 

Themselves unto the rink ; 
For it is there that damsels fair 

May best be mashed, they think. 
And now and then a bloody Soph., 

With hay-seed in his hair, 
Is to be found skylarking 'round 

Amid the Freshmen there. 

The Junior class have been recently engaged in 



128 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



dissecting star-worms. Tliey have at length discov- 
ered where US occurs free in natui'e. 

The Independent containing President Hyde's 
article on "The New Economic Man," had quite a 
sale among the students. 

The electric lights have been placed in both 
laboratories and are now in worliing order. A tele- 
phone has also been put up connecting the qualita- 
tive and quantitative laboratories. 

The class officers for '88 are as follows : Presi- 
dent, G. Gary ; Vice-President, A. G. Dresser ; Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, Bradford ; Historian, M. 
Smithwick; Poet, W. W. Woodman; Orator, J. 
Williamson, Jr.; Toast-Master, R. W. Goding; 
Prophet, P. F. Marston. Gommittee on Odes : 1st, 
A. W. Tolman ; 2d, E. S. Barret; 8d, F. Smitliwick. 
Gommittee of Arrangements: E. S. Barret, L. H. 
Ghapman, J. H. Maxwell. 

A number of the young ladies from the Normal 
School at Farmington were in town last week and 
visited the college. 

The examinations for the Senior class in Political 
Economy and Psychology at the end of this term will 
not be final. These studies will be carried over till 
the end of the year, when an examination will be 
held in them, as well as in the studies of the next 
two terms. 

The Junior class officers are : Pi'esident, J. V. 
Lane ; Orator, L. V. Varney ; Poet, E. C. Plummer ; 
Ghaplain, Robinson ; Odist, S. B. Fowler; Marshal, 
C. M. Austin. 

A memorial window is to be placed in the Con- 
gregational Church to Professor William Smyth. 
The window is to be a companion to the one placed 
there in memory of Professor Packard, and will have 
the figures of the evangelists, Matthew and Mark. 

The base-ball men are ahead of the boating men 
this year and a subscription paper for the nine has 
already been passed around. 

Prof. Garmichael has made an assay of some of 
the ore taken from the mine recently discovered in 
Farmington, and finds it to be quite rich in silver, 
and assaying, besides, a small amount of gold. 

Prof Johnson has just issued a very fine cata- 
logue of the sketches in the possession of the col- 
lege. The catalogue contains twelve photographs. 
The edition is limited, only fifty copies being 
printed. Prof. Johnson intends to get out a cata- 
logue of the art collection. 

One of the Juniors was seen making a practical 
application of the knowledge he has gained in 



Physics, and trying to light with a match one of the 
electric lights. 

A new tennis court is being made of blue clay 
at South Appleton by the same man who made the 
college court. 

Rev. Joseph Cook's lecture in the Town Hall, 
Thursday evening, Nov. 19th, on the subject, "Does 
Death End All ? " was attended by a large number of 
students. President Hyde introduced the speaker in 
his customary graceful manner. 

Mr. F. A. Fisher, '81, formerly tutor in Mathe- 
matics, has presented Prof. Lee with an Indian bowl 
recently discovered at his home in Westford, Mass. 

The Freshmau, in the evening breeze 
(With Dinah sitting on his knees), 
Just above the sombre trees 
Luna sees. 

Funeral bells ring o'er the lea, 
The Fresh, goes to the cemetr'y ; 
His case the doctors all agree 
Was Luna see. 

A Freshman recently discovered a large plug of 
tobacco lying in the road, and with the economical 
instinct of his class, picked it up and carried it home 
with him. Having no use for it himself he secretly 
placed it in the coat pocket of an astute Junior, who 
was addicted to the weed. The tobacco being of ex- 
cellent oder, and neither too dry nor too moist, the 
Junior — who thought it an old plug of his own — 
used it both for smoking and chewing purposes. We 
expect that Junior when he reads this item — for he is 
yet in ignorance of the joke — will hone his razor and 
start out in searcli of that Freshman, but the wily 
son of '89 " won't be there." Foreseeing the inevit- 
able result of his brash deed, he engaged a district 
school for the winter, and left for the scene of his 
labors on the same night that he related these facts 
to an Orient reporter. 

The Seniors had an examination in Political Econ- 
omy Wednesday morning, just before the Thanks- 
giving vacation. Tlie time given for the examina- 
tion was rather short for those who wished to take 
the train. 

Burpee, '87, is suffering from the typhoid fever. 

The entertainment given by the St. Paul's Church 
in tlie court-room was quite a success, both socially 
and financially. The net proceeds will amount to 
$130. The room was tastefully decorated, and the 
collection of fancy articles was well worth seeing. 

The Seniors had a very enjoyable time at the re- 
ception given them by President Hyde. 

Mr. Hutchins gave the Seniors a very interesting 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



129 



lecture in Astronomy last Monday evening, illustrat" 
ing it with the magic lantern. 

The iVIineralogy division will spend the remainder 
of this term in grinding sections of minerals for the 
microscope. 

We learn from the Brunswick Telegraph that the 
ladies of the Congregational Church will hold a Fair, 
December 17th. 

The Till Family gave a concert at the Town Hall, 
Wednesday evening. The programme was very 
good and there was quite a fair attendance consider- 
ing the weather. The " rock harmonicon" was a 
novelty and perhaps one of the most enjoyable fea- 
tures of the entertainment. 

Prof. Lee has received some valuable donations 
of fossils for the college this year. 

Mrs. Stevens has, as usual, a very fine display of 
Christmas goods in her windows, and deserves the 
patronage of the students. 




'35. — Rev. Charles Dame 
has resigned his pastorate 
at Acton, and is engaged to preach for 
six months at Newfield, Me. 
'46.— Rev. Edwin B. Webb, D.D., who 
has just resigned a pastorate of twenty-five 
years' duration over theShawmut Church at Boston, 
has been engaged to preach for six months in Wor- 
cester, Mass. 

'53.— Rev. Ephraim C. Cummings published, a 
short time since, a work on " Nature as seen in the 
Bible," and tending to show the agreement in their 
respective teachings. The: Literary T7o7-W speaks of 
the book in high praise, as a thoughtful, learned, 
and carefully elaborated treatment of the subject, 
exceedingly creditable to the author, and worthy of 
the theme. 

'57.— Prof. Lewis O. Brastow, D.D., recently elect- 
ed to the Chair of Homiletios in Yale Theological 
Seminary, is reported by a correspondent of the Con- 
gregationalist, to be doing practical work with the 
Seniors in his department, and is proving a worthy 
successor of Prof. Barbour. 

'60.— Rev. Edwin A. Harlow was dismissed from 



the First Church in Cape Elizabeth, Nov. 11th, and he 
is now employed by the Maine Missionary Society in 
special work in difi'erent parts of the State. 

'67. — Rev. Stephen M. Newman, pastor of the 
Congregational church in Washington, D. C, is 
meeting with great success. His church is crowded, 
and his sermons are commended as both thoughtful 
and eloquent. He was called to Washington from 
the double office of a pastorate and a professorship 
at Ripon, Wis. 

'70. — Lucian Howe, a celebrated occulist, in 
Bufifalo, N. Y., recently read a paper there on the 
use of cocaine for diseases of the eye, which re- 
ceived high praise. 

'70. — E. C. Woodward is in the assaying business 
in Leadville, Colorado. 

'72. — Marcellus Coggan, vv'ho resides in Maiden, 
Mass., is one of the leading candidates for mayor of 
that city. He is practicing law in Boston. 

'72. — Rev. W. F. Bickford, from Colorado, ac- 
cepts a call to Park Congregational church, at 
Berkeley, California. 

'74. — Mr. Samuel V. Cole, who is at present study- 
ing in the Andover Theological Seminary, has a 
fine poem in the current number of the Atlantic 
Monthly. 

'76. — Arlo Bates's recent publication, " Wheel of 
Fire," is very highly spoken of by The Critic of 
Oct. 3d. 

'78. — Mr. Hartley C. Baxter was in town, and pres- 
ent at the chapel service, Sunday evening, Novem- 
ber 22d. 

'79. — Mr. Walter G. Davis, who went abroad 
recently, on a brief business trip, was to sail for 
home Saturday, Nov. 21st. 

'84. — Jesse Waterman is studying law at No. 10 
Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 

'85. — M. H. Purrington recently passed through 
here on his way home. He had just completed a 
most successful term of school at Kennebunk, Me. 

'85. — J. A. Peters, instead of being at Medford, 
Mass., studying law, is pursuing his studies at his 
home in Ellsworth. 

'85. — F. W. Whittier is studying law at Farming- 
ton Falls. 



I am sitting, Mary, sitting 

In our cabin in the lane ; 

And I'm looking, Mary, looking 

At the cattle in the rain. 

And I see the water running 

Off their skins that shine like silk, 

And I wonder muohly, Mary, 

If It is that which spoils the milk. 

— Somerville Record. 



130 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




It is always gratifying to editorial pride to liave 
articles, from one's paper, copied ; but when the 
weary editor reads in exchange after exchange some 
proud conception of his own, which so far from re- 
flecting any honor upon himself is not even credited 
to his paper, then it is that the iron enters his soul, 
and he begins to think that literary reputation is, 
after all, a chimera. When an enterprising ex- 
change turns up with that self-same conception in 
its literary department, then that editor — if he is 
anything like some editors — gives vent to his pent- 
up feelings, and delivers himself on the subject of 
plagiarism in forcible and oftimes original, meta- 
phors. 

As the editor looks over the exchanges which 
have honored the Orient by copying articles 
from it (some of these articles being published in 
their literary departments, and others among their 
clippings and credited to the indefinite "Ex."), he 
lays aside his pen for fear it may take upon itself the 
task of expressing the true inwardness of his feel- 
ings. At present he contents liimself with keeping 
a scrap-book, but when at length he dons paint and 
steals upon the war ijath, it will be at that season of 
the year when there is " Blood on the moon ! " 



It was with mingled feelings of amusement and 
amazement that we recently came upon a labored 
tirade against the Orient in the columns of an ex- 
change. Amusement, at the pompous and inflated 
style of the rhetoric, evidently the production of 
some belligerent tyro who had determined to ex- 
plode himself upon the journalistic world in a mul- 
tiplicity of synonyms which should hide his paucity 
of brains. Amazement, at the colossal gall — or 
ignorance — which enabled this newly-fledged bantam 
to publish his effusion. We looked back in retro- 
spect over the pages of that exchange, as well as 
those of the annual published at the same colleo-e, 
and these famous lines of the poet Burns recurred to 
us with an additional force : 



" Oh Tvad some power the glf tie gie us 
To see oursels as itbers see us I 
It wad frae mony a bluder free us, 
And foolish notion," 

Alas how true it is that, even amidst the advant- 
ages of the nineteenth century, men are found who 
overlook the beam in their own eye, wliile they point 
out the mote in their neighbor's. 



THE world's progress. 

With the term cyclopedia, we usually associate 
the idea of a ponderous set of octavo volumes, call- 
ing for a large outlay and requiring a considerable 
proportion of the library space. We have, however, 
just received from the publishers, Messrs. Putnam, 
of N"ew York, a work which can fairly claim to be 
described as a cyclopedia, although comprised 
within the limits of one volume (a handsome octavo 
of 1,100 pages) and selling at the very moderate 
price of $2.90. This is the new edition, revised and 
extended, of their standard work of reference, "The 
World's Progress," which was originally compiled 
by the late Geo. P. Putnam, and of which later re- 
visions have been prepared by F. B. Perkins and L. 
E. Jones. The work is described as an index to 
universal history, a cyclopedia of facts, dates, and 
general information. It has been called "An entire 
system of education," and in its statistical material 
covers such varied topics as History and Biography, 
Poetry and Art, Philosophy and Religion, Science 
and Criticism, Statesmanship and War, Invention 
and Discovery. It contains a chronological and 
alphabetical record of the essential facts in the prog- 
ress of society from the beginning of history to the 
present time. A chart of history, quite oi'iginal in 
its design, represents the rise, revolutions, and fall 
of the principal empires of the world. The im- 
portant historical facts have been so successfully 
grouped as to enable the reader of history to recall 
the full pictures of the events and tends to facilitate 
the vrork of correctly classifying these in the memorj'. 

The Literary Chronology has been arranged in 
tables by nations. The sectioa devoted to the 
Heathen Deities and the heroes and heroines of 
antiquity is in itself a condensed classical dictionary. 
A feature which is of essential importance, and 
which is original with this work, is presented by 
the Synchronistical Tables, or tabular views of uni- 
versal history, which show in parallel columns the 
events which were occurring in different parts of the 
globe at any given period from the earliest records 
of history to the present day. 

The book is completed by a biographical dictiou- 
arj", whicl\ serves as an index to the names men- 
tioned in the chronological tables, and which serves 
also to indicate by reference to these tables the chief 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



131 



political events and contemporary public characters 
during the life of each pei-son in the list. 

The volume is certainly quite exceptional in the 
extraordinary amount of information which has been 
compressed within its 1,100 pages, and is further ex- 
ceptional in offering its valuable material at such a 
very moderate price. 



CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 



STOKER BLOCK, 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



A COMPLETE CYCLOPEDIA FOR $2.90. 

THE AVORLD'S PEOGKESS. 

An Index to Universal History and a Cyclopedia of 
Pacts, Dates, and General Information. By George P. 
Putnam. Eevised and extended by F. B. Perkins and 
Lynds E. Jones. 

Ovei- IWO par/es larye quarto. With chart and Fine iSteel 
Portrait. Now offered, by mail or exj)ress,free for $2.90. 
The publishers' extensive facilities for book-mannfactur- 
ing enable them to sell this most valuable work at the 
above unprecedented low price. Prospectus and specimen 
pages forwarded upon application. Orders should be sent 
direct to the publishers, 
G. P. Putnam's Sons, 27 and 29 West 23d St.. New York. 



ELEGANT MACKINAW 

STRAW HATS, 
THE BEST QUALITY, 

$1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 

MEEEY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND. 



H. V. STACKPOLE, 

FINE BOOTS AND SHOES, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

-sS. R. JACKSON, 2D, s- 

HEADQ,TJAKTEES FOR 

Overshoes, Rubber Boots, and Rubbers 

Constantly on hand in large variety. Call and examine. 

No. 2 Odd Fellows Block, 

MAIN STKEBT, - - BEUIJ-SWICK, MAINE. 



TxazE 



Wf 



^- TRAVELERS * 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 



OF EC^RTFORD, COlSriSr., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCr $8 1,000,000, and is now paying them $4,000 a daii. Issues 

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A\j\jLiJj:j\^ Jl 1: VjJLii'UirjO Proiits, the Wage-Worker for 



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and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death 

Only ©5.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 1861 have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. 

Issues T TT?T7 T)r^T Tr^TTTG of every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 
also IjIJ: Ji X UljiV^XXliO Personal Benefit. 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
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Assets, $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

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JAS. G. BATTEKSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




CIGAnETTE 

Smokers who 
are willingoto 
ay a little more 
3r Cigarettes 
tlian tne price 
charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, will 
find the RICHlYiOlVD STRAIGHT CUT 
Wo. 1 SUPERIOR, TO Alili OTHERS. 
rhev are made from the brightest, most 
deltcatel}'' fla-vored, aud blebest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are abso- 
lutely -vrluLont adulteration or drugs. 

STRAIGHT COT!^!'-: 

We use the GemUne French Rice Paper 

of our own direct importation, which is made 
ospeciallv for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
uouu are genuine. IMITATIOISS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
ori;;iual brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or box of 
Ricliiiioiid 
Straight Cat 
Cigarettes 
bears the 
signature of 



aiGARETTE 

allenTcinter 



MANUFAOXXTBEKS, 



RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E . WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

n^aine Ceniral R. ^. 

On and after Oct. 12th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

Tor Bath, 8.15, 11.25 A.M., 3.38, 4.45 aud 6.25 P.M., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Rockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.38 P.M. 
For Portland aud Boston, 7.40 and 11,30 a.m., 4.40 p.m., and 

12.35 (night). 
For Lewiston, 8.15 A.M., 3.45 aud 6.33 P.M., aud every night at 

12.40. 
For Farniington, 8.15 A.M. fmixed), and 2.45 P.M. 
For Augusta and Waterville, 8.20 A.M., 3.40 P.M., 12.45 every 

night, and on Saturdays only at 6.35 p.m. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 p.m., and 12.45 (night). 
For P.angor, Kllsworth, Mt. Desert Ferry, St. Stephen, Houlton, 

Vanceboro, and St. John, 2.40 p.m., 12.45 (night). 
For Bar Harbor, 12.45 (night). 

Note.— The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
iston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun- 
day, but do not counect for Skowhegan on Monday momlug, or 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sun- 
day morning. 

PATSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BOOTHEY, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 6, 1885. 

C. L, York, Old College Barber" 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call, 



NOTICE. 

BEWARE OF COUNTERFEITS AND IMITATIONS. 
Our Cigarettes are made fi'om the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, aud pure Rice Paper, are rolled by the highest 
class of skilled labor, and waiTanted free from flavoi'ing or 
impurities. 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a FAC-SIMILE of Kinnev 
Bros.' signature. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KINNEY BROS. 

NEW YORK. 

The following are our well-kDOwn 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Caporal, Sweet Caporal, St. James J, Capokal 1, St. 

James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES 

SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

id becoming very popular. Manufactuicd by special refjueat. 



The Sixty-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February it.h,1886, 
and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Rev. Wji. DeWitt Hyde, President: Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrice and 
Diseases of Women and Children ; Cjlarles W. Goddard, A.M., 
Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. Gerrish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Franklin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemisti-y; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D,, Materia Medica aud Therapeutics; Henry H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G.Young, Public Hygiene; 
IKVING E. Kimball, M.D. , Demonstrator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. NEALET, M.D., Demonstrator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

MIXTURES FOR PIPE OR CIGARETTE- 
THREE KINGS, Turkish, Perique and Virginia. 
IVIELLOW MIXTURE, Turkish and Perique. 
TURKISH and VIRGINIA. 
PERIQUE and VIRGINIA. 
GENUINE TURKISH. 
Flake Cuts Especially Adapted for the Pipe. 
VANITY FAIR. OLD GOLD. 

Fragrant Vanity Fair, Superiative, and Glotli of Gold Cigarettes 

ALWAYS FKESH, CLEAN AND SWEET. 

Our cigarettes were never so line as now, they cannot be sur- 
passed for puriiy and excellence. Only the purest rice paper 
used. 14 FIRST -PKIZE MEDALS. 

WM. S. KIMBALL & CO. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday IVIorning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTUY EXECUTED. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



OOLLEaE BOOKSTORE. 

We have coustiiDtly iu stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. Colleo'e Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer iu all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

«S-Speoial Kates to Student Clubs..ffl8 



-# 
■^ 






2 i^urtij "iht^ 



m^^ 



DEALER IN 



CEDAR STBEET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Eings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
^"Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BEIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



Successor to Atwood & Wentworth, 

DEALER IN 

DI^^OplDS, WA.TCHES, JEWELRY. 

and importers of French Clocks, Opera Glasses, etc. 
Fine Watch Repairing ; Gold and Silver Plating. 

509 CONGRESS ST., Portland, Me. 

ALL THE STUDENTS SHOULD BUY 

THEIR 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND EUBBERS 

AT 

Frank E. Roberts' Boot & Shoe Store, 

Cor. Main AND Mason Sts., opp. town Clock. 



«. 



Sl^SWs 



DEALER IN 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

VioUns, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of aU kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 



M&rchmmt Tmilor,, 

DUNLAP BLOCK, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT 

BICYCLE 
BASE-BA LL 

BOATING 

SPECIAL RATES TO CLUBS. 



SHIRTS, 

STOCKINGS, 
.JEUSEYS. 



OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



MAIN STREET, BRUNS'WICK, ME. 



W]W. % FIELD, 



WW^^^- 



aiiiilinii 

OTTAWA UU L 




jCushing's Island, 
Portland, Me. 



3VC. S. C3-IBSOISr. 



239 MIDDLE STBEET, PORTLAND, aLA.INE. 

J. A. MERKILL. A. KEITH. 



DEALER IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PURITY SWEET CIGARETTES. 

THE PUREST, MILDEST, AND BEST CIGARETTE ON THE MARKET. 

PUEE, BRIGHT VIRGINIA TOBACCO AND PUREST RICE PAPER. 



FOR THE FINEST MADE TRY OUR 

STRAIGHT WEB CIGARETTES. 

MANUFACTURED FROM THE FINEST BRIGHT TOBACCO GROWN WITH 

TURKISH MIXTURE. 



PURITY SMOKING TOBACCO. 

THE FINEST, PUREST, AND BEST SMOKING TOBACCO MADE. 



RALEIGH CUT PLUG SMOKING. 

THE ORIGINAL, PUREST, AND THE BEST. 



We guaratitee all not injurious. Only a trial and you will be convinced. 

PACE & SIZER, Manufacturers, Richmond, Va. 



ON SALE AT FIELD'S. 




u 




^CID PHOSPHATE. 

[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

The Unrivalled Remedy for Dyspepsia, 3Iental and Physical E.vhaustion, Nervousness, Wakefulness, 

Diminished Vitality, etc. 

As Food for an Exhausted Brain, in Liver and Kidney Trouliie, in Seasicliness and M Headaclie, in Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion and Constipation, in Inebriety, Despondency and cases of Impaired Nerve Function, 

It has become a necessity in a large number of households throughout the world, 

And is universally prescribed and recommended by physicians of all schools. 
Its action "will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 
It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body. 
It is unsurpassed as a substitute for lemons or limes, and 

IT MAKKS A DELICIOUS DRINK "WITH WATER AND SUGAR ONLY. 
Prices Keasouable. Pamphlet giTlng further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

RUMFOKD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, R. I. 
4S-BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.-fflS' 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bruns-wick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Vie'nrs* 

F. ROEMER, 

Successor to A. Roemer & Son. 
THE LARGEST HISTORICAL 

GOSTUMER« ARMORER 

IN AMERICA. 

Also Costumer for all the priDcip.nl tlieati'es : 
Fifth Avenue Theatre, Grand Opera House, 
Star Theati-e, Madisou Scjuare Theatre, Js'iblo's Garden Theatre, 
Xew Park Theatre, People's Theati-e, 14th Street Theati-e. 
Wo. 8 UNION SQUARE, NEW YORK. 

Go to W, IB. ITIToodard's 

To buy Tour GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doiug. 
si=eci.^Xj 22,.fi^TE:s to ST-crns:iT'X' cx.T:r:BS. 
Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 




C. E. TO^WISrSEND, 

DE..ILE1! IN 

CHOICE GROCERIES, 

Canned Goods, State Prison Harnesses, Fruits, Confec- 
tionery, Tobacco and Cigars, 
Corner Main and Cleaveland Streets, BRUNSWICK. 

N. B.— .SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENT CLUBS. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank BookWork of Every Description done to Order. 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

We also make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges. 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



^'■Ti^ai-i, 



^^^nigh 



er 

■ .St 



ALLEN & CO., Portland. 

Having moved to their new store, 204 Middle Street, Cor. of Plum, are coDstantly opening 
ricti and elegant goods for gentlemen's wear. 

IhoicG loreign fabrics low lisplayed iii iur tailoring iepartment. 

The finest-made up Clothing to be seen in the State now exhibited in our 



Novelties for Gentlemen 's Dress in Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves, Uleckwear, Canes, and Silk Umbrellas 
in Seasonable Styles to be found in our 

Furnishing D@]?artm @r[t. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

204 MIDDLE STREET, CORNER OF PLUM, PORTLAND. 



Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Sts., PORTLAND, ME., 

WOULD RESPECTFULLY CALL THE ATTENTION OF 

Buyers ol FurnituFe, Gaipets, MH Parlor Stoves, names, &g.. 

To the Enormous Stock of House Furnishings at the Portland Store. Being Manufacturers, 

intending purchasers can see tlie styles and select their own coverings for Parlor Furniture, and have it made 

to order for the same price. We keep enormous quantities of Upholstery Goods in the Boston Store, and 

full lines of Samples. Here our prices on Parlcx Suites range from .1f3.T.OO in Hair Cloth to 

,$375.00 in Silk or Mohair Plushes. 

CHAMBEB rXJE.iriTTJK.E. DRAPERY of every description made to order in the 

, . , -,„ -,.,.,. ^ Boston store. Orders taken here and desisrns and samples 

We have m stock m our three stores bi ditterent pat- shown, 

terns of Chamber Suites, manufactured from all the popu- > i ' -d a -d x rfo arvntT-ca 

lar woods, viz.: Pine, Ash, Walnut, Cherry, Basswood, ir-AitljUit (siOVJiS). 

and Mahogany, ranging in price from $18.00 to .$400.00. Special attention is requested to onr Parlor Stove De- 

We also have all kmds, sizes, and quantities of Bedsteads, partment, as we believe we have the best line to select 

Bureaus, Commodes, etc. Spring Beds, Cot Beds, Lounge from in Maine. Prices .Hil. 00 to 140.00. 
Beds, Sofa Beds, Mantel Beds, etc. Mattresses of every 

kind and quality, from an excelsior at .f2.00 to a pure STOVES AND RANGES. 

bleached South American curled horse hair at .$25.00. 

Our line of Ranges comprises all the latest and best in 

CARPET DEPARTMENT the market, including the " New Tariif " and "Quaker," 

• which are considered superior to anything yet produced. 
$75,000 worth of Cottons, Cotton and Wools, All-Wool Write for cuts of these two Ranges. Prices $15.00, $20.00, 
Extras, Tapestry, Brussels, Body Brussels, Velvets, Wil- $22.50, $25.00, ,$27.50, $29.00, ,$33.00, $35.00, $38.00, and Up- 
tons, etc., at our usual Rock-Bottom Prices. Any of these wards to $65,00. These prices include all the ware, pipe, 
can be selected at the Portland store. SHADES and and zinc. 



Any of the above goods sold for Cash, or on our Special Contract System, at 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Streets, Portland, Me. 

Branch of the Qreat Nassau Hall House Furnishing Store,, 827 Washington Street,, Boston. 

B. A. ATKINSON & CO., 

ISA.A.C C. ATICIIVSON, manager. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard " and " Duplex " Burner 

m PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 
LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENOEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY rOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

m- S ©DD FEItMW^ BII0CK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 



'I?, 



Made at Higgins' Ground-Floor Studio, Bath, 




< 



p 



HONETIC SHORTHAND. 



OSGOODBY'S 
METHOD 
For Self-Instruction. Containing all the late improTe- 
ments. Jt'rice §1.50. Special Instruction by Mail, $(j.OO. 
Senrl Stamp for Specimen Pages and lUusti'ated Pamphlet. 

W. VT. OSGOODBY, Publisher, Rochester, N. T. 



The New Styles in 

SmiFI^ and. SOI^T H^A^TS 

ready. An elejifiiut line of New York 
Shapes and Colors jnst received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, "Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

\ ELLIOTT'S, t 

OPPOSITE MASON STBEET. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDGE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi' 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



Browne's Hair Dressing Rooms, 

Odd Fellows' Block, Over Bavis' Grocery Store, 

Main Street, Brunswick. S. W. BROWNE, PROPRIETOR. 







rȣ FAVORITE A/OS. S03-404-332'I70-S5I- WITH 
HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. MERRYMAi PHARMACIST •> 



Fancy ani Toilet Articles, Clprsl Tolacco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

UpgTrescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Wo So S if TO ® 1 3 
Book-Seller, Stationer, Book-Binder. 

AND BIiANK-BOOK MANTJFACTUREK, 

Opposite City Hall, Center St., Bath, Maine. 

They do say, and it is a fact, that Lenton & Neagle's is the 
cheapest place in this county. Their assortment of trunks and 
bags cannot be beaten. No shop-worn goods, but direct from the 
manufacturers. They have the largest line of whips ever shown 
in this town. Jobbing of all kinds promptly attended to. 
Trunks and bags neatly repaired. 

HAENESS MAKEKS & CAKKIAGE TRIMMERS, 
MAIN STREET, Store formerly occupied by Washburne. 




J. S. TOWS"E, 
PHARMACEUTIST. 

PURE DRUGS, MEDICINES, FANCY AND TOILET AR- 
TICLES; ALSO A FINE LINE OF CHOICE CIGARS 
' AND CIGARETTES. PRESCRIPTIONS a Specialty. 

Main Street, Neae Bowdoin College. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



OVER BOARDMAN'S STORE, MAIN STREET. 

— S- B. G. DENNISON, H— 

Brunswick Book - Store, 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery ; Portland and Boston Daily Papers ; Circu- 
lating Library, 1600 Volumes; Base-Ball and La Crosse; Pict- 
ures and Picture frames; Frames made to order at short notice. 

F. W. BAEEOI«r, 

Dealer in Stanlarl anl Fancy Groceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 



11 liiiiigiAi m 



(EstaljUslied 18TT.) 



Institute Building, Huntington Ave., Boston. 



ON THE ROAD. 



ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 
OTHER TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp at above address. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amouut of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greeuough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Csesar, — Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
.Slneid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophou, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry, — first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra, — so much as is included in Loomis 
thi'ough Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Eegulae Examinations foe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writiug. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Hallowell Classical and Sci- 
eniiflc Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryehurg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to bo answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range ol 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQUrRED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DEC. 16, 1885. 



No. 11. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 

PUBMSHBD ETERT ALTEKNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE YEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

W. v. "Wentwokth, '86, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
J. H. Davis, '86. Levi Turner, Jr., '86 

A. A. Knowlton, '86. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. C. Parker, '86. C. B. Burleigh, '87. 

H. L. Taylor, '86. E. C. Plummer, '87. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extr.a copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
mnnicati^ns in regard to aU other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions rausr be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunsn-ick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 

Vol. XV., No. 11.— December 16, 1885. 

An Accident, 133 

Editorial Notes 1,33 

A Visit to the Museum of Superannuated Jokes, . . 134 

My Adventure, 135 

Troy, 135 

Camping Out, 137 

The First Snow-Storm, 137 

One Summer 138 

Communication 139 

CoLLEQii Tabula, 140 

Personal, 141 

Clippings, 142 

Book Notices 143 



AN ACCIDENT. 

The evening breeze from 'mid the trees 

Came rippling o'er the water. 

As in our boat we were afloat — 

Myself and Silver's daughter. 

She wished to know the way to row, 

And I began my teaching. 

With such a zeal I did not feel 

My arms were round her reaching, 

Till from the shore I heard a roar 

Which bore a terror in it ; 

And from afar her angry pa 

Said : " Come ashore this minute." 

P. S.— We went. 




The subject lias been broached of 
forming a society of those who are interested 
in the sciences, both members of the faculty 
and students, for special scientific work. 
The idea impressed us very favorably and 
we hope to see a movement started in that 
direction, believing that those of us, who 
inchne to that line of work would learn, 
both in the way of training for private work 
and in direct knowledge, much that will 
otherwise necessarily be attained at a com- 
parative disadvantage. The Orient will 
contribute three, perhaps more, members ; 
will the rest of the college follow our ex- 
ample ? It would seem that many of the 
Senior and Junior classes would feel suffi- 
cient interest in such a matter to take hold 
and make the thing a success if once started ; 
certainly our professors in the sciences are 
not indifferent to such an association. 



For two or three weeks the most com- 
mon salutation, — heard even more frequent- 
ly than " Isn't it cold to-day ? " — has been 
"Has the freestone arrived?" Work on 
the gymnasium was begun early in the term 
and progressed well until the walls were 
raised to the first floor above the basement, 
when the freestone was needed. It was 



134 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



found that the contractors to furnish the 
stone had done nothing about it, conse- 
quently the contract has been given to new 
parties who will soon have it ready. Mean- 
while the masons have necessarily stopped 
work, though the carpenters have been do- 
ing as much as possible. 

On account of this vexatious delay it is 
doubtful if any of us, who have been so 
loudly calling for a new gymnasium, have an 
occasion to complain of the gymnastic work 
this winter, though we hope that at least a 
place will ere long be provided for our crew. 



A VISIT TO THE MUSEUM OF SU- 
PERANNUATED JOKES. 

Happening to be in the city of C , I 

thought I would take in the new Museum 
there, which had already attained a world- 
wide reputation. 

Taking the horse-cars, and alighting at 
the proper place, I found myself before a 
spacious stone building, with iron-barred 
windows. I thought at first that I must be 
mistaken in the place and that the building 
must be either a jail or a lunatic asylum. 

I found upon inquiry that it was the 
Museum, and, paying the admittance fee, 
went in through a doorway protected by an 
iron railing. Just inside a uniformed guard 
was stationed, and there were others in va- 
rious places in the room. I noticed that 
they all kept a sharp outlook on everything 
that was going on around them. 

The cases which contained the objects of 
interest were strong iron-bound ones and 
had thick glass panes in front, but not so 
thick but what the contents could readily 
be seen. 

I thought it rather queer that such pre- 
cautions should be taken, and becoming in- 
quisitive, asked one of the guards why such 
precautions were taken. 

"Well, sir," said he, "we have a large col- 



lection of the most ancient forms of jokes 
now known. All of them were called in 
years and years ago, and we are doing our 
best to keep them in. Every now and then 
we miss a joke, but we soon find it in some 
paper or book which has passed it off as its 
own. Unfortunately we have no copy-right 
and are unable to claim damages, but we 
always know where the joke came from. It 
is an imposition upon a suffering public to 
have these mouldy gags perpetrated and so 
we have strict orders to watch them." 

Thus enlightened, I passed on to the first 
case. 

No. 1 was labeled " The Original Church 
Fair Joke." It represented a very fascinat- 
ing young lady in bangs fixing a boutonniere 
in " Gawge's " button-hole. " Only ten dol- 
lars, dear Gawge," she is murmuring so 
charmingly, as Gawge fondles his purse and 
looks sick. 

No. 2 shows an enormous pair of shoes. 
Label, " The Chicago Girl Joke." Both 
shoes were " out at the elbows," as it were, 
showing it to be a well-worn veteran. 

No. 3 is the mouldy " Doctor Joke." It 
takes two figures to represent this one. Fig- 
ure one shows the doctor, in relief, inserting 
a liquid from a jug labeled " physic " into a 
large tunnel which made connections with a 
patient's throat. Figure two shows the 
church-yard, '■'■Sicjacet," etc. 

No. 4 is the celebrated " Lawyer Joke." 
The client is seen to be presented, by his 
lawyer, with a bill for $500.00. The lawyer 
has just collected $1.50 for his client. The 
client rushes from the office and wends his 
way along a street marked " Poor House 
Avenue." 

No. 5 appeared on the catalogue as " The 
Vassar Gum Joke." A number of young 
ladies are posing beside an enormous piece 
of gum. Suspended overhead is the motto, 
'■^Dum vivimus, gumamous." 

No. 6, the " Mother-in Law Joke," shows 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



135 



the son-in-law peeking from behind the cur- 
tains in the parlor, as the mother-in-law 
slices gracefully down the front steps, which 
had been doctored, the cold night before 
with water. There are many different spe- 
cies of this joke and all of them have seen 
hard service at the front. 

No. 7 is the brilliant " Hotel Clerk Joke." 
A very large diamond gleams with an al- 
most blinding light. Around the edge is the 
whiskers attachment, presumably the clerk. 
The spread-eagle adjustment is also fully 
shown. No. 8, the "Milkman Joke," repre- 
sents Farmer Jones filling his milk cans 
from the well. "Bring the chalk, Bub," 
says he to " Bub " who appears round the 
corner of the old red barn with a can of ripe 
potato bugs in his right hand. The rava- 
ges of time upon this joke was something 
fearful to behold. 

No. 9 is the "Pohceman Joke." Police- 
man Pat is in a kitchen engaged in tickling 
Biddy under the chin. Outside a lively row 
is in progress. "Away wid ye to the con- 
flic, Pat," says Biddy. 

" Wait till the divils disperse, Biddy, and 
thin Oi'l run tliim in," says Pat. 

No. 10 is marked " The Count Joke." 
An Italian Count. An organ. Monkey in 
perspective. "Le heiresseez iz to the zee- 
zide," says the count, as the monkey hands 
him the heated penny. 

Feeling somewhat tired, I rapidly " did " 
the " Chestnut," the " Boston Culchaw," the 
"Plumber," the "Brick in the Hat," the 
" Full Moon," etc. 

As I was about to leave the Museum, a 
guard, politely touching his hat, said to 
me, " Beg pardon, sir, but we have to ex- 
amine everybody who goes out to make 
sure that none of the antiquities are miss- 
ing." 

After" turning my pockets inside out, 
satisfying the guard that I had taken noth- 
ing, I departed weU satisfied. 



MY ADVENTURE. 

" 'Twas at the solemn midnight horn', 
When silence reigns with awful power " — 

It was late. Not a line of Latin for the 
morrow had been translated, not a sentence 
of Greek slaughtered, as I sat gazing ab- 
stractedly at the figures on my wall-paper. 
The wind muttered about my window, now 
rising into a sharp shriek, as it whisked the 
dry leaves across the pane, and now subsid- 
ing into a low disconsolate moan. How 
long my reverie lasted I cannot say, but sud- 
denly rousing, I determined to take a short 
walk, and thus endeavor to awaken myself. 
No sooner said than done, and in a moment 
more I was in the open air. 

The moon was silvering the chapel spires 
with its liquid rays, and enveloping all the 
campus in that mystic light so attractive to 
ghosts, and like volatile phantoms of the 
spirit world. All was still. Fascinated by 
the scene, I almost involuntarily stayed my 
steps, and as I hesitated, a distant clock 
chimed the magic hour of twelve. 

