(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Bowdoin Orient"

BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 20, 1906 



NO. 1 



COLLEGE RALLY 

The third annual rally was held in Memo- 
rial Hall last Friday evening, and proved 
itself one of the most notable occasions held 
at Bowdoin for a long time. A large num- 
ber of Bowdoin's best known and most loyal 
alumni were on hand and these with the stu- 
dent body and a number of preparatory school 
men made the gathering a large and enthusi- 
astic one. 

The hall was beautifully decorated with 
flags of many colleges, fraternity banners 
and other decorations, all of which were 
arranged about the hall in a most artistic 
manner. Music was furnished by the college 
band and the Glee Club and this part of the 
program gave a pleasing variety to the even- 
ing. 

One of the attractive things of the rally 
were the souvenirs, which consisted of printed 
copies of some of the Bowdoin college songs. 
On the outside cover was a fine picture of the 
Hubbard Library and the college seal, together 
with the date of the rally. Altogether the 
souvenir was one of the most pleasing that 
could have been devised and reflects great 
credit upon the committee. 

Like its predecessors, Friday night's rally 
was delightfully informal. The Freshman 
and the "old Grad" met on equal grounds and 
like true Bowdoin men, they felt that it was 
as it should be. Speeches were made, the 
band played, refreshments were served and 
from the time Chairman Hawkesworth 
introduced the first speaker until the close, 
the occasion was one of delightful informal- 
ity and good fellowship. Surely the rallies 
are one of the great events of the college 
year. 

The speaking was of the best. There was 
wit and fun mingled with more serious things 
touching the policies of the college and its 
varied interests; and more than that, the 
speeches all had the ring of the Bowdoin 
spirit. 

The first speaker introduced by Chairman 
Hawkesworth was President Hyde, who 
responded in his usual happy manner. He 



said, among other things, that Bowdoin was 
always celebrating, and this time it was the 
100th anniversary of the first Commencement. 
He also stated that he was pleased to 
announce two gifts to the college. The first 
was a present from the Class of '73 and was 
a trophy to be presented annually to the class 
among the alumni that was most largely rep- 
resented at each Commencement. The sec- 
ond gift announced was from a number of 
the alumni who had subscribed $5,000 to 
make up the deficit in the running expenses 
of the college for the coming year. Presi- 
dent Hyde then touched upon the topic of 
"The College Man in Business," and in a brief 
but forcible manner showed that there was 
a constantly growing demand for the college 
man in this field. 

The next speaker was Judge Clarence 
Hale, '69, of Portland. Judge Hale responded 
to the subject "The Atmosphere of the Col- 
lege." His speech was exceedingly humor- 
ous and was one of the happy responses of 
the evening. 

Dr. Daniel Robinson, '73, of Bangor, was 
the next speaker, and his address was both 
eloquent and brilliant. He responded to the 
subject "Bowdoin Spirit" and told of his first 
impressions received at the fiftieth anniver- 
sary of the Class of 1825, at which Longfel- 
low was present. He also spoke of an inci- 
dent of the college days of Gen. Thomas H. 
Hubbard who got into a dispute with a rail- 
road man and which ended somewhat disas- 
trously for the general's antagonist. Dr. 
Robinson referred very eloquently to the 
heroism of Gen. Joshua L. Chamberlain, The 
Hero, of Little Round Top ; to William Pitt 
Fessenden, the statesman ; to Charles Jame- 
son, Class of '76, who led a forlorn hope in 
the Boxer uprising, and to Commander Peary 
now on a dash for the North Pole- 

Franklin C. Payson, '76, was the next 
speaker. Like all of Mr. Payson's speeches, 
his remarks were bright and humorous. He 
said that the only speaker in his class was 
Charles T. Hawes of Bangor, who was also 
present. He stated that the 100th -.-anniver- 
sary, to which President Hyde had referred, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



was merely an incident and that the real sig- 
nificance of the occasion was in the fact that 
it was the 30th anniversary of the Class of 
1876. 

Charles T. Hawes, a graduate member of 
the Athletic Council, came next. He spoke 
on "Bowdoin's Present Athletic Policy," and 
among other things said: "It is our, policy 
to maintain our present freedom and avoid 
all entangling alliances with other colleges of 
the State. Football will be played at Bow- 
doin next year, no matter what other colleges 
do. The outlook in track and baseball is 
encouraging and all hope for a clean record 
of Bowdoin victories." 

Coach Smith and Captain Tobey of the 
track team spoke of the track situation and 
urged upon the students the necessity of hard 
work. Coach Irwin and Captain Hodgson 
of the baseball team spoke of the baseball sit- 
uation. They stated that the prospects for a 
good team were encouraging. 

Captain Drummond of next fall's football 
team stated that a system of graduate coach- 
ing would be inaugurated with the next col- 
lege year and that Laferriere, '01, would be 
the head coach. 

Other speakers were Harry L. Webber, '03, 
of Auburn, and George E. Fogg, '02, of Port- 
land. The meeting concluded with the col- 
lege yells, songs and cheering, ending an 
event that all who were present will long 
remember. 



DRAMATIC CLUB 

The first production of "The Rivals" will 
be given in the Brunswick Town Hall next 
Friday evening, April 27. The club has been 
handicapped by several of its members, being 
forced to drop out. Only this week Estes, 
'09, who was to take the part of "Julia," has 
left college to teach. Nevertheless, Simmons, 
'09, will fill his place, and everything 
points to a good production next Friday. 
Ever since the spring term began, rehearsals 
have been held daily, and the competent 
coach, "Gus" Huse of Bath, has pronounced 
the cast to be even better than it was last 
year. "The Rivals" is a comedy, and 
although it has been on the boards many 
years, it is just as full of fun and just as 
laughable to-day as it was a hundred years 
ago. 

The Dramatic Club needs the support of 



the whole student body this year, for the cost 
of the staging of such a play as "The Rivals" 
amounts to a large sum. The costumes and 
wigs are of the period of the Revolution and 
can only be hired at large expense. Further- 
more, "The Rivals" is a play which calls for 
much good acting, and consequently consid- 
erable time and money have been spent at the 
rehearsals, for which one of the best coaches 
in the State has been employed. The pro- 
duction of an annual college play will become 
an established custom at Bowdoin, if the play 
is a success this year, but if "The Rivals" is 
not a success it is probable that dramatics 
will have to be given up. To make the play 
a success every man in college can help by 
being present. The seats cost but 50 cents, 
and every one that comes is guaranteed his 
money's worth. The plan for the sale of 
tickets is as follows: Checks will be sold this 
week to every one who intends to attend the 
play, and these checks, which cost 50 cents 
apiece, can be exchanged for seats when the 
seats go on sale at Shaw's Book Store at 8 
a. m., Monday, April 23. 

Admission tickets will also be sold at the 
door on the evening of the performance, but 
seats will probably not be obtainable then. 

The cast for next Friday is as follows : "Sir 
Anthony Absolute," F. E. R. Piper, 06;" Capt. 
Absolute," W. S. Linnell, '07; "Faulkland," 
W. E. Roberts, '07; "Bob Acres," J. W. Ley- 
don, '07; "Sir Lucius," H. N. Marsh, '09; 
"David," L. H. Fox, '06; "Fag," H. W. 
Atwood, '09; "Mrs. Malaprop," J. A. Bart- 
lett, '06; "Lydia," P. H. Powers, '08; "Julia," 
J. S. Simmons, '09; "Lucy," H. ' H. Bur- 
ton, '09. 



MUSICAL CLUB CONCERTS 

Manager Andrews has completed arrange- 
ments by which the postponed concerts at 
Thomaston and Camden are to take place 
Tuesday and Wednesday, April 24 and 25. 
The Tuesday evening's concert will be at 
Thomaston and that of Wednesday evening 
at Camden. The concert at Thomaston will 
be given under the auspices of the Junior 
Class of the High School, instead of the 
Senior Class, as had been previously 
arranged. 

The date of the annual Brunswick concert 
will be Monday, May 7. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE TRACK OUTLOOK 

This year Bowdoin faces one of the hardest 
battles in the history of her track athletics. 
With the graduation of Captain Denning of 
last year's team, the college lost its great indi- 
vidual point winner, and the loss is not easily 
replaced. 

Nevertheless, there are some very encour- 
aging features of the present situation and 
the men are developing splendidly under the 
efficient coaching of Mr. Smith. In the 
jumps especially, there seems to be a remark- 
able amount of new material, all of which is 
developing rapidly. In the distance runs 
Bowdoin should have strong candidates for 
the leading positions. The men who have 
done such good work in the past two years 
are in good form again and will doubtless 
give a good account of themselves. In the 
pole vault and half mile the prospects do not 
appear so encouraging, although they may 
improve before the meet. 

Not much is known about the new material 
for the sprints, as the muddy condition of the 
track up to the middle of the week had pre- 
vented a good tryout. Captain Tobey is in 
fine form for the hurdles and there are some 
other men who are working out well in these 
events. 

A good word should be said for Coach 
Smith. He is working hard and conscien- 
tiously with the men and is not only taking 
careful pains with the sure point winners, but 
also with the men who may not accomplish 
much the present year, but who are to count 
in the years to come. 

The following men are candidates for the 
different events : 

Sprints — Jenks, Doherty, Crowley, Lee, 
R. Files, Skates, Bouve, Rich, Putnam, 
Childs, Giles. 

Quarter Mile— Kimball, Stubbs, A. F. Bur- 
ton, Johnson, Pottle, A. L. Smith, Merrill, 
Goodspeed, Marsh, Leighton, Hichborn, 
Archibald, Powers. 

Half Mile — Holman, Blair, Chadbourne, 
Hughes, Brewster, Morrison, Timberlake. 

Long Runs — Shorey, D. S. Robinson, Tefft, 
A. L. Robinson, Simmons, Grey, Benner, 
Phillips. 

Broad Jump — Purington, Whitemore, Min- 
cher, M. C. Webber, Penned, Thaxter, 
Crowley. 

High Jump — Thaxter, Penned, Atwood, 
Bridsrham, Sanborn. 



Pole Vault — Winched, H. Burton, Gaston- 
guay. 

Hurdles — Tobey, LeavitfJ, Skolfiekl, Adam.s. 

Shot and Hammer — Garcelon, Hatch, Mac- 
Michael. 

Discus — Adams, Webber, Thomas, Stacey. 

Notice. 

Coach Smith wishes all who are trying for 
the field events to come out between 10 and 12 
o'clock in the morning:. 



HARVARD SECOND GAME 

Manager Wilson of the baseball team, 
announces that he has arranged a game with 
Harvard Second for June 2. This is the date 
when the proposed game with Dartmouth 
would have been played, and will complete a 
schedule of the usual number of games. The 
game will be played on the Whittier field. 



DR. SACHS' LECTURE 

Dr. Julius Sachs spoke in Memorial Hall last 
Monday evening on 'Teaching as a Profession." 
Dr. Sachs is connected with the Department of 
Education at Columbia University and is one of the 
leading educators of the country. 

He said in part : "Every student as he approaches 
the end of his college course naturally turns his 
mind to thoughts of his future work. In a great 
measure the decision of this question should depend 
upon himself, yet the advice and counsel of his 
professors will often aid greatly in shaping his 
future course. Opinion is prevalent at the present 
day that the profession of teaching is over-crowded, 
and so it is., but by men of inferior ability. For 
the right kind of man approaching it in the right 
spirit it offers an attractive field and the difficulty 
at present is that there are not enough competent 
men to fill places. 

"Men should not elect teaching for the good it 
does them, but for the good that they can confer 
upon humanity. Mere college training is not a fit 
for teaching, but simply a basis upon which the 
teacher can build. The two requisites necessary for 
a successful teacher are scholarship, and study of 
methods. In the first of these the student should 
avoid the dangers of specialization, and endeavor 
to procure a good general education, and develop 
keen reasoning powers. In methods of study 
mechanical methods alone cannot bring success, 
they should be accompanied by tact and skill, 
qualities which every teacher should make strenu- 
ous efforts to acquire. You who would be teachers, 
neglect no opportunity to broaden, extend your 
knowledge along social as well as literary lines, 
disregard those who advocate specialization in the 
earlier part of the college course and utilize every 
opportunity to strengthen and fortify your position 
as a teacher." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 



H. E. WILSON, 1907 
W. S. LINNELL, lgo7 
A. L. ROBINSON, 1908 
R. H. HUPPER, 1908 



R. A. LEE, 1908 
H. E. MITCHELL, 1908 
H. H. BURTON, 1909 
J. S. STAHL, igog 



A. L. JONES, Medical 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 Business Manager 

N. S. WESTON, 1908 Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 

Entered at Post-Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
Lewiston Journal Pkess 

Vol. XXXVI. APRIL 20, 1906 No. I 



Concerning 
Ourselves 



With this issue the 
Orient passes into the 
hands of the new editorial 
board. It is with a keen sense of responsi- 
bility and with some knowledge of the diffi- 
culties connected with the work that the new 
board enters upon its duties. It is not too 
much to say that the task of getting out a 
representative weekly in a college of Bow- 
doin's size is one of the most difficult duties 
connected with the various fields of college 
activities- The man who labors in athletics 
has the constant inspiration of an enthusias- 
tic student body behind him ; the same is true 
to a great extent of the debater ; and in either 
case their work is largely confined to a season. 
It is different with the men on the college 



paper. They get but few kind words (if they 
are fortunate enough to deserve them), and 
they are sure to get unkind ones. They must 
labor each week through the college year and 
at the end should consider themselves fortu- 
nate to have escaped with their lives. 

With these things in mind the new board 
asks for the assistance and co-operation of 
the student body and faculty. If it is felt 
that the college weekly may be improved, 
take active steps to help us make the change. 
This can best be done by coming to the mem- 
bers of the board with an honest, frank criti- 
cism, rather than by unkind words behind 
our backs. The college weekly deserves the 
active assistance of the students and faculty 
and we respectfully request the same. 

The new board plans no radical departures 
for the coming year. Perhaps the most 
important innovation will be the attempt to 
run a college calendar each week. In this, 
too, we must have the assistance of the stu- 
dents and faculty, especially the managers of 
the various college organizations. If they 
will kindly inform us of coming events 
in their departments, it will make it possible 
for a reliable calendar to be printed each 
week. The calendar will be in charge of J. 
S. Stahl and H. H. Burton, the two new 
members of the board, who will endeavor to 
see the managers and members of the faculty 
each week. 

The Orient also hopes to print a Faculty 
department more regularly than in the past 
In this the co-operation of the faculty is abso- 
lutely necessary. All items concerning the 
members of the faculty are always of interest 
to the students and alumni, and' such a 
department should be a distinct help to the 
paper. 

Contributions from the alumni will always 
be welcome. There are few ways in which 
the college paper can be made more attractive 
than by contributions from outside sources. 
Communications are especially solicited. The 
opinion of the graduates on college matters 
is of interest and importance to the under- 
graduate body and the Orient will welcome 
the opportunity of bringing about the closest 
relationship. 

In closing, we simply wish to say that we 
ask for the help of the students, alumni and 
faculty. Without it we shall be seriously 
handicapped. With it we pledge our efforts 
to publish the best possible paper. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Men in college will 
Sympathy extend heartfelt sympathy 

to William J. McDougall, 
'06, in the sudden death of his father, which 
occurred recently at his home in Rockland. 
Mr. McDougall had been a resident of Rock- 
land for many years, where he was well known. 
He is survived by a wife, one daughter and 
three sons. 



All friends of the college 
Pleasing Gifts were pleased to learn at 

the rally last Friday of the 
new trophy that is to be given each year to 
the class having the largest number of grad- 
uates present at the annual commencements. 
The gift is both novel and appropriate and 
will be an added impetus to the class reunions 
each year. The plan is to reckon by the per- 
centage of living members in each class, thus 
giving all an equal chance in the competition. 
The gift is made by a member of the Class of 
'73 m behalf of that class. It has not been 
decided as yet as to exactly what the trophy 
will be. 

Another pleasing incident of the rally was 
the announcement of the pledging of $5,000 
to meet the current expenses of the college. 
It has been one of the sources of regret for 
some time past that there should be an annual 
deficit and for some of the alumni to take 
charge of the matter for the current year is 
a source of keen pleasure to the friends of the 
college. Both this and the trophy are appro- 
private and timely gifts and are another evi- 
dence of the splendid loyalty of Bowdoin's 
graduates. 



Beginning with next fall, 
Graduate Coaching Bowdoin will inaugurate 

the graduate coaching 
system in football. For some time past the 
matter has been under consideration by our 
Athletic Council and the action has been 
taken only after mature deliberation. The 
system is now in vogue in a number of large 
colleges, including Harvard, Yale and Dart- 
mouth and is apparently an unqualified suc- 
cess. It is believed that there are a number 
of advantages in the system that can be 
gained in no other way, important among 
which will be that with the same head 
coach year after year the teams will be 
coached in the same methods of playing the 
game each season. This is a most desirable 



result. Under the old system of a different 
coach nearly every year men have been 
obliged to adapt themselves to varying 
methods of playing with the result that they 
never mastered any of them well. 

Another gain is that there will be 
more coaches. The advantages of this are 
evident. It will give the individual player 
an attention which he has never before had 
and as a result will permit of the rapid devel- 
opment of green material. Men who make 
good' coaches for certain positions can be 
secured from the alumni and work on candi- 
dates for that particular position. In the 
past it has often been the case that the 
coaches secured have been fine men 
for training the candidates for particular posi- 
tions, but have been useless for others 
and the elimination of this defect by 
graduate coaching will be no small advantage. 
The expenses of the new system will be some- 
what heavier, but it is believed that the advan- 
tages accruing will more than commensur- 
ate for the increased outlay. 



NOTICES 

All Seniors appointed on the provisional list of 
commencement speakers are required to write com- 
mencement parts. These parts, which should be 
not more than twelve hundred words in length, 
will be due. Monday. May 14. 

The Hawthorne Prize is forty dollars, given by 
Mrs. George C. Riggs (Kate Douglas Wiggin) and 
is awarded annually to the writer of the best short 
story. The competition is open to the members of 
the Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Classes. The 
stories offered in this competition must be not less 
than fifteen hundred words in length, must be type- 
written, and must be left at Room 3, Memorial 
Hall, not later than May 14. 

The subject assigned for the competition for the 
Pray Prize in English Literature and composition 
is "The Tragedy of Macbeth. Its Material, 
Dramatic Art, Poetry, and Moral Teaching." Due 
June s. 

Six copies of the catalogue of the Art Collections 
of Bowdoin College are wanted. For these, the 
regular price — twenty-five cents — will be paid. 
They may be left with the Librarian. 



GREAT BASEBALL VICTORY 

There was great rejoicing on the campus, Wednes- ^ 
day night, as the result of the victory over Brown 
by the score of 7 to 5. The victory was a most 
unexpected one, as the team has had little practice 
and was weakened by the absence of Greene and 
Abbott. A bonfire was indulged in, after which a 
procession was formed and calls made on several 
members of the faculty. The Orient will give an 
account of the game next week. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, APRIL 20TH. 

10-12.30 A.M. and 2-5.30 P.M.^Track team prac- 
tice on Whittier Field. 

2.30-5.30 — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

7.30 p.m. — Ibis Meeting. Lecture on "Socialism" 
by James F. Carey of Haverhill. Mass. 

SATURDAY, APRIL 2 1 ST. 

8.20 a.m. — Prof. Chapman conducts Chapel. 
10_.50-12.30 A.M. — Track Team practice on Whit- 
tier Field. 

2 p.m. — Bowdoin vs. Exeter on Whittier Field. 
7.30 p.m. — Lecture on "My Winter in Greece" by 

Prof. Woodruff in Congregational vestry. Admis- 
sion, 25 cents. 

MONDAY, APRIL 23D. 

8 a.m. — Baseball team leaves for Burlington, Vt. 

8 a.m. — Seats for "The Rivals" go on sale at 
Shaw's. 

10.12 a.m. and 2-5.30 p.m. — Track team practice 
on Whittier Field. 

4.30 p.m. — Exhibition of Photos, at Art Building 
closes. 

TUESDAY, APRIL 24TH. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 2-5.30 p.m. — Track Team prac- 
tice on Whittier Field. 
2.10 p.m. — Glee Clubs leave for Thomaston. 

3 p.m. — Bowdoin vs. University of Vermont at 
Burlington. 

8 p.m. — Glee Club Concert at Thomaston. 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25TH. 

10-12.30 and 2-5:30 p.m. — Track team practice at 
Whittier Field. 

3 p.m. — Bowdoin vs. University of Vermont at 
Burlington, Vt. 

8 p.m. — Glee Club Concert at Camden. 

THURSDAY, APRIL 26TH. 

Holiday. Fast Day. Cuts do not count double 
either before or after. 

11.20 a.m. — Debating Team leaves for Worcester. 

8 p.m. — President Hyde lectures at Bangor Theo- 
logical Seminary. 

FRIDAY, APRIL 27TH. 

Clark College Debate at Worcester. 

Dr. Burnett speaks in Cambridge, Mass. 

10.30-12.30 a.m. and 2-5.30 p.m. — Track team 
practice, Whittier Field. 

8 p.m. — "The Rivals" by the Dramatic Club at 
Brunswick Town Hall. Seats 50 cents. Admission 
35 cents. 

SATURDAY, APRIL 28TH. 

2 p.m. — Bowdoin vs. U. of M. on Whittier Field. 
Prof. Foster attends conference of New England 
College Teachers of Education in Boston. 



IBIS NEWS 

Three new members have been recently elected to 
the Ibis. They are Harry E. Mitchell. Fulton J. 
Redman, and Neal W. Allen, all of the Junior Class. 

James F. Carey of Haverhill, Mass., will speak 
before the Ibis and invited guests this evening in 
Hubbard Hall. His subject will be "Socialism" 

Announcement is made that Hamilton Wright 
Mabie will speak in Memorial Hall May 2, under 
the auspices of the Ibis. His subject will be "Liter- 
ature as a Personal Resource." The lecture will be 
open to the public. 



College Botes 

BOWDOIN vs. EXETER TOMORROW. 

April 26 is Fast Day and a holiday. 

Haley. '08, is teaching school at Harpswell. 

Richardson, '09, is teaching school at Topsham. 

Jesse Wilson, '03, is visiting his home in Bruns- 
wick. 

R. K. Eaton, '05, is visiting his home in Bruns- 
wick. 

Ray Pettengill. '05, was a recent visitor at the 
college. 

Millard Chase, '04, was a visitor at the college 
last week. 

H. S. Pratt, '09, will not return to college until 
next fall. 

A. W. Merrill, '08, was in Portland last Saturday 
and Sunday. 

The Zeta Psi Fraternity will give its house party 
Wednesday evening. May 2. 

Harold Kirkpatrick of Phillips-Andover, was a 
recent visitor at the college. 

R. H. Remick, Wesleyan, '08, was visiting friends 
on the campus, last Saturday. 

General Chamberlain gave a lecture in the Con- 
gregational Church last evening. 

Manager Wilson is distributing neatly printed 
copies of the season's baseball schedule. 

Atwood, '09, has returned after an absence of 
over a week on account of sickness. 

Stacey, '09, has returned to college after a week's 
visit to his home in Somerville, Mass. 

The members of the D. K. E. Fraternity dined 
at the Rossmore last Saturday evening. 

The members of the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity 
sat for pictures at the Webber studio, last week. 

Burton, '07, was in Portland, Saturday, on busi- 
ness connected with the printing of the next Bugle. 

Captain Schumacher of the Bates football team 
visited friends in college during the latter part of 
the week. 

Cole, '09, returned to college last Monday after 
an absence of many days on account of the illness 
of his mother. 

E. O. Beane, '04, who was captain of the football 
team in the fall of that year, was one of the visitors 
at the college last week. 

John M. Bridgham, '04, was a visitor at the col- 
lege during the closing days before the recess. He 
is teaching at the Groton School, Groton, Mass. 

Estes, '09. will leave Friday for South Thomas- 
ton. where he has a position as principal of the 
South Thomaston High School. 

A meeting of the Junior Class was held on 
Wednesday of last week. The principal business 
was the appointment of a committee to collect 
funds for the payment of certain bills. 

Bowdoin is represented in the Cooper murder 
trial, which is now attracting so much notice in the 
papers, by H. M. Heath, '72. counsel for the 
defense, and by Mr. Heath's able assistant, A. M. 
Goddard. '82. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Gammon, '09, has returned to college after an 
absence of about six weeks on account of illness. 

Upton, '07, returned to college the first of the 
week after a prolonged absence caused by illness. 

Beginning with this week, Sunday chapel will 
occur at 5 o'clock through the remainder of the 
year. 

Pennell, '08. will be out of college during the 
spring term, being engaged in work at his home 
in Portland. 

Prof. Sachs who spoke in Memorial Hall last 
Monday evening, attended the chapel exercises last 
Tuesday morning. 

There have been several fraternity baseball teams 
organized and quite a number of games are soon 
to be played on the Delta. 

The paths on the campus are being made over 
with the ashes taken from the furnaces which sup- 
ply the college buildings with heat. 

The debating team is busily at work preparing 
for the debate with Clark next Friday evening. 
The team will leave Brunswick next Tuesday fore- 
noon. 

A dancing party was given at the Theta Delta Chi 
house, Wednesday evening, in honor of several 
young ladies from the Burnham School, North 
Hampton, Mass. 

Favinger, '06, has accepted a position as 
instructor in Latin and Greek at Tome Institute, 
1 a Southern school and one of the largest second- 
ary schools in the country. 

The announcement has recently been made that 
the employes of the Lewiston, Bath & Brunswick 
Railway are to receive a 10 per cent, raise in wages 
under the new management. 

A considerable number of Freshmen have as 
usual been visiting the dissecting laboratory of the 
Medical Building this week, and there has been 
the usual failing of appetites. 

There is a great opportunity now for the man 
who is seeking to put his money where it will do 
the most good. The opportunity is in the hands of 
the managers of the various college teams. 

Many of the fraternities have lately caused their 
members to draw lots for seats in their dining 
rooms, in order to enable members of the differ- 
ent delegations to become better acquainted. 

O. A. Pike, '07, sang a solo, entitled "Alleluia," 
at the Central Congregational Church of Bath, on 
Easter morning, and repeated it in chapel on Easter 
afternoon, giving it a very beautiful rendering. 

Briggs, '07, had the misfortune to throw his left 
arm out of joint at the shoulder in the baseball 
practice of Monday afternoon. The injury will 
cause him great inconvenience for some time to 
come. 

During the vacation Mr. Marquardt, of one of the 
Maine forts, spoke at a meeting of the Parish Club 
of the First Congregational church. Professor W. 
B. Mitchell presided at the meeting, and Dr. Elliott 
of the medical faculty was one of the chafing dish 
artists. Mr. Marquardt spoke before the Bowdoin 
Y. M. C. A. last January, when his story of his 
experiences at the battle of Manila was much appre- 
ciated. 



This has been a busy week for Freshmen — on the 
tennis courts. 

Mr. and Mrs. George C. Riggs (Kate Douglass 
Wiggin) sailed for Italy April 3. They will visit 
Rome, Florence and later England, after which 
they will return to Hollis, Me. They expect to 
return in June. 

Easter Sunday in Brunswick was far from pleas- 
ant, the rain falling in torrents during the greater 
part of the forenoon. However, nearly all the stu- 
dents attended services either in Brunswick or 
neighboring cities. 

Joe Drummond, '07, and Holt, '07, attended the 
annual banquet of the Alpha Phi Fraternity of 
Portland High School last Monday evening. Drum- 
mond acted as toast-master of the evening, and 
Holt was one of the speakers. 

The Bugle Board sat for pictures on Friday of 
last week. This is the last picture taken that can 
be inserted in the coming issue of the Bugle, and 
had been greatly delayed because of the absence of 
Upton, who has been out of college. 

A delightful informal dance was given by the 
Psi Upsilon Fraternity. Wednesday, February 28. 
The patronesses were Mrs. William A. Houghton 
and Mrs. Allen Johnson. Refreshments were served 
and a most pleasant evening passed. 

Gerald G. Wilder, assistant in the college library, 
who is secretary of the Maine Library Association, 
has recently sent out the preliminary announce- 
ment of the eleventh annual meeting of the State 
Association, which is to be held in Auburn, April 25 
and 26. 

A good word should be said of the work of the 
college band last Friday evening. This is one of 
the college organizations which is essential to the 
success of many of our college functions and is 
especially entitled to the thanks of the students for 
its work last Friday. 

Subscription papers have been the disturbers of 
the peace during the past ten days. With baseball, 
track, tennis, debating and rally papers following 
each other in rapid succession, most of the fellows 
have a worried look. Still, it is the man who has 
to do the collecting that is entitled to the greatest 
sympathy. 

The students were somewhat surprised last Sat- 
urday afternoon to hear the vigorous ringing of 
the chapel bell. As there was no known cause for 
such an occurrence an investigation was started, 
and after keys had been secured it was found that 
Pike, '07, and Rogers. '06, were confined within, 
where they had been inadvertently locked up by 
those in charge of the building. 

THE FACULTY 

Professor George T. Little of the college library, 
will be one of the speakers at the meeting of Maine 
Library Association, which will be held at Auburn 
April 25 and 26. His subject will be "Some 
Glimpses of Foreign Libraries." 

In the recently issued edition of "American Men 
of Science," a biographical directory of men dis- 
tinguished for their scientific attainments, Bowdoin 
is represented by the following men : President, 
William DeWitt Hyde; Professor Charles C. 
Hutchins of the chair of physics ; Prof. Leslie A. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Lee, of the chair of geology and biology; Professor 
William A. Moody of the department of mathemat- 
ics ; and Professor F. C. Robinson of the chair of 
chemistry and mineralogy. The medical staff is 
represented by Professors Frederic H. Gerrish, E. 
J. McDonough and H. A. Burnett. 

Professor Moody attended a meeting of the New 
England Association of Mathematical Teachers, 
which was held at the Brookline High School, 
Brookline, Mass., on Saturday, April 14. , 

President Hyde gave an address last Wednesday 
before the Lexington Historical Society. The 
address was delivered in the old Belfry Club House, 
and on the anniversary of the eve of the Battle of 
Lexington. 

Next Thursday President Hyde will give a lec- 
ture on "The Contagion of Character," before an 
assembly of Congregational ministers from all over 
the State, which will be held at the Bangor Theo- 
logical Seminary. 

Professor Woodruff, during the vacation, was at 
his home in Burlington, Vermont, where he was 
called by the sudden death of his mother. 

On next Saturday evening Professor Woodruff 
will give an illustrated talk on "My Winter in 
Greece," at a Greek entertainment to be given at 
7.30 p.m. in the vestry of the Congregational Church 
in Brunswick. Refreshments will be served by 
young ladies in Greek costume. An admission fee 
of 25 cents is to be charged. 

Dr. Burnett has been offered the head of the 
department of psychology in a New England Col- 
lege of about a thousand students ; but he has 
declined the invitation and will remain at Bowdoin. 

Professor Chapman on April 4, read a paper 
entitled "Old 'Flood' Ireson," at a meeting of the 
New England Historic-Genealogical Society at Bos- 
ton. On the following Saturday, April 7, he was 
present at the meeting of the Bowdoin Alumni 
Association of Boston and Vicinity. 

Professor Allen Johnson took a trip to North 
Carolina during the Easter recess. Professor 
Johnson is writing a book on Stephen A. Douglass, 
and he went South to look over the family papers 
of Lincoln's great opponent, and to interview his 
son. Judge Douglass, who now has the care of his 
father's belongings. 

Professor Foster on April 2, presided at a ban- 
quet of the Roxbury Alumni Association. 

Dr. Alfred Mitchell, Dean of the Medical 
Faculty, spoke on "Rational Medicine" at a recent 
meeting of "The Gentlemen's Club" of Brunswick, 
held at the home of Hon. Barrett Potter, '78. 

Dr. Whittier is still busy with the Cooper trial, in 
which he has been of much service as an expert 
witness. 

Professor McCrea and Professor Ham have 
planned to go to Germany this summer, and conse- 
quently will probably close their courses in the 
early part of June. 

Professor McCrea was in Boston during the 
Easter vacation, making researches in the State 
House Library. The researches were to aid him in 
writing some long treatise which he now has under 
way. 

Dr. C. T. Burnett has been invited by the Har- 
vard Philosophical Club to deliver an address on 
"The Art of Misleading" at an open meeting of the 
club in Cambridge, on April 27. 



LIBRARY NOTES 

Very recently Mr. W. J. Bowdoin, of Brooklyn, 
N. Y., has very kindly presented the library with a 
valuable set of photographs, which were taken in 
Italy, of the newly discovered sketches of Michael 
Angelo very soon after their discovery. In the 
current issue of "The Independent" these six 
photographs are reproduced, and an interesting arti- 
cle by Helen Zimmern, a great art critic, accompa- 
nies the sketches. 

There has also been received a large engraving 
entitled "The Most Eminent Living Americans in 
1906," which contains the portraits of 264 of our 
nation's greatest men. This interesting collection 
of portraits is now being presented to each of the 
100 great libraries of the world, among which the 
Hubbard Library holds no mean place. Among the 
men in the engraving Bowdoin is represented by 
President Hyde, Senator William P. Frye, '150. 
Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller, '5,.', and General 
Thomas H. Hubbard, '57. This engraving is to be 
put on exhibition in the periodical room. 

Among the books lately received may be men- 
tioned a "Life of Charles Lamb," by E. V. Lucas ; 
"Early Western Travels," by R. G. Thwaites ; 
" Philippine Islands," by Blair & Robertson; "Seats 
of the Mighty," by Gilbert Parker; "The Philis- 
tines," by Arlo Bates, '76, and also "The Mystery 
of Sleep." by John Bigelow, LL.D. 



ART BUILDING NOTES 

On Thursday, the 12th, Dr. E. B. Mason ren- 
dered the seventh musical recital of the series now 
being given in the Bowdoin Gallery. A good audi- 
ence was present, and the music was much appre- 
ciated. The general subject of the recital was 
"The March," the program being as follows : 

1. Witches' Dance. — McDowell. 

2. March of the Dwarfs. — Moszkowski. 

3. Fatinitza March. — Suppe. 

4. Marche Militaire. — Schubert-Tausig . 

5. Marche Grostesque. — Sinding. 

6. Kaisermarsch. — Wagner. 

7. Dance Caracteristique. — Tschaikowsky. 

At four o'clock yesterday afternoon, the eighth 
recital was given. The general topic dealt with 
was "The Symphony," and the program which Dr. 
Nason made use of was as follows : 

II Trovatore — Fantaisie. — Sidney Smith. 
Symphony No. VII. — Beethoven. 

(a) Poco Sostenuto — Vivace. 

(b) Allegretto. 

(c) Presto. 

(d) Allegro con brio. 
Spring Song. — Henselt. 

Polacca de concert. — Tschaikowsky. 

The same recital will be repeated next Sunday at 
3.30 p.m It was omitted last night on account of 
Gen. Chamberlain's lecture in the Congregational 
Church. 

The ninth recital. "The Waltz," will be given in 
the Bowdoin Gallery next Thursday afternoon at 
4 o'clock and the same music will be played again 
on the following Sunday afternoon at 3.30. The 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



omission of the evening recital is due to the holiday 
on Thursday, which is Fast Day. This recital will 
be the next to the last one, and it seems that the 
series will finish much stronger than it started, 
which is a source of much gratification to those con- 
cerned, and which gives promise of a like series 
being given next year. 

Last Monday, Mr. George W. Hammond, A.M., 
Bowdoin, 'oo, added several valuable coins to the 
collection, with which he has already presented the 
Art Building. The coins are as follows : Ten and 
25 sous (paper) Assignato ; two lire (paper) from 
Italy ; three Moorish copper coins ; one silver piece 
of the time of Philippus V. ; one nickel 20 centesimi 
from Italy ; and ten other coins from the same 
country. But most interesting of all, is a silver 
Denarius of the time of Emperor Tiberius of Rome. 
This valuable coin is in excellent condition and was 
presented to Mr. Hammond by Dr. Long of Con- 
stantinople, who is an authority on coins and 
vouches for its genuineness. 

There are now on exhibition in the Bowdoin gal- 
lery a set of nearly 100 photographs illustrating 
French Art in Paris. This is an unusually good 
collection of photographs, and is loaned by the 
Library Art Club for exhibition until Monday, 
April 23d. 



THETA DELTA CHI HOUSE PARTY 

The annual reception and house party of Eta 
Charge of the Theta Delta Chi Fraternity was held 
Friday, March 30, at the fraternity house on Maine 
Street. The reception took place from 3.30 to 5.30 
in the afternoon and proved itself a most delightful 
society function, there being about 175 guests pres- 
ent. The greater part were from Brunswick, Lew- 
iston, Portland, Westbrook, Bath and Augusta. 
The patronesses were Mrs. William DeWitt Hvde, 
Mrs. Wilmot B. Mitchell. Mrs. Frank E. Woodruff, 
Mrs. Frank W. Shorey, all of Brunswick and Mrs. 
F. J. C. Little of Augusta. 

In the evening dancing was enjoyed by about 25 
couples, the same ladies acting as patronesses in the 
evening. 

Music for both afternoon and evening was fur- 
nished by an orchestra led by Francis J. Welsh, 
'03, of Portland. 

The house was beautifully decorated with palms, 
ferns, smilax, potted plants and cut flowers, and 
these with the beautiful costumes of the ladies 
made the occasion a brilliant one. 

Among the young ladies present were Miss Anna 
Percy, of Bath, Miss Dasie Hubbard, Miss Sue 
Winchell, Miss Edith Woodruff, Miss Edith 
Weatherill, Miss Helen Johnson of Brunswick, Miss 
Bernice Ham, Miss Lena Paul of Lewiston, Miss 
Margaret Kent of Westbrook, Miss Tillie Rolfe of 
Somerville. Mass.. Miss Gladys Brown, Miss Pfieffer 
of Wellesley College, Miss Helen Jewell of New- 
ton, Mass.. and Miss Frances Skolfield. Miss Lena 
Redlon and Miss Hattie Brazier of Portland. 

The delegates from the other fraternities were 
Harry Leslie Childs, '06. from Alpha Delta Phi, 
Walter Bradon Clark. '06, of Houlton from Psi 
Hnsilon. Arthur Otis Putnam, '06, of Houlton from 
Delta Kapna Epsilon, Asa Osgood Pike, '07, of 
Frveburg from Zeta Psi, Harold Everett Wilson, 
'07, of Newburyport, Mass., from Delta Upsilon. 



and Ralph Grant Webber, '06, of Augusta, from 
Beta Theta Pi. 

The committee of arrangements consisted of 
Harold G Tobey, '06, Robert T. Woodruff, '06, 
Harry L. Brown, '07, Joseph A. Davis, '09, and 
Harrison Atwood, '09. , 



Hlumnt personals 



A pamphlet has recently been received at the 
library, containing the great tribute paid by Justice 
D. J. Brewer of the United States Supreme Court 
to Rev. Stephen M. Newman, D.D., '67, at the time 
of his recent retirement from the pastorate of the 
First Congregational Church of Washington, D. C, 
after filling the position for 21 years in a manner 
of which the congregation all feel proud. 

C. D. Jameson, '76, who was spoken of at the 
Rally as one of Bowdoin's illustrious alumni, has 
very recently had the honor of being put in general 
charge of all the construction work, or in fact, of 
all important foreign enterprises undertaken in 
China. 



©bituar^ 



REV. THOMAS S. ROBIE, A.M., '56. 
Rev. Thomas S. Robie, A.M., '56, died in Chicago 
on Sunday, March 25. For several months Mr. 
Robie had been very ill, having, however, borne his 
sickness with courage and patience. He was born 
at Gorham, Me., in 1835, and prepared for college 
at Gorham Academy. He entered Bowdoin in 
1852, joined the Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity, 
and graduated with high honors in 1856, later 
receiving the degree of A.M. Immediately after 
graduation he entered the Bangor Theological Sem- 
inary and again graduated among the first of his 
class in 1859. After leaving the Theological Semi- 
nary he was ordained pastor of the Congregational 
Church at Waldoboro, Me, and since then has held 
various pastorates in Connecticut, New Hampshire, 
Maine, and Massachusetts. In 1859 Mr. Robie 
married Virginia D. Pendleton of Gorham, and she 
now survives him with a son and daughter. 



See pie flfioui a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
1906 man who will be in the market for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July let. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick flouse at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

a. s. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPGOOD'S 



10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



IN MEMORIAM. 
The Kappa Chapter of Psi Upsilon mourns the 
loss of Thomas Martin Giveen of the Class of 1863 
who died at his home in Topsham on March 28. 
Mr. Giveen was a native of Brunswick and a prom- 
inent lawyer here. As a young man he studied 
and practiced law in Portland for several years. 
Later he removed to Brunswick where he practiced 
for more than thirty-five years, winning for him- 
self a large circle of friends. The Chapter mourns 
with the bereaved relatives and friends and extends 
to them its deepest sympathy. 

Robie Reed Stevens, 
Francis Robbins Upton, Jr., 
Neal Willis Cox, 

For the Chapter. 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 

PULSIFER'S 
5 AND 10 QEBT ST0RE 

Now Open for Business. 
J. W. PULSIFER, - - MAINE STREET, BRUNSWICK 




S. P. ROBIE, 

LEWISTON, = MH1NE 
FOR BEST 

Hats, Furnishings, Athletic Goods. 



Bowdoin Calendars 

ON SALE at HALF PRIGE 

(50 Cents) 



WOODRUFF, '06, or 
BY^ON STEVENS' BOO^STO^E 



THE MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Has a carefully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; Clinical Conferences; Modified Seminar Methods, and thoroughly Practical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest and finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every respect, and the new laboratories arc specially planned and equipped for individual work by the students. 
The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 
^ SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of Medicine. 




Tfflar/zii 



REPEATING SHOT GUN 
NEW MODEL N2I7 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By the omission of the take down feature we have 
been able to greatly reduce the cost of production and at the same time have kept the sun up to the 
famous high /flar/in standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
barrels are especially bored for smokeless as well as black powder and so chambered that 2M inch or 
^'jS ln ch shells may be used. Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 
reliable and best working gun in existence. We are glad to make it possible for every lover of guns 
and bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so low a price. 

Have your dealer order it for you. 

Send for the ZSar&n Catalogue and Experience Book to-day. Free for 3 stamps. 

7j2e'2flcOlfi/i firearms £a,42Willo W Street, New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 27, 1906 



NO. 2 



BASEBALL 

BOWDOIN II, EXETER 1 

Bowdoin had the satisfaction of paying off 
a portion of her old debts in baseball, Satur- 
day afternoon, when she defeated the Exeter 
team, for the first time in several years. The 
score was 11 to 1. As the figures indicate, 
the game was a one-sided contest, but this fact 
rather added to the pleasure of the game from 
the Bowdoin standpoint. 

This was the first game that Bowdoin has 
played on the Whittier field this season, a fact 
which gave the contest an added interest. 
The result was all that the enthusiasts could 
desire. Bowdoin showed up in splendid form 
in every department of the game, and when 
the earliness of the season is considered it 
may be said that Bowdoin has every reason to 
feel pleased with its prospects. 

The Exeter team was much weaker than 
those of recent years. The fielding was poor 
and the men were absolutely unable to con- 
nect with Files. However, after the first two 
innings the visitors improved considerably 
and Bowdoin did not score as easily as in the 
earlier part of the contest. 

The feature of the game was the splendid 
fielding of Bowdoin. This was where the 
greatest contrast was seen. Bowdoin played 
practically an errorless game, while Exeter 
made many errors and some of them were 
decidedly costly. If Bowdoin continues to 
play the fielding game of Saturday through 
the season, she should be able to hold her 
opponents down to very small scores, even if 
her hitting should not be sufficient to warrant 
victories. 

Files' work in the box was another feature 
of the game. He had the visitors at his mercy 
throughout and it was not until the latter part 
of the contest that they were able to secure 
even a single hit. Judging from Saturday's 
game, he is in even better form than last year, 
and if he continues the work he has clone thus 
far this season, he may be considered one of 
the best men among the New England 
colleges. 



It is hard to make individual mention of 
players, for each man of the team played with 
the team work and snap that wins games. 
Blair and Hodgson did especially good work, 
their fielding being of the very best. Pike, on 
first, also showed up very strongly. This is 
a ne\v position for him and had he played a 
far inferior game, it would have been pardon- 
able, but instead he played in the form of a 
veteran ■ and showed that Bowdoin has not 
reason to worry about first. 

Bowdoin did not hit hard, but what she did 
get counted to excellent advantage. Streuble, 
who started in to pitch, was wild and it was 
this rather than Bowdoin's ability to hit him 
that caused his removal. He was replaced by 
White, who pitched a first-class game. Bow- 
doin's best hitting was done by Sparks, who 
drove out a double .very opportunely in the 
second and also secured another good single. 

The greater part of Bowdoin's scoring was 
done in the first two innings. In the first 
Blair and Abbott both secured a base on balls, 
and Files was safe on an error at right ; 
then Sparks hit for two bases, scoring Blair 
and Abbott, and Files. Bower hit, as also did 
McDade, which allowed Sparks and Bower to 
score. 

The scores in the second innings were 
secured by errors at first and short, allowing 
Abbott and Stanwood to secure their bases, 
and a long drive to Files in which he circled 
the bases and scored the men before him. 
Bowdoin's other runs were secured in the 
third, fourth and ninth innings. Exeter 
secured her only run in the seventh, when 
with two men retired, Cooney and Barry both 
hit for two bases, which allowed the former 
to score. 

The summary: 

Bowdoin. 

ab r bh po a e 

Blair, ss 4 o o 1 3 o 

Abbott, c 4 2 o 7 3 o 

Stanwood, 3b.. 510210 

Files, p 5 2 1 o 1 o 

Hodgson, 2b.. 4 1 o 3 2 o 

Sparks, rf 4 3 2 o o o 



12 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Bower, cf 4 1 1 1 

McDade, If.. .. 3 o 1 1 

Pike, ib 4 o o 10 

Houghton, If . . 2 o o 2 



Totals, 



39 " 



27 10 



Exeter. ' 

ab r eh po' a e 

Leddy, c 4 o o 1 2 o 

Loftus, If 4 o o 1 o o 

Mulkeen, 2b ... 3 o o 2 1 1 

Grattan, ib. .. 4 o 1 5 o o 

Barry, rf 4 1 1 1 o 1 

Cooney, ss. . . . 4 o 1 1 3 8 

O'Donnell, 3b. 3 o 1 3 1 o 

Hunter, cf 3 o o 5 o 1 

Streuble, p. . . . 1 o o o o o 

White, p 2 o o o 2 o 



Totals, 36 1 



o 



27 



Innings.. 1234567 
Bowdoin . . 5 3 1 1 o o o 
Exeter . . . . o o o o o o 1 



9 

1 — 11 

o — 1 



Runs earned — Bowdoin 2, Exeter 1. Two- 
base hits — Sparks, Barry, Cooney. Sacrifice 
hits — Houghton, Stanwood. Stolen bases — 
Blair 3, Abbott 2, Hodgson, Sparks 3, Bower 
Pike. First base on balls — Blair, Abbott, 
Hodgson, Sparks, Bower, Pike, Loftus. 
First base on errors — Bowdoin 7. Left on 
bases — Bowdoin 7, Exeter 2. Struck out — 
Stanwood 2, Hodgson 2, Sparks, McDade, 
Houghton, Pike, Leddy, Loftus 2, Mulkeen, 
O'Donnell, Hunter, Streuble, White. Passed 
ball — Leddy. Hit by pitched ball — Loftus, 
Blair, Files, Bower, Barry. Time — 1 h. 40 m. 
Umpire — Conway. Attendance — 400. 



BOWDOIN 7, BROWN 5 

Bowdoin opened her baseball season with 
Brown on Andrews Field at Providence, April 
18, and started most auspiciously with a well- 
earned victory. The Bowdoin team was 
weakened by the absence of two of her regu- 
lar players, but the men played together well 
and showed up in first-class style in spite of 
the short time of practice. Files pitched for 
Bowdoin and was in fine form and remarka- 
bly steady throughout the game. For Brown, 
Adams, Newse, and Tift followed in succes- 



Bowdoin went to bat first. Neither scored 
in the opening inning, but in Bowdoin's sec- 
ond time at the bat Hodgdon got a free pass 
to first ; a hit by Lawrence advanced him a 
base, after which he stole third, and came in 
on a long hit by McDade. Brown did not 
score in their half. In the third Stanwood 
added another run, scoring on a hit by 
Hodgson. Brown in her half scored two 
runs. Dennie got first with a base on balls, and 
stole second ; Adams got his base on an error 
and then both scored on a hit by Jones. In 
the first half of the fourth, with two men out, 
Blair got a single and was scored by Stan- 
wood with a long three-base hit. In Brown's 
half Paine started off with a three-base hit, 
and after two men were out, got home on a 
single by Elrod. In the fifth inning Brown 
substituted Newse as pitcher. For the next 
four innings the score remained 3 to 3. In the 
last half of the eighth, Brown secured two 
runs on two singles and an error. Thus the 
score stood 5 to 3 when Bowdoin came to the 
bat for the last lime. For the last inning Tift 
was put in for Brown. Tift gave three bases 
on balls in succession. A wild throw to the 
plate brought in Pike and Stanwood and tied 
the score. 

An error put Files on first and then an error 
and wild throw by the first base man gave 
Bower and Files a chance to add two runs. 
The score now stood 7 — 5. Brown failed to 
score in her half and thus it remained. The 
summary : 

Brown 

AB R BI-fr PO E 

Hoye, 3b 4 2 1 2 o 

Jones, ss 4 o 1 2 o 

Paine, rf 4 2 2 1 o 

Raymond, c 4 o o 8 1 

Dickinson, 2b 3 o o I o 

Elrod, ib 4 o 1 10 2 

McElroy, If 2 o o o o 

Dennie, If 3 1 o 1 o 

Adams, p 1 o o 1 o 

Newse, p 1 o o 1 o 

Tift, p 2 o o 1 o 

Total, 32 5 5 27 3 

Three-base hits — Paine, Stanwood. Two- 
base hits — Stanwood, McDade. 

Brown 002 1 000205 

Bowdoin ...o 1 1 1 0000 4 — 7 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



13 



BOWDOIN. 



Blair, ss 4 

Stanwood, 3b 4 

Rower, cf 4 

Files, p 4 

Sparks, rf 4 

Hodgson, 2b 4 

Lawrence, c 4 

McDade, If 4 

Pike, lb 3 



Total, 



3 1 



27 



A 



TUFTS 13, BOWDOIN 2 

Bowdoin lost her second game of the season 
to Tufts on Tufts Oval, April 19. In the 
first three innings Sparks was wild and aided 
with a number of bad errors Tufts secured 
eleven runs. Bowdoin secured one run in the 
fifth and one in the sixth and Tufts got two 
more in the eighth. Watson pitched a fine 
game for Tufts. Bower made some fine 
catches at center field for Bowdoin. 



The 



summary follows : 

AB 

Lamb, 2b 4 

Bailey, rf 1 

Priest, rf., p. .. 5 

Roper, ss 5 

McConnell, If . . 4 

Suitor, c 3 

Buchanan, c. .. o 
Fisher, ib. . . . 4 
Fitzgerald, cf . . 1 
Gallagher, cf . . 1 

Clapp, 3b 3 

Watson, p 1 



Tufts. 



po 
3 



32 13 6 
Bowdoin. 



27 



AB 

Blair, ss 4 

Bower, cf . . . . 4 
Stanwood, 3b . . 4 

Green, ib 4 

Files, rf. 

Sparks, p t 

Hodgson, 2b. 
Lawrence, c. 
McDade, rf . . 



27 



4 


1 





1 








T 











3 


1 


3 





1 





1 


1 


3 








10 


2 











1 


1 





2 



Two- base hits — McDade, McConnell, 
Suitor. Struck out — Sparks 9, Watson 7, 
Priest 2. First on balls — Off Watson 2, 
Priest 2, Sparks 9. Hit by pitched ball — 
Sparks, Watson. Wild pitch — Sparks. 



SATURDAY'S GAME 

Bowdoin will play the first game of the 
Maine College series on the Whittier Field 
to-morrow afternoon, the opposing nine being 
University of Maine. If the weather should 
prove pleasant a large crowd should be on 
hand for the first important game of the year. 

The game will be called at 2 o'clock in 
accordance with a desire of the visiting team. 
The make-up of the two teams with their bat- 
ting order, as given the Orient by the respec- 
tive managers at the time of going to press, is 
as follows : 

Bowdoin. Maine. 

Blair, ss cf ., Sawyer 

Abbott, catcher 2d b., Burns 

Stanwood, 3b 3b., Higgins 

Files, rf If., Chase 

Hodgson, 2b ss., Scales 

Sparks, p rf ., Quint 

Bower, cf ib., Mayo 

McDade, cf c, Blossom 

Greene, ib p., Frost 



LAST SATURDAY'S RESULTS 

Harvard 4, Annapolis 2. 
Pennsylvania 5, Yale 4. 
Princeton 3, Cornell 1. 
Holy Cross 15, Tufts 4. 
Williams 8, Union o. 
Dartmouth 13, Norwich o. 
Brown 11, M. A. C. 2. 
Bowdoin 11, Exeter 1. 
Niagara 13, Wesleyan 8. 
Columbus 3, West Point 2. 
Georgetown 8, Fordham 1. 
Tech 1908 22, Tufts 1908 6. 
Harvard 1909 4, Tufts 1909 3. 
Colby 17, Taconnet o. 



24 



THE VERMONT GAMES 

Bowdoin lost her first game with Vermont 
last Tuesday by the score of 10 to 6, in a 
rather loosely played contest. In the Wednes- 
day game Bowdoin was a winner 5I to 4 in an 
exciting finish. An account of the games will 
appear next week. 



14 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 

H. E. WILSON, 1907 R. H. HUPPER, igo8 

H. E. MITCHELL, 1907 R. A. LEE, 1908 

W. S. LINNELL, 1907 H. H. BURTON, 1909 

A. L. ROBINSON, 1908 J. S. STAHL, 1909 
A. L. JONES, Medical 

G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 Business Manager 

N. S. WESTON, 1908 Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 

Entered at Post-Ofiice at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
Lewistun Journal Press 

Vol. XXXVI. APRIL 27, 1906 No. 2 



Alpha Delta Phi £n Thursday, Friday and 
Convention Saturday of next week 

will occur the seventy- 
fourth annual convention of the Alpha 
Delta Phi Fraternity at Portland. During 
these three days it is expected that 
many members of the fraternity will visit 
Bowdoin, and on Thursday afternoon the 
entire party will come to Brunswick. 
Seldom has it been Bowdoin's privilege to 
extend its hospitality to so large and distin- 
guished a body of guests as will doubtless 
come to Brunswick on that date. With this 
fact in mind all men in college, individually 
and as members of fraternities, should vie 
with each other in showing the visitors every 
hospitality. Let each student see to it that the 
hand of good fellowship is extended to all 
who may visit us, and that they go away with 
pleasant remembrances of Bowdoin, not only 



to their fraternity brothers, whose special 
guests they will be, but to every other Bow- 
doin man as well. 

Good fellowship among college men is com- 
ing to be more and more recognized under 
the fraternity system. Bowdoin students will 
have a rare opportunity to illustrate it next 
week. -Let us do so. One of the fraternities 
has already voted to keep "open house" dur- 
ing the visit of the delegates and doubtless all 
others will follow the example. In such 
action each fraternity will be doing credit to 
itself and to the college. 



Bowdoin=Clark 
Debate 



The Bowdoin debating 
team will meet Clark Col- 
lege to-night for the first 
debate ever held between the two institutions. 
Every Bowdoin man hopes to see our team 
win ; whether it will or not is another ques- 
tion. In any event we may be sure that Clark 
will have a good team. The college is one of 
the coming institutions of New England and 
the work done there is rated with the best of 
the colleges. Her debating interests are not 
neglected, and there is reason to believe that 
her team has been working hard in prepara- 
tion for to-night's contest. She also has had 
the advantage of faculty coaching to a certain 
extent, although the scope of this assistance 
has been materially limited by the debating 
agreement. Her men, again, will have the 
inspiration of an audience made up of fellow- 
students. 

On the other hand Bowdoin students may 
feel well pleased with her representatives. 
The team has been carefully selected and since 
the arrangement of the debate each member 
has been working with untiring zeal. If hard 
work will win the contest Bowdoin should 
have good prospects. Again the men have 
had splendid training. One of the number 
was a member of last year's team; another 
has taken active part in the college debating 
work for two years, and while the third man 
is less experienced he has proven that he has 
the qualifications of a strong debater. On the 
whole it would seem that Bowdoin. has a 
strong, well balanced team and one that 
should at least make an excellent showing. 

Debates are uncertain, however, and the 
winner will not be known until the judges 
make their announcement, and it would not 
be surprising if even they would have a hard 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



15 



problem to settle. Be this as it may there is 
no doubt that there will be a fine contest at 
Worcester to-night and Bowdoin has a team 
there which every student believes to be a rep- 
resentative one. 

Bowdoin men need to put 
Concerning Track in the hardest possible 

work during the next two 
weeks in preparation for the annual track 
meet. There is no question but the meet will 
be the most closely contested of any held since 
the formation of the association and it is safe 
to say that the outcome will depend on the 
second and third points taken. For this 
reason it behooves every man in college to get 
out and work for some event. In every meet 
yet held, men have unexpectedly taken second 
and thirds, and in some cases firsts. There 
will be such occurrences this year, and upon 
these contingencies will depend the outcome 
of the meet. It is for the student body to see 
that these point winners are Bowdoin men. 

Thus far this season the number out at 
work has not been as large as the situation 
demands. There is some first-class new 
material and the older men are also working 
faithfully. The second and third men, how- 
ever, must be developed. The meet is but two 
weeks away, and all should turn out each day. 
It is possible that one man with the taking of 
an unexpected third may win that meet. Such 
a man will be the hero of the day. Let every 
man in college work for the coming fortnight 
with these things in mind. 



„ . . „ Several New England 

Taxing College newspapers recently criti . 
Property dsed p res ident Eliot 

because of his opposition to the attempts that 
have been made to bring about the taxation 
of college property in Massachusetts. That 
there should be an attempt on the part of 
any individual to bring about such taxation, 
or an endorsement of such an attempt, by the 
press, is one of the surprising things of the 
day. Were colleges unworthy of assistance, 
justice would demand that the privately 
endowed college, in its relation with the 
State endowed institution, should not be 
taxed. That they are worthy of all assist- 
ance has long since been recognized; it is 
in accordance with this very recognition that 
our government, both State and National, has 



founded the State College and University ; and 
although there are cases where the wisdom of 
the taxation of the people to support them 
might well be raised, it is nevertheless in 
the nature of things that such publicly 
endowed institutions should be founded. But 
any state or municipality, in the face of this 
condition, should undertake to tax any prop- 
erty whatever of a privately endowed college 
or university, and that such a movement 
should find supporters among the press, is a 
thing that cannot be easily understood. 

If it should ever become necessary for any 
community to raise revenue by an attack on 
its educational institutions, let it first make an 
alteration of policy toward its publicly 
endowed institutions. To lay tax on what 
benevolent men have endowed for the help of 
young men and incidentally the State, is the 
last thing a state or municipality should 
undertake, whatever the exigency in which it 
may be placed. 

That such a movement will ever attain, any 
prominent importance may be questioned ; that 
it has been raised at all is, however, surpris- 



INTERSCHOLASTIC BASEBALL LEAGUE 

Manager Wilson of the baseball team is 
completing arrangements for the Bowdoin 
Interschokstic Baseball League. There has 
been considerable difficulty in arranging a 
league this year, because of unpleasant feel- 
ings between some of the teams. A number 
of the teams composing the last year's league 
refused to enter the league if Portland was 
included, and for this reason Portland had to 
be dropped out. So far four teams are in the 
league. They are Edward Little High School 
of Auburn, Lewiston High School, Leavitt 
Institute and Gardiner High. It is possible 
that Thornton may enter later. 

Although the league is small, it should be 
a successful one. The difficulties of a large 
league are many, as past experiences have 
shown, and the management believes a small 
league is to be preferred- The four teams rep- 
resented are considered among the strongest 
High School teams in this section of the 
State, and the rivalry will doubtless be keen. 
Judging from what is known of the relative 
strength of the four teams, there should be 
some exciting- contests. 



16 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, APRIL 27TH. 

Clark College Debate at Worcester 

Dr. Burnett speaks in Cambridge, Mass. 

10.30-12.30 a.m. and 2-2.50 p.m. — Track team 
practice, Whittier Field. 

8 p.m. — "The Rivals" by the Dramatic Club at 
Brunswick Town Hall. Seats SO cents. Admission 
35 cents. / 

8 p.m. — Sousa's Band at Empire, Lewiston. 

SATURDAY, APRIL 28TH. 

10. "0-12.30 a.m. — Track Team practice, Whittier 
Field. 

2 P.M. — Bowdoin vs. U. of M. on Whittier Field. 

2 p.m. — Bowdoin Second vs. Leavitt Institute at 
Turner. 

Prof. Foster attends conference of New England 
College Teachers of Education in Boston. 

7.15 p.m. — Meeting of Massachusetts Club at D. 
K. E. House. President Hyde will speak. 

SUNDAY, APRIL 20TH. 

10.45 A - M ' — Prof. Eugene Lyman of Bangor Theo- 
logical Seminary will preach at the College church 
in place of Mr. Jump. 

5 p.m. — Solo at chapel by Johnson, '06. 

Debating Team returns from Worcester. 

MONDAY, ArRIL 3OTH. 

10.30-12.30 a.m. and 2-2.50 p.m. — Track Team prac- 
tice on Whittier Field. 
2.30 p.m. — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

TUESDAY, MAY 1ST. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 2-2.50 p.m. — Track Team prac- 
tice on Whittier Field. 

2.30. — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 
7.00 p.m. — Debate in Hubbard Hall. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 2ND. 

10.12-12.30 A.M., 2-5.30 p.m. — Track Team practice 
on Whittier Field. 

Bates Second vs. Bowdoin Second on Whittier 
Field. 

Zeta Reception and House Party. 

8 p.m. — Hamilton W. Mabie speaks in Memorial 
Flail on "Literature as a Personal Resource." 

8 p.m. — Andrew Mack at the Empire, Lewiston. 

THURSDAY, MAY 3D. 

10-12.30 a.m.. 2-5.30 p.m. — Track Team practice 
on Whittier Field. 

2.30 p.m. — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

Opening Day of the Alpha Delta Phi Convention 
at Portland. Delegates come to Brunswick by 
special train in the afternoon. 

FRIDAY, MAY 4TH. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 2-5.30 a.m. — Track Team prac- 
tice on Whittier Field. 

2.30 — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

Prof. Mitchell speaks at Richmond. 

Second Day of Alpha Delta Phi Convention at 
Portland. 

8 p.m. — Annie Russell at Empire, Lewiston. 

SATURDAY, MAY 5TH. 

10-12.30. — Track Team practice on Whittier Field. 
Bowdoin vs. Bates on Whittier. Field. 
Bowdoin Second vs. E .L. H. S. at Auburn. 
Closing day of Alpha Delta Phi Convention at 
Portland. 



College Botes 

Warnings were out last Wednesday. 

Saturday's game will be called at 2 o'clock. 

Prof. Cary of Harvard was in town last 
week. 

Henry Evans, '03, was on the campus last 
week. 

The Brunswick Gun Club held a shoot yes- 
terday. 

Messer, '09, was visiting relatives in 
Augusta last week. 

Professor Moody is having his house 
re-shingled. 

Bowdoin vs. Maine on the Whittier Field, 
Saturday afternoon. 

Marsh, 'og, was at his home in Deering the 
latter part of the week. 

Roland E. Bragg, '01, of Bangor, was a 
visitor at the college last week. 

"The Real Widow Brown" was the attrac- 
tion at the Empire Thursday evening. 

Hacker, '07, has returned to college after 
an absence at his home in Fort Fairfield. 

Clarence Robinson, '08, passed last Satur- 
day and Sunday at his home in Portland. 

Owing to press of matter the review of the 
last Quill will not appear until next week. 

A party of students known as the "Logical 
Club" dined at the Inn, Saturday evening. 

The Colby Second baseball game was can- 
celled, owing to Colby's inability to play on 
that date. 

Those trying for assistant baseball manager 
are Tefft, Kane, Benner, Koughan, Twing 
and Drummond. 

Manager Voorhees of the track team was 
in Lewiston, Tuesday, on business connected 
with the coming meet. 

The Orient may be delayed this week 
because of the fact that Fast Day was observed 
as a holiday at the printing office. 

The selectmen of Brunswick have recently 
taken action forbidding the placing of posters 
on the trees of the town. The action is a most 
commendable one. 

The Oracle, the Bangor High School paper, 
has an extended article in its last issue from 
the pen of Cushing, '09, on the subject of 
"Bowdoin College." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



17 



Smith, 'o6, has been confined to his room 
for over a week because of illness. 

Sunday saw a number of visitors at the col- 
lege as a result of the beautiful weather. 

The fire at the Eagle Hotel called many of 
the students down town Saturday night. The 
fire was not serious. 

The snow of Tuesday was a most unpleas- 
ant visitor, it being especially unwelcome to 
the track candidates. 

Morris B. Campbell, '05, now of the Har- 
vard Law School, was a visitor at the college 
the first of the week. 

Allen, '07, returned to college the first of 
the week after an illness, during which he was 
at his home in Portland. 

All the Economics quizzes that were to have 
been held on Saturday of last week, were post- 
poned until last Tuesday. 

It is stated that the plant of the Androscog- 
gin Pulp Co., which was recently destroyed 
by fire, will not be rebuilt. 

Elder, '06, passed Saturday and Sunday at 
his home in Portland, where he was called by 
the serious illness of his sister. 

The Brunswick Golf Club was scheduled to 
hold its first tournament at its links yesterday. 
There are now 71 members in the club. 

Next Sunday Mr. Jump preaches at 
Amherst College, and his place here will be 
filled by Professor Eugene Lyman of the Ban- 
gor Theological Seminary. 

All students were glad to greet "Pop" Wil- 
liams last Saturday. He is coaching the Exe- 
ter team this year, and accompanied the nine 
to Brunswick for Saturday's game. 

"Jim" Clarke, captain of last year's Bow- 
doin ball team, will probably play with the 
South Portland team a portion of this season. 
"Pop" Williams is to manage the team. 

Rev. Herbert A. Jump has very recently 
been asked to consider a flattering offer from 
a church situated in a rapidly growing section 
of Brooklyn, N. Y. Mr. Jump has not given 
his answer. 

On Monday, the sixteenth, Paine, '06, won 
first in the roll-off with a score of 293 and 
Childs. '06, tied for second with 267. In the 
bowling match between Westbrook and 
Brunswick on April 17, Paine bowled the best 
string for Brunswick, with a score of 278 ; 
nevertheless Brunswick lost. 



Extensive repairs are being made about the 
dining-room at the Alpha Delta Phi house. 
Among other changes will be the installation 
of a new hardwood floor. 

A party of 12 members of T. W. Hyde 
Camp, Sons of Veterans, in uniform, attended 
the lecture given by General Chamberlain at 
the Congregational Church last Thursday 
evening. 

Brunswick tied for first place in the 
State bowling championship Monday evening, 
by winning from Lewiston. Paine and Childs 
of the Senior Class were on the team repre- 
senting Brunswick. 

Gardiner Heath, '09, was at his home in 
Augusta the latter part of last week, where he 
listened to the closing pleas in the famous 
Cooper trial, his father being senior counsel 
for the defense. 

Bowdoin students have a great deal to think 
about to-day and to-morrow with the Clark 
debate at Worcester and "The Rivals" this 
evening, and the first of the Maine college 
games coming to-morrow. 

The members of the Exeter ball team were 
entertained at the various fraternity houses 
when in Brunswick last Saturday. They were 
not accompanied by rooters, as is often the 
case when they come to Brunswick. 

It is learned that S. C. W. Simpson, '03, 
was in San Francisco during the recent disas- 
trous earthquake and that he was located 
where the greatest destruction took place. It 
is stated that he has not been heard from as 
yet. 

H. C. Blake, Dartmouth, '07, was a recent 
visitor at the college. Mr. Blake is one of 
Dartmouth's best known athletes, taking third 
in the shotput at the Worcester mieet last 
spring, and playing guard on the football team 
last fall. 

Manager Wilson has made arrangements 
with Carrigan of Lewiston, to umpire 
all the 'Varsity games on the Whittier Field 
this season, with one exception. It is under- 
stood that he will also act as Bates' umpire for 
the season. 

P. F. Chapman, '06, assisted in the enter- 
tainment given under the auspices of the Ani- 
mal Rescue Society in Portland last Friday 
and Saturday evenings. The event was one 
of the society events of the season in that city. 
Mr. Chapman played a mandola solo. 



18 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The ball team left for Burlington, Vt., at 8 
o'clock last Monday morning. Besides Man- 
ager Wilson, the following men were taken : 
Files, Sparks, Lawrence, Pike, Hodgson, Blair, 
Stanwood, McDade, Bower, '07, with Bower, 
'09, as substitute. The team returned to 
Brunswick last night. 

Messrs. Burns and Favor, under whose aus- 
pices "King Pepper" was presented by college 
talent a year ago, will produce the opera in 
Gardiner in the near future, and have made 
arrangement for four Bowdoin men in the 
cast. They are the Gumbel Brothers, Neal 
Cox and Frank Mikelsky. 

The first turbine steamship ever built in the 
United States has been named the "Governor 
Cobb." The launching took place at Chester, 
Pa., last Saturday. The craft is built for the 
Eastern Steamship Co., and will run between 
Boston and Maine ports. Governor Cobb was 
present at the launching. 

The Brunswick G. A. R. Post has secured 
Hon. Herbert M. Heath, '72, of Augusta, to 
deliver the annual Memorial Day address. 
Mr. Heath is considered one of the ablest 
speakers among Bowdoin's alumni, and stu- 
dents who are in Brunswick that day will have 
the opportunity of listening to a fine speaker. 

The Zeta Psi Fraternity of North America 
met in New York last Friday, with Governor 
Cobb, 'yy, as the principal guest. Governor 
Cobb was some time since elected "Phi Alpha" 
of the fraternity. Among other busi- 
ness was the sending of telegrams of sympa- 
thy to the chapters of the fraternity at the 
University of California and Leland Stanford 
University. The fraternity had planned to 
hold the annual convention of the fraternity 
in San Francisco next September. 



NOTICES 

The essays written in competition for either 
the Class of '75 Prize in American History or 
the Philo Sherman Bennett Politics Prize will 
be due on May 1. 

All students having scholarships will please 
sign for them at the Treasurer's office before 
April 28 (-to-morrow). 

The Justin Winsor prize of $100, offered by 
the American Historical Association for the 
encouragement of historical research, will be 
awarded for 1906, to the best unpub- 
lished monograph in the field of American 



History that shall be submitted to the commit- 
tee of award, on or before Oct. 1, 1906. For 
further particulars see circular on. Library 
Bulletin Board. 

The following reports in English 4, are yet 
due: "Ruskin," April 28; "Hawthorne," May 
5 ; "Emerson," May 12; "Stevenson," May 19. 



FACULTY NOTES 

Professor Mitchell, last Saturday, attended 
a meeting of the Executive Committee of the 
Maine Association of Colleges and Prepara- 
tory Schools, which was held in Augusta. 

On the afternoon of May 4, Prof. Mitchell 
will address a convention of the Sagadahoc 
County Teachers, at Richmond. The subject 
of his address will be "The Teaching of 
English Composition." 

Prof. Houghton was in New York last 
Wednesday evening, and attended a reunion 
of the "Senior Society," of which he was a 
member while at Yale. The society is the 
"Scroll and Kye," and Prof. Houghton was 
one of the members who was taken in from 
the Class of '73. 

Prof. Woodruff's lecture entitled "My Win- 
ter in Greece," which was given last Saturday 
in the Congregational Church vestry, was 
at tended by many students, and several mem- 
bers of the faculty, as well as a large number 
of townspeople. The lecture was very inter- 
esting, and the pictures thrown on the screen 
were excellent. After the lecture a Dionysial 
passed through the audience, and later those 
who took part in the procession served the 
refreshments. Before and after the lecture 
the Alpha Sigma Mandolin Club, made up of 
Brunswick High School boys, played several 
very good selections. 

Prof. Lee lectured before the State Street 
Parish Club at the Falmouth Hotel in Port- 
land the latter part of last week. His sub- 
ject was "The Straits of Magellan," and was 
illustrated with stereopticon views. 



ALPHA DELTA CHI CONVENTION 

The seventy-fourth annual convention of 
the Alpha Delta Chi Fraternity will be held 
in Portland, Maine, on May 3, 4 and 5, under 
the auspices of the Bowdoin Chapter. The 
headquarters of the convention will be at the 
Falmouth Hotel. 

The delegates will assemble on Wednesday 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



19 



evening- when an informal smoker will be 
given to all the visitors. On Thursday the 
convention will officially commence, with the 
first business meeting at the Falmouth. Thurs- 
day afternoon, after another short business 
session, the delegates and friends will take a 
special train to Brunswick and visit Bowdoin 
College. An informal reception will be ten- 
dered at the house of the local chapter, and the 
convention picture will be taken at the Art 
Building. The delegates will return to Port- 
land late in the afternoon. On Thursday 
evening at 7.45 a short order of public literary 
exercises will be given, after which comes the 
Convention Ball at the Falmouth. 

Friday morning will be devoted to conven- 
tion business sessions. Friday afternoon a 
sail is to be taken down Casco Bay through 
the islands, returning in the evening. At 9 
p.m. will come the Convention Banquet. Sat- 
urday will be devoted to adjourned business 
meetings, if necessary. 

About two hundred visitors are expected, 
among the many noted men, as Hamilton W. 
Maine, Gen. Joshua L. Chamberlain, Prof. 
Frederick J. E. Woodbridge, of Columbia ; 
Edward Everett Hale ; Dr. D. A. Robinson, 
of Bangor ; General John Marshall Brown ; 
Hon. Charles F. Libby ; Bishop Codman ; 
Prof. Chapman ; Prof. Moody ; Prof. Robin- 
son, and others. 

The Orient wishes all success to the gath- 
ering, and extends from the college to all vis- 
itors, a hearty welcome to Bowdoin. 

SOPHOMORE THEME SUBJECTS 

The third theme of the semester for Sopho- 
mores not taking English 4, will be due Tues- 
day, May 1. Subjects: 

1. The College Rally. 

2. Teaching as a Profession for College 
Men. 

3. "The Man with the Muck Rake." 

4. Governor Cobb's Speech at Riverton. 

5. Esperanto — A Universal Language. 



REDUCED RATES TO COMMENCEMENT 

Dr. Burnett has just received word that all 
the railroads belonging to the New England 
Passenger Association will sell return tickets 
at reduced rates to ■ anyone who attends the 
Bowdoin Commencement this spring. The 
price of return tickets will be one-third of 



their regular cost, but a fee of twenty-five 
cents must be paid to the special railroad agent 
of the roads. There will be no reduction on 
tickets to Brunswick. 

This reduction will affect those who come 
to the commencement from outside the State, 
as the reduced rates will extend as far as New 
York and Albany, as well as 'to New England 
cities and towns. 



OFF FOR WORCESTER 

The Bowdoin debating team left yesterday 
forenoon for Worcester, where it will meet 
Clark College this evening. The party con- 
sisted of Mitchell, '07, Redman, '07, Hupper, 
'08, the three regular debaters, and Snow, '07, 
the alternate. Prof. Wm. T. Foster and W. 
B. Drummond, '07, accompanied the party 
and will listen to the debate this evening. 

The judges of the contest are Dr. T. N. 
Carver, professor of economics at Harvard 
University, Hon. H. J. Parker, ex-attorney- 
general of Massachusetts, and Charles W. 
Bartlett, late democratic candidate for Gov- 
ernor of Massachusetts. 

DRAMATIC CLUB 

"The Rivals" goes on to-night, for its first 
appearance. The management and those tak- 
ing part have worked hard and faithfully. A 
good show is guaranteed. It is hoped that 
the whole college will turn out. For the last 
two years the college dramatics has been one of 
the, events of the year, and it is hoped that the 
same will be true this year. The cost of pro- 
ducing such a play as "The Rivals" is very 
heavy, and on the success of this presentation, 
depends the prospect of its being repeated 
Ivy week, or in any places outside of Bruns- 




I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
100G man who will be in the market for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will calr and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunilies for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States and'sevcral foreign countries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

A. S. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPQOOD'S 



20 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



wick. Tickets will be on sale at the door. 
Reserved seats 50 cents, admission 35 cents. 
The play will start at eight o'clock. 



HISTORY CLUB MEETING 

The members of the History Club enjoyed a 
rare treat last Saturday evening, when they 
had the privilege of listening to ' a his- 
torical paper by Gen. Chamberlain. After 
the reading of the paper a general discussion 
was indulged in and a most delightful evening 
passed. The club met with Voorhees, '07, at 
the Theta Delta Chi house. Gen. Chamber- 
lain was made an honorary member of the 
club. 

T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 

PULSIFER'S 
5 AND 10 GERT ST0RE 

Now Open for Business. 
J. W. PULSIFER, - - MAINE STREET, BRUNSWICK 




S. P. ROBIE, 

LEWISTON, - MB1NE 
FOE BEST 

Hats, Furnishings, Athletic Goods. 



Bowdoifi Calenders 

ON SALE at F|ALf Pf?ICE 

(50 Cents) 



: , '06, or 
BYS|0N STEVENS' BOOKSTORE 



THE MEDICQ-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 
Has a carefully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward 1 'I as .(■-; clinical Conferences; Modified .Seminar Methods, and thoroughly Practical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The Clinical amphitheatre is the largest and finest In the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every respect, and the new laboratories are specially planned and equipped for individual work by the students. 

The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 
SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department nf Medicine. 




2fllizr/iiz^ 



REPEATING SHOT GUN 
NEW MODEL N2I7 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By th< 

=en able to greatly reduce*the cost of production and at tht 
mous high ^Zgy^fo? standard of strength, safety and di 
:is gun. The workmanship and finish 
irrcls are especially bored for smokeless 

JS incn shells may be used._ Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 
j l-J 1 l • l wor *" n 8 8un in existence. We are glad to make it possible for every lover of guns 
id bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so low a price. 
Have your dealer order it for you. 

Send for the Z^zr/az Catalogue and Experience Book to-day. Free for 3 stamps. 



<i the take down feature we have 
ame time have kept the gun up to the 
_ biliry. Notice the clean simplicity of 
perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
' black powder and so chambered that 2% in " 



7%e2fflcmfi/ifliFearjns Co., 



42W1II0W Street, New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 4, 1906 



NO. 3 



THE BOWDOIN=CLARK DEBATE 

Before an audience of over one thousand 
people, in the Gymnasium of Clark University 
last Friday evening, Bowdoin and Clark con- 
tended for forensic honors. The question 
was "Resolved, That the United States Gov- 
ernment should inaugurate a movement to 
bring about reforms in the Congo Free State." 
Clark's representatives were L. D. Hadley, G. 
H. Mirick and Jacob Asher with W. L. 
Osborn as alternate ; Bowdoin's were H. E. 
Mitchell, R. H. Hupper and F. J. Redman with 
A. W. Snow, alternate. Hon. Charles G. 
Washburn acted as presiding officer, and the 
judges were Dr. T. N. Carver, Professor of 
Economics at Harvard ; Hon. H. J. Parker 
and Gen. Charles W. Bartlett of Boston. 

The affirmative case was opened by S. H. 
Hadley of Clark, who dwelt upon the cruelties 
enacted under the Leopold regime in the 
Congo. Mr. Mitchell opened the case for 
Bowdoin by minimizing the cruelties, showing 
that they were confined almost exclusively to 
that part of the Congo ruled over by the 
Concessionaire companies. He further showed 
that Leopold himself was attempting to 
reform the existing evils. 

Mr. Mirick of Clark showed that it was 
possible for the United States to inaugurate 
the proposed movement and proved his point 
by numerous quotations from International 
law. 

Mr. Hupper began by analyzing the case as 
it stood, and contended that action by the 
United States was at this time unfair and 
unwarranted. 

Mr. Asher reviewed the two points of his 
colleagues, and showed how the proposed 
action would be expedient for the United 
States. He also showed how the United 
States was the only world power which could 
at present step in and demand a reform of 
Congo conditions. 

Mr. Redman proved that the principle and 
practice of international law was against the 
practicability of the proposed action ; also that 
the movement was unexpected and contrary 
to our traditional foreign policy. 



The rebuttal speeches were in the main used 
to re-enforce the points previously made. 
Bowdoin showed herself superior to Clark in 
rebuttal, but the final speech of Mr. Asher was 
a masterpiece of persuasion. 

The judges were unanimous in giving Bow- 
doin the decision. Bowdoin's case showed 
careful team work, was well built, and was 
constructive from first to last. Clark, on the 
contrary, did not have a constructive case, did 
not attempt to show any movement that might 
successfully be inaugurated, and did not seem 
to fit their material into a harmonious whole. 
From the standpoint of persuasion, however, 
the Clark men evinced a superiority. 

Review would be incomplete without ref- 
erence to the cordial hospitality of Clark men. 
They met our contingent at the train, con- 
ducted them to the banquet hall and did every- 
thing possible to make the trip one of pleasure. 
They were broad enough "to be outvoted with 
a smile," and by their friendly and courteous 
treatment earned the good will and hearty 
respect of our team. 



THE APRIL QUILL 

To evince such genuine appreciation of the 
charm of Miss Austen as does the author of 
the opening essay in the April Quill is com- 
pletely to disarm criticism. For grasp of the 
author's peculiar spirit and power is the heart 
of the matter in good literary reviewing, and 
the present Quill writer seems to have caught 
not only Miss Austen's humor but something 
of the very ease and quiet flow of her style. 

Miss Austen has been much loved and 
much neglected, and this careful, penetrating 
study of her work should not only delight the 
few who love her deeply, but it should also 
appeal to the unfortunate ones who have not 
come to feel how completely refreshing are 
her little pictures of commonplace people in 
the quaint setting of the quiet English country 
life of her day. 

The writer of this essay on the novels could 
give us another pleasing paper on the Society 
of Miss Austen's day — the much-talked of 



22 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



parties, the mild gayeties of the Pump Room, 
the interminable walks when things invaria- 
bly happened, the tea-drinkings always 
attended with prodigious possibilities in the 
novels, a fascinating study at close range into 
the manner and customs of those heroines 
whom our essayists put second to Shakes- 
peare's. And well he may ! They certainly 
are more spirited than Dickens's, more true 
and equable than Thackeray's types, and far 
above the dead level of inanity in Howells' 
women-characters. How very slight must 
seem our few objections, when we say, for 
one, that to us the attachment of Captain Ren- 
wick and Louisa seems to show Miss Austen's 
keen insight into the human heart. We are 
somewhat offended by the bringing in of the 
long-suffering quotation, "sweetness and 
light" (for plain "perspective" or "sense of 
proportion"), and "In these days of the 
psychological novel" sounds a bit trite, like 
some undergraduate formulas for beginnings. 

The "Lines to Day'" show a true poetic 
sense, and a feeling for natural beauty — 
which saves the verses from the usual fate of 
a much-used subject. They have, too, sincer- 
ity and directness of expression. "Nature 

awakes to travel on her whispering 

way" is rather an inexplicable line. 

"And night is lonely watcher till the morn" 
is good and pleasing. 

As a piece of well-written narrative "The 
Hermit of Black Ledge" is admirable in lan- 
guage and composition ; it is beautiful in its 
touches of natural description and it is a good 
record of life apart from social ties. But 
it is practically devoid of incident ; or is it that 
although there are incidents they don't hap- 
pen vividly or are merely points in the smooth 
telling of the tale? Technically its form is 
nearly faultless although such a sentence as 
the following shows undue haste : "So now he 
met the friendly urgings of the storekeeper to 
remain, by a disdainful silence." 

The description of the succession of images 
in the delirious man's brain is a particularly 
good bit of realism. In endeavoring, how- 
ever, to specify the nameless lack which the 
reader feels in this sketch, one is tempted to 
resort to a very mean and mercantile criterion 
(which may help, withal!) : Would this story, 
unrelieved by any greater play of imagination, 
sell, and where ? It needs condensation ; bar- 
ren exactitude of detail is fatal to the artistic 
effect that needs only apt suggestion. 

The "Vision of Sir Launcelot" is content 



presumably to be a fairly good imitation. The 
concept of the vision has significance and 
beauty, although the hermit's response adds 
little. Certain lines are obtrusively weak, or 
have the dangerous exactness that leaves them 
correct but unpleasing. The few verses of 
natural description, the six closing lines, for 
instance, are among the best. A very little of 
such imitative work in fields pre-empted by 
writers of eminence is advantageous. 
Power comes with courageous handling of 
original themes. 

The "Goose Tracks" is well written, very 
spiritedly indeed, but what is it all about? 
Either the reviewer is very stupid in inter- 
preting or she is not supposed to understand 
the cult. 

It occurs to her that there might be a 
temptation for a skillful and unkind outsider 
to parody it. 

Ye Postman's contribution is most credita- 
ble, exceedingly well written, and with just 
enough characterization of the several selec- 
tions to convince us that he chose excellently 
and to make us think the exchanges worth 
reading. 

How heartily we agree with the editor's gen- 
eral thesis in his ringing cry for finer literary 
feeling and greater willingness to follow the 
pursuit of "mere literature" ! 

But hope lies in the very fact that such as 
he and not alone the older representatives of 
the rich earlier culture, the Charles Eliot Nor- 
tons and the William Everetts, can protest 
against commercialism and uncompromising 
practicalness even in our colleges. It is 
ground where feeling can run high and tense, 
and our editor's justifiable dissatisfaction must 
have led him to speak of an "exasperating" 
dearth of articles where "lamentable" would 
have been safer; and he would prefer "quiet 
period" to "still period," would he not? And 
we are hardly "a commercial college on a 
magnificent scale," actually or rhetorically, 
although the scale of 'values' favors the prac- 
tical and the American method of many enter- 
prises, — supposedly quick roads to "culture" — 
leaves little time to "loaf and invite the soul." 

M. C. H. 



BASEBALL 

BowdO'IN, 6 ; Maine, 3. 
Bowdoin played the first game in the Maine 
Intercollegiate Athletic series with Maine last 
Saturday, and won by a score of 6 to 3. The 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



23 



game was well attended by the student body, 
although there were not so many out-of-town 
people as will doubtless be on hand later 
in the season. 

The game was interesting for the most part, 
although there was not much doubt as to the 
p result after the second inning, when Bowdoin 
secured five of her six runs. The home team 
secured her other run in the ninth. Maine 
secured two of her runs in the fourth and the 
last one in the sixth. 

Bowdoin showed up strongly, the pitching 
of Files being the feature of the game, he 
holding Maine down to three scattered hits, 
one of which was of the scratch order. Bow- 
doin showed rather more fielding at times, 
and had it not been for this Maine would 
probably have been shut out. There were not 
a remarkable number of them, but they were 
all costly. They were doubtless due in a 
large measure to the earliness of the season. 

Among the men who played an especially 
strong game were Hodgson, Abbott, McDade, 
Bower and Sparks, all of whom did some 
effective stick work, while the two former did 
some fine fielding. For Maine Frost pitched 
a good game outside the second, when three 
singles and a double gave Bowdoin her five 
runs. Burns also showed up well in fielding 
and hitting. 

The summary: 

Bowdoin. 

ab r bh po a e 

Blair, 2b 5 o o o 2 1 

Abbott, c 5 o 1 5 1 o 

Stanwood, 3b. 4 o o 2 o 2 

Files, p 3 1 o o 6 1 

Greene, lb.... 2 1 o 13 o 1 

Hodgson, ss. . 4 1 1 4 3 o 

Sparks, rf . . . . 4 2 2 o o o 

Bower, cf 4 1 2 o o o 

McDade, rf. .. 4 o 1 3 o o 

Totals, 35 6 7 27 12 5 

Maine, 

ab r bh po a e 

Sawyer, cf . . . . 4 o o o o o 

Scales, ss 4 1 o o o o 

Higgins, 3b. .. 4 2 o 3 o o 

Burns, 2b 4 o 2 o 4 o 

Chase, If 4 o o 4 o o 

Frost, p 4 o 1 1 3 o 

Mayo, ib 4 o o 11 o o 



Smith, rf 4 

Blossom, c. . .. 3 



35 



27 



Totals, 
Bowdoin ...o 5 o o o o o o 1 — 6 

Maine o o o 2 o 1 o o o — 3 

Two-base hit — Abbott. Stolen bases — 
Files, Bower, Higgins. Struck out — By 
Files, Scales, Higgins, Smith, 2 ; by Frost, 
Abbott, Stanwood, Files 2, Greene 2, Sparks, 
McDade, Bower. Hit by pitched ball — Blos- 
som. Base on balls — Frost, 3. Wild pitch — 
Frost. Umpire — Carrigan. Time — 1.50. 



Vermont 10; Bowdoin, 6. 
The first of the two games with the Uni- 
versity of Vermont was played on April 24. 
The contest was close until the last of the 
fourth when two passes, four hits, and a num- 
ber of errors gave Vermont nine runs, which, 
added to the one they made in the second, gave 
her ten points. Bowdoin secured three in the 
third, one in the fourth, and two in the sev- 
enth. Sparks pitched for Bowdoin and Camp- 
bell for Vermont. 

Bowdoin. 
ab r bh po a e 

Blair, ss 5 1 1 o 1 2 

Stanwood, 3b.. 3 1 1 1 o o 

Sparks, p 5 1 2 o 2 o 

Files, rf 5 o 2 3 o 1 

Hodgson, 2b. . 5 o o 1 6 o 
Bower, cf . . . . 3 1 1 2 o o 

Lawrence, c. .. 4 o o 5 2 o 
McDade, If . . . 4 1 1 2 1 o 

Pike, lb 4 1 o 10 o 1 

Total, 38 6 8 24 12 4 

Vermont. 

ab r bh po a e 

Gardner, 3b. .. 2 1 o 1 2 1 

Collison, 2b... 3 1 1 3 2 o 

Campbell, p... 5 o 1 o 3 o 

Woodward, If. 3 10200 

Peck, ib 5 1 1 11 o 1 

Kibby, c 4 1 1 6 3 o 

Whitney, cf . . . 5 1 2 1 o 1 

Williams, ss . . . 2 2 1 2 5 2 

Grow, rf 2 2 1 1 o o 

Total, 31 10 8 27 15 s 
Bowdoin ..00310020 o — 6 
Vermont ..01090000 o — 10 

[Continued on page 25.] 



24 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 



H. E. WILSON, 1907 R. H. HUPPER, 1908 

H. E. MITCHELL, 1907 R. A. LEE, 1908 

W. S. LINNELL, 1907 H. H. BURTON, 1909 

A. L. ROBINSON, lgo8 J. S. STAHL, 1909 

A. L. JONES, Medical 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 Business Manager 

N. S. WESTON, 1908 Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 

Entered at Post-Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
Lewiston Journal Pkess 



Vol. XXXVI. 



MAY 4, 1906 



This year's base-ball team 
Baseball has already made a greater 

reputation than any team 
Bowdoin has had for several years. Its work 
outside the State has been especially com- 
mendable. Only two home games have been 
played thus far, and although both of these 
have been important games the attendance, 
especially of undergraduates, has been by no 
means large. 

The amount of the subscriptions so far 
signed in is very far below what was signed 
last year and since the coaching expenses are 
'considerably heavier than they were at that 
time, it will be practically an impossibility for 
the Association to come out square unless the 
undergraduates give the team more loyal sup- 
port, both in subscriptions and in attendance 
at the games. The next home game after 
to-morrow will come on the 9th of this month, 



when the team plays Colby. There will not 
be another home game this month, so that this 
is the last opportunity the students will have 
to support the team in the matter of attend- 
ance for some time. It is, therefore, right- 
fully expected that everybody will turn out to 
these two games, and that from now on a lit- 
tle more cordial support will be given in sub-' 
scriptions. It is hardly to the credit of the 
Freshman Class, the largest class in college, 
that they have given less than any other. 



Musical Clubs 
Concert 



The last Musical Clubs 
concert for this year will 
be given next Monday 
evening in Memorial Hall. The clubs, this 
year, have been pronounced the best in a num- 
ber of years, and the reception accorded them 
on all their trips has been evidence that the 
club is a credit to the college. The conclud- 
ing concert, as in past years, is given for the 
purpose of securing money to pay debts the 
clubs have contracted during the season, and 
it is hoped that every man in college will 
attend and help out the organization. The 
concert will be worth listening to, and more 
than that the organization is worthy of all 
support. The expenses this year have been 
unusually heavy, and for this reason alone all 
students should attend. 



The committee on football 
Football Rules rules has at last completed 

its work and now the 
friends and enemies of the sport , are busy 
expressing their opinion of what has been 
done. On the whole, the result seems some- 
thing of a compromise, and like most com- 
promises, it does not fully satisfy either side. 
Men like President Eliot of Harvard feel 
that sufficient change has not been made. 
Again the friends of the old game feel that 
too much has been done. 

However, the real test will come with the 
fall season. While all can theorize as to just 
how the changes will affect the game, it will 
not be until the teams are lined up and the 
practical workings of the new rules are seen, 
that the extent of the changes can be judged. 
If the game has not been sufficiently 
reformed, as President Eliot believes, then 
there will be another opportunity for an arbi- 
tration board. If it has, all well and good. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



25 



In either case, however, it is safe to say that 
the committees will never go back to the 
game as it has been played in the past 



Bowdoin may well be con- 
The Debate gratulated on the outcome 

of the debate of last Fri- 
day night. The result showed a number of 
things that are highly satisfactory to friends 
of the college. In the first place our team met 
a strong team from a representative college ; 
for this reason the result was pleasing. But 
in a broader sense also the outcome of the 
debate was pleasing. It shows that our 
team was able to deal with what may be safely 
termed the unpopular side of a great question 
in a way that is attracting wide attention. The 
fact that the Belgian minister in Washington 
has asked for the text of the debate is good 
evidence of this. Still another pleasing result 
of the debate is in its proof that our debating 
department is among the strong things of the 
college. Our intercollegiate debates may well 
be continued, if not increased in their scope. 

BASEBALL — Continued from page 23. 

Two-base-hits — Stanwood, Sparks (2), 
Files, Collison, Peck. Base on balls — by Camp- 
bell, 3 ; by Sparks, 4. Struck out — by Camp- 
bell, 5 ; by Sparks, 5. Hit by pitched ball — 
McDade, Kibby, Williamson. Sacrifice hits — 
Stanwood. Stolen bases — Bower, Campbell, 
Kibby. Umpire — Hazleton. 



Bowdoin, 5 ; Vermont, 4. 

On Wednesday, April 25, Bowdoin turned 
the tables on Vermont and won by a score of 
5 to 4. It was a cold, rainy day and quite 
unsuitable for baseball. Files pitched for 
Bowdoin and played a fine game. Vermont 
made one in the first, third, fifth and seventh. 
Bowdoin secured one in the second, three in 
the eighth, and one in the ninth. 

Bowdoin. 

ab r bh po a e 

Blair, 2b 4 1 o 2 o 

Stanwood, 3b. 5 2 o 2 o 1 

Sparks, rf . . . . 4 1 1 1 o o 

Files, p 5 1 2 o 7 o 

Hodgson, ss.. 4 o 2 4 3 3 

Bower, cf . . . . 4 o 1 o o o 

Lawrence, c . . . 3 o o 7 2 o 



McDade, If... 3 o o 3 o o 
Pike, lb 4 o o 10 o o 

Total, 36 5 6 27 14 4 

Vermont, 

ab r bh po a e 

Gardner, 3b. . 5 1 1 1 2 

Collison, 2b. .. 3 3 1 2 3 

Campbell, p. .. 4 1 1 1 o o 

Woodward, If. 4 o 2 o o o 

Peck, ib 4 o o 13 1 2 

Whitney, rf . . . 3 o o o o o 

Kibby, c 4 o 1 7 1 o 

Collins, p 4 o o o 3 o 

Williams, ss.. 2 o o 3 2 o 

Total, 33 4 6 27 11 4 

Bowdoin ...01000003 r — 5 
Vermont ...1 o 1 o 1 1 00 o — 4 

Two-base hits — Files, Woodward. Three- 
base hit — -Collison. Bases on balls — by Col- 
lins, 2 ; by Files, 4. Hit by pitched ball — 
Blair, Whitney. Struck out — by Collins, 7; 
by Files, 5. Sacrifice hits — Stanwood, 
Bower. Stolen bases — Gardner, Collison 
(2), Campbell, Kibby. 



BOWDOIN LEAGUE STANDING 

Per 
Won. Lost. Played. Cent 

Gardiner High 1 o 1 1.000 

Edward Little o 1 1 .000 

Leavitt Inst o o o .000 

Lewiston High o o o .000 



TENNIS SCHEDULE 

Manager Mincher has announced the fol- 
lowing tennis schedule : 

May 14-15-16 — Maine Tournament at Water- 

ville. 
May 21-22-23 — Vermont at Burlington. 
May 28-29-30 — Longwood Meet. 



MR. MABIE'S LECTURE 

A large and delighted audience listened to ¥ 
the lecture of Hamilton W. Mabie last 
Wednesday evening on the subject of "Litera- 
ture as a Personal Resource." The Orient 
regrets that it is unable to give a more full 
account this week. 



26 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, MAY 4TH. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 2-5.30 p.m. — Track Team prac- 
tice on Whittier Field. 

2.30 — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

Prof. Mitchell speaks at Richmond. 

Second Day of Alpha Delta Chi Convention at 
Portland. 

8 p.m. — Annie Russell at Empire, Lewistpn. 

SATURDAY, MAY STH. 

10-12.30 — Track Team practice on Whittier Field. 

2.00 p.m. — Bowdoin vs. Bates on Whittier Field. 

Bowdoin 2d vs. E. L. H. S. at Auburn. 

Closing day of Alpha Delta Chi Convention. 

Extemporaneous Speaking for English 7 in Hub- 
bard Hall. 

Dr. Whittier attends meeting of Bowdoin Club in 
Boston. 

MONDAY, MAY 7TH. 

10-12.30 a.m. 2-5.30 p.m. — Track Team practice 
on Whittier Field. 

2.30 p.m. — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

8.00 p.m. — Glee and Mandolin Club Concert at 
Town Hall. Admission, 25 cents. 

TUESDAY, MAY 8TH. 

10-12.30 a.m. 2-5.30 p.m. — Track Team practice 
on Whittier Field. 

2.30 p.m. — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY CjTH. 

10-12.30 a.m. — Track Team practice on Whittier 
Field. 
2.00 p.m. — Colby vs. Bowdoin on Whittier Field. 

THURSDAY, MAY IOTH. 

10-12.30 A.M. 2-5.30 p.m. — Track Team practice 
on Whittier Field. 

2.30 p.m. — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

FRIDAY, MAY IITH. 

10-12.30 A.M. 2-5. jo P.M. — Track Team practice 
on Whittier Field. 

2.30 p.m. — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

R. R. Paine, '06, speaks at Yarmouth Academy on 
"Longfellow at Bowdoin." 

8 p.m. — Kellar at Empire, Lewiston. 

SATURDAY, MAY I2TH. 

10 a.m. — Trials in Maine Intercollegiate Athletic 
Meet at Lewiston. 
2.00 p.m. — Trials in Maine meet at Lewiston. 
8 p.m. — Kirk Brown at Empire, Lewiston. 



KAPPA SIGMA DINNER 

The 1 2th annual dinner of Alpha Rho 
Chapter of the Kappa Sigma Fraternity of 
Bowdoin was held in Portland last Saturday 
evening at the Falmouth Hotel. The dinner 
was a happy occasion, there being about 50 
members present, made up of undergraduates 
and alumni. 

The toast-master was Henry P. Boody, 
'06, and the following 'toasts were 



responded to: "Fraternity Ideals," Edward 
A. Duddy; "Alumni Spirit," William T. 
Rowe; "Woman," Charles F. Thomas, Jr.; 
"Gradatim," Ralph H. Files ; "Always Con- 
stant," Harold S. Stetson; "The Strenuous 
Life," Fred V. Delavina. 

Several representatives from other chapters 
were in attendance as guests, among the num- 
ber being F.'D. French of Psi Chapter of the 
University of Maine, W. C. Campbell of Beta 
Kappa Chapter of the New Hampshire State 
College, and G. H. Stickney of Lynn, Mass. 



INTERSCHOLASTIC BANNER 

At the meeting of the Aroostook Club held 
at New Meadows Inn, Saturday evening, it 
was voted to offer another banner this year, 
for the championship of the Aroostook Pre- 
paratory Schools. The banner offered this 
time will be awarded to the team that first 
wins the championship for three years. This 
does not mean three consecutive years, but 
merely the team which shall have first won 
three championships. The champions for 
each year will hold the banner until some 
school obtains permanent possession of it. Last 
year the club gave a banner for that year only, 
which was won by Caribou High. 



NOTICES 

All candidates for the position of college organist 
for the ensuing year are requested to report their 
names to the undersigned on or before May 14. 
The organist's year begins with Ivy Day. 
F. E. Woodruff, 

Chairman of Music Committee. 

We can furnish employment to several well 
recommended men. This may be for the balance 
of the year as well as the summer months. Write 
about yourself, stating your business experience. 
The Home Educator Co., - 
Boston, Mass. 

Mr. A. S. Pond, Jr., representing the New York 
office of Hapgoods, the national organization of 
employment experts, will be at the Eagle House 
to-day and to-morrow to secure a number of Bow- 
doin College Seniors for good positions in business 
or technical work. All men who are interested in 
securing the right opportunities immediately after 
graduation or in the early fall should not fail to see 
him. 

Students who desire to apply for positions to 
teach in Porto Rico will please apply for informa- 
tion and blanks at the Registrar's office. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



27 



College Botes 

Glee Club Concert Monday Evening. 

Arbor Day to-day. 

Hichborn, '07, was in Boston the first of the week. 

Webber, '06, visited his home in Augusta the first 
of the week. 

Pitcher Johnson of Bates witnessed the Maine 
game, Saturday. 

Archibald, '04, was a visitor at the college the 
first of the week. 

Cox. '08, is out of college this week because of 
the death of a relative. 

Redmond, '07, is making a short visit with rel- 
atives in Massachusetts. 

The Brunswick concert of the Glee Clubs will be 
held next Monday evening. 

The Penobscot County Club met at New Mead- 
ows Inn last Saturday night. 

Roger Wattles, of Canton, Mass., was the guest 
of Jenks, '06, the first of the week. 

Every tennis court on the campus has had con- 
siderable work put on it this spring. 

It is expected that Junior marching will begin 
either to-day or the first of the week. 

Adjourns were given in Dr. Burnett's courses last 
Saturday, because of his absence in Cambridge. 

Saunders, '08. has been obliged to go on crutches 
for the past week as the result of water on the knee. 

Announcement is made that Payne's Second Reg- 
iment Band of Lewiston will furnish music for 
Commencement. 

"Jim" Clarke, '05, is credited with winning Port- 
land's game last week with a timely two-bagger in 
the last of the game. 

G. G. Wilder of the College library, was re-elected 
secretary of the Maine Library Association, which 
met in Auburn last week. 

One week from to-morrow is the date of the 
track meet at Lewiston. The campus will doubt- 
less be deserted that day. 

Hull, '07, has just received a call from his Free- 
port parish to remain the pastor for the next year, 
and has decided to accept the same. 

A. C. Denning, 05, reached here last Tuesday, 
and has been coaching the men on the track team, 
who are going into the field events. 

Two thunder showers have passed over Bruns- 
wick during the past ten days. Near Augusta some 
farm buildings were struck by lightning and burned. 

Last week Westbrook won a bowling match from 
Brunswick by the narrow margin of three pins, but 
taking two out of the three strings. Paine, '06, and 
Childs, '06 bowled for Brunswick. 

The Kirk Brown repertoire company, which is 
claimed to be one of the best on the road, will be 
the attraction at the Empire, Saturday night. May 
12. The manager of the house has offered to 
reserve a section for Bowdoin men, if they care to 
have it, but it is probably yet too early for definite 
steps to be taken. 



Bowdoin vs. Bates Tomorrow Afternoon 
on the Whittier Field. 

The Aroostook Club dined at the Inn last Satur- 
day night. 

J. C. Minot, '96, of Augusta, was at the college 
the first of the week. 

Harold S. Stetson, '06, has accepted a position 
with the International Banking Co. 

The members of the debating team returned from 
Worcester on the midnight train, Sunday. 

Charles P. Kinsman, ex-07, was among the vis- 
itors who witnessed the game last Saturday. 

Second Baseman Burns of the Maine team.passed 
Sunday in Brunswick as the guest of Hacker, '07. 

The Harcourt Company is the attraction in the 
Town Hall the last three evenings of this week. 

Arnold Cayting, University of Maine, '07, was 
the guest of Collins, '07, last Saturday and Sunday. 

J. S. Stahl, '09, will be out of college during the 
remainder of the term and will teach in Lincoln 
Academy. 

One of the students has recently calculated the 
number of stars painted on the ceiling of the chapel 
to be 1268. 

It is expected that Henry D. Evans, '01, State bac- 
teriologist, will address the Chemical Club some 
time next week, the exact date of which has not as 
yet been fixed. 

The date of the Interscholastic track meet will be 
May 26. The date given on the baseball program 
is given as the 29th, through an error on the part 
of the printer. 

The Maine team left for Medford on the 4.48 
train Saturday afternoon, where they played Tufts 
Monday. The team played Harvard Second. Tues- 
day, and Wesleyan, Wednesday. 

The Alpha Delta Phi Convention opened yester- 
day and included the visit to Brunswick during the 
a'fternoon. An account of the convention will 
appear in next week's issue. 

Winslow, '06. has been out of college this week, 
moving household goods from Gardiner to Port- 
land, where he will take up his residence after 
graduating. He will enter the employ of the Maine 
Central. 

The Second team lost its game with Bates Sec- 
ond on the Whittier Field, Wednesday afternoon, 
by the score of 4 to 2. Bowdoin's battery was Har- 
ris and Lawrence. The game was a most interest- 
ing contest. 

A party of five students of the forestry depart- 
ment of the University of Maine are in Brunswick 
and are engaged in work under the charge of Prof. 
Carey on the Harpswell road. They arrived the 
first of the week. 

The second team won its first game of the season 
from Leavitt Institute last Saturday. The game 
was played at Turner, and the score was 17-5 in 
Bowdoin's favor. The Bowdoin team was made 
up as follows : Manter, p. ; Greene, c. ; Piper, lb. ; 
Ellis, 2b. ; Hayes, Capt, 3 ; Dresser, ss. ; Morrell, If. ; 
Harris, cf. ; Hughes, rf. 



28 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



It was noticed last Saturday that the new large 
flag was flown over Memorial Hall ; it added much 
to the appearance of the campus and it is hoped 
that it will be in position more frequently than dur- 
ing the winter months. 

The Orient is unable to give an account of the 
Zeta Psi reception and dance until next week, owing 
to the date of going to press. The committee in 
charge was composed of Hatch, '06; Hall, '06; 
Erskine, '07; Kilborn, '08; and Kane, '09., 

Rev. Herbert A. Jump and Mrs. Byron Stevens 
have been appointed by Governor Cobb as two of 
the delegates from Maine to the 33d annual session 
of the National Conference of Charities and Cor- 
rections, which is to be held in Philadelphia May 
9-16. 

The Musical Clubs returned from their trip to 
Thomaston and Camden on Thursday of last week. 
Although the clubs were handicapped by the 
absence of some of the best talent, they neverthe- 
less gave some satisfactory concerts and also 
enjoyed a good time. 

The national convention of the Psi Upsilon Fra- 
ternity is being held with Trinity College at Hart- 
ford. Conn., this week. The representatives from 
Bowdoin Chapter are Robie R. Stevens, '06 ; James 
W. Sewall, Jr., '06; and Paul D. Blanchard, '07. 
They left for Hartford the first of the week. 

"King Pepper" was presented in Gardiner last 
Monday evening, and in Augusta on Wednesday 
evening; it is understood that it will also be pre- 
sented elsewhere in the State. Beside Mikelsky, Cox 
and the Gumbel brothers, mentioned in last week's 
Orient, Bowdoin was represented by Greene, 'oS. 

Although Bates declined Bowdoin's challenge for 
a debate, this year, yet Bowdoin men figured prom- 
inently in the Bates-University of Vermont debate 
in Lewiston's City Hall, April 25, which was won 
by Bates. The debate was presided over by Judge 
Franklin M. Drew, Bowdoin, '58; the prayer was 
offered by Rev. Percival F. Marston, Bowdoin, '88, 
and two of the three judges were Hon. O. D. Baker, 
Bowdoin, '68. and Chief Justice Wiswell, Bowdoin, 
'73- 

The following concerning Leo Hafford from the 
Fall River Globe, will be interesting reading for 
Bowdoin students from more standpoints than one : 
"Hafford is a tall young man with a boyish face, 
yellow-jaundice hair and freckles, writes Charley 
Power in the Pittsburg Dispatch. It is not 
recorded that he ever won any medals at a beauty 
contest, although while pitching for Bowdoin Col- 
lege he was popular with the ladies who were wont 
to flock to the college campus and there watch the 
giddy boys doing things athletic. But Hafford can 
pitch. He has a side-arm delivery that is effective, 
and the best the Pirates could do in nine spavined 
innings was five hits — two doubles and three singles 
— and they were lucky to escape being smeared 
with a coat of kalsomine." 



COLLEGE BOOK STORE SOLD 

It is stated that Mr. Stevens has sold the 
College book store and that the new proprie- 
tor is Frank Reynolds of Brunswick. 



HISTORY OF CLASS OF '96 

The secretary of the Class of '96, John 
Clair Minot of Augusta, has just issued the 
decennial record of the class. It is a neat lit- 
tle volume of 135 pages, bound in the class 
colors of crimson and silver gray, and con- 
tains both the detailed story of the four years 
as undergraduates and individual sketches of 
the members of the class for the ten years 
since leaving college. The class had 58 men 
when it entered and 47 at graduation. Only 
one member has died, J. H. Libby, a young 
Fort Fairfield lawyer who died in 1903. 
There are only 16 of the class now in Maine, 
and the rest are scattered over the world as 
follows : Six in Massachusetts, five in New 
York, three in Chicago, three in Connecticut, 
two in New Hampshire and one each in Cali- 
fornia, District of Columbia, Nebraska, New 
Jersey, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, Ten- 
nessee, China, New Zealand and the Philip- 
pines. The class has 11 lawyers, eight teach- 
ers, seven physicians, three bankers, four mer- 
chants, three newspaper men, two clergymen, 
one insurance man, one publisher, one mill 
superintendent, one government scientist, etc. 
Thirty-one of the 46 are married and they 
have 28 living children, 13 boys and 15 girls. 
The class has had a dinner and reunion at 
each commencement since graduation with an 
attendance varying from a dozen to 20. This 
year, being the 10th anniversary of gradua- 
tion, unusual efforts will be made to secure a 
large attendance and over 30 have written 
the secretary that they will be present. 



FIFTH FRESHMAN DEBATE 

Debate for Division A on Wednesday, May g, at 
2.30 p.m. : for Division B on Thursday, May 10, at 
8.30 a.m. Briefs and forensies due on Wednesday, 
May 2. 

Question : Resolved, That the refusal of employ- 
ers to recognize labor unions is unjust. 

Division A : Affirmative : Estes, Koughan, Lum- 
bard. Negative : Blair, Sewall, Thwing. 

Division B : Affirmative : Pennell, C. Powers, 
Stubbs. Negative : Stacey. Stetson, Studley. 



H. M. HEATH, 72, TO SPEAK 

There will be an open meeting of English 7 this 
month, probably on Thursday, the 17th, at 
seven o'clock in Hubbard Hall. At this meeting, 
Hon. Herbert M. Heath, '72, of Augusta, who won 
the case for the defense in the recent trial of Mrs. 
Cooper, will speak on "Debating as Training for 
Public Service." Gold medals will be presented at 
this time to the victorious Bowdoin debaters. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



29 



FACULTY NOTES 

Dr. Burnett will be Bowdoin's representative at 
the annual meeting of the New England Entrance 
Certificate Board which is to be held in Boston on 
May ii. 

Prof. Foster on last Friday afternoon gave an 
address at the Roxbury High School. The sub- 
ject of his address was "The Man Who Thinks." 

Dr. Whittier will attend a meeting of the Bow- 
doin Club of Boston, to-morrow evening. Henry 
Chapman, .'06, will accompany him. 

Prof. Henry Johnson has just been appointed a 
National director of the American Free Art League. 

On Thursday, April 26, Prof. Little addressed a 
meeting of the Maine State Library Club, taking as 
his subject, "Glimpses of Foreign Libraries." Sev- 
eral members of the faculty attended this meeting. 

Prof. Little was in Boston, last Wednesday to 
personally examine a valuable series of books to be 
sold at auction that day. Prof. Little also expected 
to attend the meeting of the Massachusetts Library 
Club which was to be held last night in Boston. 

Prof. Robinson was in Portland last Friday and 
Saturday. 



CONGRATULATIONS ON DEBATE 

Prof. Foster received the following telegram 
immediately after the Clark Debate : 

Baltimore, Md., April 27. 
Professor William T. Foster : 

Congratulations. Will you give me the text of 
the Bowdoin debate with a view to publication. 
Your victory will be communicated to Brussels 
with the details. 

James Gustavus Whiteley, 
Consul-General Congo Free State. 



TOMORROW'S GAME 

Following is the make-up and batting order of the 
two teams, as given the Orient by the respective 
managers : 

Bowdoin. Bates. 

Blair, 2b c, Boothby 

Abbott, c p., Johnson 

Stanwood, 3b lb., Conner 

Files, rf 2b., Kendall 

Hodgson, ss 3b., Jordan 

Sparks, p ss., Wilder 

Bower, cf If., Austin 

McDade, cf cf., Rogers 

Greene, lb rf., Wight 



MASSACHUSETTS CLUB 

Last Saturday evening the Massachusetts Club 
held a very successful and pleasant meeting at the 
Delta Kappa Epsilon house. There were about 
eighteen members at the meeting, and President 
Hyde gave a very interesting talk on how the Mas- 
sachusetts Club could best serve its purpose, which 
is to induce more Massachusetts men to come to 
Bowdoin. Incidentally Preident Hyde spoke of 
some of the special features of Bowdoin, among 
which he said that Bowdoin had nothing in her cat- 



alogue which she did not have in fact, that Bowdoin 
had a wide-awake faculty, not burdened with 
inferior professors; that at Bowdoin the rich man 
and the poor man were on absolutely an equal foot- 
ing, and that Bowdoin is just the size to be of most 
benefit to its students. 

On the suggestion of President Hyde, a motion 
was put and carried, that a short letter be sent to 
every Bowdoin alumnus in Eastern Massachusetts, 
stating the purpose of the Massachusetts Club at 
Bowdoin, urging the alumni to co-operate with its 
members, and stating that the members will do all 
in their power to send any desired information 
about the college, or to help to entertain in any way 
any sub-Freshmen from Massachusetts. 



"THE RIVALS" 

Last Friday night the Dramatic Club staged "The 
Rivals" with more success than the club has ever 
had at its first performances. The audience did not 
fill the hall, but it amply sufficed to pay the club's 
expenses, and gave the club a slight surplus which 
may be used to pay several small debts left by last 
year's management. The real success of the club 
was in the acting. From start to finish everything 
went along finely, and each member of the cast car- 
ried out his part very successfully. The ladies on 
the cast were better made up, and were more tak- 
ing than ever. "Jim" Bartlett was even better than 
last year, and did the leading lady's part of "Mrs. 
Malaprop," fully as well as any girl could have 
ckpne. The heroine, "Lydia," though she carried 
out her part well, and very much took the eye 0/ 
"Capt. Absolute" and "Sir Anthony," was really sur- 
passed in beauty by her younger dark-haired friend, 
"Julia," and her pretty maid, "Lucy,"' also came in 
for her share of the kisses. "Bob" Acres, who took 
the leading man's part, did excellently, and certainly 
had the house with "him when he played his duel 
scene. The other rival was Captain Aboslute who 
also portrayed his character very well indeed, play- 
ing his part as became an officer, and an "obedient 
son." 

The gouty "Sir Anthony" was also much appre- 
ciated, and Fred Piper certainly kept up his repu- 
tation as an actor when it came to the scene, where 
he swore that he would "never call his son Jack 
again." 

Marsh, '09. did very well indeed with "Sir Lucius 
O'Trigger," and spoke a good brogue throughout the 




I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
11106 man who will be in the market for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do alter graduation. 

A. S. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPGOOD'S 



30 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



play. The other two parts, "David" and "Tag," were 
played by Fox, '06, and Atwood, '09, who played 
them to perfection. 

Much credit is due to the coach, Mr. H. A. Huse, 
Jr., who has given the club a great deal of his time, 
and to Fred Piper, who managed the whole pro- 
duction. Piper has just given notice to the Orient, 
that he will soon go around among the students to 
get as many pledges as possible from those who 
would attend the play if repeated on the night 
before Ivy. When "The Magistrate" was'produced 
in June, last year, it was presented with even 
greater success than the first time, and if the play 
is given again this year on the night before Ivy, it 
will probably become a custom to produce it then, 
the earlier production being in Bath or some other 
place than Brunswick. 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



PULSIFER'S 
5 AND 10 (BERT ST0RE 

Now Open for Business. 
J. W. PULSIFER, - - MAINE STREET, BRUNSWICK 




S. P. ROBIE, 

LEWISTON, = MKINE 
FOE BEST 

Hats, Furnishings, Athletic Goods. 



Bowdoin Calendars 

ON SALE at HALF PI^ICE 

(50 Cents) 



WOODRUFF, '06, or 
BY^ON STEVENS' BOOKSTORE 



THE MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Flas a cnrclully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
N aril Classes; clinical Conferences; Modified Seminar Methods, ami thoroughly I 'radical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and waul classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest and finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every re-peel, and the new laboratories are specially planned and equipped for individual work by the students. 

Tbe College iris also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 

SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of MeHicine. 




7/Iar/m^ 



REPEATING SHOT GUN 
NEW MODEL N9I7 




Here is the cheapest good gun yet made. By the omission of the take down feature we have 
been able to greatly reduce the cost of production and at the same time have kept the gun up to the 
famous high 7/Zar/en standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
lly bored for smokeless as well as black powder and so chambered that 2% inch or 
1 improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 
existence. We are glad to make impossible for every lover of guns 



barrels are espei 

2',' 6 inch shells may bi 

reliable and best working „_.. 

and bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun 
— ; your dealer order it for you. 



Ha 



) low a price. 



Send for the ffZou£n Catalogue and Experience Book to-day. Free for 3 stamps. 
7j2&27larfi/Z firearms £tt,42Willow Street, New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY n, 1906 



NO. 4 



ALPHA DELTA PHI CONVENTION 

The 74th annual convention of the Alpha 
Delta Phi Fraternity was held at Portland on 
Thursday, Friday and Saturday of last week, 
and proved itself a grand success in every 
way. The convention was held under the aus- 
pices of the Bowdoin Chapter and those in 
charge of the arrangements, as well as all 
members of the fraternity, succeeded in mak- 
ing the convention an unqualified success. 

Delegates were present from all the leading 
colleges and universities of the country, and 
it is estimated that the attendance was fully 
as large as that at the conventions held in 
more central parts of the country. Over 200- 
delegates were on hand at the opening session. 

