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Full text of "Bowdoin Orient"

89 08 
Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2010 with funding from 
LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation funding 



http://www.archive.org/details/bowdoinorient50bowd 



VOL.L. NO.l 



APRIL 7, 1920 



B0WD0IN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 




CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Lecture by Hamlin Garland ... 1 

Lewiston H. S. Wins Debating 

Championship 2 

Class Agents for Bowdoin Alumni 

Fund 2 

Musical Club Concert in Portland . 3 

Track Schedule 3 

Editorial : 

The Orient for the Year ... 4 



PAGE 

H. S. White '17 Wins High Jump in 

Oxford-Cambridge Meet ... 4 

Musical Clubs' Trip to Massachu- 
setts 5 

Campus News ., 5 

Faculty Notes 5 

Alumni Department 6 

Calendar 7 

Resolution 7 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Let Jud "Outline" your work and do your "Cutting" for you 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 


Just received a shipment of 

Bowdoin Seal Stationery 

in quire boxes to retail at $ 1 .00 each 

The work was unsatisfactory and 
instead of returning it to the Factory 
have bought it at a low price. 


PRINTING 


On April 8th, THURSDAY 

we shall sell this at 


OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWN BUILDING BRUNSWICK 


29 cents per box 

Better come early and get some of this. 
Only 100 boxes to be had. 

F. W. CHANDLER & SON 



COLLEGE AND "PREP" SCHOOL MEN 

Clothing for Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 
ercoats and Ulsters. 




Hats 



Haberdashery 

Macullar Parker Company 



400 Washington St. 



Boston, Mass. 



THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT" 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



As good for You as 
for Her! 




The war brought men to eat candies — 
good candy — and often ! This Whitman 
Sampler of chocolates and confections are 
"super-extra" in quality. None" better in the 
world! 

For sale by 

Allen's Drug Store 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



EVENING CLOTHES 

Designed and tailored es- 
pecially for us by 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 

CORRECT DRESS 
FURNISHINGS 



Haskell & Jones Co. 



Portland, 



Maine. 




BERWICK- 1'A in. 
\ GORDON- VA in. 

Arrow 

a«5fr COLLARS 

curve cut toft shoulders perfectly. 

CLUETT, PEABODY &COi INCSVtoAcw 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 



New Lot of KNITTED TIES 

IN PLAIN COLORS 
$1.50 to $3 



E. S. BODWELL & SON 

Brunswick. 



Greenhouse 21 -W 
Residence 21-R 



WALTER 


L. LaROCK 


F" l_ O 


R 1 S T 


Potted Plants 


and Cut Flowers 


Floral Designs 


for All Occasions 




15% Jordan Avenue 



COURSON & MORTON 

SUPPLIES 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. L 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 7, 1920 



NO. 1 



LECTURE BY HAMLIN GARLAND 

Mr. Hamlin Garland, the eminent author of 
"Main-travelled Roads," "The Captain of the 
Gray-Horse Trail," "Hesper," now popularized 
in the moving pictures, and other novels of the 
Middle Border and old West, who is himself such 
a splendid representative of the best in American 
literature, gave unusual pleasure and a deepened 
interest in letters to all who met him and listened 
to his stimulating talks during his visit at Bow- 
doin. After giving three lectures to the English 
classes of the college, Mr. Garland spoke in pub- 
lic on "Meetings with Famous American Au- 
thors" in Memorial Hall, March 24th. This lec- 
ture, as President Sills said in his introductory 
speech, was one of a notable series of talks at 
various colleges concerning art and literature as 
important factors in the formation of the national 
character. Because of his intimate acquaintance 
with so many of the most important American 
authors, Mr. Garland in a most charming and in- 
formal manner not only presented them as actual 
living personalities, but also portrayed the rich- 
ness of the earlier American literature. 

Mr. Garland began his lecture by very warm 
praise of Nathaniel Hawthorne. Next he told of 
his early delight in fantastic romances of far dis- 
tant places and times, which lasted until he read 
Edward Eggleston's "The Hoosier Schoolmaster" 
in 1871, in a number of "Hearth and Home." In 
1876 the simple but vivid description of a buffalo 
by Joaquin Miller made a deep impression upon 
him. 

In telling of some of the first books of Mark 
Twain and William Dean Howells, he said that 
he had estimated "Roughing It" and "The Undis- 
covered Country" at their true worth long before 
the critics recognized them. In the latter he 
"felt dimly something new, crisp, gracious, and 
precise, not hitherto felt in prose." Howells he 
called his friend, adviser, and inspiration for 
over thirty-five years. Mr. Garland was also in- 
timate with Mark Twain, and spoke of the beauti- 
ful friendship which existed between these two 
greatly differing personalities, Howells and 
Clemens. Howells was refined to the highest de- 
gree in all his actions and sayings, but in con- 



trast, Mark Twain used to "swear with an Ori- 
ental magnificence and supernal fervor that was 
unequalled; it was not profanity, it was just elo- 
quence." Howells called Clemens "a great rug- 
ged figure. in American literature," not to be read 
for amusement, but to give the actuality of the 
life in the mining period in Montana and Nevada. 
Again the speaker quoted Mark Twain somewhat 
as follows, "I have been writing for many years 
a daily note-book, in which I have set down ex- 
actly as I felt at the time an estimate of people 
I have met. I don't know when it can be pub- 
lished, — I can't publish it while any of their de- 
scendants are alive,— but when I do publish it, 
that man Webster, who cheated me, will turn in 
his grave !" 

James Whitcomb Riley was praised most highly 
as one "who had struck a vital, homely, humorous, 
and American note of Indiana life," and who "at 
his best, was as characteristic of the Middle West 
as Robert Burns was of Scotland." Riley had a 
beautiful handwriting and used a quaint phrase- 
ology in his letters to Mr. Garland. The speaker 
gave an intimate description, full of quiet humor, 
of a call on Riley at the Parker House in Boston. 

In 1892 Mr. Garland went to California and in- 
cidentally called on Joaquin Miller in his secluded 
retreat near Oakland. At that time the author 
was writing his "beautiful and mystical 'Life of 
Christ' " in verse. In his abode there were num- 
erous trophies of the chase, but nothing to indi- 
cate the poet of the Sierras. The lecturer de- 
scribed Miller's eccentricities in a very delightful 
manner. Joaquin Miller as an author, he called 
"the greatest poet of the mountains in the English 
language," and again, "he has presented the finest 
picture of the Rocky Mountains in our literature 
or in any literature." 

After telling of the peculiar humor of Eugene 
Field and of his passion for collecting oddities, 
Mr. Garland depicted a few of the qualities of 
Edward Eggleston, who, even as an elderly man, 
was a charming talker, profoundly versed in 
American folk-lore, and such a pioneer in West- 
ern literature that Mr. Garland had once said, 
"We are all sons or grandsons of Edward Eg- 
gleston." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The speaker next touched on the new form of 
American literature of which the foundation was 
laid by Frank L. Stanton, Joel Chandler Harris, 
and Thomas N. Page. Harris he called great in 
delineation of the negro and of the Georgia 
mountaineer. 

In treating of Hopkinson Smith, the lecturer 
said "there were three of him, Frank H. Smith, 
who built lighthouses, F. Hopkinson Smith, who 
wrote stories, and Hop Smith, who painted 

in water colors He was a real Colonel Carter 

in his actions." At this point Mr. Garland spoke 
of the appalling lack of creative artists today. In 
fact, there is no one producing either literature, 
or art, or sculpture, in Maine, New Hampshire, 
Vermont, and the South. 

One of the speaker's pleasantest episodes was 
the description of a dinner in New York with 
Rudyard Kipling and James Whitcomb Riley, 
when the latter read so impressively some of his 
nature study poems that Kipling exclaimed, 
"That's American literature !" 

Of John Burroughs the lecturer spoke most 
feelingly as a writer who had remained all his 
life in his native place in the Catskills, while 
nearly all other writers had moved to New York 
City. The work of this author "showed something 
new, something vital, and something American." 

Mr. Garland's meeting with Bret Harte in Lon- 
don, when Harte was an "expatriate who had 
failed to make himself an Englishman," was most 
interesting, for Harte said that he could not be 
at home in America because his old West, the 
West of "Poker Flat," had gone forever. The 
concluding sentence of his talk was very striking : 
"All America needs is to be honest and fearless 
and to have the art that appeals to the whole 
world" while treating in our own vein subjects 
of truly national note. After his lecture he de- 
lighted his audience by reading three poems of 
his own in the vernacular. 



LEWISTON H. S. WINS DEBATING 

CHAMPIONSHIP 

In the debating room in the library, Lewiston 
High School won the championship of the Bow- 
doin Interscholastic Debating League from Port- 
land High School, March 25th. The subject of 
the debate was "Resolved, that electricity gen- 
erated by Maine water power should be reserved 
by law for use within the State." The win- 
ning team supported the negatve side of the 
case. The members of the Lewiston team were 
Richard J. Stanley, Harold P. Owens, William E. 
Young, and Earl C. Catland (alternate). The 



Portland team consisted of Raymond Ward, 
Charles G. H. Evans, Maurice Levinsky, and Al- 
fred Chapman (alternate). Young of Lewiston 
and Evans of Portland both had strong argu- 
ments. The judges were Professors Catlin, Mc- 
Clean, and Mitchell. L. H. Hatch '21 presided. 
Gordon '20 was the coach for the Lewiston team, 
and Haines '21 for the Portland team. 



CLASS AGENTS FOR BOWDOIN ALUMNI 
FUND 

Owing to errors in the table as previously print- 
ed, the following corrected list of the class agents 
for the Bowdoin Alumni Fund is here submitted. 

All classes up to i860 — Horace M. Jordan, Li- 
brary of Congress, Washington, D. C. 

i860 — Augustine Jones, in Lincoln St., New- 
ton Highlands, Mass. 

1861 — Edward Stanwood, litt.d., 76 High St., 
Brookline, Mass. 

1862 — Professor Sylvester Burnham, d. d., 
Hamilton, N. Y. 

1863 — Hon. George A. Emery, Saco, Me. 

1864 — Frederick H. Appleton, Esq., Bangor, 
Me. 

1865— Moses C. Stone, M. D., 18 Belair Ave., 
Wellesley, Mass. 

1866— Frederic H. Gerrish, M.D., Ll.D., 675 
Congress St., Portland, Me. 

1867 — George P. Davenport, Bath, Maine. 

1868 — Llewellyn S. Ham, 3010 Gilpin St., Den- 
ver, Colorado. 

1869 — Thomas H. Eaton, 136 Liberty St., Room 
320, New York City. 

1870 — DeAlva Stanwood Alexander, A.M., 
Ll.D., 31 North St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

1871— Rev. E. S. Stackpole, Bath, Me. 

1872— Rev. J. S. Richards, R. F. D. No. 1, Wal- 
nut Hill, Me. 

1873— David W. Snow, Esq., A. M., Fidelity 
Bldg., Portland, Me. 

1874 — President S. V. Cole, Wheaton College, 
Norton, Mass. 

1875— Myles Standish, M.D., Sc.D., 51 Here- 
ford St., Boston, Mass. 

1876 — Arthur T. Parker, East Orleans, Mass. 

1877 — John E. Chapman, Esq., Brunswick, Me. 

1878 — Barrett Potter, Esq., Brunswick, Me. 

1879 — Hon. Charles F. Johnson, U. S. Circuit 
Court, Portland, Me. 

1880 — Frederick O. Conant, 143 Park St., Port- 
land, Me. 

1881— John W. Manson, Pittsfield, Me. 

1882— Charles H. Gilman, 186 Middle St., 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Portland, Me. 

1883 — Stuyvesant T. B. Jackson, 396 Congress 
St., Portland, Me. 

1884 — John A. Waterman, Gorham, Me. 

1885 — Eben W. Freeman, Esq., 120 Exchange 
St., Portland, Me. 

1886 — Frederick L. Smith, Penn Charter 
School, Philadelphia, Pa. 

1887 — Edgar L. Means, Orleans, Nebraska. 

1888 — George F. Cary, 396 Congress St., Port- 
land, Me. 

1889— William M. Emery, A.M., Box 397, Fall 
River, Mass. 

1890 — H. H. Hastings, Bethel, Me. 

1891 — Lewis A. Burleigh, Esq., Augusta, Me. 

1892 — John C. Hull, Esq., Leominster, Mass. 

1893 — John H. Pierce, Esq., Fidelity Bldg., 
Portland, Me. 

1894— W. W. Thomas, Esq., 184K Middle St., 
Portland, Maine. 

1895 — George C. Webber, Esq., Auburn, Me. 

1896— Henry Hill Pierce, 49. Wall St., New 
York City. 

1897 — James E. Rhodes, 2d, Esq., Travelers' 
Ins. Co., Hartford, Conn. 

1898— Alfred B. White, 85 Devonshire St., 
Boston, Mass. 

1899 — Francis W. Briggs, Skowhegan, Me. 

1900 — John R. Bass, Wilton, Me. 

1901 — W. L. Sanborn, Lansdale, Pa. 

1902 — Sidney W. Noyes, Liberty National 
Bank, New York City. 

1903 — Luther Dana, Westbrook, Me. 

1904— Donald S. Walker, 88 Wall St., New 
York City. 

xgos — Louis D. H. Weld, Swift & Co., Chicago, 
Illinois. 

i9o6^Philip F. Chapman, 187 Middle St., Port- 
land, Me. 

1907 — Roscoe H. Hupper, Esq., 27 William St., 
New York City. 

1908— Chas. E. Files, Fidelity Bldg., Portland, 
Me.' 

1909 — Ernest H. Pottle, Room 860, 233 Broad- 
way, . .ew York City. 

1910 — Hon. Burleigh Martin, Augusta, Me. 

191 1 — Ernest G. Fifield, White & Chase, 14 
Wall St., New York City. 

1912— William A. MacCormick, Y. M. C. A., 
Montclair, N: J. 

1913 — Albert P. Cushman, Bangor, Me. 

ICH4 — Louis N. Donahue, 104 Neal St., Port- 
land, Me. 

I9I5 _Clifford T. Perkins, 101 Milk St., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 



1916 — Dwight H. Sayward, 549 Masonic Bldg., 
Portland, Me. 

1917 — Clarence H. Crosby, 61 Cedar St., Ban- 
gor, Me. 

1918 — Harlan L. Harrington, 69 Bigelow St., 
Quincy, Mass. 

1919 — Donald S. Higgins, 41 Holkoke St., 
Brewer, Me. 



MUSICAL CLUB CONCERT IN PORTLAND 

The Musical Clubs will give a concert in Port- 
land Saturday evening under the auspices of the 
Bowdoin Club of Portland. This will be the last 
concert of the season. The concert will be fol- 
lowed by a dance for which music will be fur- 
nished by a quartet consisting of Sprince, Rochon, 
Richan,and Lyseth. Tickets may be obtained from 
Manager Berry at the Kappa Sigma house and 
are 75 cents each, plus war tax, eight cents ; or 
reserved seats may be obtained by making re- 
mittance to the secretary of the Bowdoin Club, 
D. H. Sayward, 549 Masonic Building, Portland. 



TRACK SCHEDULE 

The spring track schedule has not as yet been 
completely arranged. The management is con- 
sidering the Pennsylvania Relay Carnival (April 
30, May 1), owing to the great desire of the 
Philadelphia Alumni to see a Bowdoin team in 
these important games. However, if Bowdoin 
does not enter this carnival, it is planned to have 
two dual meets, one with Bates on May 1 in 
Brunswick, and the other with some other college 
at their field on May 8. The Maine Intercol,legi- 
ates come at Lewiston, May 15 ; the New England 
meet at Tech Field, Cambridge, May 22 ; and the 
I. C. A. A. A. A. games at Franklin Field, Phila- 
delphia, May 28-29. 

Coach Magee has been invited by President 
Dallas of the A. A. U., also president of the 
Meadowbrook Ckib, to send a relay team, and 
some men for special events, to compete in the 
Meadowbrook Club games in Philadelphia, June 
5. The Meadowbrook Club has offered to defray 
all the expenses of the Bowdoin team. 

Coach Magee plans to keep several men in 
shape to compete in the Olympic try-outs later 
on in the season. 

As for the Maine meet, it is expected that 
Maine will have a much stronger team than in 
1919, while Bowdoin will be weakened by the 
loss of Savage and Higgins. On this account, a 
much closer meet and a far harder battle between 
Bowdoin and Maine is expected for the cham- 
pionship. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Wednesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdotn 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 

Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 

Managing Editor 

Edward B. Ham, 1922 

Department Editors 

Floyd A. Gerrard, 1923 Faculty Notes 

George H. Quinby, 1923 Alumni Department 

Frederick K. Turgeon, 1923 Campus News 



Associate Editors 

John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 
William R. Ludden, 1922 
Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 
Roland L. McCormack, 1922 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Business Manager 
Frederick A. Allen, 1922 Assistant Manager 
Wilfred R. Brewer, 1922 Assistant Manager 



Vol. L. 



APRIL 7, 1920. 



No. 1 



Entered at Post Office at Brunswickas Second-Class Mail Matter 

The Orient for this Year. 

With this issue the Orient begins the fiftieth 
year of its existence. It is to be hoped that this 
year will mark a reversion to its pre-war excel- 
lence. 

As has often been stated in this column the 
Orient has two services to perform ; service tc 
the alumni and service to the student body. In 
the interest of the student body the Orient hopes 
to continue its policy of accurately registering the 
worthwhile events of student activities. As be- 
fore, too, it invites student opinion to express 



itself through its medium. The management of 
the Orient hopes, however, to make its reading 
matter more interesting by the introduction of 
appropriate cuts from time to time and to further 
enrich its appearance by putting out such special 
issues as the Football Number of last year. 

For the alumni the Orient will constantly en- 
deavor to collect and print a sizable and inter- 
esting department of alumni notes. In addition it 
plans to give special mention of distinguished 
alumni accompanied, whenever possible by a pic- 
ture of the subject. This will not only prove of 
interest to alumni but will also be of value in 
making known famous Bowdoin men to those 
not connected with the College. The Orient 
also reminds the alumni of the privilege, very 
seldom exercised, of contributions by alumni to 
its columns. Alumni may many times perform a 
useful service by giving of their counsel and ex- 
perience to the younger generation. 

In the preceding paragraphs have been outlined 
the general plans for the advancement of the 
Orient in this volume. It may be well at this 
time to make definite the plan mentioned in the 
last issue in regard to lightening the burden of 
the managing editor, who has been a long-suffer- 
ing factotum. The plan is, briefly, for the man- 
aging editor to appoint a news editor for each 
week from the present Sophomore members of 
the Board. The amount and character of the 
work to be done by the news editor is left to the 
discretion of the managing editor. In this way 
the managing editor will be less burdened and 
more free to exercise the more important duties 
of his office, while at the same time his associates 
will be acquiring valuable experience, especially 
in case of being called upon to take up his func- 
tions in an emergency. 

The editorial column will, as in the past, en- 
deavor to present the view of the student body 
concerning questions with which it has to do. 
This column will prove much more valuable, how- 
ever, if there is an exchange of ideas presented 
rather than a one-man view. 

The present management of the Orient wishes 
to thank the student-body for its whole-hearted 
support during the past year and to insure the 
continuance of this support during the following 
issues by the publication of a worthwhile and 
readable college weekly. 



H. S. WHITE '17 WINS HIGH JUMP IN 
OXFORD-CAMBRIDGE MEET 

In the first meet between Oxford and Cam- 
bridge since March, 1914, Hal S. White '17, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Longfellow Scholar from Bowdoin, won first 
honors in the high jump. The meet took place 
March 27th at the historic Queen's Club grounds 
in London before an unusually large gathering 
of spectators. Oxford won the -meet with five 
and a half events to the four and a half taken by 
Cambridge. Two of these events were won by 
Americans. The Boston Herald stated that White 
won his event in easy fashion, with a height of 
five feet five inches, and immediately followed 
with an exhibition jump which added two inches 
more to his record. His performance in this 
meet was not quite so good as in the Oxford 
University Athletic Association Track Meet of 
March 1, where White took first place with a 
mark of five feet, seven and a quarter inches. On 
March 15, in a special meet at Oxford, White 
won the high jump with a leap of five feet, eight 
inches. This was the necessary height required 
to win the "blue blazer" which is the highest 
honor attainable in athletics at Oxford. Only 
seven men have become "blues" this year. White 
is the holder of the Bowdoin record in his event 
with a height of five feet and nine inches. He is 
a former pupil of Jack Magee, and one of the 
few Bowdoin men who have come into. promi- 
nence in athletic lines outside of college. Photo- 
graphs of White taking his jumps have recently 
appeared in the London Daily News and in the 
London Daily Sketch. 



MUSICAL CLUBS' TRIP TO MASSACHUSETTS 

The Bowdoin Musical Clubs left Brunswick on 
Thursday, March 25 for their last trip of the sea- 
son. On Thursday evening they played in San 
ford, on Friday in Portsmouth, N. H., and on 
Saturday they gave their annual Boston Con- 
cert. The Clubs were enthusiastically received 
all along their route. The trip was the climax of 
an unusually successful season. 

In Sanford the concert was presented in the 
Leavitt Theatre before a large audience. After 
the concert the members were given a banquet in 
the Unitarian Hall and later enjoyed a dance. 
The concert in Portsmouth was given under the 
auspices of the High School for the benefit of its 
Athletic Fund. The concert was one of the best 
of the season. The Boston Concert was given in 
the Ball Room of the Hotel Vendome. The hall 
was filled with alumni and friends, who greeted 
the program with great enthusiasm. A dance fol- 
lowed the concert. The program was the same as 
has already been printed in the Orient, except 
that Helson '21 substituted for Philbrick '20 as 
violin soloist. 



Campus Jl3etos 

Plans have been made for the inter-fraternity 
baseball this spring. The rules are practically the 
same as last year, except that the games are to be 
seven-inning affairs. The schedule will be ar- 
ranged later. There are to be two leagues as be- 
fore; the first league to consist of Beta Theta Pi, 
Zeta Psi, Theta Delta Chi, Kappa Sigma, Psi Up- 
silon and Non-Fraternity; and the second league 
to consist of Delta Upsilon, Chi Psi, Alpha Delta 
Phi, Delta Kappa Epsilon, and Sigma Nu. 

During the vacation the engagement of Rob- 
ert Earle Cleaves '20 to Miss Mary Frances 
Stearns of West Paris, Maine, was announced. 

Owing to a typographical error in the last issue 
of the Orient, in the summary of points in the 
Inter-fraternity Meet, Kappa Sigma was credited 
with only 27 points instead of the 51 points which 
the fraternity actually won. Chi Psi had 27 in- 
stead of the 21 points an indicated. 

Edward F. Merrill '03, county attorney for 
Somerset County, was on the campus shortly be- 
fore the last term ended. 

JFacuItp iSotes 

President Sills has been appointed chairman of 
a committee of five prominent educators to make 
a survey of the five colleges of the United States 
which are closely affiliated with the Protestant 
Episcopal Church. The committee is to make a 
survey of Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio; the 
University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. ; St. 
Stephens College, Annandale-on-Hudson, N. Y. ; 
Hobart College, Geneva, N. Y., and Trinity Col- 
lege, Hartford, Conn., and to report on general 
conditions to The Presiding Bishop and the Coun- 
cil of the Church. The other members of the 
committee are : Professor Charles R. Baldwin, 
of the Department of English, Columbia Univer- 
sity; Very Reverend Hughell E. Fosbroke, Dean 
of the General Theological Seminary, New York 
City ; Dean Frederick Jones of Yale University ; 
and President Charles F. Thwyng of Western 
Reserve University. 

Professor Woodruff went to the meetng of the 
New England Classical Association at Middle- 
town, Conn., April 2, where he read a paper on 
"Back to Greek Ideals." 

Professor Bell left at the end of the last term 
for Bermuda where he will continue the work 
which he started last summer for the Bureau of 
Historical Research of the Carnegie Institution. 
He will spend two weeks in Bermuda inspecting 
documents concerning the history of the West 
Indies. Professor Bell is planning to write an- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



other book of a set already begun on the history 
of the islands, showing the part they have played 
in the history of Great Britain and the United 
States. 

Dean Nixon has recently purchased the house 
on Federal Street now occupied by Mrs. Wil- 
liam DeWitt Hyde. 

Professor Elliott returned Monday from 
Haverford College, where he has been giving a 
series of lectures on English literature. He gave 
a public lecture on Robert Frost. 



alumni Department 

The Orient desires to be of the greatest possi- 
ble service to Alumni in keeping them informed 
of one another's activities. Alumni are earnestly 
requested to support the Orient in this work by 
sending items about themselves or their brother 
Alumni. All such communications should be ad- 
dressed to the Alumni Editor. 

'62 — Joel M. Marshall died at the home of his 
son at Alfred, Maine, March 20, 1920. He was 
born May 23, 1834 at Buxton, Maine. Three 
years after graduation he received the degree of 
Master of Arts from Bowdoin. From 1865 until 
around 1912 he practiced law at Buxton. Since 
1912 he has been living at Alfred. As a local his- 
torian he was without a peer in his section of 
the country, and his work in this line is well 
known in the book which he compiled and edited 
after the celebration of the Buxton Centennial. 
He was a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon 
fraternity. 

'63 — Hon. Evans Searle Pillsbury, ll.d., repre- 
sented Bowdoin at the recent inauguration of 
President Barrows of the University of Cali- 
fornia. Mr. Barrows is a prominent lawyer of 
San Francisco. 

'71 — In the March issue of The Bookman, Ed- 
ward P. Mitchell, Editor of the New York Sun 
has contributed a review of "Marse Henry" — an 
Autobiography by Colonel Henry Watterson. In 
addition to discussing the merits of the book, Mr. 
Mitchell gave a detailed description of his per- 
sonal impressions of Colonel Watterson in 1877, 
when the latter was serving his only term in 
Congress, as a Representative from Kentucky. 

'"jy — In a recent issue of the Berliner Tagcblatt 
there was a picture of the late Admiral Peary in 
his Arctic costume, with some of his dogs. 

Medic — '82 — Dr. Justin Adfer Walling, who 
has been practicing medicine at Milbridge, 
Maine, for nearly twenty-five years, died there 
March 2, 1920. He was born at Burrillville, 



Rhode Island, October 29, 1858. He took his 
academic course at Colby, from which he gradu- 
ated in 1879. From January, 1883 to May, 1887, 
Dr. Walling was in Jonesport, Maine, after which 
he moved to Milbridge. He married Sophia M. 
Wilson, April 2, 1883. In 1909 he received the de- 
gree of Master of Arts from Colby. 

Medic-'9i — Dr. Harry Waldo Kimball died of 
erysipelas at his home in Providence, Rhode Is- 
land, March 28, 1920, after an illness of about a 
week. He was born January 17, 1868, at Woon- 
socket, R. I. He married Miss Emma Leonard 
Hayward of Pawtucket, January 15, 1895. Dr. 
Kimball held membership in many societies of 
state-wide and national importance. For nearly 
two years before his death he held the rank of 
major as a surgeon in the United States Public 
Health Service. 

'92 — Henry C. Emery, formerly assistant man- 
ager of the foreign department of the Guaranty 
Trust Company, has left for China, where he is 
to become manager of the Pekin branch of the 
Asia Banking Corporation. 

'94 — Charles Allcott Flagg, since 1913 librarian 
of the public library in Bangor, Maine, died in 
Bangor the night of March 28, after a brief ill- 
ness, diagnosed as sleeping sickness. He was 
born October 1, 1870 at Sandwich, Mass. The 
year after he graduated from Bowdoin he was 
principal of the Hopedale (Mass.) High School. 
From 1896 to 1900 he was an assistant in the 
New York State Library at Albany. From 1900 
to 1913 he was a specialist in American history 
in the Library of Congress at Washington. He 
was the author of several historical and genealog- 
ical works. In 1902 he received the degree of 
Master of Arts from George Washington Uni- 
versity. He was a member of Delta Kappa Epsi- 
lon, and in his senior year, vice president of his 
class. 

'96 — Wallace Seymour Mitchell died rather un- 
expectedly March 15, 1919. He was born at 
Freeport, Me., Dec. 5, 1873. Immediately after 
graduation he went into journalism in Portland. 
For the first three years after receiving his de- 
gree, he served as a newspaper manager. In 
1899 he became circulation manager for the Port- 
land Express and Advertiser, with which paper 
he was associated until the time of his death. He 
was a member of the Delta Upsilon fraternity. 

'98 — Donald B. Mac Millan, the Arctic explorer 
who is now planning his expedition to the north 
to investigate the geology of the mysterious land 
reported in recent discoveries, delivered a lec- 
ture not long ago to the Harvard undergradu- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ates on "Five Years Among the Polar Eskimos." 

'98 — Daniel Lyman Wormwood, superintendent 
of schools in Bangor, died very suddenly after an 
illness of four days at his home, March 23, 1920. 
His death was due to a complicated ailment be- 
lieved to have been an abscess in the head. He 
was born at Crawford, Maine, August 18, 1864. 
He married Anne B. Lydick of Crawford, Jan- 
uary 9, 1886. After graduating from Bowdoin, 
he was principal of the high school at Machias 
until 1903. From 1903 to 1912 he was superin- 
tendent of schools in Old Town and vicinity. In 
June, 1912, he was appointed superintendent in 
Waterville, but this position he held for only two 
months, as he accepted an appointment in Ban- 
gor in August of the same year. In 1913 he was 
elected president of the Maine Teachers' Asso- 
ciation at its convention in Bangor. 

'05 — In the Boston Transcript for March 31 
there appeared a poem by Charles Poole Cleaves, 
entitled "Soldiers in Europe." 

'11^ — Harold N. Burnham was recently elected 
to fill a vacancy in the science department of 
Deering High School. 

'11 — Dr. Elmer H. King of Portland has been 
making great progress recently in his wo'rk on 
the cancer germ, and a possible cure for that 
disease. While not definitely known as yet, it is 
thought very probable that Dr. King has actually 
isolated the germ. Many doctors who know of 
Dr. King's work think that there is considerable 
chance that he will discover a cure for the 
disease. 

'16 — Mrs. Helen Ganse Head, wife of Alden 
F. Head died at the Newton (Mass.) Hospital, 
March 30, 1920. 

'17 — Mrs. Olga Sivolobov Jacob, wife of 
Francis W. Jacob, was recently engaged as trans- 
lator of the seventy Bolshevik and anti-Bolshevik 
posters placed on exhibition in Boston by Mr. 
"Thomas Whittemore, who has just returned from 
relief work in South Russia. Mrs. Jacob says of 
these posters that those of the Bolsheviki use the 
newly introduced Russian orthography, while 
those of Denikine use the old one. 



CALENDAR 

April 10 — Baseball: Harvard at Cambridge. 

April 15 — Fraternity Dances. 

April 16 — Sophomore Hop. 

April 17 — Baseball: Fort Williams at Bruns- 
wick. 

April 19 — Exhibition Baseball : Bates at Lew- 
iston. 

April 21 — Baseball: Brown at Providence. 



RESOLUTION. 

Whereas, in the death of John Alfred Roberts, 
Eta Charge has lost a brother, distinguished in 
academic work and in public service, and 

Whereas, in spite of physical disability, he was 
ever an earnest worker, and attained high honors 
both in college and after life, and 

Whereas, his fellow citizens paid tribute to his 
worth by bestowing upon him responsible offices 
of his county and State, and 

Whereas, by his interest in agriculture he en- 
couraged and dignified that calling in this State, 
therefore be it 

Resolved, That the members of Eta Charge 
deeply mourn the passing of one so deeply be- 
loved by all who knew him into the hall of 
Omega ; that their heartfelt sense of bereavement 
be extended to his family in their sorrow, and 
that they be assured of the inexpressible grief of 
the Eta Charge at the loss of one who was bound 
to it by the closest ties of friendship; and be it 
further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be entered 
upon the records of the Eta Charge and be 
published in the Bowdoin Orient; that a copy be 
sent to his bereaved family, to the Grand Lodge, 
to each sister Charge, to each surviving member 
of his delegation, and to The Shield of Theta 
Delta Chi. 

For Eta Charge, 

Norman W. Haines 
H. Paul Larrabee, 
Ralph E. Battison. 



Boston 
Garter 




"Ta\e care your ball is not teed 
too close to sand'box, disc or 
anything which will give your 
eye an excuse for wandering 
from the ball." 

— Edward Ray 

in Golfer's Magazine 





PERFECT concentration — 
and a true ball — are largely 
responsible for your best strokes. 

Try One of the New U.S. Golf Balls 

U. S. Royal U. S. Revere 
U. S. Floater 




Keep Your Eye on the Ball- 
Be Sure It's a U. S. 




V. S. Royal $1.00 each 
U S. Revere 85c each 
U S Floater 65c each 



You'll find a 
size and weight 
just fitted to your 
game. 

Buy them from 
your pro or at 
your dealer's. 



United States Rubber Company 






BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Summer Positions for College Men 

Do you earn all or part of your college expenses? Do you wish 
profitable employment for next summer? Do you want a real job, 
with real work, and real pay? If you can answer YES to these 
three questions, write us for particulars. 

THE NATIONAL SURVEY COMPANY 

TOPOGRAPHICAL OFFICES CHESTER, VERMONT 

Lithographic Works, 705 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



PALMER SHOE CO. 

PORTLAND 



THAYER McNEIL CO. 

COLLEGE MEN'S 

SHOES 

BOSTON 

JOE BULGER - - - Representative 

In Store on Saturdays 



CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 



4 Elm Street 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

"CANTEEN" 

19 NORTH WINTHROP 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 Sundays 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES, CAKE, ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 

PORTLAND WATERVILLE WESTBROOK 

Try "POMONA," a fruit drink 

The Ideal Punch Syrup 

The Spear Folks 

Karl V. Palmer '18, Manager 
BATH BRUNSWICK 



BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


LAW 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

Trains students in the principles of the 
law and in the technique of the profession 
so as to best prepare them for active prac- 
tice wherever the English system of law 
prevails. 


DANCING 

Miss Jennie S. Harvey's Evening Dancing 
Class and Assembly every Tuesday evening at 
Town Hall, Brunswick, commencing Oct. 21st. 

Lesson 7.30 p. m. Assembly 8.30 p. m. 

This class is open to college students. 

Private instruction by appointment. 

Monday evening Class and Assembly at Arm- 
ory Hall, Bath. 

Address 897 Middle St., Bath, Maine. 'Phone 
151-W. 


College graduates may receive scholar- 
ships not exceeding $75. 

Course for LL. B. requires 3 school years. 
Those who have received this degree from 
this or any other approved school of law 
may receive LL. M. on the satisfactory com- 
pletion of one year's resident attendance 


A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office ... Brunswick, Maine 


under the direction of Dr. Melville M. Bige- 
low. Several $25 and $50 scholarships 
open in this course. 

For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 


BUTLER'S 


11 Ashburton Place, Boston 


FIRST NATIONAL BANK 


WE CARRY 

Co-operative Shoes 


of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 


New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store 


We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Cusliing St.— Tel. 16. 


W. E. ROBERTS '07 


J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 


LARGEST AND BEST 

Stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 


DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 


Covers, Window Draperies, 
etc., in town. 


The Bowdoin 



JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 
Portland 


WILLIAM F. FERRIS 

COLLEGE AGENT 


PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSON'S PHARMACY 


Citizens Laundry 

AUTO SERVICE 9 SOUTH APPLETON 






COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 


CHIPMAN 






CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 


DIAMOND RINGS 

At prices 1 5 per cent and 40 per 
cent less than New York prices. 
A. G. PAGE CO., BATH 



"The Store of Progress and Service" 



Gentility 



The word definitely expresses the style and quality character- 
istics of our fine Shirts: — the shirts of a gentleman; either 
in plain white or pattern effects that are refined in their con- 
ception whether they be pronounced or subdued in color 
tones. $2 to $12 

Black Ties and Neckwear in the dark neat patterns- so popular 
with college men. 

Men's Cordovan Brogue Shoes. 

Mr. Jack Handy '23 at the Zeta Psi House is our 
representative, and anything you wish in this line 
he will be glad to take your order for. 



Monument Square 




Portland, Maine 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 
CONSTANCE BINNEY 

IN 

ERSTWHILE SUSAN 




FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
MAY ALLISON 

IN 

THE WALK-OFFS 



MONDAY and TUESDAY 

THE GREAT RACING DRAMA 

CHECKERS 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 
CONSTANCE TALMADGE 

IN 

THE VEILED ADVENTURER 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
EARL WILLIAMS 

IN 

THE BLACK GATE 



MONDAY and TUESDAY 
MARY PICKFORD 

IN 

THE HOODLUM 



VOLL. NO. 2 



APRIL 14, 1920 



B0WD0IN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



CONTENTS 



PA.GE 

Interchurch World Movement 

Speakers 9 

Death of General Jonathan P. 

Cilley 9 

Student Rally Next Week ... 10 

Musical Clubs Portland Concert . 10 

Valuable Gift to the Library . . 10 

Cast Announced for Commence- 
ment Play 10 

Interfraternity Baseball Season 

Opens 10 



PAGE 

Excellent Record of the Bowdoin 

Fencing Team 11 

Regulations Concerning Major 

Examinations 11 

Editorial: 

Keeping Fit ....... 12 

Praise for American Athletics . 12 

Campus News 13 

Faculty .Notes 13 

Alumni Department 13 

Calendar 14 

Resolution 15 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Let Jud "Outline" your work and do your "Cutting" for you 


WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 


SPRING LINES OF 

SPORTING GOODS 


BOWDOIN COLLEGE 


GOLF BALLS BASEBALL GOODS 






PRINTING 


TENNIS GOODS 


We carry SPALDING & REACH 


OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWN BUILDING BRUNSWICK 


Lines of Baseball Goods and WRIGHT 
& DITSON Tennis Goods. 


F. W. Chandler & Son 







COLLEGE AND "PREP" SCHOOL MEN 

Clothing fot Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 
ercoats and Ulsters. 

Haberdashery Hats 

Macullar Parker Company 




400 Washington St. 



Boston, Mass. 



"THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT 





A casting for one of the 
huge water-wheel driven 
generators installed in the 
Mississippi River Power 
Company's plant at Keo- 
kuk. This installation will 
ultimatelyconsistof thirty 
of these machines, giving 
a total capacity of 216,000 
kilowatts (300,000 horse- 
power). It is the largest 
hydro - electric develop- 
ment in the world. The 
General Electric Company 
builds generators for wa- 
ter-wheel drive in sizes 
ranging from 37% to 32,500 
kilowatts and the aggre- 
gate capacity of G-E units 
now in successful opera- 
tion is in excess of four 
million horse-power. 



Mississippi River Power 
Company, l£eokuk, Iowa 



Utilizing Nature's Power 

ELECTRICAL energy generated by water power 
has grown to be one of our greatest natural 
resources — and we have only begun to reach its 
possibilities. It mines and refines our ores, turns the 
wheels of industry, drives our street cars and lights 
our cities and towns. The power obtained from 
Nature saves many million tons of coal every year. 

At first the field of its utilization was limited by the distance elec- 
tricity could be transported. But soon research and engineering 
skill pointed the way to larger and better electrical apparatus 
necessary for high-voltage transmission. Then ingenious devices 
were invented to insure protection against lightning, short-circuits, 
etc., which cause damage and interrupt the service. And now all 
over the country a network of wires begins to appear, carrying 
the magic power. 

The General Electric Company, with its many years' experience, 
has played a great part in hydro-electric development. By suc- 
cessfully co-ordinating the inventive genius of the company and 
its engineering and manufacturing abilities, it has accomplished 
some of the greatest achievements injhe production and applica- 
tion of electrical energy. 

The old mill wheel of yesterday has gone. Today the forces of 
immense volumes of water are harnessed and sent miles away to 
supply the needs of industry and business and the comforts of 
the home. 




General Office 
Schenectady; NY. 



Sales Offices in 
all large cities 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



COMPLETE STOCKS 

of 

Seasonable Clothes 

Haberdashery 

Hats 

FOR TOWN AND COUNTRY WEAR 



Also Special Styles in 
SPORTING APPAREL 



Haskell & Jones Co. 



Portland, 



Maine. 




ARROW 

^roy tailored 

Soft Collars 

CLUETT, PEABODY & CO., INC., TROY, N. Y. 



ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



NOBBY MODELS 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 



E. S. BODWELL & SON 

Brunswick. 



Greenhouse 21 -W 
Residence 21-R 

WALTER L. LaROCK 
FLORIST 

Potted Plants and Cut Flowers 
Floral Designs for All Occasions 

15% Jordan Avenue 



COURSON & MORTON 

SUPPLIES 



BOWDOIN ORILNT 



VOL. L 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 14, 1920 



NO. 2 



INTERCHURCH WORLD MOVEMENT 
SPEAKERS 

A series of talks on various subjects was con- 
ducted last week-end by several prominent lead- 
ers in the Interchurch World Movement. The 
Babson Life Work Institute was in charge of the 
group sent here. The first lecture was on ''The 
Business Man and Religion" by H. Langdon 
Pratt, the secretary and business manager of the 
Babson Institute. He spoke particularly of the 
necessity for the application of Christian prin- 
ciples to business. Business has suffered great 
periods of elevation and depression, he stated, 
and when business was most prosperous, Chris- 
tian principles were being applied to .the best ef- 
fect. At the present time, business is at a higher 
level than ever before. This lecture was in the 
debating room in the library last Friday evening. 
It was expected that Roger W. Babson would be 
here, but a very short time before the lecture, it 
was found impossible for him to come. Satur- 
day morning Mr. Pratt spoke very interestingly 
to the class in Economics 8. 

Rev. Fletcher Parker outlined the plans for the 
visit of this group of speakers in the Saturday 
morning chapel service. In the evening there 
was a banquet at the Hotel Eagle, given by the 
Y. M. C. A. for forty students,. chosen from the 
various fraternity houses. Professor Mitchell 
was the toastmaster. Three of the visiting group 
spoke on various aspects of missionary work. 
Gren O. Pierrel, Industrial Secretary of the Wor- 
cester Y. M. C. A. spoke on the "Y" as a place 
for young men to invest their life work. The 
second speaker was Rev. Fletcher Parker, a 
young minister of Boston, who mentioned the 
ministry as needing college graduates of ability. 
The last speaker was Charles D. Hurrey, General 
Secretary of the Committee on Foreign Rela- 
tions of the International Y. M. C. A., who urged 
men with medical training to take up the work of 
medical missionaries. He also spoke of the Con- 
sular Service as affording great opportunities for 
men to better the lot of less fortunate countries. 

•Sunday morning Mr. Hurrey spoke at the Con- 
gregational Church, while Mr. Parker spoke at 
the Methodist. 



Both of these men talked on the expansion of 
the church to meet world needs. Mr. Hurrey talk- 
ed again in the afternoon at the Sunday chapel 
service, on "Moral Leadership, the World's 
Greatest Need." Again in the evening Mr. 
Parker and Mr. Pierrel spoke in Hubbard Hall 
on "Principles Governing the Choice of a Life 
Work." 

Much credit is due to the Bowdoin Y. M. C. A. 
and especially to McGown '21, the secretary, for 
securing such a fine group of speakers to lecture 
to the college. 



DEATH OF GENERAL JONATHAN P. CILLEY 

The death on April 7 of General Jonathan 
Prince Cilley, one of the best known of Maine's 
surviving Civil War heroes, touches closely the 
college from which he graduated in 1858, for 
his family's connection with Bowdoin covers ex- 
actly a period of a century. His father was the 
Congressman Jonathan Cilley, — the friend of 
Hawthorne, — who graduated from Bowdoin in 
1825, and who was later killed in the famous 
duel with Congressman Graves of Kentucky. 
Jonathan C. Tibbitts of the class of 1922 is a 
grandson of General Cilley. The late general 
was born at Thomaston, Maine, December 29, 
1835. Two years after his graduation from 
Bowdoin he was admitted to the Knox County 
bar, and began law practice in Thomaston. In 
the early part of 1861, he enlisted in the Army. 
During the retreat of General Banks from the 
Shenandoah Vajley, General Cilley was taken 
prisoner at Middletown, Va., and forty pieces 
of bone were removed from his wounded arm 
and shoulder. He was promoted to the rank of 
major on April I, 1864, and ordered to report to 
General John H. Martindale, military governor 
of Washington, for special duty. Later he re- 
joined his regiment, with which he remained un- 
til June 24, 1864, when he was wounded for a 
second time. At the time he rejoined his regi- 
ment, he had just meen made a lieutenant-colonel. 
For distinguished service he was soon promoted 
to the grade of colonel, and finally on June 12, 
1864, he was made Brigadier-General. After the 
war he resumed his law practice in Rockland, 



10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Maine, where he remained until shortly before 
his death. In 1867 he was a member of the 
Maine Legislature, and from 1876 to 1878 the 
state adjutant-general. He was a member of the 
Psi Upsilon fraternity. 



STUDENT RALLY NEXT WEEK 

Plans are now being arranged for a "student 
sing" to be held in Memorial Hall on the even- 
ing of April 20, at seven o'clock. If the weather 
is especially fine, the rally will be held on the 
Art Building steps. It has been suggested 
that such a rally would be just the thing 
to put some energy into the coming base- 
ball season. It is proposed to have a meeting of 
all the students for about three-quarters of an 
hour to review the standard Bowdoin songs. 
The Musical Clubs will lead the singing and 
give a few selections, but they are merely to 
lead the singing, not to give a concert. Be- 
sides ''Bowdoin Beata," "Phi Chi," "Glasses 
Clinking High," and "Forward the White," 
several of the latest popular hits will be on the 
program. The success of this rally depends up- 
on the attendance and enthusiasm of the stu- 
dents. It will be short and "full of pep." Ev- 
erybody out, to make this affair a roaring suc- 
cess ! 



MUSICAL CLUBS' PORTLAND CONCERT 

The Musical Clubs presented their annual con- 
cert under the auspices of the Bowdoin Club of 
Portland in Frye Hall, Portland, last Saturday 
night. The audience, which included many Bow- 
doin alumni, was large and enthusiastic. The 
program was unchanged since the last trip. 
Richan '20 and Philbrick '20 had their usual suc- 
cess as soloists. Asnault '20 responded to sev- 
eral encores. The ensemble numbers and the 
Jazz Quartet were well received. A dance fol- 
lowed the concert. 



VALUABLE GIFT TO THE LIBRARY 

A Delphini edition of the complete works of 
Horace, annotated by Cardinal Louis Desprez, 
printed in London in 1762, has just been sent to 
the library by Mrs. Elisabeth Winthrop, wife of 
the late Robert C. "Winthrop, Jr. On the title 
page there is a note stating that the book origin- 
ally belonged to John Winthrop, who graduated 
from Harvard in 1770, and died in 1780. At a 
later period the book belonged to Thomas Lindall 
Winthrop, Jr., and James Bowdoin Winthrop, 
nephews of its first owner, and subsequently to 
their younger brother, Robert Charles Winthrop, 



who eventually gave it to his son, R. C. Winthrop, 
Jr. All through the book are marginal references 
by James Bowdoin Winthrop, who has indicated 
on the title page that he began the reading of 
Horace at Bowdoin, October 15, 1810. In the 
back appear the signatures of John Winthrop 
(1766) and T. L. Winthrop (1803). James 
Bowdoin Winthrop graduated from Bowdoin in 
1814, about a year after he had given up the 
name of Winthrop, and so his name now appears 
in the general catalogue as James Bowdoin. Hon. 
Robert Charles Winthrop graduated from Har- 
vard in 1825, and received an LL.D. from Bow- 
doin in 1849. 



CAST ANNOUNCED FOR COMMENCEMENT 
PLAY 

Philbrook '23, acting manager of the Masque 
and Gown, has announced that the following men 
have been chosen for the Commencement Play, 
the "Merchant of Venice." 

Shylock Asnault '20 

Antonio Little '23 

Bassanio Goff '22 

Lorenzo .' Hall '21 

Salanio Crossman '20 

Salarino Lindner '20 

Duke of Venice Smiley '21 

Tubal Stackhouse '23 

Launcelot Gobbo Gordon '20 

Old Gobbo Hunt '23 

Gratiano Quinby '23 

Nerissa Turgeon '23 

Portia Redman '21 

It was decided to cut the part of Jessica as the 
play had to be shortened, and rather expensive 
properties were necessary for the part. Rehearsals 
started Tuesday and will continue weekly for 
some time. 



INTERFRATERNITY BASEBALL SEASON 
OPENS 

This week marks the beginning of the inter- 
fraternity baseball games. As announced last 
week the fraternities have been separated into 
two leagues as follows : League A, Beta Theta 
Pi, Zeta Psi, Theta Delta Chi, Kappa Sigma, and 
Psi Upsilon ; League B, Chi Psi, Delta Kappa 
Epsilon, Delta Upsilon, Sigma Nu, and Alpha 
Delta Phi. The schedule is as follows : 

April 12— Beta Theta Pi vs. Zeta Psi. 

April 14 — Chi Psi vs. Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

April 16 — Theta Delta Chi vs. Kappa Sigma. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



11 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 

silon. 
April 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 

Phi. 



20 — Delta Upsilon vs. Sigma Nu. 
21 — Psi Upsilon vs. Beta Theta Pi. 
23 — Alpha Delta Phi vs. Chi Psi. 
26 — Zeta Psi vs. Theta Delta Chi. 
28 — Delta Kappa Epsilon vs. Delta Up- 

30 — Kappa Sigma vs. Psi Upsilon. 

3 — Sigma Nu vs. Alpha Delta Phi. 

3— Beta Theta Pi vs. Theta Delta Chi. 

7 — Chi Psi vs. Delta Upsilon. 
10 — Zeta Psi vs. Kappa Sigma. 
12 — Delta Kappa Epsilon vs. Sigma Nu. 
14 — Psi Upsilon vs. Theta Delta Chi. 
17 — Alpha Delta Phi vs. Delta Upsilon. 
19 — Beta Theta Pi vs. Kappa Sigma. 
21 — Chi Psi vs. Sigma Nu. 
24 — Zeta Psi vs. Psi Upsilon. 
26 — Delta Kappa Epsilon vs. Alpha Delta 



EXCELLENT RECORD OF THE BOWDOIN 
FENCING TEAM 

The Bowdoin fencing team has completed an 
unusually successful season this winter. It has 
defeated Dartmouth and M.I.T., and has lost 
to Harvard and Columbia by narrow margins. 
This is a remarkable showing against teams 
from colleges many times the size of Bow- 
doin, and to Schlosberg '20, who has 
coached the team as well as being captain and 
manager of it, the highest praise is due. Og- 
den has also made a fine showing, as he has suc- 
cessfully met fencers of considerable experi- 
ence, although this is his first season with the 
foil. Schlosberg, Ogden, Osterman and Mc- 
Conky have been recommended for fencing let- 
ters. 

The first match of the season was with Har- 
vard in the Hemenway Gymnasium, February 
7. Bowdoin lost 6 to 3. The next match, with 
Columbia at Brunswick, was lost by only one 
point,— t5 to 4. On March 13, Bowdoin met 
Dartmouth and Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology in a triangular meet at Hanover. 
The final score was: Dartmouth 11, Bowdoin 
10, M.I.T. 6. Bowdoin defeated Dartmouth 5- 
4, and M.I.T. 5-4, but Dartmouth won the meet 
by defeating M.I.T. y-2. 

As the Bowdoin scores have not as yet been 
printed in the Orient, they are given here as 
follows : 

Schlosberg, Bowdoin 7; Skabo, M.I.T. 6. 
Schlosberg, Bowdoin 14; Taylor, M. I. T. 13. 
Schlosberg, Bowdoin 10; White, M. I. T. 6. 
Schlosberg, Bowdoin 8; Hutzburg, Dart. 7. 



Schlosberg, Bowdoin 10; Liao, Dart. 7. 

Schlosberg, Bowdoin 9; Weld, Dart. 11. 

Ogden, Bowdoin 3 ; Skabo, M. I. T. 9. 

Ogden, Bowdoin 5, Taylor, M. I. T. 9. 

Ogden, Bowdoin 8; White, M. I. T. 4. 

Ogden, Bowdoin 8 ; Hurtzburg, Dart. 6. 

Ogden, Bowdoin 10; Liao, Dart. 9. 

Ogden, Bowdoin 4; Weld, Dart. 7. 

McConky, Bowdoin 9; Skabo, M. I. T. 5. 

McConkv, Bowdoin 6; Taylor, M. I. T. 7. 

McConky, Bowdoin 5 ; White, M. I. T. 7. 

McConky, Bowdoin 6; Hurtzburg, Dart. 10. 

McConky, Bowdoin 7; Liao, Dart. 6. 

McConky, Bowdoin 6; Weld, Dart. 8. 

Weld, who won all six of his bouts, was high 
point winner while Schlosberg was second with 
five bouts. 



REGULATIONS CONCERNING MAJOR 
EXAMINATIONS 

At a meeting of the faculty on March 22, the 
following rules were adopted in regard to the 
general examinations in major subjects: 

1. Time of examination. 

(a) The examination shall be held some 
time during the senior year at the dis- 
cretion of the department. 

(b) A student failing the major exami- 
nation shall not be allowed a reexami- 
nation during the same year, except by 
special vote of the faculty. He shall, 
however, have the right to take an ex- 
amination the next fall and to secure his 
degree upon passing it if all the other 
requirements are satisfied. 

2. Nature of the examination. 

(a) The student before taking the exami- 
nation shall satisfy the department that 
he is prepared by having made a thor- 
ough review of the courses presented 
for the major, and by having done what- 
ever additional work the department has 
recommended. 

(b) The examination shall consist mainly 
of a written test; but this test may be 
supplemented at the discretion of the 
department by an oral test to which the 
president and other members of the 
group shall be invited. 

(c) The department shall notify the pres- 
ident and other members of his group 
of the time the major examination is to 
be held. These may attend, may re- 
quest an oral examination of a particular 
phase of the subject, and may take part 
in the oral examination. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Wednesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 

Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 

Managing Editor 

Edward B. Ham, 1922 

Department Editors 

Floyd A. Gerrard, 1923 Faculty Notes 

George H. Ouinby, 1923 Alumni Department 

Frederick K. Turgeon, 1923 Campus News 



Associate Editors 



John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 
William R. Ludden, 1922 
Roland L. McCormack, 1922 
Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Business Manager 
Frederick A. Allen, 1922 Assistant Manager 
Wilfred R. Brewer, 1922 Assistant Manager 



VOL. L. " APRIL 14, 1920 


NO. 2 


Entered at Post Office at Brunswickas Second-Clas 


;s Mail Matter 



Keeping Fit. 

Now that compulsory gym is over, those of 
us who are lucky enough to have no make-ups 
have a tendency to neglect our physical side. It 
is very natural and pleasant to spend the after- 
noon on a couch or in an easy chair concen- 
trating on the latest current fiction, but does such 
a practise insure the best bodily and mental de- 
velopment ? 

It is true enough that last week did not 
prove very tempting to the most ardent lover 



of outdoors with its winter "hangover." Such 
inclement weather cannot last long, however, 
and it behooves us to get outdoors for the pur- 
pose of following some pastime energetically 
and enthusiastically. Coach Houser will 

doubtless welcome any additional candidates for 
the varsity baseball squad, which has already 
commenced its work-outs on Whittier Field. 
For those who do not have the ambition or 
ability to try out for varsity baseball the In- 
tcrfraternity League offers a tempting field for 
the amateur baseball player. There he has at 
the same time an opportunity to display his 
skill and boost his fraternity, besides having a 
good time and getting a good amount of 
healthy exercise. Coach Magee also has a wel- 
come for those who wish to try their hand at 
track. Here is an excellent opportunity to 
make good under an experienced master. Oth- 
er outdoor diversions that ought to prove pop- 
ular are golf and tennis. Some of the golfers 
have already made their appearance, while the 
tennis courts will soon be in shape. If the stu- 
dent does not care for the realm of sport he 
can at least spend his time profitably by 
taking hikes to the many interesting points 
around Brunswick. 

The idea is, don't let your winter gymnasium 
work go to waste. Continue to keep yourself 
in good physical condition by participation in 
some healthy outdoor sport or pastime. Men 
of Bowdoin, "snap out of it." — keep fit. 



PRAISE FOR AMERICAN ATHLETICS 

There is an article on "Athletic Science" by 
Captain F. A. M. Webster in the London Sunday 
Sportsman for March 21, in which H. S. White 
'17 is cited as an excellent example of the finished 
athlete turned out by an American coach. To 
Bowdoin men who know the scientific training 
White received from Jack Magee, this will be no 
such surprise as it was to the Englishmen. The 
article is as follows : 

"There is at Oxford University at the present 
time an American scholar, H. S. White 
(Bowdoin College, U.S.A., and Brasenose, Ox- 
ford), whose high jumping performances pro- 
vide a complete answer to the often asked ques- 
tion, "Why do the Americans always beat us in 
International competition?" It is because in the 
United States athletics are treated as an exact 
science. 

"There is a reason for each little twist and 
body movement; each smallest detail is carefully 
thought out, and its value assessed. Hence the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



13 



world's records established in America are of 
such magnitude as could not be attained by nat- 
ural strength, spring or swiftness of foot alone. 

"Nor do the Americans rely upon mental analy- 
sis alone to reach their results; photography and 
kinematography are fully employed in the study 
of athletics as an exact science. 

"Films of athletes in action are taken at the 
highest possible speed, and are subsequently pro- 
jected upon the screen so slowly that every last 
detail of movement, down to the final flip of the 
shot putter's fingers as he delivers the weight, is 
made plain. Apart from this, the whole effort 
can thus be studied as a progressive movement 
in detail; points of perfection indicated and faults 
corrected. 

"Another point in which the Americans score 
over us is that they never hesitate to take trouble 
for fear of being" laughed at or called 'sidey.' 

"When the American long-jumper goes out to 
compete he measures his run-up accurately, and 
tests it before attempting to jump; the high- 
jumper ties a white handkerchief to the bar as 
an aid to vision, and asks to have the take-off spot 
rolled the moment the cinders show signs of 
working loose. Apart from these matters, the 
American athlete is not content to do rfis natural 
best, but practices and trains until perfection of 
balance and body movement are attained. Nor 
are they content to go upon the lines laid down, 
but keep on experimenting until the perfect style 
is evolved which best suits their own personal 
requirements. 

"It is these little, but none the less vital, 'tricks 
of the trade' that our men must acquire if we 
are to do ourselves justice at future Olympic 
Games. We have men ' of wonderful natural 
ability, of that there can be no doubt, but it must 
be our business and, incidentally, their own, to 
put them upon the equality in teaching and train- 
ing with their foreign antagonists." 



Campus jRetos 

The beautiful calla lilies on the reading desk at 
chapel during the past week were an Easter gift 
from Mrs. Forbes Rickard of Denver, in memory 
of Forbes Rickard, Jr., '17, who was killed in the 
war. 

Harvey Doe ex-'20 was on the campus April 
ninth. 

At a meeting of the Orient Board last 
Thursday it was announced that Mr. Arthur G. 
Staples, editor of the Lezviston Journal, would 
address the Board sometime during the last of 
April. Mr. Staples graduated in the Class of 



18S2 and was given the degree of Master of Arts 
last year. 

Professor Kimball of Smith College who was 
to address the students on Wednesday evening, 
April 7, on the subject of "Constitutional Ob- 
stacles to International Comity," was unable to 
reach Brunswick in time for the lecture. Pro- 
fessor Kimball has been speaking at several 
near-by colleges. 

Schonland '21 underwent an operation for 
appendicitis last week in a Portland hospital. 

The game with Harvard, scheduled for Satur- 
day at Soldiers' Field, had to be cancelled on ac- 
count of wet grounds. 

William Angus '19 was on the Campus last 
week. 

Monday the Masque and Gown played "Believe 
Me Xantippe" to a large and appreciative audi- 
ence at the Augusta Opera House, Augusta. As 
this is the fifth presentation of the play, and as 
it is to be put on in Westbrook sometime in May, 
it will undoubtedly be a finished production by 
Ivy. There has been one change in the cast 
since the Portland trip. Crosby Redman has 
taken the place of Lea Reiber who left college 
just before Easter. 

On Monday, April 5, there appeared in the 
Lezviston Journal a letter addressed to the Editor 
of the Orient, and signed by Frederick L. Smith 
'86, Penn Charter School. This letter with its 
interesting proposal of a memorial boulevard 
around the campus, to be named for Professor 
Files, the Orient did not receive, and does not 
now print, because it has already appeared and 
been commented on in several newspapers. 



jFacultp Jftotes 

Dr. Gross gave a talk on milk inspection in its 
relation to public health in the Brunswick High 
School building last Thursday evening. 

Professor Elliott has published in the English 
Journal for March an article entitled "When 
Greek meets Anglo-Saxon." This is a keen criti- 
cism of the ideals and methods that prevail in the 
teaching of English Literature in American grad- 
uate schools. 



alumni Department 

The Orient desires to be of the greatest possible 
service to Alumni in keeping them informed of 
one another's activities. Alumni, and especially 
class secretaries, are earnestly requested to sup- 
port the Orient in this work by sending items 
about themselves or their brother Alumni. All 
such communications should be addressed to the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Alumni Editor. 

'70— Charles Henry Moore died at his home in 
Chicago on March 10, 1920, after an illness of 
five months. He was born in Lewiston, Maine, 
September 26, 1849, and fitted for college at the 
Edward Little Institute, Auburn. He was a mem- 
ber of Delta Kappa Epsilon. After graduation 
he taught for a year at Auburn, and for six years • 
thereafter at Bowdoin, being an Instructor in 
Latin, Greek, French, and German. He was 
marshal at the Commencement of 1875, when 
Professor Longfellow of the celebrated class of 
1825 delivered his "Morituri Salutamus." In 
1877 he removed to Chicago and engaged in busi- 
ness, being connected with R. G. Dunn and Co. 
for thirty-two years. He was an accomplished 
linguist, a successful business man, and deeply 
interested in maintaining a high standard of 
business ethics. His courtesy and active sym- 
pathies endeared him to everyone with whom he 
was associated. On June 6, 1902, he married 
Miss Kate Backman of Chicago. He is survived 
by his widow, a son, Wallace Backman, born 
September 6, 1903, and a daughter, Mary 
Blanche, -born January 27, 1907. Eleven class- 
mates also survive him. 

'75 — Dr. Ernest Henry Noyes died at his 
home in Newburyport, Mass., on Feb. 7. He 
was born at Gloucester, Mass., on Nov. 21, 
1853. He was principal of the Barnard High 
School of Southampton, Mass., the year after 
his graduation. Upon receiving the degree of 
Master of Arts from Bowdoin in 1878 he 
studied medicine at the Harvard Medical School 
for two years, receiving the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine in 1880. In 1879 he was house sur- 
geon. From 1888 to 1918 when he retired he 
practiced medicine in Newburyport and for the 
past two years he has resided there. He was a 
member of the Boston Medical Association and 
the Massachusetts Medical Society. 

'01 — The engagement of Miss Virginia Don- 
nell of. Houlton, Me., to Roland Eugene Clark 
was announced a week ago Wednesday. 

'06 — In the April Atlantic Monthly appears an 
article entitled "Profiteering and Prices" by Pro- 
fessor Melvin T. Copeland, Director of the Bu- 
reau of Business Research at Harvard Uni- 
versity. 

ex-'o7 — Dr. Henry L. Johnson, who has been 
practicing at Westerly, R. I., since the war, was 
visiting in Brunswick recently. At the beginning 
of the war he was with the Rhode Island Base 
Hospital. Very soon he was sent to Newport 
News, where he remained for five months before 



going across. In France, he was stationed at 
Neuilly, where he witnessed operations on forty- 
eight hundred fractures. He returned to this 
country a year ago last January. Dr. Johnson re- 
ceived his M. D. from Columbia in 1912. 

'13 Lawrence W. Smith, who has been work- 
ing for a large firm of American importers and 
exporters during the past year in London, has 
been recently sent to Lisbon, Portugal, where 
he will remain for the coming year. 

'13 — Raymond D. Kennedy is now an instructor 
at Tabor Academy, Marion, Mass. 

'15 — Joseph C. MacDonald, who was wound- 
ed while in the aviation service, has accepted a 
call to the Congregational Church in Wilton, 
Mass. Mr. MacDonald was at the Union Theo- 
logical Seminary for three years after gradu- 
ation from Bowdoin. 

'16 — The engagement of Miss Marjorie Lin- 
der Perkins of Warren, Mass., to Robert Camp- 
bell, Jr., was announced on April 5. Miss Perkins 
is now a senior at Wellesley College and is the 
college song leader. She has specialized on the 
pipe organ during her college course and is a 
choir librarian. She is a member of the Alpha 
Kappa Chi Society. Mr. Campbell, who re- 
ceived the degrees of B.D. and S.T.B. from the 
Bangor Theological Seminary and the Harvard 
Theological Seminary after graduation from 
Bowdoin, was chaplain of the 101st Field Ar- 
tillery, 26th Division during the war and is now 
pastor of the Warren Congregational Church. 

'17 — Percy F. Crane is with the Eastern 
Manufacturing Co., this year and is residing at 
Bangor, Me. 

'18 — Ensign Albert L. Prosser, U.S.N., is in 
Brunswick awaiting the launching of a new 
destroyer at the Bath Iron Works. He has re- 
cently returned from service in the Adriatic 
where he was stationed during the occupation 
of Fiume by Gabriele DAnnunzio. 

ex-'20 — Stanley B.Adams died at his home in 
Bangor on March 26, after a sickness of more 
than a year. Mr. Adams transferred to the 
University of Pennsylvania after one year at 
Bowdoin and enlisted in the Naval Reserve in 
June, 1918. He was a member of the Delta 
Kappa Epsilon fraternity and the Bowdoin 
Club of Bangor. 



CALENDAR 

April 15 — Fraternity Dances. 
April 1(5 — Sophomore Hop. 
April 17 — Baseball : Fort Williams at Bruns- 
wick. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



15 



April 19 — Patriots' Day. 

Baseball : Exhibition game with 
Bates at Lewiston. 
April 20 — Student Rally. 



April 21 — Baseball 
April 22 — Baseball 
April 23 — Baseball 

nut Hill. 

April 24 — Baseball: 

Chester. 



Brown at Providence. 
Wesleyan at Middletown. 
Boston College at Chest- 

St. Anselms at Man- 



RESOLUTION. 



Hall of Theta of Delta Kappa Epsilon : 

It was with great regret that Theta Chapter re- 
cently learned of the death of Brother Charles 
Alcott Flagg of the class of 1894. Brother Flagg 
received the degree of B. L. S. from the Univer- 
sity of the State of New York, and A. M. from 
George Washington University. 

He was for several years sub-librarian in the 
New York State Library in charge of -history 
and geneology and later was appointed specialist 
in American History in the Congressional Li- 
brary at Washington. Brother Flagg was also 
the author of a number of historical works and 
member of several historical, genealogical, and 
librarians' associations. 

In recent years Brother Flagg has been librari- 
an of the Bangor public library and his death is 
a great loss to the city. 

INTERNATIONAL 

BANKING HOUSE 

offers an opportunity for a representative with 
connections in Maine. If you believe you have the 
qualifications necessary to make a success of this 
opening, send us a brief statement of your train- 
ing: experience in salesmanship a prerequisite — 
Address Mr. Woodworth, 13 Congress Street, 
Boston, Mass. 



Theta Chapter extends her sympathy to his rel- 
atives and friends. 

Craig Stevens Houston, 
Lewis Woodbridge Brown, 
Ronald Bibber Wadsworth, 

For the Chapter. 

Quality 
First 



Boston 
Garter 




GEORGE FROST CO., Makers, BOSTON 



We equip both the Red Sox and the Braves 
The Horace Partridge Co. 

Mfrs. Athletic & Sporting Goods 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Coach Magee is frequently sending 
orders to us, and will be glad to handle 
your order. 



Do You Need Extra Courses? 

Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages, Economics, 
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire 
how credits earned may be applied on present college program. 

Sty? Intorattg of (Eljiragn 




HOME STUDY DEPT. 




Start the Golt Season Right 

The new U. S. Golf Balls will help put 
you back on your game. These balls are 
made with a scientific exactness that guar- 
antees an accurate performance. They 
fly far and putt true. And if you like a 
ball that will hold its paint, its cover and 
its shape longer than any ball you've 
ever tried, you will want one of these. 
There's a size and weight to suit your play. 

Buy them from your pro or at your 
dealer's. 




U. S. Royal $1.00 each 
U. S. Revere 85c each 
U. S. Floater 65c each 



Keep your eye on\the ball — be sure it's a U. S. 



United States Rubber Company 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THAYER McNEIL CO. 

COLLEGE MEN'S 

SHOES 

BOSTON 

JOE BULGER - - - Representative 

In Store on Saturdays 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

"CANTEEN" 

19 NORTH WINTHROP 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 Sundays 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES, CAKE, ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 

PALMER SHOE CO. 
PORTLAND 

CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 

4 Elm Street 



SUMMER WORK 

We still have room 
For a few LIVE men 
Provided they want to 
Earn a lot of MONEY 
This summer. 

This isn't a gamble 

It is a SURE THING 

For the man who HUSTLES 

And besides 

We pay a SALARY. 

NOW is the time 

To get on the Band Wagon 

So see our local man 

Or write us direct and 

Ask for the dope. 

Local representative 

Harry Helson, '22, 

Room 29, North Winthrop. 

The National Survey Co. 

Topographical Offices 
CHESTER, VT. 



PORTLAND WATERVILLE WESTBROOK 

Try "POMONA," a fruit drink 

The Ideal Punch Syrup 

The Spear Folks 

Karl V. Palmer '18, Manager 
BATH BRUNSWICK 



BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


LAW 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

Trains students in the principles of the 
law and in the technique of the profession 
so as to best prepare them for active prac- 
tice wherever the English system of law 
prevails. 


DANCING 

Miss Jennie S. Harvey's Evening Dancing 
Class and Assembly every Tuesday evening at 
Town Hall, Brunswick, commencing Oct. 21st. 

Lesson 7.30 p. m. Assembly 8.30 p. m. 

This class is open to college students. 

Private instruction by appointment. 

Monday evening Class and Assembly at Arm- 
ory Hall, Bath. 

Address 897 Middle St., Bath, Maine. 'Phone 
151-W. 


College graduates may receive scholar- 
ships not exceeding $75. 

Course for LL.B. requires 3 school years. 
Those who have received this degree from 
this or any other approved school of law 
may receive LL. M. on the satisfactory com- 
pletion of one year's resident attendance 


A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office - - - Brunswick, Maine 


under the direction of Dr. Melville M. Bige- 
low. Several $25 and $50 scholarships 
open in this course. 

For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 


BUTLER'S 


11 Ashburton Place, Boston 


FIRST NATIONAL BANK 


WE CARRY 

Co-operative Shoes 


of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 


New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store 


We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Cushing St.— Tel. 16. 


W. E. ROBERTS '07 


J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 


LARGEST AND BEST 

Stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 


DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 


Covers, Window Draperies, 
etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 


The Bowdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 

Portland 

PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSONS PHARMACY 

COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 
SOULFS BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 

CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 



WILLIAM F. FERRIS 

COLLEGE AGENT 

Citizens Laundry 



AUTO SERVICE 



9 SOUTH APPLETON 



CHIPMAN 



DIAMOND RINGS 

At prices 1 5 per cent and 40 per 
cent less than New York prices 

A. G. PAGE CO., BATH 




"The Store of Progress and Service" 



Gentility 



The word definitely expresses the style and quality character- 
istics of our fine Shirts: — the shirts of a gentleman; either 
in plain white or pattern effects that are refined in their con- 
ception whether they be pronounced or subdued in color 
tones. $2 to $12 

Black Ties and Neckwear in the dark neat patterns so popular 
with college men. 

Men's Cordovan Brogue Shoes. 

Mr. Jack Handy '23 at the Zeta Psi House is our 
representative, and anything you wish in this line 
he will be glad to take your order for. 



Monument Square 




Portland, Maine 



Cumberland Theatre 




WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 
MARY MILES MINTER 

IN 

ANN OF GREEN GABLES 

FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
WILLIAM FARNUM 

IN 

WINGS OF THE MORNING 



NEXT WEEK 

MONDAY and TUESDAY 

MARGUERITE CLARK 

— IN — 

A GIRL NAMED MARY 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 
WALLACE REID 

~ IN 

DOUBLE SPEED 

FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
WILLIAM RUSSELL 

IN 

THE LINCOLN HIGHWAYMAN 



NEXT WEEK 

MONDAY and TUESDAY 

GERALDINE FARRAR 

IN 

THE TURN OF THE WHEEL 



d& 



VOL. L. NO. 3 



APRIL 21, 1920 



B0WD0IN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 




CONTENTS 



The Sophomore Hop 


. 17 


Bowdoin 23, Fort Williams 1 


. 18 


Baseball Prospects 


. 19 


Track Letters 


19 


Editorials: 




The Baseball Team . . . 


. 20 


Keeping Off the Grass 


. 20 



PAGE 

Memorial Boulevard Around the 

Campus 20 

Beta Theta Pi 5, Zeta Psi . . 21 

Campus News 22 

Faculty Notes 22 

Alumni Department .... 22 

Statement of Ownership ... 23 

* 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Let Jud "Outline" your work and do your "Cutting" for you 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



PRINTING 



OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWN BUILDING BRUNSWICK 



SPRING LINES OF 

SPORTING GOODS 



GOLF BALLS BASEBALL GOODS 

TENNIS GOODS 



We carry SPALDING & REACH 
Lines of Baseball Goods and WRIGHT 
& DITSON Tennis Goods. 



F. W. Chandler & Son 



COLLEGE AND "PREP" SCHOOL MEN 
Clothing foi Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 
ercoats and Ulsters. 




Hats 



Haberdashery 

MacuSlar Parker Company 

400 Washington St. Boston, Mass. 

"THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT" 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



America's most famous 
box of candy 




Candies of exquisite quality in a quaint, ar- 
tistic box. Fine to give to a girl or for a girl to 
give to herself! 

For sale by 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



COMPLETE STOCKS 

of 

Seasonable Clothes 

Haberdashery 

Hats 

FOR TOWN AND COUNTRY WEAR 



Also Special Styles in 
SPORTING APPAREL 



Haskell & Jones Co. 



Portland, 



Maine. 




BERWICK- lYi in. 
•i GORDON- VA in. 

Arrow 

3™3vCOLLARS 

curve cut to jit shoulders perfectly. 

CLUETT, PEABODY &COI [NcCMakers 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 



NOBBY MODELS 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 



E. S. BODWELL & SON 

Brunswick. 



Greenhouse 21-W 
Residence 21-R 



WALTER 


L. 


LaROCK 


F" l_ O 


F3 


1 S T 


Potted Plants and Cut Flowers 


Floral Designs 


for 


All Occasions 
.5% Jordan Avenue 



COURSON & MORTON 

SUPPLIES 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. L 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE., APRIL 21, 1920 



NO. 3 



THE SOPHOMORE HOP. 

The Sophomore Hop, held in the Gymnasium 
last Friday night, was attended by more than 
125 couples. It was a very successful dance, 
and much praise is due the committee who 
managed it so well at a small cost. Sprince's 
Syncopated Dozen furnished the music which 
was highly satisfactory. The patronesses pres- 
ent were : Mrs. Sills, Mrs. Woodruff, Mrs. 
Moody, Mrs. Hutchins, Mrs Whittier, Mrs. 
Mitchell, Mrs. Burnett,. Airs. Ham, Mrs. Brown, 
Mrs. Copeland, Mrs. Elliott, Mrs. Nixon, Mrs. 
Wilder, Mrs. Wass, Mrs. Gross, and Mrs. 
McClean. 

The committee in charge consisted of Wood- 
bury, Partridge, Fogg, Curran, and Ludwig. 
Professor Mitchell, Professor Copeland,. and 
Mr. Little acted as advisers to the committee. 

In addition to those guests who arrived Thurs- 
day for the fraternity dances, the following were 
present at the Sophomore Hop: Dr. and Mrs. 
Joseph S. Stetson of Brunswick; Dr. and Mrs. 
Aschman of Kansas City, Neb. ; the Misses Ber- 
nice B. Butler, Imogene M. Crocker, Marion 
Griffin, Ten Broeck Jackson, Gladys Merrill, 
Maude Merrill, Lottie Smith, Dorothy Spear, 
Helen York of Portland; Franchise Barrett of 
Caribou; Doris Creamer, Virginia Holway, Irene 
Purrinton of Augusta; Rita V. Moore of Wood- 
fords; Vivian Bowman, Helen Root, Beryl 
N evens, Helen McDonough of Lewiston; Helen 
M. Orr, Mrs. Karl V. Palmer, of Brunswick; 
Mary Stearns of West Paris; Dorothy Ellms of 
Auburn; Ernestine Philbrook of Bethel; Agnes 
Woodward of Portsmouth, N. H. ; Alice Wood- 
worth of Fort Fairfield; Mildred Leathers of 
Lowell, Mass. ; Vera Howe, Esther Hall of Bath. 



Psi Upsilon 

The Kappa Chapter of Psi Upsilon had its 
house dance Thursday evening. The patron- 
esses were Mrs. Manton Copeland and Mrs. 
Charles T. Burnett of Brunswick; and Mrs. 
Louis H. Schlosberg of Portland. The com- 
mittee consisted of Lamb '20, Willson '21, Free- 
man '22, and Schlosberg '23. Music for an ord- 
er of twenty dances was furnished by the Co- 
lonial Orchestra of Portland. 



Among the guests were the Misses Ruth Cald-- 
well of Winchester, Mass. ; Edith Clark of All- 
ston, Mass.; Catharine Clifford of Boston; Mir- 
iam Eldridge of Natick, Mass. ; Eloise Hayes of 
Brockton Mass.; Winifred Brehaut, Lois Has- 
kell, of Brunswick; Dorothea Farrell, Elizabeth 
Hall, Frances Mansfield, Cornelia Smart, of 
Portland; Dorothy Blethen, Alsy Hemenway, of 
Rockland; Margaret Hansen of Bath. 



Delta Kappa Epsilon 

Theta Chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon held a 
formal reception frpm three to five at the Chapter 
House on Thursday, April 15. Mrs. William De- 
Witt Hyde, Mrs. George T. Little, Mrs. Gilbert 
M. Elliott, and Mrs. George F. Stetson poured. 
In the evening the members of the fraternity had 
their house dance, at which the patronesses were 
Mrs. Kenneth C. M. Sills, Mrs. William Widgery 
Thomas of Portland, and Mrs. John Clair Minot 
of Boston. The committee in charge consisted 
of Rhoads '20, chairman, C. S. Houston '20, and 
Richardson '22. Music was furnished by Pease's 
orchestra. 

Among the guests were the Misses Mona Ames 
of Boston; Lucie K. Atwood of Eastport; Helen 
Baker of Bangor; Hilda Bangs, Lucile Puring- 
ton, Beatrice M. Straw, of Augusta; Emily 
Baxter, Helene Blackwell, Evelyn C. Cobb, Kath- 
arine L. Willis, of Brunswick; Molly V. Blunt, 
Doris Gower, of Skowhegan; Marian Bodwell, 
of Sanford; Mildred Bridgham, of Ashland; 
Edna Chamberlin of Fort Fairfield; Ida Collins, 
Minnie Norell, of Caribou; Elizabeth Dennis of 
Madison, Wisconsin; Priscilla Elliot of Guil- 
ford ; Louise Hanson of Yonkers, N. Y. ; Edith 
Hawkins of Springfield, Mass.; Margaret Lane 
of Auburndale, Mass. ; Margaret G. Leavitt of 
Purcell, Oklahoma; Helen Shepard of Haverhill, 
Mass.; Louise G. Walton of New York City; 
Bernice B. Young of Portland ; and Marion Mc- 
Loon of Rockland. 



Theta Delta Chi 

Eta Charge of Theta Delta Chi held its 
formal house dance Thursday evening. The 
patronesses were Mrs. Wilmot B. Mitchell 



18 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



and Mrs. Alaric W. Haskell of Bruns- 
wick, and Mrs. Hugh Pendexter of Nor- 
way. The committee consisted of Curtis '20, 
Pendexter '21, and Stearns '22. The Foristall 
Orchestra of Portland furnished the music for 
an order of twenty dances. 

Among the guests were the Misses Ruth 
Trafton of Boston; Ruth Button of Exeter, 
N. H. ; Elinor Howe, Catharine Anderson, of 
Wellesley College; Dorothy Glover of Brook- 
line, Mass.; Bertha Merrill of Augusta; Idamae 
Wotton of Rockland; Maybelle Beach, Ruth 
Foss, Elizabeth Nash, of Brunswick; Ev- 
elyn Frost, Ruth Johnson, Helen Munroe, Hel- 
en Nissen, Carla Sherman, of Portland. 



Delta Upsilon 

The Bowdoin Chapter of Delta Upsilon held 
its fraternity dance Thursday evening. The 
patronesses were Mrs. Joseph S. Stetson, Mrs. 
E. S. Bodwell, and Mrs. Samuel B. Furbish of 
Brunswick. The committee in charge consisted 
of Ryder '21, chairman, Blodgett '22, and Perkins 
'23. Among the guests present were the Misses 
Dorothy Johnson, Marjorie Mathis, Luena Hut- 
chinson of Woodfords; Elizabeth Hamilton, 
Louise Lapointe, Isabelle Pollard of Brunswick; 
Frances Burrowes, Margaret MacDonald of 
Portland; Doris Wakeley of Lisbon Falls; Eula 
Pinkham of Lincoln; Dorothy Sylvester of Deer 
Isle; Winifred Page of East Orange, N. J.; 
Helen Meador of Dover, N. H.; Martha Ford 
of Gloucester, Mass. ; Sally Hill of Colebrook, 
N. H. 



Kappa Sigma 

Alpha Rho Chapter of Kappa Sigma had its 
fraternity dance in Pythian Hall Saturday, April 
17. The patronesses were Mrs. Roscoe J. Ham 
of Brunswick, and Mrs. Frank H. Monahon of 
Woodfords. The committee in charge consisted 
of W. H. Berry '20, chairman, Clifford '21, and 
Bachulus '22. Music for an order of eighteen 
dances was provided by Sprince's orchestra. 

Among the guests were the Misses Muriel 
Berry of Springfield, Mass.; Frances Bradish, 
Marion Glover, Virginia Lane, of Portland; 
Eveleen Priest, Helen Colby, of Brunswick; 
Violet Mills of Ellsworth; Harriet Sweetscr, 
Louise Merriam, of Yarmouth ; Bernice Spraguc 
of Boston; Clara Dary of Taunton, Mass.; Irene 
Goodrich of Augusta; Gertrude Kearney of 
Bangor; Edna McAllister, Phyllis Moran, of 
Rockland ; Esther Power, Hester Gaffney of 
Gloucester. 



Chi Psi 

Alpha Eta of Chi Psi had its fraternity dance 
at Pythian Hall Thursday evening. The 
patronesses were Mrs. Frederick L. Anderson of 
Newton Centre, Mass., Mrs. Lewis E. Wagg of 
Brunswick, and Mrs. Lloyd H. Hatch of Dexter. 

Among the guests present were the Misses 
Annie Marshall, Lillian Marshall, of Bruns- 
wick; Ruth Henderson, Marion Look, Helen 
■Meserve, Florence Trask, of Portland; Evelyn 
Groves, Alveda Groves, of Freeport; Ruth 
Chipman, Dora Higgins, of Topsham ; Lillian 
Staples, Margaret Staples, of Pittsfield; Algia 
McLeary of Farmington; Lucile Walker of 
Warren; Neva A. Rowe of Springvale; 
Algie Cummings of Jonesport; Arlene Mar- 
ston of Waverly, Mass.; Marion G. Williams 
of Hartford, Conn.; Geraldine Baker of Bing- 
ham. 



BOWDOIN 23, FORT WILLIAMS 1. 

In a decidedly uninteresting game on Whittier 
Field last Saturday Bowdoin administered an 
overwhelming defeat to the team from Fort Wil- 
liams of Portland. Twenty-two players figured 
in the Bowdoin line-up, aggregating a total of 
twenty-two hits, and twenty-three runs. Needel- 
man was the high man at the bat with five clean 
singles out of five at bats. J. Smith drove out 
four hits, two of them doubles, out of six chances. 
He was the only player to remain in the game 
for the full nine innings, and he showed up very 
well at third in his first game for Bowdoin. 
Handy, another freshman, allowed no one to 
steal a base on him during his six innings of 
playing. Coach Houser sent in five pitchers dur- 
ing the contest, and also other substitutes for 
every other position except third base. In the 
third' inning, Cook was the chief factor in the 
first triple play seen on Whittier Field for a long- 
time. With men on first and second, Cook 
stabbed Ledou's liner, touched second, and re- 
layed the ball to Clifford before the other runner 
could get back to first. Bowdoin made the game 
a farce at the very start by piling up eleven 
runs in the first inning on eight hits, six errors, 
and a base on balls. Morrell amused the crowd 
his first time up by hitting eleven fouls, a num- 
ber of them over the grand stand, before taking 
his base- on balls. A neat one-hand catch by 
Davis of a fly to short left in the seventh, and 
Joe Smith's catch of Patterson's hit in the fourth, 
together with Cook's triple play, were the chief 
fielding features of the game. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



19 



The result of the game seems especially good 

in that Fort Williams held Bates to the score 

of 4 to 3 a day or two before. This contest 

was an excellent preparation for the hard week 
of the Massachusetts trip. 

The summary : 

BOWDOIN. 

ab r bh po a e 

Needelman, cf 5 3 5 o o 

Canter, cf 1 o o o 

Cook, 2b 3 3 2 4 2 2 

Perkins, 2b 1 - o 1 o 

J. Smith, 3b 654130 

Morrell, ss 3 1 1 o 3 1 

G. T. Davis, ss 1 1 2 1 o 

Doherty, rf 4 2 2 o 

A. Hall, rf 1 1 1 

Wagg, rf o o 1 o 

Handy, c 4 1 o 1 o 

Miller, c 1 o 1 3 o 

Marston, c o 00 

Prosser, If 4 1 1 o 

Towne, If ; 2 o o o 

Clifford, ib 3 2 2 11 o 

G. Mason, ib 2 3 o 

Flinn, p 1 1 1 '1 2 o 

P. Mason, p 1 1 b 1 

Walker, p 2 1 1 3 o 

Tuttle, p 1 o 1 

Graves, p o c^ 



Total 



46 23 

FORT WILLIAMS, 

ab r 

Ledou, rf 3 1 

Patterson, cf 4 

Lacy, 2b 4 

Mays, 3b, p 4 o 

Bolte, If 4 

Sherlock, ss 4 o 

Walsh, ib 3 

E. Smith, c 3 

Fowler, p o 

Paulson, 3b 2 



bh po a e 



4 



Total 31 1 5 24 14 10 

Score by innings : 123456789 

Bowdoin 11 4 1 o 4 o 3 x — 2s 

Fort Williams o o 1 — 1 

Two-base hits, J. Smith 2, Walker, Lacy, Mays. 
Earned runs, Bowdoin 10, Fort Williams 1. Stolen 
bases, Needelman 2, Cook, J. Smith 2, Doherty 2, 
Prosser, Clifford 2, Flinn, Tuttle. Left on bases. Bow- 
doin 7, Fort Williams 6. First base on errors, Bowdoin 
5, Fort Williams. Sacrifice hits, Handy, Clifford. 
Sacrifice flies, Cook, Morrell. Triple play, Cook to 
Clifford. Double play, Walker to Cook to Clifford. 
Struck out, by Flinn, by Tuttle 3. by Mays 3. First 
'base on balls, off Walker, off Tuttle 2, off Fowler. Hit 
by pitched ball, Cook (by Fowler), Doherty (.by Mays). 
Wild pitch, Mays. Passed balls, E. Smith 2. Hits, off 
Fowler, 3 in one inning (none out when Mays began 
pitching); off Mays, 19 in 8 innings; off Flinn, 1 in 2 
innings ; off Mason, 1 in 2 innings ; off Walker, 2 in 
2 innings ; off Tuttle, 1 in 2 innings ; off Graves, o in 1 
inning. Umpire, Corey of Portland. Time. 1 hour, 45 
minutes. 



BASEBALL PROSPECTS. 

Coach Ben Houser has been whipping the 
many canditates for the varsity baseball team 
into the best of condition. There has been 
daily practice out-of-doors since the Easter re- 
cess and the diamond is now in good condition 
for a game. There is a large and rich supply 
of material this year and everyone is entering 
into the game with the spirit which means fu- 
ture victories. 

The Harvard game was postponed until Ap- 
ril 27, at the request of the Harvard manager, 
the diamond being too wet and the weather too 
cold for baseball. This was not altogether a 
misfortune because the Bowdoin nine had not 
had sufficient practice to show up in its best 
form, and several players would have been un- 
able to play for various reasons. 

There is a wealth of material out this season 
and Coach Houser predicts a season of many 
successes. There are three varsity pitchers re- 
maining from last season, Mason, Flinn, and 
Tuttle, and the heaviest twirling will fall to 
their lot, although they will be ably supported 
by Walker, Whitman, and several other men 
who are showing good form. The infield 
promises to be one of the snappiest in years. 
Clifford on first base, Captain Cook on second, 
Morrell at short-stop, and J. Smith on third 
base are now working in fine style, while sev- 
eral men are pressing them hard for their po- 
sitions. The freshman class has contributed an 
unusually large number of candidates, of whom 
Hill, Smith, Handy, Towne, G. T. Davis, and 
Walker are all possible letter men this year. 

This list of candidates with mam' others are 
working hard for the stiff schedule which faces 
them. Coach Houser does not expect to have 
a spectacular performance at first but is confi- 
dent that as the ■season progresses, the caliber 
of the team will increase steadily. He puts 
great trust in the spirit which is being exhibit- 
ed in the daily practices and feels that with the 
combination of this material, spirit, and prac- 
tice, he can assure Bowdoin of a team of 
which she can be justly proud. 



TRACK LETTERS. 

At a meeting of the Athletic Council last 
week, track letters were awarded to the follow- 
ing men for performances this winter: L. H. 
Moses '20, M. H. Smith '20, S. M. Cook '21, 
L. H. Hatch '21, and E. A. Hunt '22. 



20 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Wednesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 

Editor-in-Chief 
Norman W. Haines, 1921 

Managing Editor 
• Edward B. Ham, 1922 
Department Editors 
Roland L. McCormack, 1922 News Edtior 

Floyd A. Gerrard, 1923 Faculty Notes 

George H. Quinby, 1923 Alumni Department 
F. King Turgeon, 1923 Campus News 



Associate Editors 



John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 . 
Crosby E. Redman, 1921 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 
William R. Ludden, 1922 
Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



able. This is not an attempt to record individual 
brilliancy, which should be mentioned in another 
column, but merely pays tribute to the good work 
done by members of the squad in the field and 
at bat, encouraging to those who have the wel- 
fare of our baseball team at heart. 

After such a fine showing the student body 
should be doubly zealous in giving the team its 
hearty support. Let every Bowdoin man get 
his attendance at every rally held in the interests 
of baseball and at every game within a reason- 
able distance; let him cheer himself hoarse 
whether the team is ahead or not; and let him 
make evident to individual members his interest 
in them and his enthusiasm for the team as a 
whole. Help make this baseball season one 
worthy of being remembered by all Bowdoin 
men. Get behind the team ! 



BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Business Manager 
Frederick A. Allen, 1922 Assistant Manager 
Wilfred R. Brewer, 1922 Assistant Manager 

VOL. L. APRIL 2i, 1920. No. 3 

Entered at Post Office at Brunswiekas Second-Class Mail Matter 

The Baseball Team. 

The baseball team at its initial appearance 
against Fort Williams last Saturday made a 
showing that gives Bowdoin supporters reason to 
believe that they will be proud of their outfit be- 
fore the season ends. While the team did not 
meet as strong competition as could be desired, 
there was an opportunity to size up the excel- 
lent material. While there were several changes 
from last year's line-up the team work and team 
spirit of the White was noticeable and commend- 



Keeping Off the Grass. 

As the campus gradually lends itself to easier 
navigation, Bowdoin upperclassmen are exercis- 
ing their time-honored privilege of cutting across 
the grass. While it may not be desirable to 
abolish the practice, it is well, especially at this 
season of the year, to use some discretion in 
walking on the soft turf. Until the grass is well 
started, trespassing upon it is likely to check its 
growth and to cause unsightly cross paths, un- 
less care is taken. At all times of the year 
the appearance of both the paths and grass will 
be improved, if students will take the trouble to 
walk within the paths rather than on their sides, 
as is done too commonly. 

Perhaps the best thing to say in regard to this 
matter is : don't walk upon the grass unless 
there is an advantage to be gained by so doing. 
When one has occasion to hurry, it is quite 
natural to take short cuts. Too often, however, 
in this case, we abuse our privilege by using it 
when there is no necessity for it. Let's all co- 
operate by taking heed to the points mentioned in 
order to make the campus present, even more 
than usual, its attractive aspect at Ivy and Com- 
mencement. 



MEMORIAL BOULEVARD AROUND THE 
CAMPUS. 

The Orient is glad to print the following- 
letter which was intended originally for the col- 
lege paper, but failed to reach us in time to ap- 
pear simultaneously at Bowdoin and in some of 
the leading journals of the state. The first part 
of this communication was Mr. Smith's comment 
on the attitude of the Philadelphia Alumni to- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



21 



wards his proposal, while the last part is his 
letter proper, describing his suggestion in more 
detail. 

"Cyrus K. Curtis, President of the Curtis Pub- 
lishing Company, entertained the Bowdoin Club 
of Philadelphia in the banquet hall of his mag- 
nificent building. on Independence Square. In 
the absence of President Sanborn, Frederick L. 
Smith of the Penn Charter School, Bowdoin 
'86, former president of the Philadelphia Club, 
presided. Among the measures discussed in the 
interest of the college a proposition of a road- 
way around the college, dedicated to the mem- 
ory of George T. Files and set with memorials 
to Bowdoin's distinguished sons, received unan- 
imous endorsement of the Club. Mr. Curtis, in 
particular, was very cordial in the support of 
this idea, inasmuch as he is a loyal son of Bow- 
doin, whose mother was born in Brunswick. 

"It was definitely stipulated by the Club that 
in promoting this idea, the more vital matter of 
providing adequate endowment for the increase 
of salaries of Bowdoin's teaching staff should 
receive first attention." 

Mr. Smith's letter to the Bowdoin Orient 
follows : 

"To the Editor of the Bowdoin Orient: 

"The great majority of the graduates of Bow- 
doin College in the past have been natives of 
the Pine Tree State. The College campus has 
always been associated in their minds with the 
whispering pines of Longfellow and Kellogg". 
The location of the college is ideal, its stately 
pines typify its close relation to the honored 
Commonwealth which shelters Bowdoin. Her 
students are inspired by the sacred memories 
of her distinguished sons. In many ways the 
development of the campus has kept pace with 
the academic progress of the curriculum. Mem- 
orial gates and paths shaded by stately trees 
enhance the natural beauties of its location. 

"In one particular, however, the campus is 
notoriously incomplete. Unfortunately this de- 
fect interferes seriously with the due appreci- 
ation of its many charms. I refer to the condi- 
tion of the streets which border the campus. 
This condition is little better than that which 
characterizes the many wood roads which amble 
across the plains of Brunswick. During the 
spring and summer months motor parties from 
all over the country are seeking a season of re- 
pose in the mountain and shore resorts of 
Maine. Practically all these pass through 
Brunswick over the magnificent boulevard that 
spans the state. A detour from the beautiful 



highway to encircle the roads which bound fa- 
.nous Bowdoin, the Alma Mater of distin- 
guished poets and statesmen, is an experience 
little likely to be repeated, owing to the almost 
impassable condition of the roadway. 

"In his tribute to Prof. Files in chapel, Presi- 
dent Sills said that it had always been one of 
the fondest traditions of the college that the 
members of the faculty should take a lively in- 
terest in the affairs of the community. George 
Taylor Files, of the Class of '89, devoted his 
life to the service of Bowdoin. In his devotion 
to the college, however, he never lost sight of 
the claims of his native state. He was a pio- 
neer in the movement for better roads. The 
present system of trunk lines across the state 
is a monument to his zeal and enthusiasm in 
this progressive movement. 

"Such efforts as Prof. Files and those asso- 
ciated with him made in the cause of good 
roads are utterly devoid of the incentives of 
spectacular triumphs. They are rather anala- 
gous to the sacrifices of physicians, who give 
their lives in their experiments for the allevi- 
ation of human suffering. 

"What monument better calculated to visual- 
ize and perpetuate the work of this champion 
of good roads could be devised than a perma- 
nent highway around the campus? 

"The opportunity which such a permanent 
boulevard about the college would afford for 
the erection of memorials to Longfellow, Haw- 
thorne, Kellogg, President Pierce, General 
Chamberlain, Speaker Reed, Chief Justice Full- 
er, and Admiral Peary and other distinguished 
sons of Bowdoin is at once evident. As a 
means of bringing to the attention of the pres- 
ent generation the great work Bowdoin has per- 
formed in the past in training her sons to the 
broadest service of the state and nation, such 
a roadway dedicated to the memory of Prof. 
George Taylor Files and marked with appro- 
priate memorials to her distinguished sons, 
would ever remain an inspiration to similar 
service in state and nation. 

"Frederick L. Smith." 



BETA THETA PI 5, ZETA PSI 0. 

Last Thursday afternoon the Beta Theta Pi 
baseball team played Zeta Psi in the first game 
of the season. The game, which ran through 
seven rather slow innings, resulted in a 5-0 vic- 
tory for the Beta team. Wing '23 with fifteen 
strike-outs to his credit was a sensation in the 
Beta pitching box. Haggerty '20 played a good 



22 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



game for the Zetes. 

Score by innings : 

Beta Theta Pi 2 1 o 1 1 — 5 

Zeta Psi o o o — o 

Batteries: Wing and Hill; Haggerty, Hall, 

and Handy. Beta Theta Pi : 6 hits, 2 errors ; 
Zeta Psi : 2 hits, 4 errors. 



Campus jRerus 

The Democratic Club, which has been a 
prominent factor in the college during previ- 
ous presidential campaigns, met in the library, 
April 12, to make plans for a revival of the or- 
ganization. Williams '21 was elected president, 
and Harmon '22 secretary and treasurer. The 
club will listen from time to time to prominent 
democratic speakers, and the members plan 
next fall to take the stump for the democratic 
nominee. 

The Bowdoin second team defeated the Cabots 
of Brunswick on the Whittier Field Monday 
morning by a score of 7 to 2. Walker '23 pitched 
for Bowdoin, and Marston '21 caught. Graves 
'20 did the twirling for the town team. Mason 
'23 and Walker drove out a three-base hit apiece, 
while McLellan '21 also got in some good hits. 

Last week the college received a large "grand- 
father" clock, the gift of Mrs. William LeBaron 
Putnam, widow of the late Judge Putnam, of 
the class of 1855. It is very beautifullly inlaid, 
and its case is of solid mahogany. It has three 
sets of chimes, the Westminster, the St. Michael, 
and the Whittington. 

The Musical Club Concert which was to have 
been held in Lewiston last Saturday has been 
postponed until the coming Saturday because 
of a mistake in the lease on the hall. This is 
the last concert of the season. 



jFactiltp Jftotes 

President and Mrs. Sills were in Boston last 
week. 

Dean Nixon addressed the Fraternity Club 
in Portland on ''Martial," April 5. 

Professor Brown is to take a leading part in 
the open performance of the Brunswick Dra- 
matic Club, "A Successful Calamity," which is 
now being rehearsed. 

Dean Nixon was in Bath Friday evening, 
April 16, attending a meeting of the Maine 
Wesleyan Alumni of which he is secretary. 

Professor Mitchell is giving a course in pub- 
lic speaking in the Y.M.C.A. at Portland. 

Dr. and Mrs. Whittier were in Boston last 



week where they attended the banquet given to 
Major-General Wood at his class reunion. 

President Sills spoke before the Bath Rotary 
Club Tuesday noon, April 13. 

Professor Bell who planned to spend the 
spring recess in Bermuda was suddenly called 
to Hamilton, Ontario, by the illness of his fa- 
ther. 



alumni Department 

'77— Mrs. Marie Stafford, the daughter of the 
late Robert E. Peary, acted as sponsor of the 
torpedo boat destroyer "Peary," launched at 
Cramp Yard on April 6th, the eleventh anniver- 
sary of the discovery of the north pole. 

'01 — In the last issue of the Orient it was 
erroneously stated that the engagement of Miss 
Virginia Donnell of Houlton, Maine, to Roland 
Eugene Clark had been announced March 31. 
Instead it should have been reported that they 
were married at Houlton April 7. Mr. Clark is 
vice-president of the Fidelity Trust Company 
of Portland, and he is also a member of the 
Psi Upsilon fraternity. 

'05 — In the March supplement of the American 
Economic Reviezv is an article entitled "Is Large 
Scale Centralized Organization of Marketing in 
the Interest of the Public?" by Dr. L. D. H. 
Weld, Manager of the Bureau of Research for 
Swift and Co. 

'13 — In the March number of the American 
Economic Reviezv is a paper on "The Computa- 
tion of the Labor Turnover" by Professor Paul 
H. Douglas of the University of Washington, 
and in the February number of the Quarterly 
Journal of Economics is an elaborate essay by 
Mrs. Douglas on "The Cost of Living for Work- 
ing Women: A Criticism of Current Theories." 

'14 — The engagement of Miss Winifred Brad- 
bury of Fort Kent, Maine, to William Henry 
Cunliffe, Jr., was announced some time ago. 

'14 — A daughter, Barbara, was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Warren D. Eddy, February 19, 1920. , 

'14 — Dr. H. C. Dixon is now practicing medi- 
cine in Kensington, Conn. He saw overseas ser- 
vice in France as a first lieutenant in the Medical 
Corps. Dr. R. E. Hubbard of the same class is 
pacticing medicine in Waterford, Maine. 

'15 — The engagement of Miss Marion Hazel 
Whitcomb of Portland, Me., to James Blaine Lap- 
pin has recently been announced. 

Medic '15 — Dr. Herbert F. Hale is moving to 
Oxford, Mass., where he is to take up prac- 
tice. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



23 



Statement of the Ownership, Management, Circu- 
lation, Etc., Required by the Act of Congress 
of August 24, 1912. 

Of the Bowdoin Orient, published weekly during 
college year, at Brunswick, Me., for April i, 1920. 
State of Maine, County of Cumberland, ss. 

Before me, a Notary Public, in and for the State 
and county aforesaid, personally appeared Kenneth S. 
Boardman, who, having been duly sworn according to 
law, -deposes and says that he is the business manager 
of the Bowdoin Orient and that the following is, to 
the best of his knowledge and belief, a true statement 
of the ownership, management (and if a daily paper, 
the circulation), etc., of the aforesaid publication for 
the date shown in the above caption, required by the 
Act of August 24, 1912. embodied in section 443, Postal 
Laws and Regulations, printed on the reverse of this 
form, to wit : 

1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, 
editor, managing editor, and business managers are : 

Name of — Post office address — 

Publisher, Eowdoin Publishing Co., Brunswick. Me. 
Editor, Norman W. Haines, Brunswick Me. 
Managing Editor, Edward B. Ham, Brunswick, Me. 
Business Manager, Kenneth S. Boardman, Brunswick, 

Me. 

2. That the owners are : 

Bowdoin Publishing Co., Mutual association. No 
member receiving share of profits. 

3. That the known bondholders, mortgagees, and 
other security holders owning or holding *i per cent, 
or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other 
securities are: (If there are none, so state.) None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next above, giving the 



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names of the owners, stockholders, and security holders, 
if any, contain not only the list of stockholders and 
security holders as they appear upon the books of the 
company but also, in cases where the stockholder or 
security holder appears upon the books of the company 
as trustee or in any other fiduciary relation, the name 
of the person or corporation for whom such trustee is 
acting, is given : also that the said two paragraphs con- 
tain statements embracing affiant's full knowledge and 
belief as to the circumstances and conditions under 
which stockholders and security holders who do not 
appear upon the books of the company as trustees, 
hold stock and securities in a capacity other than that 
of a bona fide owner ; and this affiant has no reason 
to believe that any other person, association, or cor- 
poration has any interest direct or indirect in the said 
stock, bonds, or other securities than as so stated by 
him. 

KENNETH S. BOARDMAN, Business Manager. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 14th day of 
April, 1920. 

SAMUEL B. FURBISH. 

(Seal.) 



Quality 
First 



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k. must be uniform throughout; the size and weight 
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factors help to lower your score. 

The New U.S. Golf Balls 

U. S. Royal, U. S. Revere, U. S. Floater 

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Buy them from your pro or at your dealer's. 



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U. S. REVERE 85c each 
U. S. FLOATER 65c each 

Keep your eye on the Ball — be sure it's a U. S. 




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BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THAYER McNEIL CO. 



COLLEGE MEN'S 



SHOES 



BOSTON 



JOE BULGER - - - Representative 



In Store on Saturdays 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

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8-12 a.m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 Sundays 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

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CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES, CAKE, ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 

PALMER SHOE CO. 



PORTLAND 



CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 

4 Elm Street 



SUMMER WORK 

We still have room 
For a few LIVE men 
Provided they want to 
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For the man who HUSTLES 

And besides 

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NOW is the time 
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So see our local man 
Or write us direct and 
Ask for the dope. 

Local representative 

Harry Helson, '2 1 , 

Room 29, North Winthrop. 

The National Survey Co. 

Topographical Offices 
CHESTER, VT. 



PORTLAND .WATERVILLE WESTBROOK 

Try "POMONA," a fruit drink 

The Ideal Punch Syrup 

The Spear Folks 

Karl V. Palmer '18, Manager 
BATH BRUNSWICK 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



LAW 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

Trains students in the principles of the 
law and in the technique of the profession 
so as to best prepare them for active prac- 
tice wherever the English system of law 
prevails. 

College graduates may receive scholar- 
ships not exceeding $75. 