Hardly had the last solemn intonation 
died away, sounding like the final note of 
a funeral dirge for some defunct demon, 
when a faint murmur like the gentle purl of 
a brook greeted my ear. Scarcely audible 
at first, it grew louder and louder, coming 
nearer and nearer, until it seemed to fill the 
whole atmosphere. Instinctively I looked 
up, when, Lo ! approaching at a terrific 
speed, I saw a black cloud — its edges shin- 
ing as if of gold, and its centre alive with 
fiends whose grinning features and forked 
tails might be seen ever and anon in sharp 
relief against the bright margin. A moment 
more and I was wrapped in Stygian dark- 
ness, and assailed with such a Babel of 
sounds as never deafened mortal ear before. 
The moans and groans, howls and cries of 
all Hades seemed to have been let loose at 
one instant. 

But I had no time for reflection. In the 



136 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



twinkling of an eye, I was snatched up as 
by a whirlwind, and ere a second had 
elapsed, I was in the very midst of all that 
devilish crowd. And what a crowd ! First 
I was pulled hither and thither, pinched, 
stabbed, and tortured by one set of imps, 
and then almost choked by a long, lank 
ghoul, who persisted in winding himself 
about my neck, and biting my ears with his 
teeth. I had hardly become accustomed to 
this, when I felt myself falling, falling, fall- 
ing, and in a trice I struck with a force that 
threatened to dislocate every bone in my 
body, upon what seemed an iron grating. 
The clangorous din with which I had been 
compassed about, now grew more and more 
indistinct, and was apparently far below me. 

I had lain perhaps a minute when I 
began to feel warm, and to become aware of 
certain indistinct figures moving about 
near me. Another minute, and the heat had 
increased. Mysterious creakings and harsh 
sounds saluted my ears, and what was worse, 
a strong smell of brimstone began to per- 
vade the air. A horrible suspicion entered 
my mind. Was I to be roasted ? I confess 
that although moderately courageous, I was 
alarmed. 

This state of affairs had lasted, it seemed, 
an age, when to complete my discomfiture, 
one of the fiends approaching, thrust the 
barbed points of his tail into my side. It 
was awful. I tried to shout, but I could 
not. "My hair stood on end, my voice 
stuck in my tlaroat." Again the perform- 
ance was repeated, and again I tried to cry 
out in vain. The heat intensified, and faint- 
ness came over me. I was almost insensible 
when I was called back to consciousness by 
hearing — "It's no use, Joe, he's too green!'' 
and I awoke. 



Owing to numerous delays, the '87 Bugle will not 
be out at the close of this term, as was intended by 
the editors. It will come out, if nothing happens 
to prevent, by the first of next term. 



TROY. 

Land of the heroes of old Homer's song. 

Where Priam lived, where Hector warred and fell, 

How is thy glory fallen, thy name decayed, 

How art thou changed from what thou once hast 

been! 
Standing upon the mound that rises still 
Above the Trojan plain, I mused alone 
Until the shadows of three thousand years 
Faded before my sight. I seemed to see 
The long-lost Ilium, its moonlit roofs 
Gleaming through cypress groves ; the river raised 
Its olden song; the hills and woods replied; 
And the calm summer night encompassed all, 
Till Lucifer above the wooded heights 
Of lofty Ida marshaled his bright train, 
And slowly paling, heralded the day. 
The darkness fled away ; the golden car \ 

Of Phoebus rolling up the eastern hill. 
Shed o'er the fertile Troad its glad rays, 
Bathing in floods of cheerful light alike 
The marble palace of the Trojan lord, 
And humble cot of lowly husbandman. 

Soon began to smoke, 
Staining with curling wreaths the pure, still air. 
The cottage roofs embowered in leafy groves 
That echoed loud with the rejoicing songs 
Of myriad birds released from Night's embrace. 
Far in the north the broad Sigjean straits 
Flashed from their dark-blue surface the bright 

beams. 
Their waters rulfled by the morning wind. 
Fresh blowing from the grassy upland slopes 
And hilly tracts of breezy Phrygia. 

To their tasks 
Came forth the dwellers of the lovely plain, 
And with the hum of busy, happy life. 
Till the warm noon in wonted toil engaged. 
Then from the arrows of the flaming sun 
Refuge they sought beneath the spreading boughs 
Of many a shaded grot, where through the plain 
Sparkling Scamander wound his seaward course. 
Full pleasant passed the hours in rustic sport. 
Till o'er the glittering, tossing sea there came 
The west wind welcome with refreshing breath. 
That in the sultry summer afternoons 
Blows landward from the brightly-glancing deep. 
Bending before its blast the bearded grain. 
Soon did their labors summon them again. 
And hard they toiled to evening's peaceful shades. 
Then sought a well-earned rest. 
Such life was Troy's, until its sacred walls 
Admitted Spartan Helen ; on that day 
Came strife and discord and a train of woes. 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



137 



Swift followed then the sudden dread alarm, 
' ' The Greeks have landed on the Trojan shore ! " 
The nine years' siege, the wrath of Peleus's son, 
The, fraud of Sinon, and that fatal night 
When crashed in ruin palace tower and wall. 
And 'midst the roaring conflicts of the flames 
The hostile deities exulting moved. 

Still stands the morning star 
Above Mount Ida as in days of old ; 
Still comes the cooling breeze. 
Scented with odors from the vine-clad isles 
That stud the blue jEgean ; and still I'uns 
The Hellespont, hemmed in by tree-fringed shores, 
And gliding on in slow, majestic flood, 
A barrier betwixt the continents. 
They are the same and yet are not the same, 
A race base and enslaved now holds the land 
Where Greek and Trojan strove in deadly feud. 
A few low mounds, o'ergrown and half concealed. 
Now mark the spot where mighty Troy once stood. 

Such is the course of time. 
O Earth, the proudest cities thou now hast 
Ere long shall sink, and, mingling with the dust. 
Pass to oblivion. 



CAMPING OUT. 

An article in a late Orient on "Sum- 
mer in the Sierras," started the query, why 
more of those students who have some time 
at their disposal during the summer, do not 
spend a part of it in the woods. Camping 
out is a rational, inexpensive sport, which 
has everything to recommend it, particularly 
to college students. There is nothing which 
will rest a man so thoroughly after hard 
study, as a trip in the woods, because no 
two things form so complete a contrast; 
and, likewise, nothing will send one back to 
work again so refreshed and vigorous in 
mind and body. Camping is, besides, a very 
enjoyable pastime. Love of the woods and 
the seclusion they afford, is not entirely a 
poet's fancy or a poet's possession. Even 
the prosaic man, to whom a babbling rill is 
neither more nor less than a trout brook, 
may still entertain a feeling for the woods, 
and lakes, and mountains, which amounts 
almost to a passion. 

Then, too, the entire change in the man- 



ner of living, which camp life affords, is 
another of its pleasant features ; for there 
is something both attractive and beneficial 
in getting untied occasionally from the 
apron-strings of civilization, and leading, if 
only for one short week, the impulsive, " no 
sooner said than done " sort of a life of our 
remote ancestors, — something instructive in 
having for a time one's own sweet will, and 
taking the consequences. 

There is a peculiar element in the atmos- 
phere of the woods, which makes one enjoy 
everything. Under its influence, the little 
privations and inconveniences of camp life 
become simply as spice to the appetite. It 
makes accidents which anywhere else would 
be vexatious, here seem to be only ludicrous ; 
while, by it, the genuine camper-out feels 
himself stimulated to the hardest kind of 
work, merely for its own sake, and the sat- 
isfaction he gets in doing it. Indeed, to 
one who enters into the spirit of the thing, 
the occasional trip in the woods, with the 
accompanying enjoyment to be got out of 
rod and gun, if congenial, form that expe- 
rience in life from which he derives the 
purest and heartiest pleasure. 

With every college man of leisure, there- 
fore, camping out deserves to be a standard 
summer recreation; and for the hard- 
worked fellow who can have only one last 
week in which to prepare for the coming 
year of study, there is nothing else which 
will produce so pleasant a relaxation, and, 
at the same time, give better results in the 
shape of a clear head and a sound body. 



THE FIRST SNOW-STORM. 

To-day I heard a snow-bird singing 
In the russet woodland upon the hill. 

And a gurgling brook in its leaf-hemmed channel 
Was wending its way along to the mill. 

Whispering through the leafless bushes 
Was stealing along the year's late sigh, 

And a choir of echoes their saddened feelings 
Gave to the earth and air and sky. 



138 



bowdoin orient. 



And at evening the sunset shadows 

Darkened the stubble of frosted plain, 

And lent to the landscape a sombre silence- 
A stillness nor of joy nor of pain. 

But midnight's stiller loneliness, 

And his retinue of hours 
Saw the moonlight paler growing 

And the misty snow-cloud lowers. 

And the solitary snow-bird 

With its head beneath its wing, 

A hermit of the winter, 

Disdains, these hours, to sing. 

From her snow-made nest the partridge 
Flies away on a fluttering wing 

To the budded branch of the birches 
That shadow the glades of spring. 

But the morning sun is rising. 

And the voice of the northern wind 

Is silenced among the woodlands. 

And the snow-fall its branches bend. 

Like emeralds and golden jewels 
The flakes of the feathered snow 

Glisten their varied glitter. 

With tints of the summer bow. 

And so through the trackless woodland 

A snow-born stillness dwells, 
Except where a rabbit or snow-bird 

Its hunger or loneliness tells. 



ONE SUMMER. 

" So glides along a wanton brook 
"With gentle pace unto the main. 
Courting the banks with amorous look 
He never means to see again; 
And so does Fortune use to smile 
Upon the short-lived fav'rite's lace. 
Whose swelling hopes slie does beguile 
And always casts him in the race; 
And so doth the fatastic boy, 
The god of the ill-managed flames. 
Who ne'er kept word in promised joy 
To lover nor to loving dames ! 
So all alike will constant prove. 
Both Fortune, running streams, and Love." 

The good old State of Maine lias of late 
years become a popular summer resort for 
people of other States. One who has the 
desire to avoid the heat of a city, which 
makes life so disagreeable during the sum- 



mer months, can find no better place than 
Maine, with its scenery of sea-shore and 
mountain, wherein to while away the idle 
hours. And so the wild fowl, instinctively 
feeling the approach of summer, begin their 
annual flight northward, so follows soon the 
annual pilgrimage of pleasure seekers, who, 
thrusting care aside, fill up the farms and 
shores of the Pine Tree State and give them- 
selves over to unalloyed enjoyment. 

How many happy hours have been spent 
in these summer months, and what sweet 
thoughts the memory of the old days brings 
up in retrospect ! Why is it that the faces 
we have seen, in after time appear to come 
so frequently into our vision ? Sometimes 
joy and, alas, sometimes sadness is mingled 
with the view. Yet they will come and can- 
not be repressed. There exists in the human 
heart something besides the good, the true, 
and the beautiful ; and fickleness and falsity 
are always ready to push open the doors and 
spring out. 

One summer, not long ago, among the 
visitors to a country town, a young lady 
from a neighboring city, by her pleasant dis- 
position and beauty, won many friends. Let 
us imagine a gM of good height and grace- 
ful form, with a face which, besides its 
beauty, had an expression of truth and 
force, and we will have some idea of this 
young lady. She had blue eyes, with a 
depth of expression in them one could not 
fathom, and lips to approach which would 
be bliss eternal. So at least thought a 
young college student, who happened also 
to be spending his vacation in the town, and 
who soon cultivated an intimacy with her, 
which drew them away from the rest of the 
world. I suppose many summer companion- 
ships are the same ; with pleasant excur- 
sions on the land and on the water, delight- 
ful walks and happy trysting-places. How 
many are the pledges given and received, 
and talks of happier days to come, when the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



139 



fleeting hours bring us nearer to the parting ! 
But such happiness cannot last forever, and 
the student's heart was saddened by the de- 
parture of his friend for another place of re- 
sort. But he was made happy by a promise 
of faithful remembrance. She would write 
to him, of course, and he would write to her 
in due season. 

As she had won friends before, so she 
won friends anew in her next abode. 
Among her admirers was a college student, 
a classmate of him whom she had met before. 
His attentions were soon accepted above all 
others, and the rest of the summer passed 
away altogether too soon. Here again, 
pledges of love were exchanged, and when 
they parted it was with the hope that they 
" would meet again." 

The vacation was past, and our students 
returned to college, both happy in the ex- 
perience of the summer. But unluckily, or 
perhaps luckily for them, they were one day 
recounting to each other the pleasures of the 
summer vacation, in that confiding way 
which students in particular have, when the 
revelation was made that the young lady 
whom they had successively adored was only 
a heartless flirt. Although it was hard to 
bear, to have our high hopes thus rudely 
cast down, yet we — for I was the first capt- 
ured — will try to bear it as best we can. 
Our hearts, although bruised, may heal again, 
and we can only say, in the words of the 
old poet, 

" Such is this world, whoso kan it biholde ! 
In ech estat is litil hertes reste ! 
God leve us for to take it for the bests ! " 



COMMUNICATION. 

To the Editors of the Orient : 

In view of the recent controversy be- 
tween the Orient and the Cornell papers, 
and the disposition shown to sneer at Bow- 
doin and her work in aqxiatics, a few facts 



in connection with the formation of the 
present intercollegiate association may be 
of interest. The unsatisfactory result of 
the races at Springfield and Saratoga, ten 
years ago, left boating almost beyond a hope 
of revival, and aside from the contests be- 
tween Yale and Harvard, no races of gen- 
eral interest were rowed. Bowdoin was the 
first to break this lethargy, and the Orient, 
in the winter of 1879 and 1880, vigorously 
urged the formation of a New England inter- 
collegiate association for six-oared shells. 
She stood ready to send a crew, but her 
efforts met with no co-operation. The next 
year she was again active, and a challenge 
was sent to Wesleyan. That college first 
showed a responsive interest, although, at 
that time, not in a position to accept a chal- 
lenge. Together with the hotel proprietors, 
at Lake George, Bowdoin worked indefati- 
gably to arrange a race with other colleges, 
but with no better success. Cornell, with 
characteristic self-conceit, had gone across 
the ocean to find competitors worth meas- 
uring oars with, and was busily engaged in- 
vestigating charges brought against one of 
her crew, of selling races while abroad. 
Under the circumstances, Cornell men might 
well be excused for not being enthusiastic 
over new boating enterprises. An effort 
was made to enter the race for the Child 
cup, but, owing to the condition governing- 
competition, without success. Pennsylva- 
nia, however, kindly consented to a race on 
the Schuylkill, if Bowdoin would pay her 
own expenses and contribute one-half the 
cost of a flag to be rowed for. This gener- 
ous offer was declined. 

In 1882, the association was formed, with 
"Wesleyan and Bowdoin as a nucleus. The 
race resulted in a victory for Pennsylvania, 
Bowdoin, represented by the '82-class crew, 
rowing practically a dead heat with the 
other crews. A great deal of the success 
of the regatta in 1884 was due to the efforts 



140 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



of the chairman of the regatta committee, 
Mr. W. G. Reed, of Bowdoin, '82, and only 
the outrageous conduct of the proprietors 
of a pleasure steamboat prevented her crew 
from gaining a better than third position in 
the race. Her connection with the regatta 
last summer needs no comment. Bowdoin 
can, with justifiable pride, claim the associa- 
tion to be a plant of her nursing, and the 
sneer of envy, nor malice of defeat can de- 
tract nothing from her record. In closing, I 
may add that Bowdoin is not a child new- 
born to aquatics, but her recollections are 
strong of earlier contests at Springfield and 
Saratoga. V. 




When exchanges cease from 

clipping 
The gag on "Maid and Goat"; 
"When the " metre " poem ceases 
Through our Western " Ex." to float; 
When a lot of college papers 
Cease to deal in heavy "lit"; 

And when others cease from printing 

Bomhast under guise of wit; 

When the fighting " eds " assemble 

For a brotherly embrace ; 

And when charity's the watch-word 

That shall guide the human race ; 

When all these things shall happen, 

Then the glorious day will come, 

Which ancient annals presaged. 

In the word millennium. 

The Junior class took their final examination in 
German, Tuesday, December 8th. They will read 
Lessing's " Minna von Barnhelm" next terra. 

Sophomore conundrum : "Why is the large 
stone in fi-ont of the new ' gym' like a Freshman ?" 
Answer: "Because it's going over the door." 

Prof. Robinson is going to give an illustrated 
lecture in Mineralogy showing sections of rocks cut 
for the microscope. The arc light will be used in- 
stead of calcium light for projecting the sections on 
the screen. 



Mr. Llewellyn Boston, of Naples, a graduate of Bow- 
doin College in the class of '85, is studying law in the of- 
fice of D. J. MoGillicuddy, in this city. Mr. Boston is a 
member of the present Maine Legislature from Naples. — 
Leioiston Journal. 

We are not aware that there was ever a man by 
the name of Boston in college, and we know that no 
one of that name graduated in the class of '85. We 
are well acquainted, however, with Llewellyn Bar- 
ton who graduated in the class of '84, represented 
Naples at the last session of the legislature, and is 
at present studying law in D. J. McGillicuddy's ofSce 
in Lewiston. The Journal scribe is probably from 
the " Hub," and wrote the above item while " dream- 
ing of home and of mother." 

A Freshman was recently seen looking over the 
different grave-stones in the analytic cemetery. A 
Senior who was passing overheard him soliloquiz- 
ing: " Anna, '77, Anna, '81, Anna, '80. Most all of 
'em seemed to have been named Anna — Puritan times 
probably, but great gosh didn't they live to a green 
old age in them days? " 

Card, '88, has returned to college. 
A new version of an oft-told tale : 

Beneath a Senior's window 

(She was a Vassar Maid) 

A Thomas cat one evening stole 

To give a serenade. 

A piece of cake they threw at him 

From off that upper floor : 

The merry songs he used to sing 

He'll sing, ah, nevermore I 

Mr. Hutchins is going to obtain for the college a 
new telescope. The object glass is to be six inches 
and the value of the instrument complete will be 
about fifteen hundred dollars. 

Shaw, '88, Freeman, Merrill, Doherty, and E. L. 
Adams, '89, have gone out teaching. 

The entertainment given at the Unitarian vestry , 
Wednesday, December 2d, fully demonstrated the 
fact that there is no Dearth of dramatic talent in col- 
lege. Austin, '89, as " the only young man in the 
town," was simply unapproachable, his facial ex- 
pression being especially commendable. Dearth, '87, 
as " the Prince," was a roaring success, while Fogg, 
'89, in the diflcult role of the " Messenger Boy," re- 
ceived a perfect ovation of thunderous applause, and 
was only prevented by extreme modesty from re- 
sponding to the encore. 

C. A. Davis, '86, has been engaged for the past 
few weeks in arranging the native minerals in the 
CleavelaHd cabinet. A grand improvement has been 
made the past year in the arrangement of specimens 
in the cabinet. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



141 



An arrangement was made to have the base-ball 
ground scraped, prepared with ashes, dirt and saw- 
dust, and rolled. This work was to have been done 
on the first day of the Thanksgiving; vacation, but 
for some reason nothing has been done, and we shall 
have the same trouble and delay in the spring as 
usual. 

The Senior division in English Literature are hav- 
ing quite an enjoyable time reading Chaucer. 

'Twas at a dance I met her, 
A radiant young miss, 
Who seemed to me too lovely 
To grace a world like this. 

I danced with her and flirted 
And then I saw her hojne, 
And gazed with her upon the stars 
In heaven's azure dome. 

I saw her next upon the street. 
And felt myself grow faint, 
The beauty that had captured me 
"Was lily-white and paint I 

Rev. Mr. Cressy of Bangor, graduate of Bow- 
doin, gave a very interesting address in the chapel 
Sunday afternoon. The singing by the chapel choir 
was very fine. The piece was rendered as well, 
if not better, than any we have listened to there for 
some time. 

There was a large attendance at the Congrega- 
tional Church last Sunday, to listen to a sermon by 
President Hyde. 

Wentworth, '86, brought with him from his home 
in Rockland, some very fine specimens of calcite. 
Though the calcite is not of suflScient clearness for 
Nicol's prisms, yet some of it is without any very 
noticeable flaws. Mr. Wentworth presented the 
cabinet with quite a large and fine specimen of the 
cleavage calcite. 

The officers for the Freshman class for the en- 
suing year are as follows : President, L. Prentiss ; 
Vice-President, J. M. Pheelan ; Secretary and 
Treasurer, E. W. Shirley ; Orator, J. L. Doherty ; 
Prophet, F. L. Staples; Toastmaster, C. F. Hersey ; 
Committee of Arrangements, E. Manson, J. B. 
Clark, O. P. Watts; Committee on Order, F. H. 
Hill, D. E. Owen, F. W. Adams. 

A short time ago, a meeting of the joint commit- 
tee of the trustees and overseers of Bowdoin College 
was held in the Falmouth Hotel, at Portland, to con- 
sider the advisability of moving the Maine Medical 
School from Brunswick to Portland. Hon. J. W. 
Bradbury, Prof. Young, Hon. George E. B. Jackson, 
and Hon. S. S. Harris were present for the commit- 
tee. Doctors Dana, Gerrish, Hunt, Weeks, and 



Thayer appeared before the committee, and ex- 
plained the advantages of a change of location. 
After listening to the reason advanced in favor of 
the change, the committee adjourned without taking 
action. 

A meeting of the Boating Association was held 
Tuesday, at which the following officers were chos- 
en : Second Director, Sewall ; Captain, Varney, '87. 
E. U. Curtis, '82, was chosen delegate to the boating 
convention to be held in New York, Dec. 26th. 

The Seniors have finished Porter's Psychology, 
and for the remaining two weeks of the term. Presi- 
dent Hyde reads and lectures on the History of 
Philosophy. 

Dike, '86, has gone to spend a few weeks in the 
South, and will not return till the middle of next 
term. 

After repeated delays, no sandstone has come for 
the gymnasium, and as a consequence no work has 
been done by the masons. Had the sandstone come 
in proper season, the building would have been well 
under way by this time, and probably completed in 
January, but as it is now, there seems but little pros- 
pect of our using it next term. We understand 
that the contract for the sandstone has been placed 
in new hands, by Mr. Philbrook, and there is pros- 
pect that it will soon be here. 

The only examination the Seniors have at the 
close of this term is in Astronomy ; all other studies 
are carried over till the final examination before the 
trustees, at the end of the year. 

We think any one in want of anything in the 
Xmas goods line can hardly fail to be suited at the 
College Bookstore — which is, as usual, very attract- 
ive. One can scarcely imagine anything in the line 
of beautiful things which cannot be found there. 




'37.— Hon. L. D. M. 
Sweat is in Washington, 
and will remain there during the win- 
ter, perhaps permanently. He contem- 
plates opening an office in that city as a 
solicitor before the government departments. 
'72. — Marcellus Coggan, whom we mentioned as 
candidate for mayor of Maiden, Mass., was elected 
in the recent municipal election. 



142 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



76.— W. G. Beal recently visited his native home 
at Bangor, Me. He is the law partner of Hon. 
Robert T. Lincoln. 

'75. — Rev. G. C. Cressy, pastor of the Independ- 
ent Congregational Church at Bangor, preached at 
the Unitarian Church here, December 6th. 

'78. — Will Sargent is principal of Hebron Acad- 
emy. 

'81. — Dr. J. E. Walker, of Thomaston, was mar- 
ried on November 25th, to Miss Josephine E. Percy, 
of Phippsburg, Me. 

'83. — Snow is studying medicine at the Bellevue 
Hospital, New Yorli. 

'84. — Longren is preaching at Waldoboro, Me. 

'85. — Libby has just completed a successful term 
of school at Waldoboro. He is now spending a few 
days with us. 

'85. — Lunt has resigned from the principalship of 
the Patten High School and taken up the study of 
Dentistry. Harding, '85, has taken his place. 

The following has been ascertained in regard to 
the class of '76. 

Atwood, County Attorney Androscoggin Co. 

Bates, Editor Boston Courier. 

Brookhouse, Shoe Manufacturer. Fitzroy, Australia. 
Burnham, Congregational Minister — Wilton, N. H. 

Evans, Business Portland. 

Hall, Lawyer Damariscotta, Me. 

Hawes, Minister Searsport, Me. 

Hemenway, Business Davenport, Iowa. 

Kimball, E. H., Business Lewiston, Me. 

Kimball, F. R Boston, Mass. 

Leavitt, Business Gorham, Me. 

Libby Auburndale, Mass. 

Marrett, Business, Texas. Address, Brunswick, Me. 

McNulty, Business Kansas Citj', Kan. 

Merrill Hezelton, Ohio. 

Millay Arizona. 

Morrill, Lawyer Auburn, Me. 

Newcomb, Master Mechanic, S. D. Warren & Co.'s 

Parsons, Business Cairo, 111. 

Paper Mills, Cumberland Mills, Me. 

Payne, Physician Boston, Mass. 

Payson, Lawyer Portland, Me. 

Prince, Civil Engineer, in charge of Water Works, 
Atlantic City, N. J. 

Robinson, Supt. Schools Franklin Falls, N. H. 

Rogers, Prof. State College Orono, Me. 

Rowe, Business Boston, Mass. 

Sabin, Business Burlington, Vt. 

Sanford, Lawyer Boston, Mass. 

Sargent, Business Portland, Me. 

Sewell, H. R., Died April 17, 1884. 
Sewell, J. E., Shipmaster. 

Stevens, Lawyer Boston, Mass. 

Stimson, Business Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Sturgis, Business Augusta, Me. 

Taylor, Teaching Goshen, Ind. 

Waitt, Lawyer Boston, Mass. 



Wheeler, Manufacturer Winehendon, Mass. 

Whitcomb, Lawyer Boston, Mass. 

Whittemore, Business Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Wilson, Lawyer Augusta, Me. 

Wright, Lawyer Salem, Mass. 

Yates Boston, Mass. 




AT THE FAIK. 

I saw Susan at the fair; 
And my hopes rose full and strong, 
None there was that could compare 
With her among the hurrying throng. 

Eyes of blue and locks has she 

That eclipse the silkiest skein 
Ever cast by the eternal sea. 

Far upon the rocky main. 

I saw Susan at the fair, . 

Susan and her dress of yellow; 
But Oh, what can heal despair ? 

Susan with the other fellow. 

— Fortnight. 

In the hammock they sat together, 
Idly talking about the weather, 
When to her side her pug she brings, 
Around its neck her arm she flings, 
While Frederick, thinking his wit to show, 
Says, " Would I were a dog, you know." 
She smiles and answers, " Is that so ? 
Well, dear, you'll grow." —Yale Record. 

TWO LETTERS. 

The one in delicate writing, 

" To-night I'm waiting for you," 

The finest blue-tinted paper, 
A sweet little billet donx. 

As rich and fragrant perfume 

Escaped from its prison cell, 
I breathed again the aroma 

Of times remembered well. 

From memories thus mellow, 

I recall myself with pain. 
To read the other letter 

Which in my hand has lain. 

This one not blue-tinted. 

Nor yet a billet dottx, 
But in a large hand written: 

To-day your bill is due. — Brunonian. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



143 



BOOK NOTICES. 

We have received from John B. Alden & Co., 393 
Pearl street, New York, a copy of the latest of the 
works of that popuhir juvenile author, Emily Hunt- 
ingdon Miller. The book is entitled " What Tommy 
Did," and if any of our readers have any small broth- 
ers and sisters at home, to whom they wish to give a 
Christmas present, they may rest assured that this 
little volume would be just the thing to please the 
children. The style is lively and interesting and the 
whole make-up of the book is pleasing. Space for- 
bids a more extended notice, which the work richly 
deserves. 

Also, from A. H. Andrews & Co., Chicago, a 
pocket compendium of 5000 useful facts, entitled 
"Look Within." The 25 cents which the book costs 
is certainly a small outlay for so handy a collection. 



CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 

STOKER BLOCK, - - BKUNSWICK, MAINE. 



ELEGANT MACKINAW 

STRAW HATS, 
THE BEST QUALITY, 

$1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 

MEEKY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND. 



H. V. STACKPOLE, 

FINE BOOTS AND SHOES, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

-sS. R. JACKSON, 2D, e- 

HEADQUARTEES FOR 

Overshoes, Rubber Boots, and Rubbers 

Constantly on hand in large variety. Call and examine. 

No. 2 Odd Fellows Block, 

MAIN STREET, - - BRUNSWICK., MAINE. 



TiaiE 



* TRAVELERS * 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HERTFORD, OOlSriSr., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCr $1 8,000,000, and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 

A PT^TTkT7XTT' T>/"kT Tr^TTTQ Indemnifying the Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
ill^VylJJiliiV X JT VJXjivyirjO Profits, tlie Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidental Injury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. . j. , 

Only SiS.OO a year to Professional or Business Men, for each f 1,000, with $5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 1864 have received fata] or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 

Issues T TT?!? T)/^T Tr^TTTO of every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 

also -LiiJf -Ci X UJLil-ylXliO Personal Benefit. 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Office at Hartford. 
JAS. a. BATTERSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



R ICHMOND ISjl 

■* ' ^B^^I^^^^^^^B than the price 
chareed for the ordiiiary trade Cigarettes, will 
iind the RICHMOWD STRAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO AU- OTHERS. 
Ihey are made from the Tjriglitest, most 
delicately flaTored, and biehest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are abso- 
lutely without adulteration or drags. 



JTRAIGHTCUT 



No. 
I- 



We use the Gemutne French Rice Paper 

of our own direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the hrand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
original brand, and to observe that each pack- 



age or box of 
Richmond 

Straight Cut 
Cigarettes 

bears the 
signature of 



CIGARETTES 

ALLEN &g!nTER 

MANTJFAOTUIIEKB, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL KATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

njaine Genl^ral W. ^. 

On and after Oct. 12th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.15, 11.25 A.M., 2.38, 4.4.5 and 6.25 P.M., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Rockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.38 P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.40 P.M., and 

12.35 (night). 
For Lewiston, 8.15 A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. fmixed), and 2.45 P.M. 
For Augusta and ■Waterville, 8.20 a.m., 2.40 P.M., 12.45 every 

night, and on Saturdays only at 6.35 P.M. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 (night). 
For Bangor, Ellsworth, Mt. Desert Ferry, St. Stephen, Houlton, 

Tanceboro, and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Bar Harbor, 12.45 (night). 

Note.— The night ti'ains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
iston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun- 
day, but do not connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, or 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sun- 
day morning. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BOOTHBY, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 6, 1885. 



C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 



NOTICE. 

BEWARE OF COUNTERFEITS AND IMITATIONS. 
Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and pure Ricu Paper, are rolled by the highest 
class of skilled labor, and warranted free from flavoring or 
impurities. 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a fac-slmile of Kinney 
Bros.' Signature. 

KIUBTEX" TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KINNET BROS. 

NEW YORK. 

The following are our well-kiiown 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Caporal, Sweet Capokal, St. James J, Cafokal J, St. 

James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS, STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES 

SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 



|©piptaeit 



The Sixtj'-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February ith,18S6, 
and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Rev. Wm. DeWitt Hyde, President : Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Isp.ael. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrice and 
Diseases of Women and Children; Charles W. Godd.\rd, A.M., 
Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. Gekkish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Pkanklin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemistry; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henby H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Young, Public Hygiene; 
Irving E. Kijibaj.l, M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

MIXTURES FOR PIPE OR CIGARETTE- 
THREE KINGS, Turkish, Perique and Virginia. 
MELLOW MIXTURE, Turlcish and Perique. 
TURKISH and VIRGINIA. 
PERIQUE and VIRGINIA. 
GENUINE TURKISH. 
Flake Cuts Especially Adapted for the Pipe. 
VANITY FAIR. OLD GOLD. 

Fragrant Vanity Fair, Superiative, and Giotli of Gold Cigarettes 

ALWAYS FRESH, CLEAN AND SWEET. 

Our cigarettes were never so fine as now, they cannot be sur- 
passed for purity and excellence. Only the purest rice paper 
used. 14 FIRST -PEIZE MEDAIS. 

WM. S. KIMBALL & CO. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday IVIorning by A. G. Tenney. 
Teems, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEaE BOOKSTORE. 

We have constactly in stock a full assortmeut of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods iu variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, i 

Dealer in all kinds of , 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store, i 

«S-Special Rates to Student Club8.,S8 






DUNLAP BLOCK, BRUNSWICK, ME. 






1^1^. 



DEALER IN 

CEDAK STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Branch office three doors north of Tontiue Hotel. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
I^° Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Successor to Atwood & "Wentworth, 

DEALER YS 

DtA^pOHDS, WA^TCHES, JEWELRY. 

and importers of French Clocks, Opera Glasses, etc. 
Fine Watch Repairing ; Gold and Silver Plating. 

509 CONGRESS ST., Portland, Me. 

ALL THE STUDENTS SHOULD BUY 

THEIR 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 

AT 

Frank E. Roberts' Boot & Shoe Store, 

Cor. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



-DEALER IN- 



Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 



EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT 



BICYCLE 
BASE-BALL 

TENNIS 
BOATING 
SPECIAL RATES TO CLUBS. 



SHIRTS, 

STOCKINGS, 

JERSEYS. 



OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



WM. % FIELD, 



M^N^6E1^. 




Cushing's Island, 
Portland, Me. 



O-IBSOIN-. 



239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, BIAINE. 

J. A. MERRILL. A. KEITH. 



DEALER IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PURITY SWEET CIGARETTES. 

THE PUREST, MILDEST, AND BEST CIGAEETTE ON THE MARKET. 
PURE, BRIGHT VIRGINIA TOBACCO AND PUREST RICE PAPER. 



FOR THE FINEST MADE TRY OUR 

STRAIGHT WEB CIGARETTES. 

MANUFACTURED FROM THE FINEST BRIGHT TOBACCO GROWN. WITH 

TURKISH MIXTURE. 



PURITY SMOKING TOBACCO. 

THE FINEST, PUREST, AND BEST SMOKING TOBACCO MADE. 



RALEIGH CUT PLUG SMOKING. 

THE ORIGINAL, PUREST, AND THE BEST. 



We guarantee all not injurious. Only a trial and you ivill he convinced. 

PACE & SIZER, Manufacturers, Richmond, Va. 



ON SALE AT FIELD'S. 




^CID PH08PHA.TE. 

[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. B. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

The UnrivaUed Remedy for Dyspepsia, Slental and Physical Exhaustion, Nervousness, Wakefulness, 

Diminished Vitality, etc. 

As Food for an Exhausted Brain, in Liver and Kidney Troubie, in Seasicl(ness and Sicl( Headaciie, in Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion and Constipation, in Inebriety, Despondency and cases of Impaired Nerve Function, 

It has become a necessity in a large number of households throughout the world, 

And is universally prescribed and recommended by physicians of all schools. 
Its action wiU harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 
It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body. 
It is unsurpassed as a substitute for lemons or limes, and 

IT MAKKS A DELICIOUS DRINK WITH "WATER AND SUGAR ONLY. 

Prices Eeasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

BUMFORD CHEMICAL. WORKS, Providence, B. I. 
«S-BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.-SS' 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bruns-wick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vie^ws ; also College Vieirs. 

F. ROEMER, 

Successor to A. Roemer & Son, 
THE LAKGEST HISTOKICAL 

GOSTUMER f ARMORER 

IKT AMERICA. 

Also Costiimer for all the priucipal theatres: 
Fifth Avenue Theatre, Grand Opera House, 
Star Theatre, Madison Square Theatre, Niblo's Garden Theatre, 
New Park Theatre, People's Theatre, 14th Street TheatTe. 
No. 8 UNIOlyr SQUARE, NEW YORK. 

Go to W. B. VKToodard^s 

To buy Your GEOCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

SrSCI^f^X. Ea.A.TES to STTJ-DEiTT CXiTTSS. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

O. E. TOA^^ISrSEND, 

DEALER IS 

CHOICE GROCERIES, 

Canned Goods, State Prisou Harnesses, Fruits, Confec- 
tionery, Tobacco and Cigars, 
Corner Main and Cleaveland Streets, BRUNSWICK. 

N. B.— SPECIAL EATES TO STUDENT CLUBS. 



ALL KINDS OF 




MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank BookWorkof Every Description done to Order. 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



" ATParker 

164 High^ 

ALLEN & CO., Portland, 

Having moved to their new store, 204 Middle Street, Cor. of Plum, are constantly opening 
rich and elegant goods for gentlemen's wear. 

ihoice foreign fabrics low iisplapd iii iur tailoring iepartment. 

The finest-made up Clothing to be seen in the State now exhibited in our 



Novelties for Gentlemen's Dress jn Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves, Necliwear, Canes, and Silk Umbrellas 
in Seasonable Styles to be found in our 

Rurni3hin$ Dspartm^rit. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

204 MIDDLE STEEET, COKNEB OP PLUM, PORTLAND. 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Sts., PORTLAND, ME., 

WOULD RESPECTFULLY CALL THE ATTENTION OF 

Buyers ol Furolture, Carpets, Beiliig, Parlor Stoves, Kaqges, K 

To the Enormous Stock of House Furnishings at the Portland Store. Being Manufacturers, 

intending purchasers can see the styles and select their own coverings for Parlor Furniture, and have it made 

to order for the same price. We Iveep enormous quantities of Upholstery Goods in the Boston Store, and 

full lines of Samples. Here our prices on Parlor Suites range from $35.00 in Hair Cloth to 

SloTo.OO in Silk or Mohair Plushes. 

CHAMBEK FUBNITTJUE. DRAPERY of every description made to order in the 

,.„ Boston store. Orders taken here and designs and sainples 

We have m stock m our three stores 8r dittereut pat- shown, 
terns of Chamber Suites, manufactured from all the popu- ' -datdt/a-d arr,r>TrT7'a 

lar woods, viz.: Pine, Ash, Walmrt, Cherry, Bassvvood, i:'AiiLU±t OJ.UVJit>. 

and Mahogany, ranging in price from 3fl8.00 to .15400.00. Special attention is requested to om Parlor Stove De- 

We also have all kinds, sizes, and quantities of Bedsteads, partment, as we believe we have the best line to select 

Bureaus, Commodes, etc. SprmgBeds.Cot Beds, Lounge from in Maine. Prices $4.00 to $40.00. 
Beds, Sofa Beds, Mantel Beds, etc. Mattresses of every 

kind and quality, from an excelsior at $2.00 to a pure STOVES AND RANGES. 

bleached South American curled horse hair at $25.00. 