The convention began Wednesday evening 
with an informal smoker at the Falmouth, but 
the real opening came with the first business 
meeting of Thursday morning. This meeting 
was held at the same hotel and lasted until 
12.30, when lunch was served and arrange- 
ments made for the visit to Bowdoin. 

The special train reached Brunswick early 
in the afternoon and for two hours the dele- 
gates visited the college and the various fra- 
ternities, all of whom kept "open house" dur- 
ing the visit. The trip was a most delightful 
one and all expressed themselves as highly 
pleased with Bowdoin. The party returned 
to Portland at 4.30 o'clock. 

Thursday evening came the public literary 
exercises in Kotzschmar Hall. The chief 
feature of the evening was the oration by 
Hamilton W. Mabie, LL.D., editor of the 
Outlook, whose subject was "The Heart of 
the College." The address was one of the 
most notable made in Portland in a long time 
and was listened to by a large gathering of 
people The ode was given by Prof. Arlo 
Bates of the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology. 

Immediately after the public exercises the 
convention ball was held at the Falmouth, the 
patronesses for the occasion being Mrs. John 
Marshall Brown of Portland, Mrs. John F. 
Thompson of Portland, Mrs. Franklin C. 
Robinson of Brunswick, Mrs. Charles F. 



Libby of Portland, and Mrs. Henry L. Bab- 
cock of Boston. 

The ball and reception committee consisted 
of Gen. John Marshall Brown of Portland, 
Hon. Charles F. Libby of Portland, Dr. Fred- 
erick H. Gerrish of Portland, Dr. John F. 
Thompson of Portland, Rt. Rev. Bishop Cod- 
man of Portland, Philip F. Chapman, '06, of 
Portland, James A. Bartlett, '06, of Richmond, 
Neal Allen, '07, of Portland, Frank Thomas, 
09, of Brewer, Irving Rich, '09, of Portland, 
and Roger Thaxter, '09, of Portland. 

Business occupied the attention of the con- 
vention, Friday, until 3.30 p.m., except for 
the lunch hour. At that time the visitors and 
local members of the society went to Custom 
House Wharf where the steamer Merrycon- 
eag of the Casco Bay Steamboat Company 
was boarded and a sail of several hours' dura- 
tion was being enjoyed about Casco Bay, the 
weather being excellent for the season of the 
year. 

One of the most brilliant affairs of its kind 
that has taken place in years was observed at 
the Falmouth Hotel, Friday evening, when 
the annual banquet of the fraternity was 
given. To the strains of the "Alpha Delta 
Phi March," the members entered the hall, 
after which prayer was offered by the Rev. 
John Gregson of Rochester, N. H. Collin 
Armstrong of New York presided in the 
absence of Mr. Mabie. The following toasts 
were given : "The Fraternity," Gen. Joshua 
L. Chamberlain; "The Fraternity and the 
Student Opinion," Prof. Frederick' J. E. 
Woodbridge; "The Fraternity in College and 
After," Prof. Henry L. Chapman ; "The Fra- 
ternity and Christianity," the Rt. Rev. Bishop 
Robert Codman ; "The College Man in Prac- 
tical Life, "the Hon. Charles F. Libby; "Cui 
Bono," Dr. Daniel Robinson. Dr. David M. 
Beach of Bangor read an original ode. 

The banquet committee consisted of H. B. 
Chandler, '07, G. E. Tucker, '05, and F. E. 
R. Piper, '06. 

The convention closed, Saturday morning, 
with a brief business session, after which the 
greater part of the delegates left for the 
various homes, after one of the most success- 



32 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



fill conventions ever held by the fraternity. 
The following officers were elected for the 
ensuing year at the Friday business session : 

President — Talcott Williams, Philadelphia, 
Pa., Editor Philadelphia Press. 

Vice-President — Collin Armstrong, New 
York. 

Secretary — Robert A. Gunn, New York. 



v BASEBALL 

Bowdoix, 2 ; Bates, 3. 

Bowdoin lost its first game with Bates, last 
Saturday, by a score of 3 to 2 in an exciting 
1 1 -inning contest. The game was delayed 
somewhat at the opening because of a steady 
downpour of rain, and the grounds during the 
earlier part were very clamp. This contrib- 
uted to make the game less cleanly played than 
otherwise would have been the case. 

The game was a pitchers' battle in which 
both men did splendid work. For Bowdoin, 
Files pitched one of the best games seen on 
Whittier Field for a long time, while Johnson 
did excellent work for Bates. In fielding, 
however, Bowdoin did inferior work, and this 
inferiority was what gave the honors to Bates 
after Bowdoin had apparently won the game. 
Had any one of the last few errors not been . 
made, the game would have been Bowdoin's. 

The best work for Bowdoin, in addition to 
the splendid work of Files, was done by 
McDade, who had five put-outs to his credit, 
as well as securing one of Bowdoin's hits and 
scores. The work of Bowdoin's infield was 
brilliant a portion of the time and at others 
was very erratic. This doubtless was due in 
a large measure to the condition of the field, 
and for that reason is partially excusable. It 
is, however, a thing in which the team is 
showing up surprisingly weak this year. 

Bowdoin secured her first run in the sixth, 
when a base on balls and two sacrifices 
brought in Blair. In the eighth came 
another, when a single by McDade, a base on 
balls, a man hit by a pitched ball and a drive 
to the outfield, brought in Bowdoin's remain- 
ing run. Bates secured her first run in the 
eighth by a base on balls, a passed ball and an 
error. She tied the score in the ninth on an 



error at second and a two-base hit. In the 
eleventh the game was won by a hit and two 
errors with no one out. The summary : 

Bowdoin. 

ab r bh po a e 

Blair, 2b 3 1 1 2 o 1 

Abbott, c 3 o o 7 1 o 

Stanwoqd, 3b. 4 o o 2 3 1 

Files, p 4 o 1 o 2 o 

Greene, lb. ... 5 o on o 1 

Hodgson, ss. . . 5 o o o 3 3 

Sparks, rf . . . . 4 o 1 1 o o 

Bower, cf 4 o 1 2 o o 

McDade, If . . . 4 1 1 5 o o 

Total, 36 2 5 30* 9 6 

Bates, 

ab r bh po a e 

Wilder, ss . . . . 5 o o 2 1 1 

Johnson, p.... 5 o o o 5 o 

Kendall, 2b ... 5 o o 3 2 o 

Austin, If . ... 5 1 1 3 o o 

Jordan, 3b .... 4 o o 1 3 1 

Rogers, cf . . . . 5 1 1 1 o o 

Bowman, rf... 4 o 2 1 o o 

Connor, lb... 4 o o 17 o o 

Boothby, c .... 2 1 o 5 4 o 

Totals, 39 3 4 33 15 2 
*No one out when winning run was made. 

Bowdoin 00000 10100 o— 2 

Bates 0000000 1 10 1 — 3 

Earned runs — Bates 1, Bowdoin 1. Two- 
base hits — Files, Bowman 2, Austin. Sacri- 
fice hits — Abbott 2, Stanwood. Stolen bases 
— Blair 2, Boothby 2, Jordan. First base on 
errors — Bates 5, Bowdoin 1. Left on bases 
— Bowdoin 4, Bates 6. Struck out — Stan- 
wood, Greene, Hodgson 2, Sparks 2, McDade, 
Jordan, Bowman, Conner, Boothby 2. Passed 
ball — Abbott. Hit by pitched ball — Stan- 
w o o d. T i m e — 2 h. Umpi re — Carrigan. 
Attendance — =;oo. 



Bowdoin, 6; Colby, 7. 

Bowdoin lost its championship game to 
Colby last Wednesday by the score of 7 to 6 
in an exciting contest. Bowdoin batted 
Coombs hard, but lost, largely because of 
costly errors. The Orient will give an 
account of the game next week. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



33 



ZETA PSI HOUSE PARTY 

The annual reception and ball of the 
Lambda Chapter of the Zeta Psi Fraternity 
was held at its chapter house on College 
Street on Wednesday afternoon and evening 
of last week, and proved itself a most delight- 
ful occasion. 

The reception was held from 3 to 5 in the 
afternoon, and was attended by about 200 
guests. During this time light refreshments 
were served and delightful music was fur- 
nished by an orchestra led by Francis J. Welch 
of Portland. In the evening the annual ball 
was held and the entire lower house was 
given to dancing. The patronesses were Mrs. 
William DeWitt Hyde, Mrs. Hartley C. Bax- 
ter, Mrs. Henry Johnson of Brunswick, Mrs. 
William T. Kilborn of Portland, Mrs. Fred 
W. Wight of Rockland, and Mrs. Oscar 
Peterson of Cornish. At half past 10 delic- 
ious refreshments of salads, ices, cake and 
punch were served. 

Among those present were Miss Helen 
Thaxter, Miss Louise Edwards, Miss Amy 
Anthoine, Miss Elizabeth Bates, Mrs. Walter 
Edwards, Mrs. Champlin of Portland, Miss 
Eleanor Dunlap, Miss Sarah Merriman, Miss 
Lula Woodward, Miss Florence Alien,, Miss 
Grace Crawford, Miss Dasie Hubbard, Miss 
Christine Pennell, Miss Bertha Stetson, Miss 
Alice Knight, Miss Evelyn Stetson, Miss 
Margaret Sutherland, Miss Sue Winchell, 
Miss Ethel Purinton, Miss Helen Johnson, 
Miss Mynee Owen of Brunswick, Miss 
Martha Cobb, Miss Alice Webb of Rockland, 
Miss Louise Richards of Farmington, Miss 
Nellie Avery, Miss Evelyn Thompson of 
Rath, Miss Hubbard of Skowhegan, Miss 
Johnson of Gardiner and Miss Helen Weeks 
of Wiscasset. 

The delegates from the other fraternities 
were E. R. Hale, '06, from Psi Upsilon ; F. 
L. Bass, '07, from Delta Kappa Epsilon ; G. 
W. Tuell, '06, from Theta Delta Chi; C. C. 
Holman, '06, from Delta Upsilon ; E. Otis, 
'07, from Kappa Sigma ; W. S. Linnell, '07, 
from Beta Theta Pi, and L. H. Fox, '06, as 
the non-fraternity delegate. The committee 
of arrangements consisted of G. U. Hatch, 
'06 ; C. C. Hall, Jr., '06 ; L. M. Erskine, '07 ; 
K. B. Kilborn, '08; and H. F. Kane, '09. 



TOMORROW'S MEET 

The following is the correct list of Bow- 
doin's entries at to-morrow's meet : 

100-Yard Dash — Doherty, '07, Atwood, '09, 
Tenks, '06, Putman, '06, Hanson, Med. 

220-Yard Dash — Doherty, '07, Atwood, '09, 
Lee, '08, Hanson, Med., Burton, '07, 
Jenks, '06. 

440-Yard : Dash — Kimball, '07, Powers, '09, 
Skolfield, '06, Lee, '08, Blair, '09, Johnson, '09. 

880- Yard Run— Holman, '06, Blair, '09, 
Morrison, '08, Skolfield, '06, Kimball, '07, 
Brewster, '09. 

Mile Run— Shorey, '07, D. Robinson, '07, 
A. Robinson, '08, Gray, '08. 

Two-Mile Run— Shorey, '07, D. Robinson, 
'07, A. Robinson, '08, Gray, '08. 

■I 20- Yard Hurdles — Tobey, '06, Skolfield, 
'06, Adams, '07, Leavitt, '08, Mincher, '07, 
Thaxter, '09. 

220- Yard Hurdles — Tobey,, '06, Skolfield, 
'06, Adams, '07, Leavitt, '08, Mincher, '07, 
Bass, '07. 

Pole Vault — Winchell, '07, Burton, '09, 
Gastonguay, '09, Skolfield, '06. 

High Jump— Pennell, '09, Thaxter, 09, 
Atwood, '09, Sanborn, '08. 

Broad Jump — Atwood, '09, Doherty, '07, 
Shaw, '06, Bolster, Med., Purington, '08, 
Bass, '07. 

Shot Put — Garcelon, '09, Chapman, '06, 
McMichael, '07, Sewall, '09, Hatch, '06, Skol- 
field, '06. 

Throwing the Hammer — Chapman, '06, 
Garcelon, '09, Hatch, '06, Stacey, '09, 

Throwing the Discus — Adams, '07, Stacy, 
'09, Jackson, '09, Chapman, '06, Garcelon, '09, 
Thomas, '09. 

ALEXANDER PRIZE SPEAKING 

The following named men have been chosen 
to take part in the Trial Competition for the 
Alexander Prize Speaking. This Trial Com- 
petition will be on Tuesday, May 22. 

Juniors — Briggs, Duddy, Leydon, Linnell, 
Mitchell, Pike, Redman, Roberts, Snow, 
Voorhees. 

Sophomores — Donnell, Foss, Gould, Ham, 
Hupper, Morrison, M. P. Merrill, Putnam, C. 
M. Robinson, Weiler. 

Freshmen — Atwood, Cole, Gastonguay, 
Ginn, Goodspeed, Harris, Marsh, Rich, Shee- 
han, Stetson. 



34 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

lished every friday of the collegiate y 
by the Students of 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

R. A CONY, 1907 Editor-in-Chief 

Associate Editors 
h. e. wilson, 1907 r. h. hupper, 1908 

h. e. mitchell, 1907 r. a. lee, 1908 
w. s. linnell, 1907 h. h. burton, 1909 

a. l. robinson, 1908 j. s. stahl, 1909 

A. L. JONES, Medical 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 Business Manager 

N. S. WESTON, 1908 Ass't Business Manager 

Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 



Entered at Post-Office at Brunswick as Second-Clas 


s Mail Matter 


Lewistun Journal Press 


Vol. XXXVI. MAY 1 1, 1906 


No. 4 



The Orient cannot refrain 
Misrepresentations from speaking of the 

embarrassing incidents of 
last Friday's chapel exercises. For a part of 
it no one was to blame ; for another part a few 
fellows were responsible. We refer to the 
"wooding." To those who could see the 
expression on the faces of the visitors it was 
no hard task to read their feelings of keen 
embarrassment when the demonstration took 
place ; and throughout the exercises it was evi- 
dent that they felt that the situation was any- 
thing but what it should have been — that of a 
pleasant visit to the chapel exercises. It is 
probable that a portion of the men began 
"wooding" for the baseball men ; others, the 
Orient knows for a fact, did so from motives 
which we will not attempt to name. As it 
happened, the guests were the principal, 
teachers and students of one of Maine's larger 



preparatory schools, and there is every 
reason to believe that their remembrance of 
Bowdoin will be both unpleasant and lasting. 

To be a gentleman is always expected of a 
college man ; those few who failed to be such 
Friday morning were guilty of a thoughtless- 
ness of which few college men would care 
to be guilty. And more than this, there is a 
practical aspect to such incidents. Those 
who come to us as visitors usually have 
friends who are to go to college, some have 
children and all have friends. Those of last 
Friday, however, as teachers and educators, 
are placed in a position of unusual influence 
in this connection. After their visit is there 
any doubt as to their position in regard to one 
Maine college? A few men misrepresented 
the college in a way that others will have to 
work hard and long to offset. 

The same thing applies to all misconduct 
of college students. A few men who are 
thoughtless, or something worse, are fre- 
quently misrepresenting the college. This is 
particularly true of conduct about the railroad 
station. As a concrete illustration, the fol- 
lowing incident may be mentioned. The 
editor of a certain Maine newspaper a num- 
ber of years ago passed through Brunswick 
and saw some ungentlemanly conduct on the 
part of some students, and from that 
time on, in his conversation and through the 
columns of his newspaper, he has been careful 
to show no favors to Bowdoin. It was a case 
where one or two men misrepresented their 
college in a way that has ever since continued 
to react against Bowdoin. 

Another illustration of the same thing came 
under the observation of the Orient. In a 
certain Maine preparatory school last June 
two bright men graduated. Both are of 
the Phi Beta Kappa type and men with bright 
futures before them. When approached on 
the subject of college it was found that they 
could not be induced to come to Bowdoin 
because of one of these railroad station inci- 
dents. They had no affiliations for other col- 
leges in Maine. They wished to go to a first- 
class college, but despite all some loyal Bow- 
doin men could do, they went out of the State. 
Here again some fellows who would probably 
be very indignant if accused of disloyalty to 
the college, have inflicted a real and lasting 
injury to its interests. 

Thousands of people pass through Bruns- 
wick during the vear, and with the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



35 



majority of them what they see at the railroad 
station is their only real impression of the col- 
lege. The conduct of men may not be repre- 
sentative, even of the individual himself, but 
the effect is just as harmful. Can it be said 
that the man who misrepresents Bowdoin to 
these people is loyal to his college? The 
answer would seem to be in the negative. 
There is a greater and more influential college 
loyalty than that displayed on the baseball 
and football field. 

The Orient does not wish to be understood 
as asserting that other colleges do not have to 
contend with these things, but such incidents 
as that of Friday impresses the necessity of 
guarding- against them. 



From week to week the 
Crowded Columns Orient is obliged to omit 

matter, the importance of 
which would seem to warrant its appearance 
in the college weekly, but which lack of space 
prevents. Were it possible to secure suffi- 
cient advertisements to permit additional 
pages during the spring term this could be 
done ; the money available, however, will not 
warrant such a step, and the Orient asks that 
all bear with it for the non-appearance or 
delay of matter that at first sight would seem 
ought to appear in its columns. 



All colleges know what it 
Singing by Proxy is to take exercise by 

proxy, to stretch at ease in 
the grandstand while a few of their fellows 
have the struggle and the fun, and develop 
the sound and vigorous frame in the field 
below. Bowdoin has gone a step beyond 
that. She does her singing by proxy. Her 
students line the chapel benches, rows of 
silent mouths, while up in the choir loft a few 
representatives of those silent mouths make 
the music for the remainder. One of the 
pleasantest memories that a visitor carries 
away from a college is that stir and sweep 
of many voices singing together. No mem- 
ories of that sort can be borne away from our 
chapel now. We do not sing and yet we can 
sing. One almost never hears a song floating 
across the campus. Rare and welcome are 
those exceptions made by the Glee Club com- 
ing away from a rehearsal, and especially by 
the several fraternities on the night of initia- 
tion. If the fraternities can do it once why 
can they not do it many times? If the frater- 



nities find voice for themselves why must the 
college sit in tuneless silence? 

There seems to be no reason why it should 
not be possible, pleasant and profitable to the 
college to remedy this state of things by 
invoking a little class rivalry in the interest of 
all the classes. As the warm days of late 
spring and early summer come on it would 
seem as though one of the pleasantest things 
that a class as a body could do would be to 
gather on the steps of the Art Building for 
some singing. To stimulate rivalry and so 
increase the activity perhaps some of the 
classes already graduated, say the present 
decennial class, might find it worth while to 
give a prize to the winning class, — a prize 
that should take into account both excellence 
in singing and the excellence of the songs, 
if they were original. And here would be 
just the place and just the stimulating condi- 
tions to bring forward new Bowdoin songs. 
The college has too few of these. 

Then the social side of such an occasion 
would be highly enjoyable. All the college 
would gather in a pleasantly informal way 
for an event in which all would be both spec- 
tators and actors. Friends from the town 
would join the number. Sub-Freshmen 
might stray in. 

There is, of course, no reason why one 
night should begin and end the pleasure of all 
this. The preliminary practicing, except per- 
haps in its earliest stages, might occur out of 
doors ; and so the college and its friends get 
into the way of spending the early hour of the 
mild summer evenings in June on the campus. 
Would not the memories of such evenings 
linger long with us after the last festivity of 
Commencement had flickered out? 



COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM 

Sunday, June 24 — The baccalaureate ser- 
mon by the President in the Congregational 
Church at 4 p.m. 

Monday, June 25 — The Alexander prize 
speaking in Memorial Hall at 8 p.m. 

Tuesday, June 26 — The class day exercises 
of the graduating class in Memorial Hall at 
10 a.m. and under the Thorndike oak at 3 
p.m. Promenade concert at Memorial Hall 
at 9 p.m. The annual meeting of the Maine 
Historical Society, Alumni Room, Hubbard 
Hall, at 2 p.m. 

Wednesday, June 27 — The annual meeting 
of the Phi Beta Kappa Fraternity, Alpha of 



36 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Maine, in the Alumni Room, Hubbard Hall, 
at 9 a m. The graduation exercises of the 
Medical School of Maine in the Congrega- 
tional Church at 10 a.m., with address by 
the Rev. Raymond Calkins of Portland. The 
reception by the president and Mrs. Hyde in 
Hubbard Hall from 8 to n p.m. 

Thursday, June 28 — The annual meeting of 
the Alumni Association in the Alumni Room, 
Hubbard Hall, at 9.30 a.m. The commence- 
ment exercises in the Congregational Church at 
10.30 a.m., followed by commencement din- 
ner in Memorial Hall. 



FACULTY NOTES 

Next Sunday President Hyde will preach 
at Mount Holyoke in South Hadley, Mass. 
On the following Monday, he will attend a 
dinner given by the Alumni of the Union 
Theological Seminary in New York, and on 
Tuesday will be present at a meeting of the 
Grenfell Association in Boston. He will also 
give a lecture at Pittsfield, Me., on Friday, 
the eighteenth. 

Prof. Ham will attend a meeting of the 
Maine Modern Language Association which 
is to be held at the Edward Little High School 
at Auburn, Me., on Friday and Saturday of 
next week. 

At the same time that the meeting of the 
Modern Language Association is going on, 
Prof. Mitchell will preside at a meeting of the 
English Department of the Maine Association 
of Colleges and Preparatory Schools. This 
meeting is also to be held in the Edward Lit- 
tle High School, and a very interesting pro- 
gram has been arranged. Among the speak- 
ers will be Prof. Roberts of Colby, Prof. 
Hartshorn of Bates, Principal Stevenson of 
Coburn Institute, Miss Hodsdon of Hebron, 
Miss Johnson of the Cony High School of 
Augusta, and Prof. Foster of Bowdoin, who 
will take as his subject: "Argumentation in 
the Secondary Schools." Prof. Mitchell will 
also address the meeting and state work of 
the Committee of Eight, of which he is a 
member, and which has been appointed by the 
New England colleges to consider the ques- 
tions r.rising in regard to entrance examina- 
tions. 

Dr. Whittier, last Tuesday, completed the 
course in Surgical Pathology which he has 
been giving to the third-year medical students 
in Portland. 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, MAY IITH. 

10-12.30 a.m. 2-5.30 p.m. — Track Team practice 
on Whittier Field. 

2.30 p.m. Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

C. W. Hawkesworth, '06, speaks at Yarmouth 
Academy on "The Optimism of Browning." 

SATURDAY, MAY I2TH. 

10.00 a.m. Trials in Maine Intercollegiate Ath- 
letic Meet at Lewiston. 

2.00 p.m. — Finals in Maine Intercollegiate Athletic 
Meet at Lewiston. 

8.00 p.m. — Kirk Brown at Empire Theatre, Lew-. 
iston. 

Report on "Emerson," in English 4, due. 

SUNDAY, MAY I.3TH. 

President Hyde preaches at Mt. Holyoke. 

5.00 p.m. — Rev. George C. DeMott, '94, of Bath, 
will conduct chapel. 

In chapel J. E. Crowley, '09, will play a violin 
solo. 

MONDAY, MAY I4TH. 

2.30 p.m. — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

4.30 p.m. — Exhibition of Photographs of Sar- 
gent's works closes at Art Building. 

Names of those trying for the position of college 
organist due. 

iVlaine Tennis Tournament at Colby. 

Senior Commencement parts due. 

Stories for Hawthorne Prize due.' 

Translations for David Sewall Premiums due. 

President Hyde attends an alumni dinner at New 
York. 

TUESDAY, MAY I5TH. 

2.30 p.m. — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

6.30 p.m. — Dinner of English 7 at New Meadows 
Inn. 

President Hyde attends the meeting of the Gren- 
fell Association in Boston. 

Maine Tennis Tournament at Colby. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY l6TH. 

Baseball game with Andover at Andover. 
Boody, '06. speaks before Y. M. C. 'A. at Bates 
College. 

THURSDAY, MAY I7TH. 

Baseball game with Boston College at Boston. 

8.00 p.m. — H. M. Heath, '72, speaks at open meet- 
ing of English 7. in the debating room of Hubbard 
Hall. 

A. B. Parsons speaks before Y. M. C. A., Banis- 
ter Hall. 

Meeting of Hebron Club with Piper, '06, 9 South 
Winthrop. 

FRIDAY, MAY l8TH. 

President Hyde lectures at Pittsfield, Me. 
Professors Ham. Foster and Mitchell attend 
meetings at Auburn, Me. 

"Sweet Clover" at Empire Theatre in Lewiston. 

SATURDAY, MAY I9TH. 

Baseball game with Bates at Lewiston. 
Second team plays Kent's Hill at Kent's Hill. 
Professors Ham and Mitchell attend meetings at 
Auburn. Me. 
"Utah" at Empire Theatre in Lewiston. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



37 



College Botes 

Track Meet Tomorrow. 

The Gurnet has opened for the season. 

Junior marching began last Tuesday noon. 

A meeting of the college jury was held Monday 
evening. 

Prof. Baker of Harvard will speak before the 
Ibis May 23. 

Adjourns were given in the history courses Mon- 
day morning. 

Williams, '06. passed Saturday and Sunday with 
friends in Saco. 

Hughey Quinn. '03, was at Alpha Delta Phi house, 
Saturday and Sunday. 

The State tennis tournament will begin Monday 
forenoon at Colby. 

Some one rung the college bell a little too early 
last Saturday afternoon. 

President White of Colby, was the guest of Pres- 
ident Hyde last Wednesday. 

There have been some beautiful evenings this 
week ; also some less beautiful. 

"Don" White, '05, was among those who wit- 
nessed the game last Saturday. 

Workmen are engaged in getting Merrymeeting 
Park in condition for the season. 

Editor Robinson of the Colby Echo made a pleas- 
ant call on the Orient this week. 

Upton, '07, was in Portland last Saturday, where 
he took part in a golf tournament. 

George Craigie, '07, passed Saturday and Sun- 
day at his home in Cumberland Mills. 

Bavis, '06, who has been out of college during the 
past two weeks, returned last Monday. 

Workmen are engaged in grading and turfing the 
grounds about the Kappa Sigma House. 

The visiting Alpha Delts were enthusiastic in 
their praise of Bowdoin and its hospitality. 

Early breakfasts will be the order to-morrow, in 
order to catch the 8 o'clock train for Lewiston. 

Rev. Mr. Sewall of the examining board con- 
ducted the chapel exercises last Friday morning. 

The Y. M. C. A. elections were held yesterday, 
but the Orient is unable to print them until next 
week. 

Lewiston is to have a Sunday paper beginning 
next Sunday. It is to be published by the Daily 
News Company. 

Henderson, Med., who is now at Portland, was 
at the game Saturday. He will take part in the 
meet Saturday, being entered in the dashes. 

Adjourns were' given in the chemistry courses 
last Friday because of the absence of Professor 
Robinson, who was one of the expert witnesses in 
the Maloney murder trial at Rockland. 

Lyman A. Cousins, '02 ; Edward S. Anthoine, 
'02; and Alfred G. M. Soule, '03, of Boston; and 
J. A. Clarke, '05, were among the Zeta Psi men 
who were present at the house party last week. 



To-morrow is the date of the great meet. 

Edward Patten of Brewer, was the guest of col- 
lege friends this week. 

Coach Smith atended the Maine-Tufts dual meet 
at Orono, last Saturday. 

Harry Lewis, '05, was present at the Bates-Bow- 
doin game last Saturday. 

Carpenters are engaged in making repairs on the 
piazza of the residence of Prof. Little on College 
Street. 

The members of the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity 
were excused from recitations during the conven- 
tion at Portland. 

The second team will leave for Kent's Hill on the 
8 o'clock train to-morrow morning, where it will 
play in the afternoon. 

The first band concert of the year occurred last 
Tuesday evening, and was very enjoyable — for 
those who had their overcoats. 

Pictures of Maine College athletes have been 
occupying prominent positions on the ^porting 
pages of Maine dailies during the past ten days. 

Mikelsky, Med., was in Hebron, last Friday 
evening, where he gave a reading before the stu- 
dents for the benefit of the Athletic Association. 

Charles K. Harris, the proprietor of the Harcourt 
Company, and who plays the leading role, is a 
brother of William Harris of the Freshman Class. 

The street musicians have arrived. There have 
been several in Brunswick during the past few days, 
one of whom made a round of the different frater- 
nity houses. 

At the time of going to press the Orient was 
unable to learn whether there would be adjourns 
Saturday or not. It is believed, however, that such 
will be the case. 

Rev. H. E. Dunnack of Augusta, was among the 
visitors in Brunswick, Wednesday. Mr. Dunnack 
is a great lover of baseball, as well as being a very 
loyal Bowdoin man. 

Carpenters are at work constructing a barber 
shop next door to the bowling alley which will be 
occupied by Mr. Soule, who now occupies the shop 
next the Kennebec Fruit Co.'s store. 

Rev. John S. Sewall. of Bangor, Rev. Edgar M. 
Cousins of Thomaston, John A. Morrill, Esq., of 
Auburn, and Charles T. Hawes of Bangor, of the 
examining board, visited the college the latter part 
of the week. 

There will be no interscholastic tennis meet this 
year. Manager Mincher has been in correspondence 
with several preparatory schools, but has been una- 
ble to secure assurances from a sufficient number 
to warrant the arranging of a meet. 

Students will sympathize with Harold S. Elder. 
'06, in the death of his sister, which occurred at her 
home in Portland, last Wednesday, after a long ill- 
ness. He had been out of college several days, 
being called home by her critical condition. 

The Seniors have appeared in caps and it is 
planned to attend Sunday chapel in both caps and 
gowns during the remainder of the year. The cus- 
tom is in vogue in most colleges and has been for- 
merly carried out at Bowdoin, though in recent 
years it has been given up. 



38 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Announcement is made that the final examination 
in Sociology will consist of a review of one of the 
books required for outside work. 

The Harcourt Company drew well from the col- 
lege last week. It was one of the best companies 
that has visited Brunswick in a long time. 

The members of the Tufts track team passed 
through Brunswick on their way to Orono last Fri- 
day afternoon. While the train was at the Bruns- 
wick station the men gave vigorous cheers for 
Bowdoin. 

The Portland Express of last Friday evening con- 
tained a picture of Bowdoin College extending 
entirely across its first page. The picture was 
inserted in connection with a write-up of the Alpha 
Delta Phi Convention. 

A letter received from "Jim" Cox, '04, states that 
he was at San Francisco during the recent earth- 
quake, but that he escaped without injury. He is 
at present playing ball in Oakland, Cal. He expects 
to make a trip East during the early summer. 

Last Saturday the Second team won from 
Edward Little High School by a score of 9-4. ■ The 
Bowdoin team was made up as follows : Morrell, p. ; 
Lawrence, c. ; Piper, lb. ; Pike, 2d; Hayes, 3d; Har- 
ris, ss. ; Redman, If.; C. H. Greene, cf. ; Ellis, rf. 

Among those who spoke at the Sagadahoc Teach- 
ers' Convention held recently, were : Professor 
Mitchell, Rev. H. A. Jump, C. M. Pennell, '92, 
Superintendent of Brunswick Schools ; and E. A. 
Kaharl, '99, Principal of the Brunswick High 
School. 

The Glee Club concert was given in Memorial 
Hall last Monday evening and proved a pleasant 
event. Although there were but few students in 
attendance, there was a good attendance of towns- 
people, and the numbers rendered were well 
received. About $20 was taken. 

Members of the football squad began out-door 
work the first of the week. This is the first time 
in several years that outdoor practice has been 
undertaken in. the spring. The work is confined 
chiefly to kicking. The practice thus far has been 
held on the Delta and near the gym. 

Last Tuesday afternoon a dozen Freshmen under 
the direction of Prof. Moody, surveyed the corner 
of the campus where Memorial Hall stands. This 
is a change from surveying the old Delta, and this 
optional course promises to be much more popular 
than it has been in the last two or three years. 

A. B. Parsons of the national committee 
of the Bowdoin Y. M. C. A., wlil speak 
before the Bowdoin Association on May 17. He 
will speak concerning the annual Northfield Con- 
ference, which is held at Northfield from June 22 
to July 1. It is hoped that several Bowdoin men 
will attend this year. 

One of the special addresses in English 7, was 
given this morning by C. W. Hawkesworth, '06, 
who supplied the place of Paine, '06, at Yarmouth 
Academy. Hawkesworth took as his subject "The 
Optimism of Browning." Next Wednesday even- 
ing H. P. Boody, '06, will give his address before 
the Bates Y. M. C. A. 



COMMENCEMENT RATES 

Dr. Burnett 'has completed arrangements 
whereby reduced rates to Bowdoin's Com- 
mencement have been secured over the three 
passenger associations of the eastern states, 
instead of merely the New England, as has 
been previously announced. The new arrange- 
ment secures rates over the lines of the Trunk 
Association, the Central Association and the 
New England Association, and embraces 
places east of St. Louis. One of the great 
advantages of the arrangements is that 100 
tickets over all three of the associations, 
instead of one, is all that will be required to 
secure the reduced rates. This arrangement 
will be an added impetus for the alumni who 
wash to attend Commencement and will help 
to swell the various classes in the competition 
for the trophy that is to be offered for the 
largest attendance. 



TENNIS TRIALS 

The tennis trials for the selection of the team 
that will represent Bowdoin in the Maine tourna- 
ment, was held last Tuesday, and resulted in the 
choice of Tobey, '06. and Paine, '06, in the singles ; 
and Tobey, '06, Paine, '06, Johnson, '06, and Roberts, 
'07, in the doubles. Paine and Tobey did not enter 
the tournament, as the latter is very busy this week 
with track and there is no doubt of their ability. 

The results of the tournament were as follows : 
Ham, '08, and Briggs, '07, defeated W. Drummond, 
'07. and J. Drummond, '07. Roberts, '07, and John- 
son, '06, defeated McMichael, '07, and Haines, '07. 
Linneli, '07, and Hughes, '09, defeated Robinson, '08, 
and Timberlake, '09. Clarke, '06, and Lombard, '09. 
defeated J. Woodruff, '06, and Soule, '06. 

In the semi-finals Roberts, '07, and Johnson, '06, 
defeated Briggs, '07, and Ham, '08. .Linneli, '07. 
and Hughes, '09, defeated Clark, '06, and Lombard, 
'09. 

In the final Roberts, '07, and Johnson, '06, defeated 
Linneli, '07, and Hughes. '09. Linneli and Hughes 
are entered as substitutes in both singles and 
doubles. 

The tournament to select the team which Bow- 
doin will enter against Vermont was to have been 
played yesterday. 

The Maine Tournament will open at Colby Mon- 
day forenoon. 



DAVID SEWALL PREMIUM 

The faculty have recently decided to award the 
sum of ten dollars known as the David Sewall 
Premium, to the member of the Freshman Class 
who shall hand in the best translation of an 
assigned passage from Latin. Greek, German, or 
French. The translation must be given to Profes- 
sor Mitchell on or before May 14, and the assigned 
passages are given below. The Sewall Premium 
has for several years been awarded "to members 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



39 



of the Sophomore Class for excellence in Oratory 
at their annual Prize Declamation," but it is 
changed this year owing to the receipt of the Alex- 
ander Prize in oratory, which will be open to com- 
petition among members of the three lower classes. 

The David Sewall Premium has a long history 
back of it, which it may be of interest to cite here. 
As early as November 4, 1795 (the fall after the 
incorporation of the college) a letter from Judge 
David Sewall was read at a meeting of the Boards. 
This letter enclosed ten dollars, and from a later 
letter, dated October 9, 1821 (and still preserved in 
the Treasurer's office) we learn that it was the 
Judge's purpose to establish an annual prize of ten 
dollars to be awarded to some undergraduate for 
excellence in oratory or as the college authorities 
should otherwise see fit. For this purpose Judge 
Sewall had at some time given the college a fund, 
the interest on which would furnish the prize 
money. In some way, however, this sum later dis- 
appeared from the Treasurer's books, and it was 
not until 1899 that the attention of the Boards was 
called to the omission. In 1899, accordingly, it was 
voted to withdraw from the general fund a suf- 
ficient amount to replace that lost, and it is with 
the interest on this money that the "David Sewall 
Premium" will be awarded next June. 

Judge Sewall himself was a man of some note. 
He received the degree of A.B. from Harvard in 
1755. later his Alma Mater gave him the degree of 
A.M., in 1812 Bowdoin presented him with an 
LL:D., and he served on our Board of Overseers 
from 1794-1815. He held at one time the position 
of Judge of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts, 
and he also served as United States District Judge 
of Maine. 

The assigned passages for translation this spring 
are as follows : 

Latin : Letter 51, "A Faithful Friend," in Port- 
land's "Selections from thfe Correspondence of 
Cicero." 

Greek: Odyssey, Book IV. Lines 219-331. 

German : Scheffel's "Ekkehard," Vbrwort, 
through the words "aus dem Gebiet unserer deut- 
schen Vergangenheit." 

French: Charles Rollin's "De l'Utilite de l'His- 
toire found in "La France Litteraire" (p. 405) by 
Herrig et Burguy. 

The French and German books are reserved in 
the Library. 



Hlumni personals 



HON. H. H. CHASE, '82. 

Hon. H. H. Chase, '82, a well-known law- 
yer in Brockton, Mass., and for some years 
judge of the police court, has recently 
removed to San Bernardino, Cal. The change 
was necessary on account of his wife's health 
and he will continue the practice of his profes- 
sion in the latter city. 

A. P. WISWELL, ys- AUSTIN CAREY, 
'87. 
Hon. A. P. Wiswell of Ellsworth, Hon. N. 
M. Jones of Bangor, and Austin Carey of 
Brunswick, were appointed delegates, by 
Governor Cobb, to attend the hearing to be 
held April 25, before the committee of the 
House of Representatives at Washington, D. 
C, on the matter of getting a forest reserve 
for the White Mountains and the Appalachian 
range. 



©bttuan? 

ELLIS R. DRAKE, D.D., '62. 
Rev. Ellis R. Drake, D.D., passed away at his 
home in Denver, Colorado, on March 10. His 
death was due to pneumonia, and though for sev- 
eral years he has been unable on account of his ill 
health to attend to his ecclesiastical duties, he is 
greatly mourned in Denver by the parish of the 
Villa Park Church, the pastorate of which he held 
from 1896 to 1902. Mr. Drake was a native of 
Maine, having been born at Garland, Maine, in 
1840. He graduated from Bowdoin in 1862, and 
for the next two years was principal of the Bluehill 
Academy. During this time he had been studying 
law, and was admitted to the Suffolk County 



SIXTH FRESHMAN DEBATE 

Debate for Division A on Wednesday. May 9, 
at 2.30 p.m.; for Division B on Thursday, May 10, 
at 8.30 a.m. Briefs and forensics due on Wednes- 
day. May 2. 

Question : Resolved, That the Southern negro 
should not have been given the right of suffrage. 

Division A: Affirmative: W. J. Crowley. Pike, 
Wight. Negative : Benner, P. H. Powers, Wake- 
field. 

Division B: Affirmative: Brewster, Merrill, 
Timberlake. Negative: A. L. Smith, Marsh, 
Thomas. 



See pie Hot a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
1906 man who will be in the market for a good, position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position von want and are 
fitted to All. I can give you full Information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign cointries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

A. S. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPQOOD'S 



40 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



(Mass.) bar. He practiced for only a short time, 
abandoning the law for the ministry. He attended 
the Andover Theological Seminary and graduated 
from there in 1868. Since then he has held pas- 
torates in the Congregational churches in Wayland, 
Middleboro, Quincy Point and East Northfield, 
Mass., and later in Eureka, Kan., and in Denver, 
Col., the latter place being his home at the time of 
his death. 

THOMAS M. GIVEEN, '63. '. 
Thomas M. Giveen, '63, died very suddenly, at 
his home in Topsham on the 28th of last month. 
Mr. Giveen was a prominent lawyer of this dis- 
trict, and for several years has acted as moderator 
at the Topsham town meetings. He was born in 
Brunswick in 1841, and received his early education 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 

PULSIFER'S 
5 AND 10 ©ERT ST0RE 

Now Open for Business. 
J. W. PULSIFER, - - MAINE STREET, BRUNSWICK 



at the Brunswick High School, the College du 
Havre, France, and Andover Academy. He then 
came to Bowdoin, graduated with the Class of 1863, 
and later received the degree of A.M. After leav- 
ing college he studied law in Portland, in 1867 was 
admitted to the bar, and in 1868 to practice in the 
United States Circuit and District Court. After 
practicing a few years in Portland, he returned to 
Brunswick, where he has remained for the last 32 
years. Besides several minor offices he has been 
Commissioner of the Supreme Court of Maine. He 
is survived by a wife and four children. 



S. P. ROBIE, 

LEWISTON, = JViaiNE 
FOB BEST 

Hats, Furnishings, Athletic Goods. 




THE MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Has a carefully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; Clinical Conferences; Modified Seminar Methods, and thoroughly Practical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest and finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every re.-pect, and the new laboratories are specially planned and equipped for individual work by the students. 
The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 
SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of Medicine. 




REPEATING SHOT GUN 
NEW MODEL N9I7 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By the omission of the take down feature we have 
been able to Sreauy reduce the cost of production and al the same tune have kept the gun up to the 
famous high 772ar/in standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
barrels are especially bored for smokeless, as well as black powder and so chambered that 2% inch or 
r IJ 1 J L may i ■ u • Sever^ improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 
reliable and best working gun in existence. We are glad to make it possible for every lover of guns 
and bird shoobng to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so low a price. 
Have your dealer order it for you. 

Send for the 27lai&n Catalogue and Experience Book to-day. Free for 3 stamps. 
TA^THai/i/l /%reaFmS Co. ( 42Willow Street, New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 18, 1906 



NO. 5 



X 



THE TRACK MEET 



The twelfth annual track meet of the four 
Maine colleges was won by the University of 
Maine on Garcelon Field, last Saturday, with 
a score of 51 points, to 39 for Bowdoin, 22 for 
, Bates and 14 for Colby. This is the second 
rtime that Bowdoin has lost the meet in the 
twelve years of track athletics in the State. 

While the outcome was something of a dis- 
appointment, it was not altogether a surprise. 
It had been felt from the first that the loss 
Bowdoin sustained in the graduation of Capt. 
Denning and Everett was one that could not 
be easily replaced and that the new material 
must come largely from the Freshman Class. 
That there was considerable new material 
there was no doubt, but it could not be 
sufficiently developed to secure many points 
was greatly feared, and the outcome of the 
meet justified the fear. 

There was a large attendance of college 
men and others. The entire Bowdoin student 
body turned out en masse, as did also the stu- 
dents from University of Maine, and Bates, 
together with a number from Colby. The 
day was pleasant, although somewhat cold, 
and with the presence of two bands, the occa- 
sion was one of interest and enthusiasm. 

But one record was broken at the meet. 
Bosworth of Bates, captured the two-mile race 
and succeeded in taking several seconds from 
the State record. Shorey for Bowdoin fought 
hard and had not his opponent taken such a 
long lead in the early part of the race, it is safe 
to say the contest at the finish would have 
been very close indeed. Capt. Tobey equalled 
the State record in the 120-yard hurdles in a 
great finish. 

Several of the events were hotly contested, 
but there was not much doubt as to the out- 
come of the meet after the early part of the 
day, as the trials showed that Maine had a 
fine team. Bowdoin fought hard, but one or 
two events in which somefhope was entertained, 
went to Maine, and after this there was no 
doubt as to the result. 

In the 100-yard dash, Doherty and Hanson 
of Bowdoin, and Porter and Harlow of Maine 



were qualified in the trials. In the final heat 
Porter was the winner, Doherty second and 
Hanson third. The race was a very interest- 
ing contest for second and third places, 
Doherty, Hanson and Harlow being very 
closely bunched at the finish. 

In the quarter St. Onge of Maine won out 
with Wyman second and Kimball of Bowdoin, 
third. This race was also an interesting con- 
test and was closely contested from the first. 
Kimball ran a fine race, leading a great por- 
tion of the distance, but was unable to retain 
his position in the stretch. 

In the mile Robinson and Shorey were \ 
again the winners for Bowdoin. In the hur- 
dles, Capt. Tobey of Bowdoin again won two 
first in splendid form. 

In the 22Q-yard dash Porter of Maine was 
the winner, while Doherty and Wyman had a 
great contest for second place, Doherty finally 
winning out. 

In the high jump, Meserve of Maine finally 
won out, with Pennell of Bowdoin and Hig- 
gins of Maine, tied for second place. Atwood 
and Thaxter jumped well but were unable to 
keep up. In the broad jump Currier of Maine 
won over Atwood of Bowdoin, while St. 
Onge of Maine, took third. 

In the pole vault Bates took first, to the sur- 
prise of all. This event had been conceded 
to Rogers of Maine, but Wiggin led him at 
the close. Skolfield of Bowdoin took third in 
a plucky fight. 

Nearly all the weight events went to Bates 
and Colby. Maine took three thirds, but the 
remaining points went to the other two col- 
leges. 

The summary of the meet was as follows : 

Half-Mile Run— Won by Bearce, Maine; Blair, 
Bowdoin, second ; Phillips. Bates, third. Time — 
2m. 10 1-5S. 

440- Yard Run — Won by St. Onge, Maine ; 
Wyman, Maine, second; Kimball, Bowdoin, third. 
Time — 52 2-5S. 

100- Yard Dash — Won by Porter, Maine ; Doherty, 
Bowdoin, second; Hanson, Bowdoin, third. Time — 
10 1-5S. 

Mile Run — Won by Shorey, Bowdoin ; Robinson, 
Bowdoin, second; Potter, Maine, third. Time — 4m. 
49 2-SS. 



42 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



120- Yard Hurdles — Won by Toby, Bowdoin ; 
Currier, Maine, second; Fraser, Bates, third. 
Time — 16 2-5S. 

220- Yard Hurdles — Won by Toby, Bowdoin ; 
Clayton. Maine, second; Harlow, Maine, third. 
Time — 26 I-Ss. 

Two-Mile Run — Won by Bosworth, Bates ; 
Shorey, Bowdoin, second ; Robinson. Bowdoin, 
third. Time — 10m. 24 2-5S. 

220-Yard Dash — Won by Porter, 'Maine; 
Doherty, Bowdoin, second ; Wyman, Maine, third. 
Time — 22 3-5S. 

Pole Vault — Won by Wiggin, Bates; Roger, 
Maine, second; Skolfield, Bowdoin, third. Height, 
10 ft. 4 in. 

Putting 16-lb. Shot — Won by Coombs. Colby ; 
Hietherington, Colby, second : Weymouth, Maine, 
third. Distance — 37 ft. 8 1-2 in. 

Running High Jump — Won by Meserve, Maine ; 
Higgins, Maine, and Pennell, Bowdoin, tied for 
second. Height — 5 ft. 6 7-8 in. 

Throwing Hammer, 16 lbs. — Won by Johnson, 
Bates ; Coombs, Colby, second ; Bennett, Maine, 
third. Distance — 108 ft. 6 3-4 in. 

The points were won as follows: 

Running Broad Jump — Won by Currier. Maine : 
Atwood, Bowdoin, second ; St. Onge. Maine, third. 
Distance — 20 ft. 8 in. 

Throwing Discus — Won by Johnson, Bates ; 
Hetherington, Colby, second ; Bennett, Maine, third. 
Distance, 108 ft. 6 3-4 in. 

Maine Bowdoin Bates Colby 

Half-mile run 5 3 1 

440-yard dash 8 1 o o 

100-yard dash 5 4 o o 

One-mile run 1 8 o o 

120-yard hurdles 3 5 I o 

220-yard hurdles 4500 

Two-mile run o 4 5 

220-yard dash 6 3 o o 

Pole vault 3 1 s o 

Putting the shot 1 o o 8 

Throwing hammer 1053 

Running broad jump 6300 

Running high jump 7200 

Throwing discus 1053 

Totals 51 39 22 14 

The officials were Eugene Buckley of Boston, ref- 
eree ; H. A. Wing of Lewiston, W. W. Bolster, Jr., 
of Auburn, E. A. Parker of Skowhegan, judges at 
finish; H. L. Swett of Skowhegan, clerk of course; 
A. K. Lewis of Bath, marshal ; A. L. Grover of 
Orono, F. N. Whittier of Brunswick. E. Rice o^f 
Fairfield, timekeepers; A. C. MacReadie of Port- 
land, starter ; E. T. Clayson of South Paris, E. A. 
Stanford of Orono. measurers for field events, and 
E. C. Lane of Lewiston, and W. D. Hurd of Orono, 
judges for field events. 



leges. Bowdoin has particularly strong men 
this year in Tobey and Paine, both of whom 
are veterans at the sport. 

The summary of the doubles was as fol- 
lows : 

Preliminaries — Guptill and Dunn, Colby, beat 
Mitchell and Jewett, Maine, 9-7. 8-6. Lovett and 
Tabor. Maine, beat Palmer and Stevens, Colby, 7-5, 
6-4. Tobey and Paine, Bowdoin, beat Salley and 
Fisher, Bates, 7-5, 6-4. Jordan and Austin, Bates, 
beat Roberts and Johnson. Bowdoin, 6-4, 6-4. 

Semi-Finals. — Tobey and Paine, Bowdoin, beat 
Guptill and Dunn, Colby, 6-3, 6-4. Lovett and 
Tabor, Maine, beat Jordan and Austin, Bates, 6-3, 
8-6. 

Final Round — Tobey and Paine, Bowdoin, beat 
Lovett and Tabor, Maine, 6-1. 6-1, 6-0. 

The summary of the singles was as fol- 
lows : 

Toby of Bowdoin defeated Jordan of Bates, 6-2 
6-0. 

Lovett of Maine defeated Stevens of Colby, 6-0 
6-2. 

Tabor of Maine defeated Palmer of Colby, 6-3 
6-3- 

Paine of Bowdoin defeated Austin of Bates, 3-6 
6-4; 7-5- 

In the first match of the semi-final round 
Toby of Bowdoin defeated Lovett of Maine, 
7-5 ; 6-4. 

The second match of the semi-final round 
was won by Paine of Bowdoin who defeated 
Tabor of Maine, 6-4 ; 9-7. 

This gave the tournament to Bowdoin with- 
out the necessity of playing the final round, 
and Bowdoin retains possession permanently 
of the cup in singles, this being the third year 
it has been won by that college. This closed 
the tournament. A match between- Paine and 
Toby of Bowdoin to determine the champion- 
ship of the State in singles will be played at 
Brunswick later. 



TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIP 

Bowdoin won the Maine college tennis 
championship at Waterville on Monday and 
Tuesday of this week, the team defeat- 
ing the men representing the other Maine col- 



BASEBALL 

Colby, 7; Bowdoin, 6. 

Bowdoin lost its game with Colby on 
Wednesday of last week by a score of 7 to 6. 
The attendance was the largest of the year 
and the enthusiasm was at a pitch seldom seen 
at a baseball game. Colby was accompanied 
by the greater part of the student body, and a 
band, the party arriving in Brunswick by spe- 
cial train shortly before 2 o'clock. A large 
number of baseball lovers from various parts 
of the State, were also present. 

The game 1 was not especially well played 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



43 



because of the high wind that blew across the 6, Bowdoin 13. Base on balls — Off Coombs 

field, which made fast fielding very difficult. 2, off Files 5. Base on errors — Colby 6, 

As a result of this, both sides made a large Bowdoin 5. Hit by pitched balls — Abbott 2, 

number of errors. The feature of the game Dwyer 1. Time — 1.47. Umpire — Carrigan. 
was the batting of the Bowdoin team, the team 

securing 12 singles with a total of 15 off Bowdoin, 5 ; Andover, 2. 

Coombs' delivery. , . ... , , 

Colby secured a lead in the early part of the Bowdoin defeated Andover, Wednesday 

game and kept it throughout. Bowdoin, on afternoon, by the score of 5 to 2. The Orient 

the other hand, gained in the later innings, and wl11 & lve a more ful1 account next week. 

several times it seemed as though the score 

would be tied. At these critical times, how- HARVARD SECOND GAME CANCELLED 

ever, Colby steadied down and at the end the 

visitors lead by a single score. Manager Wilson has received notice from 

Files pitched a fine game for Bowdoin, the Harvard management that the Second 

despite the high wind, while the hitting of the team will be unable to play here on June 2, 

whole team was most commendable. Coombs as had been arranged. The reason given is 

pitched well for Colby at critical times, despite that the date comes in the midst of their 

the way the Bowdoin batsmen hit during the examinations and the Athletic Council of the 

greater part of the contest. Shaw, at center, college has refused to permit the men to leave, 

played a fine game for Colby, his catches not Manager Wilson is endeavoring to secure 

only being brilliant, but coming just at the another game, but the lateness of the season 

times when hits meant runs. makes it a difficult task. 

The summary : 

Colby, 

ab r eh po a e ENGLISH 7 AT NEW MEADOWS 

Tribou, If 5 o 1 1 o o The first annual banquet of the Debating 

Dwyer, c 4 1 o 13 o o Council was held at New Meadows Inn last 

Craig, 3b 5 1 o 2 1 1 Tuesday evening and proved a most delight- 
Coombs, p 4 2 1 o 1 o ful ocassion. Nearly all the members of the 

Willey, ib.... 4 2 2 5 o 1 course were present and after a fine shore 

niton, 2b .... 4 1 3 o 1 o dinner had been enjoyed, came the after-din- 
Shaw, cf. .... . 400301 ner speaking. All of the speakers acquitted 

Reynolds, ss. . 4 o o 3 1 3 themselves with great credit. The prepara- 

Palmer, rf . . . . 4 o 1 o o o tion and delivery of the speeches is a part of 

— — — — — — the regular work in the course. George C. 

Totals 38 7 8 27 4 6 Soule, '06, presided as toast-master, and the 

„ following toasts were responded to : 

Bowdoin. ° L 

AT! R BH PO A E "My Noblest Tribute to English 7," 

Blair, 2b 6 10200 ,.„. M .«,..- fr L. M. Erskine 

a 1 , . the Moral Significance of Football, 

Abbott, c 412730 G. U. Hatch 

Stanwood, 3b. . 5 I I 3 I I "Bowdoin Men in Public Life," C. J. Fernald 

Files, p 5 O I O 5 O "The Advantages of Being a Failure in Athletics," 

Greene lb a i i 10 2 1 R A - Burton 

tt , ' "J U : "The Honor System in College," M.P.Merrill 

liougson ss. . . 5 O I I 3 5 -Lessons from the Bowdoin-Clark Debate," 

Sparks, rf 5 I 3 I o O R. H. Hupper 

Bower, cf 502200 "For a Democratic College Spirit," P. Kimball 

McDade, If.... 5 I I 1 o O "Bowdoin Beata." 

— — — — — — "English 6 and 7," F. J. Weed 
Totals 44 6 12 27 14 7 "Bowdoin's Athletic Policy," F J Redman 

' ^ ' The Quill, C. W. Snow 

Earned runs — Colby 1, Bowdoin 3. Two- "Familiar Crustaceans," A. B. Roberts 

base hits— Willey, Sparks 2, McDade. Three- i;X he ° ther Fellow," C. W. Hawkesworth 

base hit— Tilton. Stolen 'bases-Coombs, 0ur Future m Intercollegiate Debating ^^ 

Willey, Files, Bower. Left on bases — Colby '"Phi Chi." 



44 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 



H. E. WILSON, lgo7 R. H. HUPPER, 1908 

H. E. MITCHELL, lgc.7 R. A. LEE, 1908 

W. S. LINNELL, 1907 H. H. BURTON, igog 

A. L. ROBINSON, 1908 J. S. STAHL, 1909 

A. L. JONES, Medical 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 
N. S. Weston, 1908 



Business Manager 
Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 



Entered at Post-Office at B 



. Second-Class Mail Matter 



Lewiston Journal Press 



MAY 18, 1906 



The Orient would sug- 
Track Team "B's" gest to the consideration 

of the Athletic Council 
the matter of granting "B's" to members of 
the track team that take third place in the 
annual State meets. It is certainly true that 
the time has come in Maine College athletics 
when to take third place deserves its reward. 
In years past, when Bowdoin took nearly all 
the points in the meets, it was perfectly cor- 
rect that only the first and second men should 
be given their letter. Now, however, the sit- 
uation is vastly different. The three other 
colleges, as shown by the recent meet, are 
more and more inclined to enter into track 
activities, and to gain a third, in view of this 
situation, is something that would seem to 
entitle any man to a "B." 

The track man receives the smallest 
amount of pleasure of any athlete. Few of 



them get more than one trip a year, and that a 
short one. He is obliged to train more than 
any other athlete. And more than that, his 
contest is not of the pleasurable kind of the 
baseball or football player. His game is one 
of nervous strain and tension almost as much 
as ability in the sport. He fights alone and 
the matter of "nerve" is a big factor. In most 
cases it is also the hardest kind of work. 
Who struggles more for his college than the 
man in the mile or two-mile run or even the 
dashes ? The man who secures a point in 
them under present conditions certainly 
deserves recognition. 

Track is becoming of more and more inter- 
est in the college world, and for this, as well 
as for many other reasons, it would seem that 
the man who secures even one point should 
be remembered. 



The loss of the track meet 
The Track Meet was something of a dis- 
appointment to many who 
had cherished hopes of a victorious team. To 
those familiar with the situation, however, the 
outcome was no great surprise. With the 
losses Bowdoin sustained by graduation last 
June, and with the men our opponent had been 
developing for the past two years, the result 
could not have been different. Bowdoin can- 
not expect to win every meet without a break, 
and we may well feel proud of our past record, 
and feel sure that next year our team will be 
stronger than was that of this year. 



One of the nuisances 
Concerning Dogs about the college at the 
present time is the pres- 
ence of dogs. There are several of these four- 
legged students who seem determined on 
taking a college course whether they are 
properly admitted or not. Hardly a day 
goes by but what one or more of them 
appears in chapel or class-room and often 
they prove themselves a disturbing element in 
a way that is neither entertaining nor interest- 
ing. It is hard to suggest a remedy for this 
nuisance other than a shotgun, and even that 
might not be proper in the case of dogs 
belonging to people who really try to care for 
their pets. 

The fact is that in many instances the dogs 
or their owners are not to blame. Fellows 
about college take pleasure in speaking to the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



45 



dogs and encourage them to enter class. 
The result is, the canine thinks himself highly 
popular in college and immediately resolves to 
take a course at Bowdoin. Was the college 
intended to be a training school for canines, 
this attitude would be highly commendable. 
As it is, the wisest thing in this connection is 
to cease treating the dogs with all the favors 
of a sub-Freshman. Dogs are agreeable com- 
pany in their place, but that is certainly not in 
chapel or the class room, and students should 
bear this in mind. 



_ . Despite the outcome of the 

ennis track meet and the some- 

Charap.onship what gloomy baseball 
prospects, Bowdoin can find some consolation 
in the outcome of the tennis meet at Water- 
ville, in which our team scored a signal vic- 
tory. The work of the men was highly com- 
mendable and the Orient congratulates both 
the members of the team and the college. 
The victory gives Bowdoin permanent pos- 
session of the cup for singles, which it obtains 
as a result of having won the championship 
for three successive years. The cup for 
doubles will be held temporarily at least, Colby 
having had that honor in the past two years. 



Interscholastic 
Meet 



The attention of the stu- 
dents should be called to 
the annual Interscholastic 
Meet, which will take place on the Whittier 
Field one week from to-morrow. As in the 
past, this will be the day of all the year for 
the entertainment of preparatory school men, 
and the students should make preparations to 
give the visitors a good time on the occasion 
of their visit. 

It is not known at present just how many 
schools will be represented. Five will 
certainly be on hand, and it is probable that 
there may be others. Those who are certain 
to send teams are Bar Harbor, Portland, 
Westbrook Seminary, Coburn Classical Insti- 
tute, and Hebron Academy. It is also possi- 
ble that Kent's Hill and Brunswick High will 
be represented. 

BATES FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

Sept. 22 — Fort Preble at Lewiston. 
Sept. 29 — Exeter at Exeter. 
Oct. 6— Hebron at Lewiston. 



Oct. 10 — Harvard at Cambridge. 

Oct. 20 — Colby at Waterville. 

Oct. 27 — Bowdoin at Brunswick. 

Nov. 3 — N. H. State College at Lewiston. 

Nov. 10 — U. of M. at Lewiston. 



Coll ege B otes 

Piper, '07, is visiting his home this week. 

Senior marching began last Monday noon. 

The Second team will play at Kent's Hill 
to-morrow. 

Bowdoin vs. Bates on the Garcelon Field, 
to-morrow afternoon. 

Frank Clark of Fort Fairfield visited friends 
at the college last week. 

Rupert M. Much, '05, who is now in New 
York, has recently visited in this vicinity. 

The Bates baseball team played the Holy 
Name nine at Portland, last Wednesday. 

A number of trees have recently been set 
out on Maine Street just west of the college. 

Arrangements have been made for make-up 
work in Chemistry 2 to-day and again the first 
of the week. 

An opportunity is being offered to make up 
gym. work this week between the hours of 5 
and 6 p.m. 

The members of the tennis team returned to 
Brunswick, Tuesday night, after their victory 
at Waterville. 

On May 16, the Class in Education visited 
the schools of Portland, and took dinner at 
Riverton Park. 

Hichborn, '07, has been at his home in 
Augusta for the past ten days, where he is 
confined by illness. 

Adjourns were given in the Freshmen 
English classes the latter part of the week 
because of the absence of Professor Mitchell. 

Fryeburg Academy played Leavitt Institute 
on the Whittier Field last Saturday afternoon. 
The former team was victorious by a score of 
7 to o. 

The ball team left on the 8 o'clock train, 
Wednesday morning, for Andover. Beside 
the regular members of the team, Morrell, '09, 
and Hayes, '08, were taken as substitutes. 
The former was taken as pitcher, in case 
Sparks was unable to pitch either game. 



46 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



H. D. Evans, '01, will speak before the 
Chemical Club this evening at the Beta Theta 
Pi house. His subject will be "Drinking 
Water." 

Ralph G. Webber, '06, was in Portland last 
Saturday, where he represented the Bowdoin 
Y. M. C. A. at the State Convention held in 
that city. ' 

W. B. Webb, '05, now in the employ of the 
International Banking Co., passed Sunday at 
the college. He was also present at the track 
meet Saturday. 

The Brunswick basketball team played the 
alumnae of the High School in the Armory 
Hall on Thursday evening. It was the last 
game for the season. 

A meeting of the Athletic Council was held 
Wednesday evening, to decide how many men 
could go to Worcester on the funds at the dis- 
posal of the manager. 

A large half-tone picture of the Alpha Delta 
Phi convention delegates, which was taken at 
the Art building, appeared in the Lewiston 
Journal of last Monday. 

Folders giving the exercises of Commence- 
ment Week have been printed for the use of 
Seniors and friends of the college and may be 
obtained at the library. 

Doubtless a number of students will go to 
Lewiston, to-morrow, to witness the Bates- 
Bowdoin game. It is expected that Files will 
do the pitching for Bowdoin. 

Professor Baker of Harvard will speak 
before an open iheeting of the debating course 
in Hubbard Hall next Wednesday afternoon. 
His subject will be "Debating." 

Junior marching was resumed last Monday 
after a suspension of several days, because of 
the removal of the piano from Memorial Hall, 
dishing, '09, is acting as pianist. 

Peaslee of the Medical School, has recently 
returned to college after an absence of nearly 
ten weeks at his home in Thomaston, where 
he has been detained because of illness. 

A meeting of the Athletic Council was held 
on Wednesday of last week. The most impor- 
tant business was the consideration of the 
report of the manager of the baseball team. 

The playing of the tournament for the 
selection of the tennis team to represent Bow- 
doin at Burlington next week, was completed 
Thursday, but the Orient was unable to 
obtain the final results in time for publication. 



Miss Sue Winchell of Brunswick, Maine's 
well-known 'cellist, will play with the 
Fadettes, the leading woman's musical organ- 
ization of this country, for the summer season 
at Keith's, Boston. 

Hon. H. M. Heath, '72, of Augusta, 
addressed the members of the debating course, 
last evening, on the subject of public speak- 
ing. The medals to the members of the vic- 
torious debating team were presented at this 
time. 

The Richer Classical Institute baseball team 
is scheduled to play the Second team on Whit- 
tier Field, Monday. This school has one of 
the strongest preparatory school teams in the 
State, and it is hoped that there will be a good 
attendance. 

To-morrow evening and Monday evening, 
the Committee on Commencement Parts will 
listen to their reading in Hubbard Hall, and 
will decide upon the best ones. Those on the 
committee are Professors Moody, Foster, and 
Allen Johnson. 

Workmen have been engaged in drilling the 
paint off the chapel steps, where some Fresh- 
man who had more time than brains had seen 
fit to paint his class numerals. The trick 
comes the nearest to the act of an imbecile of 
anything done about college for a long time. 

Effort is being made to secure enough 
names to warrant the production of "The 
Rivals" the night before Ivy, and it is believed 
that a sufficient number may be secured. If 
this is not done, there is some talk of arrang- 
ing a joint concert of the Bowdoin and Colby 
Glee Clubs on that evening. 

Sparks, '09, pitcher and outfielder on the 
baseball team, is having a somewhat painful 
experience with his arm, which was recently 
injured by a pitched ball in practice. He 
accompanied the team on the Andover trip of 
this week, but at the time of departure it was 
thought very doubtful if he could pitch either 
game. He had been scheduled to pitch the 
Andover game. 

On Tuesday and on the following two or 
three evenings, the Committee on the Alexan- 
der Prize Speaking will listen to the rehearsals 
of the various pieces, and will decide upon 
the men who will compete for the prize dur- 
ing Commencement Week. Those on this 
committee are: Professor Woodruff, Profes- 
sor Mitchell and Mr. Smith. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



47 



The subject of Prof. George P. Baker's lec- 
ture in Memorial Hall next Wednesday even- 
ing, will be "Shakespeare's England." The 
lecture is given under the auspices of the Ibis, 
but will be public. 

Manager Voorhees of the track team is 
busily engaged in making arrangements for 
the annual Interscholastic Meet, which is to be 
held on Whittier Field, May 26. So far he 
has received responses from five schools 
which have signified their intentions of send- 
ing teams, with the possibility of two others. 

Several fraternity baseball games have been 
played of late. The Alpha Delta Phi Frater- 
nity were defeated by the Beta Theta Pi men 
last Wednesday by the score of 7 to 1 1 on the 
Delta. Last Monday the A. D.'s defeated the 
D. K. E. nine by a score of 21 to 9. Wednes- 
day the team again met the "Dekes" winning, 
33 to 6. 

Three members of the debating course will 
speak at preparatory schools to-day. They 
are Linnell, '07, who will speak at Thornton 
Academy on the subject of "School Spirit;" 
Snow, '07, who will speak at Bath on the sub- 
ject of the "Congo Free State," and Roberts, 
'07, who will speak at Yarmouth on the sub- 
ject of "Luther Burbank." 

The arrangements for Ivy Day are being 
perfected by the committee in charge. The 
events of the day will not be different from 
those of past years. There will be the Colby 
game in the forenoon and the literary exer- 
cises, and Senior's last chapel in the after- 
noon, concluding with the Ivy hop in the even- 
ing. Pullen's Orchestra will again furnish 
music, this year. 



FACULTY NOTES 

Prof. Henry Johnson last Tuesday evening 
attended a meeting of "The Dante Club" 
which was held at the house of Mr. Charles 
E. Norton of Cambridge, Mass. 

Professor Chapman will on May 26, deliver 
the address at the dedication of the B. H. 
Bartol Library, a Carnegie building, at Free- 
port. Professor Little will attend the dedica- 
tion. 

Prof. Robinson will lecture at Machias 
to-night under the auspices of the Machias 
High School. He will leave for Washington, 
D. C, Sunday, for a few days' absence. 

No adjourns were given last Saturday, but 



the attendance in all of the classes was very 
small. 

Tennis is becoming more and more popular 
as the term progresses. It is difficult to find 
a vacant court about college on pleasant after- 
noons. 



SOPHOMORE THEMES 

The fourth theme of the semester for Soph- 
omores not taking English 4 will be due, 
Tuesday, May 22. The subjects are as fol- 
lows : 

1. The Importance of Good Second Teams 
in College Athletics. 

2. Should College Property Be Taxed? 

3. Prizes in College Work. 

4. Is it Justifiable for Members of Trades 
Unions to Refuse to Work with Non-Union 
Men? 

5. Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice." 



$23,000 FOR BOWDOIN 

By the filing of the will of the late Dr. 
Charles M. Cumston, last week, it was shown, 
that he had remembered his Alma Mater with 
a gift of $23,000. Dr. Cumston was one 
of Bowdoin's most loyal alumni. It is under- 
stood that the money is to be used for scholar- 
ships for needy students. 



PLEASING REMEMBRANCE 

The College Treasurer has just received a 
check for $400, which is the second annual 
contribution by the Class of 1894, to the 
income of the College. This is to represent 
the interest at 4 per cent, on $10,000, and is 
pledged for five years. 

The Class of '94 sets a good example well 
worthy of imitation. 



FOR THE NEW ENGLAND MEET 

The team that will represent Bowdoin in 
the New England meet left on the 8 o'clock 
train yesterday morning, for Brookline, Mass., 
where the meet will be held on the Tech. 
grounds for the first time. 

But five men were taken, because of the 
small amount of money at the disposal of the 
manager. They were Capt. Toby, Dorothy, 
Robinson, Shorey, and Kimball. 



48 



BOWDOIN .ORIENT 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, MAY l8TH. 

2.30 p.m. Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

President Hyde lectures at Pittsfield, Me 

Professors Ham, Foster and Mitchell attend meet- 
ings at Auburn in afternoon and evening. 

Trials for New England Intercollegiate Athletic 
Meet at Tech. Field, Brookline, Mass. 

"Sweet Clover" at Empire Theatre, Lewiston. 

SATURDAY, MAY IC,TH. 

Championship baseball game with Bates at Lew- 
iston. 

Second team plays Kent's Hill at Kent s Hill. 

Professors Ham and Mitchell attend meetings at 
Auburn, in morning. 

Finals in New England Intercollegiate Athletic 
Association meet at Brookline, Mass. 

7.15 p.m. Rehearsals of Commencement Parts in 
Hubbard Hall. 

"Utah" at Empire Theatre, Lewiston. 

SUNDAY, MAY 20TH. 

5.00 P M. Song by quartet at chapel. 

MONDAY, MAY 2IST. 

Tennis tournament with University of Vermont 
at Burlington. . , T 

Second team plays Ricker Classical Institute on 
Whittier Field. 

6.30 p.m. Meeting of Aroostook Club at JNew 
Meadows Inn. 

715 p.m. Rehearsals of Commencement Parts in 
Hubbard Hall. 

TUESDAY, MAY 22D 

2.30 p.m. Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

Tennis tournament with University of Vermont, 
at Burlington. . 

Trials for Alexander Prize Speaking m Hubbard 
Hall. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 23D. 

Tennis tournament with University of Vermont 
at Burlington. 

Championship baseball game with Maine at 
Orono. 

Second team plays Lewiston High School on 
Whittier Field. 

3.30 p.m Professor Baker of Harvard, addresses 
an open meeting of English 7, in Hubbard Hall, on 
"Debating." 

8.00 p.m. Prof. Baker delivers a stereopticon 
lecture on "Shakespeare's London." This lecture is 
given in Memorial Hall under the auspices of *he 
Ibis. 

Nance O'Neill at Empire, Lewiston. 

THURSDAY, MAY 24TH. 

2.30 p.m Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 
Nance O'Neill at Empire, Lewiston. 

FRIDAY, MAY 25TH. 

2.30 p.m. Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

C. W. Snow, '07, speaks before Bath High School 
on "Congo Free State." 

W. S. Linnell. '07, speaks at Thornton Academy 
on "School Spirit." 



A. B. Roberts, '07, speaks at Yarmouth Academy 
on "Luther Burbank." 

Chemical Club meets at Beta Theta Pi house. 
Evans, '01, speaks on "Drinking Water." 

SATURDAY, MAY 26TH. 

Prof. Chapman delivers address at dedication of 
Freeport Library. 

Championship baseball game with Colby, at 
Waterville. 

Second team plays Fryeburg Academy at Frye- 
burg. 

Interscho.lastic Athletic Meet on Whittier Field. 

"Fihilla Romana" at Empire Theatre, Lewiston. 



NOTICE 

A notice has just been received by Professor 
Woodruff stating that there is to be a dress 
rehearsal of the annual Harvard Greek Play on 
June 14 at 2.30 p.m. This rehearsal will be given 
outdoors in the stadium, as will the regular per- 
formance on June 16 and 19. (In case of rain the 
rehearsal will be postponed until June 15, and the 
other performances until the 18th and 19th.) No 
seats will be reserved at the dress rehearsal, but 
tickets admitting to any part of the enclosed por- 
tion of the stadium, will be sold at the entrance 
for one dollar each. Such tickets may be obtained 
before June 10, by writing to Dr. George H. Chase, 
24 Grays Hall, Cambridge, Mass., enclosing the 
price of the tickets, and an addressed, stamped 
envelope. Attention is called to the fact that this 
rehearsal comes the day after the Bowdoin-Harvard 
game. For further information in regard to the 
plays see Harvard Graduates' Magazine for March. 



ART BUILDING NOTES 

Thursday, April 26, at 4 o'clock, although 
it was a holiday, a number of people attended 
the ninth musical recital. The general topic 
was "The Waltz," and the very enjoyable pro- 
gram arranged by Dr. Mason was as follows : 

1. Symphonie Pathetique Finale. — Tschai- 

kowski. 

2. Valse de Concert. — Wieniawski. 

3. Valse de Juliette. — Gounod-Raff. 

4. Valse Poetique. — Gdttschalk. 

5. Valse Mignonne. — Moszkowski. 

6. Valse de Concert. — Wieniawski. 

7. S. Puritani, Fantaisie. — Sidney Smith. 

This recital was not repeated in the evening, 
because many of the students were away, but 
was given again on Sunday afternoon at 3.30. 

A circular has recently been received at the 
Art Building, containing an outline of the 
work of an Art School which is to be carried 
on at Boothbay Harbor, from July 9 to August 
11. Classes in painting, dancing, and applied 
desien will be held under the instruction of 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



49 



Mr. Henneman, a Belgian artist, Mr. A. G. 
Randall, Dartmouth, '92, and Mrs. Randall, 
Pratt Institute, 1900. Further information 
can be obtained by consulting the circular, or 
addressing Mr. Randall at Fitchburg, Mass. 

On Thursday, May third, Dr. Mason gave 
the tenth and fast of the series of musicals to 
be given in the Art Building. The general 
topic of the musical was the concert, and the 
excellent program arranged and played by Dr. 
Mason was as follows : 

1. Danse Creole. — Chaminade. 

2. Concerto in A Minor. — Grieg. 

(a) Allegro, molto moderato. 

(b) Adagio. 

(c) Allegro Marcato. 

3. Concerto in C Minor. — Beethoven. 

Allegro con Brio. 

4. Grande Valse. — Chopin. 

Many thanks are due to Dr. Mason for so 
kindly arranging for, and playing these 
recitals in the absence of Prof. Hutchins, who 
started what may now be called the custom of 
having such a series of musicals every year. 
The college also is indebted to the kindness 
of Messrs. Cressey and Allen for the loan of 
the excellent Ivers and Pond Princess Grand 
Piano, and Cecilian Piano-Player that have 
been used in the Art Building this winter. 

The Art Building has recently received thtee 
samples of Loess from the cave-dwellers' 
houses in Houan, and one sample of brick and 
mortar taken from the great wall of China at 
Shan-hai-kuan. These specimens are the 
Sfifts of Mr. Charles F. Gammon of Tien 
Tsin, who used to reside in Portland, Maine, 
and who has already presented the Art Build- 
ing with a collection of articles taken in China 
during the Boxer uprising. 

There was recently on exhibition in the 
Bowdoin Gallery, an exceptionally good col- 
lection of 78 photographs illustrating all the 
masterpieces of John S. Sargent, R. A. These 
photographs were loaned by the Library Art 
Club, and remained on exhibition until 
May 14. 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



See pie Hut a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
1906 man who will be in the market for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

A. S. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPQOOD'S 

jflfc S. P. ROBIE, 

LEWISTON, = MKINE 



<gjj§RH_ 

FOB BEST 

Hats, Furnishings, Athletic Goods. 

PULSIFER'S 
5 AND 10 GEHT ST0RE 

Now Open for Business. 
J. W. PULS1FER, - - MAINE STREET, BRUNSWICK 

For Your Summer Vacation 

Why not make it profitable to you if you need the money? If 
you do not need the money, you will want something extra, and 
you might as well earn a fit tie something. Experience does not 
count. Jf you are honest and industrious and really in earnest, 
we will stand by you and help you to a handsome income. 
There is more than an ordinary living in this. You can make 
more than your next season's college expenses. We give you 
full instructions and furnish you with an outfit at cost, money to 
be refunded you when you turn in the outfit, so that you are 
virtually running no risk whatever. You will be your own 
master or mistress of your own time and movements. When 
you wish to work, you can work with the energy and spirit of 
one who is his own employer. You can make $3.00 per day 
and upward above all expenses. Communicate with us at once. 

THE CLEVIS CLEVER CUTTER CO., 

FREMONT, OHIO 

Yale University 

SOn SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 

A seven weeks' course in Forestry at Milford, Pike County, 
Pa., under the direction of the Faculty of Yale Forest School. 
Sixth annual session opens July 5, 1906. Designed for students 
considering forestry as a profession, those about to enter the 
lumber business, ownersof woodlots, etc. 
For further information address 

Prof. Henry S. Graves, New Haven, Conn. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




Profitable 
Vacation Work 



Canvassers wanted to sell the I. M. E. Gas-Heated 
Flatiron. No gas user, whether a young man, young 
woman, or householder, can afford to be without it. 
Working alone or in a force of five or six in each town 
you can make $4.50 to $9.00 per day. Write at once to 

Central Mfg. Co., Binghamton, N. Y. 



Bowdoin Calendars 

OH SALE at HALF PI^ICE 

(50 Cents) 

WOODRUFF, '06, or 
BYHON STEVENS' BOOKSTORE 



THE MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Has ;i carefully grailetl course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; Clinical Conferences; Mnililieci Seminar Methods, and thoroughly Practical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest and finest in the world, the hospital is newlv reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every respect, and the new laboratories are specially planned and equipped for 'individual work by the students. 

The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of 'Pharmacy. For announcements or furtlier information apply to 
SENECA EGBERT, M.Q., Dean of the Department of Medicine. 




2fflar/£zi 



REPEATING SHOT GUN 
NEW MODEL M 17 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By theomission of the take down feature we have 
been able to sreauy reduce the cost of production and at the same time have kept the gun up to the 
famous high Martin standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
s are especially bored for smokeless as well as black powder and so chambered that 2% inch or 
Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 
ake it, possible for every lover of suns 



j may be 

reliable and best working gun in existence. " We =.,. 
nd bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at s 
— z your dealer order it for you. 



Ha 



low i. 



Send for the Zfiaz&n Catalogue and Experience Book to-day. Free for 3 stamps. 

7j2e2ffiarf/fi firearms da,42wnw street. New Haven, a. 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 25, 1906 



NO. 6 



BASEBALL 

Bowdoin, 6; Bates, i. 

Bowdoin won the third game of the Maine 
College series at Lewiston last Saturday, 
defeating Bates by the score of 6 to 1 in an 
interesting game. 

Bowdoin played fast ball from the first, the 
team showing up in the best form of the 
season, and playing a remarkable game in both 
fielding • and hitting. The latter was the 
feature of the contest, the team connecting 
with Johnson for 13 hits, a large portion of 
which were bunched. The work of Abbott, 
Files, Bower and Greene was particularly 
strong in this department. 

Files pitched, and, as usual, played a splen- 
did game. The fielding of the team was of 
the best, the work of the entire infield being 
as near perfect as one could ask. The out- 
field also played in its usual fast form. 

The game was a very close contest during 
the first six innings. Bates got one run in 
the first inning, and Bowdoin secured one in 
her half of the second. In the seventh, how- 
ever, Bowdoin began her batting. With two 
men retired, Bower singled, stole second and 
scored on a three-bagger by Abbott. 

In the eighth Bowdoin secured another run. 
Sparks singled, followed by another by Greene. 
Hodgson reached first in a fielder's choice and 
Sparks took third, after which Blair singled, 
scoring Sparks. In the ninth three more runs 
were secured on clean hitting and good all- 
round playing. Bowdoin secured three sin- 
gles and a triple in this inning. 

The summary : 



Bowdoin. 



Abbott, c 5 

Stanwood, 3b 4 

Files, p 5 

Sparks, rf 5 

Greene, lb 5 

Hodgdon, ss 4 

Blair. 2b 4 

Bower, cf 4 

McDade, If 3 

Totals 39 



Bates, 

ab r bh po a e 

Boothby, c 4 o o 10 4 o 

Wilder, ss 4 ° 2 1 3 I 

Bowman, irf 4 I I I o o 

Austin, If 4 o 2 I I 

Kendall, 2b 4 o 1 4 o o 

Jordan, 3b 4 o 1 o 2 o 

Rogers, cf 3 o 1 2 o o 

Connqr, lb 3 o o 8 o 1 

Johnson, p 3 o o o 2 o 

Totals 33 1 8 27 12 2 

Bowdoin 1 o o o o 1 1 3 — 6 

Bates 1 o o o o o o o o — 1 

Earned runs — Bowdoin, 3. Two-base hit — Wilder. 
Three-base hits — Abbott. Piles, Austin. Stolen 
bases — Files, Blair, Bower, Austin, Kendall, Jor- 
dan . Double play — Hodgdon to. Blair to Greene. 
Base on balls — Off Johnson 1, off Files I. Struck 
out — By Johnson, 11 ; by Files, 4. Passed balls — 
Btoothby, 2. Time — (1.45. Umpire — Oarrigan. 



13 27 15 



Bowdoin, 5 ; Andover, 2. 

Bowdoin won its game from Andover on 
Wednesday of last week by a score of 5 to 3. 
Bowdoin played a fine all-round game, field- 
ing in good form and hitting the Andover 
pitcher very effectively. 

The summary: 

Bowdoin. 

ab r bh po a e 

Abbott, c 4 1 2 6 o 1 

Stanwood, 3b 4 1 1 2 I o 

Files, p 4 o 2 o 1 o 

Sparks, rf 3 o 1 o o o 

Greene, lb 3 o I 10 o o 

Hodgson, ss 4 o o 2 4 2 

Blair, 2b...., 4 I 2 I 3 o 

Bower, cf 4 o 1 5 o o 

McDade.. If 3 2 1 1 o o 

Totals 33 5 11 27 9 3 

Andover. 

ab r bh po a e 

Clow, If 4 1 1 1 o 1 

Lannigan, rf 4 o 1 o o o 

B. Reiley, 2b 4 I I 2 5 o 

Fels, ss 4 o o 2 3 o 

Murphy, cf 4 o o 5 2 o 

Gunning, lb 3 o o 9 o 

Merritt, 3b 300230 

Hennessey, c 3 o I 6 1 1 

J. Reiley, p 3 o o o o o 

TJotals 32 2 4 27 14 2 



52 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Bowdoin o o 2 o 3 o o o o — 5 

Andover o 1 o o o o o 1 — 2 

Three-base hits — Abbott, Stanwood, Bower, Lan- 
nigan. Two-base hit — Files. Base on balls — By J. 
Reilej', 1 ; by Files, I. Struck out — Stanwood 2, 
Greene, Lannigan, Fels. Murphy. Stolen bases — 
Blair, B. Reiley, Hennessey. Sacrifice hits — 
Greene, Blair. Umpire — Pendleton. 



Boston College, 7 ; Bowdoin, 5. 

Bowdoin lost to Boston College on Thurs- 
day of last week by the score of 7 to 5. Both 
teams played a loose fielding game, and this 
contributed largely to the loss of the game. 
Morrell pitched the first three innings, but 
retired in favor of Sparks. After that time 
Boston College secured but one run. 

The summary : 

Boston College. 

ab r eh po a e 

Kelley, 2b 4 1 1 5 2 2 

Cox, c 3 2 2 5 2 1 

EV"iseoll, ss 4 o o 2 4 o 

Orchard, 3b 4 o o 2 2 1 

McCarty, rf 2 2 o o o o 

O'Kane. If 2 o o 3 o o 

Flatley, cf 4 1 o o 1 1 

Hogan, lb 4 o o 10 I 2 

Wheatley, p 4 1 o o 4 o 

Totals 31 7 3 27 16 7 

Bowdoin. 

ab r bi-i po a e 

Abbott, c 4 1 1 6 3 o 

Stanwood, 3b 5 1 1 2 o 2 

Hayes, 2b 4 1 3 1 o 2 

Greene, lb 5 1 2 10 o 2 

Hodgson, (ss 5 d 2 3 1 1 

Blair, 2b 4 1 1 1 2 1 

Bower, cf 4 o o o o 

McDade, If 4 o o 1 o o 

Morrell, p 1 o o o 1 2 

Sparks, p 3 o o o 1 o 

Totals 39 5 10 • 24 8 10 

Boston College 1 4 1 0000 I x — 7 

Bowdoin 1 o o o 1 1 2 o — 5 

Base on balls — Off Wheatley. 2; off Morrell, 2; 
off Sparks, 1. Struck out — Bower, Greene, Kelley, 
Orchard 2, Hogan 2. Stolen bases — Abbott, 
Hayes, Driscoll. 



Bowdoin, 5 ; Maine, 2. 
Bowdoin won a great victory over Maine at 
Orono last Wednesday by the score of 5 to 2. 
It was an interesting contest and was witnessed 
by a large crowd of people, it being the Junior 
week at that institution. An account will 
appear in the next issue. 



THREE ADDITIONAL BALL GAMES 

Manager Wilson completed arrangements 
last Monday to play the Holy Name team of 
Portland in that city June 2. This is the date 
recently cancelled by Harvard Second. It 
had been hoped that this date could be 
secured for a game in Brunswick, but owing 
to the financial condition of the association, 
sufficient guarantee could not be offered. 

Arrangements are also being completed for a 
game with the South Portland team for June 
9 in that city and a return game at Brunswick 
during Commencement week. In the arrange- 
ments that are being made it is stated that 
"Pop" Williams is to pitch the Brunswick 
game, which will be an added attraction for 
Bowdoin men. 



NEW ENGLAND MEET 

The annual track meet of the New England 
colleges was held on the Tech. field at Brook- 
line last Saturday and resulted in a victory 
for Dartmouth. Bowdoin was represented 
by five men and succeeded in capturing five 
points. It was hoped that Capt. Tobey might 
score for Bowdoin, but the fact that he has 
been playing tennis a great deal of late proved 
a great handicap. He, however, qualified for 
the semi-final heat before being beaten. Kim- 
ball succeeded in capturing second in the 
quarter in a great race, and Robinson took 
third in the two-mile. The summary of the 
meet was as follows : 

100-Yard Dash — Won by Risigari, Tufts ; Porter, 
Maine, second; Swasey. third; Jordan, Dartmouth, 
fourth. Time — 10 1-5S. 

220- Yard Dash — Won by Porter, Maine; Risi- 
gari, Tufts, second; Swasey, Dartmouth, third; 
Jordan, Dartmouth, fourth. Time — 24 4-5S. 

440- Yard Dash — Won by Mowe, Technology ; 
Kimball, Bowdoin, second ; Wyman, Maine, third ; 
Honiss, Brown, fourth. Time — 53 3-5S. 

880- Yard Run— Won by Thrall, Dartmouth; Wil- 
son Technology, second; Shipley, Dartmouth, 
third ; Cams, Dartmouth, fourth. Time — 2m. 4 
3-Ss. 

One Mile Run — Won by Tucker, Brown; Wright. 
Brown, second ; Grey, Wesleyan, third ; Bucking- 
ham, Technology, fourth. Time — 4m. 37 3-5S. 

120- Yard High Hurdles — Won by J. H. Hubbard, 
Amherst ; Shaw, Dartmouth, second ; Griswold, 
Williams, third; Grey. Dartmouth, fourth. Time — 
15 4-Ss. 

220- Yard Low Hurdles — Won by J. H. Hubbard, 
Amherst ; Shaw, Dartmouth, second ; Pond, Trin- 
ity, third ; Griswold, Williams, fourth. Time — 25 
i-Ss. 

Two-Mile Run — Won by Tucker, Brown ; Bon- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



53 



ner, Williams., second ; Robinson, Bowdoin, third ; 
Gallup, Brown, fourth. Time — iom. 19 3-5S. 

Running High Jump — Horax of Williams and 
Farrington of Technology tied for first and second 
places at height of 5 ft. 9 in. In jump-off for 
medal Farrington cleared 5 ft. 10 1-4 in. Rapelye 
of Technology and Meserve of Maine tied at 5 ft. 
7 in. for third and fourth places. Rapelye won 
toss for medal. 

Running Broad Jump — Won by Mayhew, Brown, 
distance 21 ft. 5 1-2 in.; Brown, Williams, and 
Kent, Wesleyan, tied for second and third places, 
distance 21 ft. 3 in.; Morton, Amherst, fourth, dis- 
tance 20 ft. 10 in. 

Pole Vault — Won by Hazen, Dartmouth, height 
11 ft. ; Rogers, Maine, second, height. 10 ft. 10 in. ; 
Orr, Technology, third, height 10 ft. 8 in. ; Horrax, 
Williams, Farrington, Technology, and Newton, 
Amherst, tied for fourth place, at height 10 ft. 4 in. 

Shotput — Won by Marshall, Williams, distance 
41 ft. s in. ; Dearborn, Wesleyan, second, distance 
38 ft.; 10 1-2 in.; Polhemus. Technology, third, dis- 
tance 37 ft. 9 in. ; Gage, Dartmouth, fourth, dis- 
tance 36 ft. 8 in. 

Hammer Throw — Won by Gage, Dartmouth, dis- 
tance 132 ft. ; Knapp, Technology, second, distance, 
125 ft.; Blake, Dartmouth, third distance 116 ft. 
9 in.; LaMent, Williams, fourth, distance 113 ft. 
2 in. 

Discus Throw — Won by Dearborn, Wesleyan. 
distance 120 ft. 11 1-2 in.; Smith, Brown, distance 
107 ft. I in. ; Low, Dartmouth, "third, distance 103 
ft. 7 1-4 in. ; LaMent, Williams, fourth, distance 
101 ft. 6 in. 

The summary of the points was as follows : 

Dartmouth 36 

Brown 23 

M. I. T 21 s-6 

William^ 19 5-6 

University of Maine 14 1-2 

Wesleyan 12 1-2 

Amherst 11 1-3 

Tufts 8 

Bowdoin 5 

Trinity 2 



DRAMATIC CLUB 

During the past week the Dramatic Club 
has been getting pledges from those students 
who would buy tickets to "The Rivals," if 
repeated on the night before Ivy, June 7. 
Enough names have been obtained to give a 
fairly sure guarantee of expenses, so the 
management has decided to give the perform- 
ance. A few minor details are yet to be 
arranged, but the presentation is assured, and 
it is hoped that every one will make arrange- 
ments to attend the play, and have as many as 
possible of their friends go with them. 
Not only is "The Rivals" a good play, but 
Bowdoin has an excellent caste in it this 
spring, and the club deserves the support of 
the college. 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, MAY 25TH. 

2.30 p.m. — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

C. W. Snow, '07, speaks before Bath High School 
on "Congo Free State." 

W. S. Linnell, '07, speaks at Thornton Academy 
on "School Spirit." 

A. B. Roberts, '07, speaks at Yarmouth Academy 
on "Luther Burbank." 

7.30 p.m. — Chemical Club meets at Beta Theta Pi 
house. Evans. '01, speaks on "Drinking Water." 

SATURDAY, MAY 26TH. 

Championship baseball game with Colby, at 
Waterville. 

Second team plays Fryeburg Academy at Frye- 
burg. 

Interscholastic Athletic Meet on Whittier Field. 

Professor Chapman delivers address at dedica- 
tion of Freeport Library. 

"Weary Willie Walker" at Empire Theatre, Lew- 
iston. 

8 p.m. — "Dora Thorne" at Town Hall. 

MONDAY, MAY 28TH. 

2.30 p.m. — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 
Longwood Tennis Tournament, at Longwood, 
Mass. 

TUESDAY, MAY 29TH. 

2.30 p.m. — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

Longwood Tennis Tournament, at Longwood, 
Mass. 

2.00 p.m. — Special meeting of Trustees and Over- 
seers in Hubbard Hall. 

4 p.m. — Meeting of College Visiting Commit- 
tee in Massachusetts Hall. 

"The Convict's Daughter" at Empire Theatre, 
Lewiston. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 3OTH. 

Holiday, Memorial Day. 

Exhibition game with Bates, at Lewiston. 

Longwood Tennis Tournament at Longwood, 
Mass. 

Proifessolr Mitchell delivers M'emorial Day 
address at Freeport. 

H. M. Heath, '72, delivers Memorial Day address 
at Brunswick, Town Hall. 

THURSDAY, MAY 3IST. 

2.30 p.m. — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 
Professor Mitchell acts as judge at Good Will 
Farm Prize Declamations. 
Deutscher Verein initiation. 

FRIDAY, JUNE 1ST. 

2.30 p.m. — Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 
Semester Reports in History 6 and 8 are due. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 2D. 

Make up quizzes in Economics courses. 



54 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Athletic 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

R. A CONY, 1907 Editor-in-Chief 

Associate Editors 

H. E. WILSON, igo7 R. H. HUPPER, 1908 

H. E. MITCHELL, 1907 R. A. LEE, 1908 

W. S. LINNELL, lgo7 H. H. BURTON, igog 

A. L. ROBINSON, 1908 J. S. STAHL, Igog 

A. L. JONES, Medical 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 
N. S. Weston, 1908 



Business Manager 
Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, 10 cents. 

Entered at Post-Oftice at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
Lewistun Journal Press 

Vol. XXXVI. MAY 25, 1906 No. 6 



The Orient has received 
A Word of Thanks a copy of the official 

directory of the 59th Con- 
gress, through the kindness of Congressman 
D. S. Alexander, Bowdoin, '70, and extends 
its thanks for the same. 



The Orient prints else- 
Mr. Heath's Address where a somewhat 

extended account of the 
address of Hon. H. M. Heath, '72, before the 
debating course. The address was one of 
the most interesting and instructive that has 
been delivered at Bowdoin in a long time, and 
the Orient commends its reading to those 
who did not have the privilege of listening to 
Mr. Heath. 



A word of criticism may 

well be said concerning 
Subscnptions ^ ^^ of tfae ^^ 

this spring, in the matter of athletic subscrip- 
tions, ft is doubtful if there has been so much 
indifference among undergraduates for a long 
time as has existed this semester. It is far 
from complimentary to the undergraduate 
body to state that the money paid in for base- 
ball, track and tennis has all been below 
recent years, and that the managers have had 
the greatest difficulty in being able to 
play off their schedules as arranged. Just 
why this condition exists, is hard to say, but 
that there is great indifference there can be 
no doubt. 

In baseball the subscriptions signed was 
$750.00 as compared with $911.00 a year ago, 
and the amount paid in has been between 
$200.00 and $300.00 less. The manager this 
year arranged the best possible schedule and 
has been untiring to make the season a suc- 
cess. He has been particularly fortunate in 
the way of weather, but even under these con- 
ditions he must collect in a large proportion of 
the money outstanding at the present time in 
order to make his accounts balance. Had he 
not had this good fortune, it is hard to say 
where he would have been at this time. 

The attitude toward track has not been any 
more creditable. The amount subscribed for 
compared well with previous years, but the 
amount paid in has been far less. Men have 
not met their subscriptions at the dates speci- 
fied, and there is at the present time, with the 
season over, nearly $200.00 which has 
not been paid. Before the Maine „meet the 
management made complete canvasses of the 
college for the funds that must be forthcom- 
ing in order to pay for the expenses of the 
team, and the amount resulting from a whole 
evening's work was in some instances as small 
as $3.00. As is well known, the night before 
the New England Meet the management were 
obliged to raise $72.00 in order to allow 
five men to take the trip, and as the money 
was not forthcoming the team could not go 
on the early morning train, and for a time it 
appeared as if they might not be able to go at 
all. And this with a large number of overdue 
subscriptions unpaid. It would have been 
desirable for more men to have gone if the 
students had done their duty by the team, and 
it is also possible Bowdoin might have secured 
a few more points. The same thing was true 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



55 



of tennis. The day before the Vermont trip 
it was not certain that the men could go. 
Men who had subscribed and named the date 
could not pay when the time came. 

There are several ways of considering these 
things. If a fellow in college is unable to pay 
a little money to support the college teams, 
he is not obliged to do so. There are, doubt- 
less, cases where this is true, although the 
number is probably not large. If such is 
the case, the student should not pay and he is 
entitled to all respect in his not doing so. 

The student who puts his name down, how- 
ever, and then does not pay, is doing a dis- 
loyal if not a dishonest act. A name on a sub- 
scription is just as binding as any contract, 
and the men who refuse to pay are doing wrong 
by the managers and by the college. Every 
cent that has been put into athletics this year 
has gone for good purposes, and to support 
the teams is one of the privileges of every stu- 
dent who can afford it. And yet there are 
men in college who are able to spend money 
freely in other directions who have stated that 
they could not pay their subscriptions after 
they have signed in for them. 

One of the worst things about this condi- 
tion is its contagion. Men who would other- 
wise pay, seeing fellows whom they know are 
more able to meet their subscriptions refusing 
to do so, think it no more than just that they 
should escape. There is some logic in such 
a conclusion, but the result is disastrous for 
the managers. 

Bowdoin undergraduates justly pride them- 
selves on college spirit, but when it is remem- 
bered that another college of the State paid out 
for a special trip for its track team, this year, 
half as much as our men have paid in alto- 
gether, to say nothing of much larger sub- 
scriptions for other college activities, the stu- 
dents have no reason to feel especially proud 
of their support this spring. 

The Orient does not refer to these condi- 
tions as being in any way alarming or as against 
the college spirit in general. It is rather a 
temporary laxness on the part of some stu- 
dents which should, and doubtless will, be 
corrected. 



COMMENCEMENT SPEAKERS 

The trials for the selection of the Com- 
mencement speakers to compete for the Good- 
win prize, was completed last Tuesday even- 



ing, and resulted in the selection of the fol- 
lowing men : Philip F. Chapman, James A. 
Bartlett, George C. Soule, Robie R. Stevens, 
Oscar Peterson and Charles L. Favinger. 



MR. HEATHS ADDRESS 

A large number of the students and faculty 
enjoyed the lecture on "Public Speaking" by 
Hon. H. M. Heath, '72, in the Debating Room 
of Hubbard Hall last Thursday evening. 
Mr. Heath said in part: 

"It is a comfort for me to know that so 
many college men to-day have so much 
advantage. Thirty-eight years ago when I 
entered college, no attention was paid to 
English ; that men had to go out into the 
world and get along largely by the use of 
their own language, was entirely forgotten. 

"In the first place, I think the use of a skel- 
eton, even, in public speaking, ought to be made 
a capital offense. A man should have such a 
command of his work as to be able to frame it, 
skeleton and all, upon his feet. You cannot 
frame good thought under the 'snow heaps' of 
the closet. 

"The first requisite in the public speaker is 
to have a body of iron. No physical exercise 
that our athletic systems entail is any too 
severe. Thomas B. Reed recognized the 
necessity of a sound body when Speaker of 
the House of Representatives. At a dinner 
in Washington he would partake of no wine 
because he felt that the least bit of alcohol 
might impair his ability to fulfil his duty to 
his people in the trying time to which the 
Speaker is subject. 

"The next study is simplicity of English. 
You can best get this by the study of Latin 
and Greek, by long training in dissecting 
these languages. Then learn an old English 
synonym for every word in your vocabulary 
from Latin and Greek. Thus you may bring 
yourself down to the plain language of the 
plain people. The mind should grasp the 
picture of the idea and not have to hunt 
around for its meaning. 

"To attain this simplicity the first book to 
study is the Bible; no pther piece of literature 
equals it. The Bible holds its power because 
its translators chose the simple language of 
the plain people. Next to this is Shakes- 
peare ; then the very best and choicest of liter- 
ature with no time wasted on hastily written 
literature. Of the orators, study Webster of 



56 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



America, and next to him John Bright of 
England; by his plain words John Bright 
kept England from interfering in favor of the 
South in our Civil War. Then study the dic- 
tionary ; Ruf us Choate studied, it every day, to 
acquire simplicity. Finally, to gain simplic- 
ity, use short words, short sentences, and 
short speeches. Aaron Burr, one of the great- 
est orators this country has known, never 
made his argument on a case more than half 
an hour long. 

"The third requisite is voice training. A 
course in voice training should be given as 
much attention as any other. Nine hundred 
and ninety-nine men out of a thousand make 
a failure in their voice, in its natural state. 

"The public speaker should learn to use the 
middle voice; public speaking should not be 
declamatory, and should not start on a high 
pitch. Erom the middle voice it is easy to go 
down to the heavy bass, then up, if necessary. 
Then again the middle voice is sympathetic; 
minds like to be fooled and the sympathetic 
tone makes it easier to steal the other fellow's 
head. Half the power of the orator is due to 
the proper use of the voice. Pitt at the age 
of twenty ruled the House of Commons with 
his admirable voice. Jefferson, although a 
master of written English, couldn't rule men 
because of his poor voice. 

"In regard to gestures, I think every man 
should be a law to himself. True gesticula- 
tion is natural. In Washington I saw Camille 
played in Italian, not one word of which I 
could understand; nor had I any translation. 
Yet from the gestures I could follow every 
detail. 

"The public speaker must back up what he 

"says with character. Jurors and judges are 

men of blood and require character. The 

effective speaker must be sincere ; if not his 

blow never strikes home. 

"The next element is intensity of word and 
manner. If your speeches haven't fire in 
them, they should be in the fire. You need 
the power of humanity, to speak from heart 
to heart. This is the power which will make 
Lincoln's Gettysburg address live down 
through countless ages, long after Everett's 
empty rhetoric is forgotten. To help attain 
this, study rich poetry and good novels. 

"The public speaker must accumulate the 
knowledge of the ages. Some day he can use 
it for life or death. Thus it was that Web- 



ster was enabled to reach out for his smoking 
thunderbolts. 

"The human mind must be relieved, so you 
cannot neglect the study of wit and humor ; a 
man is a failure without it. You must also 
use the pen. Alexander Hamilton in his 
great libel case, wrote out his speech the night 
before and then destroyed it. The use of the 
pen will teach you how to prune. You must 
make up your mind that others will not suffer 
your own delusion in regard to your fine 
sounding sentences. You should take every 
chance to stand on your feet and think. Get 
full of your subject and then there is no 
trouble about the words. You need to stand 
on your feet when you talk, for there is a mul- 
tiple process going on which you cannot use 
in a chair. 

"Without nervousness before speaking you 
will never be a success. Nervousness is an 
indication of the proper condition of mind. 
But you must take care to let neither your 
opponent nor your audience see your nervous- 
ness. 

"I trust no graduate of this college will 
ever read his speech. No verdict ever was 
won in this way, and I do not believe souls 
are so won. 

"The object of eloquence is to convince ; so 
never try to be eloquent. If so you lose your 
power. Just think and speak of your cause. 
O'Connell said a great speech was very fine, 
but the verdict was the real thing. This 
oower of eloquence is partly a gift, more 
largely an acquisition. 

"I can summarize all I have said in one 
sentence: Work, fight, believe in-a future life, 
the survival of the fittest, be true to self, to 
conscience, and to God, and the battle of life 
shall end in victory." 

At the close of the lecture President Hyde 
presented the debating team with gold medals, 
the reward of the victory over Clark College, 
April 27. 



Y. M. C. A. ELECTIONS 

The Bowdoin Y. M. C. A. held its annual 
election on Thursday evening of last week. 
The following officers were elected : 

President — Neal W. Allen. 

Vice-President — Felix A. Burton. 

Treasurer — F. J. Morrison. 

Corresponding Secretary — Carl M. Robin- 
son. 

Recording Secretary — Harold H. Burton. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



57 



College Botes 



Bowdoin vs. Colby at Waterville to-morrow. 

The Verein initiations will take place May 31. 

Pope, '07, was at his home in Manchester last 
week. 

The Freshman debate scheduled for this week was 
again postponed. 

The May issue of the Quill appeared on Wednes- 
day of this week. 

James Archibald of Houlton recently passed a 
few days at the college. 

"Dora Thorne" will be the attraction in the Town 
Hall to-morrow evening. 

Sparks, '00. and Greene, '09, were in the Kent's 
Hill the first of the week. 

Gen. Chamberlain will deliver the Memorial Day 
address at York this year. 

J. B. Drummond, '07, passed several days of this 
week at his home in Portland. 

W. A. Kinney of Kent's Hill, has been visiting 
friends at the college this week. 

Make up quizzes in economics will be given June 
2 at the regular recitation hours. 

Wing, '06, M. and C. Webber, '07, and Scammon, 
'09, all passed Sunday in Fairfield. 

The Psi Upsilon Fraternity is planning to give 
a house party the night before Ivy. 

The Bangor News of last Saturday contained a 
photograph of Farnsworth Marshall, '03. 

Harold Garcelon, '04, now of the McGill Medical 
School, has been visiting the college this week. 

But few college men attended the Bowdoin-Bates 
game last Saturday, there being less than 40 in the 
party. 

■ Gen. O. O. Howard will deliver the Memorial 
Day address at the National Soldiers' Home at 
Togus. 

The Chemical Club will meet at the Beta Theta Pi 
House this evening. It will be addressed by H. D. 
Evans, '01. 

Duddy, '07, was in Portsmouth the latter part of 
the week. He expects to be employed in that city 
this summer. 

Professor Baker of Harvard, gave a very inter- 
esting talk on "Debating" before English 7 last 
Wednesday afternoon. 

The Musical Clubs election was scheduled to be 
held yesterday, but the Orient is unable to secure 
the results for this week. 

Open cars were run on the Brunswick and Bath 
electric road on Friday, May 18. This is a little 
later date than is usually the case. 

A meeting of the Freshman Class was held on 
Wednesday of last week. It is understood that the 
matter of a class banquet was the chief business 
under discussion. 

Last Monday the Music Committee elected the 
following men. for next year : M. P. Cushing, '09, 
chapel organist; W. S. Linnell, '07, choir leader; 
and M. P. Whipple, '07. organ blower. 



Winslow, '06, Williams, '06, and Hacker, '07, 
passed Saturday and Sunday in Farmington. 

Elder, '06, of the Bowdoin Verein. attended the 
initiation of the Bates Verein on Thursday of last 
week. 

A poster designating where the recitations of the 
various classes are held, have recently been placed 
on the bulletin board. 

T. F. Sheehan, '09, was at his home in Portland 
during the first of the week, where he was confined 
with a severe sore throat. 

Saunders, '08, is out of his room this week after 
three weeks' confinement caused by water on the 
knee. He is still obliged to go on crutches. 

The History Club will probably hold its last meet- 
ing of the year on June I. It is planned to hold the 
meeting at the. home of Professor Johnson. 

Kingsley, '07, has been obliged to go on crutches 
during the past few days, as a result of a sprained 
ankle, which was injured while playing tennis. 

H. C. McGrath of Boston, who will act as starter 
at the Interscholastic Meet to-morrow acted as 
starter at the New England meet last Saturday. 

Several of the Maine papers contained extended 
accounts of President Hyde's address at the Potter 
Committee hearing which was held last Wednesday 
at Portland. 

Among the Bowdoin men who attended the 
Brookline meet were Holrnan. '06 ; Stone, '06 ; 
Paine, '06; Upton, '07; McMichael, '07; Andrews, 
'06 ; Putnam, '06. 

Bowdoin will play Colby at Waterville to-morrow 
in the last championship game which Bowdoin 
plays this year. It is expected that Files and 
Coombs will be the opposing pitchers. 

The Aroostook Club dined at the Inn last Satur- 
day evening, where it entertained the members of 
the Ricker ball team. There was a large attendance 
and a pleasant social time was enjoyed. 

The Alpha Sigmas of Brunswick played the 
Oreonta baseball team of Portland on Whittier 
Field last Saturday afternoon. The score was 8 
to 5 in favor of the Brunswick team. 

Linnell, '07. represented the Orient, and Gould. 
'08, the Quill, at the annual banquet of the New 
England Intercollegiate Press Association, held at 
the Copley Square in Boston last Monday evening. 

The Second team defeated the Ricker team on the 
Whittier Field last Monday afternoon, by the score 
of 16 to 6. It was a rather loosely played game. 
The battery for the Second was Morrell and Law- 
rence. 

The Orient is unable to secure the complete 
results of the Vermont tournament for this issue. 
At the close o.f Tuesday's playing Bowdoin needed 
to win but one event in the final doubles to secure 
the tournament. 

The Second team lost its game with Lewiston 
High on the Whittier Field Wednesday afternoon, 
by the score oi 9 to 7. The game was somewhat 
loosely played on both sides, the visitors winning 
out on bunched hits, coupled with several errors in 
the seventh inning. The battery for the Second 
was Morrell and Lawrence. 



58 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Semester reports in History 6 and 8 will be due 
on June I. 

Professor Baker gave his illustrated lecture on 
"Shakespeare's London" in Memorial Hall, last 
Wednesday evening. The lecture was given under 
the auspices of the Ibis. The Orient will give a 
more full account next week. 

Ham and Haines of the tennis team, acompanied 
by Manager Mincher, left on the 4.48 Saturday for 
Boston, where they joined Tobey and Paine, both 
of whom had been at the Brookline meet. The 
party went to Burlington from that city, Sunday 
morning. 

Next Tuesday a special meeting of the Trustees 
and Overseers will be held in Hubbard Hall to 
take action with reference to a resolution proposed 
by the Carnegie foundation, as a condition of plac- 
ing Bowdoin College on its list of institutions which 
are to receive retiring allowances for its professors. 

A. B. Parsons spoke before the Y. M. C. A. last 
Tuesday evening, on the subject of the Northfield 
Conference. His talk was largely confined to out- 
lining the work for the coming summer. Mr. Par- 
sons' address was postponed from last week because 
of his inability to be present on the date first 
arranged. 



FACULTY NOTES 

Professor Foster on Wednesday, May 16, spoke 
before the Westbrook Seminary on "The Opportu- 
nities of College Life." 

Last Wednesday President Hyde appeared before 
the Committee of the Legislature on the "Duty of 
the State to the University of Maine," at the public 
hearing which was held at Convention Hotel in 
Portland. 

Professor Mitchell acted as one of the judges in 
the Andover-Exeter debate held at Exeter last Sat- 
urday. The other two judges were Professor Lay- 
cock of Dartmouth, and Professor Huntington of 
Brown. The question was : Resolved. "That inter- 
scholastic football is more of a benefit than a det- 
riment." Exeter had the negative, and won. 

On Memorial Day Professor Mitchell will speak 
at Freeport. and on May 31 will go to Hinckley, 
Me., where he will act as a judge at the Good Will 
Farm Prize Declamation. 

Professor Robinson left Monday for Washington, 
D. C, where he attended the meeting of the execu- 
tive committee of the American Public Health 
Association, of which he is president. The next 
annual meeting of the association will be held in 
the City of Mexico in October. 



TENNIS TOURNAMENT 

The tennis tournament, played last week for the 
purpose of selecting the third and fourth men foi 
the Vermont tournament, was completed last Fri- 
day. The summary was as follows: 

In the preliminary round Ham beat Craigie, 
6-1, 6-3 ; L. Timberlake beat Wilson, 2-5, 7-5 ; Lin- 
nell beat Webber, 6-2, 6-4; McMichael beat Clark, 
by default; Hughes beat Woodruff, 6-1, 6-3; Law- 
rence beat Goodspeed. 1-6, 6-3, 6-2 ; Haines beat 
Briggs, 12-14, 7-5. 6-1 ; Elder beat Stone, 7-5, 6-3. 



In the semi-final round Ham, beat Timberlake, 
6-4, 6-1; Linnell beat McMichael, 6-4, 3-6, 8-6; 
Hughes beat Lawrence, 6-2, 7-5; Haines beat Elder, 
1-6, 6-4, 6-2. 

In the final round Ham beat Johnson and Haines 
beat Hughes, giving Ham and Haines the two 
places on the Vermont-Longwood team. Paine 
and Tobey did not enter the tournament. 



GRADUATE TROPHY COMPETITION 

The following rules will govern the competi- 
tion for the trophy offered for classes having the 
largest percentage of living members present at 
Commencement : 

First.- — Any graduating class, except the class 
graduating in the year of competition, shall be 
eligible for competition provided it has at least ten 
living members. 

Second. — Any class proposing to compete shall 
notify the college librarian of its intention so to 'do 
on or before twelve noon, Commencement day. 

Third. — Any competing class may include as 
members any former member, provided it gives to 
the college librarian the name of such member at 
or before the time of giving notice of its intentions 
to compete. 

Fourth. — The trophy is to be awarded to the com- 
peting class having in the year of competition the 
largest percentage of graduates present at Com- 
mencement day, and shall be held by such class 
until it is won by another class at a subsequent 
Commencement. 

Fifth. — Competition shall close at twelve noon 
on the Commencement day in the year of compe- 
tition. 

Sixth. — The college librarian shall decide which 
class has the largest percentage of members present, 
basing his decision upon the signatures in the 
Alumni Registration Book, and his decision shall be 
final. 



JUNIOR BANQUET 

At a meeting of the Junior Class held last Mon- 
day it was voted to hold a class banquet in the near 
future, the exact date of which was left with a com- 
mittee. It is planned to have a clam bake on the 
shore in the vicinity. The committee in charge con- 
sists of Holt, Joy and Lawrence. It is thought 
probable that the banquet may take place June 2. 



TOMORROW'S MEET 

Tomorrow is the date of the annual Interschol- 
astic Meet on the Whittier field, and the event 
should be an interesting one for both college and 
the visitors. Six schools have signified their inten- 
tions of sending teams. They are Hebron Academy, 
Westbrook Seminary, Portland High, Bar Harbor 
High, the Abbott School and Coburn Classical 
Institute. 

The following officials have been selected by 
Manager Voorhees : 

Referee— W. W. Bolster. 

Starter— H. C. McGrath of Boston. 

Marshal — J. B. Drummond, '07. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



59 



Judges of Finish — P. R. Shorey, '07 ; C. W. 
Doherty, '07; Phillips Kimball, '07. 

Timers— E. N. Whittier, C. F. Jenks, '06; D. W. 
Robinson. '07. 

Clerk of Course — W. T. Rowe, '04. 

Assistant Clerk of Course — T. W. Winchell, '07. 

Announcer — D. Bradford Andrews, '07. 

Scorer of Track Events — Harry Atwood, '09. 

Scorer of Field Events — F. L. Bass, '07; E. H. 
McMichael, '07. 

Measurers — Clement Skolfield, '06; C. C. Hol- 
man, '06. 

Judges of Field Events — H. P. Chapman, '06; G. 
U. Hatch, '06; Robert Pennell, '09. 



©bituan* 



REV. F. H. ROWSE, EX='81 

Word has been received of the sudden 
death by suicide of Rev. Frederick H. Rowse 
at St. Paul, Minn. Mr. Rowse had been suf- 
fering from ill health for a long time, and this 
is said to have been the cause of his taking his 
own life. He was a native of Augusta, hav- 
ing been born there in 1859. He was the 
son of Edward Rowse, a well-known 
Augusta jeweler. Frederick Rowse entered 
Bowdoin with the Class of 1881, and joined 
the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity, but at the 
end of his Sophomore year left college to enter 
the ministry. In 1882 he became pastor of 
the Episcopal Church at Fort Fairfield, and 
held this pastorate for five years, when he 
removed to Plymouth, Mass., where he 
preached until 1902. In 1902 he went to Min- 
nesota and since his arrival he has preached 
at Fairbault, Pipestone, and St. Paul, where 
he was at the time of his death. 



CHARLES FRED MOULTON, '87 

Dr. Charles Fred Moulton, a well-known 
eye specialist of Boston, died April 24, at his 
residence, 75 Park Street, West Roxbury, 
Mass., aged 40. A widow, son and daughter 
survive. He was on the medical staff of the 



City Hospital and the Massachusetts Eye and 
Ear Infirmary. Dr. Moulton was born at 
Canton, Me., June 23, 1865. He was gradu- 
ated from Bowdoin College, Class of 1887, 
and from Dartmouth Medical School in 1890. 
He began practice in West Roxbury in Janu- 
ary, 1891. In 1896 he went abroad and spent 
considerable time in the hospitals of London 
and Paris, studying the diseases of the eye. 
On his return to Boston he opened an office 
in the Warren Chambers as a specialist. In 
that year he was stricken with a spinal trouble 
which for four years kept him in his bed, but 
in 1902 he resumed practice. At the time of 
his death his office was at the Westminster 
Chambers, Copley Square. The cause of his 
death was tuberculosis meningitis. He was a 
member of Prospect Lodge, A. F. and A. M., 
Roslindale, and of the Highland Club. The 
death of Dr. Moulton is the fourth break in 
the ranks of '87, the others who have died 
being Robinson, Pushor and Choate. 



See pie moot a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
1906 man who will be in the market for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men In all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, 1 feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do alter graduation. 



a. s. 



POND, JR., 
Representing HAPQOOD'S 




S. P. ROBIE, 



LEWISTON, - MKINE 



Hats, Furnishings, Athletic Goods. 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 



PULSIFER'S 
%<^n^izU 3H<Hui,c 9wnUkvi*, 5 AND 10 ©ERT ST0RE 

Now Open for Business. 
PORTLAND, MAINE j. W . PULSIFER, - - MAINE STREET, BRUNSWICK 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




For Your Summer Vacation 

Why not make it profitable to you if you need the money? If 
you do not need the money, you will want something extra, and 
you might as well earn a little something. Experience does not 
count. If you are honest and industrious and really in earnest, 
we will st-itid by you anil help you to a handsome income. 
There is more than an ordinary living in this. You can make 
more than your next season's college expenses. We give you 
full instructions and furnish you with an outfit at cost, money to 
be refunded you when you turn in the outfit, so that you are 
virtually running no risk whatever. You will be your own 
master or mistress of your own time and movements. When 
you wish to work, you can work with the energy and spirit of 
one who is his own employer. You can make $3.00 per day 
and upward above all expenses. Communicate with us at once. 

THE CLEVIS CLEVER CUTTER CO., 

FREMONT, OHIO 



Yale University 

SIMER SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 

A seven weeks' course in Forestry at Milford, Pike County, 
Pa., under the direction of the Faculty of Yale Forest School. 
Sixth annual session opens July 5, 1906. Designed for students 
considering' forestry as a profession, those about to enter the 
lumber business, owners of woodlots, etc. 
For further information address \ 

Prof. Henry S. Graves, New Haven, Conn. 



THE MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

lias a carefully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; Clinical Conferences; Modi lied Seminar Methods, and thoroughly Practical Iustruciion. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching, clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest and finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every respect, and the new laboratories arc specially planned and equipped for individual work by the siudents. 

The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 
SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of MeHicine. 




2%ar/iJi 



REPEATING SHOT GUN 
NEW MODEL N2I7 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By theomission of the take down feature we have 
been able to greatly reduce the cost of production and at the same time have kept the gun up to the 
famous high fflar/ifl standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
barrels are especially bored for smokeless as well as black powder and so chambered that 2% inch or 
i^Li n j l ■ may i ■ Usec ^-. Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 
reliable and best working gun in existence. We are glad to make it possible for every lover of guns 
and bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so low a price. 
Have your dealer order it for you. 

