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Full text of "Bowdoin Orient"

Digitized by the Internet Arcinive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation funding 



http://www.archive.org/details/bowdoinorient49bowd 



VoLXLIX. No.1 



APRIL 8, 1919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



CONTENTS 




PAGE 


PAGE 


Bowdoin Professors Win Distinc- 




Rhodes Scholarships 


6 


tion Abroad 


1 


Student Forum Inaugural at Bow- 




Dekes Win Track Meet by Three 




doin 


6 


Point Margin 


1 


Many Students Back This Term 


6 


Interfratemity Baseball League 
Resumed 


2 


H. D. Eberlein Talks at Chapel 
on Italy's Claims 


7 


Results of Bradbury Debates 


2 


Spring Track Commences 


7 


Baseball Prospects 


2 


New Courses Being Offered 


7 


Ivy Play 


3 


Call for Candidates for Editorial 




Description of Marshal Foch 


3 


Board 


7 


Bowdoin Men Commended by 




Calendar 


7 


Divisional Commanders 


3 


On the Campus 


7 


Editorial: 




With the Faculty 


8 


Back To Normal 


4 


Alumni Notes 


9 


The March Quill 


5 


Resolutions 


9 


Results of Student Elections 




6 







B7411 

BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Over There" know JUD is in the game. 



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School and College Work a Specialty 



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Near Post Office, Brunswick, Maine. 



LAW 

AND AMERICA'S 
WORLD POSITION 



n international 
challenges the 



America's new place 
politics and commerce 
young American. 
He must equip himself for new world 
conditions with a knowledge of legal funda- 
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LAW — its principles and application to all 
business is almost as necessary to the 
coming business man as it is indispensable 
to the lawyer. 
Qualify for real leadership. 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

gives a thorough training 

principles. 

LL.B. Course requires 3 years. 



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For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 



ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



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Summer positions for college men. Application blanks 
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3 South Maine. 

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The College Book Store 

ABBA FATHER 

by the late President Wm. DeWitt 
Hyde is an excellent book for every 
Bowdoin man to own. 

This book has been out of print for 
the last year, the first edition having 
been completely exhausted. 

We now have a new lot to sell at 
35c each. 

THE SUPPLY IS LIMITED. 

Ask to see our 50 cent 

EXPANDING BOOK RACK 

A new lot of 

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have just arrived. 

F. W. CHANDLER & SON 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



NEED MONEY 

For college expenses. Do you know what the opportunities are with our line of 
new revised maps. Then why not find out. Do it now. 



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Makers and Retailers ' of Best 

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Sole Boston Agents for the 
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400 Wisiilngton Street, Boston, Mass. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 8, 1919 



NO. I 



BOWDOIN PROFESSORS WIN DISTINCTION 
ABROAD. 

Bowdoin is proud to welcome back two of her 
faculty members who have achieved distinction 
abroad in their separate fields. They are Cap- 
tain Philip W. Meserve and Captain Herbert C. 
Bell. The former is professor of chemistry and 
the latter professor of history and political 
science. Captain Meserve played an important 
part in the plan and execution of a great gas 
offensive launched by the American Expedition- 
ary Forces. Captain Meserve by submitting to 
General Bliss several reports on previous plans 
of world union and a tentative plan for a league 
of nations performed a less spectacular but no 
less noteworthy task. Bowdoin has reason to 
be proud to claim instructors as talented as these 
men have shown themselves to be. 



DEKES WIN TRACK MEET BY THREE POINT 
MARGIN. 

By a margin of three points the track team 
of the Deke House won over the Betes in 
the interfraternity track meet held Thursday 
night, March 14, prior to the term vacation. The 
winners totalled 28}^ points while the Betas came 
in for 25^4 points. The Zetes came in a close 
third, much to the surprise of many who had not 
figured them previously as one of the topnotchers, 
and rolled up 22j^ points. Following are the 
points made by the other seven fraternities : 
Alpha Delta Phi, 16; Chi Psi 10^, Delta 
Upsilon 3^, Kappa Sigma i6j/^, Psi Upsilon 
SYs, Sigma Nu 6, Theta Delta Chi 75^. 

The meet, the first held at the college, was a 
decided success in every way. Much credit should 
be given to Coach Magee who was the originator 
of the plan, and who conducted the meet in such 
an excellent manner. Although no records were 
broken, competition and rivalry were very keen 
in every event, and exciting finishes were 
features of the evening. 

Thomson '21, proved the individual star of the 
meet, and incidentally was the big man for the 
Deke House, making 15 points. Out of a 
field of a hundred or more competitors, Thomson 
won the forty-yard dash. This event proved one 



of the most exciting of the evening, as the five 
competitors in the finals, Averill of the Deke 
House, Dostie of the Chi Psi House, McCarthy 
of the Beta House, Thomson of the Deke 
House, and Allen of the Beta House, were 
bunched so close together at the tape that the 
judges at the finish had great difficulty in picking 
the winners. Thomson also won the forty-five 
yard high hurdles, making the time of 6 3-5 
seconds, and the forty-five yard low hurdles, 
crossing the tape in 5 4-5 seconds. 

An unexpected feature of the evening was the 
Bowdoin Freshman and Hebron Academy relay 
race. Due to some misunderstanding in cor- 
respondence this event, previously scheduled, was 
thought cancelled by the Bowdoin officials, and 
Coach Magee had not worked the Freshmen for 
two weeks. The star Bowdoin Freshman team 
won the event, making a time of 2 minutes, 
16 2-5 seconds, but not until they had been 
pushed hard by the fleet-footed Hebron runners. 
Beals of Hebron got the jump on Averill at the 
first corner, and the Academy boys held first 
place until Partridge '22, third runner for the 
Freshman team passed Steams near the end of 
his second lap. Hunt '22, was able to hold the 
lead made by Partridge, although a few yards 
behind Captain Munce. 

The several relay races between the fraterni- 
ties proved another big feature of the evening. 
In the preliminary races, the Betas, Dekes, Kappa 
Sigs, and A. D.'s won their events, and qualified 
for the finals. The real tussle in the finals was 
between the Betas and the Dekes. Both teams 
kept abreast of each other during the two laps 
and they crossed the tape with the Betas a little 
in the lead. 

A handsome shield, the gift of President Sills 
to the winning fraternity to be held by it per- 
manently, was presented after the meet to Thom- 
son of the Deke House, by Coach Magee. A 
beautiful silver cup, the gift of the track as- 
sociation, was awarded to the Beta House, for 
winning the relay race, the presentation speech 
being made by Coach Magee to McCarthy of that 
house. 

Summary follows : 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



40- Yard Dash — Won by Thomson of D. K. E. House ; 
second, Averill of D. K. E. ; third, Dostie of Chi Psi ; 
fourth, McCarthy of Beta House. Time, 4 i-5 seconds. 

45-Yard High Hurdles — Won by Thomson of D. K. 
E. House ; second, Foulke of Zete House ; third, Moses 
of Kappa Sigma House. Time, 6 3-5 seconds. 

45-Yard Low Hurdles — Won by Thomson of D. K. E. 
House; second, Parent of Sigma Kappa House; third, 
Moses of Kappa Sigma House ; fourth, Foulke of Zete 
House. Time, 5 4-5 seconds. 

440-Yard Run — Won by Young of Sigma Nu House ; 
second, Foulke of Zete House ; third. Partridge of 
Beta House ; fourth, McCarthy of Beta House. Time, 
56 seconds. 

880- Yard Run — Won by Cleaves of A. D. House ; 
second. Hunt of Psi U. House ; third, Lovell of A. D. 
House; fourth, Noyes of Sigma Nu House. 

Mile Run — Won by Cleaves of A. D. House ; second, 
Heeney of A. D. House ; third, Johnson of Psi U. 
House ; fourth. Hatch of Chi Psi House. Time, 5 
minutes, 3 3-5 seconds. 

Putting i6-lb. Shot — Won by Zeitler of Zete House ; 
second, EUms of Beta House ; third, Thalheimer of D. 
U. House ; fourth, R. Perkins of Beta House. Dis- 
tance, 32 feet % inch. 

Running Broad Jump — Won by Allen of Beta House ; 
second. Parent of Kappa Sigma House ; third, Foulke 
of Zete House ; fourth, Dostie of Chi Psi House. Dis- 
tance, 20 feet, 254 inches. 

Running High Jump — Won by Dostie of Chi Psi 
House ; Parent of Kappa Sigma House and Tarbox 
of T. D. House tied for second and third ; Cook of D. 
K. E. House, McCarthy of D. K. E. House, Meacham 
of Psi U. House, Thalheimer of D. U. House, Mc- 
Carthy of Beta House, S. Perkins of Beta House, 
Coombs of Kappa Sigma House, Foulke of Zete House, 
all tied for fourth place. Height, 5 feet, 2 inches. 

Pole Vault— Won by Cook of the D. K. E. House; 
Ludwig of the D. K. E. House, Fish of the D. U. 
House, Prosser of the Chi Psi House, Cole of the 
Kappa Sigma House, all tied for remaining places. 

Throwing Discus — Won by Caspar of T. D. House ; 
second, R. Perkins of Beta House ; third, Ellms of 
Beta House ; fourth. Smith of Zete House. Distance, 
III feet, 7 Yi inches. 

36-lb. Weight — Won by Zeitler of Zete House ; sec- 
ond, Schonland of Psi U. House ; third. Knight of 
Zete House; fourth, Rhoades of the Deke House. 
Distance, 29 feet, 2 inches. 

Exhibition Relay Races. 

Exhibition Relay Race — Troup Two of the Bruns- 
wick Boy Scouts (Doughty, Nason, Mack, Walsh) won 
over Troop One (Litchfield, Soule, Lamarre, Morse) 
and Arrows (Cummings, Morrill, Bailey, Carlin). 
Time, i minute, 13 3-5 seconds. 

Bowdoin Freshman Relay Team (Averill, Hunt, 
Woodbury, Partridge) won over the Herbron Team 
(Beals, Wardwell, Stearns, Munce). Time, 2 minutes, 
16 2-5 seconds. 

Relay Trials. 

Beta Team (Allen, Casey, Partridge, McCarthy) won 
over the T. D. Team (Cook, Cousins, Woodbury, Tar- 
box) and the D. U. Team (Thalheimer, Ridley, Fish, 
Mason). Time, 2 minutes, 19 4-5 seconds. 

A D. Team (Flynn, Lovell, Cleaves, Gray) won over 
Psi U. House (Leavitt, Willson, Johnson, Hunt) and 
the Zete Team (Foulke, Colter, Towle, Holbrook). 
Time, 2 minutes, 23 3-5 seconds. 

D. K. E. Team (Thomson, Averill, McConky, Wake- 



field) won over Kappa Sigma Team (Perry, Parent, 
Cole, Moses), Chi Psi Team (Dostie, Hatch, Prosser, 
Ciymer) and Sigma Nu Team (Young, Therriault, Mar- 
tin, Rogers). Time, 2 minutes, 21 4-5 seconds. 

(Both D. K. E. team and Kappa Sigma team qualified 
for the finals.) 



INTERFRATERNITY BASEBALL LEAGUE 

RESUMED. 

At a meeting of fraternity representatives held 
at the Delta Upsilon House Thursday night it 
was decided to resume the interfraternity base- 
ball league which proved so popular last year. 
An innovation will be the formation of two sub- 
sidiary leagues within the larger one, to be 
designated as Leagues A and B. Alpha Delta 
Phi, Beta Theta Pi, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Delta 
Upsilon, and Theta Delta Chi will compose 
League A, while Chi Psi, Kappa Sigma, Psi 
Upsilon, Zeta Psi, and the non-fraternity men 
will compose the other. League B. After the 
schedule has been played off the winners of the 
leagues will play a championship series of three 
games. Before May i the games will be called 
promptly at four-thirty, after that date they will 
commence at half past six. All varsity men are 
ineligible. If a man becomes a varsity player 
during the season be becomes automatically in- 
eligible. As far as possible varsity men will act 
as umpires. It was voted to award a trophy to 
both the winning team and the runner-up. 



RESULTS OF BRADBURY DEBATES. 

As the result of trials held March 12 the fol- 
lowing men have made the Bradbury debates: 
Affirmative team, Chadboume '19, Buker '21, 
Hatch '21, Young '21, alternate; negative team, 
Taylor '20, Helson '21, McGown '21, Cobume '21, 
alternate. 

The teams are now working in preparation 
for the Bradburys to be held April 22. The sub- 
ject for debate will be: "Resolved, that the best 
interests of the United States would be furthered 
by the adoption of the proposed covenant for the 
League of Nations." The same teams will com- 
pose the varsity debating teams. A triangular 
debate will be arranged with Brown and Wes- 
leyan with whom dates are now pending. 



BASEBALL PROSPECTS. 

The prospects for a championship team this 
year are unusually bright. The arrival this term 
of "Benny" Smethurst '19, last year's varsity 
pitcher, and "Huck" Finn '19, captain of the 
team for part of last season until entering the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



service, has greatly strengthened the squad. 

Among the last year's men who will play this 
year are Paul Mason, who was one of the pitch- 
ing staff; Fred Hall '19, who was the regular 
backstop; Caspar 'ig, varsity first baseman; 
Cook '20, the varsity's second sacker; 
Small '19, last year's third baseman; Captain 
Donnell '19, Grover '19, Allan Hall '20, and 
Racine '19, who formed the outfield last spring. 

The new material is plentiful and good. Flynn 
of the Freshman class promises to be a varsity 
twirler this year or next, K. B. Coombs '20, who 
played for the second team last year may share 
the catcher's position with Hall, Perrj' '22 and 
Richards '22 are out for first, Don Clifford, who 
played that position for Bates last season will 
not be qualified this year by the terms of the 
one year rule. However, he will doubtless be a 
valuable addition to the squad next year. Dahl- 
gren, who was hurt in the U. of M. football 
game last fall has reported but is temporarily 
laid off because of a slight injury to his foot 
which is not entirely healed. Others reporting 
are K. C. Coombs '19, Frosser '20, McLellan '21, 
Williams '21, Morin '22, and Wagg '22. 

Coach Houser has been working out with the 
squad regularly and should expect his charges 
to make a good showing in the Harvard game 
Wednesday. The schedule follows : 

April 9 — Harvard at Cambridge. 

April 19 — Bates at Lewiston. 

April 26 — Tufts at Medford. 

May 3 — Colby at Brunswick. 

May 6 — Boston College at Boston. 

May 7 — New Hampshire State College at Brunswick. 

May 10— U. of M. at Brunswick. 

May 14 — New Hampshire State College at Durham. 

May 17 — Williams at Williamstown. 

May 22 — Open. 

May 24 — Colby at Waterville. 

May 30 — Bates at Lewiston. 

June 6 — Bates at Brunswick. 

June 7 — U. of M. at Orono. 



IVY PLAY. 

The Masque and Gown has selected "A Pair 
of Sixes" as the play which they will present 
for the Ivy play this year. The cast has been 
selected and work has commenced. The cast 
follows : 

Coddles Edwards ' 1 9 

Thomas J. Vanderholt Kirke '20 

Tony Toler Lamb '20 

Krome Curtis '20 

Miss Sally Parker Battison '22 

Mr. Applegate Pendexter '2 1 

Miss Florence Cole Angus '19 

Mrs. George B. Nettletou Redman '21 

Office Boy Cook '20 



Shipping Clerk Rhodes '20 

George B. Nettleton Crockett '20 

T. Boggs Johns Asnault '20 

The rehearsals will commence at once. Parts 
for the play may be had at 20 North Winthrop. 

The Commencement play will be held as usual 
this year. The play has not been selected as 
yet but the selection of play and parts will be 
made in the near future. 



DESCRIPTION OF MARSHAL FOCH. 

The following account of meeting General 
Foch may be of interest to the readers of the 
Orient. The writer is one of younger graduates 
of the College. 

"I had my first and only sight of Foch at this 
club (Cercle Interallie) a few evenings ago. 
He and General Diaz and Admiral Fournier and 
a few other people dined here and stayed after 
dinner to talk. It was by an accident that I was 
here, listening for half an hour to the Marshal 
telling stories about the German armistice dele- 
gates and commenting on things generally. He 
made a great impression on me by his simplicity 
and modesty. He talked about the armistice quite 
unaffectedly as a personal triumph. One could 
see with what dissatisfaction he looked back on 
it. But there wasn't the least swank in his 
allusions to any of the incidents of which he was 
so large a part. In manner and bearing, there 
is very little in him that is "soldierly." He car- 
ries himself well but is not a ramrod, and his 
face and appearance suggest the man of affairs 
quite as much as the soldier. 

BOWDOIN MEN COMMENDED BY 
DIVISIONAL COMMANDERS. 

It is very interesting and pleasing to note 
that during the tour of Maine by General 
Clarence R. Edwards, recent commander of the 
26th Division, he paid high tribute to the ex- 
cellent work and extraordinary record of Lieut. 
Col. Sherman N. Shumway, Bowdoin '17, who 
was in his division. Mention of the career of 
this honored Bowdoin son was made by General 
Edwards in several addresses he made during 
the trip. It is also pleasing to note that Brigadier 
General Charles H. Cole of the 26th Division 
who landed in New York last week to prepare 
for the parade of the entire 26th Division in 
Boston the last of this month, in speaking of the 
achievements of the men in the division 
mentioned first the names of Lieut. Colonel Sher- 
man N. Shumway and Major William D. Ireland, 
Bowdoin '17, of the division. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Tuesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 

department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Elward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Vergil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 

Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Albert E. Hurrell, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
George O. Prout, 1921 Assistant Manager 



Vol. XLIX. APRIL 8, 1919. 



No. I 



Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

Back To Normal. 

The publication of the forty-ninth volume of 
the Orient of which this is the first number 
marks the beginning of a new era in the history 
of the college following the agitated period of 
the war. With the exception of the Civil War 
period, never since her founding in 1794 has 
Bowdoin College been called upon to meet such 
varied and perplexing problems of administra- 



tion and instruction as during the past two years. 

Ever since the day of the declaration of war 
with Germany, two years ago last Sunday, Bow- 
doin has been face to face with the problem of 
carrying on the college work with a sadly de- 
pleted student body and a depleted faculty; and 
Bowdoin has met the situation in an admirable 
manner. 

The college is now fairly well back to her 
pre-war condition. To be sure the curriculum is 
still experiencing many effects of the war but 
college life appears to be assuming a quite normal 
aspect. Social functions are again securing their 
due prominence in college life ; athletics are 
again being carried on with their pre-war vigor 
and prospects of winning teams are most promis- 
ing; the literary- life of the college is being 
happily revived with the resumption of the pub- 
lication of the Quill; and, what is pleasing to 
all Bowdoin men, fraternity life is back to 
normal with the opening of all the houses by 
the college to the fraternities and the renewal 
of the dining clubs. The fraternities are greatly 
indebted to the college authorities for the aid 
given to them during the trying period of the 
past year; and although complaints were numer- 
ous the fact remains that if it had not been for 
the taking over of the houses by the college, 
many of the fraternities would have had a hard 
row to hoe to maintain their existence. 

The aim of the student body should not be 
merely to bring college life back to normal, how- 
ever important that may be, but to make Bow- 
doin better than it was ever before. This can 
be best accomplished by a more devoted support 
of college activities in general, by a better col- 
lege spirit which means that every Bowdoin 
man shou d learn and be able to sing Bowdoin 
Beata, if he cannot now, and by working now 
for a class of 1923 which will surpass all other 
entering classes. 

It is of supreme importance in the support 
of college activities that every loyal Bowdoin 
man pay his blanket tax. In the past there has 
always been a certain number, sometimes large 
and othertimes small, who refuse to lend their 
support to CO lege activities by not paying their 
blanket tax. If this condition continues in the 
future it will become necessary to adopt some 
such system as advocated in the Amherst 
Student of March 20, whereby the tax would 
be made "compulsory and collected with the 
tuition fee of the college." Let us hope that 
this will never be necessary and that we can 
depend on the spirit of the student body more 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



than in the past for the financial support of our 
ultra-curriculum activities. 

A greater student support of the Orient 
would greatly improve our college life. One of 
the most important services of the college news- 
paper should be to act as the medium for student 
opinion on college problems. The Orient has 
not fully done this in the past and cannot do so 
in the future until the members of the student 
body cultivate the habit of submitting com- 
munications more freely. The policy of the 
Orient with regard to communications was 
stated in the issue of February i8 and has not 
changed in the least. 

The same support which is urged for the 
Orient should be lent to every other activity, 
whether social, athletic, dramatic, or what not. 
In the reaction which follows the period of 
stress through which we have just passed, let 
us not lose from sight what should be our true 
goal, — to make Bowdoin College the best college. 



THE MARCH QUILL. 

The Bowdoin Quill redivivus — Good! 

The Quill starts again after a suspension 
wholly creditable. There have been times during 
its career, one seems to recall, when the fate of 
another sort of suspension threatened it — of de- 
mise through negligence on the part of alumni 
with dollars (single, detachable dollars) and of 
undergraduates with literary brains. Such 
negligence — (would it be contributory, or non- 
contributory?) — ^has never proven fatal — a fact, 
surely, of fortunate augury ; and the Quill, as 
it resumes its career, has reason to congratulate 
itself alike on the honor of its continuance and 
the honor of its suspension, and to look ahead 
to the future confidently. 

It is a pleasure to see again the familiar cover, 
with its graceful medallion and the silhouette that 
speaks of a literary tradition in which the Col- 
lege rejoices. Familiarity had almost made us 
forget how permanently tasteful that cover de- 
sign is. And perhaps, too, familiarity had some- 
what dulled us to the sheer suitability of the 
very name "Quill." It is one of those inevitable 
names, like "Lancet," or "Lampoon," which re- 
main everlastingly happy. Name and format to- 
gether do all that name and format can to pros- 
per the cause of the Bowdoin literary monthly. 
May the Quill prosper as it deserves, from now 
on, uninterruptedly. 

One turns to the Table of Contents of the 
March number with unusual curiosity. Like 
every other institution the College has passed, 



within a twelve month, through strange experi- 
ences. There have been upheavals, great un- 
certainties and questionings, voyages, adventures, 
battles, high aspirations, heroic deeds. Like 
every other institution the College returns now 
to itself — or does it? Is the past ever to be 
possible again? Is the renewed Quill a novel 
mirror of martial vicissitude and reality, or is it 
still just the modest reflector of honest amateur 
enthusiasm for literature? 

It is both. That is the answer the reader 
gets to these questions. If he went no further 
than the greeting of the editors, with its touch- 
ing tribute to that fine spirit, Forbes Rickard, he 
would find how poignantly the Quill realizes 
the war. He goes on, however, to the informal 
record of the personal experience of Professor 
Davis at Plattsburg, a record, in part, of "homely 
detail," such as the historians may, or may not, 
crowd summarily into a footnote, and such as 
plain posterity will like to dip into, as we like 
to dip into the photographic history of the Civil 
war. Only in part, though, is it such a record: 
the "Faculty people" whom the recorder de- 
scribes must not be classed as "homely detail," 
and the phrases in which he describes them are 
too effective and vivid to be details — they are 
whole pictures. It is indeed to be hoped, and 
it will no doubt be brought about, that the Quill 
will publish more of the records of the experi- 
ence of Bowdoin men "who had the good 
fortune to take part in the war." 

Then, in the vein or strain that witnesses the 
unperturbed persistence of such an emulous feel- 
ing for letters, for books, for verse, as founded 
the Quill and kept it going for twenty years, 
there appear a sonnet, and another bit of verse; 
the carefully-studied retelling of somebody else's 
story; an appreciative comment on the poetry 
of Sara Teasdale; and a pleasant essay-in- 
miniature with the artful title, "A Middle-Class 
Journey." 

It it is mainly the function of the Quill to 
encourage undergraduate writing, it ought to be 
the main function of a reviewer to encourage 
the Quill. To do otherwise, indeed, appears 
almost as graceless a proceeding as to mention 
discords in connection with a volunteer choir. 
Certainly the editors of the Quill, and the con- 
tributors to it, deserve at all times that cordial 
recognition which should be regularly given to 
willing workers, but often is not so given. Per- 
haps the reviewer ought also — but no ! One is 
too glad to see the Quill back to mix or modify 
the welcome. H. E. A. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



RESULTS OF STUDENT ELECTIONS. 

The elections held at the close of last term 
showed the following results : Assistant man- 
ager of football, Willson '21 ; editor-in-chief of 
the Orient, Goodrich '20; managing editor, 
Haines '21. 



RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS. 



Resumption of Competitions, October, 1919 — 
Preliminary Announcement. 



1. Date: As announced recently through the 
press, appointments to Rhodes Scholarships in 
the United States, which were postponed for the 
duration of the war, will be resumed in October, 
1919. There will be elections in all states, and 
sixteen states, which, under normal conditions, 
would have appointed scholars both for 1918 and 
1919, will be allowed to appoint two scholars this 
year. These states are Alabama, Arkansas, Cali- 
fornia, Colorado, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Michi- 
gan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, 
Oregon, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin. Other 
states will elect one scholar each. 

2. General Regulations : The Rhodes will 
provides for two scholars constantly at Oxford 
from each state in the Union. Each scholar 
stays three years and receives a stipend of three 
hundred pounds a year, out of which he pays 
his tuition, fees, and expenses exactly as any 
other student. There are no restrictions as to 
the subjects which he should study; Rhodes 
scholars may take any of the various Oxford 
honor schools, or, if prepared, may work for 
the Oxford research degrees of B. Litt., B. Sc, 
B. C. L., or Ph. D. Candidates must be un- 
married, between the ages of nineteen and 
twenty-five, and must have completed at least 
their second year in college. Candidates may 
try for the appointment either from the state in 
which they reside or from that in which they 
have received the major part of their education. 

3. Abandonment of Qualifying Examination: 
The qualifying examination which has been re- 
quired of all candidates for Rhodes scholarships 
in the past is now to be abandoned and it will 
only be necessary for condidates to make formal 
application, endorsed by the authorities of their 
college or university. The selection will be made 
in the future, as in the past, on the basis of a 
man's record in school and college, according to 
the four points outlined in the Rhodes will; (i) 
scholarship, (2) character, (3) interest in out- 



door sports, and (4) interest in one's fellows 
and instincts for leadership. 

4. Method of Selection : The selections will 
be made by committees in each state, constituted 
for that purpose. A list of the names of the 
men to whom application should be made, to- 
gether with a formal application blank, will be 
printed in June and copies will be sent to any 
address upon application to Frank Aydelotte, 
American secretary to the Rhodes trustees, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. Meanwhile further questions con- 
cerning the scholarships should be addressed to 
any college president, or ex-Rhodes scholar, or 
to the American secretary. College presidents 
and ex-Rhodes scholars are asked to give the 
material of this announcement the widest pub- 
licity. 

Frank Aydelotte, 
American Secretary to the Rhodes Trustees. 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cam- 
bridge, Mass., March 17, 1919. 



STUDENT FORUM INAUGURAL AT 
BOWDOIN. 

On March 12 a student forum made its first 
appearance at Bowdoin. It is decidedly an in- 
novation, unless the lyceums or debating so- 
cieties of earlier days may be considered its 
forerunnners. The forum was fortunate in se- 
curing as its initial speaker, Robert Treat White- 
house of Portland, who spoke on the timely sub- 
ject of the League of Nations. Foulke '19 made 
a brief speech explaining the purposes of the 
■forum and introducing the speaker. Mr. White- 
house gave an interesting and instructive talk 
on the proposed league presenting arguments 
for and against it. The students present then 
accepted the opportunity of asking questions of 
the speaker. From the good attendance and the 
keen interest exhibited in the informal discus- 
sion it is evident that the forum is likely to prove 
a decided success here at Bowdoin. 



MANY STUDENTS BACK THIS TERM. 

The opening of the spring term has brought 
back many men who have been away in various 
branches of the service. Their return is a wel- 
come one inteed, and makes all the brighter the 
prospect of a quick "come back" of student 
activities here at college. The following men 
From the senior class : Clark, Farnham, Finn, 
have thus far registered at the college office. 
Freese, Higgins, Hurlin, Hutchinson, MacCor- 
mick, Mitchell, Norton, Savage, Smethurst, Spear 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



and Sturgis. Of the juniors: Adams, Avery, 
Grossman, Leach, Libby, Rollins and Gordon. 
Of the sophomores : Ghick, Eames, Goodwin, 
Hall, Holmes and Warren. 



H. D. EBERLEIN TALKS AT CHAPEL ON 
ITALY'S CLAIMS. 

At the first chapel exercises of the term, held 
Tuesday morning, April i, Mr. Harold Donald- 
son Eberlein of Philadelphia gave a very interest- 
ing talk concerning one of the most difficult 
questions before the Peace Conference at 
Versailles, the Italian problem. Mr. Eberlein 
began his lecture with a detailed explanation of 
Italy's attitude during the early days of the war, 
paying a high tribute to the loyalty and 
patriotism of the Italians. He then showed, on 
the basis of an elaborate and carefully con- 
structed argument, that the Dalmatian coast to- 
gether with the town of Fiume should rightfully 
be granted to Italy. Mr. Eberlein passed several 
months in Italy as a correspondent for important 
periodicals and is in a position to know her 
needs. He is also the author of several well- 
known books and is about to publish another on 
the matter described so clearly in his lecture. 



SPRING TRACK COMMENCES. 

. On Tuesday, the day college opened. Coach 
Magee issued a call for candidates for spring 
track. Since then a good number of men have 
been reporting every day. These include Cap- 
tain Cleaves '20, Foulke '19, Moses '20, Thom- 
son '21, all men of track experience, besides 
promising Freshman candidates. The squad 
will be materially strengthened by the addition 
of Caspar '19, discus thrower; Savage '19, 
hurdler, and sprint man, and Goodwin '21, mid- 
dle distance runner. Thus far the work has con- 
sisted of outdoor runs for conditioning. Later 
the candidates will train for the various events 
at Whittier Feld. Coach Magee is anxious to 
see a still larger number of men training, re- 
gardless of their previous track experience. 

Last Saturday at Waterville a conference vi^as 
held at which the officials for the Maine meet 
were selected. Among , those present were 
Managers Coates of Bates, Brown of Bowdoin, 
Drew of Colby, and Dingley of the University 
of Maine, Coaches French and Magee of the 
University of Maine and Bowdoin respectively. 
The officials selected are among the best in the 
East including George V. Brown of the B. A. A., 
H. C. McGrath, starter, and D. B. Osthues, clerk 
of course. 



A dual meet will be held with New Hamp- 
shire State College at Durham, May 3. The 
state meet will take place at Orono, May 27. 



NEW COURSES BEING OFFERED, 

The abnormal conditions here this year have 
made it advisable to offer a number of new 
courses for the accommodation of the men re- 
turning and also to complete work taken by men 
in the S.A.T.C. Professor Bell is offering a new 
course in Contemporary History and Politics. 
He is also offering certain revised courses in 
Government. Professor Meserve is to give a 
course in Geology, and Professor Cram has 
started one in Minerology. For the benefit of 
those men who started Physics at the beginning 
of the second term there is to be a special 
laboratory course under the direction of Mr. 
Hilton. Special courses in Calculus, Spherical 
Trigonometry and Surveying, have been added 
to the department of mathematics. Professors 
Catlin and McClean are to give courses on Pub- 
lic Finance and Corporations. There have also 
been several minor changes and adaptations in 
the courses dealing with the languages, art, 
economics and sociology. 



CALL FOR CANDIDATES FOB THE ORIENT 
BOARD. 

So far only two men have announced their 
intention of entering the competition for the 
Sophomore membership on the Orient Board. 
It does not seem to be generally understood that 
a man is selected for the Board every fall from 
the Sophomore class. The success of the Orient 
depends in large measure upon the quantity and 
quality of the competition that it encourages. 
Each fraternity should feel duty bound to send 
out one or more candidates this spring. 



CALENDAR. 

April 9 — Baseball, Bowdoin vs. Harvard, at 
Cambridge. 

April 10 — House parties held by the following 
fraternities : Delta Kappa Epsilon, Theta Delta 
Chi, Kappa Sigma, Zeta Psi, Delta Upsilon, and 
Psi Upsilon. 

April II — Sophomore Hop, Bowdoin Gym- 
nasium. 

April 12 — Glee Club Concert at Sanford, Me. 



©n tlie Campus 



As the snow disappears the crack of the bat 
is frequently heard on the Campus. 



8 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Professor Meserve will lecture at 10.30 Wed- 
nesday morning- in the chemistry lecture room. 
The lecture will be open to all students of the 
College. 

Blanket taxes are payable today and tomor- 
row at the manager's room in the gymnasium. 

The Orient will appear on Tuesday during 
the present term. 

John E. Burbank '96, of Freeman, Me., was 
on the Campus last Saturday. He was an in- 
structor in physics at Bowdoin from 1896 until 
1900. 

George S. Nevens ex-'i8. Dental Assistant, 
104th Field Hospital, loist Engineers, is ex- 
pected to arrive at his home in Brunswick with- 
in a few days. 

Rev. Norris A. Buncamper '19, has occupied 
the pulpit at the Kellogg Congregational Church 
at Harpswell Centre each Sunday for the last 
three weeks. One of the evening services was 
very interesting when the pastor took for his 
theme his home people in Southwest India. 

Ensign Noel C. Little '19, who is studying at 
the Harvard Graduate School, was on the 
Campus shortly before college opened. 

Lieut. Bela W. Norton '18 was on the Campus 
for a short time before the end of last term. 

Lieut. Perley S. Turner ex-' 19, Augusta, was 
on the Campus last week for a little while and 
was cordially greeted by the boys. 

Several of the ends seem almost deserted as a 
result of the influx this term of the upperclass- 
men to the fraternity houses. 

Seven men have reported to Manager Mc- 
Williams of the baseball team as candidates for 
assistant manager. They are Curran of the Psi 
U. House, Vose of the D. K. E. House, Barker 
of the T. D. House, Ridley of the D. U. House, 
King of the Sigma Nu House, Clymer of the 
Chi Psi House, and Merry of the Kappa Sig 
House. 

Several undergraduates, who left college to 
join the service and have recently been dis- 
charged, have returned for the third term. They 
are being cordially received by their classmates 
and the college as a whole. 

The Freshmen the past week have had an ex- 
cellent opportunity to display their ability at 
moving for their upper-classmen and at cleaning 
up the fraternity houses. 

Many of the boys assisted Mrs. Sills last week 
in entertaining a company of young ladies from 
Portland who spent the afternoon at the Presi- 
dent's home. 

Richard Cobb '22 made a trip during vacation 
to Camp Jackson, Columbia, South Carolina, to 



visit his brother, Captain Roland Cobb, Bowdoin 
'17, who has recently returned from France with 
a Southern division. Captain Cobb expects to 
be discharged soon now and upon his return 
North will visit the college. 

The Musical Clubs will go to Sanford this 
coming Saturday night, April 12, where they 
will give a concert under the auspices of a local 
church in that town. 

The Sophomore hop Friday night will be the 
first real college social function of the year. Two 
college dances were given the first term while 
the army regime was in order, but the affair 
Friday evening will mark the first social function 
after the college's return to a pre-war basis. 

Six fraternities will hold house dances Thurs- 
day night, prior to the Sophomore hop the fol- 
lowing evening. The fraternities are the Delta 
Upsilon, Psi Upsilon, Delta Kappa Epsilon, 
Kappa Sigma, Theta Delta Chi, and Zeta Psi. 

Ten men received straight "A" in all their 
courses this last term. Their names were read 
in chapel by President Sills the opening of the 
third term, a week ago last Tuesday. They are 
Foulke '19, Hilton '19, Goodrich '20, Hatch '21, 
Morrill '21, Morse '21, Prout '21, Simpson '22, 
Towle '22, Ham '22. 



Wiii^ tlje JFacuItp 

President and Mrs. Sills attended the debate 
on "The League of Nations" between between 
Senator Lodge and President Lowell at Boston 
last month. 

President Sills was notified March 17th by 
Secretary Daniels that President Wilson had for 
the third time appointed him a member of the 
Board of Visitors of the Naval Academy. The 
board is to meet at Annapolis on Monday, 
June 2. 

At the last meeting for the year of the Town 
and College Club, Professor Moody read an in- 
teresting paper on "Modern Aims in Teaching 
Mathematics." 

The quarterly milk inspection report for the 
town of Brunswick was recently submitted by 
Professor Gross. 

President K. C. M. Sills was in Boston Thurs- 
day, April 3, attending a banquet held at the 
Boston City Club, at which Donald B. MacMillan, 
Class of 1888, was the principal speaker. 

Captain P. W. Meserve, who has been in 
France for some time in connection with the 
American Gas Service, has returned and taken 
up his work in the chemistry department. 

Professor Woodrufif has recently visited 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Wheaton College. 

Professor Stanwood spent the spring vacation 
in Washington, D. C. 

Dean Nixon has been in Illinois during the 
spring vacation. 

Dr. Copeland went to Taunton, Mass., for the 
spring holidays. 

Mr. G. G. Wilder has been called home to 
Pembroke on account of the serious illness of 
his mother. 



3Iumni Botes 

'6i — Colonel Edward Simonton died at Wash- 
ington, D. C, January lo, 1919. He was born 
October 3, 1836, at Searsport, Maine. After 
graduating from Bowdoin in 1861, he enlisted 
in the 33rd Massachusetts Volunteers. In 1862, 
he received a commission as second lieutenant 
in the 20th Maine Volunteers. The following 
year he was promoted to the rank of captain. 
In 1865 he was made a Brevet Lieutenant- 
Colonel. A year later he was commissioned as a 
first lieutenant in 4th Infantry, U. S. A., and in 
1867, he became a Brevet Captain. In 1864 he 
had received the degree of Master of Arts from 
Bowdoin. After he left the army. Colonel 
Simonton went into law at St. Paul, Minnesota, 
until 1904, when he entered the United States 
Civil Service at Washington, which position he 
held until his death. 

'64 — Augustus Frost Libby died at his home 
in Summit, New Jersey, March 19, 1919. He was 
born November 16, 1841, at Limerick, Maine. 
After his graduation he received his Master's 
degree from Bowdoin in 1867. For forty years 
he was a merchant in New York City until 1906, 
when he retired from business and went to his 
last residence in New Jersey. 

'68 — Thomas Jefferson Emery died March 4, 
1919, at his home in Whitman, Maine, after a 
short illness. He was born at Poland, Maine, 
December 26, 1845. He was awarded a degree 
of Master of Arts from Boston University in 
1871, and later a degree of Bachelor of Laws 
from the same institution in 1877. From 1868 
until 1876 Mr. Emery taught in various Massa- 
chusetts high schools. From 1877 until very re- 
cently he has practiced law in Boston. He was a 
professor of law at Boston University from 1903 
to 1908. In 1909 he was elected as an overseer 
of Bowdoin College. Mr. Emery was a member 
of a number of Masonic bodies in Boston. He 
was also a member of the Boston School Com- 
mittee and of the City Council for a few years. 



'70 — The library received a notice several 
weeks ago of the death of Dr. Charles Turner 
Torrey, but no record has been found yet of 
the date of his death. Dr. Torrey was born at 
North Yarmouth, Maine, December 21, 1845. 
After graduating from Bowdoin he went to 
Columbia University, where he received a 
doctor's degree in 1873. Since that time, he has 
practised medicine at Naples, Maine, and at Yar- 
mouth. In 1889, he took up his residence at 
Plympton, Mass. Mr. Torrey was a member of 
the Zeta Psi fraternity. 

'70 — Dr. Edward Burbank Weston of Chicago, 
111., died September 14, 1918. He was born July 
31, 1846, at Auburn, Me. He received a degree 
of Master of Arts in 1873 from Bowdoin, and a 
doctor's degree from Rush Medical College the 
same year. Since that year he has practiced 
medicine at Lewiston, Me., Highland Park 111., 
and at Chicago. He was a member of the Alpha 
Delta Phi fraternity. 

'05 — Harold Russell Nutter died March 13, 
1919, in a Bangor hospital after an illness of ten 
weeks. He was born in Bangor July 13, 1882. 
Since his graduation he had been the treasurer 
of the Noyes and Nutter Manufacturing Co. He 
was a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fra- 
ternity. 

Medic '94 — Major William L. Haskell of Lew- 
iston, surgeon of the 54th Artillery (C. A. C.) 
A. E. F., who recently received his discharge 
after returning from several months' service 
overseas, on Sunday morning, March 16, was 
presented with a handsome silk service flag by 
the Men's Bible Class of the Pine Street Con- 
gregational Church, Lewiston. 

'12 — Captain Chester L. Clarke returned from 
France to his home in Portland in the last part 
of February. He had been in charge of a field 
hospital connected with the British Medical 
Corps. 



RESOLUTIONS. 



Hall of Gamma Chapter of Phi Chi: 

Gamma Gamma Chapter learns with deep re- 
gret the death of Brother Wilfrid Oliver Ber- 
nard of the Class of 1921. 

As a student, friend and advisor he was con- 
stant credit to the Fraternity and his loss is 
keenly felt among us. The Chapter extends its 
sympathy to his many friends and relatives. 
For the Chapter, 

William E. Hill. 
Daniel M. Mannix. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

UNION CANTEEN 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 

Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 

OFFICERS' SHOES 

TAN CALF AND CORDOVAN 

Spiral Puttees 

Army Boots 

AT 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 

DANCING 

MISS JENNIE S. HARVEY 
Evening Class and Assembly every 
Tuesday evening, Town Hall, Bruns- 
wick. Class at 7.30 p. m. Assembly 
at 8.30 p. m. Open to college students. 

Every Monday evening Class and Assembly at 
the Arcade, Bath. 

Private instruction by appointment. Phone 
Bath 151-W. Address 897 Middle street. 




IT WILL HELP ! 
SEND HER THE SAMPLER ! 

Chocolates and confections of 
a quality worthy of your card! 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 
TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 

BATH, MAINE 




WfiKLEi IH IN. DEVON 2i4 IN. 



ARROW 

COLLARS 

CLUETT. PEABODY II CO.. INC. MAKERS 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ANTIQVITY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

ffim jfurnttute, ©ID ffifiina, ©etottt, (Etc. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 
to orders for antique goods of any kind 

The Citizens Laundry 

BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short Notice by competent work- 
men. We use only the Best 
of Leather. 
E. WHITTOM 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 



We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16. 



J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The Bo^wdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



-t-i-<e: ^tore: op- f^rooress 

NEW SPRING 
SUITS, 

SHIRTS, 

SHOES, 
HATS 

The snappiest lines ever shown in 
Maine. 




FRANK M. LOW & CO. 
PORTLAND, - - MAINE. 



STUDENTS 

desiring to work an hour or more a day 
can make wages of more than $1.00 per 
hour selling America's War for 
Humanity and Life of Roosevelt. Send 
at once for free outfit, 

F. B. DICKERSON CO. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

enclosing 20c in stamps for mailing 
outfits. 

Telephone 160 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 



Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
A. G. PAGE COMPANY, Bath 




Cumberland Theatre 

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

THE IRON TEST 

— and — 

ENID BENNETT 

— in — 

FUSS AND FEATHERS 




FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

WILLIAM FAVERSHAM 

— in — 

THE SILVER KING 



PASTIME THEATRE 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

THE LION'S CLAW 

— and — 

BERT LYTELL 

— in — 
HITTING THE HIGH SPOTS 



Vol. XLIX. No. 2 



APRIL 15, 1919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



CONTENTS 




PAGE 


PAGE 


Harvard Held Until Ninth Inning 11 


Tennis Prospects Bright 


15 


House Dances Held On The 


Musical Clubs Visit Sanford 


15 


Campus 11 


Musical Clubs' Activities 


15 


Sophomore Hop 12 


Agreement for Co-operative Buy- 




Bowdoin 3, Cabots 2 13 


mg 


15 


Bowdoin Second Team Organized 13 


Errors in the Orient 


15 


Musical Men Must Pay Blanket 


On the Campus 


16 


Tax 13 


With the Faculty 


16 


Memorial Service for Lieut. Rob- 
inson '10 13 


Alumni Notes 


17 


Editorials: 


Calendar 


19 


Sophomore Hop 14 


Resolutions 


19 


Scholarship Aid 14 


Let's Clean It Up 


19 


Alumni News 14 













BOWDOIN ORIE^fT 



Just to let the boys "Over There" know JUD is in the game. 







LEWISTON JOURNAL 
PRINTSHOP 


Think It Over 

The trend of modern conditions makes 
a knowledge of law necessary to the heads 
of all great industrial enterprises. 

Whether a young man contemplates fol- 
lowing the legal profession, or whether he 
hopes to head any great industrial or- 
ganization, he will find a legal training of 
utmost value to him in after life. 

The forward-looking youth lays his plans 
now for future success. The study of law 
is one great essential to this end. 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

Gives a thorough training in the principles 
of law. Course for LL.B. requires 3 years. 
Men preparing for college or business, 
who wish to plan ahead in selecting a 
school of law, should address, for catalog, 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 


BOOK AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING 


School and College Work a Specialty 


12 Lisbon Street, Lewiston, Maine 


LARGEST AND BEST 

stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 




CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 




ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 


CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 


4 Elm Street 


WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 


MESERVE'S FRUIT SHERBET 

The Blended Product of the Natural Juices of 
Sound Ripe Fruit and Berries. A Delicious and 
Healthful Beverage for Receptions, Teas and 
Parties. Prepared only by 

P. J. MESERVE, Pharmacist, 

Near Post OflSce, Brunswick, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE NATIONAL SURVEY CO. 

MAP MAKERS PUBLISHERS 

Summer positions for college men. Application blanks 
may be obtained of "CF" ALBERT, '19, 

3 South Maine. 

TOPOGRAPHICAL OFFICES 
CHESTER, VERMONT 



SPRING STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

John A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULES BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 

A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BEOWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office - - Brunswick, Maine 



BUTLER'S 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSON'S PHARMACY 



PRINTING 



OF QUALITY 

WB AIK TO PLBA8S 

WHEELER'S 

TOWS BUILDIKO BBCKSWICK 



The College Book Store 

ABBA FATHER 

by the late President Wm. DeWitt 
Hyde is an excellent book for every 
Bowdoin man to own. 

This book has been out of print for 
the last year, the first edition having 
been completely exhausted. 

We now have a new lot to sell at 
35c each. 

THE SUPPLY IS LIMITED. 

Ask to see our 50 cent 

EXPANDING BOOK RACK 

A new lot of 

WATERMAN'S SELF FILLERS 

have just arrived. 

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BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 15, 1919 



NO. 2 



HARVARD HELD UNTIL NINTH INNING. 

At Cambridge last Wednesday, Bowdoin made 
the best showing against the Harvard baseball 
nine since her defeat of the latter in 1907. The 
contest was a hard fight from start to finish, 
and was not decided until the very last inning. 
Flinn, pitching for the first time in a college 
game, gave a splendid exhibition against the 
university team. Besides holding Harvard to 
seven hits, the Bowdoin pitcher hit the ball on 
the nose twice, getting one clean single and a 
base on balls out of three times at bat. In the 
field he accepted seven chances without an error. 

Bowdoin played somewhat better ball in the 
field than her opponent, being charged with two 
less errors than Harvard. As for individual 
fielding, Donnell and Cook did well for Bowdoin 
and McLeod and Emmons for Harvard. 

Emmons and Frothingham of Harvard de- 
livered the most telling hits of the game while 
Flinn did the best work at the bat for Bowdoin. 

In the first inning,- Donnell started the game 
by reaching first on an infield error, stole second, 
and scored the first run on a clean single by Finn. 
Harvard tied the score in its half when Emmons 
singled and was forced in as a result of three 
bases on balls. Bowdoin took the lead again 
in the second when Prosser, Grover, and Fliim 
singled in succession, and Donnell walked. Flinn 
settled down somewhat after the first inning, but 
Harvard scored in the fourth on a single by 
Perkins and a triple by Frothingham. In the 
fifth Harvard scored an unearned run, when 
Evans crossed the plate with the aid of a bad 
error by Finn. Bowdoin squared matters again 
in the eighth by means of a couple wild throws. 
Donnell reached second when the Harvard 
pitcher heaved the ball over Frothingham's head, 
and then scored when the first baseman threw 
the ball beyond Perkins in an attempt to get the 
Bowdoin man at third. Harvard finally took 
the game in the ninth when Stillman doubled. 
The Crimson catcher left the game and Baldwin 
went in to run for him. The latter took third 
on a sacrifice and scored on a timely hit by 
Emmons. Cook '20, was hit in the elbow by a 
pitched ball, but finished the game. He has been 
unable to practice for the last week, but expects 



to play in the Bates game. 

This game is a most satisfactory start for the 
season and it augurs well of future success in 
the Maine series and other games. Following 
is the summary : 

BOWDOIN. 



HARVARD. 

- ab r bh po a 

Evans, c.f 4 112 

Emmons, SS..4 1 2 6 2 

Gross, l.f 3 10 

Jones, r.f 4 

McLeod, 2b.. 3 1 3 
Perkins, 3b.. 3 1 2 1 5 
Froth'h'm, lb.4 1 12 
Stiliman, c..3 1 3 4 
Johnson, p. . . 4 1 2 
*Baldwin ...01000 



ab r bh po a 

) Donnell, 3b.. 3 2 1 2 2 

. Cook, 2b 4 2 5 

) Finn, ss 4 13 1 

0|Caspar, lb.. 4 12 

Racine, c.f.. 4 10 
2 Hall, c 4 3 

1 Prosser, r.f.. 4 1110 

Grover, l.f... 3 13 

1 Flinn, p 2 10 7 



32 4 7 27 16 5 32 3 6 27 15 3 

Innings 123456789 

Harvard 10011000 1 — i 

Bowdoin 11000001 — 3 

Two-base hit, Stillman ; three-base hit, Frothingham. 
Stolen bases, Emmons, Jones, Donnell, Caspar. Sacrifice 
hits, Evans, Emmons. Bases on balls, off Johnson 2, off 
Flinn 4. Struck out, by Flinn 3, by Johnson 2. Double 
plays, Emmons to Stillman to Emmons : Donnell to Cook to 
Caspar. Earned runs. Harvard 3, Bowdoin 2. Time, Ih 
50m. Umpire, D. Barry. 

*Ran for Stillman in the 9th. 



HOUSE DANCES HELD ON THE CAMPUS. 

The following fraternities held dances Thurs- 
day evening. A brief account of each dance 
follows. 

Kappa Sigma. 

W. E. Chandler's Orchestra played for an 
order of 20 dances in the Union. The patronesses 
were Mrs. Frank A. Hilton and Mrs. W. E. 
Chandler. The committee was F. A. Hilton '19 
K. B. Coombs '20, and W. L. Parent '21. Among 
those present were the Misses Frances Glover, 
Mary Moore, Mary Blakey, Ruth Merritt, Ruth 
Warren, Marion Johnson of Portland; Erma 
Emerson, Mildred Corey, Evelyn Brown of 
Auburn; Maybelle Beach, Mary Allen, Eveleen 
Priest of Brunswick; Jeannette Henderson of 
Boston; Madeleine W^itham of Springvale; 
Marion McLoon and Flora Gray of Rockland. 



12 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Psi Upsilon. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Frank W. Lamb of 
Portland, Mrs. Atherton N. Hunt of Braintree, 
Mass., and Mrs. Charles T. Burnett of Bruns- 
wick. The committee in charge was Johnson '19 
(chairman), Lamb '20, Willson '21, and Free- 
man '22. The Colonial Orchestra of Portland 
furnished music for an order of 24 dances. 
Among those present were the Misses Ellen 
Baxter, Helen Files, Doris Hayes and Lois 
Haskell, of Brunswick; Elizabeth Freeman, 
Margery Lamb, Marion Legrow, Len Broeck 
Jackson and Mildred Kingsley, Gertrude Schon- 
land and Alice Hutchinson of Portland; Elice 
Cain, Dorothy Blethen and Alsy Hemenway of 
Rockland; Gertrude Redicker of Calais; Mar- 
garetta Marshall of Waterville, and Gladys 
Bryant of Braintree, Mass.; Margaret Hanson 
of Bath, and Dorothy Belch of Marshall Town, 
Iowa. 

Delta Upsilon. 

The patronesses were Mrs. William H. Davis, 
Mrs. Joseph S. Stetson and Mrs. R. P. Bodwell 
all of Brunswick. Chandler's four piece or- 
chestra of Lewiston furnished the music for an 
informal dance. The committee was Paul '19 
(chairman). Mason '20, Dudgeon '21, and Thal- 
heimer '22. The guests were the Misses Eliza- 
beth Sawyer of Brookline, Mass.; Hazel Bosch 
of Brockton, Mass. ; Martha Ford of Gloucester, 
Mass.; Marion Goss of Needham, Mass.; Vir- 
ginia Ralph of Northeast Harbor; Katherine 
Drummond of Waterville; Katherine Goodwin 
of Saco; Christine Atwood of Sabattus; Blanch 
Plummer and Caroline Jordan of Lewiston; 
Evelyn Granes of Freeport; Harriet Jackson of 
Bath ; Stella Haskett, Helen Emmons, and Isabel 
Pollard of Brunswick. 

Theta Delta Chi. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Wilmot B. Mitchell, 
Mrs. Alaric Haskell, and Mrs. William Porter, 
all of Brunswick. The committee was Curtis '20, 
McPartland '20, and Pickard '22. Holbrook's 
orchestra furnished the music. The guests were 
the Misses Grace Ronan, Dorchester, Mass.; 
Marian Conley, Ruth Cobb, Ethel Pierce, Eleanor 
Russell, Margaret Haynes, Jeanette Beckett, 
Caroline James, Marion Conley and Mary Town- 
send of Portland; Ida Mae Watterson of Rock- 
land; Pauline Perkins and Eleanor Home, 
Wellesley; Florence Barker and Alice 
Sheehan, Biddeford; Ruth Buckner, Marjorie 
Southack, Dorothy Fletcher and Marjorie 
Stewart, Boston; Emily Baxter, Elizabeth Nash 
and Burdean Stevenson, Brunswick; Ethelyne 



Peabbles, Old Orchard, and Gladys Willey, Saco. 
Zeta Psi. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Arthur Brown, Mrs. 
Lee D. McClean and Mrs. F. W. Chandler. 
Lewis' orchestra of Portland furnished the music. 
The committee was Colter '19, Zeitler '20, and 
Woodward '21. Among those present were the 
Misses Martha Warren, Cumberland Mills; 
Katherine Dow and Dorothy Dow of Portland; 
Dorothy Films, Auburn ; Dorothy Ludlenn, New 
York; Beulah Crozier, Rockland; Isabel Hutton, 
Helen Colby and Sarah Wheeler of Brunswick. 
Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

A reception was held the afternoon preceding 
the dance at which representatives of each fra- 
ternity were present. The patronesses were Mrs. 
K. C. M. Sills, Mrs. Lewis A. Burleigh, Augusta; 
Mrs. Herbert L. Lowell, Skowhegan. The com- 
mittee was L. W. Doherty '19, C. P. Rhoades '20, 
and Alexander Standish '21. The music for the 
afternoon was furnished by Lov ell's orchestra, 
for the evening by Kelly's orchestra, and for the 
final dance of the house party Saturday evening 
by the Colonial orchestra of Portland. Among 
those present were the Misses Charlotte Thomas, 
Alice McCrum, Margaret Clark, Portland; Mil- 
dred Ford and Mary Sturtivant, Boston; Vema 
Greenleaf, Auburn; Louise Wakefield and Bea- 
trice Straw of Augusta; Harriet Medlicet, Cam- 
bridge, Mass.; Lenora Thompson, Sanford; 
Mary Dennis, Madison, Wis.; Helen Getchell, 
Waterville; Marian Williams, Houlton; Molly 
Blunt, Margaret Patton and Doris Gower, Skow- 
hegan; Senath Bassett, Worcester, Mass.; Min- 
nie Norrell, Caribou; Priscilla Webster, Bangor; 
Alice Zepfles, Needham, Mass.; Doris Holmes, 
Waverly, Mass.; Mary Briggs and Marjorie 
Mathes, Wellesley; Helen Johnson, Springfield, 
Mass.; Virginia Averill, Oldtown; Lieut. Col. 
and Mrs. Roy L. Marston. 



THE SOPHOMORE HOP. 

The annual Sophomore Hop, the first formal 
dance of the present college year, was held in 
the Gymnasium last Friday night. It was an 
unusually successful affair, one of the largest in 
years. The decorations of the hall and the 
various booths were also especially attractive. 
The Mystic Orchestra of Lewiston under the 
leadership of Henry Sprince '19 furnished ex- 
cellent music for the order of twenty-four 
dances. 

The patronesses were: Mrs. Kenneth C. M. 
Sills, Mrs. Frank E. Woodruff, Mrs. William A. 
Moody, Mrs. Charles C. Hutchins, Mrs. Frank 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



13 



N. Whittier, Mrs. Wilmot B. Mitchell, Mrs. 
Charles T. Burnett, Mrs. Roscoe J. Ham, Mrs. 
Frederic W. Brown, Mrs. William H. Davis, 
Mrs. Manton Copeland, Mrs. Orren C. Hormell, 
Mrs. Lee D. McClean, Mrs. Gerald G. Wilder, 
Mrs. Samuel B. Furbish, Mrs. Edward H. Wass, 
Mrs. Alfred O. Gross, Mrs. George R. Elliott, 
Mrs. George T. Files, Mrs. Rhys D. Evans, and 
Mrs. Frederic S. Nowlan. 

The committee in charge consisted of Wilfred 
L. Parent '21, chairman, Walter J. Rich, Jr., '21, 
John E. Woodward '21, and Harold A. Dudgeon 



BOWDOIN 3, CABOTS 2. 

Last Saturday the Bowdoin nine defeated the 
local team from the Cabot mill in a practice game 
by the score of 3 to 2. The Cabots held Bow- 
doin to a much lower score than was expected, 
especially after Bowdoin's performance against 
Harvard. Flinn pitched six innings and allowed 
four hits, two of which were of the scratchy 
order. Tuttle twirled the last three innings, al- 
lowing only one hit, which did not affect the 
score at all. The Bowdoin team secured eleven 
clean hits off "Babe" Charron. Both teams were 
rather weak on the defence, the Cabots making 
six errors, and Bowdoin one less. Hall took 
the batting honors for Bowdoin and Hutchins 
for the locals, each securing three singles apiece. 
Finn and Prosser also did creditable work at 
the bat. 

Both teams got their first scores in the sixth 
inning. In the first half. Small '19 struck out, 
and then Zeitler '20, landed on one for a three- 
base hit to deep centre. Hutchins then came 
through with a clean single to left and Zeitler 
tallied. For Bowdoin, Clifford led off with a 
long double to centre, but was put out when he 
tried to stretch it to a triple. Hall singled clean- 
ly to left and went to second on Holmes' sacri- 
fice to the pitcher. Prosser drove out a single to 
centre, and Hall scored when the ball went 
through McKenney, while Prosser got around to 
third. Grover ended the inning with a fly to 
Smith. 

In the seventh each team scored again. For 
the Cabots, Comee walked and took second on 
Tuttle's wild pitch. McKenney fanned and 
Lavoie was retired on a grounder to Clifford, 
while Comee went to third. Joe Smith drove a 
grounder through Donnell, scoring the Cabot 
catcher. In Bowdoin's half. Coombs singled with 
two out, and took second on Finn's hit. Clifford 
hit a grounder which went through Hutchins and 



Coombs scored. Hall was retired on a foul tip to 
Comee, ending the inning. 

In the ninth inning the Cabots filled the bases 
with two out, but Zeitler failed to connect with 
the ball for the third time in the contest, and the 
Cabots' last chance was gone. After two Bow- 
doin men had been disposed of Coombs reached 
first on Small's error, and then scored the win- 
ning run on Finn's double to centre. 

Bowdoin played a much looser game Saturday 
than against Harvard three days before, but on 
the other hand several substitutes were used. 
Although Bates defeated Harvard 9 to 7 last 
week, there is no reason to worry over the com- 
ing State series, because in that game Harvard 
used not only two substitute infi elders but also 
three second string pitchers, and then outhit the 
Lewiston aggregation almost two to one. 

BOWDOIN SECOND TEAM ORGANIZED. 

For the first time in several years, the Bow- 
doin second team will have considerable im- 
portance. It is to be regarded more as a sep- 
arate club than as a minor part of the varsity 
squad. A captain will be elected in the near 
future, and a schedule will be completed. Two 
games have been already arranged; the first 
with Morse High on May 24, and the second 
with Hebron Academy on May 28. 



MUSICAL MEN MUST PAY BLANKET TAX. 

By a vote of the Board of Managers and the 
Student Council, members of the musical clubs 
must pay their blanket tax before they can rep- 
resent the college on such organizations. This 
action was taken in view of the fact that while 
the clubs receive no appropriation from the 
student body they are as much representatives 
of the college as the men on the athletic teams 
and as such should be compelled to support stu- 
dent organizations as a whole. 



MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR LIEUTENANT 
ROBINSON '10. 

A memorial service was held for Lieut. War- 
ren Eastman Robinson, Company C, I02d Ma- 
chine Gun Battalion, at the Church of the New 
Jerusalem on Bowdoin street (Boston, Mass.) 
last Sunday. Lieut. Robinson took part 
in all the major battles of the 26th Division, at 
Chauteau Thierry, St. Mihiel and the last great 
battle on the Meuse, in which action he fell. He 
was twice cited in division orders for gallantry 
in action. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Tuesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 

department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Albert E. Hurrell, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
George O. Prout, 1921 Assistant Manager 



Vol. XLIX. APRIL IS, 1919 



No. 



Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

The Sophomore Hop. 

The attendance at the Sophomore Hop last 
Friday night evinced a most commendable spirit 
on the part of the student body. At very few 
college dances in recent years have the students 
responded so heartily. The music was also ex- 
ceptionally good. It is seldom that criticism is 
offered on account of liberality in giving en- 
cores, but if a definite time limit is to be set for 



the closing of the dance, it seems that a time 
limit should be set for each number so that the 
entire order of dances may be completed. 

It is regrettable that through some misunder- 
standing, may we hope it was that, proper means 
of conveyance were not provided for all the 
chaperons. This error of omission may be sub- 
ject to pardon if the facts were known but it 
should be a warning to committees in the future 
to see that sufficient carriages are provided for 
the patronesses. 



Scholarship Aid. 

Last week scholarship aid to the amount of 
over ten thousand dollars was awarded to needy 
and deserving students in college. This aid is 
greatly appreciated by the students, to be sure, 
but with no outward expression of their ap- 
preciation to those who awarded the aid and 
to whom they are largely indebted for it. Presi- 
dent Sills' comment on the subject in chapel last 
Sunday was certainly to the point. We owe 
it to ourselves to make some expression of thanks 
for the liberal aid which we receive in college, 
thanks to Bowdoin's heavy endowment. 

This aid, while it is not given in the spirit 
of a loan which must be paid within a certain 
time, should encourage all students who receive 
it and, in fact, make them feel morally bound 
to contribute in some way or other in later life 
to the well-being of the college in some material 



Alumni News. 

To us in college the news items of the Orient 
may not seem very interesting as most of the 
news is of what we do and therefore of what we 
already know. It serves rather as a record of 
college life which may be more interesting to 
read in the future than now. To the alumni, 
however, the Orient serves a distinct purpose 
both in conveying to them college happenings, 
and, what is perhaps more important, in acquaint- 
ing them with what other alumni are doing 
through the aluimii notes. It is very essential 
therefore to a wide circulation of the paper 
among the alumni that the alumni column be 
given more careful attention and due prominence. 
All readers of the Orient are urged to send all 
news items about Bowdoin alumni which come 
to their attention to the managing editor. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



15 



TENNIS PROSPECTS BRIGHT. 

From the present forecast the tennis prospects 
for the coming season are very bright. Captain 
Chin, only letter man of last year's team, will 
prove the mainstay of the team this year. He 
will be ably backed up by Mitchell '19, who just 
returned to college from service in Naval 
Aviation. He was a veteran player prior to his 
enlistment and will doubtless be seen in action 
this spring. Sawyer '19, Burr '20, and Partridge 
'22 are also out for the team. All these men are 
good players having had previous experience at 
the game. When the call for candidates for the 
team is sounded, which is expected to be very 
soon, several other men are expected to respond 
and with such a nucleus to work on it is ex- 
pected that a winning combination will be de- 
veloped. 

Manager Hall '20 of the tennis team is now 
arranging the schedule for the season. The 
opening match of the season will be at the Long- 
wood Courts, Boston, the week of May 11, when 
the New , England Intercollegiate Tournament 
will be played. Following that will come the 
Bowdoin Interscliolastic Tournament which will 
be staged here at the college. May 9 and 10. All 
the high schools and preparatory schools of the 
State will be invited to compete. Following in 
order will be the Maine Intercollegiate Tourna- 
ment which will be entertained here this year 
on the dates of May 22, 23, 24. This will take 
in the four Maine colleges. A dual tournament 
is pending with Bates College, but the date as 
yet has not been settled. 



MUSICAL CLUBS VISIT SANFORD. 

Last Saturday evening the Musical Clubs en- 
tertained a large audience at the Sanford Town 
Hall. The concert was given under the auspices 
of the Universalist Church of that town. A ban- 
quet was tendered the members of the clubs 
after the performance. Dancing followed till 
midnight. 



MUSICAL CLUB ACTIVITIES. 

Monday evening, April 21, has been set as the 
date for the annual appearance in Brunswick 
of the Bowdoin Musical Clubs. The concert will 
be given in the Town hall, and dancing will fol- 
low. The fact that the concert comes directly 
after Easter will draw a large crowd. The clubs 
this year are exceptionally good. They contain 
excellent material both in the clubs and the 
special numbers. Tickets for the concert will be 



fifty cents plus the war tax and may be obtained 
from Manager McGorrill of the clubs. 

On Wednesday night. May 23, the clubs will 
go to Portland en route to Boston, and give their 
annual concert in the Forest City at Frye hall. 
The concert is under the auspices of the Beta 
chapter of Delta Epsilon, a popular club in Port- 
land. On the next day they will go to Boston 
for the Boston concert held each year at the 
Somerset Hotel under the direction of the Bow- 
doin Club of Boston. They will go to Beverly 
from Boston, where a big affair is being planned 
under the auspices of the Beverly Singing Club. 
The clubs will render their concert in conjunc- 
tion with the Beverly Singing Club, following 
which a formal reception and dance will be 
tendered to the Bowdoin men. 



AGREEMENT FOR CO-OPERATIVE BUYING. 

A Co-operative Buyers' Association, embrac- 
ing all duly organized fraternities of Bowdoin 
College, is being strongly agitated on the Campus 
just now. The purpose of such a co-operative 
plan is to- save money in buying food stuffs under 
one head, which will curtail to a large degree 
the over-head expenses in running the dining 
rooms. 

Such a system has been agitated here at the 
college for several years and has been strongly 
favored, but it has lacked the initiative to put it 
through. Since the college has turned back the 
fraternity houses to the different chapters, the 
need for such a system became acute, because 
it was seen that at the present prices of goods, 
it was next to impossible to run the several 
dining rooms and make them a paying propo- 
sition. 

A tentative agreement has been drawn up for 
such an association by some of the stewards and 
other parties interested. A meeting of the 
stewards was held recently at which this matter 
was discussed and those present were strongly 
in favor of such a plan. Others who were not 
present expressed their endorsement of the mat- 
ter. At that meeting it was decided to submit 
the matter to each fraternity for endorsement 
at their meetings and for each fraternity to give 
his steward, who is to be the duly elected rep- 
resentative from that chapter, authority to act 
in their behalf at the next meeting. This meet- 
ing will decide whether or not this matter goes 
through. 



ERRORS IN THE LAST ORIENT. 

Attention is called to the fact that credit 



16 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



should have been given to Captain Bell rather 
than Captain Meserve for making a tentative 
constitution for the League of Nations, errone- 
ously stated in the last Orient. The Orient 
requests that its readers call mistakes of this 
nature to the attention of the managing editor 
so that he may set them aright as far as possible. 



Dn tDe Campu$ 

Lieut. Willard A. Savage ex-'i8, Plymouth, 
Mass., is back on the Campus after a ten months' 
experience in the service. 

First Lieut. William E. Walker ex-'i8, Castine, 
returned to college last week, being discharged 
from service April i. 

Alden '21, president of the Rifle Club, is en- 
deavoring to arrange a match with the newly 
organized University of Maine team. The Bow- 
doin team will play off a match with the Third 
Maine at the Armory, Brunswick, at an early 
date. 

Quite a number of the boys aided in putting 
out the forest fire on the Bath road last Tues- 
day afternoon. By the time the Brunswick fire 
department was on hand the fire was well under 
control. 

John S. Crowley and Clarence H. Lunt of 
Beverly, Mass., in charge of the concert and re- 
ception of the Bowdoin Musical Clubs in 
Beverly, April 25, which is to be under the 
auspices of the Beverly Singing Club, were on 
the Campus last Tuesday afternoon and attended 
the rehearsals of the Mandolin and Glee Clubs. 

Mitchell ex-' 19, returned to college from ser- 
vice last week. 

The usual spring house cleaning has been 
taking place at the different fraternity houses, 
especially last week in preparation for the sev- 
eral house parties. The lawns have been raked, 
and bonfires to get rid of the old debris have 
been numerous. 

Eleven men besides Ben Houser, coach, and 
McWilliams '20, manager, took the Harvard trip 
in connection with the Harvard-Bowdoin game 
played last Wednesday. Those men were F. Hall 
'19, Caspar '19, Cook '20, Finn '19, Donnell '19, 
Keith Coombs '20, Racine '19, Prosser '20, 
Grover '19, Mason '20, and Flinn '22. The team 
left on the early train Wednesday morning. 

Captain Philip W. Meserve, professor of 
chemistry and recently returned from service, 
gave a special lecture to chemistry (c) class and 
others interested in the Chemistry Lecture Room 
last Wednesday at the 10.30 period. The subject 
of the lecture was "Gas Warfare." The room 



was filled with students, professors and invited 
friends. 

Cleaves '20 of the Alpha Delta Phi House has 
assumed the agency for the caps and gowns to be 
worn by the Juniors at the Ivy exercises and by 
the Seniors at Commencement. 

Last week, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, 
was the time set for the payment of the blanket 
taxes for the coming term. 

By vote of the Student Council at its meeting 
held last week, Monday evening, a loving cup 
will be given to Lieut. Col. John H. Duval, 
U.S.A., former commanding officer of unit of the 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps here at the col- 
lege, by the students of the college in apprecia- 
tion of the excellent work and service he rend- 
ered in aiding the boys to get into Plattsburg. 

Ray Swift '17, Augusta, was on the Campus 
last Wednesday night. 

Lieut. Charles A. Haggerty ex-'20, Webster, 
Mass., pilot in Air Service, has returned to col- 
lege from service. 

Lee Webber '16, Augusta, was on the Campus 
last Friday and attended the Sophomore Hop. 

An announcement has been recently made of 
the engagement of Miss Doris McGuiness of 
Brunswick and Burchard K. Look '20. 

Ensign Hugh A. Mitchell of the United States 
Naval Aviation Force, returned home April 6th 
from Pensacola, Fla., having been placed on the 
inactive list. He has been stationed at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, at Akron, 
Ohio, at Rockaway Beach, Long Island, and at 
Pensacola. He has resumed his college courses 
this term. 

Lieut. Col. Roy L. Marston '99 of Skowhegan, 
Me., was on the Campus over the week end. 

Barton ex-' 19 was in town to attend the Sopho- 
more Hop. 

Morrison '19, who has been stationed in Zanes- 
ville, Ohio, with the Chemical Warfare Depart- 
ment of the Army has returned to colleg'e. 

Major William D. Ireland '17 and Captain 
Roland H. Cobb '17 were on the Campus recently. 



Wiitb tt)e JFacuItp 

Dean Nixon has been out of town this week 
visiting Fairfield High School, Coburne Classical 
Institute, and Waterville High School. 

Mr. Neal Tuttle who has been an assistant in 
the Chemistry department for the term just 
passed has left Bowdoin for Harvard College 
where he will prepare for Oxford. Mr. Tuttle 
is the winner of the Rhoades Scholarship and 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



17 



will probably enter Oxford next year. 

Professor Burnett has purchased the house ad- 
jacent to the Alpha Delta Phi House on Maine 
street and expects to move in by the first of May. 

Dean Thayer of the Medical School was in 
Brunswick last Wednesday. 

Professor Ham spent the week end in Boston. 



aiumni jQotesi 

'65 — The death of a man who has been promi- 
nent for over fifty years in Maine politics oc- 
curred April 7, 1919. Hon. Joseph Eugene 
Moore was born at Lisbon, Me., March 14, 1841. 
Three years after his graduation he received the 
degree of Master of Arts, and was also admitted 
to the bar. Mr. Moore served three terms in the 
Maine House of Representatives; the first in 
1878, the second in 1883, and the last in 1885. 
In 1880 he was one of the Maine delegates at the 
Democratic National Convention in Cincinnati. 
Four years later he was an alternate at the con- 
vention held in Chicago. Under President Cleve- 
land, he was the collector of customs for the 
Waldoboro district. In 1883 he was a member 
of a commission which revised the statutes of 
Maine. From 1896 until his death Mr. Moore 
was an overseer of Bowdoin College. He was a 
member of the Psi Upsilon and Phi Beta Kappa 
fraternities. 

Medic '84 — Dr. Frederic Carroll Heath of In- 
dianapolis, Ind., died October 16, 1918. He was 
born at Gardiner, Maine, January 19, 1857. He 
graduated from Amherst College in 1878, and 
received a Master's degree from that institution 
in 1886, two years after his graduation from the 
Bowdoin Medical School. Dr. Heath was Acting 
Assistant Surgeon at the U. S. Marine Hospital 
Service in Portland from 1884 to 1886. After 
that, he was Assistant Surgeon at Chicago until 
1887, and then at Detroit until 1890. Until 1892, 
he was a practicing physician at Lafayette, Ind., 
after which he went to Indianapolis. Dr. Heath 
was now appointed Clinical Professor on Di- 
seases of the Eye at Indiana University. From 
1910 until 191 1 he served as president of the 
Indiana Medical Association. 

Ex-'9i — Col. Edmund M. Leary, commanding 
the 35th Infantry, 90th Division, U.S.A., has been 
awarded the distinguished service cross and cited 
for bravery. Col. Leary entered Bowdoin in 1887 
but left college in the spring of 1888 to enter the 
United States Military Academy at West Point, 
graduating in the spring of 1892 as second lieu- 
tenant of cavalry. In 1901 he was made a cap- 



tain and assigned to the nth Cavalry, whence 
he was assigned to the 9th Cavalry on the Border. 
He was later promoted to lieutenant-colonel in 
the I2th Cavalry and later was ordered to the 
90th Division as a colonel. When sent across, 
he was in command of the 35th Infantry, a fight- 
ing unit. 

'95 — Major George C. Webber of Auburn re- 
cently returned from Chicago, where the mem- 
bers of his battalion had presented him with a 
loving cup bearing the following inscription: 
"Presented to Major George C. Webber in ap- 
preciation by the men of the Fifth Anti-Air 
Craft Machine Gun Battalion, March 26, 1919." 
Below this inscription is engraved the insignia 
adopted by the battalion. This is called the "Red 
Devil," and it represents a German soldier with 
an arrow piercing his body. The vase is gold- 
lined and is nearly two feet high. Major Webber 
has had many exciting experiences during his 
time of service in France. In a recent issue of 
the Lewiston Journal he is quoted as making this 
striking statement, "France is poorer only in 
blood and men, but aside from that, is richer 
than ever before in all her history." 

'98 — In the New York Times of April 4th, 
there appeared a citation of Major Thomas L. 
Pierce, of the 325th Infantry. The notice in the 
Times is as follows : "The Commander-in-Chief, 
in the name of the President, has awarded the 

Distinguished Service Cross to Major 

Thomas L. Pierce, 325th Infantry, for extra- 
ordinary heroism in action near St. Juvin, be- 
tween Oct. II and 14. Although suffering from 
a machine gun bullet wound, he refused to go to 
an aid station, but remained in personal com- 
mand of his battalion during the action. Upon 
receiving two other wounds three days later, this 
officer again refused assistance and remained 
with his command until the afternoon, when he 
was again severely wounded. He permitted him- 
self to be evacuated only after he had given his 
successor detailed instructions and information." 
Major Pierce is the brother of Henry H. Pierce 
'96, the author of the words of "Bowdoin Beata." 

'99 — Word has just recently been received con- 
cerning the death of Alton Amaziah Hayden, 
who died July 18, 1917, at Guadalajara, Jalisco, 
Mexico. He was born March 24, 1878, at 
Presque Isle, Maine. He studied medicine at 
Johns Hophins University for one year after his 
graduation from Bowdoin. Mr. Hayden was a 
chemist at Swissvale, Tenn., and at Rankin, 
Penn., from 1905 to 1908. Until he went to 
Mexico he was a lawyer in Chicago, 111. 



18 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



'oi — At the annual meeting of the Cumber- 
land County Teachers' Association, held March 
7, Principal George R. Gardner of the Bruns- 
wick High School was elected vice-president of 
the association for the coming year. 

'03 — Lieutenant Henry A. Peabody, U. S. A., 
and Register of Probate for Cumberland County, 
returned to his home in Portland April 2 from 
service in France with an Anti-Air Craft Bat- 
tery. With the outbreak of the war he was one 
of a few non-commissioned officers from Maine 
selected for training at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 
Later he was sent to France and stationed at an 
anti-air craft artillery school in Paris, where he 
received his commission. Lieut. Peabody has 
had many thrilling experiences. The battery to 
which he was attached was pased in a lively lo- 
cation and was busy repelling bombing attacks. 
He went through three night raids at Nancy 
during every one of three visits that he made 
to that city. He was also in Paris when the city 
was being bombarded by the German long-range 
gun. 

'07 — Edward Carpenter Pope, of the Beta 
Theta Pi fraternity, died last month at Man- 
chester, Me. He was 39 years of age. Since 
graduation from Bowdoin he had been employed 
in agriculture in Manchester. 

'o7_Dr. William C. Whitmore ('07 and Medic 
'09), who was expected to return to his home m 
Portland recently, has just been sent to Germany, 
where he is expected to remain about a year. 
Dr. Whitmore is now a captain in the Medical 
Corps of the American Expeditionary Force. He 
has specialized in orthopedic work, and there is 
great demand for his services. Another Portland 
doctor who has also been sent to Germany is 
Philip P. Thompson, who had been an instructor 
of embryology in the Bowdoin Medical School 
from 191 1 until the war. 

'08 — Captain Arthur L. Robinson, U. S. A., of 
Portland, has been appointed clerk in charge of 
investigations by Hon. Guy H. Sturgis '98, also 
of Portland, and the attorney general. Captain 
Robinson immediately entered Harvard Law 
School after his graduation, and received the 
degree of LL.B. in 191 1. He was admitted to 
practice before the courts of Maine that same 
year and became a member of the Cumberland 
bar. In July, 1917, Captain Robinson entered the 
Federal service as a first lieutenant. He was 
commissioned a captain on November 27, 1917. 
He did not receive orders for overseas duty 
until October, 19 18. Captain Robinson returned 
to the United States in January and was dis- 



charged in February. 

ex-'i2 — Mark W. Burlingame has recently ac- 
cepted the position of publicity director of the 
Maine State Agricultural and Industrial League, 
which was organized last year for the purpose 
of overcoming the opposition from other states 
against the Maine agricultural markets. Since 
leaving Bowdoin, he has been active in Boston 
advertising circles, acting as advertising man- 
ager of the National Sportsman Magazine, ad- 
vertising manager of Filene's Automatic Bargain 
Basement, editor of the Pilgrim Publicity News, 
director of the Pilgrim Publicity Association. 
He has also lectured on advertising at the Bos- 
ton niversity School of Business Administration, 
doin, he has been active in Boston advertising 
circles, acting as advertising manager of the 
National Sportsman Magazine, advertising man- 
ager of Filene's Automatic Bargain Basement, 
editor of the Pilgrim Publicity News, director of 
the Pilgrim Publicity Association, and also hav- 
ing lectured on advertising at Boston University 
School of Business Administration. 

ex-'i3 — Word has just been received at the 
college concerning the death of First Lieutenant 
Frederic Trevenen Edwards, who was killed in 
action near Montfaucon Oct. 6, 1918. He was 
buried with military honors in a French ceme- 
tery at Fleury-sur-Aire, Meuse. Lieutenant Ed- 
wards stayed at Bowdoin only two years, but he 
afterwards went to Columbia University, from 
which he graduated in 1915. Immediately after 
his graduation he entered the General Theo- 
logical Seminary, New York City. He had al- 
most passed all the requirements for a 
Diaconate, when the United States declared war, 
and he enlisted. He won his commission in the 
i8th Field Artillery, U.S.A. He was a member 
of the Theta Delta Chi fraternity. 

'15 — Mr. and Mrs. M. V. MacKinnon an- 
nounce the arrival of a daughter, Virginia Louise, 
on Feb. 14, 1919. Mr. MacKinnon has just been 
released from active service in the Navy, and is 
now the Cleveland representative of the Alex- 
ander Hamilton Institute. He enlisted as a sea- 
man, but was later sent to an officers' school to 
study for his commission as an ensign. 

'15 — Lieut. Joseph C. MacDonald has just re- 
turned from aviation service in France and has 
received his discharge from the service. He will 
return to his studies at Union Theological Semi- 
nary in New York after a week's stay in Bangor. 
Previous to entering the aviation service, Lieut. 
MacDonald was in ambulance work where he 
was severely injured. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



19 



CALENDAR. 

April 1 6 — Baseball, Chi Psi vs. Sigma Nu. 

April i8 — Baseball, Delta Upsilon vs. Alpha 
Delta Phi. 

April 19 — Baseball, Bowdoin vs. Bates at Lew- 
iston. 

April 21 — Musical Clubs at Brunswick. 

April 22— Baseball, Chi Psi vs. Zeta Psi. 

April 22 — Bradbury Debates. 



RESOLUTIONS. 



Hall of the Kappa Chapter of Psi Upsilon: 

The death of Brother Joseph Eugene Moore 
of the Class of 1865, which occurred last Mon- 
day, marked the passing of a beloved and 
esteemed brother of the Kappa who always had 
the interests of his college and fraternity at 
heart. 

To him we are greatly indebted for our chapter 
house for it was largely through his earnest and 
untiring efforts that it was originally built and 
so comfortably furnished. Courageous and de- 
termined in everything that he undertook, sym- 
pathetic and kindly toward all, a man of broad 
intellect and .many-sided interests. Brother 
Moore's death comes as a distinct loss to all who 
knew him. 

To his family and friends, the Kappa extends 
her feeling of profound sorrow. 
Gordon S. Hargraves, 
Leland M. Goodrich, 
George E. Houghton, Jr., 

For the Chapter. 



In Memoriam 

Whereas, Our beloved brother, Robert L. 
Hull, having answered his Country's call to 
arms in the great European War, has been 
summoned by Almighty God to die for the honor 
of his county, and 

Whereas, During the time of his fraternity 
life, he displayed those traits of sterling char- 
acter which endear men to their friends and 
make zealous and faithful sons of Theta Delta 
Chi, be it, therefore, 

Resolved, That the members of Eta Charge 
deeply mourn the loss of this, their brother, who 
has now passed into the halls of Omega, that 
their heartfelt sympathy be extended to his rela- 
tives in their bereavement and that they be as- 
sured of the inexpressible sorrow of the Eta 
Charge at the loss of one who was bound to us 
by the closest ties of friendship, and be it further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be entered 
upon the records of Eta Charge, that a copy be 



sent to his bereaved family, to the Grand Lodge, 
to each Sister Charge, and to The Shield for 
publication, and that our badges be draped for a 
period of nine days. 

For Eta Charge, 

Carl J. Longren, 
Sanford B. Cousins. 



In Memoriam 

Whereas, Our beloved brother, Albra H. 
Harding, has been summoned by Almighty God 
unto Himself, and 

Whereas, In his death the Eta Charge of 
Theta Delta Chi realizes that it has lost a true 
and faithful brother, whose every effort was 
directed toward the betterment of the fraternity 
and the moral uplifting of those around him, 
therefore be it 

Resolved, That the members of Eta Charge 
deeply mourn the passing of one, so deeply be- 
loved by all who knew him, into the halls of 
Omega, that their heartfelt sense of bereavement 
be extended to his family in their sorrow, and 
that they be assured of the inexpressible grief 
of the Eta Charge at the loss of one who was 
bound to it by the closest ties of friendship, and 
be it further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be entered 
upon the records of the Eta Charge, that a copy 
be sent to his bereaved family, to the Grand 
Lodge, to each Sister Charge, and to The Shield 
of Theta Delta Chi. 

For Eta Charge, 

Carl J. Longren, 
Sanford B. Cousins. 



LET'S CLEAN IT UP. 



The United War Work Fund is still before us. 
Bowdoin pledged $5,503.10 during the campaign 
in November. On Feb. 7 Professor Catlin an- 
nounced a total payment of $3,750.05. Owing 
to the change in conditions since the money was 
pledged, many of the pledgees have left college. 
In spite of that the committee is anxious that 
those remaining in college should clean up their 
pledges at once and help Bowdoin to make a 
standing of at least 80 per cent. paid. 



A new recruit, placed on guard for the first 
time, about midnight observed a shadowy form 
approaching from the distance. Following his 
instructions, he called out: 

"Halt ! Who goes there?" 

"Shut up !" a husky voice replied; "I ain't 
going; I'm coming back." — Exchange. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

UNION CANTEEN 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.80-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 

Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 

OFFICERS' SHOES 

TAN CALF AND CORDOVAN 

Spiral Puttees 

Army Boots 

AT 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 



DANCING 

MISS JENNIE S. HARVEY 

Evening Class and Assembly every 
Tuesday evening, Town Hall, Bruns- 
wick. Class at 7.30 p. m. Assembly 
at 8.30 p. m. Open to college students. 

Every Monday evening Class and Assembly at 
the Arcade, Bath. 

Private instruction by appointment. Phone 
Bath 151-W. Address 897 Middle street. 




IT WILL HELP ! 
SEND HER THE SAMPLER ! 

Chocolates and confections of 
a quality worthy of your card! 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 
TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co^ 

BATH, MAINE 




^Arrow 

COLLAR 

CLUETTPEABODYflCCo:lNC: TROYNY 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ANTIQVITY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 M'AINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

SDiO iFurniture, SDID eiiiina, Petoter, (Stc. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 
to orders for antique goods of any kind 



The Citizens Laundry 

BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short Notice by competent work- 
men. We use only the Best 
of Leather. 
E. WHITTOM 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 



We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16. 



J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The Bo^vdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



NEW SPRING 
SUITS, 

SHIRTS, 

SHOES, 
HATS 

The snappiest lines ever shown in 
Maine. 




FRANK M. LOW & CO. 
PORTLAND, - - MAINE. 



STUDENTS 

desiring to work an hour or more a day 
can make wages of more than $1.00 per 
hour selling America's War for 
Humanity and Life of Roosevelt. Send 
at once for free outfit, 

F. B. DICKERSON CO. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

enclosing 20c in stamps for mailing 
outfits. 

Telephone 160 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 



Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
A. G. PAGE COMPANY, Bath 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

VIVIAN MARTIN 

IN 

HER COUNTRY FIRST 

and 

ANTONIO MORENO 

IN 

THE IRON TEST 




FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

WILLIAM S. HART 

IN 

THE BORDER WIRELESS 



PASTIME THEATRE 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

EMMY WEHLEN 

IN 

SYLVIA ON A SPREE 

and 

MARIE WALCAMP 

IN 

THE LION'S CLAWS 



Vol. XLIX. No. 3 



APRIL 22, 1919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



CONTENTS 




PAGE 


PAGE 


Bowdoin Drives Cusick from the 




Term Bill of 1845 


23 


Mound in Third Inning 


21 


How To Help The College Paper 


23 


Interfratemity League Under 




Editorials : 




Way 


22 


That Blanket Tax! 


24 


Freshman Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 




Saturday's Game 


24 


Organized 
Social Service Projects 


22 
22 


Fielding and Batting Averages 
Triangular Debate Arranged 


24 
25 


Col. Harvey D. Gibson '02, To 
Speak in Memorial Hall 


22 


Loving Cup To Be Presented To 
Lieutenant Colonel Duval 


25 


Betas Win Opening Game 


22 


The Fight for the Classics 


25 


Chi Psis Win Second Game Inter- 
fratemity Baseball 
Student Council 


22 
23 


War Risk Insurance 
Calendar 


25 
25 


Freshman Hold Class Meeting 


23 


On the Campus 


26 


Bowdoin Benefactress Dead 


23 


With the Faculty 


27 


Training Tables Approved at Yale 
Freshman Caps 


23 
23 


Alumni Notes 
Resolutions 


27 
29 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Over There" know JUD is in the game. 



LEWISTON JOURNAL 
PRINTSHOP 


LAW 

AND AMERICA'S 
WORLD POSITION 

America's new place in international 
politics and commerce challenges the 
young American. 

He must equip himself for new world 
conditions with a knowledge of legal funda- 
mentals. 

LAW — its principles and application to all 
business is almost as necessary to the 
coming business man as it is indispensable 
to the lawyer. 
Qualify for real leadership. 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

gives a thorough training in legal 

principles. 

LL.B. Course requires 3 years. 

For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 


BOOK AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING 


School and College Work a Specialty 


12 Lisbon Street, Lewiston, Maine 


LARGEST AND BEST 

stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 




CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 

184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 




ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 


CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 


4 Elm Street 




MESERVE'S FRUIT SHERBET 

The Blended Product of the Natural Juices of 
Sound Ripe Fruit and Berries. A Delicious and 
Healthful Beverage for Receptions, Teas and 
Parties. Prepared only by 

P. J. MESERVE, Pharmacist, 

Near Post Office, Brunswick, Maine. 


WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE NATIONAL SURVEY CO. 

MAP MAKERS PUBLISHERS 

Summer positions for college men. Application blanks 
may be obtained of "Cr" ALBERT, '19, 

3 South Maine. 

TOPOGRAPHICAL OFFICES 
CHESTER, VERMONT 



SPRING STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

John A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULES BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 



A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office - - Brunswick, Maine 



BUTLER'S 



PARKER, FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WIL SON S PHA RMA CY 



PRINTING 



OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWN BUILDIKG BRUNSWICK 



The College Book Store 

F. W. CHANDLER & SON 

This year's Tennis Goods are in 

NEW CHAMPIONSHIP BALLS 
55c EACH 

1918 CHAMPIONSHIP BALLS 
40 CENTS. 

We have some of last year's Rackets 

on hand which will be sold at 

the old prices, which are 

considerably less than 

this year's prices. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



NEED MONEY 

For college expenses. Do you know what the opportunities are with our line of 
new revised maps. Then why not find out. Do it now. 



IMA.-riONA,l_ IVIA.F> CO. 



119 NieVSS.A.VJ ^T. 



l^tE.'SKr VOIRK ^IT-V 



Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 

Portland 



NEW FOUR-IN-HANDS 

65C AND $1.00 

NEW BATWINGS 
E. S. BODWELL & SON, 

BRUNSWICK. 



THE WAISTLINE 

A NEW MODEL FOR 
YOUNG MEN DE- 
VELOPED BY 

HART SCHAFFNER & 
MARX 

HANDSOME NEW FABRICS. 

THE FINEST OF MAKING. 

FROM $30. 

Haskell & Jones Co. 



Portland, 



Maine. 



HAVE YOU PAID YOUR 
SUBSCRIPTION ? 



Greenhouse 21 -W 
Residence 21-R 

WALTER L. LaROCK 
F I- O Fg I S T 

Potted Plants and Cut Flowers 
Floral Designs for All Occasions 



15% Jordan Avenue 



BUSINESS ESTABLISHED 1849 

MACULLAR PARKER COMPANY 

Makers and Retailers of Best 

Clothing for Men, Young 

Men and Boys 



Special attention to the require- 
ments of young men at 
school and college 

Clothes ready to wear and made 
to order 



Fine Haberdashery—Stetson Hats 



Sole Boston Agents for the 
"Stetson special" 



400 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 22, 1919 



NO. 3 



BOWDOIN DRIVES CUSICK FROM MOUND 
IN THIRD INNING. 

. Last Saturday in the annual exhibition game 
with Bates at Lewiston, Bowdoin won easily 13 
to 4. With the exception of the seventh inning-, 
Bowdoin played good baseball. The most in- 
teresting feature for Bowdoin men was the fact 
that Cusick was driven from the mound in the 
third inning, after four runs had been scored 
against him. Flinn pitched a steady and suc- 
cessful brand of ball all through the game except 
in the seventh inning, when Bates secured all its 
tallies. Only two of the runs scored by the ' 
Lewiston team were earned. 

Bowdoin started the game right in the first 
inning by scoring" two runs. Donnell singled, 
stole second, and after Finn walked, a double 
steal was pulled off, putting men on second and 
third. Prosser scored both runners with a clean 
single. In the second, although Flinn walked 
and Donnell reached first on Trask's error, no 
scores resulted. 

The big inning for the Bowdoin nine was the 
third. Cusick was very wild, and after hitting 
' Finn with a pitched ball, uncorked a wild pitch, 
and then walked Caspar and Prosser, thus filling 
the bases. Finn scored on Hall's fly to Maxim. 
Caspar came in when Stone dropped the ball 
which had been thrown to him on Holmes' hit. 
Grover walked, and the bases were full again. 
Flinn drove a liner to right, scoring Prosset and 
Holmes. This was the end of Cusick, who was 
relieved by Garrett. After Donnell had been put 
out on an infield play, Grover scored the fifth and 
last run of the inning on Talbot's error. 

In the fourth inning, Caspar and Prosser 
reached first on two errors by Davidson. They 
each advanced one base on Hall's sacrifice bunt 
to Garrett. Holmes walked, filling the bases. 
Grover walked, forcing in Caspar, and then 
Prosser scored on a fielder's choice. 

In the next inning, a base on balls, a hit by 
Caspar, and a sacrifice netted another run. 
Grover singled in the sixth, stole second, and 
scored when Donnell's grounder went through 
Dillon. In the following inning, an error by 
Rice, a base on balls, and a sacrifice, allowed 



Caspar to score Bowdoin's twelfth run. Bow- 
doin's last tally came in the eighth when Grover 
doubled, took third on Flinn's out, and scored on 
Donnell's infield out. 

In the last of the seventh, with one out, Trask 
was hit by a pitched ball, took second when 
Stone was safe on Caspar's error, and third on 
a fielder's choice through which Stone was 
caught out, and Moulton reached first. Rice 
singled, scoring Trask, and then Moulton scored 
on Garrett's hit and Grover's error. Rice was 
now on third and Garrett on second, and both 
men came home when Prosser fumbled Maxim's 
single. 

The score : 

BOWDOIN. 

ab. r. bli. po. a. e. 

Donnell, 3b 6 i i i i 

Racine, c.f 6 2 i o 

Finn, s.s ...3 3 o 2 6 i 

Caspar, ib 5 3 i 14 o i 

Prosser, l.f 3 2 i o o i 

Hall, c 2 o 7 2 o 

Holmes, 2b 4 i i i i 

Grover, l.f 3 3 2 i i 

Flinn, p 4 o i 2 o 



Totals 36 13 7 2^ 13 5 

BATES. 

ab. r. bh. po. a. e. 

Maxim, c.f 4 i 2 

Talbot, s.s 5 I 3 I 

Dillon, 2b 4 o 3 4 I 

Davidson, ib 4 o i 13 o 2 

Trask, 3b 3 i o 3 3 i 

Stone, c 4 I 4 I 2 

Moulton, r.f 4 i i o o o 

Rice, l.f 4 I I I o I 

Cusick, p o o 

Garrett, p 4 i i 5 



Totals 36 4 6 27 16 8 

Innings : 123456789 

Bowdoin 2 o 5 2 i i i i — 13 

Bates o o o o 4 o — 4 

Two-base hit, Grover. Stolen bases, Donnell 2, Finn 
2, Caspar, Prosser, Hall, Grover, Flinn, Maxim, Rice. 
Sacrifice hits, Prosser 2, Hall. Sacrifice fly. Hall. 
Double play, Finn and Caspar. Left on bases, Bow- 
doin II, Bates 6. Bases on balls, off Cusick s, off 
Garrett 4, oif Flinn. Hits off Cusick 2 in 2 1-3 in- 
nings, off Garrett 5 in 6 2-3 innings. Earned runs, 
Bowdoin 6, Bates 2. Hit by pitcher, Finn (by Cusick), 



22 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Trask (by Flinn). Struck out, by Flinn 7, by Cusick 
3, by Garrett. Time, 2 hours 25 minutes. Umpire, 
Jenks. Losing pitcher, Cusick. 



INTERFRATERNITY LEAGUE UNDER WAY. 

The initial games of the Interfraternity 
League have been played and augur a very suc- 
cessful season. The Orient will publish each 
week hereafter a report of the standing of the 
teams. 

LEAGUE A. 

April 23 — Theta Delta Chi vs. Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

April 28— Beta Theta Pi vs. Alpha Delta Phi. 

May 2 — Delta Upsilon vs. Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

May 7 — Theta Delta Chi vs. Alpha Delta Chi. 

May 12 — Beta Theta Pi vs. Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

May 16 — Theta Delta Chi vs. Delta Upsilon. 

May 21 — Alpha Delta Epsilon vs. Delta Kappa 
Epsilon. 

May 26 — Beta Theta Pi vs. Delta Upsilon. 
LEAGUE B. 

April 22 — Chi Psi vs. Zeta Psi. 

April 25 — Zeta Psi vs. Kappa Sigma. 

April 30 — Chi Psi vs. Non-fraternity. 

May I — Psi Upsilon vs. Kappa Sigma. 

May 5 — Sigma Nu vs. Kappa Sigma. 

May 9 — Zeta Psi vs. Psi Upsilon. 

May 13 — Sigma Nu vs. Non-fraternity. 

May 14 — Chi Psi vs. Kappa Sigma. 

May 19 — Sigma Nu vs. Psi Upsilon. 

May 23 — Non-fraternity vs. Zeta Psi. 

May 28 — Chi Psi vs. Psi Upsilon. 

May 29 — Sigma Nu vs. Zeta Psi. 

June 2 — Non-fraternity vs. Kappa Sigma. 



FRESHMAN Y. M. C. A. CABINET 
ORGANIZED. 

At a recent meeting of the Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet the following men were elected to the 
Freshman Cabinet: Zeta Psi, Towle, Thayer; 
Beta Theta Pi, Hart, Cobb; Kappa Sigma, Mc- 
Curdy, Pugsley; Psi Upsilon, Bagdikian, Weth- 
erill; Delta Upsilon, Congdon, Norton; Theta 
Delta Chi, Pickard, Battison; Sigma Nu, Sea- 
land, Noyes; Delta Kappa Epsilon, Ferris, 
Averill; Alpha Delta Phi, Ham, Eldridge; Chi 
Psi, Clymer, Knight. During the past week 
these men have been canvassing the town for the 
purpose of aiding the employment bureau of the 
Y. M. C. A. in obtaining a complete registration 
of those who may have occasion to hire help. 



SOCIAL SERVICE PROJECTS. 

As a result of a recent conference with Presi- 
dent Sills, Lang' '19 is looking into the matter of 
starting a set of classes for the benefit of the 
workers at Bath. It is the plan to establish 
classes in English and mathematics. All students 
should leave their names with Lang if willing to 



officiate as instructors. 

The College Y. M. C. A. has recently con- 
ducted a thorough registration throughout the 
town of all those who are in need of help at the 
present time. The plan is meeting with much 
success as a very good proportion of the mer- 
chants and townspeople have registered. 

The Y. M. C. A. wishes to thank all the stu- 
dents who contributed toward the expenses of 
the boys' conference held here some time ago. 
The response of the men was fine, and those in 
authority feel that a good part of the success 
of the affair was due to their hearty support. 



COL. HARVEY D. GIBSON '02, TO SPEAK IN 
MEMORIAL HALL. 

Last week President Sills announced in chapel 
that Colonel Harvey D. Gibson '02, would speak 
in Memorial Hall, Friday evening, April 25, at 
eight o'clock. He is to tell of his experiences 
in Red Cross work in Europe during the war. 
At the time the United States went into the war 
he was president of the Liberty National Bank 
in New York City. He became general manager 
of the American Red Cross and gained distinc- 
tion as an organizer. He went to France and 
for a time was chairman of the American Red 
Cross in Europe. He has been spoken of as 
one of five Americans who did the greatest 
work in France for the United States. All 
students should attend this lecture, as Col. Gibson 
is an interesting speaker, and the experiences 
which he has to tell about are some of the most 
important that any one man has had in con- 
nection with the great war. 



BETAS WIN OPENING GAME. 

The Interfraternity Baseball League was 
officially opened last Monday afternoon on the 
Delta when the Theta Delt and Beta nines 
clashed for honors in League A. The Betas by 
heavy batting in the first inning, in which they 
rolled up seven runs, and followed up in the 
second and third by more hits, won the game 
ii-o. The losers seemed to be weak both with 
the stick and in the field. Partridge of the Beta 
House held his opponents to two hits. 



CHI PSI'S WIN SECOND GAME INTER- 
FRATERNITY BASEBALL. 

Chi Psi and Sigma Nu played off the second 
game of the Interfraternity Baseball League, 
last Friday. The score was three to two, in 
favor of the Chi Psi's. The Sigma Nu's batterv 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



23 



was good but did not prevent the other side from 
connecting with the ball for three runs. All in 
all, the teams were about evenly matched, and 
in spite of bad weather, played a good game. 



STUDENT COUNCIL. 

At a recent meeting of the Student Council 
Foulke '19 was elected secretary and treasurer 
in place of Mahoney '19. Higgins '19 and Finn 
'19 were elected to the Council to replace Mc- 
Carthy '19 and Mahoney '19. It was also voted 
at this meeting to levy a tax of 25 cents on each 
member of the student body for the purpose of 
purchasing a loving cup for Lieut. Col. Duval. 



FRESHMEN HOLD CLASS MEETING. 

The Freshman class held a class meeting in 
Memorial Hall last Thursday' noon to make plans 
for the Freshman banquet. It was voted that 
the date for the banquet be left to the banquet 
committee. The banquet will probably be held 
at Riverton 'Casino, Portland, if the place can 
be secured. 

The banquet committee is composed of Perry, 
Partridge; Stearns, Drake, Fogg, Ludwig, 
Knight, Curran, Thalheimer, and Sealand. 



BOWDOIN BENEFACTRESS DEAD. 

Mrs. Martha B. Angell of Boston, who pre- 
sented the College with a collection of beautiful 
paintings last year, died recentl}-. She was a 
great lover of art and her home on 
Beacon street contains so many beauti- 
ful paintings that it has been called "The 
Treasure House of Art." Her gifts to Bowdoin 
have been placed both in the Boyd Gallerjr and 
in the Sculpture Hall of the Art Building. 



TRAINING TABLES APPROVED AT YALE. 

It is interesting to note, since so much dis- 
cussion in collegiate circles has been going on 
lately relative to the abolition of the training 
table from the season's work in athletics, that 
the board of control at Yale University has re- 
cently approved supervised training tables for 
members of the athletic teams with the pro- 
vision that the bills be paid by the individual 
members. 



FRESHMAN CAPS. 

The college welcomes the appearance of the 
Freshman caps once more. It is significant in 
that it marks the return of another of the college 



customs which we cherish here and which had 
to be abandoned last fall on account of the S. A. 
T. C. The Freshman is by no means to be pitied 
for having to wear this cap for while it may 
not be worn in the best of society, it is a very 
convenient article of headwear. 



A TERM BILL OF 1845. 

There is certainly a great difference between 
the term bills of seventy years ago and those of 
today. In 1S45 all the incidentals were itemized 
separately instead of being included under the 
general head of tuition as today. Another 
peculiar feature of the old form is the fact that 
different blanks were used in different terms. 
In this case, the heading reads, "To his first 
term bill, etc.," while a different heading was 
used for the other terms. The following is the 
copy of a bill issued at the end of the fall term 
of 1845 to a member of the Class of 1849. 

To the President and Trustees of Bowdoin 

College, Dr. 

To his first term bill, ending December 18, 1845. 

Interest to be paid, if not discharged within one month 

after the commencement of the next term. 



Dolls. Cents 



Tuition 

Chamber rent 

Repairs 

Averag-e of Repairs 

Sweeping and Bed-making 

Library 

Monitor 

Catalogues, Order of Exercises, and Commence- 
ment Dinner 

Books 

Bell 

Reciting Room and Lights 

Chemical Lectures 

Wood 

Library fine 

Assessment for absence from College 

Advance standing 

Commons 



HOW TO HELP THE COLLEGE PAPER. 

(Printed for the benefit of those that don't know) 
Hand out all the knocks you can think of. 
Borrow your friend's paper and tell the manager 
to cut off your subscription. Never hand it back 
without saying, "thanks, pretty punk piece of 
business." Always knock when the editor's back 
is turned. Never praise anything. That's sure 
to make his head swell. 



24 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Tuesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 

department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 Exchange 

Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 

Cloyd E. Small, 1920 

John L. Berry, 192 i 

Harry Helson, 1921 

George E. Houghton, 1921 

Crosby E. Redman, 192 i 

Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Albert E. Hurrell, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
George O. Prout, 1921 Assistant Manager 



Vol. XLIX. APRIL 22, 1919 



No. 3 



Entered at Post Office at Bninswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

That Blanket Tax ! 

Again the blanket tax has come due and again 
must the same old request be made, — pay your 
blanket tax ! Thus far little over half of the 
students have actually paid this tax. On the 
face of it, this would seem to be a rather bad 
showing but when those who have secured ex- 
tensions are included, the outlook is much better. 
The Board of Managers is determined that every 



student shall pay this important assessment and 
there is no reason why it should not be done. 
Last term the showing made by the student body 
was most satisfactory; this term, with the base- 
ball and track teams to support, there is every 
reason to expect that it will be perfect. Make 
it a 100 per cent, payment ! 



Saturday's Game. 

The result of the Bates game was most elating 
to every Bowdoin man. It only goes to show 
how difficult it is to prophesy results in baseball. 
Scarcely anyone, even the strongest Bowdoin 
rooter, expected that she would win so decisively 
after the manner in which Bates defeated Har- 
vard. The Bates team may have been over- 
confident, as is liable to be the case after a 
victory of such unexpected magnitude as that 
won against Harvard, but it certainly was in- 
ferior in all departments of the game Saturday. 

The team's showing Saturday augurs well for 
the future. With the student body behind it en 
masse, our chances for the State championship 
should be most excellent. This raises the ques- 
tion of student rallies, a question that has been 
discussed by the Orient more than once during 
the past year. With the Colby game of May 3 
opening the State series, can't we get together 
sometime in the near future for a real Bowdoin 
rally and imbibe some of the real Bowdoin 
spirit, the spirit which will prove indomitable? 
We can not expect the. team to do it all; the 
student body has got to do its share in the grand- 
stand. 



BATTING AND FIELDING AVERAGES. 

The following are the batting and fielding 
averages of the Bowdoin baseball team through 
the Bates game last Saturday. The rapctice 
game with the Cabots is not included in this list. 
Through an error in the last issue of the Orient, 
Flinn was charged with only two times at bat 
instead of three, while Cook should have had 
only three instead of four. 

The averages : 











Fielding 




ab. 


h. 


Ave. 


Average 


Grover 


6 


3 


Soo 


.667 


Flinn 


7 


2 


2S6 


1. 000 


Prosser 


7 


2 


2S6 


.500 


Holmes 


4 


I 


250 


1. 000 


Donnell 


9 


2 


222 


.S33 


Finn 


7 


I 


143 


.800 


Caspar 


9 


I 


I n 


.929 









000 
000 




Hall 


6 


1. 000 


Cook 


3 





000 


1. 000 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



25 



TRIANGULAR DEBATE ARRANGED. 

Arrangements for a triangular debate with 
Brown and Wesleyan have been completed, al- 
though the date is yet to be announced. Bowdoin 
will be represented by two teams on the ques- 
tion, "Resolved," That immigration into the 
United States should be prohibited for a period 
of five years following the ratification of the 
Peace Treaty." 



LOVING CUP TO BE PRESENTED TO 
LIEUTENANT COLONEL DUVAL. 

The student council has voted to make an ex- 
pression of the gratitude and respect of the stu- 
dent body by presenting to Lieutenant Colonel 
Duval a loving cup. Col. Duval not only gained 
the respect and affection of the student body by 
his conduct of the Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps at Bowdoin but by his untiring efforts to 
see that Bowdoin men be admitted to Officers' 
Training Schools. At considerable pains to him- 
self he inaugurated an intensive course in mili- 
tary training last spring to which all men of 
draft age were" admitted if they so elected. 
Practically all of these men later received ap- 
pointments to Officers' Schools. Last June be en- 
couraged and rendered every possible practical 
assistance to those men who attended the Junior 
Plattsburg Camp. Although ill health compelled 
him to take an inactive part in the Students Army 
Corps programme of last fall, he was constantly 
furthering the work in spirit and acting in an 
advisory capacity to the younger officers of the 
unit. All in all. Lieutenant Colonel Duval de- 
serves the tribute that is to be presented him for 
his warm loyalty to Bowdoin College and we are 
confident that every student will gladly pay for 
his share in the loving cup. 



THE FIGHT FOR THE CLASSICS. 

There has been, perhaps, no briefer or more 
cogent summary of the reasons why the study 
of Latin and Greek should not be abandoned in 
the modern scheme of education than is pre- 
sented in this paragraph from an address by 
Dean West of Princeton at the annual meeting 
of the Classical Association of the Atlantic 
States at Haverford College. 

"They are fundamental to our national 
language and to other important modern tongues. 
They are demonstraably an agency of the first 
value for training the young mind to clearness, 
exactness and thoroughness. They are of great 
help in preparing students to master all other 



studies, whether scientific, professional, technical, 
historical, literary or artistic. Their literature 
is full of the noblest impulses and is admittedly 
the greatest of all foreign literatures. Their 
history is 'the key to all history,' and it records 
the origins of our own civilized liberty, justice 
and democracy. To omit the classics would 
therefore be to destroy a main part of the founda- 
tion of our modern knowledge." 

If any advocate of the total extinction of the 
classics as a factor of education can present his 
case with equal force, in equally good English 
and in not much more than one hundred words, 
we shall be glad to put the condensed argument 
alongside the foregoing product of Dean West's 
loyal enthusiasm and then let intelligence com- 
pare, weigh, and decide. — New York Sun. 



WAR RISK INSURANCE. 

All discharged soldiers and sailors should be 
advised to keep up the payment of the premiums 
due on their war risk insurance, applied for while 
in the military service. 

After the declaration of peace those who have 
kept up such payments will be permitted to con- 
vert their present insurance to other forms with- 
out another physical examination. Any dis- 
charged soldier who has permitted his insurance 
to lapse should correspond with or call at the 
office of Captain T. J. Johnston, Department In- 
surance Officer, Headquarters Northeastern De- 
partment, Room 717, 99 Chauncy street, Boston, 
Mass., as soon as possible, as it is not yet too 
late to be reinstated. Information may also be 
obtained there with reference to the new kinds 
of insurance to be issued and the premium rates 
therefor. In writing, in addition to asking the 
information desired, the person should indicate 
the date of his discharge and whether he has 
paid any premiums since such discharge. 

The officer above mentioned will also be 
pleased to assist the allottees of soldiers in cases 
where allotments and Government allowances are 
not being received. 

T. J. Johnston, 
Captain, A. G. Dept., U. S. Army. 



CALENDAR. 



April 23 — Musical Clubs at Portland. 

April 23 — Baseball, Theta Delta Chi vs. Delta Kappa 

Epsilon. 
April 24 — Musical Cltibs at Boston, Mass. 
April 25 — Musical Clubs at Beverly, Mass. 
April 25 — Col. Harvey D. Gibson Lecture, Memorial 

Hall, 8 :oo p. m. 
April 25 — Baseball, Zeta Psi vs. Kappa Sigma. 



26 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



April 26 — Baseball, Varsity at Tufts College, Med- 

ford, Mass. 
April 28 — Baseball, Beta Theta Pi vs. Alpha Delta 

Phi. 
April 30 — Baseball, Chi Psi vs. Non-Frats. 



Dn tDe Campus 

Walker '18, has returned to college. 

Freshman caps are now seen on the Campus. 

Special musical selections and an organ re- 
cital were rendered at last Sunday's chapel. 

The game between the A. D.'s and the D. U.'s 
scheduled for last Friday was postponed on ac- 
count of its coming just before the holiday. 

Donald S. Higgins '19, has returned to 
college. He has been studying at the Harvard 
Ensign School from which he was commissioned. 

Ensign Albert L. Prosser '18 was on the 
Campus Saturday. 

Mr. John E. Chapman 'y^ returned to Bruns- 
wick last week from Fryeburg, Maine, where he 
has been spending the winter. 

John L. Baxter '16 of Brunswick left last week 
on an extended business trip to the Pacific coast 
together with Hon. Rupert H. Baxter '94. 

Jack Magee was the starter at the annual dual 
indoor meet of the Lewiston High and Edward 
Little High Schools at Lewiston a week ago 
Friday. 

The Brunswick High School nine defeated the 
Alpha Delts in a close five-inning game last 
Monday by a score of 8 to 7. 

Last Tuesday evening the Psi U.'s won an 
easy victory over the D. U.'s in a practice game 
by a score of 13 to 3. 

Hall '20 was elected captain of the newly 
organized Bowdoin second team a week ago 
Monday. 

Ensign John W. Thomas ex-' 18 was on the 
Campus last week. He has just completed his 
first trip to France in the service of the United 
States Navy. 

Charlie Dam, former star Hebron Academy 
weight man, who left school to join the Navy, 
was on the Campus last week visiting Jack 
Magee. He has participated in several inter- 
scholastic meets here at the college and many 
of the students will remember his excellent work 
in the field events. 

Richan '20 has returned from West Point and 
will continue his college course. He obtained 
Congressional appointment to West Point last 
fall. He resigned from that school to com- 
plete his college education here. 

The Sigma Nu Freshmen held a very pleasant 
smoker at their fraternity house last Thursday 



evening. Two representatives of the freshmen 
delegates from the several fraternities were 
present. 

The Musical Clubs will start tomorrow on their 
Portland and Boston trip. Tomorrow night they 
will give their annual concert in Portland at 
Frye Hall. It will be under the auspices of the 
Delta Epilson club of Deering High School. 
Thursday night they will play at the Hotel 
Somerset in Boston and will conclude their 
Massachusetts tour with a big concert in Beverly. 

Many of the ardent followers in the college 
of the struggle between Rumford High and 
Cony High for the State championship in basket- 
ball attended the deciding game of the series at 
Lewiston last Friday night. 

Meacham '22, who met with a bad accident at 
South Winthrop last Monday night, is fast im- 
proving at the Infirmary. His miraculous escape 
from more serious injury is the talk of the 
Campus. 

The varsity baseball team will go to Medford, 
Mass., this coming Saturday and there play their 
annual game with the Tufts College nine. The 
first game of the Maine series to be played at 
Brunswick will come a week from Saturday, 
May 3, when Colby and Bowdoin clash at the 
Athletic Field. It is commonly reported that 
Colby has the best college team in the State this 
season and the game then promises to reveal 
the real facts. 

The Juniors were asked last week to make 
out their major and minor cards at the office. 

Many spent the past week-end at their re- 
spective homes, as Saturday was a holiday, 
Patriots' Day. Several of the boys who could 
not get home went to Lewiston Saturday after- 
noon and attended the Bates-Bowdoin game. 

The Fre-shman English classes enjo3'ed an il- 
lustrated lecture on the "Wordsworth Country" 
by Professor Wilmot B. Mitchell last Thursday. 

The bulletin board has been pretty well filled 
lately with notices of the loss of fountain pens. 

Because of the inability of some members of 
the clubs to be present, the concert and dance 
of the Musical Clubs in the Town Hall, previous- 
ly arranged for Monday night, was forced to be 
postponed. It will either be given next Monday 
night, April 28, or the following Frida}^ night, 
May 2. 

Three men have already signified their in- 
tentions to become candidates for assistant 
manager of tennis and have given their names 
to Manager Hall. They are Tileston, McCormick 
and Freeman. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



27 



The attendants at the Union for this term 
have been chosen as follows: Cole '19, Angus 
'19, Goodwin '21, Hatch '21, Welch '22; the 
alternates, Norwood '20, Gaffney '21, Simpson 
'22. 

The Senior class held a meeting in the Union 
last Tuesday noon. 

The Orient is glad to report that the present 
quality of paper is not to be used permanently. 
A new stock of the standard type has already 
been ordered. 

The fact that the Orient did not appear on 
time last week was due to difficulties in the print- 
ing room. Everj' effort is being made to get it 
out Tuesday. 



snitf) tbe Jfacultp 

Professor Ham attended the dinner of the 
Harvard Class of 1896 and the smoke talk on 
Russia which followed, at the Harvard Club, 
Boston. On April 15 he addressed the County 
League of Portland, of which Llewellyn Barton 
'84 is president. 

Professor Davis was at Cambridge, Mass., 
Friday and Saturday of the week before last. 
He presided at the annual meeting of the New 
England Public Speaking Conference, of which 
he is president. 