Our line of Ranges comprises all the latest and best in 

CARPET DEPARTMENT the market, including the " New Tariff " and "Quaker," 

which are considered superior to anything yet produced. 
$75,000 worth of Cottons, Cotton and Wools, All-Wool Write for cuts of these two Ranges. Prices $15.00, $20.00, 
Extras, Tapestry, Brussels, Body Brussels, Velvets, Wil- .$22.50, $25.00, $27.50, $29.00, $33.00, $35.00, $38.00, and Up- 
tons, etc., at our usual Rock-Bottom Prices. Any of these wards to $B5.00. These prices include all the ware, jpipe, 
can be selected at the Portland store. SHADES and and zinc. 



Any of the above goods sold for Cash or on our Special Contract System, at 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Streets, Portland, Me. 

Branch of the Great Nassau Hall House Furnishing Store, 827 Washington Street, Boston. 

B. A. ATKINSON & CO., 



ISA.A.C C. ATKHIVSON, aianager. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STKADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KLNDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

EHQEAVED IN THE MOST FASniOHABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENUV FOR 

LAW 



opp. Preble House. 



474 Congress St., 




< 



® 
0= 






PHONETIC SHORTHAND, ""^^^^r 
For Self-Instruction. Contaiuing; ail the late improve. 
iiieiits. nice .^LdU. Special Instruction by Mail, SO.OU. 
Senil Stamp for Specimen Pages and Illnstrateil Pamphlet. 

^V. W. OSGOODBY, Publisher, Rochester, N. Y. 



The New Styles in 

STII^iF and. SOIPT H-^TS 

In all colors, are now ready. An ele«:ant line of New Y'ork 
.\eck\^'ear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

% ELLIOTT'S, X 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

]Ve. 5 eDD FEIilxOW'^ BIiGCK, 

Is the place to buy 

ScQ^Af StaMonekj,, § d'ancy, §-qccU. 

Telephoue Exchange counected with the stove. 

Fi3:oTOC3-i?.^f^F:E3:s 
Made at Higgins' Ground-Floor Studio, Bath, Q. L. York, Old College Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MTISIC PUBLISHER, 

in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Mu 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. MERRYMAN, PHARfflACISTv 

DIUQS, MIDICIIIS, 

Faicyani Toilet Articles, Clprsl Totocco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

US' Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Wo Bo gfieiiYg 

Book-Seller, Stationer, Book-Binder, 

AND BLANK-BOOK MANUFACTUKEK, 

Opposite City Hall, Center St., Bath, Maine. 
CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 



STOKER BLOCK, - 



BRtnVSWICK, MAINE. 



J. S. TOWl^E, 
PHARMACEUTIST. 

PURE DRUGS, MEDICINES, FANCY AND TOILET AR- 
TICLES; ALSO A FINE LINE OP CHOICE CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES. PRESCRIPTIONS a Specialty. 

Main Street, Near Bowdoin College. 

Is now prej>ared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 Middle Street, - - - - Portland. Me. 



OVEE BOARDMAN'S STOBE, MAIN STEEET. 

— {- B. G. DENNISON, -»— 

Brunswick Book - Store, 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery; Portland and Boston Daily Papers; Circu- 
lating Library, 1600 Volumes; Base-Ball and La Crosse; Pict- 
ures and Picture frames; Frames made to order at short notice. 

F. W. BARE ON, 

Dealer In Staniari anJ FaBcy Groceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 



/^ CLup i\oAD t^^CE 







til giMiigiii ii«« 

(Established 18Tt7.) 

Institute Building, Huntington Ave., Boston. 

ONE DEVOTED EXCLtTSIVEL'S TO BICYCLES, AND THE 
OTHEE TO TEICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp at above address. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, test- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar, — Allen and Greeuough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Caesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspu-acy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucohcs, and first six Books of the 
JSneid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography,— Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory coarse. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Eegulae Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. II and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Hallowell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Acadermj, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

electives — FOUR HOFllS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JAN. 20, 1886. 



No. 12. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE YEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLKGK. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

W. V. Wentworth, '86, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
J. H. Davis, '86. Levi Turner, Jr., '86. 

A. A. Knowlton, '86. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. C. Parker, '86. C. B. Burleigh, '87. 

H. L. Taylor, '86. E. C. Plummek, '87. 

Per annum, in advance $2.00 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
municati''ns in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to conti'ibute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by \vriter's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 

Vol. XV., No. 12.— January 20, 1886. 

The Deserted Isle Ii5 

Editorial Notes. 145 

My Grate, 146 

Hector's Parting with Andromache, 146 

My Niece, 147 

Daniel Webster's Place iu American History, . . . 147 

A Junior's Soliloquy 150 

Flowers as Emblems of Heraldry, 150 

Thirty-ninth Annual Convention of Zeta Psi, . . . 151 

In ilemoriam 152 

CoLLEon Tabula, 152 

Personal, 153 

Editor's Table, 154 

Book Notices, 155 



THE DESERTED ISLE. 

Loud, angry waves in sullen cadence break, 

Upon a rock-bouad shore ; 

From which the tide of summer life has ebbed, 

And sea-gulls as in days of yore 

Their wonted haunts resume. 

The snow-clad cottages in groups around 

Like sentinels appear ; 

And save the mad ocean's roar, no sound 

Breaks on the silence drear 

Of winter's icy tomb. 




Since the Orient last greeted its 
friends, the holidays have come and gone, 
but instead of the lengthy editorials upon the 
new year which meet our eyes so frequent- 
ly now, we content ourselves (for protection 
from the wrath of readers) with wishing for 
all a prosperous time. 

The beginning of it has certainly displayed 
enough of variety in the weather to please 
the most fastidious. The long-continued 
thaw of the vacation extended until the mid- 
dle of ourfirst week here, causing the Andros- 
coggin to rise to a height seldom exceeded, 
if equaled, by the spring freshets. Nearly 
all of the students visited the river, gazing 
from the bridges or the banks at the immense 
volume of water pouring by, laden with cakes 
of ice and thousands of logs. It was truly a 
grand sight to see long logs go over the 
dams and plunge out of sight for a moment, 
then re-appear turning end over end, and 
few of us will soon forget the spectacle. 

This thaw was followed by a long and 
severe cold spell which saved a large amount 
of sole leather, though this gain was fully 
compensated by the rapid disappearance of 
anthracite. 



Through the kindness of Mr. Barrett Pot- 
ter, we have had an opportunity for reading 



146 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



the Brunswick Journal of August 31, 1830, 
published by Wm. Noyes. While the issue 
is eminently political, a considerable space is 
devoted to Bowdoin College, it being the 
first of commencement week. The Boston 
Brigade Band announced a concert on com- 
mencement afternoon, in the meeting-house. 
Among the exercises announced for Thurs- 
day was the following : " The installation of 
Henry W. Longfellow, A.M., Professor of 
Modern Languages, will take place. Doors 
opened at half-past nine ; notice given by 
ringing the bell. Performances to commence 
at ten precisely." 

The college was a disturbing factor in 
politics at that time, and the paper contains 
a two-column editorial, defending the faculty 
from the charge of being political partisans, 
in allowing or causing party speeches to be 
delivered at the Sophomore Exhibition, and 
trying to make of the college a sui^port for 
one partjr. Mr. Noj^es denies the allegations, 
and said that the members of the faculty gen- 
erally had not interfered in polities, even to 
the extent of voting. 

The college was then receiving a state 
grant and the attack seems to have been for 
the purpose of crippling the institution if 
possible. 



At the meeting of the Intercollegiate 
Rowing Association, Saturday, Dec. 26th, 
Bowdoin was represented by Mr. E. U. Curtis. 
Brown, Columbia, Cornell, and Pennsylvania 
also sent delegates. Bowdoin obtained the 
chairmanship of the regatta committee, the 
most important oifice in the association, Mr. 
Curtis being chosen to that position. It was 
voted that the committee should purchase a 
flag for Bowdoin as the champion of 1885, 
making an assessment on each college to pay 
for it. A proposition to row in eight-oared 
instead of four-oared shells was voted down, 
but the committee were instructed to have 
an eight-oared race within three days after 



the three four-oared, provided there shall be 
two entries. The committee were also in- 
structed to report to the colleges before 
March 21st, the time and place of the race. 



MY GRATE. 
The Sun his gleaming streamers 

Has painted on the west, 
Spreading as the peacock proud 

Of the colors on its crest. 

Before my open grate I sit, 

Dreaming carelessly ; 
'Tis the hour before all others 

Most delightful to me. 

The bright flames how they leap and dance, 

Lilve demons beckoning on 
To glowing caves beneath the cliff 

Black as night before the morn. 

Keep up your siren humming. 

As though for my delight ; 
Contentment has perchance escaped 

From your caverns deep and bright. 



HECTOR'S PARTING WITH 
ANDROMACHE. 

Farewell, Andromache, farewell. 
Sweet wife I must away. 
Achsean hosts are now in sight, 
I hear the tumult of the fight. 
The battlements are manned, 
Not here must Hector longer stay. 
But to the thickest of the fray. 
Lead on proud Ilium's band 
To fight 'mid foes on every hand 
The battles of our fatherland. 

Restrain thy tears Andromache 
Let not your heart be sad. 
Full madly now the tide of life 
Is pressing towards the scene of strife 
Where battling hosts contend. 
When dauntless valor holds the field 
The forces of our foes must yield, 
And gods their aid will lend. 

For Ilium's streets shall ne'er resound 

The tread of hostile feet, 

Else will her sons in glorious fray, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



147 



Have left the Heavenly light of day 
To dwell amid the shades. 
'Tis glorious thus for men to die, 
And gain beneath their native sky 
A fame that never fades. 

And should I fall — nay, do not weep, 
But let your heart be firm. 
Rear up our child my sword to wield. 
Teach him to bear his father's shield 
Against his country's foes. 
Propitious may the omens be, 
May kind gods grant us victory 
And end a nation's woes. 



MY NIECE. 

The experience I am about to relate is 
intended as a warning to those who are apt 
to assume dignities beyond their years. It 
taught me a large lesson, and clings to my 
memory like a condition in mathematics. In 
brief it is this : 

I spent the winter vacation with my 
brother who has been a family man for some 
twenty years. One of his children, a maid 
of eighteen summers, is, according to ordinary 
etiquette, my niece, and the subject of this 
essay. When Ave had both been little more 
than children, I had thought it quite an honor 
to be called " uncle " by one so nearly my 
own age, and so had insisted upon it as my 
title, until she grew to address me by that 
word as a matter of course. This practice 
continued until the second of January, 1886, 
and then stopped for the following reason : 

New-year's eve Avas celebrated at my 
brother's house by a gathering of his daugh- 
ter's friends, and among them was a young- 
lady whom I had never met before, but Avho 
struck me at once as the ideal maiden des- 
tined to win my hand. I may as well con- 
fess it all ; I was thoroughly interested in her, 
and exerted myself to make a favorable im- 
pression. I was just flattering myself that 
she was not wholly insensible to my attacks, 
and was fast becoming eloquent in a Avay 
peculiarly my own, when my niece approached 



to refer some doubtful point to " uncle." I 
thought what would probably happen, the 
moment I saw her coming, and fervently 
praj'^ed that she might for just this one time 
leave off that elderly title, but as usual my 
prayers were vain, and, seemingly uncon- 
scious of the agony she was causing, she ad- 
dressed me in the same old way, as if the 
gray hairs were rather prominent on my head. 
After settling the questions Avith certain un- 
intelligible remarks, I returned to the as- 
sault, but there was a look of half respectful 
amusement in those eyes that made me wish 
this particular mode of address had never 
been invented. 

Of course any one can guess the rest. 
How that respectful look continued, and the 
conversation turned upon art and science, in- 
stead of the nonsense it had been before. 
How she referred to things which occurred 
thirty years before, as if I had been present 
and taken an active part. How that an idea 
of extreme age seemed to be fixed upon me 
in her mind and she was soon enjoying the 
company of a youth not three years my jun- 
ior, but who was the so7i of a near neighbor. 

I met her several times after this evening, 
but she always persisted in treating me as a 
relic of a past age and so I had to give up in 
despair. When I reproved my niece with her 
mistake, she onlj^ reminded me of the many 
times I had caused her to be considered a 
mere child when among elderly people by 
referring to her as " my little niece." A 
treaty was at once made in which we agreed 
to use those terms with care and discrimina- 
tion, to the entire satisfaction of myself and 
niece. 



DANIEL WEBSTER'S PLACE IN 
AMERICAN LITERATURE. 

It is the custom in this country to lavish 
the verbal honors of literature with a free 
hand. Literary reputations are manufact- 
ured for the smallest considerations. Yet in 



148 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Tiew of this strong tendency to bestow all 
that is due literary merit, there is a disposi- 
tion to overlook and disregard what ought 
to be deemed a permanent portion of our 
national literature. 

A great portion of the intellectual and 
moral energy of the nation is engaged in 
active life. Those who most clearly reflect 
the spirit of our institutions are those who 
are not writers by profession. If we were to 
make a hst of American authors, a list which 
should comprehend only such as were ani- 
mated by an American spirit, we should pass 
over many of the contributors to the maga- 
zines, and select men who lead representative 
assemblies or contend for vast schemes of 
reform. We should attempt to find those 
who were engaged in some great practical 
work, who were applying large powers and 
attainments to the exigencies of the times, 
who were stirred by noble impulses, and la- 
boring to compass great ends. 

If our national literature is to be found 
in the records of our greatest minds, and is 
not confined to the poems, novels, and essays 
wMch may be produced by Americans, it is 
a matter of surprise that the name of Daniel 
Webster is not placed high among American 
authors. Men every way inferior to him in 
mental power have obtained a wide reputa- 
tion for ivriting works, in every way inferior 
to those spoken by him. We ought not to 
think that thought changes its character 
whether published from the mouth or from 
the press. In Webster's case the fame of 
the man of action overshadows that of the 
author. We are so accustomed to consider 
him as a speaker that we are somewhat blind 
to the great literary merits of his speeches. 
The celebrated argument in reply to Hayne, 
for instance, was intended by the statesman 
as a defense of his political position, as an 
exposition of constitutional law, and a vin- 
dication of what he deemed the true policy 
of the coiintry. The acquisition of merely 



literary reputation had no part in the mo- 
tives from which it sprung. Yet the speech, 
to those who take little interest in subjects 
like the tariff, nuUiiication, and the public 
lands, will ever be interesting, from the pro- 
found knowledge it displays, its clear ar- 
rangement, the mastery it exhibits of all the 
weapons of dialectics, the broad stamp of 
nationality it bears, and the wit, sarcasm, and 
splendid and impassioned eloquence, which 
pervade and vivify without interrupting the 
close and rapid march of the argument. If 
the mind of Webster were embodied in any 
other form than orations and speeches, this 
strange oversight would never be committed. 
It cannot fail to be interesting to examine 
the literary characteristics of Webster and 
to inquire the sources of his power as a 
speaker. 

In the case of an author like Webster, 
whose different powers interpreted each other, 
and produce by joint action a harmonious 
result, it requires a more potent alchemy 
than we shall attempt, to resolve his differ- 
ent productions into the elements from whose 
combination they sprung. In the first place, 
his productions are eminently national. His 
works all refer to the history, the policy, the 
laws, the government, the social life, and the 
destiny of his own land. They have come 
from the heart and understanding of one, 
into whose very nature the life of his country 
had passed. His production was a part of 
his being. It is not meant that Webster's 
patriotism, as displayed in his speeches, is a 
blind, unintelligent impulse, leading him into 
fanaticism and inspiring a rash confidence in 
everything American. He has none of that 
overweening conceit, that spirit of bravado, 
that ignorant contempt for other countries, 
that indiscriminating worship of his own, 
which have done so much to make patriotism 
a convertible term for cant or folly. 

It is wonderful to note the perfect organic 
relation and harmony in the workings of his 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



149 



mental faculties. He rarely confounds the 
processes of reason and imagination, even in 
those popular discourses intended to operate 
on large assemblies. Earnestness, solidity 
of judgment, elevation of sentiment, broad 
and generous views of national policy, and a 
massive strength of expression, characterize 
all his works. We feel, in reading him, that 
he is a man of principles, not a man of expe- 
dients. He never seems to be playing a part, 
but always acting a life. 

The ponderous strength of his powers strike 
us not more forcibly than the broad individ- 
uality of the man. The mind of Webster 
was eminently comprehensive, and fitted for 
large speculations. It was neither misled by 
its own subtility, nor bewildered by the fal- 
lacies of the feelings ; it was rather telescopic, 
than microscopic — more conversant with 
great principles than minute distinctions. 
Through all his speeches, one perceives the 
movement of an intellect, strong enough to 
grapple with any subject, and capacious 
enough to comprehend it, both in itself and 
in its relations. Force and clearness of con- 
ception, exact analysis, skillful arrangement, 
a sharp logical ability, and a keen insight, 
" outrunning the deductions of logic," indi- 
cate a mind well calculated for the investiga- 
tion of truth and the detection of error. His 
common sense — a quahty which does not al- 
ways accompany mental power — is as prom- 
inent as his dialectical skill. 

He was also powerful in reasoning a priori^ 
in appljdng universal principles of reason 
and morals to particular cases, and in forcing 
the mind into assent to their application, 
which is perhai^s a greater sign of genius 
than slowly traveling up the ladder of in- 
struction, and arriving at a general law by 
successive steps. 

Reference has been made to the strength 
of personal character which the productions 
of Webster evince. This is to be attributed 
in a great degree to the depth and intensity 



of his feelings, and especially to his pas- 
sions. Mental power alone could not have 
sustained him in the many emergencies of 
his political position. 

From overlooking the claims of his under- 
standing and sensibility, much has been writ- 
ten in praise of his imagination. It must be 
conceded though, that loftiness of moral prin- 
ciple, reach of thought, and depth of passion, 
are more apparent than affluence of imagery. 
But whatever images he called up are gener- 
ally distinct and vivid, speaking directly to 
the eye, and appropriate to the feeling of the 
moment. Throughout the speech in replj^ to 
Hayne, there is a constant reference to fig- 
ures and phrases which are in the memories 
of all who have studied the Bible, Shake- 
speare, and Milton. Yet in his noblest bursts 
of eloquence, we are struck, rather by the 
elevation of the feeling, than the vigor of the 
imagination. For instance, in the Bunker 
Hill oration, he closes an animated passage 
with the well-known sentence, " Let it rise 
till it meet the sun iu his coming ; let the 
earliest light of morning gild it, and parting- 
day linger and play upon its summit." 

Webster was not a learned lawj^er in the 
sense in which Parsons, Story, and Kent were 
learned lawyers. He had laid solid founda- 
tions of legal knowledge, but he had not 
built upon them so loftily as these great law- 
yers had. But in the analysis of human 
motives and the knowledge of human nat- 
ure, and in the discussion of constitutional 
and fundamental questions which underlie 
government and society, he towered above 
every other lawyer that has lived. He 
needed no precedents. He was an advocate, 
who made the law for which he spoke. Even 
such a man as Marshall yielded to him here, 
and the great Chief Justice's opinion in the 
Dartmoutli College case is Webster's argu- 
ment reiterated. 

The oratory of Webster changed the 
tastes of his times. It created a new school 



150 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



of oratory which may be called " Websterian." 
It has none of Wirt's sentimentality, nor of 
Pinkney's frigid classicality. Between the 
schools that went out with the latter orators, 
and that which came in with Webster, there 
is the same difference, as between a statue 
of Candover and an antique. Burke's imagi- 
nation, Erskine's nobility, Chatham's power, 
and Everett's harmony, were all embraced in 
this mighty man. There is a recipe for a 
style like Webster's, but it is noteworthy 
that he loved Saxon words, and laid it down 
as a rule, "to use no word which does not 
suggest an idea, or modify some idea already 
suggested." 

Some authors are listened to with delight, 
some with astonishment, and some with con- 
viction. Writ belonged to the first class, 
Pinkney to the second, and Webster was 
monarch of the last. In the senate, in the 
courts, on the bastings it was the same. His 
presence and declamation were magnificent. 
He was certainly the most imj^osing man of 
his time in his physical appearance. His 
utterance was deliberate and dignified, and 
his voice was one of the noblest gifts ever 
bestowed on an orator, — deep, rich, harmo- 
nious, flexible, and of tremendous power, 
capable of a great variety of expressions, and 
always managed in a manly and natural 
manner. 

Great as Webster was as an orator he 
was still greater as a man. Plis influence, 
like that of Washington, was mainly due to 
moral qualities. The man was always greater 
than his words, superior to his emotions, 
master of the occasion. 

In his life of Napoleon, the Baron Jomini 
depicts the great captain in Elesium, con- 
versing on his campaigns with the spirits of 
Alexander, Frederick, and Csesar who sur- 
round him in admiring attitudes. So we can 
imagine the spirits of Demosthenes, Cicero, 
and Burke clustering to receive the last ac- 
cession of a peer to their number, and con- 



fessing as the great soldiers confessed to 
Napoleon, " that he surpassed them all in his 
force of genius and greatness of soul." 



A JUNIOR'S SOLILOQUY. 

You may sing of laughing eyes, 
And love's burning raptures prize, 
But shall I for these despise 
My old cob pipe ? 

You may sing of ruby wine 
When its sparkling lusters shine. 
But dearer are thy charms benign 
My old cob pipe. 

You may sing of luna's beams 
And the summer sunset's gleams, 
But thou canst bring me sweeter dreams 
My old cob pipe. 

Thou hast my Freshman heart consoled, 
I clung to thee, a Sopho' bold, 
What tales thou mightst have often told 
My old cob pipe ! 

I love thee in my Junior ease. 
Thou shalt me when a Senior please. 
Thy friendship sure wilt never' cease. 
My old cob pipe. 

And when I string my heavenly harp. 
And tune it up a note too sharp. 
Thou at my ear wilt never carp. 

Dear old cob pipe. K. 



FLOWERS AS EMBLEMS OF 
HERALDRY. 

In reading the history of ancient times, 
of the overthrow and rise of empires, when 
muscular skill was an envied heritage, and 
physical culture was in the highest repute, 
it is both curious and interesting to note 
with what prominence flowers were regarded 
as the emblems of powerful houses. 

The emblem originated by Henr}^ the 
Fourth was a pomegranate on which was in- 
scribed these words, "Sour yet Sweet," to 
signify that in a judicious reign, severity 
should, at times be tempered with mildness. 

The arms of Dundee are represented by 
a bough-pot of lilies carved out of silver, be- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



151 



cause lilies were emblematical of the Virgin 
Mary, and she was the acknowledged patron 
saint of that town. 

For a number of ages, the broom has been 
symbolical of the arms of Brittany. The 
reasons for having adopted this have been 
variously stated, but the most authentic is 
this : Fulk of Anjou was probably the first 
of the renowned family of Plautagenet, which 
name is derived from plantagenista, meaning 
a broom. He is said to have assumed the 
name while making a tour of the Holy Land, 
signifying his humility. After the memora- 
ble battle of Bosworth Field, resulting in 
the overthrow of Richard HI., the crown of 
England was found bruised and stained with 
blood in a hawthorn bush. From this cir- 
cumstance, the hawthorn was chosen by the 
Princes of Tudor as their badge. 

When the Duke of Lancaster, known as 
John of Gaunt, married Blanche of Lancaster, 
he assumed as typical of his might, the red 
rose, familiar in history as the fatal red rose. 

The white rose was the emblem of the 
House of York and the ducal contests, grad- 
\ially dividing the nation into two great par- 
ties of the Houses of York and Lancaster, 
culminated in those bloody civil wars known 
as the War of the Red and White Roses. 

" The rose that's like the snow," became 
later emblematical of the House of Stuart. 
Of the white rose connected with this unfor- 
tunate family the poet has sung in mourn- 
ful strains. 

To tradition are we indebted for the em- 
blem of Scotland. It is said that once upon 
a time, a party of Norsemen attempted to 
surprise the army of Scotland by night ; but 
as one bold son of the North sought to outdo 
his companions, in his reconnoiter he acci- 
dently trod upon a thistle. His cry of pain 
instantly aroused the sturdy Scots, who re- 
pelled the foes. From this time the thistle 
with the motto, " Wha daur meddle wi me ? " 
was adopted as the ensign of Scotland. 



The shamrock as the symbol of Ireland, 
was said to have been assumed from the cir- 
cumstance that St. Patrick picked it up when 
he was proving to the Irish the doctrine of 
the Trinity. It is also said that on St. Pat- 
rick's day, every Irishman who obeys the 
dictates of his religion will try to procure a 
bunch of shamrocks. The shamrock is also 
the emblem of hope, and some maintain that 
it was believed from the earliest times that 
no serpent would touch the plant. 

The device taken by Clovis of France was 
three black toads represented on his shield, 
but was soon succeeded by one less repulsive. 
A venerable hermit, who had renounced all 
sociability and eked out a miserable existence 
on the outskirts of a sombre forest, was said 
to have been visited one night by an angel, 
radiant in a cloud of silvery brightness who 
extended to him a shield of wondrous beauty, 
on which were enblazoned three golden lilies. 
She commanded him to see that this was 
presented to his king. He did as directed, 
and after this event the armies of Clovis were 
very successful, and after a victory the sol- 
diers used to adorn themselves with lilies. 



THiRTY-NINTH ANNUAL CONVEN- 
TION OF ZETA PSL 

The thirty-ninth annual convention of 
the Zeta Psi Fraternity was held at Easton, 
Penn., on January 5th and 6th, under the 
auspices of the Tau Chapter of Lafayette 
College. 

The first day was taken up with prelimi- 
nary business, and in the evening the dele- 
gates and visitors were the guests of the 
entertaining chapter at a theatre party. 

On the second day the business of the 
convention was transacted, which, owing to 
the large amount to be done, was not com- 
pleted till the evening session. 

At 8.30 P.M., the convention was called to 
order by the presiding officer, Hon. George 



152 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



S. Duryee, and listened to a scholarly oration 
delivered by Prof. William Owen, of Lafay- 
ette College. 

After the evening session a large number 
of brothers sat down to the annual banquet 
in the dining-hall of the United States Hotel. 

After several hours of conviviality the 
convention adjourned to meet at the call of 
the grand officers, at whatever place they 
may decide upon. 

All agreed that this was one of the most 
successful conventions of Zeta Psi ever 
assembled, and all parted with pleasant 
memories of the past and bright hopes of 
the future of Zeta Psi. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Zeta Psi Hall, Jan. 15, 1886. 
Whereas, It has pleased God to take our late 
brother, Alvan J. Bolster, to his long home, 

Resolved, That, although we grieve at our loss, 
and fain would wish our brother with us once again, 
yet must we say " God's will be done " ; 

Resolved, That we extend our heartfelt sympathy 
to his family and friends in this, their deep afiSiction ; 
Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be in- 
serted in the Bowdoin Orient. 

Geo. S. Berry, "^ 

H. B. Austin, > Commiltee. 

JM. P. Smithwick, ) 




He chinned for rank 
And he chinned for fun ; 
And he chinned again for 
fame, 
And though all knew his chin was false 
Yet he chinned on just the same. 
He cliinned the parson, chinned the Prex. 
And all the girls in town. 
In fact when he had any chance to chin 
He always did it brown. 
And when he dies a-chinning some day. 
His spirit will nothing abate ; 
But will chin St. Peter to death you may bet, 
And sneak through the golden gate. 



Some arrangement should be made for more 
thoroughly heating the Cleaveland lecture room. If 
the present furnace is inadequate for the purpose, a 
stove should be added. As it is at present the tem- 
perature of the room on cold days is positively 
dangerous to health. 

Now that the spirit of invention seems to be upon 
Bowdoin scientists, it would be well for some of them 
to turn their attention towards the construction of a 
drain in the chemical laboratory for carrying away the 
contents of the slop jars. In spite of the many " mod- 
ern improvements," the classes in Chemistry have 
still to empty their own jars in the same prosaic way 
that their fathers did before them. Delightful as this 
diversion may be at some seasons of the year, it is 
apt to lose many of its charms with the temperature 
below zero. 

The following syllogism is respectfully submitted 
to the President and Faculty of Bowdoin College : 

Colds are injurious to health. Colds are con- 
tracted in attendance at chapel exercises. Therefore 
chapel exercises are injurious to health. " A word 
to the wise is sufficient." 

During the vacation quite a destructive lire caught 
at the lower end of the town, burning Mr. Scribner's 
flour mill and Mr. F. H. Purinton's machine shop. 
There was a gale of wind blowing and the whole 
town was threatened with destruction, but the lire 
was got under control and no farther damage was 
done. The corn, a large amount of which was stored 
in the lower part of the mill, is still burning, though 
the fire occurred over two weeks ago. 

The young ladies of the town are soon to give the 
play "Esmeralda," in the town hall. The proceeds 
are to go to the town library. January 18th is the 
dp,te fixed for the entertainment. 

Dr. Stephen H. Weeks, of Portland, delivers the 
address at the opening of the Maine Medical School, 
Thursday, February 4th. His subject is the "Pros- 
ecution of Medical Study." 

The Bowdoin Alumni of Boston held their annual 
meeting anddinner at Young's Hotel, on Wednesday, 
January 13th. A reception was held at the same 
place from four to six o'clock, by President Smith of 
the Association, and President Hyde of the college. 

Prof. Avery has recently been elected a member 
of the Royal Asiatic Society of England and Ireland. 

Prof. Little intends getting up a memorial volume 
to the late Professor A. S. Packard, if he receives 
sufiioient encouragement in the way of meeting the 
expense. 

The river presented a sight during the recent 
freshet, such as few of us have ever before had the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



153 



opportunity to witness. The water poured over the 
dam in torrents, carrying with it in its rapid course 
huge cakes of ice and logs. Logs over a foot in 
diameter were hurled out of the water on passing the 
falls, and some were snapped in two like straws. 
Several bridges up river were destroyed and bay- 
bridges were washed away. 

Circulars have been issued to graduates by Prof. 
Little, asking their aid in the work of building up 
the library. Efforts are being made to fill two 
alcoves devoted to the publications of alumni and to 
the literature of Maine. For this purpose, books, 
pamphlets, newspapers, and magazines are earnestly 
solicited. 

E. W. Freeman, '85, was in town a few days last 
week. 

Mr. Hutchins has made a change in the Junior 
Physics this term, and is giving lectures on "Elec- 
tricity" instead of using the text-book. 

Mr. Gilbert has not devoted much time to the 
waltz during the first part of the dancing school, but 
has spent most of the time teaching the polka, 
schottische, and redowa, but the remainder of the 
term will be devoted to the germans, as nearlj' all 
have become good waltzers from practice outside. 

Tlie Freshmen, instead of reading the Greek 
Lyric Poets, as has usually been the custom in the 
winter term, are reading Pindar, and pronounce it a 
change for the better. 

Monday evening before the beginning of the 
term Denman Thompson and his company gave 
Joshua Whitcomb at the town hall, and as usual 
drew a good house. 

The Sophomores and Freshmen were treated to a 
lecture on the evils of using translations in Greek, 
and undoubtedly will discontinue their use from this 
time on. 

The Seniors are using Calderwood's Hand-Book 
of Moral Philosophy this term, and from the nature 
of the book are obliged to do considerable reading 
outside. 

The delta has been prepared with gravel and 
partially with clay, and will be fixed in good condi- 
tion by spring. 

The chapel service might, with advantage, be 
held in Memorial Hall during the colder part of the 
winter, as was done two years ago. It may not be 
impossible to heat the chapel cold mornings, but the 
fact remains that it never has been heated sufficiently 
yet. 

The new library rules have been mentioned in a 
former issue of the Orient, but for the benefit of 



those unacquainted witli them we print the following 
extracts : 

Rule 1st. Always leave the door open. The cold 
draught will afford an excellent ventilation, and the 
exercise obtained by the librarians in closing it will 
keep them from being dyspeptic. 

Rule 2d. Never leave your hat on the rack. It 
is much better to wear it, otherwise some sinister 
person might accuse you of being courteous. 

Rule 3d. If you have anything to say speak it 
out in a loud voice. Those in the library will be 
glad to close their books and listen to you. 

Rule 4th. If any passage pleases you mark it off 
in lead pencil. This will add much to the typograph- 
ical appearance of the volume, and will aid in pre- 
serving the thoughts of the author. 

Rule 5th. Never take any books from the library. 
It is much better to spend your time in learning their 
titles and the names of their authors. In this way 
you may acquire a reputation for literary knowledge, 
and be able to criticise authors and their works from 
an unprejudiced standpoint. 

Rule 6th. Persons whose acquisition of knowl- 
edge is accelerated by elevating the feet will be 
furnished with chairs for that purpose upon applica- 
tion to the librarian. 




'37.— George F. Talbot 
at a recent meeting of the 
Maine Historical Society read a me- 
moir of the late James S. Pike. 
'40.— Hon. Dexter Hawkins, of New 
York, will have a prominent part in the 
Centennial Celebration at Norway. 

'44. — Judge W. W. Virgin, of Portland, has re- 
ceived an invitation to deliver the oration at the Cen- 
tennial Celebration of Norway, to be held this year. 
'41. — Hon. Henry Ingalls, of Wiscasset, presided 
over the meeting at the recent reunion of ex-mem- 
bers of the legislative and executive department 
held in Augusta. Mr. I. has been appointed one of 
the committee to examine the accounts of the State 
Legislature. 

'41. — Hon. John C. Talbot, of East Machias, has 
served more times in the Legislature of this State 
than any other man now living. He gave a very 



154 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



interesting account of his service in the liouse, ex- 
tending in all over fifteen years. 

'42. — Rev. E. S. Jordan has resigned his position 
as pastor of the Congregational church in Brownfield, 
which he has held for nearly twelve yeai's. During 
this time he has preached in Denmark, and has mar- 
ried seventy coujales. He goes to Waltham to live 
with his son, who is piMcticing medicine thei-e, says 
the Kezar Falls Record. 

'49. — Hon. Joseph Williamson presented an ar- 
ticle on the " Rumored French Invasion," which was 
read before the Maine Historical Society at their 
recent meeting. 

'60. — Hon. Josefsh W. Symonds, a brother of the 
late W. L. Symonds, who had some literary repute 
before he died, has written a novel, which is now in 
the hands of a Boston publishing house. 

'62. — Rev. D. W. Waldron,of Boston, a native of 
Augusta, Maine, was, January 7th, elected chaplain 
of the Massachusetts House. Mr. Waldron has been 
chaplain since 1879. 

'61. — Ex-Senator Bradbury at the recent reunion 
in Augusta, on the presentation of tlie portrait of Lot 
M. Morrill, late ex-Secretary of the Treasury, deliv- 
ered an eloquent address. He made brief sketches 
of his private life and public career, and made public 
for the first time a letter from Gen. Grant, very 
complimentary to Mr. Morrill. 

'68. — C. O. Whitman, assistant in the Museum of 
Comparative Zoology at Harvard Universitj', has 
just completed a valuable work on " Methods of Re- 
search in Microscopical Anatomy and Embryology," 
which is published by Cassino & Co., Boston. Prof. 
Lee will use it in the Zoological Laboratory. 

'77. — Alvan J. Bolster died at Sioux City, Iowa, 
on Sunday, December 13th. His death was very 
sudden. He had been engaged in the practice of law 
in Dakota, with which he had connected a real estate 
and insurance business. He was not quite thirty 
years of age. 

'77. — George H. Marquis has removed to Clear 
Lake, Dakota, where he is a member of the firm of 
Sanborn & Marquis, attorneys at law, real estate, 
loan, and collection agents. 

'77. — Rev. A. M. Sherman is rector of All Saints 
Church, Sing Sing, N. Y. 

'77. — Dr. Will Stephenson, U. S. A., is stationed 
at Rock Springs, Wyoming. 

'77. — Dr. E. J. Pratt has returned from Colorado, 
where he remained over a year, much improved in 
health. He is at present in New York City. 

'81. — H. L. Staples, of Parsonsfield, a member of 
the Portland School for Medical Instruction, has been 
appointed clinical clerk at the Maine General Hos- 



pital, an office which has recently been established 
in that institution. 

'81. — Charles Haggerly, of Southbridge, Mass., 
who has been studying law with Herbert M. Heath, 
of Augusta, was recently married to Miss Gary 
Colburn, of Augusta. 

'81. — John O. P. Wheelwright, a successful lawyer 
at Minneapolis, recently made his Eastern friends a 
short visit. 

'84. — E. C. Smith has commenced his studies at 
Harvard Theological School. 

'84. — Longi-en, who has been occupying the Con- 
gregational pulpit at Waldoboro, Me., for several 
months past, has again resumed his studies at An- 
dover Theological School. 

'84. — Clark is in a bank at Bangor. 

'84. -Bradley is pursuing a course of studies at 
Bryant & Stratton's Commercial College in Boston. 

Prof. John S. Sewall, '50, of the Bangor Theolog- 
ical Seminary, and Geo. S. Cressey, pastor of the 
Unitarian church, have been chosen members of the 
examining committee of the college for the ensuing 
year. Hon. L. H. Emery, of Ellsworth, '61, and S. 
J. Humphrey, '48, are on the visiting committee. 



,^^^W^ 




After looking over a large pile of exchanges, it is 

always pleasant to find one of more than ordinary 

merit, and it was with particular interest that we 

examined the last number of the Williams Literary 

Monthly. For articles of real interest and editorials 

which are written to say something and not merely 

to fill space, we always turn to the Monthly and the 

Fortnight. Of all references to the new year, the 

best we have seen is the following sonnet from the 

former publication : 

With wondering eyes that toward the future bend 
Their truthful glances, comes the sweet new year; 
"While in his train triumphant, far and near, 
Briglit rays of promise with the doubts contend. 
And pelting buds of liope, tliat far transcend 
Our choicest dreams, drive off the imps of fear. 
Beueatli its crystal prison, loud and clear, 
The brooklets purling symplionies ascend 
In choice music, while the distant heights 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



155 



Lifting their heads above the clouded veil 
That hid their glory, greet the glancing lights, 
Which dress their summits in a silver mail. 
And sing with nature, as each peak unites 
In one sweet anthem, softly breathing " Hail." 
From the University of Michigan, the Chronicle 
sendsout a large illustrated Christmas extra of forty 
pages containing some fine articles, whicb, however, 
are not the product of undergraduate minds. Abun- 
dant food for thought is furnished by one of its poems. 