Course for LL. B. requires 3 school years. 
Those who have received this degree from 
this or any other approved school of law 
may receive LL. M. on the satisfactory com- 
pletion of one year's resident attendance 
under the direction of Dr. Melville M. Bige- 
low. Several $25 and $50 scholarships 
open in this course. 

For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 



WE CARRY 

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etc., in town. 

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BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



DANCING 

Miss Jennie S. Harvey's Evening Dancing 
Class and Assembly every Tuesday evening at 
Town Hall, Brunswick, commencing Oct. 21st. 

Lesson 7.30 p. m. Assembly 8.30 p. m. 

This class is open to college students. 

Private instruction by appointment. 

Monday evening Class and Assembly at Arm- 
ory Hall, Bath. 

Address 897 Middle St., Bath, Maine. 'Phone 
151-W. 



A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office - - - Brunswick, Maine 

BUTLER'S 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 

We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
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kinds east of Portland. 

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87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store — 2 Cushing St.— Tel. 16. 

J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 

The Bowdoin 



Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 






BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


Pianos Victrolas Music 

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COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

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184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 


DIAMOND RINGS 

At prices 15 per cent and 40 per 
cent less than New York prices. 

A. G. PAGE CO., BATH 



"The Store of Progress and Service" 

TYPES and TASTES 
In College Men 

We've experience in analyzing these. You can pretty nearly determine a 
man's taste by his type — we're eminently successful in suiting both. The 
character, complexion, bearing of each individual man enables us at first 
sight to judge the sort of model, fabric or pattern that will appeal to his 
taste, and through our immense variety we have little difficulty picking out 
the right thing in a Suit or Overcoat. Mr: Jack Handy '23 at the Zeta Psi 
House is our representative, and anything you wish in the way of Shirts, 
Neckwear, Shoes, Hosiery, Pajamas, etc., he will be glad to take your order. 



Monument Square 




Portland, Maine 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY 
NORMA TALMADGE 

IN 

THE ISLE OF CONQUEST 

FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
BERT LYTELL 

IN 

THE RIGHT OF WAY 




NEXT WEEK 

MONDAY and TUESDAY 

BRYANT WASHBURN 

— IN — 

IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 
CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 

IN 

The Road Through the Dark 

FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
HARRY MOREY 

IN 

IN HONOR'S WEB 



NEXT WEEK 

MONDAY and TUESDAY 

THE CONFESSION 



VOL. L. NO. 4 



APRIL 28, 1920 



B0WD0IN 




Established 1871 



ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Bowdoin 12, Bates 2, in Ex- 
hibition Game 25 

Bowdoin Loses to Wesleyan . 25 

Bowdoin S, St. Anslems 3 . . 26 

Lecture by Dr. Walter A. Rob'n- 

son 26 

Poet and Explorer .... 26 

Student Rally 27 

Bradbury Debating Trials . . 27 
James L. Doherty '89 on Import: 

ant Board of Arbitrators . 27 
Editorial: 

The Proposed Memorial Boule- 
vard 28 



PAGE 

Communication 28 

Golf Boom Under Way ... 28 

Musical Clubs End Season . . 29 

Report of Baseball Manager . 29 
Lecture by Dr. Charles Upson 

Clark :....... 29 

Faculty Notes 29 

Campus News 30 

Alumni Department .... 30 

Calendar 31 

Resolution 31 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Let Jud "Outline" your work and do your "Cutting" for you 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 


SPRING LINES OF 

SPORTING GOODS 


BOWDOIN COLLEGE 


GOLF BALLS BASEBALL GOODS 


PRINTING 


TENNIS GOODS 


We carry SPALDING & REACH 


OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWN BUILDING BRUNSWICK 


Lines of Baseball Goods and WRIGHT 
& DITSON Tennis Goods. 


F. W. Chandler & Son 



COLLEGE AND "PREP" SCHOOL MEN 
Clothing fov Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 
ercoats and Ulsters. 

Haberdashery Hats 

Macullar Parker Company 

400 Washington St. Boston, Mass. 

"THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT" 





BOWDOIN ORIENT 




I 



a 



i 



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Chocolates 

The Chocolates 

(hat are 

DifjPereirb 

Truly Great Chocolates are so luscious and so good 
that you will wish the box were many times larger. 
This package has a very special assortment of choice 
fillings of pre-eminent quality, and many of the coatings 
are the delicious butter coatings original with Apollo 
Chocolates. 

The dainty assortment of finely decorated pieces 
snakes the "Truly Great" Assortment a charming gift 
of far more distinction than the usual box of chocolates. 

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BOWDOIN ORIENT 



COMPLETE STOCKS 

of 

Seasonable Clothes 

Haberdashery 

Hats 

FOR TOWN AND COUNTRY WEAR 



Also Special Styles in 
SPORTING APPAREL 



Haskell & Jones Co. 
Portland, - - - Maine. 




ARROW 

^roy ^Tailored 

Soft Collars 

CLUETT, PEABODY 4 CO. , INC.. TROY, N. Y. 



ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



NOBBY MODELS 

IN 

Young Men's Suits 



E. S. BODWELL & SON 

Brunswick. 



Greenhouse 21 -W 
Residence 21-R 



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Floral Designs 


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15% Jordan Avenue 



COURSON & MORTON 

SUPPLIES 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOL. L 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 28. 1920 



NO. 4 



BOWDOIN 12, BATES 2, IN EXHIBITION 
GAME. 

Bowdoin won an easy victory over Bates on 
Patriots' Day in the annual exhibition game. On 
account of the wet field at Bates the game was 
played on the Auburn Athletic Association Park. 
With a team that was superior both^ in batting 
and fielding, Bowdoin led Bates all through the 
game. Bates used four pitchers but Bowdoin 
batted out a twelve to two victory, earning eight 
of its runs. The score: 

BOWDOIN. 

ab r bh po a e 

Needelman, cf 5 i 2 o o o 

Cook, zh 4 i o 2 2 o 

Smith, 3b 4 o 1 4 3 

Morrell, ss 6 2 1 4 5 1 

Hall, rf 5 3 3 o 1 o 

Handy, c 3 1 1 4 3 1 

*Miller, c 1 o 

Prosser, If 4 1 1 2 

Clifford, ib 4 2 2 10 1 o 

FHnn, p 5 o 2 1 3 



Totals 40 12 13 27 18 2 

*Also ran for Handy in ninth. 
BATES. 

ab r bh po a e 

Dillon, 2b 3 4 1 

Woodbury, rf 3 o 1 o o 

Besse, rf 1 o o 

Donahue, ss 4 o 2 2 3 3 

Van Vloten, c 4 1 2 o 1 

Wiggin, cf 4 3 5 o 1 

Langley, ib 3 2 8 o o 

McAllister, ib 1 o 4 o o 

Ebner, If 2 1 o 1 

Rice, If 2 o o o 

Young, 3b 3 1 o o o 

Garrett, p o o 3 o 

Spiller, p • 1 o i 1 o 

Johnston, p 2 3 

Cusick, p o o o 1 1 



Totals 33 2 9 27 \2 6 

Bowdoin o 4 2 o 2 4 — 12 

Bates o 2 o o o o o — 2 

Hits and earned runs, off Flinn 9 ;off Garrett 4 in 

1 1-3 innings; off Spiller 5 in 1 inning; o Johnston 

2 in 5 innings ; off Cusick 2 in 1 2-3 innings. Two 
base hit, Handy. Three base hits, Prosser, Clifford, 
Smith, Donahue, Wiggin. Runs driven in by Hall, 
Prosser, Flinn, Handy, Clifford, Needelman 2, Smith 
2, Spiller 2. Stolen bases, Morrell, Prosser, Clifford 



2, Ebner, Young. First base on balls off Johnston 1, 
Cusick 2. First base on errors, Bowdoin 2, Bates 1. 
Left on bases, Bowdoin 10, Bates 5. Double plays, 
Morrell and Clifford, Flinn and Smith. Struck out, by 
Flinn 5, Johnston" 1, Cusick 1. Wild pitch, Cusick. 
Passed balls, Handy, Van Vloten 2. Hit by pitcher, 
by Spiller (Smith), by Cusick (Handy), by Flinn 
(Dillon. Umpire, J. Carrigan. Time, 2.35. 



BOWDOIN LOSES TO WESLEYAN. 

In a loose game on Andrews Field last 
Thursday afternoon, April 22, Wesleyan 
brought disaster to Bowdoin in the first game 
of Bowdoin's New England trip. Vice Presi- 
dent George M. Dutcher threw the first ball, 
opening the season for Wesleyan. 

The first three innings of the game were 
well played, and no runs resulted, so that the 
800 fans expected a close game. Immediately 
after this, however, Mason was hit hard by the 
Wesleyan batters, eight runs being scored in 
the next three innings. Tuttle replaced Mason 
on the mound and held the Middletown college 
to one hit during the remainder of the game. 
Needelman and Cook played a good game for 
Bowdoin, and Raines excelled for Wesleyan. 
WESLEYAN. 

ab r bh po a e 

Jones, 3b 5 1 1 3 o 

Bateman, cf 5 3 3 3 o 1 

Boote, c 4 1 1 4 1 

Webb, ss 4 1 1 1 2 

Jacobs, ib 3 1 9 o 

Lawson, 2b 3 2 1 o 

Raines, If 3 1 2 5 

Tomlinson, rf 4 1 o 1 o o 

Connelly, p 3 o 1 o 5 o 

Fitter, ib 1 2 o 

Totals 33 8 10 27 12 1 

BOWDOIN. 

ab r bh po a e 

Needelman, cf 3 3 o o 

Cook, 2b 4 1 1 2 1 

Smith, 3b 4 o 2 1 1 

Morrell, ss 4 o 1 1 3 1 

Hall, rf 4 1 2 o 

Handy, c 2 o 5 2 o 

Prosser, If 3 o o 2 o 

Clifford, ib 3 9 1 1 

Mason, p 2 o o 2 1 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Tuttle, p i o o o o o 

Totals 30 1 3 24 11 5 

Wesleyan o o 2 3 3 o o — 8 

Bowdoin o o 1 o o o o — 1 

Three base hits. Bateman, Boote. Sacrifice hits. 
Handy, Smith, Needelman. Sacrifice fly, Boote. Left 
on bases, Bowdoin 2, Wesleyan 5. Stolen bases, Webb, 
Raines. Bases on balls, off Mason 2, off Connelly 2. 
Struck out, by Mason 2, by Tuttle 1, by Connelly 4. 
Hits, off Mason S, off Tuttle 2, off Connelly 3. Um- 
pire, Rorty. Time, 1.55. 

*Needelman. x Cook. 



Flinn, p 4 



BOWDOIN 3, ANSELMS 3. 

In the game at Manchester, N. H., last Satur- 
day Bowdoin and St. Anselms played a tie game, 
called at the end of the tenth inning because of 
cold weather. The game was marked by many 
errors on both sides. This was due to a large ex- 
tent to the extreme cold of the afternoon. 

The first inning was distastrous to Bowdoin 
as St. Anselms started with two runs, obtained 
largely through infield errors on the part of 
Bowdoin. After this inning the game was de- 
cidedly in favor of the White. Both Flinn and 
Laughery pitched good ball during the entire 
game. Joe Smith played a good game both on 
third base and at bat. Handy, Cook, and Mor- 
rill each made two hits for Bowdoin. These 
hits however were so scattered that they were 
not used to great advantage in bringing in runs. 
The members of the Bowdoin nine, however, 
feel confident that- they can assure the college 
of a victory when St. Anselms plays at Bruns- 
wick, May 5. The score: 

ST. ANSLEMS. 

ab r bh po a e 

W. Slattery, ss 3 1 o 2 4 

R. Slattery, cf 4 o o 3 o o 

Sullivan, rf 4 1 1 1 o o 

Borden, If 5 3 l ° ° 

McLaughlin, ib 4 1 16 1 2 

McWilliams, 2b 4 o 1 1 1 

Scully, 3b 3 2 o 

Cunningham, c 4 1 o 5 o o 

Laughery, p 5 1 10 

*Downey 1 o o o 6 

Totals 3S 3 5 30 18 3 

BOWDOIN. 

ab r bh po a e 

Needelman, cf 4 1 o o o 

Cook, 2b 5 1 - 2 x 2 

Smith, 3b 5 1 2 6 

Morrell, ss 4 o 2 2 1 

Hall, rf 5 o 1 1 o 

Clifford, ib 4 o o 13. 2 

Doherty, If 5 o 2 o 

Handy, c 5 o 2 9 4 1 



Totals 41 3 9 30 17 9 

Two base hits, Handy. Earned runs, Bowdoin 1. 
Stolen bases, McLaughlin 3, Needelman, Hall, Morrell. 
Sacrifice hits. W. Slattery, R. Slattery. Hit by pitched 
ball, Cunningham. Struck out by Flinn 8, by Laughery 
5. Wild pitches, Flinn 2. Passed balls. Handy 2. Um- 
pire, Lynch. 



LECTURE BY WALTER A. ROBINSON. 

Walter A. Robinson of the Class of 1876 
gave a very interesting illustrated lecture under 
the auspices of the Ibis at Memorial Hall, Fri- 
day evening. Mr. Robinson's subject was "The 
Battle and Training Areas in France during 
the Summer of 1919." He showed many scenes, 
familiar in name to every one, where Co. C of 
the I02d Machine Gun Battalion, in which his 
son was a lieutenant, was in action. Among 
the slides were many showing the ruin brought 
about by the war; some of Domremy, the birth- 
place of Joan of Arc; Neuf Chateau, Vailly, 
the Soissons and Toul sectors, and the terri- 
tory covered in the St. Mihiel Drive. In the 
course of the lecture Mr. Robinson gave an in- 
timate picture of the life of the small towns of 
France. The lecture meant more to the audi- 
ence for the reason that the 26th division had 
traversed nearly the same districts. 



POET AND EXPLORER. 

Among those interesting old papers in the 
Library that contain such riches of Bowdoin 
history, is a simple little Ivy Day Program, a 
card in vivid green border and ribbon, — and from 
it we reprint the following Ode. It was de- 
li iered in King Chapel on June 6, 1876, when '77 
held its Ivy exercises, and the author's name 
appears as "Bert Peary." The explorer of 
Arctic fame and world reputation spoke even 
then of "paths that lead far hence," and there 
is in this youthful verse the firmness of purpose, 
the earnestness, and the impelling imagination 
that sent its author to solve his own "future's 
mystery." On the card appears also the name 
of John E. Chapman '77, now of Brunswick, 
brother of the late Professor Chapman. 

Ivy Ode. 

Bert Peary. 

Air — "Music in the Air." 

"O ! Ivy ever true, just awakening from thy sleep. 
Henceforth like vestal pure thou a sacred trust dost 

keep : 
Take thou then by subtle art of our throbbing lives a 






BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Fill thy veins with richest life for the future's storm 
and strife. 

"All through the coming years in thy leaves of darkest 

green, 
Upon the Chapel walls will our peerless name be seen ; 
All our hearts beat fast and strong, beat to send thy 

life along, 
Every thought goes out to thee and the future's 

mystery. 

"Let others praise thy trust, but thy leaves remind us 

now, 
Of ages long gone by, when they decked young 

Bacchus' brow ; 
So may we, O Ivy fair, ever keep away despair, 
And with Ivy crowns always live our lives through 

fresh and gay. 

"But not for joy alone dost thou stand the symbol fair. 
We see thy dark leaves gleam in the Isthmian victor's 

hair ; 
Wreath the garland, shape the crown, we will hunt 

Dame Fortune down, 
And her vanquished hand shall pour richest gifts our 

pathways o'er. 

"Thus speaks the noble vine in a glorious triple sense, 

Its voice shall guide us all, though our paths may lead 
far hence ; 

Now God speed thee gentle vine, softly o'er these gray 
walls twine, 

Meeting every stranger's eyes with a vision's glad sur- 
prise." 

Among" old programs of interest is another 
of the Sophomore Prize Declamations, June 30, 
1884, consisting of twelve numbers, largely his- 
torical ! While a modern audience might resent 
so long a list, it has seemed regrettable that the 
Commencement Day program, for instance, 
should have been limited in recent years to four 
speakers instead of the earlier six, for a "piece," 
well spoken, and even more an original part, is 
always a pleasure to the audience of parents and 
friends, for whom after all that day chiefly 
exists. In a Senior class with a large number of 
provisional appointments, four seems a small 
representation. 



STUDENT RALLY. 



The first rally of the baseball season was well 
attended and enthusiastic. The time was taken 
up for the most part with singing the old Bow- 
doin songs that had fallen into disuse because 
of the war. To many members of the Class of 
1923 these songs were a wonderful surprise, as 
few of them had realized the great fund of 
songs that Bowdoin has. Under the direction 
of Richan '20 and with the help of the Musical 
Clubs, the undergraduates made Memorial Hall 



ring with "Forward the White," and "We'll 
Sing To Old Bowdoin." One could not help 
feeling that this sing was a great step toward 
regaining the traditional Bowdoin "spirit." In 
the near future several more rallies will be 
held, out doors if possible. 

A new method of choosing cheer leaders was 
announced by Cleaves '20 between the songs. 
Hereafter candidates from the Junior class will 
compete for nomination like the candidates for 
managerships. The two nominees picked by the 
Student Council will be voted upon by the stu- 
dent body. 



BRADBURY DEBATING TRIALS 

Last Tuesday the debaters of the college met 
in the Debating Room of Hubbard Hall to com- 
pete for places on the team. The subject under 
discussion was "Resolved: That the Lloyd 
George plan for Home Rule in Ireland should 
be adopted." The judges were Professor Mit- 
chell, Professor Catlin, and Professor Van 
Cleve. The affirmative team was chosen as 
follows: Badger '21, Little '23, Nixon '21, and 
Haines '21 (alternate). The negative team is 
composed of the following men: Finnegan '2^, 
Mitchell '23, Thayer '22, and Laughlin '21 (al- 
ternate). These men will represent the college 
in the intercollegiate debates. 



JAMES L. DOHERTY '89 ON IMPORTANT 
BOARD OF ARBITRATORS. 

James L. Doherty' 89, who was elected to the 
Board of Overseers last June, was named on the 
17th of April as a member of the Board of Arbi- 
trators to act in the dispute between the Car- 
men's Union and the Boston Elevated Railway 
Company. 

The appointment came as a result of con- 
ferences between representatives of the carmen 
and the Elevated Company. The board will de- 
cide upon the requests of the union for changes 
in hours and working conditions and increases 
in pay. 

Mr. Doherty's name was on the list suggested 
by Governor Coolidge, and both sides to the con- 
troversy consider that he is especially well quali- 
fied for the position and that he can be depended 
upon to act fairly and impartially on the issues 
involved. 

It is expected that Mr. Doherty will go to 
Boston this week and that hearings will begin 
at once in an attempt to reach a conclusion be- 
fore May 1, when the present agreement as to 
wages will expire. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published Every Wednesday During the Col- 
legiate Year by The Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 
In the Interest of the Students of 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 

Editor-in-Chief 

Norman W. Haines, 192 i 

Managing Editor 

Edward B. Ham, 1922 

Department Editors 

Roland L. McCormack, 1922 News Edtior 

Floyd A. Gerrard, 1923 Faculty Notes 

George H. Quinby, 1923 Alumni Department 

F. King Turgeon, 1923 Campus News 



Associate Editors 



John L. Berry, 1921 
Harry Helson, 1921 
George E. Houghton, 1921 
Russell M. McGown, 1921 
Crosby E. Redman, 192 i 
Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 
William R. Ludden, 1922 
Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 

All communications regarding subscriptions 
should be addressed to the Business Manager of 
the Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 



BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Business Manager 
Frederick A. Allen, 1922 Assistant Manager 
Wilfred R. Brewer, 1922 Assistant Manager 



VOL L. 



APRIL 28, 1920. 



No. 4 



Entered at Post Office at Brunswickas Second-Class Mail Matter 

The Proposed Memorial Boulevard. 

The proposal of Frederick L. Smith, of the 
Class of 1886, for a boulevard dedicated to the 
memory of the late Professor- George T. Files, 
of the Class of 1889, seems a timely and logical 
suggestion. To all familiar with the appearance 
of the College and its surroundings the slack 
condition of the roads around the campus is not 
only unsightly, but also is an actual obstruction 
to walking during the spring months on account 
of the poor surface drainage. 



As Mr. Smith intimates, there will be an added 
inducement for tourists to view the College, if 
the campus is surrounded by a well-paved and 
beautiful drive. In this age of the automobile 
the proposition ought to be received .with all 
the more favor. And as the originator of the 
idea also states, a boulevard would be particu- 
larly fitting because of the active interest that 
Professor Files took in advancing the good roads 
movement. 

The project appears to be ideal in presenting 
to the public view memorials of famous alumni. 
It would not only be an attractive means of 
showing how Bowdoin had honored her great 
men, but also would indicate what great men 
she had and their claim to greatness. 

The plan has the additional strength of being- 
backed by at least one strong alumni organiza- 
tion. It seems probable too that other organiza- 
tions will fall in line with the idea. The support 
of the alumni ought to insure sufficient financial 
backing to carry the plan to completion. It cer- 
tainly has qualities that should appeal very 
strongly to both undergraduates and alumni. 



Communication. 

April 4, 1920. 
To the Editor of the Orient: 

Just a little in the way of endorsement of the 
editorial, "Keeping Fit." I think, while it is the 
sentiment of most undergraduates, that such ad- 
monition is timely and needful. It reminds me 
of another editorial which appeared in a journal 
or magazine only a few days ago. The sub- 
stance of that was comment on excessive pat- 
ronage of athletic games, and participation there- 
in, rather for excitement's sake than for benefit 
derived. It declared, plainly enough, that our 
sports were gradually approaching the danger 
line of existing as an end rather than as a means. 
It concluded that such a process, if persistently 
followed, would result in a state of affairs rather 
deplorable. I think we will all agree that as 
a means to greater ends adequate physical exer- 
cise is indispensable, but to what extent is the 
premise true? It is an interesting thing to think 
about. R.W.N. ('21) 



GOLF BOOM UNDER WAY. 

During the first four days of this week a golf 
tournament is being held with the idea of bring- 
ing out material for a golf team and of advanc- 
ing interests in this sport which is being received 
with such great favor by students at the present 
time. This is to be followed by other tourna- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



29 



ments throughout the spring. It is hoped to hold 
a match play championship ..tournament later for 
the College title. Already negotiations are under 
way for team matches with Portland and Au- 
gusta. Any men interested in golf and who wish 
to be put on the handicap list, thereby becoming 
elegible for future tournaments, should com- 
municate with Rounds '20, who is in charge of 
the activity this spring. 

The tournament will be played under rules of 
the United States Golf Association, subject to 
changes as by local rules which are posted on 
the bulletin board. Score cards must be kept 
by every player for himself and opponent, these 
attested by each, and turned in before 6.30 p. m. 
Thursday, April 29. Matches may be played at 
any time between Monday morning and Thurs- 
day night except that men matched as opponents 
must turn in their scores for the first eighteen 
holes they play. All matches are for two con- 
secutive nine hole rounds which is equivalent to 
one eighteen hole round. 



MUSICAL CLUBS END SEASON. 

The Musical Clubs on last Saturday evening 
ended the most successful season for years with 
a concert in Lewiston City Hall. The clubs went 
to Lewiston under the auspices of the Lewiston 
High School, and were greeted by a large audi- 
ence. The usual program was followed by a 
dance. It is worthy of especial note that the 
Bowdoin Clubs could appear twice in the same 
community with success. A concert was given 
in Auburn in March, and Auburn is locally called 
the "Twin-city" of Lewiston. 

Eleven concerts, every one of which was a 
real success, have been presented this season. 
Four states have been visited. The College has 
a right to be proud of the clubs for they have 
helped greatly to maintain her honor and fame. 
The success of the season is due in no small 
measure to Professor Wass who has spent much 
time in coaching the singing. Manager Berry, 
it is needless to say, deserves a large share of 
the credit. Leaders Richan and Sprince inspired 
the men by their hard and tireless work. How- 
ever, the fine spirit of co-operation shown by 
every member of the clubs was the deciding 
factor in the success of the season. 



REPORT OF BASEBALL MANAGER. 

Season of 1919. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Coaching account $ 3S5.00 

General account 62.92 



Manager's account 40.19 

Equipment account 96.25 

Travelling account 1,451.22 

Game expense account, j 536. oS 

Total $2,571.66 

RECEIPTS. 

A. S. B. C $1 ,000.00 

Guarantees 80S.36 

Gate receipts 763.30 

Total $2,5 7 1 .66 

Audited and found correct. 

(Signed) Paul Nixon, Treasurer. 
January 28, 1920. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. K. McWilliams, Manager. 



LECTURE BY DR. CHARLES UPSON CLARK. 

Under the auspices of the Classical Club, Dr. 
Charles Upson Clark will lecture on "Adriatic 
Problems" tomorrow evening in Memorial Hall. 
Dr. Clark was formerly professor of Latin at 
Yale, from which he graduated in 1897 at the 
head of his class. In 1916 he was appointed to* 
the very important position of director of the 
School of Classical Studies of the American 
Academy in Rome. In recent years he has 
lectured very widely in this country on many 
subjects. During the war Dr. Clark had in- 
terviews with a large number of statesmen and 
rulers in the belligerent countries. Two years 
ago he lectured in America for the Propaganda 
Bureau of the Italian Government. This year 
he has spoken at many of the universities and 
colleges of the country. Bowdoin is indeed for- 
tunate to have this opportunity of hearing a 
speaker who is such a profound scholar in the 
classics, and so widely recognized as a lecturer. 



jFacuItp i3otes 

Professor Mitchell preached at the Congre- 
gational church at Wilton on April 16, and in 
the evening delivered a lecture on the life of 
Theodore Roosevelt. 

President Sills has expressed himself in sev- 
eral of the leading newspapers concerning an 
improvement on the direct primary in this state. 
He suggests a referendum primary as a check 
upon the convention. 

Professor Woodruff has filed his primary 
nomination papers as a candidate for represen- 
tative to the legislature from Brunswick on the 
Democratic ticket. 

Professor Moody has been elected vice presi- 
dent of the Brunswick Loan and Building As- 



30 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



sociation. 

President Sills is to deliver the principal ad- 
dress at the annual installation and public exer- 
cises of the Boston University Chapter of Phi 
Beta Kappa, May 14th. 

Professor Burnett, McConky '22, and Priest 
ex-'23 played in important parts in the Bruns- 
wick Dramatic Club performance, "Alice-Sit-by- 
the-Fire," last Thursday evening. Professor 
Brown was the stage director, and also took con- 
siderable part in the coaching. 

President Sills, who has been appointed chair- 
man of a commission to make a survey of the 
five colleges affiliated with the Episcopal Church, 
left on Friday for an extended trip during which 
he will visit these colleges and make his annual 
visit to the Naval Academy at Annaoplis as a 
member of the Board of Visitors. On May 7 he 
will attend a meeting of the American Council of 
Education in Washington. 

Professor Burnett appeared in the production 
of "Alice-Sit-by-the-Fire" given by the Bruns- 
wick Dramatic Club last week. 

Professor Bell sent word last week of the 
death of his father, whose illness had caused him 
to return from the West Indies. 



Campus I3etos 

The April Quill in the form of a "Spring 
Verse Number" with an attractive cover of gray, 
has received great praise, not only the much 
valued commendation of President Sills in 
chapel, but also the hearty approval of the 
Campus. Such a number gives pleasant assur- 
ance of the persistence of the poetic impulse even 
in a day of harsher and more trying interests. 

The Psi Upsilon baseball team defeated the 
Delta Upsilons 7-2 in a practice game last 
Thursday. Clark '23 pitched a steady game for 
Psi Upsilon. The game was played on the dia- 
mond west of the Library and lasted. seven in- 
nings. 

The engagement of Miss Dorothea M. Far- 
rell of Portland to Richard Turner Schlosberg 
'20 was announced last Friday. 

Zeitler '20 spoke at the monthly meeting and 
banquet of the Bowdoin Club of Portland on 
April 17 concerning the undergraduate activi- 
ties at college. 

At a recent meeting of the Freshman class, 
Palmer was elected president to succeed Marcus 
Chandler, who has left college. 

The baseball game scheduled with Brown for 
last Wednesday, and the game with Boston Col- 



lege for Friday had to be concelled on account 
of weather conditions. 

The district convention of the Beta Theta Pi 
fraternity was held with the Beta Sigma 
chapter last Saturday, and an address was given 
by Dr. Melvin T. Copeland '06 of Harvard Uni- 
versity. 

Psi Upsilon defeated Sigma Nu in a practice 
game last Saturday afternoon 11 to 4. The 
game lasted for seven innings. 



alumni Department 

The Orient desires to be of the greatest possi- 
ble service to Alumni in keeping them informed 
of one another's activities. Alumni, and especial- 
ly class secretaries, are earnestly requested to 
support the Orient in this work by sending items 
about themselves or their brother Alumni. All 
such communications should be addressed to the 
Alumni Editor. 



'75 — Following is a copy of a statement con- 
tained in the Simmons College Review of 
March, 1920, which refers to Professor E. H. 
Hall, of the Class of '75, Bowdoin College: 

"At the meeting of the Faculty of Simmons 
College held on January 20, 1920, it was voted 
that the following memorial be placed on the 
Faculty records of Simmons College, and that a 
copy be sent to Professor E. H. Hall, of Har- 
vard University : The Faculty of Simmons Col- 
lege having learned that Professor Edwin Her- 
bert Hall, Rumford Professor of Physics in 
Harvard University, served as a voluntary 
policeman during the recent police strike in Bos- 
ton, that during this period Professor Hall pa- 
trolled for a number of nights that portion of 
the city known as 'The Simmons College beat,' 
and that thereby he aided in securing protection 
to the College property, the Faculty wishes to 
place on its records and to express to Professor 
Hall the College's profound appreciation of and 
its lasting gratitute for the service thus rendered 
the College, a service probably without parallel 
in the history of colleges, a service gladly given 
from a busy and distinguished life, at a sacrifice 
of personal comfort and at the risk of life itself. 
The great scientist in his service for others has 
again shown himself a- chief among men." 

'91 — Harry deForest Smith, Professor of 
Latin at Amherst, is managing editor of a series 
of books to be published by the trustees of Am- 
herst college in connection with the commem- 
oration of their centennial which will take 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



31 



place in 1921. The first volume is by President 
Alexander Meiklejohn and entitled "The Lib- 
eral College," another one which is nearly 
ready for publication is "The Life Indeed" by 
the late Professor John F. Genung. It is ex- 
pected that there will be a large number of vol- 
umes in the series which is to be known as 
"The Amherst Books." The publishing will be 
done by the Marshall Jones Company of which 
A. Marshall Jones, Bowdoin '93, is president. 

'12 — Robert D. Cole, A.M., who was a lieu- 
tenant in the 321st Field Artillery, A.E.F., and 
is now teaching at Huntington School, is to 
teach French and Spanish next year at the Law- 
renceville School. This summer he is to con- 
duct a party of boys over France, Belgium, and 
Switzerland, with special trips to the battle 
regions. 

'13 — A new University Club has been organ- 
ized in Worcester, Mass., recently. Among the 
charter members Bowdoin leads, and Major 
Winthrop Stephenson Greene, Bowdoin, 1913, 
was elected secretary and treasurer. 

'18 — The engagement of Miss Marguerite C. 
Houser to Jean Paul Hamlin has recently been 
announced. 



CALENDAR. 

April 29 — Lecture by Dr. Charles U. Clark in 
Memorial Hall. 

April 30 — Masque and Gown plays at Free- 
port. 

April 30-May 1 — Pennsylvania Relay Carnival. 

May 1 — Baseball: Colby at Brunswick. 

May 1 — Tennis: Bates at Brunswick. 

May 5 — Baseball: St. Anselms at Brunswick, 
iston. 

May 7 — Debate with Rhode Island State. 

May 8 — Baseball: University of Maine at 
Brunswick. 

May 8 — Dual track meet with Bates at Lew- 
May 8 — Tennis: M. I. T. at Cambridge. 



RESOLUTION. 

Hall of the Kappa Chapter of Psi Upsilon: 

It is with a profound sense of sorrow that the 
Kappa Chapter of Psi Upsilon records the death 
of Brother Jonathan Prince Cilley of the Class 
of 1858. Brother Cilley's life was one of true 
service to his country and those with whom he 
was associated. His record in the Civil War 
was one bringing high honor to himself and his 
college, and his career since as a loyal citizen 
and friend is worthy of equal approbation. 

The Kappa extends to his relatives and friends 
her deepest sympathy. 

Leland M. Goodrich, 
George E. Houghton, 
Francis P. Freeman, 

For the Chapter. 



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taste, and through our immense variety we have little difficulty picking out 
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BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



VOL. L 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 5. 1920 



NO. 5 



BOWDOIN WINS RELAY AT PENNSYLVANIA 
CARNIVAL. 

Bowdoin, the only small college in New Eng- 
land to be represented at the 26th Annual Relay 
Carnival of the University of Pennsylvania, won 
its event last Saturday with flying colors. Cap- 
tain Dostie, M. H. Smith, Hatch, Goodwin, and 
Parent went on the trip with Coach Magee. 
Parent started for Bowdoin, and immediately 
jumped into the lead which he held almost to 
the end of his race. Smith immediately passed 
his opponent, and Hatch increased the lead. 
Goodwin started oft" with a 20-yard lead, but the 
Rochester anchor man made a wonderful spurt, 
which reduced the Bowdoin star's lead to 10 
yards. Each man ran a quarter of a mile. The 
time was three minutes, thirty-eight and three- 
fifths seconds. Rochester finished second and 
Buffalo third. By this fine showing the team 
certainly repaid the Philadelphia Alumni who 
defrayed the expenses. When the news of the 
victory reached the campus late Saturday night, 
some of the students, disappointed in their hopes 
of a celebration in the afternoon, organized an 
impromptu parade, and with a small but noisy 
bank marched around the campus and down 
town. The festivities were completed with a 
bonfire in front of the chapel. 



COLBY TOPS BOWDOIN IN CLOSE GAME. 

Before a large crowd of fans on Whittier 
Field last Saturday afternoon, Bowdoin dropped 
the first game of the Maine series to Colby in a 
very tight game, the score being I to o. The 
game was marked by the good fielding and in- 
different hitting of both teams. Both Flinn for 
Bowdoin and Bucknam for Colby pitched fine 
ball. Bowdoin obtained six hits off Bucknam 
while Colby drew only four from Flinn. Buck- 
nam's underhand and spit ball delivery along 
with some bad breaks of the game kept Bow- 
doin's hits so scattered that the White was un- 
able to put a man across. Williams of Colby 
in the fourth inning obtained the only score of 
the game; driving the ball far out into left field 



for a three base hit, he beat Hall's throw to the 
plate on Lampher's sacrifice fly. In the last two 
innings Bowdoin's cheering section tried loudly 
but in vain to start the team on a rally to tie the 
Score. 

First Inning. 

Colby — Taylor, the first to the plate for 
Colby, hit weakly to Clifford who put 
him out at first. Williams struck out. Lampher 
knocked a short infield fly to Smith at third. 
No runs, no hits, no errors. 

Bowdoin — Needelman, after making several 
fouls, hit over third base for a clean single. Cook 
fouled out to Wills. Smith singled between third 
and short, advancing Needelman to second. 
Needelman stole third and Smith immediately 
after went to second. Morrell struck out. Hall 
only popped a short fly to Good. No runs, two 
hits, no errors. 

Second Inning. 

Colby — Good drove a liner past second base. 
Bucknam was out on a short fly to Morrell. In 
the next play, Good attempted to steal second 
but was put out on a perfect throw by Handy 
to Morrell. Willis, the next man at bat, grounded 
to Clifford who relayed the ball to Flinn, who 
had covered first. No runs, one hit, no errors. 

Bowdoin — Clifford was out, Bucknam to Wills. 
Doherty was retired on a grounder to Good. 
Handy poled out a high fly to Fraas who made 
a pretty catch. No runs, no hits, no errors. 
Third Tinning. 

Colby — Greenlaw struck out. Tyler hit to 
Morrell who made a difficult stop getting his 
man at first. Fraas fanned. No runs, no hits, 
no errors. 

Bowdoin — Flinn hit to Greenlaw at third base, 
who threw him out at first. Needelman hit to 
Bucknam who easily put him out at first. Cook 
walked. Smith knocked a high fly to Tyler in 
right field. No runs, no hits, no errors. 
Fourth Inning. 

Colby — Taylor went out on a short fly to Flinn. 
Williams, the next batter for Colby, then drove 
out the best hit of the game. He sent the ball 



34 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



far over Doherty's head in left field and reached 
third. Lampher lifted a sacrifice fly to Hall and 
Williams came home before the throw to the 
plate. Good struck out. One run, one hit, no 
errors. 

Bowdoin — Morrell struck out. Hall was put 
out at first by a throw from Lampher. Clifford 
sent a long fly into the hands of Williams in left 
field. No runs, no hits, no errors. 
Fifth Inning. 

Colby— Bucknam flied to Hall. Wills hit to 
Cook, who made an error, allowing the latter to 
reach first in safety. Greenlaw hit a foul fly to 
Smith, who in attempting to catch Wills off first, 
threw wild, allowing the runner to go to second. 
Tyler, the next at bat, hit to Flinn, who put him 
out at first base. No. runs, no hits, two errors. 

Bowdoin — Doherty struck out. Handy hit to 
Good who threw him out at first. Flinn then 
landed a safe hit through second base. Needel- 
man followed with another single advancing 
Flinn to second. Cook hit to short and was out 
at first. No runs, two hits, no errors. 
Sixth Inning. 

Colby— Fraas knocked a long fly to Hall, who 
made a pretty catch. Taylor hit to Clifford who 
retired him at first. Williams drove the ball 
down to Morrell who threw him out in excellent 
fashion. No runs, no hits, no errors. 

Bowdoin — Smith grounded out to Bucknam. 
Morrell was thrown out at first by Lampher. 
Hall struck out. No runs, no hits, no errors. 
Seventh Inning. . 

Colby — Lampher got a safe hit to right field. 
In the next play, however, Flinn caught him fast 
asleep off first base. Good hit to Morrell, and 
was out at first. Bucknam popped a high foul 
to Smith. No runs, one hit, no errors. 

Bowdoin — Fraas made a fine catch of Clifford's 
short fly. Doherty hit to Good who threw him 
out at first. Handy struck out. No runs, no 
hits, no errors. 

Eighth Inning. 

Colby — Wills singled to right. Greenlaw 
bunted and Handy threw high, the ball passing 
through Clifford's hands, letting Wills go to 
third and leaving Greenlaw on first. Greenlaw 
went to second, the only stolen base off Handy 
during the game. With none out, Flinn began 
pitching airtight ball and retired the side with- 
out a run. Tyler fanned, and Fraas was out, 
Flinn to Clifford. Handy caught Taylor's high 
foul. No runs, one hit, one error. 

Bowdoin — Flinn beat out a hit down the third 



base line. Needelman sacrificed, Greenlaw to 
Wills, sending Flinn to second. Cook hit to 
Bucknam who threw to catch Flinn. The Bow- 
doin twirler started back to second and Green- 
law threw to Fraas who missed the ball, where- 
upon Flinn started for third again. Good, how- 
ever, had backed Fraas and after getting the ball, 
threw to Greenlaw who caught the pitcher at 
third. In this play, one of Bowdoin's best 
chances of scoring died. Smith, the next at bat, 
was out at first, Bucknam to Wills. No runs. 
one hit, no errors. 

Ninth Inning. 

Colby — Williams hit a high fly to Needelman. 
Lampher went out on a fly to Doherty. Good 
hit to Smith who threw him out at first. No 
runs, no hits, no errors. 

Bowdoin — Morrell knocked a foul fly to Green- 
law. Hall hit past second and was safe at first. 
Prosser, batting for Clifford, grounded to Buck- 
nam, Hall going to second. Doherty ended the 
game with a short fly to Fraas. No runs, no hits, 
no errors. The score : 

COLBY. 

ab r th pa a e 

Taylor, cf 4 

Williams, If 4 1 1 1 

Lampher, c 3 1 4 3 

Good, 2b 4 1 4 

Bucknam. p 3 6 

Wills, lb 3 1 15 

Greenlaw, 3b 2 2 4 

Tyler, rf 3 1 

Fraas. ss 3 4 



Totals 29 1 4 27 17 

BOWDOIN. 

ab r Ih po a e 

Needelman, cf .-...3 2 1 

Cook, 2b 3 1 

J. Smith. 3b 4 1 3 1 1 

Morrell, ss 4 2 2 

A. Hall, rf 4 1 3 

Clifford, lb 3 9 1 

"Prosser 1 

Doherty, If 4 1 

Handy, c , 3 6 1 1 

Flinn, p 3 2 2 3 



Totals 32 6 27 8 3 

Score by innings: 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

Colby 1 0—1 

Bowdoin 0—0 

Three-base hit, Williams. Stolen bases, Needelman. Smith, 
Greenlaw. Sacrifice hits. Greenlaw, Needelman. Sacrifice 
fly, Lampher. Earned run. Colby. Left on bases, Bowdoin 
7. Colby 3. First base on errors, Colby 2, Bowdoin. Base 
on balls. Cook, off Bucknam. Struck out, by Bucknam 5, by 
Flinn 5. Umpire, W. C. Corey of Portland. Time. 2.00. 



-Batted for Clifford 



linth. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



35 



DR. CHARLES UPSON CLARK ON "ADRIATIC 
PROBLEMS." 

Dr. Charles Upson Clark, former director of 
the School of Classical Studies of the Ameri- 
can Academy in Rome, gave a very interesting 
and instructive lecture in Memorial Hall last 
Thursday evening on "Adriatic Problems." The 
lecture was illustrated by beautiful colored 
slides. The Classical Club deserves great cred- 
it for having secured Dr. Clark as a lecturer. 

Dr. Clark has spent many years in Italy and 
in the Balkan States. His knowledge of their 
affairs is thorough, his appreciation of their dif- 
ficulties deep and sincere, especially in regard 
to Italy and Roumania. In his years of travel 
he has interviewed many famous personages 
such as d'Annunzio, Nitti, Orlando, and Diaz, 
and his intimate descriptions of their personal- 
ities were intensely interesting. D'Annunzio, 
the speaker declared, writes the best prose in 
any living tongue. 

The first part of the lecture was devoted to a 
careful explanation of present day affairs and 
conditions in the Mediterranean countries. The 
speaker discussed the Fiume question at consid- 
erable length. In talking of the inadvisability 
of relinquishing this Italian business center to 
Jugo-Slavia, Dr. Clark said that the Jugo-Slav 
government has not even the respect of its own 
subjects. He later spoke rather scathingly of 
the present propaganda of Hungary to release 
itself from the indemnity imposed upon it. The 
lecturer had a rich fund of stories reflecting 
the character of the various nations concerned. 
Dr. Clark was constantly laying great stress 
upon the falseness of the newspaper reports and 
of the statements issued by nearly all govern- 
ments. 

The second part of the lecture was more a 
description of the countries themselves. Dr. 
Clark showed many slides, which gave a 
glimpse into the life in these nations. Espec- 
ially interesting were views of improvements 
made by Italy in Albania, and also some rare 
mountain scenes in the same country. 

Dr. Clark pointed out more clearly than any- 
thing else in his lecture the admirable loyalty of 
Italy, and even more of Roumania, to the Allied 
cause all through the war, giving a most accu- 
rate description of their great work, the extent 
of which few people in this country have as 
yet realized. 

Friday morning Dr. Clark talked to the 
classes in Latin 6 and Latin 4 on the "Rouma- 
nians and their Language," in the Classical 



Room in Memorial Hall. Here he told of the 
close connection of the Roumanian language 
with the Latin, in spite of the great Sl.avic in- 
fluence which has been brought to bear upon it. 
Dr.. Clark spoke of various aspects in the his- 
tory of Roumania, and added a number of ar- 
guments to his lecture of the previous evening 
in regard to the loyalty of this Balkan nation. 



TENNIS SCHEDULE. 

Manager Haines '21 has announced the fol- 
lowing tentative tennis schedule for this spring: 

May 4 — Dual Tournament; Bates at Bruns- 
wick. 

May 8 — Dual Tournament; M. I. T. at Cam- 
bridge. 

May 10 — New England Intercollegiate Tour- 
nament at Longwood Courts. 

May 21-22 — Bowdoin Interscholastic Tour- 
nament at Brunswick. 

May 26-27 — Maine Intercollegiate Tourna- 
ment at Orono. 

Date unsettled — Portland Country Club at 
Portland. 

The dual matches with Bates, -scheduled for 
Saturday had to be postponed until Tuesday, 
too late to be reported in this issue of the Orient. 

The Bowdoin Interscholastic Tennis Tourna- 
ment is scheduled for May 21-22. Among those 
schools which have entered are Cony High, 
Hebron Academy, Brunswick High, Sanford 
High, and Edward Little. Special effort is be- 
ing made to secure an entry from Andover. Much 
fast playing is anticipated especially in the case 
of Fisher of Hebron — a former Cony star who 
won the State championship of 1918 with Part- 
ridge '22, Captain of the Bowdoin tennis team. 

Those who are out for assistant managership 
of tennis are Colburn, Jacob, Philbrick, and Reed. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 3; CHI PSI, 1. 

In a comparatively close game on the Delta 
April 27, Alpha Delta Phi defeated Chi Psi 3 
to 1. Both Smith and Butler pitched good ball, 
each registering ten strike-outs. Marston, 
Towne, and Morin were the only men to score 
hits off Smith. Lovell got two singles, Merrill 
a double, and Moses a single, off Butler. 
The score: 1234567 

Alpha Delta Phi o o 1 o o 2 — 3 
Chi Psi o o o 1 — 1 

Batteries: Smith and Merrill; Butler and 
Marston. Alpha Delta Phi : 4 hits, 3 errors. Chi 
Psi : 3 hits, 5 errors. Umpire, Holmes '21. 



36 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the college year by the 

Bowdoin Publishing Company in the interest of 

the students of Bowdoin College. 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Editor-in-Chief 

Edward B. Ham, 1922 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 News Editor 

Floyd A. Gerrard, 192.3 Faculty N;tes 

George H. Quinby, 1923 Alumni Department 

F. King Turgeon. 1923 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
John L. Berry. 1921 Crosby E. Redman. 1921 

Harry Helscn, 1921 Frank A. St. Clair. 1921 

George E. Houghton, 1921 William R. Ludden, 1922 

Russell M. M.Gown, 1921 Roland L. McCormack, 1922 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. JBoardman, 1921 Business Manager 

Frederic A. Allen. 1922 Assistant Manager 

Wilfred R. Brewer. 1922 Assistant Manager 

All communications regarding subscriptions should be ad- 
dressed to the Business Manager of the Bowdoin Publishing 
Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, 10 cents. 

Vol. L. MAY 5, 1920. No. 5 

Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

COMMUNICATION. 

Brunswick, Me., April 29, 1920. 
To the Editor of the Orient: 

I do not wish to appear too strongly opposed to 
an idea that seems to express so well the senti- 
ment of our Alumni Associations, our faculty 
and our undergraduates, but nevertheless 1 do 
feel that there is another side of this movement 
for a Memorial Boulevard that has not been ade- 
quately emphasized. 

A boulevard around the campus, dedicated to 
Professor Files would certainly be a very fine 
and a very fitting - memorial. Its merits have 
been put before you through the columns of this 
and of other papers, and I firmly believe that in 
time such a thing should and will be done. How- 
ever, before the matter is decided upon there 
are other sides to consider. In the first place 
there is the matter of cost. 

Without going into figures it is easy to see 
that, especially at this time, the cost of a road- 
way around the campus as proposed would be 
very great. And Bowdoin surely does not want 
a boulveard unless it can be of the best. 

In the second place, we ought to consider the 
other things that Bowdoin needs, and needs more 
urgently, it seems to me, than a boulevard. Look- 
ing hastily down the list we find at least two 
things that are of immediate importance — a swim- 
ming pool and a new Union. The former is a 



question that has been before us for some time ; ' 
the latter is a recent need that arose through 
circumstances with which we are all acquainted. 
Not to deprecate in any sense the idea of a 
Memorial Boulevard, nevertheless it does appear 
to me that these more urgent matters should ob- 
tain first consideration. I do not believe that 
the boulevard should be given up, I think that it 
should merely be held over until conditions seem 
better suited for its construction. 

F. A. St. Clair. 



INNOVATIONS IN ORIENT. 

At a meeting of the Orient board last Tues- 
day evening in the Classical Room in Hubbard 
Hall, Mr. Arthur G. Staples '82, editor of the 
Leiviston. Journal,, in behalf of the Alumni 
Council, gave a member of valuable suggestions 
for the improvement of the Orient. Some of 
them are being put into effect with this issue. 
The most important one adopted this week, is 
the removal of the table of contents, thereby 
necessitating the use of the first half of the 
paper for news and the last half for advertise- 
ments, instead of the old arrangement of hav- 
ing advertisements at each end. Mr. Staples 
spoke of other excellent methods by which the 
character of the Orient can be improved, in- 
cluding a new system of membership on the 
editorial board. 

The editors appreciate the interest shown by 
Mr. Staples, who has given them the benefit of 
his long connection with a paper of such rec- 
ognized standing in the political world at 
large. 



BASEBALL SIDELIGHTS. 

Since the Massachusetts trip, the baseball team 
has been working hard to eliminate the weak- 
nesses that were brought to light in the two 
games which were played. The Colby game cer- 
tainly showed the result of this work in the 
fielding department of the game, but during the 
next week the hitting ought to be improved. As 
for the Massachusetts trip, the two games played 
were held under wretched weather conditions. 
The Wesleyan game did not indicate a true com- 
parison of the strength of the two teams. Wesley- 
an obtained all her scores in- three innings, the 
other innings being very evenly balanced. Flinn 
outpitched his opponent in the St. Anselms game, 
and only the extreme cold, which caused many 
errors, prevented Bowdoin from winning. 

Bowdoin has a rich supply of battery material. 
Mason, Flinn, Tuttle, and Walker are all twirl- 
ing well, while Handy and Miller are doing good 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



37 



work at the receiving end of the line. Miller, 
an understudy of Handy, has been showing re- 
markable improvement. In the infield Smith and 
Morrell form a snappy combination and are help- 
ing greatly in composing what Coach Houser 
believes to be the best infield in Maine. Captain 
Cook and Clifford have been doing excellent 
work at second and first respectively. In the 
outfield, Needelman, Prosser, Hall, and Doherty 
are all playing good ball. Towne '2$ is showing- 
good form and promises to make the varsity men 
work hard to hold their positions throughout the 
season. In many of the games, Prosser will play 
against southpaws, while Doherty will be sent 
against the right-handers. 

The three men who have been showing up the 
best in batting are Needelman, Smith, and Flinn. 
The outfielder has an average of .429 ; Flinn one 
of .385, and Smith .348. 

Although there has been little brilliant work 
so far this season, owing largely to the weak- 
ness in hitting, Coach Houser is confident that 
the team will show its real worth in the rest of 
the state .series games. He believes that the 
nine shows a 50 to 75 per cent, improvement over 
last year's team. 

Saturday of this week, as every student ought 
to know, Bowdoin plays the University of Maine 
in the second game of the state series. There 
is to be no rally Friday, but any Bowdoin man 
who has any spirit at all will be in front of the 
chapel at two o'clock sharp to march to the field. 
Even though Holy Cross did succeed in making 
the university team look like a crowd of bush 
leaguers last Friday, to the tune of 24 to nil, and 
even though Cusick of Bates held Maine to two 
hits on Saturday, that is no reason why the stu- 
dent body should not get out to this game with 
all the pep there is in it, and see to it that the 
team has every possible bit of support. Maine 
has beaten the White in football this year, but 
the stunt must not be repeated in baseball and 
track. We know the team will come through to 
the best of its ability, so let's show the old Bow- 
doin spirit and have a hundred per cent, of the 
student body in the cheering section Saturday 
afternoon. 



BOWDOIN MAN DECORATED. 

Russell Davey Greene, of the class of 1919 
and of the Kappa Sigma fraternity at Bow- 
doin, has been receiving remarkable honors in 
the Great War, having been decorated by two 
different countries. He was recently decorat- 
ed with the First Order of the Red Cross of 



Serbia. The decoration was bestowed by ord- 
er of King Peter I. of Serbia. While in the 
Balkans as assistant to the American Red Cross 
Director of all of Jugo-Slavia, Lieut. Greene 
received from the Prince Regent Alexander, 
the Serbian Legion of Honor, (officer's grade) 
which was awarded to only three others. This 
decoration is awarded to those rendering the 
highest and most merited service to the king- 
dom. When bestowing this signal honor Gen- 
eral Branko Ivanovitch, Minister of War, said 
that Lieut. Greene was the youngest officer ev- 
er to have received a decoration of such high 
order from the Serbian government. 

In addition to this, the French Minister of 
War has recently bestowed a medal of distinc- 
tion upon him for volunteer service with the 
French armies in the American Ambulance 
Corps. While in Paris, Lieut. Greene was of- 
ficial representative of Bowdoin College at the 
American University Union in Europe. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF PORTLAND ALUMNI 
ON ENDOWMENT FUND. 

Harold L. Berry '01, chairman of the Alumni 
Endowment Committee, announced at the month- 
ly meeting and banquet of the Bowdoin Club of 
Portland, held on April 17, that $32,000 of the 
million dollar endowment fund had already been 
pledged for this year by the alumni. It is the 
plan of the committee to raise at least $50,000 
each year. The $32,000 raised so far represents 
only the amount for the year 1920 and not the 
total amount received to date for the whole 
campaign It is considered that a good begin- 
ning lias bkt'n made on the campaign, although 
less than 20 per cent, of all the alumni have been 
heard from so far. 



BRADBURY DEBATE. 



The Bradbury prize speaking debate was held 
Monday evening, April 26, in the debating room 
of the Library. The prize of $40.00 went to the 
affirmative team which was composed of Nixon, 
Little, Badger, and Haines. The prize of $20.00 
went to the negative team which was made up 
of Thayer, Finnegan, Mitchell, and Laughlin. 
The judges were Professor Mitchell, Professor 
Catlin, and Rev. H. H. Bishop. Both teams were 
closely matched and the losing team deserves as 
much credit for its work as the winner. The men 
have been working hard on the debate and will 
be prepared with strong arguments for Rhode 
Island State. 



38 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THETA DELTA CHI 6, ZETA PSI 1. 

Theta Delta Chi won its first game last Monday 
from Zeta Psi. The game was loose from start 
to finish, superior pitching and fielding winning 
for the T. D.'s. The score was six to one. The 
score : 

Theta Delta Chi i 2 I 2 o o x — 6 

Zeta Psi o I o o o o o — I 

Batteries: Theta Delta Chi, Adams and Lar- 
rabee ; Zeta Psi, W. K. Hall, Webb, and Parsons. 



THETA DELTA CHI, 5; KAPPA SIGMA, 0. 

Last Friday afternoon the Kappa Sigma base- 
ball team met defeat at the hands of the Theta 
Delta Chi nine. The first of the game was 
marked by errors on the part of the Kappa 
Sigma team. Toward the last of the game 
however, the fielding improved and there was 
little scoring. Adams pitched a good game for 
the Theta Delts, allowing no walks and secur- 
ing 12 strike outs. In the fifth inning Gaffney 
was succeeded by Davis, as the Kappa Sigma 
pitcher, although the hitting was not very 
heavy in any part of the game. 
Score by innings : 

Theta Delta Chi I I o o 3 o o — 5 
Kappa Sigma o o — 

Batteries : Adams and Larrabee, Gaffney, Da- 
vis and Dahlgren. Umpire, Sullivan. 



REPORT OF PUBLISHING COMPANY. 

The Bowdoin Publishing Company has com- 
pleted with the last volume of the Orient a most 
successful year. For the first time for a num- 
ber of years the company has been able to pay 
all its debts to date. Much praise is due Allan 
W. Hall '20, for leaving the Orient and Quill 
in such excellent financial condition for the be- 
ginning of the new volume. Following is the 
detailed report of the Publishing Company : 



Report of Allan W. Hall, Business Manager, Bow- 
doin Publishing Co. for period from June 
12, 1919, to April 6, 1920. 

RECEIPTS. 

Received from Albert Hurrell $53.5 1 

A.S.B.C. appropriation 400.00 

Advertising 329.29 

Cash sales 1.7.75 

F. W. Chandler (news stand sales) : 

Orients 1S.50 

Quills 4.05 

Preparatory School subscriptions.... 75-00 
Subscriptions : 

Quill, Vol. XXIV 58.00 

Vol. 46, Orient 2.75 



Vol. 47, Orient 21.75 

Vol. 48, Orient 224.66 

Vol. 49, Orient 705.25 

Vol. 50, Orient 8.00 

Total receipts $1,918.51 

EXPENDITURES. 

Cut for Bugle $4.00 

Expenses to Advertising Convention 

(Boston) 14.47 

Mounting cuts 22.46 

Notary public fee .50 

Postage 62.23 

Printing : 

Old bills (191S-1919) 462.20 

Current (1920) 1. 100.50 

Rebates 5.00 

Rental of typewriter 7.00 

Stationery : 

Orient Board 4.60 

Publishing Company 19.80 

Salary of manager 53-94 

Total expenditures $1,756.70 

Cash in bank 161.81 

$1,918.51 
Respectfully submitted, 

Allan W. Hall, Business Manager. 
Audited April 21, 1920. 

Wilmot B. Mitchell, Facultv Auditor. 



Campus Jftetos 

Monday evening (May 3) the Freshman dele- 
gation of Delta Kappa Epsilon entertained two 
representatives of the Freshman delegations from 
each fraternity at a smoker. The evening was 
spent in playing cards, singing, and smoking. 
Refreshments were served, and the party broke 

An enthusiastic rally was held last Friday 
evening in Memorial Hall, in preparation for 
the Colby game, Saturday afternoon. 

A letter has been received by the track man- 
ager from the Navy Recruiting Station at Port- 
land, offering to present a ten-inch shell as a 
trophy to the winning team in the Outdoor In- 
terscholastic Meet. 

The baseball game with Harvard postponed 
to last Tuesday was cancelled because of the 
cold weather. 

The Masque and Gown played in Freeport last 
Friday with its usual success before an en- 
thusiastic audience. 



jFacuItp Jftotes 

President Sills has been appointed a director 
for four years of the Maine Public Health As- 
sociation. 

In "A Successful Calamity," the open play 
of the Brunswick Dramatic Club, to be held 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



39 



May 13, Professor Brown, Dean Nixon, Pro- 
fessor Wass, and Dr. Dimock are to have parts. 
From the student body there will be Crockett 
'20, Kileski '20, and Bell Medic '23. 

Dr. Whittier attended a meeting of the Med- 
ical Officers of the World War held with the 
Elk's Club in Portland last Tuesday evening - . 

Mr. Wilder spoke on ''College Libraries'' 
before the Fraternity Club of Portland 
at the Congress Square Hotel on April 26. 



alumni Department 

'69 — Judge Clarence Hale has appointed 
George C. Wheeler 'or, a clerk of the U. S. 
Courts for the district of Maine to take effect 
in September, upon the resignation of the pres- 
ent clerk. Mr. Wheeler is particularly well 
qualified for the position as he has served as 
Referee in Bankruptcy for Cumberland and 
York counties for eight years. 

'82 — Arthur G. Staples has been appointed a 
director for four years of the Maine Public 
Health Association. 

'95 — Arthur H. Stetson has recently been ap- 
pointed assistant counsel for the United States 
Shipping board at Washington, D. C. Mr. 
Stetson was commander of the 4th section base 
of the First Naval District during the war and 
later acted as legal aide to Admiral Wood, 
commandant of that district. 

'06 — In a recent issue of the Boston Herald, 
appeared an article in praise of Romilly John- 
son, together with a copy of his picture. The 
article in part is as follows : "Indirectly Boston 
lays claim to one of the most promising Ameri- 
can song composers of the day, Giovanni Romilli 
of New York, known in private life as Romilly 
Johnson. Ever since the prodigious success of 
his 'Boat Song,' which became at once a favorite 
with Geraldine Farrar, Mr. Johnson has been 
soaring consistently in the field of composition, 
until no less than ten of his songs have been ac- 
cepted since the beginning of the year. Among 
his choicest art songs are 'My Dream of You' 
and 'Angelus.' "Pillow Time' and 'Down in 
Alabama' and many others are full of charm 
and popular appeal. A volume of Neapolitan 
songs, including 'Marietta' and 'Napoli,' already 
published, is promised by this ambitious com- 
poser in the near future." He appeared April 
14 at a concert in Lynn, given by the Lynn 
Woman's Club in aid of the Lynn Home for 
Aged Women, recently burned. 

'06 — Robert T. Woodruff, latelv with the law 



firm of Simpson, Thatcher, and Bartlett of New 
York, has been recently made a vice president 
of the Kinsley Steamship Lines. 

'14 — The engagement has been recently an- 
nounced of Miss Helen Van Keuren of Troy, 
Penn., to Paul Lambert White, instructor in 
historv at Yale, and formerlv a captain in the 
A.E.F. 

'15 — The Oxford letter, describing the Uni- 
versity as it now is, in the April number of the 
American Oxonian, was written by Robert Pet- 
er Coffin. It contains much valuable informa- 
tion which is told in a most entertaining style. 

'16 — Leigh Webber is a partner in Webber's 
Auto-Electric Service Station which will start 
business in Augusta on May 15. 

'16— Donald S. White left France in March, 
to go by way of Berlin to Riga in the section 
of Russia now known as Latvia, where he is 
engaged in relief work as a lieutenant in the 
Red Cross. 

'17— Lieutenant Erik Achorn, U.S.A. (retired) 
was the poet at the dinner given the evening of 
April 24 at the Copley Plaza by the New England 
Association of Zeta Psi in honor of the presi- 
dent of the national fraternity. 

'18 — John R. Edwards, Jr., who served in 
aviation in France, was on the campus last week, 
on his way to Japan, where he is to have a posi- 
tion with the Standard Oil Company. 

'19 — Bateman Edwards, who is now in the 
Princeton graduate school, is writing some of the 
incidental music for the Princeton production of 
"The Man with a Dumb Wife," and for that 
purpose is making a study of old French folk 
song's. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Hall of Theta of Delta Kappa Epsilon: 

It is with profound sorrow that Theta Chapter 
records the death of Brother Robert Edwin 
Peary of the Class of 1877. He was one of the 
most prominent and distinguished alumni of this 
Chapter, and not only will his loss be keenly felt 
by the national fraternity, but also by the entire 
nation as well. 

Brother Peary's life was unselfishly devoted to 
rendering a true service to his country, thereby 
winning for him world wide prominence. 

While in college he took an active interest in 
all student activities, winning by his personal ef- 
fort numerous honors, and receiving the B. S. 
and M. S. degrees from Bowdoin. Shortly after 
graduating he entered the U. S. Navy, where he 



40 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



not only gained immortal fame by his historic 
discovery of the North Pale in 1909, but also 
won a commendable reputation as a naval en- 
gineer and inventor. 

The last few years of his life were especially 
devoted to writing scientific and geographical 
works. 

Lewis Woodbridge Brown, 
Craig Stevens Houston, 
Ronald Bibber Wadsworth, 

For the Chapter. 



Hall of Theta of Delta Kappa Epsilon : 

It is with regret that Theta Chapter learns of 
the recent death of Brother Joel M. Marshall of 
the Class of 1862 at his home in Alfred, Maine. 
He received his A. M. degree from Bowdoin in 
1865 and practiced law from that time until 1912 
when he retired. 

Brother Marshall held the office of trial justice 
at Bar Mills, Maine, from 87-92 and was prin- 
cipal of Oswego Institute from 65-70. He was 
also Internal Revenue assessor in 1870. Brother 
Marshall was well known as a local historian 



especially for his book "Buxton History." 

Theta Chapter extends her deepest sympathy 
to his relatives and friends. 

Lewis Woodbridge Brown, 
Craig Stevens Houston, 
Ronald Bibber Wadsworth, 

For the Chapter. 



Bowdoin Chapter of Delta Upsilon: 

Brother Fred H. Cowan '01 died Tuesday in 
the Homepathic Hospital. From his early stu- 
dent days his life bears evidences of industry 
and energy. After receiving the degree of A. M. 
in 1903 from Bowdoin, Brother Cowan entered 
a life of sincere service. He taught in Augusta 
and Bar Harbor, Maine, and in Roxbury, Massa- 
chusetts. He was a loyal citizen, active in the 
social and religious work of the communities in 
which he taught. The Chapter extends profound 
sympathy to his family and friends. 
Allen W. Hall, 
J. Maxim Ryder, 
H. Simpson, Jr., 

For the Chapter. 



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BOWDOIN ORIENT 



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Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



&k 



VOL. L 



WEDNESDAY. MAY 12, 1920 



Bowdoin Crushes Maine 11 to 1 



Joe Smith Breaks Up Game With Three Timely 
Hits — Mason Pitches Fine Game. 



Last Saturday on Whittier Field, Bowdoin 
gave the University of Maine one of the worst 
drubbings in baseball that the up-state institu- 
tion has received in years from the White. In 
spite of a drizzling rain during almost the entire 
contest, play was continued, and Bowdoin had 
full opportunity to pile up the score. Three runs, 
enough to win, were driven across in the third 
inning, on three singles and two sacrifice hits. 
In the seventh Bowdoin tallied six times on three 
clean hits, some errors, and some sacrifices. Just 
to express the score in two digits, two more 
counters were added in the eighth on more hits 
and errors. 

Mason had the game well in hand in all stages, 
except one or two innings when Maine came 
fairly near scoring. Bowdoin made a few errors 
here and there, but none of these were at all 
costly. Handy allowed only one man to steal 
on him during the game. Morrell and Smith did 
excellent work in the field. 

At bat Smith and Morrell starred for Bow- 
doin. In the third inning the former drove in 
the first run with a clean single to right, and 
later scored himself. In the seventh he doubled, 
sending two men across the plate. Finally in 
the eighth a hard smash to left pushed the tenth 
run of the contest across. In his first three at 
bats, Morrell registered two clean hits, and a 
scratch. Clifford drove in a couple of runs in 
the seventh with a timely single to left. 

Following is a play by play account of the 
game : 

First Inning 

Maine — Coady flied to Needelman. Sargent walked and 
stole second, but Waterman flied to Doherty and P. John- 
son to Morrell. 

Bowdoin — Needelman grounded out to Watson. Cook and 
Smith both flied to Sargent. 

Second Inning 

Maine — Rusk was out. Handy to Clifford. After A. John- 
son fanned. Walker reached first on Cook's error, and second 



on another fumble by Hall. Prescott flied to Doherty. 

Bowdoin — Morrell drove a liner to left, after which he 
advanced to second when Doherty w-as hit by a pitched ball. 
Handy fouled out to Prescott, Hall flied to Rusk, and Clifford 
was retired, A. Johnson to Walker. 
Third Inning 
Maine— Watson was retired. Smith to Clifford. Coady 
fanned and Sargent flied to Morrell. 

Bowdoin — Mason opened up with a Texas leaguer to 
centre. Needelman bunted to Watson, who made a perfect 
throw to get Mason at second, and failed on account of 
Johnson's error. Cook hit to Watson, who caught Mason 
at third. Smith smashed a single to right, scoring Needel- 
man and putting Cook on third. Morrell beat out a bunt 
while Cook scored and Smith went to third. While the 
catcher was holding the ball, and the Maine infield was in 
close, Morrell went to second without any opposition. Smith 
scored from third on Doherty's fly to Sargent. Handy was 
hit by a pitched ball, but Hall was out Coady to Walker, 
ending the inning. Three runs, three hits, two errors. 
Fourth Inning 
Maine — After Waterman had been retired. Mason to Clif- 
ford, P. Johnson walked, and went to third on Rusk's single 
to right. A. Johnson forced Rusk at second, Morrell to 
Cook, while P. Johnson scored. Walker was out, Morrell 
to Clifford. One run, one hit, no errors. 

Bowdoin — Clifford struck out, Mason grounded out to 

Coady, and Needelman to Waterman. 

Fifth Inning 

fas out, Cook to Clifford; Watson, 

but Ccady reached first when Cook 

Handy made a good throw to second 

lan stealing, but Cook dropped the ball, 

safe. Sargent ended the inning with 



Maine — Prescott 
Mason to Clifford ; 
missed his grounder, 
to catch the Maine m 
and the runn 
a grounder to Mason. 

Bowdoin — Cock and I 
out a clean hit to left. 



mith struck out, but Morrell drove 

Doherty struck out. 
Sixth Inning 

Maine — After Waterman struck out, P. Johnson flied to 
Cook, and Rusk to Needelman. 

Bowdoin — Handy struck out, and Hall was retired, Coady 
to Waterman. Coady made a fine stop of a hard grounder 
just inside the bag. Clifford fanned. 
Seventh Inning 

Maine — A. Jchnson struck out, and Walker was hit by a 
pitched ball. After Prescott had fouled out to Joe Smith, 
Watson singled to centre, putting Walker on second. Coady 
was thrown out by Cook. 

Bowdoin — Mason reached first on Prescott's error. Needel- 
man sacrificed, but Prescott threw wild trying to get Mason 
at second, and both runners were safe. Cook sacrificed, but 
was allowed to reach second on Watson's wild heave to first. 
On this play Mason scored, and Needelman went to third. 
Joe Smith doubled to left, scoring both runners. A minute 
later he himself scored on a passed ball by Prescott. Four 
runs had been scored, nobody was out, and the bases were 
clear. Morrell reached first on another passed ball by 



42 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Prescott on the third strike. At this point Fierman re- 
placed Prescott behind the bat. Doherty singled to right, 
sending Morrell to third. Handy and Hall struck out, but 
meanwhile Doherty had stolen second. Clifford poked a hit 
into left, scoring both Morrell and Doherty. Mason ended 
the big rally with a grounder to Coady. Six runs, three hits, 
three errors. 

Eighth Inning 

Maine — Sargent singled to left, and after Waterman had 
flied to Dcherty. he went to second on P. Johnson's hit to 
left. Rusk fanned, and A. Johnson walked, filling the bases. 
Walker hit to Cook, who touched second, forcing A. Johnson 
out. 

Bowdoin — Needelman lifted a long fly over Johnson's head 
in left, for a two-base hit. Cook poled out a fly into Sar- 
gent's hands, but the right fielder dropped the ball, allowing 
Needelman to take third, and Cook to reach second. Joe 
Smith cracked out his third hit of the game, scoring Needel- 
man, and putting Cook on third. Smith stole second, and 
then on a wild throw by Fierman, Cook romped home with 
the eleventh run. Smith took third on a passed ball. Mor- 
rell popped up a fly to Watson. Doherty flied to Rusk, and 
Handy struck out. Two runs, two hits, two errors. 
Ninth Inning 

Maine — Fierman was hit by a pitched ball, but was im- 
mediately forced, Mason to Morrell, at second by Watson. 
Coady struck out. Sargent hit cleanly to left, but Watson 
over-ran second, and was out, Doherty to Cook. 

The summary : 

BOWDOIN 

ab r bh po a e 

Needelman, cf 3 3 1 2 

Cook, 2b 4 3 4 2 3 

Smith, 3b 5 2 3 1 1 

Morrell, ss 5 1 3 3 2 

Doherty, If 3 1 1 3 1 

Handy, c 4 5 3 

Hall, rf 4 1 

Clifford, lb 4 1 9 

Mason, p 4 1 1 4 

Totals 36 11 10 27 12 4 

MAINE 

ab r bh po a e 

Coady, 3b 5 1 5 

Sargent, rf 4 2 3 1 

Waterman, ss 4 1 

P. Johnson, If 3 1 1 

Rusk, cf 4 1 2 

A. Johnson, 2b 3 1 1 

Walker, lb 3 7 

Prescott, c 3 7 3 

Fierman, c 3 1 

Watson, p: 4 1 1 3 1 

Totals 33 1 5 24 10 7 

Score by innings : .. 123456789 

Bowdoin 3 6 2 x— 11 

University of Maine 00010000 0—1 

Two-base hits : Smith, Needelman. Stolen bases : Smith, 
Doherty, Sargent. Sacrifice hits : Needelman 2, Cook. Sacri- 
fice fly: Doherty. Earned runs: Bowdoin 5, Maine 1. Left 
on bases-: Bowdoin 7, Maine 9. First base on errors: Maine 
2, Bowdoin 1. Hit by pitched ball: Doherty, Handy (by 
Watson), Walker, Fierman (by Mason). Struck out: by 
Mason 5, by Watson 8. Bases on balls : off Mason 3. Passed 
balls: Prescott 2, Fierman. Umpire, W. C. Corey of Port- 
land. 



Bowdoin Romps Away 

With Dual Meet 

The Bowdoin track team won over Bates for 
the second time this year last Saturday. At no 
time was the White in danger, although several 
surprises were sprung. The track was in very 
bad condition because of the rain which fell all 
through the meet. The final score was 86 3-5 
to 39 2-5. 

In the 880, the mile, and two mile runs Bates 
took first places. Captain Dostie took first in 
the 100 yard dash with McKinney of Bates run- 
ning a good second. Moses took first in the 120 
yard high hurdles. In the 220 yard dash Averill 
beat out Dostie who finished ahead of Small of 
Bates. In the 220 yard low hurdles all the points 
went to Bowdoin with no finals. 

In the field events Cook took first in the pole 
vault, Philbrook, first in the running high jump, 
Ellms in the hammer throw, and Bisson in the 
shot put. In the discus throw Luce of Bates 
took first, while A. M. Smith was a close second. 

The summary is as follows : 

Summary of B-wdoin-Bates Meet. 

100 Yard Daih — Won ty Dostie. Bowdoin ; second, McKin- 
ney, Bates : third, Butler, Bowdoin. Time — 10 3-5 seconds. 

Mile Run — Won by Clifford, Eates ; second, Ray Buker, 
Bates; third, Towle, Bowdoin. Time— 5 minutes 11 3-5 
seconds. 

440 Yard Run — Won by Young, Bowdoin ; second, Batten, 
Bates; third, Palmer, Bowdoin.' Time— 55 1-5 seconds. 

120 Yard High Hurdles — Won by Moses, Bowdoin ; second, 
Thomson, Bowdoin ; third, Woodman, Bates. Time — 17 
seconds. 

880 Yard Run — Won by Richard Buker, Bates : second, 
Hatch, Bowdoin ; third, Hunt, Bowdoin. Time — 2 minutes, 
6 3-5 seconds. 

220 Yard Low Hurdles — First trial heat : Won by Moses, 
Bowdoin ; second, Thomson, Bowdoin. Time — 27 3-5 seconds. 
Second trial heat : Won by Parent, Bowdoin ; second, Leigh- 
ton, Bowdoin. Time — 27 3-5 seconds. No final heat run. 

Two Mile Run — Won by Ray Buker, Bates ; second, Good- 
win, Bowdoin ; third, Levine, Bates. Time — 10 minutes 3 3-5 
seconds. 

Pole Vault — Won by Cook, Bowdoin ; second. Rice ; third, 
tie between Mallett, Philbrook, and Kennedy, all of Bow- 
doin. Height, 10 ft. 5 in. 

Putting 16-lb. Shot — Won by Bisson, Bowdoin ; second. 
Galvariski, Bates ; third, Zeitler, Bowdoin. Distance, 36.66 
feet. 

Running High Jump — Won by Philbrook, Bowdoin ; second 
and third, tie between Dostie and Fish of Bowdoin, and 
Grose and Newell of Bates. Height, 5 ft. 1 in. 

Hammer Throw — Won by Ellms, Bowdoin ; second, Zeitler, 
Bowdoin ; third, Tootell, Bowdoin. Distance, 106.7 feet. 

Running Broad Jump — Won by Dostie, Bowdoin ; second, 
Averill, Bowdoin ; third, Moses, Bowdoin. Distance, 21 ft. 
1.5 in. 

Discus Throw — Won by Luce, Bates ; second, A. M. Smith, 
Bowdoin : third, Ellms, Bowdoin. Distance, 115.9 feet. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



43 



Bowdoin Debating Team Wins 

Twice From Rhode Island State 

The Bowdoin Debating Team met Rhode 
Island State College in a dual debate last Fri- 
day evening, the question being, "Resolved, That 
the Lloyd George plan for Home Rule for Ire- 
land should be adopted." The affirmative team 
from Bowdoin met Rhode Island State's nega- 
tive team at Kingston, Rhode Island, while Bow- 
doin's negative team debated at home. The affir- 
mative team consisted of Nixon '21, Little '23, 
Badger '21, and Haines '20. The result of the 
debate at Kingston was a unanimous decision in 
favor of the affirmative. 

The result of the home debate was also a 
unanimous victory for Bowdoin. The speakers 
on the winning team were : Finnegan '23, 
Thayer '22, and Mitchell '2$. Laughlin '21 was 
alternate. Representing Rhode Island State 
were : Holburn, Levine, Midgley, and Canlan. 
The judges were Professor Albert C. Baird, of 
Bates College, Professor F. W. H. Stott of An- 
dover Academy, and Professor William D. Ful- 
ler, superintendent of the public schools of Port- 
land. Dean Paul Nixon presided. 

A. E. Holburn, the first speaker of the affirma- 
tive gave the. history of the question and at- 
tempted to prove that the Lloyd George plan, 
providing for two parliaments and a single na- 
tional council composed of an equal number of 
delegates from Ulster and the South of Ireland, 
was the most desirable plan, because it satisfies 
both factions and allows them to unite in the 
future. 

Finnegan '23 opened the argument of the 
affirmative. He maintained that the division of 
Ireland was unjustifiable because the two parts 
of Ireland are too closely united. He also said 
that the minority (i. e. Ulster) would have a 
veto over the majority in the national council. 
This was greater injustice than had yet been 
endured. 

S. J. Levine for the affirmative said that Eng- 
land would not permit secession, that the Lloyd 
George plan would create harmony, and bring 
about a union of Ireland in the future, and that 
it guarantees desired self-government without 
creating" economic differences. 

Thayer '22 maintained that the suggested plan 
could not be enforced because it was not desired 
by the Irish people any more than the present 
rule is desired. 

D. A. Midgley said that Ireland is a com- 
mercial but not a political unit, and that the plan 



suggested would satisfy the requirements of both 
conditions. He then summarized the affirmative 
argument. 

Mitchell '23 concluded the negative argument, 
by repeating that the affirmative must prove their 
plan workable. He then advanced the plan of 
his own side, namely, the constituent assembly 
plan, whereby Ireland shall decide for herself 
what form of government she wants and shall 
have her wants approved by an Imperial com- 
mission with members from each Colonial do- 
minion. 

The rebuttal centered on the results of the 
constituent assembly of 1917. The affirmative 
evaded the issue of the practicability of the plan, 
putting their time on attempting to down the plan 
advanced by the negative. The decision was 
unanimous in favor of the negative team. 



'Punch' Doffs His Cap To Bowdoin 

In the April 7 number of Punch appeared the 
following in reference to the recent Oxford- 
Cambridge meet, in which Hal White '17 won 
the high jump. The defeat of the Oxford crew 
on the Thames is alluded to in the last line of 
the first stanza. 

"There was a great athlete named Rudd 
Who was born with a Blue in his blood, 

Stout hearted, spring-heeled, 

He achieved on the field 
What his Varsity lost on the flood. 

"But when he had breasted the tape 
A cynic emitted this jape, 

Pray notice, old son. 

'Tisn't Oxford that's won. 
But Utah, Bowdoin, and the Cape." 



H. S. White himself has just been given a 
journalistic position for the summer with the 
Cross Atlantic Nazvs, Fleet street, London, and 
will this spring term contribute to this press 
agency special articles on American activities at 
Oxford and the American point of view. 



Publishing Company 

As yet only four houses have sent out men 
for the assistant managerships of the Publishing 
Co. There is plenty of time yet for new men 
to come out and make good. Competition lasts 
until March, 1921. Those out are Reed, Chi Psi; 
Renier, Zeta Psi; Stackhouse, Delta Upsilon; 
Wing, Beta Theta Pi. Let's have some men 
from the other houses. K. S. B. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the college year by the 

Bowdoin Publishing Company in the interest of 

the students of Bowdoin College. 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Editor-in-Chief 

Edward B. Ham, 1922 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

William R. Ludden, 1922 News Edit:r 

Floyd A. Gerrard, 1923 Faculty Notes 

George H. Quinby, 1923 Alumni Department 

F. King Turgeon. 1923 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
John L. Berry, 1921 Crosby E. Redman, 1921 

Harry Helson, 1921 Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

George E. Houghton, 1921 Roland L. McCormack, 1922 

Russell M. McGown, 1921 Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Business Manager 

Frederic A. Allen, 1922 Assistant Manager 

Wilfred R. Brewer, 1922 Assistant Manager 



All communications regarding subscriptions should be ad- 
dressed to the Business Manager of the Bowdoin Publishing 
Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, 10 cents. 



Vol. L. 



MAY 12, 1920. 



No. 6 



Entered at Post Office at Brunswickas Second-Class Mail Matter 

ATTENDANCE AT COLLEGE GATHERINGS. 

During the preceding month there have been 
two lectures at the College under the auspices 
of two student organizations, the Ibis and the 
Classical Club. These lectures, moreover, were 
presented by men of wide reputation on certain 
international situations. Those who attended 
them can vouch for the excellence of the speak- 
ers and their subjects. The talks had the fur- 
ther attraction of being combined with slides of 
unusual interest. 

Whether the vast majority of the students 
felt the call of the "movies" more strongly than 
the appeal to the intellect or whether natural in- 
ertia kept them shackled to the seclusion of their 
rooms on those nights, is problematical. It may 
be that in their zeal for preparing for next 
day's courses some of our friends entirely for- 
got the existence of Memorial Hall. The small 
attendance seems all the more to be condemned 
when even the members of the clubs, under 
whose auspices the lectures were given, came 
far from showing a full quota. 

The general attitude of lassitude or indiffer- 
ence toward lectures extends to all other forms 
of College assemblies. Rallies, and particularly 
class meetings, have not had the numbers nec- 
essary to insure the complete and proper exe- 
cution of those things which they set out to do. 

These gatherings surely ought to mean as 
much to a college man as any other part of his 
education. A little ambition on our own part. 



a little prodding for the slackers, and everything' 
will be as it should be. Show some spirit. Sup- 
port the intellectual side of college activities as 
strongly as the athletic ! 



The Orient regrets that, owing to the illness 
of the Editor-in-Chief, no editorial appeared in 
the issue of last week. 



Public Speaking 

The following editorial from the May number 
of the Penn Charter school magazine was sent 
to the Orient by the courtesy of Frederick L. 
Smith '86. It is of interest to Bowdoin men be- 
cause one of the prize-winning numbers was 
"Spartacus to the Gladiators" by Elijah Kellogg 
'41, a speech which was for years a feature at 
Bowdoin speaking contests and won many prizes. 

"Training in public speaking is one of the 
fundamental requirements of good citizenship. 
The ability to express his thoughts clearly, dis- 
tinctly, and persuasively, should be acquired by 
every real citizen, especially in a democracy like 
ours. This has been the purpose and the ideal 
of the public speaking at Penn Charter for many 
years. One of the most effective means of 
achieving this aim has been the declamation. 
Every student from Secunda and Upper Prima is 
required to learn an oration. Each class selects 
by popular vote a certain number of its best 
speakers (the number varying according to the 
class). These candidates compete before a board 
of judges, and the nine best are divided into 
Class A, Class B, and Class C, with three con- 
testants in each class. To each winner in Class 
B and C a silver cup is awarded. The winner 
of Class A receives a gold medal. During the 
past week the Class A contest took place. Frank 
A. Fortescue was the first speaker, his oration 
being "Resistance to British Aggression," by 
Patrick Henry. The last two declamations were 
written by Elijah Kellogg. These have been 
popular for seventy-five years, and are still prime 
favorites. "Spartacus to the Gladiators" was re- 
cited by Ernest R. Hosbach. William P. 
Schaible, the final speaker, recited "Regulus to 
the Carthaginians." The board of judges, com- 
posed of Dr. Gummere, Mr. Spiers, and Mr. 
Smith, awarded the decision to Hosbach. It is 
significant of the merit of these old classics that, 
after nearly eighty years, the two most popular 
written by the author of the "Whispering Pine" 
series at Bowdoin College have received the first 
and second prize in the final contest of a large 
modern city school." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Fine Trophies for Relay Victory 

For their victory a week ago Saturday in the 
Pennsylvania Relay Carnival, the members of 
the Bowdoin team have received watches on the 
back of which are engraved names of the colleges 
in the group. A flag presented to the College is 
in the trophy room of the gymnasium ; it is about 
three feet long and two wide; half black and 
half red; with the names of the colleges in Bow 
doin's group. The Bowdoin runners were given 
a splendid entertainment by the Philadelphia 
Alumni and they certainly appreciate the gener- 
osity which made it possible for Bowdoin to ap- 
pear in this carnival. 



Connie Mack Opposed to 

Spit-Ball in College Games 

Last Friday, Coach Houser received the fol- 
lowing letter from Connie Mack, manager of the 
Philadelphia Americans, in regard to the discus- 
sion among the Maine colleges concerning the 
use of the spit-ball in the state series games: 

"Hotel Buckminster, Boston. May 6, 1920. 

"Dear Ben — Yours of the fifth inst. received. Pleased to 
hear from ycu. Have always thought the colleges were 
free from spit-tall pitchers, no reason why I should have 
thought this, except that I may say that the college man 
should set the right example, and in using the spitter they 
are doing- just the opposite. 

"One of the best and cleanest rules that has been put in 
force was carried out when the rules committee decided to 
eliminate the spitter. No pitcher will be allowed to use the 
spitter after the present season. Our league this season 
allows the clubs to name those players who will use the 
spitter for this season. All clubs had to notify President 
Johnson ten days before the opening of our championship 
season, giving names of the pitchers. I find that only ten 
names were sent in, some of the clubs, namely, Washington 
and Philadelphia, had no one on the list. 

"Our games are going to be cleaner, also better played 
by eliminating the spit-tall pitchers, never should have had 
them, as it encouraged unclean baseball. I don't know of a 
minor league today that allows the spit-ball to be used. I 
cannot see a college man using the spitter, and if they are 
doing this, it reflects little to their credit. Understand me, 
I am only giving my opinion and am always open to argu- 
ment. Very best wishes to you. 

"Sincerely yours, 

"CONNIE MACK." 



St. Anselms 2, Bowdoin 1. 



Walker Yields Only Four Hits — Handy Strong 
At Bat. 

St. Anselms defeated Bowdoin 2 to i last 
Wednesday in one of the best early season base- 
ball games ever played on Whittier Field. Be- 
cause of the ten-inning tie, played earlier in the 
season, the game was of particular interest. 



The game was a pitchers' battle, and just a 
single slip lost the game for Walker against a 
veteran opponent. In the fifth he gave Borden 
a base on balls and then made a wild throw in 
fielding McWilliams' bunt. Laughlin, who fol- 
lowed, singled. With the bases full two runs 
were scored on sacrifice flies. Aside from this 
slip, air-tight baseball was played throughout 
the game. 

Bowdoin's score came in the eighth when 
Doherty singled, took second on a passed ball, 
and scored on errors by Hays and Cunningham. 

The summary: 

ST. ANSELMS. 

ab r bh po a e 

Downey, cf ■> o 10 

Hays, ss 4 1 1 1 

Sullivan, rf 4 1 

Borden, If 3 1 1 2 

McWilliams, 2b 3 1 

McLaughlin, lb 3 2 11 1 

Scully, 3b 3 2 1 1 

Cunningham, c 2 9 1 1 

Melanson, p 3 1 7 



Needelman, 
Cook, 2b . . 
Smith, 3b . 
Morrell. ss 
Prosser, rf 
Clifford, lb 
Doherty, If. 
Handy, c . , 
Walker, p . 











Totals 30 1 4 27 19 5 

St. Anselem 2 0—2 

Bowdoin 1 — 1 

Stolen base — Handy. Struck out — By Melanson 9, by 
Walker 2. Double plays — Prosser to Morrell ; Walker to 
Smith to Clifford. Passed ball— Cunningham. Base on 
balls— By Walker 3. Sacrifice hits— Downey, McWilliams, 
Cock. Sacrifice flies — Scully, Cunningham. Umpire, Breen 
of Lewiston. Time, 1.50. 



President Sills Honored 

At Annapolis 

The following notice of President Sills' ap- 
pointment as president of the Board of Visitors 
to the Naval Academy appeared in the Baltimore 
Sun for May 5 : 

"Annapolis, Md., May 4 — Organizing by the 
selection of Dr. Kenneth C. M. Sills of Bowdoin 
College, as president, the members of the Board 
of Visitors to the Naval Academy, consisting of 
prominent educators from various sections of the 
country, and members of the Naval Affairs Com- 
mittee of Congress today started the annual in- 



46 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



spection of the institution, which will continue 
through the week. Upon the result of these in- 
spections a report setting forth the need of Uncle 
Sam's "cradle of the navy" will be framed and 
submitted to Congress. 

"The official reception to the inspection officials 
took place this morning. Superintendent Scales, 
Captain Wat T. Cluverius and other ranking- 
officials extended the official greetings. The ar- 
rival of the visitors within the government in- 
closure was the signal of a salute of 17 guns. 
A complete inspection . was made of Bancroft 
Hall, which is the largest of the structures of the 
academy. 

The board is composed of the following: 

Appointed by the President — President Sills, 
Bowdoin; Dean Fine, Princeton; Dr. Arthur N. 
Talbot, University of Illinois; D. Albert R. Hill, 
University of Missouri; Col. C. A. Hyatt, 
Chester, Pa.; Dr. Edwin A. Alderman, Univer- 
sity of Virginia; Dr. William C. Riddick, North 
Carolina State College of Agriculture and En- 
gineering; President Sills, Bowdoin; Dean Fine, 
Princeton. 

By the Vice-President — Senators Carroll S. 
Page, of Vermont; Key Pittman, of Nevada; 
Medill McCormack, of Illinois; Peter G. Gerry, 
of Rhode Island. 

By the Speaker — Representatives Patrick H. 
Kelley, of Michigan; William S. Vare, of Penn- 
sylvania; Milton Kraus, of Indiana; James F. 
Byrnes, of South Carolina; William Kettner, of 
California. 



Dean Nixon, secretary of the Committee of Se- 
lection for Maine will, on application, send to 
any prospective candidates other memoranda of 
an informational nature. 



Rhodes Scholarship 

Oxford University has dropped its require- 
ment of Greek for entrance and for all degrees. 
This fact should make the possibility of a < 
Rhodes Scholarship at Oxford more interesting 
to American collegians. A Rhodes scholar will 
be appointed for the State of Maine on Septem- 
ber 25, 1920, and will go into residence at Ox- 
ford the following January. Bates, Bowdoin 
and Colby each may nominate two candidates, 
and the University of Maine three, to appear 
before the Committee on Selection in Septem- 
ber. The secretary of this committee must have 
on file the application of all candidates by Aug- 
ust 14th, and each institution should select its 
own candidates by June 15, 1920. 

Considerable information regarding Oxford 
and the scholarships may be obtained from the 
April number of the American Oxonian ; copies 
of this publication will be sent by Mr. W. W. 
Thayer, Concord, N. H, on receipt of 25 cents. 



On the Eve of the Intercollegiates 

Enthusiasm and fighting spirit are running" 
high on the eve of the greatest track battle of 
the season. Of the four Maine colleges, Bow- 
doin is the favorite with Maine running a close 
second, but this fact is no reason for overcon- 
fidence. In 1916 and 1917 Bowdoin was the 
favorite but Maine came down fighting and won. 

There is no reason why the student body 
should not be in Lewiston next Saturday 400 
strong. The other colleges will be there with 
lots of pep and fight, and it is the duty of every 
loyal Bowdoin man to show his spirit. There 
will be a special train, it is hoped. The fare is 
but a little over a dollar, so there is no reason 
for staying away. 

In a statement to the Orient Sunday night 
Coach Magee warned against overconfidence, but 
said that Bowdoin has a well-balanced team. He 
was on the whole satisfied with the men last 
Saturday, for all of them did well except one 
or two who were in poor physical condition. He 
emphasized the importance of the support of the 
student body next Saturday. "Maine is coming 
to Lewiston with her old fighting spirit," he said, 
"and it's up to us to do as much if we want to 
win." 

Now let everybody be out to the biggest rally 
of the year Friday evening — then back up the 
rally by going to Lewiston. 



Phi Chi Banquet 

The Phi Chi medical fraternity met at the 
Congress Square Hotel in Portland, May 1, and 
held a very enjoyable banquet which was fol- 
lowed by a short business meeting and short 
informal talks on technical subjects. Among 
those present were Webber, Thayer, Perkins, 
Finn, Brewster, Vance, Bell, Johnson, Burke, 
Anderson, Hill, Wight, LeLasher, and Herlihy. 



Document of Interest at Library 

The original notice of a meeting of the Bow- 
doin College Board of Trustees on July 28, 
1795, has been received at the Library. It is 
signed by Tristram Gilman, the president of the 
Board, and was sent to the Library ' by his 
great-grandson Charles Howard Gilman '82. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



47 



Fraternity Baseball 

Delta Upsilon 24, Sigma Nu 1. 

Delta Upsilon 6 3 2 7 2 4 — 24 

Sigma Nu , 1 — 1 

Batteries : Whitman and Albert ; Hurlin, Tootell and 
Eldridge. 

Chi Psi 3, Delta Kappa Epsilon 2. 

Chi Psi 2 1 0—3 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 2 — 2 

Batteries : Towne and Marston ; Ludwig and Dmmmond. 

Kappa Sigma 9, Psi Upsilon 7. 

Kappa Sigma won from Psi Upsilon last week 9 to 7, 
after a hard uphill fight. The batteries were : Dahlgren 
and Richan ; Mundie and Varney. 



League Games in the Near Future. 



May 10 — Zeta Psi vs. Kappa Sigma (3.30 P. 
Chi Psi vs. Delta Upsilon (5.00 P. 
May 11 — Beta Theta Pi vs. Theta Delta Chi. 
May 13— Alpha Delta Phi vs. Sigma Nu. 
May 14 — Psi Upsilon vs. Theta Delta Chi. 
May 17 — Alpha Delta Phi vs. Delta Upsilon. 
May 18 — Delta Kappa Epsilon vs. Sigma Nu. 



Campus jRetos 

At a spirited rally held in Memorial Hall last 
Friday evening, a watch was presented to Pro- 
fessor Lee D. McClean by the students in recog- 
nition of his splendid work at Bowdoin. Emer- 
son W. Zeitler '20 made the presentation speech. 
After the Bowdoin songs and cheers were re- 
hearsed Jack Magee spoke a few words of en- 
couragement and prophesied the victory of the 
baseball team over Maine. 

Members of the three upper classes who wish 
to compete for the Hawthorne Short Story 
Prize of forty dollars must offer their stories 
on or before Tuesday, June 1st. The stories 
must be at least fifteen hundred words in length, 
typewritten, and signed with a fictitious name. 

Samuel B. Furbish has recently purchased the 
former home of Professor Robinson. 

The end of the first golf tournament found 
McClave '20 in the lead with a gross score of 
102, net 75. R. Perkins '21 had the smallest 
gross score with 97 and net 88. Handicaps have 
been revised in view of the results of this tourna- 
ment. The second tournament is now being 
played with twenty-one matches. 

The annual Freshman banquet was held at 
Riverton last Saturday evening. Palmer, the 
president of the class, was chairman of the com- 
mittee. There were twelve speakers, including 
men from each fraternity and from the non- 
fraternity group. 

The second Baseball Team went down in de- 



feat last week before the Kent's Hill team, 15 to 
3. Later in the week they won from Brunswick 
High, 1 to o, Wing '23 pitching a no-hit, no-run 
game. 

Rev. Harold G. McCann addressed the stu- 
dents in Chapel Sunday. 

Dr. William E. Sargent '78, principal of 
Hebron Academy, was a recent visitor on the 
campus. 

Extensive repairs have been made on the roof 
of the Athletic Building in the last few weeks. 

The hockey rink between Hyde Hall and the 
Library is being filled in. Next year the rink 
will probably be on the Delta. 

Ray Swift '16 was on the campus last Tues- 
day. 

Dwight Sayward '17 was on the campus last 
week. 

Rehearsals for the Commencement play are 
being held several times a week. The steps of 
the Art Building will be used as soon as the 
weather permits. 



jfacultp jftotes 

Professor Mitchell was elected last week presi- 
dent of the Congregational State Conference for 
the coming year. 

Professor Catlin gave a very interesting talk 
before the League of Women Voters at the home 
of Mrs. F. N. Whittier a week ago Thursday. 

Professor Mitchell gave an address at the Odd 
Fellows meeting at Wiscasset last Sunday after- 
noon on the subject, "Can the Sin of Our Fore- 
fathers Prevail?" 

At a recent conference in Augusta, Dr. Gross 
read a paper urging the necessity of the tuber- 
culin test of dairy cattle in order to secure the 
highest quality of milk. 



alumni Department 

'98 — In the April number of the National Geo- 
graphic Magazine was an enthusiastic article on 
Peary's explorations by Donald B. MacMillan. 
There were a large number of illustrations, from 
photographs taken by both Peary and MacMillan. 

Ex-'98 — Hon. Edward W. Wheeler of Bruns- 
wick has been elected chairman of the Maine 
delegation to the Republican National Conven- 
tion. Last week he received also two honors 
of a different nature, being chosen Grand Master 
of the Masons of Maine, and Grand Commander 
of the Knights Templars of Maine. 

'08 — Neal W. Cox has recently gone to Bos- 
ton as a salesman for a leather firm. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



'01 — Fred Herbert Cowan died recently at 
the Homeopathic Hospital in Boston, Mass. He 
was born on July 18, 1874, in Sidney, Me. He 
attended the district schools in Sidney, took the 
college preparatory course at the Farmington 
High School and was graduated from the State 
Normal School in the same town in 1893. Af- 
ter this he was engaged as a teacher in various 
Maine schools until he entered Bowdoin in 1898. 
He worked his way through college, teaching at 
intervals, and graduated in 1901. Returning 
for pOoC gutduate work in chemistry, he receiv- 
ed the degree of A.M. in 1903. Mr. Cowan was 
sub-principal and teacher of science at Cony 
High School in Augusta from 1901 to 1904, 
principal and teacher of science at Bar Harbor 
High School from 1904 to 1906, and junior- 
master in science at the Girls' Latin School in 
Boston from 1906 to 1920. During the period 
of his work in Boston he resided at Roxbury, 
and in 1913 he arranged and conducted, togeth- 
er with G. A. Cowan of West Roxbury High 
School, a European tour in which he visited 
Scotland, England, France, Switzerland, and It- 
aly. He is survived by his widow and two chil- 
dren. He was a member of the Delta Upsilon 
fraternity. 

'16 — The following notes have been received 
concerning 1916 men : 

Alfred C. Kinsey is a travelling fellow with 
Bussey Institution (Harvard), engaged in en- 
tomology. He has contributed a number of pa- 
pers to entomological magazines. 

J. Glenwood Winter is attached to the Uni- 
ted States Naval Headquarters, 9 Rue de Chail- 
lot, Paris, France, and is engaged in the liqui- 
dation of U. S. Naval Aviation affairs. 

E. Robert Little is with the Lewis Mfg. Co., 
Walpole, Mass. 

Frederick A. Ranson is a specification writer 
for Avery Company, manufacturers of tractors 
and motorized farm implements at Peoria, 111. 

J. Scott Brackett is with Chocolate Refiners 
Inc., Mansfield, Mass. 

Kenneth T. Burr is treasurer and general 
manager of Bancroft and Martin Rolling Mills 
Co., Portland, Maine. 

'17 — Lafayette F. Dow has been appointed in- 
structor in French at Cornell, and will also study 
for a Master's degree. 



Thirty-Fifth Annual Conference 

of Eastern College Students 

The thirty-fifth Annual Conference of Eastern 
College Students (formerly the Northfield Stu- 



dent Conference) will be held this year at Silver 
Bay, N. Y., from June 25 to July 4. 

About 60 colleges from New York, Pennsyl- 
vania, Ohio, New Jersey, Delaware, West 
Virginia, Maryland, and the New England states 
will be represented, and Bowdoin men are now 
working to get the largest delegation which the 
college has yet sent to the summer conference. 
It is reported that one large university is work- 
ing for 125 delegates, and as the attendance is 
limited to 800 delegates, it is highly important 
that an early registration be made. 

Silver Bay has a beautiful location on Lake 
George, near the Adirondacks. The region has 
a multitude of traditions of the Indians and of 
Ethan Allen and his Green Mountain boys. This 
will also be the meeting place of the Y. M. C. A., 
Interchurch World Movement, and the confer- 
ence promoted by the Y. W. C. A. for women 
students of eastern colleges. 

Silver Bay has unexcelled outdoor and indoor 
athletic facilities with its fine fields, tennis courts 
and a new gymnasium. 

This conference has significant opportunities 
for the college man. It offers a remarkable oc- 
casion for intercollegiate fellowship. It helps 
in personal, moral and religious problems. Its 
discussion groups and personal talks give deeper 
understanding of the personal and social mean- 
ings of Christianity. 

HARVARD DENTAL SCHOOL 

Department of Harvard University 
Graduates of this school admitted without ex- 
amination in September, 1920, provided they have 
taken required subjects. One year in college is 
required for entrance in 1921. Modern buildings 
and equipment. Fall term opens September 27, 
1920. Degree of D.M.D. Catalog. 

EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D. , Dean, Boston, 
Mass. 

We equip both the Red Sox and the Braves 
The Horace Partridge Co. 

Mfrs. Athletic & Sporting Goods 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Coach Magee is frequently sending 
orders to us, and will be glad to handle 
your order. 




Using the X-Ray 
in the Home 



Greater X-ray Service — 

through Research 



FOR years after the discovery of 
X-rays it -was evident that only 
intensive research could unfold their real 
possibilities. 

Meanwhile, scientists of the General 
Electric Company developed the process 
of making wrought tungsten. This 
proved ideal as the target in X-ray tubes 
and its use for this purpose soon became 
universal. 

Then further research resulted in the =P= 
development of an X-ray tube of a radi- ^P 
cally new type — the Coolidge Tube— seif- 
with both electrodes of wrought tungsten rectifying 
and containing the highest attainable ty Pe ° r 
vacuum. Cooiidse 

X-ray 

But the complication of high-vacuum Tube 



pumps made the new tube in large 
quantities impossible. The answer to 
this problem was the Langmuir Con- 
densation Pump, utilizing mercury vapor 
in its operation and almost automatic. 

To meet the need for simple X-ray 
apparatus during the war— the G-E La- 
boratory developed the Self- Rectifying 
Coolidge Tube, which made possible port- 
able outfits at the front. The latest X-ray 
outfit of this type is so small it can be 
taken conveniently to the home or to 
the bedside in the hospital. 

Thus the Research Laboratory of the 
General Electric Company continues to 
serve, that progress in things electrical 
may continue for the good of humanity. 




General Office 
Schehectady,KK 



Sales Offices in 
all large cities 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Let Jud "Outline" your work and do your "Cutting" for you 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



PRINTING 



OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWN BUILDING BRUNSWICK 



SPRING LINES OF 

SPORTING GOODS 



GOLF BALLS BASEBALL GOODS 
TENNIS GOODS 



We carry SPALDING & REACH 
Lines of Baseball Goods and WRIGHT 
& DITSON Tennis Goods. 



F. W. Chandler & Son 



COLLEGE AND "PREP" SCHOOL MEN 

Clothing for Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 
ercoats and Ulsters. 




Haberdashery Hats 



Macullar Parker Company 



400 Washington St. 



Boston, Mass. 



'THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



COMPLETE STOCKS 

of 

Seasonable Clothes 

Haberdashery 

Hats 

FOR TOWN AND COUNTRY WEAR 



Also Special Styles in 
SPORTING APPAREL 



Haskell & Jones Co. 
Portland, - - - Maine. 




Arrow 

'O'roy ^Tailored 

Soft Collars 

CLUETT, PEABOOY 4 CO. . INC. . TROY N. Y. 



New Double Breasted Suits 



IN 



PLAIN GRAY, BROWN & BLUE 



ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



E. S. BODWELL & SON 

Brunswick. 



Greenhouse 21 -W 
Residence 21-R 

WALTER L. LaROCK 
F L- Q FR I S T 

Potted Plants and Cut Flowers 
Floral Designs for All Occasions 

15% Jordan Avenue 



COURSON & MORTON 

SUPPLIES 



"The secret of long driving is 
strength and the right appli- 
cation thereof by means of 
accurate, rapid timing" 

Golfers' Magazine 




THE ball also plays an important part in securing 
more distance. 

The New U. S. Golf Balls 

have the resiliency and balance that make for dis- 
tance and accuracy. They are made in different 
weights and sizes. Try them. Buy them from your 
pro or at your dealer's. 



U. S. Royal $1.00 each 
U. S. Revere 85c each 
U. S. Floater 65c each 



Keep your eye on the ball — be sure it's a U. S. 




United States Rubber Company 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THAYER McNEIL CO. 

COLLEGE MEN'S 

SHOES 

BOSTON 

JOE BULGER Representative 

In Store on Saturdays 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

"CANTEEN" 

19 NORTH WINTHROP 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 Sundays 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES, CAKE, ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 

PALMER SHOE CO. 

PORTLAND 



CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 

4 Elm Street 



SUMMER WORK 

We still have room 
For a few LIVE men 
Provided they want to 
Earn a lot of MONEY 
This summer. 

This isn't a gamble 

It is a SURE THING 

For the man who HUSTLES 

And besides 

We pay a SALARY. 

NOW is the time 

To get on the Band Wagon 

So see our local man 

Or write us direct and 

Ask for the dope. 

Local representative 

Harry Helson, '21, 

Room 29, North Winthrop. 

The National Survey Co. 

Topographical Offices 
CHESTER, VT. 



