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Full text of "Bowdoin Orient"

THE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



EDITORIAL BOARD. 



C. B. Burleigh, '87, Managing Editor. 

L. B. Vaenet, '87, Business Editor. 

C. C. Choate, '87. 

M. L. Kimball, '87. 

A. W. Merrill, '87. 

E. C. Plummer, '87. 

C. H. Vereill, '87. 
H. C. Hill, '88. 

M. P. Smithwick, '88. 

A. W. ToLMAN, '88. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

1886-87. 



Index to Volume XVI. 



PROSE ARTICLES. 

PAGE. 

Abstract of the Baccalaureate Sermon by Pres. Hyde 79 

Alumni Association Prof. Geo. T. Little 102 

Alumni and Overseers Frederic Henry Gerrish, M.D 16 

Answer Sought, An A. W. Merrill 177 

Answers to Correspondents C. B. Burleigh 88 

Appeai-ance M. P. Smithwick 130 

Athletic Exercises Austin Gary 41 

Average Repairs Shown Up. ... 219 

Aztec Legend, An D. E. Owen 217 

Back Again 104 

Base-Ball 8, 49, 66, 89, 118 

Base-Ball A.coounts F. L. Talbot 256 

Base-Ball Dance, The C. C. Choate 235 

Bowdoin Abroad E. B. Burpee 20 

Bowdoin Alumni at Dinner : 

Boston Alumni 203 

Washington Alumni 204 

New York Alumni 205 

Classification of the Library C. J. Goodwin 125 

Class Day ." A. W. Merrill ' 81 

Clippings M. L. Kimball, Editor 11, 71, 212 

COLLEGU Tabula A.W. Merrill, L. B. Varney, A.W. Tolman, Editors. 

8, 24, 54, 68, 91, 105, 118, 131, 114, 156, 168,181, 195, 209, 223, 236, 256 

College Literature A.W. Merrill 129 

College Self-Government A. W. Merrill 62 

College World M. L. Kimball, C. C. Choate,* Editors. 

70, 108, 120, 133, 147, 185, 198, 212, 226, 238, 258 
Communications : 

Eighty-Nine in Boating. D. E. Owen 52 

Prof. Chapman's Poem Frederic Henry Gerrish, M.D 102 

Location of College Graduates D. H. Felch 232 

David A. Wasson 252 

Delta Kappa Epsilon Convention Austin Gary 180 

Dexter A. Hawkins Prof. H. H. Boody 220 

Duped C.B.Burleigh 142 

Early Base-Ball at Bowdoin 89 

Early Days at Bowdoin W. T. Hall, Jr 247 

Echoes from the Past Edgar O. Aohorn 162, 177 

Editorial Notes C. B. Burleigh, Editor. 

1, 13, 29, 59, 73, 97, 111, 123, 135, 149, 161, 173, 187, 201, 215, 229, 241 

Etching, An A.W. Merrill 46 

Expenses of Boating Association C. F. Moulton 194 

Even-tide of Rev. Dr. Cheever 248 

Field Day A.W.Merrill 19,40 

Hare and Hounds C. C. Choate 155 

History of the Gowns, A C. B. Burleigh 245 

*Pro tern. 



I N D E X..— (Continued.) 

PAGE. 

.History of 'Eighty-Six G. S. Berry 83 

H2S 191 

Incident of Vanderbilt's Generosity, An H. C. Hill 114 

InMemoriam 108, 146, 169, 211, 212 

Inauguration of President Hyde A. W. Tolnian 78 

Intercollegiate Tennis A. W. Merrill 49 

Intercollegiate Rowing Association L. B. Varney 181 

Ivy Day A. W. Merrill 42 

Ivy Day Oration L. B. Varney 35 

Ivy Hop C. C. Choate 45 

John Abbott Douglass M. L. Kimball 162 

Judge Barrows Hon. J. W. Symonds 48 

Know Thyself A. W. Merrill 6 

Library Improvements C.J. Goodwin , 63 

Lie, A C. C. Choate 207 

Maine Intercollegiate League 7 

Matter with Snooks, The C. B. Burleigh 165 

Medical Graduation A. W. Tolman 82 

Meeting of New England College Editors C. C. Choate 231 

My Barrel of Charcoal C. B. Burleigh 233 

Necrology, 1885-6 94 

Need of College Educated Men in Journalism, The. J. V. Lane 65 

New Advance, A A. W. Merrill 116 

New England Intercollegiate Athletic Association.. F. L. Talbot. . ." 167, 235 

Old Boating Days C. B. Burleigh 141 

Old-Time Pranks W. T. Hall. Jr 166 

Personal C. H. Verrill, Editor. 

11, 27, 66, 69, 94, 107, 120, 132, 146, 158, 170, 184, 198, 211, 225, 238, 258 

Psi Upsilon Convention H. R. Fling 88 

Psi Upsilon Convention, The Fifty-Fourth E. B. Burpee 254 

Reflections E. C. Plunimer 154 

Reminiscence of Parker Cleaveland, A 5 

Rugby ■ F. M. Gates 176 

Sad, But True C. B. Burleigh 180 

Sketch of the Islands Sapelo and Blaokbeard J. Warren Achorn 46 

Sunrise on the Old Farm J. V. Lane 126 

Table Turned, The W. L. Black 181 

Theta Delta Chi Convention M. L. Kimball 166 

Tom Brown ... Austin Cary 64 

Town and Gown M. L. Kimball 103 

Victim of Imagination, A W. T. Hall, Jr 193 

Visit to a Poet, A E. S. Barrett 115 

What Cured Spoondledyke C. B. Burleigh 185 

Y. M. C. A. Convention O. D. Sewall 140 

Y. M. C. Association C. F. Hersey 208 

Y. M. C. A. Conference C. H. Fogg 234 

"^ VERSE. 

Above My Mantel C.B.Burleigh 215 

Acrostic C. B. Burleigh 65 

AntEBUs A. W. Tolman 63 

Bowdoin A. W. Merrill 97 

Capacity C. B. Burleigh 208 

Century Mark, The C. B. Burleigh 105 

Chanson Spirituelle C. B. Burleigh 229 

Chestnut Warmed Over George Birdseye in Judge 175 

Chooorua Lake C. B. Burleigh 114 

Class-Day Ode A. R. Butler 81 

College Ladies' Man, The C. B. Burleigh 142 

College Progress C. B. Burleigh 45 

Deserted Home, The C. B. Burleigh. 191 

Does It Pay? M. P. Smithwick 59 

Dubitation E. C. Plummer 153 

Ethel's Rock E. C. Plummer 80 



I N D E:K.— (Continued.) 

PAGE. 

Evolution C. B. Burleigh 255 

Fooled E. S. Barrett 203 

Her Little Sister C. B. Burleigh 49 

Hope M. P. Sinithwick 82 

How, Not Where ' M. P. Smithwick 104 

Icicle, The C. B. Burleigh 201 

In My Grate C. B. Burleigh 149 

In the Forest C. B. Burleigh 155 

Isles of the iEgean, The M. L. Kimball 246 

Ivy Poem E. C. Plummer 37 

Ivy Ode S. B. Fowler 44 

Journey, A M. P. Smithwick 87 

Juiiioi''s Soliloquy C. B. Burleigh 231 

L'Envoi E. C. Plummer 247 

Light House, The M. P. Smithwick 19 

Like Cures Like C. B. Burleigh 173 

Lines C. B. Burleigh 123 

Little May E. C. Plummer 19 

Longing and Will M. P. Smithwick 48 

Lost E. C. Plummer 126 

Love and Philosophy , W. J. Henderson, in Puck 207 

Luther at Wartburg Castle E. C. Plummer 151 

Maples, The A. W. Tolman Ill 

May-flower, The C. B. Burleigh 1 

Monitor, The C. B. Burleigh 220 

Morning Lesson, The C. B. Burleigh 101 

My Betrothed C. B. Burleigh 164 

My First Boxing Match W. W. Woodman 219 

My Normandy A. W. Tolman 217 

My Queen C. B. Burleigh 141 

Night and Morning A. W. Tolman 161 

Ode Rev. Elijah Kellogg 16 

Ode to Diana .C. B. Bijrleigh ' 125 

Old Man's Request, The C. B. Burleigh .113 

Province of Faith, The C. B. Burleigh 13 

Question, A E. C. Plummer 247 

Recorder, The M. P. Smithwick 241 

Safeguard, A M. P. Smithwick 140 

Scented Tassel, The H. C. Hill 234 

Sea-Mist, The A. W. Tolman 135 

Sunrise v A. W. Tolman 246 

Spiritus Esculapius C. B. Burleigh 188 

Thought, A M. P. Smithwick 61 

To Lou J. L. Doolittle 176 

Tree-Toads Last Wail, The C. B. Burleigh 35 

Two Methods C.B.Burleigh 5 

Two Cases C.B.Burleigh 117 

Ubiquity, An C. B. Burleigh 4 

Ubi Sunt? Prof. H. L. Chapman 102 

Under the Stars C. B. Burleigh 66 

Upsala C. B. Burleigh 138 

Venice M. L. Kimball 128 

Vernal Zephyrs C. B. Burleigh 7 

Veni, Vidi, Vici E. C. Plummer 138 

Vision, A C. B. Burleigh 251 

Wail, A C. B. Burleigh 179 

Waiter's Bonanza C. B. Burleigh 116 

When C. B. Burleigh 254 

Winter Morning, A C. B. Burleigh 187 

Wreck, The M. P. Smithwick 78 




-y ■^-i=»s»1886. "^^i^^ 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard " and " Duplex " Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Glass Cards and Monograms 

EMOEAVED IN THE MOST PASHIONiBLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 

ROGERS' CELEBRATED GROUPS. 

All the Late Publications in stock. Text-Books of all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

474 Congress St., - - - opp. Preble House. 

THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

]\[0. 5 ©DD EEIiMW^' BLOCK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 

A. W. TOWNSEND, Prop'r. 



Mixtures for Pipe or Cigarette. 
THREE KINGS, Turkish, Perique and Virginia. 
MELLOW MIXTtlRE, Turkish and Perique. 
TURKISH and VIRGINIA. 
• PERIQUE and VIRGINIA. 

GENUINE TURKISH. 
FLAKE CUTS, ESPECIAI.LT ADAPTED FOR THE PIPE. 

VANITY FAIR . OLD GOLD. 

SALMAGUNDI, a New Granulated Mixture. 

FRAGRANT VANITY FAIR, 
SUPERLATIVE, CLOTH OF GOLD. 

STRAIGHT CUT CIGARETTES. 

People of refined taste who desire exceptionally fine Cigar- 
ettes should use only our Straight Cut, put up in Satin Packets 
and boxes of 10s., 303., 50s., and 100s. 

Our Cigarettes were never so tine as now. They cannot be 
surpassed for purity and excellence. Only the purest Rice Paper 
used. Established 1846. 14 First Prize Medals. 

Wm. S. Kimball & Co., Peerless Tobacco Works, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



PHONETIC SHORTHAND. %^e%"o'd^'^ 
For Self-Instruction. Containing all tlie late improve- 
ments, i'rice $1..jU. .-special Instruction by Mail, $U.OO. 
Send Stamp for Specimen Pages and Illustrateil Pamphlet. 

\V. W. OSGOODBY, Publisher, Rochester, N. Y. 



The New" Styles in 

STir^I^ and. SOI^T H-^^TS 

In all colors, are now ready. An elegant line of New York 

Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, "Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, 

-s^T ELLIOTT'S, s- 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 

C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 







I70-S5I-WITH 
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



| Hl!i fKOrKllilUK of the Nearest Comer Grocery will 
endeavor to merit a 

CONTINTTANCE 

Of the Student's patronage. Come and prove him. 



J. S. TOWNE, 
PHARMACEUTIST. 

PURE DKUGS, MEDICINES, FANCY AND TOILET AR- 
TICLES; ALSO A FINE LINE OF CHOICE CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES. PRESCRIPTIONS a Specialty. 

Main Street, Near Bowdoin College. 



J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIIVIIVIER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 

Dentist, 



STOKER BLOCK, 



BRUNSWICK, MAIMS. 



F. W. BAERON, 

Dealer i Staiiari ni Fancy Groceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 



Bowdoin College Medical Department. 

The Sixtj'-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 4th,lS86, 
and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Rev. Wm. DeWitt Hyde, President: Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M. , 
Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. Gerrish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Franklin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemistry; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henry H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Young, Public Hygiene ; 
Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonsti-ator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonsti-ator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



The Largest Assortment of 



Gents' Fine Shoes 

Is to be found at 

JACKSON'S. 



LAWN- TENNIS, BASE -BALL, AND LOW SHOES, 

In Large Variety. 

S. R. JACKSON, 2(1, 2 Odd FeUows Block, Brunswick. 

drop in and inspect. 



j. m. lombard, 
Dentist, 

OVER BOAEDMAN'S STOKE, MAIN STKEET. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 
J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce. 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

E. G. SIMPSON, 

DEALEK IN 

ALL KINDS OF COAL, 

CEDAK STREET, BRUW SW^ICK, ME. 
Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 

Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry, Promptly Repaired and Warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

THOMAS H. RILEY, 

dealer in 

Pianos, Organs, Band Instruments, 

Violins, Sheet JIusic, etc. Large Stock of Instruments ol all 

kinds to Rent. Also Insurance written in sound 

Companies at Low Rates. 

:]Bxt.xTis's-wicxL, 3iz.A.xnr£:. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates foe Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books beincr mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grrammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Caesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
^neid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,- Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Eoot, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry, — first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specilications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regulae Examinations foe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and ou the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. li and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Halloivell Classical and Sci- 
etitific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

eequieed— FOUE houes a week. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, sis terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and ilineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 
Christianity, three terms. 

Political Science, three terms. 

electives — FOUE houes a week. 
Mathematics, two terms. 
Latin, four terms. 
Greek, four terms. 
Natural History, four terms. 
Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry aud Mineralogy, two terras. 
Science of Language, one term. 
English Literature, three terms; 
German, two terms. 
Sanskrit, two terms. 
Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XVI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 28, 1886. 



No. 1. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGLiTE YEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

C. B. Burleigh, '87, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
C. C. Choate, '87. C. H. Verrill, '87. 

A. W. Merrill, '87. H. C. Hill, '88. 

E. C. Plummer, 87. M. P. Smithwick, '88. 

L. B. Varney, '87. A. W. Tolman, '88. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extra copies can he obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-OiBce ut Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 

Vol. XVI., No. 1.- April 28, 1886. 

The May-Flower, 1 

Editorial Notes, 1 

An Ubiquity, i 

A Reminiscence of Parker Cleaveland, 5 

Two Methods 5 

Know Thyself 6 

Vernal Zephyrs 7 

Maine Intercollegiate League, 7 

Base-Eall 8 

CoLLEGii Tabula 8 

Personal, 11 

Clippings, 11 



THE MAY-FLOWER. 

Half hidden 'ueath the lingering snows. 
The may-flower lifts its head. 

And borne upon the vernal breeze 
Its rich perfume is spread. 

O modest flower, that sweetly scents 
The passing zephyrs breath, — 

Thou typify a law divine, 
A law of life and death. 

For almost everywhere we see 
The signs of death's decay, 

There, blooming life springs up afresh, 
To take its pain away. 




It is not our purpose, in prefacing 
a new volume of the Orient, to offer the 
customary apologies, nor to draw disparag- 
ing comparisons between the present board 
of editors and those who have preceded 
them. Our readers will need no charge 
from us to enable them to return a just ver- 
dict upon our work, as it appears in this and 
succeeding issues. 

A glance over the mass of exchanges, 
which have accumulated in the Orient 
office, during the past year, furnishes ample 
proof of the esteem in which the last volume 
was held by our contemporaries. Twenty- 
five of the poems and eight of the prose 
articles in that volume were copied into 
other papers. In this way, more than thirty 
leading exchanges complimented the Ori- 
ent, in a more delicate and substantial man- 
ner than they could possibly have done by 
any amount of the stereotyped felicitation, 
which, too often, characterizes the exchange 
department. 

While the present editors are not pre- 
sumptuous enough to expect so marked 
and unanimous a recognition of their labors, 
they will, nevertheless, spare no pains to 
make the Orient truly representative of 
the college and its interests ; a medium 
through which undergraduates and alumni 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



may freely discuss all topics of common in- 
terest. We do not expect to pass unscathed 
through the coming editorial campaign, for, 
if we did, we should consider it good evi- 
dence that we had been derelict in our duty. 
We have entered upon our task with no 
momentous schemes for reform, but though 
animated by an almost unprecedented pur- 
pose to accept things about as we find them, 
we shall, nevertheless, speak candidly and 
decisively on every topic that may enter 
into our discussions. We shall not, how- 
ever, hold our opinions to be infallible, but 
cordially invite any who may not agree 
with lis to make use of our columns in stat- 
ing their differences. 

It is a gratifying privilege, at the begin- 
ning of our labors, to be able to welcome 
our fellow-students back to the duties and 
pleasures of the most agreeable term in the 
year, a term which promises to be a pecul- 
iarly eventful one for Bowdoin, at the close 
of which we hope to see the base-ball pen- 
nant once more floating from the flagstaff 
on the delta, and our 'Varsity at Lake 
George prepared to again carry the white to 
the front in the intercollegiate regatta. 



The editors are always glad to receive 
communications from students and alumni, 
provided they are not too long, nor of a per- 
sonal character, but they wish it distinctly 
understood that they do not hold themselves 
responsible for any statements made, or views 
expressed, in a communication. The editors 
may hold opinions precisely the reverse of 
those expressed in communications. This 
must, of necessity, be the case when they 
take the form of a discussion, in which both 
sides are presented. 



We publish elsewhere in this issue a re- 
port of the proceedings of the base-ball 
managers, at their meeting in Waterville, last 
vacation. The schedule of games will be 



seen to be about the same as last j^ear, the 
most notable exception being the final game 
between Bowdoin and Colby, which will be 
played at Brunswick, June 12th, instead of 
at Lewiston, May 30th, as was the case last 
year. Most of the clubs appear to be full 
stronger than they were last season, and the 
games promise to be unusually exciting and 
well contested. 



Professor Little is hard at work in the 
library, arranging a Bowdoin alcove, into 
which he intends to collect the publications 
of Bowdoin College graduates, both of the 
literary and medical departments. When 
comjDleted, this alcove will form a portion of 
our library to which every son of Bowdoin 
may point with pardonable pride, as indicat- 
ing what a vast amount of work her alumni 
have accomplished in the world of literature. 
They have, in the words of Dr. Johnson, 
"left scarcely any style of writing un- 
touched, and touched nothing that they 
have not adorned." 

Much credit is due Professor Little for 
the energy he has shown in initiating and 
pushing forward this work, which, as yet, is 
only fairly begun, and the earnest co-opera- 
tion of undergraduates and alumni is solic- 
ited in making this monument to " Bowdoin 
in Literature " as imposing as possible. In 
onl}' a few cases has the library complete 
sets of the works of alumni, though nearly 
all are represented. A very large number 
of publications — books, pamphlets, addresses, 
poems, etc., — are yet to be procured, and it 
is earnestly hoiked that all Bowdoin men 
will enlist themselves in this work, and 
assist in making the collection in the Bow- 
doin alcove as complete as possible. 



Mr. H. E. Cole, '83, writes the base-ball 
management as follows : "I wish to offer 
this year a silver cup, suitably inscribed, to 
the member of the Bowdoin Base-Ball Nine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



who shall make the best record in batting 
and fielding combined, in the games to be 
played in the Maine Intercollegiate series." 
Mr. Cole was manager of the Bowdoin nine 
during his Senior year, and has always taken 
an active interest in the success of the team. 
He offered, last season, on the same condi- 
tions, a prize silver cup, which was won by 
Pushor. 



The faculty have arranged a rich treat 
for us this term, in the shape of a course of 
lectures on the Professions, to be given as 
follows : " Journalism," by Mr. Edward 
Stanwood, Tuesday, May 4th ; " The Minis- 
try," by Rev. E. B. Webb, D.D., Wednes- 
day, May 12th ; " Medicine," by Daniel 
Robinson, M.D., Tuesday, May 18th; 
'• Law," by Hon. J. W. Symonds, Tuesday, 
May 25th. All the above-named gentle- 
men are graduates of Bowdoin, and each 
has met with marked success in his chosen 
profession. To those who are pausing at 
the cross-roads of professional life, undecided 
in which of the four directions they will 
travel, these lectures will be of especial in- 
terest, while all will find them an instruct- 
ive and enjoyable diversion from the regular 
routine work of the term. 



The college probably never had such an 
abundance of first-class material for the 
formation of a strong reserve nine as it has 
at the present time. There is nothing which 
will so insure the perpetuity of a strong 
college nine as the maintaining of a well- 
organized second nine, upon which players 
may be developed for the college team. In 
this way the strongest players will come to 
the front, and the college team will always 
be the best that could be put into the field. 
The method now in vogue of selecting the 
second nine from the men who chance to be 
present on the delta is practically useless. 
If we are to have a second nine it should be 



as well-organized and disciplined as the col- 
lege nine. Each man should have his regu- 
lar position and play it. It ' should be the 
aim of the management to get the strongest 
nine possible outside of the college team, 
and care should be taken in the choice of 
the men, to select those whom it is thought 
may hereafter be desirable players for the 
'Varsity team. A well-organized and dis- 
ciplined " Bowdoin Reserve " team could 
play any of the clubs in the Cumberland 
County League a strong game. 



We would remind those who intend to 
compete for positions on the Orient another 
year that " procrastination is the thief of 
time," and that in the election of the next 
board of editors preference Avill certainly 
be given to those who write early. What 
the Orient wants, both in prose articles 
and poems, is brevity. The board is often 
unable to piiblish meritorious articles on ac- 
count of their length. Condensation is a 
faculty few young writers possess, but it is 
one that we would earnestly advise all, es- 
pecially those who intend to write for the 
Orient, to cultivate. Short spicy poems, 
and terse, bright prose articles, are what 
bring sunshine to the sanctum. We have 
several bushels of ^'- solid" articles on hand 
now. Many of them " have come down to 
us from a former generation." We have 
never read all of them. We are still young, 
and life is sweet. We have swooned pon- 
derously on beholding the titles of some of 
them, and we sadly fear that if any friend 
should climb the office stairs with a " solid " 
— that is a regulation " solid " — article he 
would find the door locked and the editor 
"gone to dinner." 

We earnestly invite all to shake off the 
"innocuous desuetude" incident to a sum- 
mer term, and give the Orient some sam- 
ples of their work. Even if your articles 
are not published, they will be credited to 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



you in the election of the next board of 
editors. 



An editorial appeared in the last issue of 
the Orient, in reference to the base-ball 
management, which was calculated to con- 
vey a false impression, inasmuch as, while 
ostensibly voicing the sentiment of the 
whole college, it in reality gave utterance to 
the opinions of a minority. We do not be- 
lieve in invading the editorial columns with 
matters of a personal character, but in the 
present instance we think that justice to 
Mr. Turner demands some explanation of 
this matter. The fact may not generally be 
known through college, but it is nevertheless 
true, that Mr. Turner was the avowed choice 
of the members of the nine for manager, 
and it was only at the urgent solicitation of 
old and leading players that he consented to 
be a candidate for the office. The sentiment 
of the college was fully demonstrated in his 
election. Mr. Turner was well qualified for 
the position, and we sincerely regret that 
the serious illness of a member of his family 
compels him to resign. 



It is with pleasure that we note the ap- 
pearance of the '87 Bugle. It is from the 
press of B. A. Burr, of Bangor, and is a 
model of typographical excellence. The 
arduous labors of the editors, in the prepa- 
ration of this volume, have resulted in giving 
to the college and its alumni a publication 
of which all Bowdoin men may justly feel 
proud. The illustrations are numerous and 
executed with a finish and artistic taste 
rarelj^ seen in such publications. The frontis- 
piece is an excellent photograph of President 
Hyde. There is, also, a fine photograph of 
the victorious '85 crew, which won the pen- 
nant at the intercollegiate regatta on Lake 
Quinsigamond, and an artistic cut of the new 
gymnasium. In the preparation of their 
illustrations, the editors have made an orig- 



inal and agreeable departure from the old 
ruts, and given us, in nearly every instance, 
something strikingly new and symbolical of 
some thought. In a word, the cuts mean 
something and are not inserted merely to 
fill space. The secret society. Phi Beta 
Kappa, Jury, Tennis, and companion edito- 
rial cuts (pages 102 and 142) are the finest, 
both in point of conception and execution, 
which we have ever seen in a college annual. 

The literary matter is also of a high or- 
der. The biographical sketch of President 
Hyde, by Prof. C. H. Smith, and the eulogy 
on the late Prof. Brown, by Prof. H. L. 
Chapman, each inimitable in its own prov- 
ince, lend an additional dignity and charm to 
the volume, while the editorial work is above 
the usual standard in presenting much to be 
praised and little to be criticised. There is 
also an encouraging absence of the coarse 
personalities, which, under the misnomei", 
" wit," have detracted so much from the 
merit of former Bugles. 

The labor and expense of preparing such 
a volume can scarcely be appreciated by the 
uninitiated. A Bugle editorship has come to 
be fraught with so many financial dangers, 
that, unless the publication shall receive the 
hearty support, both of undergraduates and 
alumni, the present high standard cannot 
possibly be maintained. No alumnus of 
Bowdoin can afford to be without the Bugle, 
which will be sent, post-paid, upon receipt of 
sixty cents, by M. H. Boutelle, Business Edi- 
tor. 



AN UBIQUITY. 

'Tis a rule of life, both in peace and strife, 

As the average man can tell. 
That it doesn't pay, in the good old way 

To use mankind too well. 

The man who is kind, and never behind 

In helping the poor bereft, 
Will find with surprise, when troubles arise. 

That he is the man who's left. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Since the time we are told when Judas of old, 

Betrayed his Lord with a liiss, 
All gratitude fled to the realms of the dead 

Abhorring a world like this. 

Though the world has been blessed and man- 
kind has progressed, 

Since Judas his Master sold. 
Smaller traitors to-day in quite the same way 

Ape after the Judas of old. 



A REMINISCENCE OF PARKER 

CLEAVELAND. 

Boston, April 7, 1886. 

To the Editors of the Orient : 

I have just received a letter from my 
friend of many years, Hon. Wm. D. North- 
end, which, with the inclosure, you may con- 
sider of interest enough to print. 

p. AV. c. 
Salem, April 6, 1886. 

My Dear Mr. Chandler, — I am housed for the day 
with a cold, and looking over an old bound maga- 
zine found an article of which I inclose an exact 
copy, thinking it may be interesting to you. I re- 
member at Byiield, before I entered college, 1843, of 
hearing some of the ancients speak of Professor 
Cleaveland, whom they had known, and they related 
some scientific information they had heard him give 
in conversation. I remember they had great rever- 
ence for him. I knew no one connected with the 
college when I entered, and was surprised and de- 
lighted when Professor Cleaveland came to my room 
and introduced himself, and referred to the fact that 
we both came from the same parish. 

In the first term I fell in the gymnasium, or 
rather from a rope on a high post, and injured my 
head a little. I went to my room and laid down, 
and within a half hour the dear old professor, who 
had heai'd of it, came to me, examined me carefully, 
and then brought me an immense dose of glauber 
salts, which he, with great satisfaction, saw me 
swallow. I remember the salts were in great junks 
before dissolved. He called several times till he 
found I was entirely well. What a kind, big hearted 
man he was, and how simple and beautiful in all his 
ways. Yours very truly, 

W. D. NORTHEND. 



[From Merrimack Magazine.] 

Nbwburypokt, Nov. 2, 1805. 
Bowdoin College, — On Wednesday, the 23d ult., 
Pai'ker Cleaveland, A.M., late a tutor in Harvard 



University, was inaugurated Bowdoin Professor of 
the Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in Bowdoin 
College at Brunswick, district of Maine. A proces- 
sion was formed, about noon, consisting of the stu- 
dents, president, professors, trustees, overseers, and 
gentlemen from the neighboring towns, who pro- 
ceeded from the president's house to the chapel (a 
temporary wooden building, containing the library 
in its second story), where, after a prayer by the 
Rev. Dr. McKeen, an oration in Latin was delivered 
by the professor elect. It could not but afl"ord pleas- 
ure to all, who witnessed the scene, to reflect on the 
happy prospects of this rising and respectable sem- 
inary. We understand a new building of brick is 
soon to be erected, of larger dimensions than the 
present college, in order to accommodate a greater 
number of students and secure the library and 
philosophical apparatus. 



TWO METHODS. 

FORMER. 

We passed him by in lordly scorn. 

And called him Freshman Jones, 

We quickly stopped his boisterous fun 

In very crushing tones. 

We never rode or walked with him 

Upon the public street. 

For fear his verdancy'd disgust 

Some lady friend we'd meet. 

In fact we fully made him feel. 

As far removed was he 

From our estate, as JEtna. from 

The level of the sea. 

And Jones who came to college 

With some hay-seed in his hair. 

Soon combed it out, and went about 

With quite a cultured air. 

Yet Jones would always stick by us. 

For he had brains you see. 

To know that such a course for him 

Was really policy. 

And when the next fall term came round. 

In accord with college lore. 

We backed him strongly 'gainst the crowd 

That hales the Sophomore. 

LATTER. 

We treated him as if he were 

A member of our class. 

His rather loud and boisterous fun 

We quietly let pass. 

We walked with him fraternally 

Upon the public street, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



We gave him introductions 

To the lady friends we'd meet. 

'Till finally he came to think 

Himself to run the town, 

That could manage college things, 

And manage them up brown. 

And though unskilled in college lore. 

With college life to cope. 

He had a jolly chance to give 

His egotism scope. 

He swelled around and criticised 

The men of upperclass. 

In short he was exceeding fresh 

And acted like an ass. 

And when for kindnesses he got 

A chance to make amends 

He showed his hand by going 

Squarely back upon his friends. 

And why all this j-ou ask my friends ? 

Well, we can quickly tell, 

The man was spoiled by being used 

A plaguy sight too well. 

KNOW THYSELF. 

Gentle student, you are blest with many 
advantages, and among them are a greater 
or less number of shekels. Now is the sea- 
son of subscription papers. Pray give liber- 
ally, while you are young. Remember that 
to receive, one must impart ; and likewise 
that other historic quotation of beggars, that 
" it is more blessed to give than to receive." 
Just recollect that no contribution box is 
passed through the galleries at church. 
Friend, for what are shekels made ? 

Can you row ? Why don't you then ? 
It may be you won't win, but remember that 
there can be but one winner in every race. 
It will be a benefit to the college if you row, 
both in training oarsmen and in keeping an 
interest alive. It never hurts any one to 
work, and it is hardly the thing to put an 
hour in bed, or an hour of afternoon loafing, 
in place of manifest college interests. You 
will feel better for rowing, and it will be 
good discipline. Just move that inanimate 
and transitory flesh of yours a little more 



briskly, and show a little energy. A little 
self-deprivation will not injure your pros- 
pects in life. A paper collar and a languid 
grace never made any man. 

Or it may be that you can play ball. If 
you can't get on the first nine, by working 
you may be able to get on the second. It 
will raise the base-ball average if nothing 
more. Then by playing now, you will be 
qualified to accept some position hereafter, 
which you may desire. It pays better to 
do one thing as well as you can than to half 
do two things ; and it pays better to do 
something than to do nothing. Then if you 
can play ball, play for business. Why not? 

It is reported that a Maine Intercollegiate 
Tennis League is being agitated. There is 
no reason why there should not be one. A 
busy man always does the most, and is al- 
ways ready to do more. Why is not this 
true of a college? Now, here is a chance. 
If you can play tennis, why not ? Only play 
to win. You will feel better for a healthy 
out-of-door exercise, and heaven will be — 
further off. 

My son, are you a student? It don't pa}' 
to get 6.99 when you can get 7.00. You had 
better go it while you are young and "make 
hay while the sun shines." When you are 
old you may want a Commencement part ; 
and if you want one bad, it will make you 
feel melancholy to think how you wasted 
your youth in riotous loafing. The ranking 
system is bad enough, but pompous indiffer- 
ence to it is worse. It may be that on some 
bright day in the now dim and hazy future, 
another little Henry will be treading these 
college walks, and j'ou will hardly want to 
point to a series of 6's and say, "My son, 
behold thy father's rank; go thou and do 
likewise." 

Don't things go just to suit you ? For 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



heaven's sake don't kick ! It is mulish, to 
put it mild. Nothing will cause discord, 
dissension, and no end of trouble, more than 
kicking. Besides, it will be for j'our own 
interests not to kick. Four caj)tains never 
won a race, and nine captains never carried 
off a pennant. It is better to follow one 
man, and do a few things wrong, than to fol- 
low nine men and do nothing right. Remem- 
ber that if every one, who was dissatisfied, 
kicked, there would be no unity and no suc- 
cess. Friend, it will pay to keep your shirt 
on. A kicker is fitted for no place nearer 
front than the back seat. 



VERNAL ZEPHYRS. 

BY A FRESHMAN. 

Warm gentle east-winds sweep the main, 
The twittering birdlets liomeward fly, 
And fairy voices sound again 
From distant regions of the sky. 

The sighing wail of zephyrs wake, 
^olian meanings in my heart 
To think that like the zephyr's breath 
So must all temporal things depart. 

WITH EDITORIAL ELUCIDATIONS. 

Warm, gentle east-winds sweep the main 

(For it is cased in dirt), 

The twittering birdlets homeward fly 

(To change their winter shirt) , 

And fairy voices sound again 

(The gossips of the town) 

From distant regions of the sky 

(For they cannot get down). 

The sighing wail of zephyrs wake 

(For he is drunk you know), 

.aiolian moanings in my heart 

('Tis indigestion, though). 

To think that like the zephyr's breath 

(That blows from ofl' the mall) 

So must all temporal things depart 

(Except a Freshman's gall) . 



James Russell Lowell will probably deliver the 
oration at the celebration of the two hundred and 
fiftieth anniversary of the founding of Harvard Col- 
lege, which has been lixed for November 7, 1886. — 
Dartmouth. 



MAINE INTERCOLLEGIATE LEAGUE 

MEETING OF MANAGERS. 

The following is the schedule and agree- 
ment as adopted by the managers of the 
Maine State Intercollegiate Base-Ball 
League : 

Schedule of Games. 

May 8 — Bates vs. Colby Lewiston. 

" 12 — Colby vs. Bowdoin Waterville. 

" 13 — M. S. C. vs. Bowdoin Orono. 

" 15 — Bowdoin vs. Bates Brunswick. 

" 15— M. S. C. vs. Colby Orono. 

" 21 — Bowdoin vs. M. S. C Brunswick. 

" 22 — Bates vs. M. S. C Lewiston. 

" 26— Colby vs. Bates Waterville. 

" 29— M. S. C. vs. Bates Orono. 

" 29 — Bowdoin vs. Colby Lewiston. 

June 2— Colby vs. M. S. C Waterville. 

" 2 — Bates vs. Bowdoin Lewiston. 

" 5 — M. S. C. vs. Bowdoin Bangor. 

6 — Bates vs. Colby Brunswick. 

" 9 — Bowdoin vs. Bates Waterville. 

" 12 — Bowdoin vs. Colby Brunswick. 

" 12— M. S. C. vs. Bates Waterville. 

" 19— Colby vs. M. S. C Bangor. 

Agreements. 

Voted, To adopt the Wright and Ditson League 
Ball (best). 

Voted, To adopt the college league rules of 1885, 
subject to such changes as all of the managers of this 
league see fit to make, by correspondence or other- 
wise, and in place of Article VIL of Constitution, 
we adopt the following : Any student who is prop- 
erly a member of either of the respective institutions 
which are represented by this league, and whose ex- 
penses are in no way borne by any one connected 
with base-ball interests, is eligible to the nine of that 
institution. 

Voted, To have one umpire for all the games ex- 
cept in those instances where two games come on the 
same day, then a second umpire shall be emploj-ed. 

Voted, That the Secretary correspond with, and, if 
possible, engage Mr. C. W. Fuller, of Auburn, for 
principal umpire. 

Voted, That each manager pay one-fourth of sum 
total, of expenses of umpiring. 

Voted, That each nine pay its own expenses when 
visiting another nine, excepting in case of the 
games between Colby and M. S. C, June 19th, and 
Bowdoin and M. S. C, June 5, in which eases Maine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



state College is to pay one-half of the expenses of 
Bowdoin and Colby. 

Voted, That if any two nines are dissatisfied with 
either of the umpires, they may object to his further 
umpiring, and he shall officiate no longer. 

Voted, That if any disagreement arises in the in- 
terpretation of these articles of agreement, the prin- 
cipal umpire shall choose one man, and these two a 
third, and the three shall act as referees to decide the 
disputed points. 

J. H. Williamson, for Bates, 
G. F. Black, for M. S. C, 
S. B. Overlook, for Colby, 
L. TuKNEE, Jk., for Bowdoin, 



BASE-BALL. 

On Thursday, April 22d, the Bowdoins 
played the opening game of the season with 
the Portlands, on the grounds of the latter. 
Although the Portlands met our boys with 
three strong batteries, which relieved each 
other in the different innings, they did some 
sharp work and plaj^ed on the whole a satis- 
factory game. Davis pitched in good form, 
and was well supported by Moulton. The 
alumnus present complimented our nine very 
highly. The following is the tabulated score : 
PORTLANDS. 



Galligan, 1. f. 
Kearus, s. s., 
Wheelock, c, r. f 
Hattield, 3b., . 
Sheffler, c. f., . 
Cavanagh, lb., 
Spence, 2b., 
O'Eourke, r. f., 
Rellly, c, . . 
Dugaa, p., . . 
Hickman, p., . 
McKinley, p., . 



R. B.H. T.E. S.B. P.O. A. 



Totals, . . 48 18 18 21 



BOWDOINS. 



A.B. 

Dearth, c. f 2 

Moulton, c, . . . 4 

Pushor, lb., ... 4 

Wilson, s. s., . . . 4 

Soule, 3b., .... 4 

Talbot, 1. f., . . . 3 

Murphy, 2b., ... 4 

Larrabee, r. f., . . 4 

Davis, p., .... 2 



B.H. T.B. S.B 

1 

110 



P.O. A. E. 



















Totals, . . 31 1 4 6 1 27 15 10 

Earned runs— Portlands, 2. Two-base hits— Sheffler, 
(2), Cavanagh, Larrabee, Wilson. First base on errors- 



Portlands 11, Bowdoins 12. First base on balls — Portlands 
6, Bowdoins 5. Struck out — Portlands 2, Bowdoins 7. 
Left on bases — Portlands 8, Bowdoins 8. Passed balls— 
O'Bourke 1, Moulton 9. Wild pitches— Dugan 1, Davis 3. 
Time of game— two hours thirty minutes. Umpire — 
Flaherty. 

CLASSICS VS. MEDICS. 

A picked nine of the Classics played a 
friendly game with the Medics on the delta, 
Saturday afternoon, April 24th. Enthusias- 
tic cheering from the assembled multitude 
" nerved up " the contestants to some very 
sharp playing. The interest of the game 
was somewhat diminished by its protracted 
length. Its most notable feature was the 
score, 27 to 7, in favor of the Classics. 

The official scores of all the Massachu- 
setts games will appear in. our next issue. 




A modern plugger one even- 
ing strove 
His muddled brain to cram 
With a thousand things of which he had 

need, 
To pass through the morrow's " exam." 
He could judge of a 'Varsity oarsman's form 
AVithout the slightest mistake. 
He could tell you the curve a pitcher would throw, 
From the position he saw him take ; 
But he couldn't grasp, with retaining grip, 
The things that were in his books ; 
And he feared just now that he was about 
To be hung on the faculty hooks. 
So with pallid brow and ghastly mien. 
In his sombre room he worked, 
To gather up a slight idea 
Of the lessons he had shirked. 

In the transient light of the morning there. 
His wondering classmates found him, 
With a Heavenly smile on his marble lips, 
And Ms cribs and his " horses " around him. 

A certain Sophomore, before returning to the pa- 
ternal mansion at the end of the last term, invested 
in a new stiff black hat. Returning to his room, he 
laid it upon the table. Before long, having occasion 
to display it to his room-mate, he inadvertently picked 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



up his chum's last season brown hat, brushed il with 
the utmost care, viewed a grease spot upon it with 
some solicitude, and finally ventured the remark that 
the hat looked somewhat shop-worn, and he feared 
that he had been taken in. After the hat had been 
nicely brushed and polished, his chum remarked that 
he had probably confused the hats. Cigars are solic- 
ited before the next issue. 

On the Saturday before the campus was burned, 
a fire broke out in the pines behind the buildings, 
and Mr. Booker required the assistance of a number 
of the students before he could get the flames under 
control. 

A week ago last Monday, the nine played their 
first game with the Brunswicks. Both of our batter- 
ies were given practice. Only four innings were 
played, the score standing 11 to 4 in favor of the col- 
lege. 

Work on the Brunswick water-works was com- 
menced April 19th, a trench being dug for quite a 
distance along Main Street. About seventy-five men 
were employed. 

Prayers are held at 7.60 this term. 

Stackpole, '86, is teaching the high school at Tops- 
ham. 

Sewall, '87, commences his school at Searsport 
this week. 

The reading-room papers were sold at auction, as 
is the custom, Wednesday, April Idth. The whole 
amount realized was between four and five dollars. 

Material has arrived at the boat-house for the 
building of a new float, the old one having been car- 
ried down river by last winter's freshet. 

Fred Plaisted has been coaching the 'Varsity crew 
for the past few days. He speaks well for the crew 
and predicts a very exciting race. The crew now in 
practice are arranged as follows : L. B. Varney, Cap- 
tain, stroke ; W. R. Tenney, No. 3 ; H. C. Jackson, 
No. 2; F. Lynam, bow. 

Prexy was caught sampling the old gym. one day 
during the vacation. 

A youthful Junior bethought himself not many days 
ago of giving the Freshmen crew a few points. 
Thinking that the most appropriate place for giving 
the object lesson was the stroke, he quietly assumed 
that position, though he had never before rowed on 
the port side. He met with no further mishap until 
he attempted to put his oar into the lock, when he 
put in the wrong end. Next he found that he had 
got a starboard oar. When last seen he was serenely 



catching crabs in the middle of the river, with flat- 
tering prospects for a large haul. 

During the spring vacation, work was commenced 
on the delta under the superintendence of Dearth, 
Pushor, and Talbot. The diamond was dug up to a 
depth of about eight inches, and then filled in with 
clay, and a coaling of sand sprinkled over it. The 
finishing touches were given, Friday, April 16th. The 
same afternoon, the nine took jDossession and put in 
two hours of very creditable work ; on Saturday af- 
ternoon a game was played between two nines picked 
from the college. 

Hill, '89, is teaching at his home in Cape Eliza- 
beth. Harriman, '89, is acting as clerk in a Fryeburg 
hotel. 

At a meeting of the class of '87, E. B. Burpee was 
elected first on committee of arrangements. 

At a recent meeting of the college, W.W. Kilgore, 
'86, was unanimously elected manager of the nine 
in place of Dike, resigned. 

Prof. Lee lectured in Portland, Monday evening, 
April 19th, on " Structure and Mode of Formation of 
Limestones." 

The Sophomore and Freshmen crews are doing 
good work upon the river. If the Freshmen work 
hard we predict that the Sophomores will have all 
they can do to get away with them. 

The College Orchestra have re-commenced their 
practice in the laboratory, and again the souls of the 
neighboring towns-jieople are filled with a feeling 
of vague unrest. 

" A feeling of sadness and longing, 
That is not akin to pain, 
And resembles sorrow only 
As the mist resembles the rain." 

The Sophomores of the Greek Division are study- 
ing this term " Smith's History of Greece," the same 
book that was formerly used here. 

" The Dalys in Vacation," May 3d. 

May-flowers have appeared, accompanied by the 
small boy who wishes to turn an honest penny by 
selling them to the students. 

Smith, '86, takes Botany with the Juniors. 

We were glad to notice the presence of Pres. Hyde 
at the boat-house the other day, when the crews were 
taking their practice pulls, for it is not often that the 
crews in practicing have among their spectators, 
either the President or any of the professors. 

Of the Junior electives for the summer term, 
nine take Botany ; five. Physics ; eight. History ; 
seven. Science of Language. 



10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



James McKeen, of the class of '64, was in the 
chapel, Sunday, April 18th. 

The advertisement in '87 Bugle, under the name 
of Adams &Vinal, should be corrected to Adams & 
Uniac. 

Smith, '86, has charge of the chapel bell this 
term. 

The provisional list for Commencement parts is 
as follows : Berry, Butler, C. A. Davis, Home, 
Parker, Smith, Taylor, Turner, Tultle, Wentvvorth. 

'Tis now the verdure-loving Soph., 

Looks forth with troubled glance, 
And shouts, "Climb off the campus. Fresh., 

And give the grass a chance." 

Cropped heads have appeared upon the campus. 
The annual book agent has made his rounds. 

Wanted — A long-haired melancholy to write 
poetical squibs for the local column. 

The fathomless depth of mud and water, that at 
the close of the winter term covers the roads about 
the campus, has disappeared, and the Brunswick 
streets have resumed tlieir summer coating of sand 
and dust. 

The second Senior and Junior Exhibition was 
held the evening of April 1st, in Upper Memorial, 
before an appreciative audience. The speaking was 
exceptionally good. Excellent music was furnished 
by the college orchestra. 

It is currently reported that Mr. Booker's dog is 
on the trail of the men who have been playing tennis 
on the campus in front of the buildings. Cave 
canem, George. 

Freeman, '89, and Gilpatrick, '89, who have been 
out teaching nearly all winter, returned at the be- 
ginning of the term. 

Tennis bids fair to receive an unusual amount of 
attention this season. Already, there are on the col- 
lege grounds four grass courts and two clay ones, 
with good prospect of others being added to the num- 
ber. The interest shown is praiseworthy, for tennis, 
as an athletic sport, is unexcelled, calling, as it does, 
for a combination of activity, skill, and endurance. 

A week or so ago the campus was burned over, 
the flickering flames in the evening reminding one 
of Dante's Inferno. 

Prof. Lee, of Portland, was here Wednesday, 
April 14th, to secure pupils for a class in sparring. 
His terms were .$10.00 for twenty-four lessons. 

The Congregational Society gave a "Sunflower 
Festival" in their vestry, Thursday evening, April 



15th, for the benefit of the Smyth memorial window. 
Burpee, '87, gave a violin solo, an elegie from Boz- 
zini. Fling, '86, sang the " Song of the Old Bell," 
with violin, clarinet, and piano accompaniment. 
F. W. Adams, '89, played a clarinet solo. 

We trust that the students will be careful not to 
overwork themselves in the new gymnasium. The 
fact of its being a novelty, causes some danger. 

Prof. — "Name the large cavities of the body." 
Hesitating Student— " The mouth?" Prof. — "Not 
unless it is open. When properly closed it is not a 
cavity." 

Quite a large amount was collected among the 
boys for Bill Seco, who is sick from an operation per- 
formed at a clinic. 

The ball team appear this season in new caps, 
shirts, stockings, and shoes. The caps are the regu- 
lar league pattern. The shirts are white, with Bow- 
doin, in blue letters across the front. 

It isn't every man who will sacrifice his best hat 
for nothing but a rheumatic pump. The philanthro- 
pist who did it recently, deserves a leather medal 
and promotion to a Booker Lieutenancy. 

For causes unknown, " Mul." was never considered 
more than a first-class Greek scholar; but he estab- 
lished an unimpeachable reputation when he eluci- 
dated the existence of a Greek letter " C." Since 
then he has labeled it a joke. 

Mr. F. P. Vinton, who is to paint the new panel 
in the chapel, was in town Monday, April 19th. The 
panel will be completed by Commencement. 

How is this for a prospective reserve nine? Bou- 
telle lb, Marshall 2b, Freeman 3b, Russell c. f., Clark 
r.f., Fogg 1. f. One of the regular batteries could be 
used, and their places filled on the regular nine by 
two substitutes, who should be regularly elected 
members of the college team. By the way, such a 
nine would not make a bad showing in the Cumber- 
land County League. 

Walker, Bates, '87, has entered Tufts College. 
We are sorry to lose so fine a player from the Maine 
League, but congratulate Tufts on the acquisition to 
her base-ball interests. 

Sunday chapel at 5.30 p.m. 

A Sophomore, noted for subtlety of wit and ana- 
lytical acuteness, gave the following definition of 
amanuensis : An amanuensis is a person who is in 
close connection with the one with whom he is con- 
nected. 

Lane, '87, has returned to college. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



11 




'36.— The Class of '36 
will celebrate its fiftieth 
anniversary the coming Commence- 
ment There are now but nine sur- 
vivers out of a class of twenty-six. Cyrus 
Woodman, Esq., of Cambridge, has charge 
of the arrangements. 

'39. — Judge William G. Barrows died at his home 
in Brunswick the 6th inst. He was born in Bridgton 
in 1821. After graduation he studied law with Gen. 
Samuel Fessenden, and afterwards with Judge Ten- 
ney of Norridgewock. He was admitted to the bar in 
1842, and settled in Brunswick. From 1853 to 1855 
he edited the Brunswick Telegraph. In 1856 he was 
elected Judge of Probate of Cumberland County, 
and again in 1860. He succeeded Judge Fox in 
1863 on the Supreme bench. After serving three 
terms as Judge of the Supreme Court of the State, 
ho declined a re-appointment in 1884. He leaves a 
wife. His health had been poor for some time, so 
that his death was not unexpected. On the bench 
Judge Barrows had an enviable reputation for integ- 
rity and learning. 

'46. — Rev. Joseph C. Pickard, Professor of the 
English language and literature in the Industrial 
University at Urbana, 111., is to deliver the address 
at Fryeburg Academy graduation, June 8th. He 
was principal at Fryeburg for two years after gradu- 
ation. 

'60. — Senator Frye delivered a lecture on "The 
Tariff" at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, on Tues- 
day evening, March 30th. 

'52. — Col. Henry Stone, of Boston, lectured at 
the Lowell Institute, March 22d. His subject was 
"Franklin and Nashville." 

'59. — Gen. C. H. Howard, for a long time con- 
nected with the Chicago Advance, has, after a period 
of service with the Government in behalf of the 
Indians, returned to journalism. He becomes editor 
of the Farm, Field, and Stockman, of Chicago, 
which changes from a monthly to a weekly. 

'61. — The class of '61 are making arrangements 
for the celebration of their 25th anniversary during 
Commencement. 

'63.^ — Dr. Newman Smyth has been delivering a 
series of lectures on the labor question at New 
Haven, 



'64. — Chas. Bennett is living at Mattoon, 111., and 
is Judge of the Supreme Court of that State. 

'69. — Rev. H. S. Whitman, of Dexter, has re- 
ceived a call to the Winthrop Street Universalist 
Church of Augusta. 

'74. — F. W. Hawthorne, of Bath, is business 
manager of the Jacksonville (Fla.) Morning News. 

'74. — Frank K. Wheeler has been appointed post- 
master at Kennebunkport, Me. 

'75. — The class of '75 has just issued a revised 
edition of their decennial report. Of the fifty-seven 
original members of the class, now living, eighteen 
are still unmarried. The class has lost by death 
three members. The next formal reunion will be 
held at Brunswick in 1895. 

'79!— F. M. Byron is General Ticket Agent of the 
Michigan Central Railroad at Kalamazoo. 

'82. — Melvin S. Holway, of Augusta, has been 
appointed disbursing clerk of the new public build- 
ing to be erected at that place. 

'83. — Winter was recently admitted to the bar at 
Sparta, Wis. 

'84. — Barton is studying law with Cleaves & 
Cleaves, Portland. 

'84. — C. W. Longren, of Andover Seminary, who 
last year supplied the church at Dexter, will supply 
for a year at Wilniot, N. H. 




Professor John Avery, a noted savant, of 
Bowdoin College, is compiling an elaborate 
dictionary of a South Indian language with 
which, it is said, no other American is fa- 
miliar. Will Professor Avery come nearer home 
and kindly publish a dictionary of New England 
slang so that we, benighted scholars of New Jersey, 
will be able to read our " cnlchawed " exchanges 
from the land of pines and Puritans? — Signal. 

Of the eight students at Yale College, selected 
for scholarship, to speak at the public exhibition of 
the Junior class, one is Yan Phou Lee, a native of 
China. His offence is rank. The Chinese must go. 
— Tuf Ionian. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND; 



'CIGARETTK 
i Sanolcers "who 
I are willingeto 
I pay a little more 
; for Cigarettes 
' than the price 
charged for the ori^inary trade Cigarettes, wlU 
fmd the RICHIaOND STRAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO Alil- OTHERS. 
Ihey are made from the ■briglitest, most 
delicately flavored, and lllgllest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are aljso- 
nitely Tflthont adulteration or drags. 




We use the Gennine Frencli Rice Paper 

of OUT own direct importation, which is made 
espeoiallv for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand-RICHMOWD STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
original brand, and to observe t hat each pack- 
ageorboxoli 
Ricbinond 
Straight Cat 
Cigarettes I 

bears the 
Rignature of ' 



f.lGARETTE 

ALLEN &GINTER 



MANTrPACTTJREBS , 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



njaine Bentrel 1. ^, 



On and after Oct. 12th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, S.15, 11.25 A.M., 3.38, 4.45 and 6.25 P.M., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Eockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.3S P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.40 P.M., and 

13.35 (night). 
For Lewiston, 8.15 A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 p.m., and every night at 

13.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. (mixed), and 2.45 P.M. 
For Augusta and Waterville, 8.20 a.m., 2.40 P.M., 12.45 eveiy 

night, and on Saturdays only at 6.35 P.M. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 p.m., and 13.45 (night) 
For Bangor, Ellsworth, Mt. Desert FeiTy, St. Stephen, Houltcii 

Vanceboro, and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Bar Harbor, 12.45 (night). 

Note.— The night ti-ains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
iston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun 
day, but do not connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, o] 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sun- 
day morning. 

PATSON TUCKEE, Gen'l Manager, 
F. E. BOOTHBV, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 6, 1885. 



SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. 

Manufactured hy special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 

The following are our well known 

STANDARD BRANDS : 

Caporal, Sweet Caporal, St. James 1-2, Capokai, 1-2, 

St. James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES. 

Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and French Rice Paper, are rolled by the high- 
est class of skilled labor, and warranted free from flavoring or 
impurities 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a fac-sijiile of Kinsey Bros. 
Signature. 

KINWE!f TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KINNET BROS. 
NEW YORK. 




JORDAN SNOW, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

DuNLAP Block, Brunswick, Me. 



EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT 



BICYCLE 
BASES A LL 

TENNIS 
BOATING 



SHIRTS, 

STOCKINGS, 

JEBSETS. 



SPECIAL RATES TO CLUBS. 



OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



Confectionery, Fruit, and Cigar Store, 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

Wm. R. FIELD, Manager. 



h. v. stackpole, 
Fine Boots and Shoes, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



TUie n A BCD '3 on filein Pliilailelphia 
I HI A F&ttn'i^ 'he ^cwe^aper .\tlver- 
I "*** J "' "■" tisins Agency of ilcssrs. 

N> W» AVER * SON, our authorized agents. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEGE BOOKSTORE. 

We have constantly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 

BYKOIV STEVJillVS. 



DEALER IN 

Ice -Cream, Fine Confectionery, Frnit, and Cigars. 



Under the Old Universalist Cbnrch, - • Main Street, BRUNSWICK. 

THEY do say, ■iiid it is a fact, Uiat Lenton & Ne.agle's is the 
cheapest place in this county. Their assortment of Trunks 
and Ba^s cannot he beaten. No Shop-Worn Goods, but direct 
from the manufacturers. They have the largest line of Whips 
ever shown in this town. Jobbing of all kinds promptly attended 
to. Trunks and Bags Neatly Repaired. The best stock of goods 
ever placed before the public. 

HARNESS MAKERS AND CARRIAGE TRIMMERS, 

Main Street, Store formerly occupied by AVashburne. 

F. H. WILSON, 

DISPENSER OF 

Pure Drugs, Medicines, and Chemicals. 

Imported and Domestic Cigars. 
MAIN STREET, - - - BRUU'SWICK, ME. 



COBURN CLASSICAL INSTITUTE, 

WATEKVILLE, ME. Both Sexes. Four Courses of Study : 
Introductory; College Preparatory, 3 years; English and 
Scientific, 3 years ; Ladies' Collegiate, 4 years. Location healthy, 
expenses moderate, discipline wholesome, morals good. Pei'sons 
using aicoholic beverages or tobacco need not apply. Accommoda- 
tions ample and excellent. For further information send for 
Catalogue to J. H. HANSON, Principal. 

ANTED 

Local Men to take orders for our Specialties 
in their own towns and counties. Live men 
make S5 a day. Write for terms, giving ref- 
erences and age. 

CHARLES H. CHASE, 
NURSERYMAN. EOCHESTER, N. Y. 

CUT FLOWERS. 

Orders for Cut Flowers and all Floral Designs will be promptly 
filled if left at the store of E. J. MEREYM AN, Pliariuacist, or 

At the Greenhouse on Jordan Avenue. 

FUNERAL FLOWEES A SPECIALTY. 
Brunswick, Jan. 25, 1886. 




■TI^IE 



•m 



TRAVELERS 



Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HERTFORD, COlSTlSr., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCT $11)000)000) and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 

A r^OTT^TTlVT' T*OT Tr^TTTQ IndemuifTing the Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
-fiV^V^-LJ-'-rji^ X X V7JU±V^JLI:jO Profits, the Wage-Worlcer for his wages, lost from Accidental injury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only 555.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each $1,000, with f 5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 1864 have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. 

Issues T TTTTT T>OT Tr^TTTQl of every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 
also JLi-Ll: XLi X ^ljiV_;±JCiO Personal Benefit. 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home OflSce at Hartford. 
JAS. G. BATTERSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PURITY SWEET CIGARETTES. 

THE PUREST, MILDEST, AND BEST CIGARETTE ON THE MARKET. 

PURE, BRIGHT VIRGINIA TOBACCO AND PUREST RICE PAPER. 

FOR THE FINEST MADE TRY OUR 

STRAIGHT WEB CIGARETTES. 

MANUFACTURED FROM THE FINEST BRIGHT TOBACCO GROWN. WITH 

TURKISH MIXTURE. 

PURITY SMOKING TOBACCO. 

THE FINEST, PUREST, AND BEST SMOKING TOBACCO MADE. 



RALEIGH CUT PLUG SMOKING. 

THE ORIGINAL, PUREST, AND THE BEST. 

We guarantee all not irijurious. Only a trial and you will he convinced. 

PACE & SIZER, Manufacturers, Richmond, Va. 

ON SALE AT FIELD'S. 




^CID PHOSPHATE. 

[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

The Unrivalled Remedy for Dyspepsia, Blental and Physical Exhaustion, Nervousness, Wakefulness, 

Diminished Vitality, etc. 

As Food for an Exhausted Brain, in Liver and Kidney Troulile, in Seasicl(ness and Sick Headaclie, in Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion and Constipation, in Inebriety, Despondency and eases of Impaired Nerve Function, 

It has become a necessity in a large number of households throughout the world, 

And is universally prescribed and recommended by physicians of all schools. 
Its action wiU harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 
It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body. 
It is unsurpassed as a substitute for lemons or Umes, and 

IT MAKES A DELICIOUS DRINK WITH WATER AND SUGAR ONLY. 
Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further psirticulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, R. I. 
.^-BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.-Sf 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Viewrs ; also College Vie^rs. 



F. ROEMER, 

Successor to A. Koenier & Sou, 
THE LARaEST HISTORICAL 

GOSTUMEE i ARMORER 

IN AMERICA. 

[I ^H jg Also Costiimer for all the priucipal theatres : 
Fifth Avenue Theatre, Granil Opera House, 
Star Theatre, Madisou Square Theatre, Niblo's Garden Theati-e, 
New Parlt Theatre, People's Theati-e, 14th Street Theati-e. 

No. 8 XJNIOlSr SQUARE, NEW YORK. 



Go to W, B. ITIToodard's 

To buy your GEOCEEIES, CANNED GOODa, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



ALL KINDS OF 





EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 

•SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 

ELEGANT MACKINAW 

STRAW HATS, 
THE BEST QUALITY, 

$1.00, $1.25, S1.50, 

MERRY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND. 

W. HAWTHORNE, 

FINE * TAILORING, 

2 Church Block, Bath. 



ATParter ^ 
164 High St 



ALLEN & CO., Portland, 

Having moved to their new store, 204 Middle Street, Cor. of Plum, are constantly opening 
rich and elegant goods for gentlemen's wear. 

IhoiGG foreign labrics low iisplayed iii fur tailoring iepartment. 

The finest-made up Clothing to be seen in the State now exhibited in our 



Novelties for Gentlemen's Dress in Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves, Neckwear, Canes, and Silk Umbrellas 
in Seasonable Styles to be found in our 

Furnishing Dspartrnsrit.. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

204 MIDDLE STREET, COENEE OF PLUM, PORTLAND. 



k. ki\mmQ\ 



Donnel Building, Corner Pearl and Middle Streets, PORTLAND, ME., 

WOULD RESPECTFULLY CALL THE ATTESTION OF 

Buyers o[ Fumituie, Gaipets, Beiiim, Fatlot Stoves, Ranges, ki, 

To the Euoruious .Stock of House Furnishings at the Portland Store. Being Manufacturers, 

iiitendiug purchasers can see the styles and select their own coverings for Parlor Furniture, and have it made 

to order for the same price. We keep enormous quantities of Upholstery Goods in the Boston Store, 

and full lines of samples. Here our prices on Parlor Suites range from .ff:i5.00 in Hair Cloth 

to .fST.i.OO in Silk or Mohair Plushes. 

CHAMBER FURNITURE. DRAPERY of every description made to order in the 

„,,.,,. , ,. Boston store. Orders taken here and designs and samples 

We have m stock m our three stores Si ditferent pat- shown 
terns of Chamber Suites, manufactured from all the pop- 
ular woods, viz. ; Pine, Ash, Walnut, Cherry, Basswood, PARLOR STOVES. 
and Mahogany, ranging in price from .UIS.OO to .PlfiO.OO. c ■ , ^^ i- • » , 4- t. , c^ t^ 
We also have all kinds, sizesrand quantities of Bedsteads, fP*^"?^ attention is requested to our Parlor Stove De- 
Bureaus, Commodes, etc. Spring Beds, Cot Beds, Lounge P^'-t^ent as we believe we have the best line to select 
Beds, Sofa Beds, Mantel Beds, ?tc. Mattresses of eve?y ^^^ '" ^^™''- ^"'^''^ *^-"'' '° **°-°°- 
kind and quality, from an excelsior at .1)i2.00 to a pure crrmT-pc ATO-n T3A-mt>-pc 
bleached South American curled horse hair at .?25.nn. biUVJib AJMi) RAJ!Jtriib. 

Our line of Ranges comprises all the latest and best in 

CARPET DEPARTMENT. the market, including the"JSrew Tariff " and "Quaker," 

„_^ .„, , . ^ ' which are considered superior to anything yet produced. 

51.75,000 worth of Cottons, Cotton and Wools, AU-Wool Write for cuts of these two Ranges. Prices .SIS.OO, $20.00, 
Extras, Tapestry, Brussels, Body Brussels, Velvets, Wil- .ff22.50, .1f25.00, .5527.50, $29.00, $SAM, .USo.OO, .$38.00, and Up- 
tons, etc., at our usual Rock-Bottom Prices. Any of these wards to Sftio.OO. These prices include all the ware, pipe, 
can be selected at the Portland store. SHADES and and zinc 



Any of the above goods sold for Cash or on our Special Contract System, at 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Streets, Portland, Me. 

Brunch of the Great Na^aa Hall Hoiisp Fandshing Store, S27 Washington Street, Boston. 

B. A. ATKINSON & CO. 

ISAAC C. ATKINSON, Manager. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Glass Cards and Monograms 

ENaEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENOY FOR 

ROGERS' CELEBRATED GROUPS. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

474 Congress St., - - - opp. Preble House. 

THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

m. S ©DD FEIiIieW^' BII0OK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 

A. W. TOWNSEND, Prop'r. 



Mixtures for Pipe or Cigarette. 
THKEE KINGS, Turkish, Perique and Virginia. 
MELLOW MIXTURE, Turkish and Perique. 
TUBKISH and VIRGINIA. 

PERIQUE and VIRGINIA. 
GENUINE TURKISH. 
ELAKE CUTS, ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE PIPE. 



VANITY FAIR. 



OLD GOLD. 



SALMAGUNDI, aKew Granulated Mixture. 

FRAGRANT VANITY FAIR, 



SUPERLATIVE, 



CLOTH OF GOLD. 



STRAIGHT CUT CIGARETTES. 

People of reliued taste wlio desire exceptionally fine Cigar- 
ettes should use only our Straight Cut, put up iu Satin Packets 
and boxes of 10s., -203., oOs., and 100s. 

Our Cigarettes were never so fine as now. They cannot be 
surpassed for puritv and excelleiice. Only the purest Rice Paper 
used. Established 1846. 14 First Prize Medals. 

Wm. S. Kimball & Co., Peerless Tobacco Works, 

BOCHESTER, N. Y. 



PHONETIC SHORTHAND. °^m^e°t»^'" 
For Self-Instruction. Containing all the late improve- 
ments. Price $1..50. Special Instruction Ijj' Mail, $6.00. 
Send Stamp for Specimen Pages and Illustrateil Pamphlet. 

W. W. OSGOODBY, Publisher, Kochester, N. T. 



The New Styles in 

Smi^iF and. SOI^T H-^TS 

In all colors, are noAV ready. An elegant line of New York 

Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves In all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Pancy Mixtures, 

-s^T ELLIOTT' S,e^ 

OPPOSITE MASON STKEET. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 

C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 



^^S- 



THE FAVORITE NOS.S03-404-332-I7O-SSI-WITH 
MOTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



THE rROPKllllOK of the Nearest Corner Grocerj' will 
endeavor to merit a 

CONTINUANCE 

Of the Student's patronage. Come and prove him. 



J. S. TO AVNE, 

PHARMACEUTIST. 

PURE DRUGS, MEDICINES, FANCY AND TOILET AR- 
TICLES; ALSO A FINE LINE OF CHOICE CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES. PRESCRIPTIONS a Specialty. 

Main Stkeet, Neae Bowdoin College. 



J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
menceraents, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

750 Middle Street, - - - - Portland Me. 



CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 

Dentist, 



STORER BLOCK, - 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



F. W. BARE ON, 

Dealer \\ IWmi i\i Fancy Groceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 



Bowdoin College Medical Department. 

The Sixty-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 4th, 1886, 
and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— REV. W.M. DeWitt Hyde, President: Alfked 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Iskael. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Practice; Alfked Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Godd^rd, A.M 
Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. Gerrish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; FramiLin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemisti-y; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henrv H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Yodng, Public Hygiene ; 
Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonsh-ator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, AI.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine 



The Largest Assortment of 



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Is to be found at 

JACKSON'S. 

LAWN- TENNIS, BASE -BALL, AND LOW SHOES, 

lu Large Variety. 

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drop in and inspect. 



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OVER BOAKDMAN'S STORE, MAIN STREET. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 
J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

^^©gfet a?3.,d Salt IfSeatSs 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce. 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

E. G. SIMPSON, 

DEALER IN 

ALL KINDS OF COAL, 

CEDAR STREET, BRUNS>AriCK, ME. 

Branch office three doors north of Tontine Hotel. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 

Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry, Promptly Repaired and Warranted. 

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COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

W. HAWTHORNE, 

FINE -^-TAILORING, 

2 Church Block, Bath. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, test- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkuess. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Caesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
JSneid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xeuophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra, — so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
speciiications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which tliey wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regular Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 188.5). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Halloivell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved' 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topursae their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish, 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A ■WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75.. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week^ 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount tO' 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XVI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 12, 1886. 



No. 2. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE TEAR ET THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

C. B. Burleigh, '87, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 

C. C. Choate, '87. C. H. Verrill, '87. 

A. W. Merrill, '87. H. C. Hill, '88. 

E. C. Plummer, 87. M. P. Smithwick, '8i 

L. B. Varnet, '87. A. W. Tolman, '88. 



Per annum, in advance $2.00 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 

Vol. XVI., No. 2.- Mat 12, 1886. 

The Province of Faith, 13 

Editorial Notes, 13 

Ode, 16 

Alumni and Overseers, 16 

The Light-House, 19 

Field Day 19 

Little May 19 

Bowdoin Abroad, 20 

Collegii Tabula, 24 

Personal, 27 

THE PROVINCE OF FAITH. 

We may ponder ancient logic, 
We may drinli of classic fountains, 
We may follow subtle reason 
Over dialectic mountains ; 
But the essence of our being 
Does not lie in depth of learning. 
All of earth's vast erudition 
Can't appease the soul's deep yearning. 
'Tis a faith in something higher 
Than e'er scholarship possessed 
That reveals life's truest purpose, 
And gives the spirit rest. 




The next issue of the Okient will 
probably be delayed a week in order to con- 
tain a report of the Ivy and Field-Day exer- 



We have enlarged this issue of the Ori- 
ent four pages in order to present those of 
our readers who are interested in base-ball 
with a full account of the nine's Massachu- 
setts trip. 

Doctor Gerrish, President of the Alumni 
Association, publishes in another column a 
history of the association's action in refer- 
ence to the election, by the alumni, of over- 
seers of the college. We Avould commend 
this article to the careful attention of the 
alumni. Dr. Gerrish writes us that " efforts 
are to be made to have a very large meeting 
of the alumni this year," and we have every 
reason to believe that some final action will 
be taken on this matter. 



We publish elsewhere in this issue a full 
report of the ball nine's Massachusetts trip. 
On the whole the report is highly satisfactory. 
The nine started out upon this trip with 
scarcely any preliminary practice, and played 
eight successive games, all of them against 
strong clubs. Victory under such circum- 
stances was not, of course, to be expected. 



14 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The whole trip was marked by strong bat- 
ting on the part of our nine, and, towards the 
last, some very close and exciting games 
were played. Despite the unusually large 
number of games played, the nine has re- 
turned in good form, every man being in fine 
condition, and prepared to do good work in 
the intercollegiate series. 



The reading-room fiend has visited us 
again this term, occupying his leisure, and 
doubtless enlarging his ponderous scrap-book, 
with clippings purloined from the latest pa- 
pers and periodicals. This reading-room fiend 
is a sort of modern anomally. Scientists have 
been utterly baffled in their attempts to 
place him. He is not the missing link. He 
ranks much lower in the scale of endless 
progression, but humane considerations for 
the apes — who are not deserving of such an 
indignity — have prevented him from being 
classed where he manifestly belongs. The 
reading-room fiend has not the gigantic 
grasp of thought to appreciate the fact that 
the articles which have such a remarkable 
fascination for him, might possibly prove 
slightly interesting to others. This fiend is 
incorrigible. There is absolutely no hope 
for him. All that remains for us is to culti- 
vate a college sentiment against him, suffi- 
ciently strong to put an end to his aimless 
existence. 

We desire to impress upon those who 
propose to enter into any of the Field-Day 
sports, the necessity of systematic training 
in the short time that remains to them. 
There is no reason why, with good, honest 
work, a number of the college records may 
not be broken this season. 

We should think it would be a good in- 
ducement to harder training on the part of 
our students, if the college were to send the 
men breaking the best Bowdoin records, to 
represent us in the intercollegiate contests 
at Mott Haven. There is no reason why 



Bowdoin should not be represented there. 
We certainly believe there are men in college 
well qualified to represent us in these con- 
tests, and we trust they will spare no effort 
to make their records. Field Day, such as to 
warrant the college in sending them away to 
represent us in larger contests. 



There is apparently a growing desire 
among New England colleges to enlarge the 
powers of their alumni, in the election of 
college officials. At the winter meetings of 
a majority of the Dartmouth Alumni Asso- 
ciations, votes were passed favoring the 
granting to the alumni of a voice in the 
election of trustees. At the last Dartmouth 
Commencement a committee of the alumni 
was appointed to submit to the association 
" a plan for the representation of the alumni 
in the election to vacancies in the Board of 
Trustees." The sentiment of the Dartmouth 
alumni appears to be favorable to such a 
plan, and the indications are that it will be 
adopted at the coming Commencement. This 
is a move in the right direction. As The 
Dartmouth very justly remarks: 

"It would seem to us that, as the almost entire 
support of the college is looked for from its alumni, 
and as they, as a body, are most deeply interested in 
its welfare, they should be given at least a minority 
voice in its councils. It is not quite within the spirit 
of our modern institutions to make a body entirely 
self-perpetuating." 

There is probably more antiquated con- 
servatism connected with the older colleges, 
than with any other American institutions. 
This may, to a limited extent, be well, but 
there are cases where the best interests of 
the college, as well as the progressive spirit 
of the times, demand a change. A little 
less red tape and more democratic simplicity 
would be productive of beneficial results. 



There is a general desire, among the stu- 
dents, to have a greater number of ball 
games this season on the home grounds. We 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



15 



have no doubt that the management would 
gladly arrange more games if their financial 
support would warrant it. 

It must be remembered that while the 
practice games away from home are a source 
of income to the nine, those played on the 
home grounds are a source of expense. It, 
therefore, lies wholly with the students 
whether or not we shall have an increased 
number of games this term on our own 
grounds. There are a number of men in 
college who are a great deal more liberal 
with their criticism and advice than with 
their lucre. The constitutional croaker is 
an undesirable factor in any college commu. 
nity. We have a nine in every way worthy to 
represent us in the intercollegiate contests, 
and it only remains for us to do away with 
all censorious spirit, and give them that sub- 
stantial support which they deserve at our 
hands. 

An incident occurred a few days ago, 
which, though seemingly trivial in itself, is 
indicative of a most important and funda- 
mental principle, that responsibility is one of 
the greatest of educational and conservative 
elements. In the celebration of the victory 
over Tufts, one of the institutions of the 
Medics was torn down and burned. Retali- 
ation was threatened and explanations fol- 
lowed. A general feeling prevailed that 
the matter should drop, provided that resto- 
ration was made. But a few, bent on revenge, 
retaliated by burning the foul-board. The 
outburst of feeling which immediately fol- 
lowed was spontaneous and unanimous. The 
Medics immediately restored the foul-board, 
and the students repaired the injury which 
they had done. The result was a feeling of 
good-will among all concerned. 

As we said, this incident is seemingly 
trivial, but to us it is one of the manifesta- 
tions of a revolution which has been working 
silently, but profoundly, for the past few 
years. It is an outcome of the self-govern- 



ment instituted here three years ago, a feel- 
ing of co-operative interest and responsibility 
in the welfare and prosperity of the college. 



The Faculty of Oberlin have distin- 
guished themselves for intolerance by refus- 
ing to allow Henry Ward Beecher to lecture 
there for fear his contaminating(?) influence 
might lower the religious standing of the 
college. Mr. Beecher is certainly to be con- 
gratulated that he is spared from coming in 
contact with such bigots. 



We have, at this time, no opinion to ex- 
press of '89 as a class ; but there is an ele- 
ment in it which demands, at least, a passing 
remark. The class seems to be divided into 
two factions : one, which enters into college 
life with spirit, is willing to give liberally 
within its means, and make personal sacrifices 
for class and college interests ; the other, 
which has no enterprise, no public spirit, a 
class well typified in the fellow, Avho, after 
expending a good deal of superfluous wind 
on the delta, then turned to a classmate with 
the idiotic remark, " Ar'n't we brash ? " For 
this class there is nothing congenial at Bow- 
doin. And if they are not capable of seeing 
it themselves it should be impressed upon 
them. 

In the short time during which '89 has 
been at college, what has this faction done ? 
It has prevented '89 from putting a class crew 
upon the river, a thing unprecedented, if we 
are not mistaken, in the history of boating. 
It has refused to support or subscribe to any- 
thing in which it has not a peculiarly personal 
interest. It has given '89 the smallest rep- 
resentation in athletics of any class in col- 
lege. It has given '89 the name of having 
the least enterprise and public spirit of any 
class in college. And all this with a class 
a third larger than any one other, and with 
double the number of the Senior class. 
How this faction will stand in the class- 



16 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



room and in scholarship in general, we do 
not know, but we predict that in those de- 
partments it will occupy the same place which 
it does on the campus, — namely, the foot. 

It is an unfortunate thing for '89, and the 
college, that this element is so powerful in 
the class. It is neutralizing and paralyzing 
all united acting, and crushing all ambition 
to excel. We hope that the better element 
of the class will be able to overcome it. A 
general and vigorously-expressed sentiment 
is the only means capable of coping success- 
fully with such a sentiment, and this means 
ought to be unanimously and forcibly used. 



ODE. 

By Rev. Elijah Kellogg of Harpswell, Class of 1852. 

[The following poem was read at the semi-centennial anni- 
versary of Bowdoin in 1852, and has never before appeared in 
any paper.— Eds.] 

From vpaves that break to break again, 
From winds that die to gather might, 
How pleasant on the stormy main 
Appears the sailor's native height. 

And sweet I ween the grateful tear 
That glistens in the wanderer's eye. 
As haunts and homes of early years 
Begemmed with morning's dew-drops lie. 

Borne on the fragrant breath of morn. 
His lazy vessel stems the tide 
Among the fields of waving corn 
That nestle on the river's side. 

His mother's cottage through the leaves 
Gleams like a rainbow seen at night ; 
While all the visions fancy weaves 
Are stirring at the well-known sight. 

But sweeter memories cluster here 
Than ever stirred a seaman's breast. 
Than e'er provoked his grateful tear, 
Or wooed the mariner to rest. 

'Twas here our life of life began — 
The spirit felt its dormant power ; — 



'Twas here the child became a man — 
The opening bud became a flower. 

And from Niagara's distant roar 
And homes beside the heaving sea, 
Rank upon rank thy children pour, 
And gather to thy Jubilee. 

On these old trees each nestling leaf, 
The murmur of yon flowing stream. 
Has power to stir a buried grief, 
Or to recall some youthful dream. 

Each path that skirts the tangled wood, 
Or winds amidst its secret maze. 
Worn by the feet of those we loved, 
Bring back the forms of other days. 

Of those whose smile was heaven to thee, 
Whose voice a richer music made 
Than brooks that murmur to the sea, 
Or birds that warble in the shade. 

Around these ancient altar fires 
We cluster with a joyous heart. 
While ardent youth and hoary sires 
Alike sustain a grateful part. 



ALUMNI AND OVERSEERS. 

Portland, April 26, 1886. 

To the Editors of the Orient : 

For fifteen years past the subject of the 
election of the overseers of the college, by 
the alumni, has been discussed at the annual 
meetings of the General Alumni Association, 
and it will receive further attention at the 
next Commencement. As the attendance of 
graduates will doubtless be unusually large 
this year, and the interest in this matter is 
greater than ever, it seems to me very de- 
sirable that the alumni should be informed as 
to the previous work of the Association in the 
premises, so that time and effort may not be 
wasted in traversing ground which already 
has been sufficiently explored. 

With this end in view, I have extracted 
from the records of the Association all that 
relates to this subject, and send it herewith. 
At a future time I shall ask permission to 
make a few comments on these facts, and 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



17 



some suggestions as to the action of the As- 
sociation at its next meeting. 

Fredbeic Henry Geeeish. 



At the annual meeting of the Association 
of Alumni of Bowdoin College in 1871, " a 
communication of votes passed by the Board 
of Overseers of the college was received as 
follows : 

" Copy of votes passed by the Overseers of Bow- 
doin College at the annual meeting of 1870, relating 
to the nomination of candidates for filling vacancies 
in the Board. 

"Voted, Thatthealumniof this college of three (3) 
years standing, and over, be requested to nominate 
at their next, and each succeeding annual meeting, 
until otherwise voted, under such regulations as may 
be adopted by the Executive Committee of the 
alumni, candidates for such vacancies in this Board 
as may then have occurred or become known, the 
nominations so to be made not to exceed in number 
one-half of the vacancies to be filled ; and that the 
alumni be informed that this Board will readily re- 
ceive and consider any suggestions that the alumni 
desire to make to this Board in relation to the subject 
matter of this vote, and that the Secretary communi- 
cate a copy of this vote to the President of the 
alumni. 

"Also, Voled, That the Secretary of the Board 
notify the President of the Alumni Association on the 
day of the annual meeting of this Board, of the num- 
ber of vacancies then known in the Board, and that 
the nominations for one-half that number may be 
nominated by the alumni in conformity with vote 
passed by this Board." 

The offer of the Board of Overseers was 
formally accepted, and their communication 
"was referred to a committee of five, con- 
sisting of Messrs. W. W. Rice, J. W. Perry, 
J. C. Dodge, W. P. Tucker, and E. B. Webb, 
to investigate what further action in this re- 
gard is required, and report at the next an- 
nual meeting." 

In 1872, the committee presented the fol- 
lowing report, through its chairman, Hon. 
W. W. Rice, of Worcester, Mass. 

"Report of the committee of alumni of Bowdoin 
College, appointed July, 1871, to consider what 
action may be necessary in case any change be made 
in the mode of electing members of the Board of 
Overseers of the college. 



" It does not fall within the province of this com- 
mittee to consider the expediency of making any 
change in the mode of electing or organizing the 
Board of Overseers, but merely to ascertain what 
action would be required to confirm and carry out 
any change sought to be made. 

" Bowdoin College was chartered by the Legisla- 
ture of Massachusetts in 1794. The charter provides 
for the organization of two corporate Boards, the one 
intrusted with the property and management of the 
college, under the name of ' The President and 
Trustees of Bowdoin College ; ' the other with a su- 
pervisory and visitatorial power and duty under the 
name of 'The Overseers of Bowdoin College.' It is 
only with regard to the second of these Boards that 
any action is suggested. Massachusetts dealt gener- 
ously by the young college ' established in the dis- 
trict of Maine for the purpose of educating youth.' 
She reserved no place upon either Board for any 
state official or public functionary. She imposed no 
test of political or religious faith in any department. 
She endowed the college with a liberal hand, gave it 
the name of one of her own most honored sons — hon- 
ored most by that distinction — and only retained to 
herself, as expressed in the sixteenth section of the 
charter, the right ' to grant any further powers to, 
or alter, limit, annul, or restrain any of the powers 
by this act vested in the said corporation, as shall be 
judged necessary to promote the best interests of the 
said college.' 

"In the act of separation of Maine from Massa- 
chusetts, incorporated into the constitution of Maine 
in 1820, Massachusetts, still careful of Bowdoin Col- 
lege, provides that ' the President, and Trustees, and 
Overseers of Bowdoin College shall have, hold, and 
enjoy their powers and privileges in all respects, so 
that the same shall not be subject to be altered, lim- 
ited, annulled, or restrained, except by judicial 
process according to the principles of law.' 

" This act of separation can be changed in no re- 
spect except by concurrent act of the Legislatures of 
both states. 

" The committee do not deem it necessary to re- 
port upon the absolute right of these Legislatures, 
by concurrent act, to enact any change in the mode of 
organizing these Boards without their consent, for 
they unanimously believe that any proposition so 
prejudicial to the interests of the college, coming 
from whatever source, would be met with no favor 
in either Legislature. 

" Your committee, therefore, unanimously are of 
opinion that any change in the mode of electing 
members of the Board of Overseers of Bowdoin 
College, can be accomplished only by the concurrent 



18 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



act of the Board of President and Trustees, of the 
Board of Overseers, and of the Legislatures of Mas- 
sachusetts and of Maine. 

"And this they have the honor to report." 

This report was accepted, and, on motion 
of Gen. John M. Brown, it was 

" Resolved, That, in the opinion of the Alumni As- 
sociation, the Board of Overseers should be elected 
by the alumni. 

'^ Resolved, That a committee be appointed to 
consult with the Boards as to the possibility of carry- 
ing out the views of the Alumni Association as ex- 
pressed in the first resolution, and, if the Boards 
consent, that said committee are authorized and in- 
structed to procure, if possible, the necessary Legis- 
lation. 

" These resolutions were adopted, and the fol- 
lowing committee of five were accordingly appointed : 
Messrs. Geo. E. B. Jackson of Portland, D. C. 
Linscott of Boston, J. W. Perry of Salem, John 
Rand of Portland, and H. H. Boody of Brunswick." 
In 1873, Mr. Jackson reported that the 
committee had not been able to complete 
their work, and requested that the committee 
be continued with powers, and it was so 
voted. There is no record of a report b}^ 
this committee. 

In 1888, a committee, consisting of Prof. 
C. C. Everett, M. W. Fuller, Esq., and J. L. 
Crosby, Esq., was appointed to meet with 
committees of the various local alumni asso- 
ciations to consider the subject of the 
election of the overseers by the alumni. 

lu 1884, Prof. Everett "presented a biU 
prepared by Oliver C. Stevens, Esq., ('76) 
to be proposed to the Legislatures of Maine 
and Massachusetts, for such a change of the 
charter of the college as would allow the 
alumni to elect the Overseers." 

The following votes, offered by Dr. Ger- 
rish, were adopted: 

"First. It is the opinion of the alumni or the 
college that it will be for the interest of the college 
to allow the alumni to elect the members of the 
Board of Overseers, and that it is desirable to secure 
such changes in the charter of the college as will 
make this possible. 

" Second. The Secretary of this Association is 
instructed to send a copy of the above vote to each of 
tlie Boards." 



It was also " Voted, That a committee of 
three be appointed to present the subject of 
election of Overseers to the Board, and to 
act with them in securing such changes as 
are proposed." 

Josiah Crosby, W. S. Gardner, and W. 
G. No well were appointed as this committee. 
" Voted, That a committee be appointed to pre- 
sent names for vacancies in the Board of Overseers 
to be voted for by the alumni at their annual meet- 
ing; and that such committee present two names for 
each vacancy, asking for suggestions and nominations 
from any and all alumni in seleeti-ng such names ; 
and that, upon the report of the committee, the 
alumni proceed by ballot to elect members to fill the 
vacancies." 

This committee consists of J. B. Sewall, 
H. L. Chapman, and F. C. Upton. 

In 1885, " the committee that were ap- 
pointed at the last annual meeting were con- 
tinued in charge of the matters entrusted to 
them." 

"Voted, That the committee appointed last year 
to nominate to the Association candidates for vacan- 
cies on the Board of Overseers be instructed to act 
for the Association the present year in naming per- 
sons for the vacancies on the Board, if the Associa- 
tion should be asked for such nominations." 

The following nominations have been 
made by the Association : 

In 1871, James R. Osgood, '54, and 
Joseph W. Symonds, '60. 

In 1874, Thomas H. Hubbard, '57, and 
Egbert C. Smyth, '48. 

In 1875, Melville W. Fuller, '53. 

In 1877, Albert H. Currier, '57. 

In 1878, Samuel F. Humphrey, '48. 

In 1879, John H. Goodenow, '52, and 
Francis Fessenden, '58. 

In 1880, Josiah Crosby, '35. 

In 1881, Melville W. Fuller, '53, and 
Edward Stanwood, '61. 

In 1884, Charles A. Packard, '48, and 
Daniel A. Robinson, '73. 

In 1872, "on motion of Mr. Northend, 
on account of lateness of the hour and small 
numbers now present, voted, to waive the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



19 



right to nominate candidates for the Board 
of Overseers for this time." 

In 1873, " a motion to proceed to nomina- 
tion of candidates for Board of Overseers 
was laid on table." 

The records of 1876 are silent on the 
subject, as also are those of 1882 and 1883. 



THE LIGHT-HOUSE. 

On a barren, sea-girt islet, 
Straight and tall the light-house stands, 
Rising lip in stately grandeur, 
Girt about by shining sands, 
Keeping there its lonely vigil 
Through the dark and stormy night, 
Warning sailors of their danger 
By its ruddy beacon light. 

Now its patient watch is ended. 

When, to usher in the day. 

The Sun from out the East arisen 

Shines again with genial ray. 

Gilding all the white-capped billows 

Of the restless, heaving sea, 

And the seething, churning breakers. 

As they roar in savage glee. 

Let us learn a moral lesson 
Which the light-house teaches plain : 
Watch to aid your fallen brothers 
Wrecked upon life's stormy main ; 
And when they have reached the haven, 
Should they coldly you ignore. 
Though 'tis not reward you covet. 
It is promised, just and sure. 

FIELD DAY. 

It has been suggested that the Medics 
be admitted to a participation in our Field- 
Day sports. We are not at present prepared 
to render an opinion on this suggestion ; but 
it deserves, and should receive, a thorough 
consideration. Heretofore the arrangement 
of the medical term has debarred them from 
any participation in our spring sports ; but 
now this obstacle is removed. In the nature 
of things, there is no reason why they should 
not take part in these sports ; it remains for 
objectors to say why they should not. The 



admission of the Medics would surely raise 
the records, and in some directions create an 
interest now entirely lacking. 



The Fortnight, in an article in the com- 
ing intercollegiate athletic contests at Mott 
Haven, says : 

"For the benefit of those who may be inclined to 
compete, we add a table of times that must be made 
before any person can hope to find his name on the 
list of fortunate aspirants : One-mile run, 5 minutes ; 
one-half mile run, 2 minutes 10 seconds ; one-quarter 
mile run, 55 seconds ; tvvo-hundred-and-twenty yards 
dash, 24 seconds; one-hundred-yards dash, 11 sec- 
onds ; hurdle race, 19 seconds." 

All of these records, except the mile and 
half-mile runs, have been easily surpassed at 
Bowdoin ; and both of these exceptions we 
expect to see excelled this year. Bowdoin 
has the material to make as good average 
records as any college in New England ; but 
on account of its small numbers, the few 
who are willing to enter athletics are over- 
worked. But this year there seem to be a 
larger number than usual who are unoccu- 
pied, either with ball, boating, or tennis. 
Why do not these train for Field Day with 
an intention of making good records ? Those 
who do intend to enter should specialize and 
train for that only. In that way only can 
high records be made. 

The committee who have charge of the 
arrangements for Field Day should early 
make out the list of contests, and make it as 
varied and interesting as possible. The 
sameness which has characterized the con- 
tests here for the past few years could be 
broken with good effect. The list used at 
Mott Haven might be followed as far as pos- 
sible. It would, at least, give us the advan- 
tage of making accurate comparisons. 



LITTLE MAY. 

Just a baby of a year. 
Like a bud of early spring. 
Knowing naught of hope or fear, 
Thinking nothing gay or drear — 



20 



60WDOIN ORIENT. 



Who can tell what Time may bring ? 
Thus the nurse was heard to say 
As she bore the child away 
To its cradle, there to sleep, 
Wrapt in slumber calm and deep, 
And the light of waning day 
Softly shone on " little May." 

Then a household full of grief. 
For the light from it has flown ; 
As the tender growing leaf 
Long before the autumn's sheaf 
Falls in summer's early dawn, 
Thus a cruel hand one day 
Stole the little maid away, 
And the seasons' tireless roll 
Cannot soothe them or console. 
For that mother's heart will say : 
' Where to-night is ' little May ? ' " 

Just a child to woman grown, 
Seen amid the city's throng, 
Bufi'eting the world alone, 
'Midst its dangers ever thrown. 
Yet forever brave and strong ; 
For those hands that took away 
Could but govern for a day. 
Till a subtle power innate 
Turned her feelings into hate 
For the two who still would say 
She was theirs, their " little May." 

Just a woman by the gate 
That protects her pleasant home, 
In the twilight there to wait 
For that coming, never late. 
From the city, through the gloam. 
Peace is in that gentle face, 
Happiness with joy and grace. 
As she greets her husband there, 
Coming from his daily care ; 
And beside her at its play 
Is another " little May." 

Baby, child, and woman one ; 

So thi-ough changes great and grave 

Did that short existence come 

To the summit. It is done ; 

All that Fortune should, she gave. 

And as e'en the darkest night 

Must give way to morning light, 

So all trials to the strong 

Prove incentives to push on 

To that brighter, better day 

That received our " little May." 



BOWDOIN ABROAD. 

A few clays ago the nine returned from 
pne of the most extended trips it has ever 
taken, as well as one of the most beneficial. 
Every game helped to settle the nine to 
steady work, and to show the strong and 
weak points of individual players and of the 
nine as a whole. The records show that we 
have a remarkably strong batting team, two 
first-class batteries, a fine out-field and in- 
field, — in fact that we have the best nine 
that ever went out from Bowdoin. Now, as 
formerly, the successful working of the nine 
is somewhat impeded by too many captains. 
The men ought to learn that in a base-ball 
nine, as in an army, the highest efficiency 
can only be attained through discipline and 
unity. When a man undertakes to fill a 
position on a nine, it is his duty to fit him- 
self to fill that place to the best of his ability, 
and every time he goes upon the field he 
should do his best, whether playing with 
professionals or with a grammar s.chool nine. 
It is a disgrace to do otherwise. It would 
be well for those chronic growlers who never 
give encouragement when the nine does good 
work, but at the least bad luck are always 
ready with a dose of wormwood, to go 
abroad and see how things are done at other 
institutions. They would find that it was 
not the custom, if the nine were defeated by 
a combination of circumstances which they 
did not understand to telegraph (at the ex- 
pense of the scorer) for the nine to come 
home. At every college visited, we found 
the greatest enthusiasm amongst the stu- 
dents, and a large number was always pres- 
ent whenever the nine practiced, ready 
to give generous applause at every good 
play. 

The trip began under the most favorable 
circumstances as far as weather was con- 
cerned and not a game was lost or postponed 
during the entire trip. On the morning of 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



21 



^xFast Day, April 22d, the nine accompanied 
bjy^ large body of students took the train 
for r<;rtland. The day was charming, and 
an audience of about four thousand people 
greeted the players. The Bowdoins prac- 
ticed like veterans, and for three innings the 
game was very close, when the score stood 
two to one in favor of Portland. After that, 
however, the home team found the ball and 
scored in every inning but one. Talbot 
made the only run of the game for Bowdoin ; 
he reached first on an error, stole second, 
and came home on Larrabee's two-base hit. 
Larrabee led the batting having two hits 
with a total of three to his credit. Consid- 
ering that it was our first game and that we 
had three batteries to work against, the nine 
acquitted themselves creditably. The nine 
remained at the Preble until the next morn- 
ing, and then started for Lawrence, where 
they played in the afternoon. Arriving at 
Lawrence we were escorted to the Central 
House by a crowd of "dust," and partook 
of a dinner fit for — dogs. The most central 
thing in the house was the bar, — of no use 
to the nine. An audience of about a hun- 
dred witnessed the game in the afternoon. 
It was marked by loose fielding on the part 
of the Bowdoins, but this was mainly due to 
the fact that Dearth was crippled by a severe 
sprain received in practice, that Coffin was 
sick, and that several played out of their 
usual positions. Wilson and Soule were the 
battery, and considering that this was their 
first game, they did finely, — Lawrence mak- 
ing but ten hits with a total of twelve. 
Gorman was very effective, the Bowdoins 
making but five singles. The only inning in 
which they scored was the sixth, in which 
four runs were made. Lawrence has a very 
strong team, as the two league games with 
the Brocktons show. We remained in Law- 
rence over night, and went to Boston in the 
morning. We made the Quincy House our 



headquarters, where every attention was paid 
to our comfort. Below is the score : 

LAWRENCE vs. BOWDOIN AT LAWRENCE, 
APRIL 23, 1886. 

A.B. B. E.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 



Dearth, 






. 8 


3 


1 








3 





1 


Moulton, 






. 9 


4 


1 


1 


1 


1 





1 


Pushor, 






. 3 


4 











8 





1 


Wilson, 






. 1 


4 


1 


2 


2 


1 


8 


5 


Soule, . 






. 2 


4 











5 








Talbot, . 






. 7 


4 





1 


1 


2 








Murphy, 






. 4-8 


4 





1 


1 


2 


1 


3 


Larrabee, 






. 5 


4 











1 


2 


1 


Davis, 






. 8-4 


1 














3 


2 


Coffin, . 






. 6 


4 


1 








1 





4 




36 


4 


5 


5 


24 


14 


18 


Kiley, 8 


5 


2 








1 








O'Connell, .... 3 


6 


2 


2 


4 


13 


2 


1 


Burns, 9 


5 


3 


1 


1 


2 





1 


Gorman, .... 1 


5 


1 


1 


1 


3 


7 


5 


Burke, 7 


5 


1 


3 


2 











Cox, 6 


5 


1 











1 





Potter, 4 


5 


3 








1 


5 





Donald, 5 


5 


1 


2 


2 





1 





Guhoer, . 






. 2 


4 


2 


2 


2 


7 


1 


2 



45 16 10 12 27 17 9 

Wild pitches— Wilson 3, Gorman 2. First base on called 
balls — Wilson 3, Gorman 0. Total called balls — Wilson 
59, Gorman 66. Struck out — Wilson 4, Gorman 7. Total 
strikes called — Wilson 14, Gorman 21. Passed balls — Soule 
4, Guhoer 2. Umpire — McLaughlin of Lawrence. Time 
of game — 2 hours 5 minutes. 

In the afternoon we played Harvard on 
Holmes' Field. Neither nine scored in the 
first inning, but in the second Harvard made 
5 runs ; making 4 hits with a total of 9, — 
one a home run. Foster made another four- 
base hit in the next inning, and the score 
stood 7 to 0. About tliis time it commenced 
to rain, but the umpire would not call time, 
and the game proceeded. Davis and Moul- 
ton were the Bowdoin battery until the fifth 
inning, when Davis had to give up on ac- 
count of a lame back, and Wilson and Soule 
took their places. Wilson pitched very ef- 
fectively; the Harvards failing to make a 
hit during the rest of the game. Smith was 
also a puzzler to our boys, they only making 
three safe hits. The foUowuig is the score : 



22 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN vs. HAKVARDS AT CAMBKIDGE, 
APRIL 24, 1886. 



A.B. B. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 



Dearth, . 

Moulton, 

Pushor, 

■Wilson, . 

Soule, 

Talbot, . 

Murphy, 

Larrabee, 

Davis, 



8 
2-9 



. 6-1 

. 5-2 

. 7 

. 4 

. 9-5 

. 1-6 



Wiestling, .... 6 

Smith 1 

Holden, 5 

Willard, .... 3 

Allen 8 

Henshaw, .... 2 

Foster 7 

Choate, 9 

Phillips, 4 



33 12 6 16 27 20 



Wild pitches — Davis 2, Wilson 0, Smith 0. First base on 
called balls — Bo wdoins 1 , Harvards 4. Total called balls 
— Davis and "Wilson, 86, Smith, 85. Total called strikes — 
on Bowdoins 47, on Harvards 38. Struck out — Davis 1, Wil- 
son 4, Smith 8. Passed balls — Moulton 0, Soule 2, Hen- 
shaw 0. Two-base hits— Bowdoins 1, Harvards 0. Three- 
base hits, Harvards 2. Home Runs, Harvards 2. Earned 
runs — Harvards 4. Double plays — Bowdoins 1. Umpire 
— J. H. Green, Cambridge. Time of game — 2 hours. 

After the game we returned to Boston 
and started at 3 p.m. next day for Williams- 
ton; arriving there in the evening. We 
were not expected until the next day and 
had to be content with a cold supper. We 
had high hopes of winning the next day, 
but, alas ! " The best-laid schemes o' mice 
and men, gang aft a-gley." The day was all 
that could be desired and a large crowd was 
present to witness the game. Our men 
played in the same positions as on Saturday. 
Unfortunately Wilson had been ill for two 
days and failed to pitch with any success. 
The outfielders had to play on the side of a 
hill, and the right field had the sun in his 
eyes, causing him to make two costly errors. 
Luck seemed to be against us. We batted 
well, — ^nine hits with a total of eleven, but 
they were not bunched, and every error was 



a costly one. In the seventh inning Coffin 
made our only run, by getting a three-bagger, 
and coming home on a wild throw by Black- 
mer. Coffin led the batting, having two hits 
with a total of four to his credit. For the 
home team Burden carried off the honors, 
making four singles. In the eighth inning 
Talbot made a wonderful fly catch getting 
the ball after a long run. Following is the 
score : 

BOWDOIN vs. WILLIAMS AT WILLIAMSTOWN, 
APRIL 26, 1886. 

A.B. K. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. B. 



Dearth, 8 

Moulton, .... 9 

Pushor, 3 

Wilson, 1 

Soule, 2 

Talbot, 7 

Coffin, 4 

Larrabee 5 

Davis 6 



Eastman, 

Duryee, . 

Tuck, 

Burden, 

Blackmer, 

Perry, 

Blackinton, 

Wallace, 

Campbell, 



11 27 21 13 



15 12 13 27 18 



Earned runs — Williams 4, Two-base hit^-Burden 1. 
Three-base hit — Coffin 1. Double play— Campbell and 
Blackmer. Left on bases — Bowdoin 5, Williams 8, Passed 
balls— Soule 7. Wild pitches— Wilson 2, Tuck 1. Struck 
out — Wilson 8, Tuck 4. Umpire- L. L. Lewis, Jr., Wil- 
liams, '87. 

The next day things were very different, 
and it is fair to suppose we should have won 
if the game had been finished, for the score 
stood four to four, and we had two men on 
bases, and one out. Our boys were playing 
very steadily while Williams played with 
uncertainty. We had to hurry to catch the 
train, and arrived in Boston late in the even- 
ing, tired out by our long ride. The follow- 
ing is the score : 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



23 



BOWDOIN vs. WILLIAMS, APRIL 27, 1886. 



Dearth, 

Moulton 

Pushor, 

Wilson, 

Soule, 

Talbot, 

Coffin, 

Larrabee, 

Davis, 



Eastman, . 

Duryee, . . 

Tuck, . . 

Burden, . . 

Blackmer, . 

Perry, . . 
Blackinton, 
Wallace, 

Campbell, . 



AB. R. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. K. 

4 11110 
4 2 2 7 2 





10 18 16 



26 



Umpire — L. L. Lewis, Williams, '87. 

Next day we played Tufts and every man 
was determined to win. All felt that unfair 
umpiring had beaten them the year before, 
and they were resolved to show Tufts that 
they could play ball. The game from the 
beginning was very one-sided and closed 
at the end of eight innings. Our boys 
played finely, making only three errors out- 
side of the battery. Davis pitched a won- 
derful game, and Tufts made only two 
scratch hits. Moulton supported Davis in 
fine style. We commenced by making two 
runs in the first inning, and two in the 
second, blanking the home team both times. 
When time was called the score stood 17 to 
4. We then returned to Boston and remained 
over night. We give below the score : 

BOWDOIN vs. TUPTS, APRIL 28, 1886. 



Dearth, 8 

Moulton, .... 2 

Pushor, 3 

Wilson, 6 

Soule, 5 

Talbot 7 

Coffin, 4 

Larrabee 9 

Davis, 1 



A.B. R. B.H. T.B. P.O. 

5 1110 

S 2 1 1 7 

5 3 2 2 7 



44 17 10 14 24 16 11 



Chapman 7-5 2 2 

Westcott, .... 1-9 2 

White, 5-14 

Walker 4 4 

Cook, 6 4 1 1 

Bailey, 2 3 

Ames, 9-7 2 1 

Prouty, 8 3 1 1 



Bascomb, ....3 2 1 10 1 

26 4 2 2 24 12 19 
Umpire — J. H. Green, Cambridge. 

We started for Hanover in the morning ; 
arriving there about 1 p.m. Another beau- 
tiful day greeted the players, and at 3.25 the 
most exciting game of the trip began. Wil- 
son and Soule were our battery, while Aiken 
and Johnson filled the same positions for 
Dartmouth. Wilson pitched well, and Soule 
caught a great game, although his hands 
were very sore. We were first at bat and 
the first three strikers out. Dartmouth 
began with a base hit and then Quackenboss 
made a home run. They made four runs in 
this inning. Larrabee began the third inn- 
ing by making a home run. Moulton made 
a base hit and was brought home by base hits 
of Pushor and Wilson. At the end of the 
sixth inning the score stood 6 to 6, and there 
was great excitement. In the seventh, 
Quackenboss made an earned run and that 
ended the run getting for both sides. The 
following is the score : 

BOWDOIN vs. DARTMOUTH, APRIL 29, 1886. 



Dearth, 8 

Moulton, .... 5 

Pushor, 3 

Wilson, 1 

Soule, 2 

Talbot 7 

Coffin, 4 

Larrabee, .... 9 

Davis, 6 



.H. 
1 


T.B. 

1 


P.O. 




A. 



E. 




2 


2 


1 








3 


3 


9 








2 


2 





11 


1 








9 


3 


2 


1 


3 

















2 


3 


1 


2 


5 


2 









12 17 24 17 



Aiken, 



Chandler, 

Scruton, 

Dillon, . 

Viau, 

Johnson , 

Dascomb, 

McCarthy, 









11 








2 


2 


1 








2 


4 


1 


1 


























8 


5 


1 











1 











5 


2 





8 


13 


27 


21 


2 



24 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



"Wild pitches— Wilson 1. Passed Balls— Soule 1, John- 
son 3. Struck out — Wilson 5, Aiken 7. Home run — Lar- 
ratee, Quackenboss. Earned runs — Bowdoins 2, Dart- 
mouths 2. Umpire — L. D. Gove, Dartmouth, Medical De- 
partment. 

The next day we were also favored with 
good weather, and a large and enthusiastic 
audience was on the grounds. The Bowdoins 
outbatted their opponents as they did the 
day before but were defeated by their wild 
throws. Otherwise they played a good 
game. Dillion pitched the first inning, but 
McManus couldn't hold him and Viau went 
in to pitch while Artz went behind the bat. 
Davis pitched an excellent game and was 
well supported by Moulton — the home team 
making but four safe hits. Moulton and 
Soule led the batting, each making two hits- 
Following is the score : 

BOWDOIN vs. DARTMOUTH, APRIL 30, 1886. 



Dearth, .... 

Moulton, 4 

Pushor, 5 

Wilson, i 

Soule, 4 

Talbot, 4 

Coffin, 4 




2 2 6 4 1 

1 1 13 1 2 
110 3 1 

2 2 12 
10 
4 2 



Larrabee, 4 

Davis 4 2 2 2 1 7 3 



38 6 9 9 21 20 1: 

Aiken, 3. s 4 1 1 1 

Quackenboss, 3b., ... 4 1 1 1 1 2 

Chandler, lb., .... 4 1 1 1 11 

Scruton, c. f 4 1 1 1 

Dillon, 1. f., p., .... 4 2 1 1 

Viau, 1. f., p., .... 4 1 10 

Artz, r. f., c, 4 9 4 

McManus, c, r. f 4 1 2 3 

McCarty, 2b 3 1 2 3 



35 8 4 5 27 22 9 
Earned run — Bowdoins. Two-base hit — McManus. 
Passed balls — Moulton 4, Artz 2, McManus 1. Wild 
pitches — Dillon 1, Davis 1. Base on balls — Bowdoins. 
First base on errors — Bowdoins 6, Dartmouths 9. Struck 
out — Davis 3, Viau 5. Double plays— Aiken, Quacken- 
boss, and McCarty ; McCarty and Chandler. Time — 2 
hours 20 minutes, tfmpire— G. W. Wales. 

TOTAL AVERAGES OF PLAYERS FOB THE TRIP. 

AV. 

417 
606 
648 
474 
520 
464 
435 
513 
487 



Dearth, c. £., . . 


8 


30 


5 


167 


12 


8 


667 


Moulton, c.,r.f.,3b. 


■ 8 


33 


12 


364 


49 


42 


848 


Pushor, lb., . . 


8 


33 


11 


333 


82 


79 


963 


Wilson, s. s., p., . 


8 


33 


7 


212 


72 


53 


736 


Soule, 3b., c, 


8 


31 


C 


193 


64 


54 


847 


Talbot, l.t, . . 


8 


31 


4 


129 


10 


8 


800 


Murphy, 2b., . . 


3 


11 


2 


182 


16 


11 


688 


Larrabee, r. f.,.''b. 


8 


31 


7 


226 


15 


12 


800 


Davis, p., 8. s., . 


8 


26 


7 


269 


58 


41 


706 



We passed the night at White River 
Junction, and left for Boston at 3 A.M. All 
of the men were very tired, and left Boston 
on the first train going east, arriving in 
Brunswick at 6.30, thus ending a very en- 
joyable and profitable trip. 




Jones says that Ms anatomy 
Is healthy, strong, and sound, 

That not a single lazy bone 

Can anywhere be found. 

Vet every single student here. 
To our own certain knowledge. 
Would swear this Jones the laziest man 
That dwells within the college. 

His malady's a common one, 

Oft' seen in worldly tussles. 

Our bones, like Jones, are always smart 

But oh the lazy muscles ! 

The Medics eliminated the old foul-board one 
night, about two weeks ago. 

The classes of '36, '46, and '61 are making ar- 
rangements to hold reunions here next Commence- 
ment. 

A temporary drain has been laid from the Gym. 
into an unused well. 

All the wells on the campus should be thoroughly 
cleaned out. There is hardly one in which the 
water is fit to drink. The one at South Appleton is 
at best not much better than a cesspool. 

Verrill has charge of the reading-room during 
Sewall's absence. 