3lumni JSotes 

'53 — ^A memorial service was held in the Bos- 
ton Circuit Court for Judge Putnam who died 
last summer. 

Medic-'6i — Dr. George Liberty Kilgore, of 
Wakefield, Mass., died March 2, 1919, at the 
Orange General Hospital, Orlando, Florida. He 
was born June 27, 1835, at Harrison, Maine. 
After his graduation from the Medical School, 
Dr. Kilgore practised medicine at Windham, 
Maine, until 1870. Then he was at Lewiston 
from 1872 until the following' year. Finally he 
moved to Wakefield, Mass., where he practised 
until shortly before his death. He was a mem- 
ber of the Maine Medical Association. 

Medic-'93 — The superintendent of the Bangor 
State Hospital, Dr. Pearl Tenney Haskell, died 
April 13 from acute dilation of the heart, due 
to over-exertion. He was born March 10, 1868, 
at Deering, Maine. He was a practising phy- 
sician in various New Hampshire towns from the 
year after his graduation until 1914. He was in 
Concord during the last nine years of this period, 
and for the most of that time he was assistant 
superintendent of the New Hampshire State Hos- 



pital. In 1911 he served a term in the New 
Hampshire Legislature. He was a prominent 
member of the Knights of Pythias in the Granite 
State. In 1914 he was appointed assistant sup- 
erintendent of the Bangor State Hospital, and 
three years later, in July, 1917, he was made 
superintendent. 

'01 — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Warren Starbird 
of Portland recently announced the wedding of 
their daughter, Margaret Wyer Starbird, and 
George Currier Wheeler. The ceremony took 
place Monday, April 21, 1919. Mr. Wheeler re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Laws from Har- 
vard in 1904, and since 1912 he has been a 
Referee in Bankruptcy in Portland. 

'02 — George R. Walker, Fulton J. Redman 
'07, and Frank C. McKinney have announced a 
partnership for the general practice of law, at 
59 Wall street, New York City. Mr. Walker 
received an LL.B. from Harvard in 1905, and 
has been a lawyer in New York City since 1906. 
Mr. Redman received his LL.B. also from Har- 
vard in 1910, and has since been practicing law 
in New York. 

'09 — Dr. Howard F. Kane left Portland April 
5 to return to Washington, D. C, to resume his 
practice in that city. Dr. Kane was among the 
first Americans to see service overseas, but he 
had the misfortune to be taken prisoner in March, 
1917. He remained in a German camp until the 
armistice last fall. 

'11 — Franz U. Burkett, who has been con- 
nected with a law firm in Portland for the past 
few years, was admitted to practice in United 
States courts by Judge Brown of Providence, 
April 9, 1919. Before taking up law, Mr. Burkett 
was the principal of the Union (Me.) High 
School. 

'12 — Captain Reginald E. Foss of Skowhegan 
has earned one of the finest records among Bow- 
doin men who have served in the war. He en- 
listed about a month after the declaration of war 
by the United States, and was commissioned 
second lieutenant at Plattsburg. He was then 
assigned to Company G, 103d Infantry. He sailed 
for France Sept. 26, 1917. A year later he was 
made a first lieutenant, and last February a cap- 
tain. He is now attending the University of 
London. 

'12— Mr. and Mrs. Frank M. Stetson of 
Brunswick announce the engagement of their 
daughter, Lucy Adelaide, to Burleigh Gush- 
ing Rodick of Freeport. Mr. Rodick received 
his A.M. degree from Harvard in 1914 and since- 
then has been teaching, at present at Lawrence- 



28 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ville School, Lawrenceville, New Jersey. 

'i2 — Mr. Frederick L. Scott announces the en- 
gagement of his daughter, Elizabeth Mc- 
Keen Scott, to Lieutenant Curtis Tuttle of 
Cakisa, Cal. Lieut. Tuttle was recently dis- 
charged from the United States Field Artillery 
at Camp Zachary Taylor and made a short visit 
to his former home in Brunswick before return- 
ing to California. 

'i3_Mr. and Mrs. James McMurtrie of Port- 
land not long ago received news of the engage- 
ment of their son, Lieut. Douglas Howard Mc- 
Murtrie and Madeline Lempereur of Paris, 
France. Lieut. McMurtrie went overseas in the 
Chemical Warfare Service, and was stationed 
for the most part in Shenon, France. 

'i_j — Arthur S. Merrill, formerly a teacher at 
Maine Central Institute, Pittsfield, Maine, and 
once in charge of the boys department of the 
Augusta Y. M. C. A., has recently been elected 
superintendent of schools for the union of towns 
including Mexico, Maine. During the war, Mr. 
Merrill was for some time connected with edu- 
cational activities in the service at Camp John- 
son, Jacksonville, Florida. 

'14 — Mr. Joseph A. Littlefield announces the 
marriage of his daughter, Isabel Harvard, to 
Sumner Leighton Mountfort, on Saturday, Feb- 
ruary 22d, at Salem, Mass. Mr. Mountfort is 
with the Federal Board for Vocational Educa- 
tion at Portland. 

'16— Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Nichols of Bath 
recently announced the engagement of their 
daughter, Dorothy Nichols, to Lieut. Paul 
K. Niven (P. C), U.S.N. , of Providence, R. I. 
'16— Herbert H. Foster is treasurer of a newly 
incorporated company for the distribution and 
sale of Chandler cars. Mr. Foster has been in 
the service for the past 18 months, having en- 
listed in the Milliken Regiment. On account of 
his knowledge of the automobile industry, he was 
transferred to a school for automobile mechanics 
in Texas, and given a first lieutenancy. Prior to 
his enlistment he was in the employ of the Hen- 
ley-Kimball Co., as their Bangor agent. 

'16 — The directors of the First National Bank 
of Brunswick, at a meeting held April 3, elected 
John L. Baxter as a director. Mr. Baxter is 
probably the youngest bank director in the State. 
He has but recently returned home after more 
than six months service in the United States 
Army. He entered as a private and received 
his discharge as a second lieutenant. 

'i7_Lieut. Erik Achorn of the nth Field 
Artillery (Regular Army) saw service at the 



front in August with the French and was with 
the American forces in the final drive in the 
Meuse. Subsequently he was at the headquarters 
of the 6th Division at Aignay-le-Duc as editor 
of the Division newspaper. Lieut. Achorn is 
now stationed at Beaune, Cote d'Or, with the 
A. E. F. University. 

'17 — Colonel and Mrs. Edward C. Moran an- 
nounce the engagement of their son, Lieut. Ed- 
ward Carleton Moran, Jr., to Elizabeth C. 
Baines of Heathfield, Sandown Park, Wavertree, 
Liverpool. Lieut. Moran, after graduation, left 
Brunswick as a sergeant in the Tenth Company, 
Maine C.A.N.G. He was later assigned to the 
73d Artillery and went overseas in September. 
Lieut. Moran recently received his discharge at 
Fortress Monroe. 

'17 — Lieut. Frank E. Noyes of Topsham, who 
has been the town major of two German villages 
near Coblenz since the occupation of the Rhine- 
land, has recently received a university appoint- 
ment, and is now studying at the University of 
Paris. 

'17 — David A. Lane, Jr., is now a first lieu- 
tenant, holding the position of adjutant of the 
S.A.T.C. Unit at Mehany Medical College, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. Lt. Lane entered the R.O.T.C. at 
Des Moines, Iowa, June 18, 1917. He was com- 
missioned a first lieutenant from this post, and 
then served nine months with the 350th Field 
Artillery Regiment at Camp Dix, New Jersey. 
He then served two months with the iS3rd Depot 
Brigade and in the Quartermaster's Corps. Last 
fall before he was stationed at Mehany College 
he was commanding officer of the S.A.T.C. Unit 
at Georgia State Industrial School, Savannah, 
Ga. 

ex-'i7 — Gilbert E. Ogle who returned recently 
from ambulance work in France has been made 
manager of the Bickett-Shirkie Coal Company at 
Terre Haute, Indiana. 

ex-'i8 — Neil E. Daggett has received two cita- 
tions for bravery as an ambulance driver in re- 
moving wounded under fire. He is mentioned 
in special orders by Major General O'Ryan of 
the 27th Division for courage under fire in the 
evacuation of wounded during the battles of the 
Hindenburg line, Sept. 27-30, 1918. The other- 
citation is for bravery and devotion to duty, 
July 25, 1918, when he served for twenty-four 
hours without rest. 

ex-' 19— Lieut. Russell D. Greene, after twenty- 
three months of service in the Army, has been 
presented with a medal for efficient and faithful 
service in the Aviation Supply Department at 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



29 



the Paris Headquarters. Since receiving an 
honorable discharge from the Army, he has been 
chosen with a rating of first lieutenant to go on 
a mission in the interest of the Red Cross for 
six months. His work will be first in Rome, and 
later in the Balkans. 

ex-'iQ — Some very interesting field observation 
notes were recently sent by Corporal J. Paul 
Hamlin of M-ilo, Maine, to his parents. A few 
of these were printed in the Bangor Nezvs of 
April 4. Corporal Hamlin belongs to B Com- 
pany, 301st Engineers, which is attached to the 
42nd (Rainbow) Division. He was with the 
Army of Occupation at Brohl, Germany, until 
the division left the Rhine for Brest. Corporal 
Hamlin went into Germany at Grevemacher, 
Luxembourg, December 2, 1918. 

ex-'20 — Ensign David W. White of Topsham, 
Me., had the honor of being on one of the sub- 
marine chasers that escorted President Wilson 
into Boston harbor last month. Ensign White 
graduated from the Harvard Ensign School last 
June and has since been stationed with the First 
Naval District at Boston, Mass. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Whereas, Our beloved brother, Frank J. Weed, 
has been summoned by Almighty God unto Him- 
self, and 

Whereas, In his death the Eta Charge of 
Theta Delta Chi realizes that it has lost a true 
and faithful brother, whose every effort was 
directed toward the betterment of the fraternity 
and the moral uplifting of those around him, 
therefore be it 

Resolved, That the members of Eta Charge 
deeply mourn the passing of one, so deeply be- 
loved by all who knew him, into the halls of 
Omega, that their heartfelt sense of bereavement 
be extended to his family in their sorrow, and 
that they be assured of the inexpressible grief 
of the Eta Charge at the loss of one who was 
bound to it by the closest ties of friendship, and 
be it further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be entered 
upon the records of the Eta Charge, that a copy 
be sent to his bereaved family, to the Grand 
Lodge, to each Sister Charge, and to The Shield 
of Theta Delta Chi. 

For Eta Charge, 

Carl J. Longren, 
Sanford B. Cousins. 



Edwards, having answered his Country's call to 
arms in the great European War, has been sum- 
moned by Almighty God to die for the honor of 
his country, and 

Whereas, During the time of his fraternity 
life, he displayed those traits of sterling char- 
acter which endear men to their friends and 
make zealous and faithful sons of Theta Delta 
Chi, be it, therefore. 

Resolved, That the members of Eta Charge 
deeply mourn the loss of this, their brother, who 
has now passed into the halls of Omega, that 
their heartfelt sympathy be extended to his rela- 
tives in their bereavement and that they be as- 
sured of the inexpressible sorrow of the Eta 
Charge at the loss of one who was bound to us 
by the closest ties of friendship, and be it further 
Resolved, That these resolutions be entered 
upon the records of Eta Charge, that a copy be 
sent to his bereaved family, to the Grand Lodge, 
to each Sister Charge, and to The Shield for pub- 
lication, and that our badges be draped for a 
period of nine days. 

For Eta Charge, 

Carl J. Longren, 
Sanford B. Cousins. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Whereas, Our beloved brother, Frederick T. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Whereas, Our beloved brother, Charles W. W. 
Field, having answered his Country's call to arms 
in the great European War, has been summoned 
by Almighty God to die for the honor of his 
country, and 

Whereas, During the time of his fraternity life, 
he displayed those traits of sterling character 
which endear men to their friends and make 
zealous and faithful sons of Theta Delta Chi, 
be it, therefore, 

Resolved, That the members of Eta Charge 
deeply mourn the loss of this, their brother, who 
has now passed into the halls of Omega, that 
their heartfelt sympathy be extended to his 
relatives in their bereavement and that they be 
assured of the inexpressible sorrow of the Eta 
Charge at the loss of one who was bound to us 
by the closest ties of friendship, and be it further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be entered 
upon the records of Eta Charge, that a copy be 
sent to his bereaved family, to the Grand Lodge, 
to each Sister Charge, and to The Shield for 
publication, and that our badges be draped for a 
period of nine days. 

For Eta Charge, 

Carl J. Longren, 
Sanford B. Cousins. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

UNION CANTEEN 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 

Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 

OFFICERS' SHOES 

TAN CALF AND CORDOVAN 

Spiral Puttees 

Army Boots 

AT 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 

DANCING 

MISS JENNIE S. HARVEY 

Evening Class and Assembly every 
Tuesday evening, Town Hall, Bruns- 
wick. Class at 7.30 p. m. Assembly 
at 8.30 p. m. Open to college students. 

Every Monday evening Class and Assembly at 
the Arcade, Bath. 

Private instruction by appointment. Phone 
Bath 151-W. Address 897 Middle street. 




IT WILL HELP ! 
SEND HER THE SAMPLER ! 

Chocolates and confections of 
a quality worthy of your card! 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 
TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 



BATH, MAINE 




^Arrow 

COLLAR 

CLUETTPEABODYflCCo:lNC-. TROYNY 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ANTIQVITY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

ffl51ti JFutnitUK, flDin China, DJctotet, dEtc. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 
to orders for antique goods of any kind 



The Citizens Laundry 

Quali-by - Service 

BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short Notice by competent work- 
men. We use only the Best 
of Leather. 
E. WHITTOM 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, |100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 



We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store — 2 Gushing St. — Tel. 16. 



J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The Bowdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



TiHE ^-rOFSE: C3F- F3F30C5F3E^^ 

NEW SPRING 
SUITS, 

SHIRTS, 

SHOES, 
HATS 

The snappiest lines ever shown in 
Maine. 




FRANK M. LOW & CO. 
PORTLAND, - - MAINE. 



STUDENTS 

desiring to work an hour or more a day 
can make wages of more than $1.00 per 
hour selling America's War for 
Humanity and Life of Roosevelt. Send 
at once for free outfit, 

F. B. DICKERSON CO. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

enclosing 20c in stamps for mailing 
outfits. 

Telephone 160 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 



Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
Jl. G. PAGE COMPANY, Bath 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

BRYANT WASHBURN 

IN 

THE WAY OF A MAN 
WITH A MAID 

ALSO 

THE IRON TEST 




FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

NAZIMOVA 

IN 

OUT OF THE FOG 



PASTIME THEATRE 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

FRANCIS X. BUSHMAN 

and 

BEVERLY BAYNE 

IN 

THE POOR RICH MAN 

ALSO 

THE LION'S CLAWS 



Vol. XLIX. No. 4 



APRIL 29, 1919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



CONTENTS 




PAGE 




PAGE 


George Taylor Files '89 


31 


Student Forum To Discuss 


Col- 


Timely Hit in Tenth Saved Game 




lege Athletics 


35 


for Bowdoin 


32 


Musical Clubs' Trip 


35 


First Six Inning Game of Inter- 




President Sills' Tribute to 


the 


fraternity League 


33 


Late Professor George T. Files 35 


Bradbury Debates 


33 


Tribute to Professor Files by Sec- 


Psi U's Lose To Non-Fraternity 


33 


retary of Class of 1889 


36 






Student Council Resolution 


on 


Ex-Senator Burton to Speak on 




Death of Professor Files 


36 


League of Nations 


33 










Tributes to Professor Files 


36 


Editorials : 




Calendar 


37 


Professor George T. Files 


34 










On the Campus 


37 


The Student Forum — A Success 


34 


With the Faculty 


38 


Colonel Gibson Speaks in Me- 




Alumni Notes 


38 


morial Hall 


35 


Resolutions 


39 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Over There" know JUD is in the game. 



LEWISTON JOURNAL 
PRINTSHOP 




Think It Over 

The trend of modern conditions makes 
a knowledge of law necessary to the heads 
of all great industrial enterprises. 

Whether a young man contemplates fol- 
lowing the legal profession, or whether he 
hopes to head any great industrial or- 
ganization, he will find a legal training of 
utmost value to him in after life. 

The forward-looking youth lays his plans 
now for future success. The study of law 
is one great essential to this end. 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

Gives a thorough training in the principles 
of law. Course for LL.B. requires 3 years. 
Men preparing for college or business, 
who wish to plan ahead in selecting a 
school of law, should address, for catalog, 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 


BOOK AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING 


School and College Work a Specialty 


12 Lisbon Street, Lewiston, Maine 


LARGEST AND BEST 

stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 




CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 




ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 


CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 


4 Elm Street 


WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 


MESERVE'S FRUIT SHERBET 

The Blended Product of the Natural Juices of 
Sound Ripe Fruit and Berries. A Delicious and 
Healthful Beverage for Receptions, Teas and 
Parties. Prepared only by 

P. J. MESERVE, Pharmacist, 

Near Post Office, Brunswick, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE NATIONAL SURVEY CO. 

MAP MAKERS PUBLISHERS 

Summer positions for college men. Application blanks 
may be obtained of "CF" ALBERT, '19, 

3 South Maine. 

TOPOGRAPHICAL OFFICES 
CHESTER, VERMONT 



SPRING STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

John A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULFS BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 



A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post 0£Sce - - Brunswick, Maine 



BUTLER'S 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSON'S PHARMACY 



PRINTING 



OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWN BDILDIKG BRUNSWICK 



The College Book Store 

F. W. CHANDLER & SON 

This year's Tennis Goods are in 

NEW CHAMPIONSHIP BALLS 
55c EACH 

1918 CHAMPIONSHIP BALLS 
40 CENTS. 

We have some of last year's Rackets 

on hand which will be sold at 

the old prices, which are 

considerably less than 

this year's prices. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



NEED MONEY 

For college expenses. Do you know what the opportunities are with our line of 
new revised maps. Then why not find out. Do it now. 



IMA.nriOIMAL. IVIAF9 CO. 



119 ■MA.SSA.O ^T. 



ime:\a/^ voirk ^ity 



Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 

Portland 



NEW FOUR-IN-HANDS 

65C AND $1.00 

NEW BATWINGS 
E. S. BODWELL & SON, 

BRUNSWICK. 



THE WAISTLINE 

A NEW MODEL FOR 
YOUNG MEN DE- 
VELOPED BY 

HART SCHAFFNER & 
MARX 

HANDSOME NEW FABRICS. 

THE FINEST OF MAKING. 

FROM $30. 

Haskell & Jones Co. 



Portland, 



Maine. 



HAVE YOU PAID YOUR 
SUBSCRIPTION ? 



Greenhouse 21-W 
Residence 21-R 

WALTER L. LaROCK 
R- L. O R 1ST" 

Potted Plants and Cut Flowers 

Floral Designs for All Occasions 

15X Jordan Avenue 



BUSINESS ESTABLISHED 1849 

MACULLAR PARKER COMPANY 

Makers and Retailers of Best 

Clothing for Men, Young 

Men and Boys 



Special attention to the require- 
ments of young men at 
school and college 

Clothes ready to wear and made 
to order 



Fine Haberdashery-Stetson Hats 



Sole Boston Agents for the 
"Stetson special" 



400 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 29, 1919 



NO. 4 



PROFESSOR GEORGE TAYLOR FILES '89. 




Last Wednesday morning', April 23, word was 
received of the death of Professor George Taylor 
Files, a most loyal alumnus of Bowdoin and for 
over twenty-five years a devoted teacher on its 
faculty. His death came after a severe illness 
which had been gradually becoming" worse ever 
since his return to this country from France 
last November. 

Professor Files was born September 23, 1866, 
at Portland, Maine. After his graduation from 
Portland High School in 1885, he entered Bow- 
doin, and in each of his first three years at col- 
lege, he won one of the Brown Memorial 
Scholarships, and in his sophomore year he was 
awarded the Sewall Greek prize. In his senior 



year he received one of the second prizes for 
excellence in English composition, and gradu- 
ated at the head of his class. He belonged to 
the Psi Upsilon fraternity, and was elected to 
Phi Beta Kappa. In 1892 Professor Files re- 
ceived the degree of Master of Arts from Bow- 
doin, and in August of the following year, the 
University of Leipzig awarded him the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy. A few years later he 
published "The Anglo-Saxon House," the dis- 
sertation which he wrote for his degree at the 
German University. He also published an edi- 
tion of "Goethe's Poems, Selected and Bio- 
graphically Studied," and edited Gustav Freitag's 
"Soil und Haben." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



It was in the spring of 1894 that he was ap- 
pointed professor of Germanic languages at 
Bowdoin, the position which he held until his 
death. Three years later he became registrar 
of the college, and he held this position until 

1905- 

He was a prominent member of three of the 
most important educational associations in 
America: The Modern Language Association 
of America, of which he was on the executive 
council in 1901 ; the New England Modern 
Language Association, of which he was presi- 
dent for the year 1915-16; and the American 
Historical Association. 

Professor Files was effective, moreover, not 
only in his work in the college, but also in a 
number of other organizations. He has been 
recognized for several years as one of the lead- 
ing highway experts of the State of Maine. He 
was a member of the Maine Automobile As- 
sociation, of which he became president in 1917. 
He belonged to the Portland Rotary Club, in 
connection with which in 1917, he presented a 
handsome silk regimental flag to the First Maine 
Heavy Artillery (formerly the Milliken Regi- 
ment). In April, 1916, he was elected treasurer 
of the Maine Aeronautical Coast Patrol Associa- 
tion. For several years Professor and Mrs. Files 
have helped both town and college by bringing 
to the Church on the Hill and the College Chapel 
some of America's most distinguished preachers. 

Last year. Professor Files began his splendid 
work in the Y. M. C. A. in France. He sailed 
from this country in March, 1918, and immediate- 
ly after his arrival- on the other side he was 
placed in charge of one of the many Y. M. C. A. 
Foyers. Concerning the quality of his services, 
the "Red Triangle Overseas" of September 7, 
1918, says that he "makes it a point to shake 
hands with and have a pleasant word for every 
one of the hundreds of soldiers, whether French 
or American, who came into his Foyer." On ac- 
count of an attack of influenza. Professor Files 
was granted a leave of absence last fall, and he 
returned to this country in November. Shortly 
after his arrival he delivered a number of 
lectures, and fully expected to return to France 
in February. 

As an interested and active citizen. Professor 
Files was especially esteemed in the town of 
Brunswick, for he gave freely of time, counsel, 
and means for its good. He was beloved by his 
students for the genial friendly qualities which 
made his teaching both stimulating and popular. 

The funeral took place Saturday afternoon at 



82 West street, Portland. Rev. Thompson E. 
Ashby of Brunswick officiated at the service. 
There were many beautiful floral tributes, 
especially from the members of his class, the 
Portland Rotary Club, and the Maine Automobile 
Association. The honorary bearers were Presi- 
dent Sills, Professor Woodruff, Professor Moody, 
Professor Hutchins, Professor Mitchell, Profes- 
sor Ham, Professor Burnett, Barrett Potter '78, 
secretary of the board of trustees, Dwight R. 
Pennell '98 of Lewiston, and D. W. Hoegg, Jr., 
of Portland. The burial was in the Evergreen 
Cemetery in Portland. 



TIMELY HIT IN TENTH SAVED GAME FOR 
BOWDOIN. 

Paul Mason '20, starting a regular game for 
the first time this season against Tufts last Sat- 
urday at Medford, set up for himself the finest 
record made by a Bowdoin pitcher for a long 
time, when he held the strong Tufts aggregation 
hitless until two men had been retired in the 
tenth inning. With such pitching it is little 
wonder that the Bowdoin team came through 
with a clean victory over its Massachusetts rival 
by the score of 2 to 0. Mason struck out 10 men, 
walked no one, and hit one man. Only four 
Tufts men reached first, but none of these ever 
saw second. The one man who scored a hit off 
the Bowdoin pitcher was Callahan, a pinch 
hitter in the very last inning with two out. The 
game was a brilliant pitching duel from start to 
finish with Mason having the edge over the Tufts 
twirler all the time. Weafer of Tufts held Bow- 
doin to three hits up to the tenth inning, two 
singles by Capt. Donnell, and one by Caspar. 

In the first of the tenth, with one down, Racine 
reached first, when his grounder was fumbled 
by the Tufts second baseman. Grover walked, 
and then Mason hit to the shortstop, on which 
play Ring failed to cover second for a forceout, 
and consequently the bases were filled. Racine 
was forced out at home when Donnell hit a 
grounder to the first baseman. With two out, 
Cook delivered a swift liner to right, scoring 
both Grover and Mason with the winning runs. 

Although the weather was really too cold for 
baseball, both teams pulled off some excellent 
defensive work. For Bowdoin the playing of 
Donnell and Cook was sensational, while the 
Tufts outfielders cut off more than one drive 
which would have meant extra bases. 

Considering the first few games of the season, 
Bowdoin looks by far the best on paper for the 
Maine series. Bates made the best showing 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



33 



against Harvard, but Bowdoin has nothing to 
fear from that quarter after the exhibition game 
on Patriots' Day. Colby was easily defeated by 
Harvard not long ago by a score of 6 to o, and 
last Saturday, Fitzpatrick of Boston College held 
the University of Maine outfit hitless in a seven- 
inning affair, which the Massachusetts team won 
6 to o. 

The score : 

BOWDOIN. 

ab r bh po a 

Donnell, 3b 5 2 2 2 

Cook, 2b 5 o I 4 4 

Finn, ss 4 o o 4 

Caspar, ib 4 o i 13 

Prosser, cf 4 o 

Hall, c 4 o 9 2 

Racine, rf 4 o 2 

Grover, If i i o 

Mason, p 4 i o o 

Totals 35 2 4 30 12 

TUFTS. 

.lb r bh po a 

Gladu, cf 4 o I o 

Roache, If ' 4 5 

Jeffery, c _ 3 i 2 

Ring, 2b 4 3 2 

Baker, ss 3 6 

Mackenzie, rf 3 o 4 o 

Sullivan, ib 3 o o 13 i 

Reiter, 3b 3 o i o 

Weafer, p 3 o 2 5 

* Callahan i i 

t Tirrell i 

Totals 32 I 30 16 

Bowdoin o o o o 2 — 2 

Errors, Ring 2, Baker, Finn, Mason. Stolen bases, 
Caspar. Left on bases. Tufts 2 ; Bowdoin 6. Base on 
balls, off Weafer 3. Hit by pitcher, by Weafer, Grover ; 
by Mason, Jeffery. Struck out by Weafer i : by Mason 
7. Wild pitches, Weafer. 

* Batted for Baker in loth. 
t Batted for Mackenzie in loth. 



FIRST SIX-INNING GAME OF INTER- 
FRATERNITY LEAGUE. 

In the closest game yet played in the Inter- 
fraternity Baseball League, April 22, the Zeta 
Psi nine defeated the Chi Psis in a six-inning 
game on the Delta. The Chi Psi team piled 
up a lead of seven runs in the first four innings, 
but after that the Zetes scored nine runs against 
their opponents' one. In the last half of the 
fifth with the score 9 to 6 in favor of the Chi 
Psi's, Lombard scored a home run on a hit over 
the short right field fence, and a few minutes 
later the Zetes tied the score. They then had 
the bases full with only one out. Sylvester 
then struck out two men, ending the inning. In 



the sixth, Morin drove in the tenth run for the 
Chi Psi's with a clean single to left. In the last 
half, however, after the Zetes had placed men on 
second and third, the Chi Psis lost the game 
when Gray threw the ball past first base, letting 
two runners score. The final score was 11 to 10. 

Score by innings : 

I 2 3 4 s 6— r. h. 

Zeta Psi 2 o 4 3 2 — 1 1 6 

Chi Psi 3 o I 5 o I — 10 12 

Batteries : Zeta Psi, Lee and Haggery ; Chi 
Psi, Sylvester and O. L. Berry. 



BRADBURY DEBATES. 

The Bradbury Debates this year will be held 
Monday afternoon, May 5, at 3.30, in Memorial 
Hall. Contrary to the usual custom there will 
be but two teams competing for the prize. These 
teams will be the varsity teams that will debate 
with Brown and Wesleyan on May 20. The 
question for debate is, "Resolved, That immigra- 
tion into the United States should be prohibited 
for a period of five years following the ratifica- 
tion of the Peace Treatjr." The speakers on the 
affirmative team will consist of Chadbourne '19, 
Buker '21, and Hatch '21, with Young '21, as 
alternate. On the negative Taylor '20, Helson 
'21, and McGown '21, with Coburne '21, as al- 
ternate will participate. The winners of this 
debate will receive a prize of $40 and the losers 
$20. 



PSI U.'S LOSE TO NON-FRATERNITY. 

The Psi U.'s were defated by the Non- 
fraternity team on the Delta last Tuesday by a 
score of 12 to 7. The non-fraternity men suc- 
ceeded in knocking' Ricker from the box in the 
first inning and pounded his successor, Mundie. 
At no time in the game were the non-fraternity 
men in real danger of losing the game. 

Batteries : Non-fraternity, Smith, Canter. Psi 
U.'s, Ricker and Mundie, Dunbar. 



EX-SENATOR BURTON TO SPEAK ON 
LEAGUE OF NATIONS. 

Ex-Senator Theodore E. Burton is to give an 
address on the League of Nations at Memorial 
Hall Monday, May 5. Ex-Senator Burton was 
elected senator for the term 1909-1915. In 1916 
he received strong support as Republican presi- 
dential candidate. He is now President of the 
Merchants' National Bank, New York City. Ex- 
Senator Burton is a national figure and well 
qualified to speak on the big issue of a League 
of Nations. 



BOWDOIN ORIElSfT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Tuesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 

department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Akimni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 Exchange 

Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 

Cloyd E. Small, 1920 

John L. Berry, 1921 

Harry Helson, 1921 

George E. Houghton, 1921 

Crosby E. Redman, 192 i 

Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Albert E. Hurrell, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 192 i Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 



Vol. XLIX. APRIL 29, 1919 



No. 4 



Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

Professor George T. Files. 

In the death of Professor George T. Files, last 
Wednesday, the college made one of her greatest 
war sacrifices. It was as a direct result of the 
heavy nervous strain of his work overseas that 
he was forced to resort to medical care at the 
Deaconess ' Hospital, Boston, where his death 
occurred. 

Seldom in the history of an institution of learn- 



ing is it the good fortune of the student body 
to come in contact with a man of such high 
ideals and inspiring personality as Professor 
Files possessed. To the alumni, who were in 
college with him, his death is that of a "loyal 
classmate and friend" ; to the members of the 
faculty and administration, it comes as that of an 
able and inspiring associate and a capable or- 
ganizer; to the student body and the younger 
alumni, his death means the loss of a kindly and 
cheerful teacher, a respected advisor, and a sym- 
pathetic friend. 

Professor Files was a true Christian gentle- 
man. His classes meant hours of enjoyment; his 
broad and liberal education, in part the result of 
extensive travels, and his magnetic personality 
enabled him to attract the keenest interest from 
his students. In class he availed himself of every 
opportunity to encourage the student, whatever 
the grade of his work, provided it was the result 
of honest effort. It was his sympathetic nature 
and liberality of thought which endeared him to 
all who have been associated with him. 

Professor Files has always been an enthusiastic 
worker in community and State affairs. His 
loss in this field of enterprise will be keenly felt. 
For us in college, however, his death means a 
seemingly irreparable loss. His family and 
friends may find consolation, however, in the 
fact that he had the great satisfaction of having 
contributed his best services to the cause which 
was always so dear to him. 



The Student Forum — A Success. 

The first meeting of the Student Forum last 
term at which the League of Nations was dis- 
cussed by Mr. Robert T. Whitehouse of Port- 
land proved a success even beyond the fondest 
expectations of its proponents. The second 
meeting promises to equal if not surpass the 
standard set by the first. The subject of "Col- 
lege Athletics" which Dean Nicolson of Wesleyan 
will take up at this meeting should be of vital 
interest to all of us. It has often been said that 
the alumni do not give their best to our athletics 
because we have no settled athletic policy. Every 
student should hear what Dean Nicolson has to 
say on the subject and enter heartily into the 
discussion. Athletics constitute the back-bone of 
our college life. If there is any way to improve 
our present system, let's find it and adopt it. 
This can best be accomplished by free and open 
discussion such as the Student Forum offers. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



35 



COLONEL GIBSON SPEAKS IN MEMORIAL 
HALL. 

First-hand information of the wonderful work 
done in the war by the American Red Cross in 
Europe and on the battlefields of France was 
given last Friday evening in a lecture in Me- 
morial Hall by Colonel Harvey D. Gibson, Red 
Cross Commissioner to France, chairman of the 
American Red Cross in Europe, and one of 
Bowdoin's most prominent and honored gradu- 
ates. The lecture was informal and Colonel 
Gibson did not seek to deliver an address, but 
told of the work of the Red Cross, his experi- 
ence in the work, and gave many striking and de- 
scriptive illustrations, which were characteristic 
of the powerful influence this organization known 
as "The Greatest Mother in the World" played 
in the war. 



STUDENT FORUM TO DISCUSS COLLEGE 
ATHLETICS. 

The Studerrt Forum has very fortunately been 
able to secure Deaji Frank W. Nicolson of 
Wesleyan to discuss "College Athletics" in a 
meeting to be held in the Union, Tuesday even- 
ing, May 6. Dean Nicolson was President of 
the Association of New England Colleges for 
Conference on Athletics 1907-11 and from 1908 
to the present time has continually served in the 
capacity as secretary-treasurer of the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association. Being in direct 
touch with all phases of college athletics, he is 
perhaps better able than anyone else at this 
time to discuss this matter, which is of so vital 
importance to us here at Bowdoin. It is hoped 
that all who are interested in the policies of the 
college in so far as they greatly affect the athletic 
life of the college will attend. 



MUSICAL CLUBS TRIP. 

The Musical Clubs scored a big hit in Frye 
Hall at Portland last Wednesday evening on the 
occasion of their annual concert and dance in 
that city. There was a large attendance present 
and quite a number went up from Brunswick 
to hear the clubs. The concert was under the 
auspices of the Delta Epsilon Sorority of Deer- 
ing High School. The Colonial Orchestra of 
Portland furnished music for dancing which fol- 
lowed the concert. 

The clubs on Thursday morning went to Bos- 
ton where they gave their annual concert at the 
Hotel Somerset under the auspices of the Bow- 
doin Club of Boston. There they were met with 



a hearty reception by the , graduates of the col- 
lege and their many other friends. 

The clubs went from Boston to Beverly and 
gave a concert in that city Friday evening. The 
concert was in charge of the Beverly Singing 
Clubs which planned and carried out an elaborate 
affair for the boys. Following the concert the 
Bowdoin men were tendered a big reception and 
dance by the members of the Singing Club. 

Following is the program which was rendered 
at the various concerts : 

Rise, Sons of Bowdoin Sills-Burnett 

Violin Solo — En Bateau Baussais 

Mr. Howe. 

A Song of the Sea Stebbins 

Glee Club. 

Reading Selected 

Mr. Asnault. 

Vocal Solo — The Americans Come Foster 

Mr. Hill. 
Mandolin Club. 

Violin Solo Selected 

Mr. Howe. 

With You, Dear Jones 

Glee Club. 

Vocal Solo — "O Lovely Night" Bullard 

Mr. Hill. 

Reading Selected 

Mr. Asnault. 
Mandolin Club. 
Bowdoin Eeata, Phi Chi Bowdoin Songs 

PRESIDENT SILLS' TRIBUTE TO THE LATE 
PROFESSOR GEORGE T. FILES. 

Only those who have an intimate knowledge 
of the administration of Bowdoin can realize 
fully the great changes that have taken place 
in the facult}' in the past ten years. On the list 
we can no longer read the familiar names of 
those who for periods from 25 to 40 years gave 
their best to the college, the honored names of 
Lee and Robinson and Chapman and Little and 
Hj-de and Johnson. And when another who has 
been all his working days an officer of the college 
is taken away, his loss is even more deeply felt. 
Professor Files was an ardent and enthusiastic 
teacher, a capable organizer and a brave man. 
We know now what a real danger it was for 
him to have volunteered for overseas work; and 
his offer and his services were heroic, sealed as 
they later were by his death. 

Every member of the faculty who has served 
here with distinction has left his own individual 
impress on the college. The name of Pro- 
fessor Files is associated with his work as 
registrar of the college, on the committee on 
buildings and grounds, and as a popular teacher. 
To him and to Professor William MacDonald 



36 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



we owe in very great measure the present in- 
ternal organization of the college. They changed 
old-fashioned methods for new and put the 
recording and examining and registering activities 
of the college on a sound basis. It was hard 
work — often mere drugery — but they saved much 
time for others and gladly attended to the dreary 
details themselves. Then again Mr. Files took 
a deep interest in the development of the campus. 
He always advocated a liberal attitude. He felt 
that it was from every standpoint desirable to 
beautify the grounds; and he was properly in- 
dignant when niggardly methods were employed. 
Most of us New Englanders do not see the im- 
portance of beautiful surroundings especially 
when they cost something. Mr. Files was broad- 
minded and experienced enough to advocate a 
very generous policy, and we who love our fair 
campus are greatly in his debt. 

As a teacher he was unusually popular with 
his students. He had a reasonable standard ; 
but he always gave the student the benefit of the 
doubt and took into kindly consideration any 
earnest effort. He made his classes interesting 
by his wide knowledge of men and of affairs. 
He was a very kindly man, very enthusiastic, 
very open-hearted. He will be greatly missed 
in home, in college, in town, and in State ; but 
nowhere more than by his old pupils. 



TRIBUTE TO PROFESSOR FILES BY SECRE- 
TARY OF CLASS OF 1889. 

William M. Emery of Fall River, Mass., the 
secretary of the Class of 1889, has sent to the 
members of Professor Files' class, the follow- 
ing tribute in his honor; 

"George Taylor Files. 

Born, Sept. 23, 1866. 

Died, April 23, 1919. 

"Our classmate gave up his life through his 
devotion to the cause of the men who fought in 
the fearful war. Returning to Brunswick last 
winter, broken in health after long months of 
service with the Y. M. C. A. in France, he made 
a gallant fight against the inroads of disease con- 
tracted during his work among the soldiers, but 
the struggle was in vain. He passed away at the 
Deaconess Hospital in Boston, where he had been 
since January. 

"Practically his entire life had been centered 
in the interests of the college. As a leader in 
our student activities, as instructor and professor 
since 1890, as registrar for five years, as head 
of the department of German, and influential in 
faculty circles, our Brother Files labored unceas- 



ingly and effectively for the welfare of Bowdoin. 
With the same zeal he volunteered his services in 
the war. His affection for the Class of '89 was 
steadfast and abiding. At two of our reunions, 
in 1904, and on the occasion of our memorial 25th 
anniversary, five years ago, he gladly welcomed 
us to his hospitable home, and as guests we 
shared the unalloyed pleasure that animated him 
as the thoughtful and genial host. 

"We honor his unstinted devotion and self- 
sacrifice, and cherish his memory as a loyal class- 
mate and friend. 

"William M. Emery, Class Secretary." 



STUDENT COUNCIL RESOLUTION ON 
DEATH OF PROFESSOR FILES. 

The death of Professor Files has made every 
Bowdoin undergraduate feel the inestimable loss 
of a friendly instructor and brotherly councilor. 
After graduating from Bowdoin he studied at 
home and abroad, returning to devotedly give 
his natural ability, his extensive knowledge and 
his wealth of experience to his Alma Mater. 
Actively interested in all undergraduate activities, 
vitally concerned with the policies of the college, 
deeply enlisted in public affairs, his sudden death 
is a loss not only to the undergraduates, but also 
to the alumni and the State. Ever looking on 
the bright side of life, ever seeing and striving 
to develop the best in a man made him dearly 
beloved by all with whom he came in contact. 
Harkening unto the call of humanity in this 
crisis of the world's history, he left the college 
to give his services and his life where they were 
more needed. Although departed from us his 
life and memory will long guide Bowdoin men 
in their endeavors. 

For the Council, 

F. P. Hall, 
Roy Foulke, 
E. S. Paul, 2d. 



TRIBUTES TO PROFESSOR FILES. 

The death of Professor Files will be gravely 
felt in College, town and State. To his ability 
and hospitality as a teacher, to which hundreds 
of his students can testify, he added the ability 
of an organizer. He was one of two men who, 
together, first organized the internal adminis- 
tration of Bowdoin College, in the office of regis- 
trar, on the basis of efficiency. In the affairs of 
the town, in the business and social life, he was 
widely effective. The Dramatic Club, the Vil- 
lage Improvement Society, as well as local ad- 
ministrative matters, profited by his constructive 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



energy. In a conversation at the club not long 
since, I heard him described as a man who could 
not be spared. And he was a very kind man. 
The last months of his life were months of pain, 
patiently borne, with great regard for others. 
The loss of our community is in no way 
measured by the space required to record it. 

Professor Charles T. Burnett. 



In the death of Professor Files Bowdoin Col- 
lege has suffered a great loss. For more than 
25 years he has been one of her most able and 
enthusiastic teachers, one who achieved results 
by leading rather than driving. His genial and 
sympathetic nature, his thorough knowledge of 
the subject which he was teaching and his 
enthusiastic interest in it, made his students feel 
at once that he was their friend and counsellor 
and aroused in them a desire to do their best. 
As a member of the faculty he did not confine 
his work to the class room. He was interested 
in all the activities of the college — social, dra- 
matic, musical, and athletic. As the first regis- 
trar of the college he rendered a much-needed 
service in systematizing and extending the work 
of the ofifice, and as a member of the Buildings 
and Grounds Committee he has done much to- 
ward making and keeping the Bowdoin campus 
and its buildings clean, orderly, and beautiful. 
He has also made the good influence of the col- 
lege felt in the town and the State by his active 
participation in public affairs. His death is with- 
out doubt due to the hard strain of his work 
for the Y. M. C. A. in France. In his death, 
hardly less unselfish and heroic than if he had 
died in battle, his college, which today deeply 
mourns his loss, may also take a solemn pride. 
WiLMOT B. Mitchell. 



The death of George T. Files will bring deep 
sorrow to the people of Brunswick. The spirit 
which prompted him to enlist in the service in 
France, which undoubtedly caused his untimely 
death, was characteristic of his nature. While 
he has been best known in the State at large as 
an original and consistent champion of improved 
highways and through his long connection with 
Bowdoin College, his fellow townsmen will also 
recall his great interest in town affairs. His 
active assistance could always be secured for 
every civic improvement and his democratic 
tastes, affable manner and personal charm 
brought him the cordial friendship and high 
esteem of the entire community. Our loss is 
indeed great. Hon. E. W. Wheeler. 



CALENDAR. 

April 30 — Baseball, Chi Psi vs. Non-fraternity. 

May I — Baseball, Psi Upsilon vs. Kappa 
Sigma. 

May 2 — Baseball, Delta Upsilon vs. Delta 
Kappa Epsilon. 

May 3 — Baseball, Bowdoin vs. Colby at Bruns- 
wick; dual track meet with New Hampshire 
State at Durham; dual tennis meet at Lewiston. 

May 5 — Bradbury debates, 3.30, Hubbard Hall; 
Ex-Senator Burton on the League of Nations. 
8.00 p. M., Memorial Hall. 

May 6 — Student Forum, Dean Nicolson of 
Wesleyan, on College Athletics, 8.00 p. m.^ Union. 
Baseball, Bowdoin vs. Boston College at Boston. 

^n tt)c Campus 

Coach Magee was the referee at the wrestling 
bout in the Town Hall last Monday night. Many 
of the boys suspended the evening's work to see 
the matches. 

Donald Higgins ex-' 19, of Brewer, returned 
to college from service last Wednesday and is 
being cordially greeted on the Campus. 

During the recent telephone strike which tied 
up all lines, several of the college men worked 
nights in the Portland exchange office. 

Sergeant Whitney Coombs ex-'i8, returned to 
college last Wednesday to complete his college 
course, having returned from France but a short 
time, where he was in the Ambulance service 
and later transferred to the Heavy Artillery. 

Hart '21, was in charge of the Gardiner tele- 
phone exchange office during the recent strike. 
It is reported that he had several thrilling ex- 
periences. 

The flag on Memorial Hall was placed at half 
mast and the chapel bell was tolled when word 
was received Wednesday morning of the death 
of Professor Files. 

Quite a number went to Boston last week to 
see the parade of the Yankee Division in that 
city Friday afternoon. 

The loving cup to be presented to Lieut. Col. 
John H. Duval from the student body in the 
near future was purchased this last week in 
Boston by a committee appointed from the Stu- 
dent Council. 

For the college boys to turn forest fire fighters 
seems to be getting to be a regular thing now. 
Every few days some forest fire in the vicinitj 
of the college breaks out and the men turn out 
to aid in extinguishing it. 

A number from the college attended the pre- 
sentation of "Behind the Front" by the Bruns- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



wick Musical Club last Wednesday evening in 
the Town Hall. 

With a large crowd in Boston to see the 26th 
Division parade, the baseball team which played 
Tufts, the musical club' Massachusetts trip and 
the usual week end absences, the campus was 
pretty well deserted last week end. 

The Bowdoin Musical Clubs are giving their 
annual concert and dance in Bangor this evening. 
The Bangor papers have been featuring the con- 
cert and a large crowd will probably be on hand 
to hear the boys. They will wind up their sea- 
son in Fairfield tomorrow night, Wednesday, 
with a concert and dance in the assembly hall of 
Lawrence High School. 

Coach Magee was in Boston over the week 
end. 

The Portland Evening Express in its editorial 
column of April 24, the night after the concert 
and dance of the Bowdoin Musical Clubs in Frye 
Hall made the following comment on the affair, 
"The Bowdoin boys made a hit last evening in 
their annual concert and it seemed good to have 
them with us again." 

Coach Magee is having little impromptu track 
meets at the Athletic Field for the track candi- 
dates to get a line on the strength of the team 
which will face the New Hampshire State boys 
in the dual track meet this coming Saturday at 
Durham, N. H. The team as yet has not been 
picked for the meet. 

Meacham '22, is steadily improving at the In- 
firmary and it is expected that he will be able 
to leave there within a very short time. 

Mr. Hartley C. Baxter '78, returned to Bruns- 
wick last week from a trip to Miami, Florida. 

The Kappa Sigma fraternity held its annual 
installation banquet at the Hotel Eagle last Tues- 
day evening. An excellent menu was enjoyed 
which was followed by short speeches from the 
officers-elect and the retiring officers. 



aOitD tt)e Jfacultp 

President Sills addressed the Portland Social 
Workers Club at its last meeting, held Wednes- 
day, April 23, at the Hotel Falmouth. He took 
for his topic "True and False Americanism." 

Professor Frank E. Woodruff spoke before 
the Portland Equal Franchise League at the 
home of Mrs. George S. Hunt last Wednesday 
afternoon. His subject was "Woman Suffrage." 

President Kenneth C. M. Sills with U. S. Sena- 
tor Hale were among the special guests at the 
second annual ball of Company C, Third Maine 
Regiment, last Monday evening in the City Hall, 



Portland. 

Professor Davis was a judge at a debate held 
last Thursday at Auburn between Edward Little 
High School of that city and Deering High 
School. 

The funeral of Professor Files, who died in 
Boston April 23, was held in Portland Saturday. 
Many of the faculty attended. 

Professor Ham was one of the judges of a 
debate between Hebron Academy and Edward 
Little High School, which was held at Hebron 
last Thursday evening. 

Professor Davis was a judge at the debate be- 
tween Deering High School and Hebron 
Academy, which was held at Deering last Thurs- 
day evening. 

Professor Woodruff was a judge at the de- 
bate between Bates College and Clark College 
at Lewiston, last Friday. 



aiumni J13otcs 

Tn the last issue of the Phi Beta Kappa Key, 
there appeared "In Memoriams" for five Bow- 
doin alumni. The first of these was Judge Wil- 
liam LeBaron Putnam '55, LL.D., who died a 
year ago last February. The next was a brief 
sketch of the life of Jonathan Young Stanton '56, 
Litt.D., who died in February, 19 18. There were 
also brief accounts of the lives of August New- 
bert Luiscott '62, who died in March, 1918, and 
of Usher Ward Cutts '67, A.M., who died last 
May. The last of these five men was Professor 
Henry Johnson '74, Litt.D., whose death oc- 
curred February 7, 1918. The Key has an out- 
line of his life together with a list of his most 
important writings. 

'60 — The dedication of the Thomas Memorial 
Library at Cape Elizabeth, Maine, took place 
a few days ago. The early history of the build- 
ing is very interesting. All the work of pre- 
paring it for a library has been done under the 
direction of Hon. William Widgery Thomas, 
formerly LTnited States Minister to Sweden and 
Norway. The principal address of the dedication 
ceremony was delivered by Mr. Thomas. Among 
the other speakers was Hon. Percival P. Baxter 
'98 of Portland. 

ex-'67 — Dwinel French Thompson, for forty- 
four years a member of the faculty of Rens- 
selaer Poyltechnic Institute, died at his home in 
Troy, N. Y., April 19. He was born at Bangor, 
Me., January i, 1846. In 1863 he entered Bow- 
doin where he stayed two years before trans- 
ferring to Dartmouth. He was the captain of 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



39 



the first baseball team at Dartmouth, where he 
earned the title of "father of baseball." He 
graduated from Dartmouth in 1869, and then 
held the position of tutor at that institution for 
three years. In 1872, he was appointed pro- 
fessor of descriptive geometry, stereotomy, and 
drawing at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 
Owing to ill health, he was obliged to retire in 
1916, when he was elected professor emeritus 
of the college. Professor Thompson had one of 
the best collections of Indian relics in New York 
State. He was always deeply interested in 
archaeolog'ical research. He was a member of 
the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity, and he was 
also an honorary member of the Sigma Psi and 
Tau Beta Pi fraternities, and the Phalanx so- 
ciety. 

'72 — Samuel Lane Gross, who has been a 
lawyer in New York City for over forty years, 
died April 16 at his residence, 159 West 76th 
street. New York City. He was born at Bruns- 
wick, Me., November 18, 1846. Three years 
after his graduation from Bowdoin he received 
the degree. of A.M., and one year after that, 
Columbia niversity awarded him the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Since that time, until his 
death he has been a practicing lawyer in New 
York. 

'94 — Information has been recently received 
at the college that Reverend Albert J. Lord ar- 
rived at Paris March 17 to do Y. M. C. A. work. 
.He is expected to remain in Europe for about 
six months, and his work will probably be with 
the Army of Occupation. He is the second mem- 
ber of his class to be engaged in war work on 
the other side, the other member being Reverend 
Frederick J. Libby, who is with the Friends' 
Unit of the Red Cross. 

'02 — Announcement is made of the engage- 
ment of Miss Ruth Steinthal of East Ninety- 
first street. New York City, to George Rowland 
Walker of the same city. Mr. Walker is a gradu- 
ate of the Harvard Law School, and is .a mem- 
ber of the Lawyers (Harvard niversity) Club, 
and the Ardsley Club. 

Medic-'o2 — Two pamphlets by Dr. Eugene R. 
Kelley have been received by the Bowdoin Col- 
lege Library. The first is entitled "The Medical 
Profession and the New Public Health." The 
subject of the second is "The Program of the 
Massachusetts State Department of Health 
Against Tuberculosis." Dr. Kelley is the Massa- 
chusetts Commissioner of Health. 

'03 — James B. Perkins of Boothbay Harbor, 
Me., announces his candidacy for the Democratic 



nomination for representative to Congress from 
the Second Maine District. Mr. Perkins has 
been county attorney of Lincoln County and was 
a member of the House of Representatives in 
the last Legislature. 

'04 — A detailed article concerning Dr. William 
E. Lunt, who is now a member of a commission 
to decide some boundaries on the Italian frontier, 
appeared in the Leiviston Sim last Friday. He 
was quoted as saying that the hardest part of 
the work of the peace conference would be if 
Italy refused to accept the terms laid down by 
the delegates. Recent events indicate the truth 
of Dr. Lunt's statement very clearly. 

'10 — Judge Clarence Hale '69, of Portland, not 
long ago received a letter from his son, Lieut. 
Robert Hale '10, that the latter had left France 
in March to go to Russia as a member of a mis- 
sion headed by Lieut. Colonel Warwick Greene. 
According to the letter the mission has been dis- 
patched in the interests of the peace conference 
to learn about conditions in Finland, Esthonia, 
Livonia, Courland and Lithuania, as to Bol- 
shevism and other matters. The mission is to 
report on this subject to the peace conference. 
This will delay Lieut. Hale's return to this 
country until late in June, as he plans to go to 
Oxford to receive the degree of A.M. which will 
be conferred upon him by the English university 
on June 19. 

'13 — There appeared in the March issue of the 
Journal of Political Economy an article by Paul 
H. Douglas entitled "Labor Administration in 
the Shipbuilding Industry During War Time." 



RESOLUTIONS. 



Hall of the Kappa Chapter of Psi Upsilon: 

It is with the deepest sorrow that the Kappa 
Chapter of Psi Upsilon records the death of 
Brother George Taylor Files of the Class of 1889. 
Brother Files was known to us as a wise and 
interested worker, a man of lofty ideals and of 
worthy accomplishments, a constant and devoted 
friend. 

In the fullness of his career, imbued with the 
spirit of sacrifice and of devotion, he contributed 
his services to his country, and, in his ardent 
endeavor to perform his duty as he saw it, he 
has made the noble sacrifice of life itself. 

To his family and immediate friends the 
Kappa extends her deepest sympathy. 
Frederick Orlando Johnson, 
Leland Matthew Goodrich, 
George Edmund Houghton, Jr., 

For the Chapter. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

UNION CANTEEN 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 

Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 

OFFICERS' SHOES 

TAN CALF AND CORDOVAN 

Spiral Puttees 

Army Boots 

AT 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 

DANCING 

MISS JENNIE S. HARVEY 

Evening Class and Assembly every 
Tuesday evening, Town Hall, Bruns- 
wick. Class at 7.30 p. m. Assembly 
at 8.30 p. m. Open to college students. 

Every Monday evening Class and Assembly at 
the Arcade, Bath. 

Private instruction by appointment. Phone 
Bath 151-W. Address 897 Middle street. 




IT WILL HELP ! 
SEND HER THE SAMPLER ! 

Chocolates and confections of 
a quality worthy of your card! 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 
TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 

BATH, MAINE 




COLLAR 

CLUETTPEABODYacCo:lNC: TROYNY 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



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of IBrunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 



We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
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87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16. 



J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The Bowdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



thie: stof^e: of- ^fsocsi^e^^ 

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STUDENTS 

desiring to work an hour or more a day 
can make wages of more than $1.00 pel- 
hour selling America's War for 
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F. B. DICKERSON CO. 

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enclosing 20c in stamps for mailing 
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Telephone 160 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 



Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
A. G. PAGE COMPANY, Bath 



G. G. "".Vilder, 




Cumberland Theatre 

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

ANTONIO MORENO 




THE IRON TEST 

and 

PAULINE FREDERICK 

IN 

OUT OF THE SHADOW 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

CHARLES RAY 
STRING BEANS 



PASTIME THEATRE 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

MAY ALLISON 

IN 

HER INSPIRATION 

and 

THE LION'S CLAWS 

WITH 

MARIE WALCAMP 



Vol. XLIX. No. 5 



MAY 6, 1919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



CONTENTS 




PAGE 


PAGE 


Bowdoin Lost To Colby in Ten- 


Dekes Lost To D. U.'s 


45 


Inning Game 41 


Psi U.'s Won From Kappa Sigs 


45 


New Hampshire Upset Bowdoin 


Alpha Delts Lose To D. U.'s 


45 


in Dual Meet 42 


Bowdoin Swamped Fort Preble 


46 


Bowdoin Graduate Awarded 


1868 Prize Won by Colter 


46 


French Croix de Guerre 43 


Batting and Fielding Averages 


46 


Bowdoin Club of Philadelphia 


Memorial Service to Professor 




Holds Annual Dinner 43 


Files 


46 


Intercollegiate Debating 43 


Tribute to Professor Files 


47 


Editorials : 


Humanities and Military Training 


47 


Where The Blame Lies 44 


On the Campus 


48 


United War Work Fund 44 


With the Faculty 


48 


Communication 44 


Alumni Notes 


48 


Meeting for Pre-Medical Men 45 


Among the Colleges 


49 


Concert in Memorial Hall 45 


Calendar 


49 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Over There" know JUD is in the game. 



LEWISTON JOURNAL 
PRINTSHOP 



BOOK AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING 



School and College Work a Specialty 



12 Lisbon Street, Lewiston, Maine 
LARGEST AND BEST 

stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 

CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 

4 Elm Street 

MESERVE'S FRUIT SHERBET 

The Blended Product of the Natural Juices of 
Sound Ripe Fruit and Berries. A Delicious and 
Healthful Beverage for Receptions, Teas and 
Parties. Prepared only by 

P. J. MESERVE, Pharmacist, 

Near Post Office, Brunswick, Maine. 



Think It Over 



The trend of modern conditions makes 
a knowledge of law necessary to the heads 
of all great industrial enterprises. 

Whether a young man contemplates fol- 
lowing the legal profession, or whether he 
hopes to head ajiy great industrial or- 
ganization, he will find a legal training of 
utmost value to him in after life. 

The forward-looking youth lays his plans 
now for future success. The study of law 
is one great essential to this end. 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

Gives a thorough training in the principles 
of law. Course for LL.B. requires 3 years. 
Men preparing for college or business, 
who wish to plan ahead in selecting a 
school of law, should address, for catalog, 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

H Ashburton Place, Boston 



ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE NATIONAL SURVEY CO. 

MAP MAKERS PUBLISHERS 

Summer positions for college men. Application blanks 
may be obtained of "Cr" ALBERT, '19, 

3 South Maine. 

TOPOGRAPHICAL OFFICES 
CHESTER, VERMONT 



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COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

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SOULES BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 


The College Book Store 

F. W. CHANDLER & SON 


A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office - - Brunswick, Maine 


This year's Tennis Goods are in 

NEW CHAMPIONSHIP BALLS 
55c EACH 


BUTLER'S 


1918 CHAMPIONSHIP BALLS 

40 CENTS. 

We have some of last year's Rackets 




PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSON'S PHARMACY 


on hand which will be sold at 

the old prices, which are 

considerably less than 

this year's prices. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



NEED MONEY 

For college expenses. Do you know what the opportunities are with our line of 
new revised maps. Then why not find out. Do it now. 



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NEW BATWINGS 
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Floral Designs for All Occasions 

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Clothing for Men, Young 

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Special attention to the require- 
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Clothes ready to w^ear and made 
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Fine Haberdashery—Stetson Hats 


FROM $30. 

Haskell & Jones Co. 


Sole Boston Agents for the 
"Stetson special" 


Portland, - - - Maine. 


400 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 



BOWDOIN ORILNT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUN5VIC K. MAINE, MAY 6, 1919 



NO. 5 



BOWDOIN LOST TO COLBY IN TEN INNING 
GAME. 

In a close ten-inning game on the Whittier 
Field last Saturday, Colby defeated Bowdoin in 
the first game of the State championship series. 
Colby won the game largely because the team had 
all the breaks. No one of Colby's six runs was 
earned. Colby won the game by an actual score 
of 6 to 4, but if earned runs alone counted, Bow- 
doin would have come through to the tune of 3 
to o. Mason pitched almost airtight ball until 
the seventh inning, after which Colby hit him 
rather freely. The Bowdoin batters pounded the 
Colby twirler, but the visitors' defense was too 
strong to permit much scoring. Driscoll was 
the only Colby batter who scored any hits off 
Mason before the eighth inning. Finn and Hall 
starred at the bat for Bowdoin, while Prosser 
delivered a perfect single at just the right time 
to drive in one run and set the stage for two 
more. 

Following is an account of the game inning by 
inning : 

First Inning: Taylor flied to Prosser, and 
Nourse fanned. Driscoll drove out a long double 
over Grover's head and took third on the left 
fielders wild throw-in. The Colby catcher then 
succeeded in stealing home while Mason was 
making too long a wind-up. Bucknam was out, 
Mason to Caspar. One hit, one run, one error. 

Donnell was safe when Marshall dropped Buck- 
nam's throw, and took second on Cook's sacrifice, 
Driscoll to Marshall. Finn walked and Caspar 
fanned. Prosser walked, filling the bases. Hall 
ended the inning when he was retired, Fraas to 
Marshall, on a questionable decision by the um- 
pire. No hits, no runs, one error. 

Second Inning: Hayes was retired, Donnell 
to Caspar, and then Williams was put out on a 
short hit which Hall threw to Caspar. Grant 
drove a grounder to Caspar. No hits, no runs, 
no errors. 

Holmes flied to Marshall, Grover fanned, and 
Mason flied to Taylor. No hits, no runs, no 
errors. 

Third Inning: Fraas fouled out to Hall, 
Marshall drove a liner to Mason, and Taylor 



struck out. No hits, no runs, no errors. 

Donnell was out, Nourse to Marshall, and 
Cook failed to beat out a bunt which the Colby 
catcher threw to Marshall. Finn walked, but 
Caspar struck out. No hits, no runs, no errors. 

Fourth Inning: Mason threw out Nourse, and 
Donnell took care of Driscoll in the same way, 
and Bucknam ended Colby's half with a foul fly 
to Donnell. No hits, no runs, no errors. 

Prosser was out, Nourse to Marshall. Hall 
drove out Bowdoin's first hit with a clean single 
to left. After he stole second, Holmes walked, 
but Grover fanned, and Mason flied out, for the 
second time, to Taylor. One hit, no runs, no 
errors. 

Fifth Inning: Hayes was retired on a 
grounder to Finn, and Williams on another to 
Mason, while Cook handled Grant's roller. No 
hits, no runs, no errors. 

Donnell flied to Williams, but Cook got on 
when his grounder went through Bucknam. He 
took second on Finn's hard drive to centre. 
Caspar struck out, but Prosser hit a single to 
right, scoring Cook, and putting Finn on third. 
Prosser stole second, and then Hall walloped a 
double over Grant's head in right field, and two 
more runs came across. Holmes flied to Taylor. 
Three hits, three runs, one error. 

Sixth Inning : Fraas was put out on a 
grounder to Caspar, Marshall flied to Prosser, 
and Taylor popped one up to Cook. No hits, no 
runs, no errors. 

Pulsifer went out in right field in place of 
Grant. Grover dropped a single behind third 
base. Mason hit a grounder to deep short, and 
Grover reached second when Fraas juggled the 
ball, but the Bowdoin runner was caught out 
for overrunning the bag. Donnell forced Mason, 
Bucknam to Nourse, and was immediately after 
put out trying to steal second, Driscoll to Nourse. 
One hit, no runs, no errors. 

Seventh Inning: Nourse walked, took second 
on Driscoll's scratch infield hit, and scored when 
Donnell gummed a grounder which appeared to 
be a foot outside the third base line. Driscoll 
reached third on the play, and Bucknam got to 
second. Hayes was hit by a pitched ball, filling 
the bases. Williams forced Driscoll at the plate, 



42 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Finn to Hall, but two runs came across when 
the Bowdoin shortstop fumbled Pulsifer's 
grounder, on which play Williams reached third. 
Pulsifer stole second, but Fraas fanned the 
breezes and Marshall was out, Mason to Caspar. 
One hit, three runs, two errors. 

Cook was out, Hayes to Marshall, but Finn 
poked out a hit to centre. The single was use- 
less, however, as Caspar was retired on a 
grounder to Hayes, and Prosser on another to 
Nourse. One hit, no runs, no errors. 

Eighth Inning : Taylor was out on a grounder 
to Finn, but Nourse singled. Driscoll hit a fly 
to Prosser, who relayed the ball to Caspar, catch- 
ing Nourse off the bag. One hit, no runs, no 
errors. 

Nourse handled Hall's grounder, Holmes struck 
out, and Grover hit a feeble roller to the pitcher. 
No hits, no runs, no errors. 

Ninth Inning: Bucknam and Hayes struck 
out, and although William singled, he was caught 
out stealing. One hit, no runs, no errors. 

Mason was hit by a pitched ball, but he was 
forced at second on Donnell's bunt, Driscoll to 
Nourse. Cook singled, putting Donnell on sec- 
ond. Finn flied to Taylor, but Caspar sent a hit 
over Fraas' head, scoring Donnell with the tying 
run, and sending Cook to third. Prosser fanned, 
ending the inning. Two hits, one run, no errors. 

Tenth Inning: Pulsifer struck out, but Fraas 
knocked out a two-base hit to right, and took 
third on Marshall's single to centre. Marshall 
stole second. Taylor hit a grounder to Caspar, 
who uncorked a wild throw to the plate, letting 
in the two winning runs. Nourse flied to Grover, 
and Driscoll was out, Mason to Caspar. Two 
hits, two runs, one error. 

Hall grounded out to Hayes, and Holmes to 
Bucknam. The game ended when Grover was 
retired on a grounder to Fraas. No hits, no 
runs, no errors. 

The score : 

COLBY. 

ab r bh po a e 

Taylor, If 5 o 4 o 

Nourse, 2b 4 i i 3 5 o 

Driscoll, c 5 I 2 7 4 

Bucknam, p 4 i o 4 i 

Hayes, 3b 3 i o 3 o 

Williams, cf 4 o i i o o 

Grant, rf 2 o o o o 

Pulsifer, rf 2 o o o 

Fraas, ss 4 i i i 3 

Marshall, ib 4 i i 14 o i 

Totals 37 6 6 30 19 2 



BOWDOIN. 

ab r bh po a e 

Donnell, 3b 5 i i 2 i 

Cook, 2b 4 I I 2 I o 

Finn, ss 3 i 2 3 i 

Caspar, ib - 5 o i 14 i 

Prosser, rf 4 i i 3 i 

Hall, c 5 o 2 8 2 

Holmes, cf 4 o o o 

Grover, If 5 o i i i 

Mason, p 3 i 5 

Totals 38 4 8 30 14 4 

Innings: i 23456789 10 

Colby 100000300 2 — 6 

Bowdoin 000030001 o — 4 

Two-base hits, Driscoll, Hall, Fraas. Sacrifice hit. 
Cook. Stolen bases, Driscoll, Pulsifer, Marshall, Pros- 
ser, Hall. Earned runs, Bowdoin 3. Left on bases, 
Colby 3, Bowdoin 10. First base on errors, Colby 2, 
Bowdoin 2. Double play, Prosser and Caspar. Bases 
on balls, off Bucknam 4, off Mason. Struck out, by 
Bucknam 7, by Mason 6. Hit by pitched ball, Mason 
(by Bucknam), Hayes (by Mason). Umpire, Conway 
of Bath. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE UPSET BOWDOIN IN 
DUAL MEET. 

To the great surprise of the Bowdoin men, the 
New Hampshire track team succeeded in winning 
the dual meet at Durham last Saturday by a 
margin of 10 1-3 points. The final score was 
(>"] 2-3 to 57 1-3. Both teams were well balanced 
except in the hurdles and weights. In spite of 
the fact that Savage did not run in the high 
hurdles, Bowdoin took 15 out of a possible 18 
points in the two barrier races. The big surprise 
of the afternoon came in the half mile, in which 
Captain Cleaves was beaten by O'Leary of New 
Hampshire. In this race none of the runners 
would set the pace until the second quarter, when 
Cleaves took the lead, with O'Leary close behind 
him. They ran side by side towards the end of 
the race, but finally the New Hampshire man 
broke ahead, and won the race by a good margin. 
O'Leary won this race after taking second in 
the quarter mile. 

In the mile and two-mile, Bowdoin again failed 
to score the number of points expected. Night- 
ingale, the star New England cross-country run- 
ner, and Leath walked away with the mile, while 
Goodwin of Bowdoin took third. In the two mile 
these three men had a very close race, but Night- 
ingale came through with a lead of four of five 
yards over Goodwin at the finish. 

Out of the 14 events, the Bowdoin team took 
six first places and seven seconds. Averill won 
the 220-yard dash in the time of 22 4-5 seconds. 
Thompson won the high hurdles, and Foulke beat 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Savage in the low hurdles. Ellms took first 
in the hammer throw, and second in the discus. 
Higgins won the high jump, and Parent the 
broad jump. O'Leary and Nightingale were the 
individual stars of the meet. 

The summary : 

100-Yard Dash— Won by Felker, N. H. State; Hol- 
brook of Bowdoin, second ; third, Averill of Bowdoin. 
Time lo 2-55. 

220-Yard Dash — Won by Averill of Bowdoin ; second, 
Felker of N. H. State; third, Holbrook of Bowdoin. 
Time 22 4-5S. 

120-Yard High Hurdles — Won by Thompson of 
Bowdoin ; second, Stevens of N. H. State ; third, Hol- 
brook of Bowdoin, disqualified. Time 17s. 

220-Yard Low Hurdles — Won by Foulke of Bowdoin; 
second, Savage of Bowdoin ; third, Parent of Bowdoin. 
Time 29s. 

440-Yard Dash — Won by Melville of N. H. State; 
second, O'Leary of N. H. State ; third. Savage of Bow- 
doin. Time 54 1-5S. 

880-Yard Run— Won by O'Leary of N. H. State; 
second, Cleaves of Bowdoin ; third, Hunt of Bowdoin. 
Time 2m. 6 4-55. 

Mile Run — Won by Leath of N. H. State; second, 
Nightingale of N. H. State ; third, Goodwin of Bow- 
doin. Time 4m 51 2-5S. 

Two Mil'e Run — Won by Nightingale of N. H. State ; 
second, Goodwin .of Bowdoin ; third, Leath of N. H. 
State. Time lom 25 3-5S. 

Shot Put — Won by Andrews, N. H. State ; second, 
Batchelder of N. H. State; third, Sawyer of N. H. 
State. Distance, 36 feet 3 in. 

Hammer Throw — Won by Ellms of Bowdoin ; second, 
Sawyer of N. H. State; third, Cassilo of N. H. State. 
Distance, in feet, 4 inches. 

Discus Throw — Won by Sawyer of N. H. State ; 
second, Ellms of Bowdoin ; third, Andrews of N. H. 
State. Distance, 105 feet 8 inches. 

High Jump — Won by Higgins of Bowdoin ; second, 
Nansell of N. H. State; third, Stevens of N. H. State. 
Height, 5 feet, 6 inches. 

Pole Vault — Won by Nute of N. H. State ; second, 
Cook of Bowdoin ; third. Brown and Creed of N. H. 
State, and Cole of Bowdoin tied. Height 10 feet. 

Broad Jump — Won by Parent of Bowdoin ; second, 
Dostie of Bowdoin ; third, O'Leary of N. H. State. 
Distance, 20 feet 6 1-8 inches. 

Referee and starter, Archie Hahn of Brown. 



BOWDOIN GRADUATE AWARDED FRENCH 
CROIX DE GUERRE. 

The great part which the loyal sons of Bow- 
doin played in the war is coming more and more 
to the front as the lists of citations for bravery 
are being announced. The latest is the honor 
conferred on Major William D. Ireland of the 
Class of 1916 who was among the 35 soldiers 
of the famous 26th Division who received the 
French Croix de Guerre at Camp Devens 
April 22, where the division is being stationed 
waiting discharge. Of those men who re- 
ceived the coveted honor, the only one whose 



rank was higher than Major Ireland's was Brig- 
adier General Charles H. Cole of the 52nd In- 
fantry Brigade. 

Major Ireland's citation was for bravery in 
action, for he has been with the Yankee Division 
throughout the war and was in action each time 
the division entered the lines. 



BOWDOIN CLUB OF PHILADELPHIA HOLDS 
ANNUAL DINNER. 

The Bowdoin Club of Philadelphia held its 
annual dinner on Friday evening, April 11, at 
Kugler's. Frederick L. Smith '86, presided. 
The guest of the evening was Mr. W. T. Plum- 
mer, president of the Main Belting Company. 
Harold E. Wilson '07, had been advertising man- 
ager for this company up to the time of his 
death in February and Mr. Plummer paid a 
beautiful tribute to him in a speech of apprecia- 
tion. Rev. William Francis Ayer 'yj, told of 
the famous Bowdoin class of which he was a 
member, and President Smith outlined his cam- 
paign for national highways as war memorials 

Walter L. Sanborn '07, editor of the Lansdale 
Reporter and an enthusiastic worker for the 
system of college athletics which Yale has re- 
cently adopted, was elected president of the 
club for next year, and John Halford '07 was 
elected secretary. 

In addition to the above there were present: 
Edward S. Power, M.D., 1880; Professor Lester 
D. Tyler, 1901; Donald E. McCormick, 1903; 
Myrton A. Bryant, 1904; John W. Leydon, 1907; 
Harry E. Mitchell, 1907; Frank C. Evans, 1910; 
G. L. Skofield, Jr., 1913; W. Fletcher Twombly, 
1913; Earl F. Mahoney, 1912; Ralph Barrett, 
1916; and Thomas W. Leydon, 1921. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE DEBATING. 

The schedule for the intercollegiate debates has 
been arranged as follows: Brown affirmative de- 
bates Bowdoin negative at Brunswick; Bowdoin 
affirmative debates Wesleyan negative at Middle- 
town; Wesleyan affirmative debates Brown 
negative at Providence. The question for de- 
bate is, "Resolved, That immigration into the 
United States should be prohibited for a period 
of five years following the ratification of the 
Peace Treaty." 

This is the first time in the history of the 
college that Bowdoin has debated Brown and 
much interest is being displayed in the result. 
On the other hand Wesleyan is an old rival, 
since this is our tenth encounter with her de- 
baters. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Tuesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 

department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 Exchange 

Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Albert E. Hurrell, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 



Vol. XLIX. may 6, 1919 



No. 5 



Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

Where The Blame Lies. 

A very noticeable fact at the game Saturday 
was the absence of any organized cheering. This 
was in marked contrast to what always has been 
the custom at baseball games, especially at those 
in the State championship series. Hardly less 
noticeable was the comparatively small attend- 
ance of students. Too many of the student body 



let week end trips stand in the way of their loyal 
attendance at the games. 

To be sure enthusiasm ran high at times Sat- 
urday and full support of the team by the student 
body was self-evident but did not this evidence 
always come at the time when it was least 
needed? We could cheer when the team was 
winning but when it was in a bad situation and 
really needed support we were perfectly silent. 
Is that the right spirit? No. Can you expect 
the team to do its best when with the other side 
ahead and things breaking bad, it gets no support 
from the student body in the grandstand? The 
team played an excellent game Saturday but the 
student body failed to come through. 



The United War Work Fund. 

A statement recently issued by Professor 
Catlin shows that Bowdoin stands the lowest of 
all the Maine Colleges in the per cent, of total 
pledges paid in the United War Work Campaign. 
We have paid only 70 per cent, of what we 
pledged. However, of the 30 per cent, yet un- 
paid, nearly one-half was pledged by students 
who have since left college. This greatly im- 
proves our showing but by no means brings it 
up to what it should be. 

Those who have not yet paid this pledge can 
not excuse themselves on the ground that the 
need of money for such work has passed, for that 
is not true. So long as we have an army in 
Europe, and so long as soldiers remain in camps 
on this side, not yet discharged, there is a vivid 
need that the work of the Y. M. C. A., Knights 
of Columbus, and other similar organizations be 
carried on. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Fo the Editor of the Orient: 

In your issue of April isth some reference 
was made to the fact that, after the signing of 
the armistice, I was ordered to draught a con- 
stitution for the League of Nations and forward 
it to a member of the American Commission to 
Negotiate Peace. I desire to call attention to 
the fact that in preparing the draught, as well 
as in making the studies on which it was based, 
I had the great advantage of working in con- 
junction with Lieutenant Laurence A. Crosby, 
Bowdoin, 1913. Remembering Mr. Crosby's 
brilliant scholastic record both prior and sub- 
sequent to his graduation, I requested his as- 
signment to this work, and was more than 
justified in my expectations. If any credit is 
due he must share it to the very fullest degree. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



45 



Mr. Crosby's record in the army has been an 
exceptionally fine one. In spite of deficient eye- 
sight he succeeded in enlisting voluntarily as a 
private and in that capacity went to France. 
The excellence of his service vi'on him an ap- 
pointment to the Army Candidate School at 
Longres where he was commissioned last June. 
On account of the urgent need for men of in- 
tellectual attainment in staff work he was drawn 
into intelligence, and, although unceasing in his 
efforts to get back with the troops, so dis- 
tinguished himself as to win the warmest praise 
and further promotion from his chiefs. "A very 
fine type of young soldier" was the verdict of 
one of the most eminent and most critical of our 
generals in France. More recently still he has 
been the recipient of honors of a different type. 
At the end of February he went to O.xford in 
charge of the 150 members of the A.E.F. who 
succeeded in obtaining the privilege of going, on 
"detached service," to Oxford College. On his 
arrival his old college paid him the compliment — 
rare indeed in the case of a foreigner — of an 
appointmenf to a teaching fellowship in law. But 
all of this will please rather than surprise his 
friends. Herbert C. Bell. 



MEETING FOR PRB-MEDICAL MEN. 

There will be a meeting in the Union, Wednes- 
day evening, May 9 at 8 o'clock for all the pre- 
medical men and others who are interested in 
the study of medicine. The meeting will be ad- 
dressed by members of the Portland medical 
faculty and also the Brunswick faculty; and it is 
hoped that many men in college will avail them- 
selves of this opportunity. During the evening 
smokes and refreshments will be served. The 
committee in charge consists of Hill, Medic '21, 
Howard, Medic '21, and Dr. Follett. 



CONCERT IN MEMORIAL HALL. 

On Tuesday evening. May 13, there will be 
given at Memorial Hall a concert of piano and 
vocal music. 

The artists are Mrs. F. L. Dutton and Mrs. 
G. H. Brickett of Augusta, who have twice be- 
fore played in recitals at Bowdoin, and Miss 
Marcia Merrill, contralto, and Mr. Harry F. 
Merrill of Portland. 

Miss Merrill made a successful debut last week 
in MacFarlane's opera, "Swords and Scissors," 
at the Farnhara Opera House, Portland. 

Mr. Merrill is the well-known basso of Port- 
land, who was for 14 years soloist of Emmanuel 
Church, Boston, and is now singing at the State 



Street Church, Portland. 

He has previously sung in Brunswick under 
the auspices of the Saturday Club. Mr. Merrill 
is the father of Lawrence F. Merrill of the Class 
of 1922. 

Mrs. Dutton has studied for many years with, 
Harold Bauer, the distinguished concert pianist- 
Mrs. Brickett, who will play the orchestral 
parts of the concerts on a second piano, is or- 
ganist of the Congregational Church in Augusta 
and is a member of the American Guild of Or- 
ganists. 

A feature of the forthcoming concert will be a 
number of pieces for two pianos, one for the 
solo part, the other representing the orchestra. 
The program includes the great E fiat concerto 
of Beethoven. 

The concert is given under the auspices of the 
Music Department of the College and no admis- 
sion fee will be charged. 



DEKES LOST TO D. U.'S. 

In a hotly contested game played on the 
campus Friday afternoon the D. U. team de- 
feated the Dekes in the last inning. The Dekes 
scored first blood making two runs early in the 
game. The D. U.'s came back with two in their 
half of the inning and the Dekes scored in the 
fifth making the score 3 to 2 in their favor. At 
the last half of the fifth Ridley of the D. 
U. team poled out a long hit to right field, scoring 
two men. 

Batteries : Delta Upsilon, Norton, Sears, 
Toyokawa; Dudgeon. Delta Kappa Epsilon, 
Ludwig; Drummond. Umpire, Sprince. 



PSI U.'S WON FROM KAPPA SIG'S. 

The game between the Psi U.'s and the Kappa 
Sig's last Thursday was one of the most in- 
teresting games of the Interfraternity League 
thus far. At the end of the fifth inning the score 
was a tie and in spite of the darkness the tie was 
played off. This inning also was close but 
Gaffney's error on first gave the game to the 
Psi U.'s. 



ALPHA DELTS LOST TO D. U.'S. 

In a fairly interesting game on the Delta a 
week ago Monday, Delta Upsilon defeated Alpha 
Delta Phi by a score of 5 to 3. The A.D.'s got 
the jump on their opponents in the first two in- 
nings, but after that the winners held them score- 
less. The D. U.'s got out of a bad hole in the 
last inning when Rich and Drake singled with 
none out, and then after two men were retired 



46 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



the bases were full on account of James' base on 
balls. The last batter, however, was easily re- 
tired on a grounder to the pitcher. Merrill's 
fielding was a feature. 

Innings: I 2 3 4 5 r h 

Delta Upsilon o 2 i 2 — 5 5 

Alpha Delta Phi i 2 o o — 3 4 

Batteries : Delta Upsilon, Norton '22 and 
Sears '21; Alpha Delta Phi, James '22 and Clif- 
ford '22. 



BOWDOIN SWAMPED FORT PREBLE. 

In an uninteresting game on the Whittier Field 
last Wednesday, Bowdoin overwhelmed the Fort 
Preble team from Portland by a score of eleven 
to nothing. The Portland nine was held to three 
hits, and only four men reached first, of whom 
none made second. Fort Preble's ten errors were 
largely responsible for Bowdoin's easy victory. 
Smith made several good catches in left field 
for Fort Preble, while Cook and Finn played a 
good game for Bowdoin. Caspar and Donnell 
batted well for Bowdoin, and Barker for the 
soldier outfit. Coach Houser used three pitchers, 
Flinn, Smethurst, and Mason, each of whom 
pitched three innings. Mason continued the fine 
pitching that he showed in the Tufts game, and 
held the visitors hitless during his stay in the 
box. 



1868 PRIZE WON BY COLTER. 

Lloyd O. Colter won the Class of 1868 prize 
for the best written and spoken oration by a 
member of the Senior class at the annual com- 
petition held at Memorial Hall last Tuesday 
evening. Colter took as his subject, "Mons and 
the First Hundred Thousand," and he based his 
theme largely on his own experiences while serv- 
ing in the American Ambulance Service in 
France, where he won the Croix de Guerre. 

The other speakers and their subjects were as 
follows : "Americanization," by E. Shepley Paul, 
2d.; "Jerusalem Redeemed," by Fred B. Chad- 
bourne; "American Diplomacy," by John W. 
Coburn; "Omar Khayyam: An Honest Thinker," 
by Roy A. Foulke; and "When Dreams Come 
True," by Lewis A. Burleigh, Jr. 

The judges were Mr. John E. Chapman '']'] of 
Brunswick, Reverend David L. Wilson of Bath, 
and Superintendent John A. Cone of Topsham. 



ing the game with Colby : 

Fielding 

ab bh Ave. tc po a e Ave. 

A. Hall 2 1 .500 

Grover 16 6 .375 11 8 3 .727 

Donnell 24 6 .250 15 6 7 2 .867 

Prosser 16 4 .250 9 7 11 .889 

Flinn 8 2 .250 12 12 1.000 

Cook 17 4 .235 24 10 14 1.000 

Caspar 22 5 .227 65 62 3 .954 

Finn 18 4 .222 26 5 16 5 .808 

F. Hall 20 3 .150 40 33 7 1.000 

Mason 8 1 .125 7 15 1 .857 

Holmes 11 1 .091 6 4 2 1.000 

Racine 15 .000 4 3 10 1.000 

Smethurst 2 .000 

Clifford 1 .000 2 2 1.000 

Totals 180 37 .206 221 141 65 15 .932 



BATTING AND FIELDING AVERAGES. 

The following are the batting and fielding 
averages of the Bowdoin team to date, includ- 



MEMORIAL SERVICE TO PROFESSOR FILES. 

At last Sunday's chapel, there was a simple 
memorial service in honor of the late Professor 
Files. In a tribute to him. President Sills said, 
in part : 

For the third time within two years the college 
is called upon to mourn the loss of one who gave 
to her the service of a life-time and whose bril- 
liant talents were placed whole-heartedly at her 
feet. More than most organizations the college 
is personal and living. The college deals with 
persons, not with things, with the spirits of men 
not with property. And while in the modern 
college there is of necessity a rather elaborate 
system of administration, while there are many 
activities that center about a rather complicated 
social and athletic life, when you come down to 
the heart of things, the college consists of those 
who teach and those who are taught. In no 
other business of life are men so closely and so 
intimately associated — and the association is 
usually for long periods of time and often for 
life — as in the faculty of a small college; and in 
no other relations are there more personal con- 
tacts than between teachers and students. The 
outside world does not well consider this ; care- 
less observers do not understand it. But we who 
are all members of the college who work and 
study and play and live together, realize our 
common loss when in the prime of life one is 
taken from us whom we have respected and 
honored and loved as colleagTje and teacher. 

His labors for college, town and State were 
fittingly crowned by the glorious opportunity that 
he seized to be of service to his fellow men on 
the battlefields of France. For a man of his 
years and health and temperament to insist on 
going over seas simply from the call of dutj' 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



47 



was in itself an act of high patriotism. When he 
left Brunswick he made light of the dangers and 
hardships he was liable to incur and said simply 
that it seemed to him imperative that a man in 
his position with his knowledge of languages and 
his experience should do something for his coun- 
try at the time of her dire need. Those of us 
who heard him speak in Memorial Hall last De- 
cember and who even then were anxious about 
his physical condition realized that to a man of 
his sensibilities service with the Y. M. C. A. 
in the danger zone had been indeed hazardous. 
No man can penetrate the veil fate draws over 
human beings and their actions; yet it seems al- 
together probable that had Mr. Files been less 
zealous in his work, had he taken greater pre- 
cautions for his health, he might be with us today. 
As it is, he has left to us all a splendid memory 
of one who gave himself fully and gladly, of 
another golden star on our Bowdoin banner shin- 
ing forth as an example of patriotism and self- 
sacrifice. The scholar has finished his learning; 
the teacher has taught his last class and left to 
us all a noble example of industry and devotion. 
Best of alf his service abroad unstintedly given, 
his last illness borne with patience and courage 
and marked consideration for others have won 
for him praise higher than usually falls to 
mortals. Here at Bowdoin he will long be re- 
membered as a very kindly and very brave man. 



TRIBUTE TO PROFESSOR FILES. 

The Portland Evening Express in its editorial 
column of April 24th paid an eloquent tribute to 
the life and work of Professor George T. Files 
whose death was a great shock to the college. 
State and Nation. The editorial reads as fol- 
lows : 

"The whole State mourns the loss of Professor 
George T. Files whose death occurred yesterday. 
Few men in Maine had a larger circle of true 
friends, and no man deserved them more. Facing 
the best years of his career, with wonderful 
ability to carry through anything which he un- 
dertook, his life meant much to the State he loved 
so well. His remarkable work for better high- 
ways in Maine, for the upbuilding and develop- 
ment of the State along progressive lines, his 
exceptional ability as a public speaker, and his 
driving force in any cause which he felt was 
right, will never be forgotten. Bowdoin owes 
much to Professor Files and the thousands of 
boys who passed under his guiding hand during 
his many years' connection with that institution. 



will alwa3fs recall with deepest reverence the 
splendid memories of those days. Among busi- 
ness men he was recognized as possessing marked 
ability. A tireless worker for his friends, for 
his State, and for his Country, with never a 
thought of self, he practically offered himself as a 
sacrifice to the causes for which he fought. 
Never exceptionally robust, the great strain of 
his work in Europe, where for months he battled 
to maintain the morale of the French army 
against the heaviest of odds, was too much foi 
him, and his heart and constitution could not 
stand up against it. It is no exaggeration to say 
that the name of George T. Files will live long 
in the memory of the people of Maine. Even 
after the present generation has passed away the 
results of his work will live and be remembered." 



THE HUMANITIES AND MILITARY 
TRAINING. 

At the annual dinner of the Harvard Club of 
Washington, on Jan. 28, Gen. Samuel T. Ansell, 
a West Point graduate of 1899, now Acting 
Judge Advocate General, spoke on "The Pla.ce 
and Influence of the College Man in the Recent 
War." His remarks had so important a bearing 
on the future of military education in the United 
States that the Orient asks the privilege of 
giving them to its readers. The speech is printed 
in part herewith : 

I was one who before this war had, if I may 
speak frankly, become quite critical of the 
American college. It seemed to me that it pre- 
tended to teach everything and succeeded in 
teaching nothing; that it had come to be a sort 
of social aggregation without real institutional 
purpose or objective. It seemed to me that it 
had no definite object or aim, and that it failed 
to recognize, or, if it recognized, failed to adhere 
to the principles of conduct and control which 
I, for one, thought necessary to any institution 
of learning. 

I had about made up my mind that the college 
was a place where everything was taught or tol- 
erated except learning, a place which was de- 
voted to the development of almost everything 
except mind and character. No other class of 
our youth seemed quite so destitute of intellectu- 
al appreciation and intellectual attainment as our 
so-called college class. No set of youth in our 
land seemed to exhibit less intellectual capacity 
and more bad manners than a body of college 
students. 

I now think that this view of mine was some- 
what exaggerated and wrong, but to a degree at 



48 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



least it was true. My reference is to the college 
of liberal arts, and not to the scientific technical 
schools. But what I have said of the one is 
equally applicable to the other. 

The college man has had a wonderful part in 
this new Army of ours, and has played it well. 
He played it well, in my judgment, because he 
had studied, not the practical sciences, not the 
studies of the technical profession, not those so- 
called practical studies that are designed to en- 
able a man to leave college and immediately be- 
gin the making of money; but because, notwith- 
standing all the deficiencies of college, he had 
studied, in some thoughtful and helpful degree 
at least, the humanities. In this Army it is a 
knowledge of, and love for, the humanities that 
count. I have observed it to the point that there 
can be no mistaking. 

The training which the college man has re- 
ceived in the study of the humanities, such as it 
is, has contributed to his qualifications in the 
new establishment in an unexpected and doubt- 
less an unappreciated degree. 

I think the mechanical education must here- 
after take a less important place in the curricu- 
lum of military training and be superseded to an 
appreciable extent by a study of the liberal arts, 
and sciences, and humanities. The study and 
knowledge of human beings, rather than ma- 
chines, will be a necessary part of the profes- 
sional training of our soldiers. In my judgment, 
it will be unfortunate if hereafter West Point 
and the Service Schools should not pay less at- 
tention to machine, and more to men, their quali- 
ties and culture. 

Although the college man may have an over- 
developed individualism, although the college has 
little or nothing of immediate practical value in 
its curriculum, although it aims to cultivate the 
aesthetic side, the sympathies, and the imagina- 
tion, it must be remembered that these things 
are so, in order that human beings may be un- 
derstood, interested, influenced, and controlled. 
It must be remembered that many of these things 
are of great military worth, and, whether of mili- 
tary worth or not, they are there to be dealt 
with. Though some of it, of course, will be mod- 
ified out of military existence, much of it will 
last and remain a permanent and strengthening 
element in any military establishment. 

A knowledge of mechanics cannot dominate or 
put to best advantage such a spirit. Such a spirit 
itself is of the humanities, and a knowledge of 
the humanities is required for its leadership. — 
Harvard Alumni Bulletin. 



2Dn tfte Campus 

Smethurst 'i8, umpired the game between 
Brunswick High and Edward Little High on the 
Delta last Thursday. 

A half holiday was given Friday afternoon 
on account of the Welcome Home Day parade. 

An error in last week's Orient in the box 
score of the Tufts game, credited two put-outs 
to Racine. 

Captain John A. Slocum '13, was on the 
Campus last week. 

Coach Magee refereed the wrestling matches in 
the Town Hall last Wednesday evening. 

Meacham '22 was able to leave the Infirmary 
the first of last week and went to his home for a 
few days. 

Lieut. Col. Sherman N. Shumway '17, who has 
made such a commendable war record, stopped 
on the Campus last Tuesday on his way to his 
home in Skowhegan. He received his discharge 
from the 103d Maine Infantry at Camp Devens 
.shortly after the big parade of the Y.D. Division 
in Boston. 

Because of the conflict with the Bowdoin-New 
Hampshire dual track meet and the champion- 
ship games in the Maine series, the dual tennis 
tournament between Bowdoin and Bates at Lew- 
iston, which was previously scheduled for last 
Saturday, May 3, was set ahead until this week 
Wednesday. 

Major William D. Ireland '16, was on the 
Campus last Thursday night. He received his 
discharge at Camp Devens last Tuesday. 

The Musical Clubs closed the season last 
Thursday evening at Richmond. The concert 
in that town finished a four-day run which the 
clubs made last week giving concerts in Bruns- 
wick on Monday evening, Bangor on Tuesday 
evening, Fairfield on Wednesday evening, and 
Richmond on Thursday evening. 

Gibson '21 was ill in the Infirmary a few days 
last week. 



a:iaitt) tlje JFacuItp 

President Sills was one of the speakers at the 
Welcome Home Day exercises. 

Dean Nixon and Assistant Professor Wass 
attended the Glee and Mandolin Club concert at 
Beverly, Mass., April 25. 

Professor Woodruff occupied the pulpit at 
Harpswell Centre a week ago Sunday. 

Mr. Wilder attended a meeting of the college 
librarians held in Worcester Friday, May 2. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



49 



Slumni jQotcs 

'69 — Judge Clarence Hale, who returned to 
Portland, April 20, with Mrs. Hale from a vaca- 
tion visit of several months to California, re- 
sumed his duties recently as presiding judge in 
the United States District Court. 

'72 — Herbert Harris of Chicago, formerly of 
Bangor, has sent to the Maine Historical Society 
a copy of book entitled "Bowdoin's Class of 
1872." This writing contains brief biographical 
sketches of the author's classmates, of the class 
meetings and reunions, including the forty-fifth 
reunion at the Commencement of 1917. The 
Class of 1872 was the last class to be represented 
in the Civil War. Two of its members took part 
in the war, the first being Warren F. Bickford, 
who was in the First Maine Cavalry in the last 
year of the struggle, and the other being George 
M. Seiders, who was a corporal in the Twent}'- 
fourth Maine Volunteers. Mr. Harris was or- 
ganist at the Central Church, Bangor, from 1900 
to 1904, but several years later he took up his 
residence in Chicago. He is one of Maine's 
best known teachers. 

'88— William T. Hall, Jr., of Bath, had the 
honor of being the first subscriber in that city 
to the Victory Liberty Loan, the subscriptions 
for which were begun April 22. 

Ex-'i9 — The wedding of Lieut. Raymond Lor- 
ing Atwood of Paris, Me., and Miss Pauline 
Stongaton of Whitefield, N. H., took place at 
the North Congregational Church at Cambridge, 
Mass., April 23. Lieut. Atwood entered Bow- 
doin after graduating from Hebron in 1915, and 
remained in college two years, when he enlisted 
in the naval aviation branch of the United States 
service. He first took the ground school course 
at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and 
then the flying school course at Pensacola, Fla. 
On January 25, 1918, he received his commission 
as United States Naval Ensign, and was soon 
a'fter sent to England. Until the signing of the 
armistice, he served on a patrol of the North 
Sea. He returned to this country, and was then 
promoted to the rank of Junior Lieutenant, after 
which he was sent with the Atlantic Fleet to 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to which he made the 
journey in the air from Hampton Roads. During 
the last winter he has done considerable flying in 
connection with the manoeuvres of the fleet. He 
came to New York the week before last, and 
then went to Cambridge. After a short trip to 
Whitefield, N. H., Lieut. Atwood will return to 
duty at Hampton Roads, Va. 



AMONG THE COLLEGES. 

With this issue the Orient is inaugurating a 
new department which we hope will contribute to 
the interest and usefulness of the publication. 
We are already exchanging with a number of 
the other colleges not only in New England and 
the Eastern states but even with a few from as 
far as the Pacific coast. We hope to increase 
this list until Bowdoin will be able to compare 
the Orient with all the leading college papers 
and can get helpful suggestions that will tend 
to promote a greater spirit of fellowship in our 
intercollegiate relations. 

This department proposes for the present 
simply to recount incidents of particular interest 
to all college students that occur on the other 
campuses. 

Amherst:' An interfraternity baseball league 
has just started its season on the Amherst 
campus. 

Brown : The Daily Herald is conducting a 
campaign with a "Keep off the Grass" slogan, 
hoping to eliminate from the campus those 
muddy, unkempt looking cross paths made by 
those who will not stay on the walks. 

Maine: Under the direction of Coach "Pat" 
French the track squad is fast rounding into 
shape for that Maine Intercollegiate Meet, May 
17. The workmen are putting the track and 
jumping pits into the best possible condition. 

Oeerlin : The Cosmopolitan Club recently 
held an International Night in which they in- 
terpreted the international spirit of the times 
with an elaborate pageant-like program. 

Reed (Ore.) : We are delighted to exchange 
with an institution that is as closely related to 
Bowdoin and Bowdoin men as Reed is. 

"Bob" Leigh, Bowdoin '14, who has been act- 
ing as Assistant Professor of Politics, has been 
granted a year's leave of absence for study at 
Columbia University. 

Smith : The Glee and Mandolin Clubs' con- 
cert was held Saturday, April 26, in connection 
with the dances in the different houses. Several 
Bowdoin men were present as guests. 



CALENDAR. 

May 7 — Dual Tennis Tournament at Lewiston. 

May 9 — Meeting for Pre-Medical Men; Union, 
8 o'clock. 

May 10 — Baseball, Bowdoin vs. University of 
Maine at Brunswick. 

May 14 — Baseball, Bowdoin vs. N. H. State at 
Durham. 

May 17 — Baseball, Bowdoin vs. Williams at 
Williamstown. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

UNION CANTEEN 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 

Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 

OFFICERS' SHOES 

TAN CALF AND CORDOVAN 

Spiral Puttees 

Army Boots 

AT 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS "07 

DANCING 

MISS JENNIE S. HARVEY 

Evening Class and Assembly every 
Tuesday evening, Town Hall, Bruns- 
wick. Class at 7.30 p. m. Assembly 
at 8.30 p. m. Open to college students. 

Every Monday evening Class and Assembly at 
the Arcade, Bath. 

Private instruction by appointment. Phone 
Bath 151-W. Address 897 Middle street. 




IT WILL HELP ! 
SEND HER THE SAMPLER ! 

Chocolates and confections of 
a quality worthy of your card! 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 
TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 

BATH, MAINE 




^Arrow 

COLLAR 

CLUETTPEABODYacCo:lNC: TROYNY 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ANTIQUITY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

aniD JFutnitute, aDIB ffihina, ©EtDtcr, ffitc. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 
to orders for antique goods of any kind 



The Citizens Laundry 



Quali-ty 



t^r'vi^^ 



r 



BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short Notice by competent work- 
men. We use only the Best 
of Leather, 
E. WHITTOM 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 



We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel, 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16, 



J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The BoAvdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



NEW SPRING 
SUITS, 

SHIRTS, 

SHOES, 
HATS 

The snappiest lines ever shown in 
Maine, 




FRANK M, LOW & CO, 
PORTLAND, - - MAINE. 



STUDENTS 

desiring to work an hour or more a day 
can make wages of more than $1.00 per 
hour selling America's War for 
Humanity and Life of Roosevelt. Send 
at once for free outfit, 

F. B. DICKERSON CO. 

DETROIT, MICH, 

enclosing 20c in stamps for mailing 
outfits. 



Telephone 160 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 




Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
A. G. PAGE COMPANY, Bath 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

FLORENCE REED 

IN 

TODAY 




THE IRON TEST 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

THE STILL ALARM 



MONDAY and TUESDAY 

WALLACE REID 

IN 

TOO MANY MILLIONS 



THE LIGHTNING RAIDER 



PASTIME THEATRE 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

VIOLA DANA 

IN 

THE GOLD CURE 



THE LION'S CLAWS 



Vol. XLIX. No. 6 



MAY 13,X919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



^^^ CONTENTS 




PAGE 


PAGE 


Bowdoin Overcomes Six Run Lead 


Editorials: 




and Defeats U. of M. 51 


The Use of Reserved Books 


54 


Boston College Defeats Bowdoin 


A Vulnerable Spot 


54 


in Poor Game 51 


Support the Ivy Play 


55 


Student Forum Addressed by Dean 
Nicolson 52 


Student Council Votes to Raise 
Funds for Band 


56 




Kappa Sigma Defeats Sigma Nu 


56 


Pre-Medical Meeting at Union 52 


Zeta Psi Defeated by Kappa Sigma 


56 


Bates-Bowdoin Tennis Tournament 52 


Zeta Psi 8, Psi Upsilon 2 


56 


Baseball Rally 52 


Batting and Fielding Averages 


56 


Memorial Tablet to Lieut. Forbes 


Bowdoin in Paris 


56 


Rickard '17 52 


On the Campus 


57 


Ex-Senator Burton Heard in Me- 


With the Faculty 


57 


morial Hall 53 


Alumni Notes 


58 




With the Other Colleges 


59 


Interscholastic Tennis Tournament 53 




59 


First Union Dance of the Year a 


Resolutions 


59 


Success 53 







BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Over There" know JUD is in the game. 



LEWISTON JOURNAL 
PRINTSHOP 


LAW 

AND AMERICA'S 
WORLD POSITION 

America's new place in international 
politics and commerce challenges the 
young American. 

He must equip himself for new world 
conditions with a knowledge of legal funda- 
mentals. 

LAW — its principles and application to all 
business is almost as necessary to the 
coming business man as it is indispensable 
to the lawyer. 
Qualify for real leadership. 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

gives a thorough training in legal 

principles. 

LL.B. Course requires 3 years. 

For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 


BOOK AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING 


School and College Work a Specialty 


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BOWDOIN ORIENT 



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This year's Tennis Goods are in 

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BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 13, 1919 



NO. 6 



BOWDOIN OVERCOMES SIX RUN LEAD AND 
DEFEATS U. OF M. 

In one of the most exciting games played on 
Whittier Field for a long time, Bowdoin beat 
the University of Maine g to 7. With the count 
seven to one in favor of the visitors, the Bow- 
doin team drove in six runs in the sixth inning 
and then two more in the eighth. Bowdoin had 
been held to one run until then, only because 
the Maine pitcher was favored by sheer luck 
and splendid defense, but in the sixth he was 
hit for five clean singles, which with the aid of 
some errors and a wild pitch netted six runs, 
tied the score, and caused the departure of the 
pitcher and the third baseman from the contest. 
The team pounded the ball hard all through the 
game, getting fourteen hits for a team average 
of .378. Finn, Grover, and Hall did especially 
fine work at the bat, the first of these scoring 
two long triples out of five times up. For Maine, 
Faulkner and Slattery did very well. The Bow- 
doin man who should receive the most credit for 
the victory is Smethurst, who went into the game 
in the sixth and stemmed a dangerous Maine 
rally, and thereafter held the university team 
helpless. In Bowdoin's big inning, Smethurst 
knocked in two runs, and scored a third himself. 
Again in the eighth, the pitcher laid down a 
perfect bunt along the first base line, scoring 
Caspar with the winning run. 

One of the elements which contributed largely 
to Bowdoin's fine victory was excellent support 
from the grandstand. There was no organized 
cheering section at the Colby game, but under 
the leadership of Cleaves '20, last Saturday, the 
student body gave the team far better support 
than at any other game this year. 

The score : 

BOWDOIN. 

ab r bh po a e 

Donnell, 3b 4 i 2 i o 

Cook, 2b 5 I I 2 3 2 

!• inn, ss 5 2 2 i 2 

**Caspar, ib 5 i o 7 i ° 

Prosser, rf 4 i 2 o o 

Hall, c 4 2 2 10 3 I 

Holmes, cf 3 ° i 2 o o 

Grover, If 4 i 2 3 

Mason, p 2 i o i o 



Smethurst, p i 



Totals 37 9 14 26* 12 5 

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE. 

ab r bh po a e 

Wood, If 5 o 2 o I 

Sargent, cf 5 i i i o 

Young, rf 5 i o o o 

Waterman, ib 5 i i n i 

Faulkner, 2b 4 2 3 i i 2 

Slattery, ss 4 2 2 2 4 o 

Reardon, c 4 i 2 6 2 

Thompson, 3b 2 o i i 2 

Walker, 3b i o i o 

Johnson, p 3 o 5 o 

Zeigler, p 1 o o 



Totals 39 7 II 23*15 5 

Innings : 123456789 

Bowdoin i o o 6 2 x — 9 

U. of Maine 40100200 — 7 

Two-base hit, Grover. Three-base hits ; Hall, Finn 2, 
Slattery, Waterman. Stolen bases, Finn, Waterman, 
Faulkner, Reardon. Sacrifice hits, Donnell, Smethurst, 
Earned runs, Maine 6, Bowdoin 4. Left on bases, 
Maine 6, Bowdoin 7. First base on errors, Maine 3, 
Bowdoin 3. Hits, off Mason, 10 in 5 1-3 innings; off 
Smethurst, i in 3 2-3 innings; off Johnson, 12 in 6 
innings ; off Zeigler, 2 in 2 innings. First base on 
balls, off Mason, off Johnson. Struck out, by Mason 3, 
by Smethurst 2, by Johnson 3, by Zeigler 3. Wild 
pitch, Johnson. Double play, Johnson to Slattery to 
Waterman. Time, 2h. 3m. Umpire, John E. Carrigan 
of Lewiston. Winning pitcher, Smethurst. Losing 
pitcher, Zeigler. 



*Wood and Holmes both out, hit by batted ball. 
**Ran for Grover in 8th. 



BOSTON COLLEGE DEFEATS BOWDOIN 
IN POOR GAME. 

In a very poor game played at University 
Heights, Boston, Bowdoin was rather easily de- 
feated by Boston College 11 to 5. This was the 
seventh straight win for the Massachusetts team. 
Both sides pounded the ball hard, the winners 
scoring fifteen hits, and the losers ten. Shana- 
han, the first Boston College twirler, was driven 
from the mound in the fourth, when Bowdoin 
hit him for four runs. Holmes, Hall, and Pros- 
ser did the best stick work for Eowdoin, while 
Urban and O'Doherty were the stars for the 
winners. O'Doherty turned in two home runs 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



and a single out of four times at bat. In the 
field, Cook, Burke, and Bond did good work. 



STUDENT FORUM ADDRESSED BY DEAN 
NICOLSON. 

At the last meeting of the Student Forum, held 
in the Union, May 6, Dean Nicolson of Wes- 
leyan College gave a very interesting address on 
"College Athletics." Dean Nicolson has been 
prominent in athletic affairs for many years. 
His address was very instructive as to the at- 
titude of other colleges toward that branch of 
college activities. First of all, he spoke of the 
difference in the attitude of the English and 
American college man in regard to athletic con- 
tests. In England the result of the game is of 
minor importance compared with the benefit and 
fun to be derived from participation in the sport. 
Our spirit of winning at any cost has caused the 
introduction of many objectionable features such 
as professional players on college teams, irregu- 
lar students of great athletic ability. The Na- 
tional Collegiate Association to which most of 
the leading colleges now belong has stood for the 
abolition of such a policy and is striving for the 
best in athletics. Dean Nicolson favors faculty 
management of athletics. This, he observed, will 
dignify sport by placing it on a level with other 
courses. No longer can athletics be ignored as a 
vital and necessary part of a college man's life. 
He opposed the system of hiring the best coach 
that the college can afford for a season or a few 
seasons only. "This makes for professionalism 
and the spirit to win at any cost," he declared. 
The war has brought the country to a realization 
of the importance of mass athletics. The speaker 
favored a system which would include every 
freshman in college in a competitive track meet, 
the winning college in a special district to be 
awarded a banner and the best college in the 
country a cup. He spoke at length on the kind 
of sportsmanship which exists in many colleges 
and urged that all institutions take a higher 
stand than they have done in this respect. 

A discussion of the subject followed. Much 
valuable information was obtained by informal 
question and answer. It will surely pay a larger 
number of the students to attend these informal 
discussions on matters vital to the interests of the 
student body. It is hoped that a larger number 
will attend the next meeting of the forum. 



contemplating a medical course at Bowdoin and 
elsewhere. Many of the members of the Medical 
School faculty were present, and short addresses 
were delivered by President Sills and Dean 
Nixon of the college, Drs. Gerrish, Moulton and 
Tobie, members of the Medical School faculty. 
Refreshments were served during an informal 
talk which followed the addresses. This year 
promises to turn out an unusually large number 
of pre-medical students as there were about fifty 
present. 



BATES-BOWDOIN TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 

Unfortunately rain interfered with the tennis 
tournament at Bates, on May 7, and there is 
little chance that the meet will be completed. 
Single matches, which brought together the 
players of third and fourth rating, were won by 
Bowdoin, while the Bates first doubles team won 
from Bowdoin with the loss of one set. 

Scores : 

Singles — Sawyer, Bowdoin, defeated Kirsch- 
baum. Bates, 6—1, 2 — 6, 6 — 3. 

Mitchell, Bowdoin, defeated Woodard, Bates, 
6—2, 7—5- 

Doubles — Purinton and Powers, Bates, de- 
feated Chin and Partridge, Bowdoin, 7 — 9, 6 — 3, 
6-4. 



BASEBALL RALLY. 



The first baseball rally of this year was held 
on the Campus, May 9, before the game with 
the U. of M. Dr. Whittier, Dean Nixon, and 
Captain Donnell, spoke to the student body about 
the "Old Bowdoin Spirit," and Coach Magee told 
the men about the coming track meet at the U. 
of M. As everyone can see, Bowdoin's "Spirit" 
has almost spent itself in the strain of world 
war, to which she contributed freely, but it can, 
and it will come back. 



PRE-MEDICAL MEETING AT UNION. 

On last Wednesday evening a successful meet- 
ing was held for the benefit of the men who are 



MEMORIAL TABLET TO LIEUT. FORBES 
RICKARD '17. 

There has been placed in St. John's Cathedral, 
Denver, Colorado, a bronze tablet in memory of 
the late Lieutenant Forbes Rickard, Jr., '17. The 
inscription which follows is interesting in that 
the first quotation is from one of his letters 
home, and the last two lines are from his Class 
Day poem, and wer? selected by President Sills. 
The inscription is as follows : 

In loving memory of 

Lieutenant Forbes Rickard, Jr., 

Co. B, 59th Infantry, U.S.A. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



53 



Killed in action near Chateau-Thierry, 

July 19th, 1918, 

In the 23rd year of his age. 

The first communicant of this Cathedral. 

The first graduate of Bowdoin College 

"To join the ranks of the gallant unreturning" 

"Their work is done and though they could not 

stay 

They built the glory of a later day." 



EX-SENATOR BURTON HEARD IN 
MEMORIAL HALL. 

Senator Theodore E. Burton of New York 
City, former senator from Ohio, addressed the 
townspeople and students of the College on 
"The International Situation." 

Senator Burton has served the people of Ohio 
for nearly twenty years in both Houses of Con- 
gress. Throughout his long public life he has 
been one of the leaders in the fight against 
"pork barrel" legislation. He has always ad- 
hered to his belief that his duty was to serve the 
country as a whole rather than the particular 
section from whfch he came. 

President Sills, in introducing the Senator, 
spoke warmly of his long and honorable career 
in public affairs and his constant thought for the 
people he represented rather than his own benefit. 

In opening his speech. Senator Burton pictured 
the tremendous cost of the great war in life, 
property, and suffering, emphasizing the im- 
portance of preventing a similar calamity in the 
future. In order to insure peace the Senator de- 
clared, we must have some satisfactory method 
for settling the disputes which will arise in the 
future. The world has made great gain in that 
direction in the last few years. The countries 
of the world are coming' to a realization of the 
fact that a republic is the best method of govern- 
ment to prevent a dynasty similar to the Hohen- 
zollern's. To insure lasting peace the value of a 
"scrap of paper" must be realized and the 
principles of international law respected. 

The Senator then enumerated some of the 
more important articles in the Covenant of the 
League of Nations. The most important article, 
he declared is the twelfth, which deals with arbi- 
tration. Such an article would have prevented 
the present war, for Germany would have been 
unable to catch the other nations unprepared as 
she did in 1914. Furthermore the three months' 
delay enables the sentiment of the world to be 
expressed on the matter before the declaration of 
hostilities. The article providing for the limita- 
tion of arguments is another important one. No 



nation will go to war without elaborate prepar- 
ation; the nation who is the most warlike is the 
one with the best preparation. 

Senator Burton then enumerated the principal 
objections which had been made to the covenant. 
He ridiculed the people who felt distrust for 
Great Britain because she had five representa- 
tives from the British Isles as well as many more 
from her colonies. "These colonies," he re- 
minded, "are practically independent nations. 
They participated in this war through their love 
for the mother country, not from compulsion. 
They expressed their desire to have representa- 
tives at the peace table entirely independent of 
Great Britain herself." A short history of the 
Monroe Doctrine, whose present influence he 
disparaged, followed. Senator Burton concluded 
his remarks expressing his pleasure at having 
the opportunity to address a college audience. 

Throughout the speech his strong personality 
was apparent. Although the address lasted more 
than an hour, at no time did the audience lose 
interest. His manner was easy, dignified, and 
above all, scholarly. He spoke with the auth- 
ority of one who has thoroughly mastered his 
subject. It is rare, indeed, that Bowdoin has had 
the opportunity to hear an address so instructive 
and at the same time so fascinating as that which 
the Senator delivered. 



INTERSCHOLASTIC TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 

The Interscholastic Tennis Tournament was 
played off here last Friday and Saturday with 
Cony High and Lewiston High coming out on 
top. The entries were Cony, Lewiston, Sanford, 
Rumford, Gardiner, Freeport, Bath and Edward 
Little. 

Finals, Singles — Roberts, Lewiston, and Allen, 
Sanford, Roberts winning, 6 — i, 6 — i. 

Doubles — Tetreault and Toas, Cony; Berman 
and Roberts, Lewiston, Cony winning, 6 — 3, 6 — 4 



FIRST UNION DANCE OF THE YEAR A 

SUCCESS. 
On Saturday evening the first Union dance of 
the year was held in the Bowdoin Union. A 
fairly large crowd was in attendance. During 
intermission harlequin ice cream was served. 
Sprince's orchestra furnished the music which 
was excellent. The committee in charge con- 
sisted of Cole '19 (chairman), Caspar '19, 
Rounds '20. The patronesses were Mrs. William 
H. Davis and Mrs. Lee Dudley McLean. 



54 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOiN ORIENT 

Published Every Tuesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 

department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 Exchange 

Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



bowdoin publishing company 
Albert E. Hurrell, 1920 Business Manager 

Ppiilip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 



Vol. XLIX. MAY 13, 1919 



No. 6 



Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

The Use of Reserved Books. 

It is a rule of the Library, which everybody 
is acquainted with and which nearly everybody 
persists in breaking, that reserve books are never 
to be taken out until the close of library hours 
and are to be returned as soon as the Library 
opens. The need of this rule is obvious. Books 
are usually placed on the reserve list because 



they are needed for assigned outside reading in a 
course, and it is therefore essential that they be 
available to everyone. 

It is easy to tuck a reserved book under your 
coat and escape unnoticed. It is not even neces- 
sary to conceal it. Soon someone asks the 
Library attendant for the book in question and 
it is not to be found, and the unfortunate who 
needs the book but cannot find it, suffers. You 
take the book to your room and perhaps read it, 
and then forget all about it and do not return 
it for a week or two. That is usually the case. 
Again, someone takes a reserved book out over 
night and does not return it the next day. In 
this case, the lost book is usually soon located but 
someone is inconvenienced in the meantime. 

What is the remedy? Surely we do not wish 
to be deprived of any of the freedom which we 
now enjoy. Why not do the right thing, observe 
the Librarjr rules with regard to reserved books 
which we all agree are fair and just, and perhaps 
put ourselves out a little to see that the other 
fellow is not deprived of the use of reserved 
books which should be available to all students? 



A Vulnerable Spot. 

The worthy victory of Saturday over the Uni- 
versity of Maine was due in a marked degree 
to the revival of traditional Bowdoin fight and 
spirit. Possible defeat was changed to victory 
by combined forces of team and student body. 
The grit and fight displayed by the team, the 
forceful cheering, the inspiring band music re- 
called to alumni and upperclassmen many mem- 
orable struggles on Whittier Feld in pre-war 
days. 

But in the celebration of the victory, Bow- 
doin disclosed a vulnerable spot. Her students 
failed in the many attempts to sing Bowdoin 
Beata or Phi Chi. 

The singing of the verses, as one alumnus 
candidly remarked, gave to the listener an ex- 
cellent impression of the vocal music from the 
first phonographs in this country, an interming- 
ling of music, discordant stutterings, mumblings, 
and minors ; but the alumnus admitted the 
choruses reminded him that improvements were 
made in the phonograph the first of this decade. 

Then there were a considerable number of 
silent mouthed students during the singing, who, 
because of the degeneration of our singing dur- 
ing the war, have mistakably informed them- 
selves that Bowdoin has instituted the system 
of singing by proxy. Traditional Bowdoin has 
always sung in chapel, on the campus, and at the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



55 



fraternity houses. Alumni state that one of the 
pleasantest college memories is the recalling of 
the stir and sweep of the many voices singing 
together. 

One of the most essential requirements to Bow- 
doin unity and spirit is that each man can and 
does sing frequently with his fellow students, the 
College songs. 

It is time that the Upperclassmen reviewed, 
and the Freshmen learned the College songs, not 
only that the unfavorable impression created by 
the singing on Saturday will not re-occur, but that 
Bowdoin spirit and unity may be nearer one 
hundred per cent. 