PORTLAND 



BATH 



BRUNSWICK 



If You Want the Biggest Drink 

For Your Money 

Get Your 

Milk Shakes and Soda Fountain Drinks 

AT 

The Spear Folks 

119 Maine Street 
WATERVILLE WESTBROOK 



Do You Need Extra Courses? 

Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages, Economics, 
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire 
how credits earned may be applied on present college program. 

Sty? Intersttjj of (JUpraga 

HOME STUDY DEPT. 




I 
28th 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS Year 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



LAW 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 



Trains students in the principles of the 
law and in the technique of the profession 
so as to best prepare them for active prac- 
tice wherever the English system of law 
prevails. 

College graduates may receive scholar- 
ships not exceeding $75. 

Course for LL. B. requires 3 school years. 
Those who have received this degree from 
this or any other approved school of law 
may receive LL. M. on the satisfactory com- 
pletion of one year's resident attendance 
under the direction of Dr. Melville M. Bige- 
low. Several $25 and $50 scholarships 
open in this course. 

For Catalog, Address 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 



WE CARRY 

Co-operative Shoes 
New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS "07 
LARGEST AND BEST 

Stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 




WORN THE WORLD OVER 

For more than forty years Boston Garter has 
been a friend to men the world over. It not 
only keeps the old but makes many new ones 
each year. Most men ask for Boston Garter 
as a matter of course — the two words go so 
well together. 
GEORGE FROST CO., Makers, BOSTON 

A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office - Brunswick, Maine 

BUTLER'S 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 

We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Cushing St.— Tel. 16. 

J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 



BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 
Portland 


WILLIAM F. FERRIS 

COLLEGE AGENT 


PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSONS PHARMACY 


Citizens Laundry 

AUTO SERVICE 9 SOUTH APPLETON 






COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULES BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 


CHIPMAN 






CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 

184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 


DIAMOND RINGS 

At prices 1 5 per cent and 40 per 
cent less than New York prices. 
A. G. PAGE CO., BATH 



"The Store of Progress and Service" 

TYPES and TASTES 



In College Men 



We've experience in analyzing these. You can pretty nearly determine a 
man's taste by his type — we're eminently successful in suiting both. The 
character, complexion, bearing of each individual man enables us at first 
sight to judge the sort of model, fabric or pattern that will appeal to his 
taste, and through our immense variety we have little difficulty picking out 
the right thing in a Suit or Overcoat. Mr. lack Handy '23 at the Zeta Psi 
House is our representative, and anything you wish in the way of Shirts, 
Neckwear, Shoes, Hosiery, Pajamas, etc., he will be glad to take your order. 



Monument Square 




Portland, Maine 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 
MARY MILES MINTER 

IN 

JUDY OF ROGUE'S HARBOR 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
LONGFELLOW'S EVANGELINE 




PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 
CHARLES RAY 

IN 

ALARM CLOCK ANDY 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
GEORGE WALSH 

IN 

THE SHARK 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



V 



VOL. L 



WEDNESDAY. MAY )9. 1920 



NO. 7 



BOWDOIN REPEATS IN MAINE 

CHAMPIONSHIP MEET AT LEWISTON 



Parent, Goodwin, and Moses Star for Bowdoin in Decisive Victory — Buker Brothers Strong in 
Distance Runs — Colby Springs Surprise — No Records Broken. 



President Sills On Important Board 

President Sills has been made a member of 
the Advisory Board of the American Field 
Fellowships for French Universities. These fel- 
lowships have been founded in memory of the 
men who lost their lives in the war while in the 
American Field Service. Thirty fellowships will 
be available for 1920-21. 



The Intercollegiate Y. M. C. A. 

Conference at Bates 



Bowdoin Man Elected President. 



The Intercollegiate Y. M. C. A. Conference 
at Bates College from April 30 to May 2 
was a remarkable success. Seventy delegates 
representing about twenty of the New England 
Colleges met at Lewiston and conferred on col- 
lege problems of the Y. M." C. A. On Friday eve- 
ning a banquet was given by the Ladies' 
Auxiliary of the Y. M. C. A., after which greet- 
ings were given by President-elect Grey of Bates 
and Dave Porter '06, who is secretary of the 
Student Department of the International Y. M. 
C. A. Saturday and Sunday were filled with 
short discussions on Y. M. C. A. methods and 
principles. 

Bowdoin had five men at the conference, 
Young '21, McGown '21, Blanchard '21, Ander- 
son '21, and McCurdy '22. The officers elected 
for the International Council were : President, 
R. M. McGown of Bowdoin; secretary, H. Mc- 
Donald of Wesleyan. Members at large, H. L. 
Edwards of Springfield, E. Egan of Yale, H. S. 
Richter of Dartmouth, G E. Fargo of M. I. T. 
and W. W. Hall of Brown. 



In one of the most thrilling meets held by the 
Maine colleges in recent years, Bowdoin 
triumphed over Maine, Colby, and Bates 
at Lewiston last Saturday. The final score 
was Bowdoin 45, Maine 31, Bates 25, 
Colby 25. The track events were the 
features of the meet and in both long and short 
distances, the finishes were close and exciting. 
The day was ideal for such a meet and the rain 
late in the afternoon served more good than 
harm. The forenoon was taken up mostly in 
the trials for the short distance finals of the af- 
ternoon. The weight trials were also held. In 
the afternoon, the real meet began and for sev- 
eral hours some A- 1 track events thrilled the 
crowds. 

Colby sprung a surprise in the meet by the 
unexpected success of her athletes in the field 
events. This feature of the meet seemed 
a surprise even to the Colby sup- 
porters, for the Waterville institution, not con- 
sidered dangerous, tied Bates and came within 
six points of equalling Maine, the favorite at 
the close of the morning trials. Cook, in the 
hammer throw and shot-put, Brakewood in the 
shot, and Bucknam in the discus throw, were 
unexpected winners. 

The stars of the meet were, without a doubt, 
Parent, Goodwin, and Moses, of Bowdoin, the 
Buker brothers of Bates, and Pratt of Maine. 
All of these won first places and Parent and 
Pratt were tied for high point honors with 13 
each. Parent won first place in the low hurdles 
and broad jump, and second in the 220-yard 
dash, while Pratt broke the tape in the 220 and 
440 and added a second in the broad jump. 

The mile and two-mile runs were the most 
discussed and uncertain events of the meet. Bow- 



50 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



(loin. Maine, and Bates each had men who 
seemed to have an equal chance in both events. 
Goodwin for Bowdoin, R. B. Buker for Bates, 
and Preti and Raymond for Maine were all 
looked upon as possible winners. ' In the mile 
run Preti set the pace for the first quarter, but 
the pace told on the Maine veteran and in the 
next two laps it became evident that he was 
weakening while Goodwin and Buker were gain- 
ing steadily until they passed him in the last 
of the third lap, Goodwin ahead. In the fourth 
and last lap Goodwin let out and steadily length- 
ened the space between him and Buker, although 
the Bates man did his best to keep in the run- 
ning. Goodwin, however, was going in perfect 
form and sprinted down the home stretch amid 
roars of Bowdoin cheers reaching the tape some 
fifty yards ahead of Buker, who in turn finished 
another fifty in front of the tired Preti. Good- 
win had the added satisfaction of recording his 
fastest time so far in this event. 

In the two-mile, Goodwin and Towle were 
Bowdoin's orrfy runners. Towle made a fast 
start which drew out Clifford of Bates and Ray- 
mond of Maine. Goodwin, and R. B. Buker 
stayed in the rear for the time being. Clifford 
took the lead near the end of the first lap, and 
held it for over half a mile. Raymond passed 
him at the end of the first mile, but now Good- 
win and Buker came rapidly to the fore, the 
former taking the lead. The Bowdoin runner 
held his position until about two hundred yards 
from the finish, when Buker made the spurt that 
won the race. Raymond finished third, a 
considerable distance behind Goodwin. 

The hurdles, low and high, were the events in 
which Bowdoin displayed its greatest superiority. 
Moses easily won the high hurdles with Thomson 
second, and Fenderson of Maine third. Parent, 
Moses, and Thomson took all the points in the 
low hurdles in the order named. 

In the quarter, M. H. Smith of Bowdoin 
started off in the lead with Palmer second. At 
the second corner Pratt and Castle of Maine 
passed both Bowdoin runners. From then on 
there was no change in the positions, Pratt win- 
ning, Castle second, and Smith third. 

The half mile was Preti's last run of the meet. 
R. S. Buker led nearly all the way, but Hunt of 
Bowdoin could have given him a hard run if he 
had not lost one of his shoes early in the race. 
As it was the. Bowdoin middle-distance runner 
finished a strong third, well ahead of Preti when 
the latter dropped out, near the end of the race. 

Parent led the field in the 220 down to the 



Bowdoin stands, but Captain Pratt of Maine 
passed him and won by a very scant margin. The 
Bowdoin man passed back the defeat in the 
broad jump, which Pratt lost by five-eighths of 
ail inch. 

Bowdoin was not so strong comparatively in 
the field events. Cook won the pole vault, but 
aside from his five points, no other first place 
went to the White in this part of-the meet. Ellms 
took second in the hammer, and Zeitlerthird. A. 
M. Smith won third in the discus throw, while 
there were no points at all for Bowdoin in the 
shot. 

The summary : 

One mile run — Won by Goodwin, Bowdoin ; R. B. Buker, 
Bates, second ; Preti, Maine, third. Time, 4.24 3-5. 

440-yard dash — Won by Pratt, Maine ; Castle, Maine, sec- 
ond ; Smith, Bowdoin, third. Time, 52 4-5. 

100-yard dash — won by Wiggin, Bates ; Thomas, Maine, 
second ; Pinkham. Maine, third. Time, 10 3-5. 

120-yard high hurdles — Won by Moses, Bowdoin ; Thom- 
son, Bowdoin, second ; Fenderson, Maine, third. Time, 
17 2-5. 

880-yard run— Won by K. S. Buker, Bates ; Mercer, Colby, 
second ; Hunt, Bowdoin, third. Time, 2 minutes, 1 1-5 sec- 
onds. 

220-yard dash, won by Pratt, Maine ; Parent, Bowdoin, 
second ; Wiggin, Bates, third. Time, 23 3-5 seconds. 

Two-mile run— Won by R. B. Buker, Bates ; Goodwin, 
Bowdoin, second ; Raymond, Maine, third. Time, 10.02 4-5. 

220-yard low hurdles — Won by Parent, Bowdoin ; Moses, 
Bowdoin, second ; Thomson, Bowdoin, third. Time, 28 1-5 
seconds. 

Throwing 16-pound shot — Won by Brakewood, Colby ; Gal- 
variski, Bates, second ; Cook, Colby, third. Winning dis- 
tance, 36.16 feet. 

Hammer throw— Won by Cook, Colby; Ellms. Bowdoin, 
second ; Zeitler, Bowdoin, third. Distance, 114.47 feet. 

Discus throw — Won by Bucknam, Colby ; Bishop, Maine, 
second ; A. Smith, Bowdoin, third. Distance, 110.55 feet. 

Running high jump, tie between Sewall, Maine, and 
Crook, Colby; W. Berry, Colby, third. Heitht, 5 feet, 2 
inches. (On jump off for medal, Sewall won.) 

Running broad jump — Won by Parent, Bowdoin ; Pratt, 
Maine, secend ; Libby, Maine, third. Distance, 20 feet, 10 1-8 
inches. 

Pole vault — Won by Cook, Bowdoin ; Rice, Bates, second ; 
Pulsifer, Colby, third. Height, 10 feet, 6 inches. 

INDIVIDUAL SCORING: 



Farent, Bowdoin 13 

Pratt, Maine 13 

Goodwin, Bowdoin 8 

Moses, Bowdoin 8 

R. B. Buker, Bates S 

Wiggin, Bates 6 

Coak, Colby 6 

Cook, Bowdoin 5 

R. S. Buker, Bates 5 

Brakewood, Colby 5 

Bucknam, Colby 5 

Thomson, Bowdoin 4 

Sewall, Maine 4 

Crook, Colby 4 

Ellms, Bowdoin 3 

Galvariski, Bates 3 



Rice. Bates 3 

Mercer, Colby 3 

Castle, Maine 3 

Thomas, Maine 3 

Bishop, Maine 3 

Hunt. Bowdoin 1 

M. H. Smith, Bowdoin . . 1 

Zeitler. Bowdoin 1 

A. M. Smith, Bowdoin. . 1 

Pinkham, Maine 1 

Fenderson, Maine 1 

Raymond, Maine 1 

Libby, Maine 1 

Pulsifer. Colby 1 

W. D. Berry, Colby 1 

Preti, Maine 1 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



51 



NUMBER OF PLACES TAKEN BY EACH COLLEGE: 

Firsts — Bowdoin 5, Colby 3, Bates 3, Maine 2 ; one tie be- 
tween Maine and Colby. 
Seconds — Bowdoin 5, Maine 4, Bates 3, Colby 1. 
Thirds — Bowdoin 5, Maine 5, Colby 3, Bates 1. 

POINTS SCORED IN EACH EVENT: 

Bowdoin Maine Bates Colby 

One mile run 5 1 3 

Quarter mile run 1 8 

100-yard dash 4 5 

120-yard high hurdles 8 10 

Half mile run 1 5 3 

220-yard dash 3 5 1 

Two mile run 3 1 5 

220-yard low hurdles 9 

Running high jump 4 5 

Shot put 3 6 

Running broad jump 5 4 

Hammer throw 4 5 

Pole vault 5 3 1 

Discus throw 1 3 5 

Totals 45 31 25 25 



Phi Beta Kappa Address 

By President Sills 

In his address before the Boston University 
Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa Friday evening, 
President Sills spoke of the vital part that schol- 
arship plays in the development of a nation's 
literature. There is a very general popular im- 
pression that literature and poetry are concerned 
more with the emotions than with the intellect. 
It is of course true that poetry must stir the 
heart. But many of the world's great poets have 
been scholars and have learned from books as 
well as from life. Virgil was famed for his 
erudition; Dante was the most learned man of 
his age ; Milton studied to be a poet as zealously 
as a man would study law or medicine and was 
thoroughly at home in many different fields of 
knowledge; Goethe was a thorough scholar; and 
curiously enough the most popular poem in the 
English language was written by Thomas Gray, 
who was perhaps the most scholarly of all the 
English poets. Undoubtedly many great poets 
of the world were in no sense of the word 
scholars, and yet Shakespeare for all his "small 
Latin and less Greek" was a very widely read 
man, perfectly at home in books. 

In these days when there is so much writing 
that is careless and slipshod, when there is so lit- 
tle regard for the workmanship of letters, when 
scholarship is not held in very high popular 
esteem, it is well to remember that great poetry 
and great literature, summing up as they do the 
experience and the emotions of the human race, 
have been produced usually in periods of great 



intellectual activity and by men of undoubted in- 
tellectual power. There are many encouraging- 
signs of a renewed interest in poetry, drama, and 
art. What the nation needs so far as its litera- 
ture is concerned is a genuine renaissance, a re- 
birth of intellectual enthusiasm. Poetry is bound 
to be shallow and sentimental — pretty stuff but 
not lasting unless it incorporates the thought as 
well as the feelings of the time. We have many 
clever writers both of prose and verse ; but there 
are very few strong intellectual figures among 
American men of letters. The American uni- 
versity has of late years stifled rather than en- 
couraged literature. In the early days most of 
our writers came from our colleges ; Lowell and 
Emerson from Harvard ; Hawthorne and Long- 
fellow from Bowdoin ; Poe from the University 
of Virginia. Our colleges should today do more 
to foster the literary spirit and put more empha- 
sis on production than on criticism, and our read- 
ing public should recognize more widely than it 
does the need of scholarship in literature. 



Beta Theta Pi The Dansant 

Beta Sigma Chapter of Beta Theta Pi enter- 
tained at a pleasing informal the dansant last 
Friday afternoon from two to five. The chapter 
house was decorated with spring flowers. Mrs. 
Joseph E. Stetson of Brunswick poured. 

Among those present were the Misses Thelma 
Damren, Virginia Holway, Alice Stevens, Emily 
Toas, of Augusta; Norine Whiting, of Auburn; 
Emma Abbott, of Presque Isle ; Helen Artis, 
Marion Small, and Mabel Wallace, of Bath; 
Esther Mitchell, Helen M. Orr, and Martha 
Wheeler, of Brunswick. 

The committee in charge consisted of Scrimge- 
our '20, Hill '23, and Turgeon '23. 



Rally for Maine Intercollegiates 

Last Friday at 5.30 a rally and send-off took 
place at Memorial Hall and at the station. 
Nearly every student on the campus who was 
not going to Lewiston until Saturday morning 
was there and the band was there with all its 
inspiration. Holmes '21 led some snappy cheer- 
ing and Richan '20 led the songs. "Jack" Magee 
gave a very interesting talk on the coming meet, 
warning the men not to be too confident. Pro- 
fessors Burnett and Stanwood each spoke en- 
thusiastically and called upon the student body 
to back the team. After the meeting, the stu- 
dent body formed behind the band and marched 
down to the station where the track men were 
given a royal send-off as they left for Lewiston. 



52 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the college year by the 

Bowdoin Publishing Company in the interest of 

the students of Bowdoin College. 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Editor-in-Chief 

Edward B. Ham, 1922 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

William R. Ludden. 1922 News Editor 

Floyd A. Gerrard, 1923 Faculty Notes 

George H. Quinby, 1923 Alumni Department 

F. King Turgeon, 1923 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
John L. Berry, 1921 Crosby E. Redman, 1921 

Harry Helson. 1921 Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

George E. Houghton, 1921 Roland L. McCormack, 1922 

Russell M. McGown, 1921 Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Business Manager 

Frederic A. Allen, 1922 Assistant Manager 

Wilfred R. Brewer, 1922 Assistant Manager 

All communications regarding subscriptions should be ad- 
dressed to the Business Manager of the Bowdoin Publishing- 
Co. Subscriptions. $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, 10 cents. 

Vol. L. MAY 19, 1920. No. 7 

Entered at Post Office at Brunswick as Second-Class Mail Matter 

Another Track Victory. 

Another championship was added to Bowdoin's 
list of victories in track, when the White 
triumphed over Maine, Bates, and Colby by a 
substantial margin. It was an interesting meet 
to watch and extremely gratifying to the many 
Bowdoin followers who took the trip to Lewiston 
last Saturday. 

The track team and its coach deserve the 
greatest commendation for this victory. It is 
they, combined with the whole-hearted support 
of the student body who made Saturday's at- 
tainment possible. Any man with even the most 
limited experience in track work knows the 
gruelling training to which men for every, event 
must be subjected. And training under Coach 
Magee is rigorously and faithfully observed. The 
men who went out for track last winter and this 
spring and "stuck to it," are worthy of the un- 
qualified respect and admiration of the student 
body. 

The Maine Championship is certainly an 
achievement worth attaining, but it means all the 
more, because it represents the hard work and 
consistent excellence of Bowdoin track men. Hats 
off to Coach Magee and his track squad ! 



Explorations in the Far North," by Gilbert 
Grosvenor, President of the National Geographic 
Society, in the National Geographic Magazine 
for April, 1920. 



Communication 

To the Editor of the Orient: 

There is a great deal of speculation among a 
large part of the student body regarding the 
failure of the non-fraternity men to be repre- 
sented in the Inter-fraternity Baseball League. 
For the last two seasons, the non-fraternity men 
have had a team in the field. This year, they 
were not asked to join, and so the schedule con- 
tained only games between fraternity teams. 

The writer believes that there are only two 
reasons why such action was taken by the fra- 
ternities : That 

1. The non-fraternity body is numerically 
larger than any fraternity, and therefore would 
have more material to pick from. 

2. This season, the league was defined as an 
"Inter-fraternity League" and so this excluded 
any "non-fraternity" team. 

These two facts are admitted but are not the 
non-fraternity men a part of the student body ? 
Baseball has a lure for every American boy, but 
through this interpretation of the term "Inter- 
fraternity League" approximately one-sixth of 
the student body is deprived of the opportunity of 
playing baseball in a league. 

It has been said that the non-fraternity men 
would be allowed to form an independent team 
and could seek games with the fraternity teams. 
But interest would be lacking in these games and 
the fraternities would not. put their strongest 
team on the field, preferring to save it for a 
league game. 

The only remedy for this condition is to allow 
the non-fraternity team in the league. Of course 
this cannot be done this year, but this state of 
affairs could be rectified next year. If, on the 
other hand, the non-fraternity men are not per- 
mitted to play baseball on an equal footing with 
the fraternity men, it shows a weak spot in Bow- 
doin's "boasted democracy." X. 



"Peary a few years previously had been gradu- 
ated from Bowdoin College second in his class — 
a position which means unusual mental vigor in 
an institution which is noted for the fine scholar- 
ship and intellect of its alumni." — From "Peary's 



Office of Bowdoin Publishing Co. 

The Business Management of the Orient and 
Quill is glad to announce the acquisition by it 
of an office at 4 South Appleton for the combined 
use of the Orient and Quill boards and the Pub- 
lishing Company. 

Exchanges received from other colleges are 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



53 



on file and are open to all at any time when the 
office is open. 

All mail now comes to this office and is sorted 
here. The mail box on the door is also large 
enough to hold any Quill or Orient contribu- 
tions, communications, alumni or general news 
notes, suggestions or criticisms which members 
of the college may care from time to time to 
leave. 

If any addresses are now incorrect, or if the 
Orient is not delivered, a notice to that effect 
should be left for the Business Manager. 

The Orient has needed an office and the stu- 
dent body has needed some centrally located 
place where the boards might be reached. 

Both needs have been filled, so it is now up 
to the students to aid with contributions and con- 
structive criticism if or when conditions are un- 
satisfactory. 

Help the Orient to be to Bowdoin what the 
Crimson is to Harvard; what The Dartmouth is 
to Dartmouth ; and what in general a college 
paper should be to its college. K. S. B. 

Note. — Communications relating to subscriptions, 
circulation, change of address, and advertising should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the Bowdoin 
Publishing Company, all other communications should 
be addressed to the Managing Editor of the Orient. 



Bowdoin, 7; Portland K. of C, 0. 



Mason Holds St. Anselm's Conquerors Helpless. 



While the track team was cleaning up the rest 
of Maine at Lewiston last Saturday, the baseball 
team went to Portland and defeated the Knights 
of Columbus seven to nothing. The losers had 
been the only team to beat St. Anselms on its 
recent invasion of the state. The chief feature 
of the game was the splendid pitching of Mason. 
He yielded only two singles during the entire 
contest. Bowdoin garnered nine hits from Em- 
bleton, with Doherty, Morrell, and Clifford taking 
the major portion. 

The team as a whole showed up very favor- 
ably indeed. The fielding was of high order, 
especially that of Morrell at short. The base- 
running was better than usual, and the batting, 
as said above, was good. Clifford drove out a 
very timely double in the fourth inning, scoring 
two men, and practically putting the game on ice. 

Following is a play by play account of the 
game: 

First Inning. 

Bowdoin — Needelman was out, W. Barron to French. 
Cook poled out a single which went to naught, as both 
Smith and Morrell grounded to the third baseman. 



K. of C. — Lyons was retired by Smith. M. Barron walked, 
but French fanned and W. Barron was out, Mason to 
Clifford. 

Second Inning. 

Bowdoin — Doherty opened up with a clean double, alter 
which Handy scored him with a single. Hall ,.ierifieed, 
putting Handy on second. Clifford hit to Cady, who ca.'frht 
Handy. The inning ended when Mason fanned. One lun, 
two hits, no errors. 

K. of C— Martell flied to Clifford, Cady grounded . ut to 
Morrell, and O'Donnell to Cook. 

Third Inning. 

Bowdoin — Cady retired Needelman, and Cook flied to 
O'Donnell. Smith reached first on Walsh's error, l.ut v as 
put out at second, Embleton to Walsh. 

K. of C— Walsh went out. Cook to Clifford, Embleton 
walked : but Lyons fouled out to Handy, and M. Barron 
flied to Needelman. 

Fourth Inning. 

Bowdoin— Morrell singled, and Doherty sacrificed, but 
both men were safe when Embleton tried to get Morrell 
at second. Handy advanced both runners on a sacrifice to 
Embleton. After Hall fouled out to Martell, Clifford drove 
out a double, scoring Morrell and Doherty. Mason was re- 
tired, Embleton to French. Two runs, two hits, no errors. 

K. of C— French reached first on Morrell's error, but W. 
Barron and Martell flied to Morrell and Smith respectively, 
and Cady stiuck out. 

Fifth Inning. 

Bowdoin — Needelman grounded to W. Barron. Cook 
struck out, but Joe Smith walked, stole second, and scored 
on Morrell's second hit of the game. Walsh retired Doherty, 
ending the inning. One run, one hit, no errors. 

K. of C.— O'Donnell flied to Morrell, Walsh fanned, i^nd 
Embleton was out. Cook to Clifford. 
Sixth Inning. 

Bowdoin — Handy was hit by a pitched ball. Hall singled 
to left, and when M. Barron fumbled the ball, Handy 
tallied. Hall romped heme a minute later on Cl-fford's 
single. Mason flied to Embleton, Needelman to M. Larron, 
and Cook to Embleton. Two runs, two hits, cne error. 

K. of C. — Lyons was out, Mason to Clifford, M. barren 
grounded to Smith, but Fremh got on with the help of Ivlor- 
rell's error. W. Barron died to Needelman. 
Seventh Inning. 

Bowdoin — Smith walked again, advanced to second on 
Morrell's sacrifice (Lmbleton to French), and scored en 
Doherty's hit. Handy struck out, and Hall forced Doheity 
at second, on a grounder to Walsh. One run, one hit, no 
errors. 

K. of C. — Martell broke through with the first hit of the 
game eff Mascn, and was immediately iollowed by Cady. 
O'Donnell h.t into a double play. Cook to Morrell to Clifford, 
while Martell went to third, the only man on the home kam 
to reach chat base dur.ng the whole game. V/alsh ended the 
rally by striking out. 

Eighth Inning. 

Bowdoin — Clifford grounded out to W. Barron, and Mason 
to Cady. Needelman flied to M. Barron. 

K. of C. — Embleton and Lyons flied to Morrell, and M. 
Barron was out, Cook to Clifford. 

Ninth Inning. 

Bowdoin — Cook flied out to Mathews, Smith grounded 
to Cady, and Morrell struck out. 

K. of C— French flied to Needelman, and W. Barron to 
Morrell. The game was over when Handy retired Martell 
on a short hit in front of the p'ate. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The summary : 

BOWDOIN. 

ab r bh po a e 

Needelman, cf 5 

Cook, 2b 5 1 5 

Smith, 3b 3 2 1 2 

Morrell, ss '. 4 1 2 6 2 2 

Doherty, If 3 2 2 3 

Handy, c 2 1 1 5 1 

Hall, rf 3 1 1 

Clifford, lb '. 4 2 12 

Mason, p 4 2 

Totals 33 7 9 27 12 2 

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS. 

ab r bh po a e 

L yons , r f 4 

M. Barron. If 3 2 1 

French, lb 4 13 

W. Barron, 3b 4 4 

Martell, c 4 1 4 

Cady, ss 3 1 2 4 

O'Donnell, cf 3 2 

Walsh, 2b 3 2 1 1 

Embleton, p 2 2 6 

Totals 30 2 27 15 2 

Score by innings: 123456789 

Bowdoin 10 2 12 10 0—7 

Knights of Columbus 000000 0—0 

Two-base hits — Clifford, Doherty. Earned runs— Bowdoin 
6. Sacrifice hits — Morrell, Doherty, Handy, Hall. Base on 
balls — off Mason 2, off Embleton 2. Struck out — by Mason 4. 
by Embleton 4. Hit by pitched ball— Handy. Umpire — 
Hassett. 



Bowdoin Batters Swell Averages 

At Expense of Norwich 



Team Bats for .455— Hall Drives Out Five 

Singles — Every Bowdoin Player 

Scores and Hits. 



In a deadly uninteresting game on Whittier 
Field this week, Monday, Bowdoin crushed Nor- 
wich University to the tune of 19 to 5. During 
the first half of the contest Norwich led, and 
when Bowdoin came to bat in the fifth inning, 
the score was 5 to 2 in favor of the visitors. 
Maher in the first inning had driven a homer 
over the right field fence. In the fifth, after 
Smith had walked, seven singles came, one after 
another, and with the help of an error, a couple 
of fielder's choices, two more hits, and a sacrifice 
fly, ten runs were scored. Seven of these runs 
crossed the plate before a single batter had been 
retired. The first ten hitters all scored, and al- 
together fifteen batters appeared in this one in- 
ning. 

Every man on the team got one hit or more, 



and also one run or more. Hall scored five hits 
out of six times up, Flinn three out of five, and 
Doherty two singles and two sacrifices out of 
four. The whole team was working splendidly, 
and after the fifth inning the game was a farce, 
with all the fun for Bowdoin. Flinn allowed 
only one hit in the last four innings. 
The summary : 

BOWDOIN. 

ab r bh po a e 

Needelman, cf 4 2 1 1 

Cook, 2b 4 3 1 3 1 

Smith. 3b 3 2 1 2 3 1 

Morrell, ss 6 2 2 2 3 

Doherty. If 2 2 2 3 

. Prosser, If 2 1 1 

Handy, c 6 1 2 5 2 

Hall, rf 6 1 5 1 

Clifford, lb 6 2 2 9 



Fli: 



Totals 44 19 20 27 11 1 

NORWICH. 

ab r bh p3 a e 

Harrington, rf 2 1 2 

Keefe, 3b 5 1 1 1 

Maher, ss 4 3 2 3 2 2 

Waite, If 4 1 1 2 

Mathews, cf 4 3 2 

Smith, 2b 4 4 1 1 

Rogers, lb 4 1 4 1 3 

Hyland, c 2 4 

Olson, c 1 2 2 

Vitty. p 2 1 

Mitchell, p 

Martin, p 2 1 



Totals 



.34 



24 



Nor 



1234567S9 

1 1 10 4 2 1 x— 19 

20102000 0—5 



Two-base hit. Morrell. Home run, Maher. Stolen bases. 
Maher 2, Cook, Doherty, Prosser, Handy, Hall, Flinn. Sac- 
rifice hits, Needelman. Smith 2. Sacrifice flies, Doherty 2. 
Earned runs, Bowdoin 12, Norwich 5. Struck out. by Flinn 
6, by Vitty 4, by Martin 2. Bases on balls, off Flinn 2, off 
Vitty. Hit by pitched ball, by Vitty, Needelman, Cook; 
by Martin, Cook, by Flinn. Harrington. Wild pitch, Martin. 
Passed ball, Hyland. Time. 2.20. Umpire, Breen of Lew- 
iston. 



French Players Coming to Brunswick 

A company of French players from the 
Theatre d'Art in New York will give a perform- 
ance under the auspices of the college on the 
evening of May 27th at the Cumberland Theatre. 
The program will consist of three one-act plays : 
"Les Deux Pierrots" by Rostand, "L'Etincelle" 
by Pailleron, and "Un Caprice" by de Musset. 
The players of the Theatre dArt finished their 
New York season in March and are now making 
an extended tour of the American colleges. Two 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



55 



of the company are originally from the Odeon in 
Paris, a national subsidized theatre ranking next 
to the Comedie Francaise. Their recent New 
York season, to judge from the reviews of com- 
petent dramatic critics, has been one of dis- 
tinguished artistic success. In bringing these 
French players to Bowdoin it is felt that the 
•college is offering the student body an unusual 
occasion of advantage and enjoyment. Copies 
of "L'Etincelle" and "Un Caprice" have been 
placed on a reserved shelf in the Library. Due 
announcement of the sale of tickets will be made. 



Tennis Trip 

The tennis team consisting of Captain Part- 
ridge '22, Bishop '23, M. H. Smith '20, Larrabee 
'22, made the trip to Boston, Saturday, May 8, 
but were unable to play Tech on account of the 
rain. The following Monday Partridge played 
Bennett of Amherst and was defeated 6 — o, 6 — I. 
Smith played Sanders of Dartmouth and was de- 
feated 6 — o, 6 — 3. In the afternoon Partridge 
and Bishop played doubles with Amherst and 
lost 6 — 3, 6 — 4. The matches were played on 
the Longwood courts at Chestnut Hill. 



Examination for Appointment of 

Cadets and Cadet Engineers 

The U. S. Coast Guard announces a competi- 
tive examination, commencing July 12, 1920, for 
appointment of cadets and cadet engineers, which 
is an exceptional opportunity for young men of 
the right caliber to complete their education and 
receive special training at Government expense 
and to become commissioned officers in the U. S. 
Coast Guard, one of the military services of the 
United States. 

Age limits, for appointment as cadet, are 18 to 
24 years; and for appointment as cadet engineer, 
20 to 25 years. 

A circular giving full information about the 
examination may be obtained by writing to the 
Commandant, U. S. Coast Guard, Washington, 
D. C. Any special information relative to the 
Academy or the Service will be furnished upon 
request. 



Campus iftetos 

A call has been issued for all the candidates 
for assistant manager of football to report to the 
assistant manager. 

Freshmen, Sophomores, and Juniors must regis- 
ter for their fall courses between June first and 
ninth. The usual one dollar fine for each dav 



after the ninth will be charged. 

Gym make-ups will run through May without 
extra charge. A list of the men who have cuts 
is now posted on the bulletin board with the 
rumber of cuts against them. 

A pamphlet privately printed by the college 
committee on a war memorial has been sent out 
during the past week, with certain recommenda- 
tions to the Alumni Council and signed by H. H. 
Pierce '96, W. W. Lawrence '98, and A. G. 
Staples '82. The different forms proposed for 
such a memorial include a rostrum, a statue, a 
Union, and scholarships. 

The new Quill board recently organized to 
start work next fall consists of J. L. Badger '21, 
chairman; R. W. Morse '21, F. W. Anderson '21, 
H. Nixon '21, R. W. Noyes '21, and K. S. Board- 
man '21, business manager. 

This week, known as "Clean-up" week, has 
apparently been well observed on the campus. 
The walks have been filled in, Massachusetts 
Hall has received some much-needed paint, the 
grounds about the chapter houses have been 
cleaned, and at least one house, the Beta House, 
has received a spring coat of paint. ' 

The second baseball team won another victory- 
last Wednesday, when it defeated Lewiston High 
School at Lewiston by a score of 9 to 1. Walker 
and Marston made up the Bowdoin battery. 

Holmes '21 umpired a baseball game between 
Brunswick High and Lewiston High on the Delta 
last Saturday. 

Major and minor cards are now available at 
the Dean's office for members of the Class of 
1922. They should be filled out, signed, and re- 
turned to the office before June 1. 

The Bowdoin Chapter of Alpha Delta Phi were 
the guests last Friday 'at a banquet given by the 
Portland Alumni at the Portland Country Club. 

At a recent meeting of the New England In- 
tercollegiate Tennis Association Partridge '22 
was elected secretary and treasurer. 

Saturday the Bowdoin tennis team will play 
the Portland Country Club in preparation for the 
Maine Intercollegiate Meet on the 25th and 26th 
of May which will be held at Orono. 

The manager of the tennis team is trying to 
make arrangements to play Bates this week. 

The second team beat Jordan High of Lewis- 
ton 9-1 on Wednesday, May 12. Walker '2^ 
pitched and Marston '21 caught. Last Friday the 
second team was defeated by Coburn Classical 
Institute of Waterville 5-1. The batteries were 
Turtle and Marston. 

The Fort Preble baseball team failed to show 



56 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



up for the game scheduled for last Wednesday 
and disappointed the loyal fans who had gone 
to the field. 

The tennis tournament between Bowdoin and 
Bates was postponed on account of the rain. 



jfacultp H3ote0 

Professor Meserve conducted the services at 
Grace Church, Bath, last week, in the absence 
of the pastor. 

Professor and Mrs. Charles Burnett were in 
Boston for several days last week attending the 
exhibition of the paintings of Mrs. Rieber. 

Dr. Whittier was one of the timers and Dean 
Nixon one of the field judges at the Maine Inter- 
collegiate meet at Lewiston last Saturday. 

President and Mrs. Sills returned last Tues- 
day night from a two weeks' trip to Washington 
and Annapolis, Md., where President Sills was 
called by his duties as President of the Board 
of Visitors of the Naval Academy. During their 
absence Mrs. Sills visited relatives in Baltimore, 
Md., and also visited in New York, where she 
attended the national anti-suffrage convention. 



alumni Department 

'03 — Carl W. Smith has recently been ap- 
pointed captain and regimental adjutant of the 
Third Maine Infantry. Captain Smith entered 
the regiment as a private two years ago. 

'05 — A. C. Denning, former track man and 
record holder, is the manager of a fibre board 
plant for the Endicott-Johnson Shoe Co., and is 
located at Johnson City, N. Y. In connection 
with his work, he has invented a new material 
in the nature of a fibre substance of extreme 
durability, which is to be used in certain pro- 
cesses of shoe-making. 

ex-'o5 — Miss Emily S. Stinson of Augusta and 
Frank Keith Ryan were married at Augusta, 
Tuesday, May 11. 

'09— Rev. Melbourne Owen Baltyer recently 
received a call from the church in Bridgton but 
decided to remain in his present pastorate at 
Norway, Me. 

'11 — Roderick Paul Hine married Miss Mil- 
dred Florence Hubbard on May 8. 

'12 — Dr. Frank A. Smith of Augusta has re- 
cently been discharged from military service 
after spending five years in uniform. He went 
across with the first Harvard Unit. 

'i 4 — Alfred E. Grey is teaching French this 
year at Milton Academy. 



'15 — Harold McNeil Somers married Miss 
Laura Marie Gaudreau of Portland on May 12 
at the Sacred Heart Church. Mr. Somers is as- 
sociated with the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. 
He is a member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity. 



The following notes have been received con- 
cerning 1916 men: 

Lawrence W. Cartland is with the Monadnock 
(Textile) Mills, Claremont, N. H. 

Malcolm H. Dyer is an instructor at the Stone 
School, Cornwall-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Don J. Edwards is an assistant superintendent 
with the Thomas Laughlin Co., Portland. 

Richard S. Fuller is an oil operator with the 
White Oil Corp., Tusla, Okla. 

Chauncey A. Hall is a bond salesman with 
Richardson, Hill & Co., Boston, Mass. 

Hugh M. Hescock is a salesman with the 
Library Bureau, 316 Broadway, N. Y. 

Donald C. Hight is the principal of Somerset 
Academy 'in his native town of Athens, Me." 
He is chairman of the Board of Selectmen of 
the town. 

Carroll W. Hodgkins is a cost accountant with 
the Portland Co., Portland, Me. 

Laurence Irving is with the San Jose branch 
of Hunt Brothers Packing Co., fruit packers, 
Meneo, Calif. . 

Maurice C. Proctor is in the general insur- 
ance business, 506 Hutchinson Bldg., New Bed- 
ford, Mass. 

Raymond M. Richardson is a first lieutenant, 
C. A. C, Fort Williams, Me. 

Dwight H. Sayward is with his father, Charles 
E. Sayward '84, as Portland agents for the John 
Hancock Insurance Co. 



Calendar 

May 21-22 — Interscholastic Tennis Tourna- 
ment at Brunswick. 

May 22 — Baseball: Colby at Waterville. 

May 22 — Masque and Gown at Westbrook. 

May 25-2(5 — Maine Intercollegiate Tennis Meet 
at Orono. 

May 26— Baseball: Tufts at Medford, Mass. 

May 29 — Baseball: Maine at Orono. 

May 30 — Memorial Day. 

May 31 — Baseball: Bates at Lewiston. 

Tune 3 — Ivy Play, "Believe Me Xantippe," in 
Cumberland Theatre. 

June 4 — Ivy Day. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



America's most famous 
box of candy 




Candies of exquisite quality in a quaint, ar- 
tistic box. Fine to give to a girl or for a girl to 
give to herself! 

For sale by 

ALLEN S DRUG STORE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Let Jud "Outline" your work and do your "Cutting" for you 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



PRINTING 



OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWN BUILDING BRUNSWICK 



SPRING LINES OF 

SPORTING GOODS 



GOLF BALLS BASEBALL GOODS 
TENNIS GOODS 



We carry SPALDING & REACH 
Lines of Baseball Goods and WRIGHT 
& DITSON Tennis Goods. 



F. W. Chandler & Son 



COLLEGE AND "PREP" SCHOOL MEN 

Clothing for Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 
ercoats and Ulsters. 

Haberdashery Hats 

Macular Parker Company 

400 Washington St. Boston, Mass. 

"THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT" 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



COMPLETE STOCKS 

of 

Seasonable Clothes 

Haberdashery 

Hats 

FOR TOWN AND COUNTRY WEAR 



Also Special Styles in 
SPORTING APPAREL 



Haskell & Jones Co. 
Portland, - - - Maine. 




Arrow 

\7roy ^Jailored 

Soft Collars 

CLUETT, PEABODY 4 CO., INC.. TROY. N. Y. 



New Double Breasted Suits 

IN 

PLAIN GRAY, BROWN & BLUE 

£4-9 



E. S. BOD WELL & SON 

Brunswick. 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 



Greenhouse 21 -W 
Residence 21 -R 



WALTER 
F- I- O 


L. 


LaROCK 
1 S T 


Potted Plants and Cut Flowers 

Floral Designs for All Occasions 

15% Jordan Avenue 



COURSON & MORTON 

SUPPLIES 



They Wear 

The new trio of U. S, Golf Balls — 
U. S. ROYAL, U. S. REVERE, 
U. S. FLOATER — are tough balls. 
They are made to be long-lasting. 
Durability is built in them. 

If you have been looking for a ball that 
will give you good service and lasting 
wear — here it is. 

Try them. They will prove their worth. 

Buy them from your pro or at your 
dealer's. 







U. S. Royal 

$1.00 each 

U. S. Revere 

85c each 

U. S. Floater 

65c each 



Keep your eye on the ball — be sure it's a U. S. 




United States Rubber Company 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HARVARD DENTAL SCHOOL | SUMMER WORK 

Department of Harvard University 
Graduates of this school admitted without ex- 
amination in September, 1920, provided they have 
taken required subjects. One year in college is 
required for entrance in 1921. Modern buildings 
and equipment. Fall term opens September 27, 
1920. Degree of D.M.D. Catalog. 

EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D. , Dean, Boston, 
Mass. 



We equip both the Red Sox and the Braves 
The Horace Partridge Co. 

Mfrs. Athletic & Sporting Goods 
BOSTON, MASS. 



HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

"CANTEEN" 

19 NORTH WINTHROP 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 Sundays 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES, CAKE, ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 



PALMER SHOE CO. 

PORTLAND 

CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 

4 Elm Street 



We still have room 
For a few LIVE men 
Provided they want to 
Earn a lot of MONEY 
This summer. 

This isn't a gamble 

It is a SURE THING 

For the man who HUSTLES 

And besides 

We pay a SALARY. 

NOW is the time 

To get on the Band Wagon 

So see our local man 

Or write us direct and 

Ask for the dope. 

Local representative 

Harry Helson, '2 1 , 

Room 29, North Winthrop. 

The National Survey Co. 

Topographical Offices 
CHESTER, VT. 



PORTLAND 



BATH 



BRUNSWICK 



If You Want the Biggest Drink 

For Your Money 

Get Your 

Milk Shakes and Soda Fountain Drinks 

AT 

The Spear Folks 



119 Maine Street 



WATERVILLE 



WESTBROOK 



Do You Need Extra Courses? 

Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages, Economics, 
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire 
how credits earned may be applied on present college program. 

Stye Itttorfitftj af OHjtragfl 

HOME STUDY DEPT. 




i 
28th 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS Year 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THAYER McNEIL CO. 

COLLEGE MEN'S 

SHOES 

BOSTON 

JOE BULGER - - - Representative 

In Store on Saturdays 



WE CARRY 

Co-operative Shoes 
New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 



LARGEST AND BEST 

Stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 




WORN THE WORLD OVER 

For more than forty years Boston Garter has 
been a friend to men the world over. It not 
only keeps the old but makes many new ones 
each year. Most men ask for Boston Garter 
as a matter of course — the two words go so 
well together. 
GEORGE FROST CO., Makers, BOSTON 



A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office - Brunswick, Maine 

BUTLER'S 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 

We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Cushing St.— Tel. 16. 

J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 



BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 
Portland 


WILLIAM F. FERRIS 

COLLEGE AGENT 


PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSONS PHARMACY 


Citizens Laundry 

AUTO SERVICE 9 SOUTH APPLETON 






COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 


CHIPMAN 






CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 


DIAMOND RINGS 

At prices 1 5 per cent and 40 per 
cent less than New York prices. 
A. G. PAGE CO., BATH 



"The Store of Progress and Service" 

TYPES and TASTES 
In College Men 

We've experience in analyzing these. You can pretty nearly determine a 
man's taste by his type — we're eminently successful in suiting both. The 
character, complexion, bearing of each individual man enables us at first 
sight to judge the sort of model, fabric or pattern that -will appeal to his 
taste, and through our immense variety we have little difficulty picking out 
the right thing in a Suit or Overcoat. Mr. Jack Handy '23 at the Zeta Psi 
House is our representative, and anything you wish in the way of Shirts, 
Neckwear, Shoes, Hosiery, Pajamas, etc., he will be glad to take your order. 



Monument Square 




Portland, Maine 




Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 
NORMA TALMADGE 

IN 

SHE LOVES AND LIES 

FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
WILLIAM S. HART 

IN 

WAGON TRACKS 




NEXT WEEK 
BRYANT WASHBURN 

IN 

THE SIX BEST CELLARS 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

CONSTANCE TALMADGE 

IN 

A LADY'S NAME 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
CORINNE GRIFFITH 

IN 

THE TOWER OF JEWELS 



\EXT WEEK 

MONDAY and TUESDAY 

DE MILLE'S 

WHY CHANGE YOUR WIFE 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



VOL. L 



WEDNESDAY. MAY 26, 1920 



SPECIAL EDITION 

FOR 

Bowdoin Alumni Fund 




Bowdoin College Faculty 1919-20 

Front Row (left to right) — Professor Burnett, Professor Mitchell, Professor Hutchins, 
President Sills, Professor Woodruff, Professor Moody, Dr. Whittier. 

Second. Row (left to right) — Professor Catlin, Professor Copeland, Professor Brown, Dean 
Nixon, Professor Gross, Professor Bell. 

Third Row (left to right)— Mr. Little, Mr. Wilder, Professor Ham, Professor Elliott, Pro- 
fessor Dimock. 

Back Row (left to right) — Professor Stone, Professor Nowlan, Professor McClean, Professor 
Wass. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Brunswick, Maine, May 25, 1920. 

To All Boivdoin Men: — 

The Bowdoin Orient has very kindly offered to issue a Special Edition for the 
Bowdoin Alumni Fund to be sent to all Bowdoin men. 

The Committee appreciates very greatly this co-operation by the undergradu- 
ates in the maintenance of the Bowdoin standards and wish to take this opportunity 
of making their grateful acknowledgement. 

In putting into operation the plan used at Yale for twenty-nine years, your 
Committee asks and expects the hearty co-operation and team work of every Bow- 
doin man and every class. 

Immediate Financial Need of Bowdoin College 

Increased income from contributions, and additional endowment to provide 
funds for the raising of salaries, for the proper maintenance of equipment, and to 
meet any deficits which may occur. This condition is not peculiar to Bowdoin. 
Over one hundred colleges are asking for additional* funds at this time. 

The bulk of the labor falls on a representative from each class called the 
Class Agent. He must keep in close touch with his classmates, and keep a record 
of their contributions, and subscriptions, showing the total amount from his class, 
and the percentage of members who have answered the appeal. 

If every former member of Bowdoin College will give as much as he can 
afford — no more — no less — the greatest present need of the College will be met and 
her energy increased and strengthened. 

Bequests may be made to the principal of the "Bowdoin Alumni Fund." 

Gifts may be made to the Fund by individuals or classes in memory of Bow- 
doin men who died or were killed in the War. 

Gifts may be made to the Principal Fund by individuals under their own 
names and not included in the record of their class. 

When the Alumni of Bowdoin adopted the so-called "Yale Plan" they put the 
responsibility directly on themselves. The need is great and will be so for a long 
time. The Bowdoin Alumni Fund standing out by itself will show just what the 
Alumni are doing. We must give a good account of ourselves. 

One of the greatest benefits of this Plan to the College is the increased in- 
terest which every man will feel, when, by giving, he again becomes an integral 
part of the institution. The man who gives one dollar is just as honorable, if that 
is all he can afford, as the man who gives ten thousand dollars. 

Gifts from those who are not college men or who graduated from some other 
institution may be made to Bowdoin as an appreciation of what she has done for 
more than one hundred years, and the good she will do in the future. 
Very sincerely yours, 

Committee from Alumni Council, 

Harold L. Berry, '01. 
E. Farrington Abbott, '03. 
PvAlph 0. Brewster, '09. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 59 



Concerning Funds in General and 

The Bowdoin Alumni Fund in Particular 



Gradually Bowdoin men are waking up to the glad tidings that they are not the subject nor 
the object of a "drive" in connection with the Bowdoin Alumni Fund. 

After the harsh experiences of the past few years it was perhaps but natural that there should 
be an instinctive resort to a posture of self defence when the suggestion of a fund loomed on the 
horizon and it was probably a more or less general reaction on the arrival of the first circular 
last winter. 

It was not a matter for argument, however, and only time could heal the hurt. Gradually 
one by one, here and there, Bowdoin men raised their financial heads out of the shell-holes in 
which they had sought refuge, peeped about, and felt for their purse. A few hardy ones ventured 
forth and survived. 

Quiet mention of the plan developed from one source and another but still all the para- 
phernalia of the drive seemed missing. The winter passed and still the Fund drifted merrily 
along and everyone concerned was enjoying it. Distinctively painless extraction! The second 
circular went out and then the idea began to penetrate. After all it was really true. NOT A 
DRIVE!!! 

A retired Judge was at some pains to hunt up one of the Committee in order to say: "I want 
to send in something and help out. I approve of the plan and the system. I like the absence of 
a 'drive.' I am through being 'driven.' " 

Fifty- eight responses arrived in the first week following the last circular. That is Bowdoin 
spirit at its best in an individual consideration and voluntary response to Bowdoin's needs. As one 
who has worked much and joyfully on this Fund has said a hundred times this winter: "Boys, 
we are starting on a long pull. Let's go slow so we can hold out." 

To be sure, it did not look especially impressive. There was no talk of a million-dollar goal, 
intensive team effort, haunted graduates and all that. 

There were plenty of doubters who had been through all the "drives" from 1917 to 1920 and 
they thought this more or less a fiasco and a farce but the committee plugged away and gradually 
the income accumulated and the doubters began to take an interest and a graduate here and there 
began to raise his subscription. One man went from $25.00 to $200.00 and then to $2,000 and all 
without a direct word of solicitation. That was his individual problem and he answered it in his 
own way. 

There are no assessments and no rating committees. You give what you can afford when you 
get ready. That is our motto. No one else knows your income, the demands upon you, or the 
place which Bowdoin occupies in your valuation of existence. 

Public opinion has been doing a lot of things outside its regular line of business in the last 
few war-crowded years and it seems high time that public opinion along with the government 
retired to the side lines and let an individual have the formerly God-given privilege of being a 
man and determining his own action in the seclusion of his own conscience and the knowledge of 
his own purse. 

The Bowdoin Alumni Fund is a disciple and an exponent of this New Freedom — self-deter- 
mination for individuals as well as nations is its program and you are the beneficiary. 

"Drives may come and drives may go, 
But our Fund goes on forever." 

It does not look very large; — $20,000 for the income side of the Fund and $15,000 for 
the principal in four months given by one-quarter of the living Bowdoin men, yet it is tremend- 
ously gratifying because it is the hope and the belief that no one was forced into line. There is 
no blood-money in this Fund. 

Of course it all came about when Franklin C. Payson, 1876, at Commencement last June moved 
the adoption by the Bowdoin Alumni Association of the so-called "Yale Plan" for raising funds 
to lift Bowdoin's income out of its 1914 status. 



60 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The Alumni Council was instructed to proceed with the matter and its Committee has been 
steering more or less uncharted seas since that time. 

All contributions received before June 10 will be included in the compilation of gifts by 
classes and localities to be published at Commencement. The names of all individual contributors 
will also be printed but not the amounts of the gifts. 

Now the matter is definitely up to Bowdoin men wherever they may be to take this home 
to themselves and consider what they are able to do in helping the Fund to receive a 100% re- 
sponse by contributions large or small. Every individual is his own solicitor. The case is left 
with the court and you are the judge. 
R. S. V. P. 



Bowdoin Alumni Fund 

The following table shows the contributions 
and pledges by districts for the current year to 
May 1, 1920: 



DISTRICTS. 



California : 

San Francisco 14 

Other cities and towns 38 

Connecticut 47 

Delaware 3 

District of Columbia: 

Washington 24 

Florida 5 

Idaho 2 

Illinois: 

Chicago 25 

Other cities and towns 9 

Indiana 9 

Iowa 3 

Maine : 

Auburn IS 

Augusta 45 

Bangor 48 

Bath 22 

Biddeford and Saco. . . 23 

Brunswick 41 

Houlton 18 

Lewiston 22 

Portland 224 

Rockland 16 

Other cities and towns 399 



3 ~ 

S o 

< u 

$1,177.50 
89.00 
420.00 
160.00 

120.00 
510.00 
60.00 

356.00 

100.00 
20.00 



250.00 
240.00 
820.00 
122.00 

1.175.00 
285.00 
260.00 
47.00 

7,999.41 
70.00 

2.978.54 



Massachusetts : 

Boston 144 38 1,555.00 26 

Cambridge 41 4 170.00 10 

Worcester 12 5 35.00 42 

Other cities and towns 252 50 1,669.00 20 

Michigan 6 1 10.00 17 

Minnesota 25 5 625.00 20 

Missouri 12 2 60.00 17 

Nebraska 3 1 25.00 33 

New Hampshire 72 20 772.00 28 

New Jersey 43 7 285.00 16 

New York Slate: 

New York City 133 33 6,420.00 25 

Other cities and towns 51 5 135.00 10 

North Carolina 5 2 40.00 40 

Ohio 20 2 12.00 10 

Oklahoma 3 2 17.00 67 

Oregon 9 1 10.00 11 

Pennsylvania: 

Philadelphia 12 6 112.50 50 

Other cities and towns 25 7 101.00 28 
Rhode Island : 

Providence 15 4 292.00 27 

Other cities and towns 7 3 135.00 43 

South Carolina 2 1 120.00 50 

South Dakota 4 1 5.00 25 

Vermont 12 2 110.00 17 

Countries Outside the 
the United States: 

Alaska 2 1 25.00 50 

China 9 2 200.00 22 

Philippine Islands 5 1 100.00 20 

Honorary graduates 5 1.225.00 

Friends of the College.. .. 4 820.00 

Non-graduates 19 191.00 

Some localities have not yet been heard from. 
We hope they will appear in the next list. 



ALUMNI FUND FIGURES INCLUDING 
May 19, 1920. 

Con- 
ss. Alive. tributors. Amount. Pie 



Con- 










ributors 


Amount. 


Pledge. 


Total. 


1 


10.00 






10.00 


■1 


70.00 






70.00 


3 


210.00 






210.00 


2 


1,500.00 






1,500.00 


4 


220.00 






220.00 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



61 



1870 
1870 



Con- 








butors. 


Amount. 


Pledge. 


Total. 


1 


5.00 




5.00 


4 


405.00 




405.00 


"larence 


Hale Fund' 




2.500.00 


2 


100.00 




100.00 


5 


290.00 




290.00 


9 


90.00 


70.00 


160.00 


3 


1,000.00 


50.00 


1.050.00 


2 


65.00 




65.00 


1 


2.000.00 


1.000.00 


3.000.00 


14 


1,300.00 


50.00 


1,350.00 


7 


400.00 


25.00 


425.00 


5 


185.00 


25.00 


210.00 


12 


1,100.00 




1,100.00 


7 


1,900.00 


100.00 


2,000.00 


10 


380.00 




380.00 


9 


380.00 


15.00 


395.00 


7 


217.00 


25.00 


242.00 


2 


51.54 




51.54 


13 


290.00 


SO. 00 


370.00 


4 


125.00 




125.00 


11 


271.00 




271.00 


5 


160.00 


210.00 


370.00 


5 


335.00 




335.00 


2 


75.00 




75.00 


3 


60.00 


10.00 


70.00 


12 


431.00 




431.00 


13 


445.00 


465.00 


910.00 


8 


360.00 


75.00 


435.00 


6 


1,025.00 


350.00 


1,375.00 


8 


82.00 


60.00 


142.00 


29 


1,372.00 


425.00 


1,797.00 


15 


320.00 


100.00 


420.00 


9 


145.00 


30.00 


175.00 


36 


1.693.97 


150.00 


1,843.97 


7 


2,715.00 


350.00 


3,065.00 


18 


1.162.00 


200.00 


1,362.00 


17 


797.00 


255.00 


952.00 


17 


476.00 


275.00 


751.00 


12 


165.00 


225.00 


390.00 


12 


700.00 


175.00 


875.00 


2 


105.00 


100.00 


205.00 


35 


470.00 


140.00 


610.00 


7 


527.50 


37.50 


565.00 


5 


105.00 




105.00 


10 


180.00 




180.00 


13 


275.00 


10.00 


285.00 


9 


129.00 


20.00 


149.00 


26 


120.50 




120.50 


25 


159.00 


2S.75 


1S7.75 


22 


175.00 


45.00 


220.00 


12 


100.00 


40.00 


140.00 


5 


100.00 




100.00 



Mr. 



May 7, 1920. 



2169 550 $27,926.01 
Honorary graduates and gifts 



$5,316.25 §33,242 



Communication 

The following letter expresses the views of 
one Bowdoin man who wanted to send a second 
subscription for this present year : 



Brunswick, Me. 

Dear Sir: — 

I have just received the circular sent by your 
committee asking financial aid for Bowdoin Col- 
lege. 

I regret that I cannot send you anything. I 
sent a very little (all I felt I could spare) to the 
representative of my class sometime ago. 

I am only a teacher, on a teacher's salary 
(mine is today exactly what it was fourteen 
years ago) and, though I know your need, I've 
got to get ahead a bit in preparation for old age 
which is now beginning to seem very real to me. 

Please accept my best wishes and my deep 
regret that I have nothing more helpful to send 
you. Yours sincerely, 

(Signed 

It is letters such as this that typify the meaning 
of Bowdoin. 




REV. WILLIAM C. POND, D.D., 

of San Francisco, Calif., 

Class of 1848. 

Bowdoin's oldest living Alumnus, one of the 
earliest contributors to the "Fund," and a mem- 
ber of Chi Psi. 



62 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Regional Committees for 

the Bowdoin Alumni Fund 

For the purpose of assisting the Class Agents 
in their work for the Bowdoin Alumni Fund, 
Regional Committees have been appointed. They 
furnish the personal contact with Bowdoin men 
in their localities. This feature is regarded as a 
strong factor in the organization. 

Boston Committee (for Boston and nearby towns) — 
Chairman. Alfred B. White '98. Ellis Spear. Jr. '98, Ripley 
L. Dana '01, George P. Hyde '08. James F. Hamburger '10. 

Chicago Committee— Chairman, Arthur L. Small '01. 

Detroit Committee — Chairman. Rev. Chester B. Emerson 
'04. 

Maine Committees : 

(1) Auburn and Lewiston — Chairman, E. Farrington Ab- 
bott '03. Philip L. Pottle '00, Harry S. Coombs '01, Thomas 
C. White '03. 

(2) Aroostook County (for Houlton, Caribou, Fort Fair- 
field. Fort Kent. Presque Isle) — Chairman, Fred L. Putnam 
'04, Walter B. Clark '06, Tom Edgar Hacker '07. 

(3) Augusta (for Augusta, Gardiner, Hallowell)— Chair- 
man, Melvin S. Holway 'S2. 

(4) Bangor (for Bangor, Oldtown, Orono) — Chairman, 
Donald F. Snow '01, Charles D. Hawes '76, Edgar M. Simp- 
son '94. Charles P. Conners '03, Samuel B. Gray '03. 

(5) Bath— Chairman, Frederick E. Drake '98. 

(6) Brunswick (for Brunswick. Topsham, Bowdoinham, 
Freeport) — Chairman, George R. Gardner '01, Barrett Potter 
'78, Wilmot B. Mitchell '90, William H. Farrar '14. 

(7) Portland (for Portland, South Portland, Liddeford 
and Saco. Goiham, Westbrook)— Chairman, Franklin C. 
Payson '76, Judge Clarence Hale '69, Frederick O. Conant 
'80, W. W. Thomas '94, William M. Ingraham '95, Eugene 
L. Bodge '97, Joseph B. Drummond '07, Leland G. Means '12. 

Minneapolis Committee (for Minneapolis and St. Paul) — 
Chairman. Albert C. Cobb '81, William B. Webb '05. 

New York Committee (for New York City, New York 
State, New Jersey, Connecticut) — Chairman, Harvey Gibson 
'02 ; secretary, John W. Frost '04 ; advisory, William J. 
Curtis '75, Hoyt A. Moore '95, Henry H. Pierce '96, William 
W. Lawrence '98, Fred H. Albee, M.D., '99, Harry K. Mc- 
Cann '02, George R. Walker '02, Donald S. Walker '04, 
Roscoe H. Hupper '07. 

Pacific Coast Committee (for San Francisco, Canifornia ; 
Portland, Oregon ; Seattle, Wash.) — Chairman, Harrison 
Atwood '09, Bernard C. Carroll '59, Henry Q. Hawes '10. 

Philadelphia Committee — Chairman, Donald E. MacCor- 
mick '03. 

Providence Committee (for Providence and Pawtucket) — 
Chairman, Frank H. Swan '98, Harold A. Andrews '12, 
Raymond W. Hathaway '12. 

HARVARD DENTAL SCHOOL 

Department of Harvard University 
Graduates of this school admitted without ex- 
amination in September, 1920, provided they have 
taken required subjects. One year in college is 
reduired for entrance in 1921. Modern buildings 
and equipment. Fall term opens September 27, 
1920. Degree of D.M.D. Catalog. 

EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D., Dean, Boston, 
Mass. 



Bowdoin Fifth in New England Meet 

In the annual New England Intercollegiate 
Track Meet held last Saturday at Tech Field, 
Cambridge, Bowdoin took fifth place with 13% 
points. Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
surprised the dopesters by winning the meet with 
a three-point margin over Brown. The scores 
were as follows: M. I. T. 33, Brown 30, Wil- 
liams 20-}4, Boston College 16, Bowdoin 13 J4, 
Wesleyan 11, Holy Cross 10, Amherst 7, New 
Hampshire College 6]/ 2 , Tufts 2, and M. A. C, 
Middlebury, Vermont, and Worcester P. I., one 
each. 

The field was more than muddy, and for that 
reason primarily, no new records were hung up 
in any of the events. Bowdoin was the only 
Maine college to figure in the- point column. In 
the trials of Friday, Bowdoin was in a tie for 
third in the number of men qualified. Captain 
Dostie qualified in the hundred-yard dash and 
the broad jump, Ellms in the hammer and discus 
throws, Thomson in the high hurdles, Parent 
in the lows, and Cook in the pole vault. 

In the final events of the meet, Goodwin took 
second in the mile, being beaten only by Nightin- 
gale, the New Hampshire star who not long 
ago showed his heels to the best that Eng- 
land could offer. The Bowdoin runner led the 
field most of the way, and the winner had no 
easy time taking the race. Parent won the low 
hurdles after a hard race with Sullivan of Bos- 
ton College, in the creditable time of 26 4-5 
seconds. Cook, who had qualified on Friday for 
the pole vault, was one of four competitors who 
were obliged to split first honors in the event, 
because the referee refused to allow it to be held 
on account of the bad conditions. The winning 
height was eleven feet. Ellms was fourth in the 
hammer throw with a mark of 117 feet and J 1 /) 
inches. He tied for third in the discus with a 
distance of 108 feet and 954 inches. Bowdoin's 
remaining half point was won by Dostie, who 
tied for fourth in the broad jump at twenty feet 
and three inches. 



ABRAXAS INITIATION 

The Abraxas Honorary Junior Society held its 
annual initiation and banquet at the Lafayette 
Hotel in Portland last Friday evening. Those 
initiated from the Class of 1922 were: Curran, 
Dahlgren, Drake, McGorrill, Morrell, Perry, 
Richards, Woodbury. Members from 1920 and 
1921 were present. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



63 



Fine Pitching of Bissonnette 
Gives New Hampshire 

Victory Over Bowdoin 

A week ago today the baseball team was de- 
feated 8 to i at Durham, by New Hampshire 
College. Bisonnette's air-tight twirling was the 
chief factor in Bowdoin's defeat. This pitcher 
is the best man that the White has run up against 
this season. Bowdoin's fielding was off form 
more or less, and the batting was below the usual 
standard. Morrell hit two singles, one of them 
driving Cook across with the only run of the 
game for the losers. 

The summary : 

NEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE 

ab r bh po a e 

Perry. If 4 n 2 

Bailey lb 4 1 o 13 

Lundholm. rf. 5 2 2 1 

Butler, 3b 5 2 2 2 

Bissonnette, p 4 1 1 o 2 

Conner, cf 5 1 

Broderick. ss 4 2 2 5 1 

Borden, 2b 4 1 2 1 1 

Champaigne, e 4 2 9 

Totals 39 8 13 27 10 2 

BOWDOIN 

ab r bh po a e 

Needelman. cf 4 3 1 1 

Cook, 2b 4 1 1 2 2 

Smith, 3b 4 2 3 1 

Morrell, ss 4 2 2 3 

Prosser, If 4 1 2 

Handy, c 4 3 

Hall, rf 4 

Clifford, lb 3 12 

Tuttle, p 

Flinn, p 2 3 

Totals 33 1 4 24 11 5 

Score by innings: 123456789 

New Hampshire 40001300 x — S 

Bowdoin 1 0—1 

Two-base hit, Prosser. Three-base hit, Eutler. Sacrifice 
hit, Bailey. Stolen base, Morrell. Earned runs, New Hamp- 
shire 5, Bowdoin. Struck out, by Bissonnette 9, by Flinn 2. 
Bases on balls, off Tuttle 2. Hits off Tuttle, 4 in 1 inning; 
off Flinn, 9 in 7 innings. Hit by pitched ball, Flinn (by 
Bissonnette). Winning pitcher, Bissonnette. Losing 
pitcher, Tuttle. 



Alexander Prize Speakers Chosen 

The Alexander Prize Speaking Contest will 
be held in Memorial Hall Monday evening of 
Commencement week, June 21. A committee of 
the faculty, consisting of Professor Woodruff, 
Professor Stone, and Mr. Little, have selected 
the following speakers: Joseph L. Badger '21, 



Maurice S. Coburn '21, Leo A. Daviau '2$, Walter 
F. W. Hay '21, James E. Mitchell '23, Lewis H. 
Ross '23, Walter E. Stearns '22, Carroll S. Towle 
'22, Frederick K. Turgeon '2^ ; alternates, George 
J. dimming '21, Theodore W. Cousens '23, and 
Joseph Finnegan '23. 



Bowdoin Has Easy Victory 

Over Bates in Tennis 

Last Tuesday, the Bowdoin tennis team had 
a walk-away from the Bates quartet on the Beta 
Theta Pi and Theta Delta Chi courts. Cap- 
tain Partridge had an easy time both in singles 
and doubles. Harvey Bishop '23 and Lloyd 
Bishop '2^,, new men on the team, also won their 
singles matches. Both doubles teams won, giving 
Bowdoin a five to one victory. 

The scores were as follows : 

SINGLES. 

Partridge of Bowdoin defeated Woodward 

of Bates 6—3 6—0 

H. Bishop of Bowdoin defeated Roberts 

of Bates 9—7 1—6 6—4 

L. Bishop of Bowdoin defeated Purinton 

of Bates 5 — 7 6 — 2 6 — 3 

Kirschbaum of Bates defeated M. H. Smith 

of Bowdoin 6 — 4 4 — 6 6 — 4 

DOUBLES. 
Partridge and H. Bishop of Bowdoin defeated 

Woodward and Kirschbaum of Bates 6—0 6—3 

M. H. Smith and L. Bishop of Bowdoin defeated 

Purinton and Roberts of Bates 6 — 4 6 — 3 



Fraternity Baseball 

Results of games not mentioned hitherto in the 
Orient: 

Chi Psi 7, Delta Upsilon 5. 

Beta Theta Pi 4, Psi Upsilon 3. 

Delta Upsilon 7, Delta Kappa Epsilon 1. 

Alpha Delta Phi 8, Sigma Nu 2. 

Psi Upsilon 11, Zeta Psi 7. 

Beta Theta Pi 2, Theta Delta Chi 0. 

Zeta Psi 11, Kappa Sigma 9. 

Standings of the Leagues to Date 

League A 

Beta Theta Pi 3 1.000 

Theta Delta Chi 3 1 .750 

Kappa Sigma 1 2 .333 

Psi Upsilon 1 3 .250 

Zeta Psi 1 3 .250 

League B. 

Alpha Delta Phi 2 1.000 

Chi Psi 2 1 .667 

Delta Upsilon 2 1 .667 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 2 .000 

Sigma Nu 2 .000 



64 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the college year ty the 

Bowdoin Publishing Company in the interest of 

the students of Bowdoin College. 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Editor-in-Chief 

Edward B. Ham, 1922 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

William R. Ludden, 1922 News Editor 

Floyd A. Gerrard, 1923 Faculty Notes 

George H. Quinby, 1923 Alumni Department 

F. King Turgeon, 1923 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
John L. Berry, 1921 Crosby E. Redman, 1921 

Harry Helson. 1921 Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

George E. Houghton. 1921 Roland L. McCormack, 1922 

Russell M. McGown. 1921 Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Business Manager 

Frederic A. Allen, 1922 Assistant Manager 

Wilfred R. Brewer, 1922 Assistant Manager 

All communications regarding subscriptions should be ad- 
dressed to the Business Manager of the Bowdoin Publishing 
Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, 10 cents. 

Vol. L. MAY 26, 1920. No. 8 

Entered at Post Office at Brunswickas Second-Class Mail Matter 

A Dual Appeal. 

This issue of the Alumni Orient is primarily 
in the interests of the Alumni Fund, and as such 
is to be mailed to every living alumnus and non- 
graduate. The purposes and results of the drive 
have been presented to the Alumni through 
special literature and, to some extent, through 
the columns of the Orient. It is not, therefore, 
necessary in this editorial either to outline the 
plan or describe its progress. The Orient does, 
on the other hand, wish to heartily commend the 
plan and to cooperate in every possible way in 
putting it through to a successful conclusion. The 
Orient wishes also to assure its readers that the 
undergraduate body, though largely unable to 
back the plan in a financial way, is heartily in 
sympathy with the movement and ready to help 
in every possible way. 

Not to overshadow the appeal for the Alumni 
Fund but simply to put forth a proposition in 
line with it, the Orient takes this opportunity to 
put in a plea of its own. Through the Orient 
is your opportunity not only to keep in touch 
with this drive and other Alumni activities, but 
also to "get a line" on the whole wide range of 
College interests. If you are a loyal Bowdoin 
man, you want to follow Bowdoin achievements 
on track, diamond, and gridiron, as well as in 
her other varied activities, and the logical place 
to do that is in the Orient. To be sure, certain 
sections of news are a few days old when it 
reaches you, but the important fact is that it is 



Bowdoin nezvs from a Bozvdoin point of view. 
Moreover, the Orient will give you a much more 
complete survey of Bowdoin activities than even 
the closest reading of newspapers can ever hope 
to offer. 

You need the Orient, and we need you. Mail 
your check now to K. S. Boardman, 4 South Ap- 
pleton, which has been established as the busi- 
ness headquarters of the Orient. 

The Orient wants your subscription but it 
wants more your opinion and advice, especially 
in regard to the improvement of the paper. Will 
you consider this a personal invitation to send us 
an article for publication on any subject on which 
you may choose to write? If you have an in- 
terest in the Orient and other Bowdoin activi- 
ties, make that interest evident through this 
medium. 

In conclusion, alumni of Bowdoin, back your 
alma mater by contributing to your Alumni Fund 
and clinch your hold upon old Bowdoin by sub- 
scribing to the Orient. 



Communication 

To the Editor of the Orient : 

At this time of the year we hear a great deal 
about College spirit. From time to time rallies 
are held and much is done to stimulate the spirit 
of Old Bowdoin in the breasts of all the under- 
graduates. And efforts along this line are well 
rewarded. The fellows turn out and they stand 
behind the team to the last ditch. 

But there is one side of the question that could 
be improved. At a recent rally Dean Nixon in 
one of his characteristically fine speeches in- 
formed us that the Faculty is very interested in 
the athletic activities of the college. We sincere- 
ly believe that such is the case, but from any 
evidence that we have such faculty interest is 
almost a minus quantity. We do have a few 
staunch supporters, but aside from these we are 
forced to take the matter for granted. As stated 
above, we firmly believe that the Faculty does 
have a very deep interest in our athletic activi- 
ties, but we wish that we might have more con- 
crete evidence. The average college student is 
from Missouri. 

F. A. St. Clair '21. 



Farm Work During Vacation 

The following letter from the Secretary of 
Agriculture (quoted in part), recently received 
by President Sills, concerning summer work on 

(Continued on page 66) 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



65 





Chocolates 

The Chocolates 

{hat are 

Difjferervb 

Truly Great Chocolates axe so luscious and so good 
that you will wish the box were many times larger. 
This package has a very special assortment of choice 
fillings of pre-eminent quality, and many of the coatings 
are the delicious butter coatings original with Apollo 
Chocolates. 

The dainty assortment of finely decorated pieces 
makes the "Truly Great" Assortment a charming gift 
of far more distinction than the usual box of chocolates. 

~r.y/.J'Co6er£s Co., 

Boston, Mass. 

limum ii imiiii i Mini miimimii in iiiiiMiinmimimiiimiiniMiiiiiili^ 




66 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



(Continued from page 64) 

farms, is surely important to all Bowdoin men : 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
Office of the Secretary 

Washington, May 10, 1920. 
Dear Mr. President : — 

Our country faces a possible curtailment of food produc- 
tion due to a shortage of farm labor — a shortage that 
promises to increase as the summer advances. 

May I urge that you bring this situation to the attention 
of the young men in your student body with the suggestion 
that, if possible, they spend their summer vacations help- 
ing on the farms ? A considerable number of college men 
already make this a practice. This year there is special 
need for such help on the farms, because of the importance 
of maintaining a normal production of food. I hope that 
not only students, but business men generally, will lend aid. 
as so many of them did, patriotically and effectively, in the 
summer of 1918. 

Unquestionably there is sufficient man power in the schools 
and cities to relieve the farm labor situation this summer. 
I believe the men will respond when they learn conditions, 
and so afford another practical demonstration of the neigh- 
borly and co-operative spirit which characterized the coun- 
try's war efforts. 

Many students have relatives or friends in the country to 
whom they can offer their services. Others interested should 
write the director of agricultural extension at the State 
Agricultural College, stating their qualifications, the time 
when they can go to work, etc. The director will put them 
in touch with county agents who know farmers in need 
of help. 

Thanking you for the assistance which I feel sure you 
will be glad to render in this emergency, I am 
Very truly yours, 

E. T. MEREDITH, Secretary. 



The Silver Bay Student Conference 

The movement for securing a large delega- 
tion from Bowdoin to attend the Silver Bay 
Student Conference is making good headway in 
the college. This conference, which embraces 
all the colleges of the New England and Middle 
Atlantic states, will be held at Silver Bay, on 
Lake George, New York, from June 25 to July 
5. 1920. 

The program is made up of a series of con- 
ferences and activities which is sure to give one 
who is imbued without reservation with its spirit 
and inspiration an experience of abiding satis- 
faction and power. The speakers and leaders 
of the conference are of the highest calibre and 
include such men as Bernard Bell, Harry Ward, 
Robert Speer, E. T. Calton, and many others 
equally well fitted to take the position of leaders. 
The subjects taken up will vary so that all 
branches of religious study can be touched upon. 
There will be many opportunities for personal 
interview — perhaps the greatest offer of the con- 
vention. 

The expenses for men from Maine attending 



the convention are : 

Registration (paid in advance) $5-00 

Board and room $20.00 

Transportation (Portland to Silver Bay — 
round trip) $i5.oo-$i8.oo 

Total $40.00 to $43.00 

These expenses may be greatly reduced by one 
willing to wait on table and to do other work 
at the conference, for many of the students will 
be able to find employment. Details may be 
learned from McGown '21. 

The attending of this conference is a happy, 
beneficial, and unique experience. The presence 
of hundreds of earnest, joyous students; the 
frank discussion and intimate fellowship ; the 
healthy intercollegiate rivalry; and the new- 
found partnership with men of other colleges ; 
all these elements will combine to create that 
indescribable atmosphere which makes a stu- 
dent conference marked in the experiences of a 
lifetime. 

Bowdoin has made a good start toward a large 
delegation, five men having already manifested 
their intentions of going to the conference. Ef- 
forts are being' made to continue the enrolment 
until Bowdoin shall have the largest delegation 
going to Silver Bay this year that she has ever 
sent to a student conference. 



Campus J13etos 

The game with Colby scheduled for Saturday 
at Waterville, had to be postponed on account of 
rain. The game with Harvard, twice postponed 
this spring on account of bad weather, has been 
scheduled once more, this time for Tuesday, May 
25, too late to be reported in this issue of the 
Orient. 

The Interscholastic Tennis Meet was started 
last Friday, but was unfinished on account of 
rain. There are three matches yet to be played, 
and these will be run off this week end. A sum- 
mary of the tournament will be given in the Ivy 
Orient. 

Dr. William Trufant Foster, formerly of the 
Bowdoin faculty, and formed}- president of Reed 
College, gave the annual Benjamin Apthorp 
Gould Fuller lecture on social hygiene May 17 in 
the Chemistry Lecture Room. 

The Delta Upsilon fraternity at Bowdoin had 
its Seniors' last supper at the chapter house last 
Friday evening. 

(Continued on page 69) 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



67 




f~7~fHE, College man desiring to 
-*■ enter the business world will 
find unusual advantages offered by 
the General Electric Company through 
its Business Training Course. 

This Course is open to young men of sound 
health, good character, and broad education. 

The advantages of studying the methods and 
organization of the Company through actual em- 
ployment in the various departments is supple- 
mented by a formal study of business theory. 

To men with such training as applied to its policies, 
the General Electric organization extending to all parts 
cf the globe, offers a wide range of opportunity through 
its commercial, manufacturing and administrative depart- 
ments. 




Educational Committee 

General Electric Company 

Schenectady, N. Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Training College Men for 
Business 

The Graduate School of Business Administration of Harvard 
University offers a two-year course to college graduates. The course 
is designed to give a broad fundamental training for business together 
with specialization in those fields in which the student is most in- 
terested. 

College men, looking to business as a career, feel the lack of ade- 
quate preparation which enables them to deal effectively either with 
general business problems or with the problems in their own special 
fields. The Harvard Business School aims to fill this need. 

Special emphasis is placed upon the application of business 
theory to actual business problems. For this purpose the "problem 
method" of instruction is used. The Boston territory affords an ex- 
cellent business laboratory. 

Courses offered: Accounting, Business Law, Banking and Fi- 
nance, Marketing, Advertising, Industrial Management, Employ- 
ment Management, Business Statistics, Foreign Trade, Transporta- 
tion, Insurance, Lumbering, Income Taxation, Office Organization, 
Printing and Publishing. 

Completion of the two-year course leads to the degree of Master of 
Business Administration. 

For detailed information please address 

Dean W. B. Donham 

Graduate School of Business Administration 

Harvard University 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 



New Double Breasted Suits 

IN 

PLAIN GRAY, BROWN & BLUE 

$49 



E. S. BODWELL & SON 

Brunswick. 



Greenhouse 21 -W 
Residence 21-R 

WALTER L. LaROCK 
F~ I- O R I S T 

Potted Plants and Cut Flowers 
Floral Designs for All Occasions 

15% Jordan Avenue 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



69 



OLampus Jl3etos 



(Continued from page 66) 

A call has been issued by the Manager of the 
Masque and Gown for assistant managers. 

There is a greatly needed path now in con- 
struction between the Science Building and Maine 
street. 

C. P. Rhoads '20 was injured in an accident 
with his motor cycle to such an extent that 
eleven stitches had to be taken in his leg and he 
will probably have to remain in the Infirmary 
for a considerable time. 

A meeting of the medical students and those 
interested in the medical department was held at 
the Zeta Psi House last Friday evening. 



Jfacultp JBotes 

On Saturday, May 29, Professor Mitchell, as 
the representative from Bowdoin, is to attend 
the celebration of Founders' Day at Grinnell 
College, Grinnell, Iowa. Two of the founders 
of Iowa College, as it was then called, Rev. 
James J. Hill and Dr. Daniel Lane, were gradu- 
ates of Bowdoin in the Class of 1838. Mr. Hill 
made the first subscription for the founding of 
the college and Dr. Lane -was for several years 
on the college faculty. The first President of 
Iowa College was Dr. George F. Magoun, Bow- 
doin '41. 

President Sills has been appointed one of the 
fifteen presidents to act as vice chairman of the 
Plymouth Tercentenary Committee to commem- 
orate the Landing of the Pilgrims. He has also 
been chosen Educational Director of the State 
Chamber of Commerce and Agricultural League. 

Dr. Whittier was in Boston last Friday at the 
meeting of the New England Athletic Associa- 
tion of which he is president. 

President Sills was named by Governor Carl 
E. Milliken as one of the delegates to represent 
the State of Maine at a National Citizens' Con- 
ference called by the Secretary of the Interior 
through the Bureau of Education to be held at 
Washington, D. C, May 19 to 21. 

Professor Woodruff attended a banquet and 
initiation of Phi Beta Kappa at Bates College 
last week, six new members being initiated. 

Professor Stone visited last Thursday at Bridg- 
ton Academy and Bridgton High School. 

Dean Nixon spent several days last week at 
Wesleyan College, where he attended a meeting 
of the Association of Deans, May 21 and 22. 

Professor Woodruff was in Clinton last Wed- 
nesday, addressing the Kennebec County Sunday 



School Association. 

Professor Bell has recently purchased the 
house owned by Joseph W. Higgins on Potter 
street. 



Outdoor Interscholastics 

The 22nd Annual Bowdoin Outdoor Inter- 
scholastic Meet will be held on Whittier Field 
next Saturday. The trials will be held at ten 
o'clock in the morning and the finals at half past 
two in the afternoon. There will be at least 
sixteen schools entered, with about 125 con- 
testants. The point summary will include the 
first four places in each event. 

The trophy this year is to be a ten-inch armor- 
piercing shell weighing 560 pounds which would 
have been used in a shore battery in France had 
the war lasted longer. This handsome trophy 
has been given by the United States Navy 
through the Naval Recruiting Station at Port- 
land. 



REPORT OF THE SOPHOMORE HOP 
COMMITTEE 

May 1, 1920. 
Ticket Sales: 

By committee, 105 at $4.50 $472.50 

At door, 16 at $4.50 72.00 

Complimentary, 6 

$544.50 

Expenditures : 

Catering $200.00 

Music 99.75 

Hotel Eagle (musicians) 15.00 

Leather covers for orders 90.00 

Higgins (including $15 for taxi) 41.50 

Litchfield (teaming) 28.73 

Printing 21.25 

Matron 5.00 

Incidentals 2.00 

Total Expense $503.23 

Bal. turned over to Treas. Soph. Class.. $41.27 

Respectfully submitted by R. G. Woodbury. 
Audited May 17. 1920, 

Wilmot B. Mitchell. Faculty Auditor. 



Nominees for Student Election 

At a meeting of the Student Council on May 
17, the following men were nominated for the 
college election of June 8 : For the Student 
Council ; Badger, Buker, Cook, Crowell, Dudgeon, 
Eames, Goodwin, Haines, Hatch, Holmes, Lovell, 
McGown, Parent, Perkins, Ryder, Schonland, 
Thomson, Whitney, Willson, Young (from 1921), 
Averill, Dahlgren, Flinn, and Woodbury (from 
1922) ; for the Athletic Council, Dudgeon, Good- 
win, Parent, Thomson (from 1921), Averill, 
Flinn, Partridge, McGorrill (from 1922), Handy,. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Bal. turned over to Treas. Soph. Class. . $41.1 

Respectfully submitted by R. G. Woodbury. 
Audited May 17, 1920. 

Wilmot B. Mitchell. Faculty Auditor. 



New York Alumni Association 

At the recent annual meeting' of the Associa- 
tion of the Alumni of Bowdoin College of New 
York and vicinity, the following officers were 
elected for the ensuing year: 

President, H. D. Gibson '02 ; vice-presidents, 
Henry C. Emery '92, Dr. Fred H. Albee '99, 
George B. Chandler '90, Frederick W. Packard 
'94, E. H. Sykes '94, Hoyt A. Moore '95 ; secre- 
tary, John W. Frost '04: assistant secretary, L. 
A. Crosby '13; treasurer, Sidney W. Noyes '02; 
chorister, Romilly Johnson '06; placement com- 
mittee, S. O. Martin '03, G. R. Walker '02, H. L. 
Palmer '04 ; executive committee, Thomas L. 
Pierce '98; R. S. Cleaves '99, H. L. Palmer '04, 
George McWilliams '15, Arthur H. Ham '08, 
Alden S. Hichborn '11, Malcolm S. Woodbury '03. 



alumni Department 

The Orient particularly wishes to be recog- 
nized as the central exchange for receiving and 
distributing news of the Alumni. Obviously this 
can be done only with hearty cooperation of the 
Alumni themselves, and especially of the class 
secretaries. The Orient can maintain no elabor- 
ate service for the collection of college news out- 
side of Brunswick, and for notes about the 
Alumni it must remain dependent on the Alumni 
themselves and on such newspapers as are re- 
ceived at the college library. The present edi- 
torial board is making every effort to realize the 
ideal set up by the Alumni Council — to print all 
interesting facts about the doings of the Alumni. 



1848 — It has recently been learned that the 
oldest living graduate of Bowdoin College, Rev. 
William C. Pond, D.D., of San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, Class of '48, whose picture appears else- 
where in this issue, will visit his alma mater at 
Commencement this year. Dr. Pond, although 
over ninety years of age, is still in excellent 
health. 

Alumni of Bowdoin are sending in their nomi- 
nations for a member of the Board of Overseers 
to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Ad- 
miral Robert E. Peary, LL.D., of Washington, 
D. C. 

1894 — Elmer T. Boyd was appointed librarian 



of the Bangor Public Library on May 14 to suc- 
ceed the late Charles A. Flagg '94. He plans 
to study library work this summer, and to begin 
his new duties next January. 

1898 — Clarence W. Proctor, submaster in Ban- 
gor High School, has been appointed principal 
for next year. 

1902 — Major George E. Fogg of Portland will 
deliver the Memorial Day address at Fryeburg 
under the auspices of the Grover Post, G. A. R. 

1904 — Howard C. Griffin has returned to the 
Carnegie Institute of Technology at Pittsburgh 
as an associate professor in the department of 
chemical engineering. 

1905 — Captain James G. Finn, who was seri- 
ously wounded in action near Chateau Thierry 
has lately been transferred to the United States 
Army General Hospital at Fox Hills, Staten Is- 
land, New York. Capt. Finn has made con- 
tinuous progress toward recovery from his 
wounds, but is still obliged to remain under hos- 
pital care. 

1908 — Arthur L. Robinson of Portland recent- 
ly went to Washington to attend a conference 
of representatives of the American Legion to 
discuss the soldiers' bonus measure, which is now 
before Congress. Mr. Robinson is attending the 
conference as a member of the National Execu- 
tive Committee of the American Legion. 

1908 — The South Pacific Mail of a recent date 
contained the following item which will be of 
interest to Bowdoin men : "Dr. Sturgis E. Leav- 
itt, associate professor of romance languages in 
the University of North Carolina, at present on 
leave of absence and holder of a Sheldon trav- 
eling • fellowship from Harvard University, is 
concluding an important volume on Chilian lit- 
erature and in a short time will leave Santiago 
for Buenos Aires. This work which will be pub- 
lished in English, and will take the form of a 
bibliography including biographies of Chilian 
writers, with criticisms and histories of the lit- 
erature. It will serve as a guide and an intro- 
duction to the study of Chilian literature for 
English speaking people, and in addition to the 
usual bibliographic detail, each book-title will 
be accompanied by notes setting forth the con- 
tents of the work and its value as a piece of lit- 
erature. 

"Dr. Leavitt's book will therefore contribute 
its share toward filling a want at present felt in 
England and the United States for a further 
knowledge of the intellectual life of South Am- 
erica. Dr. Leavitt has recently made studies of 
Peruvian and Bolivian literature which will be 

(Continued en page 73) 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



71 




CAPITALIZE YOUR SUMMER 

INVEST SIX WEEKS 

IN 

TRAINING FOR BUSINESS 

AT 
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July 6— August 13 Six Weeks 

Sessions 9—1 o'clock 

WRITE FOR BULLETIN OF SUMMER COURSES TO 

REGISTRAR, 334 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 



"BRUNSWICK" Billiard and Pocket Tables and Bowling Alleys have been the 
World's Standard Regulation for more than three quarters of a century 



We specialize in Ivory, 
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also furnish expert me- 
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and alleys. 




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All world's Champion- 
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THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER COMPANY, (established 1840) 
94 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 
Billiard and Bowling Headquarters for New England 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




THE BRUNSWICK 

Convenient to the theatre and 
shopping districts. 

The sort of Hotel guests 
visit once and return to every 
time they come to Boston. 

Boylston St. at Copley Sq. 



•■:i,.i.i- 'i.S i "&■■' 



THE LENOX 

In the center of Boston's 
Back Bay residential district. 
For many years a stopping 
place for college teams. 
The "Old Grad" claims it 
still and so do the Under 
Grads. It's their Hotel. 

Boylston St. at Exeter St. 

UNDER SAME MANAGEMENT 
L. C. PRIOR, Managing Director 



TEMPLE TOURS 

Europe is Open $460 and Up 

Cathedrals, galleries, lakes and mountains. 

Exceptional arrangements for Paris and 
the Battlefields. 

Small parties with experienced leaders 
sail in May, June and July. 

THE TEMPLE TOURS 

80 Boylston St. Boston, 11, Mass. 

ALDEN F. HEAD 1916 

INTERCOLLEGIATE TOURS 

EDUCATION THROUGH TRAVEL 

A summer in Europe in company with a 
great interpreter of the world's Master- 
pieces of the Spirit is worth a college de- 
gree. 

Pilgrimages for 1920 specialize in each of 
the following fields: Art, Music, French 
Language, and English Literature. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE TOURS 

1027 Little Building Boston, 11, Mass. 

ALDEN F. HEAD, 1916 



COMPLETE STOCKS 

of 

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BOWDOIN ORIENT 



73 



alumni Department 

(Continued from page 70) 

published on his return to the United States. It 
is his plan to conduct similar investigations in 
Argentina and Uruguay and at a later date in 
other South American countries. After the 
termination of his work in Argentina and Uru- 
guay Dr. Leavitt will return to the University 
of North Carolina where he will have charge 
of the department of Spanish." Dr. Leavitt is a 
member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity. 

1909 — John R. Hurley has recently re- 
turned from an extended trip through south- 
eastern Europe where he has been engaged in 
work for the Grain Administration as a repre- 
sentative of Mr. Herbert Hoover. Mr. Hurley 
traveled extensively through Siberia, Roumania, 
Turkey and portions of Asia-Minor and the Re- 
public of Georgia, and for his services to the 
people in connection with Grain Administration 
work, he has been decorated by the King of 
Roumania. 

1913 — Mrs. James Dallett of Wilmington, 
Delaware, recently announced the engagement 
of her daughter, Esther, to William Fletcher 
Twombly. Mr. Twombly is a research chemist 
in the Jackson Laboratory of E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours & Company. 

The following notes have been received con- 
cerning 1916 men : 

Aaron W. Canney is a student at the Andover 
Theological Seminary. 

Adriel L T . Bird is with John Bird Co., whole- 
sale groceries, Rockland, Me. 

Paul A. Ladd, ex-'i6, is executive secretary 
for the Framingham Civic League, Framingham, 
Mass. During the war he was in the American 
Field Ambulance Service, and later was in the 
U. S. Naval Service ; assistant navigator and en- 
sign on the U. S. S. Northern Pacific; later aide 
to Admiral Fletcher, Commandant of the 7th 
Naval District ; next, executive officer of the 
Naval Unit at University of Florida; and finally 
commander of the submarine chaser 436. 

The following notes have been received from 
the secretary of the Class of 1917, concerning 
various members of his class: 

Charles E. Allen is with Lunn & Sweet Co., 
shoe manufacturers at Auburn. Erik Achorn is 
specializing in literature at Harvard. Leon W. 
Babcock is a chemist with Hercules Powder Co. 
at Carthage, Missouri. Boyd W. Bartlett is a 
first lieutenant stationed at Camp Gordon. Ed- 
win H. Blanchard is with the Neiv York Sun 



and Herald. Clifton W. Bowdoin is teaching- 
history at Moses Brown School, Providence, 
R. I. Donald 0. Burleigh is in the advertising 
business in Denver, Col. W. S. Cormack is an 
aviator with the Ricon Air Lines, Hongkong, 
China. Percy F. Crane is studying scientific 
management with the Eastern Manufacturing 
Company, Brewer, Maine. George E. Colbath 
is selling automobiles in Los Angeles, California. 
Arthur B. Chapman is with Franklin Motors, 
Syracuse, New York. Clarence H. Crosby is 
the Bangor representative of H. J. Heinz Co., 
makers of the 57 varieties. L. F. Dow is in- 
structor of French at Cornell. Leigh D. Flynt 
is associated with his father on the Kennebec 
Journal at Augusta. Ernest C. Fuller is a mem- 
ber of the faculty at Hebron Academy. Rev. 
" Arry" Harrison has a pastorate in Dorchester. 
Edward H. Murphy is in business in Ashland, 
Mass. Paul C. Kent is with the American Tele- 
phone Company in New York City. David A. 
Lane, Jr., is doing graduate work at Harvard. 
Noel C. Little is instructor of Physics at Bow- 
doin. Carroll A. Lovejoy is with the Guarantee 
Trust Company in New York City. N. V. Mc- 
Conaughy is with the American Telephone Com- 
pany in New York. Harvey D. Miller is on the 
faculty of Bangor High School. E. C. Moran, 
Jr., is associated with his father in insurance 
business in Rockland. F. E. Noyes is the Ameri- 
can representative of Arthur Turner Co. of Lon- 
don, in New York City. J. C. Oliver is in the 
automobile business in San Francisco. J. W. 
Philbrick is at the Harvard Law School. F. E. 
Phillips is with the International Banking Cor- 
poration, Hongkong, China. Dwight W. Pierce 
is in business with his father in Brunswick. 
Carleton M. Pike is with the First National Bank 
of Boston. Carl K. Ross is a bond salesman in 
Portland. H. H. Lampson is principal of Bridg- 
ton Academy. Sherman N. Shumway is at the 
Harvard Law School. Charles P. Spalding is 
president of Dundee Manufacturing Company at 
Conway, N. H. M. A. Sutcliffe is at the Har- 
vard Business School. Kenneth G. Stone is 
with the Warren Paper Company at Westbrook. 
Ray W. Swift is in business with his father in 
Augusta. Ralph B. Thayer is house physician 
at the Marine Hospital in Portland. D. W. True 
is a member of D. W. True Company, wholesale 
grocers in Portland. J. W. Tuttle is at Harvard 
Law School. Fred W. Willey is with the Good- 
year Tire Company, Akron, Ohio. Hal S. White 
is doing graduate work at Oxford, as the Long- 
fellow scholar from Bowdoin. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



R 



IPE MAINE 
ASPBERRIES 



MAKE THE FOUNDATION FOR 
THE OTHER FRUITS BLENDED IN 

HAY'S FIVE FRUIT 

The unequaled fruit punch syrup. Send for a 
folder telling other uses for HAY'S FIVE 
FRUIT 

Pints, 85c Quarts, $1.50 Gallons, $5.00 

H JV H H.HAY SONS 

H/ PORTLAND, MAINE 



The Bowdoin 
Medical School 

ADDISON S. THAYER, Dean 
10 Deering Street Portland, Maine 

HUNGRY? Sure! 

THEN GO TO THE 

"CANTEEN" 

19 NORTH WINTHROP 

8-12 a. m. 1-6 p. m. 7.30-11 p. m. 

Saturday evening 7.30-10 Sundays 2 to 4.30 p. m. 

CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO 

CONFECTIONERY SANDWICHES 

PIES, CAKE, ETC. 

MILK and HOT COFFEE 

ARTHUR PALMER, Proprietor 

PALMER SHOE CO. 
PORTLAND 

CARL H. MARTIN 

CLEANSING and DYEING 
PRESSING and ALTERATIONS 

4 Elm Street 



SUMMER WORK 

We still have room 
For a few LIVE men 
Provided they want to 
Earn a lot of MONEY 
This summer. 

This isn't a gamble 

It is a SURE THING 

For the man who HUSTLES 

And besides 

We pay a SALARY. 

NOW is the time 
To get on the Band Wagon 
So see our local man 
Or write us direct and 
Ask for the dope. 

Local representative 

Harry Helson, '21, 

Room 29, North Winthrop. 

The National Survey Co. 

Topographical Offices 
CHESTER, VT. 

PORTLAND BATH BRUNSWICK 

If You Want the Biggest Drink 

For Your Money 

Get Your 

Milk Shakes and Soda Fountain Drinks 

AT 

The Spear Folks 

119 Maine Street 
WATERVILLE WESTBROOK 



Do You Need Extra Courses? 

Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages, Economics, 
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire 
how credits earned may be applied on present college program. 

QUje Interattij of OUjtrago 




HOME STUDY DEPT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



"ONE ON EVERY DESK" 

EVEREADY PAPER FASTENER 



Makes and fastens staples in one operation. 

No heavy blow required. Only slight pressure of 

the hand is necessary. Much more satisfactory 

than the old style paper fasteners. 

One roll of Eveready Staple Tape furnished with 

each machine. 5000 staples per roll. 

More economical than any other stapling machine 

at any price. 

Carried by Leading Stationers Everywhere 




Model "D" Eveready Paper Fastener 



Eveready Mfg. Co. of Boston 

BOSTON MASS. 




Arrow 

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Soft Collars 

CLUETT, PEABODY & CO.. INC.. TROY, N. Y 



ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



C0URS0N & MORTON 

SUPPLIES 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Let Jud "Outline" your work and do your "Cutting" for you 



WEBBER'S STUDIO 

MAKER OF 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

FOR 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



SPRING LINES OF 

SPORTING GOODS 



PRINTING 



OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

TOWN BUILDING BRUNSWICK 



GOLF BALLS BASEBALL GOODS 
TENNIS GOODS 



We carry SPALDING & REACH 
Lines of Baseball Goods and WRIGHT 
& DITSON Tennis Goods. 



F. W. Chandler & Son 



COLLEGE AND "PREP" SCHOOL MEN 

Clothing for Personality 

Leather Garments, Golf Suits, 
Sport Coats, English made Ov- 
ercoats. 

Exclusive Models in Suits, Ov- 
ercoats and Ulsters. 

Haberdashery Hats 

Macullar Parker Company 




400 Washington St. 



Boston, Mass. 



THE OLD HOUSE WITH THE YOUNG SPIRIT' 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THAYER McNEIL CO. 

COLLEGE MEN'S 

SHOES 

BOSTON 

JOE BULGER - - - Representative 

In Store on Saturdays 



WE CARRY 

Co-operative Shoes 
New Stock of CORDOVANS 

EXPECTED SOON 

Roberts' Shoe Store 

W. E. ROBERTS '07 



LARGEST AND BEST 

Stock of Carpet Rugs, Portieres, Couch 

Covers, Window Draperies, 

etc., in town. 

JAMES F. WILL CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 




WORN THE WORLD OVER 

For more than forty years Boston Garter has 
been a friend to men the world over. It not 
only keeps the old but makes many new ones 
each year. Most men ask for Boston Garter 
as a matter of course — the two words go so 
well together. 
GEORGE FROST CO., Makers, BOSTON 



A. W. HASKELL, D.D.S. W. F. BROWN, D.D.S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Post Office ... Brunswick, Maine 

BUTLER'S 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. Surplus and Profits, $100,000 

Student Patronage Solicited 

We carry the largest assortment of Olives, 
Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and Biscuits of all 
kinds east of Portland. 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street - - - Tel. 136-137 
Branch Store— 2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16. 

J. S. STETSON, D.M.D. 

DENTIST 

98 Maine Street - - Brunswick, Maine 
Lincoln Building 




Dependability 



The new U. S. Royal, U. S. Revere, and U. S. Floater 
Golf Balls are dependable balls. They help you out of 
the tight corners — make those difficult shots less hard to 
face. They fly true and putt true, and are uniformly 
accurate from core to cover — well balanced, sound and 
lively. There's a size and weight to suit your style of play. 

Buy them from your pro or 
at your dealer's. 

U.S. Royal $1.00 each 
U. S. Revere 85c each 
U. S. Floater 65c each 

Keep your Eye on the Ball — be sure it's a U. S. 




United States Rubber Company 



BOWDOIN 


ORIENT 


Pianos Victrolas Music 

CRESSEY & ALLEN 
Portland 


WILLIAM F. FERRIS 

COLLEGE AGENT 


PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

...AT... 

WILSON'S PHARMACY 


Citizens Laundry 

AUTO SERVICE 9 SOUTH APPLETON 






COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 MAINE ST. 


CHIPMAN 






CLIFTON C. POOLER 

SPECIALTY CATERER 
184 Clark St., Portland, Me. 


DIAMOND RINGS 

At prices 1 5 per cent and 40 per 
cent less than New York prices. 

A. G. PAGE CO., BATH 



"The Store of Progress and Service" 

TYPES and TASTES 
In College Men 

We've experience in analyzing these. You can pretty nearly determine a 
man's taste by his type — we're eminently successful in suiting both. The 
character, complexion, bearing of each individual man enables us at first 
sight to judge the sort of model, fabric or pattern that will appeal to his 
taste, and through our immense variety we have little difficulty picking out 
the right thing in a Suit or Overcoat. Mr. Jack Handy '23 at the Zeta Psi 
House is our representative, and anything you wish in the way of Shirts, 
Neckwear, Shoes, Hosiery, Pajamas, etc., he will be glad to take your order. 



Monument Square 




Portland, Maine 



Cumberland Theatre 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 
MARGUERITE CLARK 

IN 

EASY TO GET 





FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
TOM MIX 

IN 

THE CYCLONE 



NEXT WEEK 

MONDAY and TUESDAY 

DOROTHY DALTON 

IN 

HIS WIFE'S FRIEND 



PASTIME THEATRE 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 
ALICE BRADY 

IN 

HER GREAT CHANCE 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
SHIRLEY MASON 

IN 

HER ELEPHANT MAN 



t&«- »H* * * 



T5he 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



IVY NUMBER 
1921 




Hubbard Hall— The Library 



June 4, 1920 



"BRUNSWICK" 

Billiard and Pocket Tables and Bowl- 
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We specialize in Ivory, 
Broadcloth, All Billiard 
and Bowling Supplies, 
also furnish expert me- 
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JheBB.CCa 

MONARCH 

WORLDS 

BEST 



All "BRUNSWICK" 
Tables are equipped with 
fast "MONARCH" match 
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All world's Champion- 
ships, professional and 
amateur always played 
on "MONARCH" match 
game cushions. 



The Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co. 

(ESTABLISHED 1840) 

94 Washington St. Boston, Mass. 

Billiard and Bowling Headquarters for New England 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



America's most famous 
box of candy 




Candies of exquisite quality in a quaint, ar- 
tistic box. Fine to give to a girl or to give your- 
self! 

For sale by 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



WORTH-WHILE NEW FICTION 



THE GREAT 
IMPERSONATION 

By E. PHILLIPS OPPENHEIM 

This master novel of love, mystery and international in- 
trigue, is recommended to you as the best story Oppenheim 
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By the Author of "The Ov 



of the Lazy D" 



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By WILLIAM PATTERSON WHITE 

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methods brusque, painful and lawless. 

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Soft Collars 

CLUETT. PEABODY d CO., INC.. TROY, N. Y. 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OUTFITTERS TO 

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344 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 



COMPLETE STOCKS 

of 

Seasonable Clothes 

Haberdashery 

Hats 

FOR TOWN AND COUNTRY WEAR 



Also Special Styles in 
SPORTING APPAREL 



Haskell & Jones Co. 
Portland, - - - Maine. 



COURSON & MORTON 

SUPPLIES 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, .MAINE 



VOL. L 



FRIDAY, JUNE. 4, 1920 



NO. 9 



Ivy Exercises 

The Ivy Day exercises are being held this 
afternoon in Memorial Hall. The program in- 
cludes the oration, by John Ganiett Young, 
printed elsewhere in these columns; the poem, 
by Robert Winthrop Morse; the prayer, by 
George Jordan Cumming; and the presentation 
of gifts. The presiding officer of the day is 
Philip Robinson Lovell, who is to introduce the 
speakers and make the following presentations: 

Our Athlete: Bottle of Liniment George R. Good-win 

Our Mathematician: Plug of Five Brothers . .Percy D. Wilkins 
Our Infant : Stilts Leslie E. Gibson 

The customary wooden spoon, the serious gift, 
is to be presented to Alexander Thomson, the 
popular man of the class. • 

After the exercises, the ivy is to be planted 
on the front side of Memorial Hall, accompanied 
by the singing of the class ode, written by Joseph 
Lynwood Badger. 

The class marshal is Paul Herford Eames. 
The committee in charge of the Ivy Day activi- 
ties consists of R. L. Perkins (chairman), C. W. 
Crowell, H. A. Dudgeon, L. H. Hatch, R. R. 
Schonland, and J. J. Whitney. 