Send for the TTZar&l Catalogue an J Experience Book to-day. Free for 3 stamps. 
7Ae r 27lar/lfi firear/nS Cd. ( 42WMow Street, New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE i, 1906 



NO. 7 



BASEBALL 

Bowdoin, s ; Maine, 2. 

Bowdoin won a decisive baseball victory 
over the University of Maine at Orono on 
Wednesday of last week, by the score of 5 to 2. 
The game was a most interesting contest 
throughout, but was clearly Bowdoin's from 
the start. 

Sparks pitched his second game of the year 
for Bowdoin and surely made a good begin- 
ning, the Maine team being able to secure but 
three hits off his delivery during the nine 
innings. He also played a strong fielding 
game. 

The work of the entire infield was of the 
best — even better than that of the Bates game 
of the previous week. Every man played in 
remarkable form. Blair played his position 
in a way that was a revelation to those who 
have not seen him at his best, while Capt. 
Hodgson also did splendid work. The play- 
ing of the remainder of the infield was also 
commendable. 

As in nearly all the games of the year, the 
team hit hard and effectively, ten hits being 
secured off Frost. Stanwood excelled in this 
work, he securing three out of five times at 
bat. 

Bowdoin secured her first run in the second 
inning. Sparks sent a hot drive to Burns, took 
second on Blair's out, and scored on a single 
by Greene. In the third, Bowdoin secured 
another run. Abbott drew a base on balls, 
stole second and scored on a drive along the 
first base line by Stanwood. In the fourth, 
Bowdoin secured two more runs. Blair sin- 
gled, and took third on a poor throw by Gor- 
don to cut off his steal. Then Hodgson hit 
to Frost, but Mayo missed the throw and 
Blair scored. Hodgson then stole second and 
scored on a passed ball. Bowdoin secured 
another run in the seventh, Abbott securing a 
single and scoring on a timely hit by Stan- 
wood. 

Maine secured her first run in the third. 
Mayo beat out a short hit and scored on a 
wild pitch by Sparks. Her only other run 



came in the seventh, Quint securing a double 
and scoring on a hit by Higgins. 
The summary : 

Bowdoin. 

ab R BH PO A E 

Abbott, c 4 2 1 3 o 1 

Stanwood, 3b 5 o 3 1 o 1 

Files, p 4 o 1 o o 

Sparks, rf 5 1 1 o 7 o 

Blair, 2b 4 1 1 2 6 o 

Hodgson, ss 4 1 o 1 4 

Greene, ib 4 o 2 17 o o 

Bower, c 4 o I o o o 

McDade, If 4 1 2 o o 

Total 38 s 10 27 17 2 

Maine. 

ab r bh po a e 

McDonald, rf 4 o 1 o o 

Scales, ss... 3 o 1 o o 

Burns, 2b 3 o o 3 3 1 

Frost, p 4 o o 1 4 o 

Quint, If 3 1 1 1 o o 

Chase, cf 3 ■ o 1 o o 

Higgins, 3b 3 o 1 1 2 2 

Gordon, c 3 o o 7 2 1 

M'ayo, lb 3 1 1 11 o 1 

Total 29 2 3 27 11 5 

Innings 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

Bowdoin o 1 1 2 o o 1 o o — 5 

Maine o o 1 o o o 1 o o — 2 

Two-base hits — Quint, Higgins. Stolen bases — 
Abbott, Stanwood 2, Hodgson, Greene. Sacrifice 
hits — Files, Quint First base on balls — By Sparks 
2, by Frost 1. Struck out — By Sparks, Scales, 
Quint, Chase, Higgins ; by Frost, Files 3, Sparks 3, 
Hodgson, McDade, 2. Passed balls — Gordon, 2. 
Wild pitch — Sparks. Time — 1.50 Umpire — New- 
enham. 



Bates, ii; Bowdoin, 2 

Bowdoin lost the Memorial Day game with 
Bates by the score of 1 1 to 2. Bowdoin played 
a loose game, and Sparks , who pitched, 
lacked control in two innings. The best work 
was clone by Bower and Hodgson. The 
summary : 

Bates. 

ab r bh po a e 

Boothby, c 4 1 2 8 3 1 

Wilder, ss 4 2 1 5 I 

Kendall, 2b 4 1 o 2 1 o 

Austin, If 4 2 1 o o o 



62 



bowdoin orient 



Bowman, rf 4 1 1 o o 

Jordan, 3b 3 2 o o 4 o 

Connor, ib 3 I 1 14 o o 

Rogers, cf 3 I o 2 o o 

Dwinal, p 4 1 2 o 4 o 

Totals 33 11 8 27 17 2 

Bowdoin". 

ab r bh p0 a e 

Abbott, c 4 o o 7 o 3 

Stan wood, 3b 3 o o 2 o 

Files, rf 4 o 1 1 o o 

Sparks, p 3 1 1 o 2 2 

Greene, lb 4 1 3 9 o o 

Hodgson, ss 3 o 1 o 4 1 

Blair, 2b 3 o 2 3 5 1 

Bower, cf 4 o o 1 2 o 

Houghton, If 2 o o 1 1 

Piper, If 2 o o o o o 

Totals 32 2 8 24 13 8 

Bates s o 3 2 1 o o o x — 11 

Bowdoin 1 o o o o 1 o o — 2 

Two-base bits — Blair. Greene, Sparks. 'Base on 

balls — Off Dwinal. 4: off Sparks, 2. Hit by pitched 

ball — By Sparks, 4. Struck out — By Dwinal, 7; by 

Sparks, 5. Passed balls — Abbott, 2. Time — 2.00. 
Umpire — Carrigan. 



THE VERMONT TOURNAMENT 

Bowdoin succeeded in winning a decisive 
victory over Vermont in the annual tennis 
tournament, which was held in Burlington, 
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of last 
week. Bowdoin was represented by Tobey, 
'06, Paine, '06, Haines, '08, and Ham, '08. All 
four of the men did excellent work, although 
the work of the first two men was the strong- 
the playing of the first two men was the 
strongest, they being in a class by themselves 
in both singles and doubles. The total score 
was 1 1 to 7 in favor of Bowdoin. 

The summary of the first day's play was as 
follows : 

Tobey of Bowdoin beat Rustedt of Vermont 6-1. 

7-5- 

Paine of Bowdoin beat Hill of Vermont, 8-6, 9-7. 

Ward of Vermont beat Ham of Bowdoin, 6-1, 6-3. 

Pease of Vermont beat Haines of Bowdoin, 6-1, 
6-3- 

Tobey of Bowdoin beat Ward of Vermont, 6-3, 
6-1. 

Rustedt of Vermont beat Ham of Bowdoin, 2-6, 
6-4, 6-4. 

Hill of Vermont beat Haines of Bowdoin, 2-6, 
6-2, 6-2. 

Paine of Bowdoin beat Pease of Vermont, 6-4, 
6-3- 



The second day plays resulted as follows : 

Tobey of Bowdoin, beat Hill of Vermont, 6-2, 6-2. 

Paine of Bowdoin, beat Rustedt of Vermont, 6-4, 
6-0. 

Haines of Bowdoin, beat Wood of Vermont, 6-0, 
7-5- 

Pease of Vermont, beat Ham of Bowdoin, 6-0, 6-2. 

Afternoon play : 

Tobey of Bowdoin, beat Pease of Vermont, 6-2, 
3-6, 6-4. 

Haines of Bowdoin beat Ward, of Vermont, 3-6, 
7-5. 6-1. 

Ham of Bowdoin beat Hill of Vermont, 6-1, 6-8, 
6-4. 

Rustedt of Vermont, beat Haines of Bowdoin, 2-6, 
6-4. 7-5- 

In the last day's play in doubles Ward and Rustedt 
of Vermont, defeated Haines and Ham of Bow- 
doin, 6-2, 7-5. The other game was won by Tobey 
and Paine of Bowdoin, who defeated Hill and Pease 
of Vermont, 6-1, 6-4. 



INTERSCHOLASTIC MEET 

Hebron Academy won the eighth annual 
Interscholastic Field Meet, held on Whittier 
Field last Saturday afternoon, securing a 
total of 60 points. The other schools scor- 
ing points were Westbrook Seminary with 
22; Coburn Classical Institute, 15; Bar Har- 
bor High School, 1 1 ; Portland High, 6 ; and 
Bangor High, 3. The Abbott School of 
Farmington did not score. 

The meet was a most successful one in 
every way. Four records were broken and 
the events were all well contested. The 
records broken were in the pole vault, the 
running broad jump, the 220-yard hurdles 
and the high jump.. The pole vault record 
went to Chase of Hebron, who' cleared the 
bar at 9 feet, 11 1-2 inches, the previous 
record being held by Quincy of Kent's Hill. 
Thomes of Portland High took the record in 
the high jump at a height of 5 feet, 7 1-2 
inches, while McFarland of Hebron beat the 
record in the broad, going 20 feet, 11 1-2 
inches. Abercrombie of Hebron made the 
220-yard hurdles in the fastest time ever 
made at a Bowdoin meet. 

The following is the summary of the meet : 

100- Yard Dash — First heat won by Lowell of 
Westbrook ; Evans of Bar Harbor, second ; time, 
10 4-5 seconds. Second heat won by Abercrombie 
Westbrook ; Redmond of Hebron, second ; time, 

10 4-5 seconds. Third heat won by Winslow of 
Westbrook ; Redmond of Hebron, isecond ! time, 

11 seconds. Final heat won by Lowell of West- 
brook ; Abercrombie of Hebron, second ; Evans of 
Bar Harbor, third. Time — 10 3-5 seconds. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



63 



120- Yard Hurdles — First heat won by McFarland 
of Hebron; Keogh of Hebron, second; time, 17 
1-5 seconds. Second heat, Abercrombie of Hebron, 
first ; Chapman of Westbrook, second ; time, 18 1-5 
seconds. Final heat won by Abercrombie of 
Hebrori; McFarland of Hebron,, second; Keogh of 
Hebron, third; time, \y 1-5 seconds. 

880- Yard Run — Won by Stinson of Coburn ; 
Coane of Hebron, second ; Hill of Bar Harbor, 
third ; time, 2 minutes, 10 seconds. 

220- Yard Hurdle — Won by Abercrombie of 
Hebron; McFarland of Hebron, second; Valla- 
dares of Westbrook, third. 

440- Yard Dash — Won by Forham of Westbrook ; 
Joy of Hebron, second ; Bicknell of Westbrook, 
third ; time, 55 2-5 seconds. 

220- Yards Dash — Won by Lowell of Westbrook ; 
Chapman of Westbrook, second ; Evans of .Bar 
Harbor, third ; time, 23 4-5 seconds. 

Mile Run — Won by Kenniston of Hebron ; Rich- 
ards of Bar Harbor, second; Winslow of West- 
brook, third; time, 5 minutes, 4 1-5 seconds. 

Putting 16-lb. Shot — Won by Newman of Bar 
Harbor ; Sm'th of Coburn, second ; Cavanaugh of 
Hebron, third; distance, 35 feet, 8J4 inches. 

Throwing 16-lb. Hammer — Won by Andrews of 
Hebron ; Stanley of Hebron, second ; Keogh of 
Hebron, third ; distance, 102 feet, 5-}4 inches. 

Running High Jump — Won by Thomas of Port- 
land ; Smith of Bangor, second ; McKeen of 
Hebron, third ; height. 5 feet, 7J4 inches. 

Pole Vault — Won by A. C. Chase of Hebron ; 
Smith of Bangor, second ; Hall of Westbrook, 
third; height, 9 feet, 11 1 /, inches. 

Runmng Broad Jump — Won by McFarland of 
Hebron; Smith of Coburn, second; Thomes of 
Portland, third; distance, 20 feet, Iij4 inches. 



J 



PROFESSOR BAKER ON DEBATING 



Wednesday afternoon, May 23, Professor 
George P. Baker of Harvard University, gave 
a half-hour talk before the debating course. 
He said in part : 

"I shall interpret my subject very broadly; 
students like the broader meaning, the applica- 
tion debating has to practical affairs. 

"We lose sight of the fact that education is 
a privilege and not a birthright ; only an insig- 
nificant proportion are educated. The chief 
difference between the men in Harvard Col- 
lege and thousands of young men in Boston is 
one only of opportunity. 

''The education that makes a man able to 
think turns him out an educated man. Men 
must think tolerably and persuasively, no mat- 
ter what they study. I have no interest in the 
man who does not try to make himself the 
most effiective in his profession. A man may 
lead two lives ; his professional life, and his 
life in his own community. He has a duty to 
make his life in the community also most 
effective. 



"Opportunities to-day are universally com- 
pared with what they used to be. The college 
man is sure to get a chance. Most people do 
not think. When they do think they have a 
capacity to think wrong. The college man 
has a great chance to set him right. Three 
great resisting forces must be fought in every 
case, ignorance, intolerance and inertia ; to 
meet them the student should develop the two 
qualities of sympathy and trust. 

"From this power of creating sympathy and 
trust, Dean Shaler of Harvard was a born 
leader. You know he was sincere and that 
he had thought about what he said. His 
qualities of sincerity and simplicity endeared 
him. These are what the public wants. 

"I do not believe college men can expect to 
become leaders in the first year or two out of 
college, but they are sure to be in demand 
some day. They must keep their eyes open 
and be active. A man should feel the possi- 
bilities of his leadership. According to the 
sentiment of one of President Cleveland's 
speeches, he should be appreciative, sympa- 
thetic, prompt and sturdy. He should get the 
point of view of the other side." 



"SHAKESPEARE'S LONDON" 

On Wednesday, May 23, Dr. G. P. Baker, 
of Harvard, under the auspices of the Ibis gave 
a stereopticon lecture before a large audience 
in Memorial Hall, on "Shakespeare's Lon- 
don." Dr. Baker first showed pictures of and 
talked about the various streets of old Lon- 
don, then took the audience through London, 
over London Bridge and out to the park 
where most of the theatres of Shakespeare's 
day were situated. After showing several 
views of the exterior of these theatres, Dr. 
[laker went into an extended account of the 
stage details used in Shakespeare's day, and 
illustrated many of his points with pictures 
t?.ken of the very carefully reconstructed 
Shakesperean stage of Harvard. 



ALEXANDER PRIZE SPEAKERS 

The trials for the Alexander prize speakers 
held last week, resulted in the selection of the 
following men to compete for the prize : Red- 
man, '07 ; Pike, '07 ; Briggs, '07 ; Haley, '07 ; 
Hupper, '08; Gould, '08; Morrison, '08; Gas- 
tonguay, '09 ; Cole, '09. 

The alternates selected were Snow, '07 ; 
Leydon, '07; Harris, '09. 



64 



BOWDOlN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Associate Editors 

H. E. WILSON, igo7 R. H. HUPPER, igo8 

H. E. MITCHELL, 1907 R. A. LEE, 1908 

W. S. LINNELL, 1907 H. H. BURTON, 1909 

A. L. ROBINSON, lgo8 J. S. STAHL, igog 

A. L. JONES, Medical 



G. W. CRAIGIE, igc>7 
N. S. WESTON, 1908 



Business Manager 
Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 

Entered at Post-Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
Lewistun Jouknal Press 

Vol. XXXVI. JUNE I, 1906 No. 7 



, , A . Last Saturday's Inter- 
Interscholast.c scholastic Meet proved 

itself one of the best ever 
held. While there was not as many schools 
represented as is sometimes the case, the men 
competing were perhaps the best ever gath- 
ered for a preparatory school meet in the 
State. The work in the hurdles, jumps, 
pole vault and weights, in particular, was of 
a sort that would do credit to any Maine col- 
lege, and it is safe to say that the men who 
took the points will be heard from later in 
college. 

It is unfortunate that ■ there should not 
have been more schools represented. The 
Interscholastic Meet is surely the best time of 
all the 3 f ear for the entertainment of visitors. 
The college is at its best and it comes at a 



lime when all the fraternities are working to 
bring men to the college. Students from the 
various preparatory schools should work 
hard each year to see that their school sends 
a team, even if they cannot win points. It is 
an opportune time for the best work and 
another year there should be more schools on 
hand. 



Our Debating 
Department 



Bowdoin deserves to be 
congratulated on the 
work done in its debating 
department during the past year. A large 
number of men have taken the course, our 
intercollegiate team was victorious, and the 
course has extended its scope. The sending 
out of men for special addresses is worthy oi 
special mention. Members of the course have 
been given real training in public speaking 
before general audiences and the results have 
been very satisfactory, both to the men and 
to the college. In this way the college appears 
before prospective students in a practical 
light. The fact that we have here at Bow- 
doin a thorough course in argumentation, 
credit for work in which is given towards 
the degree, ought to have great weight with 
those men in our preparatory schools who are 
at all interested in debating and who aim to 
be able to express their ideas clearly and logi- 
cally. There is no other course that gives a 
man the power to handle himself and the 
knowledge he gains from other lines of study 
so effectively as a consistent course in debat- 
ing:. The banquet of the Council at 
New Meadows also bad its practical as well 
as its social side, and was only one of the 
features of the course that is making it one of 
the strong departments of the college. 



The season of the Musical 
Musical Clubs Clubs for 1905-6 was com- 
pleted with the annual 
election of the clubs held last Thursday even- 
ing. In every respect the season has been one 
of the best in years. Not only have the clubs 
been of a rare excellence in -musical ability, but 
the season has been completed with a surplus 
of $60.00 in the treasury. The clubs have 
made the usual number of trips during the 
year, and in every place visited they were 
accorded a cordial reception, both in attend- 
ance and in enthusiasm. The work done by 
the clubs in some cities was credited with 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



65 



being the best ever given, and to those who 
have heard the concerts it is certain that the 
statement was no exaggeration. The members 
enjoyed dinner at New Meadows last Tuesday 
evening, where it invested a portion of its sur- 
plus in a shore dinner. The Orient congrat- 
ulates the clubs and the college on the work 
done this year. 



The attention of Seniors 
Class Marching and Juniors should be 

called to the necessity of 
attending the class marching. The marshals 
of both classes are experiencing difficulty in 
getting all of the men to turn out each day, 
and the result is that the perfecting of the 
marching is seriously handicapped. Several 
times during the past few years the class 
marching has not been of the best, 
and the cause was exactly this thing. A few 
men in each class, by their negligence can in 
a large measure spoil the work of those who 
turn out faithfully. There are, doubtless, 
times when many men find it impossible to be 
present, but repeated absences look more like 
a lack of spirit than anything else. Nearly all 
the members of both classes are on hand each 
day. The faithful work of these men should 
not be handicapped by a few others. 

MUSICAL CLUBS DINNER 

The Glee Club season came to a close last 
Monday night in a merry manner when the 
entire musical association indulged in a din- 
ner at New Meadows Inn. A fine banquet 
was provided by the management, after which 
a jolly hour was spent in singing college and 
other songs. The event brought to a close, 
fittingly, one of the most successful years 
that has ever been the lot of any Bowdoin 
Clubs. 



NEW VEREIN MEN 

The men who have been elected • to the 
Deutcher Verein for the next year, are as fol- 
lows : Allen, '07 ; Bower, '07 ; Weed, '07 ; 
Chadbourne, '07; Stetson, '07; Pike, '07; 
Mincher, '07 ; Linnell, '07 ; Duddy, '07 ; Voor- 
hees, '07 ; Bridgham, '08 ; Lee, '08 ; Delevina, 
'08 ; Gray, '08 ; Marsh, '09 ; Jackson, '09 ; 
Brewster, '09. 

The initiation took place at New Meadows 
Inn last Thursday evening. 



MEETING OF TRUSTEES AND OVERSEERS 

Last Tuesday afternoon a meeting of the 
Trustees and Overseers was held in Hubbard 
Hall. The meeting was called to consider a 
resolution proposed by the Carnegie founda- 
tion as a condition of placing Bowdoin College 
in its lists of institutions which are to receive 
retiring allowances for its professors. No 
decision was reached in regard to this resolu- 
tion, but a committee was selected to confer 
widi the Carnegie Institute. This com- 
mittee consists of President Hyde, Gen. T. 
H. Hubbard, Hon. C. F. Libby, Hon. J. P. 
Baxter, and F. C. Payson, Esq.," of Portland. 
Several other matters were considered, but no 
definite action was taken on anything impor- 
tant. 

At this meeting there was an unusually large 
attendance. Out of the 13 trustees, there were 
present President Hyde, Rev. J. S. Sewall, 
lion. J. L. Chamberlain, Hon. W. LeB. 
Putnam, Gen. T. H. Hubbard, Gen. 
O. O. Howard, Rev. S. V. Cole, Hon. 
A. P. Wiswell, and Dr. Edward Stan- 
wood. Of the other three, Chief Justice Ful- 
ler was presiding over the Supreme Court, 
Senator Frye was temporarily presiding over 
the Senate, and Gen. J. M. Brown was ill. 
Out of the 42 Overseers, 16 were present, 
which is a very creditable number considering 
the area over which the members of this board 
are scattered. 

On Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock, the vis- 
iting committee met in Massachusetts Hall, 
and again at 7 o'clock in conjunction with 
the faculty meeting in Hubbard Hall. Of the 
five members of the visiting committee those 
present were Rev. S. V. Cole, S. C. Belcher 
of Farmington, G. F. Cary of East Machias, 
and F. H. Appleton of Bangor. 



SOPHOMORE THEME SUBJECTS 

The last themes of the semester for Sophomores 
not taking English 4. will be due, Tuesday, June 5. 
The subjects are : 

The Influence and Control of Fraternity Houses 
in a Small College. 

Why Bowdoin Should (or Should Not) Join the 
Arbitration Board. 

A College Student's Temptations. 

The Grange: How it Affects the Social, Political, 
and Industrial Life of Maine Farmers. 

Is the Boycott a Legitimate Weapon of the Work- 
ing Man? 

Ruskin's Criticism of Modern Life (See "Crown 
of Wild Olives" and "Sesame and Lilies"). 



66 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CALENDAR 

SATURDAY, JUNE 2D. 

Baseball game with Holy Name team, in Portland. 
5.00 p.m. Juniors leave Brunswick for Banquet 
at the Rossmore. 

MONDAY, JUNE 4-TH. 

2.30 p.m. Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 
Professor Chapman at Bangor Theological Semi- 
nary. 

TUESDAY, JUNE STH. 

Political Economy final examinations at recitation 
hours. 

2.30 p.m. Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 
2.30 p.m. Final examination in German 4. 
Essays competing for Pray English Prize due. 
Last Sophomore themes due. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6TH. 

2.30 p.m. Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 
2.30 p.m. Final examinations in German 2 and 8. 
Professor Chapman at Castine Normal School. 

THURSDAY, JUNE 7TH. 

Political Economy final examinations at recita- 
tion hours. 

Economic reports due. 

11.20 a.m. Prof. McCrea leaves Brunswick for 
the summer. 

2.30 p.m. Baseball practice on Whittier Field. 

8.00 p.m. Dramatic Club presentation of "The 
Rivals" at Town Hall. 

8.00 p.m. Psi Upsilon dance at chapter house. 

8.00 p.m. "The Professor of Heidelberg" at 
Columbia Theatre. Bath. 

FRIDAY, JUNE 8TH. 

Ivy Day. Holiday. Cuts do not count double 
either before or after. 

10.00 a.m. Baseball game with Colbv on Whittier 
Field. 

2.00 p.m. Ivv Day exercises begin in Memorial 
Hall. 

Prayer. Oration, Poem, Presentations. 

Planting of Ivy, Seniors' Last Chapel. 

1907 Bugle and New Bowdoin Song Book will 
appear. 

9.00 p.m. Ivy Hop. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 9TH. 

Baseball game with South Portland team at 
Portland. 



NOTICE 

Professor Ham announces the following schedule 
for the final examinations in his courses. German 
4 on Tuesday, Tune 5, at 2.30 p.m. German 2 and 
German 8 on Wednesday, June 6, at 2.30 p.m. 

Professor McCrea has already explained to his 
classes the system on which the final examinations 
will be given in his courses. The examinations will 
be given at the regular recitation hours on Tuesday, 
June 5, and on Thursday, June 7. Professor Mc- 
Crea will leave Brunswick on Thursday noon, not 
to return this summer, so if any one wishes to 
make special arrangements with him, he should 
do so on or before Wednesday. 



LIBRARY NOTES 

During the past week many books have been 
added to the library, consisting principally of 
old volumes that have just been rebound, and 
presented to the Library for the first time. 
There also have been quite a number of books 
presented to the Library by Bowdoin Alumni. 
Among several presented by Isaac B. Choate, 
'62, may be mentioned "Mary of Magdala," 
by D. Cortez ; '"The Nation Builder," by Bacon 
and Wheeler; "Argumentation and Debate," 
by Laycock and Scales, and "Irish History and 
the Irish Question" by G. Smith. Among 
other gifts are four bound volumes of the 
"National Geographical Magazine," presented 
by Austin Gary, '87, and "The Development 
oi the American Merchant Marine," presented 
by E. C. Plummer, '87. The library has also 
recently purchased a very well written and well 
edited book on "The Bahama Islands" by 
Professor G. B. Shattuck of Johns Hopkins 
Universitv, and three volumes of "The Politi- 
cal Historv of England," by T. F. Tout, which 
is just being published in a set of twelve vol- 
umes, all of which, however, are not yet avail- 
able. 



MUSICAL CLUB ELECTIONS 

The annual election of the Musical Clubs 
was held last Thursday evening, and resulted 
in the choice of the following men : 

Manager — H. E. Wilson, '07. 

Assistant Manager — A. H. Ham, '08. 

Leader of Glee Club— A. O. Pike, 07. 

Leader of Mandolin Club — T. W. Win- 
ched, '07. 



ALPHA KAPPA KAPPA BANQUET 

The annual banquet and installation of officers of 
the Alpha Kappa Kappa Medical Fraternity was 
held at Riverton last Monday evening. About 40 
members were present and a most enjoyable evening 
passed. Francis J. Welch acted as toast-master and 
speeches were made by the grand president, Dr. 
George Cook of Concord, N. H.. Dr. Frederick H. 
Gerrish, Dr. John F. Thompson, Dr. Addison S. 
Thayer, Dr. Edwin M. Fuller of Bath, and Dr. G. 
M. Elliott of Brunwick. One pleasing feature of 
the after-dinner exercises was the presentation of 
a fraternity pin to. Dr. Gerrish, the speech being 
made by Toast-master Welch. 

The following is a list of the officers installed: 
President, Olin S. Pettengill ; Vice-President, Geo. 
Parcher ; Recording Secretary, Willard H. Bunker ; 
Corresponding Secretary, Arthur L. Jones ; Treas- 
urer, Sidney L. Pendexter; Marshal, Walter R. Mer- 
ril ; Warden, John L. Murphy ; Chaplain, Elmer M. 
Cleaves. 



bowdoin orient 



67 



College Botes 



Merry-meeting Park will open on June II. 

There was no chapel exercises last Wednesday 
morning. 

Powers, '09, has been visiting his home in Skow- 
hegan this week. 

The D. K. E. Fraternity dined at the Gurnet last 
Saturday evening. 

Powers, '06, has been visting at Brookline, Mass., 
for some time past. 

The Orient will contain a review of the last 
Quill in its next issue. 

The ball team will meet the Holy Name nine in 
Portland this afternoon. 

The last Economics recitations for the year 
occurred last Thursday. 

Tobey, '06, and Paine, '06, returned from Long- 
wood last Thursday evening. 

D. B. Andrews, '06, has accepted a position with 
the International Banking Co. 

Laferriere, '01, of Hebron Academy, was in 
Brunswick, Saturday and Sunday. 

The Orient is delayed one day this week because 
of the holiday in the printing office. 

The Second team won its game with Gardiner 
Memorial Day by the score of 11 to 3. 

Gen. Chamberlain spoke at Freeport last Satur- 
day at the dedication of the soldiers' monument. 

The Musical Clubs dined at New Meadows last 
Monday evening, and a pleasant evening enjoyed. 

The College Band furnished the music for the 
Memorial Day exercises in Brunswick on Wednes- 
day. 

The Alpha "Sigmas of Brunswick will play the 
Bath High team on the Whittier Field this after- 
noon. 

Principal and Mrs. Sargent of Hebron Academy, 
were present at the Interscholastic Meet last Sat- 
urday. 

The engagement of Harvey Philip Winslow, '06, 
of Portland, to Miss Clara Ella Farmer of Portland, 
is announced. 

The annual Freshman "set up" of the Theta Delta 
■Chi Fraternity took pkee at the Gurnet last Thurs- 
day evening. 

A number of students attended the dance given 
by the- Brunswick High basketball team last Tues- 
day evening. 

The Junior Class will hold their banquet at the 
Rossmore this evening. The members will leave at 
S o'clock by team. 

Harry L. Wiggin of the Worcester Military 
School, was the guest of Professor W. T. Foster, 
the first of the week. 

The song book which is being prepared by Foster, 
'05, and Allen, '07, will appear on Ivy Day. All who 
have not already ordered should be sure and secure 
one at this time. No pains have been spared to 
make the collection one that all Bowdoin men will 
want. 



The Brunswick Golf Club held a tournament on 
Memorial Day in which Mitchell, '07, won the 
handicap championship. 

The second team did not go to Fryeburg Saturday, 
as scheduled, the game being cancelled at the 
request of the academy team. 

Preliminary arrangements are being made for a 
Sophomore-Freshman prize debate, which it is 
hoped will be held next spring. 

"The Rivals" is being presented by the Amherst 
College Dramatic Club, and, as at Bowdoin, will be 
one of the events of their Junior week. 

The History Club met at the home of Professor 
Allen Johnson on Federal Street last evening. A 
paper on "Pemaquid" was read by Hatch, '07. 

Snow, '07, and Roberts, '07, went to Auburn, last 
Thursday evening, where they listened to the lec- 
ture of Elbert Hubbard, the leader of the Roycroft- 
ers. 

Wednesday was a quiet day on the campus. A 
number of students attended the ball game at Lew- 
iston, while a large number visited their homes in 
nearby places. 

The Bangor Commercial of last Monday con- 
tained a photograph of Cushing, '09, in connection 
with a write-up concerning his appointment as 
chapel organist. 

Weston, '08, left this week for his home in 
Augusta, from where he will go into the woods for 
the summer. He has a position in connection with 
the Somerset Railroad extension. 

Woodruff, '06, and Wing, '06. left this week for 
New York, where they will enter the employ of the 
International Banking Co. They took their final 
examinations before their departure. 

The Orient is obliged to omit an account of the 
Longwood tennis meet in this issue. Both Tobey 
and Paine did fine work in the meet, and were 
only defeated in the semi-finals after a hard battle. 

The first college sing of the year was scheduled 
to lie held on the Art Building steps last evening. 
It is planned to hold another in the near future, 
though no date can be definitely stated as yet. 
Notice will be posted on the bulletin board. 

The students in Philosophy 7, who are now study- 
ing insanity, made a visit to the State Insane Asy- 
lum at Augusta last Monday, through the courtesy 
of Dr. Burnett. This took the place of the regular 
Tuesday recitation. 

Haines, '08, and Ham, 'oS, who represented Bow- 
doin at the Vermont tennis tournament, returned 
to Brunswick the latter part of the week. Tobey, 
'06, and Paine, '06, did not return and remained 
away until after the Longwood Meet. 

Miss Sue Winchell played on the 'cello in the Y 
Congregational Church for the last time this spring 
on Sunday, the 27th of May. Miss Winchell has 
accepted a position in a Boston orchestra for the 
summer, and it is for this reason that she is now 
leaving Brunswick. She will be much missed here 
for her beautiful 'cello playing not only added 
much to the services at the college church, but Miss 
Winchell has also played at several regular college 
functions, where her music has always been highly 
appreciated. 



68 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



McDade, '09, has been in Portsmouth, N. H., this 
week, where he is learning the work on the street 
railway in order to be able to accept a position there 
during the summer months. Among other Bowdoin 
men who expect to be employed at the same work- 
are Kingsley, '07, Duddy, '07, Small, '07. W. T. 
Rowe, '05, and Stacey, '09. 

Clark College defeated Tufts in debate in their 
annual contest which was held last week. The ques- 
tion was "Resolved, That it would be for the best 
interests of the United States that the Panama Canal 
zone should be neutralized by joint agreement of 
the powers." Clark had the affirmative. The con- 
test was the second one held between the two col- 
leges, both of which have been won by Clark. 



FACULTY NOTES 

On June 4 Professor Chapman will preside at a 
meeting of the trustees of the Bangor Theological 
Seminary, and on the following Wednesday will be 
present at a meeting of the trustees of Castine Nor- 
mal School. Professor Chapman will also attend 
the graduation of the Farmington and Gorham 
academies, of both of which institutions he is a 
trustee. 

Professor Foster to-day is visiting Washington 
Academy, which is one of Bowdoin's special fitting 
schools, and is scheduled to speak there before the 
scholars. 

Professor McCrea will leave Brunswick on Thurs- 
day noon to attend to some important business 
before sailing for Germany with Professor Ham on 
the fifteenth or sixteenth of June. 

Professor Robinson returned from Washington 
and New York last Saturday evening. Besides 
attending to the business connected with the prepa- 
rations for the next annual meeting of the Ameri- 
can Public Health Association, he attended the meet- 
ing of the Chemical Club in Boston last Friday 
evening. 



IVY DAY ARRANGEMENTS 

The work of arranging for Bowdoin's Ivy Day is 
now well along and the indications point to a most 
successful event. The evening before "The Rivals" 
will be presented in the Town Hall and doubtless 
this will bring many friends of the college to Bruns- 
wick earlier than they would otherwise come. The 
play is a strong one. the caste excellent, and it is 
safe to predict a large attendance. The Psi Upsilon 
Fraternity will also entertain its friends with a 
dancing party on this evening. 

The ball game of the next morning will take place 
at 10 o'clock, the opposing team being Colby. 
Although the contest will be but an exhibition game 
it will be worth seeing, and as is usually the case, 
there will probably be one of the largest crowds of 
the year on hand. 

The Junior exercises will be held in Memorial 
Hall at 2 p.m., immediately after which will occur 
the planting of the Ivy and the Seniors' last chapel. 
In addition to the Bugle this year, will appear the 
Collection of Bowdoin Songs which have been com- 
piled by Foster, '05.. and Allen, '07. This will be 
placed on sale during the day and both will doubt- 



less have a large sale. The new book is 
intended to be a fine collection of songs and the 
printing and other details are to be of the best. The 
book deserves a large sale. The Bugle is too well- 
well at Bowdoin to need an introduction. 

The Ivy hop will occur at 9 p.m. The music will 
be by Pullen of Bangor, who will also furnish music 
for the afternoon exercises. 



MODERN LANGUAGE COURSES 

Department of Spanish. 

The following courses to be given by Assistant 
Professor Ham : 

Spanish 1 and 2. Grammar, composition and 
reading of modern stories and pJays. Hills and 
Ford: Spanish Grammar (D. C. Heath & Co.). 
Ramsay: Spanish Reader (H. Holt & Co.). Mon- 
day, Wednesday, Friday, at 11.30. 

Omitted in 1907-1908 : 

Spanish 3 and 4. Outline of the History of 
Spanish Literature with reading of representative 
works. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 11.30. 

Omitted in 1906-1907; to be given in 1907-1908: 
Courses 1 and 2 are to alternate in successive years 
with courses 3 and 4. Courses 1 and 2 are counted 
for the degree of A.B. only when both are taken 
in the same year. 

Department of German. 

The following elective courses for 1906-1907 will 
be given by Professor Files : 

German 3 and 4. Advanced Prose Composition 
with reading, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, at 
10.30. 

German 5 and 6. Reading of modern German 
authors with sight practice, Tuesday, Thivsrday, 
Saturday, at 8.30. 

German 7 and 8. Lectures on the History of 
German Literature with collateral reading Tues- 
day, Thursday, Saturday at n^Oy 

German 9 and 10. Life and Woa-ks of Lessing. 
Students who wish to elect courses 9 and 10 must 
consult the instructor in advance. These courses 
will meet in the evening at hours to be determined 
later. 



CHEMISTRY CLUB 

The Chemistry Club met a* the Beta Theta Pi 
House on the evening of May 25th, with Copeland, 
'06. There were 14 members present. The 
speaker of the evening was Henry D. Evans, .Bow- 
doin, '01, who is State Chemist at the State Labor- 
atory at Augusta. Mr. Evans talked on the sub- 
ject of "Drinking Water." His talk was very 
interesting and highly appreciated by the club. He 
spoke of drinking water in general and more par- 
ticularly of the drinking water of the State of 
Maine. After the talk by Mr. Evans an informal 
discussion ensued in which all the members of the 
club participated. Following this refreshments 
were served and the evening concluded with a 
hearty, social intermingling of the memebrs. 

The next meeting of the club will be the business 
meeting to be held at New Meadows Inn on June 
nth. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



69 



BASEBALL NOTES 

** The baseball management has arranged for the 
return dale with South Portland to take plaee on 
Whittier Field Wednesday, June 27. As announced 
last week, "Pup" Williams will pitch the game, 
and it is expected that "Jim" Clarke, captain of 
last year's team, w.ll play left field for the visitors. ' 

The date arranged for the postponed game with 
Colby at Waterville will be June 16. It is possible 
that the game may not be played, since if Colby 
wins all her other games she can claim the cham- 
pionship beyond dispute, and the game would not 
be necessary. If, however, Colby should lose any 
of her thre: remain ng games, Bowdoin would have 
the opportunity of tieing for the championship, and 
the game would be the most important of the 
season. 

Coach Irwin left last Saturday, to take charge of 
his summer hotel business. However, he will be 
on hand at the Harvard game, and if it becomes 
necessary to pjay the Colby game it is expected that 
he will come down a short time before in order to 
get the men in the best possible form. 



SEVENTH FRESHMAN DEBATE 

Debate for Division A on Wednesday. May 23, at 
2.30 p.m. ; for Division B on Thursday, May 24, at 
8..0 A.M. 

Question : Resolved, That Arizona and New 
Mexico should be admitted to the Union as one 
state. (For Division A.) 

Affirmative: Bower, Garcelon, Newman, F. T. 
Smith. Negative : Burton, Carter, Goodspeed. 

Question : Resolved, That the United States 
should establish a system of shipping subsidies. 
(For Division B.) 

Affirmative : dishing. Manter, Stahl. Negative : 
Harlow. Harris, Sparks. 



BOWDOIN'S MEMORIAL DAY SPEAKERS 

Among this year's Memorial Day orators in Maine 
are noted the following Bowdoin graduates : Gen. 
O. O. Howard, '50, at Togus ; Gen. J. L. Chamber- 
lain, '53, at York; Col. A. W. Bradbury, '60, at 
Buckfield ; Hon. Augustine Simons, '71, at Skowhe- 
gan; Hon. H. M. Heath, '72, at Brunswick; Profes- 
sor A. E. Rogers, '76. at Bucksport ; Edward B. 
Burpee, '87, at Rockland ; Judge F. L. Staples, '89, 
at Bath ; Prof. W. B. Mitchell, '90, at Freeport ; 
John Clair Minot, '96, at Houlton ; Rev. H. E. Dtin- 
nack '97, at Belgrade ; and Frank L. Dutton, '99, at 
Winthrop. 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 




I want to have n pursonal talk with every Bowdoin College 
lilOG man who will be in the market for n good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
litted to fill. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do alter graduation. 

A. S. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPQOOD'S 



PULSIFER'S 
5 AND 10 GERT ST0RE 

Now Open for Business. 
J. W. PULSIFER, - - MAINE STREET, BRUNSWICK 



Visit our 

ICE=CREAM 

PARLOR. 




119 Maine Street 
CATERING in all departments a Specialty. 



GFoeerdes and JVIcats 

FISH FRIDAYS 
WM. HAMILTON, GROCER 

MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK 

Yale University 



SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 



A seven weeks' course In Forestry at Milford, Pike County, 
Pa., under the direction of the Faculty of Yale Forest School. 
Sixth annual session opens July 5, 1906. Designed for students 
considering forestry as a profession, those about to enter the 
lumber business, owners of woodlots, etc. 
For further information address 

Prof. Henry S. Graves, New Haven, Conn. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




For Your Summer Vacation 

Why not make it profitable to you if you need the money? If 
you do nut need the money, you will want something extra, and 
you might as well earn a lillle something. (experience does not 
count. If you are honest and industrious and really in earnest, 
wi' will stand by you ami help you to a handsome income. 
There is more than an ordinary living in this. You can make 
more than your next season's college expenses. We give you 
full instructions and furnish you with an outfit at cost, money to 
be refunded you when you turn in the outfit, so that you are 
virtually running no risk whatever. You will be your own 
master or mistress of your own time and movements. When 
you wish to work, you can work with the energy and spirit of 
one who is his own employer. You can make $3.00 per day 
and upward above all expenses. Communicate with us at once. 

THE CLEVIS CLEVER CUTTER CO., 

FREMONT, OHIO 



Bowdoin Calendars 

ON SALE at HALf P^SCE 

(50 Cents) 

WOODRUFF, '06, or 
BY5J0N STEVENS' BOOKSTORE 



THE MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

lias a carefully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; Clinical Conferences; Modified Seminar Methods, anil thoroughly Practical Instruction. Particular attention 
lo laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre Is the largest and finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every respect, and the new laboratories are specially planned and equipped for 'individual work by the students. 

The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of'Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 
SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of Medicine. 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By the omission of the take down feature we have 
been able to greatly reduce the cost of production and at the same time have kept the sun up to the 
famous high /7Zai/in standard of strength, safely and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
s are especially bored for smokeless as well as black powder and so chambered that 2% inch or 
; may be used.^ Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 
irking gun in existence. We are glad to make it_ possible for every lover of guns 



2% inch she'L .. 

reliable and best l 

nd bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so low a price. 
"—8 your dealer order it for you. 



Ha 



Send for the 7/Ztzr/az Catalogue an J Experience Book to-day. Free for 3 stamps. 
7n&2fflazd£I2 jFirear/nS dtt^Willow Street, New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 




Harold E. Wilson 
Manager 1906 Ball Team 




Robert J. Hodgson Jr 
Captain 1906 Team 





... 


/» r- 






i. / •:■,.-" ' 










1 ' 1 Hi M 




in Di ^ 








Jv^ : 




E 




s 


19 








W 




rS 


; : s''--'B|. 






'-''■'.■•'!•■■ 


w 


' : §^Bb 


"•'' W 








m 


mt 


g 1 SfflJ! 








I 


"m 


fa v>il«i ■ 


i 






^r 




if 


* ..: a 








vW 


■fr- 








.^iLj 












George H. Hull 
Chaplain 





Charles W. So 






Earle H. MacMichael 
Chairman Ivy Committee 



Asa O. Pike 
Ivy Committee 



Cornelius F. Doherty 
Ivy Committee 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 8, 1906 



NO. 8 



IVY DAY 



To-day is Ivy Day at Bowdoin, and, like its 
predecessors, is one of the greatest days of the 
year. This afternoon occur the literary exer- 
cises of the Class of 1907, consisting of the 
presentations, the oration, the reading of the 
poem and the singing of the ode. In addition 
to this the day is observed by the Seniors' 
Last Chapel, the planting of the ivy, the 
appearance of the Bugle and other features. 
The Orient takes pleasure in presenting the 
oration, the poem, and the ode in this issue. 



^. The Oration 

The oration was delivered by Aubrey J. 
Voorhees. His subject was "The Municipal 
Problem," and was as follows : 

Who of a century ago would recognize the mod- 
ern United States? A century ago we were a small 
nation, with but little influence among the nations 
of the world and hardly able to maintain our honor 
and self-respect against the aggressions of England, 
France and the Barbary States. To-day this con- 
dition of affa : rs has completely changed. Politically 
we have grown from a nation, despised and insig- 
nificant, into one of the Powers of the world. Eco- 
nomically we have become the strongest country in 
Christendom. Not the least of these changes have 
been the growth and development of the city. In 
New York City to-day there are more people than 
there were in 1776 in our whole country. In the 
growth of the city better chances of development — 
mental, physical, moral and social — have been pro- 
vided, as is evidenced by the modern public school 
and even college; by the libraries, art buildings and 
museums ; and by the parks, gymnasiums, and play- 
grounds ; but on the other hand, competition has 
become keener and more relentless, the poor have 
ben forced into the cheap boarding house and into 
the crowded tenement, and as a result we have our 
terrible slums, which are a blot on our otherwise 
fair cities. Of the black side of city life, Professor 
Thomas H. Huxley says: "Anyone who is acquainted 
with the state of the population in all the great 
industrial centers is aware that amidst a large and 
ever-increasing body of that population, there reigns 
supreme that condition which the French call 
la misere. It is a condition in which the food, 
warmth and clothing necessary for the mere main- 
tenance of the functions of. the body in their normal 
state cannot be obtained ; in which men, women, and 
children are forced to crowd into dens wherein 



decency is abolished, and the most ordinary condi- 
tions of healthful existence are impossible of attain- 
ment; in which the pleasures within reach are 
reduced to brutality and drunkenness ; in which the 
pains accumulate at compound interest in the shape 
of starvation, disease and stunted development, and 
moral degradation ; in which the prospect of steady 
and even honest employment is a life of unsuccessful 
battling with hunger, rounded by a pauper's grave. 
We are confronted by a contradiction. On the one 
hand we see splendid chances for moral, mental and 
physical development ; on the other hand, in the face 
of those opportunities, we see parts of our cities 
filled with ragged, dirty-faced children, unkempt, 
sickly, haggard women, and listless, whiskey-gorged 
men. Is there no remedy for this contradiction? 
These poor sium dwellers do not live so from choice. 
Is the cause of their condition to be found in our 
institutions; is our government at fault; have we 
too much democracy, and are we Americans unfitted 
to the task of governing ourselves ? 

The mass of the people in our large American 
cities have no voice in the government. Theoreti- 
cally they have, but in practice the government of 
our large cities is conducted by a "privileged few." 
These few do not care whether Republicans or Dem- 
ocrats are in power. They are usually the heads of 
big corporations. Their only anxiety is for their 
dividends. Many of those men have made their 
fortunes out of the public through securing "privi- 
leges" in the form of franchises. For instance, on 
the Bronx and Manhattan, in New York, the secur- 
ities for surface railways, and gas and electric light- 
ing plants are valued at $4,000,000,000.00. The physi- 
cal property of these corporations is worth but $126,- 
oco 000.00. In other words, the city has given these 
corporations franchises worth $175,000,000.00, in 
return for which the city has not received one cent. 
Nay, in return for those franchises they secured only 
graft and corruption. To obtain the franchises the 
corporatons will willingly offer bribes, as in St. 
Louis a few years ago, when bribery entered every 
department of government. In St. Louis the boss 
was the agent of the corporations. It was the boss 
who organized the government of the city by domi- 
neering the caucus and the election ; it was the boss 
who was the mediator between the dishonest city 
officials and the corporation, and it was the boss 
who grew by means of his bribes from a poor black- 
smith into a multi-millionaire. In Philadelphia we 
have seen in the recent exposure how the "city ring" 
has grown until it has reached our United States 
Senate. The boss of Philadelphia sits in our Sen- 
ate, and dictates the government of Philadelphia in 
the interests of the corporations. These cases are 
extreme, but they are typical. We Americans are 
notoriously easy-going. We pride ourselves on our 
democratic government. We will endure being 
ruled, as long as we do not see the hand that rules 
us. But our large cities are not truly democratic, 



72 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



for the people do not control the government, but 
must endure such government as the "privileged 
few" are willing to give them. Herein is the cause 
of the bad condition of our large cities. The cor- 
porations do not care for the people. Their only 
concern is their dividends. To make their dividends 
large, they do not scruple at bribery or any dishon- 
esty; they maneuvre to keep in office officials who 
will be their agents and tools. The people look on 
and only spasmodically protest. No, we Americans 
are not unfitted to the task of ruling ourselves. We 
have not all had a chance. If we shall ever solve 
the problem of the black side of our city life, we 
must have more and a purer democracy. 

To secure a wider democracy, and to help the 
shimmers, we must take from the oppressive cor- 
porations that which belongs to the cities. Trans- 
portation, light, water, heat and power, are natural 
monopolies, and are necessities of life. The con- 
trol of these should not be in the hands of a few 
grasping, unscrupulous men. In many of our large 
cities conditions have become so unbearable that 
the long-suffering peopile have been roused from 
their lethargy, and have been practically forced to 
assume control of the light, heat, water, and power. 
New York has awakened and besides other munici- 
pal property, has invested profitably $200,000000 in 
docks ; Chicago annually receives $125,000,000 from 
her water works ; corrupt Cincinnati, and Detroit, 
Wheeling and Seattle have roused themselves, and 
find profit in the municipal ownership of the neces- 
sities of life. In none of these instances has there 
been financial failure, nor has the service been infe- 
rior to that rendered by private monopolies. On the 
other hand, the people have taken greater pride in 
their city, they have become keener critics, and by 
their interest they have stirred the officials to a high 
sense of their duties. 

In the discussion of municipal ownership one 
point has commonly been overlooked. We do not 
usually perceive the relationship between the slum 
problem and the municipal ownership of the trans- 
portation lines. Yet in the municipal ownership of 
the traction lines is wrapped part of the solution of 
the slum question. In Glasgow, Liverpool, and the 
other large English cities, the slum problem was 
formerly about the same as it is in our large Ameri- 
can cities. In 1894 Glasgow assumed control of the 
traction lines, improved the equipment, and reduced 
the car fares thirty per cent. In spite of private 
opposition, and in spite of reduced fares, the Glas- 
gow traction lines are a profitable investment to the 
city ; London, Manchester and Leeds own all or part 
o.f their traction lines. Liverpool assumed control 
of hers in 1894. By 1903 the number of passengers 
carried increased one hundred and ninety^four per 
cent, and the receipts in the same time grew eighty 
per cent., in spite of the fact that the wages of the 
employees were raised, the hours of employment 
reduced, and the car fares cut down fifty per cent. 
We in America have only begun to think of the 
municipal ownership of the street railways. Chicago 
is struggling in an attempt to take over her trac- 
tion lines, but the corporations are madly fighting to 
retain their monopoly. Yet in assuming control of 
the local traction lines, the English cities have com- 
menced to solve the slum problem. By reducing 
the car fares the dwellers of the slums can afford 
to live away from the slums in the suburbs and in 



the country, and yet be in touch with their daily 
work. We will find it so in Chicago, and in all our 
big cities. At present the tenement dwellers cannot 
afford to ride daily to and from their work in the 
city. Yet if Glasgow could profitably reduce her 
car fares thirty-three percent., and if Liverpool could 
reduce hers fifty per cent., surely we Americans 
could do so. The tendency to-day is toward the 
municipal ownership of the local traction company. 
If the municipal ownership of the street railways 
will help the slum and tenement problem in even the 
slightest degree, certainly we should use our influ- 
ence to hasten this desirable result. 

To take over the traction companies will not be 
easy. The rich, influential men do not want to give 
up their profits. Naturally these men oppose reform. 
On the patronage of these men depend a large pro- 
portion of the press, many of our lawyers, and prac- 
tically all the politicians. They will not offend their 
patrons. Thus we have a powerful class which will 
oppose at every turn any and all reform that hurts 
their dividends. Therefore it is with the educated 
common people that reform must begin. They, and 
they alone, must work their own salvation, by strik- 
ing at graft and dishonesty in politics, and also by 
assuming control of their birthright — the natural 
monopoly. The struggle will not be easy. Rather 
it will be the hardest problem the people have ever 
worked out, but it must be faced. In assuming con- 
trol of the traction companies, the cities will be tak- 
ing a course which vitally concerns their welfare, 
just as in opposing municipal ownership of the 
traction lines, the corporations will be looking after 
their own private interests. It is with the people, 
the intelligent people, that we. the members of the 
Class of 1907, must ally ourselves. The college man 
occupies a peculiar position. For four years he stud- 
ies the theories of Economics and Sociology; he 
learns the true conditions which exist in the slums 
of our large cities and he knows what causes these 
conditions. Moreover, by his training he learns in 
theory how these conditions can be remedied and 
improved. Surely every college man would be 
ashamed of joining forces with those who seek to 
keep in subjection the oppressed slum dweller. No, 
classmates, our college training must not be for 
naught. We must endeavor to put in pfactice what 
we have learned in theory, and by joining forces 
with the educated common people we must try to 
lift up from their deadening environment our igno- 
rant and less fortunate countrymen. 



The Poem 

The poem was by Charles W. Snow, and 
was as follows: 

O soul of song, 
Unheeded in this latter day 
By us who oft recall that we are clay, 
We need thy power in our joyous throng. 
Dark commerce clouds have brooded o'er our time 
And limited the upward look sublime. 
Against this sordid spirit, which enthralls, 
A stand is made in academic halls 
To keep the fire on the altar bright. 
And shed throughout the world a ray of light. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



73 



O kindly mother, *" 

Whose bosom for a hundred years, 
Has nourished warriors, poets, statesmen, seers, 
Thine altar softer shines than any other. 
The mystic meaning of thy lonely child 
Has wreathed a halo 'round the undefined ; 
The murmuring music of thy soulful bard 
Has cheered our journey over many a shard; 
And all thy great ones, both alive and dead, 
Have laid their choicest laurels on thy head. 

Now we to-day, 
The heirs of all the century's store 
Of priceless culture and of learned lore, 
Owe thee a debt we never can repay. 
The memories thronging 'round historic halls, 
Commingling joy with pathos that extols, 
The fragrant campus and perennial pines, 
The arching elms in solemn, stately lines, — 
These still, small voices of a higher life 
Have made us stronger for the future strife. 

But best of all 
The endearing thoughts of friendly ties, 
Which bid us out of narrowness arise, 
And deeply feel the universal call. 
As yonder elms join heads across the path 
In Nature's recompense for winter's wrath, 
And form a gothic archway high and grand, 
So we in spring of life join heart and hand 
To form an arch of beauty, love and power, 
Our Alma Mater's pride, and richest dower. 

Too soon they're o'er, 
These happy, careless, four sweet years, 
When fancies seldom lie too deep for tears ; 
For we are children playing on the shore. 
We love to hear the yeasty billows roll, 
And sport with dangerous combers near the shoal. 
We've caught a glimpse of ocean from the strand, 
And must away from harsh, enslaving land ; 
We pine to be released from every rod 
And sail the virgin seas which lead to God. 

Wild dreams of youth, 
Those blessed visions bright and dear, 
Like glistening dewdrops 'neath the arc-light clear, 
Appear at times to hold no grain of truth. 
Yet culture's freedom through it all can find 
A better social life for all mankind, 
A yearning for the Eden life again, 
When God in cooling gardens talked with. men. 
And though old progress slowly oft doth seem. 
At last, at last our hope will reign supreme. 



The Ode 



The ode was by G. A. Duddy, and was as 
follows : 

Air — Fair Harvard. 

Let the hearts that have loved thee since first they 
have known 
The sweet care of a mother so dear, 
Pledge the love that they bear the allegiance they 
own, 
In a tribute to her they revere. 



Round thy gray, hoary walls we will plant the green 
vine, 

And the hearts of those gathered to-day, 
With their protests of love let the ivy entwine, 

Until all the long years roll away. 

When the long years have passed with their sorrows 
and joys, 

And we meet as in good Auld Lang Syne, 
May sweet mem'ry recall the day when here as boys 

We planted the green ivy vine. 
And fresh in our hearts, as the vine on the walls. 

May the love of old Bowdoin still cling, 
Till the last moss-grown stone of the old chapel 
falls, 

And the chapel bell ceases to ring. 



THE MAY QUILL 

As compared with the April number, the 
May Quill has the advantage of being the 
work of undergraduates practically through- 
out. Graduate contributions, however impor- 
tant and desirable in themselves, cannot logi- 
cally be more than an occasional feature of an 
undergraduate publication. On the other 
hand, the editors ought not to be compelled, 
as in this instance, to furnish nearly every arti- 
cle, although they can properly find their 
reward in the consciousness of duty well per- 
formed. 

The personality and services of Luther Bur- 
bank make a fresh and interesting subject, 
which is treated in an unconventional way. 
Its author shows himself capable of looking 
beyond the college campus, and does not shape 
his ideas to conform to the regular college pat- 
tern. This freedom of thought and phrase is 
stimulating and attractive. More of it would 
be an excellent thing in the student communi- 
ty, and must somehow be had if col- 
lege graduates are to claim the individ- 
uality which is denied them by certain 
eminent but ungraduated literary per- 
sonages. But raggedness of form, acerbity 
of tone, and enthusiastic surrender to 
eccentric leadership are perils which seriously 
beset the path of those who "walk with bare 
feet in the presence of mightier Enlighten- 
ment." Perhaps the first peril is more imme- 
diate in the case of the writer in question. 
The less technical terms in chemistry and of 
the sciences in general, often give point to an 
illustration ; but "valence" and "saturated 
characteristic" are little better than Greek to 
the layman. Some incongruity too suggests 

(Continued on page 75.) 



74 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 

h. e. wilson, 1907 r. h. hupper, 1908 

h. e. mitchell, 1907 r. a. lee, 1908 

w. s. linnell, 1907 h. h. burton, 1909 

A. L. ROBINSON, 1908 J. S. STAHL, igog 

A. L. JONES, Medical 



G. W. CRAIGIE, igo7 Business Manager 

N. S. WESTON, 1908 Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 

Entered at Post-Oftice at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
Lewiston Journal Press 

Vol. XXXVI. JUNE 8, 1906 No. 8 



To the Class of 1907 and 
Ivy Day to all who join it in the cel- 

ebration of its Ivy Day the 
Orient brings special greetings and congrat- 
ulations. May the day prove one of happiness 
without alloy, and may all its time-honored 
ceremonies and exercises be most successfully 
carried out. For over forty years successive 
Bowdoin classes have celebrated Ivy Day until 
around it there have gathered many of the tra- 
ditions dearest to our hearts as Bowdoin men. 
Many sister colleges have borrowed the cus- 
tom, as they have others originating at Bow- 
doin, but this of course, is a compliment of 
which we are proud rather than an occasion 
for resentment. Other colleges may have 
such a day, but for us there is only one Ivy 
Dav, and each class in turn is satisfied bevond 



any doubt that there never was, and never 
will be, any other Ivy Day like its own. 

This day brings us sharply to the realiza- 
tion that the college year is almost at an end. 
The Seniors in particular, as they participate 
in the beautiful ceremony of Seniors' Last 
Chapel, are forced to realize that the day of 
separation and farewell is close at hand. That 
exercise is one of the finest and most impressive 
of all the college year, and after taking part 
in it "Auld Lang Syne" always has a deeper 
and more precious significance to the heart of 
a Bowdoin man. In some of its features Ivy 
Day has changed as the years have passed. 
More social functions are connected with it 
than there used to be, and the baseball games 
in the morning has been a feature for only a 
decade or so. In the old times there was 
usually a class boat race on the river in the 
morning, the last of these taking place in 1894. 
In some years the inter-class field day sports 
were held in the morning over on the Topsham 
track. 

There has been practically no change, how- 
ever, for more than a generation in the after- 
noon exercises, and the oration, the poem and 
the presentations, as well as the planting of the 
Ivy and the Ivy dance, have been established 
fixtures. To the alumni, Ivy Day has less 
interest than many other occasions during the 
college year, but to the undergraduates, and 
especially to the Juniors and their guests, it is 
the gala day of the year and an occasion never 
to be forgotten. Some of the ivies that have 
been planted have flourished and many others 
have failed to, but the memories of the day 
entwine themselves around the hearts of all 
who participate and become one of the strong- 
est of the many ties that bind us to Bowdoin 
and to our classmates. 

-f 

Bowdoin's baseball season, 
so far as championship 
games are concerned, is 
now closed, except for the one remaining 
game with Colby. As to whether this will be 
of any importance remains to be seen 
and depends entirely on whether the Water- 
ville college wins her two Bates games. Be 
I his as it may, every student believes Bowdoin 
has a remarkably strong team this year. The 
nine is one of which it may be truly said that 
there is no really weak place. It is very sel- 
dom that a Maine college team does not have 
at least one position that "goes begging." But 



The Baseball 
Season 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



75 



the Bowdoin team this year has had no such 
position. Every man has held his place by his 
ability to play ball and the result is that .the 
team has been a very strong one — perhaps the 
strongest in a number of years. The results 
of two of the games — those with Brown and 
Andover — showed the ability of the team when 
at its best. The games lost have been at times 
when the men were not putting up the game 
of which they were capable, and it is not too 
much to say the defeats have been in the 
nature of "hard luck." We may yet have a 
chance to tie for first place in the Maine col- 
lege series, but whether we do or not, there is 
no reason to doubt that the team has been one 
of the best in recent vears. 



This year the Y. M. C. A. 

V. M. C. A. Work work, as a whole, did not 
meet with great success, 
although the reception to the Freshmen went 
off well, the hand-book was published, the 
gymnasium thrown open to Brunswick boys 
on Saturday morning, and a considerable 
number of successful Sunday meetings were 
held after chapel. Next year there is to be a 
decided attempt to put the association again on 
its feet, and have it play a real part in the life 
of the college. 

There is now a very evident need of a bet- 
ter place than that afforded by Banister Hall 
in which to hold the meetings. Some mem- 
bers of the faculty have very kindly volun- 
teered aid in this direction, and it is now 
hoped either to remodel Banister Hall, or to 
make over a large room up-stairs in the back 
part of the chapel, which may be devoted 
entirely to Y. M. C. A. purposes, an arrange- 
ment not possible if Banister Hall was used. 

The general plan of work next fall is to 
have as many fellows as possible become mem- 
bers of the Association, hold regular Sunday 
meetings after chapel, at which prominent 
men will speak to the students, to hold special 
meetings on Thursday evenings at which anv 
matters of college interest will be discussed, 
and to have the Association do more practical 
work along the lines followed by the Christian 
Associations in the larger colleges. The Y. 
M. C. A. a few years ago was one of the 
strongest elements in Bowdoin College for it 
was practically the onlv place where fellows 
from all the classes and all the fraternities 
could meet as one thinking body, and discuss 
any college business or projected reform. Of 



course the fundamental object of a Y. M. C. 
A. is Christian work, but in a college its work 
broadens, and next year it is planned to make 
every attempt to give to the Y. M. C. A. the 
broadest possible scope. 



THE MAY QUILL 
(Continued from page 73.) 

itself when a man is said "to step into his nat- 
ural toga and delve with a divine spade." "A 
profession of his own creation and perfection" 
is not a happy phrase. The sentence construc- 
tion, however, is terse and vigorous ; and the 
blemishes noted are trifling matters, mere chips 
drifting on the strong current of a pure and 
refreshing idealism. Emerson, and even Fra 
Elbertus, are better gods to worship than the 
multi-millionaires. 

"The Morocco Note Book" is a happily 
conceived and brightly told sketch of youthful 
friendship as affected by intercollegiate rela- 
tions. The material is simple, even common- 
place ; but it is treated with true insight and 
feeling. Within the given limits the plan and 
thought-expression are those of college-writing 
at its best. 

Tn "Carlyle's Message to the Men of 
To-Day" the theme is so large that the writer 
can do hardly more than scratch the surface 
in four Quill pages, and one of these is wasted 
on an introduction. He is right in his con- 
tention that the great hater of sham and ini- 
quity was never more needed ; but even a sten- 
ographer could not treat the subject in such 
narrow limits. Although the observations 
have truth and force, one cannot help feeling 
that this writer, whose stories have been a 
credit to the Quill, is here "writing with his 
left hand." 

Of the three verse contributions it may be 
said that they reach the average mark. The 
lines are correctly measured, although the well 
rhymed "Weep No More" is somewhat irregu- 
lar. "Morn and Eve" and "A Strange 
Dream," while quite regular in meter, are 
faultily rhymed in several places. The latter 
is also marred by slang words and phrases in 
a niece intended to be serious. 

The editorial departments, as often, suffer 
from over-haste. In these the editors have a 
valuable opportunity to shape college opinion 
and to promote a fuller understanding between 
students and facultv ; but as yet no board has 
lived up to its privileges in this respect. When 



76 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



the literary revival that we are awaiting here 
at Bowdoin bears fruit in an abundance of 
contributed papers, thus relieving the editors 
of the task of writing all the articles them- 
selves, let us hope that the editorial pages 
will take on a wider range. 

P. S. A professional conscience compels the 
remark that pedes frigus is too bad eyen for 
the rollicking burlesque of the festive Gander 
Club. 

W. A. H. 



BASEBALL 

Holy Name, 2; Bowdoin, i. 

Bowdoin lost its game with the Holy Name 
team of Portland, last Saturday, by a score of 
2 to 1. The game was witnessed by a large 
crowd of people and, as the score indicates, 
was a fine contest. The summary : 



H. N. S. 

AB R BH PO A E 

Welch, 2b 4 O O 2 I O 

Chandler, ss 3 o 1 2 5 I 

Taylor, rf 3 o o 2 o o 

Shaw, ib 3 o o 9 o o 

McFarland, cf 4 I I 1 o o 

Gilmour, 3b 3 o 1 o 1 o 

Ham, If 3 o 1 I o o 

Goodrich, c 2 o o 10 1 o 

Newick, p 3 1 1 o 2 2 

Totals 28 2 5 27 10 3 

Bowdoin. 

ab r bh po a e 

Abbott, c 4 o o 7 o 1 

Stanwood, 3b 4 o 1 o 3 1 

Files, p 4 o o 1 3 o 

Sparks, rf 4 1 2 1 o o 

Hodgson, ss 3 o o 2 o 

Blair, 2b 3 o 1 3 1 o 

Bower, cf 4 o 1 1 o o 

McDade, If 2 o o 1 o 1 

Pike, ib 2 o o 10 o 1 

Totals 30 1 5 24 9 4 

H. N. S o 1 1 o o o o o x — 2 

Bowdoin o 1 o o o o o o — 1 

Two-base hits — Newick, Sparks. Stolen bases — 
Chandler, Sparks. Hodgson, McDade. Bases on 
balls — Chandler. Struck out — Shaw 2, McFarland, 
Gilmour, Ham, Newick, Abbott 3, Stanwood, Files, 
Sparks, Hodgson, Bower, Pike. Sacrifice hits — 
Taylor. Shaw, Goodrich, Hodgson, Blair, Pike. 
Double plays — Blair unassisted; Chandler to Welch 
to Shaw. Hit by pitched ball — McDade. Passed 
balls — Abbott 2. Time — 1.20. Umpire — Armstrong. 
Attendance — 500. 



THE LONGWOOD TENNIS MEET 

The New England Intercollegiate Tennis 
Association held its annual meet at Longwood, 
Mass., on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 
of last week. The meet resulted in the honors 
being divided between Tech. and Williams, the 
latter capturing the singles and the former the 
doubles. 

Bowdoin showed up in fine form with Tobey 
and Paine and it was not until the semi-final 
rounds that they were defeated. Both these 
men have been doing splendid work for Bow- 
doin in tennis this year, they being instru- 
mental in the winning of the Maine meet, the 
Vermont meet and proving a hard proposition 
for the other colleges in the New England 
meet. 

The summary of the singles at Longwood 
was as follows : 

First round : 

Nicholl, Tech., defeated Hanscom, Tufts, by 
default. 

Second round : 

White, Wesleyan, defeated Wolf, Amherst, by 
default. 

Paine, Bowdoin, defeated Burgess, Brown, 6-3 
6-2. 

McLane, Dartmouth, defeated Pease, Vermont 
6-3. 6,3. 

Smith, Williams, defeated Nicholl, Tech.. 6-3, 0-6. 
6-4. 

Rotch, Dartmouth, defeated Wescott, William 
6-4. 6-8, 6-4. 

Porter, Brown, defeated Gatch, Wesleyan. 6-4, 6-4. 

Tobey, Bowdoin, defeated Wycoff, Tufts, 6-0, 6-2. 

Third round : 

Paine, Bowdoin, defeated White, Wesleyan, 7-5 
7-5- 

Fanning, Tech., defeated Porter. Brown, 7-5. 6-1. 

Smith, Williams, defeated McLane, Dartmouth 
6-3, 6-4. 

Rotch, Dartmouth, defeated Tobey, Bowdoin, 7-5, 
6-0. 

Semi-finals : 

Smith, Williams, defeated Paine, Bowdoin. 3-6, 
6-3. 6-3. 

Fanning, Tech., defeated Rotch, Dartmouth, 6-4. 
3-6, 7-5- 

In the final play. Srriith played Fanning, last 
year's champion, and won in straight sets, 6-3, 8-6, 
7-5- 

In the first round of the doubles, Porter and Bur- 
gess, Brown, defeated Hanscom and Hooper, Tufts, 
6-2. 7-5. Smith and Wescott. Williams, defeated 
Sturgis and Wolfe. Amherst, by default. Tobey and 
Paine. Bowdoin, defeated Gatch and White. Wes- 
leyan, 6-3, 6-3. Fanning and Nicholl, Tech., 
defeated McLean and Rotch, Dartmouth, 0-6, 6-2, 
6-2. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



77 



In the semi-finals Smith and Wescott, Williams, 
defeated Porter and Burgess, Brown, 6-2, 6-2. Fan- 
ning and Nicholl, Tech., defeated Tobey and Paine, 
Bowdoin', 6-3, 6-4. 

In the final round P. H. Fanning and J. S. Nicholl 
of Technology, defeated F. R. Smith and P. N. 
Wescott of Williams, in a hard-fought five set 
match by scores of 3-6. 6-4, 6-4, 6-8, 7-5. 



DEBATING COUNCIL ELECTIONS 

The annual meeting of the Bowdoin Debat- 
ing Council was held last Tuesday evening. 
The business transacted was the listening 
to the report of the manager and the election 
of officers for the next year. The following 
men were elected : 

President — F. J. Redman, '07. 

Secretary and Treasurer — W. S. Linnell, 
'07. 

Manager — A. O. Pike, '07. 

Faculty Advisory Member — Prof. W. T. 
Foster. 

The election of an assistant business man- 
ager was postponed until the opening of the 
fall term, in order that it may be determined 
what members of the present Sophomore Class 
elect debating and would thus be eligible to 
the position. 



ART BUILDING NOTES 



Last week the Art Building received from 
Hon. H. P. Baxter, of the Board of Overseers, 
a very interesting collection of Egyptian 
antiquities. These Mr. Baxter obtained from 
the great Egyptian archaeologist, Professor 
Maspers, when in Egypt last summer. The 
collection is a valuable one and will be exhib- 
ited soon in a glass case in the Boyd Gallery. 

Another collection of photographs loaned by 
the Library Art Club is now on exhibition in 
the Bowdoin Gallery. These are photographs 
of selected examples of Decorative Art from 
the South Kensington Museum in London, 
and they form one of the most interesting col- 
lections that have been exhibited this year. 
The collection will remain here until June 25. 



NEW IBIS MEMBERS 



At the meeting of the Ibis held last Tuesday 
afternoon, the following men were elected to 
membership from the present Junior Class: 
E. A. Duddy, S. G. Haley and Lester Adams. 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, JUNE 8TH. 

Ivy Day. Holiday. Cuts do not count double 
either before or after. 

10.00 a.m. Baseball game with Colby on Whittier 
Field. 

2.00 p.m. Ivy Day exercises begin in Memorial 
Hall. 

Prayer, Oration, Poem, Presentations. 

Planting of Ivy, Seniors' Last Chapel. 

1907 Bugle and New Bowdoin Song Book will 
appear. 

9.00 p.m. Ivy Hop. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 9TH. 

Baseball game with South Portland team at Port- 
land. 

SUNDAY, JUNE IOTH. 

10.45 A - M - Children's service at "Church on the 
Hill." 

MONDAY, JUNE IITH. 

9-12 a.m. 1.30-4.50 p.m. Registrar's office in 
Memorial Hall open for registration of courses for 
the next semester. 

6.30 p.m. Last meeting of Chemical Club, at New 
Meadows Inn. 

Merrymeeting Park opens. 

TUESDAY, JUNE I2TH. 

7.00 p.m. Last meeting of Hebron Club at 9 South 
Winthrop. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE I3TH. 

Second team plays Fryeburg Academy at Frye- 
burg. 

President Hyde speaks at Hill School, Pottstown, 
Penn. 

THURSDAY, JUNE I4TH. 

S.."o a.m. Exam, in Biology 6, Biology Laboratory. 

8.30 a.m. Exam, in French 2, Physics Lecture 
Room. 

1.30 p.m. Exam, in History 2, Memorial Hall. 

Term bills of April I are due before exams, are 
taken. 

President Hyde speaks at Middlesex School, Con- 
cord, Mass. 

Professor Chapman visits Farmington Normal 
School. 

Dr. Whittier at Maine Medical Association Con- 
vention in Portland. 

Professor Foster speaks at Bridge Academy, Gar- 
diner. 

FRIDAY, JUNE ISTH. 

8.30 a.m. Exam, in English 2, Memorial Hall. 

8.30 a.m. Exam, in Biology 3, Biology Labora- 
tory. 

1.30 p.m. Exam, in French 6, Physics Lecture 
Room. 

SATURDAY, JUNE l6TH. 

8.30 a.m. Exam, in English Literature 4, Memo- 
rial Hall. 

3.30 p.m. Championship game with Colby at 
Waterville. 

6.30 p.m. Last meeting of Massachusetts Club at 
New Meadows Inn. 

Professor Woodruff attends Greek Play at Har- 
vard. 

Professor Ham leaves Brunswick for summer. 



78 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ATHLETIC COUNCIL MEETING 

A meeting of the Athletic Council was held 
last Tuesday evening, Professor Moody, Dr. 
Whittier, with the undergraduates being the 
only members present. The business of the 
evening was the listening to the pre- 
liminary report of the baseball, track and ten- 
nis managers, and the selection of nominees 
for managers and assistant managers for next 
year. The election by the student body will 
probably take place the first of the week. The 
following nominations were made: 

For Baseball Manager— A.L.Robinson, '08; 
N. W. Cox, '08 ; for assistant manager, D. T. 
Drummond, '09 ; K. R. Tefft, '09. 

For Track Manager— R. A. Lee, '08; H. 
W. Purington, '08 ; for assistant manager, H. 

D. Benner. '09; R. O. Brewster, '09. 

For Tennis Manager— K. B. Kilborn, '08; 
J. F. Morrison, '08 ; for assistant manager, J. 

E. Crowley, '09 ; O. H. Stanley, '09. 



THE SPECIAL ADDRESSES 

All the special addresses in English 7 have 
now been given. Those who delivered them 
are : 

Snow at Bath High School on "The Congo 
Situation." Hawkesworth at Yarmouth Acad- 
emy on "The Optimism of Browning." Rob- 
erts at Yarmouth Academy on "Luther 
Burbank." Linnell at Thornton Academy 
on "School and College Spirit." Boody 
at Bates College on "The More Abun- 
dant Life." Mitchell, Hupper and Redman, 
at Clark University, Congo Debate. Erskine 
at Jefferson, Grange Address. 



LIBRARY NOTES 



A highly valued gift has been made to Bow- 
doin College Library by Dr. William C. Mason 
of Bangor, in a set of the silhouettes of the 
Class of 1825. Only one other collection of 
the youthful profiles taken of the famous men 
who graduated in this class is known to be in 
existence. 

Among the books of interest that have been 
added to" the library this week are seven vol- 
umes of the new Library Edition of John Rus- 
kin's Works. This new edition is to consist 
of thirty volumes, each of which is printed on 
the best paper and is beautifully illustrated, 
chiefly with reproductions of Ruskin's sketches 



and paintings. Only two thousand of these 
sets are on sale, and it is, therefore, an 
extremely valuable collection of books. The 
library has also just received three little books 
by Anthony Trollope, Aristotle's "Theory of 
Conduct," and a report of the "Hearings on 
Hazing at Annapolis," presented by Hon. A. 
L. Allen, '60. 



Colleoc Botes 

Ivy Day. 

Nance O'Neill dined at New Meadows Inn one 
day last week. 

Adjourns were given in Professor Chapman's 
classes last Wednesday. 

The baseball team plays the South Portland team, 
to-morrow, at Portland. 

The schedule of the final examinations was 
posted the latter part of last week. 

The members of the D. U. Fraternity dined at 
the Gurnet on Friday evening of last week. 

Dr. G. M. Elliott of the Medical School, has been 
elected adjutant of the First Maine Regiment. 

The last meeting of the Chemical Club is to be 
held at New Meadows Inn on Monday evening. 

The last meeting of the Aroostook Club is 
scheduled for one week from to-morrow evening. 

The Psi Upsilon dancing party took place at their 
chapter house last evening. An account will appear 
next week. 

Professor Chapman on next Thursday will attend 
the meeting of the trustees of the Farmington Nor- 
mal School. 

Gannett, '07. has returned to college after an 
absence at his home in Fort Fairfield, where he has 
been at work. 

A. C. Shorey, '04, who is now employed by the 
International Banking Co.. has been visiting the col- 
lege the past week. 

A. R. Lord, U. of M., '06, and Harrradon. Bates, 
'06, were among the guests of the Bowdoin Verein 
at its initiation, last week. 

Dr. Burnett last Wednesday conducted the mid- 
week social service at the Congregational Church in 
the absence of Mr. Jump. 

The Orient contains an unusually small amount 
of College Notes in this issue, as a result of the 
great pressure on its columns. 

The new Maine Central time table went into effect 
on last Sunday. A number of changes in time of 
arrival and departure have been made. 

The last exhibition of the stereopticon pictures 
illustrating Mr. Jump's travel sermons was given 
last Sunday at the Congregational Church. 

This morning's game started Bowdoin on her VC 
athletic career with the avowed motto of ''Fair Play 
and May the Best Man Win," which has been cut 
on the front of the grandstand, and will be Bow- 
doin's motto as long as the grandstand remains. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



79 



Mr. Jump delivered the annual address of the 
alumni of Bangor Seminary in connection with the 
Commencement exercises held last Wednesday. 

Colby defeated Maine at Waterville last Satur- 
day by the score of I to o. If she wins her two 
games with Bates the championship is settled. 

Professor Woodruff will go to Cambridge on Sat- 
urday, June 16, to attend the presentation of the 
Harvard Greek Play to be given on that date in the 
Stadium. 

The Junior banquet was held at the Rossmore last 
Saturday evening. Toasts were responded to and 
a pleasant evening passed. C. W. Snow acted as 
toast-master. 

Professor Ham has made arrangements to sail on 
June 20, on the Holland-American line from New 
York. .He will probably leave Brunswick on the 
afternoon of June 16. 

Professor Foster on June 14 will deliver the grad- 
uation address at Bridge Academy near Gardiner, 
Maine. During the past week he has been visiting 
several of Bowdoin's preparatory schools. 

It is expected that Paine, '06, and Tobey, '06, will 
play off the tennis championship of the college and 
the State some time during the coming week, the 
exact date of which has not yet been fixed. 

President Hyde on June 13 will deliver the gradu- 
ation address at the Hill Preparatory School at 
Pottstown, Penn., and the following day he will 
de'iver the address at the Middlesex School in Con- 
cord, Mass. 

Dr. Whittier attended the meeting of the Ameri- 
can Medical Association which was held in Boston 
last Tuesday and Wednesday. He will also be 
present at the meeting of the Maine Medical Asso- 
ciation which will be held in Portland on June 14 
and 15. 

NEW ELIGIBILITY RULES 

The following new eligibility rules were passed 
by the faculty at a recent meeting : 

1. A student is ineligible for the College Organ- 
izations as specified in that section of the College 
Hand-Book when failing to receive promotion as 
provided under the regulations for class standing, 
and, in the case of first year students, during the 
period after receiving a minor warning. 

2. Spec : al Students will be required to take four 
courses in each semester and will be subject to all 
regulations applying to regular students, with the 
exception that they are excused from the required 
courses. Any deficiency or condition by a Special 
Student must be removed within such time as would 
be required of him, if a regular student, for advance 
in class standing. 

3. In the case of first year students, there will 
be required, in addition to the regular mid-semes- 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 



ter, reports of standing, a fall report three weeks 
before, and a spring report three weeks after, the 
corresponding mid-semester reviews, and on the 
basis of these reports, warnings will be sent to the 
students concerned. 



NOTICES 

Programs of the exercises of Commencement 
Week may be had by the Seniors on application at 
the Library. 

Students are required to record their elections of 
studies for the first semester of the next college year 
on Monday, June 11. For that purpose the Regis- 
tration office in Memorial Hall will be open from 
9 to 12 a.m., and from 1.30 to 4.30 p.m. 

The Term bills of April 1, 1906. must be paid 
before the 14th of June. 

There is a notice pasted on the library stating the 
conditions necessary for application for the Wollas- 
ton Research Studentship in Physics, at Gouville 
and Caius College, Cambridge, England. 



See pie iou( a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
190G man who will be in the market for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to 1111. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, 1 feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

A. S. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPGOOD'S 

PULSIFER'S 
5 AND 10 GERT ST0RE 

Now Open for Business. 

J. W. PULSIFER, - - MAINE STREET, BRUNSWICK 

Visit our 

ICE=CREAM 

PARLOR. 




CATERING 



119 Maine Street 

all departments a Specialty. 



PORTLAND, MAINE 



Groceries and JVIeats 

FISH FRIDAYS 
WM. HAMILTON, GROCER 

MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



OG!U 




50 CENTS 

Moat Comfortable, Durable, Economical Suspender 

made and tne only one with a guarantee that 

means absolute satisfaction or your money back. 

One pair of BULL BOG SUSPENDERS 

will outwear three of the ordinary kind 

Thc-v rmihim more am] ln-tu-r rnl.lu r. h,m- hcnvily 

Silver niekeled, non-rustintf m.-hil j..m, that <l» not 

tarnish or soil the elutkes ; lomrli, |>linbl<-, iinlirc:ikii- 

ble imported Hull Don k-fit.h.T <-u-K eji-y to button. 



exiro lengths for the s.nne prion .-it nil up-lu-ilute 

Acr.pt rw suhatittt/f for this W.itrh />>,</,>/ lour 
interest. Kmtuhlr for all classes. 

HEWES & POTTER M mt 

Largest Suspender & Belt Makevs in the World 

J>epl.^47, S7 LINCOLN STREET, BOSTON, 1VIASS. 

UooKIeu giving valuable information about Correct 

Dress and Suspender Styles FREE ON REQUEST. 



¥ 



^2ll2iE Summer Vacation 

Why not make it prufltablft to you if you need the money? If 
you do not need the money, you will want something extra, and 
you might as well earn a lillle simiu tiling, ftxperienei' does not 
count. If you are honest and industrious and really in earnest, 
wo will stand by you and help you to a handsome income. 
There is more than an ordinary living in this. You can make 
more than your next season's college expenses. We ^ive you 
full instructions and furnish you with an outfit at cost, money to 
be refunded you when you turn in the outfit, so that you are 
virtually running no risk whatever. You will be your own 
master or mistress of your own time and movements. When 
you wish to work, you can work with the energy and spirit of 
one who is his own employer. You can make $3.00 per day 
and upward above all expenses. Communicate with us at once. 

THE CLEVIS CLEVER CUTTER CO., 

FREMONT, OHIO 



Bowdoin Calendars 

ON SALE at HAlf PIJICE 

(50 Cents) 



: , '06, or 
BYJ^ON STEVENS' BOOKSTORE 



THE miCO-CHIRUBGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 
Has a carefully graded course of four sessions of eisfht months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; Clinical Conferences; Mollified Seminar Methods, and thoroughly Practical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest aud finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every respect, aud the uew laboratories arc specially planned and equipped for individual work by the students. 
The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 
SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of Medicine. 




T^Inr/iiz 



REPEATING SHOT GUN 
NEW MODEL N9I7 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By the omission of the take down feature we have 
been able to greatly reduce the cost of production and at the same bme have kept the gun up to the 
famous high fflarfin standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
barrels are especially bored for smokeless as well as black powder and so chambered that 2% inch or 
2/8 inch shells may be used. Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 
reliable and best working gun in existence. We are glad to make it possible for every lover of guns 
and bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so low a price. 

Have your deales order it for you. 

Send for the JffizF&a Catalogue and Experience Book to-day. Free for 3 stamps. 

/rt&JfUZlTlIl firearMlS £«,42Willow Street, New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 15, 1906 



NO. 9 



CIVIC DUTIES IN OUR COLLEGES 

The following correspondence between Mr. 
E. O. Achorn, '81, and David R. Porter, 
Bowdoin's Rhodes scholarship student, will 
be of interest to Bowdoin, not only for the 
subject matter, but also as coming from Mr. 
Porter : 

Boston, Jan. 18, 1906. 

Mr. David R. Porter, Trinity College, Oxford. 

My dear Mr. Porter : In an address before the 
Bowdoin Club of Boston this fall, I made the state- 
ment that American college graduates were remiss 
in their civic duties, and that in my opinion the 
English university student took a deeper interest in 
English politics and was more familiar with the pol- 
icies of the government and platforms of the various 
parties than our students were with those of our 
country. Mr. Edward Stanwood took issue with 
me on this. I based my opinion on personal 
observation and certain comments made by Mr. 
Bryce recently while in this country. As you are 
in Oxford I should like to know what impression 
you have ga : ned of this matter ; and may I publish 
your reply, with this inquiry, in the Orient? I am 
sure it would be of interest to Bowdoin men. 
Very sincerely yours, 

Edgar O. Achorn. 

Mr. Edgar 0. Achorn, Boston. 

My dear Mr. Achorn : I was very glad to receive 
your inquiry a few days ago as to the relative inter- 
est and information of American and English Uni- 
versity students about politics. It is a thing I have 
often thought of myself but I fear that even now I 
cannot give any very sweeping comparisons. I 
believe that many people make definite assertions in 
regard to differences of the two countries based on 
analogies which anything more than superficial 
thought will show to be false. This has been 
recently done in comparing students of American 
and English universities. But there is a vast dif- 
ference in the personnel of the colleges of England 
and New England. Bowdoin College, for instance, 
is made up of many classes of men. A surprisingly 
large number of the students come from farms or 
small villages where they have have had few educa- 
tional advantages. All their spare time has been 
spent in physical work of some kind, either at home 
duties or in earning money to pay their college 
expenses. Many come from homes where the library 
is very limited and most of the environments are 
local. 

In England, Oxford and Cambridge, the great 
typical universities, are mostly made up of the 
"upper middle class;" men to whom the word 
"work" connotes nothing more than learning a page 
of Vergil for punishment; whose weekly allowance 



covers every possible expenditure, and who from 
their earliest days have had an intimate acquaint- 
ance with the best tutelage and literature. 

Mr. Bryce says somewhere that the "glory of the 
American universities" is that they are accessible 
to every kind of citizen ; but this is not from the 
nature of things conducive to a universal student 
knowledge of general subjects such as national or 
international politics. 

After carefully making this deduction, however, 
I think that your opinion that American college 
students take less interest in politics than their 
English cousins, is correct. I should say the reason 
for this is the vast expanse of our national territory, 
which allows us no real political center. Every 
State is a unit in itself, and our newspapers are 
local in scope and interest. I suppose it can be said 
that we have not a single national daily. 

in England the chief universities are within an 
hour's ride of the great capital, and there is hardly 
a home in the country that cannot have the Times 
brought up with breakfast. Again, the conversa- 
tion more naturally turns on national problems if 
mo.st of your associates have parents or relatives 
who are guiding the affairs of the country. 

This whole sphere of student life seems to be 
almost untouched in America, unless it is by the 
growing interest in debating, which tends to bring 
men face to face with real problems. 

The great life purpose of an English college stu- 
dent, too, often differs from ours. I think it is safe 
to say that the highest ideal of the majority of the 
students here is to spend his life in the service of 
the empire, in either secular or church management. 
The men of the largest calibre look forward to polit- 
ical life ; the late prime minister is well known 
from his philosophic work, "Foundations of Belief;" 
a high place in the new cabinet is given to the 
author of the remarkable essay, "The Holy Roman 
Empire." and the well-known "American Common- 
wealth." Somehow it seems almost inconsistent 
to think of the possibility of the leader of Tam- 
many Hall devoting much time to historical or phil- 
osophical researches. 

The highest reward that a British university 
graduate can receive is to pass the rigid examina- 
tions for admission to the Civil Service of India. 
A friend of mine told me a few days ago that he 
would be glad when the next three years were over 
so he could "get out to work in the colonies." I 
am sure he was rather surprised that I did not look 
forward to "helping the government care for the 
Philippines." 

I am not sure as you can make any use of these 
desultory remarks ; if so, I shall be very glad. 

Yours very sincerely, 

David R. Porter, 



Feb. 3, '06. 



Trinity College, Oxford. 



82 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BASEBALL 

Colby, 7; Bowdoin, 3. 

Bowdoin lost its Ivy Day game with Colby 
by a score of 7 to 3. The game was a very 
loosely played contest on the part of Bowdoin, 
the men showing an evident lack of practice 
throughout. Sparks pitched, and although 
his control was not of the best, the defeat can 
in no wise be attributed to him, as the support 
given was very discouraging. 

Colby did not play a remarkably fast game, 
but her errors were less costly and her hitting 
more effective. Shaw pitched for the visit- 
ors and his control was poor, but he managed 
to keep Bowdoin's hits scattered and prevent 
the piling up of a large score. The best work 
for Colby was done by Coombs at center, who 
played a remarkable fielding game. 

For Bowdoin the batting of Stanwood and 
the fielding of Hodgson were the best features. 
The summary : 

Bowdoin. 



Abbott, c 3 1 1 7 3 

Stanwood, 3b 40322 

Files, rf 4 o o o 

Sparks, p 4 o o o 2 

Greene, lb 40070 

Hodgson, ss 4 o o 3 3 

Blair, 2b 3 1 1 2 1 

Bower, cf 4 o 2 2 o 

McDade, If 3 1 4 o 



Totals 33 



27 11 



Colby. 



Tribou, If 5 

Dwyer, c 2 

Craig, 3b 3 

Coombs, cf 4 

Willey, lb S 

Shaw, p 5 

Tilton, 2b 5 

Reynolds, ss 4 

Palmer, rf 3 



Totals 36 



10 27 13 



Colby o o o 3 1 o 3 o x — 7 

Bowdoin 1 o 1 1 o o o o o — 3 

Two-base hits — Stanwood, Bower, Shaw. Stolen 
bases — Coombs, Willey, Blair 2. Struck out — By 
Shaw. Stanwood, Files 2, Greene 2, McDade ; by 
Sparks, Coombs, Shaw 3. Base on balls — By 
Shaw 2, by Sparks 7. Sacrifice hit — Abbott. Double 
play — Reynolds to Willey. Wild pitch — Shaw 2. 
Passed ball — Abbott 3. Umpire — Carrigan of Lew- 
iston. Time — 1.25. 



Portland, 13 ; Bowdoin, 9. 

Bowdoin lost its third consecutive game 
last Saturday to the Portland team by a score 
of 13 to 9. The game was replete with errors, 
there being a total of 15 during the nine 
innings. 

The summary : 

Portland, 
ab r bh tb po a e 

McClellan, rf 3 2 1 o 1 

Rawson, 2b 4 2 o o 2 1 2 

Kilfeder, ss 5 1 o o 2 4 1 

Tetreault, cf 5 2 2 2 3 1 1 

McDonongh, ib... 5 2 1 1 9 o 1 

Lamon, 3b 5 2 1 I 1 1 1 

Clark, If 3 o 2 2 2 o o 

Edgar, c 4 o 1 1 6 3 2 

Willard, p 2 2 1 1 o 4 o 

Totals 36 13 8 8 *26 14 9 

Bowdoin. 

ab r bh tb po a e 

Stanwood. 3b 3 1 o o 1 2 2 

Files, p 4 3 2 3 o 1 

Sparks, rf 4 1 2 2 1 o 1 

Blair, 2b 5 o 1 1 2 3 1 

Hodgson, ss 4 1 2 2 1 3 I 

Bower, cf 5 2 1 I 1 o o 

McDade, If 5 i 1 1 2 1 o 

Lawrence, c 3 o 1 2 5 o 

Pike, ib 4 o o o 11 o o 

Totals 37 9 10 12 24 9 6 

*Stanwood otrt on foul strike. 

Innings : 

Portland o o 5 o 2 6 o o x — 13 

Bowdoin o 2 4 2 o 1 o o 'o — 9 

Summary : 

Two-base hits — Lawrence, Files. Sacrifice hits — 
Rawson, Files. Stolen bases — Clarke, 3 ; Willard, 
2; Tetreault, McDonough, Lamon, Files, Bower. 
Bases on balls — Off Files. 4; Willard 3. Struck 
out — By Willard, 6; Files, 4. Wild pitches — Files, 
2. Hit by pitcher — Stanwood, 2 ; McClellan, Clarke, 
Willard. Passed ball — Edgar. Umpire — Laidley. 



r 

Bowdoin, o ; Harvard, 2. 

Bowdoin lost its game with Harvard last 
Wednesday by a score of 2 to o after a fine 
contest. Bowdoin played a splendid all-round 
game. The summary: 

Harvard. . 

ab r bh po a e 

Leonard, 3b 2 I- o 2 6 I 

Stephenson, ib 4 o 1 11 o o 

Pounds, rf 4 o o 1 o o 

Dexter, If 3 o 1 o o o 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



83 



Simons, ss 3 o o 2 2 o 

McCall, 2b 3 1 1 5 5 1 

Currier, c 3 o o 4 5 1 

Greene, p 3 1 1 2 

Harvey, cf 3 o 1 1 o 

Totals 28 2 4 27 19 S 

Bowdoin. 

ab r bh po a e 

Abbott, c 3 o o 7 2 o 

Stanwood, 3b 300030 

Files, p 4 o 2 o 2 o 

Sparks, rf 4 o o 1 o 

Greene, lb 4 1 12 1 

Hodgson, ss 3 o o 2 1 1 

Blair, 2b 3 o 1 o 3 1 

Bower, cf 3 o o o o o 

McDade, If 3 o o 2 o o 

Totals 30 o 4 24 n 2 

Harvard o o o o 1 1 o o x — 2 

Bowdoin o o o o o o o o o — o 

Sacrifice hits — Currier, Abbott. Stolen bases — Dex- 
ter, Files 2. Left on bases — Harvard 4, Bowdoin 5. 
First base on balls — Off Greene 2, off Files 2. 
First base on errors — Harvard I, Bowdoin 2. 
Struck out — By Greene 4. by Files 7. Wild pitch — 
Greene 1, Files I. Time — 1.30. Umpire — Hassett. 



Bowdoin, 2; Tufts, i. 

Bowdoin won its second game with Tufts 
last Tuesday in the greatest game of the year 
by a score of 2 to 1. It took 12 innings to 
decide the contest, neither side having scored 
a run at the end of the ninth. Sparks pitched 
a fine game for Bowdoin and the team played 
fast ball throughout. 

In the tenth Sparks got a single, went to 
second on a sacrifice by Green and scored on 
Hodgson's double to left. Rober tied the 
score for Tufts in the second half of the 
inning, getting a two-base hit, stealing third 
and going home on Fisher's long fly. In the 
T2th McDade scored for Bowdoin through 
singles and a stolen base. 

Bowdoin 00000000010 1 — 2-7-2 
Tufts ..000000000 1 o o — 1-7-3 

Batteries — Sparks and Abbott ; Watson and 
Suitor. Time — 2.20. Umpire — Burleigh. 



NEW PROCTORS 

The proctors for next year have been 
appointed, and are as follows : Allen, Bass, 
Haley, Hupper, Snow, and Voorhees, with 
Professor Foster acting as chairman of the 
board of proctors. All the men are members 
of next vear's Senior Class. 



PSI UPSILON HOP 

The Psi Upsilon Fraternity gave a delight- 
ful reception and hop at its chapter house on 
Thursday of last week to its invited friends. 
The afternoon was given up to the reception, 
the patronesses being Mrs. William A. Hough- 
ton and Mrs. H. C. Baxter. Music was fur- 
nished during the reception by Greenleaf's 
Orchestra of Lewiston. 

The hop began at 8.30 in the evening and 
proved itself a delightful occasion. Among 
those present were Miss Anna Percy, Miss 
Madelyn Clifford, Miss Marcia Sewall of 
Bath ; Miss Cecil Houghton, Miss Bertha 
Graves, Miss Mae Despeaux, Miss Sarah 
Merriman, Miss Daisie Hubbard of Bruns- 
wick; Miss Anita Little, Miss Persis Vose of 
Portland, Miss Martha Cobb, Miss Creighton 
of Portland ; Miss Gertrude Christopher of 
Pejepscot ; Miss Grace King of Ellsworth; 
Miss Lucia Russell of Somersworth, N. H. ; 
Miss Louise Dutton of Augusta ; Miss Eleanor 
Sowers of Washington, D. C. ; Miss Low of 
Wellesley ; Miss Leslie Dillingham of Bridge- 
port, Conn., and others. 

The delegates from the other fraternities 
were Dwight S. Robinson, from Alpha Delta 
Phi ; Carl M. Robinson, from Delta Kappa 
Epsilon ; George U. Hatch, from Zeta Psi ; 
Henry P. Chapman, from Theta Delta Chi ; 
J. A. Greene, from Delta Upsilon ; Charles J. 
Hicks, from Kappa Sigma ; and Willis N. 
Haines, from Beta Theta Pi. 

The committee of arrangements consisted 
of Philip R. Andrews, '06 ; Fulton J. Redman, 
'07 ; Neal W. Cox, '08 ; and Philip H. Brown, 
'09. 



ATHLETIC ELECTIONS 

The election of managers and assistant 
managers for baseball, track and tennis, and 
members of the Athletic Council was held last 
Thursday evening in Memorial Hall, and 
resulted as follows : Manager Baseball Team, 
A. L. Robinson, '08 ; Assistant Manager, Ken- 
neth R. Tefft, '09 ; Manager Track Team, R. 
A. Lee, '08; Assistant Manager, R. O. Brew- 
ster, '09 ; Manager Tennis Team, J. F. Mor- 
rison, '08 ; Assistant Manager, J. E. Crowley, 
'09; President Athletic Council, J. B. Drum- 
mond, '07 ; A^ice-President, F. J. Redman, '07 ; 
Secretary, C. E. Files, '08; Members of 
Athletic 'Council, A. H. Ham, '08; D. M. 
McDade, '09. 



84 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 

h. e. wilson, 1907 r. h. hupper, 1908 

h. e. mitchell, 1907 r. a. lee, 1908 

w. s. linnell, i9 o 7 h. h. burton, 1909 

A. L. ROBINSON, 1908 J. S. STAHL, igog 

A. L. JONES, Medical 



G. W. CRAIGIE, igo7 Business Manager 

N. S. WESTON, igo8 Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 



Entered at Post-Office at Brunswick 


as Seco 


nd-Clas 


s Ma 


] Matter 


Lewistun Jouris 


AL PR 








Vol. XXXVI. JUNE 15, 


1906 






No. 9 



This will be the last num- 
Last Issue b er f the Orient before 

the Commencement num- 
ber, which will appear after college closes. 
The paper will be mailed to the home 
addresses as given in the catalogue, unless 
otherwise ordered. Those who wish them 
sent elsewhere should notify the business man- 
ager at once. 



Life in the dormitories this 
New Proctors year has been the cleanest 
and most orderly that the 
college has known. The great improvement 
has been due mainly to the pressure of manly 
undergraduates who have themselves ably 
handled the few cases which needed discipline. 
A strong sentiment has been developed which 



condemns disorder and the destruction of col- 
lege property as childish, disloyal and wholly 
unbecoming the Bowdoin ideal of a gentleman. 
The college believes that the students will 
themselves for their own comfort and self- 
respect, as well as for the good name of the 
college, strengthen this manly sentiment, and 
show in the coming year how effective student 
self-government can be at Bowdoin. Accord- 
ingly, the maintenance of good order in the 
dormitories is to be placed in the hands of the 
students, represented by a board of six proc- 
tors, chosen from among those who shall be 
Seniors in the coming college year. The one 
Faculty member, Professor Foster, will be 
Chairman of the Board. The six men who 
have been chosen from among the students — 
Allen, Bass, Snow, Haley, Hupper, Vorhees — 
have the confidence and esteem of the whole 
college. That such men, in their Senior year, 
are willing to give up the attractions of fra- 
ternity-house life for the sake of serving the 
college in this important matter assures success 
for the plan. These men will be strong forces 
in the "ends" for manly conduct and fair 
treatment to all ; and they will be regarded as 
college officers, with the authority necessary 
for making the coming year in the dormitories 
as much better than this year as this year has 
been better than the one before. It remains 
for the student body as a whole to accept the 
responsibility placed upon them as Bowdoin 
men and justify the confidence of the College. 



Concerning Our 
Medical School 



There has been a 
proportion of college 
graduates in the Maine 
Medical School in recent years, and although 
the classes have been becoming somewhat 
smaller of late than they were formerly, due 
probably to the longer courses of study and 
the greater requirements, and no doubt also 
to the establishment of several new medical 
schools in various parts of the country, yet 
the quality of the classes, as a whole, have 
been greatly "improved. There is no vocation 
or profession, it will be generally admitted, for 
which there should be more careful and 
thorough preparation. The scope and inter- 
ests of the medical profession are constantly 
extending, and those who undertake its exact- 
ing and responsible duties must of necessity 
be men, and women also, of liberal education, 
broad training and the highest intelligence. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



85 



Hence there has been more and more effort 
on the part of prospective physicians to more 
satisfactorily fit themselves for their life work 
by laying a broad and solid foundation at the 
outset. This has been insisted on by the officers 
in charge of our medical institutions, and 
with excellent results. The tendency is grow- 
ing in medical circles to require the A.B. 
degree of those who wish to pursue the study 
of medicine, and college graduates are wel- 
comed in all medical schools. 

In the Maine Medical School, the curricu- 
lum has been continually broadening, the 
number of professors and instructors 
increased, the equipment enlarged, and the 
courses of study extended. Not so very long 
ago the course of study covered a period of 
six months in each year for three years, the 
class of 1899 having been, the last to graduate 
under the three-year system. In 1904 the 
course was lengthened two months, the term 
beginning in October, so that now practically 
32 months of study is the requirement for the 
M.D. degree, whereas it was only 18 months 
up to within a few years. Thus many impor- 
tant advances and marked progress have been 
made. In looking over the statistics of recent 
classes, it is found that in the class of 1905 
there were 18 graduates, 9 of whom, or 50 per 
cent., had college degrees, — 8 A.B. and 1 
B.S. In the Medical School at present there 
are registered 80 students, 26 of whom, or 
about one-third, have the degrees A.B. or 
B.S., there being but three with the latter 
degree. They are as follows : Fourth year, 
17 members, 7; third year, 20 members, 4; 
second year, 25 members, 12; first year, 18, 4. 
The second year class has the largest propor- 
tion of college graduates among the classes in 
the school at the present time, and one of the 
largest representations within the history of 
the institution. One of the A.B. students 
enrolled in the first year class is also taking 
second year work. Two of the members of 
the first year class will receive the A.B. degree 
from Bowdoin College at the present year 
Commencement. There are several members 
of the class of 1907 in Bowdoin who have sig- 
nified their intentions of entering upon the 
medical course here next autumn. The pres- 
ent arrangement of allowing students in the 
literary department of the college to complete 
both courses and receive both degrees in. seven 
years, appeals to several in each Senior Class, 
and the recently inaugurated plan of permit- 



ting those who have taken the first two years 
in the medical school to enter the Junior Class 
in the literary department, obtain, the A.B. 
degree in two years, and complete both 
courses in six years is being taken advantage 
of by some students, and several others have 
been inclined to try and accomplish this work. 

The increasing number of college gradu- 
ates pursuing the medical course has been the 
important factor in bringing the members of 
the two departments of the college into closer 
relationship, which has been attended with 
many beneficial results. 

It is recognized more fully each succeeding 
year that the more careful and complete the 
preparation, for the medical profession, the bet- 
ter it will be for the protection of the public, 
and for the reputation and success of the med- 
ical practitioners. 



NEW SUBSCRIPTION SYSTEM 

The Football Association is considering a 
plan by which a football subscription of five 
dollars or more for the season of 1906 will 
entitle a person to a season ticket. This ticket 
will admit to the Bates, Exeter, Fort McKin- 
ley and all other home games with the excep- 
tion of the Colby games. In order to be able 
to use this system of football subscriptions a 
large majority of the students in college must 
agree to subscribe five dollars or more. 
Papers have been started in the different fra- 
ternities to see how many are willing to sup- 
port such a system if it can be inaugurated. 
This system would not only be helpful to the 
management but also beneficial to the student 
body. Similar plans have been tried in other 
colleges and have worked well, and there 
seems to be no reason why Bowdoin should 
not have such a system if the students will 
support it. 



CHEMICAL CLUB ELECTIONS 

The Chemical Club elected its officers for 
next year last Monday afternoon, the follow- 
ing men being selected : 

President — George W. Bower, '07. 
Vice-President — Neal W. Allen, '07. 
Secretary and Treasurer — M. P. Whipple, 
07. 



86 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CALENDAR 

SATURDAY, JUNE l6TH. 

8.30 a.m. Exam, in English Literature 4, Memo- 
rial Hall. 

3.30 p.m. Championship game with Colby at 
Waterville. 

Professor Woodruff attends Greek Play at Har- 
vard. 

Professor Ham leaves Brunswick for summer. 

SUNDAY, JUNE I7TH. 

10.45 A - M - Mr. Jump preaches sermon on "Story 
of Metlakahtla." 

5.00 p.m. Miss Evelyn Stetson sings in chapel. 

MONDAY, JUNE l8TH. 

8.30 a.m. Exam, in Chemistry 4, Chem. Lab. 

8.30 a.m. Exam, in Latin 2, and 4, Memorial Hall. 

1.30 p.m. Exam, in Philosophy 4, Memorial Hall. 

1.30 p.m. Exam, in Biology 1, Biol. Lab. 

Professor Foster at Georgetown, Mass. 

TUESDAY, JUNE ICJTH. 

8.30 a.m. Exam, in English Lit. 2, Memorial 
Hall. 

8.30 a.m. Exam, in Greek 2. Memorial Hall. 

1.30 p.m. Exam, in French 10, Physics Lecture 
Room. 

1.30 p.m. Exam, in Philosophy 2 and 7, Memo- 
rial Hall. 

Brunswick High School graduation exercises and 
hop. 

President Hyde speaks at Clark University. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20TH. 

8.30 a.m. Exam, in Mathematics 2 and 4, Memo- 
rial Hall. 

8.30 a.m. Exam, in Latin 12, Memorial Hall. 

1.30 p.m. Exam, in Biology 5. Biol. Lab. 

1.30 p M. Exam, in Education, Memorial Hall. 

President Hyde at Exeter Academy. 
Professor Foster at Tufts College. 

THURSDAY, JUNE 2IST. 

8.30 a.m. Exam, in Chemistry 6, Chm. Lab. 
1.30 p.m. Exam, in History 6, Memorial Hall. 

FRIDAY, JUNE 22D. 

8„"0 a.m. Exam, in Chemistry 2. Chem. Lab. 
College closes. 



STATE TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIP 

Last Wednesday afternoon before a large 
number of students, Tobey won the State Ten- 
nis Championship from Paine in a hard- 
fought match. The scores were 2-6, 8-6, 6-1, 
6-4. Linnell, '07, acted as umpire. 



COLLEGE TENNIS TOURNAMENT 

When the Orient went to press last Thursday, 
the tournament for the tennis championship of the 
college in doubles had gone through the semi-finals, 
and in the singles as far as the semi-finals. In the 



doubles Ham and Hughes were to meet in the finals 
the winners of the match played by Pike and Law- 
rence against Roberts and Johnson. In the singles 
Paine, '06, was to meet in the semi-finals the winner 
of the match to be played between Haines.. '08, and 
Johnson, '06. 



Colleoe Botes 



J. C. Minot, '96, visited the college last Sunday. 

Adjourns were granted in all courses last Satur- 
day. 

C. R. Cook, '05, was a visitor at the college last 
week. 

G. F. Fogg, '02, was a visitor at the college last 
Friday. 

Senior marching at the church began the middle 
of the week. 

"Eddie" Bates, ex-'o6, has been visiting the col- 
lege this week. 

C. P. Merrill, of Farmington, ex-'96, was a visitor 
at the college last week. 

The most important game of the baseball season 
will take place at Waterville to-day. 

At a recent meeting of the Ibis, Redman, '07, was 
elected president, and Allen, '07, secretary. 

Many of the Maine papers contained pictures of 
Bowdoin's Ivy Day speakers, last Saturday. 

Merrymeeting Park will open next Monday, 
instead of last Monday, as was first announced. 

Brunswick had a circus on Tuesday of this week. 
A large number of college men visited the show. 

The members of the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity 
are planning to hold a track meet in the near future. 

Ralph Powers, brother of W. A. Powers. '06, has 
been a visitor at the college during the past week. 

Several of the baseball men remained in Portland 
over Sunday, where they were the guests of friends. 

"Jim" Marston, ex-'o5, was a visitor at the college 
last Friday. He graduated from Columbia this 
year. 

Entrance examinations for Bowdoin have been 
held at the preparatory schools during the past three 
days. 

Marshal Cram, '04, who is now a student at Johns 
Hopkins, has returned to. his home in Brunswick for 
the summer. 

Hon. Charles E. Littlefield is expected to be a 
guest and speaker at the Commencement dinner on 
Thursday, June 28. 

The Willard team of Portland defeated the 
Cabots on the Delta, last Saturday afternoon, by 
the score of 9 to 6. 

The Portland Sunday Times contained pictures of 
Robert Foster, '01. and Mrs. Foster, whose wedding 
took place at Evanston, 111., last week. 

Several Bowdoin men received invitations to the 
Hobart-Briggs wedding, which was held at the 
bride's home in Auburn last week. Mrs. Hobart 
is a sister to B. F. Briggs. '07. 



BOWDOIN' ORIENT 



87 



Last Sunday was one of the hottest days so far 
this season. A number of men took trolley rides, 
while others went to the shore in this vicinity. 

W. A. Powers, '06, will go abroad this summer, 
where he will pursue the study of modern 
languages. He will accompany Professor Ham on 
the trip. 

The Orient is delayed one day this week in 
order to include several items of news which other- 
wise would have been held over until the Com- 
mencement number. 

The band elections were to have been held last 
Wednesday evening, but owing to the small attend- 
ance, was postponed. It was thought at the time of 
going to press that the election would occur this 
evening. 

The Bowdoin arguments in the Bowdoin-Clark 
debate have been printed recently, and Professor 
Foster has a few copies of the speeches now on 
hand. Anyone may obtain one of these copies by 
asking him for it. 

At the recent meeting of the Athletic Council 
track B's were awarded to' H. G. Tobey, '06; C. F. 
Doherty, '07; P. Kimball.. '01; P. R. Shorey, '07; D. 
S. Robinson, '07; H. Atwood, '09; R. M. Pennell, 
'09; M. L. Blair, '09. 

On Sunday morning, June 24, Mr. Jump will 
preach a sermon entitled "A Candid Discussion of 
the Maine Prohibitory Law." On that same after- 
noon at four o'clock, President Hyde will deliver 
the Baccalaureate Sermon. 

The Y. M. C A. has printed some enrolment 
cards for next year, and either this spring or early 
in the fall every one will be given an opportunity 
to sign in, and give the association a good start 
for the fall and winter months. 

The members of the D. K. E. Fraternity held 
their "Second Annual Track Meet" on the Whittier 
Field last Monday afternoon. The winners in the 
various events enjoyed a dinner at New Meadows 
in the evening at the expense of the vanquished. 
The officials of the meet were Tobey, '06, Redman, 
'07, Kimball, '07. 

David R. Porter, the Maine boy who is a Rhodes 
student at Oxford University in England, is playing 
second base on the University baseball team, which 
is made up of the American students. The nine is 
serving in no small way to further introduce the 
sport in the British Kingdom. Porter was a mem- 
ber of the Class of '06 at Bowdoin and will be given 
his degree with his former classmates this month. — 
Kennebec Journal. 

Foster, '05, and Allen, '07, who have compiled the 
Songs of Bowdoin, announce that copies of the 
book may be obtained at Rooms 7 and 8. South Win- 
throp Hall. It is desirable that all who signed in 
for copies secure them at once, in order that the 
accounts with the printers may be settled as soon as 
possible. The publishers have contracted large 
bills in the production of the book, and they must 
have the co-operation of those who signed for books 
in order to. meet them when due. 



FACULTY NOTES 

President Hyde will next Tuesday deliver the 
Commencement Address before Clark University at 
Worcester, and on the following day he will be 
present at the graduation exercises and trustee meet- 
ing of Exeter Academy at Exeter. 

A private letter from Professor Geo. T. Files, 
dated at Interlaken, Switzerland. May 25, speaks of 
special enjoyment of the days spent in that country 
and of his plans for leisurely travelling by the way 
of Lucerne to Germany, thence down the Rhine to 
Holland and Belgium, spending the latter part of 
the summer in England find Scotland, 'reaching 
Brunswick the last week in September. He, with 
his family, are all in improved health. 

Professor Foster will give the graduation address 
at the Georgetown High School, Georgetown, Mass., 
next Monday, and on Wednesday he will represent 
Bowd'oin at the inauguration of President Hamilton 
of Tufts College. 

Professor Allen Johnson was recently elected at 
the Brunswick Republican caucus, to attend, as a 
delegate, the State Republican Convention which 
will be held on June 27. 

Professor Mitchell attended the graduation of the 
Kennebunk High School last Wednesday, and on 
Thursday was present at the exercises held at Yar- 
mouth Academy. 



Hlumni personals 



CLASS OF 1836. 
Dr. Alonzo Garcelon, '36, A.M., on May 6 
passed his 93d birthday, and is now hale and 
hearty at his home in Lewiston. Dr. Garcelon 
graduated from Bowdoin in 1836, received the 
degree of M.D. in 1839 from a medical college 
in Ohio, where he had studied three years. In 
1855 he became State Senator, 1861 a Hospital 
Surgeon, 1864 the Chief Hospital Surgeon, 
and in 1879 served as Governor of the State of 
Maine. 

CLASS OF 1858. 

Hon. Edwin Reed, A.M., '58, of Andover, 
Mass., has added another book to the series 
that he has already written defending Bacon's 
claim to the authorship of what are now 
called Shakespeare's plays. This last volume 
is entitled "Bacon and Shakespeare's Coinci- 
dences" and sets forth the arguments in favor 
of the Bacon theory even more forcibly than 
have the other four books that Mr. Reed has 
written on the same subject. 

CLASS OF i860. 
From the administrator of the estate of the 
late Jacob H. Thompson of the Class of i860 



88 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



the college library has recently received a 
class album and many interesting manuscripts 
and records relating to his undergraduate 
course at Bowdoin. 

CLASS OF 1870. 
Dr. Lucian Howe, '70, A.M., M.D., Jias just 
published a book entitled "The Muscles of the 
Eye." It is in two volumes, contains about 
300 illustrations, and it succeeds well in the 
accomplishment of its purpose, which is "to 
state in the simplest language possible the 
actual facts now known concerning the ocular 
muscles." 

Edgar O. Achorn, '81, has accepted an 
appointment on the Board of the Montclair 
Military Academy, Montclair, New Jersey. 
This is one of the best fitting schools in the 
East and Mr. Achorn becomes the New Eng- 
land representative on the board. 

CLASS OF 1882. 
Dr. W. O. Plimpton, '82, Professor of 
Orthopedic Surgery in the Post-Graduate 
Medical School of New York City, will spend 
this summer travelling abroad with his wife 
and daughter. 

CLASS OF 1886. 
Charles A. Davis, '86, has recently received 
the degree of Ph.D. from the University of 
Michigan. He has just severed his connec- 
tion with the Forestry Department of that 
University, and now is in charge of the Herba- 
rium as Curator, as well as being engaged in 
work for the State Geological Survey. 

E. C. Plummer, '87, has been representing 
the American Shipping interests, especially 
those of Bath, Me., at the hearings before the 
Committee on the Merchant Marine and Fish- 
eries, and his speech has been included in the 
recently published account of the hearings. 
Mr. Plummer has presented the library with 
one of these accounts. 

CLASS OF 1891. 
Henry W. Jarvis, '91, has an article in the 
June second number of the Outlook on "A 
People's Palace." Mr. Jarvis is prominent in 
charitable work in Boston, he being on the 
Executive Committee of the Boston Trav- 
eller's Children's Outing Work, and also 
Treasurer of the People's Palace. He has 



been for ten years attorney of the New Eng- 
land division of the Salvation Army. 

CLASS OF 1894. 
Invitations have been received to the 
wedding of Miss Frances Sargent of 
South Brewer and Ralph P. Plaisted, Esq., of 
Bangor at the Congregational Church in 
South Brewer at 8.45 p.m. Tuesday, June 19. 
Mr. Plaisted is a former Augusta boy, a 
younger brother of Mayor Plaisted, and he 
has a great many friends. He graduated 
from the Cony High School in 1890 and from 
Bowdoin in 1894. For several years he has 
practiced law in Bangor of which city he is 
now city clerk. 



©bttuar\> 



DR. MILTON C. WEDGWOOD, M. '59 

Dr. Milton C. Wedgwood, Med. '59, one 
of the leading physicians of the State, died 
at his home in Lewiston on April 9. Dr. 
Wedgewood was born at Bowdoin, Me., in 
1832, and graduated from the Bowdoin Med- 
ical School in 1859. Three years after his 
graduation he served as assistant surgeon in 
the 1 ith Maine Volunteers during the Civil 
War. Later he served as a member of the 
Governor's Council during the terms of Gov- 
ernors Burleigh and Hill, and had been quite 
prominent in Republican circles. Dr. Wedge- 
wood was a member of the International 
Health Association, the Maine Academy of 
Medicine and Science, and was also a Mason 
of the 32d degree. He is survived by his wife. 



DR. STEPHEN E. WENTWORTH, M. '68 

Dr. Stephen E. Wentworth, Med., '68, died 
recently of heart failure while driving in his 
carriage in Auburn. Dr. Wentworth had 
been in excellent health lately except for 
slight heart trouble during the last 
week, and his death was a very unexpected 
blow to his friends. He was 69 years old, and 
one of the oldest practicing physicians in the 
city. He was born in Limington, Me., in 
1837, attended the Limington Academy, then 
went to Dartmouth College, from which, on 
conceiving a liking for the medical profession, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



89 



he went to the Bowdoin Medical School, and 
graduated with the Class of 1868. He first 
practiced medicine in Brownville, leaving to 
take a larger practice in Lovell, which he held 
for two years. At the end of that time he 
removed to Auburn, where during the past 32 
years he has built up a very extensive prac- 
tice. He is survived by his son Dr. Ernest 
Wentworth who will probably inherit his 
father's practice. 



HERBERT W. GRINDALL, '80 

Herbert W. Grindall, '80, died from heart dis- 
ease at his home in Brooklyn, N. Y., on February 
5. News of his death has just been received and 
he will be much mourned by his classmates. He 
was born on September 7, 1857, in Salem, Mass., 
prepared for college at the Salem High School, and 
entered the scientific department of Bowdoin in 
1876. He was prominent as a speaker and writer 
during his college course, receiving awards at the 
Junior declamation. and for extemporaneous 
English composition, as well as an appointment in 
the '68 Prize Speaking. After graduating, he took 
up law at Columbia University, and received the 
degree of LL.B. on the completion of his course in 
1882. Wlrle at law school he served as assistant 
librarian, and was later elected librarian. For 
twenty years he has been practising his profession 
in New York City, and residing in Brooklyn. He 
is survived by his wife, Mrs. Magdalena (Ten 
Broeck) Grindall, whom he married in 1884. 