To facilitate this accomplishment, the words to 
Bowdoin Beata and Phi Chi are included in this 
issue. S. M. G. 



BOWDOIN BEATA* 

Air — "Wake, Freshmen, Wake." 

When bright skies were o'er us, 

And life lay before us. 
'Neath Bowdoin's pines we gathered far and near. 

So filling 9ur glasses. 

And pledging our classes, 
We drink a health to Alma Mater dear. 

Chorus 

Clink, clink, drink, drink, drink ! 
Smash the glass in splinters when you're done. 
Bowdoin Beata, 

dear Alma Mater, 
There is no fairer mother 'neath the sun. 

When manhood has found us, 

And children surround us. 
Our college days and friends we'll still recall. 

With heartfelt emotion, 

And deathless devotion. 
We'll send our sons to Bowdoin in the fall. 

When age, gray and hoary. 

Has filled out our story. 
The tender mem'ries swelling back again. 

Loyal forever. 

Until death shall sever. 
One glass to Alma Mater we shall drain. 

So, Comrades, together, 

Iji fair or foul weather. 
Your glasses fill to Bowdoin and her fame. 

For where'er we wander : 

Stronger and fonder 
The tend'rest ties shall cling about her name. 

H. H. Pierce '96. 

*Every Bowdoin man stands uncovered while Bow- 
doin Beata is played. 



rection's come, 
Bring out the horns of plenty, and the old ancestral 

drum ; • 
Bring out the ponderous gewgaw that has made 

Gomorrah hum. 
For Phi Chi's in her ancient glory. 

Chorus 

Hurrah ! hurrah ! hurrah for old Phi Chi ; 
Hurrah ! hurrah ! and may she never die ; 
While pluck beats luck, and Prex is stuck, and Profs, 
are high and dry. 
We will follow her to glory. 

There are pails and there are windows, and there's 

water in the well. 
As the Freshman will discover, if he tries to cut a 

swell ; 
Cold water for his diet, till existence is a hell. 
For Phi Chi's in her ancient glory. 

Then hush the grinning skeleton, and close the coffin 

lid. 
And screw the Freshman in it, 'til his infant form is 

hid; 
For he must learn that he must do precisely as he's 

bid. 
For Phi Chi's in her ancient glory. 

This Baby, born to Bowdoin, 'way back in Sixty-four, 
Has thundered for admission at many a Freshman's 

door. 
And thanks to God and ig — , will thunder evermore. 
For Phi Chi's in her ancient glory. 

E. P. Mitchell '71. 



Air — "Marching through Georgia." 
Swing out the brave old banner boys, for the resur- 



SUPPORT THE IVY PLAY. 

It was but a few weeks ago that the Masque 
and Gown stepped forth from its tomb and with 
a sad dignity softened by debt and defunctity 
implored the financial assistance of those who 
have the privilege of reading the Bowdoin 
Orient. 

Now we are with j'ou again, not, however, in 
shrinking rectitude but reeking with work and 
toil. We no longer inhabit the tomb, — we live in 
Memorial. We even have money, jealously 
guarded by our treasurer, who wears it over his 
heart. 

Dear Sisters, our last eruption was for cash, 
now it is for — YOU. We realize that all that 
sparkles is not Green River, and that after all 
money is not the only thing in life even though 
it is in the treasurer's office. Friends, our an- 
nual tragedy takes place on June Sth and it is 
rumored that with malicious afterthought cer- 
tain of our brethren are planning dances and 
e.xcursions on that holy night. Last year such 
planning brought tears to the eyes of the man- 
ager and gnashing of teeth and typewriters 
among the creditors of the Masque and Gown. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Is this right? Eleven earnest and solemn 
souls are attending early morning rehearsals in 
order to be fitted to appear before you and yours 
on the evening of June 5th and you are planning 
to sneak away. Can you men, who have had 
mothers, meet the reproachful gaze of the fair 
)'0ung lily who is your joy at Ivy and hear her 
moan, "That dance kept me from seeing Kirk 
act." 

Fellow-victims of the institution, don't desert 
us. It isn't that we want your money. We are 
giving tickets away — for 83 cents. All we want 
is YOU, and if you can't come send your 83 
cents. For the love that you bear your Alma 
Mater and morning chapel don't let the rafters 
of the Cumberland re-echo in silence on the night 
of June Sth. Even with five cents next to us 
we don't feel that we can afford to equip our 
actors with telescopes so that they can see the 
audience. We would sooner spend it for malted 
milk. R. A. 



STUDENT COUNCIL VOTES TO RAISE 
FUNDS FOR BAND, 

The student body has voted that each fra- 
ternity be assessed five dollars so that the band 
may accompany the track team to Orono next 
Saturday. This plan makes the assessment for 
€ach man approximately twenty-five cents. 



KAPPA SIGMA DEFEATS SIGMA NU. 

The Kappa Sigma baseball team defeated the 
Sigma Nu team a week ago Monday evening, 
17 to 6. Errors were frequent and costly for 
both sides. Dahlgren of the Kappa Sig team 
was the star at bat, with two triples, a double 
and a single. Parent, pitching for the Sigma Nu 
team failed to puzzle the Kappa Sig's, who found 
him for a total of sixteen hits in their four times 
at bat. Keith Coombs pitched a steady game, 
allowing but four scattered hits. 

Score by innings : 1234 5 — r h e 

Sigma Nu o o o 2 4 — 648 

Kappa Sigma 3 i 10 3 o — 17 16 - 

Batteries : Sigma Nu, Parent and Martin. 
Kappa Sigma, K. C. Coombs and Richan. Um- 
pire, Louis Smith. 



ZETA PSI DEFEATED BY KAPPA SIGMA. 

By defeating the Zeta Psi team last Tuesday, 
the Kappa Sigma's are now tied with the Chi 
Psi team for first place in League B. At no 
time except in the second inning were the Kappa 
Sig's in danger. In that inning the Zete's had 



three on bases with one out. By striking one 
out and catching another at first the Zete's one 
chance was lost. Moses, pitching- for Kappa 
Sigma, was the star, .striking out eight men in 
three innings and allowing but three hits. 

Score by innings : 1234 5 — r h e 

Kappa Sigma 2 2 5 — 9 10 2 

Zeta Psi i o 2 — 3 3 4 

Batteries : Zeta Psi, Lee and Haggerty. 
Kappa Sigma, K. C. Coombs, Moses and K. B. 
Coombs. Umpire, Allan Hall. 



ZETA PSI 8, PSI UPSILON 2. 

Zeta Psi won from Psi Upsilon in the first 
inning, scoring five runs. During the remaining 
innings the game was close. Johnson replacing- 
Mundie did good work in the box for the Psi 
U.'s. Batteries : Zeta Psi, Lee and Haggerty ; 
Psi Upsilon, Mundie, Johnson and Dunbar. 



BATTING AND FIELDING AVERAGES. 

The following are the batting and fielding 
averages of the Bowdoin team to date, including 
the game last Saturday with Maine : 







Batting 








Fielding 




ab 


bh 


Ave. 


tc 


po 


a 


e Ave. 


A. Hall... 


. 2 


I 


500 
















Grover ... 


■ 23 


8 


348 


16 


13 





3 


813 


Prosser ... 


. -4 


S 


ZIZ 


1 1 


9 


I 


I 


909 


Smethurst 


■ 3 


I 


333 


2 





2 


I 


000 


Donnell . . 


. 32 


9 


281 


23 


7 


12 


4 


S26 


F. Hall.... 


. 28 


7 


250 


61 


48 


12 




9S4 


Holmes .. . 


. 16 


4 


250 


8 


6 


2 


I 


000 


Cook 


. 26 


6 


231 


36 


14 


20 


2 


944 


Finn 


• 27 


6 


222 


38 


10 


21 


7 


S16 


Mason .... 


. 10 


2 


200 


S 


I 


6 


I 


87.'; 


Caspar . . . 


. 31 


6 


194 


83 


n 


2 


4 


952 


Flinn .... 


. 12 


2 


167 


14 


I 


13 


I 


000 


Racine . . . 


• 17 


I 


059 


.s 


3 


I 


I 


Soo 


Clifford .. 


I 





000 


- 


- 





I 


000 


Totals . 


.252 


61 


242 


307 


191 


92 


24 


922 



BOWDOIN IN PARIS. 

The following selections from a letter which 
has come to the notice of the alumni editor seem 
to be of unusual interest to Bowdoin men. The 
letter was written by Captain Paul L. White '14, 
who has recently had an army appointment as a 
student in the Sorbonne, Paris. 

"Today in the grand amphitheatre of the Sor- 
bonne, Dean Briggs of Harvard spoke before 
some two or three hundred fortunate Americans 
who are now in the schools of Paris. Almost 
every university and college in America was rep- 
resented. Three times in the course of his con- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



57 



ference he quoted President Hyde, and once at 
some length on the functions of the college as 
opposed to those of the university. He added 
that Bowdoin had guarded well its proper func- 
tions and then praised the college method. Bow- 
doin was the only college he named. 

"To hear the dean of our greatest university 
speak in that way of Bowdoin and so well voice 
what we have all thought to be great, was a 
satisfaction that rejoiced the hearts of the Bow- 
doin men in that audience. 

"The courses in the history of French civiliza- 
tion are given with a real enthusiasm which one 
finds only in the best men. It is truly contagious. 
I think that M. M. Lemonnier, Reynier, Guigue- 
bert, and Brigle are doing as much for France 
as her finest soldiers. 

"But I think often of Bowdoin and especially 
of Professor Johnson whose great heart reached 
out across racial and social prejudice, which must 
have been .strong within him, to the great har- 
monious heart of beautiful Paris and F" ranee. 
He was a great man." 



Samuel B. Furbish was elected grand high 
priest of the Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the 
State of Maine at its annual meeting held in 
Portland Tuesday evening. 

Gordon '20, has been reinstated on the editorial 
boards of the Orient and the Quill. 

Governor and Mrs. Carl E. Milliken and Judge 
and Mrs. Charles F. Johnson were on the Campus 
last Monday evening to attend the address given 
by Ex-Senator Theodore E. Burton. 

All pleasant afternoons find the devotees of 
golf in college out on the Brunswick golf links. 

The D. U. baseball nine won a practice game 
from the Psi U. team on the Delta last Thurs- 
day night 7 to 4. . 

Coach Jack Magee and Manager Brown '20 
of the track team attended a meeting of the 
Maine Intercollegiate Track Association at the 
Elmwood Hotel, Waterville, last Tuesday after- 
noon. 

A large crowd from the student body is plan- 
ning to attend the Maine Intercollegiate Track 
Meet which will be staged at Orono this coming 
Saturday. 

Finn '19 was elected Senior member of the 
Athletic Council at a special election held last 
Thursday afternoon. The two other candidates 
for the position were Higgins '19 and Small '19 



Preparations are now under way for the Bow- 
doin Interscholastic Outdoor Track Meet which 
will be held at the Athletic Field on Saturday, 
May 31. Already some twelve or more schools 
have accepted the invitation sent to them to com- 
pete in the meet, and it is expected that a lively 
contest will be seen. 

Rain prevented the Bowdoin-New Hampshire 
State baseball game which was scheduled for last 
Wednesday afternoon at the Athletic Field. The 
New Hampshire State team was on the Campus 
all the afternoon. 

Merrill ex-'i8 is back on the Campus from ser- 
vice and will complete his college course. 

McGorrill '19, president of the New England 
Intercollegiate Tennis Association was in Bos 
ton over the week end to attend the annual meet- 
ing of the association. 

The Bowdoin tennis team is in Boston this 
week competing in the New England Intercol- 
legiate Tournament played at the Longwood 
Courts. 

The date for the Freshman banquet has been 
set for Memorial Day, May 30. It will be held 
at the Riverton Casino, Portland. 

Manderson ex-'i8, discharged from the 104th 
Engineers, was on the Campus last week. 

Manderson, ex-' 18, recently discharged from 
the 104th Engineers, was on the Campus last 
week. 

Sprague, ex-'ig, was on the Campus Saturday. 



mitb t!)e JFacuitp 

Professors Brown and Wass took part in the 
Brunswick Dramatic Club's play, "Under Cover," 
last Thursday evening. 

Professor Woodruff visited Kent's Hill last 
week. 

President Sills spoke at Wellesley College, 
Tuesday, May 13. 

At a meeting of the faculty last Wednesday 
the following report of the curriculum committee 
was adopted: i. That of all candidates for de- 
grees of A.B. or B.S. two years in either French 
or German be required, at least one year of 
which shall be taken in college. (This is not to 
be interpreted as altering requirements for ad- 
mission.) 2. That of the same students there 
be required one year in a second modern foreign 
language taken in college. 3. That the course in 
geology be extended to cover two semesters. 

Professor Mitchell was elected Vice-President 
of the State Congregational Conference for next 
year, at the annual State Conference in Auburn. 

Professor Burnett was elected a corporator of 



58 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



the Brunswick Savings Institution at its annual 
meeting. 

President and Mrs. Sills gave an informal re- 
ception at their residence in honor of Hon. 
Theodore E. Burton from four to six o'clock. 

Professor Bell became an American citizen 
May 5, through naturalization proceedings be- 
fore Judge Clarence Hale '69, in the United 
States District Court. Professor Bell was 
naturalized in the simple manner made possible 
by the act relating to men in the service. 



3lumni Botes 

'74 — Hon. Edward Newton Merrill, of Skow- 
hegan, was killed in a train accident last Friday, 
May 9. He was bom in Harmony, Maine, April 
II, 1849. For forty-three years, since 1876, Mr. 
Merrill was a prominent lawyer in Skowhegan, 
and also a strong business man and political 
leader in Somerset County. He served two 
terms in the Maine Legislature, the first being 
from 1899 to 1900, and the second from 1905 
to 1906. 

'75 — Dr. Dudley Allen Sargent resigned his 
position May 2 as director of the Harvard Gym- 
nasium. He is widely known as a physical train- 
ing specialist, and he has been connected with 
Harvard athletics for forty years. After he 
graduated from Bowdoin, he studied medicine 
at Yale, and received his M.D. in 1877. Two 
years later he was appointed director of the 
Hemenway Gymnasium at Harvard. He was 
also the assistant professor of physical training 
from 1879 until 1889. From 1890 to 1895 he 
was president of the American Association for 
the Promotion of Physical Training. He is the 
author of a number of books on physical train- 
ing, and he is also the inventor of several gym- 
nasium appliances. The Sargent Gymnasium, 
now the Bowdoin Union, was named in his honor. 

Medic '79 — A brief account of Dr. Nathaniel 
M. Marshall appeared in the Portland Express 
of May 5. After his graduation, he took up his 
practice in Portland, where he has remained ever 
since. He has been vice-president of the Cumber- 
land County Medical Society, and has also acted 
as president of that society. 

'94 — The annual directory of the Class of 1894 
has recently appeared. It contains the address, 
position, and other information concerning each 
member. 

ex-'98 — Hon. Edward W. Wheeler, deputy 
grand master of the Grand Lodge of Masons, 
presided over the annual session held in Port- 



land May 6 in the absence of the Grand Master. 
Mr. Wheeler was re-elected to his position at the 
annual meeting held in the afternoon. 

'99 — Drew B. Hall of Boston, who was com- 
missioned Captain in the Quartermaster Corps, 
June II, 1917, has had a most interesting ex- 
perience in the Army. Until December 7, 1917, 
he was assistant to the Finance Quartermaster 
of the Eastern Department at Governor's Island. 
After that, until June 3 of the following year, 
he was supply officer, in charge of the transpor- 
tation, food, pay, and all equipment of the Fifth 
Sanitary Train, Fifth Division (Regulars), at 
Camp Logan, Houston, Texas. June 4, 1918, he 
sailed for overseas on the U.S.S. Mauretania and 
from June 19 to August 22 was on the front 
line in the Vosges, taking part August 17 in the 
Frapelle offensive. From September 12 to 16 
he was in the St. Mihiel offensive, and from 
October 11 until the signing of the armistice 
in the Meuse-Argonne offensive. After the 
armistice he was sent through Longwy into the 
Grand Duchy of Luxembourg with the American 
Army of Occupation, with which he is still sta- 
tioned, at Mondorf-les-Bains in Luxembourg. 

'07 — Harold S. Stetson, formerly of Bruns- 
wick, has been made manager of the Canton, 
China, branch of the International Banking Cor- 
poration, which was established by General 
Thomas H. Hubbard '57. Mr. Stetson has been 
located in New York City, London, Hongkong, 
Shanghai, Yokohama, Kobe (Japan), Singapore, 
and now at Canton. 

'10 — Lieut. Warren E. Robinson, who died of 
wounds received in leading a patrol into the Ger- 
man lines the night of November 5, 1918, was 
recommended for the Distinguished Service 
Cross for gallantry in action against the enem\' 
at Neptune Sector, November 5. The commend- 
ation has been received by Lieut. Robinson's 
father, Walter A. Robinson '76 of Boston. The 
citation is as follows : 

"American Expeditionary Forces in France, 
"One Hundred and Second Infantry. 

"This Diploma certifies that First Lieut. War- 
ren E. Robinson, I02d Machine Gun Battalion, 
was recommended for the Distinguished Service 
Cross for gallantry in action against the enemy 
at Neptune Sector on November 5, 1918. 

"Douglas Petts, Colonel Commanding." 

A fine portrait of Lieut. Robinson has been 
placed in the Alumni Room in the Library by his 
wife, Mrs. Anne Johnson Robinson, the daughter 
of the late Professor Henry Johnson. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



59 



'ii — Mr. and Mrs. Franklin G. Hubbard of 
Bridgeport, Conn., recently announced the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Mildred Florence 
Hubbard, to Roderick Paul Hine. Mr. Hine at 
present is with the Berkshire Fertilizer Company 
of Bridgeport, Conn. 

'14 — Robert D. Leigh who has since graduation 
been teaching at Reed College, has been awarded 
the Gilder Fellowship at Columbia University 
for next year. This is one of the largest and 
most important fellowships awarded by Columbia. 

'15 — The wedding of Miss Marie Beth Fogg 
of Westbrook and Philip Livingstone Card of 
Portland was solemnized at the home of the 
bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Fogg 
of Westbrook. After the honeymoon, Mr. and 
Mrs. Card will make their home in Buffalo, New 
York, where the groom is now located. Mr. 
Card has recently received his discharge from 
the L^nited States service, and during the war 
was an ensign in the Naval Reserve. 



mitii m ©tber Colleges 

Amherst: A great Victory Commencement 
lasting from June 14 to June 18 is being planned 
for this year. 

Brown: The Daily Herald says, "The advent 
of prohibition will necessitate the rewording of 
some of our popular college songs." 

Obcrlin: President King is at the head of the 
Inter Allied Commission to Syria in Paris. 

Reed: In the 24-mile inter-class relay race 
held recently the freshmen were the winners. A 
new record of 2 hrs. 16 min. 4 sec. was made 
for the course across country to Oregon City 
and return to the college. 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute: The Institute 
recently entertained the Conference of the N. E. 
College Christian Associations. Seventy-six 
delegates were present from twenty-five N. E. 
colleges. 

Trinity: Dr. Flavel S. Luther, who for thirty- 
six years has been closely connected with Trinity 
as professor and president, has recently offered 
his resignation as head of the college. 

New Hampshire College: On April 25, Pro- 
fessor Bliss Perry of Harvard gave the most in- 
teresting lecture of the year. A week ago last 
Wednesday, Lieutenant Commander Thomas 
Mott Osborne lectured on his success with prison 
reforms. 

An impressive ceremony in honor of the 
seventeen New Hampshire men who gave up 
their lives in . the war, was held Saturday, 
April 26. 



The Class of 1922 won the annual inter-class 
track meet a week ago Saturday. 

The Orient acknowledges the following ex- 
changes from preparatory schools : The 
Oracle, Bangor High School; The Megunticook, 
Camden High School; The Folio, Jordan High 
School, Lewiston; The Maple Leaf, Mapleton 
High School; P. I. H. S. Flyer, Presque Isle 
High School; The Advance, Salem (Mass.) High 
School; The Vigornia, Worcester (Mass.) 
Academy. 



CALENDAR. 

May 12-14 — New England Intercollegiate Ten- 
nis Tournament. 

May 13 — Concert in Memorial Hall. 

May 14 — Baseball, Bowdoin vs. New Hamp- 
shire State at Durham, N. H. 

May 16 — Baseball, Bowdoin vs. Holy Cross at 
Worcester, Mass. 

May 17 — Baseball, Bowdoin vs. Williams at 
Williamstown. 

May 17 — Maine Intercollegiate Track Meet at 
Orono. 

May 20 — Debate, Bowdoin vs. Brown at 
Brunswick; Bowdoin vs. Wesleyan at Middle- 
town. 

May 24 — Track, New England Intercollegiate 
Track Meet at Boston. 

May 24 — Baseball, Bowdoin vs. Colby at 
Waterville. 



RESOLUTIONS. 



Hall of Alpha Delta Phi : 

The Bowdoin Chapter of Alpha Delta Phi 
wishes to express its deep sorrow at the loss of 
Brother Samuel Lane Gross, of the Class of 
1872, whose death occurred on April 16, 1919, 
in the city of New York. 

Brother Gross was an earnest and faithful 
member of the Fraternity during his undergradu- 
ate days, and loyal throughout life to its spirit 
and traditions. For more than forty years he 
was actively engaged in the practice of law in 
New York City, winning the respect and con- 
fidence of a very large clientage. 

It is voted that this word in recognition of the 
loss to the Fraternity, and of sincere sympathy 
with his family in their bereavement be spread 
upon the records of the Bowdoin Chapter, and 
transmitted to the family of our departed brother. 
Richard Kenneth McWilliams, 
Philip Robinson Lovell, 
Leslie Boltlter Heeney, 

For the Chapter. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

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8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 

Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 

OFFICERS' SHOES 

TAN CALF AND CORDOVAN 

Spiral Puttees 

Army Boots 

AT 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 



DANCING 

MISS JENNIE S. HARVEY 

Evening Class and Assembly every 
Tuesday evening, Town Hall, Bruns- 
wick. Class at 7.30 p. m. Assembly 
at 8.30 p. m. Open to college students. 

Every Monday evening Class and Assembly at 
the Arcade, Bath. 

Private instruction by appointment. Phone 
Bath 151-W. Address 897 Middle street. 



The right candy — 
From the right man — 
To the right girl — 
If you send her 




She will be equally delighted with 
the dainty, original box and the 
super-extra quality candies inside! 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 
TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 

BATH, MAINE 




^Arrow 

COLLAR 

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BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ANTIQVITY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

Din ifutnitute, ©IB ahina, ©etoter, ffitc. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 
to orders for antique goods of any kind 



The Citizens Laundry 

Qu^liiiy - S^r'vi^^ 

BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short Notice by competent work- 
men. We use only the Best 
of Leather. 
E. WHITTOM 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Sui-plus and Profits, |100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 



We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16. 



J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The BoAvdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



NEW SPRING 
SUITS, 

SHIRTS, 

SHOES, 
HATS 

The snappiest lines ever shown in 
Maine. 




FRANK M. LOW & CO. 
PORTLAND, - - MAINE. 



STUDENTS 

desiring to work an hour or more a day 
can make wages of more than ?1.00 per 
hour selling America's War for 
Humanity and Life of Roosevelt. Send 
at once for free outfit, 

F. B. DICKERSON CO. 

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enclosing 20c in stamps for mailing 
outfits. 

Telephone 160 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 



^ 



Alent Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
A. G. PAGE COMPANY, Bath 




Cumberland Theatre 

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

DOROTHY DALTON 

IN 

HARD BOILED 




THE IRON TEST 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

THE GIRL OF MY DREAMS 

Gaumont Graphic — Vod-a-vil 



MONDAY and TUESDAY 

MARGUERITE CLARK 

IN 

LITTLE MISS HOOVER 



THE LIGHTNING RAIDER 



PASTIME THEATRE 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

THE LION'S CLAWS 

FINAL EPISODE 

and 

BIG METRO PRODUCTION 



Vol. XLIX. No. 7 



MAY 20, 1919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 





CONTENTS 






PAGE 


PAGE 


Bowdoin Wins M. I. A. A. Meet 


Non-fraternity 4, Sigma Nu 3 


65 


with Ease 


61 


Fielding arid Batting Averages 


65 


Bowdoin Represented in N. 
Tennis Tournament 


E. 

62 


New Contributions to Art Build- 




Bowdoin 7, New Hampshire 1 


62 


ing 




Intercollegiate Debates Tonight 63 


Provisional Commencement 
Speakers 


66 


Bradbury Debates 


63 




Concert in Memorial Hall 


63 


What Education Cost Our Grand- 










66 


The Northfield Conference 


63 






Editorials : 


'^ 


College Training in France 


66 


Campus Paths 


64 


War Risk Insurance 


67 


Support the Ivy Play 


64 


On the Campus 


67 


Actors Wanted 


64 


Alumni Notes 


68 


Dramatic Drippings 


65 


With the Other Colleges 


69 


Dekes Defeat Theta Delts 


65 






Betas Bat out 11-4 Victory 


over 


Calendar 


69 


Alpha Delts 


65 


Resolutions 


69 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Over There" know JUD is in the game. 



LEWISTON JOURNAL 
PRINTSHOP 


Think It Over 

The trend of modern conditions makes 
a knowledge of law necessary to the heads 
of all great industrial enterprises. 

Whether a young man contemplates fol- 
lowing the legal profession, or whether he 
hopes to head any great industrial or- 
ganization, he will find a legal training of 
utmost value to him in after life. 

The forward-looking youth lays his plans 
now for future success. The study of law 
is one great essential to this end. 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

Gives a thorough training in the principles 
of law. Course for LL.B. requires 3 years. 
Men preparing for college or business, 
who wish to plan ahead in selecting a 
school of law, should address, for catalog, 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 


BOOK AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING 


School and College Work a Specialty 


12 Lisbon Street, Lewiston, Maine 


LARGEST AND BEST 

stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 




CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 






CARL H, MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 


ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 


4 Elm Street 




Harvard Dental School 

A DEPARTMENT OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

Graduates of secondary schools admitted without ex- 
amination provided they have taken required subjects. 
Modern buildings and equipment. Fall term opens 
September 22, 1919. Degree of D.M.D. Catalog. 

EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D., 

Dean, Boston, Mass. 


WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE NATIONAL SURVEY CO. 

MAP MAKERS PUBLISHERS 

Summer positions for college men. Application blanks 
may be obtained of "CF" ALBERT, '19, 

3 South Maine. 

TOPOGRAPHICAL OFFICES 
CHESTER, VERMONT 



SPRING STYLES 

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WILSON'S PHARMACY 



PRINTING 



OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWN BOILDING BRUNSWICK 



The College Book Store 

F. W. CHANDLER & SON 

This year's Tennis Goods are in 

NEW CHAMPIONSHIP BALLS 
55c EACH 

1918 CHAMPIONSHIP BALLS 

40 CENTS. 

We have some of last year's Rackets 

on hand which will be sold at 

the old prices, which are 

considerably less than 

this year's prices. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



NEED MONEY 

For college expenses. Do you know what the opportunities are with our line of 
new revised maps. Then why not find out. Do it now. 



IMA.TIOIM/1^1- IVi/^l=> OO. 



119 iM.A.^sxx.(_i ^-r. 


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Portland 


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White Flannels 

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Floral Designs for All Occasions 

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BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 20, 1919 



NO. 7 



BOWDOIN WINS M. I. A. A. WITH EASE. 

Despite the sharp wind, the incessant rain, and 
the soggy track the Bowdoin track team won a 
crushing victory over the two other track teams, 
Maine and Bates, last Saturday afternoon at 
Orono in the 23rd annual Maine Intercollegiate 
Track Meet. Winning points in every event on 
the card, the Magee coached team piled up a 
total of 73 points against 36 for Maine and 17 for 
Bates. 

Contrary to previous predictions the meet 
proved to be a mere walk-away for the Bowdoin 
boys. It seemed from advance "dope" before 
hand that the meet would be practically a "dead 
heat" for Bowdoin and Maine with the final re- 
sult being determined by the second and third 
places and the way the Bates points went. But 
after the trials in the morning, at which 16 Bow- 
doin men qualified for the finals against 11 Maine 
men and four Bates men, it was seen that the 
Bowdoin team had the margin. Eighteen points 
were practically cinched in the low and high 
hurdles for Bowdoin in the morning, and every 
man placed strong for the finals in the after- 
noon. 

Savage, Goodwin, and Cleaves were the stars 
of the meet running heady races and winning 
their own events. Savage won the 440-yard run, 
which was one of the prettiest races seen at the 
meet. He from third position at the mark 
jumped into the lead at the crack of the gun, 
was forced to give way to Pratt of Maine and 
Lawrence of Bates on the second corner, jumped 
them again at the third corner and led on the 
home-stretch to the tape. Savage in the hurdles 
found little difficulty in placing and didn't exert 
himself in either the low or high. He crossed 
the finish first in the low, running an extremely 
slow race as all four of the contestants were 
Bowdoin men. And with two other men from 
Bowdoin in the highs he allowed them to finish 
first, he taking third place as clean-up man. 

Captain Bob Cleaves displayed his track ability 
in the half mile, winning his event with com- 
parative ease over Buker of Bates, who took the 
lead a good part of the first lap. Partridge made 
a dashing finish and crossed the tape third, shut- 



ting out the Maine competitors entirely. 

Goodwin won the mile and two mile races, 
running in excellent shape all the way. His 
time, due to the condition of the track, was not, 
very fast, but he was not pushed hard in either 
of the races and finished far ahead of the other 
competitors. Herrick, whom Maine banked so 
strongly on to win the mile, "didn't have a 
prayer" against this sturdy Bowdoin runner and 
the best the Maine man could do was to finish 
third. 

Holbrook, of Bowdoin, proved the winner of 
the 100-yard dash final, making a time of 10 1-5 
seconds. If the track had not been so heavy 
from the rain, the race would have gone for 10 
flat easily. Wansker of Maine, who was con- 
ceded to take the dashes, came in second to Hol- 
brook, followed closely by Thompson of Bow- 
doin, third. 

Averill of Bowdoin and Pratt of Maine ran a 
practically dead heat in the 220-yard dash. 
Averill had his opponent all the way until the 
last five yards when Maine succeeded by almost 
a hair's breadth in nosing out the victor. 

Pratt of Maine won the running broad jump 
making a distance of 20 feet 7J/2 inches. Allen 
of Bowdoin came second with 20 feet 6 inches. 
Allen would probably have won the event if he 
had not spiked himself in making that jump and 
was forced to leave the event. 

The Maine team found their weight men lack- 
ing at the final show-down and the Bowdoin men 
displayed material which made them "sit up and 
take notice." Ellms won the hammer throw at a 
distance of 107 feet, followed second by Zeitler 
of Bowdoin, loi 4-5 feet. In the shot-put 
Zeitler was placed third. Ellms and Caspar, both 
of Bowdoin, were tied for first place in the dis- 
cuss, making a distance of 1 1 1.70 feet. 

In the high jump the points were split evenly 
between two Bowdoin men, Higgins and Dostie, 
and two Maine men, Small and Wood as they 
were all tied for first place with the bar at 5 
feet 2^ inches. 

The credit for the success of the meet be- 
longs justly to Coach Magee who has labored 
hard and long to build up a winning squad and 



62 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



he has accomplished his undertaking. 
The summary : 

220-Yard Dash Trial Heats — First heat won by Averill, 
Bowdoin ; second, Allen, Maine, time 23 seconds. Second 
heat won by Pratt, Maine ; Small, Maine, second. Time 22 
2-3 seconds. 

120-Yard Hurdles, Trial Heats — First heat won by Hig- 
gins, Bowdoin: second. Castle, Maine: time 16 3-5 seconds. 
Second heat won by Thomson, Bowdoin ; second. Savage, 
Bowdoin. Time, 16 3-5 seconds. 

220-Yard Hurdles, Trial Heats— Won by Thomson, Bow- 
doin ; time, 26 2-5 seconds : second. Savage, Bowdoin : time 
26 2-5 seconds. Second heat, won by Parent, Bowdoin : 
second, Foulke, Bowdoin. Time, 26 2-5 seconds. 

100-Yard Dash, Trial Heats — First heat won by Dostie, 
Bowdoin ; second, Wansker, Maine : time 10 2-5 seconds. 
Second heat, won by Thomson, Bowdoin : second Holbrook, 
Bowdoin. Time, 10 1-5 seconds. 

Finals — 100-Yard Dash — Won by Holbrook, Bowdoin : sec- 
ond, Wansker, Maine ; third, Thomson, Bowdoin. Time, 
10 . 1-5 seconds. 

220-Yard Dash — Won by Pratt, Maine : second, Averill, 
Bowdoin : third, Sewell, Maine. Time 23 2-5 seconds. 

440-Yard Dash — Won by Savage, Bowdoin ; second, Pratt, 
Maine : third, Lawrence, Bates. Time, 53 seconds. 

8S0-Yard Run — Won by Cleaves, Bowdoin : second, E. S. 
Buker, Bates : third. Partridge, Bowdoin. Time, 2 minutes 
7 1-5 seconds. 

Mile Run — Won by Goodwin, Bowdoin : second, E. S. 
Buker, Bates ; third, Herrick, Maine. Time, 4 minutes 37 
3-5 seconds. 

Two Mile Eun — Won by Goodwin, Bowdoin ; second, 
Gregory, Bates ; third, Barnard, Maine. Time, 10 minutes, 
10 seconds. 

120-Yard Hurdles— Won by Higgins, Bowdoin : second, 
Thomson, Bowdoin : third. Savage, Bowdoin. Time, 17 sec- 
onds. 

220-Yard Hurdles — Won by Savage, Bowdoin : second, 
Thomson, Bowdoin : third. Parent, Bowdoin. Time, 28 sec- 
onds. 

Eunning Broad Jump — Won by Pratt, Maine, distance 20 
feet 7 1-2 inches ; second, Allen, Bowdoin, distance, 20 feet 
6 inches : third, Sewell, Maine, distance, 19 feet 9 1-2 
inches. 

Pole Vault — First, Eice, Bates and Wood, Maine, tied, 
height 9 feet 7 inches : third, Houston, Maine, and Cook, 
Bowdoin, tied, 9 feet 1 inch. 

Hammer Throw — Won by EUms, Bowdoin, distance, 107 
feet: second, Zeitler, Bowdoin, distance, 101.05 feet: third, 
Strout, Maine, distance, 92.1 feet. 

Shot Put — Won by Allen, Maine, distance, 41.70 feet : 
second, Adam, Bates, distance 33.25 feet; third, Zeitler, 
Bowdoin, distance 32 feet. 

Discus Throw — Ellms, Bowdoin, Caspar, Bowdoin, tied for 
first, 11.70 feet : third, Allen, Maine, distance 93.7 feet. 

High Jump — Dostie and Higgins of Bowdoin, and Small 
and Wood of Maine, all tied for first place and points 
divided. Height 5 feet 2 3-4 inches. 



BOWDOIN REPRESENTED AT N. E. TENNIS 
TOURNAMENT. 

Captain Chin 'i8, and Partridge '22 represented 
Bowdoin tennis team at the New England In- 
tercollegiate Tennis Tournament at the Long- 
wood Courts, Boston, last Monday and Tuesday. 
Both players won their preliminary matches but 



were defeated in their second attempts. They 
were defeated in doubles by the Dartmouth team 
which won the tournament. Scores : 

Harmon and Carleton of Dartmouth defeated 
Chin and Partridge of Bowdoin, 6 — 4, 6 — 2. 

Chin of Bowdoin defeated Swift of Wesleyan, 
6—4, 6—3. 

Brookman of M. I. T. defeated Chin of Bow- 
doin, 6 — 2, 6 — I. 

Partridge of Bowdoin defeated Pollard of Wil- 
liams, 6 — 3, 7 — 5. 

Purington of Bates defeated Partridge of Bow- 
doin, 7—5, 6—3. 



BOWDOIN 7, NEW HAMPSHIRE 1. 

The Bowdoin baseball nine had an easy time 
beating New Hampshire College at Durham last 
Wednesday by a score of 7 to i. Flinn pitched 
a steady game, and had the New Hampshire 
hitters well in hand at all stages of the contest. 
He had one difficult inning when three men got 
on the bases with only one out, but tight fielding 
kept them from scoring. New Hampshire was 
very weak in the pinches since six of Bowdoin's 
runs were assisted by errors. Donnell and Cook 
batted well for Bowdoin, and Broderick for New 
Hampshire. 

The score : 

BOWDOIN. 

ab r bh po * a e 

Donnell, 3b 4 1 3 2 3 

Cook, 2b 4 1 2 1 1 1 

Finn, ss 5 1 1 1 3 1 

Clifford, lb 5 1 9 

Prosser. cf 4 1 3 

F. Hall, c 4 1 1 10 3 

Holmes, rf 3 

Grover, If 4 1 

Flinn. o 4 2 1 



Totals 37 



11 



NEW HAMPSHIEE COLLEGE. 

ab r bh po a 

Broderick, ss 4 2 1 

Butler, 3b 4 1 2 4 

Smith, c 4 7 1 

Jenness. rf 4 1 3 

Rumazza. If 4 1 

Harris, lb 2 5 

ShutUeworth, lb 2 1 7 1 

Davis, cf 4 1 

Sorden, 2b 3 1 1 1 6 



Anders 



P 











Totals 

Innings: 

Bowdoin 

New Hampshire 10 0—1 

Two-base hits. Broderitk, Cock. Stolen bases, Broderick. 



34 1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 S 
13 10 



14 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Butler 2, Sorden, Donnell, Finn, Hall, Flinn. Sacrifice hits, 
Cook, Holmes. Earned runs, Bowdoin 1, New Hampshire 0. 
Left on bases. Bowdoin 7, New Hampshire 6. First base 
on errors, Bowdoin 3, New Hampshire 2. Bases on balls, 
ofiE Anderson 2, off Flinn. Struck out, by Flinn 9, by An- 
derson 7. Hit by pitcher, Prosser (by Anderson). 



INTERCOLLEGIATE DEBATES TONIGHT. 

Tonight Bowdoin is represented in her first in- 
tercollegiate debate of the year. While the 
affirmative team debates against Wesleyan's 
negative team at Middletown. The negative 
team meets the affirmative Brown debaters in 
Memorial Hall. Besides Taylor, a varsity de- 
bater of last year, McGown, ' Helson, and 
Cobnrne, alternate, all men of experience in de- 
bating, made the trip to Middletown yesterday. 
Tonight's negative team is composed of Chad- 
bourne, Hatch, Buker, and Young, alternate, all 
of whom have debated on their class team. This 
team will meet J. S. Eastham '19, W. M. Burse 
'20, H. W. Lord '20, and T. A. Distler '22, alter- 
nate, of Brown. These men have also had con- 
siderable experience in debating so that a close 
contest is expected. The subject. Prohibition of 
Immigration for Five Years After the Signing 
of the Peace Treaty,- is timely and interesting. 



BRADBURY DEBATES. 

The Bradbury Prize Debate was held in Hub- 
bard Hall, May 6. The subject for discussion 
was' that of the triangular league. Resolved : 
"That immigration into the United States should 
be prohibited for a period of five years follow- 
ing the ratification of the Peace Treaty." 
The affirmative team, comprising Taylor '20, Mc- 
Gown '21, Helson '21, and Coburne '21, alternate, 
defeated the negative, composed of Hatch '21, 
Buker '21, Chadbourne '19, and Young '21, al- 
ternate. A prize of forty dollars went to the 
winning team and twenty dollars to the losing 
team. 

The judges, President Sills, Professor Catlin 
and Professor Andrews, voted unanimously in 
favor of the affirmative team. 



CONCERT IN MEMORIAL HALL. 

On Tuesday evening. May 13, the students of 
Bowdoin and many townspeople enjoyed a fine 
concert in Memorial Hall. The artists were Mrs. 
Frank L. Button, Mrs. George H. Brickett, 
pianists. Miss Marcia Merrill, contralto, and Mr. 
Harry F. Merrill, bass. 

Program. 

1. Piano duos — March, Heroique Saint-Saens 

Sonata in D (arr. by Gries) Mozart 

2. Songs — "Where'er You Walk" Handel 



"Invictus" Huhn 

"The Americans Come" Foster 

3. Piano Solo — Prelude, Choral and Fugue. .. .Cesar Franck 

4. Songs — "What's in the Air Today ?" Eden 

"Roses of Picardy" Wood 

"Dawn" Curran 

5. Duet — "Homer Gulf" Gow 

6. Piano Duos. — Suite Alg-erienne Saint-Saens 

Concerto in E. flat Beethoven 



THE NORTHFIELD CONFERENCE. 

The annual Intercollegiate Student Conference 
is to be held at East Northfield, June 20-30. Re- 
cently Mr. Arthur F. Newell of Boston was on 
the campus with a comprehensive series of 
lantern slides about the conference and life at 
Northfield. He showed these before a meeting 
of the Y. M. C. A. Cabinet and the Freshman 
Cabinet and pointed out to them the need of 
Bowdoin having a representation at a conference 
where almost every college in the Eastern states 
has a delegation. 

Northfield comes at the close of a college year 
at a convenient time to get a short vacation be- 
fore attacking the summer's work. It gives 
a delegate an opportunity to hear addresses by 
John R. Mott, Robert E. Speer, Dean Charles R. 
Brown, Charles W. Gilkey, J. Stitt Wilson, the 
great labor leader, and other prominent leaders. 
It offers an opportunity to meet some 800 picked 
college men from all our Eastern institutions 
and to form friendships of the most lasting sort. 
The afternoons of the conference are devoted to 
recreation and are featured by baseball, tennis, 
golf, and an Intercollegiate track meet in which 
everyone is urged to take part. Parties are 
formed to take hikes every afternoon over the 
beautiful Connecticut Valley country or up to 
where the three states, Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire and Vermont join. One night is de- 
voted entirely to stunts by the different dele- 
gations and here are heard all the songs and 
cheers of the colleges represented. This is fol- 
lowed by a celebration and war dance around 
one of the most elaborate bonfires built. The 
whole series of experiences go to make up one 
of the best vacations for ten days that any of 
us could provide. 

The expenses of the Conference will be $15 
board and $5 registration plus the railroad fare 
from the college. It is estimated this would 
amount to about $10 one way from Brunswick. 
It is essential that Bowdoin have at least 10 men 
there this year. Already three have decided to 
go. If you are interested even if you can't yet 
see the expense, get in touch with McGown '21 
and get the details. 



64 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Tuesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 
Norman W. Haines, 1921 



Editor-in-Chief 
Managing Editor 



department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 Exchange 

Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be, ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Albert E. Hurrell, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 



Vol. XLIX. MAY 20, 1919. 



No. 7 



Entered at Post OfiRce at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

Campus Paths. 

One of Bowdoin's proudest possessions is her 
beautiful campus. As members of the college, 
we should especially pride ourselves in it. We 
owe a great debt to those past members of the 
college who have been so active in making possi- 
ble the pleasing surroundings which we enjoy 
today. Without doubt, the student body ap- 



preciates the advantages of a beautiful campus 
and wishes to see everything possible done to 
bring ours to the highest standard of excellence. 
However, we have carelessly fallen into certain 
habits of action which serve to impair the ap- 
pearance of the campus. 

We must come to the supreme realization that 
the paths were laid out for the explicit purpose 
of affording convenient routes, connecting vari- 
ous points on the campus, along which the stu- 
dent could wend his way without disturbing the 
beauties of nature. Many of us have reached 
the point, however, where we no longer dis- 
criminate between paths and grass ground in our 
desire to apply that well-known geometrical law 
that a straight line is the shortest distance be- 
tween two points. The results of this are ap- 
parent in many places on the campus where we 
find the grass being worn away and ragged paths 
being formed. It is up to the student body to 
remedy the situation. A few extra steps will 
not shorten any of our lives but will greatly 
lengthen the life of the grass. 



Support of the Ivy Play. 

Last week's number of the Orient contained a 
particularly effective appeal for support from 
the student body for the Ivy play, an appeal 
coming from a member of the Masque and Gown. 
Surely, we all agree that the same undivided 
support should be given to the Masque and Gown 
as is given an athletic team. However, it has 
been brought to the attention of the Student 
Council that certain fraternities are planning 
some sort of entertainment, outing trip or dance, 
for the night of the play. While circumstances 
may be such as to warrant such action in one or 
two cases, any plans of this kind are generally 
to be condemned as manifestations of a spirit of 
non-support of college activities. It is the duty 
of the fraternities to give their undivided sup- 
port to the Ivy play. 



ACTORS WANTED. 



In an editorial of this issue is an appeal to 
support the Ivy play. An opportunity to aid, 
other than financially, the dramatic activity of 
the College is now open to all students of his- 
trionic ability. A pitiably small number appeared 
in response to the call for candidates for "The 
Tempest," this year's Commencement play. A 
chance to do something worth while for himself 
and the College, it is hoped, will induce a much 
larger number to come out at the next call. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



DRAMATIC DRIPPINGS. 

The Masque and Gown is coming along in 
splendid style with "A Pair of Sixes" and by 
June 5, we'll be holding a full hand. Our re- 
hearsals are almost as good as the play itself 
and anyone who has paid his Blanket Tax and 
Quilt Duty is eligible to attend. 

The cast is a group of finished actors — 
finished some fifteen years ago. Mr. Huse is 
quite overcome with our work and says he never 
saw a group of amateurs display such human in- 
telligence. 

Personalizing is odious but we cannot avoid 
a word or two concerning some of the victims. 
They deserve it. Amidst them all William Angus 
sits out particularly. He knows two lines of his 
part and before he gets through he expects to 
know two more. Crockett, Curtis and Pendexter 
seem fairly inspired — with what, the Lord only 
knows. Battison and Redman shade their work 
with a delicacy most touching — in fact they are 
in the shade most of the time. 

Kirke who has a following all his own among 
Brunswick theatre-goers is at his best in this 
production. His work even excels his efforts of 
last year. 

Edwards' technique is too fine for words. He 
hasn't even had to rehearse at all as yet. Rhoads 
is letter-perfect in his lines and his co-operation 
with Kimball is very pleasing. It seems almost 
an accident. Henry Lamb likewise stands out, 
his breezy personality fairly reeking with 
"furnacyed oxygen." Mr. Huse frequently speaks 
of his work. 

Altogether we are getting along in superb 
style. It is even rumored that the Student 
Council is about to crown our labors with their 
blessing. How sweet ! R. A. 



DEKES DEFEAT THETA DELTS. 

The Dekes defeated the Theta Delts a week 
ago today, 6 to 2. Ludwig allowed no hits till 
Burr scored a home run for the Theta Delts. 

Batteries: Dekes, Ludwig and Drummond; 
Theta Delts, Adams and Burr. 



BETAS BAT OUT AN 11-4 VICTORY OVER 
ALPHA DELTS. 

By persistent slugging and superior playing 
the Beta Theta Pi baseball nine won an 11-4 
victory over the Alpha Delta Phi team last 
Thursday afternoon on the Delta. Batting ral- 
lies in the first and fourth innings during which 



the winners clouted the pill for five runs each 
inning put the game on ice. Errors for the 
losing side were numerous and were responsible 
in a measure for the runs obtained. Partridge 
pitched a good game and held his batsmen to only 
one hit. He was supported in an excellent man- 
ner by his team mates. 

Score by innings: 1234 5 — r h e 

Beta Theta Pi 5005 i — 11 6 

Alpha Delta Phi 1200 i — -4 i 2 

Batteries : Beta Theta Pi, Partridge and Webb. 
Alpha Delta Phi, James and Moses. Umpire, 
Prosser. 



NON-FRATERNITY 4, SIGMA NU 3. 

The Non-fraternity men defeated Sigma Nu 
men on the Delta last Tuesday, 4-3. 

Batteries: Sigma Nu, Morton and Hurling; 
Non-fraternity, Smith and Canter. 

BATTING AND FIELDING AVERAGES. 

Following are the batting and fielding averages 
of the Bowdoin team to date, including the New 
Hampshire game : 

Batting Fielding 

ab bh Ave. ' tc po a e Ave. 

A. Hall 2 1 .500 

Donnell 36 12 .333 28 9 15 4 .857 

Smethurst 3 1 .333 2 2 1.000 

Grover 27 8 .296 17 14 3 .823 

Prosser 28 8 .286 14 12 1 1 .857 

Cook 30 8 .267 39 15 21 3 .923 

F. Hall 32 8 .250 74 58 15 1 .988 

Finn 32 7 .218 43 11 24 8 .814 

Holmes 19 4 .211 8 6 2 1.000 

Mason 10 2 .200 8 16 1 .875 

Caspar 31 6 .194 83 77 2 4 .962 

Clifford 6 1 .167 11 11 1.000 

Flinn 16 2 .125 15 1 14 1.000 

Racine 17 1 .059 5 3 11 .800 

Totals 289 69 .239 347 218 103 26 .911 



NEW CONTRIBUTIONS FOR ART BUILDING. 

Through the generosity of the United States 
Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corpoi-ation a 
set of the war posters issued by that organiza- 
tion for display in shipyards and industrial plants 
has recently been received by the College. The 
set includes, of course, the "Together We Win," 
of James Montgomery Flagg, the "Let Nothing 
Stop You," by H. Giles, "The Launching of the 
Lady Janet," by Joseph Pennell, and the "On the 
Job," by Jonas Lie. These posters will surely 
possess a historical and educational value which 
will make them an important addition to the 
archives of the Walker Art Building. 



66 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PROVISIONAL COMMENCEMENT SPEAKERS 

On a basis of rank secured ,the men have now 
been chosen for Provisional Commencement 
Speakers. Four of the men -will be selected from 
the list, by a committee of the Faculty, as 
speakers on Commencement day. 

The provisional list is as f ollowrs : Berry, Bur- 
leigh, Caspar, Casey, Chadbourne, Edwards, 
Foulke, Grover, Haynes, Higgins, Hilton, Mc- 
Donald, MacCormick, Nelson, Newell, Norton, 
Paul, Pearson, Racine, Sawyer, Simmons, Small, 
and Stevens, R. A. 

Rev. Dr. Daniel Raynes Goodwin, gives a prize 
of fifty dollars each year, which is awarded to 
the author of the best Commencement part. 



WHAT EDUCATION COST OUR GRAND- 
FATHERS. 

In the Boston Herald of April 28, there ap- 
peared an editorial concerning the term bill of 
1845 which was published in the Orient. In a 
recent issue of the Boston Transcript there was 
printed a copy of this bill. The following is the 
Herald's comment : 

"The students' newspaper at Bowdoin College 
publishes some figures showing what an under- 
graduate had to pay for his education at that 
institution seventy-four years ago. The figures 
are taken from a term bill dated Dec. 18, 1845, 
which gives the various items for tuition, room- 
rent, books, and library fees. They bring home 
to us how great a change has taken place in 
monetary values during the last seven decades. 

"This term bill gives no inkling as to what 
a Bowdoin undergraduate had to pay for his 
board in these halcyon days, but all his other 
obligations were satisfied by the payment of 
$16.68 for a college term, or less than $50 for 
the entire year. This included tuition, room, 
books, and incidental charges. Today the usual 
tuition fee is $150 per annum, or more at nearly 
all collegiate institutions, except the State uni- 
versities. Other expenses have gone up pro- 
portionately. In the first half of the nineteenth 
century it was possible to pay the entire cost of a 
four years' college course with -the money now 
required to attend college during a single year. 
But our grandfathers were no better off in this 
respect than we are. Allowing for changes in 
the purchasing power of money during the past 
three-quarters of a century, a college education 
is doubtless as cheap today as it ever was. The 
general level of prices determines the cost of edu- 
cation just as it determines the cost of every- 
thing: else." 



COLLEGE TRAINING IN FRANCE. 

The War Department is at present carrying 
on an educational enterprise in the American 
Expeditionary Force which is unique in magni- 
tude, comprehensiveness and in the rapidity with 
which it has been put into effect. It is nothing 
less than a highly diversified and progressive 
educational program, providing for the needs of 
the entire overseas force, and embracing graded 
courses of study all the way from the elements 
of reading and writing to advanced scholarship 
and professional training. 

The important bearing of educational activities 
on the morale of the Army has been recognized 
from the time of our entrance into the war. At 
the time of the signing of the armistice plans 
were already being developed which would have 
resulted in the creation of educational oppor- 
tunities for the entire fighting force, with a view 
to creating an intelligent interest in the purposes 
of the war, and with a view to making the period 
of service as little wasteful as possible to the in- 
dividual soldier. To some extent this plan had 
already been carried into effect through the Y. 
M. C. A. and other welfare organizations. The 
signing of the armistice at once created both a 
greater need and a greater opportunity. It re- 
moved the greatest incentive to industry and 
strict observance of military routine and tended 
to create a spirit of restlessness on the part of 
the soldier. As the date of discharge was now 
near at hand, it became necessary to prepare the 
soldier for a return to civilian pursuits. It was 
necessary to create in the soldier both the at- 
titude and the condition of preparation that 
would enable him rapidly to be assimilated to in- 
dustrial and professional life. While the case 
of the disabled soldier was provided for by the 
Reconstruction Division of the Surgeon General's 
Department and by the Federal Board for \^o- 
cational Education, it was evident that it was 
just as important to "reconstruct" the able- 
bodied man. This is recognized in a statement 
made in General Orders 30 published February 
13, 1919. 

"This citizen army must return to the United 
States prepared to take an active and intelligent 
part in the future progress of our country." 

While the need for educational work was thus 
increased by the armistice, there was at the same 
time an enlarged opportunity for carrying it on. 
It was now practicable both to allot a consider- 
able amount of time and at the same time some- 
what to relax the strain and rigor of military 
routine. As a result there was now opportunity 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



for a consecutive educational program, for in- 
, teVisive application and study on the part of the 
soldier, and for changes of assignment and or- 
ganization that would make it possible to group 
men together in classes and schools. It is to be 
noted that the same condition did not obtain on 
this side of the water owing to the rapidit}' of 
the demobilization. It was deemed sufficient here 
to carry on the less systematic and less intensive 
educational work already provided by the Y. M. 
C. A. Overseas, on the other hand, there was 
evidently, both opportunity and need for a serious 
educational program, comparable in scope and 
efficiency with those conducted in times of peace 
at regularly established educational institutions. 

The civilians employed for this work are for 
the most part educational experts, and are en- 
gaged in administrative supervision, teaching of 
methods, and the preparation of syllabi and 
courses of stud}'. They also serve as heads of 
departments in the University of Beaune. There 
are about, 500 civilians so employed, of whom 
about one-half were already in France as Y. M. 
C. A. secretaries, the other half consisting of 
college professors, school superintendents and 
other educational experts who have been sent 
abroad since the signing of the armistice. 

It is a notable fact that nearly all of the actual 
teachers are drawn from the Army itself, and 
consist of officers and enlisted men who are freed 
from their military duties for this purpose, but 
without affecting their present military status. It 
has developed that the teaching resources of the 
Army are so great as to make it educationally 
self-contained. A preliminary survey made from 
the Army personnel records showed that the 
American Expeditionary Force contained at least 
40,000 men who had already had some teaching 
experience, 2,600 officers of the Army on duty 
overseas have been college professors in America 
or are otherwise suitably equipped to conduct in- 
struction of collegiate grade, covering almost 
every subject which is offered in the most highly 
developed modern university. These facts testify 
both to the militant patriotism of the teachers 
themselves, and to the high average quality of 
the personnel of the United States Army. 

In addition to the above several hundred 
French teachers have been most generously sup- 
plied by the French Ministry of Public Informa- 
tion, and these teachers have taught French by 
the "direct method" to over 250,000 American 
soldiers. 

Each student must carry at least three lectures 
or recitation hours and four and a half hours 



of study periods daily during five days of the 
week, Saturday and Sunday being free. Stu- 
dents attending this University will have the 
option of returning to the United States with 
their organizations or of remaining to complete 
the term of three months. 

Reports show that these men on detached leave 
are eagerly interested in their work and popu- 
lar in the communities in which they reside. In 
many cases they are carrying on sports, college 
papers, and other characteristic features of 
American college life. 



WAR RISK INSURANCE. 

All discharged soldiers and sailors are advised 
to keep up the payment of the premiums due on 
their War Risk Insurance, applied for while in 
the militar\' service. 

Within a short time those who have kept up 
such payments will be permitted to convert their 
present insurance to other forms without another 
physical examination. Any discharged soldier 
who has permitted his insurance to lapse should 
correspond with or call at the office of Captain 
T. J. Johnston, Department Insurance Officer, 
Headquarters Northeastern Department, Room 
717, 99 Chauncy street, Boston, Mass., as soon as 
possible, as it is not yet late to be reinstated. In- 
formation may also be obtained there with refer- 
ence to the new kinds of insurance to be issued 
and the premium rates therefor. In writing, in 
addition to asking the information desired, the 
person should indicate the date of his discharge 
and whether he has paid any premiums since such 
discharge. 

The officer above mentioned will also be 
pleased to assist the allottee of soldiers in cases 
where allotments and Government allowances are 
not being received. 



2Dn tDe Campus 

The Forbes Rickard Prize of ten dollars is 
given to the author of the best poem submitted 
each year by an undergraduate. All poems must 
be t^'pewritten and sent to Professor G. R. Elliot, 
254 Maine street, as soon as possible, and not 
later than June 9. 

Hebron has paid a fine tribute to Bowdoin by de- 
ciding to compete in the Bowdoin Interscholastic 
Outdoor Meet in preference to that given by New 
Hampshire State College on the same date. May 
31. The decision is all the more noteworthy 
because Hebron therebv sacrifices her chances 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



for the New Hampshire College's loving cup, on 
which she already has a claim. 

Harrington 'i8, was on the Campus this last 
week. 

Final trials for the Commencement play to be 
given by the Masque and Gown in the Cumber- 
land Theatre Thursday evening, June 5, in 
connection with Ivy Week, were held in the 
Classical Room last Friday afternoon. 

Daggett '18, spent a few days on the Campus 
last week. 

Twenty-six track men, besides Manager Brown 
and Coach Magee, made the trip to Orono last 
Friday for the Maine Intercollegiate Track Meet. 
The team went in a special Pullman car attached 
to the 1.39 train. They made their headquarters 
at the Bangor House. 

Walker ex-'i8. Small '19, and Mahoney '19 
were among the officials at the Maine meet in 
Orono last Saturday. 

The Kappa Sigma fraternity held their seniors' 
last supper at New Iven House, New Meadows, 
last Tuesday evening. 

The Phi Chi, medical fraternity, held an in- 
formal smoker at the Kappa Sigma house last 
Tuesday evening for their pledges and invited 
guests. Several speakers, including Dr. Whittier, 
spoke briefly. 

The baseball game with Williams was called 
off last Saturday on account of rain. The team 
made the trip as far as Greenfield. 

Harvey D. Miller '17, was on the Campus re- 
cently. 

Ensign John W. Thomas ex-'i8, who has just 
been placed on the inactive service list of the 
U. S. Navy, was in town last week-end. 

Lieutenant Donald S. White '16, of the 20th 
Aero Squadron, First Day Bombardment Group, 
who has recently been honorably discharged, is 
on the Campus for a few days. 

Captain Philip S. Wood '13, was on the 
Campus Sunday. 

Final examinations begin either June 11 or 12, 
and they will end on June 19. June 11 is the 
first Wednesday after Ivy Day. 



alumni J13otE$ 

The Orient desires to be of the greatest possi- 
ble service to Alumni in keeping them informed 
of one another's activities. Alumni are earnestly 
requested to support the Orient in this work by 
sending items about themselves or their brother 
Alumni. 

'56 — Enos Thompson Luce, for thirty-five years 



a judge of a Massachusetts District Court, died 
at his home in Waltham, Mass., May 10, 1919, 
after an illness of ten days. Judge Luce was 
born at Wilton, Maine, January 23, 1832. After 
his graduation from Bowdoin he was principal 
of Lewiston Falls Academy, now Edward Little 
High School, for one year, until June, 1857. In 
1862, together with William W. Virgin '44, who 
was an associate in law, he organized the 23rd 
Maine Regiment, of which he was the Lieutenant 
Colonel. After the war he was Judge of Probate 
of Androscoggin County until 1871. While hold- 
ing this position he wrote a book on Maine pro- 
bate practice, which has long been an authority 
on the subject in Maine. From 1870 to 1874 
he was a lawyer in Lewiston, and for one year 
of that period (1871-2) he was a judge of the 
Municipal Court. In 1874 he moved to Boston, 
where he practiced law until 1881, when he was 
appointed Judge of the Second Eastern Middle- 
sex District Court. During his term of thirty- 
five years in this office. Judge Luce resided at 
Waltham, Mass., where he was very prominent in 
city affairs. He drew up the first charter for 
the city, was chairman of the commission that 
constructed its sewer system, served on the 
School Board, and was president of the Waltham 
Savings Bank for about forty years. Judge Luce 
was twice married, first in i860 to Phoebe Learned 
Adams, who died in 1874, and in 1879 to Sarah 
J. Mills, who died in 1915. He was a member 
of the Loyal Legion and of the Delta Kappa 
Epsilon fraternity. 

'94 — Charles A. Flagg, chairman of the execu- 
tive committee of the Bowdoin Club of Bangor 
has made plans for a meeting and supper to be 
held at the Chamber of Commerce banquet room, 
Thursday, May 22. This is to be the last meet- 
ing of the year, and President Sills is to be a 
guest. A number of Bowdoin men who have 
seen service overseas are expected to be present. 

'98 — Thomas L. Pierce of the 32.sth Infantry, 
who has been awarded the Distinguished Service 
Cross, and who has recently rejoined his regi- 
ment after several months spent in the hospital 
in France, has just been promoted from the rank 
of Major to that of Lieutenant Colonel. 

'11 — The college has just received notice of 
the death of Alfred Wellington Johnson on No- 
vember 6, 1918. Mr. Johnson was born at White- 
field, Maine, September 16. 1800. In his senior 
year, he entered the Medical School, where he re- 
mained for two years, until June, 1912. After 
this he stayed in Augusta until December, lor'^, 
when he received an appointment as plant clerk 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



69 



with the Bethlehem Steel Company. In June oi 
last year, he became a clerk of the Steelton, Le- 
banon and Reading Plants, and held this position 
until his death. He married Mary Elizabeth 
Johnson in December, 1913. He was a c nb^r 
of the Delta Upsilon fraternity, and of the Alpha 
Kappa Kappa medical fraternity. 

'11 — Mr. and Mrs. Franklin G. Hubbard of 
Bridgeport, Conn., recently announced the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Mildred Florence 
Hubbard, to Roderick Paul Hine. Mr. Hine is 
at present with the Berkshire Fertilizer Company 
of Bridgeport, Conn. 

'14 — Of seventy-six officers left in France by 
the 26th Division to complete courses at French 
colleges and schools, are Captains Paul L. White 
'14, and Reginald E. Foss '12. They are not ex- 
pected to return to this country before the first 
of July. 

'14 — Mr. Arthur S. Merrill who has been super- 
intendent of schools for the union of towns 
around Mexico, Maine, has entered State Y. M. 
C. A. work and will have his headquarters at 
Augusta. 

Medic ex-'20 — Abraham Bernard Margulis of 
Portland was naturalized before Judge Hale 
May 5. 



miti^ tt)e ©ttjer Colleges 



rst : "Sabrina," the statue goddess of 
Amherst men, made its appearance in Amherst 
for a few minutes last week. The Juniors im- 
mediately hurried it away into hiding again be- 
fore any other class could capture it. 

Brown: Junior Week with a perfect whirl 
of activities has just been celebrated. Among 
the features was the defeat of Amherst in a dual 
Track Meet. Also the nine succeeded in over- 
coming Yale 2 to I in a hard, close game. 

Colby: The Echo is starting a campaign to 
try to interest Colby students in the Rhodes 
Scholarship and wants to make the State of 
Maine appointment a permanent Colby prize. 

Maine: All roads led to Orono last Saturday 
and the great athletic event of the state attracted 
numbers from all directions. 

Reed: A Reed College movie is now being 
filmed. It consists of a story woven around the 
scenes and life of the college so that almost all 
phases of college activities will get into the 
picture. Undergraduates are doing the acting. 

W. P. I.: The baseball team by winning three 
straight from other colleges and the track team 
by taking three places for 5>4 points in the 
Eastern Intercollegiates have rescued Tech from 



athletic oblivion and given her a prominent place 
in New England. 

Trinity: Franklin K. Lane, Secretary of the 
Interior, and Judge Elbert Gary are to be the 
Commencement speakers this year. 

Wellesley : The Outdoor Number of the 
Wellesley College Magazine has recently been 
received by the Orient. It is a remarkably 
good issue with several interesting stories and 
poems. Wouldn't illustrations improve the issue 
somewhat ? 



CALENDAR. 



May 20 — Debate, Bowdoin vs. Brown, at 
Brunswick; Bowdoin vs. Wesleyan, at Middle- 
town. 

May 24 — New England Intercollegiate Track 
Meet at Boston. 

May 24 — Baseball, Bowdoin vs. Colby at 
Waterville. 

May 30 — Bowdoin vs. Bates at Lewiston. 

May 31 — Interscholastic Track Meet; Fresh- 
man Banquet at Riverton. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Hall of Theta of Delta Kappa Epsilon: 

It is with the greatest sorrow that Theta 
Chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon records the 
death of our beloved Brother, Benjamin P. Brad- 
ford, of the Class of 1917. Brother Bradford 
held a lieutenant's commission in Air Service of 
the American Expeditionary Force and was 
killed in an airplane accident. Gallant in battle, 
faithful to his friends, and loyal to his fraternity, 
his name will ever be held in honor among us. 
Lewis W. Brown '20, 
Cornelius P. Rhoads '20, 
George C. Cummings '21, 

For the Chapter. 



Hall of Theta of Delta Kappa Epsilon: 

Whereas, It has pleased God in His infinite 
wisdom to take from among us Brother John 
Hej'wood of the Class of 1914 of Bowdoin Col- 
lege ; be it 

Resolved, That we extend our heartfelt sym- 
pathy to the family and friends of the deceased, 
and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be 
recorded in the archives of our Chapter and a 
copy be published in the Bowdoin Orient. 
Lewis W. Brown '20, 
Cornelius P. Rhoads '20^ 
George C. Cummings '21, 

For the Chapter. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

UNION CANTEEN 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 

Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 

OFFICERS' SHOES 

TAN CALF AND CORDOVAN 

Spiral Puttees 

Army Boots 

AT 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 

DANCING 

MISS JENNIE S. HARVEY 

Evening Class and Assembly every 
Tuesday evening, Town Hall, Bruns- 
wick. Class at 7.30 p. m. Assembly 
at 8.30 p. m. Open to college students. 

Every Monday evening Class and Assembly at 
the Arcade, Bath. 

Private instruction by appointment. Phone 
Bath 151-W. Address 897 Middle street. 



The right candy — 
From the right man- 
To the right girl — 
If you send her 




She will be equally delighted with 
the dainty, original box and the 
super-extra quality candies inside! 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 
TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 

BATH, MAINE 




c£k ^Monroe 

-Arrov^ 



CLUETT- PEABODY-£<^Co: Inc: TROYNY 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ANTIQVITY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

2DIH iFutniture, ffilD €fitna, ©etoter, (Etc. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 
to orders for antique goods of any kind 



The Citizens Laundry 



Qu^li'fcX 



t^r'vi^^ 



BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short Notice by competent work- 
men. We use only the Best 
of Leather. 
E, WHITTOM 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 



We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 



87 Maine Street 
Branch Store 



Tel. 136-137 
-2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16. 



the: stofie: of- i=>F90CSF3e^^ 



J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The Bowdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



NEW SPRING 
SUITS, 

SHIRTS, 

SHOES, 
HATS 

The snappiest Hnes ever shown in 
Maine. 




FRANK M. LOW & CO. 
PORTLAND, - - MAINE. 



STUDENTS 

desiring to work an hour or more a day 
can make wages of more than $1.00 per 
hour selling America's War for 
Humanity and Life of Roosevelt. Send 
at once for free outfit, 

F. B. DICKERSON CO. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

enclosing 20c in stamps for mailing 
outfits. 

Telephone 160 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 



Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
A. G. FA GE COMPANY, Bath 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 



IN 




HARD BOILED 
THE IRON TEST 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

THE GIRL OF MY 
DREAMS 



MONDAY and TUESDAY 

MARGUERITE CLARK 

IN 

LITTLE MISS HOOVER 



THE LIGHTNING RAIDER 



PASTIME THEATRE 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

ETHEL BARRYMORE 

— - IN 

THE DIVORCEE 



THE LION'S CLAWS 

FINAL EPISODE 



Vol. XLIX. No. 



MAY 27, 1919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 







^g^ 


* 


^^^^p 




PAGE 


PAGE 




Non-Fraternity Men Lead in Friar 


Speakers Chosen for Alexanders 75 




Cup Standing 71 


Mother of Bowdoin Man First 




Bowdoin Wins from Colby, 5-2 71 


Woman to be Presented Croix de 




Bowdoin Scores Nine Points in 


Guerre 75 




New England Track Meet 72 


Opportunity for College Men to 




I. C. A. A. A. A. Meet 73 


See France this Summer 75 




Beta Theta Pi and Chi Psi Lead 


Rev. Ashley Day Leavitt Speaks 




League 73 


in Chapel 76 




Editorial : 


Edward Little H. S. Wins 




A Victory Commencement 74 


Abraxas Cup 76 




Theatrical Trimmings 74 


Bowdoin Wins Triangular Debate 76 




Interfraternity Baseball: 


Sixteen Schools in Outdoor Meet 77 




Sigma Nu 4, Psi Upsilon 3 75 


On the Campus 77 




Chi Psi 3, Kappa Sigma 1 75 


With the Faculty 78 




Theta Delta Chi 16, Delta Up- 


Alumni Notes 79 




silon 4 75 






Intercollegiate Tennis Match sched- 


With the Other Colleges 79 




uled for this week 75 


Calendar 79 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Over There" know JUD is in the game. 

LEWISTON JOURNAL 
PRINTSHOP 



BOOK AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING 



School and College Work a Specialty 



12 Lisbon Street, Lewiston, Maine 
LARGEST AND BEST 

stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F.WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 

CARL H, MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 

4 Elm Street 

Harvard Dental School 

A DEPARTMENT OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

Graduates of secondary schools admitted without ex- 
amination provided they have taken required subjects. 
Modern buildings and equipment. Fall term opens 
September 22, 1919. Degree of D.M.D. Catalog. 

EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D., 

Dean, Boston, Mass. 



LAW 

AND AMERICA'S 
WORLD POSITION 



1 international 
challenges the 



America's new place i 
politics and commerce 
young American. 
He must equip himself for new world 
conditions with a knowledge of legal funda- 
mentals. 

LAW — its principles and application to all 
business is almost as necessary to the 
coming business man as it is indispensable 
to the lawyer. 
Qualify for real leadership. 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

gives a thorough training in legal 

principles. 

LL.B. Course requires 3 years. 

For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 



ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE NATIONAL SURVEY CO. 

MAP MAKERS PUBLISHERS 

Summer positions for college men. Application blanks 
may be obtained of "Cr" ALBERT, '19, 

3 South Maine. 

TOPOGRAPHICAL OFFICES 
CHESTER, VERMONT 



SPRING STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

Jo'hn A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 


PRINTING 


OF QUALITY 

■WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWN BUILDING BRUNSWICK 






COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULFS BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 


The College Book Store 

F. W. CHANDLER & SON 


A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post OflSce - - Brunswick, Maine 


This year's Tennis Goods are in 

NEW CHAMPIONSHIP BALLS 
55c EACH 


BUTLER'S 


1918 CHAMPIONSHIP BALLS 
40 CENTS. 

We have some of last year's Rackets 




PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS | 

...AT... 

WILSON'S PHARMACY 


on hand which will be sold at 

the old prices, which are 

considerably less than 

this year's prices. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



NEED MONEY 

For college expenses. Do you know what the opportunities are with our line of 
new revised maps. Then why not find out. Do it now. 



DMA-TIOBM/VL. BVHAF> OO. 



Its ■MA.SSA.I^ ST- 


rsll£\A/ YOFSK CSITY 


Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 

Portland 


HAVE YOU PAID YOUR 
SUBSCRIPTION ? 








Greenhouse 21-W 


STRAW HATS 


Residence 21-R 


White Flannels 


WALTER L. LaROCK 
F- l_ O R 1 S T 


Potted Plants and Cut Flowers 


E. S. BODWELL & SON, 


Floral Designs for All Occasions 


BRUNSWICK. 


15K Jordan Avenue 






THE WAISTUNE 


BUSINESS ESTABLISHED 1849 

MACULLAR PARKER COMPANY 


A NEW MODEL FOR 


Makers and Retailers of Best 


YOUNG MEN DE- 


Clothing for Men, Young 


VELOPED BY 


Men and Boys 


HART SCHAFFNER & 


Special attention to the require- 
ments of young men at 


MARX 


school and college 
Clothes ready to wear and made 


HANDSOME NEW FABRICS. 


to order 


THE FINEST OF MAKING. 


Fine Haberdashery-Stetson Hats 


FROM $30. 


Sole Boston Agents for the 


Haskell & Jones Co. 


"Stetson special" 


Portland, - - - Maine. 


400 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 



BOWDOIN ORILNT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK. MAINE, MAY 27, 1919 



NO. 8 



NON-FRATERNITY MEN LEAD IN FRIAR 
CUP STANDING. 

Although no Friar Cup is being awarded this 
year, the standing of the respective fraternities 
has been compiled as usual. The non-fratcrnit\ 
group with forty-three men is in first place, on 
the basis of the grades secured last term, with 
an average of 12.1279, heing a fraction of a 
point above the Chi Psi record. These averages 
are reckoned by letting a grade of A equal 4, 
B equal 3, C equal 2, D equal i, and E equal -2. 
Grades in Hygiene and Public Speaking are 
divided by two. 

The follow^ing is a complete list of the record 
of each fraternity : 

No. Men Averag'? 

Non-fraternity 43 12.1279 

Chi Psi 25 11.7000 

Beta Theta Pi 5.5 14.1818 

Theta Delta Chi 30 11.2500 

Sigma Nu 26 11.0576 

Delta Upsilcn 29 10.7586 

Kappa Sigma 27 10.5555 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 35 10.0857 

Alpha Delta Phi 21 9.7857 

.Psi Upsilon 27 0.3703 

Zeta Psi 21 8.7557 

Record of Senior Delegations: 

No. Men Average 

Psi Upsilon 4 15.2500 

Delta Upsilon 7 14.5714 

Beta Theta Pi 25.5 11.2744 

Alpha Delta Phi 4 13.5000 

Kappa Sigma 4 13.5000 

Sigma Nu 3 13.3333 

Non-fraternity 7 12.7143 

Chi Psi 7 12.5714 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 7 12.4285 

Zeta Psi 5 12.4000 

Theta Delta Chi 4 11.2500 

Record of Junior Delegations : 

No. Men Average 

Chi Psi 5 13.4000 

Non-fraternity 13 13.153S 

Beta Theta Pi 3 13.0000 

Psi Upsilon 7 12.4285 

Kappa Sigma 5 12.0000 

Theta Delta Chi 9 11.6666 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 6 11.1666 

Alpha Delta Phi 5 11.2000 

Z"ta Psi 2 11.0000 

Delta Upsilon 4 10.5000 

«„,.,» '•T,, 9 10.2222 



Record of Sophomore Delegations: 

No. Men Average 

Sigma Nu 7 14.4285 

Theta Delta Chi 7 13.8571 

Chi Psi 5 13.6000 

Alpha Delta Phi 3 11.3333 

Non-fraternity 10 10.7000 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 10 10.2000 

Psi Upsilon 5 9.6000 

Kappa Sigma 11 9.4545 

Beta Theta Pi 8 9.2500 

Delta Upsilon 10 8.7000 

Zeta Psi 4 6.0000 

Record of Freshman Delegations : 

No. Men Average 

Non-fraternity 13 11.8846 

Beta Theta Pi 9 10.7222 

Delta Upsilon 8 10.1375 

Kappa Sigma 7 9.5914 

Theta Delta Chi 10 9.0500 

Chi Psi 8 8.6875 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 12 8.0833 

Sigma Nu 7 7.7857 

Zeta Psi 10 7.6500 

Alpha Delta Phi 9 6.8333 

Psi Upsilon 11 5.1818 

BOWDOIN WINS FROM COLBY, 5-2. 

The Bowdoin baseball team stands well up in 
the Maine series as a result of the 5-2 victor)' 
over Colby last Saturday afternoon at Water- 
ville. The Bowdoin team without doubt played 
the best baseball of the season. Flinn pitched 
a steady and heady game, and save for a few 
questionable errors, the team backed him up in 
fine style. 

The two sensational features of the game were 
the wonderful running stabs made by Grover 
and Finn. Fleyc^, firct man up in the second 
inning, connected squarely with the ball and 
drove it deep into left field, almost to left fieP 
fence. The drive seemed good for two bases at 
least, and perhaps three, but Grover in a running- 
side stab picked the ball from the air, and so 
bewildered was the batter that his hit had not 
been placed safely, that it took a minute or two 
to convince him that the put-out had really bee 
made. Then in the ninth "Huck" Finn made a 
similar sensational play when he picked Grant'r 
fly, which seemed far over his head, out of the 
air in a running side catch. 

Bowdoin was the first to score, making a ru'i 



72 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



in the first inning, followed by the Colby team 
in the third with two, the only tallies made by 

the Waterville players. Bowdoin tied the score 
in the fifth, and by a succession of passes, errors 
and hits, scored three runs in the seventh. 

BOWDOIN. 

ab r bh po a e 

Donnell, 3b 5 1 1 2 1 

Cook, 2b ■ 3 1 2 1 2 

Finn, ss 3 2 1 6 1 

Caspar, lb 4 1 16 

Prosser, rf 5 1 1 1 

F. Hall, c 5 1 2 3 

Holmes, cf 5 1 1 1 

Grover, If B 1 2 

Flinn, p 4 1 7 

Totals 39 5 6 •:'26 20 4 

COLBY. 

ab r bh po a e 

Taylor, If 3 1 1 

Nourse, 2b 3 4 4 2 

DriseoU, p 4 S 4 1 

Bucknam, cf 4 1 4 

Hayes, 3b. ss 4 1 1 1 

Grant, c 4 2 4 1 

Sullivan, rf, 3b 4 1 1 

Willis, lb 3 1 S 

Fraas, ss 2 1 1 2 2 

Williams, ss 1 

Totals 32 2 5 27 12 6 

Innings : 

Bowdoin 1 1 S 0—5 

Colby 2 0—2 



Savage had the ill luck to fall over a hurdle in 
one of the trial heats. In the second semi-final 



*Fraa5 out hit by batted ball. 

Sacrifice hits. Cook, Nourse. Stolen bases, Finn. Left en 
bases. Bowdoin 9. Colby 6. Earned runs, Bowdoin 0, Colby 
0. First base on balls, ofE Flinn 2, off DriscoU 5. Struck 
out by Flinn 3. by Driscoll 2. Time, 2 hours 5 minutes. 
Umpire, Thayer of Auburn. 



BOWDOIN SCORES NINE POINTS IN NEW 
ENGLAND TRACK MEET. 

In the thirty-third annual New England in- 
tercollegiate track and field meet, held at Tech 
field last Saturday, the Bowdoin competitors suc- 
ceeded in landing only nine points. Six colleges 
finished ahead of the White. M. I. T. walked 
away with first place with 37 points, while Wes- 
leyan finished half a point ahead of Brown with 
i9/''2 points. The other points were divided as 
follows: New Hampshire College lyYi, Wil- 
liams II, Boston College 10, Bowdoin 9, Holy 
Cross 8, Maine 6, Tufts 5, Middlebury 5, Am- 
herst S, Worcester P. I. i, and M. A. C. i. 

In the 100-yard dash, Dostie was the only 
Bowdoin runner who qualified for the final heat, 
in which, however, he failed to score. In the 
high hurdles, Bowdoin's best hope was gone when 




CAPTAIN R. E. CLEAVES 20. 

of this event. Thomson took first and Higgins 
second, but neither of them could score in the 
final. 




G. R. GOODWIN '21. 



The low hurdle race was the event in which 
Bowdoin made her best showing. In the trial 
heats, both Savage and Parent took first places. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



73 



and in the final Savage lead the field, and Parent 
finished fourth. 

Bowdoin was able to land only two points in 
the distance runs. In the mile run, which was 
won by Nightingale of New Hampshire College, 
Goodwin of Bowdoin succeeded in finishing third. 
This is the third time this spring that Night- 
ingale has shown the Bowdoin man his number 
in a long distance race. In the two-mile, Good- 
win was unable to place, being beaten by Leath 
of New Hampshire again, and also by Herrick 




W. A. SAVAGE '19. 



of Maine, whom the Bowdoin man trimmed with 
ease in the Maine meet. 

The only remaining point that Bowdoin scored 
was a fourth place won by Ellms in the discus 
throw. Andrews of New Hampshire, who was 
beaten by Ellms three weeks ago, took third last 
Saturday. 

The following is a summary of the events in 
which Bowdoin figured: 

120-YARD HIGH HURDLES. 

First Heat — Won by Burbank, Wesleyan ; second, Scranton, 
M. I. T. ; third, Lundgren, Worcester P. I. Time, 16 4-5 
seconds. 

Second Heat — Won by Thomson, Bowdoin : second Hig- 
gins, Bowdoin ; third. Low, Amherst. Time, 17 2-5 seconds. 

Final Heat — Won by Low, Amherst : second, Burbank, 
Wesleyan : third, Scranton, M. I. T. ; fourth, Lundgren, 
W. P. I. Time, 17 seconds. 

220-YARD HIGH HURDLES. 

First Heat — Won by Savage, Bowdoin ; second, Keeler, 
Wesleyan. Time, 26 1-5 seconds. 

Second Heat — Won by Mills, M. I. T. ; second, Besser, 
Brown. Time, 26 3-5 seconds. 



Third Heat — Won by Parent, Bowdoin : second, Low, 
Amherst. Time. 26 3-5 seconds. 

Final Heat — Won by Savage, Bowdoin ; second, Keeler, 
Wesleyan ; third, Besser, Brown ; fourth. Parent, Bowdoin. 
Time, 26 2-5 seconds. 

Mile Run— Won by Nightingale, N. H. College: second, 
Sullivan, Holy Cross ; third, Goodwin, Bowdoin ; fourth, 
Gale. Wesleyan. Time, 4 minutes, 28 seconds. 

Throwing Discus — Won by Nichols, Brown : second, An- 
derson, Wesleyan ; third. Andrews, N. H. College ; fourth, 
Ellms, Bowdoin. Distance, 121 feet 7 inches. (Ellms's dis- 
tance was 116 feet 4 inches.) 



I. C. A. A. A. A. MEET. 

The usual ''week-before dope" concerning the 
big intercollegiate track event of the year ap- 
peared in last Sunday's Boston Herald. The 
article in part is as follows : 

"Pennsylvania appears to have the best chance 
to win the annual intercollegiate track and field 
championship meeting in the Stadium Friday 
and Saturday. No other college can hope to do 
as well. Cornell is not strong enough all around 
to win. 

"The one-mile run should be a corking race. 
Although up to yesterday no collegian had travel- 
led better than 4.30, this mark will surely be 
beaten. McDermott of Cornell, O'Connell of 
Harvard, Goodwin of Bowdoin, Crawford and 
Kleinspehn of Lafayette, and O'Brien of Yale 
are capable of running close to 4.25, which makes 
it look as if it will be a real race. 

"There are several fast two-milers, Goodwin of 
Bowdoin, Sedgwick of Michigan, Bolles of 
Dartmouth, McCullough of Princeton, Waterman 
of Yale, and Hutchinson of Harvard. 

"The hurdle races are narrowed down to a 
select few. Carl Johnson of Michigan, Carl Erd- 
man and Trowbridge of Princeton, Smith and 
Watt of Cornell, Savage and Higgins of Bow- 
doin, and Smalley of Penn. should settle both 
timber topping events between them." 



BETA THETA PI AND CHI PSI LEAD 
LEAGUES. 

League A. 

Won Los 

Beta Theta Pi 2 

Delta Upsilon 2 1 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 1 1 

Theta Delta Chi 1 2 

Alpha Delta Phi 2 

League B. 

Won Los 

Chi Psi 3 1 

Non-fraternity 2 1 

Zeta Psi 2 1 

Kappa Sigma 2 2 

Psi Upsilon 1 2 

Sigma Nu 3 



P. C. 

1.000 
.667 
.500 



.750 
.667 
.667 
.500 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Tuesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT AND ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Facuhy 

Edward B. Ham, 1922 . Ahimni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 

Russell M. McGown, 1921 Exchange 

Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY' 

Albert E. Hurrell, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boaedman, 1921 Assistant Manager 



Vol. XLIX. MAY 27, 1919. 



No. 8 



Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

A Victory Commencement. 

This year the College is offering a unique at- 
traction in a week-end Victory Commencement 
of no mean distinction. To alumni the Com- 
mencement this year should prove a welcome op- 
portunity to throw aside the humdrum cares of 
daily life and renew their undergraduate en- 



thusiasm for Bowdoin College. Coming on a 
week-end, June 19 to 27,, this year's Commence- 
ment favors the return of many a loyal Bowdoin 
man, who otherwise would not feel able to leave 
business or other cares. Recent graduates of the 
College, especially those who have been in war 
service, will welcome the opportunity to return 
to their alma mater for the first time as alumni. 
And older graduates, to whom the war has been 
no less of a burden, will also take occasion to 
celebrate the coming of peace by treading again 
Bowdoin's fair campus. The Commencement 
play, the Alumni-Varsity baseball game, the 
Senior dance, all the old features of Commence- 
ment promise to add more zest than ever to the 
Commencement program. 

And to undergraduates as well. Commence- 
ment ought to appeal strongly. There is no 
Plattsburg this year to bring an untimely ending 
to the school year. Why not see what it seems 
like to enjoy leisure around the campus for once, 
with no courses or exams to distract? For most 
of us it means only a few days after finals to take 
in the entire Commencement program. Each un- 
dergraduate should see at least one Commence- 
ment before his own and this is certainly a note- 
worthy one of which to take advantage. To the 
undergraduate, too, comes the opportunity of ex- 
tending real hospitality to his older brothers. 
Commencement in which the undergraduate 
greets his alumni in person rather than by proxy 
is certainly desirable. 

To both alumni and undergraduates is given 
a final opportunity to honor Bowdoin men who 
gave their lives in the Great War. It is some- 
what with a sense of sacred duty that friends 
of the College should attend this ceremony. 

So for both undergraduates and alumni this 
year a week-end, Victory Commencement is 
something that they can ill afford to miss. Men 
of Bowdoin, let's go! 



THEATRICAL TRIMMINGS. 

Two more Orient issues and the Ivy Play 
will be history. The editor of the Orient says 
if he has to publish much more of this stuff his 
paper will also be history — and not of the present 
variety. Be that as it may be it is, the time has 
struck to inform you that tickets are now on sale, 
see H. S. Cole and take a good look at him, and 
that they are sailing very fast. We have de- 
liberately disposed of two, and have let four go 
out on trust to responsible parties. We will 
cheerfully pay the war tax on the ticket of any- 
one who will sell a thousand tickets for us. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



75 



But seriously writing-, us are introducing a few 
innovations this year and the question is are they 
approvalized by the Student Corpse and the Y. 
M. C. A. Once of all you will not have to pay 
extra for your seats from which you survey the 
performance. We will let the eighty-three cents 
cover them. There will be ushers, by the aisle, 
to find them for you; in case you can't find them 
yourself. Nexedl)' we have split our show into 
acts between which ice water will be served on 
ice. NOTE. We warn an3'one against trying 
to steal the acts. There will be more or less 
alleged music during the evening and electric 
lights will enhance the queenly interior of the 
Cumberland. Programs will be supplied in pro- 
fusion and as a last little surprise you will hand 
over your tickets at the gate. This last innova- 
tion we know will cause great rejoicing. 

Now, in concluding and continuing, if you read 
this, or while you are reading this, or if j-ou 
listen to it read or if you don't read it at all we 
would like to call your attention to the rest of 
this colurrln. Then O ! Now, so far as the rest 
of it is concerned we, you know "we" is me and 
the typewriter, would like to call your attention 
to the first of this column, in case you read the 
last first instead of the -first first and the last last. 
But if you did not read the first last but the last 
last and the first not last but first then your duty 
is did and you may as well take a minute off and 
go bum a Fatima, first as last. R. A. 



Batteries: Chi Psi, Gray and Berry; Kappa 
Sig, JNIoses and K. B. Coombs. Umpire, Howard. 



INTERFRATERNITY BASEBALL. 



Sigma Nu 4, Psi Upsilon 3. 

The Psi U.'s were unable to connect with Tut- 
tle's delivery a week ago Monday and again suf- 
fered defeat. 

Batteries : Sigma Nu, Tuttle and Martin ; Psi 
Upsilon, Johnson and Hunt. Umpire, Canter. 



Chi Psi 3, Kappa Sigma 1. 

The Kappa Sigma-Chi Psi game on the Delta 
Tuesday night was one of the best of this year's 
series. Chi Psi scored in the first inning by a 
combination of a hit and two errors, and twice 
in the third inning by two hits and an error. 
The features of the game were the fielding of 
the Chi Psi team and the pitching of Moses for 
the Kappa Sig's. Moses fanned nine Chi Psi 
batsmen in five innings, three of them with three 
men on base. 

Score by innings : 1234 5 — r h e 

Chi Psi I o 2 o — 3 4 I 

Kappa Sigma o o o i — i 2 3 



Theta Delta Chi 16, Delta Upsilon 4. 

On Friday, JNfay 23, the Theta Belts won a 
one sided game of baseball. The D. U.'s used 
three pitchers, but were unable to keep down 
the score. Norton allowed eight runs in the first, 
and Toyokawa and Pearson did not tighten up. 

Batteries: Theta Delta Chi, Adams and Burr; 
Delta Upsilon, Norton, Toyokawa, Pearson and 
Sears. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE TENNIS MATCHES 
SCHEDULED FOR THIS WEEK. 

Bowdoin, Bates, and Colby were to be repre- 
sented at the Maine Intercollegiate Tournament 
held here the first three days of the week. Bow- 
doin's team comprises Captain Chin, Burr, 
Partridge, Sawyer, and Mitchell ; Bates' team in- 
cludes Captain Purinton, Ivirschbaum, Powers, 
and Woodard, while Colby is represented by 
Captain Smith, Dunnack, Hatch, and D. Smith. 
Bowdoin has already defeated Bates in a dual 
tournament, for the first time in several years. 



SPEAKERS CHOSEN FOR ALEXANDERS. 

The trials for the Alexander prize speaking- 
were held last week. Nine men and three alter- 
nates were chosen to compete for the prize. Fol- 
lowing is the list of those successful in the trials: 
Goodhue '20, Richan '20, Taylor '20, Morse '21, 
Ferris, '22, R. B. Knight '22, Merrill '22, Simpson 
'22, Stearns '22 ; alternates, Gordon '20, Coburne 
'21, Towle '22. 

The winner will receive a prize of twenty dol- 
lars and the second best speaker one of ten dol- 
lars. 



MOTHER OF BOWDOIN MAN FIRST WOMAN 
TO BE PRESENTED CROIX DE GUERRE. 

On May 5, General Edwards presented to Mrs. 
Edward A. Martell a Croix de Guerre, in lieu of 
her son, the late First Lieutenant Judson G. 
Martell, Bowdoin ex-' 17. The presentation took 
place on Boston Common. Mrs. Martell has the 
honor of being the first woman to whom the 
Croix de Guerre has ever been presented. 



OPPORTUNITY FOR COLLEGE MEN TO SEE 
FRANCE THIS SUMMER. 

A bulletin has just been issued by the Marine 
Corps, offering an opportunity to enlist for the 
summer only. Discharged soldiers, of at least 



76 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



two months' training in the S. A. T. C, and who 
have passed the physical qualifications, are to be 
given preference. Men who enlist will be used 
to replace Marines now in the Army of Occupa- 
tion and France. According to the bulletin, all 
enlisting now will be returned in the fall together 
with all other Maine forces. The bulletin is 
signed by Major General George Barnett. 



REV. ASHLEY DAY LEAVITT SPEAKS IN 
CHAPEL. 

The Reverend Ashley Day Leavitt gave the 
address at Sunday Chapel this week. He took 
for his theme, the necessity of waking up to 
the demands upon us resultant from the 
sacrifices of the war. He declared that there 
was no half way course, we must either grasp 
the moral problems that confront us or by care- 
lessness or indifference lose our moral con- 
sciousness. 



EDWARD LITTLE H. S. WINS ABRAXAS CUP. 

The Abraxas Cup, which is awarded by the 
Abraxas Society each year to the high school 
whose representatives in the Freshman class 
make the best scholastic record, was won this 
year by Edward Little High School of Auburn, 
Maine. Instead of determining the result on the 
basis of the grades secured during the first 
semester, it was decided this year by the records 
of the schools during the last term. The averages 
are reckoned in the same manner as those for 
the Friar Cup standing. Only those schools are 
eligible for the Abraxas Cup which have sent 
three or more delegates. This year there were 
twelve schools which complied with this require- 
ment. The average secured by the Edward Little 
High School is rather lower than the usual aver- 
age of a school winning first place. Portland 
High was a close second, and Freeport third. 
The three men representing the winning school 
are William R. Ludden, Henry H. Merry, Jr., 
and Evarts J. Wagg. Of all the schools com- 
peting, the Island Falls High School was the 
only one which had no E's on its record. 



BOWDOIN WINS TRIANGULAR DEBATE. 

On Tuesday, May 20, Bowdoin defeated both 
Brown and Wesleyan in her first after-the-war 
debate. The negative team defeated the Brown 
affirmative in Brunswick, while the affirmative 
team defeated the Wesleyan negative in Middle- 
town, on the question, "Resolved, That immigra- 
tion into the United States should be prohibited 
for a period of five years following the ratifica- 



tion of the peace treaty." This debate is the 
first intercollegiate contest since 1917. The 
victories of this year bid fair to be repeated, 
since only one varsity debater is lost this Com- 
mencement and probably only one next Com- 
mencement. 

The Bowdoin-Brown Debate. 

The Bowdoin-Brown debate, held in Memorial 
Hall, was opened by Lord of Brown, who de- 
scribed the menace resultant from the new type 
of immigration, a transient individual of Slavic 
origin as compared with the sturdy home-builder 
of Northern Europe. This type of immigrant, 
whose habitat is the city, was, he asserted, a 
menace not only to the wage but also to the 
standard of living of the American laborer. 
Eastham, Brown's second speaker, reminded the 
negative that the proposed measure is onl> 
temporary. He considered prohibition of im- 
migration necessary because of the congested 
condition of our tenement districts and the lack 
of employment in our industrial centers. Burse, 
concluding speaker for Brown, besides giving 
statistics of larger prevalence of crime and in- 
sanity among aliens, showed that a very small 
percentage of immigrants becomes naturalized. 

For the negative Hatch opened the argument 
by pointing out the dangers resultant from pro- 
hibition of immigration, the loss of confidence in 
us, the blow to internationalism which we would 
strike. Buker contended that the LTnited States 
is capable of assimilating the immigrant popula- 
tion. Chadbourne concluded the negative argu- 
ment by stating that our emigration was much 
greater than our immigration and that excess of 
immigration was unlikely, since the people of Eu- 
rope must remain to build up the countries de- 
populated by the war. 

Bowdoin won chiefly through an appeal based 
on existing conditions, maintaining that at this 
time it would be a 'dangerous thing "to close the 
gates." She established the fact that the League 
of Nations even would be imperiled by adopting 
a new and obviously selfish nationalistic prin- 
ciple, especially on the part of the United States, 
the acknowledged leader of the new world. 

The rebuttal, spirited on both sides, narrowed 
down to the question of whether immigration 
would be less during the next few years. 
Each side strengthened its case materially, 
but Chadbourne's clear summing up of the situ- 
ation was the best piece of debating during the 
evening, and probably contributed more to the 
result than any one factor. Bowdoin, through- 
out the debate seemed to have a better grip on 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



the question and showed the results of thorough 
preparation. 

The judges, Governor Carl E. Milliken of Au- 
gusta, Judge Arthur P. Stone and Professor A. 
T. Robinson of Boston, gave a two to one de- 
cision in favor of the negative. Dean Nixon 
acted as presiding officer. 



The Bowdoin-Wesleyan Debate. 

Bowdoin was represented at Wesleyan by Tay- 
lor '20, Helson '21, McGown '21, and Coburne 
'21 , alternate. This team had the affirmative side 
of the question. The Wesleyan team upholding 
the negative consisted of Doussea '20, Piper '21, 
Batdorf '21, and Cambria '21, alternate. 

The affirmative built up its case on the facts 
that we already have a great problem of assimi- 
lation on our hands without further complica- 
tions ; that in this period of reconstruction im- 
mediately following the war it would be danger- 
ous to complicate our problems with a flood of 
immigration ; and that prohibition is the only 
means of keeping out of the country dangerous 
and unassimilable elements. 

The negative argued that a great number of 
immigrants were not to be expected and that a 
selective policy similar to or more stringent than 
the Literacy Test of 1917 would be preferable to 
prohibition. 

The judges awarded the dicision to the affirma- 
tive team. The Bowdoin men had a clearer, 
more forceful presentation in the main speeches. 
In the rebuttal Taylor clinched matters by ef- 
fectively meeting the challenge of the negative 
that there would be much immigration in the 
next few years. 

President Shanklin was presiding officer. The 
judges were C. H. Clark of Hartford, Conn., 
Professor Frank W. Pitman of Yale University, 
and Mr. Porter of Portland, Conn. 



SIXTEEN SCHOOLS IN OUTDOOR MEET. 

The Bowdoin Interscholastic Outdoor Track 
Meet staged each year by the track association 
of the college for the benefit of the high schools 
and preparatory schools of JNIaine, New Hamp- 
shire, and Massachusetts will be held at the Ath- 
letic Field this coming Saturday and will find a 
field of amateur athletes embracing some 16 
schools. Those schools which have announced 
their intention to compete to Buker '21, assistant 
manager of track, are as follows : Thornton 
Academy, Portland High, Hebron Academy, 
Maine Central Institute, Westbrook Seminary, 
Gardiner High, Deering High, Brunswick High, 



Leavitt Institute, Stevens High, Bangor High, 
Wakefield High, Sabattus High, Gorham High, 
Wilton Academy, and South Paris High. 

Of this number only five had returned their 
entry blanks to Buker up to Saturday, but it was 
expected that practically all would be in by Mon- 
day- morning. Westbrook Seminary has decided 
to send a team to the New Hampshire State 
track meet instead of the Bowdoin meet, but 
Hebron will compete here in spite of the fact 
that she already has a claim on the New Hamp- 
shire State cup. 

It is expected that competition in this meet 
will be exceptionally keen. Hebron Academy 
and Maine Central Institute will fight for first 
place in the meet, and the contest should prove 
decidedly interesting. Wakefield High School of 
Wakefield, Mass., has sig'nified its intention to 
enter the meet. It it sends a team down, the 
track devotees will see some fast work, as it was 
this school that won the Boston Interscholastic 
track meet at the Armory last winter. Followers 
of this team claim that Hebron may be forced 
to give up her title to the shield which she 
has won for several years past. 



©n tDe Campus 

Lieutenant Hanson '18 was on the Campus 
last Monday afternoon, and was cordially 
greeted by the boys. 

Governor Carl E. Milliken of Augusta, was 
one of the judges at the Bowdoin-Brown Inter- 
collegiate debate held in Memorial Hall last 
Tuesday evening. This makes the second time 
within the last few weeks that he has been at 
the College to attend some function, since he was 
here a few weeks ago to attend the lecture given 
by Ex-Senator Theodore E. Burton of Ohio on 
"The International Question." 

Keith Coombs '20 was at home sick with tonsil- 
itis several days last week. 

Rain again prevented a mid-week baseball 
game here at the Athletic Field. The Bowdoin- 
Fort Williams game scheduled for last Wednes- 
day afternoon had to be cancelled because of the 
incessant rain. 

The Bowdoin second team will travel to 
Hebron tomorrow afternoon, Wednesday, and 
play the Hebron Academy nine. Allan Hall '20 
is captain of the second team and Roderick Perk- 
ins '21, is manager. 

Colter '19, left college last Thursday to ac- 
cept a position in Massachusetts. 



78 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Walter Hay ex-'20, was back on the Campus a 
few days last week. 

Gaffney '21, was ill in the Infirmary several 
days last week. 

Thompkins ex-'22, visited friends on the 
Campus last week. 

Eleven men, besides Coach Jack Magee and 
Manager Brown of the Bowdoin track team, 
made the Massachusetts trip last Friday, to com- 
pete in the New England Intercollegiate track 
meet at the Tech Field last Saturday. They 
were Captain Cleaves '20, Savage '19, Goodwin 
'21, Holbrook '19, Parent '21, Ellms '20, Allen 
'21, Higgins '19, Averill '22, Thomson '21, and 
Dostie '20. 

McGorrill '19, has been home ill for the past 
week. 

Allen '21, returned to College Monday after 
a visit last week to his home in Boston where 
he had treated the hand which he spiked in 
the Maine Meet at Orono. 

Coach Magee will take Savage '19, Cleaves 
'20, and Goodwin '21, to the National Meet in 
Philadelphia this coming Saturday. 

The date and place of the Freshman Banquet 
has been changed from this Friday evening, May 
30, at Riverton Park, to Thursday evening, May 
29, at the Congress Square Hotel. The commit- 
tee is now arranging the program for the affair 
and a "big" time is expected. 

A prize for forty dollars is given annually by 
Mrs. George R. Riggs, Litt.D. (Kate Douglass 
Wiggin) for the best short story written by a 
Sophomore, Junior, or Senior. The story must 
be typewritten, of no less than 1,500 words in 
length, and left in Room i, Memorial Hall, be- 
fore June 10. Professor Mitchell conducts the 
contest. 

The Aero Club of Massachusetts will hold a 
ball at the Copley Plaza, Boston, tomorrow night, 
as a memorial for the men who gave their lives 
in the air service for the United States or its 
allies. 

Former drivers of field ambulances are in- 
vited to a dinner at the Hotel Somerset, Boston, 
June 6. 

The Board of Managers held a meeting in the 
Union Thursday. 

Mr. Hamilton Holt, editor of the Independent, 
who has been in Paris in connection with the 
covenant of the League of Nations, addressed the 
College in Chapel Monday morning. 

Reverend Ashley Day Leavitt, D.D., pastor of 
the State Street Congregational Church in Port- 
land, who has recently been elected pastor of the 



Harvard Church in Brookline, Mass., gave the 
address at the chapel service on Sunday. 

"Husbands on Approval" is to be presented by 
the Brunswick High School Athletic Association 
in the To^yn Hall tomorrow night. Dancing will 
follow the play. 

Many students were held up for tags last Sat- 
urday in the interest of the Salvation Army 
Drive. 

Rev. Ashley Day Leavitt, D.D., pastor of the 
State Street Congregational Church in Portland, 
who has recently been elected pastor of the Har- 
vard Church in Brookline, Mass., gave the ad- 
dress at the chapel service on Sunday. 

The chapel bell rings at one o'clock for Junior 
marching. 

Captain J. A. Slocum '13, is spending a few 
days on the Campus. 

Mr. Hamilton Holt, editor of The Independent, 
who has been in Paris in connection with the 
covenant of the League of Nations, addressed 
the College Monday morning in chapel. 



mittf m JFacuItp 

Last week President Sills was in Boston. On 
Tuesday evening he was the Phi Beta Kappa 
orator at Wellesley College. On Thursday he 
attended committee meetings in connection with 
the New England College Board, and in the af- 
ternoon presided at a conference of the Board 
and the New England State Superintendents of 
Schools. Friday and Saturday he attended a 
meeting of the administrative officers of New 
England colleges held at the Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology. This week on Thursday 
he will speak at a meeting of the Bowdoin Club 
at Bangor. On Friday he will attend the con- 
ference of the League of Nations to be held at 
Portland, and on Saturday afternoon will be 1 
guest at a dinner given by Dr. Thayer to the 
graduating class of the Medical School. On 
Wednesday he will attend the Episcopal Con- 
vention in Portland. 

Dean Nixon and Dr. Whittier were in Bos- 
ton Friday to represent the College at the New 
England Athletic Union. 

Mr. Wilder delivered an address at the Maine 
Library Association meeting, held in the Tol- 
lege Library, Friday. l\Ir. Wilder is the rct'ring 
prc-.ident of t'-.c a'-jjoc-'ation. 

Professor Bell spoke on "Some A-pects of 
]\lil''tarv Law" in Memorial Hall, Mv.y 26, un- 
der the ausp'ces of the Ibis. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Professor Davis, who has charge of the Sal- 
vation Army Fund drive in Brunswick, presided 
over a meeting in the Town Hall last Wednes- 
day evening to stimulate the success of the drive. 
Professor Davis explained the plans for the Tag 
Day, which came last Saturday. 



3Iumni Jl^otes 

'64 — In a recent issue of the Boston Trarscrif^t 
in the section of Notes and Queries, there was 
printed a poem entitled "The Man from Maine" 
by John Harrison Woods. The word of this 
poem were intended to be sung to the tune of 
"Marching Through Georgia." The following- 
article in connection with the poem was printed 
in the Transcript : "I wonder if the following' 
poem would interest some of the readers of Notes 
and Queries, as being a relic of former political 
campaigns? It was composed by a man who was, 
I think, in college with Reed, and was sung at a 
club banquet during the preliminary campaign 
which culminated in the nomination of McKinley. 
It reads well today to those of us who were 
admirers of Czar Reed." 

'75 — A poem entitled "Who Won the War?" by 
Woodbury Pulsifer appeared in a recent issue 
of the Washington Evening Star. 

'85 — An article from the Journal of the Wash- 
ington Academy of Sciences of March 4, 1919, 
was received not long ago at the library. It was 
written by Dr. William C. Kendall of the Bureau 
of Fisheries, and deals with the question : "What 
kind of characters distinguish a species from its 
subdivisions?" Dr. Kendall has been connected 
with the U. S. Civil Service at Washington for 
thirty years. 

'12 — Herbert E. Locke '12, and William R. 
Pattangall have announced a law partnership. 
They will have their office at 283 Water street, 
Augusta. 

'17 — A very interesting letter from Lt. Frank 
E. Noyes of Topsham, was printed in the last 
issue of the Brunswick Record. 

ex-'i8 — Sergeant Albert Parent of Brunswick, 
formerly attached to the 26th Division Head- 
quarters, is now stationed at a hospital in Paris, 
from which he expects to be released in a few 
months. He sailed for France with the 26th, 
October 8, 1917. In February, 1918, he left his 
division and was placed in the Medical Corps. 
Since September, 1918, Sergeant Parent has been 
in Paris serving as an interpreter, and also per- 
forming hospital duties. He is expected to re- 
turn home in the latter part of next fall. 



mith m ©tfter Colleges 

Amherst: The Musical Clubs gave a very 
successful concert, May 16, at the Hotel Somer- 
set in Boston. 

Bates: The baseball team had a remarkably 
successful Massachusetts trip when it defeated 
Tufts in a ten-inning battle, 4-3, and stopped the 
winning streak of Boston College to the tune of 
6-5. 

Brown: Brown broke even in the triangular 
debate by winning from Wesleyan at Providence 
and losing to Bowdoin at Brunswick. 

Maine: The Sunset League of interfraternity 
baseball is rapidly approaching the championship 
games. 

W. P. I. : The Musical Clubs of Tech and 
Clark recently combined in one of the best con- 
certs given in Worcester. 

Trinity: In a dual meet with M. A. C. Trinity 
made a good showing but couldn't quite win. The 
score of 64-53 wasn't bad for the first meet of 
the season. 

Welleslcy : The Victory Loan went over the 
top a long way in the Wellesley drive. The 
quota was set at $50,000 and incomplete returns 
show $88,600 for the College. 

Neiv Hampshire College: The N. H. C. Glee 
Club and Orchestra gave its annual concert in 
the gymnasium, May 16, the Phi Lambda 
Phi and Pi Gamma fraternities held 
initiations recently. The N. H. track team suc- 
ceeded in beating Bowdoin a second time last 
Saturday at the N. E. meet. 



CALENDAR. 

May 29 — Bowdoin Second vs. Hebron at 
Hebron. 

Ma}' 29 — Freshman Banquet, Congress Square 
Hotel, Portland. 

May 30 — Baseball, Bowdoin vs. Bates at Lew- 
iston. 

May 31 — Bowdoin Interscholastic Track Meet. 

May 31 — Bowdoin Tennis Team vs. Portland 
Country Club at Portland. 

May 31 — Bowdoin Track Team at I. C. A. A. 
A. A., Philadelphia, Penn. 

June 4 — Fraternity house parties. 

June 5 — Ivy Play. 

June 6 — Ivy Day; Ivy baseball game — Bow- 
doin-Bates ; Ivy Dance. 

June 7 — Baseball, University of Maine vs. 
Bowdoin at Orono. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



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DANCING 

MISS JENNIE S. HARVEY 

Evening Class and Assembly every 
Tuesday evening, Town Hall, Bruns- 
wick. Class at 7.30 p. m. Assembly 
at 8.30 p. m. Open to college students. 

Every Monday evening Class and Assembly at 
the Arcade, Bath. 

Private instruction by appointment. Phone 
Bath 151-W. Address 897 Middle street. 



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Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, §100,000 

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We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
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kinds east of Portland. 

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J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

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Lincoln Building 

The Bowdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



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Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
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Cumberland Theatre 

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FRED STONE 

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FRANK KEENAN 

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MONDAY and TUESDAY 

CHARLES RAY 

IN 

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PASTIME THEATRE 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

TOM MIX 

IN 

CHIP OF THE FLYING U 
MAY ALLISON 

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DOROTHY DALTON 



1920 




O 
R 
1 

N 
T 



Vol. XLIX. No. 9 



JUNE 6, 1919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 





CONTENTS 




PAGE 


PAGE 


Bowdoin Again Scores Nine Points 




Men Who Have Not Paid Blanket 




in Intercollegiate Meet 


81 


Tax 


83 


Hebron Again Wins Outdoor Meet 


81 


Ivy Oration 


84 


Bowdoin Wins Doubles in Tennis 




Communication 


86 


Tournament 


82 


Ivy Program 


86 


Coach Magee to Remain at Bow- 




Ivy Ode 


87 


doin 


82 


Inter-fraternity Baseball 


87 


Tennis Team Visits Portland Coun- 
try Club 




Inter-fraternity League Standing 


87 


82 


Bowdoin Dinner in Paris 


88 


Bowdoin Second Team Defeated by 
Morse High 


82 


Ivy Hop Tonight 


88 


Debating Council Elects Officers 


82 


Commencement Speakers 


88 


Seniors' Last Chapel 


82 


Bugle Board Elected 


88 


Dr. Holt Addresses Students 


83 


Final Schedule of Examinations 


88 


1920 Bugle 


83 


On the Campus 


88 


House Parties on the Campus 
Bowdoin Defeats Bates, 8-5 


83 
83 


With the Faculty 
Alumni Notes 


89 
89 






Abraxas Holds Initiation 


89 


Friars Initiate 


83 










Dartmouth Leads 


89 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Over There" know JUD is in the game. 



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184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 

CARL H, MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
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4 Elm Street 

Harvard Dental School 

A DEPARTMENT OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

Graduates of secondary schools admitted without ex- 
amination provided they have taken required subjects. 
Modern buildings and equipment. Fall term opens 
September 22, 1919. Degree of D.M.D. Catalog. 

EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D., 

Dean, Boston, Mass. 



LAW 

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politics and commerce challenges the 
young American. 

He must equip himself for new world 
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Qualify for real leadership. 

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principles. 

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For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 



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FOR 

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This year's Tennis Goods are in 

NEW CHAMPIONSHIP BALLS 
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1918 CHAMPIONSHIP BALLS 
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We have some of last year's Rackets 

on hand which will be sold at 

the old prices, which are 

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this year's prices. 



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BOWDOIN ORILNT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE.. JUNE. 6, 1919 



NO. 9 



BOWDOIN AGAIN SCORES NINE POINTS IN 
INTERCOLLEGIATE TRACK CONTEST. 

The quality of Bowdoin athletes was demon- 
strated at the I. A. A. A. Meet in the Harvard 
Stadium last Saturday. With but two entries 
Bowdoin defeated such institutions as M. I. T., 
winner of the New Englands, and Columbia Uni- 
versitjr, besides several other colleg'es. Of the 
Maine colleges Bowdoin was the only one to 
compete, except Maine, whose score was only 
five points. Both Savage and Goodwin were 
pitted against the best of athletes in their re- 
spective event,s. In the high hurdles Savage 
took a fourth place about a yard behind the 
third man in the final heat. In the low hurdles 
he narrowly lost second place to Watt of Cornell, 
in the final heat. Goodwin, entered in the two 
mile, showed his mettle by finishing second be- 
hind Captain Dresser of Cornell, who broke the 
only record of the meet. Coach Magee ac- 
companied Savage and Goodwin to the meet. 



HEBRON AGAIN WINS OUTDOOR MEET. 

Hebron repeated her successes of previous 
years, when she captured the Twenty-first An- 
nual Bowdoin Interscholastic Outdoor Meet by a 
large margin. As usual, no other preparatory 
school appeared to anywhere near equal the score 
made by Hebron Academy. Wakefield High, 
which was expected to give Hebron a rub, failed 
to appear. The real competition came between 
Deering High, which gained second place with 
13 points, Bangor High with a final score of 12 
points, and Westbrook Seminary with 11 points. 
Although both the track and the weather were 
excellent, no records were broken. The closest 
to a record breaker came in the quarter when 
Marsters of Deering, broke the tape a fifth sec- 
ond more than the record. 

The loo-yard dash was one of the closest 
events of the afternoon. Captain Munce of 
Hebron won the final heat with Captain Nash 
of Portland, and Belanger of Westbrook Semi- 
nary, closely following. Captain William John- 



son of Deering ran a pretty race in the mile, 
sprinting splendidly until the last of the race, 
when Burton of Westbrook, passed him close to 
the finish. 

Captain JMunce of Hebron had the misfortune 
to pull a tendon in the lOO-yard dash. This ac- 
cident prevented his competition in any other 
events. 

The meet, under the direction of Assistant 
Manager Buker, was run off in the remarkably 
quick time of an hour and a half, and, although 
not spectacular in many events, was very satis- 
factory from the point of view both of specta- 
tors and the management. The usual prizes were 
awarded to the winners, including the shield 
which Hebron again claimed. 

The summary : 

TRIALS TRACK EVENTS. 



220-Yard Dash. 

First Heat — Won by Belanger, Westbrook Seminary ; sec- 
ond, Simmons, Gardiner High. Time, 24 4-5 seconds. 

Second Heat — Won by Munce, Hebron Academy : second, 
Walcroft, Sabattus. Time, 23 2-5 seconds. 

Third Heat — Won by Lawrence, Gardiner High : second, 
Galvariski, Rnmford High. Time, 24 1-5 seconds. 

Fourth Heat — Won by Adiey, Rumford High : second, 
Wardwell, Hebron Academy. Time, ^4 1-5 seconds. 

Semi-final for second place men (winner qualifying for 
finals)— Won by Simmons, Gardiner High. Time, 24 4-5 
seconds. 

120-Yard Hurdles. 

First Heat — Won by Herrick, Hebron Academy : second. 
Gray, Gardiner High. Time, 20 4-5 seconds. 

Second Heat — Won by Hardly, Hebron Academy ; second, 
Swett, Bangor High. Time, 19 2-5 seconds. 
220-Yard Hurdles. 

First Heat — Won by Swett, Bangor High ; second. Hardy. 
Hebrcn Academy. Time, 30 2-5 seconds. 

Second Heat — Won by Herrick, Hebron Academy : second. 
Gray. Gardiner High. Time. 30 4-5 seconds. 

100-Yard Dash. 

First Heat — Won by Belanger. Westbrook Seminary ; sec- 
ond, Simmons. Gardiner High. Time. 10 3-5 seconds. 

Second Heat — Won by Nash, Portland High ; second, Law- 
rence, Gardiner High. Time, 10 4-5 seconds. 

Third Heat — Won by Taylor, Rumford High ; second Ram- 
say, Deerin.g High. Time, 11 2-5 seconds. 

Fourth Heat — Won by Munce. Hebron Academy ; second, 
MacDonald, Bangor High. Time, 11 seconds. 

Semi-final for second place men (winner qualifying for 
finals) — Won by Simmons, Gardiner High. Time, 11 1-5 
seconds. 



82 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Final Track Events. 

100-Yard Dash — Won by Munce, Hebron Academy ; second. 
Nash, Portland High ; third. Belanger, Westbrook Seminary- 
Time, 10 4-5 seconds. 

200- Yard Dash — Won by Belangei', Westbrook Seminary ; 
second, Simmons. Gardiner High ; third, Adley, Eumford 
High. Time, 24 2-5 seconds. 

440-Yard Dash — Won by Marsters, Deering High ; second. 
Lawrence, Gardiner High t third, A. Scott, Gardiner High. 
Time, 53 2-5 seconds. 