Now is the time to take morning walks. There 
are many pretty places within a short distance of 
the college. A walk to Paradise Spring, the Fish- 
way, or Sprague's Hill, will well repay the exertion 
of rising an hour earlier than usual. 

Marston, '88, is teaching at Freeport. 

On April 30th, the fire-engine was brought up on 
the campus and the delta sprinkled. Several of the 
students assisted at the brakes, with the result of a 
number of lame backs .and blistered hands. 

Of the Senior electives for this term, twelve take 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



25 



English Literature ; four, Chemistry ; and four, 
German. 

Quite a number of the boys attended the Catholic, 
Easter Sunday. 

Local Parson (elucidating to S. S. concert) — 
" When the news of the surrender at Appomattox 
came, there was great rejoicing. But I could not 
stop to participate in it; for I was on my way to 
Canada as fast as I could go, and never stopped till 
I had crossed the line." 

A new foul-board has been put up on the delta. 
It is a great improvement on the old one. 

"TheDalys" appeared here, May 3d, and were 
greeted by a crowded house. 

The ground about the gymnasium has been 
neatly graded. 

Mr. Moody is giving the Freshmen an optional 
course in Surveying. The exercises come twice a 
week, and consist of practical work, which is very 
interesting. Quite a number of the class have 
availed themselves of the opportunity to learn the 
surveyor's art. 

A little excitement was caused in the Mineralogy 
class when a few Medics were detected prying up 
the foul-board. Peace followed an explanation. 

Mathematics is now made an elective at the be- 
ginning of the Sophomore year, instead of at the 
second term of the year. There has not heretofore 
been sufficient time to do the required work. 

The campus is undergoing its spring cleaning-up. 

The Sophomores have had Davis' sliding seats 
placed in their boat, in place of the old ones, which 
makes a marked improvement in their rowing. 

Prof. Lee, with the assistance of the class in Bot- 
any, is compiling a catalogue of all the plants 
found upon the college grounds. It is good practice 
for the class and the catalogue is something that is 
very much needed. 

"Tyranny of Labor Organization " and "Physi- 
ological Effects of Alcohol " are the subjects for 
Junior themes, due Wednesday, May 19th. 

"Moll Pitcher," a drama in four acts, was pre- 
sented before a large audience in Town Hall, Tues- 
day evening, April 27th. The acting was very good 
indeed and everything passed off satisfactorily to all. 
The proceeds of the entertainment go to Giveen's 
Military Band. The following is the cast of char- 
acters : 

Maladine. E. C. Plummer. 

Wm. Grey. G. M. Wheeler. 

Mr. EUiston. C. B. Burleigh. 

Jotham Hook, Esq. H. B, Austin. 



Jotham Hook, Jr. 
Valdez. 
Putney. 
Mr. Merton, ) 
Jack, I 

Zeb Hornfoot, ^ 
Bill, [ 

Citizen , ' 

Moll Pitcher. 
Rosalie Elliston. 
Mrs. Hook. 
Nabby Squeerler. 



Paul Randall. 
Chas. Pettis. 
F. L. Stone. 



W. R. Tenney. 

Miss Abbie Nason. 

Mrs. A. T. Bodge. 

Mrs. Knight. 

Miss Annie Snow. 



The soil which was removed from the delta has 
been placed in the hollow space between Winthrop 
and Massachusetts Halls, if adds greatly to the im- 
provement of the grounds. 

Owing to the Freshmen's lack of interest in boat- 
ing, they will not put a crew upon the river this 
year. The Juniors are practicing in their boat, and 
it looks as though we might have quite an exciting 
race. There is no reason why there should not be 
three crews upon the river, and we hope before 
another year passes, to see '89 alive to the interests 
of the college. 

Now that Field Day will soon be here, why 
would it not be a good idea to offer special prizes to 
those who shall break the best college record in 
the various contests? And, furthermore, not to give 
a prize to the person who won the same last year, 
unless he beats his previous record. 

The 'Varsity crew are to have new suits for Field 
Day, when they probably will race the Portland 
crew for a mile and a half straight-away. 

A professor and two tutors were seen with knap- 
sacks upon their backs, wending their way towards 
the Harpswell shore, on Fast Day. 

Files, '89, who has been home, sick, for the past 
two week, has returned to college. 

A second nine has been organized under the 
management of E. E. Rideout, '86, and has played 
several very good games with the Brunswicks. 

At a meeting of the class of '88 the following 
were chosen as Bugle editors : H. S. Card, R. W. 
Goding, H. L. Shaw, J. Williamson, Jr., W. W. 
Woodman. 

Sophomore French recitation : Mr. C. (translat- 
ing) — "He stood in an attitude of perpendicular 
solidity — " Class indulge in a gentle smile over 
Mr. C.'s " perpendicular solidity." 

Gary, '87, has returned to college. 

W. W. Kilgore, '86, delivered the oration at the 
banquet of the New England Association of Theta 
Delta Chi Fraternity, held at Young's Hotel, Boston, 



26 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



April 20th. A. C. Dresser, '88, was elected a direc- 
tor of the Association. 

The latest joke on the Freshmen. Prexy, in the 
introduction of Mr. Stanvvood: The three upper 
classes need no introduction ; and the lower class 
doubtless still has h\m fresh in memory through the 
columns of the Youtli's Companion. 

The following speakers have been elected to take 
part in the Sophomore Prize Declamation at the close 
of the term : BaiTett, Bartlett, Cary, Dresser, Cod- 
ing, Hill, Larrabee, Marston, M. P. Smithwick, 
Thomes, Tolman, Woodman. 

A week ago last Sunday night. Prof. Avery spoke 
in the Congregational church on " Buddhism." The 
subject was treated in a very interesting manner. 
A good number of the students were present. 

Mr. H. K. White, 74, principal of Lincoln Acad- 
emy, Damariscotta, was in town a short time ago. 

It is intimated that if the Medics do not articulate 
the bones of the head in better shape in the future. 
Prof. Gerrish will be converted into a star actor. 

At a recent meeting of the Tennis Association, 

there was discussed a ijroijosal from Colby for the 

formation of an Intercollegiate Tennis League. It 

was suggested that the players could travel with the 

nines of their respective colleges. It was decided 

to accept the proposition, and to select two players 

to represent Bowdoin. 

A Freshman on an End woman 
Conceived a mighty mash, 
And left his club to board with her. 
Though hairs were in his liash. 

For she, poor soul, was much deceived, 

As she thought by the way he'd scoff 

At religion, and Freshmen, and similar things, 

He must surely be a Soph. 

But when she discovered him only a Fresh. 
She bounced him forth from the coop, 
So he sold out his share iu the '89 boat 
And went off with a minstrel troupe. 

Prof. Gerrish — " I will ask somebodj' an easy 
question, now. Mr. Nonesuch, how many digits ai'e 
there on your left hand?" Mr. N. — "Fourteen, 
sir!" Prof. — "The next, Mr. Snodgrass." "Four, 
sir." [Applause among the quacks.] 

On receiving news of the victory over Tufts, the 
boys turned out and indulged in the usual festivities. 
A large bonfire was kindled in front of the chapel. 
The exact cost of the celebration will not be ascer- 
tained until the term bills are issued. 

There appeared in town recently a vender of false 
whiskers and goatees. Here is a chance for those 
who have been vainly endeavoring to raise the gen- 
uine article. 



H. R. Fling, '86, went as delegate from the Kappa 
Chapter, to the Psi Upsilon Convention, held at 
Bethlehem, Pa., May 6th. 

Somewhere along in the spring is the proper 
time for grumbling of all kinds, and as the college 
has been spared this year, it seems right that a wail 
of some kind must be sent out ; therefore we wail 
about the ash heaps. They have been an eyesore to 
everybody long enough ; and now that the gymna- 
sium will attract visitors to the back part of the 
campus, why cannot something be done to make the 
appearance of things in that locality a little more 
attractive? There should be an arrangement of 
some kind whereby the ashes need not be thrown on 
the ground in plain sight. A box or pit with a trap- 
door could be made, and the ashes thrown into it, 
and in that way the present unsightly piles could be 
avoided. We do not wish to be over-particular in 
this matter, but certainly a change for the worse 
could not be made. 

An album containing the autographs of the fac- 
ulty some twelve years ago, and also those of the 
class of '74, was recovered a few days since by its 
owner, Mr. Henry K. White, from the laboratory 
where he carried it, at the time of graduation, to 
secure the signature of Prof. Carmichael. 

Wouldn't it be well if certain of the 'Varsity left 
a little more of the management to the captain, and 
had less to say ? 

President Hyde attended the medical lecture on 
Tuesday afternoon, given by Prof. H. H. Hunt. 
When the new president ftivors us with his presence, 
the Medics should understand that his coming is the 
signal for applause ; as it was, not a leaf fell, not a 
crow chattered. 

It is said that a certain Freshman, who draws his 
literary sustenance from the Boston Olobe, is accus- 
tomed to board the train at Brunswick, and ride to 
Bovvdoinham, in the mean time devouring the 
paper, which he borrows from the train-boy. 

The first of the course of lectures for this term 
was delivered by Mr. Edward Stanwood on "Journal- 
ism, in Lower Memorial," May 4th. The attendance 
was lai'ge and the closest attention was given 
throughout. For various circumstances the discourse 
can not, in this number, be given the attention which 
it deserves ; but in a subsequent issue we hope to be 
able to print an abstract of it for the benefit of our 
readers. 

Chapel singing has been omitted for the past two 
terms. Isn't it about time to revive it? It could be 
done by any one who would take the lead. Being 
the most attractive of all the exercises,- it should no 
longer be neglected. 

A small, but enthusiastic meeting of the Athletic 
Association was held in Lower Memorial, Friday, 
May 7th, for the election of ofiicers for the ensuing 
year. The officers were elected as follows : Presi- 
dent, H. B. Austin ; Vice-Presidents, H. M. Moulton, 

C. C. Choate; Directors, Austin Cary, '87, M. P. 
Smithwick, '88, O. P. Watts, '89 ; Master of Cere- 
monies, Fermer Pushor; Secretary and Treasurer, 

D. M. Cole. 

A rain prevented the opening game of the league 
between Colby and Bates. 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



27 




'36.— The following are 
the survivors of the class 

Aaron C. Adams, Congregation- 
alist clergyman, resident in Connecticut. 
Jotham Donnell, doctor at Houlton. 

George F. Emery, lawyer, Portland. 

Alonzo Garcelon, doctor, Lewiston. 

John Goodenow, lawyer, Baltimore. 

Thomas S. Harlow, lawyer, Boston. 

Isaac Randall, lawyer, Dixfield. 

David B. Sewall, Congregationalist clergyman, 
York. 

Cyrus Woodman, Cambridge, Mass. 

'39.— Rev. Chas. F. Allen, D.D., who has been 
presiding elder of the Lewiston district for the past 
four years, with his residence in this town, assumes 
the pastorate of the church at Richmond by appoint- 
ment of the recent conference at Bridgton. 

'44. — Nathaniel Hatch, of Bradford, Mass., died 
suddenly of heart disease, April 22d, aged seventy 
years. Mr. Hatch was born in Gorham, Me. He 
was, for several years, principal of the Gorham and 
Westbrook Academy. He was also principal of the 
Haverhill High School for two years and a half. Af- 
terwards Mr. Hatch engaged in the shoe business and 
in a life insurance agency. He was town clerk in 
Bradford from 1861 to 1874. He leaves a widow and 
four children. 

'46. — Chas. A. Spofford, has been appointed by 



the President to be collector of customs for the dis- 
trict of Castine, Me. 

'49. — Hon. Joseph Williamson, of Belfast, has 
been at work for some time upon a Bibliography of 
Maine. It is stated that he has already secured over 
3,000 titles. 

'50. — Rev. H. F. Harding is to deliver the Memo- 
rial Day address at Machias. 

'64. — Mr. James R. Osgood, sailed for England, 
April 28th, to assume the duties of the agency in 
London for Harpers' Bros., a place which was tilled 
for nearly forty years by Sampson Low. He was 
complimented by a farewell dinner in Boston by 
members of his college class, some eight or ten of 
whom reside in Boston and vicinity. 

'55. — Dr. J. K. Greene, of Constantinople will 
return to his missionary labors in that city the first of 
June. It is two years since he came to this country 
for a period of rest after a service of twenty years in 
Turkey. He has recently been lecturing in the West. 

'55. — Rev. Flavins V. Norcross, of the Congre- 
gational church at Union, Me., has tendered his res- 
ignation, to take effect the first Sunday in June. He 
h"as been pastor of the church 26 years. 

'60. — Hon. Wm. W. Thomas, Jr., has sailed for 
Europe, in company with his father, Hon. Wm. W. 
Thomas, of our Board of Overseers, expecting to be 
absent about thi-ee months. 

'61. — Mr. Edward Stan wood, in addition to his 
other journalistic labors, conducts the novel and val- 
uable department in the New Princeton Eeview, 
known as " The Record." It is a record in narrative 
form of all important events occurring throughout 
the world. 

'76.— John A. Morrill, Esq., of Auburn, has been 
admitted to practice in the U. S. Circuit Court. 

'81. — Edgar O. Acliorn, Esq., of Boston, is to de- 
liver the memorial oration before the Weld Sargent 
Post, G. A. R., at Boothbay, on Decoration Day. 

'82. — Benson Sewall, gave a lecture at Ellsworth 
Falls, April 16lh, on "Reminiscences of a European 
Trip." 



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PUEE, BRIGHT VIRGINIA TOBACCO AND PUREST RICE PAPER. 



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MANUFACTURED FROM THE FINEST BRIGHT TOBACCO GROWN. WITH 

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RALEIGH CUT PLUG SMOKING. 

THE ORIGINAL, PUREST, AND THE BEST. 



We guarantee all not injurious. Only a trial and you ivill be convinced- 

PACE & SIZER, Manufacturers, Richmond, Va. 



ON SALE AT FIELD'S. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




CIGARETTE 
Smokers who 

are ■vvilling^to 
3aya little more 
-Tor Clgarettea 
than the price 
charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, -n-ill 
And the RICHIaOND STKAIGHT CUT 
Wo. 1 SUPERIOR TO Alili OTHERS. 
They are made from the ■brightest, most 
delicately flavored, and bigbest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are abso- 
lutely wltbottt adulteration or drugs. 



No. 
-I- 



STRAIGHT CUT 

We use the Genuine Frencli Rice Paper 

of our oivn direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1 — on each Cimrette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 



brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
original brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or box of ■ 
Kichu 
Straight Cat I 
Cigarettes 

bears the I 
Bignature of " 

ALLEN &GINTER 

MAS DFAOXUIIEBS, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



P.IGARETTES 



ELEGANT MACKINAW 

STRAW HATS, 

THE BEST QUALITY, 

$1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 

MERRY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND. 

njaine Gentral R. ^. 

On and after Oct. 02th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.15, 11.25 A.M., 2.38, 4.45 and 6.25 P.M., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Rockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.38 P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.40 P.M., and 

12.35 (night). 
For Lewlston, 8.15 A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 p.m., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. (mixed), and 2.45 p.m. 
For Augusta and Waterville, 8.20 A.M., 2.40 P.M., 12.45 every 

night, and on Saturdays only at 6.35 P.M. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 (night). 
For Bangor, Ellsworth, Mt. Desert Ferry, St. Stephen, Houlton. 

Vanceboro, and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Bar Harbor, 12.45 (night). 

Note.— The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
lston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun- 
day, but do not connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, or 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sun- 
day morning. 

PAYSON TDCEEE, Gen'l Manager. 
F. B. BOOTHBY, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 6, 1885. 



SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. 

Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 

The following are our well kno\vn 

STANDARD BRANDS : 

Caporal, Sweet Caporai,, St. James 1-2, Caporal 1-2, 

St. James, Ambassador, Entke Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS, STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES, 
Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughl}^ cured, and French Rice Paper, are rolled by the high- 
est class of skilled labor, and warranted free from flavoring or 
impurities 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a fac-sijiile of KiNNET BEOS. 
Signature. 

KINNEY" TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KINNET BROS. 
NEW YORK. 



JORDAN SNOW, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

DuNLAP Block, Brunswick, Me, 



EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT 



BICYCLE 
BASE-BA LL 

BOATING 



SHIBTS, 

STOCKINGS, 

JEBSETS. 



SPECIAL RATES TO CLUBS. 



OWEN, MOORE & CO., 

Portland, Maine. 



Confectionery, Fruit, and Cigar Store, 

MAIN STKEET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

Wm. R. FIELD, Manager. 

h. v. stackpole, 
Fine Boots and Shoes, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



TniS PAPERS' "le Newspaper Adver- 
I "lis r 'r'.i.r" tisina: Agency of Messrs. 
N> W, AVER & $ON, our autborized agenta. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEGE BOOKSTORE. 

We have coustantly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a flrst-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 



T3:. 



DEALER IN 



Ice -Cream, Fine Confectionery, Frnit, and Cigars. 



Under the Old Universalist Chnrcli, ■ - Main Street, BRUNSWICK. 



LENTON & NEAGLE. 



In this may be seen a very fine assortment of Ladies' and Gents' 
TraTeliDg Bags, Valises, and Shawl Starps. There is also to he 
seeu a very fine line of Riding Saddles for both Ladies and Gen- 
tlemen, showing that they pay strict attention to the w.ants of all 
their customers who are lovers of that healthy sport of horse- 
back riding. In connection with their riding gear they keep the 
Largest Stock of Horse Clothing and Dusters that can he found 
this side of the manufacturers, — 150 different patterns to 
select from. They are also Manufacturers of Fine Harnesses 
of every description, and are ahead of all their competitors as 
regards to Prices and Good "Work. They pay strict attention 
to Trunk and Valise Repairing, and can Canvas a Trunk If it 
be so desired. They Cut Prices to all College Students. 
Remember the place and give them a call, at the Sign of 



IiBNTON & NEAGLE, 



Under G. A. R. Hall. 



Main Street, BRUNSW^ICK, ME. 



COBURN CLASSICAL INSTITUTE, 

WATERVILLE, JIB. Both Sexes. Four Courses of Study : 
Introductory ; College Preparatory, 3 years ; English and 
Scientific, 3 years ; Ladies' Collegiate, i years. Location healthy, 
expenses moderate, discipline wholesome, morals good. Persons 
using alcoholic beverages or tobacco need not apply. Accommoda- 
tions ample and excellent. For further information send for 
Catalogue to J. H. HANSON, Principal. 



W: 



ANTED 

Local Men to take orders for our Specialties 
in their own towns and counties. Live men 
make S5 a day. Write for terms, giving ref- 



erences and age. 

CHAKLES 



Nurseryman. 



H. CHASE, 
ROCHESTER, N. T. 



F. H. WILSON, 

DISPENSER OF 

Pure Drugs, Medicines, and Clieniicals. 

Imported and Domestic Cigars. 
MAIN STREET, - - - BKITNSWICK, ME. 



-THE 



* TRAVELERS # 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD, co]sr:^r.. 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCT $1 1,000,000, and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 

A f^r^TT^TTIVT' "POT Tr^TT-T^ indemnifying the Business or Professional Man or Fanner for his 
-^^-^^-^A-L-'-'-'-'-^ J- J- V/-L/XV7-LijO Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidental Injury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only S5.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each S1,000, with S5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 18G4 have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASBf 
benefits. 

Issues T TT7T? lI>r^T Tr^TT?G of every Desirable .Form for Family Protection or Investment for 
also -L/J-JTIL J: T^J^11_/1J:!^0 Personal Benefit. 

On ALi, our plans, paid-up Policies wUl be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $i,947,oo(> 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Office at Hartford. 
JAS. G. BATTERSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretaiy, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



QOCIJEJTY' 'Dies cltxcL Alettes, Casts cLrtd. JErLsigrhtcL. 
yVrittrtg Fctper cutcL Cards JEngrctved ctnd Prtnted. 
Stixdeixt's yzsitirtg Ccurds. Iixvitattoixs of every 'kxrtd 
e3:ecizted by tlxe engrajvircg hozise of 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



Society Irxvito-tions, 9Jtes, and lllixstrcLttons for Yectr- 
t^oo'h.s, Jd:orLogr CUTIS, ^rms, ctrcd Crests JEngi^ctved ctrtd 
Printed. VisitirLg Cards, cind tlxe Choicest StCLtiortery . Seals, 
Tapers and Sealing Was:, and Sealing Sets. 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 




[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, ]^ass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

The Unrivalled Remedy for Dj'spepsia, Mental and Physical Exhaustion, Nervousness, Wakefulness, 

Diminished Vitality, etc. 

As Food for an Exhaosted Brain, in Liver and Kidney Trouble, in Seasicltness and Sicl( Headaciie, in Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion and Constijmtion, in Inebriety, Despondency and cases of Imx>aired Nerve Function, 

It has become a necessity in a large number of households throughout the world, 

And is universally prescribed and recommended by physicians of all schools. 
Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 
It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body. 
It is unsurpassed as a substitute for lemons or limes, and 

IT MAKES A DELICIOUS DRINK W^ITH WATER AND SUGAR ONLY. 
Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

RUMFORD CHEMICALi WORKS, Providence, R. I. 
W-BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.-fif 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



.'UJu,A..<L,.i .i 



•ftmi 






Special Rates to Classes i Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of BrunsiiTick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College VieTws. 



F. ROEMER, 

Successor to A. Eoemer & Son, 
THE LARGEST HISTORICAL 

GOSTUMEE i ARMORER 

IN AMERICA. 

Also Costumer for all the principal theatres ; 
Fifth Avenue Theatre, Grand Opera House, 
Star Theati'e, Madison Square Theatre, Niblo's Garden Theatre, 
New Park Theatre, People's Theatre, 14th Street Theab-e. 

BTo. 8 XJNIOlir SQUARE, NEW YORK. 



Go to VIT. B. Woodard's 

To buy your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

SI=ECX.A.Ij lajf^TEIS to STTTXJEITT' CIj-CTES. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and Durable JVIauuer. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order, 



OTTAWA 




Cushing's Island, 
Portland, Me. 

3vn. s. c3-iBsoisr. 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 




Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Atldress all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 




'ALMA <^ 



PORTLAND. 




1. A, ATl^lPiS©! 

Oonnel Building, Corner Pearl and Middle Streets, PORTLAND, ML, 

WOULD RESPECTFULLY CALL THE ATTENTION OF 

im oi Furqltuie, Gaipets, BefiHi, Patloi Stoves, BaQges, &g., 

To the EuormoLis Stock of House Furnishings at the Portland Store. Being Manufacturers, 

intendiug purchasers can see the styles and select their own coverings for Parlor Furniture, and have it made 

to order for the same price. We keep enormous quantities of (Jpholstery Goods in the Bostori Store, 

and full lines of samples. Here our prices on Parlor Suites range from $35.00 in Hair Cloth 

to 1375.00 in Silk or Mohair Plushes. 



CHAMBER FURNITURE. 

We have in stock in our three stores 87 different pat- 
terns of Chamber Suites, manufactured from all the pop- 
ular woods, viz.: Pine, Ash, Walnut, Cherry, Bass wood, 
and Mahogany, ranging in price from -SIS.OO to §400.00. 
We also have all kinds, sizes, and quantities of Bedsteads, 
Bureaus, Commodes, etc. Spring Beds, Cot Beds, Lounge 
Beds, Sofa Beds, Mantel Beds, etc. Mattresses of every 
kind and quality, from an excelsior at $2.00 to a pure 
bleached South American curled horse hair at $25.00. 

CARPET DEPARTMENT. 

$75,000 worth of Cottons, Cotton and Wools, All-Wool 
Extras, Tapestry, Brussels, Body Brussels, Velvets, Wil- 
tons, etc., at our usual Rock-Bottom Prices. Any of these 
can be selected at the Portland store. SHADES and 



DEAPEEY of every description made to order in the 
Boston store. Orders taken here and designs and samples 
shown. 

PARLOR STOVES. 

Special attention is requested to our Parlor Stove De- 
partment, as "we believe we have the best line to select 
from in Maine. Prices $4.00 to $40.00. 

STOVES AND RANGES. 

Our line of Ranges comprises all the latest and best in 
the market, including the " New Tariff " and " Quaker," 
which are considered superior to anything yet produced. 
Write for cuts of these two Ranges. Prices $15.00, $20.00, 
$22.50, $25.00, $27.50, $29.00, $33.00, $35.00, $38.00, and up- 
wards to $05.00. These j)rices include all the ware, pipe, 
and zinc. 



Any of the above goods sold for Cash or on our Special Contract System, at 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Streets, Portland, Me. 

Branch of the Great Nassau Hall House Famishing Store, 827 Washington Street, Boston. 

B. A. ATKINSON & CO. 



ISAAC C. ATKINSON, Manager. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



VANITY FAIR. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE AD.rDSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard " and " Duplex " Burner SUPERLATIVE, 

IN I'LACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETYFOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 
LORING, SHORT. & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENaEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOE 

ROGERS' CELEBRATED GROUPS. 

All the Late Publications in stock. Te.-ct-Books of all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

474 Congress St., - - - opp. Preble House. 

THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

]\[0. 5 0DD KELMW^' BIi0CK, 

Is the place to buy 

S'O.'akS,, Siuihnet§, § cFancf ^-q-oS. 

Telephone Exchange ccnnecteil with the store. 

A. W. TOWNSEND, Prop'r. 



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BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshmau 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Caesar,- Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil,— Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
-Slneid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra, — so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regulae Examinations eoe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Rallowell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryehurg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQUIEED— FOUR HOUES A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOITE HOUES A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XVI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 2, 1886. 



No. 3. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE YEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

C. B. Burleigh, '87, Managing Editor. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, Business Editor. 
C. C. Choate, '87. C. H. Verrill, '87. 

A. W. Merrill, '87. H. C. Hill, '88. 

E. C. Plummer, 87. M. P. Smithwick, '8S 

L. B. Varney, '87. A. W. Tolman, '88. 



Per annum, in advance. 
Single Copies, 



$2.00 
15 cents. 



Exti'a copies can be obtained at the boolistores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Kditor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as tlie signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-OtSce at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 



CONTENTS. 

Vol. XVI., No. 3.— June 2, 1886. 

Editorial Notes, 29 

The Tree-Toad's Last Wail, 35 

Oration 35 

Ivy Poem, 37 

Field Day: 

Boat Race 40 

Athletic Exercises, 41 

Ivy Day: 

Exhiljition Ball Game 42 

Presentation of Prizes, 43 

Ivy Exercises 43 

Senior's Last Chapel, 44 

Ivy Hop 45 

College Progress, 45 

An Etching 46 

Sketch of the Islands Sapelo and Blaclibeard, ... 46 

Longing and Will 48 

Judge Barrows, 48 

Intercollegiate Tennis, 49 

Her Little Sister • 49 

Base-Ball, 49 

Communication, 52 

CoLLEGii Tabula 54 

Personal, 56 




The present issue of the Orient is 
twice the size of any that has ever been pub- 
lished. It is not a double issue, but simply an 
enlargement of the present issue. We trust 
the labor and expense we have been to in 
getting it out will repay our readers for the 
delay that has necessarily been incurred. 



The large amount of matter relative to 
Ivjr and Field Days has crowded out of this 
issue several interesting articles and com- 
munications, from alumni and others, which 
will appear in our next issue. 



In spite of the inclemency of the weather, 
the '87 Ivy Day passed off smoothly, and 
was a decided success. The exercises in 
Memorial Hall were brief and appropriate, 
the music by the Salem Cadet Band excep- 
tionally fine, and the programmes tasty and 
beautiful. The Hop in the evening was 
very well attended, the order of dances was 
well arranged, and an appropriate little sup- 
per was served during the intermission. 
It is with a feeling of sadness that the class 
realize that they have cut the Gordian knot 
that bound another pleasant event to their 



30 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



college course, and tliat the time is drawing 
near for them to go sadlj^ forth from 

" These pines, that mui-mur in low monotone 
The walks frequented by scholastic feet," 

wliich have been the scenes of memories 
and friendships that shall be as enduring as 
life. 



The Colby Echo has increased the num- 
ber of its editorial board to ten, and will be 
issued hereafter as a bi-weekly. The Echo 
is one of our best exchanges, both in matter 
and in typographical appearance, and we 
are glad to note the prosperity which has 
enabled it to make so desirable a change. 
The Echo voices the wish of every editorial 
heart, when it asks for aid in the way of 
"sparkling sketches and delicious verses." 
It has become more and more the office of 
college journalism to depict the humorous, 
and, to a great extent, the sentimental side 
of student life. As we look back over the 
old files of college papers, it is amusing to 
see the pedantic attempts to grapple with 
abstractions, and the straining after pro- 
foundness, gained only at the expense of 
clearness, which characterizes the majority 
of the so-called "solid" articles. 

It should be the aim of college men to 
make their college journal as bright and 
sparkling as the life about them. A little 
shadow will not be out of place, by way of 
contrast, but it should not be made too 
prominent. We are very far from the at- 
tainment of our ideal, here at Bowdoin, but 
■we have found by experience that we can 
approximate most nearly to it, by having 
each board of editors elect their own suc- 
cessors from those who have written for the 
paper during the year. Thus the way is 
open to every student in college, who pos- 
sesses literary abilities, to obtain a position 
on the college paper. The societies will 
urge forward their strongest men to com- 



pete, and all will usually be represented. 
This method of electing editors has done 
more toward stimulating our own students 
to literary work than anything else, and we 
have become quite firmly convinced that it 
is the best method that can be pursued. 



There is nothing to which the average 
student clings more tenaciously, and has 
more pride in perpetuating, than the so- 
called "old college customs." When these 
customs are those which embody, in the 
truest sense of the word, loyalty to college 
and class, and whose observance tends to 
bind the students together more closely in 
love and allegiance to their Alma Mater, the 
solemn obligation devolves upon undergrad- 
uates to maintain them unimpaired, aud to 
hand them down to succeeding classes, as 
time-honored observances which unite the 
sons of Bowdoin, old and young, in the 
binding ties of common memories and a 
common fellowship. Such customs should 
be as the sacred fire in the temple of Vesta, 
whose flames were never permitted to lan- 
guish. But while we should guard with 
jealous care those deserving customs, we 
should never permit the mere fact that any- 
thing is an " old custom," to blind us to any 
evils it may possess, or to command our sup- 
port if it is in itself unworthj- of it. The 
blind fealty, on the part of college students, 
to ancient aud unworthy customs has been 
for years the bane of college social life. It 
was this, and this alone, that for so many 
years upheld the barbarous custom of haz- 
ing, which has now, we are happy to say, 
almost wholly ceased to exist in American 
colleges. It is this same morbid, indiscruni- 
nating custom-worship that opposes itself to 
every new departure that promises to direct 
college life into other and worthier channels. 

We are fortunate at Bowdoin in having 
buried the most objectionable of the "old 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



31 



college customs " beyond all hope of resnr- 
rectiou.. One or two remain, however, not 
so objectionable in themselves as in the im- 
pressions attaching to them, which we be- 
lieve it would be for the interests of the 
■college to abolish. One of these is the "old 
custom " of having " Field-Day cider," the 
prize awarded to the successful class in the 
Field-Day contests. Now every one here in 
college knows that there is nothing more 
harmless than the so-called "Field-Day 
■cider." The temperance sentiment was 
never so strong in the college as it is at the 
present time. To those who have entered 
college during the last two or three years 
from large, preparatory schools, where they 
were accustomed to see more or less drink- 
ing, our remarkable freedom from intem- 
perance has been a matter of surprise. This 
is not the result of arbitrary discipline on 
the part of the college authorities. Indeed, 
•we doubt if any amount of discipline could 
have brought about such a result. It is 
wholly due to the growth of a healthy senti- 
ment on the subject among the students 
themselves. Unfortunately, the general 
public is always more ready to believe evil 
than good reports of a college, and we have 
not received the credit for this freedom from 
intemperance that we merit. Within a year 
a man, well known for his temperance work 
in this State, took occasion in a public ad- 
dress delivered in this town, without ac- 
quainting himself at all with the facts, to 
reflect severely upon the temperance senti- 
ment of the college. We had charity enough 
to ascribe to ignorance what we should 
otherwise have stigmatized as an unmiti- 
gated libel, and a gratuitous insult to every 
person connected with the college. This 
incident, however, will show us the necessity 
not only of maintaining our present freedom 
from intemperance, but also of seeing that 
no impression to the contrary may possibly 
go abroad. For this reason, we would ad- 



vocate the doing away with " Field-Day 
cider," and the substituting in its place of a 
flag, suitably inscribed, as the reward for 
the victorious class. Such flags could be 
placed in our library, and would serve as 
constant reminders of the prowess of former 
classes, and also as an incentive to each 
class for earnest ■work in future Field-Day 
contests. The misleading words " Field- 
Day cider," would no longer figure in the 
newspaper reports of our Field-Day contests, 
and the result, ^ve believe, would be for the 
highest interests of the colleg-e. 



Since writing our editorial on the doing 
away with the Field-Day cider, the directors 
of the Athletic Association have decided to 
adopt this plan, and present the winning 
class with a suitable banner. This is a good 
precedent to establish, and one which, for 
the honor of the college, we hope to see em- 
ulated in future Field Days. 



We publish in this issue a communica- 
tion from a member of the Freshman class, 
in which he asserts that the editorial in our 
last issue, in reference to his class, w^as man- 
ifestly unjust and likely to convey a false 
impression to alumni. Inasmuch as promi- 
nent members of '89 have expressed their 
regret that the editorial in question, al- 
though somewhat vigorous, was nevertheless 
substantially correct, and since it but A'oiced 
the opinion of the three upper classes, we 
fail to see wherein its injustice w^as "mani- 
fest," except to certain members of '89, and 
their class apologists, whom, we submit, 
were not in a position to judge of the mat- 
ter from an unbiased standpoint. Our '89 
friend strikes out boldly into statistics, and 
makes the somewhat startling statement 
that ninety per cent, of the class of '89 are 
members of the Boating Association, and 
ninety-two per cent, are members of the 
Base-Ball Association, and adds, by way of 



32 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



comparison, that of tlie Junior class forty 
per cent, are members of the Boating Asso- 
ciation, and sixty-three per cent, are mem- 
bers of the Base-Ball Association. Here inex- 
perience has led our '89 friend into error. His 
statistics are evidently based upon the mem- 
bership of the various associations, as given 
in the Bugle. These lists are generally 
copied from Bugle to Bugle., with little or no 
change, and are incomplete in the case of 
nearly every class. It is obviously unfair, 
then, to base any statistics upon such lists, 
the only correct basis being the books of 
the different associations. A fairer way 
to draw comparisons between '89 and the 
other classes, would be to take the mem- 
bership of these classes in the various ath- 
letic associations during the Freshman year. 
It remains to be seen whether '89 will have 
as large a representation in these associations 
a few years hence as she has at the present 
time. The question, however, of patriotism, 
does not hinge so much upon the member- 
ship in the athletic associations, as upon the 
actual stand taken in the active athletic life 
of the college. The college had a right to 
expect more from '89 in this direction, than 
from any other class, inasmuch as there has 
been an unusual amount of interest in such 
matters this year, and the class of '89 was 
well fitted, both by its large numbers, and 
the physique of its men, to take an active 
and honorable position. 

Look at this question as we may, the 
stubborn fact remains that '89 was prevented 
from putting on a crew, simply because the 
greater part of her available men — and she 
had a number of them — refused to pull. 

In referring to the objection of the direc- 
tors to having the two '89 men on the 'Var- 
sity pull on their class crew, and comparing 
this with the fact that the stroke of the 
'Varsity pulled on the Junior crew, our '89 
friend is peculiarly misleading, and as it ap- 
pears to us, fallacious. He apparently en- 
tirely overlooks the fact that this man was 



an old oarsman, who had had two years' hard 
work in a class-boat, as well as a season's 
training in a shell, as the substitute of the 
victorious Quinsigamond crew. He also 
forgets to mention the fact that while this 
man did " row " with the Junior crew, he 
did not train with them, another man being 
hired to practice with the class crew, up to 
within a day or two of the race, while he 
continued to row daily with the 'Varsity, 
and was only out with his class crew six 
times before the race. 

We leave it to those acquainted with 
boating to judge whether or not this thing 
would have been possible with Freshmen, 
who had had scarcely any experience in a 
class-boat, who had participated in nothing 
but scrub races, and who, however much 
promise they gave of becoming in time good 
oarsmen, had yet to establish, by hard work 
and experience, their reputation in boating. 
Such a thing would have been unprece- 
dented in the history of boating at Bowdoin. 
The using of 'Varsitj^ oarsmen, who had had 
experience on class crews in former class 
contests had, however, been done in the past, 
and will, we presume, be done in the future. 

Heretofore it has been the custom of 
the college not to send a crew to the inter- 
collegiate contests, unless the members of it 
could be selected from the experienced oars- 
men of the three upper classes. This year 
a departure from this rule was made, and 
the class of '89 was honored by having two 
of her men given positions on the 'Varsity. 
Under the circumstances, the college ex- 
pected that '89 would reciprocate the favor 
by giving to boating an earnest and active 
support. The following table shows the 
position taken by the different classes in 
athletics : 

Class. No. of Men. Given to Ball Team. Given to Boating. 
'86 24 1 6 

'87 30 4 7 

'88 31 2 6 

'89 39 2 2 

These figures are based on the men in these 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



33 



classes who were members of the college in 
the summer term of Freshman year. Tak- 
ing out the four men whom '89 has put into 
athletics, there still remains a class of thirty- 
five, eleven more men than '86 had in the 
whole class ; five more than '87 had ; four 
more than '88 had; these men, too, aver- 
aging full heavier than the men of other 
classes. 

The present season is now nearly past, 
and it is vain to indulge in regrets. We 
only hope that another year will see '89 as- 
sume that position in our athletic life which 
she certainly ought to occupy. 



The last number of the Colby Echo blos- 
soms out into a wail of virtuous (?) indigna- 
tion over the Soule question. It opens with 
the very crushing declaration that "in one 
college at least physical prowess may be 
substituted for intellectual attainments," 
and then proceeds to give vent to its pent-up 
feelings in a re-hash of the stale and erro- 
neous report of the meeting of the Arbitra- 
tion Committee, which the Colbj^ correspond- 
ents have assiduoiisly inflicted upon the 
Maine press. 

Now, friend Echo, to drop all hypocriti- 
cal cavil, and be frank about the matter, 
isn't this rhetorical effort of yours, after all, 
merely the expression of Colby's last de- 
spairing lamentation over a decided case of 
sour grapes ? Isn't it simply a little smoke 
intended to cover two worse cases in your 
own college? You have doubtless never 
heard that Colby was once desirous of this 
same Soule, and that an old and prominent 
member of the Colby nine was authorized 
to correspond with him, and make him lib- 
eral offers in the way of board, tuition, 
room-rent, etc., if he would honor Colby 
University and the Colby nine with his pres- 
ence. Of course you knew nothing of this. 
The pure and elevated tone, the lofty disin- 
terestedness, and the calm, dispassionate 



expression of honest (?) indignation, in 
your editorial, show that you were yet in 
blissful ignorance of any such proceeding, 
and yet, friend Echo, it is a cold, cruel fact. 
These letters are still in the possession of 
Mr. Soule, and if it would relieve your un- 
biased mind of any harrowing doubts, wer 
will gladly publish them in our next issue. 
We can imagine, friend Echo, that we see 
the flush of indignation that mantles your 
honest brow, as you learn this fact. We 
see you, overcome by the strength of your 
emotions, weep copiously, and vigorously 
deplore the fact that there should be, in 
Colby University, a man so low, so despica- 
ble, so eminently lacking in every element 
of honor and decency, as to be guilty of 
such a heinously wicked proceeding. Of 
course this man acted wholly upon his own 
responsibility, without even consulting any 
of the other students, and, if Mr. Soule had 
seen fit to accept his liberal offers, would 
doubtless have paid him out of his own 
personal resources ; and then it is quite com- 
forting to know, that even if Mr. Soule had 
accepted those offers, the dear old Colby 
Faculty would scornfully have refused him 
admission to the college (?). Even if they 
hadn't, and the sinful man who corresponded 
with him evidently believed they would not, 
he would doubtless have entered Colby for 
purposes entirely different from those which 
our Colby friends aver subsequently influ- 
enced him to enter Bowdoin. He would, of 
course, have gone to Colby purely for the 
purpose of study. Once having quaffed at 
that Pierian fount and breathed in the at- 
mosphere of "intellectual attainment," 
which hangs around that institution, a 
miraculous metamorphosis would have been 
effected. " Physical prowess " would have 
availed him nothing. He would have refused 
to sacrifice his studies by going onto the 
nine. The Muses would have smiled on 
him ; his Pegasus would have soared away 



34 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



into vast fields of erudition, and he would, 
in time, after graduating at the head of his 
class, have gone forth into the world and 
taken his place by the side of Benjamin 
Butler, as the second illustrious alumnus of 
Colby University. Trul}-, friend JEcho, we 
do not Avonder that your proud and sensitive 
spirit is bowed down with grief. 

Now, friend Ucho, we wish to correct a 
few of the statements in your review of the 
evidence before the Arbitration Committee, 
and to direct your candid attention to sev- 
eral discrepancies between Colby pretension 
and Colby practice. In the first place, 
where did you derive your authority for the 
statements contained in your editorial? 
Nearly all of them are misleading, and sev- 
eral of them are false. They were, doubt- 
less, prepared by a Colby man for Colby 
purposes. In common with the usages at 
most New England colleges, it is the custom 
at Bowdoin to admit students, who are 
shown to be qualified, to special courses of 
studj'. Soule applied for admission to the 
college through an old and personal friend. 
Undoubted evidence of his qualifications 
was presented, and the faculty could do 
nothing else than admit him. His name is 
on the roll-call of both of his classes, and 
is called, with the other names, at each reci- 
tation. He came to college two weeks be- 
fore the close of the winter term, and nearly 
a month before the snow left the ground. 
The resolutions drawn up by the Arbitration 
Committee signify little except that two of 
the three members of that committee were 
old Colby men. 

Now, friend UcJio, let us turn your atten- 
tion for a moment from the case of Soule 
to more serious affairs nearer home. We 
are informed by Colby men themselves that 
one year ago AVill Goodwin and Matthews 
left college. Now when the last term in the 
year is nearly done, and a good part of the 
intercollegiate games have been played, both 



of these men tui'n up on the Colby nine- 
Matthews came back to college two days be- 
fore the game with the Maine State College, 
and during that time was present at tivo rec- 
itations, but did not recite in either. Good- 
win re-entered college, after a year's absence,, 
on the very afternoon of the game with 
Bates. In fact, he had little more than time, 
in response to a communication, to get into 
Waterville and don his uniform, before the 
game was called. And it is a somewhat 
amusing circumstance, which comes to us on 
good authority, that his old friends felt con- 
strained to repress all signs of welcome, in 
order that the attention of the Bates men 
might not be directed to his recent arrival,, 
and a protest entered against his playing. 
Doubtless both of these men were called 
back to college by an irresistable desire to 
study/ It appears, however, that it was- 
necessary to stimulate Goodwin's studious 
longings by way of communications. Of 
course neither of these men could have been 
influenced by any such base- motive as the- 
desire to play ball! Oh no! Soule might 
be guilty of such a thing, but they never I 
We have no desire to dwell longer upon 
this matter, nor to draw into this part of 
our discussion facts of a personal character,, 
which might put our case in even a stronger 
light. We have, however, no desire to de- 
scend into the mw-e in our editorial contro- 
versy, although we believe it is the duty of 
every college journal to uphold its own side 
in a vigorous and forcible manner. No can- 
did man can for a moment doubt that these 
men returned to college to play ball, nor 
will there be much doubt in. the minds of 
disinterested people that they receive remu- 
neration for their services. A recapitulation 
of this whole subject brings into prominence 
the following facts : The Colbys made lib- 
eral offers to Soule before he went to college. 
Failing to secure him, they assumed the role 
of the ancient Pharisee, and thanked Heaven 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



35 



they were not as sinful as the Bowdoins 
were. Under cover of all this smoke, they 
obtained two additional players for their 
nine, neither of whom came into college 
until the eighth or ninth week of the sum- 
mer term. 

The faculty of Colby University must 
have allowed these students to enter at the 
eleventh hour of the summer term, after a 
year's absence from the college, in the full 
understanding that they were there for the 
express purpose of playing ball. They must 
have allowed them either to take special 
studies, or to make up in three or four weeks 
a whole year's work — a proceeding that 
would scarcely be in keeping with Colbys 
pretensions to " intellectual attainments." 

The action of Colby in this whole matter 
has simply impressed more deeply upon our 
minds than ever, the fact, 

"That for ways that are dark 
And for tricks that are vain," 
Our Waterville friends are " peculiar." 



THE TREE-TOAD'S LAST WAIL. 

A tree-toad on a summer's night, 
Long ere the moon had risen. 

Lay groaning in a hollow tree, 
At once his tomb and prison. 

TSo female toads around his couch 
His suiferings did condone, 

He knew, alas, that he must die, 
And die, alas, alone. 

A Freshman, roaming through the woods, 

Sat down beside that tree, 
The tree-toad ceased his dying wail 

And rose up merrily. 

For greener things than I, he said, 
This wide world wander o'er. 

Then why should I desire to die, 
I'll live forevermore. 



In round numbers it costs Yale $7,000 
for boating, •'3<5,000 for base-ball, and $2,000 
for foot-ball. — Ex. 



ORATION— THE CLAIMS OF A COL- 
LEGE UPON ITS GRADUATES. 

By L. B. Varney. 

Our Puritan forefathers, on coming to 
these untrodden shores, from a country 
where religious liberty was set at naught, 
genius and scholarship no longer receiving 
the stimulus and support which it had hith- 
erto received, and seeking a place where 
they might worship God according to the 
dictates of their heart, naturally foresaw 
that the inevitable course for them to pur- 
sue, in order that they might enjoy civil, 
social, and religious liberty, and transmit 
these blessings to future generations, was 
through the mental and moral culture of the 
youth. Scarcety had that j)ioneer band es- 
tablished themselves in the wilds of an un- 
known continent, scarcely had they suc- 
ceeded in warding off the attacks of wild 
beasts and hostile savages, ere they pro- 
ceeded from their scanty means to lay the 
foundation, not merely of an elementary 
school for temporary needs, but of a per- 
manent, well-established college. 

It was two hundred and fifty years ago, 
since that college was founded, but the 
seed thus sowu took firm root, and brought 
forth a bountiful harvest. From that insti- 
tution others have sprung, until to-day 
their numbers are reckoned by hundreds, 
and their influence is felt throughout the 
length and breadth of this land. They 
have grown with our growth, and strength- 
ened with our strength. Their history is 
our history, and upon their future depends 
ours. In view of this fact let us briefly look 
to the claims that a college has upon its 
graduates. 

These institutions of learning have for 
their object the development and cultivation, 
to the highest degree possible, of the intel- 
lectual powers of the country, to form our 
j^oung men to a just and respectable citizen- 
ship, so they can creditably perform the du- 



36 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ties incumbent upon them as citizens of this 
Republic, and to so influence and direct 
the minds of the youth as to guide them to 
a higher and nobler life. To carry out 
these objects and make college life as attract- 
ive as possible, buildings have been erected ; 
libraries and museums established ; beautiful 
and ample grounds laid out ; funds be- 
queathed, and, above all, a corps of able and 
experienced instructors engaged, whose duty 
it is to infuse into the minds and hearts of 
the students the principles of knowledge and 
virtue. Everything that pertains to the 
elevation and advancement of man himself 
is there offered. 

To these classic retreats the young men 
come from their respective homes, with va- 
rious individual peculiarities, those arising 
from local associations, as well as the result 
of their own individual idiosyncrasies. But 
in the friction of college life these peculiar 
traits of character, are, to a marked degree, 
worn away, and the youth themselves, after 
four years of hard, conscientious work, after 
having the privilege of drinking at these 
living fountains, the society and fellowship 
of kindred students, the silent, yet all-pow- 
erful influence of its shady groves, its grand 
buildings, and beautiful lawns, go forth 
changed into new men. With their percep- 
tive faculty broadened and deepened, their 
minds disciplined, their powers of practical 
business increased, and their self-estimation 
rectified, they go forth fully equipped to 
play their part in the great drama of life. 
The education there received makes human 
weakness more than a match for adverse 
circumstances. The liberal studies and 
literary associations of their college course 
have, to a great measure, shaped their 
ends in life, and will shed an abiding in- 
fluence over the most unclassical of their 
pursuits. Here the genius of the past and 
the spirit of the present combine and lead 
the student in the paths of knowledge and 



wisdom. Society realizes the worth of the 
enlarged, well-trained intellect of the scholar 
and welcomes it to a place in her midst. 

For these varied and marked improve- 
ments has, then, the college no claim upon its 
graduates ? Rather might we ask, has the 
parent no claim upon its child ? For what 
else are the students than a band of brothers 
gathered together for mutual action, mutual 
desires, and mutual good? And as the par- 
ent looks to and rightfully expects the child 
to be an honor and blessing to the family, 
so the college has a right to demand that its 
graduates should be good and true men — 
men who are able and qualified to march 
abreast with the advanced thinkers of the 
day, men who are imbued with the spirit of 
energy and progress tempered by wisdom, 
men who shall go forth with heart, soul, and 
every power that God has given them lov- 
ingly and firmly dedicated to the cause of 
truth. As the descendant of a long line of 
illustrious or noble ancestors feels the weight 
of conscious responsibility for others as well 
as himself, so the college graduate should be 
admonished by the renown of his great asso- 
ciation, to live worthily of the select com- 
pany to which he belongs. Let him remem- 
ber that he is not merely a member of that 
fraternity, that he wears its badge and bears 
its seal, but that it lays obligations upon 
him, obligations of duty which he can not 
shake off. 

When the chartered rights of Dartmouth 
College were questioned, and it seemed likely 
that that institution, as well as all others, 
must fall, then her faithful son came for- 
ward, and for no other cause than pure love 
for his Ahia Mater, defended her rights in 
one of his grandest, if not greatest, of fo- 
rensic efforts, before the highest tribunal in 
the country. For the benefits derived from 
the relations in which he once stood to that 
institution, it was his duty to give to her cause 
his influence and power, and grandly did he 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 



37 



do it. That speech, more than all others, 
showed the true spirit and character of the 
man. 

Our country calls loudly, and the college 
demands of those who have had the position 
to enjoy the advantages offered by her for 
education, to prove true to the high trust 
that has been committed to them, to exert 
their influence in advancing the well-being 
of society, and communicate freely of those 
treasures which they possess, — treasures 
which they cannot bequeath to their friends, 
or leave to be inherited by their children, 
but must be used, if used at all, while life is 
given them. Let those who have it within 
their means contribute fully of their worldly 
possessions, for in no better way can they 
repay the obligations resting upon them than 
in founding a scholarship, which, devoted to 
such noble ends, and consecrated to the 
memory of a departed friend, leads others to 
enshrine in grateful recollection, the name 
so dear to the donor's heart. It is a better 
monument than chiseled marble, for while 
it honors the dea'l, it benefits the living, and 
extends its benefits to all time. It may not 
lay in the power of all graduates to render 
such assistance as this, but all can be good 
and true men, who shall be an honor to 
their country, an honor to their college, an 
honor to their Maker. 

Classmates, according to a most beauti- 
ful and ennobling custom, we have gathered 
here to-day, apart from the routine duties of 
college life, to plant our Ivy vine, and in so 
doing, to strengthen not only the bonds which 
hold us together, but also those nearer and 
dearer ties which bind us to our Alma Mater. 
Short, indeed, will be the time before we must 
gather up the scanty leaves of our youthful 
love, gird on the manly gown, and go forth 
to take our ^^art in the duties of active life. 
And when we shall have betaken ourselves 
from these secluded retreats, these hallowed 
influences, these early associations of our 



youth, let us, feeling deeply the obligations 
we owe to this institution, labor conscien- 
tiously and zealously for those results which 
shall better the interests of these institu- 
tions, and raise the standard of civilization. 
Let no factitious popularity, no damning 
fame, which listens but to the shouts of the 
rabble crowd, no eager and thirsty desire for 
gain, claim those powers which have been 
fostered and nourished in these halls, but 
rather an honored name, a lasting influence, a 
life that shall increase in splendor and use- 
fulness as the stars of evening, which grow 
brighter and brighter unto the breaking 
dawn. 

" And when, like her elder children, 

We are scattered far and wide. 
In our hearts and thoughts and feelings 

We'll be ever by her side." 



IVY POEM. 

By E. C. Plummer. 
Once as I thoughtlessly glanced through a case of 

age-begrimmed volumes. 
Lifted each out of its place and carelessly noted the 

title. 
Listlessly turning the leaves and marking at the 

quaint faded letters, 
Seeing the words yet heeding them not while lost in 

reflection ; 
Chanced I to open a book of strange mediseval tra- 
ditions. 
Wild, unpolished, and strong, the earliest born of our 

language. 
Caught by a passing phrase mine eye grew fixed on 

the pages, 
Pleased with the curious tone, the simple and archaic 

language. 
Till, when I placed the book again with its dusty 

companions, 
Still re-echoed to me were the words of the youth 

and the hermit. 

I. 

When England knew a foreign king. 
And bowed beneath the Norman rod, 
A wild, untamed, but helpless thing, 
And blinded to the ways it trod ; 
There dwelt beyond the banks of Trent 



38 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A hermit known and loved of all 


Until I saw my days unfurled 


As one whose heart and hand were lent 


And heard tlieir tumult as a song ; 


In sympath}' to great and small. 


While just above the shining field. 


II. 

One day there rested at his door 
A youth of fair and noble mien, 


Where circling Hope beat high and warm. 


I saw the laurel wreath revealed 
For him who never lowered his arm. 


Whose thoughtful face an impress wore 


VIII. 


Of burning zeal and passions keen ; 


Few years have passed me since those days, 


But now those eyes were damp with tears, 


But they have been an Autumn storm 


That heart was wrung with cruel pain. 


That sweeps the forest where it lays 


And e'en those lips that scorned at fears 


In tangled wreck the great oaks form ! 


Shook like the flowers beneath the rain. 


I have awakened, and I see 


in. 


A stranger in my father's hall. 


As o'er him bowed the aged man, 
And kindly sought such cause of woe 


My people turn their hearts from me, 
And heed no more their master's call. 


That turned his spirit and began 


IX. 


The steep and awful fall below, 
The pent-up grief a moment shook, 
The storm within an instant broke. 
Then calmed before that friendly look. 
And bitterly the young nian spoke. 


Then can I say that it is well 
When stricken Nature cries aloud ? 
I do not know ! I can not tell ! 
My eyes are blinded by the cloud ! 
I only see my cherished hopes 


IV. 


Strewn to the tempest far and wide. 


My life is but a Winter's day ! 


My faith in loving Wisdom droops. 


At first I saw the morning sky 


My soul has been too sternly tried ! 


Flame brightly with the rising ray 




And from the earth the shadows fly ; 


Soft was the old man's look as he gazed on the bowed 


But quickly fled the sun away. 


head beside him, 


The sky assumed its leaden pall. 


Touched was his heart with grief at the woes that 


The earth put on a sombre gray. 


had so overwhelmed him ; 


And then the snow began to fall ! 


But when the passionate words had died on the lips 


V. 


of the young man, 


Since first my days began to run 
The reasoning cycles, and I saw 


Bright was his eye and strong were his tones as the 
hermit made answer. 


The noble deeds that men had done 


I. 


Made part with one Eternal Law, 


Child ! when the eaglet leaves its nest 


My soul shot forward toward the years 


And spreads its pinions to the sky 


And hailed them gladly from afar. 


It plunges not at once on high 


My eyes grew bright with joyous tears 


But lingers round its native crest. 


And saw existence as a star. 


II. 


VI. 


Its flight is but from stone to stone. 


My heart was filled with waking dreams— 


Below it proves its youthful might. 


Those bright-eyed children of the mind 


Until, grown strong in shorter flight, 


That play about life's early streams 


It soars about the sun alone.- 


And weave those fancies undefined ; 




I loved their prattle as they told 


III. 


Of wondrous countries far below 


Would man but read aright the book 


Through which the stream a river rolled 


That Nature thus to him displays 


Where naught could check its massive flow. 


His life should know less darkened days, 


VTI. 


And less the sorrows he should brook. 


I heard them whisper of the world. 


IV. 


The great contentious careless throng. 


But youth is eager, full of fire. 



I 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



39 



Nor knows that Time his wing must lend 


XIV. 


Before he may those mounts ascend 


The man himself is all in all. 


To which his burning hopes aspire. 


And chance is but an empty word ; 




A cry of little natures, heard 


He boldly tries the steepest height ; 


When weaklings miss their steps and fall. 


But scarcely is the way begun 


XV. 


When darkness warns that day is done 


'Tis hard to read our lives aright. 


And brings tlie terrors of the night. 


But strongest minds have held it plain 


VI. 


That all when rightly seen is gain. 


Then many turn their steps below 


Though much may seem the child of Night. 


And leave the cheerless search behind, 


XVI. 


While those of more unyielding mind 


Then yield not e'er the strife is done ! 


Press blindly toward the trackless snow. 


Perchance this thing of cruel face 


VII. 


Hath only stript thee for the race 


Few reach the summit ; many fall 


That thou mayst yet more freely run. 


Amidst the dark and faithless rocks, 


XVII. 


And broken seek familiar walks 


Then shake the doubts from out thy mind ! 


To heed no more ambitions' call. 


Man's heart is for Despair no home ! 


VIII. 


And boldly face the days that come 


This makes the lives deformed by pain ! 


Unmindful of the ones behind. 


This makes the many darkened skies ! 


XVIII. 


This makes the many that should rise 


Then youthful hopes shall come again 


Ne'er leave the old familiar plain ! 


To cheer thy heart with chastened joy, 


IX. 


And with their warmth the chills destroy 


The river bursts not from the mount 


That come as hours of twilight wane. 


A rolling mass to shake the hills, 




But grows by tributes from the rills 


I. 


That leave a slight sequestered fount. 


We stand upon an upland fair 


X. 


With prospect full and clear; 


And thus the life that smoothest ran 
Through light and shadow never found 
The prize it sought at one strong bound, 


The Morning's breath is on the ai , 
The bright dew glistens everywhere. 
The opening flowers are here ! 


But only through a lengthened jslan. 


II. 


XI. 


The home where early life passed o'er 


The hopes that make our youth so bright. 


Is still within our call ; 


Though wild and boundless, still presage 


Familiar forms are at the door. 


What may be in maturer age. 


They send us cheery words once more. 


Will we but seek it as our right. 


They watch us lest we fall. 


XII. 

But disapijointments pave the way, 


III. 
We look before, and through the trees 


While sleepless toil the treasure guards, 


We catch a fitful glance 


And only shows the secret wards 


Of waters rippling in the breeze. 


To those who force him to obey. 


And sunbeams glancing round to seize 


XIII. 


The shadows as they dance. 


Think not because the chance of war 


IV. 


Hath taken all that seemed thine own 


The view enchants us and we haste 


That thou art evermore undone. 


To reach that hidden shore ; 


But rise supreme to Foi-tune's law. 


To cross the river, and to taste 



40 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Those sweets the Future's hand has placed 
For us, from out her store. 



But each must pass that stream alone, 

Nor trust another's aid ; 
Those mystic waters are unknown, 
No hand can point the stepping-stone. 

By each the road is made. 

VI. 

And some will cross that river wide 

Where pebbles gem the way, 
Will see the dimpling waters glide 
Across their path a cooling tide 
Of ripples lost in play. 

VII. 

But some will find their courses stray 

'Mid rapids wild and strong. 
Where tumbling waters hide the way 
And blind the straining eyes with spray 
That madly drives along. 

VIII. 

Then as we pause upon this slope 

Uncertain where we go, 
Our hearts alive with burning hope 
And untried spirits strong to cope 

With what may chance below ; 

IX. 

Let each prepare his mind to face 

The rudest water's shocks, 
To press with strong determined pace 
On toward the distant resting place 
Scarce seen beyond the rocks. 

X. 

Then none shall fall before the stream 

But on that farther shore. 
While still the rays of daylight gleam 
Across the plain with softened beam. 

We'll stand a class once more. 



Ex-President Mark Hopkins is now in his 
eighty-fifth year, with mental and physical 
force apparent!}^ unabated; and whether sit- 
ting for his portrait in the studio of a 
painter, or lecturing before a popular audi- 
ence on "Love as a Law," or entertaining 
the alumni of Williams College — as he did a 
few years ago at Philadelphia — with the ex- 
cellent record of that seat of learning, he 
seems like a man in his prime. — Ex. 



FIELD DAY. 

BOAT RACE. 

Wednesday, May 26th, Bowdoin's Field 
Day dawned rather unauspiciously for the- 
athletic exercises. A heavy rain had fallen 
all the day before, and though it had cleared 
away the air was raw and a strong wind pre- 
vailed. The annual class boat race had 
been advertised to occur at nine o'clock, and 
at that hour the bank below the boat-house 
and the railroad bridge were crowded with 
an animated throng of spectators. Among- 
those apparently the most interested were the 
President, many of the faculty, and a large 
number of alumni. The two classes to be 
represented upon the river were '87 and '88. 
Wind, tide, and current were unfavorable 
for fast time, but a close race was antici- 
pated. '88 had the benefit of long and pa- 
tient training, while '87 had the heavier 
crew, though she had been but three weeks 
upon the water, and had rowed with her 
stroke only half a dozen times before the 
race. Below are the names,' weights, and 
heights of the two crews : 



Merrill, bow, 
Plummer, No. 2, 
Moulton, No. 3, 
Varney, stroke. 
Lane, coxswain, 



JUNIOR CREW. 

Weight. 
148 pounds, 
154 pounds, 
193 pounds, 
175 pounds, 
130 pounds. 

SOPHOMORE CREW. 
Weight. . 
160 pounds, 

2, 141 pounds, 
160 pounds, 
163 pounds, 
120 pounds. 



Height. 
5 feet 9 inches. 
5 feet 84 inches. 

5 feet 11 inches. 

6 feet 10 inches. 



Height. 

5 feet 6 inches. 

5 feet 7 inches. 

5 feet 7 inches. 

5 feet 11 Inches. 



Cole, bow, 
Smithwick, No. 2, 
Meserve, No. 8, 
Woodman, stroke. 
Black, coxswain, 

The race was over the Androscoggin 
course of three miles, around Cow Island, 
starting and finishing at the railroad bridge. 
A little after nine o'clock, the Junior crew 
appeared in their neat boating suits — 
cherry-red tights and white, sleeveless shirts, 
with '87 worked in their class color across 
the breasts. They took a short spin up the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



41 



xiver, turned and glided down to their float 
on the Topsham side. The Sophomore crew 
followed immediately, looking trim and 
«ordy in their neat suits — blue pants and 
white sleeveless shirts, with '88, in their 
class color, worked upon the breasts, and 
rowed at once to their float on the Bruns- 
wick side. 

The word " go " was given at 9.15. The 
Junior crew took the water first at a 44 
stroke, gaining a half boat-length in the first 
quarter of a mile. At the end of half a mile 
they had gained nearly a length. The 
Sophomore crew took the water with a little 
slower, but more even stroke, increasing it 
until they were pulling nearly a 46. At the 
•end of half a mile '87 settled down to 
steady work, and '88, by a strong spurt, de- 
creased the lead to about ten feet. Just at 
this exciting point a foul seemed imminent. 
In the excitement the starboard of '88 
caught a " crab," '87's coxswain called for 
.a spurt, and before '88 settled down to 
work again, had put a boat-length of clear 
water between the boats. At the foot of 
the island '87's boat led by a length-and-a- 
half of clear water. At the end of two 
miles '87 was pulling 40 strokes, '88, 42 ; at 
the end of two and a third miles '87 was 
pulling 42 and '88, 44; at the end of two 
and three-fourths miles both crews were 
pulling 42. When near the finish the 
Juniors commenced their home spurt, going 
under the bridge in 20 minutes and 6 sec- 
onds, at a 46 stroke, winning by six lengths. 
'88's crew was most unfortunate in catching 
3. " crab " as they did, which forced them to 
pull a stern race almost from the start, and 
could have had no other effect than to dis- 
courage them. But they pulled well and 
pluckily. '88's stroke pulled a strong and 
steady oar from beginning to end. 

'Eighty-seven is much indebted for the 
race to her old and experienced coxswain, 
who steered a perfect course. The race 



showed, too, that the '.Varsity has a stroke 
of which any college might well be proud. 
The referee was Prof. Robinson ; time- 
keeper, Prof. Lee ; starter for the Juniors, 
Austin Gary, for the Sophomores, George 
Gary ; judges on the island, Boutelle, '87, 
and Goding, '88. This gives to '87 the an- 
nual class race for the second time, and for 
another year the cup in the library will be 
ornamented with the scarlet and cream. 

ATHLETIC EXERCISES. 

The annual exercises of the Athletic As- 
sociation took place at the Topsham Fair 
Grounds, May 26th, beginning at 2 p.m., 
and occupying about three hours. There 
was a strong wind blowing, and the air was 
very sharp, thus making it disagreeable for 
contestants and spectators, and bad for 
record making ; but, in spite of these draw- 
backs, a very creditable showing was made, 
and Field Day was a decided success. Fol- 
lowing is a summary of the different con- 
tests : 

1. Throwing base-ball. Winner, Wilson, '89, 
349 feet. Second, Talbot, '87, 347J feet. Owing to 
the strong wind in favor of the throwers, the judges 
decided not to count this as the college record, al- 
though the best previous throw here was 332 feet 
3 inches. 

2. 100-yards dash. This contest was won 
easily by Dearth, '87, in 104 seconds, the time made 
by him last year, when the record was broken. 
Merrill, '87, was second. 

3. Throwing hammer. Won by Pushor, '87, 
record, 57 feet 4 inches ; second, Boutelle, '87. 

4. Standing high jump. Won by Norris '86, 
record, 4 feet 3 inches ; second, Burpee, '87. 

5. Hop, skip, and jump. Winner, Woodman, 
'88, record, 36 feet; Gahan, '87, second. 

6. Mile run. This contest was won again by 
Talbot, '87, in the very creditable time, all things 
considered, of 6 minutes, 11 seconds the best time 
ever made here except Talbot's of last year. H. 
Merrill, '89, was an easy second, followed by two 
other starters, E. A. Merrill, '89, and Shorey, '88. 

7. Standing broad jump. Winner, Burpee, 87; 
Gahan, '87, second; record, 9 feet 3i inches. 



42 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



8. Half-mile walk. Won by Bodge, '89, in 3 
minutes 27i seconds; second. Cole, '88. 

9. Running high jump. Winner, Norris, '86 ; 
second, Burpee, '87 ; record, 4 feet 7i inches. 

10. 220-yards dash. Won by Dearth, '87; sec- 
ond, Merrill, '87 ; time, 25 seconds. 

11. Three-legged race. In this race Dearth and 
Gahan, '87, with Cole and Woodman, '88, were the 
only pairs contesting, in spite of many entries. 
Cole and Woodman won in 15J seconds, as Gahan 
fell and broke his bandage when near the wire and 
leading the race. 

12. Pole vault. It is the first time that this 
pretty contest has been tried here, and everybody 
was much taken with it. Prentiss, '89, won easily, 
going cleanly over a string 8 feet from the ground. 
Cole, '88, was second. This contest bids fair to be a 
most interesting feature of future Field Days. 

13. Running broad jump. Won by Gahan, '87, 
■with a record of 16 feet 6A inches. Cole, '88, second. 

14. Hurdle race. Several men started in this 
race in which there were five 8-foot hurdles to be 
jumped, but Dearth, '87, easily won in 131 seconds, 
thus beating the college record by a quarter of a 
second. He was followed by Gahan, '87, and Wood- 
man, '88. 

15. Running kick. This contest was won by 
Norris, '86, at 7 feet 9 inches. Gahan second, and 
Dearth third. 

16. One-fourth mile consolation race. This race 
had four starters and was well contested. H. Mer- 
rill, '89, won in 68 seconds, followed by Merrill, '87. 

17. Tug of war. '87 and '89 were the only 
classes who got their eight men together and pulled 
regularly, but a strong tendency was noticed on the 
part of the bloody Sophs, to curry favor with the 
Freshmen by pulling on their end of the line. After 
two tries and much wrangling the judges awarded 
the pull to the Freshmen. 

Besides the afternoon exercises at the 
Fair Grounds, a tub race and swimming 
match came off at the boat-house immedi- 
ately after the boat race Wednesday morn- 
ing. There were three starters in the swim- 
ming race, Burleigh, '87, Kimball, '87, and 
Lynam, '88. Burleigh won the race with 
Lynam second. 

As the tubs provided were too small, of 
the six starters in the tub race only one 
crossed the line in his tub. This was Cole, 
'88, who was given the race. 



The best individual record was made by- 
Cole, '88, with 15 points. '87 made the best 
class record, and is to receive an appropriate 
banner. Besides the regular prizes for the 
different contests, a medal was given for the 
individual record, and one was also given to 
Dearth for breaking the record in the hurdle 
race. We shall welcome the time when 
medals shall be given in place of prizes in alt 
our athletic contests. 

The officers of the day were as follows : 
Master of ceremonies, Pushor, '87 ; referee,. 
Prof. Lee ; judges, Mr. C. C. Torrey, Mr. W. 
A. Moody ; time-keepers, Mr. C. C. Hutch- 
ins, H. M. Moulton, '87 ; directors, Gary, '87,, 
M. P. Smithwick, '88, Watts, '89. The 
cheerfulness with which the faculty consent 
to undertake the thankless tasks of Field- 
Day officers, deserves the appreciation of the 
students, and it is one of the things for 
which we should be thankful, that the Bow- 
doin faculty is not composed of such fossils 
as some of our sister institutions can boast 
of, but men who take a lively and intelligent 
interest in athletics, as in every other subject 
that interests and benefits us. 



IVY DAY. 

EXHIBITION BALL GAME. 

Ivy Day, May 27th, was one of peculiar 
interest. In the forenoon there was an exhibi- 
tion game between Bates and the home team,^ 
which was very largely attended. Both nines 
played well, and the game was one of the 
most interesting witnessed thus far. The 
Bates team was strengthened by three play- 
ers, the battery, and second baseman. Wil- 
son and Moulton formed the Bowdoin bat- 
tery for the first time this season. Wilson 
pitched very effectively, striking out seven- 
teen men, and was well supported. Our boys 
hit Kearns without much difficulty, Pushor 
making a two baser and Wilson a home run- 
Following is the score : 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



43 



BOWDOIN. 

A.B. R. E.H. T.E. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, c-. f., 5 2 3 3 1 

:Moulton, c, 4 1 13 6 1 

Pushor, lb., 4 2 2 3 8 1 1 

AVilson, p., i 1 1 4 20 

Soule, 3b., 4 2 2 1 

Talbot, 1. f., 4 

.Larrabee, r. f 4 3 3 

Freeman, 2b 4 1 1 2 

■Cary, s. s., 3 1 1 2 

36 6 11 15 27 29 7 

BATES. 

A.B. E. E.H. T.E. P.O. A. E. 

Sandford, lb., .... 3 2 14 2 

Wilbur, 2b., 3 1 1 1 4 2 1 

Underwood, c. f 4 1 1 2 

Kearns, p 4 5 1 

Minnehan, c, .... 4 1 2 

Woodman, s. s., ... 4 1 1 1 5 

Tinker, r. f., 4 1 1 

Flanders, 1. f., .... 4 1 1 1 

Jjfickerson, 3b. 4 

34 3 4 4 24 16 4 

Struck out — Wilson 17, Kearns 1. Wild pitches — Wil- 
son 3, Kearns 2. Passed balls— Moulton 1, Minnehan 3. 
Two-base hit — Pushor. Home nm — Wilson. Earned 
Tuns — Bowdoin 1. Double plays— Tinker and Wilbur. 
Left on bases— Bowdoin 6, Bates 4. Umpire— Murphy, 
Bowdoin Medical School. 

PRESENTATION OF PRIZES. 

At 1.30 o'clock the students and their 
friends assembled in the chapel to witness 
the presentation of prizes to the successful 
oontestants in the sports of the previous 
day. President H3^de presided, and after a 
few appropriate words, in which he compared 
the contests with the ancient Greek and 
Roman sports, saying that if they had not 
struggled in Olympic dust, they had, at least, 
covered themselves with Sagadahoc mud, he 
awarded the prizes to the victors. 

During the presentations, the Junior 
-crew marched in, headed by the coxswain, 
carrying an oar decorated with their class 
-colors, and received the cups, the annual 
prizes for the winners in the spring race. 

IVY EXERCISES. 

At three o'clock, the Junior class 
inarched up the aisle of Memorial, headed 
by their marshal, Mr. C. M. Austin, and took 
their places in the seats in the rear of the 
stage. The Salem Cadet Band furnished 
music for the occasion. The hall was filled 



with a brilliant throng of friends to witness 
the exercises of the day. President Hyde 
opened the exercises with prayer. The fol- 
lowing programme was then observed : 

MUSIC. 

Oration. L. B. Varney. 

MUSIC. 

Poem. E. C. Plummer. 

MUSIC 

The oration and poem will be found in 
another place, and will speak for themselves. 
The closing remarks of both orator and 
poet, in addressing the class, were peculiarly 
beautiful and appropriate. But further 
comment from us would be inadequate and 
unnecessary. Suffice it to say that both ef- 
forts are well worthy of careful perusal. 

After the completion of these exercises, 
the class, headed by its marshal, marched 
out and over to the north corner of the 
chapel, where the Ivy was to be planted and 
the honors awarded. After all had assem- 
bled here, the President of the class, Mr. J. 
V. Lane, addressed a few appropriate re- 
marks, alluding to the occasion and briefly 
reviewing the college life of the class. 
There is space only for a few of his remarks. 
He said : 

"Classmates, — As we come together here, in ac- 
cordance with custom, and look back on the pleas- 
ant hours passed at Old Bowdoin, it may be difficult 
and almost unpleasant to think of them as gone. 
But as there are no spectres of [ignoble ' might have 
beens' to haunt us, we will, true to our class max- 
im, look upon this hour as one of the many in which 
our purposes shall be ready for the ' must bes ' await- 
ing us. The time looked forward to is now ours to 
enjoy, and enjoy, except through memory, but once 
in our lives. 

"We entered college in the Freshman class, 
strange as it may now seem to us. We didn't, how- 
ever, come to a full realization of our position until 
we had received a few skillful applications of that 
famous pruning knife, fresh from the grindstone of 
old Loomis. With one sentiment would we voice 
our gratitude to the former professor of geometry 
for the numerous and timely ' squelches ' received at 
his hands. Time went on, and we, not knowing the 
ropes, plugged on. The 22d of February, 1884, ar- 



44 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



rived. It was a beautiful morning. We stood out 
in the clear, cool, morning air. Awaiting us was 
the stifling recitation room. All the circumstances 
were favorable to patriotic feelings. At this mo. 
ment of ' 'twixt and 'tween ' some enthusiastic mem- 
ber cried out, ' Who was George Wasliington ? ' 
The spell was broken and the day saved, which ever 
after was to be a conceded holiday in memory of him 
who was ' first in war, first in peace, and first in the 
hearts of his countrymen.' 

"Probably all present know what is expected of 
Sophomores. Indeed, a natural desire to gratify just 
such expectations has caused many an episode in tlie 
hazy past. Laugh as we may, so long as these ex- 
pectations are not in a measure removed, to be a 
true-blue Sophomore, requires a something, call it 
prejudice, rashness, or what you will. Yet expe- 
rience has taught that this something must be had, if 
class unity is what it should be ; and we do believe 
that class pride and spirit are the foster parents of 
the enthusiastic alumnus ; that zeal for college 
should take precedence to zeal for class, though the 
former derives its birth in the latter. On such con- 
victions has the well-known unanimity of our class 
rested securely thus far. It outlived the storms of 
two years, and on entering the calm of the mythical 
Junior ease did not go down with the tempest. This 
enthusiastic unison derived its origin in Freshman 
contests, grew with our growth, nerved us to the 
maintenance of the good name of the class, and en- 
couraged even personal sacrifice in so doing. We 
have already learned to love Old Bowdoin, with her 
advanced ideas of government, her kind instructors, 
and her honored name. Secondly, in order of duty, 
but not of degree, we love the class name of '87. It 
reminds us of struggles and their attendatit victories ; 
of friendships made, never to be broken ; and of a 
loyalty to manliness awakened here, never to be 
lulled to sleep hereafter." 

At the close of the President's remarks a 

shower compelled an adjournment back to 

Memorial. There was a rapid scamper 

across the campus by the students, while the 

spectators returned more sedately. All 

were soon gathered again in Memorial, and 

when order was restored the honors of the 

class were presented as follows : 

Lazy Man, Casket. C. C. Choate. 

Best Moustache, Miniature Razor. H. B. Austin. 

Ladies' Man, " Pomme D'Ambre." A. Gary. 

Grank, Crank. M. L. Ivimball. 

Hercules, Bludgeon. A. W. Perkins. 

Popular Man, Wooden Spoon. C. B. Burleigh. 



We should be glad to record a few of the 
many happy hits and felicitous phrases, but 
space forbids. But we are sure that they 
will hold their place among the many pleas- 
ant memories of the day. After the pres- 
entation of honors the class again adjourned 
to the chapel, where the Ivy was planted, 
and the trowel delivered to the curator of 
the class, Mr. W. L. Gahan. The exercises 
closed with singing the following beautiful 



BY S. B. FOWLER : 

Our Ivy is planted here, 

A vine for the love of all ; 
May it grow with the ceaseless year. 

Till it covers this granite wall ; 
And out from its strongest part 

May many a tendril run, 
To circle about each heart. 

And bind us the more in one. 

When far from our Ivy vine. 

And lost in the world's great throng, 
'Twill be as a treasured sign 

To cheer and to make us strong ; 
And here, when the shadows run. 

To sadden the sky with gloom. 
Like birds, when the day is done. 

Shall our wearied thoughts come home. 

seniors' last chapel. 

Immediately after the singing of the ode 
occurred what is perhaps the most beautiful 
and impressive of Bowdoin customs — the 
"Seniors' Last Chapel." The chapel was 
crowded to overflowing with spectators. At 
the ringing of the last bell the Seniors slowly 
marched up the aisle headed by their marshal, 
and took their accustomed seats for the last 
time as a class. Pres. Hyde conducted the 
worship, reading appropriate- passages from 
the Bible and offering prayer. Then, linked 
arm in arm, in solid phalanx, three abreast, 
and swaying to the music, the Seniors 
marched slowly out singing "Auld Lang 
Syne." Just outside the chapel they formed 
a line on each side of the walk. Marching 
between and forming below them came the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



45 



lower classes in their order. Then the Seniors 
inarched down between the lines and took 
their places below the Freshmen. Their 
marshal then proposed cheers for the college, 
the faculty, and the three lower classes, 
which were heartily given. Quite a number 
of the Freshmen were detected cheering 
lustily for themselves. Cheers were then 
given by the lower classes for '86, and the 
afternoon exercises were over. 

THE rVY HOP. 

The successful Ivy Day of the Junior 
class was crowned by the Ivy Hop, which 
was exceptional in every respect. The hop 
was the largest for many years, if not the 
largest ever held. About fifty couples were 
on the floor during the evening. From 8 
until 9 a concert was given by the Salem 
Cadet Orchestra, and no comment upon it 
is necessary, as the reputation of that or- 
chestra is too well known. By the time 
the concert was over the dancers were ready 
for the fray, and at a few minutes past 
nine the grand march was led off by Mr. 
E. B. Burpee. The couples made a very 
pretty sight, as in a long, wavy line across 
and around the hall ending finally in the 
circle. Before proceeding further, the dance 
orders were distributed. The outsides of 
these were of heavy paper, soEtie in a blue 
others in a brown, and the inside was of 
plain card-board vnth a pretty order of 
dances on it. Extras were interspersed very 
freely during the evening, and it was nearly 
two o'clock before unj of the dancers were 
ready to leave. The gallery and seats on 
the floor were full for the greater part of the 
evening, and those who came to watch the 
dancing seemed to enjoy it nearly as much 
as the dancers. The favors for the German 
figures which were introduced, consisted of 
two small bits of ribbon in scarlet and cream, 
the class colors, with a tinj' ivy leaf at their 
point of juncture, on the scarlet ribbon was 
printed Ivy Hop, '87, and on the cream the 



date. Most of the Juniors wore the badge 
and ivy leaf as during the exercises in the 
afternoon. Of the individual dancers it 
would be hard to say which one was the 
most noticeable, but it is whispered that a cer- 
tain fair lady from another State was the 
most eagerly sought after as a partner, while 
a young lady of this town showed her good 
sense of the fitness of things by wearing a 
very pretty dress trimmed with ivy leaves. 
Certainly there was more elaborate dressing 
than for some years past at any rate, and the 
class have reason to congratulate themselves 
upon their Ivy Hop, as upon the other exer- 
cises for the two days. 



COLLEGE PROGRESS. 

In the opulent flush of my Freshman year 

A seedy Senior croaked, 

I wore four-button cutaways 

And ten cent straights I smoked. 

With the lordly air of a Vanderbilt 

In a livery team I'd ride 

And revel in realms of lallygag 

With the fairy maid at my side. 

As a Sophomore I swelled around 

In a cutaway worse for wear, 

And rejoiced whene'er I met a girl, 

Its good long tails were there. 

I never rode out with a maiden fair, 

In such an extravagant manner, 

And I never indulged in a higher priced smoke 

Than a five-cent " Seal of Havana." 

In my Junior year I little cared 
That my coat was a seedy sack. 
It mattered little to maidens then 
What covered my manly back. 
I smoked with that grand and noble air 
That belongs to Junior men, 
Cheroots of a very fragrant kind. 
They sold 'em "five for ten." 

But now my friends is woe to me, 

This Norfolk, grim with dirt, 

I wear that none of the girls may see 

I do not own a shirt. 

Then he smiled such a sad and weary smile, 

As mortals seldom see. 

And settled back in big arm chair 

For a pull at his old T. D. 



46 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



AN ETCHING. 

[George's mother has come on the morning train to visit her 
son.] 

" George, what is that volume of dust 
coming from that door-way ? " 

" O, only the end-woman shaking her 
broom, preparatory to her morning's sweep- 
ing." 

" ' End-woman,' ' end-woman ' ? why do 
you call her that ? " 

"It's short for endless woman; you 
know the saying, 'woman's work is never 
done.' " 

" To be sure ; what nicknames college 

boys do get up ! but let us go to your room." 

" Not now ; it has not been fixed up yet." 

" Here it is, George, nearly nine. Can't 
we go up to your room now ? " 

" It won't be swept out yet, mother." 

" Don't you think your room is so we 
can go to it now, George ? It is almost 
twelve." 

" I hardly think it is yet ; it is sweeping 
morning." 

"Surely, George, we can go into your 
room now, it is after two." 
" Perhaps so." 

" Heavens ! George, how did all this dust 
get here ? " 

" Yes'm, very little dust this morning." 

" Very ivTiat ? it's almost a quarter of an 
inch thick ! Where did it come from ? " 

" O, I suppose it settles after the end- 
woman dusts. Extra clean this morning." 

" Well, I never ! But how did so many 
of these things become broken, your look- 
ing-glass and vases ? " 

" That's nothing. We get used to those 
little tilings. I suppose it's the end-woman's 
broom-handle." 

" Who are these end-women, George ? " 



"No one knows. They are peculiar 
creatures — fearfully and wonderfully made." 

" How came your bed-clothes changed, 
wrong-end-to?" 

"It's the morning for them to be so> 
They are changed end for end every morn- 
ing." 

"What is that for?" 
" I don't know, unless it's to make them, 
wear out even at both ends. End-womert 
are provident creatures." 

" What do you do when you get holes in 
your stockings ? " 

" I wear the holes." 

"Aren't they ever mended? " 

" I never knew one to be. End-women 
are great on conservation of energy." 

"And yet you say that you enjoy this- 
way of living — end-women and all ? " 

" Yes, very much indeed ; it is so free 
and easy. We have no care for our room 
and things, you know." 

[Ti-ain whistles. Exit iliaier.l 



SKETCH OF THE ISLANDS SAPELO 
AND BLACKBEARD. 

Bt J. Warren Achorn. 
The island of Sapelo, lying just without 
the mouth of the Altamaha River, on the- 
Georgia coast, is certainly one of the most 
beaiitiful in the whole coast chain of islands- 
from the bay of the Chesapeake to the Flor- 
ida capes. Its occupation and settlement 
by French Huguenots date back to that of 
St. Augustine. The lineal descendants are 
still in direct possession of the island and its 
oral history. An old fort at its outer ex- 
tremity, the ruins of which are still con- 
spicuous, bears witness to the character and. 
precautionary foresight of its first settlers. 
Twelve miles in length by three in width,. 
it reaches along the coast. A narrow arm 
of the sea divides it on the north from the- 
Georgia main, while its southern shore 
stretches away for miles, a snowy expanse of 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



47 



wave-washed sand — unequaled this, by any 
frequented beach along the southern coast, 
save that at Fernandina, in extent. Here, 
a most beautiful picture presents itself. On 
the one hand, the broad Atlantic, sweeping 
far out to meet the sky ; on the other, huge 
live oak trees, gray with age and hanging 
moss ; many a giant among them stands, 
whose arms, outstretched and low, marks a 
circumference of two hundred feet and more. 
Between them, as if to guard against their 
nearer approach, lies the glistening band of 
sand. Here the "league long roller thun- 
dering on the beach," and the "moving 
whisper of huge trees " is never ending. 
Here the deep sea turtle comes to deposit 
her eggs, and here, then, there is rare sport 
for the vigilant on the dark of the moon. 
The diamond-backed terrapin is here, and to 
be had for the catching — less than with Del- 
monico, at sixteen dollars a dozen. 

Beyond, close in, but separated by a nar- 
row channel, lies Blackbeard. This island 
deserves more than passing mention. Once 
the rendezvous of Blackbeard, the pirate 
(a contemporary of Robert Kidd), here he 
is supposed to have buried his ill-gotten 
booty, and here, even here, the deluded 
treasure-seekers have been with pick and 
spade ; their reward was as empty as the 
holes they dug. 

This island has been the property of the 
Government for some years past, and in the 
time of wooden naval ships, was considered 
especially valuable for its live oak, groves 
of which extend throughout its length, on 
the sandy ridges running through it, once 
surely sand bars of the ocean. Shallow la- 
goons have formed between these ridges, 
and here at night-fall, ducks, in season, and 
ocean fowl of every description, gather to 
rest on the sheltered waters. Here also is 
the retreat of the sea island deer ; and here, 
among the " saw " palmettos and along 
these ridges, close with green briers and 



hanging vines, almost impenetrable, they 
rear their young. The quarantine station 
for ships entering at Doboy, is on this island. 
But to return. 

Sapelo Light, on the island shore, oppo- 
site Doboy, guards the entrance to this, the 
port of Darien. Ships of all nations pass 
in and out by this light, bearing away with 
them the famous Georgia yellow pine to all 
parts of the world. Coastwise vessels also 
are here in numbers, particularly three- 
masted schooners, the last of their race, and 
happily, the most graceful commercial crafts 
afloat; models of symmetry, fitting testi- 
monials to the now idle, but inimitable skill 
of the American ship-builder. 

The interior of Sapelo presents one im- 
mense plantation, interspersed with live 
oak groves and palmetto brakes, and broken 
at regular intervals by broad avenues and 
side ways, lined with tall, lowland pines or 
live oak trees. These are the landmarks. 
They alone remain to break the sameness 
and lend a pleasing grandeur to the scene ; 
they tell of the plantation life once here, a 
crumbling wall of " tabby " overgrown with 
roses, marks the spot where once was the 
"memorial hall," while around and about 
all is the pine forest. Once peopled and 
cultivated by eleven hundred slaves, its rich, 
dark soil yielded untold wealth in sea-island 
cotton, and of all the coarser products nec- 
essary to life and living, an abundance. 
Almost deserted these years past, it has 
turned back upon itself and relapsed into a 
vast solitude, an island park, peopled no 
longer by men, but with wild game. Both 
sea-island and mainland deer abound. 

Sapelo is the stepping-stone between 
Blackbeard and the main for the ever- 
migrating deer. In the winter of 1883, a 
party of six of us, with eleven dogs, after 
a three days' hunt, brought in seven fine 
deer ; and here let me add, that during four 
nights out, Ave all slept by the camp-fire 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



without covering of any sort ; this of itself 
speaks well for the mildness of the winter 
season. A deserted plantation is the natural 
home for quail ; here they gather in great 
numbers. The " rice bird of the Carolinas " 
is at hand in the rice fields about Darien, 
while the challenge of the wild turkey 
echoes unheeded through the river swamps 
bordering the Altamaha — next to deer, the 
keenest shooting south. 

Many varieties of fish frequent the 
waters about the island, while oyster beds 
of great value line every creek and estuary 
leading out of the Altamaha. The Chesa- 
peake oysterman, in the veritable pungy, 
should not longer delay his coming to these 
shores, where he may reap abundantly and 
with easy toil. What a Utopia for many of 
those who, fleeing our rigorous Northern cli- 
mate, seek restful homes or a winter's sport 
in the sunny South. Surely this beautiful 
island so easy of approach, presenting 
such a panorama of ocean and landscape, 
with its waters and woods abounding in fish 
and wild game, with its genial climate, its 
hospitable shores, and people cannot longer 
remain unnoticed and unsought. 



LONGING AND WILL. 

When before the youth ambitious, 
Rise up visions bright and fair, 
Dazzling views of future greatness 
To a mind untried by care, 
Then his soul is filled with longing 
For a higher, grander fame 
Than to lot of man has fallen, 
For distinction worth the name. 

Time its ceaseless course pursuing. 
Changes him till he can see 
With maturer, clearer vision 
Life in its reality. 
Vanish vain and useless longing, 
When the strife is once begun, 
'Tis by will strong and enduring, 
That the battle's ever won. 



JUDGE BARROWS. 

[ The following feeling .and eloquent tribute to the late Judge- 
Earrows, is taken from the lecture on " Law " delivered before 
the faculty and students of Bowdoiu College, May 25th, by Judge 
J. W. Symonds, of Portland.— Eds.] 

But the time and the place remind me of 
another name. In the cemetery just with- 
out the gates of these college grounds, the 
turf is green now for the first time upon the 
grave of a man, respected and loved while 
he lived, and whose memory now that he is 
dead is cherished, I might almost say, in 
every home in Maine. To him, too, after 
years at the Bar, after twenty-one years of 
arduous service upon the Supreme Bench, it 
seemed good to withdraw from the cares and 
distractions of his profession to the calmness 
of contemplation and the companionship of 
his books. Would that there might have 
been a later lingering, a slower close, of that 
serene, declining day : — but, quickly as the 
darkness fell, the record of the results of 
Judge Barrows' judicial life, written by his 
own hands, is still a fair page in the history 
of his native State, now and for all time. 

We know not what hopes closed over his 
grave, what other work the cunning of his 
patient hand might have wrought, had the 
sunset tarried. We can only contemplate 
the past and cherish the memory of his life, 
of his painstaking, self-sacrificing, sustained 
and disciplined energy, of the large-minded 
and large-hearted man, tolerant of details in 
which rights were involved, firm and broad 
in his mental grasp, quick to detect the rela- 
tions and proportions of things, clear- 
sighted, vigilant, true, with nothing in his 
heart but love of the right and scorn of pre- 
tence and wrong, imder whatever guise ; the 
servant of justice, believing that legal prin- 
ciples must serve her ends and do her bid- 
ding, the true citizen, the sincere scholar, 
the wise counselor, the good judge, treading 
securely the most doubtful mazes of law and 
fact. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



49 



If the grand, firm lines of his mind 
seemed sometimes to be sliaded too heavily 
and there was danger of over-firmness in a 
position once taken, it was clear as the sun- 
light that he never intended to be fixed in 
Ms opinion till the most careful attention, 
the most untiring examination, at whatever 
sacrifice or cost to himself, had convinced 
Mm that he was right. Then it was part of 
Ms nature not to yield, for in his mind or 
heart there was no motive to which the 
judgment and conscience could bend. 

Surely, this was the good man, the good 
man of whom Coleridge speaks, who has 

"Always treasures, always friends, 

three treasures, love and light, 

And calm thoughts, regular as infant's breath. 

And three firm friends, more sure than day and night. 

Himself, his maker, and the angel Death." 



INTERCOLLEGIATE TENNIS. 

Colby and Bowdoin, who comprise the 
league, made the schedule games coincide 
with the league ball games between the two 
colleges, in order that advantage might be 
taken of the half fares. In accordance with 
this schedule, the first contest took place at 
Colby, May 12th. Perkins and Larrabee 
represented Colby, Berry and Williamson, 
Bowdoin. In the doubles. Berry and Wil- 
liamson won two straight sets, the scores 
being 7 to 5 and 6 to 4. 

Perkins and Williamson then played one 
set of singles, resulting in favor of Perkins 
by a score of 9 to 7. 

The second contest occurred at Lewiston 
on the Bates court. May 29th. Here Per- 
kins and Pepper represented Colby, Bow- 
doin being represented as before. In the 
doubles Bowdoin won two straight sets by 
the scores 6 to 4 and 6 to 3. Berry and 
Perkins then played 3 sets of singles. The 
scores were : first set, 6 to 2 for Perkins ; 
second set, 6 to 4 for Berry ; third set, 6 to 
■3 for Perkins. 



The last contest of the series occurred at 
Bowdoin, May 31st. Colby was represented 
by Perkins and Pepper, Bowdoin by Wil- 
liamson and G. Cary. The first two sets of 
doubles were won by Bowdoin, by the scores 
6 to 4 and 6 to 3. Perkins and Williamson 
played the singles. Williamson won two 
straight sets by the scores 8 to 6 and 6 to 2. 



HER LITTLE SISTER. 

I have read of Roman tortures. 
But to me they seem as naught. 

For I've been within the clutches. 
Of the modern Hottentot. 

I have writhed in mighty anguish, 
I have groaned in dull despair, 

I have smothered muttered curses, 
I have wildly torn my hair. 

worse ! far worse ! than ancient flames 

That martyrs' feet did blister, 

1 know that I can truly rank. 

My Mary's liille sister. 



BASE-BALL. 

The opening game of the Maine Inter- 
collegiate series was played at Waterville, 
May 12th, with Colby. It was a most ex- 
citing game throughout, ten innings being 
required to decide who should be the victors. 
At the end of the ninth inning the score 
stood 2 to 2. In the tenth inning our boys 
secured two scores more, blanked Colby, and 
thus won the game. Quite a large number 
of the boys went to Waterville to witness 
the game, and came home well satisfied with 
the result. The game indicates that Colby 
and Bowdoin will be closely matched the 
present season. Below is the score : 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. R. B.H. T.E. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, c.l, 5 2 1 2 1 

Moulton, c 5 2 2 2 16 5 

Pusher, lb 5 1 2 8 1 

Wilson, s. s 5 1 1 

Soule, 3b 4 1 2 2 

Talbot, l.f., 4 1 

Larrabee, r. f., . . . . 4 1 

Freeman, 2b., .... 4 3 1 

Davis, p 4 2 2 13 2 

40 6 8 30 24 3 



50 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLBY. 

A.B. R. E.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Goodwin, p., 5 2 1 1 1 5 1 

Larrabee, c, 5 1 2 5 G 7 1 

Putnam, o. f., . . . . 5 1 2 2 

Pulsifer, s. s., . . . . 3 2 1 4 

Webber, lb 4 2 3 17 

Gibbs, 1. f., i 2 

Boyd, 3b., i 1 3 3 1 2 

Fan-, 2b., 4 1 3 2 

• Bradbury, r. f., . . . . 4 

38 4 9 14 SO 18 10 

Struck out — Davis I.", Goodwin 10. Passed balls — 
Moulton 4, Larrabee 1. Two-base hits — Bowdoin 2, Colby 
3. Three-base hits — Colbj' 1. Earned runs— Bowdoin 2, 
Colby 1. Left on bases — Bowdoin 3, Colby 3. Umpire — 
D. M. Parks, of Pittsfleld. Time of Game— 2 hours. 

From Waterville the nine took the morn- 
ing train, reaching Orono at 6.30 A.M. Here 
another close and exciting game was played, 
the Oronos presenting a very strong team. 
Below is the score : 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. K. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, c. f., 4 1 1 2 

Moulton, 3b 4 1 1 1 2 

Pushor, lb., 4 1 2 2 14 1 

Wilson, p., 4 1 1 1 21 1 

Soule, c, 4 1 1 10 7 

Talbot, 1. f., 4 1 

Larrabee, r. f 4 

Freeman, 2b., .... 4 1 1 

Davis, s. s., 2 1 1 1 

34 4 7 7 27 29 5 
MAINE STATE COLLEGE. 

A.B. R. E.H. T.E. P.O. A. E. 

Merritt, 1. f., 4 

Kay, s. s., 4 2 1 1 3 

Burleigh, c. f., . . . . 4 1 1 

Small, p., 4 10 2 

Rogers, c 4 6 3 2 

McNally, r. f., . . . . 4 3 1 

Elwell, 3b., 3 1 1 1 2 

Mason, lb 3 Oil 1 

yose, 2b., 3 1 2 1 

33 2 1 1 24 19 11 

Struck out— Wilson 17, Small 6. Wild pitches— Wil- 
son 1, Small 1. Passed balls — Soule 5, Bogers 4. Left on 
.bases— Bowdoin 6, M. S. C. 3. Umpire — D. M. Parks. 

The first game of the series on the delta 
was played Saturday, May 15th, between 
Bates and Bowdoin. This was also Bates' 
first league game, rain having prevented her 
from playing with Colby, according to 
schedule. Bates was expected to put a 
strong team into the league, and no little 
interest was manifested as to the result of 
her first game. Moreover she was to play 
Bowdoin who had already played the other 



two teams. The game was well and closely 
contested. It showed that the struggle for 
the pennant would be doubtful to the very 
end. Below is the score : 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. R. E.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, c. f., 4 1 1 

Moulton, c, 4 1 1 1 9 3 

Pushor, lb., 4 2 2 4 11 2 

Wilson, s. s., 4 1 1 2 1 

Soule, 3b 4 2 3 2 

Talbot, 1. f., 3 1 

Larrabee, r. f. 3 1 1 

Freeman, 2b., .... 3 1 1 1 

Davis, p., 3 3 10 

32 4 5 7 27 19 7 
BATES. 

A.B. K. E.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Sandtord. c 4 2 2 6 2 0- 

Nickerson, 3b 4 4 2 

Underwood, p., ....4 1 1 4 

Woodman, s. s 4 2 2 1 

Call, 0. f., 4 2 

Cutis, 2b 4 1 3 2 2 

Tinker, r. f 3 2 

Small, lb., 3 1 1 1 4 1 

Flanders, 1. f 3 1 

33 2 4 4 24 10 6 

Struck out — Davis 10, Underwood 5. Passed balls — 
Moulton 1, Sandford 2. Two-base hits — Pushor 2. Earned 
runs — Bowdoins 1. Left on bases — Bowdoins 3, Bates 4. 
Umpire — C. W. Fuller of Auburn. Time of game — 1 hour 
45 minutes. 

The long-anticipated ball game between 
the mighty men of '86 to place on the delta, 
Wednesday afternoon, May 19th. The game 
was interesting throughout, and at times ex- 
citing. It was characterized by rapid base 
running and sharp fielding. Among the 
many individual plays were Knowlton's rapid 
transit to first on -a pass ball, Parker's fine 
running catch in center, and Fling's sharp 
in-field work. The game was called promptly 
at two. Neither catcher had any passed balls. 
Below is the tabulated score : 

FRANCISCANS. 

A.B. R. E.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Smith, p., lb 7 4 3 5 8 4 4 

Norris, lb., p., .... 7 6 5 6 10 5 3 

Byram, c 7 6 4 6 4 5 3 

R'ideout, 2b., 7 4 1 1 1 3 

Dyke, s. s., 7 4 1 1 1 4 

Tuttle, 3b 6 1 2 2 3 1 4 

Taylor, 1. f., 6 2 

Parker, c. f., 5 3 2 2 1 1 

Knowlton, r. f 4 2 

56 32 18 23 27 16 22 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



51 



DOMINICANS. 

A.B. E. E.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Berry, p., 7 3 1 2 3 3 

Knight, 2b., ..... 7 2 3 3 2 

Turner, St., c 7 3 1 1 1 i i 

Davis, J. H., 3b., c, lb., 7 4 4 5 5 5 1 

Fling, s. s 7 4 1 4 

Horr, c, lb., 5 4 15 2 (i 

Davis, C. A., c. 1, .3b., .6100003 

Wentworth, 1. f., ... 6 2 

Butler, r. f 4 2 1 1 1 

56 25 7 9 24 18 24 

SCORE BY INNINGS. 

123456789 

Franciscans, 53320847 x— 32 

Dominicans 2 3 433007 3—25 

Struck out — Franciscans 5, Dominicans 7. Bases on 
balls — Franciscans 2, Dominicans 5. Time of game — 3 
liours 40 minutes. Umpire— F. D. Dearth. Scorer — J. L. 
Doherity. 

The second game between Bowdoin and 
the Maine State College occurred on the 
delta, May 21st. It was loosely played on both 
sides. Rogers, the M. S. C.'s catcher, was 
injured twice during the game and obliged 
to retire. The grit he disijlayed in endeav- 
oring to play out the game after his first 
injury called forth general admiration. For 
the M. S. C, Mason excelled both at the 
bat and in the field. Dearth led the Bow- 
doins in batting. There was little competi- 
tion for fielding honors. On the whole the 
game was far from satisfactory, and it is 
quite probable would have resulted differ- 
ently had it not been for the retirement of 
the M. S. C.'s catcher. Below is the tabu- 
lated score : 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. R. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, c. f., 6 2 3 3 1 

Moulton, c, 3b 6 3 2 2 3 1 1 

Pushor, lb. 6 1 2 3 13 1 5 

Wilson, s. s., p., . . . 6 1 1 13 1 

Soule, 3b., c, .... 6 3 1 1 7 4 3 

Talbot, 1. f 6 2 2 2 

Larrabee, r. f., . . . . 6 1 1 1 2 

Freeman, 2b 5 2 2 2 1 2 2 

Davis, p., s. s., .... 4 4 1 1 4 1 

49 18 14 15 27 25 15 
MAINE STATE COLLEGE. 

A.B. E. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Mason, lb 6 3 2 2 18 1 

Ray, s. s 5 3 1 2 1 1 3 

Burleigh, c. f., 1. f., . . 5 1 1 1 1 1 

Small, p., 5 2 2 4 1 11 3 

Rogers, o 6 2 1 1 3 3 

McNally, r. f., . . . . 5 1 3 3 1 2 

Elwell, 3b 5 2 4 

Merritt, 1. f., c, ... 6 1 1 1 

Vose, 2b., 5 1 2 3 4 

46 13 11 14 27 23 16 



SCORE BY rNNINGS. 

123456789 

Bowdoins, 06011220 6—18 

Maine State College, ..00544000 0—13 
Struck out — Davis 3, Wilson 6, Small 4. Wild pitches 
— Small 1. Passed balls — Moulton 1, Soule 3. 1 base on 
called balls — Davis 0, Wilson 0, Small 3. Two-base hits — 
Pushor 1, R.iy 1, Small 2. Earned runs— Bowdoin 2. Left 
on bases — Bowdoin 7, Maine State College 3. Umpire — 
C. W. Fuller of Auburn. Scorer— E. B. Burpee. Time 
of game — 3 hoiu-s. 

The second schedule game with Colby 
was played on the Bates grounds at Lewis- 
ton, May 29th. It was a well-played game 
throughout and abounded in exciting pas- 
sages. The features of the Bowdoin's play- 
ing were the fine work of the battery, the 
playing of Pushor and Freeman, and Lar- 
rabee's throw to third. Pulsifer, Matthews, 
and Putnam did the best work for Colby. 
In the sixth Webber placed the ball a few 
feet in front of the plate, and through a 
fumble of Wilson reached first. He stole 
second, reached third on a passed ball, and 
scored on a wild throw by Davis. In the 
eighth, with two men out, Dearth hit for 
two bases and Moulton followed with a single 
to short on left. With Pushor at bat Bow- 
doin's prospects looked bright, but her hopes 
were blighted by the failure of Moulton to 
reach second. This game was remarkable 
as the closest ever played in the Maine Inter- 
collegiate League. The game was played 
under protest by Bowdoin. The score : 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. E. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, c. f 4 1 2 

Moulton, c 4 1 1 12 3 1 

Pushor, lb 4 12 

Wilson, p 4 1 2 17 1 

Soule, 3b 4 1 

Talbot, 1. f., 3 

Larrabee, r. f., . . . . 3 1 

Freeman, 2b 3 1 3 

Davis, s. s., 3 1 1 2 

32 3 5 27 25 4 
COLBY. 

A.B. E. E.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Goodwin, p., 4 10 

Putnam, c.f., .... 4 1 1 2 

Webber, lb 4 1 12 2 

W. Goodwin, 2b 4 2 1 

Pulsifer 4 6 3 

Gibbs, 1. f., 4 1 2 2 

Matthews, s. s., . . . . 3 1 1 3 

Bowman, r. f., . . . . 3 1 1 

Boyd, 3b., 3 2 2 1 

34 1 3 4 27 19 4 



52 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 



struck out — Wilson 13, Goodvrin 5. Passed 'balls— 
Moulton 1. Left on bases— Bowdoin 5, Colby 5. Two- 
base hits— Dearth, Gibbs, Wilson. Umpire — Michael 
Coyne, Lewiston. Time of game — 2 hours. 

The Bowdoins were defeated for the sec- 
ond time in the league series by Bates, at 
Lewiston, June 2d. Our nine met with the 
worst usage here that they have ever expe- 
rienced. They were hooted and jeered al- 
most from the time they got off the train 
until they left the city. The Bates men had 
an umpire after their own heart — a fellow 
named Mike Coyne, who resides in Lewiston. 
His umpiring was of the rankest description, 
but he was doubtless amply repaid for his 
work in this direction by the bountiful ban- 
quet which the Bates men justly tendered 
him that evening. Wilson pitched a superb 
game, striking out fourteen men in seven 
innings, and holding the Bates men down to 
two scratch hits. LTnderwood during that 
time struck out but four men, and was batted 
for five, with a total of seven hits. The bril- 
liant playing, however, of Bates' tenth man 
prevailed and Bowdoin was beaten, 8 to 4. 
Wilson injured his arm during the game and 
was obliged to retire at the close of the sev- 
enth inning. While the Bowdoins were re- 
arranging their nine, with a view of putting 
Gary into the box, the tenth man declared 
the game forfeited to Bates, although they 
had had no man in the batsman's position 
during the short delay occasioned by Wil- 
son's injury. This is in marked contrast 
with the course pursued by Bowdoin in the 
game with the Maine State College when 
Rogers was injured. Instead of being mean 
enough to seek to get the game by any such 
unworthy method, they waited twice, each 
time to the extent of twenty minutes or more, 
and only resumed the game when the Maine 
State College boys were ready to go on with 
it. Such meanness as that pursued by Bates 
is not ball playing. It is simply a display of 
pusillanimous spirit that is anything but 



creditable to their college and their nine. 
Below is the tabulated score : 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. R. B.H. T.E. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, c. f 2 

Moulton, c, 4 1 1 2 10 3 

Pushor, lb i 2 2 8 2 

Wilson, p 3 1 14 T 

Gary, .3b., 1 2 2 1 

Talbot, 1. f 3 1 1 2 

Larrabee, r. f., . . . . 3 1 1 

Gahan, 2b., 3 1 1 2 

Davis, s. s., 2 1 1 

25 4 5 7 21 21 12 

BATES. 

Sandford, c 3 1 6 2 

Underwood, p., .... 4 2 1 6 6 

Thayer, 2b., 4 2 2 1 2 

Woodman, s. s., . . . . 4 1 1 1 

Tinker, r. f 4 1 1 

Call, c. f 3 1 1 1 

Small, lb., 4 8 

Nickerson, 3b., .... 3 2 1 

Flanders, 1. f., .... 2 1 2 

31 8 2 2 21 11 9 



Bowdoin, 


. 1 

















Bates, 


. 2 





- 1 












Struck out — Wilson 14, Underwood i. Wild pitches - 
Wilson 1, Underwood 1. Passed Balls — Moulton 6, Sand- 
ford 2. Two-base hits — Moulton, Talbot. Left on bases — 
Bowdoin 5, Bates 5. Umpire — Michael Coyne of Lewis- 
ton. Time of Game — 2 hours 15 minutes. 



COMMUNICATION. 

To the Editors of the Orient : 

There appeared in the Orient, recently, 
an article censuring the class of '89 for its 
want of interest in athletic sports and gen- 
eral lack of college spirit. Up to this time 
no vindication of the class has been at- 
tempted, but the publication in your last 
issue, of an editorial embodying statements 
manifestly unjust to the class, and so likely 
to convey a false impression to alumni and 
others, causes us to feel that it is time to 
say a word for ourselves. It is for the pur- 
pose of saying this word that we beg a lim- 
ited portion of your space, and that we may 
occupy a no larger amount than is necessary 
will proceed at once to the consideration of 
the matter in question. 