AMOS A. KNOWLTON, '86 

Amos A. Knowlton, '86, died on April 14, at 
his home in Madison, Wisconsin, after an ill- 
ness which he has been suffering under for 
nearly six years. Mr. Knowlton was born in 
Boston in 1859, prepared for college at Exe- 
ter, entered Bowdoin with the Class of 1886, 
joined the Psi Upsilon fraternity, and from 
1884-86 was editor of the Bowdoin Orient. 
After graduating, he taught Greek and 
Latin at the English and Classical School 
of Providence, R. I., for two years. In 1888 
he left Rhode Island, studied abroad at the 
University of Berlin, returned to the United 
States after a year and a half, and in 1890 took 
up his residence in Madison, Wisconsin, and 
for the next ten vears was connected with the 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



English Department of the University of Wis- 
consin. In 1900 he was forced to give up his 
teaching on account of his health, which has 
been very poor ever since then, although Mr. 
Knowlton is said never to have lost any of his 
accustomed cheer and good nature. He is sur- 
vived by his wife and five children, the eldest 
of whom is attending the University of Wis- 



ta 



I want to have a personal talk with every Bow-loin College 
190G man who will be in ihe market tor a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and sec me at the Brunswick Rouse at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position yon want and are 
titled to till I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best, opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States ami several foreign co-mtrles. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

A. S. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPGOOD'S 



Visit our 

ICE=CREAM 

PARLOR. 




119 Maine Street 
CATERING in all departments a Specialty. 

PULSIFER'S 
5 AND 10 GEHT ST0RE 

Now Open for Business. 
J. W. PULSIFER, - - MAINE STREET, BRUNSWICK 

Yale University 

SOPimER SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 

A seven weeks' course in Forestry at Milford, Pike County, 
Pa., under the direction of the Faculty of Yale Forest School. 
Sixth annual session opens July 5, 1906. Designed for students 
considering forestry as a profession, those about to enter the 
lumber business, owners of woodlots, etc. 
For further information address 

Prof. Henry S. Graves, New Haven, Conn. 



Mention the Orient when patronizing our Advertisers. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ILBOGtii 




tnrnish or soil the cl.nlirs ; toinrh, pliable, unlu'enka- 
ble, imported Hull Dor biitlur enils, ciisy to button, 
and webs carefully woven by n special process for 
strength and wear. Tliey c.tn be lutd in liphr wi-iplit 
li.slcs and benvv weight twill u i:l>s in cli'iii e patterns 
with neat stripes, men's or youth's sizes, fur SO Cts, 
extra lengths for the same price at all up-to-date 
dealers or bv mail postpaid an re. eipi of amount. 

Accept 7><-> 'mthshtitip I'm- ih's Watch f>o(i of lour 

Jiitt'rst. Suitable for all clauses. 

HEWES & POTTER 

Largest Suspender <fe Belt Makers in the World 

Deut.|247, S7 LINCOLN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

Booklet giving valuable information about Correct 

Dress and Suspender Styles FREE ON REQUEST. 



Y~% 



For Your Summer Vacation 

Why not make it profitable to you if you need the money? If 
you do not need the money you will want something extra, and 
you might as well earn a little something. Kxperiencc does not 
count. If you are honest and industrious and really in earnest, 
we will stand by you and help you to a handsome income. 
There is more than an ordinary living in this. You can make 
more than your next season's college expenses. We give you 
full instructions anil furnish you with an outfit at cost, money to 
be refunded you when you turn in the outfit, so that you are 
virtually running uo risk whatever. You will be your own 
master or mistress of your own time and movements. When 
you wish to work, you can work with the energy and spirit of 
one who is his own employer. You can make $3.00 per day 
and upward above all expenses. Communicate with us at once. 

THE CLEVIS CLEVER CUTTER CO., 

FREMONT, OHIO 



Bowdoin Calendars 

ON SALE at HALf PI?IGE 

(50 Cents) 

WOODRUFF, '06, or 
BYRON STEVENS' BOOKSTORE 



THE MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Has a carefully graded course of four sessions of eight mouths each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; clinical Conferences; Modified Seminar Methods, and thoroughly Practical Instruction. Particular attention 
lo laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest and finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every respect, and the new laboratories arc specially planned and equipped for individual work by the students. 

The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 
SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of Medicine, 




UTIczrZiJi 




REPEATING SHOT GUN 
NEW MODEL N9I7 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By the 

been able lo greatly reduce the cost of production and at the 
famous lush 7fflar/in standard of strength, safety and dur 



The 



>rkma, 



nd 6nish . 



barrels are especially bored fo 

2% inch shells may be used. Several improvements 

reliable and best working gun in existence. We are 

and bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at 



of the take down feature we have 
ame time have kept the gun up to the 

bility. Notice the clean simplicity of 

perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 

black powder and so chambered that 2% inch or 

the operating parts make it the easiest, most 

d to make it _ possible for every lover of guns 



) low I 



price. 



Have your dealer order it for you. 

Send for the ZBar&n Catalogue and Experience Book to-day. Freefor3 stamps. 

yA&Tmittf/l firearms £a,42Willow Street, New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, AUGUST 24, 1906 



NO. 10 



Commencement, 1906 



The "Baccalaureate Sermon 

Commencement began with the baccalaureate ser- 
mon by President Hyde, on Sunday, June 24. 

President Hyde spoke from the subject "No Pull 
for Place, but Endurance for Service," and the 
sermon was listened to with careful attention from 
beginning to end. His text was as follows : 

"And there come near unto Him James and John 
the sons of Zebedee. saying unto Him, Master we 
would that thou shouldst do for us whatsoever we 
shall ask of thee. And He said unto them, What 
would ye that I should do for you? And they said 
unto Him, Grant us that we may sit, one on thy 
right hand, and one on thy left, in thy glory. But 
Jesus said unto them, ye know not what ye ask. 
Are ye able to drink the cup that I drink? or to 
be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized 
with? And they said unto Him, We are able. And 
Jesus said unto them, The cup that I drink ye shall 
drink; and with the baptism that I am baptized 
withal shall ye be baptized ; but to sit on my right 
hand and on my left hand, is not mine to give, but 
it is for them for whom it hath been prepared. 
Mark : x : 35-40." 

President Hyde said in part: 

"Favoritism and pull rule the little surface things. 
But- deep down in the realities the big things are 
reserved for the toil and service that rise to the 
height of perpetual sacrifice. There are no places 
to give away on the athletic teams or on the teach- 
ing staff ; no openings in remunerative business or 
positions of influence in politics for the man who 
merely wants the honors or emoluments. These 
places are reserved for the men who combine the 
industry and energy, the firmness and tact; the 
courage and consecration which make the effective 
holding of these positions a perpetual act of labor 
and sacrifice. Even the dear joys of home and 
family are not to be had on cheaper terms ; and the 
selfish creatures who expect to get something for 
nothing are doomed to disappointment. Happy 
homes are reserved for those who can rise above 
their natural selfishness and merge their individual- 
ity in memberhip in a larger life. A self-seeking, 
pull-working Christianity is a contradiction in 
terms. There is no heaven here or hereafter for the 
people who seek for it directly, and want God to 
give it to them ready made. God gives us the stuff 
to make a heaven out of. The imperfection of the 
world is its glory; for it is man's opportunity to 
make the soil fruitful, and the mineral useful ; 10 
make the fibre into cloth and the timber to shelter ; 
to make the earth a highway and the sea a bond 
between man and man ; to give and take in fair 
exchange what one produces and another wants ; to 



bring together individuals in families, and families 
in states, and states in nations, and establish justice 
and good will over all ; to create beauty of form and 
expression; to discover truth; to hand down these 
discoveries from one generation to another; to 
apply the laws of health and healing; to care for the 
poor and unfortunate; to train the ignorant, and 
to correct the depraved; to unite men in common 
enthusiasm and to lift them in their highest capac- 
ity ; this is the God-given task of man. to find one's 
station and function of largest usefulness in this 
vast work; to do it with one's might; to care not 
whether it be great or small, conspicuous or 
obscure, so it be the part especially given to us; 
and to do as well as it can be done; to take the 
criticism it brings good-naturedly; to bear defeat 
without discouragement; loss without depression, 
persecution without resentment, knowing that_ what- 
ever befalls us the Lord's good work is going on 
and we have our little share in His great_ triumph — 
this is the only and all-sufficient seat in heaven 
which Christ has reserved for each faithful fol- 
lower. 

"Members of the graduating class : Ask of God 
and the world only the chance to do your best; do 
that with all your might; with firmness and cour- 
age ; yet with gentleness and love. All the powers 
of selfishness and courage; all the forces of jealousy 
and malice; all the criticisms of imcompetence and 
insincerity will soon or later assail the man who 
speaks the truth as he sees it; who does the 
thing that needs to be done; who tries to fit the 
thing he stands for ; not into the favor of this man, 
or the pocket of that man, but into the genuine 
service of all men; and the impartial will of the 
one good God. This is the cup that every honest 
worker must drink; and the wider his responsibility 
the deeper and more bitter does this cup become. 
That is the baptism in which every brave follower 
of Christ must be impressed. And the depth and 
volume of criticism and condemnation such a man 
brings on himself from the self-seeking, place-hunt- 
ing, money-loving, time-serving multitude, is a 
pretty accurate measure of his service to the world 
and his fidelity to his Lord. 

"That is the price of being generous and just. 
Christ paid it to the full: And we must pay it too, 
if we are to be sharers in his great life which here 
and everywhere is Heaven. But it is a 
small price to pay for the glorious fellowship it 
brings. To know that you are one of God's faith- 
ful workers in the world; that you are one with 
Chirst and all true Christians ; that have been or 
shall be, Catholic or Protestant, conscious of their 
nominal connection with him, or unconsciously 
doing the will of their unnamed and unknown Lord 
— this is a heaven here and now within the soul, 
which makes every yoke of duty easy and every 
burden of sacrifice a joy. 

"I commend to each one of you the cup and 



92 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



baptism of Christ. Make sure that your place and 
function in the world is precisely what he would 
have it ; make sure, in other words, that you are 
making the best contribution to the glory of the 
world and the welfare of men that your capacity 
permits — and that assurance will bear you cheer- 
fully, serenely, triumphantly through whatever of 
trial and vexation, hostility and hate, this still 
imperfect world, and the still undeveloped^ people 
in it. may have in store for you." 



Class Day Exercises 

The class day exercises proved themselves one 
of the most pleasing events of the week, there 
being a large attendance, and everything contribut- 
ing to make the day a success. 




Charles Wesley Hawkesworth 

&he Oration 

By C. W. Hawkesworth. 

Mr. Hawkesworth took for his subject "The 
Principle of Non-Resistance," and spoke in part as 
follows : 

"The principle of non-resistance is not a popular 
principle. But little is written about it, but still it 
has been the underlying principle of educational 
progress. Corporal punishment among progressive 
teachers is a thing of the past. To-day schools and 
colleges are finding out what the scholar takes to 
naturally and arc not attempting to drive him to 
study courses which he has no liking for. Courses 
are being made to fit the nature rather than nature 
being made to fit the courses. Where the elective 
system has been introduced students are taking 
courses which are akin to their natures and thus 
keep alive the fires of youth. 

"The final step in the principle of non-resistance 
is seen in what is known as the honor system. 
Because constant watching has not brought the 



desired results an appeal has been made to the 
student honor. The heart of the student is difficult 
to reach, the students being distrustful of the 
teachers on account of the many years that they 
have been distrusted, but the honor system is 
rapidly growing in favor. 

The principle of non-resistance does not depend 
on whether it can be enforced to-day or to-morrow, 
but whether it is the highest ideal of life given us 
to conceive." 

In this way Mr. Hawkesworth showed how it 
applied to the highest educational systems. He then 
explained the methods used by John L. Whitman, 
jailor of the Cook County, 111., jail, who is known 
as the man tamer, and in whose method punishment 
plays no part. The system has been very successful 
in managing prisoners. 

In conclusion he showed how the principle which 
applies in the college and the jail, the two greatest 
extremes imaginable, and applying in those that 
it would necessarily apply in all conditions of 
soc : ety. 



The Opening Address 

By C. L. Favinger. 

Mr. Favinger spoke as follows : 
In looking for suitable words with which to greet 
you this afternoon. I have been unable to find any 




Charles Luff Favinger 

which could express all I wish to convey to your 
minds. It would be easy to say "welcome," but 
the word has become such an inexpressive one that 
I shall leave to your own selection the phraseology 
of the greeting I wish to convey to you in behalf 
of my class. 

Being assured, then, that we are glad to have jou 
here, let us consider the position the class of 1906 
will be expected to take as graduates of Bowdoin 
College. From these pleasant surroundings we 
must go out to become real citizens, and to face at 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



93 



first hand the practical problems of citizenship in a 
free republic. 

In these days we hear much of the college man 
in politics, in law and in business, but little of the 
really vital position which he holds as a plain cit- 
izen. When we are reminded of the exceedingly 
small number of college-bred men in proportion to 
the whole population we can readily see how large 
is the practcal field open to such men, and how 
great are the possibilities for usefulness. The 
opportunities are absolutely unlimited, and the 
claims of the commun'ty upon the college graduate 
are of no slight consequence. No other class of 
men in the world have greater opportunities than 
\\ e have. Fathers and mothers make sacrifices to 
keep us here ; magnificent buildings are erected and 
equipped for our exclusive use ; and highly trained 
specialists are paid to train us. Justly, then, may 
we be expected to make some small return for all 
these benefits. Surely they are not given for the 
purpose of men to live for themselves alone. Rather 
are they given that the highest welfare of society 
may be conserved and the continued existence of 
the republic assured. And these objects may be 
reached only by the active interest of college men 
in the affairs of their respective communities. 

What, then, are the specific lines of activity which 
justly claim their interest? One of the highest of 
these duties is to fight for absolute honesty in 
polit'cs. One need not be a politician to perform 
this service. He need but identify himself with the 
better class of people in the effort to educate the 
masses up to a high standard of civic virtue. Every 
man should attend the primary elections and see to 
it that his influence and vote are cast with those 
candidates whose records of honesty and efficient 
public service are unstained. It is the primary 
elections that corruption originates, for, if the men 
who are chosen there are thoroughly honest, the 
honesty of higher officers must follow. The college 
man has, then, an excellent opportunity to place his 
stamp upon the political life of his community. 

But not in political affairs alone should his influ- 
ence be evident. The public schools should also 
receive a large share of his attention. To-day in 
almost every progressive town or city a hard 
struggle is going on for the perfection of the 
schools. Educational leaders must fight for almost 
every innovation. Larger salaries are needed for 
the teachers ; rrtore efficient administration is 
demanded ; and these things are not secured simply 
because the taxpayers do not fully understand the 
significance of education in a free republic like 
ours. They must be brought to see the necessity of 
these things. Each man, therefore, who goes out 
from this college should go as a missionary in ttie 
cause of popular education through the medium of 
well equipped schools. He may not be able to 
accomplish all he works for, but, if he allies himself 
with progressive forces his efforts cannot be wholly 
lost. 

Closely allied to the schools in every town and 
hamlet are the churches. The schools and the 
churches go hand in hand for the promotion of the 
republican form ideal. Remove either from the 
community, and degeneration must follow. Unfor- 
tunately the churches do not to-day have the sup- 
port of all the men best fitted to help them. The 



men who ought to fill the pews leave them to be 
filled by women and children or not at all. Here, 
then, is another chance for good service. It should 
be the college man's aim to support the churches in 
such a way that his influence may clearly aid them 
in promoting the Christian life of the community. 
Few men would care to live where the churches 
have ceased to exist. It is therefore, their duty to 
support what they would not do without. 

The church and the school furnish the incentives 
to still another line of activity in which the college 
man may make his influence count for something 
practical. I refer to civic improvement. Various 
public journals have already initiated a movement 
whose object is the beautifying of towns and cities. 
But thev have a hard task before them : for the 
tendency of the masses is to disregard the social 
claims upon them, and to thwart the efforts of those 
who would live amid attractive surroundings. The 
college man can lend a hand in this laudable effort 
and thus render invaluable service to his fellows. 

These are but a few of the more important duties 
of each man who leaves this college. There are, 
however, many more which every man of worth 
will have to meet in one form or another. If he is 
true to the ideals of the college, he will not shirk 
them. Rather will he give his best efforts for their 
accomplishment ; and by so doing bring credit upon 
himself and honor to his Alma Mater. 

The ideal of the college is to send out into the 
world men well equipped, not for a particular pro- 
fession, but for complete citizenship — men who can 
rise above the narrow claim of self and respond to 
the larger claims of society. For this object the 
college keeps a man four years and rightly expects 
him to do his duty when his four years are past. 
In view of this ideal, my classmates, guard with 
jealous care the trust committed to you by Bowdoin 
College, remembering always that the institution 
can rise higher or more efficient position than those 
whom it has carefully trained. 

To you who have assembled here I can only say 
that we are happy to have you with us. 



The Closing Address 

By H. P. Winslow. 

"At such a time in such a place as this. 
Here, where a melancholy whisper comes 
From the thin breezes yearning toward sea; 
Where wistful sighs of long remembrance stir 
The bosom of the low murmuring pines ; 
Here, where a thousand varied memories 
Rise up to waken pride or touch regret — " 

We come to say "good-bye." Twice two happy 
years we have passed here beneath the pines, and 
now we must depart as we came, each traveling his 
own way and alone. As we look back on the many 
bright, careless days of college life, we realize what 
they have been and what they might have been to us, 
but that now the time has come to pay the last 
respects to friendship. We cannot but help feel mel- 
ancholy at such a time when we think that some of 
us here will never see the old campus again, and 



94 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



that as we shake hands with friends and classmates 
now we may be doing so for the last time. We 
have, however, seen three classes graduate and we 
know that those so happy here now will soon fol- 
low us. We know that those whom we leave behind 
to fill our places will in a little while be taking their 
departure also. Just as these halls will cease to 
echo to the sound of our voices so will they cease to 
echo to theirs. And we derive a certain sad, conso- 
lation from this common fellowship in the thought 
that fate treats all alike. 

We came as individuals and now we must part as 
individuals, but we do not part as we came, for we 
now have something in common and dear to us all. 
and that something is the love of Old Bowdoin. It 




Harvey Philip Winslow 

has been infused into us until it has become a very 
part of our nature, and it is that bond which will 
ever hold us together. As the heart-beats of a trav- 
eler in a foreign land quicken at the mention of his 
native country, so will we ever fill with pride at the 
sound of the name we love and honor. 

College life is memory now and to-day we go 
forth into the world with greater confidence in our- 
selves and brighter hopes for the future, believing, 
as Shakespeare says, that 

"There is a tide in the affairs of men 
Which taken at the flood leads on to fortune." 

And that 

"On such a full sea are we now afloat, 
And that we must take the current when it serves 
Or lose our ventures." 

To-day 

"The mirror is turned forward to reflect 
The promises of the future, not the past." 

And as we look we see our ways for the most part 
to be hard and difficult. A few will perhaps achieve 
success, but the names of far the greater number 



will go down in years to come marked "Unknown." 
All we ask, however, is that from out our number 
one name may be added to the list of fame for the 
sake of "Old Bowdoin." If this be done then we shall 
feel that the great debt we owe her is at least par- 
tially paid. 

As we have tried to do our duty by our college so 
must we now devote our energies to the interests of 
our nation. As President Roosevelt has said : "A 
heavy moral obligation rests upon the men of learn- 
ing to do their duty by their country. And on no 
one class does this obligation rest more heavily than 
upon the men' of the collegiate education." 

"To-day the land has bitter need of us. 
Those to whom knowledge is given stand in 

double trust. 
Guardians of liberty and of the right." 

There are two parts to a college education. One 
is that which is obtained in the classroom from the 
professors, while the other is that derived from the 
association with fellow students. And it is the lat- 
ter which is the more important part. For the first 
we can only make you scholars, while the latter 
makes you men. It is men that our country wants. 
And may Bowdoin ever be proud, as she always has 
■ a rght to be, of the gifts she makes to her country. 

Alma Mater, we bid thee farewell. Never shall 
we be able to repay thee for the blessings which 
thou hast bestowed upon us. Thy sons ? As thou 
hast protected and cared for us, so may we ever 
honor and cherish thy name, for 

"What were we if we were stripped of Thee 
Thou who unto our calmer souls hast given 
Knowledge, Truth and Holy Mystery?" 



The Class Ode 

J. A. Bartlett. 

We sing, good fellowship we sing 

Under our good oak tree ; 
Loud, loud let all our voices ring 

In loyal unity. 
For light of Bowdoin rises bright, 

Glad sun to all the world 
It gleams upon our banner white, 

To God's own winds unfurled. 

To world of men, from world of youth 

There leads a broad highway, 
Where love of strength and dauntless truth 

Shall guide us through the day. 
And may we keep our symbol bright, 

Though painfully we go. 
And seeking, find the greater light 

In God's deep heart aglow. 



The Poem 

James Wingate Sewall. 

The poem was by J. W. Sewall of Oldtown, and 
was as follows : 

Our college, shadowed by the pines, 
The waving, softly-speaking pines, 
That call with joy the morning tide 
Stretching their hands into the sun 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



% 



To welcome {he gorgeous day ; 
That slowly sing the evensong, 
Bowing their head as though in prayer, 
To bid the lingering light farewell, — 
Our college now — as oft before — 
Another parting honors thee 
With what small honor it may give, 
While we go forth to greet the world, 
And this our earnest, heartfelt prayer 
As we go out from thee : "May we 
Be of their nature faithful sons — 
Men understanding fellow-men 
And knowing world realities. 




James Wingate Sewall 

And yet, more mystic, holding sweet 
The speculation of the dreams 
Of lovers, poets, and their kind. 
Whom reveries and visions hold 
With thoughts ideal and fancies fair; 
So thy true sons we pray to be — 
Dreamers of dreams, yet doers of deeds !" 
Into the East of Life we look, 
Where life in truth has just begun ; 
So, standing on the mountain height, 
Whose eastern front in veiled in mist 
And rainbow glints from out the sun, 
Whose eastern slope is fair to view, 
All built of distance-mellowed green, 
The wanderer sees the glowing day — 
In fairest rose the dawn breaks forth, 
Sweet as blushes seem, before 
They cloy upon the satiate sense, — 
And lo ! of sudden, hill and dale 
Outleap from their obscurity, 
While objects near are soft with dew, 
And those afar are soft with light, 
Half-veiled in sweet, mysterious mist 
As heaven his bride, the earth, would kiss, 
When all the land is like the dream 
Of him who wrote the Paradise : 
As hushed in awe the wanderer stands 



So we, spell bound, in silence gaze, 
Enraptured, peering down the paths 
Of life, that stretch far, far before, 
While dew of youth lends sweetness near, 
And light of hope shade future joy. 
Yet — as we look — the old, old days 
Come sweeping back with memories ! 

We remember old nights on the campus 
When the ground was white with snow, 
And the trees sang songs above us 
Like ghosts in the pale star-glow, 
Like skalds of long ago. 

We remember old nights on the campus 
When summer was in the air 
And the joy of youth swelled in us 
And oh ! but the world was fair ! 
To live in, to die in, to dare. 

You, companions, heart friends, 
You must hold it dear. 
Bowdoin's starlit campus, 
Fairer with each year. 

Lounging on the benches 
Out by old Maine Hall, 
Song and chat and laughter 
Over one and all ! 

Voices on the campus 

In the summer eves, 

Song and chat and laughter — 

Moonlight in the leaves. 

You, alumnus, older, 
You must hold it dear, 
Bowdoin's starlit campus. 
Bringing youth so near. 

Old Bowdoin, thou givest thy sons a glorious gift ! 

The privilege of being linked through thee, 

To those far-famous names of days gone by. 

Thy worthy sons — Greet men of mighty mould 

Whoever on thy name some glory shed. 

For who would scorn associations' boon. 

Or who decry the reverence of age? 

Or dare compare the sapling strength of youth. 

So quickly grown, so easy ripe, and bent 

By every passing, fitful gentle breeze, 

With thy vast rugged strength, the growth of years? 

Oh, Bowdoin, I sing thee not a tender mother, 

Whose kindness must be that of womankind, 

And who, through loving, must be too kind! 

But rather as a father, strong and wise, 

Who rules his sons and teaches them the ways 

Of men, and spareth not the needed rod, 

Nor yet doth spare true praise when honor's due, 

Nor fears to say to one who earns, "Well done." 

Ah ! much there is in that "well done ;" 
Praise is good when battle's won, 
Faces grow gay at night 
As though they caught the glowing light 
Of the setting sun. 

For thou art rugged, honest and sincere, 
Thy work is thorough and thy work is good. 
I praise our college, mighty Bowdoin, 

[Continued on page 96, column 2] 



96 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Published 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 

H. E. WILSON, lgo7 R. H. HUPPER, lgo8 

H. E. MITCHELL, 1907 R. A. LEE, 1908 

W. S. LINNELL, lgc-7 H. H. BURTON, igog 

A. L. ROBINSON, lgo8 J. S. STAHL, 1909 

A. L. JONES, Medical 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 
N. S. WESTON, 1908 



Business Manager 
Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 



Entered *t Post-Office at B 



nd-Class Mail Matter 



Lewiston Journal Pkess 



Vol. XXXVI. 



AUGUST 24, 1906 



The Orient is delayed in its 
Commencement issue because 
of a delay in the arranging for 
and the printing of certain 
copy which could not be obtained sooner. 



Delayed Orient 



Football Schedule 



The Orient prints in another 
column the football schedule 
for the fall series of games. 
The schedule is somewhat dif- 
ferent from those of recent years in that it embraces 
games with teams which Bowdoin has not before 
met. Perhaps the most important is that with 
Cornell, which will take place at Ithaca. This trip 
to New York will be one of the longest ever under- 
taken by a Bowdoin athletic team, but the arrange- 
ments are such that it will be less fatiguing than 
that of the Amherst trip, which is given up this 
year for the first time. Very satisfactory terms 
have been arranged with the New York institution 
and there seems to be every reason to feel pleased 
with this new game. 



The other new feature will be the game with 
Wesleyan. For several years attempts have been 
made by both Bowdoin and Wesleyan to secure 
games with each other, particularly in baseball, but 
not until now have the managers succeeded in bring- 
ing about such an arrangement. Of all the New 
England colleges no two perhaps are better fitted to 
meet each other in intercollegiate contests than 
Bowdoin and Wesleyan and that such a contest has 
at last been arranged is very pleasing. The 
Orient congratulates Manager Allen and the col- 
lege on its new schedule. 



CLASS POEM— (Continued from page 95.] 

The spirit that lives on and on for age, 
While men, both old and young, but fade away. 
The college that is like the fatherland, 
The college we must reverence and adore. 

Ah ! forgive, forgive this poor week pen, 
That cannot yield thee half thy due, 
But only to itself be true 
And pray thy pardon at the end. 



The Alumni Dinner 

At the close of the exercises in the church the 
procession was formed again and proceeded up 
Maine Street under the elms and in through the 
Class of '75 gates to Memorial Hall where the Com- 
mencement dinner was served. There were about 
, fjob Bowdoin graduates in the line by classes, and 
their cheering and singing drowned the music of 
the band most of the time during the march across 
the campus. Once in upper Memorial Hall they were 
seated at the six long tables where the excellent din- 
ner was enjoyed. On the stage were President 
Hyde, the guests of the occasion and leading mem- 
bers of the governing boards. When the president 
called the great gathering to order after the dinner 
was over he was greeted with a great and long- 
continued outburst of enthusiasm. The alumni, 
young and old, leaped to their seats and cheered 
again and again in token of their love, esteem and 
confidence for the great educator for over 20 years 
at the head of old Bowdoin. He spoke briefly in 
review of the year, mentioning especially the $125,- 
000 received in gifts during the year and announcing 
a new gift of $2 000 from the Class of '81 to establish 
a scholarship. He then announced that the beauti- 
ful big bronze and gold loving cup given by David 
W. Snow, '73'., as a reunion trophy to be given to the 
class having the largest percentage of its members 
back at Commencement had been won by the Class 
of '76. This class, which graduated thirty years 
ago, had 23 members back out of 39 living, giving it 
a percentage of .58 9-10. The class ranking next 
was given honorable mention. It was the Class of 
'96 which had 27 men back out of 46 living, giving 
it a percentage of .58 7-10. There was great applause 
and cheering over the announcement, the two classes 
between which the competition was so close cheer- 
ing each other over and over. Many classes had 
over 50 per cent, of their men back and several of 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



97 



the later classes had actually more men than '76 or 
'96, though a less proportion. 

The speakers of the afternoon were Congressman 
Littlefield who had been made a Doctor of Laws at 
the morning exercises ; President Fellows of the 
University of Maine whose special farming train 
stopped at the station to allow him to be present ; 
General Hubbard, '57, who paid a splendid tribute to 
his classmate, General Francis Fessenden, who died 
in Portland last year ; Hon. C. F. Libby, '64, of 
Portland, who spoke for the overseers ; Prof. H. L. 
Chapman, '66, who was given one of the most 
tumultuous greetings of the day by the hundreds of 
alumni who love him so well and whose speech was 
a gem of wit and eloquence ; Tascus Atwood ,'76, of 
Auburn, who spoke for the class which won the 
reunion trophy; Judge F. A. Fisher, '81, of Lowell, 
Mass., who spoke for the class of a quarter of a 
century ago ; W. V. Wentworth, '86, of Great 
Works, who spoke for the class of twenty years 
ago ; and Hon. C. A. Knight, '96, mayor of Gardi- 
ner, who spoke for the class of ten years ago which 
came within two-tenths of one per cent, of winning 
the trophy.The speeches were of a high order and 
each speaker was warmly received and applauded. 
It was about 3 when the speaking was over and the 
600 happy sons of old Bowdoin went out of the hall 
to the beautiful campus and another most successful 
Commencement was at an end. Most of the big 
crowd of graduates left Brunswick on the after- 
noon and evening trains while the newly graduated 
class went to Casco Castle in the evening for their 
farewell meeting and banquet. Friday and Satur- 
day will be days of packing up and departure. 



1 



The Medical Graduation 



The graduation exercises of the Medical School 
of Maine took place Wednesday at 10 a.m., and as it 
was the only event at that hour, drew the greater 
part of the visitors to the college church. There was 
also quite a large number of friends of the "Medics" 
in the number. 

The men who were to graduate formed in line in 
front of the Medical building, shortly before 10 
o'clock and headed by Payne's band started on the 
march to the church. A section in the front of the 
edifice had been reserved for them, the men march- 
ing up the center aisle, and the band taking its posi- 
tion in the south balcony. After a musical selec- 
tion prayer was offered by Rev. John C. Perkins of 
Portland, followed by the address of Rev. Raymond 
Calkins of the State Street Church of Portland. 

Mr. Calkins' address was one of the strongest 
that has been heard in a long time. He dwelt largely 
on what he considered to be essential attributes of 
a truly successful life. He said that a man's power 
may be judged by his work as it is projected through 
his personality. 

This involved two things. First, the kind of 
work to which we are adapted, and secondly the 
kind of men we are. This latter factor he believed 
after all to be the great one. He then discussed 
what goes to make the real man. He said that there 
was a large compass of soul and a fineness of moral 
fibre which go to make a man and must always con- 



tribute to the strong personality, thus learning the 
great factor in success, whatever the business or 
profession of the individual. 

He said that the true man should have the four 
qualities of reverence, awe, humility and faith. 
These things are the fountains from which all that 
is best in man's make-up must necessarily flow. He 
said there might be a certain feeling of opposition 
to these sentiments in undergraduate days, but that 
the experiences of the world soon taught a man that 
there were certain great factors in life that never 
could be subjected to mere reason, and that only so 
far as an individual learned to recognize this did 
he put himself in a position to become one of the 
strongest and best men in a community. 

He said the medical men and scientific men of to- 
day, are perhaps the most reverent men in a commu- 
nity. Through their investigations they come face 
to face with the great mysteries of life, and the nat- 
ural result was reverence. 

Mr. Calkins dwelt on the necessity of unselfish- 
ness and generosity to attain to the highest and 
asserted that r.o man could build safely on a narrow 
selfish foundation. They are shams which are soon 
discovered. 

He spoke of the statement made of Gladstone, 
that he was engrossed in politics, but that he never 
became submerged in them, and the speaker thought 
no man should become submerged in his profession 
to lose sight of the greater and more important 
things of life. 

Following the address the members of the gradu- 
ating class marched onto the platform where they 
were presented with their diplomas by Dr. Mitchell, 
dean of the Maine Medical school, after which they 
filed out, led by the class marshal. 

There are 17 men graduating from the Medical 
school this year : Their names and residences are as 
follows : Harris Clark Barrows. A. B., Augusta ; 
Arthur Osman Davis, Bridgton ; John Lewis Davis, 
Portland ; Louis Andrew Derry, A. B„ Portland ; 
Frank Leslie Ferren, Levant ; Stanwood Elmer 
Fisher, Portland ; Leonard Harris Ford, B. S.. East 
Eddington; Percy Emerton Gilbert, A. B., Water- 
ville : Scott Goddard Larrabee, Scarboro : Homer 
Elbridge Marks, Portland; Joseph Randall Ridlon, 
A.B., Gorham ; Walter Joseph Roberts. Kennebunk ; 
Atherton Monette Ross, Phillips ; Harry William 
Sampson, Monson : Alfred Herman Schriver, Tem- 
ple ; Adam Shaw, Jr., Lowell, Mass. ; Francis Joseph 
Welch, A.B., Portland. 



Award of "Prizes for the Year 1905-1906 

Smyth Mathematical Prize — Chester Yeaton, 
1908. 

Sewall Greek Prize — Thomas Edward Gay, 1908. 

Sewall Latin Prize — Thomas Edward Gay, 1908. 

Class of 1868 Prize — James Austin Bartlett, 1906. 

Pray English Prize — Lewis Hewitt Fox. 1906. 

Goodwin French Prize — Harold Hitz Burton, 1909. 

Noyes Political Economy Prize — Melvin Thomas 
Copeland. 1906. 

Class of 1875 Prize in American History — William 
Alexander Robinson, 1907. 

Bradbury Debating Prizes — First prizes to Harry 
Edward Mitchell, 1907; Fulton Jarvis Redman, 1907; 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Charles Wilbert Snow, 1907. Second prizes to 
Charles Luff Favinger, 1906; George Carroll Soule, 
1906; Roscoe Henderson Hupper, 1908. 

Hawthorne Prize— Edward Augustin Duddy, 1907. 

Alexander Prize — First prize, Roscoe Henderson 
Hupper, 1908. Second prize, Seth Gurney Haley. 
Jr., 1908, with honorable mention of Benjamin 
Franklin Briggs, 1907. 

Charles Carroll Everett Scholarship— Melvin 
Thomas Copeland, 1906. 

Brown Memorial Scholarships— Philip Freeland 
Copeland, 1906; Joseph Blake Drummond, 1907; 
Carl Merrill Robinson, 1908; Thomas Francis She- 
han, Jr., 1909. 

Brown Composition Prizes— Oscar Peterson, 06, 
first prize; James Wingate Sewall. '06, second prize. 

Goodwin Commencement Prize— Philip Freeland 
Copeland. '06. 

Freshman Language Prize— John Robert Hurley. 

Honorary Degrees. 

The following honorary degrees were conferred at 
the close of the graduating exercises : 

Doctor of Laws (LL.D.) — Charles Edgar Little- 
field, able lawyer, judicious legislator, a representa- 
tive in Congress in whom Maine has found not an 
echo but a voice. Frederick Nelson Powers, learned 
jurist, associate justice of the supreme court of 
Maine. 

Doctor of Letters (Litt.D.)— Edward Page 
Mitchell of the Class of 1871, the brilliant editor of 
the New York Sun, in student days the author of 
Bowdoin's favorite song. 

Doctor of Divinity (D.D.) — Daniel Evans of the 
Class of 1890, pastor of the North Avenue Congre- 
gational Church, Cambridge, Mass., a pastor of 
righteousness on philosophical foundations. Eugene 
William Lyman, professor of theology in Bangor 
Theological Seminary, a truthful teacher of spirit- 
ual truth. Charles Fletcher Dole, pastor of the 
Unitarian Church in Jamaica Plain, _ Mass., a 
preacher of peace and prophet of the kingdom of 
good will. 

Master of Arts (A.M.)— Joseph Edward Merrill 
of the Class of 1854, successful merchant and donor 
of a beautiful public library building to his native 
town of Yarmouth. Me. Edward Noyes Pomeroy, 
graceful writer. George Campbell Yeaton of the 
Class of 1856, able lawyer. Thomas Bird Mosher, 
publisher of good literature in beautiful form. 



The Graduating Class 

The following are the names and addresses of the 
members of the graduating class : 

Abbott, Edville Gerhardt, Portland ; Andrews, 
Dura Bradford, Portland ; Andrews, Philip Roy, 
Kennebunk ; Bartlett, James Austin, Richmond ; 
Bavis, Chester Swan, Calais ; Bodkin, Arthur Hor- 
ace, jr., Portland; Boody, Henry Philiips, Jackson; 
Booth, Harold George. Buffalo, N. Y. ; Boothby, 
Alfred RusselL Westbrook; Boothby, Clayton Deer- 
ing, Madison ; Bradford, Charles Henry, South Liv- 
ermore ; Chapman, Philip Freeland, Portland ; 



Childs, Harry Leslie, Lewiston ; Clark, Walter 
Bradon, Houlton ; Copeland, Melvin Thomas, 
Brewer ; Cunningham. Charles Hunter, Strong ; 
Elder, Harold Starbird, Woodfords ; Favinger, 
Charles Luff, Frederica, Del. ; Fox, Lewis Hewitt, 
Woodfords ; Gumbel, Lester, New Orleans, La. ; 
Hale, Edward Russ»ll, Portland ; Hall, Crowell 
Clairinton, Dover ; Hatch George Ulmer, Belfast ; 
Hawkesworth, Charles Wesley, Boston, Mass. ; 
Hicks, Charles Joseph, Westbrook; Hodgson, Rob- 
ert John, Jr., Lewiston; Holman, Currier Carlton, 
Farmington ; Houghton, Charles Andrew Johnson. 
Brunswick: Jenks, Charles, Fitch, Canton, Mass.; 
Johnson, Romilly, Lynn, Mass. ; Johnson, William 




Philip Freeland Chapman, President of Graduating Class 

Treby, Augusta; Knowlton, Chas. Colby, Ellsworth; 
McDougald, William James, Rockland; Packard, 
Frederick Lucius, Turner; Paine, Roscoe Randall, 
Winslow ; Parcher, George. Ellsworth ; Parker, 
Leon Vasco, Cumberland Mills ; Perry, Elmer, Port- 
land; Peterson, Oscar, Cornish; Piper, Fred Edg- 
comb Richards, Portland ; Porter, David Richard, 
Bangor; Powers, Walter Averill, Houlton; Putnam, 
Arthur Otis, Houlton ; Roberts. Thaddeus Blaine, 
Norway; Rogers, Clarence Arthur, Brunswick; 
Rowe, Frank Davis, Ellsworth; Sewall, James Win- 
gate, Old Town ; Shaw, Cyrus Clyde, North Gor- 
ham ; Shaw, Richard Edson, Belfast ; Silha, Emil 
Albert, Chicago, 111. ; Simonds. Otis Franklin, Port- 
land ; Skolfield, Clement, Brunswick ; Smith, Fred 
Elhanan, Norway ; Soule, George Carroll, South 
Freeport; Stetson, Harold Stanwood, Brunswick; 
Stevens. Robie Reed, Kennebunk; Stone, William 
Haines, Biddeford ; Tobey, Harold Grant, Clinton, 
Mass. ; Tuell, Gilbert Woodsum, Bethel ; Tuttle, 
Chester Clinton, Brickfield ; Walker, Thomas Butler, 
Biddeford ; Webber, Ralph Grant, Augusta ; Wil- 
liams, Raymond Blin, Farmington ; Wing. Eugene 
Eveleth, Fairfield ; Winslow, Harvey Philip, Gardi- 
ner ; Woodruff, Rober Thomson, Brunswick; You- 
land, William Edward, Jr. , Biddeford. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



99 




George Ulmer Hatch, Marshal of Graduating Class 

Honor List 

The following is the honor list of the graduating 
class : 

Summa cum Laude — Philip Freeland Chapman, 
Melvin Thomas Copeland, Walter Averill Powers, 
Robie Reed Stevens. 

Magna cum Laude — Harold George Booth, 
Charles Henry Bradford, Leon Vasco Parker, Oscar 
Peterson. Thaddeus Blaine Roberts, James Wingate 
Sewall, Cyrus Clyde Shaw, George Carroll Soule. 

Cum Laude — Edville Gerhardt Abbott, Philip Roy 
Andrews. James Austin Bartlett, Henry Phillips 
Boody, Clayton Deering Boothby, Charles Luff 
Favinger, Lewis Hewitt Fox, Lester Gumbel, 
Charles Colby Knowlton, Elmer Perry, Fred Elha- 
nan Smith, William Haines Stone, Ralph Grant 
Webber, Eugene Eveleth Wing, Robert Thomson 
Woodruff. 



The Phi 'Beta Kappa Men 

Those admitted from the Class of 1906 were 
as follows : James Austin Bartlett of Richmond ; 
Harold George Booth of Riverside; Charles Luff 
Favinger of Frederica, Del. ; Charles Colby Knowl- 
ton of Ellsworth ; Leon Vasco Parker of Cumber- 
land Mills; Oscar Peterson of Strong; Thaddeus 
Blaine Roberts of Norway; James Wingate Sewall 
of Old Town ; George Carroll Soule of South Free- 
port ; Eugene Eveleth Wing of Fairfield ; Robert 
Thomson Woodruff of Brunswick. 

The men who are admitted from the Junior Class 
are as follows: Neal Woodside Allen of Portland; 
Charles Reynolds Bennett of Yarmouth ; Leon Dear- 
born Mincher of Mattawamkeag ; Edward Carpenter 
Pope of Manchester ; Malon Patterson Whipple of 
Solon and Harold Everett Wilson of Newburyport, 
Mass. 

The following officers were elected for the ensuing 
year as follows : 



President, James McKeen. of New York ; Vice- 
President, General Thomas H. Hubbard, of New 
York ; Secretary and Treasurer, Professor George 
T. Files, of Brunswick ; Literary Committee, Profes- 
sor George T. Little, of Brunswick; Rev. Samuel V. 
Cole of Norton, Mass. ; Professor Torrey, of New 
Haven, Conn.; Dr. Charles H. Cutter, of Bangor; 
and Professor Henry L. Chapman of Brunswick. 



The Prize Speaking 

The Alexander prize speaking contest was held 
Tuesday evening, June 26. The first prize was won 
by Roscoe Henderson Hupper of Martinsville. Seth 
Gurney Haley of Old Orchard won the second 
prize, and Benjamin Franklin Briggs of Auburn 
received honorable mention. 

The contest was based on a new foundation pre- 
sented to the college by Congressman D. S. Alexan- 
der of Buffalo, N. Y., Bowdoin. '70. 
The program : 

Music. 
"Against the Spoils System." — Henry van Dyke 

. Roscoe Henderson Hupper, '08, of Martinsville 
"On Receiving the Master's Degree from Harvard." 
— Booker Washington 

Asa Osgood Pike, '07, of Fryeburg 
"Knee-Deep in June." — James Whitcomb Riley 

Gardner Wilson Cole, '09, of East Raymond 
Music 
"The Soldier of the Empire." — Thomas Nelson Page 
Thomas Armedus Gastonguay, '09, of Brunswick 
"The Puritan Principle Applied to the Hayes-Tilden 
Controversy." — George William Curtis 
Fulton Jarvis Redman, '07, of Dorchester. Mass. 
"The Call of the Sea." — Anonymous 

Albert Trowbridge Gould, '08, of Thomaston 
Music 
"The Famine." — Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 

Seth Gurney Haley, Jr., '07, of Old Orchard 
"America's Mission." — Albert Jeremiah Beveridge 

Benjamin Franklin Briggs, '07, of Auburn 
"Pheidippides." — Robert Browning 

John Franklin Morrison, '08, of Medford, Mass. 

Music 
Alternate speakers — Charles Wilbert Snow, '07. of 
Spruce Head ; John William Leydon, '07, of Bath ; 
William Matthew Harris, '09, of Newcastle. 



Meetings of Trustees and Overseers 

At the meetings of the trustees and overseers held 
during commencement week business of impor- 
tance was transacted. Among other things that have 
come up was the election of two additional doc- 
tors to the staff of the Medical School of Maine. 
They are Dr. W. E. Robie of Portland, who will be 
professor of anatomy for three years. Another was 
Dr. T. J. Burrage, who was also elected as assistant 
demonstrator of histology for one year. The third 
new man is Dr. James A. Spaulding as clinical 
instructor. The old staff was all re-elected. 

Among the other items of business was the con- 
ferring of degrees. Alphonso C. Merryman of Free- 



fOO 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



port was given the degree of Master of Arts, pro 
merito. 

The degree of B. A. was conferred on Edgar 
Yates, ex-76; Carleton P. Merrill, ex-'g6 ; Donald 
S. Walker, ex-'04. 

Other business was for the appropriation of a 
sum of money for the celebration of the centenary 
of the birth of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. 

The election of the committees of ^ie board 
resulted as follows: Visiting committee. Messrs. 
Cole, Stanwood, Appleton. Belcher. Payson ; exam- 
ining committee. Messrs. Sewall, Chamberlain, Mor- 
rill Torrey, Hawes. Cutler; finance committee, 
Messrs. Putnam, Wiswell, Moses. Crosby; honorary 
degrees, Messrs. Chamberlain and Stevens ; art 
interests. Chamberlain and Baxter; grounds and 
buildings, the treasurer, with Profs. Chapman and 
Robinson from the faculty; vacancies in the Medical 
School, Messrs. Frye, Putnam, Purington, Alexan- 
der: vacancies in college faculty, Messrs. Hubbard, 
Brown Bell, McKeen. 

Two new members of the board of overseers were 
elected as follows: 

George P. Davenoort, '67, of Bath, and Addison 
D. Herrick, '73, of Bethel. 

Kenneth Z. M. Sills, '01, was elected assistant 
professor of Latin for three years. 



SHOREY TRACK CAPTAIN 

At a meeting of the track men at the close of the 
season, P. R. Shorey, '07, was elected track captain 
for the next year. Mr. Shorey has been prominent 







- 1 




4^ 


-•>•%% 


ill 


^ i/&WrW 3WW%f p%j 




:■:: ' ' '• :■:::'■ 




■ill 

I|i|k 


m&^ : M A mM': 



The Alumni Association 

The annual meeting of the Alumni Association 
was held at 9 o'clock this morning in the alumni 
room. The officers of last year were all re-elected, 
as follows: 

President, Franklin Conant Payson, Portland; 
Vice-President, Charles Taylor Hawes. Bangor; 
Secretary and Treasury, Dr. George T. Little, 
Brunswick. 

The election to fill vacancies on the board of over- 
seers resulted in the choice of George Patten 
Davenport, A.M., of Bath, chosen by the Alumni 
Association while Addison Emery Herrick of Bethel 
was chosen by the committee of the boards. 

The committee to have charge of the award of the 
Pray prize for 1907 was chosen as follows : Augustus 
F. Moulton, '73; Albert W. Tolman, '88; Clarence 
W. Peabody, '93. 



THE FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

Manager Allen has arranged the following 
ball schedule for the coming season: 

Sept. 29 — Fort Preble at Brunswick. 
Oct. 3 — Harvard at Cambridge. 
Oct. 6 — Exeter at Brunswick. 
Oct. 13 — Wesleyan at Middletown. 
Oct. 20 — Cornell at Ithaca. 
Oct. 27 — Bates at Brunswick. 
Nov. 3— Tufts at Medford. 
Nov. 10 — Colby at Brunswick. 
Nov. 17 — Maine at Orono. 



foot- 



a.TX Phil R. Shorey 

in track work throughout his three years and has 
proved himself a sure point winner in the Maine 
meets, as well as making good showings in the New 
England meets. 



BASEBALL CAPTAIN 



At a meeting of the "B" men of the baseball team 
held immediately after the last game with Colby, 
Files was elected captain for the next year's team. 

"Eddie" is a member of the Sophomore Class and 
is one of the most popular men in college. He was 
Bowdoin's first pitcher during his Freshman year 
and during the present season has made an enviable 
record. 



REPORT OF TRACK MANAGER, SEASON 1905=06 

Total Receipts. 

Subscriptions $611 25 

B. A. A. Guarantee SO °° 

Indoor Meet 249 95 

Interscholastic Meet 152 45 

M. I. A. Dividend 34 75 

Locker Keys 3 00 

Sale of Numbers 2 00 

Total $1,103 40 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



tot 



Total Expenditures. 

Telegrams and Telephone Messages $2 02 

Registration Fees 8 75 

Travelling 125 58 

Hotel 134 30 

Printing 99 OS 

Stamps 4 00 

Laying Board Track 62 50 

Caring for Board Track 1 1 03 

Care of Whittier Field 29 37 

Track Supplies 17 80 

Coaching 234 00 

Rubbing 23 75 

Officials 29 41 

Locker Keys 3 o° 

Cups, Medals and Pennant 101 21 

M. I. A. A. Dues IS 00 

N. E. I. A. A. Dues 15 00 

Not Otherwise Specified 45 80 

Balance on hand 141 2,3 

Total $1,103 40 

Unpaid Subscriptions 78 00 

Unpaid Bills 171 99 

A. James Voorhees, Manager. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE COUNCIL 

Wm. A. Moody, Treasurer, in account with Bow- 
doin Athletic Council : 

To Balance on hand July, 1905 $779 91 

Interest on deposits 11 40 

Old tennis subscriptions from Manager 

Chapman 27 76 

Ten per cent, football gate receipts 83 85 

Advance to Manager Sewall repaid 35 21 

Balance of football accounts 12 84 

Ten per cent, baseball gate receipts 61 96 

Balance of baseball accounts 116 80 

$1,129 73 
Cr. 

By Tennis bills, season 1904-5 $34 85 

Baseball bills, season 1904-5 64 60 

Track athletes bills, season 1904-5 15 07 

Maintenance of Whittier Field, charged 

to ten per cent, fund 235 66 

Water rates ten per cent, fund 1483 

Advance to Manager Mincher 12 00 

Delegates' expenses 30 00 

Printing 7 00 

Telephoning, etc 1 40 

Balance on hand July 1, 1906 714 32 

$1,129 73 
The funds of the Council are disposed as follows : 

Union National Bank balance $353 67 

Brunswick Sav. Inst, deposit and interest. . 360 65 

$714 32 

General Treasury balance $499 30 

Ten per cent. Fund 215 02 

$714 32 



REPORT OF TENNIS MANAGER 

Receipts. 

Student subscriptions %22,2 20 

Rec'd for new rackets bought, and racket 
case and restringing and fixing old 

rackets 24 45 

Miscellaneous 24 72 

$281 37 
Expenditures. 

Wright & Ditson for balls $12 00 

Maine Intercollegiate Tournament 4387 

Vermont and New England Intercollegiate 

Tournaments 148 90 

Loring. Short & Harmon bill (balls, sup- 
plies, etc. ) 62 70 

Miscellaneous 12 02 

Balance on hand 1 88 

$281 37 

Uncollected subscriptions $67 50 

Unpaid bills 20 00 

Leon Mincher, Manager. 
June 29, 1906. 



REPORT OF BASEBALL MANAGER 

Harold E. Wilson. 
Receipts. 

Gate $612 60 

Guarantees and gate out of town 1,286 ;o 

Subscriptions 651 00 

Minstrel Show 114 96 

Miscellaneous 23 25 

$2,658 11 
Expenses. 

Guarantees $315 00 

Travelling 929 99 

Supplies 495 35 

Umpres 53 00 

Coaches 507 50 

Printing 39 25 

Labor 20 85 

Telegrams, etc 14 27 

Council 61 27 

Pennant 15 00 

Unclassified 90 38 

Balance on hand 1 16 75 

$2,658 II 
Unpaid bills 154 5° 

July 7. 1906. 



July 7, 1900. 
I have examined the books, accounts and vouchers 
of the Treasurer of the Athletic Council, and of the 
Managers of the Baseball Association, the Track 
Athletic Association, and the Tennis Association, 
and find that the foregoing reports are correct and 
properly vouched, 

Barrett Potter, 

For the Auditors. 



J02 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PRESIDENT HYDE'S NEW BOOK 

President Hyde's latest book, "The College 
Man and the College Woman," is receiving 
the highest praise from the reviewers and 
many call it an even stronger work than his 
"From Epicurus to Christ." 

The following review from trie Boston 
Advertiser is handed to the Orient by a 
well-known alumnus, who believes it of an 
excellence that warrants its appearance in the 
Orient: 

"In a book called 'the College Man and 
the College Woman' are observations of a 
sane and exceptionally vigorous educator, 
President Hyde of Bowdoin, who deals with 
the personal, ethical and spiritual side of col- 
lege life. Taken as a whole, these chapters 
represent what twenty years in a college have 
taught about what students mean to be, and 
what graduates may be expected to become. 
'I trust,' he says in prefatory remarks, 'that 
I may assure over-anxious parents that not 
every aberration of their sons and daughters 
while in college is either final or fatal, per- 
suade critics of college administration that 
our problem is not so simple as they seem to 
think ; and inspire the public with the con- 
viction, cherished by every college officer that 
college students, with all their faults and fol- 
lies are the best fellows in the world ; and 
that notwithstanding much crude speculation 
about things human and some honest skepti- 
cism concerning things divine 1 , the great 
social institutions of family and industry and 
church and state may be safely intrusted to 
their hearts and hands.' 

"Dr. Hyde is convinced that the main reli- 
ance of a college for its moulding of men and 
women is not preaching or exhortation, or 
rules and regulations, least of all threats and 
penalties ; 'but actually living in an atmos- 
phere of freedom, where each person has 
returned to him frankly, swiftly, mercilessly, 
the social judgment that his acts invite and 
his character deserves.' It holds most, then, 
for the average man, who is most in need of 
moulding. The best spiritual beverage for 
college youth, as Dr. Hyde would brew it is a 
blend of Greek sanity and Christian service. 
Of the Greek spirit he makes much. Touch- 
ing the question of benefits and bruises in 
co-education, his opinion may be understood 
from these lines : 'I have ventured to recog- 
nize that fact that man and woman are not 
just alike, and to suggest that what God has 



put asunder man cannot satisfactorily join 
together.' 'Is a college education,' we often 
hear, 'good for a girl?' Dr. Hyde answers 
in his chapter on 'The Choice of the College 
Women :' 'If college women remain college 
women, and try to bring the world to them, 
they will be very unhappy ; but if they go 
into the world forgetting that they are differ- 
ent from other people they will be the happi- 
est persons there.' The situation in a nut- 
shell. The college woman who uppishly 
refuses to clasp hands with her environment 
is a failure, not because of education, but 
through her ignorance of its value- Other 
subjects treated are Alumni Ideals, The Col- 
lege, Six Partners in College Administra- 
tion, and The Personality of the Teacher. 
Able and candid, Dr. Hyde is sure of being 
widely read by professional educators and 
other persons actively interested in educa- 
tional problems." 



LIBRARY NOTES 

The Library received recently a very inter- 
esting piece of old manuscript. It is addressed 
to Sir William Phipps of New England, and 
is an order from King William III. ordering 
him to appear before the King's Council to 
answer sundry charges of illegal and arbitrary 
acts attributed to him. It is dated Whitehall, 
February 5, 1694, and is written and signed 
by the King's Secretary, J. Trenchard. 

The library has recently received from Mr. 
W. G. Bowdoin, a proof of a cut made from 
a block print of St. Christopher. This proof 
is of interest because it is said that the orig- 
inal block on which this cut was made, sug- 
gested to Gutenberg the system of printing 
by using small separate blocks, the invention 
of which system is attributed to Gutenberg. 

Among the books recently added to the 
library may be mentioned : "American Men of 
Science," edited by J. McK. Cartell; "Maine 
from Maine," by F. C. Griffith; "Sir Christo- 
pher Wrenn," by Lucy Phillimore ; and a set 
of Charles Lever's novels in 26 volumes. 

Among other books of note that have just 
been added to the library are: "Standard Dic- 
tionary of the English Language," in two 
volumes, edited by Funk ; "Story of Bowdoin, 
'96," written and presented by J. C. Minot, 
'96; "Playing Cards of All Nations," written 
and presented by W. G. Bowdoin ; "Science 
and Health," a Christian-Scientist book by 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



103 



Mrs. Mary B. G. Eddy; and a large set of 
Law Books which came from the estate of 
John C. Dodge, '34, who died several years 
ago. 

Among the books that have been received by 
the Library this year may be mentioned: 
"Jacksonian Democracy" by Professor Mac- 
Donald ; and the "Lives of the Popes" in three 
volumes by H. K. Mann. Four small books 
by Longfellow have been added this week to 
the so-called "Longfellow Case." 



Hlumni personals 



CLASS OF 1896. 

The Class of '96 has engaged the house of 
S. F. Marston at 21 Potter Street, as its 
headquarters during Commencement week. 

CLASS OF 1899. 

The marriage of Edwin Marrett Nelson of 
Calais, to Miss Edith Gertrude Johnson is 
announced. The wedding took place June 1 
at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. John M. Johnson. 

CLASS OF 1902. 

The engagement of Sidney W. Noyes of 
Portland, to Miss Abbie Clark of Bath, has 
been announced. Miss Noyes has recently 
been one of the nurses at the Maine General 
Hospital in Portland. 

On June 20 Richard B. Dole, '02, was mar- 
ried to Miss Hulda Humphreys at the home of 
the bride in Brunswick. 



See pie moot a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
1906 man who will be in the market for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do alter graduation. 

a. s. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPQOOD'S 



George R. Walker, '02, who graduated 
LL.B. from Harvard last June, took the New 
York State Bar examinations last April, and 
is now established in the practice of his 
profession at 59 Wall Street, New York City. 

T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



CAN 
EARN 



$65.00 to $200.00 MONTHLY 
or 33c, to $1.00 AN HOUR 

SOLICITING SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR 




Winslow G. Smith 
A $200.00 Man 

WHY NOT YOU? 

Address for Fu>l Fart ; culars 

Dept. CM, PICTORIAL REVIEW 

853 Broadway NEW YORK 



Mention the Orient when patronizing our Advertisers. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




Visit our 

ICE-CREAM 

PARLOR. 




119 Maine Street 
CATERING in all departments a Specialty. 

PULSIFER'S 
5 AND 10 6ERT ST0RE 

Now Open for Business. 
J. W. PULSIFER, - - MAINE STREET, BRUNSWICK 

Bowdoin Calendars j 

ON SALE at HALF PRICEj 

(50 Cents) 

WOODpfF, '06, or 
BYJ^ON STEVENS' BOOKSTORE 



THE NIEOICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Has a carefully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; Clinical Conferences; Modified Seminar Methods, and thorough I v Practical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest and finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every re-peel, and the new laboratories arc specially planned and equipped for individual work by the students. 
^ The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 
SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of Medicine. 




T^jr/hz 



REPEATING SHUT GUN 
NEW MODEL NS17 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By the omission of the take down feature we have 
been able to greatly reduce the cost of production and at the same bme have kept the gun up to the 
famous high Martin sta ndard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
'"--'- — ; especially bored f 9 r smokeless as well as black powder and so chambered that 2% inch or 



1% inch shells may be' 

enable and best working .„. ..,.„,.._,, 

and bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so l 
"»■"• your dealer order it for you. 



Ha 



Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 
existence. We are glad to rnake it possible for every lover of guns 
' a price. 



Send for the ZBar&n Catalogue and Experience Book to-day. Free for 3 stamps. 

SJZ&jSar/i/tfirefZrmS £tt # 42Willow Street, New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCTOBER 12, 1906 



VOL. XXXVI 



NO. 11 



A VISIT TO LAKE ASQUAM 

[The Orient is pleased to print the following 
description of a visit to the property recently pre- 
sented to the President and Board of Trustees of 
Bowdoin College by W. F. Langdon, '53, as a 
memorial of his own regard and that of his 
deceased brother for the college. The description 
is from the pen of a classmate of Mr. Langdon at 
Bowdoin.] 

Your readers may be interested to know 
something" of a trip recently taken by Pres- 
ident Hyde in company with the writer. It 
was undertaken at the invitation of Wood- 
bury F. Langdon, Esq., of Plymouth, N. H., 
to visit him at his summer home at "Squam 
Lake." Reaching Alton Bay by rail, then 
by steamer across Winnepisaukee to Weirs, 
we enjoyed the beauty of a lake which one 
who has never seen "Asquam" would think 
unsurpassed. At this point is the headquar- 
ters of the New Hampshire Association of 
Veterans, as well as a fine hotel, seated on 
an eminence commanding a view of the 
whole lake and its vicinity, an attractive 
spot to lovers of good air and fine scenery. 
Arriving later in the evening at Ashland, 
N. H., we were met by our host and driven 
to his home on Squam Lake (at Holderness, 
N. IT. ) . The morning revealed a most 
entrancing prospect. The Lake, some six 
miles in average width and length, dotted 
with islands, the thickly wooded shores, the 
surrounding mountains, from "Rattlesnake" 
and Ossipee, to the Franconias, and in the 
dim distance the Presidential range with 
Mount Washington overtopping all, dis- 
closed a scene of beauty and grandeur rarely 
equalled. Our poet Whittier, whose annual 
rest was taken on a slope overlooking these 
waters, thus sung of their loveliness: 

"The shadows round the inland sea 
Are deepening into night; 
Slow up the slopes of Ossipee 
They chase the lessening light. 
Tired of the long day's blinding heat, 
I rest my languid eye. 

Lake of the hills ! Where, cool and sweet, 
Thy sunset waters lie ! 

"O, gems of sapphire, granite set ! 
O, hills that charmed horizons fret ! 



I know how fair your morns can break, 
In rosy light on isle and lake : 
How over wooded slopes can view 
The noonday play of cloud and sun, 
And evening droop her oriflamme 
Of gold and red in still Asquam." 

On the shores and islands have been estab- 
lished many summer camps, under the direc- 
tion of various schools, where scores of youth 
enjoy aquatic and athletic sports under lead- 
ership which promotes physical development 
without moral degeneracy. Specially inter- 
esting visits were paid to establishments con- 
nected with the Church School of Holder- 
ness, and the Webster School of Boston, 
which are supplied with ample accommoda- 
tions, and provision for health and recreation. 
The Groton School, co-operating in the noble 
charity of St. George's Church, New York, 
gives to groups of boys, whose ordinary 
opportunities are limited, the uplift , and 
encouragement of a life with nature. 

The place to which our friend welcomed 
us, contains about forty acres, on the slope 
of a hill commanding a view of rare beauty 
and sublimity, gently falling to the lake in a 
deep cove. A commodious cottage, supplied 
with every comfort, with limpid water from 
a ' neighboring spring, was at our disposal, 
and a farm house nearby and a "camp" afford 
shelter for those who conduct the farming 
operations. A motor launch conveyed us 
about the lake, whose shores were visited so 
far as time allowed. 

Of the rare hospitality of the home, the 
dainty meals, the refreshing rest of the cool 
nights, above all the companionship of the 
refined and accomplished ladies then consti- 
tuting the household, it is impossible to speak 
adequately. 

But your readers may ask with reasonable 
impatience "Why this long story?" The 
answer shall be that of the sententious Capt. 
Cuttle. "The bearing of this observation 
lays in the application of it." Mr. W. F. 
Langdon, the present owner of this property, 
is a graduate of Bowdoin College of the Class 
of 1853. His brother, John G., graduated in 
1857, and is now survived by his son, who is 



106 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



a successful architect in Boston. These with 
the wife and sister of Mr. W. F. Langdon, 
constitute the present family. Mr. Langdon, 
with the cordial assent of his family, pro- 
poses to convey this property, with the sole 
condition of occupancy during life, to the 
President and Trustees of Bowdoin, College 
as a memorial of his own regard and that of 
his deceased brother for the College, his wish 
being that the property may be held for use 
of the Faculty of the College. 

Mr. Langdon is a grandnephew of Hon. 
John Langdon, a former Governor of New 
Hampshire, and a contemporary of Hon. 
James Bowdoin, the benefactor of the Col- 
lege which bears the family name. 

In contemplating this generous proposal, 
and the loyal affection of which it is the 
expression, one recalls the words of that 
greatest of American statesmen, cradled 
among the lakes and hills of the Granite 
State, spoken of his own Alma Mater: "It is 
a small college, and yet there are those who 
love it." 

J. L C, 1853. 



EXETER, 11; BOWDOIN, 5 

Bowdoin played its third game of the 
season on the Whittier Field last Saturday 
with Exeter, and was defeated by the score 
of n to 5. The game was the best exhibi- 
tion of the new game in which Bowdoin has 
been a contestant, and it was due to pro- 
ficiency in the double pass and the quarter- 
back kick that Exeter won the game. 

The Bowdoin team played a fine game and 
had it met with a good share of the luck that 
goes with the new game the outcome might 
have been a tie. The line did splendid work 
throughout, and showed that it was the 
strongest that Bowdoin has had in a number 
of years at least. 

Several of the men were not in the best of 
condition while neither Drummond or Crow- 
ley played right end, the former because of 
injuries received in the Harvard game, and 
the latter because of a misunderstanding 
about his courses. Ellis played the position 
and it is not too much to say that he did excel- 
lent work, as indeed did the whole team. 

Bowdoin won the toss and chose the east 
goal. Hart kicked to Lee on the 5-yard line, 
who run the ball down 15 yards. Bowdoin 
failed to make her distance and on a fumble 



of an attempted punt Exeter secured the ball 
on Bowdoin's 8-yard line. The visitors could 
not rush it over, however, and Bowdoin 
secured the ball on downs. The teams con- 
tinued to exchange punts until finally Bow- 
doin punted the ball for 60 yards to Exeter's 
25-yard line. Exeter could not gain and on 
an attempted punt Stacey broke through and 
blocked the punt, Draper falling on the ball 
behind Exeter's goal post. Draper failed at 
goal. 

In the remainder of the half Bowdoin lost 
the ball on her own 7-yard line on a fumble 
and Exeter rushed the ball over for her first 
touchdown. 

The second half was largely a punting 
exhibition and was characterized with the 
successful working of the double pass by the 
visitors. Finally on a quarterback kick on 
the right side of the line from Bowdoin's 40- 
yard line, Hurley took the ball over for a 
touchdown. The line-up : 

Exeter. Bowdoin. 

Hurley, le re., Ellis 

Hart, It rt., Stacy, Cummings. 

McGregor, Burr, lg rg., Stanley 

Lynch, c c, McDade, Boynton 

Power, rg lg., Newman 

White, rt It., Draper 

Gilroy, re le., J. Drummond 

Vaughan, qb qb., Bass 

Burn, lhb ....rhb., Lee 

Woodhull, Loftus, rhb lhb., Gastonguay 

Porter, Mclntyre, fb fb., Blanchard, Adams 

Score — Exeter ir, Bowdoin 5. Touchdowns — 
Draper, Porter, Hurley. Goal from touchdown — 
Vaughn. Umpire — Stevens, Exeter. Referee — Dr. 
Sullivan, Lewiston. Linesmen — Wing, Kinsman, 
Libby. Time — 15-minute periods. 



BOWDOIN, 6; ARTILLERY, 

Bowdoin's football season opened on the 
Whittier Field, Saturday, September 29, our 
opponent being the Artillery team of Port- 
land. The game was fiercely played, result- 
ing in a victory for Bowdoin by the score of 
6 to o. The contest was in the nature of a 
tryout for the Bowdoin team, especially for 
the new men who are candidates for the team 
this year. 

The visitors had one of the heaviest teams 
that has played on the Whittier Field in a 
long time and their team work was far supe- 
rior to that which the Fort Preble team has 
displayed in previous years. 

Bowdoin showed that there was some 
unusually promising material in the squad, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



*07 



and although the men were green as a result 
of the small amount of practice, they never- 
theless did fully better than could have been 
expected. The line-up : 

Bowdoin. Artillery. 

J. Drummond, le re., Yates 

Drake, It rt, Morris, Bonner 

Newman, lg rg., Donahue, Reightel 

Boynton, c c., Cowan 

Stanley, rg lg., Anderson 

Timberlake, rt It., Levitt 

W. Drummond, Matthews, re le., Schwartz 

Bass, Greene, qb gb., Brennan 

Roberts, Gastonguay, lhb rhb., Humphrey 

Lee, rhb lhb., O'Donnell 

Blanchard, fb fb., Sheridan, Jackson 

Score — Bowdoin, 6. Touchdown — J. Drummond. 
Goal from touchdown — Draper. Umpire — Captain 
L. E. Brown of Fort Preble. Referee — A. Sullivan 
of Holy Cross. Linesman — Lieut. Greger of Fort 
Preble ; assistants, Files of Bowdoin, Armstrong 
of Artillery. Time — 15-minute periods. 



' HARVARD, 10; BOWDOIN, 

Bowdoin lost her game with Harvard on 
Wednesday of last week by the score of 10 to 
o. Bowdoin played a hard, up-hill game and 
in some respects outpointed Harvard. 

All the luck was in favor of Harvard and 
it was largely through this element that Har- 
vard secured her points. The Bowdoin team 
played excellent football and put up the best 
game against Harvard that Bowdoin has 
played in years. 



SOPHOMORES, 9; FRESHMEN, 6 

The first of the annual series of games 
between the Sophomores and Freshmen was 
held on the Delta, Saturday afternoon, and 
resulted in a victory for the Sophomores by 
the score of 9 to 6. 

The teams were well matched, the Fresh- 
men showing up well except in base running, 
and it was their loose work in this department 
that was largely responsible for their defeat. 
There was more or less cheering and noise, 
as usual, but the game passed off without 
any great excitement. The summary : 

Sophomores. 

ae r bh po a e 

Bowers, 3b 4 1 2 4 2 I 

Harris, ss 5 2 3 1 1 o 

Morrill, p 4 1 1 o I 1 

Hughes, lb 5 o 2 8 o 1 

Crowley, 2b 4 o o 2 3 1 



Jackson, c 3 r ° 9 3 I 

Brewster, If 3 2 I 1 o o 

Havden, cf 3 I o 2 o o 

Pratt, rf 4 1 I o 1 

Totals 35 9 10 27 11 5 

Freshmen. 

ab r bh po a e 

Webster, 2b 3 2 1 4 o 

Walker, ss 4 o o o o o 

Draper, c 1 o o 2 o 

Evans, lb 4 ° I I2 1 

Wandtke, 3b 4 ° ° ° 4 1 

McLaughlin, p 3 o o 1 4 ° 

Colbath, If 3 1 1 ° ° 

Morse, rf 1 1 o o o 

Martin, cf 2 I o o o o 

Spurling, c 2 I 9 o o 

*Otis 1 o o o o 

**Ludwig 1 o o o o o 

Totals 29 6 3 24 12 2 

*Batted for Morse in the ninth. 
**Batted for Martin in the ninth. 

Sophomores 02220003 x — 9 

Freshmen 1 03001 10 o — 6 

Two-base hits — Hughes, Bower. Three-base hit 
— Hughes. Stolen bases — Bower 2, Harris, Mor- 
rill, Webster 2, Draper, Burleigh, Colbath 3, Morse, 
Martin. Base on balls— Off Morrill 9, off 
McLaughlin 6. Struck out — By Morrill 8, by 
McLaughlin 10. Sacrifice hit — Bower. Hit by 
pitched ball — Crowley. Wild pitches — Morrill 2. 
Passed ball — Spurling. Umpire — Files, '08. Time — 
I.40. 



NEW FOOTBALL CUP 



Mr. James H. Home, '97, has presented to 
the college, a large, and handsome silver cup 
to be awarded to some football man excelling 
in some special branch of the game, the 
choice of the particular branch being left to 
the judgment of this year's coach. Coach 
Laferriere has decided to award the cup to 
the best all-round kicker in the football squad 
— either on the first or second team — the cup 
to be held for one year by the man selected 
by the coaches at the end of the season as its 
proper holder. The cup is now on exhibition 
in the trophy room. It is made of silver, 
stands about eighteen inches high, and is 
appropriately decorated with_a football player 
standing on the lid. 

Mr. Home has always been an enthusiastic 
Bowdoin man and when in college was a 
prominent athlete, being a star hurdler, and 
captain of the track team. After graduation 
he went West and for several years was ath- 
letic instructor at the University of Indiana. 



108 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Published 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 
h. e. mitchell, 1907 r. h. hupper, 1908 

W. S. LINNELL, lgo7 R. A. LEE, 1908 

A. L. ROBINSON, 1908 H. H. BURTON, 1909 

J. S. STAHL, igog 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 
N. S. WESTON, 1908 



Business Manager 
Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 



Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 



Entered at Post-Oftice at Brunswick as Second-Clas 


s Mail Matter 


Lewiston Journal Pkess 


Vol. XXXVI. OCTOBER 12, 1906 


No. 1 1 



Bowdoin has opened its 
The New Year doors once more after a 

summer vacation and 
once more a new class enters its halls for the 
first time. The outlook for a prosperous 
year for the college and all its interests 
appears excellent. For the first time in 
nearly a quarter of a century the college has 
not suffered the loss of any member of its 
faculty at the opening of a new year, while 
on the other hand a new instructor is added 
to the number. 

Considerable improvement has been made 
about the buildings this summer, including 
the opening of new recitation rooms in Ban- 
nister Hall and the converting of the north 
wing of jyiassachusetts Hall into a faculty 
room. The new room in Bannister Hall is 
very attractive and the bringing of the 
faculty room and the treasurer's office into 



the same building is a much needed change. 
There have also been a number of other 
pleasing changes made about the college. 

The entering class is a large one — nearly 
as large as that of a year ago — which was 
the largest in the history of the college. ' The 
class clearly contains some promising athletic 
material and there is no doubt that scholar- 
ship is well represented in their number. To 
the new year and to the new class we extend 
welcome. 



The Bowdoin Christian 

The Christian Association promises this 

Association year to be one of the most 

active and helpful of our 
college organizations. It is practically the 
only organization where men from every 
class and every fraternity may meet on 
a perfectly equal footing, and it is the 
only organization that holds regular weekly 
meetings throughout the year, thus sup- 
plying an opportunity for companionship and 
activity during the winter months which dur- 
ing the spring and fall terms is supplied by 
the various athletic squads. The Association 
was left last year with a heavy debt on its 
hands, and for this reason is unable now 
either to publish a handbook or to hold a 
reception for the Freshmen. The officers 
have however, with the kind aid of some of 
the Faculty, been able to give to the Associa- 
tion this fall, new life, new ideas, and a new 
room. The new room is in the north wing 
of the chapel, and is reached by entering the 
north side door and turning to the right. 
This room has been fitted up appropriately 
during the summer, and now affords to the 
Association a better meeting place than it 
has enjoyed for many years. One of the 
new ideas was to send to the Freshmen a let- 
ter of greeting, and to maintain during the 
first two weeks an information bureau, where 
lists were kept of boarding houses, laundries, 
and places of employment in town. The 
membership fee has been reduced to one dol- 
lar, payable on Jan. i, 1907, and the meet- 
ings will be held every Thursday evening, 
when there will always be some speaker of 
interest to those present. Everyone is eligi- 
ble for membership, and it is especially ur- 
gent that everyone should join, since if 200 
members are enrolled, there has been prom- 
ised to the Association a gift of $200, which 
if received in addition to the membership fees 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



109 



would clear all the debts, and also furnish the 
Association with a good piano. The meet- 
ings are open to all, whether members or nut, 
and the Orient urges everyone to attend. 



The readers of the Orient 
Lack of Space will please bear with us in 
this issue for very brief 
accounts of some news matters and for the 
non-appearance of others. The great pres- 
sure on the columns after the summer vaca- 
tion is such that it is impossible to handle 
properly all the matter which deserves men- 
tion. 



. The Orient wishes to 

„ 0ne ". call the attention of 

Competii.on Freshme „ to the annual 
competition for the Orient Board, which 
will begin at once. Two, and perhaps three, 
members of the Class of 1910, will be added 
to the board at the annual election in March, 
and as usual the competition will be based on 
the quality and quantity of the "copy" sub- 
mitted. Few fields of college activity offer 
better opportunity for profitable experience 
than the Orient competition. It not only 
tests and trains the student's alertness, but 
also in writing things after he sees them. 
Again, it gives him a personal interest in all 
that goes on in and about the college and by 
so doing helps to give him that breadth of 
interest and thought, which, after all, is one 
of the chief things that a college course can 
bring to any man. The Orient hopes to see 
a large number of Freshmen enter the compe- 
tition. Further particulars may be learned 
of the editor-in-chief. 



NOTICES 

Unpaid term bills for last June must be 
adjusted by the thirteenth of the month — 
to-morrow. 

All students entering Bowdoin for the first 
time are required to deposit a bond. Blanks 
for the same may be secured at the Treas- 
urer's office. 

The attention of the Freshmen is called to 
the Bugle, the year book of the college, pub- 
lished each year by the Junior Class. The 
book contains in addition to a large number 
of excellent half-tone cuts of the college 
buildings, complete records of all college 



activities including class statistics, athletics, 
anil fraternities. Every Freshman should 
have a copy. Copies can be secured of G. 
A. Lawrence, Zeta Psi House. 



THE FRESHMAN CLASS 
Following is the complete registration of 
the Freshman Class, corrected up to the 
present week. The list shows a total of 93 
new students. Of this number two are 
admitted to the Junior Class and eleven are 
special students, leaving a total of eighty reg- 
ular Freshmen. This is only a few less new 
students than last year, which was the largest 
in the history of the college.' The special stu- 
dents in the list are marked with a star: 

George Ashworth, Waldoboro ; William 
E. Atwood, Paris ; Merton G. L. Bailey, Wood- 
fords ; Harold B. Ballard, Gardiner; Chester 
A. Boynton, No. Whitefield ; Stuart F. Brown, 
Whitinsville, Mass.; Charles A. Cary, East 
Machias; Harrison C. Chapman, Portland; 
John D. Clifford, Lewiston ; Henry J. Col- 
bath, Dexter; Thomas C. Commins, Somer- 
ville, Mass.; J. Leland Crosby, Bangor; 
Ralph S. Crowell, Bangor; *Harold W. 
Davie, Hyde Park, Mass. ; Clyde L. Deming, 
Cornish Center, N. H. ; James B. Draper, 
Canton, Mass.; Walter Driscoll, Somerville, 
Mass.; Harry J. Dugan, Bangor; Ricard R. 
Eastman, Fort Fairfield; Sumner Edwards, 
Cambridge, Mass. ; Frank C. Evans, Camden ; 
Guy W. Farrar, South Paris; Afton Farrin, 
Pemaquid Harbor; R. Edgar Fisher, Ridlon- 
ville; Ralph B. Grace, Saco; William S. 
Guptill, Gorham; Robert Hale, Portland; 
Tames F. Hamburger, Hyde Park, Mass. ; 
*John B. Hanrahan, Lawrence, Mass. ; Har- 
len F. Hansen, Portland; Leroy A. H. Hart, 
New Iiaven, Ct. ; Orville V. Haskell, South 
Windham; Henry O. Hawes, Westbrook; 
Merrill C. Hill, Groveville (Buxton) ; Elmer 
H. Hobbs, Waterboro; Frank E. Kendrie, 
Ocean Park; Frank A. Kimball, Alfred; 
Frank W. Knight, Rockland; * Allen Lan- 
der, Bingham; F. H. Larrabee, Houlton; 
Leon S. Lippincott, Augusta; Lawrence G. 
Ludwig, Houlton; Frank B. McGlone, 
Natick, Mass.; H. B. McLaughlin, Wil- 
liamstown, Mass.; *William D. McMillan, 
Norwich, Conn.; George H. Macomber, 
Augusta; R. Burleigh Martin, Augusta; E. 
C. Matthews, Portsmouth, N. H. ; Lewis L. 
Mikelsky, Bath; Philip B. Morss, Medford, 



no 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Mass.; Robert D. Morss, Medford, Mass.; 
Colby L. Morton, Friendship ; William P. 
Newman, Bar Harbor; P. T. Nickerson, 
Boothbay Harbor ; W. B. Nulty, Buckfield ; 
Thomas Otis, New Bedford, Mass. ; Clinton 
N. Peters, Woodfords ; Edward T. Pickard, 
Auburndale, Mass. ; D. J. Readey, Manches- 
ter, N. H. ; Alfred P. Richards, Lymr, Mass. 
Frank P. Richards, Bar Harbor; Rodney E 
Ross, Kennebunk ; Ira B. Robinson, Bath 
Warren E. Robinson, Arlington, Mass. 
Flarold E. Rowell, Skowhegan ; Henry ■ L 
Russell, Salem, Mass. ; William H. Sanborn 
Portland ; Harold S. Small, Portland 
*Charles A. Smith, West Medford, Mass. 
Leon H. Smith, Portland; * Ralph W. Smith 
Augusta; Harold W. Slocum, Albany, N. Y. 
Francis Spurling, Northeast Harbor ; * Derby 
Stanley, McKinley ; :|: Winston B. Stevens, 
New Bedford, Mass. ; Alfred W. Stone, Ban- 
gor; ^Cornelius J. Taylor, Bangor; Randall 
L. Taylor, Frye ; Ralph L. Thompson, Bruns- 
wick ; Frank D. Townsend, Brunswick ; Ray- 
mond Turtle, Freeport ; Charles W. Walker, 
Skowhegan ; Alfred W. Wandtke, Lewiston ; 
Herbert E. Warren, Woodsville, N. H. ; S. 
Sewall Webster, Augusta ; Harold E. Weeks, 
Fairfield ; *G. Cony Weston, Augusta ; Earl 
Wing, Kingfield ; Robert F. Wing, East 
Machias ; Harry W. Woodward, Colorado 
Springs, Col. ; *Berton C. Morrill, Boston. 

Admitted to Class of 1908 — Leroy VV. 
Coons, Brunswick; E. S. Bagley, Woodfords. 



COLLEGE JURY 



The first meeting of the College Jury was 
held last Monday evening. The following 
representatives from the various fraternities 
and classes were present : 

Delta Kappa Epsilon — R. A. Cony. 

Theta Delta Chi — George W. Craigie. 

Zeta Psi — Asa O. Pike. 

Delta Upsilon — F. S. Piper. 

Kappa Sigma — E. A. Duddy. 

Beta Theta Pi— W. S. Linnell. 

Class of 1908 — Albert T. Gould. 

Class of 1910 — James E. Draper. 

The jury organized with the election of 
W. S. Linnell as foreman and E. A. Duddy 
as secretary. 

The Alpha Delta Phi and Psi Upsilon Fra- 
ternities and the Classes of 1907 and 1909 
were not represented, — having not selected 
their juror at the time of the meeting. 



College Botes 

Foss, '08, returned to college, Monday. 

Bradley Clark, ex-'o6, has returned to college. 

President Hyde spoke in the college church last 
Sunday. 

F. G. Swett, '92, was a visitor at college the first 
of the week. 

The first meeting of the college jury was held 
Monday evening. 

The first meeting of the college jury was held 
on Monday evening. 

Kendrie, '10, played two beautiful solos at the 
chapel exercises last Sunday. Haines, '07, played 
the accompaniment. 

Archibald, '08, is out of the college this year 
owing to poor health. 

The annual Sophomore posters were put in posi- 
tion last Friday night. 

Professor Files met his classes in German last 
Tuesday for the first time. 

Topsham Fair has proved to be attractive to the 
students during the past three days. 

Kinsman, ex-'o7, has been visiting at the college 
for several days during the past week. 

"David Harum" was the attraction at the Colum- 
bia Theatre in Bath, Wednesday evening. 

A meeting of the Athletic Council was held last 
Saturday afternoon immediately after the football 
game. 

Adjourns were given in the courses of Professor 
Foster the first of the week owing to his absence 
in Caribou. 

Dr. Lincoln will speak before the Bowdoin- 
Christian Association next Thursday evening on 
"Life in China." 

J. S. Stahl, '09, has returned to college this fall 
after an absence of some weeks last spring, having 
been teaching school. 

H. E. Wilson, '07, will not be in college during 
the year, but will return in June to graduate with 
the present Senior Class. 

Adjourn was given in English Literature No. 3 
last Tuesday, owing to Professor Chapman's 
absence at the Musical Festival. 

Upton, '07, is at Auburndale, Mass., this week 
in attendance on the Intercollegiate Golf Meet 
which is being held in that place. 

There are still a few copies of the Bowdoin Cal- 
endar for 1906 at the College Bookstore. The 
price has been reduced to 25 cents. 

Harvey Winslow, '06, was a visitor at the college 
last Saturday. He has a position in the Maine 
Central Railroad office in Portland. 

Hichborn, '07, who has been in poor health for 
some time past, is not able to return to college this 
fall, but may do so later in the year. 

A. L. Robinson has recently returned from a trip 
to Aroostook County and the Provinces, where he 
has been collecting water for his father, Professor 
F. C. Robinson. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



U\ 



Denning, '05, was a visitor at college, Wednesday. 

The training table for the football men will be 
started the first of the week. 

Adjourns were given Thursday afternoon to 
allow students to attend the Topsham Fair. 

"Ted" Hale, '06, was a visitor at college the past 
week. He has a position with the R. G. Dun Co. 
of New York, but is located in Maine. 

The following members of the Senior Class will 
enter the Medical School this year : Blanchard, Col- 
lins, Drummond, Holt, McMichael, Russell. 

Jude, '08, is teaching school in the Alfred High 
School. Bennett, '07, has been teaching in the 
same school, but has now returned to college. 

The Maine Central time table changed last Mon- 
day. The new table embraces several changes in 
the arrival and leaving time of trains at the Bruns- 
wick station. 

Last Monday morning some half dozen Fresh- 
men eagerly inquired at the Library desk for "Tri- 
angle Tickets," only to be directed to "Kiko's" 
stand at the Fair. 

Plans are being made for cross country running 
by students interested in track. It is planned to 
give a cup for the best man and it is hoped that 
the idea may be carried out successfully. 

"Billy" Rowe, '04, ex-captain of the Bowdoin 
track team, is coaching the Sophomores and Fresh- 
men for their coming meet. He also has charge 
of the physical examination of the Freshmen. 

Kingsley, '07, and Sawyer, '07, will represent the 
Bowdoin Chapter of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity 
at the annual convention which will be held with 
Colgate College on the 24th and 25th of this month. 

Captain Shorey of the track team was in Lewis- 
ton, Tuesday, where he went to make arrangements 
for a track meet between the Bowdoin and Bates 
Freshmen which it is proposed to hold the latter 
part of the month. 

The foolball team will leave this afternoon for 
Middletown, where it will play Wesleyan Univer- 
sity to-morrow. The exact make-up of the team 
is rather uncertain at the time of going to press, 
owing to the fact that some of the men are not in 
the best of condition. 

The annual fraternity initiations will be held 
next Wednesday evening. The change from Fri- 
day is made this year on account of the football 
schedule and in order that the training of the men 
will not suffer. Adjourns will be given on Thurs- 
day. 

Rev. Mr. Jump of the College Church left last 
Saturday for Amherst, Mass., where he preached 
on Sunday. This week he has been in attendance 
on the annual meeting of the American Board of 
Foreign Missions, which has been held in North 
Adams, Mass. 

At a meeting of the members of the musical 
clubs held September 27, Ham, '08, was elected 
manager for the coming year, and Cox, '08, assist- 
ant manager. The election was necessitated by 
the absence of Manager Wilson, who will not be in 
college during the year. 

At the annual initiation of the D. U. Fraternity, 
next Wednesday, the Bowdoin Chapter will have 



as their guest the members of the uolby Chapter. 
The visitors will arrive in Brunswick in the after- 
noon and will participate in a joint banquet to be 
given at the Fraternity House. 

The following Sophomores are trying for the 
assistant managership of the football team: Stud- 
ley, Simmons, Files, and Burton. 

It is stated that Bates students are taking great 
interest in track this fall, there being about 40 
men working in the squad each day. 

At a meeting of the Freshman Class held Sept. 
28, James E. Draper was elected class president 
pro tan. and Frank P. Richards was elected track 
captain. G. L. Morton was elected baseball cap- 
tain. 

At a meeting of the Sophomore Class held Octo- 
ber 1 the following were elected : Track captain, 
Harry Atwood ; track manager, Howard F. Kane ; 
baseball captain, R. H. Ellis ; baseball manager, D. 

C. Drummond ; football captain, L. F. Timberlake ; 
football manager, K. H. Dresser. 

The publications which the Public Printer has 
issued in regard to Simplified Spelling, consisting 
of a pamphlet, a small pocket brochure, and a wall 
card containing the 300 revised words, may now 
be obtained by sending 25 cents to the "Supt. of 
Documents, Gov. Printing Office, Washington, 

D. C." 

It is stated that the running time on the Lewis- 
ton, Brunswick & Bath Street Railway will be 
changed on the arrival of the new cars which have 
been ordered. The cars are to leave for Bath 15 
minutes before and 15 minutes past the hour, thereby 
making close connection with the Freeport and 
Portland cars. 

During the past summer the class-room occupied 
by the Economics and History classes was entirely 
made over and many new appliances added which 
will greatly facilitate the work. The heads of 
both departments are grateful to the Board of 
Trustees for their kindness in this respect. 

At a recent meeting of the Middle Atlantic Sec- 
tional Committee of the American Intercollegiate 
Football Rules Committee in Philadelphia, a list of 
eligible officials was drawn up which contain a 
number of Bowdoin men. They are E. C. Beave, 
Guy M. Cleveland, H. H. Cloudman, A. L. Lafer- 
riere, D. C. Monroe, Joseph Pendleton, Paul Preble, 
Howard A. Ross, and D. F. Snow. 

THE 1908 BUGLE 

The 1908 Bugle Board has been chosen by 
the various fraternities, organization being 
perfected at a meeting held Oct. 1. The fol- 
lowing are the men who will have charge of 
the college annual for the corning year: 

Editor-in-Chief— A. T. Gould. 

Art Editor — B. N. Gregson. 

Business Manager — G. H. Foss. 

Associate Editors — A. L. Robinson, C. M. 
Robinson, N. S. Weston, C. P. Robinson, J. 
A. Davis, H. H. Hayes, J. M. Boyce. 



\n 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FACULTY NOTES 

Professor Woodruff delivered a very able sermon 
Sunday, October 7, in Elijah Kellogg's old church 
at Harpswell. 

Professor Chapman attended the Maine Music 
Festival held in Portland, last Monday and Tues- 
day night. 

Professor Allen Johnson was elected to mem- 
bership in the Maine Historical Society,' during 
the last summer. 

Professor W. B. Mitchell will speak before the 
Lincoln County Teachers' Association, at New- 
castle, Me., October 15, on "The Use of Our 
Mother Tongue." 

Professor George T. Files returned to Brunswick 
last Sunday from his year abroad. Professor Files 
was given a warm welcome by the student body on 
his appearance at chapel, Monday morning. 



excused by the Secretary, the student may take a 
"make-up" examination only upon payment in 
advance of a fee of five dollars to the Treasurer 
of the College. A student desiring a "make-up" 
examination in any course must notify the Reg- 
istrar not later than May first for examinations 
of the first semester, and not later than November 
first, for examinations of the second semester. The 
Registrar will post notices of all "make-up" exam- 
inations. They will be held between May first and 
fifteenth, and between November first and fifteenth. 

Students are ordinarily required to take the first 
"make-up" examination after the deficiency is 
incurred. 

9. All absences during the three days at the 
opening and the three days at the close of a semes- 
ter, and all absences during the three days immedi- 
ately preceding and following a holiday are a more 
serious disregard of college requirements than 
absences at other times. 



NEW ABSENCE AND EXCUSE RULES 

The following regulations supersede the cor- 
responding section in the published handbook : 

1. Students are expected to attend all the meet- 
ings of the courses in which they are enrolled and 
all chapel exercises. 

2. The instructors and monitors shall report to 
the Registrar daily on slips provided for the pur- 
pose all absences. 

3. The Secretary shall have the sole power of 
granting excuses for absences. All applications 
for excuse must be made in person at the office of 
the Secretary, in office hours. Unless such appli- 
cation is made in advance of the absence, the stu- 
dent must satisfy the Secretary that it was impos- 
sible to apply in advance. In such cases the appli- 
cation must be made within three days of the expir- 
ation of the period of absence. The Secretary may 
refuse to consider any application which does not 
conform to these rules. 

4. Any student whose attendance at chapel exer- 
cises or at recitations is unsatisfactory shall receive 
a warning from the Secretary. If his attendance 
is still unsatisfactory, the Secretary may place him 
on probation. Any student on probation whose 
attendance is unsatisfactory may be suspended from 
college by the Secretary. Notices of probation and 
suspension will be sent to parents or guardians. 

5. A student on probation shall not represent 
the college in any capacity nor be entitled to hon- 
orable dismissal from the college, nor retain a 
scholarship. 

6. Any student may appeal to the Faculty _ in 
writing from a decision of the Secretary, stating 
in full his reasons for appeal. Such appeals must 
be presented to the Faculty through the Secretary. 

7. Students will make up work missed on account 
of absences, under such conditions as the instructor 
may prescribe ; but any instructor may decline to 
grant permission to make up work when, in his 
judgment, the absences have been such as to render 
it impossible for the student to make up the work 
in a satisfactory manner. 

8. A student who, for any reason, is absent from 
the final examination in any course may have only 
one trial for making up that deficiency. If the 
absence from the original examination is not 



CALENDAR 

10-12.30 a.m. and 3.30-5.30 p.m. Track work on 
Whittier Field. 
4.48 p.m. Football team leaves for Wesleyan. 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1 3. 

Adjourns. 

8.05 a.m. Second footfall team leaves for Hebron. 
10.00 a.m. Sophomore-Freshman baseball game. 
3.00 p.m. Football game with Wesleyan at Mid- 
dletown. 

3.00 p.m. Second team plays Hebron at Hebron. 

MONDAY, OCTOEER 15. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 3.30-5.30 p.m. Track work. 
3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

Professor W. B. Mitchell speaks at Newcastle, 
Maine. 

TUESDAY', OCTOBER l6. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 3.30-5.30 p.m. Track work. 
3-5P.M. Football practice. 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1 7. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 3.30-5.30 p.m. Track work. 
3-5 p.m. Football practice. 
Fraternity initiations. 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1 8. 

Adjourns. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 3.30-5.30 p.m. Track work. 
4.48 p.m. Football team leaves for Cornell. 
7.30 p.m. Dr. Lincoln speaks at Christian Asso- 
ciation Meeting. 



THE FOOTBALL SEASON TICKETS 

So far, one hundred and eighty season tickets 
have been sold, and most of them paid for. This 
is considerably less than the number which was 
required to clear this fall's expenses. However, if 
those students who have not season tickets, pay 
as large subscriptions as they are able, and if the 
attendance at the Bates and Colby is above the 
average, it will be possible to clear expenses, so 
the management has practically decided to leave 
the season tickets in the possession of those who 
hold them, and to try and raise the deficit by sub- 
scription. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



1J3 



TENNIS TOURNAMENT 

The tennis tournament to determine the captain 
of next spring's team, has been in progress during 
the past week. The number of men who are can- 
didates is now narrowed down to four, who will 
play a round robin, the man preserving the best 
average of games won to be elected captain. 
The result of the play this week is as follows : 
First Round — Pike beat Ham, 6-1, 6-4; Burton 
beat Goodspeed, 6-4, 6-2 ; Linnell beat Small, 6-3, 
fj-o; Upton beat Files, 7-5, 6-0; Hyde beat Law- 
rence, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3; Haines beat Craigie, 6-0, 6-1; 




I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
1906 man who will be in the market for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to*5th, inclusive 
^afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects arc of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, 1 feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

A. S. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPQOOD'S 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

The Eighty-seventh Annual Course of 
Lectures will begin October 25, 1906, and 
continue eight months. 

Four courses of lectures are required of all 
who matriculate as first-course students. 

The courses are graded and cover Lectures, 
Recitations, Laboratory Work and Clinical 
Instruction. 

The third and fourth year classes will receive 
their entire instruction at Portland, where 
excellent clinical facilities will be afforded at 
the Maine General Hospital. 

For catalogue apply to 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Dean. 
Bjil'nswick, Maine, October, 1906. 



Hughes beat Roberts, 6-0, 6-2; Brewster beat 
Brown, 6-2, 9-7. 

Second Round — Pike beat Burton, 6-2, 6-3 ; 
Upton beat Linnell, 6-2, 6-3 ; Haines beat Hyde, 6-2, 
1-6. 7-5 ; Hughes beat Brewster, 6-4, 7-5. 

The four men left in the round robin are Pike, 
Upton, Haines and Hughes. 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



A WHOLESALE CATALOGUE FREE 



Send Us Your List for Quotations 
Our Prices Beat Them All 



INCLUDE IN EVERY ORDER: 

Everybody's ------ 

Ladies' Home Journal - 

Saturday Evening Post - - - - 



$1.50 
1.50 
1.50 



Ainslee's 
Outing - 
World To=Day - 
Cosmopolitan 
Harper's Bazar, or 
World To=Day - 
World's Work - 
Delineator - 
McCIure's - 
American Magazine 
Photo Era - 



$1.80 
3-oo 
1.50 

$1.00 ^ 

"•50 S 
$3.00 ) 

1.00 \ 

1. 00 ) 
$3.00 \ 

■ •50/ 



OUR PRICE 

$3.50 

OUR PRICE 

$1.50 
To one address 
OUR PRICE 

$3.00 

OUR PRICE 
$1.65 



ADDRESS 

COMPENDIUM SUBSCRIPTION AGENCY, 

226 HOWELL STREET, BATH, W. Y. 

COLLEGE TYPEWRITER AGENCY. 

UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITERS for sale and 
for rent. Supplies of all kinds furnished. Ribbons for 

all makes of machines at, cost. Carbon paper in stock. 

Call and see an Underwood, if you are thinking of 
renting or buying a machine. 

HAROLD W. FILES, Agent, 32 Maine Hall. 



Wright, Kay & Co. 

Our 1905 Catalogue of Frater- 
nity Noveltiefl is now reiidv and 
wilibempiled upon npplic 



Fraternity Badges 
Fraternity Jewelry 
Fraternity Novelties 
Fraternity Pennants 
Fraternity Stationery 
Fraternity Invitations 
Fraternity Announcemc 
Fraternity Programs 



WRIGHT, KAY & CO., Manufacturing Jewelers and Importers, 



Paris Office, M 1 



Detroit, Mich. 



Mention the Orient when patronizing our Advertisers. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




Visit our 

!CH=CREAM 
PARLOR. 




119 Maine Street 

CATERING in all departments a Specialty. 

PULSIFER'S 
5 AND 10 6ERT ST0RE 

Now Open for ^Business. 
J. W. PULSIFER, - - MAINE STREET, BRUNSWICK 

Bowdoin Calendars 

OH SALE at IJALf PI?1GE 

(50 Cents) 



J^UfF, '06, or 
;¥^ON STEVENS' BOOS^STO^E 



THE MEOICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

H:is a carefully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; Clinical Conferences; Modified Seminar Methorls, and thoroughly Practical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest and flnest in' the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every respect, and the new laboratories arc specially planned and equipped for 'individual work by tliestndents. 

Tbe College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of' Pharmacy. Far announcements or further information apply to 
■ SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Denn of the Departme-t of Medicine. 




27JiZF/l7l 



REPEATING SHOT GUN 
NEW MODEL NO 17 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By theomission of the take down feature wehave 
been able to greauyreduce the cost of production and at the same time have kept the sun up to the 
famous high Mar/in standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish aie perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
barrels are especially bored for smokeless as well £s black powder and so chambered that 2% inch or 
z S inch shells may be used. Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 

ju-ju ■ workm8 , 8un in existence. We are glad to make it pos " ' 
and bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so low a price. 



ake it possible for every lover of guns 
, a.iuuiiuji , u]S c, uus mgn graae repeating shot gun at so 101 
Have your dealer order it for you. 

Send for the TPZarfin Catalogue and Experience Book to-day. Free for 3 stamps. 
7A&2uarfifl jffireCWmS £#,42Willow Street, New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCTOBER 19, 1906 



NO. 12 



WESLEYAN, ; BOWDOIN, 

Bowdoin played a tie game with Wesleyan 
University at Middletown last Saturday, 
the contest being the most interesting and 
hotly-contested of any in which the Bow- 
doin team has played this season. 

The game was the first ever played between 
the two colleges and had a special interest for 
that reason. Bowdoin's opponents were a 
very heavy eleven and they played a hard, 
consistent game, and made a desperate effort 
to win at several stages. 

Bowdoin, however, played with equal des- 
peration and at one time saved a touchdown 
by a magnificent rally on their own 3-yard 
line, holding their opponents for downs. 

The game balanced up to about as even as 
the score indicates. During the first half 
Bowdoin kept the ball in Wesleyan's territory 
the greater part of the time, while in the last 
half Wesleyan kept Bowdoin mostly on the 
defensive. 

Bowdoin once seriously threatened Wes- 
leyan's goal, when Fullback Draper tried a 
drop kick which went a little on one side of 
the posts. Woodhead of Wesleyan tried a 
place kick in the second half which missed 
the posts by a few feet. 

Both teams tried the forward pass, and as 
a rule it was successful. Wesleyan also tried 
the quarterback kick, which gained ground 
several times. There was considerable pen- 
alizing, Bowdoin suffering most in this 
respect. Gildersleeve of Wesleyan played a 
star game, while Draper, Drummond and 
Crowley did noticeably good work for Bow- 
doin. 

In view of the fact that the Bowdoin team 
was not in the best of form and was weakened 
by the absence of several of its best men, the 
outcome of the game was very satisfactory 
indeed from a Bowdoin standpoint. The 
summary : 

Wesleyan. Bowdoin. 

Palmer, l.e r.e., Crowley 

Woodhead, l.t .■ r.t, Commins 

Taylor, l.g r.g., Stanley 

Doe, c c., McDade 

Joy, r.g l.g., Newman 



North (Capt.) r.t l.t, Stacy 

l.t., Draper 

b inley, r.e I.e., Drummond 

Moore, q.b q.b., Bass 

Kipp, q.b. 

Van Tassel, l.h.b r.h.b., Gastonguay 

Gildersleeve, r.h.b l.h.b, Lee 

Munson, f.b f.b., Draper 

f.b., Adams 
Umpire— Davis. Referee— Pendleton. Head 

linesman — Garrison. Time — 20-minute halves. 



HEBRON, 12; BOWDOIN SECOND, 

Bowdoin Second played Hebron Academy 
at Hebron last Saturday and was defeated by 
the score of 12 to 6. The Hebron team 
proved to be a strong one and for the greater 
part of the game the Second team was kept 
on the defensive. Hebron's backs were fast 
and her line was strong enough to prevent 
the Bowdoin team from making its distance. 

Hebron scored one touchdown in the first 
half and in the second both sides succeeded in 
taking the ball over its opponent's line. The 
line-up : 

Hebron. Bowdoin. 

Rogers, I.e., (Capt.) I.e., Hanrahan 

Sharp, l.t l.t., Timberlake 

Smith, l.g l.g., Thomas 

Cavanaugh, Gerrish, c c, Buttrick 

Loring, r.g : r .g., Sewall 

Hammond, d.t r.t., Readey 

Keough, Miekelsky, r.e r.e., Ellis 

Moreau, Wilson, q.b q.b., Green (Capt.) 

Stacey, fb fb., Grey 

Pond, l.b l.h., Manter 

Wilson, Joy, r.h r.h., Matthews 

Touchdowns— Keough, Wilson, Grey. Referee — 
Garcelon. Umpire — Grey. Timers — Joy, Robinson. 
Linesmen— Joy (head), Speake, Milliken. Time — 
Two 15-minute halves. 



PRESIDENT HYDE AT NORTH ADAMS 

President Hyde was one of the speakers at 
the annual meeting of the American Board 
of Foreign Missions, which was held at North 
Adams, Mass., last week, his subject being 
"The New Premises and the Old Conclusion." 
He said in part: 

"A hundred years ago God was a judge; 



U6 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



the Bible a statue book ; earth a court room ; 
man a prisoner at the bar; Christ our advo- 
cate ; the cross of Christ the price of our 
release; death the end of the trial and eter- 
nity the duration of the sentence. These 
premises were sharply visualized. Eternity 
was pictured thus : 

"Our premises to-day are very different; 
yet we must beware of complacency or pride 
in consequence. If they are wiser, and 
broader, it is not because we are better or 
bigger men than they ; it is simply because 
God has been at work a century longer on our 
intellectual environment than he had on theirs. 
What, then, are our premises? And what 
missionary conclusion do we draw therefrom? 
Logically and inevitably this : We give the 
best we have to those in all the world who 
need it most. This general conclusion has 
three specific applications. It requires a mis- 
sionary organization to be in supply and need 
together ; a policy on the foreign field which 
shall meet actual and concrete rather than 
abstract and general needs ; and an attitude 
at home which shall raise and sustain supply." 



INTERCOLLEGIATE GOLF 

The outcome of the individual champion- 
ship of the New England Intercollegiate Golf 
Association, which was held at West Newton, 
Mass., last week, resulted in first honors 
to M. Stanton of Dartmouth, who barely 
defeated J. R. Upton of Bowdoin. Upton 
was the only representative that Bowdoin had 
in the meet and his work proved him to be 
one of the best college players in the 
country. 

In the first day's play he defeated Kelley 
of Technology and on the second day 
defeated two Williams men, narrowing the 
contest down to Stanton and himself. The 
summary of the three days' playing is as fol- 
lows: 

First Day. 

First round : 

A. Mitchell (Williams) defeated W. H. Stucklen 
(Dartmouth), I up (23 holes). 

W. R. Upton (Bowdoin) defeated N. J. Kelley 
(Technology), 6 up, 5 to play. 

L. Mitchell (Williams) defeated F. Lichtenhein 
(Williams), 6 up, 4 to play. 

F. A. Gregory (Williams) defeated N. Faunce 
(Amherst), 2 up, 1 to play. 

W. Pfeil (Technology) defeated T. Smith (Dart- 
mouth), 2 up, 1 to play. . 

P. Jackson (Williams) defeated T. L. Coffin 
(Technology), 5 up, 4 to play. 



H. H. Flynt (Amherst) defeated M. Garby 
(Dartmouth), 5 up, 4 to play. 
_M. Stanton (Dartmouth) defeated J. G. McKen- 
zie (Brown), 9 up, 7 to play. 

Second Day. 

J. R. Upton (Bowdoin) defeated A. Mitchell 
(Williams) 3 up, 2 to play. 

A. Gregory (Williams) defeated T. W. Mitchell 
(Williams) 3 up, 1 to play. 

W. G. Phiel (Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology) defeated R. Johnson (Williams) 4 up, 2 to 
play. 

M. Stanton (Dartmouth) defeated H. H. Flynt 
(Amherst) 4 up, 2 to play. 

Semi-finals : 

Upton defeated Gregory, 6 up, 5 to play. 

Stanton defeated Pfeil, 1 up (22 holes). 

Third Day. 

STANTON. 

Forenoon : 

Out 5 4 4 4 6 3 4 5 s— 40 

I" 4 4 5 3 4 4 3 7 5—38—78 

Afternoon : 

Out 6 6 5 s 4 4 5 4 s— 43 

hi 3 5 5 4 5 4 3 5 4—38—81 

159 
UPTON. 
Forenoon : 

Out 6 5 5 5 3 S S 5 5—42 

In 3 S 4 3 S S 3 6 6—40—82 

Afternoon : 

Out 5 5 5 5 3 5 4 5 4—41 

In 3 6 5 3 4 4 3 6 4—28—79 

161 
Summary : 

Championship singles, second : 
M. Stanton (Dartmouth) defeated F R. Upton 
(Bowdoin), 3 up, 1 to play. 



SOPHOMORES, 10; FRESHMEN, S 

The Sophomores won the second and last 
game of the interclass series on the Delta Sat- 
urday forenoon by the score of 10 to 5. The 
game' was close and exciting until the eighth 
inning, when the Sophomores made three 
runs and made their slight lead a safe vic- 
tory. The best work for the Sophomores 
was done by Atwood, Hughes and Harris, 
while Spurling and Walker did creditable 
work for the Freshmen. The summary : 

Sophomores. 

ab r . eh p0 a e 

Bower, 2b 5 1 2 o 1 o 

Harris, ss 5 2 2 1 2 

Morrill, p 4 1 o 1 

Hughes, ib 4 3 2 10 1 I 

Crowley, 2b 3 o o 2 2 1 

Jackson, c 4 o 2 8 1 1 

Brewster, If 3 1 o 2 o o 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



m 



Hayden, cf 2 o o I o o the Eowdoin Praying Circle of the early days, and 

Atwood, rf 3 i o 3 3 1 closed with a wish of success to the Association 

Cole, cf o 1 o o o o in its revived work. Several songs were sung dur- 

— — — — — ■ — ing the meeting, which adjourned soon after 
Total 33 10 8 27 11 4 Professor Chapman closed. 

The Association has now purchased a fine new 

Freshmen. piano, which through the kind services of Dr. 

ab r bh po a e Mason it was able to procure on very reasonable 

Webster, 2b 511032 terms. The membership list now includes one hun- 

Spurling, c 4 I 10 o 1 dred students, but although this is encouraging it 

Martin, cf 4 o 2 3 o o must be doubled before the Association will be eli- 

Evans, lb 4 o 6 o o gible for the gifts of money from outside which 

Otis, rf 1 1 1 1 o o will clear away last year's debts. 

McLaughlin, If 3 1 o 2 o On Sunday after chapel Mr. Groves of the Har- 

Hobbs, p 4 o o o 2 1 vard Christian Association, had an informal talk 

Ludwig, 3b 402000 with those especially interested in the work here, 

Walker, ss 4 2 2 1 1 o and gave several valuable suggestions. 

Morss, rf 3 o I I o o ====== ^^^ = ^^^^^ = ^^^^ ======== ^ = ^ 

Hamburg, cf o o o o o 

— — — — -- CALENDAR 
Totals 36 5 10 24 6 4 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER ICj. 

Innings 1 2345678 9 10.-12.30 a.m. and 3-30-5-30 p.m. Track work on 

Sophomores 3 o 2 o 1 1 o 3 x— 10 Whittier Field 

Freshmen 2 o 1 2 o- s 3.5 p. M . Second football team practice. 

Three-base hits — Harris. Stolen bases — Harris, . "Mayor of Laughland" at Empire Theatre, Lew- 
Hughes 2, Crowley, Jackson, Hayden 2, Brewster, iston. 

Martin, Morss, Walker. Bases on balls — By Hdobs Saturday, October 20 

5 Struck out— By Morrill 8, Hobbs 10. Hit by I0 _ and 3 .3 : s . 30 P . M . Track work on 

pitched ball — McLaughlin. Passed balls — Jackson, Whittier Field 

Spurling. Umpire-Files, '08. Time— I hour 15 Football game with Cornell at Ithaca. 

mmutes - Bates plays Colby at Waterville. 

7.30 p.m. Massachusetts Club meeting at D. K. 
E. House. 



KAPPA SIGMA CONVENTION 

The seventeenth biennial conclave of the 
Kappa Sigma Fraternity was held at Lookout 
Mountain, Tenn., July 25th, 26th and 27th, 
and was the largest and most successful 
gathering in the history of the Fraternity. 
All the chapters of the Fraternity were rep- 
resented and large numbers of alumni were 
present. The convention program included 
important business sessions, drives to the 
famous battlefields in the vicinity, a recep- 
tion and ball, closing with a banquet on the 
evening of July 27th. Charles F. Thomas, 
07, represented Alpha Rho Chapter of Bow- 
doin. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The Christian Association held its first meeting 
on Thursday evening, the eleventh. About 75 men 
were present, and everything moved with a vigor 
that promised well for the year. Neal Allen, '07, 
presided, and short speeches were made by Burton, 
'07, Snow, '07, and Professor Foster. Then Profes- 
sor Chapman addressed the meeting for about 
fifteen minutes. He complimented the Association 
on its new room, and gave some little reminiscences 
about Professor Packard, Professor Smythe, and 
Elijah Kellogg, whose pictures hang among those 
on the wall of the new room. He then told about 



SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21. 

4.00 p.m. Quartet sings at chapel. 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 22. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 3.30-5.30 p.m. Track work on 
Whittier Field. 

3-5 p.m. Second football team practice. 
"Daughters of Men" at Empire Theatre, Lewiston. 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 3.30-5.30 p.m. Track work on 
Whittier Field. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

The Black Dike English Band at Empire Theatre, 
Lewiston. 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24. 

2.00 p.m. Sophomore-Freshman Athletic Meet. 
"Fritzi Scheff" in Mile. Modeste at the Empire 
Theatre. 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 3.30-5.30 p.m. Freshman track 
work. 
3-5 p.m. Football practice. 
7.00 p.m. Christian Association Meeting. 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 3.30-5.30 p.m. Freshman track 
work. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

7.00 p.m. Mass Meeting in Memorial Hall. 
"Professor Foster, Professor Johnson and Profes- 
sor Sills speak at Lewiston. 



U8 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 
h. e. mitchell, 1907 r. h. hupper, 1908 

W. S. LINNELL, lgo7 R. A. LEE, 1908 

A. L. ROBINSON, 1908 H. H. BURTON, igog 

J. S. STAHL, 1909 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 
N. S. WESTON, 1908 



Business Manager 
Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 



Entered at Post-Office at B 



k as Second-Class Mail Matter 



Lewiston Journal Press 



Vol. XXXVI. 



OCTOBER 19, 1906 



No. 12 



The football season has 
Football Outlook progressed sufficiently to 

give something of an idea 
of the Bowdoin team and its prospects. 
On the whole, it does not seem too much to 
say that the team bids fair to be one of the 
best that has represented the college for a 
number of years. A remarkably strong line 
seems assured and if the backs can be brought 
into the form hoped for, the team should be 
an excellent one by the time of the Maine 
games. 

The factor that makes all calculations 
purely guesswork, however, is the uncertainty 
of the new game. As football has been 
played in the past, a pretty definite idea could 
be formed as to the outcome of games when 
the personnel of teams were known. But 
under the new game it is evident that 
the determining factor is in many instances 



bound to be luck. When teams are any- 
where near evenly matched (and the Maine 
colleges are nearly always so) the slightly 
stronger team has practically no advantage 
and the chances are that first downs will be 
made but seldom and the. outcome of the 
game will depend in a large measure on the 
bound of the ball during the punting carnival 
that is bound to be the feature of the game. 
It is more spectacular, to be sure, but it is 
less a game of science and comparative 
ability. 

These things make the prophecies for our 
team purely guesswork. We may say, how- 
ever, that the team is a promising one, and 
that with a good share of the luck that goes 
with the new game it will doubtless give a 
good account of itself. Thus far the team 
has not been in its best form at any time. 
Men have been ill or crippled from time to 
time, and this with scholarship troubles has 
kept the team seriously handicapped, and these 
things are still proving a serious menace to 
the team's prospects. It is to be hoped that 
all these things will be remedied in the near 
future. 



As in past years, the 
To the Freshmen Orient is mailed to all 
members of the Freshman 
Class, it being taken for granted that each 
will feel it a part of their college life to have 
the college paper each week. It is from the 
subscribers that the business manager depends 
in a large measure for the funds to pay his 
bills, and it is one of the most difficult under- 
takings in college for him to meet his obliga- 
tions with every man paying his yearly sub- 
scription. The Orient is a real part of the 
college and as such deserves the loyal sup- 
port of every Bowdoin student ; and it is 
expected and believed that the Class of 1910 
will prove its loyalty by supporting the paper 
in the same manner as have the classes pre- 
ceding it. 



„ ,. . An occasionally notable 

Conservatism in ,-. r -r> A ■ t. 

„ . quality of Bowdoin stu- 

■ dents is conservatism. 

While in some aspects this is desirable and 

an attitude of which we may be proud, it is 

also true that there are times when it bears 

a close relationship to a lack of college spirit. 

For example, a track has been arranged 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Ii9 



between Bates and Bowcloin Freshmen, but 
with a few exceptions there does not seem to 
have been much effort on the part of the 
Freshmen to develop the best possible team. 
A track coach has been on hand and nothing 
has been lacking to bring the Freshmen out 
for work. Nevertheless, there has been but 
small interest and it would not be in the 
least surprising that Bates won the meet. 

It may be said that the Freshmen are busy 
at the present time, and that their college 
work may well take up the greater part of 
their attention ; but it is doubtless true that 
Bates Freshmen have the same things to con- 
tend with, and despite them they are able to 
turn out a large squad of men for some time 
past, and are continuing to do so at the pres- 
ent time. Whether Bowdoin Freshmen win 
the meet or not is, of course, not an all-im- 
portant question, and the case is merely men- 
tioned as an example, but the fact remains 
that it is an example of an occasional indif- 
ference that in college activities is not condu- 
cive to the best interests of the college or to 
the students individually. 

Nor is this conservatism or indifference 
confined entirely to Freshmen. The same 
attitude is apparently what is keeping the 
candidates for next spring's track team from 
getting out for practice these fine fall days. 
Thus far only a small number of men have 
been out, while at two other institutions in 
the State the number is reported to be about 
40. Last year we neglected this preliminary 
work, while another college did not, and the 
result was that when we went to Lewiston 
last May we saw men of whom we had 
scarcely heard, take point after point. 

The conservatism at this time is surely not 
based on brilliant track prospects. A well- 
known alumni who keeps closely in touch with 
college athletics tells the Orient that the 
present fall is the first time in the history of 
our track work when Bowdoin could not 
figure out in preliminary calculation from 20 
to 30 points in firsts for the annual Maine 
meet, whereas this year, unless there should 
happen to be an individual star in the Fresh- 
man Class, we can scarcely depend on 10 
points. 

None of the students would wish to admit 
this conservatism to be due to the fraternity 
houses, but there are many college graduates 
who believe that indifference is the natural 
outgrowth of the system. Only last week the 



Wesleyan student body voted down a petition 
for a new fraternity for this very reason and 
stated in a resolution that the system is injur- 
ing the college spirit. 

The Orient does not believe this to be the 
case at Bowdoin. We have our periods of 
indifference which are more apparent than 
real and when given time we show the genu- 
ine spirit. But there are times when we for- 
get ourselves, as seems now to be the case 
with track, and such lapses should be called 
to the attention of the student body. Let us 
remedy it at once ; let us show our spirit in 
something more than securing captains and 
managers for our individual fraternities and 
remedy these lapses into an unwarranted 
conservatism. If we do so we shall not only 
take a long step in making all our teams win- 
ners, but we shall be putting ourselves in har- 
mony with the broader college interests, 
which demand activity and enthusiasm from 
every student. 



College Botes 

C. A. Powers, '09, has returned to college. 

Whitmore, '07, returned to college this week. 

Orville Haskell, '10, is out of college, seriously ill. 

The Medical School of Maine will open October 
29. 

Dr. King of Portland was on the campus, 
Tuesday. 

The football team left for Cornell on the 5.15 
train last night. 

Hacker, '07, made a business trip to Boston the 
first of the week. 

Adjourns were given yesterday and everybody 
enjoyed taking them. 

Miss Evelyn Stetson rendered a delightful vocal 
solo in chapel Sunday. 

Harris, '09, is acting as agent for the Underwood 
Typewriter Co. this year. 

George Phelan of Kent's Hill visited friends in 
college the first of the week. 

Philip D. Stubbs, '9S, of Strong, was at the col- 
lege the latter part of the week. 

The Whittier Field has been thoroughly raked 
and cleaned during the past week. 

Herbert E. Warren has been elected temporary 
captain of the Freshman track team. 

Clifford, '10, has been selected as coach of the 
Brunswick High School football team. 

Gannett, '07, has returned to college, having been 
at work since the opening of the term. 