DRIFTING. 

Float, tloat, 

Tiny boat. 
Chase the river to the sea. 

O willow trees 

With flickering leaves, 
Cast shadows over me I 

Flow, flow, 

Where branches low, 
Bend down to kiss the stream, 

And on thy breast. 

In beauty drest, 
The starry lilies gleam. 

The waters flow. 

Or swift or slow, 
In narrow bounds or wide. 

O'er rocky bed, 

Or smooth way led. 
To join the ocean's tide. 

Thiis life doth flow, 
Or swift, or slow. 
In channels straight or free; 
O'er shoal or deep, 
It still doth sweep, 
Toward eternity's dark sea. 
Several new excbanges have made their appear- 
ance, among which The Signal seems worthy of 
special mention. Rarely does a college publication 
start with so good promise of being a desirable ad- 
dition to the list of student papers. Though pub- 
lished at the Trenton Model School, it threatens to be 
a formidable rival to many papers from literary 
colleges. From the second number we clip : 

ROLLER SKATES. 
See the children with their skates, 

Roller skates ! 
What a great amusement in the choosing of their mates! 
How they rattle, rattle, rattle. 
On the smooth and glassy floor. 
While the children's merry prattle. 
Seem to form a raging battle, 
As to who shall be the first to reach the door, 
Rolling round, round, round. 
With a still increasing sound; 
And the queer manipulation, that will always bring its 
fate. 
From the skates, skates, skates, skates, 

Skates, skates, skates. 
From the slipping and the sliding of the skates. 

Hear the warning of the skates, 

Roller skates ! 
What a tale of terror the creaking wheel relates ! 
This the sober-minded think, 
As the sounding ebbs and flows; 
But the rollers can relate, 
In their creaking 
And their squeaking, 
How they always met their fate. 
By the breaking or the stumbling of the skate. 

Of the skate ; 
Of the skates, skates, skates, skates, 

Skates, skates, skates. 
In the ticking and the clicking of the skates. 



BOOK NOTICES. 

A unique genius, that of Charles Lamb. Just like 
nothing that ever appeared before them, or has since 
appeared, are the quaint and delightful "Essays of 
Elia," anew edition of which has recently been issued 
by Alden, "The Literary Revolution" publisher of 
New York. Turn to any of your cyclopedias and 
they will tell you that Charles Lamb was one of the 
most charming essayists that the English language 
has ever known, and also that his "Essays ot'Elia," 
are the choicest of his works. They are not merely 
the first work of their class, but, like " Pilgrim's Prog- 
ress" and "Robinson Crusoe," they constitute a 
class by themselves. The volume is certainly one of 
the most delightful of the books described in Mr. Al- 
den's 148-page illustrated catalogue, which he offers 
to send for 4 cents, or the 16-page catalogue which 
is sent free. Address, John B. Alden, Publisher, 
New York City. 

We have received from O. Ditson & Co., Boston, 
a copy of their " College Songs," a new college song- 
book containing many old favorites, and a large as- 
sortment of new songs of the true lively "ring," 
which enlivens many a gathering of students. Fifty 
cents is certainly cheap for the work. This firm is 
noted all through the college world for the strictly 
first-class character of their musical publications. 
All the solos in " College Songs" have piano accom- 
paniments. 

Also, a tine calendar from the Pope Manufactur- 
ing Co. The Columbia "takes the cake." 



H. V. STACKPOLE, 

FINE BOOTS AND SHOES, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

ELEGANT MACKINAW 

STRAW HATS, 

THE BEST QUALITY, 

$1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 

MERRY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND. 

-eS. R. JACKSON, 2D, s- 

HEADQUAKTEKS FOB 

Overshoes, Rubber Boots, and Rubbers 

Constantly on hand in large variety. Call and examine. 

No. 2 Odd Fello'ws Block, 

MAIN STREET, - - BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



^■ 1 "" ' "" T^^^^^^ CIGARETTE 

oiPijiyinRjn are "-v^jSigUo 
n I y n If i y ii u ^^^^t^zi 

B B ^B^IH^^BH^B than the price 
charaed for the oi^Jnary trade Cigarettes, mU 
find the RICHI-iOWD STKAIGHT CUT 
Wo.l SUPERIOR, TO AUi OTHERS. 
They are made from the ■briglitest, most 
delicately flavored, and liigliest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are al)SO- 
Iwtely TrtSioiit adulteration or drugs. 



No. 
-I- 



TRAIGHTCUT 

We use the Gennine Frencli Rice Paper 

of our own direct importation, which is made 
esaeeiallv for us, water marked with the name 
of the hrand-RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are captioned that this is the old and 
original brand, and to obse rve that each pack- 
age or box of ■ 
Kicbiiiond 
Straight Cnt 
Cigarettes 

bears the L 
iignature of " 



SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. 

jManiifactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turki-^h and Virginia. 

The followiug are our well known 

STANDARD BRANDS : 

Caporal, Sweet Caporai,, St. James 1-2, Caporal 1-2, 

St. James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES, 
Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and French Rice Paper, are rolled by the high- 
est class of skilled labor, and warranted free from flavoring or 
impurities 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a fac-similk of Kinney Bros. 
Signature. 

KinNEY TOBACCO CO. 

StTCCESSOB TO KINXET BROS. 

NEW YORK. 



niGARETT 

allenXcinter 



MANDFAOTUBEES, 

RICHMOND. VIRGINIA. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

njaine Genl^ral M. ^. 

On and after Oct. 12th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, S.15, 11.25 A.M., 2.38, 4.45 and 6.23 P.M., and on Suuday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Eoctland, 8.15 A.M., 2.38 P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 a.m., 4.40 P.M., and 

12.35 (night). 
For Lewiston, 8.15 A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. (mixed), and 2.45 P.M. 
For Augusta and Waterville, 8.20 A.M., 2.40 P.M., 12.45 every 

night, and on Saturdays only at 6.35 P.M. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 (night) 
For r.angor, Ellsworth, Mt. Desert FeiTy, St. Stephen, Houltou 

Vauceboro, and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Bar Harbor, 12.15 (night). 

Note. — The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
iston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun- 
day, but do not connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, or 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sun- 
day morning. 

PATSON TDCKEE, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BOOTHEV, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 6, 1885. 



If^flWl 



|,aiMiD« 



I HIN J'flr tnat the Newspaper Adver- 

I '"** r Vj-r" tisiue Afency of Messrs. 
N. W. AVER * SON, our authorized agenta 



The Sixty-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 4:th,18S6, 
and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— REV. Wii. DeWitt Htde, President : Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrice and 
Diseases of Women and Children; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., 
Medical Jurisprudence ; Frederick H. Gerrish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Franklin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemisti-y; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; CHARLES O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henev H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Young, Public Hygiene; 
Irving E. Kimball, iu.D., Demonsti'ator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealev, M.D., Demonstrator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

MIXTURES FOR PIPE OR CIGARETTE- 
THREE KINGS, Turkish, Perique and Virginia. 
MELLOW MIXTURE, Turkish and Perique. 
TURKISH and VIRGINIA. 
PERIQUE and VIRGINIA. 
GENUINE TURKISH. 
Flake Cuts Especially Adapted for the Pipe. 

VANITY FAIR. OLD GOLD. 
Fragrant Vanity Fair, Superlative, and Clotii of Goid Cigarettes 

ALWAYS FRESH, CLEAN AND SWEET. 

Our cigarettes were never so line as now, they cannot be sur- 
passed for purity and excellence. Only the purest rice paper 
used. 14 FIKST- PRIZE MEDAXS. 

WM. S. KIMBALL & CO. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday IVIorning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Year in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



OOLLEaE BOOKSTORE. 

We have coustantly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 

BYRON STEVJbGlVS. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds o{ 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

«®-Speeial Kates to Student Clubs.-zffis 



Mr 



rahmmt Tmilor^ 

DUNLAP BLOCK, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT 






2 %\\\xt\ "^l^tk, 



U\ 



* 



DEALER IN 



CEDAR STREET, BRUWSWICK, ME. 

Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
|^i° Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COE. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BEUNSWICK, ME. 



BTCrCXE 
BASE-BALL 

TENNIS 
BOATING 

SPECIAL RATES TO CLUBS. 



SIIIBTS, 

STOCKINGS, 

JEltSEYS. 



OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



MAIN STREET, BRUWS"WICK, ME. 



ww^^% 




Successor to Atwood & Wentworth, 

DEALER IN 

Dl^pOflDS, WATCHES, JEWELRY, 

and importers of French Clocks, Opera Glasses, etc. 
Fine Watch Repairing ; Gold and Silver Platinc/. 

509 CONGRESS ST., Portland, Me. 



ALL THE STUDENTS SHOULD BUY 

THEIR — — 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND EUBBEES 

AT 

Frank E. Roberts' Boot & Shoe Store, 

CoK. MAIN AND Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



%m^. 



DEALER IN 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 



OTTAWA 



jCushing's Island, 
Portland, Me. 



Js/C. S. C3-IBS0 35T. 



wkimm, 



239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. a: MERRILL. A. KEITH. 



DEALER IN 

GMClBEffiS AND PEsflYISBNS, 

Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 'WATER ST., AITGITSTA, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PURITY SWEET CIGARETTES. 

THE PUREST, MILDEST, AND BEST CIGARETTE ON THE MARKET. 

PURE, BRIGHT VIRGINIA TOBACCO AND PUREST RICE PAPER. 



FOR THE FINEST MADE TRY OUR 

STRAIGHT WEB CIGARETTES. 

MANUFACTURED FROM THE FINEST BRIGHT TOBACCO GROWN. WITH 

TURKISH MIXTURE. 



PURITY SMOKING TOBACCO. 

THE FINEST, PUREST, AND BEST SMOKING TOBACCO MADE. 



RALEIGH CUT PLUG SMOKING. 

THE ORIGINAL, PUREST, AND THE BEST. 
We guarantee all not injurious. Only a trial and you ivill be convinced. j 

PACE & SIZER, Manufacturers, Richmond, Va. 

ON SALE AT FIELD'S. 



w 



I 




A.Cir) FHOSPH^TE. 

[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

The Unrivalled Remedy for Dyspepsia, Mental and Physical Exhaustion, Nervousness, Wakefulness, 

Diminished Vitality, etc. 

As Food for an Exhausted Brain, in Liver and Kidney Troubie, in Seasicliness and Sicl( Headaciie, in Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion and Constipation, in Inebriety, DesjMndency and cases of Impaired Nerve Function, 

It has become a necessity in a large number of households throughout the world, 

And is universally prescribed and recommended by pliysicians of all schools. 
Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 
It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body. 
It is unsurpassed as a substitute for lemons or limes, and 

IT MAKES A DELICIOUS DRINK WITH WATER AND SUGAR ONLY. 
Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

BUMFORD CHEMICAIi WORKS, Providence, R. I. 
«®-BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.-Stf 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vieivs ; also College Vieiirs. 



:f. roemer. 

Successor to A. Ruemer & Son, 
THE LARGEST HISTORICAL 

GOSTUMERS ARMORER 

IN AMEKICA. 

^^.j^ Also Costumcr for all Mie priucipal theatres : 
Fifth Avenue Theatre, Grand Opera House, 
Star Theatre, Madison Square Theatre, N'iblo's Garden Theatre, 
Nevr Parli Theatre, People's Thcati'e, lltli Street Theatre. 

No. 8 UKTIOBT SQUARE, NEW YORK. 



Go to lAT. B. ITVoodard's 

To buy your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save cuouey by so doiug. 

SE=EC!Ij5^Xj ia-A.1'E:S to STTrXJEKTO? Clj-CrBS. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 




ALL KINDS OF 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

MagaziDCS, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Iluling and Blank BookVVork of Every Description done to Order. 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges. 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



^^J'a7ke,. 



m u 



'>ft St 



ALLEN & CO., Portland, 

Having moved to their uevv store, 204 Middle Street, Cor. of Plum, are coustantiy opeuiug 
rich aod elegaut goods for geutlemen's wear. 

ihoice foreign fabrics low iisplapd in fur tailoring iepartmeni 

The finest-made up Clothing to be seen in the State now exhibited in our 



/novelties for Gentlemen's Dress in Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves, Neckwear, Canes, and Silk Umbrellas 
in Seasonable Styles to be found in our 

Furnishing Dspartmsrit. 

ALLEN&COMPANY, 

204 MIDDLE STREET, CORNER OP PLUM, PORTLAND. 
THE 



# TRAVELERS ♦ 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HERTFORD, COISTN., 

Has paid to Policy-liolders OVCT $1 I^OOO^OOO) and is now paying tliem $4,000 « day. Issues 

A r^r^n^T^^XTT TJC'kT TPTTT'i Indeiniiifying tl.e Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
jWjKJ i-U l^iy X X V/±J±l-/ JL JUO Pruiit.s, the Wage- Worker for his Wages, lost frotn Accidental Injury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only $i5.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each .Ijl.OOU, with .1?5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Kesidence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 18G4 have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. 

Issues T XT?!? TD/^^T Tr^TTi^Cl o' every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 
also JUIJC JCj JT V-/ljlvyl-JjjO Personal Benefit. 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued alter tliree payments, if desired, for amounts jiroportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, ------ $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Office at Hartford. 
JAS. G. BATTERSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary. 



ill 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGISG 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard " and " Duplex " Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 
LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Yisiting, Glass Cards and Monograms 

ENOEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE, 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 

AU the Late Publications in stoclv. Text-Boolis ot all kinds. LAW 
and MEMCAL WORKS ilt PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 

474 Congress St., - - - opp. Preble House. 

THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

]V[0. i §DD EEIiMW^ BII0CK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange, connected with the store. 

1. m. f ©eiiiii, tffat'p. 




m 



0° 

© 

IH 

© 






PHONETIC SHORTHAND. °1«Tt°h"o^d^'^ 
For Self-Instruction. Containing all the lau' improve- 
munis. I'lice ^l..:n>. biJecial Instruction by Mail. :?li.U0. 
Send Stamp foi- Specimen Pages and Illustrated Panipldet. 

W. W. OSGOODBY, Publisher, Rochester, X. Y. 



i>i3:oToa-it-A.Fia:s 
Made at Higgins' Ground-Floor Studio, Bath, 



The New Styles in 

In all colors, are now ready. An elegant line of New Y^ork 
Neckwear in New Shapes .and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

1 EH^LIOTT'S, t 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEE, 

in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

Ovei- Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



■ED. J. MEREYMAN, PHARMACISTi- 



Faicf aflJ Toilet Articles, Clprsl Totacco. 

DUIMLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

Il^" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Book-Seller, Stationer, Book-Binder. 

AND BLANK-BOOK MANtTFACTUREK, 

Opposite City Hall, Center St., Bath, Maine. 
CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 

STOKER BLOCK, - - BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



J. S. TOWK'E, 
PHARMACEUTIST. 

PURE DRUGS, MEDICINES, FANCY AND TOILET AR- 
TICLES; ALSO A FINE LINE OF CHOICE CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES. PRESCRIPTIONS a Specialty. 

Main Steeet, Near Bowdoin College. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
meucements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

180 Middle Street. - - - - Portland, Me. 



OVER BOABDMAN'S STOKE, MAIN STREET. 

— H B. G. DENNISON, -1— 

Brunswick Book - Store, 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Statiouery ; Portland and Boston Daily Papers ; Circu- 
lating Library, lUOO Volumes; Base-Ball and La Crosse; Pict- 
ures and Picture frames; Frames made to order at short notice. 

Dealer in Staiiiari anl FaBcy Groceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 




ON THE ROAD. 



®?) 



(Established 1817.) 



Institute Building, Huntington Ave., Boston. 



ONE DEVOTED BXCIiTJSIVEL'2 TO BICYCLES, AND THE 
OTHER TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-oent 
stamp at above address. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Fresliman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin G-rammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Caesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
^neid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar, — Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Koot, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Looniis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regular Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Hadotvell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their seTeral Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers of the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range ot 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED- four HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature-, two terras. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOUItS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terras. 

Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three te'rms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEB. 10, 1886. 



No. 13. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE TEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

W. V. Wentworth, '86, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
J. H. Davis, '86. Levi Turner, Jr., '86. 

A. A. Knowlton, '86. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. 0. Parker, '86. C. B. Burleigh, '87. 

H. L. Taylor, '86. E. C. Plummer, '87. 

Per annum, in advance, 

Single Copies, 



$2.00 
15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or ou applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to conti'ibute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied bj- \vi'iter's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 



CONTENTS. 

Vol. XV., No. 13.— February 10, 1886. 

Fens Bandusiae, 157 

Editorial Notes, 157 

The Medic, 159 

Parlier Cleavelaud, 159 

Does It Pay? 161 

Alumni Reunions, 162 

Remarks of Rev. P. T. Bayley, 163 

Collegii Tabula, 163 

Personal, 166 

Editor's Table, 167 

Book Notices, 167 



EONS BANDUSIAE. 

O fount Bandusian, in thy crystal tide 

The quivering rays of sunlight come and go 

Through thiols green shade, with which thine oak 

doth hide 
Cool waters murmuring ever as they flow. 

Murmuring of days when on yon sloping bank 
Venusian Horace lay with thoughtful eye, 
Drew inspiration from thee as he drank. 
And wrote for us the songs that never die. 




We feel that an apology is due our 
patrons for the delay in issuing the present 
number. At the time when the copy should 
have been sent to the Journal office, about 
four columns of matter had been handed in, 
but as that is a small part of twenty-two col- 
umns, and as Nature has not been so lavish 
in endowing the managing editor with liter- 
ary genius and versatility as she was in the 
cases of' Longfellow and Hawthorne, we 
dared not venture to inflict upon innocent 
readers the agony of reading an issue pro- 
duced by his unaided brain. 

In the face of this delay we trust that our 
final appeal for brief articles to all who are 
interested in their college publication, espe- 
cially members of the faculty and alumni, 
will not be unnoticed. A few such articles, 
received during the year, have materially 
aided in maintaining the standing of the 
Orient, and we are sincerely grateful to 
those who have thus favored us. 



Again are we compelled to remind our 
fellow-students who aspire to literary dis- 
tinction, that little time remains for competi- 
tion for those positions which afford almost 
the sole opportunity for such work in col- 
lege. In about six weeks the new board of 



158 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



editors will be chosen from those who have 
contributed to the present volume, and we 
naturally feel that those who write articles 
during the year, when they are of some use, 
are more deserving of our votes than those 
who, a few days before the election, hastily 
scratch off a few pages with the hope of 
being future ORiiSrET editors, doubtless also 
intending, if chosen, to do as little work as 
possible. 

Four additional editors are to be chosen 
from '87 and three from '88, but the mem- 
bers of those classes seem not to realize that 
the responsibility of securing a good repre- 
sentation upon the next Oriekt board rests 
with themselves. Besides, there is an excel- 
lent opportunity to obtain one of the prizes 
offered for the best prose articles, as there 
has been thus far no competition worthy of 
the name. Such articles must, however, be 
handed in at least one week before No. 15 
appears, that is, as early as February 24th. 



Rarely have the elements combined to 
produce an effect like that upon the night of 
January 28th. A period of freezing weather 
was followed by a cold rain, continuing 
through Thursday and freezing as fast as it 
fell, until the trees were literally coated with 
ice, each tiny twig being a rod of ice an inch 
in diameter. To say that the sight was beau- 
tiful is to add nothing to the view wliich 
must be pictured by every one who has seen 
Bowdoin's campus ; but feelings of admira- 
tion were changed to those of regret as the 
increasing burden became too great for even 
the tough limbs of our noble elms, which fell 
in rapid succession. Nor was pedestrianism 
the favorite form of exercise, for the icy 
walks and falling boughs conspired to make 
one's safety seem to hang by a slender 
thread. All night the devastation continiied, 
and Friday morning most of the trees, with 
the exception of those in the bordering belt, 
which afforded mutual support, presented a 



sorry spectacle. Branches from three to 
eight inches in diameter were strewn about 
in abundance, while larger ones were to be 
seen broken like glass. One large elm, about 
a foot and a half in diameter, was split, the 
falling half paying its compliments to a blind 
on North Winthrop. Several days of dull 
weather succeeded, but when the sun finally 
appeared thousands of flashing diamonds did 
their best to atone for the great damage. 
Our old friend, the Thorndike Oak, did not 
suffer so badly as many of the other trees, 
but bids fair to witness the exercises of many 
a Class Day. 



Through the courtesy of Hon. P. W. 
Chandler, we are enabled to present his re- 
marks on Prof. Cleaveland, read by him at 
the recent alumni reunion in Boston. We 
have all learned to admire and respect the 
late scientist, and such a tribute, coming 
from one so intimately acquainted with him 
for years, cannot fail to give many of us a 
much clearer idea of what his life actually 
was. The simplicity, modesty, and earnest- 
ness of purpose so prominently set forth, fur- 
nish us the clue to the life of one whose ex- 
ample is a beacon light, showing where lies 
the course leading to success. 



In compliance with the general inclina- 
tion to speak of the disagreeable last, we 
have left for this place mentioa of the finan- 
cial affairs of the Orient. Some of our con- 
temporaries, among them some of the leading 
college papers, have been upon the verge of 
suspension for lack of support. We rejoice 
at being able to state that our alumni have 
responded nobly to our appeal for subscrip- 
tions, but it is a painful necessity to mention 
the fact that the receipts of money have not 
been correspondingly large. Though sub- 
scriptions are supposed to be paid in ad- 
vance, very little has as yet been received, 
while about one hundred subscriptions to the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



159 



last volume, XIV., remain unpaid. Un- 
doubtedly the reason is to be found in the 
lack of anything to especially attract atten- 
tion ibo the payment of subscriptions, there- 
fore we make this appeal. Knowing that 
most people do not rejoice at the sight of a 
bill, we trust that a general favorable re- 
sponse will relieve us of the necessity of 
sending many. However, the Okibnt year 
is coming to a close and our printer's bills 
must be paid, consequently it will be neces- 
sary to mail bills about the end of this month 
to those who are then delinquent. 



THE MEDIC. 

Like an embryonic king, 
Or some other sort of thing 
Such as poets love to sing, 

Does he come ; 
With his satchel held so tight, 
And his face so fresh and bright, 
And his pants so very light ; 

Like a bum. 

How the maidens laugh in glee 
As the Medic's form they see 
Gliding down so gracefully 

To the post ; 
But their faces sadder grow 
When his time has come to go 
And tlie thought doth them o'erflow : 

That he's lost. 



PARKER CLEAVELAND. 

Of all the eminent men connected with 
Bowdoin College, the great traditional teacher 
is undoubtedly Parker Cleaveland. As to 
the general traits of his character, nothing re- 
mains to be said after the masterly eulogy 
of President Woods. But there are some 
points known to those who lived in intimate 
relations with this distinguished man, which 
cannot fail to be interesting to his pupils, and 
may be useful to those who never saw him. 
One of these was his wonderful simplicity. 
Nothing, it may be safely asserted, is more 
remarkable in the truly great, and nothing 



tends more to real success, especially in sci- 
entific investigations, than that faculty, habit, 
or trait — -whatever you choose to call it — 
which enables one to go directly to the mat- 
ter in hand, to place his mind exactly on the 
crucial point, to divest himself of everything 
unessential, and to concentrate his whole 
thought absolutely on a given subject. Such 
a man comes very near to nature, and seems 
almost to be taught directly by nature's God. 
He hears whisperings which do not reach 
those whose ears are obstructed by personal- 
ities and who let themselves stand between 
themselves and the truth. 

A scholar of real simplicity is all muscle. 
His powers of investigation are not impeded 
by adipose matter. As the fat man in the 
race waddles clumsily and totteringly along, 
losing his wind at every step, while his leanj?^ 
competitor strides forward with ever increas- 
ing energy and spirit, so the scientist or 
scholar who is encumbered by self-conscious- 
ness, or weighted with a burning egotism, or 
tormented by the love of approbation, strug- 
gles under difficulties unknown to him who 
applies his mind with a simplicity that is 
free from all personal considerations, and an 
energy that is born of a sincere desire for 
nothing but the truth. In this regard our old 
teacher was quite remarkable. In his every- 
day life, in his intercourse with others, there 
was a simplicity almost childlike although not 
always exactly "bland," as with the "heathen 
Chinee." His fondness for children and 
young people and their fondness for him 
were almost touching. When engaged in 
most earnest work his study was often taken 
for the nursery. A whole familj^ of noisy 
children would be turned in upon him and 
the only stipulation he made was, that they 
should not run against his chair. The same 
thing appeared in his practical religion. No 
man ever heard him speak of his own con- 
victions. It was absolutely impossible to get 
at him in this regard. Callow ministers some- 



160 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



times attempted it, but never more thaii once. 
Nor would he ever converse on the general 
subject. But in the regulation of his conduct, 
in the observance of all Christian duties and 
observances, he never came short. The fam- 
ily worship twice in the day was always ex- 
plicitly required as a duty. And every morn- 
ing after this he invariably retired to his 
study, and locked the door, to search the 
Scriptures iiud commane with his Heavenly 
Father in secret. 

The sacred writings he regarded at eighty 
with the same simple reverence that he did 
when taught at his mother's knee. He had 
tempting offers of money and was vehe- 
mently urged to publish a third edition of 
his treatise on mineralogy ; but nothing could 
induce him to do it or to allow others to do 
From a remark he once made about the 

bunt of the Creation in the Book of Gen- 
esis, I was led to suppose that he was not 
willing to give up the literal sense, while he 
could not as a scientist ignore the vast 
changes wrought in the old doctrine by re- 
cent investigations. 

In his mode of life there was the same 
simplicity. At one period he had acquired 
so high a reputation at home and abroad, that 
some of his visitors were most distinguished 
men. They were always welcomed, but there 
was not the slightest difference in his table, 
or in his house, or of study and devotion to 
daily duty. 

Always a poor man, the expenses of en- 
tertaining came heavily upon him and he was 
often put to straits for what would now be 
regarded as very ordinary fare. But he never 
seemed to be conscious of it and never in- 
dulged in the poor taste of apologizing for 
what he could not help. Always -a sufferer 
from a painful and sometimes distressing dis- 
ease, no one ever heard him allude to it, still 
less complain or excuse himself on that ac- 
count. His whole life, all his hours and min- 
utes, were devoted to the performance of 



duty. In the long winter terms he never dined 
at home. The whole day was spent in the lab- 
oratory. At noon a servant with a little tin 
pail appeared and the professor would devote 
a few minutes to a lunch that any boy in col- 
lege would now despise. This was invariably 
put up by the faithful companion of his life, 
who prepared what he should eat with her own 
hands, and whatever came he took with 
thankfulness and without a question. I be- 
lieve if she had put in a stewed toad or a 
sausage of dog's meat, he would have taken 
it without the least hesitation. 

It seems to me that modesty is the hand- 
maid or companion of simplicity. It certainly 
was in him. Anything like a compliment 
seemed to annoy him. I always had a feel- 
ing that this simplicity of character was one 
great element of his success as a lecturer and 
a writer. How sure he was to select the very 
best words ! How remarkably he conveyed 
his exact thought to the listener, and what a 
wonderful power of expression ! All these 
are matters of recollection to -the compara- 
tively few survivors of his pupils, but they 
are matters of tradition to all of the alumni 
of the college. 

His death was as characteristic as his life 
had been simple. He had passed his eight- 
ieth year. He had become very infirm ; his 
splendid physique showed the signs of age ; — 
the gray hairs; — the bent form; — the slower 
pace, all made it clear that he must soon cease 
from labor. A week or two before his death 
he wrote one of daughters : " If I should give 
you an account of myself, it would consist of 
alternate light and shade, and some of the 
shades very dark. I have no appetite and 
live entirely on gruel. I cannot walk to col- 
lege without resting four or five times on the 
way and expect to ride over to-morrow." 
His friends earnestly besought him to take 
rest, but all in vain, until the summons came 
in a way as simple as his life had been. He 
had prepared for the morning recitation, but 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



161 



felt faint and entered a vacant parlor where 
he lay down on the sofa and quietly died. 

It is more than a quarter of a century 
since we laid him away, on a remarkable Oc- 
tober day, among the whispering pines, whose 
mysterious murmurings had been so long a 
pleasure to his ears. It seemed to us all 
that the autumn leaves and winter snows 
would cover no grave of one so pure, so un- 
selfish, so devoted to duty and so simple in 
character as the old professor. 



DOES IT PAY? 

The opportunity of spending the summer 
months of the long vacation at a fashionable 
resort, filling the position so universally ac- 
cepted by students, that of waiter, may seem 
to some romantic. But those who have been 
so unfortunate, or fortunate, as some may pre- 
fer to call it, to occupy such a position, if 
consulted on the subject, would give a dif- 
ferent verdict. It has been the writer's 
lot to occupy such a place, and if his 
version is to be believed, certainly I think all 
will agree that the calling is neither a lucra- 
tive nor elevating one. 

As the summer months, which are 
allotted to us for rejuvenating our mental fac- 
ulties and toning up our physical constitu- 
tions, approach, some with this purpose in 
view leave the classic halls, others (the unini- 
tiated) who, it may be, are compelled in part 
to rely upon their own support, think of the 
hotel as the place where they may secure 
the forenamed conditions, and at the same 
time replenish their mind with useful knowl- 
edge, and their purse with the " filthy lucre " 
so much desired. But it is only necessary 
for the average student to meet with but one 
experience of this nature, before he will de- 
cide as to its propriety. 

Let him go, as a common waiter, he will 
be immediately informed by his haughty land- 
lord that his place is in the back part of the 
house, and that under no considerations must 



he be seen talking with the guests; by his 
mistress that his sleeping apartment is under 
the bowling alley, or in the basement contig- 
uous to the laundry, in reaching which he is 
warned by the laundress that none of her ap- 
paratus, which perhaps, may blockade the 
only accessible approach to his so-much-cov- 
eted retreat, must be moved. The head- 
waiter informs him that he must be regular 
at his meals, which will be served regardless 
of order, odor, or taste, and that under no con- 
ditions must he eat any article of food carried 
in the guests' dining-room. 

The respective cooks finally approach him 
with the most heart-rending of all demands, 
that of money. He does not yield, but after 
two or three days in the service, when he is in- 
formed that the people at his table are com- 
plaining of the kind and quality of their food 
and his attempts to explain the cause futile, 
rather than lose his position, he goes to the 
cooks and makes negotiations, promising 
them one-half or two-thirds of his perquisites, 
or in case he doesn't receive any, may be one- 
half of his wages, if they will make his orders 
palatable. 

Seven weeks have passed. The waiter 
returns home, with what success, you may 
ask. With his health improved? Yes, if 
sleeping in laundries or under bowling alleys 
are conducive to health. With his mind 
stored with useful knowledge? Certainly, if 
association with the help usually employed 
around hotels would afford such knowledge. 
With a well-filled purse ? Yes, if any money 
is left after paying cooks and car-fare. But 
some may say this is not a fair representation 
of the case. Some may look at it differently. 
But there is no one who has had experience 
here, who will say that the facts represented 
are not true. 



The first college paper ever published in 
America was the Dartmouth Gazette. Its 
first number appeared at Dartmouth College 
in 1810. 



162 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ALUMNI REUNIONS. 

The third annual banquet of the Bowdoin 
Alumni Association of the Northwest at the 
West Hotel, Minneapolis, Jan. 7, was attended 
by about sixteen graduates of old Bowdoin, 
mostly residents of St. Paul and Minneapo- 
lis. There was a slight increase in the at- 
tendance over last year, and some young 
faces among the number indicated that the 
famed institution is still sending out her 
sons into all parts of the country. It was 
nearly nine o'clock before all had arrived. 
After a few words of greeting the gentlemen 
proceeded to the private dining-room, where 
for an hour or more they discussed old times 
and a pleasing succession of choice dishes 
from Col. West's cuisine. At the close of 
the repast the President announced that in 
the absence of any set programme each mem- 
ber would be called upon to make a speech. 
This was carried out to the letter, and the 
speeches that followed occupied the time 
until nearly an hour after midnight. Officers 
for the ensuing year were then elected as 
follows : 

President, W. D. Washburn ; Vice-Pres- 
idents, R. W. Rundlett and Everett Ham- 
monds; Secretary, J. O. P. Wheelright; Ex- 
ecutive Committee, A. C. Cobb, Dr. C. H. 
Hunter, and Hon. F. H. Boardman. 

The following is a list of those present : 
Albert C. Cobb, class of '81 ; C. M. Fergu- 
son, '74 ; Thomas Kneeland, '74 ; Hon. F. 
H. Boardman, '69; George F. Bates, '82; 
J. O. P. Wheelright, O. J. Boardman, '73 ; 
W. D. Washburn, '54; Dr. C. H. Hunter, 
'74; T. C. Stevens, '81; Edward Simonton, 
'61 ; T. O. Merriam, '60 ; S. R. Child, '84 ; 
D. M. Scribner, '75 ; W. C. Merryman, '82 ; 
W. R. Morrison, '83. — Pioneer Press. 



The annual meeting of the Association of 
Bowdoin Alumni in Boston and vicinity took 
place at Young's Hotel, Wednesday, Jan. 



13th. The President of the Association, 
Professor Egbert C. Smyth of Andover, and 
President Hyde of the college held a recep- 
tion from four to six o'clock in the afternoon. 
About sixty sat down to the dinner, which 
with the post-prandial speeches, lasted from 
six o'clock till eleven. There was a relatively 
large representation of the graduates of the 
last ten or twenty years. The interest felt 
in the life and work of the college, both as 
each one remembered it and as it is now, was 
abundantly and unmistakably manifested. 
President Hyde was received with uniform 
and generous cordiality. After the blessing 
had been asked by the Rev. R. B. Howard, 
'56, President Smyth in a felicitous introduc- 
tion, presented President Hyde, who rose 
amidst demonstrations of enthusiastic wel- 
come. His extended statement of the condi- 
tion and needs of the college received the 
closest attention and called out a dissenting 
opinion in only a single case, to the effect 
that an increase of the general unconditioned 
endowment of the college, might be better 
than gifts to the same amount for special 
purposes such as those suggested by President 
Hyde. The tendency of the after-dinner 
speeches was mainly conservative in what- 
ever concerned the policy and work of the 
college. The Hon. Peleg W. Chandler, '34, 
stated in the course of some remarks which 
elicited frequent responses of approval, that 
as a trustee of the college, he used his in- 
fluence against the prevailing tendency of 
the present time to spread too much. His 
closing words, an eloquent tribute to Profes- 
sor Parker Cleaveland, whom he referred to 
as a man who never spread, we are through 
his courtesy enabled to give in another 
column. The poet, Samuel V. Cole, '74, 
read a fine poetic contribution to the festivi- 
ties of the evening. Remarks were also made 
by the R«v. Dr. George M. Adams, Overseer, 
'44, of HoUiston, Mass., Rev. John T. Ma- 
grath, '62, of Hyde Park, Mass., Hon. Wil- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



163 



liam D. Northend, '43, of Salem, Mass., Hon. 
Edward P. Loring, '61, of Fitchburg, Mass., 
and others. 

The oiScers of the Association for the 
following year are : President, Augustine 
Jones, '60 ; Vice-President, C. U. Bell, '63 ; 
Secretary, A. T. Parker, '76; Assistant Sec- 
retary, E. U. Curtis, '82 ; Executive Com- 
mittee, R. L. Hodgdon, '45, E. C. Smyth, '48, 
R. B. Howard, '56, E. P. Loring, '61, E. N. 
Packard, '62, W. E. Spear, '70, G. R. Swasey, 
'75, and F. V. Wright, '76. 



REMARKS OF REV. F. T. BAYLEY. 

Thursday, January 28th, was the day of 
prayer for colleges, and Rev. F. T. Bayley, 
of Portland, addressed the students in Me- 
morial Hall. His remarks were pointed and 
made their impression, and we give the fol- 
lowing abstract fi-om our notes : 

I do not come here to preach ; in fact, I 
wish you to forget that I am a minister, and 
let me talk to you about yourselves. It will 
make me happy if you will seriously enter- 
tain the question. What is your life ? Every 
inquiring mind naturally asks about every- 
thing brought to its attention two questions, 
What is it ? and Why is it ? Should not a 
man much more ask these questions concern- 
ing his own life ? 

Suppose you go to a great factory, where 
are produced wheels, and screws, and axles, 
and ask one of the mechanics for what he is 
making wheels, or screws, or axles, and he 
will tell you that they are to form a perfect 
locomotive. These things would not be made 
without an object. You are here in college 
for some object. So the farmer, when he 
sows his seed, has an object. What are all 
these things for ? Man inquires. What is it 
all for? 

A creature of the field may eat that he 
may live, but that is not sufficient for a man. 
You can do nothing successfully unless you 
have two things, a purpose and a plan. If a 
man adopt any purpose, if he does not work 
for that purpose according to a plan, he never 
reaches it. 



I am not a pessimist, nor is the Bible pes- 
simistic. I do not come here to take any hap- 
piness from your lives, but to ask you to 
think of them. An Architect has made a 
plan for your lives. It cannot be said there 
is no plan. Do you suppose that God, who 
made a plan for the worms, made man with- 
out any plan? It is a glorious thing to live 
because there is a plan, and it is your privi- 
lege to consult the plan of the Architect. 




And now the merry Medic 

comes 
To haunt our streets once 
more. 

And kill all tuneful Thomas cats 

That prove themselves a bore. 

So let us cease to load him with 

Gratuitous abuses, 

For in this good old town, at least, 

The Medic has his uses. 