It is stated that the class of '89 is divided 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



53 



into "two factions, one which enters col- 
lege life with spirit ; the other which has no 
enterprise, no public spirit " — in short, no 
anything. It may be of interest, first of all, 
to note how large this faction is in compari- 
son with a like element in some of the other 
classes in college. 

The more prominent sports iu college, 
such as boating, base-ball, and tennis de- 
pend largely for their support upon the asso- 
ciations formed for their advancement. By 
these organizations are chosen those who 
control the selection of men to represent 
the college in intercollegiate events and 
those to whom the financial affairs of the 
teams are entrusted, when chosen. It is, 
therefore, fitting that every college man who 
has interest enough in athletic sports to 
wish to see them well conducted, should be- 
come a member of one or more of these asso- 
ciations. Of the class of '89, ninety per 
cent, are members of the Boating Asso- 
ciation and ninety-two per cent, of the Base- 
Ball Association. Of the Junior class, forty 
per cent, are members of the Boating Asso- 
ciation, while, as yet, sixty-three per cent, 
have joined the Base-Ball Association. So 
much for the formidable dimensions of this 
" faction," and now as to its doings. " In 
the short time during which '89 has been at 
college what has this faction done ? It has 
prevented '89 from putting a crew upon the 
river, etc." 

Last fall, when the Freshman class began 
its college course, it fully intended to put a 
class crew upon the river. The men were 
selected without any opposition from the 
" faction," and steps were taken toward 
the purchase of a boat. When, however, 
the 'Varsity crew was made up, two of the 
strongest men in the boat were removed to 
that crew. An attempt was then made to 
form a second crew, for a time, to be sure, 
without success. One eligible member of 



the class was forbidden to row by his par- 
ents; several had gone into base-ball, and 
did not wish to leave it for boating, while 
two of the strongest men in the class were 
obliged to be out during the spring term. 

The attempt at forming a crew of new 
men proving a failure, it was next proposed 
that the two Freshmen members of the col- 
lege crew should be allowed to row in the 
class races. This was strongly objected to 
by the directors of the Boating Association, 
on the ground that such a thing never had 
been done ; that it would necessitate over- 
training, etc. It is worthy of notice at this 
point, that when the Junior class wished to 
put a crew upon the river the same direct- 
ors could see no reason why the stroke of 
the' Varsity should not row on the Junior 
crew. 

To return. After many more essays a 
crew was at length formed and put in 
training. It was voted to buy a boat, and 
negotiations were opened with the class of 
'87, with the view of purchasing its boat. 
A second time circumstances removed one 
of our crew, and we were left with tliree 
men. Three men failed to make very quick 
time " round the island " and the crew was 
disbanded. Such is the history of '89's 
aquatic tribulations, a history which she is 
not ashamed of, and which is not quite so 
black as some would paint it. 

In conclusion we have but a word to say. 
A glance at the subscription books will con- 
vince any one that the statement that this 
" faction " subscribes to that only in which 
it has a peculiarly personal interest is erro- 
neous, and as to scholarship, we have only 
to remark that diamonds, before cutting, 
have rough exteriors. In short, it remains 
to be seen whether or not, with fair manage- 
ment and a fair show, '89 does or will fill 
the place on the campus some would have 
her — the foot. A Mbjiber. 



54 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




These balmy nights the giiile- 
less Fresh, 

The giddy maid doth meet, 
And promenades with her upon 
Some far sequestered street. 
Yet when liis Senior year comes round, 
Tliis seK-same Fresh Tvill swear 
He never knew that giddy maid, 
And never met her there. 



HeiT Booker's lap dog has been fittingly styled the 
personiflcalion of a rolling rag bag, — that dog is en- 
titled to dissection or graduation. 

Rumor has it that the University crew are doing 
excellent work and making a fine showing, consider- 
ing tbe time they have been boating. 

The following Juniors have been selected to take 
part in the prize exhibition, Monday, June 21 : H. B 
Austin, Farmington ; C. B. Burleigh, Augusta; E 
B.Burpee, Rockland; M. H. Boutelle, Bangor; C 
C. Choate, Salem, Mass. ; F. D. Dearth, Sangerville 
M. L. Kimball, Norway; J. V. Lane, Chichester 
N. H. ; C. F. Moulton, Cumberland; E. C. Plum 
mer, Yarmouth; F. Pushor, Pittsfield; L. B. Varney 
Litchfield. 

A. H. Brown, '84, has been in town for the past 
few days taking measurements for the apparatus 
which is soon to be placed, by Dr. Sargent, in our 
new gymnasium. 

The class of '76 will hold a reunion and dinner 
at the Falmouth in Portland, on the evening of June 
23d. 

. C. J. Goodwin, '87, has been engaged in cata- 
loguing and arranging the books in the library that 
bear on the Greek language, art, literature, etc. All 
such works will be classified under fifty or sixty dif- 
ferent heads. This catalogue, when completed, will 
be of great assistance to those wishing to make a 
specialty of any branch of Greek. 

The Salem Cadet Band furnished the Ivy-Day 
music. 

On Tuesday, May 25th, the Seniors competed for 
the Extemporaneous Composition Prizes. One hour 
was allowed them to write upon the subject of " Me- 
morial Daj'." Twelve of the class took part in the 
competition. 



For a week or so before their last chapel, the Sen- 
ior choir appeared in their former places, and singing 
became once more a feature of the morning exer- 
cises. '86 has more than its share of musical talent, 
and the voices of its members will be greatly missed 
hereafter in any college gathering. 

We would suggest to a certain member of the 
Freshman class, that, although his executive ability 
may be of a high quality, the ball-nine and other 
college institutions can be managed without his as- 
sistance, and that he would appear to much better 
advantage if he were seen but not heard. 

Hurrah for the underclassmen ! 

In spite of the ravages of last winter's ice storm, 
the campus is once more beginning to look very 
pretty. Though in many places the loss of the 
larger branches is noticeable, yet the trees, as a 
whole, have not suffered as badly as one would 
think. Indeed, in most cases, the destruction of 
some branches appears to have stimulated the others 
to put forth more luxuriant foliage. It is fortunate 
that the storm was not of longer duration, for, had 
it continued, the damage would have been much 
greater, and the pride of Bowdoin's campus is in 
her beautiful trees. 



I'm the Hon. Michael Koin, 
And I play for the Bates so foine, 

Jist give me a trate 

And observe me bate 
The other side every toime. 

For oh 
You know 
In Lincoln Street I do dwell, 
And the maidens fair 
With auburn hair 
Consider me quite a swell. 

II, 
Jist get onto the shape of me fate, 
For to look at them 's rally a trate, 

And listen again 

While I tell you my name, 
It 's Micky McKoin, the bate. 

For oh, etc. 

On May 18th, the Bowdoins defeated the Portland 
Reserves in a practice game on the delta. 

Barrett, '88, who has been out since the close of 
last term, has returned to college. 

Grimmer's Orchestra has been engaged to furnisli 
the Commencement music. 

Sophomore Greek recitation: Professor — "Mr. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



55 



T., for what was Pylos noted?" Mr. T.—" For its 
sand, Professor." Class applaud Mr. T'.s " sand." 

The '88 Bugle Board has organized with R. W. 
Goding as managing editor, and H. L. Shaw, Busi- 
ness editor. 

The lecture on "Medicine," the third of the 
course, was delivered by Dr. Robinson, of Bangor, 
on the evening of May 18th, in Lower Memorial. A 
sketch was given of medical progress from the ear- 
liest times down to the present day. A good sized 
audience was present, from which the dry humor of 
the lecturer called forth frequent applause. 

Quite a number of visitors and friends were en- 
tertained by the different societies during the cere- 
monies of Field and Ivy Day. 

The Brunswick base-ball nine have appeared in 
their new uniforms. They are a fine looking set of 
boys, and are good ball-players. 

The new foul board on the delta is a great im- 
provement on the old one. 

The Senior game was played on the delta. May 
19th, between the Franciscans and Dominicans. It 
was won by the former, the scoi-e standing 32 to 26. 
The features of the game were the phenomenal 
errors on both sides, the hard work of the two bat- 
teries, and John's remarkable catch of a fly at short 
center ; the other fielders caught nothing but mos- 
quitoes. 

J. W. Wilson, '81, was in town a short time ago. 

" Mul " seems to have developed quite a talent in 
the way of linguistic research. His latest discovery 
was made public when he informed the professor of 
Greek that his Norman ancestors were of Mongolian 
descent. It is a great boon to the college to have 
such a deep and thoughtful scholar within its walls. 

During the intermission at the dance in the Band 
Hall on the 18th, some one set off some gun powder 
in the hall below, and the smoke rushing in among 
the dancers caused quite a little excitement, but as 
soon as it was ascertained that there was no fire in 
the building, the dancing was resumed. Whatever 
was the motive of the person who made the trouble, 
it must have been a low one. Had there been more 
smoke a panic would have probably followed, and 
some one would have been hurt. The affair as it 
was, did not turn out to be serious, but the thought 
of the damage and injury which might have been 
done, should have been sutticient to deter any one 
from such a thoughtless, foolish act. 



Yes, Bludkins was a liar. 

As everybody knew. 
He told a hundred yarns a day. 

And none of them were true. 

But still we'd listen to the lies 

He'd told us oft before, 
And when he'd stop to rest himself, 

We'd clamor after more. 



Warm-hearted, sunny Bhidkiiis, 

We watch for you in vain. 
We long to greet your smiling face, 

And hear your tales again. 

" Dead ? " did you ask, oh, no indeed, 
He tried the thing, you see. 
Upon our dear old Faculty, 
And got the great G. B. 

It may be of interest to the alumni to know that 
a I'eturn to Commencement this year will be unac- 
companied by the certainty of poor accommodations 
at the hotel. The ancient Tontine has passed into 
the hands of Mr. B. E. Plummer, formerly of the 
DeWitt House in Lewiston, and the result of the 
change will probably be a well-kept house. Mr. 
Plummer knows what the public want and has the 
ability to manage the Tontine so as to merit the pat- 
ronage that he will doubtless get. The house will 
be renovated and repaired before Commencement, 
so let us have no alumnus absent at that time, be- 
cause there are poor accommodations. 

The readers of the Orient will notice the adver- 
tisement of F. L. Dunne, in this issue. Mr. Dunne 
is tailor to the Harvard Co-operative Society, which 
comprises about seven-eighths of the students, and 
also to most of the leading New England colleges. 
His agent will probably visit us some time in the 
near future, and students will do well to patronize 
him. He carries only the finest goods, but makes a 
liberal discount to college men. 

The lecture on the "Ministry" was delivered 
May 12th, in Lower Memorial, by Rev. Mr. Webb, of 
Boston. He gave a very interesting description of 
the studies and duties of a representative clergyman. 
He was heard with the closest attention on the part 
of his audience. 

The last Sophomore themes of the year were due 
May 26th. The subjects were "The Liberty of the 
Press" and "The Manufacture of Pulp." 

The Brunswick Band has given several evening 
concerts upon the Mall. 

Gahan is captain of the Brunswick base-ball 
team. 



56 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



" Let me tumble my hand in your hair, my pet," 
Sang the student tender and low, 
But the maiden a shudder of horror gave, 
And hastily answered " No." 

" My hair," said she, " is peculiar in shade. 
And," with eyes cast pensively down, 

" If this should be lost I really don't believe 
There's another such match in the town." 

Cook and Soule formed the battery of the Free- 
port nine, in their game with the Brmiswicks, M ay 
14th. 

Some of the boys prefer dancing to the music of 
an itinerant minstrel to reciting German. 

There is a man in college who measures 38 inches 
around his leg at the thigh. 

Pi-of.— " Why aren't insects made as large as ele- 
phants?" Acute Junior— "I suppose— er— because 
they couldn't fly so well." 

Sunday chapel talks were given by Bangor Theo- 
logical professors, May 16 and 23. 

Why can't we revive the old custom of singing 
on the chapel steps or under the Thorndike oak 
pleasant evenings? Here is a work for the good 
singers of the college. 

Sunday evening chapel has been gradually length- 
ening until it now occupies nearly a half hour. We 
would humbly suggest that if a full house is desired, 
a little more brevity be observed. 

Perhaps a certain Freshman has learned some- 
thin o- by his little conversation with a certain Junior, 
about a hammer, that " things are seldom what they 
seem." That same Freshman the next time he is 
sent after a hammer to throw will know better than 
to bring out a hammer that is used for the purpose 
of getting mineralogical specimens, and weighs only 
a few pounds, whereas the hammer used in athletics 
weighs sixteen and has a long handle. 

The Boston papers set on Bowdoin's professional 
ball players, and in consequence the state papers are 
flooded with " appeals for starving Ireland ! " — Colby 
Echo. Starving Ireland is all right as long as she 
can get ofi' such grammar as the above. 




Professor at Vassar College — "Now, young 
ladies, I propose to lecture on human anatomy, but I 
cannot while there is so much bustle among you." 
All " Professor, we can take our bustles off." Pro- 
fessor (confused)—' ' I — I didn't mean that way. You 
misunderstood me." All — "Ah, thanks. You think 
they are out of shape, but they are in style." — Mirror. 



'09. — Mr. John Mussey, 
one of the oldest citizens 
of Portland, died. May 21st, after a 
brief illness, aged ninety-six years. 
He was the last of his class to pass away, 
and for several years lias been known as 
the oldest graduate of the college. He was ad- 
mitted to the Cambridge Bar in 1812, but iu 1819 
gave up his law practice to accept the appointment 
of clerk of the United States District Court. On the 
establishment of the circuit court in 1820, he was 
appointed clerk of that court, under Judge Story. 
This position he resigned in 1818, and in 1849 he 
also resigned the clerkship of the district court. He 
leaves two daughters, one the wife of Hon. L. D. 
M. Sweat, and the other the wife of William P. 
Preble, Esq., clerk of the United States District 
Court. 

'33. — Mr. Charles Duren died in Granby, Vt., 
May 9th, aged 71 years. After graduation, he spent 
three years in teaching. In 1839, he graduated from 
the Bangor Theological Seminary. In 1839 and 
1840, he preached in Falmouth, Cumberland, Clin- 
ton, and Fairfield. He was made pastor of the 
churches in Sangerville and Abbot in 1841 , and in 
1843 accepted a call to Vermont, and afterwards 
preached for churches in Weathersfield, Waitsfield, 
Georgia, Shelden, West Charleston, Vershire, and 
other towns. He was called West in 1870, and 
preached in Minnesota and Wisconsin. He returned 
to Vermont in 1874, and remained at Granby until 
his death. On September 16, 1841, he was united 
in marriage with Miss Serena McKeen. daughter of 
Rev. Silas McKeen, D.D., then of Belfast. She died 
in 1862. There were three chiUlren, one of whom 
survives, Charles McKeen Duren, now cashier of 
the National Bank, Eldora. Iowa. In 1864, he mar- 
ried Mrs. Sarah W. Atherton, who survives him. 

'40. — Rev. Elijah Kellogg delivered an historical 
address at the celebration of the one hundred and 
fiftieth anniversary of the settlement of Gorham, 
Me., May 26th. Gov. Bobie, '41, was President of 
the day, and a hymn was written for the occasion by 
Henry L. Chapman, '66. 

'.al. — Dr. Augustus C. Hamlin of Bangor, is a 
prominent candidate for nomination to the guberna- 
torial oflSce, by the Republican party. 

'55.— Hon. William L. Putnam has been retained 
by the Government at Washington, as counsel to 
represent its interests in the trials ai-ising from the 
recent seizure of fishery vessels by the Canadian 
authorities. .^ 

'60. — Hon. Thomas B. Reed will deliver the ora- 
tion at the Centennial Celebration of the incorpora- 
tion of the city of Portland, July 5th. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



57 



'61. — Dr. W. Winslow Eaton delivered the Me- 
morial Day Oration at Danvers, Mass., before the G. 
A. R. 

'61. — Mr. Edward Stanwood furnishes an inter- 
esting chapter of our national history in the current 
number of the Atlantic Monthly, entitled, " A 
Glimpse at 1786." 

'68.— Charles O. Whitman, Ph.D., has just pub- 
lished, through the house of S. E. Cassino & Co., 
Boston, "Methods of Research in Microscopical 
Anatomy and Embryology." The Nation says of it: 
"It is the result of studies at home and abroad, is 
illustrated and filled with practical directions, and is 
probably the best volume we have that will instruct 
the beginner and also assist the advanced scholar." 

'69. — Rev. Harrison S. Whitman has accepted an 
invitation to become the pastor of the Winthrop 
Street Universalist Church, Augusta and commenced 
his labors there about June 1st. 

'72. — Rev. Jehiel S. Richards, of Waterford, has 
accepted a call to the pastorate of the Congregation- 
alist church at Alfred, and entered upon his work 
May 16th. 

76.— Mr. Frank V. Wright, of Salem, Mass., a 
member of the Essex Bar, and Miss Cornelia L. 
Pennell, of Brunswick, were married May 8th. 
Rev. George Holbrook, a classmate of Mr. Wright 
was the oificiating clergyman. 

'78. — Mr. Barrett Potter has recently been ad- 
mitted to the bar, and will establish himself in prac- 
tice here in Brunswick. 

'80. — It was Winter, '80, who was recently admit- 
ted to the bar at Sparta, Wis., and not Winter, '83, 
as stated in the Orient. 

'82. — Mr. Howard Goodwin, of Augusta, recently 
sailed for Europe, where he will spend a few months 
in travel. 

'84. — Mr. Melvin H. Orr, a student for the past 
year in the oiHce of Weston Thompson, Esq., of this 
town, has been admitted to the bar. 



ELEGANT JIACKTSAW 

STRAW HATS, 

THE BEST QUALITY, 

$1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 

MERRY THE HATTEK, 

PORTLAND. 

h. v. stackpole, 
Fine Boots and Shoes, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 

Dentist, 



STOKER BLOCK, 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



F. W. BAERON, 

Dealer in StaniarS mi Fancy &roceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce. 
Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

FRANK A. HALE, Proprietor, 
DeWITT HOUSE, TONTINE HOTEL, 

Lewiston, Me. Brunswick, Me. 

Private Suppers and Banquets a specialty. 

B. E. PLUMMER, Manager. 

W. B. SPEAK. J. A. WHITMORE. 

SPEAR & WHITMORE, 

DE.ILEES IN 

ALL KINDS OF COAL 

Cedar Street, Brunswick, Me. 

Lce, Opposite Post-Office, Main Sti-eet. 
Communication with Coal Yard. 

F. L. DUNNE, 
Tailor 

TO THE 

HARVARD CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY. 

Constantly in Receipt of the Latest London Novelties. 

338 WASHINGTON STREET, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



E^l Ain^'TT&T? CIGARETTE 

R ICHMDND IMg 

™ ^ g^^mm^mm^^^^ than the price 
charged for the ordiaary trade Cigarettes, will 
find the RICHI.iOND STRAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR. TO AXJL OTHERS. 
rhey are made from the Tjrlglitest, most 
delicately fla-Fored, and Iilebest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are aljso- 
Fntely vrltlioilt adulteration or drugs. 

We use the Genuine Frencli Rice Paper 

of our o\vn direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IBIITATIONS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
original brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or box of w^^—i^^—^^^i^i B^^ ^^— 

dgnature of V^^^^^H^HHBH^^^Bi 

ALLEN &GINTER 

MANXTFAOTUBEEB , 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Kings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 

■Watches, Clocks, and Jeweliy, Pi-omptly Repaired and WaiTanted. 

EDWIN F-. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

I1|aine Bentral R. ^. 

On and after Oct. 12th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, S.I.'i, 11.25 a.m., 2.3S, 4.45 and 6.25 p.m., and on Sunday 

moruings at 12.4:2. 
Tor Eockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.3S P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.40 P.M., and 

12.35 (night). 
For Lewiston, 8.15 A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. (mixed), and 2.45 P.M. 
For Augusta and Waterville, 8.20 A.M., 2.40 p.m., 12.45 every 

night, and on Saturdays only at 6.35 P.M. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 (night) 
For Bangor, Ellsworth, Mt. Desert Ferry, St. Stephen, Honlton, 

Vanceboro, and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Bar Harbor, 12.45 (night). 

Note.— The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew 
iston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun 
day, but do not connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, oi 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sun 
day morning. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BOOTHBY, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 6, 1885. 



SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. 

Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 

The following are our well known 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Caporal, Sweet Caporai,, St. James 1-2, Caporal 1-2, 

St. James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES. 

Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and French Eice Paper, are rolled by the high- 
est class of skilled labor, and warranted free from flavoring or 
impurities 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a fac-seuile of Kinney Bros. 
Signature. 

KINWEY TOBACCO CO. 

SOCCESSOR TO KINNEY BROS. 
NEW YORK. 



JORDAN SNOW, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

DuNLAP Block, Brunswick, Me. 

(INTEReEPTKD LETTER.) 

Brunswick, May 14, 1886. 
Owen, Moore & Co., Portland. 
Gentlemen : 
Please send me by mail one pair long Bicycle'Stockings, 
size 94, regulation League Color. Enclosed one dollar and 
stamps for postage. I see by advertisement in Portland 
paper that you carry a line of Tennis Goods. Please send 
me a price-list of Rackets and Balls, with best discount to 
a regular club. What are the prices on Jersey Coats, 
and in what color do they come '? 

Yours truly, 
P. O. Box 2002. BOB BROWN. 

Confectionery, Frnit, and Cigar Store, 

MAIN STKEET, BKXJlirSWICK, ME. 

Wm. R. FIELD, Manager. 

W. HAWTHORNE, 

FINE * TAILORING, 

2 Church Block, Bath. 



5.. nfileinPliilailelphia 
Ht the Newspaper Adver- 
, tisiuf^ Agency of Messrs. 

N. W. AYER & SON, our i.uthoTized agents. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEGE BOOKSTORE. 

We have constantly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 

BYRON STDEVl^NS. 



131. 



DEALER IN 



Ice -Cream, Fine Confectionery, Frnit, and Cigars. 



Unto the Old Universalist Church, - - Main Street, BRUNSWICK. 



LENTON & NEAGLE. 



In this may be seen a very fine assortment of Ladies' and Gents' 
Traveling Bags, Valises, and ShaAvl Starps. There is also to be' 
seen a very fine line of Riding Saddles for both Ladies and Gen- 
tlemen, showing that they pay strict attention to the wants of all 
their customers who are lovers of that healthy sport of horse- 
back riding. In connection with their riding gear they keep the 
Largest Stock of Horse Clothing and Dusters that can he found 
this side of the manufacturers, — 150 different patterns to 
select from. They are also Manufactui'ers of Fine Harnesses 
of every description, and are ahead of all their competitors as 
regards to Prices and Good Work. They pay strict attention 
to Trunk and Valise Repairing, and can Canvas a Trunk if it 
he so desired. They Cut Prices to all Collegre Students. 
Remember the place and give them a call, at the Sign of 

LENTOK & NEAGLE, 

Under G. A. R. Hall. Main Street, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



COBURN CLASSICAL INSTITUTE, 

WATERVILLE, ME. Both Sexes, Four Courses of Study : 
Introductory; College Preparatory, 3 years; English and 
Scientific, 3 years ; Ladies' Collegiate, 4 years. Location healthy, 
expenses moderate, discipline wholesome, morals good. Persons 
using alcoholic beverages or tobacco need not apply. Accommoda- 
tions ample and excellent. For further information send for 
Catalogue to " J. H. HANSON, Principal. 



ANTKD 

Local Men to take orders for our Specialties 
in their own towns and counties. Live men 
make S5 a day. Write for terms, giving ref- 
erences and age. 

CHAELES H. CHASE, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




Nurseryman. 



F. H. WILSON, 

DISPENSER OF 

Pure Drugs, Medicines, and Chemicals. 

Imported and Domestic Cigars. 
MAIET STREET, - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 



■ TiaiE 



^ TRAVELERS ^ 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HERTFORD, co:^r]sr.. 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCT $1 I ^OOOfOOO) and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 

A /^r^TT~iT?1VT' T^/^'iT TOTTTQ indemnifying the Business or Professional Man or Parmer for his 
-nLVyV^J--L'X'jl>l JL X V/AjiV^iri/O Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidental Injury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only $5.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each $1,000, with .fl5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required . 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 1864 have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. 

Issues T TT?Tr T>r^T TP^TTTQ of every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 
also i-il-TJjJ X VJljll_y±JJjO Personal Benefit. 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums j)aid. 

Assets, - $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Office at Hartford. 
JAS. G. BATTERSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



QOCIJETY' ^ies cnxd Alettes, Cuts ctrtcL ^nsigixzct. 
'Writtrtg JPcuper cuxcl CcltoLs JErbgrcLved cltxcL JPrtntecL. 
Stixdertt' s Vzsitiixg Cctrds. IrhvttcLttoTLS of eve-ry 'Pcirtd. 
ejcecTtted by t7ie erzgi^ctvirig Ixonse of 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



Society XnvttcLtzoTis , 'dJte-s, ctixd J ilzzstrcLtioTLs for ^ecur- 
(J^ooTzs, J\£oTZogr CUTIS , Jlnns, ctnd Crests JiJng-rcLvedL and 
^rirhted.. ^tstting Ccvrds, ctncl tlxe Clxoicest StcLtiorLery. Seals, 
Tctpers cltlcL Sealirtg 'Wets:, and Sealing Sets. 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



Ho 



% 

■"''Air bSIfoW- 




^CID FHOSPH^TE. 

[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

The Unrivalled Remedy for Dyspepsia, aiental and Physical Exhaustion, Nervousness, Wakefulness, 

Diminished Vitality, etc. 

As Food for an Exhausted Brain, in Liver and Kidney Trouble, in Seasickness and Sick Headache, in Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion and Constipation, in Inebriety, Despondency and cases of Impaired Nerve Function, 

It has become a necessity in a large number of households throughout the world, 

And is universally prescribed and recommended by physicians of all schools. 
Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to taiie. 
It is the best tonic Isnown, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body. 
It is unsurpassed as a substitute for lemons or limes, and 

IT MAKES A DELICIOUS DRINK WITH WATER AND SUGAR ONLY. 
Prices Eeasouable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free. Mauufactnred by the 

KUMFORD CHEMJCAL WORKS, Providence, R. I. 
J8S-BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.-®* 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Special Rates to Classes i Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brans-wick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Vie^rs. 



Go to Wr. B. VUoodsLvd^s 

To buy your GEOCEEIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBAcbo, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. Tou will save money by so doing. 
si=Eci.;a.Xj ia.,a.TEs to stxtisei^tt clttes. 
Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 




OTTAWA 



Cushing's Island, 
Portland, Me. 
a-IBS01>T- 



Bowdoin College Medical Department. 

The Sixty-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures atthe Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February ith, 1886, 
and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Rev. Wii. DeWitt Hvde, President : Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M. , 
Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. Gerrish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Franklin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemistry; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henry H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Young, PubUc Hygiene ; 
IR^^NG E. Kdiball, M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealev, M.D., Demonstrator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BOBDEBS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 

such as 

PBOGBAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDBESSES, 

SEBMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ALLEN & CO., Portland, 

Having moved to their new store, 204 Middle Street, Cor. of Plum, are coDStantly opening 
rich and elegant goods for gentlemen's wear. 

lhoiG8 loreign fabrics low iisplapd iii fur tailoring iepartmeiit. 

The finest-made up Clothing to be seen in the State now exhibited in our 



Novelties for Gentlemen's Dress in Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves, Neckwear, Canes, and Silk Umbrellas 
in Seasonable Styles to be found in our ■_ 

Furnishing Dspartmsrit. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

204 MIDDLE STREET, COKNER OF PLUM, PORTLABTD. 



!. k. kTmm%Q\ 



Donnel Building, Corner Pearl and Middle Streets, PORTLAND, ME., 

WOULD RESPECTFULLY CALL THE ATTENTION OF : 

Buyers of Fumltiin!, Garnets, Beili, Parlor Stoves, Baoges, &e., 

To the Enormous Stock of House Futnishings at the Portland Store. Being Manufacturers, 

intending puroliasers can see tlie styles and select their own coverings for' Parlor Furniture, and have it maOe 

to order for the same price. "We keep enormous quantities of Upholstery Goods in the Boston Store, 

and full lines of samples. Here-our prices on Parlor Suites Kinge from .fiHS.OO in Hair Cloth 

to .J!37o.00 in Silk or Mohaii- Plushes. 

CHAMBER FURNITUBE. DRAfEEY of every description made to order in the 

Bostoji store. Orders taken here and designs and samples 
We have in stock iu our three stores 87 different pat- sliowh. 
terns of Chamber Suites, manufactured from all the pop- ' mrvrT-vc! 

ular woods, viz. : Pine, Ash, Walnut, Cherry, Basswood, PARLOR STOVES. 

and Mahogany ranging in price from $18.00 to SiOO.OO. g j j attention is requested to our. Parlor Stove De- 

We also haveall kinds sizes and quantities of Bedsteads, -p^rtment, as we believe we have the best line to.select 
Bureaus, Commodes, etc. Spring Beds, Cot Beds, Lounge {■,.„«;„ ajoj^^ tj,:^<>= «/i no t„ «di-i on 
Beds, Sofa Beds, Mantel Beds, Itc. Mattresses ot eve?y , *'°™ '" ^^'°«- ^"«''' **-'*° *" ***^-'"^- 
kind and quality,. from an excelsior at $2.00 to a pure <!TnT7'ii'« Aivrn "RATCm?*! 

l)leaclied South American curled horse hair at $25.00. STOVES AND RANGES. 

Our line of Ranges comprises all the latest and best iu 
CARPET DEPARTMENT. the market, including the "New Tariff " and "Quaker," 

which are considered superior to anything yet produced. 
$75,000 worth of Cottons, Cotton and Wools, All-Wool Write for cuts of these two Ranges. Prices $15.00, $20.00, 
Extras, Tapestry, Brussels, Body Brussels, Velvets, Wil- $22.50, $25.00, $27.50, $29.00, $33.00, $35.00, $38.00, afld Up- 
tons, etc., at our usual Rock-Bottom Prices. Any of these wards to .$65.00. These prices include all the ware,' pipe, 
can be selected at the Portland store. SHADES and and zinc. 



Any of the above goods sold for Cash or on our Special Contract System, at 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Streets, Portland, Me. 

. Brunch of the Great jSFasmu Hall House Furnishing Store, 827 Washington Street, Boston. 

B. A. ATKINSON & CD. 

fSAAC C. ATKINSON, Manager. 



164 High St 





1886. 's?^- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A GLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENOEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 

ROGERS' CELEBRATED GROUPS. 

AU the Late Publications in stock. Text-Books of all kinds. LAW 
and MEDICAL WORKS at PUBLISHERS' PRICES. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

474 Congress St., - - - opp. Preble House. 

THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

Ji®. § 0DD EEIiMW^' BMOK, 

Is the place to buy 

StioM, Stuiionei/y,, § c/ancp ^o,-oS. 

Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 

A. W. TOWNSEND, Prop'r, 



Mixtures for Pipe or Cigarette. 
THREE KINGS, Turkish, Perique and Virginia. 
MELLOW MIXTURE, Turkish and Perique. 
TURKISH and VIRGINIA. 

PERIQUE and VIRGINIA. 
GENUINE TURKISH. 
FLAKE CUTS, ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOE THE PIPE. 

VANITY FAIR . OLD GOLD. 

SALMAGUNDI, a Hew Granulated Mixture. 

FRAGRANT VANITY FAIR, 
SUPERLATIVE, CLOTH OF GOLD. 

KIIVIBALL'S SATIN STRAIGHT CUT CIGARETTES . 

People of refined taste who desire exceptionallv fine Cigar- 
ettes should use only our Str.iight Cut, put up in Satin Packets 
and boxes of 10s., 20s., 50s., and 100s. 

Our Cigarettes w'ere never so fine as now. They cannot be 
siupassed for purity and excellence. Only the purest Rice Paper 
used. Establislietl 1846. 14 First Prize Medals. 

Wm. S. Kimball & Co., Peerless Tobacco Works, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



PHONETIC SHORTHAND. °«m^e°t»^'^ 
For Self-Instruction. CoiUaiuiug all the late improre- 
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Send Stamp for Specimen Pages and lUnsti'ateil, Pamphlet. 

W. W. OSGOODBY, Publisher, Rochester, N. Y. 



it 



The New Styles in 

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Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, "Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, 

-SA.T ELLIOTT'S, e^ 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 



124 Exchange Street, Portland. 



C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



| Hb PnOrKlblOK ol the Nearest Coiner Grocery will 
endeavor to merit a 

CONTINtTANCE 

Ol the Student's patronage. Come and prore him. 

J. S. TOWITE, 
PHARMACEUTIST. 

PUEE DRUGS, MEDICIXES, FANCY AND TOILET AR- 
TICLES; ALSO A FINE LINE OF CHOICE CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES. PRESCRIPTIONS a Specialty. 

Main Street, Near Bowdoin College. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



The Largest Assortment of 

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Is to be found at 

JACKSON'S. 

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Dentist, 

OVEK BOARDMAN'S STORE, MAIN STREET. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 



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ON SALE AT FIELD'S. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books beino; mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparator.v work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Caesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
^neid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,- Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and thh-d Books of Loomis. 

Algebra, — so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivaleuts being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Rbgulae Examinations eoe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commeuce- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the Ph'St Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Hallowell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EBQUIEED— FOUR HOURS A ■WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A "WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, 'four terms. 

Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XVI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 16, 1886. 



No. 4. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE ■WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE TEAR ET THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
C. B. Burleigh, '87, Managing Editor. 



'87, Business Editor. 

C. H. Verrill, '87. 
H. C. Hill, '88. 
M. P. Smithwick, '88. 
A. W. TOLMAN, '88. 



L. B. Varnet, 
C. C. Choate, '87. 
M. L. Kimball, '87. 
A. W. Merrill, '87. 
E. C. Plumjier, 87. 



Per annum, in advance $2.00 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on applica" 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
municati*^ns in reg.ard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to conti'ibute 
literaiy articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as tlie signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post.OIEce at SruDswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 

Vol. XVI., No. 4.- June 16, 1886. 

Does it Pay ? 59 

Editorial Notes, 59 

A Thouglit, . 61 

College Self-Government, 62 

Antfeus, 63 

Library Improvements, 63 

Tom Brown, 64 

Acrostic, 65 

Need of College Educated Men in Journalism, ... 65 

Under the Stars, 66 

Base-Ball 66 

CoLLEGii Tabula 68 

Personal, 69 

College World, 70 

Clippings, 71 



DOES IT PAY? 

'Tis a question we're all .asking, 
In oni- lives from day to day, 
When we balance joy and trouble, 
Is it worth it, does it pay? 
When the scale with trouble laden, 
Seems to weigh the other down, 
When the sky looks dark above us. 
And we meet with naught but frowns, 
If we all could but remember, 
That for each must come a day 
When just judgment will be rendered, 
We'd so live that it would pay. 




We regret to announce the resig- 
nation of Mr. M. L. Kimball as business 
editor. Other duties compel him to relin- 
quish this position, in which he has served 
long and well, and with marked success. 
Mr. Kimball will still retain his position on 
the editorial board. 



The coming Commencement will prob- 
ably be graced by the fullest attendance 
of alumni for a number of years. An unu- 
sually large number have signified their in- 
tention of being present, and the college 
authorities have been busily engaged in mak- 
ing arrangements for their accommodation, 
a large number of rooms have been secured 
in private families, the Tontine under its 
new management offers better facilities than 
ever before, and those who intend to visit 
us next week may feel assured that they can 
secure good quarters. 



Among Maine colleges, for the past few 
years, tennis has maintained a precarious 
existence. So precarious has it been that 
only Colby and Bowdoin have been able to 
support anything like a collegiate organiza- 
tion. Between these two colleges annual 
series of games have been arranged, but in a 
rather informal manner. Now we believe 



60 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



the time has come when an intercollegiate 
league should be established on a firm basis. 

While the game can never hold, probably, 
the position which base-ball occupies in the 
public estimation, it is yet one of the most in- 
teresting of college sports ; and, when well 
played, devoid neither of interest nor excite- 
ment. It is also a sport which need inter- 
fere . with no other, and is well fitted to oc- 
cupy the attention of athletes, who now 
devote their time and energy to no single 
game. 

Though nothing can be done the present 
season, we mention the subject now with 
the hope that local discussion may be in- 
duced and a definite sentiment formulated 
in each college. We also trust that the 
subject will be deemed of enough impor- 
tance to merit the attention of the college 
papers. 



The free and easy intercourse of the stu- 
dents among themselves has a tendency to, 
and, as experience shows us, does give rise to 
loose methods of conducting business affairs. 
This is largely due to a lack of direct ac- 
countability, and a reluctance on the part of 
students generally to go very much into 
details, yet there is nothing more important 
in a college course than the formation of 
strict systematic biTsiness principles so essen- 
tial to success in after life. It was quite an 
advance over the lax methods formerly in 
vogue, when the last year's manager of the 
'Varsity submitted to the students, through 
the columns of the Orient, an itemized ac- 
count of his receipts and expenditures, and 
we trust his example will be followed this 
year by the officers of all the various asso- 
ciations. We have entire confidence in the 
ability and integrity of the present officers 
of our different associations, but we think 
the establishment of such a precedent as this 
is strictly in keeping with business princi- 
ples, and we hold it to be the right of those 



who contribute to sxipport of college inter- 
ests to know how the money is expended. 
There is no reason why students should not 
exercise the same business methods in con- 
ducting their affairs as are required in the- 
outside world, and we hope to see a change 
for the better in this respect, in the man- 
agement of our college associations. 



The benefit of such lectures as the four 
we have enjoyed this term cannot be esti- 
mated. It can neither be elicited by exami- 
nations nor indicated by rank. But the 
future may hereafter discover great and im- 
portant results. Each lecturer represented 
the highest ideal of his own profession. He 
urged his hearers to enter it from no sordid 
motives ; he gave no encouragement of wealth 
or fame ; but emphasized its opportunities 
for benefiting mankind ; for a work of self- 
denial and long, arduous labors; for the- 
future consciousness of having toiled long 
and faithfully in a congenial occupation. 
Each, in short, urged his hearers to make 
their life-work one of love ; and appealed to 
the noblest and purest motives of the soul to 
live for something higher than any transient 
end. Such appeals cannot be lost; they will 
bear fruit in the future. 



We would call the attention of the mem- 
bers of the Base-Ball Association to the in- 
efficiency of their present constitution. As- 
far as we can ascertain there have been few 
or no amendments to this constitution since 
its adoption in 1875. However efficient it 
may have proved in those days, it is alto- 
gether too antiquated to meet the present 
exigencies, and as a matter of fact the asso- 
ciation has for some years conformed very 
little to its provisions. Under the constitu- 
tion as it stands at present a two-thirds vote 
of the association is necessary, in addition 
to signing the Constitution and By-Laws, to 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



61 



constitute membership. There is no provis- 
ion whatever for the appointment of a scorer, 
and the annual election is required " to be 
held during the second week of the first 
term of the collegiate year." The captain of 
the nine is vested with the power " to select 
the nine, determine the positions of the 
players, and have entire control of them 
during practice and match games." At pres- 
ent the power of selecting the nine has come 
by usage to be vested in the five old players 
elected by the directors to hold over from 
one season to another, although the constitu- 
tion provides for no such election. It will 
be seen that the present constitution is prac- 
tically a dead letter, and measures should be 
taken either to amend it so as to conform 
with the present requirements, or to adopt 
an entirely new one. We trust the members 
of the association will give this matter their 
early and careful attention, and that some 
action may be taken in the matter before the 
close of the present term. 



The Intercollegiate Athletic contest oc- 
curred at Mott Haven, May 29th. Twelve 
of the fourteen colleges in the association 
were represented. Harvard won five first 
prizes and eight second, thereby winning the 
championship cup. According to the rules 
of the association, the cup becomes her ex- 
clusive property, and the association will 
now dissolve unless reorganized. In a re- 
cent number, the Fortnight urged that under 
the contingency that Harvard again won the 
cup, which has since come to pass, a New 
England Athletic Association be formed 
comprising the smaller colleges. We men-, 
tion it here as a suggestion well worthy of 
consideration. We are inclined to be strongly 
in favor of it. But next winter will give 
abundant time for fuller discussion. 

But whether a new association be formed 
or the old one be reorganized, we hope to 
see Bowdoin represented among the con- 



testants another year. We have now ade- 
quate facilities for training and good mate- 
rial. For the sake of comparison we give 
below the events at Mott Haven and their 
respective records. We can see in the 
comparison nothing in the way of dis- 
couragement, but on the contrary every 
reason to believe that we can make a good 
record. 

One-hundred-yards dash, 10 1-2 seconds ; 
two-mile bicycle race, 6:39 ; one-mile run, 
4:38 4-5 ; putting shot 38 feet 9 1-2 inches ; 
440-yards dash, 51 4-5 seconds; one-mile 
walk 7:11 4-5 ; running broad jump, 20 
feet 11 inches; 120-yards hurdle race, 17 
seconds ; throwing the hammer, 95 feet 11 
inches ; 220-yards dash 22 4-5 seconds ; pole 
vault, 10 feet 3-4 inch ; half-mile run, 2:4 1-5 ; 
high jump, 5 feet 11 3-4 inches. Records 
were broken in the hurdle race and in 
throwing the hammer. 



A THOUGHT. 

I was gazing o'er the ocean, 

On a bright midsummer day, 
While I marked the white-winged voyagers 

Pursue their watery way. 

Some to distant lauds were wafted, 
For the wealth of foreign shores, 

Others coasted past the headlands, 
Where the sullen breakers roar. 

Each a guiding hand directed. 

Through that heaving waste of sea, 

Save one shattered hulk which drifted, 
Toward the breakers on her lea. 



Ah, thought I, there lies the secret 

Of success in daily life, 
'Tis a purpose, never altered 

By the whims and fancies rife. 

Seek in life some worthy object. 
As a magnet seeks the pole, 

When success has crowned our efforts, 
We at last have reached the goal. 



62 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEGE SELF-GOVERNMENT. 
In college self-government, trial by jury 
is rightly and inevitably considered an essen- 
tial part. But the fact should not be over- 
looked, as it sometimes seems to be, that the 
jury is not an end in itself, but only a means ; 
that the jury does not maintain order, but 
the spirit which is behind it and works 
through it. Some minor occurrences have 
recently agitated the student-mind in regard 
to the relation of the jury system to self- 
government. 

To the successful operation of trial by a 
jury, two things are essential : first, a com- 
plaint ; and second, an honest verdict. 

For an honest verdict only one thing is 
absolutely necessary, the expression of an 
honest opinion. Be the character and habits 
of the jurymen ever so questionable, and 
their private conduct ever so bad, an hon- 
est opinion alone can be required. We do 
not say that a good character in a jury- 
man is not desirable, but only that it is not 
absolutely essential. The juryman, in his 
official capacity, can exercise no option, no 
influence ; his province is simply to render 
justice. 

There is, then, in trial by jury, so far as 
the verdict goes, no exercise of self-govern- 
ment; for its operation is arbitrary; and 
self-govei-nment consists of something more 
than justice. 

The other essential thing is the complaint. 
And the making of the complaint is by far 
the most important part of the trial ; for ex- 
cepting when made from personal spite or 
from feelings of revenge, it registers a de- 
mand for peace and order, and indicates the 
sentiment on which successful self-govern- 
ment must be based. It shows, at least, that 
there is a spirit abroad which demands jus- 
tice, and which will enforce those demands ; 
that at least a part of the community pre- 
serves order itself and demands it of the rest ; 
and when any community exercises this 



power, order and justice are permanently 
secured, and not till then. 

To secure this expression of public feel- 
ing is the ultimate object toward securing 
good government ; but it involves time, pa- 
tience, resti'aint, and, perchance, many tem- 
porary failures. It is secured only by the 
appreciation of personal responsibility, and 
a consequent feeling that each is accountable 
for the good order and name of the commu- 
nity. To secure it requires education ; but 
it must be the education which comes through 
experience, at times bitter and harsh, often 
involving shame and loss. 

But now suppose a person, not one of 
the student-body, appears, and, instead of 
leaving to the students the responsibility of 
securing order among themselves, taking a 
technical advantage of the jury system, 
makes complaint himself, and undertakes to 
enforce order without reference to them. 
To be sure, the case is tried before the jury ; 
but the privilege of making the complaint is 
arbitrarily taken away. Arbitrarily in this, 
that time is not given for a sentiment to be 
developed, and the student-body to act. It 
may be that no complaint would be made ; 
but if no opportunity for making complaints 
be given, it is obvious that little progress 
can be made in self-government. And the 
effect of what is considered by the students 
as a practical usurpation of vested rights is 
a moral set-back, and will end in a disinher- 
itance of responsibility on their part. If 
this policy is carried out, there can only be 
one result, the destruction of self-govern- 
ment. The only alternative will be a return 
to the old form of inefficient coercion. 

It has long since been demonstrated that 
human nature will neither be coerced into 
goodness, nor be made a silent and passive 
partner in the operation, and when such 
methods are attempted a reaction and ulti- 
mate failure must inevitably follow. It 
seems to indicate that the student-body can- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



63 



not be trusted; and that suspicion it will 
not tolerate. It is not the verdict of the 
jury'which secures good order, but the senti- 
ment behind it, and working through it; 
and only when a sentiment for order is de- 
veloped will there be permanent order; 
neither verdicts nor arbitrary power can 
secure it. And only when free will, and a 
self-educated sentiment is allowed to develop 
and mature, will that spirit prevail. 



ANT^US. 
As that famed giant who in days of yore 
With great Alcides strove in mortal fight, 
And hurled to eai'th, regaining twice his might, 
Uprose to battle stronger than before. 
And after each defeat but fought the more ; 
So the tired poet, who with patient sight 
And eager longing has pursued the flight 
And grappled with some theme of deepest lore. 
When oft defeated, weary of his pen. 
Cast down at heart, and humbled in his mood, 
Seeks the green solace of the fields again, 
Climbs the steep mount and threads the cool, dim 

wood, 
Feels the warm heart-throbs of his fellow-men. 
Then mounts again to struggle unsubdued. 



LIBRARY IMPROVEMENTS. 

While most of the students are sensible 
of the deficiencies of the college library, it 
is to be feared that few realize the great 
wealth that it contains in some lines of 
study, and in which it is not surpassed by 
many of the larger libraries of the country. 
Some of the methods recently adopted un- 
der the management of Prof. Little, in order 
to render these resources more accessible, 
have already been noticed in the Orient. 
The increased hours, and the careful atten- 
tion given to the library this year have been 
repaid by an unusual attendance and use of 
books. 

Among the new features adopted is one 
which, as an experiment likely to be repeated 
if found successful, deserves especial notice. 
At the request of Prof. Avery, a catalogue 



of works and authorities bearing on the 
Greek department has been in preparation, 
and will be printed for use the coming year. 
As this is executed on a plan that has been 
put in operation only in the very largest 
libraries, and will present, at a glance, a list 
of authorities on any connected topic, which 
could not otherwise be found except by long 
and careful search, a brief description of the 
work may not be out of place. 

The plan includes not only entire works, 
and monographs on any subject, but, as far as 
practicable, scattered essays collected from 
a wide field of miscellaneous literature. 
All authorities have been carefully exam- 
ined and classified under one or more of the 
following heads: Geography, Religion, So- 
cial Life, History, Language, Literature, 
Philosophy, Art. These, again, have been 
divided and subdivided into a large number 
of topics, under each of which will be found 
the books, chapters, or essays bearing on 
that topic. Under literature, for instance, 
to which the most space has been given, ap- 
pears the name of every important author 
of the Classical Period, and a glance will 
show, practically, all that the library has on 
Aristophanes or Plato. The History is 
taken up by periods ; the Philosophy, both 
by schools and by single leaders. Under 
Religion will be found treatises bearing on 
Mythology, the Mysteries, and Religious 
Observances. Social Life has been divided 
into Government (where Athens and Sparta 
receive separate notice) and manners and 
customs, including Dress, Warfare, etc. 
Some standard works, such as Grote's His- 
tory of Greece, are referred to by chapters 
or pages, under many different topics. 
This summary will sufficiently show the 
character and usefulness of the work. While, 
by reason of the extent of ground to be 
traversed, it will, even after the most care- 
ful revision, doubtless be defective in some 
respects, yet, for practical purposes, it will 



64 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



represent the entire contents of the library 
in this department, and will greatly facili- 
tate reference. It is hoped that it wiU. serve 
two good purposes at once — promote in- 
creased interest and knowledge in the study 
of Greek, and open up partially, to both 
students and others, the resources of our 
valuable library. 



TOM BROWN. 

Novels and novel-writers in general have 
had so many eulogists to set forth their liter- 
ary claims, that to say much on that subject, 
in general terms, would be both a waste of 
time and a strain on the patience. But the 
particular works for which it is the object of 
this article to express, at least, a hearty esteem, 
are those two books by Thomas Hughes, 
entitled " Tom Brown's School Days," and 
" Tom Brown at Oxford." It must be that 
every reader of these books is their debtor 
to some considerable extent, for the author, 
throughout, expresses such a truthful, hope- 
ful, and sympathetic view of every subject 
he touches, that his way of thinking can not 
but impress itself on the mind with the 
most wholesome results. 

There is nothing artificial about these 
works. They describe in a straightforward 
manner, persons, incidents, and thoughts 
which every one can understand ; and the in- 
terest of the story, as it centers powerfully 
around the principal figures, is a real and 
hearty friendship for characters which at- 
tract, and hold, and abundantly repay the 
fullest attention. Especially is there found 
in the life of Tom Brown himself, some- 
thing which every man can appreciate. His 
many good qualities are not of the ornamen- 
tal, theoretical kind. They are the out- 
growths of that genuine manliness that, 
whether in man or boy, is nowhere more re- 
spected than by equals and associates. He 
is altogether a representative person. We 
find him doing what we all have done, and 



thinking the best of all we ever thought; 
and as, under the guidance of a master spirit, 
we watch his passage through our common 
experience of school and college life, we 
learn, through him, to name and to under- 
stand the influences which have been at 
work with us. And before Tom Brown, 
passing through it all, has come out of it a 
good, strong, and self-reliant man, his life 
has become as much of a reality, and his good 
influence as strong and as lasting as that of 
any living friend. And so, when the story 
ends, and the man whose life we have ac- 
companied from the cradle stands at the end 
of school days, calmly and hopefully looking 
out on that new world " which is the same 
old, old world, after all," we are helped, by 
his example, to look with clearer under- 
standing on the time when we, too, shall 
meet the world barehanded, making again 
the simple determination to do well what- 
ever may lie before us. We part from Tom 
Brown regretfully, as from a life-long friend, 
but a friend whose influence will never be 
outgrown, and whose life it will always be a 
bright pleasure to remember. 

In these times of change, the real useful- 
ness of almost everything may be ques- 
tioned. The best thought of one age is rid- 
iculed in the next, while some would even 
doubt whether the most practical scientific 
research really increases the sum of human 
happiness. But for all that, the good of 
square, honorable, and straightforward deal- 
ing can never be questioned, and to promote 
that end, the man who, like the author of 
Tom Brown, takes human nature as he finds 
it, and brings the pliable part of the com- 
munity into sympathy with good and manly 
characters, has done quite as much as all the 
writers of learned philosophical discussion 
of the past century. 



The Monday holiday has been adopted at 
Alleghany College. — Ex. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



65 



ACHOSTIC. 
Bowdoin ! What fond memories linger 
O'er tliy dear familiar name, 
Words are faint to tell the honor 
Due to thy illustrious fame. 
O'er those whose minds were broadened 
In thy kindly fostering care, 
Noble mem'ries still -vvill hover, 

Clustered round thy image fair. 
Only truest love they bear thee. 
Linked with memories fond and true. 
Lingering ties of warm devotion. 
E'er your noble name jsursue. 
Glorious Bowdoin, all our manhood 
Earnestly we give to you. 

THE NEED OF COLLEGE EDUCATED 
MEN IN JOURNALISM. 
As we come and go, whether by rail or 
loj boat, whether passing from one country 
to another, or going from home to our places 
of business, the newspaper greets us at 
■every turn. There is no one able to spell 
out the words who does not read it, no per- 
son too low to receive its notice or too high 
in station to escape its sarcasm. It consti- 
tutes a form of reading matter that, of all 
Mnds, is best fitted for general perusal. Its 
influences on the philology of the language 
in which it is printed is almost immeasur- 
able. The amalgamation of foreign phrases 
with local slang, the employment of words, 
the right meanings of which are unknown to 
many of our editors themselves, these and 
similar abuses, that are daily palmed off on 
millions of readers, are inflicting on lan- 
guage an injury that years of reformation 
could scarcely eradicate. Thus the news- 
paper becomes the great teacher of modern 
times ; a teacher for good when, in pure, 
grammatical language, it aims to elevate the 
thinking capacities of the people, and to 
point out the way in which they may rise, 
even above their instructor ; but a teacher 
for evil when it strives to think for the peo- 
ple, and to bind them to its own tenets in 
leligion or politics. The true purpose of 



the newspaper is perverted when it fails to 
present facts, be they friendly or hostile to 
its own ideas. 

A well-known writer, speaking of the 
Greeks in their decline, says : " The passion 
for novelty had eaten up all other and bet- 
ter passions in them — -all reverence, all faith, 
all freedom." Do these words contain no 
warning for us ? Consider the facilities that 
our newspapers offer to the journalist who 
may wish to tickle the diseased palates of 
that horde of " Quidnuncs " which infests 
society. Yet these facihties not only may 
be, but are daily employed by those who 
claim to be journalists ; nor need we find 
difficulty in ascertaining the causes. The 
journalist is human, and often grossly so ; 
his work is arduous, and does not command 
the remuneration that it ought ; his position 
has not been recognized as professional to 
the extent that it should be, nor, in many 
cases, is the journalist himself possessed of 
an intellect so enriched by study, or pol- 
ished by culture as to be fitted for the emer- 
gencies of his calling. With a limited edu- 
cational training to rely on, and with no 
time free from his ever-present duties, in 
which to study and cultivate himself, he is 
gradually narrowed in mind and aspirations 
and, in the end, becomes a caterer to the 
perverted tastes of those whose minds, if 
they have any, are vitiated with trivial 
gossip. 

Shall we, then, wonder that certain, po- 
litical newspapers have been said to perform 
a part similar to that of the " claqueurs " in 
the French theatres? Can we suggest no 
method of improvement when we see those 
so-called journalists, who, in the hope of 
raising a general cachinnation, hold up to ridi- 
cule any object or principle, moral or im- 
moral? It is not only improper, but abso- 
lutely dangerous, to have our news gleaned 
and served up by the hands of such men as 
a certain writer describes when he says, 
" The New York reporter is understood to 



66 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



be a person who never writes English, who 
never ceases to carry the odor of bad liquor, 
and is never known to have a clean shirt." 

Some slight change for the better has al- 
ready taken place in journalism, but it has 
only served to show up in a clearer light its 
glaring defects. Shall it be said that public 
opinion brought about this slight improve- 
ment? Experience has taught us that pub- 
lic opinion has, of itself, never yet achieved 
any great reform, but has rather been the 
handmaid of earnest, efficient lives, devoted 
to explaining the obtuse problems which 
popular opinion had not the courage or 
ability to solve. Though the voice of the 
reading public may attract attention to the 
defects in our present system of journal- 
ism, yet energetic men of well rounded qual- 
ities are required to execute the needed re- 
forms. 

The reformation, we believe, should begin 
with the adoption of methods calculated to 
elevate and perfect journalism as a profes- 
sion. But men who are to elevate and per- 
fect their calling must be competent to fill 
their positions. How then shall such men 
be obtained ? If we consider the incessant 
strain to which the brain of an editor is sub- 
jected, there appears an obvious demand for 
a solid educational foundation. For the pur- 
pose of giving just such a foundation our 
colleges were established, and no intelligent 
person will say that the most of them do not 
fulfill the intentions in which they were 
founded. Thus equipped let the would-be 
journalist apply himself to reporting and 
corresponding for the newspaper, and while 
passing through these training departments 
let him eschew liquor and bad English, 
though he be obliged to forego the luxury of 
" a clean shirt." His mental stock in trade 
being now increased he is far less likely to 
lower the calling of journalism and to pass 
through intellectual or moral insolvency 
than is one who, though endowed with the 



same natural abilities, is nevertheless pos- 
sessed of but little education and that of a 
superficial order. 



UNDER THE STARS. 
We lingered softly by the gate, 

One balmy, summer night, 
When gentle breezes softly blew, 

And stars above were bright. 

But brighter than the stars above. 
Two stars shone forth below, 

That lit my world that evening, with 
A soft, celestial glow. 

My arm stole softly round a waist 

Small and divinely fair, 
A light head nestled on my breast. 

Our vows we plighted there. 



I lingered still around the gate. 
My life seemed heavenly bright. 

Her words of love still lingered on 
The breezes of the night. 

Till from her room I heard a voice 
Exclaim in tones of joy,- 
" Oh, Jen, wake up, for don't you know 
Tve caught a college boy ! " 

BASE-BALL. 

BOWDOIN VS. MAINE STATE COLLEGE. 

The game at Bangor, June 5th, between 
Bowdoin and the Maine State College, was- 
won by the latter. It was marked by heavy 
batting and loose fielding. Oxley umpired 
in a very satisfactory manner. Below is the 
tabulated score : 

BOWDOIN. 

A.B. R. B.H. T.E. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, c. f., i 1 11 1 

Moulton, c, i 2 1 1 6 1 2 

Pushor, lb., 5 2 2 2 11 2 

Talbot, 1. f., 5 1 2 2 

Larrabee.s. 3., .... 5 1 1 3 2 3 

Gahan, 2b., 5 1 i 2 

Gary, 3b 4 3 1 1 

Clark, r. f., i 

Davis, p., 3 1 2 12 3 

39 9 8 10 24 21 11 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



67 



MAINE STATE COLLEGE. 



Mason, 1\> 5 2 1 1 

Ray, s. s 5 2 1 3 

Burleigh, c. f., . . . . 5 2 

Small, p., 5 1 3 7 

McNally, r. f., . . . . 5 2 1 3 

Bogers, c, i 1 1 

Jllwell, 3b i 

PMlbrook, 2b i 

Vose, 1. f 2 1 



A.B. ». E.H. T.B. P.O. A. B. 

10 1 

3 2 3 



14 3 

2 

11 4 



Bowdoln, 
M. S. C, 



39 10 7 15 27 24 10 
SCOEB BY INNINGS. 
23456789 
10120310—9 
10 3 2 2 —10 
Struck out — Davis 10, Small 13. "Wild pitcbes — Davis 

1, Small 4. Passed balls— Moulton 6, Rogers 4. Three-base 
Tiits Larrabee, Small (2), McNally. Earned runs — Bowdoin 

2. Left on bases — Bowdoin 6, M. S. C. 7. Umpire — Harry 
■Oxley. 

BOWDOIN VS. BATES. 

The last game of the series between 
Bowdoin and Bates was played at Water- 
Tille, June 9th. Goodwin, the Colby pitcher, 
officiated as umpire, and gave perfect satis- 
faction. The following is the detailed score : 



Dearth, 8 

Moulton, .... 2 

Pushor 3 

Wilson, 9 

Talbot, 7 

Larrabee, .... 6 

Freeman 4 

Gary 5 

Davis, 1 



Sandford, 
Underwood 
Thayer, . 
Woodman, 
Tinker, . 
Call, . . 
Small, . 
Nickerson, 
Flanders, 



A.B. E. B.H. T.E. P.O. 



10 


2 








1 

















1 


5 


3 


5 


1 



12 16 27 24 12 



A.B. R. E.H. T.E. P.O. A. E. 

5 1 1 1 11 3 3 

5 3 2 2 13 4 

2 1 

1 

1 2 



2 

1 2 
1 



Bowdoin, 
Bates, 



41 10 8 

SCORE BY INNINGS. 
2 3 4 5 6 

10 3 3 
2 3 10 



9 

0— 9 
0—10 I 



Struck out — Davis 10, Underwood 11. Wild pitches — 
Davis 4. Passed balls— Moulton 4, Sandford 1. Two-base 
bit — Nickerson. Three-base hit — Freeman. Earned runs 
— Bowdoins 1. Left on bases — Bowdoins 10, Bates 5. 
Umpire — Forrest Goodwin, Colby, '87. Time of game — 2 
hours 50 minutes. 

BOWDOIN VS. COLBY. 
The Bowdoins played their last league 
game for this season, on the delta, June 12th, 
with Colby, and were defeated by the fol- 
lowing score : 

BOWDOIN. 



A.B. R. B.H. T.E. P.O. A. E. 



Dearth 8 

Moulton, .... 2 

Pushor, 3 

Wilson 9 

Talbot, 7 

Larrabee, .... 6 

Freeman, .... 4 

Gary, 5 

Davis, 1 



F. Goodwin, 
Putnam, 
Webber, 
Larrabee, . 
W. Goodwin, 
Pulsifer, 
Gibbs, . . 
Mathews, . 
Boyd, . . 



2 3 





A.B. K. B.H. T.B. P.O. 



9 12 27 16 



SCORE BY INNINGS. 

123456789 
Bowdoin, .10101000 0—3 
Colby, ..10003001 —5 
Struck out — Davis 5, Goodwin 10. Wild pitches — 
Davis 1. Passed balls — Moulton 1, Pulsifer 2. Earned 
runs — Colby 1. Double plays — Larrabee and Cary, W. 
Goodwin and Webber. Two-base hits — Pushor, Talbot, 
Goodwin. Three-base hit — Goodwin. Left on bases — 
Bowdoin 6, Colby 5. Umpire — Oxley. Time of Game — 1 
hour 35 minutes. 



The Yale Freshmen have been admitted 
this j^ear to the race between the '89 crews 
of Columbia and Harvard, and the question 
of supremacy will probably be settled at 
New London, June 30th. 



68 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




'Tis now the youthful Fresh- 
man seeks 
The wiles of social life, 
And turns his mind to future days 
"When he will need a wife; 
But very soon the fact he finds, 
Undoubtedly is true, 
That courtship with the maidens here, 
Is really nothing new. 

Mr. S. B. Ward has been looking for canvassers 
among the college boys. He finds tlie market dull. 

What sort of a statement is this for an umpire 
to make ? It was made by Coyne after the second 
Bowdoin-Bates game : "I favored Bowdoin after I 
saw Bates was so far ahead." 

Sewall, '87, has returned to college after a very 
successful term at Searsport. 

'Eighty-nine's Freshman dinner will be held at 
the Falmouth, in Portland, on June 17th. 

The college orchestra, that practiced so energet- 
ically during the winter term, has not been heard of 
for the past two mouths. The spring term, with its 
athletic sports, does not allow much time for extra 
work, but we hope next fall to see the orchestra re- 
newed with increased interest. 

There is prospect of a good-sized class next year. 

The glass-setter has made his annual rounds, and 
the buildings and campus are being put in order, 
preparatory to Commencement week. 

The strawberry festival, held on the evening of 
June 7th, at the Unitarian Church, was well attended 
by the students. 

Several of the Seniors have taken advantage of 
the Senior vacation to pay visits home, and else- 
where. 

A week or so ago there was posted on the read- 
ing-room door a letter from an alumnus in Portland, 
urging the nine to make " one immortal brace." 

Prof. Chapman preached the Baccalaureate Ser- 
mon, on Sunday evening, June 6th, before the grad- 
uating class of Fryeburg Academy. 

The Bates have made a new addition to their 
college "yell," which now is B-a-t-e-s, rah, rah, rah, 
Boom-alaka-Boom-alaka, Boom-Bates-Boom. 

One hundred and twenty-eight volumes and forty 



pamphlets have been added to the library for the 
month of May. Among them are Frazer's Maga- 
zines, comprising seventy volumes. 

The Librarian has had the offer of the London- 
Illustrated Neivs, comprising seventy-six volumes, 
beginning with the first issue, and coming down ta 
the year 1881, for $100; but as yet has not de- 
cided to take them. The books are now in the 
library. 

General improvements are being made upon the 
campus preparatory to Commencement. The appa- 
ratus for the new gymnasium will be here in a few 
days, and it is hoped everything will be in working 
order for the inspection of the alumni, Commence- 
ment week. 

Owing to unavoidable difiiculties, the 'Varsity 
shell, which has been undergoing rej^airs at Davis'' 
boat-house, Portland, did not arrive till last week, 
j'et the crew has been doing good work in the old 
shell. Their intentions are now to pull an exhibi- 
tion race iiere, Tuesday forenoon of Commencement 
week, with a Portland crew, and leave that night 
on the midnight train for Lake George. 

Examinations come Tuesday, Wednesday, and 
Thursday of this week. 

There was a large attendance to witness the Bates 
vs. Colby game on the delta, Saturday, June 5th, 
which resulted in a score of 7 to 4 in favor of Bates> 
The game was very exciting throughout, the most 
noticeable feature of the game was the fine base- 
running of Sandford. The umpiring of Coyne was- 
wretched. 

Considerable excitement was created in chapel 
the other morning, by the appearance, at the en- 
trance of the art gallery, of what at first sight 
looked like some celestial being, but who, on further 
observation, proved to be a washer-woman engaged 
in cleaning the floor, and who doubtless were at- 
tracted hither by the coming in of the students. 

Mr. Edward Stanwood, secretary of the class of 
'61, has received from twenty-eight of the forty-two 
survivors of the class, letters expressing their inten- 
tion to be present at the reunion, June Sith. It is 
expected that at least thirty-five will attend. There 
will be a dinner at the Falmouth, in Portland, on the 
evening of June 23d, and those present will on the 
next day attend the Commencement dinner at Bruns- 
wick. 

E. C. Plummer, '87, now rings the chapel bell. 

One of the members of the Sophomore Greek 
division has discovered the existence of a new Greek 
school of philosophy, known as the " Peripathetic.'' 

The final Commencement appointments are as fol- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



69 



lows : Ben-y, Butler, C. A. Davis, Horn, Norris, 
Parker, Smith, Turner, Tuttle, Wentworth. 

The programme for the eighty-first Commence- 
ment of Bowdoin College, June 20-26 is as follows : 

SUNDAY. 

4.00 P.M. — Baccalaureate Sermon by the President. 

MONDAY. 

8.00 P.M. — Junior Prize Declamation. 

TUESDAY. 

Class-Day exercises. Illumination and dance on the 
Green in the evening. 

WEDNESDAY. 

9.00 A.M. — Graduating exercises of the Medical Depart- 
ment. 
11.30 A.M. — Phi Beta Kappa meeting. 
3.00 P.M. — Inauguration of the President. 

THURSDAY. 

8.30 A.M. — Prayer-meeting of Alumni and friends in Y. M. 
C. A. rooms. 

9.00 A.M. — Meeting of the Alumni. 

10.30 A.M. — Commencement exercises, followed by dinner 
in Memorial Hall. 

8.00 to 10.30 P.M. — Reception by the President in Memo- 
rial Hall. 

FKIDAY. 

8.30 A.M. — Examination of candidates for admission to 

college at Massachusetts Hall. 
9.00 A.M. — Annual meeting of Maine Historical Society 

in Adams Hall. 

SATURDAY. 

8.30 A.M. — Examinations for admission continued. 

The Senior English Composition Prizes were 
awarded as follows : First Prizes, Smith, Tuttle ; 
Second Prizes, J. H. Davis, Turner. The Brown 
Prizes tor Extemporaneous Composition were 
awarded to Knight (first), and Turner (second). 

At a recent meeting of the Reading-Room Asso- 
ciation, the following ofiicers were elected for next 
year: President, Jos. Williamson, Jr., '88; Vice- 
President, G. A. Ingalls, '88 ; First Director, D. M. 
Cole, '88. 

There will be no Commencement Concert this 
year. Possibly a band concert may be given in the 
evening. 

Gleams from Sophomore Greek: Prof. — "Mr. 
H., what would you call Greece, as regards its 
shape?" Mr. H. — " A parallelogram. Professor." 
Prof. — "I should call it a peninsula." Prof. — "Mr. 
S., what were the habits of the Greeks concerning 
their eating and drinking?" Mr. S. — "They did 
both on a large scale." 

The Medical School closes June 23d. 




'25.— Rev. George B. 
Cheever is about to issue a 
new edition of his latest work, " God's 
Time Piece for Man's Eternity." 
'34. — Rev. Henry T. Cheever has re- 
cently issued a new edition of his book, 
"The Whale and his Captors." He has also re- 
cently published " Correspondencies of Faith," a 
work dedicated to Bowdoin College and its alumni. 

'50.— Rev. T. S. Perry, of Cumberland Centre, 
has accepted a call to the Congregationalist Church 
at Limerick, Me. 

'58. — Hon. F. M. Drew, ot Lewiston, was the 
Memorial-Day orator at Skowhegan, Me. 

'60.— Rev. James L. Phillips, D.D., delivered a 
lecture. May 21st, before the students of Bates Col- 
lege, on " Mission Work in India." 

'70. — Mr. D. S. Alexander is a member of the 
law firm of Hon. James A. Roberts at Buffalo, N. Y. 
This makes five members of the class of '70, who 
are novf residents of that city, the others being Dr. 
Lucien Howe, Dr. Joseph Keene, Willis H. Meads, 
and James A. Roberts. 

'75. — Mr. Francis R. Upton has been ill, and will 
spend the summer in Europe for his health. 

No. H of Vol. XV. of the Orient contained a 
partial list of the class of '76. The following com- 
pletes the list : 

Aldon, physician. 

Clark, Principal High School, Auburn, Me. 

Hill, Principal High School, Bangor, Me. 

Jameson, instructor at Institute of Technology, 
Boston, Mass. 

Knight, lawyer, Wiscasset, Me. 

Parker, business, 164 High Street, Boston, Mass. 

Perry, Congregationalist minister, Randolph, Vt. 

Pratt, Episcopal minister, Clinton, Mass. 

Somes, Principal Berwick Academy, South Ber- 
wick, Me. 

Souther, business, Fryeburg, Me. 

White, teaching, Lisbon Falls, Me. 

Yates, reporter on Daily Advertiser, Boston, Mass. 

The following have died : 

Andrews, A. E., died at Biddeford, Me., Sept. SO, 
1878. 



70 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Andrews, C. S., died at Norway, Me., April 12, 
1883. 

Gordon, died at Chesterville, Me., Jan. 13, 1880. 

Sewall, H. 11., died at Albany, N. Y., April 17, 
1884. 

'80. — Mr. Henry A. Wing of Mattawamkeag, is 
night editor of the Portland Press. Mr. Wing was 
formerly connected with the Lewiston Journal and 
later with the Bangor Commercial. 

'81. — It is said that Rev. Carroll E. Harding is to 
be rector of St. John's Episcopal Church in Thomas- 
ton, entering upon his duties about the middle of 
June. 

'83. — Mr. C. S. Woodbury was recently admitted 
to the Cumberland County Bar. 

'83. — Dr. A. C. Gibson has returned from Europe, 
where he has been pursuing his studies in med- 
icine. 



Prof. Edward S. Morse, wlio occupied the 
chair of Zoology and Comparative Anatomy for 
three years at Bowdoin, was recently elected Presi- 
dent of the American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science. 




The faculty of Yale are said to be intruding to 
prohibit base-ball there next year. 

Cornell has abolished compulsory attendance at 
recitations and lectures. 

Harvard and Yale are tied for the base-ball cham- 
pionship thus far, with Princeton close behind. 

The Colby Echo lias become a bi-weekly. 

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is to 
have a class day this year for the first time. 

Vermont has a college base-ball league this year. 

Williams established a literary magazine a year 
ago, Amherst this spring, and novv Dartmouth calls 
for one. This will make the number of college lit- 



erary monthlies ten, the others being at Harvard, 
Yale, Princeton, Hamilton, Washington and Lee, 
Richmond, and Vassar. 

The Cornell crew is made up as follows : 

Name. Position. Age. Weight. Height. 

H. S. Howland, bow, 22, 1564, 5 ft. 7 in. 

"W. P. Morgan, 2, 20, 153, 5 ft. lOj in. 

W. G. Barney, 3, 21, 162, 5 ft. Hi in. 

E. M. Olmsted, stroke, 22, 152, 5 ft. 8 in.. 

Columbia has defeated Harvard, Princeton, and 
Yale in base-ball this year. She ought to become a 
member of the league in 1887. 

The Brunonian is the oldest college paper in 
the United States. 

. The University of Pennsylvania has presented a 
Greek comedy on the stage. 

Brown is rumored to be about to become a co-ed- 
ucational institution. 

Senior vacation has been abolished at Amherst. 

Brown, '89, defeated Harvard, '89, 6 to 0. 

The Tuflonian suggests a convention of the Col- 
lege editors of New England. The idea is a good 
one, and we hope it will be carried out. Why not 
form a regular association, holding yearly conven- 
tions, and electing proper officers. A banquet might 
be given after an annual business meeting of one day, 
the object being the interchange of ideas, both in the 
literary and business departments. By this, also, a 
schedule of minimum advertising rates might be made 
wliich would prevent the scaling down, so ruinous to 
many papers. If the Tufto7iian, being centrally sit- 
uated, will take the lead, there is no reason why an 
opening convention should not be held next October. 
The Orient will promise to be represented. 

Five Colleges have been established in Dakota 
during the past year. Go it while j'ou are young. 

Williams opened her new gymnasium May 26th, 
with an athletic exhibition. 

The aggregate income of the colleges in the United 
States is four and a half million dollars per annum. 

Harvard's library contains 164,000 volumes. 

Cornell has established a summer school of Chem- 
istry. 

Harvard will hold examination in Paris this year, 
for the benefit of those studying abroad. 

Finley, the Columbia catcher, was offered $300 to- 
catch one week for the New Yoi-k league team. 



What one of our number suggested to his lady- 
friend that she play a duet with him on the mouth- 
organ ? — Ex. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



71 




I met a girl of the . 

And gently took her 
I thought I'd pop the ? 
But didn't have the s&. 
"I do love pig's feet so!" exclaimed a young 
Freshie at his boarding house the other day, as he 
reached over and took the last one from the plate in 
the middle of the table ; " I do believe I could live 
■on pig's feet." "Are you sure that you don't ? " was 
the sarcastic question put to him by a SojDh. who was 
about to help himself to the fast disappearing foot. — 
Beacon. 
The young moon sinks into the cloudless vvest, 

Her crecent-arms stretched upward toward the stars, 
Pillowing her head upon the snow's cold hreast ; 
Her beams no longer pierce my window-bars — 
I and the stars alone are not at rest. 

The moon hath watched through many a weary night, 
Must watch again, and so she resteth now. 

Then let thine own wild, bitter thoughts take flight, 
To the calm stars uplift thy throbbing brow. 

And rest thy head on thy cool pillow white. 

— Chronicle. 



ELEGANT MACKINAW 

STRAW HATS, 

THE BEST QUALITY, 

$1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 

MERRY THE HATTER, 

PORTLAND. 

h. v. stackpole, 
Fine Boots and Shoes, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 

Dentist, 



F. W. BAEEO]N", 

Dealer in Staiiiarj M Fancy Groceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce. 
Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

FRANK A. HALE, Proprietor, 
DeWITT HOUSE, TONTINE HOTEL, 

Lewiston, Me. Brunswick, Me. 

Private Sui^pers and Banquets a specialty. 

B. E. PLUMMER, Manager. 



STOKER BLOCK, 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



SPEAR & WHITMORE, 

DEALERS IN 

ALL KINDS OF COAL 

Cedar Street, Brunswick, Me. 



F. L. DUNNE, 

TO THE 

HARVARD CO -OPERATIVE SOCIETY. 

Constantly in Receipt of the Latest London Novelties. 

338 WASHINGTON STREET, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



CIGARETTE 
Smokers who 

are willlng^to 
paya little more 
for Cigarettes 

than the price 



charsed for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, \yill 
find the RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO AT.Tj OTHERS. 
They are made from the Ijrlglitest, most 
delicately flavored, and lilgliest cost 
gold leaf" grown in Virginia, and are abso- 
lately ^Tithont ndiUteratlon or dmgs, 

TRAJGHTCUTJ^g: 

We use the Genwliie Frencli Rice Paper 

of our own direct importation, which is made 
especiallv for us, water marked with the name 
of the hrand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
original brand, and to obsen'e that each pack- 
age or box of ■ 
Richmond 
Straight Cut 
Cigarettes I 
bears the I 
Bignatiu-e of ' 

ALLEN &GINTER 

MANUrACTnEERS, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



niGARETTES 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Bye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 

i Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry, Promptly Repaired and Warranted. 

EDWIIM F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BBUNSWICK, ME. 



On and after Oct. 12th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.15, 11.25 A.M., 3.38, 4.45 and 6.25 P.M., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.43. 
For Eockland, S.15 A.M., 3.38 P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.40 P.M., and 

12.35 (night). 
For Lewiston, 8.15 A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. tmixed), and 2.45 P.M. 
For Augusta and Waterville, S.20 a.m., 2.40 P.M., 12.45 every 

night, and on Saturdays only at 6.35 P.M. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 (night). 
For Bangor, Ellsworth, Mt. Desert FeiTy, St. Stephen, Houlton. 

Vancehoro, and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Bar H.arhor, 13.45 (night). 

Note. — The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
iston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run evei^y night, including Sun- 
day, htit do not connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, or 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sun- 
day morning. 

PAYSON TUCKEE, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BooTHBT, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 6, 1885. 



SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. 

Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Yirglnia. 

The following are our w^ell kuowTi 

STANDARD BRANDS : 

Caporal, Sweet Caporal, St. James 1-2, Caporal 1-2, 

St. James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES, 
Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and Fi-ench Rice Paper, are rolled by the high- 
est class of skilled labor, and warranted fi'ee from flavoring or 
Impurities 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a rAC-srsnLE of Kinney Bros. 
Signature. 

KINBTEr TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KIXNET BROS. 
NEW YORK. 



JORDAN SNOW, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

DuNLAP Block, Brunswick, Me, 



(INTEReEPTED LETTER.) 

Brunswick, May 14, 1886. 
Owen, Moore & Co., Portland. 
Gentlemen : 
Please send me by mail one pair long Bicycle'Stockings, 
size Oj, regulation League Color. Enclosed one dollar and 
stamps for postage. I see by advertisement in Portland 
paper that you carry a line of Tennis Goods. Please send 
me a price-list of Rackets and Balls, with best discount to 
a regular club. What are the prices on Jersey Coats, 
and in what color do they come ? 

Yours truly, 
P. O. Box 2002. BOB BROWN. 



Confectionery, Frnit, and Cigar Store, 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

Wm. R. FIELD, Manager. 

W. HAWTHORNE, 

FINE * TAILORING, 

2 Church Block, Bath. 



1 file in Philadelphia 

I at the Newspaper Adver- 

_ __^ _ r tisinf^ Agency of Messrs. 

Ni W. AVER & SON, our authorized agents. 



THIS PAPERS 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



OOLLEaE BOOKSTORE. 

"We have constantly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 

BYRON STEVJBIVS. 



DEALER IN 



Ice -Cream, Fine Confectionery, Fruit, and Cigars. 



Under the Old Univcrsalist Chnr4 ■ - Main Street, BRUNSWICK. 



LENTON & NEAGLE. 



In this may be seen a verj' fine assortment of Ladies' and Gents' 
Traveling Bags, Valises, and Shawl Starps. There is also to be 
seen a very fine line of Hiding Saddles for both Ladies and Gen- 
tlemen, showing that they pay strict attention to the wants of all 
their cnstomers who are lovers of that healthy sport of horse- 
back riding. In connection with their riding gear they keep the 
Largest Stock of Horse Clothing and Dusters that can be found 
this side of the manufacturers, — 150 different patterns to 
select from. They are also Manufacturers of Fine Harnesses 
of every description, and are ahead of all their competitors as 
regards to Prices and Good "Work. They pay strict attention 
to "Trunk and Valise Repairing, and can Canvas .a Trunk if it 
be so desired. They Cut Prices to all College Students. 
Eemember the place and give them a call, at the Sign of 

LENTON & NEAGLE, 

Under G. A. R. Hall. Main Street, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



COBURN CLASSICAL INSTITUTE, 

WATERVILLE, ME. Both Sexes. Four Courses of Study : 
Introductory; College Preparatory, 3 years; English and 
Scientific, 3 years ; Ladies' Collegiate, 4 years. Location healthy, 
expenses moderate, discipline wholesoriic, morals good. Persons 
using alcoholic beverages or tobacco need not apply. Accommoda- 
tions ample and excellent. For further information send for 
Catalogue to J. H. HANSON, Principal. 



ANTKD 

Local Men to take orders for our Specialties 
in their own towns and coiinties. Live men 
make »5 a day. Write for terms, giving ref- 
erences and age. 

CHAKLES H. CHASE, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




NUESERYMAN. 



F. H. WILSON, 

DISPENSEK or 

Pure Drugs, Medicines, and Ctiemicals. 

Imported and Domestic Cigars. 
MAIN STKEET, - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 



T23:e 



« TRAVELERS « 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HA-RTFORD, COnSTHST., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OvCr $1 1,000,000, and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 

A r^r^TTiTTIVr'T' T*(^^T Tr^TTr^ ludemnifyins the Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
-^ ^--"^-^ -"--•-' -•-'-L^ -i -•- V^'iiiVyJ-.LjKJ Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidental Injury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only $5.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each 8*1,000, with §5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Eesidence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

O'^ESSt OnSTES JLTSr 3S-IKrE3 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 1861 have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. 

Issues T TTj^Tj' X>r^T Tr^TT?Q of every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 
also -L/ir Ih Jr ULil^iiiiO Personal Benefit. 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, ------ $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Oflice at Hartford. 
JAS. G. BATTERSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



QOCIJETIT S)ies curtd. Elates, Cuts cuxd JErLstgrvtcL. 
'Writirtg JPcupe-T clticL Cards JUrtgrcuv-ed cured, JPrvrvted. 
StLLd&rvt's 'Vtstttrhg Ccurds. iTwttcLttorLS of ervemy kind 
e-^ecjited hy the arhgTCLvtrtg Thoixse of 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 

Society Irv\ritcLttons , 'Dtes, curtd lUixstrcLttorts for Jt^ecw- 
(^ooks, J^fortogrcLirtSj j^rirts, cuxd Crests Ercgrcuved curtd 
^rinteoL. 'Vtstiing CctrdLs, and, the Choicest Stcttionery . Seals, 
Tapers aixd, Sealirtg TVa^, and. Sealing Sets. 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 




Js^aiU PHOSPHATE. 

[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

The Unrivalled Remedy for Dyspepsia, Mental and Physical Exhaustion, Nervousness, Wakefulness, 

Diminished Vitality, etc. 

As Food for an Exhausted Brain, in Liver and Kidney Trouble, In Seasickness and Sick Headache, In Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion and Constipation, in Inebriety , Desj^ondenCy and cases of Impaired Nerve Function, 

It has become a necessity in a large number of households throughout the world, 

And is universally prescribed and recommended by physicians of all schools. 
Its action wiU harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 
It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body. 
It is unsurpassed as a substitute for lemons or limes, and 

IT MAKES A DELICIOUS DRINK "WITH "WATER AND SUGAR ONLY. 
Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, R. I. 
J5S-BEWARE OF IMrTATIONS.-Sff 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunswick and Xopsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 



Go to W, B. lAToodard's 

To buy your GKOCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 
s:fect.£i-Xj sa-^TEs to s'X'T3-x)eitt cxjTj-ss. 
Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 




OTTAWA lllll If ijCushing's Island, 
Ul irtWrt M.M.\J \JKf*J Portland, Me. 

3VC. S. GIBSOlSr. 



Bowdoin College Medical Department. 

The Sixty-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence FebruauY 4th, 1886, 
and continue TWENTY WEKKS. 

FACULTY.— Eev, Wm. DeWitt Hvde, President: Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. Dana, M.p., Pathol- 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obsteti-ics and 
Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M. , 
Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. Gerrish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Fkaxklin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemisti-y; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henrv H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G.Young, Puljlic Hygiene; 
Irving E. ItiMEALL, M.D., Demonstrator oJ Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealev, M.D., Demonsti'ator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine 



ALL KINDS OF 





EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 

such as 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, IVIaine. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, IVIAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and Diu'able Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



164 High St i 

ALLEN & crO:T"r6RTLAND, 

Having moved to their aev? store, 204 Middle Street, Cor. of Plum, are constantly opening 
rich and elegant goods for gentlemen's wear. 

IhoicG loPGign fabrics low iisplapd in fur tailoring leparimBiit. 

The finest-made up Clothing to be seen in the State now exhibited in our 



Novelties for Genilemen 's Dress in Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves, Neckwear, Ganes, and Silk Umbrellas 
in Seasonable Styles to be found in our 

Furnishing D@i?artm@rit. 

•ALLEN & COMPANY, 

204 MIDDLE STKEET, COKWER OF PLUM, POETLAISTD. 



L k. kTKWm©\ 



Donnel Building, Corner Pearl and Middle Streets, PORTLAND, ME., 

WOULD RESPECTFULLY CALL THE ATTENTION OF 

Bimeis of FniQltiiie, Gargets, Besili, Farloi Stoves, Baiiges, ki, 

To the Enormous Stock of House Furnishings at the Portlaud Store. Being Manufacturers, 

intending purchasers can see tlie styles and select their own coverings for Parlor Furniture, and have it made 

to order ior the same price. We keep enormous quantities o£ Upholstery Goods in the Boston Store, 

and full lines of samples. Here our prices on Parlor Suites range from $35.00 in Hair Cloth 

to }f375.00 in Silk or Mohair Plushes. 

CHAMBER FXJIINITXJRE. DRAPERY of every description made to order in the 

Boston store. Orders taken here and designs and samples 
We have in stock in our three stores 87 different pat- shown, 
terns of Chamber Suites, manufactured from all the pop- 
ular woods, viz. : Pine, Ash, Walnut, Cherry, Basswood, PARLOR STOVES. 
aoid Mahogany ranging in pric^e from $18 00 to |400.00. g ;^j attention is requested to our Parlor Stove De- 
We also have all kinds sizes, and quantities of Bedsteads, artment, as we believe we have the best line to select 
Bureaus, Commodes, etc. Spring Beds, Cot Beds, Lounge ^ j j^ j^ p j ^^ qq ^ ^^g qq 
Beds, Sofa Beds, Mantel Beds, etc. Mattresses of every ^^-^^ ^^^ '■j-'^^^- ^ ix^-co »:. w « w^v vu. 
kind and quality, from an excelsior at $2.00 to a pure STOVES AND RANGES 
bleached South American curled horse hair at Si25.00. oj-uvjio a-atu a^isKxca. 

Our line of Ranges comprises all the latest and best in 
CARPET DEPARTMENT. the market, including the " New Tariff " and " Quaker," 

which are considered superior to anything yet produced. 

$75,000 worth of Cottons, Cotton and Wools, All-Wool Write for cuts of these two Ranges. Prices $15.00, $20.00, 

Extras, Tapestry, Brussels, Body Brussels, Velvets, Wil- $22.50, $25.00, $27.50, $29.00, $33.00, $35.00, $38.00, and up- 

tons, etc., at our usual Rook-Bottom Prices. Any of these wards to $65.00. These prices include all the ware, pipe, 

can be selected at the Portland store. SHADES and and zinc. 



Any of the above goods sold for Cash or on our Special Contract System, at 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Streets, Portland, Me. 

Branch of the Great JSfassmi, Hall Hotise Furnishing Store, 827 Washington Street, Boston. 

B. A. ATKINSON & CO. 

ISAAC C. ATKINSON, Manager. 



^ %r^ 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STKADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard " and " Duplex " Burner SUPERLATIVE, 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



Mixtures for Pipe or Cigarette. 
THREE KINGS, Turltisli, Perique and Virginia. 
MELLOW MIXTURE, Turkish and Perique. 
TUKKISH and VIRGINIA. 

PERIQUE and VIRGINIA. 
GENUINE TURKISH. 
FLAKE CUTS, ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE PIPE. 

VANITY FAIR. 



OLD GOLD. 

SALMAGUNDI, a New Granulated Mixture. 

FRAGRANT VANITY FAIR, 

CLOTH OF GOLD. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENSEAVED IH THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOE 

ROGERS' CELEBRATED GROUPS. 



KIMBALL'S SATIN STRAIGHT CUT CIGAREHES . 

People of refined taste wlio desire exceptionally fine Cigar- 
ettes should xise only our Straight Cut, put up in Satin Packets 
and boxes of 10s., 20s., oOs., and 100s. 

Our Cigarettes were never so floe as now. They cannot be 
sm-passed for purity and excellence. Only the purest Rice Paper 
used. Established 1846. 14 First Prize Medals. 

Wm. S. Kimball & Co., Peerless Tobacco Works, 

ROCHESTEK, N. Y. 



PHONETIC SHORTHAND. ""'^^^^iP 
For Self-Instruction. Coutaining all the late improve- 
ments. Price $1.50. Special Instruction Ijy Mail, $6.00. 
Send Stamp for Specimen Pages and Illustrateil Pamphlet. 

VV. W. OSGOODBY, Publisher, Uochester, N. Y. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

474 Congress St., - - - opp. Preble House. 

THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

]Me. 3 0DD EEIiMW^' BMOK, 

Is the place to buy 

S-aoki, SiaUonei§, § d'mimj ^nodS.. 

Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 

A. W. TOWNSEND, Prop'r. 



The New Styles in 

STII^^ and. SOI^T H^a^TS 

In all colors, are now read3^ An elegant line of New York 

Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Brow^ns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, 

-s^T ELLIOTT'S, e- 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer ia Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 

C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 







THE FAVORITE NOS. S03-404-SS2-/7O-JS/-W/TM 
OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



J HE PROPRIETOR of tUe Nearest Coiner Grocery will 
endeavor to merit a 

CONTINUANCE 

Of tlio Student's patronage. Come and prove liim. 



J. S. TOWNE, 
PHARMACEUTIST. 

rURE DRUGS, MEDICINES, FANCY AND TOILET AR- 
TICLES; ALSO A FINE LINE OF CHOICE CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES. PRESCRIPTIONS a Specialty. 

Main Street, Near Bowdoin College. 



J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 



The Largest Assortment of 

Gents^ Fine Shoes 

Is to be lounrt at 

JACKSON'S. 

LAWN-TENNIS, BASE -BALL, AND LOW SHOES, 

In Large Variety. 

S. R, JACKSON, 2d, 2 Odd Fellows Block, Brunswick. 

I.>Ii0I> IN AND INSPECT. 

j. m. lombard, 
Dentist, 

OVER BOAKDMAET'S STORE, MAIN STREET. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 



PURITY SWEET CIGARETTES. 

THE PUREST, MILDEST, AND BEST CIGARETTE ON THE MARKET. 

PUBE, BRIGHT VIRGINIA TOBACCO AND PUREST RICE PAPER. 



FOR THE FINEST MADE TRY OUR 

STRAIGHT WEB CIGARETTES. 

MANUFACTURED FROM THE FINEST BRIGHT TOBACCO GROWN. WITH 

TURKISH MIXTURE. 



PURITY SMOKING TOBACCO. 

THE FINEST, PUREST, AND BEST SMOKING TOBACCO MADE. 



RALEIGH CUT PLUG SMOKING. 

THE ORIGINAL, PQREST, AND THE BEST. 



We guarantee all not injurious. 



Only a trial and you 'will be convinced- 



PACE & SIZER, Manufacturers, Richmond, Va. 



ON SALE AT FIELD'S. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books beinp; mentioned in some ihstances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Caesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
Mi\e\d, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xeuophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra, — so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regulae Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. II and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the KaUoivell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryehurg Academy, these scliools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQUIEED— FOUR HOURS A -WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A "WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terras. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 




#wi#m 




COMMENCEMENT NUMBER. 



Vol. XVI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JULY 7, 1886. 



No. 5. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE TEAR ET THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
C. B. Burleigh, '87, Managing Editor. 
L. B. Varnet, '87, Business Editor. 



C. C. Choate, '87. 




c. 


H. 


Vekrill, '87. 


M. Ij. Kimball, '87. 




H 


C. 


Hill, '88. 


A. W. Merrill, '87. 




M 


P. 


Smithwick, '88. 


E. C. Plummeb, 87. 


TERIvIS 


A. 


W 


Tolman, '88. 


Per annum, in advance. 






$2.00 


Single Copies, 








15 cents. 



Extra copies can be obtained at the boolcstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
municatif^ns in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, .and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. XVI., No. 5.-Jult 7, 1886. 

Editorial Notes 73 

The Wreck, 78 

Inauguration of President Hyde, 78 

Abstract of Baccalaureate Sermon 79 

Ethel's Rook, SO 

Class Day, 81 

Medical Graduation 82 

Hope 82 

History of '86, » . . 83 

A Journey, 87 

Answers to our Contributors, 88 

Psi Upsilon Convention 88 

Base-Ball : 

Early Base-Ball at Bo wdoin 89 

'87 vs. '89, 91 

General Averages of the Ball Team, 91 

CoLLEGii Tabula, 91 

Personal, 94 

Necrology, 1885-86, 94 

Exchanges, 95 




The magnificent victory of the Bow- 
doin crew at tlie intercollegiate regatta at 
Lake George, N. Y., Saturday, brings the 
pennant to Bowdoin for two years in succes- 
sion, and will more than atone for our re- 
verses in base-ball. The crew is indeed to be 
congratulated upon its superb work. The 
victorious Quiiisigamond crew went out with 
the class of '85, and consequently none of the 
present crew had ever participated in an in- 
tercollegiate contest. Three of them entered 
college at the beginning of the year, and this 
is therefore their iirst summer's work upon 
the water. That this crew should not only 
win the intercollegiate pennant, but also 
break the best four-oared time made by our 
'85 crew at Quinsigamond last year, is a 
thing, we believe, unprecedented in the his- 
tory of the Intercollegiate Association. The 
crew is entitled to the highest praise for the 
hard, conscientious work they have done and 
the honor they liave brought to the college. 
Had our nine put in the hard, systematic 
work that has been done by the crew, we be- 
lieve that we should now hold two pennants 
instead of one. 



We regret that for the first time in 
some years the Commencement number of 



74 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



the Orient contains none of the Class- 
Day parts, with the exception of the history. 
The remarkable modesty of the participants 
in these exercises, although of mushroom 
growth, has led them to hide their lights 
under a bushel. It is always thus with genius, 
and although the Okibnt would gladly have 
opened its columns to the acumen of a most 
successful Class Day, it can only content itself 
with publishing other and less erudite articles. 
We trust this native reserve, this self- 
depreciation, this timid shrinking from the 
horrors of the public gaze, will not always 
characterize our '86 friends. We trust that 
when (to use a remarkably original phrase, 
which we have heard several times recently) 
they " go out to grapple with the Avorld " 
— the ci-uel world — they will lift the bushel 
and let their lights shine with an effulgent 
lustre upon humanity and the Orient. 



The Commencement that has just closed 
was one of the most eminently successful in 
the history of the college. An unusually 
large number of the alumni were present, 
especially from the earlier classes. The har- 
mony and enthusiasm that prevailed, showed 
that the sons of Bowdoin were still animated 
by that love and devotion which has ever 
characterized her alumni. President Hyde 
performed the many and arduous duties of 
his position with a grace and dignity which 
won the admiration of all, and the alumni 
present were unanimously of the opinion that 
Bowdoin was at last honored by a President 
who is fully the equal, in scholarship and 
ability, of any of his eminent predecessors, 
and that under his wise direction the college 
will enter upon an era of progressive pros- 
perity. The action of the Boards in provid- 
ing so excellent and experienced an instruc- 
tor for our new gymnasium as Mr. A. H. 
Brown, is most commendable, and assures us 
that, in the future, the physical welfare of 
our students will be carefully attended to. 

Mr. Hutchins, who has met with marked suc- 



cess, during the past year, as an instructor in 
Physics, has been granted a leave of absence, 
in order to fit himself for the duties of that 
professorship, to which he will doubtless be 
called, upon his return from abroad. A com- 
mittee was appointed to choose a Latin Pro- 
fessor, whom we are assured, on good author- 
ity, will be a man of established reputation, 
and one well qualified for the duties of the 
position. 

Everything showed that the alumni were 
eminently satisfied with the present admin- 
istration of the college, and ready to give it 
a strong and enthusiastic support. The Com- 
mencement was in all respects a successful 
one, and was a most gratifying close to the 
first year of President Hyde's administration. 
The future of Bowdoin never looked brighter, 
and it only remains for the undergraduates 
to see to it that nothing shall occur to mar 
the present harmony of our college. 



The 'Varsity pulled an exhibition race 
with the Dirigos, of Portland, Thursday 
morning, June 22d, at 8 o'clock. The easi- 
ness of the hour was necessary on account of 
the tide. But nevertheless a good audience 
was present to witness the contest. The 
course was a mile and a half straight away, 
starting at the foot of the island, and finish- 
ing at the bridge. Tlie word " go " was 
given by Plaisted. Both crews dipped nearly 
together, but the 'Varsity pulled away at the 
start, and increased their lead to the finish, 
winning by at least a dozen lengths, in the 
fast time of 8.15. Had the race been close, 
much better time could have been made. 

The 'Varsity pulled at about a forty or 
forty-two stroke, and in splendid form, mak- 
ing a fine spurt at the finish. The new shell 
has been changed somewhat for the better, 
and the crew is very much pleased with it. 
Considering that before the race the crew had 
been in the shell but once or twice, the steer- 
ing was excellent, but little use being made 
of the rudder. With ten days' practice be- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



75 



fore the race, it ought to become well-nigh 
perfect. 

The crew has done good and conscien- 
tious work, and we have faith in its ability. 
In practice, it has done its duty; and we 
have confidence that it will do its best in the 
race. If it does not win, we shall, at least, 
have the satisfaction of knowing that it was 
no fault of the crew. They will do their 
best, and that is all we can ask. 



At Harvard, "prayers" have been made 
practically optional. We are not acquainted 
with the details of the plan, but, as we un- 
derstand it, the entire charge of weeklj^ and 
Sunday services has been put into the hands 
of a body of clergymen. This plan is, we 
believe, an experiment; but it can hardly be 
considered a hazardous one, since compulsory 
attendance at chapel is everywhere an ac- 
knowledged failure. 

In the discussion of this subject, much 
stress has been laid upon the influence and 
necessity of preserving the "form " of wor- 
ship ; but if even the " form " is of such 
value, then surely the substance is worthy of 
deeper consideration than it has been accus- 
tomed to receive from college faculties. We 
should suppose that the associations of a 
place of worship would be of some import- 
ance ; and when " prayers " are so dull that 
the time is passed by the students in snap- 
ping toothpicks, studying behind the seats, 
or any other convenient diversion, and ab- 
sence is carried to its utmost limit, we doubt 
the counteracting value of " form." It may- 
be claimed that respect for the place and the 
occasion should preserve, at least, an outward 
appearance of reverence; but we defy any 
individual to attend the average college 
" prayers " for a year without becoming thor- 
oughly demoralized. 

From the wide-spread and deeply-rooted 
discontent, it is evident that there is some- 
thing fundamentally wrong in the pi'esent 



method of conducting college services ; and 
it is time that faculties should investigate the 
subject in a more personal light, than in re- 
cording absent marks and dispensing repri- 
mands. The alacrity with which a student, 
on becoming metamorphosed into a tutor, 
takes advantage of the privilege of his posi- 
tion, to studiously abstain from ever dusting 
his chapel seat, would be hugely amusing, 
were it not so impressively sad. If profes- 
sors were fined five cents for every chapel 
cut, it would take but few years for all the 
colleges in the land to become wealthy. 

The fact is, "compulsion" is becoming 
an odious word among college students. It 
has caused more trouble than all other things 
combined. There is a growing appreciation 
of manhood, which revolts against it. 
Wiierever confidence and responsibility have 
been placed in students, then unprecedented 
advance in college government has been 
made. Compulsion can onl}' compel the ful- 
fillment of the letter of the law; option has 
power to fulfill the spirit also. Option like- 
wise has this advantage ; it makes interest 
absolutely necessary to secure attendance, 
and thereby stimulates the facult}^ to do its 
utmost. 

Now, to make a personal application. A 
year ago the Sunda}' morning chapel at Bow- 
doin was abolished, and the afternoon service 
was varied, a practical talk of ten or fifteen 
minutes being given in place of the ordinary 
services. The result has been that in the 
morning the students sleep in undisturbed 
bliss, — as they had long since trained them- 
selves to do, — and in the afternoon the attend- 
ance has been larger than it formerly was at 
both services combined. The change has 
been, in every way, an entire success. We 
hope, on the advent of another fall, to see 
further improvements along this line. 



We see by the associated press report of 
the meeting of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, 



?6 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



at our recent Commencement, that "a com- 
mittee was appointed, after considerable dis- 
cussion, to examine the advisability of electing 
members from the Junior class, it being alleged 
that many who would be eligible during the 
Junior year are at the end of the Senior j^ear 
completely distanced in the race for rank." 
This leads us to a consideration of this matter 
as it seems, not to alumni, but to the under- 
graduates. It has become a common saying 
in college, and events would seem to verify 
it, that in order to obtain a Commencement 
part, a membership in Plii Beta Kappa, and 
in fact all the honors attendant upon a high 
rank, it is only necessary to take a high rank 
during the Freshman year. Once having es- 
tablished a reputation as a scholar, and one 
may lay back and take things considerably 
easy, without any great change in rank. 
This is rather a sweeping statement to make, 
but we have seen so many evidences of this 
same thing, that we are convinced that it is 
not without foundation. How often during 
Junior year have we heard the class remark 
how far W and X, who stood up near the head 
of the class during the first two years, had 
fallen behind ; how poorly they were reciting, 
and how far ahead of them Y and Z, who were 
only average scholars during the first two 
years, were going; how finely they were doing, 
and how they would surely leave the former 
leaders in the rear. Yet, when the ranks 
were given out, we have generally found that 
W and X were still in the van, and Y and 
Z occupied about the same positions in their 
class that they did Freshman year. We do 
not believe that any of our instructors would 
intentionally be anything but just in their 
ranking. It is much easier, however, to mark 
down a flunk for a student who has been in 
the habit of making them, than it is for one 
whose reputation as a scholar might warrant 
the inference that he "ought to have known 
about it," even if he was unable at the time 
to demonstrate his knowledge. In short, it 



takes the average instructor a good while to 
recognize a change for the worse in a good 
scholar, and a good deal longer to recognize 
a change for the better in a poor one. We 
believe our present ranking system is funda- 
mentally and radically wrong. All rank, in 
our opinion, should be based upon the actual 
knowledge which a student possesses of a 
studj', and not upon what he does, or what 
the instructor thinks he does, in recitations. 
The rank for attendance is just, inasmuch as 
the presence of a student at recitations is in 
itself an advantage to him, even if he has no 
previous knowledge of his lesson. Other than 
this, we believe recitation rank is simply a 
matter of relative difference, too much de- 
pendent upon the opinion of the instructor. 
We have refrained thus far from indulging 
ourselves in any remarks upon the venerable 
subject of the ranking system, and also from 
publishing various articles, more or less vig- 
orous, upon the same broad theme. Even the 
howl of universal indignation that went up 
from the Junior class, at the close of the fall 
term, over the unusually low and, as it was 
claimed at the time, discriminating ranks in 
Physics, did not cause us to open our columns 
to any of the literature with which we were 
then favored. While we fully appreciated the 
fact that the ranks, as a whole, were altogetlier 
too low, and cut down many of the class who 
would otherwise have stood highly, we never- 
theless believed that the scale was as impar- 
tial as it was possible for it to be under the 
present ranking system. At another time we 
shall air this question more thoroughly. We 
then hope to present other systems which are 
in use in other institutions, and which are su- 
perior to our own, and also to point out more 
clearly the defects in our present S3'stem. 



The year past has been a most harmoni- 
ous one. College affairs have progressed, 
with scarcely any friction, and good-will and 
harmony have prevailed generally. It has 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



77 



been a year marked by many changes, all of 
which we think have been for the best inter- 
ests 6f the college. At the beginning of the 
fall term old students were greeted and new 
ones welcomed by a new President. New 
instructors took charge of the Latin and 
Physics Departments, and a new assistant in 
Chemistry entered upon his duties. As the 
year has shown us, all of these men were 
eminently qualified for their positions. Pres- 
ident Hj'de has proved himself to be an un- 
usually successful instructor in the difficult 
department assigned to him, and has alread}' 
endeared himself to the students by his dig- 
nified bearing and earnest devotion to the 
highest welfare of the college. Much of his 
success with the students may be attributed 
to the fact that he has been at all times ac- 
cessible to them He has dealt with them 
in a spirit of candor and fairness, and 
they have endeavored to respond in the same 
spirit. His work has been with the students, 
rather than upon them, and they have come 
to see in him, not only the President of Bow- 
doin, but the true. Christian gentleman, who 
has deeply and earnestly at heart the highest 
interests of the college. We are glad that 
it is our fortune to be with him at the begin- 
ning of an administration which, we believe, 
is destined to be a long and successful one. 

Tutors Torrey and Hutchins have been 
popular and successful instructors, and the 
action of the Boards in granting the latter — 
whose success in the difficult department 
assigned to him has been remarkable — a leave 
of absence, to fit himself for the professorship 
of that branch will meet the heartj^ com- 
mendation of all. 

Mr. Cothren has met with flattering suc- 
cess as the assistant in Chemistry. He is a 
thorough scholar, a hard worker, and pos- 
sesses mechanical abilities of a high charac- 
ter, as is shown by various inventions and 
improvements he has made in the laboratories 
during the past year. 



The long-hoped-for gymnasium has grown 
during the past year into a tangible reality, 
second to none east of Boston. No pains have 
been spared to make it complete in every re- 
spect, and it is a model of its kind, and adds 
an additional attraction to our college, and an 
ornament to our campus. Henceforth we 
may reasonably expect to see Bowdoin rep- 
resented on the diamond by better nines, 
and on the river by better crews, and a cor- 
responding improvement in the physical con- 
dition of all the students. 

The ball nine have failed to secure the 
championship, through a series of misfortunes, 
which deprived us at one time of three of 
our best players. While we are sorry to lose 
the pennant, which promised so brightly to 
be ours, at the opening of the season, we 
can only offer our congratulations to our 
Colby friends, and hope that our nine, which 
loses only one man in the class of '86, 
may, with good, hard, systematic training, 
bring the pennant back to Bowdoin another 
season. The present season has seen all the 
clubs more evenlj' balanced than ever be- 
fore, all the games were closely contested, 
and while victory was an honor, because 
hard earned, defeat was certainly no disgrace. 

At the beginning of the year, our pros- 
pects for a 'Varsity crew were not very en- 
couraging. All of the members of the vic- 
torious Quinsigamond crew went out in the 
class of '85, and this year's crew had to be 
composed of entirely new men. Hard, sys- 
tematic work, however, has enabled us to put 
a first-class crew into the regatta at Lake 
George. They have been twice successful 
in races with the best oarsmen of Portland, 
and we are confident that, even if they do 
not win in the intercollegiate contest, they 
certainly will not come in last. 

We turn now from the old year to the 
new. The class of '86 iias gone out from 
our midst. We wish them success in their 
various vocations. We shall miss their 



78 



SOWDOIN ORIENT. 



genial faces and good-fellowship. The classes 
have taken a step forward in the college 
course, and the indications are that a strong 
entering class will make us stronger in num- 
bers next year than for some time. We trust 
that all may enjoy a pleasant vacation, and 
return in the fall ready for another year of 
pleasure and work. 



THE WRECK. 

Wild and shrill the night-wind whistled 

O'er an angry, Winter sea, 
Casting high its mighty billows 

On a bleak and rook-bound lea, 
Where the seething, reef-churned surges 

Strove the vaulted skj' to gain. 
Vising with the loud-toned thunder 

And the raging hurricane. 
As the murky cloud was parted 

By the jagged lightning's glare, 
Locked about by hungry billows 

Came a ship, a captive fair. 
Tattered sails, like broken pinions, 

As an ocean-bird it bore, 
Then, as if by long flight wearied. 

Sank from view to rise no more. 



INAUGURATION OF PRES. HYDE. 

Shortly after 3 P.M. the procession of the 
alumni, headed by Grimmer's Band, marched 
to the church, where the President was to be 
inaugurated. Rev. John O. Fiske, of Bath, 
presided, and introduced Prof. John S. Sewall 
of Bangor, who offered a short prayer. The 
introductorj^ address was given by Rev. E. 
B. Webb of Boston. He reviewed the lives 
of all the Bowdoin Presidents, made an elo- 
quent plea for the study of the Bible in col- 
lege, and closed with an exhortation that 
character should be the end of college work. 
He then intrusted the keys of the college to 
the President. 

President Hyde's response was a model 
one, both in substance and in delivery. His 
subject was " The Organic Relationship of 
the College to the Community." The fol- 
lowing is an abstract of his address : 



All life is oi'ganic. In the tree, in the animal, in 
man, in society each member is at once means and 
end to each other. The college is no exception to 
this law. Its usefulness to the community is its sole 
claim to support. Let us then briefly review the 
work of the college. 