The afternoon festivities are concluded with 
the customary Seniors' Last Chapel. 



The Ivy Hop and 

Fraternity House Parties 

The annual Ivy Hop is to be held this evening 
in the Gymnasium. It is expected that over a 
hundred and fifty couples will be present. The 
patronesses, as usual, will be the wives of mem- 
bers of the faculty. Music will be provided by 
Sprince's Syncopated Dozen. 

The various fraternity house hances have al- 
ready been held, most of them Wednesday eve- 
ning. Following are brief accounts of these 
dances. 

ALPHA DELTA PHI 

The Bowdoin Chapter of Alpha Delta Phi held a formal 
reception at the chapter house Thursday afternoon, June 3. 
Mrs. William DeWitt Hyde and Mrs. Charles T. Burnett 



of Brunswick, Mrs. Franklin C. Robinson of Portland, Mrs. 
Emma Duncan of Bath. Mrs. John W. Thomas of Rockland, 
and Miss Bernice B. Ham of Lewiston were the pourers. 

Wednesday evening the chapter had its annual Ivy dance 
in Pythian Hall. The patronesses were Mrs. William A. 
Moody, Mrs. Charles C. Hutchins, and Mrs. Roscoe J. Ham 
of Brunswick ; Mrs. Harry S. Emery of Portland ; Mrs. 
Harry S. Childs and Mrs. Donald C. White of Lewiston. 
Avery's -orchestra of Eath furnished music for an order 
of twenty-four dances. The committee in charge con- 
sisted of S. M. Gordon '20 (chairman), R. E. Cleaves '20, 
L. B. Heeney '21, L. F. Merrill '22. and Stephen Palmer '23. 

Among the guests were Mrs. John W. Thomas of Rock- 
land : the Misses Ruth Gordon of Aurora, N. Y. ; Mary 
Stearns of West Parisj Mildred Heeney of Portsmouth, 
N. H. : Bertha Merrill of Augusta ; Kathryn Beck and Maria 
Blackford of Wayland, Mass. ; Jane Corwin of Hartford, 
Conn. ; Dorothy Clark of Plainville, Conn. ; Doris Wadley 
of Plainfield, N. J. ; Dorothy Pryor of Philadelphia. Pa. ; 
Marcia Higgins of Nyack. N. Y. ; Marion Gifford of South 
Lawrence, Mass. ; Helen Root of Lewiston ; Louise Alex- 
ander of Island Falls ; Miriam James, Marcia Merrill, Louise 
Verrill, and Lottie Smith of Portland ; Frances Bragg of 
Bangor ; and Ruth Perkins cf Auburn. 

PSI UPSILON 

Kappa Chapter of Psi Upsilon held a formal reception 
from three to five at the Chapter House on Wednesday, 
June 2. Mrs. Kenneth C. M. Sills, Mrs. Charles T. Burnett, 
Mrs. Roscoe J. Ham, and Mrs. Manton Copeland poured. 

In the evening the chapter had its house dance at which 
the patronesses were Mrs. F. W. Lamb of Portland, Mrs. 
A. N. Hunt of Braintree, Mass., Mrs. E. W. Freeman of 
Portland, and Mrs. C. E.. Page of Winchester, Mass. Music 
was furnished by Cole's orchestra of Portland. 

The committee in charge consisted of M. L. Willson '21 
(chairman), F. P. Freeman '22, and P. H. Schlosberg '23. 

Among the guests present were the Misses Henrietta 
Kilborn of Akron, Ohio; Winifred Dodge of Newton Centre, 
Mass. ; Marvel Fabian, and Dorothy Worcester of Boston, 
Mass. ; Ruth Caldwell and Phyllis Fitch of Winchester, 
Mass. ; Mildred Kinsley of New York City ; Ruth Little, 
Dorothea Farrell, Ten Broeck Jackson, Helen Kilborn, Cor- 
nelia Jackson, and Christine Billings of Portland ; Priscilla 
ton ; Dorothy Blethen and Alsy Hemenway of Rockland ; 
Margaret Hanson of Bath. 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON. 

Theta Chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon held its formal 
dance on Wednesday evening, June 2. The patronesses were 
Mrs. Kenneth C. M. Sills, Mrs. A. L. P. Dennis of New York 
City, and Mrs. James Q. Gulnac of Bangor. The committee 
in charge consisted of P. G. McLellan '21, chairman, A. 
Standish '21, and R. B. Wadsworth '21. Music was fuH- 
nished by Welch's Orchestra from Waterville. 

Among the guests were the Misses Margaret Merrill, Irene 



76 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Pur'nton, Lucille Purinton, Louise Skene, and Beatrice 
Straw of Augusta; Louise G. Walton of New York City; 
Zella Bridges of Buffalo. N. Y. ; Mary Elizabeth Dennis of 
Madison. Wisconsin ; Helen Getrhell of Limestone ; Hilda 
Brown of Windsor ; Lucie Atwood of Eastport ; Elva Tooker 
of Waterville ; and Katharine Pletts of Brunswick. 



ZETA PSI 

Lambda Chapter of Zeta Psi held its Ivy dance at the 
fraternity house Wednesday. June 2. The patronesses were 
Mrs. George C. Eames of Bangor, Mrs. S. F. Fogg of Au- 
gusta, and Mrs. A. P. Hall of Hampden. The committee 
in charge consisted of Charles A. Haggerty '20 (chairman), 
Arthur H. McQuillan '20, Maurice S. Philbrick '20. Paul 
H. Eames '21, and Oliver G. Hall '21. 

Among the guests were the Misses Dorothy Gardiner, 
Katherine Lewis, and Gertrude Merrill of Portland ; Sarah 
Wheeler of Brunswick ; Katherine Cooper, Louise Parklan. 
and Katherine Bell of Reading, Mass. ; Pauline Woodward. 
Elizabeth Palmer, and Ruth Crowell of Bangor; Dorothy 
Ellms of Auburn ; Louise Folsom of Augusta ; Marion Mc- 
Lane of Rockland : Ruth Henderson of Boston. Mass. ; Beth 
Durkee of Worcester, Mass. : Verna Abbey of Skowhegan ; 
and Alice White of Westbrook. 



THETA DELTA CHI. 

Eta Charge of Theta Delta Chi held its formal house 
dan:e Wednesday evening. The patronesses were Mrs. Wil- 
mot B. Mitchell, Mrs. Alaric W. Haskell, Mrs. G. Allen 
Howe. Mrs. William Porter, of Brunswick ; Mrs. A. E. 
Stearns and Mrs. E. R. Bowers of Rumford ; Mrs. F. W. 
Pickard of Wilmington. Del. : and Mrs. Hugh Pendexter of 
Norway. 

The committee consisted of Elmer T. Boardman '20, H. 
Paul Larrabee '21, Hugh Pendexter '21, and Arthur C. 
Bartlett '22. Music was furnished by the Foristal Orchestra 
of Portland. 

Among the guests were the Misses Ruth Johnson, Helen 
Nissen. Helen Munroe, Carla Sherman, Marjorie Mathis, 
Ragnhild Dalsgaard. Helen Donnelly, Eleanor Russell. Evalyn 
Frost, and Helen McKown of Portland ; Ruth Wheeler of 
Philadelphia ; Elizabeth Nash of Brunswick ; Idamae Wotton 
of Rockland ; Ruth Cummings of Norway ; and Gladys Willey 
of Saco. 



DELTA UPSILON. 

Delta Upsilon held its house dance on Thursday evening. 
The patronesses were Mrs. Joseph S. Stetson and Mrs. R. P. 
Bodwell of Brunswick, Mrs. M. C. Lyseth of Norway, Me., 
and Mrs. Samuel Dudgeon of New Bedford, Mass. 

The committee in charge was A. W. Hall '20, chairman, 
H. A. Dudgeon '21, Victor S. Whitman '23, and William B. 
Jacob '23. Music was furnished by Davis's Orchestra of 
Lewiston. 

Among the guests were the Misses Isabelle Pollard, Louise 
Lapointe, and Doris Hayes of Brunswick ; Marguerite Mc- 
Donald of Portland ; Eleanor B. Phillips, and Sarah A. Cas- 
sell of Quincy, Mass. ; Dorothy Johnson of Woodfords ; Doris 
Wakely of Lisbon Falls ; Harriet Jackson of Bath ; Mary 
Rogers of Fahhaven. Mass. ; Mildred White of Topsham ; and 
Constance Turner. 



KAPPA SIGMA 

The Ivy house dance of the Alpha Rho chapter of Kappa 
Sigma was held Thursday, June 2. The patronesses were 
Mrs. Roscoe J. Ham of Brunswick, Mrs. J. A. Richan of 
Rockland, and Mrs. J. A. Scott of Corinna. The com- 



mittee in charge was made up of J. J. Whitney '21 (chair- 
man), A. L. Richan '20, W. L. Parent '21, H. G. McCurdy 
'22, and W. R. JVhitney '23. 

Among the guests were the Misses Lucy Fuller, Margaret 
Flannigan, Marian McAllister, and Phyllis Moran of Rock- 
land ; Maybelle Humphrey and Grace Murphy of Spring- 
field. Mass. ; Mary Bradish and Virginia Currier of Port- 
land ; Theresa Pretto, Lillian McLane, and Gertrude Kear- 
ney of Bangor ; Irma Emerson of Auburn ; Iva Goodwin 
and Eveleen Priest of Brunswick ; Caroline Jordan of Lew- 
iston ; Sadie Halpin of Rochester, N. H. ; Muriel Byard of 
Ellsworth ; and Bernice Sprague of Boston, Mass. 



BETA THETA PI 

Beta Sigma of Beta Theta Phi held its annual reception 
and house party en Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday 
of this week. At the reception held Wednesday afternoon 
the pourers were Mrs. Frank E. Woodruff. Mrs. George 
T. Little, Mrs. Charles T. Burnett, Mrs. Roscoe J. Ham. 
Mrs. Manton Copeland. Miss Anna E. Smith, Mrs. Clara 
D. Hayes, and Mrs. Joseph L. Rohr, all of Brunswick. 

On Wednesday evening Blouin's orchestra of Portland 
played for an order of twenty-four dances. The patronesses 
were Mrs. Arthur Abbott of Dexter, Mrs. Lee D. McClean 
of Brunswick, and Mrs. George R. Gardiner of Brunswick. 

Among the guests present were the Misses Hilda Bangs, 
Clarenda Clouthier, Thelma Damren, Irene Goodrich, Vir- 
ginia Holway, Marie Simpson, and Alice Stevens of Au- 
gusta : Elizabeth Jenney of Belmont, Mass. ; Rosamond 
Coolidge of Cambridge, Mass. ; Edith Tiffany of Camden ; 
Edna Chamberlain of Fort Fairfield; Marian Gibson of 
Norway ; Bernice B. Butler of Portland ; Maude M. Mitchell 
of Reading. Mass. ; Esther M. Stevenson of Rockland ; 
Jeannette Canney of Somerville. Mass. ; Vera Harmon of 
Stonington ; Evelyn Park of Wellesley Hills, Mass. ; and 
Nancy Oxnard of West Medford. Mass. 

The committee in charge consisted of E. H. Ellms '20. 
C. W. Scrimgeour '20, F. L. Rochon '21, N. L. Webb '22, anl 
J. R. Sheesley '23. 



SIGMA NU 

Delta Psi Chapter of Sigma Nu is holding its annual 
Ivy house party and dance on Friday and Saturday of this 
week. An informal banquet and dance will be held on 
Saturday at the Fairview House. St. Pierre's orchestra of 
Brunswick will furnish the music. 

The patroness is Mrs. Laura Palmer of Portland. The 
committee in charge consisted of C. R. Lindner '20 (chair- 
man), A. M. Benton '21. E. F. Sealand *22, and S. C. 
Martin '22. 

Among those present are the Misses Gladys Merrill, Marion 
Griffith, and Katherine Palmer of Portland ; Dorothy Spear 
of South Portland ; Eloise Ford of Sanford ; Adlyn Car- 
penter of Rockville Center, N. Y. ; Vyvyan Bowman, Irene 
Bowman and Gertrude Baumann of Lewiston ; Helen Hoyt 
of Presque Isle; Ruth Gardiner of Kezar Falls; Marjorie 
Blagdon of Wiscasset : Louise Haggett of Bath : Mrs. 
Douglas Haddock and Mrs. Karl V. Palmer of Brunswick. 



CHI PSI 

Alpha Eta of Chi Psi held its annual Ivy house dance 
on Wednesday, June 2, at Topsham Town Hall. Music was 
furnished by Helson's orchestra. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Alfred O. Gross and Mrs. 
Charles W. Steele of Brunswick, and Mrs. Charles W. 
Hatch of Dexter. The committee in charge consisted of 
M. S. Howe '22 and E. M. Hall '22. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Among those present were the Misses Lilian Man hall, 
Annie Marshall, Adrienne Morin, and Ruth Wass of Bruns- 
wick ; Margaret Staples and Elizabeth Staples of Pittsfield ; 
Gertrude Anderson of Newton Center, Mass. ; Helen Meserve, 
Ruth Henderson, and Florence Trask of Portland ; Dorothy 
Adams of Arlington, Mass. ; Ruth Chipman and Dora Hig- 
gins of Topsham ; Agnes Jordan of North Bridgton : Merle 
Rokes and Nancy Starrett of Warren ; Algie Cummings of 
Jonesport ; Doris McGuiness of Strong ; and Mrs. Lloyd H. 
Hatch of Dexter. 



Harvard Has Lucky 

Win Over Bowdoin 



The 1921 Bugle 

The 1921 Bugle, distributed this morning, is 
well up to the standards set in previous years 
and in many respects superior. It is dedicated 
to Edwin Upton Curtis, LL.D., of the Class of 
1882, police commissioner of the city of Boston, 
"whose loyalty to the principles of justice and 
steadfastness in the right have won for him the 
admiration of every son of Bowdoin and of 
every true citizen." 

The cover is very appropriately designed, with 
the figure of the polar bear's head, suggesting 
Bowdoin's connection with the distinguished ex- 
plorer. 

There is a rich fund of pictures, — more than 
have appeared in past Bugles. For the first 
time group pictures of the fraternities are being- 
used. The accounts of athletic seasons have 
been somewhat condensed, but the usual sta- 
tistics are included. 

The humor of the "grind" section is of high 
order, very little of it seeming insipid and color- 
less. Some of the best skits are "Our College 
Government," "The Quill: A Review," and "The 
Sub-Freshman Visits the Interscholastics." 

The art department has been attended to in 
excellent fashion by Ormerod. The volume, 
with its additional pictures, its pleasing' design, 
and keen humor, is one which will stand very 
high among the many Bugles of the past. 

The editorial board consists of J. Maxim 
Ryder, editor-in-chief; Charles W. Crowell, busi- 
ness manager; Luke Halpin, assistant business 
manager; Frank H. Ormerod, art editor; Maurice 
S. Coburne, Sanger M. Cook, Lloyd H. Hatch, 
Gordon R. Howard, Philip R. Lovell, Robert R. 
Schonland, Frank A. St. Clair, John G. Young, 
associate editors. 



COMMENCEMENT SPEAKERS CHOSEN. 

Professor Ham, chairman of the committee 
for the selection of Commencement speakers, an- 
nounced last Thursday that the following Seniors 
had been selected: Abbott, Adams, Henderson, 
and Richards. 



Walker Outpitches His Opponent — Harvard Wins 

On Bowdoin's Errors — Morrell and Doherty 

Hit Well. 

In his second start of the season, Walker held 
the Harvard nine to five hits in the game at 
Cambridge Tuesday, May 25, but the game was 
lost 7 to 4. He struck out nine men, and if he 
had had good support in the second inning, Bow- 
doin would have emerged victorious. Jones and 
Frothingham, two long distance sluggers, were 
both disposed of without a hit, the latter fanning 
the breezes twice. 

Bowdoin scored six hits, bettering the winners 
in this respect by one. In the first inning, the 
visitors opened up on Hardell with a three-run 
rally. Needelman singled, took second on Hard- 
ell's error, and third on a passed ball. Cook was 
retired and Smith walked. Morrell smashed the 
ball for three bases, sending two runs home. 
Morrell scored also when Doherty reached first 
on Lincoln's error. 

Again in the eigth, Doherty scored Morrell 
on a two-bagger, after the latter had gotten on 
by Lincoln's second error. In the third Bowdoin 
had the bases jammed but the rally failed to ma- 
terialize. Prosser and Clifford singled in the 
fourth with none out, but they were unable to 
advance further. 

In the second Harvard earned only one of its 
six runs, even considering the bases on balls 
issued. In the eighth, Hallowell tripled and 
Hallock followed with a double for the seventh 
tally. 

The summary : 

HARVARD 

ab r bh po a e 

Conlon, ss 4 3 1 

Lincoln, 3b 3 1 1 2 

Emmons, 2b 4 1 3 1 1 

Jones, lb 4 1 8 

Frothingham, If 3 1 

Hallowell, rf 3 2 1 2 

Hallock, cf 3 1 2 2 1 

Blair, c 4 1 1 10 1 

Hardell, p 2 1 1 2 1 

Totals 30 7 5 27 9 5 

BOWDOIN 

ab r bh po a e 

Needelman, cf 4 1 1 1 

Cook, 2b 4 3 3 

Smith, 3b 4 1 2 3 

Morrell, ss 3 2 1 1 1 3 



78 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Dcherty. If 4 2 

Handy, c 4 9 1 

Prosser, rf 4 1 

Clifford, lb 4 1 7 1 

Walker, p 4 1 2 

Totals 35 4 6 24 10 4 

Score by innings: 123456789 

Harvard 6 1 x— 7 

Bowdoin 3 1 — 4 

Two-base hits: Doherty, Hallock. Three-base hits: Morrell. 
Hallowell. Stolen base: Hallock. Sacrifice hit: Lincoln. 
Earned runs : Harvard 2, Bowdoin 2. Left on bases : Bow- 
doin 9. Harvard 4. First base on errors : Harvard 4, Bow- 
doin 4. Struck out: by Hardell 9, by Walker 9. Bases on 
balls: off Hardell 4, off Walker 3. Hit by pitched ball: 
Hallock (by Walker). Morrell (by Hardell). Double play: 
Hallock to Jones. Passed ball. Blair. Time, 2.15. Umpire, 
Dan Barry. 



One Big Inning Settles Tufts Game 



Mason Repeats Last Year's Victory Over Med- 

ford Nine — Morreli Scoies Four Singles — 

Handy Drives Out Timely Triple. 



In a hard up-hill game on the Tufts Oval last 
Wednesday, Bowdoin came through with a five- 
run rally in the seventh, overcoming Tufts' lead 
of three runs, and winning the game five to three. 
In this inning Morrell and Doherty singled, and 
both scored on Handy's three-bagger. The 
catcher scored when Prosser reached first on 
Lord's error. Clifford hit a sacrifice fly to Gladu, 
Mason reached first on a fielders' choice. 
Needelman was retired. During this time Pros- 
ser scored. Mason now crossed the plate on 
Cook's single. 

In the first four innings Tufts found Mason 
for five hits, two of them doubles, and scored 
three runs. After that the Medford team wai 
held to two singles, and Mason was never again 
in danger. This game reminds one of Mason's 
superb performance against Tufts last year, 
when he pitched a no-hit game for nine and two- 
thirds innings. Weafer had Bowdoin practically 
helpless until the seventh, when he was knocked 
out of the box. 

Morrell played a splendid game, both at bat 
and in the field. Out of four times at bat, he 
poled out four singles. His playing at short 
was pronounced the best seen on the Oval this 
season. He had ten chances and accepted them 
all without a slip-up. Handy's triple in the 
seventh practically broke up the game as far as 
Weafer was concerned. 

The summary : 



BOWDOIN 

ab r bh po a e 

Needelman. cf 3 3 

Flinn, cf 1 

Cook, 2b 4 1 4 3 

Smith, 3b 4 1 10 

Morrell, ss 4 1 4 5 5 

Doherty. If 3 1 1 1 

Handy, c 3 1 1 4 2 

Prosser, rf 4 1 1 

Clifford, lb 3 8 

Mason, p 4 1 2 

Totals 33 5 8 27 12 

TUFTS 

ab r bh po a e 

Gladu, cf 4 1 3 

Fallon, 3b 4 1 2 1 

Lord, lb 4 9 2 

Callahan, rf -4 2 2 2 

Kirchstein. If 3 1 

White, ss 4 2 3 4 

Baker, 2b 3 3 3 

Keefe. c 2 4 3 

Weafer, p 2 1 1 

Collucci, p 1 1 

Totals '. 31 3 7 27 12 2 

Score by inninss: 123456789 

Bowdoin 5 0—5 

Tufts 1 2 0—3 

Two-base hits: Fallon. White. Three-tase hit: Handy. 
Stolen base : Callahan. Sacrifice hits : Handy, Kirchstein. 
Sacrifice fly: Clifford. Earned runs: Bowd:in 3. Tufts 3. 
Left on bases : Bowdoin 5. Tufts 3. Hits : off Weafer, 7 in 7 
innings ; off Collucci, 1 in 2 innings. Struck cut : by Mason 
4. by Weafer 4. Bases on tails: off Mason, cff Weafer. 
Hit by pitched ball, Dcherty (by Collucci). Umpire. Mc- 
Donald. 



Home Runs and Ragged Fielding 

Figure in Maine Victory 



Maine Wins From Bowdoin 6 to 5 — Doherty Gets 

Homer — Walker Yields Only Four Hits — 

Fielding Poor On Both Sides. 



In the third game of the State series, played 
at Orono last Saturday, Bowdoin lost to Maine 
6 to 5. Walker, as usual, was hard to hit, but 
he passed a number of men, and lost out 
partly on account of this, but more on 
account of poor fielding. Two of Maine's 
four hits were home runs, which in- 
volved the scoring of three tallies. In the first 
inning Waterman scored Rusk on a homer, and 
in the eighth Walker, the enemy first baseman, 
drove out another circuit wallop for the winning 
run. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



79 



Doherty was the real individual star at the 
bat, getting a home run (with two on), two 
singles, and a sacrifice in four times up. He 
scored two runs himself, and aided in sending 
across the other three. In the first inning Cook 
reached first on P. Johnson's error, Morrell was 
hit by a pitched ball, and both men scored on 
Doherty's homer. 

In the fourth inning, Doherty singled, stole 
second, and scored when Waterman fumbled 
Clifford's grounder. After this the score was 
4 to 2 in Bowdoin's favor, but Maine tied the 
count in the fifth. Maine took the lead in the 
sixth, and Bowdoin tied the score again in the 
eighth, when Morrell singled, advanced on 
Doherty's sacrifice, and scored on Prosser's hit. 
Smith and Doherty each got a single in the fifth 
and sixth respectively, but neither could get 
around. 

No play by play account of this game can be 
given here, owing to the lack of space in this 
special issue of the Orient. 

The summary. 

MAINE 

ab r bh po a e 

Sargent, rf 4 1 1 

Rusk, cf 3 1 3 

Waterman, ss 3 2 1 1 1 

P. Johnson, If , 4 1 1 1 3 

A. Johnson, 2b 4 1 1 

Coady, 3b 4 1 2 

Walker, lb 2 2 1 8 

Prescott, c 2 12 1 

Watson, p 4 1 4 

Totals 30 6 4 27 10 4 

BOWDOIN 

ab r bh po a e 

Needelman, cf 5 3 

Cook, 2b 5 1 1 1 2 

Smith, 3b 4 1 2 1 

Morrell, ss 3 2 1 5 

Doherty, If 3 2 3 1 

Handy, c 4 7 

Prosser, rf 4 1 

Clifford, lb 4 10 

Walker, p 3 3 

Totals 35 5 6 24 9 3 

Score by innings : 123456789- 

Maine 2 2 1 1 x— 6 

Bowdoin 3 1 1 0—5 

Home runs: Doherty, Waterman, Walker (Maine). Stolen 
bases: Smith, Doherty, P. Johnson, Walker (Maine). Sacri- 
fice hit : Doherty. Earned runs : Maine 4, Bowdoin 3. Left 
on bases: Maine 7, Bowdoin 6. Struck out: by Watson 11, 
by Walker 7. Bases on balls: off Watson 1, off Walker 7. 
Hit by pitched tall: Morrell (by Watson). Umpire, Dris- 
coll. Time, 2.15. 



Masque and Gown Completes 

Successful Season 

Thursday evening at the Cumberland Theatre 
the Masque and Gown presented for the last 
time the comedy which has made such a hit on 
all the trips, "Believe Me, Xantippe." Every 
actor had, by reason of able coaching and con- 
slant rehearsing, become proficient in his part. 
Asnault '20, who took the part of MacFarland, 
displayed an unusual amount of literary and dra- 
matic ability. Badger '21 and Ridlon '22, and 
the remainder of the cast all handled their parts 
very well. 

The program was as follows : 

CAST OF CHARACTERS: 

George McFarland, wealthy bachelor. . .Raymond Asnault '20 

Thornton Brown, his friend Philip Crockett '20 

Arthur Sole, detective Gsorge Quinby '23 

"Buck" Kamman, sheriff Magnus Ridlcn '22 

"Simp" Calloway, desperado Clifford Par<her '23 

William, the butler Oliver Hall '21 

Wrenn, the jailor Earl Heathcote "23 

Dolly Kamman, "Buck's" daughter Joseph Badger '21 

Violet, vamp Crosby Redman "21 

Martha, Dolly's aunt Kenneth Boardman '21 

SYNOPSIS: 

Place — New York City and Colorado. 
Time— -The present. 



New York. 

in Colorado nearly a 



Act I. — McFarland's apartments i 

Act II. — A deserted mountain cab 
year later. 

Act III. — Two days later. The sheriff's office at Delta, 
Colorado. 

Act IV. — A week later. The same. 

Music by College Orchestra. 

Masque and Gown Executive Committee: 

President Raymond Asnault 

Manager Karl R. Philbrick 



Goodwin Scores for Bowdoin 

In I. C. A. A. A. A. 

At the I. C. A. A. A. A. track and field meet 
held at Franklin Field, Philadelphia, last Satur- 
day, George Goodwin '21, Bowdoin's only en- 
trant, captured fourth place in the mile run, giv- 
ing Bowdoin two points in the meet. This was - 
Goodwin's first try at the one-mile run in these 
games, as he has done the two-mile previously. 
The race was won by Shields of Pennsylvania 
State in the fast time of four minutes, twenty- 
two and two-fifths seconds. L. A. Browne of 
the University of Pennsylvania was second, and 
Crawford of Lafayette third. According to the 
Boston Herald Goodwin "romped home a fight- 
ing fourth." 



80 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the college year by the 

Bowdoin Publishing Company in the interest of 

the students of Bowdoin College. 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Editor-in-Chief 

Edward B. Ham, 1922 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 News Editor 

Floyd A. Gerrard, 1923 Athletics 

Karl R. Philtrkk, 1923 Fa-ulty Notes 

George H. Quinby, 1923 Alumni Department 

F. King Turgeon, 1923 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
John L. Berry, 1921 Crosby E. Redman, 1921 

Harry Helscn. 1921 Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

George E. Houghton, 1921 William R. Luddcn, 1922 

Russell M. McGowan. 1921 Roland L. McCormack, 1922 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. Baardman, 1921 Business Manager 

Frederic A. Allen. 1922 Assistant Manager 

Wilfred R. Brewer, 1922 Assistant Manager 

All communications regarding subscriptions should be ad- 
dressed to the Business Manager of the Bowdoin Publishing 
Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, 10 cents. 

Vol. L. JUNE 4, 1920. No. 9 

Entered at Post Office at Brunswickas Second-Class Mail Matter 

Some Aspects of 

American Leadership 

These States of ours are united and we are 
all peoples of this union, all Americans though 
we come from far separated portions of this 
great country. At our several places of resi- 
dence we are all interested in the affairs of our 
own town or city, county or parish and our 
State. Each honorable citizen knows and feels 
a responsibility and should take a keen interest 
in the problems facing his community and in the 
plans for bettering it, be it large or small, near 
to him in ties of long residence or just a child 
of his recent adoption. 

Each of you wants your community, your State 
to be leader, each of you wish to see the object 
of your affection placed at the head. But you 
wish to see it as a leader by leading, by straight 
achievement, by bettering itself and not a leader 
by the destruction of its neighbors. In fact each 
of you wish to aid by every means in your power 
to better your community and thus aid your- 
selves. 

Though we may be members of different com- 
munities and different states we all have one 
common love and one common duty. Our love 



prompts us to do our duty, our love for these 
states as a country prompts us to do our very 
level best as our duty. We wish to see our 
country in the place of leadership but of honor- 
able leadership justly attained through advance- 
ment, through progress, by bettering itself not 
by the dominion and destruction of its fellow 
nations. Our cry is "American Leadership" and 
not "American Dominance.'' Too many nations 
have been examples of Dominance and they are 
gone. 

Where there is a leading nation there must 
be a leader of that nation. For every society 
and organization of men must have a leader, 
one to follow, and that organization is judged 
to a large extent by that leader (through him) 
must be expressed the ideals and attainments of 
his people. The highest ideals of that people 
must be his ideals and he must be a leader of 
the whole people, though not a composite figure 
of the people — not merely the reflection of the 
people but a real leader who leads and one worthy 
to follow and worthy of the confidence of his 
followers who trust him. 

The aspects of such a leader are to be con- 
sidered, — those aspects above mere executive 
ability, the qualities which are not usually con- 
sidered but are usually taken for granted. As 
America is a leading. nation so Americans are 
in some way usually leaders and have been since 
America came into being. It might be said that 
one of the inborn characteristics of an American 
is leadership. This is shown in many and varied 
ways, in trade, in production, in science and even 
in the physical development of our athletes as 
one Englishman asked and then answered, "Why 
does America usually beat us in international 
competition?" and then the answer, "It is be- 
cause in the United States athletics are treated 
as a science and America leads, setting records 
which we seldom equal." 

The new era just opening contains new prob- 
lems and new issues which must be met. How 
to meet, to cope with and then attain the end 
through the fight depends on the qualities of the 
new leadership which must be developed. And 
yet these qualities are not new, they are old, 
as old as is leadership, we all know them though 
perhaps do not think of them as qualities of 
leadership. They are old but they must be 
grasped with as warm a welcome as though just 
discovered and included with as much fervor as 
though a new found friend and guarded as 
though an ancient and honorable heritage from 
our fathers. 





Paul Herford Eames 

Marshal 



Roderick Lawrence Perkins 

Chairman Ivy Committee and 
Manager of Baseball 




Alexander Thomson 

Popular Man 





Robert Winthrop Morse 

Class Poet and 
Chairman of Quill Board 



George Jordan Cumming 

Class Chaplain 





John Garnett Young 

Class Orator 



Philip Robinson Lovell 

Class President 




Joseph Lynwood Badger 

Class Odist and 
Chairman-elect of Quill Board 





Samuel Cummings Buker 

Manager of Track 



Merritt Lawrence Willson 

Class Vice President and 
Manager of Football 




1921 BUGLE BOARD 

Halpin Howard Schonland Ormerod Lovell Coburne 

Hatch St. Clair Crowell Ryder Young Cook 




Russell Miller McGown 

Class Secretary and Treasurer and 

President N. E. Intercollegiate 

Y. M. C. A. 





Norman William Haines 

Editor-in-chief of the Orient and 
Manager of Tennis 



Kenneth Sheffeld Boardman 

Business Manager of the Bowdoin 
Publishing Co. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



81 



The leaders of the new age must be imbued 
with that necessary and first quality of sincere 
conviction. He must be one who searches for 
the truth, searches for a sure foundation for his 
belief, one who will sacrifice in order to attain 
and hold as his own the truth as he sees it. Sound 
convictions are builded on time and study, sure 
belief is founded on whole testimony and not on 
half truths. Sincere conviction as a quality of a 
man shows love for truth and honesty and this 
love can never die. His convictions must not 
tend toward stubbornness and the attitude that a 
sincere mind is always in the right must not be 
his attitude. But he must believe that a different 
way is not, necessarily, an inferior way. 

The second quality of leadership which must 
be in the mind of those leaders of America is a 
sincere courage of conviction. As a true belief 
in the truth as he sees it is important so a cour- 
age to proclaim or defend this conviction should 
be his strong attribute. In this day of striving 
so many who strive for leadership have true 
convictions but when called upon to stand by 
their convictions before adverse and criticising 
audiences they often change or even belittle the 
cause in which they truly believe. The most 
evident example of this is to be found in the 
stand a man takes for Christian ideals. With 
himself and friends and Christians he is sincere 
and proclaims his beliefs, but when placed in the 
other crowd, where the atmosphere is different 
and criticism is paramount it would be a difficult 
task to even obtain his beliefs and next to im- 
possible to have him defend them. He loves 
and believes in his convictions but has not the 
courage to back them up, not even the courage 
to face an unsympathetic audience. But the 
leaders of this new era should have courage — 
courage to face adverse audiences, courage to 
cling to a belief and defend it as long as it is 
truly a belief — not merely one who caters to 
public opinion changing as the audience is 
changed but one who has the sincere courage 
of his conviction. 

Another attribute to be included is that of 
education — not necessarily so much book and 
laboratory knowledge, not memory only, but real 
education, that four square kind that is the ideal 
of most of us. The education of a man widens 
his field of vision, it broadens, and in this way 
aids the man to see as others see, and yet not 
forsake his own way unless firmly convinced 
of a better. As our late great American, Roose- 
velt, was a truly educated man so should the 
future leaders be, men acquainted with books, 
methods, literature, and best of all with nature's 



laws, for we have often read that "nature's laws 
are Gods thoughts" and every one, leader or no, 
needs such thoughts. That which has led our 
great leaders as Lincoln and Roosevelt to seek 
higher and nobler things will lead our future 
leaders to higher and nobler ambitions and on- 
ward and upward. 

These must be qualities of leadership, attri- 
brites of an American leader and yet that is not 
all. There remains yet that something, that 
guidance, that real fountain within the man, that 
punch, that ruling power that makes him fit for 
leadership, makes him worthy the confidence and 
trust of Americans who follow him. Other great 
Americans have had it, likewise the great men 
of the world. And now in this time of turmoil 
and striving ahead it is needed badly and should 
be considered an essential of leadership. It is 
that which gave Washington his desire to lead 
the stragglers and enabled him to quietly govern 
them and be their leader. This quality was ever 
present in Franklin and was a rule of his life. 
Likewise Marshall and Jefferson, lived by it and 
were lead by it. This quality moved Lincoln, 
made Lincoln, and kept Lincoln a just, beloved, 
reverenced and memorable American. It has 
been present in all truly great men for without 
it no one is truly great. Sometimes it is called 
one thing and sometimes another yet it does not 
change. It is not fame, it is not money, it can't 
be bought and it won't be sold. We shall call it 
Christianity. It is not creed, it is not theology, 
it is not ceremony nor is it form. It is a living, 
working, leading, and livable power which 
enables a man to. go beyond himself, beyond the 
mere present with its rewards, it is the applica- 
tion of the Golden Rule, it is to follow in daily 
walk and service after Him who served humanity 
beyond humanity's power of appreciation. This 
attribute when possessed by a man rounds out 
his character, his life, and his soul. Makes him 
able to give his best for his America and makes 
him able to present himself as a servant to his 
fellow man though he holds the highest post in 
the land. True Christian living must be the 
dominating desire and the inspiring attribute of 
those leaders of America who shall come in the 
future, who shall come from this student gener- 
ation. 

Not new yet always new and yet an ancient 
heritage from all of the best generations, some- 
thing to cling to, something we shall guard and 
cherish. These are some aspects of American 
leadership. 

John G. Young. 



82 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



SPRING VISION. 

Light through the trees a spring wind blowing, 
Mysterious south wind, past all knowing. 

Caressingly sweet. 
Vague in our hearts a strange warmth growing, 
Restless our feet to be new roads going, 

Carelessly fleet. 

Hot shining sun through a dull gold haze, 
Heavy the scent from the lilac sprays. 

Lone singing thrush. 
Slow heaving ocean, shi'ouded in grays, 
Ships that pass silently out on their ways, 

Mystical hush. 

Happy the poet in spring's returning. 
After the winter of toilsome learning, 

Keenly to feel. 
"Well may he pause to praise spring's burning. 
Rightly he loveth her uncharted yearning. 

Subtle appeal. 



What is the song of this dreamer of dream 
What says this watcher of meadow streams 

To you and me? 
For greater than self the poet seems. 
He speaks for all with his idle dreams ; 

What does he see? 

Just eighty picked and racing men, 
And eighty striving minds on fire ! 
Man yearning toward the light again 
With unappeasable desire ! 
And eighty wills that shift and surge 
With dizzy madness in the heat, 
On, on, with youth's resplendent urge 
To summon death to dull defeat. 
And evermore these warriors steel 
Their purpose with the sense of right, 
And after the fervor still they feel 
Ideals that began the fight. 



-Robert Winthrop Mors 



IVY DAY ODE 

(Air: All Those Endearing Young Charms.) 

O dear Bowdoin, this ivy we plant by thy wall, 

Is a symbol of love ever true. 
And the sight of it ever shall mem'ries recall, 

Sweet mem'ries, dear Bowdoin. of you. 
Three years we have spent in the shade of thy pines, 

Three years with true happiness bright. 
And the ivy shall grow to encircle the shrines. 

Of the days when our hearts were so light. 

In the days yet to come when life's highway seems hard, 

And we're tired of work without cease, 
We'll turn back to the spot that our ivy will guard; 

And find that in Bowdoin is peace. 
So grow, blessed ivy, and with thy green arms. 

Bind closer our friendship for aye. 
That our hearts may turn back from the world's fierce alarm 

To the spot where we linger today. 

— Joseph Lynwood Badger 



Our Dead — The Gallant Unreturning 

At the Memorial Day exercises in Chapel last 
Sunday, the list of Bowdoin and Brunswick men 
dead in the war was read by President Sill?. 
Professor Burnett's address was especially beau- 
tiful in feeling for Bowdoin dead and happy in 
expression of th,e common aim for living and 
dead; moreover it gave challenge so well to the 
ignoble elements at work today among the na- 
tions that the Orient is glad to give it place, re- 
gretting the few abridgments necessary, m a 
number devoted so completely to the festivities 
of the present. 

"This is the day for the praise of the dead, — our dead : 
the youths who but yesterday crowded with the others into 
these seats at Chapel and vespers and did the things you 
do ; our dead, who, born and growing up in this village, 
exchanged the easy, friendly life of our peaceful com- 
munity for ways that first amaze and rack the soul with 
pain and fearful turmoil and peals of doom before the 
exhausted frame is stricken with eternal quiet ; cur dead, 
from homes in every corner of our land ; our dead — dare I 
say it? — from homes across the sea, of whom Rickard once 
wrote : 'That frail human lives should struggle so and 
suffer so for such an eternity is beyond comprehension.' 

"But thus to praise the dead is but another way to praise 
the living — the gallant returning ; — you living, who, scat- 
tered among this company, from Freshman bench to Senior, 
wagered all, as did your fallen comrades, but have been 
kept for further tasks. 

"Yet this is also a day of mourning, of bitter moum'ng, 
for the dead, — for their great and eager hopes stricken with 
blight; a day of brooding sorrow for our own fickle hearts 
(or is it our leaders?) ; for ourselves, the living, that are 
becoming traitors to our dead ; traitors to those living also 
whose hurt and broken bodies present to daily gaze the 
price-mark of their devotion. They gave their youth away 
for a new world. Dare I say that this was their motive? 
Dare I say that men everywhere, among the allied nations, 
accepted the call to enter the Valley of Death, consented 
to their own destruction, because they somehow felt that 
in this huge and dreadful endeavor we were trying to alter 
the face of the world, by establishing a better relation, yes, 
a friendly relation among the peoples ? Oh, I know that 
this was often a dumb aspiration ; that commonplace ex- 
pression of commonplace motives could be quoted from many 
a soldier's lips to refute me. But was it to such common- 
places that the heart warmed and the blood ran full? Where 
now is their high hope of friendly peoples — the hope of these 
dead ? Now, but eighteen months after armistice, where 
are those friendly relations among nations? 

"In the press of the struggle it seemed that they believed 
in each other. On at least one great occasion Woodrow 
Wilson could venture a great appeal to the sense of com- 
mon good even in the foe, — an appeal against the Germans, 
running mad in the world, to a truer Germany, hidden in 
the souls of that nation, misled by its leaders, self-deceived, 
if you will, but not beyond the reach of a friendly voice 
of reason, appealing to manhood, assuring a nation, on for- 
saking its false leaders, its false gods, of a welcome into 
the family of nations. 

"With victory came a loss more terrible in portent for 
the future than losses in battle; the allied nations lost their 
faith in each other. And soon each nation gave grounds 
to all for this distrust of each. Demands for the fulfillment 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



83 



of secret treaties written in the old spirit of distrust, de- 
mands for overwhelming the foe with economic burdens, 
when that foe was struggling out of its ancient, misfit form 
of government, demands for coasts here and mines there ; 
for the principle of the self-determination of peoples when 
it worked one way and rejection of the principle when it 
worked the other. And now, even America, who, we may 
say in all humility, had no selfish interest to promote and 
was standing for the common good of peoples, in the dark 
days of the Conference, and looked on, heart sick, at that 
unregenerate struggle : — even America, alarmed at its own 
venture in moral greatness, is hurrying back to isolation 
and sauve qui pcut, 

"Was it natural to hate the foe? Beyond a doubt? If 
it be a question of their right to complain, surely, surely 
they can have no such right. The book of their judgment 
is complete. But has this treatment served the interests 
of the allied peoples themselves ? Did it bind up to heal- 
ing processes the wounds of the nations ? Nay, rather, 
it gave acid for balm and bound these wounds with iron ; 
till now it begins to seem that the victorious nations have 
not had the wisdom of even the serpent. I think the very 
deact must mourn. 

"The hcnored survivors of that other great struggle, our 
Civil War, have quite another retrospect. A heavy price, 
a dreadful price, they gave ; still the nation received that 
precious thing for which they were paying. But the boys 
of this later struggle ! Who of us that, in the general 
mourning, reserves a special pang for some one dead soldier 
friend, can look at his pictured face without a poignant 
regret at the contrast ? 

"Who is to blame? I think it is a tragedy of our human 
nature, whether it be in leaders or in led, in a man or in 
a people. Power makes us selfish. Alas, for (he human 
heart, so great in peril, when a people is on trial for its 
defense of an unselfish cause, not counting too great any 
cost of its best selfish treasures ; but shrunken lo such 
mean dimensions, when turned to its private pains ! 

"The way out, for the peoples, from our valley of hu- 
miliation, seems to be the way along which we Americans 
had begun to venture ; — the way of belief in our fellow- 
men, the way of international confidence and kindnes.s ; the 
way of faith that, as a man's good is the common good, 
so the nation's good, no less, is in the good of all the 
nations. So foolish this principle seems to a man or 
nation in the effrontery of power ; so inevitably does its 
abandonment lay us in the dust. 

"John Hay once said to a Harvard audience that the 
only working principle of diplomacy was the Golden F.uJe. 

"We have tried distrust ; we know into what miseries this 
has plunged the world. Youth has had the faith ; the seers 
of the world, whether old or young, have had it. He had 
it in whose honor the noble gateway is rising yonder on the 
Campus. He had it who said: 'He that would save his 
life must lose it.' 

"Men of Bowdoin, fellow-townsmen, shall we keep pact 
with our dead?" 



Interscholastic Tennis Tournament 

The annual Bowdoin Interscholastic Tennis 
Tournament, interrupted two weeks ago by rain, 
was finished last week-end at Lewiston by the 
courtesy of the Bates management. Hebron 
Academy won both the singles and the doubles, 
with Kimball Fisher starring. 



The summary : 

SINGLES. 

(First Round) 

McLeary of Hebron defeated Pierce of 

Cony 6—2 2—6 6—3 

Robinson of Gorham, who had drawn a bye, 

defeated McLeary 1—6 13—11 8 — 6 

Smith of Rum ford defeated Hough of 
Sanford 5—7 7—5 6—3 

Conant of Edward Little defeated Senter 
of Brunswick 6 — 1 7 — 5 

LaCourse of Rumford defeated Webber of 

Gardiner By default 

Goodwin of Sanford and Trasker of 
Gardiner won from the two representa- 
tives of Oak Grove By default 

Whittle of Edward Little defeated Parrott 

of Cony ; 6—4 5—7 6—0 

Fisher of Hebron defeated Priest of 

Brunswick 6 — 6 — 2 

(Second Round) 

Conant defeated LaCourse 3 — 6 6 — 2 7 — 5 

Goodwin defeated Trasker 6—3 7 — 5 

Fisher defeated Whittle 6—0 6—0 

(Semi-Finals) 

Fisher defeated Goodwin 6—1 6 — 1 

DOUBLES. 
(First Round) 

Pierce and Parrott of Cony defeated 

Whittle and Fogg of Edward Little 8—6 4—6 7—5 

Bishop and Ormsby of Brunswick defeated 
Hough and Goodwin of Sanford 6 — 1 6 — 2 

Fisher and McLeary of Hebron defeated La- 
Course and Smith of Rumford 6 — 1 6 — 3 

(Semi-Finals) 

Cony drew a bye. Hebron defeated Bruns- 
wick 6—2 6—1 

(Final) 

Hebron defeated Cony 6—0 6—1 

Note. — It has been impossible to secure the 
scores of the last three matches of the singles 
tournament from the Bates management. 



Bates Wins Close Game 

On Bowdoin's Errors 



Flinn Hit Only Once After Second Inning — 

Doherty Scores Three Hits — Bates Almost 

Sure of Championship. 



In an exciting game decided by errors, Bow- 
doin lost to Bates last Monday at Lewiston, 3 to 
2. Bowdoin had a number of chances to score 
in the latter part of the game, but the team 
seemed to lack the punch to put a tally across. 
Bates scored twice in the first inning on two hits, 
a sacrifice, and two errors. 

Bowdoin scored in the second when Doherty 
singled, went to third when Donahue heaved the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ball past first on Handy's grounder, and reached 
home on a wild pitch. In the fifth Clifford 
singled, Flinn sacrificed, and tallied on a wild 
pitch by Johnston. 

Bates won the game in the fifth when Donahue 
walked, and scored on Doherty's error after 
reaching third. 

In the sixth Doherty tripled to right, and al- 
most made it another homer, but Van Vloten 
managed to put the ball on him just too soon. 
The Bowdoin left fielder repeated his stunt of 
three hits as in the Maine game. 

Flinn pitched a good game, good enough to 
win, holding Bates to five hits, while Bowdoin 
got seven. After the second inning Bates got 
only one scratch hit. 

The summary : 

BOWDOIN 

ab r bh po a e 

Needelman, cf 4 1 

Cook, 2b 4 1 1 2 1 

Smith, 3b 3 2 3 

Morrell, ss 4 3 4 2 

Doherty. If 4 1 3 1 

Handy, c 4 4 3 

Hall, rf 4 1 

Clifford, lb 3 1 1 14 

Flinn, p 3 8 1 

Totals 33 2 7 24 20 5 

BATES 

ab r bh po a e 

Dillon, 2b 4 1 2 4 4 

Wiggin. cf 4 1 2 1 

Sauvage, 3b 2 1 5 2 

Donahue, ss 3 1 1 2 2 

Langley, rf 4 1 1 

VanVloten, c 4 9 1 

Burns, lb 4 11 

Ebner, If 3 

Johnston, p ' 3 3 

Totals 31 3 B 27 16 4 

Bowdoin 1 1 0—2 

Bates 2 1 x— 3 

Earned run: Bowdoin. Three-base hit: Doherty. Sacrifice 
hits: Smith, Flinn. Sauvage. Stolen bases: Needelman, Wig- 
gin, Langley. First base on balls: off Flinn 2, off Johnston 3. 
First base on errors : Bowdoin 3, Eates 3. Left on bases : 
Bowdom 9, Bates 8. Wild pitches: Flinn. Johnston 2. Hit 
by pitcher: by Flinn (Ebner). Struck out: by Flinn 4, by 
Johnston 7. Umpire, J. Carrigan. Time, 2.10. 



"Peace in England" 

The following is from a timely communica- 
tion of Professor William Hawley Davis in Lon- 
don, written at the request of the Editor of the 
Quill, but received too late for insertion in the 
June number. It is here printed for its decided 
contribution to our knowledge of the war's after- 
math in England. 



"Service ribbons come first to my mind. There is ap- 
parently no English badge corresponding directly to our 
American Legion or service buttons. Instead, the Eng- 
lish ex-service man wears his service ribbon, always en his 
left breast — the news vender on his great coat, the cabman 
and the constable likewise, the boots or the door-tender on 
his sack coat, and many a truly modest chap on his waist- 
coat. We encountered these ribbons immediately upon leav- 
ing New York ; scarcely a steward, and certanly not an 
officer of the vessel was without a set of ribbons, formed 
into a narrow band, on his coat or jacket. In England, 
and notably in London, the bands are everywhere. Some 
appear to indicate limited or inconspicuous participation in 
the war ; others, especially those displayed by stalwart fel- 
lows still in khaki, extend to two strips or rows which 
would measure nine inches or a foot in all, and which 
cause amazement at the limits of human luck, pluck and 
endurance. 

"English real estate is likewise, so to speak, still in 
khaki. Through the length of what was the pond in St. 
James's Park runs a continuous war building ; there are 
more on the noble terraces near the Mall, more here 
and there on the Strand and throughout London — tempor- 
ary structures, often covering great space, rapidly ap- 
proximating in outward appearance the New England 
abandoned farm or dwelling place, but still for the most 
part occupied. One reaches the entrance to the great 
Tate Gallery only to find the structure tenanted by a war 
bureau. London residences, noble and commonplace alike, 
are still placarded as war offices of various designations ; 
one I pass frequently, not without an impulse to salute, is 
marked "Officers' Estates." And in Kensington Gardens, 
all through Holland Park near it, on a slope of Primrose 
Hill, and here and there in even small villages and towns, 
are now being busily sowed and planted what we call war- 
gardens : close up to the wall of the Congregational Chapel 
in rural Freshwater Bay are rows of potato plants. 

"Wounded, disabled men, are less conspicuous than I had 
supposed they would be. True, the boots and man of all 
work at our 'residential hotel' is a casualty — 'shiapr.el: 
early in the War ;' and behind a temporary hospital for 
wounded officers opening upon a beautiful enclosed garden 
I saw a tall young fellow bounding along on crutches anJ 
one leg. Occasionally a wheeled chair or invalid's tricycle, 
hand-propelled, is seen crossing Trafalgar Square. And a 
few well-nigh demolished London beggars and colored- 
crayon artists admit that they were soldiers. But in general 
the object lesson of shattered human beings is not thrust 
upon the visitor here. Perhaps these men, really numerous, 
are merely conforming to the fine English custom of con- 
cealing what is emotional or dramatic. 

"The more far-reaching effects of the war upon British 
civilization, I am of course njt qualified to indicate. One 
Sunday afternoon we observed in Hyde Park a tremendous 
gathering of demobilized soldiers and sailors. Chapters of 
an organization similar to our Legion marched into the 
park, eaih chapter with its tanner, and often with some 
of its disabled members in a motor truck or a delivery 
wagon. They were from all sectiens of London and its 
suburbs, men crowding, eager, obviously of all ranks and 
types and dispositions, but unified by an experience and 
united in a temper which our great college and com- 
munity gatherings only feebly counterfeit. On into the 
great open park they came. The newspapers estimated the 
numbers, I believe, at eight thousand. At last the group 
near which I stood became reasonably quiet as one of their 
leaders from the body of a truck addressed them on the 
subject of some resolutions in favor of Parliamentary con- 
sideration or redress which .he gathering had been si_m- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



85 



moned to endorse. And as I overheard the phrases 'we who 
have saved the country' and 'enable us and our families 
to live in decency,' I wondered if chance had led me to 
witness part of a great militant movement. But since the 
action proposed was only political, and since the men 
of the group are so sensible and harmless as I rub elbows 
with them on bus and subway train each day, I conclude 
that they are once for all demobilized. 



Bowdoin Tennis Team Cleans 

Up For State Championship 

At the Maine Intercollegiate Tournament in 
Orono, May 26 and 27, Bowdoin carried off the 
honors in both singles and doubles. Captain 
Partridge of Bowdoin was the individual star of 
the tournament, winning the singles finals against 
Woodman of Maine. Although handicapped by 
cramps during the latter part of his match, Cap- 
tain Partridge pluckily kept in the game. Cap- 
tain Partridge, with H. Bishop, also won the 
doubles finals against the Bates team, composed 
of Roberts and Lesieur. 

The summary : 

SINGLES. 

(First Round) 

Woodman of Maine defeated Woodman of 

Bates 6—1 1—6 S— 6 

H. Bishop of Bowdoin defeated Kirsch- 

baum of Bates 7 — 5 6 — 2 

Partridge of Bowdoin defeated Gow of 

Colby 7_5 6 — 2 

D. Smith of Colby, defeated Trafton of 

Maine 6—2 6—3 

(Semi-Finals) 
Woodman of Maine defeated H. Bishop of 

Bowdoin 1 — 6 6 — 1 6 — 2 

Partridge of Bowdoin defeated D. Smith 

of Colby 6 — 3 C— 3 

(Final) 
Partridge of Bowdoin defeated Woodman 

of Maine 8 — 6 2 — 6 6 — 4 6 — 4 

DOUBLES. 

(First Round) 

Roberts and Lesieur of Bates defeated 

Merrow and Woodman of Maine 4 — 6 8 — 6 6 — 1 

M. H. Smith and L. Bishop of Bowdoin 

defeated Avery and Trafton of Maine,. 6 — 2 6—3 

Gow and Smith of Colby defeated Wood- 
ward and Woodman of Bates 8 — S 5 — 7 6 — 3 

Partridge and H. Bishop of Bowdoin de- 
feated Hatch and Black of Colby 6 — 6 — 2 

(Semi-Finals) 

Roberts and Lesieur of Bates defeated M. 

H. Smith and L. Bishop of Bowdoin.... 2 — 6 6 — 3 6 — 4 

Partridge and H. Bishop of Bowdoin de- 
feated Gow and Smith of Colby 6—1 7—5 

(Finals) 

Partridge and H. Bishop of Bowdoin de- 
feated Roberts and Lesieur of Bates .... 6 — 3 6 — 2 6 — 4 



Portland Country Club Wins 

From Bowdoin Golfers 

Last Saturday for the first time a golf team 
representing the College played against another 
organization. A team of seven men, consisting 
of Adams '20, Boardman '20, Graves '20, J. B. 
Ham '20, McClave '20, Rounds '20, and Richards 
'22, played the Portland Country Club. Bow- 
doin's opponents included Turner, last year's 
State champion, Campbell, the runner-up to 
Turner, and a number of other high-grade 
golfers of the State. Bowdoin lost all the seven 
matches, but this might be expected upon con- 
sidering the expert calibre of the Portland men, 
and also the fact that the Bowdoin players had 
never gone over the Portland course before. 
Richards and Boardman put up the best game 
for the losers. 



ENGLISH LITERATURE COURSES RE- 
ARRANGED 

Professor Elliott's courses will be rearranged as below, 
for 1920-1921, and designed for Juniors and Seniors only. 
But Sophomores intending to major in English, and other 
Sophomores who have special reasons, may be admitted 
to courses 13-14 [or 17-18] on consulting Professor Elliott : 
consultation hour, 7-8 every evening, at 254 Maine street. 
Conference groups will be held in all courses. Required for 
Major: Courses 15. 16, and four chosen from Courses 3, 
10, 12; 13, 14; 17, 18; 19, 20. 

13-14. Shakespeare and the Drama. All of Shakespeare's 
principal plays will be read, and the most important will 
be studied in detail. The course will include an account of 
the history of the drama, and passing attention will be 
given to plays outside Shakespeare. Designed for Juniors. 
Open also to Seniors. Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 10.30. 

15-16. The Renaissance and Milton. The history of Eng- 
lish literature will be followed from its beginning to the 
end of the eighteenth century. For special study: Chaucer, 
Spenser, the Elizabethan lyric, Shakespeare's King Lear, 
Milton. Pope, and Swift. Main attention will be given to 
Milton, and Paradise Lost will be studied entire. Designed 
for Seniors. Open also to Juniors. Required for Major. 
Tuesday, Thursday. Friday, 2.30. 

The above courses will be omitted in 1921-22 and given 
in 1922-23. The courses named below will be omitted in 
1920-21 and given in 1921-22. 

[17-18. Earlier Nineteenth Century. Mainly poetry. For 
special study : Wadsworth, Coleridge, Byron. Shelley, Keats ; 
Browning, Emerson's prose and poetry. Designed for 
Juniors. Open also to Seniors. M, W, F, 10.30.] 

[10-20. Later Nineteenth Century. Mainly prose. For 
special study: Newman, Carlyle, Ruskin, Tennyson and 
Longfellow and other Victorian poets, Arnold, poetry from 
Whitman to the present. Designed for Seniors. Open also 
to Juniors. T, Th, F, 2.30.] 



INTERFRATERNITY BASEBALL. 

Kappa Sigma 5, Beta Theta Pi 2. 

Chi Psi 11, Sigma Nu 6. 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 18, Alpha Delta Phi 8. 



$6 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



MUSICAL CLUB ELECTIONS. 

Wednesday, May 26, the Musical Clubs elected 
Ryder '21 manager, for next year Iir with Wood- 
bury '22 as assistant manager. Sprince '21 was 
elected leader of the Mandolin Club and Lyseth 
'21 leader of the Glee Club. Manager Berry 
'20 submitted his report showing the com- 
pletion of a most successful year, with fifty dol- 
lars remaining in the treasury. 



Campus Ji3etos 

Owing to the lack of space in this number it is 
necessary to omit a number of items of news, 
which would have been printed in an ordinary 
issue. 

At a meeting of the Orient board last Tues- 
day, K. R. Philbrick was elected as the fourth 
member of the board from the Class of 1923. 

In addition to those nominees given in last 
week's Orient, the candidates for the presidency 
of the Bowdoin Y. M. C. A. have been an- 
nounced. Cong-don '22, Mc Curdy '22, and Towle 
'22 are to be voted on, the highest man winning 
the presidency and the second highest the vice- 
presidency. 

Flynn ex-'2i was on the campus last Friday. 

On Thursday afternoon of this week General 
Pershing visited the College from two to two- 
thirty, and spoke under the Thorndike Oak. The 
party consisted of General Pershing and four of 
his personal attendants: Adj. Gen. Presson, Capt. 
F. H. Farnham, Col. Greenlaw, and Sergeant 
James L. Boyle; Capt. L. M. Hart, member of 
the executive council, and representatives of the 
Maine daily papers. 



alumni Department 

'13 — Fred D. Wish, Jr., has been appointed 
executive secretary of the Connecticut State 
Teachers' Association's general committee, which 
has charge of the campaign for the improvement 
of educational conditions in the State. Mr. Wish 
is teacher of civics at the Hartford High School. 

'14 — Lewis T. Brown is one of the superin- 
tendents at the Bates Mfg. Co., manufacturers 
of cotton goods, Lewiston, Me. W. E. Mason, Jr., 
is associated with the E. A. Strout Farm Agency, 
Greenfield, Mass. P. H. Pope, M. A., is teaching 
at the University of Pittsburgh. A. L. Pratt is 
with the Texas Steamship Co., Bath, Me. E. S. 
Thompson is a bond salesman for Hornblower 
& Weeks, Portland, Me. 




THE BRUNSWICK 

Convenient to the theatre and 
shopping districts. 

The sort of Hotel guests 
visit once and return to every 
time they come to Boston. 

Boylston St. at Copley Sq. 




THE LENOX 

In the center of Boston's 
Back Bay residential district. 
For many years a stopping 
place for college teams. 
The "Old Grad" claims it 
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BOWDOIN ORIENT 



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Warren Eastman Robinson Memorial Gateway 



JUNE 24, 1920 



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BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



VOL. L 



THURSDAY, JUNE. 24, 1920 



NO. 10 



Dedication of Robinson Gateway 




LIEUT. WARREN EASTMAN ROBINSON '10 
Killed in Action November 6, 1918, to whose 
Memory the Robinson Gateway is Dedicated. 



A most important feature of the Commencement 
program was the dedication of the Warren Eastman 
Robinson Memorial Gateway, Wednesday afternoon. 
Robert Hale 'jo, a classmate of Lieut. Robinson, spoke 
in behalf of Mrs. Anne Louise Robinson, who makes 
this beautiful memorial gift to the college. The fol- 
lowing is quoted from his address, which was of un- 
usual beauty in word and thought. 

Warren Eastman Robinson entered Bowdoin a boy 
just passed sixteen, the youngest of his class. Beneath 
the charm of his boyishness there underlay maturity 



of purpose and stability of character. These innate 
qualities of manliness joined to a singular good humor, 
a rare capacity for friendship, a quick intelligence, and 
a discriminating intellect made him at once a leader 
in our undergraduate life. He graduated summa cum 
laude and embarked immediately on what he designed 
for his life career, the work of a teacher of science 
and mathematics. But "the end men look for cometh 
not, and a path there is where no man thought." 

Lieut. Robinson first went into the front line with 
his unit in the Chemin des Dames sector early in 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



February. 1918, and remained with them until the 
spring. 

He was in the thick of the July fighting in the 
Pas Fini sector Northwest of Chateau Thierry that 
saved Paris and crushed the last German offensive of the 
war. Here he was cited in divisional orders for 
bravery. Then in September began the forty days of 
the St. Mihiel fighting and after ten days rest he was 
with his unit in the line again, this time in the 
Neptune sector, north of Verdun, and East of the 
Meuse. The glorious dawn of victory was breaking 
over those shattered trenches. On November 5th, he 
was chosen to conduct a difficult piece of reconnaisance 
in the German lines. Though grievously wounded in 
the enemy's wire entanglements, he succeeded in lead- 
ing his men back to their own lines. On the next day, 
he succumbed to his wounds and died. The deed of 
gallantry that cost him his life won him a recommenda- 
tion for the Distinguished Service Cross. 

He was of the lads who "kept their rendezvous with 
death." who "poured out the fed sweet wine of youth," 
who with a song "went down to join the tide of t^ie 
gallant unreturning." 

One likes to recall the words of Pericles at the 
burial of the first Athenians who fell in the Pelopon- 
nesian War 'Bestowing thus their lives on the public, 
they have everyone received a praise that will never 
decay ; a sepulchre that will always be most illustrious ; 
not that in which their bones lie mouldering, but that 
in which their fame is preserved, to be on every oc- 
casion when honour is the employ of either word or 
act eternally remembered. This whole earth is the 
sepulchre of illustrious men ; . . ." 

Warren Robinson's was of. these brave hearts knit 
by war in one intrepid brotherhood, the brotherhood of 
the invincible spirit of man. Only by deed and by 
devotion can we keep the faith with such as he. But 
of such devotion men may create visible symbols. And 
so this gateway austerely simple is given to the college 
by the generosity of his wife, Anne Louise Robinson, 
in perpetual memory of her husband and of those 
principles of loyalty, of sacrifice, and of devotion for 
which he so nobly lived and so gloriously died. • 

Mr. President, in the name of Anne Louise Robinson, 
I ask you to accept for the college this gateway erected 
to the memory of her husband, Warren Eastman Rob- 
inson, of the class of 19 10. May it forever be to 
Bowdoin men a hallowed reminder of their heroic 
brother, and a symbol of that strait gate which leadeth 
unto life. 

President Sills in his address of acceptance for the 
college spoke as follows : 

Mrs. Robinson, Mr. Hale, Ladies and Gentlemen : 

After the eloquent words which you have just heard 
it only remains for me very briefly and very gratefully 
to accept in the name of Bowdoin College this very 
beautiful gateway which shall, as long as the college 
endures, bear the name of one of her most gallant 
sons. To those of us who know the college intimately 
this gift means very much. With it are associated two 
honored Bowdoin names, the devoted interest of the 
donor, the memory of a vivid and beautiful character 
who gave his all — no less — and whose body rests far 
from here beneath the heroic wooden cross in France. 
It all means much today ; but it will mean more and 
more as the years go on. Like other memorials it will 
exert an untold and unconscious influence on generation 



after generation of college youth who will pass through 
its graceful portal. On the walls of another New Eng- 
land college there is a bronze tablet in memory of 
some students who were killed fighting in the Revolu- 
tion ; and the inscription is the precious line from 
Horace : 

Dulcc et decorum est pro patria mori. 

A few years ago a young French instructor at that 
college passed by and read the words, "It would be 
sweet to die for France," he said, and in a few months 
the challenge came, and like a true son of France he 
left his new home and wife and children and met 
death on the field of honor in one of the early en- 
gagements of the war. It may be that a hundred 
years from now some Bowdoin youth passing this gate 
may look up and read, "In Memory of Warren East- 
man Robinson, 1890-1918, Bowdoin '10, First Lieu- 
tenant U. S. Army, Second Battle of the Marne, St. 
Mihiel, Meuse, Argonne. Killed in action." It may be 
that he too will think it sweet to die for his country ; 
and it may be that he will enlist in some future war 
for freedom under the spell of the inspiration of the 
past. Better still is it to think that many a son of 
the college will see in this gateway a symbol indeed 
of the straight and narrow way that leadeth unto 
life but also a memorial to duty simply and fully done ; 
and the expression not only of accomplishment but of 
hope. For what Bowdoin men have done they can do. 
And on every campus not the only teachers are those 
who sit in professors chairs. There is a quaint story 
of Emerson, who when he visited Williams College re- 
marked to the students that in the faculty list in the 
catalogue he noted one remarkable omission — that of 
Mount Graylock. And this gateway with its simple 
dignity and beauty will teach generations yet unborn 
that there is nothing higher or more important than 
service, and nothing fairer than a young life sacrificed 
for country. 

And so by virtue of the authority vested in me as 
President of the College I accept the Warren Eastman 
Robinson Memorial Gateway presented by his widow, 
and I dedicate it to the uses for which it is, intended — 
a memorial to a brave son of the college, and an in- 
spiration to right living and high patriotic service Co 
all who shall pass by. 



BACCALAUREATE ADDRESS 1920. 

Every age of the world's experience seems to re- 
quire a particular virtue. At times mankind needs to 
summon forth all the latent powers of initiative and 
invention and forge ahead on uncharted seas. Then 
again comes the call to gather all the powers of re- 
sistance against tyranny and oppression and to strike 
hotly for freedom. Sometimes the world needs to ex- 
pend energ}' and effort in the acquisition of fresh 
knowledge. Then again when the world that has been 
built up so slowly and painfully at such cost and 
sacrifice seems to be cracking and falling in ruin, there 
comes the time to hold fast, to act with deliberation 
and restraint, to keep the head cool and the passions 
checked. Manifestly such a period is ours today. If 
much that is best in modern civilization is not to go 
to waste, it will be because those who lead will hear 
the call to wisdom and right judgment in all things, 
will refuse to be swayed by prejudice and the preach- 
ing of demagogues and agitators and will hold steady 
though the heavens fall. 

Such an attitude has not at first blush the attraction 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



of a clear clarion call to action ; nor may it fall in 
with the hot desire of youth to reform the world. 
But when there are so many strident voices abroad 
in the world preaching the doctrine of hate and mis- 
trust, urging frantically the opportunity of getting 
while the going is good, there is beyond peradventure 
need of cool, clear thinking and of holding fast to 
that which has been tested and found not wanting. The 
times call for leadership that is forceful and temperate ; 
and when the danger is past, patient still. Since the 
war there has been the inevitable reaction to material 
things, and with it a cynicism that is sweeping us from 
our moorings. Many of the worst forces of human 
nature have been unloosed. The spirit of vandalism is 
abroad in the land ; for one may be a vandal with 
words as well as in deeds. Ungenerous attacks are 
being constantly made upon the principles of American 
democracy. Ignorant alien clamor is too often an- 
swered not by reason but by repression. The forces 
of reaction add recruits by clouding the issues. The 
profiteer doubles his gains by deceit and fraud ; and 
the laborer responds by refusing to do honest solid 
work no matter how high the wage. The wise words 
ascribed to General Baden Powell that only ten years 
after peace has been declared can the real victors of 
the war be determined come overwhelmingly home. 
We need all the intellectual powers with which God 
has endowed us to think through to the right solutions. 
Exhortation we must indeed have ; but the crying need 
today is of quiet reflection and thoughtful action. 

Some one once defined the chief value of education 
to be the ability to discriminate between things that 
difler. To do that requires first an open mind, a 
readiness to receive, a desire to see the other fellow's 
point of view, and always and everywhere the liberal 
spirit. Proper training whether at school or at college 
consists not only of educating the mind but of training 
the taste and the conscience. The object of education 
is indeed to make men free intellectually and spiritually 
and to develop the resourceful mind in the strong 
Christian character. Some times we need to spur on 
to action ; today we ought to recall men to sober 
counsels, to a realization of personal responsibilities. 
The doer of the word has always his opportunity ; now 
we need the thinker too. This age in which we live 
.calls as never before for steadiness. 

Nor is there any doubt that men today as always 
will respond to sober, righteous leadership. To be sure, 
as Wordsworth says : 

"The world is too much with us ; late and soon 
Getting and spending we lay waste our powers.'' 

"Of course the cash bonus is graft; but everyone 
is getting his share — Why not I ?" is a remark that 
has been heard of late. "What's the use of working 
hard; seven dollars a day and loaf as much as you 
will" is the slogan of some artisans. Many a shop 
keeper and grocer and manufacturer with his eye only 
upon exorbitant profits has frankly got all the traffic 
could bear. Not long ago on a freight car not a 
hundred miles from Brunswick there were seen some 
I. W. W. verses intelligently written, the purport of 
which was "Don't hit them too hard ; we have got 
them going now ; be quiet for a while ; what's theirs 
will soon be ours." "The man who works with his 
hands will soon get more ; the man who works with his 
brains will soon get less : the man who does not work at 
all will soon get nothing," is a sentence written by a 



public man whose name is honored all over the land. 
These concrete examples remind us that all is not right 
with the world in which we live ; but as a wise Yankee 
farmer remarked, "It isn't the world that is queer ; 
it's the folks that is in it." And we must always re- 
member the words of Jehovah to Elijah : "Yet have I 
left me seven thousand in Israel, all the knees which 
have not bowed unto Baal and every mouth which has 
not kissed him." For it is good to reflect that now 
as in ancient days high-minded consecrated leadership 
can recall men to their better selves even when they 
have erred and strayed like lost sheep. 

And that is the task of intelligent leadership today — 
to make men and women everywhere see and accept 
their personal . responsibility and to interpret their 
aspirations, so that they will willingly follow. For the 
evils in the body politic, for the ills in the industrial 
world, for weaknesses in the social order we are every 
one of us to blame just so far as our personal in- 
fluence goes. And the trouble is that our influence is 
too largely negative. We think more of rights and 
privileges than of duties and responsibilities. And 
when this is true of well trained thoughtful citizens 
what wonder that the thoughtless and the careless are 
out for all they can get. From college platforms and 
from Christian pulpits should be sounded again and 
again the old truth : "To whom much is given, of them 
much shall be required." The force of example is 
still potent. Duty is a fine virtue to call forth if we 
remember that when we have done what we ought 
to do we have just commenced. Wordsworth in his 
lovely Ode to the stern daughter of the voice of God 
thus concludes : 

"To humbler functions, awful Power 
I call thee ; I myself commend 
Unto thy guidance from this hour ; 
O let my weakness have an end ! 
Give unto me, made lowly wise 
The spirit of self sacrifice ; 
The confidence of reason give ; 
And in the light of truth thy bondman let me live.'' 

With such a conception of duty the man of trained 
and consecrated powers can go forth to teach and to 
preach the doctrine of personal responsibility. For 
when the leaders of a country or a community have 
this sense of duty -others will in their light see light 
and gladly co-operate. 

Another function of sober leadership today is to 
call men everywhere to work. There is a popular 
fallacy that we should pity the toiler. Work is not 
something to be dodged ; it is to be courted and wooed. 
We need to settle down, to mind our own business and 
to work. It is not simply because by increasing pro- 
duction we can cure some of our economic ills. 
Through industry we can also repair the moral fabric 
of the nation. That Satan finds mischief for idle 
hands to do is much more than a Sunday school 
platitude. Restlessness and discontent often do as 
much to break down character as do more open and 
positive sins. We are put here to work. The task 
of intelligent leadership is to see that so far as is 
humanly possible every member of the community has 
the opportunity of working at a task which he likes 
and which will bring him due reward. 

Where working conditions are still unsatisfactory 
improvement should be made even through legislation 
if necessary although much better through co-operation. 



90 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The workman is entitled not only to his hire but to 
the right of intelligent interest in what he is doing. 
Democracy in industry may lead ultimately to a share 
in management and direction ; what ought not to be 
postponed for a moment is a generous attitude in in- 
dustry that will make the humblest employee realize 
his personal responsibility and his personal share. The 
Report of the Second Industrial Conference called by 
President Wilson hits the nail squarely on the head 
when it sets as the aim of industrial reorganization 
"the advantages of that human relationship that 
existed when industries were smaller." "It should 
emphasize the responsibility of managers to know men 
at least as intimately as they know materials, and the 
right and duty of employees to have a knowledge of 
the industry, its policies and processes." 

Men ought to understand what they are doing so 
that they may once more have a creative interest in 
their work. If that interest can be aroused, if in- 
human conditions of working are removed, we can then 
deal severely with the drones and with the agitators. 
Work ought not to be a treadmill for animals ; it ought 
to be a real opportunity for partnership with other men 
and with God to build up a better world. Measured 
by wages alone or hours alone or material benefits 
alone, labor is still of earth, earthy ; translated and 
interpreted as human effort it becomes not only worth 
while (to bring about ideal society), but is illumined 
and vivified. Replace the present low grubbing theory 
of ".get while the going is good" with leadership that 
sees in honest industry not only the nation's salvation 
but the individual's glory, and a part at least of the 
labor problem is solved. 

It is not hard to carry this thought into all the 
relations of life. We need to resist the tendency to 
take things easily, to be indifferent and cynical. We 
need not, to be svire, copy the austere manners of 
the Pilgrim fathers ; but it would be well, as the 
President of Princeton University recently said, if we 
copied their austere morality. We laugh sometimes 
at the New England conscience; but after all that_ 
willingness to work, that dissatisfaction with every- 
thing that is not excellent are pretty admirable traits. 
The early New Englander could not get along with his 
neighbors ; we, his descendants, get along pleasantly 
with everyone. But is not something lost when black 
and white no longer exist and everything is gray? We 
need more steadfastness, more conviction, more of the 
sterner virtues. Above all we ought to get over the 
tendency to play the soft and effeminate role of drifting 
with the current. Leadership should call on everyone 
to make the most of himself. 

For it is half heartedness that is losing the battle, 
and cowardice that leads to panic. The heart of the 
nation is sound. Hundreds and thousands of our 
American men and women will ultimately do the right 
thing. But we get easily tired; we lose our enthusiasm 
as soon as it is aroused. It is hard to hold to a 
cause or to a man. And when we get tired of hearing 
a moral issue discussed we drop it as if that would 
settle it — and go about something else. That is not 
the way this nation was founded. There were of 
course periods heavy with disappointment. Valley 
Forge was not the greatest trial Washington went 
through. In 1785 after the successful conclusion of 
the war so great was the lack of unity among the 
American people that he wrote, "No dawn ever broke 
fairer than ours — but now it seems almost as if the 
war were fought in vain." But the leaders were stead- 



fast; they carried their policies through, and they 
trusted not the immediate but the ultimate judgment 
of the people. 

Today also we need to rally the forces of righteous- 
ness. The war has shown us not only that the nation 
will respond but that our youth is as sturdy as it ever 
was. Human nature and the American character has 
not changed in two short years. But we need more 
enthusiasm for the old moral standards, and above 
all more religion. A nation without faith like, a na- 
tion without a vision perishes. We may become the 
wealthiest and most powerful country on the face of 
the globe ; but if we are indifferent to the common and 
decent claims of humanity, if through snug self-satis- 
faction we lose our moral leadership, we are false to 
the very name of Americans. It is a common criticism 
of college men that comparatively few desire to make 
the very best of themselves, to use every talent God 
has given them until the latest hour. The nation 
which is a collection of individuals at times too gets 
tired. But herein lies the task of consecrated leader- 
ship, to spur on this great country to make the very 
best of itself, to use all its resources and wealth and 
moral influence, internationally as well as within our 
own borders, for the good not only of itself but of 
others. 

No doubt it is true that in external circumstance 
life grows more and more complicated. And that is 
the reason for more knowledge, for more intelligence, 
for more and more education. But it is not the 
principles of justice and righteousness but their ap- 
plication that brings difficulty and doubt. Religion 
tells us what those principles are : the church preaches 
them in season and out of season. And just as the 
College helps to develop character among its members 
through hard intellectual work, so it is the function of 
educated leadership to apply to individuals and com- 
munities and nations the principles of just and fair 
dealing with discrimination and with intelligence. And 
so today the call comes first to be steady. "O Neptune, 
sink me or save me ; but I shall hold my rudder true," 
was the prayer of Seneca's helmsman — a prayer that 
every good citizen may well repeat today. For if the 
seas are stormy there is a haven ahead thrice blessed 
if it be reached after a tempestuous voyage. 

Members of the graduating class : — 

It is an ancient custom that on this occasion at the 
end of this beautiful service the representative of the 
College should send you forth with a brief admonition. 
You ought to congratulate yourselves that life will 
not be for you easy or soft or certain. These are 
times that try mens' souls. Much will depend not 
merely on your actions, but upon your attitude. From 
lessons learned in laboratory and history and literature 
you have had elementary training at least in the busi- 
ness of analysis and in judgments. On you and on 
your fellows there rests the responsibility of testing 
what things are more excellent and of clinging to them. 
You ought to be able to discern what is cheap and 
unstable and demagogic. You ought not to be fooled 
by quack remedies and insincere pleas. Today the 
voice of America calls to you down those centuries, 
asking you to judge if her early ideals are right or 
wrong. Your love for your country and your loyalty 
to your community ought to be tested by your desire to 
make country and community better. You must not 
turn deaf ears to the demands of the present and the 
future and rest in the doldrums of reaction. But you 
ought also to remember that the past of this country 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



91 



has been glorious ; that your ancestors have given to 
you a goodly heritage, that they are looking down from 
heaven to see if you keep the faith. Your training 
here makes you potential leaders. But that leadership 
will be nothing worth while unless it is intelligent and 
unless it is consecrated. Nor can you help others to 
make much of themselves unless you make the best of 
yourselves. Be steady ; be resolute : be manly ; be in- 
dependent in thought and action but mindful of the 
rights and interests of others. Go forth in the power 
of the Lord of Hosts to join the multitude of earnest 
Christian souls who like you have passed through these 
college halls to enter into service. And remember that 
Bowdoin has taught you that the heart and the mind, 
that knowledge and love, that intelligence and charity, 
are the things that under God's providence will make 
this world fairer and men happier and heaven nearer. 



ALEXANDER PRIZE SPEAKING. 

Monday evening the Alexander prize speaking con- 
test was held in Memorial Hall. It has been im- 
possible to have the results in time for publication in 
the Orient. The speakers were Joseph L. Badger, 
Maurice S. Coburne, Theodore W. Cousens, George J. 
Cumming, Leo A. Daviau, James E. Mitchell, Lewis H. 
Ross, Walter E. Stearns, and F. King Turgeon. 



CLASS DAY EXERCISES. 

The annual Class Day exercises were held Tuesday 
afternoon. . 

The opening address was by Edgar Curtis Taylor, 
theoration by Richard Kenneth McWilliams, the his- 
tory by George Raymond Asnault, the poem by James 
Sumner Draper, the prayer by Allan William Con- 
stantine, and the closing address by Avard Leroy 
Richan. The following abstracts have been made from 
the history and the closing address. (It has been im- 
possible.to secure copies of the opening address and the 
oration before going to press.) 



CLASS HISTORY. 

I have never been particularly proficient in mathe- 
matics and for the life of me I fail to recall whether 
it was Woodrow Wilson or Jack Dempsey who said, 
"The paths of glory lead but to the grave," but I feel 
assured it was written just before writing a class 
history. For to the historian, no matter how small, or 
how humble the class, the class history is written 
with those of parting and separation and I dare say 
that the historian of, well, even the class of 1924 will 
experience the same lacrymal sensations that I have 
felt in typing these simple lines, meaningless perhaps, 
to the rude world about us, but again, perhaps, faintly 
recalling, to us, the brave deeds of the four, six or 
seven years, be that as it may, that we have been the 
honoured guests of Joe Bowdoin and the town of 
Brunswick. 

I must admit with a feeling of numerical turpitude 
that I cannot begin this little memoir by giving the 
total war strength of the class in round numbers, or 
even in square ones — as every personally conducted 
historian should. I have been trying to count the 
class for the past five days but there are some men 
who are around Brunswick so little that I could only 
count them as half and fractions have always con- 
fused me. 



Withdrawing however from the field of cold calcu- 
lations it is a pleasure to admit that scholastically, 
athletically and socially our class ranks high. Among 
the bright young faces that I see before me today are 
many who are wearers of the emblem of Phi Beta 
Kappa, that is — they wear it on their vest. _ 

Then too there are numerous athletes, barring those 
of the Spanish and Assyrian variety and lastly, as I 
have said, in the sphere of social activities, for cookie 
carnivals and tea turmoils 1920 boasts some of the best 
first story workers this side of dear old Harvard. 

"How far that little candle throws its beams 
So shines a good deed in a naughty world." 

said Wm. Shakespere but if he were living today he 
would put 1920 in place of the candle. In all modesty 
let me say that we leave nothing to be desired and 
much to be questioned. Not content with setting the 
pace for years to come, athletically, aesthetically and 
sympathetically, we have endeavored to impress upon 
the young blossoms about us the beauty and sweetness 
of honest scholastic endeavor and the kindly paternal 
interest that the College feels in our trivial little 
"goings on." No matter how long any of our number 
wandered about in New York or Boston, if no one 
else was glad to see him when he returned, he was 
always sure of a warm welcome from the office and 
its genial presiding deity. I recall even now, with a 
catch in my throat, the burst of feeling that well-nigh 
overwhelmed me as after a week's relaxation I re- 
turned to my College duties and found waiting for me 
an invitation to meet the Dean in his office, a sound and 
convincing proof that Bowdoin is ever mindful of her 
absent sons. Even in my wanderings my professors, 
my Dean had been thinking of me. 

Dear Classmates — we are soon to part. We are, to 
use those beautiful lines of James Sumner Draaer : 
"Shivering 'neath the city's heat 
Wondering as we cross the street 
Now that Dad's not standing trea~ 
How to get enough to eat." 
But after all in the new Kirk Unabridged there is no 
such word as fail. Always remember that from the 
Automat to the Ritz is but a step. Begin at the bottom 
and eat up. Sic semper stepor'hus. Let me leave you 
with this thought. Raymond Asnault. 



COMMENCEMENT POEM 

1920 

A broad horizon round us sweeps, 

O'er capped by azure — crystalled space 
That down, among the tree-tops creeps, 

Fringing the wondrous arch's bare; 
Where fairy, lace-like branches blend 

With varying tints — or dark or bright ; 
And all a pure enchantment lend 

To human hearts, through human sight. 

There, on the verge, erect in form, 

Majestically rise the lofty pines; 
Pointing to heaven, alike in storm 

And when the wondrous sun-god shines, 
Their soft, perennial verdure fills 

With rich perfumes the bird-house bowers ; 
Through summer heat and wintry chills, 

They solace grief-worn, weary hours. 



92 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The long gray years cannot subdue, 

And time and tide cannot erase 
The loyalty we hold to you, 

For in our hearts you have your place. 
What ever the future will unfold, 

We'll count the hours spent with thee 
Dearer to us than purest gold, 

Our strength, our hope, our memory. 

We love these walls ! Our lives they teach 

To be with vital verdure clad ; 
Erect with noble aims to reach 

For joys that make each moment glad. 
Our little, trembling notes to raise 

Amid the universal choir ; 
And thus to swell paeanic praise, 

And bear our aspirations higher. 

J. S. Draper. 



FAREWELL ADDRESS. 

One hundred and fifteen years ago the first class 
graduated from Bowdoin College. A member of that 
class placed an acorn in the ground where the exer- 
cises were held. That little acorn was the beginning 
of this beautiful, majestic Thorndike oak. Since that 
time one hundred and fourteen classes have gathered 
about it and bid this dear old campus farewell. We 
are just beginning to realize that each class feels 
that its departure is the most impressive — but merely 
because its own farewell is from the depths of its own 
soul. 

All this campus is a stage. Each man in his time 
plays many parts, his acts being four college years. 
First he is the unsophisticated Freshman, then he is 
the super-sophisticated. Sophomore. In the course 
taken by our class he was next the soldier. However, 
he returned and assumed the role of the dignified 
Senior "full of wise saws and modern instances." 
Alas ! he returns to second childhood. Not with 
"shrunk shank" and childish treble, but with manly 
voice and renewed vigor. We will admit, — sans close 
college friends, sans inspiring campus, sans willing 
advisors, but not without those helpful memories 
coupled with that everlasting Bowdoin Spirit. What is 
that Bowdoin Spirit ? Some have attempted to de- 
fine it. I call it ^indefinable. 

We, as a class, are now about to emerge into that 
outside world which is at present in a period of great 
changes. Reconstruction cannot be accomplished with- 
out the aid of conscientious individuals. Those who 
make up this great nation are individually responsible 
and liable for its progress. Conditions will remain un- 
adjusted until this fact is more popularly realized. 

My classmates, this is easy to say in the quiet of 
this peaceful afternoon while we are safely concealed 
from that turmoil by our high wall of Bowdoin pines. 
We are to venture forth from its protection all too 
soon. This moment is the climax, — yet it is but one 
fleeting hour. 

We are leaving for fields unknown. For some of 
us this may be the last fond glance over this wonder- 
ful old campus, but those memories, that undying spirit, 
and our eternal love for our Alma Mater shall con- 
tinue to bind the bonds of fellowship and to keep in 
our minds and hearts that spirit and those ideals which 
make a college, a nation, and a world. 

AVARD L. RlCHAN. 



CLASS DAY ODE. 

Words and Music by Jere Abbott. 

Gone are the happy care-free days 

Of work and play together ; 

Gone are the walks beneath the pine 

In the joyous springtime weather. 

Gone are the songs that we used to sing 

When the campus lights were low ; 

Yet from all these 

Spring memories, 

To cheer where'er w T e go. 



What though our tasks be hard to do 

And our roads lead far apart ; 

What though the tired heart be sad 

And hard the way and dark : 

Yet Bowdoin you will ever be 

As in a by-gone day, 

And thoughts of you, 

So good, so true, 

Will cheer us on our way. 



CLASS DAY OFFICERS. 

The officers of the graduating class, prominent in 
the Class Day activities, are Emerson W. Zeitler, presi- 
dent ; Archie O. Dostie, vice-president ; Stanley M. 
Gordon, secretary-treasurer ; Burchard K. Look, 
marshal ; Allan W. Constantine, chaplain ; Paul V. 
Mason (chairman), Lewis tV. Brown, Justin S. Mc- 
Partland, Harold S. Prosser, and Paul W. Smith, Class 
Day committee. 



COMMENCEMENT HOP. 

The annual Commencement Hop took place Tuesday 
night in the Gymnasium. The patronesses were wives 
of members of the faculty. The committee ir» charge 
of the dance, as well as of the other class day activities, 
consisted of Paul V. Mason (chairman), Lewis W. 
Brown, Justin S. McPartland, Harold S. Prosser, and 
Paul W. Smith. 



COMMENCEMENT PLAY. 

Wednesday' afternoon the Masque and Gown pre- 
sented Shakespeare's "Merchant of Venice" on the 
steps of the Walker Art Building. The play was well 
performed, particularly the major parts, taken by 
Asnault, Redman, Quinby, and Turgeon. The coach- 
ing has been done by Mrs. Arthur F. Brown. 
The cast of characters was as follows : 

Portia Redman 

Nerissa Turgeon 

Shylock Asnault 

Antonio Quinby 

Bassanio Goff 

Gratiano Kileski 

Salanio Crossman 

Salarino Lindner 

Lorenzo Clymer 

Duke Smiley 

Tubal Stackhouse 

Launcelot Gobbo Hunt 

Old Gobbo Gordon 

Balthazar Cole 

Clerk Heathcote 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



93 



PRESIDENT'S RECEPTION. 

The President's reception took place in the Alumni 
Room of the Library Wednesday evening. Professor 
and Mrs. Moody, and Dean Thayer of the Medical 
School and Mrs. Thayer received with President and 
Mrs. Sills. The ushers were Kenneth S. Boardman '21, 
Philip R. Lovell '21, Hugh Pendexter '21, and Philip 
S. Stetson '21. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL CENTENNIAL. 

Wednesday afternoon in the Congregational Church 
the centennial of the Medical School of Maine was 
celebrated. Addresses were given by President Sills 
and by Dean Thayer of the Medical School. Follow- 
ing is an abstract from the address of President Sills : 

The maintenance of the Bowdoin Medical School 
for one hundred years has been one of the great ser- 
vices which the College has performed for the State 
of Maine ; and it is appropriate in many ways that the 
centennial of the Medical School and of the State 
should coincide. 

But today we ought not simply to look backwards. 
If the school is to survive and to hold its place of 
usefulness in the future, it must have far more than 
it has now, the support, financial as well as sympa- 
thetic, of the people of Maine. No profession marches 
forward with quicker steps than does medicine. What 
' was competent instruction in one generation becomes 
old-fashioned in the next. Facilities and equipment 
that seemed adequate and generous in 1890 are out 
of date in 1920. The evolution of medica ; education 
is clearly shown in the history of this school. At 
first the course was only a few weeks, just a series 
of lectures given in one year ; then it was extended to 
cover two years ; then to three ; and finally to four. 
Likewise the requirements for admission increased un- 
til now no one can center the school without two 
years of previous college training. The school has 
also reflected the advance in medical science by its 
physical surroundings. The school had temporary 
quarters for 42 years in Massachusetts Hall, reminds 
me of General Hubbard's story of .the regular minister 
at a church in York who had been absent 40 years. 
In 1S62 the school moved into more adequate quarters 
in Adams Hall. Then later the two upper classes went 
to Portland ; the building there was erected and the 
Mason Dispensary added. It is a far day from the 
annual lectures delivered in Massachusetts Hall in 1820 
to the facilities offered today. 

And yet so great have been the studies in medical 
education that the facilities we have today are still 
inadequate. This is, I think, an appropriate occasion 
to inform the people of Maine of the needs of the 
school. We ought to have an additional endowment 
of at least $500,000 so that the school may have several 
teachers who can give their full time to their teaching 
and to research. 

So long as the Bowdoin Medical School lives, we 
are bound to maintain high standards and it is our 
duty to plan at least for the next generation. The 
people of the State of Maine who one hundred years 
ago through the legislature entrusted the Medical 
School to the "control, superintendence and direction 
of the President and Trustees of Bowdoin College" 
ought to know that the school properly supported is 
ready and able to continue its good work and to pro- 
gress ; but that without generous financial assistance 
it is badly hampered and may not even survive. There- 



fore on this centennial celebration I call on all who 
are interested in the cause of medicine in Maine to 
ponder seriovisly these questions : 

(1.) Do we need a medical school in the State? 

(2.) If the answer is affirmative, ought we not 
to put this medical school on a firm basis so that 
those who teach and those who study here may be 
assured of adequate facilities, kept in touch with all 
the movements of progressive medical education, 
trained so thoroughly and so well that graduates of 
the school in the future as in the past may go forth 
to their great life work ready to take their places un- 
afraid by the side of their brothers from the larger 
schools? 

If the funds for that are forthcoming, the college 
will gladly continue its trust ; but we shall not main- 
tain a school that is not first rate. 

So much for the future. But I cannot conclude 
these remarks without bringing to the school and its 
friends here the hearty congratulations of the College 
on a hundred years of work well done ; and the thanks 
of the College to those devoted men who have served 
on the Medical Faculty. 



COMMENCEMENT PARTS 
(Abstracts) 



IS AMERICAN LIBERTY IMPERILLED? 

Since the close of the World War a great wave of 
radicalism has swept over the American nation. The 
"Red" flame, so long smouldering here and there, has 
suddenly burst forth. Revolutionary programs have 
been freely issued in which the avowed purpose of 
the radicals is to overthrow the present government, 
and to inaugurate the rule of the proletariat. They do 
not propose merely "to capture the bourgeoise par- 
liamentary state, but to conquer and destroy it." 
the masses is certainly important. 

Following this wave of radicalism has come a tidal 
wave of terror and terrorism against Communists, 
Socialists, "Reds," and radicals of all sorts. Their 
premises have been raided, their literature seized, they 
themselves arrested, some have been refused seats in 
legislative halls to which they have been duly elected 
by American citizens, others deported to a land of 
unrest and disorder. This campaign is being waged in 
a rather spectacular fashion. The government means 
business, and has gone after the "Reds" with every 
possible weapon that it can use. 

But are not these strange days upon which this 
great Republic has fallen — days of repression, sup- 
pression, and deportation? Is it possible that a great 
democracy has to resort to such means ? Freedom of 
thought and speech seem to be endangered, so that 
the Englishman was perhaps right in his observation 
when he said : "To the American, America' is 'the 
land of liberty' not because every one is free to think 
and speak and do as he likes, but because he is free 
to conform to the accepted standards of thought, ex- 
pression and conduct." 

But can it be that even then, America is becoming 
intolerant — America, the symbol of liberty, of whom 
we sing, "the land of the free and the home of the 
brave," — America, at whose great eastern gateway 
stands the Statue of Liberty to welcome the stranger — 
America, who has given to the world such a character 
as Abraham Lincoln — America, who has developed the 



94 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



great free institutions which stand as a tribute to a 
people's faith in democracy — America, to whose shores 
have come the persecuted Puritans from England, the 
Huguenots from France, the Germans from the Rhine, 
the Jews from Russia, the Armenians from Turkey, the 
Catholics from Ireland? Can it be that this America is 
becoming intolerant ? 

America must be careful that while endeavoring to 
preserve her traditions of freedom, she does not sacri- 
fice one of the greatest of these. During our Revolu- 
tionary war, it is well known, that the great intellectual 
leaders of the British Parliament favored the cause of 
the Colonies. Among these were Edmund Burke and 
Charles James Fox. But a tragic severance of friend- 
ship came when Fox championed the cause of the 
French Revolution. Edmund Burke abhorred Jacob- 
inism, but even this abhorrence did not lead him to 
call for the expulsion of Fox from Pariament. Has 
not the America of the twentieth century shown her- 
self more intolerant by the arrogant action of the 
New York Assembly than the England of George the 
Third ? 

Liberty asks us a price, the price of tolerance toward 
those to whom we do not wish to show tolerance. As 
a noted English Lord has said : "The supreme test of 
Civil liberty is our determination to protect an un- 
popular minority in time of national excitement." 

We must remember that supression can produce revo- 
lution. We have but to witness Russia, and remember 
France. "I will make them conform or I will harry 
them out of the land," cried James I of England against 
the Puritans ; and these words it has been said, 
"heralded the struggle which within half a century was 
to deliver up James' son to the executioner." 

If it were possible to confine thought to any particu- 
lar part or corner of the earth then we might hope 
to accomplish something by deportation. But in this 
age when communication is nearly the easiest thing to 
accomplish, "thought is the most difficult thing in all 
the world to repress, compress or successfully oppress." 
Russia failed with deportation under the old regime. 
England .was no more successful with her expulsions 
from the colonies in her attempt to combat liberal 
thought. Deportation is no sufficient weapon against 
ideas. We cannot rid ourselves of thought or opinion 
that way. The radical can be nailed to the cross, he 
can be burned at the stake, he can be thrown into the 
dungeon, he can be confined in a modern penitentiary, 
he can be deported to Russia, but the real problem has 
never been dealt with — his thought. It is an easy 
matter to deport persons, but it is another matter to 
get rid of ideas. That is what we overlook. Thought 
survives the cross, the stake, the dungeon, the peni- 
tentiary, and even the Buford to Russia. 

The government must therefore make the aims of the 
"Reds" known and understood. When their avowed 
purpose is fully realized, then the people will stand 
solidly behind the existing institutions. This will form 
the strongest bulwark of defence against the propa- 
ganda, and not high-handed actions by agents of the 
departments of justice. The "Red" flame which has so 
suddenly burst forth in this country will just as sud- 
denly die out, in an atmosphere charged with under- 
standing. 

Education too must play its part. In this respect 
America has been sadly negligent. We have allowed 
masses of unassorted foreigners to come here, and we 
have made a partial failure in handling the problem 
of their treatment. Since most of them have come to 



stay, it was evident that we must Americanize them 
or pay the penalty for allowing them to group them- 
selves in unassimilated masses. We are paying the 
penalty ; we have not wisely conserved the interests 
of our nationality. We need a serious crusade for 
education and Americanization, and not an idle clamor 
for suppression and deportation. That is the easy way 
out, but only temporarily so. 

America can remain America only through main- 
taining its hold upon the minds and hearts of the 
great mass of the people. They must intelligently ap- 
preciate American ideals ; they must sense the real 
value of American institutions ; they must share our 
pride in American traditions. And if they will not be 
Americans of their own free will, we can never make 
them so by suppressions, proscriptions and penalties. 
America's imperative, immediate duty is to American- 
ize. Alexander Henderson. 



TWENTIETH CENTURY GENIES. 

In the creation of a social machinery we have come 
to deal with genies of the imagination rather than the 
realities of life. We deal with metaphysical and arbi- 
trary factions of a vaguely conceived humanity. 

What is humanity ? A term for all men, you say. 
But, in being a term for all men, it becomes a term for 
no man. How can we, who know so little of the 
possibilities of any man, hope to deal successfully with - 
such a giant genies of imagination as all men repre- 
sent ? While the hopes, the fears, the aspirations, the 
loves of one man are so mysterious and intangible, how 
shall we treat wisely of an aggregate of all men ? In 
attempting to deal with' an abstract humanity, are we 
not sure so grossly to disregard the detailed nature 
of any man as to make our conclusions anomalous and 
open roads to deeper error and confusion ? 

Yet constantly in these days do we treat of men 
and the affairs of men in arbitrary and coagulated 
factions. The newspaper — that great reflector of con- 
temporary life — cries of the Church, the Nation, Big 
Business, the Railroad, Labor, Capital, Trade, Science — 
of arbitrary and factional groups. And what do we 
mean by these exceedingly comprehensive terms ? They 
are of too vast a scope for human ingenuity to analyze 
or decipher. 

Yet it would be sheer folly to claim that we should 
abolish these arbitrary factions. They are essential 
for communication and order in the world. But should 
we not cease to defy them, or to idolize ourselves 
through them ? They have brought us much material 
happiness, and may they continue to do so. But let 
us view them as they really are — as were temporary 
means to immediate ends. How much have national 
boundaries changed in our brief historical period? Like 
oil spilt in the dust, the civilized world has expanded 
and contracted in changing shapes and characters. 
All ancient organizations of mankind have either 
furnished or changed in form to meet advancing 
human needs, till their founders would scarcely recog- 
nize in present forms a likeness to the original. They 
were not permanent. They could not be. Only the 
human paver that shaped them persists. 

And why do we constantly strive to deal with men 
in groups ? Has it not been demonstrated again and 
again that man collectively is less than man individual- 
ly? "In Union there is strength," but strength merely 
drives the arrow. The elevation of its aim is de- 
termined by the vision of an individual, as Carlyle 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



95 



showed us seventy-five years ago. Great thoughts are 
not synthesized in mobs. They are born in the in- 
dividual brain. 

In our deification of these humanly conceived idols 
built of human material, we are fast getting into 
chaos. We put so much force and thought into these 
imaginary structures of a very real composition that 
they become too gigantic for our control. No man can 
foresee the results of such concerted action, as is 
taken in the names of these factions. Great Her- 
culean bands of men are putting forth prodigious 
energy without adequate leadership, without control. 
Might — ungoverned might — clashes with might. United 
man copes with united man till the very foundations 
of our civilized world rock and sway. Capital, whose 
fullness no one knows, closes with Labor, which does 
not know itself — each blind — too comprehensive for 
human intellect — reaching down into the very fibres 
of thousands of individual beings — but each with a 
strength to spread pillars which shall bring the shelter- 
ing roof of civilization toppling about our ears. 

Why then do human groups . come to such grief ? 
Why do they become but blinded mastodons clashing 
in the darkness of ignorance? 

It is because they are unnatural. The Universe is 
operated by natural law. Of this one fact above all 
others our centuries of study have convinced us. There 
are physical laws, psychic laws, moral laws. All 
creation moves by law. Slowly — very slowly — by a 
trial and error method — we are learning those laws. 
Christianity has revealed some, and holds in record 
many others that with long study and experience 
finally burgeon into revelation. By repeated study, 
practise of our discoveries, and more study we are 
making slow but steady progress in learning these 
laws. 

The world is recognizing that the principles which 
rule mankind — which determine the relations between 
man and man — must be those prescribed by Christ. 
Those principles are the ones that work. He revealed 
to us the mechanics of the world, and told us how to 
operate that most majestic and most constant of ma- 
chines — Nature. Only by meeting those conditions on 
which the Universe operates can we progress. The 
mills of the gods grind on. They will grind whatever 
we place between the stones, but if we get between 
the stones they will grind us. 

In these factional groups we have vast imaginary 
agents of a humanly conceived realm, operated on 
humanly contrived law, but we forget, in our supreme 
egocentrism, that every particle of matter and every 
last creature represented is subject to that inevitable 
law for which our ignorance can find no application to 
such conceptions. 

As a result of man's fancied creation and feverish 
endeavors to rule a world of fabulous giants, composed 
of the materials and creatures under the dominion of 
the gods, we get a hopeless chaos. The prospective 
gfiant servants of mankind become the playthings of 
the gods. All things and creatures — mankind included 
— can obey but one code of law. That law must be 
the law eternal and incontravertible. 

Man cannot build with his intellect a harmonious 
world based on principles other than those to which 
all his materials and himself are subject. It is 
profitless to kick against the goads. Only by un- 
wearied study and vigorous practises of that universal 
natural law can we secure the promised order out of 
the present chaos. 



But those laws which govern human destiny — those 
laws on which Christianity is based — so far as we at 
present know them, have an application entirely per- 
sonal. These laws are to govern individual activity. 
Only by their application to the subject for which we 
know their adaptation can we secure harmony. In 
present factional groups we have purely human pro- 
ducts, for which no natural laws have yet been de- 
duced. They are unnatural products which cannot 
function under eternal natural law. Truly man has 
btiilded bigger than he knew. 

Irving Trefethen Richards. 
(Continued on page 96) 



STUDENT ELECTION. 

On Tuesday, June 8, a large number of student 
officers were elected for the coming year. The new 
student council consists of Young '21, president; P. H. 
Eames '21, vice-president; Thomson '21, secretary; 
Buker '21, Dudgeon '21, Goodwin '21, Hatch '21, Lovell 
'21, Perkins '21, Willson '21, Averill '22, and Flinn '22. 

The athletic council consists of Goodwin '21, Thom- 
son '21, Flinn '22, Partridge '22, and Handy '23. The 
Union Board is Perkins '21, Young '21, Fogg '22, Hunt 
'22, and D. J. Eames '23. 

Ridley '22 was elected manager of baseball, and Put- 
nam '23 assistant manager. McGorrill '22 was elected 
manager of track, and D. J. Eames '23 assistant man- 
ager. Freeman '22 won the tennis managership, and 
Jacob '23 is assistant manager. Small '23 was chosen 
assistant manager of hockey. Holmes '21 is head cheer 
leader, while the two other cheer leaders are' Cook '21 
and Rochon '21. 

Towle '22 was elected president of the Y. M. C. A., 
and Congdon '22 vice-president. Philbrick '23 was 
elected treasurer. 



PROFESSOR MITCHELL HONORED BY 
GRINNELL COLLEGE. 

On May 29, at the celebration of Founders' Day at 
Grinnell College, the degree of Doctor of Letters was 
conferred upon Professor W. B. Mitchell. On this 
occasion two other honorary degrees were given : 
Doctor of Laws to Professor Edward C. Moore of 
Harvard University and the same degree to Professor 
John W. Platner, Dean of Andover Theological Semi- 
nary. 

Professor Mitchell, who attended the celebration, re- 
ports a delightful visit at Grinnell. The literary exer- 
cises, and especially the pageant illustrating the early 
history of the college, were of a high order. Grinnell, 
founded in 1848 by some of the Iowa Band, who went 
from Andover Theological Seminary and two of whom, 
James J. Hill and Daniel Lane, were graduates of 
Bowdoin in the Class of 1838, has long been regarded 
as one of the principal colleges of the Middle West 
with New England ideals and 'standards. Today it 
has a beautiful campus, a thoroughly equipped plant, 
a scholarly faculty, and a student body numbering 
more than seven hundred. 



FRIARS INITIATION. 

The Junior Society of Friars held its annual initia- 
tion at Portland June 12. The following men were 
taken in from the Class of 1922: Averill, Flinn, Hunt, 
Ludden, Page, and Partridge. 



96 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the college year by the 

Bowdoin Publishing Company in the interest of 

the students of Bowdoin College. 

Norman W. Haines, 1921 Editor-in-Chief 

Edward B. Ham, 1922 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Virgil C. McGorrill, 1922 News Editor 

Floyd A. Gerrard, 1923 .' Athletics 

Karl R. Philbrick. 1923 Faculty Notes 

George H. Quinby, 1923 Alumni Department 

F. King Turgeon, 1923 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
John L. Berry, 1921 Crosby E. Redman, 1921 

Harry Helson. 1921 Frank A. St. Clair, 1921 

George E. Houghton, 1921 William R. Ludden, 1922 

Russell M. McGowan. 1921 Roland L. McCormack, 1922 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. Boardman, 1921 Business Manager 

Frederic A. Allen, 1922 Assistant Manager 

Wilfred R. Brewer, 1922 Assistant Manager 



All communications regarding subscriptions should be ad- 
dressed to the Business Manager of the Bowdoin Publishing 
Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 per year, in advance. Single 
copies, 10 cents. 