Yet very soon the time will come, 

( The Lord preserve us! ) when 

He'll cease from killing Thomas cats, 

And try his hand at men. 
The class of '87 is sorry to miss the genial faces 
of several who were fellow-students in German last 
term. Although they never did much at recitations, 
their presence lent additional dignity to the class- 
room. 

The Grand Masquerade Ball to be held at the 
Town Hall, Wednesday evening, February 10th, will 
undoubtedly be the great social event of the year. 
The fact that some of the most prominent citizens of 
Brunswick are active in getting it up insures the 
high character of the entertainment. Music will be 
furnished by Grimmer's Orchestra, of Portland. A 
costumer from the Esses Costume Parlors, Boston, 
will be at the Town Hall, Tuesday and Wednesday, 
February 9th and 10th, with a large assortment of 
costumes, which may be obtained from him at prices 
ranging from one to five dollars. Refreshments will 
be furnished in the Court Room. Persons will be 
admitted to the floor only on presentation of invita- 
tions. Tickets, admitting a gentleman and two 
ladies, $1.50. 



164 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



There were seventy-five members present at the 
meeting of the Bowdoin Alumni Association held in 
Boston. President Hyde, in his remarks, set forth 
some of the needs of the college, and especially the 
need of a chair in Political Economy and History. 
The ball nine and boat crew are in active training 
this term, making the best of the few pieces of ap- 
paratus at their disposal. The rowing and pulley 
weights in the lower part of Winthrop are used, and 
for the past few weeks the running. truck in the new 
gymnasium has been made use of. 

Prof. Chapman recently delivered a lecture in 
Bangor before the Central Club. His subject was 
"Idyls of the King." 

"Esmeralda" was given in the Town Hall last 
week, the proceeds to go to the public library. The 
acting was very good indeed and all who went pro- 
nounced it a decided success. At the close of the 
entertainment quite a number remained and spent 
a short time quite enjoyably in dancing. The enter- 
tainment was given by the young ladies of the 
Shakespeare, Manning, and Crescent Clubs, and some 
of their number acted as ushers. The following is the 
cast of characters: "Old Man Rodgers," a North 
Carolina farmer— C. C. Choate, '87 ; Lydia Ann Rodg- 
ers, his wife — Miss Nellie M. Berry; Esmeralda, 
his daughter — Miss Allie Burgess ; Dave Hardy, a 
young North Carolinian— O. T. Newcomb ; Ester- 
brook, a man of leisure— Robert S. Thomas, '88 ; 
Jack Desmond, an artist: — A. W. Preston, '89; Nora 
Desmond — Miss Annie King ; Kate Desmond — Miss 
Annie Bates ; Marquis De Montesseu — Henry W. 
Beakman ; Geo. Drew — Willie R. Tenney. 

We pity, yes earnestly pity, 

The man who so stylish appears, 

Close-wrapped in a Bunker Hill collar, 

That sinks in the flesh of his ears. 

We've often longed to be stylish. 

But had we the almighty dollar 

We haven't the courage to be so 

By wearing a Bunker Hill collar. 
Edwin A. Wakefield is to establish a paper in 
Brunswick to be called the Bowdoin Journal. We 
have not seen the paper itself, but a circular pro- 
spectus informs us that the Journal is " a first-class 
family paper," that "Every one likes it. Every one 
wants it. Every one is going to have it." Also, that 
"Every man of business advertises in the Journal.'''' 
This must surely be very gratifying to Mr. Wake- 
field, as brother Tenney of the Telegraph informs us 
that advertisements always pay better than reading 
matter. The name of the new paper is certainly an 
excellent one, and should commend it to all sons 
of Bowdoin. 



The dude of the streets is quite harmless. 

The general dude is a fool ; 
But the dude that tires us greatly, 
Is the dude of the dancing school. 

Now that "Stack "is training in the "gym," he 
ought to put enough muscle into his profession to at 
least enable those rooming in Appleton and Maine 
to hear the bell. It should also be possible to walk 
from Winthrop Hall to South Maine between the 
alarms, but that is not always the case. If the bell 
were rung five minutes there would be a larger 
attendance at prayers. 

The Seniors, in the absence of President Hyde, 
last week read Mills' Utilitarianism and wrote out 
an abstract. 

The Bowdoin College Orchestra has been brought 
to life again, and practice several times a week in 
the qualitative laboratory. The Orchestra is com- 
posed of the following talent : E. B. Burpee, 1st 
violin ; E. B. Torrey, 2d violin; W. H. Bradford, 3d 
violin ; C. C. Torrey, violincello ; A. R. Butler, bass 
viol; C. C. Hutchins, flute; F. Adams, clarionet; S. 
G. Stacy, 1st cornet; V. O. White, 2d cornet; A. W. 
Preston, trombone. 

The midnight trains no longer collect the mail 
placed in the letter-box at the depot. All wishing 
mail to go by that train must post it in the office 
before 8 p.m. 

Professor Robinson delivered a lecture before the 
Bath High School last week, and also one at Frank- 
lin, N. H. On his return he re-visited the chemical 
laboratories at Harvard, and the Institute of Tech- 
nology. 

Some years ago there existed a society in college 
known as the Cleavland Scientific Society, but it has 
for some time been discontinued. A movement is 
now on foot to start a society in college of a similar 
nature, composed of instructors and students, and 
whose object shall be the discussion of subjects of 
scientific interest. 

The young ladies of the Congregational church 
will give a supper in their vestry some time during 
February. 

Some of the Freshmen were obliged to send out 
of the country to get suitable books in Greek to 
study. The Professor would confer a favor if he 
would select authors whose works are included in 
Harper Bros', library. 

Mr. Hutchins has been working this term on a 
small electrical dynamo which he intends to use in 
the lecture room in performing experiments before 
the class. 

The boiler has been set up in the gymnasium and 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



165 



the steam-pipes are now nearly all in place, so it is 
to be hoped we shall soon have a warm place for 
taking exercise. 

We understand that the business men of the town 
are going to get up a masked ball, which will be the 
event of the season. The best music to be had will 
be furnished and the company a very select one. 

As the weary local scribe was grinding out his 
semi-monthly contribution, he was startled by a suc- 
cession of hideous sounds and muffled blows from 
the room above him. With the instinct of his calling 
he at once commenced an investigation. Creeping 
stealthily upon the scene of action, a sight burst 
upon his startled eyes, such as it is seldom permitted 
even reporters to witness. Four Freshmen were en- 
gaged in an animated pillow-fight. Their torn 
clothing, and disheveled hair, showed the intensity 
of their feelings. They were amusing themselves in 
that delightful manner peculiar to underclassmen. 
The scribe watched them for a moment in thought- 
ful retrospection. The scenes of his Freshman year 
returned to his mind with realistic distinctness. 
Alas! those childish days ; those boyish sports ; those 
wild outbursts of exuberant mirth, would never re- 
turn, and he went back to his weary labors in the 
sad realization that he was indeed "growing old." 

Some of the Freshmen had a "large time," last 
Wednesday night. There were no lessons to be pre- 
pared for the morrow, and they seized the oppor- 
tunity to exchange room-mates with those in other 
dormitories. The change of bed-clothing and wall- 
paper thus afforded was peculiarly refreshing. It 
isn't often that Freshmen go visiting, and the excite- 
ment of travel, and strange scenes, is especially 
resuscitating to debilitated systems. 

A gentleman from the rural districts is anxious 
to form the acquaintance of a Mr. Murpee, one of 
the students. Mr. Murpee rooms, he informs us, 
near the meeting-house on the campus. Any one 
knowing such a person will confer a favor by com- 
municating with the Orient. 

Dinner Scene : Upperolassmen are talking of 
the decline of Mr. Booker's athletic powers ; why he 
graduated only in '64. Freshman breaks in: "I 
know that Mr. Booker is very intellectual, but I 
didn't know that he was a collegiate." 

Rev. Mr. Bayley, of Portland, delivered a very 
able discourse before the students in Memorial Hall, 
Thursday, January 28th. 

A Freshman was considerably surprised recently, 
on returning from the dancing school, to find that 
his bed had evidently taken wings and soared beyond 
" the land of Freshman wailing." A long and care- 



ful search revealed the fact that it had set itself up in 
the room of a brother Freshman. No reason can be 
assigned for this action, unless the bed intended it 
as a delicate hint for a change of sheets. 

Several Freshmen who "didn't object to smok- 
ing," received a social call from a band of college 
fumigators the other evening. Nothing could exceed 
the bland politeness of the guests, who exerted 
themselves to their utmost to entertain their genial 
hosts with story telling, songs, and general convivi- 
ality. The first host stuck to his post though his 
"eyes moistened and his lion mien grew pale." His 
guests finally thanked him for his hospitality, and 
started out to see another Freshman. He received 
them with all the studied etiquette of blue-blooded 
"culchaw." The same programme was carried out 
as at the previous room. The host, with classical 
indifference joined them in a cigarette, but presently 
laid it aside, and with pallid brow, began to carry 
out the debris with a zeal worthy of Seco. Three 
times he left the room — to divest himself of break- 
fast, dinner, and supper — and while he was out a 
fourth time endeavoring to throw up his boots, his 
guests, seeing that he was smoked out, bade him an 
affectionate good-night. 

Scene in the English History Class: Student — 
" Isn't the emigration of Chinese to Australia a very 
grave calamity?" Professor — "Yes, and another 
very grave calamity is the rapid multiplication of 
rabbits on that island. It will get so soon that white 
men can't live there." 

The following is the programme of the Senior and 
Junior Exhibition, '86-'87, in Memorial Hall, Thurs- 
day evening, December 17, 1886 : 

MUSIC 

Salutatory. A. R. Butler, Portland. 

Thomas Paine in the American Revolution. 

J. C. Parker, Lebanon. 
Extract from Plato's Apology of Socrates. 

*C. J. Goodwin, Farmington. 

MUSIC 

Necessity of Independence in Opinion. 

P. L. Smith, "Waterboro. 
Oration on the Death of Henrietta Marie. 
(English Version from Boussuet.) 

* Austin Cary, Machias. 
Social Condition. C. A. Byram, Freeport. 

Speech Against the Trial of Louis XVI. 
(English Version from Fauchet.) 

* M. L. Kimball, Norway. 

MUSIC. 

John Wyclif. G. M. Norris, Monmouth. 

Supposed Speech of Leonidas to the Spartans. 
(English Version from Seneca.) 

*L. B. Varney, Litchfield. 
King John. George S. Berry, Damariscotta. 

HUSIC. 



166 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




'34.— Re7. Henry T. 
Cheever, D.D., of Worces- 
Mass., has recently published a 
book, entitled "Correspondencies of 
Faith," the inception of which are in a 
great measure, the author says, to the writ- 
ings of Professor Upham, and has largely to do with 
his work on Madame Guyon. The book is dedicated 
to Bovvdoin College. 

'34. — Rev. Edwin B. Webb, D.D., was elected to 
the Presidency of the Congregational Club of Boston 
and vicinity, at the annual meeting of the club on 
the 2oth of January. 

'35.— Rev. S. Allen, D.D., of Augusta, was elected 
one of the Vice-Presidents of the New England 
Methodist Historical Society. 

'49.— Rev. J. K. Mason, D.D., of Fryeburg, is 
delivering a course of lectures before the students of 
Bangor Theological School during the present term 
there. 

'49. — David A. Wasson (a member, but not a 
graduate of this class), in an editorial of a recent 
number of the Boston Herald was spoken of as " one 
of the brightest and strongest minds of this genera- 
tion, one whose work is chiefly scattered throuo-h 
our periodical literature but whose writings are next 
to Emerson's in the quality of an almost unlimited 
suggestiveness." 

'54. — Mr. J. R. Osgood will soon leave to repre- 
sent Harper & Brothers in London. His long famil- 
iarity with the literati of England will render him a 
most efiicient representative of this leading publish- 
ing house. 

'55. — Hon. William L. Putnam, LL.D., was elected 
Vice-President, and Franklin C. Payson ('76), Sec- 
retary of the Cumberland Bar Association at its 
annual dinner, January 26th. 

'57. — F. B. Stewart is preaching In Lynn, Mass. 

'60.— Hon. W. W. Thomas, Jr., is talked of 
among the Portland Republicans as a candidate for 
mayor of the city. 

'60. — Hon. Thomas B. Reed, LL.D., takes a part 
in the controversy now going on in Massachusetts 
over the proposition to substitute biennial for annual 
elections, by writing a letter in which he expresses 
strongly the opinion that the citizens of Maine made 



a mistake in giving up annual elections and annual 
sessions of the Legislature. He says : " When you 
double the prize for which corrupt politicians or in- 
terested monopolists may strive by making two years 
of power the stake, instead of one, you double the 
incentive to fraud in elections, to bribery and wrong- 
doing, and divide by two the power of the people to 
correct wrong, to make progress and punish dis- 
honest servants." 

'66. — Prof. H. L. Chapman reviews Richard 
Grant White's "Studies in Shakespeare," and Mr. 
Samuel V. Cole ('74), reviews several volumes of 
poetry in the January number of the Andover Review ; 
in the February Review Prof. Chapman reviews 
Sted man's " Poets of America." 

'72. — Mr. C. M. Whitaker of the Southbridge Jour- 
nal has purchased the old and popular newspaper, 
the New England Farmer. Mr. W. was one of the 
founders of the Bowdoin Orient. He contributed 
a verjf interesting series of papers to our last vol- 
ume on " Bowdoin in Journalism." 

'73. — Prof. Robinson recently delivered a very 
interesting lecture on Chemistry, before the Bath 
High School scholars. Prof. R. is one of the most 
interesting and popular lecturers of the State. 

'73. — William G. Fassett died in Denver, Col- 
orado, January 23d. He went to Colorado imme- 
diately after graduation on account of -failing health ; 
but after remaining two or three years in Denver, 
his health seemed to be sufficiently restored to admit 
of his returning to his home in Portland. There he 
studied law and was admitted to the Bar in 1878. 
The state of his health, however, compelled him to 
return to Denver, where he opened an office and 
entered upon the practice of his profession. A severe 
hemorrhage on the 3d of January was the immediate 
cause of his death. 

'78. — Alfred E. Burton, Professor of Topograph- 
ical Engineering in the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, paid a short visit to his home in this 
village last week. He was recently elected a coun- 
cilor in topography of the Apalachian Society. 

'80. — Mr. Henry A. Wing, who for several years 
past has creditably filled the position of city editor 
on the Commercial, has closed his connection with 
that jsaper. He will be succeeded by Mr. Tryon, 
formerly of the Portland Press. Before leaving their 
work for the day the compositors assembled to- 
gether, and through Mr. I. N. Clufi", foreman of the 
office, presented Mr. Wing a handsome testimonial 
of their esteem. Though taken by surprise, Mr. 
Wing was equal to the occasion and fittingly re- 
sponded. — Bangor Whig. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



167 



'81. — Frederic A. Fisher, Esq., formerly instructor 
in Matliematics in the college, was in town for a few 
days last week. He is established in the practice of 
law in Lowell, Mass., and is meeting with good 
success. 

'83. — Gibson has been appointed Assistant Sur- 
geon in Maternity Hospital at Munich, where he is 
studying. 

'83. — Pearson is the first father of his class. 

'85. — Tarr is teaching at Boothbay, Me. 

At a recent examination before the Massachusetts 
Board of Commissioners in Pharmacy for the Cer- 
tificate of a Registered Pharmacist, there were fifty 
applicants, of whom only four passed the examina- 
tion. F. H. Eames, '82, was one of the successful 
four. 

Married, Dec. 24th, Z. W. Kemp to Lillian, 
daughter of Gardiner Boynton of Norway. 

Married in Denver, Col., Nov. 5, 1885, D. P. 
Howard, ex-'85, to Miss Minnie F. Palmer of Denver. 




The last issue of the Hamptonia contains some 
very interesting reading. The article on the 
"Chinese Question," by G. W. Crane of Seattle, W. 
T., is an able and concise statement of a growing 
evil in our social and industrial life, that is destined 
ere long, unless restrained by legislation of a more 
stringent character, to assume alarming proportions. 
The first editorial in the Social Fraternity's depart- 
ment, is a production of far more than ordinary 
merit. Mounting above the mediocrity of ordinary 
school journalism, it conies at once into the realm of 
terse and vigorous thought, and we gladly hail it as 
a marlied advance over anything of the kind we have 
yet seen in our fitting school exchanges. 



IN CAP AND BELLS. 

In cap and bells the jester sung 
At court of kings and gaily flung 

His sparkling jests at high and low, 

And made the merry laughter flow 

"While yet our toiling world was young. 



But now, ahl now, the songs that sprung 
From lips of old, and blithely rung. 
Are heard no more as long ago 
In cap and bells. 

Yet should I bring, who long have hung 
O'er mirthful tales of those who clung 
To " motley," but the faintest glow 
Of their swift-flashing wit, I know 
Not all in vain my lyre is strung 

In cap and bells. — A 



BOOK NOTICES. 



In reviewing Richter's Liorganic Chemistry, of 
which we have received a copy, we are especially 
interested by the easy and natural association of 
theory and fact, thus placing the student in a pocilion 
not only to be acquainted with the more common 
phenomena of the science, but also to deduce original 
results from his knowledge. Among the colleges 
which recommend this work are Yale, Dartmouth, 
Trinity, the University of Pennsylvania, the R. P. I., 
etc. Published by P. Blakiston, Son, & Co., 1012 
Walnut St., Philadelphia. Price, in cloth, S2.00. 

We have received Smith's Diagram of Parlia- 
mentary Practice, from the Review and Eerald, Bat- 
tle Creek, Michigan. It is a neat little bonk, and 
the Diagram itself will enable any one, whether con- 
versant with parliamentary rules or not, to seize at 
a glance upon the important points of procedure. 



H, V. STACKPOLE, 

FINE BOOTS AND SHOES, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



ELEGANT JIACKINAW 

STRAW HATS, 

THE BEST QUALITY, 

$1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 

MERRY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND. 

-eS. R. JACKSON, 2D, s- 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Overshoes, Rubber Boots, and Rubbers 

Constantly on hand in large variety. Call and examine. 

No. 2 Odd Fellows Block, 



MAIN STREET, 



BRUITSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, ivdl 
find the RICHSIOND STRAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO AUi OTHERS. 
Ihey are made from the torigbtcst, most 
delicately flavored, and blghest cost 
gold leaf grown m Virginia, and are abso- 
lutely -wlSioiit a d.Tilt«ratlon or djugs. 

J^TRAIGHTCUFf?: 

We use the Genuine French Rtce Paper 

of our oivn direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smoiiers are cantionedthat this is the old and 
original brand, and to observe that each pack- 
ageorbox of «^^«^i^^^""i^^«"^"^" 

^ niGAREHES 

signature of ^^BHH^^IHB^^^^BB 

ALLEN &CenTER 

MAMCTAOTtmEBS, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

njaine Ceni^ral H. ^. 

On and after Oct. 12th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.15, 11.2.5 A.M., 2.38, 4.45 and 6.25 p.m., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Rockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.38 P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.40 P.M., and 

12.35 (night). 
For Lewiston, 8.15 A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. (mixed), and 2.45 P.M. 
For Augusta and Waterville, 8.20 A.M., 2.40 P.M., 12.45 every 

night, and on Saturdays only at 6.35 P.M. 
For Skowhegau, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 (night)' 
For Bangor, Ellsworth, Mt. Desert Ferry, St. Stephen, Houlton 

Vanceboro, and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Bar Harbor, 12.45 (night). 

Note.— The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
iston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun- 
day, but do not connect for Skow^hegan on Monday nioming, or 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sun- 
day morning. 

PATSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BOOTHBY, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 6, 1885. 



SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. 

Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 

The following are our well known 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Capokal, Sweet Caporal, St. James 1-2, Caporal 1-2, 

St. James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS, STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES, 
Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and French Rice Paper, are roUed by the high- 
est class of skilled labor, and warranted free fi'om flavoring or 
impurities 

Every genuine Cigarette hears a fac-simile of Kinney Bros. 
Signature. 

KIlSrWE^ TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KINNEY BItOS. 

NEW YORK. 




53 



lleliedfi 



The Sixtj'-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 4th,18S6, 
and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— REV. Wm. DeWitt Hyde, President: Alfkeu 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrice and 
Diseases of Women and Children ; CiLiRLES W. GoDDARD, A.M., 
Medical .Jurisprudence; Frederick H. Gerrish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Franklin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemisti-y; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henry H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Young, Public Hygiene; 
Irving E. Kimbai.l, M.D., Demonsti-ator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonsti-ator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
BruuBwick, Maine. 

MIXTURES FOR PIPE OR CIGARETTE- 
THREE KINGS, Turkish, Perique and Virginia. 
MELLOW MIXTURE, Turkish and Perique. 
TURKISH and ViRGIIMIA. 
PERIQUE and VIRGIIMIA. 
GENUINE TURKISH. 
Flake Cuts Especially Adapted for the Pipe. 
VANITY FAIR. OLD GOLD. 

Fragrant Vanity Fair, Superlative, and Clot!) of Goid Cigarettes 

ALWAYS FRESH, CLEAN AND SWEET. 

Our cigarettes were never so fine as now, they cannot be sur- 
passed for purity and excellence. Only the purest rice paper 
used. 14 riKST- PRIZE MEDAIS. 

WM. S. KIMBALL & CO. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday Morning by A, G. Tenney. 

Terms, ----- $1.50 ti Tear in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



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We have constantly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 

35YKON STEVENS. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

j8S-Special Kates to Student Clubs.-ffiS 









latl. 



DEALER IN 

CEDAK STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Branch office three doors north of Tontiue Hotel. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
^P Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

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COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



Successor to Atwood & "Wentworth, 
DEALER m 

DIA^pOt^DS, WATCHES, JEWELRYt 

and importers of French Clocks, Opera Glasses, etc. 
Fine Watch Repairing ; Gold and Silver Plating. 

509 CONGRESS ST., Portland, Me. 

ALL THE STUDENTS SHOULD BUY 

THEIR 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND HUBBEES 

AT 

Frank E. Roberts' Boot & Shoe Store, 

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^OID PHOSPHATE. 

[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

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IT MARKS A DELICIOUS DRINK AVITH "WATER AND SUGAR ONLY. 
Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

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■'-^^1886. <5. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, test- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

CsBsar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
^neid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar, — Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory coarse. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regular Examinations eoe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. II and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. ' The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Hallowell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — EOUE HOUKS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terras. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEB. 17, 1886. 



No. 14. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAT DUBING 
THE COLLEGIATE TEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

W. V. Wentworth, '86, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
J. H. Davis, '86. Levi Turner, Jr., 'St 

A. A. Kno-wlton, '86. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. 0. Parker, '86. C. B. Burleigh, '87. 

H. L. Taylor, '86. E. C. Plummer, '87. 



Per annum, in advance $2.00 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extr.i copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to the Busiuess Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
mHnicati<^ns in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and .\luinni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, per.souals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 

Vol. XV., No. 14.— February 17, 1886. 

A Winter Torrent, 169 

Editorial Notes, 169 

A College Metamorphosis, 170 

A Half Hour with Myself 171 

Thackeray 172 

The Prominent Man, 173 

The Labor Question 174 

Social Element in College, 176 

Answers to Correspondents, 176 

CoLLEGn Tabula, 176 

Personal 178 

In Memoriam, 179 

Clippings, 179 

A WINTER TORRENT. 

Roaring, 

Whirling, tumbling, 

Over the rooks 

Bearing the heavy bloclis 

Of ice. Rushing madly on 

Carrying all before. Trees are torn 

From the banks. Great logs roll by ; 

A boat, unguided, no harbor nigh, 

Carried headlong on. Life its 

Stormy torrent has, perchance. 

Whirling, tumbling, 

Roaring. 




It is the fashion for a certain set of 
students to decry the ranking system and 
loudly proclaim that they " care nothing for 
rank," but their position is rendered untena- 
ble by their own action. Nowhere is incon- 
sistency more clearly illustrated than by 
these apostles of the no-rank system. These 
same independent spirits are the first to de- 
nounce the unfortunate instructor who gives 
them a little lower mark than they have con- 
sidered their desert, though of course their 
indignation arises from a desire to see justice 
done. 

But certainly we shall find that they 
adopt no unfair means to obtain rank ! Yes, 
if " cribbing "; studying during recitations ; 
feigning an unbounded interest in books 
bearing upon a professor's branch, though 
the covers are never opened ; " cutting " 
when it is one's turn to recite and the lesson 
is not well learned ; getting excused when 
the lesson is difficult ; attempts to draw lead- 
ing questions from a professor ; after correc- 
tion, declaring that the opposite meaning was 
intended; and the whole series of actions 
known as " chinning for rank," constitute 
perfect fairness and indifference. 

Though these endeavors to obtain posi- 
tions higher than deserved are too often suc- 
cessful, the subject would hardly merit 



170 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



editorial notice were there not danger that 
some of that class may obtain Commence- 
ment orations to the exclusion of those who 
are really better scholars. Probably every 
student would like a Commencement part, 
and it hardly seems just that any, who have 
worked faithfully and done well during the 
whole course, should lose their well-earned 
position through the generally despised arti- 
fices of others, who have discovered that the 
merit of their work is not sufficient to win 
for them the coveted honor. 

We understand that the faculty are not 
imposed upon by all of these schemes, and 
we are aware that the judgment, not only of 
the present Senior class but of others, may 
be wrong, still a class has, after all, the best 
opportunity to learn, regarding its members, 
how much of their recitations indicates a 
knowledge of the subject and how much is 
intended to deceive the professors, and we 
hope that our faculty will see that a critical 
eye reduces the evil to a minimum. 



Through the generosity of Hon. Henry J. 
Furber, '59, of Chicago, one of the vacant pan- 
els upon the south side of the chapel will soon 
be filled. The painting will be upon canvas, 
moiinted on a movable stretcher, and will, 
undoubtedly, be finer than any of those which 
at present adorn the walls of King Chapel. 
Mr. Frederic Vinton, of Boston, one of the 
finest portrait painters in the country, will 
be the artist. The subject selected is " Adam 
and Eve," by Flandrin, one of the decora- 
tions in the church of Saint Germain des 
Pres, Paris. The original is regarded as ex- 
ceptionally fine, and the treatment is said to 
be so masterly that one may there observe the 
expression upon their countenances, which 
every one expects to find, but which is gen- 
erally made subservient to beauty and fine- 
ness of form. 



Many of us were disappointed when the 
Stockbridge lecture course was abandoned 



for lack of support last fall, but the Literary 
Association did not, after the experience of 
last year, feel like attempting anything this 
winter. The faculty, however, took the 
matter in hand and succeeded in getting 
Rev. Mr. Guild to deliver a course of six 
lectures upon "English Literature," espe- 
cially that of the seventeenth century. This 
is the course which Mr. Guild gave last year 
in Lowell, and we were pleased to see that 
an appreciation of his kindness in repeating 
it for our benefit was shown by the large 
attendance at the opening lecture, Tuesday, 
Feb. 9th. That one displayed the clearness 
of thought and aptness of expression, charac- 
terizing the gentleman's sermons and attract- 
ing so many of the students to his church. 



A COLLEGE METAMORPHOSIS. 

'Twas in his Freshman year quite late, 
One autumn eve we found him 
Hard digging out the classic lore, 
Not any " horses " round him. 

"Young man," we said, " though we commend 
This grand scholastic pride. 
You'll reach, we think, the ' promised land ' 
Much easier to ride." 

He gazed at us in stern disgust 
Throughout this observation ; 
And then voiced forth in thund'rous tones 
His mighty indignation. 

"Why did we seek these classic halls," 

He asked with earnest air, 
"If not to cultivate our minds 

By studious toil and care." 

Besides he hoped he still possessed 
A little grain of honor, 
And of the " horse " was e'en from youth 
A most inveterate scorner. 

We left. We'd fallen far we knew 
In this man's estimation. 
And felt within our guilty heart 
His manly condemnation. 



Time sped on and summer came. 
We met our friend once more. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



171 



And almost wept when we beheld 
The mighty oaths he swore. 

'•Why is this thus," we asked abashed 

At his bold conversation. 
'Because," he said, " these Lyric Poets 

Possess no good translations. 

Tve got a ' horse ' on Horace's Odes, 
The work of one named Smart, 
And manage well to get my ' Trig ' 
By aid of copying art." 

We left for we had seen enough 
Of this degenerate man, 
Yet when he layed his scruples down 
We felt his sense began. 

As long as faculties delight 

Long lessons in providing. 

So long, up learning's rugged height, 

Will students go on riding. 



A HALF HOUR WITH MYSELF. 

I don't pretend to be a philosopher at 
all, in fact I am as un-Emerson like as possi- 
ble. I have studied Psychology, a little Eth- 
ics, and have done some reading in Philoso- 
phy, yet I make no pretensions. 

I have been accused of being cynical bj^ 
those whom I have ventured to criticise, but 
they are those, who, although they hate to 
admit it, even to themselves, see a gleam of 
truth in the Parthian darts which I have 
sometimes shot. 

Some one has said, " Be yourself." This 
saying I try to follow, and if I don't always 
succeed, it isn't the fault of the remark. 

If I appear to criticise in an unkindly 
vein, remember that however freely I may 
treat the faults of others, yet I don't spare 
myself. 

When twilight falls, I like to draw my 
easy chair up to the glowing fire and think 
over what my neighbors have done, and what 
they haven't done ; what I myself have ac- 
complished, and what I've left undone. 

I remember I met A — , whom I hadn't 
seen for some time, the other day. He 



rushed up to me with every appearance 
of cordiality, shook me warmly by the hand, 
and said he was " very glad to see me." I 
returned his hearty shake and inquired after 
his health. That same evening, happening 
to be walking along just behind him, I over- 
heard him say to his companion, "That Big- 
ley (my name) makes me tired. He's about 
the worst toady to the faculty I ever saw. 
Conceit ! why he's primed with it." (Now I 
am not aware that I toady, or am more con- 
ceited than the general run, but it may be.) 
I passed by without a word. We haven't 
spoken since. 

I wonder why I played whist last night 
and didn't get that lesson. Of course I was 
called up and of course took a complete 
flunk. How was I to blame ? The profes- 
sor, " he done it." It's just my confounded 
luck. 

"You have a large number of absences 
from chapel," said my class officer on the day 
of reckoning. " Have you any excuse ? " 

" Yes sir, the chapel is rather cold, so I 
thought it would be dangerous to go in." 

" 0, that is no excuse," said the professor, 
" if I can attend, the students should not 
complain." (The professor has been present 
once during the term, and that once on a 
warm day.) 

My neighbor plays the trombone. I like 
music ; in fact have a passion for it. I gen- 
erally sit down to play awhile after 4 o'clock. 
Just as soon as I get comfortably under way, 
a crash ! bang ! whoop ! I cling to my chair 
in apprehension. Don't mind, it's merely my 
neighbor across the way practicing on his 
trombone. I take my hat and go out to find 
some stone wall to butt my head against. He 
took it rather hard when I spoke to him about 
it, and said that it was none of my business. 

The professor got off a remark which he 



172 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



evidently thought funny. The fellows all 
laughed. I didn't. I found my rank at the 
end of the term to be very low. The world 
still moves, however. 

I asked him if he was going to plug that 
evening. " Oh, no," he said, in a careless 
sort of way, " go in on blood." 

I had to be up late that night and just 
before going to bed went out to the pump 
after some water. I could see him through 
his window, studying for all he was worth. 

The next morning he made a brilliant 
recitation. " Quite a sail on blood," said he 
to me after recitation. I didn't say anything, 
but I don't consider him the genius that some 
do. 

We call him "The Hatchet Fiend" in 
our end. He borrows my hatchet. When 
my fire goes out, I have to go up three flights 
of stairs to get it again. I ask him if he's 
through with it. He says he is. " Thank 
you," says I. " You're very welcome," says 
he. 

I have to pay my share of the " Average 
Repairs." I never have any repairs done on 
my own room, so I break all the windows I 
can, so as to be sure and get my money's 
worth. 

Am I cynical or not ? 



THACKERAY. 

The peculiar province of the novelist is to 
amuse. This, indeed, all strive to do; for 
according to their ability to amuse they suc- 
ceed or fail. But beyond the entertainment, 
there must be a lesson, good or bad, in every 
novel. It must be so whether the author 
wills or not. We read a novel. Perhaps no 
lesson is intended, but by every character, 
every circumstance of the tale, we — con- 
sciously or unconsciously — are influenced. 
Every character is sure to leave its impres- 



sion on our minds and morals. The girl 
will be taught modesty or immodesty, simplic- 
ity or affectation ; the youth will be taught 
manliness or meanness, integrity or deceit. 

There are novels Avritten to amuse only. 
But I doubt if they will even amuse if they 
fail to teach anything. Such novels are not 
simply not good ; they are worse than worth- 
less ; they intoxicate the mind, and unfit it 
for its proper food. 

None of Thackeray's novels are of this lat- 
ter class. He hates the shams and the little 
meannesses of society, and against these he 
hurls the shafts of his satire. And very tell- 
ing they are. He shows how thoroughly bad 
some phases of life are, and thus gives a more 
effective lesson of warning than any amount 
of preaching possibly could. 

Unlike most novelists he does not seek 
to give us his ideals of perfect men and 
women. His heroes and heroines are pict- 
ures of real character. This appearance of 
reality adds greatly to the effect of his lessons. 
What girl would wish to be like Beatrix ! 
She proves the utter wretchedness of her 
manner of living. Hers is a character that no 
young man would love, no girl would imi- 
tate. But nothing is overdrawn in it. We 
at no time feel the want of the reality. We 
may go through all the characters of Thack- 
eray with the same result. The good are 
not angels that we know are far above the 
reality. They are men and women such as 
we may meet every day. They have their 
faults and their weaknesses, but we like them 
all the better for it. We love Esmond 
and Col. Newcome for their noble and gen- 
erous natures, although we may pity their 
weaknesses. 

Some are accustomed to regard great 
writers as men to whom writing is no effort, 
but simply a pastime. An examination of 
Thackeray's novels will soon dispel such an 
illusion. In " Vanity Fair," in " Pendennis," 
in "The Newcomes," and in "The Virgin- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



173 



ians " most of all, there is a certain wander- 
ing of the narrative which seems to indicate 
an idle, desultory writer. But in creating 
" Esmond," Thackeray has evidently given 
us his best — the result of painstaking thought 
and study. And when we see how much 
better it is than any of his other works, we 
cannot forbear the thought that, although 
his life's gift to literature is not small, it is 
but a fraction of what he might have given 
us. 

One of the admirable features about " Es- 
mond " is the perfection of his imitation of 
the language of the period in which the book 
is supposed to be written. Thackeray has 
endeavored to throw the narrative back into 
the time of Queen Anne. Whether he has 
succeeded is a question on which we may 
form some opinion. We have the letters of 
Swift, the papers of Addison and Steele, and 
the novels of Defoe from which we can catch 
the peculiarities of the language of the day. 
And we are bound to say that the imitation 
is excellent. Nothing is unnatural or af- 
fected. No one would even suspect that the 
story was told by a writer of the present 
century. 

Thackeray has often been accused of 
being a cynic, of course not because of his 
life, but because of the satire running through 
all his writings. But on the whole the evi- 
dence of his books tends to disprove the 
charge. We do not believe that any one at 
all cynical in his nature could portray such 
characters as Ethel Newcome, Esmond, 
Lady Castlewood, and the Warringtons. In 
short, we do not believe a cj'nic could write 
a novel in which the hero or the heroine 
would be loved and admired. The follow- 
ing lines, written shortly after the death of 
Thackeray, give an excellent picture of the 
author and the man : 

" O gentle censor of our age ! 
Prime master of our ampler tongue ! 



Whose word of wit and generous page 
Were never wrath, except with wrong. 

'Fielding — without the manner's dross. 
Scott — with a spirit's larger room. 
What Prelate deems thy grave his loss P 
What Halifax erects thy tomb ? " 



THE PROMINENT MAN. 

There is probably no natural creation in 
the form of humanity that is so invariably 
present and exerts himself so needlessly as 
the above-named animal. You can visit no 
social gathering, attend no party, or spend 
a few days at no watering place, without 
meeting this willful waste of flesh and bones. 

But especially is he unbearable in small 
companies, where it is impossible to overlook 
him and where his senseless talk is a nec- 
essary check on all other conversation. Then 
one fully realizes the meaning of the simple 
word "bore," with a vividness not to be 
dimmed by any flight of years. 

It was my misfortune during the last season 
to unwitingly fall into the clutches of one of 
these men, and I give below my experience 
in the slender hope that some bore may read 
it and recognize the error of his ways. It 
happened thus : A small party set out from 
Portland to make a yachting trip down the 
coast and in that party was the subject of 
this article. To look at him one would think 
him perfectly harmless. His face wore that 
sweetly bland expression which indicates a 
blissful consciousness or lack of brains, and 
his prettily curled hair seemed to mark him 
as one of nature's infants who are chiefly use- 
ful as ornaments for hotel veranders. So I 
allowed him to come aboard without injury. 