Two thousand one hundred and forty-five young 
men have graduated. Of these, 800 have engaged in 
teaching; 107, that is 1 in every 21, has been a col- 
lege professor ; 23 have been college presidents ; 
the Alumni Alcove will contain among its 1000 
books and 4,000 pamphlets the works of 20 men 
well known in literature and philosophy and science ; 
260 have practiced medicine, 18 of whom have 
been professors in Medical Schools ; 429, or 20 
per cent., have entered the ministry, of whom 18 
have been professors in Theological Seminaries. To- 
day Bangor, Bates, Andover, Harvard, Yale, and 
Union Seminaries have Bowdoin graduates upon their 
fecuUies ; 801, or 37 per cent, of the number, have 
studied law, of whom a large proportion have sat 
upon the bench; 214, or 10 per cent, of the number, 
have been prominent in politics; 23, or 1 in each 
hundred, have been elected to Congress ; 7 have been 
U. S. Senators ; and 1 has held the highest office in 
the nation. With the exception of the unexpired term 
caused by the death of her most distinguished sena- 
tor, the State of Maine has had a Bowdoin graduate 
in her Congressional delegation continuously since 
1825 ; and during 14 out of its 66 years the State has 
had a Bowdoin graduate for governor ; 65 have de- 
voted themselves to journalism, and among the papers 
whose editorial staflf has contained Bowdoin men are 
nearly all the leading papers of Maine, Boston, and 
New York ; 70 per cent, of the graduates have en- 
gaged in one of the three leading professions, and if 
we include teaching and journalism, we may say that 
90 per cent, of all the graduates have engaged for a 
longer or shorter period in distinctly literary or pro- 
fessional work. Bowdoin gave to the late war 266 
other sons. The ten classes from '66 to '65 out of 
395 men gave 178, or 45 per cent. 

These fiicts are commended to the friends of Bow- 
doin and to the citizens of Maine. Think what it 
means to a community that its health,»it rights of 
person and property, its political policy, its educa- 
tional interests, its interpretation of current events, 
its religious faith have been guarded and guided 
and maintained by men who brought to these high 
services the fruits of ancient wisdom, the results of 
contemporary experience recorded in foi'eign tongues, 
the sound results of the latest science, and above all, 
minds trained to the habitual contemplation of great 
historic monuments and lofty moral ideas ! The 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



79 



difiference between the scholar and the ignoramus in 
your teachers' chairs ; the difference between the ju- 
rist and the pettifogger in your courts ; the differ- 
ence between the scientific physician and the quacli 
by the bedside of your sicli ; tlie difference betvveen 
the man of learning and the fool on your editorial 
staffs ; the difi'erence between the statesman and tlie 
demagogue in your legislative halls ; the difference 
between the rational believer and the declaming 
charlatan in your sacred desks, — that is in large 
measure the difference between civilization and bar- 
barism ; between the peaceful security of society and 
the lawless violence of anarchy ; between the glori- 
ous light and liberty of the kingdom of God and the 
darkness and bondage of a perpetual reign of super- 
stition, injustice, and oppression. He that can ajjpre- 
ciate aright the infinite width of that celestial diameter 
that separates these two conditions knows how vital 
is the organic relationship between the college and 
the community. 

The community has a right to say whether those of 
its members who are to be the standard bearers of its 
literature and the exponents of its life shall stand in 
living continuity with the classic writers, who are 
the great masters of literature, or whether they shall 
be left to the pitiful alternative of either using second- 
hand reproductions, or relying on their own unchast- 
ened originality. As long as the college remains 
t}»e faithful guardian of the rights of the community 
to be reijresented in the supreme parliament of the 
world's greatest minds ; as long as the college stands 
to indicate the claim of the community to its share 
in all that is grandest and purest and brightest in 
human thought and achievement, so long will Latin 
and Greek, the mother tongues of civilized humanity, 
demand of each candidate for collegiate honors that 
he render account of his native powers and acquired 
training in terms of their own perspicuous elegance 
and fine precision. Modern Languages, Mathematics, 
Chemistry, one or more of the Special Sciences, Rhet- 
oric and Philosophy must likewise be required. The 
elements of these subjects may be taught thoroughly 
and still leave room for elective studies. The ad- 
vantage of such elective studies is that they enlist 
the will of the student more directly in the work of 
self-education ; and also that they develop whatever 
special aptitude he may possess. 

To meet the need of physical training an ample 
and commodious gymnasium has been erected, and 
with a competent director in charge, the college will 
begin the coming year fully equipped for the im- 
portant work. 

Moral and religious training is an essential part of 
the work of the college. The community has a right 



to the assurance that so far as the influence of the col- 
lege can secure it, the graduates shall go forth in a 
spirit of reverence toward God, and unselfish service 
to their fellow-men. 

The college is under the control of the Congrega- 
tional denomination. Its teaching must be evangeli- 
cal, without being controversal. 

The community also has a right to expect that 
those who are trained in the college for active life in 
a democratic state shall learn both to enforce and to 
obey just laws. This two-fold object our system of 
self-government is well adapted to accomplish. 

Friends and guardians of the college, to you I sub- 
mit these considerations on the true relation of the 
college to the community. I trust that having satis- 
fied yourselves that the college still, as of old, is 
efficiently and faithfully doing the work so vital to 
the common welfare, you will never suffer her to 
want any needed support so long as this free com- 
monwealth endures to require her services ; so long 
as the son of man continues to have need of well- 
trained servants to contribute by their learning and 
their labors to the establishment on earth of his 
eternal kingdom of truth and righteousness. 

The inauguration service ended with a 
prayer by Rev. Dr. Mason of Fryeburg, after 
which President Hyde pronounced the bene- 
diction. 



ABSTRACT OF THE BACCALAURE- 
ATE SERMON BY PRESIDENT 
HYDE. 

Behold, now is the accepted time ; behold, now is 
the day of salvation. — 2 Cor. 6 : 2. 

It is always now ; it is never by and by. The 
present ever is ; the future never is ; we live in the 
pi-esent; we always must. The future, as future, 
ever remains beyond us like the end of the rain- 
bow which the child pursues. When the child 
comes to the point where the bow seemed to meet 
earth the apparent point of meeting is just as far 
away as ever. The child soon learns that nowhere 
in space can that meeting-point be found. Well 
were it for grown men and women could they learn 
as quickly that the point where the future is really 
present is nowhere to be found in time. 

What of these truths? Our purpose here is not 
philosophy, but life. To make these truths practical, 
only a single inference needs to be added ; it is this : 
whatever we heartily resolve with whole-souled 
energy to be and do in the present, now, is real, 



80 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



abiding, sure ; whatever we dreamily expect to be 
or do in the future is unreal, delusive, false. The 
application is obvious. 

First, with reference to intellectual life, now is the 
accepted time. The flrst six months out of college 
will decide the question whether you ever become 
scholars or not. You start with an intellectual mo- 
mentum. Maintain and increase that, and all is well. 
Lose that, by indolence or by absorption in alien in- 
terests, and your last hope of scholarship is gone. If 
you can not keep up the impulse the college gives 
yoii, you never will create an impulse of yourselves. 

From him that hath not, time soon takes away the 
little that he hath. 

The same truth applies to the moral and spiritual 
life. The mere unimproved lapse of years never 
brought man aught but evil. To the tiny germ that 
resolutely puts forth the little energy stored up within 
itself, time well improved, brings indeed the giant 
trunk, the spreading branches, and the expansive 
foliage of the majestic oak. But to that same mass- 
ive trunk, when once it has ceased to put forth its 
vital energy, the passing years bring only decay and 
dissolution. So to the moral fibre of a human soul, 
time steadfastly subjected to strong moral purpose, 
brings character and honor; but time neglected 
brings to that same soul nothing but rottenness and 
corruption. Expect from the lapse of time no slight- 
est favor, save such as you wrest from it by actual 
conquest in the real present, everlasting now. Only 
the solid achievements you win to-day, and keep by 
you to-morrow and the third day perfect in habit, 
these and no more are ever yours. 



ETHEL'S ROCK. 



In the outer line of Casco's isles. 
Afar on the glistening strand. 

You may see a huge, black, broken rock 
Half buried in the sand. 



The tinted sea-shells dot the shore. 

And the ever restless sea 
Playfully ripples among the stones 

In a seemingly innocent glee. 

in. 
Some years ago a tent was pitched, 

In the pleasant summer days. 
In that quiet grove, from among whose trees 

The whole bay meets the gaze. 



For little Ethel had come to live 

For a season on the isle. 
As the song-bird comes with the summer 
flowers. 

And stays for a little while. 

V. 

Oft you would meet her on the beach 

(iathering pretty shells. 
But her favorite place was the big, black 
rock 

Long worn by the ocean's swells. 



There she would sit in the bright sunshine. 

Watching the ships go by. 
Or the breakers heaving against the cliffs 

And tossing the spray on high. 



One day when tired with gathering shells. 

She rested her weary feet 
On that rock, and leaning against a crag. 

Soon nodded and fell asleep. 

TIU. 

The tide had turned and the ripjsles crept 

Slowly along the shore. 
Over the pebbles, and over the shells. 

Strewn on that sandy shore. 

ts. 

The tide had covered that strip of sand. 
And the water's again were drawn 

Around the rock rising there alone. 
But the little child slept on. 

X. 

The wind grew strong with the coming tide. 
It I'oughened the darkening bay. 

And the white-cajJS gathered along the deep 
In a wild and fearful array. 

XI. 

She awoke when the ever-advancing tide 
Had covered her form with spray. 

She saw the waters around her swirl, 
And the breakers near her play. 

xn. 

Her cries were heard in the quiet grove, 
And a boat came swift from shore. 

While she stood with her tiny hands out- 
stretched 
To her father, at the oar. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



81 



But eager to leap to lier father's arms, 
She slipped on the treacherous stone, 

And the tumbling waters clasped her form 
In their panoply of foam. 



Snatched from the breakers' cruel grasp, 

They carried the little maid 
Back to the tent in the quiet grove — 

But t'was only the form that stayed. 



There where the bay and ocean greet. 
As if 'twould the billows mock, 

Is that crag, worn deep by the restless sea. 
And they call it Ethel's rock. 



CLASS DAY. 

To the Class of '86 the Oeient extends 
best wishes for its individual future prosper- 
ity, and congratulations that its last exercises 
passed off so pleasantly. All things conspired 
to make the Class Day of '86, June 22d, a 
pleasant occasion and an entire success. The 
officers of the day were as follows: Presi- 
dent, C. W. Tuttle; Marshal, W. W. Kil- 
gore ; Committee, F. L. Smith, E. E. Hide- 
out, I. W. Horn. 

At 10 o'clock A.M. the class marched 
in to Memorial Hall, where the following ex- 
ercises were observed : 





MDSIC. 




Prayer. 


MUSIC. 


A. R. Butler 


Oration. 
Poem. 


MUSIC. 
MUSIC. 


J. C. Parker 
J. H. Davis 



The class then adjourned till 3 o'clock 
P.M. At that hour, with its friends, it as- 
sembled under the historic Thorndike Oak 
for its closing exercises. Of all the Com- 
mencement exercises this is the most beauti- 
ful and impressive. The officers of the oc- 
casion were seated upon a raised platform ; 
at one side were assembled the remainder of 



the class, and, in front, their friends. The 
exercises were as follows : 



Opening Address. 
History. 
Prophecy. 
Parting Address. 



L. Turner, Jr. 

G. S. Berry. 

G. M. Norris. 

P. A. Knie:ht. 



MUSIC. 

After the Parting Address, the class col- 
lected in a circle on the grass and passed 
around the Pipe of Peace, decked with col- 
lege, class, and society ribbons. Some held 
it longinglj^ while others passed it quickly 
on. After smoking the pipe, they arose and 
united in singing the following beautiful ode : 
I. 
Like to the song-birds fleeing home, 

When Autumn's fields are sear, 
These moments whisper to our hearts, 

" The parting hour draws near." 
Those days, that once so brightly glowed 

With morning's sunlight bars. 
We'll see no more but by the rays 
Of Memory's softened stars. 
n. 
'Tis hard to speak that word, " farewell," 

Old pines, old walks, old homes. 
Thy pictured forms must still remain 

With us where'er we roam. 
But though long years may roll away 

And Fortune's fair hand fall, 
Should old Bowdoin ask our aid, 
We'll answer to her call. 

The class then formed in a double col- 
umn, and, headed by the band, marched to 
each hall in succession and cheered it, finally 
assembling before Memorial, where they gave 
the farewell cheers and shook hands. 

After the exercises of the afternoon 
everything was made ready for the dance on 
the green, which took place in the evening, 
under the Thorndike Oak. The decorations 
were very tasteful. Dancing commenced at 
about half-past eight o'clock. At about ten 
o'clock there was an intermission, when most 



82 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



of the dancers adjourned to the " spreads." 
These were held by the ^. K. E.'s, in South 
Appleton ; by the 9'. T.'s, in South Maine ; 
by the 2. If'.'s, in North Maine; and by the 
A. A. iP.'s, in North Winthrop. Many of the 
"ends" were very prettily decorated. North 
Maine had lanterns swung from the fourth 
story, and sweeping down to the lower. The 
window-panes were decorated with different 
colored papers bearing the letters, Z. W. ; and 
from one of the windows extended a large 
transparency with the letters, Z. 'F. South 
Maine had a row of lanterns hanging in grace- 
ful loops from window to window on the sec- 
ond story, and a transparency, in the form of 
a diamond, bearing the clasped hands and the 
symbols, 9'. Y. 

South Appleton was decorated with an 
arch of lanterns across the pathway, and a 
row of lanterns extending along the side of 
the end. The entrance and halls were also 
lighted with lanterns. 

The spreads were neatly arranged, and 
formed one of the most attractive features of 
the evening. After the spreads, the dancing 
was renewed, and continued till after twelve. 
Thus closed the exercises of the day — a day 
filled with happj^ incidents and pleasant mem- 
ories — a fitting termination to the last class 
exercises of '86. 



MEDICAL GRADUATION. 

The graduating exercises of the Maine 
Medical School were held in Upper Memorial 
in the forenoon on June 23d. After a 
prayer by Rev. Edward Packard, an address 
was delivered by Rev. W. H. Fenn, D.D., 
of Portland. Mr. Fenn took for his subject 
the moral qualities of the physician, and 
made a deep impression on his audience by 
his apt and forcible words. The parting ad- 
dress was delivered by W. L. Dana, of Port- 
land, a member of the graduating class. 
President Hyde then presented the diplomas. 



Music was furnished by Grimmer through- 
out the exercises. The graduating class this 
year numbered twenty-one. The three high- 
est in the order of their rank were H. L. Sta- 
ples, A.M., W. L. Dana, A.B., and W. A. 
Ballou, M.D. J. F. Thompson, A.B., and 
F. E. Varney, tied for the fourth place. The 
following were the class officers : President, 
A. I. Noble; Vice-President, W. F. Hart; 
Secretary and Treasurer, W. J. Maybury; 
Marshal, F. E. Varney ; Orator, W. L. Dana ; 
Committee, A. S. Thayer, L. A. Sukeforth, J. 
D. Haley. 



HOPE. 

I was sitting sad and lone, 

All about so still had grown, 

That nothing broke the silence 

Save the clock on mantel ticking. 

While I watched the pendulum, 

As it regularly swung, 
I forgot my care my trouble. 

And a quiet settled o'er me. 

Soon my weary eyes had closed. 

In my mind's eye there arose 
Dire scenes of strife and carnage, 

Whilst the fight was ever thick'ning. 

One amongst the throng I spied. 
Bravely strive to breast the tide. 

Which ever bore him backward, 
As a boat on swelling surges. 

Many times he strove and failed, 

(But his brave heart never quailed) 

'Till his standard floated high 

O'er the foemen's conquered ramparts. 

Cheers resound both long and loud. 
When is cleared the battle-cloud. 

See, I stamped upon its folds 

That blazing word, the title " Hope." 

I awoke with trouble flown. 

In my breast new strength had grown, 
Whilst o'er me in the silence 

Still I heard the time-piece ticking. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



83 



HISTORY OF '86. 

To the friends of the class of '86, and es- 
pecialljr- to those fair friends, who, for four 
short years or less, have watched the course 
of the class with a peculiar interest, in short 
to all and everybody who have been intimate- 
ly or indirectly associated with us here, to 
faculty, undergraduates, Brunswick girls and 
all, I make bold to dedicate this literary sui- 
cide. 

It is not without some trepidation that I 
pose here as the historian of my class, for, 
from the nature of the case, a historian, like 
^neas, must steer clear of Chary bdis while 
he keeps his eye open for Scylla. If he tells 
too much of the truth, he is liable to receive 
the indignant condemnation of a few, while 
a fabrication merits the reproach of all. 

In my youthful days, when my soul was 
more filled with poetic fancy than at present, 
when I held every man for a hero who could 
ascend a stage and make his little speech, and 
when my untutored mind had thought that 
nothing could transcend the ravishing beauty 
of the Brunswick girls, I had often gazed 
here at the historian of a college class as the 
noblest figure in my category of heroes. But 
time has passed, and here is the historian, 
here am I, but where is the ideal of my 
youthful days? 

Four years ago, just as the leaves were 
beginning to change their hues, an unwonted 
agitation was occurring in diverse different 
households in the eastern part of New Eng- 
land. As a result of this agitation, twenty- 
three young men, the sunflowers of their re- 
spective families, after advice of all kinds of 
conditions, from relatives and aunts, and 
amidst the weeping of the children and the 
lamentation of the neighborhood, bought 
tickets for Brunswick. The arrival of these 
young men in this town did not create such 
an alarming excitement as would have been 
supposed from the importance of the various 
individuals in their own localities. If, how- 



ever, they were not received with open arms 
by the inhabitants of the town or college, 
there were a few students who managed to 
insinuate themselves into the favor of the 
unwary Freshman, and at the station relieved 
tiie latter of his superfluous bundles and 
satchels with an agility that was no less pleas- 
ing than unexpected. Among these tempor- 
ary porters was a young Sophomore, who, in 
the course of a week, made our absent friend, 
Henry CAaj, green with jealousy, by his pro- 
ficiency in this direction. It was one of the 
compensations of nature, that, for every 
pound of Freshman baggage he lugged dur- 
ing the fishing season, he agitated the pump 
handle ten times during the coming festivi- 
ties, for that same Freshman's benefit. Such 
favors as shown by these nimble tongued and 
light-fingered gentry are at the same time 
pretty and appropriate, and serve at once to 
give the recipient thereof a favorable im- 
pression of college life, which is not dispelled 
until the first pail of cold water descends 
upon his luckless head. The appearance of 
new members of the class was eagerly 
watched for by the few who had arrived first, 
and the little number of men grew with 
alarming slowness. The visions of fifty or 
sixty in the early part of summer had become 
gradually reduced to thirt}', tintil now only 
twenty-three remained to oppose the forty or 
more impatient Sophomores. 

It will be long before the memory of those 
few opening days will be effaced from the 
mind, those days of arrival and preparation 
for the work before us, those daj^s of forming 
future friendships, those days of hopes and 
prospects for the four years to come. Every 
train was met, every face scanned, and every 
trunk examined. Then was the beautiful 
time, when class elections had not thwarted 
the political ambition of some, and plugging 
and chinning for rank had not been intro- 
duced among us. 

It is an established custom of the college 



84 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



that Freshmen be put immediately to hard 
work. We were soon cognizant of that un- 
written regulation, and were soon plunging 
into Latin, Greek, and Mathematics with the 
greatest alacrity, if not delight. 

The first. week of the year is the time, 
and the only time, when a Freshman is of 
much importance, except as the object of at- 
tack. The annual contests between the two 
lower classes take place at that time, and our 
athletic Freshman is looked upon with as 
much admiration and criticism as a prize pup. 
The contests in which we first took part 
were a foregone conclusion ; for the Sopho- 
mores, although not such perfect specimens of 
manhood as ourselves, yet outnumbered us, 
as our recent Professor of Mathematics would 
say, in the ratio of two to one. In the rope- 
pull, by some providential or upperclassman 
intervention, we dragged the Sophomores 
over the line, but in the foot-ball contest, the 
ball was hardly thrown in the air before it 
was past us and over the goal. Our base- 
ball game also was lost by us, but only by a 
small advantage. We had a pretty good 
nine, considering that it took nearl}^ half the 
class to form it, but " Shoddy " had so many 
passed balls that he got tired chasing them, 
and hence the result. Our record for taking 
deads in Mathematics during the first part 
of the term must have been unsurpassed, 
and it required the best efforts of Horn, 
Smith, Wentworth, Percy, Perkins, and Ride- 
out to rescue the reputation of the class from 
the oblivion into which it would have fallen. 

The fall term of Freshman year is al- 
ways an eventful one, and this proved no 
exception to the rule. Hazing, in its prime- 
val gorgeousness, was fast becoming a lost 
art at Bowdoin, and its practice, like the 
struggling of a decapitated rooster, was grad- 
ually becoming less and less. There were a 
few spasmodic attempts, however, to put the 
Freshmen through, called forth by some 
provocation on our part. 



Percy and fehe " Prof. " showed their pro- 
ficiency in Geometry by demonstrating the 
mathematical qualities of the symbolic char- 
acters <P. .v., written in blood by the Sopho- 
mores on the coal closet door. Rideout and 
Perkins, one night, on a false alarm, sought 
the protection of an upperclassmau's room 
with nothing on but a "ro6e de nuit" 
apiece. 

Piner, who thought his vocal abilities 
warranted going out of chapel ahead of all 
others, was soon made to see the untenability 
of his position. After Geometry recitation 
he immediately celebrated his dead by rush- 
ing up stairs to his room, but hardly had he 
begun to ascend the second flight, when the 
contents of several buckets was "flung" 
over the railing on his flying form. More 
Sophomores, likewise revengeful, paying re- 
spect to that beautiful adage, " One good 
turn deserves another," immediately depos- 
ited more of the liquid on his already drip- 
ping shape. 

The few minor incidents of this sort 
served to vary the monotony of our first term, 
and drew our attention from the books for 
which we had quickly formed a surpassing 
love. 

The winter term was more uneventful, 
being marked by hard plugging on our part, 
and, beyond a few slight losses sustained by 
several of our members, is nothing worthy 
of note. Norris and Parker, at various times, 
were robbed of bootblacking and pints of 
pea-nuts. Smith lost the symptoms of a mous- 
tache, while Tuttle and C. A. Davis lost — 
what most of us have still in possession. 

The approach of the sun to the vernal 
equinox, according to Hutchins^ gave us op- 
portunity to divide our attention between 
books and athletics. Our boat crew, after 
several weeks' training, managed, on the day 
of the race, to bring up within telephone 
distance of the winning crew. This was our 
last attempt at boating, not for lack of en- 



BOWDOJN ORIENT. 



85 



thusiasm or muscular ability, but for lack of 
unanimity among members of the crew. 

If there is one thing in which '86 is pro- 
ficient it is music, and some of our members 
entered with an already establislied musical 
reputation. In a short time the musical mania 
spread itself throughout the whole class. 
Hearing cries of pain one day, I entered a 
room, to find Smith and Stackpole engaged 
in teaching each other how to sing. They 
had an old choir book before them, and were 
striking the key-note with a sound any- 
where between the braying of a mule and 
the crowing of a cock at early dawn. Talk 
about Apollo and his lyre ; imagine if you 
can the muSic of the spheres, consider even 
Orpheus, as he drew stone, tree, and bird 
about him, even with his magic instrument 
being able to draw his wife half way out of 
Hades; but never, no never, I think, would 
you have heard such strains as these. 

The exhilarating influence of the summer 
air made Finer seek to follow the Muse of 
Song, in a poem to be used as one of the 
charms of our Freshman class supper in 
Portland. Although the Muse must have 
been on a vacation when Finer composed his 
little lay, yet, I assure you, there was consid- 
erable amusement created at the time of its 
recital. 

The crowning act of Freshman year and 
the occasion of many happy thoughts in ret- 
rospect, was our Class Supper. Then, with 
his cane, red ribbon, and tall hat, the Fresh- 
man is no longer a Freshman, but, all of a 
sudden, is transmogrified into a bold and im- 
pudent Sophomore. 

Sophomore year opened bright and fair, 
but two of our number had gone. Hutchins 
was unable to return on account of sickness, 
and Calderwood left for Yale, whence, also, 
he departed, and is now roaming about the 
wilds of Texas. In place of these, we had Tay- 
lor, familiarly known as Hubbie, who, after 
having escaped the Faculty at Colby and the 



Modocs of California, now lends his attractive 
appearance to grace this occasion. 

Our class contests with the Freshmen 
were not very profitable for us, and we were 
beaten, both in base-ball and in foot-ball, but 
met with our usual victory in pulling the 
Freshmen over the line in front of the 
chapel. 

The opening of the year of study brought 
us into contact with a new and pleasing 
branch, French, and this proved to be the 
most interesting study of the year. Our late 
instructor in that, Beinkleider, is now so- 
journing in foreign lands for his health, but 
the memory of falling settees and rattling 
pebbles, the echo of audible voices and 
" now, gentlemen, please be quiet," is as 
vivid as though we could now see his glori- 
ous form before us. 

It is with the utmost amusement that we 
recall the waywardness of our Sophomore 
year in the class room. Often, in the later 
days, have we turned longingly back to 
scenes of our Latin, Greek, and French 
rooms. But we breathe a sigh for the mem- 
ory of past joys, and let them be buried with 
foi'gotten thoughts. 

In the winter term. Prof. Little, deciding 
that it would be a good point to create an in- 
terest, if only a forced one, in Latin Litera- 
ture, offered as prize to all those obtaining 
above a certain rank, a " Crutwell's History 
of Latin Literature." Immediately was in- 
tense excitement, and all became exceeding- 
ly anxious to obtain a prize ; so much so, that 
every time he crossed the Campus, the Pro- 
fessor was besought imploringly from behind 
trees and buildings by the cry of " I want a 
Crutwell!" In due season two Crutwells 
were awarded, but the Professor didn't try it 
again. 

But by far the most interesting occur- 
rence of the year, was the observation and 
celebration of Washington's birthday, and 
the result of our paying respect to the mem- 



86 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



oiy of a hero of national — nay — world-wide 
repute. The Faculty were not patriotic 
enough to give us a holiday on that occasion, 
and were evidently oblivious of the great 
service done by the Blather of His Country to 
educational as well as other interests. Hence, 
we resolved, with the exception of a few, to 
cut recitations that day. Those who went 
in were made miserable by being howled at 
from under the windows, and it is my impres- 
sion that this was the day a heavy lightning- 
rod was pushed half-way through the French 
recitation room. Contrary to expectation, 
we were told to make up the lost recitations, 
and, as the Faculty evidently meant busi- 
ness, it was not for us to say nay. 
But if any one is under the impression 
that we were not fully repaid for our 
trouble in making up, let me advance a 
few arguments : The exercises in French 
were two shades more interesting than usual, 
which is saying a great deal, and the time 
spent under Prof. Avery passed away alto- 
gether too soon. In Latin, also, those who 
were not reciting, occupied the time in throw- 
ing beans at the desk and gas shades, some 
of them coming dangerously near the Pro- 
fessor. Norris was the star of this perform- 
ance, and delighted his audience, unwillingly 
it may be said, by letting a pint of beans 
drop through a hole in his pocket on to the 
resounding floor. 

A few days later occurred one of the most 
surprising freaks of nature I have ever wit- 
nessed. During a storm, the entrance to the 
modern language room was stuffed full of 
snow, and water showered down to make it 
quite solid. I have heard of astonishing nat- 
ural phenomena, such as dogs with open 
mouths being turned outside in by a cyclone, 
but never before had I heard of an entry 
being packed full of damp snow, and then 
wet down to suit the occasion. 

During Sophomore year we lost Cornish, 
who died in this town, of typhoid fever, March 



24, 1884. Hutchins also, who left at the end 
of Freshman year, did not come back, and 
died of consumption, at his home in North 
Anson, March 18, 1885. 

We missed Dike during the summer term, 
for he was one of Bein's chief serenaders. 
However, he returned in the fall term, and 
'86 will have the honor of graduating 
him. 

Norris went to Saratoga as substitute in 
the '84 crew, and had so much success in 
acting as porter for the others, that we feared 
he would leave college, and embark in a 
profession for which he was so well adapted. 
But fortunately for us he came back, and 
pulled a magnificent oar as his crew brought 
up in the rear in the Fall races. 

Our Professors were, for the most part, 
changed in Junior year, but some renewed 
their old love and elected Latin or Greek for 
divers reasons. 

One day an incident occurred which nearly 
upset the calculations of the Greek division. 
Norris, who had the guardianship of the most 
approved method of translating Demosthenes, 
summoned home by a recess at Wellesly, or 
something else, suddenly left with the afore- 
said method locked up in his room. It was 
an angry group which gathered around that 
room, looking sadly at the stout door, and 
wondering if the double windows could be 
taken down with impunity. The attempt 
was fruitless, and Rideout nearly fainted, 
while Percy vented his rage in language the 
most choice. Smith, who that year was ac- 
customed to read his Greek at sight, but 
could not now get a sight of the pony, on 
account of the untransparency of matter 
composing the door, looked on with his usual 
imperturbability. The providential arrival 
on the next train of George, who for some 
reason could not get home, put an end to the 
agony, and brought victory on the morrow 
from the very jaws of defeat. Demosthenes 
outdid himself. Philip was repulsed, and 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



87 



the eagle, Uiat bird of victory perched upon 
our banners. 

In all the oratorical exhibitions where we 
took part, in Sophomore and Junior Prize 
Declamations, Junior and Senior exhibitions, 
and Ivy Day parts, you will pardon me for 
claiming that we did very well. Our Ivy 
Day replies must have been very excellent, 
judging from the fact that each of the other 
speakers told me afterwards, privately, that 
some one had complimented him highly on his 
reply, saying that it vi^as a perfect specimen 
of English wit, and way ahead of all the 
others. Now as I imagined mine w^as not 
much inferior to the rest, you may assume we 
gave a pretty good show. 

Probably everybody here would imme- 
diately guess that I received the moustache 
cup, as a fitting encouragement to the grow- 
ers of hair. Let me assure you, ladies and 
gentlemen, such was not the case. Our 
friend Hideout, whom you see setting there, 
was the recipient of that. And before that 
brilliant throng, in the midst of burning elo- 
quence and sparkling wit, he told them all 
that his silky moustache did not brush harshly 
against the countenances of the Brunswick 
dames, when everybody there knew it never 
had much of a chance. 

While the changes among us as a class are 
somewhat such as I have given, yet I think a 
record of the class as individuals would not 
come amiss, and for the enlightenment of the 
uninformed I will venture to give a fevF sta- 
tistics : Number in class, 20 ; oldest man, 
Taylor, 28 years 5 months 21 days ; young- 
est man, Dike 21 years, 20 days ; average 
age, 23 years 9 months 9 days ; nearest to 
average age, Rideout, 24 years ; heaviest 
man. Fling, 178 pounds ; lightest man, But- 
ler, 126 pounds ; total age of class, 475 years 
6 months 11 daj's ; total bulk, 3033 pounds ; 
average weight, 151J pounds ; tallest man, 
Kilgore, 6 feet inches ; shortest man, Berry, 
5 feet 6 inches ; 3 will take law, 3 will soon 



be medics, 4 will teach, 1 will teach for a 
profession, 2 will try to be chemists ; 1 will 
be a minister, and 6 are undecided; 15 Re- 
publicans, 1 Mugwump, and 4 Democrats ; 
10 Congregationalists, 1 Methodist, 1 Episco- 
palian, 1 Swedenborgian, 1 Presbyterian, 1 
Baptist, and 5 do not seem to have much 
preference ; ten smoke, four chew, six are 
engaged ; Tuttle smallest foot. Turner, larg- 
est foot. But time is short, and we have just 
seen one sadly Turner way, Norris it Berry 
long before the gathering shades will Fling 
about us the dreary mantle of the Knight. 

Twenty of us here are now about to sever 
the pleasant ties which have bound us to our- 
selves and to the college, and we depart 
leaving our best wishes for the college in all 
its relations, and hoping to have kind thoughts 
follow us. But it is not permitted us to 
gather here with a completed number, to 
grasp all with a brotherly hand, and wish all 
God speed in the work to come. But two 
are gone, and are in othei- hands than ours. 
They live only in memory, and all our re- 
grets can not call them back. And I am 
sure, if they can see us to-day, as we are 
leaving these scenes which it was not fated 
for them to enjoy long, they will say with 
me, " God bless the class of '86 ; may their 
course in this world be full of mercy and 
good fruits;" and when the final time shall 
come, when after throb, throb, throb, the 
last spirit in '86 is extinguished, then may 
we unite again in " that clear, white light, 
which shineth around the throne." 



A JOURNEY. 

In the east a streak of gray 
Signaled the appi'oaching day, 

To the city and country stretching wide. 
But the murky shadows clung, 
Where the winding rivers run 

Through pleasant, shady vales, like silver tides. 

From the noisy, dashing stream 
Rise up pastures bright and green, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Where many mild-eyed cattle roam at will, 
While beyond the mountain chain 
Where the shadows yet remain, 

Lies a picturesque valley calm and still. 

By the highway hot and brown 
Winding toward the busy town 

Strode a youth, starting out to gain a name. 
Bright the future then appeared 
(Though his eyes were filled with tears) 

To his manly heart thirsting after fame. 

When were left the dear old home, 
(Then to him thrice dearer grown). 

And his parents with sorrow overwhelmed 
All the grief thus far restrained 
Shook his noble, manly frame 

Then the old farm seemed grander than a realm. 

When the weary week was gone. 
And each Sabbath morning dawned, 

Then old, familiar scenes in mind he'd view. 
He could see the chapel rise 
With the silent graves beside, 

Where the ivy and fragrant lilacs grew. 

Swiftly now the seasons go, 
Sprinkled are his locks with snow. 

And the grim messenger has robbed the nest. 
In the world he'll see no more 
Parents who have gone before, 

Midst the ivy-covered graves laid to rest. 

Swifter now the years go by. 
And his eyes can scarce descry 

Faces of the dear ones gathered round him. 
While from the forgotten past. 
O'er his mind come rushing fast. 

Words by father spoken on life's morning. 

As the shadows round him creep, 

Peacefully he falls asleep. 
And the weary journey now is ended. 



ANSWERS TO OUR CONTRIBUTORS. 

G. B. — Your poem, "Sunlit Zephyrs," is an ar- 
tistic conception, and evinces considerable depth of 
poetic ferver. Your meter is full and flowing, and 
your interpretation of nature extremely original, 
but, owing to the sickness of our poetical editor, we 
have decided to publish no more zephyr poems. 
Longfellow, Tennyson, and those fellows, have done 
the zephyr business pretty thoroughly. Suppose 
you try something else. 

M. — Your " Life and Works of John L. Sullivan " 



is intensely interesting. We think, however, you 
are mistaken in stating that John has received a call 
to the chair of athletics in our new gymnasium. We 
believe " Gus " is to have that position. 

J. B.— Your article, the "Sanskrit Fathers," is 
probably authentic, but we have all we can do with 
the Brunswick Fathers at the pi-esent time, and must 
respectfully decline your contribution. 

'89. — Your article on "Our National Life" is of 
real intrinsic value, and contains many useful facts. 
It is too metaphysical, however, for our purposes. 
We think you have genius. In fact we have noticed 
a remarkable similarity between your style and that 
of Daniel Webster. 

B. — Your statements regarding the "evils of to- 
bacco " are doubtless substantially correct, but you 
are altogether too dognastic. There is another side 
to this question. B. vide "My Old Cob Pipe" in 
former issue of Orient. We would advise you to 
re-write your article in a less dictatorial and more 
argumentative style. Assertion is not logic, B. No, 
not by a long chalk. 



PSI UPSILON CONVENTION. 

The fifty-third annual convention of the 
Psi Upsilon Fraternity was held with the Eta 
Chapter, at Lehigh University, Bethlehem, 
Pa., Thursday and Friday, May 6th and 7th. 
Business meetings were held forenoon and 
afternoon of both days. 

Thursday evening, at 7.30, the literary ex- 
ercises were held in the Moravian Hall, Judge 
Hooper C. Van Vorst, presiding. The exer- 
cises consisted of an oration b}^ Rev. Dr. Chase 
H. Hall, S.T.D., of Brooklyn, N. Y., poem by 
Prof. Wm. Whitman Bailey, of Brown Uni- 
versity. Rev. Dr. Samuel Goodale, of Col- 
umbus, O., one of the seven founders of the 
society, acted as chaplain. At 10.30 o'clock 
the same evening, the annual hop was held 
in the Lehigh Theatre. All the towns of the 
Lehigh Valley had a full quota of their fair- 
est daughters present, besides many from 
other states where chapters are located. Land- 
er's Orchestra, of twenty-two pieces, from 
New York, furnished music for the literary 
exercises and hop. Dancing was kept up 
until three o'clock. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



89 



Friday night the banquet was held in the 
Lehigh Theatre, at eight o'clock, Hon. Asa 
Wentworth Teune}', of New York, presiding. 
This was a very enjoyable part of the pro- 
gramme. Music for banquet was furnished 
by Allentown Cornet Band. The annual 
walk round of the undergraduates was in- 
dulged in at tlie Eagle Hotel, in the small 
hours of Saturday morning. 



BASE-BALL. 

EARLY BASE-BALL AT BOWDOIN. 

The class of 1861 has the honor of or- 
ganizing the first Base-Ball Club at " Old 
Bowdoin." During vacation, in the summer 
of 1860, some of our class had become inter- 
ested in the new game, then beginning to 
supplant the old. They were enthusiastic in 
praise of the scientific game, and inspired 
others with like enthusiasm, when we had 
returned to college, put on our " Senior dig- 
nity," and made our first fine "sails" in 
Astronomy, " Tommy," and Paley, the first 
day of the term. 

Two days later, August 29th, a meeting 
was held, probably in the Senior recitation- 
room, in the north end of Maine Hall, and an 
organization effected by the choice of the 
following officers: President, Samuel Fes- 
senden ; Vice-President, Frank O. L. Hobson ; 
Secretary, George E. Stubbs; Treasurer, 
Edward P. Loring ; Directors, Philenthius 
C. Wiley, Albion H. Johnson, Sidney M. 
Finger. Of the other members, we call to 
mind, Nelson P. Cram, Wellington R. Cross, 
Edwin Emery, Gordon M. Hicks, Albion 
Howe, Samuel Jordan, Augustus N. Lufkin, 
Moses Owen, John Rich, Reuben A. Rideout, 
Edward Stanwood, and Grenville M. Thur- 
low. 

The Juniors organized, September 4th, 
witii Joseph Noble, President; Joseph W. 
Chadwick, Vice-President; George W. Ed- 
wards, Secretary; Albion Burbank, Treas- 



urer; Eugene P. Morse, Howard L. Prince, 
Frederick H. Beecher, Directois. 

The Freshmen followed, September 12th, 
with John E. Dow, Jr., President ; Enoch 
Foster, Jr., Vice-President ; James H. Max- 
well, Secretary ; William L. Gerrish, Treas- 
urer; Frank W. Libby, Charles F. Libby, 
John Deering, Jr., Directors. 

The Sophomores having, presumably, too 
many regular Sophomoric duties to perform, 
to engage in other and less exciting recrea- 
tions, did not organize until the 20th of the 
month. Their officers were, William E. 
Greene, President ; Joseph C. Bates, Vice- 
President; Thomas T. Bevei'age, Secretary; 
George M. Pease, Treasurer ; Sewall C. Wey- 
mouth, Richard W. Robinson, Thomas M. 
Giveen, Directors. 

Each club had two nines, 'and several ex- 
tra members, that it might play in case of 
absences, without calling in outsiders to help. 
Li the order of classes, they numbered 
twenty-two, thirty, thirty-one, and twenty- 
six members, respectively, when the Bugle 
blew its blast in November. 

Soon after organization, the Seniors took 
possession of the delta, — " the site of ye 
funeral pile of ye ■Calculus, who suffered 
martyrdom at the hands of ex-lugubrious Jun- 
iores" — laid out the diamond according 
to the rules of that day, and began to prac- 
tice. The several clubs "displayed a com- 
mendable degree of discretion, energy, and 
skill in their daily, bi-daily, tri-daily, and 
even poly-daily contests." 

They were on remarkable good terms 
with one another, notwithstanding the foul 
play practiced.- "Their games attract[ed] 
the attention and curiosity of the non-com- 
prehending passers-by and draw [drew] 
crowds of intelligent loafers." The first 
game, of which we have any record, was 
played between the Seniors and Juniors, Sat- 
urday, September 29th, with the following 
score : 



90 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Johnson, c, . 
Thurlow, p., . 
Wiley, lb.,. . 
Loring, 2b., . 
Finger, 3b., . 
Emery, s. s.. . 
Lufkin, 1. f., . 
Kideolit, c. f., 
Stan wood, r. f., 



Seniors, 
Juniors, 



Morse, c, . . 
Beecher, p., . 
Noble, lb., . 
Donnell, 2b., . 
Pease, 3b., 
Hunt, s. s., . 
Woodside, 1. f., 
Mattocks, c. f., 
Edwards, r. f.. 



RUNS BY INNINGS. 











Total. 
0—13 
1—23 



7 4 2 3 2 
Umpire — John E. Dow, Portland. Scorers— Nelson P. 
Cram, of '61, Howard L. Prince, of '62. 
* Homes lost. 
When our club had been organized about 
a month, we received a challenge to play a 
match game, on the Fair Grounds in Tops- 
ham, during the annual exhibition of the Sag- 
adahoc Agricultural Society, in October, from 
the "Sunrise Club," composed of "down- 
town" boys — young men — and organized early 
in the season. We felt that they, knowing the 
rules of the game, and having had practice, 
ought to beat, and it seemed very doubtful 
whether our club would accept. On the one 
side, it was argued that it would be to the dis- 
grace of the college, if one of its clubs should 
suffer defeat at the -hands of the " yaggers " ; 
on the other, that it would not injure us if 
we should get beaten — at any rate, we would 
have a good time. After a lively meeting, 
and an animated discussion, the club accepted 
the challenge. On the 2d of October, we 
chose our best nine by ballot. Six were 
readily selected, but it was with difficulty 
that the other three were chosen. Then be- 
gan the playing and practice, which we 
hoped would put us in a condition to win the 
game. 

As we are giving details, allow us to 
mention the following facts : We played on 
the 6th of October, when the wind was blow- 
ing fiercely, at one time the snow falling, and 
the weather chilling, though it did not cool 
our ardor, for morning and afternoon found 
us on the delta, doing our " level best." On 
the morning of the 9th, we played with 



Venus visible distinctly seen with the naked 
eye, though the sun was shining bright. 

Early on the morning of the 10th, we re- 
paired to the Fair Grounds, where our match 
game was witnessed by a large companj-. It 
was a novel sight, and the lookers-on were 
eager to see everjUhing going on. They 
crowded one another, and pressed in upon us, 
so that it required all the tact and ingenuity 
and force of the police to keep them back to 
give us room. The result, given below, 
shows that we were beaten by four runs, and 
that both clubs were amateurs, not profes- 
sionals : 



Booker, c., . 
Field, p., . . 
Tarbox, s. s., 
G. G. Wing, lb., 
C. A. Wing, 2b., 
Murray, .3b., . . 
Harmon, 1. f.. 

Day, c. f 

J. Furbush, r. f., 



46 



Johnson, c, 
Emery, p., 
Loring, s. s., 
Wiley, lb., 
Howe, 2b., 
Frugar, 3b., 
Thurlow, 1. f. 
Hicks, c. f., 
Stubbs, r. f.. 



42 



BY INNINGS. 

Sunrise, .2497 12 017 4^^6 
'61, ...1 6 8 10 2 3.4 4 4—42 

Umijire — Joseph Noble, of '61. Scorers — B. L. Dennison, 
Sunrise, Samuel Fessenden, of '61. 

We enjoyed the game, and were treated 
very courteously by the victors, who pre- 
sented us with the ball used on that occasion. 
The writer made this entry in his diary of 
October 10th : " Our men never played bet- 
ter, and I think we showed more skill than 
they. Had all decisions been as I think they 
ought to liave been, we should have beaten. 
The umpire made one or two mistakes, but I 
was glad he gave his decisions against us. 
There was the best of feeling manifested, 
not a harsh word being spoken on either 
side." 

Two decisions are well remembered, both 
in favor of the winning club. One was 
given when Harmon claimed that he caught 
the ball on the first bound, behind a small 
clump of bushes in the left field ; the other, 
when our pitcher claimed that he touched 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



91 



the base before the baseman, who had stepped 
aside to catch the ball. 

On- the delta, the next day, their sec- 
ond nine beat ours, as the following score 
shows : 



C. A. Wing, . 
A. Day, p., 
Townsend, lb., 
Williams, 2b., 
Dunning, 3b., 
Nichols, s. s., 
Metcalf, 1. f., . 
Bearing, c. f., 
Davis, r. f., . 



'61 

H.L 

Stanwood, c, . . 3 

Owen, p., .... 2 

Lufkin, lb., ... 4 

Cross, 2b., .... 3 

Fessenden, 3b., . . 4 

Cram. s. s 1 

Rich, 1. f 1 

Hobson, c. f., . . 4 

Jordan, r. f., . . . 5 



BY INNINGS. 



Sunrise 
'Gl . , 



9 6—53 
1 2-37 



. 11 6 4 

We continued playing, with varied suc- 
cess, until the cold drove us in-doors. In the 
spring of 1861, playing was resumed, but it 
lost some of its attractions when '■'■la c/fande 
tactique" called our men to muster on the 
" campus." 

One op 'Sixty-One. 



'87 vs. '89. 
The game between the classes of '87 and 
'89 was one of the closest and best class con- 
tests ever witnessed upon our delta. Pushor 
was very effective, only four hits being made 
off his delivery. Boutelle supported him in 
excellent shape. Watts was also very effect- 
ive, and gives good promise of becoming, in 
time, with hard, systematic work, a first-class 
pitcher. He was well supported by Russell. 
The game ended in a tie, and as it was exam- 
ination week, both nines were content to 
let it remain so. Below is the tabulated 
score : 

A.B. K. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Dearth, c. f 4 1 1 1 

Moultou, lb 3 9 1 3 

Pushor, p 3 1 1 1 9 1 

Talbot, 1. 1 3 1 1 1 

Gahan, s. s 3 1 1 1 

Boutelle, c, 3 1 1 3 5 2 1 

Torrey, 2b., 3 2 2 2 3 

Little, c. f., 3 1 1 

Burleigh, r. f., . . . . 3 1 1 1 1 

28 6 5 7 IS 16 11 



A.B. E. E.E. T.B. P.O. 



Freeman, 2b 3 

Russell, c, 3 

Clarke, r. f., 3 

Fogg, c.f., 3 

VTilson, lb., 3 

Merrill, 3b., 3 

Stacy, 1. f 3 

Watts, p., 3 

Prentiss, s. s 3 






1 





(1 


2 





1 


14 





(1 














1 


1 



27 6 4 4 18 11 8 
Struck out— Pushor 5, Watts 1. Passed balls— Boutelle 
1, Russell 3. Three-base hit — Boutelle. Left on bases — 
'87, 3; 89, 2. Time— 1 h. 35 m. Umpire— Rideout, '86. 

GENERAL AVERAGES OF THE BALL TEAM. 

NO. G. A.B. B.H. PER. CH. ACC. PER. AV. 



Dearth, 

Moulton, 

Pushor, 

Wilson, 

Soule, 

Talbot, 

Larrabee, 

Freeman, 

Davis, 

Gary, 

Gahan, 



BATTING. 

1 — Pushor. 
2 — Moulton. 
3— Talbot. 
4 — Wilson. 
5 — Dearth. 
C — Freeman. 
6— Gary. 
7— Davis. 
8 — Larrabee. 
9— Soule. 
10— Gahan. 



7 700 445 

81 920 601 

14 350 115 101 878 614 

73 859 530 

38 884 467 



200 

2 099 

10 270 

5 135 

4 143 

4 138 

2 143 





666 468 

15 555 345 

27 794 469 

66 857 498 

14 778 461 

5 556 278 



FIELDING. 

1 — Moulton. 
2 — Soule. 
3 — Pushor. 
4 — Davis. 
5 — Freeman. 
6 — Gary. 
7— Dearth. 
8— Talbot. 
9 — Gahan. 
10 — Larrabee. 




" Yes, Simpkins is green," he said slowly. 

And then, as he noticed her frown, 
" It isn't his fault, though," he added, 
'•' For he's scarcely been out of the town. 



" It's no wonder the fellow is awkward 
In manners, espression, and pace ; 
For what would I been if I'd never 
Been out of my own native place ? " 

Her smile it was childlike and pensive. 
As she heard him poor Simpkins deride, 

And sweetly she answered his question, 
" You'd surely been chief ot your tribe." 



92 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



" Terribly slow work here, isn't' it?" whispered 
one of the examining committee to another during 
the Sophomore Calculus examination. 

The Smyth Mathematical Prize was awarded to 
G. F. Gary; A. W. Tolman received Honorable 
Mention. The Sewall Latin Prize was awai'ded to 
E. S. Bartlett, and the Sewall Greek Prize to A. 
W. Tolman. 

Mr. A. H. Brown, '84, has been appointed in- 
structor in the gymnasium. At present he holds a 
similar position with the Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation of Boston. 

On the evening of June 23d, the class of '46 had 
a supper at the Tontine. 

A few days before Commencement one of the 
panels on the right-hand wall of the chapel was filled 
by the gift of Hon. Henry J. Furber, '59, of Chi- 
cago. It is a painting on canvas, by Mr. Frederic 
Vinton, of Boston, and is copied from one of the 
decorations of a Parisian church. The subject is the 
"Adam and Eve " of Flandrin. The figures are 
finely executed and their faces are full of expression. 
The cost was $800, much more than was paid for 
filling any other panel. 

Every man in '89 had a tall hat on the night of 
their Freshman dinner. 

The class of '61 held their twenty-fifth annual re- 
union at the Falmouth in Portland the night before 
Commencement Day. It was a pleasant informal 
gathering. Twenty-six members were present. 

On the same evening and at the same hotel, the 
centennial class of '76 had their tenth reunion. 
There were fine floral decorations, and an excellent 
menu. Nineteen of the class attended. 

A ball game was recently played between the 
medics and a picked college nine, the score standing 
20 to 12 in favor of the college. 

At the dance on the green the platform was illum- 
inated by an electric light placed in the branches of 
the Thorndike Oak. Power was obtained from the 
laboratory. This is the first time that Bowdoin's 
campus was ever lighted by electricity. 

The race which was to have taken place in Port- 
land harbor, Wednesday, June 23d, between the 
Dirigo crew and our boys, was not rowed on account 
of rough water. 

The Goodwin Commencement Prize for the best 
written and spoken Commencement part was awarded 
to F. L. Smith. 

Despite the unpleasant weather a large number 
of alumni turned out Commencement Day. 



On Class-Day night there were as usual "spreads" 
in the rooms of many of tlie students. 

Tlie stranger who enters the campus during Com- 
mencement week cannot help having his attention 
drawn by the number of notices which cover the 
trees. Everywhere are seen placards announcing 
society reunions, meetings of the trustees, the Com- 
mencement dinner, the alumni game, etc. 

Professor Robinson has been appointed to the full 
professorship of Chemistry. 

On Wednesday afternoon after the inauguration 
of the president, the alumni game took place on the 
delta. Only three innings were played with the re- 
sult of a score of 9 to 7 in favor of the college. 

It is with pleasure that we welcome new discov- 
eries. From the columns of the Brunswick Telegraph 
we learn that " The Soliloquy of the Dying Alche- 
mist " was written by Whitlier. 

The Sophomore Prize Declamation took place on 
Monday evening, June 14th. Music was furnished 
by Grimmer. The programme was as follows : 

MUSIC. 

National Eecollections the Foundation of 
American Character. Everett. 

W. W. Woodman, Miuot. 
Eulogy on Garfield. Blaine. A. C. Dresser, Standish. 
Volunteer Soldiers of the Union. IngersoU. 

E. S. Bartlett, East Stoneham. 

MUSIC. 
The Past Eises Like a Dream. IngersoU. 

H. C. Hill, Knlghtsville. 
Soliloquy of the Dying Alchemist. Willis. 

E. S. Themes, Cumberland Centre. 
Speech on Seminole War. Clay. 

E. S. Barrett, West Sumner. 
Massachusetts and South Carolina. Webster. 

G. H. Larrabee, Bridgton. 

MUSIC 

Eulogy on Lafayette. Sprague. 

G. F. Cary, East Machias. 
Our Battle Flags. Schurz. P. F. Marston, Wiscasset. 

Selection from.au Essay on Miltou. Macaulay. 

*A. W. Tolman, Portland. 
Liberty and Prerogative. Webster. 

*R. W. Coding, Alfred. 
Speech on Greek Revolution. Clay. 

M. P. Smithwick, Newcastle. 

MUSIC. 

* Excused. 
The programmes were exceptionally tasteful, and 
the parts were very well rendered. A commit- 
tee composed of Prof. Robinson, Weston Thompson, 
Esq., and Rev. Mr. Guild, awarded the first prize to 
I Hill, and the second to Smithwick. 

Commencement has come, and still the gym- 
nasium stands empty of the long-expected appa- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



93 



ratus. We hope on i-etnrning next fall to find it 
fully equiioped. 

The Junior Prize Declamation was held Mondaj- 
evening, June 21st, with this programme : 

MUSIC. 

Wendell Phillips. Curtis. E. C. Plummer, Yarmouth. 
Progress of Society. Channlng. 

H. B. Austin, Farmington. 
Death-Bed of Benedict Arnold. Lippard. 

M. H. Boutelle, Bangor. 

MUSIC. 

The Ballad of Lady Lena. Moore. 

E. B. Burpee, Rockland. 
Justification of New England. Gushing. 

P. D. Dearth, Sangerville. 
Irish Aliens and English Victories. Shlel. 

C. B. Burleigh, Augusta. 

MUSIC. 

Daniel O'Connell. Phillips. 

J. V. Lane, Chichester, N. H. 
Joachim I. Anon. M. L. Kimball, Norway. 

The Lay of the Madman. C. C. Choate, Salem, Mass. 

MUSIC. 

The American Flag. Beecher. 

L. B. Varney, Litchfield. 
Garfield's Reply to Long. C. F. Moulton, Cumberland. 
Public Faith. Sumner. F. Pushor, Pittsfield. 

MUSIC. 

Every one on the progarame spolie and spoke 
well. C. C. Choate rendered his part in a startlingly 
realistic manner. Tlie judges, Barrett Potter, F. A. 
Fisher, and Dr. Packard, awarded Lane the first 
prize, and Boutelle the second. IMusic by Grimmer. 

On the forenoon of June 16th, two Sophomore 
nines representing the Greek and Mathematical divis- 
ions, struggled for the supremacy of the delta. Af- 
ter a hard-fought battle, the Greeks were victorious, 
the score standing 18 to 17. In the evening the class 
marched down to Maynard's and partook of the 
creams at the expense of the Mathematical division. 

On Thursday, June 17th, the class of '89 attended 
their Freshman Dinner at the Falmouth in Portland. 
Of the thirty-nine members forming the class, all 
but three were present. After the dinner, the fol- 
lowing toasts were i-esponded to : 

Our College. E. A. Merrill. 

President Hyde. F. C. Russell. 

Our Girls. D. E. Owen. 

Class of '86. E. B. Stearns. 

'89 in Athletics. S. L. Fogg. 

Class of 'ST. A. E. Neal. 

Our University Crew. F. W. Adams. 

The Horse and Prof. Bird. Isaac. 

Our Freshman Trials and Triumphs. J. L. Bodge. 

Mathematics. J. H. Phelan. 

Class of '88. J. L. Doherty. 



Class of '89. L. Prentiss. 

Class of '90. H. Merrill. 

Next the following programme was carried out: 



ODE. 

^ir— Phi Chi. 



Opening Address. 



G. T. Files. 



Air — It's a way we have at Old Bowdoin. 
History. O. L. Rideout. 

ODE. 

Air — Michael Boy. 
Oration. J. L. Doherty. 

ODE. 

Air — Excelsior. 
Prophecy. P. L. Staples. 

ODE. 

Air — Auld Lang Syne. 
All passed a most enjoyable time. The class offi- 
cers were : President, Lory Prentiss ; Toast-Master, 
C. F. Hersey; Committee of Arrangements, E. Man- 
son, J. R. Clark, O. P. Watts; Committee on Odes, 
F. H. Plill, D. E. Owen, F. W. Adams. 

Sophomores on the delta. Cosines vs. Birds. 
Score 18 to 17. The Birds treated the winners to ice- 
cream. 

Even a conference wasn't enough to keep tlie 
fossils away from examinations. 

Freshmen vs. Juniors, 6 to 6 ; 7 innings. 

The vvay to keep boating booming is to put half 
a dozen single sculls and three or four row and sail 
boats upon the river. 

Hundreds of little eels, from three to six inches 
long, were seen crawling over the rocks in the chan- 
nel by the paper factory, by some of the boys. They 
said it was an odd sight. 

About a third of the students remained through 
Commencement. 

North Winthrop and North Maine have settees' 
under the trees. A good precedent. 

'?. T. Freshmen vs. A. K. E Freshmen on the delta, 
June 14th. Score 21 to 7. 



Prelty little maiden. 

Tripping through the snow. 
Let me be your escort, 

Maiden answered, "No!" 

Pretty little maiden. 

Do you love me less 
For thus importuning ? 

Maiden answered, " Yes !" 



— Argo. 



94 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




'81. — Rev. Joseph Pack- 
ard, Professor of Sacred 
irature in the Virginia Theological 
Seminary, completed this Commence- 
ment, his fiftieth year of service with that 
institution, when he gave up his professor- 
ship. Dr. Packard is the youngest and only surviv- 
ing brother of the late Prof. Packard of Bowdoin. 
He was a member of the American Committee on 
the revision of the New Testament. 

'35. — Hon. T. C. Woodman died at his home in 
Bucksport, Sunday, June 13th, aged 71. He was 
President of the Bucksport National Bank ; repre- 
sented the town and county in both branches of the 
Legislature, and was prominent in his section of the 
State. Mr. Woodman was a member of '85, but did 
not graduate here, leaving, and graduating from 
Dartniouth. 

'86. — The class of '36 was pleasantly entertained, 
Tuesday afternoon of Commencement week, at the 
Tontine, by Mr. Cyrus Woodman, of Cambridge, 
Mass. 

'65. — Rev. B. P. Snow, of Biddeford, has received 
a call from the North and South Congregational 
Churches at Cape Elizabeth, which it is thought he 
will accept. 

'61 and '76 held reunions Wednesday evening of 
Commencement week, at the Falmouth, Portland. 
Both were well attended. 

'66.— Thursday evening '66 was entertained by 
Professor Chapman, at his residence in Brunswick. 
Friday, Dr. (Jerrish entertained them at the Fal- 
mouth. A very pleasant time was enjoyed by all. 

'69.— Prof. M. E. Wadsworth, of Colby, will have 
charge of a party engaged in the geological survey 
of Minnesota, during the summer vacation. 

'71.— Mr. John F. Moody, Principal of Bridgton 
Academy, has been offered the position of Principal 
of the Edward Little High School, Auburn, Maine, 
the place now filled by C. H. Clark, '76. 

'75. — Mr. Chas. A. Black, now Principal of Wash- 
ington Academy, East Machias, a fitting school of 
Bowdoin, has been elected Princip.al of the Union 
Free School .atSchuylerville, Saratoga County, N. Y., 
an institution of 850 students and nine teachers. He 
will assume charge in September. 



'76. — Mr. C. H. Clark has resigned his position as 
Principal of the High School at Auburn, and will 
take a similar one in Massachusetts. 

'8-2. — Cutler graduates from Andover Theological 
Seminary this year. 

'88. — Packard recently graduated from the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, New York. 

'83 — Stetson, who has been for the past year sub- 
master in the High School, Leicester, Mass., has 
resigned, and will enter upon the study of medicine. 

'83. — Swan, who has been engaged in teaching at 
Vancouver Island, has taken a similar position at 
Omaha. 



NECROLOGY, 1885-86. 
The following is the necrology of Bowdoin Col- 
lege Alumni, the past year : 

1809— JoUn Mussey, b. Portland, Oct. 15, 1790; d. Port- 
land, May 21, 1SS6. 

1833— Charles Duren, h. Boston, Mass., June 28, 1815; 
d. Granby, Vt., May 9, 1886. 

1834— John Wheelock Allen, b. Pittsfleld, Mass., Nov. IT' 
1813; d. North Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 24, 1885. 

1835— Edward Welch Bailey, b. Wiscasset, July 10, 1815; 
d. Wiscasset, July 4, 1.S85. 

1839- William Griswold Barrows, b. Bridgton, Jan. 12, 
1821; d. Brunswick, April 6, 1886. 

1842— William Edwards Phillips, b. Newburyport, Mass., 
Oct. 9, 1823; d. Fordham, N. T., Nov. 26, 1885. 

1843— Nathaniel Hatch, b. Gorham, S(3pt. 1, 1815; d. Brad- 
ford, Mass., April 22, 1886. 

1844— Samuel Farnham, b. Woolwich, Jan. 13, 18-6; d. Au- 
burn, Aug. 17, 1885. 

1848- Richard Henry Tibbetts, b. Aug. 2, 1827; d. San 
Francisco, October, 1885. 

185.3 — .Jeremiah Evarts Pond, b. Cambridgeport, Mass., 
June 23, 1831; d. Alfred, Feb. 15, 1886. 

1873— William Green Fassett, b. Bath, Sept. 25, 1850; d. 
Denver, Col., Jan. 23, 1886. 

1878— Philip Lee Paine, b. Portland, Feb. 4, 1857; d. Hep- 
ner, Oregon, Feb. 10, 1886. 

NOT BEFORE REPORTED. 

1838 — Ammi Lavrabee Parker, b. Greene, May, 1813; d. 
Auburn, Sept. 4, 1883. 

MEDICAL GRADUATES. 

1829— Joseph Haven Smith, b. Eochester, N. H., Nov. 17, 
1805; d. Lowell, Mass., Feb. 25, .1886. 

18.30— Calvin McQuesten, b. Bedford, N. H., 1801; d. Ham- 
ilton, Canada, Oct. 20, 1885. 

1832— Asher Ellis, b, Topsham, June 4, 1803; d. Bruns- 
wick, Sept. 12, 1885. 

1877— George Melville Lee, b. 1851; d. Portland, Nov. 2, 
1885. 

NOT BEFORE REPORTED. 

1811— James North, b. Clinton, July 25, 1813; d. Ham- 
monton, N. J., Jan. 8, 1885. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



95 



EXCHAKGES. 



The trustees of Harvard College have at last 
yielded" to the petitions of the students and made 
attendance at chapel an optional exercise. The 
Tuflonian hails their action as the " harbinger of a 
general freedom," and says further: "We may yet 
live to see religious worship everywhere recom- 
mended, but not enforced, with the gain in sincerity 
and manliness that must flow from such honorable 
treatment." We confess ourselves scarcely able to 
see it in just this light. We do not like to think of 
the abandonment of the good old practice of having 
morning prayers at which attendance is required. 
Of course the tendency of the age is toward liberal 
ideas and principles in regard to such matters. But 
are we going to draw no lines anywhere ? Shall we 
let this tendency sweep away every hallowed prac- 
tice that religious feeling has held to for so long a 
time? Shall we acknowledge that perhaps chapel 
service is all wrong, and through fear of inflicting 
injury fail to exact it of any one ? This mav be very 
well for institutions which are trying mainly' to ad- 
vance liberal doctrines and so-called progressive 
ideas. We know there are man}' such, where relig- 
ious exercises scarcely seem in harmony with the 
spirit and teachings that are breathed forth. But 
how is it with Colby and all other denominational 
colleges ? Were they not founded as much for the 
advancement of religion as of learning ? Is not re- 
ligious teaching a part of the object for which they 
exist to-day ? If we insist on literary exercises, why 
not also on religious ones? The idea of electives is 
a grand one, when you have offered a choice between 
several really good things ; but the idea is scarcely 
the same when one is asked to choose between some- 
thing and nothing, and strongly urged to elect noth- 
ing. Even the secular press is already deploring the 
action taken at Harvard, and we can but express the 
sincere hope that it will not be taken as the prece- 
dent for like action elsewhere. 



ELEGANT MACKINAW 

STRAW HATS, 

THE BEST QUALITY, 

Sl.OO, $1.25, $1.50, 

MERRY THE HATTEE, 

PORTLAND. 

h. v. stackpole, 
Fine Boots and Shoes, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 

Dentist, 



F. W. BAEEON, 

Dealer in Slandarj anj Fancy Groceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce. 
Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

FRANK A. HALE, Proprietor, 
DeWITT HOUSE, TONTINE HOTEL, 

Lewiston, Me. Brunswick, Me. 

Private .Suppers and Banquets a specialty. 

B. E. I'LUilMER, Manai/er. 



SPEAR & WHITMORE, 



WHITMORE. 



DEALERS IN 



STORER BLOCK, 



- BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



ALL KINDS OF COAL 

Cedar Street, Brunswick, Me. 

Branch Office, Opposite Post-OiBce, Slain Street. Teleplione. 
Communication witti Coal Yard. 



F. L. DUNNE, 
•Tailor 

TU THE 

HARVARD CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY. 

Constanthj in Receipt of the Latest Limdon Novelties. 

338 WASHINGTON STREET, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 



CIGARETTE 
Smokers who 

are williog^to 
I^aya little more 
tor Cigarettes 
than the price 
charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, wfll 
find the RieHMOIHD STRAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO AXiL. OTHERS. 
They are made from the brightest, most 
delicately flavored, and hleliest cost 
sold lea* grown in Virginia, and are abso- 
lutely vrlthoa* adDlterationi or drugs. 



STRAIGHT CUT 



No. 
-1- 



We use the Genuine Frencli Rice Paper 

of our own direct Importation, which is made 
espeeiallv for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of thLs 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
original brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or box of ■ 
Richin. 
Straight 
Cigarettes I 
bears the I 
signature of ' 

ALLEN &CINTER 

MANUTAOTUEERS, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



RIGARETTES 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Elngs, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 

Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry, Promptly Repaired and Warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

njaine Central R. ^. 

On and after Oct. 12th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.15, 11.2.5 a.m., 2.3S, 4.45 aud G.25 p.m., and on Sunday 

mornings at 13.42. 
For Eockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.38 p.m. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.40 p.m., and 

12.35 (night). 
For Lewiston, 8.15 a.m., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 a.m. (mixed), and 2.45 p.m. 
For Augusta and Waterville, 8.20 A.M., 2.40 P.M., 12.45 every 

night, and on Saturdays only at 6.35 p.m. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 (night). 
For Bangor, Ellsworth, Mt. Desert FeiTy, St. Stephen, Houlton. 

Vanceboro, and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Bar Harbor, 12.45 (night). 

Note.— The night trains to aud from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
iston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun- 
day, but do not connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, or 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sun- 
day morning. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BOOTHBV, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

PorUand, Oct. 6, 1885. 



SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. 

Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Tnrkisli and Virginia. 

Tlie following are our well known 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Capoeal, Sweet Caporal, St. James 1-2, Caporal 1-2, 

St. James, Ambassador, Entke Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS, STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES. 

Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and French Rice Paper, are rolled by the high- 
est class of skilled labor, and warranted free from flavoring or 
impurities 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a FAC-SniiLE of Kinney Bkos. 
Signature. 

KINNEY" TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KJNSEY BROS. 
NEW YORK. 



JORDAN SNOW, 

MERCHANT TAILOR 

DuNLAP Block, Brunswick, Me, 

(INTERGEPTED LETTER.) 

Brunswick, May 14, 1S86. 
Owen, Moore & Co., Portland. 
Gentlemen : 
Please send me by mail one pair long Bicycle'Stockings, 
size 9J, regulation League Color. Enclosed one dollar and 
stamps for postage. I see by advertisement in Portland 
paper that you carry a line of Tennis Goods. Please send 
me a price-list of Rackets aud Balls, with best discount to 
a regular club. "What are the prices on Jersey Coats, 
and in what color do they come ? 

Yours truly, 
P. O. Box 2002. BOB BRO"WN. 

Confectionery, Fruit, and Cigar Store, 

MAIN STEEET, BRUNS"WICK, ME. 

Wm. R. FIELD, Manager. 

W. HAWTHORNE, 

FINE * TAILORING, 

2 Church Block, Bath. 



_ „ ,n fileinPbilailelphia 

\ at the Newspaper Adver- 

. ^___ _ ? tising' Ag-ency of JMessrs. 

N W. AYER & SON, t'ur authorized agents. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEGE BOOKSTORE. 

We have coustaotly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book "and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 

BYRON STEVJilNS. 



KC. 



T. <3-i-v:E3iNr, 

DEALER IN 



Ice -Cream, Fine Confectionery, Fruit, and Cigars. 

Ice-Cream furnished to Parties, Levees, etc., 
at Reasonable Terms. 

Under the OM Universalist Church, - - Main Street, BRUNSWICK. 



LENTON & NEAGLE. 

In this may be seen a very fine assortment of Ladies' and Gents' 
Traveling Bags, Valises, and Shawl Starps. There is also to be 
seen a very fine line of Riding Saddles for both Ladies and Gen- 
tlemen, showing that they pay strict attention to the wants of all 
their onstomers who are lovers of that healthy sport of horse- 
back riding. In connection with their riding gear they Iceep the 
Largest Stock of Horse Clothing and Dusters that can be found 
this side of the manufacturers, — 150 different patterns to 
select from. They are also Manufacturers of Fine Harnesses 
of every description, and are ahead of all their competitors as 
regards to Prices and Good "Work. They pay strict attention 
to Trunk and Valise Rep.airing, and can Canvas a Trunlc if it 
be so desired. They Cut Prices to all College Students. 
Remember the place and give them a call, at the Sign of 



LENTON & NEAGLE, 



COBURN CLASSICAL INSTITUTE, 

WATERVILLE, ME. Both Se.Nes. Four Courses of Study : 
Inti'oductory ; College Preparatory, 3 years; English and 
Scientific, 3 years ; Ladies' Collegiate, 4 years. Location healthy, 
expenses moderate, discipline wholesome, morals good. Persons 
using alcohoHc beverages or tobacco need not apply. Accommoda- 
tions ample and excellent. For further information send for 
Catalogue to J. H. HANSON, Principal. 



W: 



NUESEKYMAN. 



ANTKD 

Local Men to take orders for our Specialties 
in their own towns and counties. Live men 
make S5 a d.ay. Write for terms, giving ref- 
erences axad age. 

CHAKLES H. CHASE, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Under G. A. E. Hall. 



Main Street, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



F. H. WILSON, 

DISPENSER OF 

Pure Drugs, Medicines, and Chemicals. 

Imported and Domestic Cigars. 
MAIN STREET, - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 



THE 



^ TRAVELERS * 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF H:A.RTFORr), COIsTN^., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCf" $1 1,000,000, and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 

A r^r^TT^T71VT T*OT Tr^TTT^ Indemnifying the Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
-^'-^^-^-'--•-^-'-'-'-^ -•- -•- V-'-L'XVJiXjCJ Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidental Injury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only 3?5.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each f 1,000, with $5.00 -weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 1864 have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. 

Issues T TT7T7 "POT Tr^TTf'^ °* every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 

On ALL 

nber of 

Assets, 



also XJX-L -UJ X V.'XJXV^J.JJjkJ Personal Benefit. 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

$7,826,000 [ Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Office at Hartford. 
JAS. G. BATTERSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



QOCIKT'Y' 'Dies cLT\.d. ^Icutes, Cu±s cltlcL EnstgrvtcL. 
'W'-rittrLg Fajper curtcl Ccvrd^s JUrtgircLved. cund JPrtntecL. 
Stziderit's 'Vistttng CcltcLs. Iruvvtattons of ever-y kirtcl 
e^ecLzted by the engrccving Ixozzse of 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 

Society IrwttoJ:iorhs , 'Dies, CLnd llVLLstrcLtioizs for Yecvr- 
Q§ool=cs, JVLoTiogrcLTns, Jlnns, ctrid. Crests JUixg-rctved. and 
^pirttecl. 'Vtsiitng CarcLs, and. tKe. Chnjce.st Stcttioneri/. Seals, 
Tapers and. Sealing Wa^. aixd Sealing Sets. 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



m 



% 




^CID PHOSPHATE. 

[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

The Unrivalled Remedy for Dyspepsia, 3Iental and Physical Exhaustion, Nervousness, Wakefulness, 

Diminished "Vitality, etc. 

As Food for an Exhausted Brain, in Liver and Kidney Trouble, in Seasicl(ness and Sicl( Headaclie, in Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion and Coyistipation, in Inehriety, Despondency and cases of Impaired Nerve Function, 

It has become a necessity in a large number of households throughout the world, 

And is universally prescribed and recommended by physicians of all schools. 
Its action -will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 
It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body. 
It is unsurpassed as a substitute for lemons or limes, and 

IT MAKKS A DELICIOUS DRINK WITH WATER AND SUGAR ONLY. 
Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by tlie 

KUMFOKD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, R. I. 
«S-BEWARE OF IMITATIGNS.-ffiar 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BI^XJKrS'^T^ICK:, 3VCE. 

Special Rates to Classes |~Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brnns'wick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Vie^vs. 



Go to 1717. B. VlToodard^s 

To buy your GEOCEEIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGAES, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 




OTTAWA 
Is/L 



|Cushing's Island, 
Portland, Me. 

a-iBsoisr. 



Bowdoin College Medical Department. 

The Sixty-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 4th, 1SS6, 
and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— REV. W.M. DeWitt Hyde, President : Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Fracdce; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Women and Children; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., 
Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. Gerrish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Franklin C. Eobinson, A.M., Chemistry; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henkv H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Young, Public Hygiene ; 
Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealet, M.D., Demonstrator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGTJES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE AD.JUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IX TLACK OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 
LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

EHOBAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 

ROGERS' CELEBRATED GROUPS. 



Mixtures for Pipe or Cigarette. 
THREE KINGS, Turkish, Perique and Virginia. 
MELLOW MIXTURE, Turkish and Perique. 
TURKISH and VIRGINIA. 

PERIQUE and VIRGINIA. 
GENUINE TURKISH. 
FLAKE CUTS, ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOE THE PIPE. 

VANITY FAIR . OLD GOLD. 

SALMAGUNDI, a W ew Granulated Mixture. 

FRAGRANT VANITY FAIR, 
SUPERLATIVE, CLOTH OF GOLD. 

KIIVIBALL'S SATIN STRAIGHT CUT CIGARETTES. 

People of refined taste who desire exceptionally fine Ciijar- 
ettes should use only our Straight Cut, put up in Satin Pactets 
and boxes of 10s., 20s., ."iOs., and 100s. 

Our Cigarettes were never so fine as now. They cannot be 
surpassed for purity and excellence. Only the purest Rice Paper 
used. Establisbed 1846. 14 First Prize Medals. 

Wm. S. Kimball & Co., Peerless Tobacco Works, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

COBURN CLASSICAL INSTITUTE, 

WATERVILLE, ME. Both Sexes. Four Courses of Study : 
Introductory; College Preparatory, 3 years; English and 
Scientific, 3 years ; Ladies' Collegiate, 4 years. Location healthy, 
expenses inoderate, discipline wholesome, morals good. Persons 
using alcoholic beverages or tobacco need not apply. Accommoda- 
tions ample and excellent. For further information send for 
Catalogue to J. H. HANSON, Principal. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

474 Congress St., - - - opp. Preble House. 

THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

]\[0. g 0DD EEIiIieW^' BMCK, 

Is the place to buy 

o^'Q'OM, Staiioneif, § Sanuj Soodi. 

Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 

■ A. W. TOWNSEND, Prop'r. 



The New Styles in 

Smr^I^ and. SOI^T H^^TS 

In all colors, are nOAV ready. An elegant line of New Y'ork 

NeckAvear in New Shapes and Colors just receiveil. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Eancy Mixtures, 

-«-^T ELLIOTT'S, 8- 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer Id Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 EjEchange Street, Portland. 

C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 




THE FAVORITE NOS.S03-4O4-3S2-/7O-SS/-W/TH 
''HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



f HE PROPRIETOR of tlm Nearest Coiner Grocery will 

endeavor to merit a 

CONTINTTAUCE 

Ot the Student's patronage. Come and prove liim. 



C. H. POWERS' 

Hair -Dressing Rooms, 

LEMONT BLOCK, 
Main Street, BKUNSWICK, MAINE. 



J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

GRIMMER'S ORCHESTRA 

Is DOW prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

750 Middle Sheet, - - - - Portland, Me. 



The Largest Assortment of 

Gents Fine Shoes 

Is to be found at 

JACKSON'S. 

LAWN- TENNIS, BASE -BALL, AND LOW SHOES, 

In Large Variety. 

S. R, JACKSON, M, 2 Odd Fellows Block, Brunswick. 

DROP IN AND INSPECT. 



j. m. lombard, 
Dentist, 

OVEK BOAKDMAN'S STOKE, MAIN STREET. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 



PURITY SWEET CIGARETTES. 

THE PUREST, MILDEST, AND BEST CIGARETTE ON THE MARKET. 

PURE, BRIGHT VIRGINIA TOBACCO AND PUREST RICE PAPER. 



FOR THE FINEST MADE TRY OUR 



STRAIGHT WEB CIGARETTES. 

MANUFACTURED FROM THE FINEST BRIGHT TOBACCO GROWN. WITH 

TURKISH MIXTURE. 



PURITY SMOKING TOBACCO. 

THE FINEST, PUREST, AND BEST SMOKING TOBACCO MADE. 

RALEIGH CUT PLUG SMOKING. 

THE ORIGINAL, PUREST, AND THE BEST. 



We guarantee all not injurious. 



Only a trial and you will be convinced. 



PACE & SIZER, Manufacturers, Richmond, Va. 



ON SALE AT FIELD'S. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the followiBg subjects, text- 
books being mentioned, in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenougb, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Csesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
iEneid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,- Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,- first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class wliich they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Eegulae Examinations t'or Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Couimence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Hallowell Classical and Sci- 
en'iflc Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryeburff Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers of the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be ansvpered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQUIEED— rOUE HOUES A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 
Greek, four terms. 
Mathematics, four terms. 
Modern Languages, six terms. 
Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 
' History, two terms. 
Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 
Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 
Natural History, three terms. 
Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terras. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — EOUE HOUES A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry aud Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XVI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, SEPTEMBER 29, 1886. 



No. 6. 



BOV\^DOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE 'WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE YEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

C. B. Burleigh, '87, Managing Editor. 

L. B. Varney, '87, Business Editor. 
C. C. Choate, '87. C. H. Verrill, '87. 

M. L. Kimball, '87. H. C. Hill, '88. 

A. W. Merrill, '87. M. P. Smithwick, '8! 

E. C. Plummer, '87. A. W. Tolman, '88. 



Per annum, in advance. 
Single Copies, 



$2.00 
15 cents. 

Extr.i copies can he obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Coni- 
niunicaticns in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Of&ce at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. XVI., No. 6.— September 29, 1886. 

Bowdoin, 97 

Editorial Notes 97 

Tlie Morning Lesson, 101 

Alumni Association, 102 

Communications 102 

Town and Gown, - 103 

How, Not Where, 104 

Back Again ]0i 

The Century Marie, 105 

CoLLEGii Tabula, 105 

Personal, 107 

In Memoriam, 108 

College World, 108 

BOWDOIN. 

Sequestered from the rough, cold world. 
Hedged 'round with living green. 

No strife or turmoil stirs thy quiet life ; 
But all, a peaceful scene. 

Thy children love thy shaded walks ; 

And in thy honored halls 
Breathe all the glory that has thrilled 

Thy venerated walls. 




It is once more the privilege and the 
pleasure of the Orient to greet ohi students 
and welcome new ones at the beginning of a 
college j-ear. The year has indeed opened 
most auspioiously. A large entering class 
makes us stionger in numbers than for some 
years; the g^aunasinm is at length fully 
equipped and will soon be opened under a com- 
petent instructor; and the Hinckley Profes- 
sorship of Latin has been filled by a gentleman 
of established reputation and one well qual- 
ified for the position. 

The opening of the year is a good time to 
form new resolutions and make needed inno- 
vations. We hope that this will be a year of 
energy and activity, both in studies and in 
sports. We hope to see a college of live men 
full}' awake to all legitimate interests and 
ready to give one and all a hearty and manly 
support. We trust we shall see a marked 
diminution in the number of those college 
quid nuncs who, without any blood of their 
own, are always ready to cry down the enter- 
prise of other men. Let us have none of 
these men, for they are simply ciphers on the 
left of college integers. The}' serve mainly 
as decimal places in the college notation, and 
exhibit activity only in carrying out their own 
narrow and selfish motives. Let us regulate 
all such members of our college community — 
if we should chance to discover any — to the 



98 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



shades of their own conceits. Let every live 
man give his hearty and active support to all 
our college interests, and we may rest assured 
that the year before us will not be barren of 
results. 



It is a matter of congratulation to all 
friends of Bowdoin that the committee, to 
whom was intrusted the duty of filling the 
Chair of Latin, have succeeded in securing 
so excellent an instructor as Professor Ernest 
M. Pease. We clip the following notice of 
him from the Portland Argus : 

Mr. Pease is a graduate of the University of Col- 
orado in the class of 1882. He then entered Johns 
Hopkins University, teaching Latin, at the same time 
in the University Fitting School. The third year lie 
was elected to a fellowship in Latin, and his work 
was so satisfactory that contrary to custom he was 
re-elected for an additional year. In January he re- 
signed to accept the position left vacant by the resig- 
nation of the Professor of Latin in Smith College, 
Northampton. It was the earnest desire of the Pres- 
ident and Faculty to retain him there, but the trustees 
decided that the chair should be filled permanently 
by a lady. He comes with the highest testimonials 
from Prof. Warren of Johns Hopkins University, 
Rev. W. L. Slocum of Baltimore, Geo. W. Cable, 
the author, and his associates on the Faculty of 
Smith College. 

We will also add that Prof. Pease is un- 
der an engagement with the well-known pub- 
lishing firm of Ginn & Heath, to prepare for 
them an edition of Cicero's Letters. Although 
Prof. Pease has been with us but a short time, 
he has already, by his pleasant and gentle- 
manly bearing, and his success in the class- 
room, won the respect of all his pupils and is 
deservedly popular. 



In an editorial last term the Orient noted 
the defects in the present constitution of the 
Base-Ball Association and urged the immedi- 
ate necessity of the adoption of a constitution 
more adequate to the needs of the Association. 
Tlie Oeient has also frequently advocated 
the organization and maintenance of a good 



reserve nine. In drawing up the new consti- 
tution we vvould advise that provision be 
made for such a reserve nine. The manager 
of the 'Varsity has always had too much to 
attend to in his regular duties to give the 
matter of a reserve nine the attention it de- 
serves. We would therefore advise that dis- 
tinct provision be made in the new constitu- 
tion for the election, not only of a manager of 
the 'Varsity, but also of a manager of the 
second nine, whose duties shall be the same 
as regards the reserve nine, as are those of 
the manager of the 'Varsity as regards the 
college nine. In tliis way we believe that 
with a good energetic man as manager, one 
thoroughly interested in his work, a good re- 
serve nine could be organized capable of doing 
creditable work and of playing the 'Varsity 
team good practice games. We trust that a 
meeting of the Base-Ball Association may be 
called at once and a committee appointed to 
draw up and present to the Association for 
its ratification a new constitution embodying 
more of the ideas of the nineteenth century. 

It is with pleasure that we welcome to 
our midst the class of '90. We believe that 
there is good material in the class and we 
trust it may develop itself in the advance- 
ment of college interests. The first year in 
college will be the great test for the class of 
'90, and will furnish the standard by which 
other classes will estimate them. We hope 
and confidently expect that '90 will take an 
honorable position in college ; that it will be 
a class not lacking in energy and college 
spirit. Let the class see to it at the begin- 
ning of their course that they foster among 
themselves that spirit of unity which will en- 
able them to assume a positive and honorable 
position in the active life of the college. Let 
it never be said that the class of '90 showed 
any lack of .sand in entering with spirit and 
determination into any of our college con- 
tests. Let every man who can represent his 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



class in any direction feel it not only a duty 
but an honor to do so. Let the class be rep- 
resented on the diamond by their best nine, 
and on the river by their best crew. Let 
there be no delay in these matters. We trust 
that '90 will not be burdened with the mem- 
bership of any of those college nonentities 
who are conspicuous only for their inactivity. 
We trust that every man in '90 may be a 
positive factor both in his class and in the 
college. If the class desire a man to repre- 
sent them on their nine he should feel hon- 
ored in doing it; if called to a position upon 
his class crew, he should feel a pride in repre- 
senting his class upon the water. At the 
close of the year we trust that it may be said 
of '90: "The}' have been tried in the tests of 
Freshman year and have not been found 
wanting." 



The Mondaj'' evening receptions, instituted 
by the Faculty last year, proved entirely sat- 
isfactory and eminently successful in accom- 
plishing the object for which they were in- 
tended. Before this number of the Orient 
reaches its readers the announcement of their 
continuance during the coming year will 
probably have been made. The value of 
these receptions, in the years to come, to 
those wlio avail themselves of them, is incal- 
culable. Social culture should form an im- 
portant part of every student's education ; 
a part which, unfortunately, is too often neg- 
lected. To the students of Bowdoin, espe- 
cially, coming principally, as they do, from 
the country or from small towns, is this oppor- 
tunitj- which is now offered them, valuable. 

But in a much broader and higher sense 
than mere outward culture, the receptions 
may be made of immense importance. The 
world, naturally enough, expects of the col- 
lege student a broad and scholarly culture, 
and, what is more, demands it of him, and, 
in a great measure pre-judges him bj^ this 
standard. If the college student wishes to 



fill, acceptably and adequately, the positions 
and station in life for which he is presumably 
fitting himself, he must acquire this culture. 
And desultory conversation, with broad and 
cultured minds, fills a place in one's educa- 
tion which no curriculum, however elaborate, 
can supply. 

These receptions are an almost entirely 
gratuitous offering on the part of the Faculty; 
for relatively little of the benefit falls to 
them. They are given at a great sacrifice of 
time and convenience, to say nothing of other 
annoyances. And if the Faculty, of its own 
accord, do all this for the single profit of the 
students, the students, on their part, should 
not allow the gift to go unrequited ; and the 
most graceful and appreciative way of re- 
turning the kindness is by attending the 
receptions. 



It was no matter of surprise, although 
one of regret to Bowdoin students, upon re- 
turning to college at the beginning of this 
term, to find that Wilson, the pitcher of the 
college nine, had entered Williams. The 
newspaper reports of the liberal offers which 
representatives of that college were making 
the battery men in the Maine League had 
prepared us for such news. It was generally 
known that Williams was in need of a bat- 
tery, and it is not at all strange that she 
should have preferred to purchase the expe- 
rienced players of other colleges rather than 
to develop the inexperienced players of her 
own. It may, perhaps, be the legitimate 
province of the smaller colleges to furnish 
base-ball nurseries for the benefit of larger 
institutions, but it will strike the unbiased 
mind as a relation scarcely consistent with 
the aims and courtesies of higher education. 
We certainly have no desire to train up men 
who are to devote the skill of their maturer 
years to building up this somewhat crumb- 
ling, but still popular branch of the Williams 
curriculum. The facts of the case seem to 



100 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



be these : Williams was in need of a battery. 
Of the four men in the Maine League who 
were desired to fill this need only one (Wil- 
son) appeared to be eligible, the others 
having played on professional teams. Wilson 
was a fellow in straitened circumstances. The 
Williams nine had played against liim and 
knew his value as a player. A representa- 
tive of Williams visited his parents and the 
next term finds him at that college. At the 
same time, by a most remarkable and happy 
coincidence, Clark, the excellent catcher of 
the Browns, makes a change in his Alma 
Mater, and the ambition of Williams for a 
battery is realized. 

Now, friend Williams, let us anticipate 
your reply. You will tell us that an opulent 
relative of Wilson — a graduate of Williams, 
has promised to defray his college expenses 
if he will complete his course there. We 
have heard this same yarn ourselves, and we 
take it with a large amount of salt. It is 
altogether too thin, and will deceive nobody. 
We understand that Wilson claims never to 
have received remuneration for his services 
as a ball player. We think however we can 
make it rather difficult for him to prove this. 
It was generally understood here that he re- 
ceived ample pay for his services on the Bates 
nine a year ago this fall ; and that his work 
on the Yarmouths was by no means gratis. 

We shall await with some interest the ac- 
tion of the college league in this matter. 
We desire to know whether the standard of 
college athletics has degenerated to such a 
degree that a barefaced transaction like this, 
which savors so very strongly of profession- 
alism, can receive the sanction of the other 
colleges and of the Williams Faculty. 



The matter of an intercollegiate oratori- 
cal contest has again become a topic of dis- 
cussion in the Maine colleges. The Cadet, 
Echo, and Student have all come out in edito- 
rials favorable to the project. The Ueho 



claims that " Oratory is on a decline in our 
colleges," and that we cannot suffer the ruin 
to fall to pieces without an effort to "prop the 
falling parts,'" and advises the formation, at 
Colby, of "a college oratorical society with a 
view to developing ready and able speakers." 
The Student proposes the following plan for 
the formation of an Oratorical Association : 

"Let the editors of each college paper see to it, 
that one man is chosen as a representative of his col- 
lege ; these four representatives shall meet on the 
earliest possible date at Waterville, to draw up a set 
of rules or laws that shall govern the intercollegiate 
contest; these rules will decide the length of the 
discourses to be delivered, the date of the contest, 
the number of participants, etc." 

We fully agree with the Echo that oratory 
does not receive as much attention in our col- 
leges as formerly. This is due, we believe, 
partly to an increasing activity in athletics, 
and partly to changes in the social life of the 
students. We doubt if it would be possible, 
under existing circumstances, to awaken 
toward the cultivation of oratory much of the 
old-time enthusiasm, or to restore it to any- 
thing like its former position. It has faded 
out of our colleges, in company with many 
other old customs, good, bad, and indifferent, 
and we doubt if it can be made to return 
again, with any degree of permanency. 

Intercollegiate oratorical contests have, to 
a large extent, taken the place of athletics in 
some of the Western colleges. As there can 
be no standard of difference fixed in these 
contests, but everything is relative and de- 
pendent wholly upon the opinions, and some- 
times prejudices of the judges who are placed 
in a position in comparison with which the 
office of a base-ball umpire is a " soft job." 
Their opinions are seldom, we may almost 
say never, generally acquiesced in, and are 
usually followed by a storm of indignation 
and abuse that furnishes the fighting editors 
of the competing colleges with a whole year's 
job. So exceedingly bitter and acrimonious 
have some of these contests among the West- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



101 



ern colleges become during the last few years, 
as to lead to the breaking up of several of the 
largest associations. We do not intend to 
be biased in this matter, brother editors. We 
desire to discuss it fairly and freely iu all its 
lights, and we trust we are open to conviction, 
but at the present writing we do not see how 
the formation of such an association would be 
for the best interests of the Maine colleges. 



Now that there appears to be some pros- 
pect that the new " gym " will soon be 
opened, it would be well to consider the mat- 
ter of purchasing gymnasium suits. By co-op- 
erating in this matter we shall be able to se- 
cure the reductions which any of the sporting 
firms will give on such goods if ordered in 
quantity. It seems to us tliat it would be a 
unique and pleasing idea to order our suits 
bj'^ classes, each class selecting some suit that 
embodied most nearly its colors. The appear- 
ance of the various classes in uniform would 
certainly be much more pleasing than for 
each man to order his suit as it chanced to 
come. We would suggest that each class 
choose a committee to select a "class suit" 
for "gym" work, and take orders for them 
from their classmates, and that the chairmen 
of these class committees constitute a com- 
mittee of the college to order the goods of 
the firm offering the best terms. We trust 
there may be sufficient class pride in college 
to make this idea a success. We do not mean 
that every man in college shall buy a "gym" 
suit, but that all who do, shall purchase the 
kind chosen by his class as a uniform. 



A copy of this number of the Oeient is 
sent to every member of the Freshman class ; 
and the paper will continue to be sent until 
stopped. The Orient is a paper conducted 
solely in the interests of the students ; which 
means, more broadly, of the college, in all 
its departments. Every one who unites him- 
self with Bowdoin College identifies him- 



self with the interests which the Orient 
represents, and of which it is a part. 

It is on this ground, in behalf of each 
student's own manifest interests, that the 
Orient asks the support and patronage of 
every member of '90, on the threshold of his 
college life. 



THE MORNING LESSON. 
Come, children, gather round my knee 

And drop your youthful toys, 
For men, you know, though e'er so Fresh, 
Must cease from being boys. 

So drop your cribs and " bosses," 

Lay by your chewing gum. 
Just rake in all I tell you. 

And be sure you keep it mum. 

You doubtless think, my little dears, 
You have no need of college — 

That all your little craniums 

Are brimming full of knowledge. 

You were giants in the high school 

Despite your tender age. 
Kind aunties wept to hear you spout 

In public on the stage. 

And all your loving parents — 

(Put up that rattle, Jake,) 
Were filled with loving notions 

Of the statesman you would make. 

And granny sometimes would remark — 
(Roy, don't stand on your head, sir,) 
How much you oft' reminded her 
Of dear old Daniel Webster. 

The high school girls they smiled at you 

And sent you billet doux. 
And when they had a cud of gum 

You always got a chew. 

But, children, all this thing is changed, 

(Get off that rocking horse,) 
You've rolled into Old Bowdoin, dears, 

To gather learned moss. 

Your motto heretofore has been 

Dum vivimus vivamus ; 
But now, my children, it must be 

magnus ignoramus ! 



102 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 
The annual meeting of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation, held in Adams Hall on the morning 
of Commencement Day, was more fully at- 
tended than usual and well deserves the notice 
which it failed to receive in our last issue. 
On taking the chair the President, Professor 
Frederic Henry Gerrish, M.D., expressed in 
a few graceful sentences his appreciation of 
the honor conferred upon him by his election 
the previous 3'ear, and then proceeded to give 
a valuable and interesting summary of the 
past action of the Association in regard to 
the election of the Board of Overseers by the 
alumni. This has already appeared in the 
main in these columns and needs no abstract. 
The committee on nominating candidates for 
vacancies in the Board of Overseers reported 
the following names : Edward Stanwood, 
Class of 1861 ; Frederic Henry Gerrish, Class 
of 1866 ; Orville Dewey Baker, Class of 1868; 
John Adams Morrell, Class of 1876. There 
were three vacancies in the Board and it was 
decided to present two candidates. Tiie re- 
sult of the ballot then taken was the choice 
of Prof. Frederic H. Gerrish, M.D., of Port- 
land, and Edward Stanwood, Esq., of Brook- 
line, Mass. The Board of Overseers has 
since formally elected both of these gentle- 
men members of its body. The Alumni Asso- 
ciation re-appointed its old committee on nom- 
inations, laid an assessment of one dollar 
on members present to defray incidental ex- 
penses, and adjourned with every prospect of 
a still larger gathering next year. 



COMMUNICATIONS. 

To the Editors of the Orient : 

I inclose a copy of a poem read last Com- 
mencement week at the reunion of my class 
by Prof. Chapman. The class had it printed 
for its own pleasure ; but it seems to many 
of us to be worthy of a wider reading, es- 
pecially as it relates to the old professors 
who were the teachers of the students of 
Bowdoin for more than a generation, and its 



sentiment will find a response in the hearts of 
all the classes previous to twenty years ago. 
I am confident that the hundreds of old Bow- 
doin graduates, who are glad to remem- 
ber that the}' sat under the teachings of 
Woods, Smyth, Upham, and Packard, will 
thank you for giving them an opportunity to 
read a poem in which their old instructors 
are so fittingly and touchingly alluded to. I, 
therefore, send it to you, in the hope that you 
will give it a place in the next issue of the 
Bowdoin Orient. 

Yours very truly, 

Feedekic Henry Gerrish, 

Sec, Glass of 1866. 



UBI SUNT? 

[Lilies read at the twcDtieth reunion ol the Class of 1S66, 
June 25, 1886. By Henry Leland Chapman.] 

I. 

Brothers, listen! Do you hear it? 'Tis the old fa- 
miliar bell, 
And it rings from out the distance in the tones we 

knew so well ; 
And it rings a summons to us, pealing from the ivied 

tower. 
Whence it used to send its warning at the recitation 

hom\ 

II. 
And again we come together, with our lessons partly 

learned, 
Hoping still for better fortune than our idleness has 

earned ; 
Glad to be once more together, though our tongues 

can speak but ill 
Of the lessons that were set us, aud are all unmas- 

tered still. 

III. 
Here we are ; — a little noisy, for the Prof, is not yet 

come, — 
Soon enough when he is present we shall find our 

lips are dumb ; 
So, until he comes, be merry ; laugh, aud sing the 

songs that tell 
Of the fellowship that holds us in its never-failing 

spell. 

IV. 
Still we wait, and still he tarries ; it was never so 

before ; 
We were wont to find him waiting, when we entered 

at the door. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



103 



Now the solemn desk is vacant, yet our lips are loth 

to turn 
From their music or their silence to the old-time 

shout "Adjourn !" 

V. 
Will not some one corae to hear us blunder through 

what we have learned ? 
Through a master's magic blunders often have to 

blessings turned ; 
And our tasks have been less irksome, though so 

feebly we have wrought. 
For the wisdom that we gathered when the rank we 

reaped was nought. 

VI. 

Where is he whose face benignant beamed upon us 

when we tried 
To recount how the Apostles suffered for the truth 

and died ? 
In bis face we saw the sweetness of his spirit shin- 
ing through. 
And the teacher, more than Paley, made us think the 

doctrine true. 

VII. 
Where is he who spoke in figures, and whose rugged 

face was kind ? 
True, we thought the curves he taught us were a 

trifle too refined ; 
But we understood the beauty of the straight line 

that he drew 
In his own heroic conduct, feai'less, faithful, firm, 

and true. 

VIII. 
Where is he who always heard us in divisions, though 

he found 
He must cut a man in sunder, when but one was on 

the ground ? 
Solomon in all his glory was not wiser in the lore 
Of the human heart whose memories are of him a 

precious store. 

IX. 
Where is he who looked a welcome with his keen 

but gracious eye. 
Quickly kindling at the beauties which our heedless 

glance passed by. 
In the Grecian text of Homer, or the verse which 

Horace wrote ? 
His the beauty we remember : 'twas of that our hearts 

took note. 

X. 
And not one of all to meet us, while we wait ex- 
pectant here? 



Still the song of faith and friendship sing on, broth- 
ers, full and clear ! 

Where are they? O, Alma Mater, thou did'st win our 
love of yore, 

And thou still art here to claim it, though the years 
have fled — a score. 

XI. 

Close the books ! there's no reciting ; but there's many 

a loving thought 
Of the men whose patient wisdom for our youthful 

folly wrought ; 
And there's many a benediction for the Mother, still 

our pride. 
As she draws her wandering children back a moment 

to her side. 

XII. 

Brothers, listen! Do you hear it? 'Tis the old fa- 
miliar bell. 

And it rings from out the distance in the tones we 
knew so well ; 

Now it rings dismissal to us, for the hour has 
swiftly flown, 

And the " Good-bye" that we utter is the echo of its 
tone. 



TOWN AND GOWN. 

Shall students enter town society? Too 
many allow the tide of circumstances to drift 
them one way or the other in regard to this 
question, or let their natural tastes guide 
them without weighing the arguments which 
ma}- be adduced on either side. 

The chief objections to a decision in the 
affirmative are the loss of time and the ex- 
pense. As to the former, it is true that while 
the actual number of hours and minutes lost 
may be small, a lack of attention to regular 
work is likely to ensue, but a sensible college 
man ought to be able to systematize the hours 
of work and recreation so as to have ample 
time for both, and even gain an advantage, 
by acquiring the habit of doing this, which 
every man must do, if he expects to be suc- 
cessful in any profession. 

In regard to expense, it is entirely unnec- 
essary that a student in general society should 
be extravagant. The best society is far from 



104 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



being the most costly, and a comparatively 
slight outlay will enable any one to preserve 
a respectable position. 

There is a great tendency among students 
to confine themselves exclusively to " college 
life." Without reference to the class known 
as "digs," many of those who make a spe- 
cialty of some branch of athletics, or give 
themselves up to the thousand and one 
minor employments which the life " within 
the bricks " offers, are subject to this. In con- 
sequence, numerous well educated men on 
leaving college are ignorant of the usages of 
good society, and still more of the character- 
istics of a true lady. Many talented college 
graduates have had their lives spoiled by an 
uuwise choice of a wife, and only because for 
want of experience they lacked the ability to 
read character as readily as they could Greek. 

Furthermore, the advantages of an ex- 
tended acquaintance are so great that they 
cannot well be overestimated. No matter 
whether a man enters the law, medicine, 
journalism, the ministry, or business, a large 
circle of friends is always conducive to his 
advancement, and in no other way can he 
gain this more easily than by mingling in 
society, and if he does this in a reasonable 
manner, and according to his time and means, 
he need never fear that he will wish, at some 
future time, that he had passed his college 
course as a bear does the winter, hibernating 
in his den. 



HOW, NOT WHERE. 

We can say it differs nothing 
Where the little brooklets glide ; 
Whether through some lowly valley, 
Or from lofty mountain sides, 
If their cool refreshing waters. 
Dashing on in noisy glee. 
Do their work, perform their mission. 
As they hasten toward the sea. 

Thus the flower born at even 
Takes away the gloom of night 
And performs a mission, worthy 



As that bloom which loves the light; 
For, though flashing gems attract us. 
Oft the meaner is more fair. 
And the diamond is precious, 
Why ? Because it is so rare. 

We may never conquer kingdoms, 
Never hear the sound of war ; 
We may never rule them conquered ; 
But we can obey their laws. 
Which recalls a truthful saying. 
Though its age I cannot say, 
That the dropping, if 'tis constant. 
Wears the stone, in time, away. 

Let us copy not the eagle, 
As it mounts on dizzy wing ; 
For the absence of the pinions. 
Proves that we're another thing. 
Let us labor then with patience. 
Each in his allotted place ; 
Slow at first, and after, faster. 
Is the way to run a race. 

BACE AGAIN. 

How anxiously we watched for familiar 
land-marks. Would they never appear ! 
Yes, here they are ! the old barn, the strag- 
gling fence, the trestle, the long, black coal 
sheds, and, at last, the long, dusty, dreary, 
Brunswick station. Little love it is with 
which most travelers view that rambling old 
structure ; but we look for it as for an old, 
familiar friend. It means more to us than 
three hours waiting ; it means a renewal of 
college life, the return to old scenes, and the 
meeting of old friends. 

How restlessly we had started out from 
home that morning ; it seemed as if the train 
would never reach its destination. But soon 
familiar faces began to appear. Here is 
Dick, then Fred, and Jack, and Bill ; and be- 
fore we reach Brunswick, there is quite a 
little crowd. And when we alight at the 
station we find a few still earlier ones there 
awaiting us. Words flow too slowly. There 
is a ceaseless clatter of tongues as we wend 
our way to the " Bricks." 

"Well, how has the summer gone?" 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



105 



"Glad to get back?" "How are things 
looking?" "Many Freshmen yet?" As 
we pass from the outside world on to the 
campus, how familiar all things look. Is it 
possible that we have been away three 
montiis ! Vacation seems like a dimly-re- 
membered dream. The past vanishes like a 
fleeting memory ; and we seem to awake as 
from a troubled sleep. As we near the " ends," 
accustomed sounds float to our ears, and we 
are once more under the enchanting, spell of 
college life. 

With each train comes a crowd of stu- 
dents. Soon all is activity and bustle. The 
halls are filled with dust and rubbish. Sub- 
Freshmen are wandering around with won- 
dering and bewildered gaze. The rooms are 
cluttered as they were left in the hurrj- of 
departure, and covered with the dust of vaca- 
tion. Windows are at once thrown open, and 
brooms and brushes brought into requisition. 

By evening many are settled and ready 
to receive callers or go on visits. "Well, 
Dick, v/hat does this mean ? Here is a new 
picture on your shelf — and, by Jove, in a new 
frame, too ! That indicates something more 
than ordinary. Is it a severe attack?" 

There is a zest in renewing college ac- 
quaintances at the beginning of each new 
year, which none but college students can 
fully understand ; and we tumble into bed 
late at night, tired, but happy. 



THE CENTURY MARK. 

Such a guileless face had she, 
Such a modest manner, 

That I thought no other girl 
Trod the earth like Anna. 

All my college course I went 
Everywhere with Anna. 

How I loved that witching face 
And that modest manner ! 

It was when I popped to her 
That I found I'd blundered. 

She cut a notch upon her fan 
Which made just a hundred. 




Yes, Bisbee's grown mucli 

larger, 
He's shot ahead a year, 
His class is one notch liigher 
^ Than when last we saw him here. 

But oh, those languid airs he sports. 
That look o£ classic scorn. 
That princely condescension, 
Is all vacation born. 

His classmates smile an inward smile. 
Whene'er they see him pass, 
While in their mental note-books 
They write him down — " an ass." 

The annual rope-pull between the Sophomores 
and Freshmen took place on the first Saturday morn- 
ing in front of the chapel. After a hard pull it was 
won by the Freshmen. 

The base-ball game occurred Saturday afternoon, 
and was characterized by the usual amount of " chin- 
ning " on the part of the Sophomores, who demoral- 
ized the Freshmen to such an extent that the latter 
were beaten badly. Below is the score : 

SOPHOMORES. 

A.E. R. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Freeman, 2b., .... 6 3 2 4 2 

Russell, c 6 4 5 8 12 2 3 

Clark, c. f., 5 2 2 2 

Fogg, 1. f 6 3 2 2 

Gilpatric, 3b 5 2 1 1 2 

E. A. Merrill, lb 5 1 8 1 

Stacy, r. f., 5 1 1 1 

Watts, p. 5 3 2 3 1 14 1 

Prentiss, s. s., . . . . 5 2 1 1 2 1 

Totals, .... 48 21 15 21 24 IS 9 

FRBSHMEN. 

A.E. K. B.H. T.B. P.O. A. E. 

Briggs, c. f., 4 1 1 1 2 

Pendleton, c, .... 4 2 3 3 7 2 4 

Dunn, r. f., p., .... 4 1 1 4 2 

Brooks, lb., 3 9 3 

Sears, 2b., 4 1 1 4 

Greeley, 3b 4 1 1 1 2 

Royal, s. s 4 1 1 3 

McCullock, 1. f., ... 3 1 

Allen, p., r. f 3 2 6 2 

Totals, .... 33 6 44 21 15 23 
Struck out — Watts, 11; Allen and Dunn, 6. Bases on 
balls — Watts, 1 ; Allen and Dunn, 3. Three-base hits — 
Russell; Freeman. Two-base hits — Russell; Watts. Wild 
pitches — Allen, 1. Passed balls — Russell, 2; Pendleton, 6. 
Time — 2 hours, 40 minutes. 

A few of the boys came back early, but most of 
them did not put in an appearance till IMonday. 



106 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Sophomore mathematics have been made elective 
at the beginning of this term, instead of the winter 
term as was formerly the custom. 

The umbrella gag didn't take this year. 

A Colby student, whose character is hardly com- 
patible with the tenets of the New Testament, be- 
guiled a sub-Freshman to that college on the plea 
that it was a "more moral" institution than Bow- 
doin. Tlie main ground for this self-complacent 
Pharisaism seems to be the same old chestnut so often 
sprung by Colby disciples : Whatever Colby does is 
perfect. We can hardly say that we appreciate 
the force of the argument in view of the true facts 
and the doctrines of modern theology. 

It is reported that sundry intellectual tutors have 
beguiled their leisure hours this season with "fish- 
ing." 

Prof.— "Mr. B." Mr. B.—" My boolj hasn't— " 
Chestnut-bell. 

The Freshman class numbers at present thirty- 
five men. 

Pres. Hyde preached at Portland, September 12th. 

The Sophomores are making use of Whitney's 
"Practical French Grammar" in place of the 
smaller book which was used last year. 

There is some talk of putting an eight-oared shell 
on the river this fall. 

Chapel at 8.20 a.m., this term. 

The Freshman Greek class is using Merriman's 
"Phffiaciaus of Homer." 

Improvements are being made in the south wing 
of the library. Spare room has been economized by 
-the construction of new cases wliich, it is estimated, 
will hold six thousand books. As the average rate 
of increase is twelve hundred a year, these cases 
will suf&ce for five years to come. Prof. Little will 
be assisted this year by C. J. Goodwin, '87, C. H. 
Verrill, '87, and W. W. Woodman, '88. 

We were glad to see the Chapel Choir in their 
places on the second morning of the term, and we 
hope that they will continue to do tlieir part toward 
maintaining interest in the morning exercises. 

During the first week of the term, quite a number 
of the students visited the State Fair at Lewiston. 