The date of the Freshman-Sophomore track men 
has been changed to Wednesday, October 24. 



J20 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Paine, '06, was a recent visitor to the college. 

The Sigma Omicron Society of the Bath High 
School will give a dance October 31. 

The examinations in Economics 1 scheduled for 
October 18 was held on October 16. 

Hatch, '07, is out of college at present travelling 
for the firm of Dugis & Gust of Boston. 

"Bernie" McGraw has been engaged as the 
coach of the Hebron Academy football team. 

Tuesday and Wednesday was a great day for the 
goat. He kept the Freshmen busy most of the time. 

John W. Manter, '09, has returned to college, 
and played at halfback last Saturday against 
Hebron. 

The Brunswick High School football team plays 
Lisbon Falls High on Whittier Field, Saturday 
afternoon. 

There was a good number of alumni present at 
the initiations at the various fraternities, Wednes- 
day night. 

The residents of the "Ends" appreciate the action 
-., of the college in supplying Pine Spring water for 
their use. 

Workmen have been engaged in making repairs 
in the stone work about the Art Building during 
the past week. 

Shorey, '07, W. E. Roberts, '07, Brown, '07, and 
Robinson, '07, made a brief visit to Boston the 
first of the week. 

Several college men attended the dance given by 
the High School students in the Court Room last 
Saturday evening. 

Coach Noble, an Amherst man who has had 
charge of the Hebron Academy team, was a recent 
visitor to the college. 

Speake, '07, Gray, '08, Hinckley, '09, Dresser, '09, 
Studley, '09, and Atwood, '10, visited Hebron with 
the Second team, Saturday. 

Upton, '07, left Wednesday for Brookline, Mass., 
where he will attend the anual fall golf tournament 
of the Country Club of that place. 

Matthews, '10, was at his home in Portsmouth, 
N. H., the latter part of the week, where he was 
called by the illness of a relative. 

R. H. Ellis, '09, is writing a description of Bow- 
doin College for the Hebron Semester, the school 
publication of Hebron Academy. 

Harold Pratt, '09, competed in the State shoot at 
the Brunswick rifle range, Tuesday, as a member 
of the rifle team of Co. K, Farmington. 

"Girls Will Be Girls" was the attraction at the 
Empire Theatre in Lewiston last Monday evening, 
but did not draw heavily from the students. 

Many of the fellows will probably witness the 
game between Holy Cross and U. of M. which 
takes place at Portland to-morrow afternoon. 

Bates played a good game at Harvard, but inju- 
ries to several men in this game caused the can- 
cellation of her game with Brown University. 

Professor W. E. Sargent, Principal of Hebron 
Academy, visited the college this week. It is 
learned that he secured the services of Bernie 
McGraw, the star quarterback of the 1904 team. 



"Fritzi Scheff" will be the attraction at the 
Empire Theatre in Lewiston on the evening of the 
24th, and will be one of the best attractions of the 
season. 

There seems to be a great scarcity of waiters 
about Brunswick this fall, several of the fraternities, 
as well as residents, having considerable difficulty 
in this connection. 

Adjourns were given to Professor Mitchell's 
classes Tuesday, he being at Newcastle, Me., where 
he delivered an address before the Lincoln County 
Teachers' Association. 

The Freshman track squad is training hard for 
the Bates Freshmen next week and the only fault 
to be found is that the squad is too small. Where's 
your class spirit, 1910? 

Bleachers are being erected on the north side of 
Whittier Field in preparation for the Bates and 
Colby games. There should be a record-breaking 
crowd at both games. 

The granting of adjourns last Saturday and the 
absence of both 'Varsity and second elevens, caused 
a general exodus which gave the campus a some- 
what deserted appearance. 

Bates will play Colby at Waterville to-morrow ■ 
in the first game of the Maine college series. U. 
of M. will play Holy Cross at the Pine Tree 
grounds in Portland, on the same date. 

At the time of going to press the matter of the 
Bowdoin-Bates Freshman Meet was still in the 
hands of the Athletic Council, but everything 
pointed to the meet's coming off on October 29, as 
announced. 

The Massachusetts Club will hold its first meet- 
ing to-morrow night at the Delta Kappa Epsilon 
House. This club should be in flourishing condi- 
tion this year, since there are eighteen Massachu- 
setts men in the entering class. 

The football management has been making 
arrangements for the Second team to play at Kent's 
Hill to-morrow, but owing to the fact that it 
will be impossible for a number of the men to go 
on the trip it has been decided not to play the 
game. 

Several Bowdoin men attended the reception and 
dance given by the Alpha Phi Society of Portland 
High School last Friday evening. Included in the 
number were Sheehan, '09, Drummond, '09, Hale, 
'10, and Holt, '07. The function was held at Riv- 
erton Park. 

Monday for the first time the cars on the Port- 
land & Brunswick Street Railroad began making 
through trips to Portland. Now a person can ^ 
leave Brunswick, at the corner of Maine and Pleas- 
ant streets, and go right through to Congress 
Street without a change, the run being made in 
two hours. 

Ten new cars are to be added to the Lewiston, 
Brunswick & Bath Street Railway about the first - 
of January. With the new cars it is intended to *^ 
shorten the running time between Lewiston and 
Bath to two hours, which is fifteen minutes quicker 
than the run is made at present. They will be of 
the combination type with smoking apartments. 
The big eight-wheel cars now in use will be used 
as extra cars, and the line is in much need of them. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



\2\ 



The New England Telephone Company has heen 
introducing extension telephone sets at the frater- 
nity houses this week. 

The annual shoot of the marksmen of the Maine 
National Guard was held on the Brunswick range 
on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of this week. 

The greater part of the football squad returned 
from Wesleyan at midnight, Sunday night, 
although one or two men arrived on the noon 
train. 

In accordance with the annual custom, services 
were held at .the Catholic cemetery Sunday after- 
noon. The members of the St. Jean Baptiste and 
the Holy Name societies, headed by the St. Jean 
Baptiste band, marched to the cemetery, while 
hundreds of members of the church either walked 
or rode to the cemetery. 

Dr. William C. Mason of Bangor, to whom the 
library is already indebted for a set of the sil- 
houettes of the Class of 1825, has recently sent two 
interesting relics of the early college days in the 
silver medals worn by members of the Athenean 
Society- and of the Phi Beta Kappa Alpha of Maine, 
at its establishment in 1825. 

Barring out Hebron and Kent's Hill, which 
schools are considered in a class by themselves, 
Edward Little should stand a good show for the 
Prep, school championship of the State. She has 
shown herself superior to anything she has met 
thus far, and in defeating Portland, probably 
defeated her only dangerous opponent. 

Rev. David H. Evans, the new pastor of the 
South Parish Congregational Church, is one of two 
students, in the history of Williams College, who 
never missed a chapel exercise during the four 
years' course. The other student was Bliss Perry, 
now editor of Atlantic Monthly, aind recently made 
professor of English at Harvard. 

The Bath High School football team defeated the 
Brunswick High School, Saturday afternoon on 
Whittier Field by a score of 17 to 0. Several of 
the officials were Bowdoin men. McMillian, '10, 
was referee ; Johnson, '09, linesman ; and Fisk, '09, 
timer. Dr. Robert H. Donnell, '01, of Bath, a for- 
mer Bowdoin football player, is coaching the Bath 
High team. 

It is a little unfortunate that the Bowdoin-Colby 
game at Brunswick and the Bates-U. of M. game 
l/' at Lewiston fall on the same day, November 10. 
Many Lewiston enthusiasts would like to see the 
game at Brunswick and many from Brunswick 
would naturally go to the same at Lewiston if there 
was not a game at home. It will cut down the 
attendance at both games. 

The item in the newspapers under a Lewiston 
date line stating that a dual tennis meet between 
Bowdoin and Bates Freshmen had been arranged 
was somewhat erroneous. No such meet had been 
arranged up to the time of going to press, though 
Manager Morrison had received a letter from 
Bates requesting an informal meeting of some of 
the best men in the two institutions. In view of 
the fact Bowdoin has no captain until home series 
are settled, the manager did not feel free to make 
arrangements. It is possible that this may be done 
later, but the lateness of the season would seem 
to make it doubtful. 



Hopewell, a leading candidate for end on the 
Harvard eleven, has had a hard time on account of 
the working of the one-year rule. In his Fresh- 
man year he made his class eleven which beat the 
Yale Freshmen. Then deciding to leave Harvard 
for a small college he went to Bowdoin, where he 
was a prominent member of the football squad and 
would surely have been on the regular eleven but 
for the one year rule. At the opening of his 
Junior year on account of the death of his father 
he returned to Harvard in order to be near his 
mother, who lives in Boston. The one year rule 
was again in operation in his case and kept him 
from the. Harvard eleven this time. Now as a 
Senior he is out of the shadow of that rule and 
will try for the first team. — Exchange. 



THE FACULTY 

_ President Hyde addressed the students at Wil- 
liams College at their chapel exercises on last 
Thursday morning. His subject was "Our Three 
Selves." 

Professor Sills will speak on the subject, "Sight 
Reading in Latin" at the convention of the Maine 
Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools 
which will be held at Lewiston next week. 

Professor Allen Johnson will address "The 
Department of History" of the Maine Association 
of Colleges and Preparatory Schools at Lewiston 
next week. Professor Johnson is president of the 
history department. 

Professor Foster will speak before the Maine 
Teachers' Association and the Maine Association 
of Colleges and Preparatory Schools at their annual 
meeting in Lewiston next week. His subject will 
be "Simplified Spelling Reform from the Philologi- 
cal Standpoint." 



CROSS COUNTRY RUNNING 

Capt. Shorey has been taking out a small squad of 
men every day for a run through the country as 
training for the cross country handicap race to be 
held on November 10. This cross country running 
is one of the most healthful departments of college 
athletics ; a fellow need only run as far and as fast 
as he wishes ; and he is bound to get plenty of fresh 
air and of exercise. If a man tries it for one day, 
he will keep it up willingly. Bowdoin will soon 
need some long distance men and here is a chance 
for anyone to make a start. The squad leaves the 
gymnasium every afternoon at three o'clock. 



SOPHOMORE=FRESHMAN MEET 

The Sophomore-Freshman track meet will take 
place next Wednesday at two o'clock on Whittier 
Field. At the time of the Orient going to print, 
the entries for the various contests had not yet 
been made out. The Freshmen, however, have so 
far had a larger number of men in training than 
have the Sophomores, owing chiefly to the fact 
that most of 1909's best athletes have conditions in 



122 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



their studies. The men that so far have been train- 
ing are : 

From 1909 — Atwood, Brewster, Buck, Bur- 
ton, Hughes, Johnson, Phillips, Powers, and Sim- 
mons ; from 1910, Ashworth, W. E. Atwood, Bal- 
lard, Clifford, Davie, Deming, Edwards, Farrar, 
Favin, Hanson, Hawes, Kimball, Ludwig, Morss, 
Morton, Pickard, W. E. Robinson, Russell, Slocum, 
Warren and Weeks. 



THE INITIATES 



The following are the men received into the 
various fraternities, Wednesday evening: 

Alpha Delta Chi — Chester A. Boynton, Harrison 
C. Chapman, John D. Clifford, William D. McMil- 
lan, H. B. McLaughlin, Robert D. Morss, Philip D. 
Morss, W. B. Nulty, Warren E. Robinson, Winston 
B. Stevens, Herbert E. Warren. 

Psi Upsilon — Robert Hale, Clinton N. Peters, 
Rodney E. Ross, William H. Sanborn, Harold S. 
Small. 

Delta Kappa Epsilon — R. Burleigh Martin, 
Charles A. Cary, Edward T. Pickard, Harry W. 
Woodward, Derby Stanley, Francis Spurling, 
Henry J. Colbath, Ralph S. Crowell, J. Leland 
Crosby, Alfred W. Stone, E. Curtis Matthews, Jr. 

Theta Delta Chi— Harold W. Davie, James F. 
Hamburger, James B. Draper, William P. Newman, 
Leon H. Smith, Harlan F. Hansen, Henry L. Rus- 
sell, Frank P. Richards, Ha'rold W. Slocum, Sum- 
ner Edwards, Raymond Turtle, Henry Q. Hawes, 
Leon S. Lippincott. 

Zeta Psi — P. T. Nickerson, George Ashworth. 
Lawrence G. Ludwig, Richard R. Eastman, Alfred 
P. Richards, Charles A. Smith, Ralph W. Smith, 
Charles W. Walker, Harold E. Weeks. 

Delta Upsilon — Allen Lander, Thomas C. Com- 
mins, John B. Hanrahan, Cornelius J. Taylor, 
Alfred W. Wandtke, Robert F. Wing, Guy W. Far- 
rar, Frank A. Kimball, Frank B. McGlone, Colby 
L. Morton, William E. Atwood, Ralph L. Thomp- 
son, Harry I. Dugan. 

Kappa Sigma — Harold B. Ballard, William S. 
Guptill, Merrill C. Hill, Orville V. Haskell, Ralph 
B. Grace, Afton Farren, Thomas Otis. 

Beta Theta Pi— Merton G. L. Bailey, Frank C. 
Evans, Elmer H. Hobbs, Frank E. Kendrie, George 
H. Webster, Ira B. Robinson, S. Sewall Webster, 
G. Cony Weston, George H. Macomber. 



REQUIRED READINGS— HISTORY 3 

For the week ending October 5 : 

Robinson, History of Western Europe, Chs. 1-2. 
Robinson, Readings in European History, Ch. 2. 
Prepare : 

1. A physical map of Europe naming the chief 
river systems and mountain chains. 

For the week ending October 12 : 

2. A map of the Roman Empire at its greatest 
extent. 

Review in some trustworthy history the chief 
events of Roman History from the foundation of 
the Empire to the year 378. The following are 
recommended. 

Betsford, History of Rome Chs. 9-12. 

Seignobos, History of Roman People, Chs. 
18-27. 



For the week ending October 19 : 

Emerton, Introduction to Middle Ages, Chs. 3-7. 
Prepare : 

1. A map showing the location of the Ger- 
man tribes before the migrations. (See Emerton.) 

2. A map of Europe in the time of Theodoric. 
(See Robinson). 

For the week ending October 26: 

Robinson, Readings, ch. 3. 

Robinson, History, pp. 39-43. 

Emberton, Introduction to Middle Ages, Ch. 8. 
Hour Examination, October 26 : 

Quiz every Friday on the readings of the week. 



REQUIRED READINGS— HISTORY 5 

For the week ending October 5 : 
Thwaites, "Colonies," Chs. 1-2. 
Fiske, Discovery of America, I. pp. 1-100. 
Recommended : 

Parkman, Jesuits in No. Am. Introduction. 

Outline maps, Nos. 1 and 2. 
For the week ending October 12 : 
Thwaites, Colonies, Paragraphs 28-31, 33-34, 48-50. 
Prepare synopses of the following charters : 

Virginia Charters of 1606, 1609, 1612. 

Maryland Charter of 1632. 

MacDonald, Select Charters Nos. 1, 2, 3, 12. 
For the week ending October 19 : 
Thwaites, Colonies Paragraphs 51-56. 
American History Leaflet No. 31. 
Prepare synopsis of first Massachusetts charter. 
MacDonald, Select Charters, No. 8. 



UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



The fifty-fourth session of this College, of Medicine 
begins December I, 1906, and continues seven months. 

A New Building with 

Large, well equipped Laboratories, 

Commodious Lecture Halls, 

Pleasant Recitation Rooms, 

Every Facility for Instruction. 



NUMEROUS CLINICS 



MODERATE EXPENSE 



For Announcement and further information, address 

H. L. WHITE, A.M., Secretary, 

BURLINGTON, VT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



123 



For the week ending October 26 : 

Thwaites, Colonies, Paragraphs 57-68. 
Prepare a synopsis of the following: 

Constitution of the New England Confeder- 
ation. 
Conn. Charter of 1662. 



See pie Mont a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
1900 man who will be in the market for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(^afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

a. s. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPGOOD'S 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

The Eighty-seventh Annual Course of 
Lectures will begin October 25, 1906, and 
continue eight months. 

Four courses of lectures are required of all 
who matriculate as first-course students. 

The courses are graded and cover Lectures, 
Recitations, Laboratory Work and Clinical 
Instruction. 

The third and fourth year classes will receive 
their entire instruction at Portland, where 
excellent clinical facilities will be afforded at 
the Maine General Hospital. 

For catalogue apply to 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., Dean. 

Brunswick, Maine, October, 1906. 

COLLEGE TYPEWRITER AGENCY. 

UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITERS for sale and 
for rent. Supplies of all kinds furnished. Ribbons for 
all makes of machines at cost. Carbon paper in stock. 

Call and see an Underwood, if you are thinking of 
renting or buying a machine. 

HAROLD W. FILES, Agent, 32 Maine Hall. 



Rhode Island Charter of 1663. 
MacDonald, Select Charters, Nos. 19, 24, 27. 

Hour Examination October 26 : 

Quiz every Friday on the readings of the week. 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



FOB 
RI BBONS 



JAMES F. WILL CO. 

100=102 MAINE STREET, BRUNSWICK 

MAGAZINE BARGAINS 

A WHOLESALE CATALOGUE FREE 



Send Us Your List for Quotations 
Our Prices Beat Them All 



INCLUDE IN EVERY ORDER : 
Everybody's ------ 

Ladies' Home Journal - 

Saturday Evening Post - - - - 



ii.50 
1.50 
1.50 



Ainslee's - $1,801 

Outing ----- 3.00 I 



World To=Day 
Cosmopolitan 
Harper's Bazar, or 
World To=Day - 
World's Work - 
Delineator - 
McClure's 

American Magazine 
Photo Era - 



• 50) 
$1.00 ^ 

1-50 J 
$3-oo ^ 



OUR PRICE 

$3.50 

OUR PRICE 
$1.50 



: address 
OUR PRICE 
I. OO 
I. OO 
$3.00 ) OUR PRICE 

1.50/ $1.65 



i$3.00 



COMPENDIUM SUBSCRIPTION AGENCY, 

226 HOWELL STREET, BATH, N. Y. 



Mention the Orient when patronizing our Advertisers. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




Visit our 

ICE=CREAM 

PARLOR. 




119 Maine Street 
CATER J IMG in all departments a Specialty. 

PULSIFER'S 
5 AND 10 ©EBT ST0RE 

Now Open for Business. 
J. W. PULSIFER, - - MAINE STREET, BRUNSWICK 

Bowdoin Calendars 

Qn SALE at HALf PfJICE 

(50 Cents) 

WOODRUFF, '06, or 
BYI^ON STEVENS' BOO^STO^E 



THE MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Has a carefully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; clinical Conferences; Modified Seminar .Methods, ami thoroughly I'ractical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work anil ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest ami linest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every respect, and the new laboratories are specially planned and equipped for individual work by the'students. 

The College has also a Department of Dentistry ami a Department of' Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 
SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of Medicine. 




REPEATING SHOT GUN 
NEW MODEL N9I7 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yetmade. By theomUsion of the take down feature we have 
been able to greatly reduce the cost of production and at the same time have kept the sun up to the 
famous high ///green standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
barrels are especially bored for smokeless as well as black powder and so chambered that 2% inch or 
z -8 inch shells may be used. Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 
reliable and best working gun in existence. We are glad to make it possible for every lover of guns 
ana bird shooUng to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so low a price. 

riave your dealer order it for you. 

Send for the fflat&n Catalogue and Experience Book to-day. Free for 3 stamps. 
Tnefflarflfi firearms £«,42Willow Street, New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCTOBER 26, 1906 



NO. 13 



CORNELL, 72 ; BOWDOIN, 

Bowdoin met an overwhelming defeat at 
Ithaca, N. Y., last Saturday, when our team 
was defeated by Cornell, the score being 72 
to o in what was a decidedly one-sided con- 
test. It had been expected that our team 
would lose by a big margin, but hardly as 
large as proved to be the case. The univer- 
sity team, however, proved to be one of the 
finest football eleven we have ever played in 
the history of our athletics and this with 
their splendid form and the long halves made 
the score what it was. 

The Bowdoin team fought against great 
odds, but it was useless. The team was in 
very poor form and much weakened by the 
absence of men, and these things with the 
long journey and lack of sleep were inpor- 
tant factors in preventing them from doing 
their best work. 

From the beginning Cornell played fast, 
with superb team work, and smashed Bow- 
doin's line to pieces with every plunge. 
Within three minutes of play, including a 50- 
yard dash by Gibson, Cornell took the ball 
near enough for McCutcheon to drop back 
and kick a pretty placement goal. After that 
the Ithacans made four touchdowns before 
the first period closed. Babcock, at left end, 
was used for line plunges, and played a very 
strong game, gaining distance many times, 
until he became unsteady and had to be 
retired. Gibson and Earle were each credited 
with a dozen long runs, Gibson getting the 
longest, of 75 yards. 

McCutcheon played a wonderful game, 
and several times carried several men on his 
• back after his interference had been shat- 
tered. Bowdoin played a plucky uphill game, 
but could not gain against Cornell's strong 
defense. Three times Bowdoin resorted to 
the forward pass, but each time it failed. The 
first half ended with the score 27 to o. 

The second half started with snap, and in 
three plays after Bowdoin's kick-off Gibson, 
with splendid interference by Watson, ended 
a 45-yard run behind the goal line. In four 
plays McCutcheon was sent over. After that 



Warner began sending substitutes on the 
field until not one man who started the game 
remained. But these changes did not stop 
the scoring or spectacular plays. Sailor, Corn- 
wall and Gardner made numerous long runs, 
and Sailor sent the ball twirling between 
the goal posts by a clean drop kick from the 
40-yard line. When there was but one 
minute left, Cornwall broke loose and ran 60 
yards for a touchdown. 
The line-up : 

Cornell. Bowdoin. 

Babcock, Watson, l.e I.e., Drummond (Capt.) 

Cook (Capt.), Carman, l.t l.t, Commins 

Thompson, R. W. Sailor, l.g l.g., Newman 

Newman, McNamara, c c, McDade, Boynton 

Dann, Cosgrove, r.g r.g., Stanley 

Britton, Oderkirk, r.t r.t, Garcelon 

Van Orman, Piollet, r.e r.e., Crowley 

Jamieson, Gardner, Pollak, q.b...q.b., Webber, Bass 

Earle, Mason, Bishop, l.h.b l.h.b., Gastonguay 

Gibson, Cornwall, r.h.b r.h.b., Lee, Roberts 

McCutcheon, Sailor, f.b f.b., Draper 

Touchdowns — McCutcheon 3, Gibson 2, Sailor 
2, Cornwall 2, Babcock and Earle. Goals from 
touchdowns, Cook 7 and Sailor 2. Goals from field, 
McCutcheon and Sailor. Referee — Mr. Pulsifer, 
Bates. Umpire — Mr. Wright, Columbia. Head 
linesman — Mr. Young, Cornell. Time of halves — 
30 minutes. 



ADDRESS BY D. R. PORTER 

David R. Porter, ex-'o6, the first Maine 
student to win a Cecil Rhodes scholarship at 
Oxford, gave a very interesting address in 
the First Parish Church, Sunday evening, on 
"A Bowdoin Man at Oxford University." 
Mr. Porter told of the conditions there, of the 
life led by the students and described the 
work done. 

Mr. Porter said in part : 

"The English University differs from the 
American university in that it is composed 
of a collection of different colleges. At 
Oxford there are 22 different colleges, all 
located in the city of Oxford, and forming the 
University. Each college stands for a dis- 
tinct thing, and each is a unit in itself. Each 
is surrounded by a high wall, which prevents 
the students from going out. 



126 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



"It is difficult for an American to under- 
stand the relation of one college to the other 
colleges of the University. It can be com- 
pared to the United States government, com- 
posed of a number of states, all having one 
central government. 

"There is no co-education at Oxford, but 
in the city of Oxford there are several col- 
leges for young women. The women may 
attend the lectures and take the examinations 
of the University, but cannot receive the 
degree. The colleges for the women have 
their own boards of trustees, and are entirely 
separate from the University. 

"The Oxford student is required to take 
only three examinations. The first is called 
the Responsers, and was taken by the Ameri- 
can students before we left our native shores. 
The English students, however, do not take 
this until they have entered the University, 
and they sometimes remain there a year or 
more before passing it. There is another 
examination which all are required to take, 
but which really is a farce. It is called Divin- 
ity Moderation, and is given to test the can- 
didate's knowledge of the New Testament, 
and the subject matter of the Book of Acts. 
For a small sum a student may purchase a 
book containing the questions, and if he mas- 
ters these, he is pretty sure of passing the 
"exam." However, occasionally a surprise is 
sprung, and this was the case when the first 
Rhodes scholars arrived. If the student does 
not pass, he is fined one pound. This money 
is used to fill the coffers, and when the times 
are hard, as at present, the majority of the 
Freshmen are required to pay the fine. 

"The second examination is held usually in 
the middle of the course, after the student 
has been there a year and a half, or two 
years. The third and final written examina- 
tion is held at the end of the course, and the 
student is expected to remember all he has 
learned. There is, however, after this an oral 
examination, which is also a farce. 

"After the student has passed his second 
examination, he may chose whether or not 
he will work hard. If he chooses to work 
hard he will take what is called the Honor 
School, and if not, the Passed School. This 
latter is used chiefly by wealthy Englishmen, 
who want the Oxford life, but do not care 
to studv hard. I believe that even these get 
as much out of their college course, as do 
the Americans who study hard a few nights 



before the examinations, and then forget it 
all in a few days. 

"There is no elective system in England. 
The student chooses at the beginning what 
general course he will take up, and then goes 
to that college, and remains there for two 
years, or until he has taken his last, examina- 
tion. 

"The tutorial system is in force at Oxford. 
A new man is assigned to a tutor, who has 
charge of his moral and physical welfare dur- 
ing his career. Each tutor has between six 
and fifteen students under his charge. It is 
necessary to call upon your tutor at least once 
a week. He will inquire what books you 
have read, what lectures you have attended, 
and about your social life during the past 
week. He will then advise you as to your 
work for the next week. 

"All of the teaching is done within the col- 
lege, and the examinations are prepared, and 
the degree given by the University. It is the 
work of the tutor to prepare you for the 
examinations. Oxford is a barren land as 
far as recitations go, for there are none. 

"To the Englishman the social side of 
life is much more important than the studious 
life. There are three terms of eight weeks 
each, and the student must attend at least six 
of the eight weeks. The work is all done dur- 
ing the vacations, and the students come up 
to Oxford to get acquainted, and to attend 
lectures. The Englishman believes there are 
two ways of obtaining an education ; reading 
books, and reading lectures ; they consider the 
latter the more important." 

Mr. Porter then described a typical Oxford 
day. The student is called at 7.30 and is 
given 20 minutes to take a cold water bath, 
dress and get to chapel. Chapel is compul- 
sory, and if he does not attend, he must write 
his name in a book in the dining-room ten 
minutes before eight. Breakfast is from 8.30 
until about 10 o'clock. Lectures come from 
10 until 1, and then lunch is served. The 
students all go out to the athletic field after 
lunch. At 4.30 comes tea,- and dinner is 
served at 7 o'clock. The first three meals 
are supposed to be eaten alone, but one is 
either invited out or has company. Dinner 
is really the only satisfactory meal of the day. 
The students hurry through this, and go off 
to one another's rooms for coffee. 

"Freshmen are treated much different in 
England than in America. The Rhodes 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



127 



scholars had all been Freshmen in America, 
and were not anxious to live those days over 
again, but when we arrived we found things 
entirely different than in America. There a 
Freshman is looked up to and honored by the 
upper classmen. During the first few months 
the upper classmen are all of the time invit- 
ing the Freshmen to meals in their rooms, or 
to the theatres. Sometimes when there is not 
room at the college for all the students, the 
Seniors give up their rooms for the Freshmen. 

"The proctors have charge of the students 
outside of the college. It is their duty to see 
that the student wears his cap and gown 
when he calls upon his tutor, and also when 
he is on the street after 9 p.m. If a student 
is caught, he must pay a fine. 

"The religious life is under the control of 
the Church of England, which sends its best 
preachers to Oxford. The student need not 
attend these services, but a very large num- 
ber do. The World's Christian Student Asso- 
ciation, which is much like the Y. M. C. A., 
does much good work. In vacation time, 
many students do settlement work in Lon- 
don." 



A COMMUNICATION 

The Editors of the Orient: 

Gentlemen — The musical recitals that 
have been given at the Art Building during 
the past two college years are not to be con- 
tinued. This is the more to be regretted as 
the college is unable for lack of means to give 
any instruction in the fine arts, if the few and 
informal talks given each winter by the cura- 
tor on the subject of the building and its con- 
tents be excepted. The unusual conditions 
which rendered possible the giving of the 
recitals do not continue. The valuable musi- 
cal instruments which have been so gener- 
ously loaned to the college by the individuals 
owning them are no longer available. The 
demand upon the time of the two gentlemen 
who have previously given their services to 
the cause is so great that the college cannot 
ask them indefinitely for such a contribution. 
What they have done already is much more 
than to give those who have had the privilege 
to attend the recitals evidence of their well- 
known skill and equally well-known unselfish- 
ness ; the question of the esthetic value of 
such courses to our undergraduates and to 
the other members of the town and college 



community who have attended them in the 
past two years, has been settled for this col- 
lege. There is no room for doubt that such 
explanation of the world's best music and 
such skilful illustration of it have a distinct 
place in the period of a college student's life. 
The instruments needed are an orchestrelle, 
a grand piano of the best quality, and a 
piano player. The conditions of heat and 
moisture such as have to be observed for the 
paintings and other objects kept in the Art 
Building, and the fact that the Building is 
never opened except by someone in the 
employment of the college, would insure due 
care of such property. I am sure that some 
friends, who should understand the case and 
be in a position to so help us, would gladly 
furnish us the instruments, without which 
the instruction will be impossible. 

Henry Johnson. 



COACH IRWIN TO RETURN 

It is with a great deal of pleasure that the 
Baseball Association announces that John 
Irwin, the old New England League baseball 
player, will have charge of the Bowdoin base- 
ball team for 1907. John Irwin is univer- 
sally esteemed and respected by the students. 
He brought forth the championship teams of 
1903 and 1905, and had good success last 
spring although forced by circumstances to 
leave in the very middle of the season and 
so in the midst of his work. 



MISS KATHERINE EVARTS 

* Miss Katherine Jewell Evarts, well known 
as a reader, will give a reading in Brunswick 
on November 15, under the auspices of the 
Saturday Club of the town. Miss Evarts is 
a pupil of Leland Powers and widely known 
as an impersonator of rare ability. 



CERCLE FRANCAIS 

An attempt is being made this year to reorganize 
the Cercle Francais. The object of the club is 
merely to help students to learn to converse in 
French, which the limited time allowed for recita- 
tions makes impossible in the class room.. Every- 
one who is interested in improving his French 
along this line is eligible for membership, and is 
invited to the first meeting, which will be held next 
Thursday at 7 o'clock at 5 South Maine Hall, for 
the purpose of electing officers, and arranging the 
plans for the year. 



128 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Friday of the Collegiate Y 
by the Students of 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 

H. E. MITCHELL, 1907 R. H. HUPPER, igo8 

W. S. LINNELL, igo7 R. A. LEE, 1908 

A. L. ROBINSON, 1908 H. H. BURTON, igog 

J. S. STAHL, igog 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 
N. S. WESTON, 1908 



Business Manager 
Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, 10 cents. 

Entered at Post-Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
Lewiston Journal Press 

Vol. XXXVI. OCTOBER 26, 1906 No. 13 

There seems to be many 
Athletic Trainer reasons why we should 
have an athletic trainer. 
That proper training is an important factor 
in the production of strong athletic teams 
there can be no doubt, and — what is more 
fundamental — it is a prime requisite in mak- 
ing athletics what they should be — conducive 
to the best possible physical condition. 

The only possible objection to a trainer is 
the matter of expense, and it is extremely 
doubtful is this is valid. There are colleges 
near at hand where trainers are retained 
throughout the year and where it is claimed 
that the students have less money to expend 
than at Bowdoin. 

This being true it would seem that the 
objection is based on a lack of aroused senti- 
ment. With the proper enthusiasm the neces- 
sary funds could be easily raised and few 



students would know the difference. A 
trainer would have meant a great deal to our 
football squad this fall, and would also mean 
a great deal to our track men next spring. 
We need a trainer and there is no one to 
blame but ourselves if we do not have one. 



„ . In this issue the Orient 

Concerning publishes a letter from 

Musical Recitals £ rof Henry Johnson> in 

which he states that the musical recitals which 
have been given for two years in the Art 
Building will have to be omitted this winter 
because of a lack of instruments. We publish 
this announcement with much regret, for the 
recitals in past years have been a source of 
much enjoyment, as well as of valuable 
instruction, to a large number fo students, to 
whom this opportunity to hear the world's 
best music well rendered once a week, added 
something to their college course that cannot 
be replaced by anything else, and the lack of 
which is continually felt. 

Last year in the absence of Prof. Hutchins, 
Dr. A. B. Mason kindly gave us his time and 
services, so as to enable us to continue the 
course. This year Prof. Hutchins is again 
with us and has kindly offered to give the 
college the benefit of the special study he 
made last year in Germany of Wagner and of 
Wagner's music. It is, therefore, earnestly 
hoped that some person or group of people 
interested in Bowdoin, will respond to Prof. 
Johnson's letter by putting the college in 
the way of obtaining the instruments needed 
to continue the musical recitals. 



Christian 
Association 



During the last two weeks 
the Christian Association 
has been organizing its 
committees and beginning its practical 
work. The two committees whose influ- 
ence will be felt the most and to help 
which it is the duty of the whole college, are 
the Employment Committee and the Library 
Committee. The first committee will keep a 
list of winter or summer jobs open to Bl>w- 
doin men, and will furnish the same to any 
applicant. It will, therefore, add much to 
the efficacy of the committee if every man 
who is looking for a position, or knows where 
there is one, will give his name or informa- 
tion to some member of the committee as soon 
as possible. The members of the commit- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



129 



tee are: T. R. Winchell, '07, at the Alpha 
Delta Phi House; A. W. Merrill, 'oS, at the 
D. K. E. House, and B. C. Morrill, '10, prob- 
ably in Maine Hall. The second committee 
is collecting a library of second-hand text- 
books which will be available for needy stu- 
dents, who will be given the use of a book 
during a semester if they make a small deposit 
with the Library Committee. The members 
of this committee are L. H. Fox, '06, who is 
to be found at the Hubbard Library and W. 
M. Harris, '09, at No. 3 South Appleton 
Hall, and every one who has any second-hand 
text-books which he is willing to give for this 
purpose, is requested to leave them as soon as 
possible at the Hubbard Library. The other 
committees now organized are the committees 
on, tutoring students having low rank, on 
seeing that sick students are cared for, on 
opening the Sargent Gymnasium to Bruns- 
wick boys on Saturday mornings, on music 
for the meetings, on press reporting, on tak- 
ing care of the rooms, and on membership. 
This last committee is composed of M. C. 
Webber, '07, J. A. Davis, '08, R. O. Brewster, 
'09, and E. C. Matthews, '10. 

The second meeting of the Association was 
held last night, and Dr. Lincoln addressed the 
meeting on his experiences in China. The 
Orient will give a more expended account of 
the meeting next week. The Association has 
not yet begun to organize its classes for Bible 
Study, but this will soon be done under the 
direction of C. W. Snow, '07. 



The fellows seem to have 
College Band forgotten all about the 

question of the music for 
the college games this year. It is high time 
that something should be done about this and 
a band organized for the next three games, if 
nothing more. The members of the band for 
last year should certainly organize at once 
and take steps for starting this branch of 
activity. 

A COMMUNICATION 

Last spring the college was informed that 
instead of choosing a football coach from 
among the stars of other colleges, the "grad- 
uate system" of coaching would be given a 
trial. Are we at Bowdoin giving this system 
a fair trial? At institutions where this sys- 
tem is in vogue, there are graduate coaches 



for every department of the game, and in 
most cases, there are one or more coaches for 
every position on the team. At Cornell last 
Saturday eleven graduate coaches were on 
the field, and in preparation for the Princeton 
game of October twenty-seventh, six more 
coaches were then expected. Here at Bow- 
doin we may not expect to see such a large 
corps of coaches, but have we not a right to 
expect more than two coaches at this stage of 
the game? Does not the success of the 
"graduate system" of coaching depend on 
the presence of at least one graduate coach 
for each department, and more than one grad- 
uate coach if more can be induced to return 
to give the college the benefit of their ' pre- 
vious training and experience? We do not 
mean this for a criticism of the work of the 
present coaches ; neither do we mean it for 
a harsh criticism of those in whose power lies 
th ability to engage more coaches. Yet it is 
the feeling of a large number of undergradu- 
ates that all is not being done toward round- 
ing into championship form the splendid 
football material which this year brings to us. 
Will not the football authorities give the 
"graduate system" a fair trial by immediately 
engaging the requisite number of coaches? 
If we are to have the "graduate system" of 
coaching, why not test the system fairly, and 
instead of having two graduate coaches, why 
not give the team at least one coach for every 
department of the game ? 

Undergraduate. 



MASSACHUSETTS CLUB 

The Massachusetts Club held its first meeting 
last Saturday evening at the Delta Kappa Epsilon 
House. Twenty-four Massachusetts men were 
present, and fifteen out of the eighteen Fresh- 
men from Massachusetts, who were present, became 
members of the club. The plans for the year were 
discussed and it was decided to hold three meetings 
in the Fraternity Houses, one meeting at the Inn, 
one at the Gurnet, and one public meeting in 
Memorial Hall, at which some speakers from Mas- 
sachusetts would address the college. After the 
business meeting, refreshments were served, and the 
meeting adjourned at about nine o'clock, having 
spent a pleasant evening. 



BATES=BOWDOIN FRESHMAN MEET 

Word was received from Bates College last Tues- 
day evening agreeing to change the date of the 
meet from October 29, to Saturday, November 3, 
as our Athletic Council had stipulated. The Fresh- 
men have been turning out in good numbers this 
week, and everything points to a spirited meet. 



130 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



College Botes 

Wakefield, '09, has returned to college. 

Wing, 'io, was at home ill last week. 

Phillips, '09, is teaching school in Topsham. 

Professor Foster conducted chapel exercises last 
Sunday. , 

Kingsley, '07, and Hayes, '08, spent Sunday in 
Augusta. 

Pottle, '09, spent a few days in Portland the first 
of the week. 

Files, '09, recently visited Tufts College and Har- 
vard University. 

David R. Porter, ex-'o6, lectured at Bates Col- 
lege, October 18. 

Emery, '05, has been visiting at the college dur- 
ing the past week. 

W. Drummond was at his home in Portland sev- 
eral days last week. 

Snow, '07, andHupper, '08, visited Hebron Acad- 
emy over Sunday. 

Bird, U. of M., '07, was on the campus visiting 
friends, this week. 

There will be no Sunday evening services at the 
Church on the Hill this winter. 

President Hyde gave adjourns in his Philosophy 
course on Wednesday. 

A New Hampshire Club has been formed, with 
a membership of eight. 

Coach Beane attended the Bates-Colby football 
game at Waterville, Saturday. 

Henry Chapman, '06, captain of last fall's football 
team, was on the campus, Tuesday. 

The Bates College Football Team has been in 
secret practice during the last week. 

Maurice Blair, ex-'09, is in Chicago where he has 
a position with the firm of Swift & Co. 

Pike, '07, leader of the College Glee Clubs, sang 
a solo in chapel, Sunday afternoon. 

Hamburger, '10, entertained his mother at the 
Theta Delta Chi Chapter House over Sunday. 

There is some talk of introducing a system of 
graduate coaching for the track team this spring. 

A span fell out of the bridge across the New 
Meadows just below the Inn, one day last week. 

A mass meeting was held last Monday evening 
for the purpose of selling reserved seats for the 
Bates game. 

A number of college men attended the theatre at 
Lewiston, Wednesday evening and saw Fritzi Scheff 
in "Mile. Modeste." 

Inter-fraternity bowling will soon commence. 
Why not have a small silver trophy for the winner 
of the tournament ? 

Leland Powers is to speak in Lewiston on 
November 5 under the auspices of Bates College, 
his subject being "The Taming of the Shrew." 

Professor Robinson granted adjourns in his 
courses on Monday, as he was away in Alfred, 
engaged in expert work at the session of court. 



A short poem by Cleaves, '05, appears in the Octo- 
ber number of Harper's Magazine. 

Hatch, '07, Greene, '09, and Marsh, '09, were 
among the undergraduates who attended the Colby- 
Bates game at Waterville, Saturday. 

David R. Porter, who has been visiting the col- 
lege a few days the latter part of the week, sailed 
for London from New York, last Tuesday. 

Stacey, .'09, who had been confined to the house 
with blood poisoning for several days, reported for 
football practice the middle of the week. 

The Freshman tryouts for the Freshman-Soph- 
omore Meet were postponed from Saturday to 
Monday on account of the poor condition of the 
track. 

It seems that the matter of Cary's ineligibility to 
play on Colby has been settled, from the fact that 
he was not allowed to take part in last Saturday's 
game at Waterville. 

The Bowdoin Quill for October which should 
have made its appearance on the fifteenth of the 
month, is a little late this month owing to a misun- 
derstanding with the printer. 

Wallace Philoon, '05, was on the campus for a 
short time Monday morning. Philoon was for- 
merly captain and center of the Bowdoin football 
team and is now at West Point. 

The meeting of the Freshman Class, which was 
to have been held Friday afternoon, was postponed 
owing to the absence from town of Draper, the 
temporary president of the class. 

Walter S. Cushing, '05, of the International Bank- 
ing Corporation, made a short visit to the college 
last Saturday. He will shortly .sail for Yokohama, 
where he will represent the company. 

Abbott, '08, has returned to college. Since last 
May he has been in the employ of the Canada 
Northern Railway working with a surveying party 
in the wilderness north of Lake Superior. 

When the football team reached Ithaca last Sat- 
urday morning they were conveyed to the college 
on street car No. 13. The conductor's number was 
23 and he rang 23 fares on the trip to the college. 

The following members of the jury, who, at the 
time of the meeting, had not been chosen, have now 
been elected : From Alpha Delta Phi, Dwight Rob- 
inson; Psi Upsilon, F. J. Redmond. The Class of 
1907 has not as yet elected. 

Two hundred and fifty students from the Uni- 
versity of Maine attended the Holy Cross game in 
Portland last Saturday, their band rendering selec- 
tions at Waterville and Brunswick on the way to 
the game. Where is our band this year? 

Through the kindness of Professor Files a large 
number of the leading German Weeklies and 
Monthies have been obtained, and henceforth will 
be on file in the periodical room at the library. 
These magazines were procured instead of techni- 
cal works, so that students might get some insight 
into German life as it exists at the present time. 
They are intended for all men who are interested 
in this line of work, and especially for the students 
in German 7, and 9. The periodicals are "Das 
Buch fur alle," "Die Gartenlauber," "Reclams Uni- 
versum," "Vom Fels zum Meer," and "Die Woche." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



J3J 



A large number of students attended the Maine- 
Holy Cross game at Portland, Saturday. 

Owing to excessive cutting by the Freshmen the 
faculty have ruled that any Freshman taking more 
than two recitation cuts during the two weeks com- 
mencing Monday, October 22, will be put on pro- 
bation. 

It is stated that Bearce, who was one of the well- 
known athletes at U. of M. during the past four 
years, and who graduated last June, recently lost 
one of his hands in a mill in which he was employed. 

Sawyer and Kingsley, of the Senior Class, left 
Brunswick, Tuesday morning, for Middlebury, Vt., 
where they go as delegates to th National Conven- 
tion of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity, which will be 
held this week with the Middlebury Chapter of 
Middlebury College. 

Notices have been given by the Lewiston, Bath & 
Brunswick Street Railway that special arrange- 
ments have been made with the Empire Theatre in 
Lewiston, whereby reserved seats for all attractions 
at the house this winter can be secured at the 
Brunswick waiting room without additional expense. 

The L. B. and B. Street Railway car No. 73 
jumped the tracks near the Maine Central crossing, 
Thursday noon, and for an hour and a half delayed 
travel on the road and also tied up the freight 
trains on the Maine Central. The accident was 
caused by a brake shoe dropping and falling under 
the wheels. 

During the summer a committee appointed by 
the Athletic Council has prepared a revised edition 
of the amended constitutions of the Athletic Coun- 
cil, and Athletic Association. The new pamphlet 
will be similar to the old one, but contains in addi- 
tion, a summary of the Faculty Regulations, con- 
cerning eligibility to athletic teams. 

It was noticeable to our team at Cornell how the 
graduate coach system is arranged for them. 
There were over twelve graduates, acting as 
coaches, at the time of the Bowdoin game, and 
seven more were expected later. At this place there 
is a coach for every position on the team, a coach 
for left end and a coach for right end, a coach for 
left tackle and one for right. 

Interested by the glaring account in the Boston 
American of last week, a number of fellows took a 
walk up to Shiloh, the colony of Sandford in Dur- 
ham. From outside appearances the conditions at 
the colony were anything but as represented. The 
people seem happy and the children well fed. It is 
an interesting walk up around this place. To con- 
fess the truth, however, the inhabitants are by no 
means so glad to welcome visitors as the visitors 
are to see the place. 

It will be exceedingly interesting to those who 
know anything of the wonderful work of Dr. Gren- 
fal in Labrador, to know that on next Sunday after- 
noon at the five o'clock vesper service, Mr. Albert 
Gould, a Bowdoin student, will tell of his experience 
with Dr. Grenfal in Labrador during a summer 
vacation. Several books, concerning the work of 
Dr. Grenfal, may be found in the Lewiston Public 
Library and it may be of interest to some to read 
these before hearing Mr. Gould. — Lewiston Journal. 



It is stated that one of Bowdoin's best known 
track athletes had a rather unique experience a 
short time ago. It seems that he was out taking his 
regular afternoon cross-country jaunt and on emerg- 
ing from the woods on the Bath road, came sud- 
denly on the Bath Anvil's coaching party bound for 
the Topsham fair. The party was made up largely 
of ladies and on the appearance of the track man 
they all began to scream, evidently impressed with 
the firm belief that this strangely dressed man was 
none other than a wild man. The horses also 
became frightened and started to run away. The 
cross-country runner withdrew with as much speed 
as possible, but so far as known the coaching party 
have not yet learned who the "wild man" was. 



THE FACULTY 

President William DeWitt Hyde preached at 
Wellesley College, Sunday, October 21. 

Professor W. A. Houghton attended the Maine 
Teachers' Association in Lewiston, Friday. 

President William DeWitt Hyde attended the 
meeting of the Exeter Trustees, last Saturday. 

Dr. F. N. Whittier will speak at Lewiston City 
Hall, this evening, on "The Athletic Situation." 

President Hyde will attend the conference of 
New England Colleges, at New Haven, October 
29-30. 

President Hyde attended the committee meeting 
on "Relations of Carnegie Foundations" in Port- 
land last Wednesday. 

Professor Kenneth C. M. Sills will speak before 
the Department of Classics at Maine Teachers' 
Association, Lewiston, this evening. 

Professor W. T. Foster will speak before the 
Maine Teachers' Association, in Lewiston, Friday, 
on "Moral Education in the Lower Schools." 

Professor Allen Johnson, as a delegate from 
Bowdoin, will attend the Conference of New Eng- 
land Colleges, at New Haven, Conn., October 29-30. 

President Hyde will deliver an address before the 
"Reading Club" of Holyoke College, Saturday, 
October 27, and will preach at Mount Holyoke Col- 
lege, Sunday, October 28. 

President William DeWitt Hyde will speak before 
the general session of Maine Teachers' Association 
at Lewiston, this afternoon, on "The Communica- 
tions of Character." This evening Professor W. 
T. Foster will speak at Lewiston City Hall, on 
"Simplified Spelling from the Philological Stand- 
point." 

CROSS COUNTRY RUNNING 

The date for the run has been postponed from 
November 10 to November 17. Captain Shorey 
starts from the Gymnasium every afternoon at 
three o'clock, and everybody who is out training 
should go out with his squad instead of starting off 
alone from his fraternity as is being done now. 
Shorey does not lead the squad at a pace that the 
other fellows cannot easily keep up, and takes them 
over courses that are well adapted to running. 



132 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26TH. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 3.30-530 p.m. Track work on 
Whittier Field. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

5.00 p.m. Aroostook Club leaves for fipst meet- 
ing at the Inn. 

7.00 p.m. Mass Meeting in Memorial Hall. 

President Hyde, Professor Foster, Professor 
Sills, Professor A. Johnson, and Dr. Whittier speak 
at Maine Teachers' Association meeting in Lew- 
iston. 

"Black Dike Band" at Columbia Theatre, Bath. 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27TH. 

10-12.30 a.m. Track work on Whittier Field. 

2.30 p.m. Bates game on Whittier Field. Admis- 
sion, 50 cents ; grandstand, 25 cents. 

U. of M. plays Tufts. 

Colby plays Exeter. 

George Ade's "Just Out of College" at Empire 
Theatre. 

"The Mayor of Laughland," Columbia Theatre, 
Bath. 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2STH. * 

4.00 p.m. Quartet sings at chapel. 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29TH. 

10-12.30 a.m. Track work on Whittier Field. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

Fenberg Stock Company for a week at Empire 
Theatre. 

6.45 p.m. Mandolin Club practice begins in 
Memorial Hall. 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30TH. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 3.30-5.30 p.m. Track work on 
Whittier Field. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

7.00 p.m. Cercle Francais holds first meeting at 
5 South Maine Hall. 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3IST. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 3.30-5.30 p.m. Track work on 
Whittier Field. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1ST. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 3.30-5.30 p.m. Track work on 
Whittier Field. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

7.00 p.m. Christian Association Meeting. 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2D. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 3.30-5.30 p.m. Track work on 
Whittier Field. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 



3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

6.05 p.m. Deutscher Verein leaves for first meet- 
ing at the Inn. 

"The Lion and the Mouse," at Columbia Theatre, 
Bath. 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3D. 

2.00 p.m. Bates 1910-Bowdoin 1910 Track Meet. 
Tufts-Bowdoin game at Medford, Mass. 
7.00 p.m. Massachusetts Club Meeting. 



ART BUILDING NOTES 

During the summer Professor Henry Johnson 
has compiled and had printed the third edition of 
the catalogue of the Walker Art Collections. It is 
published, as previously, in neat pamphlet form, 
with the addition of Professor Hutchins's photo- 
graph of the Art Building for a frontispiece, and 
is ar credit to the local printer^ who held the con- 
tract for the job. The catalogue is very complete 
and accurate, and may be obtained at the desk at 
the usual price of twenty-five cents. 

Several additions to the collections have been 
made during the summer months, but the working 
library of the Art Building has been very much 
increased this vacation. This library is not included 
in the new catalogue, for it cannot be readily put 
on exhibition. It, however, is a very valuable col- 
lection in itself and is chiefly composed on books 
on Art, lantern slides, and portfolios of valuable 
photographs of various portions of Europe or of 
famous works of Art. 

There is now on exhibition in the Bowdoin Gal- 
lery, an excellent set of photographs loaned by the 
Library Art Club. It includes the photographs of 
seventeen of the world's famous pictures, with text 
relating to each picture. The exhibition will close 
on October 29. 



BOWDOIN FACULTY CLUB 

A new club has been organized in the college dur- 
ing the summer. It is called The Bowdoin Faculty 
Club, and its membership consists of all members 
of the Bowdoin Faculty. Its meetings, however, 
are open to the families of the Faculty, to all per- 
sons in Brunswick who are now, or whose kindred 
have been connected with the college, and to such 
students who were made members of Phi Beta 
Kappa at the end of their Junior year, or who are 
now members of the Ibis. The purpose of the club 
is to afford to an appreciative group of people an 
opportunity to reap the benefits of the investiga- 
tions carried on by the members of the Faculty 
outside of their regular class work. 

The meetings will be held on the first and third 
Monday in every month from October to March, 
in the English and French Departments' Room of 
Hubbard Hall. The general topic chosen for con- 
sideration this winter is "The Great Men, and 
Movements of the Dark Ages." Last Monday 
evening at the first meeting of the club, President 
Hyde read a paper on "Saint Jerome," which was 
listened to attentively by an audience of over fifty 
people. The next paper will be given on November 
5, by Prof. W. B. Mitchell, on "St. Augustine." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



133 



And the following program has been arranged for 
the rest of the year : 

November 19— "Boethins," by Prof. C. T. Burnett. 

December 3 — "Cassiodorus," by Prof. W. A. 
Houghton. 

December 17— "St. Benedict," by Dr. E. R Mason 

January 7 — "St. Gregory," by Prof. 

January 21 — "The Anglo-Saxon 
Prof. G. T. Files. 

February 4 — "Mohammed," by Prof, 
ruff. 

February - i8 — "The Venerable Bede," by Prof 
Chapman. 

March 4 — "European Literature," 476-800," by 
Prof. K. C. M. Sills. 

March 18— "Alcuin," by Prof. W. T. Foster. 



G. T. Little. 
House," by 



E. E. Wood- 



TENNIS CAPTAINCY 

The round-robin to determine the captainshig of 
■ the Bowdoin tennis team has been played off, 
resulting in first honors for Hughes, thus making 
him the captain for the year. The summary: 
Hughes vs. Haines— 7-5, 11-9, 2-6, 8-6. 
Hughes vs. Pike— 6-4, 6-0, 3-6, 6-1. 
Upton vs. Haines— 6-0, 3-6, 6-3, 3-6, 7-5. 
Pike vs. Haines — 6-2, 6-3, 4-6, 2-6, 1-6. 
Hughes vs. Upton — 6-2, 6-8, 6-1, 6-4. 



SOPHOMORE=FRESHMAN MEET 

At the time of going to press the outcome of the 
Sophomore-Freshman Meet was unsettled. With the 
discus and shot put undecided, the upper classmen 
led by a score of 55 to 44. The full result will 
appear next week. 



1In flDemoriam 

The Kappa Chapter of Psi Upsilon mourns the 
loss of Herbert W. Grindal, of the Class of 1880, 
who died at his home in Brooklyn, N. Y., on Feb- 
ruary 5. Mr. Grindal was prominent as a speaker 
and writer during his college course, receiving 
awards at the Junior declamation and for extem- 
poraneous English composition, as well as an 
appointment in the '68 Prize Speaking. After grad- 
uation from the Columbia Law School in 1882, he 
entered upon the practice of law, in which profes- 
sion he established for himself a reputation for 
fidelity and thoroughness. The Chapter mourns 
with the bereaved relatives and friends and extends 
to them its deepest sympathy. 

Francis Robbins Upton, Jr., 
Albert Trowbridge Gould, 
Philip Haywood Brown, 

For the Chapter. 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



See pie Hut a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
1906 man who will be in the market for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill. I can give yon full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United Slates and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

A. S. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPQOOD'S 



UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



The fifty-fourth session of this College of Medicine 
begins December I, 1906, and continues seven months. 

A New Building with 

Large, well equipped Laboratories, 
Commodious Lecture Halls, 
Pleasant Recitation Rooms, 

Every Facility for Instruction. 



NUMEROUS CLINICS 



MODERATE EXPENSE 



For Announcement and further information, address 

H. L. WHITE, A.M., Secretary, 

BURLINGTON, VT. 



PULSIFER'S 
5 AND 10 GERT ST0RE 

Now Open for Business. 
J. W. PULSIFER, - - MAINE STREET, BRUNSWICK 



Mention the Orient when patronizing our Advertisers. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




50 CENTS 

Most Comfortable, Durable, Economical Suspender 

made and the only one with a guarantee that 

means absolute satisfaction or your money back. 

One pair of BULL DOG SUSPENDERS 

will outwear three of the ordinary kind 

Tlicv I'imlnii! more on. I bctn-r nil '. Imve heavily 

silver nickeled, non-nislirifr ini-tnl |.nrts tl.nt do not 
tarnish or soil I he clolhes ; t'mt'li. [ilinlili', unlirciika- 
imported Bull Dog lea r ends, ™-y to button, 



id webs carefully 



i, for SO Cts, 



iccept vo substitute for this W.n.-I, ling of 1 



In 



,1,1, . 



oil i- 



HEWES & POTTER 

Largest Suspender & Belt Makers in the World 
De|,t.j;47, 87 LINCOLN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
Booklet giving valuable information about Correct 
Dress and Suspender Styles FREE ON REQUEST. 



MAGAZINE BARGAINS 



A WHOLESALE CATALOGUE FREE 



Send Us Your List for Quotations 
Our Prices Beat Them All 



INCLUDE IN EVERY ORDER; 

Everybody's ------ 

Ladies' Home Journal - 
Saturday Evening Post - 



Ainslee's 

Outing - - - 
World To=Day - 
Cosmopolitan 
Harper's Bazar, or 
World To=Day - 
World's Work - 
Delineator - 
McClure's 

American Magazine 
Photo Era - 



>i-50 
1.50 
1.50 



$1,801 OUR PRICE 

I-™} $3.50 

$I.OO ) OUR PRICE 

> $1.50 

I.50 ) To one address 

$3.00 ) OUR PRICE 

J:™, $3.00 

$3.00 1 OUR PRICE 
1.50 f $1.65 



COMPENDIUM SUBSCRIPTION AGENCY, 

2SJ6 HOWELL STREET, BATH, N. Y. 



THE MEDICO-CHIRUHGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Hits a carefully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; clinical Conferences; Modified Seminar Methods, ami thoroughly Practical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest anil finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every re»peet, and the new laboratories are specially planned and equipped for individual work by the?sludents. 
The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of'Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 
SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of Medicine. 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By theomission of the take down feature we have 
been able to sreauy reduce the cost of production and at the same time have kept the gun up to the 
famous high 772ar/in standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish are petfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
barrels arc especially bored for smokeless as well as black powder and so chambered that 2% inch or 
r Li j l may i u Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 

reliable and best working gun in existence. We are glad to make it possible for every lover of guns 
and bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so low a price. 
Have your dealer order it for you. 

Send for the fflar&n Catalogue and Experience Book to-Jau. Free for 3 stamps. 
7A&2fflar/ifl firearms £a,42W"illow Street, New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 2, 1906 



VOL. XXXVI 



NO. 14 



J BATES, 6; BOWDOIN, 

Bowdoin lost its first game of the Maine 
College series last Saturday, being defeated 
by Bates by the score of 6 to o. The game 
was one of the most disappointing, from a 
Bowdoin standpoint, of any defeat in a num- 
ber of years. 

The fact that Bowdoin has an abundance 
of material this year, has led the students to 
believe that in the Maine games the team 
would surprise its friends, and that the poor 
showing at Cornell was simply incident to the 
long journey of the men and their consequent 
poor condition. Such did not prove to be the 
case, however, and as a result we were 
defeated by a team that every Bowdoin man 
believes was much weaker, man for man. 

Bates had a very ordinary team, but 'she had 
one all-important thing that Bowdoin did not, 
team-work — and for this quality she deserved 
her victory. Despite this, it was only through 
a fortunate penalty that Bates secured her 
touchdown, and, as subsequent events proved, 
won the game. 

Bowdoin received the kick-off, Schumacher 
sending the ball over the heads of the Bow- 
doin men and back of the goal line, where it 
was captured by Draper and advanced 20 
yards. Bates secured their touchdown in the 
first ten minutes of play. Cobb, the Bates 
quarterback, made a 35-yard run, and Bates 
gained their ten yards in the next three 
downs. Following this came a penalty of 
fifteen yards for offside play, which gave 
Bates the ball on Bowdoin's two-yard line. 
To make this distance and a touchdown in 
three rushes, was a comparatively simple 
matter. Cummings kicked the goal, making 
the final score of 6 to o. 

For the remainder of the half the honors 
were evenly divided, neither side threatening 
their opponents' goal line. The ball was 
kicked back and forth, both teams fumbling 
it more or less, especially the Bowdoin men, 
who seemed to find a wet ball difficult to 
handle. Capt. Schumacher of Bates received 
a bad cut over the eye and through the 
courtesy of Capt. Drummond time was taken 



out for the doctor to bandage the injured 
member. 

The second half opened with no change in 
the line-up of either team, and the Bowdoin 
men went into the game with traditional 
Bowdoin spirit which has won many games 
for the college, but not even this could pre- 
vail in a rain storm, on a wet field with a wet 
ball. Delayed passes were used by both 
teams but with no results. Once Bowdoin 
got away a forward pass that worked, and 
netted a good gain, but as a general thing this 
play was not to be relied upon as a ground 
gainer. End runs were out of the question 
on the muddy field and the entire second half 
was a series of line bucks and kicks. When 
the game was nearly over, W. Drummond 
'replaced Crowley at end and Stacey was put 
in Cummin's place at tackle. 

The line-up and summary: 

Bowdoin. Bates. 

J. B. Drummond, l.e r.e., Cummings 

Commins (Stacey), l.t r.t, Schumacher 

Newman, l.g r.g., Booker 

McDade, c c, Cochran 

Stanley, r.g l.g., Ricker 

Garcelon, r.t l.t., Foster 

Crowley (W. Drummond), r.e I.e., Brown 

Green, q.b q.b., Cobb 

Lee, r.h.b l.h.b., Hull 

Manter, l.h.b r.h.b., Wight 

Draper, f .b f.b., Manning 

Score — Bates, 6; Bowdoin, o. Touchdown — Hull. 
Goal from touchdown — Cummings. Referee — Dr. 
W. O'Sullivan of Lewiston. Umpire — J. P. O'Con- 
nell of Boston. Head lineman — Frank Q. Twitchell, 
Portland. Linemen — Allen of Bates, Kinsman of 
Bowdoin. Timers — George S. McCarty and Henry 
Wing, Lewiston. Time — 30- and 25-minute halves. 



COMMUNICATION 

To the Editor of the Orient: 

It is not soothing to the nerves of the aver- 
age graduate to find the sporting columns of 
the New York papers filled with comment on 
such a grotesque score as "Cornell, 72; Bow- 
doin, o." It reads altogether too much like 
some of "Hurry Up" Yost's scores against 
those fresh-water colleges out in the Middle 

West. 



\ 36 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



It is well enough to play a practice game 
with Harvard with short halves and very early 
in the season, but to take a small college team 
all the way to Ithaca, New York, at a time 
when the season is fairly well advanced and 
the big teams presumably well shaken 
together, is not fair either to the tearh or the 
college. Nothing but bad management could 
have been responsible for the making of that 
date. In travelling it is not distance that 
counts so much as speed, service and connec- 
tions. It would be far easier, so far as wear 
and tear are concerned, to transport the 
Chicago University team to Harvard than 
it was to take Bowdoin to Ithaca. This 
the management ought to have known. It 
should also have stopped to consider that Cor- 
nell would make every effort to roll up a big 
score against a team that had played Harvard 
o to 10. It was not a square deal to the boys 
to put them up against such a proposition. 

Bowdoin is a small college with a big 
name ; but the name won't carry the ball. 
Stick to your class, boys ! And in the name 
of the founder and all that is sacred in the 
history of the institution, don't, don't, play 
any more of those prep, schools unless you 
can beat them. 

George Beinton Chandler, '90. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL OPENS 

The Medical School of Maine opened last 
Monday with a fair attendance and good 
prospects for the coming year. Up to Tues- 
day noon, 23 first year men had registered, 
which is several more than last year, and it is 
known that there are several more yet to reg- 
ister. Of this number eight enter from the 
college, six from the Senior Class and two 
from the lower classes. There are 16 second 
year men back. Following are the names and 
addresses of the students, those entering the 
first year from the college being indicated by 
a star : 

First Year — Elmer Jonathan Brown, Strong; Carl 
Hervey Stevens, Northport; Adam Phillips Leigh- 
ton, Jr., Portland ; Lester Warren Carpenter, North 
Waterboro ; *Charles Francis Thomas. Jr., Caribou ; 
Leo Frederick Hall, Lewiston ; Edwin Lindsay 
Palmer, Portland ; Edward William Bridgham, 
Bridgton ; Ralph Burtis Parker, Winthrop ; Charles 
Francis Traynor, Biddeford ; Percy Hobbs Abbott, 



Waterboro; *James Atwood Crowell Milliken, New 
Bedford, Mass.; *Earle Haggett MacMichael, East 
Boston, Mass. ; *Blinn Whittemore Russell, Farm- 
ington; Ricardo Geronimo Valladares, Santa Clara, 
Cuba ; Ralph Burleigh Sprague, Portland ; Charles 
Fuller Deering, Waldoboro ; Julius Elvin Aram, 
Portland; *Paul Drake Blanchard, Oldtown ; 
*Joseph Blake Drummond, Portland ; *Erastus 
Eugene Holt, Portland ; Frank Mikelsky, Bath ; 
Harry Edward Anderson, South Limington, 
*Charles Harlow Greene, North Bridgton. 

Second Year — George Parcher, A.B., Ellsworth ; 
Francis Howe. Webster, B.S., Orland ; Henry Whit- 
ing Ball, Mt. Desert Ferry; George Ivery Higgins, 
Clinton ; Otis Franklin Simonds, Portland ; Elmer 
Morse Cleaves, Bar Harbor; Walter Irving Mer- 
rill, Portland ; Charles Moore Wilson, Waterford ; 
John Luke Murphy, Bartlett, N. H.; Willard H. 
Bunker, Red Beach ; Ernest Davis Humphreys, 
Henderson; James Francis Cox, Houlton ; Herbert 
Ellery Thompson, South Portland ; William Joseph 
Fahey, Lewiston ; Sidney Eugene Pendexter, Port- 
land ; Charles Leverett Curtis, Middleton, Mass. 



SATURDAY CLUB LECTURE 

The subject of the opening lecture of the 
Saturday Club, to be given in Memorial Hall 
at 8 o'clock Monday evening, November 5, 
by Mr. Charles Zeublin, Professor of Sociol- 
ogy in the University of Chicago, is "Demo- 
cratic Culture." Professor Zeublin is the 
author of "American Municipal Progress," 
and "A Decade of Civil Development," and 
has come east to deliver courses of lectures 
before "The National Arts Club" of New 
York, "The Twentieth Century Club" of Bos- 
ton, and "The Civic Club" of Portland. He 
is one of the most effective speakers on the 
present lecture platform, and it is a piece of 
good fortune for Bowdoin students, that the 
college, in co-operation with The Saturday 
Club, has secured a lecture from him in 
Memorial Hall. 



FIRST GLEE CLUB REHEARSAL 

The first rehearsal of the Glee Club was 
held in the Y. M. C. A. Rooms, last Monday 
night, and the prospects appear exceedingly 
good. Aside from the fact that there is an 
unusually large amount of vocal talent in the 
entering class, most of the older members are 
still in college. There were about sixteen 
from the entering class present. The leader 
earnestly requests all the new men possessing 
any vocal ability, as well as all the old men, to 
come out. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



137 



TOMORROW'S MEET 

The first track meet between Bowdoin and 
Bates Freshmen will be held on the Whittier 
Field to-morrow afternoon. Both teams have 
been busy during the past weeks and it is 
expected that there will be exciting contests 
in some of the events. 

It is understood that the Bates squad has 
been larger than that at Bowdoin, and it is 
asserted that there is some promising material 
in their squad. Bowdoin Freshmen will also 
be handicapped by some of the weight men 
on the football team. Following are the Bow- 
doin entries for the various events : 

ioo- and 220- Yard Dashes — Ballard, Hawes, 
Deming, Matthews, Russell, Davie. 

440-Yard Dash — Powers, Davie, Morss, Hanson, 
Weeks, Smith. 

Half-Mile Run— Colbath, Kimball, Slocum, 
Weeks, Farrar, Hanson. 

Mile Run — Colbath, Kimball, Slocum, Farrar, 
Robinson, Hanson. 

Low and High Hurdles — Deming, Edwards, 
Warren, Morss. 

High Jump — Deming, Morss, Edwards, War- 
ren. 

Pole Vault — Deming, Otis, Warren, Hawes. 

Broad Jump — Ballard, Matthews, Crosby, Edwards, 
Hawes, Ludwig. 

Hammer — Warren, Oosby, Ashworth, Draper, 
Newman, Tefft. 

Shot and Discus — Warren, Crosby, Ashworth, 
Draper, Newman, Nulty. 



SOPHOMORE-FRESHMEN MEET 

The final events of the Sophomore-Fresh- 
men track meet resulted in a victory for the 
Sophomores by the score of 60 to 56. At the 
close of Wednesday's events the upperclass- 
men were in the lead by 11 points, but in 
Thursday's contests the Freshmen reduced 
the lead to four points, but not enough to 
win the meet. 

The summary: 

880- Yard Run — Won by Colbath, 'io ; Brewster, 
'09, second; Weeks, '10, third. Time — 2 minutes, 
20 seconds. 

High Hurdles (60 yards) — Won by Crowley, '09; 
Edwards, '10, second; Deming, '10, third. Time — 
11 seconds. 

100- Yard Dash — First heat won by Ballard, '10; 
Lowell, '09, second. Time — 11 seconds. Second 
heat won by Atwood, '09; Deming, '10, second. 
Time — 11 1.5 seconds. Final heat won by Atwood, 
'09; Ballard, '10, second; Lowell, '09, third. Time — 
11 seconds. 



440- Yard Dash — Won by Johnson, '09; Morse, 
'10, second ; Davie, '10, third. Time — 56 3-5 sec- 
onds. 

Low Hurdles (no yards) — Won by Edwards, 
'io; Crowley, '09, second; Burton, '09, third. Time 
— IS seconds. 

220- Yard Dash — Won by Atwood, '09; Ballard, 
'10, second; Matthews, '10, third. Time — 25 sec- 
onds. 

Mile Run — Won by Colbath, '10; Brewster, '09, 
second; Kimball, '10, third. Time — 5 minutes. 

High Jump — Won by Atwood, '09 ; Crowley, '09, 
and Deming, '10, tied for second. Height — 5 feet. 

Throwing the Hammer — Won by Warren, '10; 
Morrill, '09, second; Jackson, '09, third. Distance — 
128 feet, 6 inches. 

Pole Vault — Won by Deming, '10 ; Burton, '09, 
second ; Lowell, '09, third. Height — 8 feet 6 inches. 

Running Broad Jump — Won by Atwood, '09; 
Lowell, '09, second ; Burton, '09, third. Distance — 
19 feet. 

Shot Put — Won by Newman, '10; Ashworth, '10, 
second; Crosby, '10, third. Distance — 31 feet, 11 
inches. «. 

Throwing the Discus — Won by Jackson, '09 ; 
Crosby, '10, second; Burton, '09, third. Distance — 
77 feet 10 inches. 

The officials of the meet were as follows : Wil- 
liam T. Rowe, '04, referee; Philip R. Shorey, '07, 
judge of track events ; Aubrey J. Voorhees, '07, 
judge of field events; C. F. Doherty, '07, starter; 
Richard A. Lee, '08, clerk of course; Samuel B. 
Furbish and Dwight S. Robinson, '07, timers ; 
Thomas R. Winchell, '07, and Leon D. Mincher, '07, 
measurers. Sturgis E. Leavitt, '08, scorer. 



PROF. ROBINSON TO 00 TO MEXICO 

On the twentieth of next month Prof. F. C. 
Robinson will leave for the City of Mexico, 
as the representative of the Maine State 
Board of Health at annual meeting of the 
American Public Health Association. Prof. 
Robinson is the president of this association, 
which embraces the national and state health 
workers of the Dominion of Canada, the 
United States, Cuba and Mexico. This Asso- 
ciation has been foremost in the field of pub- 
lic hygiene and health work in America and 
the meetings, which will last over a week, will 
be attended by more- than five hundred dele- 
gates from all North America. A number of 
foreign representatives will also be present. 
The presidency of an association of this 
widely-recognized scope is a most distin- 
guished position and a credit to the State of 
Maine and Bowdoin College. It is undoubt- 
edly the most eminent honor attained by any 
member of the Bowdoin faculty in recent 
years. Prof. Robinson expects to be away 
about six weeks and will be accompanied on 
the trip by Mrs. Robinson. 



J3S 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Published 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 

H. E. MITCHELL, 1907 R. H. HUPPER, igo8 

W. S. LINNELL, lgo7 R. A. LEE, 1908 

A. L. ROBINSON, 1908 H. H. BURTON, lg09 

J. S. STAHL, 1909 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 
N. S. WESTON, 1908 



Business Manager 
Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 



Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 



Entered at Post-Oftice at Brunswick a.' 


iSi 


;cond-Class 


Ms 


lil Matter 






Lewiston Journal '. 


Press 








Vol. 


XXXVI. 


NCVEMBER 


2, 


1906 




No. 


14 



Concerning the 
Orient 



It should be stated for the 
benefit of the students 
that the Orient arrives 
in Brunswick, Friday afternoons, and that 
they may be secured at the post office 
as soon as the express team goes to the post 
office after the arrival of the 1.20 train from 
Lewiston. It is stated that they are not 
always received until Saturday, but if called 
for at the office Friday afternoon, can be 
received at that time, except in cases where 
unforeseen delays occur. 



Monday Evening's 
Lecture 



Bowdoin students will 
have an opportunity Mon- 
day evening of hearing Mr. 
Charles Zeublin of the University of Chicago. 
Professor Zueblin is considered one of the 
most interesting speakers in the West and 
Bowdoin students are very fortunate in hav- 



ing this opportunity. The lecture is given 
under the auspices of the Saturday Club in 
co-operation with the faculty, and it is hoped 
that there will be a large attendance of stu- 
dents. The lecture will be at 8 o'clock in 
Memorial Hall. 



,, .. , „ . , The Medical School of 

Medical School M • ., • , 

ft Maine opens this week 

P with a good-sized attend- 

ance. There are but three changes on the 
faculty this fall and everything looks bright 
for a prosperous year. The Orient extends 
a hearty welcome to the new men and assures 
them a warm welcome from the men in the 
academic department. 



To-morrow for the first 
Tomorrow's Meet time Bowdoin and Bates 

Freshmen will meet in a 
dual meet. Though the event can scarcely 
arouse the interest that attaches to the regu- 
lar intercollegiate contests, it nevertheless 
will attract considerable attention from its 
novelty if nothing more. It surely gives an 
impetus to fall track training in both institu- 
tions, and as such should be beneficial in more 
ways than one. There is some feeling that 
there is too much athletics in our colleges 
these days, but so long as athletics stand for 
the development of bodily strength and good 
health, they will continue to remain popular, 
and a Freshman track meet with Bates, it is 
safe to say, is in no danger of doing any 
harm to either place. 



THE ANNUAL SHOW 

It has become an established custom now 
for the Baseball Association to put on an 
annual show, and arrangements are already 
underway towards the production for 1907. 
As soon as the football activities are past, 
active work on rehearsals will begin. It is 
probable that the show this year will be some- 
thing of a vaudeville idea. There will be 
numerous chorus effects and musical numbers. 
The Association asks for the help of all the 
students in ideas, suggestions and services. 
Particularly do we want some bright hits and 
acts. All advice and help will be greatly 
appreciated. It is planned to stage the show 
in the Town Hall about January 23, and to 
play at least once out of town. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



139 



Colleoe Botes 



Sargent, '07, has returned to college. 

F. P. Wight was in Rockland over Sunday. 

The college catalogue will be issued shortly. 

Snow, '07, preached at Richmond last Sunday. 

Lombard, '09, is in business at Seattle, Wash. 

Milliken, ex-'og, has entered the Medical School. 

Grace, '10, was at his home in Saco over Sunday. 

"Doc" Sawyer, '05, visited the college over Sun- 
day. 

The first report in French III. was due last 
Monday. 

Stanwood, '08, has been out of college for the 
past week. 

R. W. Messer, '09, was in Augusta several days 
this week. 

Professor Roberts of Colby College was on the 
campus, Saturday. 

Kendrie, '10, played a violin solo at the Church 
on the Hill Sunday. 

Files, '08, is at home in Cornish, because of the 
illness of his parents. 

Hymn No. 23 was selected last Saturday morning 
for the chapel exercises. 

The Hebron Club held its first meeting of the 
year, Wednesday evening. 

Kinsman, '04, former halfback on the 'varsity, was 
back to the Bates game, Saturday. 

E. R. Hunnewell, Hebron, '06, was at the Delta 
Kappa Epsilon house over Sunday. 

Charles Greene has returned to college and will 
enter the Medical School, this fall. 

The annual raking and burning of the leaves on 
the campus is going on at present. 

Powers '09, and Walker, '10, were in Skow- 
hegan over Sunday, visiting relatives. 

E. H. MacMichael has returned to college and 
will enter the Medical School this fall. 

Ralph B. Parker, formerly of Brown University, 
has entered the Medical School this fall. 

Cunningham, '06, was at the college over Sunday. 
He will later return to the Medical School. 

"Jim" Cox, '04, has returned to Medical School, 
and will again take up his course of study. 

Thomas, '07, has returned to college. He will 
take his Senior work in the Medical School. 

J. J. Keough, Coburn Swan and W. C. Caldwell 
of Hebron, spent Sunday with friends in college. 

Atwood, '09, Scates, '09, Sturtevant, '09, and 
Wentworth, '09, went to Dixfield last Thursday. 

G. K. Heath, '09, has been absent from college 
during the last week on account of severe sickness. 

President Hyde has granted adjourns in Philos- 
ophy III. till next Wednesday, but the regular 
exam, was given by Dr. Burnett, to-day. 

Harley Rawson, second base of the Portland base- 
ball team last summer, was the guest of Sparks, '09, 
at the Delta Kappa Epsilon House, Saturday. 



Harry Atwood, '09, was in Auburn over Sunday. 

The iron-work around the Library has been 
cleaned of rust and given a new coat of paint for 
the winter. 

The scene of last Monday's wreck was a center 
of attraction for many of the students during the 
day, Monday. 

Grover Brown, University of Maine, 1910, was 
the guest of Guy W. Farrar, Bowdoin, '10, at the 
college last week. 

Gould, '08, will speak in the Church on the Hill 
next Sunday morning, on "My Summer in Labrador 
with Dr. Grenfell." 

Carl Bryant, Colby, '05, will enter the Medical 
School this fall. Bryant is a member of the Delta 
Upsilon fraternity. 

Tucker, '05, and Foster, '05, were in town over 
Sunday, on their way to begin work in the Med- 
ical School at Portland. 

Professor Woodruff granted adjourns in Greek 
I last Friday, as he had to attend the Teachers' 
Convention in Lewiston. 

Kendrie, '10, has been engaged as violinist in the 
Congregational Church, during the absence of its 
regular 'cellist, Miss Sue Winchell. 

During the absence of Professor Allen Johnson 
last Friday, A. J. Voorhees, assistant in History, 
conducted the "quiz" in History III. 

J. A. Bartlett, '06, was a visitor at the college the 
latter part of the week. He has a position as 
teacher of English at Thornton Academy. 

Ralph E. G. Bailey of Skowhegan, who was in 
Bowdoin in the fall of 1905, has accepted a posi- 
tion as principal of the Easton High School. 

An attempted burglary took place at the Inn 
last Sunday night, but the would-be-thief was dis- 
covered by Mr. Cahill and put to flight before he 
had stolen anything. 

Bowdoin men will be pleased to learn that Ralph 
E. Sawyer was chosen Secretary of the National 
Convention of Delta Upsilon at Middlebury, Vt., 
last week. 

Valladaries, Westbrook Seminary, '06, will enter 
the Medical School this fall. Valladaries has for 
several years been running the hurdles for West- 
brook at the Interscholastic Meets. 

Adjourns were granted in Professor Allen John- 
son's courses, Monday, on account of his trip to 
Hartford, where he represented Bowdoin at the 
"Convention of New England Colleges." 

The engagement is announced of James M. 
Chandler, ex-'o8, to Miss Marguerite Russell Robb 
of Fresno, Cal. Mr. Chandler is now in the employ 
of the J. B. Inderrieden Packing Co., of Fresno, 
Cal. 

Stephens, '10, has been making some fine football, 
baseball and track posters for sale among the stu- 
dents. He will be glad to receive orders for more 
and will make fraternity designs in raised work at 
reasonable rates. 

There was a meeting of the Coffee Club, Monday 
evening and the subject for discussion was "Rom- 
ola." Another meeting will be held Monday, 
November 12, and the subjects for discussion will be 
"Hamlet" and "King Lear." 



140 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The national convention of the Delta Kappa Epsi- 
lon Fraternity will be held at Springfield, Mass., the 
15th and 16th of this month. Burton, '07, and 
Hacker, '07, will represent the Bowdoin Chapter. 

The first meeting of the Verein which it was 
planned should be held to-night, has been post- 
poned until next Friday evening, when the club 
hopes to start in its new year with a wide-awake 
and active membership of all its last year s men. 

As the Bates special train came into the Bruns- 
wick station, Saturday afternoon, a brake beam on 
the tender dropped and derailed the tender and first 
truck of the forward car. Fortunately the train 
had almost come to a standstill at the time of the 
accident. 

Bernie McGraw spent Sunday at the Alpha Delta 
Phi House. McGraw is coaching the Hebron Acad- 
emy football team and it is understood that he will 
remain at Hebron throughout the year, to act in the 
capacity of gymnasium instructor, basketball, and 
baseball coach. 

The New Hampshire boys in college met at 29 
South Maine Hall, last week, and formed a New 
Hampshire Club. The purpose of the club is to 
arouse interest in Bowdoin among New Hampshire 
men, and it has now a membership of seven. 
Officers were chosen as follows : President, Harold 
M. Smith, '09; Vice-President, P. H. Timberiake, 
'08; Secretary and Treasurer, Matthews, '10. 

The Bowdoin Band is again on its feet. The 
reason that it was not there earlier, is that there is 
no one in college who has had sufficient experience 
to lead it, and that no manager has been elected to 
secure a leader from out of town. The Christian 
Association, however, last week appointed a com- 
mittee to organize a band. The results are, that 
Mr. Brawn, the competent leader of the Bath 
Band, has been engaged to lead our organization, 
at least until some student shall come forward who 
can fill the position, and that some fifteen men have 
offered themselves as candidates for the band. Nat- 
urally the hiring of a leader will make extra 
expenses, but the college should be only too glad 
to support the organization. 



THE FACULTY 

President Hyde will not return to Brunswick 
until next Tuesday night. 

Professor Moody gave a stereopticon lecture 
before the First Parish Men's Club last Monday 
evening on the subject, "Some Scenes from 
English Country Life." 

Professor Allen Johnson, who has been in 
attendance on the Conference of New England Col- 
leges at New Haven, Conn., did not return to 
Brunswick, Tuesday, as was expected, being called 
to Lynn, Mass., by the critical illness of his mother. 



AROOSTOOK CLUB OFFICERS 

At the meeting of the Aroostook Club held last 
Friday evening at New Meadows Inn, Gannett, '07, 
was elected President; Weiler, '08, Vice-President; 
and Putnam, '08, Foss, '08, Powers, '08, Executive 
Committee. The club has four new members this 
year and is in a prosperous condition. 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2D. 

10-12.30 a.m. and 3.30-5.30 p.m. Track work on 
Whittier Field. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

4.35 p.m. Bowdoin team leaves for Tufts. Round 
trip, $5.00. 

"The Lion and the Mouse" at Columbia Theatre, 
Bath. 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3D. 

2.00 p.m. Bates, 1910-Bowdoin, 1910, Track 
Meet. 

Tufts-Bowdoin game at Medford, Mass. 

U. of M. plays Colby at Waterville. 

Bates plays N. H. College at Lewiston. 

7.00 p.m. Massachusetts Club meets at Theta 
Delta Chi House. 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4TH. 

10.30 a.m. Gould, '08, speaks on Labrador at the 
College Church. 
4.00 p.m. Mr. Jump conducts Sunday Chapel. 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5TH. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

Prof. Mitchell addresses second meeting of 
Faculty Club. 

8.00 p.m. Prof. Zeublin lectures at Memorial 
Hall, under the auspices of the Brunswick Saturday 
Club. All students invited. 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER. 6TH. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 
. First Sophomore themes due. 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7TH. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8TH. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

7.00 p.m. Christian Association Meeting. 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9TH. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

6.05 p.m. Deutscher Verein leaves for first meet- 
ing at the Inn. 

7.00 p.m. Mass-Meeting in Memorial Hall for 
Colby game. 



CERCLE FRANCAIS 

Tlie Cercle Francais held its first meeting on 
Tuesday night for the purpose of organizing and 
electing officers. N. W. Cox, '08, was elected 
President, M. P. Cushing, '09, was elected Sec- 
retary, and J. J. Stahl, '09, was elected Treasurer. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



141 



The following men are charter members : Chad- 
bourne, '07, Parker, '08, Bridgham, '08, Huse, '08, 
Cox, '08, Brown, '09, Cushing, '09, Scammon, '09, 
Rich, '09, Hinckley, '09, Stahl, '09, J. E. Crowley, 
'09, W. J. Crowley, '09, Files, '09, Tefft, '09, Hurley, 
'09, and Hale, '10. 

Some of the probable speakers during the year 
are Brune, Baulig, Teurneur, and Allard. Profes- 
sor Henri Micoleau of the Portland School of 
Languages, will also come here twice a month and 
address the members of the Cercle. Next year, if 
this year is prosperous, such men as Professor F. 
C. DeSumichrast and others, will be invited to 
speak. The next meeting of the Cercle Francais 
will be held on next Tuesday night at the Delta 
Kappa Epsilon House and it is hoped that all the 
students interested in French will attend and 
signify their intention of joining. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The Association held its second meeting of the 
year on October 26. The meeting was well 
attended, the hall being crowded and the attendance 
numbering about eighty, All listened attentively to 
Dr. Lincoln, '91, who gave a brief talk on his expe- 
riences in China, and the work of the St. John's 
College, in which he is a surgeon, at Shanghai. He 
also briefly mentioned the characteristics of the 
Chinese, first among them he placed an absorbing 
love for money, which often reached such a pass 
that individuals hired themselves out to serve a 
death penalty in place of the culprit, who in his turn 
is pledged to pay a certain sum of money to the 
family of his dead substitute ; another characteristic 
that Dr. Lincoln mentioned was the Chinaman's 
great ability to tell a lie, and also to keep his 
promise when once it is given. The third meeting 
was held last night and a large number of students 
listened to Lester Adams, '07, tell of Dr. Grenfell's • 
work as a missionary. 



HARE AND HOUNDS 



There is some talk among the members of the 
cross-country squad of having a series of Hare and 
Hounds runs. In order to do this with success it is 
necessary that more men come out and train. Hare 
and Hounds is not a hard strain; it is simply a 
legitimate form of exercise such as any man can 
indulge in without bad effects. The English schools 
make it a point to have at least • one * Hare and 
Hounds run a week and the English are the 
strongest distance runners in the world. At many 
of the colleges here in America there are Hare 
and Hounds Clubs. Notice of the first run will be 
posted on the bulletin board. 



ART BUILDING NOTES 

There is on exhibition at the Art Building for the 
next two weeks one of the library art collections of 
photographs representing scenes in Scotland from 
Edinburgh to the Field of Flodden. The exhibit 
will remain at Bowdoin until November 19, and is 
one which every man who is at all interested in 
Scotland or in Walter Scott should see, as it pic- 
tures many of the scenes described in his novels. 



TOMORROW'S GAME 

Bowdoin will meet Tufts to-morrow at Med- 
ford and a warm contest is expected. The Bowdoin 
team has improved considerably during the past few 
days as the result of additional coaches and should 
be able to put up a better game than earlier in the 
season. Tufts, however, is said to have one of the 
strongest teams in years and will, as usual, make 
special effort to defeat Bowdoin. The team left at 
4.35 this afternoon. 



CONNECTICUT CLUB 



The Connecticut Club held its first meeting a 
few days ago ' and elected officers for the coming 
year. Johnson, '09, was chosen president and 
McMillan.; '10, Secretary and Treasurer. The 
membership is not very large at present, but it is 
hoped that there will be an increasing number of 
Connecticut men at Bowdoin in the future. 



CALENDAR FOR 1907 



The annual Bowdoin College Calendar for 1907 
will be issued by William R. Crowley, 1908, and 
Arthur L. Robinson, 1908. The calendar this year 
will be a new departure, containing many more 
pages and filled with numerous cuts and original 
drawings. The cover will be an original design on 
heavy board, and the whole will make a very neat 
and attractive souvenir of the college year. Half- 
tone cuts of all the regular college organizations, 
and many new groups will be added. The calendar 
will be sold at the regular price, one dollar. The 
Orient is glad to notice that arrangements have 
been made for a good publication this year and 
hopes it will have the support of the entire student 
body. 



Hlumni personals 

CLASS OF 1901. 
Royal Henry Bodwell, '01, and Miss Alice 
Hamlen Macomber, both of Augusta, were 
united in marriage on Thursday evening, 
October 4, at the home of the bride's parents, 
Hon. and Mrs. George E. Macomber. The 
servce was performed by the Rev. B. P. Pope, 
pastor of the First Baptist Church. Herbert 
L. Swett of Skowhegan acted as best man. 
The bride was attended by Miss Frances M. 
Nevins of Dayton, Ohio, as maid of honor, 
and Mrs. Guy P. Gannett of Augusta, a sister 
of the bride, was matron of honor. Mr. Bod- 
well is the son of Edward S. Bodwell of 
Brunswick, and during his college course he 
played center on the 'Varsity team, and was 
one of the best men for the position the col' 
lege ever had. He is at present engaged in 
the insurance business in Augusta. 



J42 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



On Wednesday evening, October 3, Donald 
Francis Snow of Bangor, '01, and Miss 
Christine Lenox Pennell, daughter of Sheriff 
and Mrs. William M. Pennell of Brunswick, 
were united in marriage at the home of the 
bride's parents. The ceremony was per- 
formed by President William DeW., Hyde, 
and Rev. Herbert A. Jump, pastor of the 
First Parish Church. The best man was 
Robert M. Pennell, '09. The bride was unat- 
tended. The ceremony was followed by a 
wedding reception, at which about three 
hundred were present. The ushers were 
Prof. Kenneth C. M. Sills, '01, of Brunswick, 
Herbert L. Swett, '01, of Skowhegan, Royal 
H. Bodwell, '01, of Augusta, and Haraden 
S. Pearl of Bangor. Mr. and Mrs. Snow 
will make their home in Bangor, where he 
is engaged in the practice of law. 

CLASS OF 1904. 
Harry E. Bryant of Saco, has just been 
elected principal of the Uxlbridge, Mass., 
High School. He graduated from Bowdoin 
in 1894 and was for several years principal of 
the High School at Eastport. 

CLASS OF 1906. 
The marriage of Harvey P. Winslow of 
Portland, to Miss Ella Farmer of Boothbay 
Harbor, will take place at his home in Port- 
land on November 7. Mr. Winslow has a 
position in the auditing department of the 
Maine Central Railroad. 

CLASS OF 1894. 
"Few who were at Bowdoin in the early 
'90's will ever forget 'Francie' Frost," writes 
a correspondent of the Orient. "Few there 
probably are who are aware how Frost has 
climbed the ladder of journalism until he has 
become the Paris correspondent of the New 
York Herald. He began his newspaper 
career in Lawrence, Mass., going from there 
to the Boston Advertiser. One day a tele- 
graphic dispatch stated that the admiral in 
charge of the Charlestown navy yard had 
been selected to sit on the Schley court mar- 
tial. Frost had met the admiral many times 
in his round of duty, and knew precisely how 
he felt regarding Schley. Consequently he 
wrote a long article stating that the admiral's 
feelings towards Schley were hostile, as a 
result of which he was called to Washington 
to give testimony that resulted in the admiral's 



exclusion from the Schley court. Admiral 
Schley was duly grateful, promised Frost any 
favor he might ask, and on Frost's request 
used his influence in securing the young 
writer a footing in New York journalism. 
Frost 'made good' immediately. Among his 
articles which gave him a reputation along 
Newspaper Row was a series of burlesque 
interviews with Former Chief of Police 
Devery, written in an inimitable style. James 
Gordon Bennett gave Frost an important 
desk on the evening edition of the Herald, 
the Telegram, and finally called him across 
the water to the more responsible post of 
foreign correspondent. When Frost hasn't 
any serious work on hand he deluges his old 
friend, 'Russ' Hathaway of the Associated 
Press, with souvenir postals." 



©bituar\> 



HON. J. H. QOODENOW, '52 

Hon. John H. Goodenow, '52, died at 
Atlantic City on July 29, and his death is a 
very considerable loss to Bcwdoin's alumni. 
On graduating from college in 1852 he imme- 
diately took up the study of law, in 1855 was 
admitted to the bar, and began to practice in 
his native town of Alfred, Maine. In 1859 
he was a member of the State Legislature, 
and in 186 1-2 was a member of the State 
Senate, being president of that body during 
both years. In 1864, President Lincoln 
appointed him consul-general to Constantino- 
ple, and in 1873 he became secretary of the 
legation in Turkey. He held this position 
till 1875, during which time he was three 
times charge d' affaires, and acted as an 
umpire between England and Egypt in a 
large money controversy. In 1876 he 
returned to the United States, practiced law 
in Saco, Me., until 1885, since when he has 
resided in New York. He has always been 
a loyal alumnus, and for about 25 years has 
been an Overseer of the college. 

DR. A. B. DEARBORN, '63 

Dr. Alvah B. Dearborn, '63, died at his 
home in Somerville last summer on August 
19. Dr. Dearborn was born in Topsham on 
August 3, 1842, entered Bowdoin at seven- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



143 



teen and graduated in 1863. On leaving col- 
lege he taught for two years in California, 
then returned to Brunswick, entered the 
Medical School and received the degree of 
M.D. with the Class of 1870. He then prac- 
ticed in the New York hospitals, in Salisbury, 
Mass., and later in Newburyport, where he 
remained until 1884, when he moved to Som- 
erville, in which city he practiced until his 
death. In Salisbury he served on the school 
committee for two years, in Newburyport for 
nine years, and again for nine years in Som- 
erville. He also was Somerville's City Physi- 
cian from 1889-97, and 1901-06.' In Somer- 
ville he was very popular, and his loss as a 
citizen as well as a physician was felt by the 
whole city. 

REV. EDWARD HENRY NEWBEGIN, '91 

Rev. Edward Henry Newbegin, rector of 
St. John's Episcopal Church of Bangor, died 
Tuesday, October 14, at the Maine General 
Hospital in Portland after an illness of five 
weeks. He was born at Defiance, Ohio, the 
son of Henry and Ellen Taylor Newbegin. 
He was thirty-eight years of age. He grad- 
uated at Bowdoin College in the Class of 
1891, after which he read law in his father"s 
office and was admitted for practice in the 
Supreme Court of Ohio in 1893 and was for 
a short time engaged in the active practice 
of the law. In October, 1893, he abandoned 
the law and came to the Episcopal Theologi- 
cal School at Cambridge, Mass., where he 
graduated with the degree of D.D. in 1896. 
In the same year Bowdoin College gave him 
the degree of A.M. He preached for three 
years at St. Andrew's Church in Ayer, Mass. 
He was called to Bangor as rector of St. 
John's in the fall of 1899. In September, 
1900, he was married to Elizabeth King, 
daughter of D. Webster King of Boston, his 
wife surviving him with four small children. 

His oldest brother, Parker Cleveland New- 
begin, a graduate of Bowdoin in the same 
class with himself, resides at Houlton, Me., 
and is maintenance engineer of the Bangor & 
Aroostook Railroad. His younger brother, 
Robert, graduated at Bowdoin in 1896 and 
at Boston University Law School in 1898 and 
is now in the practice of the law with his 
father at Defiance and Toledo, Ohio. 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 

See pie ioui a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
1906 man who will be in the market for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
iines of work in the United States and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do alter graduation. 

A. S. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPQOOD'S 

UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



The fifty-fourth session of this College of Medicine 
begins December J, 1906, and continues seven months. 

A New Building with 

Large, well equipped Laboratories, 
Commodious Lecture Halls, 
Pleasant Recitation Rooms, 

Every Facility for Instruction. 



NUMEROUS CLINICS 



MODERATE EXPENSE 



For Announcement and further information, address 

H. L. WHITE, A.M., Secretary, 

BURLINGTON, VT. 



Visit our 

ICE=CREAM 

PARLOR. 




119 Maine Street 
CATERING in all departments a Specialty. 



Mention the Orient when patronizing our Advertisers. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




MAGAZINE BARGAINS 



A WHOLESALE CATALOGUE FREE 



Send Us Your List for Quotations 
Our Prices Beat Them All 



INCLUDE IN EVERY ORDER: 
Everybody's ------ 

Ladies' Home Journal - 

Saturday Evening Post - - - - 



$1.50 
1.50 
1.50 



Ainslee's 

Outing - 

World To=Day - 

Cosmopolitan 

Harper's Bazar, or 

World To=Day - 

World's Work - 

Delineator - 

McClure's 

American Magazine 

Photo Era - 



$1.80 
3-oo 
1.50 

$1.00 ) 

1-50 S 
$3-oo ) 

1. 00 *- 

1.00 
$3-oo 

1.50 



OUR PRICE 

$3.50 

OUR PRICE 
$1.50 

To one address 
OUR PRICE 

i$3.00 

OUR PRICE 

$1.65 



COMPENDIUM SUBSCRIPTION AGENCY, 

2«6 HOWELL STREET, BATH, N. Y. 



THE MEOICO-CHIRURGiCAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Has a carefully graded course oE four sessions of eight montlis each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; clinical Conferences; Modified Seminar Methods and thoroughly Practical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest and finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every respect, and the new laboratories are specially planned and equipped for 'individual work by the?students. 

The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Di'p;ivtment of'Ph;irm;icy. For announcements or further information apply to 
SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of Medicine. 




2^Jnr/in 




REPEATING SHOT GUN 
NEW MODEL N°I7 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By tKe omission of the take down feature we have 
been able to greatly reduce the cost of production and at the same time have kept the gun up to the 
famous high Tfflarff/z standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
barrels are especially bored for smokeless as well as black powder and so chambered that 2H inch or 
shells may be used._ Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 
E gun in existence. We are glad to make it possible for every lover of guns 



eliableand best ^ 

ind bird shooting to get this high gTade repeating shot gun 1 
Have your dealer order it for you. 



) low i 



price. 



Send for the /ZZar&n Catalogue and Experience Book to-day. Free for 3 stamps., 
7A&2ff&ri£Mfl£*&&rjnS £&,42WilIow Street, New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 9, 1906 



NO. 15 



BOWDOIN, S; TUFTS, 12 

In a hard-fought game of football Bowdoin 
was defeated by Tufts at Medford last Satur- 
day by a score of 12 to 5. The Bowdoin 
team outplayed Tufts during the entire game, 
and had it not been for two unfortunate fum- 
bles with Bowdoin making good progress 
toward its opponents' goal, the defeat would 
have been a victory. 

The Bowdoin team played the best game 
of the year, the offense, which up to this time 
has been the weakest part of the team, show- 
ing marked improvement and played with a 
dash which Tufts was seldom able to stop. 

Bowdoin scored first, securing a touchdown 
on straight football, assisted by some penaliz- 
ing of Tufts, the score being 5 to o in favor 
of Bowdoin at the end of the first half. In 
the second half Bowdoin had a chance to 
secure a place kick, but it failed, Bowdoin 
recovering the ball on Tufts' 10-yard line. It 
was at this time that the first fumble came, 
Tufts' quarterback securing the ball and 
going the length of the field for a touchdown ; 
Tufts' second touchdown was secured also by 
a fumble, Sheeny securing the ball and run- 
ning 45 yards. 

Bowdoin won the toss, and kicked off, 
Peterson getting the ball and coming back 20 
yards. Tufts, unable to gain, then punted to 
Bowdoin's 40-yard line. The latter, in turn 
trying the opponents' line unsuccessfully, 
worked a quarterback kick for 30 yards, but 
was penalized 15 yards for holding Hooper 
of the Tufts' team, and then the ball was 
again punted. After working the ball well 
into Tufts' territory and gaining 5 yards by 
a forward pass, Bowdoin lost a placement 
goal, which was blocked by Sullivan's recov- 
ering the ball. Although Greene punted out 
of danger, Bowdoin, aided by fast offense and 
Tufts' offside plays, carried the ball to the 
goal, Draper taking it over for the touch- 
down. When time for the first half was 
called, both sides were in the middle of the 
field. 

The second half opened by Greene's kick- 
ing off to Lee on Bowdoin's 10-yard line ; 



by the latter 's fumble Tufts secured the ball, 
but Bowdoin's line, proving too strong, and 
held for downs. After two attempts to break 
the opponents' line the ball was punted over 
Greene's head to Tufts' 10-yard line. A 20- 
yard gain for Tufts on a quarterback kick, fol- 
lowed. Bowdoin, securing the ball, then 
attempted a placement kick, but failed. By 
a fumble, Greene got the ball and clearing the 
line sprinted 103 yards, — the length of the 
field, for a touchdown; making the score 6 to 
5 in Tufts' favor. 

Tufts now began to play a stronger 
game. Peterson, receiving the kick-off, came 
back 30 yards through the Bowdoin line. 
Greene made 15 yards on a quarterback run, 
but Tufts was penalized for hurdling and 
forced to punt. With a neat forward pass, 
Bowdoin made 20 yards, and was then held 
for downs. Again Tufts tried the line twice, 
netting a total of 12 yards. On a third try 
the delayed pass was worked, on which 
Sheeny scored. Greene kicked the goal and 
the score became 12 to 5. 

Hooper, who received the next kickoff, was 
only prevented a clear run to the line by the 
timely tackle of Captain Drummond. Line 
plays then carried the ball to the 30-yard line, 
but a placement kick by Greene was lost out 
by six inches. When the time was called, 
Bowdoin had kicked the ball over Greene's 
head and was rapidly carrying it forward for 
a touchdown. 

The line-up and summary : 

Bowdoin. Tufts. 

Crowley, r.e I.e., Hubbard 

Garcelon (Stacey), r.t l.t., Sullivan (Marr) 

Stanley, r.g l.g., Marr (Burt) 

McDade (Boynton), c c, Reynolds 

Newman, l.g r.g., Cronin 

Commins, l.t r.t, Chase 

J. Drummond, l.e r.e., Stevens 

Greene (Bass), q.b q.b., Green 

Lee, r.h.b l.h.b., Hooper (Wallace) 

Manter, l.h.b r.h.b., Sheehy 

Draper, f.b f.b., Peterson 

Score — Tufts, 12 ; Bowdoin, 5. Touchdowns— 
Green, Sheehy, Draper. Goals from touchdowns- 
Green 2. Umpire — E. K. Hall, Dartmouth. Ref- 
eree — A. D. Saul. Linesmen — Knowlton and Skol- 
rield. Timer — J. D. Delaney. Time — 25-minute 
halves. 



J 46 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



INTERSCHOLASTIC DEBATING LEAGUE 

Professor W. T. Foster of the department 
of argumentation has completed arrangements 
for an interscholastic debating league among 
Maine preparatory schools. Professor Foster 
has been at work on this plan for some time 
past, and has now completed the prefiminary 
arrangements for a league, in which four 
schools will take part. The schools that have 
accepted the invitation to join the league are 
Edward Little High of Auburn, Lewiston 
High, Gardiner High, and Cony High of 
Augusta. 

The present plan is to hold preliminary 
debates between Lewiston and Auburn at 
Lewiston, and between Augusta and Gardiner 
at Augusta, followed by a final debate between 
the two winners, to be held in Memorial Hall. 
The dates for the several debates have not 
been arranged as yet, although the date of 
the preliminary contest between Auburn and 
Lewiston has been set for January 4. 

One of the features of the league will be 
the assigning of coaches from among the 
prominent debaters in college, the following 
men having been assigned to the several 
schools : Cony High School, F. J. Redman, 
'07; Gardiner High, A. O. Pike, '07; Edward 
Little, R. H. Hupper, '08; Lewiston High, C. 
W. Snow, '07. 

A silver cup will be presented to the school 
winning the series, Professor Foster having 
already secured the trophy. The cup will be 
appropriately lettered and will be an appro- 
priate reward for the winning school. 

Following are the agreements that will 
govern the league : 

I. The name of this organization shall be 
the Bowdoin Debating League. 

II. Each school belonging to this league 
shall hold one debate with another member 
of the league in January, on a day and place 
to be agreed upon by the schools. 

III. The questions for these preliminary 
debates shall be submitted by the school at 
which the debate is held. The other school 
shall have the choice of sides, and announce 
its choice within ten days of the receipt of the 
question. The question must be approved by 
the professor of argumentation at Bowdoin 
college, and announced eight weeks before the 
day of the debate. 

• IV. The winning teams in the preliminary 
debates shall hold a final debate at Bowdoin 
College in April. 



A'. The school submitting the question 
shall submit at the same time a list of twenty 
men proposed as judges. This list shall not 
include the names of any men who are, or 
ever have been, connected with any of the 
schools in the league. From this list, the 
other school shall endeavor as soon as possi- 
ble to secure the services of three men to act 
as judges. 

VI. For the preliminary debates, the 
school at which the debate is held shall pro- 
vide the presiding officer. 

VII. The Bowdoin College Debating 
Council agrees to furnish each school, upon 
request, with a trained and competent coach 
for each debate, without expense to the school. 

VIII. The expenses of the preliminary 
' debates, except the expenses of the coach, 

shall be paid by the schools, each school pay- 
ing one-half the expenses of the debate in 
which it takes part. The expenses of the 
final debate, except the traveling expenses of 
the teams, shall be paid by the Bowdoin Col- 
lege Debating Council. 

IX. Each member of the winning team in 
the final debate shall be awarded a prize cup, 
appropriately engraved ; and the winning 
school shall be awarded a prize cup to hold 
permanently. 

X. Each school shall elect one representa- 
tive, and these men, together with the presi- 
dent of the Debating Council at Bowdoin Col- 
lege as Chairman of the Board, shall be the 
official representatives, of the schools in all 
matters pertaining to the league. 

XI. In case of any disagreement between 
schools, each school shall select one arbiter, 
who, with the Professor of Argumentation at 
Bowdoin College, shall render a final decision 
on the point in dispute. 

XII. The judges for each debate shall be 
instructed as follows : 

Each school selects alternately the questions 
to be debated and sends the formulated ques- 
tion to its opponent, leaving to its opponent 
the choice of sides. The side which either 
school chooses to advocate need not, there- 
fore, represent the prevalent trend of opinion 
in that school, or even the individual opinion 
of the debaters. 

The League is agreed upon the general 
principle that the award should not be made 
on the merits of the question but upon the 
merits of the debate; that is to say, considera- 
tion as to what may seem to a judge the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



147 



intrinsic merit of either side of a question 
should not enter into or determine the award ; 
but the award ought to be made to that school 
team which shows in general greater argu- 
mentative ability and better form as speakers. 

In determining argumentative ability, the 
judges should take into consideration 
thorough knowledge of the question, logical 
sequence, skill in selecting and presenting 
evidence, and power in rebuttal ; and in con- 
sidering the form of the speakers, as distin- 
guished from their arguments, they should 
regard bearing, quality of voice, correct pro- 
nunciation, clear enunciation, and directness, 
variety and emphasis in delivery. 

Matter is to be regarded as more important 
than form. Should one team excel in matter 
and the other to an equal degree in form, the 
award should go to that team which excels 
in matter. 

The League ventures to suggest to the 
judges that after the debate they cast a writ- 
ten ballot, before consultation, in order to 
obtain a working basis whereby a final decis- 
ion may be reached. 



PROFESSOR ZUEBLIN'S LECTURE 

Professor Charles Zueblin, professor of 
Sociology at the University of Chicago, gave 
an interesting lecture in Memorial Hall, Mon- 
day evening, upon "Democratic Culture." 
The lecture was under the auspices of the Sat- 
urday Club in conjuction with the college. 

Professor Zueblin in opening stated that 
culture cannot be measured; it is a habit of 
the mind, and an instinct of purpose. The 
individual who keeps studying and piling up 
facts is an intellectual miser, and is little bet- 
ter off than he who does not study. One 
must be acquainted with art, literature, music, 
religion, and the sciences in order to be truly 
cultured. 

Art and literature were the subjects receiv- 
ing the most attention from Professor Zueblin. 
In referring to the former he stated that art is 
not painting only, but is a knowledge of the 
elements which combine to produce beauty. He 
referred to the men of the Dark Ages, who, 
possessing no book learning, made things of 
much more beauty than the men of to-day, 
who have an intellectual sense of beauty. 

"We do not read literature for facts but 
for characters," said Professor Zueblin in 
speaking of literature. 



He then told how many people base their 
knowledge upon the number of books they 
read instead of upon what they learn from 
them. "Literature," he said, "is quite behind 
the times, while we are keeping up with the 
book publishers." He then spoke of the lit- 
erature of the Hebrews, and Greeks and 
the Romans, and said that it was not neces- 
sary to know these languages in order to be 
cultured, but that one should know Spencer 
and Chaucer, and have a foundation for their 
learning. 

The government of the United States was 
taken up briefly. The ballot of cities like 
Chicago has been so arranged by the politi- 
cians that the most cultured man, as well as 
the most ignorant man, cannot vote intelli- 
gently. The man of culture hides behind his 
books while the politician gets the offices. 

Upon the great questions of the day there 
is little difference in the judgment of the 
ignorant man and the cultured man, as the 
former is uneducated and the latter confines 
his knowledge to his books and not to wljit 
is going on about him. 

In closing Professor Zueblin said that there 
are three things one must be up on in order 
to be cultured. These are Evolution, the 
higher criticism of the Bible, and Socialism. 



'68 SPEAKERS 

At the faculty meeting held on Tuesday 
night, the following men were selected, on 
the basis of rank in themes and elocution dur- 
ing the whole course, to compete for the 
"Class of 1868 Prize," which is awarded 
annually to the author of the best written and 
spoken oration in the Senior Class : Allen, 
Duddy, Haley, Hupper, Snow, and Voorhees. 



THE DELTA UPSILON CONVENTION 

The 72d convention of Delta Upsilon was held 
at Middlebury, Vt., October 24 to 27, with the Mid- 
dlebury Chapter of Middlebury College. Thirty- 
seven colleges were represented by two delegates 
each, besides a large number of alumni, making it 
one of the largest conventions in the history of the 
fraternity. 

The occasion was also the celebration of the 50th 
anniversary of the Middlebury Chapter. Among the 
speakers was Governor Proctor of Vermont, a 
Delta Upsilon of Amherst, '82. The delegates rep- 
resenting the Bowdoin Chapter were Chester S. 
Kingsley, and Ralph E. Sawyer and among the 
alumni present was Charles E. Merritt, Bow- 
doin, '96. 



J 48 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 
h. e. mitchell, 1907 r. h. hupper, 1908 

w. s. linnell, 1907 r. a. lee, 1908 

a. l. robinson, 1908 h. h. burton, 1909 

J. S. STAHL, igog 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 Business Manager 

N. S. WESTON, 1908 Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

*-AII communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 

Entered at Post-Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
Lewiston Journal Press 



Vol. XXXVI. 



NOVEMBER 9, 1906 



No. 15 



The attention of the 
To the Freshmen Freshmen should be called 

to the fact that it is cus- 
tomary for each Freshman Class to choose 
the colors of the class last graduating. Thus 
the colors of the Class of 1910 should be the 
same as that of the Class of 1906, which was 
blue and white. There is, perhaps, no partic- 
ularly strong reason why this should be done, 
other than it is college tradition, and as such, 
there is a sentiment about it which is dear to 
every college man. 



The Orient is pleased to 
Debating League announce the formation of 
an Interscholastic Debat- 
ing League. Such a league is a novelty 
among the interscholastic leagues formed 
under the auspices of colleges, and there is 
every reason to believe that it will prove a 
success. 



In the past, Bowdoin, in common with the 
other colleges, has devoted its attention to the 
formation of various athletic leagues, having 
as their ultimate object the drawing of desir- 
able athletes to the college ; but the formation 
of a league which is based on the intellectual 
side is surely a desirable departure. A col- 
lege stands for intellectual work and the 
brightest men in the preparatory schools must 
surely become interested in the work of a 
debating league ; and to the extent that these 
men become interested in Bowdoin the new 
league will surely do a good work. 

As mentioned elsewhere, the preparatory 
school debaters will be in charge of some of 
the best debaters in college, and this should 
prove of benefit to the coaches themselves, as 
well as show prospective students the splendid 
work that is being done in our debating 
department. 

The plan is a commendable one, and the 
Orient congratulates Professor Foster and 
the colleare on the formation of the league. 



Every Bowdoin gradu- 
Commander Peary ate and undergraduate is 
pleased to learn of the 
safety of Commander Peary of the Class 
of 'yy. Although this dauntless man did 
not quite reach the pole, he earned the 
distinction of getting farther North than ever 
man has been before. This great achievement 
on the part of an alumnus makes every Bow- 
doin man's heart beat a little faster in his 
pride for his college and for brave Com- 
mander Peary. 

The conclusion is drawn from the latest of 
Peary's dispatches that the intrepid explorer 
will try again, as he states that the Roosevelt 
is coming southward for supplies and repairs. 
Before starting in July, 1905, he definitely 
announced that this would be his last dash 
for the pole. This he stated publicly in his 
lecture in Augusta and elsewhere, and the 
same declaration was frequently made in pri- 
vate conversation. If he is to try again it is 
probable that he will regard it as simply a 
second part of this expedition from which he 
is now returning, rather than as a new expe- 
dition. 

Once before in 1901 he held the record of 
farthest north when he reached 84 degrees 
\y minutes. Then a Norwegian, Dr. Nansen, 
and an Italian, Duke D' Abruzzi, in turn 
pushed a little nearer the Pole. Now he has 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



149 



made the record of 87 degrees 6 minutes, or 
about 200 miles from the Pole and 40 miles 
nearer it than ever man went before. The 
world anxiously awaits the full story of this 
expedition which was plainly one of unusual 
experiences and great hardships. If Peary 
returns to continue his fight against the ice 
and cold and loneliness it will hardly be before 
another summer. 



T o-m o r r o w afternoon 

Tomorrow's Game Bowdoin will meet Colby 
in the second game of the 
Maine College series. To attempt to proph- 
esy the outcome of a football game is largely 
guesswork, and to attempt to forecast to-mor- 
row's result would be especially idle. 

It is felt, however, that the Bowdoin team 
should be in as good or better form to-mor- 
row than it has been at any time this season, 
so far as team work is concerned. At no 
time, with the exception of last Saturday, has 
the team been in the form of playing the 
game of which it should be capable. Man 
after man has been out of the game for 
various reasons, and this has resulted in a 
lack of team work, especially in the back 
field. It was this that caused our downfall 
in the Bates game and has been a serious 
handicap in the other games of the year. 

A most serious drawback to the Bowdoin 
team is the debarring of. several first team men 
who will not be allowed to play because of 
warnings sent out under the new rules. A 
regular tackle, a regular guard, a substitute 
center, and a fullback who is depended upon 
to do the punting are losses which can 
scarcely be replaced. Nevertheless, there is a 
somewhat hopeful feeling, and it is possible 
that the team is not so seriously weakened as 
might first appear. At all events, the team 
may be depended on to do its best. 

On the other hand, Colby will doubtless be 
in better form than in her earlier games. She 
has some excellent material in her squad and 
in the judgment of a number of critics, includ- 
ing Referee Halliday, has a team that is the 
equal of the University of Maine. 

Taken altogether, it is safe to predict a 
well-contested game, but farther than this no 
one will be justified in prophesing. 



THE SATURDAY CLUB 

On Thursday evening, November 15, in the Uni- 
tarian Church, Federal Street, Miss Katherine 
Jewell Everts, once a pupil of Leland Powers and 



until recently a teacher in his school, will give "My 
Lady's Ring," a comedy written especially for her 
by Alice Brown, author of "Meadow Grass," "Par- 
adise," "The Court of Love," and various New 
England tales. Miss Everts is especially well 
trained for her work and her skill as well as her 
charm of personality won her warm praise from 
the late Henry Austin Clapp, the Shakespeare critic. 
After her graduation from the University of Min- 
nesota, Miss Everts studied especially for the work 
of literary interpretation and for a year had the 
rare opportunity of studying upon the stage with 
Ada Rehan and Otis Skinner in whose company she 
played the part of leading ingenue. 

In "My Lady's Ring" she assumes seven charac- 
ters. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

On November first, Lester Adams, '07, spoke 
informally before the Christian Association, in 
regard to his experiences last summer in Labrador, 
where he went with Gould, '07, to help Dr. 
Grenfel in his medical missionary work among 
the poor Labrador fishermen. He told of the hard- 
ships the people suffer there, and of the wonderful 
energy of Dr. Grenfel who by his own personality 
maintains the mission, and gives to the whole work 
that enthusiasm that has made it so much of a 
success and practical help to these poor inhabitants 
of Labrador. Dr. Lincoln addressed the Associa- 
tion last night, for the second time this year, and 
took as his subject "The Opportunities in China 
for Young Men, Especially for Young Doctors to 
Do a Good Work in the World." 



OLEE CLUB 

The rehearsals for the Glee Club have been excel- 
lently attended, and the prospects for this year's 
club are better than the- have been for the last four 
years. It is hoped to have the club entirely picked 
by Thanksgiving, and from now until then at least 
two rehearsals will be held every week. The men 
that have come out so far are : First tenors : Ley- 
don, Webber, Crowley, Foss, Shehan, McMillan, 
Kendrie. Second tenors : Shorey, Crowley, Ham, 
Cox, McGlone, Pickard, Davie. First bass : Bass, 
Gregson, Brown, Chapman, Crowell, Crosby, Stev- 
ens, Morss. Second bass : Linnell, Marsh, Draper, 
Stone, Wing. 



BAND 

During this week the college band has become 
organized, and under the efficient leadership of Mr. 
A. W. Brann of Bath, has by several rehearsals, 
become quite proficient. Last Tuesday the men who 
had been picked to play at to-morrow's game were : 
Solo cornets, Cooper, '09, and Giles, '07 ; first cor- 
nets, Bunker, '10; second cornets, Stanley, '09, and 
W. E. Atwood, '10; piccolo, C. M. Robinson, '08; 
clarionet, Kane, '09; first alto, G. H. Morrill, '07; 
second alto, Spurling, '10; third alto, J. E. Crowley, 
'09 ; first trombone, Lawrence, '07 ; second trombone, 
R. W. Smith, '10; baritone, F. L. Smith, '08; bass, 
Newman, '10; cymbals, Sanborn, '08; snare drums, 
Matthews, '10, and Phillips, '09; bass drum, Stet- 
son, '09. 



150 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



College IRotes 



R. W. Smith, '10, was in Augusta over Sunday. 

S. C. W. Simpson, '03, was on the campus last 
Tuesday. 

Cecil Daggett, Colby, '03, was a recent visitor at 
the college. 

Dudley Hovey was at his home in Waldoboro, 
over Sunday. 

The first debate in English VII. takes place 
November 13. 

Miss Harvey's dancing school at Bath will open 
November 19. 

A. L. Hatch, '07, has been at home during the 
past two weeks. 

Professor William Sargent of Hebron, was on 
the campus, Saturday. 

Gardner Cole, '09, was at his home in Raymond 
several days last week. 

Otis, '07, returned to college, Sunday, after an 
absence of several days. 

Philip Sherman of Lynn was the guest of S. P. 
Richards, '10, last week. 

The meeting of the Deutscher Verein has been 
postponed another week. 

Cushing, '09, has been confined to his room for 
several days by severe illness. 

There was a large attendance of Bowdoin Alumni 
at the Tufts game, Saturday. 

Coach Laferriere attended the Colby-Maine game 
at Waterville last Saturday. 

Kendrie, '10, rendered another solo at the Con- 
gregational Church last Sunday. 

There will be an informal dance at the Kappa 
Sigma House to-morrow evening. 