But there was more activity in the creat- 
ure than I had supposed, and while we were 
stowing the baskets I heard him running up 
the gib, though the other sails were not 
loosed and we were fast to the buo3^ 

Finally we got under way and then he 



174 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



He criticised the cut of the sails, 
remarked that the craft was rather slow, and 
suggested improvements for the cabin. He 
entered into a long discussion concerning the 
relative merits of iron and lead keels, and 
kindly informed us why the Puritan beat the 
Genesta. Then he gave us a very full descrip- 
tion of a yacht that could easily outsail those 
champions, and predicted that in ten years, 
center-board yachts would be unknown. By 
the time he had exhausted these subjects we 
were passing Half-way Rock Lighthouse, and 
so he thought it necessary to advance the 
wonderfully penetrating opinion that it must 
be lonesome on that barren ledge, three miles 
out at sea. Of course he had a suggestion to 
offer. Government ought to connect that 
light with the land by a marine cable, and 
by the time he had showed the entire feasi- 
bility of his scheme and proved the superior- 
ity of an electric light over any other kind, 
we had reached Seguin. Then, of course, 
he had to tell us all about the shooting acci- 
dent at Fort Popham, and argue whether it 
was willful murder or not. He criticised the 
fort's structure, showed that those huge bowl- 
ders at the mouth of the Kennebec must have 
been brought from Canada during the glacial 
period, and set forth cause why Seguin was 
an island instead of a portion of Small Point. 
He then began a description of the Maine 
coast as it must have been during the paleo- 
zoic age, but before he had finished, we 
reached Squirrel Island, the end of our sail. 
There I got a rest and by the next day was 
recruited enough to make the return trip. It 
was just the same. He was plainly a man who 
could have improved the plan of creation and 
given Moses numerous pioints on the law. 
His experience was very extended and cov- 
ered everything that could possibly happen 
to mankind. He supported the Darwinian 
theory, advocated a prohibitory law, and 
declared his conviction that the sea-serpent 
actually exists. 



Possibly he was silent five minutes during 
the return, but certainly not more than that. 
When at last I got him safely ashore, the re- 
action came on, and for three days I lay at 
anchor in Portland Harbor, completely ex- 
hausted and without interest in life. When 
I returned to the cottage I was hardly able 
to convince my friends that I had not just 
arisen from a sick-bed, and I found upon 
weighing myself that I had lost seven and 
one-half pounds of flesh during that short 
space of time. Now I am quite recovered, 
but j'ou will notice that my form is somewhat 
bent and it is a fact that I have never been 
able to stand perfectly erect since my experi- 
ence with that Prominent Man. 



THE LABOR QUESTION. 

A few days since our attention was called 
to the condition of the laboring classes in 
this country and in Europe, and the great 
importance of the problem, — What must be 
the future relations between' capital and 
labor was commended to the earnest consid- 
eration of every student who would become 
a useful citizen. The current newspapers 
and periodicals are crowded with reports of 
mass meetings held in the interests of the 
laboring classes. Strikes are of daily occur- 
rence in different sections of the country. 
They represent a great diversity of in- 
dustries, and are far-reaching in their effects. 
At one time the railroad interests are con- 
cerned ; at another the coal and iron inter- 
ests. Cotton and woolen mills are shut 
down, and the united bakers refuse to give 
us bread. 

To such an extent has this struggle be- 
tween labor and capital spread, and so alarm- 
ing are its proportions at the present time that 
a more careful study of the conditions of the 
laboring classes, than can be gained by con- 
fining one's attention to the daily papers, — 
important as they indeed are, seems to us to 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



175 



be essential. This struggle between labor 
and capital has not originated in the imme- 
diate past. If we could trace it back to its 
beginning we should find it running far back 
even of tlie statute of laborers of Edward III. 
Throughout all history we may read of the 
unceasing efforts of the laboring classes to 
secure greater freedom and redress for real 
and sometimes fancied wrongs. 

To form a just and adequate conception 
of the labor question in our own couirtry we 
have to consider it from many standpoints. 
To understand the motives and feelings of 
the laborers of our country we have to study 
the motives and feelings of a class of people 
made up largely from various European 
nations. Difference of religious and national 
feeling must be considered. The conditions 
under which they have lived, and on ac- 
count of which many of them have come to 
America, have an important bearing upon 
their course of life, and the sympathies that 
influence them in their relations with the 
laboring communities in which they live. 

The condition of the laboring classes in 
Europe cannot well be understood by merely 
reading the foreign news columns of our 
daily papers. What they tell us is good so 
far as it goes. The best sources from which 
one may gain an accurate knowledge of the 
state of the working classes in Europe are 
the United States Consular Reports pub- 
lished in 1885 by the government. They are 
very complete and give detailed accounts of 
the rates of wages, cost of living, provisions 
made by the employers for the comfort and 
welfare, and, in short, are full of information 
upon all points touching the labor interests 
in Europe. 

Another work of great v/ilue is the spe- 
cial report of Dr. Edward Young, entitled 
"Labor in Europe and America." Dr. 
Young's report takes up the matter histori- 
cally, and beginning with labor in Egypt in 
remote times traces its conditions and de- 



velopment in all the principal European 
countries. In the chapter on " Labor in 
Europe under the Feudal System " a great 
deal of valuable information is given that 
would be difficult to reach elsewhere. The 
portion of the work given to labor in the 
United States is not so extensive as that 
given to labor in Europe ; at the same time 
it is extensive enough to embody much that 
is valuable and will richly repay a careful 
examination. 

Last year the report of the committee 
appointed by the United States Senate to 
investigate the relations between labor and 
capital was published. It is too extensive to 
allow of more than a passing notice calling 
attention to its completeness and value. 

The development of communism and 
socialism in Europe has there attracted a 
large share of attention, and caused much 
uneasiness, and happy will be the United 
States if they escape these dangerous forces 
that are so persistently working under va- 
rious guises in different sections of Eu- 
rope. 

We may call attention to two works of 
special value to one interested in the exami- 
nation of an aspect of modern society that 
has carried dismay to law-abiding citizens, 
and at times has threatened to exert no small 
influence in national politics. " Contem- 
porary Socialism," by John Rae, gives a care- 
ful view of the influences and forces that 
have been and are still powerfully operating 
in various ways in European politics. The 
German socialists Laselle and Marx each oc- 
1 cupy a chapter, and their theories are well 
set forth. The chapter on " Nihilism " is one 
i of the most interesting of all, and from it 
i may be gained an excellent idea of this dan- 
I gerous element in Russian politics. We 
have space for the title only of a valuable 
work on this subject by Professor Woolsey, 
" Communism and Socialism in their History 
1 and Theory." It deals with the American 



176 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



as well as the European side of the ques- 
tion. 

We must not be understood as aiming at 
anything further than the indication of a 
few works that may not have come within 
the notice of all who feel a lively interest in 
one of the great unsettled questions of the 
day. The works pointed out certainly do 
contain much food for fruitful thought. 



SOCIAL ELEMENT IN COLLEGE. 
It cannot be denied that good-fellowship 
in college will do a good deal for a man. 
Some neglect this part of their college 
course and become completely wrapped up 
in their books or themselves. A college is a 
little world by itself. By mingling with 
other fellows a knowledge of human nature 
can be obtained which will be of great use 
to a man in after life, not mentioning the 
good it may do in relieving the monotony of 
study. 

What, for instance, is more pleasant than 
to sit down to a game of whist ? While the 
game is going on, although it might appear 
just the reverse of social, yet, in the inter- 
vals of deal, conversation has the floor. The 
side which got the " odd " can crow over 
their brilliant play ; the other side can ex- 
plain how they might have obtained the odd 
had they played differently. We read of a 
game recently in which two or three trump 
tricks had been played. One of the players 
laid down his hand for a moment and, on re- 
turning to play, took up these tricks instead 
of his original hand. The plaj^ went on as 
before ; nobody playing noticing the mistake. 
College " howls " also promote sociability 
among the fellows. When a number of the 
boys get together and sing college songs, 
which have a snap possessed by college songs 
only, a feeling of congeniality and rest per- 
vades the atmosphere which is refreshing 
after a hard day's work. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

[Short .and suitable questions will be answered in this column 
as far as possible. The Orient takes this method as a substitute 
for individual replies.] 

Stick-in-the-mud : It was certainly not a breach 
of etiquette for you to help your hack out of the mud 
while on the way to dancing school. It was surely 
more decorous than permitting your partner to assist 
in the exercise. 

Hogg : It shows a very mean disposition to find 
fault with you for keeping away from the library a 
book which every other man in the class wishes to 
consult. Such conduct every man of spirit ought to 
resent. 

Monmouth : We are sorry to state that whiskers 
are now going out of style. But do not be discour- 
aged, for perhaps by the time yours are visible the 
fashion will have returned. 

Blow : Yes ; we have the highest authority for 
announcing that the Bugle will be issued before Com- 
mencement. 

Arthur : According to the best medical advice, a 
window should be opened a few inches at the top. If 
you room in college, however, this precaution will be 
unnecessary, as there is always a healthful supply of 
air in circulation. 

Bagaduce : Too much attention to the mirror 
is not considered quite the proper thing. Such atten- 
tion has spoiled many a handsomer man than you. 
Remember the fate of Narcissus. 




I am weary, weak and weary, 
When I scan the Ex's o'er. 
To find the same old chestnuts 
I have found so oft before. 
Those sentimental verses 

'Bout the student and the maid. 
The kiss, the angry papa. 

And the midnight serenade. 
Those flights of amorous fancy 
They really make me blush, 
For they seem to me but spasms 

Of Anacreontic gush. 
But the worn-out jokes on " Prexy," 
The vacation episode. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



177 



And the class-room exhalations 

My very soul corrode. 
I know that I'm prosaic, 

That I lack a poet's muse, 
That my mind is sadly given 

To worldly sort of views. 
But I long to greet the era 

When the sentimental strain 
Shall be fully superseded 

By the realistic rein. 

C. M. Austin, '87, who has been out teaching, has 
returned to college. 

Dr. Weeks, in his opening lecture before the 
Medical School, insinuated that the successful Medic 
would be obliged to burn the midnight oil. It looks 
as if "Nipper" had given the Doctor a little gra- 
tuity to advertise him. It might have taken better 
if the Doctor had put it something as follows : 

The Medio who in his " profesh " 

Would shine like the long-handled dipper * 

Should study all night. 

And fill full his light 
With oil that he purchased from " Nipper." 
* An astronomical term. 

The method, adopted by Prof. Little this term, of 
looking over, with the students, the themes handed 
in to him for correction is an excellent one. It af- 
fords a chance for mutual explanations, and fixes 
corrections and suggestions more firmly in mind 
than was possible by the old method. 

Eight of the college boys who attended the 
Masquerade Ball were photographed, in costume, by 
Reed & Preble, Thursday morning. 

A Freshman went to the skating rink recently, 
and determined to go home with a certain young lady 
who was there, but unfortunately, in the darkness of 
the hallway, he asked the wrong girl, and presently 
found himself escorting an unknown belle to a re- 
mote pai't of Topsham. It is rumored that that 
Freshman cursed himself to, and kicked himself 
from, that maiden's home, and then voted unani- 
mously to forego the Brunswick skating rink forever- 
more. 

There's the chemical crank, 

The botanical crank, 

And the studious crank in " Zoo," 

There's the ethical crank, 

The historical crank, 

And numerous other cranks too, 

But the crankiest crank 

Of all these cranks. 

Cadaverous, lean, and lank. 

Is the man who poses his jejune shape 

In role of poetical crank. 



To say that the Masquerade Ball was a grand 
success, would be drawing it mild. Those who 
were present unanimously voted it one of the most 
brilliant and enjoyable events that they had ever at- 
tended. Every one evidently went to the hall for a 
good time, and the unqualified success of the enter- 
tainment is good proof that they had it. The supper 
was served by Mr. Woodbury and was a model of 
variety and excellence. The music by Grimmer's 
Orchestra was fully up to their usual high standard. 
The costumes were handsome, many of them elabo- 
rate, and all of them in excellent taste. When the 
time came to close it was with genuine regret that 
those in attendance bade good-bye to an occasion 
which they will ever remember with pleasure. 

The sick and afflicted always have our utmost sym- 
pathy and pity. We are sorry to say that a young 
Freshman is in such a bad state of health that he re- 
quires the assistance of a Senior to support him in 
his travels. 

A poor horse, seemingly about to " shuffle off this 
mortal coil," was observed lying in the snow near 
brother Bowker's stable the other evening. To all 
appearances the animal had seen his best days, and 
Mr. B., after trying in vain to raise the beast, sol- 
emnly remarked, " That horse will never rise again." 
"Why not?" asked a youth standing by. "Death 
has overtaken him, young man," said Mr. B., in such 
a lugubrious tone that it gave full evidence of his sin- 
cerity. But the signs all failed in this case, for the 
animal when last seen was taking a bee-line for 
home with a speed remarkable for a dead horse. 

Mr. Hutchins gave the Juniors a very interesting 
lecture on electricity, one evening last week, show- 
ing the path of electricity through tubes containing 
hydrogen and other gases, and performing a number 
of other experiments such as could not be done 
satisfactorily by daylight. 

The medical students are taking Chemistry as an 
optional work in the qualitative laboratory. There 
are between eighteen and twenty who elect it, a 
much larger number than is usually the case. 

The entertainment given by the Maritaua Opera 
Company was very enjoyable. The music was all 
well sung, and the acting, though not as good as it 
might have been, was up to the average. The 
audience, as is usual in Brunswick, at such class of 
entertainments, was extremely small. 

The recent mild weather has increased the attend- 
ance at chapel exercises, yet there are still many 
vacant places. 

Mr. Cothren has recently prepared several speci- 



178 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



mens of the different metals, using tlie electric arc. 
Fine specimens of ehvomium, aluminium, and man- 
ganese were prepared in a short time by this process. 

Mr. Atwood, formerly tutor in the modern lan- 
guages here, has left Houlton, where he has been 
teaching, and started on a trip abroad. 

The terra of the Maine Medical School re-opened 
Thursday, February 4th, Dr. Weeks delivering the 
re-opening lecture. At an early hour a good number 
of students from the college were present, and ren- 
dered all the assistance in their power in seating the 
audience. Some over sixty have registered in the 
present class, and more will probably be here soon. 

The American Architect, for January, contained 
a cut of the Bowdoin gymnasium. We would sug- 
gest that the '87 Bugle board have a cut of the inte- 
rior with the men in training. Judging from the 
experience of other classes they would not delay 
their publication much by doing so. 

We are pleased to announce that Mr. Crawford 
has made an arrangement with a company to give 
the "Mikado" in the Town Hall this Wednesday 
evening. 

The large aspen tree, in front of North Winthrop, 
under which the rustic seat used to sit, has been al- 
most entirely stripped of its limbs by the ice storm. 

Last Tuesday evening Mr. Guild delivered the 
first of his course of lectures on the literature of the 
seventeenth century. Professor Chapman introduced 
the speaker in his usual pleasant way, and thanked 
him in behalf of the audience. The lectures are six 
in number on the Lyric Poetry. The first was a his- 
torical sketch of the times and their influence on the 
literature. The subjects of the remaining lectures 
are: "Poetic Forms," "The Ode," "The Elegy,'' 
"Pastoral Poetry," and "The Sonnet." 

It is said on good authority that the Freshman 
Medics in their examination so distorted the geogra- 
phy of the earth that it will take a long period of time 
to recover its former appearance. The history of the 
world too was transmogrified in a wonderful manner, 
and our former heroes will have to rise and assert 
their rights. 

Venus is now fast approaching the sun and soon 
will be lost in the brighter light. Fair Venus, we are 
sad to leave thee, departing for another triumph. So 
it is with us. A mortal Venus makes bright our path 
and then is lost to view. Another Venus will come, 
but it is never the same, no, never the same. 




The annual dinner of the 
Washington Association of 
Bowdoin Alumni took place on the 
evening of February 10th. Some 
thirty persons sat down at the table, among 
them being Hon. Hugh McCulIoch, '63 ; Hon. 
L. D. M. Sweat, '37 ; Senator W. P. Frye, '51 : Hon . 
W. W. Rice, '46 ; Judge W. B. Snell, '45 ; Gen. Ellis 
Spear, '58 ; Col. J. H. Gilman, '65 ; Rev. J. S. Sewall 
D.D., '50; Rev. S. M. Newman, '67 ; Israel Kimball, 
'39, and J. M. Brown, '60. Letters were read from 
Dr. D. R. Goodwin, '32, of Philadelphia, and Hon. 
Joseph Williamson, '49, of Augusta, Maine. The re- 
port of Rev. R. B. Howard, '49, about our President 
was received with enthusiasm. The following officers 
were elected : President, Commodore Horatio 
Briggs, '25 ; Vice-Presidents, Israel Kimball and 
Judge W. B. Snell; Treasurer, J. N. Whitney, '64; 
Seci-etary, Prof. J. W. Chickering, '65. On the same 
evening our alumni of New York participated in 
their annual dinner. The following officers were 
elected: President, E. B. Merrill, '57 ; Secretary, 
Frances R. Upton, '75 ; Treasurer, Dr. F. H. Dilling- 
ham, '77. 

'76. — C. G. Wheeler is engaged in the manufact- 
uring business at Winchendon, Mass. 

'77. — Wiggin, who has recently been engaged in 
the lumber business at Winthrop, Me., is now pursu- 
ing the same in East Boston, Mass. 

Class op '78. 

Baker, Physician, Portland, Me. 

Baxter, Member of Portland Packing Company, 
Portland, Me. 

Burleigh, Lawyer, Lafayette, Ind. 

Burton, Instructor, Institute of Technology, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Davidson, Lawyer, Lafayette, Ind. 

Felch, Principal High School, Orange, Mass. 

French, Physician. 

Jacobs, Farmer, Texas. 

Philip L. Paine died at Hepner, Oregon, 
Wednesday, Feb. 10th, of typhoid pneumonia. Mr. 
Paine was a son of the late Henry L. Paine, a gen- 
eral favorite among his acquaintances, and a man of 
ability. He taught in Portland after graduation, stud- 
ied law with Drummond & Drummond, and was ad- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



179 



mltted to the Cumberland Bar in 1882. His remains 
will be brouo;ht to Portland. 

Pliillips, Physician, Camden, Me. 

Porter, Law-student, Brunswick, Me. 

Pray, Lawyer, Dover, N. H. 

Purington, Principal State Normal School, Farm- 
ington, Me. 

Record, teaching in the West. 

Sargent, Principal Hebron Academy, Hebron, Me. 

Sewall, Civil Engineer, Boston, Mass. 

Smith, Thomaston, Me. 

Thing, Kansas. 

'83. — Austin is studying medicine at Harvard 
Medical School. 

'83. — Jordan has gone into business at St. Louis, 
Minn. 

Bowdoin has five representatives in the Medical 
School: Achorn, '79; Staples, 81 ; Chase and Collins, 
'83 ; and Norton, '85. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Hall of Theta a. K. E., Feb. 12, 1886. 

Whereas, It has pleased an All-wise Father, in 
His infinite Wisdom, to call a brother from our 
midst to the spirit land : 

Resolved, That in the loss of our brother, Philip 
L. Paine, the society mourns one upright and honor- 
able, who, though dead to the world, yet lives and 
speaks in the memory of his associates ; 

Resolved, That we extend our earnest sympathy 
to relatives and friends, in this, their sad bereave- 
ment ; 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be 
publiskied in the BowDOusr Orient. 

C. B. BXJELEIGH, 

W. L. Black, 
V. O. White, 

Commiltee. 




WITHIN MY WATCH. 

Within my watch there lies a face 
All full of purity and grace, 
Which loves the good, which scorns the base 
Within my watch. 



But shoiild you ask: Does beauty rare 
Adorn the face that lieth there, 
And wondrous eyes and form most fair, 
Within my watch? 

I answer, nay, there's many a lass 
In beauty might this girl surpass, 
Though sweet the face beneath the glass 
Within my watch. 

But face more true, or face more kind, 
Or face more loved you scarce could find; 
'Tis but the index of her mind. 

Within my watch. — Spectator. 



WILL-O'-THE-WISP. 

Mary, Mary, quite contrary, 

How does your garden grow ? 
Kosebuds red are ever captivating ; 
May I take just one ? What, — hesitating ? 

Well, lean through the arbor — so. 
Mary; quite contrary. 

Mary, Mary, quite contrary. 

Fie for your "Yes" and "No"! 

Yesterday you tossed my flowers a-flying, 

Mocking laugh, good-bye — God bless — 

what, crying? 

When you loose my arms I'll go. 

Mary, quite contrary. 

— Fortnight. 

H. V. STACKPOLE, 

FINE BOOTS AND SHOES, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

ELEGANT MACKINAW 

STRAW HATS, 
THE BEST QUALITY, 

$1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 

MERRY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND. 

^S. R. JACKSON, 2D, 8C- 

HEADQUAKTEKS FOR 

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Overshoes, Rubber Boots, and Rubbers 

Constantly on hand in large variety. Call and examine. 

No. 2 Odd Fellows Block, 

MAIN STREET, - - BRUNSWICK., MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




■cigarette 

i Smokers who 
1 are ■B'illingeto 
pay a little more 
for Cigarettes 
' than the price 
charged for the orriinary trade Cigarettes, mil 
find the RICHIaOND STRAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO Alili OTHERS. 
I'hey are made from the Ijrlglitest, most 
delicately flavored, and filshest cost 

f;old leaf grown in Virginia, and are abso- 
ately wtmow * adulteration or drags. 

No. 
-i- 

We use the Gennlne Frencb Rice Paper 

of our own direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand-RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of tUs 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
original brand, and to observe that each pack- 

ageorbox of ■ ^^_^_— ^— .^.— 

Kicbuioiid 
Straight Cat 
Cigarettes 

bears the L 
signature of ' 



JRAIGHIM 



n iGARETTES 

ALLEN &CINTER 



MAHUPAOTUBERB, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

njaine Bentral H. \. 

On and after Oct. 12th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.15, 11.25 A.M., 2.38, 4.45 and 6.25 P.M., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Rockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.38 P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.40 P.M., and 

12.35 (night). 
For Lewiston, 8.15 A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. (mixed), and 2.45 P.M. 
For Augusta and Waterville, 8.20 A.M., 2.40 P.M., 12.45 every 

night, and on Saturdays only at 6.35 p.m. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 (night) 
For Bangor, Ellsworth, Mt. Desert Ferry, St. Stephen, Houlton, 

Vanceboro, and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Bar Harbor, 12.45 (night). 

Note.— The night ti-ains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew 
iston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun 
day, but do not connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, or 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sun 
day morning. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager 
F. E. BOOTHBY, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 6, 1885. 



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SUCCESSOR TO KINNET BROS. 

NEW YORK. 



The Sixty-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 4th, 1886, 
and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Rev. Wji. DeWitt Hyde, President: ALFRED 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrice and 
Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. (Joddard, A.M., 
Medical Jurisprudence; PitEUERICK H. Gerrish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Fkamclin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemistry; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henry H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Young, Public Hygiene; 
Irving B. Kimbai.l, M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 

MIXTURES FOR PIPE OR CIGARETTE- 
THREE KINGS, Turkish, Perique and Virginia. 
MELLOW MIXTURE, Turkish and Perique. 
TURKISH and VIRGINIA. 
PERIQUE and VIRGINIA. 
GENUINE TURKISH. 
Flake Cuts Especially Adapted for the Pipe. 

VANITY FAIR. OLD GOLD. 
Fragrant Vanity Fair, Superlative, and Ciotli of Gold Cigarettes 

ALWAYS FRESH, CLEAN AND SWEET. 

Our cigarettes were never so fine as now, they caimot be sur- 
passed forpuriiy and excellence. Only the purest rice paper 
used. 14 FIRST -PRIZE MEDAJLS. 

WM. S. KIMBALL & CO. 

THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday iVlorning by A G. Tenney. 

Terms, 11.50 a Year ia Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEGE BOOKSTORE. 

We have constantly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store, 

*S"Speoial Rates to Student Clubs. .=ffls 



^ Win^ ®^lJij3rJtlCT0*-^ 



2 i^urtl patfe, 



M- 



:^m. 



mimwmQM^ i^ 



DEALER IN 



CEDAR STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Branoh ofSce three doors north of Tontiue Hotel. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
^F" Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 
Successor to Atwood & Wentworth, 

DEALER IN 

DI^I^O^DS, WATCHES, JEWELRY, 

and importers of French Clocks, Opera Glasses, etc. 
Fine Watch Repairing ; Gold and Silver Plating. 

509 CONGRESS ST., Portland, Me. 

ALL THE STUDENTS SHOULD BUY 

THEIR 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND RUBBERS 

AT 

Frank E. Roberts' Boot & Shoe Store, 

Cor. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 
dealer in 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 
:B:ES.XTKrsi;vicJ:K., tvt aijte;. 



M&rchmmt Tmii&r. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT 

BICYVLE 
BASE-BALL 

TENNIS 
BOATING 

SPECIAL RATES TO CLUBS. 



SHIRTS, 

STOCKINGS, 

JEBSEYS. 



OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



MAIN STREET, BRXIIfS'WICK, ME. 



WM. % FIEIiD, 



M^]\[;^6Ei^. 





1^. 



Cushing's Island, 
Portland, Me. 

S. C3-IBS01Sr. 



MAM§M®S, FINI WAT€1£S, 

239 MIDDLE STREET, PORTLAND, 3IAINE. 

J. A. MERRILL. A. KEITH. 



DEALER IN 

IJSOGESIES AND PIDVISBNS, 

Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 

Clubs. 

127 WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PURITY SWEET CIGARETTES. 

THE PUREST, MILDEST, AND BEST CIGARETTE ON THE MARKET. 

PUBE, BRIGHT VIRGINIA TOBACCO AND PUREST RICE PAPER. 



FOR THE FINEST MADE TRY OUR 

STRAIGHT WEB CIGARETTES. 

MANUFACTURED FROM THE FINEST BRIGHT TOBACCO GROWN. WITH 

TURKISH MIXTURE. 

PURITY SMOKING TOBACCO. 

THE FINEST, PUREST, AND BEST SMOKING TOBACCO MADE. 



RALEIGH CUT PLUG SMOKING. 

THE ORIGINAL, PUREST, AND THE BEST. 

We guarantee all not injurious. Only a trial and you will he convinced. 

PACE & SIZER, Manufacturers, Richmond, Va. 

ON SALE AT FIELD'S. 




^CID PHOSPHATE. 

[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

The Unrivalled Remedy for Dyspepsia, Mental and Physical Exhaustion, Nervousness, Wakefulness, 

Diminished Vitality, etc. 

As Food for an Exhausted Brain, in Liver and Kidney Trouble, in Seasicl(ness and Sicic Headaclie, in Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion and Constipation, in Inebriety, Despondency and cases of Impaired Nerve Function, 

It has become a necessity in a large number of households throughout the world, 

And is universally prescribed and recommended by physicians of all schools. 
Its action "will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 
It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body. 
It is unsurpassed as a substitute for lemons or Umes, and 

IT MAKES A DE-IGIOUS DRINK -WITH WATKR AND SUGAR ONLY. 
Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet glTing further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

RUMFOKD CHEMICAIj WORKS, Providence, R. I. 
«9-BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.-» 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bruns-nrick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vievs ; also College Vie^rs. 



F. ROEMER, 

Successor to A. Roemer & Son, 
THE LARGEST HISTORICAL 

GOSTUMER « ARMORER 

IN AMERICA. 

Also Costumer for all the priucipal theatres : 
Fifth Avemie Theatre, Grand Opera House, 
Star Theatre, Madison Square Theatre, Niblo's Garden Theati-e, 
New Park Theati'e, People's Theatre, 14th Street Theatre. 

No. 8 UNION SQUARE, NEASr YORK. 



Go to W, B. Woodard^'s 

To buy your GROOEEIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

S^'ECI.^Xj I^.A.a?ES to STTTXJSIiTT CXjTT^S. 

Main Street. Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 




ALL KINDS OF 



EXECUTED AT THE 

Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAmmES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 






ALLEN & CO., Portland. 

Having moved to their new store, 204 Middle Street, Cor. of Plum, are constantly opening 
rich and elegant goods for gentlemen's v^ear. 

ihoicG loPGign Mrics low '^i'splapd iii iur failoring iepartment. 

The finest-made up Clothing to be seen in the State now exhibited in our 



Novelties for Gentlemen 's Dress in Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves, Neckwear, Canes, and Silk Umbrellas 
in Seasonable Styles to be found in our 

Rurnishin^ Dspartmsrit. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

204 MIDDLE STREET, CORNER OF PLUM, PORTLAND. 



•X-HE 



* TRAVELERS * 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HERTFORD, CONSIST., 

Has paid to Policy-liolders OVCT $1 1 jOOO^OOOj and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 



Profits, tlie Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidental Injury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only .$5.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each !8!1,000, with ,|>5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since ISG-t have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. 

Issues T TT?T7 X>r^T Tr^TTr^ o^ every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 
also J-Jli: -Ci X:\JJljL\^LLj\J Personal Benefit. 

On ALL oxa plans, jjaid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, it desired, for amounts proiiortionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, ------ $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Office at Hartford. 
JAS. G. BATTERSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary. 



CUT FLOWERS. 

Orders for Cut Flowers and till Floral Designs will be promptly 
llUed it left at the store of E. .J. JIERRYMAN, Pliannarist, or 

At the Greenhouse on Jordan Avenue. 

FUHEKAL FLOWERS A SPECIALTY. 
Brunswick, .Jau. i:>, ISt-B. 



THIS PAPERS 



.nfileinPliiiadelpliia 

the Kewspaper Adver- 

ut? Agency of Messrs. 

N. W- AVER & SON, our authorized agents. 



-I^rt and -ipecoration. 

An Illustrated Monthly. 

EACH NUMBER CONTAINS 50 ILLUSTRATIONS IN 

BROWN AND BLACK. 

rpHE leading exponent of the progress of decorative ai-t and de- 
1 voted to the development of the highest artistic ideas in ooii- 
nection with every branch of imlustrv to which art is ancillary. 
No architect, decorative arli.sl. art stiuleut, or art amateur should 
be without it. For sale Ijy all new silealers. 
PUBLICATION OFFICE, 7 ^^■AKREN STREET, NEW Y'ORK. 

Geo. li. Halm, Art Manager. | Eil. Hugh Brown, Publisher. 
Sample copies 25 cts. $2.50 per anuuiii. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard " and " Duplex " Burner 

IN ELACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 
LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENSEAVED IK THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 



474 Congress St., 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

N0. i 0DD EEIiliGW^ BIiGOK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 




fji| 



PHONETIC SHORTHAND. %^e°tW'^ 
For Self-Instruction. Containing all the late improve- 
ments. I'v'uv SI.., I), jjpecial Instruction by Mail, S(J-00. 
Send Stamp lur sprc iiiu'u Paft-es and Illustrated Pamphlet. 

W. \V. (.)SGO(.iDBY', Puhlisher, Rochester, N. Y. 



The New Styles In 

In all colors, are now ready. An elegant line of New Y^ork 
Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and JFanoy Mixtures, at 

i ELLIOTT'S, t 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEH., 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cat Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 




r//£- FAVORITE NOS. 303-404-332-I7O-S5I-WITH 

HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



■ED. J. MERRYMAH, PHARMACIST' 



FaEf anl Toilet Articles, CiprsI Tolacco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

Hgi" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Wo Bo SM^H^Yg 
Book-Seller, Stationer, Book-Binder, 

AND BLABTK-BOOK MANTTFACTtTKEK, 

Opposite City Hall, Center St., Bath, Maine. 
CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 



STOKER BLOCK, 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



J. S. TOWI^E, 
PHARMACEUTIST. 

PURE DRUGS, MEDICINES, FANCY AND TOILET AR- 
TICLES; ALSO A FINE LINE OF CHOICE CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES. PRESCRIPTIONS a Specialty. 

Main Stkeet, Near Bowdoin College. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 Middle Street, - - - - Portland Me. 



OVER BOAKDMAN'S STORE, MAIN STEEET. 

— H B. G. DENNISON, H— 

Brunswick Book - Store, 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationery ; Portland and Boston Daily Papers ; Circu- 
lating Library, 1600 Volumes ; Base-Ball and La Crosse ; Pict- 
ures and Picture frames ; Frames made to order at short notice. 

Dealer in StanJarS aiii Fancy Groceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 




ON THE ROAD. 



Ill ieiiiigiii ee., 

(EstabUshed 1817.) 

Institute Building, Huntington Ave., Boston. 

ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 
OTHBK TO TKICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp at above address. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admissiok to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar, — Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Caesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
.^neid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra, — so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
auing of the second term. 



Entrance Examinations. 

The Eegclae Examinations foe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Hallowell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers of the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a, list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQUIKED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, .two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terras. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MARCH 3, 1886. 



No. 15. 



BOAVDOIN ORIENT. 

PXTBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE "WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE YEAK BY THE STDDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



EDITORIAL BOARD. 

W. V. Wentworth, 'S6, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
J. H. Davis, '86. Levi Turner, Jr., '86. 

A. A. Knowlton, '83. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. C. Parker, '86. C. B. Burleigh, '87. 

H. L. Taylor, '86. E. C. Plummer, '87. 



Per annum, in advance, 
Single Copies, 



$2.00 
15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
municatif^ns in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as weU as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 



Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick aa Second Class mail matter. 



CONTENTS. 

Vol. XV., No. 15.- March 3, 1886. 

Luna, 181 

Editorial Notes, 181 

O Fons Brundusiae, 182 

A Letter 182 

My Visitor 184 

Gymnasium Notes 185 

Dining with President Hyde, 186 

Bragobert et Belsqueezer, 187 

CoLLEGii Tabula 189 

Personal, 190 

Clippings, 191 



LUNA. 

Brilliant goddess, softly glancing 

O'er the campus and the pines ; 

Welcome thou at evening shadows 

Dangling in fantastic lines. 

On thy gentle face afar, 

Inspiring poet's dreams. 

Naught appears but comfort's beams. 




A recent event has turned our at- 
tention towards amusements, and caused us 
to wonder Avhether the youth of the present 
age, and the students at this college in par- 
ticular, are devoid of the earlier New Eng- 
land virtues. The Connecticut Blue Laws 
are not now in force, and few souls, in the 
church or outside, are so ascetic as to believe 
that it is wrong to get out of life as much 
enjoyment as possible, without transgressing 
any moral principle. At the same time, we 
recognize the facts that an excess is easily 
reached, and that some restriction is essen- 
tial. Any form of amusement may easily 
be perverted and made demoralizing, but 
our belief is that many of them are perfectly 
proper, both in themselves and as ordinarily 
conducted by respectable people. We think 
that the majority of people will not be in- 
jured by such pleasures, though there are, 
undoubtedly, certain persons who should 
refrain, and perhaps times when all should, 
and it seems to us that this is the view St. 
Paul held when he wrote : 

' ' But meat commendeth us not to God ; for neither, 
if we eat, are we the better ; neither, if we eat not, 
are we the worse. But take heed lest by any means 
this liberty of yours become a stumbling block to 
them that are weak." 

At present the germans are the center of 



182 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



attraction for the college, and many modest 
ladies of Brunswick and Topsham have been 
asked to attend ; but we have yet to hear of 
one who thinks she was thereby insulted. 
They are well conducted by gentlemen, and 
think that no gentleman or lady will be seri- 
ously injured by such dances, and that no 
other person can he. Certainly we do not 
expect dancing to be very seriously con- 
demned by the church so long as promis- 
cuous kissing games are sanctioned at church 
sociables. 

It seems to us that the human character 
can only reach its noblest and fullest realiza- 
tion by social intercourse, and that a friendly 
feeling is engendered by our ordinary forms 
of amusement, which goes far towards re- 
moving cynicism and developing humanity 
to its true greatness. 



The eulogy on the late Prof. Cleaveland, 
published in the last issue, has attracted the 
attention of many, and made patent a rather 
singular fact concerning our art collection. 
Bowdoin College, in and for which the great 
teacher and eminent scientist worked for 
many years, lacks and needs a portrait of the 
man who was perhaps her most distinguished 
professor. We sincerely hope that some 
means may be found for obtaining a good 
portrait of him, if there is one in existence ; 
for it seems fitting that here, the scene of 
his labors, should be found such a monument 
to him. 

And in this connection it may be well 
to state, in view of the interest at pres- 
ent being manifested in our art collection, 
that we have no portrait of Nathaniel Haw- 
thorne, nor of Presidents Harris and Cham- 
berlain. It would add greatly to the inter- 
est and value of that portion of our paintings 
which is of a peculiarly Bowdoin significance, 
if by some means, through the munificence 
of wealthy friends who may be so inclined, 



or in any other way, portraits of these and 
other distinguished Bowdoin men could be 
obtained. We have seen in the Necrology 
the names of several distinguished alumni 
who have been an honor and source of 
strength, not to Bowdoin alone, but to the 
nation, whose features we should like to be- 
hold here. But the distinguished alumni 
are not all passed away, and there are many 
still living who are worthy of being thus 
remembered by their Alma Mater. 



O FONS BRUNDUSIAE. 
Horace III., 13. 

O fount of Brundusia, cleaver than glass, 
Fitly with wine, and beautiful flowers, 
A liid will I bring ere to-morrow shall pass, — 
A tribute to thee 'neath cool, shady bowers. 

Whose horns just appearing distending his brow, 
Foretell of the love and the strife that's in store ; 
Yet in vain : for thy rills with his red blood shall flow 
And the frolicsome herd shall know him no more. 

The fierce, glowing days of the Dog-star know not 
How to reach thee concealed by the oak's spreading 

bough, 
Thy coolness delightful is eagerly sought 
By the wandering flock and the ox at the plow. 

Of fountains, renowned thou also shalt be, 
While I sing of oak o'er hollow rocks placed. 
Whence thy prattling lymph glides down clear and 

free 
In a crystal, cool stream by sparkling spray graced. 



A LETTER. 

[The following letter was read at the reunion of the 
Alumni Association of Washington, D. C, Feb. 10th.] 

Locust Stebet, ) 
Philadelphia, Feb. 4, 1886. \ 

My Dear Sir, — Your kind letter, convey- 
ing to me an invitation to be present at the 
banquet and annual meeting of the Wash- 
ington Association of Bowdoin Alumni on 
the 9th instant, is received. I cannot tell 
you how much I regret being obliged to say 
I cannot come. My special engagements at 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



183 



the time are unfortunately such as entirely 
to preclude my so doing. 