Vol L. 



JUNE 24, 1920. 



No. 10 



Entered at Post Office at Brunswickas Second-Class Mail Matter 

Welcome Back, Alumni! 

At this season of the year, when a considerable 
portion of our Alumni are on the campus and another 
group of Bowdoin men are about to become members 
of that body, we may well dedicate this editorial to 
them. First of all, we, the undergraduates of Bowdoin, 
bid you a hearty and unqualified welcome to your alma 
mater. Though many of us are unable, for financial 
or other good reasons, to personally greet you during 
Commencement week, our welcome is none the less 
sincere. We hope that you will help yourselves to 
whatever accommodations we may have in our houses 
and dormitories and feel perfectly at home in them. 
Realize to the full the true meaning of Bowdoin 
hospitality ! 

Needless to say you have the best wishes of the 
student body for a most successful and happy Com- 
mencement. May you meet more of your former 
classmates and "pals" and in general form more pleas- 
ant associations than at any previous Commencement. 
Whether this is your fifth or your fiftieth, we wish 
you a grand old time. The aridity of these United 
States need have no fears for those inured, for a 
short time at least, to Maine prohibition. 

While we wish our Alumni a happy Commencement 
first and foremost, we must remind them that they 
have more serious obligations to their alma mater 
than the mere attendance at Commencement exercises. 
Duties not only in matters such as Alumni or Class 
"drives' or in support of College activities to which 
you have probably already given your attention, but 
duties in taking a more active part in the policy and 
administration of the College by expression of opinion 
at least. Many of our Alumni are in position to ob- 
serve other institutions — their practises and innova- 
tions. Why do not some of these Alumni get busy 
and make suggestions for the development and im- 
provement of their own alma mater ? Even the more 



recent graduates have noticed defects of administra- 
tion or policy during their college course, why not 
propose remedies for them? 

In short, Alumni of Bowdoin College, we want you 
to feel part and parcel of the active members of the 
institution. We feel that we need your support and 
counsel. Will you not give both as freely as you 
gave your services for whatever came to hand during 
your undergraduate days? We need them as much, 
if not more, than then, ou have helped us often and 
generously in a financial way. Continue to do so, but 
help us in other ways by contributing yourself to 
Bowdoin.. 



COMMENCEMENT PARTS 

(Continued from page 95) 
The Need of Sane Thinking. 

Mr. Arlo Bates once said, "All of us can read and 
write but most of us had rather lie down and die than 
think," and indeed we have to confess at this time 
when sane thinking surely was never more needed, 
that what Mr. Bates said is much too true. There is 
a feeling of intensity in the air, — even the most casual 
observer will admit it, — a something that seems to 
predict a great adventure in world democracy and 
world ideas. And yet probably there is a great mass 
of people who have not even bothered to try to under- 
stand what it all means. They have not endeavored 
to discern what the significance of the past has been 
or to predict what the future has in store for them. 

One might say that there are three places where 
the ability to think sanely and clearly can be de- 
veloped in a man, — at home, at school, and, for a few, 
at college. The home as a factor in this respect is 
uncertain. One is more often given to partialities and 
prejudices there. So it falls chiefly upon the school 
to train the youth in this matter. Yet we have been 
unduly careless. How often we have allowed him to 
come under the influence of incompetent teachers who 
unfortunately were struggling so hard themselves for 
existence that their ignorance and cynicism led them 
even to discourage individual thinking and reasoning 
for fear that the questions that would inevitably arise 
would only expose their own lack of knowledge. 

One must understand the past thoroughly before he 
can say whether it is to be cast aside as a whole. 
We must give it the utmost consideration and, casting 
aside the bad, try to pick out of the past the best 
ideas, and incorporate these into the new ideals and 
feelings of the people of today. Therein lies the 
difficult task and it impels the average man to say that 
he cannot take the time— that he cannot bother. He 
is certain that there are many who can do his think- 
ing for him and in this supposition he feels secure. 
Like the vast majority he follows the line of least 
resistance. These people crave sensation ; they get a 
certain thrill, a certain enjoyment, realizing that the 
times are perilous. They feel that they can venture 
very near the whirlpool and never be drawn in. They 
have a peculiar inborn idea that, whatever may happen, 
the government will remain secure and that they, as 
spectators, will have witnessed a thrilling drama which 
will have a happy ending. The idea of a national 
tragedy is far from their minds. It is these people, 
nevertheless, who, with their unthinking chatter, spur 
on the radical element. It is these minds, unskilled in 
careful thinking that furnish fuel to the flame of Bol- 
shevism, failing to see the unsound foundation upon 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



97 



which its principles are based. It is these same 
thoughtless people who allow incompetent office holders 
to fill responsible positions and are we not more to 
blame than they if we who have been thinking and 
could have prevented it have allowed ourselves to be 
indifferent ? The other man cannot do our thinking 
but his actions can be a most violent stimulant to our 
own minds. 

There is a call now in this tense period of national 
affairs to all of us. It therefore behooves us not to 
talk glibly and obscurely but to think, and thinking to 
give voice to our ideas in a concise manner. We must 
realize, as never before, that what we think and what 
our neighbor thinks are of vital importance. We must 
realize that it does matter that these loose thinkers 
who preach the destruction of our national unity are 
allowed to feed the masses on glittering promises of 
impossibilities just because of our indifference, just 
because we feel that our small efforts will be in- 
effective. Let us then endeavor to do our share, to 
cast aside petty grievances, to try always to uphold the 
ideals for which our government was formed. Let us 
seek for the truth but let us season our facts with the 
right portion of human thoughtfulness and kindness 
and in so doing we have at least endeavored to be 
sane thinkers. Iere Abbott. 



JAPAN'S MONROE DOCTRINE FOR ASIA. 

When we in America are told that Japan is simply 
establishing a Monroe. Doctrine for the Far East, we 
may be inclined, or we may not, to approve. But we 
should not be misled by the mere implication of a 
name. We must recognize this difference : The Ameri- 
can Monroe Doctrine is defensive and all-excluding ; 
the Japanese Monroe Doctrine is aggressive and not 
self-excluding. We recognized the "status quo" in 
South America and declared that the Monroe Doctrine 
was to apply to the future only. Japan has upset the 
"status quo" in China and has made the doctrine 
retroactive. 

Let me point out definitely what the provisions of 
this doctrine are. Japan first contends that she must 
have room for colonization and that Manchuria and 
Mongolia are legitimate fields for her expansion ; 
secondly, that she must have room for commercial ex- 
pansion and that all China is a legitimate field for that 
expansion : thirdly, that in all her political activities 
Japan is merely endeavoring to protect China 
against her own weakness which is a menace at once to 
China and Japan; and last, that it is her duty and her 
purpose to maintain the peace of the Far East. 

Japan, infinitely smaller, less populous, less rich than 
China and India, sets herself up and demands — not of 
Europe that it keep its hands off, not of all Asia that it 
bar Europe — but of China that she simultaneously 
grant great and special privileges to Japan and agree 
not to give favors to other countries. 

Can Japan set up a Monroe Doctrine for Asia ? The 
total of European possessions in Asia is 9,500,000 
square miles, or more than one-half of. the total area, 
with a population of 400,000,000, or four-ninths of the 
total 9,000,000,000. China proper, is more than ten 
times the size of Japan ; while China's population is 
from six to eight times that of Japan. Yet Japan talks 
of protecting Asia against European and other foreign 
aggressions ! 

Japan makes much of the proposition that it is her 
desire and purpose to help China, to interpret the West 



to the East, to be the leader in the regeneration of 
Asia. The contract is a large one. Is the undertaking 
practical ? Between the social and political ideas and 
ideals of the Japanese and the Chinese, there is a wide 
gulf : the backgrounds in the two countries are as 
unlike as are those of the L'nited States and Prussia. 
China was for centuries Japan's tutor in ethics, phil- 
osophy, literature and art. What Japan knows of the 
West she has learned only recently. Japan can give 
Ch\na lessons in efficiency, system and military or- 
ganization ; what else can she contribute ? 

The Japanese have not yet worked out a harmoni- 
ously operating, modernized governmental system for 
themselves. Japanese politics are not free from some 
of the corrupt practices which are criticised in China. 
Japanese court procedure and administration of justice 
are still below Occidental standards. Japan has had 
anything but a happy course to run in public finance. 
Is it to be wondered at that the Chinese hesitate to 
embrace Japan's profession of friendship and to ac- 
cept the Japanese as their political advisers and com- 
cercial guides ? 

The question of the peace of the Far East lies with 
the fate of China. If China can develop strength to 
defend her own integrity, the peace of the Orient may 
be preserved. If the partition of China once seriously 
begins, nothing will save the Far East for the next 
several decades from being a theatre of aggressions, 
conflict and political redistribution. 

The statement of the Monroe Doctrine by Japan, 
which undermines and subverts the authority of the 
Chinese Government, and tends to close the door to 
others, sounds the death knell to the Open Door doc- 
trine. The United States in an official communication 
states very plainly that we cannot recognize any im- 
pairment of this policy. The issue is created. It 
exists today as an actual force, and sooner or later 
must be settled. 

Japan has stated this Monroe Doctrine for the Far 
East. Is it in the interest of the world that Japan 
should be allowed to establish a political and com- 
mercial predomination over Asia? The answer is 
obvious! No! Robert Haviland Adams. 



INTERFRATERNITY BASEBALL. 

Beta Theta Pi won the Interfraternity baseball 
championship with a double victory over the Delta 
Upsilon Fraternity. 

The scores were : 

June S — Beta Theta Pi 15, Delta Upsilon 11 

June 11 — Beta Theta Pi 12, Delta Lfpsilon 3. 



MASQUE AND GOWN ELECTIONS. 

At a recent meeting of the Masque and Gown Magnus 
Ridlon '22 was elected president. Karl R. Philbrick 
'23 was re-elected manager. Plans were considered 
for next year and it is expected that the Dramatic 
Club will have an even more successful season during 
1920-21 than it has had this year. 



IBIS INITIATION. 

The Ibis Senior Society initiated the following men 
from the Class of 1921, Tuesday, June 8: Badger, 
Haines, O. G. Hall, Helson, Morse, H. Nixon, and 
Smiley. Morse was elected president for the coming 
year, and Haines secretary and treasurer. 



;>8 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BASEBALL AND TRACK CAPTAINS. 

The letter men of the baseball team recently met 
and elected William R. Needelman of Portland, cap- 
tain. Needelman is especially well fitted for this posi- 
tion as he has played consistent baseball all the time 
for Bowdoin, and has been one of the most reliable 
players on the team. His batting and fielding have 
frequently pulled Bowdoin out of tight places. With 
such a captain backed by the team of experienced men 
which we will have next year victories should be ex- 
pected for the nine. 

By the election of Alexander Thomson of Skowhe- 
gan the track team has a captain who has the ability 
and personality for leadership. Thomson has been one 
of the most faithful men on the track team in his 
observance of training rules and in his persistent en- 
deavor to improve his hurdling. In the dual meet 
with Bates which was held at Bowdoin last winter, 
Thomson was high point man. He enters a large 
number of events and wins points in each at nearly 
every meet. Thomson was elected president of his 
class in his Sophomore year, this year he was elected 
popular man by his classmates. He was a member 
of the Athletic Council this year and will be a member 
of both the Student Council and Athletic Council next 
year. 



Professor Copeland expects to visit the two investi- 
gators after spending several weeks at Wood's Hole. 

A portrait of the late Professor Chapman in an 
alcove of his study by W. W. Gilchrist has been placed 
in the Art Building. 



1922 BUGLE BOARD. 

At a recent meeting of the Sophomore Class, the 
following men were elected to the Bugle Board of next 
year : Carroll S. Towle, Editor-in-Chief ; Allen E. 
Morrell, Business Manager ; William R. Ludden, Art 
Editor ; Wilfred R. Brewer, Assistant Business Man- 
ager ; Ernest M. Hall, Edward B. Ham, Henry H. 
Merry, Eben B. Page, John C. Pickard, Hartley F. 
Simpson, Eben G. Tileston, and Robley C. Wilson, As- 
sociate Editors. 



SPAULDING SCHOLARSHIP. 

The College has received a gift of $50 for a scholar- 
ship for next year in memory of Joseph W. Spaulding, 
A.M., who died on September 11, 1919. Mr. Spaulding 
was a Civil War veteran, who was Captain of Company 
A, 19th Maine Regiment; he was in twenty-four en- 
gagements of the Civil War, and was present at Lee's 
surrender ; later he was a successful lawyer in Boston. 
The scholarship is the gift of Miss Mary C. Spaulding, 
of Melrose, Mass. 



jFacuItp Jl3otes 

Professor Burnett was the Commencement Marshal 
last week at Amherst, where he was attending the 
twenty-fifth reunion of his class. 

Professor Ham represented Bowdoin at the in- 
auguration of President Grey of Bates on Tuesday and 
Wednesday of this week. 

This summer Dr. Gross plans to spend six weeks at 
Barnstable, Mass., studying the histology of the black- 
crowned night heron. He intends to camp on a remote 
point of Sandy Hook, two miles distant from the 
nearest village. The largest flock of this particular 
species known in this country frequents the shores in 
this locality. Mr. Herbert Jobe, a Government agent 
who is to accompany Dr. Gross, will operate a moving 
picture machine and obtain much material for the 
Audubon Society, of which he is a prominent member. 



alumni Department 

'06 — Dr. George Parker has been placed in charge 
of the Arrowhead Hospital, now being constructed at 
San Bernardino, California. It will be used only for 
discharged soldiers and sailors. Dr. Parker is now at 
San Bernardino studying the situation. The hospital 
is to have 250 beds to start with and will probably have 
a thousand before another year. 

'07 — Dr. M. Carroll Webber of Portland left May 27 
for Baltimore where he is to take a course this summer 
in medical diagnosis and internal medicine at the 
Johns Hopkins Medical School. This course is given 
by a world famous physician to a selected body of 
twenty students. The course commenced June 1 and 
continues through July 15. 

'09 — Rev. C. T. Stevens, who was with the Navy 
branch of the Y. M. C. A. during the War, is now living 
at South Deerfield, Mass. 

'12 — Miss Edna Laura Chandler and Elden Green- 
wood Barbour were married June 14 in Topsham. 

The following notes have been received concerning 
1914 men : 

F. T. Garland is with the Alexander Hamilton In- 
stitute of New York. He was discharged from the 
Service in November, 1919, after being in France for 
fourteen month as a second lieutenant of Field Ar- 
tillery. 

F. W. McCargo, after receiving his discharge from 
the Army last fall, attended the Standard Oil Training 
School in New York. On May 6th he sailed for India, 
and expects to remain in the Far East for two or 
three years. 

E. A. Nason is teaching mathematics at the Powder 
Point School, Duxbury, Mass. Next year he will be 
at the Albany Academy, Albany, N. Y. 

A. W. Newcombe is studying for a doctor's degree 
at the University of Chicago. He is a Fellow in Church 
History. 

Captain J. O. Tarbox, 46th Infantry, U.S.A., is 
stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

'16 — Miss Isabelle Palmer and Leigh Webber will be 
married on June 29 at Guernsey Villa, South Harps- 
well. 

'17 — A review of "Songs with Tears," by the late 
Lieutenant Forbes Rickard, Jr., appeared in the 
Varsity of Columbia University for March, and it was 
written by John L. Foley, instructor in English at 
Columbia. 

'17 — Miss Isabelle Olm and Dwight Wilson Pierce 
were married June 23 at Bath. 

'18 — Miss Gladys Gertrude Jackson and Albert Otis 
Moulton were married at West Roxbury, Mass., on 
June 23. 

'18 — Miss Lillian Barbara Tobey and William Lewis 
Ripley were married June 12 at Worcester, Mass. 

Medic '18 — Dr. Thomas H. Taber has been appointed 
an assistant surgeon in the Navy with the rank of 
lieutenant, junior grade. He has been stationed for 
some time at the Naval Hospital, Paris Island, South 
Carolina. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



99 



'19; — The engagement has been announced of Miss 
Eveleen A. Priest and Benjamin M. Smethurst. 

'19 — On June 10 Miss Iva Keith Goodwin and Fred 
Philander Hall were married in Brunswick, and will 
reside in Providence, R. I. 

'19 — Bateman Edwards has been appointed instructor 
of French at Western University, London, Canada. 

'20 — Miss Mary Frances Stearns and Robert Earle 
Cleaves, Jr., will be married at West Paris June 30. 

HARVARD DENTAL SCHOOL 

Department of Harvard University 
Graduates of this school admitted without ex- 
amination in September, 1920, provided they have 
taken required subjects. One year in college is 
reduired for entrance in 1921. Modern buildings 
and equipment. Fall term opens September 27, 
1920. Degree of D.M.D. Catalog. 

EUGENE H. SMITH, D.M.D. , Dean, Boston, 
Mass. 



COMPLETE STOCKS 

of 

Seasonable Clothes 

Haberdashery 

Hats 

FOR TOWN AND COUNTRY WEAR 



Also Special Styles in 
SPORTING APPAREL 



Haskell & Jones Co. 
Portland, ... Maine. 



ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 




THE BRUNSWICK 

Convenient to the theatre and 
shopping districts. 

The sort of Hotel guests 
visit once and return to every 
time they come to Boston. 

Boylston St. at Copley Sq. 






n 

m 






THE LENOX 

In the center of Boston's 
Back Bay residential district. 
For many years a stopping 
place for college teams. 
The "Old Grad" claims it 
still and so do the Under 
Grads. It's their Hotel. 

Boylston St. at Exeter St. 

UNDER SAME MANAGEMENT 
L. C. PRIOR, Managing Director 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

CUMBERLAND 

AND 

PASTIME 

THEATRES 

BRUNSWICK - - MAINE 



Another Big Business House Adopts 
THE EVEREADY 

CHANDLER & FARQUHAR CO., Boston, Mass., one of New 
England's largest distributors of Machinists' Tools and Sup- 
plies, General Hardware, Automobile Specialties, etc., have in- 
cluded Eveready Paper Fasteners as a part of the standard 
desk equipment in their new and spacious office, shown in the 
photograph. 




Like thousands of other big business houses, they found, after 
careful trial, Eveready Paper Fasteners fulfill their stapling ma- 
chine requirements to a much greater degree of efficiency than 
the old-style staplers. 

EVEREADY MFG. CO. of BOSTON 

80 B0YLST0N ST. BOSTON, MASS. 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



VOL. L 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1920. 



NO. 11 



125 EXPECTED IN FRESHMAN CLASS 



103 Admitted Through Sat- 
urday 

Last Saturday one hundred and 
three men had been admitted to the 
Class of 1924 and nine to the Class 
of 1923. It is expected that about 
twenty or more will be admitted as a 
result of this week's entrance ex- 
aminations. Following is 'a list of 
all new men admitted by last Satur- 
day. 



Ames, Herman R.; Keene, N. H. 
(1923). 

Bishop, Francis P.; Brunswick. 

Blaisdell, Richard H.; Newton, Mass. 

Blanchard, Donald D.; Cumberland 
Centre. 

Blanchard, Ralph E.; Portland. 

Blatchford, Lawrence; Portland. 

Brisebois, Joseph M.; Kingston, 
N. H„ 

Burgess, William E.; Woodfords. 

Burnell, Thornton L. C; Westbrook. 

Chamberlain, Glen; Fort Fairfield. 

Charles, Wellington; Fryeburg. 

Churchill, Lindsey C; Winthrop, 
Mass. 
• Clark, Huber A.; Meriden, Conn. 

Clavin, Charles B.; Lynn, Mass. 

Cobb, George E.; Gorham. 

Coburn, E. Harold; Brunswick. 

Cousins, Forrest E.; Guilford. 

Crawford, Howard E.; Maiden, 
Mass. (1923). 

Curtis, Raymond D.; Fr.eeport. 

Davis, George T.; Portland. 

Demmons, James A.; New Haven, 
Conn. 

Dennett, Guy F.; Springvale. 

Dow, Henry K.; Needham, Mass. 

Dunphy, Harold H.; Island Falls. 

Ervin, Jerome R.; Houlton. 

Ferguson, Homer L.; Rumford. 

(Continued on page 102) 



NEW MEMBERS OF 

THE FACULTY 

This year there will be two new 
members of the faculty, one in Phil- 
osophy and the other in Economics 
and Sociology. Dr. Mortimer Phillips 
Mason of Harvard, one of the best 
known Kantian scholars in the coun- 
try, will teach the first subject, and 
Glenn R. Johnson of Reed College and 
Columbia will have some courses in 
Economics and Sociology. 

Dr. Mason graduated from Har- 
vard in 1899, and in the following 
year received the degree of Master 
of Arts. In 1904 he was awarded the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy by 
Harvard. From 1905 to 1907 he was 
instructor of philosophy at Princeton, 
and from 1909 to 1911 associate in 
philosophy at Bryn Mawr. He was 
a lecturer on philosophy at Harvard 
from- February, 1914, to December, 
1918. 

Mr. Johnson graduated from Reed 
College in 1914 in the first class. Last 
year he had all his work for a Ph.D. 
degree completed at Columbia except 
the thesis. His thesis is to deal with 
public opinion as affected by the 
newspapers. He is regarded at Co- 
lumbia as one of the most promising 
of the younger men in the field of 
sociology. Mr. Johnson was in the 
war service for two years, and often 
during this period he gave lectures 
to large army groups. 



Annie Talbot Cole Lecturer 

The Annie Talbot Cole lecturer for 
the coming year is Paul Elmore More 
of Princeton, New Jersey, whose sub- 
ject is to be "The Spirit and Poetry 
of Early New England." The lecture 
will be given some time in December. 



Freshmen Reception 

Tomorrow evening (Thursday) in 
Memorial Hall, at eight o'clock, the 
Y. M. C. A. will hold the annual re- 
ception for the incoming class. No 
freshman should miss this opportunity 
to meet upper-classmen and members 
of the faculty. The "Freshman 
Bible," containing a great deal of 
valuable information regarding the 
college and its activities will be given 
out to the new men by the Y. M. C. A. 



New Style for the "Orient" 

In further execution of the plans 
adopted by the Editorial Board last 
spring at the suggestion of Mr. Arthur 
G. Staples '82, editor of the "Lewiston 
Journal," and former editor of the 
"Orient," the appearance of the 
"Orient" this year is radically dif- 
ferent from its appearance a year ago. 
Instead of two columns, eight inches 
deep, there are now three columns, 
nine inches deep. Copy will be set 
in type one point smaller than before. 
News will begin on the first page in 
place of the old table of contents. 
These important changes will effect a 
considerable economy of space equal 
to twelve and a half square inches on 
each page and about four pages (old 
style) in a normal issue of eight 
pages. 

Various minor changes are also be- 
ing made, regarding the assignment 
of duties to members of the board, 
and regarding the position of adver- 
tisements in the paper. 

It is hoped that this remodelling of 
the "Orient" will meet with the ap- 
prival of the alumni and of the stu- 
dent body. Constructive criticism of 
the new system which will be of as- 
sistance to the editors is solicited. 



102 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



List of New Men 

(Continued from page 101) 

Fernald, Cyrus F.; Wilton. 
Fisher, Kimball; Augusta. 
Gay, Thomas E.; Newcastle. 
Gibbons, Albert E.; Reading, Mass. 
Gillespie, Wilson C; Hewlett, L. I. 
Gilpatrick, Granville S.; Old Or- 
chard. 

Gonya, Sylvio T.; Rumford. 
Goodwin, Linwood J.; Springvale. 
Gorham, Francis W.; Round Pond. 
Gowen, Cecil H.; Sanford. 
Gray, Glenn W.; New Vineyard. 
Grenfell, Elmer W.; Fall River, 
Mass. 

Hamilton, Frederick R.; South 
Portland. 

Hardy, Malcolm E.; Phillips. 
Harris, Frank J.; Lisbon Falls. 
Hill, George E.; Collinsville, Conn. 
Hutchins, Paul A.; North Stratford, 
N. H. 

Jacques, Dennis L.; Soldier's Pond. 
James, Morrison C; Chelsea, Mass. 
Jewett, Langdon A.; Skowhegan. 
Johnson, John H.; South Portland. 
Johnson, Rupert G-; Brownfield. 
Johnston, R. Fulton; Brunswick. 
Jordan, Maurice D.; Auburn (1923). 
Keniston, James M.; Portland. 
Kierstead, Ralph E.; Oakland. 
Kimball, George M.; Lovell Centre. 
Kimball, W. Montgomery; New 
York City (1923). 

Kirkpatrick, Robert J.; Portsmouth, 
N. H. 

Klees, Frederic; Reading, Pa. 
Laevy, J. Bernard; Neponset, L. I., 
N. Y. 

Lavigne, Robert J.; Saco. 
Lawless, Kenneth O.; Auburn. 
Lee, Richard H.; Foxcroft. 
Lovell, Harvey B.; Waldoboro. 
McKinnon, Donald W.; Topsham. 
McMennamin, G. Bernard; Lime- 
stone. 

Manson, Willis C; Lovell. 
Margesson, John L. ; Caribou. 
Mason, Archie C; Amherst, N. H. 
Merrill, Adelbert H.; Portland. 
Miguel, Arthur J.; Manchester, 
Mass. 

Miller, Thor; Portland (1923). 
Moran, Anson B.; Bernardsville 
N. J. 

Mushroe, Harry L.; Princeton. 
Noah, George; Melrose, Mass 
(1923). 

Page, Lawrence L. ; Gorham. 
Patterson, Arthur D.; Vinalhaven 



Pettingill, Theodore; Island Falls. 

Phillips, Robert T.; Jamaica Plain, 
Mass. 

Pike, Frank A.; Lubec. 

Porter, Herman J.; Skowhegan. 

Putnam, Preston M.; Danvers, Mass. 

Ranney, Moses S.; Portage. 

Reynolds, Verne E.; Oakland. 

Robertson, Donald J.; Caribou. 

Robinson, Allan P.; Bingham. 

Ross, Bradley B.; Danvers, Mass. 

Rouillard, Clarence D.; Topsham. 

Rowe, George W.; Bangor. 

Ryder, Wilson C; Eastport. 

Saunders, Raymond J.; South 
Waterford. 

Savage, Brooks E.; Skowhegan. 

Simon, Harry A. ; Salem, Mass. 

Smith, Alfred J.; Clinton, Mass. 
(1923). 

Smith, Perley D., Jr.; Methuen, 
Mass. 

Southard, Ledyard A.; Wiscasset. 

Spence, George A. R.; Boston, 
Mass. 

Stiles, David A.; Augusta. 

Stone, Alfred T.; Sanford. 

Stonemetz, Harold T.; West New- 
ton, Mass. (1923). 

Sullivan, John F.; South Portland 
(1923). 

Thompson, Harold A.; Norway. 

Towle, Lawrence W.; Saco. 

Tuttle, Irving P.; Rockland. 

Weeks, Lincoln W.; Westbrook. 

Wendell, Wyatt N.; Portsmouth, 
N. H.- 
Weymouth, Clinton G.; Kingfield. 

Weymouth, Waldo G.; Limestone. 

Whalen, Raymond R.; Bath. 

White, Webster W.; Jonesport. 

Willard, Lester H.; Sanford. 

Wilson, James A.; Houlton. 

Woodruff, Luman A.; Ellsworth. 

Worsnop, Harold R.; Auburn. 



Office Announcements 

Upper Class Registration 

Unless upper classmen wish to 
change courses from their registration 
in the spring, there will be no need 
to see the Dean; but only to have 
their registration cards signed in the 
office at the regularly appointed hours. 
A list of men whom the Dean wishes 
to see about their registration is 
posted. By vote of the Recording 
Committee, at least three of the 
courses elected in the spring must be 
taken this fall. No course can be 
changed without the consent of the 



Dean. By vote of the Recording 
Committee, no course can be changed 
at all after the first week, except un- 
der most unusual circumstances, and 
with a forfeiture of the $7.50 fee. 
Seniors, Juniors, and Sophomores 

Registration, Thursday, Sept. 23 
SENIORS: 

A to L 9-10 a. m. 

M to Z 10-11 a.m. 

JUNIORS: 

A to L 11-12.30 noon 

M to Z 1.30-3 p. m. 

SOPHOMORES: 

A to G 3.00-3.45 p. m. 

H to L 3.45-4.30 p. m. 

M to Z 4.30-5.15 p. m. 

A fine of one dollar a day will be 
imposed for each day's delay in ob- 
taining the signature of the Dean to 
the registration enrolment card filled 
out last spring and now in the office. 
College Dining Club 

The College Dining Club will be 
open for breakfast and other meals, 
Tuesday, September 28. Board will 
be $7.50 per week. Thirty-six men 
can be accommodated, and preference 
will be given to freshmen. Appli- 
cations for admission to the Dining 
Club are to be handed in at the Dean's 
office on or before 9 a. m., Monday, 
September 27. A list of the men ac- 
cepted will be posted on the chapel 
bulletin board by 4 p. m. on that day. 
The Dining Club will be located at 15 
Cleaveland street. 

Freshmen Enrolment 
Freshmen, after transferring the 
courses elected by them to the yellow 
enrolment card (to be obtained at the 
Dean's office when they register) are 
to have each instructor sign for his 
course at the first meeting of the 
class. The card is then to be returned 
to the Dean's office according to di- 
rections printed on it. 



Literature 1 will not be given the 
first semester, but there will be a 
half-year course beginning in Feb- 
ruary. 



Professor Stanwood's new course in 
Common Law is open only to seniors 
who intend to go into business. 



Men who have taken entrance ex- 
aminations this week which are to 
decide whether they will enter college 
this year or not will be informed of 
their results tomorrow (Thursday). 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



103 



FRESHMEN ! 

Come Out For the "Orient." 

Freshmen: Here is the first chance 
that is being offered you to come out 
and get into one of the most import- 
ant college activities. You need work 
only two or three hours weekly to 
write enough copy to keep yourselves 
well in the running for election to 
the "Orient" board. You are to act 
as reporters for the first two terms 
of this year only, before three of the 
candidates become members of the 
board. A fourth man from your class 
will be chosen at the end of the year. 
Having once made the board, you will 
be on it for three years, until March 
of your senior year. Winning a place 
on the "Orient" means a " 'Bugle' 
honor" for three years also. 

As for further advancement on the 
board, two men are nominated for 
managing editor in March of their 
sophomore year, to be voted on by the 
student body. In March of their 
junior year, the same two men are 
usually nominated for editor-in-chief, 
to be voted on again by the student 
body. 

Assignments and further informa- 
tion can be had at 3 Bath street (op- 
posite the gates, near the Congrega- 
tional Church). Come out now, and 
get your assignment by Monday, Sep- 
tember 27. 



PROFESSOR 

WOODRUFF 

ELECTED 

In the state election last week Pro- 
fessor Woodruff won out by an easy 
margin in his contest for a seat in 
the next Maine Legislature. Profes- 
sor Woodruaff ran as a pronounced 
liberal and led the Democratic ticket 
in Brunswick. He was the only Demo- 
crat in Cumberland County to win in 
this election. E. A. Drapeau '16 ran 
strong on the same ticket, and al- 
though he failed of election he stood 
third in a list of thirteen names. 

Among other Bowdoin men who 
ran for office in this election are the 
following: 

John A. Peters '85 was re-elected 
to Congress in the Third District. Wal- 
lace H. White '99, candidate for Con- 
gress in the Second District, won out 
over Dr. Wallace N. Price, Medic-'94. 



Frank H. Haskell '95, Democrat, lost 
out in the First District to Carroll L. 
Beedy ex-'03. 

Percival P. Baxter '98 was re-elected 
to the Maine Senate. Dr. John W. 
Connellan, Medic-'92, did not win an 
election to the State Senate, although 
he was the leading vote-taker among 
the Democratic candidates for the 
Senate. 

Henry A. Peabody '03 was re-elected 
Register of Probate for Cumberland 
County. Clement F. Robinson '03, a 
son of the late Professor Robinson, 
was easily elected to the office of 
County Attorney. 



NEW FRESCOS FOR 

ART BUILDING 

Edward P. Warren, Esq., of Lewes, 
England, one of the chief benefactors 
-f the Bowdoin Art Museum, has re- 
:ently sent a gift of three frescos 
(dating from the fifteenth century) 
from the home of Fra Lippo Lippi. 
The artist is entirely unknown, and 
there is some doubt as to what the 
paintings represent. It is thought 
that they are scenes in the martyrdom 
of Saint Sebastian. Among Mr. War- 
ren's other donations are all the 
original marbles in the Sculpture 
Hall, and the Greek and Roman anti- 
quities in three of the central cases 
in the Boyd Gallery and in one of the 
cases on the south wall. 



The Gilbert Stuart painting of 
Phoebe Lord Upham, wife of Profes- 
sor Thomas Upham, which was sent 
to the Art Building several months 
ago, was not hung until just before 
Commencement. It hangs in line with 
the other Gilbert Stuarts in the Bow- 
doin Gallery. Professor Upham was 
an uncle of the late Dr. Thomas Up- 
ham Coe '57. 



The portraits of William Lambert 
(the first collector of customs in our 
country sent over from England) and 
his wife, Harriet Lambert, by John 
Smibert (1684-1751), have just been 
returned to the Art Building. They 
were lent last year by William Lam- 
bert Barnard of Boston, who took 
them away again at the beginning of 
the summer. They have been re- 
turned recently to hang in the Bow- 
doin Gallery again during the present 
college year. 



Bowdoin Represented 

In Olympic Games 

In the Olympic games of this sum- 
mer Bowdoin was represented by two 
men. Coach Magee was a member of 
the coaching staff, and George Good- 
win '21 was in the group of 1500- 
metre runners. In the try-outs held 
in the Harvard Stadium last July, 
Goodwin placed sixth in the mile run, 
for which performance he was chosen 
sixth man for the 1500-metre run at 
Antwerp. Just before the track games 
started, the Olympic committee ruled 
that each country be allowed only four 
entries in an event, so that Goodwin, 
after making the team and going to 
Antwerp, was unable to run. 

In Bob Dunbar's column in the 
"Boston Herald" of July 8, is the fol- 
lowing: "Glad to see Jack Magee 
admitted to the select circle of Ameri- 
can Olympic team directors. He is a 
home-bred athlete, was a star in his 
day, and knows the track sport 
thoroughly. He is sensible, and his 
record at Bowdoin speaks for itself. 
His boys won the Maine intercol- 
legiates last spring, and his distance 
star, Goodwin, was the only Pine Tree 
athlete to register in the big inter- 
collegiates." 

In another column of sport comment 
in the same paper, Jack was men- 
tioned again as follows: "Although 
not mentioned in dispatches, Jack 
Magee, the popular and successful 
Bowdoin College track coach, will be 
a member of Moakley's staff on the 
coming trip. Magee was busy getting 
his passports through yesterday 
(July 7), and will make a valuable ad- 
dition to the corps." 



Dr. Thomas Upham Coe '57 

Dr. Thomas Upham Coe, widely 
known for his philanthropies, especial- 
ly for the Dudley Coe Memorial In- 
firmary at Bowdoin, died at his sum- 
mer home at Kineo, Me., July 31, after 
two days' illness from pneumonia. He 
was born at Northwood, N. H., Dec. 
8, 1837. He graduated from Bow- 
doin in 1857 and in 1861 from the 
Jefferson Medical College of Phila- 
delphia. In 1860 he received his 
Master's degree from Bowdoin. He 
studied at the Ecole de Medecine in 
Paris from 1861 to 1863. After this 
Dr. Coe practiced in Bangor until 



104 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



1880. He married Sada L. Harthorn, 
May 23, 1867. 

In 1880 Dr. Coe gave up his practice 
and went into business, engaging 
chiefly in real estate. He became one 
of the wealthiest timberland owners 
in Maine. He remained in this busi- 
ness until his death. 

Dr. Coe has been one of the chief 
benefactors of the college. Besides 
giving the infirmary in memory of his 
son, Dudley Coe, he has left $150,000 
to the college in the form of a be- 
quest. He also bequeathed the same 
amount to the University of Maine. 

Dr. Coe was a member of the Alpha 
Delta Phi and Phi Beta Kappa fra- 
ternities. 



JUDGE EMERY '61 

Judge Lucilius Alonzo Emery '61, 
former chief justice of the Maine Su- 
preme Court, a most prominent figure 
in law in the state, and a member 
of the overseers and trustees of Bow- 
doin, died at Hancock, Me., August 26. 
He was born July 27, 1840, at Carmel, 
Me. After graduating from Bowdoin 
in 1861, he practiced law in Ellsworth, 
from 1863 to 1883. He married Annie 
S. Crosby in 1866. From 1867 to 1871 
he was attorney in Hancock County. 
From 1876 to 1878 he was Attorney 
General. About this time Judge 
Emery served two terms in the Maine 
Senate, the first in 1874-75, and the 
second in 1881-82. In 1883 he became 
a judge in the Supreme Court. This 
position he held until 1906, when he 
was chosen Chief Justice. He re- 
signed this office in 1911. 

During the college year of 1889-90 
he was lecturer on medical juris- 
prudence in the Medical School, and 
in the following year he was made 
professor. In 1898 the degree of 
Doctor of Laws was conferred upon 
him by Bowdoin. In this same year 
he was appointed lecturer of Roman 
Law at the University of Maine. 

From 1874 to 1907 Judge Emery 
was on the Board of Overseers, and 
from 1907 until his death on the 
Board of Trustees. He was a mem- 
ber of the Psi Upsilon and Phi Beta 
Kappa fraternities . 

At the funeral services which were 
held at Ellsworth, President Sills rep- 
resented the college. 



DR. FREDERIC 

HENRY GERRISH '66 

After a short illness, Dr. Frederic 
Henry Gerrish, one of the most promi- 
nent physicians in New England, and 
a member of the Board of Overseers 
of Bowdoin, died in Portland, Sep- 
tember 8. He was born in Portland, 
March 21, 1845. After graduation 
from college he entered the Medical 
School, from which he received his de- 
gree in 1869. In the same year he 
was awarded his Master's Degree. 

In 1872 he was appointed lecturer 
on Materia Medica at the Maine Medi- 
cal School, and in the following year 
professor of Materia Medica and 
Therapeutics. In the college year of 
1874-5 Dr. Gerrish taught these sub- 
jects at the University of Michigan. 
From 1875 to 1885 he was lecturer 
on Public Health in the Medical 
School. From 1882 to 1905 he was 
professor of Anatomy, from 1905 to 
1911 of Surgery, and since 1911 pro- 
fessor emeritus. Since 1886 he has 
been an overseer of the college. 

In 1904 Dr. Gerrish received the de- 
gree of Doctor of Laws from the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, and in the fol- 
lowing year another from Bowdoin. 

Dr. Gerrish has been a member of 
many important medical societies, in 
several of which he has been presi- 
dent. In 1887-8 he was president of 
the American Academy of Medicine, 
in 1901-2 of the Maine Medical As- 
sociation, in 1908-9 of the American 
Therapeutic Society, and at other 
times president of the Maine State 
Board of Health, the New England 
Surgical Association, and the Alpha 
of Maine Phi Beta Kappa. He has 
been governor of the Maine Society 
of Colonial Wars, trustee of the Maine 
General Hospital, and Shattuck lect- 
urer of the Massachusetts Medical So- 
ciety. He has also had a membership 
in various foreign medical societies. 

Several valuable books on medical 
subjects, particularly the "Text-book 
of Anatomy" (1899), have been writ- 
ten by Dr. Gerrish. Some of his 
others are "Prescription Writing" 
(1878), "Sex Hygiene" (1917), and a 
translated edition of Championiere's 
"Antiseptic Surgery" (1881). 

Dr. Gerrish was a member of the 
Alpha Delta Phi and Phi Beta Kappa 
fraternities. 



Death of Edward 

Francis Searles 

In the summer occurred the death 
of Edward Francis Searles, the well- 
known philanthropist often referred 
to as the "eccentric millionaire of 
Methuen." In his lifetime Mr. Searles 
was one of the benefactors of Bow- 
doin, being the donor of the Mary 
Frances Searles Science Building. 



Football News 

Football practice began a week ago 
Monday under Coach Greene, Trainer 
Magee, and Jim Brewster '16. A 
training table was immediately put in 
operation at the Delta Upsilon house 
for all members of the squad. A 
large number of men have already 
turned out, including a number of 
freshmen. 

There are seven letter men in the 
squad, and a number of others who 
are practically certain of a letter this 
year. In the line there are Captain 
Dudgeon, Thomson, Parent, Mason, 
and McCurdy. In addition to these 
will be P. S. Turner, formerly of the 
Class of 1919, who won his letter in 
track and* football both. Turner will 
be used at end and in the backfield. 
Dahlgren is the only letter man left 
in the backfield from last year's team. 

Some strong candidates for the 
backfield are J. Smith, Morrell, Miller, 
and Bisson. Freshmen who have al- 
ready reported are R. T. Phillips of 
Worcester Academy (backfield), A. E. 
Gibbons of Reading, Mass., C. H. 
Gowen of Sanford, W. E. Burgess of 
Woodfords, and A. D. Patterson of 
Vinalhaven. The other candidates in- 
clude Haines '21, Woodbury '22, 
Swinglehurst '23, Granger '21, Clif- 
ford '21, Putnam '22, Tootell '23, 
Wagg '22, Perry '22, Whitney '21, H. 
F. Morrill '21, McGown '21, Palmer 
'23, Bates '23, Badger '21, Eames '21, 
Parsons '23, Keene '22, Blake '23, 
Jacob '23, and G. Davis '23. 

The large squad is made up largely 
of light material, and as Trainer 
Magee has said, a great deal more 
speed must be shown by the men if 
the team is to be a success. The 
chances will be good if a fast eleven 
can be developed. Bowdoin has a hard 
schedule ahead, including games with 
Tufts and West Point. The schedule, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



as arranged by Manager Willson, is 
as follows: 

September 25— Springfield Y. M. C. 
A. at Springfield. 

October 2— Tufts at Medf ord. 

October 9 — Amherst at Amherst. 

October 16 — Trinity at Brunswick. 

October 23— Colby at Waterville. 

October 30 — Bates at Lewiston. 

November 6 — University of Maine 
at Brunswick. 

November 13 — West Point at West 
Point. 

Up to the beginning of this week 
four men from the Class of 1923 have 
come out for the assistant manager- 
ship: Hanscome, Hunt, Philbrick, and 
Sheesley. 



Cross-Country Prospects 

For the first time since 1914 the 
Maine cross-country race this fall will 
be run in Brunswick. Bowdoin ought 
to do well with Goodwin, Hatch, 
Towle, and E. A. Hunt left over from 
last year. Goodwin especially is in 
first-class condition after the Olymp- 
ics. Coach Magee does not expect 
to be able to give very much time to 
the hill and dale runners on account 
of his work with the football team. 

Every man from last year's cham- 
pionship team is back at the Univer- 
sity of Maine, and Frank Preti is 
there to coach nothing but cross- 
country this fall. Jack wants as 
many track men as possible to come 
out for the team so that Bowdoin 
can be well represented in the final 
list of place winners. 



Tennis Report 

Norman W. Haines, Manager 

SEASON OF 1920 

Receipts 

A. S. B. C. Appropriation $150.00 

Loan from Football Association 75.00 

Rain Guarantee, M. I. T 7.50 

Total receipts $232.50 

Expenditures 

Printing $10.60 

N. E. I. T. A. dues 15.00 

Boston trip (mileage and meals) 90.00 

Orono trip 60.00 

Tennis balls 23.90 

Cups for Interscholastics 16.00 

Cut for "Bugle" 6.00 

Postage, telephone, expressage 5.00 

Total expenditures $226.50 

Cash in bank $6.00 

Respectfully submitted. 

NORMAN W. HAINES, 

Manager of Tennis. 



Schedule of Courses 

First Semester— 1920-1921. 







MONDAY 






8.30 a. m. 
German 1 
Greek 1 
Latin A 

Math. 1— Div. A-C 
Physics 1 
Philosophy 1 
Italian 3 


9.30 a. m. 
Astronomy 1 
French 3 — Div. A-B 
Geology 1 

Math. 1— Div. B-D 
History 7 
Government 3 


10.30 a. m. 
Chemistry 1 
English 13 
German 5 
Latin 5a 
French 3 — Div. 
History 9 
Zoology 3 


C 


11.30 a. m. 
Phys. Tr. 1 
Literature 1 
Math. 3 
Math. 5 
French 7 
History 5 
Zoology 3 






TUESDAY 






Latin 3a 

Math. 1— Div. A-C 
Music 1 
Psychology 1 
Art 3 


Zoology 9 Economics 5 
Economics 1 English 1— Div. 
English 1 — Div. C Greek 3 
Greek 7 Inter. Law 1 
Math. 1 — Div. B-D Latin 1 
Music 3 Music 5 
Psychology 3 

WEDNESDAY 


A 


English 1— Div. B 
English 3 
Philosophy 3 
Economics 9 
Art 7 


German 1 

Greek 1 

Latin A 

Math. 1— Div. A-C 

Physics 1 

Philosophy 1 

Italian 3 


Astronomy 1 
French 3 — Div. 
Geology 1 
German 3 
Math. 1— Div. 
History 7 
Government 3 


A-B 
B-D 


Chemistry 1 
English 13 
German 5 
Latin 5a 
French 3— Div. 
History 9 
Zoology 3 


C 


Phys. Training 1 
Literature 1 
Math. 3 
Math. 5 
French 7 
Zoology 3 
History 5 






THURSDAY 






English 1— Div. C 
Latin 3a 
Music 1 
Psychology 1 
Art 3 


Phychology 3 
Music 3 
Zoology 9 
Economics 1 
English 1 — Div. 
Greek 7 


B 


Economics 5 
English 1 — Div. 
Greek 3 
Inter. Law 1 
Latin 1 
Music 5 


A 


English 3 
Phys. Training 1 
Philosophy 3 
Economics 9 
Art 7 






FRIDAY 






German 1— 

Greek 1 

Latin A 

Math. 1— Div. A-C 

Physics 1 

Philosophy 1 

Italian 3 


Astronomy 1 
English 1 — Div. C 
French 3 — Div. A-B 
History 7 
Geology 1 
German 3 
Math 1— Div B-D 
Government 3 


Latin 1 

French 3— Div. 
Chemistry 1 
English 1 — Div. 
English 13 
German 5 
Latin 5a 
History 9 
Zoology 3 


C 
A 


French 7 
English 1 — Div. I 
Literature 1 
Math. 3 
Math. 5 
History 5 
Zoology 3 






SATURDAY 






English 1— Div. C 
Latin 3a 
Music 1 
Psychology 1 
Art 3 


Zoology 9 
Economics 1 
Greek 7 
Music 3 
Psychology 3 




Music 5 
Economics 5 
English 1 — Div. 
Greek 3 
Inter. Law 1 
Latin 1 


A 


English 1 — Div B 
English 3 
Philosophy 3 
Economics 9 
Art 7 






MONDAY 






1.30 p. m. 
Phys. Chemistry 
Zoology 1 
Physics 7 
Physics 3 
Spanish 3 
Surveying 1 
History 11 


2.30 p. m. 
Zoology 1 — Lab 
Chemistry 3 
French 1 
Spanish 1 
Physics 7 — Lab 
Surveying 1 


3.30 p. m. 
Zoology 1 — Lab 
Phys. Training 

TUESDAY 


2 


4.30 p. m. 
Phys. Training 4 


Common Law 
Greek 1 
Psychology 5 
Government 1 
Drawing 


English 15 
Latin A 
Psychology 5 
Drawing 


Psychology 5 
WEDNESDAY 




Phys. Training 3 


Phys. Chemistry 
Zoology 1 
Physics 3 
Physics 7 
Spanish 3 
Surveying 1 
History 11 


Chemistry 3 
Zoology 1 — Lab 
French 1 
Spanish 1 
Physics 7 — Lab 
Surveying 1 


Phys. Training 
Zoology 1 — Lab 

THURSDAY 


2 


Phys. Training 4 


Common Law 
Psychology 5 
Government 1 


Chemistry 5 
Psychology 5 
Hygiene 




Phys. Training 
Psychology 5 


2 


Phys. Training 3 


Drawing 


Drawing 
English 15 


FRIDAY 






Common Law 
Phys. Chemistry 
Zoology 1 
Physics 7 
Spanish 3 
Surveying 1 
History 11 


Chemistry 3 
English 15 
French 1 
Zoology 1 — Lab 
Spanish 1 
Surveying 1 
Physics 7 — Lab 




Phys. Training 
Zoology 1 — Lab 


3 


Phys. Training 4 



Hours for the following 
students : 

Zoology 7 Chemistry 7 

Greek A Russian 1 



aged at the convenience of instructors 



Mathematics 9 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Norman W. Haines '21 Editor-in-Chief 

Edward B. Ham '22 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Floyd A. Gerrard '23 Athletics 

Karl R. Philbrick '23 Faculty Notes 

George H. Quinby '23 Alumni Department 

F. King Turgeon '23 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

John L. Berry '21 Crosby E. Redman '21 

Harry Helson '21 Frank A. St. Clair '21 

George E. Houghton '21 William R. Ludden '22 
Russell M. McGown '21 Virgil C. McGorrill '22 
Roland L. McCormack '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. "Boardman ': 

Frederic A. Allen '22. . 
Wilfred R. Brewer '22. 



Manager 

. Assistant Manager 
.Assistant Manager 



Summary of Baseball Season 



All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions. $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible for edi- 
torials ; the Managing Editor for the news 
department ; and the Business Manager for 
advertisements and circulation. 



In this issue of the "Orient" there 
is printed considerable material from 
last year, particularly items concern- 
ing Commencement and summaries of 
the track and baseball seasons. It 
was impossible to secure the news of 
Commencement printed here in time 
for the last issue of the "Orient" in 
June. 



Second Semester 

Straight A Men 

Myron Halburton Avery '20. 
Leland Matthew Goodrich '20. 
Maynard Cole Waltz '20. 
Maurice Sydney Coburne '21. 
Lloyd Harvey Hatch '21. 
Harry Helson '21. 

George Edmond Houghton, Jr., '21. 
Curtis Stuart Laughlin '21. 
Philip Henry McCrum '21. 
Harold Frost Morrill '21. 
Robert Winthrop Morse '21. 
George Oliver Prout '21. 
Harold Merle Springer '21. 
Edward Billings Ham '22. 
Leland Ornell Ludwig, Jr., '22. 
Terence Cullen Ryan '22. 
Hartley Fremont Simpson, Jr., '22. 
Carroll Sherburne Towle '22. 
Joseph Finnegan '23. 
William Beale Jacob '23. 
Frederick King Turgeon '23. 



The baseball team last year, al- 
though it failed in the Maine series, 
played some games well enough to 
show that it was up to the calibre 
of a championship nine at times. When 
both the batting and the fielding were 
up to standard Bowdoin was the 
toughest kind of proposition to beat, 
but in a number of games the nine 
seemed to weaken in one or the other 
of these two departments. 

In the opening game of the season, 
the team made twenty-two hits for a 
total of twenty-three runs against 
Fort Williams, and made three errors 
which had no bearing on the score. 
Captain-elect Needelman registered 
five hits out of five, while Smith hit 
four times out of six. Bowdoin con- 
tinued its good playing at Lewiston 
on Patriots' Day, when Bates, the 
future championship team, was 
swamped 12 to 2. 

After these two games came the 
southern New England trip, which 
was rather disappointing as two 
games had to be cancelled, one re- 
sulted in a tie, and the fourth was a 
listless game which Bowdoin lost. In 
the Wesleyan game (8 to 1 in favor 
of Wesleyan), the hitting was Bow- 
doin's chief handicap, while in the con- 
test with St. Anselm's (3 to 3), the 
fielding was responsible for all of the 
home team's runs. 

The first game of the State series 
came on May 1 with Colby at Whittier 
Field. Flinn pitched a good enough 
game to win, but Bowdoin's hits were 
scattered, and for that reason Colby 
won out by a score of 1 to 0. 

Walker '23, pitching his first full 
game of the season, lost to St. 
Anselm's May 5 merely on account 
of fielding errors. Both teams were 
held to four hits. 

The following Saturday Bowdoin 
put up its best game in the entire 
State series, when Maine was trounced 
11 to 1. Smith and Morrell starred 
at the bat, while the others hit often 
enough to roll up the score. 

In the next two games Bowdoin 
kept up its fast work, against the 
Portland Knights of Columbus and 
Norwich University. With Mason 
twirling splendid ball, Bowdoin won 
the first of these games seven to 
nothing. Doherty, Morrell, and Clif- 
ford all hit well. In the Norwich 



game Bowdoin had another batting 
bee, driving out twenty hits for nine- 
teen runs. Hall scored five hits, 
Flinn three, and various others two. 

At Durham, N. H., both batting and 
fielding were weak, and New Hamp- 
shire College won eight to one. Out 
of the remaining five games, Bow- 
doin played good ball in four, and lost 
only on account of tough breaks. Har- 
vard won seven to four on account 
of one big inning when Bowdoin's 
fielding went bad. The game with 
Tufts was one of the most satisfactory 
of the season, when Mason repeated 
his victory of 1919. The Medford 
team led three to nothing until the 
seventh, when Bowdoin batted out five 
runs and won the game. Morrell hit 
four times out of four. 

May 29, Bowdoin lost an interest- 
ing game at Orono to the U. of M. 
by a score of 6 to 5. Bowdoin outhit 
Maine, with Doherty getting three 
hits, one a home run, but weak fielding 
in pinches let Maine break through. 

The Memorial Day game at Bates, 
which virtually won the championship 
for the Garnet, was the hardest game 
for Bowdoin to lose during the whole 
season. Bates earned none of its 
three runs, and Bowdoin lacked the 
punch to score more than two. Time 
and again Bowdoin had chances to tie 
the count and win the game. Doherty 
scored three hits in four chances. This 
defeat seemed to take half the energy 
from the Bowdoin nine, as Bates came 
to Brunswick on Ivy Day and had no 
trouble winning 9 to 5. 

Coach Houser did fine work with 
the team, as shown by the games with 
Bates (exhibition), Maine, Portland 
K. of C, Norwich, Harvard, and Tufts. 
On the other hand he lost out on sev- 
eral games owing to bad breaks and 
slumps in hitting. Five men were 
lost by graduation: Captain Cook, 2b; 
Doherty (who led the team in batting 
with the excellent average of .463), 
of; A. W. Hall, rf; Mason, p; and 
Prosser, of. Next spring there will be 
Flinn, Walker, and Tuttle for pitchers, 
Handy behind the bat, Clifford on 
first, Morrell at short, Joe Smith at 
third, and Captain Needelman and 
Holmes in the outfield. There is sure 
to be an abundance of new material, 
so that Bowdoin ought to be well rep- 
resented on the diamond this season. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



107 



GENERAL HINTS 

FOR FRESHMEN 

In this column an attempt is made 
to explain and amplify for the benefit 
of the incoming class various rules 
and customs, which are often confus- 
ing to new men at Bowdoin. A num- 
ber of the things taken up here are 
carefully noted in the "Freshman 
Bible," published by the college branch 
of the Y. M. C. A. The two subjects 
most vaguely known deal with the re- 
quired courses and some alternatives, 
and with the rules governing proba- 
tion and suspension from college. 

For convenience in reference the 
following is quoted from the catalogue 
regarding required studies in fresh- 
man year: 

"Candidates for the degree of A.B. 
are required to take Hygiene, the first 
semester; English 4, the second se- 
mester; and 

"(1) English 1, 2; and 
"(2) One of the following: Greek 
A, B or 1, 2; Latin 1, 2; Mathematics 
1, 2; and 

"(3) A second elective from group 
(2), or one of the following: Govern- 
ment 1, 2; Physics 1, 2; and 

"(4) To comply with the require- 
ments in modern languages: That 
each student who is a candidate for a 
degree shall have completed, 1st, two 
years' in either French or German, at 
least one year of which shall have 
been taken in college; and, 2nd, one 
year in a second modern foreign 
language to be taken in college from 
those offered in the curriculum. 
(Neither of these provisions is to be 
interpreted as altering the require- 
ments for admission.) 

"Note. — Candidates who enter with- 
out advanced Latin are required to 
take Latin A, B. 

"Candidates for the degree of B.S. 
are required to take Mathematics 1, 2; 
otherwise their freshman courses are 
the same as those for candidates for 
the degree of A.B." 

While these rules seem self-explana- 
tory to those familiar with them, it is 
surprising to notice how many stu- 
dents have no idea of their meaning, 
especially in regard to section 4. 

There is nothing obscure about the 
requirement of Hygiene, English 4, 
and English 1, 2. As for group 2, 
most freshmen completely overlook 
the first possibility. Nearly every one 



Record of Games Played 



Bowdoin 23, Fort Willi; 
Bowdoin 12, Bates 2 
1, Wesleyan 
3. St. Ansel n 
0, Colby 1. 
11, Maine 1. 
St. Ansel n 



Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 



7, Portland K. of C. 0. 



Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 



19, Norwich 5. 

1, New Hampshire 

4, Harvard 7. 

5, Tufts 3. 
5, Maine 6. 

2, Bates 3. 
5, Bates 9. 



Bowdoin v 
opponents' 59. 



six games, lost eight, and tied 



Bowdoin's total 



Batting Averages 



GP 

Tuttle 3 

Miller 2 

G. T. Davis 2 

Doherty 12 

Morrell 15 

A. W. Hatl 11 

Flinn 8 



Clifford 15 

Cook 15 

Handy 15 

Walker 4 

P. Mason 5 

G. Mason 1 

Towne 1 

Canter 1 

Perkins 1 



12 19 26 



59 12 15 16 



60 16 12 12 



Or:) 



tl'R 


SB 


SH 


SF 


Ave. 


1) 


1 


() 





1.000 


1) 











1.000 





(1 








.500 


3 


5 


s 


3 


.463 




2 


2 


1 


.333 


1 


3 


I 





.318 


1 


3 


1 





.296 


1 


7 


6 





.254 


1 


6 


4 





.233 





3 


1 





.212 


(1 


3 


2 


1 


.200 


3 


3 


3 


1 


.200 


4 




4 





.164 








1) 





.083 





() 


II 





.067 














.000 


I) 


1) 


II 





.000 





I) 








.000 








I) 





.000 
















() 


(1 
























16 


38 


27 


6 


.253 



Totals 15 534 99 135 160 22 

Two-base hits: Smith 3, Doherty 2, Handy 2, Morrell 1, Needelman 1, Prosser 1, Clifford 1. 
Walker 1. 

Three-base hits: Doherty, Morrell, Prosser, Clifford, Handy. 
Home run : Doherty. 



Fielding Averages 



P. Mason, p 12 

Prosser, If, rf 9 

Miller, c 3 

G. Mason, lb 3 



Wagg, rf 1 

Perkins, 2b 1 

Clifford, lb 161 

Handy, c 105 

Needelman, cf 23 

Smith, 3b 62 

Hall, rf 10 

Walker, p 18 

Doherty. If, rf 23 

Flinn. p, cf 40 

Morrell. ss 98 

Cook, 2b 73 



Ave. 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
.969 
.962 
.913 
.903 
.900 
.889 
.870 
.850 
.827 



Canter, cf. 
Marston, c. 
Towne, If. 



645 393 

Pitching Records 



Gra 







































.00 



Flinn 8 64 3 3 240 47 8 35 1 5 27 9 127 

Walker 4 27 3 94 15 14 18 1 15 7 2 34 

Mason 5 35 3 1 129 24 8 15 3 12 12 3.09 

Tuttle 3 5 1 21 7 4 4 5 5 9.00 

N. B. — These records have been compiled from data given out by the baseball management, 
and not from inaccurate box scores of daily papers. 



108 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



thinks himself "cornered" between 
Latin and Mathematics. Why would 
it not be pertinent to select two years 
of Greek, especially if a man feels 
himself insufficiently grounded in high 
school Latin or Mathematics ? In 
Greek a man can begin at the first 
without needing any previous knowl- 
edge, and can thus rely on his own 
merit without the handicap of a poor 
elementary training. 

In group 3 there are four choices: 
Between Government, Physics, and the 
two courses in group 2 other than the 
one first selected. For example, Latin 
is chosen from group 2. Then the 
choice in group 3 lies between Greek, 
Mathematics, Government, and Phys- 
ics. 

Group 4 provides the chief compli- 
cation. This is most easily explained 
by showing the specific requirements 
of a student who has offered French 
for admission, and of another who has 
offered German. Supposing a student 
has offered two years or three years 
of French for admission. The mini- 
mum requirement of him after enter- 
ing college is that he take French 3, 
4, and one course in any other modern 
foreign language. It would also be 
perfectly possible for him, if he does 
not feel strong in French, to take Ger- 
man 1J 2, 3, 4, and one course in any 
other modern foreign language. 

The other alternative made possible 
by the admission requirements is that 
of a student entering with two or 
three credits in German. His mini- 
mum is to take German 3, 4 and one 
course in any other modern foreign 
language. Again he might take 
French 1, 2, 3, 4 and a course in some 
other modern language. 

All of the above explanation applies 
to candidates for the degree of A.B. 
The requirement of Latin A, B, for 
men who have offered only three years 
of Latin for admission applies only to 
the A.B. students, as B.S. men are not 
required to have Latin. In addition 
to this difference in the requirements 
for freshmen candidates for the two 
degrees, the only remaining difference 
is that B.S. men must take Mathe- 
matics 1, 2, regardless whether they 
take Latin or not. Candidates for 
both degrees have the same modern 
language requirements. 

The second difficulty, in connection 
with suspension, is not to be cleared 



up by any rigid explanation, as there 
are no absolute rules, but in nearly 
every case the following rules are 
applied: 

After six weeks in the fall pre- 
liminary warnings are sent to fresh- 
men who are doing unsatisfactory 
work in any course. A warning in 
one course, no matter how low the 
grade is in that course, constitutes a 
minor warning. A warning in two or 
more courses is a major warning. At 
the middle of the term the freshmen 
have an opportunity to remove pre- 
liminary warnings. On the other 
hand it is possible for them to be 
warned in courses not referred to in 
preliminary warnings. If the mid- 
term warning is a minor warning, the 
student need have no fear of being 
dropped at the end of the semester. 
A student receiving a major warning 
at mid-term will be recommended for 
suspension by the Recording Commit- 
tee if he fails two or more courses at 
the end of the semester. In short the 
rule is, that if a double failure at the 
end of a semester follows a major 
warning at mid-term, the student's 
name is brought before the Faculty 
for a decision regarding suspension. 
The recommendation of the Recording 
Committee is usually accepted. There 
is only one other method of being 
dropped for studies; namely, to fail 
two or more courses at the end of a 
semester and to receive a major warn- 
ing the following mid-term. Thus the 
general rule can be summarized in 
this manner; two consecutive major 
warnings are sufficient for suspension. 
A student is supposed to receive a 
warning in a course, if his rank is 
below 65 per cent. A student who has 
been dropped from college on account 
of poor scholarship can be readmitted 
only after a formal application has 
been made to the Recording Commit- 
tee, which then fixes the terms on 
which he may enter. 

As for probation on account of low 
marks, any freshman who has a warn- 
ing is on probation until he has re- 
moved it. It is impossible to remove 
a warning between mid-term and the 
end of a semester. 



A little information about some of 
the student activities may be of in- 
terest to the new men this fall. Few 
freshmen realize the necessity of "go- 
ing out" for something in their first 



year. The non-athletic student can 
win just as high a position around the 
campus by his own hard work as the 
athlete. In order to do this he must 
begin in his first year, unless he is 
planning to candidate for assistant 
manager of football. 

Of course the various branches of 
athletics, baseball, track, football, 
hockey, tennis, fencing, and rifle 
shooting, are always open for anyone. 
In other columns of this issue of the 
"Orient" there is more or less about 
the three major sports, with discis- 
sions of last year's seasons. 

Candidates will be wanted for the 
assistant managership in track, base- 
ball, tennis, and hockey, particularly 
the first two. Other organizations 
wanting men are the musical clubs, 
the Masque and Gown, the band, the 
"Orient," the Bowdoin Publishing 
Company, and the "Quill." 

A man going out for the track 
managership is required to do about 
two hours of work daily, as the man- 
ager directs, during the track season, 
indoor and outdoor. Baseball candi- 
dates begin work in March, in the 
Gymnasium, and continue to the end 
of the season. In June two men 
nominated by the Student Council for 
each assistant managership (tennis 
and hockey included) are voted on by 
the Student Body. A year later the 
same two men (usually) are voted on 
again by the Student Body for the 
managership. No freshman belong- 
ing to a fraternity having the assist- 
ant manager or the manager of any 
sport can candidate for a manager- 
ship in that sport. 

Candidates for the football man- 
agership come from the sophomore 
class, and the same rules govern their 
work as in the case of baseball and 
track, except that the student elec- 
tion comes soon after the football 
season. 

The musical clubs consist of the 
Glee Club and the Mandolin Club, the 
first of which is primarily for singing, 
and the second being made up of in- 
struments, chiefly mandolins. A call 
for candidates will be issued this fall, 
and the clubs for this year will be 
made up before Christmas (although 
a man may be dropped at any time 
during the year). This organization 
offers a number of excellent trips to 
Massachusetts and parts of Maine. 



BOWDOIX ORIENT 



109 



Last year a concert was given in New 
York. 

The Masque and Gown gives two 
plays yearly, a modern comedy at 
Ivy, and a Shakespeare comedy at 
Commencement. In addition the Ivy 
play is given at various other places 
in Maine and Massachusetts before 
being presented here in Brunswick. 
The elections for manager and assist- 
ant manager are controlled by the 
Masque and Gown itself, and there 
is no voting on them by the student 
body. 

Any student who can play a band 
instrument at all well stands an ex- 
cellent chance of making the band. 
Professor Wass has charge of this 
group, as well as of the two musical 
clubs. Managers and leaders in the 
band and in the musical clubs are 
elected by the members and not by the 
student body. 

Any freshman with literary incli- 
nations ought to write articles for the 
"Quill." Too few students take any 
notice of the "Quill" except to laugh 
at it. Essays, short stories, poems, 
descriptions, or any other type of 
theme is acceptable. Only three ac- 
cepted articles are necessary for a 
nomination to the board. In general 
a candidate is elected after three ac- 
cepted articles have appeared. In 
spite of the fact that the "Quill" gets 
little recognition from those who 
have nothing to do with it, there is 
considerable satisfaction in being a 
member of a board of five or six men 
who are managing the college liter- 
ary magazine. 

As for the "Orient," enough has 
been said in another column regard- 
ing candidates. The board which 
makes it possible to publish both the 
"Orient" and the "Quill" is something 
that freshmen ought to consider. This 
is the Bowdoin Publishing Company, 
the manager of which is the only stu- 
dent officer who has a salary for his 
work. At least ten men should try 
out for this, as it is too important 
to be overlooked. 

The desirability of paying the 
blanket tax is a factor which should 
be recognized by all students. It 
amounts to $7.50 per semester, and 
it gives one many privileges which 
are very essential to a student on the 
campus. The material benefits de- 
rived from it are as follows: It gives 



free admission to all athletic contests 
in Brunswick except the Ivy Day base- 
ball game ; it gives a free subscription 
for the "Orient" and for the "Quill;" 
it gives membership in the A.S.B.C. 
(Associated Students of Bowdoin Col- 
lege) and in the Bowdoin branch of 
the Y.M.C.A. Without payment of 
the blanket tax, no student has the 
right to vote in a general election. In 
addition to these definite privileges, 
every- Bowdoin man ought to have 
spirit enough to co-operate in college 
activities to the extent of paying this 
reasonable sum. 



Following is a reference list of stu- 
dents at the head of different groups, 
including a full list of the Student 
Council and the Athletic Council: 

Student Council: 

Young '21, president. 

Eames '21, vice-president. 

Thomson '21, secretary. 

Buker '21. 

Dudgeon '21. 

Goodwin '21. 

Hatch '21. 

Lovell '21. 

Perkins '21. 

Willson '21. 

Averill '22. 

Flinn '22. 
Athletic Council: 

Goodwin '21. 

Thomson '21. 

Flinn '22. 

Partridge '22. 

Handy '23. 
Football Manager: 

M. L. Willson '21. 
Track Manager: 

V. C. McGorrill '22. 
Baseball Manager: 

F. R. Ridley '22. 
Tennis Manager: 

F. P. Freeman '22. 
Hockey Manager: 

E. B. Page '22. 
Football Captain: 

H. A. Dudgeon '21. 
Track Captain: 

A. Thomson '21. 
Baseball Captain: 

W. R. Needelman '21. 
Tennis Captain: 

G. A. Partridge '22. 
Hockey Captain: 

E. B. Page '22. 



Masque and Gown Manager: 

K. R. Philbrick '23. 
Musical Clubs Manager: 

J. M. Ryder '21. 
Editor of "Orient": 

N. W. Haines '21. 
Manager Bowdoin Publishing Co.: 

K. S. Boardman '21. 
Editor of "Quill": 

J. L. Badger '21. 
President Y.M.C.A.: 

C. S. Towle '22. 



The Track Season of 1920 

Once more the track season closed 
last spring with a Maine champion- 
ship in Bowdoin's possession. The 
Maine meet was not won by so great 
a margin as in 1919, but neverthe- 
less there was not the slightest doubt 
that Bowdoin had the best team in 
the state after the Lewiston games. 
Coach Magee began the season with 
the loss of six men who figured con- 
siderably the year before: Savage, 
Higgins, Allen, Foulke, Holbrook, and 
Caspar. 

Last winter Bowdoin made a splen- 
did showing in its two appearances 
against other colleges. February 7 
at the B.A.A. games, the relay team 
(Averill, Hunt, M. H. Smith, Good- 
win) defeated Williams and Worces- 
ter Polytechnic Institute in the time 
of 3 minutes, 16 seconds. Each man 
ran 390 yards. Some of the Bow- 
doin men entered in the other events 
of the carnival. Palmer '23, going 
at his best, defeated Dave Caldwell 
of the B.A.A. at the tape in the 660- 
yard handicap race. Palmer had a 
handicap of twenty yards, and his 
time was one minute 30 1-5 seconds. 
Captain-elect Thomson performed 
very well against a field of stars in 
the 40-yard dash and also in the 
hurdles. Moses got into the finals 
of the 45-yard high hurdles with such 
men as Thomson of Dartmouth and 
Smith of Cornell. Goodwin finished 
third in the handicap mile, running 
an excellent race in spite of his work 
in the relay. 

In a dual indoor meet in the Bow- 
doin Gymnasium Bates was easily de- 
feated 82 to 26 February 27. Cap- 
tain Dostie, Hatch, and Goodwin broke 
records in the 220, 880, and the mile, 
respectively. Bowdoin took ten firsts, 
and Bates two. 



110 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Although Savage and Higgins had 
been lost, Jack had practically an un- 
beatable combination in the hurdles 
with Moses, Parent, and Thomson. 
Everything was looking favorable for 
the outdoor season. Besides the 
hurdlers, Coach Magee had Goodwin, 
Hatch, M. H. Smith, Palmer, Averill, 
Dostie, and Parent for other runs, 
Cook for the pole vault, Parent for 
the broad jump, and for the weights, 
Zeitler, A. M. Smith, and Ellms. 

On May 1, the relay team went to 
Philadelphia for the Pennsylvania Re- 
lay Carnival, and won from Rochester 
"University and Buffalo University by 
.about ten yards. The team consisted 
.of Parent, M. H. Smith, Hatch, and 
Goodwin. 

On May 8, Bowdoin swamped Bates 
in another dual meet, this time at 
Lewiston. The score was 86 3-5 to 39 
2-5. Bisson '23 and Philbrook '23 won 
their letters by landing firsts in the 
shot-put and high jump respectively. 
In the Maine meet at Lewiston, 
May 15, Bowdoin scored 45 points, 
Maine 31, Bates 25, and Colby 25. 
As told in a previous account in the 
"Orient," Parent, Goodwin, and Moses 
starred, getting 29 points between 
them. Parent won the low hurdles 
and broad jump, Goodwin the mile, 
and Moses the high hurdles, together 
with picking up various seconds. Cook 
won the pole vault, Thomson took four 
points in the hurdles; Ellms, Zeitler, 
and A. M. Smith five in the weights; 
Hunt and M. H. Smith one each in 
the middle distance runs. Hatch was 
unable to run the half on account of 
sickness, and Palmer, not yet entirely 
recovered from influenza, could not. 
place in the quarter. The two events 
that really turned the balance in this 
meet were the hurdles, where Bow- 
doin scored seventeen points, losing 
the eighteenth merely because two 
men instead of three entered the high 
hurdles. This victory was a great 
satisfaction to Bowdoin, as Maine en- 
tered the finals the favorite, and as 
Coach Magee had emphasized the 
danger of over-confidence, an element 
not thought of before the victory of 
1919. 

The following Saturday Bowdoin en- 
tered the New England meet and 
finished fifth with 13 3-4 points, a 
better performance than last year. It 
is noteworthy that no other Maine 
college scored a single point in this 



meet. Parent took five points with 
a first in the low hurdles; Goodwin 
three by finishing second only to 
Nightingale of New Hampshire in the 
mile; Cook two and three-fourths by 
tying for first in the pole vault; Ellms 
two and a half by getting fourth in 
the hammer and a tie for third in the 
discus; and Dostie a half with a tie 
for fourth in the broad jump. 

The track season concluded when 
Goodwin finished fourth in the mile 
run at the I.C.A.A.A.A. meet on May 
29 at Philadelphia. 

Credit must be given to Coach 
Magee for keeping the team up to the 
point to which he had raised it last 
year after six years of work. Seven 
years ago track was at a very low 
ebb, but now Bowdoin is right up at 
the top again in the state, and there 
seems to be every probability of 
future success. 

Five valuable men were lost by 
graduation in June: Captain Dostie, 
Moses, Ellms, M. H. Smith, and 
Zeitler. Next year eleven point win- 
ners will be left; Captain-elect Thom- 
son, Parent, Goodwin, Cook, Hatch, 
Hunt, Partridge, Palmer, A. M. Smith, 
Bisson, and Philbrook. 



jfacultp i3otes 

Professor Orren C. Hormell is back 
again this year after being a visiting 
lecturer at Harvard in the department 
of government for the past two se- 
mesters. 

Professor Davis returned this week 
on the "Scotian" from England where 
he has been studying since the end of 
the first semester last year. 

Professor Andrews, who has been 
studying art at Harvard and in New 
York for the past year, has come 
back, and this year will offer two en- 
tirely new courses in art. 

Professor Stanwood has recently 
ourchased the house at 165 Maine 
street. 

Professor Bell has moved into his 
new residence at 7 Potter street. 

Professor Copeland returned Mon- 
day from his summer work at the bio- 
logical station in Wood's Hole, Mass. 

Professor Stone is at St. Luke's 
Hospital, New York, recovering from 
a severe attack of inflammatory rheu- 
matism . 



Campus JQotcs 

The Rhodes Scholarship Committee 
of Maine will meet Saturday of this 
week in the office of the State Super- 
intendent of Schools at Augusta, to 
make a final decision on the candi- 
dates for next year. The candidates 
from Bowdoin are Thomson '21 and 
Helson '21. 

The repairs on the heating station 
(where the Union was last year) are 
very near completion, and it is ex- 
pected that all work will be finished 
in a fortnight. 

C. S. Little '23 is teaching at Booth- 
bay Harbor this year, and plans to 
return to college next fall. 

Miss Evelyn Carol Cobb and George 
Stetson '23 were married last August. 

Martin Mendelson '22 has trans- 
ferred from Bowdoin to the junior 
class of the Wharton School of Fi- 
nance. 



alumni jBotes 

The "Orient" particularly wishes to 
be recognized as the central exchange 
for receiving and distributing news of 
the Alumni. Obviously this can be 
done only with hearty co-operation of 
the Alumni themselves, and especially 
of the class secretaries. The "Orient" 
can maintain no elaborate service for 
the collection of college news outside 
of Brunswick, and for notes about the 
Alumni it must remain dependent on 
the Alumni themselves and on such 
newspapers as are received at the 
College Library. The present edi- 
torial board is making every effort to 
realize the ideal set up by the Alumni 
Council — to print all interesting facts 
about the doings of the Alumni. 

•1856— Rev. Edwin Pond Parker, for 
over fifty years pastor of the Second 
Congregational Church of Hartford, 
died May 28, 1920. He was born 
January 13, 1836, at Castine, Maine. 
After graduating from the Bangor 
Theological Seminary in 1860, he was 
appointed to his pastorate in Hart- 
ford, Conn., which he occupied actively 
until 1912. In that year he was made 
pastor emeritus. In 1874 Yale con- 
ferred the degree of Doctor of Di- 
vinity upon him, and in 1912 he re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of Laws 
from Trinity. From 1876 to 1879 he 
was chaplain of the Connecticut Gen- 
eral Assembly. Dr. Parker became 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



111 



a fellow of Yale University in 1895. 
He was a member of the Delta Kappa 
Epsilon and Phi Beta Kappa fra- 
ternities. 

1865 — Thomas Shepard of Somer- 
ville, Mass., died April 26, 1920, in 
Boston. He was born in Bangor March 
5, 1843. He went into the Civil War 
in 1864, but very soon became con- 
nected with the United States Civil 
Service in Washington, where he re- 
mained until 1869. For the next four- 
teen years he was a manufacturer in 
Baltimore, after which he removed to 
New York City, where he was en- 
gaged in mercantile business until 
1902. He retired in that year, and 
since then until his death he resided 
in Somerville. He was a member of 
the Apha Delta Phi fraternity. 

Medic-1872 — Dr. Frank Sumner 
Warren died at Biddeford, Me., June 
28, 1920. He was born March 12, 
1851, at Pownal, Me. Since his gradu- 
ation from the Medical School he 
practiced in Biddeford. He held vari- 
ous state offices, at one time being in 
the Legislature. 

1879 — Joel Payson Huston, a promi- 
nent member of the Lincoln County 
Bar and president of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Damariscotta, died at 
his home in Newcastle, June 3, 1920. 
He was born in Damariscotta, Sept. 
22, 1857. In 1882 he was admitted 
to the bar, and practiced for a num- 
ber of years. Meanwhile he also be- 
came cashier of the Damariscotta 
bank. After 1911 he served as presi- 
dent until his death. He was a mem- 
ber of. the Zeta Psi fraternity. 

Medic-1887 — Dr. Frank Byron 
Brown died of apoplexy at Dorchester, 
Mass., July 1, 1920. He was born 
Sept. 3, 1863, at North Chichester, 
N. H. He entered Dartmouth in 1882, 
and stayed there two years. In 1886 
he came to the Maine Medical School 
and received his degree the following 
year. After that he did post gradu- 
ate work at Harvard, at the Univer- 
sity of Berlin, and in St. Bartholo- 
mew's Hospital, London. He prac- 
ticed in Salina, Kansas, until 1892, 
and then came to Dorchester, where 
he remained until his death. From 
1894 to 1899 he was instructor in 
bacteriology and pathology at Tufts. 
He was a member of the Massa- 
chusetts and Norfolk County Medical 
Societies. In his will Dr. Brown left 



the sum of a thousand dollars to the 
Medical School. 

Medic-1895 — Dr. Robert Ambrose 
Holland of Calais died September 11 
in a hospital at Winnipeg, Manitoba. 
He was on a business trip to the Ca- 
nadian city. He was born at Chat- 
ham, N. B., November 3, 1870. After 
graduating from the Medical School, 
Dr. Holland began practice in Calais, 
where he remained all his life. 

1898— Miss Florence O. Priest of 
East Vassalboro and Charles Sumner 
Pettengill of Augusta were married at 
Augusta, June 9, 1920. 

1900— Miss Theodore Mary Beck- 
with and Harry Thompson Burbank 
were married in Boston, June 12, 1920. 

1901— Miss Abby Louise Wright 
and Harold Penniman Vose were mar- 
ried September 7 at Greenwich, Conn. 

1901 — George R. Gardner has re- 
signed his position as principal of the 
Brunswick High School to become 
superintendent of schools in five New 
Hampshire towns, with headquarters 
at Lisbon, N. H. Mr. Gardner is be- 
ing succeeded at Brunswick by Philip 
W. Kimball '11. 

1905— Louis D. H. Weld has a letter 
in the "Nation" of August 21 on "The 
Packers' Profit." He is manager of 
the commercial research department 
of Swift & Co., Chicago. 

1910 — In the July number of the 
"American Oxonian" was an article 
by Robert Hale on "War and Di- 
plomacy on the Baltic." 

1910 — Miss Alice Jane Dinsmore 
and Alfred Wandtke were married 
June 16, 1920, at Lewiston. 

1913 — Alfred H. Sweet is going to 
teach history at the University of 
Colorado this year. 

1913— Miss Esther Dallett and Wil- 
liam Fletcher Twombly were mar- 
ried at Wilmington, Delaware, Sep- 
tember 11. Paul L. White '14 was 
best man. 

1913 — Miss Alice Holland Rowe and 
James Everett Philoon were married 
at Auburn, Saturday, September 18. 

1914 — Robert D. Leigh is an in- 
structor at Columbia this year, giving 
a correlated course for freshmen 
called "Civilization." 

1914 — Samuel Wood Chase was 
awarded the degree of Doctor of Phil- 
osophy by Harvard last June. 

1914 — Richard Earl Simpson died 
August 11 at Jamaica Plain, Mass., 
after being in ill health for some 



time. He was born in Portland, Aug. 
2, 1892. In college he won Phi Beta 
Kappa honors in his junior year, and 
graduated cum laude. He taught two 
years in Salem (Mass.) High School 
and in Deering High School. He then 
studied for service in the Episcopal 
Church. After the war broke out, he 
served in the Navy for a year until 
June, 1919. He was a member of the 
Zeta Psi fraternity. 

1916— Miss Dorothy Nichols of 
Bath and Paul Kendall Niven were 
married June 26, 1920. • 

1916— Donald S. White, after sev- 
eral months of relief work under the 
Red Cross in Esthonia and Latvia, be- 
came in the summer, a member of 
Miss Anne Morgan's unit, working 
in the devastated regions of Com- 
piegne. An article by him entitled 
"Glimpses of the New Balkan States" 
appeared in the magazine section of 
the "Lewiston Journal" for August 
14. 

1916— Philip F. Weatherill, who has 
been doing graduate work at Harvard 
University, was awarded one of the 
three George H. Emerson Scholar- 
ships last June. 

1917— Miss Frances Emily Talbot 
and Percy Fremont Crane were mar- 
ried at East Machias, Maine, Septem- 
ber 15. 

1917— Miss Hazel E. Cobb and Eu- 
gene Morrill Gillespie were married 
at Gardiner, Me., July 17. Mr. Gil- 
lespie is now supervisor of the Phila- 
delphia telephone district. 

1917 — In the International Track 
Meet at London, July 6, between 
Princeton and Oxford, H. S. White 
won third place for Oxford in the 
high jump with a mark of five feet, 
eight inches. 

1918 — H. Tobey Mooers, who has 
been at Brussels as American Vice- 
Consul to Belgium, was transferred 
in the consular service this summer 
to the Azores. 

1918 — George H. Blake is an in- 
structor of French and Spanish at 
New Hampshire College this year. 

Ex-1918— John Robert Cheetham of 
Attleboro, Mass., died July 5 at his 
home as a result of an automobile 
accident. He left college after one 
year to enter the Navy. He was a 
resident of Auburn until four or five 
years ago. 

1919 — Miss Helene Mabelle Fender- 
son and Milton Morse McGorrill were 



112 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



married at Woodfords June 16. Vir- 
gil C. Morrill '22, was the best man. 
1919 — J. Wesley Coburn received 
the degree of Master of Arts from 
Bates last spring. 

Hon.-1920— Mr. Ben Foster, the dis- 
tinguished artist on whom the degree 
of Master of Arts was conferred last 
Commencement, in a letter to Presi- 
dent Sills from Wyoming, where he is 
now painting in the Big Horn Moun- 
tains, expressed his deep regret at 
not being present when the degree 
was conferred, and writes: "No de- 
gree in the gift of Oxford, Harvard, 
or Yale, could please me one-half so 
much; for denied the opportunity of 
enrolling at Bowdoin in my youth, you 
cannot realize, I am sure, how grati- 
fied I am to be thus affiliated with that 
grand old institution whose traditions 
I have always cherished so fondly." 

1920 — Jere Abbott was on a trip 
this summer to Alaska and the Klon- 
dike region. 

1920— Rev. Allan W. Constantine 
accepted a call to a church at Cape 
Town, South Africa, and sailed for 
that city from New York on July 5. 

1920— Cloyd E. Small and Maynard 
C. Waltz are teaching this year at 
Hebron Academy. 



Commencement Items 

The following data were not avail- 
able when the Commencement issue 
of the "Orient" went to press, and it 
is printed here to be included among 
the important records of the college. 
At the annual meetings of the 
trustees and overseers, Henry Hill 
Pierce '96 was elected to the vacancy 
in the overseers caused by the death 
of Admiral Peary '77. The idea 
of a rostrum proposed by the war 
memorial committee as a memorial to 
Bowdoin men in the war was accepted 
by the boards. 

It was voted to buy the Mosher 
house on Cleaveland street for use as 
a temporary Union to replace the 
Union burned in the winter. 

Among faculty changes noted by 
the boards were the promotion of As- 
sistant Professor Van Cleve to a full 
professorship in history; the appoint- 
ment of Mortimer Phillips Mason, 
Ph.D., (Harvard), to a professorship 
in philosophy; the appointment of 
Glenn R. Johnson, A.M. (Reed Col- 
lege), as assistant professor of 



economics and sociology; the granting 
of leave of absence for the second 
semester of 1920-21 to Professors 
Copeland and Elliott. There was 
voted a graded scale of increase in 
faculty salaries whereby a very sub- 
stantial increase over the present al- 
lotment is made in all departments. 

From Mrs. Edith Davis Files the 
sum of $30,000 has been received to 
endow the George Taylor Files profes- 
sorship in modern languages in 
memory of the late Professor Files 
'89. 

Dr. Lucien Howe '70, of Buffalo, 
has given $5,000 for a prize scholar- 
ship to be given to the senior who "by 
example and influence has shown 
highest qualities of gentlemanly con- 
duct and character." 

The following honorary degrees 
were conferred: 

Litt.D. — Professor Charles Town- 
send Copeland '06 of Harvard Uni- 
versity. 

D.D. — Rev. Edgar Millard Cousins 
'77. 

D.D. — Rev. Chester Burge Emerson 

'04: 

M.Sc— Captain Charles H. McClel- 
lan of Newburyport, Mass. 

A.M.— Ben Foster of New York. 

A.M. — Captain Robert A. Bartlett, 
Peary's companion in the Arctic. 

Following is the list of appoint- 
ments and prizes, announced by Presi- 
dent Sills at the conclusion of the 
Commencement exercises: 

Phi Beta Kappa Appointments. 

Appointments in June, 1919, to 
members of 1920 — Philip Dyer Crock- 
ett, Leland Matthew Goodrich, Irving 
Trefethen Richards. 

Appointments in June, 1920, from 
1920 — Maurice Wescott Avery, Myron 
Halburton Avery, Edward Horace 
Ellms, Alexander Henderson (to be 
initiated in 1921), Ezra Pike Rounds, 
Harold Merle Springer; from 1921 — 
Lloyd Harvey Hatch, Philip Henry 
McCrum, Harold Frost Morrill, 
Robert Winthrop Morse, George 
Oliver Prout. 

Honorary Commencement 
Appointments 

Summa Cum Laude — Leland Mat- 
thew Goodrich. 

Magna Cum Laude — Alexander 
Henderson. 

Cum Laude — Maurice W. Avery, 
Myron H. Avery, Keith C. Coombs, 



Philip D. Crockett, Edward H. Ellms, 
Stanley M. Gordon, Harold S. Prosser, 
Leroy A. Ramsdell, Ezra P. Rounds, 
Irving T. Richards, Harry M. Shwartz, 
Cloyd E. Small, Edgar C. Taylor. 

Prizes and Awards 

Rhodes Scholar for 1920— Philip 
Dyer Crockett, 1920. 

Rhodes Scholars now in Residence — 
Robert Peter Coffin, 1915; Neal Tuttle, 
1914. 

Charles Carroll Everett Scholar — 
Leland Matthew Goodrich, 1920. 

Henry W. Longfellow Scholar- 
Edgar Curtis Taylor, 1920. 

David Sewall Premium — Walter- 
Reginald Whitney, 1923. 

Class of 1868 Prize— Edgar Curtis 
Taylor, 1920. 

Smyth Mathematical Prize — Ed- 
ward Billings Ham, 1922. 

Sewall Greek Prize; — Maurice W. 
Avery, 1920. 

Sewall Latin Prize— Edward Bill- 
ings Ham, 1922. 

Goodwin Commencement Prize — 
Alexander Henderson, 1920. 

Almon Goodwin Prize — Lloyd 
Harvey Hatch, 1921. 

Hiland Lockwood Fairbanks Prizes 
— (English 5), Edgar Curtis Taylor, 
1920: (English 4) Charles Stuart Lit- 
tle, 1923, first; James Edward 
Mitchell, 1923, second. 

Colonel William Henry Owen Pre- 
mium — James Elmon Vance, 1920. 

Pray English Prize — George Baker 
Welch, 1922. 

Goodwin French Prize — Scott Har- 
old Stackhouse, 1923. 

Noyes Political Economy Prize — 
Philip Henry McCrum, 1921. 

Brown Composition Prizes — Irving 
Trefethen Richards, 1920, first; 
Richard Kenneth McWilliams, 1920, 
second. 

Bradbury Debating Prizes — First 
prizes, Joseph Linwood Badger '21, 
Norman William Haines '21, Charles 
Stuart Little '23, Hugh Nixon '21; 
second prizes, Joseph Finnegan '23, 
Curtis Stuart Laughlin '21, James Ed- 
ward Mitchell '23, Albert Rudolph 
Thayer '22. 

Hawthorne Short Story Prize — 
Stanley Meacham Gordon, '20. 

Alexander Speaking Prizes — Fred- 
erick King Turgeon '23, first; James 
Edward Mitchell '23, second. 

Forbes Rickard Poetry Prize — 
Robert Winthrop Morse '21. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



113 



Brown Memorial Prizes — Harry 
Martin Shwartz '20; Philip Henry Mc- 
Crum '2% Richard Winslow Cobb '22, 
Edgar Leland Means '23. 



Be sure to see 

Maynard S. Howe 

for your Bowdoin "B" 

and Fraternity pipes. 

Genuine W. D. C. pipes with 

sterling silver band and 

letters. 

Also Bowdoin College and 

all Fraternity Shields 

in two sizes. 

Chi Psi Lodge, 



Maynard S. Howe '22 

College Agent for 

The College Memory Book 

Company 

Chicago, 111. 



FRESHMEN: 

The " Bowdoin " Memory 
Book for 1920-1921 with its 
added features is the best 
ever. 

Order your Copy NOW 



Chi Psi Lodge 

I also have a good line of 

BOWDOIN Banners, 

Pennants, Pillows, Etc. 

Be sure to see my samples. 




THE BRUNSWICK 

Convenient to the theatre and 
shopping districts. 

The sort of Hotel guests 
visit once and return to every 
time they come to Boston. 

Boylston St. at Copley Sq. 



M 






^S'il'i^T-^ihYrM, 



mil-,* '»::!':i 



THE LENOX 

In the center of Boston's 
Back Bay residential district. 

For many years a stopping 
place for college teams. 

The "Old Grad" claims it 
still and so do the Under 
Grads. It's their Hotel. 

Boylston St. at Exeter St. 

UNDER SAME MANAGEMENT 
L. C. PRIOR, Managing Director 



114 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



America's most famous 
box of candy 




Candies of exquisite quality in a quaint, ar- 
tistic box. Fine to give to a girl or to give your- 
self! 

For sale by 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



"In playing a stymie, use a niblick ' * * 
the loft of the niblick will carry your 
ball over the interposing ball. " 



—Harry Vardon, in Golf Illustrated. 




Dependability 

The new U. S. Royal, U. S. Revere, and U. S. Floater 
Golf Balls are dependable balls. They help you out of 
the tight corners — make those difficult shots less hard to 
face. They fly true and putt true, and are uniformly 
accurate from core to cover — well balanced, sound and 
lively. There's a size and weight to suit your style of play. 

Buy them from your pro or 
at your dealer's. 

U. S. Royal $1.00 each 
U. S. Revere 85c each 
U. S. Floater 65c each 

Keep your Eye on the Ball — be sure it's a U. S. 




United States Rubber Company 



116 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




Tower clock 


'r 


wound auto- 


■ || 


matically by 


: : 


one-half horse 




power motor. 





Motor-generator set mounted c 
supplying power for lifting magnet. 




Magnetic sorting 
:, oper- 
ated by a two- 
horsepower 
tor, separ 



Electricity — 

the Master Force in Manufacturing 

THE marvels of electricity have revolutionized our 
manufacturing industries. With belts and pulleys 
replaced by electric motors operating automatic — almost 
human— machines, many a slow and tedious process has 
been eliminated. The factory worker's task of yesterday 
is made pleasant by his command of this magic power. 

The Crane Company's plant at Chicago — electrical throughout— is a 
model of industrial efficiency. Its 10,000 horse-power of driving 
energy is brought by three small wires from a distant power plant. 
Then electricity drives the machinery which handles the coal for heat- 
ing, cuts the steel, sifts the sand and sorts the material — in fact does 
everything from scrubbing the floor to winding the clock. 

Such an institution is marvelous — superhuman — made thus by the 
man-multiplying force of electricity. The General Electric Company 
has been instrumental in effecting this evolution. First, by developing 
successful electrical generating and transmission apparatus to furnish 
economically this modern form of power. Secondly, through many 
years of active cooperation with hundreds of manufacturers, it has 
mastered the art of applying the use of electrical energy to a multitude 
of needs. And finally, through branch offices and other distributing 
channels, its products are made accessible to all. 




Machine operated by motor 

attached to lamp socket 

scrubs floi's 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



VOL. L. 



SEPTEMBER 29, 1920. 



No. 12 



Bowdoin Fighting Against Overwhelming Odds 

Loses Game to Springfield Y. M. C. A. 



Joe Smith Stops Six Touchdowns By Splendid De- 
fensive Playing — Watson Stars For the Winners. 



Fighting harder than any Bow- 
doin team in the last seven years, ac- 
cording to Jack Magee, on an intense- 
ly hot day, the White lost to Spring- 
field Y. M. C. A. College at Spring- 
field last Saturday by a score of 
twenty-one to nothing. The locals 
outweighed Bowdoin twenty pounds to 
a man at least, and had a squad of 
over a hundred men to draw from 
to play against the seventeen Bow- 
doin men who took the trip. 

Trainer Magee said that the tem- 
perature on the field must have been 
at least ninety degrees, and that men 
on both teams were often almost suf- 
focated by the clouds of dust raised 
in every play. As a result of the ex- 
cellent training that Jack had given 
the men before the game, the Bow- 
doin players showed much more speed 
and endurance than the heavier and 
naturally stronger Springfield men. 
Time and again the game would be 
held up for injuries to the home team, 
but very rarely for any of the Bow- 
doin players. 

Bowdoin's splendid fighting spirit 
was the only thing that kept Spring- 
field from rolling up a much larger 
score. Although the home players 
made sixteen first downs, they failed 
to carry the ball across very often. 
In the first period two touchdowns 
were scored in rapid succession — one 
because Bowdoin attempted to rush 
the ball on a fourth down instead of 
punting it. In the second and third 
periods the winners were held score- 
less, although in the last period they 



managed to push over their third 
touchdown. 

Jack said that Bowdoin never put 
up a better fight under worse condi- 
tions than on last Saturday. Further- 
more he thought Springfield to be the 
very best team ■ Bowdoin has played 
against since he began training foot- 
ball elevens here. In fact a number 
of Springfield followers have said 
that this year's team is the strongest 
that has yet represented the Y. M. C. 
A. college. 

As for Joe Smith's splendid work 
at quarter, after he went into the 
game near the end of the first period, 
the "Boston Herald" has the follow- 
ing, "The tackling of Smith at quarter 
was brilliant. He prevented several 
more touchdowns by stopping Watson 
several times when the dusky end 
would have had a clear field." Smith 
never missed a single tackle and cer- 
tainly did help greatly towards re- 
ducing the score. 

Bisson got' into every play, break- 
ing up several passes, and putting up 
a fine defensive game at all times. 
Dahlgren was injured in the third 
quarter so that he had to leave the 
game. He had just made a couple 
of line bucks for a first down. Miller 
replaced him, and was later replaced 
by Phillips, who reeled off one run of 
twenty yards. 

Springfield did its scoring largely 
by long runs, in which Watson, Cam- 
mack, O'Donnell, and Schafer took 
the most prominent parts. Watson 
got away time and again for big 

(Continued on Page 118) 



Freshman Reception 

A hearty welcome to Bowdoin was 
given to the Class of 1924 at the 
Freshman reception Thursday night 
under the auspices of the Y. M. ,C. A. 
Russell M. McGown '21 acted as chair- 
man and in a general way expressed 
the greeting which the college extend- 
ed to the freshmen. 

As the first speaker, Professor 
Mitchell welcomed the upper classmen 
back to Bowdoin as well as the new 
men. He discussed briefly the privi- 
leges of college life and further stated 
that in the present condition of the 
social order the college is "borne on 
the bent backs of the laborers" and 
so it is to those less fortunate ones, 
who have not had the privileges of a 
college education, that every college 
man has a great obligation. Profes- 
sor Mitchell also offered the following 
advice to all freshmen: "Breathe 
deeply and keep the mouth closed." 
He explained that the freshmen were 
entering an undiscovered country and 
offered as a guiding motto for them 
a quotation from a letter which Cap- 
tain John Smith wrote concerning 
America, "Nothing is to be expected 
thence, except through labor." 

John G. Young '21, president of the 
student body, in a very enthusiastic 
manner urged all freshmen, and in 
fact every man, to work and work 
hard for Bowdoin. The key-note of 
his talk was co-operation; he com- 
pared Bowdoin to a large family, re- 
garding it incidentally as a decidedly 
democratic college with no snobs. 

President Sills was the next speaker 
to address the Class of '24. He dis- 
cussed the many advantages of a lib- 
eral arts course and particularly urged 



118 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



every man, during his college course 
to adopt and cultivate some intellec- 
tual hobby. Speaking both for the 
athletic instructor and the minister 
of the gospel he pointed out the ad- 
vantages in combining athletics and 
religion with the college life. 

The last speaker was Carroll S. 
Towle '22, president of the Y. M. C. A., 
who explained what the Y. M. C. A. 
stands for in Bowdoin and that it 
should mean Christian living and 
good conduct to every college man. 
He explained that under the new sys- 
tem a fee of $1.50 would admit any 
college man into active membership 
in the Y. M. C. A. 

After the speeches had been com- 
pleted the student body sang "Bow- 
doin Beata." Ice cream and cookies 
were then served and as the men left 
the hall they were presented with this 
year's handbook. 

The new handbook is a marked im- 
provement over any yet given out at 
Bowdoin. It contains considerably 
more information than previous 
"Freshman Bibles" and the style is 
better than usual. Description of 
student activities, college statistics, 
and advice to new men concerning 
fraternities, blanket tax, and campus 
organizations are all included. It is 
a pamphlet which is a decided credit 
to the students in the Y. M. C. A. who 
prepared it. 



Northerner — "I am told that the 
razor-back hogs you have down here 
are very fast runners." 

Southerner — "Fast! Say, I've knowr 
some of them hogs, sah, to outrun- 
to outi-un other razor-back hogs."— 
Life. 



The Reason Why. 

A Maine farmer was in camp in the 
South. He once tried to prove to a 
Southern native that the razor-backs 
should be fenced in and fattened up. 
The native listened to him patiently 
and answered: "That's all you know 
'bout it, stranger. But when you's 
lived here as long as I is, you'll know 
that 'tain't wuth while to have no 
hawg 'round here that can't outrun a 
nigger." — Life. 



Peggy — "Going into business?" 
Howard — "No, fawther thinks I'm 

too much of an awss. I'm going into 

society." — Life. 



Bowdoin Loses 

To Springfield 

(Continued from Page 117) 

gains, and no less than six times he 
was stopped by Joe Smith from scor- 
ing touchdowns after he had evaded 
the rest of the Bowdoin team. 

In the line Haines, Dudgeon, and 
McCurdy did the best work, against 
very formidable opponents. 

The result of this game is not at 
all discouraging for future prospects, 
all the more so in that Boston Uni- 
versity went clown to Orono and held 
the confident University of Maine to 
a scoreless tie. Bates turned down 
Fort McKinley with Mttle difficulty, 
but nothing definite can be forecasted 
from that. 

Next Saturday all the Maine col- 
leges have hard games except Colby, 
which is just beginning its season. 
Bowdoin goes to Medford to play 
Tufts, Maine to the Stadium against 
Harvard, and Bates to meet New 
Hampshire College in Durham. 

The seventeen men who took the 
trip to Springfield were Captain 
Dudgeon, Guptill, McCurdy, Tootell, 
Eames, Perry, Parent, Burgess, Wood- 
bury, J. Smith, Bisson, Miller, Dahl- 
gren, Haines, Phillips, Putnam, and 
Morrell. 

Summary of the game: 
SPRINGFIELD Y.M.C.A. BOWDOIN 

L. Watters, le re., Guptill 

Ward, le. 

Adams, It rt., Haines 

Cowell, lg rg., Eames 

Drennen, lg. 
Arms, lg. 
Denney, lg. 

Gemme, c c, McCurdy 

Bedell, c c, Putnam 

Arms, rg lg., Dudgeon 

Mooney, rg. 
Cowell, rg. 

W. Watters, rt It., Mason 

Macomber, rt It., Perry 

Watson, re le., Parent 

Husbands, re. 
Drew, re. 

O'Donnell, qb qb., Woodbury 

Allen, qb qb., Smith 

Allen, lhb . rhb., Dahlgren 

Cammack, lhb rhBT, Miller 

Delano, lhb rhb., Phillips 

Schafer, rhb lhb., Morrell 

Civelletto, fb fb., Bisson 

Score by quarters: 12 3 4 

Springfield 14 7—21 

Bowdoin — 



Tcuchdowns: Schafer, Watson, L. 
Watters. Goals from touchdown: 
O'Donnell 2, Cammack. Referee — 
Carpenter of Worcester P. I. Umpire 
— Keegan of Chauncey School. Head 
linesman — Madden of Amherst. Time 
— Two ten and two fifteen-minute 
periods. 



OPENING ADDRESS 

AT CHAPEL 

At the first Chapel of the year, 
Thursday, President Sills, in his open- 
ing address to the student body, 
sounded a key note of high ideals 
which is bound to be the guide of 
every Bowdoin man throughout the 
year. His address follows: 

The college opens this morning un- 
der happy auspices for its one hundred 
and nineteenth year of service to the 
State and the Nation. But it will not 
be the busy and happy year to which 
we all look forward unless in all the 
manifold activities of campus and 
field we are all ready to work hard 
and to co-operate with one another. 
Since we last met here in June the 
authorities of the college aided won- 
derfully by our alumni and other 
friends have done much to advance 
the best interests of Bowdoin. The 
salaries of the faculty have been sub- 
stantially increased; the building and 
grounds have been kept in fine order; 
the heating plant has been rebuilt; and 
temporary provision has been made 
by the purchase of the Mosher house 
on Cleaveland street to provide par- 
ticularly for the non-fraternity men 
some of the privileges that were lost 
through the burning of the Union. All 
these things have cost money; and as 
you all know it has been necessary to 
advance the tuition fee. Even with 
this advance, the college because of 
its endowment and of aid from the 
Alumni, expends on every student 
nearly four times what it receives. 

Feminine Curiosity. 

"John," said Mrs. John as they left 
the soda fountain. "Well?" "Wasn't 
fifty cents a good deal to pay for a 
lemon soda?"' — Life. 



Mrs. B. — "In my opinion no one 
can be good-looking unless well 
dressed." 

Mr. B. — "And yet Venus was con- 
sidered a success." — Life. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



119 



Some of the real needs of the college 
have not yet been met; we must have 
very shortly a new Union; we must 
within the next few years honor in a 
permanent way the men from Bowdoin 
who gave their lives and their services 
in the war. Nor have we as yet a 
swimming pool and basketball hall to 
complete our excellent athletic plant. 
These things will no doubt all come in 
due time. Last June we had one of 
the finest Commencements in my 
memory; more of the alumni returned 
to pledge anew their loyalty to Bow- 
doin than ever before except in the 
centennial year. I think it no ex- 
aggeration to state that not only our 
graduates but the public at large are 
taking a more intelligent interest in 
our college than ever before. But to 
whom much is given, of them much is 
expected. 