880-Yard Run — Won by Sweetser, Deering High ; second, 
McLellan, Hebron Academy ; third. Burroughs, Hebron 
Academy. Time. 2 minutes, 13 seconds. 

Mile Run — Won by Burton, Westbrook Seminary ; second, 
W. Johnson. Deering High ; third, F. H. Philbrook, Wilton 
Academy. Time. 5 minutes. 1 3-5 seconds. 

120-Yard Hurdles — Won by Hardy, Hebron Academy ; sec- 
ond, Svvett. Bangor High ; third, Herrick, Hebron Academy. 
Time, 19 seconds. 

220-Yard Hurdles — Won by Hardy, Hebron Academy ; sec- 
ond, Swett, Bangor High ; third, Herrick, Hebron Academy. 
Time, 29 4-5 seconds. 

Final Field Events. 

Running High Jump — Won by C. S. Philbrook, Wilton 
Academy, height 5 feet, 2 inches : second. Hardy, Hebron 
Academy, height, 5 feet, 1 inch ; third. Gray, Gardiner High, 
height, 5 feet. 

Discus Throw — Won by Stearns, Hebron Academy, distance, 
104.95 feet ; second, Thompson. Bangor High, distance, 94.5 
feet; third, Galvariski, Rumford High, distance, 89.25 feet. 

Running Broad Jump — Won by Nash. Portland High, 
distance, 20 feet, 4 1-2 inches ; second, Walcroft, Sabattus 
High, distance, 20 feet, 1-2 inch ; third, Pike, Hebron 
Academy, distance, 19 feet, 10 1-2 inches. 

12-Pound Hammer Throw — Won by Phillips, Hebron 
Academy, 111.15 feet ; second. Thompson. Bangor High, dis- 
tance, 101.5 ; third, Stearns. Hebron Academy, 98.2 feet. 

Pole Vault — Won by Stearns, Hebron Academy, 10 feet, 
6 inches : second, Wardwell. Hebron Academy ; third, C. S. 
Philbrook, Wilton Academy. 

12-Pound Shot Pt — Won by Pike, Hebron Academy, dis^ 
tance, 39.45 feet ; second, Galvariski, Rumford High, distance, 
27.9 feet ; third. Burroughs, Hebron Academy, distance, 
36.75 feet. 



BOWDOIN WINS DOUBLES IN TENNIS 
TOURNAMENT. 

The Maine Intercollegiate Tennis Tournament, 
played off May 25, 26, and 27, at Brunswick, re- 
sulted in victory for Bowdoin in the doubles 
and a narrow victory for Bates in the singles. 

The Bowdoin first team, consisting of Captain 
Chin and Partridge, won the championship in 
the doubles Tuesday afternoon in the Maine In- 
tercollegiate Tennis tournament, which was 
played at Bowdoin. Bates was easily eliminated 
the first day in the trials and Colby was defeated 
with a score of 6 — 2, 6 — i by the second team 
and also defeated by the first team. Purinton 
of Bates defeated Burr of Bowdoin in the 
singles for the championship. 



COACH MAGEE TO REMAIN AT BOWDOIN. 

In spite of other inducements, Coach Magee 
has decided to continue his career as coach of 
track and trainer of athletic teams at Bowdoin. 
Not only this spring, but also throughout his 
previous years at Bowdoin, Coach Magee has 
turned out teams and individual stars that have 
made names for themselves and Bowdoin. 



TENNIS TEAM VISITS PORTLAND COUNTRY 
CLUB. 

Captain Chin and Partridge defeated their op- 
ponents in their single matches at the Portland 
Country Club Saturday. Chin's score was 6 — 2, 
2 — 6, 6 — 4, while that of Partridge was 6 — 2, 
6 — 3. The Portland players took all their 
matches in the doubles. The Dana brothers of 
Westbrook, Chapman and Holt, represented the 
Country Club. Mitchell and Sawyer composed 
Bowdoin's second team. 



BOWDOIN SECOND TEAM DEFEATED BY 
MORSE HIGH. 

A week ago Saturdaj^ at Bath, the second team 
was defeated by Morse High School in a close 
game, 3 to 2. Tuttle pitched a much better game 
than Colby, allowing only five hits, as compared 
with the twelve secured off the Bath pitcher. Not 
one of the Bowdoin outfielders made a put-out, 
assist, or error during the entire game. K. B. 
Coombs and McLellan batted well for Bowdoin, 
and G. Conway for Morse. 



DEBATING COUNCIL ELECTS OFFICERS. 

At the annual meeting of the Debating Council, 
held Wednesday, May 27, the following officers 
were elected for the ensuing year : President, 
Taylor '20; secretary, McGown '21 ; and manager, 
Buker '21. Other business consisted of the sub- 
mission of the manager's report to the Council 
and discussion of plans for next year. It is not 
generally known that this year's student forum 
was under the auspices of the Debating Council. 
The outgoing' members of the Council are : 
Foulke, president; Chadbourne, secretary; and 
Coburne, manager. 



SENIORS' LAST CHAPEL. 

According to the usual custom the Seniors' 
Last Chapel will take place immediately after 
the Ivy exercises. After the usual chapel exer- 
cises the Seniors will march out, singing "Auld 
Lang Syne." Sullivan will act as marshal. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



83 



DR. HOLT ADDRESSES STUDENTS. 

Dr. Hamilton Holt, editor of the Independent 
and one of the foremost of American journalists 
addressed the student bod}' in the chapel a week 
ago Monday morning'. Dr. Holt has visited 
France in connection with the work of the Ameri- 
can League to Enforce Peace and his experiences 
have been varied and intensely interesting. 

Dr. Holt commenced his speech with a com- 
parison of the attitude of the European nations 
to our constitution. In the making of the cove- 
nant the violation of our constitution has caused 
more trouble than any other factor. Many peo- 
ple attribute the forming of the covenant to the 
brains of the wily Englishmen and for that rea- 
son distrust it. Dr. Holt is of the opinion that 
if the covenant were the original British draft 
it would be superior to the present accepted out- 
line. Having seen both the American and 
British original documents before they were even 
presented to the peace conference, he is in a 
position tq compare them. He states that much 
of the accepted covenant is taken word for word 
from the original American plan and much 
more is the same in spirit and intent. Dr. Holt 
was bitter in his condemnation of those senators 
who are striving to defeat the acceptance of the 
covenant by America. He discussed several of 
the more important articles, pointing out in each 
one that there was absolutely no ground for ob- 
jection on the part of the United States. So 
masterful was the address that although it lasted 
nearly an hour there was not the slightest let-up 
in interest. Dr. Holt is well know to Bowdoin, 
having spoken here several times and it is hoped 
that we may enjoy him many "times in the 
future. 



THE 1920 BUGLE. 



Volume 74 of the "Bugle" was distributed 
this morning. The entire book represents the 
hard work and painstaking care of the editorial 
board and business management, and is worthy 
of taking its place in the long line of successful 
Junior books. The art department has been 
capably handled by Abbott and Dunbar. The 
book is attractively bound in dark brown with a 
small design and gold lettering on the cover. 

It has been the aim of the board to have 
the "Bugle" artistic throughout. A general re- 
ordering of the departments and a fine sepia- 
section containing views of the campus and the 
surroundings, not published before add much to 
the book. A good deal of the dead material 
which tends to make the book unwieldy, has been 



omitted. Otherwise the usual statistics and ath- 
letic records are included. 

The "grind" section has been enlarged and the 
material is fully equal to the humor of past 
volumes. Individual snap-shots have not been 
published, humorous pictures and views of gen- 
eral interest have been inserted instead. 

The whole "Bugle" contains 225 pages, ex- 
clusive of advertising, and its general neat and 
artistic appearance and design, sets a high stand- 
ard in all departments for the boards of future 
vears. 



HOUSE PARTIES ON THE CAMPUS. 

All the fraternities on the campus are keeping 
open house during Ivy. Psi Upsilon, Delta 
Upsilon and Beta Theta Pi gave teas on Wed- 
nesday afternoon. There were dances at prac- 
tically all the chapter houses Wednesday eve- 
ning. It has been found impracticable to print 
in detail a list of the guests of each house in this 
week's issue. 



BOWDOIN DEFEATS BATES, 8-5. 

Bowdoin defeated Bates at Lewiston yester- 
day in a game featured by the heavy hitting of 
the White. Mason pitched for Bowdoin and 
Cusick began the game for Bates but was driven 
from the box in the first inning. 



FRIARS INITIATE. 

The Friars held their initiation at the Congress 
Square Hotel in Portland last Tuesday evening, 
when six men were initiated. The initiates were 
G. R. Goodwin, _G. T. Allen, P. R. Lovell, A. 
Thomson, T. W. Leydon, and W. L. Parent, all 
of the Class of 1921. The initiation was fol- 
lowed b}' a banquet and theatre part}'. 



MEN WHO HAVE NOT PAID BLANKET TAX. 

At the request of the Board of Managers the 
Orient publishes the names of the following 
jnen, who have given no satisfactory reason for 
not paying their blanket tax : 

Alpha Delta Phi, Edwards ; Delta Upsilon, 
Pearson; Beta Theta Pi, Sullivan, C. F. Thomp- 
son; Sigma Nu, C. E. Stevens, Simmons, Sleeper, 
W. J. White ; Chi Psi, Howe, Marston ; non- 
fraternity, Buncamper, Caldwell, Claff, Hender- 
son, Kirk, Leavitt, LeMay, Libby, A. H. Mor- 
rell, L. Smith, R. Smith, S. Smith, Sprince, 
Welch, E. White. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Tuesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by ' The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 192 i Managing Editor 

department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 Exchange 

Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E.' Small, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 192 i 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Albert E. Hurrell, 1920 Business Manager 

-Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 



Vol. XLIX. JUNE 6, 1919. 



No. 9 



Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 



THE RENAISSANCE. 



IVY DAY ORATION. 

R. K. McWilliams. 

Out of a mass of myths, conflicts and scattered 

fragments of a bygone age, there evolved in 

Greece, in the fifth century before Christ, a new 

civilization. Based on an innate desire and love 



for grace and beauty, and an ability to see and 
express the common things in life, this civiliza- 
tion, through its art and literature has had an 
inestimable effect on all nations. 

Gradually declining under the pressure of a 
materialistic and imperialistic age, this spirit be- 
came melded with the grave, temperate wisdom 
and moral strength of character of the Romans. 
Before the onslaughts of the barbarian hordes 
and the teachings of Christianity, this spirit, too, 
faded away. 

Then after a period of suppression and doubt 
came the Renaissance, truly a re-birth of the 
spirit of beauty, classical learning and joy-in-life. 
Arising in Italy, it slowly spread through France 
and England, and diffused itself throughout Eu- 
rope. Men found themselves again. The terri- 
ble French Revolution, crystalizing man's love 
for Freedom, marked the way for a rise of an 
intense romantic spirit of individualism, which 
fairly gripped the art, literature, politics, and 
everyday life of the age. 

With this came an outburst of scientific thought 
and teachings, a conflict of ideals, and then the 
industrial revolution with its factor}' system and 
its complete division of labor. 

Slowly but surely the spirit of romantic in- 
dividualism in thought and action, was giving 
place to a new spirit of co-operation and organ- 
ization, when out of a clear sky came a four 
year war. 

One nation did not assimilate the Renaissance 
spirit of Individualism and Freedom, or attempt 
to direct it in the proper channels of thought, 
such as personal freedom and self-government or 
guide it into a kindred field. 

The real principle on which zvc exist is the 
principle of self-government. That is a prin- 
ciple good for us, not only in our government 
but in our private lives. In ordinary industrial 
concerns we want freedom. We do not want 
to be slaves, we do not want to be dictated to, we 
want security and freedom. We want the aver- 
age individual not merely to be a means to an 
end, we do not want the individual to be. ex- 
ploited, we do not want the individuals for self- 
aggrandisement, but we want them to develop 
and reach the highest that they are capable of 
reaching. That we can attain only by relying on 
the principle of liberty. 

As against this there has been another system 
working in the world with great success — the 
principle on which Germany stands. In Ger- 
many there is no self-government, no freedom 
in a true sense. The whole system was to de- 
velop power, to make the individuals serve the 




Leland Harper Moses 

Marshal 





Emerson Walter Zeitler 
Popular Man 




Robert Earle Cleaves 

Chairman Ivy Committee 
and Captain of Track 




Delmont Thurston Dunbar 

Class Poet 



Allan William Constantine 

Class Chaplain 





Richard Kenneth McWilliams 

Class Orator, Editor of the Bugle 
and Manager of Baseball 



Tracy Sumner Wood 

Class President 
and Manager of Football 





Jere Abbott 

Class Odist and 
Business Manager of the Bugle 




Lewis Wcodbridge Brown 
Manager of Track 



Allan William Hall 

Manager of Tennis 



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1920 BUGLE BOARD 





Leland Matthew Goodrich 
Editor of the Orient 



Albert Edwin Hurrell 

Business Manager of the Orient 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



85 



state and to train them as members of a military 
organization, to take possession of their souls, 
and to amass the largest amount of power for 
the nation as such. That is the German system, 
that is the German principle, — not liberty, not 
freedom, not righteousness. The will to power 
is the ideal that dominates the German system, 
and we know under our modern conditions what 
an enormous power can be developed by a state 
under conditions which have existed there. 

These are the two ultimate principles which 
have been contending against one another in the 
world. Thus we have had a spiritual war — a 
moral crusade. 

We have seen the agonies of a d3-ing world. 
It is an appalling tragedy which has come over 
mankind, the like of which has never been seen 
in history before. We have seen the whole 
world perishing. That is God's providence. Per- 
haps it is better so. What world is going to 
arise on the ruins? What is the new order to 
be? That i,3 the choice before the world today. 

Based on the triumphant principles of free- 
dom, liberty and self-government, all around in 
the concerns of men, a broader, clearer under- 
standing, leading to a spirit of co-operation, or- 
ganization, and social unity is beginning to rise. 
Perhaps this is in the basic spirit of the new 
Renaissance. 

Egotism has characterized man's early struggle 
and his life has ever been influenced by it. 

Altruism, at first a faint tremulous line of 
conduct, has attracted his course of life, grow- 
ing stronger and more universal, exercising an 
ever widening influence. 

The former was, at first, relatively the 
stronger, but the latter gradually developed and 
overshadowed it, until today, altruism, or in- 
terest in the welfare and happiness of others, 
has become an essential part of our modern 
social life in ever widening circles. 

Gradually self-interest has been supplemented 
by social interest which manifesting itself in a 
narrow, national viewpoint, is now beginning to 
broaden out into a sympathy akin to an inter- 
national spirit. 

Society led by its choice and in response to 
the goads of mal-adjustment felt everywhere, is 
constantly creating new moral ideals to express 
more perfectly its sense of relationships which 
will conduce to the happiness of the greatest 
number of its constituent individuals. 

The conflict of moral ideals has gone on for 
a quarter of a century and more. Out of the tur- 
moil there begins to appear an adjustment be- 
tween two moral ideals which is neither one or 



the other. From the changing conditions of the 
present there are emerging new social ideals of 
morality. The owners of factories are evolving 
a conscience as to the hours of labor for their 
workers ; child-labor is being tabooed. The labor 
of women is condemned under certain conditions 
of factory life. The morality of an honest day's 
work by the worker begins to appear. In inter- 
national affairs, the binding obligation of "a 
scrap of paper" is recognized by the conscience 
of an unprejudiced world opinion. 

Let us consider briefl}^, some of the factors in 
which adjustments based on this spirit of a 
broader understanding of the value of co-oper- 
ation and organization are taking place. 

Hardly was the ink dry upon the document 
which defined the terms of the armistice dictated 
by the Allies to Germany, when the air became 
thick with rumors of war in the industrial sphere. 

The existing ferment is the joint product of 
causes which are in their essence, widely dis- 
similar, if not positively antagonistic. The one, 
— represents a long standing and deep-seated dis- 
content with the conditions, esonomic and social, 
of the modern industrial system. The other 
set of calises have begun to operate much more 
recently and derive their inspiration from con- 
tinental methods. The one movement aims 
principally at improving by constitutional action, 
the position of labor in the industrial common- 
wealth, the other seeks by violent and revolution- 
ary methods, to inaugurate a new social and po- 
litical order. Both find their opportunity in the 
upheaval, mental and material,, inevitably re- 
sulting from a war which has reduced to mere 
crumbling ruins, institutions, that five years ago 
seemed to be built upon indestructable founda- 
tions. 

The march of civilization is the epic of man as 
a working-man, and that is the reason why labor 
should always be held high. We have nothing 
precious that does not represent struggle. We 
have nothing of lasting value that does not rep- 
resent determination. We have nothing admir- 
able which does not represent self-sacrifice. We 
have no philosophy except the philosophy of con- 
fidence, of optimism and faith in the righteous- 
ness of the contest we make against nature. 

We must not forget that the greatest of all 
dangers to a civilization is to become stagnant. 
From that danger, at least industrial unrest is; 
likely to save us. 

The picture of Europe, today, is not an allur- 
ing one. Throughout its vast eastern and cen- 
tral regions, civilization is breaking or has 
broken, while even the western fringe is peril- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ously worn and tried. The answer is clear. The 
new world must be called in to redress the bal- 
ance of the Old. And the New World means 
primarily the United States. We m.ust furnish 
the chief effort and, above all, the moral initia- 
tive must come from ourselves. 

In Soviet Russia, a power has arisen more 
avid of world-dominion, and more fatal to civil- 
ization than Prussianism has ever been. Bol- 
shevism, the implacable foe of liberty, of de- 
mocracy, of ordered progress, of everything that 
makes life worth living, is today triumphant in 
eastern Europe, undermining western Europe, 
and raising its ugly head even among ourselves. 
The Allies are again imperiled by a new foe. 
If Bolshevism conquers the Old World it will 
conquer the New. There is no escape. Once 
more we must "go in or go under," this time 
not so much with men and guns, as with food, 
with funds, with every ounce of our initiative 
and moral power. 

The aid that America must give in this great 
problem must be based on the new spirit of a 
clearer understanding of man as man, the break- 
ing down of a narrow egotistical nationalism and 
the dawn of a broader sympathy with Interna- 
tionalism. Such a spirit will aid greatly in com- 
batting the world's greatest foe. 

A spirit of unification may resist all. With- 
out it a nation will fall. Glorious France met 
and held the power of German arms — built up 
by forty years of preparation. Britain's "Old 
Contemptibles" were wiped out, but a united na- 
tion behind the army broke the Hindenburg Line. 
United America behind America's four-million 
men at arms, put the fear of God in Germany's 
heart. And Germany herself collapsed when 
the nation ceased to stand united, behind the 
men in the field. 

If so in war, why not in peace? The strifes 
of peace are not in the trenched field under the 
menace of bursting shells and whining shrapnel, 
but in every walk of life. This interest clashes 
with that. Advantage to one may appear dis- 
advantage to another. What then is to be done? 
To a future League of Nations must be com- 
mitted the task of watching over the applica- 
tion of internationally agreed principles, and to 
taking action in the event of persistent wrong 
doing. 

As for America, only this: — To learn to see 
more clearly that in the long run, only that is 
good for each which is good for all. That the 
interests of the North are locked inseparately 
with the interests of the South, and those of the 
West with those of the East, that between the 



worker and the employer there is not a great 
gulf of difference, but a mighty bond of union, 
in self-interest, that every race and creed and 
sect is strong only in a relation which does not 
exalt the one above the other, but which estab- 
lishes all on a common basis of justice. 

This spirit is at hand: — A little toleration, a 
little sympathy, and it is done. Then our country, 
grown great in war shall grow greater in peace, 
with the greatness which comes of a unity 
founded on justice and the sacred consecration of 
human rights. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Editor of the Orient : 

I find in the last issue of the Orient evidence 
that a committee of one of the fraternities has 
made an archaelogical discovery. It has un- 
earthed that relic of a by-gone age, the phrase: 
"Whereas God has been pleased in His infinite 
wisdom," etc. 

Years ago I waged in the columns of the 
Orient successful warfare against that wooden, 
stereotyped, meaningless form of expressing re- 
gret at the death of a member, always adopted 
for no other reason than that the committee was 
too lazy to prepare an original minute expressive 
of real regard. I hope never to see either that 
phrase or its A'ariant introducing- "the Almighty 
Ruler of the Universe" in the Orient again. 

I send this for publication rather than sending 
it to the chairman of the committee, hoping that 
it will be read and heeded by members of all the 
fraternities. Edward Stanwood. 



IVY PROGRAM. 

Music 

Prayer Allan W. Constantine 

Music 

Oration Richard K. McWillianis 

Music 

Poem Delmont T. Dunbar 

Music 
Presentations 
Planting of Ivy- 
Presentations 

Our Infant Prodigy Nursing Bottle 

Our Hitless Hitter Bat 

Our Diplomat Cane 

Our Musician A Sti-ingless Violin 

Popular Man Spoon 

Officers 

President Trac> S. Wood 

Marshall Leland H. Moses 

Odeist Jere Abbott 

Committee 
Robert E. Cleaves (Chairman) Myron H. Avery 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



87 



Lewis W. Brown Justin S. McPartland 

Paul V. Mason Paul W, Smith 

Music by Mystic Orchestra 



IVY ODE. 

(Tune: Integer Vitae) 



vhere War's srim hand held sway,- 
work and deed and play ; 



Back from the fields 
Comrades once more i 
Kindle in us the fire 
Of each grateful hearl 
Bowdoin, our Mother. 



Here now we plant this vine with hearts o'erflow 
Blessed is it thrice by those who unreturning 
Gave in the heat of strife 
To the noblest call of life 
Their benediction. 

May these proud hosts, their glory never dying. 
Lead us in life and faithfulness inspiring 
When dark and drear the day. 
Ever striving on, our way, 
Their vision guiding us. 



INTERFRATERNITY BASEBALL. 



Psi Upsilon 4, Chi Psi 0. 

Chi Psi received her second defeat of the sea- 
son from the Psi U's. Although the Chi Psi's 
got on base several times, they were unable to 
bring in any runs. 

Batteries : Psi Upsilon, Mundie and JMeacham ; 
Chi Psi, Gray and O. L. Berry. 



Theta Delta Chi 9, Alpha Delta Phi 8. 

The Theta Belt's squeezed out a victory over 
the Alpha Belt's by a one run lead. Both teams 
hit well, but, although the Alpha Belt's made 
several changes in their battery, the Theta Belt's 
succeeded in bringing in the winning run. 

Batteries : Theta Belta Chi, Adams and Mc- 
Culloch; Alpha Belta Phi, Clifford, Merrill and 
James. Umpire, Mason. 



Non-Fraternity 4, Zeta Psi 3. 

The Non-fraternity men succeeded in gaining 
a one nm margin over the Zetes in a close game, 
the Zetes scored all their runs in the first inning 
and up to the last inning played errorless ball. 
The pitching of Smith featured for the Non- 
fraternity men. 

Batteries: Non-fraternity, Smith and Canter; 
Zeta Psi, Lee and Haggerty. 



Delta Kappa Epsilon 5, Beta Theta Pi 3. 

The Bekes succeeded in defeating the Betas 
Monday afternoon by the close margin of two 
runs. In the last inning the Betas filled the bases 
with but one man out, but Ludwig tightened up 
and fanned the next two men. 

Batteries : Belta Kappa Epsilon, Ludwig and 
Brummond; Beta Theta Pi, Partridge and Webb. 



Delta Kappa Epsilon 19, Alpha Delta Phi 6. 

The Bekes scored another victory Tuesday b}' 
defeating the Alpha Belts, 19 to 6. The best hit 
of the game was a line drive by JNIoses to the 
pines, a three bagger. This game ties the Bekes 
and B. U.'s for first place. 

Batteries : Belta Kappa Epsilon, Ludwig and 
Brummond; Alpha Belta Phi, Higgins, Moses, 
and Clifford. L^mpires, Smith, of Brunswick, 
Coombs, L. Smith. 



Kappa Sigma 2, Non-Fraternity 1. 

The Kappa Sigma team defeated the Non- 
frats in the most hotly contested game of the 
series on the Belta last Monday evening. Bahl- 
gren's homer to the pines and K. C. Coombs' 
attempt to stretch a long three-bagger into a 
home run were the features of the game. Both 
pitchers did good work, allowing only scattered 
hits. The result of this game places the Non- 
frats, Chi Psi and Kappa Sigma tied for the lead 
with no more scheduled games to be played. 

Batteries : Non-fraternity, Louis Smith and 
Canter; Kappa Sigma, Moses and K. B. Coombs. 
LTmpire, W. J\L Cook. 



Delta Upsilon 3, Beta Theta Pi 2. 

The small crowd which witnessed the game 
between the B. U. and Beta fraternities on the 
Belta Tuesday morning at six o'clock was well 
repaid for their early rising by seeing another 
of those well-fought games which have character- 
ized the series this j-ear. The B. U. team nosed 
out a victory by a score of 3 to 2, due largely 
to the pitching of Toyokawa. He struck out six 
men and allowed butone hit. 

Batteries : Belta Upsilon, Toyokawa and Sears ; 
Beta Theta Pi, Partridge and Webb. 



INTERFRATERNITY LEAGUE STANDING. 
League A. 

Won Lost P. C. 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 3 1 .750 

Delta Upsilon 3 1 .750 

Theta Delta Chi 2 2 .500 

Beta Theta Pi 2 2 .500 

AU>ha Delta Phi 3 .000 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



League B. 

Won Lost P. C. 

Kappa Sigma 3 2 .600 

Chi Psi 3 2 .600 

Non-Fraternity 3 2 .600 

Zeta Psi 2 2 .500 

Psi Upsilcn 2 3 .400 

Sigma Nu 1 3 .250 

BOWDOIN DINNER IN PARIS. 

Fifteen Bowdoin graduates now stationed in 
Paris, or doing university work at the Sarbonne 
there, had a reunion and dinner at the American 
University Union on Saturday evening, May 
loth. Those present were: 

Major Fred M. Fling '83. 
• Herbert T. Field '92. 

John Clair Minot '96. 

James E. Rhodes, 2nd, '97. 

Major George E. Fogg '02. 

Professor William E. Lunt '04. 

Captain Sumner S. Jackson '09. 

Winston E. Stephens '10. 

Captain William H. Sanborn '10. 

Lieutenant Robert D. Cole '12. 

Captain Paul L. White '14. 

Lieutenant D. W. Philbrick '17. 

Lieutenant Frank E. Noyes '17. 

Eugene M. Gillespie '17. 

Murray M. Bigelow '18. 

Those present had such a good time that it 
was arranged to have a similar reunion early 
in June, since all will be in F-rance until July or 
later. Up to the present time nearly three hun- 
dred Bowdoin graduates have registered at the 
Bowdoin Bureau of the American L^niversity 
Union, but that number by no means includes the 
total of our men in uniform who have been in 
Paris during the war. 

IVY HOP TONIGHT. 

Tonight will take place the annual Ivy Hop 
of the Class of 1920. As the first after-the-war 
Ivy Hop, this function bids fair to be most 
pleasant and successful. 

COMMENCEMENT SPEAKERS. 

The Faculty Committee has chosen the fol- 
lowing men as Commencement speakers from the 
Senior class: Burleigh, Chadbourne, Hilton, and 
Norton. 

1921 BUGLE BOARD ELECTED. 

At a class meeting in the Union Tuesday the 
following men were elected to the 1921 Bugle 
Board: Schonland, White, Ryder, Halpin, and 
St. Clair. 



FINAL SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS. 
Wednesday, June 11 

8.30 a. m. — Music e. Mineralogy, History c. Memorial Hall ; 
Art b. Latin c, Latin e, Psyciiology c, Adams Hall. 

1.30 p. m. — Chemistry e, Spanish c, English i. Astronomy, 
Philosophy c. Memorial Hall. 

« 

Thursday, June 12 

S.30 a. m. — Chemistry c. English k, Memorial Hall ; His- 
tory f. Zoology f, Russian c, Adams Hall. 

1.30 p. m. — Government f. Memorial Hall ; English b, 
Greek h, Adams Hall. 

Friday, .lure 13 

8.30 a. m. — Literature b. Physics b. Memorial Hall ; Gov- 
ernment h, Adams Hall. 

1.30 p. m. — English c, English h. Memorial Hall ; Chem- 
istry k, French i, Adams Hall . 

Saturday, June 14 

8.30 a. m. — Economics m. Zoology c. Memorial Hall ; 
Psychology b. Mathematics k, Adams Hall. 

1.30 p. m. — Economics f. Mathematics g. Psychology f, 
English p, Memorial Hall. 

Monday, June 16 

. 8.30 a. m. — Economics b. Economics k. Memorial Hall. 

1.30 p. m. — Spanish b, Spanish f, German c. Surveying, 
Memorial Hall. 

Tuesday, June 17 

8.30 a. m. — Botany, History e. Chemistry f. Chemistry i. 
(special). Memorial Hall. 

1.30 p. m. — French f, German f, French c, Mathematics j. 
Memorial Hall. 

Wednesday, June 18 

8.30 a. m. — Geology, Greek f. Music f. Memorial Hall. 
1.30 p. m. — Mathematics e, Greek b. Memorial Hall. 



©n tbe Campus 

Adjourns tomorrow. 

This is the last issue of the Oriext before 
Commencement. 

Stearns '18, was on the Campus Sunday. 

The Union has been tastefully decorated with 
valuable war posters. 

Theta Delta Chi, Delta Upsilon, and Chi Psi 
were among the fraternities which observed 
Seniors last supper. 

Gray '02, attended the Outdoor Meet Satur- 
day. 

Owing to the death of President Chase of 
Bates, there was no game Memorial Day. 

The Freshmen are burning their caps tonight, 
according to the time-honored custom. 

Coach Magee will referee the Maine-Holy 
Cross track meet. 

Applicants for position as LTnion attendants 
next year should hand in their names to Grant 
Cole, 7 South Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



MacMillan '98, attended the Interscholastic 
Meet Saturday. 

The members of the English class in argu- 
mentation and debating with Professor Davis en- 
joyed a farewell banquet at the Gurnett House 
last Monday evening. Ra3fmond Asnault '20, was 
the toastmaster and each member gave a short 
speech following' the shore dinner. 

The Seniors have been sporting canes oh the 
Campus this week. 



mitb tf)c jFacuItp 

Dean Sills is visiting Annapolis as member of 
the Board of \^isitors. 

Dean Nixon and Dr. Whittier attended a con- 
ference of the New England Athletic Associa- 
tion at the Boston City Club, May 23. 

Professor Brown took part in a play given 
by the Brunswick Dramatic Club last week. 

President Sills and Dean Nixon attended a 
meeting of the Deans at Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, May 16. 

The last number <si the Methodist Review con- 
tains an article entitled "Back to Normal," by 
Dean Nixon. 

Professor Meserve will be director of a Boy 
Scout campaign for the next two weeks. 

Dean Nixon has been elected president of the 
Brunswick Dramatic Club and Professor Davis 
a member of the executive board. 

Professor Copeland is quarantined at his home 
by illness. 

Professor Mitchell will be the Commencement 
speaker at the Portsmouth (N. H.) High School. 



alumni JBote0 

'13 — Cedric R. Crowell, the class president, and 
Clifton Page, acting secretary during the ab- 
sence of James Norton, who is engaged in re- 
construction work in France, announces that big 
preparations are being made for the reunion at 
Commencement. Paul Lunt, 31 State street, 
Portland, is in charge of the committee who will 
handle the affair. The other members of the 
committee are Paul Lunt of Portland, Paul Sav- 
age of Bangor, John Slocum, Leon Jones, 
Fletcher Twombly, and Clifton Page. Last June, 
when in normal conditions 1913 would have 
celebrated its "Fifth," over one-third of the 
class was in military service. Accordingly, the 
committee is arranging now for the biggest re- 
union of the class since its graduation and is 
counting on the return of nearly every member 
from the nearby states. Announcements have 



already been mailed. Owing to the large per- 
centage of members who were in service, the 
addresses in several cases have been changed, 
and so every Bowdoin man who may know a 
1913 man that has come recently to his vicinity 
is asked to tell him that the "Big Fifth" takes 
place this June. The class is asked to confer 
with the committee, Cedric Crowell of the Lord 
and Taylor Bookshop, New York City, or Clifton 
Page, 434 Middle street, Bath, Maine. 



ABRAXAS HOLDS INITIATION. 

The Abraxas, honorary interfraternity society, 
held its initiation at the Gurnett House Satur- 
day night. The initiates from the Class of 1921 
were Flynn, Perkins, Rich, Schonland, Willson 
and Woodard. 



DARTMOUTH LEADS. 



The greatly changed curriculum which Dart- 
mouth has announced for next year shows that 
the New Hampshire institution has not been 
oblivious to the lessons of the war period. The 
great emergenc}' demonstrated the value of the 
man who has made himself a specialist in any 
field of human knowledge. It proved that the 
man who knew one thing well was far more use- 
ful than the man who merely knew a little of 
everything. And it especially proved the use- 
fulness of those who had obtained a thorough 
training in the sciences. 

In the light of these lessons the Dartmouth 
faculty has recast the requirements for gradu- 
ation in a way which will command the ap- 
proval of all progressive educators. It has agreed 
upon a program of study which will require every 
Dartmouth student to take, during his first two 
years in colleg'e, a minimum of work in each 
of the great fields of knowledge, ancient and 
modern literature, philosophy, the natural 
sciences, mathematics, and the social sciences. 
Then, when th'e undergraduate has obtained this 
general and preliminary grounding, he will de- 
vote his main attention to some "major course" 
or field of specialization, chosen by himself and 
this will occupy his last two years in college. 

Taking the Dartmouth plan as a whole it in- 
volves no radical departure from sound theories 
of higher education. It gives new emphasis to 
that part of the instructional program which 
deals with matters of present day interest, but 
there is no relaxation of allegiance to the clas- 
sics. The opportunity to study the humanities 
remains as broad as before. — Boston Herald. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

UNION CANTEEN 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 

Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 

OFFICERS' SHOES 

TAN CALF AND CORDOVAN 

Spiral Puttees 

Army Boots 

AT 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 

DANCING 

MISS JENNIE S. HARVEY 

Evening Class and Assembly every 
Tuesday evening, Town Hall, Bruns- 
wick. Class at 7.30 p. m. Assembly 
at 8.30 p. m. Open to college students. 

Every Monday evening Class and Assembly at 
the Arcade, Bath. 

Private instruction by appointment. Phone 
Bath 151-W. Address 897 Middle street. 



The right candy — 
From the right man- 
To the right girl — 
If you send her 




She will be equally delighted with 
the dainty, original box and the 
super-extra quality candies inside! 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 
TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 

BATH, MAINE 




^Arrow 

COLLAR 

CLUETTPEABODYgC-Co:lNC: TROYNY 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ANTIQVITY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

acin JFutnttutf, flDin dfitna, ©etotcr, ffitt. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 
to orders for antique goods of any kind 



The Citizens Laundry 

Quali-ty - Service 

BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short Notice by competent work- 
men. We use only the Best 
of Leather. 
E. WHITTOM 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, |100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 



We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16. 



J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 



The Bowdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



TI-IE: ^TCSFIE of- F3F9C3GF9ES^ 



NEW SPRING 
SUITS, 

SHIRTS, 

SHOES, 

HATS 

The snappiest Hnes ever shown in 
Maine. 




FRANK M. LOW & CO. 
PORTLAND, - - MAINE. 



STUDENTS 

desiring to work an hour or more a day 
can make wages of more than $1.00 per 
hour selling America's War for 
Humanity and Life of Roosevelt. Send 
at once for free outfit, 

F. B. DICKERSON CO. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

enclosing 20c in stamps for mailing 
outfits. 

Telephone 160 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 



Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishe 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
A. G. PAGE COMPANY, Bath 




Cumberland Theatre 

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

BRYANT WASHBURN 

IN 

VENUS IN THE EAST 




THE IRON TEST 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

ANITA STEWART 

IN 

VIRTUOUS WIVES 



MONDAY and TUESDAY 

VIVIAN MARTIN 

IN 

JANE GOES A WOOING 



THE LIGHTNING RAIDER 



PASTIME THEATRE 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

BERT LYTELL 

IN 

FAITH 



THE TIGER'S TRAIL 



Bowdoin Orient 




VICTORY 
COMMENCEMENT 



1919 



JUNE 2 3, 1919 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



We have appreciated the patron- 
age received during the few months 
we have been in business and thank 
our customers. 

When College opens another fall 
we shall be carrying a more complete 
line, one that will be unsurpassed by 
any store of the kind in this section. 

COURSON & MORTON 







SPRING STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

John A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 


The College Book Store 

F. W. CHANDLER & SON 

This year's Tennis Goods are in 

NEW CHAMPIONSHIP BALLS 
55c EACH 


BUTLER'S 


1918 CHAMPIONSHIP BALLS 
40 CENTS. 

We have some of last year's Rackets 






PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS , 

...AT... 

WILSON'S PHARMACY 


on hand which will be sold at 

the old prices, which are 

considerably less than 

this year's prices. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINL, JUNE 23. 1919 



NO. 10 



RESULTS OF STUDENT ELECTIONS. 

At the student elections Zeitler '20, was 
elected president of the Student Council, Mc- 
Williams '20, vice-president, and Cleaves '20, 
secretary. The other men elected to the Council 
are Cook '20, Dostie '20, Ellms '20, Mason '20, 
Richan '20, Wood '20, Buker '21, and Lovell '21. 
Allen '20, Cleaves '20, Dostie '20, Goodwin '21, 
and Flinn '22, were elected to the Athletic 
Council. Buker '21, was elected manager of track 
and Perkins '21, manager of baseball. The elec- 
tion of assistant managers was deferred till next 
fall. 

Young '21, was elected president of the Y. M. 
C. A., Haines '21, vice-president, and Averill '22, 
treasurer. 



RHODES '20 WILL LEAD FOOTBALL TEAM 

At a meeting of letter men at the Zete house 
Rhodes '20, was elected captain of next fall's 
football eleven. Rhodes has had three years 
of football at Bowdoin, playing tackle. Other 
varsity men expected to play ne.xt fall are 
Crockett '20, Curtis '20, Drummond '20, Dostie 
'20, and Parent '21, besides men of experience in 
service last year. 

Manager Wood announces the following 
schedule, not yet complete : 

September 2y — Amherst at Amherst. 

October 4 — Brown at Brown. 

October 11 — Holy Cross at Holy Cross. 

October 18 — Open. 

October 25 — Pending. 

November i — Bates at Brunswick. 

November 8 — Maine at Orono. 

Men intending to go out for football next fall 
will notify Manager Wood, West Boylston, Mass. 
Captain Rhodes will communicate with these 
men so that they may return for early practice. 



IVY GAME WON BY BATES. 

The second inning proved Bowdoin's undoing 
in the annual Ivy Day game with Bates Friday 
morning. The trouble started when Huck Finn 
got spiked and before the Bowdoin team could 
steady down the visitors had scored five runs. 



With the exception of the second Bowdoin 
played magnificent ball and after that trouble- 
some inning only two Bates men reached first, 
and one of those was caught in an attempt to 
steal second. 

Bowdoin outhit Bates throughout the game, 
but was unable to bunch the drives and so the 
runs were scattered, the final tally being 5 to 3 
in favor of the Lewiston team. 

The summarv : 



Ma.xim. cf 

Stone, c 4 

Talbot, If 4 

E'oner, If i 

Davidson, p 3 

Dillon, ss 4 

Cusick, p. If 4 

Elwell, rf 3 

Burns, ib 3 

Trask, 3b 2 



ab r bh po 



Totals 



ab 

Donnell, 3b 4 

Cook, 2b 5 

Finn, ss 5 

Caspar, i b 5 

Prosser, rf 4 

Hall, c 4 

Holmes, cf 3 

Grover, If 4 

Tuttle, p 3 

Racine, cf i 

*Fl5'nn I 



Totals 39 3 12 27 19 3 

Bates 5 o — 5 

Bowdoin i o i i — 3 

Two-base hits, Dillon, Maxim, Finn 2. Stolen bases, 
Maxim 2, Dillon. Base on balls, by Davidson i. Struck 
out, by Davidson 9, by Tuttle 5. Hits off Cusick 4 in 
one inning ; off Davidson S in S innings. Double plays, 
Finn to Caspar. Left on bases. Bowdoin 10, Bates i. 
Umpire, John Carrigan of Lewiston. Time, i hour, 53 
minutes. 



* Batted for Tuttle in gth. 



92 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



MAINE WINS STATE CHAMPIONSHIP. 

Maine succeeded in clincing- the State cham- 
pionship at Orono Thursday, 5-0. The White 
secured several hits hut not at opportune times. 
Good work by the Maine batsmen and a few 
errors on the part of the Bowdoin fielders were 
responsible for most of the runs. 



COOK '20, RECEIVES CAPTAINCY. 

Cook '20, was unanimously elected captain of 
baseball after the Maine game Thursday. Cook 
has played varsity baseball during all three years 
he has been in college, playing second base. The 
election took place on the train. 



CLASS DAY EXERCISES 
OPENING ADDRESS. 

Class of 1919. 



Classmates and friends : — 

The Class of 1919 meets today under especially 
happy and fortunate circumstances. A year ago 
it seemed quite unlikely that so many of our 
number could be here for these Class Day Exer- 
cises. Some had then answered the call to .na- 
tional service; many others were preparing to 
do so. Our future as a class seemed dark in- 
deed. A large number felt that if, by good 
fortune, they were ever able to return to college, 
it would be only after a considerable lapse of 
time. 

But fate has been more kind to us. The sign- 
ing of the armistice, the prompt discharge of 
those in the military service, and the liberal at- 
titude of the college authorities have enabled a 
large part of our class to return and graduate 
this year. 

Upon this particularly happy occasion we wel- 
come you, parents and friends, to these exercises. 
You see us now at the close of our college career. 
We hope that in your eyes we may appear to 
have acquitted ourselves well in these four years. 
Our college course has been broken, but the 
break — serious and unfortunate as it was in 
many respects — has not been wholly bad, for it 
has afforded us a great opportunity which other- 
wise would not have been possible. In common 
with all college men we have had an unusual 
chance to prove the value of our training. 

We are proud of the record made in the war 
by the colleges and college men throughout the 



country. We are proud of Bowdoin's record and 
proud that our class was able to perform a part 
in establishing such a record. From the declar- 
ation of war until the signing of the armistice, 
the college men of this country were at the ser- 
vice of the Government. Many entered active 
service at once — not hastily and recklessly — 
rather thoughtfully and seriously, — but all will- 
ingly and cheerfully. 

In the past the value of a college training has 
at times been questioned, — the influence of the 
college life has been termed harmful rather than 
beneficial, — the time spent has been considered 
wasted — or at least fitting one for the cloistered 
life of a close student rather than the active life 
of a man of affairs. But the war record of the 
college men shows that their training, in reality 
has been extremely important and valuable. A 
large number were given positions of trust and 
authority as commissioned and non-commissioned 
officers. Their training in strictly military mat- 
ters admittedly had not been thorough — the 
emergency was too great and the need too im- 
mediate. They had, however, in college been 
well grounded in the fundamentals, and had 
learned to study intelligently. The knowledge 
to be obtained from books they could quickly 
acquire. But their preparation was more than in 
this. They had studied and were acquainted with 
the most important subject of all — mankind. In 
daily associations on the campus as well as when 
reading the record of human advance ever since 
the dawn of civilization — consciously or uncon- 
sciously their subject had been mankind. This 
knowledge it was which enabled them so quickly 
to adapt themselves to the new life and become 
leaders of men. 

The value of a college training might later 
have shown itself more slowly in civilian life. 
But the great emergency made it apparent at 
once. There was no time to be spent in muster- 
ing up courage and gradually preparing oneself 
for the stand to be taken. A decision had to be 
made without hesitation. Then it was that the 
seeds of truth, of justice, and of courage sown 
in half-forgotten lectures and class-room dis- 
cussions suddenly grew into strong and purpose- 
ful wills, and the quickness of decision and action 
developed on the baseball diamond and on the 
football field made the college-trained men will- 
ing and able to do their duty in what ever way 
might be required. 

The value of our training in war has, then, 
been shown. Now we are starting forth to prove 
its worth in peace. We are today bidding fare- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



well to the Alma Mater from whom we have 
learned sb much. Again, we welcome you who 
have come to be with us as we review the four 
wonderful years which are now passed, and pay 
a final tribute to our beloved Bowdoin. 



CLASS HISTORY OF 1919. 

Howe S. Newell. 

The story of the Class of 1919 is indeed a 
unique one in the history of Bowdoin College. 
Our four years spent in the shelter of these walls 
have indeed been years of change. One normal 
year we have had. We learned then to know 
each other and to know old Bowdoin, her tra- 
ditions and her lore. 

In the fall of 1915 we arrived in Brunswick 
a hundred and twenty-four strong, one of the 
largest classes in the history of the coilege. We 
had one happy year together, one year of work 
and play, one that will long linger in our 
memories. ^ Proclamation night — initiations — the 
chapel rush — baseball and football, all are now 
but memories. '^Buck" and "Flunker" and our 
first college exams are memories that will stick. 
Then came spring and that night of nights, Ivy 
1916, the burning of the fence and the wrath 
cif old "Sam Shylock." 

The next year came — most of us came back a* 
wooly sophomores. Again we went through proc 
night, only this time at the other end of the 
paddles. Mid-years came, then all things seemed 
to change. There was something in the air; our 
country went to war. Uniforms began to appear ; 
military training had begun ; each day saw men 
leaving for training ships or camps. Ivy and 
Commencement were mere shadows of the old, 
a vain attempt to keep things normal. 

Some of us came back to start our Junior 
year. Bowdoin was still more military; we had 
a unit of the Reserve Officers Training Corps. 
Each week found our numbers less, and every 
day brought stories of class-mates who had won 
commissions or sailed for overseas. Somehow 
the year slid by. Ivy came, our own Ivy, with 
only a handful of the old class left. We held our 
exercises, we sang the ode, but many a heart 
was heavy that day. What would happen by 
next Commencement was a question deep in every 
heart. We mourned our absent brothers and 
wished that we might be with them. 

Senior year dawned, and our class came back 
hardly twenty strong, dubbed the infants and 
cripples. Hyde Hall was our home, and there 
we reigned supreme as lords of the infant fresh- 



men. Early in October the College was taken 
over by the Government and turned into a train- 
ing school for prospective officers. All was 
changed. The Students Army Training Corps 
had come, and a few more of our old classmates 
returned as members of the Naval Unit or Army 
Unit. Fraternities had faded into the back- 
ground, and college life lay dormant, not dead 
but just asleep. The blare of bugles, the sound 
of martial music, the sharp commands, the in- 
cessant one-two-three-four — all made us feel that 
we were living in a new land. Military studies 
became the order of the day. Men marched to 
class, to meals, to drill, marching-marching- 
marching everywhere. Where had our college 
gone? She had answered her country's call; 
Bowdoin too had gone to war. 

But all was not to remain thus forever. Early 
in the morning of November 11, 1918, a pande- 
monium broke loose. Bells and whistles, shots 
and bugle blares left little doubt in our minds 
as to what had happened. The armistice had 
been signed. Military life here at college quickly 
became a thing of the past. Old friends re- 
turned, the class grew from twenty to over 
seventy in two months. Quickly we were back 
to normal. Our fighting faculty returned and 
old Bowdoin was again flourishing. Once more 
our class comes togetlier to smoke the final pipe 
of peace. 

But we are not all here. Let us pause for a 
moment to do honor to those of our number who 
have joined the "gallant unreturning" ; two who 
have given their lives for- their country, their 
class and their college. Albert Davis Holbrook 
who died of wounds in a German prison camp; 
wounds received while leading his men on the 
battlefields of France. William Frye Martin, a 
private in the Medical Corps, who died of wounds 
received while attempting to save the lives of 
others in the bloody battle of the Argonne forest. 

Now we stand on the threshold of life. Bow- 
doin we leave you; may we ever be a credit to 
you, and may we always do our share and be 
worthy sons of a noble mother. 

Profectiiri salutamus. 



FAREWELL ADDRESS. 

J. W. Coburn. 

"Our slender life runs rippling by, and glides 
Into the silent hollow of the past : 
What is there that abides 
To make the next age better for the last ?" 

In these few, but succinct lines, Lowell seems 
to have effectively expressed the feeling of the 



94 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Class of 1919 as wc gather here today to bid a 
formal farewell to our Alma Mater. Four years 
ago, we entered the walls of Bowdoin a hetero- 
geneous group of youths from many walks of 
life and from many climes. Today, we go forth 
a body of men united by our toil and play to- 
gether, never again to be disintegrated mitil 
Father Time shall see fit to remove us one by 
one. To bid goodbye to the college which has 
brought such unity to pass and which has con- 
tributed so bountifully to our sweet store of ex- 
periences is no pleasant task. 

If these exercises ended everything, or if by 
the mere acceptance of a diploma, we determined 
and segregated that part of our lives which is 
just coming to a close without perceiving its 
direct relationship to the future, then indeed 
would we have just cause to regard this parting 
with even greater regret. It is only by cutting 
deeper into the experiences of the last four years 
that we can fully appreciate them and face this 
time with a smile rather than with sorrow. Bow- 
doin holds a position in our hearts never to be 
rivalled. We are grateful to her for the knowl- 
edge of the class room; but we are more thank- 
ful for the high ideals and spirit with which she 
has endeavored to endow us. 

Many of you are already familiar with the 
Bowdoin spirit as exemplified by the different 
activities normally representing the college. I 
believe it would be well, however, for us to re- 
call for a moment the part which it has played 
within the undergraduate memory of the present 
Senior Class. At times, we reflect wistfully upon 
the days preceding the entrance of this country 
into the War; when Bowdoin was a place of 
peace and quiet where men studied and thought 
of the better things of life ; when we dealt with 
men's spirits rather than with their fortunes. 
But think of the change. War was declared. 
From a peaceful life we were thrust into the 
vortex of military activity. The pen was re- 
placed by the rifle. The attempt and determina- 
tion to shatter for once and for all the vain 
dreams of the War Lord resulted in the devo- 
tion of the major part of our time and attention 
to war preparation. Contemplation of man's 
mind gave way to a study of the most effective 
method by which to end his life. Just as Bow- 
doin had always risen to the demands of the 
times in previous crises, so did she then. The 
details of the manner in which she fulfilled her 
mission are already known to you. The point that 
I do wish to emphasize is that one more op- 
portunity had been given for our Alma Mater to 



teach her sons the invaluable lesson of patriotism 
and devotion to high ideals. Some of us have re- 
gretted that fate denied us the privilege of en- 
joying four years of normal college life. But 
when we consider how much deeper our ap- 
preciation is of Bowdoin because we went 
through trouble with her, and when we con- 
sider the valuable lessons that were learned be- 
cause of it, our regret seems unworthy of Bow- 
doin men. That experience will make this part- 
ing of greater significance than ever before. Our 
friendships are closer and dearer, our ties to the 
college are firmer, our memories are richer. Be- 
cause of the contribution of two of our most 
highly esteemed members to humanit3''s cause, 
the Class of Nineteen Nineteen has become 
welded together as would never otherwise have 
been possible. The past, in spite of its pains 
and sorrows, will ever be dear to us. 

Bowdoin has tried to inculcate in us the high- 
est ideals of citizenship; not citizenship of a 
limited locality, or natioUi but full realization of 
the proper place that a college man — and a Bow- 
doin man — should assume in the world. Time 
flies. The world is always progressing and we 
should keep pace with it. But when progTess 
changes to extreme radicalism then we must re- 
member, and apply, one of Bowdoin's funda- 
mental lessons — that of well-considered conserv- 
atism. This is not a reluctancy to adopt new 
theories or practices, but rather a determination 
to give them the most just and careful consider- 
ation before allowing them to plaj' an important 
part in our lives. The world today is in danger 
as the result of the actual failure to utilize this 
balance wheel of conservatism. As true sons of 
Bowdoin, it is our duty to do whatever may be 
within our power — little as that may be — to ad- 
vocate a progress that shall be controlled by real 
conservatism. 

A good citizen should be an international 
citizen. The world has been suffering for 
centuries from the poison of personal and na- 
tional selfishness. Today, the ruin of Europe 
bears eloquent testimony to the failure of this 
movement. To secure in the future a harmonious 
solution of this problem, there must be a citizenry 
with breadth of vision and a willingness to sub- 
ordinate individual ambitions to the will of the 
many, and for their benefit. • Bowdoin has aimed 
to prepare us for this demand of good Americans 
in the years to come. 

There are many other causes for our gratitude 
to our Alma Mater. How well all of these les- 
sons have been learned time alone will tell. A 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



95 



man's success is of course primarily dependent 
upon his innate qualities ; but, the fact cannot be 
denied that training plays an important role. The 
frequency and extent of successes by Bowdoin 
men seem to preclude in themselves any attempt 
to attribute them to Fate. By courage and 
tenacity of purpose, Peary and MacMillan at- 
tained that goal for which so many men have 
striven, but failed. B}^ their learning and breadth 
of view, Frye, Reed, Fessenden, Pierce gained 
honorable places in the ranks of American states- 
men. Fuller on the bench, Longfellow and Haw- 
thorne in literature are but other examples of 
natural ability combined with proper training. 
Bowdoin has performed her task well. 

Upon considering these facts, we become more 
confident of the future. We know that our train- 
ing has been excellent; and that if our lives are 
failures, it will be due to our lack of ability 
rather than to the failure of the college to give 
us adequate preparation. It would be folly to 
attempt to , prohesy the great changes which 
Time in its rapidly moving course will evolve. 
Some of my classmates will undoubtedly attain 
that enviable goal of success to which mankind 
has ever turned its eyes. Others may not be so 
fortunate. Whatever our fortune may be, we 
regard the future with confidence and consider 
this parting as but the beginning of a new period 
of increased devotion to our Alma Mater and a 
deeper appreciation of her gifts to us. Let us 
resolve that in whatever field of endeavor, in 
' whatever land, our paths may lead us, we shall 
never forget the debt that we owe to Bowdoin 
and to pay our most humble respect to her 
teachings. 

To you, O Bowdoin, we bid a fond goodbye 
and repeat the words of Byron : 

"Farewell, a word that must be and hath been, 
A sound which makes us linger, — yet Farewell." 



COMMENCEMENT POEM. 

The days of our childhood are too quickly, passed 

And so are the days of our youth ; 
Too soon on the billows of Life are we cast, 

Each one with his theory of truth. 
This theory, like clay, has been molded and shaped 

And evolved by the fash'ning of Time ; 
The earlier notions have fled and escaped 

To give place to the thoughts now in prime. 

Experience and Teaching Time brought to his aid 

In preparing his wares for the test 
And these two their talents and skill have displayed 

Where they can display them as best. 
'Tis where the gray chapel stands lofty and proud. 

Its spires overlooking the halls 
Which the neighborly trees attempt to enshroud 

And the ivies to cover their walls. 



Four years by the chapel are happily spent, 

Four years we shall never regret. 
Whether business or pleasure or both be our bent 

Those years we can never forget. 
They were full of the fondest of pleasures and pains 

That sweet in remembrance will last 
We count them among the supremest of gains, 

A possession that can't be surpassed. 

What are these possessions the world cannot seize? 

They are treasures more precious than gold, 
Intangible somethings whose values increase 

With the years that fleet by. We grow old 
And the friendships we gained 'round the chapel re- 
main 

Inseparable ties of true love 
That bring all the happiness back once again 

As if borne on the wing of a dove. 

We have known and experienced one reason for life 

In these friendships we reckon so dear. 
Like a calm after storm or a peace after strife, 

Like the calmness that drives away fear 
Is the joy and contentment we all realize 

In the moments when we retrospect ; 
When we live o'er again the days which we prize 

And sweet memory rambles unchecked. 

The devotion we hold for our mother beloved 

Who gave us the chapel and halls 
With the test of the years and old age will have proved 

To be stronger, more firm than those walls 
Of gray stone where the Ivy clings, constant and true. 

Our loyalty long will endure 
No whimsical fortune or fate will subdue 

The spirit of faith which is due her. 

Today our Alma Mater welcomes back 

Her older sons and those who knew 
Her care for only a short time. — Alack ! 

They cannot know the heritage of few 
Which she alone can give and she impart, 

A priceless legacy that she 
Pours forth frpm out the depths of her warm heart ; 

'Tis hers forever ours to be. 

With pride and exultation she receives 

Those loyal sons back home again 
And crowns each with a wreath of laurel leaves 

For speech is poor 't woixld love profane. 
They heard the challenge, nobly they replied 

From happy homes and peaceful state 
They gladly went and gladly would have died 

If such had been their destined fate. 

Was it the bubble reputation or 

What was it prompted them to go ? 
Adventure oiTered that which men abhor ? 

Or did they leave to meet the foe 
Because their friends and colleagues also went ? 

Because they feared the world's rebuke? 
Or was it restlessness and discontent ? 

Why did they leave the lamp and book? 

But even those who went cannot reveal 
What urged them on, nor what the call 

That gained the grand response, nor what the appeal 
They answered, offering their all 

As noble champions of an honorable cause 



96 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



As brave defenders of the right. 
Desiring not the empty, vain applause 
But anxious that they win their fight. 

It may have been stern Duty spoke to them 

Or Glory showed the road to fame 
Or threatened Liberty showed her torch to them, 

A service to mankind their aim 
Or love of freedom caused the sacrifice. 

Democracy had them overawed, 
Did the spirit of patriotism in them arise? — 

Sincerely we believe it was God. 

The minor sorrow can express itself. 

The greater grief cannot. And humble speech 

Is trivial and our bankrupt language fails 

To meet the obligations of the heart. 

The obligations due our comrades gone 

Beyond the beck and call of this dull world 

Unto a brighter peaceful paradise 

Where they receive their fit and just reward 

More fully than we mortals ever hope 

To grant them what they won and well deserve. 

We seem the dead who stayed behind 

While they will ever live forever blessed 

Because they gave their life blood to defend 

Their country and mankind against the wrong 

On which God frowned. They are the chosen few, 

Departed unto their last rest in peace 

To infinite and noble happiness 

Immune from strife so lately known. Theirs is 

The honor and the praise and reverence 

And ours the consecrated memory. 

So toll the bell. 

Bow the head in due respect. 

Our hearts may swell — 

That is all we may expect. 

Their hearts have bled 

So that we be saved from death. 

They are not dead ; 

Their deeds remain on earth 

To urge us on 

High achievements now to rain. 

Now they are gone 

We must reach that higher plane 

For which they strove nobly to attain. 

— WiLLi.AM Angus. 



CLASS OFFICERS OP 1919. 

Following are the class officers of iQig : Presi- 
dent, Burliegh ; vice-president, Perkins : secre- 
tary-treasurer, Pligg'ins. 



THE PROPER USE OF VICTORY. 

Baccalaureate Address by President Sills. 

(Abstract) 

This is a Victory Commencement and here at 
Bowdoin as at many other American colleges 
we are rejoicing in the triumph of our arms 
and welcoming home those gallant sons who 
fought and conquered. As last year on the same 
occasion we were concerned chieflv with the war 



and the lessons the war was teaching us all, so 
today inevitably our thoughts still surge ahead 
and we ponder on what the victory really means 
to us and our beloved country. The problems 
before as individuals and as a nation are fully 
as complicated and as difficult as those which 
confronted us in the darkest days of the war. 
The victory has been won ; but the fruits of 
victory are not yet ours. In war the dangers 
were imminent and brutal ; the need of union 
and self sacrifice was self-evident. In peace 
every interest, every class, every nation, lifts 
its shrill cry for immediate consideration ; and 
the babel is largely composed of the voice of un- 
selfishness. It requires far more imagination to 
see that the future is dark with danger ; and yet 
as the days go by, it is not hard to see that the 
statesman's task is no easier of solution than 
that which Marshal Foch and the allied staff 
carried on so nobly to glorious fruition. And we 
need today just as much courage and faith in 
the ultimate conquest of the right as we did a 
year ago. 

Like the Church, the college is eternally con- 
cerned with the things of the spirit; and there 
is much more danger that the college shall lose 
its aloofness, its academic, and, if you will, its 
ideal point of view thaii that it shall be un- 
practical. 

Nor is it inappropriate that a baccalaureate 
address should have as its theme the proper uses 
of victory. Commencement celebrates the suc- 
cessful completion of a college course. But the 
college would be recreant indeed did it not con- 
stantly emphasize that what you do with your 
college training is much more important than 
the mere obtaining of it. In other words, in 
college as in life it is more difficult to use a 
victory wisely than to win it. A victory is often 
more disastrous spiritually than a defeat. The 
magnanimous victor is just as rare a person as 
the brave vanquished; and the victor who uses 
his triumph well is even rarer. Conversely there 
is no greater tragedy than the throwing away 
of the fruits of victory. For it is a ^tragedy 
when a 'boy who has had a promising career at 
college fritters away his talents by falling into 
an initial easy job and losing straightway his 
ambition and his dreams. It is a tragedy when 
a college man graduating with principles of 
working for civic and social reform becomes 
buffeted by the minds of a practical world and 
steers his ship cynically and by the easiest course 
into a safe and inglorious port. On the other 
hand, the man who carries forth into life. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



whether in the bus}" marts or shady streets, the 
things that he has learned from the best in 
science and in literature is constantly crowning 
himself victor; and the days will fade only as his 
will to do and dare wanes. 

All young scholars, indeed all graduates of 
college, might well take to heart the lesson of 
true scholarship, which is never to be content 
with present accomplishment. Listen to the 
words of the great Petrach rebuking his friend 
Boccaccio for the suggestion that he rest a while 
from his arduous studies and labors. "However 
}'ou may describe me, I must endeavor if I am 
a nullity, to become something; and if I really 
were great which I am not, I should strive, so 
far as in me lay, to become greater." 

It is not only in the realm of science and 
scholarship that these great principles apply : 
they live with as much force in the industrial 
world. During the last five years we have seen 
great victories won by organized labor. It is, 
thank God", idle to speak longer of the down- 
trodden working, classes. Labor has come into 
its own ; and man}' of the things for which it has 
been fighting for years are now nearly every- 
where accepted. We no longer think of the 
right of collective bargaining, the minimum wage, 
a short working day with frequent holidays, as 
revolutionary. We may all well rejoice in the 
progress made ; but we have yet to see how the 
gains are to be used. If class hatred increases, 
if there is not the proper discrimination between 
skilled and initrained work, the victory will be 
thrown away ; and not only labor but all the rest 
of us will be worse off than we were before. 
Nor will the common sense of the American 
people fail to see that if we put unskilled and 
untrained labor in the same monetary plane as 
technical skill we shall have social and industrial 
chaos. Even though the danger be slight it is 
high time that men speak out : particularly those 
who have influence with our youth should not 
fail in season and out of season to show that 
trained minds count; and that if we are to have 
democracy and not socialism there must be in 
our industrial system recognition of the worth 
of the individual and no hindrances to promotion. 
In the main the leaders of American labor are 
sane and practical men. No one will begrudge 
them the victories they are undoubtedly winning 
if they are to be used not narrowly and selfishly 
but for the good of all. 

As we turn from academic and domestic prob- 
lems to the larger international questions with 
which we as Americans are intimately concerned. 



once more we must realize how hard it is to use 
victory wisely and imselfishly. The world at 
large is strangely ill at ease. We are rid of a 
dreadful menace; but if we arc not careful the 
devil of militarism will return to the swept and 
garnished chamber with other devils worse than 
he. Some times it has happened in the history 
of the world that great victories have been won 
only to be thrown away. Many people seem to 
argue that if we can secure for ourselves 
security and peace for a short term of years that 
is all we can expect or desire. If out of the 
welter of w-ar no new order arises, if no new 
system of settling disputes between nations is set 
up, we are of all men the most miserable. We 
shall have made the most humiliating of failures 
in history, we shall have to confess the human 
intellect is incapable of devising means for the 
improvement of the human race. All of us, 
nationally and individually, have our chance to 
help. Of course no scheme like the League of 
Nations will be effective unless there is behind 
it a power superior to mere mechanical agree- 
ment or a formal international covenant. But 
if we are not willing to run the risk, to make 
the new experiment, the fruits of victory will be 
like those on the Dead Sea. Honor and duty 
and country all beckon us to take our stand 
on the side of progress; to work for a peace 
that will not only be an extension of those 
principles that took us, though late, into the war. 
Before the question of securing a righteous and 
noble peace, all parties and personal consider- 
ations are as petty as the minds that can not see 
beyond them. We are veritably at the cross 
roads : backward lies the old order, the old 
diplomac}', the old wars ; forward the road is 
rough and uncertain but in it the light is shining. 

These illustrations of the uses of victory might 
easily be extended into other fields. What 
women do with the vote is much more important 
and interesting than the winning of the right 
to vote. If real temperance is not promoted by 
prohobition, the legislation will be a mere empty 
form. In fact, in every part of man's endeavor 
the same truth applies. If it be objected that 
the intepretation which has been given this after- 
noon has dwelt too much on the ideal and the 
altruistic, there is the emphatic answer that that 
is the sort of service the Christian college in- 
culcates. To gain the whole world and lose one's 
own soul, to be successful as Mammon judges 
success and false to one's own conscience — these 
are the views Bowdoin College never has taught 
and never will teach. Like all her sisters she 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



preaches that righteousness alone exaUeth a 
nation; and that onl}' by losing himself in a good 
cause does a man become victor over chance 
and circumstance ; and only by making the in- 
dividual or the class or the nation or the world 
a bit better is any victory, no matter how mo- 
mentarily great, in the end worth while. 



MEN AVHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN THE WAR. 

Memorial Address by President Sills. 

The reading of these familiar names in this 
place and at this time is far more eloquent than 
any formal memorial address. Yet since this 
service would be strangely incomplete and cold 
were no words of gratitude uttered, I ask you 
to think with me for a few minutes what 
discipline of self, what sacrifice, what love of 
country we here honor. Everyone of these men, 
whether in glorious combat on the battlefield or 
in the dread routine of duty in camp died with 
his face to the foe, expressing in that final act 
the noblest traditions of the college. "They 
would be free or die" not only because they were 
American citizens but because they had learned 
their kinship with the heroes of the past and 
their obligation to keep the heritage that had 
been so richly won for them. They poured out 
"the red, sweet wine of youth" without a murmur 
or regret; because, as we of them wrote, they 
knew they were the chosen representatives of 
their countless brothers who would as freely have 
given their lives had God so willed. Could their 
brave young spirits who may be even now hover- 
ing near their beloved college home, be given 
utterance, we may be sure they would say : "We 
have only done what many others would have 
done; and if you honor us, do not forget them." 

The war changing our ideas about so many 
things has removed almost entirely our fear of 
death. When we see the brave and young 
leave us thus gloriously, the sting of death as 
death is gone; the victory of the grave is a de- 
feat. To hold life so lightly that we can toss 
)-^it away in a splendid cause with all the zest of 
a. lover, and at the same time to value, as youth 
does the joy of living so that the sacrifice is 
real — this is the better part. 

As always happens when men do brave, un- 
selfish deeds, they are not a part of history. They 
are brothers to those golden lads who clothed 
themselves with the dust of death at Thermopy- 
lae : to those sailor men who gleefully shattered 
the Spanish Armada: to the embattled farmers 
of Concord : to those who at Gettysburg gave 
their lives that the nation might live. Vimy 



Ridge (for some of our boys fought there) 
Chateau Thierry, the Argonne shall thrill even 
as did the great battles of old: their name shall 
be "Familiar in our mouths as household words" ; 
and when the stories are retold, here at Bowdoin 
no Commencement shall go by 

"From this day to the ending of the world 
But they in it shall be remembered 
Those few, those happy few, that band of brothers." 

The war has proved once more what the 
ancients knew and Christ taught that greater love 
has no man than this that a man lay down his 
life for his friends. In this, the supremest test, 
the college man is no more worthy of praise 
than are his brothers in other walks of life: but 
in other respects, the contribution of the college 
to the war was somewhat different. Deep down 
in his heart he felt somehow or other that his 
college training had made his soul, as old 
Brethius in prison wrote, superior to future. 
And so it made really no difference to him 
whether he should come marching home some 
bright sunny day or whether he should join the 
ranks of the gallant unreturning. The storm 
might sink his craft or preserve it : but he would 
hold the rudder true. In his own citadel of self 
he would endure cheerfully whatever fate meted 
out to him. And so in all the adversities of war, 
in sickness and in wounds, in prison camp and 
in death itself, these merry carefree lads, these 
sober, earnest men kept their own souls. 

And so there is no sadness in this memorial 
service : we mourn our dead but with solemn 
pride 

"Nothing is here for tears : nothing to wail 
Or beat the breast ; no weakness, no contempt 
Dispraise or blame : nothing but well and fair 
And what may quiet us in a death so noble." 

For we celebrate a triumph here — the triumph of 
freedom over might, and of the freedom-loving 
spirit over death. 

As they represented us and their mates in 
death, so it is our part to represent them in life. 
No such happy fate as theirs awaits us. In the 
freshness and vigor of life they gave themselves 
completely to their country; all that might have 
been done amiss lies covered in a glorious grave : 
we think only of the beauty of the sacrifice. 
Something of their immortal freshness will al- 
ways linger about these halls to show future 
generations yet untold what youth can do, what 
youth has done. If we represent their right in 
the new world that is to be — if we reproduce 
and hand on their simplicity, their unaffected 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



devotion to duty, their genuineness, this college 
will be a happier place. The}' pla3'ed their parts 
well, however, we may play ours : their re- 
sponsibility ended when they ga\-e their all — no 
less. But it is not idle to think that they will 
rest more quietly if the things for which they 
fought triumph. 



COLONEL DUVAL EXPRESSES 

APPRECIATION FOR LOVING CUP 



THE COMMENCEMENT HOP. 

The Commencement Hop, held in the gym- 
nasium Friday evening, was a very pleasant 
feature of the Commencement program. The 
hop, although without a record-breaking attend- 
ance, made a much better showing than last 
year when only about fifty couples were in at- 
tendance. Paul was the chairman of the com- 
mittee in charge of arrangements. 



"THE TEJIPEST." 

The Masque and Gown of Bowdoin College 
presented "The Tempest" on the steps of Walker 
Art Building Saturday afternoon at 4.30 p. m. 
The play was one of the finest features of the 
Commencement program. The cast was made up 
of twenty-four students who had worked very 
hard to make this play possible. The costumes 
were especially designed by Hayden of Boston. 
The play was under the direction of Mrs. Arthur 
Brown. The cast follows : 

People of the Play 

Alonso, King of Naples Kenneth Coombs 

Sebastian, his brother Percy Low 

Prospero, the rightful Dudge of Naples, 

Raymond Asnault 
Antonio, his brother, usurping Dudeof Naples, 

Mortimer Grossman 

Ferdinand, son of Alonso H. F. Simpson, Jr. 

Gonzalo, an honest old Counsellor Stanley Gordon 

Adrian, Francisco, Lords. 

William Clymer and Kenneth Boardman 

Trinculo, a Jester Richard Tarbox 

Stephano, a drunken Butler Bateman Edwards 

Caliban, a savage Slave Harold Dudgeon 

Ariel, a Spirit Avard Richan 

Miranda, daughter of Prospero Crosby Redman 

Shapes and Dancers 

Howard, Stetson, Crowell, Hall, Standish, Odgen, 
Rhoads, Pickard, Davies, Gofl", Flynn. 



ALEXANDER PRIZE SPEAKING. 

Morse '21, and Simpson '22, were the winners 
of the first and second prizes in the annual Alex- 
ander Prize Speaking contest, held in Memorial 
Hall Thursday evening. The other participants 
were Richan '20, Taylor '20, Coburne '21, Ferris 
'22, Knight '22, Stearns '22 and Towle '22. 



No. 501 Third Avenue, 

Ashbury Park, N. J., 

June I2th, 1919. 
My dear Mr. Foulke :— 

The loving cup arrived yesterday, and I can- 
not tell you how much it was appreciated by 
me. Extend to the student body my deep ap- 
preciation for so handsome a remembrance of 
our most pleasant associations at dear old Bow- 
doin. I also appreciate your kind letter and the 
sentiment expressed. 

Most sincerely yours, 

John H. Duval. 



A BOWDOIN SONG BOOK. 

At the last meeting of the Student Council, 
June 17, Robert Morse '21, was elected to work 
with Professor Wass during the summer vaca- 
tion to get out a Bowdoin song book. 



PHI BETA KAPPA APPOINTMENTS. 

The following men were initiated into Phi Beta 
Kappa fraternity, Alpha of Maine, Saturday, 
from the Class of 1919: G. H. Casey, L. A. 
Burleigh, . F. A. Hilton, H. S. Newell, R. A. 
Stevens, and D. S. Higgins ; from the Class of 
1920, L. M. Goodrich, I. T. Richards, and P. D. 
Crockett. 

Casey, Foulke, and Norton, were the straight 
"A" men of the Senior class. 



AWARDS IN 1919. 

Rhodes Scholars — Robert Peter Coffn, 1915; 
Neal Tuttle, 1914. 

Charles Caroll Everett Scholar — Frank Arthur 
Hilton, Jr., 1919. 

Henry W. Longfellow Scholar — No award. 

David Sewall Premium — No award. 

Class of 1868 Prize — Lloyd Osborne Colter, 
1919. 

Smyth Mathematical Prize — Harold Frost 
Morrill, 1921. 

Sewall Greek Prize — No award. 

Sewall Latin Prize — Alexander Thomson, 1921. 

Pray English Prize — Bateman Edwards, 1919. 

Goodwin French Prize — Leon Melvin Butler, 
1922. 

Noyes Political Economy Prize — Leland Mat- 
thew Goodrich, 1920. 

Bradbury Debating Prizes — First Prizes: 
Maurice Sydney Coburne, 1921 ; Harry Helson, 



100 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



1921 ; Russell Miller McGown, 1921 ; Edgar 
Curtis Taylor, 1920. Second Prizes : Samuel 
Cummings Buker, 1921 ; Fred Babson Chad- 
bourne, 1919; Lloyd Harvey Hatch, 1921 ; John 
Garnett Young, 1921. ■ 

Alexander Prize Speaking — Robert Winthrop 
Morse, 1921, first prize; Hartley Fremont Simp- 
son, Jr., 1922, second prize. 

Colonel William Henry Owen Premium — 
Donald Shackley Fliggins, 1919. 

Hiland Lockwood Fairbanks Prize: Class of 
1920 — George Raymond Asnault. Class of 1922 
— First and second. Hartley Fremont Simpson, 

Jr. 

Philo Sherman Bennett Prize Fund — No 
award. 

Forbes Rickard Prize for Poetry — Robert 
Winthrop Morse, 1921. 



AN EXPLANATION. 

Owing to the fact that the Orient went early 
to press this Commencement, there is necessarily 
a less complete account of Commencement 
activities. While the Orient regrets these omis- 
sions, it seemed worth while in view of the fact 
that the alumni would have an opportunity to 
once more read the Bowdoin Orient on Bow- 
doin's campus. 



KAPPA SIGMA WINS CHAMPIONSHIP. 

By winning four games in succession the Kappa 
Sig's earned the championship cup in the fra- 
ternity leagues. At the close of the season in 
League B the Non-fraternity, Chi Psi, Zeta Psi, 
and Kappa Sigma were tied for first place. The 
Non-fraternity men defeated the Zetes and the 
Kappa Sigma team blanked the Chi Psi's, leaving 
the Non-fraternity men and Kappa Sig's to play 
off the tie. The deciding game went to eight 
innings, the Kappa Sig's finally nosing out a win, 
6 to 5. The Delta Upsilon team played 
the Kappa Sig's on Whittier field Fri- 
day the thirteenth, and was defeated, 8 to 
4. For the D. U.'s the pitching of Tdyokawa 
was the feature. Only two of the Kappa Sig 
batsmen succeeded in getting safe hits. The D. 
U. infield, although it had several errors against 
it, made two or three hair-raising catches which 
undoubtedly robbed the champions of two more 
runs. Moses pitched a steady game, striking out 
12 men and allowing 5 hits. The D. U. team 
received last year's cup which was not presented 
as the schedule was interrupted by the war. Last 
year the D. U.'s virtually won it, being tied for 
first place with only weak teams to play. 



REPORT OF TRACK ACCOUNTS FOR 
SEASON 1917-1918. 



Receipts. 

A. S. B. C. Appropriation 

N. H. S. C. C. Guarantee 

B. A. A. Guarantee 

B. I. I. Meet 

Soph. -Freshman Meet 

Interclass Meet 

Meadowbrook Club Guarantee 

Outdoor Interscholastic Meet 

War Tax ( B. I. I. M.) 

War Tax (Soph. -Fresh.) Interclass. 



,100.00 
50 00 



Expenditares. 

Typewriter hire 

Telephone 

Coach '. 483 

N. E. I. C. A. A. Dues 5 

N. H. S. C. C. Trip S2 

N. E. I. C. A. A C. C. Meet no 

B. A. A. Games 157 

National Indoor Championship 50 

N. E. Intercollegiate 106 

Printing 144 

Dieges & Clust (prizes) 142 

Outdoor Interscholastic Meet 93 

Meadowbrook Club Meet 200 

Equipment 63 

Incidentals 20 

War Taxes 21 



?i,;'4i.64 



$10 



Cash 

Audited Jiuie 3, 1019. 



fi.7^S.i4 
13-50 



-$.,741.64 



P.^UL Nixon, Treasurer 



THE 1319 INTERCOLLEGIATE TRACK 
SEASON. 

Bowdoin has finished a track season this spring, 
which in some ways has been as successful as 
any in the history of the college. The only team 
that could possibly be considered better is the 
1915 aggregation. The team which won the 
championship of New England back in the 90's 
could not possibly beat the 1919 team with the 
records it made at that time. This year's team 
easily out-classes the 1915 men in the track 
events, but not in the field events. 

The season began rather inauspiciously when 
Bowdoin received defeat at the hands of New 
Hampshire College by a margin of 10 1-3 points. 
At a rally shortly before the Maine meet, Coach 
Magee stated that he had not groomed the team 
for that meet but that he was grooming the men 
so that they could beat Maine by the narrow 
margin of three or four points. The following- 
Saturday, the team went to Orono, completely 
upset ail the "dope," and more than justified 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Jack's statement by trimming' Maine by a matter 
of 37 points. In the very first event, Holbrook 
surprised everybody by winning in the fast time 
of 10 1-5 seconds, in spite of the soggy field and 
rainy afternoon. Next, in the 440, Savage came 
through and won a pretty race. Captain Cleaves 
took the half, and then Goodwin carried off both 
the mile and two-mile in masterly fashion, in the 
fastest time made by any college man this year 
previous to the New England meet. Bowdoin 
practically clinched the meet when the hurdlers 
took eighteen out of a possible eighteen in the 
two barrier races. Ellms, Caspar, Zeitler, Hig- 
gins, Allen, and Cook, picked up 22j4 points in 
the field events. Savage and Goodwin were the 
individual stars for Bowdoin with eleven and 
ten points, respectively, to their credit. The final 
score in this meet was Bowdoin 73, Maine ^6, 
and Bates 17. 

A week later Bowdoin scored nine points in 
the N. E. I. A. A. meet at Tech field. Had it not 
been for ill luck and more or less mismanage- 
ment of the meet, Kowdoin would probably have 
taken at least fifteen or twenty more points. In 
the high hurdles Savage appeared to be winning 
his trial easily when he happened to look over 
his shoulder and then fell over one of the bar- 
riers. In the low hurdles he came through and 
won handily, while Parent took fourth. If more 
time between the heats had been given the men, 
Thomson and Higgins would have undoubtedly 
figured in the point scoring. Captain Cleaves 
was unable to run in the half mile, where he 
would have certainly taken some points. The 
short time between the races proved the undoing 
of Goodwin in the two-mile. Twenty minutes 
after he had taken third in the mile he had to 
start his other long race. Nightingale of New 
Hampshire dropped out after a mile or so, and 
then Goodwin also had to stop. Ellms was the 
only Bowdoin man who placed in the weights. 

Bowdoin concluded its season at the Harvard 
Stadium, May 31, by scoring more points in 
the I. C. A. A. A. A. meet than it had ever taken 
before in these games in the history of the col- 
lege. Bowdoin was by far the smallest college 
which placed in this meet. The seven colleges 
which finished ahead of the White were Cornell, 
Pennsylvania, Michigan, Harvard, Dartmouth, 
Yale, and Princeton, all many times larger than 
Bowdoin. M. I. T. was beaten with ease ; a most 
pleasing result in view of Tech's victory in the 
New England meet. Bowdoin also defeated 
such institutions as Rutgers, Georgetown, La- 
fayette, Syracuse, and Columbia. 



Savage and Goodwin were the only runners 
competing for Bowdoin, but they managed to 
win nine points between them. Savage was run- 
ning at his ver^r best in the high hurdles. This 
race was won in the fast time of 15 1-5 seconds. 
Savage, finishing fourth, probably ran it in 15 3-5 
seconds, beating his old record of 15 4-5. In the 
semi-final of the low hurdles, he tied his New 
England record of 24 2-5 seconds. In the final, 
the Bowdoin star was just barely nosed out of 
second place by Watt of Cornell. Goodwin ran 
a magnificent race in the two-mile, finishing' sec- 
ond, ahead of such stars as Sedgwick of Michi- 
gan, Hutchinson of Harvard, Dudley of Yale, 
and Bolles of Dartmouth. To be sure Dresser 
of Cornell finished a long distance ahead of him, 
but the Ithacan captain broke the only record 
of the meet with a mark of 9 minutes 22 2-5 sec- 
onds, which is a full half minute faster than any 
Bowdoin record in the past. Goodwin clipped 
the record of H. J. Colbath by 15 4-5 seconds, 
with a time of 9 minutes 40 2-5 seconds. This 
mark is 15 3-5 seconds better than Goodwin's old 
record which he made when he won the national 
interscholastic championship in this race at New- 
ark, N. J. 

This season's record clearly reflects the value 
of Trainer Magee's excellent coaching system. 
When he came to Bowdoin six years ago, track 
was very unsuccessful here. Gradually improve- 
ments have been becoming more and more mani- 
fest, and finally this year Bowdoin track has 
been seen in a position more enviable in some 
ways than at any other time in the history of the 
college. 

In Savage, Bowdoin is losing an athlete this 
year who is known all over the country as one 
of the greatest hurdlers in the game. He is one 
of the joint holders of the world's record in the 
45-yard high hurdles, having a mark of six sec- 
onds flat, tie also holds the New England record 
in the 220-yard low hurdles. He unquestionably 
deserves the mark of appreciation which the stu- 
dent body conferred upon him last week. 

Bowdoin is also losing four other men who 
scored in the Maine meet: Higgins, Holbrook, 
Caspar, and Foulke. Next year Jack will have 
eleven point winners to build up a team around. 
These are Goodwin, whom the Boston Herald 
has picked to win the intercollegiate champion- 
ship in the two-mile. Captain Cleaves, Ellms, 
Thomson, Averill, Parent, Zeitler, Partridge, 
Allen, Cook, and Dostie. 



102 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Tuesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 

Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT AND ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 

Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 

Russell M. McGown, 1921 Exchange 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Kelson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 192 i 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Albert E. Hurrell, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 



Vol. XLIX. JUNE 23, 1919. 



No. 10 



Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
The Victory Commencement. 

What better name could have been chosen for 
this year's Commencement exercises ! Obviously 
this Commencement celebrates the triumph of 
the American and allied forces over the Central 
powers. But there is another significance which 
should be no less apparent. This Commence- 
ment celebrates the remarkable success of the 



college authorities and students in their de- 
termined effort to keep up the standards and 
ideals of the college in the face of discouraging 
war conditions. It celebrates the return of Bow- 
doin's brave sons from the strenuous labors of 
war to the less sensational but no less important 
pursuits of peace. Many of them are still in the 
service and many have not yet returned from 
overseas. Some will never return, having given 
their lives in devoted service. We mourn their 
loss, yet feel a sense of pride in them and will 
ever honor their names in memory. 

All, alumni and students, have done their part 
well. Those in active service have left enviable 
records behind them ; they have performed their 
exacting duties in war ungrudgingly and faith- 
fully, and now have returned to meet their old 
class-mates and renew the pleasant associations 
of college days. Praise is also due to those whose 
lot it was to remain in college. They did a great 
service in upholding the college ideals and in 
carrying on to the best of their ability the stu- 
dent activities of the college in the absence of 
those men who would ordinarily have been most 
prominent. 

There is no need of rehearsing the events of 
the past few years for they have been sufficiently 
emphasized in these columns in the past. Those 
times of doubt and anxiety are past and as such 
may be assigned to some future historian. All 
vestiges of the war period are quickly disappear- 
ing and most of the old students who left college 
to enter the service will be back next year. 

This is a remarkable Commencement in many 
respects. It is the first complete Commencement 
since 1916, complete in the sense that all the 
Seniors are present to graduate. It introduces 
a new feature in respect to time. Past Com- 
mencements have always come in the middle of 
the week, but this year's comes on a week-end. 
The idea of having a week-end Commencement 
is to be upheld on several grounds. First and 
foremost, it permits many alumni to be here who 
would otherwise be absent due to business 
exigencies. ' The arrangement would be especially 
favorable to class and fraternity reunions. In 
addition, a week-end Commencement makes it 
possible for a great many more graduates to stay 
over, a condition which should certainly be en- 
couraged. Some features of the Victory Com- 
mencement may of necessity be omitted in the 
future, but it is hoped that the. week-end feature 
will be retained. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



103 



The success of this Commencement presages a 
rejuvenated college spirit among the students and 
alumni. The war having been won, every un- 
dergraduate should return next fall with a quick- 
ened spirit to uphold Bowdoin's traditions in all 
fields of activitv. 



mitb tbe jFacuItp 

Professor Herbert C. Bell of Bowdoin College, 
sailed for England Tuesday, and will.be engaged 
this summer in the Public Record Office of Lon- 
don under the auspices of the Bureau of His- 
torical Research for the Carnegie Institution at 
Washington, collecting materials relating' to early 
American historj', particularly from the archives 
of the West Indian colonies. Mr. Bell will re- 
turn in order to resume his college duties at the 
opening of the fall term. 

At the Commencement at Bowdoin Col- 
lege, President Sills will announce among 
other donations made during the past academic 
year the gift of $1^500 from the Class of 1875 
to establish a fund for the College Library to be 
called the Class of 1875 Book Fund. By the 
terms of the gift the income of this fund is to be 
used for the purchase of books on American 
history, the words American history to be in- 
terpreted in their broadest sense. The books 
so purchased are to have the Class of 1875 book- 
plate placed inside the front covers. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



Whereas, In the death of James M. Boothby 
the Eta Charge of Theta Delta Chi has lost a 
true and faithful brother, and 

Whereas, The Eta Charge of Theta Delta Chi 
realizes that in his passing she has lost a son, 
loyal to his fraternity and his College, and 

Whereas, In the course of a long' service in 
the practise of medicine he showed himself up- 
right and distinguished in his profession, there- 
fore, be it 

Resoh'ed, That the members of Eta Charge 
deeply mourn the passing of one, so deeply be- 
loved by all who knew him, into the halls of 
Omega, that their heartfelt sense of bereavemer 
be extended to his family in their sorrow, and 
that they be assured of the inexpressible grief 
of the Eta Charge at the loss of one who was 
bound to it by the closest ties of friendship, and 
be it further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be entered 
upon the records of the Eta Charge, that a copy 



be sent to his bereaved family, to the Grand 
Lodge, to each Sister Charge, and to The Shield 
of Theta Delta Chi. 

For Eta Charge, 

NoRAfAN William Haines. 

Ralph Emmons Battison. 



u 



our6 m 



i. 9^ ^oAe// ¥ S^vn 



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Vol. XLIX. No. 11 



OCTOBER 7, 1919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



CONTENTS 






PAGE 




PAGE 




First Chapel 105 

Freshman Reception 106 

Bowdoin Loses to Amherst by 

Small Score 106 


An Important Addition to the Col- ' 
lections at the Walker Art Build- 
ing 109 

Proclamation Night 109 




Bowdoin Second 14, Westbrook 


Nomination for Managers 


110 




Seminary 106 


Taft and Walpole Coming 


110 




Bowdoin Gives Brown Good Fight 106 


Union Board Meeting 


110 




Second Team Loses to Thornton 107 


Freshman Conferences 


110 




Faculty Behind the League 107 


On the Campus 


110 




Student Council Meetings 107 


With the Faculty 


111 




Freshmen Elect Officers 107 


With the Other Colleges 


111 




Editorials : 


Alumni Notes 


111 




Welcome 108 


Resolutions 


113 




Student Activities 108 









BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Back Here" know JUD is in the game. 


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BOWDOIN ORIENT 



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BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK. MAINE, OCTOBER 7. 1919 



NO. 11 



FIRST CHAPEL. 

On Thursday, September 25, 1919, Bowdoin 
College began its one hundred and eighteenth 
year. President Sills addressed the student body 
at the first chapel. He spoke in part as follows: 

"The college opens this morning for the one 
hundred and eighteenth year and there is every 
indication that we are entering on an unusually 
happy term. The college, like the country, has 
emerged from the last two years of strife and 
chaos stronger and more desirious than ever to 
render service. We are back on the civilian 
basis with the energies and the facilities of the 
college unimpaired, but we are all aware that it 
is a new era on, which we are entering, that we 
must constantly look ahead and never refer to 
going back to the old normal condition. During 
the past year the Faculty has made several im- 
portant provisions to render more effective the 
kind of training that is given here. Chief among 
them are the compulsory athletics for all Fresh- 
men during the fall term, and general examina- 
tions in major subjects, which will go into effect 
with the present junior class. 

"On the Faculty there are a few changes to 
announce. It is with great pleasure that we wel- 
come back the men who have been in the service. 
We ought not to forget that, while the war was 
on, eleven members from the Faculty of thirty 
were in the service. 

"Whenever we return for the fall term and 
find that things are in such good order, we are 
aware that we are indebted to many people who 
labored on during the summer. While the Dean 
and I were on our vacations the college office 
was most efficiently managed, and particular 
thanks are due to Professors Ham and Mitchell. 

"The committee on buildings and grounds has 
spent a great deal of time and effort in having 
the physical side of the college cared for. I have 
never seen the college buildings in such good 
shape. This leads me to ask your co-operation 
in one very important matter. Today when the 
college spends so very much of the income of 
its endowment on keeping the buildings and 
grounds in good condition, failure to observe the 
rules that would be enforced, say in hotels and 
apartment houses, would bring a great deal of 



financial obligation on the college which it is not 
right to assume. I am therefore asking you all 
to be very careful in the way you treat the col- 
lege property, particularly the dormitories. 

"It is a fine thing to welcome back so many 
of the former members of the classes of 1918 and 
1919 who are returning to complete the work for 
their degree. Some of these men are returning 
at no small sacrifice; but are confident that it 
is well worth their time to complete their college 
course and write Bowdoin A.B. after their names. 
In the senior class we all greatly miss the pres- 
ence of one of the best men in the class, and 
one of the leaders of college life, Tracy S. Wood, 
whose tragic death in the summer we all mourn. 

"The college is of necessity so closely in touch 
with all the movements of society and of the 
state that each year it must emphasize a differ- 
ent phase of living. The situation in which we 
find ourselves today calls emphatically for a re- 
turn to the old-time virtues of thrift and industry 
and frugality combined with the new virtue of 
co-operation. We cannot expect as a nation to 
make good all the ravages of war unless we are 
willing to bend to the task and work hard. There 
can be, of course, no cure for all our industrial 
restlessness in hard work alone. We must put 
into effect the principles of co-operation between 
capital and labor. Now the college can perhaps 
teach better than can elsewhere be taught these 
two lessons of hard work and co-operation. You 
get the first in your studies and in the high 
standards which this college has always stood 
for and always will stand for. You get the co- 
operation in all the social and athletic activities 
of college life. 

"And the college also effectively presents the 
principles of democracy. The strike of the 
police in Boston is in reality a blow at the funda- 
mental principles of the American governi^ent, 
and it is a fine thing to remember that two of 
the men who have stood most firmly for those 
principles have been graduates of the small col- 
lege. Governor Coolidge of Massachusetts is an 
Amherst man, and Police Commissioner E. U. 
Curtis is one of our graduates and at present a 
trustee of the college. If you can be trained here 
in the fundamentals of American citizenship so 



106 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



well that if when you are put to the test you 
can meet the issue with the some firmness and 
moderation with which those two men have met 
their test, the college will be proud of you." 



THE FRESHMAN RECEPTION. 

On Friday evening, September twenty-fifth, a 
reception was given the Class of 1923 in the 
Union under the auspices of the Y. M. C. A. At- 
tractive programs on which it was intended that 
each one should write his name for identification 
were given out. The first speaker was Professor 
Mitchell who represented the faculty. He spoke 
briefly in welcome, and was followed by Emerson 
W. Zeitler '20. Mr. Zeitler gave a little adv'cc 
to the Freshman and wished them success in- 
dividually and as a class. He regretted the fact 
that on account of printer's strikes the custom- 
ary Freshman Bibles had not been procured in 
time for the reception. Next President Sills in 
behalf of the college as a whole addressed the 
Freshmen. His remarks were much appreciated. 
Russel M. McGown '21, general secretary of 
the Y. M. C. A., told a few of the aims of the 
"Y." He urged the Freshmen to co-operate 
with him and the leaders of other branches of 
college life. The last speaker was Rev. T. E. 
Ashby who extended a welcome from all the 
churches of Brunswick. The program furnished 
with the singing of Bozvdoin Beata. 

After the exercises were completed an informal 
reception was enjoyed. Ice cream and fancy 
crackers were served. The whole affair was a 
success in every way, not only because it helped 
the Freshmen to become better acquainted with 
each other and with the spirit of Old Bowdoin, 
but also because it brought together again so 
many undergraduates who have returned to Bow- 
doin after one or more years in the service. 



BOWDOIN LOSES TO AMHERST BY SMALL 
SCORE. 

In a close game, which was not decided until 
the last quarter, Amherst won from Bowdoin 
by the margin of a single field goal. The Bow- 
doin team tackled well, making the Amherst 
backs fumble the ball several times, but the 
eleven seemed to lack the punch and fight to 
put over a score. Twice Amherst pushed the 
ball down to Bowdoin's S-yard line, only to lose 
it both times on downs. Sprague and Rhoads 
both put up a fine game for Bowdoin. Dostie, 
who was not sent into the contest until the last 
few minutes of play, did some fine work. After 
Zink, the Amherst quarterback, had kicked the 



winning goal, Dostie received the kick-off and 
ran it back to midfield. Immediately after that 
a forward pass, Dostie to Dahlgren, advanced 
the ball to Amherst's 18-yard line. This was 
Bowdoin's best chance to score, but the ball was 
lost on downs when four forward passes were 
broken up. Amherst started back down the field 
again, but was stopped when J. Smith inter- 
cepted a forward pass. 

The summary : 

AMHERST— —BOWDOIN 

Davison, le re., Dahlgren 

Vail, It rt., Brewster 

Reusswig, Ig rg., Dudgeon 

Olsen, Palmer, c c, McCurdy 

Carney, rg Ig., Kern, A. Smith 

Clark, Cummings, rt It., Rhoads 

Brisk, Wing, re le., James, Woodbury 

Zink, qb qb., Crockett 

Phillips, Ihb rhb., Sprague, Dostie 

Card, rhb Ihb., Keeney, Curtis 

Demarest, fb fb.. Peacock, J. Smith 

Score : Amherst 3. Goal from field, Zink. Referee, 
Keegan. Head Linesman, Swaffield. Umpire, Morse. 
Time, four 1 1 minute periods. 



BOWDOIN SECOND 14, 

WESTBROOK SEMINARY 

A week ago Saturday, the Bowdoin Second 
team defeated Westbrook Seminary in a very 
interesting game of football on Whittier Field. 
The playing of no particular individual seemed 
to stand out very prominently at any part of the 
contest. Both lines were very weak, and the 
backfields were nothing extraordinary. All the 
scoring was done on straight old-fashioned foot- 
ball. Doherty and Richan each crossed the line 
for a touchdown, and Mason kicked both goals. 
Following is the summary : 
BOWDOIN— —WESTBROOK SEMINARY 

Houston, le re., L. Whitney 

Mason, It rt., Redmond, Skillin 

Smith, Ig rg., McDade, J. Whitney 

Safford, c c, Clark, Wolf 

Wetherell, rg Ig., Dimon, Clark 

Merrill, rt rt., Averill, Stockford 

Thomson, re le, Winsor, Burnell 

Richan, qb qb., Flaherty 

Haggerty, Ihb rhb., Redman 

Granger, Davies, rhb Ihb., Davis 

Doherty, Meacham, fb fb., Burton 

Score: Bowdoin Second 14. Touchdowns, Doherty, 
Richan. Goals from touchdown, Mason 2. Referee, La- 
Casce '14. Umpire, Parent '21. Head linesman, Mc- 
Clave '19. Time, four 10 minute periods. 



BOWDOIN GIVES BROWN A GOOD FIGHT. 

Bowdoin's eleven gave Brown the surprise of 
the season Saturday, when the Brunonians, con- 
fident of an overwhelming victory came through 
with but a 7-0 win. The power of the White 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



107 



line was thrice demonstrated in the first half, 
when the Rhode Island college pushed the pig- 
skin to the lo-yard line, there to lose it on downs. 
Several times Bowdoin gained the ball on downs. 

Although not so strong out of the dang'cr zone, 
the Bowdoin liney never failed when play neared 
its goal line. Even as the home team's line was 
strong, so did the Bruins offer a stonewall de- 
fense. 

In the third quarter after several punts had 
been exchanged. Brown had the ball on Bow- 
doin's 30-yard line. From there it was rushed 
over the line by Jemail, after he and Armstrong 
had worked it to the three-yard line. Armstrong- 
kicked the goal. In the last period, the Bear 
threatened another score as she worked the 
spheroid to the 12-yard line. The summary: 

BROWN— —BOWDOIN 

Williams, le.' le., Thompson 

Shurtleff, It It.. Rhoads 

Doody, Ig Ig., Brewster 

Hoving, c . . . , c, McCurdy 

Nichols, rg rg., Dudgeon 

Johnstone, rt -. rt., Smith 

Albright, re re , Drummond 

Samson, pb . . qb.. Crockett 

Brooks, Ihb Ihb.. Peacock 

Jemail, rhb rhb , Dahlgren 

Armstrong, f b f b., Sprague 

Score — Brown 7. Eowdoin o. Touchdown, Jemail. 
Goal from touchdown, Armstrong. Officials, Referee 
Hallahan, Boston : umpire. Noble, Amherst ; head lines- 
man, Sullivan, Syracuse. Substitutions, Herriot for 
Brooks, Brooks for Herriot, Sinclair for Shurtleff, 
Lathrop for Doody. Brace for Hoving, Gulian for 
Johnstone, Coulter for Samson, Crowther for Coulter, 
Shupert for Brooks, Moody for Shupert, Emery for 
Moody, Murphy for Emery, Faulkner for Jemail : Eow- 
doin, James for Drummond. Woodbury for James, 
Dostie for Peacock, Curtis for Sprague. Time, two 
12 and two 10 minute periods. 



SECOND TEAM LOSES TO THORNTON. 

Meeting with a reverse, the Bowdoin second 
team was defeated 12-0 by the Thornton 
Academy eleven Saturday afternoon at Saco. 
Mahaney, a veteran of the A. E. F., did the scor- 
ing for the prep school boys. Both teams were 
shaky in the first half but in the closing periods 
the Academy team found itself and tallied twice. 
A muddy field made fumbles frequent and foot- 
ing slippery. The summary : 

THORNTON— —BOWDOIN SECONDS 

Vinton, le re.. Miller 

Sawyer, It rt . Mason 

Shields, Ig rg., Haggerty 

Ferguson, c c. Safford 

Palmer, rg Ig., Witherell 

Hanson, rt It., Priest 

Burnham, re le., Merrill 

Cole, qb qb., Richan 

Paraday , Ihb rhb., Doherty 



Walker, rhb Ihb, Granger 

Mahaney, fb fb., Davis 

Score, Thornton 12, Bowdoin Second 0. Touchdowns, 
Mahaney 2. Substitutes, Thornton, Sicard for Cole, 
Cole for Paraday. Referee, Leatherbarrow. Umpire, 
Burns. Linesmen, Chesley. Time, four 10 minute 
periods. 



FACULTY BEHIND THE LEAGUE. 

The members of the Faculty of Bowdoin Col- 
lege sent telegrams on October 2, 1919, to Sena- 
tors Bert N. Fernald and Frederick Hale urging 
immediate ratification of the treaty of peace. 

The telegrams were worded as follows : "The 
undersigned members of the Faculty of Bowdoin 
College respectfully urge the immediate ratifi- 
cation of the Treaty of Peace without amend- 
ments and with only such necessary interpretive 
reservations as will clearly not require recom- 
mitting the Treaty to the Peace Conference. 

Signed — ^Charles C. Hutchins, Frank E. Wood- 
rufif, President Kenneth C. M. Sills, Manton 
Copeland, William A. Moody, Paul Nixon, Fred- 
erick W. Brown, Charles T. Burnett, Wilmot B. 
Mitchell, Noel Little, George R. Elliott, Roscoe 
J. Ham, Warren B. Catlin, Edward H. Wa---. 
Gerald G. Wilder, Thomas C. Van Cleve, Philip 
W. Merserve, Frederick S. Nowlan, William H. 
Davis, Hubert K. Stone, Daniel C. Stanwood. 



STUDENT COUNCIL MEETINGS. 

The Student Council has met three times in 
the past two weeks. Matters of minor and major 
importance were discussed at these meetings. 
"Proc" night was a subject which involved quite 
a bit of discussion. 

Fraternity initiations will be held the night of 
October 15. The following day, October 16, will 
be a half holiday. 

The Senior members of the Student Council 
this year are: President, E. W. Zeitler, P. W. 
Smith, L. W. Brown, W. M. Cook, R. E. Cleaves, 
E. H. Films, A. O. Dostie, R. K. McWilliams, 
P. V. Mason, and A. L. Richan. The junior 
members are P. R. Lovell and S. C. Buker. 



FRESHMEN ELECT OFFICERS. 

On Saturday, September 27, 1919, the Class of 
1923 held its first meeting in Memorial Hall at 
one o'clock. Zeitler '20, president of the Student 
Council called the meeting to order and served 
as chairman until the president was elected. The 
following men were chosen : President, M. P. 
Chandler: vice-president, Harry Keanie ; secre- 
tary, Clifford Small ; treasurer, W. M. Chandler. 
Fames was elected baseball manager, and Orcutt 
football manager. 



108 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Tuesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 
Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 

Acting Managing Editor 
department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Ronald L. McCormack, 1922 Exchange 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
Ronald B. Wadsworth, 1920 
John L. Berry, 192 i 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 192 i 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Allen W. Hall, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 



Vol. XLIX. OCTOBER 7, 1919. 



No. II 



characterized it back in those days. There have 
been changes, to be sure, but we hope that they 
have been for the better. We heartily welcome 
those men who are new to Bowdoin this year. 
They have honored Bowdoin by choosing her 
from all other colleges as their home for four 
years. They expect much of her but the college, 
in turn, expects much of them. They expect the 
best kind of intellectual training, but to secure 
that they must give their best. The order of the 
year for all of us is hard work. 

Bowdoin has many traditions, some of which 
have suffered during the war, but now should 
be revived. These traditions have been care- 
fully listed in the 1919 Bugle and it will pay 
every new man to read them if he can get the 
opportunity. Progressiveness may demand that 
certain of these customs be modified or discon- 
tinued or that new customs be introduced. In 
either case, we must proceed with the fixed idea 
of making student life more beneficial to the 
individual student and to the college. In con- 
nection with this we are led again to state the 
mission of the Orient. The Orient purposes to 
be the mouth-piece of the student body ; it wel- 
comes all signed communications with the object 
of formulating student opinion on questions af- 
fecting life. A vigorous student life demand^; 
that every student enter energetically into it and 
assume an active interest in questions affecting it. 



Entered at Po3t Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 



Welcome ! 

It is indeed a great pleasure to welcome back 
to college so many former members of the 
Classes of 1918, 1919 and 1920 who left in the 
spring of 1917 or shortly thereafter to enter the 
service of our country. We hope that they find 
college life in the same healthy condition which 



Student Activities. 

To the man who enters college for his first 
year the question is bound to present itself: — 
"What part shall I take in student- activities?" 
The right solution of this question is of the most 
vital importance to every Freshman. Undoubted- 
ly of the greatest importance is scholarship for 
the continued presence of a man in college is de- 
pendent on it as well as his ability to represent 
the college in any line of Activity. Important as 
scholarship may be, few students can afford to 
devote their energies to it alone. There is a 
training outside of book learning which is of 
the most vital importance to the college man, — 
the training secured on the athletic field, in the 
managerial positions, on-the Orient and Quill 
Boards, and the maiiy other student organiz- 
ations. 

The average Freshman will highly benefit him- 
self if he ent-ers at once into one or more forms 
of student activity. The system of compulsory 
athletics for Freshmen makes it unnecessary to 
urge the importance of entering this field. There 
remains the competition for assistant managers. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



109 



Freshmen members of the Orient Board, debat- 
ing teams, musical clubs. Masque and Gown, and 
college band, to mention some of the most im- 
portant activities. Every Freshman should get 
into the field at once with the idea of getting his 
share of the college honors during his four years, 
not for the sake of the honor alone, but for the 
training which is invaluable to every college 
man. 



AN IMPORTANT ADDITION TO THE COL- 
LECTIONS OF THE WALKER 
ART BUILDING. 

The Bowdoin Museum of Fine Arts has re- 
cently been enriched by seven excellent water 
colors by Winslow Homer, lent by Mrs. Charles 
Homer, widow of the artist's brother. The 
paintings were carefully brought from the 
artist's studio and from the home of Mrs. 
Charles Homer at Prout's Neck, by President 
Sills, Professor W. W. Lawrence '98 of Columbia 
University, and Professor Cram, who motored 
to Prout's Neck for them on Saturday, Septem- 
ber 13th. The pictures are at present exhibited 
in the east end of the Bowdoin Gallery — the two 
large ones, a scene at Prout's Neck and "Tyne- 
mouth," on easels, and two small Gloucester 
scenes, a rare wood scene, "Jamaica Palms," and 
"An Adirondack Guide," on the railing against 
the wall. 

The museum is indebted to distinguished gradu- 
ates of the college, friends of Mrs. Homer, for 
this very valuable loan. Through therh, Mrs. 
Homer visited the museum during the summer 
and expressed her pleasure in placing the pic- 
tures in the Walker Art Building. 

Winslow Homer was pre-eminently an Ameri- 
can painter — perhaps the m('.st individual of all 
American painters. Foreign critics have been 
conscious of a fresh note in his pictures, not 
traceable to European influence. They have 
recognized the independent vision, the strong 
straightforward treatment so characteristic of 
Homer's pictures. 

Mr. Homer was prolific in oil, in water color, 
and in black-and-white, but he often said that if 
he had posthumous fame it would be for his 
v^'ater colors. The recent sale of his "Coast in 
Winter" for $33,000, one of the highest prices 
ever paid for a modern American painting, 
speaks for his fame today. His greatest in- 
spiration was the sea and the rugged New Eng- 
land coast. In his scenes we find Gloucester, 
English fisher girls set in important landscape 
surroundings, Florida, the West Indies, Canada, 



and the Maine coast. From the last he has given 
us the best work of his life. 

For this opportunity to study in a variety of 
scenes, the great American artist, Winslow 
Homer, the college, the people of Brunswick, 
and thousands of annual visitors to the Bow- 
doin Museum have reason to be profoundly 
grateful to Mrs. Charles Homer whose largeness 
of vision and generosity of spirit are giving this 
direct aid to our college museum in its influence 
upon art in this section of the country. 



PROCLAMATION NIGHT. 

Friday, October 3, was the traditional Proc- 
lamation Night. Although Warning Night was 
cancelled at the last minute the Sophomores saw 
to it that the Class of 1923 did not enter Bow- 
doin uninitiated. The Freshmen were on hand 
at the Gym at seven o'clock, clad, as they had 
been commanded, in pajamas. A line was 
formed and under the guard of 1922 the Fresh- 
men marched to town. An impromptu brass 
band led the parade under the able direction of 
President Chandler of the Freshman class. In 
the middle of Maine street the Freshmen were 
commanded to kneel and pray while the band 
played "Nearer My God to Thee." Here there 
was some attempt on the part of upper classmen 
to break up the parade and to incite the Fresh- 
men to revolt, but the Class of 1923 wisely re- 
mained submissive. 

When at last the parade had again reached 
the Gym the Freshies were all stripped and pasted 
with flaring mammoth red proclamations. These 
posters bore the usual advice and orders for the 
Freshman expressed in unintelligent words and 
phrases. Next the class, again clothed, were 
conducted to the Athletic Building where_ the 
proclamation was read by two enterprising 
Freshies. A pie-throwing contest was staged 
with Merrill '22 as hawker and auctioneer. Some 
of the Freshies resembled comedians in the 
movies as they dug the goo-ey custard from their 
c"es and hair. 

Then as a final touch the gauntlet was formed 
and the paddles were busy for some time. For 
several hours after the proceedings in the Gym 
the air was filled with excitement and rumors 
of abductions. Several of the Freshman and 
Sophmore baseball players were missing for a 
time, but the kidnapping accomplished little. 
Much to the chagrin of the Sophmores an im- 
mense "1923" blazoned forth the glory of its 
class from the top of the observatory the next 
morning. 



110 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



NOMINATIONS FOR MANAGERS. 

At a meeting of the Athletic Council held on 
Wednesday, October i, the following men were 
nominated for the elections which take place on 
Tuesday afternoon, October 7: 

Candidates for football manager, Whitney '20, 
McPartland '20. 

Candidates for assistant track manager, Mc- 
Gorrill '22, Alexander '22. 

Candidates for assistant baseball manager, 
Ridley '22, Vose '22. 

It is necessary to elect a football manager be- 
cause of the vacancy created by the death of 
Tracy S. Wood '20. 



TAFT AND WALPOLE COMING. 

It is understood that Hugh Walpole, the Eng- 
lish novelist, and ex-President William H. Taft 
are to lecture at Bowdoin during the corning 
winter under the Annie Talbot Cole Lectureship. 
Hugh Walpole will be here November 22 ; the 
■date of Taft's lecture has not been set as yet. 
The Bowdoin men are certainly fortunate in 
having the opportunity of hearing two such re- 
markable men. They will doubtless both bring 
"valuable messages. 



UNION BOARD MEETING. 

The Union Board met Monday afternoon, Sep- 
tember 29, to discuss business for the coming 
year. 

A large number of applications for positions 
as union attendants were filed. 

The following men were chosen as regular at- 
tendants : Simpson '22, Gaffney '21, Congdon 
'22, Welch '22, and Thayer '22. The alternates 
are Thompson '22, Putnam '22, and Benton '21. 

It was also decided to purchase two new 
records each month for the Victrola at the 
Union. 

A fairer system of using the pool and billard 
tables will also be in effect this year. In the 
past it was possible for one man to play all 
afternoon and thus deprive the other fellow of 
his chance. In the future the time for individual 
playing will be limited so that all may have an 
equal opportunity. 

For the present at least, the Union will be 
closed on Sundays, for it has been deemed in- 
advisable to remain open seven days a week. 



will be helpful for the men just entering Bow- 
doin. 

President Sills himself addressed the class in 
the first conference. He explained some of the 
college rules and gave some very helpful advice. 
Rev. T. E. Ashby was the speaker at the second. 
He took for his topic "Reasons for a College 
Course." His talk was much appreciated. 

These conferences are held in Memorial Hall 
at one o'clock several times a week. 



FRESHMAN CONFERENCES. 

This year President Sills has inaugurated a 
series of conferences for the Freshman class. 
In these he plans to arrange brief talks which 



2Dn tbE Campus 

Adjourns were given all day Saturday last fol- 
lowing "Proc" Night Friday evening. 

Up to last Saturday 451 men were enrolled 
in the college for this year. This breaks the 
record for total enrolment in a normal year. 
Several men, however, from the 1917-18 classes 
are in college for one semester to complete their 
academic work which they missed while in the 
service. 

The Bowdoin second team will play Hebron 
football eleven at Hebron next Saturday. It is 
expected that Hebron will play a fast game with 
such excellent material as in the Big Green 
school this year. 

Brown '20, manager of the Bowdoin track 
team last year and secretary of the Maine In- 
tercollegiate track association, attended a meet- 
ing of the association last Saturday at the Elm- 
wood Hotel, Waterville, to lay plans for the 
cross country meet this fall. 

Eighteen football men beside Coach Greene, 
Trainer Magee and Assistant Manager Willson 
'20 made the trip to Providence, R. I., last Fri- 
day to play Brown Saturday afternoon. Follow- 
ing are the men : Captain Rhoades '20, Peacock 
'20, Brewster (M), McCurdy '22, Dudgeon '21, 
Smith '23, Thomson '21, Crockett '20, Sprague 
'20, Dahlgren '22, Drummond '20, Curtis '20, 
Dostie '20, James '22, Woodbury '22, Haines '21, 
Gupital '21, Clifford '21. 

It is reported that the annual Maine Cross 
Country race will take place at Waterville No- 
vember I in connection with the Maine-Colby 
football game on that date. 

The Bowdoin football team plays Holy Cross 
this coming Saturday at Worcester. The team 
will leave Friday. Coach Greene will probably 
take 18 men. 

The date for the annual initiation of new men 
into the fraternities has been set by the Student 
Council as Wednesday evening, October 15. Ad- 
journs will be given the following morning. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The cross country squad went on a hare and 
hound chase Monday afternoon as part of the 
training for the coming fall meet. 

Rev. T. E. Ashby conducted Chapel Septem- 
ber 30th. 

The Class of 1923 held a meeting October 3 
in Memorial Hall to discuss matters pertaining 
to the flag rush. 

Donald McDonald '19 was 011 the Campus for 
a day or two the first of last week. 

The Y. M. C. A. Employment Eurcau is ready 
to find outside work for students. Applicants 
should give their names to McGown '21, 15 South 
Maine Hall. 



nors, one of the best backfield men the team ever 
had. 



mitb tt)e jFacuItp 

In the Nation of August 23rd, there appeared 
an article by Dr. Whittier in appreciation of 
Dudley Allen Sargent '75, who resigned his po- 
sition as director of the Hemenway Gymnasium 
at Harvard last spring. In the following week's 
issue of the same ]5eriodical, Professor Elliott 
contributed a critical review of John Livingston 
Lowes's "Convention and Revolt in Poetry." 

President Sills published an important essay 
on "The Future of the Small Endowed College 
of Liberal Arts" to the Nezv York Sun for 
August 31st. 



m\i\\ tfte ©tfter Colleges 

Oberlin Review : Glee club has organized with 
a membership of twenty-six. Dupont fellowship 
in chemistry, awarded to a member of the 1919 
class wins high honor for Oberlin. 

Brown Daily Herald: Many Brown men in 
line to welcome Cardinal Mercier. Musical 
clubs make extensive plans for the coming sea- 
son, expecting to take in New York City, New 
Jersey, Maryland and the Southern states on 
their last trip. 

The Amherst Student : Professor Loomis re- 
turns from Nebraska with many specimens, in- 
cluding that of the Niocene horse, found while 
doing geological research work. 

New Hampshire College : A week ago Thurs- 
day the annual "Minstrel Show" took place. This 
event corresponds to the Bowdoin Proclamation 
Night. One marked difference between these two 
ceremonies is the fact that the freshmen are 
obliged to walk instead of run through the line 
of sophomores. A week ago Saturday, the foot- 
ball team defeated the Connecticut Aggies 13 to 
o. Last week New Hampshire's team was great- 
ly strengthened by the return to college of Con- 



aiumni Jl3otes 



The Orient desires to be 01 the greatest possi- 
ble service to Alumni in keeping them informed 
of one another's activities. Alumni are earnestly 
requested to support the Orient in this work 
by sending items about themselves or their 
brother Alumni. 



'73 — Several weeks after college closed last 
spring, notice of the death of Dr. James Mc- 
Lellan Boothby was received at the library. He 
died at Benton Harbor, Michigan, May 29, 1919. 
He was born at Newfield, Maine, December 7, 
1851. After graduating from Bowdoin he studied 
three years at the Detroit College of Medicine, 
from which he graduated in 1876. The follow- 
ing year he became a practising physician at 
Dubuque, Iowa, where he remained until shortly 
before his death. 

'7:^ — Professor Albert F. Richardson, principal 
of the State Normal School at Castine, resigned 
his position not long ago, but his resignation is 
not to go into effect until the end of the present 
school year. Professor Richardson has held his 
principalship for thirty-one years, and he is 
recognized as one of the foremost educators in 
New England. 

'75 — Horace Roger True died at Buffalo about 
the first of August. He was born at Litchfield, 
Maine, May 21, 185 1. Three years after his 
graduation, he received the degree of Master of 
Arts from Bowdoin. From 1877 until 1891 he 
was an instructor in a number of Maine second- 
ary schools, the last of which was Cony High 
School at Augusta. Mr. True was accomplished 
on the piano, organ, and all the stringed instru- 
ments. He was likewise skilled as a pho- 
tographer. At one time he served as a guide in 
the country around Greenville, Maine, and mean- 
while became a taxidermist of some note. 