I have looked over the list of the mem- 
bers of your Washington Association, which 
you were kind enough to enclose to me, and 
have scanned the names with the greatest 
interest. They bring back many distant and 
delightful echoes of old Bowdoin memories. 
If those on the list who can prove an " alibi " 
are omitted, fully one-half of the remainder 
are within my personal recollection, after a 
lapse of from thirty-two to sixty years ; and 
I remember nothing had about any. Bridge, 
Evans, and Packard were my antecedents or 
Seniors ; I knew them all, and still look up 
to them with fitting and unfeigned venera- 
tion. Of Evans I have one particular rem- 
iniscence. It is this: President Allen used 
to have all the college as a sort of Bible class 
on Sunday afternoons. On one of those sol- 
emn occasions, when I was a Freshman and 
Evans was a Senior, the President, having 
called up Evans, said : " Mr. Evans, what 
did Paul say to the Corinthians ? " Evans, 
nothing daunted with the gigantic task as- 
signed him (for he had a gigantic memory), 
began at the beginning of the first epistle 
and went on and on, and would doubtless 
have gone through word for word to the end 
of the second epistle, had not the President 
at length interposed with "That will do, 
Mr. Evans," and Evans sat down. My 
" equals," or contemporaries among you are 
Adams, Coffin, and Flagg (and, by the way. 
Coffin is of the class of 1834, not 1831). I 
remember them well ; and I trust that Adams 
has not suffered the wisdom of his early piety 
to be cooled off by the secularities of post- 
office dissipation or distribution. 

Palmer and Piper, of '38, fall mostly into 
an interregnum of my college residence, but 
I well remember them both, particularly in 
their Senior year, where they were above my 
tutoring, which they had escaped in '35. 



For the rest, there are I. Kimball of '39, 
Blake of '42, Snell of '45, Sewall and Rice 
of '46, Whitcomb of '47, Grover and Fairfield 
of '48, a certain Welsh named Deane of '49, 
whom, with Jackson of Portland, I particu- 
larly recall as bright enough for the foremost 
in their class; and if they failed to shine 
with sufficient brilliancy to be so recognized, 
it was not for the lack of illuminating mate- 
rial, but because all the gas in the blubber 
was not yet lighted. Then there is Frye, of 
'50, whom we had not then elected to the 
Senate of the United States — nor, by the 
way, had we so elected Grover, of '48; but I 
trust that he was honestly counted in in due 
time, although it was in Oregon. Then 
come Butterfield and Southgate, of '51, both 
good men and true ; Chickering, of '52, who 
teaches those who do not hear — thus solving 
the great problem that baffled his old in- 
structors ; Dunlap and Washburn, of '54, — of 
course the latter's name predestinated him to 
Congress from the first, and well do I re- 
member his political erudition and proclivi- 
ties ; Gardner and C. S. Kimball, of '55, and 
Reed, of '60. The last was by some years 
out of my bailiwick, but I have had the 
honor of making his acquaintance at a later 
date. 

As for ex-Secretary McCuUoch, I have 
the greatest respect for him ; and with him I 
am glad to see all the other " alibis " in one 
fold, whether by hook or by crook. 

Thus you see I am a genuine Bowdoin 
man, of good precedents and of vast conse- 
quents. I greet all the brethren, older or 
younger, known or unknown — my want of 
knowledge doubtless argues me unknown ; 
and I am ready to shout with you all, "Hur- 
rah for Bowdoiu College ! " or fervently to 
say, " God bless Bowdoin College and all her 
alumni " ; or to join a la Frangaise in " Vive 
le College Baudoin," or auf Deutsch in 
" Es lebe, das Baldwinishe CoUegiam," or in 



184 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



a medley of Italian, Latin, Spanish, and 

English : 

" Viva, viva, vivat. 
Old Bowdoin forever." 

In every style, grave or gay, and in every 
tongue, old or new, let the sentiment be, 
" Health and prosperity to Bowdoin College." 
And so I remain, my dear brother Deane, 
Sincerely and fraternally yours, 

D. R. Goodwin. 



MY VISITOR. 

Silence had fallen upon the spacious cor- 
ridors of the j)alace of " Sodom." The last 
belated reveler had returned from the mas- 
querade. The Freshman had ceased to play 
on his infernal ocerina, and the only sounds 
audible were the revels of the rodents and the 
singing of a strange cat in the neighboring 
halls of " Gomorrah." I had been reading 
only the day before of " The Ghosts of Some 
College Customs." Naturally my thoughts 
turned to ghosts rather than to the fantastic 
figures of the morrow's lesson before my 
eyes. 

While in this state of mind I fell asleep. 
How long I slept I shall never know. I 
thought I felt the cold shivers like rushers 
in a polo game shoot down my back. I im- 
agined myself awake. The moonlight stream- 
ing in at the window flooded the room. My 
lamp had ceased to burn. Suddenly looking 
up I saw at my side a man well advanced in 
life. His eyes were fixed upon some papers 
before me. His form was short and bent 
with care, but a twinkle in his eyes testified 
that there still lingered a trace of sophomoric 
fun. 

" Halloo ! " my visitor exclaimed, " writ- 
ing for the Oeient? That is right. We 
had no college paper when I was a student. 
But the papers of the literary societies were 
always well supported. How well I remem- 
ber some of Hawthorne's articles written for 
our paper. He even then gave promise of 



what he was to do as a writer. But he 
would never read them himself, if he could 
avoid it. He dreaded that as much as a 
declamation. 

" But what is your subject ? ' The Won- 
ders of Our Ranking System ' ? Well, that 
is good ! They have not found one that 
gives satisfaction, have they? And they 
never will. We had some trouble with it 
when I was in college. We even went so 
far as to petition the boards to abolish it 
entirely. They failed to see the logic of our 
arguments. Hence we continued to suffer. 

" I suppose the boys of '86 are about the 
same as those of my day. With some, rank 
is always the chief consideration. Every- 
thing is made subservient to it. It is strange 
that the faculty are so blind. It would seem 
as though when one became an instructor, 
he lost his knowledge of human nature. 
Why, I have known fellows who when in 
college knew all the ropes for getting rank 
and did not scruple to use them. Yet they 
no sooner take an instructor's chair than 
they refuse to believe that any one can stoop 
so low as to ' crib ' or cheat for such a thing 
as rank. 

" I suppose the boys will always do it. 
And really the temptation is great. As long 
as by ' cribbing ' and the like one can get 
high rank there will be many who will not 
think it pays to study. And especially is 
this the case if the subject is one in which 
there is but little interest. 

" To be sure of high rank one must have 
genius. For it requires genius to adapt 
yourself to the necessities of the ranking 
system. Be sure to converse freely with the 
professor. He will think you take an interest 
in his department. When j^ou are called up 
to recite, ask as many questions as possible. 
If they are not connected with the lesson, no 
matter. It will show that your general 
knowledge is large, which is just as well for 
ranking purposes. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



185 



" Another thing you must observe. Never, 
upon any occasion, "wood up." Some in- 
structors tliink it indicates strength of feet, 
but weakness of mind. Hence, they will 
rank you at the foot. Watch the professor. 
Never laugh or applaud unless his smile 
gives the signal. But always laugh at his 
jokes. You will know when he makes one 
by watching him or some member of your 
class who has had experience. 

" But, excuse me, I forgot that you were 
not a Freshman. Of course my advice on 
this subject can contain nothing new to you. 
Oh, those good old times ! " he exclaimed 
with a deep sigh. With a start I returned to 
consciousness to hear the echoes of a nasal 
sigh chasing the mice to their holes. " Only 
a dream," do you say? Well, perhaps. But 
I wish it were not so near to the reality. 



GYMNASIUM NOTES. 

Work on the gymnasium is being rapidly 
pushed forward. A large crew, consisting of 
one man and a small boy, is busily at work 
eyery pleasant day. The heating apparatus 
was put in place about two weeks ago, owing 
to the herculean efforts of the directors. A 
high rate of heat is kept up in order to sea- 
son the wood, as the upper floor cannot be 
laid until this is done. As the timbers are 
expected to shrink at least twenty-five feet, 
until this takes place no work will be done 
on the floors. 

We were greatly interested last Saturday, 
when we paid an official visit to the gymna- 
sium, in noting the bee-hive appearance of 
the inside. Each workman tried liis best to 
excel and surpass the other. The boy, ex- 
cited and perspiring, was working for all he 
was worth trying to beat the man. The man 
wouldn't be beaten by a boy, so put in his 
heavy work. During the afternoon of Sat- 



urday the crew, by uniting forces — ^but even 
then only by great labor — managed to drive 
a board nail into the wall for the workman 
to hang his coat on. 

Last November a plumber was sent for. 
Last Monday he arrived on the fast (?) stage 
from Gumtown and began work at once. It 
took him only five days to take ofi: his coat, 
and only six more to light his pipe. At last 
accounts he was hard at work striking an- 
other match. 

The " battery " went in to practice one 
day. The man don't like the battery ; he 
likes the buttery better. The next afternoon 
the battery found a saw-horse in its (the 
battery's) place, with the boy mounting 
guard. The battery left. 

All work is suspended now on everything 
except the bowling alleys. The man and 
boy are both at work on them. It is said 
that a set of ten-pins, representing little sol- 
diers, is to be purchased for the bowling 
alleys. 

A new innovation is to be introduced for 
the Freshmen, in the form of a play-room. 
There are to be a large rocking-horse, a few 
drums, four rattles, and a set of wooden 
blocks. Playing tag will be strictly prohib- 
ited, as the exercise is too violent. 

A candle is to be placed in the base-ball 
cage, so that the batsman will be enabled to 
see the ball. A Rugby foot-ball is to be used 
in practice in place of Wright & Ditson's, 
and, if this is found not to work, a balloon 
will be substituted. 

As the offer of Dr. Sargent in regard to 
supplying apparatus is not considered mu- 
nificent enough, the Indian club and cracked 
oar will be moved from the old Gym. to the 
new just as soon as Mr. Booker gets a chance 
to look over the plans. 

It is reported that the plumber lost a 
penny through a crack the other day. He 
found it after a day's search. 



186 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



DINING WITH PRESIDENT HYDE. 

REUNION OF THE NEW YORK ALUMNI ASSOCIA- 
TION OF BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

We copy from the New York Times, their 
report of the last dinner of the Bowdoin Al- 
umni Association of New York city, Febru- 
ary 10th : 

The New York Alumni Association of Bowdoin 
College dined for the first time with the new and 
young President of the college, Prof. William De- 
Witt Hyde, in the Hofifman House, last night. The 
occasion was the sixteenth anniversary of the asso- 
ciation. About forty gentlemen assembled around a 
handsomely decorated oval table. Mr. Edward B. 
Merrill presided, and near him sat Prof. Hyde, Prof 
Goodwin, of Philadelphia, Dr. Roswell Hitchcock, 
Gen. T. H. Hubbard, Judge Granville P. Hawes, 
Dexter A. Hawkins, and Gen. B. B. Foster. 

When the time for speaking came, President Mer- 
rill made a graceful introductory address in which he 
said that it would be a great thing if all the college 
societies in this city could unite in an effort to promote 
a larger education. He introduced President Hyde, 
of Bowdoin College, who was saluted with cordial 
applause. Mr. Hyde said that he was only thirteen 
years old when he began to study Latin. A member 
of the association remarked that that must have been 
about twenty years ago. President Hyde spoke of 
the condition of aiRiirs at Bowdoin, and said that the 
faculty of that institution held to the old idea that 
mental discipline was the primary thing to be accom- 
plished. After a student's mind had been properly 
trained it was perfectly proper to permit him to elect 
what studies he would pursue. The speaker said 
that when he went to Bowdoin College as its Presi- 
dent, he was surprised at the moral purity that pre- 
vailed among the students there. The worst vices 
could scarcely be said to have an existence there. 
Prof. Hyde reviewed the routine work of the college, 
and suggested some improvements that might be 
advantageously made. In Political Economy and His- 
tory, Bowdoin was not doing all that it should. There 
should be a special professorship established for those 
studies. Another criticism that President Hyde of- 
fered was that the salaries paid by Bowdoin to its 
Professors were insufficient. 

A letter from Senator Frye, of Maine, was read 
extending congratulations to the New York Alumni 
Association, and regretting his inability to attend the 
dinner. Speeches were made by Prof. Goodwin of 
Philadelphia, Prof. Hitchcock, Dr. Wm. S. Dennett, 



Wm. J. Curtis, Esq., Dexter A. Hawkins, and Starr 
H. Nichols, Esq. 

The following letter was also read at the 
dinner, and the sentiments therein responded 
to by Wm. Howe, of Buffalo, and Wm. A. 
Abbott, Esq., of '58 : 

Office of the Brunswick Telegraph, ? 
February 8, 1886. \ 

Dear Sir, — I reply to your kind invitation in haste. 
But as we go to press on Saturday, I cannot take the 
time to leave town to attend to your dinner. In fact, 
if the truth was fully known to you all, I have never 
left town since I assumed the oflSce of editor of the 
inside of my paper, now I should think some forty or 
fifty years ago. I thank your committee also for a 
copy of the "menu" of your devotion and unselfish 
attention to the interests of the college. Its general 
appearance is worthy of any metropolitan press. 
The language in which it is printed is no doubt the 
language in which all epicures in our border cities 
express their wants when eating. We do those things 
differently here. This is a college town. From the 
little aid I have derived in translating it from the 
personal presence of my youngest daughter who has 
just graduated from the female " Annex" to the col- 
lege, 1 should say with no feelings of envy that you 
are having our usual Sunday dinner in " Commons 
Hall." In reading it casually, I miss the presence 
from your table of the " Meleagri's Religiosa Free- 
porlii,"'' a bird known to some of you as the "Free- 
port Turkey," sacred as one of the "household goods" 
in that neglected neighborhood and selling for fifteen 
cents a pound. They used to be brought to Bruns- 
wick in a hand-car in early morning, before Tithon, 
the son of Laomedon, had requested his consort 
Aurora to get out of bed and warm up some- 
thing for breakfast. You will recall the legend. 
They were served up at "Commons Hall" during 
those nights in the January "thaw" when there was 
no slush on the walks, and no fog on the campus, 
and the members of the faculty who were present 
were not so conspicuous as some you will have with 
you on the 10th, nor were thej'^ so hospitably received. 
I never met there any of the faculty of my time. The 
person who did the cooking, in personal appearance, 
with no jewelry except a pair of round glassed sil- 
ver-bowed spectacles, so far excelled President 
Woods' qualifications of being " sufficiently ugly" for 
an "end woman" that she was ugly enough to run 
two ends of a college ; but she could cook. Things 
about here are in the same condition as they wei'e 
before the fathers, and in some ways I might say 
before the grandfathers. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



187 



We have a new President and the towns-people 
say, I tell you this in confidence, that if a boy fitting 
at Phillips Exeter Academy, graduating at Harvard 
College, and preaching two or three years in the 
neighborhood of New York, can't run Bowdoin Col- 
lege, then they better come out and lock the gates. 
I am sorry I cannot respond to the toast to " The 
Press," or to '.' The Oirls; " to do both of which you, 
or some one else, has generously invited me. " The 
Press" is a great topic. And as we manage it here, 
with our "job printing," and "patent outsides," and 
liberal scissoring for the insides, it is a marvelous 
engine of intelligence and power. One such news- 
paper as mine should be published in every college 
town. Ask Greeley, or Bennett, or Mitchell of the 
Sun, or Thompson of the Times, all contemporaries 
of mine, to stand in my shoes, and you will none of 
you regret it. As for the " girls," I will turn them 
over to some serene and eloquent friend, of their 
higher education, like Curtis or Abbott. Then read 
to them my late contribution to the The Lynn U7iion, 
and believe me 

Diplomatically Yours, 

Tenney. 
A New-Fashioned Gikl. 
From the Lynn Union. 
She'd a great and varied knowledge, picked up at a female 
college, of quadratics, hydrostatics and pneuniatics 
very vast. 
She was stuffed with erudition as you stuff a leather cush- 
ion, all the ologies of the colleges and the knowl- 
edges of the past. 

She had studied the old lexicons of Peruvians and Mexi- 
cans, their theology, anthropology and geology o'er 
and o'er. 

She knew all the forms and features of the prehistoric 
creatures — ichthyosaurus, plesiosaurus, megalosau- 
ru3 and many more. 

She'd descrihe the ancient Tuscans, and the Basques and 

the Etruscans, their griddles and their kettles, and 

the victuals that they gnawed. 
She'd discuss, the learned charmer, the theology of 

Brahma, and the scandals of the Vandals, and the 

sandals that they trod. 

She knew all the mighty giants and the master minds of 
science, all the learning that was turning in the burn- 
ing mind of man. 

But she couldn't prepare a dinner for a gaunt and hungry 
sinner, or get up a decent supper for her poor vora^ 
cious papa, for she never was constructed on the old 
domestic plan. 

Before going into dinner the Alumni Association 
elected the following ofiicers ; President, Edward 
B. Merrill ; Vice-Presidents, the Rev. D. R. Good- 
win, LL.D., the Rev. Newman Smyth, D.D., James 



McKeen, and General B. B. Foster ; Treasurer, Dr. F. 
H. Dillingham ; Secretary, Francis R. Upton ; Cor- 
responding Secretary, William A. Abbott; Execu- 
tive Committee, General T. H. Hubbard, the Hon. 
Dexter A. Hawkins, Charles E. Soule, Dr. William 
S. Dennett, and Almon Goodwin. 



BRAGOBERT ET BELSQUEEZER. 



DRAMATIS PERSONS. 

Bragobert, a braggadocio. 
Belsqueezer, a sycophant. 
JoNCOFiN, a yaggere. 
BiLCECO, etiam yaggere. 
Alterl yaggeres. 

ACT I. 

Scene I. Street near Mall. 
Enter JONC, Bilc., yaggeresque. 

Jonc. Our two friends who are passing by seem 
not to mind our warning given yesterday, but look 
at us as arrogant as you please. Did not that big- 
gest one inflict on you a blow the other day ? 

Bilc. Yes, he did, and Til pay him for it, too. 

Jonc. What can we do about it; shall we re- 
peat the dose of fruit? 

Bilc. That will let them off too easy. Having 
disregarded our threats, something more energetic 
must be given. 

Jonc. Let's give them a pounding. 

Yaggeres. Hurrah, hurrah, hurrah ! 

Bilc. That will take some of the impudence out 
of them. 

Jonc. When shall we do it ? 

Bilc. We will all meet here to-morrow night, 
and if they don't come off of the roof we will set 
upon them. 

Yaggeres. And will make it hot for them, too. 

Omne quiescit. 

Scene II. A room in Dude Palace. 
Enter Brag, ajid Bels. 
Bels. What, Bragobert, ho ! 

Methinks I see ye agitated this morning. 
Why pace ye up and down with seeming 
Indetermination ? Your countenance, erst- 
while 
Accustomed to express full rigid strength, 
Now seems the embodiment of anxiousness 
and care. 
Brag. Right well, my dear Bels., ye consider. 
There is commotion in my heart; 
My heated blood travels its circling course 



188 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



With doubly swifter speed. Ah, revenge is 

sweet. 
Ere that yonder sun lengthens the late shadows 
Towards the east, destruction dire shall fall 
On that unhappy tribe. 

Bels. But you amaze ! What unhappy crowd 
On which your powerful might shall come ? 

£rag. Again I say revenge ! 

Look I not as though I'd suffered ? 
Am I the one to quail at danger's call ? 
Does not the strength of Milo dwell in 
This powerful arm ? Speak I not well ? 

Bels. Indeed you do ; scarce liave I ever seen 
In all my days such violent wrath 
Come on a mortal man. But anxiety 
Is mixed; confide with me your care. 
Surely with our combined strength 
No force would dare oppose. Methinks 
I never saw a more courageous frame 
Than that ye now present me. 
Had I the strength which ye most lucky have. 
No fear'd be mine. Such well-knit limbs. 
Such thick-skulled head, no blow could knock 

ye out. 
So excellent ye are that God himself 
Must envious be of the image he has made. 
But tell me first what cause ! 

Brag. [^Aside.'] How the base flatterer bam- 
boozles 
With his soft palaver, and lifts 
His smirking face up into mine. 
[To Bels.] Friend Bels., a hostile crowd with 

Insults sharp 
Have mocked me, as I, with friend, proceed 

the street, 
A hidden missile, an apple or a pomme de- 

terre. 
Assails me, placing in hazard the beauty 
Of my handsome back. Once at the Poste 
A lady fair proffered me her assistance, 
And 

Bels. A little backward of the fray, hey, Brag ! 

Brag. What insinuate you now? I — quail 
Before some mortal force ? Sooner rather 
The lion cower before the deer. 
No ! truly uot ; a faintness overtook me, 
A grievous illness ; and in that mental state, 
Compassion on that motley throng. 
Who scarce did know how near they'd ventured 
Unto death, did move me. But now 
My heart is hardened, and is firm resolved 
Against those miserable men. Have I 
Thy succor in this glorious enterprise ? 



Bels. \_Aside.'] Bold and presumptuous braggart. 
How he boasts ! 

[To Brag.] Ye art determined then 
That nothing less than death shall be the fate 
Of those who dare insult thee ? Hast thou yet 
No compassion on their perverted souls? 
Brag. Nothing but death. 

Bels. Then let us see what needs must best be 
done. 
Thine to command I am, and if thou sayest 
All will be over with our presumptuous friends 
Ere to-morrow morn, when Stack, who agi- 
tates 
The hemp, with sacrilegious hand shall drive 
The cooing pigeons from their stolen perch. 
But we must haste. No time to bandy words. 
My time is precious, both to me myself 
And to my friends. Be quick about it now ; 
When shall we meet ? 
Brag. At half-past six to-night, ready for the 

fray. 
Bels. [_Aside.'] If I am not in error our boastful 
friend 
Will find himself in trouble ; and judging 
From his previous acts, will prove himself a 

coward 
In deed if not in mouth. And, as my late 

friend 
Wise Solomon hath said, will prove, that 
"He who fights and runs away. 
Will live to fight another day." 
And 1 shall care no harm will come to me. 

lExit. 
Brag. [_Aside.'] How the man talks and tries to 
puff me up 
With his flattering words. But he will help. 

lExit. 



ACT II. 
Scene I. Street near Cathedral. 
Etiter Bels. and Brag. 
Bels. Aha, we meet again ; 'twas at the sacrifice 
Of a widow's tears, that I could tear myself 
away. 
Brag. Are you prepared ? 
Bels. Of course I am. 

Brag. Hadn't we better let them live a little 
longer ? 
My heart compassion feels at shedding blood. 
Bels. But here they come. We must proceed. 

Shall I lead on ? 
Brag. If you want to. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



189 



Bels. Then please revive yourself. Why trem- 
ble you 
So violently ? Is your " illness" come again ? 

Enter Y agger es. 
Brag. {^Clutching 'B'ELS.'] Let's speed away ; their 
force 
Is greater than I thought. 
Joncofin. l&eizing Brag.] We have you now, 

you miserable wretch. 
Brag. Is this a yagger which I see before me, 
Whose fist obstructs my gaze ? Back, baleful 
sight 

Which now 

Jonc. \_Thumping him.'] Take that! 
Brag. Oh, oh, oh ! 

\_Exeiint with music of pattering blows. 
Bels. [In the distance, with coat tails streaming in 
the air.] 
"Fare thee well. Brother Watkins, ah !" 

{Exit. 

Scene II. A hospital. 
Brag, in bed. Enter Bels. 

Bels. Truly it grieves my heart to see you 

In such plight, with bandages on head and 
limbs. 
Brag. Small thanks I have to you for this de- 
formity. 
Bels. Ah, my dear boy, only a piece of luck, 
That I escaped instead of you. 
{Aside.] I meant to save my head at any cost. 
Brag. Enough of this. Get thee gone, you sinu- 
ous scamp, 
A man who will betray a friend. 
Bels. Indeed, my dear boy. 
Brag. Enough, I say. Be gone ! Do you under- 
stand ? 

[Exit Bels. 
Now is he gone, that worm of slimy feel. 
And left me to my woes and to my mind. 
I fallen am, and justly so ; 
The product of my mouth has turned to woe. 
But I have learned one lesson by my fall, 
To leave to others boasts and arrogance. 
However much at first success may come 
To him who speaks the loudest, 
Who with false voice dissembles what he 

thinks. 
Yet the lapse of time, uncovering one true 

soul, 
Will show us to the world the what we really 
are. 




Prof. Chapman lately 
gave a very interesting 
reading of "Merchant of Venice," be- 
fore the Senior English Literature divis- 
ion. The class is now using Moul- 
ton's " Shakespeare as a Dramatic 
Artist," and will make as thorough study as possible 
of " Merchant of Venice," "Richard III.," "Julius 
Osesar," "King Lear," and "Macbeth." 

Hersey, '89, has returned from teaching. 

The graduating class in the Medical School have 
elected the following oificers : President, A. J. 
Noble, Waterville; Vice-President, W. F. Hart, 
Holden; Secretary and Treasurer, W. J. Maybury, 
East Turner; Parting Address, W. L. Dana, Port- 
land; Marsha], F. E. Varney, Skowhegan ; Commit- 
tee of Arrangements, A. S. Thayer, Portland ; L. A. 
Sukeforth, Washington ; J. D. Haley, Cornish. 

The rhetorical exercises have been discontinued 
for the remainder of this year. The few who have 
not spoken will rehearse privately to Prof. Chapman. 

Saturday evening a few of the students and in- 
structors met in the Senior recitation room, and the 
advisability of forming a scientific society was talked 
over. A committee was chosen to draw up a consti- 
tution, and the iirst meeting will be held next Satur- 
day. The society is to be called the " Cleavelaud 
Scientific Society," in memory of Prof. Cleaveland. 

Prof. Smith gave several lectures to the Seniors 
last week, on the "Rise of the Papal Power," and 
Monday morning had an examination. 

The following speakers have been appointed to 
take part in the exhibition at the close of this term : 
Seniors— W. V. Wentworth, Rockland, Salutatorian ; 
H. R. Fling, Portland; I. W. Horn, Berlin Falls, N. 
H. ; W. W. Kilgore, Newry; A. P. Knight, Port- 
land ; A. A. Knowlton, Tamworth, N. H. ; E. E. 
Rideout, Cumberland; L. Turner, Jr., Somerville. 
Juniors— E. B. Burpee, Rockland ; E. Little, Auburn ; 
E. B. Torrey, Bar Harbor ; C. H. Verrill, Auburn. 

Prof.— "Mr. C, what can you say of bats?" Mr. 
C— "I don't remember that the author speaks of 
them in to-day's lesson." Prof.— " Well, tell the 



190 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



class what your experience has been with them." 
The class comes down. 

The young ladies still give in to the "imperative 
demands of the young men," we suppose, as the ger- 
mans have not been discontinued as yet. We are 
afraid Mr. Fisher's sermon did not have the desired 
result. 

The Seniors in a recent election chose the follow- 
ing officers : President, C. W. Tuttle ; Opening Ad- 
dress, Levi Turner, Jr. ; Orator, J. C. Parker; Poet, 
J. H. Davis; Historian, G. S. Berry ; Prophet, G. M. 
Norris ; Chaplain, A. R. Butler; Parting Address, 
A. P. Knight; Committee of Arrangements, F. L. 
Smith, E. E. Rideout, I. W. Horn ; Committee on 
Music, W. W. Kilgore, H. R. Fling ; Committee on 
Pictures, W. H. Stackpole. 

Brunswick has had a good number of entertain- 
ments for the past week. Wednesday, the "Mikado" 
was given by a good company ; Thursday evening, an 
operetta was given by the ladies of the Episcopal 
church ; Saturday evening, The Dalys gave a very 
enjoyable entertainment, and those who enjoy a good 
laugh felt well paid for going. 

President Hyde had an appreciative audience 
when he gave Dr. Dike's opinions on marriage rela- 
tions to the class in Ethics. 

One of the Seniors grinding down a mineral sec- 
tion for the microscope was delighted on finding what 
he supposed were two jars of prepared emery, but 
after grinding for two days with it and not materially 
diminishing the thickness of his section he found that 
instead of grinding with emery he had been using 
organic material prepared by an instructor in the 
summer school. 

Several of those who took part in "Esmeralda" 
when it was given here, were in the same play at 
Bath where it was presented last week. 

Dike, '86, and Fowler, '87, have joined the class 
in quantitative analysis. 

A small explosion took place in the laboratory the 
other day. Mr. Cothren was engaged in distilling 
some petroleum when about a pint of the oil distilled 
caught fire, burning him slightly but doing no other 
damage. 

The germans are pronounced a decided success 
by those who attend. The favors are much prettier 
than at any of the previous germans and new figures 
are introduced evei-y night. There are at present 
twenty couples who attend. 

The Unitarian church gave a dramatic entertain- 
ment at the Town Hall last Monday night. H. B. 



Austin, E. C. Plummer, and M. P. Smithwick took 
part. The Bowdoin College Orchestra furnished 
music. At the close of the entertainment a short time 
was pleasantly spent in dancing. 

We see by the Lewiston Journal that C. M. Austin, 
W. S. Parsons, and Merrill, '87, and Marston, '88, 
had returned from preaching (?). This speaks well 
for the work of the Y. M. C. A. 




'53. — Rev. Jeremiah E. 
Pond, pastorof the Congre- 
gational Church in Alfred, died there 
recently after an illness from general 
debility, with symptoms of paralysis, for 
over two months. He was the son of Rev. 
Enoch Pond, D.D., late of Bangor. Born in Cam- 
bridgeport, Mass., June 23, 1831. He graduated at 
the Bangor Theological Seminary, and entered on his 
ministry in Neenah, Wis., in 1868, and preaching 
there three years; and afterwards in Plattville, Wis., 
eleven years ; Hampden, Me., four years ; Milltown, 
N. B., two yeai-s ; Warren, Me., six and a half 
years. He came to Alfred in July, 1885, and was in- 
stalled as pastor in October; his health seriously fail- 
ing in early winter. Mr. Pond leaves a wife and five 
children, — two daughters, teachers in South Carolina, 
and three sons, the youngest a student at Phillips 
Academy, Andover. During his brief work in 
Alfred, Mr. Pond was a very faithful and popular 
minister, his people being greatly attached to him, 
watching his sickness with serious anxiety, and his 
death is a great loss to his church and the com- 
munity. His remains will be taken to Bangor for 
burial. — Press. 

'61. — Rev. Edwin Smith, formerly pastor of the 
Congregational church at South Braintree, Mass., is 
now at Maynard, Mass. 

'72. — William C. Shannon, surgeon U. S. A., son 
of Nathaniel Shannon, of Portland, has just passed a 
successful examination for pi'omotion and has been 
stationed at Fort Warren, Boston. He has passed 
the last five years with the army in the West. 

'80. — A. M. Edwards, of Lewiston, was admitted 
to the Oxford Bar Saturday week. He is a native of 
Bethel, a son of Colonel Edwards, of that place. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



191 



He was graduated from the law school of the Uni- 
versity of Iowa in 1884. He was admitted to the 
bar in Iowa in June, 1884. He read law for a time 
with Hon. Enoch Foster, at Bethel. 

'80. — Horace R. Giveen is, at last accounts, recov- 
ering from a severe attack of t3'phoid fever at 
Weaverville, Gal. He was visiting his classmate, 
Hall, at Vallejo, Gal., and hurried to Weaverville. 
Glass of 1863. 

Joseph G. Bates, practicing law at San Francisco, 
Gal. 

Gharles U. Bell, practicing law at Lawrence, 
Mass., and member of Sherman & Bell. 

Addison Blanchard, Kev., a Congregational mis- 
sionary ; the last I heard of him was in Golorado. 

Alvah B. Dearborn, M.D., now practicing at 
Newburyport, Mass. 

John W. Duxbury, last report "head of tele- 
graph and telephone communications at Providence, 
R. I." 

Geo. A. Emery, practicing law at Saeo, Me. 

James A. Fogg, last report " business," San Fran- 
cisco, Gal. 

Rodolphus H. Gilmore, last authentic report 
"practicing law in Iowa." 

Thomas M. Giveen, practicing law at Brunswick, 
Me. 

William E. Greene, practicing law at San Fran- 
cisco, Gal. 

Benj. D. Greene, in business at Savannah, Ga. 

George A. Haines, in business at Boston, Mass. 

George G. Harriman, in business at Cleveland, O. 

Thos. W. H. Hussey, teaching at Nashua, N. H. 

Henry Kimball, attorney at law. New Hampshire. 

Evans Searle Pillsbury, practing law at San Fran- 
cisco, Gal. 

Nathaniel F. Putnam, in the West. 

Frank C. Remick, was here in 1878, now in De- 
troit, Mich. 

Richard W. Robinson, practicing law at Chicago, 
111. 

Andrew R. G. Smith, M.D., at Whitefield, Me. 

S. P. N. Smyth. 

Newman Smyth, D. D., New Haven, Conn. 

Albion W. Stuart, superintendent of schools, 
Otumwa, Iowa. 

Edwin L. Sturtevant, in charge of the New York 
Agricultural Experiment Station at Geneva, N. Y. 

Ispiah Trufant, principal of academy, in or near 
Oxford, O. 

Gyrus B. Varney, principal of a fitting school for 
Bowdoin at Portland, Me., resides in Deering, Me. 

Gharles G. Watson, Rev. 

Alexander D. Willard, Treasury Department, 
Washington, D. G. 




IN FANCY'S LOOM 

In fancy's loom let us to-niglit 
Weave those sweet things tliat come to light 
When Winter goes, and after him 
Exultingly the swallows skim 
Northward o'er greening vale and height. 

What though fierce frost-winds waste their 

might ? 
Our curtained home is warm and bright, 
Lo! bluebirds on the budding limb 
In fancy's loom. 

No mortal ever sang aright 
Spring's miracles that meet the sight 
In sunny field and forest dim, 
Therefore in silence let us trim 
A land with beauty free from blight 
In fancy's loom. 

— Bates Student. 



H. V. STACKPOLE, 

FINE BOOTS AND SHOES, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

ELEGANT MACKINAW 

STRAW HATS, 
THE BEST QUALITY, 

$1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 

MERRY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND. 



-aS. R. JACKSON, 2D, s- 

HEADQUARTEES FOB 

Overshoes, Rubber Boots, and Rubbers 

Constantly on hand in large variety. Call and examine. 

No. 2 Odd Fellows Block, 

MAIN STREET, - - BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



CIGARETTE 
Smokers who 

are wUlingoto 
pay a little more 
for Cigarettes 

than tne price 



R ICHMOND 

charged for the oiVinary trade Cigarettes! wUl 
find the MCHIaOND STRAIGHT CUT 
No. I SUPERIOR TO AXL OTHERS. 
Ihey are made from the brlglitest, most 
delicately flavored, and Ugliest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are aliso- 
nitely ^uoat a,diilteratlon or drugs. 



STRAIGHT CUT 



No. 
-I- 



We Tise the GemUme Frencli Rice Paper 

of our own direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
ori^iDal brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or box of ■ 
Richiiiond 
Straight Cut I 
Cigarettes 

bears the I 
signature of ' 



niGARETTES 

ALLEN &CINTER 



MANUFACTTTEE R B, 

RICHMOND. VIRGINIA. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

ITJaine Bentral R. ^. 

On and after Oct. 12th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.15, 11.25 A.M., 2.38, 4.45 and 6.25 p.m., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Rockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.38 P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.40 P.M., and 

12.35 (night). 
For Lewlston, 8.15 A.M., 3.45 and 6.33 p.m., and every night a 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. (mixed), and 2.45 P.M. 
For Augusta and Waterville, 8.30 a.m., 2.40 p.m., 12.45 every 

night, and on Saturdays only at 6.35 p.m. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 3.40 p.m., and 13.45 (night) 
For Bangor, Ellsworth, Mt. Desert Ferry, St. Stephen, Houlton, 

Yanceboro, and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Bar Harbor, 13.45 (night). 

Note.— The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew 
istou, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun] 
day, but do not connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, or 
lor Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sun- 
day morning. 

PAYSON TUCICER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BooTHBY, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 6, 1885. 



SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. 

Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 

I'he following are our well known 

STANDARD BRANDS : 

Capokal, Sweet Capoeal, St. James 1-2, Caporal 1-2, 

St. James, Ameassadok, Entre Notjs, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES, 
Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and French Rice Paper, are rolled by the high- 
est class of skilled labor, and warranted free from flavoring or 
impurities 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a fac-simile of Kinney Bros. 
Signature. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KINNEY BEOS. 

NEW YORK. 



The Sixty-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 4th, 1S86, 
and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Rev. Wm. DeWitt Hyde, President: Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrice and 
Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., 
Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. Gerrish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Franklin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemistry; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henky H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Yodng, PuWic Hygiene; 
Irving E. Kijiball, M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



MIXTURES FOR PIPE OR CIGARETTE- 
THREE KINGS, Turkish, Perique andVirginia. 
MELLOW MIXTURE, Turkish and Perique. 
TURKISH and VIRGINIA. 
PERIQUE and VIRGINIA. 
GENUINE TURKISH. 
Flake Cuts Especially Adapted for the Pipe. 
VANITY FAIR. OLD GOLD. 

Fragrant Vanity Fair, Superlative, and Clotli of Gold Cigarettes 

ALWAYS FRESH, CIjEAN AND SWEET. 

Our cigarettes were never so fine as now, they cannot be sur- 
passed for puriiy and excellence. Only the purest rice p.aper 
used. 14 MKST- PRIZE MEDAIS. 

WM. S. KIMBALL & CO. 



THE BRUNSWICK TELEGRAPH, 

Published every Friday IVIorning by A. G. Tenney. 

Terms, $1.50 a Tear in Advance. 

JOB WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



OOLLEaE BOOKSTORE. 

"We have constantly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 

BYRON STEVJBIVS. 