The college exists primarily to train 
men to think soundly and to develope 
a strong Christian character. A great 
deal of education is concerned too 
much with facts; too little with 
thought. It matters not how great a 
success you make of your college life 
along social and athletic lines; im- 
portant as all that is, you have missed 
the real thing if you have not learned 
to think straight. For that reason 
and also because we believe in the 
efficacy of hard work, here at Bowdoin 
we strive to keep the standards rea- 
sonably high and to offer a training 
that is not shoddy nor superficial. To 
that end the faculty is the greatest 
contributary factor, as some of you 
know to your cost. In these days 
when it is hard to secure and retain 
first rate college teachers it is in- 
deed a pleasure to report that with 
one exception every member of the 
faculty returns. We all miss Assist- 
ant Professor McClean, who left for a 
well earned promotion, to a full pro- 
fessorship at Alleghany College. Pro- 
fessor Andrews, who was on leave of 
absence last year, will offer two 
courses in the history of art and be- 
comes also the director of the 
Museum. It is much to be hoped that 
the collections in the Walker Art 
Building will be even more widely 
studied, both by the students and by 
the public, than ever. Few citizens 
of Maine know how very valuable our 
collection is. It is one of the treasures 
of the State of Maine. Professor 
Davis is back from an interesting so- 
journ in England. Professor Hormell, 



who spent last year at Harvard, where 
he had the distinction of being a visit- 
ing lecturer, will give the courses in 
Government. Professor Van Cleve 
has been promoted to a professorship 
in history. Of the two new men on 
the faculty, Dr. Phillips Mason, from 
Harvard University, who has had 
teaching experience there and at 
Princeton and who has a natural repu- 
tation as an authority on Kant, comes 
to us this year as professor of phil- 
osophy. I recommend his courses to 
the more thoughtful of you with the 
suggestion that a college graduate 
who knows nothing of philosophy and 
of the progress of human thought is 
far from being an -educated man. As- 
sistant Professor McClean is suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Glenn R. Johnson, a 
graduate of Reed College and a 
Master of Arts from Columbia, whose 
specialty is in sociology and who is 
recommended by the Department of 
Economics at Columbia as one of their 
most promising younger men. For 
those who are soon going into business 
the college makes special provision in 
a course in Business Management and 
in a new course by Professor Stan- 
wood in the fundamentals of Business 
Law. There has never been a time 
when a knowledge of American and 
of modern European history is so es- 
sential as it is today and never in the 
history of the college have there been 
more and better courses in these sub- 
jects offered. 

During the summer the college lost 
by death two of its officers, former 
Chief Justice Emery of the Class of 
61 and Dr. F. H. Gerrish of the Class 
of '66. The one was for many years 
a trustee, the other an oveiseer. Both 
loved Bowdoin deeply. Two bene- 
factors of the college died: Mr. 



"Shortly after I was admitted to 
the bar and was riding the circuit in 
Kentucky," says Congressman Wil- 
son, "I was appointed by the court to 
defend a middle-aged fellow who was 
indicted for the murder of his 
mother. I took my client aside for a 
consultation, and plumped the direct 
question at him: 

"'Did you kill your mother?'" 

" 'Yes,' he replied. 'I killed her.' " 

"'Why did you do it?'" 

" 'I killed her because she wasn't 
wuth wintering.' " — New York Mer- 
cury. 



Searles, the donor of the Science 
Building, and Dr. Thomas Upham Coe 
of the Class of '57 who not only gave 
to us and endowed the Infirmary but 
who left' in his will a legacy of $150,- 
000 to the college. At a later and 
more suitable occasion I shall dwell 
more at length on the services which 
these men rendered to Bowdoin and 
Maine. But I can not refrain from 
quoting here a remark made to me 
last May by the late Chief Justice 
Emery. Then in his eightieth year 
he said that being an old man he 
could not help feeling that things in 
the world were going much awry, and 
he was inclined to be pessimistic about 
the future. "But," he went on, "when- 
ever I visit Bowdoin and look into the 
faces of the young men here. I feel 
it's going to be all right." (Perhaps 
he didn't know you as well as we do.) 
Seriously when one hears words 
like that said of Bowdoin and of other 
colleges it makes us thank God and 
take courage. The college wishes to 
do the very best it can for each in- 
dividual student. It did not ask or 
tease a single one of you to come here. 
But when you are here it offers to 
you freely all its traditions, all its 
fine buildings and beautiful grounds, 
all its knowledge and wisdom for you 
to use and enjoy freely and fully. We 
do not seek large numbers because we 
believe in keeping our place as a small 
college. It is salutary to reflect that 
there were nearly as many students 
at Oxford and Cambridge in the six- 
teenth century as there are today, ar.d 
that colleges such as Balliol and 
Christ Church have never had more 
than a few hundred students. When 
today our great state and national in- 
stitutions are so overcrowded it may 
be that if the small college is true to 
its traditions it can give a sounder 

In Georgia. 

Friend — "I hear some Democrats 
broke up your meeting last night. Is 
that so?" 

Republican — "Yes, blame it. They 
cut a load of watermelons in front 
of our hall." — Life. 



"Johnny, you tell me you have been 
to Sunday School." 

"Yes, sir." 

"But, Johnny, your hair is wet." 

"Yes, sir; it's a Baptist Sunday 
School." — Jester. 



120 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



and more thorough training than is 
available in larger and wealthier uni- 
versities. And thoroughness is what 
the world needs today. 

There are two qualities or "habits of 
mind that I hope you will all learn at 
Bowdoin in these rather restless try- 
ing days. In the first place let the 
college teach you to be fair minded. 
Learn to discriminate between things 
that differ. You will find a good test 
of this as you follow the political 
campaign. For example it is well to 
recognize the fact that a man may 
still be a good American even if he 
differs very much from you in his 
conception of American duty. A po- 
litical campaign is chuck full of ab- 
surd statements and unworthy argu- 
ments and clap-trap. There are too 
many indications that the campaign 
this fall is going to be low toned and 
bitter. Strive to found your own po- 
litical opinions in fixed principles; 
stick to them; and whether one of the 
great majority or one of the hopeless 
minority be fair to your opponents. 

Then again as you start the college 
year remember that a very large part 
of the world's work is done by men 
and women who have never been to 
college, and that often they are 
superior not only in their contribu- 
tions to society but in their intellectual 
attainments to the college bred. Learn 
from the best people you see all about 
you to make the best of yourself. And 
learn to co-operate with others : for co- 
operation is to be the keynote of the 
next generation. 



MAINE COLLEGE 
FOOTBALL SCHEDULES 

The football season began this fall 
September 18, when Maine swamped 
Fort McKinley at Orono, 58 to 0. Last 
Saturday came the Bowdoin-Spring- 
field game, the Bates-Fort McKinley 
game, and the Maine-Boston Univer- 
sity game. 

Bowdoin is the only one of the four 
to have all its games with college 
teams, since the other three have 
games arranged with the soldier 
teams. Again, no two Maine colleges 
will play the same college teams 
previous to the championship series, 
thereby giving the dopesters a hard 
task. 

Following are the schedules of the 
other three colleges from now on: 



Bates. 

October 2 — New Hampshire College 
at Durham, N. H. 

October 9 — Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College at Amherst. 

October 16 — Colby at Lewiston. 

October 23 — University of Maine at 
Orono. 

October 30 — Bowdoin at Lewiston. 

November 6 — Fort Williams at 
Lewiston. 

November 13 — New York Univer- 
sity at New York City. 
Colby. 

October 2— Fort McKinley at Wa- 
terville. 

October 9— Fort Williams at Water- 
ville. 

October 16 — Bates at Lewiston. 

October 23 — Bowdoin at Waterville. 

October 30 — Maine at Orono. 

November 6 — New Hampshire Col- 
lege at Durham. 

November 13 — Holy Cross at Port- 
land. 

November 20— West Point at West 
Point. 

Maine. 

October 2 — Harvard at Cambridge. 

October 9 — Brown at Providence. 

October 16 — Rhode Island State at 
Orono. 

October 23 — Bates at Orono. 

October 30— Colby at Orono. 

November 6 — Bowdoin at Bruns- 
wick. 

November 13 — New Hampshire Col- 
lege at Orono. 



CROSS-COUNTRY 

The first try-outs in cross-country 
came last Thursday on the Whittier 
Field. In addition to the four runners 
from last year, Goodwin, Hatch, 
Towle, and E. A. Hunt, there are six 
other candidates out, three of them 
freshmen. Varney '23 and Renier '23 
are the only two of the six who went 
out last year. The others are L. M. 
Butler '22, Fernald '24, James '24, 
and Margesson '24. 

Practice will take place daily ex- 
cept when football games are being 
played. Manager McGorrill is mak- 
ing arrangements for a dual race with 
New Hampshire College at Durham 
in the latter part of October. The 
exact date depends on New Hamp- 
shire's schedule. The Maine state 
race will be on Friday, November 5, 
at Brunswick, the day before the foot- 



ball game with the University of 
Maine. 

In the "Maine Campus" for Septem- 
ber 22 was the following article about 
crossc-country, showing how supreme- 
ly confident the Orono institution feels 
in regard to this season: 

"With Coach Preti at the helm, the 
University of Maine harriers are mak- 
ing great headway towards continu- 
ing their long list of successful sea- 
sons. It is interesting to note that 
Maine is one of the three colleges in 
the United States that have a special 
coach for cross-country. Thus it can 
be seen that Maine is well up with 
the leaders in this particular sport. 

"Coach Preti is anxious that all 
green men report at once as he will 
need every available man to develop 
a fast team. The management is en- 
deavoring to arrange for a series of 
meets with some of the large eastern 
colleges and as we have an enviable 
record it necessitates intensive train- 
ing for the squad in order that we may 
retain our laurels. The team will 
probably go to the National's as well 
as the New England's, thus it be- 
hooves all the seniors, juniors, and 
sophomores, who think they can run 
to show their pep and come out for 
the team as freshmen are not allowed 
to compete in the National's. In our 
own State Meet, Bates is a strong 
contender and Maine will have to work 
hard to bring home the bacon. 

"Capt. Barnard is giving his un- 
divided efforts to get together a wan- 
ning team. As a nucleus Capt. Bar- 
nard, Raymond, Herrick, A. E. Wil- 
son, W. O. Wilson, McLaughlin, Pease, 
and Cohen of last year's team are out. 
It is too early in the season yet to 
ascertain the value of the new ma- 
terial as there are over fifty men in 
the squad. In order to make com- 
petition more keen, Coach Preti is 
planning to divide the squad into two 
teams and run races over the regu- 
lar course." 



COME OUT FOR THE 
TRACK MANAGERSHIP 

The first call for candidates for as- 
sistant manager of track came Thurs- 
day afternoon with the first call for 
cross-country runners. No freshmen 
responded last week, but some were 
expected Monday. There is still time 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



to get started in this work, and fresh- 
men should come out for it, as the 
track managership is one of the high- 
est honors to be earned on the campus. 
As said in the "Orient" a week ago, 
the work is all directed by the man- 
ager, and requires about two hours a 
day during the track season. 

Come out just as soon as possible, 
report to Manager McGorrill at the 
Beta Theta Pi house or at the ath- 
letic field, and get a good start in 
the race for a nomination. 



Results of Saturday 

Football Games 

Springfield Y. M. C. A. 21, Bow- 
doin 0. 

Boston University 0, University of 
Maine 0. 

Bates 34, Fort McKinley 0. 

Harvard 3, Holy Cross 0. 

Trinity 14, Connecticut Agricultural 
College 0. 

Brown 25, Rhode Island State 0. 

University of Vermont 10, St. Law- 
rence University 7. 

Middlebury 6, Union 0. 

Ursinus 14, Rutgers 7. 

Syracuse 55, Hobart 7. 

University of Pennsylvania 35, 
Delaware College 0. 

Penn. State 27, Muhlenberg 7. 

Washington and Jefferson 28, 
Bethany 0. 

West Virginia 14, West Virginia 
Wesleyan 0. 

Indiana University 47, Franklin Col- 
lege 0. 

Western Reserve 18, University of 
Toledo 3. 

Case 14, Hiram 0. 

Wooster 23, Baldwin-Wallace 0. 

Georgia Tech. 44, Wake Forest 0. 

North Carolina 23, Davidson 0. 

University of Tennessee 45, Emory 
and Henry College 0. 



Second Team Has Easy 

Time With Morse High 

The Bowdoin Second team had no 
trouble in piling up thirty-one points 
on the Morse High School eleven last 
Saturday at Kelley Feld, Bath. Dur- 
ing the greater part of the game Bow- 
doin was able to break through the 
lighter Morse line at will, although 
the school boys held fast in one or 
two tight pinches. 



On account of the intense heat the 
game was very listless and slow most 
of the time. Bowdoin scored two 
touchdowns in the first quarter and 
another in the second. Morse put up 
its best game in the third quarter, 
and the visitors were held scoreless. 
Again in the last period two more 
touchdowns were scored, making a 
total of five for the game. The last 
touchdown involved the best play 
of the whole contest. Captain 
Granger made a short pass to Jacob, 
who got away a forward to Gibbons. 
The play started at mid-field, and Gib- 
bons carried the ball over the line 
after the pass. 

Both teams were playing their first 
game of the season, and the high 
school team showed especial need of 
coaching. Morse made only two first 
downs, and fumbled the ball a great 
deal all through the game. At no 
time in the match did the locals have 
the ball within sixty yards of Bow- 
doin's goal. 

The periods were only eight 
minutes long, and with more time and 
more energy Bowdoin could probably 
have rolled up as many as sixty points, 
as the Bath team had no defense at 
all. 

The summary: 

BOWDOIN SECOND MORSE H. S. 

Williams, le re., Bates 

Keene, It rt, Sprague 

Wagg, Ig rg., Day 

Parsons, c c, Ledyard 

Hebb, rg Ig., Parris 

Clifford, rt.-. It., Atwood 

Gibbons, re le., Footer 

Jacob, qb qb., Stover 

Granger, rhb lhb, Wold 

Badger, lhb rhb., Syde 

McCrum, lhb. 

Kirkpatrick, fb fb., Joyce 

Gowen, fb. 

Score by periods: 12 3 4 

Bowdoin Second 12 6 13—31 

Morse H. S 0—0 

Touchdowns: Kirkpatrick 2, Granger, 
Gibbons, Jacob. Goal from touch- 
down, Clifford. Referee — Walbridge 
of Dartmouth. Umpire — J. H. Brews- 
ter '16. Head linesman — Prince. 
Timers — Stetson '21 and Hunt. Time 
— four eight-minute periods. 



RHODES SCHOLARSHIP AN- 
NOUNCEMENT 

At the meeting of the Rhodes 
Scholarship committee at Augusta 
last Saturday, John H. Powers, Bates 
'19, of Machias, was elected Rhodes 
Scholar for 1921. He will begin resi- 
dence at Oxford next January. 



PRESIDENT SILLS HONORED BY 
COLBY. 

At Colby's centennial commence- 
ment last June, the degree of Doctor 
of Laws was conferred upon President 
Sills. This degree was one of a very 
few honorary degrees awarded by 
Colby last year. 



More Candidates Wanted 

For the "Orient" 

Three men reported for "Orient'' 
work last week, but several more are 
wanted immediately. Freshmen 

should remember that crndidatir.g for 
membership on the "Orient" board is 
an easy task compared to some other 
campus activities. A man can make 
the board before he can make any 
other organization except the band 
and the musical clubs. 

Get your assignment this week just 
as soon as possible, and any further 
information, by reporting to the Alpha 
Delta Phi house or at 3 Bath street 
(opposite the Class of 1878 gates). 
You will be considerably handicapped 
if you don't get some copy in for the 
issue of October 6. 



Silas — "Well, Hiram, what'.s the 
good word?" 

Hiram — "Gosh all hemlock! thar 
ain't no good word! This is the 
third morning the caow's kicked over 
my milk-pail; and the speckled 
rooster's got a shingle nail stuck in 
his crop." 

Silas — 'Well, ye ain't got nobody 
to blame but yerself ; I told yer heow 
'twould be, if yer voted for the dim- 
micrats." 



"Mercy!" cried Juliet. "This glove 
is tight." 

"I, too, should be intoxicated," rap- 
turously responded Romeo, "were I 
that glove upon that hand." — Harper's 
Bazaar. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Norman W. Haines '21 Editor-in-Chief 

Edward B. Ham '22 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Floyd A. Gerrard '23 Athletics 

Karl R. Philbrick '23 Faculty Notes 

George H. Quinby '23 Alumni Department 

F. King Turgeon '23 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

John L. Berry '21 Crosby E. Redman '21 

Harry Helson '21 Frank A. St. Clair '21 

George E. Houghton '21 William R. Ludden '22 
Russell M. McGown '21 Virgil C. McGorrill '22 
Roland L. McCormack '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. Boardman '21 .. .Business Manager 

Wilfred R. Brewer '22 Assistant Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials; the Managing Editor 
for the news department; and the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 



Entered at Post Office 
Second-Class Mail Matter. 



To the Freshmen 

The "Orient" is glad of its oppor- 
tunity, as the official mouthpiece of 
the student body, to extend a hearty 
welcome to each and every member 
of the Freshman class. To most of 
you, college is a new experience amid 
a new environment. Like all of us, 
you will have your difficulties in be- 
coming adjusted to the new life. When 
the going seems hard, it may help to 
remember that every college man has 
to undergo this period of adjustment, 
and that by so doing he becomes 
more of a man. 

We can not urge too strongly the 
need, both for himself and for the 
student body, of Freshman interest 
at the very outset in every form of 
college activity. Every man has it 
in him to do something; in athletics, 
in music or dramatics, in writing, in 
some one of the many varied activi- 
ties. And by starting in at the be- 
ginning the Freshman will find his 
chance for succeeding much greater 
than during his later years. 

While it is worth while to go out 
for an activity, Freshmen will do well 
not to neglect their studies. The im- 
pression you make on your instruc- 
tors during the first few weeks will 
often last throughout your college 



course. Therefore, make it a point 
to begin and continue the policy of 
careful and intelligent study of your 
courses. 

Above all, remember that you are 
a man among men. In your college 
relations, in your fraternity associa- 
tions, conduct yourself in a manner 
to win the respect and confidence of 
your fellows without the loss of any 
of your own manly qualities. You 
will find the friendships you make 
one of the pleasantest and most valu- 
able aspects of your college life; cul- 
tivate them and be worthy of them. 



SKETCH OF DR. 

THOMAS UPHAM COE 

The following memorial sketch of 
the late Dr. Thomas Upham Coe, pre- 
pared by Rev. Samuel B. Stewart, 
secretary of the Class of 1857, has 
been sent to the "Orient" by Mr. Ed- 
ward B. Merrill '57. Mr. Stewart was 
for forty years after his graduation 
the clergyman over the Unitarian 
Parish in Lynn, Mass. Later he re- 
turned to his country seat at Ballston 
Spa, N. Y., for his permanent resi- 
dence in the summer. In the winter 
he lives in Schenectady, N. Y., where 
his son-in-law is employed in the Gen- 
eral Electric Company. He knew Dr. 
Coe in college much more intimately 
than any one of the present remnant 
of six members in the class. 

"The Class of '57 — a remnant now, 
six only and all in the 80's — deeply 
lament the sudden death of our be- 
loved class-mate, Thomas Upham Coe. 
His four score and more years of stu- 
dent life and professional service fol- 
lowed by large adventure in public 
affairs, rich in accumulating friend- 
ships and widespread benevolence, 
won the admiration and gratitude of 
the communities he served. 

"In college he was a genial modest 



"I hear that Montgomery Mont- 
gomery has taken his son out of col- 
lege." 

"Is that so ? Was the youth getting 
rapid ? " 

"Oh, no; but his instructor told 
him to work out a problem in mathe- 
matics and he objected; said none of 
his folks had ever worked out, and 
the father sustained the objection." — 
Detroit Free Press. 



fellow, attentive to the daily curri- 
culum, though unambitious of honors. 
He loved his easy chair and was a bit 
inclined to seclusion; his table loaded 
with good literature; to chosen friends 
the latch out and a warm welcome. 
How many surprises there have been! 
Professional life for which he was 
equipped in the best medical schools 
at home and abroad, and to which he 
devoted many years, failed to satisfy 
his ambition, the unemployed wealth 
of nature having weakened the genius 
of enterprise. The story* is familiar 
now how he turned the forests of 
Maine and New Hampshire into ships 
of commerce, amassing large wealth 
with which he enriched the institu- 
tions of education and charity in his 
city and state. Especially we think 
how he remembered his college with 
large endowments to strengthen its 
teaching force and to encourage am- 
bitious and needy students. And the 
College Hospital, in memory of an 
only son, deceased in early college life, 
attests the kindness and gentleness of 
his heart. 

"He was an active member of na- 
tional as well as local scientific and 
historical societies, an extensive 
traveler and prominent in the financial 
and political interests of his state. 
Whatever promoted good citizenship 
engaged his sympathy and support. 
Upright, noble-hearted, unostentati- 
ous, friend to rich and poor alike, gen- 
erations will cherish his memory in 
honor and gratitude. 

"S. B. S." 

"Ballston Spa, New York." 

Mr. Merrill has also sent the verses 
printed below, which were adapted 
from a poem written by Rev. Minot 
J. Savage and read at the funeral of 
Dr. Coe in Bangor, August 4. 



The Feminine Mind at Work. 

Mrs. Black — "Do you remember 
Mary Green? She was an orphan 
you know." 

Mrs. Blue — "Yes, I remember her. 
But she wasn't an orphan." 

Mrs. Black — "Yes, she was. What 
makes you think she wasn't?" 

Mrs. Blue — "Why, she had a sister 
I used to know." 

Mrs. Black— "Did she? Well, may- 
be she wasn't then." — Rochester 
Herald. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



123 



IN MEMORIAM 

(Dr. Thomas Upham Coe) 

You loved him, friends; and in this 
sacred place 
Would you sit silent with your 
tears today ? 
But now his lips are still, and I must 
speak ; 
But what words can our thoughts 
of him portray? 

And gentle was he as a little child; 
And, in his tender, sympathetic 
heart, 
Pain and sorrow found a hiding 
place; 
No pang of others, but he felt the 
smart. 

He loved his home. As needle to the 
pole 
Turns ever true on whate'er seas 
men roam, 
So to his fireside turned his constant 
heart; 
No spot so blessed as his home. 

Yet from his home, as from a central 
sun, 
His love for man over the earth 
outshone; 
No earnest cause appealed to him in 
vain, 
That hoped to lead the old earth 
up and on. 

A noble man lies here asleep today. 
Without a sense of weariness and 
pain, 
Sleep drew her restful curtains round 
his bed; 
And, though we call, he does not 
wake again. 

And yet, friends! it is such as he 
Who make the world seem empty 
when they leave. 
That he was noble is our comfort 
now, 
And yet 'tis for this very cavse we 
grieve. 

When all is said and done, we come 
to this; 
Though clouds be round us and 
tears dim our way, 
We still trust that He who makes the 
night 
Will lead us through it to the com- 
ing day. 



We'll hide his loving memory in our 
hearts; 
We'll follow in the pathway that 
he trod; 
We'll make each day another step 

upon , 

The stairway leading up to him and 
God. 



Campus H3otes 

In the course of the last week the 
football squad has increased to forty- 
five. Five men listed in last week's 
"Orient" have stopped coming out, 
while twelve new names have been 
added. Five of the new candidates 
are freshmen. Cassidy, Hutchins, 
Williams, W. G. Weymouth, and 
Kirkpatrick. The upperclassmen are 
M. P. Chandler '23, Fish '22, Gray '23, 
Guptill '21, Hebb '23, McCrum '21, and 
McDonald '23. 

Monday, Tuesday, and today have 
been the three days for payment of 
the blanket tax for the first semester. 
After today extension payments can 
be made to any member of the Board 
of Managers. 

The Bowdoin Chapter of Alpha 
Delta Phi had its annual fall dinner 
at the Gurnet House last Saturday 
night. 

Last Friday afternoon the Student 
Council held its first meeting. Vari- 
ous matters, including proclamation 
and the date of fraternity initiations, 
were discussed, but nothing definite 
was decided. A second meeting took 
place Monday night, but it has been 
impossible for the "Orient" to obtain 
the results before going to press. 

Among the members of 1922 who 
did not come back to college this fall 
are: F. A. Allen, F. G. Averill, Proc- 



Clarence was sent to the fish store 
to buy a dinner for his master. He 
looked at a pile of shad, became skep- 
tical as to their freshness and raised 
:>ne to his face. The dealer asked in- 
Jignantly: 

"What do you mean by smelling of 
that fish?" 

"Didn't neber smell ob de fish no- 
how, massa. Jes' speakin' to him." 

"Well, what did he tell you: 

"Massa, I jes' axes him fo' de news 
at de mouf ob de riber, an' he says 
he done clean forgot, fer he ain't seen 
no watah fo' weeks, massa. An' dat's 
all he said, sah, all he said." 



tor James, L. O. Ludwig, K. W. Mc- 
Conky, L.- F. Merrill, E. B. Page, and 
Jeffrey Richardson. 

A number of recent graduates have 
been around the campus last week, 
including Oliver '17, Casey '19, Abbott 
'20, M. H. Avery '20, Cleaves '20, Mc- 
Williams '20, Richan '20, Curtis '20, 
McClave '20, and Lovejoy '20. 

It has been recently announced that 
no course in Solid Geometry (Mathe- 
matics 9) will be given this year. 

There was a meeting of the Class 
of 1923 Monday to make arrange- 
ments for proclamation night, which 
will be Friday of this week. 

Registration day for the Medical 
School will be Thursday, October 7, 
but recitations will not begin until 
Monday, October 11. 

The Psi Epsilon Chapter of Zeta 
Psi at Dartmouth has been restored 
this fall, when the members of the 
Delta Gamma Psi local fraternity were 
initiated into the national fraternity. 
Required athletics for the fresh- 
men was begun Monday. Attendance 
is to be required three times a week 
with no cuts allowed, as usual. The 
lists of groups with the hours for 
meeting is posted on the bulletin 
board. 

Students on probation this year will 
no longer have the privilege of week- 
end cuts. 

There was a meeting of the band 
men in Memorial Hall last night for 
the purpose of getting freshman can- 
didates. 

In a slow game on Whittier Field 
last Saturday, Edward Little High 
School of Auburn defeated Brunswick 
High by the score of 21 to 0. 

The college went back to standard 
time Sunday together with Brunswick 
and Topsham. It is well to remember 
that other cities and towns in the 
state will be on daylight-saving time 
through the month of October. 



Hostess (whose reception in honor 
of Lord Dulness was somewhat over- 
crowded) — "Isn't it terrible, Lord, not 
half the people here can sit down." 

Lord D. — "Why, Lord bless me 
soul, what is the matter with them?" 



She — "Well, have you made up 
your mind yet?" 

Cholly — "No; couldn't find the 
blawsted thing you know." — Life. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



jfacultp jeotes 

Professor Catlin returned last 
Thursday from Lincoln, Nebraska, 
where he had spent the summer. 

Professor Elliott arrived at Bruns- 
wick from his vacation at Moosehead 
Lake, Monday, September 20. 

During the illness of Professor 
Stone, Robert C. Rounds '18 will con- 
duct his courses in French. 



alumni Department 

The "Orient" desires to be of the 
greatest possible service to Alumni in 
keeping them informed of one an- 
other's activities. Alumni, and 
especially class secretaries, are 
earnestly requested to support the 
"Orient" in this work by sending items 
about themselves or their brother 
Alumni. 

At the annual convention of the 
Maine Department of the American 
Legion on July 23 the following Bow- 
doin men were elected to office: Vice- 
commander, Edward S. Anthoine '02; 
alternate national committee man, Ar- 
thur L. Robinson '08; member of state 
committee from Somerset county, Ray 
L. Marston '99; delegates to the na- 
tional convention, William H. Sanborn 
'10, Don J. Edwards '16, John L. 
Baxter '16; alternate delegates to the 
national convention, Ray L. Marston 
'99, Robert Hale '10. 

1902 — The following note appeared 
in "Forbes' Magazine" for Sept. 4: 
"The very first task given Harvey D. 
Gibson on entering the Boston office 
of the American Express Company, 
when he left college, was to shoulder 
a couple of knapsacks — after he had 
finished sweeping the floor — and de- 
liver bundles of cancelled checks to 
local banks. The first bundle he de- 
livered was from the Liberty National 
Bank of New York. That was in 
1902. Fifteen years later he became 
president of this same Liberty Na- 
tional Bank. It is not quite the same 
Liberty National Bank today, how- 
ever, for its deposits have mounted 
from $20,000,000 to $100,000,000 
since he joined the institution and it 
has become an influential power in 
the financial world. Had he scorned 
to sweep the floor and shoulder knap- 
sacks, as being duties beneath the 
dignity of a college-bred youth, is it 



likely that he would be where he is 
today?" 

Hon. 1904 — Wallace Humphrey 
White, former president of the Maine 
Bar Association, died in Lewiston, 
September 29. He was born at Liver- 
more, Maine, September 4, 1848. 
Since 1874 he has practiced law at 
Lewiston. From 1876 to 1881 he was 
Attorney in Androscoggin County. In 
1883-84 he was in the Maine House of 
Representatives, and from 1899 to 
1902 in the State Senate. During 
those three years he was also presi- 
dent of the Maine Bar Association. 
In 1904 Bowdoin conferred upon him 
the degree of Master of Arts. Mr. 
White married the daughter of the 
late Senator William Frye. He was 
the father of five Bowdoin graduates, 
all of them distinguished in the busi- 
ness and political world: William 
Frye White '97, Wallace H. White 
Jr., '99, John H. White '01, Donald C. 
White '05, and Harold S. White '11. 

1904 — Captain John W. Frost was 
one of the delegates from New York 
to the Second National Convention of 
the American Legion held at Cleve- 
land, Ohio, Monday, Tuesday, and to- 
day. He has been visiting in Topsham 
the past week. 

1909 — Miss Anna Bernadette Flan- 
agan, formerly of Lewiston, and 
Daniel McDade were married at On- 
tario, Oregon, August 31. They will 
live in Burns, Oregon, where Mr. Mc- 
Dade is principal of the high school. 

1912— Miss Sally Churchill and 
George Fabyan Cressey were married 
September 15 at Berlin, N. H. Mr. 
Cressey is a member of the firm of 



The Power of Ink. 

Lord Byron — "A drop of ink may 
make a million think." 

Cynicus — "And put by scribblers 
into verse would surely make two mil- 
lion curse." — Life. 



Carlyle smoked often and com- 
plained much of dyspepsia. A friend 
once ventured to suggest that his 
smoking might, perhaps, injure and 
depress him. "Yes," the great 
moralist said, "and the doctors told 
me the same thing. I left off smok- 
ing and was very miserable; so I took 
to it again and was very miserable 
still; but I thought it better to smoke 
and be miserable than to be miser- 
able and not smoke. " — Argonaut. 



Cressey & Allen in Portland. 

1914 — The following notes have 
been sent to the "Orient" by the class 
secretary: Miss Mary Helen Shank 
of Chicago and Maurice Wingate 
Hamblen were married August 25, 
1920. Mrs. Ruth Jenkins Billings and 
Paul Edwin Donahue were married in 
Portland September 11, 1920. Frank 
R. Loeffler, who has been connnected 
with the International Banking Cor- 
poration since 1914, is now sub- 
manager of the Cebu Branch, Cebu, 
P. I. 

1916 — Miss Barbara Noyes French 
and Lee Duren Pettengill were mar- 
ried September 21 at Salem, Mass. 
John D. Churchill '16 served as best 
man. 

1918 — Miss Ruth Dana Little, 
daughter of Frank H. Little '81, and 
Neil Eugene Daggett, were married 
at Albany, N. Y., September 21. 

1920 — Miss Verna Abbey and 
Arthur Harold McQuillan were mar- 
ried recently at Skowhegan. Mr. Mc- 
Quillan plans to take a medical course 
at McGill University this year. 

1918 — Miss Dorothea M. Farrell and 
Richard Turner Schlosberg were mar- 
ried in Portland September 21., Mr. 
Schlosberg has recently received the 
commission of first lieutenant in the 
regular army, and he will probably 
be located at Camp Devens. 

Robert Browning enjoyed telling 
the story of an English friend, who, 
while staying at one of the principal 
hotels in Boston, was unable to sleep, 
owing to the mysterious, doleful 
noises that came from a room nearby. 
Calling a boy, the Englishman asked 
for the cause of the disturbance. "Oh, 
sah!" was the lad's reply. "That is 
the Browning Club just reading 
Browning, sah. That is all, sah!"- — 
Argonaut. 



"So you are not living with your 
son-in-law at Dinkey ville any more?" 

"No; I rather got the idea that I 
wasn't exactly welcome." 

"How so?" 

"Well, you see, he marched me to 
the depot at the muzzle of a shot- 
gun, kicked me seven times as I was 
climbing on the car, and told me to 
be sure to post him whenever my 
funeral came off, as he was anxious 
to attend. Somehow, I kinder thought 
I wasn't wanted, and so came away." 
—Life. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



125 



NINETEEN FRESHMEN 
ADMITTED LAST WEEK 

In. last week's "Orient" a list of the 
freshmen admitted up to that time 
was printed. With the nineteen men 
admitted by the entrance examina- 
tions last week, the Class of 1924 
numbers 121 students. Following is 
printed a reference list of the entire 
class, including numerous transfers 
to advanced standing: 

Ames, Herman R.; Keene, N. H. 
(1922). 

Badger, Richard G., Jr.; Newton- 
ville, Mass. 

Baldwin, Forest C; Bath. 

Beals, E. Alfred; Lowell, Mass. 

Bishop, Francis P.; Brunswick. 

Blaisdell, Richard H.; Newton, Mass. 

Blanchard, Donald D.; Cumberland 
Centre. 

Blanchard, Ralph E.; Portland. 

Blatchford, Lawrence; Portland. 

Brisebois, Joseph M.; Kingston, 
N. H. 

Burgess, William E.; Woodfords. 

Burnell, Thornton L. C; Westbrook. 

Butler, Forest C; Bath. 

Cassidy, Anthony B.; Cambridgs, 
Mass. 

Chamberlain, Glen; Fort Fairfield. 

Charles, Wellington; Fryeburg. 

Churchill, Lindsey C; Winthrop, 
Mass. 

Clark, Huber A.; Meriden, Conn. 

Clavin, Charles B.; Lynn, Mass. 

Cobb, George E.; Gorham. 

Coburn, E. Harold; Brunswick. 

Cousins, Forrest E.; Guilford. 

Crawford, Howard E.; Maiden, 
Mass. (1923). 

Curtis, Raymond D.; Freeport. 

Davis, George T.; Portland. 

Demmons, James A.; New Haven, 
Conn. 

Dennett, Guy F.; Springvale. 

Dow, Henry K.; Needham, Mass. 

Dudgeon, Stuart R.; New Bedford, 

Boston Maid (impressing the boy 
from Maine) — "Why, in Boston even 
the bootblacks, some of them at least 
have studied Latin." 

Bowdoin Freshman — "But in Bruns- 
wick all the bootblacks are proficient 
in Greek." 



He— "We have a clock that says 
'Cuckoo.' " 

She — "We are going to get one that 
says, 'What, must you go?'" — Life. 



Mass. 

Dunphy, Harold H.; Island Falls. 

Ervin, Jerome R. ; Houlton. 

Ferguson, Homer L.; Rumford. 

Femald, Cyrus F.; Wilton. 

Fisher, Kimball; Augusta. 

Fulle, Charles A., Jr.; New York 
City. 

Gay, Thomas E.; Newcastle. 

Gibbons, Albert E.; Reading, Mass. 

Gillespie, Wilson C; Hewlett, L. I. 

Gilpatrick, Granville S.; Old Or- 
chard. 

Gonya, Sylvio T.; Rumford. 

Goodwin, Linwood J.; Springvale. 

Gorham, Francis W.; Round Pond. 

Gowen, Cecil H.; Sanford. 

Gray, Glenn W.; New Vineyard. 

Grenfell, Elmer W.; Fall River, 
Mass. 

Hamilton, Frederick R.; Suoth 
Portland. 

Hardy, Malcolm E.; Phillips. 

Harris, Frank J.; Lisbon Falls. 

Hight, Arthur M. J.; Athens. 

Hill, George E.; Collinsville, Conn. 

Hutchins, Paul A.; North Stratford, 
N. H. 

Jacques, Dennis L.; Soldier's Pond. 

James, Morrison C; Chelsea, Mass. 

Jewett, Langdon A.; Skowhegan. 

Johnson, John H.; South Portland. 

Johnson, Rupert G.; Brownfield. 

Johnston, R. Fulton; Brunswick. 

Jordan, Maurice D.; Auburn (1923). 

Keirstead, Ralph E.; Oakland. 

Kenniston, James M.; Portland. 

Kimball, George M.; Lovell Centre. 

Kimball, W. Montgomery; New 
York City (1923). 

King, Delman H., Steuben. 

Kirkpatrick, Robert J.; Portsmouth, 
N. H. 

Klees, Frederic; Reading, Pa. 

Laevy, J. Bernard; Neponset, L. L, 
N. Y. 

Lavigne, Robert J.; Saco. 

Lawless, Kenneth O.; Auburn. 

Lee, Richard H.; Foxcroft. 

Lovell, Harvey B.; Waldoboro. 

MacKinnon, Donald W.; Topsham. 

McMennamin, G. Bernard; Lime- 
stone. 

Manson, Willis C; Lovell. 

Margesson, John L.; Caribou. 

Marshall, Hugh McC; East Wal- 
pole, Mass. 

Mason, Archie C; Amherst, N. H. 

Merrill, Adelbert H.; Portland. 

Miguel, Arthur J.; Manchester, 
Mass. 

Miller, Thor; Portland (1923). 



Moran, Anson B.; Bcrnarclsville, 
N. J. 

Mushroe, Harry L.; Princeton. 

Noah, George; Melrose, Mass. 
(1923). 

Page, Lawrence L.; Gorham. 

Patterson, Arthur D.; Vinalhaven. 

Pettingill, Theodore; Island Falls. 

Phillips, Richard B.; Jamaica Plain, 
Mass. 

Phillips, Robert T.; Jamaica Plain, 
Mass. 

Pike, Frank A.; Lubec. 

Porter, Herman J.; Skowhegan. 

Putnam, Preston M.; Danvers, Mass. 

Ranney, Moses S.; Portage. 

Reynolds, Verne E.; Oakland. 

Robertson, Donald J.; Caribou. 

Robinson, Allan P.; Bingham. 

Ross, Bradley B.; Danvers, Mass. 

Rouillard, Clarence D.; Topsham. 

Rowe, George W.; Bangor. 

Ryder, Wilson C; Eastport. 

Saunders, Raymond J.; South 
Waterford. 

Savage, Brooks E.; Skowhegan. 

Sellman, Frank H.; Wellesley Hills, 
Mass. 

Simon, Harry A.; Salem, Mass. 

Small, Harold A.; Stonington. 

Small, Joseph T.; Bath. 

Smith, Alfred J.; Clinton, Mass. 
(1923). 

Smith, Perley D., Jr., Methuen, 
Mass. 

Smythe, Robert F.; Benton Harbor, 
Mich. 

Southard, Ledyard A.; Wiscasset. 

Spence, George A. R.; Boston, 
Mass. 

Stiles, David A.; Augusta. 

Stone, Alfred T.; Sanford. 

Stonemetz, Harold T.; West New- 
ton, Mass. (1923). 

Sullivan, John F.; South Portland 
(1923). 

Thomas, George E.; Rumford. 

Thompson, Harold A.; Norway. 

Towle, Lawrence W.; Saco. 

Tuttle, Irving P.; Rockland. 

Upton, Paul H.; Lynnfield, Mass. 

Watson, John; Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Weeks, Lincoln W.; Westbrook. 

Wendell, Wyatt N; Portsmouth, 
N. H. 

Weymouth, Clinton G.; Kingfield. 

Weymouth, Waldo G.; Limestone. 

Whalen, Raymond R.; Bath. 

White, Webster W.; Jonesport. 

Willard, Lester H.; Sanford. 

Wilson, James A.; Houlton. 



126 



DOWDOIN ORIENT 



Woodruff, Luman A.; Ellsworth. 
Worsnop, Harold R.; Auburn. 
Young, Douglas W.; New London, 
Conn. 



CALENDAR. 

October 1 — Proclamation Night. 

October 2— Football: Tufts at Med- 
ford. 

October 7 — Registration Day for 
Medical School. 

October 9 — Football: Amherst at 
Amherst. 

October 11 — Opening day of Medi- 
cal School. 

October 13— Probable date of fra- 
ternity initiations. 



W. R. FLINN 

College Agent for 

WRIGHT & DITSON'S 

Athletic Goods for all 
Seasons. 

Supplies for 

Baseball, Track, Football, 

Tennis, Hockey, Golf. 

White Sweaters 

and 

Gym Suits 



A. D. House 




One of Uncle Sam's battle-wagons 
going through the Panama Canal. This 
view was taken near Culebra Cut 
from a Navy seaplane. 

The little tug hardly looks large 
enough to chaperon a battleship, does 
it? But then the tug is a part of the 
D. S. Navy too. 

Size isn't always the most impor- 
tant thing. The men of the Navy 
have learned that brains amount to a 
irreat deal more. 



ANY IVISIM 

raise money through a life insurance policy to complete their 
education. 




Life Insurance Company 

of Boston. Massachusetts 



JOSEPH L. BADGER, Agent P. U. House 



THE 

COLLEGE 

BOOK STORE 



The place to buy everything from 
a Thumb Tack to a Wedding Present. 
Take a look at our new line of Kay- 
woodie Pipes. These are of real 
Italian Bruyere with the Aluminum 
Inbore tube. All models $4.50 each. 



F. W, CHANDLER 

& SON 

150 MAINE STREET. 

Style and Value 
at Moderate Prices 
is the Keynote of 
our 

YOUNG 

MEN'S 
CLOTHES 



E. S. BODWELL 

& SON 

Brunswick, Maine. 



CORDOVAN BOOTS 

IN 

YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 

"Herman's" Tan Cordovan $13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan .. $15.50 
"Florsheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 
TENNIS SHOES. INDOOR AND 
OUTDOOR MOCCASINS, RUBBER 
BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Be sure to see 

Maynard S. Howe 

for your Bowdoin "B" 

and Fraternity pipes. 

Genuine W. D. C. pipes with 

sterling silver band and 

letters. 

Also Bowdoin College and 

all Fraternity Shields 

in two sizes. 

Chi Psi Lodge, 



Maynard S. Howe '22 

College Agent for 

The College Memory Book 

Company 

Chicago, 111. 



FRESHMEN: 

The " Bowdoin " Memory 
Book for 1920-1921 with its 
added features is the best 
ever. 

Order your Copy NOW 



Chi Psi Lodge 

I also have a good line of 

BOWDOIN Banners, 

Pennants, Pillows, Etc. 

Be sure to see my samples. 




THE BRUNSWICK 

Convenient to the theatre and 
shopping districts. 

The sort of Hotel guests 
visit once and return to every 
time they come to Boston. 

Boylston St. at Copley Sq. 




THE LENOX 

In the center of Boston's 
Back Bay residential district. 

For many years a stopping 
place for college teams. 

The "Old Grad" claims it 
still and so do the Under 
Grads. It's their Hotel. 

Boylston St. at Exeter St. 

UNDER SAME MANAGEMENT 
L. C. PRIOR, Managing Director 



128 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




u 



I 



I 



Chocolates 

The Chocolates 

{hat are 

Difjferea"b 

Truly Great Chocolates are so luscious and so good 
that you will wish the box were many times ■ larger. 
This package has a very special assortment of choic® 
fillings of pre-eminent quality, and many of the coatings 
are the delicious butter coatings original with Apollo 









The dainty assortment of 
makes the "Truly Great 
of far more distinction than the 



pieces 
a charming gift 
box of chocolates. 




~r.J/.J'Co6er£s Co., 

Boston, Mass. 



iiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiitiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiii- 




if 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




Generator room of one of the 
hydro-electric plants which sup- 
ply power to the C. M. & St. P. 



The Power of Electricity 
in Transportation 



Some Advantages of 
Railroad Electrification 

Saving the Nation's coal. 
Lower maintenance costs. 



Ability to haul smoothly 
heavier trains at higher 
speed. 

Operation of electric locomo- 
tives unaffected by extreme 
cold. 

Ability to' brake trains on 
descending grades by re- 
turning power to the trolley. 



ELECTRICITYhasleveledout 
the Continental Divide. The 
steam locomotive, marvelous as 
it is after a century of develop- 
ment, cannot meet all of the pres- 
ent demands for transportation 
facilities. Its electric rival has 
proved to be far superior. 

On the mountain divisions of the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
Railway — the world's greatest 
electrification —giant electric loco- 
motives today lift an ever increas- 
ing freight tonnage over the mile- 
high Rockies and also make travel- 
ing clean and comfortable. They 
utilize the abundant energy of dis- 
tant waterfalls and then,by return- 
ing some of this power to the 
trolley, safely brake the trains on 
descending grades. And their 
capabilities are not impaired by 
excessively cold weather when 



the steam engine is frozen and 
helpless. 

Electricity is the power which 
drives the trains of New York 
City's subway and elevated sys- 
tems. It operates the locks and 
tows the ships through the 
Panama Canal. It propels the 
Navy's latest super-dre&dr.aught, 
the New Mexico. Electric mine 
locomotives have replaced the 
slow-moving mule and the electric 
automobile has also come to do 
an important service. 

Electricity has become the uni- 
versal motive power. It has con- 
tributed efficiency and comfort to 
every form of transportation ser- 
vice and in this evolution General 
Electric apparatus has played a 
large part — from mighty electric 
locomotives to the tiny lamp for 
the automobile. 




General Office 
Schenectady; ~NY. 



Sales Offices in 
all large cities 



130 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



America's most famous 
box of candy 




Smph 




Candies of exquisite quality in a quaint, ar- 
tistic box. Fine to give to a girl or to give your- 
self! 

For sale by 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



BOW DO IN ORIENT 



"In playing a stymie, use a niblick. * * * 
the loft of the niblick will carry your 
ball over the interposing ball." 




Dependability 

The new U. S. Royal, U. S. Revere, and U. S. Floater 
Golf Balls are dependable balls. They help you out of 
the tight corners — make those difficult shots less hard to 
face. They fly true and putt true, and are uniformly 
accurate from core to cover — well balanced, sound and 
lively. There's a size and weight to suit your style r f play. 

Buy them from your pro or 
at your dealer's. 

U. S. Royal $1.00 each 
U. S. Revere 85c each 
U. S. Floater 65c each 

Keep your Eye on the Ball — be sure it's a U. S. 




United States Rubber Company 



132 BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CUMBERLAND 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

ALICE BRADY 

. . . IN . . . 

"SINNERS" 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

WILLIAM FARNUM 

. . . IN . . . 

"THE ORPHAN" 



PASTIME 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

ELAINE HAMMERSTEIN 

. . . IN . . . 

GREATER THAN FAME 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

GLADYS BROCKWELL 

. . . IN . . . 

"WHITE LIES" 



NEXT WEEK— MONDAY AND TUESDAY 

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON'S 
"TREASURE ISLAND" 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



VOL. L. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1920. 



No. 13 



BOWDOIN LOSES HARD BATTLE TO 

TUFTS BY ONE LUCKY TOUCHDOWN 



Morrell and Parent Dazzle Tufts Team With Series of Forwards — Bowdoin Runs 

Rings Around the Winners Nearly All the Time— MorrelFs Punting Fine — 

Bisson and Mason Strong. 



Bowdoin upheld her reputation of 
hard fighting in the second game of 
the season, played with Tufts on the 
Oval at Medford last Saturday. Tufts 
came out the victor by the margin of 
one lucky touchdown. The two teams 
were evenly matched in weight, but 
Bowdoin excelled in play. 

In the first half Bowdoin continual- 
ly plugged the line while Tufts in- 
variably punted. Tufts scored her 
touchdown in the third quarter when 
Macchia gathered up a fumble by 
Morrell and ran forty yards across 
Bowdoin's goal. In the fourth period 
Morrell and Parent worked a series 
of forward passes which completely 
bewildered the Tufts team, and which 
carried the ball from Bowdoin's 30- 
yard line past the Tufts goal line. 
However, a penalty fo.r off-side was 
imposed on Bowdoin in this play, 
which left the ball two yards from the 
line. Then the whistle sounded, end- 
ing the game when it seemed certain 
that Bowdoin would tie the score. 

An article in- the "Boston Post" 
gives a rather exaggerated idea of the 
Bowdoin team's weight, but, in com- 
parison with Tufts, we have a fairly 
heavy team. 

The "Post" says of the game: "Time 
and again the game furnished thrills 
for the large crowd as Bowdoin fought 
to score on the light Tufts eleven. 
Bowdoin outweighed Tufts 15 pounds 
to a man, but what the Brown and 
Blue lacked in weight they made up 
in fight and speed, chasing the husky 

(Continued on page 134) 



ADDRESS BY 

PRESIDENT SILLS 

At the session of the Maine Feder- 
ation of Women's Clubs in the Con- 
gregational Church last Wednesday 
afternoon, President Sills gave an ad- 
dress on "Education in Maine." An 
especially pleasing feature of the pro- 
gram was the reading by Professor 
Elliott of Longfellow's "Morituri 
Salutamus" from the same pulpit 
where the poet himself delivered the 
memorable lines on his fiftieth anni- 
versary in 1875. 

The following excerpts have been 
taken from President Sills' address: 

There is another- way — a very vital 
way — in which we can show an in- 
telligent interest in our schools; and 
it is the simple and homely way of 
backing up the school authorities in 
their efforts to maintain discipline 
and decent standards of scholarship. 
Occasionally, but very rarely, children 
are overworked in our schools; on 
the other hand very few schools 
maintain the standard of work that 
they should. An intelligent citizen 
of Brunswick with whom I was dis- 
cussing tlie problem recently said: 
"The scholars' are just like everybody 
else nowadays; they do about 60 per 
cent, of what they should and they 
allow anything at all to interfere with 
their regular duties." That is no 
doubt too serious an indictment; but 

(Continued on page 135) 



Proclamation Night. 

Proclamation Night this year dif- 
fered very little from the Proclama- 
tion nights of past years, but to the 
ever green Freshmen it is always a 
night strange, fearful and mysterious. 
A word dropped here and there about 
the terrors of Phi Chi, had added to 
their speculation about it, and be- 
cause of its uncertainty, it was not a 
night to be eagerly welcomed. This 
year it came on Friday night, the first 
one in the month of October, a night 
the Class of 1924 will long remember. 

By eight o'clock nearly all the 
Freshmen assembled in the gym- 
nasium and the ceremonies began. 
With the aid of a large can of shellac 
the proclamations were put on the 
backs of the unclothed Freshmen — so 
very sober and solemn that night — 
for a smiling Freshman seemed to be 
most distasteful to the Sophomores. 
The proclamations were of the usual 
order, reviling the incoming class, and 
proclaiming the orders of Phi Chi to 
them. 

The Freshmen, now arrayed in 
pajamas, were conducted to the base- 
ball cage of the gymnasium. There 
they were forced to form a huge 
circle, each man kneeling and salaam- 
ing "the august and all-powerful 
Class of 1923" in the center of the 
ring. This strange and ludicrous 
scene continued for many minutes, 
during which Cassidy '24 walked 
around inside the circle reading aloud 
the proclamation. After this various 



134 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Freshmen were drawn from the circle 
and put through droll stunts for the 
amusement of the upper-classmen. 
Some searched with their mouths for 
dimes in pans of molasses or flour; 
some, walking forwards and back- 
wards, bowed to each other continual- 
ly, thereby showing their apprecia- 
tion of each other's greenness; and 
others, strange to say, had pies 
thrown at their faces by august mem- 
bers of the learned class. One of the 
most laughable things of the evening, 
however, was the time when the whole 
Freshman class, like Napoleon's army, 
traveled around the floor on their 
stomachs. 

Then, following the old traditional 
Bowdoin method of Freshman torture, 
the Class of 1924 ran the gauntlet. 
It is interesting to note that many of 
the Sophomores who swung the clubs 
the most wickedly were not those who 
appeared at the flag rush the next 
morning, when the Freshmen had a 
chance to fight back. After this pun- 
ishment the Freshmen were taken for 
a walk about the campus, and, as the 
Sophomores feared that the Fresh- 
men had not had a godly evening in 
their company, they forced the first 
year men to sing "Nearer My God To 
Thee," which also was a most ap- 
propriate ending for a Phi Chi cele- 
bration. 

During the night a band of upper- 
classmen very obligingly put up 
posters showing the true feeling of 
the Freshman class toward Phi Chi. 
Although the candor of these posters 
was rather blunt, they were, never- 
theless, very sincere. 



TUFTS WINS 

FROM BOWDOIN 



Bowdoin backs offside and tackling 
them before they could get started. 

"One of the biggest surprises of the 
day was the style of football Coach 
Dr. William Parks ordered for his 
team. Tufts played old-fashioned 
football against a heavier team and 
played it well. The Maine backs met 
with a stonewall when they tried to 
gain through the Medford college line. 
It was the game playing of the Tufts 
line that prevented Bowdoin from 
scoring when they had the ball on the 
Tufts 5-yard line and a first down. 
In three successive rushes the Black 



and White eleven failed to gain more 
than two yards and the ball went to 
Tufts, who punted out of danger." 

Bowdoin, of the three Maine col- 
leges who tackled out of the state 
teams, received the lightest defeat, 
Maine losing to Harvard in a 41-0 
walk away, while Bates was whipped 
by New Hampshire State to the tune 
of 14 to 0. As for Colby's victory 
over Fort McKinley, little can be 
prophesied, as the Army team was 
admittedly suffering from a lack of 
both training and practice. 

Amherst, Bowdoin's rival next Sat- 
urday, lost her game to Brown with a 
score of 13-0 in a contest which 
showed numerous weak spots and gen- 
eral loose playing on the part of 
Amherst. Now is Bowdoin's chance 
to deliver a whipping to the Massa- 
chusetts team this Saturday. 

Although Bowdoin could not quite 
get a touchdown over, Tufts never 
had a look-in except when Macchia 
ran down the field for the lone score 
of the game. Morrell and Parent 
worked several passes for long gains 
particularly in the last quarter. Twice 
Parent got away for runs of forty 
or fifty yards after he had caught the 
ball. On the average these plays 
netted twenty yards or more. 

All through the game Bowdoin had 
little difficulty in gaining ground, ex- 
cept when near the Tufts line. Then 
the Medford line stiffened very much, 
and Bowdoin failed to get across. The 
White had Tufts' line almost off its 
feet most of the time, although not 
many advances could be made through 
centre. The weights of the two 
teams were about evenly matched, but 
Bowdoin showed far more football 
than the winners. 

At the end of the first half, Smith 
just barely missed a field goal, which 
might have started considerably to- 
wards changing the final result. In 
the last quarter Bowdoin rushed the 
ball twice to points within the 5-yard 
line, before the Tufts defense could 
tighten up at all. 

As for individual playing, Parent 
did by far the best work for Bow- 
doin at end, while Bisson did excel- 
lent work in the back-field until he 
was injured (near the end of the third 
quarter). MorrelPs punting was of 
high order, his average distance be- 
ing over forty yards. One punt car- 
ried sixty yards beyond the Bowdoin 



line to the enemy 5-yard mark. In 
the line Mason broke through often 
to throw the backs for losses. 

Joe Smith played at quarter until 
the last few minutes, when Woodbury 
went in. The latter worked the for- 
ward to Parent which would have been 
a touchdown had it not been for a 
Bowdoin man being .off-side. 

On the whole, the game was very 
satisfactory considering the prospect 
before it began. It is the best show- 
ing that Bowdoin has made against 
Tufts for a long time, and although 
it was a hard game to lose, after all, 
it has made clear in spite of the 
dubious outlook before the season 
started that Bowdoin will put up a 
strong battle for the championship in 
the Maine series. 

The summary: 

TUFTS— —BOWDOIN 

Macchia, le re., Perry 

re., Gibbons 

Galloway, It rt., Dudgeon 

Owen, lg rg., Putnam 

Segal, lg 

Thompson, lg rg., Keene 

Russo, c c, McCurdy 

Petrone, rg lg., Haines 

Higgins, rg. 

Higgins, rt It., Mason 

Killam, rt It., Guptill 

Nillson, re le., Parent 

LeCain, qb qb., Smith 

qb., Woodbury 

Lindell, lhb rhb., Morrell 

Tirrell, lhb 

Martin, rhb lhb., Turner 

Kelly, rhb 

Keefe, fb fb., Bisson 

.fb., Miller 
Score by quarters: 12 3 4 

Tufts 7 0—7 

Bowdoin — 

Touchdown, Macchia. Goal from 
touchdown, Keefe. Umpire, George 
V. Brown, B.A.A. Referee, Alfred W. 
Ingalls, Brown. Head linesman, K. L.. 
Morse, Dartmouth. Time, four 10- 
minute periods. 



"When I get to heaven," said Mrs. 
Boston Commons, "I shall ask Shake- 
speare who wrote his plays." 

"He may not be there," observed 
Mr. C. 

"That's true, then you can ask him," 
and Mrs. B. C. swept out of the room 
with a sixteenth century smile. — The 
Schoolmaster. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



135 






ADDRESS BY 

PRESIDENT SILLS 

(Continued from page 133) 

it has always struck me as a singular 
thing that we Americans who look 
with pride on any man or woman who 
is on the job have a singular toler- 
ance for students who never study. 
And I have heard more than one 
teacher remark in dismayed tones 
that as soon as she tries to set a high 
standard parents and friends of the 
boys and girls refuse to hold up her 
hands and complain that she makes 
her pupils work too hard. I have been 
acquainted for some years with col- 
lege boys in Maine, and I firmly be- 
lieve that they will readily rise to any 
fair and intelligent . standards that 
have been set up. When our schools 
and colleges are content with slip- 
shod work it is almost invariably the 
fault not of the students but of us 
their elders. The principle of French 
education, that you should go very 
slowly with young children but that 
from 14 to 21 you can hardly over- 
work them, is essentially sound. Here 
in Maine insistence on thorough work 
and high standards is the crying need 
of the hour. By all means adapt your 
kind of education to individual needs; 
but see to it that the standards, 
whether in the classical studies or in 
bookkeeping or in agriculture, are 
made and kept high. 

For the third representative of 
Maine's contribution to American edu- 
cation I have chosen one who is known 
to many of you, and one who, I think, 
without any question is the greatest 
educational leader Maine has given to 
the country — the late President Hyde 
of Bowdoin. It is an interesting fact 
that he was not trained for education 
at all but for the Christian ministry. 
That is the reason perhaps why all 
his efforts in education had such a 
firm foundation. He had the ideal 
of Christian service always before 
him. Although a Protestant of the 
Protestants, he took for his formula 
not the all too common modern teach- 
ing "What the world owes me I must 
get;" but the rule of the Third Order 
of St. Francis of Assisi — "What I 
owe the world I must give or do." 
He laid great stress on duty, and 
hence he set high standards for his 
college and administered them fear- 
lessly. His definition of the place of 



the small college in our educational 
system is a classic. 

"For combining sound scholarship 
with solid character; for making both 
intellectually and spiritually free; for 
uniting the spirit of truth with rever- 
ence for duty, the small college open 
to the worthy graduates of every good 
high school, presenting a course suffi- 
ciently rigid to give symmetrical de- 
velopment and sufficiently elastic to 
encourage individuality along con- 
genial lines, taught by professors who 
are men first and scholars afterwards, 
governed by kindly personal influence 
and secluded from too frequent con- 
tact with social distractions, has a 
mission which no change of educa- 
tional conditions can take away and a 
policy which no sentiment of vanity 
or jealousy should be permitted to 
turn aside." I wish that this definition 
might be more widely known and 
more carefully studied by all who 
have the interest of higher education 
at heart. With justice, President 
Hyde was more widely known through 
his teaching and his books than has 
been any other educator from Maine; 
and his life and career here are one 
of the great assets of the state. And 
yet so little is the popular regard for 
education that this very year when 
the Maine Centennial committee is- 
sued a pamphlet in which was included 
a list of Maine's famous men there 
was no mention of President Hyde, 
nor of any other man prominent in 
education. This leads one to wonder 
again if all the professions we hear 
of deep interest in education are sin- 
cere. 

Finally, may I make a special plea 
for our colleges ? We have in this 
state in addition to the University of 
Maine, Bates, Bowdoin and Colby. The 
university must be more adequately 
supported by the state; and every 
citizen of Maine ought to be in- 
terested in securing larger appropria- 
tions. The three independent colleges 
also need the support, sympathetic 
and financial, of all the people of 
Maine. While it is true that the 
population of Maine has increased but 
little, the college population has in- 
creased much, and there is room and 
to spare for all these institutions. It 
is, I think, a happy situation that we 
have the State University immediate- 
ly responsive to the people's needs, 
and the three other colleges standing 



for a liberal education, thus offering 
to the boys and girls of Maine abund- 
ant opportunity. I should like to sug- 
gest that we people of Maine have a 
very special responsibility toward our 
own institutions. A college is, to use 
a legal term, a quasi public corpor- 
ation. It exists to help boys and girls 
to become better citizens. And it 
cannot do the work it should unless 
it has back of it the hearty support 
of the public. All of us can do some- 
thing; people of means can do much. 
In these days when there are so many 
institutions that admirably serve the 
public a wealthy man or woman who 
makes in wills or otherwise no con- 
tributions to colleges, or hospitals, or 
libraries, or churches, is not only a 
false steward of wealth but increases 
the social restlessness of the times. 
Any wealthy man dying who leaves 
nothing to the public whence his 
wealth came multiplies the number of 
Radicals and Socialists. 



RECEPTION IN 

ART BUILDING 

The Saturday Club of Brunswick 
gave a reception to the ladies of the 
Maine Federation of Women's Clubs 
Tuesday evening of last week in the 
Walker Art Building. The rooms were 
unusually attractive with Oriental 
rugs and fine bouquets of cut flowers. 
Fully a hundred people, the majority 
of whom were from other parts of the 
state, were present. 

In the Sculpture Hall the guests 
were received by Mrs. Ernest L. Craw- 
ford, president of the Saturday Club; 
Mrs. William E. Brewster of Dexter, 
president of the Maine Federation; 
Mrs. E. C. Carll of Augusta, first vice- 
president of the Maine Federation; 
Mrs. Kenneth C. M. Sills, and Miss 
Anna E. Smith. There were other 
groups of ladies receiving in each of 
the three galleries. 

The ushers and general aids were 
Boardman '21, 0. G. Hall '21, Hart '21, 
Kileski '21, Pendexter '21, Reiber '21, 
Cobb '22, and Goff '22. 



Polite Frenchman — "Have you seen 
the 'bus of the elephant, please, is it 
not?" 

Lively New Yorker (mindful of his 
Fraser and Squair) — "No, sir, and the 
parrot of my aunt has not green 
trousers, either, would it?"' — Life. 



136 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



1923 WINS ANNUAL INTERCLASS 

BASEBALL GAME AND FLAG RUSH 



Ball Game Slow and Uninteresting — Twenty Errors, Five Hits, Plenty of 
Bone Plays— Hits By Needelman, Hill, and Wing Features. 



In the annual Freshman-Sophomore 
game last Saturday, on the Whittier 
Field, the 1923 team won out 12 to 4. 
The game was very poorly played, as 
out of the sixteen runs scored, only 
three were brought in by hits, all the 
rest being due to errors and poor 
playing. 

The first runs of the game were 
scored by the Sophomores in the first 
inning. Two bases on balls, numer- 
ous fumbles, wild throws, and boners, 
let four men across the plate in rapid 
succession. The losers put a run 
across in the third inning, when John- 
son walked, took second when Whit- 
man fizzled PettingilFs grounder, and 
scored on a clean hit to right by Sell- 
man. 

The Sophomores came back in their 
half when Hill opened up with a 
steaming liner to right centre, good 
for three bases. He scored on a wild 
pitch, and then two more runs were 
accumulated, chiefly on account of 
Pettingill's wild throw over Sellman's 
head. 

Each side scored once in the fourth, 
although errors were entirely re- 
sponsible. In the fifth Needelman, 
brother of this year's baseball cap- 
tain, pounded a triple over Swingle- 
hurst's head in left, with two on the 
bases. These two runs were the last 
that the Freshmen got. For the 
Sophomores in their half, Wing led 
off with a double, and a number of 
subsequent errors let in four more 
runs for the winners. 

Neither side scored in the sixth, al- 
though Handy opened up for the 
Sophomores with a single, the third 
hit for his team. The listless game 
was at last called off after the first 
half of the seventh, with the Sopho- 
mores eight runs to the good. The 
best play of the game was made by 
Pettingill '24 in the first inning when 
he ran over beyond the jumping pit 
and caught Hill's foul fly. 

Coach Ben Houser of the Varsity 
team came down for this week to see 
both from the game and from the 



practice beforehand if there was any 
likely material in the incoming class. 
For the first time in years no player 
was kept out of the game as a result 
of abduction the night before, in spite 
of the fact that upperclassmen and 
Sophomores made several attempts to 
carry away some of the players. 
There were some highly disgruntled 
Sophs when Clavin was released with- 
out the semblance of a fight. 

Following is a summary of the 
game: 

SOPHOMORES. 

ab r bh po a e 

Swinglehurst, If 2 2 

Whitman, ss 2 1 2 2 2 

G. T. Davis, 2b 2 1 2 1 1 

Hill, lb 4 1 1 5 1 

Handy, c 2 2 1 10 1 

Wing, p 2 3 1 1 1 

Chandler, cf 2 1 

Bishop, 3b 2 1 1 2 1 

McLellan, rf 1 1 

Hanscome, rf 1 1 

Totals 20 12 3 21 7 7 

FRESHMEN. 

ab r bh po a e 

Boufard, 2b 3 1 2 1 

Keirstead, 2b 1 

Pettingill, 3b 3 1 1 1 2 

Sellman. lb ...2 1 1 S 2 

Blaisdell, lb 1 1 

Needelman, cf 3 1 

Putnam, If 2 1 1 

Miguel, rf 2 

Hill, ss 2 

Harris, c 1 3 6 

Patterson, c 1 3 1 

McMennamin, p 1 

Johnson, p 2 1 2 1 

Clavin, p ! 1 

Totals 24 4 2 18 6 13 

Score by innings : 12 3 4 5 6 7 

Sophomores 4 3 1 4 x — 12 

Freshmen 1 1 2 0—4 

Two-base hit. Wing. Three-base hits, Hill, 
Needelman. No earned runs for either side. 
Winning pitcher, Wing. Losing- pitcher, Mc- 
Mennamin. Umpires, Holmes '21 and Flinn 



This year for the annual flag-rush 
two poles, each ten feet high, had 
been set up instead of one. For some 
time both classes struggled without 
either one being able to gain the least 



advantage. Many men started up the 
poles, only to be instantly pulled down 
and thrown out of the ring of fighters. 
Finally, two Freshman pushed Miguel 
through the air and he, hitting the 
top of the pole grabbed the 1923 flag 
and in another minute, was the center 
of a pile of writhing men. Soon the 
other flag was torn down by Love 
'23. The struggle, however, did not 
lessen but rather increased. Even 
when the whistle blew, both" classes 
fought on, so that when at last they 
were separated, it was difficult to tell 
who had won. 

Miguel kept hold of the 1923 flag 
until time was called, but with four 
Sophomores having their hands on it 
also, the torn penant was awarded 
to 1923. No decision was made on the 
other flag as there was a possibility 
that it had been carried from the field 
during the struggle. 

Both classes, after the rush, made 
for the chapel, but before they 
reached it the bell began to ring. For 
a long time Black '23 had been wait- 
ing inside and now he rang and rang 
for a victory which seemed to have 
been a draw. Even though the out- 
come was doubtful, it was a very sat- 
isfying scrap. On the Delta lay torn 
sweaters, ripped- sweat-shirts, and 
shreds of B. V. D.'s. 



Bowdoin Second 

Loses To Thornton 



Academy Team Outclasses the Visi- 
tors — Mahaney Stars At Full For 
Winners — Wagg and R. B. Phillips 
Strong for Bowdoin. 



On a wretched field Thornton Acad- 
emy trimmed the Bowdoin Second 
team at Biddeford last Saturday by a 
count of 13 to 0. There were few 
plays except straight football. The 
comparatively large crowd of fans 
were surprised at the strength of the 
Academy eleven, which was quite 
strong on the defense and which 
could gain considerably through Bow- 
doin's line. 

Captain Mahaney was the individ- 
ual star of the contest, making gain 
after gain for his school. The rest 
of his team was entirely out of his 
class. Both Thornton's touchdowns 
were scored in the third quarter, one 
by Cole, and the other by Vinton. The 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



first of these two touchdowns came as 
a result of two costly Bowdoin fum- 
bles. Later when Bowdoin had the 
ball near its own goal line, Tootell 
punted a short distance, and the kick 
was run back almost to a touchdown, 
and the score came immediately after- 
wards. 

Although Thornton's scores were 
rather fluky in themselves, there was 
little doubt that the Bowdoin team 
was somewhat outclassed on all- 
around play. The winners failed to 
complete a single forward at any time 
during the game. Three times they 
tried the spread eagle formation, and 
each time the play resulted in an in- 
tercepted forward pass. 

Bowdoin worked several forwards, 
and one play gained twenty or thirty 
yards. Wagg played a fine game in 
the line while Badger and Burgess 
also played well. R. B. Phillips, in 
the short time that he was in the 
game, performed better than any of 
the other backfield men. Tootell and 
Cole had to leave the game in the 
third quarter for minor injuries. 
There were very few penalties. At 
one time, when Bowdoin had carried 
the ball within the 5-yard line, the 
team was set back a couple yards for 
delaying the game, after which the 
ball was lost on downs. 
The summary: 

THORNTON ACADEMY— 

—BOWDOIN SECOND 



Touchdowns, Cole, Vinton. Goal 
from touchdown, Cole. Referee, A. 
Burns. Umpire, Leatherbarrow. 

Linesman, R. Burns. Time, four 10- 
minute periods. 



Mapes, le re. 

Vinton, le r< 



Philbrook 

, Burgess 

re., Tootell 

Shields, It rt., Philbrook 

Palmer, Ig rg., Weymouth 

Lord, lg rg., St. Clair 

Cheney, c c, Parsons 

c, Badger 

Carson, rg lg., Wagg 

Patrick, rg lg., Philbrook 

Hanson, rt It., Gowen 

It., Fish 

Burnham, re le., Williams 

Cole, qb qb., Jacob 

Si.card, qb. 

Joncas, lhb rhb., McCrum 

rhb., R. B. Phillips 

Sicard, rhb lhb., Granger 

Wilson, rhb lhb., Whitney 

Mahaney, fb fb., R. T. Phillips 

Score by quarters: 1 

Thornton 

Bowdoin Second 



GIFT FROM FRANK 

A. MUNSEY, LL.D. 

Those of us who heard the poet and 
lecturer, Hamlin Garland, last year, 
remember his telling us of Theodore 
Roosevelt's keen sense of apprecia- 
tion for newly discovered things and 
peoples. His appreciation of Mr. Ed- 
ward S. Curtis that he gives us in 
his foreword to Mr. Curtis's "The 
North American Indian," is notable. 
This work, in twenty volumes and 
twenty portfolios, half of which have 
been recently received by the Bow- 
doin Library, is a gift from Frank A. 
Munsey, LL.D. Edited by Frederick 
Webb Hodge, noted for his ethnolo- 
gical and archaeological expeditions 
in the Southwest, this work was made 
possible by the patronage of J. Pier- 
pont Morgan. Mr. Curtis, official 
photographer for the E. H. Harriman 
expedition to Alaska in 1898, has, in 
the words of Roosevelt, "because of 
the singular combination of qualities 
with which he has been blest, and be- 
cause of his extraordinary success in 
making and using his opportunities, 
been able to do what no other man has 
ever done; what, as far as we can see, 
no other man could do." "All serious 
students are to be congratulated," he 
continues, "because he is putting his 
work in permanent form; for our gen- 
eration offers the last chance for do- 
ing what Mr. Curtis has done. A vivid 
and truthful record of that strange 
spiritual and mental life of the North 
American Indian; from whose inner- 
most recesses all white men are for- 
ever barred." 

The many remarkable sepia illus- 
trations, portraying the actual and 
intimate life of the Indian, are no less 
distinguished than the record itself. 
Thoughts come to one of what pic- 
turesque use Longfellow might have 
made of this poetic material. 



Change in Day for 

Fraternity Initiations 

After a canvass of the student body 
and several alumni, and a conference 
with the faculty, the Student Council 
has named Saturday night, October 
16, as the date for the fraternity initi- 
ations. It will be remembered that 
these initiations for some years have 
taken place on a Wednesday night, 
corresponding this year to October 13. 

The reasons for making the initi- 
ations this year a week-end rather 
than a mid-week affair are these: 

First, many more alumni can get 
back. Instead of being able to stay 
only twelve hours they can stay for 
two days. The football game with 
Trinity on Saturday will serve as a 
further drawing card. 

Second, this added number of Bow- 
doin men back will make for gradu- 
ates and undergraduates alike a 
great week-end. A rousing rally on 
Friday night, big attendance at the 
game Saturday afternoon, and in- 
spiring initiations that night. 

The advantages of this change 
from the mid-week occasion to the 
week-end seem so marked that no 
doubt is felt as to its success. 

S. C. B. 



2 


3 


4 







13 


0- 


-13 








0- 


- 



Rumor has it that the Republican 
Club requires all new members to 
take the following oath: "I pledge 
allegiance to this flag and to the Re- 
publicans for which it stands." 



BAND MEETING 

On Tuesday evening, September 28, 
the first meeting of the Bowdoin Band 
was held. There were more than 
twenty men out and there is every 
indication that this year's band will 
be the largest that Bowdoin ever had. 

Upper Memorial Hall will be used 
as the permanent band room, although 
the night for regular practice has not 
yet been decided upon. 

Among the men who turned out for 
the meeting were M. P. Chandler '23, 
Clymer '22, Butler '23, F. P. Bishop '24 
Fish '22, Love '23, Mallett '23, Mc- 
Lellan '23, McLellan '21, Norton '22, 
Orr '22, S. Smith '23, Staples '23, 
Stetson '21, Woodbury '22, R. B. Phil- 
lips '24, Turgeon, '23, and Robinson 
'23. 



I wonder if the Freshman who sat 
in the Senior forms in Chapel the 
other morning thought he had better 
take advantage of his opportunity. 



138 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Norman W. Haines '21 Editor-in-Chief 

Edward B. Ham '22 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Floyd A. Gerrard '23 Athletics 

Karl R. Philbriek '23 Faculty Notes 

George H. Quinby '23 Alumni Department 

F. King Turgeon '23 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
John L. Berry '21 Crosby E. Redman '21 

Harry Helson '21 Frank A. St. Clair '21 

George E. Houghton '21 William R. Ludden '22 
Russell M. McGown '21 Virgil C. McGorrill '22 
Roland L. McCormack '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 
Kenneth S. Boardman '21. . .Business Manager 

Wilfred R. Brewer '22 Assistant Manager 

AH contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials; the Managing Editor 
for the news department; and the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 



Vol. L. October 6, 1920. No. 13 



Entered at Post Office 
Second-Class Mail Matter. 



The Bowdoin "Hello." 

It is none too early to remind Bow- 
doin men, and especially the Fresh- 
men, of the time-honored Bowdoin 
"hello." As an expression of Bow- 
doin's boasted democracy and of the 
spirit of good feeling prevalent among 
the members of the student body, it 
is customary for one student to greet 
another with a hearty "hello." 

This "hello" is all the more satis- 
factory if coupled with the first name 
or nickname of the person to whom 
it is addressed. One of the most 
salient advantages of the small col- 
lege is the opportunity to know in- 
stantly everybody connected with the 
institution. Take advantage of this 
opportunity and show that you realize 
its value. 

While Freshman "discipline" en- 
courages more or less restraint on 
the part of the underclassman in the 
matter of the "hello," the Freshman 
is urged to speak first. "Snap out 
of it" Freshmen, speak to men on 
the campus and learn their names. 



The most disagreeable person is the 
one who stands up for somebody you 
want to talk about. — Life. 




The Late Dr. Thomas Upham Coe '57, from a photograph sent to the 
"Orient" by his class-mate, Rev. Samuel B. Stewart. 



Possible Changes in 

Cross-Country Course 

In last Sunday's "Portland Tele- 
gram" was the following regarding 
the state cross-country race to be held 
here November 5: 

"While it is pretty early to forecast 
prospects in the Maine colleges, it is 
expected that the meet will be a fast 
one. Reports from the different col- 
leges indicate that they have had har- 
riers out on the courses for a week 
or two in preparation for the State 
meet. The Bowdoin management is 
contemplating changing the Bowdoin 
course so as to take in more hills and 
making it a more hill and dale course, 
rather than to run on level ground all 
the time. 

"It is understood that practically all 
the cross-country runners who com- 
peted in the State meet last fall at 
Waterville will be seen in action this 
fall, together with several new men. 



The three stars of last year's meet, 
Raymond of Maine, R. B. Buker of 
Bates, and Goodwin of Bowdoin, who 
finished in the order named, will face 
each other again and will battle for 
first place." 



Registration Figures 

Compared with that of last year, 
this year's registration shows a 
marked decrease in the total number 
of students attending college. The 
number registered for academic 
courses this year is 400, while last 
year's total was 456. A glance at the 
registrar's figures is explanatory. As 
was the case last year, the Junior 
class is in the minority, having only 
85 members as compared with the 88 
registered Seniors, while the Sopho- 
more and Freshman classes are near- 
ly equal with 105 and 113 respective- 
ly. The nine special students, three 
first year men, and six in the second 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



139 



year, complete the number. A com- 
parative table for last year and this 
follows : 

Class. 1920 1919 

Senior ■ 88 95 

Junior 85 82 

Sophomore 105 117 

Freshman 113 118 

Specials 9 20 

2nd, 3rd, 4th year Fresh- 
men 24 

Totals 400 456 



MEN WANTED FOR 

PUBLISHING CO. 

At the present time there is great 
need for more candidates for the Pub- 
lishing Co., several men having 
dropped out from the competition. The 
Publishing Co. handles and is respon- 
sible for the business end of the 
"Orient" and "Quill." This means 
time and work. It is our aim to get 
both papers out on time, but if we 
are handicapped for help and the sev- 
eral fraternities refuse to co-operate 
with us, to the extent of sending out 
candidates for the assistant manager- 
ships, we of course cannot do our part 
as we would like and the papers are 
consequently late in delivery. 

As all upperclassmen know, men 
start competition in April of Fresh- 
man year, working until April of 
Sophomore year. At this time two 
men are elected assistant managers. 
These men compete until April of 
Junior year at which time one is 
elected business manager, his term 
running through Senior year up to 
April. This managership does not 
carry with it the prestige on the 
Campus of an athletic managership, 
but it does give very valuable business 
experience, and furthermore is the 
only paid managership in college and 
means a place on the Board of Man- 
agers. 

At the present time men are 
wanted from the Sophomore class to 
work as candidates for assistant man- 
agerships until next April. Report to 
Boardman at the Psi U. House or 
Brewer at the D.K.E. House. 

K. S. B. 



Comparative Report of 

Treasurer A.S.B.C. 

Season 1919-20. 

Receipts 

Tax, first semester. 417 men §3,127.50 

Tax, second semester, 338 men 2,535.00 

Balance from last year 279.25 

Interest on Sinking Fund 2.78 

Total §5,944.53 

Expenditures 
Athletic Council for — 

Football §1,400.00 

Baseball 1,400.00 

Track' 1,400.00 

Tennis 155.00 

Fencing 90.00 

Bowdoin Publishing Co 400.00 

Christian Association 250.00 

Debating Council 225.00 

Band 250.00 

Hockey 150.00 

Incidental, — Printing 30.60 

Sinking Fund on Deposit, First Na- 
tional Bank 71.88 

Balance on Deposit, First National 

Bank 122.05 

Total §5,944.53 

Date, September 23, 1920. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Manton Copeland, Treas. 
Examined and found correct and 
properly vouched. 

Barrett Potter, Auditor. 
September 25, 1920. 



SELECTION OF 

COMMENCEMENT 

SPEAKERS 

The faculty in its meeting of Sep- 
tember 27 abolished the antiquated 
and for the seniors, at least, unsatis- 
factory method of selecting the Com- 
mencement speakers, which has been 
in force now for so many years. 

The new method which is now in 
force is based on the report of a 
special committee consisting of Pro- 
fessors Van Cleve, Ham, and Mitchell, 
and reads as follows: 



"Within the first week of the sec- 
ond semester, the Faculty Committee 
headed by the President, shall desig- 
nate six members of the Senior class 
as provisional Commencement speak- 
ers. 

"The basis of selection shall be: 
"(a) Good scholastic record; 
(b) Ability to think and write 
clearly, as shown by the entire col- 
legiate record, rather than by com- 
petitive exercises. 

"The speakers, with such faculty 
advice as they may desire, shall pro- 
ceed immediately to the selection of 
their subjects and to the preparation 
of Commencement parts. 

"Each speaker shall submit to the 
President, by March 20, a tentative 
draft of his part, and from these 
drafts, four shall be chosen as Com- 
mencement speakers. 

"Each speaker shall submit to the 
President, not later than June 10, 
three unsigned, typewritten copies of 
his finished part. 

"The President shall forward these 
copies to each of the three judges 
to be chosen by him from the Board 
of Overseers and Trustees of the Col- 
lege. • 

"These same judges shall hear the 
presentation of the parts on Com- 
mencement Day, and immediately 
shall decide, in consultation, the win- 
ner of the Goodwin Commencement 
Prize." 



Tact. 

Dorothy — Was Jack engaged to 
Mabel before he married Evelyn? 

Katheryn — Yes, and do you know 
what Mabel did? 

Dorothy — No, what did she do ? 

Katheryn — Sent Evelyn to read on 
the honeymoon, Stevenson's "Travel's 
With a Donkey." — Life. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL 

The entering class of the Bowdoin 
Medical School is moderately large 
this year, consisting of about thirty 
students. The majority of the class 
came from Maine, but there are some 
students from other parts of the 
country. 

The enrolment for the coming year 
in the Medical School is slightly 
larger than it was for the preceding 
year. Twenty-six have already been 
admitted to the Freshman class and 
one to the Sophomore class, while last 
year the complete registration for the 
Freshman class was only twenty. 
This year the total number of the 
Freshman class is likely to reach 
thirty before registration closes. Dr. 
Whittier expects a very successful 
year at the Medical School. 



140 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Saturday Football Scores 

Bowdoin 0, Tufts 7. 
Maine 0, Harvard 41. 
Bates 0, New Hampshire 14. 
Colby 40, Fort McKinley 0. 

Yale 44, Carnegie Tech 0. 

Brown 13, Amherst 0. 

Princeton 17, Swarthmore 6. 

U. of Pennsylvania 7, Bucknell 0. 

Columbia 21, Trinity 0. 

Wesleyan 20, Rhode Island State 0. 

Williams 63, Rensselaer P. I. 6. 

Boston University 7, Worcester P. 
I. 0. 

North Carolina State 14, Navy 7. 

Cornell 13, Rochester 6. 

Army 36, Union 0. 

Army 38, Marshall College 0. 

Johns Hopkins 33, Mount St. Mary's 
14. 

Dartmouth 31, Norwich 0. 

Springfield Y.M.C.A. 0, Middlebury 
0. 

Delaware 14, Ursinus 0. 

Lafayette 20, Muhlenburg 0. 

Pennsylvania State 13, Gettysburg 
0. 

Pittsburgh 47, Geneva 0. 

Syracuse 49, Vermont 0. 

Lehigh 7, West Virginia 7. 

Massachusetts A. C. 28, Connecticut 
A. C. 0. 

Colgate 0, Susquehanna 0. 

Rutgers 6, Maryland University 0. 

University of Cincinnati 45, Ken- 
yon 0. 



Campus JSotes 

At the Student Council meeting of 
September 27 it was decided to order 
the Freshman caps immediately. 
Holmes '21 and Flinn '22 were chosen 
umpires for the Freshman-Sophomore 
baseball series. October 16 was fixed 
upon as the date of the fraternity 
initiations. 

Kirkpatrick '24 tore the ligaments 
of his left wrist during football prac- 
tice last week. 

Berry '20, Goodrich '20, Ellms '20, 
Leach '20, Low '20, and Jones '20 
have been on the Campus recently. 

Physical examinations have been 
held every evening in the gymnasium 
until this week. The results will be 
ready for publication soon. 

The first call for musical club can- 
didates was issued last week. Fresh- 
men were to report Monday and 
Tuesday of this week, while upper- 



classmen will have a chance to try 
out in the near future. 

Beginning this week it is possible to 
make up gymnasium cuts left over 
from last year, every week-day from 
4.30 to 5.30. 

The following lines appeared in 
Wednesday's "Lewiston Journal" con- 
cerning the reception to the Feder- 
ation of Women's Clubs in the Art 
Building: "To add to the pleasure 
of the evening there were present all 
members of the Bowdoin faculty, 
whose dress suits made a delightful 
foil for the gowns of the club women. 
It is to be doubted if any part of the 
evening was more enjoyed by the 
party than these chats with the jolly 
college professors." 

On Tuesday, September 28, the 
Freshman class held its first meeting 
under the supervision of John G. 
Young, president of the student coun- 
cil. The officers elected were as fol- 
lows: President, E. Alfred Beals; 
vice-president, Brooks E. Savage; sec- 
retary and treasurer, Thornton L. C. 
Burnell; manager of the Freshman 
baseball team, James M. Keniston. 

There is still a good chance for any 
Freshman to start coming out for the 
"Orient" by getting an assignment 
this week as soon as possible for the 
next issue. At present there are 
eight candidates out: Cassidy, Theta 
Delt; Chamberlain, Deke; Davis, Psi 
U; Klees, Theta Delt; MacKinnon, 
Alpha Delt; Rowe, Kappa Sig; Smith, 
Zete; and Smythe, Beta. 

In the "Springfield Republican" for 
October 1 there was a communication 
in support of the League of Nations, 
by R. W. Noyes '21. 

D. M. Mannix '15 was a visitor on 
the campus last Saturday. 

An ancient supply of gymnasium 
apparatus was brought to light from 
the depths beneath the chapel last 
week and carried away, having long 
since served its purpose. 

R. T. Phillips '24, while playing on 



Son — "Say, pop, what is Newton's 
law of gravitation?" 

Father — "It is, let's see. Hem! 
Newton's law of gravitation is — . 
What is it now? (Suddenly relieved.) 
That's a foolish question. There's no 
such thing any more since Professor 
Einstein made his discovery. — Science 
and Invention. 



the second team at Thornton last- 
Saturday seriously sprained his 
shoulder and will be unable to be out 
of doors for several days. 

Dahlgren '22, who has been laid up 
because of an injury received in the 
Springfield game, is once more able 
to be around and will soon be back in 
a football suit. 

The Freshmen have cast aside their 
various decorations imposed upon 
them by their fraternities and are 
now free until the arrival of the 
Freshman caps. 

Philip H. Hansen '11, visited friends 
on the Campus last week. 

William F. Twombly '13 was on the 
Campus last week. 

A call has been issued by the man- 
ager of the Masque and Gown for as- 
sistants from the Class of 1924. Those 
who are interested in dramatics or 
the work of a manager should report 
to Philbrick '23. 

Wednesday night the Freshmen re- 
ceived a gentle warning of what to do 
and especially what not to do if they 
value life, liberty, and *he pursuit of 
happiness. 

The recent rainj season has 
brought home to the new men the 
reason why rubber boots are a part 
of every Bowdoin man's equipment. 

Among the alumni who have visited 
the campus recently are Philbrick '17, 
Shumway '17, C. S. Houston '20, 
Rhoads '20, and French ex- '21. 

B. H. M. White ex-'21, has returned 
to college this fall and is entering the 
Class of 1922. 

All men who want outside work 
should fill out application blanks at 
the office of the Y. M. C. A., 7 South 
Maine, at once. All kinds of work 
will be available soon, and the "Y" 
will try to keep busy all men who 
make application. The kinds of work 
include: Tending furnaces, raking 
leaves, washing windows, beating 
rugs and shoveling snow; also some 
office work, clerking, and work for 
skilled men. 

Freshman Bibles are now being sold 
at 7 South Maine Hall for a dollar 
while they last. 



Ex-gob-student, watching a driving 
rain filling up the Campus Lacus. 
"Well, the tide sure came in last 
night." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



141 



In the "Lewiston Journal" for Mon- 
day, September 27, the report of the 
selection of the Rhodes Scholar for 
next year contained some highly com- 
plimentary paragraphs concerning 
Bowdoin's candidates, Helson and 
Thomson. 

By vote of the Recording Commit- 
tee beginning with the present Senior 
Class, a fee of one dollar will be 
charged for all transcripts of records 
after the first such transcript. 

A call has come for counsellors for 
summer work in Maine camps dur- 
ing the summer of 1921. All men in- 
terested should leave their names at 
once at the Dean's office. 

Candidates for the Chapel Quartette 
are requested to see or telephone Pro- 
fessor Wass within the next ten days. 

As the "Orient" goes to press, the 
following freshmen have registered as 
candidates for assistant track man- 
ager: Pike, Psi U; Whalen, A. D.; 
and Johnson, Kappa Sig. 

The Library has recently received 
twenty-four cases of books in memory 
of Freeman Milliken Short '01, given 
by his mother. The cases have not 
yet been opened so that no description 
of their contents can appear in this 
number. Additional consignments 
are expected shortly by the Library. 

A representative of the General 
Electric Company will be in Bruns- 
wick, October 18, to talk with men of 
the Senior class who may be interested 
in that business. Those interested 
are advised to leave their names at 
the Dean's office and to call there on 
Monday morning, October 18, to see 
this representative. 

The sedate students of Bowdoin 
were handed a jolt in their artistic 
sense the other afternoon when a 
Freshman, clad in a colorful combi- 
nation of green sweater, purple run- 
ning shorts, and vivid tan socks, 
escorted a lady, presumably his 
mother, across the campus. Origi- 
nality counts, '24! 

The usual pre-initiation "cere- 
monies" started early in the week 
when the Freshman delegation from 
Zeta Psi appeared with bells a-tinkle. 
Somewhat later the other delegations 
bloomed with pop-guns, drums, fancy 
paper hats, collars, and ties reversed 
and toy carts containing small 
"Dinahs." 



jFacultp l3otes 

In connection with the educational 
rallies which are being held through- 
out the state, Dean Nixon spoke in 
Portland last Saturday, and Presi- 
dent Sills in Bath Monday. President 
Sills spoke again Tuesday at Wis- 
cassett. 

During the last week President 
Sills has been holding conferences 
with both Union men and mill owners, 
in the hopes of arranging an agree- 
ment in the matter of the Cabot Mill 
strike. In last week's "Brunswick 
Record" President Sills discussed the 
conditions which have caused a shut- 
down for so long a period, and also 
offered important suggestions, which 
it is hoped will bring about a satis- 
factory settlement of the controversy. 

President Sills has taken the class 
in Latin 1 and will probably continue 
to teach it during the first semester. 
Dean Nixon will resume the instruc- 
tion of the class at the opening of 
the second semester. 

Professor Hormell gave an address 
on political parties and popular gov- 
ernment before the Civics Study Class 
of the Woman's Literary Union of 
Portland Monday evening. 

Dean Nixon will speak to the York 
and Cumberland Teachers' Association 
at Portland, October 2, on "Certain 
Aspects of the Study of Latin." 



alumni Department 

The "Orient" desires to be of the 
greatest possible service to Alumni in 
keeping them informed of one an- 
other's activities. Alumni, and 
especially class secretaries, are ear- 
nestly requested to support the 
"Orient" in this work by sending items 
about themselves or their brother 
Alumni. 

1891 — Dr. Bertrand D. Ridlon has 
been commissioned a major surgeon in 
the regular army and is now on duty 
in Boston. 

1898— Mr. Reuel W. Smith of Au- 
burn, one of the founders of the Alpha 
Rho chapter of Kappa Sigma, was a 
visitor at the college Wednesday. 

1906— Dr. Edville G. Abbott, lect- 
urer on orthopedic surgery in the 
Medical School, who is at present in 
France, will read a paper before the 
French Orthopedic Association Fri- 
day, October 8. 



1909 — Harrison Atwood, who has 
been working for the H. K. McCann 
Company in San Francisco, has re- 
cently been transferred to New York 
City. 

1912 — Miss Jessie Ada Higgins and 
Maurice Pierce Hill were married at 
Hope, Maine, on September 6. 

1917 — Miss Dorothy Prince Chester 
and Dr. Sidney Collingwood Dalrym- 
ple were married September 28 at 
Brookline, Mass. Dr. Dalrymple has 
been recently appointed assistant 
pathologist at the Newton Hospital. 

Ex-1918— Miss Kathryn Bella Red- 
way and Charles Denison Brown will 
be married at Lowell, Mass., on Oc- 
tober 16. 

1919 — William Angus is teaching at 
Dummer Academy, Mass. 

Inasmuch as the Alumni have ex- 
pressed a wish to see up-to-date notes 
concerning the occupation and where- 
abouts of as many of their number as 
possible, the "Orient" plans to pub- 
lish a series of class notes in this 
column during the coming year. 

Class of 1867. 
Six members of the class are 
alive — Melvin F. Arey, Oren Cobb, 
George P. Davenport, Richard G. Mer- 
riman, Stephen M. Newman, and Fred- 
eric K. Smyth. Four of the class re- 
turned to Brunswick for their fiftieth 
anniversary in 1917 — Arey, Daven- 
port, Newman, and Stanley A. Plum- 
mer, who died February 12, 1919. Mr. 
Davenport has been at every Com- 
mencement since his graduation. Mr. 
Arey is now a professor in the State 
Normal School at Cedar Falls, Iowa. 
Mr. Cobb is an author in New York 
City. Mr. Davenport, who is an over- 
seer of the college, is a banker in 
Bath. Mr. Merriman is a teacher and 
lumberman in North Fork, Calif., ac- 
cording to the last that has been 
heard from him. Dr. Newman has 
been president of Kee Mar College, 
Hagerstown, Maryland, since 1909. 
Mr. Smyth has been engaged in fruit 
growing at Napa, Calif., since 1892. 
Class of 1870. 

Eleven members of the class are 
still living. Of this number eight were 
present at the fiftieth anniversary last 
June. They celebrated quietly with a 
dinner at New Meadows Inn, had a 
class picture taken on the Chapel 
steps, and attended the President's 
reception in a body. At the Com- 



142 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



mencement dinner Dr. DeAlva S. Alex- 
ander spoke for the class. It is in- 
teresting to note that of the original 
thirty members of the class only eight 
died under sixty, while over fifty per 
cent, have lived more than the al- 
lotted three score years and ten. All 
were in professional work. Of the 
nine Phi Beta Kappa men three sur- 
vive. 

The class now consists of the fol- 
lowing. DeAlva S. Alexander, LL.D., 
of Buffalo; Albert J. Curtis of Bruns- 
wick; Orville B. Grant of Greenup, 
111.; George W. Hobson of Lowell, 
Mass.; Lucien Howe, Sc.D., of Buffalo; 
Caleb A. Page of Methuen, Mass.; E. 
Pulton Redman of Dorchester, Mass.; 
James A. Roberts, LL.D., of New York 
■City; Davis T. Timberlake of Lan- 
caster, N. H.; Alonzo G. Whitman of 
Melrose, Mass.; and Edwin C. Wood- 
ward of Colorado Springs, Col. 

Class of 1871. 

There are five members left of this 
class. 

Edmund C. Cole has spent his life 
at Warner, N. H., where he has served 
as principal of the high school, editor 
of a paper, Justice of the Police Court, 
and Representative to the Legislature. 

James F. Chaney, after several 
years of farming in Florida and min- 
ing in Colorado, has settled in Bruns- 
wick and engaged in the coal busi- 
ness. 

William S. Dennett took his medical 
degree at Harvard in 1874 and has 
since specialized in Boston and New 
York as an occulist. 

W. R. FLINN 

College Agent for 

WRIGHT & DITSON'S 

Athletic Goods for all 

Seasons. 

Supplies for 

Baseball, Track, Football, 

Tennis, Hockey, Golf. 

White Sweaters 

and 

Gym Suits 



A. D. House 



Edward P. Mitchell, Litt.D., is 
editor-in-chief of the "New York 
Sun." His residence is at Glen Ridge, 
N. J. He is an overseer of the col- 
lege and the author of the words of 
"Phi Chi." He is one of the best 
known editors in the country. 

Everett S. Stackpole, D.D., has 
served in Methodist and Congrega- 
tional churches in the larger cities of 
Maine and for more than twelve years 
at Bradford, Mass. He was president 
and professor of Systematic Theology 
in a theological school in Florence, 
Italy for five years. He has published 
several histories of old New England 
towns, at present he is settled at his 
farm in West Bath, Maine. 



THE 

COLLEGE 

BOOK STORE 



The place to buy everything from 
a Thumb Tack to a Wedding Present. 
Take a look at our new line of Kay- 
woodie Pipes. These are of real 
Italian Bruyere with the Aluminum 
Inbore tube. All models $4.50 each. 



F. W, CHANDLER 

& SON 

150 MAINE STREET. 



NOBBY 
OVERCOATS 

FOR 

YOUNG MEN 

Stylish and Comfortable Coats that 
will please you 

$25.00 to $30.00 



E. S. BODWELL 

& SON 

Brunswick, Maine. 



RESOLUTION 

Hall of Theta of Delta Kappa 
Epsilon: 

It is with extreme sorrow that 
Theta Chapter records the death of 
Brother Edwin Pond Parker of the 
Class of 1856. 

At Bowdoin he won his Phi Beta 
Kappa appointment and was gradu- 
ated with the degree of A.B. Since 
his graduation the degiees of D.D. 
and LL.D. were conferred on him re- 
spectively by Yale and Trinity. 
Brother Parker's death will be keenly 
felt, as he was actively engaged in 
church work for over fifty years. 

The chapter extends its sympathy 
to the family and friends of Brother 
Parker in their recent loss. 

For the chapter, 

RONALD B. WADSWORTH. 



ARROW 

WASHED 

HANDKER- 
' CHIEFS r 

Clean * Soft ' Ready for 
Use in Sanitary Packages 

WHITE OR KHAKI 

CLUETT PEABODY 6? CO., Inc., Troy, N.Y. 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 Washington Street 
Boston 



s-c 




119 MAINE STREET 
BRUNSWICK 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



143 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 Maine Street 



CORDOVAN BOOTS 

IN 

YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 



"Herman's" Tan Cordovan $13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan . . $15.50 
"Florsheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 

TENNIS SHOES, INDOOR AND 

OUTDOOR MOCCASINS, RUBBER 

BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 



CARL H. MARTIN 

Cleansing and Dyeing 
Pressing and Alterations 



4 Elm Street 



A. W. HASKELL, D. D. S. 

W. F. BROWN, D. D. S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Postoffice Brunswick, Me. 



COMPLETE STOCKS 

OF 

Seasonable Clothes—Haberdashery— Hats 

FOR TOWN AND COUNTRY WEAR 



ALSO SPECIAL STYLES IN 

SPORTING APPAREL 
HASKELL & JONES COMPANY 

PORTLAND, MAINE 



BENOIT'S COLLEGE ROOM 

In announcing that its representative 

Mr. H. E. Eliason 

will visit Bowdoin College week of October 4th, 
bringing with him the very latest fashion creations 
in wearing apparel for young men 

desires to take this opportunity of thanking the students 
for the courtesies and consideration shown him in the 
past, and we hope that we may still continue to merit 
this Fall your confidence in our merchandise and business principles. 




The Store of Progress and Service 
Monument Square Portland 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Be sure to see 

Maynard S. Howe 

for your Bowdoin "B" 

and Fraternity pipes. 

Genuine W. D. C. pipes with 

sterling silver band and 

letters. 

Also Bowdoin College and 

all Fraternity Shields 

in two sizes. 

Chi Psi Lodge, 



Maynard S. Howe '22 

College Agent for 

The College Memory Book 

Company 

Chicago, 111. 



FRESHMEN: 

The " Bowdoin " Memory 
Book for 1920-1921 with its 
added features is the best 
ever. 

Order your Copy NOW 



Chi Psi Lodge 

I also have a good line of 

BOWDOIN Banners, 

Pennants, Pillows, Etc. 

Be sure to see my samples. 




THE BRUNSWICK 

Convenient to the theatre and 
shopping districts. 

The sort of Hotel guests 
visit once and return to every 
time they come to Boston. 

Boylston St. at Copley Sq. 



^T 



^ia* s "i:"' :l 



THE LENOX 

In the center of Boston's 
Back Bay residential district. 

For many years a stopping 
place for college teams. 

The "Old Grad" claims it 
still and so do the Under 
Grads. It's their Hotel. 

Boylston St. at Exeter St. 

UNDER SAME MANAGEMENT 
L. C. PRIOR, Managing Director 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



145 




Generator room of one of the 
hydro-electric plantswhich sup- 
ply power to the C. M. & St. P. 



The Power of Electricity 
in Transportation 



Some Advantages of 
Railroad Electrification 

Saving the Nation's coal. 
Lower maintenance costs. 

rid fewer 

Ability to haul smoothly 
heavier trains at higher 
speed. 

Operation of electric locomo- 
tives unaffected by extreme 
cold. 

Ability to brake trains on 
descending grades by re- 
turning power to the trolley. 



ELECTRICITYhasleveledout 
the Continental Divide. The 
steam locomotive, marvelous as 
it is after a century of develop- 
ment, cannot meet all of the pres- 
ent demands for transportation 
facilities. Its electric rival has 
proved to be far superior. 

On the mountain divisions of the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
Railway — the world's greatest 
electrification— giant electric loco- 
motives today lift an ever increas- 
ing freight tonnage over the mile- 
high Rockies and also make travel- 
ing clean and comfortable. They 
utilize the abundant energy of dis- 
tant waterfalls and then, by return- 
ing some of this power to the 
trolley, safely brake the trains on 
descending grades. And their 
capabilides are not impaired by 
excessively cold weather when 



the steam engine is frozen and 
helpless. 

Electricity is the power which 
drives the trains of New York 
City's subway and elevated sys- 
tems. It operates the locks and 
tows the ships, through the 
Panama Canal. It propels the 
Navy's latest super-dreadnaught, 
the New Mexico. Electric mine 
locomotives have replaced the 
slow-moving mule and the electric 
automobile has also come to do 
an important service. 
Electricity has become the uni- 
versal motive power. It has con- 
tributed efficiency and comfort to 
every form of transportation ser- 
vice and in this evolution General 
Electric apparatus has played a 
large part — from mighty electric 
locomotives to the tiny lamp for 
the automobile. 




General Office 
Schenectady; NY! 



Sales Offices in 
all large cities 



146 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



America's most famous 
box of candy 




Smpl 




Candies of exquisite quality in a quaint, ar- 
tistic box. Fine to give to a girl or to give your- 
self! 

For sale by 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



147 



'In playing a full mid-iron shot, the 
club head should follow through 
close to the ground as far as the 
stretch of the aims will permit." 

James M. Barnes' —Picture Analysis of Qolf Strokes. 




WHEN you have played the shot right the ball 
should go where it was intended. U. S. Balls will, 
as they are built for accuracy. They are scientifically 
balanced and uniform. 

Exceptional durability assures long and satisfactory 
service. Try them. Choose the size and weight 
you like. 

Buy them from your pro or at your dealer's. 




U.S. 


Royal 


$1.00 each 


u. s. 


Revere 


85c each 


U.S. 


Floater 


65c each 




Keep your eye on the ball — be sure it's a U. S. 

lited States 

1790 Broadway 



New York City 



148 BO WDOIN ORIENT 



CUMBERLAND 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

CONSTANCE BINNEY 

. . . IN . . . 

39 EAST 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

VIOLA DANA 

. . . IN . . . 

A CHORUS GIRL'S ROMANCE 



PASTIME 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

MAE MARSH 

. . . IN . . . 

HIDDEN FIRES 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

HARRY MOREY 

. . . IN . . . 

THE FLAMING CLUE 



NEXT WEEK— MONDAY AND TUESDAY 

JACK LONDON'S— THE SEA WOLF 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



VOL. L. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1920. 



No. -ISr- 



MINUS SEVERAL FIRST STRING PLAYERS 
BOWDOIN LOSES TO AMHERST 



13-0 



Bowdoin Outclassed in First Half Comes Back In Third Quarter — Ball 

Twice Carried to Amherst's Five-Yard Line — Several Forwards 

Gain Many Yards For Bowdoin — A. Morrell's 

Punting of High Order Again. 



Under a boiling sun Amherst 
triumphed over Bowdoin by a score of 
13-0 on Pratt Field last Saturday. 
The Amherst team showed a great im- 
provement over last week in its of- 
fense and was held for downs rarely 
throughout the game. On account of 
injuries received last week several of 
the Bowdoin first string players were 
unable to play and thus Bowdoin 
could not show much improvement in 
the offense. 

The first quarter opened with Bow- 
doin receiving. The White soon 
punted and on Amherst's second play, 
Brisk made 25 yards around end. 
However, on the next play, Bowdoin 
got a touchback after a fumble by 
Amherst, and the ball went to the 20- 
yard line. Bowdoin punted again, and 
Amherst was penalized twenty yards 
for hurdling. Zink made a long for- 
ward pass which Davidson caught on 
the 5-yard line and took over for the 
first score. Zink kicked the goal. 

The second touchdown came in the 
second quarter after a series of gains 
made by continual line plugging by 
Brisk, Card, and Murnane. Brisk was 
the man to carry the ball over, but 
Zink failed in his try for goal. 

After this score the Amherst offen- 
sive was not very much in evidence, 
as Bowdoin came back strong in the 
second half. Amherst hardly ever 
had the ball in Bowdoin's territory the 
rest of the game, while on the con- 
trary Bowdoin was continually on the 
offensive. Twice within the third 
quarter Bowdoin marched down to 

(Continued on page 150) 



Bowdoin's Strong Men. 

Results of the strength tests given 
as a part of the physical examina- 
tions at Bowdoin College, have been 
announced by Dr. F. N. Whittier, 
professor of hygiene and physical 
training. Tests were given to all 
Freshmen and to all members of the 
three upper classes who were to take 
part in athletics. 

Bowdoin's strong man this year is 
Glenn V. Butler '23 of Farmington, 
Me. His total strength is figured at 
1120.8 kilograms, the equivalent of 
2363.6 pounds in weight. Butler is a 
member of the college track squad, 
having won a place in last year's 
Bates Dual Meet. He is also a mem- 
ber of his class baseball team. 

The second strongest man in col- 
lege is Rupert G. Johnson '24, of 
Brownfield, Me., who has a total of 
1011.38 kilgrams, or 2123.7 pounds. 
Third in strength is Waldo R. Flinn 
'22 of Island Falls, Me., with a mark 
of 990.14 kilograms, equal to 2079.3 
pounds. 