A meeting of the Bugle Board was held at the 
Zeta Psi house, Saturday evening. 

A number of students attended the "Lion and the 
Mouse" at Bath, last Friday night. 

Crosby, '10, has been playing the chapel organ 
during the illness of Cushing, '09. 

P. H. Timberlake, '08, spent a few days at his 
home in Lancaster, N. H., last week. 

Webster, '10, Macomber, '10, Weston, '10, spent 
Sunday at their homes in Augusta. 

Many of the boys attended the Omicron Sigma 
dance at Bath last Wednesday evening. 

C. W. Snow, '07, supplied the pulpit at the Rich- 
mond Congregational Church on Sunday. 

Quite a number of Bowdoin men were at the 
Colby-Maine game at Waterville, Saturday. 

Snow, Hebron, '08, was a guest of his brother, 
C. W. Snow, '07, for a few days this week. 

Several of the students attended the High School 
dance given in Pythian Hall, Friday evening. 

Hacker, '07, and Burton, '07, -attended the Wins- 
low-Farmer wedding at Portland, Wednesday. 

A large number of students attended the Hal- 
lowe'en parties given by some of the townspeople. 



The Klark-Urban ompany played a three nights' 
engagement in the Town Hall the first of the week. 

Coach LaFerriere did not accompany the football 
team to Medford, Coach Beane being in charge of 
the men. 

Cox, Med., and Webber, '07, acted as the officials 
at the Hebron-Kent's Hill game at Kent's Hill, last 
Saturday. 

Burns. Thornton Academy, '08, was a guest of 
Linnell, '07, at the Beta Theta Pi House a few 
days ago. 

Raking the lawns and burning leaves has been 
the order of exercises about the campus during the 
past week. 

Rev. H. A. Jump conducted last Sunday's chapel 
exercises. Pike sang a solo, accompanied by the 
college quartet. 

Otis, '07, attended the initiation and banquet of 
the University of Vermont Chapter of Kappa Sigma 
last week. 

There will be a mass-meeting to-night to arouse 
interest and enthusiasm for the Colby-Bowdoin 
game to-morrow. 

Several students attended the football dance given 
by the Brunswick High School at Pythian Hall, Fri- 
day evening. 

The correct list of addresses of students for 
the new catalogue was secured this week. The cat- 
alogue will soon be issued. 

Several of the students have joined the Young 
People's Bible Study Class, which is being conducted 
each Sunday by Mr. Jump. 

The fifteen Greek letter societies at Dartmouth 
have agreed not to broach the "question of Frater- 
nity to Freshmen until March 26. 

The exhibit in the Art Building representing 
scenes in Scotland from Edinburg to the Field of 
Flodden will remain until November 19. 

Maine had to work hard to beat Colby last Sat- 
urday. To-morrow Bates meets Maine in what will 
be one of the greatest games of the year. 

Gastonguay, who has been out of football 
because of injuries received in the Cornell game, 
reported for practice the first of the week. 

Keith of Boston, will open Music Hall in Lew- 
iston, next Monday evening, offering some of his 
best vaudeville shows as an opening attraction. 

Linnell, '07, represented the Bowdoin Chapter of 
the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity at the initiation of the 
University of Maine Chapter at Orono last week. 

Ellis, 'oS, Gastonguay, '08, Atwood, '10, and Spur- 
ling, '10, were among the Bowdoin men who 
attended the Hebron-Kent's Hill game last Saturday. 

In the Scholarship Awards recently announced 
by the Harvard Medical Faculty, M. Shaughnessey, 
Bowdoin, '03, received the second largest award. 

L. W. Coons began his work on last Sunday, 
November 4, as pastor of the Universalist Church' 
of Brunswick. He will preach there while taking 
his course in Bowdoin. 

A number of the Freshman Class entertained the 
Sophomores in front of the chapel last Thursday 
night. Later their sins were "purified" by a hose 
in front of the Beta Theta Pi House. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



151 



Professor Sills this week took his three divisions 
of first year Latin, to the Art Building, and showed 
them what there was in the building relating to the 
days of the classics. 

Efforts are being made by the Sophomores to have 
a Sophomore dance, but at the time of going to 
press it was understood that the faculty had not 
granted permission for the function. 

A dinner and smoker of the New England Inter- 
collegiate Press Association will be held at the 
American House in Boston on Friday evening, 
November 16. It is not known as yet whether the 
Orient or Quill will be represented. 

During the past few weeks a number of students 
have visited Shiloh on Sunday afternoons. Last 
Sunday five visited this well-known place, and 
looked over the grounds and buildings. Some were 
fortunate enough to be taken through a part of the 
buildings. 

Make-up examinations for Freshmen who have 
entrance conditions will be given between January 
I and January 15. All Freshmen are required to 
give notice to the registrar not later than January 
I as to what examinations they are to take in order 
that the schedule may be made out. 

At the annual meeting of the Parish Men's Club 
of the Congregational Church held last week, the 
following officers were elected : President, Professor 
Franklin C. Robinson ; Vice-President, Professor 
William T. Foster ; Secretary, Professor Charles T. 
Burnett ; Treasurer, Samuel L. Forsaith. 

The "loop" car on the L. B. & B. Street Railway 
made its last trip for the season at 5.45 Wednesday 
afternoon. The reason given for its early discon- 
tinuance is that the road has not got a closed car 
that it can spare for the local line and that the 
weather is now too cold to run an open car. 

Gould, '08, spoke at the First Parish Church, Sun- 
day, on the subject of "With Dr. Grenfel in Lab- 
rador." He spoke of his experiences while work- 
ing with Dr. Grenfel the past summer, upon the 
lives of the fisher people of that country, and of the 
good work which is being done by Dr. Grenfel. 

The Brunswick High School closed its football 
season Friday, by defeating the Yarmouth High 
by a score of 11 to o on Whittier Field. The field 
was in poor condition for football, owing to the 
snow which was upon it. McMillan, '10, acted as 
referee and umpire. The Brunswick High team 
this year has made a better showing than any team 
from that school for several years. 

The Brooklyn Standard-Union, speaking of the 
football game for the championship of Greater 
New York between St. Peter's and the Grand Opera 
team, has the following to say of a former Bow- 
doin player : "Big Jim Finn, the ex-Bowdoin Col- 
lege man, played a great game at full for St. Peter's. 
His great line breaking, together with getting down 
under punts, was a big factor in the result." 

The second meeting of the Massachusetts Club 
was held Saturday evening at the Theta Delta 
Chi House. Professor Foster was the guest 
of the evening and gave a very interesting talk on 
the advantages of the small college over the univer- 
sity. He has made a study of the question for a 
number of years and he illustrated his talk with 



statistics proving that, during the last four years, 
the colleges have made a large gain in numbers, 
while the universities have lost slightly. 



THE FACULTY 

Professor Allen Johnson has again been obliged 
to be absent from college on account of the critical 
illness Of his mother. 

Professor R. J. Ham will talk to the Gentlemen's 
Club next Friday evening, November 9, on "The 
Observations of My Summer in Germany." 

Professor Wm. T. Foster will lecture on "Robert 
Louis Stevenson" at Dixfield, December 13. The 
lecture will be given under the auspices of the Uni- 
versalist Church and the High School of that town. 

President Hyde during his absence from town 
last week, spoke Friday before the Worcester 
County Teachers' Association at Worcester. Sunday 
he preached at Amherst, and on Monday lectured 
at Lowell before the Middlesex Club. 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER OTH. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3.30-4.00 p.m. Practice in Field Events for Track 
Team on Whittier Field. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

3.45 p.m. College meets at Memorial to march 
to grandstand and practice cheering. 

7.00 p.m. Mass-meeting in Memorial Hall for 
Colby game. 

7.30 p.m. Meeting of Hebron Club. 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER IOTH. 

2.00 p.m. Colby game on Whittier Field. Admis- 
sion 50 cents. 

2.30 p.m. Bates plays U. of M. at Lewiston. 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER IITH. 

4.00 p.m. Violin solo by Kendrie, '10, during 
chapel exercises. 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER I2TH. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3.30-4.00 p.m. Practice in Field Events on Whit- 
tier Field. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

7.00 p.m. Meeting of New Hampshire Club, at 
Delta Upsilon House. 

7.00 p.m. Glee Club Rehearsal in Christian Asso- 
ciation Room. 

Keith opens vaudeville shows, Music Hall, Lewis- 
ton. 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER I3TH. 

10.30 A.M. First examination in Economics 7. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3.30-4.00 p.m. Practice in Field Events on Whit- 
tier Field. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 



152 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



4.4S p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

Madame Modjeska at Empire Theatre in Lew- 
iston. 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER I4TH. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3.30-4.00 p.m. Practice in Field Events pn Whit- 
tier Field. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

Professor Little and G. G. Wilder represent Bow- 
doin at meeting of Maine Library Association in 
Waterville. 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER I5TH. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3.30-4.00 p.m. Practice in Field Events on Whit- 
tier Field. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

7.00 p.m. Dr. Lincoln speaks before Christian 
Association. 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER l6TH. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3.30-4.00 p.m. Practice in Field Events on Whit- 
tier Field. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

4.4S P.M. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

6.05 p.m. Deutscher Verein leaves for first meet- 
ing at the Inn. 

7.00 p.m. Mass-meeting in Memorial Hall. 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER I7TH. 

8.03A.M. Football team leaves for Orono. Round 
trip, $2.00. 
2.30 p.m. U. of M. game at Orono. 



HARE AND HOUND RACE 

The first hare and hound race was held Tuesday 
and proved a most exciting race. The hares, A. 
Robinson, '08; Weston, '08; Morrison, '08; and 
Davie, '10, started down the Bath road and after 
following the route for a mile and a half ran 
through the woods to the rifle range and thence to 
a logging road which they followed for about three 
miles. This brought them out at Merrymeeting 
Park. They again cut through the woods and 
came out at the pumping station from which place 
they ran up Jordan Avenue to the Maine Central 
Railroad tracks, where they were caught. The dis- 
tance covered was about nine miles and the run 
lasted about an hour. The hounds were McLaugh- 
lin, '10; Shorey, '07; Kimball, '10; P. Morss, '10; R. 
Morss, '10; Weeks, '10; Johnson, '09; Simmons, '09; 
Chadbourn, '07; Tefft, '09; Powers, ' 09; W. 
Roberts, '07; Brewster, '07; Colbath, '10; and 
Edwards, '10. 



FOOTBALL MEN DEBARRED 

The football squad was considerably weakened 
- the first of the week by the debarring of four of the 
best men because of the new scholarship rule. The 
men affected are Draper, fullback and punter; Gar- 
celon, right tackle ; Stanley, right guard ; and Boyn- 
ton, substitute center. 



JUNIOR ELECTION 

The Junior Class elections were held last Monday 
noon, resulting as follows : 

President — C. E. Files. 

Vice-President — B. N. Gregson. 

Secretary-Treasurer — C. M. Robinson. 

Chaplain — L. W. Coons. 

Orator— A. T. Gould. 

Poet— P. H. Powers. 

Marshal— A. H. Ham. 

Ivy Committee— N. W. Cox, A. H. Huse, M. P. 
Merrill. 

Assembly Committee— G H. Hyde, M. C. Don- 
nell, H. B. T. Chandler, N. C. Weston, J. F. Mor- 
rison. 

Track Captain — G. H. Hyde. 



MAKE=UP FOR INCOMPLETES 

The schedule of examinations for the removal of 
incompletes is as follows : 

November 12, 2.30 p.m. — French 2, Education 1, 
English Literature 2. French 6, Mathematics I 
(Solid Geometry). 

November 13, 2.30 p.m. — Greek 2, Chemistry 2, 
Biology 1. 

November 14, 2.30 p.m. — History 6. 

These examinations will be held in Banister Hall, 
with the exception of Chemistry and Biology, which 
will be held in the respective laboratories. 



MEET POSTPONED 



The Bates-Bowdoin Freshmerf track meet was 
postponed, last Saturday, because of the condition 
of Whittier Field. Owing to the lateness of the 
season it has been decided to give up the meet for 
the year. 



Hlumni personals 

CLASS OF 1870. 
Hon. D. S. Alexander of Buffalo, '70, has 
been renominated for Congress for his sixth 
term. Being a leading member of the import- 
ant Judiciary Committee, he is to encounter, 
like Hon. Charles E. Littlefield, the opposi- 
tion of Mr. Gompers, President of the Fed- 
eration of Labor. 

CLASS OF 1893. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Deane Eaton of 
Waterville announce the marriage of Miss 
Daisy Ina Day and Edward Folsom Merrill 
on Tuesday evening, October 9. Mr. and 
Mrs. Merrill will be at home at Skowhegan 
after Dec. I. Mr. Merrill is well known here 
having graduated from Bowdoin College in 
the Class of 1903. During the last three 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



J53 



years he has been studying at the Harvard 
Law School. 

CLASS OF 1894. 

At a recent meeting of the school commit- 
tee of Uxbridge, Mass., Harry E. Bryant of 
Sacp, principal of the Mansfield High School, 
was elected to succeed H. A. Blake of the 
Uxbridge High School, resigned, who goes 
to Abington to take charge of the High 
School there. Mr. Bryant is a graduate of 
Bowdoin College, 1894, and has taught school 
in several Maine towns before going to Mans- 
field. 

CLASSES 1898-1899. 

A new law firm in Portland is Clarke & 
Gardner with offices in the Union Mutual 
Life Ins. Co. building, 120 Exchange Street. 
The members of the firm are Walter B. 
Clarke, at present a member of Governor 
Cobb's Council and the senator-elect from 
Lincoln County, and Herbert M. Gardner, a 
Patten boy who was principal of the Dexter 
High School for three years before he studied 
law. Both are graduates of Bowdoin, Mr. 
-Clarke in 1899 and Mr. Gardner in 1898. 



President of Belfast Board of Trade, Presi- 
dent of the Waldo County Horse Breeders' 
Association, Trustee of the Maine State Agri- 
cultural Society, and an Overseer of Bowdoin 
College since 1872. 

COL. W. S. POOR, '60 

Col. W. S. Poor, '60, died on June 21, at 
his home in Morristown, N. Y. He was 
born in Andover, Me., in 1836, graduated 
from Bowdoin with the famous Class of 1860, 
and in 1861 enlisted as a private in the Tenth 
New York Volunteers. In November of 
that year he was transferred to the First New 
York Mounted Rifles, and in August, 1862, 
was appointed a captain in that regiment. In 
March, 1864, he was again promoted, this 
time to Lieutenant-Colonel of the Second N. 
C. Volunteers. In August, 1864, he was or- 
dered to Newbern, N. C, and there served 
as Chief Provost Marshal during a yellow 
fever epidemic. In 1867 he went to New 
York, took up the study of law, and in the 
following year was admitted to the bar in 
that city, where he has practiced ever since. 



©bituar\> 



HON. WILLIAM C. MARSHALL, '47 

Hon. William C. Marshall, '47, died at his 
home in Belfast, Maine, on October 29. Mr. 
Marshall was born in Belfast in 1827, came to 
Bowdoin when sixteen, and graduated with 
high honors with his class in 1847, when he 
gave the Latin Salutatory. After his gradu- 
ation he studied law in the offices of Solymon 
Heath and Woodbury Davis, and was later 
admitted to the Waldo County bar. In 185 1 
he moved West, but on the death of his 
brother ten years later, he returned to Bel- 
fast and took up his brother's affairs. Since 
then Mr. Marshall has been Mayor of Bel- 
fast for three terms, Collector of Customs for 
the District of Belfast, Trustee of Belfast 
Library, Director of B. & M. L. Railroad, first 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



See pie Dot a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
1906 man who will be in the market, for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

A. S. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPQOOD'S 

Announcement 

The Popular Monday Evening 1 
Dancing Class and Assemblies 

WILL BE REOPENED AT MUSIC HALL, BATH 
for season of 1906-1907, NOVEMBER 19th. 
Instruction, 7.30 to 9 p.m. 
Assembly, 9 to 11.15 p.m. 
These have always been special assemblies for college 
students. Private instruction by appointment. 

For further particulars, address 

MISS JENNIE HARVEY, 

Telephone 128-13. 691 Washington Street, Batb, Me. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



V 




UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



The fifty-fourth session of this College of Medicine 
begins December J, 1906, and continues seven months. 

A New Building with 

Large, well equipped Laboratories, 
Commodious Lecture Halls, 
Pleasant Recitation Rooms, 

Every Facility for Instruction. 



NUMEROUS CLINICS 



MODERATE EXPENSE 



For Announcement and further information, address 

H. L. WHITE, A.M., Secretary,. 

BURLINGTON, VT. 



THE MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Has a carefully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Clauses; Clinical Conferences; Modified Seminar Methods, and thoroughly I'rartical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest and finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every respect, and the new laboratories are specially planned and equipped for individual work by the students. 

The College h;is also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 
_„^___ SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of Medicine. 




2^ar/iii 



REPEATING SHOT GUN 
NEW MODEL N2I7 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By the omission of the tale down feature we have 
been able to ereauy reduce the cost of production and at the same time have kept the gun up to the 
famous high /Uarti/i standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
barrels are especially bored for smokeless, as well as black powder and so chambered that 2% inch or 
r LI ^"f" s may be used. Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 
reliable and best working gun in existence. We are glad to make it possible for every lover of suns 
and bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so low a price. 
Have your dealei order it for you. 



Send for the Tfflaef/jl Catalogue and Experience Book to-day. Free for 3 stamps. 
fJV&ltUZrfifl firearms £#.,42Willow Street, New Haven, Cfc 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 16, 1906 



NO. 16 



BOWDOIN, ; COLBY, 

The contest between Bowdoin and Colby last 
Saturd ay on the Whittier Field resulted in a 
tie, neither side being able to cross their oppo- 
nents' goal ; at least not to the satisfaction of 
the officials. Bowdoin, however, outplayed 
her opponent during the greater part of the 
game, and only by some good defensive 
work on the part of Colby, together with 
remarkably good fortune did she escape being 
scored on. Even then, Greene, Bowdoin's 
quarterback, cleared the field and ran 83 yards 
for a touchdown. This however, was not 
allowed on the ground of violation of rules, it 
being asserted that a Bowdoin man had used 
his hand in the interference work. 

This is not to imply that the officials were 
unfair. They treated both sides alike, so far 
as they saw violations, but to many there 
was a tendency to take advantage of techni- 
calities of the rules which, in the judgment of 
many, the game did not warrant. 

The game opened with Bowdoin's kick-off 
to Hammond, who .was downed where he 
stood. Unable to gain, Colby punted to Web- 
ber who advanced the ball several yards. 
Aided by Colby's offside plays Bowdoin 
made 5 yards more ; and when the ball 
had changed sides a number of times a 
play followed which made our prospects still 
brighter. Greene punted to Hammond, who, 
when tackled by Sewall, lost the ball to 
McDade on the 10-yard line. The officials, 
however, averred that Hammond had not been 
allowed a fair catch, and the ball was taken 
back and given to Colby. 

After Bowdoin had made several gains and 
a number of punts had taken place, the half 
ended with the ball in her possession on her 
own 33-yard line. 

In the second half both teams entered the 
field with no change in their line-up. Ham- 
mond kicked off to Ellis, who advanced the 
ball 12 yards. Speake made 3 yards and then 
Bowdoin was forced to punt. Peterson and 
Goode netted 6 yards in two attempts. Colby 
was then compelled to punt, whereupon Greene 
made his 83-yard run for a touchdown with 



the unsatisfactory decision, previously men- 
tioned. When the play had been called back, 
Bowdoin got possession of the ball in the cen- 
ter of the field. Speake and Stacy then rap- 
idly advanced it to Colby's 30-yard line, but 
here Colby proved too strong and, blocking a 
quarterback kick, punted out of danger. 

Again Bowdoin started down the field. This 
time, aided by a forward pass, she reached the 
20-yard line only to lose the ball on downs. 
Colby again punted out of danger, but Bow- 
doin for the third time had brought the ball 
close to the opponents' goal, when time was 
called. 

Although characterized by frequent penaliz- 
ing on both sides, the game proved interesting 
from start to finish. 

The line-up : 

Bowdoin. Colby. 

J. Drummond, l.e I.e., Kimball 

Commins, l.t l.t., Sherburne 

Newman, l.g l.g., Deane 

McDade, c c., Thompson 

Sewall, r.g r.g., Penfold 

Stacy, r.t r.t, Smith 

Ellis (Wantke) , r.e r.e., Dwyer 

Greene, q.b q.b., Hammond 

Webber (Bower), l.h.b l.h.b., Goode 

Speake, r.h.b r.h.b., Trask 

Gastonguay, f.b f .b., Peterson 

Score — Bowdoin, ; Colby, o. Umpire — Burleigh 
of Exeter. Referee — Halliday of Lewiston. Head 
linesman — Carrigan of Lewiston. 



A COMMUNICATION 

To the Editors of the Orient: 

There is an unfortunate and growing ten- 
dency at Bowdoin at present which is deplored 
by a number of her alumni, who desire to take 
this opportunity of making their views known 
to the undergraduate body. This, to put it 
briefly, is the gradual narrowing of the col- 
lege horizon, until its chief interest is centered 
in winning in athletics, in debate, and in other 
branches of intercollegiate contests solely 
from the three Maine colleges, Bates, Colby 
and Maine. 

There was a time when Bowdoin met any 
New England college you might choose, and 



156 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



won from it, going into the contest with a 
confidence that in every way it was fully as 
good as that particular Massachusetts or 
Connecticut college. Her battle-ground, so 
to speak, was all New England. Since the 
fall of 1 901, Bowdoin has not won a single 
important victory in athletics from any col- 
lege outside the state. There has been good 
material ; there have been good coaches ; but 
the general feeling has been, strengthened by 
successive defeats, let well enough alone, and 
let the chief ambition of the college be to win 
from Bates, Maine and Colby. 

This is said in no spirit of criticism of the 
men on the teams or of the coaches, who have 
worked, and worked hard. Nor is it said in 
a spirit of disparagement of the other Maine 
colleges. But the general feeling in college 
has been that we should give all our energies 
to winning from our three neighbors. It was 
so in the writer's time ; it is so now. 

Bowdoin cannot afford to narrow her hori- 
zon in this fashion. It is for her interest a 
thousand times more to win from such teams 
as Wesleyan, Williams, Tufts, and the other 
widely known New England colleges, rather 
than devote her energies to becoming cham- 
pion of the State of Maine, a hollow victory 
which is never heard of outside of the State, 
which scarcely gets a few inches of space in 
even the comparatively nearby Boston papers. 
No one counts the worth of the college by her 
title of champion of Maine, but it is what she 
does against Dartmouth, Williams, Amherst, 
and the other colleges of that class by which 
Bowdoin is known. In the fall of 1904, when 
Bowdoin had a championship team, Caspar 
Whitney, the editor of Outing, in making up 
a list of the teams of the country, placed the 
University of Maine team, the weakest team 
in the State series, nineteenth in the list of 
colleges of the country, not even giving a 
place to Bowdoin, Bates or Colby, all of 
whom had decisively defeated Maine, but had 
not made anywhere the record against the 
well-known colleges that Maine did. Rarely 
a person hears much of the other colleges out- 
side of the State, but they all know Bowdoin. 
In everything but athletics Bowdoin is in a 
class head and shoulders over the other Maine 
colleges,' and this is said in no disparagement 
of their good work, either. Victory over them 
is perhaps sweet to us, but it is a hollow vic- 
tory in the end, and a dangerous one, if we 
neglect the games by which we are judged 
outside the State. Bowdoin is the New 



England college representative of Maine, as 
Dartmouth is of New Hampshire, or Wes- 
leyan and Trinity are of Connecticut. Bow- 
doin is a Maine college, to be sure, but above 
all she is a New England college, and a 
worthy competitor of Dartmouth, Williams, 
Amherst and the other colleges in everything 
but athletics. In this branch she should be 
known, not in the class with Maine, Bates and 
Colby, but with her real and natural rivals. 

The fault is not alone a lack of material, 
a lack of coaching, but a lack of interest, an 
indifference. The remedy, if remedy the sug- 
gestion of a number of her alumni can be 
called, is a drastic one, but drastic measures 
are needed to combat the present local feeling. 
Instead of concentrating all the energies of 
the college to capture the state championship, 
a hollow plum at best, and making the Bates, 
Colby and Maine games the all-important ones, 
take them from the position where they now 
are, cease even to make them games in which 
a man rnay win his "B." Play the other 
Maine colleges, to be sure, for their students 
are good fellows and generous rivals, but put 
them at the first of the season, let them be 
practice games, if you will, in which we shall 
stand as good a show of winning as the other 
fellow, whose team will be no farther advanced 
than ours at that time in the. season. Even if 
they do beat us, devote the energies of the 
team and the college to winning the games 
with such colleges as Tufts, Wesleyan, Trin- 
ity, Williams, and others which are really in 
our class and are really our natural rivals. 
Let the team's schedule be something like 
this, and in this order: Fort Preble, Harvard, 
Colby, Maine, Bates, Trinity, Wesleyan, 
Tufts, Williams. And devote the energies 
of the college and the team to winning those 
last four games, even if you have to let the 
others go. Then Bowdoin will be more 
favorably known throughout New England, 
will draw men from all over this section of 
the country, and will take her old place in the 
list of New England Institutions, rather than 
narrowing herself down to being known sim- 
ply as a Maine college. 

Alumnus. 



To the Editors of the Orient: 

The criticism of the football management 
which appeared in the Orient of Nov. 2d in 
a letter from Mr. Chandler of the Class of 
1890, is, in my estimation, extremely unfair 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



157 



and uncalled for. May I be permitted to state 
the views of another alumnus in regard to this 
matter? 

In the first place, doesn't Mr. Chandler 
know that the football schedule is not arranged 
according to the whims of the manager, but 
that each feature of it is thoroughly discussed 
by the manager, the members of the athletic 
council and the gymnasium director, and the 
advisability of each game carefully weighed 
before final arrangements are made? 

Further, how, pray, was it possible for the 
management to foresee "that Cornell would 
make every effort to roll up a big score against 
a team that had played Harvard o to 10" 
before the season had begun and while the 
Harvard game was still a thing of the future? 

Bowdoin is a small college, — true ; but is 
that a reason why our athletic teams should 
not try to make a creditable showing against 
the teams of larger institutions? Why "stick 
to your class?" Didn't the Amherst team 
hold Yale down to a very small score late in 
this very season? And because Princeton 
whipped Dartmouth 42-0 this fall, is that a 
reason why Dartmouth should "get cold feet" 
and forego any further chance of repeating her 
last year's splendid performance against the 
Tigers ? 

It is my belief that the average alumnus is 
with the present management in its effort to 
institute new features in this season's schedule. 
This movement cannot fail to have a counter- 
acting effect upon the narrowing influences, 
which, on account of Bowdoin's geographical 
position, naturally render it easy for us to 
play more games in Maine and fewer outside 
the State. 

As it happened, the result of the Cornell 
game this fall was unfortunate, and in such 
cases it is always easy to make a scapegoat of 
the management; further, the writer ventures 
the opinion that had the Cornell game resulted 
in a Bowdoin victory, the present critics would 
be among the first to hail the management 
with praise for arranging a game in New 
York, where the athletic results are reported 
more widely than in Maine, and hence, where 
the glory of a victory is greater. 

The "average graduate" is willing, I am 
sure, to trust the making of the football 
schedule in the hands of such competent per- 
sons as Dr. Whittier, the manager of the 
team, and the members of the Athletic Coun- 
cil. And don't worry about our nerves — they 



are all right. All the "soothing" they need at 
present is that which will come with the news 
of the favorable outcome of the University 
of Maine game on Nov. 17th. 

Yours very truly, 

John W. Frost, 1904. 

New York City, November 5, 1906. 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER l6TH. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3.30-4.00 p.m. Practice in Field Events on Whit- 
tier Field. 

3-5 p.m. Football practice. 

4.45 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

6.05 p.m. Deuscher Verein leaves for first meet- 
ing at the Inn. 

7.00 p.m. Mass-meeting in Memorial Hall. 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER I7TH. 

8.03 a.m. Football team leaves for Orono. Round 
trip, $2.00. 
2.30 p.m. U. of M. game at Orono. 
Cuts excused for men who go to the game. 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER IO/TH. 

4.00 p.m. Faculty meeting. 

Dr. Burnett addresses third meeting of Faculty 
Club. 
Miss Harvey's Dancing School opens in Bath. 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH. 

7 p.m. Debate, Hubbard Hall. 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21 ST. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3.30-4 p.m. Practice in Field Events, Whittier 
Field. 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22D. 

3.00 p.m. Cross-country squad starts from Gym- 
nasium. 

3.30-4 p.m. Practice in Field Events, Whittier 
Field. 

7.00 p.m. Christian Association Meeting. 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23D. 

4.45 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsals in Memorial 
Hall. 

8.00 p.m. Sophomore Hop in Memorial Hall. 
$1.00 a couple. 

8.00 p.m. "Gingerbread Man" at Columbia 
Theatre, Bath. 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28TH. 

12.30 P.M. -8.20 a.m. Monday, Dec. 3d. Thanksgiv- 
ing Vacation. 



158 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

lished every friday of the collegiate y 
by the Students of 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 
h. e. mitchell, 1907 r. h. hupper, 1908 

W. S. LINNELL, lgo7 R. A. LEE, 1908 

A. L. ROBINSON, 1908 H. H. BURTON, 1909 

J. S. STAHL, 1909 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 
N. S. WESTON, igo8 



Business Manager 
Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 



Entered at Post-Office at Brunswick as Second-Class 


Mail Matter 


Lewistun Journal Press 


Vol. XXXVI. NOVEMBER 16, 1906 


No. 16 



All students will extend 
Sympathy sympathy to J. W. Ley- 

don, '07, in the loss of his 
father, whose death occurred at his home in 
Bath the first of the week. Mr. Leydon had 
been in failing health for some time past as the 
result of a shock. 



"Hard luck" stories are 
"Hard Luck" always in order after an 

athletic defeat, but it is not 
too much to say that Bowdoin's football season 
thus far has been characterized by hard luck of 
a genuine sort. Beginning the season with a 
splendid squad and bright prospects, the team 
has been crippled by injury and other causes 
in every contest to such an extent that in last 
Saturday's game there were just three of the 
regular first-team which had been in the 
game earlier in the season. Even then the 
men put up a splendid exhibition and should 



have won the game. It is doubtful, however, 
if there is any of the small colleges that can 
show a similar hard luck record. 

Not only has the hard luck applied to loss 
of men but in the games themselves. In last 
Saturday's game Bowdoin outplayed Colby to 
a degree that with any reasonable amount of 
luck should have given the team from one to 
three touchdowns, but despite the splendid 
work not a point was scored. The same was 
true of the Tufts game. Bowdoin outplayed 
the Tufts team from start to finish. Our 
opponents had no show of a touchdown, but 
on a couple of fumbles the Massachusetts 
team managed to score twice and won the 
game after an exhibition that should have 
brought them defeat. 

Comment on these things are hardly worth 
while, but the Orient feels that a word of 
commendation should be said for the men who 
have struggled against these odds ; and the col- 
lege owes them thanks for the way they have 
been playing football with every element of 
luck against them. 



Tomorrow's Game 



Bowdoin will play her last 
game of the year to-mor- 
row with the University 
of Maine at Orono. It is 
hoped and expected that every man who pos- 
sibly can, will show his loyalty to the team by 
accompanying it to Orono. Manager Allen 
has secured a $2 rate for the round trip, good 
for the day only; and if 100 men go, they will 
be allowed to return on the second midnight 
at this same price. If men wish to remain 
over Sunday they can secure a rate of if 
cents a mile. Cuts will be excused. Let every 
student go to Orono who can possibly do so. 



Athletic The ° RIENT is sim p!y 

„ , ,. voicing- the sentiment of 

Regulat.ons the g * dent body when it 

asserts that the new eligibility regulations 
which went into effect for the first time this 
fall, are not satisfactory. The practical 
working out of the rules is unjust not only 
to the students affected, but to the graduate 
and undergraduates who desire to see Bow- 
doin hold her proper position in Maine Col- 
lege athletics. 

The Orient fully appreciates the- position 
of those who believe there is an over-emphasis 
of athletics in our colleges. That such is the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



159 



case probably few undergraduates would care 
to deny. Certainly the Orient does not care 
to do so. What may be denied, however, is 
that it is possible for Bowdoin to alter the sit- 
suation ; or if possible, that the proper methods 
are being taken. 

In the first place the standard of scholarship 
required to keep a student free from the four- 
week rule is altogether too high. A man just 
entering college has no knowledge of the con- 
duct of college classes, no knowledge of the 
ranking system or his individual instructors, 
and moreover his general situation is as a rule 
not conducive to his best, or even his average 
work. Take these facts in conjunction with 
the fact that he must be absent on athletic 
trips and there is no small likelihood of his 
rank being such that he may be entitled to a 
warning at the end of so short a period as 
four weeks. It is, perhaps, not too much to 
say that a very large percentage of the men in 
every entering class could be debarred under 
these conditions. Debarring these men is 
unjust to the students and to the alumni who 
look with loyalty to see our teams win at least 
half of the Maine college games. Athletics in 
some respects, may be subordinate ; but Bow- 
doin is at present in a situation where her 
graduates and undergraduates scarcely care to 
have her lose all her games. 

It is said Ihe only alternative is to debar 
specials. This, the Orient believes would be 
even worse in its practical working out. The 
fact that a man is an athlete and a special does 
not necessarily mean that he is not here for 
legitimate purposes. A glance at the name of 
the specials who have represented the college 
in the past will show that with one or two 
notable exceptions, they have been men who 
will bear comparison with our regular stu- 
dents in every sense of the word. In fact, 
their worth to the college as undergraduates 
and graduates is of a sort that makes us wish 
that we had more of them. If debarred from 
college activities, even for one year, what 
would be the result? In nine cases out of 
ten, it is safe to say, they would go to some 
other Maine college where they could feel 
themselves a real part of the college, and 
where they would be sure of a more gracious 
reception. The result to Bowdoin would be 
that she would lose men who in the vast major- 
ity of cases would be desirable in more ways 
than one. 

The majority of the graduates and under- 
graduates would prefer to see no athletics 



whatever than teams which cannot cope suc- 
cessfully with our natural competitors. And 
yet that is what the question resolves itself to 
in the case of these rules. The past five years 
have shown that it takes our best athletes to 
even hold our own ; and we only need the sin- 
gle blow of debarring specials and four-weeks 
rule to eventually insure this result. 

It may be answered that our team last Sat- 
urday demonstrated its ability to play under 
the handicap of the former rule. But the fact 
is that the only reason why our team was able 
to cope fairly successfully with the weakest 
team in Maine was simply because our squad 
is the largest in years. Had the blow fallen 
last year or indeed any of the past four or five 
years, the strength of our team would scarcely 
equal that of some of the academies. This is 
not said as an argument that we must have 
winning teams at any cost; but with the con- 
viction that the men debarred under this rule 
do not have a fair opportunity to show their 
scholarship ability, and also that unfair treat- 
ment to desirable specials would contribute to 
the same result. 

If it is felt that we are getting undesirable 
men on our athletic teams from our specials 
and first year men, it would seem that the for- 
mer could be guarded against by a close exam- 
ination of their credentials on admission ; or in 
the case of regular Freshmen, by debarring 
them simply while they are in arrears in their 
work rather than putting them out for a year. 
Allow them a fair opportunity to do their 
work, and failing in this they may be properly 
debarred. 

These things are said in no spirit of antag- 
onism to those who have been instrumental in 
the making of new rules or who are contem- 
plating others. The Orient recognizes, with 
them, that there is, generally speaking, too 
much athletics in our colleges. But we also 
feel that Bowdoin is in a peculiar if not an 
unfortunate situation. And such being the 
case she owes some things to her undergrad- 
uates and graduates in her athletic regula- 
tions. Our athletics are and have been clean, 
and we have no reason to handicap our teams 
over an evil which seems to be more imagin- 
ary than real. 

MEDALS FOR DEBATERS 

Anouncement is made that the gentleman who has 
given medals for the Bowdoin debating teams for 
the past two years, has kindly renewed his offer for 
the current year. 



i60 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



College Botes 

AH aboard for Orono. 

Round trip, only $2.00. 



Isn't it time to hear from the Dramatic Ch]b? 

All Maine football teams are now in order. 

Cox, '08, has been absent from college this week. 

All aboard for Orono on to-morrow morning's 
train. 

W. B. Drummond is threatened with water on the 
knee. 

A. F. Noble, Amherst, '05, was on the campus 
last week. 

Ballard, '10, spent a few days .at his home in Gar- 
diner last week. 

Many former Bowdoin football men attended the 
game, Saturday. 

The second reports in the French courses are due 
Monday morning. 

Jackson, ex- Jefferson Medical School, '09, has 
entered the Medical School. 

Lawrence Libby, ex-'o7, was a guest at the Beta 
Theta Pi House, Saturday. 

From present appearances a small number of foot- 
ball "B's" will be awarded. 

A meeting of the Junior Class was held in Memo- 
rial Hall, yesterday afternoon. 

Vorhees, '07, conducted the weekly quizzes in the 
History courses, last Friday. 

The annual distribution of bones to the first year 
"Medics" took place last week. 

Mr. Frank rendered a very delightful vocal solo 
in chapel last Thursday morning. 

Kendrie, '10, rendered another of his delightful 
violin solos at chapel last Sunday. 

There was a meeting of the Bugle Board at the 
Zeta Psi House, Monday evening. 

H. R. Nutter, '05, of Bangor, passed several days 
at the college the first of the week. 

Messer, '09, is sick at his home in Rockland, but 
is expected to return in a few days. 

Snow, '07, occupied the pulpit of Rev. Oscar 
Peterson, '06, at Cornish, last Sunday. 

A stereopticon outfit has been added to the equip- 
ment of the Greek room in Memorial Hall. 

Many of the fellows attended the Morse High 
football dance at Bath last Saturday night. 

The training table at which the football squad has 
been eating, will be discontinued after to-day. 

The review of the last issue of the Quill is 
crowded out of this issue but will appear next week. 

The usual hymn was omitted from the chapel ser- 
vice, Monday, as no one was present to play the 
organ. 

A large party of students went up to Lewiston, 
'Tuesday evening, to see Modjeska as "Lady Mac- 
beth" in Shakespeare's most celebrated tragedy, 
"Macbeth." 



George Pratt, '01, was on the campus, Tuesday. 

C. W. Snow, '07, preached at Cornish last Sunday. 

Farrar, '10, was called home Sunday by the illness 
of a relative. 

Hatch, '07, has returned to college after an 
absence of two weeks. 

The 1908 Bugle Board met with Foss, '08, at the 
Zeta Psi House last Monday evening. 

John Greene, who is now doing medical work in 
the Portland hospital, was in Brunswick this week. 

Rogers, captain of the Hebron football team, was 
the guest of Stanley, '10, last Saturday and Sunday. 

Rev. C. K. Ellsworth, '97, of East Machias, was in 
town last week visiting his step-son, Robert Wing, 
'10. 

The annual football game between the Freshmen 
and Sophomores will occur on Thursday of next 
week. 

W. P. Hinckley, '09, returned to college, Monday, 
after a visit of several days at his home in Good 
Will. 

Brimmer, '08, and Sargent, '08, of the University 
of Maine, were guests of friends at the college over 
Sunday. 

L. M. Erskine, '07, left Brunswick, last Monday 
for a week's hunting in the woods of Northern 
Maine. 

The class in French 3 was excused Friday, 
Professor Johnson going to Portland on college 
business. 

Harrie Webber and Farnsworth G. Marshall, both 
of the Class of 1903, were back to the Colby game 
last Saturday. 

A large number of students attended the opening 
of the Keith circuit at the Music Hall, Lewiston, last 
Monday night. 

Messrs. Pease, Mitchell, and Savage of Fairfield, 
were the guests of Harold Weeks, '10, over Satur- 
day and Sunday. 

The Coffee Club met, Wednesday night, with 
Snow, '07, and Roberts, '07. The subject for discus- 
sion was "Macbeth." 

There was a small crowd at the Colby game, as the 
Maine-Bates game attracted many who would other- 
wise have come here. 

The Sophomores trying for assistant business 
manager of the Orient are : R. W. Brewster, G P. 
Estes, and C. E. Stone. 

A number of men took advantage of the opportu- 
nity to see "Macbeth" played by Madame Modjeska 
at the Empire, Tuesday evening. 

Excuses will be granted to all who attend the 
Bowdoin-Maine game to-morrow, providing Prof. 
Sills is notified before this evening. 

There was a class meeting of 1908, Thursday after- 
noon at one o'clock to determine the amount of 
assessment per capita for the 1908 Bugle. 

Those wishing to attend the Maine game can 
purchase round-trip tickets, good on November 17 
only, at the greatly reduced rate of $2.00. 

Kendrie's violin solo last Sunday, was, in the 
opinion of the student body, the finest rendition 
that has been heard in King Chapel for a long time. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



161 



The crumbling cement in the granite work of the 
various buildings has been replaced during the past 
week. 

Carney, '07, will act as instructor in Physics and 
Chemistry at Lincoln Academy for the next two 
weeks. 

The home of Professor Allen Johnson at the cor- 
ner of Bath and Federal Streets is rapidly nearing 
completion. 

To-night the U. of M. will hold its annual rally 
"Maine Night." Several of the fraternities will also 
hold their initiations Saturday night. 

A number of preparatory school men who were 
present at Saturday's game remained over Sunday 
being guests at the various fraternity houses. 

It is said that a book relating to phases of college 
life at Bowdoin, will soon be published by some 
undergraduates. Further details will be given later. 

A large flock of wild geese about twenty-five in 
number, flew over the campus last Sunday night. 
The unusual occurrence created quite a lot of excite- 
ment. 

Proprietor Cahill of New Meadows Inn has pro- 
cured a handsome, large Dane to act as a reception 
committee for any future burglars who may pay the 
Inn a visit. 

Members of the Senior Class who desire to apply 
for the Charles Carroll Everett Scholarship should 
make application to the President some time during 
the present semester. 

Monday evening the New Hampshire Club met 
with Smith, '09, at the Delta Upsilon House. The 
full membership was present and a social time and 
light refreshments were enjoyed. 

The latest sectional club is the Medford Club, 
which was organized Saturday evening at the room 
of Morss, '10, with four charter members. No 
officers have been elected as yet. 

Miss Katherine Jewell Everts gave a dramatic pre- 
sentation of "My Lady's Ring," a comedy by Alice 
Brown, in the Unitarian Church last evening, under 
the auspices of the Saturday Club. 

After the game last Saturday the Colby football 
team dined at New Meadows Inn. Several mem- 
bers remained in Brunswick over Sunday, the guests 
of friends at various chapter houses. 

At the second meeting of the Faculty Club, Profes- 
sor Mitchell gave an interesting talk on St. Augus- 
tine. Among the special guests present were A. B. 
Roberts, '07, Snow, '07, Powers, '08, and Gould, '08. 

The Freshmen have chosen Newman as Captain 
and Wandtke as Manager of their football team. 
Manager Wandtke wishes to announce that all who 
want to try for the team may obtain suits by apply- 
ing to him. 

The county commissioners of Sagadahoc and 
Cumberland Counties met this week in Topsham 
and held a. hearing on the question of accepting the 
suspension bridge as a county highway. No decis- 
ion was given. 

Through the efforts of the Massachusetts Club 
the Thanksgiving vacation has been extended so 
that it will last from noon, Wednesday, to Monday 
morning. There will be only one Sophomore-Fresh- 
man baseball game in the future. 



The injury to Blanchard's knee is more serious 
than was at first expected and may keep him out of 
athletics in the future. 

Adj_ourns were granted last Thursday morning in 
English I., Professor Mitchell being away on busi- 
ness connected with the college. 

The Bowdoin College Band made its first appear- 
ance in public at the game, Saturday, and is now 
practicing hard for the Maine game. Considering 
the length of time that the band has been practicing 
it did excellent work. 

At a meeting of the Sophomore Class Tuesday 
afternoon it was voted to hold a formal dance in 
Memorial Hall on Friday evening, Nov. 23. The 
committee in charge consists of Burton, Kane, 
Bishop, Hughes, and Crowley. 

The first debate of the debating course took place 
Tuesday evening. The subject was "The present 
laws relating to Chinese Immigration should be 
amended to include the Japanese." Affirmative : 
Baldwin and Merrill. Negative: Snow and Roberts. 

The following members of the Delta Kappa Epsi- 
lon Fraternity left Tuesday for Springfield, Mass., 
where they will attend the sixtieth annual conven- 
tion which is held this week : Hacker, '07, Burton, 
'07, Hyde, '08, Robinson, '08, Putnam, '08, Burton, 
'09, Brewster, '09, Marsh, '09, Merrill, '08. 

The new Christian Association piano is a tribute 
to the kindness and taste of Doctor Mason. Both 
the Christian Association and the Musical Clubs 
regard it as the best instrument we have had. And 
it is all paid for early in the year. The college is 
grateful to the friends who contributed and to Doc- 
tor Mason for making the selection. 

At a meeting of the Freshman Class held last 
week W. H. P. Newman of Bar Harbor was elected 
captain of the Class track team and A. W. Wandtke 
was elected manager. Class numerals were awarded 
to Evans, McLaughlin, Wandtke, Walker, Colbath, 
Martin, Otis, R. D. Morss, Ludwig, Hobbs. Blue 
and white was adopted as the class colors. 

The victory of Andover over her old rival, Exe- 
ter, last Saturday, is a great triumph for "Jack" 
O'Connor, who has turned out Andover's winning 
teams for the past two years. O'Connor graduated 
from the medical School in 1905 and was Bowdoin's 
coach for the seasons of 1902 and 1903. His 
friends among both students and alumni will be glad 
to hear of his success at Andover. 

At chapel, Sunday, President Hyde spoke of the 
"honor system" as in use at Amherst and Williams. 
He said that at a recent meeting in New Haven the 
subject was discussed and it was the general thought 
that it would not be wise to introduce it in other 
New England colleges. The system seems to be 
based on the supposition that the student will cheat 
at examinations unless he is made to promise that 
he will not, and for that reason it is believed to be 
founded on a wrong principle. 



THE FACULTY 

Professor R. J. Ham went to Lewiston last Tues- 
day to confer with Professor Leonard of Bates on 
educational matters. 



162 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



On Thursday, November 8th, Dr. Lincoln spoke 
before the Christian Association for the second time 
this fall. He took as his subject "The Opportunity 
for Young Doctors in China." His talk was an 
interesting one, and in it he described the condition 
of the medical science in China. He said that about 
2500 B. C. there was an eminent Chinese doctor, and 
later a surgeon, who studied the science and wrote 
books based on their discoveries. These works 
were wonderfully good for that period, but to-day 
these same books make up the basis of Chinese 
knowledge of medicine, and consequently their doc- 
tors are about one thousand years behind the times. 
Yesterday President Hyde conducted a questionaire 
on "Practical Student Conduct," but it is impossible 
to publish an account of it in this issue of the 
Orient. The next meeting of the Association will 
not be held until Thursday, December 6. 



settled is whether Memorial Hall can be used, and 
this is assured if fifty men agree to buy tickets. The 
tickets are one dollar for a couple, and refreshments 
will be served for twenty cents a person. The order 
of dances will be posted next Monday. 



VEREIN MEETING 



The "Deutscher Verein" holds its first meeting of 
the 3'ear to-night at New Meadows Inn. The Verein 
has at the present time about thirty members, and an 
unusually prosperous year is anticipated. Many 
speakers of note have already been secured, among 
whom is Prof. Keeno Francke, head of the depart- 
ment of Germanic Languages and Literature at 
Harvard University. 



INFORMAL DANCE 



Last Friday evening an informal dance was held 
at the Kappa Sigma House. An order of twenty- 
two dances was enjoyed, refreshments being served 
at intermission. The party was chaperoned by Mrs. 
Elias Payson Grimes of Portland. The young ladies 
remained to witness the Colby-Bowdoin game Sat- 
urday, the house having been turned over to them 
the previous night. Among those present were : 
Miss Celia M. Pearsons, Bridgeport, Conn. ; Miss 
Alice M. Clancy, Saco; Miss Ella Sawtelle, 
Lewiston; Miss Alice F. McCarthy, Portland; Miss 
Charlotte Lowell, Westbrook; Miss Harriette Wise, 
Gardiner; Miss Lucy Stetson, Brunswick; Miss 
Georgia Chadbourne, Saco ; Miss Florence C. Smith, 
Wells Beach; Miss Ruth Woodhull Smith, Boston, 
Mass. ; Miss Freda Belle Ward, Topsham ; Miss Bes- 
sie Atherton Lugrin, Lewiston ; Miss Alice Hast- 
ings Eaton, Brunswick ; Miss Maybelle Doughty, 
Brunswick; and Miss Hortense L. Stevens, Wake- 
field, Mass. 



THE SOPHOMORE HOP 



Arrangements have been made for a formal Soph- 
omore Hop, to be given under the auspices of the 
Sophomore Class to the members of the football 
team on Friday, November 23. Lovell's Orchestra 
of five pieces, with Kendrie, '10, as leader, has been 
engaged for music, and Morton is to furnish the 
refreshments. The only thing that remains to be 



FRESHMAN ELECTION 



At a meeting of the Freshman Class, Tuesday, 
officers for the ensuing year were elected as follows : 
President, James E. Draper ; Vice-President, P. T. 
Nickerson ; Secretary and Treasurer, J. Leland 
Crosby. 



CHEMICAL CLUB MEETING 

The first meeting of the Chemical Club was held 
at New Meadows, Tuesday evening. The program 
of the evening consisted of an informal discussion 
of the objects of the club, together with remarks by 
Professor Robinson, who made some suggestions on 
the conduct of the club. A number of new mem- 
bers were received into the club. 



SCHEDULE OF DEBATES 

Following is the schedule of debates in the debat- 
ing course for the present semester. 

November 13 — "The present laws relating to 
Chinese Immigration should be amended to include 
the Japanese." Affirmative : Baldwin and Merrill. 
Negative : Snow and Roberts. 

November 20 — "The American Federation of 
Labor should enter politics as an independent party." 
Affirmative: Linnell and Harris. Negative: Red- 
man and Hupper. 

November 27 — 'The State of Maine should enact 
laws for the regulation of child labor agreeing in all 
essentials with those of Massachusetts." Affirma- 
tive: Pike and Gould. Negative: Erskine and Bur- 
ton. 

December 4 — "The next Congress should 
thoroughly revise the tariff." Affirmative : Delavina 
and Merrill. Negative : Mitchell and Snow. 

December 11. — "The peaceable annexation of Cuba 
to the United States would be for the best interests 
of the United States." Affirmative : Erskine and 
Morrison. Negative : Roberts and Drummond. 

December 18. — "The Legislative Referendum 
applying to both the statutes and the constitution 
should be adopted by the State of Maine." Affirm- 
ative : Haley and Pike. Negative : Redman and 
Robinson. 

January 8. — "United States Senators should be 
elected by popular vote." Affirmative : Abbott and 
Scates. Negative : Baldwin and Whitmore. 

January 14. — "The recommendations of the Simpli- 
fied Spelling Board, in Circular No. 2, should be 
adopted by the American people." Affirmative : 
Boyce and Burton. Negative : Hull and Drum- 
mond. 

January 15. — "The law prohibiting the manufac- 
ture and sale of intoxicating liquors in Maine should 
be resubmitted to the people at next State election." 
Affirmative : Pennell and Burton. Negative : Web- 
ber and Linnell. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



J 63 



Hlumni personals 

CLASS OF 1862. 
Isaac B. Choate, '62, the author and jour- 
nalist, entertained some of his friends and 
classmates in Boston recently. Mr. Choate is 
a Bowdoin alumnus who is constantly express- 
ing his love for his Alma Mater and his pride 
in her prosperity. 

CLASS OF 1870. 
Hon. D. S. Alexander of Buffalo, '70, is 
elected to Congress for his sixth term. His 
plurality was twenty-five per cent, larger than 
heretofore in an "off" year. 

CLASS OF EX-1906, MED. 
the U. of V. Medical School, has settled in 
Stonington and has opened an office there. 
Dr. Wiggin is a former football and baseball 
man at Bowdoin. 



REV. FRANCIS B. KNOWLTON, '58 

Rev. Francis B. Knowlton, '58, died at his 
home in Athol, Mass., on October 17. Mr. 
Knowlton was born in Farmington, Maine, 
and received his early education at the Farm- 
ington Academy, coming to Bowdoin in 
1854. After his graduation from college, he 
studied theology at Oxford, Penn., and at the 
Bangor Theological Seminary from which he 
graduated in 1863. He has exercised his 
ministry in Waldoboro, in Phillips, where he 
was ordained in 1865, in South Paris, in 
Alstead, and for eleven years in Orford, N. 
H. When at Orford, Mr. Knowlton's health 
failed him, and he was forced to give up his 
pastorate, though for over twenty years he 
has been active in the Congregational Church 
at his late home in Athol, even, on many 
occasions, filling the pulpit of that church. 
Mr. Knowlton leaves a widow and two sons, 
and is much missed by the people of Athol. 



©bituan? 

DR. C. A. COCHRANE, M., '56 

Dr. Charles A. Cochrane, who graduated 
from the Medical School in 1856, passed 
away on August 13 at his home in Winthrop, 
Me. Dr. Cochrane was born in Monmouth 
in 1833, and graduated from Monmouth 
Academy before entering Bowdoin. On 
leaving the Medical School he began his prac- 
tice in Vassalboro, but in 1857 removed to 
Winthrop, where he has practiced since that 
time. He was widely kown in the State both 
in medical and Masonic circles. 




I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
1906 man who will be in the market for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

A. S. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPGOOD'S 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



Visit our* 

ICE=CREAM 

PARLOR. 




19 Maine Street 
CATERING in all departments a Specialty. 



Announcement 

The Popular Monday Evening: 
Dancing Class and Assemblies 

WILL BE REOPENED AT MUSIC HALL, BATH 
for season of 1906-1907, NOVEMBER 19th. 

Instruction, 7.30 to 9 p.m. 

Assembly, 9 to 11.15 p.m. 
These have always been special assemblies for college 
students. Private instruction by appointment. 

For further particulars, address 



Telephone 128-13. 



MISS JENNIE HARVEY, 

691 Washington Street, Bath, Me. 



Mention the Orient when patronizing our Advertisers. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




50 CENTS 

Moat Comfortable, Durable, Economical Suspender 

made and the only one with a guarantee that 

means absolute satisfaction or your money back. 

One pair of BULL DOG SUSPENDERS 

will outwear three of the ordinary kind 

They contain more ami beiicr ruMier, lutvc heavily 

tarnish or soil i ht:; clnUvs ; t< in ltIi , pliable, it n bre.'i k a- 
bio, imported Hull Dup li-aMi. r cii.Ii, rasy to button, 
and webs carefully woven by special process for 
They can be bad ' 



and heavy woiffht 

neatsfripcs.men'soryo 

. lenpfhs for the Bhme 

r by mail postpaid r 



uth' 



i choi 



■ p;M 



Accept no 'im/xfifii/c r,„- /!,,< \V,,',-h />,„,<■/ lour 

Jitter".*/. Siiihtblc far nil classes. 

HEWES & POTTER 

Largest Suspender & Belt Makers in the "World 

" .(^47, 87 LINCOLN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



W 




UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



The fifty-fourth session of this College of Medicine 
begins December J, J906, and continues seven months. 

A New Building with 

Large, well equipped Laboratories, 
Commodious Lecture Halls, 
Pleasant Recitation Rooms, 

Every Facility for Instruction. 



NUMEROUS CLINICS 



MODERATE EXPENSE 



For Announcement and further information, address 

H. L. WHJTE, A.M., Secretary, 

BURLINGTON, VT. 



THE MEOICO-CHIROHGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Has a carefully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; clinical Conferences; Modified Seminar Methods, and thoroughly Practical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching-. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest and finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every respect, and the new laboratories are specially planned and equipped for individual work by the students. 
The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of' Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 
___ SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of Medicine. / 




Ifflczrfiii 



REPEATING SHOT GUN 
NEW MODEL N9I7 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By the omission of the tale down feature wehave 
been able to greaUy reduce the cost of production and at the same time have kept the gun up to the 
famous high /Uaeft/i standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
barrels are especially bored for smokeless as well as black powder and so chambered that 2% inch or 
/■■S men shells may be used. Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 
reliable and best working gun in existence. We are glad to make it possible for every lover of guns 
and bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so low a price. 

Have your dealer order it for you. 

Send for the fflea/ui Catalogue and Experience Book to- Jay. Free /or 3 stamps. 

7j7@2f£Oril/Z firearms Csi,-42WiHow Street. New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 23, 1906 



NO. 17 



v 



BOWDOIN, 6; MAINE, 



Bowdoin closed her football season for the 
year 1906 with a great victory last Saturday, 
when in spite of the ' great handicap under 
which the team has labored, it defeated the 
University of Maine by a score of 6 to o. 
It was a great game and a great victory; it 
was also a splendid vindication of the men 
who have worked with untiring energy against 
great odds throughout the year. In short, it 
was a proof of the old Bowdoin spirit. 

The entire team played with a determina- 
tion and dash that the confident Maine men 
were unable to meet and it is not too much to 
say that the Orono team was swept off its 
feet by the fierceness of Bowdoin's attack. 
Indeed, the size of the score is no indication 
of the superiority of the Bowdoin team. 
Maine had no play that Bowdoin did not 
smash up and at no time was the Maine team 
in hailing distance of the Bowdoin goal. 

Maine was on the defensive nearly the 
entire game and had not Bowdoin wished 
to play a safe game in the last half, it is more 
than probable that we would have scored at 
least once more. It was, however, prudent 
to take no chances and it is this fact largely 
that allowed Maine being let off as easily as 
she was. 

The entire Bowdoin team did splendid 
work and had these men been able to play 
with the form they were in Saturday, 
it would be safe to say that Bowdoin would 
have won the greater number of the games on 
her schedule. Speake did some sensational 
work in all departments of the game, while 
Gastonguay, Webber, McDade, Drummond, 
and indeed the entire team did some remark- 
ably effective work. The touchdown came 
in about 8 minutes of play as the result of 
some good gains by Speake, a 30-yard gain 
through center by Gastonguay, an on-side 
kick and a forward pass, putting the ball in 
Maine's 5-yard line. Then Stacey was given 
the ball on a third and went over the 
line on a play which Maine was powerless to 
stop. Webber kicked the goal. 

The game opened with Higgins kicking off 
to Bowdoin, Stacey receiving the ball on the 



15-yard line and advancing to the 25-yard line 
before being downed. After two attempts 
at Maine's line, Bowdoin punted to Maine's 
40-yard line. -Maine then sent Swift at Bow- 
doin's right tackle twice in succession, but the 
first failed to gain and the second resulted in 
a loss. At this time Higgins made a good 
gain on a fake punt, but the next two plays 
brought no result, and Maine punted back to 
Bowdoin's 25-yard line. It was at this time 
that Bowdoin started for her touchdown. 
Speake made 5 yards through tackle and then 
Gastonguay went through the center of the 
Maine line for 30 yards. Maine then held, 
but an on-side kick to Drummond gave Bow- 
doin 10 yards and a forward pass which 
Miner fumbled gave Bowdoin another big 
gain. Speake made 10 yards again, and after 
Webber had failed to gain, Speake carried the 
ball 5 yards, leaving it on Maine's 5-yard 
line. Stacey was then given the ball and 
cleared the line by a good yard. Webber 
easily kicked the goal. 

Maine kicked off twice, each time the 
ball going over the line. Bowdoin then 
kicked off to Matheas on Maine's 23-yard 
line. Swift made about 4 yards on two 
attempts and then Maine was set back for 
holding. Miner got 4 yards on a run and 
then Bowdoin lost 5 yards for holding. Hig- 
gins now made about 7 yards but Swift failed 
and Maine was obliged to punt, the ball going 
to Bowdoin's 35-yard line. Speake made 10 
yards on a delayed pass, and then Bowdoin 
retained the ball on a forward pass in Maine's 
territory. Bowdoin started down the field 
again, but was stopped on Maine's 35-yard 
line. 

At this time Higgins made about 10 yards 
around left end, but after this Maine was 
again forced to punt. Speake failed to gain, 
but an on-side kick netted 5 yards. Then came 
a slip-up on a forward and Maine secured the 
ball on downs. Next came an exchange of 
punts, the half ending with the ball near the 
center of the field. 

In the second half Maine made many 
changes and the team showed that it was 
weakening several times. Bowdoin, on the 



i66 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



other hand, showed up as strong as in the 
first half and Maine's fresh men could do no 
more execution than could the others. Web- 
ber kicked off to Swift, who was 
downed on the 30-yard line. Maine could 
not gain and punted to Greene on the 35-yard 
line, he advancing the ball 10 yards before 
being downed. Speake failed and Webber 
made 6 yards, but on the on-side kick Maine 
got the ball. At this time Maine made first 
down once but the advance was quickly 
stopped. The remainder of the game was a 
repetition of this work, with all the odds in 
favor of Bowdoin, while frequent changes 
continue to be made in the Maine team. The 
game closed with the ball in Bowdoin's pos- 
session on Maine's 35-yard line, and good 
advances being made toward the Maine goal. 

The summary: 

Bowdoin. Maine. 

Drummond, l.e I.e., Burleigh 

Stacey, Commins, l.t l.t., Smith 

Newman, l.g l.'g., Talbot 

McDade, c c., Rounds, Seavey 

Sewall, Buttrick, r.g r.g., Ray 

Garcelon, r.t r.t, Matheas 

Ellis, r.e r.e., Metcalf 

Greene, q.b q.b., Miner 

Webber, l.h.b l.h.b., Higgins, Quint 

Speake, r.h.b r.h.b., Swift, Vickery 

Gastonguay, f.b f .b., Farwell, Hodgkins 

Score — Bowdoin 6, Maine o. Touchdown — Stacey. 
Goal — Webber. Umpire and referee, alternating, 
T. F. Murphy of Harvard and A. D. Saul of New- 
ton Atheltic Asssociation. Linesman — Rice of Colby. 
Time — 25m. periods. 



THE OCTOBER QUILL 



The dedicatory address which the Quill has 
the honor to print as its opening article, 
creates in the reader the instantaneous, unmis- 
takable effect of eloquence. It would be an 
excellent model for • analysis in classes of 
rhetoric and public speaking; and it is with 
something of the teacher's interest, not in the 
vain desire to praise where praise is needless 
and presumptuous, that we would call atten- 
tion to its simplicty of diction and its dignity 
of treatment and -to its fine congruity of form 
and subject, from the felicitous opening sen- 
tence to the striking parallel of the closing 
paragraphs. 

It would be interesting, further, to notice 
in this connection what has constituted elo- 
quence in different eras. For we have 
gone so far in reaction from the fulsome 
praise, the stilted arrangement, and the over- 



elaborated formalism of a Bossuet and even 
of our own Webster that we seldom attain so 
happily as does the present address the stateli- 
ness of a right use of the formal. 

As the echo of a mood or as an attempt to 
suggest, yet conceal, that mood by words, "The 
Twilight Rock," has decided merit, but the 
hapless reviewer, who although unable, after 
the manner of reviewers, to rhyme two lines 
together, yet dares to criticise, feels that as 
poetry it has its limitations. The third stanza 
seems an intrusion, a troubling cross-motif. 
"Amid the encircling night" is not so expres- 
sive as the well-known line that its suggests, 
and "silently" and "eternity" as end words 
with the forced accents for proper stress, 
although permissable, are unpleasing. 

There are notes in the story called "Pop- 
pies" that raise it to the level of a prose-poem. 
It has color and feeling and much of the spirit 
of its setting. It is an alluring theme, too, 
that of a life lived, as the writer well puts it, 
in "the peace that touched him on all sides yet 
could find no resting-place in his heart." 

In the good work of this writer it may be 
pardonable to point out a possibly dangerous 
mannerism, — the use of a sort of Latin abso- 
lute which sometimes results in so loose a sen- 
tence as to suggest misprints. Examples are 
"his pockets emptied," "a feeling almost of 
joy within him," "head bowed ," and this 
broken sentence: "Camilla, too much the girl, 
too little the woman, and Hugo's voice so soft, 
Hugo's eye so fine, when he whispered she 
trembled and turned away." 

As to the ending, well, there are those 
who will ask, Is it the vision of an over- 
wrought brain projecting the image it cher- 
ishes, or is it the real woman appearing only 
to make necessary a second renunciation, 
greater than the first? 

A long and rather tedious modern play, "A 
Pair of Spectacles" points the homely moral 
of "From the Fo'castle" no better than does 
this short rhymed lesson, a fresh, attractive 
form for the presenting of old truth, and for 
its wholesomeness we accept the Kipling jingle 
of the first stanza and commend the second 
with its succession of pleasing images. 

So much has been written of Stevenson's 
determination to find life livable and, withal, 
so much unreasoning optimism has been 
preached in his name that it is not the 
theme so much as the spirit of the present 
Quill essay on "Stevenson's Theorem" which 
commends it. It is the buoyant exemplifica- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



167 



tion of what Stevenson called the "ruddy con- 
victions" of youth. It is a happy, contagious 
mood, and the style is correspondingly 
attractive with a literary flavor that raises it 
out of the order of barren platitude. 

It is seldom in this writer that we find an 
awkward sentence similar to the one begin- 
ning, "A further proof ... is mani- 
fested by" 

So strongly and convincingly poetic are the 
closing verses of "Abelard at St. Marcel" 
("Rashly we sowed . . . etc.") that the 
weak first half seems the more disappointing 
as we re-read, for the diction is annoyingly 
uneven. The poem as a whole is rich in 
poetic feeling. "Maid of the winning ways" 
seems unsatisfactory for Heloise, especially as 
Abelard's transmuted passion dwelt on her. 
"What sad changes brings each year" is too 
commonplace a verse in a poem which, how- 
ever it baffles, yet delights because of the hint 
and promise of possible achievement. 

The sketch "The Island Belle" is for the 
greater part well-written yet it gives little 
decided flavor, and the ending is questionable, 
and if intended to justify the tale, hardly 
does so. Nevertheless, the reviewer admits 
that the objection to such denouements is 
largely a matter of personal feeling. There 
is a certain crudity throughout the fourth 
paragraph (p. 231) especially in such a 
sentence as "She wanted to be with 
young people of her own type more" and in 
the phrase "her delicate submission." "On 
arriving at the station a tug was summoned" 
is an instance of loose grammar rare in the 
pages of the Quill. Would not the author of 
this tale do well to try his powers of careful 
narration in the realm of dispassionate histor- 
ical writing, or to attempt the serious or 
didactic essay? 

With stories, essay, and poems all well 
above the average college publication, this is 
an especially creditable number of the Quill; 
but it is to be hoped that succeeding numbers 
will not leave the burden of contribution to the 
editors, who furnish also the Postman, which 
shows an appreciation of good college verse, 
and the Gray Goose Tracks which in this num- 
ber has more content than usual and is a bit 
brighter and more readable to the "general 
public." Ordinarily this department adds lit- 
tle to the Quill and fails to utilize its oppor- 
tunity. 

The plea in Silhouettes is admirable in idea 
and suggestive for future articles in this 



department, but its contention that "Painting 
and sculpture have a stronger claim on our 
aesthetic nature than poetry or music" may be 
open to discussion. First, however, it would 
be necessary to have the writer explain just 
what is meant by "have a stronger claim." 

M. C. H. 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23D. 

4.45 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

8.00 p.m. Sophomore Hop in Memorial Hall, 
$1.00 a couple. 

8.00 p.m. "Gingerbread Man" at Columbia. 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25TH. 

4.00 p.m. Quartet sings in chapel. 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27TH. 

4.45 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 
7.00 p.m. Debate, Hubbard Hall. 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28TH. 

12.30 p.m. 8.20 a.m. Monday, Dec. 3. Thanks- 
giving Vacation. 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON CONVENTION 

The sixtieth annual convention of the Delta 
Kappa Epsilon Fraternity was held at Springfield, 
Mass., on October 14, 15, and 16, under the auspices 
of the chapters at Amherst and Williams. The 
convention was one of the most successful and 
largest ever held, there being delegates present from 
thirty-nine out of the forty-one chapters. The pro- 
gram of the convention included a smoker at 
Amherst, several business sessions in Springfield, a 
ride around the country, a theatre party, and a ban- 
quet, which closed the session. The delegates from 
the Theta Chapter of Bowdoin were F. A. Burton, 
'07, and T. E. Hacker, '07. Bowdoin was also rep- 
resented by H. DeForest Smith, '91; L. C. Hatch, 
'95; J. C. Minot, '96; C. M. Robinson, '08; G. P. 
Hyde, '08; A. A. Putnam, '08; A. W. Merrill, '08; 
H. M. Marsh, '09; R. O. Brewster, '09; and H. H. 
Burton, '09. 

BATES WINS THE CHAMPIONSHIP 

The victory of Bowdoin over Maine last Saturday 
gives the State Championship to Bates. This is the 
first time that Bates has had a clear and undisputed 
title. In 1902 Bates and Maine tied for the Cham- 
pionship, but it was generally conceded to Maine 
by comparative scores. 

Bates began the season under discouraging cir- 
cumstances, nine of her previous season's men having 
left college. But by her winning the championship 
great credit is due to Capt. Schumacher, and above 
all to Coach Purington, who, from unpromising 
material, developed the championship team of the 
State. 



168 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 
h. e. mitchell, 1907 r. h. hupper, 1908 
w. s. linnell, 1907 r. a. lee, 1908 

a. l. robinson, 1908 h. h. burton, 1909 

J. S. STAHL, 1909 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 
N. S. WESTON, 1908 



Business Manager 
Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
»tes, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, 10 cents. 

Entered at Post-OHice at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
Lewiston Journal Press 

Vol. XXXVI. NOVEMBER 23, 1906 No. 17 

Owing to the fact that 
Next Orient there will be adjourns in 
all college exercises from 
next Wednesday noon until the follow- 
ing Monday, the next issue of the Orient 
will not appear until Friday, Dec. 7. 



The Sophomore Class has 
Sophomore Hop decided to give a formal 

dance, under its auspices, 
to the members of the football team this Fri- 
day evening. The Orient is glad to see a 
custom started which shall in some way 
recognize the efforts of the football team who, 
whether they win or lose, put in a harder two 
months' fight for the college's name, than do 
the members of any other athletic team. There 
is no college dance, until late in January, and 
a dance like this, open to the whole college, 
paid for by admission tickets, and given in 
honor of our football team, should meet with 
general aproval. 



_. . . . The Orient wishes to call 

Thanksgmng attention to a notice in 

another column relative to 
cuts before and after the Thanksgiving recess. 
As is stated, cuts at either of these times will 
be a serious offense, and all students need to 
bear this in mind. 

The faculty has been exceedingly liberal in 
its treatment of the students in regard to the 
extension of the recess and it is necessary for 
the best interests of the college that there be 
no cutting before or after. Everyone should 
read the notice carefully. 



The Orient would ask 
To the Alumni the alumni to send all the 

alumni personals possible. 
The worth of the college paper to the gradu- 
ate is determined in a large measure by the 
news it contains concerning men in college in 
previous years. The greater part of this must 
of necessity come from the alumni themselves. 
The deaths are usually secured without much 
difficulty but the changes in business, or loca- 
tion and a thousand other items stand a small 
likelihood of reaching the editors except from 
the alumni. All contributions of this kind 
will be a great help in making the Orient 
interesting to the graduate. 



The football season closed 
Our Football Season last Saturday by a victory 
which will serve to wipe 
out the memory of the season's earlier defeats 
and disappointments. The victory over Maine 
showed, as has been so often shown before, 
that Old Bowdoin msut always be reckoned 
with until the last game is over. We con- 
gratulate Captain Drummond, the coaches, 
and the team on the well-earned victory at 
Orono. 

The present season has been unique in 
Bowdoin's football history. Changes in the 
coaching system, eligibility rules, and in the 
game itself, caused confusion and inevitable 
mistakes, and if we profit by this year's expe- 
rience, the next season should be very suc- 
cessful. The season of 1907 may seem a long 
distance away, but it is not too early to pre- 
pare for it. 

While we lose several good men in the 
present Senior Class, there is a wealth of 
good material from which to fill their places, 
without considering the next entering class. 
The letter from "Alumnus" in last week's 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



169 



issue contains ideas which must appeal to 
every one. It must be admitted that both 
undergraduates and alumni do not favor such 
trips as the recent one to Cornell, which are 
undesirable in many ways ; but on the other 
hand, there is a growing sentiment in favor 
of closer relations with Tufts, Wesleyan and 
Williams, whom we can meet on fairly even 
terms. 

We should, if possible, have at least two 
games with New England colleges in Port- 
land every season. These would be con- 
venient for the student body, (which does not 
see the team play as often as it should) and 
would serve to bring Bowdoin before the rest 
of New England, as nothing else could. The 
financial side should not be forgotten, for, the 
splendid patronage which Portland has always 
given to Bowdoin teams would enable the 
management to give liberal guarantees to the 
visiting teams, and make the season a financial 
success. 



NOTICE 

Thanksgiving Recess will extend from 
Wednesday, November 28, at 12.30 p.m." to 
Monday, December 3, at 8.30 a.m. 

All students absent from recitations on 
Wednesday morning or Monday morning, 
without permission from the Secretary, 
obtained in advance, will be placed on proba- 
tion. 

Students are particularly warned not to 
miss trains. 

Kenneth C. M. Sills, 



Secretary of the Faculty. 



SOPHOMORE=FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 

The Sophomore-Freshman football will 
take place to-morrow on Whittier Field. Both 
classes have good teams and are confident of 
winning. 



N. E. I. P. A. CONVENTION 

Duddy, '07, represented Bowdoin at the annual 
convention of the New England Intercollegiate 
Press Association, held at the American House, 
Boston, last Friday evening. After the banquet and 
smoker, Mr. Corbury of the Boston Post gave an 
interesting talk on newspaper work. Twenty dele- 
gates from the various New England Colleges were 
present, making the Convention a most successful 
one. 



College Botes 

Kimball, '07, has returned to college. 

Cleaves, '05, was on the campus this week. 

French Reports will be due December 17. 

A half semester quiz was given in Hygiene 
yesterday. 

Clement Skofield, '05, has been in Brunswick for 
the past week. 

The "Medics" have begun work in the physiolog- 
ical laboratory. 

Evans, '01, passed through here Sunday morning, 
on his way to Mexico. 

Haines, '07, was obliged to leave college last week 
on account of sickness. 

Dr. Dyson of Portland, has replaced Dr. Hos- 
mer on the Medical School Faculty. 

W. W. Fairclough, '08, has been absent from col- 
lege a number of days on business. 

"The Chrystal Plex Carnival" has been the attrac- 
tion at the Town Hall all this week. 

The campus was almost deserted last Saturday 
and recitations were slimly attended. 

The annual initiations of the medical fraternities 
take place shortly after Thanksgiving. 

The football captain for next year will be elected 
probably soon after the "Bs." are awarded. 

Snow, '07, went to Lewiston, Monday, to coach the 
debating team of Lewiston High School. 

A pleasing number of adjourns was granted by 
professors in their courses Saturday morning. 

Maine's mascot, the "Blue Elephant," was on the 
field last Saturday — but failed to save the day. 

Pictures of Speake, McDade and Captain Drum- 
mond appeared in the Boston Globe last Saturday. 

Moulton,' '09, entertained several of his college 
friends at his camp at Prout's Neck, over Sunday. 

Gymnasium work begins immediately after the 
Thanksgiving recess. Have you got your suit 
ready ? 

It is noted with regret that the lecture by Hamlin 
Garland has had to be cancelled on account of 
illness. 

Hupper, '06, has commenced his work as coach 
for Edward Little High School in the Debating 
League. 

The "hot dogs" and "turnovers" of Sparks and 
Morrill are proving popular as nightly features of 
the "Ends." 

Bower, '07, is receiving congratulatons for the 
able way in which he presided at the piano at "Rail- 
road Jack." 

S. G. Haley has gone to Thornton Academy, 
where he will coach the indoor track team for a 
short time. 

An important change has been made recently in 
the hours of collecting the mail from the boxes 
about town. The collection which was formerly 
made at 6 a.m. has been abandoned and in its place 
a collection is now made at 8 o'clock in the evening. 



J 70 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Work in the gymnasium will commence, Monday, 
December 3. 

Willis Haines, '07, left, Friday, for his home to 
be operated on for appendicitis. 

Maude Adams is soon to appear at the Jefferson 
Theatre, Portland, in "Peter Pan." 

All students will regret to learn that "Joe" Boyd 
is seriously ill wtih bronchial pneumonia. 

About a hundred and thirty took advantage of 
the reduced rates to attend the game at Orono. 

A number of the "Medics" were unable to attend 
the game at Orono, on account of a quiz in Physi- 
ology. 

Messer, '09, returned to college, Wednesday, Oct. 
14, but is again confined at his home in Rockland by 
sickness. 

Kendrie, '10, played a violin solo at the Saint 
Paul's Episcopal Church in Brunswick, Sunday 
evening. 

Fiske, '09, and Robinson, '08, led the Bowdoin 
cheering, Saturday, in the absence of the regular 
leaders. 

Thwing, '09, and Webster, '10, attended the Beta 
Theta Pi banquet in Bangor, on the night after the 
game, Saturday. 

At the third meeting of the Faculty Club held 
Monday evening, Dr. Burnett read an interesting 
paper on "Boethius." 

A. O. Pike went to Gardiner last Wednesday to 
begin his duties as debating coach to the Gardiner 
High School. 

Joe Pendleton, '91, refereed the Dartmouth-Har- 
vard game. Mr. Pendleton is acquiring great suc- 
cess as a referee. 

A handsome building structure is being erected 
on the lot formerly occupied by the Greene house 
on Maine Street ! 

The examination in History V. was postponed last 
Friday, but examinations were held in the other 
courses as scheduled. 

The apportioning of the scholarships is now com- 
pleted and interested parties can ascertain full par- 
ticulars at the Treasurer's office. 

On the calendar of the First Parish Church Sun- 
day were the names of eleven students who are 
assisting in the work of the church. 

Those taking English 3 to Professor William T. 
Foster are to have a vacation in writing daily 
themes until after the Thanksgiving holidays. 

The Sophomore Hop takes place to-night. This 
is a new social event in the college — but will prob- 
ably be a very successful and pleasant occasion. 

A bonfire, speeches by the professors, songs and 
cheers, and a rousing welcome of the comers from 
Bangor, was a part of Saturday night's program. 

The Portland Bowling Team, the champion team 
of the State, defeated the Brunswick team three 
straight strings on the Park alleys, Monday evening. 

Bates is thanking Bowdoin for the aid we gave 
her in giving her the title to the state championship 
in football this fall, ft is interesting to notice that 
this is the first time that a state championship in 
football has gone to any other college except Bow- 
doin or University of Maine. 



A rumor was circulated that Francis was seen 
about one of the Fraternity Houses last week. The 
trade in revolvers and guns has been active about 
town ! 

In celebrating the Bowdoin victory Saturday 
evening, the chapel bell was twice turned over, 
making it impossible to ring it for the chapel ser- \ 
vice, Sunday afternoon. 

Professor Little this week explained to the Fresh- 
men the card catalogue of the Library and the 
method of finding books. This took the place of 
the Thursday recitation in English I. 

Duddy, '07, attended the annual initiation and 
banquet of the Kappa Sigma Fraternity at Brown 
University last week. On his return he witnessed 
the Harvard-Dartmouth game at Cambridge. 

Miss Harvey's dancing school bids fair to be 
more popular than ever this winter. Many of the 
students are attending the school, while the first 
Assembly, Monday evening, drew a goodly number. 

The date of the third Hare and Hounds run was 
set for yesterday, November 22. These runs have 
been very well attended this fall and should help 
materially in developing track material for next 
spring. 

The Freshman-Sophomore football game to-mor- 
row, will probably be close and exciting. There 
has been a large number of candidates for both 
teams and the practice has been more thorough 
than usual. 

Several members of the Bangor High School 
football team were entertained at the fraternity 
houses Friday. Saturday the team played Portland 
High in the annual game, which resulted in a tie, 
neither side scoring. 

The Brunswick High School will this winter sup- 
port a boys' basketball team. The team com- 
menced practice Monday afternoon in the Armory 
Hall. Geo. C. Whittemore, a former Andover man, 
will coach the team. 

F. T. Smith, '08, had a narrow escape from death 
or serious injury last Saturday. While standing on 
the running-board of an electric, bound to Orono 
from Bangor, he was struck by a pole and knocked 
off the car, rendering him unconscious for some 
time. 

While on the way to the game last Saturday, Bow- 
doin men were reminded of several different defeats 
painted on the fences at Waterville and Orono. 
We've never attempted to decorate the fence at 
Whittier Field in this fashion, besides the fence 
isn't long enough. 

Cards have been received at college announcing 
the coming wedding of Charles Penney Kinsman, 
ex-'o7, to Miss Hortense Beauharnais Powers, 
daughter of Judge and Mrs. Don A. H. Powers of 
Houlton. The wedding will take place at the 
Episcopal Church in Houlton, Thursday afternoon. 
December 6. 

A book in which all questions, suggestions, and 
complaints can be filed by the students, has been 
placed upon the delivery desk at the Library. The> 
book is in charge of Prof. Little, who will attend 
to all questions asked, and whatever complaints may 
be made. A book of similar nature was kept in the 
Library four years ago, and proved very popular. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



J7J 



The Freshman football squad began practice last 
Monday afternoon. More than enough for two 
teams were present and some lively scrimmage 
work was indulged in. 

Harold B. Weiler, '08, is out of college at pres- 
ent as a result of an operation which he has been 
obliged to undergo for appendicitis. All will be 
glad to learn that the operation was successfully per- 
formed and that the latest reports indicate that he 
is improving as fast as can be expected. 

The Holderness Club held its first meeting on 
Nov. 14, at the room of Gregson, '08. Officers 
were elected as follows : President, Chandler, '07, 
Vice-President and Treasurer, Gregson, '08; Sec- 
retary, Stephens, '10. The club is soon to have a 
shingle and it. is planned to have a meeting at the 
Inn. 

At the next meeting of the Saturday Club, the 
works of Margaret Deland, will be studied and dis- 
cussed. There will be papers upon her work by 
Mrs. William A. Houghton, Miss Frances A. 
McKeen and Miss Annabel Stetson. The works of 
this author are at present in great demand at the 
Library. 

Friday evening a rousing mass-meeting was held 
in Memorial Hall to arouse enthusiasm for the 
Maine game. Capt. Drummond presided, and the 
speakers were Manager Allen, Professor Sills, 
Coaches LaFerriere and Beane, and E. C. Plummer 
of the Class .of '87. All spoke hopefully of the 
Maine game and eulogized the Bowdoin spirit to the 
highest degree. The speech of Mr. Plummer was 
the best that has been given at a Bowdoin mass- 
meeting for a long time. After the meeting the 
bleacher seats were put on sale, and students who 
had not signed their intentions of going with the 
team were given a chance to do so. 



THE FACULTY 

Professor W. T. Foster will speak before the 
Christian Fraternity at Exeter Academy, Nov. 25. 

Prof. Robinson and Mrs. Robinson left Sunday 
for Mexico. They arrived at Chicago on Tuesday 
and there joined the special train which will take 
the delegates to the American Public Health Asso- 
ciation to Mexico. The party takes a considerable 
tour of the southwest and Mexico before arriving 
at the city.- En route they will visit Kansas City, 
Colorado, the Grand Canon, the Garden of the Gods, 
the Petrified Forest, Vera Cruz, and the old ruins 
and natural wonders of that region. The train does 
not arrive in Mexico City until December 2, where 
the meetings of the Association will continue for a 
week. Professor and Mrs. Robinson intend to 
travel somewhat on the way home and are not 
expected to arrive home until after Christmas. 



ART BUILDING NOTES 

Mr. Edward P. Warren, the distinguished expert 
in classical antiquities, through whom the Misses 
Walker secured the Greek Amphora for their col- 
lection, has recently given to the college a marble 
bust of the Emperor Antonius Pius. The work 
dates from the life time of that Emperor (on the 



throne from 138 to i6r A. D.), and in its glossy 
finish shows well the workmanship of the time. It 
is a portrait of great dignity, and has suffered 
only slight mutilation. It is placed on a pedestal in 
the southwest corner of the Sculpture Hall, of which 
it is a distinguished ornament. 

Three other works of sculpture, consisting of a 
low-relief of the Alexandrian Age, a marble Head 
of Christ, it is supposed, and a fragment of Assyrian 
sculpture, have also been received at the Art Build- 
ing from the same source and will be exhibited 
before long. These pieces of original classic sculp- 
ture will be valuable additions to the collections, 
for although of course it is necessary that we have 
more casts of the world famous sculpture, it yet 
adds much to have some examples of the real handi- 
work of the Ancient Romans. 

Professor Johnson has recently asked Professor 
Hutchins to put on exhibition and for sale enlarge- 
ments of the principal photographs which he took 
while abroad last summer, or when on his earlier 
sale. There are now a few of the photographs 
at the Art Building, and the whole will be ready 
for exhibition within a week. 

Within the past week the low relief of Hercules 
has been put in place on one of the pilasters in the 
Sculpture Hall. The light from the dome is of 
excellent effect in showing the good qualities of this 
classical original, which is placed just at the 
side of the bust of Antonius Pius. 

An important addition to the works of American 
artists has just been made to the college collections 
by Mrs. Annie L. Cummings of Portland, who has 
given to the college a set of the valuable illustra- 
tions of Shakespeare's plays, drawn by Mr. F. O. 
C. Darley in the last ten years of his life. These 
drawings are temporarily on exhibition in the Bow- 
doin Gallery, with quotations from Shakespeare, 
showing what point each drawing represents. It 
will be remembered that Miss Walker gave, not 
long before her death, the set of original Darley's 
illustrations of Evangeline now exhibited in the 
Walker Gallery. 

There will be exhibited shortly in the Bowdoin 
Gallery a set of large illustrations of the Parthenon, 
loaned by the Library Art Club. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

On Thursday, November 15, President Hyde con- 
ducted an informal questionaire, and answered such 
"Practical Questions of College Life" as were put 
to him. Questions were written out and passed to 
the President who selected such as were practical 
and answered them. There was much interest 
taken in the meeting and the hall was crowded with 
students. 



VEREIN MEETING 

The Deutscher Verein held the first meeting of 
the year at New Meadows Inn last Friday evening. 
The meeting was a purely business one. J. S. Ley- 
don was elected "Vorsitzender," M. P. Whipple, 
"Schriftwart," J. F. Morrison, "Kassenwart," J. J. 
Stahl, "Bibliothekar," Prof. G T. Files, Prof. R. J. 
Ham, and Neal W. Allen were chosen as a commit- 
tee to secure speakers for the coming year. 



J 72 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HARE AND HOUND 

The second of the series of hare and hound races 
was held Wednesday of last week. The hares, 
Tefft, '09, Ludwig, '10, Kimball, '10, and Simmons, 
'09, succeeded in making their den, the gymnasium, 
about two minutes before they were overtaken by 
the hounds. The course was about eight miles in 
length, and was about as follows: From the gymna- 
sium to the rifle range, across the plains to Coffin's 
Pond, from there through the woods to the Mere 
Point road about a mile to Longfellow's Avenue, 
through Longfellow's Avenue to Coffin's, and from 
there back to the gymnasium. The hounds were 
Colbath, '10, R. D. Morss, '10, P. H. Morss, '10, 
Weeks, '10, Morrison, '08, A. Robinson, '08, D. Rob- 
inson, '07, Chadbourn, '07, Powers, '09, Weston, '10, 
Voter, '09, Sturdevant, '09, Gray, '08, Wing, 10, 
McLaughlin, '10, and Smith, '10. 



THE SHOW 

Now that the football season is over, active work 
will commence on the college show by the Baseball 
Association. It has been decided to present this 
about January 18. A new style of entertainment has 
been planned. The idea of the first half of the show 
is for the curtain to rise on a scene representing a 
fete day or some similar idea. The chorus will be 
composed of students, and then the customary "end 
men" will appear as travelling entertainers. This 
will vary the monotony of the stereotyped minstrel 
show form. The second part will contain a number 
of bright vaudeville sketches. It will be a strictly 
Bowdoin show throughout, by college ability alone. 
Rehearsals will commence directly after Thanksgiv- 
ing, and it is hoped that there will be a generous 
response to the request for help as the aid of all is 
needed in making the show a success. 



PRESIDENT HYDE AT CHAPEL 

At chapel Sunday Pres. Hyde spoke on the im- 
portance of every student taking upon himself some 
particular duty connected with the college life and 
attending to it as though it was a part of his own 
private affairs. In this way, he said, a student 
becomes a leader, and is prepared to take the posi- 
tion of a leader after he leaves college. About 90 
per cent, of the college activities are performed by 
about ten per cent, of the students. Every student 
should be fitted while in college to become a leader 
in some one thing, and not belong to the much larger 
class of those who are led. 



JOHN IRWIN COMING SOON 

It is expected that John Irwin, the baseball coach, 
will come down for a week or ten days directly after 
Thanksgiving to look over the baseball material for 
next spring and make arrangements for the cage 
work. Irwin will appear in the spring about March 
15. All baseball players should make especial 
efforts to see him during this time. 



THE "B" MEN 

At the time of going to press the Orient cannot 
give the exact list of "B" men as the Council meeting 
was not held in time for this issue. On the basis of 
playing the whole of two or parts of three major 
games, which usually include the Maine College and 
Tufts games, the following men would receive the 
coveted letter : McDade, Newman, Garcelon, Com- 
mins, Stacey, Greene, Speake, Gastonguay, J. Drum- 
mond, Stanley, Manter, Lee. Four other men who 
have played one entire game and practically the 
whole of another are Sewall, Ellis, Draper and 
Webber. 



BANOOR BANQUET 

Bowdoin men feel very grateful to the Bangor 
alumni for the fine banquet given the football men 
after the game last Saturday. Bowdoin is noted for 
her loyal alumni, but it is safe to say that none are 
more so than those residing about Bangor. The 
football men fully appreciated their kindness. 



READINGS IN ECONOMICS 3 

For week ending October 4 : 
Johnson, pp. 1-33. 
Hadley, pp. 1-40, 146-163. 

October 1 1 : 
Johnson, pp. 34-107. 
Hadley, pp. 40-56. 

October 18: 
Johnson, pp. 111-183. 
Hadley, pp. 87-90. 

October 25 : 

Johnson, pp. 184-210. 

Hadley, pp. 56-62. 

The American Railway, pp. 267-297. 

November 1 : 

Johnson, pp. 213-257. 

Hadley, pp. 63-100. 

Newcomb, Railway Economics, pp. 120-142. 
November 8 : 

Johnson, pp. 258-304. 

Hadley, pp. 100-125. 

Taussig, Theory of Railway Rates Q. J. E., vol. 
v., pp. 438-465- 
November 15 : 

Johnson, pp. 307-334. 

Hadley, pp. 163-203. 

Hendrick, Railway Control by Commissions, pp. 
8-26, 63-92. 
November 22 : 

Johnson, pp. 335-348- 

Hadley, pp. 203-236. 

Hendrick, pp. 26-63. 
November 29 : 

Johnson, pp. 349-407. 

Hadley, pp. 129-146. 
December 6 : 

Johnson, pp. 408-427. 

Hadley, pp. 236-258. 

Hendrick, pp. 140-161. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



173 



Eleventh Annual Report of Interstate Commerce 
Commission, 5-50. 

December 14 and 20 : 

Ripley, President Roosevelt's Railroad Policy. 
Atlantic Monthly, September and October, 1905. 

Meyer, H. R., Government Regulation of Rail- 
way Rates, pp. 359-397, 449-473- 
Hour examinations will be given on the fol- 
lowing dates, covering readings to such dates : 
October 25, November 22, and December 20. Read- 
ings for remainder of semester will be posted later. 



Hlumni personals 



CLASS OF 1870. 

Hon. DeAlva S. Alexander, '70, has just 
published a very valuable book entitled "A 
Political History of New York." A copy of 
the book, which was presented by the author, 
is now available at the Library. 

CLASS OF 1883. 

Wallace E. Mason, '83, was recently elected 
Suprintendent of Schools at Andover, Mass., 
over a large number of other candidates. This 
is one of the most prominent educational posi- 
tions in the State and one which is much 
sought after. 

CLASS OF 1897. 

Benjamin J. Fitz, '97, was in Brunswick, 
Monday. Mr. Fitz is at the present time a 
rector in one of the large churches of New 
York City. 

On August 4 a son was born to R. S. Hagar, 
'97, in Joplin Missouri. The boy will be 
named after his father, who is now a prosper- 
ous lawyer and is connected with the Con- 
queror Trust Company in Joplin. 

CLASS OF 1903. 

Farnsworth G. Marshall last July was 
elected Principal of the Cony High School in 
Augusta, to fill the vacancy left by the resigna- 
tion of Principal C. S. Cook. 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



CLASS OF 1903. 

Grant Pierce, submaster in the Westbrook 
High School has tendered his resignation to 
take effect at the beginning of the year, which 
would be the close of the present term or at 
once, if a successor is found. 

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Andy 
Havey at their home in Franklin Oct. 29. The 
young man bears the name of Boardman 
Blaisdell Havey. 



See pie Hut a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoiu College 
1906 man who will be in the market for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th t inclusive 
(.afternoon or evening-) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, I feel Biire, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

a. s. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPGOOD'S 



Visit our 

ICE-CREAM 

PARLOR. 




119 Maine Street 
CATERING in all departments a Specialty. 



The College 
Book: Store 

We try to keep a good line of 

STUDENTS' SUPPLIES 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pen, and 
Moore's Non-Leakable Pens. 

F. W. CHANDLER & SON 



Mention the Orient when patronizing our Advertisers. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



The fifty-fourth session of this College of Medicine 
begins December J, J906, and continues seven months. 

A New Building with 

Large, well equipped Laboratories, 
Commodious Lecture Halls, 
Pleasant Recitation Rooms, 

Every Facility for Instruction. 



NUMEROUS CLINICS 



MODERATE EXPENSE 



For Announcement and further information, address 

H. L. WHITE, A.M., Secretary, 

BURLINGTON, VT. 



THE MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Has a carefully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; clinical Conferences; Modified Seminar Methods, and thoroughly Practical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest and finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every respect, and the new laboratories are specially planned and equipped for individual work by the students. 

The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of"Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 

SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of tha Department of Medicine. 




Tffl&rZiji 



REPEATING SHOT GUN 
NEW MODEL N9I7 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By the omission of the take down feature we have 
been able to greatlyreduce the cost of production and at the same time have kept the gun up to the 
famous high /Oar/in standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
barrels are especially bored for smokeless as well as black powder and so chambered that 2H inch or 
v u shells may be used. Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 
reliable and best working gun in existence. We are glad to make it possible for every lover of guns 
and bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so low a price. 
Have your dealer order it for you. 

Send for the 77Zaz&l Catalogue and Experience Book to-day. Free for 3 stamps. 
7j2&2ilarii/i firearms £#,42Willow Street, New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DECEMBER 7, 1906 



NO. 18 



SYRACUSE DEBATE 

According" to present indications it is more 
than likely that Bowdoin will meet Syracuse 
University in debate sometime during the com- 
ing winter. Some time ago, the Bowdoin 
Debating Council received a letter from the 
New York University asking for a debate 
with Bowdoin and signifying a willingness to 
enter into a two-year agreement and intimat- 
ing the advisability of a triangular league 
consisting of Bowdoin, Syracuse and some 
third college some time in the future. 

The matter was considered at a meeting of 
the Bowdoin Council just before the Thanks- 
giving recess and Syracuse notified that Bow- 
doin would be willing to debate if satisfactory 
arrangements could be made. 

A second letter was received the present 
week stating under what conditions Syracuse 
would prefer to debate, among other things 
mentioning faculty coaching. Bowdoin has 
never had faculty coaching and as to just what 
action will be taken in this connection cannot 
yet be stated. A further letter of inquiry has 
been sent to Syracuse to find out if they would 
be willing to give up their system under any 
condition. If they decide not to do so, the 
Bowdoin Council will have to decide whether 
they will be willing to debate under faculty 
coaching arrangements. It is felt, however, 
that some satisfactory arrangements can be 
made by which the matter may be settled. 

The matter of place has, of course, not been 
discussed to any great extent as yet. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS IN ATHLETICS 

Editors of the Orient: 

It is rumored that the Bowdoin Faculty is 
considering the step of refusing to allow 
special students to represent the college in any 
branch of athletics during their first year in 
the college. Speaking as a graduate who has 
closely followed Bowdoin athletic affairs for 
over a dozen years, I sincerely hope that no 
such drastic rule will be passed — at least, not 
until Bowdoin has many more students than 
at present. It would be an injustice to our 



athletic interests and a discrimination unwor- 
thy of the Bowdoin spirit of fair play. By all 
means keep the standard of admission high 
for special students as well as for others, and 
hold them to their work after they are 
admitted, but once admitted do not deprive 
them of any of the privileges of college life or 
deprive the college of any benefits which may 
result from their presence. Does anybody 
urge that they be barred from the debating 
team or from the musical clubs? 

We all know that those whom Bowdoin 
grudgingly admits as special students would 
be welcomed to regular standing in the other 
colleges of the State — not only welcomed, but 
sought after and urged by every manner of 
inducement to go there. If Bowdoin is to 
continue to play any part in intercollegiate 
athletics it cannot afford to place itself under 
the unnecessary handicap of barring out any 
student or group of students whom it deems 
worthy of admission and who maintain the 
required classroom standing. There may 
have been one or two instances in the. past 
decade of special students taking part in ath- 
letics who ought not to have been admitted, 
but this is hardly a sufficient reason for a 
sweeping rule which would shut out the many 
who come to Bowdoin in good faith and who 
have the ability and the disposition to main- 
tain the required rank while playing on the 
eleven or the nine. 

There is no escaping the fact that such a 
rule would turn away from Bowdoin and 
toward other colleges many boys who have a 
liking for athletics and a natural desire to 
participate in them — boys, too, in many 
instances, perfectly able to keep up in their 
work if admitted here. Such students would 
be welcomed to Dartmouth, Amherst, Wes- 
leyan and Tufts, not to mention the other 
Maine colleges, and be eligible to represent 
them at once in contests against us. Such a 
consideration must be allowed some weight 
unless we are to give up athletics together 
as is perhaps the desire of some members of 
the Faculty. The difficulty of gaining admis- 
sion to Bowdoin is already well understood in 
the preparatory schools, and in fact is often 



176 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



exaggerated there by the emissaries of our 
sister colleges who are continually going to 
desirable athletes and saying in substance : "It 
is no use for you to try to get into Bowdoin ; 
come with us." Sometimes they are justified 
in saying this and sometimes they scare away 
from Bowdoin a fellow who could gain admis- 
sion here if he tried for it. In any qase such 
a new rule as is suggested would make things 
still harder for us in the keen and constant 
competition in the fitting schools. I urge 
that by its present high standards of entrance 
and of work Bowdoin is sufficiently handi- 
capped in athletic matters. 

It is occasionally argued that the under- 
graduates put too much emphasis on athletics. 
I fear that some of the members of our faculty 
put too little emphasis on them, and fail to 
see them in their true place in undergraduate 
life and as affecting the welfare of the college. 
I know that Bowdoin victories and defeats in 
athletics mean more to hundreds of her alumni 
than those on the campus are apt to realize. 
Many of the alumni feel that those in charge 
of our athletic interests have been crowded 
full hard enough as it is, and deeply deplore 
any tendency to deplete the numbers of our 
available athletes or to discourage good ath- 
letes from coming to Bowdoin — whether they 
come for one year or for four. Let fitness to 
do the college work, not length of residence, 
be the test of eligibility. 

C. 



GREETING TO PEARY 

Every Bowdoin student who could possibly 
be present was at the Railroad Station on last 
Tuesday and greeted Commander Robert 
Edwin Peary, 'jj, who was on the way to 
New York after his dash to the pole. Com- 
mander Peary made a brief address and was 
cheered again and again by the assembled stu- 
dents. He said in part : 

"I could not resist coming out to see you, 
boys. I am very deeply pleased and proud 
of this greeting. It is gratifying to find that 
Bowdoin students recognize the achievement 
of reaching the farthest north that has been 
reached by any man during three centuries of 
endeavor. I assure you that my memory of 
Bowdoin was never greener than during 
those days in the frozen region. I am glad 
that Bowdoin men feel an interest in me. 
The possession, I believe, of any record of any 



test of skill or strength is a desirable asset 
to a man, an institution or a nation." 

His speech was interrupted by frequent 
cheers, and when he had finished, the students 
took up the yell "Bully for Peary," and kept 
it up until the train had pulled out. 



COMMUNICATION 

To the Editors of the Orient: 

I have noticed during the last two or three 
years a growing tendency to cut down the 
space in the Orient allotted to Alumni News, 
and the resulting scarcity of such news has 
impressed on my mind the necessity of a pub- 
lication devoted primarily to the interests of 
Bowdoin's graduates. Such a magazine 
might be issued quarterly and contain, besides 
news from all classes, corporation and faculty 
news, and undergraduate notes, one or two 
general articles of especial interest to Bow- 
doin men, pertaining to the history of the col- 
lege or the State or to special studies in which 
the members of the Faculty or Alumni may 
be engaged. This publication would furnish 
a medium for the expression of graduate opin- 
ion, and, in its pages, controversies, such as 
those at present appearing in the Orient, 
could be fought to a finish. 

Of course all such details as those above 
suggested would be decided upon after the 
main point, whether or not such a publication 
be instituted. I do not claim any originality 
in this idea ; numerous colleges, East and 
West, can testify to the practicability of the 
idea. William and Mary College, though a 
small institution, has for years published a 
"Quarterly" which has been the source of not 
a little of the early colonial history of Vir- 
ginia. But a Graduates' Magazine should be 
instituted, not because other colleges have 
done so, but because of its own merits. 

The publication of this magazine would call 
for a considerable amount of self-denial on 
the part of those who took it directly in hand, 
but surely the work is worthy of the price. 
We do not for an instant, doubt the loyalty of 
Bowdoin men, but think how much the knowl- 
edge of the doings of her alumni from 1850 
and before to 1906 will increase that Esprit de 
Corps which we so cherished in our under- 
graduate days ! We are justly proud of the 
success of our fellow-alumni, but we only hear 
of some of the most conspicuous achieve- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



177 



merits, and it is safe to say that the names of 
many of our successful alumni are strangers 
to us. The Graduates' Magazine would 
counteract this, and, by keeping the sons of 
Bowdoin in touch with one another, would 
make each one feel more strongly the duty he 
owes to his Alma Mater. 

I am writing this to the Orient in the hope 
that some of the alumni may feel strongly 
enough to push this matter. I know there 
are numerous arguments in favor of it which 
I have not stated for the reason that I believe 
such arguments will readily suggest them- 
selves to all readers. I am confident that if 
such a publication were undertaken, it would 
be a source of pride to all sons of Bowdoin. 

Yours truly, 

George W. Burpee, '04. 

ALPHA KAPPA KAPPA INITIATION 

The annual initiation of the Alpha Kappa 
Kappa Fraternity of the Medical School will 
take place to-morrow afternoon and evening, 
concluding with a banquet at New Meadows 
Inn. 

Following are the men who will be taken 
into the fraternity : A. P. Leighton, R. B. Par- 
ker, C. F. Traynor, E. H. MacMichael, R. G. 
Valladares, R. B. Sprague, J. E. Oran, P. D. 
Blanchard, J. B. Drummond, E. E. Holt, Jr., 
J. H. Collins. 



HARE AND HOUND RACE 

Owing to the unseasonable cold weather 
of the first of the week, no steps were taken 
toward running off the hare and hound race 
for the cup that has been offered by the track 
management. Just when this will take place 
the Orient was unable to ascertain at the 
time of going to press, but Capt. Shorey stated 
that it would occur as soon as the condi- 
tions warranted. There has been fine interest 
in the hare and hound work this fall and it is 
probable that there will be from 15 or 20 men 
in the contest. 



every man is asked to come out. The man- 
ager cannot, of course, call personally on 
every man and ask each one to come out and 
help. This general summons is given and we 
hope all will respond. The "End Men" have 
been selected and active work must commence 
at once if it is to be produced on January 
11, which is the desired date. The produc- 
tion will be produced at least once out of town 
and all helping will be taken on the trips. 
Robert A. Toothaker, of Brunswick, has been 
engfagred to coach the show. 



ANNUAL SHOW 

The first general rehearsal for the Annual 
Show will take place in the Christian Asso- 
ciation Rooms next Monday evening. A large 
number is desired for this production and 



ELLERY CLARK'S LECTURE 

The Orient is unable to publish a report 
of last evening's lecture by Ellery Clark, 
owing to the date of going to press. An 
account will, however, appear in next week's 
issue. 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7TH. 

4.45 p.m. Mandolin Club Rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8tH. 

Alpha Kappa Kappa Initiations. 

SUNDAY, DECEMBER CjTH. 

4.00 P.M. Quartette sings in chapel. 

MONDAY, DECEMBER IOTH. 

7.00 p.m. Glee Club Rehearsal in Christian Asso- 
ciation Room. 
7.30 p.m. Meeting of Chemical Club. 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER IITH. 

4.45 p.m. Mandolin Club Rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 
7.00 p.m. Debate in Hubbard Hall. 

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER I2TH. 

7.30 p.m. New Hampshire Club meets at Delta 
Upsilon House. 

7.30 p.m. Holderness Club meets at Alpha Delta 
Phi House. 

THURSDAY, DECEMBER I3TH. 

7.00 p.m. Christian Association Meeting. 

Professor Foster lectures on Stevenson at Dix- 
field. 

Lawrence D'Orsay in "The Embassy Ball" at 
Empire Theatre, Lewiston. 

FRIDAY, DECEMBER I4TH. 

4.45 p.m. Mandolin Club Rehearsal in Christian 
Association Room. 

6.30 p.m. Deutscher Verein Meeting at New 
Meadows Inn. 

. SATURDDAY, DECEMBER I5TH. 

Bowdoin Calendars issued by 1908, go on sale at 
n Winthrop Hall. Price, $1.00. 



178 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Published 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 
h. e. mitchell, 1907 r. h. hupper, 1908 

W. S. LINNELL, Igo7 R. A. LEE, 1908 

A. L. ROBINSON, 1908 H. H. BURTON, 1909 

J. S. STAHL, igog 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 
N. S. WESTON, igo8 



Business Manager 
Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 



Entered at Post-Office at Brunswick as Second-Clas 


s Mail Matter 


Lewistun Journal Press 


Vol. XXXVI. DECEMBER 7, 1906 


No. 18 



The Orient, in common 
Sympathy with all students, extends 

most sincere sympathy to 
William R. Crowley in his recent bereavement 
in the loss of his father. 



Probably few times in the 
Peary's Ovation history of the college 

has there been accorded to 
an alumnus such a splendid reception as was 
given Commander Peary when he passed 
through Brunswick. Doubless there has 
been more formal demonstrations in the 
past, but certainly none which were charac- 
terized with more enthusiasm or more genuine 
spontaneity of feeling than that given the 
great explorer. 

Although Commander Peary was not 
expecting the demonstration he was, never- 
theless, able to make most fitting remarks. He 
laid little stress on what he had accomplished, 



but spoke with a loyalty toward Bowdoin 
that was an inspiration to every undergrad- 
uate. This fact, with the informality of the 
occasion, made it something that every marl 
who was there will always remember as one 
of the delightful incidents of his college course. 
Bowdoin has turned out many famous sons, 
but it is safe to say that none of them are 
closer to the hearts of the undergraduates 
than is Commander Peary, as was attested by 
the reception accorded him. 



Death of The Orient regrets to 

I A W II announce the loss of one 
* of Bowdoin's best known 

sons in the death of Chief Justice A. P. Wis- 
well, which occurred very suddenly at Boston 
last Monday. Judge Wiswell was a trustee 
and an alumnus of which Bowdoin was proud. 
Bowdoin mourns the loss of one of her loyal 
sons and the State one of her brightest men. 



The Orient is pleased to 
Communications welcome an unusually 

large number of communi- 
cations in the recent issues. Few features of 
the college weekly can be made of more inter- 
est and worth to the college than a frank dis- 
cussion of matters of college importance 
through the columns of the paper. The 
Orient hopes that they will continue to come 
in. during the remainder of the year. 



There appears to be con- 
Hockey siderable interest in hocky 

at present and there is 
reason to believe that the college would be 
able to produce a first-class team this winter. 
There has been more or less discussion of this 
sport for several years past, and two years 
ago arrangements were made for a rink on 
Whittier Field, but there did not appear to be 
the interest necessary to produce a team. 
This is not true now, and it is believed that 
the only thing necessary is the permission of 
the council. 

That a good winter sport would serve to 
enliven interest in athletics in general there 
can be no doubt ; and in view of the unusual 
amount of hockey material in college there 
would seem to be no reason why the sport 
should not be tried, at least experimentally. 
Bowdoin has no basketball team, despite the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



179 



fact that nearly every other college has such 
teams, and if we put out a hocky team it 
would serve to fill the want of a winter 
sport. The report of the committee of the 
Athletic Council, to which was referred the 
matter of hocky, is awaited with interest. 



It has become customary 
College Rally in the past few years for 

the President of the Ath- 
letic Association to appoint the committee for 
the Annual College Rally. Although no for- 
mal motion to this effect was made at the 
recent mass-meeting as has been done pre- 
viously, still the Orient would recommend 
that steps be taken to appoint a committee 
similar to that of the past two years to take 
the affair in charge. We certainly want a 
good, rousing rally next spring and it is none 
too early to begin preparations. 



All will be glad to learn 

Proposed Debate of the ' proposed debate 
with Syracuse University 
and will unite in the hope that the two insti- 
tutions may meet in an intercollegiate contest. 
Bowdoin will, of course, be engaging herself 
in fast company in meeting a • college of 
between 2,000 and 3,000 students, and our 
men would perhaps meet some of the best 
debaters in eastern colleges. On the other 
hand, it is probable that the New York Uni- 
versity will put out at least two teams this 
year, whereas the present plan at Bowdoin is 
to only engage in one. Again Wesleyan, 
which is about Bowdoin's size, has met Syra- 
cuse in years past, and it is understood has 
won more than half of the contests. And in 
any event there would be no disgrace by being 
defeated by one of the largest colleges in the 
East. 

A strong argument in favor of debating a 
first-class institution is that we have far less 
at stake so far as victory and defeat is con- 
cerned. 

With an inferior college there is almost 
nothino- to win and everything to lose. If we 
win there is no great amount of credit, while a 
defeat would be felt keenly. With Syracuse, 
however, such an argument would not hold. 
A defeat would be no disgrace, and a victory 
would be a victory worth while. 

Another argument in favor of such a debate 
would be that it is a step out of the provincial- 



ism in which our athletics have become 
involved, and which is the subject of consid- 
erable dissatisfaction on the part of the 
alumni. Debating with a New York College 
would put one of our teams where many of our 
alumni believe they ought to be, and would 
surely be beneficial. The Orient unites with 
the greater part of the undergraduates in the 
hope that the arrangements may be satisfac- 
torily completed. 



HOCKEY 

At the last meeting of the Athletic Council 
a committee in charge of Files, '08, was 
appointed to investigate the matter of ice 
hockey for the coming winter. Several other 
colleges have decided to introduce the game 
and there is reason to expect that it will be 
possible to arrange games with those institu- 
tions. It has been definitely decided to build a 
regulation rink on Whittier Field so that it will 
at least be possible to arrange class and frater- 
nity games. The committee is busy making 
inquiries as to the methods and expenses of 
hockey at other New England colleges and 
will soon have a report ready. There are a 
number of men in college who have had expe- 
rience in the game, and it ought to be possible 
to secure a good team to represent the college. 
Among those who have played are Abbott, '08, 
Wight, '08, Dresser, '09, Hughes, '09, 
McDade, '09, Purinton, '08, Hamburger, '10, 
Ready, '10, Draper, '10, and others will doubt- 
less be found later. 



CERCLE FRANCAIS 

The Cercle Francais held its first formal meeting 
at the Psi Upsilon House on Tuesday evening, 
Professor Micheleau giving a short and instructive 
address on the French educational system. He 
spoke of how the severity of the French discipine 
tends to develop the mind at the expense of the 
body. The French school boy has no games like 
our football, basketball or baseball and practically 
his only form of exercise is short walks into the 
country, accompanied on all occasions by his teacher. 
The average school boy of France is much younger 
than the average American school boy. This is 
caused by the fact that after the age of twenty-one 
all the men in France are eligible to be drafted into 
the army. Thus if a man desires an education, he 
has to acquire it before he reaches his majority. 

The conversation of the evening was carried on 
almost entirely in the French language, and at the 
close several French songs were sung. The Cercle 
contemplates staging some French plays at the end 
of the year. 



J 80 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



College IRotes 

Catalogues will soon be out. 

Otis, '10, is sick with tonsilitis. 

Reports in French III. will be due December 17. 

Powers, '09, has been appointed monitor of his 
class. 

Sewall, '06, has been passing a few days in Bruns- 
wick. 

The required exercise in the gymnasium began 
Monday. 

The Bowdoin calendars for 1907 will appear Sat- 
urday, Dec. 15. 

A meeting of the Chemical Club will be held next 
Monday evening. 

The campus was deserted from last Thursday to 
Monday morning. 

The Deutscher Verein meets at the Inn on Friday 
evening of next week. 

Dr. Lincoln spoke before the Bowdoin Club of 
Boston last Saturday. 

The mid-semester warnings came out just before 
the Thanksgiving holidays. 

The work of putting the outdoor running track in 
place was begun this week. 

Kenneth Tefft spent Thanksgiving with John Hur- 
ley at his home in Oldtown. 

Fernald, '07, has returned, and is starting in his 
course at the Medical School. 

Dr. Lincoln gave an address at the Episcopal 
Church, Sunday, November 25. 

Joy, ex- '07, and Tobey, '06, are both in the employ 
of the Boston Telephone Company. 

Buck, '09, will be out of college for the next ten 
weeks teaching school in Harrison, Me. 

The New Hampshire Club will meet at the Delta 
Upsilon House next Wednesday evening. 

The Ransom B. Fuller has been taken off of the 
run from Boston to Bath for the winter. 

Collins, '07, returned to college the first of last 
week, and has entered the Medical School. 

S. G. Haley has returned from Thornton Acad- 
emy, where he has been acting as athletic instructor. 

There is a possibility that the "Cercle Francais" 
will put a French play on the stage some time dur- 
ing the year. 

Richardson, '09, has accepted a position as 
instructor in Latin, French, and Mathematics at 
Greeley Institute, Cumberland, Me. 

Gymnasium work began in earnest last Monday. 
Make-up work in the Gymnasium comes on Tues- 
day, at 3.30 and Saturdays at 2.30 o'clock. 

A stack of silver dollars one foot high is offered 
by Callahan's Commoner for the best three short 
stories. Send stamp for particulars to James E. 
Callahan, Editor, 109 Randolph Street, Chicago. 

An effort is being made to have Leland Powers 
speak in Memorial Hall some time in January. The 
address will be given under the joint auspices of the 
college and the Saturday Club. Mr. Powers has 
already spoken twice in Memorial Hall. 



Humphreys, Medic, is ill at his home with typhoid 
fever. 

Miss Mary Ward is presiding at the organ at the 
Sunday chapel services for the present. 

The board coverings to the stone steps about the 
campus have been put on for the winter. 

Redman, '07, spent Tuesday in Augusta for the 
purpose of coaching the Cony High School debating 
team. 

A number of the Portland fellows remained in the 
city, Monday, in order to vote in the municipal 
election. 

A picture of Philoon, '05, who is now at West 
Point, appears in the last week's issue of Leslie's 
Weekly. 

Kendrie, '10, plays at the Congregational Church 
every Sunday and will continue to do so throughout 
the year. 

The Portland and Bangor High School football 
teams played their third tie game of the season on 
Saturday, Nov. 24. 

Mincher, '07, has returned to college from his 
home in Mattawamkeag, where he has been for the 
past two weeks. 

The Works of Margaret Deland were studied and 
discussed at the meeting of the Saturday Club held 
Saturday afternoon. 

Giles, '07, has been at his home in East Brown- 
field for the past two weeks, but is expected to 
return in a few days. 

A Freshman in the Library looking for Profes- 
sor Little, a few days ago, inquired at the desk if 
Professor Small was there. 

Quite a lot of property, such as fountain pens, 
money and caps, was lost in the rush after the Soph- 
omore-Freshman football game. 

Last Monday evening four students took advan- 
tage of the clear night and what snow there was, 
to go tobogganing on the Stand-Pipe Hill. 

The baseball men will be divided into four squads 
for the indoor work this season. Cox, '04, and 
Capt. Files, will each have charge of two squads. 

The members of the Study Class of the First Par- 
ish Church were entertained by Rev. Herbert A. 
Jump at his rooms, Tuesday evening of last week, 

What about Government Clubs, History Clubs, and 
"Poly Con" Clubs? Have they got the fate of this 
year's "Bowdoin Night," or are they simply sleeping. 

College re-opened Monday morning after the 
Thanksgiving recess. Nearly all of the students 
were able to go home, owing to the extension of 
the recess. 

There was a meeting of the "Cercle Francais" 
at the Psi Upsilon House last Tuesday night. Mon- 
sieur Micolot gave a very instructive and entertain- 
ing lecture. 

Henry L. Johnson, ex-'07, a former Brunswick 
boy, but now residing at Berlin, N. H., was a visitor 
in town Wednesday of last week, on his way to 
Wiscasset, where he passed Thanksgiving. 

The Connecticut Club was entertained at the Inn 
after the Sophomore-Freshman football game by 
McMillan, '10. In the evening the club attended 
the entertainment and dance in the Town Hall. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



18J 



Many of the students were at the depot Wednes- 
day evening of last Week to see Francis, the negro 
l ' who escaped from State's prison, and who was being 
taken back to Thomaston. 

Crowley, '08, is still confined in his home, suffer- 
ing from the injuries received some time ago at 
practice. In addition to a broken collar bone, he is 
also threatened with water on the knee. 

McDade, whose ankle was severely injured in 
the class football game, is still unable to be about 
the first of the week, though it is hoped that no 
permanent injury to the member will result. 

Messer, '09, who was here for a few days, left for 
his home in Rockland, Monday, November 26. He 
will not return to college until next September as 
he is obliged to remain at home on account of his 
health. 

Stacey, '09, expects to enter business in Chicago 
at an early date, probably in the wholesale shoe busi- 
ness. Everyone will regret the loss of Mr. Stacey 
and their best wishes will accompany him in his new 
line of work. 

Gould, '08, gave a lecture on "Labrador" under 
the auspices of the Baptist Church at Livermore 
Falls last Friday evening. He also gave the lecture 
before the pupils of the Brunswick Grammar School 
last Wednesday. 

Willis E. Haines, '07, who was recently operated 
on for appendicitis at the Maine General Hospital in 
Bangor, is doing as well as can be expected, although 
at the first of the week he had not been able to 
leave the hospital. 

There was a small attendance at the business 
meeting of the Christian Association on November 
22. The various heads of committees made their 
reports and Allen, '07, gave a short outline of the 
work for the year. 

The illustrated section of last Saturday's Lewis- 
ton Journal, contained an extended account of the 
late Charles Frederick Kimball, together with a 
half-tone picture of one of his paintings in the 
Walker Art Building. 

Most of the students who remained in Brunswick 

over the Thanksgiving holidays went down to Bath 

on Saturday and witnessed the launching of the six- 

v masted schooner "Annie M. Lawrence," from the 

yard of Percy and Small. 