Wentworth, '86, is back as assistant in chemistry. 

The Brunswick Water Co. has laid its pipes 
within the college grounds, and now that the water 
is turned on we shall no longer be obliged to depend 
upon the wells for drinking purposes. 

On the evening of September 16th, a reception 



was given the Freshman class at the Y. M. C. A. 
room. About half the class were present. There 
was singing, an address by Pres. Hyde, and the 
closing prayer by Prof. Smith. A very pleasant 
evening was passed by all. 

The first Junior themes of the term are due Sep- 
tember 29th. The subjects are: "Is Unconscious 
Irreverence Excusable?" and "Natural Scenery." 

On Thursday night of the first week in the term, 
the usual horn concert was given by the Sophomores. 
They were accorded their customary welcome by the 
different ends. 

On the Friday morning of the first week came 
the foot-ball rush of the Sophomore class. The 
struggle was a long and severe one, the ball being 
driven within the vicinity of the gymnasium. It 
was finally won by Prentiss. 

On the afternoon of the same day came the foot- 
ball game between the Sophomores and Freshmen. 
Owing to the participation of men desirous of fair 
play, the game was prolonged to the time of an hour 
and three-quarters. The Freshman class showed 
that it contained some good material. After about 
sixteen rushes, the ball was at length forced over 
the line by the Sophomores. 

And now the college poet raves. 

And pulls his auburn hair, 

And searches books of synonyms 

In harrowing despair. 

In vain are all his searchings 

And all his waste o£ time. 

For not a vernal word he sees 

With '90 that will rhyme. 
It had been decided by the Faculty, on account of 
Prof. Smith's other duties, not to offer English His- 
tory among this year's Junior electives. But as 
about fifteen of the Juniors are desirous of taking 
the study, Prof. Smith has kindly consented to act as 
instructor. The text-books used will be Green's 
Shorter History of the English People, Guest's Lect- 
ures on the History of England, and Keith John- 
son's Historical Atlas. 

The nine has begun to practice on the delta. On 
September 13th, a game was played between two 
picked teams. The batteries were Moulton and 
Boutelle, and Watts and Pendleton. 

The gymnasium has been fitted up during the 
vacation, and in a short time will be ready for occu- 
pation. Mr. A. H. Brown, '84, who was elected in- 
structor, has declined the position, and the place will 
be filled by Mr. F. N. Whittier, '85. 

Ten or twelve of the Sophomore class have elected 
Mathematics. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



107 



There seems to be about the usual interest ia 
tennis this fall. The courts are in good condition 
and are. occupied most of the time. We hope that a 
tournament will be arranged with Colby before the 
cold weather commences. 

We would suggest to the college authorities that 
if, instead of replacing the attic floors that are mys- 
teriously missing at the close of each college year, 
they were to place a few slabs from the mill there, 
they would be carrying out a great economic meas- 
ure, and would save the students a great deal of 
needless labor. 

We understand that Prof. Pease uses the Roman 
method of Latin pronunciation. We trust he will 
change to the English, as that is the pronunciation in 
vogue at all the Bowdoin preparatory schools, and 
the one which has long been in use in this college. 

Mr. A. F. Nichols, whose advertisement may be 
found in another column, is offering special rates to 
students for fall and winter suits. We would advise 
the students to give him a call. 




'24.— Professor Calvin E. 
Stowe died in Hartford, 
Conn., August 22d. He was born in 
Natick, Mass., April 6, 1802. He 
graduated from Andover Theological Sem- 
inary in 1828. He was immediately ap- 
pointed assistant professor at Andover. In 1832 he 
was editor of the Boston Recorder. From 1831 to 
1833 he was Professor of Languages in Dartmouth. 
For tlie next seventeen years he occupied the 
chair of Biblical Literature in Lane Theological 
Seminary at Cincinnati. In 1850 he came to Bruns- 
wick to take a professorship. The next year he went 
to Andover to take the chair of Sacred Literature, 
where he remained till 1862, when he was obliged to 
resign ou account of ill health. Since then he has 
resided in Hartford devoting himself to literature. 
His contributions to Biblical literature are quite 
numerous and valuable. Professor Stowe was twice 
married ; in 1832, to Elizabeth, daughter of Rev. Dr. 
Tyler, who died in 1834, and in 1836 to Harriet, 
daughter of Rev. Dr. Lyman Beecher, by whom he 
had seven children, 



'25. — Some unpublished writings of Longfellow 
are reported. Mr. Justin Jones, an old news- 
paper man informs the editor of the Brunswick Tele- 
graph that he " set the type for several of Longfellow's 
works, and that he has in his possession an unpub- 
lished work (printed, but not issued) of Longfellow, 
and several short poems. The work had a local 
application and was entitled, ' The Little Man of 
Gosling Green.' " 

'43. — The Brunswick Telegraph says that Hon. 
Abernethy Grover, whom the President has appointed 
registrar of the land ofiice at Miles City, Montana, 
is a son of the late Dr. John Grover of Bethel, 
and brother of ex-Senator Grover of Oregon. Aber- 
netliy Grover was a graduate of Bowdoin, class of 
1843. 

'80. — A. M. Edwards, who was principal of the 
Lewiston (Me.) Grammar School last year, lias been 
elected superintendent of schools in the same place. 

'84. — P. S. Lindsey is assistant in the Eaton School 
at Norridgewock. 

'84.— E. C. Smith, of Harvard Divinity School, 
has been preaching at Wayne during the vacation. 

'85.- — R. S. French will practice law with Judge 
W. W. Brookings, '55, at Sioux Falls, Dakota. 

'86, 

Berry is principal of the high school at Damaris- 
cotta. Me. During the summer months he was editor- 
in-chief of the paper printed at that place. 

Butler has been chosen instructor in Greek and 
Latin at Tilton Seminary, Tilton, N. H. 

Byram has been chosen principal of the grammar 
school at Bangor, Me. He was the successful one of 
more than sixty applicants. 

C. A. Davis was married on the 26th of August to 
Miss Frances M. Humphreys, of Brunswick. He has 
now taken up his abode in Hyde Park, Illinois, at 
which place he is teaching the sciences in a high 
school. 

J. H. Davis, the champion pitcher of the year of 
'85, has been playing on a local club during the past 
season. At present he at his home in Bangor, Me. 

Dike has secured a position in the insane asylum 
at Somerville, Mass. 

Fling has spent the summer months at Old Or- 
chard Beach, where he has occupied the position of 
clerk in the Lawrence House, meeting with marked 
success. He has been chosen principal of the high 
school there, and intends to give his spare time to 
music. 

Home is principal of the high school at Topsham, 
Me. 



108 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Kilgore is principal of a Iiigh school at Thomp- 
son, Dakota. 

Knight, the first member of the class who obtained 
a situation, still retains his position in Lothrop's 
Publishing House, Boston, Mass. 

Knowlton is principal of a school in Providence, 
R. I. 

Norris contemplates the study of law. 

Parker has been chosen principal of the high 
school at Kennebuok, Me. 

Rideout will begin the study of law, this fall, in 
Portland. 

Smith is at his home in Waterboro, Me. Unfor- 
tunately he has been compelled to abandon his pro- 
posed trip to Germany. . 

Stackpole is principal of the high school at 
Excelsior, Minn. 

Taylor is a teacher in the Eaton School at Nor- 
ridgewock, Me. 

Turner is instructor in Greek and Latin at the 
Portland High School. 

Tuttle has sailed for Germany, where he intends 
to devote three years to the study of chemistry. 

Wentworth is tutor in chemistry at the colleire 
for the present year. He has taken a very active 
part in the political campaign, recently closed in this 
State. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

At a meeting of the Bowdoin Alumni Association 
of New York, held July 27, 1886, in reference to the 
death of Dexter A. Hawkins, Esquire, the followincr 
resolutions were unanimously adopted : 

Resolved, That the members of this Association have 
learned with deep sorrow of the death of Mr. Hawkins. 

Resolved, That while the memory of Mr. Hawkins 
deserves to be cherished for his exemplary life, and most 
useful and honorable career before the public, as evi- 
denced by his loyalty to his country in the period of its 
severe trial, and by his efforts in behalf of good and pure 
government in tliis city and everywhere, and in the cause 
of public education, we desire to hold in grateful remem- 
brance his devotion to this Association, and his love for 
the college and for all its brotherhood. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be trans- 
mitted to the family of the deceased with assurance of the 
sympathy of this Association. 

Edward B. Mekrill, 

President of the Association. 
James McKeen, 

Secretary , pro tern. 



At a meeting of the A. K. E. fraternity, with ref- 



erence to the death of Mr. Dexter A. Hawkins, of 
the class of '48, the following resolutions were unani- 
mously passed : 

Resolved, That we learn with regret of the death of 
Brother Hawkins. 

Resolved, That while his decease will be felt by a 
large circle of people, and especially by Bowdoin College, 
this fraternity has lost one of its most respected members, 
and a uniformly staunch and hearty supporter. 

Resolved, That copies of these resolutions be sent to 
the family of the deceased brother and inserted in the 
college paper. 

I. H. Robinson, '87, 

A. Gary, '87, 

E. A. Merrill, '89, 

Coviinittee. 




The time made by Yale in the eight-oared Yale 
vs. Harvard race at New London, July 2d, was the 
best on record, 20. 21 J for four miles. 

The pole vault record, which has been held by 
Princeton for over five years, was broken on June 
24th, by S. D. Godshall, '87, of Lafayette, who 
cleared 10 feet 7| inches. 

The trustees of Cornell have voted to establish a 
complete law department in the University. The 
action is in accordance with the recommendation of 
Pres. Adams. 

Dartmouth re-opened Sept. 9th, with an un- 
usually large Freshman class. 

The Vermont College base-ball league was won 
by the University of Vermont over Rutland and Mid- 
dlebury Colleges, the latter taking last position. 

Cornell has had two hundred and thirty appli- 
cants for the Freshman class. 

W. B. Page, of the University of Pennsylvania, 
has again broken the record in the high jump by his 
last efibrt. He made six feet and three-quarters of 
an inch. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



109 



Princeton has one hundred and forty-one Fresh- 
men. 

The University of Virginia has had a course of 
summer law lectures 

The University of Pennsylvania held its one hun- 
dred and thirtieth Commencement this year. 

Of six Yale Seniors who this year received the 
highest literary honors — the Townsend prizes for or- 
atory, — one is captain of the base-ball team, another 
is captain of the foot-ball team, two rowed in their 
class crew, one played on the class nine, and the 
sixth is a good general athlete. 

Edward Everett has become an honorary mem- 
ber of the class of '86, Vassar, and will attend its 
exercises and reunions. 

Thirty-seven colleges are said to possess the 
champion bicycle rider of the United States. — Index. 

There are more colleges in Ohio than in all Eu- 
rope put together. 

Phillips Exeter Academy has two hundred and 
fifty-eight students. 

The Lasell Gymnasium is a grand success. 



ALLEN'S PHARMACY, 

LEMONT BLOCK, 

Main Street, - - Brunswick, Me, 



ELEGANT MACKINAW 

STEIAW HATS, 

THE BEST QUALITY, 

$1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 

MEERY THE HATTEE, 

PORTLAND. 



h. v. stackpole, 
Fine Boots and Shoes, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 

Dentist, 



STOKER BLOCK, 



- BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



F. W. BAEEON, 

Dealer in StailarJ mi Fancy Groceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Veg-etables, Fruit, ami Couutrj' Produce. 
Main Street, under L. D. Snovr's Grocery Store. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 



FRANK A. HALE, Proprietor, 
DeWITT HOUSE, TONTINE HOTEL, 

Lewiston, Me. Brunswick, Me. 

Private Suppers and Banquets a specialtj'. 

B. E. PLUMMER, Manayer. 



W. B. SPEAR, 



J. A. WHITMORE 



SPEAR & WHITMORE, 



DEALERS IN 



ALL KINDS OF COAL 

Cedar Street, Brunswick, Me. 



F. L. DUNNE, 
Tailor 

TO THE 

HARVARD CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY. 

Constantly in Receipt of the Latest London Novelties. 

Finest Work, Prices Moderate, 

Our representative who is now on liis regular tour to the 
Neav England Colleges, will be 

At the Tontine Hotel, Brunswick, 

Monday, September 27, 

Prepared to exhibit samples and take orders for 
AUTUMN AND WINTER Clothing. 

338 WASHINGTON STREET, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMOND 



CIGARETTE 
Smokers who 

are wUlingeto 
paya little more 
tor Cigarettes 
than the price 
charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, will 
iind the RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO AXJi OTHERS. 
They are made from the "briglitest, most 
delicately flavored, and lilghest cost 

f;ol<l leaf grown in Virginia, and are a'bso- 
ately wltliowt adulteration or drugs. 



STRAIGHT CUT 



No. 
-I- 



We use the GentUme French Rice Paper 

of OUT own direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand hare been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
OFiginal brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or box of ■ 
Kichiiiond 
Straight Cut 
Cigarettes 

bears the I 
signature of ' 

ALLEN &CINTER 

MANTTFAOTTTBEHB, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



P.IGARETTES 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 

Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry, Promptly Repaired and Warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND JIAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, MB. 



FI]aine Central R. ^. 

On and after Oct. 12th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.15, 11.25 A.M., 3.3S, 4.45 and 6.25 p.m., and ou Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Rockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.38 P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.40 i-.M., and 

12.35 (night). 
For Lewiston, 8.15 A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. (mixed), and 2.45 P.M. 
For Augusta and 'Waterville, 8.20 A.M., 2.40 P.M., 12.45 every 

night, and on Saturdays only at 6.35 P.M. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 (night). 
For Efingor, Ellsworth, Mt. Desert FeiTy, St. Stephen, Houlton. 

Vanceboro, and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Bar Harbor, 12.45 (night). 

Note.— The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew. 
ston, Bangor and Bar H.arbor, run every night, including Sun- 
day, but do not connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, or 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sun- 
day morning. 

PATSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BooTHBr, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Forfland, Oct. 6, 1885. 



SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. 

Manufactured hj special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 

The following are our w-ell known 

STANDARD BRANDS : 

Caporal, Sweet Caporal, St. James 1-2, Caporal 1-2, 

St. James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES. 

Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and French Rice Paper, are rolled by the high- 
est class of skilled labor, and warr.anted free from flavoring or 
impurities 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a fac-similk of Kinney Bros. 

SIGNATURE: 

KINNEr TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KI.\NET BEOS. 
NEW YORK. 



JORDAN SNOW, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

DuNLAP Block, Brunswick, Me. 

(INTEReEPTED LETTER.) 

Brunswick, May 14, 1S86. 
Owen, Moore & Co., Portland. 
Gentlemen : 
Please send me by mail one pair long Blcycle'Stocklngs, 
size 9A, regulation League Color. Enclosed one dollar and 
stamps for postage. I see by advertisement in Portland 
paper that you carry a line of Tennis Goods. Please send 
me a price-list of Rackets and Balls, with best discount to 
a regular club. "What are the prices on Jersey Coats, 
and in what color do they come ? 

Tours truly, 
P. O. Box 2002. BOB BROWN. 



Confectionery, Frnit, and Cigar Store, 

MAIN STEEET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

Wm. R. FIELD, Manager. 

W. HAWTHORNE, 

FINE*TAILORING, 

2 Church Block, Bath. 



4 



I filein Philadelphia 

Eat the Newspaper Adver- 

. ^,^_ . , tisiiif? Agency of Messrs. 

N* Wa AYER & SON, our authorized agents 



THIS P APER S 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEGE BOOKSTORE. 

We-have constantly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 



The best place in town to buy your 

LINEN COLLARS and CUFFS, TIES, SCARFS, GLOVES, 

Hats, Caps, Canes, Eot., is at 

PLUMMER'S, O'Brien Block. 

Correct Styles, and Best Quality, at Bottom Prices, 

BIS TTi^s-VT-xcis:. 

A F. KICHOLS, 

Merchant Tailor 

BKUNSWICK, ME. 
Have your Fall and Winter Suit Maile at Nichols. 

A Choice Line of Styles to Select From. 

OVEJitfOATS in Great Variety. 
FINE GOODS. LOW PEICES. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Call and Examine. 

A. F. NICHOLS, - Odd Fellows Block. 

Full Dress Suits, and Dress Frocks a Specialty, 



ADAMS & UNIACKE 

HAVE A FULL LINE OF STOVES 

Also, all kinds of Lamps, 

And most everythiug found in a Stove and Crockery Store. 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK. 



W 



NUKSEKVJIAN. 



ANTBD 

Local Men to take orders for our Specialties 
in their own towns and counties. Live men 
make S5 a day. Write for terms, giving ref- 
erences and age. 

CHARLES H. CHASE, 

ROCHE.STER, N. Y. 



F. H. WILSON, 

DISrENSEK OF 

Pure Drugs, Medicines, and Clieniicals. 

Imported and Domestic Cigars. 
MAIN STBEET, - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 



■TI^E 



# TRAVELERS ♦ 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HERTFORD, CONI^., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCr $1 1,000,000, and is now paying tliem $4,000 a dmj. Issues 

A 0(^1X^17 WT' T*OT Tr^TT?'^ indemnifying tlie Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
-C^^^^<^L1-7^.JL•\ J. J. \JXJl.\jLl^yj Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidentallnjury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only $5.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each .|;i,000, with 5p5.O0 weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 18G4 have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. 

Issues T TT^'P T*OT TCTTi^S °* every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Inve.stmeut for 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, ------ $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Ofiice at Hartford. 
JAS. G. BATTEESON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



SOCIETY^ ^ies CLixd Alettes, Cuts artci BrhsigrvicL. 
Wi^itiixg JPcvper cltlcL Cctrds EixgrcLv&d, CLTbd, JPrtnte-d. 
StrcLdertt' 8 Visiting Ccwds. IrwitcLtiorcs of eve-py l^irtd. 
e2:ecizte(Z hy tfie engrccviixg Kozzse of 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



Society Iix-vitcttioixs , 9Jies, cltlcL lllixstratiorLS for Yea.^- 
^ool^s, JMoTtog-pcLTns, jlmxs, cured. Crests ErtgrcLved ctnd 
^Printed. Visitirtg Cctrds, cmd tfie C hoic&st StcttioTteTy . Seals, 
Tapers arhd Sealing Wa^c, aixd Sealing Sets. 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bmns^tricli: and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Views ; also College Views. 



Go to W, B. Woodard^s 

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OTTAWA 



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ICushing's Island, 
' Portland, Me. 
GIBSOISX. 



Bowdoin College Medical Department. 

The Sixty-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 4th, 1886, 
and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Eev. Wm. DeWitt Hyde, President: Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Iseael. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obsteta-ics and 
Diseases oJ Women and Children ; Charles W. Goddaed, A.M. , 
Medical Jurisprudence; Fredekick H. Geeeish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Franklin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemistry; Stephen II. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica aud Therapeutics; Henry H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Young, Public Hygiene ; 
Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonsti-ator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonsti-ator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine • 



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Buyers ol Fiimiture, Carpets, Beiqg, Parlor Stoves, Baies, M., 

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.'Jt75,000 worth of Cottons, Cotton and Wools, All-Wool Write for cuts of these two Ranges. Prices '.fflu.OO, Iif20.00, 
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B. A, ATKINSON & CO. 

ISAAC C. ATKINSON, Manager. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



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C. H. POWERS' 

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J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
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CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland Me. 



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J. M. LOMBARD, 



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OVEB'BOAKDMAN'S STORE, MAIN STREET. 



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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined iu the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amonnt of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grrammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Csesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucohcs, and first sis Books of the 
^neid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal j 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specilications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, ' 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies j 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regular Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly iu writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the HaUowell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryehurg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 
Facilities will be afi'orded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

required— four hours a weee;. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terras. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 
Christianity, three terms. 

Political Science, three terms. 

electives — four hours a week. 
Mathematics, two terms. 
Latin, four terms. 
Greek, four terms. 
Natural History, four terms. 
Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and j\Iineralogy, two terras. 
Science of Language, one term. 
English Literature, three terms. 
German, two terms. 
; Sanskrit, two terms. 
Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XVI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCTOBER 13, 1886. 



No. 7. 



BOW COIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
- THE COLLEGIATE TEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

G. B. Burleigh, '87, Managing Editor. 

L. B. Varney, '87, Business Editor. 
C. C. Choate, '87. C. H. Verrill, '87. 

M. L. Kimball, '87. H. C. Hill, '88. 

A. W. Merrill, '87. M. P. Smithwick, '81 

E. G. Plummek, '87. A. W. Tolman, '88. 



Per annum, in advance. 
Single Copies, 



$2.00. 
15 cents- 
Extra copies can be obtained at the booljstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in i-egard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to conti'ibute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Eotered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XVI., No. 7.- October 13, 1886. 

The Maples, Ill 

Editorial Notes Ill 

The Old Man's Pvequest, 113 

An Incident of Vanderbilt's Generosity, 114 

Ghocorua Lake, 114 

A Visit to a Poet, . . • 115 

A Waiter's Bonanza 116 

A New Advance, 116 

Two Methods -117 

Base-Ball US 

GoLLEGii Tabula, 118 

Personal, '. 120 

College World, 120 

THE MAPLES. 

Red and yellow stand the maples 

In the cool October morning ; 
On their leaves the blood of summer 

Mingled with the gold of autumn ; 
On their boughs the frosts of winter ; 

In their veins the hope of spring-time ; 
Red and yellow stand the maples 

In the cool October mornina;. 




We are indebted to Mr. Frank 
Winter, of '80, and Mr. O. R. Cook, '85, for 
a number of the graduate personals in this 
issue. We trust that many others of our 
alumni will follow their example, and aid us 
in making this department of our paper as 
complete and interesting as possible. 



We hope that the Freshmen will make no 
delay in selecting six or eight men to train 
for their class crew, and in taking measures 
for the purchase of a class boat. A few 
weeks' work in the gymnasium will generally 
determine who are the best men of the num- 
ber selected to train, a disposition to work 
being quite as important in determining this 
as an abundance of muscle. The class of 
'90 certainly has plenty of good boating 
material, and with energetic work ought to 
be well represented upon the river. 



The action of the Facult}' in decid- 
ing to give out no more individual ranks 
in the future, but simply to indicate to the 
students the quarter of the class in which 
they stand, was a rather unexpected move, 
and one in which, we confess, we can see few 
advantages. It is simply the old system 
made twenty times more indefinite and ob- 
scure. While the old system was bad 
enough, this one is open to still more objec- 



112 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



tions. Unlike the old system, it does not 
enable a student to know his relative stand- 
ing eithei" in his class or in the college, 
since a very small percentage of difference 
in his rank may be sufficient to place him in 
different divisions of his class, where he may 
I'ank equally with the rest of that division, 
or be separated by quite a wide margin. Nor 
does his position in his own class determine 
what it would be, with the same rank, in any 
other class. A man who ranked in the fourth 
division of one class might, perhaps, on the 
same rank, be in the first or second division 
of another class. 

Again, the new system is not at all in 
keeping with the spirit of openness and can- 
dor, which should characterize the relations 
between the students and Faculty of a dem- 
ocratic college like our own. It puts every- 
thing into the hands of the instructor, and ab- 
solutely precludes all possibility of any errors 
being detected or lectified if, as is often the 
case, any should be made. Instances are not 
at all uncommon of errors being made in 
making up the old ranks, which the instruct- 
ors were glad to rectify, upon having their 
attention called to them. Under the new 
system^ if any errors should be made, some 
students will have to suffer from them with 
little or no chance of having them righted. In 
other words, this new system assumes, at the 
beginning, the infallibility of all instructors, 
and the fallibility of all students, an assump- 
tion which it may be claimed, lies, to a 
greater or less extent, at the basis of onr 
whole educational system. 

Our own Faculty, however, long ago took 
exceptions to this principle, when they in- 
trusted so large a part of the government of 
the college to the honor and judgment of the 
students. Why then should we introduce 
such a grammar-school system of ranking? 
We certainly believe that our Facultj^ intend 
to be perfectly open and impartial in all their 
dealings with the students. We do not be- 



lieve that they are, or could be, biased by re- 
ligions beliefs, society relations, or personal 
preferences. Why then should thej"^ adopt a 
ranking system which will certainly give a 
greater chance for all these charges to be 
made. Can it be that any member of our Fac- 
ulty would be led, by a fear of losing per- 
sonal popularity with the students, to involve 
his part in making up the ranks in a needless 
obscuritj' ? We believe not, and yet there 
are those who claim that this is the case. 

The feeling among the students generally 
is strongly adverse to the present step. In- 
stead of a step forward, they consider it a 
long stride in the opposite direction, and one 
well calculated to destroy confidence between 
students and instructors. We know that this 
has been the case in another institution where 
a similar S3'stem is in vogue, and where the 
charge is openly made, both by undergrad- 
uates and alumni, and perhaps not unjustlj', 
that in order to stand high in his class a stu- 
dent must be, not only a good scholar, but of 
the same religious faith as are -the members 
of the Faculty. This can never be truth- 
fully said of our own Faculty, with their 
advanced and liberal ideas, and their candid 
and open methods of dealing with the stu- 
dents, and we only regret the adoption of 
any ranking system that may possibly lead 
to the making of such charges. 

A far better plan, and one more in har- 
mony with the views of the undergraduates, 
would be to give to the students their ranks 
in each study. Surely any fair-minded in- 
structor would not object to this on the 
ground that it would endanger his popularity 
with those students who were not disposed 
to do good work. If his ranks are fair and 
impartial why should he wish to conceal 
them? True the objection might be urged, 
and perhaps not without reason, that a 
knowledge of their separate ranks might in- 
fluence students in the selection of their 
elective studies, the question of advisability 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



113 



being made subordinate to that of rank. We 
admit that such a system is open to this ob- 
jectiou, but we believe the good sense of the 
students would generally prevail under such 
a system, and certainly this objection can not 
be made to the old system. We had hoped 
that any change in the ranking system would 
have been in the opposite direction. It seems 
to us that the present move is calculated to 
involve this much-vexed question in still 
greater difficulties. 



therefore make interesting to others, will be 
a welcome and valuable addition to our con- 
tributors. 



We w^ish at the beginning of the year to 
again impress upon all, especially those who 
aspire to positions upon the editorial board 
of the Orient, the importance of handing in 
articles at an early date. For the benefit of 
the members of '90 we will say that the pres- 
ent board will elect their successors from 
those who contribute to our columns during 
the year. All articles handed in, whether 
published or not, will count in the writer's 
favor in the selection of the next board of 
editors, for the}' will at least indicate a dispo- 
sition to work, which is worth more than 
any amount of long-haired genius of the 
periodic character. In writing for the Ori- 
ent it would be well to bear in mind the old 
aphorism, " Brevity is the soul of wit." We 
have on hand now in our waste-basket a large 
amount of side-splitting mirth-provoking wit 
which will never call forth paroxysms of 
laughter from any but members of the board, 
simply because it was unaccompanied by 
brevity and would easily fill a whole issue of 
the Orient, without leaving us any room for 
clippings. It is not necessary to strive after 
"fine writing" nor to use " words of learned 
length and thundering sound," neither would 
we advise any one to grapple with any such 
theme as "Intellect Indestructible," or the 
" Ethics of Materialism," but any one who 
will come right down on this mundane sphere 
and plainly and briefly write upon any sub- 
ject that interests him, and which he can 



The Orient is the organ of no faction, 
but of the whole college, and, as such, will 
endeavor to give each side of a discussion a 
fair hearing. We publish in this issue an 
article which takes entirely different views 
of the new ranking system from those ex- 
pressed in our editorial on that subject. We 
are glad to publish it, and trust that others, 
who ma}' hold views different from our own, 
will make use of our columns in expressing 
them. 



THE OLD MAN'S REQUEST. 

Oh ! don't you remember, dear Anna, 
In the bloom of my sweet college days. 
How we went to the dances and germans, 
And took in the parties and plays ? 
And how, when the parties were over. 
You'd oft' on my bosom recline. 
While I vowed you eternal devotion, 
And you promised to always be mine ? 
Ah! Anna! those pleasures were fleeting, 
The years have rolled by us — a score, 
I now am the slave of another. 
You've belonged to a dozen or more ; 
My son has just entered the college. 
Should you meet him at dances or plays, 
Oh! Anna, deal lovingly by him, 
For the sake of our past happy days ; 
But if you are tempted to flirting. 
Why [ shall have nothing to say. 
For I was a novice, dear Anna, 
Until you had taught me the way ; 
Though I think in the matter of flirting 
That you will quite readily see. 
My son is not at all backward. 
And quite an improvement on me. 
But, Anna, I fear your attractions, 
I know what your witcheries are. 
Go slow with my boy, dearest Anna 
For the sake of his loving papa. 



Cornell is happy over the victory of How- 
land in the single-scull race last summer. The 
prospects for a four-oared crew there next 
season are fairly good. 



114 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



AN INCIDENT OF VANDERBILT'S 
GENEROSITY. 

Although by the death of William H. 
Vanderbilt the world loses one of its most 
powerful magnates of wealth, yet glancing 
over his career we find that it was signalized by 
many acts of generosity, indicating a benev- 
olent disposition, but one wliich shrank from 
publicity. 

In the summer of 1883, Mr. Vanderbilt, 
accompanied by his family, visited the Glen 
House, N. H., hoping by the crisp, invigor- 
ating air of the mountains to recuperate his 
health, then somewliat impaired. A genial 
disposition and a merry, ringing laugh were 
notably characteristic of him, far different 
from the ostentation of his sons-in-law. 

In order to understand better the circum- 
stances connected with JVIr. Vanderbilt's gift, 
and to appreciate his generosity, it is neces- 
sary to recount some of the "scenes" en- 
acted there. At the Glen tire student wait- 
ers pass a very gay and jovial summer, 
receiving handsome perquisites, thus making 
it remunerative as well as enjoyable. We 
roomed in what was called the " barracks," 
a building remote from the main house and 
occupied by students only. Tart were the 
rackets which we had in those old "barracks," 
and often was night made hideous by the 
unseemly noises which were wont to issue 
out upon the cool, midnight air like a train of 
invisible goblins on a revel. 

The most exciting sport was the pillow- 
fight. As we were about to retire for the 
night a cry of "row" would be heard. The 
mystic word had its instant effect. Im- 
mediately dusky forms, each grimly clutch- 
ing a pillow, could be seen gliding noiselessl}' 
along the narrow corridor; then the fun 
would begin and continue until exhaustion or 
the rueful appearance of the pillow warned 
them to desist. On a day subsequent to one 
of these downy contests we were informed 
that the head-waiter desired to see us that 



afternoon in Bascom's room in the barracks. 
We looked at each other askant, mentally 
deciding that some of us would receive sum- 
mons not in accordance with our inclinations. 
At the appointed time we convened there, 
intently endeavoring to conjecture what was 
" in the wind," but gleaning nothing from 
each other to reward our useless inquiry. 
In a short time the head-waiter appeared, 
and they wlio can explain every circumstance 
said that under his well-feigned frown lurked 
a quizzical smile. Be that as it may, we set- 
tled back for a severe censure, when, to the 
astonishment of all, he said that Mr. Vander- 
bilt had just departed leaving a check for 
three thousand dollars to be divided among 
thirty waiters, giving each one hundred dol- 
lars. For a moment we could hardly realize 
what had transpired, and when we had broken 
from the spell which seemed to enthrall 
us, we could only grasp each other's hands 
with joy too deep for expression. To some 
this gift was a " god-send," and enabled them 
to enter college that fall who had intended to 
defer entrance a year or more for lack of 
funds. 

That night was strangely quiet. Pillows 
enjoyed a blissful repose, and in the morning 
many were the letters which went out from 
the Glen freighted with praises and glowing- 
tributes to the generous New York millionaire. 



CHOCORUA LAKE. 

Chocorua Lake is a lovely sheet of 
water, situated at the base of Chocorua 
Mountain in New Hampshire. It bears the 
name of a once famous Indian chieftain of 
that region, who, the last survivor of his 
tribe, was killed on the dome of the mountain 
by one of his white foemen. He is said, at 
the time of his death, to have pronounced a 
curse upon the surrounding country. Cattle 
and sheep pastured in the vicinity of the 
mountain have invariably been attacked by a 
peculiar and fatal disease. This was discov- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



115 



ered, some years ago, by Prof. Dana of Dart- 
mouth College, to be due to a weak solution 
of m-uriate of lime which is present in the 
springs. 

Fair lake, that nestles at the base 

Of wild and rugged mountains, 

With waters clear as those which flow 

From Bimini's fabled fountains. 

Where mighty pines their shadows cast 

Upon thy placid breast. 

From depths of which is mirrored back 

The mountain's mighty crest. 

In days gone by the Indian reared 

His wigwam by thy side, 

And o'er thy clear and limpid wave 

His light canoe he plied. 

Around thy shores there clusters still 

A wealth of ancient lore. 

The lives, and loves, and hates, of those 

Whose love and hates are o'er. 

Thy echoing hills resound no more 

The voices lulled to sleep. 

In unknown graves along thy shore. 

Or in thy crystal deep. 

Here, where Chocorua's mountain rears 

Its crest in stately pride, 

Is where the sombre legend says 

A mighty chieftain died. 

Last of his race, his spirit still 

Surrounds that towering dome, 

And guards with zealous care the spot 

That was his people's home. 

It mutters in the thunder's storm. 

It sighs in every breeze. 

It shrieks aloud in every wind 

That whistles through the trees. 

And when the evening shadows creep 

Far up the mountain's side, 

It stalks o'er all the region round. 

In grand and kingly pride. 

Around thy shores, oh lake, there cling 

Fond memories dear to me. 

And oft in mind thy guardian heights 

And placid depths I see. 

I hope again in future days. 

To visit thee once more. 

And walk with happy friends again 

Along thy shady shore. 



The Sheffield Scientific School at Yale is 
increasing in popularity. 



A VISIT TO A POET. 

While spending a few days in the town of 
S , a little country town, with two vil- 
lages, each having a store and a post-office, 
I was frequentl}' reminded by my hostess of 
a young man in the neighborhood, whom she 
said could write splendid poetry. She often 
remarked that the local 23aper had printed some 
of his verses, and every one in the village could 
repeat a poem he composed when Herbert 
Sikes, Squire Sikes' son, married Lucinda 
Plimpton, the postmaster's daughter, and to 
be in fashion, I learned the first verse, which 
runs as follows : 

"Young Herbert Sikes. Oh noble youth. 

Made happy on this day 
By Elder Skink, a man of truth. 

Who ties the knot, they say." 

One pleasant afternoon, armed with a let- 
ter of introduction from my hostess, I called 
at the house of the much-famed poet. He 
answered my knock in person, and upon the 
presentation of my letter of introduction, 
showed me into a little room, whose walls 
were covered all over with mottoes in poetry, 
one of which especially attracted my atten- 
tion. It i-ead as follows : 

"Do to-day without delay, and don't wait till to-mor- 
row, 
That which if you never do will cause you lots of 

sorrow ." 

As I was gazing with undisguised admira- 
tion on these many evidences of poetic genius, 
my newly made acquaintance invited me to a 
seat, at the same time stepping before a small 
mirror and arranging his long hair, which in 
true poetic style was parted in the middle. 
Then he went to a desk and took out a long 
manuscript and proceeded to read selections 
to me, inviting me to criticise. He began ■ 

"I love to sit and sit and think. 
And close my eyes and softly wink." 

Here I gently suggested that winking 
might be somewhat difficult with closed eyes, 
but he immediately silenced me by saying 



116 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



that it was a figure of speech allowed by po- 
etic license, and continued : 

"I love to hear in early spring, 
The new returning crow to sing." 

T never before thought crows very musical, 
but supposed it must have been from lack of 
a cultivated taste, so listened in silence till 
he read : 

" Some men chase fortune all in vain 
As boys chase butterflies down a lane." 

As he expatiated on the beauty of this 
comparison, how fortune flees the grasp just as 
a butteifly escapes the boy who thinks he has 
captured it, I became so much affected that 
I wept, and fearing the strain upon my nerv- 
ous system, bade my friend good day, deeply 
impressed with his genius and sadly puzzled 
as to the extent of poetic license. 



A WAITER'S BONANZA. 

'Twas at the Hotel Sedgewick, 

Down by the rolling sea, 
That a wondrous piece of fortune 

This summer came to me. 

I was the weary night clerk. 

But in the day you see, 
I masqueraded as a guest 

Of very high degree. 

I-had tremendous collars. 
Kid gloves and shiny tile ; 

I smoked the choicest cigarettes 
And wore a languid smile. 

The heiress, Delia Sniggins, 
(Her age was thirty-three) 

I beauxed around till she became 
Completely mashed on me. 

I wrote her gushing verses, 
I squeezed her clammy hand, 

I called her all the loving names 
I had at my command. 

Till, to cut this simple story short, 

I married the fair maid ; 
And had a far from lovely time 

While at that beach we stayed. 

She had a temper like a fiend 
(But life must have its ills), 

I'm " running things " at college now 
And Delia pays the bills. 



A NEW ADVANCE. 

We herald the new method of announcing 
rank as another advance in college govern- 
ment, as another plank in the growing plat- 
form of improvement. Hereafter, instead of 
assigning to each student a definite mark, the 
following method lias been promulgated by 
the Faculty : 

The rank of each student is determined by the 
quality of his ivork and the regularity of his attend- 
ance. 

At the close of every term each class is divided on 
the basis of rank into four parts as nearly equal as 
circumstances will permit, and each student is notified 
with his term bill of the quarter in which he stands. 

The rank of for 

the term ending places 

him in the quarter of his class. 

Class Officer. 

Wiiile we do not anticipate that this will 
be wholly acceptable to the veteran growlers, 
who have grown old and withered under the 
old fossilized system, we do prophesy that it 
will meet with general acceptance among 
coming generations. Were this system to be 
the ultimatum, we, ourselves-, should object 
to it ; but we believe it to be only a step 
toward a future and more radical change. The 
longer we have been at Bowdoin the more 
have we been impressed with what we may 
call the conservative radicalism of our Faculty. 
There have been no sweeping changes, no 
sudden obliterations of old land marks. The 
Faculty have been, in a general way, neither 
" The first by which the new is tried. 
Nor yet the last to lay the old aside." 

Nor yet, while they have benefited by the 
experiments of other colleges, they have not 
aped after them ; but every change has been 
conservative, timely, and original. Every 
change has been made step by step that the 
transition might be natural and easy. And 
in the last four years we believe that no col- 
lege in New England has made a greater and 
more definite and permanent advance than 
Bowdoin. 

The new ranking system — or rather the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



117 



new method of announcement — is not an in- 
novation in the way of ranlc, but simply a 
device to do away with old evils. The 
former method of rank and of Commence- 
ment appointments remains the same. So 
long as the custom of noting the relative 
standing of a class remains, there must be a 
ranking system ; and whatever its form, it 
must ultimately depend upon the judgment 
of more or less (usually more) fallible in- 
structors. 

But this system of announcement simply 
effects the student in (1) giving his relative 
standing in the class, and (2) concealing 
his exact standing. It makes little differ- 
ence whether A leads B by .01, as it is prob- 
ably a questionable judgment at best as to 
which is really the better scholar. But — which 
makes much difference — personal jealousies 
are removed, and study, simply for sur- 
passing a supposed rival is discouraged. It 
is the relative standing which is given and 
no one can shield himself behind the old 
excuse that "the whole class ranks low and 
I probably stand up pretty well." And, fur- 
ther, if a student in one quarter wishes to 
rise to a higher one he cannot estimate just 
how much rank it is necessary to secure, or 
on which study to work harder in order to 
attain the desired position. The only alter- 
native is to do hard and iionest work and 
abide the result. 

It is, or should be, assumed that one who 
goes to college goes there with a definite ob- 
ject in view, and has ability enough to form 
a fairly sound judgment as how best to secure 
it. It is to be presumed that the modern 
college student has enough sense to estimate 
the amount and quality of his work without 
extraneous aid. Rank is not designed to act 
as the sugar-plum in a primary school ; and 
yet many act as if they thought so. If it 
is necessary to keep rank dangling before a 
student, as Arabs do a bunch of green 
leaves before the nose of a camel, to keep 



him going, he is not worth educating. If 
students would allow rank to play its legiti- 
mate part as an index all would be well; 
but they will not. They take it from its 
proper sphere, and set it up as a reward to 
be labored for, for its own sake ; and being 
put to this illegitimate use it should be done 
away with. 

We recognize the fact that there must be 
a criterion by which to judge of each stu- 
dent's work, and that the faithful student 
naturally looks for a reward; but it is enough 
to say to a student: "Do good and faithful 
work and you shall be rewarded." But that 
does not involve the necessity of measuring 
his work by the yard or pound, as a retail 
trader would measure off twenty-five cents 
worth of calico, or fifteen cents worth of lard. 
One should find satisfaction with his work in 
his own conscience, and not in an external 
mark. To hide the legitimate end of a col- 
lege education behind a mushroom standard 
of notoriety is hardly consistent either with a 
sound education or breadth of intellect. Stu- 
dents should learn to value their education 
for its final utility, and not for the profes- 
sor's mark. 

This system we believe to be merely 
transitional — a stepping stone to a further 
change — and as such should be acceptable to 
all. If we understand it aright, it is not 
intended nor designed as a finality but simply 
as an antidote for the bad results of an old 
and outgrown system. 



TWO METHODS. 

ANCIENT. 

Time passed them unnoticed or cared for, 
Till the first rays of morning shone fair 
O'er mountain and valley and meadow, 
And pater familias there 
With a frown on his classical forehead 
And a gleam in his deep-sunken eye ; 
And later it shone on a student 
Hard rubbing his bruises near by ; 
And the clear morning air, 



118 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



And the region round there 

Were filled with the horrible oaths he did 



MODERN. 

The first rays of morning were shining ; 
But little we cared for the sun, 
For we talked of a heavenly future 
Where two lives were blended in one, 
And as I was rising to leave her. 
The pater came in through the door ; 
And said "come again and bring others. 
You know I have_/?De dmighters more." 

And his smile it was bland ; 

And genial and gi'and 

Was the fatherly pressure he gave to my 
hand. 



BASE-BALL. 

A game of base-ball was played on the 
delta, October 2d, between the 'Varsity and 
the Bowdoin Reserves, which resulted in 
favor of the Reserves by a score of 17 to 6. 
Boutelle and Moulton formed the batterj" for 
the Reserves, while Gary, Russell, and Pen- 
dleton did the battery work for the 'Varsity. 
According to the scorer of the Reserves, the 
base hits were, 'Varsity, 5, with a total of 5 ; 
Reserves, 10 ; total 11. Errors, 'Varsity, 6 ; 
Reserves, 15. According to tlie 'Varsity 
scorer, the base hits were : Reserves, 10 ; 
total, 11 ; 'Varsitj^ 8 ; total, 9. Errors — Re- 
serves, 14; 'Varsity, 6. No tabulated score 
has been handed in to the Orient, both 
being incomplete in some of the details. 



Phillips of Harvard, led the college association in 
batting, his average being .416 ; Allen of Harvard 
led the catchers, with an average of .915; Smith of 
Harvard, the pitchers, with an average of .931 ; Lar- 
kin of Princeton, the 1st basemen, with an average of 
.983; Harris of Princeton, the 2d baseman, with an 
average of .953 ; Blackinstone of Williams, the 3d 
basemen, with an average of .843 ; Noyes of Yale, 
the short stops, with an average of .916 ; Duffield of 
Princeton, the right fields, with an average of 1000; 
Foster of Harvard, the left fields, with an average of 
.937; Blaisdell of Brown, the center fields, with an 
average of .900. — Willistonian. 




I saw her home from the party 
With a sense of most heavenly 
bliss, 
I squeezed her fair hand at parting 
And gave her an exquisite kiss. 

She smiled with angelical sweetness 
And whispered, " Be careful, my dear, 
For ' hubhy ' is not a sound sleeper 
And I'm dreadfully 'fraid he may hear." 

At the meeting of the Boating Association, Mon- 
day, October 4th, the board of ofiicers for the ensuing 
year were elected : A. W. Merrill, Commodore ; 
W. H. Bradford, Vice-Commodore ; W. A. Moody, 
Secretary and Treasurer; G. T. Files, Assistant Sec- 
retary and Treasurer; L. B; Varney, A. W. Meserve, 
E. L. Adams, Directors. At a meeting of the college, 
immediately after, F. Lyman was elected Captain of 
the 'Varsity. 

Rice, '89, has joined Psi Upsilon ; Thwing, '89, 
has joined Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

The Orient makes an intense attack on the col- 
lege quid nunc, whoever he may be. There is 
another college quid that should go. — Lewislon Jour- 
nal. We will try and muzzle him, friend Journal. 

It is reported that a certain North Winthrop Senior 
of linguistic proclivities was mistaken for a Fresh- 
man, when leaving the end one evening, and that he 
received as the result of the mistake a proportionate 
amount of H^O . 

The harvest reaped by the difi'erent societies to 
reward their labors in behalf of the Freshmen : Alpha 
Delta Phi — Gates, Greeley, Moody, Morse, Royal, 
Smith, Spinney ; Psi Upsilon — Allen, Hubbard, Hunt, 
Humphreys, Hutchinson, Kimball, Littlefield, Sears, 
Simpson ; Delta Kappa Epsilon — Cummings, Don- 
worth, McCoUough, Pendleton, Turner, Wingate ; 
Theta Delta Chi — Alexander, Freeman, Hastings, 
Mitchell, Stearns ; Zeta Psi — Dunn, Smith, Tolman, 
Weeks. 

At a recent meeting of the Base-Ball Association, 
H. B. Austin was elected to fill the place of Manager, 
left vacant by the resignation of M. H. Boutelle. 

On the day of the Fireman's Muster, the classes 
indulged in a cut all around. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



119 



The Sophomores are absorbing Grecian literature 
at the rate of one recitation a weels:. 

The. first meeting of the Colby Jury was held 
October 5th. 

As two Freshmen were going to their rooms, after 
supper, one night recently, they found the light on 
the top floor extinguished and the stairs and hall 
flooded with water; whereupon the following conver- 
sation was overheard : No. One — " What do you sup- 
pose this means? Hadn't we better go into the 
reading-room for a little while? " No. Two — " Per- 
haps we had ; but I'd like to get into my room some 
time to-night." No. One (with an idea) — " There's 
no need of both getting wet ; suppose you take my hat 
and coat and go up first and see what they will do." 

The Freshman pea-nut drunk occurred in the small 
hours of the morning of October 6th. It is to be 
feared that the afterwards proceedings were to 
them devoid of pleasurable interest. 

The last year's Fresh his horn doth toot 

To show he has the stuff 
That constitutes the martinet 

So windy, loud, and tough; 
But if the truth be iinowD, he barks 

Lilie the faint-hearted pup, 
Because 'tis dark, and he desires 
To keep his courage up. 
The first Sophomore themes were due October 
6th. The following are the subjects : " Earthquakes," 
and " Extravagances of Students." 

The Fsi Upsilon Society have made arrangements 
for the construction of a new clay tennis court 
between the gymnasium and the road. 

The initiations of the various societies took place 
in the following order : Theta Delta Chi, Sejatember 
24th; Alpha Delta Phi, October 1st; Fsi Upsilon, 
Delta Kappa Epsilon, and Zeta Fsi, October 8th. 
Isn't it about time for class elections ? 
The Jury, as constituted for the coming year, are 
as follows: M. L. Kimball, '87; Joseph Williamson, 
Jr., Secretary, '88 ; E. R. Stearns, '89 ; O. W. Turner, 
'90 ; E. S. Barret, Alpha Delta Phi ; S. B. Fowler, 
Fsi Upsilon ; Austin Cary, Delta Kappa Epsilon ; 
C. M. Austin, Theta Delta Uhi ; E. C. Flummer, 
Foreman, Zeta Fsi. 

At a recent meeting of the Tennis Association 
the following oflicers were chosen : President, E. B. 
Torrey; Vice-President, A. W. Tolman ; Secretary 
and Treasurer, G. F. Cary ; Directors, E. B. Burpee, 
W. W. Woodman, F. Lynam ; I. H. Robinson, A. W. 
Tolman, and W. T. Hall, Jr., were appointed as a 
committee to make arrangements for a tournament 
to take place this fall. 



The subjects for the Sophomore themes, due Octo- 
ber 20th, are as follows : I. ■' Horace's Position in the 
World's Literature." II. " Intercollegiate Oratorical 
Contests." 

Little, '89, has returned to college. 

Would it not be a good idea to have a new rope 
for the chapel bell ? The old rope is frayed and 
untwisted, and has been broken and tied in several 
places. 

At a meeting of the '88 Bugle Board, H. S. Card 
was elected Business Editor in place of H. L. Shaw, 
resigned. 

On September 22d, the Brunswick Water Com- 
pany turned the water through the pipes into the 
town. 

Sophomore Latin recitation : Prof. — " What was 
the Campanian disease spoken of by Horace ? " 
Voice from the class — " Warts! " (General smile at 
the expense of the possessor of the above euphonious 
name.) 

C. J. Goodwin, '87, has elected Sanskrit. 

And still we await the opening of the gymnasium. 

Knowing Freshman (to Sophomore) — "To what 
society did Mr. Booker belong?" 

The Freshmen flocked to the Topsham horse trot 
in large numbers to see Cosine's horse cover the 
track under the skillful manipulation of the Bird. 

Messrs. Foreman and Wilder, Princeton gradu- 
ates of 1884-6, are making a tour of eastern colleges 
to gain recruits for the Foreign Missionary service. 
They began their tour in Maine, visiting Bates, 
Colby, and Bowdoin. They arrived here Friday, 
holding meetings at noon and evening ; another 
meeting was held Saturday evening ; and Sunday 
they conducted the chapel service, and held a fare- 
well meeting in the evening. They made a most 
favorable impression upon the students. 



Smith College has an entering class of 110. This 
is the largest class since the establishment of the in- 
stitution. Wellesly was obliged to turn away about 
one-third of the candidates for lack of accommoda- 
tions. The success of female colleges in America 
has become assured, but it seems as if institutions 
like these ought to establish college journals, and 
those which should stand in the first rank. 



Stuart, of the last year's Amherst nine, has been 
secured by the Boston National League team, so 
report says. Finley, of the Columbia's, has been 
playing on the New York's with excellent success. 



120 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




'34. — Reuben Nason was 
born in Gorhain, 1816. In 
1 s;!9-4r0 he went South at the invita- 
tion of Sargeant S. Prentiss teaching 
school in Vicksburg, Miss. Subsequently 
he studied law with Mr. Prentiss. A little 
later he drifted into journalism, and as editor of the 
Prairie News, published at Okolona, Miss., won con- 
siderable reputation. His articles were copied far 
and wide, and the Prairie News soon became, under 
his editorial management, a synonym for wit and 
humor. In 1856 he was local editor of the Mobile 
Daily Mercury, and a year later of the Commercial 
Advertiser, where he remained until 1864. After two 
years' residence in Mississippi he resided permanently 
at Mobile where he was engaged in journalism until 
1874, when he retired from active business. Since 
that time he has lived quietly at Mobile. He was 
for a long time afflicted with heart troubles, to which 
he finally succumbed. He died in August at his 
home in Mobile. 

'63. — Col. Benjamin F. Bryant, who left college 
to enter the army, is a prominent lawyer at La 
Crosse, Wis., and for four years was Postmaster of 
that place. 

'71. — John F. Moody, formerly Principal of Bridg- 
ton Academy, has accepted the position of principal 
of the Edward Little High School, Auburn, Me. 

'74. — W. H. Hemminway is vice-principal of the 
high school at La Crosse. 

'76. — Arlo Bates has recently published a collec- 
tion of his poems under the title of " Berries of the 
Brier." 

'78.— Mr. H. C. Baxter was married on the 28th 
ult. to Miss Mary Lincoln, daughter of the late Dr. 
John Lincoln, of Brunswick. 

'79. — Mr. A. L. Lumbert has been elected State 
Senator from Aroostook. 

'80. — Frank Winter has resigned the superintend- 
ency of schools at Sparta, Wis., and is practicing 
law at La Crosse. 

'83. — W. C. Winter is studying law at Sparta, 
Wis., and in December will open an ofiice at La 
Crosse. 

'84. — F. P. Knight is principal of the high school 
at Onalaska, Wis. 



'85. — Butler is principal of a high school at War- 
ren, R. I. 

'85. — Brown is principal of a high school at Hop- 
kinton, Mass. 

'85. — Harding is principal of a high school at 
Patten, Me. 

'85. — Dunham is at his home, South Freeport. 

'85. — Lunt is attending a business college at Port- 
land. 

'86. — W. W. Kilgore is principal of schools at 
Mazo Manil, Wis., not Thompson, Da., as reported. 

'85. — The marriage of Mr. Webb Donnell, Bow- 
doin College, '85, and Miss Annie M. Hamilton was 
solemnized at the house of Dr. Torsey, last July. 
They are now settled in their new home in East 
Machias, where Mr. Donnell has a position as prin- 
cipal of East Machias Academy. — KenVs Hill Breeze. 




Columbia has become a co-educational institution. 

Lafayette has fifty-two Freshmen. 

The National Council of Phi Beta Kappa met at 
Saratoga Springs, September 1st. A resolution was 
passed to the effect that secrecy was not obligatory 
upon any chapter. An application for a charter for 
Colby University was received, among others, and 
referred. No delegate from the Alpha of Maine 
(Bowdoin) was present. 

The cane rush at Yale was won by the Freshmen, 
although they were outnumbered by the Sophomores. 

The Colby Freshmen beat the Sophomores in 
base-ball, 23 to 11. 

Bates numbers thirty-nine Freshmen and Colby 
thirty. Each class includes seven ladies. Sandford 
has entered the Bates Theological School and will 
probably continue on their nine, as he has been 
appointed on the temporary fall team. 

The Echo calls for an instructor in calisthenics 
in the Colby "gym." 

The Northern Intercollegiate Foot-Ball Associa- 
tion consisting of Amherst, Williams, Tufts, and the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



121 



Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has refused 
adnaission to Dartmouth. Their schedule opens the 
20th inst. with a game between Williams (the present 
champions) and Tufts, at College Hill. 

The University of Wisconsin is having trouble 
arising from the rivalry of two college papers. 

Amherst has sixty-eight Freshmen . Tufts sixteen . 

The University of New York has started a very 
creditable college paper. 

The Amherst Student has become a weekly. 

The University of Pennsylvania is to reproduce 
the Greek comedy of last spring. Rehearsals have 
already been commenced and the play will be car- 
ried rapidly forward to the requisite degree of prep- 
aration. — We notice the Pennsylvanian, with some 
other college papers, has just published the fact that 
Bowdoin is to have a new gymnasium. You are 
about six months behind the times, our friend. 

A graduate of Brasenose College, England, is to 
give a series of lectures to the students of Trinity 
College, on English school and college life. — Trinity 
will not organize a college crew this year. 

Yale has defeated Wesleyan at foot-ball hy a 
score of 75 to 0. 



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MASON STREET. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce. 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

FRANK A. HALE, Proprietor, 
DeWITT HOUSE, TONTINE HOTEL, 

Lewiston, Me. Brunswick, Me. 

Private Suppers aud Banquets a specialty. 

B. E. PLUMMER, Manager. 

W. B. SPEAR. J. A. WHITMORE, 

SPEAR & WHITMORE, 

DE.iLERS IN 

ALL KINDS OF COAL, 

Cedar Street, Brunswick, Me. 



F. L. DUNNE, 
Tailor 

TO THE 

HARVARD CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY. 



STOKER BLOCK, - 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



in Receipt of the Latest London Novelties. 

Finest Work. Prices Moderate. 

Our representative who is now on his regular tour to the 
Xew England Collegp:s, ^ill be 

At the Tontine Hotel, Brunswick, 

Monday, September 27, 

Prepared to exhibit samples and take orders for 
AUTUMN AND WINTER Clothing. 

338 WASHINGTON STREET, 
OmSTQN. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



R ICHMOND 



CIGARETTE 
Smokers who 

are willmg^to 
payaUttlemore 
for Cigarettes 
than the price 
charged for the onUnary trade Cigarettes, will 
lind the RICHrriOIUD SXKAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO Alil- OTHERS. 
They are made from the brightest, most 
delicately flavored, and hlgliest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are abso- 
rntely without adu lteration or drugs. 

STRAIGHT CUTT 

We use the Genuine French Rice Paper 

of our own direct Importation, which is made 
especiallT for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1 — on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of tliis 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
origiDal brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or bos of ■ 
Kicliiiioiid 
Straight Cut 
Cigarettes 
bears the 
signature of ' 



niGARETTES 

ALLEN&CINTER 



MAKUFAOTDBERB, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Kings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 

Wutches, Clocks, and Jewelry, Promptly Repaired and Warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

njaine Bentral R. ^. 

On and after Oct. 12th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, S.15, 11.25 A.M., 3..38, 4.45 and 6.25 P.M., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Rockland, 8.15 a.m., 2.38 P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.40 f.M., and 

12.35 (night). 
For Lewiston, 8.1.5 A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. (mixed), and 2.46 P.M. 
For Augusta and Waterville, 8.20 A.M., 2.40 P.M., 12.46 every 

night, and on Saturdays only at 6.35 P.M. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 (night). 
For Bangor, Ellsworth, Mt. Desert FeiTy, St. Stephen, Houlton. 

Tanceboro, and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Bar Harbor, 12.45 (night). 

Note. — The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew. 
ston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, run every night, including Sun- 
day, but do not connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, or 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sun- 
day morning. 

PATSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BOOTHBY, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 6, 1885. 



SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. 

Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 

The following are our well known 

STANDARD BRANDS : 

Caporal, Sweet Caporal, St. James 1-2, Caporal 1-2, 

St. James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES. 

Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and French Rice Paper, are rolled by the high- 
est class of skilled labor, and warranted free from flavoring or 
impurities 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a fac-simile of Kinney Begs. 
Signature. 

KINBTE^ TOBACCO CO. . 

SUCCESSOR TO KIKNEY BROS. 

NEW YORK. 



JORDAN SNOW, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

DuNLAP Block, Brunswick, Me. 



(INTERCEPTED LETTER.; 



Brunswick, May 14, 1886. 
Owen, Moore & Co., Portland. 
Gentlemen : 
Please send me by mail one pair long Bicycle'Stockings, 
size 9J, regulation League Color. Enclosed one dollar and 
stamps lor postage. I see by advertisement in Portland 
paper that you carry a line of Tennis Goods. Please send 
me a price-list of Rackets and Balls, with best discount to 
a regular club. What are the prices on Jersey Coats, 
and in what color do they come ? 

Yours truly, 
P. O. Box 2002. BOB BROWN. 



Confectionery, Fruit, and Cigar Store, 

MAIN" STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

Wm. R. FIELD, Manager. 



W. HAWTHORNE, 

FINE*TAILORING, 

2 Church Block, Bath. 



THIS PAPERS 



_3 on filein Pliiladelpliia 
I at the Newspaper Adver- 

tising- Agency of Messra 

N« W. AVER & SON, our authorized agents. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEGE BOOKSTORE. 

We haA'e coustautly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 



The best pl.ice in town to buy your 

LINEN COLLARS and CUFFS, TIES, SCARFS, GLOVES, 

Hats, Caps, Canes, Ect., is at 

PLUMMER'S, O'Brien Block. 

Correct Styles, and Best Quality, at Bottom Prices. 

A. F. NICHOLS, 

Merchant Tailor 

BKUNS-WICK, ME. 
Have your Fall and Winter Suit Made at Nichols. 

A Choice line of Styles to Select From. 

OVERCOATS in Great Variety. 
FINE GOODS. LOW PRICES. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Call and Examine. 

A. F. NICHOLS, - Odd Fellows Block. 

Full Dress Suits, and Dress Frocks a Specialty. 



ADAMS & UNIACKE 

HAVE A FULL LINE OF STOVES 

Also, all kinds of Lamps, 

And most everything found in a Stove and Crockery Store. 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK. 



W: 



NUUSERVJIAN. 



ANTKD 

Local Men to take orders for our Specialties 
in their own towns and counties. Live men 
make »5 a day. Write for terms, giving ref. 
ercnces and age. 

CHARLES H. CHASE, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



F. H. WILSON, 

DISPENSER OF 

Pure Drugs, Medicines, and diemicals. 

Imported and Domestic Cigars. 
MAIN STREET, - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 



THCE 



♦ TRAVELERS ^ 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HERTFORD, CO]>^]Sr., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCr $1 1,000,000, and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 

A rinTT^T<'lVT' "POT Tr^TTf'Si Indemnifying the Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
-l-^^^^-^J-i-^J^J^^ -L X V^XJiV^iijk:? Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidental Iniury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only $5.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each $1,000, with $5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
exanimation required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 186i have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. 

Issues T TT^TT T*OT TCTT^S °* every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, ------ $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Office at Hartford. 
JAS. G. BATTEBSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



QOCIKTY' 'Dies cltzcZ Elates, Cuts cLrLcL JUnsigrttcL. 
'WrittTLg JPcLjper cvncL Cctrcls ErtgrcLT^ed, OThcL PrtrttecL. 
Stzzdeixt's 'Vistttizg Cctrcls. InvitcLttons of every 'h.tncl 
e^ecixted by the engi^cLvirzg Koixse of 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 

^ ■ *- "S- 

Society Iixvitcttions, Dies, ctrtd lllTzstrcLtiorcs for Yectr- 
^ooks, J^oixograms , Jlrms, ctrtd Crests JEngrcLved ctrhd 
'3?rzrLted. Visiting Ccvrds, ccnd. the Clxoicest Statio-nery. Seals, 
Tctpers ctrtcl Sealirtg 'Wa^, and Sealing Sets. 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



//I 



i^CID PHOSPHATE. 

[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horstord, of Camtiridge, Mass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

The Unrivalled Remedy for Dyspepsia, Mental and Physical Exhaustion, Nervousness, Wakefulness, 

Diminislied Vitality, etc. 

As Food for an Exhausted Brain, in Liver and Kidney Troulile, in Seasicliness and M Headaclie, in Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion and Constipation, in Inebriety, Despondency and cases of Impaired Nerve Function, 

It has become a necessity in a large number of households throughout the world, 

And is universally prescribed and recommended by pliysicians of all schools. 
Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 
It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body. 
It is unsurpassed as a substitute for lemons or limes, and 

IT MAKKS A DELICIOUS DRINK WITH WATER AND SUGAR ONLY. 
Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

RUMFORD CHEMICAIi WORKS, Providence, R. I. 
<®-BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.-ffiSr 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Special Rates to Classes i Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bruns-nrick and Xopsham 
Stereoscopic Vicnrs ; also College Vietirs. 



Go to W, B. Woodard^s 

To buy. your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aod COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



5) ^ftJS^'^' 
OTTAWA 




Ivl. S. G-IBSOlSr- 



Cushing's Island 
Portland, Me. 



Bowdoin College Medical Department. 

The Sixty-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine; will commence FebrtjarY 4th, 1886, 
and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— EEV. Wm. DeWitp Hyde, President: Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy ami Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., 
Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. Gerrish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Franklin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemistry; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
HnNT, M.D., Materia Mediea and Theraiseutics ; Henrv H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Young, Public Hygiene ; 
Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonsti-ator of Histology. 

ALFEBD MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 



MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc.. Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description doue to Order. 



ATParker 

164 High St^ 

ALLEN & CO., Portland, 

Having moved to their new store, 204 Middle Street, Cor. of Plum, ai'e constantly opening 
rich and elegant goods for gentlemen's wear. 

Ihoice foreign labrics low iisplapd iii iur tailoring ieparfmenf. 

The flnest-made up Clothing to be seen iu the State now exhibited in our 



Novelties for Gentlemen's Dress in Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves, Neckwear, Canes, and Silk Umbrellas 
in Seasonable Styles to be found in our 

Furnishing Dspartmsrit. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

204 MIDDLE STREET, OORNBK OF PLUM, PORTLAND. 



L k. ATICWSOI 



Donnel Building, Corner Peari and IVllddle Streets, PORTLAND, ME., 

WOULD RESPECTFULLY CALL THE ATTENTION OF 

Biiyeis of Furniture, Camels, Beiii, Farloi Stoves, Baioes, &g.. 

To the Enormous Stock of House Furnishings at the Portland Store. Being Manufacturers, 

intending purchasers can see tlie styles and select their own coverings for Parlor Furniture, and have it made 

to order tor the same price. VVe keep enormous quantities of (Jpholstery Goods in the Boston Store, 

and full lines of samples. Here our prices on Parlor Suites range from 135.00 in Hair Cloth 

to .137.5.00 in Silk or Mohair Plushes. 

CHAMBEH rURNITUIlE. DRAPERY of every description made to order in the 
, . , Boston store. Orders taken here and designs and samples 
We have in stock m our three stores 87 different pat- shown, 
terns of Chamber Suites, manufactured from all the pop- 
ular woods, viz. : Pine, Ash, Walnut, Cherry, Basswood, PARLOR STOVES. 
and Mahosany, ranging in price from lijilS.OO to .flOO.OO. o ■ i ** ..^ • * j 4 tj 1 c-* -n 
We also have 1 1 kinds, sizes! and quantities of Bedsteads, ^J>'"'^f 'Attention is requested to our Par or Stove De- 
Bureaus, Commodes, etc. Spring ieds, Cot Beds, Lounge &'-;i°J^"i^„1f,7<' P.^lrL'^in tf «4n nn 
Beds, Sofa Beds, Mantel Beds, Itc. Mattresses of eve?y *™'° ^^ ^^"^«- ^^'^''^ **-''° '" ^f^^'^"- 
kind and quality, from an excelsior at ^2.00 to a pure cTn-V7"i?c a-ntti •oaivTr'T'c 
bleached South American curled horse hair at $25.00. SiOVES AND BANtriib. 

Our line of Ranges comprises all tlie latest and best in 

CARPET DEPARTMENT. "'^ market, including the "New Tariff " and " Quaker," 

wliich are considered superior to anything yet produced. 
$75,000 worth of Cottous, Cotton and AVools, AU-Wool Write for cuts of these two Ranges. Prices jflS.OO, .1f20.00, 
Extras, Tapestry, Brussels, Body Brussels, Velvets, Wil- $22.50, $25.00, .1ii27.50, $29.00, $33.00, $35.00, $38.00, and Up- 
tons, etc., at our usual Rock-Bottom Prices. Auyoftliese wards to .1f65.00. These i^rices include all the ware, pipe, 
can be selected at the Portland store. SHADES and and zinc. 



Any of the above goods sold for Cash or on our Special Contract System, at 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Streets, Portland, Me. 

Brancti of the Great Nassau Hall House Furmshing Store, 827 Wastdngton Street, Boston. 

B. A. ATKINSON & CO. 

ISAAC C. ATKINSON, Manager. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLKAR, STKADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECKSSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE AD.njSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard " and " Duplex " Burner SUPERLATIVE, 



IS PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGEAVED IH THE MOST FASHIOIUBLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOE 

ROGERS' CELEBRATED GROUPS. 



Mixtures fox' Pipe or Cigarette. 
THREE KINGS, Turkish, Perique and Virginia. 
MELLOW MIXTUEE, Turkish and Perique. 
TURKISH and VIRGINIA. 

PERIQUE and VIRGINIA. 
GENUINE TURKISH. 
FLAKE CUTS, ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE PIPE. 

VANITY FAIR . OLD GOLD. 

SALMAGUNDI, a M ew Granulated Mixture. 

FRAGRANT VANITY FAIR, 

CLOTH OF GOLD. 

KIMBALL'S SATIN STRAIGHT CUT C I GARETTES. 

People of refiued t.iste wlio desire exceptionally fine Cigar- 
ettes should use only our Straight Cut, put up in Satin Packets 
and boxes of 10s., 20s., 50s., and 100s. 

Our Cigarettes were never so flue as now. They cannot be 
surpassed for pui-ity and excellence. Only the purest Kice Paper 
used. Established 1846. 14 First Prize Medals. 

Wm. S. Kimball & Co., Peerless Tobacco Works, 

KOCHESTER, N. Y. 

COBURN CLASSICAL INSTITUTE, 

WATEEVILLE, ME. Both Sexes. Four Courses of Study : 
Introductory; College Preparatory, 3 years; English and 
Scientific, .S years ; Ladies' Collegiate, i years. Location healthy, 
expenses moderate, discipline wholesome, morals good. I-'ersons 
using alcoholic beverages or tobacco veed not apply. Accommoda- 
tions ample and excellent. For further information send for 
Catalogue to J. H. HANSON, Principal. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

474 Congress St., - - - opp. Preble House. 

THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

jM©. 5 0DD EEIiMW^' BIieCK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 

A. W. TOWNSEND, Prop'r. 



The New Styles in 

SmiPI^ and. SOI^'T H^A-TS 

In all colors, are now ready. An elegant line of New York 

Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, 

-*^T ELLIOTT'S, e- 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 

C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 



<vv&- 



0^1, 



iX»i?:r5'Krsi 



THE FAVORITE NOS.S03-404-332-I7O-S5I-WITH 
''HIS OTHER STYLES SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



TIIfflE IS IttONEY, 

And we soil time for Little Money. Buy your Watches, 
CLOCKS, and Jewelry cheap for cash of 

*{-DAVIS, JEWELER. 4- 
A FINE LINE OF SILVER GOODS AT BOTTOM PRICES. 

Next Door to American Express Office, Brunswick, Me. 

Our $1.00 Spectacles defy competition. Repairing promptly 

done by F. E. Darenport. 

C. H. POWERS' 

Hair -Dressing Rooms, 

LEMONT BLOCK, 
Main Street, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

GRIMMER'S ORCHESTRA 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencenaents, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIIVIIVIER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 

JUST MOVED IN. 



G. B. RIDLEY 

Has a full assortment of 

Stoves, Tin, and Kitchen Ware. 

Orders Promptly Filled. 



Main Street, BRUNSWICK. 



Tlie Old Griffin Store. 



TONTINE LAUNDRY, 



Brunswick,' Me. 



G. F. HOAVE'S 

HAIR-DRESSIKG ROOMS, 
Main Street, Brunswick, 

OPPOSITE THE MALL. 



The Largest Assortment of 

Gents^ Fine Shoes 

Is to be found at 

JACKSON'S. 

LAWN- TENNIS, BASE -BALL, AND LOW SHOES, 

In Large Variety. 

S. R. JACKSON, 2(1, 2 Odd Fellows Block, Brunswick. 

DROP IN AND INSPECT. 

j. m. lombard, 
Dentist, 

OVER BOARDMAN'S STORE, MAIN STREET. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

! GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

I Hii rKOfKltilUK of the Nearest Corner Grocery will 
endeavor to merit a 

CONTINUANCE 



Of the Students' patronage. Coine and prove him. 



BOYNTON, THE JEWELER, 

No. 547 Congress St., Portland. 

Do not pay the large profits which jewelers have always 
charged. Orders hy mail receive prompt attention. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



(Cinn A U/CEI^ Ladiesor gentlemen desiring pleasant 
4)1 UU n VlClliVi profitable employment write at once. 
We want you to handle an article of domestic use that recom- 
mends itself to every one at sight. STAPLE AS FiOUR. 
Sells lilse hot cakes. "Profits 300 per cent. Families wishing to 
practice economy should for their own benefit write for par- 
ticulars. Used every day the year round in every household. 
Price within reach of all. Circulars free. Agents receive 
SAMPLE FREE. Address, 

DOMESTIC MFG. CO., Marion, Ohio. 

PATRONIZE 



ADVERTISERS, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates foe Admission to the Freshmau 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Caesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
.ailneid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xenoplion, — Anabasis, four JBooks. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Looiuis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to ou- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regular Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the HaUowell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryehurg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers of the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connecti<m with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

required- FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, fonr terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terras. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 




twi#ta # 




Vol. XVI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCTOBER 27, 1886. 



No. 8. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGLA.TE TEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

C. B. Burleigh, '87, Managing Editor. 

L. B. Varney, '87, Business Editor. 
C. C. Choate, '87. C. H. Verrill, '87. 

M. L. Kimball, '87. H. C. Hill, '88. 

A. W. Merrill, '87. M. P. Smithwick, '88. 

E. C. Plummer, '87. A. W. Tolman, '88. 

Per annum, in advance $2.00. 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extra copies cau be obtained at the bookstores or ou applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to tbe Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Poat-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 

Vol. XVI., No. 8. -October 27, 1886. 

Lines, 123 

Editorial Notes, 123 

Ode to Diana 125 

Classification of tlie Library 125 

Lost 126 

Sunrise on tlie Old Farm 126 

Venice 128 

College Literature, 129 

Appearance, 130 

CoLLEGii Tabula, 131 

Personal, 132 

College World, 133 

LINES. 

Far o'er the misty mountain tops. 

Beyond our mortal ken. 
There lies a beauteous borderland, 

A mystery to men ; 
Though many weary travellers climb 

Beyond their summits grand. 
They ne'er return again to men 

From that mysterious land. 
The way is clear and all may go 

To join that traveller's band, 
AVho've settled free from worldly cares, 

In Heaven's borderland, 




ly a com- 
paratively few students in college who have 
an adequate idea of the vast riches of our 
library. Most of them can probably tell 
the number of volumes it contains, can find 
readily certain favorite books, and discourse 
eloquently to visitors upon its many merits, 
but beyond this we fear that the knoAvledge 
of a great many in regard to this portion of 
our college is deplorably limited. This 
ought not to be. If properly used, the 
library ought to form a most important part 
of every students' course. If each one 
could form the habit of spending at least 
one hour a day in the library, we have no 
doubt but what they would derive more last- 
ing benefits from it than from half the 
studies in a college curriculum. The motto 
on the title page of Poole's Index, " Qui scit 
uhi sit seientia habenti est proximus" is the 
terse expression of a great educational truth. 
Yqvj often for practical purposes the knowl- 
edge of where facts may be found is as use- 
ful as a knowledge of the facts themselves, 
and an hour or so a day, in a library like 
ours, will suffice to locate for purposes of 
reference, a mass of varied knowledge, rep- 
resenting the life-works of some of the world's 
greatest minds. We are glad to learn that 
since the adoption of the new hours, more stu- 
dents have taken advantage of the library 
than ever before. The ability to refer 



124 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



readily to authorities upon various subjects 
is of very great importance, and we trust 
none vi^ill neglect the present excellent op- 
portunities for acquiring it. 



Did you know that for fifty cents — only 
twenty-five cents apiece for yourself and 
room-mate — you can order a barrel of char- 
coal at the treasurer's office, which will be 
sufficient to build your fires all winter, 
besides saving you the labor of cutting up 
attic floors? The latter course may at first 
thought appear economical, but this is not 
the case. The college does not pay for our 
kindling when attic floors are iised, but the 
expense comes directly out of our own pock- 
ets. The money thus foolishly wasted would 
buy many barrels of charcoal, which, all must 
admit, is a far more convenient form of 
kindling. We think that a moment's candid 
reflection will convince any fair-minded man 
that the present wanton destruction of attic 
floors is both foolish and expensive. We 
hope that every student will take a sensible 
view of this matter, and before winter sets 
in, leave an order at the treasurer's office for 
a barrel of charcoal. 



Our young brother, the Colby Echo, has 
reached our table, and we welcome it with 
pleasure. The issue before us is filled with 
interesting sketches, able editorials, and 
bright poems, and reflects much credit upon 
its editors. The Eclio has recently been 
made a bi-weekly, and, like most young peo- 
ple is anxious to celebrate its advent into 
long pantaloons, and draw attention to its 
new dignity, by seizing some older brother 
by the ear. Unfortunately, the Orient is 
the victim. We will be charitable towards 
you, however, youthful brother, and en- 
deavor to endure it with loving patience. 
We were once young ourselves, aud we 
know how to make allowance for the indis- 



cretions of youth. When you have out- 
grown your Indian period, and laid aside 
your pop-gun and wooden tomahawk, you 
will doubtless thank us, with tears of grati- 
tude, for our kind forbearance. We have 
been glad, youthful brother, to see you 
grow so fast, and we trust that age and 
experience will soon bring you to maturer 
judgments and calmer reflections. Until 
then, we shall endeavor to treat you with 
kind and thoughtful indulgence, as becomes 
an older brother. We can forgive you your 
wild outburst of boyish exuberance, but we 
trust, youthful brother, that you will try at 
all times to be honest ; and, seriously, do you 
think it is quite honest to pick out from an 
editorial a single sentence, the meaning of 
which was fully exjDlained by the context, 
and give to it an interpretation of your 
own? "Comment is unnecessary," and we 
leave it to your own innate sense of fairness, 
to say whether such a course is entirely con- 
sistent with the rules of honorable and 
courteous journalism. 

Your Pharisaism, youthful brother, is 
really quite diverting, and we are obliged to 
view it in the light of a roaring farce. The 
exquisite, though subtle, humor with which 
you resurrect the skeleton of a miscarried 
Colby intrigue from the grave to which a 
commission — composed chieflj'' of your own 
honored sons — had wisely consigned it ; the 
pious fervor with which you thank Heaven 
that your own garments are still spotless ; 
and the artless ease with which you forget 
to mention two good-sized skeletons of your 
own, which you have not yet honored with 
even a christian burial, form a most delight- 
ful and entertaining after-piece. Your act- 
ing, youthful brother, is not so very bad for 
an amateur, and the r81e is apparently well 
suited to you, but after all, your perform- 
ance is just a trifle too strained to seem 
natural. You may improve with practice, 
but we do not think kind Nature ever in- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



125 



tended you for an actor, and we honestly 
advise you to drop theatricals while there is 
yet time to turn your talents into more con- 
genial channels. If, however, you have 
honestly repented of the past, and are really 
sincere in your declaration of principles, the 
future will afford you abundant opportunity 
to prove it. "Actions speak louder than 
words," and when the time for action ar- 
rives, we think you will not find BoM'doin 
at all backward in the support of any honor- 
able scheme for elevating the standard of 
athletics in our Maine colleges ; until then, 
wouldn't it be wisest to turn your youthful 
energies to the discussion of issues that 
more nearly concern the present generation. 
If at any time, however, the hot blood of 
your fighting editor is unable to endure the 
monotony of every-day life, and his boyish 
soul pants for hair, the Okient will try and 
accommodate him, even if it is obliged to go 
to the expense of purchasing a second-hand 
wig. 

We should not be at all surprised, youthful 
brother, if, in your next issue, you were to 
inflict upon us a number of quotations from 
Pitt's famous speech on youth, or perhaps 
you will prefer to hash it up in your own 
vigorous language. Be that as it may, the 
Orient will receive even that chestnut 
with the same placid smile that it did the 
last. 



ODE TO DIANA. 
As incense of some new-born rose 

Through all the morning air. 
Exhales in sweet humility 

A fragrance rich and rare. 

And turns the careless heart away 

By a resistless charm, 
From vain and temporal aifairs 

To thoughts of holy calm. 

So, does the fragrance of thy life, 
Fair goddess, most divine, 

Breathe a celestial influence 
On other lives than thine. 



CLASSIFICATION OF THE LIBRARY. 

Most of the students are doubtless aware 
that a re-arrangement of the Library on a 
new system of classification has been begun ; 
but for the sake of those who are not ac- 
quainted with the particulars, as well as of 
those not connected with the college, who 
have occasion to use the Library, it may be 
well to state briefly the principles and mode 
of working of the system. 

The classification proceeds throughout 
on the decimal notation. All works are 
distributed into ten grand divisions. Each 
of these is subdivided into one hundred 
special heads, arranged in groups of ten. 
The subdivision can be still farther contin- 
ued, where it is found desirable, by the 
addition of one, two, or three figures at the 
right of the decimal point ; thus, to take an 
illustration, the class. History, includes the 
numbers from 900 to 999, inclusive ; North 
America is represented by the group, 970- 
979 ; the North Atlantic States are denoted 
by 974, and Massachusetts by 974.4. The 
history of Massachusetts can be farther sub- 
divided by districts, or by periods, so that, 
for instance, Boston is 974.46. 

The ten grand classes are : 0, General 
Works ; 1, Philosophy ; 2, Theology ; 3, So- 
ciology ; 4, Philology ; 5, Natural Science ; 
6, Useful Arts ; 7, Fine Arts ; 8, Literature ; 
9, History. The divisions and subdivisions 
of these classes ai"e made in the manner 
likely to be most useful ; thus. Philology and 
Literature are classified by languages ; and 
under Natural Science are placed the nine 
divisions. Mathematics, Astronomy^ Physics, 
Chemistry, Geology, Paleontology, Biology, 
Botany, and Zoology. 

In determining the number of each par- 
ticular book, the initial of the author's name, 
or of the title of the work (if anonymous), is 
added after the number of the subdivision 
in which it is placed, with an additional figure, 
if necessary, to distinguish it from other 



126 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



authors treating on the same subject, 
whose names begin with the same letter ; 
thus, under the History of Greece (938), 
Gillies is 938 : G4 ; Goldsmith, 938 : G5 ; 
and Grote, 938 : G9. In case the same au- 
thor has written two or more works which 
are put in the same subdivision, they are 
distinguished by the addition of the first 
letter of the title of the book; thus, 823.83 : 
T3v, denotes Thackeray's " Virginians," and 
823.83 : T3n, his " Newcomes." 

In the card-catalogue, by which any au- 
thor or work may, as usual, be found, the 
location, which, it should be remembered, is 
not a fixed one bj^ alcoves and shelves, but 
depends entirely upon the classification, as 
denoted by these figures. Subject-cards cor- 
responding to all the subdivisions are also 
inserted, and by the number on the subject- 
card all works bearing on that subject may 
be found. 

The advantage of the new system is, that 
all works treating of any subject are placed 
together, thereby saving an incalculable 
amount of time in looking up authorities ; 
while as there are no shelf numbers, a new 
book can be put in its proper place with the 
rest of its class by merely moving the others 
along to make room for it, instead of being- 
remanded to the nearest empty shelf. The 
heretofore troublesome and expensive opera- 
tion of removing the older and less-used vol- 
umes from the main room, as the space they 
occupied was required for the new accessions, 
is rendered easy and expeditious. There are 
no old shelf numbers to erase, no new ones 
to assign. When re-bound, each book can 
have its class number stamped on the back, 
and the danger of misplacement is thus 
greatly lessened. 

This system, devised by Mr. Melvil Dew- 
ey, librarian of Columbia College, has been 
used at Amherst, Wellesley, and Columbia 
for several years, with great satisfaction, and 
is being adopted very rapidly by public 



libraries throughout the United States. 
Work has already been begun in our own 
library, and it is believed that the advan- 
tages will repay the time and trouble which 
must necessaril3' be given to the re-number- 
ing of so many volumes. The indirect ad- 
vantages which result from the same method 
of classification being employed by several 
libraries are many and important, though 
not at first obvious to one unaware of the 
extent to which cooperation in library work 
is likely to be carried in the next few years. 



LOST. 

Yes, this stone is all 1 see 

To remind me of hef face, 

When so innocent and free 

She would come to meet with me. 

In all loveliness and grace, 

Underneath the maple tree ; 

Ah ! thou stone of misery ! 

Once she sent to meet with me, 

And I waited here alone. 

While so dark and dismally 

Came the night from tree to tree ; 

Yet she came not. Soon 'twas known 

She'd eloped and gone to sea ; 

Ah ! thou stone of misery ! 



SUNRISE ON THE OLD FARM. 

The weather was a perpetual drizzle and 
everything about put on a drizzly aspect. 
That inevitable chum sat smoking a cigar 
and hugging himself to think that the last 
term of Sophomore year was at an end. 
Not so your humble servant. Listening to 
his vivid descriptions of what "da-da" times 
vacation had in store for him, I mentally 
contrasted myself, scythe in hand, wander- 
ing amid the buttercups on old Deacon B.'s 
farm, with my valuable friend lounging 
among the " daisies " of a summer resort. 
But that mournful revery was terminated by 
a lusty knock on my door. I called out, 
" Come in." In walked a lank, sun-burned 
specimen of the genus homo. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



127 



" Air you the college feller as is goin' ter 
help our folks in hayin' ? " 

" r am engaged to assist Mr. Brown in 
gathering his hay crop, if that is what you 
mean," said I, assuming dignity, for I had 
noticed the quizzical smile of my room-mate. 

" Well, trot out yer traps. I brought 
pertaters into town, so I took the big wagon, 
and it's down ter the door. Ther springs are 
sorter stiff, but they'll onlj- shake yer to- 
gether an' make yer look a little solider." 

Without noticing this bit of sarcasm at 
my rather meagre and bleached appearance, 
I acted on his advice, and was soon jolting 
over the rough country roads. My com- 
panion grew loquacious, and ere we reached 
the farm I learned that " after hayin' " he 
was "goin' ter git hitched up." 

" Ararainty has been drove up kinder 
hard. Squire F., that's her father, keeps ten 
cows and hires three men, and she's done all 
ther churnin' outside o' keepin' house for 
the men folks." 

This rehearsal of Araminta's good qual- 
ities was cut short by our arrival at the farm- 
house. Soon I was seated at the supper 
table partaking of warm " saleratus biscuits " 
and some " o' them beans as was left over 
from dinner." The deacon had just returned 
from the performance of some church duty, 
he evidently having taken advantage of the 
"lowery weather," in which to serve the 
Lord. A smoothly shaven face, bald head 
fringed with stubborn gray hair, light steely 
gray eyes surmounted by shaggy eyebrows, 
an iron jaw bolstered up with an old- 
fashioned stock, these I noticed as the salient 
features of my employer. He reminded me 
of an old chair of Puritan workmanship, 
straight backed and staunch, but not of the 
kind that promises rest to the weary. 
Straight-backed and staunch was the old 
deacon still, though I soon learned that the 
seat of his aiiections had been re-bottomed, 
and that the kindly old soul he called 



mother was the second woman who had 
pledged to him and his drudgery her heart 
and hand. 

" Perhaps he'd better sleep in that best 
bed to-night, mother ; we want to break him 
in kind o' easy, you know," said the wily 
old saint. 

Accordingly after an hour's talk I found 
myself sweltering in a downy feather bed and 
breathing an atmosphere that hadn't been 
changed since the minister slept there during 
his last month's visit. I didn't see the sun 
rise next morning. College men only get 
up in time for prayers. But at breakfast a 
few curt remarks from the deacon informed 
me of three things. First : That it is the 
proper thing for hired men to see the sun 
rise. Next : That there were some summer 
boarders coming that day, and lastly, as the 
day promised to be fair, " We'd better strike 
in to that medder • piece down on 'tother 
place. June-grass wanted to be cut early in 
the season." So " Mother " put up our din- 
ner and supper, as we were going to make a 
day of it. We " struck " in with a venge- 
ance. At first I was charmed with the 
rhythmic rustle of the falling grass and the 
kling-er-kling of the whetstones when ap- 
plied to the dewy scythes ; but this novelty 
soon passed away, and as I awkwardly en- 
deavored to keep up with the others I in- 
wardly vowed to place no more confidence 
in the effusions of a poet who sits in the cool 
shade of a friendly tree and writes an ode 
to the merry hay-makers. 

Brooding thus over the incongruities of 
things in general, I did not notice a faint 
humming sound beneath my feet till all at 
once I experienced a sensation as if my new 
overalls had taken fire in several places. I 
beat a hasty retreat, keeping the rear col- 
umns on the defensive like a wise general. 
In fact I was so busily engaged in the rear 
that before I had time to reconnoiter, my 
front ranks got entangled with the old dea- 



128 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



con, who remarked that " This ere medder 
was a pesky place for bumble-bees." But 
all things have an end, and at last the sun 
went down in an aureole of roseate tints 
which I was too tired to rave about. 

I slept that night with one of the hired 
men, who agreed to wake me in time to see 
the sun rise. He fulfilled his agreement 
with the conscientious scruples most persons 
evince when they do an unwelcome kind- 
ness. I awoke from the midst of a dream 
in which I was on the point of proposing to 
a beautiful heiress, a summer boarder of 
" Mother's," who had sought this secluded 
spot where she might commune with un- 
varnished nature. Milk pail in hand I 
sallied forth to the barn-yard. The gray 
mists of morning were trailing their ghostly 
skirts up through the sheep pasture on 
" Hardscrabble." Guiltily they retreated as 
if ashamed to have their rheumatic forms 
meet the eye of old " Sol " as he thrust his 
ruddy face from behind the mountain. But 
the old fellow seemed too benign to notice 
them, and soon the sympathetic humor of 
his jovial face shed a glow of good feeling 
over all nature. The power of his kindly 
old face so wrought upon me that I even 
forced a smile as I gently brought my bee- 
punctured overalls in contact with the hard 
milking stool. Pleasant thoughts aud new 
resolves took possession of my brain and my 
heart throbbed with the glowing hope that 
my dream of the preceding night might be 
realized. Rhythm filled my soul, and the 
lines of the poet, where he speaks . of the 
" gray feet " of dawn, were running through 
my mind, when — swish-clatter went milk 
and pail, and away went the cow leaving on 
my prostrate forni the impress of feet far 
more tangible than the " gray feet " of dawn. 
I got up and looked, the cow wheeled around 
and looked, and our mutual gaze centered 
on a lovely female form standing by the 
barn-yard bars. Like a beautiful gift of the 



sunrise she looked with her ruby lips parted 
in laughter at my bedaubed appearance. 
" She's the image of my dream," said I to 
myself. " My fate is sealed." 

How did it end? Well, by the time I 
had washed my face and hands I learned 
that her name was Mrs. Timothy B., wife of 
the Deacon's eldest son who kept the corner 
grocery at Huskerville. Then and there, 
dear reader, believing that abnormal senti- 
ment is often the result of too early rising, 
I vowed to get ever after my morning nap, 
at all hazards. 



VENICE. 

O, thou fair but fallen mistress of the Adriatic wave, 

The waters of thy heritage thy ruined pavements lave 

As when thy rule imperial was supreme from shore 
to shore, 

As in those far-off golden days, those princely days 
of yore. 

When the vassals of thy greatness bowed low the 
head to thee. 

Or joined in acclamation as thy Doge espoused the 
sea. 

When, amid the gloom and shadow of so many cent- 
uries" dark, 

Shone forth in brilliant splendor the Lion of St. Mark. 

Then thy richly laden galleys, burdened with the 

wealth of Ind., 
Laughed the tempest's shock to scorn, bade defiance 

to the wind, 
Bore the treasures of the Orient across the foaming 

main. 
And to lower their stately banners to no earthly 

power did deign ; 
Then the beauteous Cyprian island bore allegiance to 

thy sway. 
And the storied dark JE,gea,n thy behests would fain 

obey. 
Then the Turkish foeman fled with terror aud with 

loss. 
As the skylark from the eagle fled the crescent from 

the cross. 

Then that dread and secret council, that unknown 

mysterious ten, 
Doomed, with swift and equal vengeance, lives of 

nations and of men. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



129 



Sitting in their liidden conclave, at their whispered 

soft command, 
Fell the power of popes and monarchs, as by some 

enchanter's wand ; 
Vel vet glove with hand of iron was the watchword 

of their might. 
And their foes the deepest dungeons hid forever from 

the light ; 
There lay bound the swarthy Indian, from the 

Ganges golden shore. 
Or the wisest of the Grecians, learned in all his 

country's lore. 

'Mid the seas of far Cathay, or in the ports of rich 
Ceylon, 

By the amber coast of Baltic, on the waters of the 
Don, 

Far and near thy power extended, far and near thy 
name was known ; 

Ocean was thy realm unquestioned, there thy stand- 
ards flew alone ; 

Shawls and lace of gorgeous texture, fabrics of the 
richest hue 

Then adorned thy palace chambers, fit for Venus' 
self to view ; 

Wines of old patrician cellars, saved for centuries 
with care. 

Fragrant with a balmy incense, decked thy side- 
boards, rich and rare. 

But that olden time has vanished, set is thy ancestral 

star, 
And thy lonely waters quiver, when the funeral gon- 
dola 
Bears unto thy vaulted chambers, where thy noble 

dead recline, 
Some ancestral lordly grandee, last of his famed 

princely line. 
But the story of thy prowess, spreading over ages 

far. 
Of thy lofty olden grandeur, rich in peace and strong 

in war, 
Will re-echo in the annals of the fair Italian tongue, 
And the glories of thy splendor will forevermore be 

suns:. 



COLLEGE LITERATURE.* 

The advent of a new publication in the 
college world gives us a text which we 
wish to improve. College journalism has 

*This article was written just after tlie first appearance of 
the Amherst Lit. 



now so far developed that it is assuming 
definite forms. Two general departments 
are universally recognized — a literary de- 
partment and a news department. In the 
smaller colleges, these two departments are 
united in one publication ; in the larger 
colleges they are separated into tAvo. The 
news department is generally supplied by 
the editors ; the literary department depends 
largely upon the talent of the college for its 
support. With the latter department it is 
now our purpose to deal. 

The value of the literary department 
of college publications is generally too 
little appreciated as a means of training. 
Students are too generally inclined to write 
their articles on weighty subjects and in the 
style of a Webster or a Chatham ; and this 
inclination is too often fostered in the sub- 
jects assigned for themes. This cultivates 
nothing but a congested imitation ; no real 
exercise of natural imagination and self- 
evolved thought. We have a library which 
treats of the universe in all its parts and 
conditions. And the elucidations of a stu- 
dent on these topics are as useless as they 
are vain. The President of Harvard is re- 
ported to have said that in fifteen years he 
had never seen a joke in a theme ; and why 
should he? The literature of the leading 
college papers is a reaction against this kind 
of writing. It calls for short pieces with a 
focus. It wants no platitudes, but that 
which is natural and spontaneous. 

We are aware that there are many stu- 
dents who would abuse the privilege, if 
optional themes were given them. But a 
reform in at least two directions is safe and 
desirous : first, those who desire to follow 
their own tastes in writing should be al- 
lowed to do so ; and, second, light and origi- 
nal articles should be given more credit 
than they are accustomed to receive. If 
all articles published in a college paper 
should be allowed to go to the credit of the 



130 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



writer, we are sure that the standard of 
both paper and theme would be raised. 

It may be that attempts in this mode of 
writing would be crude, for it is unques- 
tionably much easier to paraphrase than 
to originate ; but the training would be 
worth much more. An intermediate scholar 
is not set to reading Choate ; and why 
should college students be expected to 
write on themes that concern the profound- 
est scholars? 

One of the departments of the Amheist 
Lit. is the sketch-book ; and to this, writers 
are requested to send short articles of every 
kind and character, provided only they have 
literary merit. A department of this char- 
acter is one of the most valuable and inter- 
esting that a college paper can have. It 
gives scope for every diversity of talent and 
taste. 

This is the class of articles which the 
Orient wants. Those who write for the 
Orient, we advise to read the literary de- 
partments of our better exchanges. (Any 
of the editors will be happy to help any one 
in this direction.) And if any one has a 
poetical bent for effusions of not over four 
verses, — not over two preferable, — we ear- 
nestly pray him to develop and work that 
vein. And we would also urge upon all 
who write to keep in mind these sugges- 
tions : 

Think before writing. 

Write with a definite purpose. 

Write to a focus. 

Be brief and pithy. 

Experiment till you find your bent, and 
then improve on that. 



APPEARANCE. 

The minds of a free, Christian people 
naturally revolt at the mere thought of serv- 
itude. Although we may stand in perfect 
horror of any form of physical slavery, still 
there exists a moral slavery which, notwith- 



standing its alarming proportions, gives rise 
to very little apprehension. I refer to the 
desire to make a good appearance, or to keep 
up an appearance, as it is commonly styled. 
This disposition is not confined to one class 
or grade of society, but is characteristic of all 
conditions of people. It may be a natural 
outcome of a desire to please, which seems 
to be common to human beings, but what- 
ever is the true cause, the evil evidently ex- 
ists and increases yearly. 

We can scarcely take up a paper but 
what our eye is arrested by an account of 
some unfortunate who has been living be- 
yond his means. He has continued his dis- 
honesty until discovered, or until the fear of 
discovery gets control of him, and then he 
flees to Canada, or some other safe place. 
Occasionally, however, shame and remorse 
cause him to terminate his miserable life by 
a disgraceful death. 

Canada has become quite a popular re- 
sort for defaulting bank cashiers, and other 
officers of trust, and we are charitable 
enough to term the crime of one who steals 
the funds of a corporation, " shortness of 
accounts," while we brand as a thief, the 
poor wretch who takes a loaf of bread for 
his starving children. 

Thus far, we have only considered the 
man who lives beyond his means, but the 
world also judges the man of ample means, 
who wholly disregards the appearance which 
he presents before his fellows, and calls him 
slovenly or miserly. The one cares too 
much what others may think, the other not 
enough. We must, however, consider the 
second the more manly of the two, although 
a miser is one of the most despicable of be- 
ings. We see that either extreme is at- 
tended by risk and, oftentimes by peril. 
Therefore the wise man is he who chooses 
the golden mean. Such men are most nearly 
free for license, though it may seem to be, 
freedom is ofttimes slavery itself. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



131 




He bums a hatchet, bums u, 
smoke, 

And bums an easy-chair ; 
He bums some wood, and bums some coal. 
And rubber boots to wear. 

He bums his fruit, he bums the juice 
He empties down his throat ; 

He bums his paper, bums his stamps. 

And bums an overcoat. 

But when, we ween, the bummer's soul 
To the pearly gates draws near, 
'Twill see a notice posted up, 
" No bummers wanted here." 

The apple bummer is now abroad. 

There were no recitations in Psychology last 
week, as President Hyde was absent. 

Is it possible to bring the chapel service quartette 
up to four in number ? 

The biggest frng on record has been caught, and 
is on exhibition in the Zoological room. 

The Topsham Fair was well patronized by the 
students, Thursday afternoon, which was given them 
for this purpose. 

On October llth, the Geology excursion from the 
Portland High School paid a short visit to the college 
grounds and was shown over Memorial. 

By the will of Mrs. Dummer, the college is now 
richer by the sum of fifteen thousand dollars, and 
probably more. 

Boutelle and Fowler of the Senior class are taking 
up the plays of Terence with Prof. Pease. Prof. 
Johnson is also reading with them. 

Profs. Chapman and Robinson attended the Teach- 
ers' Convention, held at Gorham two weeks ago. 

At the present date, the tennis tournament is still 
in progress. The doubles have been won by Gary, 
'88, and Williamsoji, '88, but the singles are as yet 
unfinished. 

Harriman, '89, has returned to college. 

The shelves in the south wing of the library have 
been completed, and partially filled with books. In 
the main library, sets of shelves have been con- 
structed between the large columns, thus afibrding a 
convenient place for works of reference. 



The item in the last issue, which read Colby jury, 
should have read college jury. 

F. L. Smithwick, '88, has charge of the laboratory 
this year. 

A notice was recently posted on the bulletin, 
which read : " Cole stove for sale." 

A delegation of ten from the Zeta Psi Society at- 
tended the initiation exercises of the Colby chapter, 
Friday, Oct. loth. 

Rice, '89, has for some time, on account of a 
sprained ankle, been confined at his home in Rock- 
land. 

And now the Zoological Junior wanders off with 
fish-pole and dip-net to interview nature. 

The Alpha Delta Phi Society are having a clay 
tennis court laid out beside the one lately finished for 
the Psi Upsilon Society, and the Delta Kappa Epsilon 
Society are having a second one built near their first 
one. The Theta Delta Chi Society are also intend- 
ing to have one constructed at their present grounds, 
in the rear of South Appleton. With six clay courts 
on the college premises, tennis will take a fresh start 
next spring. 

The following are the subjects of the Junior 
Themes due Oct. 27th. " Should the Tariff on Su- 
gar be Removed? " and " Are the Pleasures of Leis- 
iwe Commensurate with its Perils ? " 

I'm a guileless Colby boy, 
(Bet you half a dollar.) 
To the Baptist church I go, 
(Just to hear 'em hollar). 

And I believe in temperance ; 
(Bring the bottle, chummy,) 
Playing cards I do abhor, 
(These are getting gummy). 

And I humbly bow to Sam, 
(This shows classic knowledge,) 
And the Oracle I shun ; 
(Thus I stay in college). 

Rev. Mr. Guild has been delivering a course of 
Sunday evening lectures at the Unitarian church. 

Before long the students will probably be called 
upon to pass a physical examination, prior to com- 
mencing work in the gymnasium. F. N. Whittier, 
'85, is now in Brunswick, and will probably soon 
begin his instructions. While the building is yet 
unopened, we would suggest that, for the sake of se- 
curity, an additional rail be placed around the run- 
ning track between the present rail and the floor of 
the track. As it now is, there is a possible danger 



132 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



that the runner may slip and fall to the floor below, 
an occurrence which would result in harm to life or 
limb. 

The trees on the campus have lost their leaves, 
and Main Street is now visible from the buildings, 
through the bare branches. A few evenings ago, 
the leaves, which had been raked into a large heap 
near South Maine, were set on fire, and the town fire- 
engines mistaking it for a serious conflagration, were 
soon on the spot, but quickly discovered their mis- 
take. 

A week ago last Sunday, Prof. Chapman deliv- 
ered a very able and interesting sermon in the church 
on the hill. 

A partridge flew through a pane of glass into 
Massachusetts Hall one night, and was found dead 
the next morning. 

Prof. Lee, with several of the students, took a trip 
among the islands recently, to investigate the clam 
heaps. Several pieces of flint, which the Professor 
termed " scrapers," and an arrow-head were discov- 
ered. 

The Freshman class has offered a prize of $2.00 
to that member of the class who presents the best 
design for a class cut in the '88 Bugle, to the com- 
mittee having the matter in hand. 

The members of the different classes have select- 
ed electives as follows : Seniors : Vertebrate Anat- 
omy and Physiology — Little, H. M. Moulton ; Miner- 
alogy — Fowler, C. F. Moulton, Skolfield, Torrey ; 
English Literature — C. M. Austin, H. B. Austin, Bou- 
telle, Burleigh, Burpee, Gary, Choate, Dearth, Ga- 
han, Goodwin, Kimball, Lane, Means, Merrill, Per- 
kins, Plummer, Pushor, Robinson, Sewall, Talbot, 
Varney, Verrill ; Juniors : Zoology — Black, Brad- 
ford, Gary, Chapman, Cole, Dresser, Hale, Larrabee, 
Meserve, M. P. Smithwick ; English History — Ayer, 
Barrett, Bartlett, Card, Carruthers, Gooding, Hill, 
Ingals, Linscott, Marston, Maxwell, Shaw, Shorey, 
F. L. Smithwick, Tolman, Williamson, Woodman; 
Sophomores : Mathematics — Clark, Doherty, Emery, 
Jackson, Merrill, Neal, Owen, Rogers, Watts. 

ffimball, '87, just barely escaped a serious acci- 
dent on the last day of the Topsham Fair. He had 
been waiting for a train to pass the crossing, and just 
as it got by, a team coming across the track, shied 
to the side of the road, knocking Kimball down and 
running over him. He escaped with a badly sprained 
ankle and without considerable epidermis. 

During the months of November and December, 
the Faculty have arranged for a course of four lect- 
ures to be delivered in Memorial Hall. The object 



of these lectures is to pay in part for a fine oil paint- 
ing of Nathaniel Hawthorne for the college. Course 
tickets, reserved seats, will be sold to the students 
for $1.00. Even if the lectures themselves were not 
a suflBcient inducement to students to buy tickets, 
yet a sense of patriotism should be enough. The 
course is intended to be a very fine one, and all 
should endeavor to attend. 




44.— Hon. Horatio G. Her- 
rick, of Lawrence, Mass., 
been unanimously nominated for 
the eighth term as High Sheriff of 
Essex County, Mass. He practiced law in 
North Berwick before his removal to Massa- 
chusetts. 

'50. — Dr. John?. Abbot died at his home in Warren, 
R. I., on the 10th inst. He was born in that place in 
1828. He came to Bowdoin from Trinity College, 
entering the Junior class. After graduation he, for a 
time, was purser in the navy. On the breaking out 
of the war he enlisted, and served with honor until 
the close. After the war he applied himself to the 
study of medicine. Since receiving his diploma he 
has been engaged in practicing in Warren, R. I., 
with the exception of a short time that he was in a 
Galveston (Texas) hospital. His death was caused 
by an overdose of an opiate, which his health com- 
pelled him to use. 

'60. — Mr. Granville P. Hawes is candidate for 
judge of the superior court. New York City. 

'75.— Mr. P. P. Simonds of Brooklyn, N. Y., has 
been appointed member of the board of education of 
that city by the mayor. 

'80. — Mr. W. P. Fergerson of Shapleigh, Me., 
was married to Miss Hattie M. Earle of North Ber- 
wick, September 9th. The happy couple will make 
Shapleigh their home, at which place Mr. F. is 
supervisor of schools. 

'80. — Mr. R. C. Gilbert, who taught the grammar 
school at Kennebunk, Me., one year after graduation, 
and who later on was connected with mills in Georgia 
for a year and a half, recently returned to his home. 
He is now in search of a situation. 

'80. — Mr. W. L. Dane, a very successful lawyer 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



133 



at Kerinebunk, Me., has recently taken possession of 
a new and attractive oflBce. Mr. D. was a delegate to 
tlie rece.nt national conference of Unitarians, held at 
Saratoga. 

'81. — Mr. John Wilson of Portland was married 
to Miss Jennie C. Haskell of Brunswick on the 7th 
inst. They have gone to California. 

'85. — Mr. Ralph S. French has opened an office 
for the practice of law in Houlton, Me. 




Princeton. — The foot-ball team recently defeated 
Stevens Institute, New York city,' by a score of 59 
to 0. — The old annual Tiger is to be revived ; 
Princeton has had no annual for many years. 



ALLEN'S PHARMACY, 



LEMONT BLOCK, 



Main Street, 



Brunswick, Me. 



WEAR ONE OF 

MERRY'S 

CELEBRATED HATS. 

Always the Correct Stvle. 

237 MIDDLE STREET, 

PORTLAND. 



h. v. stackpole, 
Fine Boots and Shoes, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 

Dentist. 

STOREB BLOCK, - - BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



F. W. BAREON, 

Dealer io MM iii Fancy Groceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Countrj- Produce. 
Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 



FRANK A. HALE, Proprietor, 
DeWITT HOUSE, TONTINE HOTEL, 

Lewiaton, Me. Brunswick, Me. 

Private Suppers and Banquets a specialty. 

B. E. PLUM ME R, Manatjer. 



SPEAR & WHITMORE, 



WHITMORE. 



DEALERS IN 



ALL KINDS OF COAL, 

Cedar Street, Brunswick, Me. 

ce, Opposite Fost-Oflice, Main Sti-eet. 
Communication with Coal Yard. 

F. L. DUNNE, 

Importing ^Tailor, 

338 Washington Street, 

EOSTOIiT. 

A VERY LARGE LINE OF GOODS 

Specially selected for students' wear. 

ALL THE LATEST LONDON AND PARIS NOVELTIES 

Regularly imported. 

Tailor to the Harvard Co-operative Society. 

Our representative will visit Brunswick next spring to 
take orders. 

338 WASHINGTON STREET, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



RICHMONDlis 

" ' I^^^HH^^^H^^I than the price 
charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, will 
Jind the RICHI.10ND STRAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO AUj OTHERS. 
rhey are made from the brightest, most 
delicately flavored, and higliest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are abso- 
lutely witUoDt adulteratioD or drugs. 

STRAIGHT CUT^^ 

We use the Gemulne Frencli Rice Paper 

of OUT own direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICH MOKD STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigsirette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
origlDal brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or box of ■ '^ 

Uicliiiioiid 
Straight Cut 
Cigarettes 

bears the , 
signature of ' 



niGAREnES 

ALLEN &CINTER 



MAKUFAOTUEEES, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 

Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry, Promptly Repaired and Warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

n]aine Bentral W. ^. 

On and after Oct. 12th, 1885, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.15, 11.2,5 A.M., 2.38, 4.4.5 and 6.25 p.m., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Rockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.38 P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.40 p.m., and 

12.35 (night). 
For Lewiston, 8.15 a.m., 2.45 and 6.33 p.m., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. tniixed), and 2.45 p.m. 
For Augusta and Waterville, 8.20 A.M., 2.40 P.M., 12.45 every 

night, and on Saturdays only at 6.35 p.m. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 (night). 
For Bangor, Ellsworth, Mt. Desert FeiTy, St. Stephen, Houlton 

Vanceboro, and St. ,Tohn, 2.40 P.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Bar Harbor, 12.15 (night). 

Note.— The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew. 
ston, Bangor and Bar Harbor, rim every night, including Sun- 
day, but do not connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, or 
for Belfast and Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sun- 
day morning. 

PATSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. B. BOOTHBY, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 6, 1885. 



SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. 

Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 

The fallowing are our well known 

STANDARD BRANDS : 

Caporal, Sweet Capokal, St. James 1-2, Caporal 1-2, 

St. James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES. 

Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and French Rice Paper, are rolled by the high- 
est class of skilled labor, and warranted free from flavoring or 
impurities 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a FAC-SIMILK of Kinney Bros. 
Signature. 

KINNEV TOBACCO CO. 

NEW YORK. 



JORDAN SNOW, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

DuNLAP Block, Brunswick, Me. 

(INTERGEPTED LETTER.) 