'75 — Mr. William J. Curtis will be associated 
as counsel with Winfred T. Denison and James 
F. Curtis, who have established a partnership for 
the general practice of law in New York City. 

Medic '79 — Dr. Myron Lawrence Marr, for 
twenty-two years a practising physician in Dor- 
chester, Mass., died Tuesday, May 20, 1919, at a 
hospital in New York where he had stopped for 
an operation while en route from the South. 
Dr. Marr was born at Alna, Maine, February 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



23, 1852. He spent considerable time in re- 
search work in hospitals both in this country and 
abroad, after he had graduated from the Medi- 
cal School. He< practised in Athens, Maine, un- 
til 1888, and then in Skowhegan until 1897. After 
that he went to Boston. Dr. Marr was a mem- 
ber of the American Medical Association, Massa- 
chusetts Medical Society, and president of the 
New England Association in Florida. 

Ex-'82 — John Washburn, president of the 
Washburn-Crosby Flour Mills Company of 
Minneapolis, died suddenly on Thursday, Sep- 
tember 25, at Livermore Falls, Maine. He was 
born August i, 1858, at Hallowell, Maine. After 
leaving college he started business as a flour 
manufacturer in Minneapolis, and finally became 
president of the important concern mentioned 
above. He was also a director of several Minne- 
apolis banks and trust companies, and of the 
Chicago Great Western Railway. Formerly he 
was president of the Minneapolis Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Medic '91 — Colonel Clement C. Whitcomb was 
made a member of the Legion of Honor by 
General Petain at Tours, April 9, 1919. He has 
been connected with the Medical Corps since 
1900. He was made a captain in 1906, and later 
rose to the rank of Colonel. 

'92 — Rev. John M. Wathen, pastor of the High- 
land Congregational Church at Somerville, Mass., 
has become pastor of the Globe Congregational 
Church at Woonsocket, R. I., where he preached 
his first sermon a week ago Sunday. He gradu- 
ated from the Bangor Theological Seminary in 
1890, and after completing his work at Bowdoin 
went to Harvard, where he received the degree 
of Master of Arts in 1893. From 1893 to 1899 
he was pastor at Lisbon, N. H., and for the next 
ten years at Claremont, N. H. In 1909 he re- 
ceived a call to Biddeford, Maine, and later an- 
other to Somerville. While at Bowdoin he be- 
came a member of the Phi Beta Kappa fra- 
ternity. 

'07 — Seth G. Haley, for seven years principal 
of the Collinsville (Conn.) High School, has 
been appointed principal of West Haven (Conn.) 
High School for this year. It is a comparatively 
large school, having about four hundred pupils 
and fourteen assistant teachers. Mr. Haley was 
principal of the Collinsville school from 1908 to 
1915. During the next two years he taught in 
East Hartford, Conn., and in Munson, Mass. 
After the United States entered the war, Mr. 
Haley was one of, the first Y. M. C. A. secre- 
taries to go overseas. He was in France about 



a year, and at one time was under heavy shell 
fire. He returned to this country shortly before 
the armistice. 

'07 — Among the new appointments to its 
faculty which were announced by the adminis- 
tration of Dartmouth College last June was the 
selection of William A. Robinson as a new pro- 
fessor in political science. He is a former gradu- 
ate student of the LTniversity of Wisconsin and 
Yale. 

Ex-'o7 — The death of one of the most popular 
men of his class, Harold Sprague Hichborn, oc- 
curred May 29, at Augusta. He had not en- 
joyed good health since leaving college, but had 
nevertheless been successful in business. At the 
time of his last illness he was a member of the 
bond firm of Liggett, Hichborn and Company in 
New York. He was a member of the Delta 
Kappa Epsilon fraternity. 

'10 — Harlan Frank Hansen of Portland died at 
East Parsonsfield May 17, 1919, after an illness 
of about two months. He was born in Portland, 
June 26, 1884. After his graduation, he went to 
New York City and accepted a position in the 
general offices of the New York Telephone Com- 
pany in the publicity and advertising department, 
where he was very successful and gained many 
promotions. In 1917 he went into the same kind 
of work at the Chicago office of the American 
Bell Telephone Company. At the time he was 
taken ill, he was a traveling representative of 
the West Disinfecting Company of Chicago. He 
was a member of the Theta Delta Chi fraternity. 

'12 — Francis E. Harrington, who has been sup- 
erintendent of schools in Woodstock and Thomp- 
son, Conn., has been appointed inspector of iiigh 
schools in that state, and entered upon his new 
duties last Wednesday, with headquarters at 
Hartford. Mr. Harrington has held his position 
as superintendent for two years, and his success 
with a difficult district has been the chief factor 
in his promotion. 

'13 — In the early part of July, Mr. and Mrs. 
Oscar M. Chandler of Belmont, Mass., announced 
the engagement of their daughter, Marie, to 
Loring Pratt of Newark, N. J. At present Mr. 
Pratt is connected with the General Electric 
Company in the advertising department of the 
Edison Lamp Works at Harrison, N. J. He is a 
member of the Psi Upsilon fraternity. 

'13 — Paul H. Douglass has been elected as- 
sociate professor of economics at the University 
of Washington, Seattle. 

'13 — Miss Susan MqEvoy of Lowell, Mass., 
and Captain Philip Shaw Wood of Bar Harbor 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



113 



were married at Cutler, Maine, August 30, 1919. 
Captain Wood served in the war for nearly a 
year in France, in the Eleventh Infantry, Fifth 
Division. Since his return to this country he has 
been stationed at Camp Devens. After the wed- 
ding reception, Captain Wood and his bride left 
on an automobile journey through Maine and 
the White Mountains, after which they went to 
Ayer, Mass., for the remainder of Captain 
Wood's period of service with the army. 

'14 — Myles Standish, Jr., of Boston, and Miss 
Hester Leavenworth Trumbull of Litchfield, 
Conn., were married recently at Litchfield. Mr. 
Standish has been in a Boston banking' firm since 
his return last May from service in France. 

'16 — George E. Beal, formerly of the New 
Gloucester High School has been appointed a 
sub-master for this present school year at South 
Portland High School. 

'i6-'i9 — Allan J. Ginty '16, Laurence J. Hart 
'16, M. R. Grover '19, and A. R. Caspar '19 are 
taking the app'renticeship course of one year in 
the Bureau of Economy of the Great Northern 
Paper Company at Millinocket, Maine. 

'18 — Timothy R. Stearns '18, was married to 
Miss Margaret Hinds of Portland last week. 
They will reside in Waltham, Mass. 

'19 — Miss Ruth Isabell of Hartford, Conn., and 
Raymond Lang of Dorchester, Mass., were mar- 
ried in Trinity Church, Boston, the tenth of this 
month. 

•'19 — Howe S. Newell has been appointed as a 
teacher in the Powder Point School at Duxbury, 
Mass. 



RESOLUTIONS. 



Boivdoin Chapter of Delta Upsilon. 

Shock and deep sorrow were occasioned the 
Bowdoin Chapter of Delta Upsilon in learning 
of the sudden death this summer of Brother 
Tracy Wood, of the Class of 1920. Brother 
Wood was president of his class, manager of 
football, leader of the college band, late lieu- 
tenant in the Army, and one of the most popu- 
lar men in his fraternity and the college. 

With very real feeling, Delta- Upsilon extends 
to the family and friends of Brother Wood this 
assurance of sympathy in their loss. 
For the Chapter : 

Robert W. Morse^ 
Ronald H. Peacock, 
J. Maxim Ryder. 



FALL STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

John A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 



A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office - - - Brunswick, Maine 

BUTLER'S 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSONS PHARMACY 



CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 



CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 



4 Elm Street 



HARVARD DENTAL SCHOOL 

A Department of Harvard University 

Graduates of secondary schools admitted without ex- 
amination provided they have taken required stibjects. 
Modern buildings and equipment. Fall term opens 
September 22, 1919. Degree of D.M.D. Catalog. 

EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D., Dean, Boston, Mass. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

" UNION " LUNCH 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 

Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 

WE CARRY 

Go-Operative Shoes 
New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 
LARGEST AND BEST 

Stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



LAW 

AND AMERICA'S 
WORLD POSITION 



a international 
challenges the 



America's new place i 
politics and commerce 
young American. 
He must equip himself for new world 
conditions with a knowledge of legal funda- 
mentals. 

LAW — its principles and application to all 
business is almost as necessary to the 
coming business man as it is indispensable 
to the lawyer. 
Qualify for real leadership. 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

gives a thorough training in legal 

principles. 

LL.B. Course requires 3 years. 

For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 



Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 
TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 



BATH, MAINE 




ARRO^V 

softCOLLARS 

FIT WELL— WASH EASILY 

Clmtt, PeabodySf Co., fnc, Troy, N. Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ANTIQVITY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

aOlD Jfurnitute, SDID China, IPetotEr, (Etc. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 
to orders for antique goods of any kind 

COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULES BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 

BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short Notice by competent work- 
men. We use only the Best 
of Leather. 
E. WHITTOM 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 



We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16. 



J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The Bowdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



A New Fall Liie of 

SUITS, 

SHIRTS, 

SHOES, 
HATS 

The snappiest Hnes ever shown in 
Maine. 




FRANK M. LOW & CO. 
PORTLAND, - - MAINE. 

WILLIAM F. FERRIS 

COLLEGE AGENT 

Citizens Laundry 



AUTO SERVICE 



9 SOUTH APPLETON 



Telephone 160 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 



Meat Trays, Vegetable BisJus 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
A. G. PA GE COMPANY, Bath 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

NORMA TALMADGE 

IN 

CHILDREN IN THE HOUSE 




FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

DOROTHY DALTON 

IN 

THE LADY OF RED BUTTE 



NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

VIVIAN MARTIN 

IN 

THE HOME TOWN GIRL 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY NIGHT 

MONROE SALISBURY 

IN 

THE LIGHT OF VICTORY 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

VIOLA DANA 

IN 

SOME BRIDE 



NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY NIGHTS 

PRISCILLA DEAN 

IN 

THE EXQUISITE THIEF 



VoLXLIX. No. 12 



OCTOBER 14, 1919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



CONTENTS 




PAGE 




PAGE 


Holy Cross Twice Crosses Bow- 




Prof. Mitchell's Trip to Boston 


119 


doin's Goal Line 


115 


Freshman Athletics Started Well 


119 


Bowdoin Second Loses to Hebron 




Freshman Statistics 


120 


20 to 7 


115 


New Requirements for B.S. De- 




Faculty Resolutions to Curtis 


115 


gree 


120 


Class of 1923 


116 


Fall Tennis Tournament 


120 


Sophomores Win Second Game 


116 


Additions to the Library 


120 


New Courses 


116 


President Sills on Western Trip 


120 


Freshman Conferences 


117 


Professor Bell Returns 


120 


Memorial Gateway 


117 


Liberal Ruling on Reinstatement 




Managers Elected 


117 


of War Risk Insurance 


120 


Y. M. C. A. Cabinet Meets 


117 


College Holiday 


121 


Cross Country 


117 


On the Campus 


121 


Glee Club 


117 


With the Other Colleges 


121 


Editorials: 




Alumni Notes 


121 


Student Support of the Team 


118 


Calendar 


122 


To Fraternity Freshmen 


118 


Largest Enrolment Ever 


122 


Bowdoin Guide Book 


119 


Freshman Football 


123 


Forum's First Meeting 


119 


Bowdoin Band 


123 


One Hundredth Year of Bowdoin 








Medical School 


119 







BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Back Here" know JUD is in the game. 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 


THIS 


PHOTOGRAPHS 




FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 


SPACE 




RESERVED 
FOR 


PRINTING 


OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 


WHEELER'S 

TOWN BUILDING BRUNSWICK 


The College Book Store 




F. W. CHANDLER & SON 







BUSINESS ESTABLISHED 1849 

MacuUar Parker Company 

Makers and Retailers of Best Clothing for 
Men, Young Men and Boys 

Special attention to the requirements of young 
men at school and college 

Colthes ready to wear and made to order 

Fine Haberdashery— Stetson Hats 
Sole Boston Agents for the "Stetson Special" 

400 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 




The "Constitution" of To-day — Electrically Propelled 



THE U. S. S. "New Mexico," the first battle- 
ship of any nation to be electrically pro- 
pelled, is one of the most important achievements 
of the scientific age. She not only develops the 
maximum power and, with electrical control, 
has greater flexibility of maneuver, which is a 
distinct naval advantage, but 
also gives greater economy. 
At 10 knots, her normal cruis- 
ing speed, she will steam on 
less fuel than the best turbine- 
driven ship that preceded her. 

The electric generating plant, 
totaling 28,000 horsepower, 
md the propulsion equipment 
ofthegreatsuper-dreadnaught 
were built by the General Elec- 
tric Company. Their operation has demonstrated 
the superiority of electric propulsion over old- 
time methods and a wider application of this 
principle in the merchant marine is fast mak- 
ing progress. 



Figures that tell the 
Story of Achievement 

Length— 624 feet 

Width— 97 feet 

Displacement — 32,000 tons 

Fuel capacity — a million gal- 
lons (fuel oil) 

Power— 28,000 electrical horse- 
power 

Speed— 21 knots. 



Six auxiliary General Electric Turbine-Gener- 
ators of 400 horsepower each, supply power 
for nearly 500 motors, driving pumps, fans, 
shop machinery, and kitchen and laundry appli- 
ances, etc. 

Utilizing electricity to propel ships at sea marks 
the advancement of another 
phase of the electrical indus- 
try in which the General Elec- 
tric Company is the pioneer. 
Of equal importance has been 
its part in perfecting electric 
transportation on land, trans- 
forming the potential energy 
of waterfalls for use in elec- 
tric motors, developing the 
possibilities of electric light- 
ing and many other similar achievements. 

As a result, so general are the applications of 
electricity to the needs of mankind that scarcely 
a home or individual today need be without the 
benefits of General Electric products and service 



An illustrated booklet describing the "Newr Mexico. " entitled, 

The Electric Ship," will be sent upon request. Address 

Cenecal Electric Company, Desk 44, Schenectady, Nevir York. 




General Office 
Schenectady.N.Y. 



Sales Offices in 
all large cities. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



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60 cents 

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180 MAINE ST. The Bowling Alley is next door 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCTOBER 14. 1919 



NO. 12 



HOLY CROSS TWICE CROSSES BOWDOIN'S 
GOAL LINE. 

Bowdoin lost a hard fought game Saturday to 
Holy Cross when the Purple backs scored two 
touchdowns in the first quarter for a 14-0 victory. 
Gagnon featured for Holy Cross in both goals. 

A kicking duel followed the first period in 
which neither side was able to score. McCurdy 
made a spectacular block of a punt and carried 
the ball 50 yards only to be downed without 
scoring, Dahlgren's long run for a tackle on the 
six-yard line was one of the features. The work 
of Dostie and James is also worthy of note. 
Toward the last of the game the line of the 
Black and White 'strengthened and became im- 
pregnable to Holy Cross. Bowdoin however 
could not pierce its opponent's line to any more 
advantage and the whistle blew with the score 
unchanged. 

HOLY CROSS— —BOWDOIN 

Daley (McCoy) (O'Connor), le re., Drummond 

Conway, It rt.. Mason (A. Smith) 

McCuUough (Case (Healy), Ig rg.. Dudgeon 

Gildea, c c, Guptill (McCurdy) 

Bond, rg Ig., Brewster 

Nilam (McGrath), rt It., Rhodes 

Brenna (Young), re le., James (Thompson) 

Kennedy, qb qb., Crockett 

Gagnon, Ihb rhb., J. Smith (Dahlgren) • 

Connor, rhb Ihb., Dostie (Peacock) 

Mitchell, fb fb., Dahlgren (Curtis) 

Score — Holy Cross 14, Bowdoin 0. Touchdowns — 
Gagnon 2. Goals from touchdowns — Daley 2. Umpire 
— Thomas F. Murphy. Referee — James E. Keegan. 
Head linesman — O'Flaherty. Time — Four 10m. periods. 



BOWDOIN SECOND LOSES TO HEBRON 20-7. 

Hebron's snappy and machine-like attack was 
too much for the second team last Saturday on 
the Academy's field. The prep school team 
scored twice in the first period and once in the 
second, but could not get within scoring distance 
of Bowdoin's goal during the last half. The 
second team scored in the third period when 
Doherty, having received a forward pass from 
Keeney, ran 60 yards to a touchdown. Keeney 
kicked the goal from a difficult angle. Dewhirst 
and Sawyer featured for Hebron. The sum- 
mary: 



HEBRON ACADEMY— —BOWDOIN SECOND 

H. Soule, Bowditch, le re., Doherty 

Bristol], It rt., Wetherell 

Pike, Littlefield, Ig rg., Haines 

Hawyer, c c.. Granger 

Hill. Thomas, rg Ig., Smith 

Getchell, rt It., Tootell, McQuillan 

B. Soule, Allen, re le., Cook 

Keogh, Neal. qb qb., Keeney 

Wardwell, Pike, Ihb rhb.. Miller 

Dewhirst, Beals, rhb Ihb.. Davis 

Tryon, Dee, fb fb., Haggerty 

Score — Hebron 20, Bowdoin Second 7. Touchdowns, 
Dewhirst, H. Soule, Pike, Doherty. Goals from touch- 
down, Dewhirst 2, Keeney. Referee, Moody of Dart- 
mouth. Umpire, McClave of Bowdoin. Head lines- 
man, Andrews of Bowdoin. Time, two 9 and two 10- 
minute periods. 



FACULTY RESOLUTIONS TO CURTIS. 

At a recent meeting of the Faculty the fol- 
lowing telegram was sent to Hon. Edwin U. 
Curtis '82, Police Commissioner of the City of 
Boston ; 

"We, the Faculty of Bowdoin College, most 
heartily commend the brave and wise stand which 
you have unfalteringly maintained when the 
chosen and sworn guardians of property and life 
deserted their posts of duty and gave over the 
city of Boston to lawlessness and crime. We be- 
lieve your decisive action in these days when 
representative government is at stake will be 
far reaching in its salutary effect. It is, we be- 
lieve, in accordance with the best tradition of 
your college — the kind of courageous citizenship 
which Bowdoin has endeavored to teach her 
sons." 

(Signed) 

By twenty-three members of the Faculty. 

To this telegram Mr. Curtis replied in the fol- 
lowing letter: 

President of Bowdoin College, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

Dear Dr. Sills :— 

Thank you for the encouraging telegram from 
the Faculty of Bowdoin. I have simply tried 
to do what I considered my oath of office and 
my duty to the Commonwealth required of me. 
Bowdoin would also require this, and I could do 



116 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



no less, nor consistently with her traditions and 
teachings, take any other attitude than the one 
you have seen fit to commend. 

Many letters and telegrams of congratulation 
have come to me, but this one comes from my 
own home circle and to find commendation and 
support there is the best encouragement I could 
receive. 

Kindly extend for me to each of the faculty 
who has united with you in the message, my 
warmest and most grateful thanks. 
Sincerely yours, 

(Signed) E. U. Curtis^ 
Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



CLASS OF 1923. 



One hundred and twenty-eight men have 
i-egistered in the entering class this year. They 
are pledged as follows : 



Alpha Delta Phi 

Clark. P. V. 

Hunt, E. W. 

Lothrop, E. S. 

Mallett, E. L. 

Miller, N. F. 

Palmer, S. 

Pollard, C. A. 

Putnam, W. J. 

Small, R. I. 

Smith, A. M. 
Delta Kappa Epsilon 

Bates, R. T. 

Christie, A. L. 

Fitzmorris, R. M. 

Heathcote, E. W. 

Mason, G. T. 

McLellan. L. I. 

Means, E. L. 

Philbrick, K. R. 

Russell, G. F. 

Stetson, G. 
Zeta Psi 

Black, J. A. 

Fames, D. J. 

Handy, J. F. 

Hanscom, R. D. 

Keaney, 

Kennedy, C. 

Mitchell, J. E. 

Parsons, K. G. 

Thompson, J. C. 

Webb, H. C. 
Kappa Sigma 

Bisson, P. H. 

Chandler, M. P. 

Davis, G. T. 

Gerrard, L. A. 

Hamlin, W. R. 

Mohr, H. L. 

Pierce, F. M. 

Priest, C. 

Ridlon, E. S. 

Whitney, W. R. 



Psi Upsilon 

Allen, L. C. 
Clark, B. E. . 
Gray, H. L. 
Gross. F. M. 
Orcutt, O. H. 
Parcher, C. P. 
Quimby, G. H. 
Schlosberg, P. H. 
Varney, G. D. 



Theta Delta Chi 

Blake. M. S. 
Burr, M. W. 
Chandler, W 
Hebb, E. G. 
Kemp, R. B. 
Libby, E. P. 
Perkins, E. P. 
Tice, D. F. 



M. 



Delta Upsilon 

Andrews, L. D. 
Badger, H. P. 
Beal, E. M. 
Jacob, W. B. 
Martin, J. S. 
Perkins, E. B. 
Stackhouse, S. H. 
Swinglehurst, E. N. 
Whitman, V. S. 

Beta Theta Pi 

Bishop, H. P. 
Bishop, L. W. 
Brown, B. F. 
Colburn, S. W. 
Crawford, D. 
Hill, F. B. 
Hughes, C. L. 
Sheesley, J. R. 
Turgeon, F. K. 
Wing, E. C. 



Chi Psi 

Butler, G. V. 
Philbrook, C. S. 
Plummer, A. S. 
Robinson, C. W. 
Slater, W. E. 
Staples, H. F. 
Towne, E. F. 
Wakely, C. F. 
Waller, F. M. 

Albert, E. A. 
Attaya, M. N. 
Barker, L. W. 
Berman, D. V. 
Bramson, N. 
Carter, S. H. 
Cousens, T. W. 
Dannis, M. 
Daviau, L. A. 
Davis, G. E. 
Finnegan, J. 
French. E. K. 
Hayes, R. T. 
Healy, H. E. 
Hussey, M. L. 
Kunkel, J. A. 
Little, C. S. 



Sigma Nu 

Black, L. M. 
Hall, A. C. 
Jardine. I. W. 
Latty, E. R. 
McLaughlin, C. 
Small, C. O. 
Tootell, F. D. 
Whote, S. E. 



Non-Fraternity 

Love, R. B. 
MacDonald 
Poore, W. 
Reed, H. C. 
Renter, J. U. 
Rogers, O. 
Ross, L. H. 
Schwind, P, 
Sirois, E. 
Smith, D. S. 
Smith. J. L 
Strout, R. 
Sullivan, J. F. 
Sullivan, T. F. 
Tibbitts, J. C. 
True, G. L. 
Yemprayura, W, 



F. E. 



M. 



SOPHOMORES WIN SECOND GAME. 

On Whittier Field, Saturday, the Sophomores 
won the second game of a three game series 
with the Freshmen 2-0. 

The game was a pitching duel between Flinn 
for the Sophomores and Walker for the Fresh- 
men, although both were hit during the two final 
innings. The Sophomores scored their first run 
when Smith's drive to right field brought in a 
runner in the fifth inning. The following inning 
the Sophomores added another score to their 
credit and the Freshmen failed to score during 
the game. 
SOPHOMORES— —FRESHMEN 

Canter, c 3b, Plummer 

Flinn, p ss.. Davis 

Richards, 1 b c. Wakeley 

Morrel, ss ib.. Handy 

Ferris, 3b rf .. Grey 

Hunt, If ^ 2b., Whitman 

Smith, 2b If., Town 

Wagg, cf cf.. Hill 

Rogers, rf P. Walker 

Score — Sophomores 2, Freshmen 0. Umpire, Hall '20. 



NEW COURSES. 

Although several of the courses at Bowdoin 
have been cut down, others have been extended 
over last year's schedule. 

There will be a course in Practical Astronomy 
the second semester. Quantitative Analysis, 
Geology, and Surveying are now full year 
courses instead of two, as formerly. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRESHMAN CONFERENCES. 

During the last week three more of the talks 
to Freshmen have been arranged. On Monday 
Professor Elliott addressed the Class of '23 on 
the religious questions that confront many men 
as they enter college. Wednesday noon, Pro- 
fessor Burnett spoke briefly on the Art Build- 
ing and opportunities given the Bowdoin men by 
it. Mr. Wilder was the speaker Friday 
noon and had for his subject the Library. Each 
of these lectures has been of great interest to 
the Freshmen and many troublesome points have 
been solved by them. It is to be hoped that this 
will become an annual custom at Bowdoin in 
years to come. 



MEMORIAL GATEWAY. 

The latest addition to war memorials of Bow- 
doin is the gateway back of the library, sacred 
to the memory of Lieut. Warren Robinson. The 
memorial is now in process of construction and 
will be a great addition to the Campus as well 
as a beautiful, reminder of the grim days of the 
past. 

Lieut. Robinson graduated from Bowdoin in 
1910 and belonged to Alpha Delta Phi fraternity. 
At the time of hostilities with Mexico in 1914 
he gave his services to his country. For two 
years he saw service on the Border and in June 
1917 went overseas with the first 5,000 of the 
A.E.F. 

' From that time on, Lieut. Robinson was al- 
most constantly in action, being engaged in the 
fiercest battles of the whole war. 

Shortly before the armistice was signed in 
November 1918 he was killed in action near 
Verdun. Lieut. Robinson died as he had fought 
and lived, in the service of his country. 

His widow, daughter of Professor Johnson, 
is having this memorial erected to dedicate her 
beloved husband's services to God and humanity. 
So let every man who passes its shadow give a 
thought to the memory of the valiant and im- 
mortal dead. 



MANAGERS ELECTED. 

Elections for football manager, assistant track 
manager, and assistant baseball manager were 
held in the Gymnasium Tuesday afternoon, Oc- 
tober 7. The results were as follows : Football 
manager, J. S. McPartland '20; assistant track 
manager, V. S. McGorrill '22; assistant baseball 
manager, F. R. Ridley '22. About 75 per cent, of 
the college voted. 



Y. M. C. A. CABINET MEETS. 

The new Y. M. C. A. Cabinet held its first 
session of the year in the German room of the 
library, Tuesday evening, Oct. 7, and considered 
its program of activities for the year. Promi- 
nent among these will be the employment bureau 
for obtaining outside work for the students. The 
officers and members of the Cabinet are: 

President, Young '21 ; vice-president, Haines 
'21 ; general secretary, McGown '21 ; treasurer, 
Averill '22 ; recording secretary, Towle '22. 
Members : Cousins '20, Goodrich '20, Look '20, 
Noss '20, Zeitler '20, Gibson '21, Congdon '22, 
and Flinn '22. 

A Freshman Cabinet of one man from each 
house and one non-fraternity man was elected. 
It is composed of: 

L. Bishop, Hanscomb, Jacobs, Latty, Little, 
Perkins, Philbrick, Putnam, Ridlon, Robinson, 
and Varney. 



CROSS COUNTRY. 



With a large field to select from, including 
several letter men, Bowdoin should be repre- 
sented by a strong cross country team this year. 
Compulsory athletics for Freshmen are drawing- 
out men for track who otherwise might not have 
donned running clothes. Under the tutelage of 
Jack Magee, who has trained victorious runners 
for the White, the candidates for the team will 
have every advantage possible. With Cleaves 
'20, and Goodwin '21, the letter men out for the 
quintet, Magee will have a strong nucleus about 
which to group his team. Hatch and Heeney of 
'21, and Hunt and Towle of '22, together with 
Renier and Ryan of '23, have been finishing 
strong each day and it is likely that from them 
the quintet will be formed. The first run will 
be over the Colby course at Waterville, Novem- 
ber 7. The hour is at three o'clock and the 
referee William F. O'Connell. All colleges of 
the M. I. A. A. will send teams. It is expected 
that the N. E. I. A. A. run will be November 15. 



GLEE CLUB. 

Professor Wass has already started to make 
plans for the work of the Glee Club this year. 
The call for Freshman aspirants for the Glee 
Club has been issued. They are to report at the 
Music Room Tuesday and Thursday between 4.30 
and 5.30. The officers of the Musical Clubs this 
year are : Leader of Glee Club, Richan '20, 
leader of Mandolin Club, Sprince, Medic '23 ; 
manager of clubs, Berry '20. 



118 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Tuesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bovvdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 
Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 

Acting Managing Editor 
department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Ronald L. McCormack, 1922 Exchange 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
Ronald B. Wadsworth, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Allan W. Hall, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 



Vol. XLIX. OCTOBER 14, 1919. 



No. 12 



Entered at Post OflSce at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

Student Support of the Team. 

Not in recent years have we been represented 
by a football team which at this time of the sea- 
son has shown greater possibilities for the state 
series. The games played thus far this season, 
while they have resulted in defeats for us, have 



been won by such small margins that much en- 
couragement may be derived from them. Our 
first home game will be played here next Satur- 
day with Fort McKinley. Then will follow the 
three state series games. All three of the other 
Maine colleges pride themselves in having ex- 
ceptional teams this year, so the series will un- 
doubtedly be a hard fought one. 

We now come up against that same old ques- 
tion of student support. We should have no 
doubt as to the ability of the team to come 
through. We know it will do its best; nothing 
more can be expected. But from past experience 
we have no such assurance with regard to the 
student body. In recent years there has been in 
evidence a spirit of indifference among certain of 
the student body. These individuals in question 
either consider their presence in some neighbor- 
ing town or city more important than their loyal 
attendance at the home football game, or else, 
becoming suddenly studious, consider it a waste 
of time to go. 

Their absence is entirely unexcusable in most 
cases, and can only be accounted, for by this 
spirit of indifference which should have no place 
in our college life. It is every student's duty 
to do what he can for the college. Some are 
able to represent her on the football team, to 
take this particular phase of student activity ; the 
least that the rest of us can do is to give them 
our loyal and undivided support. Beginning with 
the game next Saturday, let us work for a one 
hundred per cent, attendance from the student 
body, accompanied by good cheering and good 
singing. Incidentally, learn the cheers and 
learn Bowdoin Beata ! 



To Fraternity Freshmen. 

Wednesday night, October 15, is the date of 
all fraternity initiations at Bowdoin. Thursday 
will find approximately one hundred Freshmen 
wearing the pins of the ten fraternities on the 
campus. It seems appropriate at this time to give 
a word of advice which is intended to benefit 
them. There is a strong inclination on the part 
of the fraternity man to confine himself too 
closely to his own fraternity, to associate with 
his own fraternity brothers, and with them alone. 
This fact is regrettable as it serves not only to 
develop a cliquish atmosphere, but also weakens 
the class and college spirit in the student. Every 
Freshman should begin early the habit of mixing 
with men outside his own fraternity, of forming 
the widest possible associations and friendships, 
for primarily he is a Bowdoin man, and inci- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



119 



dentally a fraternity man. He should be care- 
ful that his interest in his fraternity did not 
transcend his interest in his college. 



BOWDOIN GUIDE BOOK. 

The men in English 3, under Professor Davis, 
contemplate editing a guide book to Bowdoin. 
Hundreds of visitors come to Brunswick each 
summer, and the need of a guide of some sort is 
now felt. The aid of those people who have 
taken visitors about the campus is being sought 
so that those points which are of most interest 
to the majority will be emphasized. Several men 
are looking up old college records and guide 
books to other colleges. This guide book will not 
only serve to help people in finding the most 
interesting spots of the college but will also 
give the visitor something' to remind him of the 
traditions and beauties of Old Bowdoin. 



FORUM'S FIRST MEETING. 

On Sunday evening, October 19, at 8 p. m. the 
first Forum of the year will be held in the Union. 
Professor Van Cleve, who was connected with 
the headquarters of the A.E.F. in France and 
who, consequently, has a knowledge of the in- 
ternal workings of that organization has been 
secured as speaker. Following his talk the meet- 
ing will be thrown open for questions and dis- 
cussion. Every man on the campus should not 
miss this opportunity to get inside information 
on the American offensive of 1918. 



ONE HUNDREDTH YEAR OF BOWDOIN 
MEDICAL SCHOOL. 

Brunswick, Oct. 13, 1919. 

Bowdoin Medical School opened Thursday for 
its one hundredth year with an enrollment of 
twenty in the Freshman class. The school has 
suffered severely during the war as most of its 
students were of military age and entered the 
service. As usual, two years of college work are 
required for admission to the school. 

A majority of the seventeen members of the 
Faculty who were in the service have returned 
and will take their places in the teaching stafif. 
Among the new members of the Faculty is Dr. 
E. C. Follett, a graduate of the school who left 
his hospital service at Waterbury Hospital to as- 
sist on the teaching staff last year. Dr. Follett 
is assistant professor in pathology and bacteriol- 
ogy. A second new instructor is Dr. E. H. Drake 
of Portland, a recent graduate of the school, who 
is assistant instructor in medicine. 



Following are the names of the men in the 
entering class, the colleges from which they 
come, and the home address of each man : 

Cincent P. Bell, Caparole, Rome, Italy. 

James H. Brewster, Bowdoin, Lisbon Falls. 

Walter E. Burke, University of Maine, Port- 
land. 

Benjamin F. Carter, Bates, Gardiner. 

Rudolph E. Castelli, Colby, Chester, Conn. 

Allen L. Davis, Bowdoin, Sanford. 

Ainslee H. Drummond, Bowdoin, Portland. 

Douglas A. Haddock, Bowdoin, Brunswick. 

Edward L. Markthaler, Wesleyan, Elizabeth, 
N. T. 

John F. McGrath, Holy Cross, Waterbury, 
Conn. 

William R. Needleman, Bowdoin, Portland. 

Eugene E. O'Donnell, Bates, Lubec. 

Stephen E. Perkins, Bowdoin, Bartlett, N. H. 

Forest H. Rogers, Bowdoin, Bath. 

Eric M. Simmons, Bowdoin, Union. 

Henry Sprince, Bowdoin, Lewiston. 

James E. Vance, Bowdoin, Lovell. 

H. Edward Whalen, University of Maine, Ban- 
gor. 

Raymond C. Willey, Middlebury, Johnson, Vt. 

Robert J. Wiseman, University of Maine, Lew- 
iston. 



PROFESSOR MITCHELL'S TRIP TO BOSTON. 

Professor Wilmot B. Mitchell returned late 
Saturday from a meeting of the Bowdoin Club 
which was held at the University Club in Bos- 
ton. The meeting was presided over by Mr. 
Ripley L. Dana of the Class of 1909, who is the 
president. Professor Mitchell spoke on the con- 
dition of Bowdbin College at the present time. 
Major Thomas Pierce of the Class of 1898 spoke 
on his work in the Hospital Corps overseas. 
Major Pierce had some very thrilling experiences 
of which he told many. At the meeting a com- 
mittee was appointed to send resolutions to Police 
Commissioner Curtis to express their approval 
of the stand which he has taken. This committee 
consisted of Mr. White of the Class of 1898, Mr. 
Lavinger of the Class of 1908, and Mr. Webster 
of the Class of 1899. 



FRESHMAN ATHLETICS STARTED WELL. 

The various branches of athletics, one of which 
every Freshman had to choose for his three hours 
of physical training each week, are being en- 
thusiastically entered into by the new men. Mr. 
E. S. Hall is in charge of the 29 football men 
who work on Whittier Field. Forty-three track 



120 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



candidates have reported to Trainer J. J. Magee, 
29 men are working with Mr. E. L. Markthaler 
at baseball on the Delta, 25 tennis men are under 
the supervision of Mr. W. E. Hill, and Mr. H. P. 
Johnson has charge of 7 golfers. The good ma- 
terial in every branch gives promise of strong 
Bowdoin teams in the future. 



FRESHMAN STATISTICS. 

Ninety-seven of the entering class registered 
as having some distinct preference for one 
church. The Congregational church leads with 
forty-two adherents, a large percentage of whom 
are members of the church. There are seven- 
teen Methodists, fifteen Roman Catholics, twelve 
Baptists, seven Episcopalians, and four Univer- 
salists. 



NEW REQUIREMENTS FOR B. S. DEGREE. 

This week the new requirements for majors 
for the B.S. degree were announced. Under 
these new regulations a candidate for a B.S. may 
either major in biology, chemistry', mathematics, 
;physics, or psychology, and minor in two sub- 
jects from any part of the curriculum; or he 
may have his major in economics, history, gov- 
ernment, and, with the consent of the depart- 
ment, in English, French, or German, together 
with" two minors and two one-year courses in 
astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, miner- 
■ology, physics, psychology, and electivfr mathe- 
jnatics. 

President Sills gave as the reason for the 
change the fact that a B.S. degree is in reality 
a Liberal Arts degree. ■ 



FALL TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 

It is planned to hold a tennis tournament in the 
near future. The purpose is two-fold; first, to 
provide sport and amusement, second, to find out 
"what material there is for the varsity team. Capt. 
Partridge '22 is very desirous that tennis should 
Tje started as soon as possible, so he has adopted 
this method for swelling the enthusiasm. On a 
slip of paper posted near the bulletin all the men 
who desire to take part in the tournament should 
register. At the present writing the following 
Tnen have signified their intention of playing: 
Capt. Partridge '22, Crossman '20, M. H. Smith 
'20, Ferris '22, P. S. Stetson '21, C. O. Small '23, 
Means '23. 

It is earnestly hoped that a large number of 
men will turn out in order to make competition 
more keen. 



ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY. 

Since the end of the fiscal year in March 759 
volumes have been added to the Library. Of 
these, 427 A'olumes were added during" the sum- 
mer. This is slightly below the average for half 
a year, but the number will probably be as large 
as usual by next March. 

From this list it is very hard to pick out any 
one of peculiar interest to Bowdoin men. Per- 
haps of the most interest to the men in college 
are ten more volumes of "Chronicles of America" 
which are edited by Professor Allen Johnson, 
formerly of the Bowdoin faculty. 

At Commencement a thousand dollars was 
added to the Class of 1875 Book Fund, bringing 
the total amount of the fund to fifteen hundred 
dollars. The income from this fund is to be used 
to purchase books for the Library, preference 
being given to books on American history. 



PRESIDENT SILLS ON WESTERN TRIP. 

President Sills left Tuesday on a two weeks' 
Western trip. He will first attend the general 
convention of the Episcopal Church, being held 
at Detroit, as a State deputy from Maine. He 
will then go to Ann Arbor, Mich., where he will 
represent New England at the National Educa- 
tional Council. He will attend Bowdoin Alumni 
gatherings in both those cities and also in Chi- 
cago, Minneapolis, and Buffalo. This will be the 
first time that the college has been officially, rep- 
resented at the meetings of the Bowdoin College 
Alumni in those Western cities. 



PROFESSOR BELL RETURNS. 

Professor Herbert C. Bell returned from Eng- 
land last week and resumed his duties in the 
college. He has been engaged since the close of 
college in June in research work in the public 
record office of London under the auspices of the 
Bureau of Historical Research for the Carnegie 
Institute in- Washington. He has paid particular 
attention to those archives containing material 
relative to early American history and the early 
history of the West Indies. 



LIBERAL RULING ON REINSTATEMENT OF 
WAR RISK INSURANCE. 

Discharged soldiers, sailors, and marines who 
have dropped or cancelled their insurance may 
reinstate it within eighteen months after dis- 
charge without paying the back premiums. All 
they will be asked to pay will be the premium of 
insurance to be reinstated for the month of grace 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



121 



in which they were covered and for the current 
month. 

For example, if a man dropped $10,000 of in- 
surance in January, 1919, and applies for rein- 
statement the first of October for $5,000, all he 
will have to pay will be the premium for January 
(the month of grace) on $5,000 and the premium 
for October on $5,000. In case he desires to 
reinstate the entire amount that he formerly 
carried, $10,000, his premium payments will be 
the January and October premiums upon $10,000. 
He will not have to pay premiums in either case 
for the intervening months. 

If application for reinstatement' is made 
promptly, the certificate of the insured concern- 
ing his state of health (which must be as good 
as at the date of discharge or at the expiration 
of the grace period, which ever is the later date) 
will be accepted. If the application is not made 
within the prescribed time limit, however, the 
formal report of examination made by a reput- 
able physician must accompany the statement of 
the insured concerning his health. 

Conversion of the reinstated term insurance 
into permanent United States Government Life 
Insurance is also provided for in the new ruling, 
imder advantageous conditions. 

Full particulars, application blanks, etc., may 
be had by corresponding with the Insurance 
Officer, Headquarters Northeastern Department, 
Room 718, 99 Chauncy street, Boston, Mass. 



COLLEGE HOLIDAY. 



October 12th, Columbus Day, was very quietly 
observed on the campus. In fact, practically 
no notice was taken of the fact. The student 
holiday comes somewhat later this week. On 
account of the Topsham Fair which every year 
proves of great interest to the students and a 
means of distracting their attention from their 
studies and on account of the annual Initiation 
Night, the observance of which takes place Wed- 
nesday night, the College has granted adjourns 
from classes on Wednesday afternoon and Thurs- 
day morning. This will give everyone a chance 
to attend the fair and to recover from the effects 
of Initiation Night. 



flDn tbe Campus 

John C. Minot '96, spent the last week end on 
the Campus. 

The familiar Freshman caps made their ap- 
pearance on the Campus Friday afternoon. 

Jack Magee is already laying plans for an 



inter class track meet. 

The customary smoking out of the dormitories 
has started with the burning of leaves by the 
college employees. 

DeMott '18 and Paul '19 were seen at chapel, 
Sunday. 

Mr. Ashby of First Parish Church was the 
Chapel speaker, October 12. 

Golf seems to be the popular undergraduate 
pastime this season. Any afternoon one may see 
several groups wending their way out to the 
links. 

The painting of the Observatory dome proved 
an effective way of blotting out the Freshman 
numerals. 

The following Freshmen have signified their 
intentions of trying out for the Orient Board 
and are already writing copy; Badger, Gerrard, 
Heathcote, Little, Mitchell, Perkins, Philbrick, 
Ouinby, Ridlon, Slater, Turgeon, Whitney, and 
Dyer '21 (transfer from Boston University). 



mitb tt)c 2Dtt)cr (EolkQCS 

List of exchanges received : Oberlin Review, 
Amherst Student, Wesleyan Argus, Bates Stu- 
dent, Trinity Tripod, Smith College Weekly, 
Brown Daily Herald, The Dartmouth, The 
Breccia. 

Boston University reports a record enrolment 
and scores coming every day even now when 
college has been in session two weeks. 

Wesleyan — One hundred and four Freshmen 
pledged at the end of cultivation week. 

Bates — Carl H. Smith, Colgate 1904, is to act 
as physical director for the coming year. 



alumni jf[3otES 

Medic ex-'7i — Augustus Bates Clark died 
August 20th at Bucksport, Maine. After leaving 
college, he resided at Auburn for a number of 
years, but later moved to Harmony, where the 
burial took place. Mr. Clark was eighty-three 
years of age. 

Medic ex-'83 — One of the leading physicians of 
Oldtown, Dr. Gawen Gilmore Weld, died at his 
home September 28. He was born at Olamon, 
Maine, November 10, 1855. He took his doctor's 
degree from Dartmouth College in 1889, after 
which he became a physician at Oldtown. He 
was mayor of the city in 1893, 1894, and 1907. 
F'rom 1907 until 1910, he served in the Maine 
Legislature; first in the House of Representa- 
tives, and later in the Senate. He was one of 
the most influential men towards advancing high- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



way improvement in the State. 

ex-'9i — Colonel Edmund Mortimer Leary was 
killed in an airplane crash near Fort Ring-gold, 
Texas, September 27th. He was born at Cam- 
bridge, Mass., November 28, 1866. He entered 
Bowdoin in 1877, and the next year transferred 
to West Point, from which he was commissioned 
second lieutenant in 1892. In the Spanish War 
he took part in the battle of El Caney. He also 
saw service in the Philippines, and later in Japan 
and China. In 1899 he was promoted to first 
lieutenant, and in 1901 to captain. He was as- 
signed to the nth Cavalry, which he helped to 
organize. During the trouble with Mexico, he 
served under General Dodd. He was twice 
recommended for bravery. After this, he was 
made a lieutenant colonel in the 12th Cavalry. 
Not long after, he was ordered to the 90th 
Division as a full colonel. In this division he 
commanded the 3S8th Infantry, the regiment se- 
lected to parade in Liverpool, July 4, 1918. On 
December 16, 1918, Colonel Leary was awarded 
the Distinguished Service Cross, and was cited 
for bravery. The immediate cause for this honor 
was the part that Colonel Leary took in the 
capture of the town of Stenay. He obtained 
permission to go up to the front lines, and there 
he pushed a machine gun battalion to one side, 
and then directed the other parts of his regiment 
(the 358th) into position. He himself led the 
men, and they captured the town. Colonel Leary 
was recommended for promotion to the rank of 
Brigadier General, but the war ended, and the 
promotion could not be made. 

'07 — Charles W. Snow has been appointed as- 
sistant professor of English at Indiana Univer- 
sity. 

'11 — Dr. Harold Vincent Bickmore was mar- 
ried to Miss Edith Marion Chadbourne Mc- 
Donald, at the home of the bride's parents on 
Congress street, Portland, September 30th. Dr. 
Bickmore graduated fro mthe Bowdoin Medical 
School in 1914. He is a member of the Beta 
Theta Pi and Phi Chi fraternities. 

'13 — Ensign Theodore Evans Emery of Ran- 
dolph, Maine, was married to Miss Eleanor 
Weston Lewis of Gardiner at Christ Church, 
Portland. The bride is a daughter of the late 
Weston Lewis '72, who was formerly an over- 
seer, and later a trustee of the college. 

'14 — Robert D. Leigh, who is doing graduate 
work at Columbia University this year, con- 
tributed an article entitled "A Center for Pro- 
gress in Higher Education" to School and So- 
city in the issue of September 13, 1919. 



'16 — Donald S. White has gone to Constanti- 
nople on an appointment to work for the Ameri- 
can Committee for Relief in the Near East. An 
air-service sketch written by him has been sold 
to the Youth's Companion and will shortly ap- 
pear in that periodical. 

'17 — Harvey D. Miller is teaching English in 
the Bangor High School. 

'17 — Frank E. Noyes, lately discharged from 
the service, has an important position as Ameri- 
can buyer of foodstuffs for the firm of Turner 
and Company, London. 

'17 — Hal S. White, who was awarded the 
Longfellow Scholarship for 1918-19, has gone to 
Oxford to work in the department of English. 

ex-'i8 — John W. Thomas has recently been 
made assistant sales manager of the Great East- 
ern Fisheries, with headquarters at Rockland. 

'19 — Bateman Edwards has entered the Prince- 
ton Graduate School where he was awarded a 
scholarship for work in the department of 
romance languages. 



CALENDAR. 



Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Oct. 14, 15, 16, 
Topsham Fair. 



Wednesday, October 15, 
Initiation Night. 



Thursday, October 16, 
Freshman Glee Club Tryout. 



Saturday, October 18, 
Football : Bowdoin vs. Fort McKinley. 



Sunday, October 19, 
Forum in Union, Speaker, Professor Van Cleve. 



Saturdays October 25, 
Football : Bowdoin vs. Colby. 



Saturday, November i. 
Football : Bowdoin vs. Bates. 

LARGEST ENROLMENT EVER. 

This 3'ear the largest number of students in 
the history of Bowdoin are enrolled. The present 
number is 446. 

The nearest approach ever made to this num- 
ber was in 1916, when 434 were enrolled. The 
increase is due partly to the return of so many 
men from war service. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL. 

Beginning Monday, the Freshmen football 
squad started in on a regular course of training 
under the coaching of Dr. E. S. Hall, who will 
soon, however, be supplanted by Edward Mark- 
thaler, since the doctor returns to Portland next 
week to resume his studies at the Medical School. 

Scrimmages will be in order twice a week, ac- 
cording to Dr. Hall, who also stated that the 
men would receive plenty of football instruction; 
Signal work will start before the end of the 
week. 

Mr. Markthaler, who at present is devoting 
considerable of his time to the second team, is 


FALL STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

John A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 


a graduate of the Springfield Y. M. C. A. Col- 
lege, and also of Wesleyan. Accordingly he is 
well equipped to train the squad. At this time, 
it may be well to say that Mr. Markthaler is to 
instruct in gymnasium work this year. During 
the war he held a first lieutenant's commission 
in the Army and has only recently been honorably 


A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office - - - Brunswick, Maine 


discharged. 




BOWDOIN BAND. 

The Bowdoin Band is reorganizing for the 
new year's work. Manager Allen '20 reports 
that about 35 men have already tried out for it. 


BUTLER'S 


There are still many men in college who should 




be out for this organization. 

The band plays at all home football games and 
will probably make the trip to Maine. Here is 
your chance to see four good games in a row as 
well as make a great trip and help the team on 
the field in a most effective way. All men who 


PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSON'S PHARMACY 


can make any kind of a noise on a musical in- 
strument should get in touch with Allen '20 at 
the Kappa Sigma House at once. 




CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 


WANTED 

Student to sell high grade line of toilet re- 


quisites, $25 per week for active fellow. 

DOVER SUPPLY COMPANY 

530 Tremont St. Boston, Mass. 


CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 

4 Elm Street 


MESERVE'S FRUIT SHERBET 


The Blended Product of the Natural Juices of 
Sound Ripe Fruit and Berries. A Delicious and 
Healthful Beverage for Receptions, Teas and 
Parties. Prepared only by 

P. J. MESERVE, Pharmacist, 
Near Post Office, Brunswick, Maine 


HARVARD DENTAL SCHOOL 

A Department of Harvard University 

Graduates of secondary schools admitted without ex- 
amination provided they have taken required subjects. 
Modern buildings and equipment. Fall term opens 
September 22, 1919. Degree of D.IVI.D. Catalog. 
EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D., Dean, Boston, Mass. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

"UNION" LUNCH 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 

Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 
FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, ?100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 

We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16. 

WE CARRY 

Co-operative Shoes 
New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 
LARGEST AND BEST 

stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



LAW 

AND AMERICA'S 
WORLD POSITION 



Q international 
challenges the 



America's new place i 
politics and commerce 
young American. 
He must equip himself for new world 
conditions with a knowledge of legal funda- 
mentals. 

LAW — its principles and application to all 
business is almost as necessary to the 
coming business man as it is indispensable 
to the lawyer. 
Qualify for real leadership. 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

gives a thorough training in legal 

principles. 

LL.B. Course requires 3 years. 

For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 



Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 

TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 



BATH, MAINE 



J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The Bowdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ANTIQVITY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 
147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

iJIC IFurnitutr, HDIti ffhina, ©Etoter, (Etc. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 
to orders for antique goods of any kind 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULES BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 

BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short Notice by competent work- 
men. We use only the Best 
of Leather. 
E. WHITTOM 



WILLIAM F. FERRIS 

COLLEGE AGENT 

Citizens Laundry 



AUTO SERVICE 



9 SOUTH APPLETON 



Telephone 160 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 





Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 




NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 


A. 


G. PAGE COMPANY, Bath 



THE STORI 



ROORI 



A NEW FALL LINE OF 

Suits Shirts 

Shoes Hats 

The Snappiest Lines ever shown 
in Maine 




FRANK M. LOW & CO. 
PORTLAND, MAINE 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

WILLIAM S. HART 

IN 

THE DEVIL'S DOUBLE 




FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

DUSTIN FARNUM 

IN 

A MAN'S FIGHT 



NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

DORIS KENYON 

IN 

The Street of thie Seven Stars 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

STELLA TALBOT 

. IN 

THE PRICE OF INNOCENCE 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

EMMY WEHLEN 

IN 

FOOLS AND THEIR MONEY 



NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

IN 

FAKING INTO SOCIETY 

AND GAIL KANE in 

WHEN MEN BETRAY 



Vol. XUX. No. 13 



OCTOBER 21, 1919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



CONTENTS 




PAfiE 




PAGE 


Bcwdoin Rolls up 73 Points on 


"The Offensive on July 18th" 


129 


Fort McKinley 125 


Medical School Reception 


129 


Freshmen 7, Sophomores 125 


Additions to the Library 


130 


Annual Initiation Night 125 


Sunday Chapel 


130 


Chi Psi's Seventy-fifth Anni- 
versary 126 


New Professors 


130 


List of Chi Psi Alumni at An- 


On the Campus 


130 


nual Initiation 127 


With the Faculty 


131 


Yemprayura '23 127 


Alumni Notes 


131 


Rifle Club Meets 127 


Pre-Championship Notes 


132 


Tennis Managers Report, 1919 127 


Great Preachers Appeal For 


Big 


Editorials : 


Calibre Men To Lead Humanity 132 11 


Use of Library Books 128 






Improving Our College Singing 128 







BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Back Here" know JUD is in the game. 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OP 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



PRINTING 



OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER^S 

TOWN BUILDING BRUNSWICK 



The CoUege Book Store 

We wish to call your 
attention to our new 

FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

in a large man size pa- 
per. 

The stock is the well known 
OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

The price is $ 1 .00 per box 
F. W. CHANDLER & SON 



COLLEGE AND "PREP" SCHOOL MEN 

Clothing for Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 
ercoats and Ulsters. 




Hats 



Haberdashery 

Macullar Parker Company 

400 Washington St. Boston, Mass. 

"THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT" 



• 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



NEW MODELS 
FOR YOUNG MEN 

Belted suit and over- 
coat styles as well as 
plainer designs by 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 

who make clothes for 

young men and make 

them right. 

$35 AND MORE 

ALSO EVENING CLOTHES 

Haskell & Jones Co. 



Portland, 



Maine. 




ARRO^V 

softCOLLARS 

FIT WELL— WASH EASILY 

Clnett, PeabodySf Co., Inc., Troy, N. Y. 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 



NEW HATS 
NEW SHIRTS 

NEW TIES 



E. S. BODWELL & SON, 

Brunswick. 



Greenhouse 21 -W 
Residence 21-R 



WALTER 


L. 


LaROCK 


F- l_ O 


R 


1 S T 


Potted Plants 


and Cut Flowers 


Floral Designs 


for 


All Occasions 
15X Jordan Avenue 



SUPPLIES 

OF 

ALL 

KINDS 

and 

Pipes Cigarette Holders 

Safety Razors and Blades 

FRATERNITY STATIONERY 
60 cents 

Courson & Morton 

180 MAINE ST. The Bowling Alley is next door 



BOWDOIN ORILNT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCTOBER 21, 1919 



NO. 13 



BOWDOIN ROLLS UP 73 POINTS ON FORT 
McKINLEY. 

In a ragged game on Whittier Field Saturday, 
Bowdo'in swamped Fort McKinley "]}, to 4. Bow- 
doin used thirty men in the game, nearly every 
man with a uniform being given a chance. The 
score was the largest that Bowdoin has made 
for several seasons. Dahlgren, Dostie, and J. 
Smith did the best work for the White. Dahl- 
gren was the best ground-gainer, while Dostie 
and J. Smith each made a number of g"ood gains. 

Dahlgren made the first touchdown before the 
ball had been in play four minutes. Three more 
touchdowns were made before the end of the 
quarter. In the second quarter Bowdoin secured 
the ball on a forward pass and Dahlgren ran 
25 yards to make his third touchdown. Near 
the end of the half Thompson made a touchdown 
on another forward pass. The line-up was 
changed several times during the half. 

In the second half J. Smith drop-kicked a goal 
from the 30-yard line. Guptill secured the next 
touchdown and J. Smith and Thomson followed. 
Keeney kicked the goals. In the fourth quarter 
the ball was on Bowdoin's territor}' for the first 
time and McKinley made it only first downs. 
Drummond made the only touchdown during 
this quarter. 

Bowdoin was rather weak in getting under the 
punts but showed a fine offense and a strong 
line. 

The summary : 
BOWDOLN— —FORT McKINLEY 

Doherty, Thomson, le re., KroU, Guy 

Mason, Clifford, It rt., Rollins 

Brewster, Haines, Keeney, Ig rg., Schreiber 

McCurdy, Dudgeon, Safford, c c., Cleland 

Dudgeon. Kern, Wetherell, rg. . . .Ig., Jordan, Langham 

A. Smith, Guptill. rt It., Filkas 

Drummond, Swingleh^irst, Tootell, re., 

le., Heini, Guy, Langocooski 

Crockett, James, J. Smith, qb qb., Williams 

Dostie, James, Miller, Woodbury, Ihb., 

rhb., Grogan, Farkas, Crouse 

Dahlgren, Keeney, rhb Ihb., Humes 

Curtis, Meacham, Granger, fb..fb., Richardson, Grogan 

Score — Bowdoin 73, Fort McKinley 0. Touchdowns, 
Dahlgren 3, Thomson 2, Curtis, Dostie, J. Smith, Gup- 
till, Drummond. Goals from touchdown, Mason 5, 
Keeney 5. Goal from field, J. Smith. Referee, O'Brien 



of Lewiston. Umpire, Dwyer of Hebron. Head lines- 
man, Parent '21. Time, two fifteen and two twelve- 
minute periods. 

Score by quarters : 

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 

Bowdoin 28 14 24 7 — 73 

Fort McKinley o o o — o 



FRESHMEN 7, SOPHOMORES 0. 

The third and final game of the Freshman- 
Sophomore series was played last Thursday on 
the Delta. The Freshmen found no difficulty in 
hitting Flinn in nearly every inning of the six 
played. In the first Plummer, Hill, and Wakely 
crossed the plate putting the game on ice. An- 
other run was scored in the second inning, two 
in the third, and one in the fifth. The Sopho- 
mores had men on second and third bases at dif- 
ferent times in the game, but Walker always 
tightened up and the Sophs failed to make their 
opportunity good. The game was played in a 
drizzle which finally turned into a rain making 
clean handling of the ball difficult. 

Thus the results of the series are: 

First game, Freshmen i, Sophomores 0. 

Second game, Sophomores 2, Freshmen 0. 

Third game, Freshmen 7, Sophomores 0. 
FRESHMEN— —SOPHOMORES 

Plummer, 3b c.. Canter 

Davis, ss p.. Flinn 

Hill, c.f lb., Richards 

Wakely, c ss., Morrel 

Handy, ib 3b., Ferris 

Whitman, Towne, l.f l.f,, Hunt 

Butler, Hayes, r.f 2b., Smith 

Bisson, 2b c.f., Wagg 

Walker, p r.f., Page 

Score — Freshmen 7, Sophomores o. Umpire, Mason 



ANNUAL INITIATION NIGHT. 

On Wednesday, Oct. 15, most of the fraterni- 
ties held their annual initiations. Following the 
initiation ceremonies and the banquets the mem- 
bers of each house followed the old Bowdoin 
custom of marching around to the other fra- 
ternities singing their songs and cheering each 
group. Every party wound up in front of old 
King Chapel with a long cheer for Bowdoin and 
"Bowdoin Beata" with bared heads. Many 



126 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



alumni and guests from other chapters were 
present for the festivities. Following is a list 
of the guests from each house : 

Alpha Delta Phi — Edward Stanwood '6i, 
Arthur W. Perkins '87, Wilbert G. Mallett '91, 
Marshall P. Cram '04, Anthony H. Fisk ex-'og, 
William B. Uulty '10, James C. Philoon '13, 
Arthur L. Pratt '14, Earl S. Thompson '14, 
Kenneth E. Ramsay '15, Roy J. W. Ashey ex-'i8, 
John W. Thomas ex-'i8, Donald S. Higgins '19, 
Roswell D. Emerson ex-'20, Nahum P. Moore 
ex-'20. 

Psi Upkilon — E. W. Freeman '85, Woodfords, 
Me. ; C. I. Hutchinson '90, Portland, Me. ; Dr. 
C. T. Burnett, Amherst '95, Brunswick, Me.; 
A. B. Moore '00, Portland, Me. ; G. E. Fogg '02, 
Portland, Me.; P. W. Meserve '11, Brunswick, 
Me.; C. H. Tapley ex-'i4, Allston, Mass.; Major 
C. F. Houghton ex-'i5, Portland, Me.; D. H. 
Sayward '16, Portland, Me.; E. I. Markthaler, 
Wesleyan '16, Brunswick, Me.; C. K. Ross '17, 
New York City; T. B. Fobes '17, New York 
City; H. R. Emery ex-'i8, Bucksport, Me.; E. 
Freeman '18, Woodfords, Me.; L. F. Wallace 
ex-'i8, Woodfords, Me.; G. S. Hargraves '19, 
New York City; D. D. Sweetser ex-'2i, Wood- 
fords, Me.; P. J. Mundi Medic '22, Brunswick, 
Me.; H. W. Hanson, Medic '22, Brunswick, Me. 

Delta Kappa Epsilon — F. N. Whittier '85, 
Charles S. Christie '95, John Clair Minot '96, 
John H. Bates '96, Robert K. Eaton '05, Ralph 
O. Brewster '09, Franz U. Burkett '11, Leland G. 
Means '12, Edwin C. Burleigh '13, George O. 
Cummings '13, Arthur S. Merrill '14, Harry M. 
Chatto '15, Noel C. Little '17. 

Members of Delta Kappa Epsilon from other 
•chapters were: J. Gleason Perry '20, of Xi ■ 
Chapter, Colby; Warren T. Mayers of Sigma 
Chapter, Amherst; Lucien D. Fuller of Upsilon 
Chapter, Brown. 

Theta Delta Chi — Professor Wilmot B. 
Mitchell '90, Brunswick, Me.; Walter P. Perkins 
'80, Cornish, Me. ; James M. Chandler '08, Lans- 
downe, Pa.; Myrton A. Bryant '04, Collingswood, 
N. J.; R. R. Lane, Westbrook, Me.; Luther 
Dana '03, Westbrook, Me.; Kenneth G. Stone '17, 
Westbrook, Me.; Carl J. Longren '18, Jefferson, 
Me. ; Leon U. Walker '03, Portland, Me. ; Ernest 
R. Woodbury '95, Saco, Me. ; Z. Willis Kemp '84, 
Kingston, N. H. ; Everett M. Waterhouse '97, 
Saco, Me.; Kenneth Towle Burr '16, Boston, 
Mass.; James Gregory Baine Lappin '15, Port- 
land, Me.; D. F. Mahoney '18, Auburn, Me.; 
C. C. Abbott, 12, Auburn, Me.; E. F. Abbot '03, 
Auburn, Me.; Harlow B. Mosher '19, Brooklyn, 



N. Y. ;L. A. Melcher '17, Brunswick, Me.; John 
H. Slocum '13, Auburn, Me.; L. G. Barton 'ig, 
Auburn, Me. ; Thomas H. Chase '04, Bucksfield, 
Me. 

Zeta Psi — Professor H. C. Bell, Lambda Psi, 
H. C. Wilbur '94, C. A. Baker '78, L. A. Cousins 
'02, D. J. Edwards '16, E. S. Anthoine '02, E. O. 
La Casce '14, L. M. Stetson ex-'i5, S. L. Fogg 
'89, P. C. Lunt '13, J. A. Clark '05, H. E. Locke 
'12, M. W. Burlingame '12, R. E. G. Burly 
'10, S. H. Hussey '11, E. G. Wilson '98, F. Owen, 
Chi '87, R. B. Soule '16. 

Beata Theta Pi — George R. Gardner '01, 
William T. Johnson '06, William S. Linnell '07, 
Willis E. Roberts '07, Daniel F. Koughan '09, 
S. Sewall Webster '10, George H. Macomber '11, 
Francis T. Garland '14, Clarence Brown '14, 
Leigh Webber '16, Charles E. Allen '17, Ernest 
Fuller '17, Dwight W. Pierce '17, Raymond V. 
Swift '17, John B. Matthews '18, George H. 
Casey '19, P. E. Graves '19, Stephen E. Perkins 
'19, James E. Vance '19. 

Delegates from other chapters : Henry W. 
Turgeon, U. of M.'; Yardley Chittick, M. I. T. 

Kappa Sigma — Reuel W. Smith '99, Ralph H. 
Files '09, Vyndel A. Hewes '11, Henry A. Briggs 
'12, Bryant E. Moulton '13, Leon E. Jones '13, 
Manning C. Multon '15, Herbert H. Foster '16, 
James C. Oliver '17, Harold L. Doten '17, and 
Reuel W. Whitcomb, delegate from Psi Chapter, 
University of Maine. 

Delta Upsilon — W. W. Simonton, K. Burns, 
L. F. Parmenter, H. W. Owen, S. Marsh, C. E. 
Richardson, C. A. Skillin, C. F. Kendall, W. S. 
McCormack, W. R. McGill, L. C. Evans, J. S. 
Stetson, H. D. Gilbert, G. A. Howe, W. F. 
Skillin, A. F. Cowan, A. L. Laferrure, G. C. 
Wheeler, F. J. Cowan, L. B. Shackford, D. F. 
Weber, W. H. Farrar, W. Wood, P. D. Mitchell, 
F. W. Jacobs, R. C. Wiley, G. E. Greely, J. W. 
Coburn, G. C. Weber, F. W. Brown, B. W. 
Russel, E. S. Paul, F. D. MacCormack, J. B. 
Stride, H. S. Dennison (Maine State), S. B. 
Furbish (Amherst), W. H. Davis (Harvard), 
R. L. Sprague (Colby). 

Sigma Nu — Hendrie Grant Medic '20, Henry 
Howard Medic '21, Langdon White '16, Stuart 
DeMott '18, Clyde Stevens '19, Ralph Peabody 



CHI PSI'S SEVENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY. 

On Saturday, October 18, Alpha Eta of Chi 
Psi celebrated the seventy-fifth anniversary of 
its foundation at Bowdoin. After a general 
gathering in the afternoon, the annual initiation 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



127 



was held which was followed by a banquet at 
Hotel Eag'le. Many alumni of Alpha Eta and 
of other Alphas were in Brunswick on this oc- 
casion, prominent among this number being Hon. 
Harold Smith of Portland, a graduate of 
Amherst in the Class of '75. 



LIST OF CHI PSI ALUMNI AT ANNUAL 
INITIATION. 

Class of 1916 — Francis H. Bate, James H. 
Brewster, Carroll W. Hodgkins. 

Class of 1917 — Lafayette F. Dow, Frank E. 
Noyes, Arthur B. Scott, I. Mervyn Webber. 

Class of 1918 — Richard P. Keigwin, Norman 
D. Stewart. 

Class of 1919 — Orson L. Berry, Allan W. 
Sylvester. 



YEMPRAYURA, '23. 



South Appleton has a very interesting tenant 
in Waht Yemprayura of Bangkok, Siam. He is 
a worker and his 'perseverance should be an 
example to every American young man. 

The story of his life in his native country is 
a long narrative but the substance of it all 
centers about his school life. In scholastic work 
he was an outstanding figure. He was finally 
chosen by his government for further study here 
in the United States. 

Looking back nearly a year we would have 
found him en route for America from Bangkok, 
via Singapore, Manila, Hongkong, Nagasaki, 
Yokahama, and Hawaii to San Francisco. From 
the Golden Gate he crossed the continent to 
Cambridge, Mass. Here he was under the super- 
vision of an older Siamese who sent him last 
year to Wilbraham Academy in Massachusetts. 

After completing his course at Wilbraham he 
was ready to enter college. It was originally 
planned to send him to college in the West but 
kind fate decreed otherwise. At Wilbraham he 
had been in close connection with one of the in- 
structors there. This man was a Bowdoin gradu- 
ate in the Class of 1913 and he pursuaded his 
Oriental prodigy to look over his alma mater. 

So Bowdoin was finally decided upon and the 
name of Waht Yemprayura is on the roster of 
the Freshman Class. He intends to study medi- 
cine and then return and aid his people in far 
off Siam. 

When asked how he liked Bowdoin he an- 
swered simply — "Fine." There is a world of 
meaning in that one word which expresses every 
Bowdoin man's opinion of his parent school. 



RIFLE CLUB MEETS. 

The Rifle Club held its first meeting last 
Thursday evening in the Union. Plans were dis- 
cussed for putting the club on its pre war basis 
and a campaign for new members was in- 
augurated. Schlosberg '20, who led the original 
club, gave a short talk on the advantageous offers 
of the club and its previous work. 

The yearly dues are one dollar, in consider- 
ation of which, under National Rifle Associa- 
tion, ruling, each member has the privilege of 
drawing one hundred and twenty rounds of 
thirty calibre ammunition. Rifles are furnished 
by the club. 

Indoor work at the Armory will start soon 
and it is quite probable that the government will 
furnish Springfield rifles for outdoor work in 
place of the Krags which are used at the 
present time. 

Before the war, the club had a membership of 
one hundred and it is desired to equal that 
number now. Forty men have already indicated 
their intentions of becoming members and all 
others who desire to join are requested to hand 
their names to a fraternity delegate or to at- 
tend the next meeting. 

The club will meet within a few days and all 
interested are requested to attend. Officers for 
the coming year will be elected and other busi- 
ness matters will be discussed. 



TENNIS MANAGER'S REPORT, 1919. 

EXPENSES. 

Stationery $ 3.50 

N. E. L. T. A. entry fee and dues. 15.00 

Balls 16.02 

Bates trips (two) 16.30 

N. E. I. T. trip -. 49.50 

Cups for interscholastics 14.00 

Cut in Bugle 6.00 

Portland trip 12.00 

Balls, cups for Maine Intercol- 
legiate 27.66 

Postage for interscholastic ('18). 1.90 
Postage, express, telephone ('19) . 4.12 

Total expenses $166.00 

A. S. B. C. appropriation $145.00 

Dues from Colby 10.50 

Dues from Bates 10.50 

Total Receipts $166.00 

Balance $000.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

Allan W. Hall, Manager. 



128 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Tuesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 
Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 

Acting Managing Editor 
department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 ' Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Ronald L. McCormack, 1922 Exchange 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
Ronald B. Wadsworth, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Allan W. Hall, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 



Vol. XLIX. OCTOBER 21, 1919. 



No. 13 



Entered at Post Office at Bninswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
The Use of Library Books. 

It seems opportune at this time to mention the 
Library rules with regard to the use of books 
for the benefit of those who are new to Bowdoin 
this year. There has been in the past consider- 
able abuse of these rules, abuse which has re- 



sulted in injustice to many and needless incon- 
venience to many others. 

It is a standing rule of the Library that no 
book shall be taken out without being signed for 
at the charging desk, and that every book so 
signed for must be returned within four weeks. 
There has been a tendency in past years for 
many students to keep books out for indefinite 
periods with the result that the Librarian has 
been forced to send for the missing books at 
considerable inconvenience and cost. 

Another general rule of the Library, and the 
importance of which cannot be emphasized too 
strongly, is that books reserved by departments 
for outside reading can only be taken out at the 
close of Library hours, and must be returned as 
soon as the Library opens. It is most important 
that this be observed, as a violation often re- 
sults in loss and inconvenience to many. There 
is a strong temptation in many instances for a 
student to take a reserved book out in the midst 
of Library hours, without taking it to the charg- 
ing desk, or having taken it out, to return it 
several hours or a day late. Needless to say, 
such an act deprives some of opportunities which 
should be open to all. Why not follow the 
Library rules and give everyone an equal 
chance? 



Improving Our College Singing. 

It is at present, and has been for many years 
past, noticeably characteristic of Bowdoin stu- 
dents that they cannot sing their college songs 
well ; and the obvious reason for this is that they 
do not know them. You cannot but notice this 
at any student gathering or mass meeting where 
Bozvdoin Beata is sung. At first, there is an 
inarticulate humming until the chorus is reached 
when nearly everyone joins in a little real sing- 
ing, then another period of humming followed 
by the chorus, and so on. 

It is a piteous situation but one which can 
easily be remedied if every student will make it 
a point to learn for himself some of the more 
important college songs such as Bowdoin Bcata, 
Forzvard the White and Phi Chi. Fraternities 
should co-operate in the future by requiring their 
Freshmen to learn these college songs along with 
the fraternity songs. For the present, every man 
must assume personal responsibility. Fraternities 
offer very convenient units for group singing of 
college songs. The need of greater fraternity co- 
operation along this line cannot be too highly 
emphasized, for if every fraternity man knew 
the college songs, we would be well on our way 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



129 



toward removing this weak spot in our college 
activity. 



"THE OFFENSIVE OF JULY 18th." 

The Bowdoin Forum opened the season in the 
Union, Sunday evening, October 19, with Pro- 
fessor T. C. Van Cleve's lecture, "The Offensive 
of July 18," before a large and appreciative 
audience. Professor Van Cleve was a captain of 
the American General Headquarters in France 
and is well informed concerning his subject. 

He told most interestingly of the greatest bat- 
tles in which the Americans took active part, 
Chateau-Thierry, Belleau Wood, and several 
others. He explained in considerable detail the 
plans of General Ludendorff and Marshal Foch, 
revealing the means through which the Allies 
received warning's of the intended German at- 
tack. With the aid of several maps, he pointed 
out the different stages of the great battle and 
mentioned fhe movements of several of the di- 
visions to which some of the college men were 
attached. 




PROFESSOR T. C. VAN CLEVE, 
Who Spoke in Forum, Sunday Evening. 

Following his lecture, he answered questions 
from both students and Faculty and at the close 
of the meeting there was a strong desire for 
many other such treats in the Forum during the 
year. 



The Forum is managed by the Debating 
Council of which Taylor '20 is president and 
Buker '21 is manager. This organization hopes 
to present several such interesting sessions dur- 
ing the year with speakers from among the 
specialists in such interesting fields as Labor, 
Politics, Athletics, Boston Police Strike, and 
questions of national and international import- 
ance. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL RECEPTION. 

With a cordial word of welcome and words 
of sound advice to Medics and Pre-Medics, Dean 
Addison S. Thayer, head of the school of Medi- 
cine, opened the reception given in honor of 
Medical Students of Bowdoin, through the as- 
sistance of the Y. M. C. A., in the Union on 
Friday evening, October 17th. Dean Thayer 
stated that those students entering the school at 
present were doing so at the end of a critical 
period. The fight for individual work has been 
won and the present and future students have 
much for which to be thankful. "I am honored," 
said Dean Thayer, "to welcome all of you to our 
school with its bright future before us." 

A welcome from the College and from the 
Town of Brunswick was tendered by Professor 
Wilmot B. Mitchell. He spoke of the Bowdoin 
atmosphere as a stepping stone for students of 
medicine ; how hospitality and brotherhood were 
learned in her halls. Speaking highly of the 
medical profession, he remarked, "I congratulate 
you men on your choice of the medical profes- 
sion. It is one of the noblest works a man can 
do. You are like the great and glorious sun in 
the high heavens — like the sun on Bowdoin's 
shield. You help to bring light to the world and 
make homes brighter." In speaking of a phy- 
sician's preparedness, he concluded, "Blessed is 
the faithful servant whom the Lord findeth, when 
He cometh, ready." 

Following Professor Mitchell, Dean Paul 
Nixon extended on behalf of the collegiate mem- 
bers, their pleasure in welcoming medical stu- 
dents to Bowdoin College. He pointed out, in a 
short interesting way, the value of the Humani- 
ties, especially Latin, to medical men. 

Dr. Earl C. Follett of the Medical School 
Faculty said a few words on the work of the 
Medical School at the present day. He told of 
the hard work ahead of the men but evidently 
did not frighten them with his threats. 

A period of informality followed the speeches, 
during which fancy cakes and ice cream were 
served to the seventy-five men present. Much 



130 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



thanks are due to Dr. F. N. Whittier whose 
generosity made the reception possible, and to 
President John G. Young of the Bowdoin Y. M. 
C. A. for the able management of the occasion. 



ADDITIONS TO LIBRARY. 

The Library has just received some fifteen 
hundred volumes in general literature from the 
books of the Rev. William H. Pierson, D.D., of 
the Class of 1864. The collection is strong in 
biography, containing most of the best writings 
that have been published along that line in recent 
years. Mr. Pierson was a lover of good liter- 
ature and had more than two thousand books 
besides his theological library. 

The first shipment of books since the war be- 
gan has just been received from Germany. It 
contains a Weimar edition of Goethe in one 
hundred and thirty-seven volumes. These books 
were ordered before the war and have been 
awaiting shipment for five years. 

Other books of general interest which have 
been recently received are : 

"Theodore Roosevelt," an intimate biography 
by Thayer. 

"The Greatest of These," a recent novel of 
Archibald Marshall, which many consider his 
best work. 

"Far Away Stories," a collection of short 
stories by W. J. Locke. 

"Alaska," one of the "See America First" 
series, containing many interesting illustrations, 
by A. R. Burr. 

The four books following should be of great 
interest to the student of the World War. 

"The Romanians' Cause and Ideals," L. A. 
Magnus. 

"Modern Germany," "Foundations of Ger- 
many," and "Great Problems of British States- 
manship," J. E. Barker. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL. 



In a very forceful address in Chapel Sunday 
Professor Mitchell spoke of the present need of 
powerful men and of the reasons why a college 
should train students to be such. He empha- 
sized the importance of hard work, self-control, 
and realization of the meaning of college train- 
ing, in the development of power. The present 
method of entrance examinations was considered 
in contrast to the new system in use at Columbia 
in respect to the picking of men for college who 
can be developed. Various other phases of 
learning were taken up in a most interesting 
.and helpful manner. 



NEW PROFESSORS. 

Professor H. K. Stone, a graduate of the LTni- 
versity of Michigan, is an instructor in French 
and Spanish at Bowdoin. Professor Stone has 
had a particularly fine preparation in the 
Romance languages. For three years he taught 
and did post-graduate work in the University of 
Chicago, having previously been at New Orleans. 
Later he taught at Northwestern University, 
University of Minnesota, University of Illinois, 
Grinnell College, and Columbia University. Pro- 
fessor Stone has also studied in Paris, where he 
perfected his knowledge of the French language. 

Noel Little, a graduate of Bowdoin in the 
Class of 1917, is an instructor in Physics. 



2Dn tDe Campus 

Jack Magee is planning an informal inter- 
class track meet to be held within a week or so, 
to bring out new material for the team. 

A holiday was given on the afternoon of Wed- 
nesday, Oct. isth, and on the morning of the 
next day because of the annual fraternity initia- 
tions Wednesday night. 

After the Bates and Colby games it is planned 
to hold informal dances in the Union. These 
will be under the direction of the governing 
board of the Union. 

It is doubtful whether the annual Football 
Dance will be given this year. 

The Cross Country Team will not run Tufts as 
had been planned. Manager Buker has received 
word from Tufts that their Cross Country Team 
has disbanded. 

Monday evening, Oct. 13th, there was a meet- 
ing in the Town Hall of citizens of the town 
and students at Bowdoin to consider the idea of 
a Roosevelt Memorial. Professor Davis was 
chairman of the committee in charge of the 
meeting. 

Rev. T. E. Ashby conducted Chapel on Tues- 
day, Oct. 14th. 

A great many alumni were seen on the Campus 
Wednesday and Thursday of last week who came 
for the annual fraternity initiations. The num- 
ber back was larger than it has .been for several 
years because so many have returned from the 
war during the last few months. 

Delegates from chapters at other colleges were 
also on the Campus. 

Jack Magee went to Portland Friday to umpire 
the Hebron- Westbrook game there. 

The usual fraternity stunts were performed in 
town and at the fair grounds Tuesday and Wed- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



131 



nesday afternoons. They afforded great pleasure 
to the onlookers. 

Track Manager Buker has received a good 
offer from M. I. T. for a cross country meet 
there. No decision has yet been made. 

Plans for the fall tennis tournament to bring 
out tennis material are maturing rapidly. A large 
number of men have signed up to play. The 
tournament will probably be held this week. 

Trials for the Freshmen Glee Club candidates 
were held Tuesday and Thursday of last week. 
The Class of '23 promises to be well represented. 

There has been a decided shortage of text 
books this fall. It has been nearly impossible to 
secure certain books and the result has been 
necessarily harmful. 

The state football series started last Saturday 
when Bates played Colby for a tie of "j-j at 
Waterville. Next Saturday Bates plays Maine 
at Lewiston and Bowdoin plays Colby here. 

Brown 'lo left Friday for Boston to attend 
a meeting of the N. E. I. C. A. A. 

Many happy faces between black Freshman 
caps and new fraternity pins were seen on the 
Campus Thursday morning. 

Trainer "Jack" Magee is beginning to pick the 
jumpers out of the Freshman track squad. He is 
nearly ready to pick the '23 cross country team 
which will run against Hebron Academy soon. 

According to the latest report of the Class of 
'94, two sons of members of that class are now 
attending Bowdoin, Pickard '22, and Thomas '22. 



aOitl) tt)e jFacuItp 

Dean Nixon left for Hanover Friday morning 
where he is to attend the centennial exercises 
at Dartmouth College. He will be away for 
several days. 

President Sills is still on his tour of Western 
cities where he is speaking at Alumni gatherings 
on behalf of the college. He will return to 
Brunswick on the 22nd of this month. 

Mr. Furbish is now away on a two weeks' 
vacation. 

Professor Mitchell was the speaker at Sunday 
Chapel. 



Alumni J13ote0 

'32 — The recent death in Cambridge of Mrs. 
Anne Goodwin Vaughan, wife of the late Ben- 
jamin Vaughan, is of interest to Bowdoin men 
inasmuch as Mrs. Vaughan, who was born in 
Brunswick in 1838, was the daughter of the 
Reverend Daniel Raynes Goodwin '32. He was 



professor of modern languages at Bowdoin from 
1835 until 1853, when he was elected president 
of Trinity College. He occupied this position 
until i860. Later he was dean of Bowdoin 
(from 1868 to 18S4). 

'94 — Reverend Trelawney C. Chapman, Jr., 
who has been the pastor of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church in York Village for about a 
year and a half, resigned his pastorate recently. 
He has accepted the chaplaincy and superintend- 
ency of certain departments in Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania. Formerly, he has had pastorates 
in Eliot, Kent's Hill, and Conway, N. H. 

'98 — The French Republic has made Thomas 
Lewis Pierce a chevalier of the Legion of 
Honour in recognition of the military services 
performed by him during the war. Mr. Pierce 
was formerly Lieutenant Colonel of the 325th 
U. S. Infantry and received the Distinguished 
Service Cross and the Croix de Guerre with 
palm for gallantry in action. The college con- 
ferred the honorary degree of Master of Arts 
on him last June. 

'98 — Hodgdon Brothers of East Boothbay, 
Maine, announced last Wednesday that plans 
have been drawn for the new vessel which 
Donald B. MacMillan '98 is to use next year. 
The ship is to be built with money contributed 
by Bowdoin men. It is owned by the MacMillan 
Arctic Club, of which there are about two 
hundred and fifty members from various parts 
of the country. It will be chartered to the Na- 
tional Geographical Society. The schooner is to 
be eighty-five feet long, and equipped with 
auxiliary power. Mr. MacMillan is expected to 
commence his voyage next spring. 

'01 — George L. Lewis is teaching this year at 
Northland College, Wisconsin. He received a 
Master's degree from Bowdoin in 1903. In 1907 
he was appointed librarian in the Westfield 
Athenaeum, Mass. 

Hon. '03 — Henry Ernest Woods, upon whom 
Bowdoin conferred the degree of Master of Arts 
in 1903, died suddenly October 11 at Greenfield, 
Mass. Mr. Woods was born June 5, 1857, at 
Boston. At Harvard, he won Phi Beta Kappa 
honors. From 1901 until 1907 he was editor of 
the New England Historical and Genealogical 
Register. In 1907 he became Commissioner of 
Public Records for the state of Massachusetts. 
Mr. Woods had travelled widely in Europe, Asia 
Minor, North Africa, and in this country. 

'06 — Melvin T. Copeland, Ph.D., is now a full 
professor in the Harvard Graduate School, 
where he had been an assistant professor for the 



132 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



past four years. He received his doctor's degree 
in 1910 from Harvard. Later he received an 
appointment to the Harvard School of Business 
Administration. Here he did five years' work 
in four, while serving as a member of faculty, 
and also while under special appointment to war 
responsibilities in Washington. 

ex-' 12 — The wedding of Miss Roxa Morse of 
Bridgewater and Richard Odell Conant of Port- 
land took place in Portland October 9, 1919. 
Reverend Ashley Day Leavitt, D.D., officiated at 
the ceremony. 

'16 — Richard S. Fuller has a position with 
Chandler, Hovey and Co., a banking and broker- 
age firm. 

'17 — Clarence H. Crosby recently accepted a 
position in the jobbing house of Heinz Co. at 
Cambridge. Earl W. Cook is with Blake Bros. 
and Co., bankers and brokers. Lawrence H. 
Marston has gone into the accounting business 
of C. C. Hartshorn in Boston. 

'17 — Mr. J. W. Tuttle of Saxonville, and a 
graduate of Bowdoin College in the Class of 
1917, has been awarded the Faculty Scholarship 
at the Law School of Harvard University. Mr. 
Tuttle is now a student in the third-year class 
of the Harvard Law School. The Faculty 
Scholarships are awarded each year to a limited 
number of meritorious students who have been 
in the school one full year at least and who in- 
tend to remain in the school for the entire three- 
years' course. The award is made by the Cor- 
poration, on the recommendation of the Faculty, 
at the beginning of each academic year, but 
preference is given to members of the third- 
year class. 

'i7-'i9 — Philbrick and Shumway '17 and Bur- 
leigh and Doherty '19 are attending Harvard 
Law School. The four are living at 76 Oxford 
street, Cambridge, Mass. 

'19 — Grant B. Cole '19 is traveling for the 
American Radiator Company in Pennslyvania 
with his headquarters at Pittsburgh. 



PRE-CHAMPIONSHIP NOTES. 

Not very much satisfaction can be gained from 
comparing the scores of the various Maine col- 
leges so far this season in football, because we 
have not played teams of the same calibre as a 
general thing. But just as the championship 
series starts it may be of interest to note how 
the teams have fared. Summary : 

Maine 55, Fort McKinley 0. 

Maine 82, Fort Williams 0. 

Maine 0, West Point 7. 



Colby 99, Fort Williams 0. 
Colby o, Harvard 35. 
Bates o, Harvard 53. 
Bates o, New Hampshire 3. 
Bates 56, Fort McKinley o. 
Bates 7, Colby 7. 
Bowdoin o, Amherst 3. 
Bowdoin o. Brown 7. 
Bowdoin 0, Holy Cross 14. 
Bowdoin 73, Fort McKinley 0. 



GREAT PREACHERS APPEAL FOR BIG 
CALIBRE MEN TO LEAD HUMANITY. 

Foremost preachers of many denominations 
unite with Dr. J. Campbell White, formerly 
president of Wooster College and now Life Ser- 
vice head of the Literchurch World Movement, 
in an effort to make up an alarming and danger- 
ous deficiency in Christian leaders. 

About four hundred thousand new leaders will 
be needed in the next five years by the evangeli- 
cal denominations of the United States alone. 

"Big men" of character and ability must be 
drawn into Christian work, to make Christianity 
a real force in every day life. It would be easy 
to supply quantity, to get the four hundred 
thousand through an emotional appeal, but what 
is wanted is the coming men of power in the 
community. 

Every college man knows there are men in his 
class who would be useless and inept if they 
tried to tackle a difficult foreign mission task, or 
create a centre of light and hope in a slum, or 
lead a congregation in a virile, healthy Chris- 
tian life. And he also knows the men in his 
class who would be a great strength in such a 
cause, whose strength would be "as the strength 
of ten." 

Dr. Campbell and his associates hope to have 
every such young natural leader of men consider 
deeply and conscientiously whether he can make 
any more satisfactory use of his talents in these 
tumultuous times than in helping to steer hu- 
manity to a world Christian civilization. 

A score of prominent clergymen have written 
out for Dr. Campbell their ideas on "Why I Am 
Glad I Am a Minister." 

Dr. Charles Edward Jefferson (Congregation- 
alist) of New York City, a member of the Yale 
Corporation, says : 

"The minister has daily opportunity of mak- 
ing a contribution toward the building of a better 
world. Everybody admits that we cannot get on 
with the world as it is, and millions are longing 
for a world which is happier and better. That 



BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 133 


is the supreme mission of the minister-building 
a better world." 

Rev. Lathan A. Crandall (Baptist) Minne- 
apolis, Minn. : 

"All human progress has been due to the in- 
fluence of a spiritual interpretation of life, and 
this interpretation is set forth in the life and 
teaching of Jesus as nowhere else." 

Dr. Cleland Boyd McAfee (Presbyterian) Chi- 
cago, 111.: 

"The thing I am set to preach would heal the 
open sore of labor and caiptal, of race suspicion, 
of political injustice. The process is slow and 
long, but it works toward the right end and 


FALL STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

John A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 


every minister can give his life to it." 

Dr. William Horace Day (Congregationalist) 
Bridgeport, Conn.: 

"Failure in social enterprise is in a large 
measure due to the lack of leadership. The man 
of genuine consecration, made efficient by train- 
ing, finds in the ministry the most challenging op- 
portunities to lead." 

Dr. Charges C. Selecman (Methodist Episco- 
pal South) Los Angeles, Cal. : 

"The work of the minister is of a very practi- 
cal character. It is an almost ideal union of the 
practical and theoretical. This may explain the 


A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office - - - Brunswick, Maine 


BUTLER'S 


fact that the ministry has produced such men 
as Paul, Savonarola, Wesley, Brooks, and others, 
who have combined in marked degree intellectual 
greatness with eminent administrative ability." 

Dr. White states that if any man interested 
will write to him in care of the Interchurch 




PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSON'S PHARMACY 


World Movement, New York City, he will be 




glad to give detailed information describing the 
unique world opportunities of today. 


CLIFTON C. POOLER 


WANTED 

Student to sell high grade line of toilet re- 


SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 


quisites, $25 per week for active fellow. 

DOVER SUPPLY COMPANY 

530 Tremont St. Boston, Mass. 


CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 

4 Elm Street 


MESERVE'S FRUIT SHERBET 


The Blended Product of the Natural Juices of 
Sound Ripe Fruit and Berries. A Delicious and 
Healthful Beverage for Receptions, Teas and 
Parties. Prepared only by 

P. J-. MESERVE, Pharmacist, 
Near Post Office, Brunswick, Maine 


HARVARD DENTAL SCHOOL 

A Department of Harvard University 

Graduates of secondary schools admitted without ex- 
amination provided they have taken required subjects. 
Modern buildings and equipment. Fall term opens 
September 22, 1919. Degree of D.M.D. Catalog. 
EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D., Dean, Boston, Mass. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

" UNION " LUNCH 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 
Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 
FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 

We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16. 

WE CARRY 

Co-operative Shoes 
New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 
LARGEST AND BEST 

stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



LAW 

AND AMERICA'S 
WORLD POSITION 



ti international 
challenges the 



America's new place 
politics and commerce 
young American. 
He must equip himself for new world 
conditions with a knowledge of legal funda- 
mentals. 

LAW — its principles and application to all 
business is almost as necessary to the 
coming business man as it is indispensable 
to the lawyer. 
Qualify for real leadership. 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

gives a thorough training in legal 

principles. 

LL.B. Course requires 3 years. 

For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 



Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 

TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 



BATH, MAINE 



J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The Bowdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 

Portland 

ANTIQIVTY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

fflJin jFurniturt, ©ID China, ©etnttr, ffitt. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 

to orders for antique goods of any kind 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULES BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 



BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short Notice by competent work- 
men. We- use only the Best 
of Leather. 
E. WHITTOM 



WILLIAM F. FERRIS 

COLLEGE AGENT 

Citizens Laundry 



AUTO SERVICE 



9 SOUTH APPLETON 



Telephone 160 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 



Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
J. G. FA GE COMPANY, Bath 



^^The Store of Progress and Service'' 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

W^e take pleasure in announcing to the men of Bowdoin Col- 
Nettleton lege that we have appointed as our representative 

Shoes Mr. Jack Handy '23, located at the Zeta Psi House 

Whenever you come to Portland don't fail to visit our COL- 
LEGE ROOM, specially designed for you College men with 
young men in attendance to look after your requirements. In 
the meantime if you should desire anything in the line of 
Clothing, Shirts, Underwear, Hosiery, 
Neckwear, Shoes, Hats, Sweaters, Gloves, Etc. 
Mr. Handy will be glad to confer with you and take your order, 
guaranteeing you prompt, careful and satisfactory service. 



RTL.AIMD 



Manhattan 
Shirts 

Carter's 
bnderwear 



IVIOIMLJIV1EIM-r SQUA.IRE: F»0 

THE HOME OF KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES 





Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

ETHEL CLAYTON 

IN 

A SPORTING CHANCE 




FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

H. B. WARNER 

IN 

The Man Who Turned White 

NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

DOROTHY GISH 

IN 

BATTLING JANE 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

HAROLD BELL WRIGHT'S 
THE SHEPHERD OF THE HILLS 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

BERT LYTELL 

IN 

One Thing At A Time O'Day 



NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

MAE MURRAY 

IN 

WHAT AM I BID? 



Vol. XLIX. No. 14 



OCTOBER 28, 1919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 





CONTENTS 






PARE 




PAGE 


Bowdoin Whitewashes Colby 


135 


Cross-Country Coming Strong 


140 


Football Rally 


137 


Bowdoin Club of Boston Suppoi 


ts 


Interclass Track Meet 


137 


Curtis 


140 


Debating 


137 


Report of Track Manager 


140 


Varsity Debating 


137 


State Baseball Schedule 


140 


Editorial: 




The President's Western Trip 


141 


The Student Forum 


138 


Announcement 


141 


^ Communications: 




Freshman- Sophomore Debate 


141 


Freshman Spirit 


138 


Freshman Football Prospect 


141 


A Word to the Freshmen 


139 


On the Campus 


141 


Student Directory 


139 


With the Faculty 


142 


Union Dance 


139 


Alumni Notes 


142 


Student Council 


139 


Saturday's Football Scores 


143 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys ''Back Here" know JUD is in the game. 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



PRINTING 



OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER^S 

TOWN EUILIIING BHUKSWICK 



Tbe College Book Store 

We wish to call your 
attention to our new 

FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

in a large man size pa- 
per. 

The stock is the well known 
OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

The price is $ 1 .00 per box 
F. W. CHANDLER & SON 



COLLEGE AND "PREP" SCHOOL MEN 

Clothing for Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 
ercoats and Ulsters. 




Hats 



Haberdashery 

MacuUar Parker Company 

400 Washington St. Boston, Mass. 

"THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT" 



BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


'^owDoir 

and FRATERNITY 

BANNERS, PILLOWS & SKINS 
FELT, SILK & LEATHER GOODS 

Orders taken if goods wanted are not 


FALL STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

John A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 


on hand 
FOR PRICES SEE 

Kenneth S. Boardman 

, PSI U HOUSE 


A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. P. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office - - - Brurswick, Maine 


BUTLER^S 


DANCING 




Miss Jennie S. Harvey's Evening Dancing 
Class and Assembly every Tuesday evening at 
Town Hall, Brunswick, commencing Oct. 21st. 

Lesson 7.30 p. m. Assembly 8.30 p. m. 

This class is open to college students. 

Private instruction by appointment. 

Monday evening Class and Assembly at Arm- 




PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSON'S PHARMACY 




ory Hall, Bath. 

Address 897 Middle St., Bath, Maine. 'Phone 
151-W. 


CLIFTON C. POOLER 


WANTED 

Student to sell high grade line of toilet re- 


SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 


quisites, $25 per week for active fellow. 

DOVER SUPPLY COMPANY 

530 Tremont St. Boston, Mass. 


CARL H, MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 


MESERVE'S FRUIT SHERBET 


4 Elm Street 


The Blended Product of the Natural Juices of 
Sound Ripe Fruit and Berries. A Delicious and 
Healthful Beverage for Receptions, Teas and 
Parties. Prepared only by 

P. J. MESERVE, Pharmacist, 
Near Post Office, Brunswick, Maine 


HARVARD DENTAL SCHOOL 

A Department of Harvard University 

Graduates of secondary schools admitted without ex- 
amination provided they have taken required subjects. 
Modern buildings and equipment. Fall term opens 
September 22, 1919, Degree of D.M.D. Catalog. 
EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D., Dean, Boston, Mass. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



NEW MODELS 
FOR YOUNG MEN 

Belted suit and over- 
coat styles as well as 
plainer designs by 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 

who make clothes for 

young men and make 

them right. 

$35 AND MORE 

ALSO EVENING CLOTHES 

Haskell & Jones Co. 



Portland, 



Maine. 




ARRONV 

T'RQY HlAILOKED 

softCOLLARS 

FIT WELL— WASH EASILY 

Cluett, Peabody^ Co., fnc, Troy, N. Y. 



ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



GOOD VALUES IN 

Young Men's Suits 

$26 to $45 



E. S. BODWELL & SON, 

Brunswick. 



Greenhouse 21 -W 
Residence 21-R 

WALTER L. LaROCK 
F- I- O R I S T 

Potted Plants and Cut Flowers 
Floral Designs for All Occasions 

15% Jordan Avenue 



SUPPLIES 

OF 

ALL 

KINDS 

and 

Pipes Cigarette Holders 

Safety Razors and Blades 

FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

60 cents 

Courson & Morton 

180 MAINE ST. The Bowling Alley is next door 



BOWDOIN ORILNT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCTOBER ?8, 1919 



NO. 14 



BOWDOIN WHITEWASHES COLBY. 

Before a large crowd on Whittier Field, Bow- 
doin surprised and outplayed Colby in an in- 
teresting gridiron battle Saturday. The Bow- 
doin eleven surprised Colby in all phases of the 
game and gave evidence of the advantage of its 
steady practice and training under Coach Greene 
and Trainer Magee. The game was featured by 
long and spectacular runs by both teams. 

The Bowdoin backfield contains two stellar 
backs in Dostie and Dahlgren who gained 
through Colby repeatedly. Dostie played a great 
offensive game and his end runs sent the Bow- 
doin rooters cheering wildly many times. He 
scored three of Bowdoin's four touchdowns. 
Dahlgreji, the other scorer, consistently gained 
with plunges through the line and broken field 
running. 

Curtis played the shining defensive game get- 
ting through the interference time and again for 
hard sure tackles. Crockett at quarterback 
showed excellent generalship in his handling of 
the team. 

Bowdoin has also found a valuable player in 
Mason, a Freshman, whose drop kick from the 
38-yard line was not to be excelled. The White 
linesmen plowed through Colby and drove her 
line before them with an impetus impossible to 
withstand, and met the Colby offensive with a 
stonewall defence. 

Brewster, acting captain, at left guard and 
tackle, McCurdy at center, Kern and Dudgeon 
figured conspiciously in the line. 

The Colby line was surprisingly weak and was 
mowed down in nearly every play by its hard- 
hitting opponents. Niles, the colored Colby half 
back, was the only important ground gainer. 
Jacobs, their star full back was forced to be con- 
tent with one 3S-yard run in the first period, 
while Bucham's kicking fell short of expecta- 
tions. 

The game started with a rush. Bowdoin 
kicked off, and Colby punted on first down. 
Dostie caught the punt, and ran the ball back 
40 yards to Colby's 30-yard line. After three 
unsuccessful attempts to gain through Colby's 
line, Mason, standing on the 40-yard line, tried 
for a field goal. The ball carried far enough 



but the direction was bad. Colby kicked from 
her 20-yard line, on the first down, and Dahlgren 
and Dostie carried the ball to Colby's goal line. 
Dahlgren carried it over for the first touchdown. 
Mason kicked the goal. 

When Colby received the ball on the second 
kick off, she began rushing the ball from an 




ACTING CAPTAIN BREWSTER, 
Who Figured Strongly in Saturday's Game. 

open formation which carried it to Bowdoin's 
15-yard line. This was Colby's best chance to 
score, but she fumbled, and, after one line plunge, 
Bowdoin punted to the middle of the field. Colby 
here completed the only successful forward pass 
on the game, lost ground by a poor snap-back, 
and punted. Dahlgren ran the ball back 40 



136 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



yards, and the quarter ended. Score, Bowdoin 
7; Colby 0. 

The second quarter commenced with the ball 
in Bowdoin's possession on Colby's 47-yard line. 
After getting- first down on line plunges, Bow- 
doin rushed the ball back to the lo-yard line, 
and tried another forward pass which grounded 
behind the goal line. Colby kicked from her 20- 



CAPTAIN RHOADS, 
Out of the Colby Game from Injuries but Ex- 
pected To Be Back Soon. 

yard line. On the next play Bowdoin was penal- 
ized 15 yards, but Dostie took the ball around 
end 40 yards to Colby's 26-yard line. Here Colby 
held and took the ball on downs. Colby kicked 
again, and this time Bowdoin carried the ball to 
the 4-yard line on line bucks and tackle plays. 
Dostie rushed the ball over the line. Mason 
kicked the goal. Bowdoin kicked off. Colby 
failed to gain by rushing and kicked. Dostie ran 
the ball back 25 yards, two or three line plunges 
were tried, and the half ended. Score, Bowdoin 
14; Colby o. 



Colby kicked off. Bowdoin carried the ball 
to the middle of the field, and kicked to Colby's 
i-yard line. Colby kicked on first down, and 
Dostie ran the ball back through a broken field 
to a touchdown. Mason kicked the goal. Bow- 
doin kicked off. The ball bounced down the field 
through the entire Colby team. Thompson fol- 
lowed it to the 5-yard line where he fell on it. 
Bowdoin's ball on Colby's 5-yard line. After 
two unsuccessful line bucks, Dostie scored a 
touchdown on the third attempt. Mason failed 
to kick the goal. Bowdoin kicked off to Colby's 
28-yard line. Colby brought the ball back to her 
45-yard line where Jacobs took it 40 yards on an 
open formation play. Bowdoin held here, and 
after getting the ball on downs, kicked to Colby's 
35-yard line. Colby tried an end run and a fake 
punt, and the quarter ended. Score, Bowdoin 27; 
Colby 0. 




TRAINER JACK MAGEE 

Who Has Trained the Team Into Shape for the 

State Series. 

Colby's ball on her 37-yard line. After an ex- 
change of punts, Colby fumbled, and Bowdoin 
carried the ball to Colby's 12-yard line where 
she lost it on downs. Colby punted from behind 
her goal line to her 40-yard line where James 
made a fair catch. Mason added 3 points to 
Bowdoin's total by a perfect drop kick from a 
difiicult angle. Bowdoin kicked off and was 
penalized half the distance to the goal line. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



137 



Colby made first down twice, attempted a for- 
ward pass which was intercepted by James, and 
the game ended. Score, Bowdoin 30; Colby 0. 

The summary : 
BOWDOIN— —COLBY 

Doherty, le le., Wolman 

■Guptill, It It., Bucknam 

Brewster, Ig Ig., Cook 

McCurdy, c c, Tyler 

Dudgeon, rg rg., Moreland 

Mason, rt rt., Pooler 

Drummond, re re., Pulsifer 

Crockett, qb qb., La Roe 

. Curtis, Ihb Ihb., Jacobs 

Dahlgren rhb rhb., Niles 

Dostie, fb fb., Kallock 

Score by periods : 

Bowdoin 7 7 13 3 — 30 

Colby — o 

Bowdoin, scoring: Touchdowns, Dostie 3, Dahlgren. 
Goals from touchdown. Mason 3. Goal from field. 
Mason. Substitutions, Bowdoin, Kern for Guptill ; 
James for Curtis, Thomson for Doherty, James for 
Dostie. Thomson for Drummond. Peacock for Dahl- 
gren, Meacham for Curtis, Clifford for Gerns, Smith 
for Peacock, Haines, Granger, Miller. For Colby, 
Gulick for Cook, Little for Pulsifer, Dalton for Pooler, 
Hamer f©r Kallock, Dalbeare for Little, Currier for 
Pulsifer, Tyler for Moreland, Sullivan for Jacobs. 
Referee, Murphy, Boston. Umpire, Crannell, Boston. 
Field judge and headlinesman. Kelley, Portland. Time 
of periods, 15 minutes each. 

FOOTBALL RALLY. 

Memorial Hall was filled Friday night at the 
first big football rally of the year in preparation 
for the Colby game. Supported by a noisy, 
spirited band of 35 pieces, the students soon en- 
tered into the atmosphere of the occasion. All 
the old cheers were practised. Speeches by Dean 
Nixon, Capt. Rhoads and Trainer Jack Magee 
stirred up the audience. Apples and "smokes" 
served to put the crowd in even better humor. 

Dean Nixon emphasized the importance of 
colleg'e support of athletics in the development 
of a particular kind of Bowdoin fighting spirit 
and in its importance toward g'etting more stu- 
dents to Bowdoin. "Dusty" Rhoads, although 
himself out of the coming contest on account of 
injuries, expressed the fighting spirit of the team 
that was to represent the White on the field and 
urged the support of a crowded grandstand be- 
hind the team to a man with songs and cheers. 
"Jack" Magee told of the history of the team 
so far this season using it as an example to point 
out its fitness for the coming contest. In his 
characteristic manner he led the students to see 
their duty to the team and the college in sup- 
porting not only this game but the rest of the 
series with all their hearts. 



The band developed by Professor Wass and 
Manager Allen is a credit to any institution and 
contributed the fire to start the enthusiasm. 
Playing all the old familiar fighting tunes as well 
as some newer pieces it quickly won its way 
into the heart of every man present. It is 
scheduled to play next Saturday at the Bates 
game and a large proportion of it will make 
the trip to Orono. A student subscription to 
make it possible for the whole band to make the 
trip has been suggested and is an idea worthy 
of being carried out. 

The rally broke up after the singing of Bow- 
doin Bcata. The presence of a number of 
alumni added to the general spirit of the gather- 



INTER-CLASS TRACK MEET. 

Manager Buker announces that an inter-class 
track meet is to be run off this week on Wednes- 
day and Thursday afternoons. A schedule of 
events and the time of each event will be posted 
early. This is an informal meet for the purpose 
of finding out what material we have in college. 
The distances have been cut down so that every- 
one will have a chance to show his calibre. Re- 
gardless of whether you are in training you 
should avail yourself of an opportunity to have 
a couple of afternoons of fun and exercise by 
entering for some or any of these events as 
posted at the bulletin board. You may register 
with Manager Buker any time now. 



DEBATING. 

Prior to the war Bowdoin had formed an In- 
terscholastic Debating League. On account of 
war activities this league had not been formed 
during the last two years. A recent letter from 
Portland High School inquiring about the league 
and expressing- a desire to enlist if such was to 
formed, led the men in charge to consider its 
reorganization. 

Letters were sent to all local secondary schools 
asking what they intended to do. If enough 
schools reply favorably, action will be taken 
at once to reorganize interscholastic debating. 



VARSITY DEBATING. 

The Varsity Debating Team is prepared for 
fall and winter debating. Negotiations are now 
under way with Brown and Wesleyan to reform 
the Triangle League. It will be remembered 
that last year Bowdoin was the winner of the 
league debates. 



138 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Tuesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 
Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 

Acting Managing Editor 
department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Ronald L. McCormack, 1922 Exchange 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
Ronald B. Wadsworth, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 192 i 
George E. Houghton, 192 i 
Crosby E. Redman, 192 i 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Allan W. Hall, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 



Vol. XLIX. OCTOBER 28, 1919. 



No. 14 



Entered at Post OfBce at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 
The Student Forum. 

A Student Forum, such as was held in the 
LTnion a week ago Sunday, is a comparatively 
new institution at Bowdoin. Initiated last year 
under the direction of the Debating Council, it 
proved so successful in promoting intelligent dis- 



cussion of questions affecting the college and 
the public at large that the Council voted to con- 
tinue it this year. 

The object of the Forum was stated at the 
first meeting held on the 19th. For the benefit 
of those absent that evening, it may be said that 
efforts will be made to secure prominent public 
men to address the meeting on some of the more 
vital questions facing us today. After the ad- 
dress by the speaker, there will be open discus- 
sion and the opportunity will be offered every- 
one to ask questions in order that doubtful points 
may be cleared up and desired information 
emphasized. The importance of supporting the 
Forum cannot be too strongly emphasized. It 
attempts to strengthen one side of our education 
which is too often neglected, — our knowledge of 
current affairs. College students are sadly in- 
clined to lead a care free life, to ignore the 
present problems of college, state, or nation. To 
correct this condition is the mission of the Stu- 
dent Forum. 



COMMUNICATIONS: 

FRESHMAN SPIRIT. 

Freshmen, the cheering, the singing, the band 
music on Friday evening were evidence of a fine 
active interest and spirit in your chosen Alma 
Mater, an interest which extends into the class- 
room, out onto the athletic field and into the 
literary work of the college. But this interest 
falls short in a particularly noticeable respect 
either because many of you have not been in- 
formed, or because you haven't had spirit enough 
to pull yourself out of the ways of a "prep" 
school past. Your laurels of prep school days 
are nothing to us. At Bowdoin you are a new 
man in a new world with a new mark to make. 
Extend therefore your interest, modify your 
spirit, and become a real Bowdoin man. 

Pack away the insignia and letters of your 
"prep" school, they are but personal memorabila, 
and enter wholeheartedly into our prided and 
traditional Bowdoin democracy. 

Know every Bowdoin man, and never fail to 
shout a friendly "hello" whenever you meet him. 
Find out the names of the leaders in college 
and of the men on the teams and all the rest, 
that you can talk intelligently with your fellow 
students on college activities. 

We have welcomed you heartily, join us, be 
one of us ! In so doing you shall reap the ex- 
ceptional benefits to be derived from the inti- 
mate touch with your fellow men. S. M. G. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



A WORD TO THE FRESHMEN. 

It is an obvious fact that many of the Fresh- 
men are not following the Bowdoin custom of 
speaking to upperclass men. Many of the new- 
comers to college not only fail to speak first, but 
also decline to return the greeting of an upper- 
classman. 

One of the "pointers" given to the Freshmen 
in the Freshman Bible is, "Say 'hello' to every 
Bowdoin man even if you have never 'met' him." 
This is not a mandate but merely a hint. Again 
the Freshman Bible says, "Bowdoin doesn't like 
snobs." And if a fellow intentionally neglects 
to speak to a Bowdoin man he is nothing less 
than one. 

The man who does not follow this unwritten 
law is hurting- himself. He is bound to be dis- 
liked. 

Snap into it, Freshmen. Show us that you 
like us, and have a "Hello" for every man in 
Bowdoin. C. JM. 



STUDENT DIRECTORY. 



student Ccuncil. 
President, Emerson K. Zeitler '20. 7 Hyde Hall. 
Vice-President, Richard K. McWillams '20, Alpha Delta Fhi 

House. 
Secretary, Robert E. Cleaves '20, Alpha Delta Phi House. 

Board of Managers. 
Chairman, Richard K. McWilliams '20, Alpha Delta Phi 
House. 

Orient Board. 
Editor-in-Chief, Leland M. Goodrich '20, 23 Maine Hall. 
Managing Editor, Norman W. Haines '21, Theta Delta Chi 

House. 
Acting Managing Editor, Russell M. McGown '21, 15 Maine 
Hall. 

Bowdoin Publishing Company. 
Business Manager, Allan W. Hall '20, Delta Upsilon House. 
Assistant Business Manager, Phillip H. McCrum '21, 14 

Maine Hall. 
Assistant Business Manager, Kenneth S. Boardman '21. Psi 
Upsilon House. 

Bugle Board. 
Editor, J. Maxim Ryder '21, Delta Upsilon House. 
Business Manager, Charles W. Crowel!, Zeta Psi House. 

Debating Council. 
President, Edgar C. Taylor '20, Theta Delta Chi House. 
Manager, Samuel C. Buker '21, Delta Upsilon House. 

Masque and Gown. 
Manager, G. Raymond Asnault '20, 171 Neal street. 

Athletic Council. 
Student Members : 

Robert E. Cleaves '20, Alpha Delta Phi House. 
A. O. Dostie '20, Chi Psi Lodge. 
G. R. Goodwin '21, 14 Winthrop Hall. 
W. Li. Parent '21, Kappa Sigma House. 
W. R. Flinn '22, Alpha Delta Phi House. 
Football. 
Captain, C. P. Rhoades '20, Delta Kappa Epsilon House. 
Manager, J. S. McPartland '20, Theta Delta Chi House. 



Baseball. 

Captain, W. N. Cook '20, 23 Appleton Hall. 

Manager, Rodney L. Perkins '21, Beta Theta Pi House. 

Track. 
Captain, A. O. Dostie '20, Chi Psi Lodge. 
Manager, Samuel C. Buker '21, Delta Upsilon House. 

Tennis. 
Captain, George A. Partridge '22, Beta Theta Pi House. 
Manager, not elected. 

Assistant Manager, R. W. Tobey '21, Zeta Psi House. 
Class Officers. 
(1920. 1921, elections held later) 
1922— 

President, Frank Averitl. Delta Kappa Epsilon House. 
Vice-President, Waldo R. Flinn, Alpha Delta Phi House. 
Secretary and Treasurer, Ralph B. Knight, Chi Psi Lodge. 
1923— 

President. M. P. Chandler, 21 Maine Hall. 
Vice-President, Harry Keanie, 7 Hyde Hall. 
Secretary, Clifford Small, 3 Maine Hall. 
Treasurer, W. M. Chandler. 

Musical Clubs. 
Manager, W. H. Berry '20, Kappa Sigma House. 
Leader Mandolin Club, Henry Sprince '20. 
Leader Glee Club, A. L. Richan '20, 7 Winthrop Hall. 

Union Board. 
Chairman, Emerson W. Zeitler '20, 7 Hyde Hall. 
Student Members : 

Ezra P. Rounds '20, Theta Delta Chi House. 
George R. Goodwin '21, 14 Winthrop Hall. 
Rodney Perkins '21, Beta Theta Pi House. 
Frank Averill '22, Delta Kappa Epsilon House. 
Y. M. C. A. 
President, John G. Young '21, 26 Appleton Hall. 
Vice-President, Norman W. Haines '21, Theta Delta Chi 

House. 
General Secretary, Russell M. McGown '21, 15 Maine Hall. 

Band. 
Manager, Everett A. Alkn, Kappa Sigma House. 
Assistant Manager, Carroll P. Norton, Delta Upsilon House. 



UNION DANCE. 



The first Union Dance of the year following 
the football game was enjoyed by about thirty 
couples Saturday evening. The committee in 
charge was composed of Rounds '20, Goodwin 
'21, and Perkins '21. Mrs. Davis and Mrs. Mc- 
Clean were chaperones. Music was furnished 
by an undergraduate orchestra of Richan '20, 
Sturgis '20, Helson '21, and Ross '23. 

The next dance comes Saturday night 
following the Bates game. These informal 
Union dances are being run this year instead of 
a big football dance in the gym. The floor 
space is limited but there is plenty of room for 
all who get in an early application for tickets. 
Avail yourself of this opportunity for a good 
dance on the Campus. 



STUDENT COUNCIL. 

At the last meeting of the Student Council it 



140 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



was decided not to hold the football dance as 
has been the custom. The big Christmas dance 
is not far off and it was thought best to put all 
the energy into making that a success. 

It was also decided to appropriate money to 
send some flowers to Zeitler '20, president of the 
Student Council. Zeitler is in a Portland hos- 
pital where he was operated on for appendicitis. 



small 



CROSS-COUNTRY COMING STRONG. 

Although the cross-country team laid off for 
a few days, ij did not lay off for good. All the 
men are out again, as strong as ever. Intensive 
training during the next two weeks will put the 
team in excellent condition for its run in the 
Maine intercollegiate run on November 7. If the 
team makes a good showing on' that date, it will 
enter in the New England cross-country run, to 
be held at Boston November 15. 



BOWDOIN CLUB OF BOSTON SUPPORTS 
CURTIS. 

October 15, 1919. 
Hon. Edwin U. Curtis, Police Commissioner of 
the City of Boston, Police Headquarters, 
Boston, Mass. 

Dear Sir : — At the first meeting of the Bowdoin 
Club of Boston, held at the University Club Fri- 
day evening, October loth, a resolution was 
imanimously passed whereby the undersigned 
were directed to formulate and send to you the 
following resolution with respect to your at- 
titude in the recent police crisis in the city, to 
■wit: 

Whereas, the Bowdoin Club of Boston desires 
to extend to Edwin U. Curtis, a graduate of the 
College and one of the founders of the Club, 
direct evidence of its loyal support throughout 
the unprecedented situation resulting from the 
strike of the policemen of the City of Boston, 
therefore, be it 

Resolved: That this Club express to Mr. 
Curtis its recognition of his sound judgment and 
tmflinching devotion to public duty through this 
present crisis, and commend his resolute stand 
as to the maintenance of constitutional govern- 
ment at a time when others were inclined to yield 
to forces destructive of the rights and principles 
upon which the body politic is established; 

And furthermore, that it express to him, as 
the representative of law and order, its unquali- 
fied support until it shall be conclusively demon- 
strated that the authority of the people, as ex- 
pressed through their duly elected officers, is 



supreme; and that the dictation of 
minority is not to be tolerated. 
Very truly yours, 

Charles L. Favinger, Chairman, 

Alfred B. White, 

Hanson H. Webster. 



REPORT OF TRACK MANAGER. 



Receipts. 

A. S. B. C. appropriations I 

Indoor Interscholastic 

Guarantee B. A. A 

Freshman-Sophomore 

Interf raternity 

Balance from D. F. Mahoney 

Guarantee N. H. State 

Receipts — Outdoor Interscholastic. . . . 

President Sills — Shield for Inter- 
fraternity Meet , 

Refund Q. C. A. A. A. A 

Loan from Athletic Council 

Loan from Athletic Council in pay- 
ment of old bills 



1,315 
^43 



84. 1 5 



Expenditures. 