At chapel, on the Sunday before Thanksgiving, 
President Hyde read the Thanksgiving proclama- 
tion and, with that text, spoke of the various things 
the college as a whole should be thankful for, its 
endowment, buildings and, most of all, its loving 
graduates. 

The regular Tuesday evening debate was held in 
the debating room last Tuesday evening, the ques- 
tion being "That the United States Should 
Thoroughly Revise the Tariff." The disputants on 
the affirmative were Delavina, '08, and Merrill, '08; 
for the negative, Mitchell, '07, and Snow, '07. 

On the evening of November 23 there was a rail- 
road wreck at the Brunswick station. The shifting 
engine drawing a freight train struck the eastern 
freight just as it was pulling out from the yard and 
knocked three cars from the track. Very little 
damage was done and the cars were soon put back 
on the rails. 



Just before the Thanksgiving vacation an agent 
called at a number of the students' rooms, claiming 
to be soliciting subscriptions for "Life." He 
required a deposit of a dollar and promised that the 
magazine would arrive the next week. Several fel- 
lows accepted his offer, and were much chagrined 
to find on the bulletin board the next day a tele- 
gram from the Life Publishing Company warning 
them against this supposed agent. 



THE FACULTY 

"Nationalizing Influence of Party," is the 
subject of an article in the November number 
of the "Yale Review," by Prof. Allen Johnson. 

Prof. R. C. McCrea has an article in the 
November number of "The Quarterly Journal 
of Economics," entitled "Taxation of Real 
Estate Property in Pennsylvania." This arti- 
cle is made the subject of a long editorial by 
the Boston Transcript. 

During the past week Prof. W. T. Foster 
attended the meeting of the Educational Con- 
gress in Boston. 

On December 13, Prof. W. T. Foster will 
deliver a lecture at Dixfield. 

Professor Leslie A. Lee has been elected 
President of the Maine Ornithological Society. 

Professor K. C. M. Sills addressed the 
men's meeting at Columbia Theatre, Bath, on 
Sunday afternoon. He spoke on "Some Beau- 
ties of the Bible." 

Professor William T. Foster addressed the 
Christian Fraternity at Exeter Academy last 
Sunday. 



ATHLETIC COUNCIL MEETING 

At a meeting of the Athletic Council held on Nov. 
24 the awarding of the football "B's" for the past 
season was voted on, 16 men receiving the letter. 
The list of men receiving the letter was the same 
as indicated in the last issue of the Orient. 

Another matter that came up for consideration 
was that of ice hockey for the coming winter. After 
some discussion it was decided to leave the matter 
in charge of a committee consisting of Dr. Whittier, 
Redman, '07, and Files, '08. The committee will 
probably report at the next meeting of the Council. 

Robinson, '08, and Ham, '08, were named as the 
candidates for football manager, and Burton, '09, and 
Simmons, '09, as candidates for assistant managers 
to be voted on at the mass-meeting held on the fol- 
lowing Monday evening. 



FOOTBALL MANAGERS 

At a mass-meeting of the student body held Mon- 
day evening, Nov. "26, Carl Merrill Robinson, '08, 
was elected manager of the football team for next 
year, and John S. Simmons, '09 was elected assistant 
manager. 



J 82 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



LIBRARY NOTES 

Within the last month the Library has^ received 
and bought a large number of books, of which a few 
might well be mentioned. President Hyde has pre- 
sented the Library with three instructive bookl 
entitled, "The Packers' Private Car Lines," by J. O. 
Armour, "The History of Two Reciprocity Treat- 
ies," by C. Robinson, and "Selections from The 
Gospels." Ami L Dennison, '95, has presented a 
family genealogy of which he is the author, and 
which is of especial interest to many citizens of 
Brunswick and the neighboring towns ; Dr. C. F. S. 
Lincoln, '91, has given to the Library a book by F. 
L. H. Pott called "A Sketch of Chinese History;" 
and two books have been received from Dr. E. H. 
Cook, '66, entitled, "The Next Great Awakening," 
by Josiah Strong, and "The Paths to Power," by 
F. B. Wilson. 

Among the books that have been purchased the 
following may be of interest: "Life of Mahomet," 
by Sir W. Muir; "Bibliography of J. R. Lowell," 
compiled by G. W. Cook; "History of the United 
States from the Compromise.," by J. F. Rhodes; 
"Arts in Early England," by G. B. Brown; "History 
of Domestic Manners," by T. W. Wright; "The 
Barbarian Invasion of Italy," by P. Villari, and Nel- 
son's Encyclopedia in twelve volumes. 

There may also now be found in the revolving 
book-cases containing recently received books: 
"Physical Education," by Dr. A. Sargent;" "Physi- 
cal Training," by J. H. McCurdy; "Manual of the 
Trees of North America," by C. S. Sargent; "The 
Trail of Lewis and Clark," by O. D. Wheeler ; "The 
Burton-Holmes Lectures," in seven volumes, and 
"The Outdoor Pastimes of an American Hunter," 
by Theodore Roosevelt. 



THE GLEE CLUB 



The make-up of the Glee Club for the coming 
season was announced on Wednesday of last week, 
the following men being selected: E. J. Crowley 
'09; W. R. Crowley, '09; Foss, '08; Kendrie, '10 
Leydon, '07; McMillan, '10; Cox, '08; Ham, '08 
McGlone, '10; Sheehan, '09; Bass, '07; Brown, '09 
Crowell, '10; Gregson, '08; Stevens, '10; Linnell 
'07; Stone, '10. Cushing, '10, will act as pianist. 



FACULTY CLUB 



The Faculty Club held its fourth regular meeting 
in Hubbard Hall last Monday evening. A number 
of members were present and listened to an enter- 
taining talk on "Cassiodorus" by Professor W. A. 
Houghton. The next meeting will be held on Mon- 
day, December 17, when a talk will be given by Dr. 
E. B. Mason on "Saint Benedict." 



FRESHMEN, 10; SOPHOMORES, 6 

The annual football game between the two lower 
classes was held Saturday, Nov. 24, and resulted in 
a victory for the Freshmen by the score of 10 to 6. 
The Sophomores scored their touchdown princi- 
pally through the work of McDade, while the Fresh- 
men secured six points on a double pass and two 
safeties. 



SOPHOMORE HOP 

The Sophomore hop was held Friday evening, 
Nov. 23, and proved itself an enjoyable occasion. 
The dancing was preceded by a short reception, the 
following ladies of the faculty acting as patronesses : 
Mrs. William DeWitt Hyde, Mrs. Henry Johnson, 
Mrs. Roswell C. McCrea, Mrs. William T. Foster 
and Mrs. H. C. Baxter. 

The music was furnished by Lovell's Orchestra oi 
Brunswick, with Kendrie, '10, acting as leader, and 
Cushing, '09, presiding at the piano. An order of 20 
dances was carried out and it was a late hour before 
the happy event drew to a close. Morton served 
refreshments at intermission. 

Among the guests of the evening were the fol- 
lowing: Miss Marion Proctor, Miss Louise Edwards 
and Miss Marion Harmon, Woodfords; Miss Mar- 
garet Sutherland, Brunswick; Miss Dorothy Foss, 
Woodfords; Miss Daisy Hubbard, Brunswick; Miss 
Helen Eaton Brunswick; Miss Olive Griffith, Prov- 
idence, R. I.; Miss Louise Wetherell, Brunswick; 
Miss Marion Ross, Portland ; Miss Marcia Sewall 
and Miss Moody, Bath ; Miss Florence Burrows, 
Portland; Miss Gertrude Christopher, Pejepscot; 
Miss Dora Holman, Winchester, Mass. ; Miss Nellie 
Chase, Yarmouth ; Miss Christine Kenniston, 
Waterville, and others. 



READINGS IN ECONOMICS 1 

Seager : Introduction to Economics. 

Mill, J. S. : Principles of Political Economy. 
For week ending October 4: 

Seager, pp. 1-20. 
October 11 : 

Seager, pp. 20-46. 
October 18: 

Seager, pp. 46-81. 

Mill, Bk. I., Ch. iii. 
October 25 : 

Seager, pp. 81-107. 

Mill, Bk. III., Ch. i. 
November 1 : 

Seager, pp. 107-137. 

Mill, Bk. I., Chs. iv. and vii. 
November 8: 

Seager, pp. 137-169. 
November 15 : 

Seager, pp. 169-198. 

Mill, Bk. II., Ch. i., Sec. 1, and Ch. xv. 
November 22 : 

Seager, pp. 244-274. 

Seager, pp. 198-222. 

Mill, Bk. II., Ch. xvi. 
November 29 : : 

Seager, pp. 222-244. 

Mill, Bk. II., Chs. xi. and xiv. 
December 6 : 

Seager, pp. 274-302. 

Mill, Bk. III., Chs. ii. and iii. 
December 13 : 

Seager, pp. 274-302. 

Mill, Bk. I., Chs. x., xi., xii., xiii. 
December 20 : 

Seager, pp. 385-434. 
January 10 : 

Seager, pp. 434-476. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



183 



January ij : 

Seager, pp. 476-510. 
January 24 : 

Seager, pp. 510-533. 

Mill, Bk. iv., Ch. vii. 
January 31 : 

Seager, pp. 580-604. 

Hour examinations will be given on the follow- 
ing dates, covering readings to such dates : October 
18, November 1, November 22, December 20 and 
January 24. Briefer quizzes will be given at more 
frequent intervals. 



©bituan? 

HON. A. P. WISWELL, 73 

Hon. Andrew P. Wiswell, '73, Chief Justice 
of the Maine Supreme Court, died very sud- 
denly in Boston on Tuesday, December 4. 
Judge Wiswell and his wife had been staying 
at the Hotel Touraine for about a week, when 
the Judge was taken ill with heart disease on 
Monday afternoon and although attended by 
a skilled doctor, died within twenty-four 
hours. 

Judge Wiswell, LL.D., was born in Ells- 
worth, July 11, 1852, and graduated from 
Bowdoin in 1873. He studied law in Ells- 
worth, was admitted to the bar at the April 
term of the Supreme Judicial Court in 1875, 
and at once began the practice of his profes- 
sion in Ellsworth. He was judge of the Ells- 
worth Municipal Court from 1877 to 1881. 
From 1883 to 1886 he held the position of 
National Bank Examiner. He was a dele- 
gate to the Republican National Convention 
of 1884. From 1897 to 1899 he was a mem- 
ber of the Maine House of Representatives, 
being Speaker of that body in the year last 
named. He was appointed Associate Justice 
of the Supreme Judicial Court of Maine in 
1893, an( l m 1900 became Chief Justice. 

Judge Wiswell has for several years been 
a member of the Board of Trustees, and not 
only a loyal alumnus, but one well known by 
our alumni and undergraduates, whom he has 
often entertained at his home in Ellsworth. 
The whole college mourns his death, and 
extends its sympathy to his widow, Mrs. 
Emma Wiswell. 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



See pie Hui a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
1906 man who will be in the market, for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States anil several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

A. S. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPQOOD'S 

BOWDOIN 

Class and Fraternity Flags 

AH Kinds and all Prices e^a- sgs-< 

ESTES, '09, B n HOUSE 



Visit our 

ICE-CREAM 

PARLOR. 




CATERING 



119 Maine Street 
all departments a Specialty. 



The College 
Book Store 

We try to keep a good line of 

STUDENTS' SUPPLIES 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pen 

and Moore's Non=Leakable Pens 

F. W. CHANDLER & SON 



Announcement 



The Popular Monday Evening; 
Dancing Class and Assemblies 



Instruction, 7.30 to 9 P.M. 

Assembly, 9 to 11.15 p.m. 
These have always been special assemblies for college 
students. Private instruction by appointment. 

For further particulars, address 

MISS JENNIE HARVEY, 

Telephone 128-13. 691 Washington Street, Bath, Me. 



Mention the Orient when patronizing our Advertisers. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 





50 CENTS 

Most Comfortable, Durable, Economical Suspender 

made and the only one with a guarantee that 

LeanB absolute satisfaction or your money back. 

One pair of BULL DOG SUSPENDERS 

will outwear three of the ordinary kind 

They villain more and belter rul.l.i-r, hiivt? heavily 
Iver nickeled, non-nislinp: nii'lul [inrta that do not 
rnish or soil I he elm lies ; tou^li, pliable, iiiith-(\-i kil- 
ts imported Bull Dog leather c-nds, easy to button, 
id webs carefully woven bv a special process for 
ronptb and wear. They can be bad in liplit weijrht 
-les and Ih-hvv wfipht \\\ ill u chs in elmiei- putt'-riis 
youtirBsijn-s,forJ50rtM. 
extra lenptbs for the same price at all up-to-date 
dealers or bv mail postpaid on re< eipt of amount. 

Accept ?ws>th.i/, hit" r.<rfh>t W.ttrh Dogof Your 

J/ttrrrtf. SinlaMe for all classes. 

HEWES & POTTER 

Largest Suspender & Belt Makers in the World 

Dept. 4,, 87 LINCOLN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

Booktt ivlng valuable Information about Correct 

Dress a. " Suspender Styles FREE ON REQUEST. 



UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



The fifty-fourth session of this College of Medicine 
begins December J, 1906, and continues seven months. 

A New Building with 

Large, well equipped Laboratories, 
Commodious Lecture Halls, 
Pleasant Recitation Rooms, 

Every Facility for Instruction. 



NUMEROUS CLINICS 



MODERATE EXPENSE 



For Announcement and further information, address 

H. L. WHITE, A.M., Secretary, 

BURLINGTON, VT. 



THE MEOICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Has u carefully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; clinical Conferences; Modified .Seminar Methods, and thoroughly I'ractical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest and finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every re-peel, and the new laboratories arc specially planned and equipped for "individual work by the students. 

The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 

SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of Medicine. 




T^iar/iiz 




REPEATING SHOT GUN 
NEW MODEL N2I7 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By theomission of the take down feature we have 
been able to gready reduce the cost of production and at the same time have kept the gun up to the 
famous high Martin standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and 6nish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
barrels are especially bored for smokeless as well as black powder and so chambered that 2% inch or 
may be used._ Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 
king_ gun in existence. We are glad to make h\ possible for every lover of guns 



2% inch sh, 

and bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so low a price. 
Have your dealer order it for you. 

Send for the ZSartin Catalogue and Experience Book to.day. Free for 3 stamps. 
/A eZ/iarfin fi rearms £«,42WilW Street, New Haven, Ct 

■ '" " ■■' ■ I 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DECEMBER 14, 1906 



NO. 19 



DEATH OF BOWDOIN'S OLDEST GRADUATE 

Bowdoin men everywhere will be pained 
to learn of the death of ex-Gov. Garcelon, '36, 
whose death occurred at the home of his 
daughter in Medford, Mass., last Saturday 
morning. 

Dr. Garcelon was, at the time of his 
death, the oldest living graduate of Bowdoin 
College, and his presence at Commencement 
was an incident of the week to which hundreds 
of alumni of the college, looked to with in- 
terest. 

Ex-Gov. Alonzo Garcelon was born in Lew- 
iston, which had always been his home, 
May 6, 1813. His father, Colonel William Y. 
Garcelon, was a prominent citizen of that 
town, and the owner of a large farm on which 
the son worked during his youth, attending 
the town school during the winter. He after- 
wards studied at the academies in Monmouth, 
Waterville and Newcastle entering Bowdoin 
College in 1832, from which he was graduated 
in 1836. During his college course a consider- 
able part of his expenses was paid by money 
which he earned by teaching school in the 
winter. 

After graduation he taught three terms at 
the Alfred academy, and then began the 
study of medicine at the Dartmouth Medical 
school and under the private instruction of 
the famous Dr. Muzzey. When, in 1838, the 
latter was called to a professorship in the 
Medical college of Ohio at Cincinnati, Mr. 
Garcelon accompanied him to take advantage 
of the greater facilities that a large hospital 
practice and numerous surgical operations 
would afford. Graduating from that institu- 
tion in 1839, Dr. Garcelon returned to Lew- 
iston and began the practice of his profession. 
He soon gained prominence as a physician and 
built up a large practice. 

Politically he was reared a Whig, but his 
admiration of President Jackson for the stand 



he took against nullification led him to join 
the Democrats. Being strongly opposed to 
slavery, however, he afterwards became a Free 
Soiler. During the Civil War he was a 
Republican, but not agreeing with the party 
in its reconstruction policy, and the impeach- 
ment of President Johnson, he withdrew and 
again joined the Democratic party of which 
he has since been a member. 

Dr. Garcelon represented Lewiston in the 
Legislature in 1853 and 1857, and was in the 
State Senate in 1855. In 1868 he was the 
Democratic candidate for representative in 
Congress from the Second District. In 1871 
he was elected mayor of Lewiston, being the 
first Democrat to hold that office. 

When the election of 1878 took place in 
Maine, the State was deeply stirred by a so- 
called Greenback movement. Dr. Garcelon 
was the Democratic nominee for Governor. 

At the election that followed Gov. Conner 
received 56,544 votes, Joseph L. Smith 41,371, 
and Alonzo Garcelon 28,218. In the State 
Legislature, to which the election was referred, 
because no candidate had, as the law required, 
a majority of the votes cast, the Republicans 
in the House of Representatives had 65 mem- 
bers, while the Democrats and Greenbackers 
combined had 86. The duty of the house was 
to choose two persons having the highest num- 
ber of votes, and Dr. Garcelon and Smith 
received 85 votes each. 

The procedure then was to submit these 
two names to the Senate for final choice. In 
that body there were 20 Republicans and 11 
Greenbackers, and the Republicans chose 
Garcelon, the Democrat, instead of the Green- 
backer, Smith. 

Dr. Garcelon married Ann Augusta Wal- 
dron of Somersworth, N H, who died in 
1857, leaving four cihldren. In 1859 he 
married Olivia N. Spear of Rockland. They 
had one daughter. 

The funeral was held from the City Hall 
in Lewiston, Wednesday afternoon, in the 
presence of the largest assemblage of the kind 
ever held in that city. President William 
DeWitt Hyde delivered the eulogy. 



\Z6 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



LECTURE BY ELLERY CLARKE 

Ellery H. Clarke, the American all-round 
track champion, gave a pleasing address in 
Memorial Hall, on Thursday evening of last 
week upon, "Track and Field Athletics." The 
address was given under the auspices of the 
Bowdoin Christian Association, and its pur- 
pose was to arouse enthusiasm in track 
team work. The hall was well filled with 
interested listeners, and the remarks of Mr. 
Clarke made a fine impression. 

In opening, Mr. Clarke stated that athletics 
should be considered under three heads, phy- 
sical, mental, and moral. He spoke first of 
the physical side, and said that a reasonable 
amount of athletics is good for everybody. 
Athletics are divided into so many branches 
that a man of any build or weight can 
find some branch which is suited to him, 
and which he can follow. No bad results 
need result from athletics, but on the other 
hand, they do a man much good in building 
up his body. The only danger is, that a boy 
may begin athletic work when too young, and 
thereby injure himself. 

Speaking of the mental side of athletics, Mr. 
Clarke stated that this is the chief charm of 
every athletic event. Brains are needed in 
every form of athletics, for there is a right 
way and a wrong way of performing every 
event. Many coaches do not thoroughly 
understand this, and for this reason, there are 
only a few good coaches in the country. 

The moral side was the last considered by 
Mr. Clarke. He stated that athletics should 
be played fair, and that the best man should 
win. Men should go into the games for fun, 
and not with the simple idea of winning. At 
the schoolboy age, the athletics are not far 
enough advanced to fully understand the dif- 
ference between right and wrong, and accord- 
ingly unfairness is often seen in the school 
games. 

A fine set of lantern views was exhibited, 
illustrating the various positions of well- 
known men in the dashes, and in the distance 
runs. The old form of hurdling was shown, 
and also the modern, and better form. Views 
of well known college men and professionals, 
taken while in the act of performing the 
several jumping events were next shown. The 



last of the events shown were the weights. 
A series of pictures taken at the Olympic 
games in '96 at which Mr. Clarke was one of 
the winners, closed the series. 

In closing, Mr. Clarke eulogized B. C. Mor- 
rill, '10, who at present is coaching the track 
squad. Mr. Clarke and Morrill have been 
friends for many years, and Mr. Clarke 
stated that he knew what he was saying when 
he told the students that in Morrill they had 
a valuable man. He hoped to see the track 
team victorious this spring in the Maine meet, 
and next year, if not this year, in the New 
•England meet. 

At the close of the meeting hearty cheers 
were given for both Mr. Clarke and Morrill. 



IN MEMORY OF JUDGE WISWELL 

To the Bowdoin Orient: 

Bowdoin commencements will not seem the 
same again to the Class of '73 because Andrew 
Wiswell has gone. We all came to look for- 
ward to meeting him as one of the most pleas- 
ant events of commencement time. He was 
so fond of meeting his classmates, and took 
such genuine pleasure in their company, that 
he seemed to count it a personal loss if those 
who could do so, did not attend all the class 
reunions. And at such gatherings he was 
in his happiest moods. Modest about his own 
achievements, he took great pleasure in hear- 
ing of the success of any of his classmates, 
and no one was more ready with heartfelt sym- 
pathy for any who had met with reverses. 
Amidst all the manifestations of sorrow 
throughout the State, from the Chief Execu- 
tive to the humblest citizen, none will be more 
genuine and heartfelt, than that of the class 

of '73- 

D. A. R. '73. 



LAST SUNDAY'S CHAPEL 

At last Sunday's chapel exercises President 
Hyde spoke in a feeling manner of the late 
Judge Wiswell, paying a splendid tribute to 
the deceased, both as a man and as a judge. 
In the course of his remarks President Hyde 
said : "Genial and courteous as a man, clear 
and thorough as a lawyer, fair and expedi- 
tious as a judge, he fulfilled socially, profes- 
sionally and personally the high requirements 
of the exalted office which he held." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



187 



$5,000 GIFT 

The announcement is made that Bowdoin 
college has, by gift of W. V. Cole, prin- 
cipal of Wheaton seminary at Norton, Mass., 
acquired a new lectureship. The sum of $5000 
has been given to the college by Prof. Cole in 
/ memory of his late wife, Mrs. Annie Talbot 
Cole, to found a lectureship on subjects 
pertaining to educational advancement. The 
income of the bequest only is to be used and 
the faculty feel much pleased at the gift as 
it "fills a long felt want," providing a lecture- 
ship that the college has needed for a long 
time. . 



FRENCH PLAY THIS WINTER 

The Cercle Francais has decided to present 
a comedy entitled "Les deux Sourds." The 
parts have not yet been assigned, but as soon 
as this is done the club will get to work so as 
to put this play on the stage by the first of 
March. It will probably be given at Bruns- 
wick and before the "L' Alliance" of Portland. 
With the completion of the present text-book, 
a collection of Lessing's early plays, the class 
in German 9 has already covered some eight 
or nine thousand lines of hard, archaic Ger- 
man prose, and will undoubtedly in the course 
of the year cover far more ground than has 
ever been done by any class in the history of 
the college. 



ALPHA KAPPA INITIATION 

The annual initiation and banquet of 
the Theta Chapter of the Alpha Kappa 
Fraternity was held last Saturday afternoon 
and evening and was attended by a large num- 
ber of the alumni of the chapter. After the 
dinner at the Inn toasts were responded to and 
a social hour indulged in. Dr. Francis J. 
Welch of Portland acted as toastmaster. 

The officers of the fraternity are : President, 
C. Arnold Wyndham ; Vice-President, George 
A. Parcher; Treasurer, Sidney E. Pendexter; 
Recording Secretary, Willard N. Bunker ; Cor- 
responding Secretary, Arthur L. Jones; Mar- 
shal, Walter I. Merrill; Chaplain, Elmer M. 
Cleaves; Warden, John L. Murphy. 

Those seated at the tables were as follows : 
Frederic H. Gerrish, M.D , Edson S. Cum- 
mings, M.D., Francis J. Welch, M.D., Frank 



Y. Gilbert, M.D., Daniel A. Barrell, M.D., 
Ernest V. Call, M.D., John R. Bruce, M.D., 
William P. Hutchins, M.D., Robert H. Don- 
nell, M.D., B. H. Mason, C. A. Wyndham, 
Harold J. Everett, Karl B. Sturgis, John A. 
Greene, George H. Stone, Seth S. Mullin, 
Arthur L. Jones, Harold T. Bibber, John H. 
Woodruff, W. E. Youland, Jr., John L. Mur- 
phy, Walter I. Merrill, Sidney E. Pendexter, 
George Parcher, Elmer M. Cleaves, James T. 
Cox, Eugene E. Holt, Jr., Joseph B. Drum- 
mond, James H. Collins, Paul D. Blanchard, 
Charles F. Trayner, Adam P. Leighton, Jr., 
Richard G. Valladares, J. Cahn Oram, Ralph 
B. Sprague, Ralph B. Parker, Earle H. McMi- 
chael. 

The names of those who were received into 
the fraternity appeared in last weeks' Orient. 



PHI CHI INITIATION 

The annual initiation of Gamma Gamma 
Chapter of the Phi Chi Fraternity of the Med- 
ical School will be held in Portland, Saturday, 
Dec. 15. The initiation will be followed by a 
banquet at the Congress Square Hotel. After 
the banquet Dr. Richard C. Cabot of Boston 
will speak on "Medicine versus Surgery as a 
Profession." The initiates are H. H. Bryant, 
Jr., E. J. Brown, C. H. Stevens, B. H. Abbott, 
L. N. Carpenter, C. F. Deering, C. J. Fernald, 
C. F Thomas, Jr., J. A. C. Milliken, L. F. 
Hall, W. J Fahey, W B. Trickey, B. W. Rus- 
sell. 



ZETA PSI CONVENTION 

The Zeta Psi Fraternity annual convention 
will be held with the Tau Chapter at Lafayette 
College in Easton, Penn., on Jan. 11, 1907. 
Seth Haley, '07, has been chosen the delegate 
of the Lambda Chapter of Bowdoin College. 



QUILL BOARD 

At a meeting of the 1906 Quill Board held 
last Friday evening the new board was elected, 
the following being selected : A. T. Gould, 
'08; P. H. Powers '08; M. C. Donnell, '08; 
A. H. Ham, '08; M. P. Cushing, '09; P. J. 
Newman, '09. 

The new Board met at the Zeta Psi House, 
Tuesday at 2.30 p.m. for the purpose of elect- 
ing an editor-in-chief. Paul Hussey Powers, 
'08, was chosen for the position. 



188 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 
h. e. mitchell, 1907 r. h. hupper, 1908 

w. s. linnell, 1907 r. a. lee, 1908 

a. l. robinson, 1908 h. h. burton, 1909 

J. S. STAHL, 1909 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 
N. S. WESTON, 1908 



Business Manager 
Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 

Entered at Post-Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
Lewiston Journal Press 



Vol. XXXVI. 



DECEMBER 14, 1906 No. 19 



n ,. . Again this week Bowdoin 

n ^ ea n ° . mourns the loss of one of 
Ex=Gov. Garcelon her begt known alumni 

In the death of ex-Governor Garcelon the 
college not only loses her oldest graduate, 
but a man of whom she was particularly- 
proud. Ex-Governor Garcelon has been appro- 
priately called "Maine's Grand Old Man." 
A long and useful life, filled with the elements 
that go to make up true success, the whole 
State as well as the college, feels a genuine 
loss. For years his presence at Bowdoin's 
Commencement has been an incident which 
the young as well as the old have looked for- 
ward to as one of the inspiring incidents of 
Commencement day. Having the distinction 
of being the oldest living graduate, as he 
headed the line of march he made a picture 
that hundreds of Bowdoin men will always 
associate with Commencement, and the gradu- 
ation day exercises to the older graduate will 
never be quite the same. 



It is planned to issue the 
Next Issue next Orient on Thursday 

of next week, instead of 
Friday, owing to the fact that many of the 
students will be going home in the early part 
of the latter day. 



Plans are being made for 
Track Squad the formation of a track 

squad to meet three times 
a week for regular work. This work will be 
additional to the regular gym. work, but will 
doubtless prove of great benefit to the candi- 
dates for next spring's team. It is to be hoped 
that a large number of men will enter the 
squad. 



The Orient hopes that 
College Show every one who possibly 

can will turn out for the 
Show rehearsals which are about to begin. 
The annual show has proved itself to be one 
of the delightful events of the college year 
and it will be necessary that there be the best 
of interest in order to keep the entertainment 
up to the standard of past years. The Base- 
ball Association wishes to make it as great a 
financial success as possible and genuine sup- 
port on the part of the students is the only 
thing that can make it so. 



The first college tea of the 
First College Tea present winter will be held 

this afternoon in Hubbard 
Hall, and it is hoped that there may be a large 
attendance of the students. These teas have 
been held for the past three years and have 
proved themselves among the pleasant events 
of the winter season. They are designed to 
encourage a closer acquaintanceship between 
the students and the members of the Faculty 
and their families and as such may be made 
occasions of pleasure and profit. 



The Orient congratulates 
Track Coach the college on the action of 

the Athletic Council in 
selecting Morrill, 'io, as track coach for the 
coming season. In so doing they have not 
only saved a large sum of money, but have 
secured the services of a man who has a first- 
class knowledge of athletics, if the recom- 
mendations of some of the best authorities may 
be trusted. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



l& 



There was a natural hestitation on the part 
of those in charge about selecting Mr. Morrill, 
owing to the fact that the step was something 
of a departure and in the fear that the case 
would open us to criticism in some quarters. 
On mature consideration, however, it was felt 
that the step was most advisable. Many of 
the larger colleges have undergraduate coach- 
ing and it is safe to say that the only reason 
that smaller institutions have not done the 
same, has been because of the absence of com- 
petent men. And if at this time Bowdoin has 
such a man in her student body there is no 
reason whatever that he should not be per- 
mitted to coach. 



Bowdoin was pleased to 
Mr. Clarke's Lecture have the opportunity of 
welcoming Ellery H. 
Clarke on Thursday evening of last week and 
of listening to his fine lecture on "Track and 
v Field Athletics." As is well known, Mr. 
Clarke is not only one of the best athletes in 
the country but is also of the kind that is 
admired. He is a firm believer "In fair play 
and may the best man win," and for this 
reason also his lecture was one of peculiar 
interest. 

Mr. Clarke graduated from Harvard in '96 
and from the Law Schol in '99. He was the 
winner of the high and broad jumps at Athens 
in '96, the winner of the National All-Round 
Track Championship in '97 and again in '03. 
He has a collection of nearly 300 prize cups, 
trophies and gold and silver medals, which 
he has won at different contests. 

Mr. Clarke has been a member of the Bos- 
ton School Board for two terms, being the 
chairman of the Committee on Hygiene and 
Physical Culture. He is also the author of 
well-known law books, dealing with electric 
railways. He is much interested in settlement 
work, having lived three years in the poorer 
district of Boston. He is also a member of the 
Boston Athletic Association. 

The college owes thanks to Mr. Clarke for 
his kindness in delivering his lecture free of 
charge, and also to Morrill, '10, who was 
instrumental in bringing Mr. Clarke to us. It 
is said Mr. Clarke may make Bowdoin again 
some time in the spring, and if he does he is 
assured of a warm welcome. 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, DECEMBER I4TH 

3.00 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal, in Memorial 
Hall. 

4-6 p.m. First College Tea, in Hubbard Hall. 

6.30 p.m. Deutscher Verein meeting at New 
Meadows Inn. 

7.30 p.m. American History Club meeting at Zeta 
Psi House. 

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15TH 

1. 00 p.m. Glee Club rehearsal in Christian Asso- 
ciation Room. 

2.30-3.30 p.m. Make-up work in Gymnasium. 

7.30 p.m. Meeting of Penobscot Club at D. K. E. 
House. 

Phi Chi Medical Fraternity initiations in Portland. 

Bowdoin Calendars issued by 1908, go on sale at 
11 Winthrop Hall. Price, $1.00. 

SUNDAY, DECEMBER l6TH 

4.00 p.m. Solo by A. O. Piike, '07, in chapel. 

MONDAY, DECEMBER I7TH 

7.00 p.m. Glee Club rehearsal in Christian Asso- 
ciation Rooms. 

7.30 p.m. Rehearsal for Annual Show in Christian 
Association Rooms 

8.00 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hal|. 

Dr. E. B. Mason speaks on St. Benedict, before 
the Faculty Club, in Memorial Hall. 

French reports due. 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER l8TH 

2.30 p.m. Track squad work in Gymnasium. 
3.30-4.30 p.m. Make-up work in Gymnasium. 
7.00 p.m. Cercle Francais meets at D. K. E. 
House. 
7.00 p.m. Debate in Hubbard Hall. 
Sophomore Themes due. 

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER I9TH 

2.30 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

7.30 p.m. Connecticut Club meeting at Alpha 
Delta Phi House. 

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20TH 

2.30 p.m. Track squad work in Gymnasium. 

7.00 p.m. Christian Association meeting. Address 
by Prof. Anthony, D.D., of Lewiston. 

8.30 p.m. Glee Club rehearsal in Christian Asso- 
ciation Room. 

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21 ST 

4.30 p.m. -8.20 a.m. January 2. Christmas vaca- 
tion. 

8.00 p.m. Alpha Delta Phi Dance at Pythian Hall. 

8.00 p.m. Theta Delta Chi Dance at Chapter 
House. 



FOOTBALL CAPTAIN 

At a meeting of the football men held last 
Friday afternoon, William R. Crowley was 
elected captain of the 1907 football team. 
Crowley has played on the 'Varsity team for 
the greater part of the past two years, and is 
one of the most popular men in college. 



190 



BOWDOTN ORIENT 



COLLEGE TEAS 

This afternoon the ladies of the Faculty will 
give the first of the series of four college teas 
that will be held during the winter. The 
ladies who will receive are Mrs. Hyde, Miss 
Chapman, Mrs. Lee, and Mrs. Ham, while 
those who will take charge of the refreshment 
tables are Mrs. Houghton, Mrs. Henry John- 
son, and Mrs. Woodruff. The special guests 
of the afternoon will be the young ladies of 
Brunswick and no doubt a large number of 
students will attend. 

The dates for the other teas are January 
ii, when the special guests will be invited 
from Portland; February 15 ,with guests from 
the cities and towns on the Upper Kennebec, 
and March 15, with guests from Lewiston, 
Auburn, and Bath. 



MANDOLIN CLUB 

The announcement of the personnel of the 
Mandolin Club was made last Tuesday morn- 
ing, the following men being named : 

First mandolins — Crowley, '09 ; Brewster, 
'09 ; Bower, '09 ; Hughes , '09 ; Stone, '09 ; 
Stone, '10; Peters, '10. 

Second mandolins — Percy, '08 ; Purinton, 
'08; Crowell, '10; Pickard, '10. 

Mandola — Kane, '09. 

Guitars — Weed, '07 ; Morrell, '07 ; Giles, '07. 



ZETA PSI DANCE 

The members of the Zeta Psi Fraternity held a 
most enjoyable dancing party at their chapter house 
last Friday evening. The patronesses were Mrs. 
Augustus Champlin of Portland, Mrs. Henry John- 
son and Mrs. Hartley C. Baxter of Brunswick. 

Among the guests present were : Miss Geraldine 
Fitzgerald, Miss Geneva Fitzgerald, Miss Helen 
Thaxter, Miss Elizabeth Bates, Miss Louise Edwards, 
Miss Mary Champlin of Portland ; Miss Lida Baker 
of Boston ; Miss Gertrude Christopher of Topsham ; 
Miss Louise Weatherill of Brunswick; Miss Mollie 
Pearse of Fort Fairfield; Miss Beatrice Coughlin of 
Augusta, and Miss Florence Freeland of Fairfield. 
Arthur H. Ham, '08, Robert Hale, '08, and Thomas 
R. Winchell, '07, and W. B. Drummond, '07, were 
also guests. 



BIBLE STUDY 

The classes for Bible Study to be conducted under 
the auspices of the Christian Association will begin 
in a week or two. 

The classes will be composed in three divisions, 
the leaders being as follows : 

For 1907 and 1908, C. W. Snow, '07; for 1909, 
Rev. Mr. Coombs, '08; for 1910, Gardiner Cole, '09. 



College Botes 



Smith, '10, was at home over Sunday. 

Crowley, '08, returned from Bangor, Monday. 

A number of students went home to vote on Mon- 
day. 

Dr. Lincoln has gone to Philadelphia for the 
winter. 

Coach Laferriere was on the campus Sunday and 
Monday. 

R. W. Smith, '10, went home Tuesday on account 
of illness. 

John Greene, '05, spent Sunday at the Delta Upsi- 
lon House. 

The Deutscher Verein will me.et at New Meadows 
Inn this evening. 

Spurling, '10, is at his home in Northeast Harbor 
because of illness. 

The Theta Delta Chi Fraternity will give a dance 
on Friday, the 21st. 

Twing, '09, has left college and will shortly enter 
Syracuse University. 

Adjourns in English I. were granted by Prof. 
Wendell last Saturday. 

Pictures of Morrill, '10, appeared in several of the 
Boston papers last week. 

Snow, '07, entertained the members of the Quill 
Board last Friday evening. 

Owing to the cold weather, many double windows 
are appearing at the Ends. 

The football team sat for pictures last Friday 
noon at the Webber studio. 

Hackett, Colby, '09, has been spending the past 
week at the Delta Upsilon House. 

Several students attended the dance held at West- 
brook Seminary last Saturday evening. 

Boyce, '08, has returned from Portland where he 
has been working for the past two weeks. 

There are several cases of sickness around the 
Ends, but nothing serious has been reported. 

A change in the schedule of the Boston & Maine 
and Maine Central went into effect, Monday. 

D. F. Koughan, '09, is absent from college on 
account of the serious illness of his mother. 

Several lives were lost at a recent fire which com- 
pletely destroyed the Chi Psi House at Cornell. 

R. W. Giles, '07, has returned to college after a 
prolonged stay on account of business at home. 

Next week will be a rather strenuous one, as 
examinations will be given in many of the courses. 

A number of the students are attending Miss Har- 
vey's Monday evening dancing school at Bath. 

Weed, '07, has returned from his home in Bethel, 
where he has been sojourning on account of illness. 

Dr. E. B. Mason will speak before the Faculty 
Club next Monday evening. His subject will be 
"St. Benedict." 

There will be a dance and house party given by 
the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity Friday, the 21st. It 
will be held in Pythian Hall. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



in 



George U. Hatch, '06, is spending a few days in 
college. 

R. H. Ellis, '09, has been out of college for a few 
days the past week. 

The Sophomore delegation of the D. K. E. frater- 
nity held a banquet at the Inn, Saturday evening. 

Piper, '07, was out of college last week employed 
on a survey in the northern part of New Hampshire. 

The steps on several of the college buildings are 
in a dangerous condition, owing to heavy coatings of 
ice. 

The Freshman delegation of the Alpha Delta Phi 
fraternity had a banquet at the New DeWitt last 
week. 

Lester Adams, '07, spoke on "My Experiences in 
Labrador" last Sunday evening at the Union Church 
in Bath. 

Derby Stanley, '10, recently shot a large white 
owl near South Appleton Hall. He will have it 
mounted. 

Houghton, Deering High, '08, was the guest of 
E. S. Bagley, '08, at the Beta Theta Pi House over 
Sunday. 

Farnsworth G. Marshall, Bowdoin, '03, now Prin- 
cipal of Cony High School, visited the college over 
Sunday. 

Keith's Theatre at Lewiston has been a leading 
attraction for many of the students during the past 
two weeks. 

The members of the American History Course 
will meet at the Zeta Psi House this evening for 
organization. 

A picture of the University o f Maine football 
team was published in the Lewiston Journal last 
Saturday night. 

C. W. Snow, '07, supplied Rev. Oscar Peterson's 
pulpit at the Congregational Church in Cornish, 
Sunday evening. 

Pendleton, a former Bowdoin football coach, was 
on the campus the past week in the interest of 
Wright-Ditson Co. 

Roberts, '07, Snow, '07, Otis, '07, Duddy, '07, 
were in Cornish over Sunday, the guests of Rev. 
Oscar Peterson, '06. 

Commins, '10, will be employed for seven weeks 
this winter as timekeeper for the American Ice Com- 
pany on the Kennebec. 

The Bangor Daily News expressed its gratification 
at W. R. Crowley's election to the football captain- 
ship, and extends to him its best wishes. 

McDade, '09, who has been confined by an injured 
ankle received in the Sophomore-Freshman game, 
has so far recovered as to attend recitations. 

There have been several exciting contests for Fra- 
ternity shields at the different chapter houses this 
week. These were conducted by Davie, '10, who is 
an agent for them. 

Given's corner store has changed hands. William 
McFadden has bought the store and will establish 
a lunch room as well as continuing the confectionery 
and tobacco departments. 



The members of the Gardiner High School 
Debating Team were entertained last Tuesday by 
A. O. Pike at the Zeta Psi house. 

It was something of a coincidence that the oldest 
living graduate of Bowdoin, ex-Governor Garcelon, 
aged 94, and of Colby, Rev. William Howe, aged 
100, died in the same week. 

Work on the outdoor running track has com- 
menced. The new regulations corners such as are i- 
used in the B. A. A. are to be put in, much to the 
delight of those interested in running. 

Through the kindness of the Faculty, the Junior 
Assembly Committee announces that two of the 
College Teas will take place on the afternoons pre- 
ceding the Junior Assemblies, Jan. II and Feb. 15. 

The work on the skating rink on Whittier Field 
has commenced and is now progressing rapidly. The ( 
rink, which is to be 180 feet long and 80 feet wide, 
will probably be finished by the Christmas holidays. 

Several members of debating teams from the Gar- 
diner and Cony High Schools attended the debate 
held in Hubbard Hall last Tuesday, since the sub- 
ject debated was the same one that they have chosen 
for their preliminary debate. 

J. E. Crowley, '09, had his cheek bone fractured 
in a basketball game at Bath, Wednesday evening. 
For some time the attending physicians feared con- 
cussion of the brain, but happily the injury did not 
prove as serious as was feared. 

At a recent meeting of the stockholders of the 
Brunswick Electric Light and Power Company, a 
syndicate secured control of the company. It is 
probable that the syndicate will erect a new power 
station on the site formerly occupied by the Andro- 
scoggin Pulp Mill. 

The regular Tuesday evening debate was held 
in the debating room at Hubbard Hall, last Tuesday 
evening, the question being "That the peaceable 
annexation of Cuba would be for the best interests 
of the United States." Affirmative : Erskine, '07, and 
Morrison, '08. Negative : W. Drummond, '07, and 
Roberts, '07. 

This year the business manager of the Quill will 
be chosen from the. Class of 1909. All Sophomores 
who care to compete should apply as soon as pos- 
sible to Powers, '08, Chairman of the Board. Under 
the future arrangement there will be an ample 
opportunity for an energetic, business-like fellow 
to "make good." 

Rev. Edward F. Sanderson who preaches in the 
Church on the Hill and conducts college chapel next 
Sunday, Dec. 16, is pastor of the Central Congre- 
gational Church, Providence, R. I., a church attended 
largely by Brown University students. He is the . 
kind of man who when an undergraduate in 
Amherst College was tennis champion and leading 
man in all dramatics and social life, and 
later when in the theological seminary he left 
in order to enlist for the Spanish War. To-day, 
though scarcely more than thirty years old, he is 
one of the most popular preachers in the denomina- 
tion, especially to college audiences. Students will 
be especially interested in next Sunday's service, 
both at the church and in chapel. 



J92 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The D. K. E. Fraternity will hold its annual house 
party on January 25. 

The Orient hopes to contain a review of the last 
Quill in next week's issue. 

Doherty, '07, plans to leave college for about two 
months to engage in work. 

President Hyde left this forenoon on^a week's 
trip to Massachusetts and other states, embracing 
several lectures and attendance on important meet- 
ings of various kinds. 



THE FACULTY 

At a convention of the New England Association 
of Mathematical Teachers, held at Simmons College, 
Boston, last Saturday, Bowdoin was well represented, 
there being four Bowdoin men present, Prof. Moody, 
'82, J. F. Eliot, '73, W. A. Robinson, '76, and I. P. 
Morss, '90. 

President Amen of Exeter, was a guest of Presi- 
dent Hyde last Monday night. 

Prof. W. B. Mitchell was in Waterville last Sat- 
urday, where he attended a meeting of the executive 
committee of the Maine Teachers' Association. 

Prof. H. L. Chapman delivered a lecture on "Rob- 
ert Burns" last Friday evening at Damariscotta, 
under the auspices of the Skidompha Library Club. 



HEBRON CLUB 

The Hebron Club met with Hupper, '08, Saturday 
evening, and elected the following officers for the 
year: President, Stetson, '07; Vice-President, Hup- 
per, '08; Secretary and Treasurer, Ellis, '09. Com- 
mittee of arrangements, Sparks, '09, Morrell, '09, 
Gray, '08. The club now has a membership of sev- 
enteen and will hold a banquet at the Inn the first 
week in January. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Yesterday evening Leroy Coons, '08, spoke before 
the Christian Association on "The Bible from a 
Literary Standpoint." At the time of the Orient's 
going to press, the Association hoped to have ready 
for distribution at this meeting, the pamphlets that 
have just been printed containing a short account 
of the purpose of the Association, and the program 
for its meetings during the remainder of the year. 

The speaker for next Thursday evening is Profes- 
sor Alfred W. Anthony, D.D., of Lewiston, who will 
take as his subject, "The Folly of the Universal 
Negation," and for a special musical number M. P. 
Cushing, '09, will play a solo on the piano. 



COMMANDER PEARY'S LECTURE 

Commander Robert E. Peary lectured this week at 
the American Museum of Natural History in New 
York on his latest attempt to reach the North Pole. 
The lecture hall seats fifteen hundred, and for an 
hour before the appointed time a throng of three 
thousand persons waited patiently to get inside. By 
the end of the lecture fully ten thousand people had 
collected outside the building in hope of getting a 
glimpse of the explorer, and following his exit came 
a stampede of persons struggling to get sight of 
him, which the police were utterly unable to control. 



NEW BOOK STORE 

After the holiday vacation, Slocum, '10, who has 
had two years experience in the wholesale book 
business, intends to open a "book shop" in 18 North 
Maine Hall. This store will carry a stock of books, 
stationery, and athletic goods. Terms are to be 
strictly cash. It is Mr. Slocum's desire to form 
eventually a co-operative business by selling stock 
and paying annual dividends. This enterprise has 
secured the favor of the Faculty insomuch that they 
have allotted a room for its headquarters. Begin- 
ning January 3, 1907, the store will be open as fol- 
lows : 8.30-9.30 a.m.; 1.30-3.00 p.m., and 7-8 p.m. 



ART BUILDING NOTES 

There are now on exhibition in the Bowdoin Gal- 
lery about twenty beautiful photographs of scenes in 
Venice, Sienna, Rome, Florence, and Rothenburg, 
of the Tower of Pisa, and of some famous paint- 
ings. These photographs are enlargements of 
those taken by Professor Hutchins on his recent 
European trip, and are put on exhibition at the 
request of the Curator of the building, who 
announces that they may be purchased at the desk 
for sums varying from $1.50 to $4.00. There are 
also at the desk several small photographs of which 
enlargements can be made if anyone should desire 
them. 

The Library Art Club has loaned a nearly com- 
plete set of pictures taken from the paintings, draw- 
ings, engravings, and wood-cuts of Albrecht Durer. 



Hlumni personals 

CLASS OF 1861 

Governor Cobb last week nominated Asso- 
ciate Justice Lucillius A. Emery of Ellsworth 
as Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court 
to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Chief 
Justice Andrew P. Wiswell. 

Mr. Emery is a native of Carmel. He was 
born July 27, 1840, and graduated from Bow- 
doin College in 1861. Previous to his appoint- 
ment to the Supreme Court in 1883 he served 
three terms in the Maine Senate and was attor- 
ney-general of the State, 1876- 1879. 

CLASS OF 1862 

J. W. Chadwick, '62, of Maiden, Mass., has 
retired from teaching and is devoting his time 
to the development of his fine orchards. Mr. 
Chadwick has been master of the Boston Latin 
School. 

CLASS OF 1890. 

Joseph P. Pearson, '90, was in Brunswick 
for a brief visit last week. He returned Sat- 
urday to the Pacific Coast where he will rejoin 
the yacht Galilee for another long cruise in 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



193 



the Pacific in connection with the work of 
making a magnetic chart of the Pacific Ocean. 
Mr. Pearson is very much interested in the 
work and the students all wish him success. 

CLASS OF 1891. 
A. S. Dyer has a position at the head of the 
Greek Department at the Hill School, Potts- 
town, Pa. 

CLASS OF 1899. 
Francis L. Lavertu has recently accepted 
the position of head of the French department 
at the Hill School, Pottstown, Pa. 

CLASS OF 1901. 
The Lezviston Journal of Saturday, Dec. 8, 
contained an extended write-up of the work 
of the State Laboratory of Hygiene, under 
the direction of H. D. Evans of the Class of 
1901. The sketch is accompanied by a fine 
photograph of Mr. Evans. 

CLASS OF 1906. 

Rowe, '06, is employed as teacher at Brown- 
field, Maine. 

Hodgson, '06, is employed in the Conti- 
nental Mill at Lewiston. 

William J. B. McDougald was married this 
fall to Miss Alice Louise Taylor at the bride's 
home in Rockland. Mr. McDougald has been 
elected sub-master of the Good Will High 
School at Hinckley, Me., where Mr. and Mrs. 
MacDougald have taken up their residence. 



©bituan> 



DR. DAVID R. BOLSTER, '52, 'MED. 

Dr. David R. Bolster died at his home at 98 
Winthrop Street, Augusta, on Sunday after- 
noon, Dec. 9, at the age of 79 years and 6 
months. Dr. Bolster was born in Paris, Aug. 
14, 1827, and received his early education in 
the public schools of that town. Taking up 
the study of medicine he graduated from Bow- 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



doin Medical College, after which he practiced 
in the town of Leeds for a few years. He then 
went to Week's Mills, where he was in prac- 
tice for more than 20 years. Dr. Bolster 
moved to Augusta 25 years ago. During the 
Civil War he was assistant surgeon of the 21st 
Maine Infantry and also of the 16th Maine 
Infantry. He was a member of Seth Williams 
Post, G. A. R., of Augusta. 



See pie Hut a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
1906 man who will be in the market for a good position In 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(.afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to Bee me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

a. s. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPQOOD'S 



BOWDOIN 



Class and Fraternity Flags 

All Kinds and all Prices .45s- &gas 

ESTES, '09, B © H HOUSE 



Visit our 

ICE-CREAM 

PARLOR. 




119 Maine Street 
CATERING in all departments a Specialty. 



The College 
Book Store 

We try to keep a good line of 

STUDENTS' SUPPLIES 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pen 

and Moore's Non=Leakable Pens 

F. W. CHANDLEU & SON 



Mention the Orient when patronizine our Advertisers. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




50 CENTS 

Most Comfortable, Durable, Economical Suspender 
made and the only one with a guarantee that 
means absolute satisfaction or your money back. 
One pair of BULL DOG SUSPENDERS 
will outwear three of the ordinary kind 
They contain more and better rubber, hav<_- heavily 
silver nickeled, non-rusting metal parts that do not 
tarnish or soil the r:l"llu^ ; ttmtrh, pliable, unbreaka- 
ble, imported Hull Dog leather ends, ea?y to button, 
and webs carefully woven by a special process for 
trength and wear. They can be had in li(rht weight 



and heavy weight twill 
with neat stripes, men's oryouth'a s 
extra lengths for the same price 
dealers or by mall postpaid 



i ehuice patti'i 



Accept no substitute for tins Watch Doaof Your 

Jnt.'>-f*<. .Suitable for all classes. 

HEWES & POTTER 

Largest Suspender & Belt Makers in the World 

Dept. 47, 87 LINCOLN STREET. BOSTON, MASS. 

Bookie tving valuable information about Correct 

' Suspender Styles FREE ON REQUEST. 



¥ 



UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



The fifty-fourth session of this College of Medicine 
begins December J, J906, and continues seven months. 

A New Building with 

Large, well equipped Laboratories, 
Commodious Lecture Halls, 
Pleasant Recitation Rooms, 

Every Facility for Instruction. 



NUMEROUS CLINICS 



MODERATE EXPENSE 



For Announcement and further information, address 

H. L. WHITE, A.M., Secretary 

BURLINGTON, VT. 



THE MEDICO-CHInURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Has a carefully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; clinical Conferences; Modified Seminar Methods, and thoroughly Practical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest and finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern hi every re-pect, and the new laboratories are specially planned and equipped for Individual work by the students. 

The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 

SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of Medicine. 




2?Iar/izi 



REPEATING SHOT GUN 
NEW MODEL N9I7 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By the omission of the takedown feature we have 
been able to greatly reduce the cost of production and at the same time have kept the gun up to the 
famous high 7/larfzn standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 
barrels are especially bored for smokeless, as well as black powder and so chambered that 2% inch or 
z,8 inch shells may be used. Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 

le and best working gun in existence. We are glad to make it possible for every lover of guns 



and bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so low a price. 
Have your dealer order it for you. 

Sen J for the ZHaz&t Catalogue and Experience Book to-iau. Free for 3 stamps. 

7j2e2fflar£ifz firearms £a,42waw street. New Haven, ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DECEMBER 21, 1906 



NO. 20 



THE NOVEMBER QUILL 

With the November issue the labors of the 
present Quill board draw near their close; and 
it is a pleasure to have this opportunity to 
record that the members of the board deserve 
well of the college for their disinterested and 
successful service. Volume X measures well 
up to the standard set ten years ago, and has 
contained much that is from a college stand- 
point of unusual literary merit. The chief 
criticism that a person interested in the literary 
activities of the college would have to offer is 
that there has been on the whole perhaps too 
much outside assistance, too little work by the 
undergraduates themselves. The members of 
the board have often times stepped nobly into 
the breach, but their efforts have not been 
furthered by others in the college as well as 
they have merited. The defect can only 
be remedied by a revival of interest in intellec- 
tual and literary things, and it is gratifying to 
believe that signs of such a revival are today 
abroad in the land. 

The November Quill is an interesting and 
well-rounded number. In addition to the 
usual departments it contains an article by a 
member of the faculty, a story by a young 
alumnus, a sketch and four bits of verse by 
undergraduates. As a rule one article from 
the alumni or the faculty should suffice but for 
reasons already stated through no fault of the 
Quill board the rule has sometimes to be 
modified in order that the high standard of 
the paper be maintained. The leading article 
on the Greek play at Harvard is written with 
unusual sympathy and enthusiasm and will be 
of more and more interest as the years go by. 
"Mountfort's Protracted Town Meetin' " 
(despite the protracted and awkward title), a 
successful sketch of New England town life, 
is by far the best work that its author has yet 
contributed to the Quill. "A Night in Man- 
churia," although properly neither a story nor 
a sketch, contains some excellent descriptions. 
If it had been written in the first person it 
would have escaped much of the stiff awk- 
wardness that in places mars the style. Of the 
other prose articles, "Ye Postman" is well 



written and makes some judicious selections 
from current college journalism. Not so much 
can be said of the "Gray Goose Tracks." It 
seems sad to waste valued space on the ortho- 
graphic eccentricities of even three such excel- 
lent and distinguished personages as a million- 
aire, a professor of dramatic literature and a 
president; and renewed discussion of the mat- 
ter is a distinct bore. 

The verse contributed altogether by under- 
graduates deserves special comment, not so 
much because of its intrinsic worth, but 
because it denotes a healthy interest in the 
handling of words and in technique — things 
which are, by the way, of more importance 
than is commonly supposed, in learning how to 
write. "Where Spirit Voices Flow" has lilt 
and melody and is of unusual merit. "The 
Autumn Night," although not distinguished, is 
a pleasant enough treatment of a conventional 
theme; and "Matins" has a certain firmness 
of touch which is promising. The lines "To a 
Friend," open uncommonly well : 

"My little loves are little lights 
That twinkle in the sky o' nights ;" 

And although the lyrical quality is not too 
well sustained, particularly in the last few 
lines, the poem is original and musical. With 
as much interest in verse as is here displayed, 
it is not perhaps vain to hope that our poets 
will continue to refrain from draped adjectives 
and funereal verbs and turn their attention 
more and more to the lighter forms of verse — 
to the triolet, the rondel and the ballade. The 
great questions of life and death and fate can 
safely be left to the great poets; but there is 
every reason for preserving some of the idle 
dreams and fancies and hopes of undergrad- 
uate days in appropriate verse form. 

Finally, if the Quill is to hold its place, it 
must be more actively supported by the stu- 
dent body. As the editor reminds us, we are 
notoriously careless about giving proper 
encouragement to our publications, particu- 
larly when it comes to subscriptions — an evi- 
dence an enemy might say, of the double 
standard of ethics that sometimes prevails 
amongst college men. Yet after all the youth 



i96 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



who goodnaturedly postpones payment of his 
subscription forever and a day, who is not care- 
ful about his obligations and strictly honorable 
in all his college dealings, is the father of the 
business man who leaves one set of morals at 
home and who sometimes regards it as per- 
fectly legitimate not to tell the exa<jt truth. 
That the college man should be through and 
through the good fellow is of course much to 
be desired ; but the good fellow who does not 
cultivate any of the sterner virtues is not likely 
to develop into the best citizen. The moral 
of all this is, of course, that it would be a pity 
to have any of our organizations embarrassed 
because we are careless or indifferent about 
the support we give them. And the true 
interests of the college would suffer as much 
if the Quill were not kept up to a proper 
standard as it would if no one should take any 
interest in the football team. 

K. C. M. S., '01. 



ALUMNI NEWS 

To the Editor of the Orient: 

It was certainly most generous on the part 
of the Orient to publish the communication 
of Mr. Burpee, proposing another Bowdoin 
periodical. The effect of his scheme, if car- 
ried out, would be to diminish the interest the 
alumni have in the Orient, and so to cause 
its circulation' to decrease. My own opinion 
is that two periodicals are as many as the 
Bowdoin constituency can support. No one 
can feel more strongly than I do that the col- 
lege, the alumni and the undergraduates suffer 
a serious loss by reason of the fact that the 
Orient is not the link between undergradu- 
ates and alumni that it ought to be. But my 
remedy would be different from Mr. Burpee's. 

The Orient should make itself an organ of 
the alumni, as well as a chronicler of the small 
beer of undergraduate life. In order to 
become such an organ it should make an effort, 
by ways well known, to increase its circula- 
tion among the alumni, and it should find 
means to obtain news of the alumni. No one 
who can earn a decent living is a "loyal Bow- 
doin man" unless he takes the Orient, — that 
is to say if the Orient provides him with the 
news about his classmates and others which 
he wishes to know. 

In short, there is duty on both sides : First, 
upon the editors of the Orient to supply the 



intelligence which will make it worth while for 
the alumnus to subscribe for it ; secondly, 
upon every alumnus to send you his two dol- 
lars a year. 

What reason is there to think that another 
board of editors would succeed in getting more 
alumni news than is at the service of the 
Orient.? And isn't it certain that if another 
periodical devoted to alumni alone were 
started, the Orient would have to depend 
entirely upon undergraduates for its support? 
Edward Stan wood, 1861. 



FIRST COLLEGE TEA 

The first College Tea of the year was held 
in the Alumni Room of Hubbard Hall on Fri- 
day afternoon, and proved to be a most suc- 
cessful event.. The special guests were 
the ladies of Brunswick, and there were a large 
number present, including not only the older 
ladies, but also many younger people. 
Alumni Room was prettily decorated with 
evergreens, potted plants, and cut flowers, 
arranged in a very artistic manner, which 
added much to the attractiveness of the room. 

In the receiving line were Mrs. William 
DeWitt Hyde, Mrs. Leslie A. Lee, Mrs. Ros- 
coe J. Ham, and Miss Helen Chapman. The 
ushers were Kimball, '07, from Alpha 
Delta Phi; Burton, '07, from Delta Kappa 
Epsilon ; Sturtevant, '09, from Theta Delta 
Chi ; Lawrence, '07, from Zeta Psi ; Sawyer, 
'07, from Delta Upsilon; Linnell, '07, Beta 
Theta Pi. 

Refreshments of punch, coffee, tea, fancy 
crackers and candy were served. Mrs. Henry 
Johnson was in charge of the tea table, assisted 
by Mrs. Samuel Furbish, Misses Dorothy 
Johnson, Margaret Sutherland, Helen Eaton, 
and June Atkinson, Mrs. George T. Little and 
Mrs. Frank E. Woodruff presided at the punch 
bowl, and were assisted in serving by Miss 
Bertha Stetson, Miss Louise Weatherill, Miss 
Sally Johnson, and Miss Sarah Pennell. Mrs. 
William A. Houghton served coffee, assisted 
by Miss Majorie Prince, Miss Lillian Odione, 
Miss Alice Knight, and Miss Isabel Fors^ith. 

The tea was attended by an unusually large 
number of the students, who took the oppor- 
tunity to become better acquainted with 
Brunswick people. The next Tea will be held 
on January 1 1 , when special guests from Port- 
land will be present. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



J 97 



PRESIDENT HYDE'S TRIP 

President Hyde will return to-night from a 
busy week's trip to various places. Last Fri- 
day he lectured in Haverhill, Mass., being one 
of the speakers in the City Hall lecture Course. 
Saturday he went to Portland where he 
attended a meeting of a committee from the 
trustees and overseers of the college on matters 
of business, and Sunday he preached in the 
Eliot Church at Newton, Mass. On Monday 
he lectured in Lynn and Tuesday attended a 
meeting of the trustees of Exeter Academy at 
Exeter. Wednesday he spoke at the dinner 
tendered to Dr. Grenfell by the Merchants' 
Club of Boston. Thursday he addressed the 
Congregational Club of Boston on their 
observation of Forefathers' Day. 



COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

The annual college catalogue appeared on 
Monday and contains the usual facts relative 
to the college. The number of students in the 
institution is shown to be 375. Of this num- 
ber 95 are in the Medical School and 288 in 
the academic department, the latter being 
divided as follows : Seniors, 47 ; Juniors, 46 ; 
Sophomores, 64 ; Freshmen, 97 ; special stu- 
dents, 34. According to careful calculation, 
however, the Senior Class will number over 60 
at the time of graduation, as an unusually 
large number of men are held back because of 
incompletes which will probably be made up in 
time to graduate with the Senior Class. 

The notable change in the catalogue that 
will be of particular interest to prospective 
students, is that hereafter French offered for 
admission will count four points instead of 
two, as has been the case in the past. 



SYRACUSE DEBATE 

It now seems practically settled that Bow- 
doin will meet Syracuse University in an inter- 
colleeiate debate sometime during the coming 
winter. The matter of Faculty coaching, 
which had been considered as the only ques- 
tion that might cause any difficulty in arrang- 
ing the debate, has been satisfactorily settled 
and now nothing remains to be done but to 
arrange the details. 

As stated in a previous issue, the Bowdoin 
Council, on learning that Syracuse would pre- 
fer to have Faculty coaching, sent a letter 
inquiring if they would be willing to give up 



such coaching under any condition. In a let- 
ter received last week the Syracuse manage- 
ment stated that they would be willing to give 
up the system if Bowdoin would consent to 
debate in Syracuse instead of Brunswick. This 
point has been granted by the Bowdoin Coun- 
cil and a letter has been forwarded expressing 
a willingness to enter into an agreement under 
these conditions. 

It is, of course, too early to say when the 
debate will take place, but it would seem 
probable that it might take place some time in 
March. 



$5,000 GIFT 

The notice that was printed in the last issue 
of the Orient in regard to the recent gift of 
$5,000 was copied from a newspaper which 
it has since been discovered was entirely mis- 
informed on the subject. The facts are as fol- 
lows : 

Mrs. Calista S. Mayhew, of South Orange, 
N. J., has presented the college with $5,000 as 
a memorial to her niece, Annie Talbot Cole, the 
wife of Rev. Samuel V. Cole, D.D., '74, who 
died last winter while she was engaged in edu- 
cational work at Wheaton Seminary. This 
$5,000 is to found a lectureship known as the 
Annie Talbot Cole Lectureship, and the inter- 
est on the money is to be used to secure lec- 
tures for the educational advancement of 
Bowdoin students, the subjects of the lectures 
being left to the discretion of the faculty and 
of Dr. Cole. 



MINSTREL SHOW REHEARSED 

The first rehearsal of the Minstrel Show took 
place Monday evening. There was a large 
attendance and the opening overture was tried 
by the chorus. This was pronounced a great 
success as it is very brisk in its movement and 
yet easy to learn. The scores for the different 
parts had not arrived at that time, but they will 
surely be here for the second rehearsal 
to-night. The separate acts were not tried 
over Monday night, but there will be a chance 
for every one at the second rehearsal. Every- 
body who can do anything to help should vol- 
unteer his services. 

The ends this year will be Upton, '07, 
Speake, '07, Kingsley, '07, Sheehan, '09, 
Smith, '10, and MacMillan, '10. The show 
will occur on Friday night, January 18. 



J98 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 
h. e. mitchell, 1907 r. h. hupper, 1908 
w. s. linnell, 1907 r. a. lee, 1908 

a. l. robinson, 1908 h. h. burton, 1909 

J. S. STAHL, igog 



G. W. CRAIGIE, igo7 Business Manager 

N. S. WESTON, 1908 Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 

Entered at Post-Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
Lewiston Journal Press 



Vol. XXXVI. 



DECEMBER 21, 1906 



The Orient is pleased to 
Syracuse Debate announce that the Syra- 
cuse debate now seems 
assured. As is stated in another column, the 
contest will probably take place at Syracuse. 
A debate at Brunswick would, of course, have 
been desirable this winter in view of the fact 
that there has been no intercollegiate contest 
here for three years, but since Syracuse has 
conceded the more important point of faculty 
coaching, our Council could not do less than 
accede to their request to have the debate at 
Syracuse. The Orient congratulates the 
college on having secured this debate. 

There has been an excel- 
Preshmen at Church lent and regular attendance 

among the Freshmen this 
fall at the Church on the Hill. But, owing 
probably to the fact that there was no Fresh- 
man handbook issued, they have been 
sitting wherever they please. It is, however, 



a custom of long standing that the first two 
rows of the south balcony are reserved for 
Seniors, and the back two rows for Sopho- 
mores, while the Juniors occupy the front 
rows of the north balcony, and the Freshmen 
the two rear rows on the same side. This cus- 
tom is merely a survival of the days when 
church attendance was compulsory, but since 
Bowdoin has but few such customs, it is well 
to preserve this one, which corresponds to the 
one we observe by sitting in class forms at 
chapel. The Orient trusts that Freshmen 
will respect the custom in the future. 



The Orient is glad to 
Alumni News receive a communication 
from Mr. Stanwood of the 
Class of '61, relative to the matter of a grad- 
uates' magazine. In regard to the reference 
that is made to the lack of alumni news in the 
columns of the Orient, the board wishes to 
state that the securing of alumni news is the 
most difficult work connected with the editing 
of the college weekly. It is a very rare occur- 
rence for the editors to receive contributions 
from the alumni in regard to any of their num- 
ber, and the result is that they have to rely 
largely on their observations of the public 
press. The amount that can be secured in this 
way is naturally very limited, and the result is 
that in many issues few alumni items appear. 

The Orient is however, grateful for the 
criticism that is incidentally offered by Mr. 
Stanwood, and is at the present time consid- 
ering a new remedy for the difficulty. In the 
meantime, we would again ask the assistance 
of the alumni as a whole in this matter. 



The approach of the Glee 
Glee Club Trips Club season brings with it 
the annual discussion for 
longer or more frequent trips, and incidentally 
an occasional word of criticism of the faculty 
for limiting the trips to the extent that has 
been the case in the past few years. 

At first sight it would seem that there was 
some justification for the criticism. With the 
splendid organization that the college pro- 
duced last year, and bids fair to produce this 
year, it appears unfortunate that the clubs 
cannot have the opportunity to advertise the 
college to the extent that the talent would cer- 
tainly ensure. 

It is right here, however, that the objection 
to the extension of the trips is well founded. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



m 



Do the clubs of Bowdoin, or any other college, 
always give the kind of advertising that is 
desirable? It is an unfortunate truth that 
they do not. There are always some few men 
each year who either never know or for a timr 
forget their duty by their college and by their 
conduct do more harm than they can ever do 
good. The Orient learns of a good illustra- 
tion. Two Bowdoin men recently visited a 
Maine town in which our clubs frequently 
appear, and in conversation with a leading cit- 
izen of the town remarked on the small num- 
ber of Bowdoin students residing there, and 
incidentally asked the gentleman why such 
was the case. To the surprise and pain of the 
Bowdoin men he stated the conduct of some 
of the men in the clubs had been such as to 
give many people a strong prejudice against 
the college and the gentleman stated that in his 
opinion this circumstance accounted in a large 
measure for the small number of students sent 
to Bowdoin. 

The Orient does not mention this as a crit- 
icism of any of the members of the clubs that 
will represent the college this winter. Indeed, 
there is reason to believe that the club is in 
every respect a thoroughly representative one. 
It is mentioned rather to call the attention to 
some of the incidents of the past that they 
may be guarded against in the future. 

When the clubs shall have learned to guard 
against these things there is no doubt our 
Faculty will do everything in their power to 
give the clubs the best seasons possible. And 
the Orient hopes and expects that our fine 
organization of this year will take a long step 
in bringing about the desired result. 



PHI CHI INITIATION 

The annual initiation of the Phi Chi Fra- 
ternity of the Medical School was held at the 
Congress Square Hotel in Portland, Saturday 
evening, there being about ioo graduates and 
undergraduates present. The post-prandial 
exercises were presided over by Wm. T. Rowe, 
'05, who is now in his last year in the Medi- 
cal School. 

The special guest of the evening was Dr. 
Richard C. Cabot of Boston. Dr. Cabot is a 
physician at the Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital and professor of internal medicine at 
Harvard Medical School. His subject was 



"Medicine vs. Surgery as a Profession." 
His treatment of the subject was both inter- 
esting and scholarly and was carefully listened 
to throughout. 

The following physicians and members of 
the fraternity were present : 

S. B. Thomes, W. W. Dyson, R. R. Tibbetts, 

E. G. Abbott, L. F. Hall, F. S. Woods, ti. £. 
Thompson, Alfred Mitchell, Jr., W. L. Hasty, 
L. W. Carpenter, J. K. P. Rogers, F. W. 
Lamb, H A. Pingree, W. W. Robinson, S. W. 
Weeks, A. L. Sawyer, Harlan R. Whitney, 
William H. Bradford, Addison S. Thayer, C. 
L. Curtis, Arthur S. Gilson, Fred M. Smith, 
Harold F. Atwood, E. P. Williams, Alfred 
King, R. D. Small, W. B. Moulton, E. J. 
Brown, C M. Leighton, W. B. Trickey, C. J. 
Fernald, H. Whiting Ball, P. H. Abbott, W. 
Y. Roberts, Ernest B. Folsom, Owen Smith, 
J. R. Ridlon, Charles L. Cragin, George L. 
Pratt, W. W. Bolster, H. E. Hitchcock, H. E. 
Marston, G. L. Sturdivant, H. W. Barrows, 
M. D. Williamson, F. H. Webster, John F. 
Thompson, Edson B. Buker, Charles F. 
Thomas, Chas. D. Smith, Edwin W. Gehring, 
Ivan Staples, Blaine W. Russell, Stanley P. 
Warren, Ernest W. Files, Henry H. Brock, S. 
C. Gordon, R. B. Moore, R. C. Cabot, Wil- 
liam T. Rowe, Herbert F. Twitchell, Homer 
H. Marks, Alfred Mitchell, David E. Dolloff, 
Charles O. Hunt, William J. Lewis, Irving E. 
Mabry, H. E. Anderson, C. H. Newcomb, H. 
W. Abbott, H. H. Bryant, Jr., C. H. Stevens, 
J. A. C. Milliken, J. W. Crane, C. J. Fernald, 
B. F. Wentworth, C. M.Wilson, T. J. Burrage, 

F. P. Webster, W. J. Fahey, G. C. Prebour, 
Walter S. Tobie, Charles F. Deering, James 
A. Spalding, Harold H. Thayer, Augustus S. 
Thayer, A. L. Sawyer, F. H. Gerrish, H. C. 
Saunders. 

The list of initiates has already appeared 
in the Orient. 



HISTORY CLUB 

A meeting of the men taking the course in 
American History was held at the Zeta Psi 
House last Friday evening for the purpose of 
forming a club. A preliminary organization 
was formed with Gould, '08, Putnam, '08, 
and Merrill, '08, as an executive committee. 

The matter of securing speakers was also 
discussed. The next meeting will probably 
be held on the first Friday after the Christmas 
recess. 



200 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FOOTBALL REPORT 

Following is the report of Manager Allen 
for the football season of 1906: 
Receipts 

Season Tickets $900 00 

Subscriptions ■ • 168 50 

Gate— Fort Preble 57 95 

Gate — Exeter < 95 10 

Guarantee — Harvard - ■ 250 00 

Guarantee — Wesleyan 285 00 

Guarantee — Cornell 525 30 

Gate— Bates 945 32 

Tufts— Gate 225 00 

Colby — receipts 255 75 

Maine — receipts 390 07 

Miscellaneous 47 °o 

Miscellaneous 55 00 

Board Training Table 124 50 

Error • • 5 51 

$4,330 50 
Expenditures 

Fort Preble $41 80 

Exeter •• 115 51 

Harvard trip 136 35 

Wesleyan trip ■ ■ 288 56 

Cornell trip 534 47 

Bates game • • 815 43 

Tufts game I9 2 95 

Colby game 239 94 

Maine game 163 75 

Coaching and training • ■ 963 35 

Training Table 247 00 

Wright & Ditson 320 84 

Miscellaneous 222 32 

$4,282 27 
Balance, 48 23 

$4,330 50 
Assets 

Balance (cash on hand) • • $48 23 

Unpaid subscriptions 23 00 

Unpaid board 46 00 

Unpaid advertisements 6 50 

Miscellaneous accounts 8 00 

$131 73 
Liabilities 

Mrs. Caldwell $15 00 

Advertising 1 50 

Wright & Ditson for sweaters 68 00 

$84 50 
Excess of assets over liabilities 47 23 

$131 73 

I have examined the books and accounts of Neal 
W. Allen, Manager of the Football Association, and 
find them correctly kept and properly vouched. The 
foregoing is an accurate summary of receipts and 
expenditures for the season, and an accurate state- 
ment of existing assets and liabilities. 

Barrett Potter, 

For the Auditors. 
December 14, 1906. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

On Thursday, December 13, Leroy Coons, 
'08, gave an interesting talk before the Christ- 
ian Association on "The Bible from a Literary 
Standpoint." He spoke of the many differ- 
ent kinds of literature in the Bible ; history in 
the first books of the Old Testament, chronicle 
in the books of Kings and Chronicles, lyric 
poetry in the Psalms, philosophy in the book 
of Proverbs, drama in the Song of Solomon, 
and so on. The Bible, he said, was not one 
book, but a library. 

For special music Miss Evelyn Stetson beau- 
tifully rendered a vocal solo that was appre- 
ciated by all present. 

At the meeting there were distributed the 
neat, little pamphlets that having been printed 
by the Association, containing the purpose of 
the Association, its present condition, its plans 
for the future, a list of its committees, and a 
calendar of the meetings for the rest of the 
year. These little pamphlets may be obtained 
by any one for the asking, from Neal W. 
Allen, '07, and there will probably be a supply 
on hand at to-night's meeting, when everybody 
should get one. 

This evening the speaker at the meeting will 
be Professor Alfred W. Anthony, D.D., of 
Lewiston, who will take as his subject "The 
Folly of the Universal Negation," and M. P. 
Cushing, '09, will render a piano solo for spec- 
ial music. 

It is also planned to hold a meeting on 
Thursday, January 3, when Prof. Files will 
speak on "Student Life in Germany," and Ken- 
drie, '10, will give a violin solo. 



PENOBSCOT CLUB 

The Penobscot Club held its first meeting 
at the D. K. E. House last Saturday evening. 
Fifteen of the twenty Penobscot men in col- 
lege were present and organized for the year 
under the following officers : President, F. L. 
Bass, '07; Vice-President, W. J. Crowley, '09; 
Secretary and Treasurer, Lester Adams, '07; 
Executive Committee, L. D. Mincher, '07, and 
F. H. Thomas, '08. Refreshments were served 
and a pleasant evening passed. 



ADDITIONAL SCHOOLS IN DEBATING LEAGUE 

Two new schools have been admitted to the 
Interscholastic Debating League. They are 
Yarmouth Academy and Freeport High 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



201 



School. A. B. Roberts, '07, has been appointed 
coach for Yarmouth, and Baldwin, '08, has 
been selected for the Freeport men. Two 
others, Camden High and Fryeburg Acad- 
emy, have applied for admission, but satisfac- 
tory opponents for these schools have not been 
secured. 



CALENDAR 

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20TH 

2.30 p.m. Track squad work in Gymnasium. 

7.00 p.m. Christian Association meeting. Address 
by Prof. Anthony, D.D., of Lewiston. 

8.30 p.m. Glee Club rehearsal in Christian Asso- 
tion Room. 

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2IST 

4.30 P.M. Christmas vacation begins. 

7.00 p.m. Alpha Delta Chi dance at New Meadows 
Inn. 

8.00 p.m. Theta Delta Chi dance at Chapter 
House. 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, I907 

8.20 a.m. Christmas vacation ends. 

Make up entrance examinations may be taken at 
appointed times during the first two weeks of Jan- 
uary. 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 3D 

8.30-9.30 A.M., 1.30-3.00 P.M., 7-8 p.m. Co-opera- 
tive book store daily hours commence at 18 North 
Maine. 

2.30 p.m. Track squad work in Gymnasium. 

7.00 p.m. Prof. Files speaks on "Student Life in 
Germany" at Christian Association meeting. 

8.30 p.m. Glee Club rehearsal in Christian Asso- 
ciation Room. 

Viola Allen plays in "Cymbeline" at Empire 
Theatre, Lewiston. 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 4TH 

3.00 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

SATURDAY, JANUARY STH 

1.00 p.m. Glee Club rehearsal in Christian Asso- 
ciation Room. 
2-3 p.m. Make-up Gymnasium work. 

MONDAY, JANUARY 7TH 

7.00 p.m. Glee Club rehearsal in Christian Associa- 
tion rooms. 

8.00 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 8TH 

2.30 p.m. Track squad work in Gymnasium. 
3.30-4.30 p.m. Make-up Gymnasium work. 
7.00 p.m. Debate in Hubbard Hall. 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9TH 

2.30 P.M. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

THURSDAY, JANUARY I0TH 

2.3J p.m. Track squad work in Gymnasium. 

7.00 p.m. First of series of speeches before Christ- 
ian Association on the "Ethical Aspects of the Pro- 
fessions." 

Rev. R. Calkins, D.D., on "Social Service" in Hub- 
bard Hall. 

8.30 p.m. Glee Club rehearsal in Christian Asso- 
ciation Room. 



FRIDAY, JANUARY IITH 

4-6 p.m. Second College Tea in Hubbard Hall. 

8.00 p.m. First Junior Assembly in Memorial Hall. 

Preliminary debate in Interscholastic League 
between Edward Little H. S. and Lewiston H. S. at 
City Hall in Lewiston. 



College IFlotes 

Stephens, '10, has Bowdoin song books to sell. 

Adjourns were granted in German I. on Wednes- 
day. 

Adjourns were granted in Greek I. Monday after- 
noon. 

Bunker, Medic, '09, is ill at his home at Red 
Beach. 

Niles Perkins, '03, spent a few days at college 
this week. 

Upton, '07, has returned from a business trip in 
New York. 

The New Hampshire Club sat for pictures last 
Saturday. 

Prof. Austin Cary has been a visitor at the college 
the past week. 

The Zeta Psi Fraternity sat for pictures at Web- 
ber's, Monday. 

The Glee and Mandolin Clubs had their pictures 
taken last week. 

Ira Mikelsky of Hebron Academy visited his 
brothers this week. 

R. W. Smith has left college for a few days 
because of sickness. 

The final examination in Algebra in Mathematics 
I. took place to-day. 

Reports in History 7 will be due immediately 
after the Christmas recess. 

Bartlett, '06, now teaching in Thornton Academy, 
was at the college, Friday. 

Hockey practice is much in evidence in the gym. 
Much good material is noticed. 

Sunday evening Snow, '07, preached in Elijah 
Kellogg's old church in Harpswell. 

A large number of the Bates students attended the 
funeral of ex-Governor Garcelon. 

Phillips, '09, who has been teaching at Topsham, 
this fall, returned to college last week. 

William E. Youland, '06, has returned to Bruns- 
wick and has entered the Medical School. 

E. D. Reed of Lewiston has been appointed super- 
intendent of the L. B. & B. Street Railway. 

Otis, '10, who has has been confined to his room 
for the past week with tonsilitis, is about the campus 
again. 

McGlone, '10, left college last week to go to 
Natick, Mass., where he will be employed during 
the Christmas vacation. 

Geraldine Farrar, the actress who has made her- 
self famous as an opera singer both in London and 
New York, and has been pronounced by the Ger- 
man Emperor the most beautiful woman in the 
world, is a first cousin to Farrar, '10. 



202 



BOWDOTN ORIENT 



George Pratt, '01, visited his brother, Pratt, '09, 
Monday. 

Coach Irwin will be here for a few days immedi- 
ately after the Christmas recess. 

Professor Woodruff gave adjourns in his Fresh- 
man Greek course, Monday afternoon. 

Snow, '07, was in Lewiston last Wednesday night 
in the interests of his debating team. ' 

Ready, '10, has gone to Gardiner for ten weeks, 
where he will be employed by the American Ice Co. 

A dramatic club has been formed at the University 
of Maine to present "As You Like It." 

Redman, '07, left last Friday for Washington, D. 
C, where he will pass the Christmas recess. 

Adjourns were given in English III. last Thursday 
owing to the absence of Prof. Foster in Dixfield. 

There was a meeting of the Cercle Francaise at 
the Delta Kappa Epsilon house, Tuesday evening. 

William Nye, Esq., of Fairfield, sheriff of Somer- 
set County, called on friends on the campus, Monday. 

Bishop, '09, attended the celebration of Coburn 
Night at Coburn Classical Institute, Waterville, on 
Dec. II. 

The Alpha Sigma Club of the Brunswick High 
School held a dance in the Pythian Hall, Saturday 
evening. 

Haines, '07, who has been operated on for appen- 
dicitis, is reported to have so far recovered as to be 
out of doors. 

A number of the Senior Class who have extra 
courses to their credit are planning to leave college 
till Commencement. 

Weiler, '08, who was recently operated upon at 
his home in Houlton, has so far recovered that he 
is able to be out. 

Merrill, '08, and Hupper, '08, went to Portland 
Monday night, to hear "Gypsy" Smith, the world- 
renowned evangelist. 

George Cary of Machias a member of the board 
of overseers, was a guest of his son, Charles Cary, 
'10, the first of the week. 

Manager Robinson of the baseball team was in 
Boston the first of the week on business connected 
with the coming minstrel show. 

Last week Tufts dedicated a soldiers' monument 
inscribed with the names of sixty-three students who 
fought in the War of the Rebellion. 

Frank Ames, proprietor of the Central Billiard 
Parlor, has recently sold out to Hiram Sedgley. 
Mr. Sedgley will take charge to-day. 

The Theta Upsilon Club will give a juvenile min- 
strel show in the Pythian Hall on Friday evening. 
The show will be followed by a dance. 

Rev. Edward F. Sanderson, pastor of the Central 
Congregational Church of Providence, R. I., con- 
ducted the services at chapel on Sunday. 

Harris, '09, has gone to Hinckley where he is 
engaged in work at the new library at Good Will 
Farm. He will be absent several days. 

H. D. Evans of the Class of 1901 was a guest at 
the Beta Theta Pi House, Saturday. Mr. Evans 
has just returned from a trip to Mexico where he 
has been at work in the interests of the State Labor- 
atory of Hygiene. 



Several fellows who live at a distance and were 
unable to go home at Thanksgiving have secured per- 
mission to leave early this week. 

Harold E. Wilson, '07, who is out of college this 
year, is spending the week at the Delta Upsilon 
House. He will graduate with his class in June. 

The Freshman delegation of the Delta Upsilon 
Fraternity had dinner at the New DeWitt Thursday, 
and visited Keith's theatre later in the evening. 

A meeting of the Athletic Council was held last 
Friday afternoon. The principal business was the 
consideration of the report of the football manager. 

It is stated that New Meadows Inn will close the 
first of February for several weeks, during which 
extensive repairs will be made about the establish- 
ment. 

Last Sunday's Portland Telegram contained a 
picture of Rowe, '05, who presided at the banquet of 
the Phi Chi Medical Fraternity last Saturday 
evening. 

Prof. Files has announced that he will unite the 
classes in German 4 and 6 during the next semester, 
and will take up the study of Faust. Faust is 
offered about once in three years. 

Ed Crowley, '09, who had one of his cheek bones 
broken while playing baseball at Bath last week, 
has left the hospital and gone to his home in Ban- 
gor where he is reported to be making good 
progress. 

Clyde Grant, '04, who is a successful teacher in 
the Mitchell Military School at Billerica, Mass., vis- 
ited college, Monday, on his way to his home in 
Fort Fairfield, where he will spend the Christmas 
holidays with his parents. 

Tuesday evening the weekly debate took place 
in Hubbard Hall. The resolution was that "The 
Legislative Referendum applying to both statutes 
and constitution should be adopted in the State of 
Maine." Haley, '07, and Pike, '07, were for the 
affirmative, while the negative was assumed by Rob- 
inson, '08. The presiding officer was Gould, '08. 

Brunswick Record: Schumacher, captain of the 
Bates College football team, has been publicly repri- 
manded by President Chase for kissing an actress 
in Empire Theatre, and the faculty is considering 
the question of suspending him for a term. Sup- 
posing Schumacher had kissed one of the Bates 
coeds, would that have brought upon him a worse 
punishment or would the faculty have winked 
solemnly and looked the other way? Shocking thing 
to contemplate, to be sure, but it would be interest- 
ing to know how they measure such crimes. 



THE FACULTY 

Morrill, '10, is coaching several men in shot-put- 
ting every afternoon. A number of Freshmen show 
good promise in this event. 

Manager Robinson is busy preparing next spring's 
baseball schedule. Bowdoin will probably have sev- 
eral new games this year. 

Professor K. M. C. Sills entertained all the stu- 
dents who are members of the Episcopal Church at 
his home last Saturday evening. Mr. E. A. Kaharl, 
principal of the Brunswick High School, and Rev. 
Mr. Lee, rector of St. Paul's Church, were also his 
guests. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



203 



Hlumni personals 

CLASS oF 1844 
A steel engraving that is an excellent like- 
ness of the late George M. Adams, D.D., '44, 
has been presented to the library by Mr. 
Adams' widow. 

CLASS OF 1854 
Benjamin I. Morrison, of Medford, Mass., 
has resigned after 40 years as principal of the 
High School of that city. 

CLASS OF 1855 
Judge W. L. Putnam, '55, of Portland, has 
made a special gift to the college to defray the 
cost of the flowers used at the college teas. 
CLASS OF 1881 
Dr. E. H. Chamberlain, of Cheraw, S. C, 
has been appointed chairman of the Homeo- 
pathic Board of Medical Examiners for South 
Carolina. 

CLASS OF 1884 
Hon. Edward E. Chase was elected Judge 
of Probate of Hancock County, Maine, at the 
September election in this State. 

CLASS OF 1887 
Clarence B. Burleigh, of Augusta, is 
the author of "The Camp on Letter K," a book 
for boys recently published by the Lothrop, 
Lee & Shepherd Co., Boston. 

CLASS OF 1890 
Joseph B. Pendleton, who is with Wright 
& Ditson, of Boston, has been in much demand 
as an official at the football games between 
New England colleges this fall. 

CLASS OF 1893 

George C. Chapin is a teacher in the Ohio 
School for the Blind at Columbus, Ohio. 
CLASS OF 1899 

Edward B. Chamberlain, who has been 
teaching in Washington, D. C, for the past 
four years, is now on the Faculty of the Sachs 
Collegiate Institute, New York City. 

Rev. Fred R. Marsh, who graduated from 
the Princeton Divinity School in 1904, is now 
located as pastor of the First Presbyterian 
Church of Wray, California. 

• T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



©bituar\> 

CLASS OF 1863 
Dr. Alvah B. Dearborn, of Somerville, 
Mass., died August 19, 1906. He was born in 
Topsham, Me., in 1842. He was a leading 
member of the medical profession of Somer- 
ville for a generation and at the time of his 
death was city physician. 

CLASS OF 1882 
Myron H. Goodwin, a prominent member of 
the Haverhill, Mass., bar, died suddenly Janu- 
ary 18, 1906. He was a teacher and lawyer 
in the West before coming to Haverhill in 
1899. He was a brother of Almon Goodwin, 
'62, a well-known New York lawyer, who died 
two months earlier. 



1Tn /IDemorlam 

By the death of Hon. Andrew P. Wiswell, of the 
Class of 1873, the Kappa Chapter of Psi Upsilon has 
lost one of its most honored members. 

For a number of years he had been in close touch 
with the college and the fraternity, and it is with 
the deepest sorrow that we mourn his very sudden 
death. He was a man of broad intellect and wonder- 
ful mental power. He showed unusual ability and 
gained a very high standing in his chosen profes- 
sion. As a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
college, he was held in the highest esteem by all his 
associates. 

The Kappa Chapter deeply mourns his loss and 
extends its hearfelt sympathy to his bereaved family 
and friends. 

Francis Robbins Upton, Jr., 
Albert Trowbridge Gould, 
Philip Haywood Brown, 

For the Chapter. 



See pie moot a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
1906 man who will be in the market for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
tafternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, 1 feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

a. s. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPQOOD'S 



Mention the Orient when patronizing our Advertisers. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



iiBOGirn 




UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



The fifty-fourth session of this College of Medicine 
begins December J, J906, and continues seven months. 

A New Building with 

Large, well equipped Laboratories, 
Commodious Lecture Halls, 
Pleasant Recitation Rooms, 

Every Facility for Instruction. 



NUMEROUS CLINICS 



MODERATE EXPENSE 



For Announcement and further information, address 

H. L. WHITE, A.M., Secretary 

BURLINGTON, VT. 



THE MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Has a carefully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes ; clinical Conferences; Modified Seminar Methods, and thoroughly Practical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest and finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every respect, and the new laboratories arc specially planned and equipped for individual work by the students. 

The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 

SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of Medicine. 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By theomission of the take down feature we have 

been able to greatiyreduce the cost of production and at the same hme have kept the gun up to the 

famous high 7/larein standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 

this gun. The workmanship and finish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The full choke 

barrels are especially bored for smokeless as well as black powder and so chambered that 2% inch or 

r kl" j l may i use d. Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 

J k-j k • wortln S, 8nn in existence. We are glad to make it possible for every lover of guns 

and bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so low a price. 

Have your dealer order it for you. 

Send for the Z/Zar&l Catalogue and Experience Book to-day. Free for 3 stamps. 
7A&2MOr/l/l firearms £a,42WiIlow Street. New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JANUARY n, 1907 



VOL. XXXVI 



NO. 21 



THE DECEMBER QUILL 

Whoever has feared that the love of the 
ideal and its expression among us were giving 
way before the pressure of practical material- 
ism, may take heart again over the contents of 
the Holiday Number of the Quill. Here are 
five poems to two prose pieces ; and of the lat- 
ter, one is a criticism of a highly imaginative 
poet, and the other is itself so highly imagina- 
tive as to deserve the name of a prose poem. 

The too brief essay entitled "The Non- 
Dramatic Poetry of Marlowe," by a graduate 
of the Class of '99, now a professor of English 
literature, not being undergraduate work, lies 
beyond the range of our criticism, though not 
beyond that of our appreciation, which is 
called forth both by the paper itself and by the 
evidence it affords of the continuing interest of 
a former Quill editor in the literary life of the 
college. 

The author of "Among the Mountains" has 
done much good writing for the Quill, and 
none better than this piece contains. The 
descriptive part is particularly well done both 
as to choice of language and form of expres- 
sion. The incidents of the dream are some- 
what less happily conceived, although not to 
the extent of spoiling the pleasing effect of the 
whole. A world of enchantment is difficult to 
create and extremely difficult to operate 
within the limits of imaginative beauty, 
which mark off the magical realm 
from the work-a-day world on the one side 
and from chaotic insanity on the other. It is 
not surprising to find in this story the conven- 
tional elements of the fairy tale combined in 
the traditional way ; also some inevitable jar- 
ring between the worlds of fact and fancy and 
chaos. Shakespeare, who 

"Exhausted worlds and then created new," 

Stands almost alone as a successful enchanter; 
and that doubtless because he had "exhausted 
worlds" of actual life. 

"Angelica's Grave," translated literally from 
the Swedish, bears very few translation ear- 
marks. The English diction is full of dignity 
and true feeling, without departing from sim- 



plicity. Perhaps the only noticeable lapse 
occurs in the line 

"Still understood no soul the sorrows of earth any 
better." 

The metre, the elegiac distich, is, no doubt, 
that of the original ; and the translator has 
probably managed it nearly as well as the 
Swedish poet. But the Vergilian hexameter, 
"the stateliest measure ever moulded by the 
lips of man," and its Cousin and mate of 
shorter stature, the so-called pentameter, 
refuse to be moulded by the lips of even the 
most gifted poet in the rough consonantal com- 
binations of accentual modern speech. Tenny- 
son, who so highly extols the ancient measure, 
speaking of the modern imitation, says, 

"These lame hexameters the strong-winged music 
music of Homer ! 
No — but a most burlesque, barbarous experiment. 
Hexameters no worse than daring Germany gave us, 
Barbarous experiment, barbarous hexameters." 

In several of the shorter lines of the present 
poem, there is neglect of the strict requirement 
that the latter half should be composed of two 
dactyls and a final syllable, the substitution of 
spondees for dactyls being permitted only in 
the first half. A negligence of less moment is 
the use of the word "heaven" as a monosylla- 
ble and dissyllable, to end a pentameter and a 
hexameter, in the space of four lines. Long- 
fellow, in the "Evangeline," makes it uni- 
formly two syllables. 

The graceful and witty little poem "Misap- 
prehension," is t amply and luminously 
accounted for by the significant signature, 
"K. D. W." 

The brief pieces entitled "Hope," "The 
Response," and "From a Casement," are well 
up to the average of college verse. The first 
is correct in form but neatly epigrammatic in 
meaning, while the second falls rather short 
in both respects. The last, though very good 
in the first eight lines, drops seriously in the 
last four. "Pale face lad" could hardly be 
said except by an American Indian; and "Soft, 
it's I that's sad," hisses harshly. 

In "Silhouettes," between several announce- 
ments and some simple and sensible farewell 



206 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



remarks, there is sandwiched a wholesome 
and, it is to be hoped, feasible suggestion for 
unifying and strengthening the social life of 
the college. This is well as far as it goes, and 
indicates the direction in which the "Editor's 
Easy Chair" of the Quill might be more fully 
developed, to the advantage of all connected 
with Bowdoin. Possibly the energy that finds a 
rather explosive vent in "Gray Goose Tracks" 
might be utilized in the service of progress 
and enlightenment, if the two departments 
were combined. But if this is held undesira- 
ble, more light and less smoke in the G. G. T. 
would be welcome to the general reader, who 
is unable to penetrate its cabalistic mirth, 
although quite willing to imagine its Aristo- 
phanic or Rabelaisian charm for the initiated. 
That the Quill has lived and thriven for a 
whole decade is a matter for congratulation 
to all the friends of the college. An exclu- 
sively literary publication has proved itself a 
thing that the student body — though they 
might indeed do more for it — will at any rate 
"not willingly let die." Its former creditable 
standard has been well maintained by the 
retiring Board, and the character of the new 
Board assures a good Quill for the coming 
year. W. A. H. 



TWO NEW BOWDOIN BOOKS 

All Bowdoin men will be interested in the 
announcement that two new Bowdoin books 
are now in process of preparation and will be 
published during the present winter. They 
are "Bowdoin Verse," a collection of over one 
hundred of the best poems contributed by both 
alumni and students to the undergraduate pub- 
lications of the college within the past twenty 
years ; and "Under the Bowdoin Pines," a col- 
lection of over 30 short stories of Bowdoin 
life, including the best of those which appeared 
in the earlier volumes of the Quill. The 
poems in the first volume are all selected with 
the approval of Professor Chapman who has 
kindly consented to assist in the preparation of 
the collection. This volume will be of about 
160 pages, printed on heavy paper and will be 
beautifully bound in crimson cloth with letter- 
ing and special cover design in gold. The top 
will be gilded and the edges of the pages left 
rough. "Under the Bowdoin Pines" will be 
a companion volume in size and shape and 
will be similarly bound in green cloth with let- 
tering and special design in gold. It will also 



be illustrated. Some of the stories will be by 
the same authors, who contributed to "Tales of 
Bowdoin" in 1901 and others will be by the 
best writers among our young alumni. Both 
will be books in appearance and contents 
which every Bowdon man and friend of the 
college will be proud of and glad to have in his 
library. They are being prepared and pub- 
lished by J. C. Minot, '96, of Augusta, 
whose work in publishing "Tales of Bow- 
doin," "The Story of '96," etc., and in other 
activities in behalf of the college, has 
made him known to all Bowdoin men, 
old and young. The books will be 
sold for $1.25 each, or $2 for the two. A sub- 
scription paper for the undergraduates will 
be found at the library and every student 
should place his name upon it. 



INTERSCHOLASTIC DEBATING LEAGUE 

The Interscholastic Debating League which 
was organized this fall by Professor W. T. 
Foster is getting well under way with the pre- 
liminary debates. The Edward Little High 
School team, which is being coached by R. H. 
Hupper and the Lewiston High School team, 
which is being coached by C. W. Snow, 
have chosen as the subject of their preliminary 
debate this question : "Resolved, That cities 
in the United States of 25,00 or more inhab- 
itants should own and operate their street rail- 
ways." The men chosen to represent E. L. H. 
S. are: Barton, '07, Philoon, '07, Adams, '08, 
and to represent Lewiston High School, 
Keist, '07, Fisher, '07, and Marston, '07. The 
debate will take place in the City Hall at Lew- 
iston to-night. 

The other two schools of the league, Gardi- 
ner High School, coached by A. O. Pike, '07, 
and Cony High School, coached by F. J. Red- 
man, '07, have chosen for their preliminary 
debate this question: "Resolved, That the 
peaceable annexation of Cuba to the United 
States would be for the best interests of the 
United States." The team which is to repre- 
sent the Cony High School has not yet been 
selected, but those who are to represent the 
Gardiner High School are Cobb, '07, Berry, 
'07, and Holt, '07, with Parker, '08, for alter- 
nate This debate is to take place in the City 
Hall in Augusta, on January 18. 

The teams winning these preliminary 
debates will chose a new question, on which 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



207 



they will debate in Memorial Hall some time 
during the month of April. There is consid- 
erable interest being taken in each school over 
these debates, and the teams selected are all 
ones that will do credit to their cities. 



NEW YORK ALUMNI BANQUET 

The alumni dinner of the New York City- 
graduates will be held on Friday, Jan- 
uary 25, and probably at the Manhattan Hotel, 
where it is usually held. President Hyde is 
expected to be present and it is hoped that 
Congressman Alexander, '70, will be one of 
the principal speakers. 



BOSTON ALUMNI BANQUET 

The annual dinner of the Bowdoin Alumni 
Association of Boston will occur on the 27th 
of February next, and it will observe the one- 
hundredth birthday of Bowdoin's celebrated 
alumnus, Henry W. Longfellow. The speak- 
ers already arranged for are Professor Barrett 
Wendell of Harvard College, President Hyde, 
Professor Chapman and Mr I. B. Choate, 62, 
who will read a poem. 

It is intended to make this a meeting of 
special interest, suitable for the occasion — and 
active effort will be made to secure a large 
attendance. 



TO RUN TUFTS 



Announcement is made by Manager Lee of 
the track team, that arrangements have been 
made by which Bowdoin will run Tufts at the 
annual B. A. A. meet. Bowdoin has run 
against Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
for several years past, but this will not be the 
case this year. The date of the meet is Feb- 
ruary 16. 



cuse will have the choice of sides. A commit- 
tee consisting of Professor Foster, Mitchell, 
'07, Hupper, '08, and Snow, '07, will select a 
question to be submitted to Syracuse some- 
time within 30 days before the date of the 
debate. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION PAMPHLET 

The Christian Association at its last meeting dis- 
tributed copies of its new pamphlet. It has for a 
frontispiece a cut of the '75 gateway with the path 
leading to the chapel. It then opens with a short 
account of the gains already made by the Associa- 
tion this year, numbering among them the jump 
from a membership of 35 to 165. There then follows 
a brief description of the new rooms, a word about 
the course of Bible Study to be undertaken, and an 
explanation of the system of committees which is the 
basis of the Association's organization. Following 
this is printed a list of officers and committees and 
also the calendar of the meetings from last October 
through next March, the book finally ending with a 
cut of the chapel itself. 

The program of speakers promises to be a good 
one. A series of talks on the "Ethical Aspects of 
the Professions" will run through the year, there 
being four speakers who will represent two sides of 
Social Science, Civil Engineering, Medicine. These 
monthly meetings will be open to the public, and 
held in Hubbard Hall. 

Special music has been arranged for each meet- 
ing, and speakers have also been engaged for every 
week until March 28th, when President Hyde will 
close the year with a questionaire. 



THE MINSTREL SHOW 

After many delays, occasioned by the blunders of 
the publishers, the long-sought music has arrived 
and the rehearsals are being held every night in Ban- 
ister Hall under the personal supervision of Coach 
Toothaker. With the show only a few weeks off the 
management wish to emphasize again the fact that 
they want every man to turn out to each rehearsal. 
Whatever success is to be achieved by the chorus 
rests largely on the unity of its volume. Many 
attractive numbers are being prepared expressly for 
the Minstrel Show and with a large and well- 
trained chorus the success of the show will be inev- 
itable. The show has been set ahead to Jan. 23. 



SYRACUSE DEBATE 

The final arrangements for a debate with 
Syracuse have recently been completed by the 
signing of a two-year agreement by the two 
institutions. There will be no faculty coach- 
ing by either college. The date of the debate 
will be March 31, and as previously stated, it 
will take place at Syracuse. 

Bowdon will select the question and Syra- 



H1ST0RY CLUB 



Last Friday evening a meeting of the History Club 
was held at the Psi Upsilon House with Ham, '08, 
and Gould, '08. Professor Chapman gave a very 
interesting talk on "Reminiscences of My Four Years 
in College." His talk was followed by the usual 
social session after which the meeting broke up to 
meet the first week in February with Putnam, '08, 
at the Delta Kappa Epsilon House. 



208 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 
h. e. mitchell, 1907 r. h. hupper, 1908 
w. s. linnell, 1907 r. a. lee, 1908 

a. l. robinson, 1908 h. h. burton, 1909 

J. S. STAHL, igog 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 
N. S. WESTON, 1908 



Business Manager 
Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, 10 cents. 

Entered at Post-Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
Lewiston Journal Press 



Vol. XXXVI. 



JANUARY I I, 1907 



No. 21 



N The Orient is pleased to 

•> j . C ^ . announce in another col- 
Bowdoin Books umn the coming pubUca _ 

tion of two more Bowdoin books. That the 
new books will be of a character that every 
Bowdoin graduate and undergraduate will 
wish to possess is assured from the fact that 
they are to be published by J. C. Minot, '96, 
who was instrumental in the publication of 
"Tales of Bowdoin" and other Bowdoin books. 
The new undertaking is one involving a larger 
expense than any previous production, but the 
Orient believes that the loyalty of .Bowdoin 
men is such that the publisher will lose 
nothing by his enterprise. 



Winter 
Track Work 



Attention is called in 
another column to the 
arrangements that have 

been made for gym and outdoor work for 

track men. 

This winter work is absolutely necessary 

this year, because of a continually growing 

number of inexperienced men joining the 



track squad; and though several have given 
unexpected promise, it is only through consist- 
ent winter work that they can win the meet 
next spring. It is therefore very fortunate 
that this year, when the meet is to depend 
chiefly on the hard work of the track men, that 
we have a coach from the student body who is 
here the year round. It is necessary, however, 
that the students do their share in the work. 



„ ..„ . .. It may well be a source of 
Bowdoin in the -, J . ,, -d , . 

Maine Leeislature P Bowdoin men 

s to note the part played in 

the public affairs of the State by the alumni of 
our college. Not only is Governor William 
T. Cobb a Bowdoin graduate in the famous 
Class of 'yj, but the 73d Maine Legislature 
now in session at Augusta has just elected 
Bowdoin men to preside over both its 
branches, Hon. Fred J. Allen, '90, as Presi- 
dent of the Senate, and Hon. Don A. H. Pow- 
ers, '75, as Speaker of the House. Moreover, 
among the members on the floor of the House, 
Hon. Geo. G. Weeks, '82, is recognized as the 
Republican leader, and Hon. Charles F. John- 
son, '79, as the Democratic leader. Other 
Bowdoin men in the legislature are Henry H. 
Hastings, '90, and Walter B. Clarke, '99, in 
the Senate; and Philip D. Stubbs, '95, and 
Andy P. Havey, '03, in the House. All four 
of these last named were well known athletes 
in their undergraduate days and two of them 
were 'varsity captains. The secretary of the 
Senate is Frank G. Farrington, '94. These, 
and the other Bowdoin men at the State 
House, make a splendid showing for the col- 
lege and demonstrate that now as for the past 
century it is furnishing the leaders in the pub- 
lic affairs of Maine. In this connection it is 
also very gratifying to us that a Bowdoin man 
continues at the head of our Maine Supreme 
Court, Chief Justice A. P. Wiswell, 73, who 
died after seven years at the head of the court, 
being succeeded by Lucilius A. Emery, '61, 
who has been an honored associate justice for 
nearly a quarter of a century. Four of the 
last five chief justices have been Bowdoin 
men and all have also served on our Board of 
Trustees. 



RALLY COMMITTEE 

J. Drummond, president of the athletic association, 
has selected the following committee for the coming 
college rally : Redman, '07, chairman ; Burton, '07, 
Bower, '07, Haley, '07, Duddy, '07, Voorhees, '07, 
Hayes, '08, Linnell, '07, A. B. Roberts, '07. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



209 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, JANUARY IITH 

8.30 a.m. Government Club organizes at recita- 
tion. 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

4-6 p.m. Second College Tea, in Hubbard Hall. 

8.30 p.m. First Junior Assembly in Memorial 
Hall. 

Preliminary debate in Interscholastic League 
between Edward Little H. S. and Lewiston H. S. 
in Lewiston City Hall. 

SATURDAY, JANUARY I2TH 

i p.m. Glee Club rehearsal in Christian Associa- 
tion Room. 

2.30 p.m. Track work in Gymnasium and on track. 

2.30-.3.30 p.m. Make-up work in Gymnasium. 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

7.30 p.m. Massachusetts Club meets at Zeta Psi 
House. 

SUNDAY, JANUARY I3TH 

4.00 p.m. Quartette, Linnell, '07, Pike, '07, W. 
Crowley, '09, E. Crowley, '09, sing in chapel. 

MONDAY, JANUARY I4TH 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

4.4S p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium 
walk. 

7.00 p.m. Debate in Hubbbard Hall on "Simplified 
Spelling." Burton, '07, and Boyce, '08, against W. 
Drummond and Hull, '07. 

6.45 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

Coffee Club meets at home of Prof. Mitchell. 
Subject, "Socialism." 

TUESDAY, JANUARY I5TH 

2.30 p.m. Track work in Gymnasium and on track. 

3.30-4.30 p.m. Make-up work in Gymnasium. 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

4.45 p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium 
walk. 

7.00 p.m. Debate in Hubbard Hall on "Prohibition 
in Maine." Mitchell, '07, and Pennell, '08, against 
Webber, '07, and Linnell, '07. 

6.45 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

Sophomore Themes due. 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY l6TH 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

4.45 p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium 

Pres. Hyde conducts Vesper Service at Brown. 

THURSDAY, JANUARY I7TH 

2.30 p.m. Track work in Gymnasium and on track. 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

4.45 p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium 

7.P.M. Anand Sidolba Hivale of Hindustan speaks 
at Christian Association Meeting. Vocal solo by 
Pike, '07. 

8 p.m. Meeting of Holderness Club at Alpha Delta 
Phi House. 

8.30 p.m. Glee Club rehearsal in Christian Associa- 
tion Room. 

FRIDAY, JANUARY l8TH 

4 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

4.45 p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium. 



6.30 p.m. Meeting of Deutscher Verein at New 
Meadows Inn. 

6.45 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
walk. 

Prof. Foster speaks on "Stephenson" at Newcastle. 

Preliminary debate in Interscholastic League 
between Cony H- S. and Gardiner H. S. at Augusta. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

_ On Thursday, January 3, the Christian Associa- 
tion Room was filled by nearly one hundred members 
to hear Professor Files give an informal talk on 
"Student Life in Germany." Professor Files said 
that in Germany a student rarely attended the same 
University more than two consecutive semesters, for 
he goes there only to hear the great German lectures 
on the special subject in which he is interested. He 
usually continues his course for about three years, 
then returns to the University he first attended, and 
takes his examination for his degree. He also said 
it would be a saving of money for an American stu- 
dent to take the trip to Germany, and study at the 
Universities, rather than to study in America. He 
closed with an account of the German duels. Ken- 
drie, '10, played a beautiful violin solo as special 
music. 

Last night Rev. Raymond Calkins, D.D., of Port- 
land, gave the first talk in the series on "The Ethi- 
cal Aspects of the Professions." He gave the talk 
irf Hubbard Hall, and took as his subject "Social Ser- 
vice." A longer account will appear in the next 
issue of the Orient. 



HISTORY PRIZE SUBJECTS 

The Class of 1875 Prize in American History will 
be awarded this year for the best essay on one of the 
following subjects: 

1. The Land Policy of Massachusetts in the Prov- 
ince of Maine. 

2. The Separation of Maine from Massachusetts. 

3. The Political Career of Governor James Bow- 
doin. 

Essays should contain not less than fifteen, nor 
more than twenty-five thousand words. All essays 
must be typewritten and submitted to Professor Allen 
Johnson not later than June 1, 1907. The competi- 
tion is open to Seniors and Juniors. Students who 
intend to compete are advised to consult with 
Professor Johnson before beginning their work. 

The Philo Sherman Bennett Prize will be awarded 
this year for the best essay on "The Practical Work- 
ing of the Initiative and Referendum in America." 

Essays should contain not less than five nor more 
than ten thousand words. All essays must be sub- 
mitted to Professor Allen Johnson not later than 
June 1, 1907. The competition is open to Seniors 
and Juniors. 



COLLEGE TEA 



The second college tea is to be held this afternoon 
in Hubbard Hall from four until six. The special 
guests will be from Portland and such visitors as 
are here for to-night's Assembly. 



210 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



College Botes 

Sandborn, '08, has returned to college. 

The B. A. A. Meet will take place on Feb. 16.' 

Several cases of measles are reported in the Ends. 

The annual Indoor Meet will take place on 
March 22. f 

Drummond, '09, has been elected business manager 
of the Quill. 

The first Junior Assembly occurs in Memorial Hall 
this evening. 

P. A. Drew, U. of M. '08, was a guest at the Beta 
House, Monday. 

Several students have recently left college to work 
at the legislature. 

Neal Doherty has returned to college and is out 
for the relay team. 

Crowley, '08, is confined to his bed this week by 
trouble with his hip. 

Hicks, '95, was a recent guest of friends at the 
Kappa Sigma House. 

A preliminary schedule of the final exams, was 
posted for Wednesday. 

Evans, '10, spent a few days in Augusta last week, 
the guest of his brother. 

'■'Fitz" Sargent, '01, and "Gil" Campbell, '03, were 
on the campus recently. 

The Class of '68, Prize Speaking will take place in 
Memorial Hall on Jan. 24. 

Many of the students in the dormitories have 
been suffering from sore throat. 

Coach John Irwin has arrived and has had charge 
of the baseball squad this week. 

Plant, Trinity, '10, was a recent guest of friends at 
the Delta Kappa Epsilon house. 

Make up examinations for entrance conditions 
have been held during the week. 

Hewey D. Benner, '09, announces that he will 
issue the Bowdoin Calendar for 1908. 

Several of the students have entered the pool tour- 
nament at the Central Billiard Parlor. 

The Bradbury Prize Debate will be held in the 
Debating Room on Jan. 22, at 7 o'clock. 

The Freshman Class sweaters have arrived. They 
are blue and white, and are of various styles. 

Several of the students saw Viola Allen in "Cym- 
beline" at the Empire Theatre last Thursday night. 

R. W. Smith, '09, took a prominent part in the 
minstrels of the Cony High School at its annual 
fair. 

Several of the students attended the concert of the 
Tufts Glee Club, in Portland, last Wednesday even- 
ing. 

Small, '07, was taken ill with appendicitis during 
the vacation, but is improved and able to attend reci- 
tations. 

The Bowdoin College Calendars were put on sale 
the last few days before the Christmas holidays. 
There are several improvements and innovations 
and the calendars are certainly up to the standard. 



Coons, '08, was one of the officiating clergymen 
at the funeral of the late Weston Thompson on 
Tuesday. 

Bunker, Med. '09, and Humphrey, Med. '09, who 
have been seriously ill at their homes, have returned 
to college. 

G. B. Webber has issued calendars with a picture 
of the baseball team upon them. The calendars are 
very attractive. 

David R. Porter, ex-Bowddin, '06, now at Oxford, 
is passing the six weeks' vacation in traveling 
through Italy. 

Francis R. Upton, Jr., '09, of Orange, N. J., has 
been elected reader for the College Glee and Mando- 
lin-Guitar Clubs. 

In one of the Boston papers it was stated lately 
that Bowdoin was to have a dual track meet with 
Tufts this spring. 

Lowell, '08, who, just before the Christmas holi- 
days, broke his forearm while pole vaulting in the 
gym, is much improved. 

Warren, '10, has been doing quite a lot of business 
selling "Insured Stockings." They are guaranteed 
not to need darning for a year. 

Fine skating has been enjoyed on the river dur- 
ing the past week. The entire river is frozen over, ' 
and the greater part is clear ice. 

Slocum, '10, has set up his book store at 18 North 
Maine Hall and offers, besides a good line of books, 
hockey sticks and athletic goods. 

The boys' basketball team of the Brunswick High 
School defeated the Lisbon Falls High Saturday 
evening, Dec. 29, by a score of 15 to 5. 

Thomas H. Riley is issuing calendars containing 
pictures of New England College buildings, among 
them being one of the Walker Art Building. 

Adams, '07, and Sparks, '09, are in the woods of 
northern Maine for several weeks, where they are 
engaged in forestry work for Professor Austin Cary. 

The outdoor running track is now being used. 
The track was somewhat remodeled this year, and it / 
is now very similar to the track used at the B. A. 
A. Meet. 

R. W. Messer, who left college about four weeks 
ago, owing to sickness, was operated on for appen- 
dicitis last Saturday in the Maine General Hospital 
at Portland. 

The Mozart Club, composed of the young 
lady musicians of Brunswick, gave a very delightful 
musical recital in the First Parish Church on Tues- 
day evening, Jan. 1. 

During the vacation an Augusta Club was 
organized at Augusta with the following officers : 
President, Weston, 08; Vice-President, Heath, '09; 
Secretary, Martin, '10. 

During the Christmas recess set bowls with hot 
and cold water were placed on each floor in North 
Maine. The expense was borne by the students 
rooming in that end. 

Rev. Herbert A. Jump had an interesting Christ- 
mas story entitled "The Christmas Star of Moneeg 
Ledge" in the Lewiston Saturday Journal recently 
and a poem entitled "My Church" in the Congre- 
gationalist. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



2U 



The Dramatic Club will present "London Assur- 
ance" this year. Lack of space prevents a full 
account of the work that is being done in this week's 
issue. 

S. F. Timberlake, '09, has accepted a position at 
Augusta as the special messenger for the Governor 
and Council, and will hold this position during the 
session of the Legislature. 

Bridge, '09, was confined to his room the first of 
the week because of a blow on the jaw received while 
boxing. He has since recoyered, however, and is 
attending to his college work as usual. 

"The Camp on Letter K" is the name of a book 
recently published by Mr. Burleigh, editor of the 
Kennebec Journal. This book is the beginning of a 
series, the last of which will deal with Bowdoin Life. 

There is considerable talk of a basketball game 
between the team from the Medical School, and a 
local team. Should the game be played it would be 
close and exciting, as there are good players on both 
teams. 

A most enjoyable dancing party was held at the 
Theta Delta Chi House, Friday evening, December 
the twenty-first. The patronesses were Mrs. Roscoe 
J. Ham, Mrs. William B. Mitchell and Mrs. Frank 
Woodruff. 

Seven Harvard students, members of the Senior 
Class in Forestry, were in town a few days during 
the vacation. They left Brunswick for the Rangeley 
region where they are at work under Professor Aus- 
tin Cary, of the Forestry Department at Harvard. 

The Brunswick High School basketball team goes 
to Freeport this evening, to play the Freeport 
High School. Wednesday evening the Brunswick 
team played the Morse High of Bath at Bath, and 
Saturday evening the Yarmouth local team at Yar- 
mouth. 

The regular Tuesday evening debate was wit- 
nessed by members of the debating teams of Lew- 
iston High and Edward Little High last Tuesday 
evening. Both schools are members of the Bow- 
doin Interscholastic Debating League and will meet 
in the preliminary debate to-night. 

The members of the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity 
held a delightful dancing party at New Meadows 
Inn on Friday evening, Dec. 21. Dinner was also 
enjoyed at the Inn. In the later part of the evening 
the party returned to the~iraternity house where a 
pleasant social hour was passed. 

Winston B. Stephens, '10, while at his home in 
New Bedford, Mass., for the Christmas vacation, 
was presented a handsome gold watch in recognition 
of his bravery last summer in saving the life of Mau- 
rice H. Richardson, Jr. Mr. Richardson, who is a 
Harvard student, was drowning near Horse Neck, 
on the Massachusetts coast when Stephens at 
the risk of his life brought him to land. 



THE FACULTY 

President Hyde will conduct the vesper service 
next Wednesday, Jan. 16, at Brown University. 

On January 18, Prof. W. T. Foster will give a talk 
on Stevenson at Newcastle, Me., under the auspices 
of the Skidompha Library Club. 



Prof. Little addressed the Faculty Club last Mon- 
day evening. His subject was St. Gregory. 

Prof. G. T. Files was a visitor at the Yale Grad- 
uate School during a part of last week. 

The American Historical and Economical Asso- 
ciations which met at Providence, R. I., Decem- 
ber 21-29, were attended by Prof. A. Johnson and 
Prof. R. C. McCrea. 

Dr. Burnett has recently been elected Superintend- 
ent of the Sunday School of the First Parish Church. 

The January number of the Maine Magazine con- 
tains an extensive write-up of Brunswick and a 
sketch of Bowdoin College from the pen of Profes- 
sor Foster. The issue contains also pictures of 
many of the college buildings, and grounds. 

Professor and Mrs. Henry Johnson, Miss Helen 
Johnson, Miss Annie Johnson, Professor and Mrs. 
William A. Houghton and Professor Kenneth C. M. 
Sills were among the Brunswick people who attended 
the reception given by Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Gardiner 
of Gardiner at their summer home, "Oaklands," last 
Friday evening. 