Brunswick, May 14, 1886. 
Owen, Moore & Co., Portland. 
Gentlemen : 
Please send me by mail one pair long Bicycle Stockings, 
size 9^, regulation League Color. Enclosed one dollar and 
stamps for postage. I see by advertisement in Portland 
paper that you carry a line of Tennis Goods. Please send 
1 me a price-list of Rackets and Balls, with best discount to 
a regular club. What are the prices on Jersey Coats, 
and in what color do they come ? 

Yours truly, 
P. O. Box 2002. BOB BROWN. 



Confectionery, Fruit, and Cigar Store, 

MAIN STREET, BEUNSWICK, ME. 

Wm. R. FIELD, Manager. 

W. HAWTHORNE, 

FINE * TAILORING, 

2 Church Block, Bath. 



1 fllein Pbiladclphia 

I at the Newspaper Adver- 

_^__ T tisinp Agency of Messrs. 

N. Wf AVER & $ON, oiir authorized agents. 



THIS PAPERS 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEGE BOOKSTORE. 

We have coustantly iu stock a full assortmeut of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 

HYKON STDE VJBIV S. 

The best pl.ice in ton-n to buy your ADAMS & UNIACKE 

COLLARS and CUFFS, TIES, SCARFS, GLOVES, uavE A FIJLT I TNF OF ^TOVFS 



Hats, Caps, Canes, Ect., is at 

PLUMMER'S, O'Brien Block. 

Correct Styles, and Best Quality, at Bottom Prices. 



Also, all kinds of Lamps, 
ost everytliin^ found in a Stove and Crocl^ery Store 
MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK. 



A. F. KICHOLS, 

Merchant Tailor oysters and ice-cream. 



VISIT G. E. CHANDLER, 

IJKALEK I> 



BRTJNS-VP'ICK, ME. 
Have your Fall and Winter Suit Made at Nicliols. 



Main Street, Brunswick, Maine. 

OITOSITS TO TK7- KT H .-i. Xj X^ . 



F. H. WILSON, 



IlISl'KNSEI! OK 



A Choice Line of Styles to Select From. 

OVERCOATS in Great Variety. 
FINE GOODS. LOW PRICES. 

satisfaction Guaranteed, Call and Exan.ine. PUfC DFUgS, MedlCmeS, M ClieilliCalS. 

A. F. NICHOLS, - Odd Fellows Block. imported and Domestic cigars. 

full Dress Suits, and Dress Froclis a Specialty. MAIN STREET, - - - BRtrNSWICK, ME. 



■TECE 



* TRAVELERS * 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HERTFORD, CONN., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCr $1 1,000,000, and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 

AnnTT)T^^,lVT "POT TP!T17,Q indemnifying the Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
^^^^^^-^^^^^ J- -L V^-L/XV^iijO Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidentallniurv. 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only $5.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each l^l.OOO, with f5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 1864 have received fatal or disabling injuries, aud been paid CASH 
benefits. - ^ - 

Issues TjT'Pp] T*OT TOTT^S °^ ''^^^ Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Ofiice at Hartford. 
JAS. G. BATTERSON, President, RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary. 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



QOCIETY' lyte-s cnici Elates, Cuts cuzd. Ensigixict. 
'Writiixg Fcvper cnid Cctrds ETigi^ccved a.7\d Priixted., 
StzzdeTzt' s 'Vtsitiixg Cctrds. iTcvtbcvtioixs of ev^ery ktixd 
ej^ecztted by the engr^cLviTig Ixoizse of 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 

■j^ *- — .«<> 

Society Itzv itchtioris , '-Dies, cutd Jllizsti^cLtiojxs foi^ 'Yectr- 
(^ooKs, Monogi^ctnis , jlmts, ctrtd. Crests Engrcwed cLJ-cd 
'Printed. Visititxcj CutcLs, and the Choicest StctttoTteinj ■ Seals 
Tapers and Sealing VTas:, and Sealing Sets. 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



//I 

tlorsBrM 



^CID PHOSPHATE. 

[liquid]. 
Prepared aecordiiit; to tlie directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

The Unrivalled Keiuedy for Dyspepsia, Jlental and Physical Exhanstion, Nervousness, AVakefuIness, 

Diminished Vitality, etc. 

As Food for an Exhausted Brain, in Liver and Kidney Trouble, in Seasickness and SiGl( Headaclie, in Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion and Constipation, in Inebrieti/. Despondency and cases of Imj>ai)-cd yerve Function , 

It has become a necessity in a large number of households throughout the world, 

And is universally prescribed and recommended by physicians of all schools. 
Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 
It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body. 
It is unsurpassed as a substitute for lemons or limes, and 

IT MAKES A DELICIOUS DRINK WITH WATER AND SUGAR ONLY. 
Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

KXTJIFORD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, R. I. 
WBEWARE OF IMITATIONS.-ffiff 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



MMKB <& FEEBLE, 



ALL KINDS OF 





'''^'^-' "/t^MiTiSl^i 



EXECUTED AT THE 



Special Rates to Classes I Students Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine 



Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brnns-nrick and Topsham 
Stereoscopic Vieiirs ; also College Views. 



Go to W. B. lA7oodard''s 

To buy your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doiug. 
s:psoi.^Xj Ea-i^TES to stttdei^t cl-ctbs. 
Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 




[Cushing's Island, 
Portland, Me. 
IsO.. S. G-IBSOnST- 



Bowdoin College Medical Department. 

The Sixty-Sixth Annual Course of Lectures at the Medi- 
cal School of Maine, will commence February 4th, 1886, 
and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Rev. W.m. DeWitt Hvde, Preeiaent: Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol, 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Women and Children; Ciubles W. Goddard, A.M., 
Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. Gerrish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Franklin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemistry; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henrv H. 
HCNT, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Youkg, Public Hygiene ; 
Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BOBDEBS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

We make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges. 

^sucii as 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



ALLEN & CO., Portland, 

Having moved to their new store, 204 Middle Street, Cor. of Plum, are constantly opening 
rich and elegant goods for gentlemen's wear. 

Ihoice loreign fabrics low iisplayed in fur tailoring lepartment. 

The finest-made up Clothing tu be seen in the State now exhibited in our 



Novs Hies for Gentlemen's Dress in Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves, Neckwear, Canes, and Silk Umbrellas 
in Seasonable Styles to be found in our 

RurnishinQ Department. 

ALLEN & COMPANY, 

avr^^2<T■UT'.^CTTJI^,EI^s, i^et^^iijEZFis, .a.2<ti3 jobbers, 

204 MIDDLE STREET, COENEE OP PLUM, POETLAITD. 



L k. kimn%@\ 



Donnel Building, Corner Peari and Middle Streets, PORTLAND, ME., 

WOULD RESPECTFULLY CALL TBE ATTENTION OF 

Bugets of Fumltuie, Gatpets, Wm, Pailoi Stoves, BaQges, &g.. 

To the Enormous Stock of House Furnishings at the Poitland Store. Being Manufacturers, 

intending purchasers can see tlie styles and select their own coverings for Parlor Furniture, and have it made 

to order for the same price. We keep enormous quantities of IJpholstery Goods in the Boston Store, 

and full lines of samples. Here our prices on Parlor Suites range from ii?.35.00 in Hair Cloth 

to 3*375.00 in Silk or Mohair Plushes. 

CHAMBEB FURNITURE. DRAPERY of every description made to order in the 

Boston store. Orders taken here and designs and samples 
We have in stock in our three stores 87 different pat- shown, 
terns of Chamber Suites, manufactured from all the pop- -da-dt/td orrmrx'a 

ular woods, viz. : Pine, Ash, Walnut, Cherry, Basswood, PAKiLOR STOVES. 

and Mahogany ranging in price from $18.00 t« $400.00. g ; ^ attention is requested to our Parlor Stove De- 

We also have all kinds, sizes, and quantities of Bedsteads, ^rtment, as we believe we have the best line to select 
Bureaus, Commodes, etc. Spring Beds, Cot Beds, Lounge f • ^;„i_„ Pricpq »4 00 to ,«40 00 
Beds, Sofa Beds, Mantel Beds, etc. Mattresses of every *'^°'" '" Maine. Prices $4.0U to *4U.uu. 
kind and quality, from an excelsior at $2.00 to a pure STOVES AND RANGES 

bleached South American curled horse hair at $25.00. 

Our line of Ranges comprises all the latest and best in 
CARiPET DEPARTMENT tl^^ market, including the "New Tariff" and "Quaker," 

which are considered superior to anything yet produced. 
$75,000 worth of Cottons, Cotton and Wools, All-Wool Write for cuts of these two Ranges. -Prices $15.00, $20.00, 
Extras, Tapestry, Brussels, Body Brussels, Velvets, Wil- $22.50, .$25.00, $27.50, $29.00, $33.00, $35.00, $38.00, and Up- 
tons, etc., at our usual Rock-Bottom Prices. Any of these wards to $05.00. These prices include all the ware, pipe, 
can be selected at the Portland store. SHADES and and zinc. 



Any of the above goods sold for Casli or on our Special Contract System, at 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Streets, Portland, Me. 

Branch of the Great Nassau Hall House Famishing Store, 827 Washington Street, Boston. 

B, A. ATKINSON & CO. 

ISAAC C. ATKINSON, Manager. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A GLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard " and " Duplex " Burner SUPLnLATIVL, 



Mixtures for Pipe or Cigarette. 
THREE KINGS, Turkish, Perique and Virginia. 
MELLOW MIXTURE, Turkish and Perique. 
TURKISH and VIRGINIA. 

PERIQUE and VIRGINIA. 
GENUINE TURKISH. 
FLAKE CUTS, ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOE THE PIPE. 



VANITY FAIR. 



OLD GOLD. 



SALMAGUNDI, a Mew Granulated Mixture. 

FRAGRANT VANITY FAIR, 

CLOTH OF GOLD. 



IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENGEA7ED IH THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY rOR 

ROGERS' CELEBRATED GROUPS. 



KIMBALL'S SATIN STRAIGHT CUT CIGAREnES. 

People of refined t.iste who desire exceptionally fine Cigar- 
ettes should use only our Straight Cut, put up in Satin Packets 
and boxes of 10s., 20s., 50s., and 100s. 

Our Cigarettes were never so fine as now. They cannot be 
surpassed for purity and excellence. Only the purest Rice Paper 
used. Established 1846. 14 First Prize Medals. 

Wm. S. Kimball & Co., Peerless Tobacco Works, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

COBURN CLASSICAL INSTITUTE, 

W' ATEEVILLE, ME. Both Sexes. Four Courses of Study : 
Introductory ; College Preparatory, 3 years ; English and 
Scientific, 3 years'; Ladies' Collegiate, 4 years. Location healthy, 
expenses moderate, discipline wholesome, morals good. Persons 
using alcoholic beverages or tobacco need not apply. Accommoda- 
tions ample and excellent. For further information send for 
Catalogue to J. H. HAI^S.ON, Principal. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

474 Congress St., - - - opp. Preble House. 

THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

JiQ. S eDD EEIiIiGW^' BIi0OK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 

A, W. TOWNSEND, Prop'r, 



The New Styles in 

Smi^E^ and. SOIFT 1^-A.TS 

In all colors, are now ready. An elegant line of New Y''ork 

Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, 

-«^T ELLIOTT'S, B- 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 

C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



TITaE IS IVEONSY. 

And we sell time for Little Money. Buy your Watches, 
Clocks, and Jewelky cheap for cash of 

-^DAVIS, JEWELER. •^ 
A FINE LINE OF SILVER GOODS AT BOTTOM PRICES. 

Next Door to American Express Oflioe, Brunswick, Me. 

Our $1.00 Spectacles defy competition. Repairing promptly 

done by F. E. Davenport. 

C. H. POWERS' 

Hair- Dressing Rooms, 

LEMONT BLOCK, 
Main Street, BRUBTSWICK, MAINE. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

OvEK Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

GRIMMER'S ORCHESTRA 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIIVIIVIER, Director, 

180 Middle Street. - - - - Portland, Me. 

CHAS. E. BURGESS, 



The Largest Assortment of 



MANUFACTURER OF 



lollege Irateriiiti] ladges. 



Our Productions are of Merit, and Commend Tiiemselves. 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 



No. 12 Plain Street, ALBANY, N. Y. 



Gents^ Fine Shoes 

Is to be found at 

JACKSON'S. 



LAWN- TENNIS, BASE -BALL, AND LOW SHOES, 

In Large Variety. 

S. R. JACKSON, 2(1, 2 Odd Fellows Block, Brunswick. 

DROP IN AND INSPECT. 



j. m. lombard, 
Dentist, 

OVEK BOAKDMAN'S STOKE, MAIN STKEET. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 



1 nti "KOrKltilOK of the Nearest Corner Grocery will 
endeavor to merit a 

CONTINUANCE 

Of the Students' patronage. Come and prove him. 



BOYNTON, THE JEWELER, 

No. 547 Congress St., Portland. 

Do not pay the large profits which jewelers have always 
charged. Orders by mail receive prompt attention. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

Ladies or gentlemen desiring pleasant 

profitable employment -ni'lte at once. 

We want you to handle an article of domestic use that recom- 
mendg Itself to every one at sight. STAPLE AS FLOUR. 
Sells like hot cakes. Profits 300 per cent. Families wishing to 
practice economy should for their own benetit write for par- 
ticulars. Used every day the year round in every household. 
Price within reach "of all. Circulars free. Agents receive 
SAMPLE FREE. Address, 

DOMESTIC MFG. CO., Marion, Ohio. 



$100 A WEEK. 



TONTINE 


LAUNDRY, 


Brunswick, Me, 


Shirts Laundered for 
Collars and Cuffs for 


10 cents. 
2 centa. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates foe Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar, — Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Cffisar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
jEneid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry, — first and third Books of Loorais. 

Algebra, — so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regular Examinations foe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Hallowell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryehurg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 
GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
iug matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQUIEED— FOUE HOUES A "WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUE HOUKS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XVI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 10, 1886. 



No. 9. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE YEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

C. B. Burleigh, '87, Managing Editor. 

L. B. Varney, '87, Business Editor. 
C. C. Choatk, '87. C. H. Verrill, '87. 

M. L. Kimball, '87. H. C. Hill, '88. 

A. W. Merrill, '87. ' M. P. Smithwick, '8! 

E. C. Plummer, '87. A. W. Tolman, '88. 



Per annum, in advance. 
Single Copies, 



. $2.00. 
15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to tlie Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 



CONTENTS- 
VoL. XVI., No. 9.- November 10, 1886. 

The Sea-Mist, 135 

Editorial Notes 135 

Upsala, 138 

Veni, Vidi, Vici, 138 

A Safe-Guard, 140 

Y. M. C. A. Convention, 140 

My Queen, 141 

Old Boating Days, 141 

The College Ladies' Man, 142 

Duped, 142 

CoLLEGii Tabula 144 

Personal, 146 

In Memoriam 146 

College World 147 

THE SEA -MIST. 
When from the east the winds of ocean blow 
And breathe their salty fragrance o'er the land, 
'Twixt leaden sky and heaving sea below 
The gray mist steals upon the foaming strand. 

On wood and stream the vaporous wreaths descend ; 
They creep o'er hill and valley, field and down, 
And fling triumphant arms where low extend 
The winding streets of many a seaward town. 




At last patient waiting has its 
reward, and the long-prayed-for gymnasium 
is in running order, under its competent in- 
structor, Mr. F. N. Whittier. The building 
is indeed a model of completeness and con- 
venience. It is lighted by electricity, and no 
detail that could in any way contribute to 
the comfort of the students has apparently 
been omitted. Gymnastic exercise, under 
such conditions, must be not only a benefit 
but a pleasure. We only regret that those 
who labored so long and earnestly for this 
end in the past are not with us to enjoy our 
present triumph. We believe that the open- 
ing of the gymnasium marks a new era in 
our athletic life and in the physical welfare 
of our students, but we must not forget, that, 
in spite of our excellent advantages, such a 
result can be attained only by hard and sys- 
tematic work. Physical and mental develop- 
ment should go hand in hand. Mental 
work ought never to be better and more 
persistent than when backed up b^^ phj'sical 
health. We believe that a proper use of the 
gymnasium will do much to secure this, and 
trust that the present enthusiasm will not be 
permitted to languish'. 



The long stretch of pleasant fall weather 
which we have enjoyed this term brings with 
it a regret that it could not have been en- 



136 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



livened by athletic contests between the 
Maine colleges. The favorite fall game of 
Rugby foot-ball has not thus far attained 
much of a hold in Maine, but we see no rea- 
son why it should not be as popular here as 
it is in other states. We have no doubt 
that all of the Maine colleges could put 
good elevens into the field. A few games of 
Rugby at this season of the year would form 
an agreeable break in the usual monotonjr, 
and would, we think, be appreciated by all. 
It is now too late to do anything this fall, 
but we hope to see some move made during 
the winter towards the formation of an inter- 
collegiate foot-ball league and the drawing 
up of a schedule of games for next fall. 
We should like to hear from the other Maine 
colleges on this subject. 



There is no lesson that should be more 
thoroughly learned in a college course than 
that of tact. It is a proficiency in this im- 
portant department of knowledge that char- 
acterizes the successful man in social and po- 
litical life, and the popular man everywhere. 
It is a trait of character which the associa- 
tions of college should do much to foster, 
and that Bowdoin graduates have not been 
lacking in this respect is shown by the long 
list of them who have received political 
honors. The power to'deal successfully with 
various men, and with human nature in the 
abstract, may be, to some extent, an inherent 
one, but it may also be greatly increased by 
thoughtful cultivation. The man who is 
dogmatic and aggressive in asserting opinions, 
may, it is true, acquire a reputation — so eag- 
erly sought after by many — for being inde- 
pendent, but in chasing this mirage, he quite 
often does so at the expense of personal in- 
fluence and popularity, and becomes in the 
end noted for nothing but obstinacy and 
bull-headedness. Independence is not at all 
incompatible with tact, and a combination of 
both is most likely to insure success. If one 



honestly differs from those about him, it is 
not at all necessary for the maintenance of 
his independence that he should seek to in- 
force his views in an arbitrary or offensive 
manner. A little shrewd management will 
often do more to give weight to an opinion 
and make it acceptable than hours of arrogant 
argument. 



Since the Orient last went to press our 
'89 friends have partaken of a turkey supper. 
Members of the press were rigorously ex- 
cluded and hence the Orient is unable to 
favor its readers with a detailed account of 
the ceremonies which we hear were of a con- 
vivial and enjoyable nature. We hasten, 
however, to acknowledge the serenade which 
was graciously tendered us, and for which 
we return our sincere thanks. It is sweet, 
even to the calloused heart of an editor, to 
know, that, amid the many and varied pleas- 
ures of such a festal occasion, he was not 
altogether forgotten. 



There is always to be found in any stu- 
dent community an element, whose chief en- 
joyment seems to come from a senseless and 
wanton destruction of things about them. 
As an infant is pleased with something that 
it can pick to pieces, so these older infants 
apparently enter with quite as much zest 
into enjoyments (?) about as intellectual, 
and far more expensive. The spirit of de- 
structiveness appears in many forms, but it 
is very seldom that it extends to a person's 
own possessions. It usually satisfies itself 
with demolishing the property of others. 
We believe that the greater part of this de- 
structiveness is due to thoughtlessness and 
lack of ordinary care. It is well to bear in 
mind that the expense of repairing such 
mischief falls directly upon the students 
themselves, so that every time we destroy 
or damage college property, either carelessly, 
or for amusement (?), we are simply adding 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



137 



so much to the term bill of every student. 
With this fact ia view, the wanton destruc- 
tion of college property, at all times repre- 
hensible, becomes both cowardly and mean. 
It may seem, at first thought, unjust to hold 
the mass of the students responsible for the 
braiulessness of a destructive few, but a 
moment's candid reflection will convince 
any one that in no other way can the college 
protect itself. 

It is neither possible, nor in keeping with 
the open methods of dealing between the 
students and college authorities, to maintain 
a system of spies, whose duty it should be 
to fix upon each student the expense of his 
own folly, however just it may be that he 
should pay for it. Such a thing is of course 
not to be thought of, and the college author- 
ities. have been compelled, most unwillingly, 
to adopt the only protection left to them. 
The preservation of college property thus 
becomes directly the interest of every stu- 
dent in college, and it seems as if the gen- 
eral sentiment ought to be strong enough to 
restrain those who have no consideration 
either for themselves or others. Occasional 
accidents will, of course, be unavoidable, 
but any man who would deliberately, by his 
own idiotic and wanton destructiveuess, add 
an extra burden of expense to all his fellow- 
stiidents, — many of whom are working their 
way through college, — is certainly lacking in 
the elements of common decency and man- 
hood. 

Every student ought to feel pride enough 
in his college to desire to see things 
in repair, and manhood enough to assist 
in keeping them so. A tour of the col- 
lege will convince any one that this is 
not always the case. It was only recently 
that the college went to considerable ex- 
pense to repair and fit up the old gymnasium 
for the use of Prof. Lee in his department 
of Zoology, but scarcely was it completed 
before all three doors were smashed down, 



and several valuable locks destroyed — pre- 
sumably to afford a passage between the 
ends — a brilliant and humorous (?) proceed- 
ing, which will cost the students of Bowdoin 
College some $20.00. This thing was quite 
likely due to the thoughtlessness of a single 
man, but it will be readily seen that a few 
such affairs as this, in a small college like 
our own, will soon become a matter, not of 
cents, but of dollars and cents, to every stu- 
dent. The only honorable course for the 
party, or parties, in this aifair, would be to 
go to the treasurer and say : " I am not 
mean enough to desire my fellow-students 
to pay for my mischief, so you may add it 
on to my term bill." This would be the 
only manly course that could be. pursued 
under the circumstances ; but we do not ap- 
prehend that anything of the kind is likely 
to occur. 

We have occasionally seen boys, who. 
were old enough to have arrived at the 
years of discretion, stand out before the 
windows, at their ends, and amuse them- 
selves by throwing tennis or base-balls to 
some companion in the hallway, and appar- 
ently filled with the same exuberant satis- 
faction upon breaking a pane of glass that 
an infant experiences in a new tin rattle ; 
or that animated the fellow who recently 
tore down the drain pipe from Prof. Lee's 
laboratory ; or the one who was instrumental 
in destroying by fire some twentj'' feet of 
hedge, which the college has gone to much 
expense, and been many years in growing. 

It is high time that a manly sentiment 
among the students should have something 
to say on these matters, and that those whose 
participation in them is due — as we trust is 
generally the case — to thoughtlessness, 
should give the subject a little candid con- 
sideration. We sincerely hope for the bene- 
fit, both of the students and the college, to 
soon see a change for the better in this re- 
spect. 



138 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



UPSALA. 

Home of ancient Thor and Odin, 
Scene of Olaf's kingly reign, 
Still thy ruined castles linger 
On the Baltic's rugged main ; 
And the glory of thy annals 
Is in history recalled. 
As 'twas sung in former ages 
By the Sagaman and Scald. 

Here the Mora Stone reposes. 

Chiseled deep with runic lore. 

Where the people crowned their monarchs 

In the ancient days of yore, 

When the bold and hardy Norsemen 

Launched their vessels on the sea, 

And sang o'er flowing wassail bowls. 

The praises of tlie free. 

Naught cared the warrior viking 
For the wild and wintry sea, 
He gloried in the raging waves, 
He hailed the storm with glee ; 
And launching then his vessels, 
Led forth his corsair bands. 
To seize, with fire and pillage, 
The wealth of distant lands. 

Here the great Gustavus Vasa, 

First of an historic line. 

Gave his earnest youth to study, 

Woo'ed the muses most divine ; 

And when he had grown to manhood, 

Sent his edicts far and wide 

That destroyed the wealth of prelates. 

And the papal power defied. 

'Tis from this we date the freedom 

Of the old Norwegian race. 

When the papal propaganda 

No longer had a place 

In the councils of the nation. 

Or the worship of the day. 

And the temporal fiefs of bishops 

Forever passed away. 

Now thou livest, ancient city. 

In the glories passed away ; 

A thousand ivies twine about 

Thy ruined castles gray. 

Whose dungeons, dark and loathsome. 

And covered deep with mold. 

Seem to shudder as they whisper, 

Of the viking davs of old. 



No longer at the draw-bridge, 
Are seen the men-at-arms ; 
No monks bear high the crucifix 
Or chant their dreary psalms. 
Nor longer in the distance,- 
On the meadow or the manse. 
Is seen again the fitful gleam, 
Of buckler or of lance. 

All is peace. The river flowing 

In its channel willow-fringed, 

Hurrying on to meet the Baltic, 

Is no longer crimson tinged. 

And the yeoman plodding homeward, 

From his daily task afar. 

Hums in song the ancient glories. 

Of historic Upsala. 

VENI, VIDI, VICI. 

" Follow, follow, thou Shalt vfin."— Tennyson. 



A DEAMA IN TWO PARTS. 
DRAMATIS PERSON.^;. 

Imealiar, Crown Prince of Mugtown. 
SOMi, a traveler from the East. 
Also two young women, and two churls. 
Scene I. — Aladdin's Palace. 

Imealiar and Somi seated at a table, on ivhich is a bot- 
tle inscribed " Tanglefut.''^ Lights turned low. The 
curtain rises in the midst of their conversation. 

ACT I. 
Ime. I tell thee, Somi, from the day that I 
Did honor to this place by coming here. 
The ladies, young and old, both far and wide 
Have sought my favor, lived upon my smiles. 
I did not win them for they came to me ; 
And as the flowerets ope to greet the sun. 
So, as by nature, oped their hearts to me. 
What cost my fellows days of anxious care, 
And still eluded when they thought it won. 
Came all unasked to bow before my will 
And humbly seek a portion of my love. 
I am your friend. You do not, cannot know 
What 'tis to number me among your friends, 
But even now the hour is drawing near 
When you shall prove my worth and know my 

power. 
An hundred damsels live but in my love ; 
And from those feir and beauteous devotees 
You shall select the noblest and most fair; 
And I will bid her love you; and she shall. 
Think not me sacrificing aught in this — 
I do but bear with them to save their hearts. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



139 



Somi. Oh Imealiar, I worship at your shrine. 
I know myself unworthy of your love ; 
But since you condescend to stoop to me, 
And let your countenance upon me shine, 
I pray you take me forth this very eve, 
And let me see that I may make a choice 
Of those fair slaves who live but in your smiles. 

Ime. I will, oh Somi, and within an hour 
You shall be seated by the brightest one 
Of those most chosen, whom we call "gilt-edged." 
• \^Exeunl. 

Scene II. — Longfellow^ s Path. 

As the curtain rises two couples are seen strolling up 
the walk, while Imealiar and Somi follow at a dis- 
tance. 
Somi. Are those the fair young damsels that we 

seek? 
Ime. Yea ! and two villians have them in their 

power. 
Somi. Shall we not slay the churls and save the 

maids ? 
Ime. Well — hem ! — perhaps they'd ratiier not be 

saved. 
Somi. What ! are they not your chiefest worshipers ? 

Are they not docile to your beck and call? 
Ime. Oh yes, of course, they live but in my love. 
But now, of course, they know not what they do. 
They shall regret the doings of this eve. 
I'll break their hearts, and cast them out for aye. 
I promised that long-legged one that she 
Should travel with me into foreign lands 
When I, my nation's minister, should go 
To repi'esent my country to the Turk. 
1 will forget her! Ah, she shall not go. 
Somi. Oh Imealiar, pray let us leave these dolts — 
I'm not particular ; I'll be content 
To have you take me to your less select — 
I'm modest ; and I do not want the moon, 
So let us seek tvvo others from your throng 
That you may bid them smile on me this eve. 
Ime. Why, yes — of course — O Somi, I could go 
And take you to a hundred pleasant homes. 
Where fathei's would set up the wine for me ; 
And matrons proudly greet their daughter's 

choice. 
But — well — ahem ! — I am too proud to yield! 
I'll wait this ending, cost me what it may. 
Somi. Oh Imealiar, I bow before your will — 
I am but dust and ashes ; thou art lord. 

During this time the couples reach a secluded cottage, 
and as the clock strikes ten the churls depart. Ime- 
aliar and Somi come timidly forth from the pines. 



Ime. I beg your pardons, fair and beauteous dames, 
Thp hour is somewhat late for evening calls — 
But Mahomet, our prophet, was with me 
On private business, and as he has done 
Me many favors in the past, I felt 
That I must entertain him ; so I did. 

Maid No. 1. Indeed! but 'tis as well ; we were en- 
gaged. 

Ime. Yes, so I — well, I mean — well yes — of course ; 
But I have brought a worthy friend with me. 

Maid No. 1. So I perceive. 

Ime. Shall I him introduce? 

Maid No. 1. I guess that I could stand it. Let her 
drive. 

Ime. And your companion, what! where is the maid ? 

Maid No. 1. She's in the cottage. It is very late. 

Ime. I know it, but I want to introduce — 

Maid No. 1 (interrupting impaliefitly). I know it! 
hurry up and bring him on ! 

The introduction being over. Maid No. 1 starts for the 
door. 



No. 1. It is a chilly niglit ! 

Somi (sotto voce). So I perceive. 

Ime. Pray tarry, fair one ! 

Maid No. 1. Yes — some other eve ! 

Ime. You know me for your friend — 

Maid No. 1. Oh yes ! I know ! 

Ime. I would j'our brother be — 

Maid No. 1. Oh, pull the gong ! 

Ime. But hear me, maiden — 

Maid No. 1. Not this eve — Ta — Ta. \_Qoes in. 

Somi. What meaneth her departure, Imealiar? 

Ime. A sudden illness hath come o'er the maid. 
She often has it and she had to go. 

Somi. Shall we not wait until the maid revives? 

Ime. Oh no! her sickness l^teth many hours. 

Som. Shall we not seek a healer of disease ? 

Ime. Oh no ; she only needs a little rest. 

Somi. Shall we then seek another domicile ? 

Ime. No, let us to the palace hie ; I swear 
That I desire no company but you. 
I have grown weary of the smirking maids 
Who crowd upon me wheresoe'er I go 
And seek to win me by their artful wiles 
Despite mj' coldness toward them. I could wish 
That I were less attractive, or that they 
Were less persistent in their strife for me. 
Then let me pass this eve alone with you. 
My cherished friend who doth possess my love. 
And in tlie nectar of the skillful Frank 
Shall we all cares and troubles gayly drown. 
Chestnut bells heard in the distance. [Exeunt. 

THE END. 



140 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A SAFE -GUARD. 
Oh what is that in man, 
That mystic power unknown, 
A power that's not his own, 
Which stands like solid land, 
And battles with the angry sea 
Of doubt? A thing of tyranny. 
Which will not yield till life is o'er. 
A creature wrapt in mystery. 
The more withstood it fights the more. 

How weak does man appear ! 

A bark on billows tossed. 

Which drifts with guidance lost, 

A bird o'ercome by fear. 

Which wildly fans surrounding night. 

Till o'er its path a ray of light 

From heaven shines, and dawns the day. 

While just below there meets its sight. 

The greedy billows balked of prey. 

It longs to be at rest > 

But not a crag it spies,' 

Above the billows rise, 

Upon the ocean's breast ; 

While all at once some unknown tire, 

With new-born strength its limbs inspire. 

And now again is fear unknown. 

Once more its strong wings scorn to tire. 

And bear it to its crag-girt home. 

Thus men, in doubt and sin. 

Who grope through darkest gloom. 

Unconscious of the doom 

So near, some unseen strength within 

Will check ; and thinking whence they came 

(Far more for honor than for name) , 

They rise and spurning all things low, 

At length that steadfast summit gain. 

Which breasts, unmoved, the waves below. 



Y. M. C. A. CONVENTION. 

The twentieth annual convention of the 
Y. M. C. A. of Maine was held at Portland, 
October 28-31. In spite of the exceedingly 
bad weather, the whole convention was one 
of great interest. The Bowdoiu Association 
sent the following delegates: Sewall and 
Goodwin, '87 ; Marston and Card, '88 ; Her- 
sey, Jackson, F. C. Russell, Stearns, H. Mer- 
rill Mitchell, '89 ; Mitchell, '90. In the mak- 



ing up of the various committees Sewall was 
placed on the business, and Hersey on the 
resolution committee. 

Friday forenoon was the time given to 
special reports. Sewall, President of the 
Bowdoin Y. M. C. A., made the report for 
our association, an abstract of which we give 
below. The past year has been the most 
encouraging in the increased working force, 
and the consequent increased interest, that 
the association has ever known. Our attend- 
ance has steadily increased. One great aid 
in our work has been the Workers' Bible 
Training Class, under the leadership of Pres- 
ident Hyde. During the past year we have 
made an effort to establish a closer relation 
between the church and association, and 
some members have renewed their church 
relation here, while others have joined by 
profession. We begun the work this year by 
giving a reception to the incoming class. 
This, although an experiment with us, proved 
a success. The present membership is sixty- 
four; nineteen are active, forty-five associate 
members. Reports from Bates and Colby 
were especially encouraging. 

Saturday forenoon an hour was given to 
the consideration of college work. Bever- 
age, of Colby, spoke of influences adverse 
to the work in his college ; among these the 
inconsistencies of active members, such as 
card-playing, cribbing, and hazing. He also 
considered base-ball, as often carried on, 
detrimental to association work. In spite of 
these influences the Colby Association was 
doing good work. Sewall, of Bowdoin, spoke 
of the sentiment in the oollege adverse 
to the association, and of means to counter- 
act it. Pendleton, of Bates, spoke of some 
of the helps in the work, as Bible classes, 
receptions to the Freshmen, class prayer- 
meetings, etc. 

Rev. T. F. Bailey, of State Street Church, 
said there was no place in which it was so 
hard to live a Christian life as a college. He 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



141 



found the army an easier place to be a 
Christian. The address, Saturday evening, 
to young men, by Pi-of. Chapman, of tliis 
college, was eloquent and intensely interest- 
ing. We wish we had time and space to 
give a full report of the other interesting 
features of the convention, but lack of both 
forbids. 



MY QUEEN. 
Let poets sing of beauty, 
Red lips, and laughing eyes; 
And fairy forms whose queenly grace, 
Description quite defies ; 
Of the mazes of the ball-room. 
And the music of guitars, 
And the graces of the maidens 
Who have opulent papas. 

I care not what the poets do, 
My rural muse, I ween, 
Shall tell the simple virtues 
Of another kind of queen, 
Who dwells amid the quiet 
Of a little farra-house gray 
Whence Puritan simplicity 
Has never passed away. 

My queen has nature's beauty. 
And a heritage of health. 
To me of far more value, 
Than any papa's wealth ; 
She may not be " accomplished," 
But she has an honest heart 
Unskilled in all the coquetry 
Of diplomatic art. 

Then chant the graces of your queen, 

Her elegance and wealth. 

And I will sing the praise of mine. 

Her innocence and health. 

And let us drink long life to both, 

In sparkling claret's foam ; 

Your queen may make society. 

My queen will make a home. 

OLD BOATING DAYS. 

It is about this season of the year that 
the veteran oarsman delights 'to give the 
Freshman crew several unabridged volumes 
of parental advice. The V. O. feels a pe- 



culiar pleasure in doing this, since it serves 
both to keep him in mind of the fact that he 
is an oarsmen, and to impress the Freshmen 
with the idea that he was an oarsman, and a 
very great oarsman, in those ancient and soul- 
stirring aquatic days, when he and similar 
Titans engaged in mighty races. 

The Freshman learns that in those good 
old- days, the oarsmen were accustomed to 
get up in the morning at four o'clock, and 
row around the island twice before breakfast. 
Then they went to the Tontine — the oars- 
men boarded at the Tontine in those days — 
where each one devoured a chicken and nine 
boiled eggs. This was the regulation amount 
laid down with Spartan inflexibility in the 
rules of training, and no oarsman, however 
hungry he might be, was permitted to eat 
more. After breakfast they ran around the 
campus five times, washed down under the 
pump, and were ready for study. At dinner, 
by the advice of Prof. Lee, they ate heartily 
of a sinew-]3roducing broth, made out of 
stewed cats, which the students of the med- 
ical department kindly furnished, neatly 
dressed and ready for cooking. After dinner 
they played leap-frog until recitation time — 
this was to develop the leg muscles and give 
elasticity to the diaphragm. Having taken 
a flunk * in recitation, the oarsmen adjourned 
to the river and made four trips around the 
island on time. This was to develop wind, 
and accounts for the large amount of it which 
many of them still have on hand. Leaving 
the river, the oarsmen partook of a supper, 
also prescribed by Prof. Lee, consisting of 
fried snails and fricasseed grasshoppers. 
After this they were conducted, under a 
strong guard, to the post-office, thence they 
were escorted to their rooms, where they 
were rubbed down \\\ bear's grease and put 
to bed. 

The gymnasium was not much of an af- 
fair in those days. Its only apparatus con- 

* A synonym (or dead, used in those days. 



142 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



sisted of a broken Indian club, which the 
oarsmen took turns in swinging, and two 
fifty-six pound weights, made out of a couple 
of guess cakes which some of the boys had 
drawn at a church fair. Late in the fall of 
1885, some of the '88 men captured a pig, 
and after that, half an hour a day on the 
greased pig was added to the prescribed 
course of training. The gymnasium advan- 
tages were certainly nothing to boast of, but 
the oarsmen made up for this in hard work. 
Ah, how they worked in those days ! Only 
the strongest and toughest men were able to 
live through the training ; the rest died. 
The result was that there were no corpses 
in the race. Such prodigious muscular de- 
velopment will probably never be seen here 
again. In those days a man was obliged to 
train off a hundred pounds of flesh before he 
was eligible, under the rules of the Boating 
Association, to row in even a scrub race. 
The interest in boating was then intense. 
The young ladies of Brunswick were accus- 
tomed to present the victorious crew with an 
elegantly painted and embroidered banner of 
their own manufacture, and the pastors of 
the various churches were wont to back 
their favorite crews to the extent of half a 
year's salary. Upon regatta day, the whole 
population, old, young, and middle aged, 
flocked to the river banks to witness the 
races. The wildest enthusiasm prevailed. 
Pools sold rapidly and vast sums of money 
changed hands. Hundreds of bouquets were 
showered upon the victorious crew as they 
came upon the float. The night after the 
races the leading citizens of the town always 
tendered the competing crews a banquet in 
the town hall. After the repast speeches 
were made by the commodore, first selectman, 
Mr. A. G. Tenney, Bill Condon (from the 
Faculty), William Seco, and other prominent 
citizens. The exercises always closed with 
a song, a drunk or a fight, and quite fre- 
quently with all three. Boating meant some- 



thing in those days. Many of the fellows 
gave fifty dollars apiece in its support, and a 
student who didn't plank down fifteen was 
considered pretty small pumpkins and was 
not received in the best society. But those 
good old days are gone, and we will never 
see the like of them again, and the V. O. 
wipes the mournful tears from his eyes, and 
walks sadly away, leaving the Freshman to 
bewail the cruel fate that has cast his lot 
amid a generation of weaklings. 



THE COLLEGE LADIES' MAN. 
Upon the campus caring not 

For personal attire, 
Since no co-ed is tiiere to view 

His negligence most dire; 
His laclv of collai- hidden 'neath 

A Norfolk buttoned high, 
Which both conceals a cloudy shirt, 

And also missing tie. 
With soiled linen, rumpled cuffs. 

And somewhat seedy clothes. 
The college masher bacli and forth 

To recitation goes. 

But in the evening straight he hies, 

And dresses up with care ; 
He changes all his linen. 

And puts oil on his hair; 
He lugs a shiny beaver. 

And a highly colored tie ; 
He blacks his boots with extra shine. 

And sports a collar high. 
Then drawing on some tony kids, 

Goes forth to call on Fan. 
Such, such are the gyrations. 

Of a college ladies' man. 



DUPED. 

He was a Freshman, and had won the 
fickle affections of the betrothed of a certain 
Sophomore. She had not told her Freshman 
admirer of this, and as yet he was in blissful 
ignorance of the fact that a rival loomed up 
in the portentious form of a Sophomore. 
Knowing this, the wily son of '89 had made 
the most of it. He took the Freshman to a 
free show in Topsham; introduced him to 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



143 



twenty-seven and a half (the other half was 
Ethiopian) French girls; treated him to an 
"imported" two for straight, and succeeded 
by these and other allurements in entirely 
winning the '90 man's confidence, and a 
night or two after an Obient reporter over- 
heard the following conversation : 

"I trust Simon, old chum (the Sophomore 
was speaking) that you haven't been fool 
enough to get mashed on Jane Duffy." 

" Why not, Ira ? " 

" Great Moses ! is it possible that you 
haven't heard? " 

" Heard what ? " 

" That she was (in a tragic whisper) a 
posthumous child ! " 

There was a hollow groan, and the Fresh- 
man's voice was tremulous with anguish as he 
murmured, " Hold me, Ira, I feel faint, but 
tell me, old friend, was it her fault ! " 

" No." 

" Did she do all in her power to re- 
form ? " 

"Yes." 

" Bless you, old chum, bless you. You 
have lifted a millstone from off my neck. 
Do you know I am engaged to that girl " 

" Indeed ! so was I." 

" And you cast her off on that account?" 

" No, worse than that." 

" What ? " 

" Her father." 

" What of him ? " 

" Hung." 

"What for?" 

" Stole a sheep." 

" Where ? " 

"In Topsham." 

" They ought not to have hung him for 
that." 

" Well, you see it was the only sheep in 
town, and the people have never been able 
to purchase another. It was a sad blow to 
the town, and the mob hung him before Des- 
paux could interfere." 



" Well, that wasn't her fault. She didn't 
steal the sheep." 

"No, of course not, but it sort of cast 
a shadow on the family name. Then her 
sister, " 

"What of her?" 

" Killed her husband." 

" How?" 

" Cut his throat with a razor." 

" He was perhaps cruel to her, and at any 
rate she couldn't have loved him as Jane 
loves me." 

" Yes, she did. They were very devoted. 
They used to sit up till twelve or one 
o'clock every night, and gush and lally-gag 
in a most affectionate manner. But Lord 
bless your heart, she couldn't help it. She 
loved him dearly, and tried to fight against 
the impulse, but it was no use. It was in 
her, and had to come out ; so she killed 
him — gently, tenderly, neatly killed him, — 
as dead as a door nail." 

There was a moment's painful silence 
and then the Freshman spoke in a subdued 
and husky whisper. 

" Ira." 

" Yes, Chummy." 

"How am I to get out of it?" 

" Out of what ? " 

" That engagement." 

"Well, the only way I see, old boy, is 
for you to stay on the campus pretty closely 
for the next month, and let me carry her a 
brass watch (since McCurdy's visit, there are 
a number of prominent citizens who will 
furnish you one dog cheap), and a lock of 
your hair, and tell her that you are dead, and 
that her name was the last word you uttered 
ere you soared away into the land of cherubs." 

" Bless you, dear Ira, bless you." And 
then they walked away arm in arm. 

A few evenings after, as the reporter 

was sauntering down Back Street to 

ahem ! enjoy his cigar, he met the fair Jane 
Duffy leaning on the arm of that Sophomore, 



144 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



but the Freshman was nowhere to be seen. 
He was shrewdly acting his part. For weeks 
he never left the campus. He sent down 
for his mail, and stole back and forth to rec- 
itation and the "gym," disguised in green 
goggles and a clean shirt. When at last he 
emerged from his seclusion, he learned, with 
unutterable chagrin, the truth. He had 
been duped. The Duffy family was one of 
the first in town. The pater familias so far 
from being hung, was still hale and hearty, 
and had had the honor of being defeated 
many times as a Democratic candidate for 
first selectman. Jane Duffy was a recog- 
nized belle. She was a better waltzer and 
knew more gossip about college boys than 
any other girl in town. She was now 
firmly engaged to the crafty Ira, and the 
Freshman was socially ostracized. He was 
obliged to go with a Bunganuc girl of ple- 
bian descent, and although he bore it with 
stoical indifference, he privately informed the 
Orient reporter that at the opening of the 
medical school there would be a fresh corpse 
upon the dissecting table. 




A little miss, 
A little kiss, 

And such a happy life; 
A little sing, 
A little ring, 

A charming little wife. 

A little dun, 

A little son 
Are added soon to this; 

And little ills. 

And little bills 
Pursue that little kiss. 

A little work, 
No little shirk 



That marked old college ways ; 

Such little times 

And little rhj'mes 
Succeed our mashing days. 

Prof. Robinson has been troubled lately with 
inflammation in one of his eyes. It has troubled him 
so that he was unable to hear recitations for a num- 
ber of days. 

Chapman, '88, is agent for a laundry in Augusta; 
and Harriman, '89, for one in Lynn, Mass. 

The requirements for the gymnasium are very 
simple. All that is required is that each student 
" provide himself with a flannel shirt or jersey, web- 
bing belt, and a pair of gymnasium slippers." The 
above suit is to be worn at all times, while exercising 
in the gymnasium. No one need complain of the 
expense or elaborateness of the above requirements. 
(N. B. — Is night-shirt the style required?) 

The Senior appointments for this term are as fol- 
lows : Burleigh, Choate, Goodwin (Salutatorian) , 
Little, Means, Merrill, Plummer, and Verrill. 

Tell us not, O mournful student, 

That to write doth tire your head; 

That you " plug " through all the day time. 

And at twilight go to bed. 

The old experienced Orient 
Will no such yarn believe. 
It knows you gush with fairy Nell 
Through many a weary eve. 

Life is real and life is earnest, 
And a " mash " is not its goal. 
For the marriage state is colder 
Than the region round the Pole. 

Or else the other sad extreme 
(It much depends on Nell) 
Makes your domestic climate 
As sultry — who can tell ? 

It will mach better profit you 
To agitate your head, 
Write down the oscillations 
And become — a happy " Ed " ! 

The gymnasium has been illuminated by incan- 
descent electric lights, power being furnished from 
the laboratory. Some of the rooms in the Medical 
building are to be lighted in the same manner. 

Of all the attractions of the new gymnasium, the 
bowling alleys seem to be the best patronized by the 
students. 

A Freshman, who received, one evening, a large 
mount of aqueous fluid, sent his chum after a tumbler 
of water in which he might mix a cheering potion. 
After waiting for some time, the victim made the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



145 



naive remark, that it took his chum longer to get 
that tumbler than it had latel}' taken him to get ten 
pailfuls. 

A Freshmen I'ecently went into a Salvation meet- 
ing, and at its close went up front and called for a 
war whooj}- He got it. 

Question: Would not the college authorities be 
justified in making every student, who would not 
agree to let the attic floors alone, purchase a barrel of 
charcoal ? 

The singles in the tennis tournament have been 
delayed on account of the long rain. 

It is with great pride that the Orient learns that 
the editorial in its last issue, upon the use of (he 
library, is beginning to bear fruit, and that the Fresh- 
men are commencing to seek its advantages. One 
of the assistant librarians recently found upon his 
desk two tally slips, upon which was written : 
"Byron — Lay of the Last Minstrel." "Byron — 
Marmion." 

The firice of chickens has advanced recently. 

A large assortment of jerseys, gymnasium slip- 
pers, trunks, caps, knee pants, stockings, belts, 
sweaters, and olher sporting goods are on exhibition 
and for sale at the room of Mr. J. V. Lane, 7 A. H., 
who is acting as agent for J. W. Brine, the Harvard 
outfitter. 

A new seven-horse-power engine was obtained for 
the laboratory, and put in position in the basement 
about two weeks ago. Its weight is eighteen hundred 
pounds ; its cost, about $250. A new engine lathe has 
also been set up. Beside these improvements a room is 
being partitioned off as a workshop, a forge has been 
put in place, and enough tools will be procured to 
render easy the constructing or repairing of any ne- 
cessary appai-atus. For the above information we 
are indebted to the kindness of Mr. Cothren. 

Among the reading-room papers there has lately 
been a French one, the Courier de Worcester, giving 
the students an opportunity to test their knowledge 
of the French language. 

If the Tennis Association can aftbnl it, would it 
not be worth while to arrange with some Massachu- 
setts college team to play a series of games here with 
our best players ? For our playing, while good, is not 
up to the standard in many details ; and such a series 
of games would do more to better our playing than 
any other single thing. 

There seems to be some fatality attached (o I he 
name of Kimball. Shortly after the mishap of Kim- 
ball, '87, recorded in the last Orient, Kimball, '90, 
went out gunning. While walking along the track. 



his foot slipped, and the gun flew from his hand and 
was discharged by the shock of falling. Unfortun- 
ately the muzzle was pointed toward him, and he 
received in his arm a good portion of the charge of 
shot. A painful but not a serious wound was inflicted. 
Brine, the Harvard outfitter, has been here fitting 
up the boys with gymnasium suits. Brine has sup- 
plied a great many of the boys. 

The bummer smiled exultantly 
As he donned the borrowed clothes. 
And blacked his boots, put on his tie, 
And powdered his ruby nose. 

And straight to the lovely Julia went. 
Determined to make a mash. 
Since Julia's pa possessed, he knew, 
A goodly pile of cash. 

She greeted him with a cordial warmth. 
And a winning smile she wore, 
" 'Pears like," she murmured soft and low. 
'■ I've seen them clothes before." 
Sophomore pea-nut drunk, 3 a.m., October 2.5th. 
" They had half an old turkey, and are rather a bad 
lot anyway." — Mr. Booker. 

The last Junior themes of the terra have for their 
subjects; " Class Elections," and " Do Savage Tribes 
have a Right to the Land which they Possess P " 

Freeman, '89, has gone out teaching for the 
winter. 

Consider.able interest was evinced by the students 
in the state elections of November 2d. On the next 
morning the reading-room was filled with a crowd 
eager for a glimpse at the daily papers. 

" White wings, they never grow weary," was the 
Sophomore pass-word on a recent expedition, for 
sprinkling the Freshmen. 

How doth the little downy Fresh 

Improve each shining hour ? 
He plugs his dry old lexicon 
Witli gloomy visage sour. 

Meantime the more experienced Sojjh 

Enjoys his cards and pipe, 
He learns his Greek from Harper's text, 

His intellect is ripe. 

Photographer Reed has presented to the college a 
fine picture of the victorious 'Varsity which pulled 
at Lake George. It is in a large-sized frame, and 
has photographs of the crew in three positions — one 
" laying to," one ready to start, and one with the 
shell above their heads. 

In the Episcopal benefit concert Mrs. Prof. Lee 
and Mrs. Prof. Pease both took prominent parts. 

The college orchestra, as organizd at present, is 
made up as follows : First violin and leader, E. B. 



146 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Burpee; second violin, E. B. Torrey; double bass, 
P. C. Brooks; clarionet, O. B. Humphrey; first cor- 
net, S. G. Stacey ; second cornet, F. M. Gates, trom- 
bone, A. W. Preston. 

The lectures have been advertised for November 
20th, December 4th, and a concert December 11th, in 
Memorial Hall. 

The hours for class work in the gymnasium are as 
follovirs : Seniors, 4.15-4.45; Juniors, 4.45-5.15; 
Sophomores, 3.45-4.15; Freshmen, 5.15-5.45; on 
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday. Attend- 
ance v^ill be required. The gym will be open every 
day from 2.30 to 6.00 p.m. 

The Railroader ofi'ers $175 in prizes for the three 
best railroad stories, competition to be closed Janu- 
ary 1, 1887. First prize, $100; second prize, $50; 
third prize, $25. The leading chardcters must be 
railroad men, and the scenes and incidents must 
relate to railroading. Details of the competition 
will be given on inquiry. Here is a chance for all 
those aspiring to literary fame. 

Psychological elucidation — "Suppose for major 
premise we say, Man is mortal, and then say, John 
is a man (general laughter and compliments), there- 
fore John is mortal, we have a legitimate conclusion. 
But if we say, John is an angel — " (all further re- 
marks are drowned in the general convulsions — one 
faints, and others go into hysterics) . 




'45. — Rev. J. K. Mason, 
D.D., has resigned his pas- 
torate at Fryeburg, Me. He has re- 
ceived a call to go to Herndon, Va. 
'61.— Hon. J. C. A. Wingate, United 
States consul at Foo Cliow, China, is visit- 
ing his classmate, Gen. Chas. W. Roberts of Bangor. 
'54. — Col. H. Claywood, assistant adjutant-gen- 
eral, U. S. Army, has been ordered to Washington, 
D. C, on duty at the War Department. 

'68. — Mr. George L. Chandler is agent for a mort- 
gate loan company at Rushville, Neb. 

'78. — Mr. Frank S. Corey of Portland was mar- 
ried, October 14th, at Calais, to Miss Mary D. King 
of that place. 



'79. — Dr. G. W. Bourne of Kennebunk, Me., was 
married on October 28th to Miss Susie L. Maling of 
the same place. Dr. Bourne is meeting with excel- 
lent success in his profession, though he has been at 
Kennebunk but a short time in the capacity of a phy- 
sician. 

'81. — Rev. C. H. Cutler of Andover Theological 
Seminary has accepted a call to preach at the First 
Congregational Church, Bangor, Me. 

'82. — Mr. C. H. Gilman was married, September 
8th to Miss Mary Louise Smith, Augusta, Me. He is 
in the real estate business at Minneapolis. 

'82. — Dr. George H. Pierce of New Haven, Conn., 
was married to Miss Betty R. Keeler of Danbury, 
Conn., October 20th. 

'83. — Dr. E. A. Packard has recently opened an 
ofiice in Lewiston, Me. 

'83.— Mr. Charles S. Woodbury of Ferry Village, 
Cape Elizabeth, died October 28Lh. For the past 
three years he has been studying law at Portland. 
He was admitted to the bar this year. 

'85. — Freeman and Thomas are studying law at 
the Boston University Law School. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



=.s 



Hall of Thbta Delta Chi, 
Brunswick, Me., Oct, 29th, 188 

Whereas, The All-Beneficent Father has seen fit 
to take to himself our dearly-beloved brother, Charles 
Simeon Woodbury, of the class of 1883 ; and 

Whereas, The genial and warm-hearted fellow- 
ship which characterized him in all his relations 
with the Fraternity, cause it to be eminently fitting 
that we should pay our best tribute of respect to his 
memory ; therefore 

Resolved, That, while humbly submitting to the 
decree of Almighty God, we deeply regret that in 
His wisdom it has seemed necessary to remove our 
brother from us ; 

Resolved, That in the death of Bro. Woodbury the 
Fraternity has sustained a loss which his love and 
devotion to it render doubly hard to bear, and that 
we mourn that loss as one of a true brother, friend, 
and companion. 

Resolved, That copies of these resolutions be sent 
to the family of the deceased, to the Grand Lodge 
and several Charges of this Fraternity, and to the 
press. 

M. L. Kimball, '87, 
D. M. Cole, '88, 
F. H. Hill, '89, 

In behalf of the Eta Charge of the Theta Delta 
Chi Fraternity. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



147 




Yale. — The Medical School opened, October 7th, 
with an address by President Dvvight. — The second 
practice foot-ball game with Wesleyan resulted, 
Yale, 48 ; Wesleyan, 0.— Dann, '88, S. S. S., has been 
elected captain of the Yale Champion Base-Ball Nine. 

Cornell. — The dormitory system is called for at 
Cornell. — The most successful field-day for years 
was held October 9th. — A shell race, between the 
Freshmen and Sophomores, will soon occur. — Cornell 
is now a member of the Tennis League. 

Brown. — The Faculty have had the rooms of the 
students entered, and all horns talien away. — A 
meeting to revive boating interest is soon to be held. 
— Brown participated in the recent Intercollegiate 
Tennis Tournament. 

ALLEN'S PHARMACY, 

LEMONT BLOCK, 

Main Street, - - Brunswick, Me. 

WEAE ONE OF 

MERRY'S 

CELEBRATED HATS. 

Always the Correct Style. 

237 MIDDLE STREET, 

PORTLAND. 



h. v. stackpole, 
Fine Boots and Shoes, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 

Dentist, 



STOBEB BLOCK, - 



BEUNSWICK, MAINE. 



F. W. BAEEON, 

Dealer ii Staniari ani FaBcy Groceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in .all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce. 
Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 

FRANK A. HALE, Proprietor, 
DeWITT HOUSE, TONTINE HOTEL, 

Lewiston, Me. ' Brunswick, Me. 

Private Suppers and Banquets a specialty. 

F. A. FAER, Manager. 

W. B. SPEAR. J, A. WHITMORE. 

SPEAR & WHITMORE, 



DEALERS IN 



ALL KINDS OF COAL, 

Cedar Street, Brunswick, Me. 

ce. Opposite Post-Ollice, Main Sti-eet. 
Communication witb Coal Yard. 

F. L. DUNNE, 

Impori^ing ^Tailor, 

338 Washington Street, 
BosToisr. 

A VERY LARGE LINE OF GOODS 

Specially selected for students' wear. 

ALL THE LATEST LONDON AND PARIS NOVELTIES 

Regularly imported. 

Tailor to the Harvard Co-operative Society. 

Our representative will visit Brunswick next spring to 
take orders. 

338 WASHINGTON STREET, 

BmsTmN. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



R ICHMOND ! 



SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL 



■cigarette 

\ Smolters who 
I are willingeto 
paya little more 
for Cigarettes 
' than the price 
charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes, will 
lind the RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO AXili OTHERS. 
rhey are made from the torlglitest, most 
deUcately flavored, and highest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are ahso- 
Imtely without adulteration or drugs. 



STRAIGHT CUT 



No. 
-I- 



We use the Genuine French Rice Paper 

of our omi direct importation, which is made 
especiallv for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand-RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old aiid 
orif?lnal brand, and to obse rve that each pack- 

age or box of ■ ^^~^^~'^^^^^^^ 

Ricbinoiid 
Straight Cut 
Cigrarettes 

bears the ' 
signature of ' 



n iGARETTES 

ALLEN &CINTER 



MANUFAOTUKERB , 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Kings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 

Wiitches, Clocks, and Jewelry, Promptly Repaired and Warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN .iND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

njaine Gentral R. 1^. 

On and after Oct. 25th, 1886, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.15, 11.25 A.M., 3.3S, 4.40 and 6.25 p.m., and on Sunday 

mornings at 13.42. 
For Rockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.38 P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.35 r..M., and 

every night, including Sundays, at 12.35. 
For Lewiston, 8.15 A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. (mixed), and 2.45 p.m. 
For Augusta, 8.20 A.M., 2.40 and 6.35 p.m., and 12.45 every night. 
For Waterville and Bangor, 8.20 A.M., 2.40 p.m., and 12.45 night, 

and for Waterville, Saturdays only at 6.35 P.M. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 p.m., and 12.45 (night). 
For Bangor and Piscataquis E. R., 8.20 A.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Ellsworth, Bar Harbor, Vanceboro, St. Stephen, Houlton, 

and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 13.45 (night). 

Note. — The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
Bton, and Bangor, run every night, including Sunday, but do not 
connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, or for Belfast and 
Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sunday morning. 

PAYSON TDCKEE, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BooTHBY, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 21, 1886. 



The Latest and becoming very popular. 

Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 

The following are our well known 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Caporal, Sweet Capokal, St. James 1-2, Caporal 1-2, 

St. James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES, 
Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and Fi-ench Rice Paper, are rolled by the high- 
est class of skilled labor, and warranteti free from flavoring or 
impin*ities 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a fac-sijiile of Kinney Bros. 
Signature. 

KINNEr TOBACCO CO. 



JORDAN SNOW, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

DuNLAP Block, Brunswick, Me, 



(INTERGEPTED LETTER.) 



Brunswick, May 14, 1886. 
Owen, Moore & Co., Portland. 
Gentlemen : 
Please send me by mall one jjair long Bicycle Stockings, 
size 9i, regulation League Color. Enclosed one dollar and 
stamps for postage. I see by advertisement in Portland 
paper that you carry a line o£ Tennis Goods. Please send 
me a price-list of Rackets and Balls, with best discount to 
a regular club. AVhat are the prices on Jersey Coats, 
aud in what color do they come ? 

Yours truly, 
P. O. Box 2002. BOB BROWN. 



Confectionery, Fruit, and Cigar Store, 



MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



Wm. R. FIELD, 



Manager. 



W. HAWTHORNE, 

FINE * TAILORING, 

2 Church Block, Bath. 



, .s on file in Ffailadelphia 

I at the Newspaper Adver- 
a ^^^ . tiBin^ Agency of Messrs. 

N> W. AVER &, SON, our authorized agents. 



THIS paper; 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



OOLLEaE BOOKSTOHE. 

We have constantly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 



The best place in town to buy your 

LINEN COLLARS and CUFFS, TIES, SCARFS, GLOVES, 

Hats, Caps, Canes, Ect., is at 

PLUMMER'S, O'Brien Block. 

Correct Styles, and Best Quality, at Bottom Prices. 

A. F. NICHOLS, 

Merchant Tailor 

BRUWS'WICK, ME. 
Have your Fall and Winter Suit Made at Nichols. 

A Choice Line of Styles to Select From, 

OVERCOATS in Great Variety. 
PINE GOODS. LOW PRICES. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Call and Examine. 

A. F. NICHOLS, - Odd Fellovi^s Block. 

full Dress Suits, and Dress Frocks a Specialty. 



ADAMS & UNIACKE 

HAVE A FULL LINE OF STOVES 

Also, all kinds of Lamps, 

And most everything found in a Stove and Crockery Store. 

MAIU STREET, BRUNSWICK. 

VISIT G. E. CHANDLER, 

DEALER IN 

OYSTERS 'and ICE-CREAM, 

Main Street, Brunswick, Maine. 

F. H. WILSON, 

DISPENSER OF 

Pure Drugs, Medicines, and CJiemicals. 

Imported and Domestic Cigars. 
MAIN STREET, - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 



■ TiaiE 



♦ TRAVELERS ^ 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD, CONN., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCT $1 1,000,000, and is now paying them $4,000 a daij. Issues 

A r^r^TTiTTATT' T*OT Tr^TT7Q indemnifying the Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
-^^-^'-^J-A-'-'-Ji^ X 1. V^JUAV^XriiO Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidentallnjary, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only 15.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each $1,000, with $5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 1864 have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. 

Issues T TTi^T? "POT T(^TT7^ °^ every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, - $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Office at Hartford. 
JAS. G. BATTERSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



QOCIETY' ^ie-s cuxdL ^Icutes, Cuts cLTtd, ^jxsigixtcL. 
'Writiixg Fctper' curtcL Cctrds JEixgrcLv^ecL ctixd JPrtnted.. 
StuLd^e-Tht' s 'Vzstttjxg CcltcLs. InvttajttorLS of everg T^vncl 
ej^ecTztecl hg the ertgrctviThg hozzse of 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 

Societg TixvitcLtioThs , 9Jies, otlcL lllTLstTCLtions for Yecur- 
^ool^s, M^oixograms , j^nns, cured. Crests JErcgrajvecL CLrtd. 
Printed. 'VtstttjxQ CctrcLs, ctrtcL the Choicest StdtioThery . Seals, 
Tapers and. Sealing Wa^c, and Sealing Sets. 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



Ho 







^CID PHOSPIIi^TE. 

[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

The Unrivalled Remedy for Dyspepsia, Jlental and Pliysical Exhaustion, Nervousness, Wakefulness, 

Diininislied Vitality, etc. 

As Food for an Exhausted Brain, in Liver and Kidney Troul)le, In Seasickness and Sick Headaclie, In Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion and Consti^Mtion, in Inebriety, Desjiondency and cases of Impaired Nerve Function, 

It has become a necessity in a large number of households throughout the world, 

And is universally prescribed and recommended by physicians of all schools. 
Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 
It is the best tonic known, furnishin^^Bustenance to both brain and body. 
It is unsurpassed as a substitute for lemons or limes, and 

IT MAKES A DELICIOUS DRINK "WITH WATER AND SUGAR ONLY. 

Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

RUMPORD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, R. I. 
^S-BEWARE OF IMITATIGNS.-ffiSf 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A.. O. REED, 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunsurick and Topsham 
Views ; also College Vie\rs. 



Go to V^, B. VCToodard's 

To buy your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, and COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doing. 
s^ecx-^Xj ^^.A.T3ss to stttxieitt cl-u-bs. 
Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 




OTTAWA 



[Cushing's Island 
Portland, Me. 

C3-ibso:n-- 



Bowdoin College Medical Department. 

The Sixty-Seventh Annual Course of Lectures at the 
Medical School of Maine, will commence February 3d, 
1887, and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Rev. Wm. DeWitt Hyde, President: Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol, 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M. , 
Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. GffiRRiSH, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Franklin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemistry; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henrv H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion. G. Young, Public Hygiene ; 
Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonstrator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
BruDSWick, Maine 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 

NEW TYPE, 

NEW BOBDEKS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

We make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges, 

such as 

PBOGBAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDBESSES, 

SEBMONS, &o. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



164 High St 



'" Jobber^®- 



g?^y^DDLE--STiI 



'PQRTLANDI 



p7^E3 



"We would be pleased to show you our line of English 
Specialties secured for our 

TAILORING DEPARTMENT. 



HIGH GLASS WORK GAN BE DEPENDED UPON. 



FASHIONABLE MADE UP CLOTHING, 

Of our own make, can always be found at our establishment. 

Shirts to Measure, Hosiery, G-loves, Underwear, Neck Dressings, 
and General Outfittings in our Furnishing Department. 



Donnel Building, Corner Pearl and Middle Streets, PORTLAND, ME., 

WOULD liESPBCTFULLY CALL THE ATTENTION OF 

Bujieis o[ FiimltDre, Camels, Eeii, Fatlor Stoves, fianges, &i!., 

To the Enormous Stock of House Furni.sbings at the Portland Store. Being 'Manufacturers, 

intending purchasers can see the styles and select their own coverings for Parlor Furniture, and have it made 

to order for the same price. We keep enormous quantities of (Jpholstery Goods in the Boston Store, 

and full lines of samples. Here our prices on Parlor Suites range from |;35.00 in Hair Clolh 

to .^375.00 in Silk or Mohair Plushes. 



CHAMBER FURNITURE. 

We have in stock in our three stores 87 different jjat- 
terns of Chamber Suites, manufactured from all the pop- 
ular woods, viz.: Pine, Ash, Walnut, Cherry, Basswood, 
and Mahogany, ranging in price from $18.00 to $400.00. 
We also have all kinds, sizes, and quantities of Bedsteads, 
Bureaus, Commodes, etc. Spring Beds, Cot Beds, Lounge 
Beds, Sofa Beds, Mantel Beds, etc. Mattresses of every 
kind and quality, from an excelsior at .$2.00 to a pure 
bleached South American curled horse hair at |)25.00. 

CARPET DEPARTMENT. 

$75,000 worth of Cottons, Cotton and Wools, All-Wool 
Extras, Tapestry, Brussels, Body Brussels, Velvets, Wil- 
tons, etc., at our usual Rock-Bottom Prices. Any of these 
can be selected at the Portland store. SHADES and 



DRAPERY of every description made to order in the 
Boston store. Orders taken here and designs and samples 
shown. 

PARLOR STOVES. 

Special attention is requested to our Parlor Stove De- 
partment, as we believe we have the best line to select 
from in Maine. Prices $4.00 to $40.00. 

STOVES AND RANGES. 

Our line of Ranges comprises all the latest and best in 
the market, including the "New Tariff " and " Quaker," 
which are considered superior to anything yet produced. 
Write for cuts of these two Ranges. Prices $15.00, $20.00, 
$22.50, $25.00, $27.50, $29.00, $33.00, $35.00, $38.00, and up- 
wards to $65.00. These prices include all the ware, pipe, 
and zinc. 



Any of the above goods sold for Cash or on our Special Contract System, at 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Streets, Portland, Me. 

Branch of the Great Nassau Hall House Furnishing Store, S27 Washington Street, Boston. 

B. A. ATKINSON & CO. 



ISAAC C. ATKINSON, Manager. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 



Df PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 



ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 
LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENEEAVED IN THE MOST PASHIdNABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 

ROGERS' CELEBRATED GROUPS. 



Messrs. WILLIAM S. KIMBALL & CO., 




Take pleasure in announcing that 
they are prepared to sup- 
ply without delay 

COLLEGE FRATERNITIES 

WITH THEIR 



Satin SttaisHt But Gisarettes. 

Packed in Fraternity Colors. 

Also Class and College Colors. 

Name of Society can be inserted on label if desired. 



14 First Prize Medals. 



ROCHESTER, IM. Y. 



COBURN CLASSICAL INSTITUTE, 

WATERVILLE, ME. Both Se.xes. Four Courses of Study : 
Introductoiy ; ColleEce Preparatory, 3 years ; English and 
Scientific, 3 ye.irs ; Ladies' Collegiate, 4 years. Location healthy, 
expenses moderate, discipline wholesome, morals good. Persons 
using alcoholic beverages or tobacco need not apply. Accommoda- 
tions ample and excellent. For further information send for 
Catalogue to J. H. HANSON, Principal. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

474 Congress St., - - - opp. Preble House. 

THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

]\[0. 5 ©DD EEIiIi0W^' BMCK, 

Is the place to buy 
Telephone Exchange connected with the store. 

A. W. TOWNSEND, Prop'r. 



The New Styles in 

STII^I^ and. SOI^T H^^TS 

In all colors, are now ready. An elegant line of New York 

Neckwear in New Shapes aud Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in. all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, 

^A.T ELLIOTT'S, s- 

OPPOSITE MASON STREET. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEK, 

And Dealer la Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi 
cal merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 

C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



t-iivie: is wlonett. 

And we sell time for Little Money. Buy your Watches, 
Clocks, and Jewelky cheap for cash of 

. -{-DAVIS, JEWELER. -^ 

A FINE LINE OF SILVEB GOODS AT BOTTOM PRICES 

Next Dool' to American Express Office, Brunswick, Me. 

Our $1.00 Spectacles defy competition. Repairing promptly 

done by F. E. Davenport. 

C. H. POWERS' 

Hair -Dressing Rooms, 

LEMONT BLOCK, 
Main Street, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

GRIMMER'S ORCHESTRA 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland, Me. 

CHAS. E. BURGESS, 



The Largest Assortment of 



MASXTFACTURER OF 



Sollege fratenjitij ladges. 



Our Productions are of Merit, and Commend Themselves. 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 



No. 12 Plain Street, ALBANY, N. Y. 



Gents^ Fine Shoes 

Is to be found at 

JACKSON'S. 



LAWN- TENNIS, BASE -BALL, AND LOW SHOES, 

In Large Variety. 

S. R. JACKSON, 2(1, 2 Odd Fellows Block, Brunswick. 

DKOP IN AND INSPECT. 



j. m. lombard, 
Dentist, 

OVER BOAEDMAWS STORE, MAIN STREET. 

Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

SPECIAL RATES MADE TO CLCBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

1 nil "KOrKltilOK of the Nearest Corner Grocery will 
endeavor to merit a 

CONTINUANCE 



Of the Students' patronage. Come and prove him. 



BOYNTON, THE JEWELER, 

No. 547 Congress St., Portland. 

Do not pay the large profits which jewelers have always 
charged. Orders by mail receive prompt attention. 

SATISFACTION GUAKANTEED. 

^inn A U/EEIf Ladies or gentlemen desiring pleasant 
4)IUU n IlLLlVi profitable employment write at once. 
We want vou lo liandle an article of domestic use that recoup 
mends itself to every one at sight. STAPLE AS FLOUK. 
Sells like hot cakes. Profits 300 percent. Families wishing to 
practice economy should for their own benefit write for par- 
ticulars. Used every day the year round in every household. 
Price within reach of all. Circulars free. Agents receive 
SAMPLE FREE. Address, 

DOMESTIC MFG. CO., Marion, Ohio. 



TONTINE LAUNDRY, 



Brunswick, Me 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar, — Allen and G-reenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Caesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero, — Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
iEneid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xeuophou, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry, — first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra, — so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wisli to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regular ExAMiNATioifs for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Malloivell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryehurg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers of the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— F0D"E HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XVI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 24, 1886. 



No. 10. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE YEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

C. B. Burleigh, '87, Managing Editor. 

L. B. Varney, '87, Business Editor. 
C. C. Choate, '87. " C. H. Verrill, '87. 

M. L. Kimball, '87. H. C. Hill, '88. 

A. W. Merrill, '87. M. P. Smithwiok, '8! 

E. C. Plummer, '87. A. W. Tolman, '88. 



Per annum, in advance. 
Single Copies, 



$2.00. 
15 cents. 

Extra copies cau be obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and fVlumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 



Batered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. XVI., No. 10.— November 24, 1886. 

In My Grate 149 

Editorial Notes, 14!) 

Luther at Wartburg Castle 151 

John Abbott Douglass, 152 

Dubitation, 153 

Reflections, 154 

In the Forest 155 

Hare and Hounds, 155 

CoLLEGii Tabula, 156 

Personal, 158 

In Memoriam, 159 



IN MY GRATE. 

In the bright glow of my grate 
'Mid the firelight's gleaming. 
Oft another world I see. 
In my hours of dreaming. 

But when gone its energies, 
And have ceased its ilashes, 
All my world of fancy lies 
Buried in its ashes. 

Thus the fondest hopes of life 
Shattered oft by fate. 
Lie as cold and lifeless as 
Ashes on the grate. 




The Colby Echo, simultaneously 
with the Orient, expresses a desire to see 
foot-ball more firmly established in the Maine 
colleges. It says : 

"Even this delightful pastime is indulged in 
mostly by Freshmen, while the whole body of students 
hold aloof with indolent indifference. What we want 
is something that will stir every man in college to take 

out-door exercise with zest and spirit All 

who have seen the game as scientifically played 
must acknowledge its beauties, and we think the 
Maine colleges offer a good field for its exercise." 

And adds that " a series of games with Bow- 
doin and Bates would do much to relieve the 
monotony of the fall term." We agree with 
the Echo that " with the present interest in 
the game it would of course" be impractica- 
ble," but we feel assured that if a few inter- 
collegiate contests could be arranged, suffi- 
cient stimulus would be immediately given 
to the game to make it an interesting and 
popular sport. We hope that the agitation 
of this matter may be productive of results, 
and that another fall may see the Maine col- 
leges represented on the field by Rugby 
elevens. 



A few years ago the Orient editors made 
an innovation in the method of selecting 
their successors. It had previously been the 
custom to select the editors exclusivel}' from 
the Junior class, but in this instance three 



150 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



editors were chosen from the Sophomore 
class. The plan proved very successful, and 
has since been followed by succeeding boards. 
There is, however, no rule to this effect, the 
editors reserving from the first the privilege 
of returning at any time to the old system, 
if the work of the Sophomore class was not 
such as to warrant the editors in giving them 
a representation, to the exclusion of an equal 
number of upperclassmen. The editors have 
thus far received very little from the Sopho- 
more class. We feel sure that there are 
many men in '89 who are well qualified to 
represent their class and the college upon the 
Orient, and we earnestly invite them to lose 
no time in handing in samples of their work. 
Articles may be handed in to any of the edit- 
ors, and whether published or not, will be 
placed to the credit of the writers. 

We also desire to call the attention of the 
'88 men to the fact that four more editors are 
to come from their class at the close of this 
volume, and although we are now on our 
last half, only two men in '88, outside of those 
upon the present board, are eligible, by the 
rules of the ORIENT, to a position oa the 
next staff of editors. It is the intention of 
the present board of editors to be perfectly 
square in the election of their successors, and 
we mean just what we say when we state 
that preference will certainly be given to 
those who have shown a disposition to work. 



her traditional ' gameness,' will " not de- 
spair," but will " bob up serenely," and be 
ready to again cross bats with you at the 
opening of another season. 



" We have heai'd that our friend Bowdoin was 
doubtful about puttino; a niue in the field to compete 
for the championship of '87. But we sincerely hope 
that this report will be contradicted, and that Bow- 
doin courage will display itself in a gallant tight for 

the pennant What has been done can be 

done again, and Bowdoin, with her new gymnasium, 
with her instructor in gymnastics and her traditional 
' gameness,' need not despair." — Colby Echo. 

Many thanks for your kind and encourag- 
ing words, friend Echo. We think that we 
can safely assure you that " Bowdoin, with 



The Colby Ucho returns editorial thanks 
to the undergraduates who responded to a 
recent call for contributions. It says : 

" We are pleased, not only that you should lend 
a hand to the Echo in distress, but that you have ex- 
hibited such talent and grace in your productions 
as substantially to realize our confident assertions of 
the literary abilities of Colby's students." 

We congratulate our friend upon its suc- 
cess. The Echo is rapidly becoming a model of 
terse and vigorous journalism. We clip from 
one of its recent issues the following sent- 
ence, which forms the opening paragraph of 
a two-page article. We commend it to the 
thoughtful attention of our readers as an 
excellent illustration of the Echo's "direct, 
simple, and wholly unconventional" compo- 
sition. We trust it may reveal to our readers 
the secret of our contemporary's " charming 
effusions and delightful dissertations " : 

"As, when traversing an unknown path at mid- 
night, a blazing torch illumining our way, and with 
its genial rays dispelling the gloomy shadows, and 
keeping at bay the savage prowlers of the forest, 
wheu suddenly the north wind, laden with chilling 
sleet, drives with impetuous force through the groan- 
ing and swaying boughs, and endeavors to quench 
the flame, and we stand trembling, fearing lest we 
shall be left in darkness, and with anxious eyes we 
watch the spark as it flutters, grows dim, and hangs 
feebly to the wick, so in the Middle Ages the lamp 
of civilization, assailed by blasts of northern super- 
stition and ignorance, driven by the slothfulness 
and corruption which had grown up in the former 
seats of refinement and energy, burned low and 
threatened to leave the world in eternal gloom." 



We hear, with regret, that owing to the 
objections of their Faculty, the students of 
the Maine State College will not be repre- 
sented in the Base-Ball League next season. 
Since they have been in the league, the M. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



151 



S. C.'s have made an excellent record, and 
by their gentlemanly bearing, both on and off 
the diamond, have won many friends. To 
no club in the league was the outlook for 
next season brighter. With two excellent 
batteries, and nearly all of the experienced 
players of last summer, we see no reason 
why our Maine State friends would not stand 
a fine chance for the pennant another season. 
We cannot refrain from the iiope that this 
matter may be satisfactorily arranged with 
the Faculty, and that we shall again have 
the pleasure of meeting the M. S. C. boys on 
the diamond next season. 



"With a previousness quite cliaracteristic of the 
Bowdoin student, the correspondent of the Lewiston 
Journal lately displayed the true journalistic enter- 
prise in informing an ungrateful public that Colby 
and Bates had formed an Intercollegiate Oratorical 
Association." — Colby Echo. 

Again the freshness of our pugnacious young 
brother has led him. into error. The item 
referred to was neither written by a " Bow- 
doin student," nor the " correspondent of the 
Lewiston Journal." It first appeared in the 
Bath Sentinel, a paper ably represented in 
this town by a resident editor, and for which, 
in consequence, no " Bowdoin student " 
writes. We can appreciate your eagerness, 
youthful brother, to find a pretext for taking 
the war-path against Bowdoin. We have 
not the slightest desire to interfere in your 
favorite pastime of playing Indian. We 
must, however, once more admonish you to 
be honest, and not to " weaken " your " self- 
respect " by rushing headlong into print with 
erroneous statements. 



Columbia has been admitted to the Inter- 
collegiate Tennis League. Bowdoin should 
apply for admission. Wesleyan and Trinitj' 
are not only members, but make an excellent 
showing. 



LUTHER AT WARTBURG CASTLE. 
I. 
The great Thuringian forests hide 
Within their shadows deep and wide 

A Castle lone. 
And twice four hundred years have lain 
Their tireless hands of wind and rain 
Upon those walls — but worn in vain 
The massive stone. 



Once Princes held their revels there 
Whose valiant deeds and pageants rare 

Were dear to fame ; 
Now Time has swept them all away, 
But round those turrets old and gray 
We see a sacred glory play 

From one bright name. 



In that dark tower, high up in air, 
Shut in by granite cold and bare 

The Stranger dwelt ; 
With none to understand his pain. 
With none to soothe his troubled brain. 
With none whose presence might sustain 

The woes he felt. 



Those walls have heard his broken cry 
That marked the anguish that would fly 

Across his thought ; 
For Doubt is born in loneliness 
And deepest sinks its dark impress 
When burdened souls by weariness 

Are overwrought. 



But when the hour of strife was o'er 
And Will resumed her sway once more 

He broke the bond. 
Resumed the task that nearest lay, 
Sought out the duties of the day, 
Nor sought to view the hidden way 

That led beyond. 

VI. 

And thus from out those walls of stone 
His words of strength and fire were blown 

To all the earth. 
That mind though tortured and restrained 
Broke from the prison where 'twas chained 
And from its lonely tower proclaimed 

True Freedom's birth. 



152 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



JOHN ABBOTT DOUGLASS. 

Among tlie many brilliant names given by 
our Abna Mater to the world, there are to be 
found those of men eminent in every branch 
of life. In literature we need not do more 
than mention Longfellow, Hawthorne, and 
the two Abbotts ; in law and politics, the 
names of Franklin Pierce, S. S. Prentiss, Pitt 
Fessenden, and William P. Frye are suffi- 
cient heralds of her honor ; in the military 
profession the name of O. O. Howard stands 
among the foremost; in medicine we only 
need take a casual glance at the best physi- 
cians of our State to see from what institu- 
tion the majority of them graduated ; while 
in diplomacy, W. W. Thomas, Jr., has earned 
a sterling fame both for himself and his col- 
lege. 

But bright as is the record of Bowdoin's 
sons in the careers where great names are won, 
it is not in any of these that her work has 
been the greatest, but in the less brilliant, but 
more enduring field of the Christian 
ministr}^ Especially is this noticeable in 
the towns of our own State. Here, Bow- 
doin men have taken up the cross in 
every locality, and by the purity of their 
lives and the best labor of their minds have 
drawn numbers to the religion of Christ. 
But among them all, none have done more for 
the advancement of His cause than John 
Abbott Douglass, of the class of 1814. 

Mr. Douglass was born in the year 1792, 
in Portland, Me., and hence entered college 
at the age of eighteen. Like most of the 
college men at that time, he had already 
determined upon the ministry, and what few 
records remain of his college course, show 
him to have been a careful, earnest, and 
painstaking student. But, as it is his life- 
work which is principally worthy of notice, 
it need merely be said that after passing 
through tlie course of theological instruction 
usual at that period, and -preaching more or 
less at various places, principally in Massa- 



chusetts, he was called in November, 1821, 
to the pastorate of the first Congregational 
church at Waterford, Me., where he was for 
almost fifty-seven years engaged in the work 
of his Master, until his death in August, 
1878, being at that time the oldest settled 
clergyman in the State. 

The influence of a minister of religion in 
a small country village, while it can contain 
few eventful episodes, is not necessarily an 
unimportant one. The influence which Mr. 
Douglass exercised over the minds of the 
several generations who sat under his preach- 
ing at the difl'erent periods of his life, cau 
hard!}' be overestimated. And it was not 
only to the ordinary population of a farming 
community that he preached. Unimportant 
as is the town, it has produced some men of 
reputation in diverse walks of life. In the 
earl}' part of his ministry that popular and 
well-known contributor to the Neiv York 
Ledger, Sylvanus Cobb, Jr., must have often 
sat in his church. Onlya few rods from the 
building is the old Browne homestead, and 
through all the period of his youth, the 
talented son of that family, the lamented 
Charles F. Browne, known to the English 
speaking race by the far-famed sobriquet of 
" Artemus Ward," must have been a frequent 
auditor of his sermons. The family of Cyrus 
Hamlin, '34, ex-president of Middlebury 
College, whose primitive steam-engine, con- 
structed from a description, is to this day the 
wonder of visitors to the Cleveland cabinet, 
were members of his parish, and it was from 
the lips of Mr. Douglass that he must have 
imbibed the first draughts of that gospel 
which he was afterward to bear with such 
success to the land of the Crescent. The 
late ex-Congressman Elbridge Gerry of Port- 
land, was another, who, in his early years, 
must have been benefited b}' the words of this 
earnest Christian. 

In regard to the personal character of Mr. 
Douglass it may be inferred that he was 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



153 



originally a man of high passions, but so well 
had he subdued tlieixi that he well deserved 
the praise of Solomon, "He that is slow to 
anger is better than the mighty, and he that 
ruleth his spirit than he that taketh a city." 
His course of life was like his opinions, steady, 
uniform, and consistent. Somewhat taciturn 
in conversation, he yet had that healthful, 
self-possessed manner which made his opin- 
ions eagerly sought after, and ' caused him 
to be naturally considered a leader of men. 

He was always regarded with respect by 
his people, and in his later days, when his 
tall form was bowed with age, and his silvery 
beard flowed down from his still youthful 
face, resembling in its dignity the paintings 
which the great masters have left us of the 
ancient prophets, this feeling was deepened 
to a reverence, which in the case of the child- 
ren became almost sacred. The writer will 
never forget an occasion when going into the 
venerable pastor's house with the spoil of a 
robbed bird'snest, he received a gentle but 
grand rebuke from " Father Douglass," as his 
people called him. To the childish mind of 
the recipient, the aged clergyman seemed 
almost to represent the Deity whom he 
preached. 

His death, even at the ripe age to which 
he liad been spared, was an occasion of un- 
feigned sorrow to the whole community, and 
his influence can by no means be better 
understood than by the contemplation of the 
heartfelt grief displayed by all at his funeral. 

Mr. Douglass had been for fortj^-seven 
years a member, and for twenty-seven years 
president, of the board of trustees of Bridg- 
ton Academy, then, as now, one of the largest 
fitting schools in the State, in the number of 
pupils sent to Bowdoin, and as if to commem- 
orate his never-failing interest in education, 
his daughter has made from the rebuilt family 
homestead a school for the education of young- 
ladies, which bids fair to become one of the 
most successful institutions of the class in 



New England. By its name, Douglass 
Seminary, the memory of the clergyman will 
be handed down to other generations, but 
after all, his best monument is in the hearts 
of the people for whom his life was spent. 



DUBITATION. 



As one who wanders in a wood 

Where winter's storm has veiled the way, 

And finding not tlie path he should 

Still plods along in hope he may, 

Until, perceiving at his feet 

A chasm, checking progress there. 

He feels his weariness complete, 

And yields an instant to despair : 



Such is the mind, which knowing long 
To suffer ills without complaint. 
To come from disappointments strong, 
To struggle on and never faint, 
When stricken by a greater loss 
(Its very dearest treasm-e gone) : 
It bows beneath the heavy cross 
And for a moment lies forlorn ! 



As heavy shocks, which crush the bone, 
Oft numb the body to its pain, 
Until a movement makes it known. 
And brings]sensations back again : 
The heart of man, when sorrows smite, 
Perceives that woe of deepest tone 
When, in tlie silence of the night, 
He sits and meditates alone. 



Cold moonlight floods the silent room, 
And strangely lights a pictured face, 
Which, in the fullness of its bloom. 
Was one of innocence and grace. 
But as I look upon it now, 
Transfigured in the peaceful ray, 
I see beneath that fair young brow 
A look of something far away. 

V. 

As if her soul were then so near 

To those high realms from which we come. 

That indistinctly she could hear 

Some whispers from her brighter home ; 

That woke a yearning in her mind — 



154 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A wish but vaguely understood, 
To leave these limits so confined, 
And pass beyond the shady wood. 

VI. 

' Why longer make unequal strife ? 
I care not what is lost or won ! 
The better current of my life, 
Which made it sweet, has ceased to run. 
May I not plunge in Pleasure's streams 
And hide those fiincies of the Fast, 
Which once allured me by their gleams : 
Yet were but leaves, and could not last ?" 

vn. 

I cannot yield a conflict o'er 
Which I remember she approved ; 
Nor plunge a darkened spirit lower, 
Which has been by that one beloved. 
How could I hope to meet again 
With her who left me here below. 
When I had grown a slave to pain. 
And stained my soul in Pleasure's flow? 

vni. 
I must not venture from my road! 
I should not question if I may ! 
1 will be patient with my load ; 
Nor let pale Sorrow lead astray ! 
Then, when a little way before 
I pass that dread and misty sea, 
Those deep calm eyes will from the shore 
Be looking out to welcome me. 



REFLECTIONS. 

As the time of the year has now arrived 
when humanity gathers itself, as it were, from 
the domestic confusion into which all well or- 
ganized families are thiown, to a greater or 
less degree by tlie pleasure season, it is a fit- 
ting time for introducing advice which may 
help whatever unfortunates there may be 
around out of their present difficulties, and 
prevent certain others from falling into like 
mistakes. 

That these words may carry with them 
the infltience which is their due, I must here 
remark that I am a graduate of Experience's 
celebrated school and thoroughly qualified to 
speak on these subjects. Such being the 
case I need ask no pardon for addressing you 



personally before we have been regularly 
introduced. Indeed, we are no such strang- 
ers as you may at first suppose. We often 
met at the beach last summer and, though 
3'ou were probably unconscious of my exist, 
ence, I came to have a friendly interest in 
your welfare. 

It was in this way that I happened to no- 
tice the mistakes into which some were fall- 
ing, and I felt that I should shirk the real 
duty of true friendship if I neglected to ex- 
pose such errors at the earliest opportunity. 
Let me begin with you. Miss Prince. 

I am glad to see that you are preparing 
yourself for the winter's campaign with cus- 
tomary vigor. It is useless for people to be- 
come discouraged just because their best ef- 
forts haven't met with due reward. I watched 
you a large part of the season, and must con- 
fess that if good solid work could win a vic- 
tory, the prize should certainly have been 
yours. When I beheld you driving along the 
avenue, every pleasant afternoon with such a 
sweet expression of childish enjoyment upon 
your features, I could hardly believe that you 
were the same Miss Prince who was born in 
our village scarcely twenty-seven years ago. 

Your charming little turn-out displayed 
you to great advantage, but the season ended 
and you didn't find your fate. But don't 
feel at all disheartened. Compared with 
yoiu- grand-mother, you are still quite 3''oung, 
and the future may yet have in store a just 
reward for your labors. So persevere. Dur- 
ing the winter you will have many fine op- 
portunities presented for energetic work, 
which I know you will make the most of. If, 
however. Fortune remains unmoved, and it 
becomes necessary for you to enter the field 
again next June, I know you will do it with 
unabated zeal. 

There are some changes which I think it 
would be advisable for 3'ou to make in your 
regular paraphernalia before beginning the 
conquest of another year Dog-carts have 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



155 



come to be regarded as the especial chariots 
of maidens bent on a victory, while pug dogs 
are considered unmistakable signs of old 
maiden proclivities. Therefore, I advise 
changes in these cases, and suggest that you 
try a new field of operations. I will not 
again urge the need of hearty work. You 
are old enough to realize that it never does 
to be careless in matters of this nature. If 
you succeed in attracting the attention of 
some inexperienced youth, secure him at once. 
Make him fast while the first hallucination is 
present, and then you can carry him to camp 
(so to speak) at your leisure. By following 
these suggestions I trust you will find suc- 
cess, for the young man probably won't be 
one who would dare attempt an escape 
with a good-sized breach-of-promise suit hang- 
ing over his head. 

In concluding, I wish to invite the atten- 
tion of practical young men to the sensible 
course pursued by one of these same acquaint- 
ances of mine. He was not a favored son of 
fortune, but was one of her more numerous 
children who are obliged to depend upon 
themselves for existence. He had received a 
month's leave from his ledgers, and he deter- 
mined to make good use of the time. He 
knew that it was impossible for him to throw 
away his vacation in idle fancies, so from the 
moment that he entered this resort he kept 
his eye open for a practicable chance. Dur- 
ing the first week he decided on devoting 
his attentions to Mr. Snow's only daughter. 
It was no objection in his mind that the world 
of fashion called her very plain. There 
might be a slight discrepancy between her 
eyes, and to some over delicate ears her 
tones might seem harsh. 

He had learned the sad truth that beauty 
is but fleeting, and old age cracks the finest 
voice. There was thus no great obstacle in 
his way. Miss Snow had waited patiently 
for a chance, and now that she had one, was 
not so foolish as to let it slip. This is how 



it happens that the large stone house oppo- 
site Mr. Snow's residence is being fitted up 
so nicely at present. That same young man 
who left his books for a month, has become 
a partner in a large business house, and is 
having himself measured for a fine suit of 
clothes. You can't mistake the meaning of 
that serene look upon his face. He intends 
to make a short European tour after the cere- 
mony of next Thanksgiving, and then will 
devote himself to the business. With this 
short extract from the life of a common-sense 
man, I will close, for the moral is too evi- 
dent to need explanation. 



IN THE FOREST. 

Alone in the sombre forest 
Where the shadows come and go. 
And the moan of autumn breezes 
Is sounding sad and low, 
We catch, as by inspiration. 
The spirit that hovers o'er 
The sylvan depths of woodland, 
The mountain and the moor. 

Alone in the sombre forest, 
We sit in a shady nook. 
On a softly cushioned moss-bed 
By the side of a babbling brook. 
And watching the lights and shadows 
Where the mighty pine trees nod. 
We hear in the voice of Nature 
The voice of Nature's God. 



HARE AND HOUNDS. 
It would be a good idea to start a Hare 
and Hounds Club here during the fall, and 
good exercise and a good deal of enjoyment 
might be gained from it. It is not too late 
now, as there will not be any snow to speak 
of until after Thanksgiving, and two or three 
good " runs " might be held before the winter 
shuts in. And then, too, what if there is a 
little snow or mud ; the harder the " run " 
the greater the glory, if successful, and the 
more the enjoyment. A lazy man or a poor 
runner has no business in this sort of thing, 



156 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



but those who have never tried it will be sur- 
prised to find the keen enjoyment there is in 
a good sharp run of eight or ten miles in a 
clear cool air. There is an object ahead that 
impels one to effort, and causes us to lose 
all sense of fatigue for the time being. Let 
this matter be agitated and see if one run at 
least cannot be tried this fall. Other institu- 
tions have tried the game and in many col- 
leges a club is maintained all the time. The 
expense is practically nothing, and there is 
nothing dangerous about it save the chance 
of being shot by some farmer for running 
across his barn-yard and frigiitening the hens, 
and even this can be avoided by great care. 




" I'm not at all a genius," 
The student sadly said, 
' I am not on the Orient, 
Or e'en a Bugle ' ed.' 
I do not row upon the crew. 
Or play upon the nine: 
And the divine afflatus, 

I fear will ne'er be mine: 

I hold no office in my class, 

I am not skilled in lore. 

And I shall rank, I sadly fear. 

Somewhere in quarter lour. 

I am not blessed with riches, 

I am unknown to fame. 

And though I'm not good looking, 

I love you just the same." 

And low the blushing maid replied, 
" I'll gladly be your wife; 

You'r not precocious, but I know 

You'll shine in after life." 

And well she chose. Her spouse became 
A noted bank cashier: 
Their income now in Canada's 
Ten thousand pounds a year. 
The last themes of the term were due Nov. 17th. 
The performance of "Si Perkins" at the town 
hall two weeks ago, was witnessed by a large num- 
ber of the students. 



Rev. Mr. Guild is now delivering a course of 
Sunday evening lectures at the Unitarian church. 
The subject of the series is " The Religious Poetry of 
the XVII. Century." The following is the schedule : 
Nov. 14, Herbert ; Nov. 21, Vaugn, Harvey, Quarles ; 
Dec. 5, Crashaw, Southwell, Habington ; Dec. 12, 
Robert Herrick. All are invited to attend. 

Jackson, '89, is teaching at his home in Wiscasset. 
Little, '89, has a school iu New Hampshire. 

During the month of October, the library re- 
ceived about 104 books and 14 pamphlets. 

The annual convention of the Theta Delta Chi 
Fraternity was held last week in Boston, under the 
auspices of the Eta of Bowdoin. The chapter here 
was represented by the following men : Austin, M. L. 
Kimball, '87; Bartlett, Card, Hall, Hill, Ingalls, 
Larrabee, Linscott, Meserve, '88; Mitchell, F. C. 
Russell, F. M. Russell, Stacy, '89. 

It is rumored that in South Winthrop, scientific 
discussion is raging high, and that the end has al- 
ready become a stronghold of embryo Evolutionist 
philosophers. 

Mr. Burpee strained an abdominal muscle quite 
badly, when attempting to turn a handspring, re- 
cently. He was confined to his bed for a day or two ; 
but we are glad to see him out again. It will be 
some time, however, before he can renew his ath- 
letic work. 

Prof. — " By what instrument is the chemical char- 
acter of the sun's rays delected ? " Student (in on 
"blood") — "The — the — eh telescope." Prof. — 
"Well, hardly by that." Student (after instructions 
from his right-hand neighbor)—" Oh ! I know now ; 
the — the — eh microscope." 

Quite a number of the towns-people, particularly 
the ministers, are taking a course in the gym. 

The Juniors have finished Otis' "Elementary 
German," and are now reading Grimm's " Kinder- 
und Hausm'firchen." On the first day after leaving 
the " Elements," as most of the readers had not come, 
Prof. Johnson, at the request of the class, gave a 
very interesting talk on German Universities. 

On the evening of Friday, November 12 th, the 
gymnasium was opened for exhibition, and was vis- 
ited by many of the towns-people. Quite a number 
of the students took advantage of the occasion to 
show the building to their young lady friends. 

The degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred 
upon President Hyde at the Harvard anniversary. 

We learn from a recent Pen7isylvanian that 
" Bowdoin is to have a new gymnasium." Ah ! our 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



157 



dear sister, we congratulate you ; but we were hardly 
prepared to learn that the " gym," erected but a few 
months since, had seen its days of usefulness. Please 
send it to us, and we will pay all charges on the 
same. — Colby Echo. 

Reviews have commenced in most of the studies 
of the term, and it will not be so very long before 
the final examinations take place. 

We hail with joy the chestnut bell, 

Which we will ring with glee 
When " Hawthornes " are imposed upon 

Freshman credulity ; 
When Cosine's hoss, the fabled maid 
Whom Freshmen oft have sought, 
And Booker's course in college 

Are to Niuties' notice brought, 
'Tis then we'll vent our feelings 

And our disgust as well 
By giving a tremendoiis yank 
Upon the chestnut bell. 
At the club : First Student — " What is the desert? " 
Waitress — "Apple, mince, and cranbei'iy pie." First 
Student — "Cranberry." Second Student — "Ditto." 
Waitress (agitated) — " But we only have apple, 
mince, and cranberry." 

The Seniors have safely tided over their class 
caucus. The class meeting will probably soon be 
called to act upon the report of the caucus. 

The Juniors who have been appointed to speak 
at the exhibition at the close of the term are Gary, 
Goding, Williamson, and Woodman. 
■ President Hyde recently attended the Two Hun- 
dred and Fiftieth Anniversary of Harvard College. 

A week or so ago the Juniors and Sophomores 
had a friendly rush in the entry leading to the mod- 
ern language room ; the superior number and weight 
of the latter turned the scale in their favor. 

The next Triennial Catalogue of the college is 
now in the course of preparation, with prospects of 
very good success. Professor Little is receiving in- 
formation from various sources, and every mail brings 
in a load of letters bearing upon the subject. 

On the evening of November 11th, a basket sup- 
per was held at the Franklin Family School in Tops- 
ham. About twenty of the college students were 
present, and the bidding for the baskets was lively 
and interesting. A very pleasant evening was 
passed by all. 

The first of Mark Twain's novels that the college 
has ever possessed, was purchased for the library a 
few days ago. There have been many inquiries for 
the productions of this classic author, and we would 
suggest that all his works be obtained and placed 
within reach of the students. 

The Bowdoin Art Collection of drawings, the /ac 



similes of rare originals, is being copied and pub- 
lished by a Lewiston firm by the new process of photo- 
gravure. The first series is already out. If finan- 
cially successful, the work will be continued. 

W. R. Smith, '90, while recently investigating the 
attic of South Winthrop, discovered behind one of 
the beams, a sword and scabbard, both in good con- 
dition, and probably relics of the good old days when 
military drill was in vogue at Bowdoin. 

Gilpatrick, '89, has gone out teaching. 

The Freshman all around would flock 

For many a weary mile, 

To sun themselves a moment in 

The sunshine of her smile: 

Their pennies into her outstretched hand 

Incessantly would pour; 

And fortune smiled on the wrinkled maid 

Who kept the candy store. 

Verrill has been excused from taking part in the 
Senior and Junior exhibition this term and J. Y- 
Lane will take his place. 

The Seniors, in connection with their work in Psy- 
chology, have written abstracts on portions of Des- 
cartes and Locke and will finish with Berkley. The 
last abstract on Berkley will be on "Principles of 
Human Knowledge," § 1 — 40 and 145 — 156 inclu- 
sive, introduction not included. 

The first illustrated lecture delivered by Mr. Sid- 
ney Dickenson was on "Spanish Painters." The 
nighl was very stormy, but nevertheless there was a 
good house. A great many of the course tickets have 
been sold, and all the body seats in the hall were se- 
cured at an early hour. 

The following conversation was overheard be- 
tween two room-mates : "George, if you wake up 
early in the morning, just give me a punch, will you ? 
Pve got to get up early to plug." "Well, Tom, Pll 
tell you just how it is. If I'm lying with my face 
towards you when I wake up, I'll punch you. But 
if I am lying back towards you — well, I'm too lazy to 
turn over just to wake you up." 

Several Topsham store-keepers are anxious to 
find out who were those students looking for the 
Topsham Congregational Sociable one Tuesday 
night a few weeks ago. 

Some of our dignified Juniors are taking hold of 
gymnastics with a vengeance, so much so that they 
while away the fleeting hours of midnight by con- 
summate performances on the hanging lamp. 

Fresh. — "Does the end woman do your sweep- 
ing?" Soph. — " Why certainly." Fresh. — "What, 
without extra charge?" Soph. — "Yes, indeed." 
Fresh. — "By cracky! I wish I'd known it before. 
Chum and I have been sweeping out our room ever 



158 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



since the first of the term, supposing the end women 
never did such things without extra pay." 

Come brother C, be not too expeditious in your 
ivTEudev i^sXdu^ei from the chapel. Remember 
the time-honored Sanskrit phrase such demonstra- 
tions are not allowed. " A word to the wise is suf- 
ficient," so we'll pause here. 

The Thanksgiving recess extends from Wednes- 
day noon till Tuesday morning. Most of the students 
go home or visit friends ; but a few will stay over. 

The Seniors are reading Chaucer. 

Mr. Booker's philosophical discussions in the cellar 
of the chapel are iBSthetically rich to the students of 
history. Is Mr. B. preparing himself for a tutor? 

A "tidal wave" has apparently been visiting 
some of our ends. 

The catalogue for 1886-7 is out. 

At a meeting of the Boating Association, L. B. 
Varney was elected as a delegate to the Intercollegi- 
ate Rowing Association Convention, which meets in 
New York, Dec. 3d. Immediately after this meet- 
ing of the Boating Association, a meeting of the 
Athletic Association was called to consider the prop- 
osition of forming a New England Intercollegiate 
Athletic Association. Mr. H. B. Austin and F. L. 
Talbot were elected delegates with power to act as 
they might deem for the interests of the college, to 
repiresent Bowdoin at a meeting of the representa- 
tives of the New England colleges, to be held in 
Boston, Thursday evening, Nov. 25th, to consider the 
matter. 

Mr. Dickenson's second illustrated lecture, deliv- 
ered Nov. 20th, was on " Italian Painters." 

Prof. Smith gave a talk before the Y. M. C. A., 
in their room, Wednesday evening, Nov. 17th. 




'28. — James Patten, Esq., 
whose death at Berne, Al- 
bany County, N. Y., Oct. 28th, is re- 
ported, was the oldest living graduate 
of the college. He was born Nov. 23, 1795. 
'77.— Dr. E. J. Pratt has settled perma- 
nently in New York City in the practice of his pro- 
fession. His address is 12 West 39th Street. 



'77. — C. L. Nickerson was compelled by I'eason 
of delicate health to resign his position as Superin- 
tendent of Schools, Garden City, Minn., after a year's 
service. He is now engaged in farming, his ad- 
dress remaining Garden City. 

'77. — G. W. Tillson is Assistant City Engineer of 
Omaha, Neb. He was elected President of the Ne- 
braska Association of Engineers and Surveyors in 
January last, and is chairman of the Committee on 
National Public Works in the same Association. 

'77. — Lieut. Peary, U.S.N. , was granted an eight 
months' leave of absence, beginning in April last. 
He has spent much of this time in Greenland, hav- 
ing joined an expedition organized for the purpose 
of exploring the interior of that land. 

'79. — C. F. Johnson has formed a law partnership 
with Hon. S. S. Brown of Waterville, Me. He 
studied law with Hon. John F. Lynch of Machias. 

'80. — Horace R. Giveen has been re-elected County 
Superintendent of Schools in Trinity County, Cal., 
by a majority of two hundred, although the opposite 
political party elected its other candidates. 

'81. — Charles Haggerty has been elected a mem- 
ber of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. 

'82. — F. H. Fames is in an apothecary store at 
Somerville, Mass. 

'83. — Austin is attending the Harvard Medical 
School. 

'83. — Bascom is in the wliolesale flour business, 
at 250 Commercial Street, Boston. 

'83. — Pettingill is attending the Boston Univer- 
sity Law School. 

'84. — Sa3'w,ard is an instructor in the Bryant & 
Stratton Commercial College, Boston. 

'84. — Waterman is at the Harvard Law School. 

'84. — Llewellyn Barton has been appointed Justice 
of the Peace and Quorum, by the Governor, to be 
confirmed by the next session of the Executive Coun- 
cil which meets the 24th. 

'85. — Eanies is at the Boston School of Pharmacy. 

'85. — Ford is at the Boston University Medical 
School. 

'85. — French is practicing law at 46 School Street, 
Boston. 

'85. — Waterman is attending the Boston Univer- 
sity Law School. 

'86. — Dike is in attendance at the Homeopathic 
Hospital in Boston. 

'86. — Norris is studying law in the office of Wil- 
son & Perkins, at Cincinnati, Ohio. He is also at- 
tending the Law School in that city. 

'85. — Mr. Edwin R. Harding, principal of Patten 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



159 



Academy, and Miss Mary P. Atwood, daughter of 
Capt. Horace Atwood of Haiupden, were married at 
the latter place, Wednesday evening, Nov. 17th. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

BowDOiN College, Nov. 12, 1886. 

Whereas, It has pleased Almighty Grod to remove 
our classmate, W. W. Dennett, from our midst; and 

WJiereas, We, though not always able to see His 
purpose, remember that " He doeth all things well " ; 
therefore 

Resolved, That we, the class of '90, while sin- 
cerely mourning the death of our brother, reverently 
submit to the will of the Heavenly Father; that we 
deeply sympathize with the bereaved relatives of 
our departed classmate in this, their great affliction ; 
and further 

Resolved, That copies of these resolutions be sent 
to the family of the deceased, and to the Orient for 
publication. 

W. I. Weeks, 
G. F. Freeman, 

E. A. MCCULLOUGH, 

Gommiltee. 



ALLEN'S PHARMACY, 

LEMOKTT BLOCK, 

Main Street, - - Brunswick, Me. 

WEAR ONE OF 

MERRY'S 

CELEBRATED HATS. 

Always the Cokkect Style. 

237 MIDDLE STREET, 

PORTLAND. 

h. v. stackpole, 
Fine Boots and Shoes, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 

Dentist, 

STORBB BIiOCK, - - BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



F. W. BAREON, 

Dealer Ie MM ni Fancj Groceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWE.ST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, aud Country Produce. 
Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 



FRANK A, HALE, Proprietor, 
DeWITT HOUSE, TONTINE HOTEL, 

Lewiston, Me. Brunswick, Me. 

Private Suppers and Banquets a specialty. 

F. A. FARR, Manai/er. 

W. B. SPEAR. J. A. WHITMORE* 

SPEAR & WHITMORE, 

DEALERS LN 

ALL KINDS OF COAL, 

Cedar Street, Brunswick, Me. 



F. L. DUNNE, 

Importing rTailop, 

338 Washington Street, 

BOS'T'01^^. 

A VERY LARGE LINE OF GOODS 

Specially selected for students' wear. 

ALL THE LATEST LONDOU AND PARIS NOVELTIES 

Regularly imported. 

Tailor to the Harvard Co-operative Society. 

Our representative will visit Brunswick next spring to 
take orders. 

338 WASHINGTON STREET, 
BH5TDN. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



■cigarette 

I Smokers who 
I are willingoto 
pay a little more 
lor Cigarettes 
I than the price 
charged for the orrUnary trade Cigarettes, wUl 
lind the RICHIaOND STRAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO AXIi OTHERS. 
They are made from the brightest, most 
delicately flavored, and lilsbest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are aljso- 
rutely without adulteration or drugs. 

No. 
-I- 



RICHMOND; 



STRAIGHT CUTT 



We use the GentUme Frencli Rice Paper 

of our ovm direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT Wo. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this Ls the old and 
original brand, and to obserye that each pack- 
ageorboxofa ^ 

Ricliinoiid 
Straight Cut 
Cigarettes I 
bears the I 
signature of ' 



CIGARETTES 

ALLiENTciNTER 



MANTJFAOTUBEHS, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Kings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 

Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry, Promptly Repaired and Warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, MB. 

TI|aine Central W. ^. 