J. J. Magee (salary) 

Interscholastic meet 

Freshman-Sophomore 

B. A. A. trip 

Interfraternity meet 

Telephone (J. J. Magee) 

Equipment _ 

N. H. State dual 

M. I. A. A. meet 

N. E. I. C. A. A. meet 

I. C. A. A. A. A. meet 

Stationery, Stamps, Printing 

Incidentals 

Authorized old bills paid 

Share M. I. A. A. meet deposit... 



600.00 
102.72 

21.25 
125.95 

90.43 

7-50 

144.90 

144-97 



-$1,992.85 



3b».4i 
170.S3 
56.65 
17-78 
2S.59 
84-15 
26.22 



Cash in bank. 



$i.992.f 
Lewis W. Brown, Manager. 



STATE BASEBALL SCHEDULE. 

There was a meeting of the baseball managers 
from the four Maine colleges Saturday, October 
iSth, at Waterville. No officers were elected, but 
the following tentative schedule was drawn up. 
There will probably be changes in it later as it 
has not yet been submitted to the Athletic 
Council. 

April 17 (exhibition game), Bates at Lewiston. 

May I, Colby at Brunswick. 

May 8, Maine at Orono. 

May 22, Colby at Waterville. 

May 29, Bates at Lewiston. 

June 4, Bates at Brunswick. 

June 5, Maine at Brunswick. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE PRESIDENT'S WESTERN TRIP. 

President Sills returned to the College last 
Friday after a trip of over a fortnight through 
the Middle West. In Detroit he attended some 
of the meetings of the General Convention of 
the Episcopal Church ; made an address at Ann 
Arbor before the National Student Council ; 
preached in the North Woodward Avenue Con- 
gregational Church on Sunday, Oct. 12th, of 
which church the Rev. Chester Emerson '04 is 
pastor; and spoke at a luncheon given by the 
Detroit members of the D. K. E. fraternity for 
Bishop Burch of New York. In Chicago he met 
the alumni of Bowdoin at a very successful din- 
ner held at the University Club on the evening 
of Friday, Oct. 17th, at which meeting an as- 
sociation of the alumni of Chicago was formed. 
From Chicago he went to Minneapolis where on 
Monday evening, Oct. 20th, at the Minneapolis 
Club about a dozen of the alumni met to hear 
reports from the College. The Minneapolis 
alumni who have not had a meeting for several 
years are going" to keep alive the Alumni As- 
sociation of the Northwest. At Buffalo on Wed- 
nesday afternoon, Oct. 22nd, the Hon. D. S.. 
Alexandei gave a dinner at the Buffalo Club for 
President Sills and the alumni of Buffalo and 
vicinity. The next morning the President spoke 
at the Technical High School and visited the 
Hutchinson High .School. During his trip Presi- 
dent Sills visited the University of Michigan, 
the University of Chicago, Northwestern Uni- 
versity, the University of Minnesota, and the 
Dunwoodie Institute at Minneapolis, which is a 
very important trade school. He found every- 
where a lively interest among the alumni of the 
College. 



bate offers an opportunity to practice for the 
Bradbury prize debates which take place later 
in the year. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 
The College has received the gift of $500 in 
memory of the Rev. Professor Roswell Dwight 
Hitchock, D.D., who was professor at Bowdoin 
from 1852 to 1855, and afterwards President of 
Union Theological Seminary. The gift will be 
used for purposes of instruction. 



FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE DEBATE. 

The Debating Council has announced a debate 
to be held between the Freshman and Sophomore 
classes on December 8, 1919. Trials will be held 
on November 3 in Hubbard Hall. Each man 
who tries out will be allowed five minutes in 
which to discuss any phase of the question, 
"Resolved, that municipal police should have the 
prerogative of collective bargaining." This de- 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL PROSPECTS. 

For five weeks coach Markthaler has been 
training a husky squad of Freshmen in the arts 
of football in anticipation of the game with the 
Sophomores which takes place after the Maine 
game. There are about twenty men out; some 
three times a week, others every day. Tackling 
the dummy, falling on the ball, and every other 
form of practice is rapidly developing a snappy 
and well organized Freshman squad. The Fresh- 
men have been complimented for tackling and 
defensive work against the varsity and they hope 
to keep living the fine precedant set by the 
Freshman baseball team. 



©n tde Campus 

Carl J. Longren '19 was on the Campus last 
week. 

The Colby baseball schedule for next spring, 
which was announced not long ago, contains two 
games with Bowdoin, the first at Brunswick on 
May I, and the second at Waterville on May 22. 

Edgar O. Achorn 'Si was on the Campus re- 
cently. 

The results of the Maine series games last 
Saturday provide more or less interesting food 
for the dopesters and betters on the remaining 
contests. Obviously, from a comparison of 
scores, Bowdoin undoubtedly is the favorite for 
the championship. The game last Saturday 
found Colby a much weaker team than the ag- 
gregation that faced Fort Williams and later 
Harvard. Bates apparently is getting stronger 
all the time in spite of a rather inauspicious start. 
After Harvard had swamped the Garnet and 
after New Hampshire College had defeated 
them, Bates certainly looked feeble, but their 
stand against Colby and Maine shows that Bow- 
doin will not have an easy time next Saturday. 
On the other hand, Bowdoin had three men out 
last Saturday, Capt. Rhoads, Sprague, and A. 
Smith, who would add greatly to the strength 
of the team. 

Miss Sawyer of Portland, Maine, had Profes- 
sor Kimura, professor of modern European his- 
tory at the University of Tokio, Mr. T. Mitzui, 
and Mr. B. Mitzui, bankers in the same city, as 
her guests on the Campus last Thursday. Pro- 
fessor Kimura is spending part of a two years' 
vacation at the Graduate School at Harvard. 



142 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The Freshman-Sophomore football game will 
be played two weeks after the Maine game. No 
varsity men will be allowed to play on either 
side. Practice has already begun. 

Parent '21 went to Lewiston Wednesday to 
referee the game between Lewiston High and 
Brunswick High. Saturday he refereed the 
Hebron-Coburn Classical g'ame at Hebron. 

Trials for the uppcrclassmen candidates for 
the Glee Club were held in the music room, 
Wednesday the 22nd. The material is very good 
this year. 

At a meeting of the Sophomore class last week 
the committee for the Sophomore Hop was made 
up. It consists of Fogg, Partridge, Ludwig, 
Woodbury, and Curran. 

The Debating Council has made plans for a 
Freshman-Sophomore debate to be held Decem- 
ber 8th. Trials will be arranged on November 
3rd, and all candidates should give their names 
to Badger, 23 Maine Hall, at once. The question 
reads, "Resolved that municipal police should 
have the prerogative of collective bargaining." 

Plans are being made for an informal inter- 
class track meet to take place October 29th and 
30th. It is for the purpose of bringing out new 
material. 

There has been much discussion both in and 
out of the college about the price of admission 
to the State Championship games. Articles have 
appeared in several newspapers which seem to 
show that the general public consider the charge 
exorbitant. 

Richards '20 is teaching mathematics at 
Hebron until Thanksgiving. 

Many alumni returned for the game on Whit- 
tier Field Saturday. 

The other score in the State series was : Maine 
26, Bates 17. 



M3itf) tbe Jfacultp 

Mr. Furbish returned from a two weeks' vaca- 
tion last Friday. 

Professor Woodruff returned last week from 
Norwich University where he has attended the 
centennial of the founding of the university. 

Dean Nixon has returned from Dartmouth 
where he attended the sesqui-centennial of the 
college. 

President Sills returned Friday night from his 
Western trip. 

Professor Stanwood will address the members 
of the Equal Suffrage League at the residence of 
Mrs. Woodruff this evening. 



At a meeting of the Men's Club of the First 
Parish, held in the Congregational Church vestry 
not long ago, the following members of the 
faculty were appointed to serve on a committee 
to have charge of a drive in Brunswick and 
Topsham for the Pilgrim Memorial Fund ; Pro- 
fessor Burnett, Professor Catlin, Professor 
Davis, Professor Elliott, Professor Mitchell, 
Dean Nixon, Mr. Wilder, and Professor Wood- 
ruff. 



aiumni J13otes 

The Orient desires to be of the greatest possi- 
ble service to the Alumni in keeping them in- 
formed of one another's activities. Alumni are 
earnestly requested to support the Orient in this 
work by sending items about themselves or their 
brother Alumni. 

The Alumni of Portland and vicinity arc mak- 
ing an effort to have Bowdoin play in Portland 
on Armistice day. If possible they will have the 
University of Maine game transferred from 
Orono to Portland. Otherwise they will try to 
have Bowdoin line up against Boston College 
or some other strong Massachusetts team. 

'95 — A very elaborate three volume history of 
the State of Maine has just been received at the 
Library. The greater part of this work was 
written by Louis Clinton Hatch, Ph.D. (Har- 
vard, 1899). In the third volume there is a 
chapter entitled "Education in Maine," which 
was contributed by Professor Mitchell. 

'03 — Clement F. Robinson, Esq., of Portland 
has announced his candidacy for the Republican 
nomination for County Attorney', and his name 
will go before the primaries in June, 1920. Mr. 
Robinson received his LL.B. from Harvard in 
1906, since when he has been a practicing lawyer 
in Boston and Portland. From 1907 to 1909, 
he was the secretary of the Maine Tax Commis- 
sion. 

'13 — In the August issue of the Quarterly 
Journal of Economics, there appeared a contri- 
bution entitled "Definition of 'Conditions of 
Labor,' " by Professor Paul H. Douglass of the 
University of Washington. Also, in the July 
number of the Journal of Political Economy, he 
had an article on "Plant Administration of 
Labor." 

'i5-'i8 — Francis P. McKenney '15 and Orrin 
S. Donnell '18 of Brunswick recently went to 
Texas where they plan to go into the oil business. 

'17 — Carleton Mt Pike is with the Foreign De- 
partment of the First National Bank of Boston 
this year. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



143 



Pittsburgh i6, Georgia Tech. 6. 
Trinity 20, Worcester Tech. 7. 
Navy 21, Bucknell 6. 
Holy Cross 69, Connecticut Aggies o. 
Army 13, Boston College 0. 
Williams 13, Hamilton o. 
Swarthmore 20, Johns Hopkins 6. 
Western Maryland 9, Mount St. Marys 0. 
Rochester 27, Clarkson 0. 
Minnesota 6, Iowa 9. 
Chicago 41, Northwestern o. 
Georgetown University 13, University of De- 
troit 16. 

Carnegie 0, Lehigh 6. 

Middlebury 7, St. Lawrence University 0. 

Virginia Poly 6, Maryland State 0. 

Ohio State 13, Michigafi 3. 

Pennsylvania Military College 14, St. John 14. 

Oberlin 13, Miami 0. 

New York University o, Rensselaer o. 

Penn State 48, Ursinus 7. 

Mass. Aggies 25, Vermont o. 



'16— Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Daniel of East 
Orange, N. J., recently announced the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Miss Dorothy Daniel, to 
Chauncey Alfred Hall of Augusta. Mr. Hall 
received his discharge not long ago from the 
Army, in which he was a lieutenant. 



SATURDAY'S FOOTBALL SCORES. 

Maine 26, Bates 17. 

Bowdoin 30, Colby 0. 

Harvard 47, Virginia 0. 

Colgate 7, Princeton 0. 

Brown 20. Norwich 0. 

Springfield College 58, Fort McKinley 0. 

New Hampshire 12, Lowell Textile 2. 

Yale 37, Tufts o. 

Wesleyan 47, Union 0. 

Dartmouth 9, Cornell o. 

Columbia 9, Amherst 7. 

Stevens 31, Rhode Island State 2. 

Pennsylvania 23, Lafayette o. 



'■'"''A'Ofo.lSSO-iOH^''' 



5th Avenue 



DE PINNA 

WILL SHOW AT THE 



New York 



on Thursday and Friday, October 30th and 31st, the new igigAutumn 
and Winter Suits, Overcoats and Sports Clothing, ready for immedi- 
ate service, in ample assortments of imported English, Scotch and 
Irish viTOolens. 

Exclusive novelties in imported furnishings for young men. 
MR. SWEENEY, Representative. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

" UNION " LUNCH 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 
Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 
FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 

We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16. 

WE CARRY 

Co-operative Shoes 
New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 
LARGEST AND BEST 

stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



LAW 

AND AMERICA'S 
WORLD POSITION 



Q international 
challenges the 



America's new place i 
politics and commerce 
young American. 
He must equip himself for new world 
conditions with a knowledge of legal funda- 
mentals. 

LAW — its principles and application to all 
business is almost as necessary to the 
coming business man as it is indispensable 
to the lawyer. 
Qualify for real leadership. 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

gives a thorough training in legal 

principles. 

LL.B. Course requires 3 years. 

For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 



Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 

TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 



BATH, MAINE 



J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The Bo\vdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 

Portland 


WILLIAM F. FERRIS 

COLLEGE AGENT 


ANTIQIVTY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

2DIti iFurniture, SDin Qlhina, iUctDtrr, ffitc. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 


Citizens Laundry 

AUTO SERVICE 9 SOUTH APPLETON 


to orders for antique goods of any kind 


Telephone 160 


COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 


FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 


BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short Notice by competent work- 
men. We use only the Best 
of Leather. 
E WHTTTOM 


Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
A. G. PAGE COMPANY, Bath 








^'■The Store of Progress and Service" 

Master Style Creators 

Design Our Clothes for the 

Younger Men 

THAT'S why they are so satisfying. The style is right — 

dominant, clean cut, exclusive. The quality is right too. 

Many of them are from the famous House of Kuppen- 

heimer. 

For the College man we also recommend the 
popular "Manhattan" Shirts and "Nettleton" 
shoes, and you will be much interested in our 
fine line of Hosiery. 

>J"^4-p Mr. Harmon Eliason connected with our College Room will 
fee at the different houses of Bowdoin College at least once a 
month with our line of high grade mierchandise, and we can assure you 
absolute satisfaction in every way. In the meantime should you require 
anything in wearing apparel Mr. Jack Handy '23 located at the Zeta Psi 
House is our representative, and will take good care of you. 



Monument 
Square 




Portland 
Maine 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

ENID BENNETT 

IN 

THE VIRTUOUS THIEF 




FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

WILLIAM FARNUM 

■ IN 

FOR FRE EDOM 

MONDAY and TUESDAY 

NEXT WEEK 

WALLACE REID 

IN 

YOU'RE FIRED 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

HARRY CAREY 

IN 

A FIGHT FOR LOVE 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

MAY ALLISON 

IN 

THE UFLIFTERS 



MONDAY and TUESDAY 
NEXT WEEK 

KATHERINE CALVERT 

IN 

A Marriage For Convenience, 



VoLXLIX. No. 15 



NOVEMBER 4 19^19 




BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 




CONTENTS 


PAGE 


PAGE 


Crockett awarded Rhodes Scholar- 


"Work-and-Save" Program 147 


ship 145 


Editorials : 


Bowdoin Defeats Br.tes By One 


Are You Going To Maine Sat- 


Point 145 


urday ? 148 


Union Dance a Success 1^6 


The Bates Game 148 


Exhibition of Water Colors in Art 


Thrift as a College Student's 


Building U6 


Problem 148 


Alumni Council Meeting I'' 7 


Bowdoin Has Oldest Bat 149 


Red Cross Meeting 1^7 


On the Campus 150 


Rifle Club Meeting 147 


With the Faculty 151 


Musical Clubs 147 


Alumni Notes 151 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Back Here" know JUD is in the game. 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



PRINTING 

OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER^S 

TOWN BUILDIKG BKUNSWICK 



The College Book Store 

We wish to call your 
attention to our new 

FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

in a large man size pa- 
per. 

The stock is the well known 
OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

The price is $ 1 .00 per box 
F. W. CHANDLER & SON 



COLLEGE AND "PREP" SCHOOL MEN 

Clothing for Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 
ercoats and Ulsters. 

Haberdashery Hats 

Macullar Parker Company 

400 Washington St. Boston, Mass. 

"THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT" 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



NEW MODELS 
FOR YOUNG MEN 

Belted suit and over- 
coat styles as well as 
plainer designs by 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 

who make clothes for 

young men and make 

them right. 

$35 AND MORE 

ALSO EVENING CLOTHES 

Haskell & Jones Co. 



Portland, 



Maine. 




>m// Collar 

Cluett, Peabody &fCo. Inc. Troy, N . Y. 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 



WINTER 

Underwear and Hosiery 



E. S. BODWELL & SON, 

Brunswick. 



Greenhouse 21 -W 
Residence 21-R 



WALTER 
F- I- O 


L. LaROCK 
R 1 S T 


Potted Plants 

Floral Designs 


and Cut Flowers 
for All Occasions 

15X Jordan Avenue 



SUPPLIES 

OF 

ALL 

KINDS 

and 

Pipes Cigarette Holders 

Safety Razors and Blades 

FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

60 cents 

Courson & Morton 

180 MAINE ST. The Bowling Alley is next door 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 4. 1919 



NO. 15 



CROCKETT AWARDED RHODES SCHOLAR- 
SHIP. 

Philip D3-er Crockett, 1920, of Everett, Mass., 
has been awarded the Rhodes Scholarship from 
the State of Maine for the 1919 Class. Crockett 
was a Phi Beta Kappa man in his Junior year 
and has played quarterback on the football team 
for the last three years. He upholds the Bow- 
doin standard of winning most of the Rhodes 
awards in this State. So far Bowdoin has won 
seven of the eight appointments. 



BOWDOIN DEFEATS BATES BY ONE POINT. 

In the hardest fought football game seen on 
Whittier Field for many years, Bowdoin de- 
feated Bates 14-13 'before a large crowd of en- 
thusiastic supporters of both teams. The two 
elevens played a surprisingly strong game and 
the fighting spirit prevailed to the last minute 
of play. Because of the rain Friday, the field 
was slippery and this greatly impaired the speed 
of the fast backs, although there were many 
sensational runs during the game. 

Doherty won the game for Bowdoin in the 
second period when he intercepted a forward 
pass by Bates on Bowdoin's lo-yard line, and 
made a brilliant dash out of the scrimmage and 
down the field for 90 yards and a touchdown. 
The line plunging of Dahlgren and the end runs 
of Dostie (who was injured in the last of the 
game), enabled Bowdoin to obtain more first 
downs than her opponent. It was by solid for- 
mations that Bowdoin had the most success in 
rushing the ball, for Dudgeon, Doherty, Brews- 
ter, and McCurdy played wonderfully well on 
the line. The reliable toe of Mason assured the 
goals that gave Bowdoin the necessary two 
points which defeated Bates. 

The Bates aggregation fought a stubborn game 
to the end and played a better brand of football 
than it exhibited earlier in the season. The for- 
ward pass was used with some success, and, with 
the aid of the peculiar "eagle spread" formation, 
Tierney caught a pass and crossed the goal line 
in the last period, for Bates' second touchdown. 
Sauvage and Wiggin also played a snappy game 
for Bates. 



Bowdoin opened the game with' Peacock, 
James, Miller, and Sprague in the backfield, re- 
serving Dahlgren, Dostie, Crockett and Curtis 
until later in the game. After an exchange of 
punts, Bowdoin rushed the ball far down the 
field, and Peacock carried it across the goal line 
within the first 10 minutes of play. Mason 
kicked the goal. Bates however came back, and 
when she received the ball from Bowdoin's kick- 
off, advanced it to Bowdoin's 45-yard line. At 
this point on fourth down Sauvage ran the re- 
maining 45 yards for Bates' first touchdown. 
Davis failed to kick the goal from a difficult 
angle. 

First Quarter — Bowdoin kicked off to Bates, 
Wiggin of Bates receiving the kick and running- 
it back 15 yards. Moulton 3>4, Sauvage 4 and 
then Davis kicked. 

Peacock received the kick and then lost a yard, 
tackled by Davis. Peacock punted to Wiggin on 
the 20-yard line, who was tackled by Drummond. 
Savage ran 3 yards, Davis i>^, Moulton i yard. 
Moulton kicked to Peacock who ran it back to 
the Bates' 35-yard line. Then Miller rushed 4 
yards. Peacock i yard. Miller 6 yards, James 8 
yards, Miller i yard. Peacock l yard, Sprague 2 
yards, then James went through for first down. 
The ball was on Bates' lo-yard line. Miller 1J/2 
yards, Sprague 3 yards, James lost i, then Pea- 
cock took the ball over the line just outside right 
tackle. Mason kicked the goal. Bowdoin 7, 
Bates o. 

Mason kicked to Bates, Sauvage running it 
back Syi yards. Davis took it i yard and Moul- 
ton went over for first down. Wiggin made an 
incomplete forward. Sauvage rushed i yard, 
Wiggin made another incomplete pass. Sauvage 
took the ball 45 yards to the goal line for a touch- 
down, through left tackle on a fake punt. Davis 
failed to kick the goal. Bowdoin 7, Bates 6. 

Fabbri kicked to Peacock who ran it back to 
his 40-yard line. Miller made no gain, then ij4 
yards, James 8, and then James took it through 
for first down. Miller 1J/2 yards, James 8 yards. 
Peacock fumbled, Duffet picking it up and run- 
ning it back until Brewster tackled him. 
Sauvage rushed 8 yards and Wiggin forwarded 



146 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



to Titerny who ran it down to the lO-yard line. 

Second Quarter — Sauvage rushed I yard, Wig- 
gin lost }4 and then Doherty intercepting a pass 
from Wiggin ran 90 yards for a touchdown. 
Mason kicked the goal. Bowdoin 14, Bates 6. 

Mason kicked to Moulton who ran the ball 
back 7 yards, Sauvage i yard, Wiggin 35 yards 
on a tackle-around play. Moulton kicked to 
Dostie who ran the ball back 20 .yards. Dahlgren 
I yard, Dahlgren passed to Drummond for a 25- 
yard gain. Dostie went through for first down, 
Dostie 3 yards, Dostie i yard, Dahlgren no gain. 
The ball was then on Bates' 3-yard line. Drum- 
mond lost a pass from Curtis behind the line. 
Bates' ball on the 20-yard line. Davis lyi, Sauv- 
age 4 yards, Moulton i yard, Moulton kicked to 
Dostie who was tackled by Tierny at mid-field. 
Dostie gained 2 yards then passed to Drummond 
for a 25-yard gain. Dahlgren i yard, Dalhgren 

3 yards, Dostie no gain. Mason tried for a field 
goal but failed; Bates ball on the 20-yard line. 
Sauvage lost 3 yards, then gained 4, Moulton 
kicked to Dostie who ran the ball back 20 yards. 
Curtis 4, Dostie ij4, Dostie forwarded over goal 
line for an incomplete. Bates' ball on the 
20-yard line. Davis 3, Moulton Ij4, Sauvage lost 

4 yards when tackled by Kern. Moulton kicked 
to Dahlgren who ran back 10 yards. Sauvage 
picked up a fumble but Dudgeon came back and 
got the Bates fumble. Dahlgren 3 yards. An in- 
complete pass over the goal line gave Bates the 
ball again. Multon gained a yard and the half 
ended. 

Third Ouarte — Fabbri kicked to Dahlgren 
who ran back 20 yards. Dahlgren 15, Dahlgren 
I, Dahlgren 4, an uncomplete pass from Dostie. 
Then Bates got the ball on downs. Wiggin 5, 
Sauvage lost 2, Sauvage no gain. Moulton kicked 
outside at mid-field. Dostie 7 yards, Curtis 3, 
Curtis 15 yards, Curtis 3, Dostie 2. Dahlgren 
made first down. Crockett gained 2 yards. 
Dahlgren lost, tackled by Ross, Dahlgren i yard, 
Dostie I. Bates' ball on downs on their 5-yard 
line. Sauvage ran length of field but was 
caught out of bounds on his yard line. Tierny 
I, Kelley 5, Kelley 4, Kelley no gain, Sauvage 5. 
After an incomplete forward Sauvage passed to 
Kelley for a 20-yard gain. Sauvage lost 2 yards 
tackled by Curtis, Crockett and Smith 2, blocked 
forward, and then Kern intercepted one and ran 
back 2 yards. Dahlgren made 7 yards. 

Fourth Period — Peacock 5, Crockett no gain, 
Peacock kicked to Kelley. Kelley i, Sauvage i, 
James intercepted a pass from Wiggin. Curtis 3, 
penalty against Bowdoin for holding, 15 yards; 
Curtis I, Peacock kicked to Kelley, Sauvage 11 



yards, Kelley received forward pass for 35-yard 
gain. Sauvage 9, Sauvage passed to Tierny who 
caught the ball behind the goal line for a touch- 
down. Guiney kicked the goal. Bowdoin 14, 
Bates 13. 

Bates kicked to Bowdoin, Rhoades running 
back to the 30-yard line. Dahlgren 12, James 5, 
forward pass from Mason incomplete, Dahlgren 
7 yards, Curtis 3, Dahlgren i, Stonier got a 
fumble. Sauvage no gain, Tierny no gain. 
Sauvage threw an incomplete forward pass and 
then Bowdoin took the ball on downs. Curtis 
gained 5 yards and Dahlgren 4 before the 
whitle blew. Final score: Bowdoin 14, Bates 13. 

The summary : 
BOWDOIN— —BATES 

Doherty le re., Cutler 

Brewster, It rt., Ross 

Kern, Ig rg., Fabbri 

McCurdy, c c, Duffet 

Dudgeon," rg Ig., Stonier 

Mason, rt It., Guiney 

Drummond, re ; le., Canter 

James, qb qb., Wiggin 

Miller, Ihb rhb., Moulton 

Peacock, rhb Ihb., Davis 

Sprague, fb fb., Sauvage 

Score: Bowdoin 14, Bates 13. Touchdowns, Pea- 
cock, Doherty, Sauvage and Tirney. Goals from 
touchdowns, Mason 2, Guiney i. Substitutions for Bow- 
doin, Crockett for James, Dahlgren for Miller, Dostie 
for Peacock, Curtis for Sprague, Swinglehurst for 
Drummond, Drummond for Swinglehurst, James for 
Drummond, J. Smith for Dostie, Peacock for J. Smith, 
Thomson for James, Guptill for Dudgeon, Rhoads for 
Kern. Substitutions for Bates, Tirney for Cutler, Scott 
for Ross, Johnson for Fabbri, Childs for Stonier, Luce 
for Guiney, Rounds for Canter, Canter for Rounds, 
Kelley for Davis. Referee, Rooney of Boston. Um- 
pire, Dorman of Columbia. Linesman, Hooper of Au- 
burn. Time 15m. periods. 



UNION DANCE A SUCCESS. 

Helson's Jolly Jazz furnished the super- 
melodious and peppery music at the dance in the 
Union last Saturday. Refreshments of ice cream, 
fancy cakes, and cookies were served to all. The 
roaring fire in the old-fashioned fireplace and the 
homelike air of the affair certainly made it an 
enjoyable occasion. 

The committee consisted of Rounds '20, 
Perkins '21, and Goodwin '21. The patronesses 
were Mrs. Roscoe J. Ham and Mrs. L. D. Mc- 
Clean. 



EXHIBITION 01' WATER-COLORS IN ART 
BUILDING. 

Through the kindness of a Bowdoin graduate, 
Mr. Eben Haley '02, a collection of modern 
water-colors, chiefly American and Italian, were 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



147 



exhibited in the Bowdoin Galley of the Walker 
Art Building on Wednesday afternoon, October 
29th. The collection belongs to the painter and 
collector, Mr. C. E. A. Merrow, who has a wide 
acquaintance with artists and their work. While 
these water-colors, done by such artists as F. F. 
English, Carl Weber, Paul de Longre, Olivetti, 
Moretti, and Baldo, were not done in the style 
"that one is accustomed to seeing today, many of 
them were beautiful and of such fine workman- 
ship in detail, that they would bear the closest 
scrutiny. In spite of the very short notice, a 
large number visited the museum, which shows 
the value of an exhibition in interesting the 
public. 



ALUMNI COUNCIL MEETING. 

Last Saturday morning, the Alumni Council 
met in the Dean's Office. The most important 
matter that was taken up was in respect to the 
raising of funds each year by the various classes. 
It was decided to appoint a committee to put in 
operation a' plan like that used at Yale for this 
purpose. It was -voted last year at Commence- 
ment to adopt such a plan, to be definitely de- 
cided upon by the Alumni Council. Other mat- 
ters of less importance were discussed, and re- 
ports of various committees were read. The fol- 
lowing members of the council were present 
Charles T. Hawes '76, president; Alfred B 
White '98, E. Farrington Abbott '03, George R, 
Walker '02, Professor Wilmot B. Mitchell '90. 
Ralph O. Brewster '09, Harold L. Berry '01 
President Kenneth C. M. Sills '01, and Leon V, 
Walker '03. 



RED CROSS MEETING. 



RIFLE CLUB MEETING. 

The first meeting of the Rifle Club was held 
in the Union last Thursday evening. About 
twenty members were present. Hurlin '20, was 
elected president. Low '20, secretary and treas- 
urer, Pendexter '21, armorer. There are at 
present about 65 members of the club and it is 
essential that this number be increased to more 
than 100 before this week is out. It is also 
necessary that each member pay his dues at once 
because the National Rifle Club from which our 
club draws rifles and ammunition recognizes 
only paid members. There seems to be a good 
deal of enthusiasm this year for shooting but it is 
not yet large enough. 



Last Tuesday afternoon in Memorial Hall 
there was a meeting of the Red Cross workers 
of Brunswick, Topsham, Lisbon Falls, Bath and 
vicinity. President Sills as chairman of the 
Brunswick Chapter presided, and addresses on 
the after-war program of the Red Cross were 
given by Mr. James Jackson, manager of the 
New England Division, Miss Elizabeth Ross, 
Division of Nursing, and Mr. C. C. Jones, 
director of Civilian Relief. Mr. Jackson called 
attention to the fact that Bowdoin College had 
during the war been particularly interested in 
the Red Cross and had conferred its highest 
honorary degrees upon Mr. Henry P. Davison, 
chariman of the War Council, and Mr. Harvey 
D. Gibson, Bowdoin 1902, general manager of 
the Red Cross during the war. 



MUSICAL CLUBS. 



Since there are a great many former musical 
club men back, and a large number of new men 
of good calibre out for the clubs, there un- 
doubtedly will be some fine performances this 
year. The last trials for the Glee Club were 
held last week, and the rehearsals will begin 
next Thursday. The Freshman trials for the 
Mandolin Club will be held next Monday, and 
the trials for the upper-classmen will be held 
on Wednesday, or Thursday. No trips, as yet, 
have definitely been decided on, but there are 
many good ones in view. Altogether, the pros- 
pects of the clubs are the best that they have 
ever been. 



"WORK-AND-SAVE PROGRAM." 



Treasury Department, Washington. 

October 18, 1919. 
To the Editor of College Publications : 

We ask you to give publicity to the enclosed 
statement with such editorial comment as you 
may be able to provide. The Savings Division, 
Treasury Department regards the "work-and- 
save program" as of fundamental importance in 
the present economic crisis and it believes that 
the college students of America by promoting 
this program among themselves will achieve far- 
reaching results through the example which they 
will set. 

We will greatly appreciate it if you will see 
that the extra copies of the enclosed statement 
are sent to the presidents of the student debating 
and literary societies. 

Very truly yours, 

Benjamin R. Andrews^ 
Vice-Director Savings Division. 



148 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Tuesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 
Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 192 i Managing Editor 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 

Acting Managing Editor 
department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Ronald L. McCormack, 1922 Exchange 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
Ronald B. Wadsworth, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Allan W. Hall, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 

Vol. XLIX. NOVEMBER 4, 1919. No. 15 

Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

Are You Going To Maine Next Saturday? 

Of course, every Bowdoin man is. Next Sat- 
urday the Bowdoin-Maine game will be played 
at Orono ; this game will decide the football 
championship of the State. The Bowdoin team 
is going to invade hostile territory to play an 



able team backed by a student body of a thousand 
odd. Is the team going up there to play Maine 
supported by a few scattering faithfuls or by 
a loyal student body en masse? The latter can 
be the only answer. 

Two cars and more if necessary will be re- 
served for the Bowdoin student body on the Sat- 
urday morning train. Whether we get reduced 
rates or not, the cost will not be so enormous 
but what everyone can bear it even if he has 
to go without a new hat or shirt or absent him- 
self from a dance or two. There is also the 
chance of saving money by keeping away from 
the movies and, incidentally, away from jail. 

There can be few excuses for anyone not at- 
tending that game Saturday. Let's show the 
spirit in victory that Bates showed last Saturday 
in defeat. With the chance of winning the State 
championship before us, this is an opportunity 
such as has not been presented in recent years, 
for demonstrating the old Bowdoin spirit of 
loyalty. 



The Bates Game. 

All those who had evolved the idea that we 
would have an easy time beating Bates last Sat- 
urday were badly shaken in their calculations by 
the actual results. In a game featured by ad- 
mirable spirit, clean playing, hard fighting and 
spectacular plays, Bowdoin won by a one point 
margin. Entering the game with a good supply 
of confidence, supported by a student body which 
was decidedly over-confident, the team, along 
with its supporters, soon realized that it had a 
different proposition to deal with than that of 
the week before, and that if it intended to win 
it must put forth every effort possible. 

While a victory by a larger margin would 
have been welcomed by Bowdoin men, the nar- 
row margin of victory which we achieved may be 
beneficial to both students and team. Whereas 
if we had won by a large margin we would be 
very liable to fall prey to a spirit of over-con- 
fidence, now everyone realizes that if we are to 
beat Maine, we have got to go the limit and give 
the team every ounce of support available. 



THRIFT AS A COLLEGE STUDENT'S 
PROBLEM. 

The war demanded that every American save 
money and students in educational institutions 
were not excepted. The Liberty Bond and War 
Savings Campaign showed that even the college 
student who is self-supporting could set aside a 
small margin for saving and investment. After- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



149 



war economic conditions are demanding a con- 
tinuance of war economics, and universal saving 
and safe investment on the part of all our people. 
Shall the college student have a part in this 
after-war program? At first thought one would 
say that it is inexpedient for the college student 
to set aside part of his current money for savings 
but a closer examination of the student's own 
best interests, regarded from the long-time point 
of view, and of his fundamental relation to the 
national economic crisis through which we are 
now going, has lead thoughtful advisers of the 
Treasury Department's Savings Division to urge 
that the present opportunity for regular saving 
and investment in government securities be put 
before the college students of the country, as was 
the need for war savings. 

The Treasury Department is offering the 25c 
Thrift Stamp, $5 War Savings Stamp and the 
$100 and $1,000 Treasury Savings Certificates, as 
a means of popular saving. It is also urging the 
continued purchase of Liberty Bonds now held by 
banks as a means of reducing the expanded 
credit which is partly responsible for constantly 
increasing prices.- 

College students are urged to participate in 
Government Savings primarily because the 
country needs a rapid increase in its savings fund 
and because the practice of regular saving car- 
ries personal economic benefits so fundamental 
and lasting that college students as future leaders 
will wish to share in this movement. 

Many a college student has earned and saved 
money before going to college and during his 
four years or more of academic and professional 
training has got entirely out of his habits of 
thrift and so starts his business or professional 
career heavily handicapped by the weight of un- 
thrifty standards taken on during college life. 
The college student who practices thrift gets a 
self-discipline that like faith will move moun- 
tains. 

The Treasury Department proposes the fol- 
lowing program : 

That students, as a matter of national service 
as well as personal advantage, work during term 
time when opportunity affords, and during part 
at least of vacations. 

That every college student should save a 
minimum of a dollar a week during his entire 
college course. 

That these savings should be funded as the 
nucleus for the start-in-life fund for use after 
graduation. 

That these savings be invested safely in gov- 



ernment savings securities. 

That the student on receiving an allowance 
from home set aside, as a first charge on this 
allowance, his weekly savings. 

That the student who is working his way 
through college and paying his own expenses in 
whole or in part, should set aside regularly a 
sum for savings even if it be so little as 2Sc a 
week, the cost of a U. S. Thrift Stamp. 

That students plan their personal expenditures 
with a personal budget now recognized as the 
most practical instrument for promoting wise 
expenditure in government, in business and in 
personal finance. 

That students discuss in debating clubs, fra- 
ternity clubs and other organizations, the rela- 
tion of personal thrift to business efficiency and 
success in life, and the relation of individual 
savings to the country's capital fund, and to 
present economic problems. 

That student organizations should as a national 
after-war service organize a public discussion of 
the economic problems related to thrift, savings 
and investment, seeking particularly a statement 
of their practical bearing on the reconstruction 
problem and of the personal responsibility which 
the college student has during college and after- 
wards, for personal thrift and for its promotion 
in the community, to the end that colleges and all 
higher institutions which in the work-and-save 
program for .the bigger and better America. 



BOWDOIN HAS OLDEST BAT. 

Fifty-nine years ago this month a Bowdoin 
College nine played its first game of baseball 
with a team outside the college, and the bat used 
in that historic contest is now on exhibition in 
the trophy room of the college gymnasium. If 
there is anywhere a baseball bat used earlier 
than Oct. 10, i860, Bowdoin men would like to 
have its owners produce it. 

The game in question was not an intercol- 
legiate contest, for the opponents of the Bowdoin 
nine were the members of the Sunrise Club of 
Brunswick — their name coming from their habit 
of practising the national game, then very much 
in its infancy, before breakfast. The college 
team was composed wholly of members of the 
Class of 1861, then beginning their senior year. 
There was friendly rivalry between town and 
gown, and the challenge for a game came from 
the Sunrise Club. The game was played on the 
Topsham Fair grounds, Oct. 10, i860, and some- 
thing of its exciting nature may be judged from 
the score of 46 to 42, in favor of the Sunrise 



150 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



team. 

The bat used was fashioned on the morning 
of the game by John Furbish of the Sunrise 
team, long a hardware dealer of Brunswick and 
the father of Samuel B. Furbish, the present 
treasurer of Bowdoin. The bat was made of soft 
wood, probably spruce, though it is difficult to 
determine with the old bat so soiled with usage 
it received that day and so stained with time. 
But think of a spruce bat in a game today — with 
88 runs pounded out ! After .the game the i8 
players, realizing that the contest opened an era 
in the history of Maine athletics, wrote their 
names in ink on the bat, and it became'a treas- 
ured trophy in the possession of the winning- 
team. Later it passed into the possession of the 
Pejepscot Historical Society of Brunswick, 
which has recently passed it over to Bowdoin 
for its trophy room. All the names written on 
the bat 59 years ago can still be made out, 
though with difficulty in some cases. The bat is 
about the same shape as the bat of today, 
though a bit longer and of course much lighter. 

Only two or three of the 18 players of the 
first game are living today. No members of the 
Sunrise team survive — most of them were older 
iellows than the college boys. Of the Bowdoin 
seniors who played in that game the survivors 
include Lucius A. Emery, long chief justice of 
Maine, a trustee of Bowdoin and for several 
years past a lecturer in the Boston University 
Law School; also Edward Stanwood of Brook- 
line, another trustee of the college, who has won 
fame as a writer and editor. Judge Emery was 
the pitcher and Mr. Stanwood the catcher. 

The second baseman of the Bowdoin team was 
Henry J. Thurber, who became a millionaire in 
Chicago. He founded the mathematical prize of 
$300 awarded annually at the college. G. E. 
Stubbs, the right fielder, rose to the top of the 
medical profession in Philadelphia. On the Sun- 
rise team, in addition to John Furbish earlier 
mentioned, was Ira P. Booker, who became for a 
generation the treasurer of the college. He was 
the catcher of his nine. In those days the play- 
ers went to bat in order of position, not in order 
of hitting ability. 



2Dn tiit Campus 

The exhibit of water-color paintings at the 
Union on Thursday was of great interest to 
many students, especially to those who have fol- 
lowed up Art, and to those who have taken the 
course in Art in college. 



One of the favorite songs of the chemistry 
students, just now, is "I'm Forever Blowing 
Bubbles." 

One of the favorite questions of our ever 
studious Freshmen is "What did you get in 
Math?" (LTsually followed by a sigh.) 

Crosby '17 was on the Campus last Friday. 

Minot '19 attended the Bowdoin-Colby game. 

Clarke '18 was on the Campus last week. 

Lloyd Colter '19 was a visitor on the Campus 
recently. 

Dr. and Mrs. Harrison L. Robinson of Bangor 
were in Brunswick during the Colby game. 

The annual cross country meet will be held 
at Colby Friday. Jack Magee is planning to 
enter seven men, five of whom to score. 

Norman J. Greene, M. I. T., '19, was seen on 
the Campus Tuesday of last week. 

Trials for Freshman candidates for the Mando- 
lin Club were held in the music room last Tues- 
day. 

The informal track meet which was run off 
Wednesday and Thursday of last week was high- 
ly successful. Much promising new material was 
unearthed. 

There has been a rumor that the Bowdoin- 
Maine game would be staged at Portland No- 
vember nth, as a part of the Armistice Day 
celebration, instead of at Orono as scheduled. 
It is reported that the Maine students greatly op- 
posed this change because of the additional ex- 
pense and the fact that the game with Bowdoin 
was their only home game this season. 

Burt Whitman, sporting editor of the Boston 
Herald, and Cartoonist Collier were on the 
Campus last Thursday making special stories of 
the football situation. They are touring all the 
Maine colleges to find information concerning 
the State series. 

Warnings for the Freshmen came out after 
the Faculty meeting yesterday. 

The football squad will leave for Maine Fri- 
day noon in a special Pullman car. Coach Greene 
will take 24 plays besides the manager, assistant 
manager, and three candidates for assistant 
manager. They will stay at the Bangor House 
while on the trip. 

The band held several rehearsals last week in 
preparation for the Bates game. 

The Bowdoin Calendar is being prepared now 
and will be out shortly. 

The student body with the band will leave 
Brunswick for Orono on special cars attached 
to the 8.30 train. It is expected that a very 
large number will go. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



151 



Because of the crowd expected at the Bates 
game additional bleachers were built last week. 

Most of the leaves on the Campus have now 
been burned and the annual campus smoker is 
at an end. 

On Friday last Parent '21 jurneyed to Water- 
ville to referee the Coburn Classical-Westbrook 
Seminary g'ame. Saturday morning he refereed 
the Hebron-Kent's Hill game at Hebron, and 
Saturday afternoon he acted as head linesman 
at the Maine-Colby game at Waterville. 

Jack Magee and Bob Cleaves '20, were in 
Waterville last Frida}' looking over the course 
for the cross countrs^ meet. 

Merrill '14 attended the Bates game. 

Zeitler '20 is back on the Campus, after a suc- 
cessful operation for appendicitis in Portland. 



Wiit^ tl)e iFacuItp 

Several members of the Faculty were in Port- 
land last Friday to attend the Teachers' Con- 
vention in session there. Among those present 
were Professors^ Burnett, Mitchell, Davis, Brown, 
Ham, Stone, and Wilder. Professor Ham pre- 
sided at the meeting of the Modern Language 
Department, where Professor Burnett spoke on 
the "Aids of Psychology to the Modern Lan- 
guage Teacher." Also, Professor Stone dis- 
cussed the problem of second-year work in 
French and Spanish. Miss Anna Smith, the 
curator of the Walker Art Building, addressed 
the Department of Drawing on "The Museum 
Habit." 



alumni Botes 

The Orient desires to be of the greatest possi- 
ble service to the Alumni in keeping them in- 
formed of one another's activities. Alumni are 
earnestly requested to support the Orient in this 
work by sending items about themselves or their 
brother Alumni. All such communications should 
be addressed to the Alumni Editor. 



CHICAGO ALUMNI DINNER. 

At the meeting of the Chicago Alumni held 
at the University Club, Chicago, on October 17th, 
the following members were present: 

H. N. W. Hoyt '64, Homer R. Blodgett '96, 
Samuel Topliff '99, John Gregson '01, R. N. 
Cushing '05, L. D. H. Weld '05, W. N. Emerson 
'11, G. H. Nichols '12, George W. TiMson '77, 
Preston Keyes '96, W. R. Smith '90, A. L. Small 
'01, H. E. Marr '05, C. A. Rogers '06, J. H. 
Newell '12, E. B. Tuttle '13. 



President Sills represented the college. 

The following officers were elected : President, 
W. R. Smith' 90, secretary, Homer R. Blodgett 
'96. 

It is hoped that alumni who are now residing 
in Chicago, or who are going to that city to 
reside, will notify Mr. Blodgett of their names 
and addresses. His address is : Homer R. 
Blodgett, 1704 West looth St., Chicago. 



MINNEAPOLIS ALUMNI MEETING. 

Among those present at the meeting of the 
alumni of Minneapolis, held at the Minneapolis 
Club on the evening of Monday, October 20th, 
were : 

A. L. Crocker '7^, A. C. Cobb '81, M. H. 
Boutelle '87, J. H. Morse '97, Thomas Kneeland 
'74, J. O. P. Wheelwright '81, L. J. Bodge '89, 
E. B. Tuttle '13, and F. A. Fogg '69, of St. Paul. 

The Association of the Northwest was re- 
vived. The secretary is John O. P. Wheelwright. 
President Sills represented the college. 



The Bowdoin Alumni Club of Portland, which 
has had a period of inactivity during the war, 
will resume its monthly meetings early in No- 
vember. Among the speakers who have been 
secured for the early meetings of the club are 
President Sills and Donald B. MacMillan '98. 

'74 — A portrait of President Samuel Valen- 
tine Cole of Wheaton College is being exhibited 
at the studio of the painter, Mr. Alfred E. Smith, 
on Boylston street, Boston. It is a full length 
portrait, life-size, representing Dr. Cole in his 
scholar's gown of black silk, with velvet bands, 
and red and purple collar. Dr. Cole is a trustee 
of Bowdoin. 

'81 — "The Unknown Quantity," a novel by 
Edgar O. Achorn '81 and Edward N. Teall has 
just appeared. It is published by the Marshall 
Jones Company of Boston. 

Ex-'85 — Richard Webb of Portland died very 
suddenly October 28th as a result of heart 
trouble while returning home from his office. He 
was born November 19, 1863, at Portland. In 
1881 he entered Bowdoin where he remained two 
years before transferring to Dartmouth, where 
he received his A.B. in 1885. Since 1887 he 
has been a practicing lawyer in Portland. From 
1893 to 1897 he was assistant county attorney in 
Cumberland. He was in the House of Repre- 
sentatives of the Maine Legislature in 1899 and 
again in 1901. In 1904 he was one of the alter- 
nate delegates-at-large to the Republican Na- 
tional Convention. In 1908 he was the delegate 



152 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



from the First District. In 1913 he was presi- 
dent of the Portland Economic Club, and he had 
also been president for the Dartmouth Club in 
Maine. He took a prominent part in the activi- 
ties of a large number of organizations around 
Portland, and in the State. He was a member 
of the Psi Upsilon fraternity. 

'94 — -William F. Allen, who has been for the 
past three years principal of the High School at 
Wilmington, Mass., is now principal of the Ply- 
mouth (Mass.) High School. 

'05 — Hon. Leonard A. Pierce has moved to 
Portland from Houlton, and has entered into a 
law partnership with Hon. Charles Sumner Cook. 
Mr. Pierce is prominent in the Democratic party 
and has served with distinction in the Maine 
Legislature. 

'12 — Dr. Chester Lorenzo Clarke of Portland, 
a former officer in the Royal Medical Corps of 
the British Army, married Miss Charlotte R. 
Wiggins of New York, not long ago. 

'12 — Lester Lodge Bragdon of Wells, Maine, 
and Miss Grace Evelyn Weare were married at 



Ogunquit, Maine, on the 28th of September. 

'13 — A daughter, Helen Schaeffer, was born 
to Professor and Mrs. Paul H. Douglas of the 
University of Washington, on October 18. 

'14 — Word has just been received that Ensign 
Stanley Dole arrived in Paris recently from 
Russia, where he has been since last February. 
He left Portland for overseas service October 
17, 1917. For a time he was in the North Sea 
with the U. S. S. Florida, and had many inter- 
esting and exciting experiences. Later he was 
sent to London, and then to Russia where he 
learned at first hand some of the results of the 
activities of the Bolsheviki. 

'19 — Hugh A. Mitchell has a position with the 
McCann Advertising Agency of New York. Har- 
rison K. McCanUj the founder of this agency, 
is a Bowdoin graduate in the Class of 1902. He 
has several Bowdoin men in his employ among- 
whom are J. Dawson Sinkinson '02, Henry O. 
Hawes '10, Harry Palmer '04 (manager of the 
New York office), and^ Harrison Atwood '09 
(manager of the San Francisco branch). 



^OUi 



■'^OfD-ISBO-V.C'^^' 



,0^ 



5th Avenue 



DE PINNA 



New York 



WILL SHOW AT THE 
MO'TEl- EAOLE 

on Monday and Tuesday, November loth and list, the new 19 19 
Autumn and Winter Suits, Overcoats and Sports Clothing, ready for 
immediate service, in ample assortments of imported English, Scotch 
and Irish woolens. 

Exclusive novelties in imported furnishings for young me 
MR. SWEENEY, Representative. 



BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


Have You Paid Your Subscription? 


FALL STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

John A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 


EDGAR O. ACHORN'S NOVEL 

"The Unknown Quantity" 

FOR SALE AT 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 






We would like to engage three or four 
energetic and capable students for us on 
cornmission. The right men can add ma- 
terially to their income for the next two 
months in a pleasant and congenial business 
which can be done in spare time. 

New England Pulilisliers Service Inc. 

462 BOYLSTON ST. BOSTON, MASS. 


A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office - - - Brunswick, Maine 


BUTLER^S 


DANCING 

Miss Jennie S. Harvey's Evening Dancing 
Class and Assembly every Tuesday evening at 
Town Hall, Brunswick, commencing Oct. 21st. 

Lesson 7.30 p. m. Assembly 8.30 p. m. 

This class is open to college students. 


PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSON'S PHARMACY 


Private instruction by appointment. 

IVIonday evening Class and Assembly at Arm- 
ory Hall, Bath. 

Address 897 Middle St., Bath, Maine. 'Phone 
151-W. 


CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 


WANTED 

Student to sell high grade line of toilet re- 
quisites, $25 per week for active fellow. 

DOVER SUPPLY COMPANY 

530 Tremont St. Boston, Mass. 




CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 

4 Elm Street 


MESERVE'S FRUIT SHERBET 

The Blended Product of the Natural Juices of 
Sound Ripe Fruit and Berries. A Delicious and 
Healthful Beverage for Receptions, Teas and 
Parties. Prepared only by 

P. J. MESERVE, Pharmacist, 
Near Post Office, Brunswick, Maine 


HARVARD DENTAL SCHOOL 

A Department of Harvard University 

Graduates of secondary schools admitted without ex- 
amination provided they have taken required subjects. 
Modern buildings and equipment. Fall term opens 
September 22, 1919. Degree of D.M.D. Catalog. 
EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D., Dean, Boston, Mass. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

" UNION " LUNCH 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 
Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 
FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 

We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 



TONDREAU BROS. CO. 



87 



Maine Street 
Branch Store 



-2 Gushing St.- 



Tel. 136-137 
-Tel. 16. 



WE CARRY 

Co-operative Shoes 
New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 



LARGEST AND BEST 

stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



LAW 

AND AMERICA'S 
WORLD POSITION 



n international 
challenges the 



America's new place ; 
politics and commerce 
young American. 
He must equip himself for new world 
conditions with a knowledge of legal funda- 
mentals. 

LAW — its principles and application to all 
business is almost as necessary to the 
coming business man as it is indispensable 
to the lawyer. 
Qualify for real leadership. 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

gives a thorough training in legal 

principles. 

LL.B. Course requires 3 years. 

For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 



Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 

TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 



BATH, MAINE 



_ J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The Bowdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 

Portland 

ANTIQIVTY SHOP 



r 



AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

ffilD jfurnttuK, ffim China, ©etottr, (Etc. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 

to orders for antique goods of any kind 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULES BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST 



BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short Notice by competent work- 
men. We use only the Best 
of Leather. 
E. WHITTOM 



WILLIAM F. FERRIS 

COLLEGE AGENT 

Citizens Laundry 

AUTO SERVICE 9 SOUTH APPLETON 



Telephone 160 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 



Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
A. G. PA GE COMPANY, Bath 



(4 



The Store of Progress and Service 

PLACE YOUR ORDER NOW FOR 

WHITE SWEATERS 

CREW (ROUND) OR V NECK 

Delivery guaranteed in about three weeks 
without fail. 

Jack Handy '23, Zeta Psi House, will take 
your order and will deliver the goods. 




MONUMENT SQUARE 



PORTLAND, MAINE 




WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

VIVIAN MARTIN 

IN 

LOUISIANA 




FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

CHARLES RAY 

IN 

GREASED LIGHTNING 



MONDAY and TUESDAY 
NEXT WEEK 

MARGUERITE CLARK 

IN 

COME OUT OF THE KITCHEN 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

MONROE SALISBURY 

IN 

BLENDING TRAIL 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

FRANCIS X. BUSHMAN 

IN 

GOD'S OUTLAW 



MONDAY and TUESDAY 
NEXT WEEK 

MARY MACLAREN 

IN 

WEAKER VESSEL 



Vol. XLIX. No. 16 



NOVEMBER 11, 1919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



m 


CONTENTS 






PA«E 


PAGE 


Rhodes Scholarship 


153 


New Society Founded 


155 


Eally for the Maine Game 


153 


Y. M. C. A. Activities 


155 


FenciBg Notice 


153 


Maine Defeats Bowdoin 18-0 


156 


Editorial: 




The Des Moines Convention 


158 


Junior Societies at Bowdoin 


154 


New Flags 


158 


Student Elections 


155 


On the Campus 


158 


Masque and Gown 


155 


"Des Moines Notes" 


159 


Freshman Debating Trials 


155 


Alumni Notes 


159 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Back Here" know JUD is in the game. 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



PRINTING 



OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER^S 

TOWN BUILDING BliUNSWICK 



The College Book Store 

We wish to call your 
attention to our new 

FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

in a large man size pa- 
per. 

The stock is the well known 
OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

The price is $ 1 .00 per box 
F. W. CHANDLER & SON 



COLLEGE AND 'TREP" SCHOOL MEN 

Clothing foi Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 
ercoats and Ulsters. 




Haberdashery 



Hats 



MacuUar Parker Company 



400 Washington St. 



Boston, Mass. 



'THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT" 





The "Constitution" of To-day — Electrically Propelled 



THE U. S. S. "New Mexico," the first battle- 
ship of any nation to be electrically pro- 
pelled, is one of the most important achievements 
of the scientific age. She not only develops the 
maximum power and, with electrical control, 
has greater flexibility of maneuver, which is a 
distinct naval advantage, but 
also gives greater economy. 
At 10 knots, her normal cruis- 
ing speed, she will steam on 
less fuel than the best turbine- 
driven ship that preceded her. 

The electric generating plant, 
totaling 28,000 horsepower, 
md the propulsion equipment 
of thsgreat super-dreadnaught 
were built by the General Elec- 
tric Company. Their operation has demonstrated 
the superiority of electric propulsion over old- 
time methods and a wider application of this 
principle in the merchant marine is fast mak- 
ing progress. 



Figures that tell the 
Story of Achievement 

Length— 624 feet 

Width— 97 feet 

Displacement— 32,000 tons 

Fuel capacity— a million gal- 
lons (fuel oil) 

Power- 28,00J electrical horse< 
power 

Speed— 21 knots. 



Six auxiliary General Electric Turbine-Gener- 
ators of 400 horsepower each, supply power 
for nearly 500 motors, driving pumps, fans, 
shop machinery, and kitchen and laundry appli- 
ances, etc. 

Utilizing electricity to propel ships at sea marks 
the advancement of another 
phase of the electrical indus- 
try in which the General Elec- 
tric Company is the pioneer. 
Of equal importance has been 
its part in perfecting electric 
transportation on land, trans- 
forming the potential energy 
of waterfalls for use in elec- 
tric motors, developing the 
possibilities of electric light- 
ing and many other similar achievements. 

As a result, so general are the applications of 
electricity to the needs of mankind that scarcely 
a home or individual today need be without the 
benefits of General Electric products and service 



An illustrated booklet describing the "New Mexico." entitled, 
"The Electric Ship," will be sent upon request. Address 
CeneLal Electric Company, Desk 44, Schenectady, New York. 




General Office 
Schenectacly, N.Y. 



Sales Offices in 
all large crties. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



NEW MODELS 
FOR YOUNG MEN 

Belted suit and over- 
coat styles as well as 
plainer designs by 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 

who make clothes for 

young men and make 

them right. 

$35 AND MORE 

ALSO EVENING CLOTHES 

Haskell & Jones Co. 



Portland, 



Maine. 




Argotne 

>m// Collar 

Cluett, Peabody 6f Co. Inc. Troy , N . Y. 



ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



WINTER 

Underwear and Hosiery 



E. S. BODWELL & SON, 

Brunswick. 



Greenhouse 21-W 
Residence 21-R 



WALTER 


L. LaROCK 


F- L- O 


R 1 s -r 


Potted Plants 


and Cut Flowers 


Floral Designs 


for All Occasions 




15X Jordan Avenue 



Fraternity Stationery 

Old Hampshire Vellum 

STUDENT SIZE 85 CENTS 

Ambassador Linen 

60 CENTS 
Have you seen our new Tobacco Pouch? 

Courson & Morton 

180 MAINE ST. The Bowling Alley is next door 



BOWDOIN ORILNT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER II, 1919 



NO. 16 



THE RHODES SCHOLARSHIP. 

On Saturday, Nov. i, the committee to select 
the Rhodes Scholar from Maine met in Augusta 
and interviewed the candidates. There were 
four, George Case}', Bowdoin '19, Philip 
Crockett, Bowdoin '20, Powers of Bates, and 
Steadman of Maine. The committee consisted 
of State Superintendent of Education A. O. 
Thomas, chairman. Dean Paul Nixon of Bow- 




PHILIP DYER CROCKETT 
Our Latest Rhodes Scholar. 



doin, secretary, Professory Webber of Colby, and 
Robert Hale, Bowdoin, 1910. 

Monday it was announced that Crockett was 
the successful candidate from the State. This 
Rhodes Scholarship provides for three years 
graduate work for American students at Oxford 
University. They are allowed a salary of $1,500 



a year for expenses. Besides the work at studies 
during the year, an opportunity is provided for 
summer travel in Europe if desired. 

Philip Dyer Crockett is in the Class of 1920. 
He hails from Everett, Mass., and is a member 
of the Theta Delta Chi fraternity. 

He was awarded his Phi Beta Kappa key 
at the end of his Junior year. For three years 
he has been regular quarterback on the Varsity 
football team and this year developed remarkable 
skill in selecting plans and in generalship. He 
has participated in the dramatic productions of 
the Masque and Gown from time to time. So it 
is that this time the coveted Rhodes Scholarship 
has been awarded to an all-round man, good 
student and good athlete. 



RALLY FOR THE MAINE GAME 

Last Thursday night the student body pledged 
its support to the Bowdoin eleven in the final 
contest of the season. Every man who expected 
to go to Orono on Saturday, and most of those 
who didn't, were there to show the team how 
they stood. 

The first speaker was Professor Bell who ex- 
pressed his greatest confidence in the ability of 
the team. When Dr. Whittier spoke, his only 
worry seemed to be, that the student body would 
not make noise enough. His audience quickly 
demonstrated how much noise it could make, and 
Dr. Whittier seemed satisfied. 

On account of Bob Cleaue's absence Cook '20 
led the cheering. The band was at its best and, 
alone, was enough to start the traditional Bow- 
doin "Fight."' Apples and "smokes" were passed 
out and the singing of "Bowdoin Beata" closed 
the meeting. The motion was made and en- 
thusiastically carried to meet at the Chapel the 
following noon and march to the station to give 
the team a good send-off. 



FENCING NOTICE. 

All men in college who wish to taken fencing- 
in place of other physical training or who wish 
to try out for the fencing team, see Schlosberg 
'20 at the Psi U. House without delay. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Tuesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 

Leland M. GoodricHj 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 

Acting Managing Editor 
department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Ronald L. McCormack, 1922 Exchange 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 

Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
Ronald B. Wadsworth, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Allan W. Hall, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 

Vol. XLIX. NOVEMBER 11, 1919. No. 16 

Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

Junior Societies at Bowdoin. 

There are two Junior honorary societies here 
at Bowdoin which have been in existence for 
several years. The fact that they are called 
"honorary" makes us believe that their original 



object was to select men from the Junior class 
who had achieved marked success in college 
activities. However, it seems that in the last 
two years this idea of selection has been lost 
sight of and a more inconsistent and unscrupu- 
lous method has been adopted. Because of this 
new policy, the question has rightfully come up : 
Have Junior societies which are not doing any 
good any right to e.xist? 

You would expect from the very title of these 
societies that the greatest care would be exer- 
cised in selecting new men. You would expect 
that no man would be selected by any honorary 
society until he had proven beyond doubt that 
his accomplishments in undergraduate activities 
were sufficiently worthy to entitled him to mem- 
bership in a Junior society. On the other hand, 
you would expect these societies to -keep their 
standards so high that men in the lower classes 
would make greater efforts to achieve distinc- 
tion in college activity than they would if these 
societies did not exist. One would expect the 
accomplishment of these men to be looked up to 
by underclassmen as a goal to be attained only 
by hard work and the exhibition of true Bowdoin 
spirit. You would expect that these societies 
would try to so fortify their position with sound 
policies and good men that all non-m«mbers 
would feel envious and that the students and 
college officials would feel proud to possess such 
organizations. 

Some of the things to be expected of such so- 
cieties have been stated ; now let us see what 
the actual results are. We find that a policy has 
been adopted by which men are approached at 
the end of their Freshman year. This policy 
is most unfair from two view-points — that of the 
man approached and that of the society. It is 
unfair to the man because the average Freshman 
learns little about Junior societies during his 
first year so that he is not capable of deciding 
with justice to himself the organization which he 
prefers. It is unfair to the society because at 
the end of a man's firfet year in college, it is im- 
possible to determine with certainty what degree 
of success he is going to win in his college life. 
A policy of pledging three men to get one man- 
ager is very poor. To get one man that deserves 
the honor, two others are accredited with the 
same distinction and become nothing more than 
loafers and parasites, thereby decidedly lowering 
the standards of the society and perhaps of the 
members themselves. A policy which allows such 
procedure should not be tolerated. 

These two societies should get together and 
adopt a fixed policy with regard to pledging 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



155 



whereby no man could be approached until April 
or May of his Sophomore year. Such a policy 
of "Fair play and may the best man win" could 
be followed safely by any respected group of 
men. If these organizations, The Friars and 
Abraxas, are not capable of policies requiring 
such high standards, then the student body should 
rise in protest against their continued existence. 
Junior societies, are you ready to justify your 
existence by setting the highest standards for 
membership, theieby encouraing the members of 
the two lower classes to honorable accomplish- 
ments in undergraduate activity? 



STUDENT ELECTIONS. 

On Thursday, November 13th, the manager 
and assistant manager of tennis and the commit- 
tee for the annual Christmas dance will be 
chosen. The nominees are as follows ; 
- Tennis Manager— Haines 'si. e.A.X. : Cole '21, KS. 

Assistant Tennis Manager (Tobie ineligible) — Free- 
man '22. -^.r. : Tileston '22. B.G.n. 

Christmas Dance Committee — From 1920 (three to 
be chosen) : 'Brown, d.K.E. ; Cleaves, A.A.*. ; Mc- 
Williams. A.A.*. ; Richan. K.2. ; P. Smith, Z.*. ; 
Zeitler, Z.'I'. 

From 192 1 (one to be chosen) — Buker, A.T. ; Lovell, 
A.A.*. 

From 1922 (one to be chosen) — Averill, A.K.E. ; 
Flinn, A.A.$. 

From 1923 (one to be chosen) — Palmer, A.A.*. : 
Sheesley, B.B.H. 



MASQUE AND GOWN. 

The Masque and Gown held its first meeting 
on Monday, November 3. Asnault '20 presided 
as last year's manager, and officers for this year 
were elected : They are — President, Asnault '20 ; 
manager. Cole '21. Two assistant managers will 
be elected from the Sophomore members at a 
later date. An executive committee was ap- 
pointed consisting of Cole '21, chairman, and 
Asnault '20, Curtis '20, Crossman '20, and Red- 
man '21. All men who had speaking parts in 
the Ivy Commencement plays last spring were 
elected to membership. 

At a meeting held later in the week various 
plays were suggested to be given next Ivy, one 
of which will be selected immediately. Tryouts 
for parts in the cast will be held very soon. 



FRESHMAN DEBATING TRIALS. 

The Freshman trials for the coming Freshman- 
Sophomore debate were held in Hubbard Hall, 
Tuesday evening, November 4. A number of 
candidates were present and each made a very 
good showing. 



The question for discussion was : Resolved ; 
That the municipal police should have the pre- 
rogative of collective bargaining. Both the nega- 
tive and the affirmative of the question were up- 
held. The judges for the evening v/ere Profes- 
sors Mitchell and Davis, and Badger '20. 

The excellence of the majority of the speakers 
in the minds of the judges made a second trial 
necessary, so on some day in the near future a 
debate will be held with Jacobs, Cousins, Slater, 
and Davis, alternate, upholding the affirmative 
of the question; and Mitchell, Little, Finnegan, 
and Love, alternate, upholding the negative. 



NEW SOCIETY FOUNDED. 

Last Wednesday evening' the second 3'ear 
medical class of Bowdoin College were delight- 
fully entertained at the home of Dr. and Mrs. 
Earl C. Follett. 

Before the merry party ended a new society 
was born to old Bowdoin. It is to be called the 
"Society of Pathology and Bacteriology," and 
its aims are both instructive and social. 

The founders of the new order are as follows: 
Dr. F. N. Whittier, Dr. Earl C. Follett, Perlie 
J. Mundie, Reginald Lombard, Harold G. Lee, 
Edwin T. Murray, Edward Whalen, and Henry 
W. Hanson, Jr. Mrs. Follett was unanimously 
elected the first honorary member. 

The officers of the society are to be elected 
at a later meeting". 



Y. M. C. A. ACTIVITIES. 

Tuesday evening the Y. M. C. A. Cabinet had 
a special meeting in the Library. The Red Cross 
drive in the college has been entrusted to the 
Y. M. C. A. and plans were made for canvassing 
the houses and ends. Mr. James Barnes, who is 
State Boys Secretary at Waterville, spoke to 
the Cabinet, suggesting ways and means of carry- 
ing out this year's program. Some of his sug- 
gestions will undoubtedly be put into effect with 
the hope that the "Y" can be a more vital force 
in student life in the future. 

Wednesday, Clarence P. Shedd, the field secre- 
tary for New England of the Student' Division, 
International Y. M. C. A., was on the campus 
helping the Cabinet to get things under way to 
send a student delegations from Bowdoin to the 
Des Moines Convention. Already steps are un- 
der way to send our quota, a delegation of five 
students, secretary of the "Y" and a faculty 
delegate. The committee shaping this up con- 
sists of Look '20, Young '21, Gumming '21, Mc- 
Gown '21, and Ridley '22. 



156 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




1919 Fooll 

FRONT ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT— Manager McPartland, Peacock, 
Granger, Haines, Dudgeon, Trainer Magee, Assistant Manager Willsoi 

BACK ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT— Meacham, Wetherell, Clifford, K( 
Drummond, Safford, Putnam, Guptil, Doherty, Coach Greene. 



MAINE DEFEATS BOWDOIN 18-0. 

In a game characterized by its smashing old- 
time tactics, the Maine eleven defeated Bowdoin 
and won the State championship Saturday, No- 
vember 8, at Orono. The one-sided score of the 
contest did not prevent the huge crowd (the 
largest ever seen at Orono) from supporting 
each team by constantly cheering encouragement 
to the end of the last minute. Both teams 
showed a grim fighting spirit which is ever pres- 
ent in the Maine-Bowdoin game. The lighter 
Bowdoin team, however, could not hold Maine 
on the slippery field and its offensive failed to 
penetrate the Maine line. Maine lost much 
ground by penalties for offsides and other in- 
fringements, the lost ground on this account 
amounting to 105 yards. In the last of the sec- 
ond period this failing almost cost Maine a 
touchdown. 

Peacock played a good game for Bowdoin both 
in the backfield and at end. He had the greatest 



success in bucking the line and his sure tackling 
prevented many long runs. Dostie, who was put 
in late in the game despite his injuries, played 
his usual fast game. The secondary defense of 
Dahlgren and James stopped many Maine men. 
The center of the Bowdoin line was impregnable 
to the Maine attack, but with their excellent in- 
tereference the Maine backs made much ground 
around ends and through tackles. For Maine, 
Ginsberg at quarterback starred ; he I'an the ball 
many yards. With the aid of a fine interference, 
Coady and Captain Stewart also gained con- 
sistently. 

Maine received the kick-off and started to rush 
down the field but Bowdoin held firm and Maine 
was forced to kick. Bowdoin kicked back and 
Ginsberg rushed the ball 30 yards to Bowdoin's 
30-yard line. Maine carried the ball to Bow- 
doin's lo-yard line where the Bowdoin line held. 
Bowdoin received the ball and Dalhgren kicked 
to Bowdoin's 40-yard line where Ginsberg caught 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




ball Squad 

Smith, Swinglehurst, Woodbury, Dahlgren, Crockett, Sprague, James, 
n, Tootel, Thomson, Ma son, Curtis, Captain Rhoades, Keene, McCurdy, 



the punt and ran it back lo yards. But Bow- 
doin's line again held and took the ball on the 
Bowdoin 19-yard line. Bowdoin punted, was 
driven back to its 4-yard line, held, and again 
punted. This time Maine carried the ball to 
Bowdoin's 7-yard line and the period closed, 
neither side having scored. 

In the beginning of the second period Maine, 
after being held for two downs, carried the ball 
over the White line for the first touchdown. 
Hussey failed to kick the goal. Score : Maine 6, 
Bowdoin 0. 

Maine kicked to Bowdoin and Curtis ran 8 
yards to his own 33-yard line. Maine took the 
ball on downs and Ginsberg ran for 32 yards. 
This was followed by an end run by Stewart for 
the remaining 28 yards and a touchdown. Stewart 
missed the goal. Score: Maine 12, Bowdoin o. 

Following this score, Maine became over-eager 
and consequently was penalized several times. 
This brought the ball down to Maine's 30-yard 



line. Dahlgren hit the line for 4 yards and then 
made Bowdoin's one successful forward pass to 
Peacock who gained 12 yards. After his carry- 
ing the ball 4 yards further however, the whistle 
blew for the end of the second period. Score : 
Maine 12, Bowdoin o. 

At the opening of the third period Stewart 
rushed 20 yards down to Bowdoin's 40-yard line. 
Maine, by short gains, advanced consistently and 
Ginsberg ran off 23 yards around the end to the 
6-3'ard line, from whence Coady carried the ball 
over for the third time. Neavling failed to kick 
the goal. Score : Maine 18, Bowdoin o. 

Following this, Maine played defensive for the 
rest of the game. Dostie entered at this point 
and had some success in piercing the line of the 
Maine team, up to the end of the third period. 

At the beginning of the fourth period, Maine 
resorted to kicking by Neavling to a great e.xtent. 
In Maine's attempt to rush Bowdoin succeeded 
in stopping her before she threatened a goaL 



158 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Peacock and Dostie tackled all men attempting 
to pass them and forced Maine to kick several 
times. Towards the last of the game, Maine 
again neared the Bowdoin goal line by a forward 
pass to Ginsberg, but lost on a penalty of 15 
yards and failed to come back before the whistle 
blew. 

The line-up : 
MAINE— —BOWDOIN 

Beverle, le le., Doherty 

R. Green, It It., Brewstei- 

Lung, Ig Ig., Dudgeon 

J. Green, c c, McCurdy 

Hussy, rg rg., Kern 

Quinn, rt rt., Rhoades 

Small, re re., Rrummond 

Ginsberg, qb . .qb., Crockett 

Harvey, Ihb Ihb., Dahlgren 

Stewart, rhb rhb., James 

G. Smith, f b f b., Curtis 

Score by quarters : 

Maine o, 12, 6, o — 18 

Touchdowns, G. Smith, Stewart, Coady. Substitu- 
tions, Maine, J. Courtney for Harvey, Coady for Court- 
ney, R. Smith for G. Smith, Neavling for R. Green, 
Lawry for Stewart, Courtney for Coady, Johnson for 
Hussey. Bowdoin, Thompson for Doherty, Peacock for 
Drummond, Sprague for Curtis, Mason for Rhoades, 
Smith for Kern, Dostie for James, James for Dahlgren, 
J. Smith for Dostie, Meachan for James, Clifford for 
Mason, Putnam for Thompson, Thompson for Guptill. 



THE DBS MOINES CONVENTION. 

During the Christmas holidays from Dec. 31 
to Jan. 4 there will be held in Des Moines the 
greatest gathering of college students in the 
history of the country. This is being called the 
Student Volunteer Convention but that is really 
a misnomen as it is not essentially a gathering 
of Student Volunteers. Again although the Y. 
M. C. A.'s and Y. W. C. A.'s are promoting it in 
the colleges, it is not fundamentally a Y. M. C. 
A. Convention. It really is an assembly of about 
8,000 picked students, men and women, from all 
the colleges in America to consider for a few 
days some of the underlying principles and ideas 
that govern life in America and in the world 
today. Two delegates are allowed from each 
college in the country. Additional delegates are 
on a percentage of membership basis, allowing 
one delegate for every hundred students above 
the first two hundred. 

The speakers and leaders for this convention 
are selected from those best able anywhere in 
the world to discuss these subjects without the 
least regard for effort or expense in securing 
them. Dr. Samuel M. Zwemer, an authority on 
the situation in the Near East, was in America 
in June but returned to his work in Arabia at 
that time. He is being brought back all the way 



from Arabia just to address the convention be- 
cause he knows the situation best. This is 
typical of the makeup of the program. Dr. John 
R. Mott and Dr. Robert E. Speer are powerful 
leaders who are behind this whole gathering. In 
all probability it will prove a strong factor in 
influencing the life of the nation for the next 
generation. All the problems that cause so much 
unrest today will be discussed by authorities. The 
influence of these meetings on the individual lives 
of the delegates cannot be estimated and the ef- 
fect of their activity as undergraduates returning 
to the campus will be a strong factor in student 
life. 

Surely, Bowdoin does not want to be left out 
of such a program. Our quota is five student 
delegates, secretary of the Y. M. C. A., and a 
delegate from the faculty. This convention oc- 
curs but once in every student generation. We 
can send our full quota, if we will. Practically 
every college in New England has already re- 
sponded asking for the privilege of sending more 
than its quota. Now, Bowdoin, let's go. 



NEW FLAGS. 
During the past week many favorable com- 
ments have been heard about the new flags from 
the staff on Memorial Hall. These two flags, one 
large one for fair weather and one smaller for 
stormy weather, were given the college by Edgar 
O. Achorn, Esq., of Boston, of the Class of 'Si. 
They greatly improve the appearance of the 
whole campus. 



On tDe Campus 

Perry '22 was in Portland the greater part 
of last week for an operation on his eye. The 
operation was executed successfully. 

Many students were surprised to look out of 
their windows last Tuesday morning onto a 
campus covered with the first snow of the sea- 
son. 

President Sills was the principal speaker at 
the Armistice Day celebration in Portland Tues- 
day. 

The cross country team went to Waterville 
Thursday before the meet in order to look over 
the course. 

Jones '20, and Tileston '22, were in Boston 
last Saturday. 

It is doubtful whether the cross country team 
will enter in the New England meet on the 15th. 

Warnings caused many anxious looks last 
Tuesday. 

The football team escorted to the station by 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



159 



the student body and the band left for Orono 
on a special Pullman car attached to the 1.30 
train Friday. They made their headquarters at 
the Bangor House while on the trip. The stu- 
dent body left on the 8.30 train Saturday morn- 
ing. 

Excuses were granted for Saturday classes 
and chapel to all men who went to the Maine 
game. 

A subscription for the purpose of paying the 
expenses of the band on the Maine trip was 
raised last week in all the chapter houses. 

Plans are being made for the entertainment 
of the principals of the high schools of the three 
neighboring counties who are to have a confer- 
ence at Bowdoin during the first week of De- 
cember. 

Through an error in last week's Orient, the 
patronesses for the last Union dance were in- 
correctly stated. They were Mrs. Roscoe Ham 
and Miss Anna E. Smith. 



"DES MOINES NOTES." 

These telegrams have come into headquarters 
in the last two weeks : 
Princeton University : 

"We are ready to send twice as many as we 
are allowed." 

Prince of Wales College, Charlottetown, Prince 
Edward Island (farthest from Des Moines) : 

"We will be represented by two delegates." 
Pennsylvania State College : 

"How many more can we send?" 
Harvard University : 

"Our quota is 25. Can we send 40?" 
University of California (600 miles further from 
Des Moines than Bowdoin is) : 

"We are faced with the task of sending 97 
and we will do it." 

Maine, Bates, and Colby have all guaranteed 
full quotas. 



aiumni il3otes 

The Orient desires to be of the greatest possi- 
ble service to Alumni in keeping them informed 
of one another's activities. Alumni are earnest- 
ly requested to support the Orient in this work 
by sending items about themselves or their 
brother Alumni. All communications should be 
addressed to the Alumni Editor. 

'75 — Not long ago Dr. Dudley Allen Sargent, 
the well-known physical director, contributed a 
thousand dollars towards a fund for the building 



of a new high school in Belfast, Maine. 

Medic-'84 — Dr. Hiram Hunt died at Green- 
ville, Maine, November 4, 1919. He was born 
at Robbinston, Maine, on the fifteenth of Novem- 
ber, i860. After graduating from the Bowdoin 
Medical School he practiced medicine in Green- 
ville for thirty-five j^ears until shortly before his 
-death. For the year 1902-03 he was president of 
the Maine Medical Association. 

'87 — John V. Lane of Augusta, formerly the 
postmaster for a number of years, has been re-' 
cently appointed managing editor of the Ken- 
nebec Journal. In 1890, three years after his 
graduation, he received a Master's degree from 
Bowdoin. For the next eight years he was en- 
gaged in editorial work in Augusta. In 1898 he 
accepted a position in the post office, and in 1901 
was appointed postmaster. 

'91— Williette W., beloved wife of Dr. C. S. F. 
Lincoln of St. John's University, Shanghai, 
China, died suddenly in Baltimore, Md., June 
30th. Mrs. Lincoln was the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. George R. Eastman of Harrisonburg, 
Va., and went out to China in 1902. She was 
married in 1903. Dr. Lincoln and his oldest 
daughter, Mercia, returned to China July 26th, 
leaving the two younger children, John Dunlap 
and Eleanor Fessenden, with relatives in this 
country. 

'03 — Edward F. Merrill of Skowhegan, the 
present county attorney of Somerset, has an- 
nounced his candidacy for the office of attorney 
general. Mr. Merrill graduated from the Har- 
vard Law School in 1906, since when he has been 
practicing law in Skowhegan. He has been 
county attorney for a little over a year. 

'08 — Arthur L. Robinson has been appointed 
the first commander of the Harold T. Andrew^ 
Post of Portland. 

'15 — The engap-ement of Miss Hazel Rebecca 
Alden and Dr. Charles Carr Morrison of Bar 
Harbor has been recently announced. After 
graduating from Bowdoin, Dr. Morrison went to 
the Harvard Medical School from which he took 
his doctor's degree. He has practiced a year 
in the Boston City Hospital, and is now on the 
surgical staff of the Bar Harbor Hospital. 

Medic.-' 1 5 — Mrs. Ella M. Reeves of Reading, 
Mass., has announced the engagement of her 
daughter, Hilda M. Reeves, to Dr. Frank La 
Forest Collins of Rowley, Mass., a graduate of 
Bowdoin Medical College in 1915. 

'16 — Leigh R. Webber has recently received 
his discharge from the Cavalry at Fort Bliss, 
Texas, where he has been stationed for eighteen 



160 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



months. 

'i6 — Captain Alfred H. Grossman has been 
transferred from the Walter Reed General Hos- 
pital at Washington, D. C., to the U. S. Army 
Hospital at Hot Springs, Akans'as. 

'17 — In his address before the teachers of the 
Maine State Convention last Thursday, Governor 
Milliken, in speaking of Maine's contribution to 
the welfare and interests of the country, cited 



Sherman N. Shumway '17 as illustrative of the 
youth who advanced from private to high com- 
manding officer. 

'18 — George H. Blake of Mount Vernon, 
Maine, is principal of the Junior High School at 
Mexico, Maine. 

'19 — Lloyd O. Colter has moved from the Bos- 
ton wholesale office of the Outing Shoe Com- 
pany to their exporting office in New York. 



HUGH WALPOLE 

The Man and His Works 

The presence of this distinguished young English novelist in America 
recalls that of Charles Dickens, who, at the age of 30, paid his first 
visit to the "States." There is more than an arbitrary association of 
names in the linking of Walpole with Dickens, for here on our own 
soil for the first time since he was eight years old is the man who, 
conspicuously, is carrying on the finest traditions of the English novel, 
reviving in his books the rich, spirited and beautifully human and 
tender emotions that stamped the pages of Fielding, Thackeray and 
Dickens for what they were. 

Walpole' s Books Are Published In Uniform Edition 

JEREMY Net, J1.75 

By some magic of his own Hugh Walpole has made live again in JEREMY 
the childhood that we all knew and turn to with longing. 



THE SECRET CITY Net,si.75 

" A finer novel even than THE DARK 
FOREST. Its descriptive passages are 
many of tfiem superb." — New York Times 

THE DUCHESS OF WREXE 

— Net, SI. 75 

"More about mankind and life than is discover- 
able in the entirety of many another novel." 
— Boston Evening Transcript 

FORTITUDE Net, $1.75 

" 'll is not life that matters! 'Tis the courage 
you bring to it' is the text of this book of 
romance and realism." — New York Tribune 

THE GOLDEN SCARECROW 

Net, S1.50 
"Charming— bears kinship to PETER PAN 
and THE BLUE BIRD, for although unUke 
them, it recreates the magical world of imagi- 
nation." — Philadelphia Press 



Net, S1.50 



MARADICK AT FORTY 

Everyman's story at forty — the turning point 
when one looks back to the experiences that 
can never come again. 



GEORGE H. DORAN COMPANY Publishers New York 



THE DARK FOREST Net, $1.50 

"There is that deep, mystical note that one 
expects to find only in the work of the great 
Russian 'writers." — Boston Herald 

THE GREEN MIRROR Net, $1.75 

The story of a caste-bound English family 
who are swept into the whirlpool of democracy^ 
of indi\'iduality and freedom of thought. 

THE PRELUDE TO ADVEN- 
TURE Net, $1.50 
If Poe had conceived the plot and Dickens had 
written it the result would have been not. un- 
Uke this storj'. 

THE WOODEN HORSE Net, si.so 

Walpole's iirst novel. "Nowhere has Walpole 
shown a greater grip on life's realities. This 
story of 'the unrepentant prodigal' is one of 
his very best." — Philadelphia Ledger 

THE GODS AND MR. PERRIN 

Net, il.50 
"An extraordinarily able study of the Ufe of 
the masters at a small English ^^frf^L. 
school. "^Z.OH(/o« Bookman. ^£lnK\. 

( mm 

Worn 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Have You Paid Your Subscription? 

EDGAR O. ACHORN'S NOVEL 

"The Unknown Quantity" 

FOR SALE AT 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

We would like to engage three or four 
energetic and capable students for us on 
commission. The right men can add ma- 
terially to their income for the next two 
months in a pleasant and congenial business 
which can be done in spare time. 

New England Publisliers Service Inc. 

462 BOYLSTON ST. BOSTON, MASS. 

DANCING 

Miss Jennie S. Harvey's Evening Dancing 
Class and Assembly every Tuesday evening at 
Town Hall, Brunsvsrick, commencing Oct. 21st. 

Lesson 7.30 p. m. Assembly 8.30 p. m. 

This class is open to college students. 

Private instruction by appointment. 

Monday evening Class and Assembly at Arm- 
ory Hall, Bath. 

Address 897 Middle St., Bath, Maine. 'Phone 
151-W. 

WANTED 

Student to sell high grade line of toilet re- 
quisites, $25 per week for active fellow. 

DOVER SUPPLY COMPANY 

530 Tremont St. Boston, Mass. 

MESERVE'S FRUIT SHERBET 

The Blended Product of the Natural Juices of 
Sound Ripe Fruit and Berries. A Delicious and 
Healthful Beverage for Receptions, Teas and 
Parties. Prepared only by 

P. J. MESERVE, Pharmacist, 
Near Post Office, Brunswick, Maine 



FALL STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

John A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 



A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office - - - Brunswick, Maine 



BUTLER'S 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSONS PHARMACY 

CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 



CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 



4 Elm Street 



HARVARD DENTAL SCHOOL 

A Department of Harvard University 

Graduates of secondary schools admitted without ex- 
amination provided they have taken required subjects. 
Modern buildings and equipment. Fall term opens 
September 22, 19 19. Degree of D.M.D. Catalog. 
EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D., Dean, Boston, Mass. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

" UNION " LUNCH 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 
Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 
FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, ?100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 

We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16. 

WE CARRY 

Co-operative Shoes 
New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 
LARGEST AND BEST 

stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



LAW 

AND AMERICA'S 
WORLD POSITION 



I international 
challenges the 



America's new place 
politics and commerce 
young American. 
He must equip himself for new world 
conditions with a knowledge of legal funda- 
mentals. 

LAW — its principles and application to all 
business is almost as necessary to the 
coming business man as it is indispensable 
to the lawyer. 
Qualify for real leadership. 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

gives a thorough training in legal 

principles. 

LL.B. Course requires 3 years. 

For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 



Bowdoin Men Keep gWarm 

TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 



BATH, MAINE 



J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The Bowdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 

Portland 


WILLIAM F. FERRIS 

COLLEGE AGENT 


ANTIQIVTY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

2DIti JFurntturr, aDlD dhina, ©etotet, ffitt. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 


Citizens Laundry 

AUTO SERVICE 9 SOUTH APPLETON 


to orders for antique goods of any kind 


Telephone 160 


COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 


FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 


BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short Notice by competent work- 
men. We use only the Best 
of Leather. 
E. WHITTOM 


Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
A. G. FA GE COAIPANY, Bath 



(i 



The Store of Progress and Service'' 

PLACE YOUR ORDER NOW FOR 

WHITE SWEATERS 

CREW (ROUND) OR V NECK 

Delivery guaranteed in about three weeks 
without fail. 

Jack Handy '23, Zeta Psi House, will take 
your order and will deliver the goods. 




MONUMENT SQUARE 



PORTLAND, MAINE 



Cumberland Theatre 




WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

ELSIE FERGUSON 

IN 

THE AVALANCHE 




FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
THE WOMAN THOU GAVEST ME 

WITH 

KATHERINE MacDONALD 



NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

The Career of Katherine Bush 

WITH 

CATHERINE CALVERT 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

MAE MURRAY 

IN 

THE SCARLET SHADOW 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

HALE HAMILTON 

IN 

HIS BROTHER'S PLACE 



NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

JAMES K. HACKETT 

IN 

ASHES OF LOVE 



VoLXLIX. No. 17 



NOVEMBER 19, 1919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Athletic Council Notes .... 161 
M. I. C. A. A. Meeting at 

Waterville 161 

Sophomore Football Organized . 161 

The Glee Club 161 

Bugle Board Organized . . . 162 
Keen Competition for Freshman 

Debaters 162 

Coming House Parties .... 162 
Resolution from Zeta Psi . . . 162 
Results of Student Elections . 162 
Maine Is Winner of Cross 

Country 162 

Report of Treasurer A. S. B. C. . 163 



The Red Cross Drive .... 163 
New England State College 

Championship 163 

Annie Talbot Cole Lecture . . 163 

A Teacher.s' Conference . . . 163 
Editorials: 

Scholarship Aid 164 

The Quill 164 

On the Campus 164 

Alumni Notes 165 

Exchanges 167 

Calendar 167 

Resolutions 167 

Is this Bowdoin's Case .... 168 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Back Here" know JUD is in the game. 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



PRINTING 

OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWN BUILIiING BRUNSWICK 



The College Book Store 

We wish to call your 
attention to our new 

FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

in a large man size pa- 
per. 

The stock is the well known 
OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

The price is $1.00 per box 
F. W. CHANDLER & SON 



COLLEGE AND "PREP" SCHOOL MEN 

Clothing foi Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 
ercoats and Ulsters. 

Haberdashery Hats 

Macullar Parker Company 

400 Washington St. Boston, Mass. 

"THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT" 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



NEW MODELS 
FOR YOUNG MEN 

Belted suit and over- 
coat styles as well as 
plainer designs by 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 

who make clothes for 

young men and make 

them right. 

$35 AND MORE 

ALSO EVENING CLOTHES 

Haskell & Jones Co. 



Portland, 



Maine. 




>77rt// Collar 

Cluett, Peabody d? Co. Inc. Troy, N . Y. 

The name "Argonne" is used by courtesy of tho 
Argonne Shirt Co. ■ Philadelphia 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

341 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 



WINTER 

Underwear and Hosiery 



E. S. BODWELL & SON, 

Brunswick. 



Greenhouse 21-W 
Residence 21-R 



WALTER 
F- l_ O 


L. 


LaROCK 
1 S T 


Potted Plants 
Floral Designs 


and Cut Flowers 
for All Occasions 






15% Jordan Avenue 



Fraternity Stationery 

Old Hampshire Vellum 

STUDENT SIZE 85 CENTS 

Ambassador Linen 

60 CENTS 
Have you seen our new Tobacco Pouch? 

Courson & Morton 

180 MAINE ST. The Bowling Alley is next door 



BOWDOIN ORILNT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 19. 1919 



NO. 17 



ATHLETIC COUNCIL NOTES. 

At a meeting of the Atheltic Council last week 
it was announced that this year's football season 
was financially one of the most successful sea- 
sons in the history of the College. While the 
complete report is not yet ready it is thought 
that a substantial balance will be found when all 
accounts are settled. 

It was decided at the meeting to build a 
hockey rink soon between Hubbard Hall and 
Hyde Hall. It is hoped that Bowdoin will have 
a strong hockey team and there are rumors to 
the effect that there will be games with the other 
Maine colleges. 

At a meeting of the Athletic Council held 
Wednesday, November 12, seventeen letters were 
awarded to the following' men: Brewster '20, 
Crockett '20, Curtis '20, Doherty '20, Dostie '20, 
Drummond '20, -Kern '20, Rhoads '20, Peacock 
'20, Sprague '20, Dudgeon '21, Thomson '21, 
Dahlgren '22, James '22, McCurdy '22, Mason '23, 
and Manager McPartland '20. 

Sweaters are to be presented only to those 
men who made their letters this season. These 
men are Doherty '20, Dudgeon '21, Thomson '21, 
Dahlgren '22, James '22, McCurdy '22, Mason 
'23, and Manager McPartland '20. 



M. I. C. A. A. MEETING AT WATERVILLE. 

A meeting of the Maine Intercollegiate Ath- 
letic Association was held Friday at eleven 
o'clock at the Hotel Elmwood, Waterville. Bow- 
doin was represented by Coach John Magee and 
Lewis W. Brown, '20; Bates by Manager L. W. 
Philbrook ; Colby by Manager R. H. Sturdevant 
and Coach Michael Ryan ; and Maine by Ath- 
letic Director Rider and Alfred B. Lingley. 

Matters relative to the cross country run were 
discussed by the coaches. It was voted to amend 
article 14 of the constitution so that it shall read: 
"The discus shall be thrown from a circle 8 feet, 
2 J/ inches in diameter." The constitution origin- 
ally called for a 7 foot circle, but other inter- 
collegiate associations now use the larger circle. 

The advisability of holding an indoor inter- 
collegiate track meet in the Exposition Building, 
Portland, was discussed. All the representatives 
appeared favorable to the proposition. This will 



be brought up before the athletic boards of the 
four institutions. If such a meet is held it would 
probably be during the month of February or 
March. 



SOPHOMORE FOOTBALL ORGANIZED. 

At a class meeting in the Union, November 
12, the Sophomores elected Pickard as class 
manager of football. The football squad of the 
class which held its first practice Monday, Nov. 
10, elected Woodbury, captain. Although the 
Freshmen have had the advantage of a long 
season of coaching and practise the Sophomores 
hope to put up a good exhibition of football in 
Saturday's game. 

Brewster '20, has been appointed head coach 
of the Sophomore team with the varsity mem- 
bers of the class as his assistants. Mr. Mark- 
thayler continues to coach the Freshmen. 

The Freshman football team, under the di- 
rection of Markthayler '22, is fast rounding into 
shape. With the completion of the baseball sea- 
son eight new men came onto the gridiron, 
bringing the number of candidates up to thirty. 
The material is excellent — the backfield men 
showing up particularly well. Butler is at pres- 
ent doing well in the punting, but none of the 
men will be picked until Friday night. The 
Sophomores, coached by Brewster, have as- 
sembled a well rounded team and expect to put 
up a stiff battle on Saturday. 



THE GLEE CLUB. 

W. H. Berry, manager of the Glee Club, an- 
nounced last week that the first Glee Club cuts 
have been made. The following candidates re- 
ported at the music room Monday afternoon, 
November 17: Lyons, Chase, Sprince, McClave, 
J. J. Whitney, Grossman, E. A. Allen, P. Doherty, 
Lindner, Hart, H. Nixon, Woodbury, Ryder, 
Kilesky, Congdon, James, Butler, Willey, Ferris, 
J. A. Black, M. P. Chandler, J. E. Mitchell, 
Turgeon, Ruber. Accompanist: Lyseth. 

No announcement of the results of Monday's 
meeting have as yet been published. The musical 
clubs ought to be successful this year for much 
fine material has been discovered. It is hoped 
that this year may be the best ever for both the 
Glee and Mandolin Clubs. 



162 



nOWDOIN ORIENT 



BUGLE BOARD ORGANIZED. 

The Bugle board has started its work with 
Ryder editor-in-chief, Crowell business manager, 
and Halpin assistant business manager. Other 
members of the board are Coburne, Cook, Hatch, 
Howard, Lovell, Schonland, St. Clair, and Young. 
This board was elected last spring by the present 
Junior class. Omerod has been recently ap- 
pointed art editor. 

Any suggestions or aid in any of the depart- 
ments will be appreciated by the board. Con- 
tributions to the "Grind Section" will be especial- 
ly welcome. 



KEEN COMPETITION FOR FRESHMAN 
DEBATERS. 

Last Friday evening a final trial was held in 
Hubbard Hall for the Freshman debating team. 
Previous to this time, first trials had been held 
but it was deemed advisable to hold a second 
trial on account of the excellence of nearly all 
who were in the first try-out. 

The question for discussion was the same one 
used in the first meeting: Resolved; That the 
Prerogative of Collective Bargaining Be Given 
To the Municipal Police. The affirmative of the 
question was upheld by Cousins, Slater and 
Jacobs ; the negative was upheld by Mitchell, 
Little and Finnegan. 

Both sides presented very forceful arguments 
and the debate on the whole was very interest- 
ing. The final choice was difficult to make but 
finally Mitchell, Cousins and Little, with Jacobs 
as alternate, were chosen to constitute the Fresh- 
man team which is to meet the Sophomore team 
some time in early December. 



COMING HOUSE PARTIES. 

Five of the ten fraternities at Bowdoin are 
going to have house parties before the Thanks- 
giving recess. The following fraternities will 
have their dances on the evening of Friday the 
twenty-first: Delta Kappa Epsilon, Theta Delta 
Chi, Delta Upsilon, and Kappa Sigma, The 
Kappa Sigma and Delta Upsilon houses are to 
combine their dance at the Delta Upsilon house. 
On Tuesday the twenty-fifth the Psi Upsilon 
house party takes place. 



RESOLUTION FROM ZETA PSI. 

Hall of Lambda of Zeta Psi, 

November 13, 1919. 
Whereas, the Student Council has placed the 



date of the Christmas dance as on the evening 
of December 23, and. Whereas, this date is in- 
convenient to a large number of the student body, 
therefore. 

Be it Resolved, that the Lambda Chapter of 
Zeta Psi place itself on record as being in favor 
of the date of December 19 as more appropriate 
for the Christmas dance. 

Oliver G. Hall, 

For the Chapter. 



RESULTS OF STUDENT ELECTIONS. 

Following are the results of the student elec- 
tions held Thursday, November 13: Christmas 
Dance Committee, McWilliams '20, Richan '20, 
Zeitler '20, Buker '21, Averill '22, Sheesley '23. 
Manager of Tennis, Haines '21 ; assistant man- 
ager, Freeman '22. 



MAINE IS WINNER OF CROSS COUNTRY. 

The University of Maine won the annual in- 
tercollegiate cross country run over the Colby 
course at Waterville Friday, November 6, 
making a score of 2^. Bates was next 
with 51, Bowdoin had 60 and Colby 
87. The weather was ideal and the 
course was in fairly good condition. The four 
colleges each entered a seven-man team and 
Maine clinched the run when they placed second, 
fourth, fifth and sixth. R. B. Buker of Bates 
was the first man to cross the finish line, with 
Raymond of Maine close behind. Goodwin of 
Bowdoin finished third in the five-mile grind. 
The entrants in the position they finished are as 
follows : R. B. Buker, Bates ; Raymond, Maine ; 
Goodwin, Bowdoin; Barnard, Maine; Herrick, 
Maine ; Philbrook, Maine ; Costley, Colby ; Le- 
vine. Bates ; R. S. Buker, Bates ; Emery, Maine ; 
Flatch, Bowdoin ; Batter, Bates ; Webb, Maine ; 
Towle, Bowdoin ; Cleaves, Bowdoin ; Henderson, 
Maine; Hunt, Bowdoin; McCormack, Colby; 
Guthrie, Colby ; Perkins, Colby ; Peterson, Bates ; 
G. H. Buker, Bates ; Clifford, Bates ; Conary, 
Colby; Avery, Bowdoin; Marden, Colby; War- 
ren, Bowdoin. Time for the first three men, 
A. B. Buker, 32 min., 37 4-5 sec. ; Raymond, 33 
min., 4 2-5 sec; Goodwin, 33 min., 12 sec. The 
officials were : O'Connell of Portland, referee ; 
judges, Parmenter of Colby; Grover of Maine; 
Pomeroy of Bates ; Greene of Bowdoin ; scorers, 
Brown of Bowdoin, Tilton of Colby, Grace of 
Colby, McGorrill of Maine; timers, Buse of 
Colby, Hersum of Colby, Finley of Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



163 



UMitt tfje JFacuItp 

President and Mrs. Kenneth C. M. Sills en- 
tertained a few guests at dinner Wednesday eve- 
ning to meet Hugh Walpole, the Annie Talbot 
Cole lecturer. Out of town guests were Mr. 
and Mrs. Harold Lee Berry of Portland and Mr. 
and Mrs. David Gray of Falmouth Foreside. 

Professor Davis presided over a meeting of 
the teachers of English in this part of the State 
last Saturday at the Brunswick High School. 
He was elected temporary chairman of the Eng- 
lish Department of the Maine Teachers' As- 
sociation at the meeting in Portland on Oc- 
tober 31. 

Professors Cram and Burnett were elected 
members of the executive committee of the local 
Red Cross chapter at its annual meeting last 
Mondav evening. 



REPORT OF TREASURER A. S. B. C. 

Season 1918-1919. 
Receipts. 

Tax, 2nd Term, 277 men $1,472.00 

Tax, 3d Term, 283 men 1,517.00 

Balance from last year 68. 19 

Interest on balance ($68.19) .91 



Total $3,058.10 

E.xpenditures. 
Athletic Council for — 

Baseball $1,000 

Track i,3i5 

Tennis 140, 

Fencing 30 

Bovvdoin Publishing Company 80 

Debating Council 100 

Band 1 00 

Incidental — Printing 

Sinking Fund on deposit. First National Bank 

Balance on deposit. First National Bank 210.15 



Total $3,058.10 

Date, June 18, 1919. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MANTON COPELAND, Treasurer. 
Examined and found correct and properly vouched, 
October iS, 1919. 

BARRETT POTTER, Auditor. 



THE RED CROSS DRIVE. 

The campaign for the Red Cross which was 
launched last week in the college has been suc- 
cessfully completed. The drive at Bowdoin has 
been conducted by members of the Bowdoin Y. 
M. C. A. who gave their assistance at the re- 
quest of the Brunswick Red Cross committee. 
These men during the week industriously can- 
vassed every fraternity and end on the campus. 

Success has met their efforts even beyond 



their expectations and thus far they have placed 
the button of the Red Cross on 249 college men. 
These subscriptions and those which obviously 
have been made previous to the drive, again 
place Bowdoin "Over the Top." 



NEW ENGLAND STATE COLLEGE 
CHAMPIONSHIP. 

When the Orient went to press the New Eng- 
land State College Championship was still in 
doubt. In the hard fought game at Durham, 
N. H., Maine was leading in the fourth period 
by a touchdown when during the last twelve 
seconds of play New Hampshire pulled an on- 
side kick with Reardon, New Hampshire's back, 
eligible to regain the ball. Reardon fell on the 
ball, which had rolled over Maine's goal line. 
Referee Ingalls, of Brown, first ruled the play 
a touchback for Maine, then reversed his de- 
cision, and finally reserved it. The question 
seems to be as to what impetus caused the ball 
to cross the goal line. Both coaches agreed to 
refer the question to the Central Board of 
officials for ultimate settlement. Meanwhile the 
score is still in doubt. 



ANNIE TALBOT COLE LECTURE. 

Hugh Walpole, the distinguished English 
novelist, was the Annie Talbot Cole lecturer at 
Memorial Hall, Wednesday evening, Nov. 13. The 
speaker has a splendid personality and the large - 
audience listened with the greatest pleasure to 
his address on "Creating the Novel." For three 
years during the war Mr. Walpole was serving 
with the British Red Cross in Russia. His 
lecture, divided into three parts, told of the in- 
fluences which made the style of writing during 
his very first attempts, of the pre-war influences, 
and of the effect of the war upon novel writing. 
Mr. Walpole is a young man and served much 
of the time while in Russia as a stretcher bearer. 
The impressions of Russia, gained during his 
three years' stay, were told in a manner which 
revealed the man's marvelous powers to de- 
scribe people and happenings. He has the power 
to see both the sublime and the ridiculous in 
whatever he chooses to speak about. 



A TEACHERS' CONFERENCE. 

On Saturday, December 6, there will be held 
at the College a conference of men teachers of 
the secondary schools in this vicinity of Maine. 
The conference is being arranged by the Faculty 
Committee on Relations with Preparatory 
Schools. The fraternities have offered to pro- 
vide entertainment for the visitors. 



164 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Wednesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 

Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 

department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

\'iRGiL C. McGoRRiLL, 1922 On the Campus 
Roland L. McCormack, 1922 Exchange 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
Ronald B. Wadsworth, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 192 i 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. ______ 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Allan W. Hall, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 

Vol. XLIX. NOVEMBER 19, 1919. No. 17 

Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

Scholarship Aid. 

December first is near at hand when all ap- 
plications for scholarships must be in the hands 
of the college treasurer. Awards will be made 
later. It is well to call to the attention of the 
students at this time that scholarship aid is 



money distributed by the college "in aid of 
meritorious students of slender means." It is 
quite easy for the college authorities making 
the awards to determine the relative merit of 
applicants but it is a very difficult and quite im- 
possible thing for them to determine the financial 
means of students without the honest assistance 
of the students themselves. While there is no 
college law, written or unwritten, to prevent any 
undergraduate from applying for and receiving 
scholarship aid, it is unfair to the college and 
to those who actually need assistance that stu- 
dents with ample means should take advantage 
of the offer of scholarship aid in order to get a 
little easy money. Such students should be sub- 
ject to the universal contempt of the student 
body. 



The Quill. 

The November number of the Quill has just 
appeared and brings an appeal for greater sup- 
port from the student body. This appeal, while 
not in writing, is very evident in the size and 
character of the November number. This num- 
ber is quite under its normal size and half of its 
pages are occupied by alumni contributions. This 
fact is emphasized, not to discourage alumni con- 
tributions by any means, but to show that the 
amount of student contribution is entirely below 
what it should be. 

The Quill is a student publication just the same 
as the Orient. If anyone has the idea that it is 
published by, and for the benefit of, a board 
composed of a certain number of inspired liter- 
ateurs, that person has been grossly misled. In 
content, the Quill is not devoted, by necessity, to 
short stories, poems or literary criticisms 
alone. Essays on subjects in the field of 
economics, politics, history or science are equally 
acceptable. This last mentioned side of the Quill 
must be more highly developed if the paper is to 
secure a circulation warranting success. The 
literary scope of the Quill is not narrow; it is 
and should be wide and comprehensive. Admit- 
ing, as everyone will, that we have many lines of 
intellectual interest represented among the stu- 
dent body, why not have a larger and more 
varied student contribution to the Quill? 



©n tbe Campus 

John Clair Minot '96, was on the Campus Sun- 
day. 

The number of "Lost — a Freshman Cap" 
signs on the bulletin board are becoming strange- 
ly numerous as Thanksgiving draws near. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



165 



Coach Magee was out of town over the week 
end to attend the A. A. U. Convention at the 
Copley Plaza in Boston. 

McGown '21, as secretary of the New Eng- 
land Intercollegiate Y. M. C. A. Council, was 
in Boston for the week end where he attended 
a meeting of the Executive Committee. 

Last year's Bugles may be obtained of Hurrell 
at the Sigma Nu house for a dollar and a half, a 
fifty per cent, reduction over last year. 

Charles Spaulding '17, was on the Campus dur- 
ing the early part of last week. 

The large number of Red Cross buttons seen 
on the Campus as a result of the active campaign 
of the Y. M. C. A. testifies eloquently to the Bow- 
doin students' appreciation of the activities of 
the Red Cross. 

Minot '19 was a visitor at the College after 
the Maine game. 

Hon. Charles F. Johnson, judge of the United 
States Court, and trustee of the College, was 
seen on the Campus last Friday. 

Several students from the College took part 
in the musical production, "Katcha-Koo," given 
in town last week. 

Webber '16, was in town last week. 

A meeting of the Sophomore class was held 
in the Union last week. Several committees were 
chosen. 

Practice is being held every day for the Fresh- 
man and Sophomore squads in preparation for 
the game which is to be played the 22nd. 

The first issue of the Quill came out Friday. 

A gratifying letter was read to the student 
body of Bates College Monday morning by Pro- 
fessor Hartshorn, acting president. The letter, 
received from President Sills of Bowdoin, re- 
ferred to the football game in Brunswick. Presi- 
dent Sills complimented Bates on its team and 
especially on the sportsmanship shown by the 
players and the student body. In conclusion he 
said it was an honor to win from such a team 
as Bates had this year. 



aiumni J13otes 

The Orient desires to be of the greatest possi- 
ble service to Alumni in keeping them informed 
of one another's activities. Alumni are earnest- 
ly requested to support the Orient in this work 
by sending items about themselves or their 
brother Alumni. Communications should be ad- 
dressed to the Alumni Editor. 

Medic-'53 — The Library has recently received 
news of the death of Dr. Oscar Fitzgallan 



Swasey on June 4, 1919. He was born at Dan- 
ville, Vermont, on Christmas day in 1826. Three 
years after his graduation he began practicing 
medicine at Beverley, Mass. He remained in 
that city for sixty-two years, until the time of 
his death. Dr. Swasey was the last member 
of his class to die, surviving all his classmates 
for over ten years. 

'56 — Woodbury Lunt Melcher died September 
10, 1919. Pie was born October 7, 1832, at 
Meredith Bridge, N. H. Three years after his 
graduation he received the degree of Master of 
Arts from Bowdoin. Since 1862 — for nearly 
sixty years — he has been a lawyer in Laconia, 
N. H. He was major in 1903-04. He was 
treasurer of the Laconia Savings Bank for 
twenty years until 1885, since that date he has 
been in the insurance business. 

'59 — Another death, news of which was re- 
cently received at the Library, is that of Dr. 
Henry Melville King, who died June 16, 1919. 
He was born the third of September, 1838, at 
Oxford, Maine. He graduated from Newton 
Theological Seminary in 1862, in which year 
also he received an A.M. from Bowdoin. ' Colby 
awarded him a D.D. in 1877, and Bowdoin in 
1S99. From 1863 to 1906 he was a pastor in 
Roxbury, Mass., then Albany, N. Y., and finally 
in Providence, Rhode Island. From 1891 to 
189s he was president of the Rhode Island Bap- 
tist Convention. Later he was a trustee of 
Vassar College. He was a member of the Alpha 
Delta Phi fraternity. 

'61 — Benjamin Shute Grant, who has been en- 
gaged in the machinery business in Boston, 
Mass., for fifty years, died at Newton on the 
thirteenth of September. He taught at Stockton 
for two years after his graduation, and then 
practiced law at Bangor until 1869, when he 
moved to Boston. He was just seventy years 
and one day old at the time of his death. He 
was a member of the Theta Delta Chi fra- 
ternity. 

'64 — Dr. William Henry Pierson, pastor 
emeritus at Somerville, Mass., for ten years, 
died August 7, 1919. He was born at Newbury- 
port, Mass., January 12, 1839. He graduated 
from Princeton Theological Seminary in 1867, 
and was awarded an A. M. by Bowdoin in the 
same year. Since then he has held pastorships 
in various Massachusetts cities, but he was in 
Somerville the longest period, — from 1891 until 
his death. 

'66 — The death of Delavan Carleton, who had 
been in ill health for a number of years, oc- 
curred July I, 1919. He was born at Portland, 



166 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Maine, June 22, 1840. He taught school for 
three years in Sandusky, Ohio ; Manistee, Michi- 
gan; and Leland, Illinois. From 1870 to 1888 
he taught music in Manistee. In 1888 he went 
into agriculture at Oriska, North Dakoto, in 
which occupation he remained until his death. 

'72 — The death of Herbert Harris at Chicago 
on the eighth of June was not known at the 
Library until recently. He was born at East 
Machias, Maine, December 17, 1846. He was a 
composer and teacher of music at Boston from 
1872 until 1884. From 1884 to 1900 he resided 
at East Machias. During the next four years 
he was an organist at Bangor, later at Portland. 
In 1909-1910 he was a member of the Inter- 
national Commission of Esperantists. From 1905 
until shortly before his death he resided in Port- 
land. He was a member of the Athensean So- 
ciety and of the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity. 

Ex-'73 — George Allen Sargent died in Bangor, 
October 28, 1919. He was born August i, 1851, 
at Haverhill, Mass. He was at Bowdoin for two 
years and then went into business at Haverhill, 
Mass., until 1891. In 1906 he entered the Metho- 
dist ministry in this State. He was a member 
of the Zeta Psi fraternity. 

'81 — Alvin Everett Whitten died June 22, 1919. 
He was born August 22, 1853, at Yarmouth, 
Maine. In 1887 Bowdoin awarded him the de- 
gree of Master of Arts. He was principal of a 
number of secondary schools from 1881 to 1892. 
From 1893 to 1906 he was at the head of a busi- 
ness college in Carroll, Iowa. Since 1906 he 
has been residing in Fresno, California. He was 
a member of the Zeta Psi fraternity. 

'gi — Mrs. Rufus G. Brown of 92 Moreland 
Street, Roxbury, has announced the engagement 
■of her daughter, Miss Rebecca Brown, to Charles 
Vincent Minott of Phippsburg, Maine. Miss 
Brown is a graduate of Radcliffe. Mr. Minott, 
-who comes from a famous old shipbuilding 
family of the lower Kennebec, was graduated 
from Bowdoin in 1891, and has served in both 
Ijranches of the Maine Legislature. 

'92 — Rev. Winifred S. Randall, for the last 
three years pastor of the North Deering Com- 
munity Church, has recently received an offer 
from the Near East Relief Committee to act as 
divisional organizer for this society. He gradu- 
ated from Andover Thelological Seminary in 
189s, after which he was a pastor in Ware, 
N. H., and Rochester, N. H., until 1900. Aside 
from his religious work, he has been engaged in 
educational work in Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire for a number of years. 



'95 — At a meeting of the Boston Life Under- 
writers Association, James Everett Hicks, the 
senior vice-president of last year, was elected 
president. Mr. Hicks, who has been a member 
of the association for nearly twenty years, has 
been connected with insurance work in Boston 
since 1895. He is the State manager of the 
Union Mutual Life Insurance Company. He be- 
lieves that the War Risk Insurance was the 
greatest advertisement that life insurance com- 
panies could have asked for. He does not regret 
the loss of clientele, and strongly urges people to 
accept "an opportunity that no company can 
offer." 

'99 — Friday, November 7, while en route from 
Boston to Chicago, Hon. Frank Leslie Dutton 
died very suddenly. He was born at Starks, 
Maine, December 19, 1870. Since 1902, he has 
been a lawyer in Augusta. In 1906 he was city 
solicitor. In 1913 he represented Kennebec 
County in the State senate. In 1918 he was made 
chairman of the Maine Industrial Accident Com- 
mission. 

'02 — The organization of the Foreign Finance 
Corporation to deal in foreign securities with a 
capitalization of $10,000,000 was announced in 
New York last Thursday. Arthur M. Ander- 
son, of J. P. Morgan and Company, will be the 
president. On the board of directors is Harvey 
D. Gibson '02. 

'03 — Mr. and Mrs. George Shaw Sabin are to 
change their residence to Springfield, Mass. 
Springfield was Mrs. Sabin's former home, and 
when Mr. Sabin accepted a position with the 
National Equipment Company, they decided to 
move there. They will probably take up their 
residence in Springfield in about a month. 

Ex-' 12 — Mark W. Burlingame, publicity di- 
rector of the Maine Agricultural and Industrial 
League, gave a very interesting talk on adver- 
tising last Friday evening before the Woman's 
Literary LTnion of Portland. 

'15 — Philip S. Smith, who received his LL.B. 
from Harvard this year, was admitted to the 
bar last Friday, November 14. 

Medic-' 1 5 — Through a special communication 
it has just been learned that Dr. Francis Sher- 
man Echols died at the United States Public 
Health Service Hospital at Newport News, 
Virginia, October 15, 1918. Dr. Echols entered 
the medical service and was first placed in the 
Walter Reed Hospital at Washington, D. C. 
Later he was a surgeon at the Middlesex Hos- 
pital in London, — then at the LT. S. Public Health 
Service Hospital at Petersburg, \'irginia, and 
finally at Newport News. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



167 



'17 — David A. Lane, Jr., who was a first lieu- 
tenant during the latter part of the war, is now 
studying for his Master's degree in English at 
the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and 
Sciences. Not long after the United States went 
into the war, Mr. Lane entered the R.O.T.C. at 
Des Moines, Iowa, from which post he was com- 
missioned first lieutenant. Then he served nine 
months in the Artillery at Camp Dix, New 
Jersey. Later he was the commanding officer 
of the S.A.T.C. unit at Georgia State Industrial 
School, Savannah, Georgia. 

'18 — Horatio Tobey Mooers, vice consul to 
Belgium, accompanied by his wife, Margarite 
Kuenner Mooers, has recently arrived in Brus- 
sels after a visit with his parents in Skowhegan, 
Maine. 



RESOLUTIONS. 



EXCHANGES. 

Tlte DarUnouth: A short story contest under 
the auspices of the Bema, is to be started. This 
will be open to all students and a prize of ten 
dollars is offered. Dartmouth is to consider the 
idea of limi,tation of activities of undergraduates. 

Brozvn Daily Herald: The student bod}' ob- 
served Armistice Daj' with a full program. 

The Gonzaga: Throug^h generous alumni 
contributions Gonzaga has opened two, new, 
fully equipped science laboratories. The Glee 
Club and the orchestra have been organized, and 
among those in the club are two distinguished 
organists. 

Tech Nnvs: The musical clubs are newly or- 
ganized and are planning a wide tour this season. 

The Oberlin Revieiv: A recital by Josef Lhe- 
vinne, the brilliant Russian pianist, was given in 
Finney Chapel, and enjoyed very much by the 
student body. 

The Tripod: A tentative document of the In- 
terfraternity Constitution was recently submitted 
to the various fraternities for ratification. 

The Smith College Weekly: A concert given 
by the "Mountain Ash Welsh Male Choir," in 
John M. Green Hall, was a recent event at Smith. 

The Bates Student: Discussion of a new initia- 
tion program is under way at Bates. 

CALENDAR. 

November 21 — Thanksgiving dances at the fol- 
lowing fraternities : Delta Kappa Epsilon, Theta 
Delta Chi, Delta Upsilon, Kappa Sigma. 

November 22 — Freshman-Sophomore football 
game. 

November 25 — Psi Upsilon house dance. 

November 26 — Thanksgiving recess. 

December 6 — Teachers' convention at the Col- 
lege. 



Whereas, in the sudden death of Edmund M. 
Leary, Eta Charge has lost a distinguished and 
faithful brother, and 

Whereas, during over a quarter of a century 
in the service of his country, for whom he paid 
the supreme sacrifice. Colonel Leary showed him- 
self efficient and gallant in action; therefore be it 

Resolved, That the members of Eta Charge 
deeply mourn the passing of one so deeply be- 
loved by all who knew him into the halls of 
Omega; that their heartfelt sense of bereavement 
be extended to his family in their sorrow, and 
that they be assured of the inexpressible grief 
of the Eta Charge at the loss of one who was 
bound to it by the closest ties of friendship; and 
be it further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be entered 
upon the records of the Eta Charge ; that a copy 
be sent to his bereaved family, to the Grand 
Lodge, to each sister Charge and to The Shield 
of Theta Delta Chi, and be published in the 
Bovvdoin Orient. 