Last year's records show that 
Myron W. Sprague '20, set the highest 
mark at 1027.3 kilograms, while Ellms 
'20, and Albert '23 took second and 
third honors respectively. 

The highest record for the strength 
tests at Bowdoin is held by Edward R. 
Godfrey of Bangor, Me., Class of '99, 
who smashed not only the college 
record, but also the record of all the 

(Continued on page 151) 



IBIS MEETING 

The Ibis Club held its first meet- 
ing of the year at the Delta Upsilon 
house Friday evening and formulated 
plans for the coming year. It is 
planned to hold meetings every two 
weeks at which literary topics of in-. 
terest will be presented and discussed 
by members of the faculty and others 
who may participate from time to 
time. Arrangements are being made 
for a speaker to address an open 
meeting of the Ibis in the near future. 
Two new members were elected and 
will be initiated at the next meeting 
of the club which will be held at the 
Sigma Nu house, Friday, October 22. 

At the above meeting an interesting 
talk was given by Morse '21 on the 
poet, Louis Untermeyer, and several 
of the poet's poems were read in a 
charming manner. The discussion of 
this author was particularly of inter- 
est because of the reader's acquaint- 
ance with him. During the evening 
refreshments were served, helping to 
diversify the evening's program, and 
when the meeting finally adjourned, 
it was voted one of the . best of its 
kind ever spent at Bowdoin. 



First Y. M. C. A. Meeting 

Last Friday night the Y. M. C. A. 
held its first meeting of the year, 
when Fay Campbell, Yale '18, ad- 
dressed a number of students as- 
sembled in Hubbard Hall. Mr. Camp- 
bell spoke on the choosing of a life 
work and in particular of his own 
choice. McGown '21 presided over the 
meeting. 



PAYMENT OF TUITION. 

As recently announced, fifty dollars 
of the annual tuition fee must be paid 
before November 1; fifty more before 
March 1; and the balance with pay- 
ment of the June term-bill. 



150 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



AMHERST WINS 13-0 

(Continued from page 149) 

Amherst's 5-yard line, only to be held 
on downs at the last minute. A num- 
ber of successful forwards helped ma- 
terially in Bowdoin's gains. Some of 
them were from A. Morrell to Smith, 
and others from Smith to Mason. 

At one time Morrell threw a long 
pass for Parent, but Amherst inter- 
fered with the Bowdoin end when he 
had a touchdown practically assured. 
The pass carried about forty yards, 
and Amherst was penalized ten yards 
more for the interference. 

Dahlgren, Bisson, and McCurdy 
were the three important losses to 
the team for this game. Captain 
Dudgeon moved over from guard to 
centre in place of McCurdy. In the 
backfleld, M. E. Morrell '24 showed up 
very well for his first start this sea- 
son. He played an excellent de- 
fensive game. 

For Amherst, Card, Brisk, and Zink 
proved to be the best ground gainers. 
Smith and A. Morrell played well for 
Bowdoin, the latter's punting being 
a strong factor in Bowdoin's play. His 
punts carried fifty yards on the' aver- 
age. 

In another column of this issue of 
the "Orient" are first-hand facts con- 
cerning the Bowdoin team alone. It 
is interesting here to note that Maine 
and Bates were easily defeated by 
teams not especially strong, while 
Colby did not play. The Massachu- 
setts Aggies are not thought to have 
as good a team as Amherst, and they 
beat Bates with ease. Although 
Maine by a fluke got the jump on 
Brown, the Providence team had no 
trouble in accumulating five touch- 
downs. 

As for the Trinity game, that 
ought to be a close battle, since both 
Bowdoin and Trinity had the same 
scores with Amherst. Wesleyan beat 
Trinity 20 to last Saturday, so ap- 
parently Trinity has made no par- 
ticular improvement. 

The summary of the Amherst game 
follows: 

AMHERST— —BOWDOIN 

Davidson, le re.. Gibbons 

Clapp, It rt., Turner 

rt. t Wagg 

Clark, lg rg„ Putnam 

Leets, lg rg., G. E. Davis 

Palmer, c c, Dudgeon 



Roberts, rt It., Mas;n 

It., Eames 

Worcester, rg lg., Haines 

Williams, re le.. Parent 

Zink, qb qb.. Smith 

Card, lhb rhb.. M. E. Morrell 

Brisk, rhb lhb., A. E. Morrell 

Gillson, rhb lhb.. Woodbury 

Murnane, fb f b.. Miller 

Wing, fb ib.. H. F. Morrill 

Score ty quarters : 12 3 4 

Amherst 7 6 — 13 

Bowdoin — 

Touchdowns, Davidscn, Brisk. Goal from 
touchdown, Zink. Referee, Keagan. Umpire, 
Murphy. Head linesman, Burke. Time, four 
12-minute periods. 



THE 1920 FOOT- 
BALL SITUATION 

By Coach Greene. 

A college football team is a part 
of the student body, consequently the 
students should be back of the team 
and in close touch with it. It is de- 
plorable that secret practise is neces- 
sary for it keeps the team isolated 
from its backers. However, we all 
know that it is necessary for we must 
perfect a machine by keeping our 
style of play from our opponents. 

You have a right to know your 
team is progressing and what chance 
it has of producing. The purpose of 
this article is to put you in touch 
with the situation. 

Most of you know that the ma- 
terial is light and inexperienced. In 
fact Bowdoin will be represented by 
the lightest team in eight years. Ten 
letter men graduated and two others 
are not out for the team for other 
reasons. Only four letter men are on 
the squad and the remainder of the 
first string men must be developed and 
injected into the machine. This 
means that a large part of the avail- 
able time must be spent on funda- 
mentals before advanced team work 
can be perfected. 

Our material is not composed of 
prep school stars. This is due prin- 
cipally to the high standard of the 
College. Consequently, the players 
must be developed from men who 
have very little football experience 
but who have as their stock in trade, 
red blood and fight. Many of the 
candidates are upper-classmen who 
are new to the squad. They were in- 
experienced men when the season 
opened. 



Despite handicaps the team is im- 
proving in condition, fight, and in its 
knowledge of the game. If this fight 
is sufficiently developed nothing is im- 
possible, for a fighting team is a 
tough proposition for experienced 
l: ams of greater weight. 

If we are to succeed, we must out- 
fight our opponents. To attain a real 
fighting team, several things are 
necessary, as follows: 

1. Training of the highest type. 

2. Attention to instructions. 

3. Keeping our football secrets in 
the squad. 

4. Promptness and thoroughness in 
our routine work. 

5. Backing, of student body. . 

6. By frowning on tampering with 
squad by people who are not in touch 
with the situation. 

7. Untiring work of management 
and coaching staff. 

If the above points are worked out 
properly, we should place a good 
team on the field; and we will all 
know that we have done our best. 

We will now consider the various 
points, and see where we are falling 
down; then see what we can do to im- 
prove the situation. 

1. The members of the squad should 
be a little more careful of training 
rules. The men should be in bed 
early to store up reserve energy, and 
they should also eat a proper amount 
regularly and keep away from junk 
between meals. 

The first team can only be success- 
ful if we maintain a good second 
team. Some men on the second team 
realize that they have no chance this 
season, but they are real fighters so 
they give the best they have. The 
men with the real ability sometimes 
fall behind them in this respect. Thus 
far this season some sixty men have 
signed up for football. We have 
never had over forty men at one time. 
At present our squad numbers forty. 
Fourteen men have quit after one day 
or after a week or more. On account 
of desertion and injuries we have only 
about twenty-four men per day fit for 
practise. To produce we must have a 
squad of at least thirty men in con- 
dition to play every day. 

2. When practise is on we should 
have no visiting by men of the squad. 
Unless strict attention is paid some 
valuable point will be missed and it 
may be fatal in one of the big games. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



151 



3. Men of the football squad must 
not spread information either around 
fraternities, at home, or outside, con- 
cerning injuries, good and bad points 
of various men or matters pertaining 
to the system of play. 

4. Some members of the squad are 
late to practise and the same men do 
not execute their part in a play. This 
is a serious drawback to our success. 

5. Some of the new men are apt 
to be influenced by outsiders unless 
they are warned. Avoid the busy 
body who tells you that things are 
going wrong and that he would do so 
and so. If you have any brains you 
must realize that, unless one is in 
touch with you every day he cannot 
tell how to develop you into a ma- 
chine. Avoid people of this nature, 
for they are only trying to disrupt 
your team. Some of the townspeople 
who have business on the campus are 
offenders in this respect. Treat them 
with contempt, for they are not your 
real friends. 

6. The student body can have a big 
part in the success or failure of the 
team. Public opinion is a big feature. 
If you by your actions make mani- 
fest how little regard you have for 
people that should be out for foot- 
ball and who either didn't go out or 
who quit after a short time, you will 
help a lot in straightening out that 
phase of the situation. 

You can also, by refusing to listen 
or by direct action, do away with the 
disturbing element. This matter 
would be of small moment, if the 
propaganda did not work on freshmen 
who are inexperienced. 

You can also assist by keeping the 
fraternity houses quiet the night be- 
fore a big game so that the men can 
sleep. And also by not talking foot- 
ball to them from Friday noons until 
after Saturday's game. We do not 
talk football from Friday's practise 
until the game commences. 

If you do not do these things, you 
have no right to criticise the team, 
for you are falling down on your por- 
tion of the job. And if every one 
does his best we cannot kick, win or 
lose. 

7. If we know that you are with 
the team and that you realize that 
the management and the coaching 
staff are trying to put over a winner, 
I am sure that you will find that we 
are able on our part to do our best 



and that Bowdoin will be represented 
by a fast, hard fighting football team. 



In addition to the "dope" given out 
by Coach Greene, we have the fol- 
lowing from Trinity regarding the 
game next Saturday: 

Trinity expects to dispose of Bow- 
doin only after a hard battle. After 
the Wesleyan game Coach Red Lam- 
berton, who was All-American end on 
Princeton in 1916, said that the 
Trinity team was not yet satisfactory 
and that it needed a lot more practise 
to get it running smoothly. Scrim- 
mage was planned for four days this 
week, the team leaving for Maine on 
Friday. The line did not show up 
as well as was hoped for in the 
Wesleyan game and a new center will 
probably be developed for the Bow- 
doin game. Brill started the season 
at that position but gave way to 
Wright in the Wesleyan game and 
now Hicks will probably get a chance. 
Hicks is a veteran but did not show 
up very well in the early practise. 
Changes in the ends are also likely. 
ROBERT D. BYRNES, 

Managing Editor, Trinity "Tripod." 



Bowdoin's Strong Men 

(Continued from page 149) 

colleges in the country. His total 
strength was 1716.5 kilograms. While 
in college Godfrey was captain of the 
'99 varsity track team, the winners of 
the New England Intercollegiate 
Meet, and he held the record in the 
shot-put for the New England col- 



Another member of Godfrey's class 
in college, the Hon. Walter B. Clarke 
of Worcester, Mass., former Maine 
State Senator and Councilor to the 
Governor, figured his total strength at 
1520. Clarke was a varsity track man, 
winning the point in the pole-vault 
which gave Bowdoin first place in the 
New England Intercollegiate • Meet. 
He was also captain of the football 
team. 

The report of the ten leading strong 
men of the college this year is as 
follows : The results are given in kilo- 
grams, and the approximate weights 
may be obtained by multiplying by 
two and one fifth. 

Glenn V. Butler '23, Farmington, 
Me., age 19, total strength 1120.8, 



strength of lungs 18, strength of back 
270, strength of legs 600, strength of 
upper arms 121.5, strength of fore 
arms 111.3. 

Rupert G. Johnson '24, Brownfield, 
Me., age 18, total strength 1011.38, 
strength of lungs 18, strength of 
back 260, strength of legs 480, 
strength of upper arm 143.88, strength 
of fore arms 109.5. 

Waldo R. Flinn '22, Island Falls, 
Me., age 20, total strength 990.14, 
strength of lungs 15.5, strength of 
back 230, strength of legs 495, 
strength of upper arms 138.94; 
strength of fore arms 112.7. 

Elvin F. Towne '23, East Parsons- 
field, Me., age 20, total strength 953.1, 
strength of lungs 20, strength of 
back 240, strength of legs 380, 
strength of upper arms 189.5, 
strength of fore arms 123.6. 

George E. Davis '23, Freeport, Me., 
age 25, total strength 942.89, strength 
of lungs 19, strength of back 160; 
strength of legs 360, strenth of upper 
arms 294.8, strength of fore arms 
109.09. 

F| Delmont Tootell '23, Salem, 
N. H., aged 18, total strength 937.36, 
strength of lungs 21, strength of back 
220, strength of legs 430, strength of 
upper arms 105.E6, strength of fore 
arms 160.4. 

Paul C. Marston '21, Brownfield, 
Me., age 20, total strength 931.9, 
strength of lungs 13, strength of back 
270, strength of legs 360, strength of 
upper arms 136, strength of fore arms 
112.9. 

Frederic M. Gross '23, Orland, Me., 
age 17, total strength 921.72, strength 
of lungs 12, strength of back 240, 
strength of legs 360, strength of upper 
arms 168.82, strength of fore arms 
140.9. 

George T. Davis '23, Portland, Me., 
age 18, total strength 914.85, strength 
of lungs 13, strength of back 240, 
strength of legs 445, strength of upper 
arms 108.75, strength of fore arms 
98.1. 

Standish Perry '22, Rockland, Me., 
age 21, total strength 909.26, strength 
of lungs 17, strength of back 205, 
strength of legs 395, strength of upper 
arms 162.72, strength of fore arms 
129.54. 

Following is the report of the ten 
strongest men of the class of 1924: 

R. G. Johnson, 1011.38; J. R. Kirk- 
patrick, Jr., 876.6; G. E. Thomas, 



152 



B0WD0I N ORIENT 



855.4; C. J. Bouffard, 814.27; D. D. 
Needelman, 810.7; T. L. C. Burnell. 
809.07; J. R. Ervin, 790.15; G. S. G.'l- 
patrick, 781.22; T. L. Petting'll, 
772.95; C. B. Clavin, 755.52. 



Report of the Manager of 
the Masque and Gown 

Season of 1920. 
Receipts 

Balance from H. S. Cole $41.60 

From Saturday Club for use of prop- 
erties 2.45 

Guarantee from Portland 60.00 

Meals paid for by Portland Y. D. Club 3.20 

Ticket refunded by M. C. R. R .90 

Refund from Walter Baker Co 2.20 

Guarantee from Augusta 120.00 

Guarantee from Freeport 60.00 

Guarantee from Westbrook 75.00 

Ivy Play ticket sale 349.60 

Money order 1.41 

Pictures sold to members of the cost.. 13.85 

Commencement play ticket sale 332.00 



FRESHMEN WIN SECOND GAME OF 

INTERCLASS SERIES BY SCORE OF 5-2 



Game Was Well Played — Clavin and Wing Pitched. 



Total $1,062.21 

Expenditures — Ivy Play 

Coach, i salary paid previously 

Royalty 

Hire of Cumberland Theatre 

Orchestra 

Scene shifters 

Costumes hired 

Costumes bought 

Advertising, printing programs, 

tickets, etc 

Railroad fares on trips 

Meals on trips 

Trucking 

Make up 

Properties 

Laundry and wigs dressed 

Commencement Play 

Coach 

Costumes hired 

Orchestra and moving- of piano 

Work of college carpenters on seats 

and scenery 

Wigs hired 

Seamstress' work 

Play books 

Commission to Chandler for ticket sell- 



$60.00 
100.00 
40.00 
20.00 
12.00 
14.00 
30.35 

102.8E 
78.91 
20.95 

12.75 
5.17 
7.77 



100.00 
50.67 
25.00 

43.50 
8.00 
3.75 
5.00 



On the Delta, Wednesday, the®. 
Freshmen won the second game of 
the annual interclass series in a very 
decisive manner. The 1924 team 
came through to the tune of 5 to 2, 
principally through the superb hurl- 
ing of the Freshman pitcher, Clavin. 
He had the upper-classmen guessing 
throughout the game. The fielding of 
the Freshmen was far better than 
their rather weak showing in the 
initial game of the series. 

The Freshmen started things in the 
first inning when they pushed two 
runs across. 

Clavin held the Sophomores down 
until the fourth inning, when a hit 
and an error let two runs in. In the 
latter half of the same inning, how- 
ever, Wing weakened and was hit 
freely. With two men on base, Put- 
nam '24, knocked a screaming double 
to left field, and drove in both run- 
ners. 

In the fifth inning, with three 
Freshmen on base and one out, Wing 
pulled his team out of a bad hole, in 
fine style, by striking out two men in 
succession. Both pitchers tightened 
after this inning, and zeros marked 
the score by innings for both teams 
thereafter. 

The teams played seven innings. 
The work of Hill '23 and Needelman 
'24 was noticeable both on the field 
and at the bat. A fair crowd wit- 
nessed the game. 



ing 



General Expenses 

Bugle cut 8.00 

Stationery 5.90 

Pictures of cast, sold later 13.85 

Cuts for advertising 2.00 

Express 9.55 

Postage 3.91 

Telephone calls 2.60 

Telegrams 1.25 

Typewriter work 2.90 

Rubber stamps, paste, receipt book, 

and trunk strap 3.50 



Total $806.40 

Balance in bank on deposit 255.81 

Outstanding bills, none. 



Total $1,062.21 

KARL R. PHILBRICK. 



GOLF TOURNAMENT 

The following pairings have been 
drawn up for the autumn handicap 
golf tournament, in which eighteen 
holes, medal play, will be played: 

Handicap 

Fogg '22 24 

Keniston '24 26 

Merrill '24 26 

Thomas '22 14 

Perkins '21 14 

Richards '22 10 

Ryder '21 24 

Stack '22 18 

Pendexter '21 16 

Pickard '22 14 

Toyokawa '21 14 

Additional entries can be made this 
week, and applications should be made 
to Perkins '21 or Toyokawa '21. 



A Common Bond. 

The new cook, who had come into 
the household during the holiday, 
asked her mistress: "Where bane 
your son? I am not seeing him 
around no more?" 

"My son?" replied the mistress 
pridefully. "Oh! he has gone back to 
Yale. He could only get away long 
enough to stay until New Year's day, 
you see. I miss him dreadfully, 
though." 

"Yas. I know yoost how you feel. 
My broder, he ban in yail six times 
since Thanksgiving." — Exchange. 



Saturday Football Scores 

Bowdoin 0, Amherst 13. 

Maine 7, Brown 32. 

Bates 7, Massachusetts A. C. 21. 

Harvard 21, Valparaiso 0. 

Yale 21, University of North Caro- 
lina 0. 

Boston College 20, Fordham 0. 

Columbia 14, New York University 
7. 

New Hampshire State 7, Boston 
University 0. 

Wesleyan 20, Trinity 0. 

Navy 12, Lafayette 7. 

Wisconsin 27, Michigan Aggies 0. 

Williams 35, Union 0. 

Cornell 55, St. Bonaventure 7. 

Syracuse 45, Johns Hopkins 0. 

Norwich 7, Rensselaer P. I. 0. 

U. of Pennsylvania 21, Swarthmore 
0. 

Princeton 35, Maryland State 0. 

Penn. State 14, Dartmouth 7. 

Worcester P. I. 9, Connecticut A. C. 
6. 

Army 35, Middlebury 0. 

Lehigh 9, Rutgers 0. 

Colgate 7, Allegheny 7. 

Vermont 7, Tufts 0. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



153 



COBURN CLASSICAL 

IS LUCKY TO WIN 



Bowdoin Second Smashes Coburn's 
Defence in Last Period — Phillips 
Scores for Bowdoin on Re- 
covered Fumble. 



On Whittier Field, last Saturday, 
Coburn Classical won from Bowdoin 
Second in a hard fought game. Coburn 
came through with a score of 9 to 6. 

The Waterville team had all the 
weight in its favor, and throughout 
the first half their backs went through 
the Bowdoin line repeatedly for long 
gains. Practically all their plays 
were straight football, although they 
worked one forward pass in the sec- 
ond period which netted thirty-five 
yards. Bowdoin, however, held on the 
12-yard line and Sutti dropped back, 
kicking a field goal from the 20-yard 
line. 

In the first period Bowdoin was un- 
able to stop the heavier backs of 
Coburn's team. In the first few 
minutes of play, DeRoche went 
through on a center plunge for a gain 
of forty-five yards. It looked like a 
touchdown, but Keene brought him to 
earth on Bowdoin's 10-yard line. 
Shortly after this, Comolli carried the 
ball across for a touchdown. Levee 
missed the goal.' 

The second half, however, told a 
different story. Coburn was unable 
to gain consistently in the third 
period, and the ball wavered back and 
forth in midfield. Bowdoin worked a 
pretty forward pass in this period for 
fifteen yards. 

In the last period Coburn began to 
slow up. Starting in midfield, Phillips, 
McCrum, and Whitney rushed the ball 
through Coburn's line for gains of 
four to five yards at a time. Bowdoin 
rushed the ball to Coburn's 9-yard 
line, when the ball was fumbled. Phil- 
lips jumped for it and ran across the 
line for a score. Levee blocked his 
try for a goal. Phillips was in- 
jured in this play and had to be taken 
from the game. Gross, who played a 
fine game at guard, was also removed 
in this period. 

Bowdoin was rushing the ball again 
from midfield when time was called. 
Had there been a few more minutes 
of play the Second team would un- 
doubtedly have scored again. 



There was a lot of slugging in the 
game. Coburn was twice spoken to 
for coaching from the side lines. They 
were also penalized fifteen yards in 
the second period for unnecessary 
roughness. 

The summary: 

Coburn Classical — — Bowdoin Second 

Fravega, le re., Bates 

Sutti, le re.. Burgess 

Whitfield, It rt., Keene 

Hascell, lg r g„ Pierce 

Kittredge, lg r g., Ball 

Carnegie, c c ., Parsons 

Wolstenholme, rg lg„ Gross 

Pierpont, rg lg., Williams 

Goodrich, rt It., Clifford 

Gagon, re l e ., Philbrook 

le., Bates 

Levee, qb qb., Badger 

Sutti, lhb rhb„ Phillips 

Fravega, lhb rhb., Jacob 

Comolli, rhb lhb., McCrum 

DeRoche, fb fb„ Whitney 

Touchdowns, Comolli, Phillips. Field goal, 
Sutti. Referee, Sawyer. Umpire, McCurdy 
'22. Linesman, Dahlgren '22. Time, two 12 
and two 10-minute periods. 



Granger, George B., Rockville, N. Y. 

Guptill, Plimpton, Topsham, Me. 

King, Leopold F., Waterville, Me. 

LeStrange, William H., Brooklyn. 
N. Y. 

Ogden, Ralph T., Springvale, Me. 

Provost, Adolphe J., Auburn, Me. 

Ryan, Terence C, Millinocket, Me. 

Sawyer, Edmund Ellis, Hackensack, 
N. J. 

Sealand, Evars F., Bangor, Me. 

Sleeper, Francis H., Houlton, Me. 

Sweatt, Linwood Austin, Brunswick, 
Me. 

Sylvester, Alan Whitney, Portland, 
Me. 

White, Wendell J., Portland, Me. 

Young, John G., Paris, Texas. 



Ye Joke Editor — Inspiration, in- 
spiration, where shall I find she? 

Bored Stude — Well, they are hold- 
ing the Glee Club trials in the music 
room. 



OPENING OF THE 

MEDICAL SCHOOL 

The hundred and first annual course 
of instruction in the Bowdoin Medi- 
cal School opened this week with a 
total registration of forty-eight. The 
number of entering students this year 
is twenty-eight, an increase of eight 
over the enrolment last year. 

Graduates and under-graduates 
alike feel keenly the loss of Dr. Fred- 
eric Henry Gerrish, M.D., LL.D., of 
Portland. Dr. Gerrish has been close- 
ly connected with the Medical School 
for over fifty years. 

The new first year men are: 

Bachulus, John M., New Britain, 
Conn. 

Bagdikian, Paul Garabed, South 
Berwick, Me. 

Beliveau, Romeo Albert, Lewiston, 
Me. 

Brown, Lewis W., Skowhegan, Me. 

Cook, Edward M., York Village, Me. 

Curtis, Harry Lester, Topsham, Me. 

Daviau, Arthur R., Waterville, Me. 

Dolce, James A., Long Island City, 
N. Y. 

Fagone, Francis A., Portland, Me. 

Farnham, Raymond K., Shoreham, 
Vt. 

Ferrara, Anthony W., Long Island 
City, N. Y. 

Goldberg, Louis E., Portland, Me. 

Gosselin, Raoul F., Lewiston, Me. 



Prof.— What is the difference be- 
tween a salon and a saloon? 

Junior — A salon is a drawing- 
room. 

Prof. — Yes, and a saloon ? 

Junior — Oh, a saloon is a draught- 
ing-room. 



English as she is spoke in the 
nursery: "Mamma, can a girl marry 
a boy she is older than?"— Life. 



Question of Judgment. 

Bill — Do you think betting is 
wrong ? 

John— Well, the way I bet generally 
is. — Minnesota Foolscap. 



Prof-— Gentlemen, I am dismissing 
you ten minutes early today. Please 
go out quietly so as not to wake the 
other classes. — Record. 



How Could He? 

Actor (in Richard III)— A horse! 
A horse! My kingdom for a horse! 

Ford Agent (in audience) — How 
perfectly absurd! — Harvard Lampoon. 



Ancient Accidents. 

Prof. — What happened to Babylon ? 
Fresh.— It fell. 

Prof. — What happened to Tyre? 
Fresh. — It was punctured. — Ex- 
change. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Norman W. Haines '21 Editor-in-Chief 

Edward B. Ham *22 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Floyd A. Gerrard '23 Athletics 

Karl R. Philbrick '23 Faculty Notes 

George H. Quinby '23 Alumni Department 

F. King Turgeon '23 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

John L. Berry '21 Crosby E. Redman '21 

Harry Helson '21 Frank A. St. Clair '21 

George E. Houghton '21 William R. Ludden '22 
Russell M. McGown '21 Virgil C. McGorrill '22 
Roland L. McCormack '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. Boardman '21 .. Business Manager 

Wilfred R. Brewer '22 Assistant Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
he addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions. $2.00 
per year, in advance. . Single copies. 10 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials; the Managing Editor 
for the news department; and the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 



Vol. L. October 13, 1920. No. 14 



Entered at Post Offici 
Second-Class Mail Matter. 



A Timely Warning. 

In this issue of the "Orient" ap- 
pears a signed article by Coach 
Greene in regard to the football situ- 
ation. The editorial department of 
the "Orient" wishes to announce that 
it is absolutely back of Coach Greene 
and his staff in their efforts to turn 
out a first-class football team. We 
are sure that the student body will 
take to heart Coach Greene's sug- 
gestions and will follow them out to 
the letter. We believe all loyal Bow- 
doin men will rally to the support of 
coach and trainer in getting behind 
the eleven. 

The "Orient" wishes to stress in 
particular one point made by Coach 
Greene. This is in reference to per- 
sons not connected with the team or 
with the College making comment on 
the condition and coaching of the 
squad. Such persons do constitute 
and have in the past constituted a 
constant menace to Bowdoin teams. 
Their influence may best be counter- 
acted, as Coach Greene intimates, by 
public opinion emphatically asserted. 
Those Freshmen and others who have 
been credulous enough to pay any at- 
tention to ill-founded gossip that has 



as its aim injury to the team will 
take warning from Coach Greene's 
article and this editorial. Men of 
Bowdoin, get behind the team and put 
it "over the top." 



Commencement Speakers. 

The new method of choosing Com- 
mencement speakers recently adopted 
by vote of the faculty committee ap- 
pointed by President Sills to investi- 
gate the matter, should recommend 
itself very highly to Bowdoin men. 
It has always been the desire of both 
the faculty and student body to have 
the best speakers and writers of the 
graduating class deliver the Com- 
mencement parts, in view of the fact 
that these exhibitions represent the 
best in undergraduate intellectual 
activity. Anything that promises to 
excite more interest and furnish more 
incentive to the men chosen to com- 
pete for a place on the Commence- 
ment program deserves a fair trial 
and hearty support, even though the 
number of men who can now compete 
has been largely reduced. And it is 
in this phase of the new scheme that 
its excellence lies. 

The six men who are chosen by the 
faculty committee to write Commence- 
ment parts will feel more interested, 
more certain, and more stimulated in 
their task than the twenty or thirty 
odd who were formerly asked to 
write. The individual was lost in the 
mass when many were compelled to 
prepare a dissertation, often when 
some of the men had little or no in- 
terest in writing on a suitable sub- 
ject. 

The sense of individual initiative, 
of personal responsibility, will now 
come into play and elicit the best that 
is in the men whom the faculty com- 
mittee will choose. 

There can be little doubt that the 
faculty will be able to pick men who 
will finally shape up to the high stand- 
ard already achieved in past Com- 
mencement exercises. Yet there are 
men who can write and speak who are 
not 'the best scholars nor have they 
achieved much distinction in lines 
that would lead the faculty to decide 
on them. Often a "dark horse" will 
carry off a '68 or Commencement 
prize and for this reason it is recom- 
mended that any students may be al- 
lowed to write and be given a hearing 
who wish to do so, in order that if 



there is any material that has escaped 
faculty recognition when the six are 
chosen, it may have a chance to show 
itself. H. H. 



The tennis report of 1920 has not 
yet been audited and is still incom- 
plete. The editors regret that the re- 
port as printed in a recent issue of 
the "Orient" was inserted prema- 
turely. 



Campus I3ctos 

The trials for the Glee Club are 
completed and the list of those chosen 
for the first rehearsal has been pub- 
lished on the bulletin board. 

The following men have been or- 
dered to report for this rehearsal, 
which is to be held in the Music Room 
tomorrow (Thursday) at 4.15: First 
tenors, Sprince '20 (Medic-'23), Nixon 
'21, Reiber '21, Black '23, Reed '23, 
Dow '24; second tenors: Butler '22, 
Ricker '22, Woodbury '22, Tibbitts '22, 
M. P. Chandler '23, Kimball '23, Mc- 
Mennamin '24; first basses: Ryder '21, 
Tuttle '21, Brewer '22, Mitchell '23, 
E. B. Perkins '23, Grenfell '24; second 
basses: Dudgeon '21, Smiley '21, Cong- 
don '22, Ferris '22, Renier '23, Sulli- 
van '23, Turgeon '23, Baldwin '24, 
Rowe '24. 

During the past week several new 
men have been admitted to the col- 
lege: Webster W. White of Jones- 
port, to the Freshman class; L. 
Doheity of Woburn, Mass., to the 
Sophomore class; W. F. Muir of 
Brunswick, and P. J. Landry of Fair- 
field, as special students. 

The author of the popular Broad- 
way farce, "Parlor, Bedroom, and 
Bath," recently shown at the Cum- 
berland theatre, is C. W. Bell, brother 
of Professor Herbert C. Bell. 

Zeitler '20 was on the campus last 
Saturday. 

Saturday, October 16, the day of 
the Trinity game and also of the fra- 
ternity initiations, will be observed as 
a holiday. There will be no mid- 
week holiday. 



"Which is the best and cheapest 
way to feed chicks? Should I pur- 
chase chick feed or mix myself?" — 
From "The Ask Questions Column for 
Maine Farmers" of the "Lewiston 
Journal." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



155 



Richan '20 was on the campus last 
week. 

Eben T. Freeman '85 of Portland 
was on the campus last week. 

E. W. Cook '17, who is now travel- 
ing for Blake Bros, of Boston, was on 
the campus last Tuesday. 

The Harding and Coolidge buttons 
have arrived, and may be secured from 
Badger '21, president of the Bowdoin 
Republican Club, The Republican 
Club hopes to have a rally in Me- 
morial Hall on the evening of Oc- 
tober 21. 

Seward J. Marsh '10 was on the 
campus last Tuesday. 

A. B. Cassidy '24 has left college 
and returned to his home in Cam- 
bridge. 

Now that the hunting season has 
opened, Jack Magee has the track men 
out on hare-and-hound chases — no 
rabbits bagged as yet. 

The tennis court in the rear of 
Winthrop Hall has been weeded and 
is now ready for use. (Thanks from 
the A. D. Freshmen.) 

Demuth '20 was on the campus last 
week. 

Lawrence J. Hart '16, principal of 
Limestone High School, was on the 
campus last Wednesday. 

Tryouts for upper-classmen for the 
musical club were held Wednesday, 
October 6. 

Incomplete registration figures 
from Columbia University indicate 
that their enrolment this year will 
exceed 31,000, a gain of over 35 per- 
cent, over last year. Columbia will 
then be the largest educational insti- 
tution in the world. Their enrolment 
at the past summer session was over 
10,000, the largest in the history of 
the university. 

Many alumni are expected back to 
attend the initiation ceremonies of the 
various fraternities and also to attend 
the Bowdoin-Trinity game, both of 
which events come Saturday. 

The Sophomore class held a meet- 
ing for the election of officers in 
Memorial Hall, Wednesday, October 
6. At this meeting Casimir A. Bisson 
was elected president; Abiel M. Smith, 
vice-president; and James E. Mitchell, 
secretary-treasurer. 

Dow '24 and Patterson '24 have 
come out for assistant manager of the 
Masque and Gown. 

Thursday noon a meeting of the 
Board of Managers was held in the 



Library at which the division of the 
blanket tax was discussed. Owing to 
the smaller enrolment of students this 
year, increases in cost of materials, 
and advanced railroad fares, the ath- 
letic teams and organizations which 
are dependent for their support on 
the tax are hard pressed for funds. 
Therefore every man who has not yet 
paid his blanket tax should do so at 
once in order that Bowdoin activities 
may not suffer. 

A. B. Sullivan '19 was on the 
campus Tuesday. 

Lyman A. Cousins '02 was on the 
campus Wednesday. 

In an authoritative work on "Attic 
Red-Figured Vases in American 
Museums" by J. D. Beazley (Oxford), 
of which there is a copy in the 
Library, certain treasures of our Bow- 
doin art collections are noted: "The 
pleasing Bowdoin Eye-cup;" the 
psykter vase-form of which only four 
are in America; "the one in Bowdoin 
College is black all over; black 
psykters are very rare;" a small 
cylindrical box referred to as the 
"Bowdoin Box," of a period when the 
"archaic style had reached its full de- 
velopment." There are reproductions 
of two Bowdoin lekythoi vases (one 
very like an example in New York) 
and others are cited. Edward Warren, 
one of the two collectors to whom 
this volume is dedicated, is the donor 
of many of Bowdoin's art treasures. 

Mason '20 was on the campus this 
week, Sunday. 

New heads of institutions to be 
seen this academic year are Frederick 
C. Hicks, University of Cincinnati; 
William W. Henderson, Brigham 
Young College; John E. Cousins, Tufts 
College; H. M. Gage, Coe College; 
Harry W. Chase, University of North 
Carolina; and F. W. Hixsen, Alle- 
gheny College. 



Assignments in 
History and Economics 

Beginning with this issue, the 
"Orient" plans to include from now 
on the weekly assignments in the de- 
partments of History and Govern' 
ment and of Economics and Sociolog5 . 
The assignments in these non- 
technical subjects provide an excellent 
course of reading for anyone in- 
terested in them, and it is thought 



that the "Orient" will be a much 
easier means of reference than the 
bulletin board in the Library for stu- 
dents taking courses in these depart- 
ments. 



EUROPE SINCE 1815. 
(History 7) 

October 18. Lecture VII: At- 
tempts of the Bourbons to crush 
Liberalism in France 1815-1830. 

October 20. Lecture VIII. The 
Revolutions of 1830 (The Triumph of 
Liberalism in France and Belgium: 
its Defeat in Russian Poland). 

Reading: Hazen, pp. 66-113. 



ENGLISH HISTORY. 
(History V) 

Oct. 18. Lecture VII. Relation of 
England and the Continent before the 
Norman Conquest. 

Oct. 20. Lecture VIII. The Nor- 
man Conquest. 

Reading: Cheyney, Short History of 
England, pp. 85-113. Cheyney, Read- 
ings in English History, Nos. 51, 55, 
56, 64, 65, 66, 67. 



ENGLISH HISTORY. 
(History V) 

Oct. 11. Lecture V. Anglo-Saxon 
Institutions. Part I. 

Oct. 13. Lecture VI. Anglo-Saxon 
Institutions. Part II. 

Reading: Cheyney, Short History 
of England, pp. 71-83. Cheyney, 
Readings in English History, Nos. 40, 
43, 45, 46, 47. 

In addition each student will read 
one of the following: Green, Short 
History of England, ch. I, sections 5 
and 6. Green, The Making of Eng- 
land, pp. 371-396. Green, Conquest 
of England, ch. IV. Ramsay, Founda- 
tions of England, Vol. I, chs. XVII- 
XIX inclusive. Draper, Alfred the 
Great, pp. 1-87. Plummer, Alfred the 
Great, pp. 69-143. Hodgkin, History 
of England, pp. 273-314. Besant, 
Story of King Alfred, pp. 51-207. 
Traill, Social England, Vol. I, pp. 193- 
228. Beard, Introduction to the Eng- 
lish Historians, Part I, chs. IV, VI. 
Oman, England Before the Norman 
Conquest, chs. XXII, XXIII. 



GOVERNMENT 1 AND 2. 

C. Public documents and reports. 

1. Author (Government). 2. Title. 

3. Date of issue. Example: Congres- 



156 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



sional Record, 60 Cong., 2 Session 
(1909), # pp. 3560-3570. 

Fifth. Organization. The wording 
of the subject often suggests a 
method of organizing the report. For 
the subject "Give the purpose, chief 
provisions, and results of the Esch- 
Cummins Bill," the report should be 
organized into three parts, (1) the 
purpose, (2) chief provisions, (3) re- 
sults. Group editorials dealing with 
the purpose of the bill under one, and 
those dealing with the results under 
three. 

If no plan is suggested by the 
wording of the subject, organize the 
report yourself. Example: "The 
Jury." (1) When used, (2) Number 
of jurors, (3) How jurors are selected, 
(4) The trial, (5) The verdict, (6) 
The importance of the jury, (7) Criti- 
cism of the system. 

Sixth. Library aids and materials. 

Handle library materials carefully. 
This applies especially to the India 
paper Britannica, the bulky New York 
Times volumes and bound periodicals 
in general. Do not remove any of the 
aids to a different part of the library. 

Do not take out of the library (ex- 
cept for over night) any of the peri- 
odical articles that are needed for 
writing up the report. Others need 
to use the same sources. 

Seventh. If you cannot find books, 
periodicals, etc., in their proper places 
consult a library assistant. Do not 
consult anyone for aid in finding your 
material until you have searched dili- 
gently for it yourself. One of the 
chief objects of these reports is to 
train you in finding material. 



GOVERNMENT 1-2. 

V. Newspapers. 

1. New York Times. 

2. New York Tribune. 

3. Springfield Republican. 

4. Chicago Tribune. 

5. Christian Science Monitor. 

6. Boston Transcript. 

7. Boston Herald. 

8. Boston Globe. 

9. Boston Post. 

10. London Times. 

11. Maine papers. 

VI. Books on Reserve Shelves. 

VII. Bureau of Research in Mu- 
nicipal Government. 



ASSIGNMENTS IN ECONOMICS 
WEEK OF OCT. 17. 

Economics 1. Topic: Land. Seager, 
ch. viii; Materials, ch. iii. Special 
topic for conferences. The Price of 
Sugar. 

Economics 9. Topic: Administra- 
tion, Jones, ch. vii, viii. 



ECONOMICS 5, WEEK OF OCT. 17 

Read: Blackmar and Gillin, pp. 82- 
111. 

Also read two or more of the fol- 
lowing selections: 

Thomas, W. I. Source Book for 
Social Origins, Introduction, pp. 3-26. 

Bristol, L. M. Social Adaptation, 
pp. 155-161. 

Woodworth, R. S. Dynamic Psy- 
chology, Chap. 3. 

Thorndike, E. L. The Original 
Nature of Men, pp. 1-15. 

Ellwood, C. A. Sociology in its 
Psychological Aspects, pp. 199-246. 



jfacultp H3otes 

In "School Life" for September 15, 
there was an article regarding a con- 
ference of English professors at the 
University of London held last July. 
Professor Davis was named as one of 
seventeen American professors who 
attended the conference. 

President Sills has recently been 
elected a member of the advisory 
board of the English Speaking Union, 
of which the Hon. James Balfour of 
England, and ex-President Taft of this 
county, are the presidents. 

Professor Ham addressed the Lew- 
iston-Aubum Chapter of the Daugh- 
ters of the Revolution on Saturday. 

President Sills was absent a large 
part of last week, when he spoke at 
meetings in several cities in this state. 
On the afternoon of Monday, October 
4, he spoke at an educational rally in 
Bath, and again at Wiscasset on Tues- 
day afternoon. Wednesday he at- 
tended a meeting of the directors of 
the State Chamber of Commerce at 
Portland, and on Friday a meeting of 
the Maine Public Health Association 
at Augusta, of which he is a director. 

Mrs. Kenneth C. M. Sills recently 
attended the convention of the 
Woman's Auxiliary at St. Luke's 
Cathedral, Portland, as one of the 
delegates from the Guild of St. Paul's 
Parish. 



An article on the League of Na- 
tions by Professor Woodruff appeared 
in last week's "Brunswick Record." 

President and Mrs. Sills entertained 
at luncheon on Saturday the teachers 
of the Portland and Brunswick High 
Schools. Short talks were given by 
Professor Hormell and by Professor 
Davis, the former speaking on "Civics 
in Schools," the latter on his ex- 
periences in England during the past 
half year and notably of the confer- 
ence of British and American teachers 
of English which he attended. 

Professor Woodruff preached a ser- 
mon at the Congregational Church in 
Strong on Sunday, October 3. 

Professor Mitchell will give an ad- 
dress at Goodwill Farm Saturday eve- 
ning, October 9. 

President and Mrs. Sills gave an in- 
formal reception to the members of 
St. Paul's Parish last Thursday eve- 
ning. 



CALENDAR 

October 16 — Fraternity Initiations. 

October 16— Football: Trinity at 
Brunswick. 

October 16 — Baseball: Freshmen vs. 
Sophomores. 

October 12, 13, 14— Topsham Fair. 



alumni Department 

The "Orient" desires to be of the 
greatest possible service to Alumni in 
keeping them informed of one an- 
other's activities. Alumni, and 
especially class secretaries, are earn- 
estly requested to support the 
"Orient" in this work by sending 
items about themselves or their 
brother Alumni. 

1873 — Maine lost one of her finest 
educators in the death of Albert 
Francis Richardson, at Castine, Oc- 
tober 2. Born at Sebago, July 2, 1841, 
his early life furnishes the story of a 
poor boy's grim struggle for an edu- 
cation. While a mere boy, he worked 
in the logging camps and on farms, 
carefully saving his small earnings to 
bear the expense of his schooling. 

Mr. Robinson started early on his 
pedagogical career. He used to tell 
the story of his first charge, a little 
school in a backwoods town. Al- 
though only thirteen years of age, he 
was very large for his years, and his 
experience in hard labor had given 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



him self-reliance along with no mean 
measure of strength. His education 
at that time was decidedly stinted but 
he could read, write, and do sums. 
When the school board suggested to 
him that he take charge of the edu- 
cation of their youth, he hastened to 
make plain his deficiencies as an in- 
structor, especially since a number of 
his prospective pupils were some 
years older than he. The board, how- 
ever, had explanations of its own to 
make; what was required of the 
young teacher was not a vast store 
of knowledge, but the ability to teach 
and enforce "discipline." And Pro- 
fessor Richardson would smilingly tell 
how he stayed in the place a full 
school year, teaching "discipline" for 
ten dollars a month, while he "boarded 
'round." 

Graduating from Bowdoin in 1873, 
Mr. Richardson continued to teach, 
steadily working upward until he de- 
cided on the career which he followed 
for nearly half a century. He was for 
ten years principal of Bridgton High 
School, then five years leader of the 
famous old Fryeburg Academy. 

Mr. Richardson came to Castine as 
principal of the Normal School in 
1888, retaining that position until last 
June when he resigned because of the 
steady decline in health which resulted 
in his death. During his term of 
office at Castine, this worthy son of 
Maine fully earned his place among 
the foremost educators of the State. 
In the thirty-one years of his leader- 
ship the school graduated over 1,500 
students, most of whom became 
teachers, and many of whom still fol- 
low that profession. As a token of 
the state's appreciation of his years 
of honorable service the splendid new 
dormitory recently added to the 
school is named Richardson Hall. 

Mr. Richardson was a member of 
the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. 

The following notes have been re- 
ceived from the secretary of the Class 
of 1911: 

Miss Margaret Beryl Skinner and 
Harold Nichols Burnham were mar- 
ried on June 24, 1920. 

A. G. Dennis is now located in Lon- 
don, England, as general auditor of 
the American Express Company for 
Europe. 

Miss Martha B. Fifield of Conway, 
N. H., and Hugh Warren Hastings 
were married on September 4, 1920. 



1919 — Fred B. Chadbourne is teach- 
ing this year at the Lawrenceville 
School, Lawrenceville, N. J. 

1914 — Harold M. Hayes has been 
elected County Attorney for Piscata- 
quis County. 

1916 — Miss Flora Marie Somers and 
Eugene Joseph Cronin were married 
at Lewiston on October 15. 

ex-1916 — Miss Marion E. Mower of 
Augusta and Elliot Sheffeld Boardman 
were married at Buffalo, N. Y., Oc- 
tober 8. 

1917 — A son, Charles Richard, has 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. 
Jacob. 

1918 — R. H. Peacock, former cap- 
tain of the varsity football team, is 
coaching the Rockland High School 
football squad this fall. 

1918 — F. F. French is reporting for 
the "Bangor Daily Commercial." 

1920 — Henry W. Lamb has entered 
the Johns Hopkins Medical School. 

Leland M. Goodrich, Jere Abbott, 
and Richard K. McWilliams are at 
Harvard Graduate School; Edward H. 
Ellms is at Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 

1920 — Frederick K. Leach has ac- 
cepted a position at the Hotel Com- 
modore, New York City. 

1920 — Archie O. Dostie is submaster 
under H. H. Sampson '17 at Bridgton 
Academy. He is also coaching the 
football team. 



Man is the only animal that blushes. 
Or needs to. — Pudd'nhead Wilson's 
New Calendar. 



CLASS NOTES. 

1873 — Augustus Q. Crocker is 
actively engaged in manufacturing at 
Minneapolis. He is also considerably 
interested in improving waterways, 
particularly the Mississippi River. 

David W. Snow is a member of the 
law firm of Snow & Snow in Portland, 
Me. 

1859 — Four members of the class 
are still living: Americus Fuller, 
D.D., Los Gratos, Cal.; Horatio O. 
Ladd, S.T.D., Boston, Mass.; William 
G. Nowell, Boston, Mass.; Edward M. 
Rand, Portland, Me. 

1874 — J. I. Boyden is a farmer at 
Tamworth, N. H.; George M. Brock is 
an invalid in a hospital in Boston, 
Mass.; Samuel Valentine Cole, D.D., 



is president of Wheaton College at 
Norton, Mass.; S. M. Chandler was, at 
last accounts, in business in Duluth, 
Minn.; James R. Day is president of 
Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y.; 
H. H. Emery has retired from busi- 
ness and is living at Woodfords, Me.; 
Cassius M. Ferguson has been a 
lawyer in Minneapolis, Minn., for over 
forty years; Walter T. Goodale is a 
physician in Saco, Me.; Edward O. 
Howard is a lawyer in Boston, Mass.; 
Ernest S. Hobbs is a mill owner and 
operator in Aurora, 111.; Thomas 
Kneeland is a prominent lawyer, 
leading member of the legislature, 
and president of the Bar Association 
in Minneapolis, Minn.; Daniel S. 
Lowell, Litt.D., is principal of Rox- 
bury Latin School and a member of a 
number of organizations; William H. 
Moulton is a banker in Portland, Me.; 
Arthur I. Perry is a lawyer in Gar- 
diner, Me.; Horace W. Philbrook is a 
lawyer in San Francisco, Cal.; Wil- 
liam M. Payson is a lawyer in Bos- 
ton, Mass.; Thomas C. Simpson is a 
judge of the Municipal Court at New- 
buryport, Mass. His twenty-fifth an- 
niversary as a judge was recently 
celebrated; Charles C. Springer is 
manager of the Mt. Tom Sulphite 
Pulp Company in Boston, Mass.; C. E. 
Stone is a clergyman in Los Angeles, 
Cal.; George B. Wheeler is a bank 
president in Eau Claire, Wis. He was 
recently engaged in erecting a $350,- 
000 hotel; Henry K. White, who has 
been a prominent educator in Maine, 
has retired and is now living at New- 
castle; Charles J. Palmer, S.T.B., is 
a clergyman in Jonesboro, Mass., he 
was recently tendered a reception on 
the occasion of the fortieth annivers- 
ary of his coming to Berkshire 
County. He has been nineteen years 
rector of St. Luke's Church, Jones- 
boro, and twenty-one years county 
missionary. 



RESOLUTION 

Hall of Theta of Delta Kappa 
Epsilon: 

It is with feelings of deep sorrow 
that Theta Chapter records the death 
last Wednesday of Brother Albert 
Francis Richardson of the Class of 
1873, of Castine, Maine. 

After Brother Richardson secured 
his A.B. degree the college bestowed 
the degree of A.M. upon him in 1876 



158 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



in recognition of his work. He was 
president of the Athenaean Society, 
principal of the. Eastern State Normal 
School, and a member of the His- 
torical Society and State Board of 
Trustees of the Normal School. He 
was also a former president of the 
State Teachers' Association. He was 
a member of the Masons and the I. O. 
O. F. Brother Richardson's death will 
be keenly felt in educational circles 
where his life work was carried on. 

The Chapter extends its sympathy 
to the relatives and friends of 
Brother Richardson in their recent 
loss. 

RONALD B. WADSWORTH, 
WILFRED R. BREWER, 
KARL R. PHILBRICK. 

For the 'Chapter. 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP. MAN- 
AGEMENT, CIRCULATION, ETC., RE- 
QUIRED BY THE ACT OF CON- 
GRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912, 
Of The Bowdoin Orient, published weekly dur- 
ing college year, at Brunswick, Maine, for 
October 1. 1920. 

State of Maine, County of Cumberland, ss. 
Before me, a Notary Public, in and for the 
State and county aforesaid, personally ap- 
peared Edward B. Ham, who, having been 
duly sworn according to law, deposes and says 
that he is the Managing Editor of the Bowdoin 
Orient, and that the following is, to the best of 
his knowledge and belief, a true statement of 
the ownership, management (and if a daily 
paper, the circulation), etc., of the aforesaid 
publication for the date shown in the above 
caption, required by the Act of August 24, 
1912, embodied in section 443, Postal Laws 
and Regulations, printed on the reserve of this 
form, to wit : 

1. That the names and addresses of the 
publisher, editor, managing editor, and busi- 
ness managers are : 

Name of — Post office address — 

Publisher, Bowdoin Publishing Co., 

Brunswick, Maine 
Editor, Norman W. Haines. Brunswick, Maine 
Manaiting Editor, Edward B. Ham, _ 

Brunswick. Maine 
Business Manager, Kenneth S. Boardman, 

Brunswick. Maine 

2. That the owners are: (Give names and 
addresses of individual owners, or, if a cor- 
poration, give its name and the names and 
addresses of stockholders owning or holding 
1 per cent, or more of the total amount of 

Bowdoin Publishing Co. (Mutual Associa- 
tion.) 

3. That the known bondholders, mortgagees, 
and other security holders owning or holding 
1 per cent, or more of total amount of bonds, 
mortgages, or other securities are: (If there 
are none, so state.) None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next above, giv- 
ing the names of the owners, stockholders, 
and security holders, if any, contain not only 
the list of stockholders and security holders 
as they appear upon the books of the company 
but also, in cases where the stockholder or 
security holder appears upon the books of the 
company as trustee or in any other fiduciary 
relation, the name of the person or corporation 
for whom such trustee is acting, is given ; also 
that the said two paragraphs contain state- 
ments embracing affiant's full knowledge and 
belief as to the circumstances and conditions 
under which stockholders and security holders 
who do not appear upon the books of the 
company as trustees, hold stoek and securities 
in a capacity other than that of a bona fide 
owner ; and this affiant has no reason to be- 
lieve that any other person, association, or 
corporation has any interest direct or indirect 



in the said stock, bonds, or other securities 
than as so stated by him. 

5. That the average number of copies of 
each issue of this publication sold or dis- 
tributed, through the mails or otherwise, to 
paid subscribers during the six months pre- 
ceding the date shown, above is 

(This information is required from daily pub- 
lications only.) 

Edward B. Ham, Managing Editor. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 9th 
day of October. 1920. 

(Seal.) Melville C. Hall. 

(My commission expires March 4, 1927.) 



Sammy — Over in America we getta 
lilac bush fifty feet high. 

Tommy — I wish I could lilac that. — 
Exchange. 



DANCING 
JENNIES. HARVEY 

EVERY TUESDAY EVENING, 

BEGINNING OCTOBER 26th 

TOWN HALL, BRUNSWICK 

Class at 7.30 p. m. Assembly, 8.30. 

Monday Evenings, Armory Hall, Bath, 
beginning October 18th. 

These classes are open to college 
students. 

Private lessons and classes on appli- 
cation. 

Address 
897 Middle St., Bath, Me. 

Phor.e 151-W. 



THE 

COLLEGE 

BOOK STORE 

The place to buy everything from 
a Thumb Tack to a Wedding Present. 
Take a look at our new line of Kay- 
woodie Pipes. These are of real 
Italian Bruyere with the Aluminum 
Inbore tube. All models $4.50 each. 



F. W, CHANDLER 

& SON 

150 MAINE STREET. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. 
Surplus and Profits, $100,000. 
Student Patronage Solicited. 



BOWDOIN CANTEEN 

8 a. m.-12 m.; 1.30-6; 7-11 

Sundays, 12-5 p. m. 

A. PALMER, 19 North Winthrop. 



Our representative will be On The Campus 

Thursday and Friday, Oct. 14 & 15 

with a complete line of 

HATS CAPS COATS GLOVES 

and NECKTIES 

See Bulletin Boards for Places and Times 
Collins & Fairbanks Co. 

Boston 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



WRIGHT &DITS0N 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 Washington Street 
Boston 




s-c 




119 MAINE STREET 
BRUNSWICK 



ODD 
TROUSERS 

Plain Colors and Fancies 

Big Line to select from 

New Lot of NOBBY CAPS 

Just Received 



E. S. BODWELL 

& SON 

Brunswick, Maine. 



Macullar Parker Co. 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Makers of Conser- 
vative Clothes for 
College Men, will 
show frequently at 
Bowdoin College. 

YOUR PATRONAGE IS 
EARNESTLY SOLICITED 

G. L. GOODWIN, Representative 



160 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 Maine Street 

CORDOVAN BOOTS 

IN 

YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 



"Herman's" Tan Cordovan $13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan. .$15.50 
"Florsheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck j Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 

TENNIS SHOES, INDOOR AND 

OUTDOOR MOCCASINS, RUBBER 

BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 



CARL H. MARTIN 

Cleansing and Dyeing 
Pressing and Alterations 



4 Elm Street 



A. W. HASKELL, D. D. S. 

W. F. BROWN, D. D. S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Postoffice Brunswick, Me. 



Featuring 

the newest productions in 
garments for fall wear made 
for us by 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 

Haskell & Jones Company 



PORTLAND, 



MAINE 



"The Store of Progress and Service" 
This is the season of the year when College men are considering the matter of 

Warm Outdoor Coats 

and we know that they are especially interested in the Sheep Lined and 
Sport Coats, so we call attention at this time to these Coats which we 
know will appeal to the College Chap. 

Sheep Lined Coats 

three-quarter length. This is a Moleskin, and a good, warm, serviceable Coat just what you want 
when you go out on a long hike or want to keep real warm at the football or other outdoor sports. 



Sport Coats 



We have got a fine line of these Coats in reversible leather. They have raglan shoulder; belt all 
around, and they come in the popular brown shade. 



Don't forget that Mr. Jack Handy '23 of the Zeta Psi House is still our represent- 
ative, and he will be glad to attend to all your requirements for Furnishings or 
otherwise. 



Monument 
Square 




Portland 
Maine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




Generator room of one of the 
hvdro-electric plantswhich sup- 
ply power to the C. M. &St.P. 



The Power of Electricity 
in Transportation 



Some Advantages of 
Railroad Electrification 

Saving the Nation's coal. 
Lower maintenance costs. 



Ability to haul smoothly 
heavier trains at higher 
speed. 

Operation of electric locomo- 
tives unaffected by extreme 
cold. 

Ability to brake trains on 
descending grades by re- 
turning power to the trolley. 



ELECTRICITY hasleveled out 
the Continental Divide. The 
steam locomotive, marvelous as 
it is after a century of develop- 
ment, cannot meet all of the pres- 
ent demands for transportation 
facilities. Its electric rival has 
proved to be far superior. 

On the mountain divisions of the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
Railway— the world's greatest 
electrification— giant electric loco- 
motives today lift an ever increas- 
ing freight tonnage over the mile- 
high Rockies and also make travel- 
ing clean and comfortable. They 
utilize the abundant energy of dis- 
tant waterfalls and then, by return- 
ing some of this power to the 
trolley, safely brake the trains on 
descending grades. And their 
capabilities are not impaired by 
excessively cold weather when 



the steam engine is frozen and 
helpless. 

Electricity is the power which 
drives the trains of New York 
City's subway and elevated sys- 
tems. It operates the locks and 
tows the ships through the 
Panama Canal. It propels the 
Navy's latest super-dreadnaught, 
the New Mexico. Electric mine 
locomotives have replaced the 
slow-moving mule and the electric 
automobile has also come to do 
an important service. 
Electricity has become the uni- 
versal motive power. It has con- 
tributed efficiency and comfort to 
every form of transportation ser- 
vice and in this evolution General 
Electric apparatus has played a 
large part — from mighty electric 
locomotives to the tiny lamp for 
the automobile. 




General Office 
Schenectady; NY 



Sales Offices in 
all large cities 



162 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



I 




Chocolates 

The Chocolates 

(hat are 

Dij^jferervb 



aire so 
e boss were many times ■ larger. 



ter coating; 



The dainty assortment of finel 
makes the "Truly Great" A 
of far more distinction than the usual 






u 



paeces 
a charming gift 



I j^.j7.J<Lo6er£s Co., 

1 Boston, Mass. 



SililMlliliiliiiiinMiiiillliiilliiliiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiMiMiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiilhic 





I 



I 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




Durable 
U. S. Golf Balls 

The durability of U.S. Golf Balls assures 
not only lasting wear but complete 
satisfaction. Cover and paint with- 
stand the roughest service you can give 
them. 

Moreover, these balls are true on the green and 
their flight through the fairway makes their play- 
ing a genuine pleasure. 

There's a size and weight to suit you. 

Buy them from your pro or at your dealer's. 



U. S. Royal 

. $1.00 each 

U. S. Revere 

85c each 

U. S. Floater 

65c each 




X. 



Keep your eye on the ball — be sure it's a U. S. 



United States Rubber Company 



164 BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CUMBERLAND 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

THE GIRL OF THE SEA 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

TOM MIX 

. . . IN . . . 

"3 GOLD COIN S" 

NEXT WEEK— MONDAY AND TUESDAY 

WILLIAM S. HART 

. . . IN . . . 

"THE TOLL GATE" 



PASTIME 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

OWEN MOORE 

. . . IN . . . 

"SOONER OR LATER" 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

WILLIAM RUSSELL 

. . . IN . . . 

"THE TWINS OF SUFFERING CREEK" 



NEXT WEEK— MONDAY AND TUESDAY 

HOBART BOSWORTH 

. . . IN . . . 

"BELOW THE SURFACE" 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



"V 



VOL. L. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1920. 



No. 15 



BOWDOIN ENTIRELY OUTCLASSES TRINITY 

AND WINS FIRST HOME GAME, 6-0 



Bowdoin's Margin of Superiority Greater Than Score Shows— Trinity Unable 
To Gain Through Bowdoin's Line— Lone Touchdown Made on Forward Pass. 



Playing in superb football weather 
Saturday, on Whittier Field, Bowdoin 
defeated Trinity to the tune of 6 to 0. 
As regards weight, the two teams 
were very evenly matched. Trinity, 
however, was able to gain very little 
through the Bowdoin line. The 
White's- superiority over the visitors 
was decidedly evident throughout the 
game, in spite of the low score. 

The game was played before a 
large body of alumni and students. 
There were a large number of ma- 
chines parked about the field. It was 
Bowdoin's first home game of the sea- 
son, and all were glad to see them 
come through with a win. 

The first quarter opened' with A. 
Morrell making a fine runback of the 
kick-off. He went around Trinity's 
end on the first play for a gain of 
thirty-five yards. Trinity finally held, 
however, and attempted to rush. The 
ball wavered back and forth through- 
out the first half. Bowdoin had the 
ball most of the time, but fumbles 
and incomplete passes .gave the 
visitors chances to punt out of danger. 
A. Morrell and Bleecker, Trinity's 
fullback, exchanged several punts 
with the Bowdoin man gaining ten to 
fifteen yards on every exchange. 

Miller was injured in the first 
quarter and was replaced by Whitney. 
The gains of Al Morrell were the only 
outstanding features of the first half. 
The play was rather listless, particu- 
larly on Trinity's part, until the be- 
ginning of the third quarter. Near 

(Continued on page 166) 



A. S. B. C. ELECTIONS 



The Student Council decided at the 
last meeting to hold student elections 
for two vacant offices, manager of 
hockey and a junior position on the 
student council, made necessary by 
men not returning to college. For 
hockey manager, Vose '22 and Har- 
mon '22 were nominated and for the 
vacancy in the student council Dahl- 
gren '22 and Woodbury '22. These 
elections are to be held Thursday, Oc- 
tober 21. 



DEBATING 



The Debating Society held a meet- 
ing in the Library, Wednesday. Plans 
were made for a forum to be held this 
winter. The society is going to ar- 
range a series of triangular debates 
with Hamilton and Dartmouth. Plans 
are being made for a series of Fresh- 
man-Sophomore debates. 



FOOTBALL DANCE 

AFTER MAINE GAME 



At a recent meeting of the Stu- 
dent Council it was decided to hold an 
informal dance in the Gymnasium on 
Saturday, November 6, following the 
football game with Maine. The com- 
mittee is composed of Perkins '21 
(chairman), Eames '21, and Flinn '22. 



Fraternity Initiations. 

Last Saturday night the ten fra- 
ternities held their annual initiation 
ceremonies. Eighty-seven men from 
the Class of 1£24 were initiated, seven 
from 1923, and one from 1921. Fol- 
lowing is a list of the students taken 
into each fraternity: 

Alpha Delta Phi. 

Ethan Alfred Beals, Richard Howell 
Blaisdell, Lawrence Blatchford, Don- 
ald Wallace MacKinnon, Adelbert 
Howard Merrill, Clarence Dana Rouil- 
lard, Frank Harwood Sellman, Joseph 
Thomas Small, Raymond Reginald 
Whalen, Douglas Winthrop Young. 
Psi Upsilon. 

George Tobey Davis, James Alvin 
Demmons, Guy Franklin Dennett, 
Wilfrid Montgomery Kimball (Class 
of 1923), Robert James Lavigne, John 
Leavitt Margesson, Arthur Joseph 
Miguel, Frank Avery Pike, Alfred 
Theodore Stone, Lawrence William 
Towle, John Watson. 

Chi Psi. 

Wellington Charles, Raymond Den- 
nison Curtis, Linwood Johnson Good- 
win, Rupert Gordon Johnson, George 
Myron Kimball, Delmar Harding 
King, Willis Chesman Manson, Har- 
ry Lea Mushroe, Allan Preble Robin- 
son, Raymond Justin Saunders. 
Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

Marshall Albert Baldwin, Glen 
David Chamberlain, Homer Leslie 
Ferguson, Charles Albert Fulle, Jr., 
Richard Milton Fulle, Cecil Hamilton 
Gowen, George Noah (Class of 1923), 
Preston Meldram Putnam, Bradley 
Bent Ross, Brooks Elliot Savage. 
Theta Delta Chi. 

Ralph Ellory Blanchard, Joseph 
Michael Brisebois, James Bernard 
Dunlaevy (Class of 1923), Sylvio 



166 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Theodore Gonya, Frederic Spang 
Klees, Harold Turner Stonemetz 
(Class of 1923). 

Delta Upsilon. 

Dwight Merrill Alden (Class of 
1921), George Key Anthony, Stuart 
Richmond Dudgeon (Class of 1923), 
Harold Henry Dunphy, Granville 
Shackford Gilpatrick, Prank Joseph 
Harris, John Henry Johnson, Anson 
Blake Moran, Theodore Pettengill, 
Donald James Robertson, John Francis 
Sullivan (Class of 1923). 

Dean Paul Nixon was also initiated 
as an honorary member. 
Zeta Psi. 

William Edward Burgess (Class of 
1923), Thornton Lewis Clough Bur- 
nell, Charles Barry Clavin, Howard 
Egbert Crawford (Class of 1923), 
Henry Kenneth Dow, Jerome 
Richardson Ervin, Albert Edward 
Gibbons, Elmer Warren Grenfell, 
George Edwin Hill, Langdon Arthur 
Jewett, Robert John Kirkpatrick, Jr., 
Herman John Porter, Perley Dennison 
Smith, David Addison Stiles, George 
Elmer Thomas. 

Kappa Sigma. 

Lindsey Crawford Churchill, Rollin 
Earle Files, Frederick Rice Hamilton, 
Arthur Mellen Josiah Hight, Kenneth 
Oakes Lawless, Archie Church Mason, 
Walter DeCoster Moore, Jr., Arthur 
Donald Patterson, Richard Betts Phil- 
lips, Robert Titus Phillips, George 
William Rowe, Harold Raymond 
Worsnop. 

Beta Theta Pi. 

Francis Powers Bishop, Kimball 
Fisher, Malcolm Elwin Hardy, Morri- 
son Cutler James, James Mortimer 
Keniston, Bernard George McMenna- 
min, Harold Arthur Small, Robert 
Frederick Smythe, Paul Hewes Upton, 
Waldo Gery Weymouth. 
Sigma Nu. 

Ralph Elwood Keirstead, Forest 
Clifford Butler, Richard Gorham 
Badger, Jr., Donald Douglas Blanch- 
arcl, George Everett Cobb, Francis 
Wilbur Gorham, Harvey Bulflnch 
Lovell, Lawrence Lord Page, Malcolm 
Elmer Morrell, Moses Scott Ranney, 
Ledyard Allen Southard. 



When little Johnny was almost six 
years old, he pinned a note on the 
door of his room: "Remember my 
birthday. Give till it hurts." — Mettco 
Meteor. 



A Student's Prayer. 

Before Exams — 
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet, 
Lest we forget! Lest we forget! 

After Exams — 
Lord God of Hosts was with us not, 
For we forgot! For we forgot! 

— Cardinal and Cream. 



BOWDOIN 6, TRINITY 

(Continued from page 165) 

the end of the half, when Bowdoin 
had been forced to punt from about 
midfield, Morrell drop-kicked, and the 
Trinity back fumbled the ball on the 
15-yard line. Guptill recovered the 
ball for Bowdoin, giving the White a 
splendid chance to score. The ball 
was lost again almost immediately, 
and Bolles punted out of danger just 
before the whistle sounded. During 
the entire half Trinity failed to secure 
a first down, and never once had the 
ball in Bowdoin's territory. 

The second half started with Bow- 
doin's off side kick off, followed by a 
long kick to Bolles, who was stopped 
on Trinity's 35-yard line. Murphy and 
Bleecker then tried the Bowdoin line 
but were repulsed for a 2-yard loss. 
Bleecker punted out to an offside on 
Bowdoin's 35-yard line and M. Mor- 
rell went through tackle for four 
yards. Whitney went through center 
for another yard and Bowdoin punted 
to Trinity's 25-yard line. The Bow- 
doin line refused to give way for 
Murphy and Bolles and the third 
down found the ball unadvanced. 
Bleecker then took the pigskin for a 
spectacular end run which was stopped 
by Mason on the 48-yard line. 
Murphy hit the White center for an- 
other three yards, followed by gains 
of one and two yards by Bolles. On 
the punt out Whitney received the ball 
and was downed on the 22-yard line. 
Al Morrell then bent the Trinity left 
wing for four yards, after which he 
followed Whitney's vain effort with a 
first down. In two more rushes Mor- 
rell put the ball within a foot of an- 
other first down, then carried it five 
yards over. Smith followed with a 
center gain of a yard while Whitney 
made a slight advance through the 
line. Bleecker received Morrell's punt 
and advanced to the 35-yard line, then 
circled the end for four yards. Bolles 
followed and made first down on the 
Trinity 45-yard line. Bleecker went 
around for four, but Bolles and 
Murphy failed to gain so Bolles 
punted to Smith for a down on the 
25-yard line. He followed with a 2- 
yard gain before the whistle blew for 
the end of the period. 

The fourth period started with 
Bowdoin's ball on her 27-yard line. 
Al Morrell missed the snap-back, re- 



covering the ball with four yards loss. 
Smith took it through for two yards, 
then M. Morrell punted to an offside 
on Trinity's 38-yard- line. Bleecker 
again tried his circling tactics, gain- 
ing three yards, followed by Bolles' 
yard gain through center. Bleecker 
made three more around Bowdoin's 
right end, but in another attempt 
failed to make first down. With 
Woodbury in for Smith, the first for- 
ward pass attempted went wild but 
the home team made up for that in 
the next play when a lateral pass sent 
Whitney through for a first down. 
Bowdoin now started to rush the ball 
down the field, taking this last chance 
to score. Al Morrell hit the line for 
two yards, an incomplete pass fol- 
lowed, but the next pass which Whit- 
ney caught gained twenty-one yards. 
Woodbury hit the line to no avail, 
then Al Morrell broke through for 
three yards. Then, without the 
knowledge of the home team, H. F. 
Morrill came on the field to relieve 
M. E. Morrell. The referee, Farns- 
worth, failed to see his signal and the 
play went on with the Trinity team 
engrossed in the progress of the sub- 
stitute. Al Morrell tossed a beauti- 
ful forward to Parent, who received 
it back of the goal, and dropped for 
the only score of the game. 

There ensued a vigorous argument 
as to the legality of H. F. Morrill's 
presence on the field, a topic over 
which the two teams waged heated 
verbal combat for some minutes with 
the result that Farnsworth decided 
that the touchdown was rightly Bow- 
doin's. The try for goal failed and 
the score stood Bowdoin 6, Trinity 0. 

Bleecker received the kick-off on the 
32-yard line. Kelly speared a for- 
ward pass for a 20-yard gain only to 
have his work undone when Whitney 
blocked another attempted forward 
for a 2-yard loss and three consecu- 
tive unsuccessful attempts at passing 
failed to advance the ball whereupon 
Bowdoin took the offensive in mid- 
field. A. Morrell went through for 
three yards, followed by Woodbury's 
unsuccessful line buck. The ball went 
to Whitney as the whistle blew. 

The summary: 

BOWDOIN— —TRINITY 

Parent, le re, Tansill 

Mason, It rt, McAnany 

Haines, lg rg, Johnson 

Guptill, c c, Kelly 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



167 



Eames, rg lg, Wright 

Putnam, rg. 

Dudgeon, rt It, Black 

It, Wolen 

Gibbons, re le, MacMackin 

Perry, re. 

Smith, qb qb, Murphy 

Woodbury, qb. 

Miller, lhb rhb, Sinclair 

Whitney, lhb. 

A. E. Morrell, rhb lhb, Bolles 

lhb, Kennedy 

M. E. Morrell, fb fb, Bleeeker 

H. F. Morrill, fb 

Score by quarters: 12 3 4 

Bowdoin 6 — 6 

Trinity ■ 0—0 

Touchdown— Parent. Referee — Farnsworth, 
West Point. Umpire, Kelly, Portland. Head 
linesman — Clifford, Lewiston. Time, two 10- 
minute and two 12-minute periods. 



Saturday Football Scores 



Bowdoin 6, Trinity 0. 

Colby 13, Bates 0. 

Maine 7, Rhode Island State 7. 

Columbia 20, Amherst 7. 

Boston College 21, Yale 13. 

Harvard 38, Williams 0. 

Vermont 7, New Hampshire State 0. 

New York University 13, Wesleyan 
3. 

Penn State 41, North Carolina 0. 

West Point 26, Springfield 7. 

Dartmouth 27, Holy Cross 14. 

Pittsburgh 7, Syracuse 7. 

Princeton 34, Washington and Lee 0. 

Tufts 7, Norwich 0. 

University of Pennsylvania 7, La- 
fayette 0. 

Lehigh 41, Rochester 0. ' 

Massachusetts A. C. 21, Worcester 
P. I. 0. 

Middlebury 7, Boston University 0. 

Cornell 60, Union 0. 

Brown 14, Colgate 0. 

Hamilton 13, Rensselaer P. I. 0. 

Annapolis 7, Bucknell 2. 

St. Bonaventure 15, Hobart 7. 

Wisconsin 27, Northwestern 7. 

Chicago 41, Wabash 0. 

St. Lawrence 20, Buffalo 0. 

Virginia 14, John Hopkins 0. 

Rutgers 19, Virginia P. I. 6. 

Stevens 14, Swarthmore 7. 

Ohio State 17, Purdue 0. 

Indiana 21, Minnesota 7. 



Getting It In the Neck. 

College President — You are sus- 
pended for the term of three months. 

Freshman — I'll be dead if I hang 
that long. — Carolina Tar Baby. 



CAMPUS ACTIVITIES 
OF AROOSTOOK 

COUNTY MEN 



To bring more intimately to the 
knowledge of the Alumni the interests 
and activities of the undergraduates, 
and thus to unite all in the common 
fellowship and traditions of Bowdoin, 
the "Orient," acting upon a sugges- 
tion of President Sills, is glad to print 
in this issue the first of a series of 
brief sketches of men now in college 
from different sections of the country. 

To mention Aroostook County is to 
call up a large and growing body of 
Bowdoin supporters. For its alumni 
are among the most devoted of the 
college and have always contributed 
largely, not only to the welfare of 
their Alma Mater, but also to the 
best interests of the State. 

The following compilation will 
show present Aroostook men in a 
variety of interests, such as the Stu- 
dent Council, Athletic Council, Masque 
and Gown, and all branches of ath- 
letics. 

Class of 1921. 

George J. Cumming is a member of 
Delta Kappa Epsilon and a graduate 
of Houlton High School. In his fresh- 
man year he won a Hiland Lockwood 
Fairbanks prize, made the class track 
team, and had a response at the 
Freshman banquet. Last year he was 
Class Chaplain, and a member of the 
Biology Club. 

Philip G. McLellan is a graduate 
of Caribou High School, and a mem- 
ber of Delta Kappa Epsilon. During 
his first three years he was in the 
college band, and he has been elected 
leader of the band for this year. Last 
year he was captain of the second 
baseball team. Last year also, he be- 
came a member of the Biology Club. 

E. Kenneth Smiley, a member of 
Beta Theta Pi, transferred to Bow- 
doin from Dartmouth at the end of 
his Sophomore year. He graduated 
from Caribou High School in 1917. 
Last year he took part in the Com- 
mencement play, and this fall he has 
made the Glee Club. Last spring he 
became a member of the Ibis. 
Class of 1922. 

William W. Alexander of Island 
Falls is a graduate of Island Falls 
High School and a member of Alpha 



Delta Phi. In his Freshman year he 
candidated from January to June for 
the assistant managership of track, 
and won a nomination. 

Wilfred R. Brewer of Ashland is a 
member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. Dur- 
ing his first two years he was in the 
college band and in the chapel choir. 
Last spring he was elected an as- 
sistant manager of the Bowdoin Pub- 
lishing Company, and later the as- 
sistant business manager of this year's 
"Bugle." 

Millard A. Eldridge of Island Falls 
is a member of Alpha Delta Phi, and 
a graduate of Island Falls High 
School. He was a member of the Y. 
M. C. A. cabinet in his first year. 

Waldo R. Flinn, a graduate of 
Island Falls High School is a mem- 
ber of Alpha Delta Phi. He has been 
pitcher on the varsity baseball team 
during his first two years here. He 
has also been on his class track and 
baseball teams. Last year he was 
captain of the class baseball team. 
He was class vice-president during his , 
Sophomore year, a member of the 
Athletic Council, and of the Y. M. C. 
A. Cabinet. This fall he has been 
elected class president to fill the va- 
cancy in that office until the junior 
elections. He is again a member of 
the Athletic Council, and in addition 
has been elected to the Student Coun- 
cil. Last spring he was initiated into 
the Friars (junior society). 

John W. Hone of Presque Isle is a 
member of Sigma Nu. In Freshman 
year he was on the class baseball 
team, and on the class track team 
both Freshman and Sophmore years. 
Last year h'e was on the rifle team, 
and on the varsity track squad. 

Herric C. Kimball of Fort Fair- 
field is a member of Delta Kappa 
Epsilon, and a graduate of Fort Fair- 
field High School. In his Freshman 
year he was a member of the Masque 
and Gown, and last year he became 
a member of the Biology Club. 

Silvio C. Martin of Van Buren is 
a member of the Sigma Nu frater- 
nity and a graduate of Van Buren 
High School. 

Arthur T. Whitney of Houlton is a 
member of Delta Kappa Epsilon and 
a graduate of Houlton High School. 
Last year he played on the Sopho- 
more football team, and also was a 
point-winner in the inter-fraternity 
track meet. He is taking the medi- 



168 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



cal preparatory course, and is a mem- 
ber of the Biology Club. 

Clarence P. Yerxa of Houlton is a 
member of Zeta Psi, and also a gradu- 
ate of Houlton High School. Last 
year he became a member of the 
Biology Club. 

Class of 1923. 

Edmund A. Albert of Madawaska 
is a member of Delta Upsilon. Last 
year he was a member of the class 
baseball team. In the strength tests, 
he broke a record for first year men 
which had stood for twenty years. 
His total strength was 993. 

Byron F. Brown, a member of the 
Beta Theta Pi fraternity, graduated 
from Presque Isle High School. He 
is taking a medical preparatory 
course. 

Maurice L. Hussey of Mars Hill is 
a member of the Zeta Psi fraternity. 
He graduated from Ricker Classical 
Institute of Houlton. 

Irvine W. Jardine of Fort Fair- 
field is a graduate of Fort Fairfield 
1 High School. He is a member of the 
Sigma Nu fraternity. 

Lendall I. McLellan of Caribou is 
a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. 
He graduated from Caribou High 
School. Last year he won a nomi- 
nation for assistant manager of track, 
after several months of candidating. 
He is a member of the college band. 
He made his class numerals in track 
last year, and this fall played on the 
class baseball team. 

Cecil C. McLaughlin of Houlton is 
a graduate of Houlton High School, 
and a member of the Sigma Nu fra- 
ternity. He is taking a medical pre- 
paratory course. 

George F. Russell of Houlton is a 
member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. He 
graduated from Houlton High School 
in 1919. 

Edmond J. Sirois of Eagle Lake is 
taking a medical preparatory course. 
He is pledged to the Phi Chi medical 
fraternity. 

Class of 1924. 

Glen D. Chamberlain of Fort Fair- 
field, a member of Delta Kappa 
Epsilon, graduated from Fort Fair- 
field High School. 

Harold H. Dunphy of Island Falls, 
a member of Delta Upsilon, graduated 
from Island Falls High School. 

Jerome R. Ervin of Houlton, a 



member of Zeta Psi, graduated from 
Houlton High School. 

Dennis L. Jacques of Soldier's Pond 
is a graduate of St. Ann's College, 
which is at Church Point, Nova Scotia. 

Bernard G. McMennamin of Lime- 
stone, a member of Beta Theta Pi, 
graduated from Limestone High 
School. 

John L. Margesson of Caribou, a 
member of Psi Upsilon, graduated 
from Caribou High School. 

Theodore Pettengill' of Island Falls, 
a member of Delta Upsilon, graduated 
from Island Falls High School. 

Donald J. Robertson of Caribou, a 
member of Delta Upsilon, graduated 
from Caribou High School. 

Waldo G. Weymouth of Limestone, 
a member of Beta Theta Pi, gradu- 
ated from Limestone High School. 



FOOTBALL RALLY 



The football rally held Friday night 
before the game with Trinity was 
very enthusiastic. John Young '21, 
presided. The first speaker was Cap- 
tain Dudgeon of the football team. 
Franklin D. MacCormick '18, who was 
manager of the baseball team when he 
was in college, spoke next. 

Jack Magee was the principal 
speaker of the evening, talking for 
Coach Greene in the latter's absence. 
He said that Saturday's game was the 
first opportunity for the Freshmen to 
show their worth by turning out and 
cheering the eleven. He appealed to 
every man to read Coach Greene's 
article about the team in the last issue 
of the "Orient." Jack summarized 
Bowdoin's splendid playing in the first 
three games and said that there was 
every reason to believe that Bowdoin 
would be victorious over Trinity. He 
lastly urged all football men who had 
drifted away from regular practise 
to return because a first team 
can never be strong without the back- 
ing of a good second team. 

President Sills was the last speaker. 
He urged Bowdoin men at all times to 
be hospitable to the opposing team 
and back the home team with honest 
sportsmanship. He also extended his 
own appreciation and the apprecia- 
tion of the faculty to the student 
council for the manner in which they 
had taken care of the campus activi- 
ties so far. 



Between the speeches apples, cig- 
arettes, and cider were distributed to 
the fellows, and the college songs we're 
sung to the accompaniment of the 
band and the fellows cheered with 
great enthusiasm. The rally was a 
splendid success. 



Wanted: Candidates for 

Track Managership 



If a college man can attain the 
managership of track he has secured 
one of the greatest honors offered here 
at Bowdoin. Of course, such a posi- 
tion is to be reached only by persever- 
ance. 

Each fraternity on the campus is 
expected to send out one candidate 
for this position. There are five men 
out now. The Zetes and Betas are 
ineligible this year since each has a 
representative in the present manager 
and assistant manager, respectively. 

What is the trouble with the others ? 
This is something well worth trying 
for! Plan to get your candidates out 
immediatelv! 



ALLMNI BACK 

FOR INITIATIONS 



Following is a list, as nearly com- 
plete as possible, of Alumni and 
other members who came back last 
Saturday for the initiation ceremonies 
of the various fraternities: 

Alpha Delta Phi. 

Charles H. Blatchford, Cornell '95; 
Hon. Carroll L. Beedy, Bates '03; John 
Blatchford, Amherst '10; George E. 
Burgess, Brown '12; Dr. Harry S. 
Emery, Bowdoin '93; Clement F. Rob- 
inson '03, Professor Marshall P. Cram 
'04, C. Franklin Packard '04, Arthur 
L. Robinson '08, Irving L. Rich '09, 
William B. Nultv '10, William H. Clif- 
ford '11, H. Ashmead White '12, 
Everett S. Winslow ex-'13, Earle S. 
Thompson '14, Ray M. Verrill '14, 
Kenneth E. Ramsay '15, Jacob B. Ham 
'19, Donald S. Higgins '19, Donald Mc- 
Donald '19, Charles E. Thomas ex-'19, 
Robert E. Cleaves, Jr., '20, Richard K. 
McWilliams '20, Oliver Moses, 3rd, '20, 
Roswell D. Emerson ex-'20, Walter J. 
Rich ex-'21, Nathan Clifford ex-'22. 

Psi Upsilon. 
Rev. Ernest A. Pressey, Trinity '92; 
Professor Charles T. Burnett, Am- 
herst '95; Edward L. Markthaler, 
Wesleyan '16; Frank F. Strout, Dart- 
mouth '19; J. Ernest Black, Trinity 
'23; Frank R. Kimball, Bowdoin '76, 
Professor Henry E. Andrews '94, Pro- 
fessor Philip W. Meserve '11, Donald 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



169 



Redfern '11, Ralph K. Sayward '12, 
David F. Kelley '16, Dwight H. Say- 
ward '16, Carl K. Ross '17, William 
Angus '19. 

Chi Psi. 

Harold Smith, Amherst '75; C. H. 
Stackpole, Wesleyan '86; Warren C. 
Coombs, Bowdoin '14; Murray M. 
Bigelow '18, Archie O. Dostie '20, 
Cloyd E. Small '20, Maynard C. Waltz 
'20. 

Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

Lucian D. Fuller, Brown '06; John 
B. McAuliffe, Dartmouth '16; R. K. 
Farnham, Middlebury '20; Stanley R. 
Black, Colby '21; Clark Drummond, 
Colby '21; Libby Pulsifer, Colby '21; 
Dr. Frank N. Whittier, Bowdoin '85, 
John V. Lane '87, William Widgery 
Thomas '94, Chas. S. Christie '95, John 
M. Bates '96, C. P. Merrill '96, John 
Clair Minot '96, Pres. Kenneth C. M. 
Sills '01, Robert K. Eaton '05, D. B. 
Andrews '06, Felix A. Burton '07, 
Frank W. Buckley '11, Edwin C. Bur- 
leigh '13, Noel C. Little '17, Parker 
B. Sturgis '19, Lewis W. Brown '20, 
Ainslee H. Drummond '20, Plimpton 
Gup till '20 (Medic-'24). 

Theta Delta Chi. 

Frank Kimball '79, Z. W. Kemp '84, 
Professor Wilmot B. Mitchell '90, 
Charles M. Leighton '94, Ernest R. 
Woodbury '95, Harvey D. Gibson '02, 
Luther Dana 'OS, Leon V. Walker '03, 
Myrton A. Bryant '04, James M. 
Chandler '08, J. C. Fitzgerald '16, Carl 
J. Longren '18, Laurence G. Barton 
'19, Daniel F. Mahoney '19, Robert H. 
Adams '20, Frank Donnelly ex-'21. 

Delta Upsilon. 

Professor William Hawley Davis, 
Harvard '05; Samuel B. Furbish, Am- 
herst '98; P, Somerville, Colby '21; C. 
E. Merritt, Bowdoin '94, Homer R. 
Blodgett '96, Howard Gilpatrick '96, 
G. S. Stetson '97, Clarence F. Kendall 
'98, Guy H. Sturgis '98, Henry E. 
Marston '99, Arthur F. Cowan '01, Al- 
fred L. Laferriere '01, Emery O. 
Beane '04, Ralph S. Smith '04, Chester 
S. Kingsley '07, Clyde E. Robinson '09, 
Arthur L. Smith '09, William E. At- 
wood '10, Earl L. Wing '10, DeForest 
Weeks '11, Seward J. Marsh '12, 
Ernest E. Weeks '12, Frank I. Cowan 
'13, Harold D. Gilbert '13, Lester B. 
Schackford '13, William H. Farrar '14, 
Percy D. Mitchell '14, Austin H. Mac- 
Cormick '15, Lee D. Pettingill '16, 
Francis W. Jacob '17, Henry W: Owen 
'17, Joseph B. Stride '17, Harold S. 
Young '17, John B. Freese '18, Frank- 
lin D. MacCormick '18, William W. 
Simonton '18, Romeyn S. Derby ex-'18, 
E. Shepley Paul, 2nd, '19, Donald H. 
Tebbets '19, Lincoln B. Farrar ex-'19, 
Allan W. Hall '20, Paul V. Mason '20, 
John C. Thalheimer ex-'21, Albert F. 
Rogers ex-'22. 

Zeta Psi. 

W. C. Philbrook, Colby '82; R. H. 
Gilpatrick, Yale, '01; L. C. Guptill, 
Colby '09; R. E. Chatelli, Colby '18; 



C. H. Stevens, Dartmouth '20; W. E. 
Burgess, Colby '21; J. E. Taylor, Jr., 
Colby '21, A. J. Sullivan, Colby '22; 

A. E. Thompson, Colby '22; Raymond 
Daniel, Colby '23; Albert J. Curtis, 
Bowdoin '70, Clarence A. Baker '78, 
Sanford L. Fogg '89, Perley D. Smith 
'95, Lyman A. Cousens '02, Edward F. 
Merrill '03, Wallace M. Powers '04, 
William F. Merrill '11, Julius C. Oram 
'11, Paul C. Lunt '13, Ellsworth A. 
Stone '15, Don J. Edwards '16, Fred- 
erick W. Powers '16, G. A. Wentworth 
'20. 

Kappa Sigma. 

Norman Bearse, New Hampshire 
'21; Friend L. Jenkins, University of 
Vermont '21; Clark Perry, University 
of Maine '21; Morris Pike, Brown '21; 
Reuel W. Smith, Bowdoin '97; Preston 

B. Churchill '99, George B. Coles- 
worthy '00, Burton M. Clough '00, 
Philip H. Kimball '11, Charles L. Ox- 
nard '11, Earle L. Russell ex-'12, Leon 
E. Jones '13, Leo W. Pratt '14, Donald 

C. Hight '15, J. W. Minot '15, E. Carl 
Moran '17, James C. Oliver '17, C. 
Eben Whitcomb '19, Everett A. Allen 
'20, Keith C. Coombs '20, Emerson 
Higgins '20, John M. Bachulus, Medic- 
'24 (ex-'22), Homer L. Mohr ex-'23. 

Beta Theta Pi. 

Clarence L. Newton, Wesleyan '02; 
Schuyler Hazard, Jr., M. I. T., '21; 
Norman B. Sewell, University of 
Maine, '21; Phillip Hodgden, Univer- 
sity of Maine, '22; Herrick A. Tappan, 
M. I. T., '23; William T. Johnson, 
Bowdoin '06, William S. Linnell '07, 
Willis E. Roberts '07, Alton S. Pope 
'11, Clarence A. Brown '14, Francis X. 
Callahan '14, Robert J. Evans '15, 
William D. Ireland '16, Leigh Webber 
'16, C. E. Allen '17, Leigh D. Flynt '17, 
Harold H. Sampson '17, Dwight W. 
Pierce '17, Raymond W. Swift '17, 
Ralph W. Pendleton '18, John H. Kern 
'19, Almon B. Sullivan '19, James E. 
Vance '19, Jere Abbott '20, Burleigh 
S. P. Jones '20. 

Sigma Nu. 
President Ogilby of Trinity; R. C. 
Seager, Trinity '02; P. M. Libbey, 
University of Maine '23; Wendell V. 
Hone, Bowdoin '17; Walter H. Lane 
'18, Robert C. Rounds '18, Henry M. 
Howard '19, G. Stewart DeMott '19, 
Arthur A. Demuth '20, Albert E. Hur- 
rell '20, Dwight L. Libbev '20. 



School should confer with Professor 
Cram at once. 

As this change in requirements of 
John Hopkins may be followed by 
changes in other schools, students who 
plan to attend the larger medical col- 
leges are advised to make certain that 
the elective courses which they take 
here are chosen with proper regard to 
present and future requirements. 



FOOTBALL PROSPECTS 



Medical School Notice 



Men who intend to study medicine 
at the John Hopkins Medical School 
should take notice that an important 
change in the entrance requirements 
in chemistry will go into effect in 
1923, by which the amount of college 
chemistry is materially increased. 
Students who intend to apply for ad- 
mission to the John Hopkins Medical 



The prospects for a successful State 
series in football this year are fairly 
good at this point in the season. Coach 
Greene and Trainer Magee have been 
putting the boys through the stiffest 
kind of practise in the last several 
weeks and the squad is showing a 
steady and sure improvement. 

Injuries this season have crippled 
the team and several good men havt 
had to drop the sport because of 
scholastic difficulties; however, there 
is still a good-sized squad left. 

There are now nearly forty men on 
the squad, all of them fellows who 
seem as though they are going to 
stick. 

There are five good men fighting for 
end positions this year — Parent, who 
was the star of two previous Bates 
games; and Perry, Gibbons, Burgess, 
and Bates look good. 

In the line, Captain Dudgeon, Mc- 
Curdy, Mason, Turner, Putnam, Wagg, 
Eames, Haines, Parsons, and Tootell 
have been doing good work. 

Joe Smith and Woodbury have been 
having a battle royal for quarter and 
both of them will probably be given 
chances in the State series. 

In the rest of the backfield there is 
an abundance of material. Dahlgren, 
M. E. Morrell, A. E. Morrell, H. F. 
Morrill, Miller and Bisson have all 
played and the choice between these 
men is going to be a hard one. Be- 
sides this number there are several 
second string men who are liable at 
any time to show varsity ability. "No 
man is sure of his place on the team 
yet," says Coach Greene. 

In short, this year's team is one 
which deserves the hearty support of 
every Bowdoin man. Let's all turn 
out, fellows, and help the team clean 
up Colby this Saturday at Waterville. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Norman W. Haines '21 Editor-in-Chief 

Edward B. Ham '22 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Floyd A. Gerrard '23 Athletics 

Karl R. Philbrick '23 Faculty Notes 

George H. Quinby '23 Alumni Department 

F. King Turgeon '23 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

John L. Berry '21 Crosby E. Redman '21 

Harry Helson '21 Frank A. St. Clair '21 

George E. Houghton '21 William R. Luddi n '22 
Russell M. McGown '21 Virgil C. McGorrill '22 
Roland L. McCormack. '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. Boardman '21. . Business Manager 
Wilfred R. Brewer '22 Assistant Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials; the Managing Editor 
for the news department; and the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 



Vol. L. October 20, 1920. No. 15 



Entered at Post Office in Brunswick 
Second-Class Mail Matter. 



Supporting the Team. 

The spirit shown at the rally and 
at the game last Saturday by the 
student body and all friends of Bow- 
doin is most commendable. Whether 
conscious or unconscious, it is a splen- 
did response to Coach Greene's article 
and the editorial in last week's issue 
of the "Orient." Next Saturday Bow- 
doin plays her first game of the State 
series. Without a doubt it will be a 
hard-fought battle from start to 
finish. While a cheering section was 
welcome at home, it will be doubly 
so on our opponent's field. We must, 
therefore, redouble our efforts in at- 
tendance and in cheering effectiveness 
at Colby. Waterville is "by no means 
a long trip, and the distance should 
not daunt any real Bowdoin man. If 
your funds are low, there are the 
traditional methods of securing trans- 
portation other than by buying tickets. 
Men of Bowdoin, make it a point to 
reach Waterville at whatever sacrifice. 
The team needs you! 

Besides supporting the team from 
the stands, there are men in the stu- 
dent body who can show their loyalty 
in a more active way. We refer to 



those men who came out for the team 
at some time during the season and 
who, for one reason or another, have 
dropped out. During the Maine series 
the coaching staff must have a reason- 
ably large squad to produce the de- 
sired results. We therefore appeal to 
any and all men who can play foot- 
ball to come out and help whip the 
team in shape for the Championship 
games. While the reward may not be 
great this year, for most of you there 
are other years coming and to Bow- 
doin men the inspiration of turning 
out a winning combination ought in 
itself to be recompense enough. Men 
of Bowdoin, show some fight; do your 
part to bring the Championship where 
it belongs. 



Cross-Country Notes. 



The cross-country team is out 
every day, taking a run over the 
course. The team is shaping up very 
well. A few Freshmen have come 
out for the team and take the run 
over the course with the upper-class- 
men. Several of them are coming 
along well and should make the team 
if they keep at the game. 

Bowdoin is negotiating for a dual 
meet with Boston College. If plans 
materialize, the probable date for the 
race will be Thursday, October 22. 

There will be seven men to start on 
each team. The first five to finish 
will be given places. 

It is expected that the State meet 
will result in a race between Goodwin 
of Bowdoin, Buker of Bates and Ray- 
mond of Maine for first honors. 

Colby, having lost heavily by gradu- 
ation, will start with a comparatively 
inexperienced team. 

The Maine team, under Coach Preti, 
is coming along well, and expects to 
duplicate its feat of last year. 



The. first meeting of the Maine In- 
tercollegiate Athletic Association was 
held last Friday at Waterville. Rep- 
resentatives from Bowdoin, Colby, and 
the University of Maine were there, 
those from Bates failing to put in 
their appearance. Bowdoin was rep- 
resented by Jack Magee, McGorrill '22, 
and Buker '21. The principal thing 
attended to was the amending of Sec- 
tion 3, Article 3, of the constitution. 
The amendment read: 

"That the sixth and seventh men of 



each team shall be scored, but they 
shall not be counted in the aggregate 
score of their team; and, that the 
place won by the sixth and seventh 
men of each team, shall not be 
credited to another runner in the 
race." 

It is necessary that before the next 
meeting of the association, each col- 
lege shall vote on this amendment. 

After some discussion it was de- 
cided that the manager of the team 
over whose course the race was to be 
run, should submit to each of the other 
colleges, a complete list of the names 
of the officials. The race is to be run 
at Bowdoin this year. 



SOPHOMORES WIN 

BASEBALL SERIES 



The Sophomores won the annual in- 
terclass series by winning, on the 
Delta, last Wednesday, the third game 
by a score of 4 to 2. As the Sopho- 
mores had won the first game 12 to 
4, and the Freshmen the second one 
5 to 2, this was the deciding game. 
At the start the Freshmen were very 
much outplayed, but as the game pro- 
ceeded, they began to come into their 
own. None of the pitching on either 
side was brilliant. 

The game started very ingloriously 
for the Freshmen just as the first one 
had done, the 1923 team scoring three 
runs, mostly through fumbles and 
wild throws. 

In the second inning the Freshmen 
began to show some speed, but were 
unable to push any runs across the 
plate. 

The most sensational play of the 
game was made by Putnam '24 in the 
third inning, when on the run he 
caught a fly in left field, thereby 
making a double play and preventing 
the Sophmores from scoring. 

The Sophomores added another run 
to the three in the fifth, while the 
Freshmen were held scoreless until 
the sixth when they put two runs 
across. In this inning the 1924 team 
had a chance to even up the score but 
they were unable to come through. 

As the game had started late it 
was called off after the Freshmen 
had had their chance in the sixth. A 
smaller crowd witnessed this game 
than had attended the other two. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



171 



ASSIGNMENTS 

GOVERNMENT I. 
Fourth- Week, Ending Saturday, Oc- 
tober 23. 

Lecture VII., Oct. 19. "Political 
Parties: Their place in popular gov- 
ernment." 

Lecture VIIL, Oct. 21. "Effects of 
Party System." 

Assignment: 1. Munro, Govern- 
ment of the U. S., Chaps. V;-XXII. 
2. Report on library topics. 

Group A. Conferences. 

Group B. Quiz section. 
Fifth Week, Ending Saturday, Oc- 
tober 30. 

Lecture IX., Oct. 26. "Machinery 
of Political Parties." 

Thursday, Oct. 28. Hour examina- 
tion. 

Hour examination will cover all the 
work of the course to date, including 
lectures, text, library reports and in- 
structions with regard to note taking, 
preparation of reports and use of li- 
brary materials. 



EUROPE SINCE 1815. 

(History 7) 

Fifth Week. 

Lectures. 

October 25th, Lecture IX. "The 
Rule of the Middle Class in France 
under Louis Philippe 1830-1848." 

October 27th, Lecture X. "Foreign 
Affairs, Dynastic Quarrels and So- 
cialism under Louis Philippe 1830- 
1848." 

Reading. 

Hazen, pp. 114-144, and thirty 
pages from the following: Andrews, 
Historical Development of Modern 
Europe I, pp. 276-341; Cheetham, 
Louis Napoleon, pp. 89-107, 118-139, 
and 180-202; Simpson, Rise of Louis 
Napoleon, pp. 79-273; Talleyrand, 
Memoirs V (any pages); Lamartine, 
French Revolution of 1848, pp. 1-83; 
Blanc, History of Ten years (any 
pages) ; Cambridge Modern History 
X, pp. 475-516. 



ENGLISH HISTORY. 
(History V) 
Oct. 25, Lecture IX. "Foundations 
of Feudal Institutions." 

Oct. 27, Lecture X. "Feudalism in 
England." 

Reading: Cheyney, Short History 



of England, pp. 113-143; Cheyney, 
Readings in English History, Nos. 73, 
78, 81, 83, 84. 

Note: Instead of the usual out- 
side readings students will prepare a 
carefully organized outline of the 
lectures and readings from Oct. 4 to 
Oct. 15 inclusive. (Outlines will be 
handed in at conference period Oct. 
28.) 



POLITICAL HISTORY OF THE 

UNITED STATES 

(History IX) 

Oct. 25, Lecture IX. The Confed- 
eration. Part II. 

Oct. 27, Lecture X. The Constitu- 
tion. Part I. 

Reading: Bassett, Short History 
of the United States, ch. X, and pp. 
238-246. 

MacDonald, Documentary Source 
Book of American History, No. 51. 

Below is a list of outside readings 
to be done before Nov. 4. (Minimum 
70 pages.) 

Curtis, G. T. — Constitutional His- 
tory of the United States, chs. XV- 
XXIII. 

Farrand, M.- — The Framing of the 
Constitution of the United States. 

Beard, C. A. — Economic Interpre- 
tation of the Constitution. 

Fiske, J. — Critical Period, chs. V.- 
VI. 

Thorpe — Constitutional History of 
the United States, ch. V. 

McLaughlin — The Confederation, 
pp. 221-310. 

Story — Commentaries, I, 627-643. 

Wilson, W. — History of the Ameri- 
can People, vol. Ill, 38-116. 

Henry, W. W.— Patrick Henry, Vol. 
II, chs. XXVI-XXXIX. 

McMaster — United States, Vol. I, 
pp. 454-502. 

Jameson, J. F.— Origin of the 
Standing Committee System in Ameri- 
can Legislative Bodies (Political 
Science Quarterly IX, No. 2. 

Lowell, A. L. — Essays on Govern- 
ment, No. 1. i 

Follett, M. P.— Speaker of the 
House, chs. I, XL 

Lodge, H. C— The Senate (Scrib- 
ner's, Vol. 34, pp. 541-550). 

Wilson, W. — Congressional Govern- 
ment, chs. II, IV. 

Fish, C. R. — Civil Service and the 
Patronage, ch. I. 

Mason, E. C. — The Veto Power, chs. 



Ill, VI. 

Lodge, H. C. — Washington, pp. 40-- 
81. 

Lodge, H. C— Hamilton, chs. V, VI. 

Bassett, J. S— The Federalist Sys- 
tem, pp. 27-42. 

Brown, W. G.— Oliver Ellsworth, 
pp. 180-200. 

Pellew, G.— J. Jay. 

ECONOMICS 5 
Week of October 24. 

Blackmar and Gillin : Two chapters 
beginning on p. 112. 

Suggested readings: McDougall, 
Social Psychology, Chap. 3 and 4; 
Cooley, The Social Process, Chap. 18; 
Hart, Psychology of Insanity, Chaps. 
4 and following chapters; Patrick, 
Psychology of Relaxation; Boas, The 
Mind of Primitive Man. 



ECONOMICS 1— ASSIGNMENTS 
Oct. 22, Materials, pp. 77-104. 
Oct. 27-29, Topic: "Capital," Seager, 
ch. 9; Materials, ch. 5. 
Conferences, Oct. 26, 28. 



ECONOMICS 9— ASSIGNMENTS 

Oct 22, Office Management, Jones, 
ch. 16. 

Oct. 24 to 27, Purchasing and Stores, 
Jones, ch. 17. 

Oct. 29, Selling, Jones, ch. 18. 



OLampus Jftetos 

Marshall '24 met with a painful ac- 
cident last week when he was thrown 
from his motorcycle. 

President Ogilby of Trinity College 
was on the campus last week. 

All men who registered late are re- 
quested to see some member of the 
Board oi; Managers in regard to pay- 
ment of the Blanket Tax. 

The attention of many students has 
been attracted by the new sun dial 
which has been placed on the campus. 
A set of instructions makes it possible 
for the exact time to be told at any 
season of the year. 

Workmen have been engaged for 
several weeks repairing the roof of 
the library. 

The Freshman delegation of Delta 
Kappa Epsilon were busy Saturday 
morning entertaining the pedestrians 
of Maine street and the students in 
the dormitories with various stunts 
and demonstrations. 



172 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Trials for the Mandolin Club have 
been held this week; for the Fresh- 
men on Monday, and for all classes 
Tuesday. 

A notice has come from Senator 
Hale in regard to examinations for 
principal and alternate nominations 
to the U. S. Naval Academy at An- 
napolis. Men who are citizens of the 
United States, between the ages of 
sixteen and twenty, and physically fit 
are eligible. Examinations will be 
held by the Civil Service Commission 
at Portland, Bangor, and Augusta. 

At a recent meeting of the Junior 
class, W. R. Flinn was elected presi- 
dent to fill the vacancy until the 
Junior elections. 

John G. Young, president of the 
student council, spoke Wednesday eve- 
ning, Oct. 13, before the Bowdoin Club 
of Portland at their first meeting of 
the year. The football prospects and 
affairs of the new year were described 
to the Portland alumni. 

Nothing definite regarding the golf 
tournament has yet been decided upon. 

Ridley '22, manager of baseball, is 
negotiating for a southern trip at the 
opening of the season which may take 
the team as far south as the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

During the past week many of the 
Freshmen at the various fraternity 
houses have gone night-walking. 
Some Freshmen proved to be such 
good walkers that they beat the 
Sophomores home; others, however, 
walked too far so that they didn't 
make their appearance at the college 
till the next morning. 

The aeroplane at Topsham fair has 
attracted much attention on the 
campus as it flew over the college 
buildings several times. s 

Phillip G. Brown '77, president of 
the First National Bank in Portland, 
was on the campus last week. 



Now We Know We Lack It. 

Son — What is horse sense? 

Father — It is the faculty of saying 
"nay" my boy. — Massachusetts Aggie 
Squib. 



Just Wait. 

"Do you know how old that Prof, 
is?" 

"No, he hasn't told us any of his 
jokes yet." — Cornell Widow. 



jfacultp jRotes 

Professor Bell went to Boston Tues- 
day on a short trip, 

Professor Woodruff spoke Sunday 
at the Men's Forum *>f the Univer- 
salist Church. 