TRACK WORK THIS WINTER 

Regular work in all the field and track evetns 
that can be handled in the Gymnasium or on the out- 
door track, will be done from now on under the 
direction of Coach Merrill every Tuesday and 
Thursday at 2.30, and every Saturday at 3.30. 

A cross country squad which will be under the 
management of Captain Shorey is to start from the 
Gymnasium every afternoon at 4.45. This squad 
will take brisk walks of three or four miles, coming 
home at a jog. Those going on the walks will wear 
their ordinary amount of clothing with sweaters, for 
this work is simply to keep all the distance men in 
good condition and give them the staying strength 
on which the races will depend next spring. 

All men trying for the relay team that is to race 
Tufts next month, are to meet every afternoon at 
four o'clock for setting-up work with dumb-bells and 
the regular practice on the board track. 



HOCKEY 

Last Saturday a hockey team composed of mem- 
bers of the college, went to Augusta where they 
defeated a local team by a score of 10 to 2. Those 
who played and their positions were as follows : 
Dresser, Draper, Hughes, and Hambruger, forwards; 
Johnson, cover point ; Wight, point ; and Lawrence, 
goal. Next Saturday the Augusta team will play a 
return game with the college team on the new rink at 
Whittier Field, when an opportunity will be given to 
see how the game is played, and also to encourage 
the formation of a hockey team to represent Bow- 
doin in intercollegiate games. 



FIRST JUNIOR ASSEMBLY 

The first Junior Assembly of the winter will take 
place in Memorial Hall this evening. The commit- 
tee have completed all the details of arrangements 
and a delightful affair is anticipated. The patron- 
esses will be Mrs. W. DeWitt Hyde, Mrs. Leslie A. 



2J2 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Lee, Mrs. George T. Files,, Mrs. Roswell C. McCrea 
and Mrs. H. C. Baxter. Lovell's Orchestra will fur- 
nish music and refreshments will be served by 
Giveen. 



SENIOR CLASS ELECTION 



The Senior Class election was held last Tuesday 
afternoon, resulting as follows : President, W. S. 
Linnell; Vice-President, N. W. Doherty; Secretary- 
Treasurer, G. A. Bower ; Marshal, P. Kimball ; Chap- 
lain, G. H. Hull; Opening Address, H. E. Mitchell; 
Oration, F. J. Redman ; Closing Address, E. A. 
Duddy; Historian, A. J. Voorhees; Poet, C. W. 
Snow; Class Day Committee, Chairman, F. L. Bass; 
S. G. Haley, D. S. Robinson. 

It was voted to have a class smoker some time 
in the near future and a committee consisting of 
Lawrence, Haley and D. S. Robinson was appointed 
to make arrangements. 



Elumni personals 

CLASS OF 1856 
The following was taken from the Boston 
Journal of a short time ago: "Eight men, 
the remnant of the Class of 1856, Bowdoin 
College, were entertained at Young's Hotel 
last night by George C. Yeaton and Judge 
Luce of Waltham. One of the members intro- 
duced his son, Robert Luce, a member of the 
Lgislature, to the class, and a delightful even- 
ing was spent in reminiscences of old times. 
Rev. Dr. Parker of Hartford, read a poem 
weaving in the names of all his classmates." 

CLASS OF 1870. 
Congressman D. S. Alexander's Political 
History of the State of New York, has recently 
been put on sale. The book is in two volumes 
and contains 840 pages and is very highly 
spoken of by commentators. 

CLASS OF 1877 
Commander Robert E. Peary will be the 
guest of honor at the annual dinner, January 
16, of the New York Alumni Association of 
Delta Kappa Epsilon, an organization with a 
membership of over 500. 

CLASS OF 1882 
Maine has a special interest in the appoint- 
ment by the President of Edwin U. Curtis of 
Boston as treasurer of the United States sub- 
treasury at that city. Though born in Bos- 
ton of a long line of Bostonians, he was edu- 
cated in Maine, married a Waldoboro girl and 



frequently visits this State. He attended 
school at the famous old Little Blue School in 
Farmington and then entered Bowdoin, where 
he graduated in '82. In college he was a 
famous athlete and was captain of the crew. 
He has since been on the Bowdoin athletic 
council and is now on the board of overseers 
of the college. He studied law after gradua- 
tion from college, but in later years has 
devoted most of his time to real estate and his 
varied business interests. In 1889 and 1890 
he was city clerk of Boston and in 1895 he 
was elected mayor on the Republican ticket. 
His new position is one of much responsibility 
but as he is a millionaire the salary of $5,000 
was not his motive in accepting the appoint- 
ment. — Kennebec Journal. 

CLASS OF 1893 
George S. Chapin, now a teacher at the 
Ohio State School for the Blind, and Pauline 
G. Gray of Columbus, Ohio, were married 
December 29, 1906. 

CLASS OF 1895 

The engagement is announced of Harlan P. 
Small, '95, a Springfield, Mass., lawyer, and 
Miss Fannie Moulton of Springfield, formerly 
of Bath, Me. 

Fred O. Small, '95, and R. S. Hagar, '97, 
are located in Joplin, Missouri, where they 
have recently formed a law partnership. 

Philip D. Stubbs, Esq., of Strong, Me., has 
been elected a member of the next Maine Leg- 
islature. 

CLASS OF 1900 

Everett B. Stackpole has been admitted to 
the Massachusetts bar and is located in Haver- 
hill. 

Robert S. Edwards, Bowdoin, '00, has 
recently opened a broker's office at 27 Milk 
Street, Boston. 

CLASS OF 1904 

A. C. Merryman, '04, has recently obtained 
a position as teacher of science in Milwaukee 
Academy, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Walter K. Wildes, 1904, has resigned his 
position with the American Woolen Company 
and will pass the winter in Europe. He 
sailed from New York, Saturday, December 
15, on the steamship New York, of the Ameri- 
can Line. After spending the Christmas holi- 
days in London he will go to Switzerland, 
returning to New York in the spring to again 
enter business. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



2J3 



©bttuar\> 



JUDGE JOHN F. LIBBY, '85 

John F. Libby, since 1900 the justice of the 
eastern Middlesex district, died Dec. 27 at his 
home in Medford, Mass. He was born in 
Richmond Feb. 3, 1863, and graduated from 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



Visit our 

ICE-CREAM 

PARLOR. 




119 Maine Street 
CATERING in all departments a Specialty. 



GOODHICffS BAKERY 

J80 MAINE STREET 
YOU CAN GET ANYTHING IN BAKER'S FOOD. 

GOOD RICH BREAD 
AND FANCY WORK 

A SPECIALTY. 



* * 
X TRIPLE SILVER PLATE J 

I GILLETTE SAFETY RAZORS I 

% MAKE SHAVING A PLEASURE | 

1 * 

« EATON HARDWARE CO. * 

* * 

* BRUNSWICK *> 

* * 
*¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥& 



Bowdoin in '85. He taught in Waldoboro 
and Bridgton, studied law in Portland and 
since 1892 has practiced in Medford. He 
served two terms in the Massachusetts Legis- 
lature, and was Medford's city solicitor and 
chairman of its water and sewer commission. 
He was appointed to the bench by Governor 
Crane and the Boston papers pay the highest 
tributes to his memory as a judge and a citi- 
zen. 



See pie nut a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
1906 man who will be In the market for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

It you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
(afternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill, I can give you full Information concerning a great 
many of the beBt opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United StateB and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

A. S. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPQOOD'S 



^0<Z>)0<Z>00<=>00<Z>00<Z>)0<==>00<r=>00<=>)(!7 

(j BOWDOIN STUDENTS A 

IP Will always be welcome to ^P 

| HARVEY STETSON'S SONS t 

U Furniture ™j Carpet Store t 

y ROOM FURNISHERS W 

1? To Bowdoin for 60 years If 



o<=>oo<==»oo<==>0()<=r^()<c=^o<r>)()<=>oo<^=>o^ 



The College 
Book Store 

We try to keep a good line of 

STUDENTS' SUPPLIES 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pen 

and Moore's Non=Leakab!e Pens 

F. W. CHANDLER & SON 



Mention the Orient; ^rhen patronizing our Advertisers, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



The fifty-fourth session of this College of Medicine 
begins December I, J 906, and continues seven months. 

A New Building with 

Large, well equipped Laboratories, 
Commodious Lecture Halls, 
Pleasant Recitation Rooms, 

Every Facility for Instruction. 



NUMEROUS CLINICS 



MODERATE EXPENSE 



For Announcement and further information, address 

H. L. WHITE, A.M., Secretary 

BURLINGTON, VT. 



THE MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Has a carefully graded course of four sessions of eight months each. Noteworthy features are : Free Quizzes; Limited 
Ward Classes; Clinical Conferences; Modified Seminar Methods, and thoroughly Practical Instruction. Particular attention 
to laboratory work and ward classes and bedside teaching. Clinical facilities unexcelled. 

The clinical amphitheatre is the largest and finest in the world, the hospital is newly reconstructed and thoroughly 
modern in every respect, and the new laboratories are specially planned and equipped for individual work by the students. 

The College has also a Department of Dentistry and a Department of Pharmacy. For announcements or further information apply to 

SENECA EGBERT, M.D., Dean of the Department of Medicine. 




Ifflizr/iiz^ 



REPEATING SHOTGUN 
NEW MODEL N2I7 




Here Is the cheapest good gun yet made. By the omission of the take down feature we have 
been able to greatly reduce the cost of production and at the same tune have kept the gun up to the 
famous high 772ar//n standard of strength, safety and durability. Notice the clean simplicity of 
this gun. The workmanship and finish are perfect. The weight is only 7 pounds. The hill choke 
barrels are especially bored for smokeless, as well as black powder and so chambered that 2H inch or 
r 8 u nC j !L may i ■ us ™- Several improvements in the operating parts make it the easiest, most 
reliable and best working gun in existence. We are glad to make it possible for every lover of guns 
and bird shooting to get this high grade repeating shot gun at so low a price. , 
"* ' t you. 



Have your dealer order it fo 



Send for the fflar£ui Catalogue and Experience Book to-day. Free for 3 stamps. 

7A&2f£ar/l/2 fireCW/nS £a,42WilIow Street, New Haven, Ct 



Mention Orient when Patronizing Our Advertisers 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JANUARY 18, 1907 



VOL. XXXVI 



NO. 22 



LONGFELLOW ANNIVERSARY 

Bowdoin College will celebrate the One- 
Hundredth Anniversary of the birth of Henry 
Wadsworth Longfellow, in connection with 
Commencement, on Wednesday, June 26th. 
Professor George H. Palmer, LL.D., of Har- 
vard University, will give the address and 
Rev. Samuel V. Cole, D.D., Principal of 
Wheaton Seminary, will give the poem. 



INTERSCHOLASTIC DEBATING LEAGUE 

The first debate in the Bowdoin Interscholastic 
Debating League was held at Lewiston last Friday 
evening and resulted in a victory for Lewiston over 
the Edward Little High of Auburn. The question 
debated was "Resolved, That cities in the United 
States of 25,000 or more inhabitants should own and 
operate their street railways." Lewiston had the 
affirmative and Edward Little the negative. 

The City Hall was well filled with supporters and 
friends of the two teams and the enthusiasm was at 
a high pitch throughout the debate. The judges 
were Hon. Harold M. Sewall of Bath, Hon. Burt 
Fernald of Poland, and Prof. K. C. M. Sills of 
Bowdoin. Mayor Newell of Lewiston presided. 

The debate was a very even content throughout 
and the various issues were carefully worked out on 
both sides. The speakers for Lewiston were 
Messrs. Keist, Marston and Fisher. The issues 
treated by them were as follows : First, That the 
present system is objectionable; second, the pro- 
posed plan would remedy the objectionable features ; 
and, third, municipal ownership has been successful 
in Great Britain. 

The speakers for Edward Little were Messrs. Phi- 
loon, Adams and Barton. They treated their side of 
the question as follows : First, that municipal own- 
ership would result in poorer service ; second, that 
it would be too expensive ; and, third, that it would 
lead to political corruption. On the constructive 
side, they advocated public control in place of pub- 
lic ownership. 

The rebuttals were for the most part good, and 
it was in this that Lewiston seemed to excel to the 
extent that the judges believed it just to award 
them the debate. 

Professor Sills in announcing the decision of the 
judges, reported a concurring opinion in declaring 
the excellence of the negative in the matter of pre- 
sentation, but because of the great superiority of 
the affirmative in the rebuttal, the judges "could do 
nothing else than give them the debate." 

The debate was satisfactory in every respect and 
much credit is due to both Snow, '07, and Hupper, 
'08, who coached Lewiston High and Edward Little 
High respectively. Lewiston High will now be 



required to meet the winner of the Cony High-Gar- 
diner High debate, in a debate to be held in Memo- 
rial Hall later in the year. 

The only unfortunate feature of the debate is that 
there appears to be some dissatisfaction among the 
Auburn supporters over the decision of the judges. 
It is hoped that the matter may be amicably settled. 



The Cony High-Gardiner debate, which was to 
have been held this evening, has been set ahead one 
week. 



FIRST JUNIOR ASSEMBLY 

The first Junior Assembly of the winter was held 
in Memorial Hall last Friday evening, and proved 
all that could be desired as an enjoyable dancing 
party. The hall was tastily decorated for the occa- 
sion, a large "1908" in the rear being a conspicuous 
part of the arrangements. 

An order of 24 dances was carried out, the music 
for which was furnished by the College Orchestra, 
with Kendrie, '10, as leader. There were about 30 
couples in attendance. The patronesses were Mrs. 
William DeWitt Hyde, Mrs. Leslie A. Lee, Mrs. 
Roswell C. McCrea, Mrs. Hartley C. Baxter, Mrs. 
George T. Files, and Mrs. Hosea Knowlton of West 
Newton. Among the young ladies present were 
Miss Margaret Stevens, of Portland, Miss Margaret 
Toage of Damariscotta, Miss Ethel McFarland of 
Keene, N. H. ; Miss Emily Creighton, of Thomas- 
ton ; Misses Annie Ross and Floradora Ross of Ken- 
nebunk; Misses Helen Eaton, Sue Winchell, Ger- 
trude Christopher, Lue Woodward, Dasie Hubbard, 
and Annie Parsons of Brunswick ; Miss Mattie Clif- 
ford of Cornish ; Misses Elizabeth Bates, Geraldine 
Fitzgerald and Geneva Fitzgerald, of Portland ; Miss 
Gertrude Stevens of Fort Fairfield ; Misses Mar- 
garet Cram and Berta Cram of Mount Vernon ; Miss 
Annie Robinson of Bangor; Misses Winifred Bent 
and Josephine Powers of Dresden; Miss Marion 
Cobb of Rockland; Miss Christine Kennison of 
Waterville; Miss Louise Sewall of Bath; Misses 
Marion Proctor, Louise Edwards and Gwendelon 
Jenkens of Portland. 



MASSACHUSETTS CLUB 

The third meeting of the Massachusetts Club was 
held at the Zeta Psi House last Saturday evening. 
After the usual business of the Club had been 
transacted, and refreshments had been served, some 
twenty-two members listened to a very interesting 
talk by Professor Ham on "What a college man 
ought to get out of his courses." On January 
twenty-sixth instead of the regular meeting of the 
club, parties of four will play cards, the two win- 
ners in each party to receive prizes, in the form of 
match-holders, embossed with a Seal of Massachu- 
setts. . ^..j 



2(6 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



DRAMATIC CLUB 

The Dramatic Club has selected as its play, 
"London Assurance," by Dion L. Boucicault. It is 
a comedy, whose action takes place in England at 
about 1840. There are twelve characters in the play, 
only three of whom are ladies, so that it is especially 
adapted to being played by a college club as was 
very successfully done at Dartmouth two years ago. 

James A. Bartlett, '06, who played 6n the club 
during the four years of his college course, has been 
engaged as coach, and will be able to give much of 
his time to the rehearsals, since he is teaching school 
at Saco. 

On Monday, Jan. 14, the trials for the club were 
held in the Christian Association Room. Professor 
Chapman, Professor Mitchell and J. A. Bartlett 
acted as judges. Their decision as to the parts had 
not been made known when the Orient went to 
press, but a good club should be picked since about 
thirty men competed for the twelve parts. - 

It is planned now to take two short trips, and 
have one performance in Brunswick. This per- 
formance will come the night before Ivy, as last 
year, and it is hoped that the college will make it, 
as it deserves to be, one of the regular events of 
Ivy Week. 



MINSTREL SHOW 

The work of preparation for the Minstrel Show 
is now making good progress and the indications 
are that the show will be fully up to the high 
standard of past years. The show will be presented 
in the Town Hall on Jan. 23. It is also hoped to 
have the show given at least once out of town. 

Kimball, '07, will be interlocutor. The "Bones" 
will be Sheehan, P. H. Browne and R. W. Smith, 
and the "Tambos" Upton, Roberts and Kingsley. 
There will be vocal solos by Pike, Linnell and Ley- 
don and a violin solo by Kendrie. The chorus will 
number about forty voices .and the manager would 
like a few more volunteers for that, although the 
attendance at the rehearsals has been very good. 
There are to be a number of specialty acts. B. C. 
Morrill will give an exhibition of club swinging and 
juggling; the Mikelsky brothers will appear in a 
sketch written especially for the occasion ; and Boyce, 
'08, will give one of his monologues. Other specialty 
acts will be given by Sargent and Cox, and by Don- 
nell and Upton. There will be a trio from the Man- 
dolin Club and a quartet from the Glee Club. Man- 
ager Robinson intends to make, this year's show the 
most successful one there has been so far. 



GOVERNMENT CLUB 

A government club was organized in the history 
room last Friday morning. An executive committee 
consisting of Professor Johnson, Voorhees, '07, and 
Pike, '07, was selected. 



CHEMICAL CLUB 

The next meeting of the Chemical Club will be 
held at 7.30 o'clock on Friday evening in Hubbard 
Hall. W. V. Wentworth, Bowdoin, '86, will speak 
on "Soda Fibre." 



SECOND COLLEGE TEA 

The second in the series of college teas was held 
in the Alumni Room of Hubbard Hall last Friday 
afternoon, and, like its predecessors, proved an 
enjoyable occasion. The special guests of the after- 
noon were friends of the college residing in Port- 
land and vicinity, and there was a large number in 
attendance. In addition to these, friends of the col- 
lege who were in town to attend the Junior 
Assembly in the evening were also in attendance, 
making an unusually large number of young ladies. 

The patronesses of the afternoon consisted of 
Mrs. William A. Houghton, Mrs. Frank E. Wood- 
ruff, Mrs. Henry Johnson, and Mrs. George T. 
Little. The ushers were from the eight fraternities, 
and were as follows : Winchell, '07, Kingsley, '07, 
Powers, '08, Huse, '08, Davis, '08, Leighton, '08, 
Cushing, '09, and Files, '09. 

Refreshments of tea, coffee, punch, fancy crackers 
and confectionery were served during the after- 
noon. The tea tables were in charge of Mrs. Frank 
N. Whittier and Mrs. Charles C. Hutchins, assisted 
by the Misses Sue Winchell, Annie Johnson, Emilie 
Felt, Sarah Merryman, Gertrude Christopher and 
Helen Curtis. 

Mrs. William A. Moody poured coffee, and was 
assisted in serving by Misses Grace Crawford, Mae 
Despeaux, Ida Smith. Mrs. George T. Files pre- 
sided at the punch bowl, assisted by Misses Sarah 
Baxter, Edna Scott, Marjorie Prince, and Cecil 
Houghton. 



ART BUILDING NOTES 



There is now on exhibition in the Bowdoin Gal- 
lery a set of 108 excellent views of Paris, loaned by 
the Library Art Club, which will remain on exhibi- 
tion until next Monday. 

The Art Building has recently received several 
coins from people interested in the college. They 
are two Japanese coins, one copper, and one nickel, 
from Horace Chandler, Esq., of Jamaica Plain, 
Mass., a bronze classical coin from Charles Mustard, 
Esq., of Brunswick, and a U. S. half dollar dated 
1835 from G. Barbalias, Esq., of Lewiston. 

The college has also entrusted to the Art Build- 
ing a piece of one of the original oak rafters used 
in the construction of Faneuil Hall, Boston, in 1742 
(which structure was burned in 1763), that recently 
was presented to the college by Sergeant E. E. 
Snow, of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery. 



THE GLEE CLUB 



Leaders Winchell and Pike having been busily 
engaged during the past week in rehearsing their 
respective clubs in preparation for the trips which 
will take place shortly after the mid-year examina- 
tions. The first concert will be held at Freeport on 
Feb. 14 and on Feb. 18 will occur the annual concert 
in Bath. A trip has been arranged which begins 
at Ellsworth on Feb. 20 and includes Bangor, Feb. 
21, Oldtown, Feb. 22, and Augusta, Feb. 23. There 
will then be a trip to Livermore Falls and Farming- 
ton on Feb. 27 and 28 respectively. In addition to 
these, concerts have been arranged in Portland, 
Westbrook and Rumford Falls, with possible trips 
to Kennebunk, Saco, and Rockland. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



217 



GREAT HONOR FOR PEARY 

At the recent annual dinner of the National 
Geographic Society, Commander Robert E. 
Peary was presented a gold medal for having 
reached "Farthest North." President Roose- 
velt was the guest of honor and made the 
presentation. The President in a brief 
address paid tribute to Commander Peary and 
took occasion to remark that he was proud of 
the fact that an American, an officer of the 
American Navy, had reached "Farthest 
North." 

The President spoke as follows: 

"I count myself as fortunate in having been 
asked to be present this evening at such a 
gathering and on behalf of such a society to 
pay tribute of honor to an American who 
emphatically deserves well of the common- 
wealth. Civilized people usually live under 
conditions of life so easy that there is a certain 
tendency to atrophy of the hardier virtues. 
And it is a relief to pay signal honor to a man 
who by his achievements makes it evident that 
in some of the race at least, there has been no 
loss of hardy virtues. 

"I said some loss of the hardier virtues. 
We will do well to recollect that the very word 
virtue in itself orginally signifies courage and 
hardihood. When the Roman spoke of virtue 
he meant that sum of qualities that we char- 
acterize as manliness. 

"I emphatically believe in peace and all the 
kindred virtues. But I think that they are only 
worth having if they come as a consequence 
of possessing the combined virtues of courage 
and hardihood. So I feel that in an age which 
naturally and properly excels, as it should 
excel, in the milder and softer qualities, there 
is need that we should not forget that in the 
last analysis the safe basis of a successful 
national character must rest upon the great 
fighting virtues, and those great fighting vir- 
tues can be shown quite as well in peace as in 
war. 

"They can be shown in the work of the 
philanthropist ; in the work of the scientist and 
most emphatically of all in the work of the 
explorer, who faces and overcomes perils and 
hardships which the average soldier never in 
his life knows. 

"In war, after all, it is only the man at the 
very head who is ever lonely. All the others, 
from the subordinate generals down through 
the privates are cheered and sustained by the 
sense of companionship and by the sense of 
divided responsibility. 



"You (turning to Commander Peary), the 
man whom we join to honor to-day, you who 
for months in and months out, year in and year 
out, had to face perils and overcome the great- 
est risks and difficulties, with resting on your 
shoulders the undivided responsibility which 
meant life or death to you and your followers 
— you had to show in addition that the mod- 
ern commander with his great responsibility 
does not have to show. You had to show all 
the moral qualities in war, together with other 
qualities. You did a great deed, a deed that 
counted for all mankind, a deed which reflected 
credit upon you and upon your country, and 
on behalf of those present, speaking also for 
the millions of. your countrymen, I take pleas- 
ure in handing you this Hubbard medal, and 
in welcoming you home from the great feats 
which you have performed, Commander Peary. 

BOWDOIN BOYS WITH THE INTERNATIONAL 
BANKING CORPORATION 

The following young Bowdoin graduates are now 
with the International Banking Corporation of which 
General Hubbard, '57, is the president; H. W. Oakes, 
'04, and Stanley Williams, '05, in Manila; Walter S. 
Cushing, '05, in Yokohama; William B. Webb, '05, 
in Hong Kong; John H. Brett, '05, in Shanghai; D. 

B. Andrews, '06, and Robie Stevens, '06, in the City 
of Mexico; A. C. Shorey, '04, E. L. Brigham, '04, 

C. J. Donnell, '05, R. B. Williams, '06, F. L. Packard, 
'06, R. T. Woodruff, '06, R. G. Webber, '06, and E. 
H. Wing, '06, in London; and E. W. Hamilton, '05, 
and H. S. Stetson, '06, in New York. 



HOCKEY TO=MORROW 



The first game of hockey that has been played at 
Bowdoin is scheduled to take place on the Whittier 
Field to-morrow afternoon. The college team 
will have as its opponent a team from Augusta and 
it is hoped that a large number of students will be 
on hand to see the game. The college material 
promises unusually well and the game will be well 
worth seeing. 



PROSPECTIVE DUAL MEET 

It is understood that one of the matters to be dis- 
cussed at the next meeting of the Athletic Council, 
which may be held to-morrow, will be that of a dual 
meet with Tufts. There seems to be much to be 
said in favor of the proposition and it is understood 
that Tufts is anxious to hold such a meet. The out- 
come will be awaited with interest. 



PROF. MITCHELL TO ADDRESS HEBRON CLUB 

The Hebron Club met with Ellis, '09, at the Delta 
Upsilon House last Saturday evening, for its regu- 
lar monthly meeting. It was voted to hold a banquet 
at the Inn to-morrow evening at which time Profes- 
sor Mitchell, Hebron, '86, will address the Club. 



218 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 Editor-in-Chief 

Associate Editors 

h. e. mitchell, 1907 r. h. hupper, 1908 
w. s. linnell, 1907 r. a. lee, 1908 

A. L. ROBINSON, igo8 H. H. BURTON, 1909 

J. S. STAHL, 1909 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 
N. S. WESTON, 1908 



Business Manager 
Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 



Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, I cents. 



Entered at Post-OSice at Brunswick as Second-Clas 


5 Mail Matter 


Lkwistun Journal Press 


Vol. XXXVI. JANUARY 18, 1907 


No. 22 



It appears to be the annual 
Throwing the Shot duty of Orient editors to 

call attention to the dan- 
gers of throwing the shot in the gymnasium in 
a careless manner. For the most part, stu- 
dents show proper care when there are others 
in the gym., but there are a few who are 
exceedingly thoughtless, if nothing worse. 
Only the other day some men were engaged 
in the careless pastime of throwing the shot 
up onto the running track and letting it roll 
off wherever it happened to. And this, too, 
at a time when there were other men in the 
gym. One man at least had a narrow escape 
from being struck and his escape was due to 
his own quickness rather than any precaution 
that had been taken. Doubtless these things 
are the result of nothing but carelessness, but 
it is the kind that would come close to being 
classified as criminal in the judgment of most 
people. 



The Orient is pleased to 
Eligibility Rules state that the faculty has 
decided on the retention of 
the athletic rules which went into effect last 
fall, instead of enacting any new regulations. 
This decision on the part of the faculty is one 
that commends itself to the entire student 
body. While it is doubtless true that the pres- 
ent rules have defects it is also true that they 
have scarcely had a fair trial, and the Orient 
believes they embody, all the necessary limita- 
tions without dealing the blow to the athletic 
interests of the college that would have been 
the case under some of the contemplated 
changes. 

This action on the part of the faculty is not 
only pleasing as being a satisfactory arrange- 
ment, but it is also an indication of a careful 
consideration of the students' standpoint, by 
our faculty. There is, perhaps, nothing in the 
conduct of a college that contributes more to 
make the institution mean what it should to a 
man in both undergraduate and graduate days, 
than a harmony of interests between the stu- 
dents and the faculty — a thing in which Bow- 
doin has always been particularly fortunate. 
And in the present instance the faculty has 
shown a consideration for which the students 
should all feel grateful. 



„ . _, . . It is well to call the atten- 

Sab-Preshmen and tkm of the students t0 the 

the Minstrel Show advisability of inviting 
sub-Freshmen to the Minstrel Show. While 
the Indoor Meet is the time generally recog- 
nized for the entertainment of preparatory 
school men, it is certain that the Min- 
strel Show is as fully as interesting an enter- 
tainment as is the meet. It is not always pos- 
sible to get men here at the Meet, and it is 
surely no harm to begin interesting men in 
the college now. If the show is anywhere 
near equal to that of previous years, it will 
be an occasion that will be thoroughly enjoyed 
by most sub-Freshmen. 



. , . _ The Orient wishes to call 

Lack of Space attention to the fact that 

Again several articles that have 

been received are crowded out of this issue 
because of lack of space. From time to time 
contributions that are greatly appreciated are 
delayed for this reason and no other. The 
current events of the college are of a charac- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



219 



ter that demands early publication, although 
in many instances they are of far less import- 
ance than the items crowded out. The 
Orient wishes to assure those who have 
kindly contributed that their articles will 
appear as soon as possible ; also that their 
kindness is fully appreciated. 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

On Thursday evening, January 10, the first of the 
monthly meetings that are to be open to the public, 
was held in Hubbard Hall. The subject for these 
meetings is "The Ethical Aspects of the Profes- 
sions," and Rev. Raymond Calkins, D.D., of Port- 
land, who spoke January 10, took as his special 
subject "The Ethics of Social Service." He said 
that there are two problems before the world, the 
social problem and the personal problem, that is the 
problem of the poor masses and of the self-sup- 
porting individual. The social problem can be solved 
only by disinterested help being given to the masses, 
and the personal problem can be solved only by the 
individual's giving help to those who need it, for 
his problem is to get true happiness. Therefore, 
when the self-supporting individual enters into social 
service, he is helping to solve the social problem as 
well as his own. The college student, Dr. Calkins 
said, is like a pond filling up with water, but having 
no outlet; so if the student should use some of his 
stored up learning in social service, he would be 
making an outlet that would give him happiness. 

The other three speakers on "The Ethical Aspects 
of the Professions" will be Prof. A. E. Burton, C.E., 
Bowdoin, '78, Dean of Masssachusetts Institute of 
Technology, on "Civil Engineering," January 31 ; 
Dr. D. A. Robinson, A.M., M.D., Bowdoin, '73, on 
"Medicine," February 14; and Mr. G. W. Hinckley 
of Good Will Farm, on "Social Service," February 
28. 

Last night Anand Sidoba Hiwale of Hindostan 
spoke in the Christian Association room, on "India's 
Need of a Christian Type of Manhood," and a solo 
was sung by A. O. Pike, '07. An account will 
appear in next week's issue. 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, JANUARY l8TH 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

4.45 p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium. 

6.30 p.m. Meeting of Deutscher Verein at New 
Meadows Inn. 

6.30 p.m. Aroostook Club meets at New Meadows 
Inn. 

6.45 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

Prof. Foster speaks on "Stephenson" at Newcastle. 

7.30 p.m. W. V. Wentworth, '86, speaks before 
Chemical Club in Hubbard Hall. 

SATURDAY, JANUARY IQTH 

1.00 p.m. Glee Club rehearsal in Christian Asso- 
ciation Room. 
2.30 p.m. Track work in Gymnasium and on track. 



2.30 p.m. Snowshoe party starts for Mount 
Ararat. 

2.30 p.m. Hockey game with Augusta on Whit- 
tier Field. 

2-30-3-3O p.m. Make-up work in Gymnasium. 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

4.45 p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium 
for walk. 

6.30 p.m. Prof. Mitchell speaks before Hebron 
Club at New Meadows Inn. 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 20TH 

4.00 p.m. Quartette, Linnell, '07, Bass, '07, W. 
Crowley, '09, E. Crowley, '09, sing in chapel. 

MONDAY, JANUARY 2IST 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

4.4S p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium. 

6.45 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

7.00 p.m. Glee Club rehearsal in Christian Asso- 
ciation Room. 

Prof. Files speaks before Faculty Club on "The 
Anglo-Saxon House" in Hubbard Hall. 

Exhibition of Paris Photographs closes at Art 
Building. 

"Lion and the Mouse" at Empire Theatre, Lewis- 
ton. 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22D 

2.30 p.m. Track work in Gymnasium and on track. 

3.30-4.30 p.m. Make-up work in Gymnasium. 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

4.45 p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium. 

6.45 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

7.00 p.m. Trial for Bradbury Prize Debate in 
Hubbard Hall. 

"Lion and the Mouse" at Empire Theatre, Lew- 
iston. 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23D 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 
4.45 p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium. 
Bowdoin Minstrels at Town Hall. 
4.30 p.m. Fencing exhibition by four members of 
the Pianelli Fencing Club, in Gymnasium. 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 24TH 

2.30 p.m. Track work in Gymnasium and on track. 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

4.45 p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium. 

7.00 p.m. Rev. James F. Albion, D.D., of Port- 
land speaks at Christian Association Meeting. 

'68 Prize Speaking in Memorial Hall. 

Mandolin and Glee Clubs give concert at "Four 
Corners" Grange. 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25TH 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

4.45 p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium. 

6.45 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

Delta Kappa Epsilon House Party. 

Alumni dinner of New York Alumni Association 
at New York. 

Preliminary debate in Interscholastic League 
between Cony High School and Gardiner High 
School at Augusta. 



220 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



College Botes 

First Hockey Game on Whittier Field 
To=Morrow. 

Snow, '07, preached at Warren, Sunday. 

The second Sophomore Themes are due Jan. 29. 

Morrell, '09, is out of college on account of illness. 

Fred W. Spollett, '03, was on the campus, Sunday. 

The first trials in relay were made Tuesday 
afternoon. 

The skating rink was used for the first time, Tues- 
day afternoon. 

There was an unusually large number of visitors 
at chapel, Sunday. 

The Deutscher Verein will meet at New Meadows 
Inn on Friday evening. 

The Coffee Club was entertained by Professor 
Mitchell, Monday evening. 

W. A. Morrill, '09, is detained at his home in 
Gardiner because of illness. 

W. W. Fairclough, '08, spent Saturday and Sun- 
day at his home in Richmond. 

Frank Benson, U. of M., '06, was on Tuesday a 
guest at the Beta Theta Pi House. 

There was a meeting of the Quill Board at the 
Zeta Psi House last Friday evening. 

John Smith, who coached the Bowdoin track 
team last year, is now coaching Tufts. 

Farnsworth G. Marshall, '03, principal of Cony 
High School, spent Sunday on the campus. 

There was a meeting of the Cercle Francaise at 
the Zeta Psi House last Tuesday evening. 

Piper, '07, has returned to college, after spend- 
ing several weeks surveying in New Hampshire. 

Cole, '09, will be out of college for the next six 
weeks, being engaged in work at East Raymond. 

Floyd Smith, '08, is collecting Quill dues, Otis, 
'07, the former business manager, being out of col- 
lege. 

Haines, '08, who has been absent from college for 
several months on account of sickness, resumed his 
work this week. 

The snow was removed from the skating rink, 
Monday afternoon, and the field put in fine condition 
for hockey practice. 

The pool tournament at the Central Billiard Par- 
lors started Monday evening, and as many good 
players are entered, interesting contests are expected. 

R. W. Messer, who was operated on for appendi- 
citis at Dr. King's Hospital in Portland recently, 
is reported to be improving. 

The fellows out for the assistant managership of 
the baseball team were kept busy placing the min- 
strel show posters in conspicuous places the past few 
days. 

The Coffee Club met on Monday evening with 
Professor Mitchell to discuss the subject of Social- 
ism. A paper was read by A. B. Roberts, '07. Prof. 
McCrea was an invited guest. 



Bagley, '08, is acting as clerk in P. J. Meserve's 
drug store. 

A picture of Duddy, '07, appeared in the Portland 
Argus last week. 

The fourth report in French III. will be due Mon- 
day, January 21. 

Hanrahan, '10, who has been seriously ill, returned 
to college last Friday. 

The Minstrel Show posters are attracting a 
great deal of attention. 

Stephens, '10, is planning to do some work in 
burnt wood this term. 

Bates and Clarke have arranged a debate to be 
held at some date not yet fixed. 

Morrison, '08, was quite ill the first of the week 
with a severe attack of the grip. 

The Alpha Kappa Kappa Fraternity of the Medi- 
cal School will hold a dance in Portland in the near 
future. 

The Colonial Club of Bath has organized a Glee 
and Mandolin Club for the winter. Harry Cobb, 
'01, is leader. 

New Meadows Inn will close on February 3 for 
several weeks in order that changes may be made 
in the building. 

Students were treated with lobster stew at the 
new Corner store on the occasion of its first opening 
last Saturday. 

Mrs. Hosea Knowlton, of West Newton, one of 
the patronesses at the Junior Assembly, was the 
guest of Mrs. Leslie A. Lee during her stay in 
town. 

The hockey game which was to have been played 
on the rink at Whittier Field last Saturday, was 
cancelled by the college men on account of the non- 
completion of the rink. 

Last Saturday morning seventeen cars were 
derailed at Hillside, a station four miles from 
Brunswick, delaying all the western trains. A 
number of young ladies who were returning from 
the Junior Assembly had tedious waits. 

The members of the Zeta Psi Fraternity turned 
over their house to their lady guests last Friday 
night. Among the guests were Miss Stevens, Fort 
Fairfield; Miss Clifford, Cornish, the Misses Fitz- 
gerald, of Portland, Miss Bates, Portland, and Miss 
Poage, Portland. Mrs. Champlin of Portland, acted 
as chaperon. 

Tuesday evening, a fire broke out in the Maine 
Central Cafe and did considerable damage. It was 
caused by a gasolene stove and gained great head- 
way before the fire department arrived. This is 
very discouraging to the proprietor, Mr. McFadden, 
who had just set up a fine lunch room and store 
there. The loss is not fully known at present. 

The Anasagunticook Snowshoe Club has recently 
been formed in Brunswick, and has a number of the 
students among its members. Tuesday afternoon 
the club with invited friends enjoyed a walk to New 
Meadows Inn, where they had a shore supper, fol- 
lowed by dancing. Sturtevant, '09, has been elected 
secretary and a member of the executive committee. 
The club intends to hold frequent walks during the 
winter. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



221 



The Augusta Club held a meeting this week. 

Cooper, '09, and Cummins, '10, have been in Bos- 
ton this week. 

Several students went on a snow-shoe tramp 
Sunday afternoon. 

The annual house party of the D. K. E. Frater- 
nity will be held on Jan. 25. 

Bates and the University of Maine will hold a 
Sophomore debate this winter. 

"The Lion and the Mouse" is booked for the 
Empire Theatre, on Monday and Tuesday of next 
week. 

Chapman, '10, has been obliged to leave college on 
account of ill health. He is going to a New York 
Sanitarium. 

The Pianelli Fencing Club of Augusta will send 
four men to give a fencing exhibition before the 
Senior Class, Wednesday of next week. 

Farrar, '10, who has been absent from college 
the past eight weeks, returned Tuesday. He had 
been teaching school at Pemaquid Harbor. 

Ready, '10, who was on the campus a few days 
last week, has returned to Cedar Grove, where he 
will remain the next six weeks, in the employ of 
the American Ice Co. 

Boxing seems to be very popular among the stu- 
dents this year. A club has been formed, and many 
interesting bouts take place daily. The members of 
the club are being trained by Clifford, '10. 

The baseball squad having been found to be 
too large for the accommodations offered in Memo- 
rial Hall, it has been decided to drop several men. 
Coach Irwin has been watching the work of the 
squad this week. 

The annual examinations for the Rhodes scholar- 
ship is being given at the State House in Augusta 
yesterday and to-day. The award will belong to 
Bates this year, Bowdoin and Colby having already 
sent a man, according to the arrangements made 
between the four Maine colleges. 

As a result of the call issued by Manager Robin- 
son, the following Freshmen have signified their 
intention of becoming candidates for Assistant Man- 
ager of Baseball : R. Morss, Atwood and Davie. If 
any other men have any intention of coming out 
they should notify Manager Robinson at once. 

The Intercollegiate Socialist Society has just pub- 
lished large editions of "What Life Means to Me," 
by Upton Sinclair, and "Confessions of a Drone," 
by Joseph Medill Patterson. These have been 
selected as especially suited to college students and 
it is desired that they have as wide a distribution as 
possible. They also have on hand a limited num- 
ber of "What Life Means to Me," by Jack London. 
The Society is anxious to circulate the same among 
college students and those interested in the matter 
are requested to write to the International Socialist 
Society, 112 East 19th Street, New York City. 



THE FACULTY 

Thursday, January 17, Professor Little was to be 
at the meeting of Librarians of New England Col- 
leges held in connection with the Massachusetts 
Library Club. 



President Hyde is soon to take an extended trip. 
On Thursday, January 24, he will attend the celebra- 
tion of the fortieth anniversary of the installation of 
Dr. Alexander MacKenzie of Cambridge. At the 
time of his installation Dr. MacKenzie was a trustee 
of Bowdoin College. 

On January 25 President Hyde will be present at 
the dinner of the Bowdoin Alumni of New York. 
On the twenty-seventh of the month he will address 
the West Side Y. M. C. A. of New York in the 
afternoon and will speak before the People's Insti- 
tute at the Cooper Union in the evening. Saturday, 
January 26, he will lecture in the Teachers' Course 
at Trenton, N. J. ; the next Thursday he will attend 
the banquet of the Washington Alumni and the fol- 
lowing day lecture at Swarthmore College, Swarth- 
more, Penn. 

President Hyde was in Portland Monday even- 
ing, where he attended a meeting called to consider 
the advisability of asking the State Legislature to 
form a State Board of Charities and Corrections. 

Governor Cobb last Friday nominated Professor 
Chapman as trustee of the State Normal Schools. 

Prof. Franklin C. Robinson will be the speaker 
at the Lewiston Universalist Men's Club, this even- 
ing. He will speak on "The Relations Between 
Mexico and the United States." 



Hlumnt personals 

CLASS OF 1896 
Robert Newbegin, who is practicing law 
with his father, Henry Newbegin, '57, at Defi- 
ance, Ohio, has opened an office in Toledo. 
The Defiance office will be continued as before. 

CLASS OF 1897 
Oscar Pease, Bowdoin, '97, is engaged in the 
practice of law, his office being in the Tremont 
Building, Boston. 

CLASS OF 1898 
The current number of the Magazine of 
Modern Philology contains a very learned arti- 
cle on the "Structure and Interpretation of 
Widsith" by W. W. Lawrence, Bowdoin, '98. 

CLASS OF 1899 
Frank L. Dutton was married Jan. 1 to Miss 
Ethel Marion Robie of Grafton, Mass., the 
wedding taking place in the Webb Congrega- 
tional Church in that city. Two of the ushers 
were Bowdoin men, Loton D. Jennings, '99, 
now a Boston attorney, and Niles L. Perkins, 
'03. Mr. Dutton is now one of the leading 
attorneys in Augusta, Me., where he is now 
city solicitor and secretary of the Board of 
Trade. 



222 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CLASS OF 1900 

Harry C. McCarty, '00, was married in 
Washington, on November 28, to Miss Ade- 
laide E. Bernhard, and the couple will be at 
home after January 1, 1907, at 55 Spring 
Street, Westbrook, Maine. 

H. G. Clement is now principal of Freedom 
Academy, Freedom, Me. ' 

Fred W. Ward, who is principal of Foxcroft 
Academy, has instituted a system of city gov- 
ernment in the management of the school that 
is proving a great success. The system has 
been the subject of much newspaper comment. 
The school form of self-government has saved 
the academy the employment of one extra 
teacher during the past year, while it has also 
been successful in maintaining the best of dis- 
cipline in every room in the school. Teachers 
and students both are high in their words of 
praise of the system. Principal Ward has, 
since the newspapers have had stories concern- 
ing the working of the system, received scores 
of letters from educators in this and other 
states asking for full particulars regarding the 
details of the plan. It is understood that other 
schools in Maine are to adopt the plan as a 
result of the academy's departure of the old 
plan of discipline by teachers and monitors. 
Principal Ward is a Cherryfield boy who grad- 
uated from Bowdoin in 1900, and has been at 
Foxcroft for four years. 

CLASS OF 1901 

Harry E. Walker, who has been Principal 
of the Fort Fairfield, Me., High School for 
four years, has accepted the principalship of 
the High School at Exeter, N. H. 

Harry H. Cloudman is Physical Director at 
the University of Vermont. 

CLASS OF 1902 

Clifford H. Preston has resigned the Princi- 
palship of the Brewer, Me., High School and 
entered the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology to study Architecture. 

Dr. Ernest W. Files, House Physician of the 
Maine General Hospital last year, has taken 
up his residence at 22 Pleasant Avenue, 
Woodfords, Me. 

T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



CLASS OF 1903 

Carl Fuller is a boss-dyer in the great Amos- 
keag Corporation at Manchester, N. H. — the 
largest colored mill in America. Mr. Fuller 
made a specialty of chemistry in college ; went 
from college into the Cowan Mill in Lewis- 
ton to learn dyeing and from there to the 
Amoskeag where he has assurance of success 
as a scientific chemist devoting his attention to 
practical work in the mill. 

Niles L. Perkins is now located in New 
York City, where he has recently become asso- 
ciated with a law firm in that city. 

It is said that the youngest member of the 
next Legislature will be Andy P. Havey of 
West Sullivan, whose age is 25. He is a grad- 
uate of Kent's Hill and of Bowdoin, complet- 
ing his college course in 1903. The intercol- 
legiate world knows him well as an athlete, 
as he was captain of the Bowdoin nine two 
years, and also played on the football eleven. — 
Kennebec Journal. 

Carl W. Smith, who graduated from the 
Harvard Law School last June is in the office 
of Powers & Hall, 101 Milk Street, Boston. 

CLASS OF 1905 
Mr. George T. Prince of Denver, Colorado, 
announces the engagement of his daughter, 
Miss Marjorie W. Prince, to Mr. John W. 
Riley of Brunswick. Miss Prince has been 
spending the past year with her grandmother, 
Mrs. John M. Bowker of Brunswick, in which 
town she has many friends. Mr. Riley grad- 
uated from Bowdoin in the Class of 
1905 and is associated with his father, Thomas 
H. Riley, in the insurance business. He is 
also secretary of the Brunswick Board of 
Trade. 



See pie flDout a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
1906 man who will be In the market for a good position In 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will rail and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, Inclusive 
^afternoon or evening) 1 can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the beat opportunities for young college men In all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign countries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

A. S. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPQOOD'S 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JANUARY 25, 1907 



VOL. XXXVI 



NO. 23 



BOWDOIN'S FIRST ENDOWMENT 

[The following letter from Edward Stanwood, '61, 
relative to Bowdoin's first endowment, will be inter- 
esting reading to friends of Bowdoin, and the 
Orient is pleased to present it to its readers. The 
letter is as follows:] 

It is noted in the History of Bowdoin Col- 
lege that in June, 1794, the governing boards 
of the college, which had just been incorpor- 
ated by the Massachusetts General Court, 
received a letter from James Bowdoin making 
a gift in money and land to the infant institu- 
tion. I presume that the correspondence 
between Mr. Bowdoin and the authorities of 
the college is preserved somewhere in the 
archives of Bowdoin, but it must be several 
generations since it has been seen and read by 
any one. I am glad to be able to send a copy 
of it to the Orient. The Massachusetts His- 
torical Society is now passing through the 
press a second volume of the Bowdoin and 
Temple papers, and the editor of the volume, 
Mr. Charles Card Smith, has kindly furnished 
me with the proof pages of the volume con- 
taining these two interesting letters. 

Edward Stanwood, 1861. 



The letters, in the type, spelling, punctua- 
tion and general style of the original docu- 
ments, are as follows: 

JAMES BOWDOIN TO THE OVERSEERS OF 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

Boston, June 27th, 1794. 
To the Overseers & Corporation of Bowdoin 
College. 

Gentlemen, — The General Court having 
established a public seminary of learning in 
the District of Maine, for the purpose of dif- 
fusing literature and useful knowledge, 
whereby it may be reasonably expected that 
the seeds of science, deeply sown in the 
natural genius of its inhabitants, will soon be 
seen to blossom, to fructify, and to contribute 
to the general stock of scientific information in 
the United States, you, Gentlemen, being 
selected for the honourable purpose of laying 
the first foundation of an institution upon the 



prosperity of which the future character, dig- 
nity, and prosperity of the District of Maine 
will materially depend; however important 
the commission, arduous the undertaking, or 
difficult the task, I have no doubt of your pru- 
dence, wisdom, and capacity to fulfill the trust 
committed to you ; you'll permit me, however, 
to sueeest that the honourable testimonial of 
respect paid in the establishment to the name, 
the character, the talents, and virtues of my 
late father, must attach me in a peculiar 
degree to an institution in y e success of w ch 
I feel myself deeply interested. 

Bowdoin College shall receive the feeble aid 
of my endeavours to promote its usefulness, 
interest, and welfare, and as a first step to the 
design, suffer me to say that as soon as you 
shall signify your acceptance by the votes of 
your respective bodies of the sum of one 
thousand dollars in specie and of one thousand 
acres of land, situated in the town of Bowdoin, 
to be disposed of in such way and manner as 
you shall deem best to subserve the designs 
of the institution, I stand ready to pay the 
said sum to whomsoever you shall direct to 
receive it, and to make y e necessary convey- 
ance of the land as aforesaid. 

Wishing you every success in the important 
trust committed to you, I have the honour, to 
be, Gentlemen, 

Your most obed' & very hble. serv*. 

James Bowdoin. 

COMMITTEE OF THE OVERSEERS OF BOW- 
DOIN COLLEGE TO JAMES BOWDOIN. 

Portland, December 27th, 1794. 
Hon'ble James Bowdoin, Esq. 

Sir, — The Board of Overseers of Bowdoin 
College have the honor and satisfaction to 
acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 
27th of June last. On their behalf we now 
transmit to you an attested copy of their vote 
by which they have accepted your free and 
generous donation, and appointed the Hon'ble 
David Mitchell, Esqr., to receive it. 

As the only testimonial of their gratitude 
which is in their power to present we .are 



224 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



charged to express to you their sincerest 
acknowledgements, both for the donation itself 
and the intimation of your future design to 
promote the usefulness of the institution. 

We are happy, Sir, in the reflection that you 
have thus become an early and liberal patron 
to Bowdoin College. This will animate those 
who shall from time to time have the superin- 
tendency and management of it to co-operate 
with you, as far as their feeble efforts can 
extend, in your laudable intention to contrib- 
ute to its character and dignity; and we anti- 
cipate with a high degree of confidence that 
under a government which depends upon the 
spread of knowledge for its support, the 
learned and wealthy part of the community 
will bestow upon it their smiles & patronage, 
so that it may soon and lastingly flourish 
under a name which has been so justly dear 
and valuable to the friends of humanity & 
science. We rejoice that with this name the 
College has been honoured, and it affords us 
additional pleasure to reflect that its patron is 
cloathed with the mantle of his father's vir- 
tues. 

We devoutly wish him every earthly felicity 
and an immortality in that happy place where 
charity will receive its complete reward. 

We have the honor to be, Sir, with pro- 
found respect, 

Your most hble. serv ts . 

Elijah Kellogg, ) A Committee of the 
Sam. Freeman, >• Board of Overseers 
Dan'l Davis, ) of Bowdoin College. 



ATHLETIC COUNCIL MEETING 

At a meeting of the Athletic Council held 
last Friday evening several matters of import- 
ance were considered. The matter of a dual 
meet with Tufts next spring was taken up 
and favorable action taken, and if the matter 
receives the approval of the faculty, the meet 
will doubtless be held one week before the 
Maine meet. It is planned to hold the meet 
on the Whittier Field. 

The matter of hockey was also taken up 
and Dresser, '08, was selected as manager and 
empowered to arrange two games with the 
University of Maine. This'' was not in the 
nature of a permanent approval but rather as 
a temporary arrangement. 

The advisability of arranging two relay 
races between Bowdoin and Bates Freshmen 
was also considered. It is possible that two 



of these races will take place, one at the Bow- 
doin and one at the Bates Indoor Meet. 

The baseball schedule as arranged by Man- 
ager Robinson was also considered and re- 
ferred to a committee, to whose approval it 
will be subjected. 



'68 PRIZE SPEAKING 

The program for the '68 Prize Speaking 
which took place last night was as follows : 

"Characteristics of Modern Irish Poetry" 

E. A. Duddy 
"Increase of Federal Power" S. G. Haley 

Music 
"The Industrial Juggernaut" N. W. Allen 

"Wordsworth's Message" C. W. Snow 

Music 
"Reason in Religion" R. H. Hupper 

"Citizenship and the School" A. J. Voorhees 

Music 
The Orient will be unable to state the outcome 
until next week. 



BASEBALL SCHEDULE 



Manager Robinson of the baseball team has 
arranged the following preliminary schedule, 
which he submitted to the Athletic Council at 
its meeting held last Friday. The schedule 
was referred to a special committee of that 
body to whose approval it will be subjected: 

The schedule is as follows: 

April 3 — Brown at Providence. 
April 17 — Tufts at Brunswick. 
April 20 — New Hampshire State College at 
Brunswick. 
April 25 — Mercerburg Academy at Brunswick. 
April 27 — Open for game at Brunswick. 
May 1 — Dartmouth at Hanover. 
May 2 — Dartmouth at Hanover. 
May 4 — Bates at Brunswick. 
May 8— Colby at Waterville. 
May 14 — Andover at Andover. 
May 15 — Wesleyan at Middletown. 
May 16 — Tufts at Medford. 
May 18 — U. of M. at Brunswick. 
May 22 — U. of M. at Orono. 
May 25 — Bates at Lewiston. 
May 30 — Bates at Lewiston. (Exhibition). 
June I — Colby at Brunswick. 
June 7— (Ivy Day) Game pending at Brunswick. 
June 12 — Harvard at Cambridge. 



BOWDOIN'S OLDEST GRADUATE 

By the death of Rev. David B. Sewall, D.D., 
'36, the honor of being Bowdoin's oldest grad- 
uate falls to Rev. W. W. Rand, D.D., '37, of 
New York City. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



225 



HOCKEY NOTES 



The first game of hockey, which was to 
have been played last Saturday between a col- 
lege team and a team from Augusta did not 
materialize owing to the fact that the Augusta 
team was unable to come. Sickness of some 
of the men is said to have been the cause. 

Manager Dresser has arranged two games 
with the University of Maine, one of which 
will be played at Orono and the other at 
Brunswick. The latter game will be played 
Feb. 16. The game at Orono will take place 
either Feb. 1 1 or March 2. 



2.30-3.30 p.m. Make-up work in Gymnasium. 
4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. _ 
4.45 p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium. 
5.30 p.m. Aroostook Club leaves to meet at Inn. 
6.30 p.m. Augusta Club meets at the Inn. 
President Hyde speaks at Trenton, N. J. 
Long Themes in English III. due. 



DRAMATIC CLUB CAST 

A provisional cast of all the characters 
except Lady Gay Spanker has been made out 
for "London Assurance." This cast is sub- 
ject to change, but. those who have been 
selected to begin the rehearsals are : 

"Sir Harcourt Courtly" F. R. Upton, Jr., '07 

"Charles Courtly" W. S. Linnell, '07 

"Dazzle" J. W. Leydon, '07 

"Max Harkaway" H. N. Marsh, '09 

"Dolly Spanker" L. H. Fox, '06 

( M. C. Donnell, '08, or 
"Mark Middle" 1 W. B. Stephens, '10, or 

( R. O. Brewster, '09 

"Cool" H. Atwood, '09 

"Solomon Isaacs" ) N w c , q8 

Martin ) 

"James Simpson" H. H. Burton, '09 

"Grace Harkaway' J. S. Simmons, '09 

"Pert" P. H.. Powers, '08 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2STH 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

4.4S p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium. 

6.45 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

Lew Dockstader's Minstrels at Empire Theatre, 

7.00 p.m. Dramatic Club meets at Alpha Delta 
Phi House. 

Delta Kappa Epsilon House Party. 

Alumni dinner of New York Alumni Association 
at New York. 

Preliminary debate in Interscholastic League 
between Cony High School and Gardiner High 
School at Augusta. 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26TH 

1.00 p.m. Glee Club rehearsal in Christian Asso- 
ciation Room. 

2.00 p.m. Conference between President of 
Bowdoin Debating Council and representatives of 
winning teams in Interscholastic Debating League. 

2.30 p.m. Track work in Gymnasium and on track 



SUNDAY, JANUARY 27TH 

4.00 p.m. Rev. H. A. Jump speaks in chapel. 

Quartette, Linnell, '07, Pike, '07, W. Crowley, '09, 
E. Crowley, '09, sing in chapel. 

President Hyde speaks at West Side Y. M. C. A. 
in a.m., and at Cooper Union in evening, New 
York City. 

MONDAY, JANUARY 28TH 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

4.45 p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium. 

6.45 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

7.00 p.m. Glee Club rehearsal in Christian Asso- 
ciation Room. 

Bernard Shaw's "Man and Superman" at Empire 
Theatre, Lewiston. 

French reports due. 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 29TH 

2.30 p.m. Track work in Gymnasium and on 
track. 

3.30-4.30 p.m. Make-up work in Gymnasium. 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

4.45 p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium. 

6.45 p.m. Mandolin Club rehearsal in Memorial 
Hall. 

Long Sophomore Themes due. 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30TH 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 
4.45 p.m. Cross country squad leaves Gymnasium. 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 3IST 

8.30 a.m. Exam, in Economics I and 5, at Memo- 
rial Hall. 

1.30 p.m. Exams, in Philosophy 1, Hygiene and 
Spanish 1, all at Memorial Hall. 

7.00 p.m. Dean A. E. Burton, '78, of Mass. Inst, 
of Tech., speaks on "Ethics of Civil Engineering" 
in Hubbard Hall. 

President Hyde speaks at banquet of Bowdoin 
Alumni of Washington. 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1ST 

8.30 a.m. Exams, in Eng. Lit. 3, at Memorial 
Hall, and in Biology 2, at Biol. Laboratory. 

1.30 p.m. Exam, in German 1, at Memorial Hall. 

President Hyde speaks at Swarthmore College, 
Swarthmore, Penn. 

Prof. Foster speaks at Lake Forest University, 
Lake Forest, Illinois. 



VEREIN MEETING 

The Deutscher Verein met last Friday evening 
at the Inn. After the business meeting, at which 
Linnell, '07, was elected "Vorsitzender" for the 
ensuing year, Professor Ham spoke on "Impres- 
sions I received in Germany." It is planned to 
hold the next meeting Feb. 15. 



226 



BOWDOtN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 



H. E. MITCHELL, 1907 
W. S. LINNELL, 1907 
A. L. ROBINSON, 1908 



R. H. HUPPER, 1908 

R. A. LEE, igo8 

H. H. BURTON, 1909 



J. S. STAHL, igog 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 
N. S. WESTON, 1908 



Business Manager 
Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, 10 cents. 

Entered at Post-Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
Lewiston Journal Press 

Vol. XXXVI. JANUARY 25, 1907 No. 23 



Dual Meet 
with Tufts 



Students will be pleased to 
learn of the favorable 
action of the Athletic 
Council relative to the proposed dual meet 
with Tufts. If the meet is pulled off one week 
before the Maine Meet and two weeks before 
the New England Meet, as is proposed, 
the advantage to the Bowdoin team is one 
which cannot be overestimated. It will be a 
tryout for the team and will show what the 
new men, who in large part make up our 
squad, are really capable. 

The past few years has shown that our 
teams need all possible training to make them 
capable of winning the Maine Meet, to say 
nothing of the New England, and this dual 
meet will not only be interesting in itself, but 
will also be of great value as a preparation for 
these later and more important meets. 

The proposed meet is not to be objected to 
as a new departure which will require more 



work on the part of the student body. The 
fact that the men who will compete will be 
out just as regularly and devote the same 
amount of time in preparation for the State 
and New England meets, removes all argu- 
ment on this score. The only possible objec- 
tion can be in the matter of detail, and these, 
it is hoped, may be easily adjusted. 



n il 1 n j • 1 Again is Bowdoin called 

"° f Bo * DS onto mourn the loss of 

Oldest Graduate her oWest graduate; in the 

death of Rev. David B. Sewall, who gradu- 
ated in 1836, in the same class with Dr. Gar- 
celon, whose death occurred a few weeks ago. 
Mr. Sewall was 90 years of age. He was a 
brother of Prof. John S. Sewall of Bangor 
Theological Seminary, who graduated from 
Bowdoin in the Class of 1850, and Prof. 
Jotham B. Sewall of Boston, who graduated 
in the Class of 1848, and who is still living. 
All three of these men have spent their long 
lives in the Christian ministry. 



, , „ . , As a result of last week's 
Intercollegiate me£ting of the Athktic 

00 ey Council, it seems that we 

shall have at least one game of Intercollegiate 
hockey on the Whittier Field. As stated else- 
where, Dresser, '08, was named as manager 
and authority given for the arrangement of 
two games with the University of Maine, one 
of which will be played at Brunswick and the 
other at Orono. The game will be something 
new among Bowdoin's athletics and should 
prove of great interest to the entire student 
body. 



•m c a The need of sand on the 
A Little Sand, college paths has been very 

Please apparent during the early 

part of the week and not a few men have 
received falls that were more unpleasant than 
graceful. It may be that there are some very 
good reasons why the sand has not been dis- 
tributed along the walks, but that does not 
alter the fact that it is a decidedly unpleasant 
if not a dangerous condition. About the 
chapel steps and bill board the ice during the 
first part of the week was so slippery that it 
was almost impossible to walk about without 
rubbers and even then one was by no means 
insured against a bad fall. 

The danger from this slippery condition 
may not be so great in the case of college stu- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



227 



dents as with visitors or others who cross the 
campus. It is not too much to say that an 
elderly person who undertook to walk along 
some sections of the campus the first of the 
week would have been in danger of a fall that 
might possibly have meant permanent injury, 
to say nothing of the unpleasant impression a 
visitor would have of our college and campus 
under these conditions. If sand cannot be 
secured, or if there are other good reasons, it 
would seem advisable to put a sign to notify 
the public that it is dangerous passing. 



, , „ Alumni and friends of the 

Loagteiiow college will be pleased to 

Anniversary ]earn of the observance of 

the iooth anniversary of Longfellow's birth, 
which will be made a feature of next Com- 
mencement. This plan is one that is in har- 
mony with the observance that is planned in 
Portland and elsewhere in memory of Amer- 
ica's great poet, and it is especially appropri- 
ate that the college whose son he was should 
celebrate the centennial of his birth. 

BRADBURY PRIZE SPEAKERS 

The trials for the Bradbury prize speakers 
was held in the Debating Room at Hubbard 
Hall last Tuesday evening, and resutled in 
the selection of the following men : Redman, 
'07 ; Hupper, '08 ; Erskine, '07 ; Roberts, '07 ; 
Snow, '07; Kimball, '07. The alternates 
selected were W. B. Drummond, '07, and Lin- 
nell, '07. 

The question debated was "granting the 
willingness of Cuba as expressed by a major- 
ity vote at a popular election, the annexation 
of Cuba to the United States is for the interest 
of the United States." The first three men 
named are to speak on the affirmative side of 
this question in the Bradbury debate and the 
last three on the negative. Drummond will 
be alternate on the affirmative and Linnell on 
the negative. The judges were Professors 
Foster, McCrea and Sills. 

The date of the Bradbury debate is set for 
Feb. 26. 



INTERSCHOLASTIC DEBATES 

The second Interscholastic Debate will take place 
in the City Hall at Augusta to-night, the con- 
testants being Cony High of Augusta and Gardi- 
ner High. The subject will be "Resolved, That 
the peaceful annexation of Cuba would be for the 
best interest of the United States." Prof. R. C. 
McCrea of Bowdoin, and A. K. Spofford, an 



instructor at Bates, will be two of the judges, while 
the third had not been named at the time of going 
to press. 

President Redman of the Debating Council, will 
hold a conference with representatives of the two 
winning teams relative to the date of the final 
debate at 2 o'clock to-morrow afternoon. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

At the regular weekly meeting of the Christian 
Association on January 17, Anand Sidoba Hi wale 
of India, spoke on "The Need of a Christian Type 
of Manhood in India." Mr. Hiwale is a native of 
India who has been studying for two years at the 
Bangor Theological Seminary and who will prob- 
ably return to India next year. He made his 
lecture especially interesting by making up and 
putting on a typical Indian turban and by showing 
the brass gods which are now worshiped in India. 
He also told an interesting bit about Rockefeller's 
method of introducing Standard Oil in India. 
Rockefeller first offered the oil for sale at five 
cents a gallon, and everyone bought it because it 
was much cheaper than the laborious sowing, reap- 
ing, and treating of a crop of oil plants. Rocke- 
feller, however, when he found the oil fields had 
been given up, raised the price to nine cents a gal- 
lon, just about equalling the cost of native produc- 
tion, and now holds India's trade with kerosene at 
nine to ten cents a gallon. Mr. Hiwale said in 
closing that Christianity and men to spread it were 
needed in India, because conversion to Christianity 
was the only way to get rid of the caste system, to 
do away with child marriage, and to make India 
keep pace with the modern world. 

Last night Rev. James F. Albion, D.D., of Port- 
land, spoke at the regular weekly meeting in the 
Association room. An account of his talk will 
appear in the next issue. On Thursday, January 31, 
Dean Alfred E. Burton, '78, of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, will speak at the second 
of the monthly meetings in Memorial Hall, and will 
take as his subject "The Ethics of Civil Engineer- 
ing." 



PROFESSOR FOSTER'S TRIP 

Prof. William T. Foster of the department of 
English and Argumentation, will leave to-morrow 
morning for the West, where he will deliver a 
series of three lectures before some of the western 
colleges. The dates are as follows : 

Feb. 1 — Lake Forest University, Lake Forest, 
Illinois. 

Feb. 6 — Chicago University. 

Feb. 7 — Beloit College, Beloit, Wisconsin. 



THE HEBRON CLUB 

The Hebron Club met at New Meadows Inn Sat- 
urday evening to hold its first banquet and also to 
listen to a talk by Prof. Mitchell, who is a gradu- 
ate of the school and an honorary member of the 
club. The present student membership of the club 
is as follows : Stetson, '07 ; Fernald, '07 ; Speake, 
'07 ; Stanwood, '08 ; Hupper, '08 ; Gray, '08 ; Ellis, 
'09; Sparks, '09; Morrell, '09; Bridge, '09; Cole, 
'09; Nickerson, '10; Stanley, '10; Atwood, '10; 
Boynton, '10; Nulty, '10; Parker, Medic. 



228 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



College Botes 



Exams, next week. 

Hale, '06, was on the campus this week. 

The next report in French 3 is due next Mon- 
day. < 

Trials for the Freshman Class squad will begin 
soon. 

Adjourns were granted in Mathematics I. on 
Tuesday. 

German I. was given adjourns last Friday, Prof. 
Ham being out of town. 

The date of the Bradbury Prize Debate has been 
set ahead to February 26. 

The Orient will contain an account of the Min- 
strel Show in its next issue. 

Quinn, '01, and Harris, '00, were at college for 
a few days the first of the week. 

Morton, 'io, has been confined to his room with 
sickness for a few days this week. 

Morrell, '09, who has been ill at his home in 
Gardiner, has returned to college. 

A dance was given on Monday evening by the 
members of the Colonial Club of Bath. 

It is rumored that Ethel Barrymore will appear 
in a play at Lewiston in the near future. 

A number of sub-Freshmen from the different 
prep, schools attended the minstrel show. 

Several of the students attended the "Lion and 
the Mouse" at the Empire, Monday evening. 

Webster, '10, has announced his intention of try- 
ing for assistant manager of the baseball team. 

"Mike," the college tailor, received his samples 
in spring styles in suits and top-coats this week. 

Several of the students saw Nance O'Neil, in 
"Magda" at the Empire Theatre last Monday even- 
ing. 

Snow, '07, attended "Magda" at Lewiston la.st 
Wednesday as the guest of the Lewiston High 
School. 

It is expected that Maurice Blair, formerly of 
the Class of 1909, will return to college for the next 
semester. 

Fred Hart and Wm. Hanley of Camden were 
guests of Evans, '10, at the Beta Theta Pi House 
on Thursday. 

Make-up quizes in Economics will be given next 
Monday evening at seven o'clock in the Economic 
recitation room. 

Mr. Hiwale, who delivered an address at Y. M. 
C. A. meeting, also spoke in the Congregational 
Church, Sunday evening. 

Sparks, '09, and Adams, '07, who have been 
surveying in the northern part of the State for the 
past month, returned to college Monday. 

Richard Dresser of the Freshman Class of 
Hebron Academy, is visiting his brother "Kid" 
Dresser, '08, at the Theta Delta Chi House. 
^- The out-door running track has been in very 
poor condition for the- relay men the past week, 
being coated with an inch or more of snow. 



Last Thursday evening Professor Sills enter- 
tained Division C of his Latin classes at his home 
on Federal Street. 

Two members of the Piannelli Fencing Club of 
Augusta gave an interesting exhibition in the Gym. 
last Wednesday afternoon. 

A number of students attended the two perform- 
ances of "The Lion and the Mouse" at the Empire, 
Monday and Tuesday evenings. 

The Holderness Club met at New Meadows Inn 
Tuesday evening. On account of the storm they 
experienced some difficulty in getting back to col- 
lege. 

"Bill" Crowley, after very serious illness and 
hip trouble, is much improved, although still under 
the care of Dr. Cousins, of the Maine General Hos- 
pital. 

Ham, '07, was in Bangor, Ellsworth and Bar 
Harbor the past week — arranging for the Glee Club 
concerts, which will be held in those places in Feb- 
ruary. 

After mature deliberation the Edward Little 
High School of Auburn has decided not to protest 
the decision in the Edward Little-Lewiston debate 
of last week. 

At a meeting of the Chemical Club held in the 
debating room of Hubbard Hall, last Friday night, 
W. V. Wentworth, '86, of Basin Mills, Me., lec- 
tured on "Soda Fibre." 

Snowshoeing seems to be very popular among 
the students this winter. Almost every afternoon 
long trips are taken, and there is some talk of 
forming a snowshoe club. 

A meeting of the Augusta Club will be held at 
the Inn to-morrow night. The club, which was 
formed during the Christmas holidays, now has a 
membership of eleven. 

The Alpha Kapna Kappa fraternity of the Medi- 
cal School will hold a dance at Riverton Park, Feb. 
2. The committee in charge of the affair is Holt, 
Leighton, and Valladares. 

R. W. Messer, '09, who has recently been oper- 
ated on for appendicitis at a hospital in Portland, 
was on the campus Tuesday, stopping off on his 
way to his home in Rockland. 

Manager Lee of the Track Team has been circu- 
lating a subscription paper during the past week, in 
order to raise money to pay the expenses of the 
team to be sent to the B. A. A. Meet. 

On Tuesday evening of last week, the members 
of the Cercle Francais were entertained by P. H. 
Powers, '08, at the Zeta Psi House. A talk on 
France was given by Monsieur Micolean of Port- 
land. 

Last Saturday night Morse High beat Brunswick 
High in a basketball game by a score of 52 to 7. 
After the game, which was played in the Armory, 
dancing was enjoyed, many of the students being 
present. 

The last issue of the Hebron Semester, pub- 
lished by the students of Hebron Academy, has 
just made its appearance and contains a picture of 
Bernard J. McGraw, ex-Bowdoin, '08, who is ath- 
letic instructor at Hebron. It also contains an 
article by Ellis, '09. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



229 



Coyle, 'o8, and Leavitt, '08, spent Sunday in Bos- 
ton. 

Burton, '07, arranged the stage setting for the 
Minstrel Show. 

The skating on the river during the first part 
of the week was the hest of the season. 

Several students have received their class stand- 
ing since the make-up entrance examinations. 

Carter, '09, was one of the officials at the Morse- 
Brunswick basketball game, Saturday evening. 

Manager Robinson has received an offer to take 
the Minstrel Show to Bangor about the tenth of 
next month. 

Pictures of the men taking prominent parts in 
the Minstrel Show have appeared in several of the 
local and Boston capers this week. 

The Freshman English Class attended the '68 
Prize Speaking last evening for the purpose of 
writing a criticism of the orations. This criticism 
will take the place of the recitation on Saturday. 

Harry L. Gordon, U. of M. ex- '08, and who was 
elected captain of the Maine baseball team, visited 
friends at the Beta House last week. Mr. Gordon 
has left college and entered business at Spring- 
field, Mass. 

Neal Cox of Winter Street, entertained ten of 
his Bowdoin friends at dinner in the green room 
at Riverton Saturday night, after which the party 
attended the "Lion and the Mouse" at the Jeffer- 
son. — Portland Sunday Times. 

The Anasagunticook Snowshoe Club went on a 
trip to Mount Ararat Saturday afternoon. To be 
sure, it was a little stormy but the young ladies 
were on hand just the same and the trip was none 
the less enjoyable on account of the storm. 

The Freshmen held a class meeting at Memorial 
Hall, Monday, at which time the matter of a class 
relay race with Bates was brought up but no action 
was taken in the matter, as Capt. Shorey of the 
track team, who was scheduled to speak, was unable 
to be present, 
v Owing to the snow storm Saturday the hockey 
game scheduled for that afternoon had to be put 
off again. This is the second time that weather 
conditions have interfered wtih arrangements. Two 
scrub teams were organized, however, and for a 
time lively sport was enjoyed on the new rink. 

The Anasagunticook Snowshoe Club will have 
a tramp on Saturday afternoon, and all college 
men are invited to join. The party will leave on 
the Bath car at 4 o'clcock, will start walking at 
Harding's station, tramp north over Ham's Hill, 
and crossing the New Meadows River return to 
the Inn in season for supper. In case any wish to 
walk all the way from Brunswick they can join 
the party at Hardings at 4.20 o'clock. 

The Saturday Club will meet in the Physics 
Lecture room to-morrow afternoon. The pro- 
gram will consist of a paper on "A Summer in 
Norway," by Mrs. John F. Thompson of Portland ; 
"Glimpses of Sicily," by Mrs. Isaiah S. Emery ; 
"Afoot in the Tyrol," illustrated by lantern slides, 
bv Mrs. Charles G. Hutchins, and "Notes from 
Abroad" by Miss Myrtie Booker. This meeting is 
held in the Physics room at the invitation of Prof. 
Hutchins. 



THE FACULTY 

Professor Moody was called out of town last 
Monday by the death of his mother. 

Last Sunday Professor Woodruff supplied the 
pulpit of the Congregational Church at Wiscasset. 

At the Monday evening meeting of the Faculty 
Club, Professor Files read an address on the 
"Anglo-Saxon House." 

Professor Chapman gave an address at the meet- 
ing of the Board of Directors of the Normal 
School in Augusta on Wednesday. 

Professor George T. Little was recently elected 
vice-president of the Maine Genealogical Society at 
the annual meeting held in Portland. 

Next semester Prof. Henry Johnson will begin 
his series of weekly talks on the Art Building and 
its contents. These talks will take place at the Art 
Building and the hour of meeting will be later 
announced. 

The lecture on "The Stand Pat Life," which was 
to have been given by Prof. Foster, on January 
30, before the Portland Teachers' Association, has 
been postponed until March 13. 



NOTICE 

Men who wish to consult with me regarding the 
courses of this semester or of next semester should 
do so not later than January 25, as I shall be absent 
from the college from January 25 to February II. 
I want especially to see the men who expect to 
elect Education I, and I shall be in my office for 
this purpose from three to five o'clock January 25. 
William T.' Foster. 



Hlumni personals 

CLASS OF 1836 
Coombs, the Lewiston artist, is to paint a 
picture of ex-Governor Garcelon for the State 
Capitol's collection of Maine's distinguished 
men, and there is talk of a similar picture for 
the Lewiston public library. 

CLASS OF 1856 
The Hartford Courant in its editorial col- 
umns pays this splendid tribute to Rev. Edwin 
Pond Parker, D.D., of that city, Bowdoin, '56 : 
"To those of us who know Dr. Parker, and 
that means about all of the 100,000 inhabitants 
of modern Hartford, it seems incredible that 
he has been settled over the South Church, 
'Dr. Parker's Church' as everybody calls it, 
for forty-seven years; but that is the fact as 
the record shows. He is still a young man in 
everything but the almanac phase of life, and 
the large place that he occupies grows steadily 
larger with the passage of the years. It is 



230 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



sadly true that during his pastorate he has 
seen friend after friend depart and his congre- 
gation change almost entirely; but friends 
have come as well as gone, and he never had 
more than now. His keen interests and ten- 
der sympathies keep him in the same close 
touch as always with those about him, and to 
the great majority of people here now he has 
always been a part of Hartford. It would 
not be what it is without him, and they are 
thankful, indeed, that the years pass him by 
so gently that they leave no marks behind. 
The city to-day congratulates alike the South 
Congregational Church and its beloved pas- 
tor." 

CLASS OF 1895 

A. L. Dennison has just published a history 
of the Dennison family in Maine. 

William H. Ingraham, who has been elected 
judge of probate of Cumberland County, is 
stated to be one of the youngest judges of 
New England, being but 36 years of age. Mr. 
Ingraham was the subject of an extended 
sketch in a recent issue of the Boston Herald. 
In conclusion the Herald speaks of him as fol- 
lows: 

"Judge Ingraham is an alumnus of Bow- 
doin College, Class of 1895, and of the Har- 
vard Law School. He was admitted to the 
Cumberland bar in 1897. He has twice trav- 
elled extensively abroad. Following in the 
footsteps of his father, he has since he became 
of age taken a deep interest in politics and has 
served on the city committee a number of 
years. In the recent county campaign he was 
on the stump two or three weeks, visiting 
nearly every town in the county." 

CLASS OF 1897 
Rev. William C. Adams, '97, has recently 
accepted a call to the pastorate of the Congre- 
gational Church at Barnstable, Mass. 

CLASS OF 1899 
Dr. Louis L. Hills has been appointed city 
physician of Westbrook for 1907. 

CLASS OF 1903 

Irving W. Nutter, who has been in the tele- 
phone business in Colorado since graduation, 
is now located at Delta in that State. 

Miss Sarah Howie Alexander, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Alexander of Hyde 
Park, Mass., and Frederick William Spol- 
lett, '03, were recently united in marriage. Mr. 
and Mrs. Spollett spent their honeymoon in 
Maine. 



CLASS OF 1904 

W. B. Webb, '04, left San Francisco last 
Tuesday for Hong Kong, China, where he has 
a position with the International Banking 
Association. 

Rev. J. F. Schneider, who has been at Win- 
terport for the past two years, has accepted a 
call to Greenwich, Conn. 

George W. Burpee is with the Engineering 
Department of the Louisville and Nashville 
Railroad. 

CLASS OF 1905 

Ray W. Pettingill is in Germany for a two 
years' course of study. 

W. Stephen Brimijoin is assistant superin- 
tendent of the Dupont Powder Works of 
Woodbury, N. J. Mr. Brimijoin graduated 
from Bowdoin in 1905 and last year was 
assistant in chemistry at the college. 



©bttuar\> 

CLASS OF 1836 

Rev. David B. Sewall died Jan. 14 at his 
home on School Street, South Berwick, 
after six weeks illness of bronchitis, fol- 
lowing typhoid fever. Mr. Sewall was a 
native of Maine and was born January 
18, 1817, and was the oldest living 
graduate of Bowdoin College. He had held 
pastorates in Robinston, Fryeburg and York, 
Me. A man of faultless character, of great 
sweetness and benignity of disposition, he had 
hosts of friends all over the State. Since his 
retirement from the active work of the minis- 
try he has made his home in South Berwick 
and has been a teacher in the Sunday school, 
a helper of the poor and a constant worker in 
the church. He leaves two brothers, Prof. 
John S. Sewall of Bangor and Prof. Jotham 
Sewall of Boston, a sister, Mrs. Stacy, in the 
far West, a son and two daughters. The inter- 
ment was at York. 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEBRUARY i, 1907 



VOL. XXXVI 



NO. 24 



VERSES READ AT REUNION OF CLASS OF 1856 

(The following verses written by Edwin Pond 
Parker of the Class of 1856, and read at a reunion 
of the survivors of that class held in Boston on 
Dec. 14, are some that every Bowdoin man will 
wish to read:) 

Dear Classmates ! fifty years ago, 

One memorable summer day, 
All hearts wtih ardent hopes aglow, 

From Bowdoin-port we sailed away. 

We sought our fortunes, thinking not 

How far misfortunes might attend; 
But confident that some fair spot 

Would be our prosperous journey's end. 

Of all the youthful, hopeful crew 
Who made the voyage with us then, 

Are only left, to-day, a few 
Old, worn, and weather-beaten men. 

Some fell asleep; some in the sight 

Of God were slowly crucified ; 
Some disappeared in storm and night ; 

And some in battle bravely died. 

Humbly we bow to his decree 

Who times and bounds our several lives ; 
The first to go may happier be 

Than he who last of all survives. 

Of this or that one who can say — 
"He missed the mark, he fought and failed?" 

The vanquished ones, like Jacob, may 
Have found the blessing and prevailed. 

Perchance the Good Samaritan 
Found him who fell beside the way; 

Come to himself, at last, the man 
Came home who went so far astray. 

And well for us who wrestle on, 

If so we learn, in humbler mood, 
That life's great victory is won 

In being overcome of good. 



Carlton, as modest in his mien 

As Strout was meek, or Whitmore mild; 
Johnson, not born to blush unseen, 

And Loring, guileless as a child ! 

Ed. Palmer, whom all men revered ; 

Good Tenney, destined soon to fall; 
Howard, who only Satan feared, 

And "Little Rob," who ranked us all ! 

Miller and True, who reached the goal 
Of mortal life too soon for fame, — ■ 

The one a generous, jovial soul, 
The other faithful to his name ! 

Kind, gentle, genial Williamson, 
The friend of all, to all most dear, 

Whose mirthfulness and wit were one 
Incarnate spirit of good cheer ! 

Tom Robie, blameless, valiant saint, 
Who, though his soul was marked with scars, 

Fought the good fight and did not faint, 
Whose crown is bright with many stars ! 

Ed Thompson, son of Mars, in whom 
The call to arms found echo true ; — 

A soldier from his mother's womb, 
Nor braver ever wore the blue ! 

Saint Ambrose at that urgent call 

From his vocation turned aside, 
Followed the flag, forsaking all, 

And so for Christ and country died. 

And Davis offered up his whole 
Self-sacrifice, in those dark years ; 

On Bowdoin's precious soldier-scroll 
No more deserving name appears. 

And Smyth, in storm of shot and shell, 
Not more perturbed than on parade; 

Amid the horrors and the hell 
Of rebel prisons, undismayed ! 

Floyd, Watson, Rice and Robinson; 

Gallant Lenoir who wore the gray ! — 
All these their work on earth have done, 

And, one by one, have passed away. 



Dear Denny Balch, in whose fair face 
A strange yet winsome beauty shone; 

Whose most magnetic charm and grace 
Led all hearts captive to his own ! 

Brown, whose bright star so soon declined ; 

The favored foster-child of art; 
A poet's chamber in his mind, 

And sanctuary in his heart! 



We know not where thev are, — those dear 
Associates of a former day, — ■ 

Nor how they fare, nor if they hear 
The benedictions that we say. 

That they are not, we cannot brook: 
Instinctively the heart cries out, 

More voiceful than the holiest book, 
Against so drear and dread a doubt. 



232 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



We trust the love that bids us hope, 
The hope that bids us lift our eyes 

And see, through its clear telescope, 
Our friends, as if in Paradise ! 

Of blame or shame they wear no trace, 
Their garments show no earthly stains, 

Radiant is each familiar face, — 
Only their best to them remains. , 

To them the youthful, we the old, 
Our greetings give, libations pour; 

In classmates' love that grows not cold 
Their memories live forevermore. 

As now our vovage nears its close, 

Invisible, and yet not far, 
They may await — God only knows — 

Our passage of the harbor bar. 

Classmates ! we mav not meet again ; 

Farewells are sorrowful to say; 
In more courageous, cheerful strain 

We'll say "Good Bye," and go our way. 

Good Bye ! Yes, God be with us all, 
His goodness all our steps attend, 

Whate'er betide, whate'er befall, 
May God be with us to the end. 

At eventide God gives us light, 

And when the hour for rest shall come, 
Grant us safe lodging for the night 

And with the morning bring us home. 



THE MINSTREL SHOW 



The musical extravaganza, "The Bowdoin 
Tars," given in the Town Hall on Wednes- 
day evening of last week, proved to be one of 
the best minstrel shows ever given by the col- 
lege. It was a decided departure from the 
usual minstrel show, and made a hit with the 
large audience. The jokes were bright and 
witty, and above all, were entirely free from 
any improper personalities. The singing was 
above the average, and the solos were espe- 
cially good. The work of the end men showed 
the careful coaching given them by Robert A. 
Toothaker, under whose direction the show 
was given. 

The stage was set to represent a scene on 
the ship "Bowdoin," and the fifty members of 
the chorus were dressed as tars. Kimball, 
'07, as interlocutor, was in command. The 
overture was followed by the end song, "I'se 
Got Something on Mah Mind," Kingsley, '07. 
The other numbers on the program for the 
first part were the end songs, "I'm Going 
Right Back to Chicago," by R. W. Smith, '10; 
"He's a Cousin of Mine," by Sheehan, '09; 



and the "Whistling Tars" by Cox, '08, and 
Upton, '07. The solos included "My First 
True Love," by Leydon, '07, and "In a Jew- 
elled Grotto," by Linnell, '08. "Jenks' Com- 
pound," by a quartet composed of Pike, '07, 
Crowley, '08^ Leydon, '07, and Linnell, '07, 
was one of the features of the evening. 
Sprague, Med., gave a clog dance, which was 
encored twice. The closing number was 
"Cheer Up Mary," by Linnell, '07, and the 
entire company. 

The Olio included only five numbers, but 
made up in quality what it lacked in length. 
Kendrie rendered a violin solo which was 
extremely well received. Boyce, '08, was 
the first number. He appeared in an orig- 
inal monologue, entitled "A Tramp's Solil- 
oquy." The work of Morrill, '10, with the 
club swinging was another feature worthy 
of especial mention, using six clubs in all and 
handling them with ease. The Mikelsky 
Brothers appeared in an original Dutch Com- 
edy which contained many jokes and witty 
sayings. The entertainment closed with 
"Bowdoin Beata," rendered by the Mandolin 
Club and the entire company. The show was 
presented for the benefit of baseball, and a 
generous sum was realized. 

A dance followed the entertainment. 



INTERSCHOLASTIC DEBATE 

The second Interscholastic Debate, between 
Gardiner High and Cony High of Augusta, 
which was held last Friday evening in 
Augusta, was won by the Gardiner team after 
a closely contested and highly satisfactory 
debate. The question and judges were stated 
in last week's Orient. 



FINAL INTERSCHOLASTIC DEBATE 

The final debate in the interscholastic series, 
between Gardiner High and Lewiston High, 
will take place in Memorial Hall on April 19. 
Gardiner is to submit a question to Lewiston 
before Feb. 9, together with a list of names 
from which Lewiston is to select three judges. 
This was decided at a conference of represen- 
tatives of the two schools with a representative 
of the council last Saturday. It has also been 
decided that Roberts, '07, will coach Gardiner 
and Linnell, '07, Lewiston High. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



233 



POSSIBLE DEBATE WITH CORNELL 

A letter has been recently received by the 
Bowdoin Debating Council from Cornell mak- 
ing inquiries as to the possibility of arranging 
an intercollegiate debate with Bowdoin. 

The matter was considered at a recent meet- 
ing of the Council and Manager Pike has for- 
warded a letter to Cornell making further in- 
quiries. If a debate can be arranged to take 
place in Brunswick, the Council may take 
favorable action in the matter. 



'68 PRIZE 

The '68 prize speaking contest, which was 
held last Thursday evening, resulted in the 
^awarding of the prize to C. W. Snow, '07. 
The judges were Dr. Alfred Mitchell, '59, of 
Brunswick, Albert W. Tolman, '88, of Port- 
land, and Rev. Robert A. Morse, '98, of Yar- 
mouth. Prof. Chapman presided. 



IN MEMORY OF JUDGE OOODENOW 

The following is a copy of a minute passed at the 
meeting of the New York Alumni, held Jan. 25, 
1907: 

At this reunion of the Bowdoin Alumni Associa- 
tion of New York, we have sad occasion to note the 
death of John H. Goodenow which occurred at 
Atlantic City, New Jersey, July 28, 1906. 

Mr. Goodenow was born at Alfred, Maine, in 
1833. He belonged to a family conspicuous in the 
law, his father being Judge Goodenow, and his 
grandfather Judge Holmes of the Maine Supreme 
Court. He graduated at Bowdoin in 1852. 

After studying law at Portland and practicing a 
few years, he entered the Legislature as represen- 
tative of his native town in 1858. In 1861 and 1862 
he was a member of the State Senate for York 
County and was chosen President of the Senate, a 
political honor rarely attained by so young a man. 

In 1864 Mr. Goodenow was appointed by President 
Lincoln, Consul General at Constantinople, remain- 
ing there till about 1875. He was there during the 
terms as ministers of George H. Boxer, Mr. Mac- 
Veagle and other statesmen of distinction, and was 
himself, at intervals in charge of the American 
Legation. He was an immediate participant in 
many important occurrence of Levantine politics. 

For many years Mr. Goodenow had retired from 
active professional life. Few men had a wider 
personal acquaintance with men influential in public 
affairs. He had a retentive memory and he 
delighted in anecdotes about public men, especially 
about those whom he had met in early life. It is 
to be hoped that he may have left memoirs which 
can be published. 

Mr. Goodenow was for many years preceding his 
death a member of the Board of Overseers. He 
rarely missed a meeting when in this country. By 
his last will he left to the college the generous leg- 
acy of $25,000. 

We deplore his death and will cherish his memory. 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1ST 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

8.30 a.m ; Exams, in Eng. Lit. 3, at Memorial 
Hall, and in Biology 2, at Biol. Laboratory. 

1.30 p.m. Exam, in German 1, at Memorial Hall. 

President Hyde speaks at Swarthmore College, 
Swarthmore, Penn. 

Professor Foster speaks at Lake Forest Univer- 
sity, Lake Forest, Illinois. 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2D 

8.30 a.m. Exam, in Chemistry 3, at Chem. Lect. 
Room. 

1.30 P.M. Exams, in French I, at Physics Lect. 
Room and in French 3, and 11, at Memorial Hall. 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

A. K. K. Fraternity dance at Riverton Park. 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3D 

4.00 p.m. President Hyde speaks at chapel. 
A. O. Pike will sing a solo at chapel. 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4TH 

8.30 a.m. Exams, in Philosophy 3, at Memorial 
Hall, and in Physics 1, at Physics Lect. Room. 

1.30 p.m. Exams, in German 5 and 7, at Memorial 
Hall. 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

Prof. Woodruff speaks before the Faculty Club 
on "Mohammed." 

New Meadows Inn closes for several weeks. 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY STH 

8.30 a.m. Exams, in History 5 at Lect. Room in 
Adams Hall; in English 1, and in Latin 5 both at 
Memorial Hall. 

1.30 p.m. Exams, in History 3 and Greek 8, both 
at Memorial Hall. 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6TH 

8.30 a.m. Exam, in Chemistry 1, at Chem. Lect. 
Room. 

1.30 p.m. Exams, in Geology 1, at Biological Lab., 
and in Physics 5, at Physics Lect. Room. 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

Professor Foster speaks at Chicago University. 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7TH 

8.30 a.m. Exams, in Economics 3, and in Latin 1 
and 3, all at Memorial Hall. 

1.30 p.m. Exams, in Chemistry 5, at Chem. Lect. 
Room, and in Biology 4, at Biological Lab. 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board walk. 

Prof. Foster speaks at Beloit College, Beloit, Wis. 

Commander R. E. Peary, '77, speaks at Augusta. 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8TH 

8.30 a.m. Exams, in History 9 at Lect. Room in 
Adams Hall, and in Math. 1, 3, and 7, at Memorial 
Hall. 

1.30 p.m. Exams, in Eng. Lit. 1, and in Greek 1, 
3, and 5, all at Memorial Hall. 

4.00 p.m. Relay squad work on board track. 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9TH 

8.30 a.m. Exams, in German 3, and in Astronomy 
3, both at Memorial Hall. 



1U 



BOWDOIN ORIENf 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



R. A. CONY, 1907 



Editor-in-Chief 



Associate Editors 
h. e. mitchell, 1907 r. h. hupper, 1908 

W. S. LINNELL, lgo7 R. A. LEE, 1908 

A. L. ROBINSON, lgo8 H. H. BURTON, 1909 

J. S. STAHL, 1909 



G. W. CRAIGIE, 1907 Business Manager 

N. S. WESTON, 1908 Ass't Business Manager 



Contributions are requested from all undergradu- 
ates, alumni, and officers of instruction. No anony- 
mous manuscript can be accepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager. 

Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, 10 cents. 

Entered at Post-Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
Lewiston Journal Pkkss 



Vol. XXXVI. 



FEBRUARY I, 1907 



The Orient requests class 
Alumni Items secretaries to send it all 

the alumni news possible. 
During the past two months the editor has 
received a number of letters from alumni con- 
taining many suggestions as to the improve- 
ment of the alumni department. Some of 
them have been helpful, and the Orient hopes 
to be able to put into practice some of the 
ideas advanced. It is interesting to note, 
however, that out of a total of about 15 let- 
ters — received from men whose kindly and 
unselfish interest is good evidence of their 
being among Bowdoin's alumni — that out of 
all this number with a single exception not an 
alumni item was sent in. As we have already 
taken occasion to say, it is the items of interest 
to the members of the classes on which we 
need help. We are very grateful for advice, 
and as alreadw said, much of it has been 
helpful, but we shall be still more grateful for 



items. The chief difficulty of the systematic 
conduct of a college weekly lies in the annual 
change of administration. One man or group 
of men can make one scheme a success, but 
the next board is likely to have radically dif- 
ferent ideas, and, as a result, the whole work 
is upset. It seems to us that the class secre- 
taries, more than any one else, can improve 
the situation. Send us advice, but above all, 
send us some of those little personal items. 



Considerable criticism is 
As to Freshmen heard about college rela- 
tive to the attitude taken 
by a few Freshmen relative to some of the 
college activities. While a criticsm of these 
matters is hardly worth the attention of the 
college weekly, the Orient cannot refrain 
from saying a word in the matter. To be in 
any degree responsible for the success of any 
undertaking — be it a relay team or any other 
organization — is a trust which a Freshman 
should be proud to have and for which he 
should be more than pleased to do his best. 
This does not seem to be the case with one or 
two men. If this attitude continues there 
would seem to be a strong temptation on the 
part of upperclassmen to resort to some old- 
fashioned methods, which would perhaps do 
more good than harm. 



Orient 
Advertisements 



The students can help the 
business manager of the 
Orient in no small degree 
if they will mention the paper when they make 
purchases of our advertisers. No man cares 
to advertise for anything but business pur- 
poses and he likes to know that he is getting 
results. There is no doubt that the Orient 
brings its results, but advertisers have no pos- 
itive knowledge unless they are told. A cer- 
tain Brunswick business man has said that he 
did not receive a call for some goods adver- 
tised in the Orient and therefore concluded 
that it was not helping him much. On inquiry 
the Orient found that a very large amount 
of these very goods are purchased of this very 
man. There is every reason to believe that 
the Orient was largely instrumental in bring- 
ing the goods to the attention of students, but 
the fact that the students had not mentioned 
the paper in connection with their purchases 
hurt our advertising and the paper. Mention 



BOWDOIN ORIENf 



235 



the Orient. It will help us give you the best 
possible paper. It is a real way to show col- 
lege loyalty. 



The students are to be 
Art Building Talks congratulated on the series 

of talks in the Art Build- 
ing which are to be given by Professor Henry 
Johnson, soon after the opening of the second 
semester. These informal gatherings offer a 
splendid opportunity for men to learn some- 
thing about Bowdoin's treasures and it is to be 
hoped that a large number will improve the 
opportunity offered. The Art Building is 
always the center of attraction for visitors to 
the college and the pleasure of a visit to it lies 
almost entirely in what one may learn of the 
facts connected with its contests. Not only 
can these talks be made a source of pleasure, 
but they can also be made of no small value 
as a part of a college education. 



FIRST MUSICAL CONCERT 

The Glee and Mandolin Clubs gave their 
first entertainment at Harpswell, Jan. 24, 
under the auspices of the Dirigo Grange. The 
program was wholly informal, three selections 
being rendered by each club. The opening and 
closing numbers were "Bowdoin Beata" and 
"Phi Chi" which were rendered by both clubs 
with the usual Bowdoin spirit. Both leaders 
were highly pleased with the results of the 
entertainment. 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON HOUSE PARTY 

The Theta Chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon held 
its annual house-party on January 25. A reception 
to the older guests was held in the afternoon from 
three till five. The matrons were Mrs. W. DeWitt 
Hyde, Mrs. George T. Little, Mrs. Hartley C. Bax- 
ter, and Mrs. Alfred E. Burton. Mrs. W. M. Pen- 
nell and Mrs. R. W. Eaton poured coffee, while 
Mrs. Allen Johnson and Mrs. G. M. Elliott served 
punch. In the evening at eight-thirty dancing began, 
the patronesses being the same as in the afternoon, 
and nearly forty couples danced until two o'clock 
when the house was turned over to the girls for the 
night. The party was arranged by the house com- 
mittee consisting of T. E. Hacker, '07, W. B. 
Drummond, '07, and A. A. Putnam, '08. Among 
those present at the reception in the afternoon were : 

Prof, and Mrs. Henry Johnson ; Mrs. Roscoe J. 
Ham ; Prof. George T. Little ; Prof. Allen Johnson ; 
Dr. Gilbert Elliott; Mr. and Mrs. Edward Payson 
Pennell of Brunswick; Mr. and Mrs. John A. Cone 
of Topsham ; Mrs. Donald F. Snow of Bangor ; 
Prof. Henry C. Chapman; Mrs. William M. Pennell 



of Brunswick; Mrs. F. V. Strickland, Bangor; Mrs. 
A. R. Smith, West Newton, Mass. ; Prof. A. E. Bur- 
ton, West Newton, Mass. ; Herbert C. Swett, Skow- 
hegan ; J. S. Bradstreet, Gardiner ; Samuel Gray, 
Oldtown; Prof, and Mrs. W. E. Moody and Prof, 
and Mrs. F. E. Woodruff, Brunswick; Mrs. E. C. 
Matthews, Portsmouth, N. H.; Miss Fannie McKeen, 
Miss Gilman, Miss Irma Smith, Brunswick ; Miss 
Edith Boardman, Brunswick; Dr. Alfred Mitchell, 
Brunswick; Prof. K. C. M. Sills, Rev. Herbert A. 
Jump, Dr. W. F. Browne, Sam L. Forsaith of 
Brunswick. And also those who were at the dance in 
the evening among whom were : Miss Margaret 
Dakin of Wellesley, Mass. ; Miss Sarah Pennell, 
Miss Sally Rice Johnson, Miss Robinson, Miss Sue 
Winchell, Miss Isabelle Forsaith, Miss Daisy Hub- 
bard, Miss Gertrude Christopher, Miss Helen Eaton, 
Miss Margaret Sutherland, Miss Louise Wetherill 
of Brunswick; Miss Marion Fletcher, Miss Helen 
Thaxter, Miss Marion Proctor, Miss May Lowery, 
Miss Emma Timberlake, Miss Mellie Timberlake of 
Portland ; Miss Josephine Ward, Miss Katherine 
Randall, Miss Bertha Flynt of Augusta; Miss Ethel 
McFarland of Boston ; Miss Lillian Fellows, Miss 
Marjorie Elms, Miss Dorothy Woodman, Miss 
Zelma F. Oak, Miss Anna Strickland, Miss Fran- 
cesca Walker, Miss Mabelle Swett, Miss Brito- 
marte Emerson, Miss Louise Hamlin of Bangor ; 
Miss Martha Pratt of Lewiston; Miss Mary Gil- 
patrick of Northeast Harbor ; Miss Bertha Bry- 
ant of Yarmouth; Miss Selma Smith of West 
Newton, Mass. ; Miss Evelyn Coolidge, Miss Ruth 
Staples of Woodfords ; Miss Imogene Bumps, Miss 
Angie Ryan of Dexter ; Miss Maude French of 
Auburn; Miss Beatrice Coughlin of Augusta; Miss 
Eleanor Danforth of Gardiner, and Miss Laura Mat- 
thews of Portsmouth. 

The delegates from the other fraternities were: 
Wm. E. Speake, '07, Alpha Delta Phi; Arthur Har- 
old Ham, '08, Psi Upsilon ; Asa Osgood Pike, '07, 
Zeta Psi ; George William Craigie, '07, Theta Delta 
Chi; Charles Francis Thomas, Jr., '07, Kappa 
Sigma ; Richard A. Lee, '08, Beta Theta Pi, and 
Earl Haggett MacMichael, '07, Delta Upsilon. 



LIBRARY NOTES 



As many as 350 books have been added to the 
library within the last two weeks, because many 
pamphlets which had been sent away to be bound, 
have returned from the binders, and have been put 
on the shelves. Among these bound volumes are 
gifts from President W. DeW. Hyde, Prof. G. T. 
Little, '77, Prof. H. C. Chapman, '66, Prof. C. T. 
Burnett, Hon. J. Williamson, '49, C. W. Pickard, '57, 
Isaac B. Choate, '62, Hon. Barrett Potter, '78, Prof. 
Austin Cary, '87, W. T. Hall, '88, J. W. Hewitt, '97, 
and G. L. Lewis, '01. And among the books of 
special interest may be mentioned "Manual of Rail- 
roads," by H. V. Poor; "Records of the Virginia 
Company of London," edited by S. M. Kingsbury ; 
"Handbook of Portland and Old Orchard," by J. T. 
Hull ; "League of Peace" by Andrew Carnegie ; 
"Heredity of Hair-Length in Guinea Pigs," by Cas- 
tle and Forbes ; "Trial of Emile Zola," "Law of 
Railroad Rate Regulation," by Beale and Wyman, 
and 42 books that have been added to the Longfel- 
low Collection. 



236 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



NOTICE 

The college librarian desires to obtain for the col- 
lege records information respecting the parentage 
and early life of Captain Samuel Brown of the 
Class of 1858, who was killed in the Civil War. He 
was a member of the Psi Upsilon Fraternity. 



AUGUSTA CLUB 

Last Saturday evening the Augusta Club met at 
New Meadows Inn. After the usual shore 
dinner, the meeting broke up, with plans to meet 
again on Feb. 23d, when it is hoped to have some 
member of the faculty address the club. The pres- 
ent student membership of the club is : Cony, 07 ; 
Kingsley, '07 ; Weston, '08 ; Heath, '09 ; Macomber, 
'10; Lippincott, '10; Martin, '10; Webster, '10; Mor- 
rill, '10; Smith, '10, and Weston, '10. 



READINGS IN ENGLISH 4, 1907 

Goldsmith — "She Stoops to Conquer," M. P. C, 
Feb. 16. 

Lamb — "Essays of Elia," M. P. C, Feb. 23. 

Thackeray— "Vanity Fair," T. C, Part I. Mar. 2. 

Thackeray — "Vanity Fair," Part II., Mar. 9. 

Carlvle — -"Heroes and Hero Worship," M. P. C, 
Mar. 16. 

Ruskin — "Sesame and Lilies," M. P. C, Mar. 23. 
Mar. 30. 

Dickens— "The Cricket on the Hearth," M. P. C. 

Reade— "Peg Woffington," T. C, April 13. 

Stevenson — "Treasure Island," M. P. C, Apr. 20. 

Poe— "Prose Tales," M. P. C, Apr. 27. 

Holmes — "Autocrat of the Breakfast Table," R. L. 
S., May 4. 

Longfellow — "Tales of a Wayside Inn," R. L. S., 
May 11. 

Hawthorne— "Twice Told Tales," M. P. C, May 
18. 

Thoreau — "Succession of Forest Trees," R. L. S., 
May 25. 

Emerson — -"Essays," M. P. C, June 1. 

M. P. C. stands for Macmillan's Pocket Classics. 
25 cents each. 

T. C. stands for the Temple Classics (Macmillan 
Co.) Cloth, 50 cents. Leather, 75 cents. 

R. L. S. stands for the Riverside Literature Series. 
(Houghton, Mifflin Co.) Cloth, 50 cents. 

On sale at Book Shop in Maine Hall. 



REPORTS IN ENGLISH 4, 1907 

Goldsmith, Feb. 16. 
Lamb, Feb. 23. . 
Thackeray, March 9. 
Carlyle, March 16. 
Ruskin, March 23. 
Stevenson, April 20. 
Holmes, May 4. 
Longfellow, May 11. 
Hawthorne, May 18. 
Emerson, June 1. 



College flotes 

Snow, '07, preached at Freeport Sunday afternoon. 

Morton, '10, was obliged to go home Monday, 
because of illness. 

The Longfellow centennial was celebrated in 
Augusta last Thursday. 

A meeting of the Aroostook Club will be held at 
the Inn to-morrow night. 

McGlone, '10, has been engaged to sing at the 
Catholic Church every Sunday. 

It is said that Ethel Barrymore will appear at the 
Empire soon, in "Captain Jinks." 

A large inumber of students witnessed "Man and 
Sunerman" at the Empire Theatre. 

Adjourns are being granted in Professor Lee's 
courses, on account of his illness. 

Kimball, '10, has been appointed alternate to take 
the examinations for West Point. 

Several students went on the snowshoe parties 
last Saturday and Tuesday evenings. 

The review of the Quill, which appeared last 
week, is deferred until the next issue. 

Grace, '10, was called to his home in Saco last 
Friday by the serious illness of his father. 

Stacey, '09, who left college to enter business in 
Chicago, is expected to return to his studies. 

Inhabitants of Brunswick say that this is the cold- 
est winter they have known for nineteen years. 

The Aroostook Club dined at the Inn last Satur- 
day night and a very agreeable time was enjoyed. 

There is some talk of a branch of the Intercol- 
legiate Civic League being established at Bowdoin. 

W. A .Robfnson, '07, after spending five weeks at 
his home in St. John, N. B., has returned to college. 

The Brunswick High School basketball team 
plays Edward Little in the Armory, Saturday even- 
ing. 

The men who took part in the '68 Speaking were 
guests of C. W. Snow, '07, at the Inn on Tuesday 
evening. 

"Lew" Dockstader's Minstrels at the Empire 
proved a great attraction for the students last Fri- 
day night. 

Several of the fellows went with sleighing parties 
to the Glee Club concert in Dirigo Hall, last Thurs- 
day evening. 

Kendrie, '10, played a solo at the Congregational 
Church, Sunday, and will play in Bath next Thurs- 
day afternoon. 

The card games of the Massachusetts Club are 
now being played, but as all the games haven't come 
off, the results are not yet known. 

The Cercle Francais will hold its next meeting 
Feb. 12 at the Kappa Sigma House, when Monsieur 
Micoleau will continue his talks on "France." 

The following Seniors have accepted positions 
with the International Banking Concern for next 
year: A. C. Chadbourne, C. H. Bennett, L D. Min- 
cher and G. H. Morrell. Seth Haley, '07, has also 
been offered a position and may probably accept. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



237 



It is a peculiar coincidence that five out of the 
six men who took part in the '68 speaking were 
proctors. 

Subscription papers to collect funds to send the 
debating team to Syracuse have been placed in the 
different fraternity houses. 

Several trials in relay were held on the electric 
car track last Tuesday. This is the first straight- 
away work that has been done. 

The Maine Central Cafe, which was badly dam- 
aged by fire a short time ago, is being repaired and 
will soon be open for business again. 

John Hetherington, Colby, '08, attended the Delta 
Kappa Epsilon reception and dance, last Friday 
evening, as the delegate of the Colby Chapter. 

Morrell, '09, who was expected to return to col- 
lege this week, is seriously ill at his home in Gar- 
diner and will not be able to return to college this 
semester. 

Last Friday evening Albert T. Gould, '08, who 
was recently with Dr. Grenfell in Labrador, gave a 
lecture on that country, at the First Parish Church 
in Bangor. 

The next meeting of the Faculty Club will be 
held next Monday evening, in the English and 
French departments' room of Hubbard Hall. Prof. 
Woodruff will read a paper on "Mohammed." 

Celebrations of the hundredth anniversary of the 
birth of Henry W. Longfellow, Bowdoin, '25, were 
held in Portland, his birthplace, and Cambridge, 
Mass., where he spent many years of his life, last 
Sunday. 

There is some talk of forming an Oxford County 
Club in college. There are a large number of men 
here from that county and a successful club could 
undoubtedly be formed, if some enterprising upper- 
classman would start it. 

Carpenters are at work laying the floor for the 
new dance hall at the Delta Upsilon House. The 
building formerly used as a stable before the house 
was moved to its present position is being entirely 
remodeled inside, and when completed will make a 
fine dance hall. 

Professor Files will conduct a course in "Faust" 
in German IV. next semester. The course will be 
open to any student who has taken German two 
years, but will count only as a half course. The 
entire course of German IV. is not open to those 
who have not taken German III. 

An orchestra consisting of J. E. Crowley, violin; 
Miss Sue Winchell, 'cello; Prof. Charles C. Hutch- 
ins, clarionet; Fred F. Hubbard, double bass; and 
Miss Helen Chapman, pianist, has been formed at 
the Congregational Sunday school, and last Sun- 
day for the first time took part in the exercises. 

Owing to the fact that Erskine, '07, expects to be 
out of college during a portion of the next semester, 
W. Drummond, '07, who was alternate on the affirm- 
ative, will be one of the regular speakers in the 
Bradbury debate. A. Robinson, '08, has been 
named as the alternate to take Drummond's place. 

The Anasagunticook Snow Shoe Club walked 
from Harding's Station to New Meadows Inn, Sat- 
urday, by way of Ham's Hill. Tuesday evening the 
club enjoyed a moonlight walk across the Plains. 



After the walk the party met at the vestry of the 
First Parish Church, where refreshments were 
served. 



THE FACULTY 

Professor Woodruff preached in Elijah Kellogg's 
church at Harpswell last Sunday. 

Prof. Sills, the secretary of the Faculty, has 
announced that during exams, his office hours will 
be from 12 to 12.30. 

Next Thursday Professor Mitchell will go to 
Westbrook where he will speak on Longfellow. 
Friday evening he will lecture on the same subject 
at Camden. 

Dr. Whittier entertained the members of the 
Men's Club of Brunswick at his home on Maine 
Street last Friday evening. Professor Robinson 
gave an interesting talk on Mexico. 

Professor Lee has been sick for several days. He 
was first threatened with pneumonia and the cold 
left him with catarrh of the inner ear, which has 
temporarily affected his hearing. It is hoped that 
no permanent harm will result. 



Hlumni personals 



CLASS OF 1850 

Among the United States Senators re- 
elected this week has been William P. Frye of 
Maine — one of the sort who would have had 
no rival even had the people been directly 
choosing his successor. Mr. Frye has now 
served in the Senate longer than any other of 
its members save three, Mr. Allison of Iowa, 
Mr. Morgan of Alabama and Mr. Hale, also 
of Maine. It was in i88i,,when James G. 
Blaine entered the Garfield cabinet, that Mr. 
Frye took his seat; and he had been in the 
House of Representatives for 10 years before 
that. The younger generation scarcely real- 
izes what a forceful party orator and floor 
debator Mr. Frye was in the earlier period of 
his Washington career. No one was in 
greater demand on the Republican stump 25 
and 20 years ago. Mr. Frye was brilliant, 
with a keen-edged irony and a kind of torren- 
tial eloquence when deep feeling stirred him. 
He disappeared from the list of frequent and 
ready speakers when he began his long ser- 
vice as president pro tern, of the Senate, an 
office in which he has made an unsurpassed 
reputation as a parliamentarian and presiding 
director of business, but which seemed to 
entomb the old, militant, dashing Frye of 
debate. Since his retirement from the chair, 



238 



BOWDOIN ORIENf 



the necessity for a proper care of his health 
has forbidden much participation in the excite- 
ment of forensic speaking. 

The tradition of high abilities of Maine's 
public men has been worthily maintained by' 
Mr. Frye, who, with his colleague, has kept 
the State in a place of influence for ar quarter 
of a century. — Springfield Republican. 

CLASS OF 1876 
Professor Charles Davis Jameson, who has 
recently been appointed to an important posi- 
tion under the Chinese government, is a son 
of the late General Charles D. Jameson, of 
Maine, who was a prominent officer in the 
Civil War. Professor Jameson was born in 
1855 in Bangor, where his mother now 
resides, and was educated in Bangor schools 
and at Bowdoin College. He was graduated 
in 1876 and soon went into active engineering, 
being for three years assistant superintend- 
ent of the Memphis and Charleston railroad. 
He has been in China many years and by 
reason of his acquaintance with the language 



and customs and his high standing with the 
government was able to save the lives of many 
missionary workers at the time of the Boxers 
uprising. 

CLASS OF 1891 

H. H. Noyes, '91, has recently accepted a 
call to the Congregational pulpit at Island 
Falls, Me. He was formerly at New 
Gloucester, Me. 

CLASS OF 1895 

Ernest R. Woodbury, '95, has become prin- 
cipal of Thornton Academy at Saco, Maine. 

Harvey Thayer, '95, is one of the preceptors 
and also assistant professor of German at 
Princeton. 

CLASS OF 1896 

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. 
Howard at South Paris on Jan. 13. 

CLASS OF 1906 
William Johnson, '06, is in California with 
a surveying party. 



See pie moot a Position 

I want to have a personal talk with every Bowdoin College 
190G man who will be in the market for a good position in 
business or technical work on or after July 1st. 

If you will call and see me at the Brunswick House at any 
time to suit your convenience from May 4th to 5th, inclusive 
tafternoon or evening) I can tell you frankly just what the 
prospects are of securing the sort of position you want and are 
fitted to fill. I can give you full information concerning a great 
many of the best opportunities for young college men in all 
lines of work in the United States and several foreign co'intries. 

It will pay you, I feel sure, to see me before deciding 
definitely what to do after graduation. 

A. S. POND, JR., 

Representing HAPQOOD'S 

Announcement 

The Popular Monday Evening; 
Dancing; Class and Assemblies 

WILL BE REOPENED AT MUSIC HALL, BATH 
for season of 1906-1907, NOVEMBER 19th. 

Instruction, 7.30 to 9 P.M. 
Assembly, 9 to 11.15 P.M. 

These have always been special assemblies for college 
students. Private instruction by appointment. 

For further particulars, address 

MISS JENNIE HARVEY, 

Telephone 128-13. 691 Washington Street, Bath, Me. 



©t>ituan> 

CLASS OF 1871 
Edwin A. Lord, for the past 20 years princi- 
pal of Brewster Academy at Wolfboro, N. H., 
died last week at the Maine General Hospital 
in Portland. He was born in Sanford, Me., 
in 1850, and graduated from Bowdoin College 
in 1 87 1. For some years he taught in the 
High School at Lowell, Mass. From Lowell 
he went to Lawrence as principal of the High 
School. For a short time he engaged in busi- 
ness in Lawrence, and installed the first suc- 
cessful electric lighting plant in America. 
Returning to his chosen work, he was again 
connected with the public schools in Lawrence. 
In 1887 he was chosen principal of the Brew- 
ster Academy. During almost his entire resi- 
dence in Wolfboro he has been chairman of 
the school board and school system. 



T. F. FOSS & SONS 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XXXVI 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEBRUARY 8, 1907 



NO. 25 



WASHINGTON ALUMNI BANQUET 

The annual dinner of the Washington 
Alumni Association was held at the Raleigh 
Hotel on Thursday evening of last week. The 
meeting proved itself a delightful occasion, 
and, as in the past, was a gathering of notable 
men such as few colleges can boast. The 
following excellent account of the gathering, 
taken from the Washington Star, is sent the 
Orient by an alumnus, and will prove inter- 
esting reading to both graduates and under- 
graduates : 

"The happy days of long ago spent at old 
Bowdoin, were recalled by loyal sons of that 
famous college at their annual dinner at the 
Raleigh Hotel last evening. A Bowdoin 
alumni dinner was never more largely attended 
by the members of the association and other 
sons of Maine residing in this city. 

"The principal feature of the addresses of 
the evening was a review of the work and plan 
of the college by its president, Dr. Wm. De- 
Witt Hyde, who was a guest of honor of the 
Washington alumni. Dr. Hyde gave a clear- 
cut review of the work of the college to-day, 
and a masterly statement of the ideal charac- 
teristics of a college. In the speeches that fol- 
lowed those who had been students at Bow- 
doin many years ago told of the conditions 
that existed then and compared them with the 
latter-day methods, much to the credit of the 
administration of the college to-day. 

"The toastmaster was Dr. Woodbury Pulsi- 
fer, whose many bristit sallies and clear-cut 
stories interjected in the proceedings were an 
interesting part of the entertainment. Dr. 
Pulsifer was presented as toast-master by Rep- 
resentative Allen. The entertainment was 
interrupted only long enough to re-elect the 
officers of the association for another term. 
Dr. Pulsifer was covered with embarrassment 
by being forced to renominate himself for the 
high office he fills, and did not long hesitate in 
calling for a confirmatory vote before declar- 
ing himself and others duly elected. But the 
legality of the proceeding was not questioned, 
and he proceeded to call upon Dr. Hyde. The 
reception Dr. Hyde received was a clear indi- 
cation of the fact that the Washington alumni 



of Bowdoin are in full accord with the general 
admiration and regard felt for Dr. Hyde by 
all in anyway acquainted with his work at 
Bowdoin. Dr. Hyde in the course of his 
remarks declared that to the alumni of this city 
Bowdoin owes much for the helpfulness that 
has been extended the college both in financial 
and in other ways. They had, he said, proved 
themselves to be generous benefactors. 

"The bounty of Col. Wing, the generous 
gifts of Mr. Crosby S. Noyes, of Senator 
Frye and of Representative Alexander and 
others have been of great help to the college," 
he said. "The contributions intended for the 
college by gentlemen who are or have been 
connected with this body are greater than the 
public is aware." 

"Dr. Hyde recounted that the morning after 
the last dinner of the alumni, Col. Wing had 
presented $50,000 for a professorship of math- 
ematics. This year from the Garcelon estate 
$80,000 had been received, and $30,000 more 
will soon come from the same source, closing 
up the estate. 

"Dr. Hyde then recounted the characteristics 
of the ideal college, and referred to the man- 
ner in which modern college life has been 
growing in attractiveness and in usefulness to 
the student. The successful college, he said, 
is one in which only trained men enter and in 
which only the studious stay. He told of the 
constant attention that is paid to the work of 
the students to see that they maintain a proper 
standard of excellence in their studies and of 
the methods adopted to call them to account in 
case they fall below the requirements. 

"Men are ranged up once in every twenty- 
four hours," he said, "and if they begin to fall 
behind in their studies that fact is promptly 
known, and means for correcting the failure 
to keep up are taken at once." 

"It was added that Bowdoin gives its stu- 
dents absolute liberty and then holds them 
responsible for their conduct. There is no 
espionage whatver exercised over the student, 
but if he goes wrong he is called to account. 
They recognize the difference between laying 
down just what the students should do and 
holding him responsible for results. 



240 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



"Dr. Hyde said he believed that a college 
should provide a home life, and that is what 
the fraternities do for the body of students. 
The fraternities tend to build up a sentiment 
of exclusion which was the result of men liv- 
ing together and eating at the same table, but 
he said that such objection was being overcome 
by efforts that were made to bring members 
of the various fraternities together in various 
ways. The fraternity is becoming to be a tre- 
mendous moral influence for good, it was 
declared. 

" 'You can get a man to do for the sake of 
his social group with which he is identified 
what he will never do for himself,' it was 
asserted. That, the speaker remarked, was a 
motive that helped the college much in main- 
taining a high standard of excellence. Seni