For Eta Charge, 

Norman W. Haines, 
H. Paul Larrabee, 
Ralph E. Battison. 



Whereas, in the death of Benjamin S. Grant, 
Eta Charge has lost a distinguished and faithful 
brother, and 

Whereas, in the course of a long practise in 
law. Brother Grant showed himself able and up- 
right in his profession, therefore be it 

Resolved, That the members of Eta Charge 
deeply mourn the passing of one so deeply be- 
loved by all who knew him into the halls of 
Omega; that their heartfelt sense of bereavement 
be extended to his family in their sorrow, and 
that they be assured of the inexpressible grief 
of the Eta Charge at the loss of one who was 
bound to it by the closest ties of friendship ; and 
be it further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be entered 
upon the records of the Eta Charge; that a copy 
be sent to his bereaved family, to the Grand 
Lodge, to each sister Charge and to The Shield 
of Theta Delta Chi, and be published in the 
Bowdoin Orient. 

For Eta Charge, 

Norman W. Haines, 
H. Paul Larrabee, 
Ralph E. Battison. 



168 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Whereas, in the death of William A. Perkins, 
Eta Charge has lost a distinguished and faithful 
brother, and 

Whereas, during a lifetime devoted to teach- 
ing, Brother Perkins proved himself a valuable 
and respected member of his profession; there- 
fore be it 

Resolved, That the members of Eta Charge 
deeply mourn the passing of one so deeply be- 
loved by all who knew him into the halls of 
Omega ; that their heartfelt sense of bereavement 
be extended to his family in their sorrow, and 
that they be assured of the inexpressible grief of 
the Eta Charge at the loss of one who was bound 
to it by the closest ties of friendship; and be it 
further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be entered 
upon the records of the Eta Charge; that a copy 
be sent to his bereaved family, to the Grand 
Lodge, to each sister Charge and to The Shield 
of Theta Delta Chi, and be published in the Bow- 
doin Orient. 

For Eta Charge, 

Norman W. Haines, 
H. Paul Larrabee, 
Ralph E. Battison. 



IS THIS BOWDOIN'S CASE? 

At one time when Eurybiades was admiral of 
the Greek fleet, he desired to flee to the vicinity 
of the isthmus of Corinth and would have sought 
refuge there but for the remonstrances of 
Themistocles. And this was the occasion of the 
well known words when Eurybiades to check his 
impatience, told him that at the Olympic games, 
they that start up before the rest are lashed. 
"And they," replied Themistocles, "that are left 
behind are not crowned." 

Our Y. M. C. A. in the past has been left 
behind. Compared with that of similar institu- 
tions it has seemed like "a wandering bark upon 
whose pathway shone. All stars of heaven, 
except the guiding one." 

If there was ever a dynamic impulse behind 
it and a righteous goal ahead: the impulse must 
have dissipated to obscurity, and left an organ- 
ization which fell somewhat below its mark. 

The Y. M. C. A. had its elections and officers 
were elected whose names in connection with the 
"Y" were printed in the Granite — a doubtful 
honor as the organization has stood in recent 
years. 

Among some of the savage tribes of the Far 
East there is a heathenish custom of binding a 
limb in such a manner that it cannot be moved. 



Eventually long immobility renders it useless. 

In our "Y" the same effects may be observed, 
long disuse or misuse has weakened it excessive- 
ly. A weak and powerless organization is surely 
of little value to the college. The college today 
is stronger than it has ever been before. Its 
rapid growth in recent years is remarkable. But 
the rapid strides that it is going to make in the 
future will be a surprise to all. It is only natural 
that organizations, which are such an important 
part of the college, must grow in proportion. 
And they must increase in strength if they are 
worthy of continuation. The Y. M. C. A. has 
inherent worth and possibilities which far excel 
those of any organization in college. It stands 
for greater things than do the various social 
organizations. If Christianity of the kind that 
Christ preached and exemplified; freed from 
theological dogma and petty sectarian squabbles, 
forming as it does the very foundations upon 
which our modern society rests; if this Chris- 
tianity means anything to us, why should not the 
"Y" which stands for these principles mean some- 
thing to us? If the "Y" which stands for clean 
thinking, clean living, and all the better things 
of life that distinguish the real Christian of to- 
day from the Hittites of ancient times, means 
anything to us why shouldn't we support the 
" Y ?" Why shouldn't the "Y" mean more to 
us for instance than the athletic teams which 
themselves take from Christianity their ethics 
of fair and clean play? 

It is useless and unnecessary to speak of the 
value of the "Y" as a whole and the work it has 
done in the past. The world knows of the in- 
estimable services that the "Y" has rendered to 
civilization during the recent war. And how- 
ever it may have been criticised, the intelligent 
doughboy knows it to be a great power for good. 

With the return to normal conditions at this 
the start of a new college year, the Y. M. C. A. in 
N. H. C. has an unparalleled opportunity ahead. 
It must not continue to be the weak organiza- 
tion of past years. 

Strengthened by a new burst of enthusiasm, 
and a new personnel and supported by a loyal 
constituency, it will be a credit to the college to 
which it can bring honor and renown. 

Take a little time, you who are loyal students, 
and think about the "Y." Do a little constructive 
thinking. Try and get a new vision of its possi- 
bilities. Criticise it honestly if you will and then 
resolve that the Y. M. C. A. of New Hampshire 
College shall have a new birth, a new purpo-^, 
and by zealous co-operation and support a r.c-y 
strength in God. — Netv Hampshire Student. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Have You Paid Your Subscription? 



EDGAR O. ACHORN'S NOVEL 

"The Unknown Quantity" 

FOR SALE AT 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

We would like to engage three or four 
energetic and capable students for us on 
commission. The right men can add ma- 
terially to their income for the next two 
months in a pleasant and congenial business 
which can be done in spare time. 

New Engiand Puliiisliers Service Inc. 



462 BOYLSTON ST. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



DANCING 

Miss Jennie S. Harvey's Evening Dancing 
Class and Assembly every Tuesday evening at 
Town Hall, Brunswick, commencing Oct. 21st. 

Lesson 7.30 p. m. Assembly 8.30 p. m. 

This class is open to college students. 

Private instruction by appointment. 

Monday evening Class and Assembly at Arm- 
ory Hall, Bath. 

Address 897 Middle St., Bath, Maine. 'Phone 
151-W. 

~ WANTED 

Student to sell high grade line of toilet re- 
quisites, $25 per week for active fellow. 

DOVER SUPPLY COMPANY 

530 Tremont St. Boston, Mass. 



MESERVE'S FRUIT SHERBET 

The Blended Product of the Natural Juices of 
Sound Ripe Fruit and Berries. A Delicious and 
Healthful Beverpge for Receptions, Teas and 
Parties. Prepared only by 

P. J. MESERVE, Pharmacist, 
Near Post Office, Brunswick, Maine 



FALL STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

John A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 



A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office - . - Brunswick, Maine 

BUTLER'S 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSONS PHARMACY 

CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 

CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 

4 Elm Street 

HARVARD DENTAL SCHOOL 

A Department of Harvard University 

Graduates of secondary schools admitted without ex- 
amination provided they have taken required subjects. 
Modern buildings and equipment. Fall term opens 
September 22, igig. Degree of D.M.D, Catalog. 
EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D., Dean, Boston, Mass. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

" UNION " LUNCH 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 
Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 
FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 

We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16. 

WE CARRY 

Co-operative Shoes 
New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 
LARGEST AND BEST 

stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



LAW 

AND AMERICA'S 
WORLD POSITION 

America's new place in international 
politics and commerce challenges the 
young American. 

He must equip himself for new world 
conditions with a knowledge of legal funda- 
mentals. 

LAW — its principles and application to all 
business is almost as necessary to the 
coming business man as it is indispensable 
to the lawyer. 
Qualify for real leadership. 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 



gives a thorough training 

principles. 

LL.B. Course requires 3 years. 



legal 



For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 



Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 

TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 



BATH, MAINE 



J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The BoAvdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 

Portland 


WILLIAM F. FERRIS 

COLLEGE AGENT 


ANTIQIVTY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

2Dlti jFurnitutr, SDID China, ©Ptutrr, (Etc. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 


Citizens Laundry 

AUTO SERVICE 9 SOUTH APPLETON 


to orders for antique goods of any kind 


Telephone 160 


COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 


FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 




BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short Notice by competent work- 
men. We use only the Best 
of Leather. 
E. WHITTOM 


Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
A. G. PA GE COMPANY, Bath 



6k 



The Store of Progress and Service 

PLACE YOUR ORDER NOW FOR 

WHITE SWEATERS 

CREW (ROUND) OR V NECK 

Delivery guaranteed in about three weeks 
without fail. 

Jack Handy '23, Zeta P>i House, will take 
your order and will delI\aT the goods. 




MONUMENT SQUARE 



PORTLAND, MAINE 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

DOROTHY GISH 

IN 

TURNING THE TABLES 




FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

ENID BENNETT 

IN 

THE HAUNTED BEDROOM 



NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

BRYANT WASHBURN 

IN 

PUTTING IT OVER 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

PRISCILLA DEAN 

IN 

THE SILK LINED BURGLAR 

FRIDAY r.nd SATURDAY 

viola ^ dana 
the"microbe 



NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

HARRY CAREY 

IN 

THE RIDERS OF VENGEANCE 



VoLXLIX. No. 18 



NOVEMBER 26, 1919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



CONTENTS 



Thanksgiving House Parties . . 169 

Musical Clubs 170 

Rifle Club 170 

Famous Welsh Choir Coming . 170 

Debating 170 

Sophomore Class Meetings . . 170 

Sophomores Beat Freshmen, 25-7 171 

Meeting of New England Colleges 171 

The New Catalogue 171 

Fencing 171 

Editorial: 

The Abuse of Union Privileges 172 

Communication 172 



With' the Faculty 173 

Physical Training Begins . . . 173 
Bowdoin Club of Portland Meets 174 
Phi Chi's Hold Banquet and Dance 174 
Football Number of the Orient ... 174 
Student Council Meeting ... 175 
Sophomore Vigilance Committee 175 

On the Campus 175 

Alumni Notes 176 

Exchanges 176 

Calendar 176 

Resolutions 176 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Back Here" know JUD is in the game. 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



PRINTING 



OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEA SE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWN BUILDIKG BRUNSWICK 



The College Book Store 

We wish to call your 
attention to our new 

FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

in a large man size pa- 
per. 

The stock is the well known 
OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

The price is $ 1 .00 per box 
F. W. CHANDLER & SON 



COLLEGE AND "PREP" SCHOOL MEN 

Clothing for Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 




ercoats and Ulsters. 
Haberdashery 



Hats 



MacuUar Parker Company 

400 Washington St. Boston, Mass. 

"THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT" 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Give the dainty touch to 
your Christmas Gifts 

Send her and Her and HER: 



s\ 



Sampler 



A quaint original box on the 
outside. Superfine choco- 
lates and confections inside. 
FOR SALE AT 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



NEW MODELS 
FOR YOUNG MEN 

Belted suit and over- 
coat styles as well as 
plainer designs by 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 

who make clothes for 

young men and make 

them right. 

$35 AND MORE 

ALSO EVENING CLOTHES 

Haskell & Jones Co. 

Portland, - - - Maine. 




Argotne 

>m// Collar 

Cluet t, Peabody 67' Co. Inc. Troy , N . Y. 



ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



CASHMERE HOSE 

IN THE NEW HEATHER MIXTURES 
$L00 TO $1.50 



E. S. BOD WELL & SON, 

Brunswick. 



Greenhouse 21-W 
Residence 21-R 

WALTER L. LaROCK 
F L- O R I S T 

Potted Plants and Cut Flowers 

Floral Designs for All Occasions 

15% Jordan Avenue 



Fraternity Stationery 

Old Hampshire Vellum 

STUDENT SIZE 85 CENTS 

Ambassador Linen 

60 CENTS 
Have you seen our new Tobacco Pouch? 

Courson & Morton 

180 MAINE ST. The Bowling Alley is next door 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 26, I9I9 



Thanksgiving House Parties. 

DELTA KAPPA EPSILON. 

The Theta Chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon 
held its dance at the Chapter house, Friday eve- 
ning, November twenty-first. 

The committee comprised Merrill '20, chair- 
man; Brown '20, and McLellan '21. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Kenneth C. M. 
Sills, Mrs. Gilbert M. Elliott, and Mrs. Hartley 
C. Baxter, all of Brunswick. 

Among the guests were the Misses Margaret 
Deering, Catherine Clark, Katherine Wheeler, 
Mary Wheeler and Ten Brook Jackson, Port- 
land; Precilla Webster, Orono; Barbara Brooks 
and Beatrice Straw, Augusta; Isabelle Souter, 
Auburn; Ruth Plummer, Newport; Virginia 
Averill, Oldtown ; Sally Brown, Augusta ; and 
Lillian Tobey, Brunswick. 

Music was furnished by the Colonial orchestra 
of Portland. 



PSI UPSILON. 

The Kappa Chapter of Psi Upsilon held its 
dance on Tuesday before the Thanksgiving re- 
cess. 

Among the guests were the Misses Anne 
Leary, New York City; Eleanor Boardman, 
Boston, Mass. ; Marion McLoon, Rockland ; 
Margaret King, West Newton, Mass. ; Sarah 
Kimball, Exeter, N. H. ; Dorothea Farrell, Alice 
Eraser, Kathryn Taylor, all of Portland; 
Mabel Waterman, South Portland ; Beryl Nevens, 
Lewiston ; Ohme and Anna Morse, Bath ; 
and Mrs. Waterman of New York City. 

The committee consisted of Lamb '20, chair- 
man; Willson '21, and Freeman '22. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Carl K. Ross, 
Portland; Mrs. Fred J. Allen, Sanford; Miss 
Belle Smith and Mrs. Manton Copeland, Bruns- 
wick. 



THETA DELTA CHI. 

The Eta Charge of Theta Delta Chi held its 
annual Thanksgiving house party at the charge 
house, Friday evening, November twenty-first. 

Sprince's orchestra played for an order of 
twenty-four dances. 



Among the guests were the Misses Kate Bur- 
den, Brookline, Mass.; Fiefie Warren, Newton, 
Mass.; Helen Farr and \^era Owen, Lowell, 
Mass.; Gladys Holcomb, Hopkinton, Mass.; 
Persis Sawyer, Methuen, Mass.; Grace Barton, 
Mildred Johnson, Ruth Johnson, Esther Mat- 
thews, Helen Nissen, Ruth Palmer, Eleanor Rus- 
sell, Pauline Thurston, all of Portland; Eliza- 
beth Cushman, Hebron; Alice Sheehan, Bidde- 
ford; Gladys Willey, Saco ; Charlotte Glenfield, 
Lisbon Falls; Dorothy Tenney, Hallowell ; Ruth 
Cummings, Norway; Maybelle Beach, Lois 
Haskell, Elizabeth Nash, all of Brunswick; and 
Majorie Daniell, Portsmouth, N. H. 

The committee in charge of the affair con- 
sisted of Pendexter '21, chairman; Larrabee '21, 
Woodbury '22, and Tice '23. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Hugh Pendexter, 
Norway; Mrs. Wilmot B. Mitchell, Mrs. Alaric 
W. Haskell, Mrs. William F. Porter, all of 
Brunswick. 



DELTA UPSILON. 

Among the guests were the Misses Luena 
Hutchinson, Mae Miller, Marjorie Mathis, Port- 
land; Stella Moseley, Thelma Simmons, Ded- 
ham, Mass. ; Lorette Lapointe, Alexina La- 
pointe, Isabel Pollard, all of Brunswick; Nora 
Jackson, Winthrop, Mass. ; Elinor Phillips, 
Boston ; Betty Woodward, Portsmouth, N. H. ; 
Virginia Payne, Richmond, Va. ; Marian Howe, 
South Weymouth ; Doris Wakeley, Lisbon Falls ; 
Faith Dudgeon, South Bedford, Conn. ; Marjorie 
Lord, Gloucester, Mass.; Sophie Fisk, Freeport; 
Esther Power, Peabody; Ella Pinkham, Lincoln; 
Lena Dorr, Oldtown. 

Gibson's orchestra of Portland furnished t'r.e 
music. 

The patronesses were Mrs, 
Mrs. R. P. Bodwell, Mrs. W. 
Paul Nixon, all of Brunswick. 

The Joint Committee consisted of Hall '2 
Smethurst '20, Toyokawa '21, Whitney '21, Con: 
don '22, Luden '22, Jacobs '23. 



J. S. Stetson, 
H. Davis, Mrs. 



KAPPA SIGMA. 

A two-day Thanksgiving" house party was en- 
joyed bjr the Kappa Sigma fraternity last Friday 



170 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



and Saturday, November 21 and 22. 

Friday evening was spent at a joint dance of 
the Kappa Sigma and Delta Upsilon fraternities 
at the Delta Upsilon House. 

On Saturday, sight seeing and the Freshman- 
Sophomore football game passed the time very 
quickly until evening, when the party enjoyed 
a straw ride to Freeport. On arriving at Mosely's 
a banquet was served. Two hours later the party 
started back to Brunswick, where an informal 
dance was held. 

Among those present were the Misses Har- 
riet Sweetser, Yarmouth; Margaret MacDonald, 
Portland; Helene Blackwell and Evelyn Priest, 
Brunswick; Eleanor Hawes, Skowhegan ; Marion 
Judkins, Miss McDougal, Miss Flannigan, and 
Miss McLoggj Rockland; Louise Merriam, Yar- 
mouth; Miss Fuller, Bangor; and Miss Bradish. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Richan of Rock- 
land, and Mrs. Priest of Brunswick. 



THE MUSICAL CLUBS. 

The Glee Club has the start on the Mandolin 
Club, for rehearsals of the former are now well 
under way. Every Monday and Thursday after- 
noon at 4.45 the club rehearses in the music 
room of the chapel. Professor Wass is very 
enthusiastic this season and firmly believes that 
this year's Glee Club will be the best ever. 

The men who are now rehearsing are : Lyons, 
Chase, Sprince, McClave, J. J. Whitney, Cross- 
man, E. A. Allen, P. Doherty, Lindner, Hart, H. 
Nixon, Woodbury, Ryder, Kileski, Congdon, 
James, Butler, Willey, Ferris, J. A. Black, M. P. 
Chandler, J. E. Mitchell, Turgeon, Reiber. Ac- 
companist : Lyseth. 

No further cuts will be made for some time 
although the final number of men in the Glee 
Club will be less than at the present time. 



THE RIFLE CLUB. 

The Rifle Club has so far been outwardly 
silent, but inwardly has developed prospects for 
the coming year. The approximate membership 
just now is seventy, but this is by no means the 
number of men desired. No matter whether or 
not you have had any experience with arms of 
any kind before, come out and give yourself at 
least a fair trial. Each man is given one hun- 
dred and twenty rounds of 30-30 ammunition 
and the membership fee is just one dollar. 

Members in good standing become automatical- 
ly members of the National Rifle Association. 

The officers of the club are: Hurlin '20, presi- 
dent; Law '20, secretary and treasurer; Pen- 
dextcr '21, armorer. 



FAMOUS WELSH CHOIR COMING. 

The Mountain Ash (male) Chorus, one of the 
finest organizations of its kind, will give a con- 
cert in Memorial Hall, Friday evening', Dec. 5. 

The program will consist of choruses, duets 
and solos ; native Welsh compositions as well 
as the more standard operatic choruses and 
part songs. 

There are fourteen men (all soloists) in the 
concert party — and they sing under the con- 
ductorship of T. Glyadwr Richards, the most 
noted conductor in Wales. It will be well to 
keep this date in mind. 



DEBATING. 

The Freshman-Sophomore debate is scheduled 
for early December and the teams of both classes 
are preparing for the contest. The members of 
the Freshman team already selected are as fol- 
lows : Mitchell, Cousins, Little and Jacobs, al- 
ternate. The members of the Sophomore team 
have not yet been fully decided upon. 

The question for debate will be the same as 
that used in the trials, namely : "Resolved, That 
the Municipal Police Should Have the Preroga- 
tive of Public Bargaining." 

A number of Sophomore debaters competed for 
places on the team which will soon oppose the 
Freshmen. The trials were held in Hubbard 
Hall Monday night, the subject being the same 
upon which the Freshmen were chosen. 

Medals for the intercollegiate debating team 
have been offered this year as they have been 
sometimes in the past by a graduate of the Col- 
lege who is much interested in debating. If the 
team loses its debate the medals will be of silver, 
if it wins, they will be of gold. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS MEETINGS. 

At a meeting of the Sophomore class held 
in the L'nion at one o'clock on Wednesday, No- 
vember 19, the Sophomores were urged to go 
out for the debating team. Assessments were 
taken for back bills and also for present ex- 
penses. Also every member of '22 was urged 
to come to the game Saturday and give the team 
its just support. 

A second meeting was held in Memorial Hall 
on Wednesday at one o'clock. Assessments for 
present issues were taken. Everyone was earnest- 
ly appealed to be on the Delta Saturday and 
do his share for his class and the fellows who 
were doing their best to inake a name for '22. 
It was also voted that there should be an or- 
ganized cheering section. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



SOPHOMORES BEAT FRESHMEN, 25 TO 7. 

The Sophomores defeated the Freshmen, 25-7. 
The field was deep with clay mud, which made 
fast playing difficult for both sides. 

Fumbles by the Freshmen near their own goal 
lines gave the Sophomores two touchdowns; an- 
other came by intercepting a forward pass. The 
Freshmen's score was made by Bisson, who 
picked up a fumble on the 45-yard line and ran 
over the goal line. Thesummar\': 
SOPHOMORES— —FRESHMEN 

Ball, le re., Swinglehurst 

Nixon, It rt, Parsons 

Wagg, Ig rg., Schlosberg 

Therrieault. c c. Chandler 

Whitney, rg Ig., Hebb 

Putnam, rt It., Tootel 

Tarbox, re le., Mcintosh 

Woodbury, qb qb., J. Smith 

Morrill, Ihb rhb., Miller 

Meacham, rhb Ihb., Keaney 

Ferris, fb fb., Bisson 

Touchdowns, Ball, Morrill 2, Meacham, Bisson. Goals 
from touchdowns, Woodbury, Keaney. Substitutes : 
Sophomores, Weatherill for Nixon, Eldridge for Whit- 
ney, Canter 'for Ferris, Keene for Wagg. Fresh- 
men : Fitzmorris -for Schlosberg, G. T. Davis 
for Mcintosh, G. Davis for Keaney, Bates for 
Chandler. Referee, Parent '21. Umpire, Curtis '20. 
Linesman and field judge. Cook '20. Time, lo-minute 
periods. 



MEETING OF NEW ENGLAND COLLEGES. 

President Sills and Professor Hutchins rep- 
resented Bowdoin at the sixty-first meeting of 
. the Association of Colleges in New England. 
The meeting was held at Middlebury College 
and was presided over by President Thomas. 
President Lowell of Harvard, President Hadley 
of Yale, and President Meiklejohn of Amherst 
were present. 

Twenty-three questions of general interest 
were discussed such as : "What action should be 
taken by the Colleges in view of the present 
popular prejudice against the study of German? 
What effects of the war can be observed in the 
student elections this year? The general exami- 
nation and its relation to various methods of 
instruction. The new scheme of Carnegie 
pensions next year at Wesleyan." 

Fifteen leading colleges of New England are 
members of this association, and all were rep- 
resented at the meeting. 



months, is almost entirely printed. It will be 
out directly after Thanksgiving. This year the 
catalogue has returned to its normal pre-war 
size. With its 125 pages of information it is 
most complete. 

There are a number of important changes and 
additions this year. Announcement is made of 
one new trustee, Hon. Clarence Hale of Portland. 
New overseers are George R. Walker of New 
York City, Lewis A. Burleigh of Augusta, James 
L. Doherty of Springfield, Massachusetts, and 
John W. Manson of Pittsfield. The officers of 
the Board of Overseers are, president, Hon. D. 
S. Alexander of Buffalo, N. Y., and vice-presi- 
dent, Hon. F. A. Powers of Houlton. 

The enrolment this year is the largest ever. 
The total has reached 499. While the total en- 
rolment of the Medical School is rather small, 
that of the entering' class is large. 

Among the Faculty several changes will be 
noticed. There are two new members. Pro- 
fessors Stone and Little. Mr. Stanwood has re- 
ceived his professorship, and, Mr. Nolan has 
been made assistant professor in Mathematics. 
Professors Nixon, Davis, Bell, Meserve, and Van 
Cleve are back after war service. Professors 
Hormell, Andrews, MacMillan, and MacCormick 
are on leave of absence; Professor Gross has a 
leave of absence for the first semester, and 
Professor Davis for the second. 

The only changes in the requirements for a de- 
gree are those in the science department, which 
have been previously mentioned. There are sev- 
eral new art courses which will be given next 
year. 

Two new scholarships and one new prize are 
announced. The new scholarships are the 
Weston Lewis Fund of $15,000 in memory of 
Weston Lewis of the Class of 1872, and the 
Stanley Plummer Scholarship Fund of $2,000 
bequeathed by Stanley Plummer of the Class of 
1867. The new prize is the Stanley Plummer 
Prize, also bequeathed by Stanley Plummer, 
which provides the income of $1,000 to be 
awarded to some member of the Junior Class for 
excellence in written or spoken English. There 
is also the Class of 1875 Library Fund providing 
the income of $1,500 for the purchase of books 
on American Historv. 



THE NEW CATALOGUE. 

The new catalogue, upon which Mr. Wilder, 
the librarian, has been working for several 



FENCING 

Practice in fencing will begin soon after 
Thanksgiving. Twelve men have already gone 
out and it is expected that others will follow 
soon. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOiN ORIENT 

Published Eveey Wednesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 
Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 

department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Roland L. McCormack, 1922 Exchange 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
Ronald B. Wadsworth, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 192 i 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



of the Union, — to provide a place where all 
students may meet in "informal sociability." To 
attain this end the Union provides varied means 
of recreation for the use of the students. Pool 
and billiard tables, a Victrola, magazines and 
daily papers are available to all students. A 
small fee is charged for the use of the pool and 
billiard tables to cover current expenses. 

Some students do not appear to appreciate 
these privileges. They try to get out of paying 
for the use of the pool table; they mar and dis- 
figure the furnishings; they break records 
through carelessness and abuse the Victrola. 
These are only a few of the pernicious practices 
which have been in vogue but must cease in the 
future. If students don't appreciate the privi- 
leges of the Union enough to use them decently, 
they should be deprived of them. The LInion 
Governing Board has this power of deprivation, 
and will exercise it if there is not marked im- 
provement in the near future. 



bowdoin publishing company 
Allan W. Hall, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 

Vol. XLIX. NOVEMBER 26, 1919. No. 18 

Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

The Abuse of Union Privileges. 

There have been many complaints of late of 
the abuse of the privileges of the Union. All 
students should know by this time the purpose 



COMMUNICATION. 



Editor of the Orient: 

Dear Sir : — As chairman of the editors of the 
Quill, I thank you for your editorial of Novem- 
ber 19, urging more numerous and more varied 
undergraduate contributions to the magazine. 
The idea of this recommendation of yours forms 
part of the policy of the present editors, and I 
am glad of this chance to say that we are 
especially interested in introducing new men and 
new subjects to the pages of the Quill whenever 
possible. Perhaps a few words as to the inner 
workings of the editorial mind may be here of 
some value. 

Only a man who has tried being an editor 
will appreciate fully the troubles of the office. 
Primarily stands the editor's literary sense, such 
as he may have. A college magazine, it will be 
agreed, should be well written. No amount of 
good idea, much as that is sought, can redeem 
a paper with bad unity, hackneyed phrasing, or a 
stiff and amateurial high school sound. Con- 
versely, a well written paper not infrequently 
contains no new idea. These things I say not to 
scai"e prospective writers, whom we are here to 
encourage rather than discourage. Let papers 
be submitted at all events; but these are the 
kinds which must usually give way at first to a 
more practised or original art, if such can be 
secured. By effort, however, is a new man 
nearer to distinction than by no effort. The 
trick is often this: not to be "sore" over a first 
rejection. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



173 



I echo your plea that the QuiU's field be 
widened so far as is consistent with the qualities 
of literature. Before the publication of your 
editorial the Quill had accepted for'the December 
issue the prize-winning historical essay delivered 
by Foulke at last June's Commencement. It is 
unfortunate, if you will, that the author is an- 
other graduate rather than an undergraduate, 
but the chief Commencement essay is usually 
worth printing, and it is not written until its 
author is graduating. This paper was chosen 
by the Quill partly because its subject is history. 

I would sa}' that good humor is always ac- 
ceptable. It has been rather lacking of late, 
and yet it is perhaps the easiest and most 
natural form in which the budding author may 
try his hand. 

With regard to the value of the Quill, I can- 
not refrain from a word of championship. This 
is one of the mediums through which new men 
may be found out who will be interested in using 
the pen, the same pen, no less, which sometimes 
rules the world. And at least the Quill is read. 
Of two cl^ss papers recently submitted in Bow- 
doin English courses, one used as its theme the 
quotation from Emerson in the November Quill; 
the other imitated the playful and original con- 
clusion of Butler's well written story, in the 
same issue. Imitation is the sincerest flattery. 

Through the Orient, I should like to say that 
the editors will always gladly welcome, even 
prefer, papers by new men. And if rejections 
displease, come and argue it out. Freshmen 
and Sophomores, being the coming lights, are 
especially invited to contribute here and now. 
Respectfully yours, 

Robert Morse '21 



aaJiti) tt)e JFacultp 

The members of the Equal Suffrage League 
met at the home of Mrs. Frank N. Whittier, on 
Tuesday evening, November 25. Professor War- 
ren B. Catlin addressed the meeting, taking for 
his subject, "Freedom of Speech and Press." 

Professor Frank E. Woodruff preached at the 
Central Congregational Church, Bath, Sunday, in 
the absence of the pastor. Rev. D. L. Wilson, who 
is spending his vacation at Fort Fairfield. 

President Kenneth C. M. Sills has been ap- 
pointed a member of the State committee, which 
between Thanksgiving and Christmas is to raise 
funds for the relief of the 4,000,000 Armenians, 
Syrians, Jews, Greeks, and Persians who face 
starvation as the result of the activities of the 
Turks in their efforts to annihilate the non- 



Turkish population. 

Mrs. Paul Nixon returned Monday from an 
extended visit at her former home in Illinois. 
Dean Nixon went to Boston Friday, November 
14, to meet her and accompanied her home. 

William E. Wass left Thursday for Water- 
ville, where he has accepted an excellent posi- 
tion in the paper mill. Mr. Wass, who is the 
son of Professor and Mrs. Edward H. Wass, 
served throughout the war in aviation. 

Dean Nixon was in Portland Thursday. In 
the afternoon he addressed the students of Port- 
land High and in the evening spoke at Laurence 
Church. On Friday he appeared before the 
Portland Town and College Club where he read 
a paper on Oxford. 

President Sills has resigned his position as 
chairman of the local branch of the American 
Red Cross, which office he has held since 1908. 
Professor Burnett has been elected to fill this 
office. 



PHYSICAL TRAINING BEGINS. 

Everyone in college must report for physical 
training at the time designated for his class be- 
ginning Monday, December i, unless otherwise 
assigned. The hours for the respective classes 
are: 

1920 — Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, 4.30 
p. M. 

1921 — Tuesday, 4.30; Thursday, 4.30; Friday, 
3.30 p. M. 

1922 — Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 3.30 

1923 — Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 11.30. 

The attendance will be taken at exactly ten 
minutes past the half hour and any later than 
this will be marked tardy. The attendance will 
be taken by the monitors of each class on the 
chapel slips and these are to be handed in to 
Mr. Markthaler directly after. 

Each man must have a gymnasivim suit which 
includes a white jersey, running pants, and rub- 
ber soled shoes. Spiked shoes will not be al- 
lowed under any conditions on the gymnasium 
floor but may be worn in the athletic building. 
All runners, however, must otherwise be dressed 
in the regular gymnasium suit. Anyone appear- 
ing without the gymnasium suit will not be given 
credit for attendance to the class. 

On entering the gymnasium the man is to go 
up to the gymnasium floor by the back staircase 
instead of using the two front staircases. It 
is also announced that all the apparatus re- 
quired will be loaned to the students and if not 
returned when called far, will be charged on 
the regular term bill. 



I 



174 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN CLUB OP PORTLAND MEETS. 

The Bowdoin Club of Portland held its first 
meeting of the year on Saturday evening, No- 
vember 15, at the Elks Club in Portland. Pro- 
fessor Donald B. MacMillan '98, who is on leave 
of absence from the College, gave a most in- 
teresting lecture on his Arctic explorations. He 
took a great many photographs while in the 
North and used a number of them made into 
lantern slides to illustrate his talk. While he 
did not announce his plans for returning to the 
Arctic next spring, it is generally understood 
that he will g'o there on a geodetic research in 
the ship "Bowdoin," which is now under con- 
struction. 

The Bowdoin Club of Portland plans to re- 
vive the old monthly meetings vvhich were so 
successful in past years. At the next meeting to 
be held on the third Thursday in December the 
annual election of officers will take place. 

Those present were: Professor Donald B. 
MacMillan '98, George F. Cary '88, president, 
Hon. Charles F. Johnson '79, Hon. William M. 
Ingraham '95, C. L. Hutchinson '90, H. C. Wil- 
b)ur '94, Dr. F. N. Whittier '85, Hon. Eben W. 
Freeman '85, O. C. Evans '76, S. B. Jackson '83, 
V. C. Wilson '80, Will O. Hersey '92, Rev. Win- 
field S. Randall '92, C. M. Leighton '94, W. Bean 
Moulton '99, W. W. Thomas '94, Elias Thomas 
'94, Louis Donahue '14, Paul E. Donahue '14, 
Clifford L. Russell '14, Dr. DeForest Weeks '11, 
Dr. Carl M. Robinson '08, Arthur F. Cowan '01, 
Kenneth G. Stone '17, George C. Kern '12, Carl 
K. Ross '17, Rev. R. H. Colby '13, Ralph C. 
Parmenter '16, Carroll W. Hodgkins '16, Eugene 
W. McNeally '13, Harry C. Cox, Burton Smith 
'89, G. T. Little ex-' 1 5, \^ T. Shaw, Dwight H. 
Sayward '16, Daniel F. Koughan '09, Lincoln 

B. Farrar '19, Virgil C. McGorrill '22, Edward 
S. Anthoine '02, Carl W. Smith '03, Elliot Free- 
man '18, Frederick G. Kileski '20, Dr. Thomas 

C. Wyman '12, Earle S. Russell '12, Clarence A. 
Brown '14, William B. Nulty '10, Frank H. 
Haskell '95, W. S. Mitchell '96, Neal W. Allen 
'07, Frank N. Burkett '11, Frank L. Prince '84, 
Dr. C. A. Baker '78, C. E. Sayward '84 John A. 
Waterman '94, Phillip H. Chapman '06, Henry 
Lewis '05, Leland G. Means '12, John F. Dana 
'98, Ralph O. Brewster '09, Herbert H. Foster 
'16, Daniel W. True '17, Dr. Manning C. Moul- 
ton 'is, Harold E. Verrill '15, J. A. Clark '05, 
Harold C. Trott '04, Luther Dana '03, H. W. 
Shaylor, Jr., Ben Barker '02, John H. Pierce '93, 
Lyman A. Cousens '02, Leslie C. Evans '03, 
Robert F. Chapman '00, Edward L. Pickard '92, 
Arthur Chapman '98. Dr. Mortimer Warren '96, 



E. R. Elwell '15, Chester G. Abbott '13, Harold 
L. Berry '01, Roland E. Clark '01, Cyrus B. 
\''arney '63, Dr. H. F. Gerrish '66. 



PHI CHI'S HOLD BANQUET AND DANCE. 

The Phi Chi Medical fraternity of Bowdoin 
College conducted a social at the Congress 
Square hotel Saturday evening, preceded by a 
banquet in the private dining room. This oc- 
casion was a climax to a series of events, one 
of which was the meeting at the Elks' club- 
house when 13 candidates were introduced to the 
mysteries of the fraternity. The social was de- 
voted to dancing and proved most enjoyable. 
There was no business session. The affair was 
under the direction of a committee with W. E. 
Hill as chairman. 

In attendance were : W. E. Hill, Louise 
Roberts, A. J. Furn, Frances Craven, Hazel 
Potter, H. M. Brewster, Dr. and Mrs. Earl C. 
Follett, Gertrude Tuttle, Henry P. Johnson, Dr. 

D. M. Mannix, Edward L. Herlihy, Mary S. 
Sullivan, Herbert F. Twitchell, Alice C. Mannix, 
Edward L. Markthaler, Helen C. Rasmussen, 
Charles W. Orr, Anna H. Rasmussen, James M. 
Brewster, Frances Brewster, James E. Vance, 
Madge M. Heald, Robert J. Wiseman, Jr., Minnie 
Caouette, Raymond C. Willey, Allan L. Davis, 
A. Andersen, Loretta MacDonough, Anne Dur- 
gin, Stephen E. Perkins, Mildred Tinker, Win- 
field E. Wight, Marcia Cunningham, R. E. 
Cartelle, Urania Kennedy, John F. McGrath, 
Ruth Kennedy, Walter E. Burke, Helen Burke, 

E. T. Murray, Helen M. Sheahan, Forest H. 
Rogers, Margaret E. Hanson, Henry W. Han- 
son, Jr., Alice D. McCrum, Reg. T. Lombard, 
Esther Mathews, Harold Lee, Terina O. Love, 
Eugene O'Donnell. 



FOOTBALL NUMBER OF THE ORIENT. 

There will be no issue of the Orient the week 
following the Thanksgiving recess, but during 
the second week after the holiday it is planned 
to put out a Football Number of the Orient. 
This number will feature the football season of 
1919 and will include, besides a picture of the 
varsity team, individual cuts of this season's 
stars, the coach, the trainer, and the manager. 
There will be individual write-ups of every mem- 
ber of the varsity, besides an extended account 
of the season as a whole. It is hoped that this 
issue will be one of the most interesting and 
valuable that has ever appeared. You are ad- 
vised to order yoxir extra copies now of Allan 
Hall '20, Delta Upsilon house. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



175 



STUDENT COUNCIL MEETING. 

The Student Council met last Tuesday evening, 
November i8. The main topic for discussion 
was the Christmas dance. The date had been 
set for December 23, the day before the Christ- 
mas holidays, but a large number of students 
were dissatisfied with that time. Consequently 
another date was set, Friday, December 19.' This 
latter date is final. 

Most of the fraternity houses plan to have 
house parties the night preceding the college 
dance in the gymnasium. Preparations are 
now under way and this Christmas will see Old 
Bowdoin in pre-war colors. 



SOPHOMORE VIGILANCE COMMITTEE. 

A vigilance committee of five was appointed 
at a recent Sophomore class meeting. There 
have been many complaints that the Freshmen 
have not been obeying rules, that they fail to 
speak on the campus, that they do not wear 
their caps, that they cut across the grass, and 
do not keep, to their own side of Maine street. 
While the fraternities control their own Fresh- 
men, they do not come in contact with the whole 
class. The purpose of the committee is to see 
that the rules are strictly obeyed by all the 
Freshmen. 



Dn tDe Campus 

Frank A. Smith '12, visited the College while 
on a furlough last week. 

Thomson '21, left early last week for Skow- 
hegan where he is teaching Latin in the high 
school until the Thanksgiving recess. 

Clarence Allen '22, has been absent from col- 
lege during the last week while he was forced 
to undergo a serious operation. He is reported 
gaining however and expects to return to school 
after the Thanksgiving holidays. 

The hockey rink between Hyde Hall and Hub- 
bard Hall was laid out last week by George 
Higgins, janitor of the gymnasium, and a crew 
of men. It is 125 feet long and 52 feet wide. 

The tentative date for the Bowdoin Inter- 
scholastic Track Meet is Saturday, February 
14. It is planned to have present several prep 
schools from Massachusetts. 

The Sophomores held a class meeting in the 
Union last Wednesday. 

The weight list is being compiled by Doctor 
Whittier. It is expected that this year the list 
will show several interesting facts. There are 
rumors current relative to strong men in the 
Freshman class. 



Several students attended the Harvard- Yale 
game last Saturday. Jack Magee witnessed the 
battle from the side lines. 

Captain John L. Scott, C.A.C., ex-'i8, was 
seen 011 the Cainpiis last week. 

Smiley '21 was removed to the infirmary Wed- 
nesday of last week suffering from a sudden at- 
tack of appendicitis. 

The annual Bowdoin Calendar will probably 
be out about December 15. Order blanks are 
now being distributed. The price is $1.50. 

Two Freshman class meetings were held last 
week in preparation for the Freshman-Sopho- 
more game, one on Wednesday at noon, and the 
other on Thursday evening. Tice was elected 
cheer leader. It was voted to assess the class 
to pay the expenses of the game. 

The U. Q. initiation will be held at the Hotel 
Eagle on December 6. 

A recent bulletin sent out from the office con- 
tained the Honor Roll of the College and Presi- 
dent Sills' memorial address. A pamphlet re- 
lating to a swimming pool was sent out at the 
same time. 

Through an error in last week's Orient it was 
stated that MacGorrill '22 was a scorer at the 
Cross Country run for the University of Maine. 

Fagoni '22 was taken to the infirmary on Fri- 
day of last week. 

Friday, at noon, the entire Freshman class 
gathered on the Delta to clean off the snow in 
preparation for the Freshman-Sophomore foot- 
ball game. 

A steam boiler was removed from the base- 
ment of Maine Hall last week. It was neces- 
sary to tear down a portion of the foundation 
in order to get it out. 

Before the next issue of the Orient the Fresh- 
man caps will have disappeared from the campus. 

The Christmas dance committee announces 
that the date of the dance has been changed to 
the evening of Friday, December 19. 

The new skating rink in front of Hyde Hall 
is beginning to look like business. The boards 
are now nearly all placed, and hockey ought to 
be started in earnest soon after Thanksgiving. 

Schlosberg '20 announces that nothing will be 
done on fencing until after Thanksgiving. The 
number of veterans appears to be small in this 
sport, but a number of Freshmen have signified 
their interest in it. 

Ben Houser was on the Campus this week. 

The first meeting of the Ibis took place on 
November 18 at five o'clock in the Classical 
room of the Library with President Zeitler pre- 
siding. The plans for the activity of the society 



176 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



during the coming year was the important ques- 
tion of the meeting. 



aiumni jQotejs 

'57 — Edward Parker, the principal emeritus of 
Brockton (Mass.) High School, died November 
15 at the home of his son in Brockton. He was 
born March 31, at Charlestown, Mass. From 
1858 to i860 he was principal of the high school 
at Georgetown, Mass. In i860 he received a 
Master's degree from Bowdoin. For the next 
four years he was principal of the Melrose 
(Mass.) High School. After that, for seven 
years he taught at Biddeford, Maine. In 1871 
he became principal of Brockton High School, 
where he remained until 1914. In 1905 he was 
made principal emeritus, but continued to teach 
for nine years more. 

'04 — Although not engaged in active military 
service, George W. Burpee is one of many Bow- 
doin men who have done some very important 
war work. He is a Managing Engineer with 
Westinghouse, Church, Kerr, and Company. 
From August 1917 to July 1917 he was con- 
tinuously \vith this corporation, engaged in in- 
dustrial activities connected with the prosecution 
of the war. From August to November 1917 he 
was Assistant to the General Superintendent of 
Construction on the Port of Embarkation, New- 
port News, Va., being personally in charge of 
the construction of Camp Hill. From December 
1917 to July 19x9 Mr. Burpee was Resident En- 
gineer in charge of the construction of the por- 
tion of United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, exe- 
cuted by the company with whom he was em- 
ployed. This plant, located at Muscle Shoals, 
Alabama, was one of the two largest war pro- 
jects to be completed, the other being at Hog 
Island. The cost of the work at Muscle Shoals 
was slightly over sixty million dollars, and of 
this amount the work executed by Westinghouse, 
Church, Kerr, and Company cost about twenty- 
five millions. The work covered an area of 2300 
acres. In so far as is known this is the largest 
chemical plant in the world. Mr. Burpee had 
thousands of men working under him, and they 
put up with incredible speed the barracks and 
other buildings required of them. 

'11 — E. Baldwin Smith '11, from Princeton 
University, and his mother, Mrs. F. E. Smith, 
will be the guests of the Misses Anna, Bessie 
and Belle Smith this week. 

'17 — Edwin H. Blanchard, who has a position 
with the New York Sun, has written a series 
of sketches of New York streets, which will be 



published soon by Appleton's in book form. 

'18 — Boyce A. Thomas is teaching Latin this 
year at the Penn Charter School in Philadelphia. 

'19 — Fred B. Chadbourne is teaching at Mon- 
son Academy, Monson, Mass. 



EXCHANGES. 



The Tufts Weekly: Tufts is establishing 
a precedent in a thing which will if successful 
be an epoch in her history. It is in short. Col- 
lege Movies, to be filmed and projected on the 
Hill. 

The Oberlin Revieiv : Ellis Parker Butler, 
L. A. U. speaker, following Stefansson, brought 
a good time to the students of Oberlin with his 
overflowing wit and humor. 



CALENDAR. 

November 26 — Noon : Thanksgiving recess 
begins. 

December i — 8.20 a. m., college exercises be- 
bin; 11.30 A. M.^ physical training for Freshmen; 
3.30 P. M.J physical training for Sophomores ; 
4.30 p. M., physical training for Seniors. 

December 2 — 4.30 p. m.j physical training for 
juniors. 

December 5 — Mountain Ash Chorus, Memorial 
Hall. 

December 6 — Teachers' Convention at the Col- 
lege. 

December 15 — Freshman-Sophomore debate. 

December 18 — Christmas dances at the fra- 
ternity houses. 

December 19 — College Christmas dance in the 
gymnasium. 

December 22 — Noon : Christmas recess begins. 



RESOLUTION. 



Bowdoin Chapter of Delta Upsilon: 

The Chapter was deeply moved by the abrupt 
announcement of the death of Brother Frank 
L. Dutton of the Class of 1899. In college he 
won many honors. He was prize orator of the 
'68 Prize Speaking and president of the Athletic 
Association. Since leaving college he has been 
prominent as a Maine attorney. State senator, 
and chairman of the Maine Industrial Accident 
Commission. 

Delta Upsilon offers to his family and friends 
the sincerest .sympathy that a heart can feel. 
For the Chapter, 

Roland H. Peacock, 
J. Maxim Ryder, 
Hartley F. Simpson, Jr. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Have You Paid Your Subscription? 

EDGAR O. ACHORN'S NOVEL 

"The Unknown Quantity" 

FOR SALE AT 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

We would like to engage three or four 
energetic and capable students for us on 
commission. The right men can add ma- 
terially to their income for the next two 
months in a, pleasant and congenial business 
which can be done in spare time. 

Service Inc. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



New England Publishers 



462 BOnSTON ST. 



DANCING 

Miss Jennie S. Harvey's Evening Dancing 
Class and Assembly every Tuesday evening at 
Town Hall, Brunswick, commencing Oct. 21st. 

Lesson 7.30 p. m. Assembly 8.30 p. m. 

This class is open to college students. 

Private instruction by appointment. 

Monday evening Class and Assembly at Arm- 
ory Hall, Bath. 

Address 897 Middle St., Bath, Maine. 'Phone 
151-W. 

" WANTED 

Student to sell high grade line of toilet re- 
quisites, $25 per w^eek for active fellow. 

DOVER SUPPLY COMPANY 

530 Tremont St. Boston, Mass. 

MESERVE'S FRUIT SHERBET 

The Blended Product of the Natural Juices of 
Sound Ripe Fruit and Berries. A Delicious and 
Healthful Beverage for Receptions, Teas and 
Parties. Prepared only by 

P. J. MESERVE, Pharmacist, 
Near Post Office, Brunswick, Maine 



FALL STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

John A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 



A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office ... Brunswick, Maine 



BUTLER'S 



n 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSONS PHARMACY 

CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 

CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 

4 Elm Street 

HARVARD DENTAL SCHOOL 

A Department of Harvard University 

Graduates of secondary schools admitted without ex- 
amination provided they have taken required subjects. 
Modern buildings and equipment. Fall term opens 
September 22, 1919. Degree of D.M.D. Catalog. 
EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D., Dean, Boston, Mass. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

"UNION" LUNCH 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 
Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 
FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Proiits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 

We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16. 



WE CARRY 

Co-operative Shoes 
New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 
LARGEST AND BEST 

stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



LAW 

AND AMERICA'S 
WORLD POSITION 



n international 
challenges the 



America's new place 
politics and commerce 
young American. 
He must equip himself for new world 
conditions with a knowledge of legal funda- 
mentals. 

LAW — its principles and application to all 
business is almost as necessary to the 
coming business man as it is indispensable 
to the lawyer. 
Qualify for real leadership. 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

gives a thorough training in legal 

principles. 

LL.B. Course requires 3 years. 

For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 



Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 

TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 



BATH, MAINE 



J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The BoAvdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 

Portland 


WILLIAM F. FERRIS 

COLLEGE AGENT 


ANTIQIVTY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

flDIB JFurntturr, 2DIIi flhins, IPrtottr, (Etc. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 


Citizens Laundry 

AUTO SERVICE 9 SOUTH APPLETON 


to orders for antique goods of any kind 


Telephone 160 


COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 


FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 


BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short, Notice by competent work- 
men. We use only the Best 
of Leather. 
E. WHITTOM 


Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
A. G. PAGE COMPANY, Bath 




''''The Store of Progress and Service''' 

Master Style Creators 

Design Our Clothes for the 

Younger Men 

THAT'S why they are so satisfying. The style is right — 

dominant, clean cut, exclusive. The quality is right too. 

Many of them are from the famous House of Kuppen- 

heimer. 

For the College man we also recommend the 
popular "Manhattan" Shhts and "Nettleton" 
shoes, and you will be much interested in our 
fine line of Hosiery. 

■^P^^p Mr. Harmon Bliason connected with our College Room will 
be at the different houses of Bowdoin College at least once a 
month with our line of high grade merchandise, and we can assure you 
absolute satisfaction in every way. In the meantime should you require 
anything in wearing apparel Mr. Jack Handy '33 located at the Zeta Psi 
House is our representative, and will take gocd care of you. 



Monument 
Square iW^^, 




Portland 
Maine 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

DOROTHY DALTON 

IN 

OTHER MEN'S WIVES 




FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

WILLIAM FARNUM 

IN 

THE LONE STAR RANGER 



NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

WALLACE REID 

IN 

THE LOVE BURGLAR 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

HEDDA NOVA 

IN 

THE SPITFIRE OF SEVILLE 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

EMMY WEHLEN 

IN 

THE BELLE OF THE SEASON 



NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

PRISCILLA DEAN 

IN 

PRETTY SMOOTH 



Vol. XLIX. No. 19 



DECEMBER 10, 1919 ,. 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 







CONTENTS 






PAGE 


PAGE 


Bowdoin's Strong Men 


177 


Physical Training 


182 


Hockey To Be Major Sport 


178 


Christmas Dance 


183 


Track Notes 


178 


Fencing 


183 


Athletic Council Notes 


178 


The '68 Speakers 


183 


Macbeth Recital 


179 


Warnings 


183 


Noted Publisher To Speak 


179 


Certificates of Honor Conferred 


183 


Welsh Male Concert Choir 


179 


Y. M. C. A. Puts On Lecture 


183 


Editorials: 




On the Campus 


183 


The Christmas Dance 


180 


With the Faculty 


184 


Library Conduct 


180 • 


Exchanges 


185 


Communication 


181 


Alumni Notes 


185 


"Ring Out Wild Bells" 


181 


Calendar 


186 


Masque and Gown 


182 


Resolutions 


186 


A Teachers' Conference 


182 







BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Back Here" know JUD is in the game. 


WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 


The College Book Store 

We wish to call your 
attention to our new 

FRATERNITY STATIONERY 






PRINTING 


in a large man size pa- 
per. 


OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWN BUILDING BliUNSWICK 


The stock is the well known 
OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

The price is $1.00 per box 
F. W. CHANDLER & SON 



COLLEGE AND 'TREP" SCHOOL MEN 

Clothing foi Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 




ercoats and Ulsters. 



Hats 



Haberdashery 

MacuUar Parker Company 

400 Washington St. Boston, Mass. 

"THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT" 



■AiSt, 




A Gateway — Electrical 



ONLY a forty-foot gateway bounded by 
two brick pilasters and ornamental 
lamps, but unlike any other gateway in the 
entire world. 

For back of it is the General Electric Com- 
pany's main office building, accommodating 
2300 employees. And just next door is its 
laboratory with the best equipment for test- 
ing, standardizing and research at the com- 
mand of capable engineers. Then down 
the street— a mile long— are other buildings 
where everything electrical, from the small- 
est lamp socket to the huge turbines for 
electrically propelled battleships; is made 



by the 20,000 electrical w^orkers w^ho daily 
stream through. 

AA^'hat a story this gate would tell, if it could, 
of the leaders of the electrical industry and 
business, of ambassadors from other insti- 
tutions and from foreign lands. 
The story would be the history of electric 
lighting, electric transportation, electric in- 
dustrials and electricity in the home. 
This gateway, as well as the research, en- 
gineering, manufacturing and commercial 
resources back of it, is open to all who are 
w^orking for the betterment of the electrical 
industry. 



Illustrated buUeiin, Y-863, describing the companys 
sevcraf plants, xvill be mailed upon request. A.ddres3 
General Electric Company, Desk 43, Schenectady, New York 




General Office 
(.Schenectady; NYi 



Sales Offices in 
all large cities. 





BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


EVENING CLOTHES 


MEN'S SILK HOSE 




85c, $1.00, $1.50 


Desiped and tailored es- 




pecially for us by 


E. S. BODWELL & SON, 




Brunswick. 


HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 






Greenhouse 21-W 


CORRECT DRESS 


Residence 21-R 


FURNISHINGS 


WALTER L. LaROCK 




F- L. O R 1 S T 


Haskell & Jones Co. 


Potted Plants and Cut Flowers 

Floral Designs for All Occasions 


Portland, - - - Maine. 


\h% Jordan Avenue 












^^^^^^^^_ 




Christmas Cards 5c to 50c 




H^ipv _^ ^^m 




Fancy Box Paper 50c to $3.00 




^^P^^'*viHwo53^« \ ' ' ' 




ARROW 

'\Troy tailored 

Soft Collars 

CLUETT, PEABODY i CO. , INC. . TROY, N. Y. 


Manicure Rolls 

$2.00 to $20.00 










WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 


Ladies' and Gents' Purses 

$1.25 to $7.00 


BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 


Courson & Morton 




BOSTON 




80 MAINE ST. The Bowling Alley is next door 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DECEMBER 10, 1919 



NO. 19 



BOWDOIN'S STRONG MEN. 

According to records compiled by Dr. Whittier 
as the results of strength tests given in the course 
of physical examinations to students at the Col- 
lege, of the ten strongest men in college six are 
Seniors, two are Freshmen, one is a Junior and 
one a medical student. 

Due to the upset in the college routine last 
year tests were not given to the Freshmen but 
this year, the class as Sophomores was examined. 
Hence a fair comparison can be made between 
the two lower classes. In considering the upper 
classes and the physical development of their 
members, however, it must be remembered that 
only men from them who were to compete in 
athletics- were e.Kamined. 

The strongest man in college is Sprague '20, 
whose total strength is 1027.3 kilograms. A rough 
equivalent of this in pounds may be found by 
multiplying it by two and one-fifth. The second 
in strength is Ellms '20 with 997.86 kilograms. 
Close behind is Edmund Albert, the strongest 
man in the Freshman class and the third strong- 
est in the whole college. His total strength is 
figured at 993.87 kilograms. 

While talking of strong men in general at 
Bowdoin, it may be well to mention Edward R. 
Godfrey '99, who set the record at Bowdoin, and 
for several years for the colleges of the United 
States at 1716.1 kilograms, made while he was 
a Junior. In his Freshman year he set the mark 
at 1121.8 kilograms and advanced it to 1317 kilo- 
grams in his second year. In his Senior year 
his strength was reckoned at 1613.5 kilograms, 
a drop from the year previous when he set the 
national record, since broken. 

The only time in recent years that a Freshman 
any where near approached Godfrey's first year 
strength total of 1121.8 was in 1916 when J. F. 
Parsons is recorded as having a total strength 
of 1009.9 kilograms. This is not far in advance 
of the mark set by the 22-year-old Albert of this 
year's Freshman class. 

The greatest total remembered as having been 
made by a man at Bowdoin when first examined 
is that of Walter B. Clarke '99, who in his 
Sophomore year totaled 1520 kilograms. Due 
to an accident received while playing football his 



Freshman year he was not examined so the 
strength of this classmate of the present Bow- 
doin strong man cannot be given. In his Senior 
year Mr. Clarke was captain of the football team 
and while a Sophomore he won the pole vault 
and the point needed to make Bowdoin the 
champion of the New England Intercollegiate 
meet. 

Following is a tabulated report of the strong 
men this year: 

Sprague '20, total strength, 1027.3 kilograms; 
strength of lungs, 31; strength of back, 250; 
strength of legs, 455; strength of upper arms, 
161. 3; strength of fore arms, 130. 

Ellms '20, total strength, 997.86; strength of 
Itings, 23; strength of back, 170; strength of legs, 
.J45 ; strength of upper arms, 203.06 ; strength of 
fore arms, 156.8. 

Albert '23, total strength, 993.87; strength of 
lungs, 26; strength of back, 195; strength of legs, 
480; strength of upper arms, 161.07; strength of 
fore arms, 131. 8. 

Peacock '20, total strength, 928.0; strength 
of lungs, 20; strength of back, 215; 
strength of legs, 435; strength of upper arms, 
126.2; strength of fore arms, 131.8. 

Dostie '20, total strength, 903.75; strength of 
lungs, 21; strength of back, 210; strength of 
legs, 340; strength of upper arms, 232.75; 
strength of fore arms, 100. 

Haggerty '20, total strength, 885.9; strength of 
lungs, 26; strength of back, 180; strength of 
legs, 380; strength of upper arms, 152.2; strength 
of fore arms, 147.7. 

Clark '23, total strength 880.73; strength of 
lungs, 17; strength of back, 195; strength of legs, 
425; strength of upper arms, 125.63; strength of 
fore arms, 118. i. 

Brewster, Medic. '23, total strength, 871.72; 
strength of lungs, 18; strength of back, 180; 
strength of legs, 390; strength of upper arms, 
155.72; strength of fore arms, 128. 

Goodwin '21, total strength, 869.68; strength of 
lungs, 24 ; strength of back, 140 ; strength of legs, 
385; strength of upper arms, 202.5; strength of 
fore arms, 118.18. 

Moses '20, total strength, 863.6; strength of 
lungs 15; strength of back, 145; strength of legs. 



178 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



410; strength of upper arms, 155.0; strength of 
fore arms, 138.6. 

The ten strongest men in the Class of 1920, 
with their respective strengths follows: Sprague, 
1027.3; Ellms, 997.86; Peacock, 928.0; Dostie, 
903.75; Haggerty, 885.9; Moses, 863.6; Rhoads, 
841.56; McQuillan, 809.91; Whitney, 802.95; and 
Smith, 781.9. 

In the Class of 1921 the ten strongest men are 
Goodwin, 869.68; Morrill, 791.60; J. W. Parent, 
778.60; McCrum, 773.20; McCurdy, 732.00; 
Lewis, 711.87; Cummings, 707.10; Reiber, 704.76; 
Schonland, 701.90; Hatch, 646.40. 

In the Class of 1922, the ten leading men in 
strength are Keene, 818.8; Kimball, 797.87; 
Flinn, 795.85; Morrill, 785.56; Allen, 773.7; Fish, 
761.06; Therriault, 760.55; Ryan, 749.22; Lud- 
wig, 739-84; James, 737.0. 

The ten leading strong men of the Class of 
1923 are Albert, 993.87; Clark, 880.73; Walker, 
841.51; Priest, 839.7; Davis, 827.7; Wakely, 
827.4; Webb, 808.1; Tootell, 798.3; Swinglehurst, 
781.00; Libby, 750.1. 

A comparison of the strengths of the class may 
be gained from the following tabic : 
Class. No. of Men. Av. Strength Test. 

1920 38 692.94 

1921 35 610.57 

1922 112 566.52 

1923 1-4 541-37 



HOCKEY TO BE MAJOR SPORT. 

The Athletic Council in one of its recent meet- 
ings decided that hockey, not played at Bowdoin 
for several years because of the war, is to be 
revived this winter as a major sport. A rink 125 
feet long and 52 feet wide has already been con- 
structed between Hubbard Hall and Hyde 
Hall. It is expected that the candidates 
for manager will be nominated very soon and 
voted upon in the coming student elections. 

Both Bates and Maine are planning hockey 
teams this winter, while Colby is considering it 
seriously. The prospects of games with other 
Maine colleges are therefore promising, while 
it is predicted that a championship series will be 
played. 

Interclass hockey games will be played in the 
early part of the season and in this way much 
of the good material which is known to be in 
Bowdoin will be unearthed. The game is one 
of the best of winter sports and many students 
have expressed their intentions of trying out 
for the team, so that a large list of candidates 
is assured. 



TRACK NOTES. 

Since the Thanksgiving recess track work has 
begun in earnest in the Gymnasium under the 
direction of Coach Magee. There is a squad 
of 75 out for track, choosing this branch of sport 
instead of physical training, some form of which 
is required of all men in college. About 50 more 
are on the waiting list who would like to take 
track, but the number is restricted as the cage 
will not adequately accommodate at one time all 
who would like to try out for the team. 

During these first few days the candidates are 
trying out in any of the events they choose until 
Coach Magee has an opportunity to size them up 
and assign them to the event for which they are 
best fitted. Relay work will start in a few days. 

Manager Buker '21 is arranging a schedule for 
the varsity relay team. New trips will probably 
be taken on this year. The Freshman relay team 
will run Hebron and Bates College Freshmen 
relay teams. The inter-fraternity track meet 
initiated last year by Coach Magee will be con- 
tinued this year. Indications are that the meet 
will be very interesting. There will also be a 
Sophomore-Freshman meet. 

The compulsory athletic system has already 
proven a decided benefit to the track authorities 
as a number of promising" men have been dis- 
covered among the Freshmen. 



ATHLETIC COUNCIL NOTES. 

The question of changing the track "B" from 
the present old English letter to a seven-inch 
block letter with the corners cut off, somewhat 
similar to the football letter, came up at the last 
meeting of the Athletic Council. While it is felt 
by many that the track "B" should be made equal 
to the football and baseball letters, no decision 
was reached. The matter was referred to a com- 
mittee to look into the question and to recom- 
mend a new style. The committee was composed 
of Dr. Frank N. Whittier '85, Luther Dana '03, 
and Robert E. Cleaves '20. 

The offers for two football games next year 
were received and considered. Harvard wants 
to play Bowdoin in the Stadium the 26th of next 
September, and on the same afternoon to play 
Colby. While the offer is very liberal the gen- 
eral sentiment seems to be against the game be- 
cause it comes so early in the season and be- 
cause it does not seem worth while to risk the 
players in a practice game in which there is 
nothing to gain. It was referred to the Foot- 
ball Committee. New Hampshire State also 
wants a game to be played in Portland one week 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



before the State series begins. No action was 
taken in this matter but the game is opposed by 
many because it is considered too strong a game 
to be played at that point in the season. The 
date for the game with Amherst was set for 
October 9. 

It is understood that Coaches Greene and 
Houser have been engaged to whip the football 
and baseball teams into shape for the coming- 
seasons. The contracts are now being signed. 
Both of these men have turned out exceptionally 
strong teams in the past and a continuance of the 
good work is to be looked for. This will be the 
fourth year for Ben Houser with the Bowdoin 
team. This year he comes under an increased 
salary. 

Willson and Gaffney have been nominated for 
football manager next year, and Ludden and 
Harmon for assistant football manager. Nomi- 
nations for a hockey manager will soon be made, 
and the elections from these nominations will be 
held late 'this week. 

March 19 hars been set as the date for the 
inter-fraternity track meet. 

Ben Houser has accepted the position of base- 
ball coach for next spring. 



MACBETH RECITAL. 



Last Wednesday evening a large gathering of 
townspeople and students filled the auditorium 
of Memorial Hall to hear a recital of Shake- 
speare's tragedy of "Macbeth" by Mr. James 
Plaisted Webber. Previous to the performance 
Professor Bell delivered a short appeal to the 
students, urging them to try out for the Ivy play. 
President Sills introduced the speaker as a gradu- 
ate of this college. Class of 1900, who has de- 
voted himself to education, music, and drama. 
Mr. Webber is now teaching at Phillips Exeter 
Academy. 

Mr. Webber portrayed 12 characters in nine 
scenes, explaining the progress of the play as 
he went along. He delivered the parts with a 
fine gradation of tone which never left the 
audience in doubt as to the character speaking. 
His technical knowledge of the play was well 
shown in the scene in which Lady Macbeth in- 
cites her husband to the murder of Duncan, the 
murder scene itself, and the sleep walking scene 
of Lady Macbeth. Despite the poor acoustic ar- 
rangement of the hall, he could be heard every- 
where, and he held the undivided attention of 
his audience. The performance lasted about an 
hour. 



ROBERT HALE TO ADDRESS FORUM. 

The second meeting of the Bowdoin Student 
Forum will be held Friday, December 12, at 
eight o'clock in the Union. Robert Hale, Esquire, 
Bowdoin '10, is to address the forum on "The 
Russian Question." Mr. Hale is a Rhodes scholar 
and is well known both in this country and 
abroad. He was a delegate to the American 
Peace Commission. 

The Debating Council urges all students to 
attend this talk on so timely and interesting a 
subject presented by a man eminently qualified 
to speak on it. 



NOTED PUBLISHER TO SPEAK. 

Mr. William Webster Ellsworth, recently of 
The Century Company of New York, was inti- 
mately connected with the great men and women 
of American literature of the past 40 years. It 
is always interesting to hear what a master of 
any art or craft has to say; especially does the 
college man find this true of a publisher. 

The Saturday Club hopes all students will be 
able to accept the invitation to be present as 
guests at the Town Hall, Thursday, December 11, 
at eight o'clock. There is no admission for col- 
lege men. 



WELSH MALE CONCERT CHOIR. 

The members of the Mountain Ash Welsh 
Male Concert Choir conducted a concert Friday 
evening, December 5, in Memorial Hall. The 
choir consisted of 12 singers, the director, and 
an accompanist. The selections were all given 
in a splendid manner. Every singer was encored 
at least once. The quartets and choir work were 
especially brilliant. 

Professor F. Glyndwr Richards, the most 
famous director of Wales, conducted the concert 
in an admirable manner. A variety of kinds of 
music rounded out the program. Mr. Jenkins, 
the tenor, had a voice which claimed the atten- 
tion of every one. Mr. John Williams sang "I 
Fear No Foe," and was encored enthusiastically 
three times. An unexpected break in the pro- 
gram was made when Mr. S. Jenkins, the 
comedian of the company, entered and sang some 
lighter music that drew vigorous applause from 
all the students. The evening closed with the 
singing of the National Anthem by choir and 
audience. 



180 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Wednesday Dueing the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 
Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 

department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Roland L. McCormack, 1922 Exchange 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
Ronald B. Wadsworth, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Russell M. McGown, 192 i 
Crosby E. Redman, 192 i 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Allan W. Hall, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 

Vol. XLIX. DECEMBER 10, 1919. No. 19 

Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

The Christmas Dance. 

For the benefit of Freshmen, and at the risk 
of repeating what may have been said in the 
past, it might be well at this time to say some- 
thing concerning the college dance to be held 
in the Gym the night of the nineteenth. The im- 



portance of attending such affairs, as well as 
house parties given by your fraternity, cannot 
well be over emphasized. Attendance at such 
functions is quite as desirable as class attend- 
ance in securing the full benefits of a small 
college. 

Roughly speaking, there may be said to be 
three essential phases to the student's life, — the 
acquiring of knowledge through the courses of- 
fered, the physical training of the student 
through participation in outdoor sports, and the 
social training of the student through con- 
tact with different people on different oc- 
casions. To neglect or stint any one of these 
means the narrowing of your college life in such 
a wa}- as to lessen your chances of success in the 
future. It happens that in our colleges and uni- 
versities the pursuit of knowledge in courses is 
made compulsory, that physical training is made 
compulsory within certain variable limits, while 
the matter of social training is left largely to the 
discretion of the individual. It is this circum- 
stance which prompts us to urge on all students 
the desirability of attending as many of the col- 
lege and fraternity dances as is compatible with 
the pocketbook. 



Library Conduct. 

It is not unusual in entering libraries to see, 
in conspicuous places, cards with a single word 
printed on them — Silence. We have no such 
admonitory signs in our college library here. 
And probably we don't need them, possibly we 
do. Be that as it may, we certainly lack the 
desirable eft"ects, to produce which such an 
expedient is resorted to. As is patent, the 
library is the place where most surely of all a 
student should find quiet. Some will say that if 
a person can concentrate at all well, the amount 
of noise now common in the reference and read- 
ing rooms is not great enough to be disturbing. 
There should, however, be practically no un- 
necessary noise in the library; and we believe 
that the majority of students at one time or an- 
other find their work delayed and interrupted 
by the selfish and thoughtless talking of some- 
one else in the building. 

The noise may be only two or three exchang- 
ing friendly greetings as they meet in the 
corridor or vestibule. No one, of course, would 
object to that sort of thing if it is not carried to 
excess; but it is unfair assuredly to the rest for 
anyone to relate some lengthy piece of news, or 
to scuffle in the library. The place for social 
intercourse and for "rough-housing" is elsewhere 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



181 



than in Hubbard Hall. 

A little serious thought upon this subject from 
most of us, for it's only a minority who remember 
the rights of others at all times, is probably all 
that will be necessary to eliminate this unpleasant 
cause for loss of time to others. The matter has 
been thus far in our hands, and as believers in 
fairness to all, we should each see to it that the 
amount of disturbance at the library is appreci- 
ably lessened. If some change for the better does 
not soon take place, however, many of us, no 
doubt, will be glad to see those in charge adopt 
some means by which a state of comparative 
silence in the library may be maintained. 

C. E. R. 



COMMUNICATION. 

The Masque and Gown was very much grati- 
fied to see the large number of men who pre- 
sented themselves at the trials held last week, 
and wishes to express its appreciation for the 
interest there shown. The plan now is to utilize 
all men who are interested in dramatics and who 
have ability, in several short plays to be put on 
this winter. The men chosen for the three tenta- 
tive casts have already been announced. Ten 
of those will be given permanent positions in the 
cast of "Believe Me, Xantippe," and the other 
twenty should get good parts in the one-act plays 
mentioned above. If these plays are successful 
here in Brunswick, it is possible that they will 
be presented out of town. Other men who came 
out for the trials and were not put on the tenta- 
tive casts, will also have a chance to show what 
they can do, both in these short plays and in the 
vaudeville show, work upon which will start 
soon. 

Through the kindness and interest of the 
faculty members the club hopes to be able this 
year to lay stress upon the educational and train- 
ing side of dramatics; and give a large number 
of students profitable instruction along this line, 
by means of increasing the number of plays pro- 
duced. As the college curriculum offers no such 
opportunity, this chance to learn something about 
acquiring a good stage presence and to get 
acquainted with the inner workings of the theatre 
should be welcomed with enthusiasm. H. S. C. 



"RING OUT WILD BELLS." 

The merry Mule's Hide Season, with its Mistle- 
toe and Mush is with us once more yet ; little 
Lurline will soon be three years old, without 
knowing what sugar and eggs look like and one 
hundred and thirty years ago, on the thirty-first 



of the February preceding the two Februarys, 
after it and superseding the one before it, the 
corner stone of the Masque and Gown, one of 
the few non-profiteering organizations that sur- 
vived the late International Unpleasantness, was 
hove deeply into Mother Gravel. 

Yes, Ambrose, with a fierce blare of trumpets 
and a roll of manuscripts the greatest of Bow- 
doin indoor sports, wabbles splendorously forth, 
or third, upon its one hundred and eightieth sea- 
son. Soon, the superb private car of H. Augus- 
tus Huse, the former leading man of Carrie 
Nation and now our high-salaried director will 
thread the gleaming steel betwixt Bath and 
Brunswick, drawn by the powerful engines of 
the Maine Central. 

The call to Feets has sounded ! 

Men of the Student Corpse, last year in the 
interests of art and civilization, in the interests 
of the perpetuation of the histrionic art at the 
Cumberland Theatre we were forced to mace 
each one of Joe Bowdoin's wards for two bits. 
This year we want — not two bits, nor four bits, 
last year's manager overlooked $50, and we are 
feeling quite affluently ; no, this twelve-month we 
want the same simple and enthusiastic support 
that you gave us last year, minus the quarter. 
Let us never again put our relations on a mer- 
cenary basis ! 

If you don't care about going out after a part 
yourself send brother or sister out, or the often- 
alluded-to-room-mate, that is if you are rooming 
with a room-mate and not with a lone. And 
then, when he returns, with a few ounces of 
perspiration and a roll of manuscript, treat him 
as j-ou would a chaperon. 

See that his favorite brand is always at hand 
when he studies his lines, don't punish the 
Spearmint too loudly and above all see that he 
sips a little malted milk before retiring. It's very 
soothing for the avuncular glands. 

Dear Fellow Sufferers ! Let us work together 
side by each. The Masque and Gown kneads 
bright and happy boys and girls. We can offer 
all the advantages of a Mohammedan Home — 
sans the seraglio ! During our long and glorious 
existence no hint, no odor of tainted money has 
ever smirched the fragrance of the fair orchids 
on our Pant of Arms. Indeed, there have been 
days when there wasn't a cent, tainted or other- 
wise, in our jeans ! Throughout it all, however, 
in darkness or dawn, rainy or wet, our order has 
retained the cold, virtuous, innocent chastity of 
shredded wheat! 

Whango ex Miserosco ad Punctatutum ! R. A. 



182 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



MASQUE AND GOWN. 

This past week has seen much activity on the 
part of the Masque and Gown. The play which 
will ultimately become the Ivy Play has been 
announced as "Believe Me, Xantippe." Manager 
Cole intends to take this play on the road and 
present it several times before Ivy Week. He 
also intends to produce a vaudeville show this 
year and to present it in several near-by towns. 
In this show there will be ten acts of vaudeville 
and a one-act play entitled "The Ghost of Jerry 
JBundy." 

Trials for the parts in "Believe Me, Xantippe" 
^ere held in Memorial Hall last Thursday eve- 
ning. The judges were Professors Brown and 
Bell, and Mrs. Sills. There were about 65 candi- 
dates, 30 of whom were picked, three men being- 
chosen for each part. The purpose of three com- 
plete casts is to select the men who are abso- 
lutely the best suited for the parts. The first 
rehearsal will be held in Memorial Hall on Tues- 
day evening, December 9, at 6.35 o'clock. With 
such a pleasing play as "Believe Me, Xantippe" 
and with such a wealth of material, the Masque 
and Gown looks forward to a most successful 
season. 

The provisional cast is as follows : 
George McFarland, 

Asnault '20, Coombs '20, Scrimgeovir '20 
Arthur Sole. . Crossman '20, Crockett '20, Anderson '21 

Thornton Brown Quimby '23, Rollins '20, Dyer '23 

Buck Kamman Simpson '22, Young '21, Ridlon '21 

.Simp Calloway. .Parcher '23, Nixon '21, Dudgeon '21 
Wrenn Rigley. .Bachulus '23, Ingraham '21, Peacock '20 

William Hall '21, Gaffney '21, Philbrick '23 

Martha Boardman '21, Richan '20, Gordon '20 

Violet Reiber '21, Pendexter '21, Kirk '21 

Dolly Kamman. . . .Redman '21, Badger '21, Turgeon '23 



A TEACHERS' CONFERENCE. 

A conference of the men teachers in secondary 
.■schools of western Maine with the members of 
the Bowdoin College Faculty was held at the 
College on Saturday, December 6, 1919. There 
were 19 visitors present representing most of 
the schools in this vicinity. The Faculty Com- 
mittee on Relations with Preparatory Schools 
consisting of Dean Paul Nixon, ex-officio. Pro- 
fessor W. H. Davis, chairman, Professor F. W. 
Brown, and Assistant Professors McClean and 
JSTowlan were in charge of the conference. 
President K. C. M. Sills was the presiding officer. 
Members of the Student Council who acted as 
guides were McWilliams '20, Cleaves '20, Ellms 
'20, Mason '20, Richan '20, and Buker '21. 

The first session of the conference was held 
in the Faculty Room in Massachusetts Hall from 
11.30 A. M. to 12.45 ^- '^- Several topics were 



considered; among the most important were: the 
widening the free margin for college entrance, 
including, specifically, credit for outside Bible 
study; and the handicap of entrance conditions. 
It was announced that plans are being made for 
making possible credit for outside Bible; study. 
These plans are being developed by committees 
of the schools and colleges of the State in con- 
junction with the State Department of Educa- 
tion. Regarding the handicap of entrance con- 
ditions Dean Paul Nixon presented statistics 
covering the five years previous to the war, 
showing that of those who then entered college 
with conditions fiftj'-one per cent, failed to gradu- 
ate with their class and only four per cent, 
graduated with honors, whereas of those who 
entered without conditions only thirty-four per 
cent, failed to graduate with their class and 
twenty per cent, graduated with honors. 

Luncheon was served at one o'clock at the 
Hotel Eagle. There were thirty-seven present. 

The second session began at 2.15 and lasted 
until 4.30 p. M. Among the topics considered 
were smoking, fraternities as aids to scholar- 
ship, and the value of visits of sub-freshmen 
during the college year. Those present cordially 
approved the stand of the preparatory schools 
in opposition to smoking among the pupils. Dr. 
Whittier made a very emphatic presentation of 
the case against smoking and attendant evils on 
the part of boys and young men. The methods 
employed by the fraternities to aid scholarship 
were described to the visitors. Visits to the 
college by sub-freshmen on- other than athletic 
occasions were favored and also, in general, a 
more definite attempt to inform prospective stu- 
dents as to the intellectual work demanded in 
college. A rising vote of appreciation of the 
efforts and hospitality of the college was taken. 
In closing President Sills stated that it would be 
the policy of the college to hold similar meetings 
in the future. 



PHYSICAL TRAINING. 

The physical training courses which all classes 
take in the gymnasium during the winter months 
started Monday, December I. The course is in 
charge of Mr. E. Markthaler. The assistants 
are Brewster, Richan, Perkins, and McCurdy. 
Because of the war this is the first time in sev- 
eral years that the gymnasium classes have met 
regularly during the winter. 

A very large number of students are taking 
track work instead of the regular gymnasium 
work this winter. There are great possibilities 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



183 



among the Freshmen and, with those taking track 
regularly, tryouts are being given in search for 
material. It is with this large stock of material 
that Trainer Magee expects to develop an un- 
usually successful track team. 



CHRISTMAS DANCE. 

The Committee for the Christmas Dance has 
its arrangements well under way. Janitor Hig- 
gins will be in charge of the decorating. Each 
fraternity will be expected to decorate one booth. 
It is thought now that there will be about 200 
couples present. The favors will be leather card 
cases for the gentlemen and vanity cases for the 
ladies. The cost of the dance will be in the 
neighborhood of $6.00. Patronesses have been 
invited and the committee is looking forward to 
a most successful dance. 



FENCING. 

Eighteen men reported to Schlosberg' '20, who 
is in charge of fencing, at? the last meeting of 
the group. Three of these men must be dropped 
as Dr. Whittier has-limited the number who may 
take fencing to fifteen. Two trips will probably 
be arranged. There are few experienced men, 
but the quantity of material at hand guarantees 
that a fairly successful team should be formed. 



THE '68 SPEAKERS. 

The seniors who are to compete for the Class 
of 1868 Speaking Prize were announced last 
week by Professor Mitchell. They are 
Abbott, Asnault, Constantine, Goodhue, Mc- 
Williams, and Taylor. The date set for the con- 
test is January 22. The prize is awarded to the 
senior who both writes and delivers the best 
oration. 



WARNINGS. 

The number of major and minor warnings 
issued this year is nearly twice the number 
issued at the same time in previous years. The 
Dean has nothing to say on the matter but be- 
lieves the following figures speak for themselves : 

Year. Majors. Minors. 

Nov. 1915 28 52 

Nov. 1916 19 61 

Nov. 1919 46 88 



CERTIFICATES OF HONOR CONFERRED. 

An interesting ceremony took place in the 
college office last Wednesday afternoon when 
President Sills conferred on twelve men who 
have returned to college certificates of honor 
which were voted them last Commencement. 



Nearly all of the men whose names follow will 
receive the Bachelor's degree in June. 

The men were : W. W. Blanchard, E. M. Whit- 
comb, H. M. Springer, G. A. Safford, Jr., J. H. 
Kern, L. Leighton, Jr., J. M. Morrison, P. E. 
Doherty, C. M. Sprague", J. B. Ham, P. E. 
Graves, L. S. Gorham. 



Y. M. C. A. PUTS ON LECTURE. 

Dr. Frank N. Seerley, Dean of the Spring- 
field Y. M. C. A. College, gave a very instructive 
talk in the Union last Sunday evening under the 
auspices of the Bowdoin "Y." Dr. Seerley has 
had much experience in both peace and war times 
as an instructor in hygiene. He served during 
the war both in this country and in France. His 
subject, "Manhood," was handled frankly yet 
tactfully and was illustrated by many stories of 
his wide experiences with men and boys. After 
the lecture Dr. Seerley stated that he would be 
only too glad to meet any fellow who might care 
to discuss any subject with him. 



f)n tbe Campus 

Not long ago a request for railway mail clerks 
was posted. So many students applied that the 
notice had to be removed last week. 

The Masque and Gown issued a call for actors 
and vaudeville artists.' Shortly afterwards the 
list of men chosen in the try-outs appeared. 

All artists should at least submit a drawing for 
the Bugle. Max Ryder will receive them at the 
Delta Upsilon House. 

Peacock '20 and H. V. Davis '23 gave brief 
addresses on the "League of Nations" at the 
public meeting in the Town Court Room on last 
Saturday evening. 

Dr. Frank N. Seerley gave the Chapel ad- 
dress last Sunday. Dr. Seerley is the Dean of 
the Y. M. C. A. College at Springfield, Mass. 

Samson '17 was seen on the Campus last week. 

Rehearsals for the Masque and Gown are tak- 
ing place in Memorial Hall. Try-outs were 
started last Thursday at which a large number 
of prospective actors turned out. 

The Welsh Choir entertained a large audience 
of Bowdoin men and Brunswick people in 
Memorial Hall last Friday evening. 

"Spaghetti," well known to Bowdoin men, has 
filled the fraternity houses and dormitories with 
plaster figures and shields. 

Principals and teachers from many of Maine's 
leading preparatory schools were on the Campus 
Saturday. • 



184 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Owing to the fact that the cuts for the Foot- 
ball Number of the Orient are not yet obtain- 
able, this issue will appear at a later date than 
first announced. 

In a recent issue, it was stated that Judge L. A. 
Emery was the first pitcher of Bowdoin College 
in the notable game between the Sunrise and the 
Class of 1861 nines. Instead, the first mound 
artist representing the White was Edwin Emery 
of the Class of 1861, father of William M. 
Emery, 1889, a present overseer of the College. 

The following men are appointed assistants 
in the various courses: English, Morse '21; 
French, Smith '20; Mathematics, Tibbitts '20; 
Chemistry, Abbott '20, Lyseth '21 ; Government, 
Hatch '21 ; History, Goodrich '20, Prout '21 ; 
Spanish and German, Waltz '20; Latin, Avery 
'20; Psychology, Helson '21; Economics, Films 
'20, Bean '21. 

Mrs. George T. Files, widow of Professor 
Files, has closed her home on Maine street and 
removed to the Hotel Touraine, Boston, for the 
winter. 

Arthur T. Small '02, of Chicago, 111., was on 
the Campus Wednesday. 

On a small ice pond a short distance from the 
campus, many Bowdoin men are getting in shape 
for the coming hockey season. 

The Masque and Gown held its trials Friday 
evening, December 5, and the casts for three 
plays were selected. 

Ernest C. Fuller '17 was seen on the Caiupits 
last Wednesday. 

Before the reading of "Macbeth" in Memorial 
Hall last Wednesday evening Professor Bell 
made an appeal for new material for the Masque 
and Gown. 

The Christmas holidays begin December 2^ at 
4.30 o'clock and end at 8.20 a. m. on the 6th of 
January. 

Trials for the instrumental soloist for the 
Musical Clubs which were scheduled for last 
Wednesday afternoon were postponed because of 
the judges' failure to appear. 

Stone '17, was on the Campus recently. 

The U. Q., Freshman Honorary Society, held 
its annual initiation Saturday evening. The 
initiates were Bates, Bisson, Clark, Colburn, 
Eames, Gray, Handy, Hanscom, Hill, Mason, 
Miller, Orcutt, Palmer, A. Smith, Wing. 



mitb tfte jfacultp 

President Sills addressed the pupils _of the 
Brunswick High School on Tuesday, December 2. 

President Sills spoke at the weekly luncheon 
of the Rotary Club of Lewiston and Auburn at 
Lewiston last Frida}'. In the afternoon he at- 
tended the meeting of the committee of the 
Alumni Council in Portland, and in the evening 
he addressed the Woodfords Club of Portland. 

Professor W. H. Davis was chairman of the 
public meeting held in the Town Court Room for 
urging immediate ratification of the Peace Treaty 
last Saturday evening. President Sills and Pro- 
fessor Van Cleve spoke at the meeting. 

Professor Hormell was seen on the Campus 
Sunday. He has recently returned from a trip 
abroad. 



CicDangcs 

The Amherst Student: Amherst has good 
prospects for the coming basketball season, and 
a well balanced schedule in New England and 
New York. 

Reed College Quest: With the coming of the 
winter season Reed has turned to the drama for 
amusement and teaching, and the three plays re- 
cently staged are said to be the best ever given 
by the students. 

The Maine Campus: The "Tales of Bolivar's 
Children," recently introduced in The Maine 
Campus promises to bring out some interesting 
"inside dope" from the history of the Blue Ele- 
phant. 



aiumni JQotes 

'10 — Robert Hale, a former Rhodes scholar, 
and recentl}' a member of a mission to Finland, 
Esthonia, Latvia, and Lithuania on the situation 
in the Baltic Provinces, had his report on 
conditions in these districts presented to Con- 
gress by Senator Lodge, Sept. 22, 1919, and later 
printed as a Government document. 

'11 — Charles Boardman Hawes has been very 
successful in writing stories of adventure. A 
new tale by him, "The Son of a 'Gentleman 
Born' " is featured for the coming year in the 
Youth's Companion. 

'16 — Mr. and Mrs. Sydney M. Brown, who 
were married at the bride's home in Oxford, 
England, last summer, are now in Kearney, 
Nebraska, where Mr. Brown is teaching at 
Kearney Military Academy. 

'18 — Miss Esther Gertrude Wills and Linwood 
Harry Jones of Lewiston were married at 'Lew- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



185 



iston November 26. Miss Wills is a graduate 
of Bates in the Class of 1917. Mr. Jones, a 
member of the Chi Psi fraternity, is at present 
located in Kenville, New Jersey, where he holds 
the position of research chemist with the 
Hercules Powder Company. 



CALENDAR. 

December 11 — William Webster Ellsworth 
lecture. Town Hall, eight o'clock. 

December 12 — Student Forum, Union, eight 
o'clock. Robert Hale, Esq., on "The Russian 
Question." 

December 15- — Freshman-Sophomore debate; 
relay begins. 

December 18 — Christmas dances at the fra- 
ternity houses. 

December 19 — College Christmas dance in the 
gymnasium. 

December 22 — 4.30 p. m., Christmas recess be- 
gins. 

Januar}' 6, 1920 — 8.20 a. m., College opens. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Hall of Alpha Delta Phi: 

In the death last June at Providence, R. I., 
of Brother Henry Melville King of the Class of 
1859, the Bowdoin Chapter of Alpha Delta Phi 
has lost one of its oldest and most prominent 
alumni. 

Brother King was an earnest and faithful 
member of the Fraternity during his under- 
graduate days, and loyal throughout life to its 
spirit and traditions. For over a half century 
he was a potent force in the Baptist ministry. 
His unselfish, unswerving devotion won for him 
the respect and confidence of all who knew him. 
It is voted that this acknowledgement of the 
loss to the Fraternity, and of sincere sympathy 
with his family in their bereavement be spread 
upon the records of the Bowdoin Chapter, and 
transmitted to the family of our departed brother. 

Stanley Meacham Gordon, 

Oliver Moses, 3RD, 

Leslie Boulter Heeney, 

For the Chapter. 

LIFE, ACCIDENT and HEALTH 
INSURANCE 

SETH G. HALEY '07 
64 Pearl St. Hartford, Ct. 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSON'S PHARMACY 

CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 

CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 

4 Elm Street 

HARVARD DENTAL SCHOOL 

A Department of Harvard University 

Graduates of secondary schools admitted without ex- 
amination provided they have taken required subjects. 
Modern buildings and equipment. Fall term opens 
September 22, 1919. Degree of D.M.D. Catalog. 
EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D., Dean, Boston, Mass. 



DANCING 

Miss Jennie S. Harvey's Evening Dancing 
Class and Assembly every Tuesday evening at 
Town Hall, Brunswick, commencing Oct. 21st. 

Lesson 7.30 p. m. Assembly 8.30 p. m. 

This class is open to college students. 

Private instruction by appointment. 

Monday evening Class and Assembly at Arm- 
ory Hall, Bath. 

Address 897 Middle St., Bath, Maine. 'Phone 
151-W. 



Have You Paid Your Subscription? 



MESERVE'S FRUIT SHERBET 

The Blended Product of the Natural Juices of 
Sound Ripe Fruit and Berries. A Delicious and 
Healthful Beverage for Receptions, Teas and 
Parties. Prepared only by 

P. J. MESERVE, Pharmacist, 
Near Post Office, Brunswick, Maine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

"UNION" LUNCH 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 
Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 
FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 

We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street 

Branch Store — 2 Gushing St.- 



Tel. 136-137 
-Tel. 16. 



WE CARRY 

Co-operative Shoes 
New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 
LARGEST AND BEST 

Stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



FALL STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

John A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 
A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office - - - Brunswick, Maine 

BUTLER'S 

Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 

TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 

BATH, MAINE 

J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The Bowdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 



WILLIAM F. FERRIS 



Portland 


COLLEGE AGENT 


ANTIQIVTY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

mn jFutntturr, flDIti Cfiina, ©etotfr, (Etc. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 


Citizens Laundry 

AUTO SERVICE 9 SOUTH APPLETON 


to orders for antique goods of any kind 


Telephone 160 


COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 


FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 




BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short Notice by competent work- 
men. , We use only the Best 
ol Leather. 
E. WHITTOM 


Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
J. G. PAGE COMPANY, Bath 



White Round Neck Sweaters 

IN STOCK 
We can deliver at once 

Give your order to Jack Handy *23, 
Zeta Psi House or phone us and re- 
verse charge. 




PORTLAND, 



MAINE 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

VIVIAN MARTIN 

AN INNOCENT ADVENTURESS 




FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

TOM MIX 

A ROUGH RIDING ROMANCE 



NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

MARGUERITE CLARK 

IN 

GIRLS 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 

IN 

CHEATING CHEATERS 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

HALE HAMILTON 

IN 

THE FOUR FLUSHER 



NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

MARY MACLAREN 

IN 

THE UNPAINTED WOMAN 



VoLXLIX. No. 20 



DECEMBER 17, 1919 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



^i — 

CONTENTS 




PA.GE PAGE 


Meeting of Track Coaches in 




Bowdoin Supports League 189 


Waterville 


187 


Dr. Hatch's History of Maine 189 


Track Notes 


187 


Editorial: 


Publication of Eickard's Book 


187 


The Peace Treaty Referendum 190 


Saturday Club Lecture 


187 


Rickard's Work 191 


Robert Hale Addresses Forum 


188 


On the Campus 191 


Masque and Gown 


188 


With the Faculty 192 


Announcement 


188 


Alumni Notes 192 


The Des Moines Drive 


188 


Calendar 194 


Dr. Seerley's Second Lecture 


188 


Treasurer's Report 194 


Figures That Talk 


188 


Assignments of Events for Track 


Smoking at Bowdoin 


189 


Squad 194 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys ^^Back Here^^ know JUD is in the game. 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



PRINTING 



OF QUALITY 

"WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWM BOILDING BRUNSWICK 



The College Book Store 

We wish to call your 
attention to our new 

FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

in a large man size pa- 
per. 

The stock is the well known 
OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

The price is $ 1 .00 per box 
F. W. CHANDLER & SON 



COLLEGE AND "PREP" SCHOOL MEN 

Clothing for Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 




ercoats and Ulsters. 



Hats 



Haberdashery 

Macullar Parker Company 



400 Washington St. 



Boston, Mass. 



THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT" 



Give the dainty touch to 
your Christmas Gifts 

Send her andt Her and HER: 



'-ampler \ 



A quaint original box on the 
outside. Superfine choco- 
lates and confections inside. 

FOR SALE AT 
ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



EVENING CLOTHES 

Designed and tailored es- 
pecially for us by 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 

CORRECT DRESS 
FURNISHINGS 

Haskell & Jones Co. 



MEN'S SILK HOSE 

85c, $1.00, $1.50 



E. S. BODWELL & SON, 

Brunswick. 



Greenhouse 21-W 
Residence 21-R 



Portland, 



Maine. 




BERWICK- 2;^ i 
•& GORDON- 2/4 ill. 

Arrow 

3-««5SfCOLLARS 

aim cut tojit shoiMas perfectly. 

CLUETT PEABODY & CO \ WiCD^lakers 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 



WALTER 
F- 1- 


L. 

R 


LaROCK 
1 S T 


Potted Plants 
Floral Designs 


and Cut Flowers 
for All Occasions 

\5% Jordan Avenue 



Christmas Cards 5c to 50c 

Fancy Box Paper 50c to $3.00 

Manicure Rolls 

$2.00 to $20.00 

Ladies' and Gents' Purses 

$1.25 to $7.00 

Courson & Morton 

80 MAINE ST. .The Bowling Alley is next door 



BOWDOIN ORILNT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK. MAINE, DECEMBER 17, 1919 



NO. 20 



MEETING OF TRACK COACHES IN 
WATERVILLE. 

The track coaches and trainers of the four 
Maine colleges, John Magee of Bowdoin, Smith 
of Bates, Ryan of Colby, and Ryder of Maine, 
met in Waterville last Saturday to discuss the 
track events for the following winter and spring. 
At this meeting Coach Ryder of Maine proposed 
that the four Maine colleges form a nucleus for 
an intercollegiate meet to be held at Portland. 
Ryan stated, however, that Colby hadn't the 
facilities for track this year as its board tracks 
was broken up while the S.A.T.C. was there ; so 
that institution would probably have no team. 
The other three coaches entirely opposed this 
proposition' of a Maine Amateur Athletic Union 
as they felt that it had nothing in common with 
college athletics. Coach Magee thought it would 
be impractical to run the four colleges in so many 
scratch races on a small wooden track with bad 
corners which furnish a great element of danger 
to his men. He felt absolutely satisfied that the 
competition he gives his men in the various meets 
during the winter in the Bowdoin gym are 
sufficient. The strain on the men would be too 
great if they were entered in so many meets, 
since they need to be rested during the winter. 
The only exception is the usual relay race which 
includes a small squad of sprinters. 



TRACK NOTES. 

Relay practise will begin Monday, December 
15. The Freshman team will be picked shortly. 
This year the Freshman Relay Team, in addition 
to the usual race with the Sophmores, will run 
the Bates Freshmen twice, once in Lewiston and 
once here. 

Manager Buker was in Waterville one day 
last week where he met the managers from the 
other colleges of the State. The purpose of the 
meeting was to discuss the feasibility of an Inter- 
collegiate Indoor Track Meet. 

Coach Magee reports that an unusually large 
track squad has turned out this year. During 
the first week the men were allowed to work out 
their own events but Jack and Dostie have now 
grouped them in the events to which they are 



best fitted. This week the men will begin to 
work on the assigned groups. The Sophomore 
and Freshmen gym classes have been combed by 
Dr. Whittier and Coach Magee for any material 
that might be placed on the varsity squad. A 
Sophomore and a Freshman division of the gym 
classes have been formed which meet respective- 
ly at four o'clock and twelve on Monday, Wed- 
nesday and Thursday, of each week. Thirty-two 
Freshmen have already been selected for the 
varsity squad and many look like good ma- 
terial. 

Coaches Magee and Smith discussed the possi- 
bilities of a dual indoor track meet at Bowdoin 
sometime in February. They favored this 
measure as furnishing the necessary competition 
for the men. The matter will be taken up later 
at a meeting of the Athletic Council when it is 
expected that the proposition will be accepted. 

Coach Magee states that Bowdoin has been 
invited to run Brown, Amherst, Wesleyan, or 
Williams. 



PUBLICATION OF RICKARD'S BOOK. 

The press of Thomas Bird Mosher of Port- 
land, long noted for beautiful editions of unusual 
books, has just issued "Songs with Tears," a 
volume of prose and verse by Lieutenant Forbes 
Rickard, Jr., '17, who was killed in action July 
19, 1918. The title is from a line in his class 
poem. The volume contains a sketch by Mrs. 
Forbes Rickard the "mother" of the letters in- 
cluded and compiler of the volume; an apprecia- 
tion by Mary Cowell Ham (Mrs. Roscoe Ham) ; 
and several tributes in verse, by Lloyd O. Colter 
'19; R. R. Greenwood of Worcester, Mass.; T. 
A. Rickard, editor of the Mining and Scientific 
Press of San Francisco; and H. S. White '17. 
The book which is distinctly a product of Bow- 
doin is reviewed elsewhere in these columns by 
President Sills. The edition will be on sale at 
Chandler's Book Store. 



SATURDAY CLUB LECTURE. 

Mr. William Russell Ellsworth spoke last 
Thursday evening in the Town hall on "Forty 
Years of Publishing." An invitation was ex- 
tended to all the students of the College by the 



188 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Saturday Club which arranged the lecture. The 
audience was not very large but was very ap- 
preciative. 

Mr. Ellsworth was connected with the Century 
Publishing Company for many years. Among his 
acquaintances were numbered many of the great- 
est literary men of the time. His personal 
reminiscences of such men as Longfellow, Lowell, 
Walt Whitman, Thoreau, Bret Harte, Kipling, 
Jefferson, and General Grant, told as they were 
with a charming personal flavor, were most de- 
lightful. His story of the making of a book was 
interesting. The thanks of the Student Body is 
due the Saturday Club for the excellent lecture. 



ROBERT HALE ADDRESSES FORUM. 

The Bowdoin Student Forum held its second 
meeting of the college year, Friday evening, De- 
cember 12, in the Union. Robert Hale, Bowdoin 
'id, very ably discussed the "Russian Question." 
Mr. Hale, a former Rhodes scholar, was sent 
with the American peace delegation to Russia 
as special legal advisor where he learned a great 
deal concerning the turmoil in that country. 

Mr. Hale's lecture dealt with the development 
of Bolshevism to its world menacing position to- 
day. He explained in detail the attitudes taken 
by the Allied Powers, in the peace conference, 
and separately. Finally he put the question, 
"What shall we do about Russia?" before the 
forum. At the close of his lecture he answered 
many questions asked by his audience and suc- 
ceeded in clearing up many troublesome points 
of the perplexing question. 



MASQUE AND GOWN. 

The final cast of the Ivy play will be chosen 
Monday night, December 15, from the three 
casts chosen last week. The same judges who 
selected these casts will probably select the final 
cast with the aid of Mr. Huse, the coach. 

Since a trip to Massachusetts is planned for 
the last part of January, the elimination has to 
be made now. Several rehearsals have been held, 
and Mr. Huse reports good progress. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 

The Masque and Gown, realizing the lack of 
entertainment provided for the guests on next 
Friday afternoon, announces an entertainment 
and tea at the Union from 3.30 to 5.30. Two short 
plays will be given, and there will be music by 
the College orchestra. Mrs. Sills, Mrs. Burnett, 
and Miss Anna Smith will pour. A fee of 25 
cents will be charged to cover expenses. 



THE DES MOINES DRIVE. 

The drive to send delegates to Des Moines, 
Iowa, to attend the Y. M. C. A. Convention in 
that city was conducted throughout the College 
last Friday. A small card proclaiming the 
wearer a subscriber to the cause was given with 
every subscription. Fraternities, faculty, in fact, 
every one on the campus received the attention 
of the canvassers. The reply of the College was 
so generous that on the close of the drive that 
evening, the collection amounted to over one 
hundred and seventy-five dollars. This added to 
the sum already received from churches and the 
Y. M. C. A. will make it possible to send Bow- 
doin's full quota of six delegates to the con- 
vention. 

The men to go to Des Moines are : Noss '20, 
Buker '21, Cummings '21, Reiber '21, and Cong- 
don '22, as student delegates, and McGown '21, 
as general secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 



DR. SEERLEY'S SECOND LECTURE. 

In the Union Monday evening, December 8, 
Frank N. Seerley, dean of the Springfield Y. M. 
C. A. College, gave an interesting and highly ap- 
preciated lecture on "Womanhood." Dr. Seerley, 
who visited Bowdoin under the auspices of the 
Y. M. C. A. at the College, is well fitted to lecture 
on his chosen subject. For two years he was in 
France as general supervisor of the athletic de- 
partment of the A. E. F. This and many other 
episodes of his varied life has enabled him to 
accumulate a large and unusual stock of stories 
which he used to great advantage in his lecture. 

Dr. Seerley's lecture of the preceding evening 
had evidently placed him high in the estimation 
of the students, for before quarter past seven 
every available seat in the Union was occupied. 
Dr. Seerley adopted a paternal attitude which 
gave his lecture the atmosphere which such a 
heart to heart talk called for. The lecture 
claimed the closest attention of everyone and re- 
ceived generous applause from the students. Fol- 
lowing the lecture. Dr. Seerley expressed his de- 
sire to meet and talk to personally any man who 
could be aided by his advice. 



FIGURES THAT TALK. 

The percentage of students with conditions 
who graduated during the last five years — 49%. 

The percentage of students without conditions 
who graduated during the last five years — 66%. 

The percentage of students with conditions 
who graduated with honors — 4%. 

The percentage of students without conditions 
who graduated with honors — 20%. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



SMOKING AT BOWDOIN. 

Aside from the comparative strength of the 
various men and classes in college, other in- 
teresting results are to be found on perusal of 
the physical examination reports. For instance, 
in the two lower classes, 92 men say that they 
have never smoked. This number has more 
significance when it is noted that there were but 
237 men in the two under classes who were ex- 
amined. It means that one-third of the lower 
classmen do not smoke. 

Of the men who smoke, the majority "light 
up" from five to ten times a day. Eleven smoke 
more than fifteen times a day. A review of the 
favorite brands would no doubt be interesting. 
Included in the number of men who smoke are 
forty-one who make use of the "makin's" oc- 
casionally. That is, they smoke on special oc- 
casions ; to show their girls how it ought to be 
done or to prove that they are "reg'lar, college 
fellers." Those who smoke from two to five 
"times a day number thirty-three. Sixteen men 
smoke from ten to fifteen times a day. 

Two men have admitted that they started in to 
iise tobacco when they were ten years old. Evi- 
dently, the age of twelve was a tender and 
•obedient age for none will admit that he began 
the practice at that time. Two more fellows 
indulged when they were thirteen years old. 
At the age of fourteen, three more became users 
of nicotine. The number of users of tobacco 
took a decided jump in the 15-year-old column, 
for here eight names were found. 

At the age of sixteen, the figures took a de- 
cided jump. Fourteen men say that they have 
smoked since they were sixteen years old. The 
peak was reached at the age of seventeen when 
thirty-four men began smoking. 

The number of men starting to smoke dwindles 
from the age of seventeen. At eighteen years 
hut fifteen began their use of "the weed." The 
next year the number dropped one and at the 
Age of twenty six men lit their first cigarette. 



Nations shall not be lost to the United States." 
Professor Davis presided. The principal 
speakers were Judge Joseph H. Rousseau of the 
local Municipal Court, President Kenneth C. M. 
Sills of Bowdoin and the following discharged 
officers of theoverseas forces: • Professor Van 
Cleve, Davis and Peacock of Bowdoin. The 
lesolution presented by Professor Bell follows: 
"We, residents and voters of the town of 
Brunswick, Me., a number of whom have served 
in the armed forces of the United States during 
the war for the establishment of international 
justice and for the avoidance of future wars, be- 
lieving that our aims will not have been fulfilled 
and that the cause for which so many of our 
countrymen died will not have been achieved 
without the establishment of the League of Na- 
tions, and believing that the general principles 
contained in the proposed covenant and treaty are 
^air, protest the recent rejection thereof in the 
Uhited States Senate, and petition that honorable 
body to reconsider its action and ratify the 
covenant and treaty in such wise that the im- 
mediate and full effect of membership in the 
League of Nations shall not be lost to the United 
States." 



BOWDOIN SUPPORTS LEAGUE. 

Members of the faculty and undergraduates of 
Bowdoin College joined some of the townspeople 
here in a non-partisan meeting at the Court 
Room Saturday night to protest the failure of 
the Senate to pass the peace treaty. 

The meeting adopted and sent to the two Maine 
Senators, Bert M. Fernald and Frederick Hale, 
a resolution urging the immediate ratification of 
the covenant and the treaty "in such wise that 
the full effect of membership in the League of 



DR. HATCH'S HISTORY OF MAINE. 

The library received last week its most re- 
markable acquisition in several months. This is 
the "History of Maine" in three volumes, by 
Louis Clinton Hatch, Ph.D. Dr. Hatch was a 
graduate of Bowdoin '95 and stood high in rank 
at college. Because of poor health he has de- 
voted his time since graduation to history, al- 
ready having published a history of the American 
army during the Revolution. This history of 
Maine may well be termed the life work of Dr. 
Hatch for he has thought and written on it for 
over twenty years in order to complete it for 
next year's Maine centennial. 

The history is enclosed in three large volumes 
containing many interesting illustrations. It 
deals with nearly every possible phase of Maine 
life, including large sections on government, re- 
ligion, industry, education, great men, commerce 
and literature. Professor Mitchell of Bowdoin 
contributed a large section dealing with educa- 
tion. This section and many others contains 
illustrations dealing with Bowdoin and Bowdoin 
men. On the whole the history is a work of 
which the college may be justly proud. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Wednesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 

Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman- W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 

department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Roland L. McCormack, 1922 , Exchange 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
Ronald B. Wadsworth, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921- 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Allan W. Hall, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 192 i Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 

Vol. XLIX. DECEMBER 17, 1919. No. 20 

Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

The Peace Treaty Referendum. 

At the chapel exercises last Thursday morn- 
ing, President Sills read excerpts from a tele- 
gram, received from the heads of four of the 
leading college papers of the country and ap- 



proved by the Presidents of the four colleges 
represented, Columbia, Princeton, Harvard and 
Yale, in which a referendum of college sentiment 
concerning the Peace Treaty is asked. It is pro- 
posed that on the 13th of January such a refer- 
endum be conducted in all the colleges throughout 
the country in order to ascertain the feeling of 
the student bodies and faculties on this vital 
question. This is only one phase of a movement 
under way in this country to ascertain whether 
the Senate represented public opinion in turning 
down the Peace Treaty last session. The whole 
question is of most vital importance to every 
college man as the success or failure of the 
Senate in passing the Treaty in some form or 
other at this session will be a powerful influence 
in shaping the social, economic and political 
future of the United States. 

It is asked that every member of the student 
body and faculty vote yes on one of the four 
following propositions: (i) Do you favor the 
ratification of the League and Treaty without 
amendments and reservations? (2) Do you op- 
pose the ratification of the League and Treaty 
in any form? (3) Do you favor the Treaty and 
the League but only with specific reservations as 
voted by the majority of the Senate? (4) Do 
you favor any compromise on the reservations 
which will make possible immediate ratification 
of the Treaty and the League? 

The meaning of the first two of these propo- 
sitions should be perfectly clear to anyone. It is 
here a question of the unqualified acceptance or 
rejection of the Treaty. To vote yes on number 
three would be to accept the Treaty with- the 
reservations which the Senate adopted. Some 
consider these reservations as necessary to pro- 
tect the interests of the United States while 
others look on them as unnecessary and indirect- 
ly nullifying the Treaty and the League. A gen- 
eral acquaintance with these reservations is 
necessary to an intelligent vote on this proposi- 
tion. Proposition four will appeal to those who 
are strongly in favor of ratification but who 
would prefer to see moderate reservations. 

It will be impossible to present to the students 
the different points of view through the columns 
of the Orient. It is necessarily left to each 
student to avail himself of his present knowledge 
and what he may acquire in the next few weeks 
on the subject in the formation of his opinion. 
The influence which this expression of opinion 
by the colleges of the country' will have cannot 
be overestimated. It is therefore quite necessary 
that a large vote be polled and that every student 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



191 



as far as possible cast an independent vote, un- 
influenced by political faith or what others be- 
lieve. To stimulate the free thinking' which is 
necessary to this, group discussion should be in- 
dulged in whenever possible and papers and 
magazines should be more widely read, especially 
with the view of ascertaining actual facts and 
weighing editorial opinion. This is a good time 
to acquire the habit of reading the daily paper for 
something more than the sporting news. 



RIGKARD'S WORK 

When one is inclined to wonder if in the 
present generation of undergraduates there is as 
much interest in the finer things of college life, 
in literature and poetry and ideas and friendship 
as in the past, there comes this beautiful book 
to give reassurance and hope to the belief that . 
the college still nurtures and breeds men whcK^ 
in aim and in expression are poets. For it is 
fair to judge each generation by the best that it 
produces, not by the average nor by the indif- 
ference of the many. No book brought forth 
under Bowdoin -auspices for manj^ a 3-ear has 
more in it to stir the heart than these selections 
from one of the noblest of her younger sons. 
In the poems and the essays and letters there are 
many lines and passages that could not have 
been written had not the author been deeply and 
soundly versed in the best traditions of the col- 
lege. And it is no exaggeration to say that this 
record of the thought and emotions of a youth 
of twenty-one is the best possible test of the 
kind of education Bowdoin gives and worth far 
more than athletic victories, academic distinction 
or generous gifts. For the college deals at all 
times with the things of the spirit. No Bowdoin 
man would be averse to having his college judged 
in literary or academic circles of the highest 
and most rigid standards by this small choice 
volume. The whole book in its composition and 
arrangement and make-up is exquisite, and the 
best memorial we could wish, not only for its 
gallant young author who now has his little cross 
at Juilly (Seine et Marne) but for his other 
comrades from Bowdoin who also lie beneath the 
flaming poppies. The prelude b}- his mother, the 
appreciation exquisitely phrased and tenderly re- 
strained by one here who knew him well, the 
verse tributes from his comrades and classmates 
— all these give the proper setting for the poems 
and prose that set forth the man himself. I 
doubt if in the long history of the college there 
has ever been a class poem equal in beauty and 
pathos to that delivered here by Rickard June 



21, 1917; and certainly no letters from the front 
have moved one more than his. For those who 
doubt and scoff at the appealing and uplifting- 
power of poetry and religion one has only to re- 
call that this boy whom we knew so well, at the 
front read from "the little black leather covered 
prayer book by way of observing the Sabbath" 
and found there "a bulwark to keep one's faith 
in a good world" and assurance that we can in 
life and thoughts try to be Christian even without 
the opportunity of church going — and also that 
in his final march he wrote of leaving all sorts, 
of practical equipment "but the Oxford book I 
still have with me." 

The publication of this book is a landmark in 
the literary life of Bowdoin; and though by its 
very intimate nature it must make its greatest 
appeal to those who knew and loved Rickard, the- 
college is deeply grateful to the compiler for 
putting into permanent and beautiful form some- 
thing that will help us all to catch "a moment 
that in its aspiration and beauty can seal the later 
days and make them sure." 



Dn tDe Campus 

Ray Swift '17 was seen on the Campus Wed- 
nesday of last week. 

F. Arnold Burton '07 of Boston was in town 
last week. 

The date for the Sophomore Hop has been set 
for February 20. 

Dr. Seerley of the Springfield Y. M. C. A. 
College delivered his second lecture in the Union 
last Tuesday evening. 

Mr. John S. Crowley and Mr. Clarence H. 
Lunt of the Beverley Men's Singing Club were 
on the Campus last Thursday. They were much 
pleased with the rehearsal of the Glee Club which 
they attended. There is a possibility that the 
Beverl}' Club will have a concert here this year. 

The condition of the walks has been very bad 
this last week. The ice covered with a thin coat- 
ing of snow was very treacherous. 

The usual regulations regarding men leaving 
college early will be in force this vacation. 

Trials for instrumental soloist for the Musical 
Clubs were held last Monday. There were four 
candidates. Trials for the reader were also held 
last week. 

The first Masque and Gown rehearshal was. 
held last Tuesday evening in Memorial Hall. The ' 
coach, Gus Huse, put some of the men through 
preliminary work. 

Last Friday was tag-day for the Y. The pur- 



192 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



pose was to raise money to send delegates to the 
Des Moines Convention. 

The College has recently purchased Professor 
Johnson's rare collection of Ancient Greek and 
Roman coins. These coins will be on view in 
the Walker Art Museum. 

Many Bowdoin men attended the lecture in 
the Town Hall last Thursday evening. Mr. Wil- 
liam Ellsworth, who has been forty years with 
the Century Company, gave many sidelights on 
the business of publishing. 

Many students were seen wearing tags last 
Friday as a result of the Des Moines drive. 

Students unable to get home before six o'clock 
at night, December 24, are excused from classes 
Tuesday, December 23, in order to make this 
possible. 

The tickets for the Christmas dance were on 
sale in the Union last Friday afternoon. They 
may also be procured from the members of the 
committee. 

Once more the campus is covered with snow 
and ice. 

A snappy relay race is being run daily by the 
track squad. Much good material is developing. 

It will be impossible to run a Football Number 
of the Orient till the picture of the varsity team 
and captain-elect are available. Unfortunately 
these pictures have not yet been taken. 

"A group of Bowdoin College students playing 
under the name of the Brunswick Town Team 
was defeated 36 to 30 by the Livermore Falls 
basketball team Friday evening. The members 
of the Bowdoin team were McCurdy, Perry, 
Walker, Mason, Marston and Dahlgren. Now 
the Brunswick boys are planning to organize a 
team to play in nearby towns under the name 
of Bowdoin College, the local boys claiming that 
they have as much right to use the name of Bow- 
doin as the students have to use the name of 
J3runswick." — Bnmsivick Record. 



^iti) tbe jFacultp 

Professor Mitchell preached at the Williston 
Church, Portland, Sunday, December 7. Pro- 
fessor Mitchell was the guest of Judge and Mrs. 
George F. Gould of Portland for the week end. 

Professor Mitchell spoke on Longfellow to the 
pupils at Goodwill Farm last Saturday evening. 

Professor Burnett and family on Thurs- 
day moved into their new residence, cor- 
ner Maine and Page streets. This house, the 
former Martin residence, has been thoroughly 
renovated and many improvements have been 
made in its appearance both inside and out since 



it was purchased by Professor Burnett last 
spring. 

Professor Gross, who is on leave of absence 
in Boston, will be back next semester. 

Mr. Furbish was in Boston several days on 
business. 

The Library has just received two pamphlets 
by Professor Copeland. The first of these, re- 
printed from The Journal of Experimental 
Zoology of February i, 1918, is entitled "The 
Olfactory Reactions and Organs of the Marine 
Snails Alectrion Obsoleta (Say) and Busycon 
Canaliculatum (Linn.)." The second, "Locomo- 
tion in two Species of the Gastropod Genus 
Alectrion with Observations on the Behavior of 
Pedal Cilia," has been reprinted from the Bio- 
logical Bulletin of August 2, 1919. 

Professor Elliott contributes to the Nation of 
December 6, an article on the "Neighborliness 
of Robert Frost." 

Last Saturday Dean Nixon attended a meeting 
of the superintendents of schools at Augusta. 

The Classical Club held a meeting Tuesday 
evening, December 16, at eight o'clock, at the 
home of Dean Nixon. 

A visitor well known to Bowdoin men was 
on the Campus Sunday, December 7, in the per- 
son of Professor Orren C. Hormell. Professor 
Hormell has been for several years the professor 
of government and history at the College, but 
is now on a year's leave of absence. While away 
from Bowdoin Professor Hormell has been con- 
ducting a course in Municipal Finance at Har- 
vard University during the present semester. 
During his visit he saw a great many of his old 
friends both of the Faculty and of the Student 
Body. 



aiumni jQote0 

The Orient desires to be of the greatest possi- 
ble service to Alumni in keeping them informed 
of one another's activities. Alumni are earnestly 
requested to support the Orient in this work by 
sending items about themselves or their brother 
Alumni. Communications should be addressed to 
the Alumni Editor. 