On and after Oct. 25th, 1886, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.15, 11.25 A.M., 2.3S, 4.40 and 6.35 p.m., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Rockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.38 p.m. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4..35 p.m., and 

every night, including Sundays, at 12.35. 
For Lewiston, 8.15 a.m., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farniington, 8.15 A.M. (mixed), and 2.45 p.m. 
For Augusta, 8.20 a.m., 2.40 and 6.35 P.M., and 12.45 every night. 
For Waterville and Bangor, 8.20 A.M., 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 night, 

and for Waterville, Saturdays only at 6.35 P.M. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 p.m., and 12.45 (night). 
For Bangor and Piscataquis E. R., 8.20 A.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Ellsworth, Bar Harbor, Vanceboro, St. Stephen, Houlton, 

and St. John, 2.40 p.m., 12.45 (night). 

Note.— The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
ston, and Bangor, run every night, including Sunday, but do not 
connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, or for Belfast and 
Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sunday morning. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BOOTHBY, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 21, 1886. 



SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. 

Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 

The following are our well known 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Caporal, Sweet Capokal, St. James 1-2, Caporal 1-2, 

St. James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES. 

Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and French Rice J'aper, are rolled by the high- 
est class of skilled labor, and warranted free from flavoring or 
impurities 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a pac-simile of Kinney Bros. 

SiGNATDRE. 

KINNEY" TOBACCO CO. 



JORDAN SNOW, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

DuNLAP Block, Brunswick, Me, 

(INTEReEPTED LETTER.) 

Brunswick, May 14, 1886. 
Owen, Moore & Co., Portland. 
Gentlemen : 
Please send me hj mail one pair long Bicycle Stockings, 
size 9J, regulation League Color. Enclosed one dollar and 
stamps for postage. I see by advertisement in Portland 
paper that you carry a line oJ Tennis Goods. Please send 
me a price-list of Rackets and Balls, with best discount to 
a regular club. What are the prices on Jersey Coats, 
and in what color do they come ? 

Yours truly, 
P. O. Box 2002. BOB BROWN. 



Confectionery, Fruit, and Cigar Store, 

MAIN STKEET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

Wm. R. FIELD, Manager. 

W. HAWTHORNE, 

FINE*TAILORING, 

2 Church Block, Bath. 



THIh PflrfcRa' 'lie Newspaper Adver- 

I iiSH r "' **" tisiUB Ag-ency of Messrs. 
N. W. AVER & SON, our authorized agents. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLT^EaE BOOKSTORE. 

We have coustantly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 

The best place in town to buy your 

LINEN COLLARS and CUFFS, TIES, SCARFS, GLOVES, 

Hats, Caps, Caxes, Ecr., is at 



PLUMMER'S, O'Brien Block. 

Correct Styles, and Best Quality, at Bottom Prices. 

A. F. NICHOLS, 

Merchant Tailor 

BHUWS'WIOK, ME. 

Have your Fall and Winter Suit Made at Nichols. 

A Choice Line of Styles to Select From. 

OVERCOATS in Great Variety. 
FINE GOODS. LOW PKICES. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Call and Examine. 

A. F. NICHOLS, - Odd Fellows Block. 

Full Dress Suits, and Dress Frocks a Specialty. 



ADAMS & UNIACKE 

HAVE A FULL LINE OF STOVES 

Also, all kinds of Xiamps, 

And most evei-ytliing found in a Stove and Crockery Store. 
MAIN STEEET, BRUNSWICK. 

VISIT G. E. CHANDi-ER, 

dealer FN 

OYSTERS and ICE-CREAM, 

Main Street, Brunswick, Maine. 

F. H. WILSON, 

DISI'ENSER OF 

Pure Drugs, Medicines, and Clieniicals. 

Imported and Domestic Cigars. 
MAIN STREET, - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 



m3:E 






* TRAVELERS 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HERTFORD, COI<^N., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCT $ll,000|000| and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 

X r^r^TTiT^ATT' T*OT Tr~^T17^ Indemnifvins the Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
-'^'-^'-^-'--'-^-■-'-'-~ J- J- V_/AjXVyl. LjO Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidental Injury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only SfS.OO a year to Professional or Business Men, for each §1,000, with $fo.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
e.xaminatioii required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 1864 have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. 

Issues T TTf'tr T*OT TC*TT7^ °* every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, ------ $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Ofiice at Hartford. 
JA.S. G. BATTBRSON, President. KODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



QOCIETir ^ies cuxd '3?lcLtas, Cuts cltlcL ETtstgntcL. 
yVrittrtg Fajper cuxcL Cctrds JUngrcuved ctrtcL IPriixted. 
Stixdent's Vzstttixg Coords. IrwttcLtioixs of every kind 
eixiecTLted by the eTigr'cuvirhg hoixse of 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 

-^ --*- ^^ 

Society Irwitctttorts , ^Dtes, ctiid IllixstrcittoThs for l^ecu^- 
^ooks, Mortog-pajTis , Jlm-zs, ctrhd Crests JUngrctved curhd 
Printed. VisitzTig Cards, andL the Clxoicest StcctioTxer'y . Seals, 
Tapers and Sealing Waz, and Sealing Sets. 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



If m 



[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

The Uniivalled Remedy for Dyspepsia, :Mental and Physical Exhaustion, Nervousness, AVakefulness, 

Diminished Vitality, etc. 

As Food for an Exhausted Brain, in Liver and Kidney Trouble, in Seasickness and Sicl( Headache, in Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion and Constipation, in Inebriety, Despondency and cases of Impaired Nerve Functioii, 

It has become a necessity in a large number of households throughout the world, 

And is universally prescribed and recommended by physicians of all schools. 
Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 
It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body. 
It is unsurpassed as a substitute for lemons or limes, and 

IT MAKES A DKLICIOUS DRINK W^ITH WATER AND SUGAR ONLY, 
Prices Reasonable. Pamplilet giving further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, R. I. 
*s-BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.-ffi» 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A., O. REED, 



BK,XT]SrS"WICI5:, Iv^E 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Special Rates to Classes I Students : Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine 



Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Bruns^rick and Topsham 
Views ; also College Vietrs. 



Go to lAT. B. ITIToodard's 

To buy your GEOCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGAES, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doiog. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



fiiiisiiniKc 

OTTAWA llUU Oil 




[Cushing's Island 
Portland, Me. 
I-^- S. GIBSOISr. 



Bowdoin College Medical Department. 

The Sixty-Seventh Annual Course of Lectures at the 
Medical School of Maine, will commence February 3d, 
188T, and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— REV. Wm. DeWitt Hyde, President: Alfred 
JIiTCHELL, M.D., Secretarj-; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol, 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Godd.-ird, A.M. , 
Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. Gerrish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Franklin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemistry; Stephen H 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henry H 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G.Young, Public Hygiene 
Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonsti-ator of Anatomy; Ever 
ETT T. Nealey, M.D., Demonsti-ator of Histology. 

ALPEED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary 
Brunswick, Maine 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BORDERS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 

We make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges. 

— such as 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manuer. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



^^^ i'igh St 




X^IEIElSr IIST IsQI^TIj-A.lNriD, 



We would be pleased to show you our line of English 
Specialties secured lor our 

TAILORING DEPARTMENT. 



HIGH GLASS WORK GAN BE DEPENDED UPON. 



FASHIONABLE MADE UP CLOTHING, 

Of our own make, can always be found at our establishment. 

Shirts to Measure, Hosiery, Gloves, Underwear, Neck Dressings 
and General Outfittings in our Furnishing Department. 



B. A. ATICTOSOI 

Donnel Building, Corner Pearl and IVIiddle Streets, PORTLAND, ME., 

WOULD EESPECTFULLY CALL THE ATTENTION OF 

Buyeis of Funiltuie, Gaipets, Bemili, Parlor Stoves, Baies, &g., 

To the Edotojolis Stock of House Furuishings at the Portland Store. BeiDg Manufacturers, 

intending purchasers can see the styles and select their own coverings for Parlor Furniture, and have it made 

to order for the same price. We keep enormous quantities of Upholstery Goods in the Boston Store, 

and full lines of samples. Here our prices on Parlor Suites range from '$35.00 in Hair Cloth 

to $?375.00 in Silk or Mohair Plushes. 



CHAMBER FURNITURE. 

We have in stock in our three stores 87 different par- 
terns of Chamber Suites, manufactured from all the pop- 
xilar woods, viz.: Pine, Ash, Walnut, Cherry, Basswood, 
and Mahogany, ranging in price from SilS.OO to ,11400.00. 
We also have all kinds, sizes, and quantities of Bedsteads, 
Bureaus, Commodes, etc. Spring Beds, Cot Beds, Lounge 
Beds, Sofa Beds, Mantel Beds, etc. Mattresses of every 
kind and quality, from an excelsior at $2.00 to a pure 
bleached South American curled horse hair at $25.00. 

CARPET DEPARTMENT. 

$75,000 worth of Cottons, Cotton a-nd Wools, All-Wool 
Extras, Tapestry, Brussels, Body Brussels, Velvets, Wil- 
tons, etc., at our usual Rock-Bottom Prices. Any of these 
can be selected at the Portland store. SHAJdES and 



DRAPERY of every description made to order in the 
Boston store. Orders taken here and designs and samples 
shown. 

PARLOR STOVES. 

Special attention is requested to our Parlor Stove De- 
partment, as we believe we have the best line to select 
from in Maine. Prices $4.00 to $i0.00. 

STOVES AND RANGES. 

Our line of Ranges com^jrises all the latest and best in 
the market, including the "New Tariff " and " Quaker," 
which are considered superior to anything yet produced. 
Write for cuts of these two Ranges. Prices .$15.00, $20.00, 
$22.50, $25.00, .$27.50, $29.00, $33.00, .$35.00, $38.00, and up- 
wards to $65.00. These prices include all the ware, pipe, 
and zinc. 



Any of the above goods sold for Cash or on our Special Contract System, at 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Streets, Portland, Me. 

Branch of the Great Nassau Hall House Furnishing Store, 827 Washington Street, Boston. 

B. A. ATKINSON & CO. ' 



ISAAC C. ATKINSON, Manager. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The "Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and "Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 

LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

EUGEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 

ROGERS' CELEBRATED GROUPS. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

474 Congress St., - - - opp. Preble House. 

THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

JVie. S 0DD EEItLGWg' BIiGCK, 

Is the place to buy 

Snok^, SiaU'Ofte't§, § d'ancy' S-aodd. 

Telephoue Exchange connected with the store. 

A. W. TOWNSEND, Prop'r. 



Messrs. WILLIAM S. KIMBALL & GO., 



Take pleasure in announcing that 
they are prepared to sup- 
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expenses moderate, discipline wholesome, morals good. Persons 
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mmMi 



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And we sell time for Little Money. Buy your WATCHES, 
Clocks, and Jewelry cheap for cash of 

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A FINE LINE OF SILVER GOODS AT BOTTOM FBICES. 

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Our $1.00 Spectacles defy competition. Repairing promptly 

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Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIViER, Director, 

180 Middle Street. - - - - Portland, Me. 



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GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 



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TONTINE LAUNDRY, 



Brunswick, Me, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amonnt of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Caesar,- Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust,— Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil,— Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
J5neid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography,— Tozer. 

Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry, — first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,- so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes ai-e examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Kegular Examinations foe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Sailowell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 
GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQUIEBD— FOUR HOUES A WEEEl. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three tei'ms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — ^FOUE HOUES A "WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XVI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DECEMBER 15, 1886. 



No. 11. 



BO WD O IN OKIE NT. 

PUBtlSHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COIiLEQIATE YEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOVVDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

C. B. Burleigh, '87, Managing Editor. 

L. B. Varney, '87, Business Editor. 
C. 0. Choate, '87. C. H. Verrill, '87. 

M. L. Kimball, '87. ' H. C. Hill, '88. 

A. TV. Merrill, '87. M. P. Smithwick, '88. 

E. C. Plummer. '87. A. W. Tolman, '88. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00. 

Single Copies 15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the boolsstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
lie wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XVI., No. 11.— December 15, 1886. 

Night and Morning, 161 

Editorial Notes, 161 

Echoes from the Past 162 

My Betrothed, 164 

The Matter with Snooks, 165 

Theta Delta Convention, 166 

Old-Time Pranks 166 

New England Intercollegiate Athletic Association, . 167 

CoLLEGH Tabula 168 

Personal, 170 



NIGHT AND MORNING. 

O'er Bowdoin's halls the stars gleam bright. 
Pine-hushed the soft winds whisper low. 
Streams from her windows many a light 
In mellow lanes across the snow. 

The curved moon in the west is pale, 
From the red east the day-dawn falls, 
And Night draws back her shadowy veil 
From Bowdoin's halls. 




This issue has been delayed a 
week, on account of the Thanksgiving recess. 



The present gymnasium hours make it 
practically impossible for those interested in 
base-ball to get much practice. At three 
o'clock, or a little past, the cage becomes too 
dark to be used. This could and should 
be remedied in part, by whitewashing the 
walls. It is very hard for a catcher to 
see a ball when it is thrown against a dark 
background. It would also be a great ad- 
vantage to lovers of base-ball if the " gym " 
could be opened a little earlier in the after- 
noon — at two o'clock regularly, and Wednes- 
days and Saturdays at one. This would 
enable considerable more batterj' work to be 
done, and would undoubtedly give our base- 
ball interests a needed boom. 



The following letter was received the 
latter part of last term, and should have been 
published then, but was, unfortunately, mis- 
placed : 

Editors of Bowdoin Orient : 

Gentlemen, — In a recent issue of the Orient, the 
credit of preparing a bill to regulate the method of 
electing overseers was erroneously given to me 
The work was done, and very efficiently done, too, 
not by me but by Frank V. Wright, Esq., ('76) 
of Salem, Mass. His interest in this matter is 
known to all : the large amount of work which he 



162 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



has done is only, known to a few. All that I had to 
do with the bill was, that in company with John C. 
Coombs, Esq., ('69) I went over it and we agreed 
that the bill was satisfactory. Will you please make 
the correction. Very truly yours, 

Alvin C. Stevens. 



We publish elsewhere in this issue a 
report of the formation of the New England. 
Intercollegiate Athletic Association. The 
need of such an Association has long been 
felt, and now that the organization is com- 
pleted a hearty support should be given it. 

We trust that the team whicli will repre- 
sent Bowdoin at the spring meeting will be a 
strong one. Good, hard, gymnasium work 
through the winter will accomplish wonders. 
Let every one who aspires to be on the team 
devote himself to the thing in which he par- 
ticularly excels. In this way a greater de- 
gree of perfection can be attained than 
would be possible if one's time and attention 
were taken up with general athletics. The 
leaders in all departments of life are almost 
invariably specialists. We trust that the 
records made at our next Field Day may be 
such as to encourage the college in sending a 
full team to the intercollegiate contests. 
Those who begin earliest and train hardest 
will undoubtedly be the ones who will event- 
ually " get there." 



The frequent receipt of illegible scrawls) 
which may be either Sanskrit, Chinese, or 
Pitman's Short-Hand, so far as ability to de- 
cipher them is concerned, has caused the 
head of many an editor to grow prematurely 
bald, and sent numberless worthy compo's 
to untimely graves. The fact that the raven 
locks of the Orient editors are still spared, 
is due to the habit, formed early in life, of 
consigning all such barbarisms to the friendly 
waste-basket. But, seriously, the ability to 
write a legible hand is of great importance 
to all, and is too often neglected by those 
who claim to be liberally educated. The 



undoubted fact that a large proportion of the 
world's greatest men have written in illegible 
scrawls, ought not to invest a poor hand- 
writing with any dignity. It was their misfort- 
une — an educational deformity, which others 
should strive to avoid. Many persons seem to 
look upon a poor chirography as an indication 
of an active intellect, and to consider a plain, 
readable hand as a sign of slow-going medi- 
ocrity. It is true that a great many men 
think faster in composition than they can 
possibly write. This fact, however, does not 
necessitate poor penmanship. With a little 
practice and attention, as much speed can be 
attained in a legible hand, as in a miserable 
scrawl. The opinions of men are apparently 
changing on this subject. The scrawls that 
formerly disfigured the books of many 
counting-rooms would not be tolerated now. 
The advertisements of merchants for young 
men to assist them in their business, almost 
invariably require that they shall write a 
good hand. What is true of the needs of 
the counting-room is equally true of all de- 
partments of life. No man can justly impose 
upon the time and patience of others by an 
inexcusable hand-writing. All may not be 
able to become Spensers or Gaskells, but a 
little practice ought to enable any one to at 
least write a readable hand. 



ECHOES FROM THE PAST. 

NUMBER ONE. 

Boston, Mass., Dec. 6, 1886. 

Editors of the Orient : 

I recently came into possession of a scrap- 
book, somewhat old, somewhat worm-eaten, 
formerly my mother's. Among its clippings 
I found a series of letters on travels in New 
England, written for the Boston Journal, 
over the signature, " A Stranger in Boston " ; 
also a brief reference, drawn out by these 
letters, to Dr. Packard, father of the late 
Prof. Packard. The author and the exact 
date of these publications are alike unknown 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



163 



to me, but the manner of discovery, the as- 
sociations, the age, and subject matter, have 
made their perusal a source of great pleasure. 
The following extracts from these letters, 
together with the above-mentioned incident, 
I feel sure will be of interest to all Orient 
readers, and will reach the eye of some who 
knew the author, or who, at least, were par- 
ticipants in the Commencement to which he 
refers. Very Sincerely Yours, 

Edgar 0. Achorn. 

It was a gladsome day. We found the cars 
crowded at an early hour. Numbers were on their 
way to the Commencement of Bowdoin College. 
Several familiar faces were enjoying the autumnal 
morning, and gazing on the green trees and shining 
waters and lively villages as we rolled rapidly along 
from place to place. Perhaps there is no excursion 
in this country more exhilerating than one at this 
season of the year to the mountainous regions of 
Maine. 

The routes to Portland, both upper and lower, are 
familiar to the public. From thence to North Yar- 
mouth the road has been quite recently opened. 
Here a branch extends to Lewiston and to Mechanic 
Falls and another to Brunswick and Bath. The one 
to Bath was opened the Fourth of July, last. An- 
other to Hallowell is i-apidly progressing ; and soon 
the interior railroad will reach Waterville, passing 
through some of the iinest agricultural improve- 
ments in Maine. It seems like a splendid dream or 
unearthly vision to a traveler, who but a few years 
since, labored up the clayey hills or jolted over rocks 
or sands between Portland and Bath, in a slow cum- 
bersome stage — perhaps amidst overwhelming drifts 
of snow or through flooded ruts and ravines iu the 
Toad — to find himself gliding along from hill to hill 
and village to village, in a car ever and anon thun- 
dering amid the caverned mountains, or waking the 
stare of the eagle in his lair on the pine top, as he 
hears the shrill whistle of the engine in the woods. 
Wonder loses all its sublimity by familiarity and the 
frequency of railroad traveling has almost obliter- 
ated impressions, once so strange and yet so delight- 
ful, in the old stage coach. The station of the At- 
lantic and St. Lawrence railroad at Portland is a no- 
ble structure. The cars are wider than usual and 
more convenient, being adapted to a gauge or dis- 
tance between the rails of live feet six inches — the 
usual one on other routes in this country being only 



four feet eight and one-half inches. -This makes a 
necessity at the junction, of changing cars. Separate 
from this inconvenience, the cars are more comfort- 
able, and have a steadier, firmer motion, and, I should 
think, presented a broader basis to resist any com- 
mon obstruction. In England the general gauge is 
fifty-six and one-half inches, but from London 
tow.ards Bristol and Exeter, it is seventy-two inches. 
Time and experience will show where the perfect 
measure lies ; proving, perhaps, with Horace, that, 
between extremes, safety lies in the middle : 
Est modus in rebus, simt certi denique fines 
Quos ultra citraque nequit consistere rectmn. 
We arrived at Brunswick the day before Com- 
mencement at half-past three, and were fortunate, 
amidst the bustle and jostling in our descent from 
crowded cars, in procuring a decent room. Bruns- 
wick contains some pretty houses and aftords some 
fine views of the Androscoggin, the falls of which 
are romantic. It was originally a pine bearing 
sandj' plain. The location of the college buildings 
is on a level, somewhat elevated above the settle- 
ment. They have a large area in front, which is 
much adorned by a noble, granite chapel, recently 
erected. Behind the buildings is a background of 
lofty, dark pines, and in front, on the opposite side 
of a wide road, several neat, retired residences of the 
college ofiieers. A country tavern which once stood 
near the college yard or grounds, and which was the 
resort of drones, and the place of revel for the dissa- 
pated — and such character's will infest every colleo-e, 
let the discipline be ever so strict — has disappeared. 
The shade of a tree marks the spot of revelry. The 
house, wherein the lamented and time-honored Pres- 
ident Appleton once dvrelt, has also vanished — the 
work of fire. Long, long will this excellent man be 
remembered. 

There are persons of high standing at the sacred 
desk, the bar and the counting room, who were 
directed and influenced by this holy guide to the nar- 
row path which leadeth to life. He presented re- 
ligion to them, not as a matter of ephemeral excite- 
ment, but as a durable principle, leavenino- the 
thoughts and habits of the whole soul. He was a man 
of venerable aspect. I well remember his hio-h, 
white forehead, pleasant smile and gracious de- 
meanor. His articulation in the pulpit was pecul- 
iarly emphatic ; his style clear, cogent, and impres- 
sive. When he prayed, it was not a rhetorical ad- 
dress to the audience, but a most reverential 
supplication to the Father of Spirits. He was one 
of those real scholars on whom the doctorate sits 
with dignity — while the numbers of half-learned 
and superficial clergymea all over the land show 



164 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



how cheap the D.D. too often becomes in a day of 
progress prone to level all distinctions of merit, 
erudition, or age. 

The Commencement at Brunswick was respect- 
able, and went off well amidst crowds of strangers 
and groups of beauty and fashion. It was held in 
the new church — a noble structure of the Gothic 
order. But with all its richly stained glass, the 
church was too darkly lighted to see one's acquaint- 
ances and distinguish the endearing forms and 
features of old friends. The architecture is costly 
and finished ; yet the ceiling, with its finely inter- 
laced beams and rafters, and cornices, and orna- 
ments, is too complicated, to circulate distinctly the 
sound of the speaker's voice. It is beautifully but 
badly contrived for the purpose to which it was de- 
signed. A simple arch, though less ornamental, 
would have been more congenial to an auditory on 
such an occasion. To see with the eye and hear 
with the ear is indispensable at such an exhibition 
of literary talent ; although the monotonous and un- 
natural key, to which the voice is usually pitched in 
college declamation, is too often a tax on the taste 
and patience of the audience. Every college has its 
peculiar cant in public speaking, which not imfre- 
quently follow the speaker through life. On this ac- 
count, we seldom meet with an easy, pleasing 
reader, even among the learned. It seems a pity 
that some distinguished actor of good character could 
not be engaged to teach our young men at college 
the art of training the voice to some variety and mel- 
ody of utterance and to gesticulate with ease and 
grace. Whoever saw a little child make an awkward 
gesture, and why? Its limbs are flexile and yield 
without stiffness to each waving motion it makes. 
The poem by C. C. Nutter, Esq., of tliis city, before 
the Athenian Society, gained him high applause. 
The address of Hon. Robert C. Winthrop before the 
Historical Society, was listened to with great in- 
terest. It was elaborate— a picture of the past — a 
narrative of a distinguished worthy whose family 
name is identified with the foundation ofthatflourisli- 
ing seminary, Bowdoin College. Expectation was 
on tip-toe to hear the voice of this talented man, 
whose rank and reputation have already reached a 
lofty stand in the legislation of our country. Nor 
was the public disappointed. He fertilized a sub- 
ject necessarily dry, with historical information and 
usefulness. But he ought to have omitted some 
parts in the delivery, reserving them for the press. 
For it must be remembered that nine-tenths of a pro- 
miscuous assembly, gathered on the heat of a Com- 
mencement day, and with their ears still ringing 



with the voices of collegians, and being, perhaps, 
indifferent judges of erudition or eloquence, would 
become wearied by a two hours' discourse, and the 
sun would go down upon their weariness. Too long, 
too long is the error of many of our most brilliant 
orators. Even the eloquence of St. Paul, if it had 
been inordinately protracted, would have turned the 
trembling Felix into a royal nap. The location and 
administration of this college are admirably calcu- 
lated for the academical education of young men ; 
and the Institution, with its excellent President and 
learned Professors, is now in a very flourishing state. 
One of its government ranks, in his department, 
very high, — Professor Cleveland, whose great work 
on mineralogy has been translated into many foreign 
languages, and to whose durable fame abroad the 
college owes much of its reputation. A most valu- 
able cabinet of minerals belongs to the college, 
which has grown up and increased under his eye, 
and to which a rich accession was made by Dr. 
Charles T. Jackson, author of the ether discovery, 
when State Geologist of Maine. The public libra- 
ries contain over 22,000 volumes. Since the organ- 
ization of this college in 1802, the alumni have ex- 
ceeded 800. 

[Concluded in next issue.'] 



MY BETROTHED. 

We sat 'neath the broad-spreading willows, 
That shaded the farm-house gray. 
In the glimmering glow of the twilight, 
At the close ot a summer's day. 

When the sombre shadows were shrouding 
The distant mountain crests ; 
When the flowers had folded their petals. 
And the birds had flown to their nests. 

In the solemn hush of the gloaming, 
While deeper the night shadows grew, 
We built fairy castles in fancy. 
And plighted our love there anew. 

She was fresh and as fair as the roses 
That bloomed round the farm-house gray. 
From whose love and whose shelter she never 
As yet had ventured away. 

And I in the morning of manhood 
The burdens of life little knew. 
For my worldly horizon was bounded 
By the mountains that cut off our view. 

Thus dreaming, the eve of our parting 
Passed sweetly and swiftly away. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



165 



Till farewell I kissed her at leaving 
In the door of the farm-house gray. 

Since then I have been here at college, 
I've dranlv at the Pierian spring ; 
But as ever my fondest affections 
To the maid of the farm-house cling. 

Though I've mingled with those who were 

cultured, 
Though I've quaffed of society's charm. 
Still the dreams of the farm-house come o'er, 
With a soothing spirit of calm. 

For I know that a pure, noble woman 
In the farm-house is waiting for me. 
Who pledged me eternal affection 
Long ago, 'neath the old willow tree. 

In heart, if not head, she is cultured. 
And I lovingly long for the day. 
When my wife she shall go forth forever 
From the door of the farm-house gray. 



THE MATTER WITH SNOOKS. 

As the season for amateur plays draws 
near the wail of the theatrical tyro is heard in 
the land. Among them is our friend Snooks, 
who is preparing to act the r6le of a fond 
lover. The other night, just as we were 
comfortably settled into a sound slumber, we 
were aroused hj a series of unearthly sounds 
in the direction of Snooks' room. Thinking 
him ill we quickly arose and hastened to his 
assistance. As we approached the door we 
recognized Snooks' voice in the following 
sentences : 

"Ah, fickle maid! why spurnest me? 
Cau'st thy adamantine heart feel no pity ? I 
go, but thou shalt re-pent hit-iQv-lj re-pent. 
J.-dieu, false coquette a-dieu. " These last 
words died away in a low gurgle that made 
our blood run cold. Concluding that Snooks 
had become a victim of intemperance, although 
we have never known of his drinking anything 
stronger than water, we determined to get 
him to bed as quietly and speedily as possi- 
ble. So we noiselessly opened the door and 
slipped in. The sight that met our gaze was 



calculated to try stronger nerves than ours. 
Suspended from the hanging lamp by a strong 
cord was a pillow, in front of which, arrayed 
in rohe de nuit, stood Snooks in the pose of a 
Roman gladiator, with an expression upon 
his face resembling that of Laocoon in tlie 
grasp of the serpents. So intent was he that 
he failed to notice us, and so we tremblingly 
seated ourselves in a corner and awaited de- 
velopments. After standing in this posture 
for a few moments a change came over 
Snooks. An expression, midway between 
the grin of an ape and cherub's smile, stole 
over his face, and he rushed upon the pillow 
with outstretched arms and clasped it to his 
heart with passionate tenderness. " Dearest 
Imogene," he murmured, thou can'st not 
know how happy thou hast made me. The 
clouds are gone. My life will be all roses 
now — My wife ! My life ! " and he kissed 
the pillow with raptuous fervor. 

We waited to see no more. Snooks was 
undoubtedly in a high fever and suffering the 
wildest delirum. He must be attended to at 
once, and as we did not feel competent to 
undertake the task alone, we hastened away 
to summon assistance. Returning with half 
a dozen of the boys we found Snooks still 
raving and embracing the pillow. As we 
entered his room he turned upon us with de- 
moniac rage. A look of terrible malignity 
came into his face. 

"Ah, fiends!" he shrieked, aiming the 
broom at us, "ye seek to take her, but it 
shall nev-ev be. I will defend her with my 
life. Back dogs to your kennels, nor cross 
my path again at your peril ! " 

We secured him after a desperate struggle 
in which several of us were badly laid out. It 
was not till we had got him upon the bed, and 
firmly bound him to it that we learned the 
truth. He had been practicing his part in the 
play. Of course we apologized to Snooks, but 
you may just believe that hereafter none of us 
will take much stock in amateur plays. 



166 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



THETA DELTA CONVENTION. 

On the evening of November 16th, last, 
fourteen Bowdoin undergraduates, members 
of the Eta charge of Theta Delta Chi, were 
gathered on the steamer running from Port- 
land to Boston. If the sedate darkies who 
composed the visible force of help upon the 
boat were ever astonished, it was that night, 
and the passengers enjoyed (?) an unwonted 
pleasure, that of hearing all the old standbys 
in the college song-book, from the musical 
and unmusical throats of fourteen students. 
However, we believe the strains were pre- 
ventative of sea-sickness, and everybody 
seemed to have a good time. 

Wednesday morning, the Fortieth Annual 
Convention of Theta Delta Chi, held at 
"Young's," under the auspices of the Bow- 
doin charge, was opened, with the President 
of the Grand Lodge, Dr. John M. Curtis of 
Wilmington, Delaware, in the chair. The 
rush of business was great for the three days 
of session, necessitating an evening sitting 
Thursday, the first instance of such an oc- 
currence on record. The most important 
matter which came up during the convention, 
and that which took up so much of the time, 
was the adoption of the new constitution, 
upon which some of the ablest lawyers and 
enthusiastic brothers in the fraternity have 
been engaged for several years. 

The officers of the Grand Lodge for the 
ensuing year were chosen at the last session. 
Dr. Curtis was re-elected President, while H. 
C. Hill of Bowdoin, holds the office of 
Treasurer. 

The banquet, Friday evening, was an ex- 
ceedingly enjoyable affair, as none but men 
who have been present at fraternity conven- 
tion banquets can fully understand. The 
President of the evening was Hon. S. A. 
Simons, of Buffalo, N. Y., a graduate of the 
Beta of Cornell, and ex-President of the 
Grand Lodge. Hon. Joseph Burnett, a grad- 
uate of Bowdoin in 1864, delivered the 



oration, which was one of the choicest pieces 
of literary criticism ever delivered in Boston, 
and received nearly a column's notice in the 
next day's Herald. 

Many graduates of various colleges at- 
tended the convention, but what made it 
peculiarly interesting to Bowdoin men, aside 
from its being under their auspices was the 
fact that two of Eta's charter members made 
their appearance — Rev. J. P. Watson, of '56, 
and C. J. Little, Esq., of '57. From them 
they received many valuable reminiscences 
concerning the foundation of their charge. 

On the whole, the Eta charge sincerely 
hopes and trusts that the Fortieth Conven- 
tion, held by her, will hereafter stand full of 
pleasant recollections to all who attended, 
and without hesitation, accepts as deserved 
the numerous congratulations upon its success. 



OLD-TIME PRANKS. 

Curious, the disposition which all men 
have to amuse themselves at the ignorance 
and credulity of others. Nowhere does this 
spirit have a better chance to. display itself 
than in a college, where the Freshman is the 
type of guilelessness. It does no harm, if it 
is not carried too far, but rather serves to 
keep the Freshman on his guard, and to pre- 
vent "brashness." In conversation with an 
old-timer I was told many anecdotes of the 
"good old times," a few of which I will re- 
late. 

On one occasion, many of the Freshmen 
were agreeably surprised by the receipt of 
fine, gilt-edged invitations to a banquet at 
the Tontine, to be given hj the Juniors. 
On arriving at the banquet hall, they were 
delighted with the sumptuous repast whicK 
met their eyes. But the eating was not so 
pleasant, for a fine pudding proved, on trial,. 
to be filled with sawdust ; some frosted cakes- 
were made of bricks; pastry, of wood,, 
turned to the desired shape, and sugared; and 
tempting dishes of confectionery consisted 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



167 



of pounded bricks and pieces of wood. The 
Freshmen went home with empty stomachs 
that night. 

At another time two of the Freshmen 
were enticed by the Sophomores into the 
attic of the hotel, and deprived of their clothes, 
and locked in. Then the Sophomores going 
into the street, set up a cry of " Fire ! " 
The poor prisoners stuck their heads out of 
the window and yelled "Murder!" lustily. 
Soon a crowd collected, and the fire depart- 
ment turned out. How the affair terminated 
my informant did not say. 

But the Freshmen on one occasion had. a 
peculiar jollification. At the time of the 
famous " drill mutiny," it was a law of the 
Sophomores that no Freshman should wear a 
tall hat, carry a cane, or have a dog. But 
when the Freshmen all mutinied against the 
drill, the Sophomores suspended the law for 
the time. Then the Freshmen ransacked the 
neighboring country for dogs. One day 
there was a base-ball match in Portland, and 
all the Freshmen turned out in a body, 
equipped with tall hats, with big weeds on 
them, carrying canes and leading dogs. 
Some were leading a diminutive poodle with 
a piece of ship's hawser, and others led big 
bull-dogs or mastiffs with a thread. They 
crowded into the rear car of the train and 
made things lively during the journey. 
Their singular appearance was the source of 
much comment among the Portlanders, but 
they didn't care. They did their duty at 
the ball game, and. returned to Brunswick at 
night very happy, but much fatigued by their 
labors. 



NEW ENGLAND INTERCOLLEGIATE 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

Delegates from Amherst, Bowdoin, Brown, 
Dartmouth, Trinity, Tufts, and Williams met 
at the Quincy House, Boston, Tuesday even- 
ing, November 23d, for the purpose of form- 
ing an intercollegiate athletic association. The 



colleges were represented as follows : Amherst, 
by Messrs. Smith and Wilkinson ; Bowdoin, 
by Messrs. Austin and Talbot ; Brown, by 
Mr. White ; Dartmouth, by Messrs. Liv- 
erraoi'e and Philips ; Trinity, by Messrs. Ap- 
plegate, Beai'dsley, and Elton ; Tufts, by 
Messrs. Cook, Durkee, and Bdgerly ; Williams, 
by Messrs. Abbott and Cravins. 

The meeting was called to order at 8 
o'clock, Mr. Applegate being elected tem- 
porary chairman, and Talbot temporary sec- 
retary. 

It was decided to call the association " The 
New England Intercollegiate Athletic Asso- 
ciation." 

A committee of three were appointed to 
consult concerning a constitution. The con- 
stitution which was agreed upon was mainly 
that of the intercollegiate association with 
some important and necessary changes. 

For officers of the convention : Mr. Ap- 
plegate, of Trinity, was elected President; 
Mr. Austin, of Bowdoin, First Vice-President; 
Mr. Abbott, of Williams, Second Vice-Pres- 
ident ; Mr. Smith, of Amherst, Secretary ; 
Mr. White, of Brown, Treasurer. 

The next regular meeting of the delegates 
will be held in Boston the second Saturday of 
February, 1888. 

An executive committee, composed of one 
from each college, was then elected, consisting 
of B. Smith, P. D. White, A. L. Livermore, 
W. A. Beardsley, W. L. Cook, J. H. Cravens, 
and F. L. Talbot. The meeting adjourned at 
10.15. 

After an intermission of fifteen minutes 
the executive committee held a private meet- 
ing. Mr. White was elected chairman and. 
Mr. Livermore, Secretary. It was not fully 
decided when the spring meeting will occur, 
but probably will be the last of May or first 
of June. This will be decided at the next 
meeting of the committee. 

The following contests were agreed upon ; 
100, 220, and 440 yards dashes; 1-mile to 



168 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



2-mile runs ; and 120 j'ards hurdle race ; 
2-mile bicj^cle race ; standing high and broad, 
running high and broad jumps ; pole and bar 
vaults; putting shot; throwing 16-poiind 
hammer; tlirowiiig base-ball; and an exhi- 
bition of Indian club swinging. 
The meeting adjourned at 12.15 




Oh, Booker ! in your life of 

ease, 
Sequestered, wily, hard to 
seize. 
When cold the cruel north winds blow 
Through windows broken months ago, 
We freeze and sigh — but sigh in vain — 
To see thy genial face again. 
Our life is short, the grave is near, 
We have not long to linger here ; 
But Booker e'er away we pass 
Come round, come round, and set that glass. 

The eighty-fifth annual catalogue of the college 
has been issued. It gives the number of students as 
follows : Seniors, 29 ; Juniors, 28 ; Sophomores, 41 ; 
Freshmen, 38 ; Medical School, 85 ; special student, 
1 ; total, 222. The catalogue states that over seven 
hundred volumes have been added to the library, 
and that large additions have been made to all the 
scientific departments. Fryeburg Academy, at Frye- 
burg, Hallowell, at Hallowell, and Washington 
Academy, at East Machias, are fitting schools for the 
college. Two studies are elective the last two terms 
of the Senior year, instead of one, as formerly. 

President Hyde has a large class in theology 
which meets once a week. 

Mr. Varney, '87, has been elected delegate to the 
New England Intercollegiate Boating Association, 
which meets in New York, December 31st. 

Governor John A. Andrew, of Massachusetts, was 
President of the Branch of the American Peace So- 
ciety in Bowdoin College, while he was a member 
of that institution. — American Advocate of Peace 
and Arbitration. 

We clip the following from a daily paper : " The 
American Protective Tariff League met to-day at the 



League room, 23 West 23d Street, and among other 
proceedings decided to offer to students of the Senior 
classes in all American colleges, a series of prizes 
for approved essays on the subject of, "Advantages 
of a Protective Tariff to the Labor and Industries 
of the United States." Each essay is not to exceed 
10,000 words, and to be sent to the oflice of the 
League on or before May 1, 1887 ; awards to be 
made June 15, 1887, as follows : For best essay, 
$250; second best, $100; third best, $50; and for 
other essays deemed especially meritorious, a hand- 
some silver medal designed for this purpose. The 
League reserves the right to publish, at its own cost, 
any of such successful essays, and to include the 
first prize essays in the annual publication of the 
League." 

A new horizontal bar has been put up in the 
gymnasium, on the southern side. Mr. Whittier has 
also obtained a number of round, wooden bars, about 
five feet long, which will be used by the classes, 
instead of the dumb-bell exercise. 

Chemical conundrum : If a student should have 
a test-tube of boiling acid poured down the back of 
his neck, what chemical change would result? 
Answer. It would cause sudden precipitation. 

At a recent meeting of the class of '89, the fol- 
lowing members were appointed to draw up a class 
constitution : Clark, Files, S. L. Fogg, Manson, 
Robie. 

Staples, '89, has gone out teaching. 

The "funny men (?) " a good ways back 

At recitation sit; 
And try to show they have no lack 

Of ever-ready wit. 
They grin, they giggle, and they scoff 

At breaks of other men. 
In order to convince the Prof. 

He'd better called on them. 
Yet when the " funny man " is pulled 

The wit (?) all leaves his head. 
He goes beyond the man that bulled 

And takes a mighty dead ! 

A Senior gifted with a child-like nature, went to 
one of the professors, and informed him that he could 
not attend recitations for a week or so, as he had a 
part in a farce which demanded all his time. 

We understand that Soule intends to open a 
boxing school here next term. Ten dollars will pay 
for the acquisition of the art. 

The Sophomores have postponed their election 
till next term. The elections in the other three 
classes still hang fire. 

Wednesday evening, December 8th, Prof. Chap- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



169 



man delivered an address before a Teachers' Associ- 
ation, which had been recently organized in Lewiston. 

The heavy storm during the week before Thanks- 
giving showed tha existence of a few leaks in the 
roof of the new gymnasium. 

Who will charge the students of the college with 
a lack of politeness, when one of the most promi- 
nent members of the Sophomore class tiikes pains 
to knock at the library door before entering ? 

A meeting of the college jury was held in Lower 
Memorial on the evening of December 7th. 

The Juniors are to have no regular examination 
in German at the close of this term. 

On the evening of December 1st, at the Franklin 
School, in Topsham, there was given an entertain- 
ment, the principal feature of which was the "Peek 
Family," under the direction of Prof. Chapman. 
The programme was very successfully carried out. 
Quite a number of the students were present. 

The attendance at the gymnasium exercises, 
which was very large during the first two or three 
weeks, has decreased somewhat on account of the 
recent cold weather. 

G. W. Parsons, '87, has returned to college. 

The hydrants on the campus were tested, Satur- 
day, Nov. 27th. A stream of water could be easily 
thrown over any of the dormitories with only the 
pressure of the standpipe. A stream of water just 
cleared the tops of the chapel chimneys. 

President Hyde addressed a crowded temperance 
meeting in the Town Hall, Sunday evening, Nov. 
28th, under the auspices of the W. C. T. U. The 
address has been most favorably commented on by 
all who heard it. 

On November 19th, Prof. Chapman went to 
Bangor to assist at the installation of Rev. Charles 
Cutler, '81, as pastor of the First Congregational 
Church of that city. 

Prof. Robinson lectured in Auburn, Friday even- 
ing, Nov. 26th, on "Explosives and Explosive Com- 
pounds." The Lewiston Journal speaks very highly 
of the lecture. 

The college orchestra have for several evenino-s 
past been practicing in Memorial, and it is an in- 
spiring sight to see the bass-viol striding across the 
campus with its latest victim. 

During the recent unsettled state of affairs in the 

South Maine recitation room, the Freshmen recited 

their Mathematics in the Sophomore room in South 

Winthrop. 

Instructor in Physics (to the Juniors)—" To illus- 



trate the conductivity of solids, if I were to hold my 
watch at one end of the table and apply my ear at 
the other end, I should distinctly hear the ticking." 
N. B. — The table is about twelve feet long and the 
students wonder at the length of the instructor's arm. 

And now the sons of indolence, 
The hibernating digs; 
The would-be-college mashers. 
And the lily-fingered prigs, 
Explain the ponderous reason why 
The " gym " they have forsaken, 
And say they're only waiting 
Till the measurements are taken. 

The following are the gymnasium officers of the 
different classes : Seniors — E. B. Torrey, Captain; 
A. W. Merrill, First Leader; C. C. Choate, Second 
Leader; Juniors — G. F. Cary, Captain; D. M. Cole, 
First Leader; W. W. Woodman, Second Leader; 
Sophomores — G. T. Files, Captain ; Lory Prentiss, 
First Leader; E. Manson, Second Leader; Fresh- 
men — F. M. Gates, Captain ; F. J. Allen, First Leader ; 
F. S. Simpson, Second Leader. 

The college library has recentlj' been enriched 
by the gift of two hundred dollars from some gen- 
erous donor who does not allow his name to be made 
known. 

M. P. Smithwick, '88, is teaching at Chebeague, 
Me. Shaw, '88, has a school at Gushing, Me. 

We hope that there will be good skating on the 
river, when the students return, next term. 

During the cold weather, the attendance at morn- 
ing chapel is rather meagre. On one morning, re- 
cently, there were but four Seniors present, and al- 
most as scanty a proportion of the other classes. 

Hill, '89, has gone out teaching, for the winter ; 
Rogers, '89, has done the same. 

Now that winter has commenced in earnest, we 
would suggest to the college authorities that the com- 
fort of the students would be greatly increased, 
if springs were placed on the end-doors of the va- 
rious buildings. 

At the Universalist Fair, Thursday and Friday 
evenings, Dec. 11 and 12, the play, " Louva, the 
Pauper," was rendered with the following cast of 
characters : Louva, Mrs. A. T. Bodge ; Aggie Fam- 
ham, Miss M. A. Stanwood ; Mrs. Craft, Miss M. I. 
Toothaker ; Gypsy Crone, Miss A. A. Snow ; Aunt 
Charity (anegress), Miss L. S. Rideout; Dick Lang- 
ley, Mr. J. V. Lane; Will Spriggs, Mr. G. M. 
Wheeler; Col. Farnham, Mr. F. Pushor; Sol Craft 
Mr. L. B. Varney ; Bob Craft, Mr. Paul Randall ; Mr! 
Withgow, Mr. E. S. Barrett ; Peleg Pucker (Yankee 
Pedler), Mr. W. W. Woodman; Cranky, Mr. H. C. 



170 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Royal ; Tony (a darkey), Mr. C. B. Burleigh. There 
was also an original farce, "A Sea of Troubles,'' 
with the following cast of characters : Godolphus 
Gout fan invalid), Mr. E. S. Barrett; Hiram Orcutt 
(a Yankee), Mr. Paul Randall; Whats-His-Name 
Thingamy (a man of memory), Mr. H. C. Royal; 
Byron Bobolink (a budding poet), Mr. L. B. Var- 
ney ; Mike JNlcShane (an Emerald Isle man), Mr. C. 
B. Burleigh ; Stammering Steve (a professor of elo- 
cution), Mr. W. W. Woodman; Robert (Gout's 
nephew), Mr. Fermer Pushor ; Jenny (Gout's ser- 
vant), Miss Annie A. Snow. 

Messrs. Wm. S. Kimball & Co. have produced a 
cigarette that has long been desired. It is delicately 
perfumed, just enough to destroy the odor of the 
burning paper, and changes the smoke to an incense, 
so entirely different from the ordinary cigarette, that 
no one cau object to its use ; it is innoxious and uni- 
versally liked. 

The Biological Laboratory has lately received a 
new Thoma microtome. This is an instrument for 
cutting thin sections of substances for examination 
by the microscope. It is of the best manufacture 
and was imported from Heidelberg as a donation 
from Mr. E. G. Spring, of the class of 1880. 

The concert given in Jilemorial, Saturday even- 
ino-, was a very pleasant and successful occasion. 
Every artist was encored. Following is the pro- 
gramme : 



Overture— The Tourist. Schlepegrell. 
Song of the Old Bell— Selected. 
Fantasia in C Minor. 



b. Allegro, 
e. Andantino, 



Venzano Waltz. 

500,000 Teulel. Grahen Hoffmann. 



Orchestra. 
Mr. Fling. 



Mrs. Kichards. 

Miss Smart. 

Herr Buehmann. 



a. Harmonious Blacksmith. Handel. 

b. Elfin Dance. Kulak. 

Mrs. Eichards. 
Good-Bye. Tosti. Mr. Walker. 

Ano-els' Serenade. G. Braga. Miss Smart. 

Violin Obligato. Mr. Burpee. 
Liitzons "Wilde Jayd. Weber. Herr Buehmann. 

Quartette— Selected. 

Mr. Walker, Mr. Simpson, Mr. Files, Mr. Fhng. 
Accompanist, Miss Mabel Swett 

The portrait of Hawthorne, to defray the ex- 
penses of which this series of entertainments was 
given, was exhibited upon the stage. We are 
pleased to announce that a course of lectures and 
concerts similar to that of the present term, will be 
given next term. 

We have to thank Mr. Byron Stevens for an in- 
teresting paper on the recent unveiling of the fa- 



mous Egyptian mummy, Rameses 11., more com- 
monly known as the Pharaoh who oppressed the Is- 
raelites in the time of Moses. In addition to the new 
information given us, there are three photographic 
engravings showing how well preserved is this old 
celebrity after his long sleep. These papers Mr. 
Stevens is selling for ten cents. 




'22.— Dr. D. Humph- 
reys Storer, LL.D., the 
well-known naturalist, has pre- 
sented to the college library over 
one hundred volumes and two hundred 
pamphlets, relating to Natural History. 
Many of the works are of considerable value. They 
will form an important addition to the department 
of Natural History. 

35.— Rev. Stephen Allen, D.D., of Winthrop, 
Me., has nearly completed his "History of the Meth- 
odism of Maine." It will be fully illustrated with 
portraits of manyof the former distinguished clergy- 
men and laymen of that denomination in this State. 

'48. — A memorial sermon on the life and work 
of the late Dexter A. Hawkins, was preached by 
Rev. Robert Collyer, in the Church of the Messiah, 
New York, Sunday morning, November 7th. 

'58. — Gen. Jonathan P. Cilley, of Rockland, is 
preparing a historj' of the First Maine Cavalry, his 
regiment. While in Boston, recently, he was given 
a reception and banquet by the First Maine Cavalry 
Association of Massachusetts. 

'60.— Hon. William W. Thomas, of Portland, is 
engaged upon a work to be entitled, " A Sketch of 
Swedish Life and Manners." He recently arrived 
home from Sweden, where he has been collecting 
materials for the work. 

'61. — Mr. Charles G. Haines, of Portland, died 
December 1st. He was engaged in business for sev- 
eral years in Biddeford, and afterwards in Portland. 

'69. — Mr. James Dike died November 23d. He 
was a son of Rev. S. F. Dike, D.D., of Bath, Me. 
He taught in the High School, Bath, in the Univer- 
sity, Urbana, Ohio, in Waltham, Mass., and in the 
Boston Latin School. He resided at the time of his 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



171 



death at Durham, N. C, where he was engaged in 
business. 

'80. — W. W. Northend was married Nov. 2, 1885, 
to Miss Holt of Winchester, Mass. Both the bride 
and groom are children of Bowdoin graduates, W. 
D. Northend, 'i3— S. A. Holt, '46. This notice was 
omitted in a previous issue by mistake. 

'81. — Mr. Charles H. Cutler, of Farmington, a 
graduate of Andover Theological Seminary, was 
installed pastor of the First Congregational Church 
of Bangor, November 19th. The sermon was by 
Prof. Henry S. Chapman. The charge to the pastor 
was by Rev. John J. Blair of Andover, Mass. 

'85. — Mr. W. R. Butler was married, November 
17th, to Miss Lu Mitchell of Freeport, Me., at the 
home of the bride. They will reside in Warren, R. 
I., where Mr. Butler is principal of the high school. 



The College of the City of New York has re- 
vived the old student mortar-board cap of the be- 
ginning of this century. A good idea. 

The University of Michigan is to observe her 
fiftieth anniversary next June. 

One hundred and eighty-nine courses are now 
offered at Harvard. 



ALLEN'S PHARMACY, 

LEMOWT BLOCK, 

Main Street, - - Brunswick, Me. 

WEAK OXE OF 

MERRY'S 

CELEBRATED HATS. 

Always the Correct Style. 

237 MIDDLE STREET, 

PORTLAND. 



h. v. stackpole, 
Fine Boots and Shoes, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 

Dentist, 



Dealer in MM M Fancy (Jroceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 

MASON STREET. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce. 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno-w's Grocery Store. 

Special Rates to Stndent Clubs. 

FRAKK A. HALE, Proprietor, 
DeWITT HOUSE, TONTINE HOTEL, 

Lewiston, Me. Brunswick, Me. 

Private Suppers and Banquets a specialty. 

F. A. FARE, Manager. 

W. B. SPEAR. J. A. WmTMOBE. 



STORER BLOCK, 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



SPEAR & WHITMORE, 

DEALERS rx 

ALL KINDS OF COAL, 

Cedar Street, Brunswick, Me. 

Brancli Office, Opposite Post-Office, Main Street. Telephone 
Communication with Coal Yard. 

F. L. DUNNE, 

Impopting ^Tailor, 

338 Washington Street, 

EOS-TOliT. 

A VERY LARGE LINE OF GOODS 

Specially selected for students' wear. 

ALL THE LATEST LONDON AND PARIS NOVELTIES 

Regularly imported. 

Tailor to the Harvard Co-operative Society. 

Our representative will visit Brunswick next spring to 
take orders. 

338 WASHINGTON STREET, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



CIGARETTE 
Smolcers who 

are wiQiiig^to 
paya little more 
for Cigarettes 

than the price 



R ICHMOND 

charged for the ordinary trade Cigarettes" ^viU 
And the RICHMOSD STKAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO AIX OTHERS. 
Ihey are made from the fcrlglitest, most 
delicately flaTOred, and blgbest cost 

f;old leaf grown in Virginia, and are aljso- 
ately TFlthont adulteration or dmgg. 

TRAIGHTCUr- 



We use the Gemiliie Frencb Rice Paper 

of our own direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of^the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
origioal brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or box of ■ 
Richmond 
Straight Cut 
Cigarettes 

bears the I 
eignature of ' 

ALLEN &CINTEI 

MANUTAOTDEERB, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



niGARETTE 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 

Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry, Promptly Repaired and Warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWED, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRrNSWICK, MB. 



njaine Bentpal R. ^. 

On and after Oct. 25th, 1886, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.15, 11.25 A.M., 2.3S, 4.40 and 6.25 P.M., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Rockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.38 P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.35 p.m., and 

every uight, including Sundays, at 12.35. 
For Lewiston, 8.15 A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. fmixed), and 2.45 p.m. 
For Augusta, 8.20 a.m., 2.40 and 6.35 p.m., and 12.45 every uight. 
For WatcrvlUe and Bangor, 8.20 a.m., 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 night, 

and for Waterville, Saturdays only at 6.35 P.M. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 (night). 
For Bangor and Piscataquis R. R., 8.20 A.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Ellsworth, Bar Harbor, Tanceboro, St. Stephen, Houlton, 

and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 12.4.5 (night). 

Note.— The night ti-ains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
ston, and Bangor, run every uight, including Sunday, but do not 
connect for Skowhegan on Monday.morning, or lor Belfast and 
Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sunday morning. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BOOTHBT, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 21, 1886. 



SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. 

Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 

The following are our well known 

STANDARD BRANDS : 

Capoeal, Sweet Capokax, St. James 1-2, Caporal 1-2, 

St. James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES. 

Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and French Rice Paper, are rolled by the high- 
est class of skilled labor, and w,arranted free from flavoring or 
impurities 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a FAC-sisnLE of Kinnet Bros. 
Signature. 

KINNEY TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KINNET BROS. 
NEW YORK. 



JORDAN SNOW, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

DuNLAP Block, Brunswick, Me. 



(INTERGEPTED LETTER.: 



Brunswick, May 14, 1886. 
Owen, Moore & Co., Portland. 
Gentlemen : 
Please send me hy mail one pair long Bicycle Stockings, 
size 9^, regulation League Color. Enclosed one dollar and 
stamps for postage. I see by advertisement in Portland 
paper that you carry a line of Tennis Goods. Please send 
me a price-list of Rackets and Balls, with best discount to 
a regular club. What are the prices on Jersey Coats, 
and in what color do they come ? 

Yours truly, 
P. O. Box 2002. BOB BROWN. 



Confectionery, Fruit, and Cigar Store, 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

Wm. R. FIELD, Manager. 

V/. HAWTHORNE, 

FINE*TAILORING, 

2 Church Block, Bath. 



THIS PAPEK"* the Newspaper 

N> Wa AVER & SON, our authorized agents. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEGE bookstore:. 

We have coustautly iu stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods "iu variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 

BYRON STEVJKNS. 



The best place in towTi to buy your 

LINEN COLLARS and CUFFS, TIES, SCARFS, GLOVES, 

Hats, Caps, Cajjes, Ect., is at 

PLUMMER'S, O'Brien Block. 

Correct Styles, and Best Quality, at Bottom Prices. 

A. F. NICHOLS, 

Merchant Tailor 

BBUNSWICK, ME. 
Have your Fall and Winter Suit Made at Nioliols. 

A Choice Line of Styles to Select From. 

OVERCOATS in Great Variety. 
PINE GOODS. LOW PRICES. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Call and Examine. 

A. F. NICHOLS, - Odd Fellows Block. 

Full Dress Suits, and Dress Frocks a Specialty. 



ADAMS & UNIACKE 

HAVE A FULL LINE OF STOVES 

Also, all kinds of Iiamps, 

And most everytUug found in a Stove and Crockery Store. 

MAIN STKEET, BRUNSWICK. 



VISIT G. E. CHANDLER, 

DEALER IN 

OYSTERS and ICE-CREAM, 

Main Street, Brunswick, Maine. 

F. H. WILSON, 

DISPENSER OF 

Pure Drugs, Medicines, and Chemicals. 

Imported and Domestic Cigars. 
MAIN STREET, - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 



THE 



* TRAVELERS ♦ 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HERTFORD, CON"I^., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVST $1 l,000,000y and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 

A ppTT\T^Xrnp "p/AT TPTTTQ Indemnifying the Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
-f*-'-^^J--L'-l-'l^ JL X VyJ-iAv^XJjjO Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidental Injury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only JfS.OO a year to Professional or Business Men, for each Sl.OOO, with $5.00 weekly Indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence f>-ee to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 1864 have received fatal or disabling injuries, and heen paid CASH 
benefits. 

Issues T T'PT? T>r^T Tr^TT?C of every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 
also JU-LX' Xj X VJXjXV^IXLiO Personal Benefit. 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Office at Hartford. 
JAS. 6. BATTEESON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary. JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



QOClJET'y 'S^tes cuxcl Alettes, Cizts ctrtd JUnstgruicL. 
'W'riting Fcuper" cltlcI Ccurds JEngi^cuve.d, ctnd Frirvted-. 
StzLdent's 'Vistttrtg Cclt^cLs. IrcvttcLtions of ej^&ry 'h.vn.d. 
e:x:eaTi.tecL by tfie. e-rcgrcuvtrig hozise of 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



•*- 



Society JjwttcLtions , ^ies, cmd IllvistrcLtzoThs for- Y'ecur- 
(^oo'ks, Afonogrcurrts , jlT^rrhSj ctrtd Cr^ests JEngr'CL^red, curh d 
^rtrute-cL. 'Vtsitzng Cards, and. the Clxoicest Stationery. Seals, 
Tapers, and Sealing Waz, and Sealing Sets. 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 




[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

The Unrivalled Remedy for Dyspepsia, Mental and Physical Exhaustion, Nervousness, Wakefulness, 

Diminished Vitality, etc. 

As Food for an Exhausted Brain, in Liver and Kidney Trouble, in Seasicliness and Sicl( Headaciie, in Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion and Constipation, in Inebriety, Despondency and cases of Impaired Nerve Function, 

It has become a necessity in a large number of households throughout the worlds 

And is universally prescribed and recommended by physicians of all schools. 
Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 
It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body. 
It is unsurpassed as a substitute for lemons or limes, and 

IT MAKKS A DELICIOUS DRINK W^ITH "WATER AND SUGAR ONLY. 

Prices Reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

RUIMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, R. I. 
fl®-BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.-ffia' 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A.. O. REED, 

BR,T:T3srsA:viCK:, IvIe. 

Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Good Assortment of Brunsmrick and Topsham 
Viewrs ; also College Views. 



Go to W. B. lAToodard's 

To buy your GROCERIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aucl COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save money by so doiog. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 




OTTAWA 

Ts/L. 



Cushlng's Island 
Portland, Me. 
C3-IBSO]Sr. 



Bowdoin College Medical Department. 

The Sixty-Seventh Annual Course of Lectures at tlie 
Medical School of Maine, will commence Frbruary 3d, 
1S87. and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Rev. Wji. DEWirr Hyde, President: Aured 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. 0ana, M.D., rathol- 
ogy anit Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., 
Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. Gekrish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Franklin C. Robinson, A.M., Chemisti-y; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henrv H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Toung, Public Hygiene; 
Irving E. Klmball, M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealey, M.D., Demonsti-ator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine 



ALL KINDS OF 




EXECUTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BOBDEBS, 

NEW BESIGNS. 

We make a specialty of 

For Schools and Colleges. 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Miig-azines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat autl Durable MauDer. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



•RE:rMUER3, ^^ 






^^ 



g9^°A\IDDLE--STii 



-PORTLANDI 



ATParker 

_^ 164 High St 



We would be pleased to show you our line of Englisli 
Specialties secured for our 

TAILORING DEPARTMENT. 



HIGH GLASS WORK GAN BE DEPENDED UPON. 



FASHIONABLE MADE UP CLOTHING, 

Of our own make, can always be found at our establisliment. 

Shirts to Measure, Hosiery, Gloves, Underwear, Ueok Dressings 
and General Outfittings in our Furnishing Department. 



Donnel Building, Corner Pearl and Middle Streets, PORTLAND, ME., 

WOULD RESPECTFULLY CALL THE ATTENTION OF 

Buyers o[ Fumltuie, Carielsjeiliig, Parlor Stoves, Banges, &g., 

To the Enormous Stock of House Furnishings at the Portland Store. Being Manufacturers' 

intending purchasers can see the styles and select their own coverings for Parlor Furniture, and' have it made 

to order for the same price. We keep euormous quantities of Upholstery Goods in the Boston Store, 

and full lines of samples. Here our prices on Parlor Suites range from $35.00 in Hair Cloth 

to 3f375.00 in Silk or Mohair Plushes. 



CHAMBER FURNITURE. 

We have in stock in our three stores S7 different ^aX- 
terns of Chamber Suites, manufactured from all the pop- 
ular woods, viz.: Pine, Ash, Walnut, Cherry, Basswood, 
and Mahogany, ranging in price from IglS.OO to 35400.00. 
We also have all kinds, sizes, and quantities of Bedsteads, 
Bureaus, Commodes, etc. Spring Beds, Cot Beds, Lounge 
Beds, Sofa Beds, Mantel Beds, etc. Mattresses of every 
kind and quality, from an excelsior at Sf2.00 to a pure 
bleached South American curled horse hair at 5f25.00. 

CARPET DEPARTMENT. 

$75,000 worth of Cottons, Cotton and Wools, AU-Wool 
Extras, Tapestry, Brussels, Body Brussels, Velvets, Wil- 
tons, etc., at our usual Rock-Bottom Prices. Any of these 
can be selected at the Portland store. SHADES and 



DRAPERY of every description made to order in the 
Bosto]i store. Orders taken here and designs and samples 
shown. 

PARLOR STOVES. 

Special attention is requested to our Parlor Stove De- 
partment, as we believe we have the best line to select 
from in Maine. Prices $4.00 to $40.00. 

STOVES AND RANGES. 

Our line of Banges comprises all the latest and best in 
the market, including the "New Tariff " and " Quaker," 
which are considered superior to anything yet produced . 
Write for cuts of these two Ranges. Prices $15.00, $20.00, 
$22.50, $25.00, $27.50, $2y.00, $33.00, $35.00, $38.00, and up- 
wards to $65.00. These prices Include all the w.are, pipe, 
and zinc. 



Any of the above goods sold for Cash or on our Special Contract System, at 

Donnel Building, Cor. Pearl and Middle Streets, Portland, Me. 

Branch of the Great Nassau Hall House Furnishi7ig Store, 827 Washington Street, Boston. 

B. A. ATKINSON & CO. 



ISAAC C. ATKINSON, Manager. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A CLEAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

A3SnD THE AJDJUSTABLE HANGING 
SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard " and " Duplex " Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Glass Cards and Monograms 

EMaEAVED IN THE MOST PASHIOHiBLE STYLE. 



Messrs. WILLIAM S. KIMBALL & CO., 



Take pleasure in announciug that 
they are prepared to sup- 
ply without delay 

COLLEGE FRATERNITIES 

WITH THEIK 



Satin Stiaiglt Gut Gigarettes. 

Packed in Fraternity Colors. 

Also Class and College Colors. 

Name of Society can be inserted on label if desired. 




14 First Prize Medali 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY ^^!^^^^. 

AGENCy FOR 

ROGERS' CELEBRATED GROUPS. 



COBURN CLASSICAL INSTITUTE, 

r ATERVILLE, ME. Both Sexes. Four Courses of Study : 
' luti-ortuctory; College Preparatory, 3 years; English and 
tilic, l> years ; Ladies' Collegiate, 4 years. Location healthy, 
expenses nioder.ate, discipline wholesome, morals good. Persons 
usinr/ alcoholic bevernges or tobacco jieed not apply. Accommoda- 
tions ample and excellent. For further information send for 
Catalogue to J. H. HANSON, Principal. 



V^ 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

474 Congress St., - - - opp. Preble House. 

THE LOWER BOOKSTORE 

N0. 5 0DD EEIjL0W^' BIiOCK, 

Is the place to buy 

So.nki, Siaiioiwi/y,, § d'anmj ^aodd. 

Telephone Exchange, connected with the store. 

A. W. TOWNSEND, Prop'r. 



The New Styles in 

Smi^I^ and. SOZPT I3:.A.n7S 

In all colors, are now ready. An elegant line of New York 

Neckwear in New Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, 

-3^T ELLIOTT'S, 8^ 

OPPOSITE MASON STKEET. 



IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHER, 

And Dealer in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 

G. L. York, Old College Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



tiiuie: is monsy. 

And we sell time for Little Money. Buy your Watches, 
Clocks, and Jeweluy clieap for casli of 

4-DAVlS, JEWELER. -h 

A FINE LINE OF SILVER GOODS AT BOTTOM PRICES 

Next Door to American Express Office, Brunswick, Me. 

Our $1.00 Spectacles defy competition. Repairing promptly 

done by F. E. Davenport. 

C. H. POWERS' 

Hair -Dressing Rooms, 

LEMONT BLOCK, 
Main Street, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

GRIMMER'S ORCHESTRA 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMIVIER, Director, 

180 Middle Street, - - - - Portland Me. 



CHAS. E. BURGESS, 



MAKCFACTUKER OF 



lOllegG fraternitj] ladges. 



Our Productions are of Merit, and Commend Tliemseives. 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 



No. 12 Plain Street, ALBANY, N. Y. 



S. R. JACKSON, 2d, 

dealer in 

SeBlig' Bine B©®fe-Weap. 

Gymnasium Shoes and Dancing Pumps 
a Specialty. 

Largest Variety of Rubbers and Overshoes in Town. 

Your patronage respectfully solicited. 

2 Odd Fellows Block, 
Main Street. BRtrETSWICK;. 



j. m. lombard, 
Dentist, 



OVER BOARDMAN'S STORE, MAIN STREET. 



Maine Central Dining Rooms, 

BRUNSWICK, ME. 

Sl'ECIAL RATES MADE TO CLUBS. 

GEO. E. WOODBURY, Proprietor. 

{ llri rKUrillEilUK of tUeXe-irest Corner Grocery will 
endeavor lo merit a 

COIfTINUANCE 

Of the Students' patronage. Come and prove liim. 

BOYNTON, THE JEWELER, 

No. 547 Congress St., Portland. 

Do not pay the large profits which jewelers have always 
charged. Orders by mail receive prompt attention. 

satisfaction guaranteed. 

M ARDY, PORTRAI T ARTIST. 



LATEST EUROPEAN METHODS. 



To THE Class of '87: 

Haviug ja3t returoed from Europe, where I have spent the s 
the study of art, as seen Iq the extensive collection of the National Gallery 
(London) theLiuv e, and Luxembourg (Paris), and the high-art centres in 
the different countries of the old world, I guarantee to my patrons the full 
benefit of my observations, made with the eagerness born of the professional 
artist's zeal, and promise to give to each and every pitron honoring me 
with their orders, perfect portraits, the result of the instruction gaineJ by 
me fir^m the works and words of the most eminent photographic artists on 
the other side. Yours respectfully, 

A. N. HARDY, 

493 Washington St., Boston. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates tor Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following^ subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Csesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
Mx\e\d, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. ' 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry, — first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra,— so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined iu the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Rbgdlae Examinations foe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall,iu Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Hallowell Classical and Sci- 
entiflc Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryehurg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered iu 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be aff'orded to students who desire 
topursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connecti(m with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
eleetives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

EEQUIEED— FOUR HOtJRS A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one term. 

Chemistry aud Mineralogy, two terras. 

Science of Language, on^ term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materiallv 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XVI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JANUARY 12, 1887. 



No. 12. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVEKY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE YEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

C. B. Burleigh, '87, Managing Editor. 

L. B. Varney, '87, Business Editor. 
C. C. Choate, '87. C. H. Verrill, '87. 

M. L. Kimball, '87. H. C. Hill, '88. 

A. W. Merrill, '87. M. P. Smithwick, '88. 

E. C. Plummer, '87. A. W. Tolman, '88. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00. 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to the Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Eatered at the Post-Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XVI., No. 12.- January 12, 1887. 

Like Cures Like, 173 

Editorial Notes 173 

A Chestnut Warmed Over 175 

Kugby, 176 

To Lou, 176 

An Answer Souglit 177 

Echoes from the Past, 177 

A Wail 179 

Delta Kappa Epsilon Convention 180 

Sad, butXrne 180 

Intercollegiate Rowing Association 181 

The Table Turned 181 

Collegii Tabula, 181 

Personal 184 

College 'SVorld, 185 



LIKE CURES LIKE. 

" Like cures like" read old Spoondledj'ke 
From the big Homeopathic book. 
"Ah now," muttered he, " I'll quickly be free " 
From the cold that I recently took. 

I'll save further bother by getting another. 

Then neither will trouble me more, 

And he jumped from his bed with naught on his head 

And hastened away through the door. 

He proved by this strike that " Like cures like," 
For it quickly cured his cold. 
And the following day they laid him away 
Six feet 'neath the crumbling mould. 




The tlianks of the Orient are 
due Mr. Edgar O. Achorn for kindly pre- 
paring for publication the interesting articles 
on " Echoes from the Past," in our last two 
issues. We are also indebted to Mr. S. R. 
Child for several of the graduate personals 
in this issue. 



We would suggest to the "powers that 
be " that if prayers were held during the 
first half of this term in Lower Memorial, or 
some place that could be kept comfortably 
warm, a large increase in attendance might 
result from the change. The temperature in 
the chapel January 4th, as indicated by the 
thermometer, was exactly at freezing, and 
several times since has been little above that. 



We are glad that the base-ball men are 
once more earnestly at work. With pluck 
and energy in training, the abundant material 
in college will enable Bowdoin to put a nine 
into the field next season, capable of playing 
a strong, and, we believe, a winning game. 



A communication from a friend of foot- 
ball brings the matter of an intercollegiate 
league once more to our attention. Colby 
and the Maine State College have expressed, 
themselves as favorably disposed to the 
project. Bates is yet to be beard from, but 



174 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



we trust she will be ready to co-opeiate in 
this matter with her sister colleges. We be- 
lieve that the first step should be the forma- 
tion in each college of a Foot-Ball Associa- 
tion. The nianageis of the different associa- 
tions can then meet and arrange all matters 
pertaining to intercollegiate contests. 



It would be well when classes or indi- 
viduals indulge in that species of " fun (?)," 
which consists in demolishing college prop- 
erty, if the jury were to report the responsible 
parties, and have the expense assessed upon 
them, and not upon the college at large. 
Sensible and ii-responsible students have no 
wish to spend their dollars and cents in pay- 
ing for any such kind of hilarity on the part 
of those who are mean enough to allow, if 
not to desire, their fellow-students to pay for 
their wanton excesses. The jury should not 
hesitate, if necessary, to take the most strin- 
gent measures to put a stop to this idiocy. 
We do not think man}' of the sensible men 
in college would weep if they were forced to 
part with some of these wreckers. They 
belong to that "list" — not a " little " one — 
who "never would be missed." 



Now that a committee has at length been 
appointed to draw up and present to the 
college, for ratification, amendment, or re- 
jection, a new constitution for the Base-Ball 
Association, we hope to see such action taken 
as shall put our base-ball interests on a more 
secure and permanent basis. It needs no 
argument to convince all of the necessity for 
a thorough renovation of this matter. We 
trust that the committee will not hesitate to 
make the most sweeping and radical changes, 
if they are persuaded that such departures 
will prove beneficial to the college. When 
the new constitution is submitted to the 
students, we trust that the whole college may 
be present, and that careful consideration 



may be given, and, if deemed necessary, 
amendments offered to each and every pro- 
vision. In this way the best interests of the 
game may be secured at Bowdoin for years 
to come. 



To those students who had the pleasure, 
during the past vacation, of listening to any 
of the excellent concerts given by the Wes- 
leyan Glee Club, the question must have pre- 
sented itself. Why hasn't Bowdoin a glee 
club? To be answered quite likely by the 
venerable chestnut, " Lack-of-material," or 
" Singers-gone-out-in-'eighty-six." We think, 
however, that there is at present in college 
material, which, with careful instruction, 
under a first-class trainer, — such an one, for 
instance, as Mr. Stockbridge of Portland, — 
would make a glee club that would reflect 
credit upon the college. The work accom- 
plished one year would be so much gained 
on the next, especially in the case of under- 
classmen, and in a year or two a glee club 
might be had which would compare favora- 
bly with those of other colleges, and success- 
ful concert tours could be given during the 
vacations. Tliis is no visionary scheme. 
Hard and faithful work, under competent 
instruction, will accomplish the same results 
here tiiat have been attained in other col- 
leges. We cannot expect to find a glee club 
read3--made, and prepared to take the stage. 
It must be developed. Patient labor will be 
required to bring about such a result, There 
are a number of good voices in college which 
only need proper instruction to develop them. 
We would advise a start to be made in this 
direction, even if in the beginning we are 
obliged to confine ourselves to an octet, or 
even to avail ourselves of some of the ex- 
cellent voices which could be found in town. 



The venerable Dr. McCosh, of Princeton, 
has donned Iris ancestral plaid, buckled on 
his claymore, and sounded the slogan of 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



175 



battle against the prevailing evils of student 
athletics. In a letter to the various college 
presidents, he advocates a general convention, 
whi-cli sliall adopt measures for eliminating 
the evils attendant upon tlie college sports, 
and proposes tliat Harvard, as the oldest 
college, take the lead in the matter. Tlie 
college press lias viewed the proposal of 
Dr. McCosh in various lights. The Bruno- 
nian, in a very able editorial on the subject, 
says : 

" As for ourselves we are inclined to look on it 
with a great deal of favor. From the allusions and 
lampoons in public prints, it is evident that there is 
a growing public opinion against intercollegiate 
sports." 

After enumerating several of the worst feat- 
ures existing in the sports, such as drinking, 
slugging, etc., it continues: 

" Another very prevalent evil is the illegitimate 
use of money to procure good players. The most 
objectionable form in which it has yet appeared is 
when one college draws from another college its 
best players by offers of large salaries. Following 
such a course college sports will, in a short time, 
become a mere matter of money. The practice can- 
not be too severely rebuked." 

The Argonaut thinks that 

" It is safe to say th.it all cultivated people are in 
sympathy with Dr. McCosh's project, and it is to be 
sincerely hoped that Harvard will follow his timely 
suggestion." 

The Undergraduate, whose editorial depart- 
ment is a model of excellence, thinks that 
Dr. McCosh was stimulated to this action by 
the reports of the Thanksgiving-Day foot- 
ball game, which, however, were very mucli 
colored. It says : 

"They are in the line of a comic paper's exag- 
ger.ated satires, such as Puck's representation of an 
Amei'ican college commencement stage, a century 
hence, where pugilism carries the day, and graced 
with the classic benison, ' Soc et Tuuni.''" 

The venerable Doctor is evidently not 
unmindful of his recent unpleasantness at 
Cambridge, and hastens to throw a sop to 



Cerberus, by inviting Harvard to take the 
lead in the proposed action. 

Grave evils undoubtedl}^ exist in the col- 
lege sports, especially as now carried on by 
the larger institutions, and Dr. McCosh is 
deserving of all credit for his desire to eradi- 
cate them. At tlie same time it is evident 
that the paragraphers and caracaturists have 
seized upon this theme with avidity, as afford- 
ing them an opportunitj' to give the liard- 
worked goat, millvman, and plumber a needed 
rest. The humorist, Biirdette, caps the cli- 
max of their delicate satire by relating the 
college experience of George Gradgrind, one 
year of which was devoted to boating and 
foot-ball; another to his laborious duties as 
president of the Athletic League; another 
on a yaclit voyage, and another on tiie Glee 
Club — but none of them in study ! All this 
may be fun, but it must necessarily, in order 
to be appreciated, iiave a basis of truth in 
existing evils. The more speedily these are 
removed, the better it will be for American 
colleges. 

A CHESTNUT WARMED OVER. 

COLLEGE RE-VISITED. 
I. 

He was a guileless college youth. 
That mirrored modesty and truth. 
And sometimes at his musty room 
His sister came to chase the gloom. 
One afternoon when she was there 
Arranging things with kindly care. 
As often she had done before, 
There came a knock upon the door. 
Our student, sensitive to fears. 
Of thoughtless comrades' laughing jeers. 
Had only time to make deposit 
Of his dear sister in the closet, 
Then haste the door to open wide. 
His guest unbidden stept inside. 

II. 
He was a cheery-faced old man. 
And with apologies began 
For calling, and then let him know 
That more than fifty years ago. 
When he was in his youthful bloom, 



176 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



He'd occupied that very room. 
He thought he'd take the chance, he said, 
To see the changes time had made, 
m. 

' The same old window, same old view. 
Ha, ha! the same old pictures, too." 
And then ho tapped them with his cane, 
And laughed his merry laugh again. 

' The same old sofa, I declare ! 
Dear me ! it must be worse for wear. 
The same old shelves," and then he came 

And spied the closet door. "The same 

Oh, my!" a woman's dress peeped through. 
Quick as a flash he closed it to.. 
He shook his head. "Ah, ah, the same 
Old game, young man, the same old game." 

TV. 

'Would you my reputation slur?" 
The youth gasped. "That's my sister, sir." 
' Ah," said the old man with a sigh, 
' 2he same old He, the same old He." 



RUGBY. 

To say that the college sport, Rugby 
foot-ball, is not appreciated, would create a 
smile at the present stage of the popular 
game. There has probably never been a 
sport introduced into this country that has 
been received with more enthusiasm, and re- 
tained with greater tenacity its popularity 
among the American colleges than the 
"Rugby." The absence of the game at 
Bowdoin is surprising, in view of the univer- 
sal favor which it has received in every 
college of note, in view of our reputation in 
the athletic sphere, and especially with the 
favoring sentiment, which seems to be the 
prevailing one throughout the college. The 
zest with which the crude, old-time game is 
entered into by many of the students, indi- 
cates this. The fact of our being somewhat 
removed from the other New England col- 
leges would seem to be the chief drawback, 
but the simplicity of the oVjjection is appar- 
ent. It will be remembered that the game is 
a fall sport. That the athletic spirit, which, 
with other colleges, is at its highest in the 
fall, is somewhat dormant with us at that 
season, is a lamentable fact. In truth, the 



scrub races are the only interesting phase of 
our fall athletics, as a college. The reason 
may be attributed to several causes, but it is 
sufficient that Rugbj' foot-ball would fill the 
vacuum in a most satisfactory manner. As 
a college sport alone, its popularity would be 
ensured, bringing into play so large a number 
I and varied kinds of athletic ability. 
■ Altiiough the game is so new, and would 
i require some time to become thoroughly nat- 
! uralized, yet there are several in college who 
\ are not unfamiliar with it. The game of 
j foot-ball played at Bowdoin would, without 
I doubt, bring to us those interested in the 
game, and the players also. The chances 
are against an eleven, formed of practiced 
i players, being deposited in our midst, rather 
than otherwise. Now as to our intercollegi- 
ate chances, tiiere is no question but that 
Bowdoin's reputation for bone and muscle, 
often expressed as " Maine Beef," has been 
deservedly earned. The surety of her 
being successful in a sport which is pre- 
eminently of that nature which calls for these 
materials, is obvious. There is no possible 
reason why we should not produce a foot-ball 
eleven in the next season, which could -well 
be matched with any college of equal num- 
bers in the country. We support our boat- 
ing in the spring, as well as base-ball, and 
why allow the athletic impulse to smoulder 
in the pleasantest and longest term of the 



year ; 



'90. 



TO LOU. 
I. 

When the busy day is changing 
To the calm of shaded night, 
And the loosened thoughts are ranging 
Over pictures dark and bright, 
'Mid the fancies born to perish 
Like the morning's crystal dew, 
There's a thought I can but cherfsh. 
Need I say it is of you? 

II. 
Weary birds their nests are seeking ; 
Rest is spreading over all ; 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



177 



Voiceless Nature still is speaking — 
We must answei^to her call ; 
And as stars their lights revealing 
Peep the spotless azure through, 
Comes that tender flood of feeling 
Veiling all in thoughts of you. 



AN ANSWER SOUGHT. 

In January, 1886, the Pall Mall Gfazette 
published a Hst of one hundied books, which 
are regarded as essential to literary intelli- 
gence. This list suggested to us the fact 
that here was a department of education al- 
most wholly neglected in our college curric- 
ulum. Colleges have their libraries and their 
librarians; but how many of them pay any 
attention to the systematic reading of their 
students? Yet for the e very-day life on 
which each must enter at his graduation, 
such a course of reading would probably be 
of more practical service than any study in 
the whole curriculum. 

But for the average student to pursue an 
extensive and systematic course of reading 
thoroughly, and at the same time do good 
work in all the studies of the prescribed 
course, is impossible. The work already re- 
quired is all that he can well do. He may 
take his choice ; but in so doing he must 
sacrifice the alternative. The result is that 
a sort of compromise is effected, which, 
like all compromises, is in the end a double 
loss. 

It is a fact that college students are no- 
torious for their lack of general knowledge, 
not only of current literature, but also of 
standard authors. We are aware that many 
students read much, but it is also true that 
they read to little advantage. Too often tiie 
amount of knowledge can be estimated by 
the size of the book-mark. The habit of 
"reading much, but not many books," seems 
a hard one to acquire. The author's name, 
or only the title, is too often the only knowl- 
edge of a book remaining in the reader's 



mind, as he closes its back cover, and re- 
places it among its dusty fellows. 

We would ask, then, the question we have 
already anticipated. How can the systematic 
use of the library in the college course be en- 
hanced? It requires a practical answer. 



ECHOES FROM THE PAST. 

NUMBER TWO. 
By a stranger in Boston. (From Boston Journal.) 

Several years ago, the welfare and even life of 
Bowdoin College were put in great jeopardy. A 
Democratic — not a Republican — Legislature of Maine 
undertook, in the heat of party, to violate its charter. 
A law was passed, authorizing the Governor and 
Council to fill vacancies in the two boards of Trustees 
and Overseers, and to add new members beyond the 
limited number as they saw fit, thereby taking away 
the right of election in each board. The consequence 
was, new faces and supernumerary members soon 
appeared at the convocations. The friends of litei-a- 
ture were alarmed. The law was contested as un- 
constitutional, and in the Circuit Court of the United 
States was declared null and void by the learned and 
lamented Judge Story. The Legislature then with- 
drew all help, aid, and assistance. For a while the 
prospect looked dark and ominous. The time- 
servers of the day trembled for this institution. But 
the two Boards went onward in the path of duty, and 
the moment the college was severed from all party 
and legislative interference, they cast themselves on 
the protection of Divine Providence, to bless a semi- 
nary whose object is so dear to all lovers of their coun- 
try and of humanity. From that period Bowdoin 
College has prospered, and every good citizen of 
Maine is proud of the character it sustains. 

Judge Story, in this decision, recognized the great 
case of Dartmouth College, where a similar attempt 
by a similar legislature, to crush a venerable and 
time-honored institution had been made and defeated. 
In calling up the memory of that great civilian, I am 
reminded of an interesting anecdote he related : It 
was in 1835. I was attending the circuit court in 
Portland, and boarded at the same hotel with Judge 
Story and some of the Bar. One day after dinner as 
we sat listening to his rich conversation, some one 
spoke of the Dartmouth College question, when Judge 
Story described to us the first appearance of the power 
of Mr. Webster, as evinced in that celebrated case. 
He spoke of him as a stranger, but little known at 
that time. The trial came on in March, 1818. The 



178 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



court-room was crowded. Many distinguished spec- 
tators were present. The case was of no common 
kind— it touclied the happiness, the preservation, the 
glory of our common country ; for every college and 
seminary of learning in the Union was interested in 
the result. 

JVlr. Webster felt the magnitude of his cause and 
the great responsibility resting upon his shoulders. 
He rose up to address the court. Every eye was 
tixed upon him — every ear was open. He began 
slowly and in a low voice. His nerves were slightly 
tremulous, and the papers shook in his hand. His 
face looked troubled. The deep an.\iety portrayed 
in his features excited the sympathy of the crowd, 
and the kindliest feelings of the court, for one who 
stood before them, a modest, unassuming man, a 
stranger, and with an overwhelming brow and look 
of no common care. But he went on step by step, 
with arguments; with authorities; with appeals to 
the Supreme Tribunal before him — each step his voice 
rose into energy and power ; his face brightened 
up ; his eye kindled ; and ere long the attention be- 
came so profound, and the interest of the whole as- 
sembly so great from the magnitude of the question 
and the manner in which he presented it, thnt not 
merely a breathless silence, but even tears started in 
many an ej'e, and some w^ere seen to fall from mem- 
bers of the Bench. He won his cause. It was his 
debtit, and from that moment Daniel Webster stood 
invincible, and look a stand in eloquence which has 
seldom been surpassed. 

Such is a feeble and imperfect sketch of a most 
impressive anecdote, to which I listened with deep 
interest as it fell from the lips of the man who was 
himself a model of eloquence, and a guide to elo- 
quence in his pei'iodical life. 

The farm to which I allude was for more than 
twenty years tlie homestead of the Rev. Hezekiah 
Packard, while settled over the parish in Wlscasset. 
He was a man greatly beloved, a Cambridge scholar, 
and a soldier of the Revolution. Like very many of 
the army of Washington, his figure was tall and ma- 
jestic. A clergyman of dignified bearing, sincere, 
of much friendliness of heart, he was a true speci- 
men of the old school. He was not an eloquent 
preacher, but he led his flock to the green pastures 
and still waters of life. He was satisfied to feed 
them with plain but wholesome food, and never 
sought to gather grapes from the thorns of persecu- 
tion, nor figs from the thistles of controversy. In 
humble, fervent, reverential pi-ayer, this venei-able 
pastor was rarely excelled. His light shown in the 



light of his own precepts. With a small salary, and 
personal labor on his farm, he united to his clerical 
duties the education of a few young men, placed un- 
der his care by friends abroad, and he fitted several 
for admission to college. He had a remarkable tal- 
ent for governing and directing the young mind to 
virtue, honor, and gentlemanly manners, while he 
dwelt much on a sound moral tone and on the fear of 
God — the beginning of wisdom. He brought up a 
large family, and his children were patterns of filial 
obedience and self improvement. Five sons were 
graduates at college, and are now well known for 
scholarship and high respectability in life. No one 
who knew Dr. Packard can ever forget the kind at- 
tentions, warm grasp of the hand, and peculiar dry 
and mellow humor which distinguished this soldier 
of the cross, who, at the bed of the dying and in the 
chamber of the mourner, felt deeply as he comforted 
them and sympathized in their trials. When I think 
of his cheerful look at his hospitable fireside, I am 
reminded of a beautiful resemblance to the Vicar of 
Wakefield. Though not a man of profound erudi- 
tion, nor a star of the first magnitude in the space 
which he filled on earth, yet he will long be remem- 
bered as the good Dr. Packard — a reputation which 
may, perhaps, shine in its own glory among the 
blessed, when the brilliant meteors of literature and 
the mere Boanerges of the pulpit, will have their re- 
ward in this life only. He died in Salem at the home 
of an affectionate daughter, the 25th of April, 1849, 
and was buried by the side of her, tlie wife of his 
youth, the admirable mother of his children, and with 
whom his best and happiest days were spent. The 
family cemetery where he lies is near the ancient 
elms which shaded his mansion, and the fruit trees 
which he planted and made to bear abundantly, flour- 
ish within view of his grave. When I last looked 
on this lot it was eventide. The sun was going down 
robed in crimson clouds, and those lofty elms were 
casting their long and melancholy shade ; but I felt 
no gloom, for as I mused on the sepulchre of this 
man of God, I thought of the immortality of the just. 

REV. DR. PACKARD. 

Mr. Sleeper, — While perusing a very interesting 
letter from the pen of a "Stranger in Boston," I was 
favorably reminded of an incident connected with the 
name of the venerable and good Dr. Packard. Three 
or four years since Alden Bradford, LL.D., now num- 
bered with the dead, but during his life-time for 
many years a resident of this city, delivered the an- 
nual address before the Phi Beta Kappa Society of 
Bowdoin College. The Rev. Dr. Packard and Mr. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT, 



179 



Bradford were classmates in college. At the time 
the address was delivered, both were old men, long 
past their prime, fast falling into the "sear and 
yellow leaf" of life, but each retaining in a remark- 
able degree the possession of his intellectual powers. 
Dr. Packard was more robust in appearance. 
His form, though bent with age, gave evidence that 
in his youth he had been a man of great phyt-ical 
energy. 

Dr. Packard was invited to make the prayer to 
open the exercises of the Phi Beta Kappa Society. 
He was, as your correspondent justly remarks, dis- 
tinguished for the fervency and simplicity of his ad- 
dresses to the Throne of Grace. The appearance of 
Dr. Packard and Mr. Bradford in the pulpit side by 
side, was in itself an affecting sight. When the noise 
was stilled, and the last strains of sacred music had 
died upon the ear, the venerable gentleman rose, 
came forward to the desk, and with a clear, full, dis- 
tinct utterance, opened his petition to the Most High, 
clothed in the simplest, yet the most eloquent terms. 
But when he came to refer to the scenes of earlier 
days, to the intimate relations of college life sustained 
between himself and the orator of the occasion, and 
to the few remaining days which each could count 
upon, his voice faltered, his utterance became choked, 
and big, manly tears coursed down his cheeks ; for 
a moment he could not utter a syllable, but summon- 
ing all his energies, he subdued the emotions of the 
hour, proceeded with and concluded his prayer. It 
was one of the most affecting scenes ever witnessed 
within the walls of a church, and will never be for- 
gotten by the very large audience who beheld it. 

Never was silence more profoundly maintained 
than that which reigned during the utterance of that 
simple but fervent prayer, the last that I heai'd from 
the lips of that venerable man. Dr. Packard. 



A WAIL. 
By the flickering rays of a study lamp. 

Whose oil was nearly gone, 
A Senior sat with a look as wild 

As that of a dying swan. 

His hair was white, his furrowed brow 

A look of anguish wore. 
As if a crushing load of grief 

His troubled spirit bore. 

His form was bent, his eye was dim, 
And gasping came each breath. 

As if he fouglit a conflict vain 
Against approaching death. 



Still, still, he sat with a dreamy gaze. 

As if at a far off land. 
Where his spirit list to the heavenly strains 

Of the little Brunswick band. 

The End grew still, the boys had gone 

To the Unitarian show. 
To see the play and gently shake 

The light fantastic toe. 

A big black book the Senior clasped, 

A ponderous book of yore. 
Whose covers hid a classic world 

Of philosophic lore. 

And then the Senior broke the spell. 

Upstarting from his chair. 
And letting forth a mighty yell 

Expressive of despair. 

With very rapid pace he strode 

Upward and down the floor. 
His black eyes flashed with inward fires. 

Great Moses ! how he swore. 

Then hissed he forth in accents fraught 

With mighty depths of woe. 
Oh curses on this millstone weight 

That bends my spirit low. 

I thought that Uncle Porter was 

Enough to kill a saint. 
But Descartes, Locke, and Berkeley, 

They make my spirit faint. 

Then, though he'd never drank before. 

To Doctor A he went, 

And for a quart of whiskey, straight, 

His filthy lucre spent. 

And with some suffering Senior friends, 
To show his woes still scorning. 

He backward went unto his room 
And whooped-her-up till morning. 

And then they "cut" Ps3-chology 

For all their heads were big. 
And they were not in any mood 

On abstract thought to dig. 

'Tis ever thus in student life. 

When men are overvvorked 
In one department others will 

Invariably be shirked. 

And why should mortals be surprised. 
If overcome with thinking. 



180 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



Upon an all-pervading theme 
They seek relief in drinking. 

Then let each branch be equally 

Upon the students laid, 
And good work can be done in all 

And progress will be made. 

Sobriety and rectitude 

Will everywhere prevail, 
And men to recitation go 

Prepared to make " a sail." 

DELTA KAPPA EPSILON CONVEN- 
TION. 

The fortieth annual convention of the 
Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity was held in 
Washington, January 5th and 6th. More 
than sixty delegates, representing chapters in 
twenty-eight colleges, in all parts of the 
country, were assembled, while a large num- 
ber of graduates, and several members of the 
General Fiaternity Council were also present. 
It was in every way a satisfactory convention. 

Beside the business sessions, of interest 
only to the initiated, there were the usual 
banquet, parade, and public literary exercises. 
The last, held in the church of Rev. Stephen 
M. Newman, a Bowdoin man, were carried 
out by Dr. A. C. Kemper, of Chicago, the 
poet, and Hon. Wm. L. Trenholm, Comp- 
troller of the Treasury, who was the orator 
of the occasion. Congressman Milliken of 
Maine, was the presiding officer. 

The afternoon of the second day of the 
Convention was spent by the delegates in 
" taking in " the city, in procession. A special 
reception was accorded them by the Presi- 
dent, by Speaker Carlisle, and by President 
Sherman, while on entering the chamber of 
the House, they were agreeably surprised to 
find a J. K. E., ex-Governor McCreery, of 
Kentucky, in the chair. 

At the banquet, the concluding exercise 
of the Convention, about one hundred and 
fifty men were present, all once active mem- 
bers of the fraternity, and some, as may be 



seen, now prominent in public and official 
life. The presence of John D. Long as pre- 
siding officer, was sufficient to drive all dull- 
ness out, while the speakers at his command 
were such as to make the occasion a really 
memorable one to many of those present. 
The appropriate toasts v/ere responded to by 
Assistant-Secretary Fairchild, Congressmen 
Herbert and McCreery, Speaker Husted, of 
the New York Assembly, and others, and in 
such a manner as to keep the audience in a 
continued show of appreciation. The prom- 
inent sentiment of the evening, emphasized 
by the Southern speakers, was a patriotic one. 
It was that the association of educated men, 
in the worthy aims of true Greek-Letter fra- 
ternity, might be a powerful leaven to bring 
about mutual understanding and good feeling 
between those geographical sections whose 
estrangement it is the interest of some to 
prolong. 

SAD, BUT TRUE. 

(extract from a letter.) 
Yes, Jim, I confess I plugged for rank 
last term. The term before I had been clear 
down — number fourteen in my class. I was 
dismayed to see how low I had fallen, but 
then I had cut a great deal and taken an un- 
usually large number of deads. I promised 
the folks at home that I would make a grand 
brace, and came back to college determined 
to do good work. I applied myself diligently ; 
never cut ; never flanked ; and had the su- 
preme satisfaction of seeing how far I was 
leaving Dick Jones, who worked very hard, 
and ranked very high Freshman year, and 
who had continued to do so on his reputation, 
although he hadn't done any studying since. 
But Jones was clear down this term. He cut 
much and flunked more. I shall never forget 
the pride with which, at the close of the term, 
I saw mother open the letter containing my 
rank. I had done good work and knew that 
a discriminating Faculty had ranked me ac- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



181 



cordingly. But — hold your breath, Jim — 
there was a quaver in mother's voice as she 
read : " The rank of Henry Hardy for the 

term ending places him in the fourth 

quarter! ! of his class! " Well, Jim, I won't 
dwell on the situation. It was harrowing in 
the extreme. 

When I returned to college, the first man 
I met was Dick Jones. " Hi Dick ! " I shouted, 
"What rank did you get last term?" "Oh, 
I was in the first quarter!" he replied. I'm 
afraid, Jim, I swore just a little — but don't, I 
beg of you, mention rank to me. I'm a cynic 
on that subject. I'm cutting and flunking as 
usual this term, and expect to be at least in 
the second quarter. 

Yours for Phi Beta Kappa, 

Henky Hardy. 

P. S. — Since writing the above I have been 
to my class officer and demanded an explana- 
tion. He said my average rank was 7.30, but 
the rest of the fellows ranked so high that it 
placed me in the fourth quarter. He also 
said that he had given me eight in the study 
I took to him. My class officer is a very pop- 
ular man. H. H. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE ROWING ASSO- 
CIATION. 

A meeting of the Intercollegiate Rowing 
Association was held at Fifth Avenue 
Hotel, New York, December 31st, with the 
following colleges represented : Bowdoin, L. 
B. Varney ; Brown, C. Colby ; Columbia, Eu- 
gene Klapp and C. K. Beckman ; Cornell, H. 
R. Ickelheimer and C. G. Peotta; University 
of Pennsylvania, T. G. Hunter. 

The following officers were elected : Pres- 
ident, G. Colby; Vice-President, C. G. 
Peotta; Secretary and Treasurer, L. B. Var. 
ney. E. V. Curtis, Charles Francis, and A. B. 
Simonds were elected regatta committee. It 
was voted to instruct the regatta committee 
to have the race at Worcester, if satisfactory 



arrangements could be made, otherwise to try 
Lake George or Saratoga. It was also voted 
to have the race in four-oared shells and to 
be rowed Tuesday, July 5th. A single shell 
race will be held within a week from the four- 
oared race. R. C. Watson was chosen ref- 
eree, with G. A. Dee, F. G. Brown, and J. E. 
Custis for alternates. If any two crews are 
present and wish it, there will he an eight- 
oared race within a week of the four-oared, 
with a suitable prize for the winning crew. 



Mrs. 
Prof. — 



THE TABLE TURNED. 

, the attendance of your husband, 

— , upon required chapel exercises, places 



him in the fourth quarter. 

John Jones, Secretary College Jury. 

N. B. — At the close of eveiy term the 
members of the Faculty are divided, on the 
basis of attendance upon religious exercises, 
into four parts, as nearly as circumstances 
will permit, and his wife, or in the case of 
tutors, his best girl, notified of the quarter 
in which he stands. 




'Tis now fully time for that 
stereotyped rhyme 
Of the lover and maiden so 
dear, 
To clip off a curl from some red-headed girl 
And again in these locals appear. 



But for fear you'd deride, the Tabula scribe 
"Who runneth the rhyming machine, 

Hath turued his big feet up an untrodden street 
Where poet hath never been seen. 

Some exchanges we find continue to grind 

The usual amative grist. 
But such poets b'long to the almighty throng 

Of those who " would never be missed." 



182 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



It is rumored that there is no equine accompan- 
iment to the Sophomore Latin. 

Italian, whicli is offered to the Seniors and Jun- 
iors as an extra under the instruction of Prof. John- 
son, commences this term. The class will do no 
work in the grammar, but will proceed directly to 
the study of Uanlc's "Inferno," taking at first only a 
small portion of the text, and gradually increasing 
the amount. The recitations come but once a week, 
viz., on Thursday at 11.30 a.m. One or two Sen- 
iors, and about a ilozen Juniors have signified their 
intentions of taking up the language. 

H. B. Austin represented the Bowdoin Chapter at 
the Z. *. Convention in New York last week. 

The college library has received another generous 
contribution, this time amounting to eight hundred 
dollars, from an unknown donor. 

A good number of the college students have now 
passed their physical examination before the gymna- 
sium instructor, Mr. VVhittier. The measurements 
which have been taken are recorded and sent to Prof. 
Sargent, of Harvard, who Vf'M send back to each stu- 
dent a book in which are marked the various exercises 
which each one should pursue. This examination, 
though not compulsory, is very important to all who 
wish to improve to the utmost the advantages of the 
new gymnasium. 

" Oh ! who 'd have thought I'd grown so weak ! ! " 

The boys who have tried the lifting machine say 
that it doesn't " give " worth a cent. 

Prof. Robinson took two pictures of the Senior 
class at one of the astronomy recitations of last term. 
The opportunity of taking a picture of a decidedly 
handsome class is very rare, which explains the why 
and wherefore of the above. 

We wish the Faculty might make some arrange- 
ment for a choir at chapel, or else hire the Brunswick 
brass band for the occasion. It is but fair that the 
burdens of the students in this direction be made as 
light as possible. 

The reading-room papers were sold at auction 
Saturday, January 8th. Little was realized by the 
sale. Receipts from that source have been decreas- 
ing of late years. 

Dr. Hyde, the President of Bowdoin, has become 
a tempei-ance lecturer. — Columbia Spectator. 

The remarks of President Hyde in chapel last 
Sabbath should be taken home by every one. We 
wish they could be printed for all to read. Though 
brief, they were comprehensive, and struck the key- 
note to sound educational advance. It is only by 



sympathetic co-operation that the results he foreshad- 
owed can be obtained. One sentence we would es- 
pecially emphasize: "Pursue at least one subject 
thoroughly, regardless of rank." 

The yearly meeting of the Maine teachers was 
held in Brunswick on the Saturday before the term 
commenced. During the day there were many visitors 
to the college buildings, and the students present in 
town were busily engaged in exhibiting the gymna- 
sium and memorial to the "normals." 

On January .5th, Soule opened his boxing-school 
in the old gymnasium on the ground floor of South 
Winthrop. He has secured a good sized class, eager 
to sacrifice themselves upon the altar of science. 

Rev. Mr. Guild will give a course of Sunday 
evening lectures on " Self-Culture," at the Unitarian 
Church, at 7 o'clock. January 9lh, "The Body"; 
January 16th, "The Will"; January 23d, "The 
Soul"; January 30th, "The Social Relations." 

Bowdoin is to have a new gymnasium. 

— Hamilton Lit., for Dec. 

We thank the Hamilton Lit. for this little item of 
encouragement. It comes like a sight of the sky to 
the lost mariner. Will the Lit. tell us when the 
realization is to be ? Or shall we account for the 
above item by the fact that it takes six months for 
the mails to reach our esteemed contemporary ? 

It is supposed that in making out the rank for the 
last term, the names of all the students were shaken 
together, and then ranked as they came out, the first 
highest and the last lowest. At all events that is the 
only theory which will account for the number of 
startling discrepancies which resulted from the last 
dispensation. 

The Portland Press of Jan. 4, 1887, has the fol- 
lowing under the head of "Assistant Librarian at 
Bowdoin": "The Woman^s Journal snjs that Miss 
Charlotte Lane, of Braintree, Mass., has been ap- 
pointed assistant librarian of Bowdoin College, — a 
jjosition for which her acquaintance with foreign lan- 
guages eminently qualifies her." 

All desiring first-class laundry work done can 
have their linen sent to the Globe Laundry, of Port- 
land, by leaving it at L. H. Chapman's room. Terms 
the same as at the local laundry. 

Austin Gary, as a representative from the Bow- 
doin Chapter, attended the fortieth annual convention 
of the Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity held with the 
Washington Alumni Association, January 5th and 
6th. 

Prof. Little has had printed a prospectus of the 
Bowdoin Art Collection as published by the new 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



183 



method of photogravure. The circular is neatly 
printed on thick white paper, and contains one of the 
old sketches engraved by the new process. A copy 
is to be sent to each of the alumni, and it is hoped 
that they will respond liberally. 

' Tis now the gifted acrobat 

Doth giggle, grin, and sneer 

At his less agile fellow man, 

Who awkward doth appear; 

Yet this same gifted acrobat, 

We shall qnite likely find. 

Gained his expan,se of muscle 

At the expense of mind; 

And ten to one the awkward man, 

Who lacks an agile form. 

Gained his expanse of intellect 

At the expense of brawn. 
Robie, '89, woke up the other morning and found 
a blister on the end of his nose — the imprint of "Jack 
Frost." He now carries a red spot on that apjjendage 
which shines from afar like the star of Bethlehem. 

Subjects of themes for winter term : Juniors — 
"King John, as delineated by Shakespeai'e " and, 
" How Far is another's estimate of our attainments a 
tit incentive to study?" Sophomores — "Vacation 
work," and " The Gulf Stream." 

Dearth spent his vacation in Brunswick. 
The Freshman class has elected F. M. Gates class 
juryman for the ensuing term. 

As usual the term commences with a new sched- 
ule of i-eoitation hours for the various classes. In 
some respects it differs considerably from that of last 
term, but the changes are on the whole satisfactory 
to the students concerned. 

During the cold weather of last week the lowest 
temperature experienced here was twenty-five de- 
grees below zero. 

One of the Juniors from Noi'th Appleton got 
rather loose in his attendance on the gym. the last of 
the term, and some of his classmates wrote him a 
gentle admonition, purporting to come from the 
instructor of Calisthenics. He mended his ways with 
a promptitude gratifying to all, and especially to his 
own conscience. 

The exact and genial bell-ringer, from force of 
circumstances, was always at chapel, attended church 
every Sunday, was regular at gymnasium, and had 
eleven marks for absences. He offers a premium to 
any one who will explain the peculiar system of 
marking which can logically explain the above de- 
duction. He fails to appreciate its practical applica- 
tion. 

The Junior class have elected the following offi- 



cers ; President, W. T. Hall, Jr. ; Vice-President, 
J. L. Doolitlle; Secretai-y and Treasurer, G. H. Lar- 
rabee; Orator, G. F. Gary; Poet, A. W. Tolman ; 
Marshall, L. H. Chapman: Odist, A. C. Shorey ; 
Chaplain, P. F. Marston ; Curator, J. H. Maxwell ; 
Committee of Arrangements, 1st, W. H. Bradford, 
2d, F. L. Smithwick, 3d, W. L. Black. 

Eighteen of the students are now out teaching. 

W. L. Gahan is teaching at Cook's Corner. 

M. L. Kimball is teaching at ... . North Waterford. 

J. V. Lane is teaching at Woolwich. 

H. L. Shaw is teaching at Gushing. 

M. P. Smithwiclc is teaching at . . . Little Cheheague. 

E. L. Adams is teaching at Chesterville. 

F. W. Freeman is teaching at Saco. 

W. D. Gilpatric is teaching at Saco. 

F. H. Hill is teaching at Cape Elizabeth. 

H. C. Jackson is teaching at Wiscasset. 

F. J. C. Little is teaching at . . . Damariscotta Mills. 

G. L. Rogers is teaching at Wells. 

F. L. Staples is teaching at Bungermuck. 

O. P. Watts is teaching at Thomaston. 

H. H. Hastings is teacliing at Bethel. 

W. B. Mitchell is teaching at Harpswell. 

H. C. Eoyal is teaching at Auburn. 

O. W. Turner is teaching at Augusta. 

Freshman (translating the Odyssey, with an eye 
to the fitness of things) : "And the divine Ulysses 
went over the dour." A sympathizing shudder runs 
through the class. 

Smith, '89, who has been sick at home with 
rheumatism, has returned to college. 

The first Senior and Junior Exhibition was held 
in Upper Memorial on Dec. IClh, the last evening of 
the fall term. The fulluwing was the programme : 

MUSIC 
Salutatory. C. J. Goodwin. 

The Germ Theory. E. T. Little. 

Chinese Indemnity. B. L. Means. 

The Pardoning of State Criminals. 

(English Version from Gambetta.) *G. F. Gary. 

MUSIC. 

Byrou. E. C. Plummer. 

Extract from II. Philippic. 

(English Version from Cicero.) *J. Williamson, Jr. 
Robert Morris. J. V. Laue. 

Eulogy on the Martial Legion. 

(English Version from Cicero.) *R. W. Godiug. 

MUSIC. 

Mormonism. C. C. Choate. 

Gustavus Adolphus. C. B. Burleigh. 

College Self-Government. A. W. Merrill. 
La Debacle. 

(English Version from Victor Hugo.) *W. W. Woodman. 

MUSIC. 

♦Juniors. 

The Committee of Arrangements consisted of C. 
C. Choate, E. L. Means, and W. W. Woodman. The 



184 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



speaking was excellent. On account of the heavy 
snow-storm during the day, the audience was small, 
bill appreciative. Music was furnished by Grimmer. 

A storm-door has been placed on the gymnasium. 

Lynam, '89, who has been absent since Thanks- 
giving on account of trouble with his eyes, has re- 
turned to college. 

The Sophomore Greek division will read this 
term, D'Ooge's "Demosthenes de Corona," the same 
book that was used last winter. 

Dorherty, '89, has returned from teaching. 




39.— The Calais Times, 

of December 9th, has an 

obituary on Hon. Frederic A. Pike, of 

that city, who died the 2d ult. It is 

ontributed by Hon. Geo. F. Talbot. 

'37. — From it we glean the following 
facts: Mr. Pike was born in Calais, December 9, 
1817. His early education was obtained at Wash- 
ington Academy. Entering college with the class 
of '39, he remained until the end of Sophomore 
year, when, becoming impatient at the loss of time, 
he left college to study law. He was admitted to 
the Bar in 1840, and immediately commenced the 
practice of his profession in his native city. His 
knowledge, judgment, and integrity soon secured 
him a large and lucrative practice. He was active 
and influential in political as well as professional 
life. He was mayor of Calais, State Representative 
eight years, and in 1860 Speaker of the House, and 
Representative to Congress eight years. In 1846, he 
married Miss Mary Hayden Green. The perfect 
uprightness of his character, even more than his 
intellect and eminent ability, have secured for him 
an enduring memory in the city where his days were 
spent. 

'44. — Hon. David R. Hastings of Fryeburg has 
been unanimously elected chairman of the Demo- 
cratic State Committee. 