E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kiuds of 



"S^t 



"Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce, 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

4®-Speeial Kates to Student Clubs.-ffis 



iflt^J^ ®^lii3!rlCT0* 



2 §^urd| Pa:fe, 



lat|. 



i^m^ m. m^^wmom^i^ 



DEALER m 



m 



CEDAR STEEET, BKUNSWICK, ME. 
Brancli office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Blngs, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 
|^= Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry promptly re- 
paired and warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



Successor to Atwood & Wentworth, 

DEALER IN 

DIA^pOrlDS, WI^TOHES, JEWELRY. 

and importers of French Clocks, Opera Glasses, etc. 
Fine Watch Bepairing ; Gold and Silver Platinc/ . 

509 COWGEESS ST., Portland, Me. 

ALL THE STUDENTS SHOULD BUY 

THEIR 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND RIIBBERS 

Frank E, Roberts' Boot & Shoe Store, 

Con. Main and Mason Sts., opp. Town Clock. 



Am m. si.^®^« 



-DEALER US- 



Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet Music, etc. Large stock of Instru- 
ments of all kinds to rent. Also insurance 
written in sound companies at low rates. 



DUNLAP BLOCK, BRUNSWICK. ME. 

EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT 



BICYCLE 
BASE-BALL 

TENNIS 
BOATING 



SHIRTS, 

STOCKINGS, 

JEBSEYS. 



SPECIAL RATES TO CLUBS. 



OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 






MAIN STEEET, BETJWSWICK, ME. 



W|I. % FIELD, 



fI5?N)?6E^. 



239 MIODLE STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE. 

J. A. MEKKILL. A. KEITH. 



DRALER IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats. Special rates to Student 
Clubs. 

127 WATER ST., AUGUSTA, MAINE. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PURITY SWEET CIGARETTES. 

THE PUREST, MILDEST, AND BEST CIGARETTE ON THE MARKET. 

PURE, BRIGHT VIRGINIA TOBACCO AND PUREST RICE PAPER. 



FOR THE FINEST MADE TRY OUR 

STRAIGHT WEB CIGARETTES. 

MANUFACTURED FROM THE FINEST BRIGHT TOBACCO GROWN. WITH 

TURKISH MIXTURE. 



PURITY SMOKING TOBACCO. 

THE FINEST, PUREST, AND BEST SMOKING TOBACCO MADE. 



RALEIGH CUT PLUG SMOKING. 

THE ORIGINAL, PUREST, AND THE BEST. 

We guarantee all not injurious. Only a trial and you will be convinced. 

PACE & SIZER, Manufacturers, Richmond, Va. 

ON SALE AT FIELD'S. 



no 



3Bk 




^CID PHOSPHATE. 

[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

The Unrivalled Remedy for Dyspepsia, Mental and Phj'sical Exhaustion, Nervousness, Wakefulness, 

Diminished Vitality, etc. 

As Food for an Exhausted Brain, in Liver and Kidney Trouble, in Seasicltness and Slcl( Headache, in Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion and Constipation, in Inebriety, Despondency and cases of Impaired Nerve Function, 

It has become a necessity in a large number of households throughout the world, 

And Is universally prescribed and recommended by physicians of all schools. 
Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 
It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body. 
It is unsurpassed as a substitute for lemons or limes, and 

IT MAKKS A DELICIOUS DRINK -WITH WATER AND SUGAR ONLY. 
Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

BUMFOBD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, R. I. 
<®-BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.-Sff 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



MMWM ^ FMEBI*] 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views iVIade to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 



F. ROEMER, 

Successor to A. Roenier & Son, 
THE LARGEST HISTORICAL 

GOSTUMER i ARMORER 

IN AMERICA. 

Also Costumer for all the priucipal theati'es : 
Fifth Aveuue Theatre, Grand Opera House, 
Star Theati'e, Madison Square Theatre, Siblo's Garden Theati-e, 
Xew Park Theatre, People's Theati-e, 14th Street Theati-e. 

No. 8 UNION SQUARE, NEW YORK. 



Go to W, B. Woodard's 

To buy your GEOCEEIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGAES, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

Main Street, Head of Mail, Brunswick, Me. 




ALL KINDS OF 



ro re 






EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



MES. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Keat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We also make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGTTES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



ALLEN & CO .""i ORTLAND. 

Having moved to their new store, 204 Middle Street, Cor. of Plum, are constantly opening 
rich and elegant goods for gentlemen's wear. 

Ihoice foreign fabrics Sow iisplapd ii| fur tailoring iepartmeni 

The finest-made up Clothing to be seen in the State now exhibited in our 



Novelties for Gentlemen's Dress in Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves, Neckwear, Canes, and Silk Umbrellas 
in Seasonable Styles to be found in our 

Furnishing Dspartm@rit. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

204 MIDDLE STREET, COKNEE OP PLUM, PORTLAND. 



THE 



Life 



» TRAVELERS ^ 

and Accident Insurance Company 



OF HERTFORD, CONN., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCT $11^000)000) and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 

A ^r^TT^T?lV'T' T*OT Tr^T17Q indemnifying the Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
-^v^v^-Li-'-Tji™ -L X V_/1jJ-V^JL1ZjC7 Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidental Injury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only 355.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each $1,000, with $5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDKNT policies since 1864: have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. 

Issues T TT7T7 X)/^T Tr^TT?C of every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 
also LtLJO Xh i:\Jxji.\jLlh\J Personal Benefit. 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, ------ $y, 826, GOO I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Ofiice at Hartford. 
JAS. G. BATTERSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary. 



CUT FLOWERS. 

Orders for Cut Flowers and all Floral Designs will be promptly 
filled if left at the store of E. .J. MEERYM AN, Pliarniacist, or 

At the Greenhouse on Jordan Avenue. 

FUNERAL FLOWERS A SPECIALTY. 
Brunswick, Jan. 25, 1886. 



THIS PAPERS 



, inPhiiatlflpliia 

I at the Newppapev Advcr- 

_ _ ■ ti^inK As^ency of .Messrs. 

N. W. AVER 4 SON, our authorized agenta 




[Cushing's Island, 
Portland, Me. 
S. C3-IBS03Sr- 



I>ia:OTOC3-E..A.D?Dc3:S 
Made at Higgins' Ground-Floor Studio, Bath, 

Cannot be excelled in style and finish. Special attention 
given to view work. 




1886. ^Fs^- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard" and "Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 
LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENQEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

A8ENCY FOK 




B- 
(0 



p 



HONETIC SHORTHAND. °^m^e°t»^'^ 

For Self-Instruction. Coutaining all the late improve- 
ments, i'rice $l.oU. Special Instruction by Mail, SG.OO. 
Send Stamp for Specimen Pa£?es and Illusti'atefl Pamplilet. 

W. W. OSGOODBY, Publisher, Kochester, N. Y. 



474 Congress St., - 



opp. Preble House. 



THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

fiQ. 5 0DD EEIiMW^ BLeCK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 



The New Styles in 

STIIFI^ and. SOIPT H-^TS 

In all colors, are now ready. An elegant line of New York 
Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in aU Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, at 

— :ELLIOTT'S,i — 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 

IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



ff©B> J?. 



C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



vED. J. MERRYMAB, PHARMACIST-:- 
Fancy ani Toilet Articles, Clprsl Totacco. 

DUNLAP BLOCK, - - MAIN STREET. 

O^" Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Wo Bo SH^MSYg 
Book-Seller, Stationer, Book-Binder. 

AND BLANK-BOOK MANUFACTUKEK, 

Opposite City Hall, Center St., Bath, Maine. 
CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 

DSDVI3V, 



J. S. TOWI^E, 

PHARMACEUTIST. 

PUEE DRUGS, MEDICINES, FANCY AND TOILET AR- 
TICLES; ALSO A FINE LINE OF CHOICE CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES. PRESCRIPTIONS a Specialty. 

Main Street, Near Bowdoin College. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



OVEB BOAKDMAN'S STORE, MAIN STREET. 

— H B. G. DENNISON, -t— 

Brunswick Book - Store, 

No. I O'Brien Block, Just North of P. 0. 

Fine Stationeiy ; Portland and Boston Daily Papers ; Circu- 
lating Library, 1600 Volumes; Base-Ball and La Crosse; Pict- 
ures and Picture frames; Frames made to order at short notice. 



STOKER BLOCK, - 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



K W. BAREON, 

Dealer i Staniarj ani FaDcy drocerles. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 



A CLup i\oAD I^^^:E 







(Established 1811.) 



Institute Building, Huntington Ave., Boston. 

M&m f uWlsto too illuslpffltei ^attCElogues, 

ONE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO BICYCLES, AND THE 
OTHER TO TRICYCLES. 

Either Catalogue sent free anywhere on receipt of a two-cent 
stamp at above address. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Csesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucohcs, and first six Books of the 
^neid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis ■ 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regular Examinations eor Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the HalloweU Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryehurg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

required— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XV. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MARCH 17, 1886. 



No. 16. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DUKINQ 
THE COLLEGIATE TEAR BT THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



EDITORIAL BOARD. 

W. V. Wentworth, '86, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
J. H. Davis, '86. Levi Turner, Jr., '8e 

A. A. Knowlton, '86. C. W. Tuttle, '86. 

J. C. Parker, '86. C. B. Burleigh, '87. 

H. L. Taylor, '86. E. C. Plummer, '87. 



Per annum, in advance, 
Single Copies, 



$2.00 
15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 



CONTENTS. 

Vol. XV., No. 16.— March 17, 1886. 

Tempe, , 193 

Editorial Notes, 193 

The Pedagogue's Mash 194 

Bowdoin in Literature, 195 

Fishing at Bowdoin 197 

Rollins' Transformation, lv)9 

Communication 201 

CoLLEGii Tabula, 201 

Personal, 203 

Clippings, 203 



TEMPE. 

In Tempe's vale of winding green, 
Half-hirt by banks with leafy screen, 
Peneius wanders through the scene 
Toward the .a^gasan blue below. 

On beetling crag high towers the pine. 
From sunny cliff-side trails the vine, 
There spray and tendril intertwine, 
O'er glassy waters as they flow. 




"What's in a name?" Certain 
recitations are held in rooms in Memorial 
Hall, exhibitions take place in Memorial Hall, 
and Mr. Guild's lectures are delivered in 
Memorial Hall, but we sometimes wonder 
whether strangers or towns-people, or even 
students, when they enter the building, think 
of it as a memorial edifice. And vfh.y should 
they ? What is there to call attention to its 
peculiar character, or to indicate in whose 
memory it was erected? Indeed, we doubt 
if all of the students could inform an inquir- 
ing visitor whether that stately granite pile 
was erected in honor of Bowdoin's earliest 
patron, or some of her more recent sons. 

Mr. Packard, of the class of '66, in a com- 
munication to the Orient last fall, called at- 
tention to the singular omission and the fail- 
ure to have about the hall anything to turn 
the attention towards those brave men who 
gave their lives to their country. Their 
noble sacrifice, nor the debt we owe them, 
can ever be forgotten, and shall their 
Alma Mater rest content with a Memorial 
Hall which has nothing memorial about it ex- 
cept the name ? At present the subject of sol- 
diers' monuments is engrossing the attention 
of numerous towns, and the time seems op- 
portune for some one, not any one, to rouse 
Bowdoin men to action. 



194 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



One week ago last Saturday, the Cleave- 
land Scientific Society was organized by the 
scientific members of the faculty and those 
students who are specially interested in the 
study of nature. By discussions of scientific 
topics, descriptions of new methods of work 
and new apparatus, accounts of interesting 
facts observed, etc., it is hoped the members 
may increase their interest in and knowledge 
of scientific subjects. Some similar societies 
in other places are accomplishing consider- 
able, some even going so far as to issue publi- 
cations embodying the main points presented 
at their meetings, and, though our new so- 
ciety does not anticipate an immediate an- 
nouncement to the world of its achievements, 
it does hope to be of service to its members. 



A typographical error in the first editorial 
of the last number of the Oeiekt, the omis- 
sion of the pronoun we by the compositor, 
has brought upon the editorial head severe 
retribution, the penalty for the sin being no 
less than a discourse upon our " uncertain 
grammar " in the columns of that eminently 
grammatical paper, the Brunswick Telegraph. 
Just what "uncertain grammar" is we have 
been unable to learn, but doubtless a treatise 
will soon be published, explaining the merits 
of the new system. Meanwhile, perhaps the 
Telegraph correspondent could enlighten us. 

In the Oeient, the sentence beginning 
" They are well conducted " was separated 
from " many modest ladies " by an interven- 
ing clause and, though the ladies are un- 
doubtedly " conducted," or escorted, by gen- 
tlemen, we would hardly be so presuming as 
to state that they are well conducted, they 
being the judges of their own escorts. 
Neither did we attempt to say what the 
ladies think about the morality of dancing, 
merely giving our opinion, to which we 
adhere. 

To read between the lines, and discover 
the motive which probably inspired the 



author of the article, is so easy a task that 
we think no further reply necessary. 



Notwithstanding the general satisfaction 
with the new gymnasium, one feature seems 
to meet with almost, if not quite, universal 
disapprobation from students, at least. We 
refer to the rail around the running track. 
Those who are most interested in athletics 
find the most fault with it, saying that it will 
not be safe to run with only one rail. If a 
man should slip, there would be nothing to pre- 
vent his rolling off and dropping to the floor 
below. As for looks, we see nothing to com- 
mend the one-rail feature, and the expense 
of a little more gas-pipe could not be serious. 



Our readers will undoubtedly be inter- 
ested in Prof. Chapman's article calling at- 
tention to the prominent position held by 
Bowdoin in American Literature, and speak- 
ing of the endeavors being made to enlarge 
the list of productions of Alumni in the 
library. 

THE PEDAGOGUE'S MASH. 

'Twas first as a Freshman I met her, 
In the midst of a party most gay, 
Assembled at old Deacon Glidden's 
To honor the advent of May. 

I was teaching, you know, in the district, 
A giant in knowledge profound, 
A man whom the fiithers predicted. 
In "larnin' " could never be " down'd." 

And she, a buxom young maiden. 
With the blossom of health in her face, 
And a form whose symmetrical beauty. 
She'd ne'er been accustomed to lace. 

If she lacked the conventional "eulchaw," 
Which the city young lady affects, 
She was up in the trivial gossip 
That characterizes the sex. 

How sweet was the innocent giggle 
With which she related to me, 
How a ram had lately caused Daddy 
To shin up the crab-apple tree. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



195 



And how Asa Green was a-sparkin' 
Right smart round Evangeline Ray, 
Though she didn't see how he could keep her, 
In clothes, on a dollar a day. 

How the calves had gone into the garden, 
And ate a big squash that was there. 
Which daddy had long been a growing 
On purpose to take to the fair. 

How Deacon Macauley's son Billy, 
And Parson Henderson's Jean, 
Were salting down slathers of money. 
By running a thrashing-machine. 

How the ruifianly boys from the Corner 
Came down the last lyceum night, 
And by our boys were solidly walloped 
In a terribly cantankerous fight. 

How flighty Crisanthene Slocum 
Had married old Solomon West, 
To get at the five-hundred dollars. 
The wealthy old sinner possessed. 

In fact everything that had happened 
(And many that didn't, I fear,) 
In the quiet old town of Pedunkville, 
For many and many a year. 

And when her fair waist I encircled 
(Of course I did it in sport), 
She nestled her head on my bosom. 
And said it was jolly to court. 

Well, no, we never were married. 
Though the gossips wisely presag'd, 
That the college feller and Delia 
Were just as good as engaged. 

I'm now a Senior in college. 
While the beautiful Delia Ann Poole 
Is engaged to one of our Freshmen 
Who's teaching the old district school. 



BOWDOIN IN LITERATURE. 

It is generally known, I supjjose, here in 
college' that Professor Little is making a 
special effort at present to enrich our library 
and to add to its interest by securing for it 
the publications of the alumni. One does 
not need to spend any words in commending 
an undertaking so worthy as this, and so 
wise; it commends itself. The glory of a 



college is not in its generous endowments, 
its fine buildings, its spacious and beautiful 
grounds, its large numbers, — not in any of 
these things, nor in all combined; but in 
what it has done for its sons, and in what, 
through them, it has done for the world. It 
points with pride to the achievements of its 
graduates in every field of honorable effort, 
and those achievements it counts, or it should 
count, as its dearest treasures. Now a great 
part of the work wrought by graduates, 
whatever may be the glory it reflects upon 
their Ahna Mater, cannot of course be ex- 
hibited in her collections ; it is a part of her 
history, it secures respect for her, it surrounds 
her with an atmosphere of dignity and rev- 
erence, but it cannot be presented to the 
eye, it cannot be made an attraction to the 
chance visitor, or an ever-present stimulus 
to the undergraduate resident. But the 
contributions which the alumni have made 
to the literature of the world, the printed 
record of their researches, their discoveries, 
their patient and fruitful studies, — these can 
be brought together and made an interesting 
and significant feature of the library, as well 
as an addition to its real value. The at- 
tempt to do this, however, has been so long 
delayed that it is now a work of no little 
difficulty to make the collection even ap- 
proximately complete, and I am sure that 
Professor Little will not take it ill if I be- 
speak for him the kindly and active co-oper- 
ation of all who may reasonably be supposed 
to take an interest in it, undergraduates, 
graduates, and friends of the college. 

There are many, no doubt, who would 
be surprised to know the extent and the 
character of the contributions which Bow- 
doin has made to the literature of the world, 
using literature in its broadest sense to in- 
clude poetry, fiction, criticism, theology, 
philosophy, history, biography, abstract and 
applied science, political economy, finance, 
etc. It would burden the pages of the 



196 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Orient to give even the titles of books and 
pamphlets which have come from the pens 
of officers and graduates of the college, and 
have added largely to the sum of the world's 
pleasure, and knowledge, and faith. What 
Mr. Stedman, in his review of Longfellow, 
calls the " little down-east school," will never 
cease to feel a just and glowing pride in her 
gifted poet who won his way not only to the 
hearts of the people but also to a place in 
Westminster Abbey by the side of Chaucer ; 
but she does not rest her claim to respect 
and distinction upon the single name of 
Longfellow. If Mr. Stedman should extend 
his critical excursions into other fields than 
that of poetry he would meet the " down- 
east school" at every turn, compelling the 
tribute of his fine critical appreciation for 
others of her sons. 

I am not aware that there has ever been 
more than one attempt to make even a partial 
bibliography of the college. Ten years ago, 
in 1876, such an attempt was made. Every 
institution and every individual was partici- 
pating to some extent in the celebration of 
the centennial anniversary of our national 
independence. Bowdoin shared in this gen- 
eral movement to the extent of making up 
a record of what had been added to the 
national literature by her presidents and 
professors. An octavo pamphlet of thirty- 
five pages was printed bearing this title- 
page : " Publications of the Presidents and 
Faculty of Bowdoin College, 1802-1876." 
This pamphlet, which is merely a catalogue 
of titles, contains, in its thirty-five pages, 
five hundred and forty titles, representing a 
contribution to the literature of the country 
the importance of which it is not easy to 
overestimate. Many of these works belong, 
of course, to what De Quincey calls the 
"literature of knowledge," and have there- 
fore been superseded entirely or in a great 
measure by the advance that is constantly 
and rapidly making in every department of 
human knowledge. But their true value 



must be measured by what they themselves 
added to that very advancement which would 
cause them to be superseded. Measured by 
such a standard many of these works deserve, 
as they have received, very high honor. 

But this pamphlet, with its five hundred 
and forty titles, deals only with the publica- 
tions of the Presidents and Faculty of the 
college. The great body of the alumni 
whose writings have helped to swell the bulk 
of our national literature are not represented 
in these pages. Longfellow is there because 
for several years he was a professor in the 
college, but Hawthorne is not, nor Cheever, 
nor their still more fertile classmate J. S. C. 
Abbott, of whose literary life Dr. Leonard 
Bacon says : " The books he has written 
have had millions of readers. His college 
classmates, Longfellow, Hawthorne, Cheever, 
are eminent in literature. Not one of them 
has had — perhaps not all of them together 
have had — so many millions of readers, and 
in so many languages of Christian and 
heathen nations as he. Some of Haw- 
thorne's stories, many of Longfellow's poems, 
may be counted among the classics of the 
world's literature when the histories which 
he has written shall have been superseded; 
but he has made his mark broad and deep 
upon the living generations, and that dif- 
fusion in which he has been so great an in- 
strument will have its effect on coming ages." 

A half dozen names might be selected 
from those of the alumni the titles of whose 
works would aggregate as many as those 
contained in the pamphlet above referred to, 
and then we should only have begun our 
bibliography. In almost every department 
of human knowledge the college can point 
to books written by its own graduates which 
have made their mark upon the thought of 
the time, and will always hold an honorable 
place in the history of our literature. It is 
not safe to begin the mention of names, for 
the list would extend this communication 
beyond all reasonable limits. In theology, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



197 



both in its scientific aspect, and in its philo- 
sophical and practical applications, our bib- 
liography would be particularly rich in works 
of recognized yalue and power. In juvenile 
literature, which is so important a branch of 
modern literature, our college may almost be 
said to " bear the bell." Uncounted multi- 
tudes of boys and girls, in our own land and 
in other lands, have read with keenest in- 
terest, and with wholesome effect upon their 
minds and characters, the " RoUo Books," 
the " Jonas Books," the " Lucy Books," and 
the " Franconia Stories," to say nothing of 
the histories, biographies, and travels for the 
young written by the same hand. Indeed, 
Jacob Abbott is said to have written more 
volumes than any other ^American, so many, 
he said, that he never dared to count them ; 
they have, however, been counted and cata- 
logued by his biographer, and there are 
nearly three hundred titles, the exact num- 
ber I do not now recall. 

The number of scientific books and mon- 
ographs in our list would be reckoned by 
hundi-eds, beginning with the treatise which 
may be said to have created the science of 
mineralogy for American students, and which 
"was warmly welcomed through all the 
domains of science and education." 

These are hints merely of what the grad- 
uates of the college have done, and of what 
they are still doing, in one field of public 
effort, that, namely, which is enclosed within 
the printed page. In other fields their 
achievements have been scarcely less notable. 
It is natural and reasonable for the Bowdoin 
man to be enthusiastic over the share which 
his college has had in the religious, the in- 
tellectual, the political, and the material 
development of the country. Taking into 
account the age of the college and its num- 
bers, it yields to no other institution, — col- 
lege or university — in the amount and qual- 
ity of the service it has wrought for the 
benefit of mankind. " Down-East " it may 
e, but its record is proof that neither the 



rising nor the setting sun looks upon any 
institution that can more justly claim to be 
the seat and source of the " complete and 
generous education " of which Milton speaks, 
" which fits a man to perform justly, skill- 
fully, and magnanimously all the offices, both 
private and public, of peace and war." 



"FISHING" AT BOWDOIN. 

It was Commencement week at Bowdoin. 
The town was full of ahimni with their fam- 
ilies, visitors, students, and "sub-Freshies," 
as the candidates for admission to the Fresh- 
man class are called. There are five secret 
societies at Bowdoin. Great rivalries exist 
between these different orders. The mem- 
bers of each strive to secure from each new 
class the most and best men. By their mem- 
bership alone, the societies maintain their 
standing in the college and their rights in 
the classes. Hence Commencement week, it 
becomes necessary for the active members of 
the several orders to do a good deal of sys- 
tematic " fishing." By fishing is meant induc- 
ing candidates to pledge themselves to be- 
come society men. Now it chanced that 
among others who came to be examined last 
July, there were two boys from B. 

The members of the Alpha Society saw 
and wanted them. I was a member of that 
society, as was also my chum. He lived in 
B. Through him I secured an introduction, 
and, strange to tell, they took a fancy to me. 
I, therefore, was delegated to work up the 
case. It was the evening prior to the day 
for examinations. Before retiring I went to 
Nipper's candy shop, just beyond the campus, 
and supplied myself with some of the neces- 
sary inducements ; namely, pounds of candy, 
dozens of oranges and pears, but no apples. 
It's an old saying and fact, that candidates 
for admission to college won't eat apples. 
Perhaps it is because apples are common. 
Of course I had no money ; the amount due 
was charged to my account. All Bowdoin 



198 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



boys have an account at the confectioners, 
and settle the bill at the close of the term, 
when their parents send them the money nec- 
essary to pay their hoard-bill. I also had 
placed at my disposal the best team the sta- 
bles in Brunswick could afford. 

The next morning as I was returning 
from breakfast, I met the college janitor. 
"Where are the 'Subs' to be examined?" 
I asked. " They are already ' grinding ' in the 
south wing of the chapel." " Thunder ! I've 
just finished ' grub ' I What time is it ? " 
" Half-past eight," said the janitor, laughing. 
To the south wing I hastened and entered the 
vestibule. There were a dozen or more up- 
perclassmen already there. I understood 
the matter perfectly ; they were awaiting the 
" Subs." Immediately I was informed hj my 
chum, who was there delegated like myself, 
that two members of the Omega Society were 
also in waiting for the boys from B. "How 
do you know that?" said I. "Saw them 
' buzzing ' them this morning just before they 
went in to examinations. There they are 
over there in the corner decked in their ' war- 
paint ' ; but ' brace up,' and don't let them 
outwit you ; you missed it ' snoozing ' so late : 
why, the ' Subs' began work at eight o'clock." 
" What time will the 'Subs' get through?" 
" About eleven ; I ' spotted ' my man this 
morning, and he's going to call at the room, 
and then go to dinner with me," said my 
chum, moving off. 

At twelve I was still waiting, and no 
signs of the " Subs." The boys in waiting 
all went to dinner save the Omegas " decked 
in their war-paint." I wasn't feeling in 
the most amiable frame of miud. I'd " waited 
long." I'd lost my dinner. If there was any- 
thing that wore on me, it was to lose my din- 
ner. The sight and persistency of those 
Omegas, tortured me. However, I kept the 
peace and waited. At last the sound of foot- 
steps, the door opened slowly, and two by 
two the " Subs " marched out into the vesti- 



bule. Such a haggard looking set ! I rushed 
up to the B.'s from one side, the Omegas from 
the other. As if by preconcerted arrangement, 
we asked them simultaneously, how they 
passed their examinations, expressed the 
greatest concern, and offering them candy, 
said, " you must be hungry ; we are." We 
walked off, arm in arm, the Omegas on one 
side, I on the other. I looked daggers at 
those Omegas, but in vain. They were two. 
to one. The " Subs " were somewhat bewil- 
dered. As we walked along, I invited them to 
" sup " with me. " We are ali-eadj^ engaged," 
said they. I invited them to call upon me 
at eight o'clock that evening. " We also are 
engaged at that hour." " By whom ? " I in- 
quired, not a little mortified. " By us," said 
the two Omegas in concert. " When did you 
make these engagements," I asked. " This 
morning, just before the examinations began," 
said the two Omegas again in concert, "it's 
the earlj' bird that catches the worm, you 
know." 

I retired, baffled and hungry, but not 
vanquished, while the Omegas bore off 
the prizes in triumph. At half-past six that 
evening I went to the Tontine, where the 
two boys boarded, and invited them out for 
a walk. We had proceeded but a short dis- 
tance, when I espied one of those Omegas in 
full chase. I tacked. The Omega tacked, 
overhauled us, and claiming by prior engage- 
ment, bore off the prizes again. I stood in- 
dignant. Several young ladies of my acquain- 
tance passed by. I didn't see them. I was 
staring at the retreating figures of those 
" subs " with that Omega. I was just begin- 
ning to recover my self-possession and looked 
about me, when that young lady, in whose 
companionship alone I was most happy, swept 
round a curve riding in company with that 
other Omega. I moved in the direction of the 
college buildings and reasoned with myself 
after this fashion. Here am I, a Junior, who 
ought to be devoting himself to ease and bask- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



199 



ing in the sunlight of some fair creature's 
smiles, lowering himself to this, to dog two, 
poor, cowering Freshmen, etc., etc. But a 
night's rest refreshed me. 

I arose with the sun, and determined to 
begin the battle anew. I filled my pockets 
yet again with candy. The way " Freshies " 
will eat candy would surprise their parents 
and make a confectioner laugh with joy. Two 
days passed. Gradually I had won those 
two boys away from the Omegas. I, alone, 
escorted them to the depot. There they told 
me frankly that the Alpha Society was the 
one they hoped to join. The train started 
and they were gone. Later, I stood on the 
hill by the church and gazed o'er the battle- 
field. I saw a crowd of lady friends, whom I 
had invited to Commencement and simply 
neglected, pass me by with a cold stare. I 
saw and encountered a host oi near and dear 
relatives, and received a " raking down " for 
merely ignoring their presence. I saw Nip- 
per's candy shop and Bowker's livery stable, 
and realized that I was hopelessly involved. 
I owed more money for horse hire and con- 
fectionery than I could ever hope to pay 
while in college. And lastly, I knew of her 
engagement to that Omega ; but o'er it all 
floated victory. I shut my eyes to every- 
thing else and was happy. 

It was the last week in August, and the 
latter half of our summer vacation. My 
brother, his chum and myself had been cruis- 
ing in the yacht " down east." We had made 
Squirrel Island Harbor on our return. The 
yacht was moored to a " tide buoy," just to 
the lee of the pier. The boys were ashore on 
the island. I remained on board and enter- 
tained myself by reading. I had just finished 
reading " Consequences," a story in the Com- 
panion, when a well-known voice and one I 
little expected to hear, shouted, " Julia ahoy ! " 
" On shore ! " I replied. " Too bad those two 
boys from B. didn't get admitted, wasn't it ? " 

J. W. A. 



ROLLINS' TRANSFORMATION. 

" How Rollins has changed ! " was the uni- 
versal remark coming from his friends and 
acquaintances. Rollins had been away at 
college for four years, and had now returned. 
During this time he had visited his home but 
seldom, and was now, for the first time since 
his departure, moving freely among his old 
associates. Rollins had surely changed. 
Everybody noticed it and commented upon 
it, and all unanimously agreed that college 
life had worked in him a grand improvement. 
Just how or what the change was, most 
could not tell. Many of his peculiarities, his 
modes of action and expression, his individual 
ways, all seemed the same, but yet there was 
a change. All who met him were astonished, 
and all were pleased. 

Before entering college Rollins had never 
moved beyond the narrow limits of his coun- 
try home and the little village academy. 
Here he had been a leader among his associ- 
ates, and, in many respects, the chief leader. 
He had strongly marked individualities, con- 
siderable mental strength, and some origi- 
nality. During his preparatory years he had 
steadily developed, but his development had 
been molded by his environments. He was 
ambitious, and already dreamed of a career 
of influence and leadership. His idea of the 
world and what his influence in it ought to 
be, were formed and measured by the limited 
circle in which he moved. His conception 
of what the conduct and bearing of a man of 
influence should be, were already fully de- 
veloped and put in practice. He, indeed, 
recognized many of his own peculiarities, but 
thought that the world should conform to 
him, rather than he to the world. His sense 
of duty was strictly defined, and extreme 
even to dogmatism. Social intercourse and 
all those accomplishments which make up a 
cultured society, he ignored, regarding them 
as trivial and injurious. More than passing 
courtesy he considered a waste of time, and 



200 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



his speech was blunt and dictatorial. He 
prided himself on being liberal, open to con- 
viction, and free from conceit ; yet he wished 
to be known as a person of aggressive opin- 
ions and unconquerable energy in pushing 
any undertaking of his own to a successful 
termination. 

Such was Rollins' character at the com- 
mencement of his Freshman year, as devel- 
oped by the tendency of his nature and the 
conditions of his surroundings. He had long 
looked forward to college as opening to him 
a new and enlarged sphere of life. Already 
had he elaborately perfected the plan of his 
career in this new world — a plan made with- 
out any regard to the conditions of his new 
surroundings. He would favor few with an 
acquaintance, and those few should be after 
his own heart and mind. His position in re- 
gard to all college customs and institutions 
was strictly defined. His course of action in 
the varying conditions of college life was 
carefully marked out. He would be the 
leader among his chosen associates, and they 
together would bend all others to their own 
purposes and ends. He would be a leader 
and molder of opinion among his fellow- 
students. Such was the career his imagina- 
tion had elaborated for him. 

The fact was, Rollins was morbid. So 
long had he brooded over his own abilities 
and future achievements, that his nature had 
become diseased and eccentric, and his judg- 
ment unbalanced. He needed hard rubs and 
bitter experiences to restore to him his 
senses ; the friction of unsympathetic compe- 
tition and opjDosition, to wear away the ir- 
regularities of his nature and show him his 
true relations to the world. 

The first year of college life passed pleas- 
antly and swiftly by. He was mostly en- 
grossed in his own affairs, and contented 
himself with a general survey of the new 
world which he had entered. Congenial 
spirits were not as easily found as he had an- 



ticipated, so he stood alone. His position 
gave him some local influence, and the few re- 
buffs which he received merely irritated him, 
but did not lessen his ardor nor divert him 
from his chosen course. 

But Rollins had not advanced far into his 
Sophomore year, before he discovered that he 
was not the only one in the class who aspired 
to leadership. Cliques were formed, and he 
saw his own influence and favor gradually 
diminishing. He could not see that he was 
unpopular, and yet he was surely losing 
ground. He continued to stand alone ; and 
although he often considered his position, on 
account of his peculiar philosophy, to which 
he still tenaciously held, he remained blind 
to his real position. 

Thus things continued till Junior year. 
But Rollins had too much native sense to 
allow this condition of affairs to remain so 
always, and it now asserted itself. Slowly 
the truth began to dawn upon him. For two 
years he had pursued a course, out of sym- 
pathy with every student, self-sufficient and 
unsocial. Naturally he had created a false 
impression. He had appreciated no one, and 
consequently no one had appreciated him. 

From the instant that Rollins realized his 
position a change began to manifest itself in 
him. He applied himself to the work of 
remolding his character into sympathetic 
relations with his associates ; and the whole 
manner of his thought and life slowly but 
surely underwent a transformation. He rec- 
ognized the falsity of his former philosophy 
and the utter weakness of his methods. He 
discovered that he was not the infallible and 
omnipotent being his imagination had con- 
jured up ; that to be appreciated was a source 
of no little strength ; that to be agreeable 
was much more conducive to happiness than 
greatness. The seriousness which had always 
pervaded his most trivial acts he now dis- 
carded. He began to see the value of social 
accomplishments, and, as he came to sympa- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



201 



thize witli his associates, they in turn began 
to appreciate him. 

The change was slow, but radical. Light 
came to Rollins only by degrees, but it came 
steadily, and when he emerged from college 
he was a new man. If the change was not 
complete, it was in a fair way to become so. 
Few, perhaps, would measure the value of 
this change in dollars and cents, yet it was 
the crowning benefit of his college course, 
and destined to be of more value to him in 
after life than any other. 



COMMUNICATION. 

New York, March 3, 1886. 



Editors Orient : 

I have read with satisfaction a recent arti- 
cle in your journal, deprecating the custom 
of students acting as waiters in summer ho- 
tels. It is true that all work, in a sense, is 
honorable, and "they also serve who only 
stand and wait." It is also true that one of 
the meanest kinds of snobbishness is shown 
by the man or the woman who treats a serv- 
ant with disrespect. It goes, too, without 
saying, that there is a vast amount of un- 
American and undemocratic and unchristian 
prejudice against certain sorts of occupation, 
and that it is one of the important provinces 
of liberal education to dissipate this preju- 
dice by precept and example. It may, how- 
ever, be suggested as a good topic for in- 
quiry in Economics what would become of 
society if it should be suddenly rid of all its 
so-called prejudices ? Mr. Ruskin has lately 
done good service in denouncing the sham 
sentiment of Canon Kingsley. "Civiliza- 
tion," Mr. R. says, in substance, " is not pro- 
moted by love matches between bishops' 
daughters and journeymen tailors, nor by 
elopements of game-keepers with squires' 
daughters." 

The motive in taking places in the hotels 
has not been to set an example of humility, 
nor to reform society. Rather, an employ- 



ment, known to be and felt to be uncongenial 
to the tastes which prompt a higher educa- 
tion, is engaged in for lucre. It was a hu- 
miliating day for New England colleges when 
the late Mr. Vanderbilt selected the "student 
waiters " as the recipients of his largess. It 
was a proud day for plutocracy when it had 
education at its beck and call. 

James McKeen. 




The reception tendered 
the Junior class, Thursday, 
March 4th, by President and Mrs. 
Hyde, was a very sociable and en- 
joyable occasion. It afforded an oppor- 
tunity for maliing some very pleasant 
acquaintances, and will be remembered by the class 
as one of the many bright spots in their college 
course. 

The nine, in accordance with ancient custom, will 
open the season Fast Day, in a game with the Port- 
lands. It is hoped that a good number of the boys 
will accompany them on this trip. 

Now that the pressure of circumstances has com- 
pelled chapel exercises to be held in Lower Memorial, 
it begins to dawn on the college mind, that a great 
deal of discomfort might have been avoided if this step 
had been taken several months earlier. We sin- 
cerely hope that another winter will see this wisdom 
of afterthought put into practical form by becoming 
a forethought. 

The nine has commenced practice in the Tops- 
ham Fair Building. This enables them to work the 
batteries, and take their training in a practical form. 

A sneak-thief recently visited a number of the 
rooms, and succeeded in securing a small amount of 
money and some clothing. We have been peculiarly 
fortunate in our freedom from individuals of this 
stamp in years past, and we trust that such an exam- 
ple may be made of any one detected in this business 
as shall deter others from pursuing a similar course. 

Owing to trouble with the boiler it is impossible 
to heat King Chapel at the present time. Until the 



202 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



damage is repaired, cliapel exercises will be held in 
Lower Memorial, and the library will only be open 
between 1.30 and 2 p.m. 

The amount of time heretofore given to Sopho- 
more Elective Mathematics being insufficient for a 
thorough study of the subject, the faculty recently 
voted to transfer a portion of the course, usually 
taken up during the second year, to the first year ; 
thus making Mathematics elective at the beginning, 
instead of the end of the fall term. In accordance 
with this change the Freshman class took their exam- 
ination in mensuration last Wednesday and will be- 
gin plane trigonometry immediatelj'. 

We very much regret the action of the faculty in 
i-efusing the students the use of the new gymnasium 
for a dedication ball. The recent ecclesiastical 
bree