'56 — At a meeting of the Yale Corporation on 
November 17, a resolution was adopted express- 
ing the sentiment of his associates toward the 
Rev. Dr. Edwin Pond Parker of Hartford, Conn., 
who retired at the October meeting. The resolu- 
tion in part is as follows: "The Yale Corpor- 
ation desires to record its appreciation of the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



193 



service which he (Dr. Parker) has rendered to 
the University through twenty-four years. To 
his fidelity and enthusiasm and wisdom we are 
all indebted. Among those who by their clarity 
of vision and sanity of judgment, and nobility of 
spirit, have co-operated in the building of Yale, 
Dr. Parker will hold an enduring place." Dr. 
Parker was born in Castine, January 13, 1836, 
graduated from the Bangor Theological Semi- 
nary in 1859, ^nd received the degree of Doctor 
■ of Divinity from Yale in 1875. For more than 
fifty years (1860-1912) he was pastor of the 
Second Congregational Church in Hartford. In 
189s he was appointed a Fellow by Yale Univer- 
sity, the position from which he has just re- 
tired. 

'69 — One of the oldest writers of boys' stories 
for the Youth's Companion, Charles Asbury, is 
going to contribute next year a serial story en- 
titled "A Flight from Petrograd." 

'74 — In the Boston Herald of November 30, 
the following mention of the new portrait of 
President Samuel \^alentine Cole of Wheaton, by 
Alfred E. Smith, was made : "It is what one 
calls a "straight" portrait, with stress upon like- 
ness, and dignified, unobtrusive treatment of the 
clothes and other accessories. It reveals a per- 
sonality ; the alert college administrator, foe of 
"Bolshevik professors." There was also a copy 
of the portrait printed in the Herald. This por- 
trait was mentioned in the November 4 issue of 
the Orient. 

Medic ex-'79 — Dr. Charles Wesley Pillsbury 
died in Saco, Maine, December 3, after an illness 
of seven months. He was born in Scarboro, 
Maine, June 30, 185 1 ; went to the Bowdoin Medi- 
cal School for two years, and then transferred to 
Dartmouth, where he received his M.D. in 1881. 
Ever since that time he has practiced medicine 
in Saco. 

Medic-'84 — Dr. George Adams Barker died 
very suddenly of acute dilation of the heart, No- 
vember 17, at his home in Menomonie, Wiscon- 
sin. He was born in Naples, Maine, May 8, 1855. 
From 1884 to 1901 he practiced medicine in Shell 
Lake, Wisconsin, and then moved to Menomonie, 
where he remained until his death. He was a 
prominent member of the Masonic order. 

'85 — In the September 25 issue of Copeia, a 
biological pamphlet published in New York, and 
dealing only with cold-blooded vertebrates, Wil- 
liam C. Kendall '85 reported the second authen- 
tic record of the appearance of capelin on the 
Maine coast (at Winterport). Again in the No- 
vember 20 issue, Mr. Kendall described a speci- 
men of Scotch sea trout which had been caught 



in the tidal portion of the Penobscot River. 

'87— Freeman D. Dearth of Dexter, one of the 
three State senators from Penobscot County 
serving on the Judiciary Committee, has been 
nominated by Governor Milliken as reporter of 
decisions of the Supreme Judicial Court. He 
was a member of the House of Representatives 
in 1917. 

'92 — Dr. Ernest B. Young has been appointed 
surgeon-in-chief of one of the services in the 
Boston City Hospital— a well deserved recog- 
nition of his years of service in that institution. 

'94— Rev. Norman McKinnon, pastor of the 
Congregational Church at Franklin, Mass., died 
December 7, 1919, at White Plains, New York. 
He was born at Kilmarnock, Scotland, October 
6, 1862. He received an S.T.B. degree from Har- 
vard in 1896. Since then he has been a pastor 
in a number of dififerent places, at St. Johns, 
New Brunswick; Foxcroft, Augusta, Me.; Clif- 
tonboro, and Middleboro, Mass. He came to the 
last named place in 1907, and remained there for 
six years until 19 13, when he went to Utica, N. Y. 
He stayed at that place until last September 
when he received his call to Franklin. He was 
able to preach only one sermon in his last 
pastorate, before he was taken ill and had to go 
to a sanitarium. 

'97— The Rev. Hugh McCallum announced 
his resignation as pastor of the First Church of 
Christ (Congregational) of Simsbury, Conn., No- 
vember 23. He has been there for nine years, 
coming from Walpole, Mass. He has already 
accepted a call to become pastor of the First 
Congregational Church of Everett, Mass., where 
he will begin his duties January i, 1920. 

'01 — Henry D. Evans has resigned as chemist 
at the State Department of Health in Augusta 
to become chief chemist at the plant of the Bates 
Manufacturing Company in Lewiston. Mr. 
Evans has served as State chemist since 1902, 
a year aftfer his graduation from Bowdoin Col- 
lege. Since 1912 he has been on the faculty of 
the Bowdoin Medical School. 

'04 — Final returns in the recent New York 
elections, in which John W. Frost of Brooklyn, 
N. Y., ran for a district judgeship on the 
Republican ticket in a Democratic strong- 
hold, shows that he made a remarkable showing 
in the face of certain defeat. The ofiScial tabu- 
lation gave Mr. Frost 13,313 votes and his Demo- 
cratic opponent 22,210. Mr. Frost received over 
four thousand votes more than the normal Re- 
publican figures in the district. He has recently 
returned from service overseas, where he was a 
captain who was cited for gallantry in action. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



'05 — Edwin L. Harvey is at present handling 
the pubHcity concerning the National Security 
League propaganda of Americanization to com- 
bat Bolshevism and other un-American influences. 
He is the acting executive secretary of the 
league, and he has been handling this work for 
two years and a half. He has directed the 
league's various "Win-the-War" campaigns. One 
newspaper states that he has spread the fame 
of the organization over the world. Before he 
took up this work, Mr. Harvey was assistant to 
the Hon. Robert Woolley, now Interstate Com- 
merce Commissioner, when the latter was di- 
rector of publicity of the Democratic National 
Committee. 

'06 — An address recently delivered in New 
Haven by Dr. Melvin T. Copeland, professor of 
marketing and director of the Bureau of Busi- 
ness Research at Harvard University, is the sub- 
ject of extensive and favorable editorial com- 
ment in The Review of November 29. 

'08 — Sturgis E. Leavitt, Ph.D., has been in the 
consulate of the United States at Santiago, Chili, 
since last June, where he is to stay for fifteen 
months. His duty is to write a bibliography of 
South American literature. 

'10 — Miss Edmee Marie Franqoise Baud and 
Winston Bryant Stephens were married in New 
York City, November 20, 1919. 

ex-'io — Henry Lowell Russell was married 
November 29 to Miss Anna Louise Lehane of 
Salem, Mass. 

'13 — The engagement of Miss Marguerite 
Wood of Cambridge, Mass., and Earl Blanchard 
Tuttle of Westbrook, has recently been an- 
nounced. 

'17 — Harvey D. Miller is an instructor in Ban- 
gor High School. 

'18 — In the magazine section of the Leiviston 
Journal of November 22, is a series of most 
graphic letters with pictures by Ensign Albert 
Laurence Prosser, who was with the LT.S.S. 
Cowell of the Adriatic fleet at the time of the 
early troubles in Dalmatia. He says that "the 
armed forces which landed at Trau, Dalmatia, 
were sailors from the 'Cowell,' and that he was 
one of the two officers in command, and that 
they had no occasion to fire upon the Italians." 

'19 — Wilfred P. Racine has gone to East 
Akron, Ohio, where he will learn the business 
from one of the largest automobile tire manufac- 
turers in the country. 

Ex-'20 — Lawrence McElwell visited friends at 
Bowdoin last week. 



CALENDAR. 

December 18 — Fraternity dances at the chapter 
houses. 

December 19— College Christmas dance in the 
gymnasium. 

December 2^ — Christmas recess begins, 4.30 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

Season of 1918-1919. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance season of 1917-1918... $258.32 

A.S.B.C. for baseball 1000.00 

A.S.B.C. for track 1315.00 

A.S.B.C. for tennis 140.00 

A.S.B.C. for fencing 30.00 

Meadow Brook Club (track).-. 190.00 

Bates-Bowdoin football garrie.. 45.20 

Sale of mileage g.43 

Interest on deposits 15-75 

$3,003.70 

EXPENDITURES. 

Baseball manager $1,000.00 

Track manager 1,315.00 

Tennis manager 140.00 

Fencing manager 30.00 

Loan to track 50.00 

Track (Meadow Brook Club). 190.00 

$2,725.00 

Balance on deposit $ 278.70 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul Nixon^ Treasurer, Atheltic Council. 
Audited and found correct. 

F. N. Whittier. 



ASSIGNMENTS OF EVENTS FOR TRACK 
SQUAD. 

Relay — Cleaves, Dostie, M. H. Smith, Good- 
win, Hatch, L. W. Parent, Thomson, Averill, 
Ball, Hunt, Palmer, Partridge, Woodbury, 
Slater, Young. 

Sprinters — W. M. Cook, Dostie, Leighton, L. 
H. Moses, M. H. Smith, Hatch, L. W. Parent, 
Thomson, Averill, Clifford, Flinn, Hunt, Part- 
ridge, Woodbury, Dahlgren, Slater, Daviau, Ken- 
nedy, Keaney, Kemp, Staples. 

Quarter Milers — Cleaves, M. H. Smith, Good- 
win, Hatch, Ball, Hunt, Partridge, Brown, 
Palmer, Parent, Young. 

One and Two Milers — Avery, Guptill, Dag- 
gett, Goodwin, Hatch, Heeney, Warren, Towle, 
Page, Colburn, Fitzmorris, Jacob, Palmer, Stack- 
house, Renier, Varney. 

Half Milers — Cleaves, Guptill, Goodwin, 
Hatch, Heeney, Lovell, Ryder, Ball, Hunt, Part- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



195 



ridge, Towle, Colburn, Palmer. 

Hurdlers — L. H. Moses, L. W. Parent, Perkins, 
Thomson, P. U. Clark, Kemp, Philbrook, Staples. 

Weight Men — Ellms, Haggerty, Look, Pea- 
cock, P. Smith, Sprague, Dudgeon, Perkins, 
Schlonland, Putnam, Dahlgren, D. S. Eldridge, 
C. A. Bisson, Brewster, Albert, Davis, Sheesley, 
Tootell. 

Pole Vaulters — Leighton, S. Cook, Bisson, 
Kennedy, Libby, Mallett, Nason, Philbrook, 
Swinglehurst. 

High Jumpers — Dostie, L. W. Parent, Thom- 
son, Drake, Fish, Tarbox, Badger, P. U. Clark, 
Kemp, Libby, Philbrook. 

Broad Jumpers — Dostie, Leighton, Peacock, S. 
Cook, L. W. Parent, Thomson, Averill, Drake, 
Woodbury, Tarbox, Dahlgren, Libby, Slater, 
Fish, Bisson, Badger, Kennedy, Keaney, Kemp. 
Philbrook. 



Before he was married 
We called him a dude. 

But now that he's wed, why. 
He's only subdued. 

— CorucU JJ'idow. 



A pretty girl sat in a railroad train, 

As lonesome as she could be; 
And she said to herself with a little sigh — 

"li he'd only talk to me." 

The young man sat just across the aisle, 
From the girl with the pretty stare. 

And he said to himself, "li I sit with her, 
I wonder if she would care." 

And so they rode the whole long day. 
And neither one of them knew, 

Just what the other was thinking of, 
Did it ever happen to you? 

— Peiui State Froth. 



Thinking of Cluistmas? 
s-o 

SPEARS CANDY 

PAGE & SHAW'S APOLLO 

The Spear Folks 

119 MAINE ST. 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSONS PHARMACY 



CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 



CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 



4 Elm Street 



HARVARD DENTAL SCHOOL 

A Department of Harvard University 

Graduates of secondary schools admitted without ex- 
amination provided they have taken required subjects. 
Modern buildings and equipment. Fall term opens 
September 22, 1919. Degree of D.M.D. Catalog. 
EUGEN E H. SMITH, D.M.D., Dean, Boston, Mass. 

DANCING 

Miss Jennie S. Harvey's Evening Dancing 
Class and Assembly every Tuesday evening at 
Town Hall, Brunswick, commencing Oct. 21st. 

Lesson 7.30 p. m. Assembly 8.30 p. m. 

This class is open to college students. 

Private instruction by appointment. 

Monday evening Class and Assembly at Arm- 
ory Hall, Bath. 

Address 897 Middle St., Bath, Maine. 'Phone 
151-W. 

LIFE, ACCIDENT and HEALTH 
INSURANCE 

SETH G. HALEY '07 
64 Pearl St. Hartford, Ct. 



MESERVE'S FRUIT SHERBET 

The Blended Product of the Natural Juices of 
Sound Ripe Fruit and Berries. A Delicious and 
Healthful Beverage for Receptions, Teas and 
Parties. Prepared only by 

P. J. MESERVE, Pharmacist, 
Near Post Office, Brunswick, Maine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

"UNION" LUNCH 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 
Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 
FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 

We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 



87 Maine Street 
Branch Store 



Tel. 136-137 
-2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16. 



WE CARRY 

Co-operative Shoes 
New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 
LARGEST AND BEST 

Stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



FALL STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

John A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 
A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office . - - Brunswick, Maine 

BUTLER^S 

Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 

TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 

BATH, MAINE 

J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The Bowdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 

Portland 


WILLIAM F. FERRIS 

COLLEGE AGENT 


ANTIQIVTY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

aDin JFutnitute, ffiin China, PetDter, (Etc. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 


Citizens Laundry 

AUTO SERVICE 9 SOUTH APPLETON 


to orders for antique goods of any kind 


Telephone 160 


COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY- 

SOULES BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. ^ 


FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 


BOOTS AND SHOES REPAIRED 

at Short Notice by competent work- 
men. We use only the Best 
of Leather. 
E. WHITTOM 


Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
A. G. PAGE COMPANY, Bath 



White Round Neck Sweaters 

IN STOCK 
We can deliver at once 

Give your order to Jack Handy '23, 
Zeta Psi House or phone us and re- 
verse charge. 




PORTLAND, 



MAINE 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

ROBERT WARWICK 

IN 

TOLD IN THE HILLS 




FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

ETHEL CLAYTON 

IN 

More Deadly Than the Male 



NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

BRYANT WASHBURN 

IN 

LOVE INSURANCE 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 
CONSTANCE TALMADGE 

IN 

MRS LEFFINGWELL'S BOOTS 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

EMMY WEHLEN 

IN 

A FAVOR TO A FRIEND 



NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

RUPERT JULIAN 

IN 

THE FIRE FLINGERS 



FOOTBALL NUMBER 



Vol. XLIX. No. 21 



JANUARY 14, 1920 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

The Christmas House Parties 197 

Ex-President Taft at Bowdoin 199 

Reception for Ex-President Taft 199 

The Wentworth Photographs 199 

Important Art Loans 199 

Editorials : 

Hockey at Bowdoin 200 

Ex-President Taft's Lecture 200 



PAGE 

Communication 201 

Resume of the Football Season 201 

The Football Letter Men 202 

Hockey Notes 203 

Track Notes 204 

Activities of the Musical Clubs 204 

The Sophomore-Freshman Debate 204 

Football Elections 204 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Just to let the boys "Back Here" know JUD is in the game. 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 


The College Book Store 

We wish to call your - 
attention to our new 

FRATERNITY STATIONERY 






PRINTING 


in a large man size pa- 
per. 


OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLBASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWN BUILDING BRUNSWICK 


The stock is the well known 
OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

The price is $ 1 .00 per box 
F. W. CHANDLER & SON 



COLLEGE AND 'TREP" SCHOOL MEN 

Clothing for Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 
ercoats and Ulsters. 




Hats 



Haberdashery 

MacuUar Parker Company 



400 Washington St. 



Boston, Mass. 



'THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT' 





I Electncally- heated glue-pots 
I are used m pattern shops 
j and elsewhere 



Electric monorail 
(or hoisting coaL 



Motor-generator set mounted on crane 
supplying power for lifting magnet 




Electricity — 

the Master Fprce in Manufacturing 

THE marvels of electricity have revolutionized our 
manufacturing industries. With belts and pulleys 
replaced by electric motors operating automatic — almost 
human — machines, many a slow and tedious process hao 
been eliminated. The factory worker's task of yesterday 
is made pleasant by his command of this magic power. 

The Crane Company's plant at Chicago — electrical throughout— is a 
model of industrial efficiency. Its 10,000 horse-power of driving 
energy is brought by three small wires from a distant power plant. 
Then electricity drives the machinery vrhich handles the coal for heat- 
ing, cuts the steel, sifts the sand and sorts the material — in fact does 
everything from scrubbing the floor to winding the clock. 

Such an institution is marvelous — superhuman — made thus by the 
man-multiplying force of electricity. The General Electric Company 
has been instrumental in effecting this evolution. First, by developing 
successful electrical generati:ig and transmission apparatus to furnish 
economically this modem form of pow^er. Secondly, through many 
years of active co-operation with hundreds of manufacturers, it has 
mastered the art of applying the use of electrical energy to a multitude 
of needs. And finally, through branch offices and other distributing 
channels, its products are made accessible to all. 



Machine operated by motor 

attached to lamp soctet 

scrubs flo"'" 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



EVENING CLOTHES 

Designed and tailored es- 
pecially for us by 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 

CORRECT DRESS 
FURNISHINGS 

Haskell & Jones Co. 



Portland, 



Maine. 




ARROW 



OVoT/ tailored 

Soft Collars 

CLUETT, PEABODY & CO., INC.. TROY, N. Y. 



ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



MEN'S SILK HOSE 

85c, $1.00, $1.50 



E. S. BODWELL & SON, 

Brunswick. 



Greenhouse 21-W 
Residence 21-R 



WALTER 

F- 1. O 


L. 


LaROCK 
1 S T 


Potted Plants and Cut Flowers 
Floral Designs for All Occasions 

15% Jordan Avenue 



Christmas Cards 5c to 50c 

Fancy Box Paper 50c to $3.00 

Manicure Rolls 

$2.00 to $20.00 

Ladies' and Gents' Purses 

$L25 to $7.00 

Gourson & Morton 

80 MAINE ST. The Bowling Alley is next door 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JANUARY 14,1920 



NO. 21 



THE CHRISTMAS HOUSE PARTIES. 

The approach of the Christmas holidays was 
celebrated at Bowdoin College, December 17-20, 
by fraternity house parties and the annual Christ- 
mas dance, which was held in the Gymnasium 
Friday evening. The Christmas dance was at- 
tended by more than 200 couples. The patronesses 
were Mrs. Kenneth C. M. Sills, Mrs. Frank E. 
Woodruff, Mrs. Charles C. Hutchins, Mrs. Frank 
N. Whittier, Mrs. Wilmot B. Mitchell, Mrs. 
Charles T. Burnett, Mrs. Roscoe J. Ham, Mrs. 
Frederick W. Brown, Mrs. Manton Copeland, 
Mrs. Gerald G. Wilder, Mrs. Samuel B. Furbish, 
Mrs. Edward H. Wass, Mrs. Frederick S. Nolan, 
and Miss Ann^ E. Smith. 

The Christmas dajice committee consisted of 
Zeitler '20, chairman, Richan '20, Mc Williams '20, 
Buker '21, Averill '22, and Sheesley '23. 

The decorations for the dance in the Gym- 
nasium and for the various house party functions 
were in keeping with the Christmas season and 
were most attractive. Evergreen trees and 
wreaths with the various fraternity colors were 
effectively used. 

Alpha Delta Phi. 

Alpha Delta Phi held its fraternity dance in 
the Bowdoin Union. 

The committee in charge consisted of O. Moses, 
3d, '20, Rich '21, Merrill '22, and Miller '23. 

Music was furnished by Welch's orchestra of 
Waterville. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Donald C. White 
of Lewiston, Mrs. Roscoe J. Ham, Mrs. Charles 
C. Hutchins, Mrs. William A. Moody of Bruns- 
wick. 

Among the guests were the Misses Lucy Evans 
of Bangor, Eleanor Jack of Farmington, Blanche 
Lawless of Lewiston, Bertha Russell of George- 
town, Caroline James, Miriam James, Mary 
Stearns, Nina Robinson, Ruth Boynton, Irene 
Hellier, Helen Smith, and Anna Shaw of 
Portland, Marcia Higgins of Nyack, N. Y., 
Polly Wood of New York City, Marcelle 
Barnul of Brookline, Mass., Nellie God- 
dard and Mildred Goddard of Lynn, Mass., Hope 
Rumery of Portland, and Helen Root of Auburn. 



Psi Upsilon. 

The Kappa Chapter of Psi Upsilon held its 
Christmas house dance at the chapter house 
Thursday evening, December 18. 

The committee consisted of Lamb '20, Willson 
'21, and Freeman '22. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Frank W. Lamb 
of Portland, Mrs. Clark of Milton, Mrs. Charles 
C. Low of Bath, and Miss Belle H. Smith of 
Brunswick. 

Among the guests were the Misses Pauline 
Otkon of Calais, Anna Morse and Gladys Olen 
of Bath, Dorothea Farrell, Ten Broeck Jackson, 
Aubigne Thomas, Helen Kilborn, Helen McKown 
of Portland, Beryl Nevens of Boston, Mass., 
Pauline Webster of Arlington, Mass., Marion 
McLoon of Rockland, Pauline Johnson of Saco, 
and Miriam Wilson of Brookline, Mass. 

Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

The Dekes held their formal dance at the 
chapter house, Thursday evening, December 18. 

The committee in charge consisted of Safford 
'20, Brown '20, and Richardson '22. 

The patronesses were Mrs. K. C. M. Sills of 
Brunswick, Mrs. George A. Safford of Hallowell, 
and Mrs. James Q. Gulnac of Bangor. 

Among the guests were the Misses Katherine 
Pletts of Brunswick, Katherine Wheeler, Mary 
Wheeler, and Beatrice Straw of Portland, Edith 
Davis of Watertown, Mass., Madeline Park of 
Fairfield, Hilda Brown of Salem, Mass., Louise 
Hanson of Yonkers, N. Y., Marjorie Safford of 
Hallowell, Mary Dennis of Madison, Wis., Mar- 
garet Leavitt of Percell, Okla., Virginia Averill 
of Oldtown, Edith Faxter of Bangor, Molly 
Blunt, Doris Gower, Lucille Wentworth, Mar- 
garet Green, and Geneva Smith of Skowhegan. 

Theta Delta Chi. 

The Eta Charge of Theta Delta Chi held its 
formal house dance on Thursday evening, De- 
cember 18. 

The committee consisted of A. R. Bartlett '20, 
chairman, Howard '21, Barker '22, and Blake '23. 

The Harmonic orchestra of Portland played 
for an order of 20 dances. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Wilmot B. Mitchell, 
Mrs. Alaric W. Haskell, Mrs. Charles Gilman of 



198 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Brunswick, Mrs. Hugh Pendexter and Mrs. Her- 
man L. Bartlett of Norway. 

Among the guests were the Misses Dorothy 
Hall of Chicago, Dorothy Fletcher of Washing- 
ton, D. C, Dorothy Peck of Bridgeport, Conn., 
Persis Sawyer of Methuen, Mass., Elaine Chad- 
wick of Brookline, Mass., Mary King of Chelsea, 
Mass., Esther Joel of Everett, Mass., Helen Mac- 
intosh of Boston, Mass., Eleanor Home of 
Somersworth, N. H., Ruth Johnson, Ragnhild 
Dahlsgaard, Evalyn Frost, Helen Munroe, Mary 
Townsend, Bertha Merrill and Helen Nissen of 
Portland, Frances Russell, Mary Blake and Emily 
Nichols of Saco, Gladys Willey of Biddeford, 
Ruth Cummings of Norway, ' Pauline Perkins of 
Cornish, Maybelle Beach and Elizabeth Nash of 
Brunswick. 

Zcta Psi. 

Lambda Chapter of Zeta Psi entertained with 
a dancing party at the chapter house Thursday 
evening, December i8. 

The committee consisted of McQuillan '20, 
Woodard '21, and Eames '23. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Sanford L. Fogg 
of Augusta, Mrs. Oliver L. Hall of Bangor, Mrs. 
Charles T. Burnett, Mrs. Hartley C. Baxter, and 
Mrs. William R. Porter of Brunswick. 

Among the guests were the Misses Sarah 
Wheeler, Belle Hutton, and Mary Allen of 
Brunswick, Frances Bragg, Elizabeth Palmer, 
Ruth Crowell, and Ruth Henderson of Bangor, 
Frances Mansfield and Dorothy Gardner of Port- 
land, Barbara Joy of Bar Harbor, Dorothy Films 
of Auburn, Virginia Payne of Bath, Irene Good- 
rich and Catherine Wyman of Augusta, Eva 
Glidden of Waterville, Carolyn Palmer and Clara 
Taylor of New York City, Esther Reed of Ros- 
lindale, Mass., Mary Fay of Auburndale, Mass., 
Mildred Wertheimer of Kaukana, Wis., and 
Elaine Percy of Arlington, Mass. 
Delta Upsilon. 

Delta Upsilon held its dance Saturday evening. 

The committee consisted of Grossman '20, 
Dudgeon '21, and Congdon '22. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Joseph S. Stetson, 
and Mrs. R. P. Bodwell of Brunswick. 

Among the guests were the Misses Ruth Tarr 
and Isabel Pollard of Brunswick, Marjorie 
Mather, Lurena Hutchinson, and Mae Miller of 
Portland, Harvest Jackson of Bath, Esther Power 
of Peabody, Mass., Virginia Ralph of Northeast 
Harbor, Ruth Conoski and Dorothy Whitman of 
Boston,. Mass., Helen Johnson of Bath, Doris 
Wakely of Lisbon Falls, and Mr. and Mrs. John 
D. Churchill of Northampton, Mass. 



Kappa Sigma. 

Kappa Sigma held a Christmas tree in the 
LTnion, Saturday afternoon, December 20. The 
fraternity dance was also held in the Union on 
the same day. 

The committee consisted of L. Moses '20, 
Parent '21, Dahlgren '22, and Chandler '23. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Z. H. Chandler of 
Camden, Mrs. H. B. Meriam of Yarmouth, and 
Mrs. J. A. Richan of Rockland. 

The Colonial orchestra of Portland furnished 
the music. 

Among the guests were the Misses Helene 
Blackwell and Eveleen Priest of Brunswick, 
Theresa Whittemore, Margaret McDonald, Mary 
Blackey, and Dorothy Speed of Portland, Theresa 
Pretto, Ruth Holden, and Edna Starrett of Ban- 
gor, Rose Hodgkins and Irma Emerson of Water- 
ville, Margaret Hall and Olive Morrison of Ells- 
worth, Elizabeth McDugal of Rockland, Harriet 
Sweetser of Yarmouth, Eleanor Hawes of Skow- 
hegan, Florence Day of Gorham, Hazel Woodside 
of Brookline, Mass., and Elizabeth Sleeper of 
Brighton, Mass. 

Beta Theta Pi. 

The Beta Sigma Chapter of Beta Theta Pi 
held its dance at the chapter house on Thursday 
evening, December 18. 

The committee consisted of Abbott '20, Ellms 
'20, Gibson '21, Harmon '22, and Hill '23. 

The Douglas orchestra of Augusta played for 
an order of 24 dances. 

The patronesses w^ere Mrs. George R. Gardiner 
and Mrs. L. D. McClean of Brunswick. 

Among the guests were the Misses Bernice B. 
-Butler, Virginia Currier, Bernice Fawcett, and 
Margaret Reed of Portland; Cecilia Robie and 
Flazelwood Scrimgeour of Lewiston, Lucile Pur- 
inton and Alice H. Stevens of Augusta, Alberta 
Plutchinson of Auburn, Doris Richmond of 
Danvers, Mass., Evelyn Park of Wellesley Hills, 
Mass., Nancy Oxfiard of West Medford, Mass., 
Kathleen Haskell of Newton, Mass., Phyllis 
Moran of Rockland, Vera M. Harmon of Ston- 
ington, Edith Tiffany of Camden, Dorothia Mer- 
rill of Falmouth, and Elizabeth Smith of Houlton. 

Sigma Nu. 

Thursday evening, December 18, the Sigma 
Nu fraternity entertained its guests with a straw 
ride to the Dirigo Grange Hall, where after a 
chicken dinner, dancing was enjoyed. 

The committee consisted of Demuth '20, Lind- 
ner '20, Reiber '21, and Sealand '22. 

The patroness was Mrs. Freeman Palmer of 
Fort Fairfield. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Among the guests were the Misses Burdean 
Stevenson and .Doris Hayes of Brunswick, 
Marion Grififin and Gladys Morrill of Portland, 
Eleanor Jones of Arlington Heights, Mass., 
Eleanor Thebeau, Ada McCormick, and Louise 
Cahill of Bath, Doris Hathaway and Dorothea 
Walker of Brookline, Mass., Vivian Bowman of 
Lewiston, Mona King and Alice Heath of 
Bangor. 

Chi Psi. 

The Chi Psi held its first dance of the year 
in Pythian Hall, Thursday evening, December i8. 

The committee consisted of Marston '21, Hall 
'22, and Plummer '23. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Manton Copeland 
of Brunswick, Mrs. A. F. Plummer, and Mrs. 
R. E. Litchfield. ■-- 

Helson's orchestra furnished the music. 

Among" the guests were the Misses Lillian 
Marshall and Annie Marshall of Brunswick, Dora 
Higgins, Delia Mutty, Ruth Ridley, Esther 
Preble, Mildred White, Ethel Willis, and Clara 
Phinney of Topsham, Elizabeth Staples and Mar- 
garet Staples of Pittsfield, Evelyn Adams of 
Lisbon Centre, Ruth Henderson and Helen 
Meserve of Portland. 



EX-PRESIDENT TAPT AT BOWDOIN. 

Friday evening Ex-President William Howard 
Taft, under the auspices of the Annie Talbot Cole 
lectureship, delivered a most interesting lecture 
on the League of Nations. The Church on the 
Hill was crowded to capacity, — the college men 
in the gallery and the public down stairs. 

Mr. Taft gave a most interesting lecture on 
a difficult subject, and added variety to a com- 
plicated political question, with an occasional 
spark of the humor which is so characteristic 
of him. The ex-President proclaimed his ap- 
proval of the League of Nations in spite of his 
Republican affiliations, and expressed a desire to 
see it go through the Senate either with or with- 
out reservations. He carefully explained each 
reservation and probably convinced the majority 
of the audience that only ten per cent, of the 
power of the League was lost by the adoption 
of the fourteen reservations. 

Mr. Taft held the attention of all his hearers 
during his entire lecture, two hours in length, 
and received hearty applause at its end. This 
discussion should aid greatly in facilitating the 
expression of opinion concerning the League 
which college men are called upon to make this 
week. 



RECEPTION FOR EX-PRESIDENT TAFT. 

The Kappa Chapter of Psi Upsilon held an in- 
formal reception for ex-President Taft on last 
Friday afternoon. Mr. Taft is a member of the 
Beta Chapter at Yale. A large number of pro- 
fessors and their wives were guests of the chapter 
and were received by Mr. Taft, President and 
Mrs. Sills, and R. Schlosberg '20. After the re- 
ception, tea was served; Mrs. Burnett and Mrs; 
Copeland poured. 



THE WENTWORTH PHOTOGRAPHS. 

Attention is called to a collection of artistic 
photographs on exhibition in the Bowdoin Gallery 
of the Walker Art Building until January 31. 
,The exhibition opened Saturday afternoon, Janu- 
ary 10, with a reception to Mr. Wentworth, the 
photographer, who has a wide reputation for his 
artistic work. He has exhibited in various art 
clubs, in colleges, and in some of our leading art 
museums. 



IMPORTANT ART LOANS. 

The Bowdoin Museum of Fine Arts is fortu- 
nate in having two important loans this season. 
The seven water-colors by Winslow Homer, lent 
by Mrs. Charles Homer, have already been com- 
mented upon. They continue to draw many 
visitors. 

The second loan is that of two portraits by 
John Sinibert (1684-1751) of William Lambert 
and his wife Harriet, lent by their descendant, 
Mr. William Lambert Barnard of Boston. They 
have been handed down from generation to gen- 
eration, always to a William Lambert. 

John Sinibert was born in Scotland and he 
came to this country with Bishop Berkeley and 
his family. An important group picture of the 
Berkeley family, begun by Sinibert on the voyage, 
hangs in the Yale dining hall. Bowdoin owns 
two portraits by the same artist — one of General 
Samuel Waldo, the other of the Rev. James Mac- 
Sparren, which hang in the Boyd Gallery. The 
wife of the latter by Sinibert is in the Boston 
Museum of Fine Arts. 

The Lambert protraits which the college has 
the privilege of exhibiting in the Walker Art 
Building and which have been given a prominent 
place in the Bowdoin Gallery in company with 
the Fekes, the Copleys, and the Suarts, are very 
fine examples of Sinibert's work, and most at- 
trafctive portraits in themselves. 



200 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Wednesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 
Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT AND ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Roland L. McCormack, 1922 Exchange 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
Ronald B. Wadsworth, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 192 i 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 

BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Allan W. Hall, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 

Vol. XLIX. JANUARY 14, 1920. No. 21 

Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Claaa Mail Matter 

Hockey at Bowdoin. 

It is now an assured fact that Bowdoin will 
be represented this winter by a hockey team. The 
college has been represented in this sport in the 
past, having had a fast team in 1917, but the 



prospects of the establishment of hockey as a 
permanent major sport at Bowdoin have never 
been as good as they are at present. It is prob- 
able, and it is quite right, that hockey should 
take a place in college athletics on a level with 
baseball, football, and track. Hockey is an at- 
tractive game, a fact to which the large number 
of men out on the ring each afternoon bears 
witness ; being an outdoor sport, it 5nds a 
eminently fitting place at Bowdoin where little 
opportunity is offered in the winter for open air 
pastimes. It is being rapidly taken up by other 
colleges in and out of the state and offers a 
worthy field for intercollegiate competition. 

There appears to be no need of urging more 
men to report for practice. There is, however, a 
need of candidates for assistant manager. We 
have a right to expect plenty of competition as 
the honor of being assistant manager, and event- 
ually manager, of hockey should be comparable 
with that associated with the managerships of 
other major sports. This is an excellent oppor- 
tunity for Freshmen who are anxious to do some- 
thing worth while in the line of student activity 
during their four years in college. 

Games are being arranged now, and part of 
them will be played here. It may be necessary 
to charge a small admission but it is hoped that 
students will not try to avoid paying by using the 
dormitory windows or any other means. It we 
are to make hockey a success, we must support it 
financially, especially while it is in its infancy. 



Ex-President Taft's Lecture. 

The college was very fortunate in having so 
prominent a man as ex-President Taft to lecture 
here on the League of Nations at a time when it 
is very essential that every Bowdoin man form 
a definite idea on the subject. Having been in 
the very fore front of the discussion, his ideas 
were founded on a broad and first-hand acquaint- 
ance with it and the enthusiasm with which the 
audience received his lecture showed its general 
approval. His attitude on the question might 
well be copied by college men for its fair minded- 
ness and the evidence that he showed of having 
the whole welfare of the nation at heart rather 
than the success or failure of any one party or 
faction. 

The only unfortunate circumstance of the eve- 
ning lay in the fact of its being generally under- 
stood by the student body that they were re- 
stricted to the galleries only. The result of this 
was the overflowing of the galleries and the 
forcing of many men to either stand up or occupy 





MANAGER McPARTLAND 



ACTING CAPTAIN BREWSTER 
AH-Maine Tackle 





CAPTAIN RHOADS 



COACH GREENE 




TRAINER MAGEE 




CROCKETT— Quarter-back 



-^' '.^ -^ 



DAHLGREN— Half-back 





DOHERTY— End 



JAMES— Half-back 



THE VARSITY SQUAD, 1919. 







■*:,: ■ : ".. 





DOSTIE— All-Maine Half-back 





MASON— Tackle and Kicker 



RHOADS— Tackle 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



201 



seats where they could neither hear nor see 
properly, while there were several seats on the 
floor of the church not taken. Some students 
were heard to express indignation that a college 
lecture should seem to be dedicated more to the 
interests of the outside public than to those of 
the college men. It might be recommended that 
at college lectures in the future, no discrimina- 
tion be made between the seating arrangement of 
the student body and that of the general public. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Dec. 3d, .1919. 
Editor Bowdoin Orient^ Bowdoin College : 

Dear Sir : — I was pleased to see you are to 
issue a Football Number as I am sure it will 
please all old Bowdoin men interested in foot- 
ball and the State games. Few old Bowdoin men\ 
can follow the games as they are played. 

There was an error in the Orient's report of 
the scoring in the Colby game as it seemed to 
me. From'my view it was Curtis, not Dalhgren, 
who scored the first touchdown. Probably this 
has now been corrected. 

Yours very truly, 

Paul H. Tuttle. 



RESUME OF THE FOOTBALL SEASON. 

The season of 1919 showed one of the best 
football teams that has represented Bowdoin 
for a number of years. To be sure, the team 
failed to win the championship of Maine, but 
that is only a minor consideration in deciding 
upon the team's actual ability. It must be 're- 
membered that Bowdoin lost the state champion- 
ship to a team which held West Point to a single 
touchdown, and which has had an unusually 
good season. As for those who think the team 
only mediocre this fall, just let them call to mind 
the low scores to which Holy Cross and Brown 
were held, and then again the striking victory 
over Colby, and the brilliant struggle with Bates. 
Again let them remember that a number of Bow- 
doin's men were on injured list much of the 
time. Captain Rhoads was able to play only in a 
small part of two games in the Maine series. 
Peacock, whose splendid work of a few seasons 
ago. is by no means forgotten, was unable to take 
a very prominent part in the more important 
games. Sprague and A. M. Smith were out 
some of the time, but the blow that seemed 
to be felt the most was the practical loss of 
Dostie in the Maine game, through a severe in- 
jury to his knee. 

To begin with the early games of the season, 



Bowdoin went to Amherst and lost by the small 
margin of a single field goal. The two teams 
seemed about evenly matched, and little could be 
decided about Bowdoin's strength after the con- 
test. Sprague, Rhoads, and Dostie all played a 
fine game. . 

In some ways the second game of the season 
was the most satisfactory of them all. Here 
Bowdoin, fighting hard against overwhelming 
odds, held Brown to the score of 7 to 0. It would 
not have been surprising had Brown scored four 
or five touchdowns, but only one did the Bowdoin 
line yield to the Providence eleven. In the first 
half Bowdoin held three times when the ball 
was within the ten-yard line, and again in the 
last period, Bowdoin took the ball on downs on 
the 12-yard line. 

A week later. Holy Cross defeated Bowdoin 
14 to o. Holy Cross got away with two touch- 
downs in the first quarter, but after that the 
Bowdoin team settled down, and although it 
failed to score, outplayed the Worcester eleven. 
Dahlgren, Dostie, and James did well in the 
backfield, and the line as a whole played up to 
its usual form. 

The following Saturday Bowdoin had its last 
game before the state series. The team had no 
trouble in rolling up 73 points on the green team 
from Fort McKinley. Practically the entire 
squad got into the game. The score was the 
largest that a Bowdoin team has gained in a 
single game for a long time. 

The Colby game came on October 25. In the 
Orient account of this game it was said that 
"the Bowdoin eleven surprised and outplayed 
Colby in all phases of the game and gave evidence 
of the advantage of its steady practice under 
Coach Greene and Trainer Magee." The Bow- 
doin backs simply ran rings around the Colby 
men. Dostie and Dahlgren were the big stars 
in this game, where Bowdoin rolled up 30 
points on the Waterville aggregation. Thirty 
points, after Jack Magee had predicted only a 
small margin of victory. His prediction was like 
the time when he stated last spring that the 
track team would win by a scanty margin. It 
may be well at this time to correct an error that 
appeared in the Orient's account of the Colby 
game. Curtis rather than Dahlgren scored the 
first touchdown. 

Bates came down next and was beaten 14 to 13 
in a spectacular contest which was in doubt every 
minute. Some expected a larger score, but just 
as Trainer Magee had foretold, Bates put up a 
splendid fight, and forced Bowdoin to the limit. 



202 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



To get a line on Bates from another view- 
point, these three scores may be compared : New 
Hampshire 3, Bates 0; Maine 9, New Hampshire 
7; Maine 18, Bowdoin o. These facts help to 
show that Bowdoin has no need to regret the 
one-point margin of victory. One result of this 
game which Bowdoin did have need to regret, 
however, was the unlucky injury to Dostie in 
the last quarter, after he had been playing a 
fine game. 

To conclude the season, the Bowdoin eleven 
went to Orono, and bowed to Maine for the 
championship of the state. With Dostie out, the 
White was badly handicapped from the start. 
Bowdoin put up a hard battle against a stronger 
team, — the strongest and fastest that Maine has 
Tiad in years, — but the men seemed to yield a 
Jittle to the hard strain brought about by so many 
hard contests before this last one. It seems very 
possible, as some have said, that if the games 
with Maine and Colby had been changed about, 
Bowdoin would have come through and given 
the champions a much harder struggle. Trainer 
Magee has consistently stated for some years 
that Bowdoin's chances for the championship 
would be greatly increased by a revision of the 
schedule. 

Coach Green, who has coached Colby and 
Bates teams has worked faithfully and well with 
the boys this year. In college he was a star 
in the line, and his knowledge of the lineman's 
job did much to make Bowdoin's line what it 
was this year. 

Trainer Magee has contributed his usual valu- 
able share to the training and general condition- 
ing of the team. 

Much credit is due to the managerial end of 
the football team. Assistant Manager "Larry" 
Willson was on the job to start things moving, 
and was succeeded by Manager McPartland who 
-was elected several weeks after the opening of 
college, owing to the sudden death of Tracy S. 
Wood, the manager-elect. Credit is due also to 
the co-operation of the men working for the 
assistant managership. Those who stayed with 
the team till the end of the season were Congdon, 
Ludden, and Harmon. 

In the recent student elections Willson and 
Ludden were selected as manager and assistant 
manager respectively. 

Contrary to press reports, Dudgeon was the 
first and unanimous choice of the team for next 
year's varsity. Captain Dudgeon was one of the 
most popular men on the squad this year, being 
universally liked and respected. Bowdoin fol- 



lowers have no doubt that he will lead the team 
through a successful season next fall. 

Following is the list of games played: Bow- 
doin o, Amherst 3; Bowdoin 0, Brown 7; Bow- 
doin o, Holy Cross 14; Bowdoin 73, Fort Mc- 
Kinley o; Bowdoin 30, Colby o; Bowdoin 14, 
Bates 13; Bowdoin o, Maine 18. 

Games won, 3 ; games lost, 4. 

Bowdoin's score, 117; opponents' score, 55. 

Individual scoring by Bowdoin players : 

Dahlgren, three touchdowns, 18; Dostie, four 
touchdowns, 24; Mason, ten goals from touch- 
down, one field goal, 13; Thomson, two touch- 
downs, 12; J. Smith, one touchdown and one 
field goal, 9; Drummond, one touchdown, 6; 
Guptill, one touchdown, 6; Peacock, one touch- 
down, 6; Curtis, two touchdowns, 12; Doherty, 
one touchdown, 6 ; Keahey, five goals from 
touchdown, 5; total, 117. 

Such is the narrative account of Bowdoin's 
1919 football season, which ought to be known 
by any Bowdoin man. There were 31 men on 
the squad who actually participated in one game 
or more. Of these, sixteen were awarded a 
letter, together with Manager McPartland. Ten 
letter men will graduate next June. 

There is a good prospect for a successful sea- 
son in 1920, in spite of the loss of ten letter men. 
A strong line can be formed with five letter men, 
• — Dudgeon, McCurdy, Thomson, Parent, and 
Mason, — to start with. A backfield, built up 
around Dahlgren and James, ought to be satis- 
factory. New backfield men are J. Smith, Miller, 
K&aney, and Meacham, all of whom will un- 
doubtedly be strong candidates for positions next 
fall. Thus Bowdoin has completed an excellent 
season, without diminishing too much the pros- 
pects for the future. Edward B. Ham. 



THE FOOTBALL LETTER MEN. 

Captain Rhoads, "Dusty," has, unfortunately 
been out of the game the last part of the season, 
owing to a dislocated knee-cap. "Before his 
injury," declares Jack Magee, "he was playing 
the game of his college career and his absence 
was keenly felt in the Maine series games." 
Rhoads has made his "B" every year in college. 
Besides his football activities he is a Friar, U. Q., 
and a prominent and popular man on the campus. 

Brewster, returning to the Medical School 
from virar service, has made a valuable addition 
to Bowdoin's line. This is his fourth year as a 
member of the team. During Captain Rhoads' 
disability "Jim" acted as captain. He is gen- 
erally conceded a place on the All-Maine team 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



203 



for this season. 

Crockett, who has played varsity football for 
three years is one of Bowdoin's best scholars. 
He made Phi Beta Kappa in his Junior year 
and has recently been awarded the Rhoades 
Scholarship. "Phil" has proved to his own satis- 
faction that brains can beat brawn even in the 
roughest of college games. 

Curtis has developed into the best defensive 
back on the squad. In every game he has done 
good work in stopping the enemy rushes and 
has made good also as a consistent ground-gainer 
through the line. 

Dostie, the man featured by all local papers 
this year has played in hard luck. Through the 
entire season he was troubled with an injury to 
his ankle, and in the Bates game was hurt to such 
an extent that he was able to play but a few 
moments in the Maine game. A faster man, 
a cleverer dodger and a better tackier was not 
produced in Maine this year. He is commonly 
acknowledged to be worthy of a place in the All- 
Maine eleven. 

Drummond, another man with four years' 
varsity work to his credit has played his usual 
good game at end. In the Bates game particu- 
larly he shone at the receiving end of some 
clever forward passes. Last year "Drum" was 
captain and played quarter but his real forte 
is at the extremity of the line. 

Doherty, who transferred to Bowdoin from 
Mass. Aggie, has been holding down the other 
end of the line. Paul was tried out as a back, 
but Coach Green saw an opportunity for a good 
end and shifted him. In the Bates game he 
starred in running a forward pass half the length 
of the field for a touchdown. 

Dudgeon, who played throughout the season, 
first as center, then at guard, has held his place 
in the line consistently. He well deserves his 
selection as next year's captain. 

Thomson has played a fast and heady game at 
end. With the build and weight of a track man 
he has done admirable work. 

Dahlgren, who has starred with Dostie in the 
Maine series games is one of the best open-field 
runners in the state. He has played in all the 
games this season, and has been a big factor in 
ground gaining through the line. 

James, another good half-back, did his best 
work in the Bates game. Time after time he 
wiggled through the line for long gains. He is a 
wizard at avoiding tacklers and a heady quarter- 
back as well. 

McCurdy, who succeeded Dudgeon at center 



has the game right at his finger tips. He is a 
past master at the spiral pass and knows all the 
inside "dope" on the niceties of the game. Be- 
fore entering Bowdoin Mac played with Spring- 
field Y. M. C. A. College. 

Mason, who did much of the kicking for the 
team this year, added his share to Bowdoin's 
scoring by a difficult field goal in the Colby game. 
Before receiving an injury in his right thigh he 
promised to be a phenomenal kicker and an ex- 
cellent tackle. 

Kern, who has returned from war service this 
fall was back in the old game at guard, stronger 
than ever. John's 220 pounds were a great help 
to the Bowdoin line in every game. 

Peacock, a former Bowdoin captain and star, 
was in the backfield part of the season. Due to 
a "charlie horse" he did not participate in the 
Maine series as much as Bowdoin would have 
liked but in the Maine game he was rushed in at 
end where he showed his mettle by outplaying 
the latter's crack lineman. 

Sprag-ue was in the game again at half and 
full. He is another old Bowdoin star back from 
the war. . In plugging the line he was the most 
consistent ground gainer. His defensive work 
was also excellent. William R. Ludden. 



HOCKEY NOTES. 

Hockey practice was started upon the opening 
of College. Every afternoon the squad has been 
at work at the rink. A call for Freshman candi- 
dates for assistant manager has been issued. 
Manager Page is arranging a number of games 
for the team and looks forward to a most suc- 
cessful season. 

A challenge has been received from the 
Canadian Club of Portland for two games to be 
played about January 17 either at Bowdoin or 
at the Portland Country Club at Falmouth Fore- 
side. On the following week the team will meet 
the Portland Country Club at Falmouth Foreside. 
Tufts has written for a game at Bowdoin on 
February 7, but a game at that time is im- 
possible on account of the mid-year exams and 
the fact that many men will be at the B. A. A. 
meet with the track squad. Games with Bates 
are probable, and if the U. of M. has a hockey 
team there will probably be a game between 
Bowdoin and Maine. There will also be games 
with Springfield Y. M. C. A. 

There are about 20 men out for the team at 
present. Many of them are former prep-school 
stars. Manager Page '22 of the forward line 
was captain and star of the Milton Academy 



204 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



team which won the Mass.achusetts State Cham- 
pionship in 1918. Richardson '22 was goal-tender 
on the Stone School team of Boston. Parent '21 
was a former Boston Latin School star goal- 
tender. Among the men on the defence are 
Graves '20, Willson '21, Putnam '22, and Hayes 
'23. Among the men on the forward line be- 
sides those already mentioned are Tuttle '20, 
Leighton '20, Pendexter '21, Burr, 23, B. Clark 
'23, Tice '23, Whitman '23, Hurrell '20 is also out 
for goal-tender; 



TRACK NOTES. 

Track practice was enthusiastically started on 
Tuesday, January 6, upon the opening of college. 
With an intense season ahead of them, the men 
on the relay squad are working every day. The 
first race will be at the B. A. A. meet in Boston, 
on Saturday evening, February 7. Besides the 
relay team, individual stars will probably be en- 
tered in the three mile, the hurdles, and the 
dashes. The relay team will also be entered in 
meets at Boston College, Melrose, and Hartford. 
Among the men out for the relay squad are : 
Dostie '20, M. Smith '20, Goodwin '21, Hatch '21, 
Thomson '21, J. Young '21, Allen '22, Averill '22, 
Hunt '22, Partridge '22, Woodbury '22, Palmer 
'23, and Slater '23. 

The Freshman relay squad is also hard at work. 
The Freshman team will run the Bates Freshmen 
at the Dual Meet in the Gym on February 27. A 
race with Hebron is also scheduled. Among 
those out for the team are: Brown, Jacobs, 
Palmer, Slater, Renier, and Varney. 



ACTIVITITES OF THE MUSICAL CLUBS. 

After weeks of intensive practice and rehears- 
ing, the Bowdoin Musical Clubs left Monday for 
New York City where they will open their sea- 
son with a concert, the first in New York for 
nine years, at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, under 
the auspices of the Bowdoin alumni of New York, 
and the State of Maine Club of New York. The 
concert on Tuesday evening will be followed by 
a dance in the ball room of the hotel. Competi- 
tion for places on the clubs has been very keen 
this year, and the 38 men who will make the 
trip represent the best musical talent of the 
college. 

The personnel of the Musical Clubs for the 
1920 season is as follows : 

Glee Club — Richan '20, leader, Allen '20, Chase 
'20, Grossman '20, Doherty '20, Linder '20, Mc- 
Clave '20, Sprince '20, Nixon '21, Reiber '21, 
Ryder '21, Whitney '21, Butler '22, Congden '22, 
Woodbury '22, Black '23, Mitchell '23, Reed '23, 



Turgeon '23. 

Mandolin Club — Sprince '20, leader; Berry '20, 
manager; Claff '20, Davis '20, McQuillan '20, 
Philbrick '20, Richan '20, S. A. Smith '20, Claff 
'21, Nixon '21, Rochon '21, Ball '22, Bartlett '22, 
Battison '22, Dahlgren '22, Fletcher '22, Ludden 
'22, Young '22, Lothrop '23, Turgeon '23. Ac- 
companist, Lyseth '21. Reader, Asnault '21. 



THE SOPHOMORE-FRESHMAN DEBATE. 

The annual Sophomore-Freshman debate took 
place Monday evening, December 15, in the de- 
bating room of Hubbard Hall. The debate was 
arranged under the auspices of the Bowdoin De- 
bating Council. The subject of the degate was: 
"Resolved, That policemen should be given the 
perogative of collective bargaining." The Sopho- 
mores upheld the negative of the question and 
the Freshmen the affirmative. 

The debate oepned with Taylor '20 as presid- 
ing officer, by whom the speakers were presented. 
The speakers for the Sophomores were : Ferris, 
Ludden, and Thayer, with Welch as alternate ; 
those of the Freshmen were Cousens, Mitchell, 
and Little, with Jacobs as alternate. The debate 
was conducted in a spirited manner; every 
speaker entered into it with enthusiasm. Thayer 
and Ludden for the Sophomores, and Mitchell 
and Little for the Freshmen were particularly 
brilliant. When the time of decision came, a 
great deal of doubt was expressed concerning the 
winning team. The judges, however, who were 
Professor Stanwood, Rev. Raspe, and Rev. 
Ashby, returned a decision in favor of the 
Freshmen. 

The committee in charge consisted of Badger 
'21, Helson '21, and ITatch '21. 



FOOTBALL ELECTIONS. 

The manager and assistant manager of foot- 
ball for the season of 1920 was elected in the 
student election conducted Wednesday, December 
17. The candidates for manager were Wilson '21 
and Gaffney '21 ; the candidates for assistant 
manager, Harmon '22 and Ludden '22. 

The results of the election made Wilson '21 
manager and Ludden '22 assistant manager of 
football for the coming season. 

According to the usual custom next year's 
varsity captain was elected by varsity members 
of the squad in Webber's Studio after ^the 
varsity picture taken just before the Christmas 
recess. Dudgeon '21, was the unanimous choice. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




5th Avenue 



DE PINNA 



New York 



MOTI 



^ 



will show at the 

. eiaoi-e: 

On Monday and Tuesday, January 19th and 20th 

their importations of exclusive productions in clothing and 
furnishings for young men. 

MR. SWEENEY, Representative. 



CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 

4 Elm Street 



s-c 




PAGE & SHAW'S APOLLO 

The Spear Folks 

119 MAINE ST. 



DANCING 

Miss Jennie S. Harvey's Evening Dancing 
Class and Assembly every Tuesday evening at 
Town Hall, Brunswick, commencing Oct. 21st. 

Lesson 7.30 p. m. Assembly 8.30 p. m. 

This class is open to college students. 

Private instruction by appointment. 

Monday evening Class and Assembly at Arm- 
ory Hall, Bath. 

Address 897 Middle St., Bath, Maine. 'Phone 
151-W. 

PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSON'S PHARMACY 
MESERVE'S FRUIT SHERBET 

The Blended Product of the Natural Juices of 
Sound Ripe Fruit and Berries. A Delicious and 
Healthful Beverage for Receptions, Teas and 
Parties. Prepared only by 

P. J. MESERVE, Pharmacist, 
Near Post Office, Brunswick, Maine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

"UNION" LUNCH 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 
Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 
FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 

We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street 

Branch Store — 2 Gushing St.- 



Tel. 136-137 
-Tel. 16. 



WE CARRY 

Co-operative Shoes 
New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store. 

W. E. ROBERTS "07 
LARGEST AND BEST 

stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



FALL STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

John A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 



A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office . - - Brunswick, Maine 

BUTLER'S 

Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 

TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 

BATH, MAINE 

J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The Bowdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 

Portland 


WILUAM F. FERRIS 

college agent 


ANTIQIVTY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

ffim JFurnituu, ffilD China, DSetotfr, (Etc. 

Miss Stetson gives personal attention 


Citizens Laundry 

AUTO SERVICE 9 SOUTH APPLETON 


to orders for antique goods of any kind 


Telephone 160 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 


COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 


CLIFTON C. POOLER 

spe;cialty caterer 

184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 


Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
A. G. PAGE COMPANY, Bath 



^^The Store of Progress and Service'' 

Smart yet Conservative 

\ NY College man who has a cultivated discrimination of genuine 
style refinement will find his admiration aroused in our inordi- 
nately smart Suits — many of them from the House of Kuppenheimer. 
The style features are noticeably distinctive yet having a thorough air 
of refinement; the fabrics attain the eminence of elegance, and the 
tailoring is handled in so masterly a manner as to insure absolute 
shape-permanence; grace in fit and drape, and unusual enduring service. 

$35 - $65 

For further information see Mr. Jack Handy '23 at the Zeta 
Psi House. He is our representative. 



Monument Square 




Portland., Maine 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

MARGUERITE CLARK 

IN 

"LUCK IN PAWN" 




FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

WILLIAM S. HART 

IN 

" JOHN PETTICOATS " 



NEXT WEEK 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

VIVIAN MARTIN 

IN 

"THE THIRD KISS" 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

ALICE BRADY 

IN 

" THE INDESTRUCTIBLE WIFE " 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

ALICE JOYCE In "THE THIRD 
^ = DEGREE " 



NEXT WEEK 

MONDAY and TUESDAY 

MARY MAC LAREN 

IN 

" BONNIE, BONNIE LASSIE " 



Vol. XLIX. No. 22 



JANUARY 21, 1920 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



CONTENTS 



Bowdoin Votes for Peace Com 
promise ' . 

Bowdoin Colony at Harvard 

Hockey News . 

The Musical Club Trip 

Masque and Gown 

Rifle Club Notes . . 

Classical Club Meeting 

The Des Moines Convention 

Bowdoin Club of Portland Meets 

Million Dollar Fund Being Plan- 
ned for Bowdoin .... 

The '68 Prize Speaking Contest 

Editorial: — 

The Y. M. C. A 



205 
205 
205 
205 
206 
206 
206 
206 
207 

207 
207 

208 



PAGE 

Track Schedule Announced . . 209 
"Bowdoin Men Who Have Made 

Good" 209 

Tribute to President Foster . 209 
Bowdoin Alumni of Boston Hold 

52nd Annual Reunion . . . 210 

Baseball Prospects .... 210 

Bangor Club Holds Meeting . 210 

On the Campus 210 

With the Faculty 211 

Alumni Notes 212 

Exchanges 212 

Resolution 212 

Tentative Examination Schedule 212 

Calendar 213 



BOWDOIN ORIE>fT 



Just to let the boys "Back Here*' know JUD is in the game. 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 


The College Book Stoie 

We wish to call your 
attention to our new 

FRATERNITY STATIONERY 






PRINTING 


in a large man size pa- 
per. 


OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOW^ BUILDING BRUNSWICK 


The stock is the well known 
OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

The price is $ 1 .00 per box 
F. W. CHANDLER & SON 



COLLEGE AND "PREP" SCHOOL MEN 

Clothing foi Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 
ercoats and Ulsters. 

Haberdashery Hats 

MacuUar Parker Company 

400 Washington St. Boston, Mass. 

"THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT" 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



EVENING CLOTHES 

Designed and tailored es- 
pecially for us by 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 

CORRECT DRESS 
FURNISHINGS 

Haskell & Jones Co. 



Portland, 



Maine. 




BERWICK- 2;^ in. 
■jk GORDON -2;4 in. 

Arrow 

2™5SfCOLLARS 

curve cut tojit shouldas perfectly. 

CLUETT PEABODY &CO;iNC5\kW 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 



BIG LINE OF 

UNION SUITS and HOSIERY 



E. S. BODWELL & SON, 

Brunswick. 



Greenhouse 21 -W 
Residence 21-R 



WALTER 
F- 1. 


L. LaROCK 
R 1 s -r 


Potted Plants 
Floral Designs 


and Cut Flowers 
for All Occasions 

15X Jordan Avenue 



Christmas Cards 5c to 50c 

Fancy Box Paper 50c to $3.00 

Manicure Rolls 

$2.00 to $20.00 

Ladies' and Gents' Purses 

$1.25 to $7.00 

Courson & Morton 

80 MAINE ST. The Bowling Alley is next door 



BOWDOIN ORILNT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JANUARY 21, 1920 



NO. 22 



BOWDOIN VOTES FOR PEACE COMPROMISE. 

Last Tuesdajf, January 13, the opinion of the 
College on a League of Nations was emphatically 
evidenced by a large plurality vote for an early 
compromise between the rival parties for the 
adoption of the peace treaty. Nearly every Bow- 
doin man, with the exception of those on the 
musical clubs' New York trip, cast a vote; the 
fraternity men in the fraternity houses and the 
non-fraternity men in the LTnion. 

There were four propositions embodied in the 
referendum to the colleges. ^^ 

Number i called for ratification of the treaty 
as it stands, without reservation. 

Number 2 was a vote ag'ainst the treaty in any 
form. ' 

Number 3 called for ratification of the treaty 
with the Lodge reservations. 

Number 4 was a vote for compromising reser- 
vations in order to insure the ratification o%the 
treaty. 

The Bowdoin vote was as follows : 

Referendum. 123 4 

Student Body 41 5 69 239 

Faculty 7 o 3 15 

Total 48 5 -72 254 

The opinion of Bowdoin was found to coincide 
very closely with that of the majority of colleges 
and universities of the country, for, with very 
few exceptions, the referendum favored was 
number 4, which provided that a compromise 
should be reached in the reservations which 
would make possible a ratification of the Peace 
Treaty. For this reason it is hoped that this vote 
will have some influence in bringing about a rati- 
fication by the Senate. 



BOWDOIN COLONY AT HARVARD. 

Harvard in its various graduate schools has a 
colony of the younger Bowdoin alumni which 
numbers into the dozens this year. The Gradu- 
ate School of Arts and Sciences, the Law School, 
the Graduate School of Business Administration, 
and the Medical School all have representatives 
from Brunswick. There has been no formal 
gathering of the group, but there are constant 



informal meetings in the vicinity of Harvard 
Square, and every dinner of the Bowdoin Club 
of Boston finds a good sized delegation from 
Cambridge. Among the group are : Drapeau '16, 
Canney '16, Lane '17, Philbrick '17, Sutcliflfe '17, 
Shumway '17, Albion '18, Brooks ex-'i8, Mander- 
son '18, Smith '18, Van Wart '18, Young 18, Chin 
'19, Dunham '19, Haynes '19, Burleigh '19, L. C. 
Doherty '19, and Hilton '19. Professor Hormell 
is lecturing in Municipal Government at the Uni- 
versity this year, and Mr. Cochrane, formerly of 
the Bowdoin facult}^, is in the history department. 



HOCKEY NEWS. 

The hockey squad, under the direction of 
Manager Page '22, is now rounding into shape. 
Practice is being held every day and some promis- 
ing material has been discovered. Leighton '20, 
A. E. Morrill '22, and Tice '23, are doing good 
work on the forward line, while Graves '20, 
Willson '21, and Putnam '22 show up well as 
defense men. Richardson '22 seems the best can- 
didate for goal tender. W. L. Parent '21 and 
J. W. Parent '21 will be out for goal tender and 
a defense position after the mid-year examina- 
tions. Other candidates are Gorham '21, Tuttle 
'22, Keene '22, Pickard '22, Moses '22, Hayes '23, 
Swinglehurst '23, Keaney '23, and Hill '23. Four 
promising candidates, Draper '20, Clark '23, 
Whitman '23, and Burr '23, have been declared 
ineligible by the Dean. The three Freshmen 
may be able to play later. 

The attack will probabty center around Page 
who captained the Milton Academy team, cham- 
pions of Massachusetts in 1918. He is an ex- 
ceptionally fast man and should cause trouble to 
Bowdoin's opponents. 

Manager Page is attempting to secure 
games with the Portland Country Club., Tufts, 
New Hampshire State, Bates, Colby, and Maine. 
It is very difficult, however, to secure dates at 
such late notice. 



THE MUSICAL CLUB TRIP. 

The Bowdoin Musical Clubs opened the sea- 
son with a concert in New York City last Tues- 
day evening. The concert was arranged by the 
Bowdoin Alumni of New York and the New 



206 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



York State of Maine Club. While the concert 
was not a distinct financial success to the Alumni, 
they felt repaid for their efforts by thought that 
this concert would become an established annual 
custom. This concert was the first to be given 
in New York for nine years, but it is now pro- 
posed to have a concert there every year. 

The thirty-eight men who made the trip left 
Brunswick a week ago Monday morning. The 
trip was made via the Fall River Line, and the 
clubs arrived in New York Tuesday morning. 
Many thanks are due the Alpha Delta Phi Club 
of New York which offered the use of its rooms, 
and which served dinner to the members of the 
Musical Clubs on Tuesday evening. The concert 
was held in a ball room at the Waldorf-Astoria, 
and was followed by a dance. 

1. Bowdoin Song. Rise, Sons of 'Bov/doin. Sills-Bitrnett 

Glee and Mandolin CKibs. 

2. Violin Solo Selected 

Mr. Philbrick. 

3. Bariton Solo. Queen of the Earth PiusiUi 

Mr. Richan. 

4. March. Special Delivery Friedrich 

Mandolin Club. 

5. Chorus. Wake, Miss Lindy Warner 

Glee Club. 

6. Reading. 

Mr. Asnault. 

7. Flute Solo. Hungarian Pastoral Fa.nta.sy ... .Doppler 

Mr. Tvirgeon. 

S. Overture. Persian Princess Armstrong 

Mandolin Club. 

9. Chorus. Keep a' Coin' Jacobsen 

Glee Club. 

10. Bowdoin Songs, Eowdoin Beta, Words by Pierce, '<j6 

Phi Chi Words by Mitchell, '71 

Glee and Mandolin Clubs. 



MASQUE AND GOWN. 

The Masque and Gown is planning a vaudeville 
show for the Interscholastic Track Meet. The 
same entertainment may be used the afternoon 
of the Sophomore Hop. The show will consist 
of nine acts including two short plays, besides 
musical and comedy skits. Preparations are now 
being made and any men having a suitable act 
should see Cole '21 at 13 Hyde Hall. Active 
preparation will begin directly after mid-years 
in order to have the entertainment ready for 
February 20. 

Rehearsals for the Ivy Play, "Believe Me, 
Xantippe," are being held regularly under Mr. 
Huse. The manager has announced that the cast 
will be ready to go on the road February 15. 
Performances will be given in various parts of 
the stafe, and a trip to Boston will probably be 
made. Mr. Huse has stated that this will be one 
of the best Ivy Plays ever presented at Bruns- 



wick. 

Several members of the Faculty and student 
body will take part in the first play of the season 
for the Brunswick Dramatic Club. It is to be 
"Good Gracious Annabelle" and will be staged 
February 17. Professors Stone, Brown, and 
Wass, and Crockett '20, Rollins '20, Cole '21, 
Pendexter '21, and Quinby '23 will represent the 
college on the cast. The co-operation between 
the Dramatic Club and the Masque and Gown 
have always been a most pleasant and helpful 
part of Brunswick social life. 



RIFLE CLUB NOTES. 



The Rifle Club will shoot its first match, Feb- 
ruary 14, against Harvard. Matches are also 
being arranged with M. I. T., Tufts, Amherst, 
and Brown, in addition to the ten N. R. A. 
League matches. Less than a month is left to 
select a team. Practise is held at the Armory 
daily, except Saturday, from 2.30 to 4.30. All 
members of the Rifle Club should report for 
practise. The team comprises ten men. The 
five making the highest scores count in each 
match. 



CLASSICAL CLUB MEETING. 

The first meeting of the year of the Classical 
Club was held at the home of Dean Nixon on 
Tuesday evening, December 16. Dunbar '20 was 
elected president, and Thomson '21 secretary of 
the club. Dean Nixon was made the third mem- 
ber of the executive committee. After the busi- 
ness meeting games were pla.yed. Avery '20 was 
the winner of the Latin game, "Americani Clari"; 
Nixon '22 was the winner of the Pentathlon; 
Moses '20 for the third year held the champion- 
ship of the "Probatio Crunnn." The next meet- 
ing will probably be held at the home of Presi- 
dent Sills on the twentieth of January. The club 
will initiate its new members at this meeting'. 



THE DES MOINES CONVENTION. 

Have- you wondered how the money you gave 
to the Des Moines Convention Fund was spent? 
The delegation from Bowdoin has been to the 
Convention and has returned to the campus 
bubbling over with enthusiasm and inspiration. 
If you are interested in what took place at the 
greatest gathering of college students in the la^t 
six years, come to the Union next Sunday night 
at seven o'clock. Some of the delegates will 
give us a picture of the Convention and will be 
ready to answer any questions you may wish to 
ask about the whole movement. The meeting 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



207 



will be -short and snappy and will give anyone 
interested an idea of what took place. 

During the days from December 31 to January 
S, the Y. M. C. A. Student Volunteer Convention 
was held at Des Moines, Iowa. The real object 
of the convention was to obtain student volun- 
teers to enter upon the work of foreign missions. 
The convention was attended by 7700 college 
students, both, men and women, who represented 
■over 1000 colleges and universities. This great 
gathering contained representatives of over 40 
nationalities and of every state in the Union. 
Nineteen special trains arrived at Des Moines, 
December 31. The students were housed in 
private residences in the very efficient manner 
which marked the entire convention. The dele- 
gates were divided into state groups in the ses- 
sions, California furnishing the most members. 
Maine sent 22 delegates to the convention. 

The convention started at 2.30 p. m., December 
31, with Mr. John R. Mott presiding. The ses- 
sions consisted of three meetings a day; from 
9.15 to 11.45 a. m., from 2.30 to 5.00 p. m., and 
from 7.30 to 10.00 p. m. During these meetings 
the delegates were divided into groups in the 
Colosseum Building of Des Moines. The over- 
flow meetings were held in churches of the city. 
The speakers were both experienced and interest- 
ing. Every delegate left, greatly impressed with 
the great work carried on by the missionaries. 
The principal speakers were Mr. John R. Mott, 
Mr. Robert C. Spear, Dr. John Jennier, Dr. T. 
Zymer, and Dean Brown of Yale. Sherwood 
Eddy, the South Indian missionary, was especially 
interesting. 

Bowdoin was represented at the convention 
hy Noss '20, Reiber. '21, Buker '21, McGown '21, 
Cummings '21, and Congdon '22. 



The principal speaker was Professor 
Mitchell. He spoke of the size of the en- 
rolment at the College this year, and of the 
general trend of the subjects taken by the stu- 
dents since the war. 



BOWDOIN CLUB OF PORTLAND MEETS. 

The Bowdoin Club of Portland held its annual 
meeting at the Elks' Club on Thursday after- 
noon, December 17, with about 70 members 
present. After luncheon the following officers 
were elected : President, Lyman A. Cousens '03 ; 
vice president, Robert Hale '10; secretary and 
treasurer, Dwight H. Sayward '16; members 
executive committee, John F. Dana '08, Ralph O. 
Brewster '09, Arthur D. Welch '12, and Carl K. 
Ross '17. 

Ralph O. Brewster, representing the Alumni 
Council, addressed the club on the proposed plan 
for a general income and endowments which it 
is proposed to adopt from the so-called Yale 
plan. 



MILLION DOLLAR FUND BEING PLANNED 
FOR BOWDOIN. 

A fund of one million dollars is in prospect 
for Bowdoin because of the enterprise of her 
alumni who have recently planned a drive for 
its subscription. The income of the fund is to 
be used to cause an increase in the salaries of 
the professors. This is needed greatly, for there 
has been a yearly deficit of $10,000 in paying 
these salaries. This would eventually tend to 
lower the standard of the college inasmuch as 
,,-aHderpaid professors will be obliged to accept 
more lucrative offers unless their salaries were 
made commensurate with their services. 

The method of raising the fund is the so- 
called "Yale plan," which has proven remarkably 
successful. Every class has a member delegated 
to collect the contributions, and he may appoint 
a regional agent as assistant to canvass in the 
larger cities. A meeting was held in Brunswick 
in order to attend to the details of the preliminary 
arrangements. 

President Sills will name an alumni committee 
which will handle the fund. The con- 
tributions may be either to the principal or in 
the form of an annuity to be added to the in- 
come. Mr. Furbish, college treasurer, will re- 
ceive any form of subscriptions at the treasurer's 
office. Securities as well as subscriptions and 
contributions will not be restricted to alumni. 
The committee of the alumni council to initiate 
the drive consists of Harold L. Berry '01 of 
Portland, chairman, E. F. Abbott '03 of Auburn, 
and Ralph O. Brewster '09 of Portland. 



THE '68 PRIZE SPEAKING CONTEST. 

The annual prize speaking contest of the Class 
of '68 will be held in Memorial Hall Thursday 
evening, January 22. The prize is forty-five dol- 
lars given by the Class of 1868 to the author 
of the best written and spoken oration. The men 
to compete are chosen from the members of the 
Senior Class by the English Department. 

The speaker chosen to compete are : Philip 
Goodhue, Raymond Asnault, Jere Abbott, Richard 
McWilliams, Allan Constantine, and Edgar 
Taylor. All of these men have had a wide ex- 
perience in composition and public speaking and 
an unusually close contest is expected. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Wednesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 
Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 

department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 . On the Campus 
Roland L. McCormack, 1922 Exchange 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
Ronald B. Wadsworth, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requested from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Allan W. Hall, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 192 i Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 



Vol. XLIX. 



JANUARY 21, 1920. 



No. 22 



Entered at Post Office at Bninswick aa Second-Class Mail Matter 

The Y. M. C. A. 

One of the organizations on our campus about 
which we hear considerable but about which 
most of us know very little is the Student Y. M. 
C. A. We may be inclined to ask ourselves what 
its function on the campus is and whether it 
justifies its existence. As the name Student 



Young Men's Christian Association suggests, it 
is an organization of those students interested in 
promoting the Christian type of manhood on the 
campus. It is not purely a local institution. It 
is associated with the Student Department of the 
International Y. M. C. A. with a membership 
of 325,000 students in over 1200 schools and col- 
leges. Of course the local associations vary ac- 
cording to the local needs and the k)cal situa- 
tions. Our association is trying to adopt itself 
to the particular Bowdoin field. 

The purposes of our local Y. M. C. A. are 
three fold : 

( 1 ) To develop the religious and moral life 
on the campus. 

(2) To be an agency of service to the stu- 
dents in as many ways as possible. 

(3) To organize and dirBjft the use of stu- 
dent groups in community service. 

The first of these purposes may have several 
fields of expression. Some years it is possible 
to secure a series of outside speakers, authorities 
on moral and religious problems. Dr. Seerley's 
recent visit was the first of such a series this 
year. Sometimes it is possible to arrange a 
series of discussion groups in which the students 
may become intimately acquainted with some 
phase of religion or some modern moral or social 
question. 

The second of the Y. M. C. A.'s purposes has 
been most actively carried out this year. The 
"Freshman Bible," Freshman reception, and 
Medical School reception helped to acquaint new- 
comers with Bowdoin life. In maintaining an 
employment bureau the "Y" is attempting to find 
work for those who need it in their spare hours. 
It is ready to co-operate in any other pieces of 
service on the campus, such as a Red Cross con- 
vass or a series of life work professional meet- 
ings. 

The community work is developing along two 
lines. The first is that of Americanization in the 
form of night school classes among the foreign 
speaking population of the neighborhood. The 
other is the formation of a "deputation" to carry 
the college man's point of view and the college 
man's religious and moral ideas into the sur- 
rounding rural communities. 

There is the Y as it stand today on the campus. 
There are possibilities of its developing into a 
much more powerful organization and of its do- 
ing a much greater work. But what it is and 
what it becomes lie entirely with the student 
body. Under our blanket tax system every stu- 
dent who pays his tax automatically becomes a 
member of the "Y" and is entitled to any privi- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



209 



leges it is able to grant. All of us are general 
members. How many of us are active members ? 
If we have criticisms or suggestions, let's give 
them to the member of the cabinet in our house 
or our "end." And if we want some other kind 
of "Y" activit}^ let's suggest it to the Cabinet 
and offer our services to put it through. There 
are limited possibilities of expansion above the 
program now being attempted. There is a place 
for all of us in that program, too. "It's time to 
lay aside the hammers and take up the horn." 
Let us stop knocking unless we have some help- 
ful criticism, and let us all co-operate to boost 
the Bowdoin Y. M. C. A. to make it not only a 
power on the campus but the best Student As- 
sociation in New England. R. M. M. 



TRACK SCHEDULE ANNOUNCED. ^ 

The tentative schedule for track has been an- 
nounced by Manager Buker '21. The winter 
schedule includes five meets for Bowdoin and a 
possibility for several others. This schedule has 
been approved by the Bowdoin Faculty and is 
expected to be maintained for the entire season. 

The Bowdoin relay team will compete in the 
B. A. A. meet at Mechanics Hall, Boston, run- 
ning Williams February 7. Several of the 
special events will also be entered by Bowdoin 
men. This relay team will also run in the Mel- 
rose meet in New York, in the Hartford meet, 
and in the Boston College meet, although the 
dates have not yet been announced. 

The Bowdoin Interscholastic Schoolboy meet 
takes place at Bowdoin, February 14, and entry 
blanks are now being sent out to the different 
schools. 

The two other meets arranged are the Bow- 
doin-Bates dual meet at the Bowdoin gymnasium 
February 27 or 28, and the Freshman-Sophomore 
meet Friday evening, March 12. 

The schedule follows : 

February 7 — Boston A. A. at Mechanics Hall, 
Boston. 

February 12 — Freshman-Sophomore meet. 

February 14 — Bowdoin Interscholastic School- 
boy meet. 

February 19 — Interfraternity meet. 

February 27-28 — Bowdoin-Bates Dual Meet. 



"BOWDOIN MEN WHO HAVE MADE GOOD." 

"Bowdoin Men Who Have Made Good" is the 
subject which is to be presented at the next meet- 
ing of the Student Forum, to be held in the 
Bowdoin Union, January 26, at eight o'clock. 

The speaker is a man of national importance. 



Mr. George R. Walker '02, of New York City. 
Mr. Walker is chairman of the Placement Com- 
mittee of the Alumni Council. The function of 
this committee is to secure positions for Bowdoin 
men. Mr. Walker is an extremely busy man, but, 
at great inconvenience to himself, has consented 
to talk to Bowdoin men on this subject which 
ought to be of vital interest to them. 

Besides describing the way by which certain 
Bowdoin men have attained distinction, Mr. 
Walker will give a general survey of business 
conditions as they exist in New York and the 
opportunities they afford to college, and especial- 
ly, Bowdoin men. In addition, as chairman of 
the Placement Committee, he will receive the 
names of students, who wish to secure positions 
in the business for which they have preference. 
-Mr. Walker will make it Ms business to see that 
these men are introduced to other Bowdoin men 
who hold positions of influence in industry. By 
way of preparing the way for Mr. Walker's 
work, Dean Nixon will explain the plan in- 
formally in the Union, January 22, at seven 
o'clock. All are urged to attend these meetings 
that the plan of the alumni may be thoroughly 
understood and given the support of the student 
body. 

Bowdoin men will not only show themselves 
ungrateful to Mr. Walker's efforts, but also un- 
mindful of their own best interests, if they fail 
to take advantage of this unusual opportunity. 



TRIBUTE TO PRESIDENT FOSTER. 

In announcing the resignation of Dr. William 
Trufant Foster as president of Reed College, the 
Portland Oregonian, of December 19, quotes Dr. 
T. L. Eliot, president of the trustees, as follows, 
in part : 

"President William T. Foster, who has been 
at the head of Reed College since it was founded 
in 191 1, has resigned. When President Foster 
accepted this position in 1910, he was one of the 
youngest college presidents in the country. It is 
largely due to the initiative and daring of the 
young college president, combined with his 
knowledge of educational administration, that 
Reed College has rapidly made a place for itself 
in the academic world. From the outset Reed 
College has been a pioneer in adopting a progres- 
sive program for college administration. . . . 
The .college began its first year to offer a series 
of free lectures known as Reed extension courses. 
During the war the college gave two official gov- 
ernment courses. . . . 

"President Foster was sent to France during 



210 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



the war as one of the first inspectors sent by the 
War Work Council of the American Red Cross. 
He spent three months in England and France. 
He visited all the Red Cross stations, every 
American army camp then established, and a 
large section of the front lines. 

"... A group of 177 students were enrolled 
in the S.A.T.C. The college made an enviable 
"war record. Of all the male students enrolled on 
April 6, 1918, who were eligible for military ser- 
vice, 89 per cent, entered the service. Of these, 
73 per cent, entered by voluntary enlistment. 

"Throughout his administration. President 
Foster has worked for the close connection be- 
tween the college and the city. . . . Besides 
his participation in public affairs he has had a 
genuine interest in the individual students of 
Reed College." 

Dr. Foster will be remembered as Professor of 
English and Argumentation at Bowdoin from 
1905 until 1910, when he received his offer of the 
presidency of Reed College. He graduated from 
Harvard in 1901, and received the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy from Columbia in 191 1. 



BOWDOIN ALUMNI OF BOSTON HOLD 52nd 
ANNUAL REUNION. 
The Bowdoin Alumni of Boston and vicinity 
held their 52nd annual reunion on Wednesday 
evening, January 14. This was one of the first 
college reunion banquets in Boston this winter. 
President Sills represented the college and gave 
a short talk. Two important guests were Judge 
Anderson of the United States District Court and 
Professor Dallas Sharpe of Boston University. 
Shumway '17, whose rise on fighting record from 
lieutenant to lieutenant-colonel was one of the 
.startling incidents in the record of the 26th 
Division, was one of the speakers. Henry S. 
Chapman '91, son of Professor Henry S. Chap- 
man for forty years Bowdoin's chief English 
professor, acted as president of the Boston 
alumni organization. 



BASEBALL PROSPECTS. 

Manager Perkins has announced that indoor 
TDaseball practice in the cage in the gym will begin 
on March 5. Light workouts and training in the 
fundamentals of baseball will be given the candi- 
dates in preparation for the coming season. 
While Bowdoin lost a number of her best men 
last year, several old men will return the- next 
semester to fill up the ranks. Lawrence Mc- 
Elwee, who has been away in the service for a 
long time will return. He was formerly one of 
the best third basemen in the State. "Gramp" 



White, one of the college pitchers in the State, 
will also be back. There is an abundance of ma- 
terial in the Freshman class which will help mat- 
ters along. A very good schedule has been ar- 
ranged and great confidence is felt by the man- 
agement and Coach Houser. 



BANGOR CLUB HOLDS MEETING. 

There was a meeting of the Bowdoin Alumni 
of Bangor at the Chamber of Commerce, Mon- 
day, Dec. 29, 1919. There were 43 present, in- 
cluding a number of undergraduates who were 
guests of the club for the evening. Edgar M. 
Simpson, Esq., '94, presided. There were no 
after dinner speeches, but a number of matters 
pertaining to the interests of the college were 
discussed. An informal report was made by the 
committee appointed to make the arrangements 
for the annual concert by the musical clubs, and 
February 6 was tentatively set as the date of the 
event. The matter of having the Masque and 
Gown present its play in Bangor sometime during 
the winter was also discussed. The following 
Alumni were present : 

Taber D. Bailey, Esq., '96 ; Elmar T. Boyd, '95 ; 
Dr. Elmer E. Brown, Medic '88; Dr. B. L. 
Bryant, '95; Charles P. Conners, Esq., '93; 
George F. Eaton, Esq., '14; Charles A. Flagg, 
'94; Edward R. Godfrey, Esq., '99; Dr. Louis C. 
Hatch, '95 ; Dr. H. J. Hunt, '02 ; Dr. F. H. Mead, 
'95; Harvey D. Miller, '17; Dr. Norman H. Nick- 
erson, '16; Leo W. Pratt, '14; Dr. D. A. Robin- 
son, '73; Dr. Harrison L. Robinson, '11; Dr. 
Harry W. Sampson, Medic '06; Arno C. Savage, 
ex-'i9; Paul C. Savage, '13; Edgar M. Simpson, 
Esq., '94 (president) ; Frederick B. Simpson, '12; 
Dr. A. E. Small, Medic '95 ; Donald F. Snow, '03 ; 
Dr. Walter E. Whitney, Medic ex-'ga ; Dr. James 
P. Russell, '97; Roswell F. Averill, Medic ex-'oo; 
Edgar F. Cousins, '12; Samuel B. Dray, '03 ; John 
A. Harlow, '03; Walter V. Wentworth, '86. 

The following undergraduates were also 
present: E. A. Allen, '20; O. G. Hall, '21; Hel- 
son, '21 ; C. E. Allen, '22; Averill, '22; Vose, '22; 
Black, '23; Mitchell, '23; W. E. Whitney, '23; 
Webb, '23 ; E. L. Herlihy, Medic '20 ; E. T. Mur- 
ray, Medic '22; and H. E. Whalen, Medic '23. 



©n tbe Campus 

Tufts College will open its football season in 
1920 with a game with Bowdoin at Medford, 
Mass., October 2. 

Many Bowdoin men appeared on the Bruns- 
wick list of subscribers to the Roosevelt Me- 
morial Association. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



211 



Kappa Chapter of Psi Upsilon accorded a re- 
ception to ex-President Taft Friday afternoon 
before his lecture. 

The Bowdoin College fencing team has been 
matched to meet Harvard at Cambridge, Mass., 
February 7. 

Coach Magee passed a part of the Christmas 
holida3's in Boston. 

The Bates College baseball schedule has games 
listed with Bowdoin to be played at Lewiston on 
April 19 and May 31 and at Brunswick on June 4. 

Mitchell '19 returned to New York Sunday 
after passing the Christmas holidays with his 
parents, Professor and Mrs. Wilmot B. Mitchell. 

Haskell '18, of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, passed the Christmas holidays with 
his parents. Dr. and Mrs. Alaric W. Haskell. 

Reginald Howe ex-'i8 was on the Campus be- 
fore the holidays. 

Dr. Lake of Harvard, formerly of St. Mary's, 
Oxford, gave the sermon at Chapel the Sunday 
before Christinas recess. His address on "Learn- 
ing and Faith" wa's most inspiring. Dr. Lake 
is one of the foremost theologians in this country 
today. 

The hockc}' rink has been flooded. Practice 
started with the opening of college. 

Men who desire work next summer should 
leave their names with Mrs. Hayes at the Dean's 
office. 

Smiley '21 has returned from Boston where he 
underwent an operation for appendicitis. 

Ernest Fuller '17 was oil the Campus two days 
before the Christmas vacation. 

Coach Magee has been assisting in developing 
a track team at Westbrook Seminary during the 
past few weeks. 

The athletic council met Thursday evening to 
consider the track and football schedule for the 
coming season. 

An attractive offer from the Goodyear Rubber 
Co. appears on the bulletin board in which men 
are asked to join the so-called Flying Squadron 
where they work three years in the main factory 
and then, if they make good, receive a 
manager's position in a branch plant. 

John J. Magee, coach of the Bowdoin College 
track team, was the speaker at the monthly meet- 
ing of the Bowdoin Club of Portland. 

The hockey team has started practice on the 
new rink with about 15 candidates reporting. 
A call has also been sent out by Manager Page 
for Freshman candidates for assistant manager. 

Allen '22 has returned to college after recover- 
ing from a severe operation which necessitated 
a four weeks' absence. 



Monday evening, December 15, the Athletic 
Council met to consider some important ques- 
tions which required attention. The council ap- 
pointed Page '22 as manager of hockey for the 
coming season. It is hoped that a series of games 
will soon be arranged. 

One hundred seats at Mechanic's Hall, Boston, 
have been reserved for Bowdoin men, for the 
B. A. A. Meet which will be held on the evening- 
of Februarjr 7. 

Coach Magee and Manager Buker were in 
Lewiston last Wednesday to make the final ar- 
rangements with the Bates management and 
Coach Smith for the Bowdoin-Bates Dual Meet 
which will be held at Bowdoin on February 28. 

The '68 Prize Speaking Contest will be held 
next Thursday, January 22. The speakers are to 
'lae^Abbott, Asnault, Constantine, Goodhue, Mc- 
Williams, and Taylor. The prize of $45 is 
awarded annually for the best written and 
spoken oration to a member of the Senior Class. 

Ellms '20 was back on the Campus last Sunday 
after several days illness in the infirmary. 

The hockey game scheduled with the Canadian 
Club of Portland last Saturday was cancelled on 
account of weather conditions. 



mitf) m jFacuItp 

President Sills attended the annual meet- 
ing of the National Collegiate Athletic As- 
sociation, held in New York December 30, as 
the representative of the First District. He 
spoke of the success that is being gained by the 
system of compulsory athletics for Freshmen in 
so many of the New England colleges. He stated 
that it will be impossible, however, for the smal- 
ler colleges to put their athletics on a sound and 
wholesome basis until the larger universities re- 
duce their expenses and place intercollegiate con- 
tests in their proper proportion. 

On Fridajr, January 9, President Sills ad- 
dressed the Rotary Club of Portland at its week- 
ly luncheon at the Congress Square Hotel. In 
the afternoon he motored to Brunswick with ex- 
President Wm. H. Taft. 

Dr. Whittier attended the banquet given 
to Dr. D. A. Sargent at the Vendome, Boston, 
Saturday evening, December 27. 

Professor and Mrs. Charles T. Burnett enter- 
tained with a Christmas party at their new resi- 
dence, December 25. Among the guests were : 
Professor and Mrs. William Hawley Davis, Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. George Roy Elliott, Professor 
Charles C. Hutchins, Professor Thomas C. Van 
Cleve. 



212 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Professor Ham was the speaker before the 
Kiwanis Club, Portland, at a luncheon last Tues- 
day. He spoke upon the Russian situation, 
principally from the knowledge gained while he 
was connected with the American embassy at 
Petrograd. Professor Ham's remarks aroused 
much interest and appreciation. 

Professor Ham has been elected faculty ad- 
visor for the Bowdoin Chapter of Kappa Sigma 
fraternity, and Professor McClean has ■ been 
elected to a similar office for the Beta Sigma 
Chapter of Beta Theta Pi. 

Professor Stanwood addressed the Saturday 
Club of Brunswick on Thursday, January 15, in 
Wheeler Hall, on the subject of "The Early 
Gospel Historians." 

William Trufant Foster, president of Reed 
College at Portland, Oregon, and former instruc- 
tor at Bowdoin, has been chosen superintendent 
of the public schools of Los Angeles, Cal. 



aiumni litotes 

'06 — In connection with the recent National 
Shoe Retailers Convention in Boston, the Boston 
Transcript recently printed a portrait of Dr. Mel- 
vin T. Copeland, who is the director of the 
Bureau of Business Research of the Harvard 
Graduate School of Business Administration. 
The picture appeared in connection, particularly, 
with an article showing the value of this bureau 
to the retail trade in this country. Dr. Copeland 
was an Everett fellow from Bowdoin and a mem- 
ber of Beta Theta Pi. 

'13 — Mr. Cedric Russell Crowell was married 
to Miss Hester Frances Flynn, October 8, 1919, 
at Richmond Hill, Long Island. 

'14 — Paul L. White, who was a captain in the 
A.E.F. and aide to General Hale, has been recent- 
ly appointed instructor in history at Yale. 

'16 — Hugh M. Hescock is with the Library 
Bureau, New York Office, at 316 Broadway. 



Broivn Daily Herald: President Faunce has 
received a medal from the University of Paris, 
in commemoration of the service rendered by the 
teachers and students of the allied universities in 
the war, and as a token of friendly allegiance 
between the educators of France and the United 
States. 

The Colby Echo: A triangular debating league 
has been formed with Tufts and Clark. 

Colby will not participate in intercollegiate 
basketball this year. 



RESOLUTION. 

Bozvdoin Chapter of Delta Upsilon: 

The Chapter sorrowfully records the death of 
Brother John Emersffn Burbank of the Class of 
1896. Through serious and earnest effort he won 
several honors in college, and was appointed to 
*.B.K. He was awarded by Bowdoin two de- 
grees, A.B. and A.M.. In later life Brother Bur- 
bank attained success. He was an assistant and 
instructor in phj'sics at Bowdoin, a Whiting fel- 
low at Harvard, instructor of sciences at the 
University School in Providence, Rhode Island, 
and instructor in physics at the University of 
Maine. After serving several years as Magnetic 
Observer in the United States Coast and Geodetic 
Survey, he was made observer in charge of the 
Cheltenham Magnetic Observatory at Chelten- 
ham, Maryland. He' was an active member of 
the American Physical Society, the Washington 
Philosophical Society, and the American Associa- 
tion for Advancement of Science. 

To his wife and children the Brothers in Delta 
Upsilon extend condolence in their deep grief. 
With them the Chapter mourns for one who ful- 
filled his life's purpose perseveringly and 
worthily. 

For the Chapter, 

Paul V. Mason. 

J. Maxim Ryder. 

Hartley F. Simpson, Jr. 



TENTATIVE EXAMINATION SCHEDULE. 

^ First Semester, 1919-20. 

Tuesday, January 27 

Division C. of English i at 7 p. m. in Memorial Hall. 
Thursday, January" 29 

8.30 a.m. — Government i, Adams Hall. 

International Law, Memorial Hall. 

Economics 5, Memorial Hall. 

English 5, Bannister Hall. 
1,30 p. m. — History 7, Memorial Hall. 

Greek A, Memorial Hall. 

Astronomy, Memorial -Hall. 

Physics 5, Memorial Hall. 

German i, Adams Hall. 

German 3, Adams Hall. 

Friday, January 30 

S.30 a. m. — Zoology i and 7, Adams Hall. 

Economics 3, Memorial Hall. 

English 3, Memorial Hall. 

Music 3, Memorial Hall. 
1.30 p. m — Spanish i, Memorial Hall. 

Spanish 3, Alemorial Hall 

Surveying, Memorial Hall. 

Psychology 5, Memorial Hall. 
Saturday, January 31 
8.30 a.m. — Chemistry i, Adams Hall. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



213 



History 9, Memorial Hall. 

English 15, Memorial Hall. 

German 5, Memorial Hall, Room 4. 
1.30 p.m. — Literature i, Adams Hall. 

English I (except Div. C), Memorial Hall. 

Mathematics 5, Memorial Hall. 
Monday, February 2 
3.30 a.m. — Economics i, Adams Hall. 

Economics 7, Memorial Hall. 

Zoology 9, Memorial Hall. 
[.30 p.m. — Geology i, Adams Hall. 

French 3, Memorial Hall. 

Latin 3, Memorial Hall. 

Mathematics 10, Memorial Hall. 
Tuesday, February 3 
3.30 a. m. — Chemistry 3, Memorial Hall. 

Chemistry 4, Memorial Hall. 

Chemistry 5, Memorial Hall. 

Latin 5. Adams Hall. 

French i, Adams Hall. 
1.30 p.m. — Hygiene, Memorial Hall. 

History 3, Adams Hall. 

Chemistry 7, Adams Hall. 

Italian i, Adams Hall. 

Wednesday, February 4 
5.30 a.m. — Physic's I, Memorial Hall. 

Physics 3, Memorial Hall. - 

Psychology 3, Adams Hall. 

Latin A, Adams Hall. 

Greek i and 7, Adams Hall. 
.30 p.m. — Mathematics i, Memorial Hall. 

Mathematics 3, Adams Hall. 

Music 5, Adams Hall. 

Thursday, February 5 
1.30 a.m. — Music I, Memorial Hall. 

Psychology 1, Memorial Hall. 

Greek 3, Memorial Hall. 
.30 p.m. — Latin i, Memorial Hall. 

English 17, Mem9rial Hall. 
Friday, February 6 
1.30 a.m. — French 5, Memorial Hall. 
Please report any conflicts to the Dean at once. 



CALENDAR. 

January 20 — '68 Prize Speaking, Memorial 
Hall, 8.00 p. m. 

January 22 — Dean Nixon, Bowdoin Union 7.00 
p. m., Exposition of Alumni Plan for Bowdoin 
Men; '68 Prize Speaking, Memorial Hall, 8.00 
p. m. 

January 26 — Student Forum, George R. 
Walker, Esq. ; Bowdoin Union, 8.00 p. m., "Bow- 
doin Men Who Have Made Good." 

January 29 — Finals begin. 

February 6 — Musical Clubs in Bangor. 

February 7 — Fencing Team at Harvard; B. A. 
A. Meet; Relay Team vs. Williams. 

February 9 — Second Semester begins. 

February 19 — Fraternity Dances at the Chapter 
Houses. 

February 20 — Sophomore Hop in the Gym. 



LIFE, ACCIDENT and HEALTH 
INSURANCE 

SETH G. HALEY '07 
64 Pearl St. Hartford, Ct. 

CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 

4 Elm Street 



s-c 




PAGE & SHAW'S APOLLO 

The Spear Folks 

119 MAINE ST. 

DANCING 

Miss Jennie S. Harvey's Evening Dancing 
Class and Assembly every Tuesday evening at 
Town Hall, Brunswick, commencing Oct. 21st. 

Lesson 7.30 p. m. Assembly 8.30 p. m. 

This class is open to college students. 

Private instruction by appointment. 

Monday evening Class and Assembly at Arm- 
ory Hall, Bath. 

Address 897 Middle St., Bath, Maine. 'Phone 
151-W. 

PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSON'S PHARMACY 



MESERVE'S FRUIT SHERBET 

The Blended Product of the Natural Juices of 
Sound Ripe Fruit and Berries. A Delicious and 
Healthful Beverage for Receptions, Teas and 
Parties. Prepared only by 

P. J. MESERVE, Pharmacist, 
Near Post Office, Brunswick, Maine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

"UNION'' LUNCH 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 
Sundays: 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES CAKE ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 
FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 

We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

Tel. 136-137 
-2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16. 



87 Maine Street 
Branch Store 



WE CARRY 

Co-operative Shoes 
New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 
LARGEST AND BEST 

stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



FALL STYLES 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 

NOW READY FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

John A. Legro Co. 

BATH, MAINE 
A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office - - - Brunswick, Maine 



BUTLER'S 

Bowdoin Men Keep Warm 

TRADE WITH 

American Clothing Co. 

BATH, MAINE 

J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The Bowdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 

Portland 


WILLIAM F. FERRIS 

COLLEGE AGENT 


ANTIQIVTY SHOP 

AT THE SIGN OF THE STREET RAILWAY 

147 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

SDID JFurniture, SDIB China, ©etoter, ffitt. 

Miss Stetson ^ves personal attention 


Citizens Laundry 

AUTO SERVICE 9 SOUTH APPLETON 


to orders for antique goods of any kind 


Telephone 160 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Decorations for all occasions 

at the old established 

Greenhouses 

WILLIAM BUTLER, The Florist 


COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 


CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 


Meat Trays, Vegetable Dishes 

NEW SHEFFIELD WARE 
A. G. PAGE COMPANY, Bath 



^^The Store of Progress and Service'' 

Smart yet Conservative 

A NY College man who has a cultivated discrimination of genuine 
style refinement will find his admiration aroused in our inordi- 
nately smart Suits — many of them from the House of Kuppenheimer. 
The style features are noticeably distinctive yet having a thorough air 
of refinement; the fabrics attain the eminence of elegance, and the 
tailoring is handled in so masterly a manner as to insure absolute 
shape-permanence; grace in fit and drape, and unusual enduring service. 

$35 - $65 

For further information see Mr. Jack Handy '23 at the Zeta 
Psi House. He is our representative. 



Monument Square 




Portland, Maine 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

CHARLES RAY 

IN 

"CROOKED STRAIGHT" 




FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
HOUDINI 

IN 

"THE GRIM GAME" 



NEXT WEEK 

MONDAY and TUESDAY 

BRYANT WASHBURN 

IN 

WHY SMITH LEFT HOME" 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 
NORMA TALMADGE 

IN 

"THE PROBATION WIFE" 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
WILLIAM RUSSELL 

IN 

"SACRED SILENCE" 



NEXT WEEK 

MONDAY and TUESDAY 

MONROE SALISBURY 

IN 

'THE MAN IN THE MOONLIGHT" 



Vol. XLIX. No. 23 



FEBRUARY 11, 1920 



BOWDOIN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



c 

- 

Bowdoin Wins Triangular Relay 
Hai-vard Fencers Beat Bowdoin 
Team 


ONTENTS 


1 
, Is Forum 


'AGE 

219 
219 

219 
219 
220 

220 
220 
220 
220 
222 
222 
222 

222 


PA.GE 

215 

215 
215 
215 

216 
216 
216 
216 

217 

217 
217 

218 
218 


George Walker, Esq. 


Classical Club Initiates . . . 
Bowdoin Man Wins High Jump 

at Oxford 

A Prize Republican Platform . 
Old Debating League Revives . 
Manager Willson Announces 

Football Schedule 

On the Campus 

With the Faculty ...... 

Alumni Notes 


Fire Wrecks Historic Union . . 
Musical Clubs Go Up-State . . 
Hockey Games: 

Bates Defeats Bowdoin 5-1 . 

Bowdoin 6, P. C. C. 4 . . . 

Bates Beats Bowdoin 9-4 . . 

Track Notes 

Dramatic Clippings 

Taylor Wins '68 Prize Speaking 

Contest 

Report of Xmas Dance Committee 
Editorial : 

Fraternity Men Attention!! . 
Dean Nixon Outlines Alumni plan 


Calendar .... 




MacMillan Contracts 


for Arctic 







BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Let Jud **Outline'' your work and do your "Cutting" for you. 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



PRINTING 



OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWN BUILDING BRUNSWICK 



The College Book Store 

We wish to call your 
attention to our new 

FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

in a large man size pa- 
per. 

The stock is the well known 
OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

The price is $ 1 .00 per box 
F. W. CHANDLER & SON 



COLLEGE AND 'TREP" SCHOOL MEN 

Clothing for Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 
ercoats and Ulsters. 




Haberdashery 



Hats 



MacuUar Parker Company 

400 Washington St. Boston, Mass. 

"THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT" 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



EVENING CLOTHES 

Designed and tailored es- 
pecially for us by 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 

CORRECT DRESS 
FURNISHINGS 



Haskell & Jones Co. 



Portland, 



Maine. 




ARROW 



'\Iroy tailored 

Soft Collars 

CLUETT, PEABODY 4 CO., INC.. TROY, N. Y. 



ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



Blue Serge Suits 

Young Men's Model — Double-breasted 

All wool 

$40 



E. S. BODWELL & SON, 

Brunswick. 



Greenhouse 21 -W 
Residence 21-R 



WALTER 
F- 1- O 


L. LaROCK 
R 1 s -r 


Potted Plants 
Floral Designs 


and Cut Flowers 
for All Occasions 

15% Jordan Avenue 



Christmas Cards 5c to 50c 

Fancy Box Paper 50c to $3.00 

Manicure Rolls 

$2.00 to $20.00 

Ladies' and Gents' Purses 

$L25 to $7.00 

Courson & Morton 

80 MAINE ST. The Bowling Alley is next door 



BOWDOIN ORILNT 



VOL. XLIX 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEBRUARY 11, 1920 



NO. 23 



BOWDOIN WINS B. A. A TRIANGULAR 
RELAY. 

Before a large crowd of spectators, which in- 
ckided manjr Bowdoin supporters, Bowdoin ran 
away from Williams and Worcester Polytechnic 
in a 1560 yard triangular relay race in Mechanic's 
Building at the 31st of the series of the Boston 
AtTiletic Association Meets, Saturday evening, 
Feb. 7. 

Thanks to the ability of Averill, Bowdoin took 
the lead at the start in the race with Williams 
and Worcester Polytechnic. Bowdoin led bj^ 
three 3'ards when the first relay was over, with 
Codding of Williams a like distance ahead of 
Cart of Worcester. 

The relative positions remained unchanged 
throughout, although the remaining Williams 
runners forced the Maine runners and it re- 
quired all the speed and stamina of George Good- 
win to stave off the determined efforts of Brown. 
Worcester was a good distance back. The win- 
ner's time was 3 minutes 16 seconds. The other 
two members of the rela}^ team were Hunt and 
M. Smith. 

Bowdoin also scored a victory when Palmer, 
a Freshman, captured the 660-yard handicap. 
With 20 yards Palmer took the race away from 
Dave Caldwell of the B. A. A., at the finish. C. 
H. Niccol of Harvard, was third with 24 yards. 
Palmer's time was one minute 30 1-5 seconds. 

Bowdoin was represented in the invitation 40- 
yard dash by Thomson who narrowly lost the 
fourth heat to W. D. Hayes of Notre Dame Uni- 
versity. The time was 5 seconds. 

Thomson also made a good showing in the 
field of crack hurdlers, when he came in close 
behind G. A. Wilson, of University of Virginia, 
■ who made a time of 6 3-5 seconds. L. H. Moses 
of Bowdoin, also made fast time in the hurdles, 
coming in second behind W. Smith of Cornell 
Universit)', who made the even faster time of 
6 1-2 seconds.. E. J. Thomson of Dartmouth won 
the finals with a time of 6 seconds, equalling his 
own world's record. 

Goodwin, who ran the handicap mile as ' well 
as the relay, finished third in this event with 15 
yards. M. K. Douglass of Phillips-Exeter, and 



G. W. Scammons of Yale, each with 50 yards, 
came in first and second respectively. The time 
was 4 minutes 24 2-5 seconds. 



HARVARD FENCERS BEAT BOWDOIN TEAM. 

The Harvard fencing team led Bowdoin in its 
opening match of the season in the Hemenway 
Gymnasium Saturday, Feb. 7, by 6 to 3. Captain 
Snow of the Crimson was easily the star with 
three victories, and Schlosberg, Bowdoin's leader, 
won two. The summary : 

^"Snow (Harvard) beat Rollins (Bowdoin) S — 6 

Snow (Harvard) beat Schlosberg (Bowdoin) 5 — 4 

Snow (Harvard) beat Ogden (Bowdoin) e — 5 

Ordway (Harvard) beat Ogden (Bowdoin) 11 — 8 

Schlosberg (Bowdoin) beat Ordway (Harvard 11 — 10 

Brewster (Harvard) beat Rollins (Bowdoin) 9 — 3 

Ogden (Bowdoin) beat Brewster (Harvard) 15 — 14 

Barss (Harvard) beat Rollins (Bowdoin) 11 — 8 

Schlosberg (Bowdoin) beat Howard (Harvard) 8 — 6 



FIRE WRECKS HISTORIC UNION. 

The college community was startled to find the 
Union in flames soon after mid-night of last 
Thursday. It was some time before the sleigh 
arrived with the hose, but this was soon attached, 
upon arriving, to the college hydrants by the fire- 
fighting force and student volunteers. With sev- 
eral streams of water spraying upon the flames 
the conflagration was soon under control. The 
Union, once the old Sargent Gymnasium and one 
of the original college group, has been used since 
the building of the new gymnasium as the light- 
ing and heating plant of the college with recre- 
ation rooms and a canteen upstairs. All the 
furnishings of the upstairs rooms were destroyed 
but the boilers of the heating plant were saved, 
and the lighting system was attached to the town 
supply, so that both light and heat were forth- 
coming Friday. Students aided in clearing the 
rubbish and building a shelter for the boilers 
Friday and Saturday. The cause of the fire has 
not vet been ascertained. 



MUSICAL CLUBS GO UP-STATE. 

The Musical Clubs gave their concert at Pitts- 
field and Bangor over the week end. The bad 
weather conditions had a tendency to decrea:;c 
the attendance at the entertainments. 



216 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BATES DEFEATS BOWDOIN 5-1. 

On the Lake Andrews rink at Lewiston, Wed- 
nesday evening, Jan. 21, the Bates College 
hockey team defeated the Bowdoin seven 5-1. 
The game was not as one-sided as the score in- 
dicates, and provided plenty of thrills for the 
large crowd which gathered at the rink. In the 
first 10 minutes of play, with both teams playing 
a fast game, neither side scored. Then Cutler 
began Bates' scoring by shooting the puck 
through the Bowdoin goal. Bowdoin came back 
strong at the beginning of the second period, 
when Morrill scored the only point. Sauvage, 
who shot three goals, starred for Bates, while 
Page and Morrill played a fast game for the 
AVhite. 

BATES (0)— —(1) BOWDOIN 

Burns, r.w l.w., Leighton 

Eoberts, c c, Page 

Provost. Woodward, l.w r.w., Morrill 

Cutler, r r., Tice 

Sauvage, c.p c.p.. Graves, Wilson 

Mosher, Buker, p p., Putnam 

Wiggen. g S-, Doherty 

Goals — Sauvage 3, Cutler, Roberts, Morrill. Referee — 
Ness. Attendance— 300. 



Score — Bowdoin 6, Portland Country Club 4. Referee — 
Abbott. Timer — Johnson. Periods — Two 20-minute periods. 



BOWDOIN 6, P. C. C. 4. 

Clean sportsmanship shown by both aggrega- 
tions was the feature of a fast game at the 
Country Club rink Jan. 24 when Bowdoin de- 
feated the Portland Country Club aggregation 
6 to 4. The game was interesting throughout. 
When' the game started. Bill Clapp pulled the 
5'reatest sensation of the afternoon when he 
ploughed down the ice with the puck and in the 
first two minutes put Portland in the lead by one 
cage. But they held this lead only a short time 
Ijcfore it was again a tie after Page scored one 
for Bowdoin. The half ended a tie, two all 
around, but in the second half on fast work by 
Morrill, Bowdoin won the contest when with the 
assistance of one goal by Putnam, Morrill made 
three counts. 

Snow at the goal played well and made stops 
that . were most noticeable to the few witnesses 
whil Foss' and Clapp's work on their quickness 
was a great help to the losers. Page and Morrill 
of Bowdoin were very fast and their work was 
the cause of Bovvdoin's victory. 

BOWDOIN— —P. c. c. 

Morrill, r.w l.w., Foss 

Page, c c, Clapia 

Leighton, l.w r.w., Adams 

Curtis, c.p c.p., Thurston 

Putnam, p p. Hall 

Doherty, g g. Snow 



BATES BEATS BOWDOIN, 9-4 

A weak defence on the part of Bowdoin was 
taken advantage of by Bates Jan. 21, and the 
Lewiston team won the first ice hockey game to 
be played here this season by a score of 9 to 4. 
Brilliant games were played by Provost, Roberts, 
Curtis and Morrill. 

The summary : 

BATES— —BOWDOIN 

Bernard (Burns), r.w rw., Morrill 

Provost, l.w l.w., Leighton (Tice) 

Roberts, c c. Page 

Cutler, c.p c.p., Curtis 

Mosher (Buker), p p., Putnam 

Wiggin. g g., Doherty 

Score — Bates 9. Bowdoin 4. Goals — Provost 6, Cutler, 
Roberts, Burns, Morrill 2, Leighton, Page. Referee — Perry 
of Portland Country Club. Timers— John J. Magee of Bow- 
doin, Carl H. Smith of Bates. Time — Two 20-minute 
periods. 



TRACK NOTES. 

Through an error it was stated in the Orient 
of last issue that the Freshman-Sophomore Track 
Meet and the Interfraternity Track Meet would 
be held on February I2, and February 19, re- 
spectively. These meets will take place a month 
later than the dates given, on March 12 and 19. 

Fifty entry blanks for the Bowdoin Inter- 
scholastic Meet, which is to take place in the 
Gym on the afternoon of Feb. 14, were sent out 
to schools. Six or seven schools have already 
signified their intention of entering men in this 
meet, among them being Coburn Classical In- 
stitute, Gorham High, and Bridgeton Academy, 
three new entrants. 

As special attractions it is now hoped that An- 
dover and Phillips Exeter will come for the meet. 
Ray A. Shepherd, former coach at M. C. I. and 
present Andover coach, is desirous of sending' a 
team to Bowdoin, and it is understood that the 
athletic director is also heartily in favor of the 
plan. The decision now rests with the faculty. 
If Andover decides to send a team, undoubtedly 
Exeter will do likewise, for the two schools are 
keen rivals. 

The prospects of speed at the meet are rather 
uncertain, for little is known of the strength of 
the teams. Hebron, which has won the meet for 
years, is handicapped this year by the loss by 
graduation of several men. This situation neces- 
sitates a new team, but with Wardwell, Beals, 
and Pike as a nucleus, Hebron will doubtless be 
strong'. Westbrook Seminary has been practising 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



for the last month, and has a strong aggrega- 
tion. Jack Magee has been devoting his Satur- 
days to whipping the team into shape. Pat 
French, former track coach at Maine, who is 
now coaching Portland and Deering High 
Schools expects to bring several stars. Reports 
have not been received from other schools as yet. 
The feature will be a series of relay races be- 
tween the school-boy teams. As far as possible 
the teams will be paired according to their wishes. 
There will be the usual twelve events besides the 
relay races on the card, including the 40 yard 
dash, 45 yard high hurdles, 220 yard dash, 440 
yard dash, 880 yard dash, mile run, running- 
broad jump, running high jump, pole vault, 12- 
pound shot-put, hammer throw, and discus 
throw. Silver, bronze, and ribbon medals will 
be given in place of cups to the winners of first, 
second, and third places, respectively. 



DRAMATIC CLIPPINGS. 

The Masque and Gown calls attention to the 
Saturday Club vaudeville and dance to be given 
on Feb. 11. The -cast includes a number of the 
college students. 

On Feb. 12, the Masque and Gown will play 
"Believe Me, Xantippe" in Rockland, and on the 
following evening in Thomaston. The cast that 
will play is as follows : 

Helson of the College orchestra will furnish 
the music in both Rockland and Thomaston. 

MacFarland Asnault '20 

Sole Rollins "20 

Brown Crockett '20 

"Buck" Kamman Ridlon '22 

Calloway Parcher '23 

Rigley Ingraham '21 

William Hall '21 

Martha Boardman '21 

Violet Reiber '21 

Dolly Kamman Badger '21 

The month of February will be the banner 
month for dramatics at Bowdoin. The Masque 
and Gown will make several flying trips to dif- 
ferent parts of the State. The itinerary will in- 
clude performances at Brunswick, Portland, 
Rockland, Thomaston, Pittsfield, Bangor, and 
Skowhegan. Manager Cole is trying to arrange 
a Massachusetts trip during the Easter vacation. 

Rehearsals are being held almost daily. Ex- 
cellent progress is being made by all members 
of the casts. Following up the custom inaugur- 
ated at the Christmas dance, on the afternoon 
before the Sophomore Hop, the Masque and 
Gown will again provide entertainment for the 
guests of the College by means of a tea and a 
\audeville performance in the Gym. 



TAYLOR WINS '68 PRIZE SPEAKING 
CONTEST. 

Before a large audience in Memorial Hall, 
Jan. 22, Edgar Curtis Taylor won the annual 
Class of 1868 Prize Speaking Contest, awarded 
for the best written and spoken oration written 
by a member of the Senior class. President 
Sills, the presiding officer, called the attention of 
the audience to the large number of contests held 
since the establishment of the prize and the dis- 
tinction attained by many of its winners. The 
judges, John E. Chapman, Esq., of Brunswick; 
Professor John M. Carroll, of Bates College; and 
Superintendent John A. Cone, of Topsham, were 
unanimous in their award. Honorable mention 
was made of Allan William Constantine. 

The program follows : 

Music 
^ THe College Man and Religion .... Allan William Constantine 
Benjamin Franklin : A Consistent Life, 

Philip Everett Goodhue 
Music 

The Travail of the Theatre George Raymond Asnault 

"Our Next Enemy"? Edgar Curtis Taylor 

Music 

The Need of Sane Thinking *Jere Abbott 

A View of National Unity. .. .Richard Kenneth Mc Williams 

Music 

Announcement of the Judges' Decision. 

Music by College Orchestra. 

''E.xcused. 



REPORT OF CHRISTMAS DANCE 
COMMITTEE. 

Dec. 22, 1919. 

Ticket Sales: 

By Committee 128 $704.00 

At door 34 187.00 



162 



Comiilimentary (Com.). 



Total 167 

Expenditures : 

Programmes $365.42 

Catering 260.00 

Music— Orchestra 94.10 

Hotel Eagle 17.50 

Higgins .\. 75.00 

Hacks 16.00 

Litchfield (teaming) 11.31 



Matron 

Tickets 

Total expense . 



6.00 
1.50 



Bal. turned over to Student Council. $45.17 

Respectfully submitted by 

Emerson W. Zeitler, Chairman, 
Audited January 6, 1920, 

VV. B. Mitchell, Faculty Auditor. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Wednesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 
Leland M. Goodrich, 1920 Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Managing Editor 

department and associate editors 
William R. Ludden, 1922 With the Faculty 
Edward B. Ham, 1922 Alumni Notes 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 On the Campus 
Roland L. McCormack, 1922 Exchange 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Philip E. Goodhue, 1920 
Stanley M. Gordon, 1920 
Cloyd E. Small, 1920 
. Ronald B. Wadsworth, 1920 
John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 192 i 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 192I 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

Contributions are requeste.d from all under- 
graduates, alumni and faculty. All communica- 
tions must be submitted to the editor-in-chief be- 
fore noon of the Saturday preceding date of 
issue. No anonymous contributions can be ac- 
cepted. 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



■ BOWDOIN publishing COMPANY 

Allan W. Hall, 1920 Business Manager 

Philip H. McCrum, 1921 Assistant Manager 
Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Assistant Manager 

Vol. XLIX. FEBRUARY 11, 1920. No. 23 

Entered at Post Office at Brunswickas Second-Class Mail Matter 

Fratenity Men Attention ! ! 

Have you thought that the burning of the 
Bowdoin Union perhaps means more to the non- 
fraternity men of the college than to you? Your 
place of recreation, social life, and get-together 
is still intact; theirs has been destroyed. Are 



you going to selfishly stand b