'49. — Hon. Joseph Williamson of Belfast was re- 
elected a Vice-President of the New England Historic 
Genealogical Society at the annual meeting in Bos- 
ton, Jan. 5tli. 



'60. — General John M. Brown of Portland has re- 
signed the office he has filled with great efficiency 
for several years, of Brigadier-General of the Militia 
of Maine. 

'65. — Joseph E. Moore, Esq., of Thomaston, has 
been appointed Collector of Customs for the Waldo- 
boro District. 

'66. — Rev. Francis S. Thatcher of Farmington 
preached in the Unitarian Church of this village, 
January 2d, exchanging with Rev. Mr. Guild. 

'66. — Mr. George T. Packard of the Boston Adver- 
tiser has received an addition to his family in the 
form of a fine boy, named Kent Packard. 

'68. — Mr. John A. Hinkley of Gorham has re- 
cently been appointed one of the Trustees of the State 
Normal Schools. 

'68. — Orville D. Baker, Esq., of Augusta, will 
serve the State another term as Attorney-General. 

'68. — Dr. Charles A. Ring of Portland has been 
suflering for some weeks from paralysis of the legs 
and arms, the result, it is thought, of an attack of 
diphtheria. 

'74.^The January number of the New England 
Magazine publishes a unique poem from the pen of 
Samuel V. Cole. The title is, '■ To an Archreologist.' 

'74. — Mr. Samuel V. Cole of Andover, Mass., con- 
tributes an interesting poem, " The City of the Violet 
Crown," to the January number of the Atlantic 
Monthly. 

'75. — Seth M. Carter, Esq., of Lewiston, has been 
elected a member of Governor Bodwell's Council. 

'76. — Mr. Arlo Bates of Boston is one of the poet- 
ical contributors to the first number of the new Scrib- 
ner^s Magazine. His contribution is entitled "Son- 
nets in Shadow." 

'76. — Bion Wilson, Esq., has received the appoint- 
ment of Deputy Surveyor of the Port of Portland, and 
has removed his residence from Augusta to Portland. 

'82. — Charles H. Gilman has been engaged in the 
real estate and loan business at Minneapolis, since 
March, 1884. He was married September 8, 1886, 
to Mary Louise Smith of Augusta, Me. 

'83. — J. W. Knapp is engaged in engineering, in 
Minneapolis. 

'83.— W. S. Pearson is clerk of the Board of Ed- 
ucation in Minneapolis. 

'83. — Arthur J. Russell is proof-reader on the 
Minneapolis Evening Journal. 

'83. — E. W. Chase, resident physician in the Maine 
General Hospital, was in town last week. 

'84. — Llewellyn Barton, who is studying law in 
Portland, spent a few days with us last week. 

'84._S. R. Child was admitted to the Bar of Min- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



185 



nesota, last July, and is now practicing law, with 
office at Minneapolis. 

'84.— Sherman W. Walker took a trip to Europe, 
and on his return went to Portland, Oregon, where lie 
is now engaged in engineering in a survey of the 
Willamette River. 

'85. — Mr. L. B. Folsora, recently an assistant in 
the Lewiston High School, has accepted an appoint- 
ment as Principal of the High School of Gardner, 
Mass. 

'85. — Frank W. Alexander, Principal of the East- 
port High School, visited the college last week. 

'86. — Irving W. Home was married Dec. 17th, to 
Miss Emma Pulsifer of Auburn, Me. Mr. Home is 
principal of Topsham High School. 



COLLEGE WORLD. 

By the death of E. Price Greenleaf, Harvard will 
soon come into possession of over $500,000. 

There are forty-two college graduates employed 
on Boston papers, seventeen of whom are from Har- 
vard. 

Madison College has a regulation prohibiting 
marriage during the college course. 

The plan proposed by President McCosh for a 
conference of college presidents to take action in 
regard to the regulations of athletic sports, is not 
met favorably by President Barnard of Columbia, 
and President Webb of the College of the City of 
New York. 



ALLEN'S PHARMACY, 

LEMONT BLOCK, 

Main Street, - - Brunswick, Me. 

WEAR ONE OF 

MBRET'S 

CELEBRATED HATS. 

Always the Corkect Style. 

237 MIDDLE STKEET, 

PORTLAND. 



h. v. stackpole, 
Fine Boots and Shoes, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 

Dentist, 



r. W. BAEEOE, 

Dealer in Fancy and Standard Groceries. 

CLUBS SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 



J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Vegetables, Fruit, and Country Produce. 

Main Street, under L. D. Sno'w's Grocery Store. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 



w. 



B. SPEAR, Proprietor, 



TONTINE HOTEL, 



BKUNSWICK, ME. 
Private Suppers and Banquets a specialty. 
F. A. FARE, Manager. 



WHITMORE. 



STOBER BLOCK, 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



SPEAR & WHITMORE, 

DEALERS IN 

ALL KINDS OF COAL, 

Cedar Street, Brunswick, Me. 

Branch Office, Opposite Post-Oflice, Main Street. Teleplioue 
Communication witli Coal Yard. 

F. L. DUNNE, 

Importing ^Tailor, 

338 Washington Street, 
BosrroiNr. 

A VERY LARGE LINE OF GOODS 

Specially selected for students' wear. 

ALL THE LATEST LONDON AND PARIS NOVELTIES 

Regularly imported. 

Tailor to the Harvard Co-operative Society. 

Our representative will visit Brunswick nest spring to 
take orders. 

338 WASHINGTON STREET, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




('CIGARETTE 
Smokers who 
are -WLlliiigeto 
paya little more 
for Cigarettes 
' than the price 
chareed for the or-'jiiary trade Cigarettes, wUl 
lind the RICH^OKD STRAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR TO AIX. OTHERS. 
rhey are made from the brightest, most 
delicately flavored, and highest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are aliso- 
lutely without adulteration or drugs. 



TRAIGHTCUT 



No. 



We use the Genuine French Rice Paper 

of our own direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the tiraud-RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATIONS of this 
brand haye been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautlonedthat this is the old and 
orisinal brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or box of ^^^^^B«^^i^^^«^^^^^^" 

Hgn iGARETTES 

Bigaature of ^ff ^H^HflHHHI^^^B^HB 

ALLEN &CINTER 

MANnPAaTUltEES, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Kings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 

Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry, Promptly Repaired and Warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BllUNSWICK, ME. 



njaine Gentpal 1. ]^. 

On and after Oct. 25th, 1886, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.15, 11.25 A.M., 2.38, 4.40 and 6.2,5 p.m., and on Sunday 

mornings at 12.43. 
For Rockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.3S p.m. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4..35 p.m., and 

every night, including Sundays, at 12.35. 
For Lewiston, 8.15 A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 P.M., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. fmised), and 2.45 P.M. 
For Augusta, 8.20 A.M., 2.40 and 6.35 p.m., and 12.45 every night. 
For Waterville and Bangor, S.20 A.M., 2.40 p.m., and 12.45 night, 

and for Waterville, Saturdays only at 6.35 P.M. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 p.m., and 12.45 (night). 
For Bangor and Piscataquis R. R., S.20 a.m., 12.45 (night). 
For Ellsworth, Bar Harbor, Vanceboro, St. Stephen, Houlton, 

and St. John, 2.40 P.M., 12.45 (night). 

Note.— The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
ston, and Bangor, run every night, including Sunday, but do not 
connect for Skowhegan on Monday morning, or for Belfast and 
Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sunday morning. 

PAYSON TUCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BOOTHBY, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 31, 1886. 



SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest and becoming very popular. 

Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 

The following are our well known 

STANDARD BRANDS : 

Capokal, Sweet Caporal, St. James 1-2, Caporal 1-2, 

St. James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES, 
Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and French Rice Paper, are rolled by the high- 
est class of skilled labor, and warranted free from flavoring or 
impurities 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a fac-sijiilk of Kinney Bkos. 
Signature. 

KHSriMEy" TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KISSEY BROS. 
NEW YORK. 



JORDAN SNOW, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

DuNLAP Block, Brunswick, Me. 



(INTERCEPTED LETTER.; 



Brunswick, May 14, 1886. 
Owen, Moore & Co., Portland. 
Gentlemen : 
Please send me hy mail one pair long Bicycle Stockings, 
size !>4, regulation League Color. Enclosed one dollarantl 
stamps lor postage. I see by advertisement in Portland 
paper that you carry a line of Tennis Goods. Please send 
me a price-list of Rackets and Balls, with best discount to 
a regular club. What are the prices on Jersey Coats, 
and in what color do they come ? 

Yours truly, 
P. O. Box 2002. BOB BROWN. 



Confectionery, Fruit, and Cigar Store, 

MAIN STREET, BRUNSWICK, ME. 

Wm. R. FIELD, Manager. 

W. HAWTHORNE, 

FINE * TAILORING, 

2 Church Block, Bath. 



, .„ , a file in Pliiinilelplim 

I at the New8p:iper Adver- 
I ^-,11 - , - I I,.,,,- " ti'iua: Af^ency vt Messrs. 
Uw W. AVER & SON, fur av(thori2eci afeote. 



THIS pAPLRi 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



OOLLEaE BOOKSTORE. 

We have constantly in stock a full assortment of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 

JBYRON STEVJSNS. 



The best place in to\vn to buy your 

LINEN COLLARS and CUFFS, TIES, SCARFS, GLOVES, 

Hats, Caps, Cakes, Ect., is at 

PLUMMER'S, 'O'Brien Block. 

Correct Styles, and Best Quality, at Bottom Prices. 



HI 



ONCE MORE I'M HERE! 



*J. LENTON,-*- 

SOCCESSOB TO LeNTON & NeAGLE. 



In thia may be seen a very fine assortment of Ladies' and Gents' Traveling 
Bags, Taliaes, and Shawl Straps. There is also to be seen a very fine line 
of Riding Saddles for both Ladies and (ientlemen, showing that he pays 
strict attention to the wants of all his customers who are lovers of that 
healthy sport of horse-back riding. In connection with his riding gear he 
keeps the Largest Stock of Horse Clothing and Dusters that can be found 
this side of the manufacturers,— 150 different patterns to select 
from. He is also Manufacturer of Fiue Harnesses of every description, 
and is ahead of all his competitors as regards to Prices and Good 
Work. He pays strict attention to Trunk and Valise Repairing, and can 
Canvas a Trunk if it be so desired. Cat Prices to all College Students. 
Remember the place and give him a call, at the Sign of 
JOHN LENTON, 
Under G. A. R. Hall. Main St., BKUNSWICK, ME. 



ADAMS & UNIACKE 

HAVE A FULL LINE OF STOVES 

Also, all kinds of Xjamps, 

And most everything found in a Stove and Crockery Store. 

MAIN STREET, BRUNS"WICK. 

dnn A U/FFI^ Ladies or gentlemen desiring pleasant 
4)IUU H IlLLlVi profltable employment write at once. 
We want you to handle an article ot domestic use that recom- 
mends Itself to every one at sight. STAPLE AS FLOCK. 
Sells like hot cakes. Profits 300 percent. Families wishing to 
practice economy should for their own benefit write for par- 
ticulars. Used every day the year round in every household. 
Price within reach of all. Circulars free. Agents receive 
SAMPLE FREE. Address, 

DOMESTIC MFG. CO., Marion, Ohio. 

F. H. WILSON, 

DISPENSER OF 

Pure Drugs, Medicines, and Chemicals. 

Imported and Domestic Ci^^ars. 
MAIN STREET, - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 



THE 



♦ TRAVELERS ^ 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HA^RTFORD, CONIN'., 

Has paid to Policy-holders OVCr $S 1,000,000, and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 

A r^r^TT^TTATT' T*OT TP'TPTQ indemnifying the Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
-f* ^^y-' -LA'AjI^ X -L V_7iJiV^l,L(k:> Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidental Injury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case ofJ3eath. 

Only :ff5.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each |1,000, with $5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
e.icamination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

0"\7"E3H O^S'JEi II^ 3Sriig"3E3 

Of all insured under its ACCIDKNT policies since 1864 have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. 

Issues T TT?T7 "P/^T TOTT?^ of every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 
also LjLS: Tj X VJJUll^JLXliO Personal Benefit. 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Olfice at Hartford. 
JAS. G. BATTERSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



QOCIWTY' ^ies ctrhd Elates, Cizts ctnd EnsigrhtcL. 
'Writtng J-'ajper cltlcL CcwcLs JEng~raj\^eci curxcL JPrtrtted^. 
StTzdervt' s ~VisttiTig CajrcLs. JrivitcttioTxs of every Txdfii-d 
e^ecTitecL ~by tlte engrctvirrg Kozzse of 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



-■*- 



Society IrwitcttioTLS , '-Dies, CLJid 1 ilzistrcLtioTzs foT' Yecur- 
(^ool^s, MoixogrcLms , Jlnrts, ctrtd. Crests Engrasi^ed cLrtd, 
(printe.(Z. Visiting Cards, and. the Clxoic&st Stationery . Seals 
Tapers, and Sealing Wa^, and Sealing Sets. 

SHREVE, CRUiMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



jrr WL 



[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

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«®-BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.-ffi* 



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Interior Views Made to Order. 

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Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 




OTTAWA 



jCushing's Island 
Portland, Me. 
C3■IBS01^T- 



Bowdoin College Medical Department. 

The Sixty-Seventh Annual Course of Lectures at the 
Medical School of Maine, will commence February 3d, 
1887, and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— Rev. Wm. DEWirr Hyde, President: Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretary; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Practice; Alfred Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M., 
Medical Jurisprudence; Frederick H. Gerrish, M.D., Anat- 
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Weeks, M.D., Surgery and Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henrv H 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Tousg, PubUc Hygiene 
Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealev, M.D., Demonstrator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretar;/ 
Brunswick, Maine 



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BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



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And Deiiler in Sheet Music, Music Books, Musical Instruments, anil Musi, 
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' ARDY, PORTRAIT ARTIST. 



LATEST EUROPEAN METHODS. 



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the study of art, as seen in the extensive collection of the National Gallery 
(London) theLouv e, and Luxembourg (Paris), and the high-art centres in 
the different couutries of the old world, I guarantee to my patrons the full 
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me from the works and words of the most eminent photographic artists on 
the other side. Yours respectfully, 

A. N. HARDY, * 

493 Washington St., Boston. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to tho Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, test- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grrammar,— Allen and Greenough, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translation into Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Caesar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
^neid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition,— Jones. 
Xenophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Koot, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry, — first and third Books of Looniis. 

Algebra, — so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatoiy coarse. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Regulae Examinations foe Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Satui'day after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. II and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Hallowell Classical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers ot the college. 

The Faculty, will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
topursue their studies aftergraduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

required- FOUE HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terms. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A W^EEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows ■ Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XVI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JANUARY 26, 1887. 



No. 13. 



BO WD O IN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE YEAR BY THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 
C. B. Burleigh, '87, Managing Editor. 
L. B. Varney, '87, Business Editor. 



C. C. Choate, '87. 
M. L. Kimball, '87. 
A. W. Merrill, '87. 
E. C. Plummer, '87. 



C. H. Vekkill, '87. 
H. C. Hill, '88. 
M. P. Smithwick, 'i 

A. "W. TOLMAN, '88. 



Per annum, in advance, S2.00. 

Single Copies, 15 cents 

Extra copies can be obtaiued at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to ttie Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
niuuications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor. 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must, be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Ecitered at the Post-OS&ce at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. XVI., No. 13.-January 26, 1887. 

A Winter Morning 187 

Editorial Notes, 187 

Spiritus EsoiilaiMus 188 

What Cured Spoondledylse 188 

Tlie Deserted Home 191 

HaS, 191 

Expenses of Boating Association, 193 

CoLLEGii Tabula, 195 

Personal, 198 

College World, 198 



A WINTER MORNING. 

From the East a crimson tide 
O'er the earth is streaming ; 

And in all the region wide 

Snow-wrouglit gems are gleaming 

O'er the ice-cased realm that lies 

In a fleecy lining, 
'Neath the chill of winter skies. 

Bright Aurora's shining. 

On the waking minds of men 
New-born hopes are dawning; 

Strengthened voices chant again 
Praises of the morning. 




hoped tliat the class of 
Ninety will lose no time in taking measures 
for securing a boat and selecting six or eight 
men to train for their class crew. The sooner 
measures are taken in this direction the better 
it will be. A captain should be elected for 
the class crew at once, to take charge of the 
men in training. We believe that Ninety is 
a class of pluck and energy, and that she will 
not be behind the classes who have gone before 
in her support of that branch of athletics in 
which Bowdoin has attained the greatest dis- 
tinction. 



It might be a wise precautionary measure 
if a lamp, or better a lantern, were provided 
for the dressing rooms in the gymnasium to 
help out the unfortunates who are left there 
when the electric lights are turned off. The 
custom now in vogue of getting out of this 
dilemma by lighting matches, is a dangerous 
one in the extreme. It is useless to post 
up a notice forbidding this. Just as long as 
there is no light provided, just so long will 
matches be used by every " Moses " who 
chances to be in the gym " when the lights 
go out." It would be sad if poor Rich- 
ard's Apothegm, " For want of a shoe the 
horse was lost," should be sung at Bow- 
doin to the refrain of " For want of a light 
the gym was lost," but if the present cus- 
tom of using matches continues it is liable 



188 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



to be added to the "Songs of Bowdoin " 
most any day. 



It is hoped that a good number of the 
Senior class v/ill compete for the prizes offered 
by the American Protective Tariff League 
for the best essay on the " The Advaktages 
OF A Peotbctive Tariep to the Labor 
AND Industries of the United States." 
While the chance of obtaining the coveted 
prizes may not be very large, the practical 
knowledge of this important public issue, 
which one would acquire in preparing such 
an article would be of inestimable value. 



Now that the season of snow-balls is at 
hand, the inhabitants of the dormitories begin 
to look forward to broken hall windows and 
a consequent decrease in the warmth and 
comfort of their rooms. But why should 
this be ? A very little labor would cover the 
hall windows with a strong wire netting, 
similar to that used in the gymnasium, and 
save all the expense and discomfort which 
comes from broken windows. It is a matter 
of surprise that ordinary intelligent precau- 
tion has not caused this plan to be adopted 
long ago. Education can be cultivated on a 
little gruel, but Pegasus flies to a warmer 
clime when the temperature approaches zero. 



We publish elsewhere in our columns a 
story which contains a good-natured hit at 
those men who have a penchmit for collecting 
souvenirs at the expense of other people, and 
wholly unmindful of the old Mosaic law 
which says " Thou shalt not steal." Equiv- 
ocation of terms does not mitigate an offense. 
A crime is a crime whether it be called by 
one name or another. It makes no difference 
whether a thief be a well dressed, light hearted 
student who steals for fun and a memory bill 
or a hardened wretch who steals for profit 
—and perhaps existence itself. Public sen- 



timent would probably laugh at the one as a 
" lark," but deplore the other as a crime ! 
but public sentiment is very fallible. In the 
light of eternal justice there can be no dis- 
tinction, there ivill be no discrimination. 
Let every student whose moral eyesight is 
dimmed b}' glasses which show up crime in 
the guise of innocent fun cast them aside 
forever before his sense of honor is dulled, 
and his distinctions between right and wrong 
become confused and indistinct. No man 
who values his good name can afford to care- 
lessly and flippantly disregard the most 
sacred laws of morality and duty. 



SPIRITUS ESCULAPIUS. 

Eva Green was a spiritual believer, 

Full many a rapping she heard ; 

Ne'er a spook had been known to deceive her, 

Though never a moment they'd leave her. 

Yet, so honest was venerable Eva, 

That nobody doubted her word. 

But so often their antics had shocked her. 

That she suffered from various ills ; 

And she prayed for her dear family Doctor, 

The jovial old gentleman Procter, 

To come back to the earth and concoct her 

A dose of his purgative pills. 

So he hastened to come and assist her, 
From the realms of his post mortem life. 
He plastered her back with a blister. 
He felt of her pulse, and he kissed her, 
But when he had vanished they missed her, 
For he'd taken her home as his wife. 



WHAT CURED SPOONDLEDYIvE. 

Spoondledyke's room was a regular mu- 
seum of souvenirs. He had devoted a great 
deal more of his time to their collection than 
to the prosecution of his studies, and conse- 
quently ranked high — as a connoisseur of 
memory bills. 

We shall never forget the pride with which 
Spoondledyke first exhibited his collection to 
our admiring gaze. There was a signal flag 
purloined from the railway ; a number of 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



189 



signs; an assortment of spoons, commemora- 
ative of several banquets and a number of 
church suppers; a lady's fan and silk hand- 
kerchief; the kej's to the rooms he had occu- 
pied in different hotels, and a number of 
similar reminders of various events and asso- 
ciations. "Verjr interesting," was my com- 
ment, after viewing these things, " but, Spoon, 
my boy, don't you think the way they came 
into your possession is just a little — that is to 
say — er — er — like stealing ? " 

I shall never forget the look of honest in- 
dignation that mantled Spoondledyke's face 
at this insinuation. 

" Steal ! " lie echoed in a tone of genuine 
surprise and not a little feeling. " Look here, 
old boy, you're joking. Of course I didn't 
steal them, and you know it. I simply took 
them for memory bills." 

I could not doubt Spoondledyke's sin- 
cerity. In all my dealings with him I had 
found him scrupulouslj^ honorable. There 
was no man in college whom I would sooner 
trust. Yet Spoondledyke could deliberately 
steal the property of others, and convince 
himself that for the purpose of souvenirs it 
was " all right." I went away from his room 
wondering at the inconsistencies of human 
character. 

I was returning from my society conven- 
tion, and stopped over for a day or two at the 
Bonus House in Boston. Here I was fortu- 
nate enough to meet with Jim Rowe, an old 
graduate whose folks resided near our college 
campus. Jim was a large, deep-voiced, good- 
natured fellow, passionately fond of a prac- 
tical joke, and his appearance at this time 
seemed most opportune to the success of a 
little scheme I was meditating. I remembered 
to have seen among Spoondledyke's souvenirs 
a key to one of the rooms in the Bonus House, 
and the opportunity to plaj^ him a practical 
joke, and at the same time teach him a needed 
lesson, was too good to be lost. Securing 



some of the hotel stationery, I wrote Spoon- 
dledyke as follows : 

Bonds House, Nov. — , 18 — . 
Mr. G. D. Spoondledyke : — 

Sir, — I have discovered that you are one of the 
many miscreants who have, at various times, pur- 
loined articles from this house, aud that you now 
have in your possession a key and presumably other 
things belonging to me. These must be returned at 
once, or I shall prosecute you to the full extent of the 

law. 

Yours, etc., 

John Lynch, Proprietor. 
The name John Lynch was a fictitious 
one. I did not know the name of the propri- 
etor of the Bonus House, and depended upon 
Spoondledyke's being in similar ignorance for 
the success of my scheme. That evening 
Rowe and I visited a costume room and se- 
cured the paraphernalia necessary to our 
project. 

" Halloo, Tom ! " 

" What's wanted ? " 

" Come up here and I'll tell you." 

It was Spoondledyke who called me, and 
leaving the work of unpacking my trunk I 
hastened up to his room, where I found him 
in a state of considerable excitement. He 
closed the door carefully, and remarked with 
agitated brevity : 

" Tom, I'm in a scrape." 

" A scrape ? " 

" Yes, a devil of a scrape. Just read 
this," and he handed me the letter I had sent 
him from the Bonus House. I scanned it over 
with a look of profound astonishment, and 
turning upon him a face as impassive as a 
tombstone, I remarked : " This is a serious 
thing. Spoon, a very serious thing; but you 
must have had this some time. It's dated 
back in November." 

"I know it. That's the worst of it. I 
only got it last night. It must have been lost 
or delayed somewhere." 



190 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



" Most likely ; but what are 3'ou going to 
do about it? " 

" Do about it? I'm going to send it back, 
of course, and apologize for the mistake." 

"The mistake? " 

" Yes. You don't think I stole it, do you ? " 

" Well, yes, to be frank, that's just what 
I thought." 

Spoondledyke's face flushed, and he was 
about to make an angry rejoinder, when there 
came a sharp rap at the door, and in response 
to Spoon's " come," a stalwart young man, 
dressed in the uniform of a Boston policeman, 
entered the room. 

" Is this Mr. Spoondledyke ? " he inquired, 
addressing Spoon. 

" It is," replied Spoon in a husky voice. 

"Then you are my prisoner." 

"Your prisoner ?" 

"Yes, for theft, you know — very disa- 
greeable, but I must do my dut3^" 

" But there's some mistake. I never stole 
anything in my life," insisted Spoondledyke, 
and there was no mistaking the blanched ap- 
pearance of his face. The terrors of the prison 
loomed up before him with startling distinct- 
ness, and he was thoroughly frightened. 

" Yes, yes, I 'spose not, leastwise I hope 
not," answered the officer, " but that's what 
they all say. You look as if you might be a 
little slippery. I give you fair warning not 
to try anything funny if you want good usage. 
For the sake of mutual safety and good under- 
standing perhaps you'd better wear these," 
and a grin came over the officer's face as he 
produced a pair of handcuffs. 

" Wear those ? " 

" Certainly^ that's what I said." 

"Butthere'ssome mistake, I tell you " 

"That will do," interposed the officer 
sternly. " If there is any mistake you will 
have an opportunity to prove it in court. You 
must submit quietly or there will be trouble," 
and he placed his hand significantly upon the 
handle of a large billy which hung at his side. 



Spoondledyke submitted. " This is outra- 
geous," he gasped, as the irons closed about 
his wrists. It was evident, however, that the 
proud spirit of Spoondledyke was completely 
humbled, and in the next breath he lemarked 
to the officer in subdued tones : " Will you 
be kind enough to send for a hack ? I will 
pay the expense. I can't go across the cam- 
pus and through the streets with these things 
on. Can't this matter be husiied up ? Can't 
it be kept out of the papers ? " and tears of 
remorse and anguish coursed down Spoon's 
cheeks in a plentiful flood. " See here, officer," 
I interposed, " can I have a word in private 
with you ? " 

" Certainly," he replied. " But look here, 
young fellow," he added, turning to Spoon, 
"don't you make any attempt to escape, or 
I'll shoot you like a dog." 

When I got the officer — who of course 
was none other than Jim Rowe — into the hall- 
way, I had to use every effort in my power 
to keep him from upsetting all my plans by 
giving vent to a paroxysm of laughter. I 
persuaded him, however, for policy's sake to 
smother it. A moment later I re-entered 
Spoon's room with the announcement: 

" It's all right, old man." 

"How?" queried Spoon with feverish 
eagerness. 

" He can be bought off — that is, if you 
don't object to paying " 

"Don't mention it, old boy; what are his 
figures ? " 

" Fifty dollars." 

" Cheap enough. I should have been glad 
to get out of the scrape for twice that. Call 
him in and tell him to remove these irons and 
he shall have his money immediately." 

I at once called in Jim. The money was 
handed over, and Spoondledyke with a sigh of 
ineffable relief found himself at liberty. 

That evening Jim Howe and I had a ban- 
quet ill my room to which we kindly invited 
Spoon. He came, and we made a clean breast 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



191 



of the whole joke to him. At first he was in- 
clined to get angry, but changed his mind 
upon reflection and joined heartily in the fes- 
tivities. When the ceremony broke up it was 
with difBculty that we prevailed upon him to 
accept what remained of his fifty dollars after 
deducting the expenses of the banquet. He 
declared that we had earned the money, and 
that the lesson he had learned was dog cheap 
at that price. The next time I visited Spoon's 
room his souvenirs had disappeared, and he 
informed me in grateful tones that it was only 
my practical treatment that had saved him 
from the horrible evils of kleptomania. 



THE DESERTED HOME. 

In a little clearing in the woods, 

With Junipers upgrown, 
An ancient farm-house lifts its head 

Forgotten and alone. 

No groups of merry children romp 

Around its open door. 
Nor longer come the happy shouts 

That came in days of yore. 

Its broken windows, crumbling roof. 

And timbers in decay. 
Are but the body of a home 

Whose soul has passed away. 

Old home ! what memories throng my heart 

At thy familiar name ; 
They bear me backward through the years, 

I am a child again. 

They wai-m once more with light and life 

The faces of the dead ; 
Once more an angel mother kneels. 

In prayer, beside my bed. 

Back from the churchyard 'neath the hill 

Familiar forms return ; 
The old house throngs with life again. 

Its ancient beacons burn. 

Once more the board is nobly spread. 

And round it cluster faces 
That formed the dear old family group, 
In old familiar places. 



And father's honest, kindly face, 
Though worn with toil and care, 

In loving pride is beaming on 
The children gathered there. 

And mother's placid countenance. 

And kind approving air. 
Lend cheerfulness and sweet content 

Unto our simple fare. 

Ah, pleasant realm of memory. 

Dear pictures of the past, 
That blessed me in my childhood, 

But were too sweet to last. 

I stand within the dear old home, 

But all is sad and drear ; 
I call aloud the cherished names 

But none of them appear. 

Gone, — vanished in the gloaming 
Are all those loved of yore. 

To the land towards which I'm roaming 
They have hastened on before. 

The echoes loud returning. 
Unto my spirit say : 
"This is the ancient homestead 

But the soul has passed away." 

Oh let my body when I'm gone. 

If 'tis my Father's will. 
Lie in the church-yard side the forms 

That slumber 'neath the hill ; 

But may my lightened spirit far 
Beyond the church-yard roam. 

To join again the family group 

That graced my childhood's home. 



RS. 

" Our little systems have their d.iy, 
They have their day and cease to be." 

— Tennyson. 

Editors of the Orient : 

There has recently been circulated among 
the students a petition, prefaced by a long 
" whereas," asking the Faculty to return to 
the old method of marking. I hope sufficient 
names will be secured to warrant the pre- 
sentation of the petition, but not enough to 
influence the Faculty to comply with the 
request. I did not sign the petition, not be- 



192 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



cause I did not believe that most of the evils 
enumerated in the preamble were not true, 
but because they did not come up to the 
conclusion. Thej^ were reasons for abandon- 
ing the ranking system; not for returning to 
the old method. Let us examine some of 
them: 

Whereas, .... the present ranking system is 
unjust . . . that it is indefinite and unsatisfactory 
. . . that it is misleading to parents. 

I do not question tlie first proposition ; 
but I beg to ask wherein it differs from the 
old in its injustice. Or is there a panacea for 
injustice in the manner of its dispensation ? 
Is it sweeter when served in one way than 
when in another ? That would indeed be a 
new and valuable discovery ! Henceforward 
we need not concern ourselves in righting 
wrongs, but only in what manner served it 
may best suit. 

But we are surprised to hear that it is 
more indefinite than the old. We have yet 
to hear of any ambiguity as to the quarter 
in which any one has been placed. Even 
those celebrities in the fourth quarter, who 
of old were never surely known to exist at 
all, — even they have a vivid realization of 
their location. The dissatisfaction seems to 
be in the knowledge of good and evil, not 
with the new system. 

If it misleads parents, it at least misleads 
them to a definite end, and into no labyrinth 
of definite indefiniteness, as formerl}-. How 
much difference there is between the two 
systems in the amount of misleading, permit 
me to show by a somewhat domestic illustra- 
tion, if it be not too great a strain upon my 
readers : 

Fall term. Young Hopeful gets, . . 7.19 

Winter term. " " "... 7.01 

[lie did the same amount of work each term.'] 
Fall term. Young Hopeful gets into the 1st quarter. 
Winter term. " " " " " 2d quarter. 

[Under Old System.'] 
Scene I. — [Paternal Parlor. Fond Parent and 



Young Hopeful alone. Lights turned low. Fond 
Parent looks sad. A sombre breeze through the tree- 
tops.] 

F. P. My son, your rank has come ; tell me, I 

pray, what means 
This large discrepancy ? I hoped to see you glean 
The highest honors of your class ; but now your fall 
Brings disappointment ; and it shrouds me like a veil. 
Y. H. Think not, O father, that I waste any time ; 

or that 
I spend my days and nights in aught but studious 

thrift. 
The Profs, are light and fickle as the Brunswick 

maid. 
Now goes a week or month and not a question asked ; 
Now come they thick and fast as hail upon the roof. 
Once I was asked if I had made resort unto 
The cellar of a worthy gentleman in town. 
And when I answered " nay," he asked me sharp 

and quick 
From what town I had come ; and straightway roared 

the class. 
So " balled" was I, that I could not recite, and so 
But naught I got for rank. It was not fair. 
Besides on abstracts most profound I pored — and 

swore. 
And many a long and weary hour, indeed, I spent. 
But naught it told on rank, and naught was all my 

time. 
Believe me, father, when I say that rank tells naught 
But where you're not. 

[Under Present System.] 
Scene II. — [Same circumstances a year later.] 
F. P. How happens it my son, you are a quarter 
down 
From where you were? I hoped to see you thrill 

and sway 
The gathered multitude on next Commencement day. 
How frail a father's hopes ! How fond delusions fade; 
Y. H. O father, take it not so hard ; you do me 
wrong. 
I lead the quarter where J stand, and Billy Jones 
Tails his; a hundredth only separates us two, 
Yet his consigns him first; I to the second go. 
He spends his time as suits him best, and chins for 

rank. 
Puts on a meek and pious air and always frowns 
When they wood up the Profs. I lack those wily arts 
Yet go my steadfast way and lay me by a learned store 
Against the years to come. Yet credit get I none. 

If, then, the logic of my analogy is cor- 
rect, the statements in the preamble of the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



193 



petition applies, not against the present 
method and in favor of the old, but against 
both alike. And I think my illustration sub- 
stantially true. 
But to go on: 

That it is calculated to engender suspicion, and 
give rise to charges of partiality on society relations 
and personal grounds, against instructions. 

Let us suppose that individual rank is 
given ; that suspicions are confirmed, and 
consequently that charges are made on said 
grounds. What is the result? amicable rela- 
tions between the two and an allayment of 
all discordant feelings? Permit me again to 
illustrate from real life : 

[Under Old System.] 
Tableau I. 
Student. Professor Blank, how happens it I'm 
ranked so low 
By you alone ; but high by all the rest ? 
Prof. You didn't do good work. 
Student. I did ; you ranked me low on grounds 

of prejudice. 
Prof. You surely did poor work. 
Student. I'll bear thee malice all my days. 

Tableau II. 
Prof, (alone). O, how these grumbling students 
harry me. I wish 
This ranking system were still further off removed 
Than human thought can traverse time or space. 
Student (alone). O! Blasphemies, where are 
thy. powers, O curses deep ; 
Where now thy potency, whereiu to vent my spleen. 
[Angel strains in the distance. Peace 07i earth, 
good will towards men.] 

[Under New System.] 
Tableau I. 
Student (looking at his rank). 
Just as I feared, behind this hollow screen 
Of quarter rank they wreak their spite ; I know them 

well. 
It is Prof. Blank, he long has borne me ill ; 
And now he spits his spite. 

Tableau II. 

Prof. Blank (singing in his study). 
How sweetly does the dying day 

Glide softly into peaceful night ; 

Fair concord now resumes her right, 
And Friendship chants her friendly lay. 



No rancorous students now insist 

That some professor ranks them harsh ; 
For like a mist above the marsh 

The " quarter" shrouds the rank in mist. 

[ Company of fairy witch demons hover over the 

Professor (singing).] 

"Where ignorance were bliss, 'twere folly to be wise," 

They little know how students damn their souls to 
lower skies ; 

For rank is rank, though mists may hide 

And through it creeps a noxious tide. 

If there is any difference in the ef- 
fects of the two methods, I leave it to those 
who can discover it to take their choice ; for 
my part I see none. Either is an aggravated 
injustice to all concerned. There is no good 
in either, and no good can come out of either. 

But to go on : 

It causes jealousy among the students, while fail- 
ing in an eminent degree to promote the spirit of 
friendly emulation th.at should exist among the mem- 
bers of a college communit}' ; and finally, that it is 
in no sense an indication of the actual work done by 
the student in his studies. 

Wherein this applies to the new method, 
and not to the old, it will take an acuter in- 
tellect to detect, and to such I leave it. 

There is a moral to this tale, which he 
who runs may read. 



A VICTIM OF IMAGINATION. 

It is singular what power imagination 
sometimes exerts over even the strongest 
men. A graduate of the medical school, 
who is now a rising phj'sician, and against 
whom the charge of nervousness or coward- 
ice could never be made, told me the follow- 
ing anecdote of his experience, which loses 
none of its interest because occurring here in 
Bowdoin. 

"A fellow-student and I," said he, "had 
to do some preparatory work, one evening, 
on a subject we were dissecting, in order to 
have it ready in the morning. My friend, 
whom I will call Charles, wished to go to the 
post-office before going to the medical build- 
ing, so I went along alone. There were five 



194 BOWDOIN 


ORIENT. 




or six dim, smoliy lamps, in the dissecting 


May, 


Paid for boat hire. 


$100 


room, partly filled with oil, and having short 




trip to Portland, . 


2 00 


wicks, which I lighted, and then started on 


19, 


cups. 


13 75 


my work. It was a bleak, stormy night, and 


23, 
25, 


rope, 
telegraphing. 


60 
50 


the wind tore round the building, and rattled 


27, 


boats for starters, 


75 


the window casings. Many subjects were 


29, 


stamped envelopes. 


50 


lying on the tables in the room. I thought 


June 1, 


trip to Portland, . 


3 00 


nothing of it, however, being absorbed in the 




suits. 


25 00 


7, 


trip to Portland, . 
telegraphing. 


2 85 


dissection. Nine o'clock came, and Charles 


8, 


50 


had not appeared. I worked on. Ten o'clock, 


9, 


" 


50 


— he did not come. One or two of the lamps 


17, 


M. F. Davis, 


50 00 


burned down and went out. Eleven o'clock. 


19, 


C. H. Colby, . 


43 64 


Two more lamps ceased to give out their 


21, 


for posters, 

shellac, . . 


100 
50 


dim rays, but I, in my study, heeded it not. 




telegraphing. 


50 


Twelve o'clock. The wind blew with re- 


24, 


tickets, 


34 30 


newed fury. I looked up; only one of my 




dinners. 


2 00 


lamps remained. It began to flicker. Every 




suppers, 


2 50 


corpse in the room seemed to rise and 
come toward me. I could stand it no longer, 


25, 


breakfast, 


2 65 


24, 
25, 


Dirigo Crew, 
for express on flag, . 
boat hire, 


25 00 
75 


but fled to the stairs and rushed down them 




50 


as if pursued by the evil one. I did not 


24, 


transportation in Bostor 


, 100 


even stop to close the doors, and paused 




tickets, Boston to Troy, 


43 50 


not till safe in my own room." 




sleeper. 


5 00 




27, 


dinners. 


2 30 






Varney, 


2 50 






30, 


for pumice-stone, ' . 


25 


EXPENSES OF BOATING ASSOCIATION. 




oil. 


20 


1886. 




sponges. 


70 


Oct. 10, Paid for Boat Hire, . . . $0 60 


24, 


ticket from T. to L. G., 


2 55 


flags 2 50 


July 3, 


" Lake George to T 


., 2 55 


rope, .... 25 




telegraphing after race. 


2 00 


bolts, .... 25 




Varney, 


6 00 


Nov. 14, insurance, . . . 10 00 




Plaisted's board, . 


15 00 


Jan. 15, leather for gymnasium, 1 00 




Gloves for Jackson, 


50 


oil " ' " 15 




Hunter, for banner, . 


15 00 


Feb. 2, Association fee, . . 1(^ 00 




for suppers, . ^ . 


3 00 


April 3, trip to Boston, . . 12 85 




sleeper. 


5 00 


10, padlock, ... 40 




boat. 


50 


screw driver, . . 25 


4, 


breakfast. 


2 20 


stationery, ... 50 


6, 


Fred Plaisted, . 


40 00 


14, stamps, ... 24 




M. F. Davis, 


60 00 


book, . . . . 1 00 


4, 


Lynam, 


3 00 


15, balance of insurance, . 3 75 


June, Paid Varney for the following :' 




transportation of stove, 50 




Ticket to Portland, . 


100 


24, olotlies-pins, . . 3 




Tablet, 


25 


rudder string, . . 20 




Board, 


4 50 


April 24, stamps, ... 24 


June, 


Ticket from Portland to Lewiston, 1 50 


30, Fred Plaisted, . . 10 00 




" to Gorham and return. 


75 


May 4, keys to house, . . 60 




" to Augusta and return. 


3 00 


7, oil 30 




Stamps, 


50 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



195 



June, 


Stamped envelopes, 




$0 25 




Chamois skin, . 




75 




Board in Portland, . 




4 00 




Crawford, for trucking 




50 




Truckage in Portland, 




70 




Dinner in Portland, 




75 




Transfer of boat. 




50 




Lunch at Newburyport 




30 




" " Boston, 




35 




Telegraphing, . 




45 




Shellac, . 




75 




Bolt, 




25 




Tickets to Portland, . 




5 00 




Trip to Boston after the 


race, 


4 25 




Cash to Varney, Capt., 




20 90 


June 21, 


Paid Plaisted's board in Brunswick 


4 75 


July 15, 


express on Banner, 




1 25 


Dec. — 


Fred Plaisted, 




25 00 


1887. 








Jan. 1, 


M. F. Davis, 




40 00 




Tenney, for Woodside, 


$ 


5 00 




613 90 




There's the parallel bar, 

The big sand-bar, 

And the "bar " of the hunter's 

yarn; 
There's the legal bar, 
The hostler's bar. 
And the castle's bartizan. 

There's the surgical bar, 

The gay barber, 

And the barber-ohirurgeon; 

There's the pitcher Barr, 

And the musical bar, 

And the old Greek barhiton. 

But barring these bars, 

Give me the bar, 

With the barley-broth so brown ; 

And a fair bar-maid. 

In a barraclade. 

To help me bar it down. 

Conversation on the " Demosthenes de Corona." 
Sophomore loquitur—" The horse on this Greek is 
no good. You have to look up so many words that 
it doesn't pay to use. it." 



The first recitation in Italian took place on Janu- 
ary 20th. 

The addresses delivered at the inauguration of 
President Hyde have been printed in a neat pamphlet, 
about the size of the college catalogue. 

Morning prayers are now held in Lower Memo- 
rial ; this arrangement will last through the cold 
weather, and it is to be hoped that the attendance 
will increase considerably, as the excuse of "cold 
chapel" can no longer be offered. 

Ayer, '88, and Meserve, '88, who were absent 
during the first tvpo weeks of the term, have returned 
to college. 

The usual schedules of the Y. M. C. A. meetings 
were distributed toward the first of the term. 

It has formerly been customary for the Junior 
class to do no laboratory work during their second 
term of Chemistry, but Prof. Robinson has decided 
that this term, in connection with the usual lectures, 
enough practical work is to be taken to render the 
study valuable and interesting. 

C. F. Moulton, '87, has taken a school at Jones- 
port for the winter. The school has the reputation 
of being a hard one to govern, but we think that 
Fred can manage it. 

We wish to compliment Professor Booker on the 
success of his conscientious efforts to keep the reci- 
tation rooms warm during the cold weather. He is 
ever willing to gratify any reasonable request of the 
students. 

The committee appointed to revise the constitu- 
tion of the Athletic Association have completed their 
work, and presented their report to the Association. 
The report of the committee was adopted. The 
principal changes were in providing for a gymna- 
sium exhibition, and in prescribing the conditions 
of representation at the New England intercollegiate 
athletic contests. 

We acknowledge the receipt of a copy of " Songs 
of Harvard," published by two of its present mem- 
bei'S. The book contains forty-four popular songs 
and glees, some of which are new to the college world. 
The cover is very tastefully gotten up, and the work 
as a whole reflects much credit upon its publishers. 

Seven members of the Sixty-Third Legislature of 
Maine are graduates of Bowdoin. Members of the 
Senate — Hon. Herbert M. Heath, Augusta, '72; Hon. 
Ansel L. Lumbert, Houlton, '79. Members of the 
House — Hon. Amos L. Allen, Alfred, '60; Hon. Au- 
gustus N. Lufkin, Orrington, '61; Hon. Frank A. 
Floyd, Brewer, '73; Hon. Andrew P. Wiswall, Ells- 
worth, '73 ; Hon. Frederick A. Powers, Houlton, '75. 



196 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Bernard Carroll, Bates, '89, has joined the Soph- 
omore class. 

During the last six months over 800 volumes 
vjrere added to the college library. 

Prof. Avery's Sunday-School class recently pre- 
sented him with a fine easy chair. 

"The same old chestnut," was the ' Professor's 
greeting to the doughty Junior, who, tired of dissect- 
ing the Lumbricus agricola, aslied to be excused, on 
the plea of having to meet a friend at the train. 

Since our last issue, the Brunswicli zephyrs have 
fallen upon the neck of the thermometer to the tune 
of thirty-two degrees below zero. 

The single pulley-weights in the gymnasium are 
to be changed into double ones, after the style of the 
two already there. There has been some talk of 
having an athletic exhibition, to be given by the 
students at the close of the term. The idea is an 
excellent one, and action should be taken on it as 
soon as jjossible. There will be none too much time 
before the end of the term, and to each squad should 
be assigned some special set of exercises, in which 
it should strive for perfection. The college contains 
many good athletes, and there is no reason why an 
exhibition of the above sort should not be a com- 
plete success. 

'Tis now the Geology man 

Essays with a terrified look 

To answer the questions he never 

Could anywhere find in the book. 

To describe the general features 

Of places he never has seen, 

From the erosive torrents of Harpswell 

To Bunganuc's fabled ravine. 

To tell of the wonderful cellars 

The Brunswick nobility keep, 

(As if he'd been monkeying round them 

When honorable men were asleep). 

Oh! don't talk of the lore of theology. 

Or the brain-stirring realms of Astrology, 

Until you've encountered the Cerberus 

That lies at the door of Geology. 

The editors of the Orient recently received the fol- 
lowing circular : 

Toledo, Ohio, 1S87. 
Dear Sir, — The Cambridge Literary Bureau, after four 
years of successful operation, is prepared to furnish ora- 
tions and essays at reasonable rates. Satisfaction is 
guaranteed. Correspondence is solicited. 
Address, 
Box 49. F. O. McKennan, Toledo, U. 

[Those vifishing Senior parts should apply at 
once. Also those intending to compete for the Pro- 
tective-Essay Prize should send in a general outline 



of what they wish to have developed, at as early a 
date as possible. — Eds.] 

On the evening of January 14th, the dinner of 
the Bowdoin Alumni Association was held at the 
Falmouth, in Portland. Despite the inclement 
weather, about forty members were present, and 
passed a most enjoyable evening. Hon. Wm. L. 
Putnam was orator of the occasion, and E. S. Os- 
good, Esq., toastmaster. The banquet was one of 
Landlord Martin's best. The college Faculty were 
represented by Prof. H. L. Chapman, who responded 
to the toast of " The College." 

During the Christmas vacation, the portion of 
the gymnasium reserved for base-ball practice, was 
sepai'ated by a netting from the rest of the basement. 
The nine are now working regularly, under the di- 
rection of the captain, M. H. Boutelle, and the pros- 
pects are that they will make a hard fight for the 
pennant next spring. 

A letter from the publishers of the Millennial 
Dawn has recently reached Brunswick, directed to 
the " Book Agent of Bowdoin College." We assure 
the publishers of the Dawn that no animal of this 
genus has been seen around here for some time. 
There was one here from a neighboring college last 
fall, but he was very shy, and it was with difficulty 
that we obtained a shot at him. Of course we missed 
him, and the last we saw of him he was fleeing 
swiftly away towards the wild, wild woods of Mt. 
David. 

E. S. Barrett, '88, who has been out canvassing 
since the end of the fall term, returned to college 
January 19th. 

A Freshman, who was belated in the library after 
the ringing of the bell calling him to his customary 
" dead " or " ten strike," caught up his hat and coat, 
and much to the amusement of the librarians, rushed 
headlong into one of the small closets which he mis- 
took for the main entrance of the library. 

On Wednesday evening, January 19th, a grand 
party was given in Lemont Hall, to which many of 
the students were invited. On the same evening 
there was a Unitarian sociable which claimed the 
presence of quite a number of the boys. 

Each member of the Junior division in English 
History is required every week to hand in a written 
abstract upon some topic coming up in the lesson of 
the day. 

Prentis, '89, has returned to college. 

And now we shall witness a series of hundred 
yard dashes for Memorial between the bell-ringer 
and the belated students hastening to prayers. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



197' 



The Medical School commences February 3d. 

A week ago Wednesday night Prof. Chapman 
delivered a lecture before the Normal School in 
Gorham . 

The number of students patronizing the library 
has increased considerably since last term. 

Professor Chapman made out a list of some 
twenty-eight standard English worlss, prose and 
poetry, the first of the term, from which each mem- 
ber of the English Literature division selected one 
on which to write an essay. In connection with this 
there is to be a sketch of the author's life. The 
essay is to be of the nature of a criticism ; and the 
writer will follow certain rules designated by Prof. 
Chapman. The essays are expected to represent 
each writer's best efl'orts. They are to be handed in 
by the middle of March. 

The following scheme of exercises has l)een in- 
troduced for class work in the gymnasium. The ex- 
ercises are the same for each class. After the regular 
class exercises each class is divided up into three 
squads, and the severity of the work proportioned to 
the needs of each squad. 

Class Exercises. Squad Exercises. 

Monday. 

1st Div. — Horizontal Bar— Jumj^ing. 

Indian Chibs. 2cl Div.— Parallel Bars— Running. 

3d Div.— Chest "Weights— Vaulting Bar. 
Tuesday. 

1st Div. — Parallel Bars — Running. 

Dumb Bells. 2d Div.— Chest Weights— Vaulting Bar. 
3d Div. — Horizontal Bar — Jumping. 
Thursday. 

l.st Div. — Horizontal Bar — Jumping. 

Ear Bells. 2d Div. — Parallel Bars— Ruuning. 

3d Div. — Chest Weights— Vaulting Bar. 
Friday. 

1st Div.— Parallel Bars— Vaulting Bar. 
Free Gymnastics. 2d Div.— Horizontal Bar— Jumping. 
3d Div. — Chest Weights — Running. 

Mr. Booker's dog has had an attack of the scarlet 
fever, the blues, and we are not sure of how many 
more maladies. He is so as to be out ; but his exist- 
ence seems to be rather precarious. 

Prof Pease has given to each member of his Soph- 
omore class one of Cicero's letters to translate and 
annotate. The translations must be in the best En- 
glish possible; a commentary must accompany it in 
which are to be noted all peculiar constructions, ar- 
rangements of phrases, clauses, and sentences, all 
incidents and names and places mentioned or referred 
to ; and all similar passages in the other letters which 
the class read tliis term. Each member of the class 
is, in short, to edit one of Cicero's letters, and do it 
in as complete a manner as possible. This is prac- 
tical work. 



The college library has just published in pam- 
phlet form the addresses at the inauguration of Pres- 
ident Hyde. It contains, besides the inaugural ad- 
dress of President Hyde, the congratulatory address 
by Rev. John Orr Fiske, D.D., and the address of in- 
vestiture by Rev. Edwin Bonaparte Webb, D.D. 

Prof Robinson is one of the principal witnesses 
of the State in the case of Mrs. Martha E. Crockett for 
the murder of her husband by poisoning, now on trial 
at Belfast. In the analysis of the contents of the stom- 
ach, which the Professor made, enough arsenic was 
found to kill ten men. 

The college library has just published fac-simile 
reproductions of the drawings presented to the col- 
lege by Governor Bowdoin, which include sketches 
by Titian, Rembrandt, Rubens, Domenichino, Cor- 
reggio, Salvator Rosa, and other great artists, to- 
gether with a biographical and descriptive text by 
Fred H. Allen. The work is to consist of five parts 
and is to be sold only on subscriplion at one dollar 
per part. It is hoped from the profits of this enter- 
prise to establish a permanent library fund. This 
work will be of interest to every alumnus as a me- 
mento of the college, and of great value to all artists 
as affording tlie means for comparing the lines, 
forms, and expressions of the masters with the 
achievements of modern painters. The hearty co- 
operation of all friends of the college in the sale of 
this work is expected. 

It is proposed to give a musical and theatrical en- 
tertainment early in February, for the benefit of the 
Boating Association. Only students will take part 
in the exercises. 

Smith, '89, who for some time has been suftering 
from rheumatism, has been obliged to leave college 
for the present. 

President Pepper, of Colby, will address the stu- 
dents on Thursday, the day of prayer for colleges, in 
Lower Memorial, at 2 p.m. 



The most heavily endowed educational institu- 
tions in the United States are Girard College, SIO,- 
000,000 ; Columbia, $5,000,000 ; Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, ^4,000,000 ; Harvard University, $3,000,000 ; 
Princeton, $2,500,000; Lehigh, $1,800,000; Cornell, 
$1,400,000. 

A college for the higher education of women is 
to be erected in Montreal. A bequest of about $400,- 
000 has been left for this purpose. 

Princeton is to have a "Senate," consisting of six 
Seniors, four Juniors, two Sophomores, and one 
Freshman. 



198 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




'47.— Col. Chas. B. Mer- 
rill, who responded to the 
toast, "The Army," at the Portland 
Bovvdoin Alumni Dinner, stated in the 
course of his remarks that 241 Bowdoin 
graduates enlisted in the army and navy dur- 
ing the late war. 

'49. — Hon. Joseph Williamson, of Belfast, read 
a paper on "Early Colonization in Maine," and a 
biographical sketch of Gen. Pownal, at the last 
meeting of the Maine Historical Society. 

'69. — C. C. Powers has been elected member of 
the Boston Common Council for 1887. 

'78. — Joseph Sewall, youngest son of the late 
Hon. Geo. P. Sewall, died Sunday, at Oldtown. Mr. 
Sewall entered college with the class of 1878, but 
owing to trouble with his eyes, was obliged to leave 
during his Senior year. He was a civil engineer. 
He was engaged upon the sewerage systems of Nor- 
folk, Va., Keene, N. H., and Owenboro, Ky. He 
was afterwards employed under tlie United States 
government in mapping the builded portions of the 
city of Boston, and in preparing the maps for the 
report upon social statistics in the tentli census. 
During his work in the South he contracted malarial 
fever, which, going to his eyes, compelled the aban- 
donment of his profession. He was for three years 
deputy sheriif of Penobscot County, resigning as 
soon as his eyes enabled him to resume his work. 
At the time of his death he was under engagement 
to the United States Forestry Congress to carry out 
their observations throughout Maine. He was jjart- 
ner of his brother, J. W. Sewall, '77. He was 82 
years old at the time of his death, and unmarried. 

'79. — D. O. Castner, Esq., is county attorney of 
Lincoln County, Maine. 

'83. — Henry A. Bascom was mai-ried on the even- 
ing of January 6th, to Miss Alice Howard of Mai- 
den, Mass. 

'86. — J. H. Davis has been appointed city editor 
of the Bangor Whig and Courier. 

'86. — F. L. Smith has been chosen principal of 
the Lindsay High School, located at Shapleigh, 
Me. His duties begin February 7th. 

A Bowdoiii Alumni Association is talked of for 
Lewiston and Auburn. 



'79. — J. Warren Achorn delivered a lecture in Port- 
land, the 12th inst., on the "Negro and the South. 'i 
'66. ^Dr. F. G. Gerrish delivered a lecture before 
the Portland Society of Art, the 13th inst., on "The 
Artistic Anatomy of the Head and Neck." 

'81.— Harrold Wylls Chamberlain was recently 
admitted to Practice in the courts of Florida. 

'86. — G. M. Norris is attending lectures and re- 
citations in the Cincinnati Law School. 




The Okient has received the Columbia Bicycle 
Calendar for '87, just issued by the Pope Manufactur- 
ing Co., of Boston ; an elegant work in chromo-lith- 
ography and the letterpress. Each day of the year 
appears upon a separate slip, with a quotation per- 
taining to 'cycling from leading publications and 
prominent personages. It is in miniature, a virtual 
encyclopedia upon this universally utilized modern 
steed. The calendar proper is mounted upon a back 
of heavy board, upon which is exquisitely executed in 
oil color effect, by G. H. Buck of New York, an alle- 
gorical scene, representing the earth resting among 
the clouds, with Thomas Stevens in heroic size, 
mounted upon his Columbia bicycle, circumbicycling 
the globe. The atmospheric lights and shades of sun- 
light and moonshine are charmingly vivid, yet artis- 
tically toned and softened. A smaller portion of the 
board is devoted to a picture of a mounted lady tri- 
cycler, speeding over a pleasant country road. As a 
work of convenient art, the Columbia Calendar is 
worthy of a place in office, library, or parlor. 

Yale's tank and stationary shell seem to be a 
very general subject for comment. 

The Tech. says that the University of Chicago 
was the first college to issue an annual publication. 
We may be mistaken, but was not the Yale Banner 
the first of these publications ? 

The Tech. sends a very good picture of the M. I. 
T. eleven. 

Williams has a toboggan slide. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



199 



The oldest of the seventeen colleges in Cam- 
bridge University, England, is Peterhouse, founded 
over, six hundred years ago, in the reign of Ed- 
ward I. — Ex. 

As a result of last year's contests Yale has the 
boat-race and base-ball pennant, Harvard the Mott 
Haven athletic cup, and Princeton the foot-ball cham- 
pionship. 

An Annex for women is to be established at Yale. 

Dwight Hall, the Y. M. C. A. building at Yale, 
cost $60,000. 

It is generally believed that Boyden and Henshaw 
will form the Harvard battery this year. 

Wesleyan allows a limit of twenty chapel cuts a 
term. 

Harvard has lost her oldest graduate. Dr. Wm. 
Perry, of Exeter, N. H. He was in the class of 1811. 

Oxford University, England, has an attendance 
of 3,000 students, and the library contains 320,000 
volumes. 

Egypt has a college which was nine hundred 
years old when Oxford was founded. 

The Faculty of Amherst is made up entirely of 
her own graduates. 



F. W. BAEEON, 

Dealer in Fancy and Standard Groceries. 

CLUBS .SUPPLIED AT LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICE. 
MASON STREET. 

J. E. ALEXANDER, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Ww^m'kk aad ^a,lt Meats, 

VegetaWes, Fruit, anrl Counti'y Produce. 

Main Street, under L. D. Snow's Grocery Store. 

Special Rates to Student Clubs. 



w. 



B. SPEAR, Proprietor, 



TONTINE HOTEL, 



BKUNSWICK, MB. 

Private Suppers and Banquets a specialty. 
F. A. FARR, Manwjer. 

W. B. SPEAR. J. A. WHITMORK. 

SPEAR & WHITMORE, 

DEALERS IN 

ALL KINDS OF COAL, 

Cedar Street, Brunswick, Me. 



ALLEN'S PHARMACY, 

LEMONT BLOCK, 

Main Street, - - Brunswick, Me, 



WEAR ONE OF 

MERRY'S 

CELEBRATED HATS. 

Always the Cokkect Stvlh. 

237 MIDDLE STREET, 

PORTLAND. 



h. v. stackpole, 
Fine Boots and Shoes, 

Next to American Express Office, 
BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

CHARLES S. SIMPSON, 

Dentist, 



STOKER BLOCK, 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



F. L. DUNNE, . 

Importing ^Tailor, 

338 Washington Street, 
EosToiNr. 

A VERY LARGE LINE OF GOODS 

Specially selected for students' wear. 

ALL THE LATEST LONDON AND PARIS NOVELTIES 

Kegularly imported. 

Tailor to the Harvard Co-operative Society. 

Our representative will visit Brunswick next spring to 
take orders. 

338 WASHINGTON STREET, 
I105TBN. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 




CIGARETTE 
Smokers who 

are willing^to 
Day a little more 
jbr Cigarettes 
than the price 
charged for the on^inary trade Cigarettes, will 
Jind the RICHl.iOWD STRAIGHT CUT 
No. 1 SUPERIOR. TO AXiI- OTHERS. 
They are made from the 'brlglitest, most 
delicately flavored, and hlebest cost 
gold leaf grown in Virginia, and are aljso- 
iistely wlflioiit adiilteratloni or drugs. 

TRAIBHTCUTiy-: 

We use the Genuine French Rice Paper 

of our own direct importation, which is made 
especially for us, water marked with the name 
of the brand— RICHMOND STRAIGHT 
CUT No. 1— on each Cigarette, without which 
none are genuine. IMITATION'S of this 
brand have been put on sale, and Cigarette 
smokers are cautioned that this is the old and 
original brand, and to observe that each pack- 
age or box of « 
Kichinond 
Straight Cut 
Cigarettes I 
bears the I 
signature of ' 



niGAREHE 

ALLEN&Gi'KiTER 



MANtrFAOTUEEHS, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, AND JEWELRY, 

Gold and Seal Rings, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, 

Magnifying Glasses. 

Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry, Promptly Eepaired and Warranted. 

EDWIN F. BROWN, 

COR. O'BRIEN AND MAIN STREETS, BRUNSWICK, ME. 



ame 



On and after Oct. 25th, 1886, 

Passenger Trains Leave Brunswick 

For Bath, 8.15, 11.35 A.M., 2..3S, 4.40 aud 6.25 P.M., and ou Sunday 

mornings at 12.42. 
For Rockland, 8.15 A.M., 2.38 P.M. 
For Portland and Boston, 7.40 and 11.30 A.M., 4.35 p.m., and 

every night, including Sundays, at 12.35. 
For Lewiston, 8.15 A.M., 2.45 and 6.33 p.m., and every night at 

12.40. 
For Farmington, 8.15 A.M. (mixed), apd 2.45 p.m. 
For Augusta, 8.20 A.M., 2.40-and 6.35 P.M., aud 12.45 every night. 
For Waterville and Bangor, 8.20 A.M., 2.40 P.M., and 12.45 night, 

and for Waterville, Saturdays only at 6.35 P.M. 
For Skowhegan, Belfast, and Dexter, 2.40 P.M., and 13.45 (night). 
For Bangor and Piscataquis E. E., 8.20 A.M., 12.45 (night). 
For Ellsworth, Bar Harbor, Vanceboro, St. Stephen, Houlton, 

and St. John, 2.40 p.m., 13.45 (night). 

Note.— The night trains to and from Boston, Portland, Lew- 
ston, and Bangor, run every night, including Sunday, but do not 
connect lor Skowhegan on Monday morning, or lor Belfast and 
Dexter, or to any points beyond Bangor, on Sunday morning. 

PAYSON TDCKER, Gen'l Manager. 
F. E. BooTHBY, Gen'l Pass. & Tick. Ag't. 

Portland, Oct. 21, 1886. 



SPORTSMAN'S CAPORAL, 

The Latest aud becoming very popular. 

Manufactured by special request. 

A delicious blend of choice Turkish and Virginia. 

The following are our well known 

STANDARD BRANDS: 

Caporal, Sweet Caporal, St. James 1-2, Caporal 1-2, 

St. James, Ambassador, Entre Nous, Sport. 

KINNEY BROS. STRAIGHT CUT, FULL DRESS CIGARETTES, 
Our Cigarettes are made from the finest selected Tobaccos, 
thoroughly cured, and French Rice Faper, are rolled by the high- 
est class of skilled labor, and warranted free from flavoring or 
impurities 

Every genuine Cigarette bears a FAC-siiiiLE of Kinney Bros. 
Signature. 

KINNEV TOBACCO CO. 

SUCCESSOR TO KINNEY BROS. 

NEW YORK. 



JORDAN SNOW, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

DuNLAP Block, Brunswick, Me. 



(INTERCEPTED LETTER. 



Brunswick, May 14, 1886. 
Owen, Moore & Co., Portland. 
Gentlemen : 
Please send me by mail one pair long Bicycle Stockings, 
size 'Jj, regulation League Color. Enclosed one dollar and 
stamps for postage. I see by advertisement in Portland 
paper that you carry a line of Tennis Goods. Please send 
me a price-list of Rackets aud Balls, with best discount to 
a regular club. What are the prices on Jersey Coats, 
and in what color do they come ? 

Yours truly, 
P. O. Box 2002. BOB BROWN. 



Confectionery, Frnit, and Cigar Store, 

MAIW STREET, BRUIMSWICK, ME. 

Wm. R. FIELD, Manager. 

W. HAWTHORNE, 

FINE -^-TAILORING, 

2 Church Block, Bath. 



TUIO n A BCD IS on filem Fliilndelpliia 
I nlA Hflr EKat 'lie Newspaper Adver- 

I '"" r HlLJSi? tirfDK Afc'eucy of Messrs. 
N. W. AVER & SON, our authorized afc-ents. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



COLLEGE BOOKSTORE. 

We have coustautly iu stock a full assortmeut of all such goods as are usually kept in a first-class 
Book and Stationery Store. Fine Stationery a Specialty. Presents, Prizes, and other Fancy 
Goods in variety. College Books supplied promptly and at wholesale prices. 

BYKON STEVJillVS. 



The best place in town to buy your 

LINEN COLLARS and CDFFS, TIES, SCARFS, GLOVES, 

Hats, Caps, Cakes, Ect., is at 

PLUMMER'S, O'Brien Block. 

Correct Styles, and Best Quality, at Bottom Prices. 



R 



ONCE MORE I'M HERE! 

MONG the many attractions oue sees on passing along Main Street 
is the handsome and well arranged Show Window of 

*J. LENTON,* 

Successor to Lenton & Neagle. 

In this may be seen a very fine assortment of Ladies' and Geota' Traveling 
Bags, Valises, and Shawl Straps. There is also to be seen a very fine line 
of Riding Saddles for both Ladies and Gentlemen, showing that he pays 
strict attention to the wants of all his customers who are lovers of that 
heHlthy sport of horse-back riding. In connection with his riding gear he 
keeps the Largest Stock of Horse Clothing and Dusters that can be found 
this side of the manufacturers, — 150 dift'erent patterns to select 
from. He is also Manufacturer of Fine Harnesses of every description, 
and is ahead of all his competitors as regards to Prices and Good 
"Work. He pays strict attention to Trunk and Valise Repairing, and can 
Canvas a Trunk if it be so desired. Cut Prices to all College Students. 
Remember the place and give him a call, at the Sign of 
JOHN LENTON, 
Undek G. A.R. Hall. Main St., BRUNSWICK, ME. 



$100 A WEEK. 



ADAMS & UNIACKE 

HAVE A FULL LINE OF STOVES 

Also, all kinds of Lamps, 

And most everything found in a Stove and Crockei-y Store. 

MAIISr STKEET, BEUNS'WICK. 

Ladies or gentlemen desiring pleasant 
profitable employment write at once. 
We want you to handle an article of domestic use that recom- 
mends itself to every one at sight. STAPLE AS rLOUK, 
Sells like hot cakes. Profits 300 per cent. Families wishing to 
practice economy should for their own benefit write for par- 
ticulars. Used every day the year round in every household. 
Price within reach of all. Circulars free. Ageuts receive 
SAMPLE FREE. Address, 

DOMESTIC MFG. CO., Marion, Ohio. 

F. H. WILSON, 

DISPENSER OF 

Pure Drugs, Medicines, and Chemicals. 

Imported and Domestic Cigars. 
MAIN STREET, - - - BRUNSWICK, ME. 



THE 



♦ TRAVELERS * 

Life and Accident Insurance Company 

OF HERTFORD, COI^N"., 

Has paid to Policy-holders Ovef $11, 000, 000; and is now paying them $4,000 a day. Issues 

A r^OT'TiT^Xf'P T*OT Tr^TTH"Ss indemnifying the Business or Professional Man or Farmer for his 
■ry^^yji-'-'^-ii-^ i- J- V^-U-LV-y J-LikJ Profits, the Wage-Worker for his Wages, lost from Accidental Injury, 
and guaranteeing Principal Sum in case of Death. 

Only $5.00 a year to Professional or Business Men, for each $1,000, vpith .$5.00 weekly indemnity. No medical 
examination required. 

Permits for Foreign Travel and Residence free to Holders of Yearly Accident Policies. 

Of all insured under its ACCIDENT policies since 1864 have received fatal or disabling injuries, and been paid CASH 
benefits. 

Issues T TT7T7 "POT Tr^TT7Q of every Desirable Form for Family Protection or Investment for 
also lj±-r_Cj X VJ1j11.^±x:jO Personal Benefit. 

On ALL our plans, paid-up Policies will be issued after three payments, if desired, for amounts proportionate to the 
number of premiums paid. 

Assets, - $7,826,000 I Surplus to Policy-Holders, $1,947,000 

Agents everywhere. Apply to any of them, or the Home Office at Hartford. 
JAS. G. BATTERSON, President. RODNEY DENNIS, Secretary JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Secretary. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



QOCIJETY' ^ies cuxcL Alettes, Cuts cltxcI EixstgruicL. 
'Wi^tttng Fcuper cvncL Ccurd.s JEixgi^ctvecL ctn-d. Frtnted.. 
StcLdent's Vzsttirtg Cctrcls. IrwttcLttorts of eve-py 'hifncL 
aze-CTLted. hy the erLgrcuv^tng Koizse of 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 



Society iTwitojttorts , 'Dies, cnxd lllixstraJLtons for ITecLT'- 
^ooks, Moitog-rcuThs , Jlrms, cund Crests ErcgrcLvecL ctncL 
'Sr'rtThtedL. Visitirtg Cctrds, ctrtd the Clxoicest Stcuttortery . Seals 
Tapers, ctrtd Sectlirtg 'Was:, artd Sealing Sets. 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

BOSTON. 






ACID PHOSPHATE. 

[liquid]. 
Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. 

The Unrivalled Remedy for Dyspepsia, ."Mental and Physical E.vhaustion, Nervousness, Wakefulness, 

Diminished Vitality, etc. 

As Food for an Exhausted Brain, in Liver and Kidney Trouble, in Seasickness and Sick Headache, in Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion and Constipation, in Inebrieti/, Des2}ondenct/ and cases of Impaired Nerce-Function, 

It has become a necessity in a large number of households throughout the world, 

And Is universally prescribed and recommended by physicians of all schools. 
Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 
It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body. 
It is unsurpassed as a substitute for lemons or limes, and 

IT MAKES A DELICIOUS DRINK WITH WATER AND SUGAR ONLY. 
Prices Re.tsonable. riiniphlet giving furtlier particulars mailed free. Manufactured by tlie 

RUMFORD CHEMICArj WORKS, Providence, R. I. 
«®-BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.-ffi* 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



A.. O. REIED. 



BDRXJIKTS'^T^ICIS:, 3VEE. 



ia 



Special Rates to Classes I Students 

Interior Views Made to Order. 

A Goo,d Assortment of Brnnsiirick and Topsham 
Vieirs ; also College Views. 



Go to W. B. ITIToodard's 

To buy your GEOCEEIES, CANNED GOODS, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, aud COLLEGE SUP- 
PLIES. You will save mooey by so doing. 

Main Street, Head of Mall, Brunswick, Me. 



ALL KINDS OF 




ML 

nTTAWA lllll I I I ICushlng'slsIand 
Ul irtWrt M.M.%J \JKfAJ Portland, Me. 

isa:. s- a-iBso3sr. 



Boidoin College Medical Department. 

The Sixty-Seventh Annual Course of Lectures at the 
Medical School of Maine, will commence February .'Id, 
1887, and continue TWENTY WEEKS. 

FACULTY.— REV. Wm. DeWitt Hyde, President: Alfred 
Mitchell, M.D., Secretarj-; Israel. T. Dana, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Practice; Aleked Mitchell, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Women and Children ; Charles W. Goddard, A.M. , 
Medical Jurisiirudence ; Frederick H. Gerrish, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Franklin C. Eobinson, A.M., Cheniisti-y; Stephen H. 
Weeks, M.D., Surgery aud Clinical Surgery; Charles O. 
Hunt, M.D., Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Henkv H. 
Hunt, M.D., Physiology; Albion G. Young, Public Hygiene ; 
Irving E. Kimball, M.D., Demonstrator o£ Anatomy; Ever- 
ett T. Nealey, M.n., Demonstrator of Histology. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Secretary. 
Brunswick, Maine 




EXEODTED AT THE 



Journal Office, Lewiston, Maine. 



NEW TYPE, 

NEW BOBDEKS, 

NEW DESIGNS. 



We make a specialty of 



For Schools and Colleges. 

SUCH AS 

PROGRAMMES, 

CATALOGUES, 

ADDRESSES, 

SERMONS, &c. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Address all orders to the 

PUBLISHERS OF JOURNAL, 

Lewiston, Maine. 

MRS. NEAL'S BOOK BINDERY, 

JOURNAL BLOCK, LEWISTON, MAINE. 

Magazines, Music, etc., Bound in a Neat and Durable Manner. 
Ruling and Blank Book Work of Every Description done to Order. 



ATParker 

164 High St 



"" jobbe:r5« 









PORTLANDi 



We would be pleased to show you our line of English 
Specialties secured for our 

TAILORING DEPARTMENT. 



HIGH GLASS WORK GAN BE DEPENDED UPON. 



FASHIONABLE MADE UP CLOTHING, 

Of our own make, can always be found at our estab' s.iment. 

Shirts to Measure, Hosiery, G-loves, Underwear, feck Dressings 
and General Outiittingrs in our Furnishing Department. 



•KSl: 
■Giifl: 

EffifT 
EffiK_. 

:ffiH 
■CHH 

:Kk_ 
:l>ia = 



FINEST WORK. 


H. W. Howard Printing Company. 


LOWEST PRICES. 


BATH AND BRUNSWICK. 



■isa: 
• Ka- 

:KK]: 
:KS1: 
:Ka: 
JKSI: 
■KSl: 

ilSSJ! 

:|}|S1: 

■ffiftl: 
■KSl: 

:ffiS]: 
iCnSl: 
•KSl: 
■ffiSl: 
EKSJ: 
:KS1: 
iffiSl: 

;Ka = 



lOSE BALMz:: 



CHAPPED HANDS, FACE, LIPS, ET C. 

Warranted. No Cure, do Pay. Prepared only by 

J. S. TOWNE, Pharmacist, Iain St., Brunswick. 

gTUDE HTS' BOOKS TORE. 

30 Worth Appleton. 

College Books, and Books of All. Kinds 

Siipplied to order. Note Books and Statiosekt constantly in stOL-k. 

Fon.vTAis Pens and Stylographs a specialty. 

All at Reasonable Rates. 

HERSEY, '87. 

Siipei'intendcnis, 




etc. 



FREE REGISTRATIOX. 

Liberal cash pay to all who Will work for us. American College 
Directory^ and United States Public School Directory 
Free to Teachers. Address with stamps, 

C. I-I. EVAKS, & CO., Managers, 

American Teachers' Kureau, 

EVANS BUILDINGS. ST. LOUI8, MO. 



tries, the pnb'ishers of the Scientific 
American L-ontinue to act as solicitors 
for patents, c;iveats, trade-marks, copy- 
rights, etc.. fnrthe United States, and 
to obtain patents in Canada, England, France, 
Germany, and all other countries Their experi- 
ence is uneQualed and their facilities are unsur- 
passed. 

Drawings and specifications prepared and filed 
in the Piitent Office on short notice. Terms very 
reasonable. No charge for examination of models 
or drawings Advice by mail free. 

Patents obtainedthroughMiinn&Co.arenoticed 
in the SCIENTIFIC AIIIERICAIV, which has 
thelarge-st circulation and is the most influential 
newspaper of its kind published in the world. 
The advantages of sucli a. notice every patentee 



is published WEEKJLYat §3.00 a year, t 
admitted to be the best paper devoted to science, 
mechanics, inventions, engineering works, and 
other departments of industrial progress, pub- 
lished in any country. It contains the names of 
all patentees and title of every invention patented 
eacQ week. Try it four months for one dollar. 
Sold by aline " ' 



:.ion to patent write to 
i of Scientific American, 
jl Broadway.' S'ew York 
Taandbook about patents mailed free. 



nn A Co., publishe- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Messrs. WILLIAM S. KIMBALL & CO., 



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S 
COMFORT AND NECESSITY. 

The ''Argand Library," 

AND THE ADJUSTABLE HANGING 

**Ij ilc>i*a,r y Hi a, Tin ■£>&'' 

SATISFY ALL DEMANDS. 

Try the new " Harvard "and" Duplex" Burner 

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS. 

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE. 

JOHN FURBISH. 
LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

PORTLAND, 

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms 

ENQEAVED IM THE HOST FASHIONABLE STYLE. 

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY 

AGENCY FOR 

ROGERS' CELEBRATED GROUPS. 



LORING, SHORT & HARMON, 

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The New Styles in 

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Neckwear in New' Shapes and Colors just received. 

Dress and Street Gloves in all Shades. Dress and 

Business Suits in Blacks, Browns, Wines, 

and Fancy Mixtures, 

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IRA C. STOCKBRIDCE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHEK, 

eet Music, Music Books, Musical Instn 
cal Merchandise, of all kinds, 

124 Exchange Street, Portland. 

C. L. York, Old College Barber, 

Over Jackson's Store. Give me a call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



tiimce: is raoNEY. 

And we sell time for Little Money. Buy your Watches, 
Clocks, and Jewelkv cheap for cash of 

-^DAVIS, JEWELER. -f 

A FINE LINE OF SIL VER GOODS A T BOTTOM PRICES. 

Next Door to American Express Office, Bkunswick, Me. 

Our $1.00 Spectacles defy competition. Repairing promptly 

done by F. E. Davenport. 

C. H. POWERS' 

Hair -Dressing Rooms, 

LEMONT BLOCK, 
Main Street, BRUNSAVICK, MAINE. 

J. W. CURTIS, D.M.D., 
Dentist, 

Over Post-Office, BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 

GRIMMER'S ORCHESTRA 

Is now prepared to furnish Music for Concerts, Com- 
mencements, Exhibitions, Balls, Parties, etc. 

CHARLES GRIMMER, Director, 

180 Middle StreeU - - - - Portland Me. 



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Our Productions are of Merit, and Commend Tliemselves. 



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No. 547 Congress St., Portland. 

Do not pay the large profits which jewelers have always 
charged. Orders by mail receive prompt attention. 

satisfaction guaranteed. 

MARDY, PORTRAIT ARTIST. 



LATEST EUROPEAN METHODS. 



To THE Class of '87: 

Having just returned from Europe, where I have spent the summer in 
tlie study of art, as seen in the extensive collection of the National Gallery 
(London) the Louvre, and Luxembourg (Paris), and the high-art centres in 
the different countries of the old world, I guarantee to my patrons the full 
benefit of my observations, made with the eagerness born of the professional 
artist's zeal, and promise to give to each and every patron honoring me 
with their orders, perfect portraits, the result of the instruction gained by 
me from the works and words of the most eminent photographic artists on 
the other aide. Yours respectfully, 

A. N. HARDY, 

493 Washington St., Boston. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Requirements for Admission. 

Candidates for Admission to the Freshman 
Class are examined in the following subjects, text- 
books being mentioned in some instances to indicate 
more exactly the amount of preparatory work re- 
quired. 

Latin Grammar,— Allen and Greenougb, or 
Harkness. 

Latin Prose Composition,— translationinto Latin 
of English sentences, or of a passage of connected 
narrative based upon the required Orations of Cicero. 

Cffisar,— Commentaries, four Books. 

Sallust, — Catiline's Conspiracy. 

Cicero,— Seven Orations. 

Virgil, — Bucolics, and first six Books of the 
^neid, including Prosody. 



Greek Grammar,— Hadley or Goodwin. 
Greek Prose Composition, — Jones. 
Xeuophon, — Anabasis, four Books. 
Homer, — Iliad, two Books. 
Ancient Geography, — Tozer. 



Arithmetic,— especially Common and Decimal 
Fractions, Interest and Square Root, and the Metric 
System. 

Geometry,— first and third Books of Loomis. 

Algebra, — so much as is included in Loomis 
through Quadratic Equations. 

Equivalents will be accepted for any of the above 
specifications so far as they refer to books and 
authors. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior classes are examined in the studies 
already pursued by the class which they wish to en- 
ter, equivalents being accepted for the books and 
authors studied by the class, as in the examination 
on the preparatory course. 

No one is admitted to the Senior Class after the 
beginning of the second term. 

Entrance Examinations. 

The Rbgulae Examinations for Admission 
to college are held at Massachusetts Hall, in Bruns- 
wick, on the Friday and Saturday after Commence- 
ment (June 26 and 27, 1885), and on the Friday and 
Saturday before the opening of the First Term 
(Sept. 11 and 12, 1885). At each examination, at- 
tendance is required at 8.30 a.m. on Friday. The 
examination is chiefly in writing. 

Examinations for admission to the Freshman 
Class are also held, at the close of their respective 
school years, at the Hallowell Glassical and Sci- 
entific Academy, Washington Academy, East Ma- 
chias, and at the Fryeburg Academy, these schools 
having been made special Fitting Schools for the 
college by the action of their several Boards of 
Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trus- 
tees and Overseers of the college. 

The Faculty will also examine candidates who 



have been fitted at any school having an approved 
preparatory course, by sending to the Principal, on 
application, a list of questions to be answered in 
writing by his pupils under his supervision ; the pa- 
pers so written to be sent to the Faculty, who will 
pass upon the examination and notify the candi- 
dates of the result. 

GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Facilities will be afforded to students who desire 
to pursue their studies after graduation either with or 
without a view to a Degree, and to others who wish 
to pursue special studies either by themselves or in 
connection with the regular classes, without becom- 
ing matriculated members of college. 

Course of Study. 

The course of study has been lately reconstructed, 
allowing after the second year a liberal range of 
electives, within which a student may follow his 
choice to the extent of about a quarter of the whole 
amount. 

This may be exhibited approximately in the 
following table : 

REQUIRED— four HOURS A WEEK. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Mathematics, four terms. 

Modern Languages, six terms. 

Rhetoric and English Literature, two terras. 

History, two terms. 

Physics and Astronomy, three terms. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, three terms. 

Natural History, three terms. 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of 

Christianity, three terms. 
Political Science, three terms. 

ELECTIVES — FOUR HOURS A WEEK. 

Mathematics, two terms. 

Latin, four terms. 

Greek, four terms. 

Natural History, four terms. 

Physics, one terra. 

Chemistry and Mineralogy, two terms. 

Science of Language, one term. 

English Literature, three terms. 

German, two terms. 

Sanskrit, two terms. 

Anglo Saxon, one term. 

Expenses. 

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75. 
Room rent (half), average, $25. Incidentals, $10. 
Total regular College charges, $110. 

Board is obtained in town at $3 to $4 a week. 
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to 
$40 a year. Students can, however, by forming 
clubs under good management, very materially 
lessen the cost of living. 



Vol. XVI. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEBRUARY 9, 1887. 



No. 14. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DURING 
THE COLLEGIATE TEAR BT THE STUDENTS OF 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

EDITORIAL BOARD. 

C. B. Burleigh, '87, Managing Editor. 

L. B. Varnet, '87, Business Editor. 
C. C. Choate, '87. C. H. Verrill, '87. 

M. L. Kimball, '87. H. C. Hill, '88. 

A. W. Merrill, '87. M. P. Smithwick, '88. 

E. C. Plummer, '87. A. "W. Tolman, '88. 

Per annum, in advance, $2.00. 

Single Copies, 15 cents. 

Extra copies can be obtained at the bookstores or on applica- 
tion to tlie Business Editor. 

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Com- 
munications in regard to all other matters should be directed to 
the Managing Editor, 

Students, Professors, and Alumni are invited to contribute 
literary articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be 
accompanied by writer's name, as well as the signature which 
he wishes to have appended. 

Entered at the Poat-Officeat Brunswick as Second Glass mail matter. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. XVI., No. 14.— February 9, 1887. 

The Icicle 201 

Editorial Notes, 201 

Fooled 203 

Bowdoin Alumni at Dinner 203 

A Lie, 207 

Capacity, 208 

Y. M. C. Association, 208 

COLLEGii Tabula, 209 

Personal, 211 

In Memorlam, 211 

College World 212 

Clippings, 212 

THE ICICLE. 

Drip, drip, drip, the drops are falling 

From tlie ice-cased eaves, 
Fast, fast, fast each one is freezing 

To the cone it leaves. 

Tick, tick, tick, the hours are speeding 

Of our temporal stay, 
Bright, bright, bright will shine the morning 

Of eternal day. 




We publish in this issue of the Ori- 
ent reports of the Bowdoin Alumni Reunions 
at Boston, Washington, and New York. We 
are enabled to give a particularly full account 
of the New York reunion through the cour- 
tesy of Hon. E. B. Merrill, President of the 
Association. Bro. Tenney's thoroughly char- 
acteristic letter will be appreciated by all, as 
former letters of his have always been. We 
hope to publish in our next issue Professor 
Boody's sketch of the late Hon. Dexter A. 
Hawkins, founder of the New York Alumni 
Association. 



It is a matter of regret that a larger 
number of the .students do not attend the 
business meetings of the various associations. 
Such indifference to the management of the 
college affairs which belong exclusively to 
the undergraduates is very discouraging to 
the few who have those interests at heart. 
We are glad to know that such apathy is not 
due to any lack of devotion to the college or 
feeling of citizenship in the community. The 
students of Bowdoin have always been loyal 
to their college, and have responded nobly to 
the demands made upon them by the various 
associations for financial support. As a re- 
sult we have been able to take an active part 
in several sports, while other colleges with 
equal numbers have been unable to carry 
more than one — and that the least expensive 



202 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



one. We" have no fault to find with the 
support given in tliis direction. We do 
think, however, that the students, as a body, 
should take a more active part in tlie affairs 
of tiie various associations. The easy-going 
disposition to intrust the management of af- 
fairs which pertain to all, to the hands of a 
few, is a dangerous one in the extreme. It 
is this very thing which lies at the bases of a 
large part of the corruption in our modern 
politics. Thousands of men lack that interest 
in public affairs which should characterize 
every man who is blessed with the right of 
suffrage. In a less degree, this is true of our 
colleges. We do not intend to cast any re- 
flections upon the present management of any 
of the associations. We believe that they 
are all in good hands. We do think, how- 
ever, that a student who would become an 
active and worthy citizen of the world, should 
begin by being an active and worthy citizen 
of the college. 



A meeting of the representatives of the 
leading college journals will occur at Young's 
Hotel in Boston, the 22d of this month at 
which an intercollegiate journalistic associa- 
tion will be formed. The credit for organiz- 
ing and pushing forward the scheme is due 
to the Tuftonian, which has labored long and 
earnestly for its success. We believe that 
such an association, if properly supported will 
be of the utmost importance in improving the 
character and aim of college journalism, 
and in bringing together the editors of the 
various publications for social intercourse. 
The Orient will be represented by Mr. C. 
C. Choate, '87. 



The plan which is being agitated of giv- 
ing an athletic exhibition in the gymnasium 
at the close of the term is an excellent one, 
and we trust will be carried into effect. It 
will stimulate those selected to take part to 
additional work, and will enable the friends 



of the college to obtain a practical idea of 
what is being accomplished in this direction. 

We publish in another column some notes 
on the present workings of the Y. M. C. A. 
The work in this association has been in all 
respects very encouraging during the present 
vear. 



We trust our 'eighty-eight friends will not 
allow the present term to pass without an 
attempt to maintain the ancient Junior pre- 
rogative of running the dancing school. Even 
if the course should not consist of more than 
six lessons, it would be of great value in giv- 
ing a start to the social life of the college. 
This has always been a Junior affair. The 
members of other classes naturallj" feel that 
it is not their place to go ahead in the mat- 
ter. We believe that such a drill as a danc- 
ing school affords is of great value to every 
one. A libeial education does not consist 
entirely of book knowledge. The student 
who attempts to model a college course on 
this theory will find to his cost that he has 
made a sad mistake. Social cultivation and 
cultivation of manners have their place in 
education as well as cultivation of mind. No 
doubt a large percentage of our students are 
looking forward to a professional life. To 
this end they are bending their energies and 
shaping their studies. Nowhere does person- 
ality count for so much as in professional 
life. Whatever tends, then, to give ease of 
manner and a graceful presence, is as much 
an assistance to, and a part of, a profession as 
the technicalities of the text-books. It would 
be greatly to the advantage of many students, 
and would doubtless save them many embar- 
rassing experiences, if they recognized this 
fact earlier in life. We have seen college 
graduates, who had stood high in their classes 
but who were as awkward and ill at ease in 
society as school boys. Such men are always 
conspicuous because society expects to find 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



203 



in college graduates a certain amount of pol- 
ish and culture. It may exist in the head, 
but if none of it appears at the surface, so- 
ciety is quite apt to conclude that it does not 
exist at all. We do not consider a man by any 
means educated who, having mastered the 
intricacies of his text-books, leaves college in 
the end a boor. 



For the first time in many years the dis- 
ciples of ^^sculapius have been allowed to 
enter upon their yearly round at the Medical 
School without tiie demonstrative but unap- 
preciated welcome of the academical depart- 
ment. The ancient custom of greeting the 
returning Medic had no lingering death. Last 
year it flourished in full vigor ; this year it 
had disappeared — not an echo remained. The 
custom was abolished by no official edict, but 
by the simple free will of the students after 
a quiet but nevertheless vigorous discussion 
among themselves. They felt that the mutual 
feelings of the two departments were not 
what they should be, and that the abolition of 
this custom was the first step necessary toward 
the establishment of a community of interests. 
This action of the students is another em- 
phatic demonstration of the wisdom of the 
Faculty in establishing self-government at 
Bowdoin. They have emancipated the body ; 
has not the time come for emancipating the 
mind ? 



We failed to give credit for a poem, " A 
Chestnut Warmed Over," which appeared in 
No. 12 of the Orient. The poem was in- 
tended for our clippings but by a mistake 
appeared in our literary department. We 
hasten to make this explanation lest some 
censorious exchange should charge us with 
plagiarism. 



The University of Bologna is soon to cel- 
ebrate the eight hundredth anniversary of its 
foundation. 



FOOLED. 

Said the frisky Freshman 

To the sweetly smiling maid, 
As by the parlor fire 

Through the evening hours he staid : 
"Just kiss me once, ray sweet one," 

But the maiden answered "No, 
For my father strictly charged me 

That I never should do so." 
Then quickly rose the Freshman, 

And hastened to depart. 
With gleaming cheek, and downcast eye. 

And wildly beating heart. 
While the maiden softly murmured : 

" The dunce, he couldn't see 
That though I could not kiss him. 

He still might have kissed we.' " 



BOWDOIN ALUMNI AT DINNER. 

TALKING ABOUT COLLEGE AFFAIRS — EDU- 
CATED MEN IN POLITICS. 



BOSTON ALUMNI. 

Tlie nineteenth annual reunion of the 
Bowdoin Alumni met at Young's Hotel, on 
the evening of Feb. 2d, with an attendance of 
about seventy. After the banquet had been 
disposed of, and cigars lighted, the President 
of the Association, Mr. Augustin Jones, '60, 
called the company to order. He said : 

Brethren, — I thank you for the honor you have 
conferred upon me in the choice of President. I hope 
you will regard the authority vested in me, if I have 
occasion to call upon you. I confess that at first I 
was oppressed by the gravity of the situation. But 
a glance about the room reassured me ; for I saw that 
the fortune and success of this festival were in the 
wit, wisdom, eloquence, poetry, and songs on either 
side of me. 

We are gathered here from far and near. Our 
vocations in life are various. We diflfer in religion 
and politics; some are Unitarians, some Universal- 
ists, some Baptists, some Congregationalists, some 
conservative, others radical, some orthodox, others 
heterodox. We have Republicans, Democrats, Mug- 
wumps, protectionists, free-traders, men who favor 
gold, silver, and paper currencies, and others who 
joyfully accept either in moderate amounts when 
legally tendered. Such we are, or however other- 
wise bounded or described, or be the measurements 
moi-e or less. But we are all Bowdoin men ! Thei-e 



204 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



is one altar at which we forgive and forget differences 
and animosities. Here at least we are friends and 
fellow-students. Business, politics, or religion may 
separate or unite us for an hour, but literature joins 
us together forever. " Behold, how good and how 
pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity." 
We join our voices, our hands, and our hearts in hom- 
age to Alma Mater! We cherish her exalted fame ! 
We honor the names of the illustrious men she has 
nurtured to noble manhood. They are household 
words at home, while the writings of her eminent 
sons are read abroad in every civilized country ! We 
reverence the memory of her mighty dead ! It gives 
us joy, in the midst of elective studies gone mad, of 
ingenuous youth lost in the maze of studies with no 
directing hand, in the face of the new education, that 
Bowdoin, thoughtfully adjusting herself to the prog- 
ress and spirit of the hour, mindful of the ever in- 
creasing multitude of subjects to be studied, has 
nevertheless adhered steadfastly to that ancient cult- 
ure which is said to make for conduct, for beauty, for 
soberness, for righteousness, and for wisdom ; that 
she has neither been allured from her course by the 
clamor of the multitude, nor by the thirst for endow- 
ments or emoluments, nor has she bowed her knee to 
wealth, fashion, or power, but continues to teach her 
children to analyze, to discriminate, to think, and 
that it is vastly more important what they are than 
what they have ! 

I propose our Alma Mater: May she always have 
the courage of her convictions ; may she never lack 
any good thing which her devoted and grateful chil- 
dren can bestow. [Introduces President Hyde of the 
college.] 

Speeches were also made by President Will- 
iam DeWitt Hyde of Bowdoin College, ex- 
Governor Henry J. Gardner of Massachusetts, 
class of '38, Prof. Egbert C. Smyth, '48; 
Judge Symonds, '60, of Portland; Prof. C. 

C. Everett, '50, of Harvard; Henry V. 
Poor, '35; Jotham B. Sewall, '48; Hon. W. 

D. Mortland, '43, and several others. Orig- 
inal poems were read by W. C. Spear, '70, 
and Geo. T. Packard, '66. Letters were read 
from Mr. Horace Briggs, '25, ex-President 
Chamberlain, Professor Vose, Congressman 
Reed, and others. 

A vote of regret at the illness of the Hon. 
Peleg Chandler was offered by Professor 
Smyth, and was unanimously adopted. 

Previous to the banquet the following 



officers were elected, the President elected 
last 3'ear holding office three years: Vice- 
President, C. H. Bell, '63; Secretary and 
Treasurer, A. T. Parker, '76 ; Assistant Sec- 
retar}', E. U. Curtis, '82 ; also an Executive 
Committee of eight : R. L. Hodgdon, '45, E. 
C. Smith, '48, Edward N. Packard, '62, W. S. 
Hutchinson, '67, W. C. Spear, '70, F. V. 
Wright, '76, F. R. Kimball, '76, and W. G. 
Reed, '82. 



WASHINGTON ALUMNI. 

The Washington Association held their 
annual banquet at the Arlington, on February 
1st. About thirty members were present. 
The Association had as guest Mr. Justice Har- 
lan and Mr. Crosby S. Noyes. Before the 
banquet a reunion was held, and the follow- 
ing officers elected for the ensuing j^ear : Com. 
Horatio Bridge, President ; Israel Kimball 
and Hon. Wm. B. Snell, Vice-Presidents; J. 
N. Whitney, Treasurer ; Prof. J. W. Chick- 
ering, Jr., Corresponding Secretary; James C. 
Strout, Recording Secretary ; Executive Com- 
mittee, L. Deane, H. L. Piper, Geo. W. Dyer, 
S. D. Fessenden. 

Mr. Deane presided at the banquet, and 
introduced as speakers Hon. W. W. Rice, '46, 
Mr. Justice Harlan, Rev. J. K. Mason, '45, 
Senator Wm. P. Frye, '50, Gen. Ellis Spear, 
'58, Gen. George W. Dyer, '43, Richard S. 
Evans, '29, Dr. Wolhaupter, '62, John S. 
Stetson, '54, Judge Snell, '44, Rev. B. W. 
Pond, '57. 

Referring to the progress made by Bow- 
doin College, Senator Prye said that with all 
reverence for the learned men of the Faculty 
in his college days, the professors and teach- 
ei's at the college to-day were their superiors 
in the profession of teaching. The boys had 
better instruction to-day than did the boys of 
his class. The professors were nearer the 
scholars. In his day at the college he said 
that the crown was worn by the roysterer, 
who was a man of greater influence in his 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



205 



class than the student. He said than Maine 
prohibition had done much for the college. 
No other college alumni could do without wine 
at their banquet table. At the college now, 
instead of the roysterer, the student rules. 
No college in the United States, he said, could 
show on its roll of graduates so many great 
and honored names in proportion to the whole 
number of graduates. He believed, though, 
that the record of the future would be a 
thousand times more glorious even than this 
brilliant record of the past. There was a new 
spirit, he said, in the State and in the college. 
• Representative Rice, Mr. Stetson, and Judge 
Snell all took exception to Senator Frye's re- 
marks that in the old days tlie roysterers 
ruled, and gave evidence in behalf of the good 
conduct of the " old boys " when in college. 
Mr. Rice concluded that Senator Frye's class 
was probably an exceptional class in that 
respect. 

No wine was served at the banquet, and 
the speeches were all interesting and bright, 
and all expressed the utmost loyalty and de- 
votion to old Bowdoin. The Orient is in- 
debted to the courtesy of the Washington 
Star for an account in full of the proceedings. 



NEW YORK ALUMNI. 

The seventeenth annual dinner of the 
Bowdoin graduates of New York took place 
at the Hoffman House, February 3d. There 
are just enough graduates of Bowdoin in 
New York to know each other thoroughly, 
and to have as good a time at their dinner as 
if they were back at college. There was no 
need of a raised table, and so all the gradu- 
ates had the privilege of sitting at the horse- 
shoe table with the President. E. B. Merrill 
presided, and near him sat Gen. Thomas H. 
Hubbard, Prof. H. H. Boody, Almon Good- 
win, Nathaniel Cothren, William A. Abbott, 
and Dr. George F. Jackson. Others present 
were the Rev. D. C. Weston, David S. Rowe, 
Charles E. Soule, Dr. Frederick H. Dilling- 



ham, John A. Titcomb, A. G. Bradstreet, 
Charles E. Clarke, Francis R. Upton, Dr. E. J. 
Pratt, W. E. Donnell, and Herbert Grinndal. 

When it was time for coffee and cigars 
President Merrill read a letter of regret from 
President Hyde, in which he announced that 
the college had received $33,700 during the 
year, and that the uniform good feeling be- 
tween the students and faculty marked an era 
in Bowdoin's history. Then M. H. Boutelle, 
a member of the Senior class, responded for 
Bowdoin as the representative chosen for that 
purpose by the Faculty. He stirred every 
one to applause by announcing that the same 
crew that won the intercollegiate race last 
year, and lowered tiie record seven seconds, 
would try it again this year. 

Prof. Boody then read a sketch of Dexter 
A. Hawkins, founder of the New York Bow- 
doin Alumni Association. 

Almon Goodwin spoke on the relations of 
college alumni associations to each other. He 
did not think that the legislative efforts of 
business men iiad proved entirely successful. 
The test of a government was in bringing its 
best men to the front, and as the college grad- 
uates represented the cultivation and educa- 
tion of the country they ought to come for- 
ward and develop better and higher ideas of 
citizenship. 

" The College and Journalism " was re- 
sponded to by Mr. Starr H. Nichols, who said 
that one copy of a modern newspaper was of 
more real value than all Greek literature, and 
that the closing of the universities of the 
country would cause less consternation than 
the suspension of its newspapers. He de- 
scribed the scholarly, out-of-the-world atmos- 
phere from which college men came into the 
world, many of them graduating from the 
university into newspaper offices — out of the 
less into the greater — and closed with a plea 
that the daily journal should have a place in 
the university curriculum. 

Dr. Geo. F. Jackson spoke for the medical 



206 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



profession ; Mr. Nathaniel Cothren and Gen- 
eral T. H. Hubbard, for the Bar; and Mr. W. 

A. Abbott, for " The Girls." 

A letter from Bro. Tenney was read by 
the President of the Association, which is 
given in full below. 

Officers were chosen as follows: Presi- 
dent, James McKeen ; Vice-Presidents, E. 

B. Merrill, Dr. Fordyce Barker, Rev. Newman 
Smyth, and Rev. D. R. Goodwin; Treasure)', 
A. G. Bradstreet ; Secretary, Dr. F. H. Dil- 
lingham ; Corresponding Secretary, William 
A. Abbott ; Executive Committee, General 
T. H. Hubbard, Prof. H. H. Boody, Aimon 
Goodwin, W. J. Curtis, and Dr. F. W. Ring. 

[confidential.] 

Office of the Brunswick Telegraph, > 
Sunday, January 29, 1887. ^ 
Mr. Secretary : 

I have again to acknowledge the receipt of your 
generous invitation to dine with your Association on 
the 2d February, proximo, accompanied as that in- 
vitation is with a free ticliet, a copy of the Menu, and 
a tooth-pick. The ticket I will try to use here at oar 
next Commencement dinner. The Menu I can't read 
intelligibly, in the absence of the prandial splendors 
which, I am bound to believe from the price of the 
dinner to somebody or other, its foreign lingo repre- 
sents ; and the tooth-pick I have no use for. I am 
too old. I know some of the boys will be sorry I 
can't come. They sent me word to that eifect after 
the last dinner. President Hyde told me as much 
(by inference) after his return. But I must remain 
on the ground at the old stand, and get my paper to 
press and circulated by Saturday night. 1 told you 
last year what a valuable paper in this State the 
Telegraph is ; and except for the loss of some valua- 
ble "ads" and a shortened subscription list, I feel 
that the people are with me. They must have it. I 
shall recover the former net income by hereafter 
charging for the notices of death and marriage — both 
convertible terms, in some cases — but I cannot be 
outdone in this respect by the New York Herald, or 
any other of the pretentious dailies of your town, or 
any other. The news regarding the details of our 
every-day life and current gossip in the college and 
the town, I am told is left for me to scatter, and I 
regret to say it is at the present writing unusually 
dull. These items may be taken as a sample, copied 
from the next week's issue: "We are having our 



season slush in the streets, and elsewhere." " A 
farmer has just been in to say that something has 
been in his poultry yard and his birds are missing." 
"At the 'Commons Hall ' the boys are complaining 
that they cannot stand the turkey diet for many more 
days after this week. The thirty-one dinners of Jan- 
uary are always given up to turkey, without cran- 
berry sauce. We live too far away from the cran- 
berry bogs for the boys to get back before morning 
prayers. The veal period will come next." 

Everything at the college is prosperous. Even 
the Orient still lives. It is to be improved with a 
new cover, so that the erring non-subscriber can read 
its name on the railway stands, where it is said to be 
greedily sought for. From its contents, I have long 
been satisfied that it is only the intense loyalty of the 
sons and daughtei'S of Bowdoin, and their disposition 
to throw away money, that has enabled it to live so 
long as it has. I can publish the Telegraph for less 
money, with more news. 

The President of the college is all right. He has 
youth and a sincere love for good scholarship on his 
side, and the respect of the students. That, you 
know, is a large capital to trade on in a college 
town. Harvard University sought him out last sum- 
mer, with the rest of the Greeks, and honored herself 
by making him hereafter a marked man. He was 
considerable of a little d. in his youth, and now she 
has made him a big D.D. He has gone to the Boston 
dinner this year. Thought he couldn'tstand two din- 
ners in New York so near together as twelve months. 
And perhaps my allusions to him in my letter last 
year were not well phr.ased. But as my letters are 
always confidential, the public are none the wiser for 
my speaking the truth, when out of my office, and in 
writing to you, and he and I have our own little pri- 
vate understandings about some things. So you 
mustn't think any the less of him because the Boston 
fellows get in first with their invitation. When you 
have Governor Chamberlain, Prof. Goodwin, and 
Prof. Boody from the Faculty of my own time, to 
say nothing of one or two of the college overseers or 
trustees, and two or three old boys, besides, to speak 
for the "Girls," you must drop your intellectual 
greediness and be content. And perhaps I will come 
on myself next year. Why don't your Alumni Asso- 
ciation do something material for the college besides 
what you do at your annual temperance dinners. I 
can't hear that you have ever done much except to 
eat, and to speak of Alma Mater with great respect, 
and swear you'll never have another, etc., etc. I 
hope to see you all here next June. I asked my 
daughter to scratch off something applicable to the 
views which she and I and young persons of her sex 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



207 



hold at the present time towards " the gentlemen on 
the hill," and she gives me the inclosed, whicli she 
calls "Love and Philosophy," and perhaps it is. 
But if so now, I can only saj' it wasn't so in her 
mother's time. Ask some married man to gather 
himself together, and explain it in the old vernac- 
ular, in a talk of about ten minutes, if you can stand 
him so long. 

As ever, yours, 

Tenney. 



LOVE AND PHILOSOPHY. 

[W. J. Henderson, in Puck.] 
I. 
"Twas at the Concord sages' school, 

We met one summer's day; 
I guessed — and used no logic rule — 

I guessed what slie would say. 
" 'Tis very warm,"— this with a sigh — 

" The sun that shines from thence," 
She said, and pointed to the sky, 

" Is rolling toward the Whence." 
II. 
I told her that it must be so, 

At least it seemed so there ; 
For there was much I did not know 

Of the Whatness of the Where. 
About the only thing I knew. 

When she was standing near, 
Was that the sky was much more blue 

In the Nowness of the Here. 
III. 
She smiled, and said perhaps 'twas well, 

Those pretty themes to touch ; 
And asked me if the rule I'd tell 

Of the Smallness of the Much. 
I told her that I did not know 

That rule, but then I knew 
A rule that just as well would go — 

The Oneness of the Two. 

IV. 

She blushed and looked down on the ground, 

And said, " It can't he so "; 
And then the whole earth turned around, 

For my heart was full of woe. 
" Unto the Ceaseness of my End," 

I said, " I now shall go." 
She murmured: " Don't you compreliend 

The Yesness of my No ? " 



A LIE. 

It all happened back in the year of eighteen 
hundred and very cold weather. I was then 
taking care of the fire in the Medical build- 
ing as a favor to a friend whose regular 
duty it was. For the first day or two all 
went on very well, but on Sunday night I 



neglected tlie fire until after dark. I rather 
dreaded the trip down into tiie cellar of that 
lonely building after coal, more especially as 
there was no means of lighting the way, un- 
less I carried a lantern, and I had none. 
However, I braced up my courage and started 
over to the Medical building ; I lit the gas, 
shook down the fire, emptied the ashes, and 
then coal-hod in hand, and sundry misgivings 
in my heart, started for the dark cellar. I 
groped my way down and along to the coal- 
bin, found the shovel and filled the hod, 
whistling meanwhile to help out my courage, 
which has never been good for much since I 
was a small child. 

I had began to congratulate mj'self on my 
success in getting along so nicely, when on a 
sudden I was startled by a peculiar sound 
coming apparently fiora near the stairs. All 
the physiological phenomena customary and 
necessary to such an occasion at once oc- 
curred. The sound was repeated again and 
again and seemed to come nearer. I became 
aware of a shape approaching me — not the 
patented standard, dim, misty, colorless, trans- 
parent shape, so well known to frequenters 
of haunted houses, etc., but a tangible shape, 
small, highly colored, with red and blue 
flames darting from it in all directions. The 
thought which flashed through my mind at 
once was, that the spirit of one of the Italian 
murderers who were dissected last winter had 
returned in all its hellish garb, and was about 
to visit upon me its wiath. Just which one 
of those Italians the spirit represented I did 
not stop to think of, but like a properly con- 
stituted mortal, I at once fainted, as was 
eminently fitting under the circumstances. I 
was aroused by the touch of something cold 
on my face. On opening my eyes I saw this 
same highly colored shape standing over me.' 
An involuntary start on my part caused it to 
move away. I summoned up enough courage 
to look at it, and as my eyes became accus- 
tomed to the darkness, I could distinguish 



208 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



the form and outline of what appeared to me 
to be a small animal. Bat whence the brill- 
iant hues that sent forth those jets of colored 
flame? Then, as it always does in such cases, 
the truth dawned upon me, I was there in that 
dark, lone)}' cellar, shut up with Boolcers dog. 
How I got out I know not, for I only remem- 
ber staggering across the road to the campus 
and somehow getting to bed after having 
locked the door and piling all the furniture 
in the room against it. 

Since then I have noticed a very peculiar 
thing. I, who was formerly a model of truth 
and verity have become a most incorrigible 
liar. If you need any proof of this read my 
tale. If I am a liar the tale is not true, but 
if the tale is not true, then I am not a liar, as 
I have said that the tale is a proof that I am 
a liar. Now, then, either the story is true or 
I am a liar, which ? 

The fire went out. 



CAPACITY. 

The good professor blandly said : 
" I give this work to you, 

A task your qualities of mind 
Have fitted you to do." 

"I'm happy, sir," I made reply, 
" To honor your commands ; 

But give this thing, I beg of you, 
In charge of larger hands." 

He pensive paused in silent thought. 
Then looked my hands to see, 

"Impossible!" he sighed aloud, 
"Alas! it cannot be." 



Y. M. C. ASSOCIATION. 
One of the most useful and efficient 
agents in the college work of the Y. M. 
C. A., is the class for Bible study. The 
original plan with which these classes were 
started was to train members in use of the 
Bible for personal Christian work. In some 
colleges the class was led by some professor ; 



in others, the students themselves took turns 
as leaders. A year ago such a class was 
started as an experiment here at Bowdoin, 
with President Hyde as leader. It was 
formed with tlie original p