Professor Bell will sneak tonight on 
the League of Nations at Rockland, 
and tomorrow night a* Stonington. 

Professor Woodruff preached at the 
Williston Church in Portland on Sun- 
day, October 17. 



alumni Department 

1908 — J. M. Chandler is special rep- 
resentative of the Comptroller's office, 
American Express Company, 65 
Broadway, New York City. 

1911— Miss Doris Wilder and 
George Herbert Macomber were mar- 
ried at Augusta on October 6. 

1911 — A. G. Dennis is general 
auditor in Europe for the American 
Express Company. His address is 8 
Haymarket, London, England. 

1913— Alfred H. Sweet for the past 
three years acting assistant professor 
of English History at Cornell is now 
Associate Professor of History at the 
University of Colorado. His address 
is 1439 Twelfth Street, Boulder, Colo. 

1914 — Vernon W. Marr has a posi- 
tion with the United Drug Co. of Bos- 
ton. 

1914 — Dr. H. C. Dixon is now prac- 
ticing medicine in Danielson, Conn. 

1914 — Ermond L. Sylvester is credit 
manager of the Foreign Credit Cor- 
poration of New York City. 

ex-1915 — Miss Alfaretta Graves of 
Brunswick and Leslie Nathaniel Stet- 
son of Buffalo, N. Y., were married at 
Brunswick, October 11. 

1917 — Erik Achorn has recently re- 
turned from Germany where he has 
been doing graduate work in history 
for about three months. Most of his 
studying was done at Bonn. He is 
now continuing his work at Harvard. 

1918— Robert G. Albion has just 
been appointed to an assistantship in 
history at Harvard, with about ninety 
freshmen to teach. He was awarded 
his A.M. last June, and is now study- 
ing for a Ph.D. He plans to spend 
next summer in the British archives 
in London, and also on the continent. 

1918 — Bela W. Norton has been very 
successful in his work for the "New 
York Sun." He has had several fea- 



ture stories and special articles pub- 
lished. 

1918— Lieutenant Richard T. Schlos- 
berg has been ordered from Camp 
Devens to Fort Benning, Georgia. 

1920— Albert H. McQuillan has 
transferred from McGill University 
to the Harvard Medical School. 



Class of 1876. 

William Alden is a physician at 717 
Liberty avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Tascus Atwood is a lawyer in Au- 
burn, Me., where he has practised 
since 1879. 

Rev. Collins G. Burnham is a re- 
tired clergyman in Belchertown, 
Mass. 

Charles H. Clark is an instructor 
in Latin and mathematics at Phillips 
Exeter Academy. 

Orman C. Evans, having been for 
many years a superintendent of 
schools in Maine and Massachusetts, 
has retired and now lives at 45 A 
street, South Portland, Me. 

Howard E. Hall is a lawyer at 
Damariscotta, Me. 

Charles T. Hawes, for many years 
chairman of the Athletic Council and 
since 1904 an overseer of the college, 
is in the life insurance business in 
Bangor, Me. 

Charles D. Jameson is a civil en- 
gineer in Bangor, Me. He was for 
many years in the employ of the 
Chinese Government. 

Frank R. Kimball has returned from 
business and is living in Lexington, 
Mass. 

John S. Leavitt has retired from 
business and is living in Gorham, Me. 

John G. Libby is in the employ of 
the Boston & Maine Railroad and is 
living in Boston, Mass. 

Walter H. Merritt, for some years 
editor of the "Wallace Monthly" and 
the "American Horseman," is now at 
Tanakee, Alaska. 

George B. Merritt is a structural 
engineer with offices in the Fidelity 
Building, Portland, Me. 

John A. Morrill, an overseer of the 
college since 1888, is a Justice of the 
Maine Supreme Court. 

Arthur T. Parker is a retired manu- 
facturer at East Orleans, Mass. 

George Parsons, for many years 
connected with the Cairo (111.) Trust 
Property and while resident there, 
mayor of the city, has retired to live 
in Kennebunk, Me. 



BO WD 01 N ORIENT 



173 



Dr. John H. Payne is a prominent 
occulist in Boston, Mass., and pro- 
fessor of ophthalmology at Boston 
University. 

Franklin C. Payson, from 1897 to 
1910 overseer of the college and since 
then a trustee, is one of the most 
prominent lawyers in the State and 
practises in Portland, Me. 

Rev. Charles A. Perry is a clergy- 
man in Bowdoinham, Me. 

Rev. George F. Pratt is a clergyman 
in Sanford, Me. 

George T. Prince is a consulting en- 
gineer in Omaha, Neb. 

Walter A. Robinson, teacher of 
mathematics in the Public Latin 
School in Boston, is now in Europe 
as chairman of the Soldiers' Grave 
Commission of Massachusetts to which 
position he was appointed by Gover- 
nor Coolidge last spring. 

Allen E. Rogers is a lawyer in San 
Diego, Cal. 

Dr. William H. G. Rowe has retired 
and is living in Los Angeles, Cal. 

Alvah H. Sabin is a chemist in 
Flushing, L. I. He lectures at New 
York University and is consulting 
chemist for the National Lead Com- 
pany. 

Alpheus Sanford, an overseer of the 
college, is a lawyer in Boston, Mass. 

Fred M. Stimson is a superintend- 
ent of asphalt mines at Bowling 
Green, Ky. 

Horace R. Sturgis is connected with 
the Augusta Lumber Company at Au- 
gusta, Me. 

Charles S. Taylor is a teacher in the 
Lake View High School in Chicago, 
111. 

Charles H. Wheeler is a teacher of 
manual training in Brunswick gram- 
mar school and lives in Topsham, Me. 

Bion Wilson is in the mortgage in- 
vestment business in Boston, Mass. 

Edgar Yates is one of the editors 
of the "Boston Post." 

Non-Graduates. 

Daniel W. Brookhouse when last 
heard from was a shoe manufacturer 
in Fitzroy, Australia. 

Jeremiah Millay is in the lumber 
business in Eureka, Cal. 

Joseph E. Sewall is a retired sea 
captain and is living in Bath, Me. 

Charles W. Whitcomb has business 
interests in Boston and New York and 
is living at Stratham, N. H. 

Forty-five men were graduated in 



the class and of these thirty-two are 
living. The four above are the re- 
maining non-graduates. 

Class of 1877. 

William G. Beale, LL.D., a trustee 
of the college, is a member of the law 
firm of Isham, Lincoln, and Beale in 
Chicago, 111. 

Philip G. Brown is a banker in 
Portland, Me. 

John E. Chapman is living in Bruns- 
wick, Me. 

Charles E. Cobb is a shoe manufac- 
turer in Brockton, Mass. 

William T. Cobb, LL.D., a trustee 
of the college, is president of the 
Bath Iron Works and lives in Rock- 
land, Me. 

Edgar M. Cousins, D.D., an over- 
seer of the college, is living in Brewer, 
Me. 

Frederick H. Dillingham, M.D., is 
practising in New York City. 

Joseph K. Greene is a lawyer in 
Worcester, Mass. 

William C. Greene is a lawyer in 
Sag Harbor, N. Y. 

Frank H. Hargraves is a manu- 
facturer in West Buxton, Me. 

George A. Holbrook is the rector 
of the St. Barnabas Parish in Troy, 
N. Y. 

Dr. Phineas H. Ingalls is practis- 
ing in Hartford, Conn. 

Charles E. Knight is in business in 
Wiscasset, Me. 

George H. Marquis is a district 
judge in Watertown, South Dakota. 

Samuel A. Melcher is living in 
Brunswick, Me. 

Frank A. Mitchell is in the railroad 
business at Manistee, Mich. 

Carroll W. Morrill is a lawyer in 
Portland, Me. 

Charles W. Morse is in the mer- 
cantile business in New York City. 

Charles L. Nickerson is a farmer 
in Garden City, Minn. 

Curtis A. Perry is an artist in 
Bridgton, Me. 

Charles B. Seabury has a business 
in New York City and lives in Boon- 
ton, N. J. 

Addison M. Sherman is a clergy- 
man in Platteville, Wis. 

Dr. Henry H. Smith is practising in 
New Haven, Conn. 

Freeland O. Stanley is an automo- 
bile manufacturer in Newton, Mass. 

George L. Thompson, whose home 
is in Brunswick, has been an invalid 



for several years. 

George W. Tillson, Sc.D., is a civil 
engineer in Le Grange, 111. 

Henry D. Wiggin is in the whole- 
sale lumber business in Boston, Mass. 



CALENDAR. 

Oct. 21 — Cross-Country : Boston Col- 
lege at Boston, over Franklin Field 
course. 

Oct. 23— Football: Colby at Water- 
ville. 

Oct. 30 — Football: Bates at Lewis- 
ton. 



'Is this a fast train?" the salesman 
asked the conductor. 

"Of course it is," was the reply. 

"I thought it was. Would you mind 
my getting out to see what it is fast 
to?"— Sonora Bell. 



Seen in front of the barracks — 
"Please do not walk on the grass — 
it dulls the blades." — Ohio State 
Lantern. 



EVEREADY; 

BATTERIES 

"Fit all Flashlights" 



We have a fresh 
supply of EVEREADV 
Flashlight Batteries 



NEW, long-lived batteries 
to snap your idle flash- 
light back into active service 

100% efficient when you get 
them. We test Eveready Bat- 
teries before you take them. 

Whatever make or shape of 
flashlight you have there's an 
Eveready Battery for it — an 
Eveready Battery to better it 

CARON, 
the Watchmaker, 

Brunswick, Maine. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




Generator room of one of the 
hydro-electric plantswhich sup- 
ply power to the C. M. & St. P. 



The Power of Electricity 
in Transportation 



Some Advantages of 
Railroad Electrification 

Saving the Nation's coal. 
Lower maintenance costs. 



Ability to haul smoothly 
heavier trains at higher 
speed. 

Operation of electric locomo- 
tives unaffected by extreme 
cold. 

Ability to brake trains on 
descending grades by re- 
turning power to the trolley. 



ELECTRICITYhasleveledout 
the Continental Divide. The 
steam locomotive, marvelous as 
it is after a century of develop- 
ment, cannot meet all of the pres- 
ent demands for transportation 
facilities. Its electric rival has 
proved to be far superior. 

On the mountain divisions of the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
Railway— the world's greatest 
electrification — giant electric loco- 
motives today lift an ever increas- 
ing freight tonnage over the mile- 
high Rockies and also make travel- 
ing clean and comfortable. They 
utilize the abundant energy of dis- 
tant waterfalls and then,by return- 
ing some of this power to the 
trolley, safely brake the trains on 
descending grades. And their 
capabilities are not impaired by 
excessively cold weather when 



the steam engine is frozen and 
helpless. 

Electricity is the power which 
drives the trains of New York 
City's subway and elevated sys- 
tems. It operates the locks and 
tows the ships, through the 
Panama Canal. It propels the 
Navy's latest super-dreadnaught, 
the New Mexico. Electric mine 
locomotives have replaced the 
slow-moving mule and the electric 
automobile has also come to do 
an important service. 

Electricity has become the uni- 
versal motive power. It has con- 
tributed efficiency and comfort to 
every form of transportation ser- 
vice and in this evolution General 
Electric apparatus has played a 
large part — from mighty electric 
locomotives to the tiny lamp for 
the automobile. 




General Office 
Schenectady; NY! 



Sales Offices in 
all large cities 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



JUD, The Barber 

was going to use this space 
but thought it wasn't neces- 
sary. 



CHOCOLATES 

OF DISTINCTION 

AT 

A. W. BUTLER'S 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 Washington Street 
Boston 



Arrow 

OLLA1L 




s-c 




119 MAINE STREET 
BRUNSWICK 



Macullar Parker Co, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Makers of Conser- 
vative Clothes for 
College Men, will 
show frequently at 
Bowdoin College. 

YOUR PATRONAGE IS 
EARNESTLY SOLICITED 

* 

G. L. GOODWIN, Representative 



176 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



NEW LINE OF 

BATH ROBES 

$7.50 



Flannel Shirts 

$3 to $6.50 



E. S. BODWELL 

& SON 

Brunswick, Maine. 

THE 

COLLEGE 

BOOK STORE 



The place to buy everything from 
a Thumb Tack to a Wedding Present. 
Take a look at our new line of Kay- 
woodie Pipes. These are of real 
Italian Bruyere with the Aluminum 
Inbore tube. All models $4.50 each. 



F. W, CHANDLER 

& SON 



150 MAINE STREET. 



DANCING 
JENNIES. HARVEY 

EVERY TUESDAY EVENING, 

BEGINNING OCTOBER 26th 

TOWN HALL, BRUNSWICK 

Class at 7.30 p. m. Assembly, 8.30. 

Monday Evenings, Armory Hall, Bath, 
beginning October 18th. 

These classes are open to college 
students. 

Private lessons and classes on appli- 
cation. 

Address 
897 Middle St., Bath, Me. 

Phone 151-W. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. 
Surplus and Profits, $100,000. 
Student Patronage Solicited. 



BOWDOIN CANTEEN 

8 a. m.-12 m.; 1.30-6; 7-11 

Sundays, 12-5 p. m. 

A. PALMER, 19 North Winthrop. 



She will applaud your good taste 
if you send— 




The quaint box gives just the right 
touch and the candies are worthy to be 
YOUR gift. You might often treat 
YOURSELF to a box, too! Why not? 
The Big War made candy a real mans 
food. 

FOR SALE BY 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 Maine Street 



I CARL H. MARTIN A w haskell, d d s . 

„. , ^ . W. F. BROWN, D. D. S. 

Cleansing and Dyeing 
Pressing and Alterations DENTISTS 

4 Elm Street Over Postoffice Brunswick, Me. 



CORDOVAN BOOTS 

IN 

YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 



"Herman's" Tan Cordovan $13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan . . $15.50 
"Plorsheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 

TENNIS SHOES, INDOOR AND 

OUTDOOR MOCCASINS, RUBBER 

BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 




Featuring 

the newest productions in 
garments for fall wear made 
for us by 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 

Haskell & Jones Company 



PORTLAND, 



MAINE 



"The Store of Progress and Service" 
This is the season of the year when College men are considering the matter of 

Warm Outdoor Coats 

and we know that they are especially interested in the Sheep Lined and 
Sport Coats, so we call attention at this time to these Coats which we 
know will appeal to the College Chap. 

Sheep Lined Coats 

three-quarter length. This is a Moleskin, and a good, warm, serviceable Coat just what you want 
when you go out on a long hike or want to keep real warm at the football or other outdoor sports. 

Sport Coats 

We have got a fine line of these Coats in reversible leather. They have raglan shoulder; belt all 
around, and they come in the popular brown shade. 



Don't forget that Mr. Jack Handy '23 of the Zeta Psi House is still our represent- 
ative, and he will be glad to attend to all your requirements for Furnishings or 
otherwise. 



Monument 
Square 




Portland 
Maine 



178 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




Chocolates 

The Chocolates 

{hat are 

Difjfer ervb 

Truly Great Chocolates are so luscious and so good 
that you wall ■wish the box were many times larger. 

This package has a very special assortment of choice 
fillings of pre-eminent quality, and many of the coatings 
are the delicious butter coatings original with Apollo 




The dainty assortment of finely decorated pieces 
makes the "Truly Great" Assortment a charming gift 
of far more distinction than the usual box of chocolates. 

Jr.j7.J'co6er£s Co., 

Boston, Mass. 



imiinm nun i mm minimum hi n:i ii'i.r. in, ii, ii'iiiiiiiuniiici!'. 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



179 



Qood putters study the line of 
their putts to gauge the roll and 
to make sure no obstacle inter- 
venes between ball and hole. 




RUNNING down a long putt involves not only 
' skill, but the perfection of your ball. 

IL S. Golf Balls are absolutely dependable on the 
green. Accuracy of construction makes them so. 
They leave the club quickly and run smoothly. 
Obtainable in various sizes and weights. 

Buy them from your pro or at your dealer's. 

U. S. Royal $1.00 each 
U. S. Revere 85c each 
U. S. Floater 65c each 

Keep your eye on the ball — be sure it's a U. S. 



United States Rubber Company 





180 BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CUMBERLAND 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

MOTHERS OF MEN 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

MAY ALLISON 

. . . IN . . . 

HELD IN TRUST 



NEXT WEEK— MONDAY AND TUESDAY 



. . . IN . . . 

THE HEART OF TEXAS RYAN 



PASTIME 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

GERALDINE FARRAR 

. . . IN . . . 

THE STRONGER VOW 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

ALICE JOYCE 

. . . IN . . . 

SLAVES OF PRIDE 



NEXT WEEK— MONDAY AND TUESDAY 

THOMAS MEIGHAN 

. . . IN . . . 

THE PRINCE CHAP 



L 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



VOL. L. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1920. 



No. 16 



STATE SERIES STARTED RIGHT WITH 

DECISIVE 7-0 VICTORY FROM COLBY 



Colby Outplayed Except in Third Quarter — Al Morrell, Turner, Dudgeon, and Gibbons 

Star — Joe Smith Scores Winning Touchdown — Colby Fails To Make First Down 

Before Second Half, and Only Four Times Then. 



Under a broiling sun and on a 
chokingly dusty field Bowdoin won 
her first game of the State Champion- 
ship series at Waterville last Satur- 
day. During the first half of the 
game Bowdoin had a decided super- 
iority over the Colby team, but the 
second half was an exhibition of hard- 
fought and well matched football on 
both sides. The Blue and Gray team 
attempted very few trick formations, 
making most of its gains through 
straight line plunging, end runs, and 
straight passes. Much credit is due 
Morebond, the Colby right guard, for 
his offensive work. He is a heavy man 
who can use his weight where it is of 
advantage. The Colby backs also 
played high class football, Sullivan 
and McGary being the most consistent 
gainers. For Bowdoin, Gibbons and 
Parent on the ends played their usual 
speedy ball, while Dudgeon, Eames, 
and Mason proved bulwarks of de- 
fense. In the backfield Al Morrell, 
Turner, Smith, and Whitney all did 
exceptionally good work. Both teams 
were in excellent condition and had 
had the best of training. 

Bowdoin went to Waterville sup- 
posedly to play an open game and 
for the first few minutes of the game, 
the White tried forward passes sev- 
eral times, generally successful. Most 
of the game, however, it was found 
unnecessary to resort to the air and 
the Bowdoin backs found little diffi- 
culty in penetrating the Colby line 

(Continued on page 185) 



Class of 1868 Prize 

Speakers Chosen 

At a meeting of the Faculty on 
Monday last the following Seniors 
were appointed speakers for the Class 
of 1868 Prize: Badger, Coburne, 
Hatch, Helson, Morse, and H. Nixon. 

The Class of 1868 prize is a prize 
of forty-five dollars, contributed by 
the Class of 1868, given annually to 
the author of the best written and 
spoken oration in the Senior Class. 

The competition is to take place 
on Thursday evening, Jan. 20, 1921. 



IBIS MEETING 

The Ibis met on Friday evening at 
the Sigma Nu House, and took in 
two new members, Kileski '21 and 
Noyes '21. Noyes read Lord Duns- 
any's latest satire, "H Shakespeare 
Lived Today," in which is described 
the probable distress of the average 
modern Britisher if asked to accept 
Shakespeare as a member of his club. 
Morse read "These Wild Young Peo- 
ple," an article in the September "At- 
lantic Monthly," which aroused wide- 
spread comment in last month's 
press, and the substance of which is a 
spirited defence of contemporary 
young people, "by one of them." 
Some recent poetry was read by 
Kileski and Helson. 

The next meeting will be held at 
the Zeta Psi House on Tuesday eve- 
ning, Nov. 2, when it is hoped to 
have a member of the faculty present. 



COLBY GAME RALLY 



Speeches By Dr. Whittier, Dean Nixon 
and John Young. 



Friday night a snappy rally for the 
Colby game was held in Memorial 
Hall. John Young '21 presided, and 
exhorted the students to the utmost 
to have the "whole of Bowdoin Col- 
lege" at Waterville on Saturday. 

Dean Nixon was the second speaker 
and began by discussing in his usual 
pleasing vein the trials and tribu- 
lations of a dean. He prophesied a 
victory for Bowdoin after a good con- 
test, and urged every Bowdoin man 
to do his share in winning that vic- 
tory by rooting for the team at Water- 
ville. 

The last speaker of the rally, Dr. 
Whittier, told of a number of the 
games with Colby in former years, 
when Bowdoin won consistently with 
scores ranging from twenty and thirty 
to nothing to sixty-eight to nothing. 
Again and again Dr. Whittier brought 
in humorous touches which were un- 
usually effective. He spoke of his 
prophesies of Bowdoin victories ten 
or fifteen years ago which always 
came true until "shortly after Dean 
Nixon came to Bowdoin." He men- 
tioned Admiral Peary's prediction 
that the recent war would be won in 
the air to compare it with his own 
belief that Saturday's game would be 
"won in the air." Dr Whittier con- 



182 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



eluded by expressing his regret that 
he could not be at the game himself, 
as he had to perform an autopsy in 
Portland, which he hoped would be no 
simpler than the autopsy to be per- 
formed on the Colby team Saturday. 
In addition to the speeches a series 
of cheers were given, among them 
cheers for the individual members of 
the winning cross-country team last 
Thursday. Several Bowdoin songs 
were sung, and refreshments of the 
usual order were passed around. The 
rally broke up with the singing of 
"Bowdoin Beata." 



LETTER FROM 

WILLIAM J. CURTIS '75 



Professor Woodruff received last 
week a most interesting letter from 
Mr. William J. Curtis '75, of New 
York City, a trustee of the college and 
one of her most loyal benefactors. 

The following extracts summarize 
the chief features of Mr. Curtis's let- 
ter: 

It will not be easy for the average 
person to understand this confusing 
and contradictory campaign, as it is 
being conducted by the various groups 
and interests in the Republican party, 
but to me it is easily explainable. The 
best minds in the party recognize 
that the United States will not stand 
for a repudiation of its obligations 
and duties, that it will not dishonor 
itself by failing to ratify the Treaty 
of Peace, that good faith to its allies 
compels ratification, and that the 
League of Nations is in itself such an 
achievement in the attempt to pro- 
mote the peace of the world that it 
will be a national disgrace not to take 
advantage of it at the present time. 
No one but a few irreconcilables 
known as "Bitter-Enders" pretends to 
oppose the League of Nations as a 
whole, and these represent only a very 
small minority of the party. I do not 
mean to say that there are not 
patriotic and high-minded people, who 
for reasons which I cannot understand 
do oppose the League. This I cannot 
explain any more than I can explain 
why Patrick Henry, one of the great- 
est of the patriots of our country op- 
posed the ratification of the Constitu- 
tion of the United States. There is 
not doubt, however, that the campaign 
has clearly demonstrated that the 



great body of American citizens favor 
our entering the League with at least 
interpretative reservations. 

How, then, can we account for this 
chasm between Senator Borah and his 
friends and Mr. Taft and his friends ? 
Isn't it manifest that there is an in- 
ternal struggle for control of the 
party by different and irreconcilable 
interests, both hoping to dominate 
Senator Harding, if elected. There is 
no doubt in my mind that this is the 
fact, and the electorate of the United 
States ought not to allow themselves, 
in a great world issue like this, to be 
diverted from the fearless perform- 
ance of their duty because of a po- 
litical schism within the Republican 
party. 

Don't forget, if Senator Harding 
should be elected, that the "Bitter- 
Enders" or "Battalion of Death," will 
treat the result as a condemnation of 
the League, and as a mandate to them 
to continue their opposition; and that 
they will be certain to continue their 
opposition with bitterness and deter- 
mination, and that they will be sup- 
ported by those who will resent the 
dishonesty and vacillating policy of 
the presidential candidate who during 
the campaign encouraged them to be- 
lieve he sympathized with their hostile 
attitude toward the Treaty and 
League, only to desert them, — if Mr. 
Root and ex-President Taft prevail in 
their influence with him, — after the 
victory is won. In such an event the 
desired end of peace and our entry 
into the League of Nations will be 
long deferred, how long no one can 
tell, no matter which coterie prevails 
in its influence with their candidate. 

The issue is plain. Everyone who 
has the moral sense clearly to see 
the duty of our country and who be- 
lieves in the peace of the world as 
nearly as it can be obtained by the 
League of Nations should vote for the 
candidate who is unequivocally in 
favor of it, not for a candidate whose 
position is so uncertain that he is be- 
ing supported by elements in his party 
who are of conflicting and opposite 
views on the theory that he is in 
favor of both. 

Patriotism should transcend all pre- 
vious party affiliations in this great 
issue. The women who are now cast- 
ing their first vote can show their 
independence, their intelligence, and 
their fine moral discrimination by vot- 



ing for the Treaty of Peace and the 
League of Nations. The soldiers who 
engaged in the war should vote as 
they fought. Those who by prejudice 
or by old association cannot see that 
the issues today compel a new align- 
ment of the forces of the world as 
well as of this country, will stick to 
their prejudices and vote with the 
party with which they have been here- 
tofore associated, regardless of the 
principles involved. 

Very sincerely yours, 

W. J. Curtis. 



Exhibit and Lecture 

of Audubon Society 



The Robin Junior Audubon Society 
held its annual exhibit and lecture be- 
fore a good sized audience at the 
Searles Biological Laboratory on Mon- 
day evening, Oct. 18. The museum, 
which was an excellent place to stage 
the exhibit, was decorated with balsam 
fir, pine, and colorful autumn leaves. 
A very interesting lecture on "The 
Boys and Their Work in the Aubudon 
Society" was delivered by Professor 
Gross. The exhibit, which was divided 
into five sections, consisted of bird 
houses, color work, used nests, photo- 
graphs, and insect specimens. They 
were judged by Professor Copeland 
and Mr. Charles G. Wheeler '76, prizes 
being awarded to the winners. Chief 
among whom were Weston Walch and 
Everett Nason. Dr. Gross has been 
doing a great deal of work during the 
last year or so in the organization 
of this club of Brunswick boys. 



Saturday Football Scores. 

Bowdoin 7, Colby 0. 
Maine 14, Bates 8. 
Harvard 31, Centre 14. 
Yale 24, West Virginia 0. 
Syracuse 10, Dartmouth 0. 
Princeton 14, Navy 0. 
Army 28, Tufts 6. 
Virginia Military Institute 27, 
University of Pennsylvania 7. 
Pittsburgh 10, Georgia Tech. 3. 
Wesleyan 10, Columbia 0. 
Cornell 42, Colgate 6. 
Brown 14, Springfield Y. M. C. A. 0. 
Williams 62, Trinity 0. 
Amherst 35, Union 0. 
Swarthmore 41, Johns Hopkins 0. 
Penn. State 109, Lebanon Valley 7. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



183 



BOWDOIN LEADS BOSTON 

COLLEGE IN CROSS-COUNTRY 



Goodwin and Hart Easy Winners — Towle Finishes Far Ahead of First 
Boston College Runner. 



The Bowdoin cross-country team 
went to Newton last Thursday and 
won a complete victory over Boston 
College. The running conditions were 
very bad, the oppressive heat making 
fast time impossible. In spite of the 
weather and the unaccustomed course, 
however, the harriers under Captain 
Goodwin easily captured first, second, 
third, sixth, and eighth places, win- 
ning the event by a score of twenty 
to thirty-five. 

Boston College has a course de- 
cidedly unlike that which Jack 
Magee's proteges are wont to follow. 
As it is only about a mile and a half 
in length, the runners make an initia- 
tory circuit of the cinder path, two 
laps on the hill and dale course 
(which, by the way, is more hill than 
dale), and then a final tour of the 
cinders. 

Goodwin Leads Throughout Race. 

The wearers of the White and Black 
jumped into the lead just as the field 
was leaving the college campus when 
Captain Goodwin strode in front of 
O'Brien, the Maroon and Gold cap- 
tain, taking the position which he 
maintained to the finish. ■ Goodv/in 
fulfilled the expectations of the col- 
lege for its Olympic representative, 
while Bill Hart's performance was 
more than satisfactory as he dogged 
George all the way, finishing about 
ten yards behinds him. Towle fol- 
lowed some fifty yards behind Hart 
and nearly a quarter of a mile ahead 
of the nearest opponent, "Dinger" 
Dolan, who was leading the B. C. 
field. Dolan was exhausted by the 
excessive heat as was his team-mate, 
Captain O'Brien, who followed close 
upon Dolan's heels. The Newton 
team was outclassed from the start, 
the chief virtue of its performance 
being that the men kept well together. 

New Letter Men. 

Hart's long legs have doubtless won 
him his "B" on his first athletic trip 
in three years at college, while 
Towle's grit has probably brought 



him the same reward. Renier also 
will receive his letter if the Athletic 
Council decides, as it probably will, 
to award letters for the event. Good- 
win and Hatch are already letter men. 




GEORGE GOODWIN, 
Winner of B. C. Cross-Country Race, 



Goodwin's time was twenty-three 
minutes, and the easy style with 
which both he and Hart finished re- 
flected the excellent training that 
Coach Magee has given them this fall 
as well as showing what good natural 
ability they have. After the race the 
Boston College men congratulated 
each of the winning team, and also 
Jack, commenting particularly on the 
work of Towle, Hatch, and Renier. 
These three "punished themselves" 
more than any runners they had seen 
for a long time. 

Hard Training for Maine Meet. 

Jack was well satisfied with his 
team, but nevertheless said that they 
must all train to the utmost and do 
their very hardest work to make a 
respectable showing in the state meet 
a week from Friday. 



Buker Confident of Second Win. 

The Bates team came down here 
last week and went over the course. 
Buker feels confident of repeating his 
last year's victory, but, according to 
Jack, he will be forced to go a lot 
harder this time to show his heels to 
Goodwin and Raymond. Hart and 
Towle are both expected to run strong 
and to be right up with the leaders. 

Bowdoin started Goodwin, Hart, 
Towle, Renier, Hatch, and Varney; 
B. C. sent out O'Brien, Russell, Dolan, 
Deeley, McGovern, and Marr. The 
men finished as follows: Goodwin, 1; 
Hart, 2; Towle, 3; Dolan, 4; O'Brien, 
5; Hatch, 6; McGovern, 7; Renier, 8; 
Russell, 9; and Deeley, 10. James E. 
Donovan, president of the N. E. I. C. 
A. A., started the pack, and John D. 
Kelley and Virgil C. McGorrill acted 
as judges. 



Publications Office. 

The managements of the Publish- 
ing Company and the "Bugle" wish to 
announce to the student body that the 
official headquarters of the "Orient," 
"Quill," "Bugle" and Publishing Co. 
will until further notice be found in 
the North Wing of the Chapel, op- 
posite the Bannister Hall classroom 
entrance. The office door is fitted 
with a mail box of sufficient capacity 
to receive all communications, ad- 
dress corrections, criticisms, sugges- 
tions and other material pertaining to 
the undergraduate publications of the 
college. Any such material if left in 
this box will be delivered to the 
proper person. 

This office for the present will not 
be open at any stated times but all 
students are welcome to the use of 
the exchanges which are on file at 
any time the office may be open. If 
there is sufficient demand for regular 
office hours for this purpose the man- 
agement is perfectly willing to make- 
file necessary arrangements. 

All papers of other colleges and 
schools on the exchange list of the 
"Orient" and "Quill" will be found on 
file for reference. These include: 
"The Dartmouth," "The Amherst Stu- 
dent," "The Brown Daily Herald," 
"The Wesleyan Argus," "The Trinity 
Tripod," "The Smith College Weekly," 
"Maine Campus," "Bates Student," 
"Colby Echo," "Middlebury Campus," 
"Alleghany Campus," etc. 



184 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



This office is for the use of the pub- 
lications. The exchanges are not only 
for the use of the boards but are here 
for any and all students who are in- 
terested in any other colleges on our 
exchange list. If you want to look up 
some paper and do not find the office 
open arrange with some member cf 
the "Orient" Board or the Publishing 
Co. to open it. The exchanges arc 
here, they are interesting examples of 
another point of view, come in and 
get acquainted with them. K. S. B. 



Campus Activities 
Androscoggin and Franklin 



In continuation of the series of 
sketches begun in last week's 
"Orient," notes about the men from 
Androscoggin and Franklin Counties 
are printed below. 

ANDROSCOGGIN COUNTY 
Class of 1921. 

Francis L. Rochon is a member of 
the Beta Theta Pi fraternity and is 
a graduate of Lewiston High School. 
He went to war at the end of his 
Freshman year, but returned in the 
middle of his Sophomore year. He 
has been in the college band for four 
years. He is a member of the Man- 
dolin Club. This year he is one of 
the cheer leaders. 

Class of 1922. 

William K. Hall of Mechanic Falls 
is a member of the Zeta Psi fraternity. 
He graduated from Gould Academy in 
1E18. 

Martin Mendelson of Lewiston 
graduated from Lewiston High School 
in 1818. He is taking the B.S. course. 

William R. Ludden, a member of 
Kappa Sigma, graduated from Ed- 
ward Little High School. During his 
first year he was elected to the 
"Orient" Board and was in Freshman 
debating. He was also in Sophomore 
debating and is now a member of the 
Debating Council. During his second 
and third years he has been on the 
"Orient" Board and Musical Clubs. 
This year he is also a member of the 
Friars, on the "Bugle" Board and as- 
sistant manager of football. 

Henry H. Merry, a graduate of Ed- 
ward Little High School, is a member 
of Kappa Sigma. In his Freshman 
year he .was a member of the Fresh- 
man debating team. This year he is 



a member of the Debating Gouncil 
and "Bugle" Board. 

Evarts J. Wagg, a member of 
Kappa Sigma, graduated from Edward 
Little High School. In his first year 
he was on the class track team. Last 
vcar he played on the Sophomore 
T-'Otball, baseball and track teams and 
his year is a member of the varsity 
football squad. 

Ludden, Merry, and Wagg were the 
three representatives who won the 
Abraxas cup in their Freshman year 
for Edward Little High School. 

Class of 1923. 

David V. Berman is a graduate of 
Lewiston High School. 

Harold E. Healey is a graduate of 
Edward Little High School. 

Maurice D. Jordan of Auburn 
graduated from Edward Little High 
School in 1918. He entered Bowdoin 
in the fall of that year, and stayed 
during the S.A.T.C. The following 
year he went to Maine and this fall 
transferred back to Bowdoin. He is 
a member of the Chi Psi fraternity. 

Norman F. Miller, a member of 
Alpha Delta Phi, graduated from Lew- 
iston High School. In his first year 
he became a member of U. Q. and also 
played on the varsity football and 
baseball teams, and was a member of 
the Freshman relay and track teams. 
This year he is a member of the 
varsity football squad. 

Lewis H. Ross is a graduate of 
Lewiston High School. 

F. King Turgeon, a member of Beta 
Theta Pi, graduated from Edward Lit- 
tle High School. During his first two 
years here he has been a member of 
the musical clubs, band, chapel choir, 
and the "Orient" Board. Last June 
he won the Alexander Prize Speaking 
contest, and also had an important 
part in the Commencement play. 

Class of 1924. 

George K. Anthony graduated from 
Monmouth Academy. He is a mem- 
ber of the Delta Upsilon fraternity. 

Kenneth O. Lawless of Auburn 
graduated from Edward Little High 
School. He is a member of the 
Kappa Sigma fraternity. 

Harold Worsnop graduated from 
Edward Little High School. He is a 
member of the Kappa Sigma frater- 
nity. 

Frank J. Harris is a graduate of 
Lisbon Falls High School. He is a 



member of the Delta Upsilon frater- 
nity. 

FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

Class of 1921. 

Milton J. Wing is a member of the 
Alpha Delta Phi fraternity and a 
graduate of Hebron Academy and 
Brunswick High School. He had a 
response at the Freshman banquet. He 
was out of college for one year dur- 
ing the war. He is a member of the 
Abraxas and U. Q. 

Class of 1922. 

Cecil F. Thompson of Kingfield is 
a member of the Chi Psi fraternity. 
He is taking a medical preparatory 
course and is a member of the Biology 
Club. In his first year he had a re- 
sponse at the Freshman banquet. 
Class of 1923. 

Glenn V. Butler of Farmington is 
a member of the Chi Psi fraternity. 
He is the strongest man in the college 
this year, his total strength being 
1120.8 kilograms, the equivalent of 
2363.6 pounds in weight. He is a 
member of the varsity track team, and 
last year was a point winner in the 
Bates Dual Meet. He is a member 
of the Sophomore baseball team, plays 
in the band, and last year had a re- 
sponse at the Freshman banquet. 

Charles S. Philbrook of Dryden is a 
graduate of Wilton Academy and a 
member of the Chi Psi fraternity. He 
is a member of the varsity track team, 
having won his letter by winning the 
high jump in the Bates Dual Meet last 
year. 

Richard I. Small of Farmington is 
a member of Alpha Delta Phi. He 
graduated from Farmington High 
School. Last spring he was elected 
assistant manager of the hockey team. 

Eugene C. Wing of Stratton is a 
graduate of Hebron Academy and a 
member of the Beta Theta Pi fra- 
ternity. He is a pitcher on his class 
baseball team. 

Class of 1924. 

Cyrus Fernald of Wilton is a gradu- 
ate of Wilton Academy. 

Glenn W. Gray is from New Vine- 
yard and is a graduate of Farming- 
ton High School. 

Malcolm E. Hardy is a graduate of 
Hebron Academy. He is a member ,of 
the Beta Theta Pi fraternity. 

Clinton G. Weymouth is a graduate 
of Kingfield High School. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



185 



BOWDOIN 7, COLBY 

(Continued from page 181) 

for consistent gains. Capt. Dudgeon 
and Haines did especially fine work 
in tearing huge gaps in the left side 
of Colby's line, ably assisted by Gib 
bons. Turner and A. Morrell broke 
through for some fine gains until 
Turner was injured and forced to 
leave the game when the brunt of 
the work fell on A. Morrell. 

The right side of Colby's line was 
noticeably strong on the offense and 
soon after the start of the second half, 
Cook did valiant work for his team 
but once the ball reached Bowdoin 
territory, our line stiffened and the 
White's line was never seriously 
threatened. With the exception of 
Werme who got away for some good 
runs, the Colby backfield was unable 
to do anything with the Bowdoin de- 
fense and even with the advantage 
in weight which Colby had in the line, 
line-plunging was pretty difficult work. 

Both teams were penalized fre- 
quently especially during the third 
quarter but with the exception of 
minor injuries and a severe kick in 
the face which Turner received, both 
teams escaped unhurt. Interest on 
both sides was high during the en- 
tire game and both the Colby and 
Bowdoin stands did some effective 
cheering. 
"A Tame Battle"— Portland Telegram. 

According to a good-sized headline 
in the "Portland Telegram" . last Sun- 
day, the game was "a tame battle." 
Maine won "a thriller" from Bates. 
These two write-ups probably came 
from student reporters at Waterville 
and Orono respectively. Both of them, 
particularly the Colby write-up, 
seemed almost too ridiculously par- 
tisan even for a college paper which 
naturally supports its team, to say 
nothing of the Portland paper which 
has a more complete sport section for 
the Maine colleges than any other 
Sunday journal. 

Colby kicked off to Whitney on the 
20-yard line. Al Morrell hit the line 
for a yard, then punted to Colby's 
42-yard line. Smith, the Colby 
quarter, made a disastrous fumble, 
for Gibbons was on the spot to re- 
cover the ball. Al Morrell went 
through for another yard but his 
brother was sent back for a 7-yard 
loss. 



Twenty Yard Pass to Parent. 

A long forward to Parent brought 
the ball to the 28-yard line and Whit- 
ney followed with another yard. After 
an incomplete forward and a yard loss, 
Joe Smith attempted a field goal but 
the ball went wide. Another attack 
on the Blue and Gray line netted no 
more than a 5-yard penalty for in- 
terference and the ball went to Colby. 
McCracken tried the Bowdoin left 
wing and found it impenetrable, but 
another dash by the same man gave 
Colby first down. Good was repulsed 
by the White left and Tarpey's yard 
gain was followed by McCracken's 
punt to Joe Smith on the 40-yard line. 
Mai Morrell lost his footing in an at- 
tempt at the Colby right and was 
tackled three yards behind the line. 
His punt was stopped on Colby's 38- 
yard line and the Blue team promptly 
lost five yards more by an offside 
penalty. 

Smith carried the ball through cen- 
ter for a yard, then for three more, 
and on a fake kick formation Good 
brought it over for another five. The 
punt to Mai Morrell on the 40-yard 
line was promptly returned to Smith 
who got as far as the 31-yard mark. 
The Colby back fumbled, however, and 
Joe Smith recovered the ball for Bow- 
doin. As the ball went down for eight 
yards more the whistle blew for the 
end of the period. The second period 
started with Bowdoin's ball on Colby's 
38-yard line. 

Fifteen Yard Run by Al Morrell. 

Following a line gain of two yards, 
Al Morrell went through for fifteen 
yards on a fake pass. Two futile 
plunges followed by two incomplete 
forward passes gave the ball to Colby 
on the 20-yard line. Smith failed to 
pass the snap-back and he was stopped 
in his tracks. Then Good took the 
ball about a yard and Tarpey punted 
to Al Morrell on Bowdoin's 43-yard 
line. Whitney bored tackle for five 
yards but the next play was fumbled 
and Colby took the ball on the Bow- 
doin 45-yard line. In two plunges 
McCracken made three yards but a 
15-yard penalty for holding brought 
the ball back into Colby territory. 
Pass to Mason Nets Twenty Yards. 
There Good fumbled and the ball 
went to Bowdoin on the 38-yard line. 
After an incomplete forward Joe 
Smith went two yards further on a 



fake pass. A lateral pass from Smith 
:o Al Morrell to Mason advanced the 
jail twenty yards down the field. An- 
other 5-yard gain was followed by a 
fumble which Al Morrell recovered., 
Turner went in for Mai Morrell and 
ifter an unsuccessful try dented the 
line for eight yards and first down 
>n the 3-yard line. 

Smith Scores After Turner's Fine 
Gains. 

His second plunge Drought the ball 
within three inches of the line and 
then Joe Smith scrambled over the 
line with a touchdown. He kicked his 
goal, making the score Bowdoin 7, 
Colby 0. Guptill went in for Mc- 
Curdy. Mason received the kick off, 
making about eight yards before he 
was stopped on the 35-yard line and 
Al's punt to Tarpey came to earth on 
the Colby 35-yard line. A lateral pass 
to Tarpey lost the Blue and Gray two 
yards, a fumble left the ball still with 
them, and Good went through tackle 
for three yards. Whitney took the 
punt eight yards to the 32-yard line, 
where he was stopped as the whistle 
blew. 

Shake-up in Colby Backfield. 

The second half commenced with 
only Good remaining in the Colby 
backfield, Smith, McCracken, and 
Tarpey being relieved by Werme, Mc- 
Gary, and Sullivan. Bowdoin's kick- 
off went to Werme who carried it 
through to the 47-yard line. Sullivan 
hit the line for two yards, followed 
by Werme's gain of three. Another 
attempt proved futile and the punt 
went to Joe Smith who made ten yards 
before he was tackled on the 38-yard 
line. Al Morrell's attempted end run 
was repulsed for a loss and he punted 
to Sullivan on the 20-yard line. 

Colby Scores Three First Downs. 

Sullivan went through for eight 
more; Good's 3-yard gain made first 
down, Colby's first one of the game, 
and Werme carried the ball four yards 
more before McGary lost two yards. 
Sullivan plowed guard only to fumble 
ten yards further on but Enholm re- 
covered, making first down on the 45- 
yard line. Werme's forward to Sul- 
livan netted a yard, but McGary's at- 
tempt at center brought only a 10- 
yard penalty. Putnam went in to re- 
lieve Haines at left guard. McGary 

(Continued on page 189) 



186 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Norman W. Haines '21 Editir-in-Chicf 

Edward B. Ham '22 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Floyd A. Gerrard '23 Athletics 

Karl R. Philbriek '23 Faculty Notes 

George H. Quinby '23 Alumni Department 

F. King Turgeon '23 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

John L. Berry '21 Crosby E. Redman '21 

Harry Helson '21 Frank A. St. Clair '21 

George E. Houghton '21 William R. Ludden '22 
Russell M. MeGown '21 Virgil C. McGorrill '22 
Roland L. McCormack '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. B~ardman '21 .. .Business Manager 

Wilfred R. Brewer '22 Assistant Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions. $2.00 
:per year, in advance. Single copies. 10 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials; the Managing Editor 
for the news department; and the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 



Vol. L. October 27, 1920. No. 16 



section, and fought all the harder on 
that account. 

Let Bowdoin retain and increase 
that fighting spirit during the next 
two weeks, and nothing will stop he)'' 



Memorial Address By 

President Sills 



Entered at Post Office in Brunswick 
Second-Class Mail Matter. 



Saturday's Victory. 

Last week the "Orient" had an edi- 
torial entitled "Supporting the Team." 
Whether in response to that editorial 
or to other influences the student body 
certainly gave the suggested co- 
operation with a vengeance. 

A sufficiently large number of men 
appeared on the field every day last 
week to carry out a complete and ef- 
fective program of practice that had 
a great deal to do with the result of 
Saturday's game. These men showed 
the fight and determination that is al- 
ways the forerunner of victory. 

No less noteworthy than the splen- 
did spirit of the squad was that of 
the student body as a whole. Not only 
did Bowdoin supporters use the tra- 
ditional "blind baggage" methods of 
transportation but a few gallant souls 
showed their enthusiasm by starting 
to walk the entire distance to Water- 
ville. Such a spirit made possible the 
splendid showing in numbers and in 
"pep" at Scaverns Field. It is safe 
to say that each and every member 
of the team felt and appreciated the 
presence of those men in the cheering 



Sunday, October 17, President Sills 
delivered a memorial address in 
chapel for the three prominent Alumni 
who have died this summer — Dr. 
Thomas Upham Coe '57, Judge 
Lucilius Alonzo Emery '61, and Dr. 
Frederic Henry Gerrish '66. Parts 
of this address are printed here, as 
the tributes to these men will un- 
doubtedly be of considerable interest 
to Alumni. 

The presence of so many alumni 
here this past week reminds all of us 
how large an institution Bowdo'n 
College is. The heart, the shrine of 
the college is here but the college 
really exists wherever its influence 
extends and into whatever cities and 
countries her sons go. Many men in 
the United States have in their own 
possession more wealth than is rep- 
resented by all the buildings and all 
the endowed funds of Bowdoin College 
even though they represent some mil- 
lions of dollars. But no man could 
buy out Bowdoin College. There are 
things money can not purchase. As 
Governor Coolidge put it in an ad- 
mirable state paper — "The realities 
of life are not measured by dollars 
and cents. The skill of the physician, 
the divine eloquence of the clergyman, 
the courage of the soldier, that which 
we call character in all men are not 
matters of hire and salary. No per- 
son was ever honored for what he 
received. Honor has been the re- 
ward of what he gave." These words 
come overwhelmingly home as we 
think of the long line of honored 
alumni who have gone from these 
halls. This afternoon I wish to speak 
particularly of three who full of years 
and honors departed this life during 
the past summer. For there is noth- 
ing more fruitful of good for youth 
to study than the careers of noble 
and honorable men. 

The first on the list is Dr. Thomas 
Upham Coe of the Class of 1857— 
the donor of our infirmary, who not 
only gave us the admirable building 



but also endowed it so generously 
that students here receive absolutely 
free of charge medical attention and 
nursing when they are ill. Dr. Coe 
also remembered the college generous- 
ly in his will with a legacy of $150,000. 
He was a gentleman of the old school, 
quiet, modest, courteous and loyal. 
Possessed of great wealth he was 
generous to his college. 

Chief Justice Emery who died in 
August shortly after his eightieth 
birthday was known to many of you. 
As chairman of the Examining Com- 
mittee he visited us very often, and 
you have seen him here in chapel 
often and listened to him in class 
rooms. For the greater part of his 
active life he was a servant of the 
State — occupying the positions of 
County Attorney, State Senator, At- 
torney General, and Associate and 
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. 

Wide and useful as was his career 
outlined by the positions he held, the 
activities and virile life of Judge 
Emery was and is a precious posses- 
sion to the State of Maine. Governor 
Plaisted in accepting the chief 
justice's resignation in 1911, expressed 
his own and Maine's opinion of its 
faithful servant, when he said: 

"The distinguished service which 
you have given our State as attorney 
general for three years, 1876-1879, 
and as associate and chief justice 
from 1883-1911, has won the admir- 
ation of your associates and the com- 
mendation of all classes. Your great 
ability is recognized throughout the 
Union, and your absolute integrity is 
acknowledged by all our people. 

You have served upon the Su- 
preme bench of Maine for nearly 
twenty-eight years, a period which 
has never been exceeded in the 
judicial history of our State except in 
two instances. Your decisions are 
found in the Maine reports, beginning 
with the 13th and continuing into the 
107th, making thirty-two volumes, or 
nearly one-third of all the published 
volumes. In these decisions, which 
will constitute your monument, you 
have made a great contribution to the 
jurisprudence of this State. Your 
place in judicial history is assured. 
You will, Mr. Chief Justice Emery, al- 
ways be remembered as one of Maine's 
greatest judges." 

The Maine bench has deservedly a 
splendid reputation throughout the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



187 



United States, it is one of the glories 
of this college that her sons have 
contributed so much, for there have 
been but very short intervals when 
Bowdoin men have not been mem- 
bers of our Supreme Court. 

Judge Emery laid great stress on 
work and on duty. He worked till the 
very end and though after his retire- 
ment in 1C11 he accepted no retainer 
and did no active practice, on every 
important question he let his opinions 
be known. In the counsels of the 
college he was wise, conservative and 
devoted. Judge Emery's family was 
very distinguished. His son, Henry 
Crosby Emery '92 was chairman of 
the Tariff Commission under Mr. Taft, 
and his daughter, Mrs. Allison, had 
been dean of women at Brown. After 
the college had bestowed on all three 
honorary degrees, President Hyde re- 
marked that only one member of the 
family had not been honored and she 
was the one who deserved it most — 
Mrs. Emery. 

Dr. Frederick Henry Gerrish of 
Portland of the Class of '66 died 
September 8. For nearly fifty years 
he was an officer of the College, serv- 
ing from 1872 until 1911 as a teacher 
in the Medical School — for some years 
after that as Professor of Medical 
Ethics, and from 1886 until his death 
as a member of the board of over- 
seers. He was one of the most loyal 
of men — loyal to his fraternity — the 
Alpha Delta Phi, loyal to his city and 
state, loyal to his college, loyal to his 
profession. He was a great teacher, 
and Gerrish's text-book on Anatomy 
had in its day and has still a national 
reputation. His eminence as a surgeon 
was so marked that at different times 
he was president of the Maine Medi 
cal Society, president of the Ameri- 
can Therapeutic Society, president of 
the American Academy of Medicine. 
He made a deep and an abiding im- 
pression on the medical profession in 
Maine. I remember that he told me 
that it made the blood course freely 
through his veins just to think of the 
advances that had been made in 
surgery in his life time. But he was 
not only a great physician, he was a 
fine man and a true friend. One who 
knew him well writes of his woncbr- 
ful loyalty to his friends and his 
friendships: "It mattered not where 
he came from nor what his circum- 
stances, a patient of Dr. Gerrish al- 



ways ended by becoming his personal 
friend. To his sympathetic spirit 
they turned in every time of sorrow; 
with his glad comradeship they shared 
every happiness and good fortune." 
He represented the loyal life as de- 
fined by Professor Royce of Harvard. 
"Everybody has heard of loyalty; 
most people prize it but few receive 
it to be what in its inmost spirit it 
really is — the heart of all virtues; the 
central duty amongst all duties." And 
Dr. Gerrish was loyal to himself and 
to his connections, and it followed as 
the night the day he could not be 
false to any man. 

In conclusion I cannot refrain from 
calling to your attention the fact that 
these honored ones of the college were 
men who were in every sense of the 
word by birth, breeding and attain- 
ments gentlemen. They were at home 
among men of the world everywhere. 
They were men of distinction. As a 
younger man I would express the 
gratitude of our generation to these 
elder statesmen so courteous, so fine; 
in the true sense of the word great 
aristocrats. We lose much if we fail 
to see that the qualities that make the 
gentleman still count. In their day 
Bowdoin was a very small college, 
but these men had strong characters. 
And we honor them today as the col- 
lege will always honor them because 
of what they gave; a great philan- 
thropist, a great jurist, a great phy- 
sician, they have left a deep impress 
upon the State of Maine. 



Championship Chances. 

With the first game of the state 
scries settled in proper fashion, Bow- 
doin's chances for a football cham- 
pionship look far better than they 
did a few weeks ago. On paper. 
Bowdoin probably looks the best 
Bates and Maine ought not to win 
from the White this time, in view of 
Colby's victory over the Garnet and 
upon considering Maine's rather lucky 
win from the Lewiston eleven at 
Orono last Saturday. At the end of 
the first half Bates led, 8 to 7, and 
Maine had to extend herself to the 
limit to score the one necessary touch- 
down to win the game. 

On the other hand it must be re- 
membered that Bates has always had 
a scrappy team, a team which last 



year almost nosed out Bowdoin at a 
time when a Bowdoin victory was re- 
garded as a matter of course. Bates 
has lost two games in the State series 
and the team will do its utmost to 
climb out of the cellar position next 
Saturday. The White must beware 
of overconfidence, and Bates should 
be considered this week no less for- 
midable than Colby was before last 
Saturday. 

There are two weeks between the 
Maine-Bates game and the Maine- 
Bowdoin game, and in those two 
weeks Maine is bound to develop a 
great deal of strength. The football 
squad is large at Orono, and it takes 
much more time to round out a fast 
team than it does at the other col- 
leges in the State. Last year the 
team which defeated Bowdoin at 
Orono was a far stronger aggrega- 
tion than that which trimmed Bates 
two weeks previous. Although this 
year's Bates game must have been a 
disappointment to Maine followers, 
Bowdoin must expect to face a team 
a week from Saturday which will be 
a whole lot stronger. 

Trainer Magee said that the Bow- 
doin team fought harder against 
Springfield Y. M. C. A. than any Bow- 
doin team in the last seven years. If 
the eleven keeps up this splendid 
spirit, which has been so much in 
evidence all season so far, and also 
if the student body gives the team its 
best possible support, the chances are 
exceptionally gocd that the Maine 
championship will spend the greater 
part of 1921 in Brunswick. 



Campus J!3eto0 

Charles Taylor Hawes '76 of Ban- 
gor was on the campus recently. 

Webb '23 has been confined in the 
infirmary for several days because of 
an injured knee. 

Goodwin '21 was elected captain of 
the cross-country team last week be- 
fore the Boston College meet. 

An interesting battle took place last 
Friday between the wind and the men 
engaged in gathering the leaves. Any- 
one looking at the campus now would 
decide that the wind had won. 

Colburn '23 is at home in Augusta 
recovering from a particularly critical 
operation for appendicitis, which he 
underwent last Thursday. 



188 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



There has been so much interest in 
the Colby game that very little has 
happened in the line of the golf tour- 
nament. Toyokawa '21 expects to 
have some definite information, how- 
ever, next week. 

In the list of first year medical stu- 
dents printed in last week's "Orient" 
the name of Theodore R. Meyer of 
Sag Harbor, Long Island, N. Y., was 
omitted. 

The engagement of Miss Isabelle 
Crawford Pollard, Mount Holyoke, 
1918, and Clyde Thompson Congdon 
'22, was announced last Friday eve- 
ning. 

The Biology Club held its first meet- 
ing last week, in the Biology Lecture 
Room. It was decided to have a field 
trip Tuesday of this week for the 
members of the club and also for any 
other students interested. Cook '21 
is president of the club for this year. 
It is expected that the new members 
will be taken in at the next meeting, 
the time of which has not yet been 
definitely fixed. 

Deering High School won a slow 
game from Brunswick on the Whittier 
Field last Saturday 46 to 0. 

Men who attended the Colby game 
were excused from chapel and classes 
on Saturday. 

About a third of the fellows who 
have been out for baseball have been 
transferred to football during the past 
week. 

At the student election held Thurs- 
day, October 21, Vose '22 was elected 
manager of hockey, while Woodbury 
'22 was elected junior member of the 
student council. 

Since the Mandolin club trials and 
the beginning of band work one may 
hear all sorts of doleful and laborious- 
ly jingly strains issuing from any and 
all of the ends. 



jFacultp Jl3ote0 

Professor Stone, who has been ill 
with inflammatory rheumatism during 
the last few months has returned and 
began his courses this week, Mon- 
day. 

Wallace W. Gilchrist, Jr., of Bruns- 
wick and Harpswell, in an exhibition 
at Portland of his portraits and water- 
colors, has portraits of President Sills 
and the late Professor Henry L. Chap- 
man. 

President Sills and Professor Bur- 



nett will represent the college at the 
Association of New England Colleges 
to be held at Wesleyan University, 
Middletown, on October 28th and 29th. 

Professor Hormell gave an address 
Wednesday evening, Oct. 20, before 
the Searchlight Club of Sanford, Me., 
on the subject "Popular Government 
and Political Parties." Thursday 
morning he spoke before the student 
assembly in the Sanford High School. 

President Sills, who is educational 
director of the State Chamber of 
Commerce and Agricultural League, 
attended a meeting of the league in 
Augusta on Thursday afternoon, Oc- 
tober 21. 

Professor Bell passed a few days in 
Boston last week. 

- Professor Stanwood returned from 
a week-end trip to Boston Monday. 

Among the speakers to be heard at 
the Maine Teachers' Convention next 
week at Bangor are President Sills, 
Dean Nixon, and Professor Mitchell. 

Mr. Wilder was elected superin- 
tendent of the Sunday school at a 
meeting of the First Parish Church, 
Wednesday evening of last week. 

Professor Mitchell will give a 
lecture on "Brunswick-born Books," 
at a meeting of the Maine Library 
Association, Friday afternoon, at 
Bangor. 

In connection with the State Teach- 
ers' Convention at Bangor, Dean 
Nixon and Professor Mitchell are 
planning to attend a meeting of Bow- 
doin men who are now teaching in 
Maine. 



alumni Department 

As an illustration of the active part 
that many of the younger alumni are 
taking in community affairs, a recent 
article in the "Portland Press" on the 
activities of the local post of the 
American Legion gave the names of 
five men who were prominent in that 
organization; all five are Bowdoin 
graduates: Robert M. Pennell '09, 
Robert Hale '10, F. U. Burkett '11, 
Leland G. Means '12, and Dwight H. 
Sayward '16. 

Ex-1857 — Charles Jenkins Little, 
died at Newton, Mass., October 14. 
He was born at Auburn April 9, 1836, 
and prepared for Bowdoin at Gorham 
Academy. After leaving college in 
1855 he studied law for some time. 
He then became interested in the 



University Press of Cambridge and in 
the shoe business at Lynn. He was 
also engaged in business at Yarmouth, 
Me., and later at Worcester, Mass. 

1872— Dr. Frank Wood Spaulding 
died of heart failure while seated at 
his office desk at the Clifton Springs 
Sanitarium at Clifton Springs, N. Y., 
on October 7. He was born at Bing- 
ham, Me., on April 29, 1844. He fitted 
for Bowdoin at Kent's Hill Seminary 
and entered college as a sophomore. 
After graduation he attended the 
medical department of the University 
of the City of New York from which 
he was graduated in 1875 as valedic- 
torian. He practiced medicine for 
several months in Bingham after 
which he was at Brattleboro, Vt., for 
two years and at Epping, N. H., for 
sixteen years. On October 20, 1880, 
he married Abby Thayer Stearns. In 
1893 he became connected with the 
Clifton Springs Sanitarium, and re- 
mained there until his death. He was 
a member of the American Medical 
Association, of the American Academy 
of Medicine, and of state and local 
organizations. He was a member of 
the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity. 

1903. — Malcolm S. Woodbury is sup- 
erintendent of the Clifton Springs 
Sanitarium in Clifton Springs, New 
York. Under Mr. Woodbury's direc- 
tion the reorganization of this institu- 
tion has made it one of the most com- 
plete and most scientific medical in- 
stitutions in the United States. The 
work has grown in extent consider- 
ably and today the institution stands 
as one of the best diagnostic hospitals 
in New York. Each department has 
been put under the direction of well- 
trained scientific men of considerable 
experience. Research has been fost- 
ered and already a high type of work 
is being carried out. 

1905. — For over five years, Georga 
H. Stone has been on the administra- 
tive staff of the Peter Brent Brigham 
Hospital of Boston, beginning as third 
assistant superintendent and now oc- 
cupying the position of assistant sup- 
erintendent. During his stay at the 
above institution he has been offered 
positions as superintendent of other 
progressive hospitals, for he is one of 
the few especially trained hospital 
executives in this country. 

1907— Philip R. Shorey, who has 
been on the staff of the "New York 
World" since graduation, is now as- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



189 



sociate editor of the "Fox News," pub- 
lished by the Fox Motion Picture Com- 
pany. He has left for a tour of the 
west with the manager to visit the 
various sections where films are be- 
ing taken. 

1919 — Miss Eveleen Andora Priest 
of Brunswick and Benjamin McKinley 
Smethurst were married at Antioch, 
Nebraska, Wednesday, October 20. 

CLASS NOTES 



1879. 

Dr. John W. Achorn after several 
years in educational, publishing and 
shipbuilding work at Newcastle, Me., 
returned to Bowdoin for a medical 
course. Since his graduation from 
the Medical School in 1887 he has 
practiced in Boston, Mass. 

Dr. George W. Bourne after gradu- 
ation took courses at a Portland 
medical school, at Bowdoin Medical 
School, and at the Jefferson Medical 
College of Philadelphia from which 
he was graduated in 1882. After 
practicing in Taunton, Mass., and 
Manchester, N. H., he returned to his 
native town, Kennebunk, Me., where 
he has stayed until now. 

Heber D. Bowker taught school 
from 1879 to 1885 when he entered 
business in Medford, Mass., where he 
is now located. 

Frank M. Byron went to Chicago in 
1880 and represented various railroad 
companies there and also in Los 
Angeles, until his return to the posi- 
tion he now holds as general agent 
for the New York Central lines at 
Utica, N. Y. 

Dr. Oscar C. S. Davies graduated 
in the Medical Class of 1883. He also 
studied in Vienna in 1885 and has 
since been connected with the Maine 
State Hospital at Augusta where he 
is now on the surgical staff. 

Holmes B. Fifield, having been a 
commercial traveller for six years 
after graduation, became a member 
of a dry goods firm at Conway, N. H., 
where he is now living. 

Henry A. Huston held several pro- 
fessorships in western universities un- 
til last year when he moved to New 
York City. 

Hon. Charles F. Johnson, after 
teaching school for some years, was 
admitted to the bar in 1886. He be- 
gan to practice in Waterville, Me., and 
has since held a large number of 



offices, chief among them United 
States Senator, and United States 
Circuit Judge. He is a trustee of the 
college. 

Frank Kimball has been in the drug 
business at Mechanic Falls, Me., Sioux 
City, Iowa, and is now at Norway, 
Me. 

Ansel DeF. Lumbert has practiced 
law at Houlton, Me., and Boston, 
Mass., and is now located at Houlton. 
He was a member of the State Senate 
from 1885-87 and is at present an 
overseer of the college. 

Dr. Henry W. Ring, after studying 
law for a year, in Portland, and work- 
ing for an insurance company in that 
city until 1886, returned to Bowdoin 
for a medical course. After his 
graduation in 1887 he went to Eng- 
land and France for further study, 
and has since been specializing at 
New Haven, Conn., on eye and ear 
diseases. 

Horace E. Henderson taught school 
until 18C9 when he was admitted to 
the Massachusetts bar. He has since 
been engaged in educational work in 
New York. 



COLBY GAME 

(Continued from page 1S5) 

circled right end for a long gain, 
stopping on Bowdoin's 40-yard line, 
and Sullivan broke the line for an- 
other seven. McGary made two yards 
more. Sullivan's plunge was re- 
pulsed but he came back with a yard 
and a half and first down. Werme 
made about a foot through center, 
then Sullivan's left wing dash gained 
a yard. McGary's fake pass failed 
to gain and when Parent broke up 
the Colby forward pass the ball went 
to Bowdoin. Smith's fake kick failed 
to gain and the period whistle blew 
before another play could be started. 
The fourth period started with the 
ball on Bowdoin's 28-yard line. Al 
Morrell's 10-yard gain through tackle 
was ruled out and Bowdoin was 
penalized fifteen yards for holding. 
The subsequent punt was stopped on 
Colby's 48-yard line and Werme 
promptly carried the ball two yards 
into the enemy territory. 

M. E. Morrell Intercepts Pass. 

After a vain try at the line, Sulli- 
van tossed a forward which Mai Mor- 
rell (in for Whitney) brought down 



on the 32-yard line. Turner made five 
yards through center and Woodbury, 
at quarter for Joe Smith, gained two 
more. Al Morrell's punt went to 
Werme, whom Eames stopped on the 
30-yard line. Sullivan's forward ^pass 
went wild but he made up for it by a 
7-yard gain around end. Werme's at- 
tempt lost two yards before Sullivan 
took the ball for another 5-yard gain, 
making first down. McGary followed 
with a yard, Sullivan lost two in an 
attempt at left end, and McGary made 
three through right tackle. Werme 
then took the ball for a loss. Swingle- 
hurst went in for Mai Morrell at left 
halfback and with Bowdoin's ball on 
the 40-yard line, Smith fumbled the 
snap-back, recovering, however, be- 
fore any damage was done. Turner 
ripped through the line for another 
five, and, after a yard loss, hurled a 
forward to the right which McGary 
intercepted and carried to the 40-yard 
line. 
Swinglehurst Makes Ten on Last Play. 

Miller went in for Turner and Wood- 
bury for Smith. Werme made a yard 
on a center rush, Sullivan followed 
with two more and McGary had to 
suffer an 8-yard loss when Parent 
downed him behind the line. Al Mor- 
rell received the punt and carried it 
to mid-field, Bowdoin advancing to 
Colby's 45-yard line on a Colby 
penalty. On the next play Bowdoin 
was penalized fifteen yards for hold- 
ing and Swinglehurst had time only 
to tear through tackle for ten yards 
before the whistle blew. 

After the game, the Bowdoin sup- 
porters held an impromptu parade 
through the streets and did a glorious 
snake-dance on the way. The entire 
team and most of the student body of 
the victorious college attended one of 
the Waterville theatres in the evening 
and Bowdoin songs and cheers were 
much in evidence during the perform- 
ance. 

The summary: 

BOWDOIN— —COLBY 

Parent, le re, Wolman 

Mason, It rt, Cook 

Haines, lg rg, Morebond 

Putnam, lg. 

McCurdy, c c, Enholm 

Guptill, c. 

Eames, rg lg, Lowery 

Dudgeon, rt It, Cratty 

Gibbons, re le, Pulsifer 



190 

J. Smith, qb qb, Smith 

Woodbury, qb qb, Werme 

J. J. Whitney, lhb l'hb, McCracken 

M. E. Morrell, lhb rhb, McGary 

Swinglehurst, lhb. 

A. E. Morrell, rhb lhb, Good 

M. E. Morrell, fb fb, Tarpey 

Turner, fb fb, Sullivan 

Miller, fb. 

Score by quarters: 12 3 4 

Bowdoin 7 0—7 

Colby 0—0 

Touchdown — J Smith. Goal from 
touchdown — J. Smith. Referee — 
O'Connell, Portland. Umpire — Beebe, 
Yale. Head linesman — Farnsworth, 
West Point. Time— four 15-minute 
periods. 

ASSIGNMENTS 

ENGLISH HISTORY. 
(History 5.) 

Nov. 1, Lecture XL The Medieval 
Church. 

Nov. 3, Lecture XII. Reign of 
Henry II. 

Reading: Cheyney, Short History: 
of England. Cheyney, Readings in 
English History, Nos. 89-91, 93, 94. 

EUROPE SINCE 1815 
(History 7) 

Sixth Week. 

Lectures : 

Nov. 1, Lecture XI. Liberalism vs. 
Metternich's System in Italy, 1830- 
1848—1. 

Nov. 3, Lecture XII. Liberalism vs. 
Metternich's System in Italy, 1830- 
1848—11. 

Reading — 

Hazen pp. 159-168. 

And sixty pages from the following: 
Thayer, Dawn of Italian Independence 
I, pp. 312-453; II, pp. 1-76. King, 
Life of Mazzini, pp. 1-122. Martinen- 
go-Cesaresco: Liberation, pp. 21-90. 
Stillman: Union of Italy, pp. 41-141. 
Mario: Birth of Modern Italy, pp. 1- 
136. Mazzini: Life and Writings I, 
(any pages). Orsi: Cavour, pp. 1-104. 
Venosta: Memoirs of Youth, chs. II.. 
III. 

POLITICAL HISTORY OF THE 

UNITED STATES. 

(History 9.) 

Nov. 1, Lecture XL The Constitu- 
tion, Part II. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Nov. 3, Lecture XII. Organization 
of the Federal Government, Part 1. 

Reading: Bassett, Ch. XL Mac- 
Donald, No. 54. 

Note: — The conference period of 
this week will be devoted to a study 
of the Constitution of the United 
States. 



ECONOMICS. 

Week Beginning November 1. 

Economics 1. 

Topic: Labor. 

Materials, Ch. 4. 

Conference topic: The Changing 
Labor Market. (Reference sheet at 
library desk.) 

Economics 9. 

Jones, Ch. 20-21. 



ECONOMICS 5 
Week Beginning November 1. 

Blackmar and Gillin, pp. 271-315. 

Suggestions for outside reading: 
Hart, Psychology of Insanity; Boas, 
The Mind of Primitive Man; Kelsey, 
Physical Basis of Society — Ch. 10; 
Bristol, Social Adaptation, Ch.8; Gid- 
dings, Principles of Sociology, pp. 132- 
152. 



GOVERNMENT I. 
Sixth Week, Ending Saturday, Nov. 6. 

Lecture X, Nov. 2. Legal Control 
of Political Parties. 

Lecture XI, Nov. 4. Elections. 
Assignments — 

1. Munro, Government of the 
United States, Ch. XXIII, XXXIII. 

2. Report on library topics. 
Group A. Quiz section. 
Group B. Conferences. 



MOLESKIN COATS 

Sheep and Blanket Lined 

Wide variety to select from 

$15 to $30 



FLANNEL PAJAMAS 



E. S. 



Brunswick, Maine. 



BOWDOIN CANTEEN 

8 a. m.-12 m.; 1.30-6; 7-11 

Sundays, 12-5 p. m. 

A. PALMER, 19 North Winthrop. 



Pressing and Cleaning 

Orders Taken for Dyeing 
SECOND HAND CLOTHING 

BOUGHT 

DAN ROSEN 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. 
Surplus and Profits, $100,000. 
Student Patronage Solicited. 

THE 

COLLEGE 

BOOK STORE 



The place to buy everything from 
a Thumb Tack to a Wedding Present. 
Take a look at our new line of Kay- 
woodie Pipes. These are of real 
Italian Bruyere with the Aluminum 
Inbore tube. All models $4.50 each. 



F. W, CHANDLER 

& SON 

150 MAINE STREET. 



JENNIES. HARVEY 

EVERY TUESDAY EVENING, 

BEGINNING OCTOBER 26th 

TOWN HALL, BRUNSWICK 

Class at 7.30 p. m. Assembly, 8.30. 

Monday Evenings, Armory Hall, Bath, 
beginning October 18th. 

These classes are open to college 
students. 

Private lessons and classes on appli- 
cation. 

Address 
897 Middle St., Bath, Me. 

Phone 151-W. 



B0WD01N ORIENT 



191 



JUD, The Barber 

was going to use this space 
but thought it wasn't neces- 
sary. 

CHOCOLATES 

OF DISTINCTION 

AT 

A. W. BUTLER'S 



Macullar Parker Co, 



WRIGHT &DITS0N 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

60WD0IN TEAMS 

344 Washington Street 
Boston 



-THE FALL 

ARROW 

QLLAR, 




s~c 




119 MAINE STREET 
BRUNSWICK 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Makers of Conser- 
vative Clothes for 
College Men, will 
show frequently at 
Bowdoin College. 

YOUR PATRONAGE IS 
EARNESTLY SOLICITED 

G. L. GOODWIN, Representative 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




Generator room of one of the 
hydro-electric plantswhich sup- 
ply power to the C. M. & St. P. 



The Power of Electricity 
in Transportation 



Some Advantages of 
Railroad Electrification 

Saving the Nation's coal. 
Lower maintenance costs. 



Ability to haul smoothly 
heavier trains at higher 
speed. 

Operation of electric locomo- 
tives unaffected by extreme 
cold. 

Ability to brake trains on 
descending grades by re- 
turning power to the trolley. 



ELECTRICITY has leveled out 
the Continental Divide. The 
steam locomotive, marvelous as 
it is after a century of develop- 
ment, cannot meet all of the pres- 
ent demands for transportation 
facilities. Its electric rival has 
proved to be far superior. 

On the mountain divisions of the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
Railway— the world's greatest 
electrification — giant electric loco- 
motives today lift an ever increas- 
ing freight tonnage over the mile- 
high Rockies and also make travel- 
ing clean and comfortable. They 
utilize the abundant energy of dis- 
tant waterfalls and then, by return- 
ing some of this power to the 
trolley, safely brake the trains on 
descending grades. And their 
capabilities are not impaired by 
excessively cold weather when 



the steam engine is frozen and 
helpless. 

Electricity is the power which 
drives the trains of New York 
City's subway and elevated sys- 
tems. It operates the locks and 
tows the ships through the 
Panama Canal. It propels the 
Navy's latest super-dreadnaught, 
the New Mexico. Electric mine 
locomotives have replaced the 
slow-moving muleandthe electric 
automobile has also come to do 
an important service. 
Electricity has become the uni- 
versal motive power. It has con- 
tributed efficiency and comfort to 
every form of transportation ser- 
vice and in this evolution General 
Electric apparatus has played a 
large part — from mighty electric 
locomotives to the tiny lamp for 
the automobile. 




General Office 
Schenectady; NY! 



Sales Offices in 
all large cities 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



193 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 Maine Street 



CORDOVAN BOOTS 

IN 

YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 



"Herman's" Tan Cordovan $13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan . . $15.50 
"Florsheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 

TENNIS SHOES, INDOOR AND 

OUTDOOR MOCCASINS, RUBBER 

BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 



CARL H. MARTIN 

Cleansing and Dyeing 
Pressing and Alterations 



4 Elm Street 



A. W. HASKELL, D. D. S. 

W. F. BROWN, D. D. S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Postoffice Brunswick, Me. 




\&ts 



Featuring 

the newest productions in 
garments for fall wear made 
for us by 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 

Haskell & Jones Company 

PORTLAND, MAINE 



"The Store of Progress and Service" 
This is the season of the year when College men are considering the matter of 

Warm Outdoor Coats 

and we know that they are especially interested in the Sheep Lined and 
Sport Coats, so we call attention at this time to these Coats which we 
know will appeal to the College Chap. 

Sheep Lined Coats 

three-quarter length. This is a Moleskin, and a good, warm, serviceable Coat just what you want 
when you go out on a long hike or want to keep real warm at the football or other outdoor sports. 

Sport Coats 

We have got a fine line of these Coats in reversible leather. They have raglan shoulder; belt all 
around, and they come in the popular brown shade. 



Don't forget that Mr. Jack Handy '23 of the Zeta Psi House is still our represent- 
ative, and he will be glad to attend to all your requirements for Furnishings or 
otherwise. 



Monument 
Square 




Portland 
Maine 



194 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




I 




Chocolates 

The Chocolates 

|hat are 

Difjferervb 

Truly Great Chocolates are so luscious and so good 

that you will wish the box were many times ■ larger. 
This package has a very special assortment of choice 
filings of pre-eminent quality, and many of the coatings 
are the delicious butter coatings original with Apollo 
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The dainty assortment of finely decorated pieces 
makes the "Truly Great" Assortment a charming gift 
of far more distinction than the usual box of chocolates. 

jP.j7.J'co6er£s Co., 

Boston, Mass. 

iiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiminniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiii 




BOW DO IN ORIENT 



cl No player should drive oj} until 
the players in front have played 
their second stroke and are 
out of range. 11 

— Etiquette oj Qolf. 



. 




U. S. Golf Balls are fast off the tee and true on the 
green. Moreover, their exceptional toughness makes 
them the choice of players who demand durability 
and consistent wear. 

They are made in various sizes and weights. Try 
them. Buy them from your pro or at your dealer's. 



U. S. Royal $1.00 each 
U. S. Revere 85c each 
U. S. Floater 65c each 



Keep your eye on the ball — be sure it's a U. S. 




United States Rubber Company 

1790 Broadway New York City 




196 BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CUMBERLAND 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 
ALICE BRADY 

. . . IN . . . 

A DARK LANTERN 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 
WILLIAM FARNUM 

. . . IN . . . 

THE JOYOUS TROUBLE MAKERS 



NEXT WEEK— MONDAY AND TUESDAY 
DOROTHY GISH 

. . . IN . . . 

REMODELING HER HUSBAND 



PASTIME 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 
OLIVE THOMAS 

. . . IN . . . 

UP STAIRS AND DOWN 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 
GLADYS BROCKWELL 

.-.•.- IN .'. . 

A SISTER TO SALOME 



NEXT WEEK- MONDAY AND TUESDAY 
HOMESPUN FOLKS 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



VOL. L. 



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1920. 



No. 17 



BATES HOLDS BOWDOIN TO SCORELESS TIE 



Outrushed Garnet Eleven Gets All the Breaks — Bowdoin Handicapped By Injuries 
— Swinglehurst Breaks Ankle — Perry Makes Longest Gain — Turner, Gib- 
bons, and Dudgeon Star — Davis and Stonier Chief Assets to Bates. 



The originator of that old saw/ 
anent the best laid plans of mice and 
men would undoubtedly be delighted 
to know that another shining testi- 
monial to the truth of his saying has 
come to light. According to the ad- 
vance dope on the subject, it was im- 
possible for Bates to hold Bowdoin 
from scoring, and, furthermore, the 
Bates aggregation was certain to 
score. As it happened Bates held 
Bowdoin to a scoreless tie in one of 
the most intensely exciting gridiron 
battles of the season. In spite of the 
rains of the day before, the field was 
in excellent condition, while the ex- 
hilarating autumn air and the some- 
what dull sky combined to make a 
nearly perfect football day. The 
stands and bleachers were packed 
with rooters who had come to see 
Bates make her last effort at cham- 
pionship honors. 

Bowdoin, flushed with the victory 
of a week before, started the game 
with a new combination in the back- 
field. Bates tore in at the start like 
a whirlwind, and seemed to have the 
edge on Bowdoin for nearly half the 
period before the visitors took the 
lead. From the time Bowdoin's kick- 
off landed in Finnegan's arms on the 
23-yard line to the last whistle it was 
a long hard grind for both elevens. 

A great deal of credit must be given 
to Turner, who, despite the injuries 
he received in the Colby game, threw 
himself into the contest with all kinds 
of energy, that meant everything to 
the team. If he had not been in the 

(Continued on page 201) 



THE STATE FOOT- 
BALL CHAMPIONSHIP 



Rally Friday Night. 



Maine defeated Colby last Satur- 
day and Bowdoin and Bates battled to 
a tie. The standing today is as fol- 
lows : 

W. L. T. P. C. 

Maine 2 1.000 

Bowdoin 1 1 1.000 

Colby 12 .333 

Bates 2 1 .000 

From this we see that Bowdoin and 
Maine are the only possibilities left 
for the championship. Bowdoin must 
defeat Maine next Saturday or else 
watch the hard fought title go to 
Maine. 

Everything depends on the outcome 
of the game next week. While Maine 
defeated Bates 14-8, they won only by 
the merest fluke and anyone who saw 
the game would say that Bates had 
Maine beaten throughout the game, 
yet things broke the wrong way and 
Maine won. Bates was far from 
scoring on Bowdoin. Not once was 
the Bowdoin line in real danger. And 
the Bowdoin team certainly had 
things their own way in the last 
period. But fumbles and hard luck 
kept Bowdoin from scoring. 

If Bates cannot score on Bowdoin, 
yet can on Maine, why are not Bow- 
doin's chances somewhat brighter? 
Surely the team will need support and 



f a Bowdoin man could not go out 
of town, surely he can get over to 
Whittier Field and root for his team! 
We do not want to see Maine duplicate 
their feat of last year! We don't 
want to have Maine go to Portland 
next Saturday and celebrate. We 
want Bowdoin to win — and — she is 
going to! 

There will be a monster rally Fri- 
day night; apples, cigarettes, cider, 
music, speeches, songs, and cheers. 
Every one come! Fill yourself up 
with enthusiasm; take it to the game 
with you, and don't stop cheering un- 
til Bowdoin has won the football 
championship of Maine! 



HARDING WINS 

STRAW VOTE 



The straw ballot taken last week in 
the college showed that from the stu- 
dent body with 354 out of 400 voting, 
272 were in favor of Harding, 73 for 
Cox, eight for Debs and one for Wat- 
kins. The faculty vote with 25 out of 
29 voting gave Cox 17 and Harding 8. 



DEBATING 

Ripon College, Ripon, Wis., is try- 
ing to arrange a date in the winter 
for a debate with Bowdoin. If a date 
can be agreed upon the Ripon College 
Club will send a debating team to 
Bowdoin to meet the Bowdoin team 
here. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CHESS CLUB 



Bowdoin is following some of the 
larger colleges in organizing a chess 
club. This interest has been prompted 
by the recent offer made by the editor 
of the "Lewiston Sun," to award a 
trophy to the college whose chess 
team is champion in a Maine inter- 
collegiate tournament. 

Professor Meserve recently enter- 
tained at his residence several players 
of the ancient game. Among those 
present were Williams '21, Anderson 
'21, Houghton '21, Blanchard '21, 
Clymer '22, Bishop '23, and Strout '23. 
Games were played, class prospects 
discussed, and refreshments served. 

It is hoped that all Bowdoin men 
who have a genuine interest in the 
game will turn out for the chess team, 
which will be selected through an in- 
tramural tournament. 

Bowdoin alumni in Portland have 
expressed a desire to compete with 
an undergraduate chess team. 

A club of this kind should bring 
men of different fraternities and non- 
fraternity men into closer contact, — 
bound together in the interest of 
wholesome, intellectual competition. 
And with the probability of an inter- 
collegiate tournament involved, Bow- 
doin in no respect can stand back. 



FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE 
DEBATE 



As a preliminary to the Bradbury 
Prize Debate and the intercollegiate 
debate, the Freshman-Sophomore d:- 
bate will be held on December 6. 

The question for both the trials and 
the final debate reads as follows: "Re- 
solved, That before the next Presi- 
dential election a method of direct 
voting shall be substituted for that 
of the electoral college." 

Each team will be composed of three 
speakers and an alternate to be 
elected at the competitive trials to 
be held November 8 at 3.30 in the De- 
bating Room. Speakers will be al- 
lowed five minutes for presenting ar- 
guments on any phase of the ques- 
tion they desire. 

Competitors are to leave their 
names at 32 North Appleton in order 
that the speaking schedule for the 
trials may be posted by the 8th. 



ENGLISH 8. 



A course in Literary Composition 
English 8, will be given during the 
second semester of 1920-1921 by Pro- 
fessors Andrews, Brown, Davis, and 
Mitchell. Not more than eight stu- 
dents will be admitted to the course, 
selection to be made on a competitive 
basis. Hours of meeting will be at 
the convenience of the instructors and 
students. 

Students, Seniors alone being elig- 
ble, who desire to take the course will 
plase leave their names with Profes- 
sor Davis and inform him not later 
than December 1920, of their qualifi- 
cations. 



Rifle Club Meeting 

At a meeting held last Thursday 
evening in the Debating Room of the 
Library, of about twenty men inter- 
ested in the Rifle Club, many of whom 
were members last year, the club was 
organized for the season of 1920-21 
and the following officers were elected : 
President, Herbert Ingraham '21; 
armorer, Albion Benton '21; secretary- 
treasurer, Karl Philbrick '23. 

Membership is open to any one in 
college, the only requirement being 
the payment of one dollar for dues 
It is the desire of the club to enroll 
as many of the students as possible, 
whether they have ever handled a gun 
before or not. Last year the rifle 
team was very successful although a 
number of the men were inexperi- 
enced. This year with the graduation 
of half the team there is a fine op- 
portunity for new men. Guns and 
ammunition for the range are fur- 
nished by the club. 



The nurse had just taken Rastus' 
temperature when the doctor arrived. 
"How are you feeling?" "Hungry 
doctor, hungry. All I get to eat was 
a piece of glass to suck on." — Ed- 
monton (Canada) Journal. 



Safe, If Not Sane. 

"He's wandering in his wind." 
"That's all right, he won't go far." 
-Virginia Reel. 



Professor — "What was Rembrandt's 
masterpiece?" 

Art Student — "Last supper at 
Erasmus." 



Y. M. C. A. ACTIVE 

MEMBERSHIP 

Are you interested in the Y. M. 
C. A. ? Do you believe it has a place 
on the Bowdoin campus ? Are you 
ready to help make that place worth 
while ? How can you help ? The Y. 
M. C. A. to do work must have money. 
No organization these clays can oper- 
ate without it. When you pay your 
Jlanket Tax, a small part of it goes 
to the Y. M. C. A., but as is only 
right end natural, the larger appro- 
priations go to the major sports. So 
if the Y. III. C. A. is to be effective 
it must secure the major portion of 
its finds elsewhere. But we are not 
asking for an outright contribution. 

This year we got out the Hand- 
book at considerable cost. Did you 
like it? The Blanket Tax appropria- 
tion covered less than half the ex- 
penses cf the Handbook. We must 
meet the rest somehow. Also we 
want to do some other things that 
will count. You who were here last 
year — Do you remember Dr. Seerley's 
talks ? Do you remember Lang Pratt 
rnd Charlie Hussey in the spring? 
These are speakers that leave some- 
thing with you. We are planning for 
more this year. But speakers take 
money. The Employment Bureau is 
helping nearly fifty fellows to work 
their way through college. Operation 
of this takes some money. 

We want you who are interested to 
jo'n an active membership in the Y. 
M. C. A. A city Y. M. C. A. offers all 
the privileg's of its building to those 
who join. So naturally your question 
is: What do I get if I join this Y.? 
We can offer you nothing of that kind. 
Your interest in the work and your 
belief in what we are trying to do 
can be your only basis for joining. If 
you believed the Handbook was worth 
while, if you enjoyed those speakers 
last year, if you want some more this 
year, you should become an active 
member of the Y. M. C. A. 

But we do not ask this of you and 
give you nothing. There are mem- 
bership cards, printed by the Inter- 
national Committee of the Y. M. C. A. 
and recognized all over the country. 
For $1.50 you will receive one of these 
cards good for one year from date. 
They are recognized in nearly every 
city association in the country. By 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



199 



presenting them you can get visitors' 
privileges. This varies in different 
cities. It generally includes use of 
the showers, swimming pool, physical 
department, and game rooms. In 
many cities it entitles you to a tem- 
porary use of the dormitory. During 
the next year when you are traveling,- 
visiting, and home on vacations won't 
you have plenty of opportuities to get 
$1.50 worth from your ticket? 

So let's everybody join this week. 
There's a man in your house who will 
sell you a ticket. There's a man in 
your dormitory to do the job. If 
these miss you, go to 7 South Maine 
Hall and McGown will be glad to All 
your needs. If you believe in the Y. 
M. C. A., stand behind it in this way. 
R. M. M. 



Speech By Senator Hale 



At an open meeting of the Repub- 
lican Club Monday night, Senator 
Hale talked on the subject of the com- 
ing election. The "Orient" regrets 
that no summary of his speech can 
be printed here, owing to the fact that 
no copy can be handled later than 
Monday afternoon. 



Campus Activities 

Portland and Vicinity 

In this week's issue sketches of the 
Cumberland County men from Port- 
land and vicinity are printed. 

Class of 1921. 

Donald K. Clifford is a member of 
the Kappa Sigma fraternity and a 
graduate of Deering High School. He 
was on the varsity baseball team last 
year, winning his letter. He has been 
on the football squad in his Sopho- 
more and Junior years and is out 
with the squad now. He transferred 
from Bates to Bowdoin in his Sopho- 
more year. 

Curtis S. Laughlin is a graduate 
of Deering High School and a mem- 
ber of the Theta Delta Chi fraternity. 
He had straight A's throughout his 
Junior year here. He has won a 
Bradbury Debating Prize and also the 
most important Hiland Lockwood 
Fairbanks Prize. 

Philip H. McCrum is a member. of 
the Sigma Nu fraternity and a gradu- 
ate of Portland High School. He re- 
ceived straight A's during the second 



semester of his Sophomore year and 
throughout his Junior year. He has 
won the Brown Memorial Scholarship 
Prize and the Noyes Political Economy 
Prize. Last year he won Phi Beta 
Kappa honors. He is on the football 
squad this year.' He plays in the 
College band and orchestra. 

Edwin T. Myers is a graduate of 
Portland High School. He trans- 
ferred to Bowdoin from the University 
of Maine. He is a member of Alpha 
Tau Omega. 

Robert R. Schonland of Portland 
graduated from Portland High School 
and' is a member of the Psi Upsilon 
fraternity. He has been a member of 
the varsity football squad, the S. A. 
T. C. football team, and his class track 
team. He was on the Ivy Day Com- 
mittee last year, an associate editor 
of the "Bugle," a member of the 
Abraxas, and also of U. Q. 

Class of 1922. 

Louis Bernstein graduated from the 
Portland High School in the Class of 
1918. 

Leon M. Butler, a member of Beta 
Theta Pi, graduated from the Deer- 
ing High School. During his first two 
years he has been a member of the 
Glee Club. In his Freshman year he 
won the Goodwin French Prize. 

Shepard M. Emery, a member of 
Alpha Delta Phi, is a graduate of the 
Deering High School. 

Francis P. Freeman, a member of 
Psi Upsilon, graduated from Deering 
High School. In his Sophomore year 
he was assistant manager of tennis 
and is now manager. This year he is 
also a member of the "Bugle" Board 
and of the Board of Managers. 

Robert F. Goff graduated from 
Deering High School and is a mem- 
ber of Psi Upsilon. Last year he was 
a member of the Masque and Gown. 

Virgil C. McGorrill graduated from 
Deering High School and is a member 
of Beta Theta Pi. In his Freshman 
year he was a member of U. Q. Dur- 
ing his Sophomore year he was man- 
ager of his class track team and as- 
sistant manager of varsity track. Dur- 
ing his second and third years he has 
been on the "Orient" Board, while this 
year he is manager of varsity track, 
secretary of the Board of Managers, a 
member of Abraxas, and a member 
of the Executive Committee of the 



New England Inter-Collegiate Ath- 
letic Association. 

Clifford P. Monahon graduated from 
Deering High School and is a mem- 
ber of Kappa Sigma. 

David Silverman is a graduate of 
Portland High School. 

Frank 0. Stack is a graduate of 
Portland High School and a member 
of the Zeta Psi fraternity. He was 
on the varsity track squad in his 
Sophomore year and on the class 
track squad in his Freshman and 
Sophomore years. 

Widgery Thomas is a member of 
the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity 
and a graduate of Phillips-Exeter 
Academy. 

Class of 1923. 

Udell Bramson of Portland is a 
graduate of Portland High School. 

George Thomas Davis of Portland 
graduated from Portland High School. 
He is a member of the Kappa Sigma 
fraternity. He has played on his 
class baseball team each year and last 
spring candidated for the varsity. 

Reginald M. Howe of Woodfords is 
is graduate of Deering High School 
and is a member of the Beta Theta 
Pi fraternity. He is on the Glee Club 
this year. 

Eaton S. Lothrop of South Portland 
is a graduate of South Portland High 
School. He is a member of the Glee 
Club and of the Alpha Delta Phi fra- 
ternity. 

Thor Miller of Portland is a gradu- 
ate of Deering High School. 

Earle B. Perkins of South Portland 
is a graduate of South Portland High 
School. He is a member of Delta 
Upsilon. He has played this fall and 
last on his class baseball team, be- 
sides candidating for the varsity last 
spring. 

Abiel M. Smith is a member of 
Alpha Delta Phi, and a graduate of 
Portland High School. A year ago 
he was on the varsity football team, 
and probably would have made his 
letter but for injuries. In the spring 
he made varsity track, and was a 
point-winner in the Maine meet at 
Lewiston. He is a member of the 
U. Q. society. 

John F. Sullivan of South Portland 
is a member of Delta Upsilon. He 
transferred to Bowdoin this year from 
the University of Maine. He is a 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



graduate of South Portland High 
School. 

Class of 1924. 

Marshall A. Baldwin, Portland 
graduated from Deering High School 
and is a member of Delta Kappa 
Epsilon. 

Ralph E. Blanchard, a graduate of 
Deering High School, is a member of 
the Theta Delta Chi fraternity. 

Lawrence Blatchford of Portland is 
a graduate of Deering High School. 
He is a member of Alpha Delta Phi. 

George T. Davis of Portland is a 
graduate of Deering High School, and 
a member of the Psi Upsilon fra- 
ternity. 

Frederick R. Hamilton of South 
Portland, is a graduate of South Port- 
land High School, and a member of 
the Kappa Sigma fraternity. 

John H. Johnson of South Portland 
is a graduate of South Portland High 
School. He is a member of the Delta 
Upsilon fraternity. 

James M. Keniston of Portland, 
graduated from Portland High School. 
He is a member of the Beta Theta Pi 
fraternity and secretary and treasurer 
of his class. 

Walter DeC. Moore is a graduate 
of Deering High School. He is a mem- 
ber of the Kappa Sigma fraternity. 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



Student Council. 

President — John G. Young '21, 23 
Appleton Hall. 

Vice-President, Paul H. Eames '21, 
Zeta Psi House. 

Secretary, Alexander Thomson '21 
7 Hyde Hall. 

Athletic Council. 

Senior Members — George R. Good- 
win, Kappa Sigma House; Alexander 
Thomson, 7 Hyde Hall. 

Board of Managers. 

Chair-man — Paul H. Eames '21, Zeta 
Psi House. 

Football. 

Captain — Harold A. Dudgeon '21, 
Delta Upsilon House. 

Manager — M. Lawrence Willson '21, 
Psi Upsilon House. 

Assistant Manager — William R. 
Ludden '22, Kappa Sigma House. 
Baseball. 

Captain — William R. Needelman '21, 



17 Clcaveland street. 

Mrnager — Francis R. Ridley '22, 
Delta Upsilon House. 

Assistant Mancgcr — Wallace J. Put- 
nam' '23, Alpha Delta Phi House. 

Track. 

Captain — Alexander Thomson '21, 7 
Hyde Hall. 

Manager— Virgil C. McGorrill '22, 
Beta Theta Pi House. 

Assistant Manager — Donald J. 
Eames '23, Zeta Psi House. 

"Orient" Board. 

Editor-in-Chief — Norman W. Haines 
'21, Theta Delta Chi House. 

Managing Editor — Edward B. Ham 
'22, 3 Bath street. 

1922 "Bugle" Board. 

Editor-in-Chief— Carroll S. Towle 
'22, Zeta Psi House. 

Business Manager — Allen E. Mor- 
rell '22, Sigma Nu House. 

Assistant Business Manager — Wil- 
fred R. Brewer '22, Delta Kappa Ep- 
silon House. 

"Quill" Board. 

Editor-in-Chief — Joseph L. Badger 
'21, Psi Upsilon House. 
Y. M. C. A. 

President — Carroll S. Towle '22, 
Zeta Psi House. 

Vice-Presidents — Clyde T. Congdon 
'22, Delta Upsilon House. 

Treasurer— Karl R. Philbrick '23, 
Delta Kappa Epsilon House. 

General Secretary — Russell M. Mc- 
Gown, 7 Maine Hall. 

Musical Clubs. 

Manager — J. Maxim Ryder '21, 
Delta Upsilon House. 

Leader, Mandolin Club — Henry 
Sprince, Medic '23, Cleaveland street. 

Leader, Glee Club — Harrison C. 
Lyseth '21, Delta Upsilon House. 
Masque and Gown. 

President — Magnus F. Ridlon '21, 
Delta Kappa Epsilon House. 

Manager— Karl R. Philbrick '23, 
Delta Kappa Epsilon House. 

Bowdoin Publishing Company. 

Business Manager — Kenneth S. 
Boardman '21, Psi Upsilon House. 

Assistant Manager — Wilfred R. 
Brewer '22, Delta Kappa Epsilon 
House. 

Debating Council. 

President— Lloyd H. Hatch '21, 23 
Hyde Hall. 



Vice-President — A. Rudolph Thayer 
'22, 7 Maine Hall. 

Secretary — Russell M. McGown '21, 
7 Maine Hall. 

Ibis. 

President — Robert W. Morse '21, 16 
Appleton Hall. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Norman W. 
Haines '21, Theta Delta Chi House. 

College Band. 

Leader — Philip G. McLellan '21, 
Delta Kappa Epsilon House. 

Manager — Carroll P. Norton '22, 
Delta Upsilon House. 

Union Board. 

Senior Members — Roderick L. Per- 
ms, Beta Theta Pi House; John G. 
Young, 23 Appleton Hall. 

Biology Club. 

President — Sanger M. Cook '21, 
Delta Kappa Epsilon House. 

Vice-President — William W. Blanch- 
ard '21, 18 Pleasant street. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Hugh Nixon 
'21, Delta Upsilon House. 

Classical Club. 

Scribe — Alexander Thomson '21, 7 
Hyde Hall. 

President not yet elected. 

History Club. 

Not yet organized. 
Hockey. 

Manager — John P. Vose '22, Delta 
Kappa Epsilon House. 

Assistant Manager — Richard I. 
Small '23, 20 Maine Hall. 

Tennis. 

Captain — George A. Partridge '22, 
Beta Theta Pi House. 

Manager — Francis P. Freeman '22, 
Psi Upsilon House. 

Assistant Manager — William B. 
Jacob '23, Delta Upsilon House. 

Fencing. 

Captain — Ralph T. Ogden '21, 38 

College street. 

Manager — Louis Osterman '21, 
Delta Kappa Epsilon House. 

Rifle Club. 

President — Herbert S. Ingraham '21, 
Delta Upsilon House. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Karl R. Phil- 
brick '23, Delta Kappa Epsilon House. 

Armorer — Albion M. Benton '21, 29 
Maine Hall. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



201 



BOWDOIN 0, BATES 

(Continued from page 197) 

game, Bates might have scored. Not 
only was he strong on the offensive 
but also on the defensive. Dudgeon, 
Perry, M. Morrell, and Dahlgren also 
did fine work for the team. Dudgeon, 
as usual, was right in his element 
when Bates tried plays through his 
station. For Bates, Wiggin, Davis, 
and Finnegan starred. Wiggin and 
Finnegan were especially good at end 
runs; while Davis excelled at line 
bucking. 

First Period. 

Bowdoin won the toss and elected 
to kick from the western end of the 
field. The ball soared neatly down to 
the Garnet 10-yard line where Finne- 
gan grabbed it, making about three 
yards before the defenders brought 
him to earth. Kelly tried a detour 
around left end but the speedy Bow- 
doin men beat him to the turn, drop- 
ping him for a yard loss. Finnegan 
lost no time in making up his team- 
mate's loss by tearing through right 
tackle for eight yards. Davis, Bates's 
star player, made a lunge at center 
which netted a yard before Gormley 
dropped back to boot the pigskin up 
the field. 

Swinglehurst Breaks Ankle. 

Swinglehurst was under the punt 
but failed to run it back before the 
Bates pack reached him. Kirkpat- 
rick and Swinglehurst advanced the 
ball four yards, then Kirk'hit the line 
again, this time without a gain. 
Mason's punt went to Kelly whom Bill 
Parent promptly brought down. Kelly 
again took the ball, bearing down on 
the Bowdoin left to be dropped by 
Swinglehurst before he reached the 
line of scrimmage. "Peewee" was 
helped off the field and sent to the 
hospital where it was found that his 
ankle was broken. Perry went in to 
fill the gap. 

Bates Gains 22 on Forward. 

As the play started again, Davis 
made an ineffectual drive at center, 
followed by a beautiful forward pass, 
Wiggin to Gormley, that netted the 
Garnet team twenty-two yards before 
Woodbury stopped the racing end. 
This was the beginning of a series 
of Bates gains that brought the ball 
well down toward the Bowdoin posts. 
Davis drove through center for five, 



Kelley bumped right tackle for four 
more, then in two more plunges Davis 
made the distance. Finnegan tried to 
go around left end but was held for 
no gain, then Davis's attempt at left 
tackle made only two yards. Wig- 
gin's forward flew wild and the ball 
went to Bowdoin. Pick Turner, bor- 
ing through center for a yard, dropped 
the ball as he hit the ground but 
Kirkpatrick pounced on it before the 
enemy recovered its senses. In two 
rushes through center Perry counted 
out four more yards for Bowdoin. 

Perry Makes 35 Around End 

Mason punted to Kelley, who raced 
up the field to the 50-yard line be- 
fore he went off side. Wiggin tried 
right end but gained nothing, then 
Finnegan circled left end for four and 
Davis broke through right tackle for 
two more. Following Gormley's punt 
to the Bowdoin 17-yard mark, Perry 
took the ball around the defender's 
left end and flashed over- six white 
lines before Davis, pursuing like an 
angry bull, brought him down in mid- 
field. Perry's dash was the big sen- 
sation of the game. His superb stiff- 
arm bowled over three Garnet players 
while his foot work was of the best. 
With this sort of encouragement Pick 
Turner needed only two stabs at right 
tackle to make first down, but Davis 
broke up the next two plays by Perry 
and Woodbury, and although Turner 
went through for four yards, Mason's 
pass to him was intercepted by Kel- 
ley and the ball went to Bates. Finne- 
gan's attempt cost the team a yard 
which Davis paid in a 3-yard gain 
through center but when Kelley was 
tackled behind the line for another 
loss, Gormley had to put his toe to the 
leather. The punt came down on Bow- 
doin's 35-yard line and after a vain 
attempt at left end by Perry the 
whistle blew for the end of the first 
period. 

Second Period. 

Perry's initial play of the second 
period was halted a yard behind the 
line by Kelley, and Mason punted to 
the 28-yard mark. Davis made two 
through center but was penalized five, 
and then when Kelley tried to get 
around the left wing Guptill spilled 
him for another 2-yard loss. Wood- 
bury received Gormley's punt, running 
it back eight yards to the 45-yard line. 
A high snap-back to Turner lost the 



White thirteen yards. Turner carried 
through right tackle for three yards 
and a penalty on Bates advanced the 
ball five yards further along the field. 
Turner again took the ball for two 
yards, but this play was too much for 
Mai Morrell's uniform and the game 
was held up for some minutes while 
he got into another pair of trousers. 
During this interval Canty reported 
in Canter's place and the play started 
with Bates on her 47-yard mark. Fin- 
negan tried the left wing, losing a 
yard in the transaction. Wiggin made 
a yard through center, and after an 
unsuccessful attempt at a pass, Gorm- 
ley punted to the 30-yard line. Perry 
made a small gain at right end, 
Turner pounded the Bates right tackle 
twice for nine yards and Woodbury 
went through center for first down. 

Dahlgren Goes Into Back Field. 

Mai Morrell went in for Kirkpatrick 
and on his first play made six yards 
through center. Perry's two attempts 
netted very little and Mason punted 
out. The ball went to Wiggin on the 
32-yard line. He fumbled and Eames 
recovered. Perry was called out, 
Woodbury dropped back in his place, 
and Joe Smith assumed the resopnsi- 
bility of calling the signals. Smith's 
first try netted two, then Morrell 
failed to gain and was relieved by 
"Dumpy" Dahlgren, in for the first 
time since the Springfield game. Fin- 
negan knocked down Turner's pass and 
Mason's attempted drop-kick went to 
Davis, whom Parent downed on the 
10-yard line. Davis punched his way 
through center for another four but 
the White refused to allow Finnegan 
or Davis a gain in the next two 
rushes. Gormley punted. The Bow- 
doin backs, gazing straight into the 
sun, failed to discern the ball as it 

(Continued on page 205) 



Studying Hygiene. 

First Freshman — "What are six 
ways of preserving the teeth?" 

Second do. — "Use six different kinds 
of tooth paste." 



Right. 

Mrs. Tattle — "Look, my dear. There 
comes Jimmy downstairs with powder 
on his lapel and rouge on his shirt- 
front." 

Mrs. Prattle; — "Yes. Parti-colored 
clothing." — Purple Cow. 



202 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Norman W. Haines '21 Editor-in-Chief 

Edward B. Ham '22 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Floyd A. Gerrard '23 Athletics 

Karl R. Philbriek '23 Faculty Notes 

George H. Quinby '23 Alumni Department 

F. King Turgeon '23 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

John L. Berry '21 Crosby E. Redman '21 

Harry Helson '21 Frank A. St. Clair '21 

George E. Houghton '21 William R. Ludden '22 
Russell M. McGown '21 Virgil C. McGorrill '22 
Roland L. McCormack '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. Boardman '21. . .Business Manager 

Wilfred R. Brewer '22 Assistant Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials; the Managing Editor 
for the news department; and the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 



Vol. L. November 3, 1920. No. 17 



Entered at Post Office in Br 
Second-Class Mail Matter. 



Bowdoin's Stand on the Election. 

The returns from the straw vote 
conducted under the auspices of the 
"Portland Express" indicate that the 
student body is overwhelmingly in 
favor of the Republican candidate. 
The Faculty, on the other hand, went 
strongly to the side of the Democratic 
nominee. 

The results of this tentative elec- 
tion are what might be expected from 
such an institution as Bowdoin. The 
State election showed that the popu- 
lace would swing decisively toward the 
Republican faction. Bowdoin men, 
while more or less isolated from the 
world at large, gave evidence of a 
more or less intimate sympathy with 
the popular view by naming Harding 
as their choice. The Faculty was 
probably influenced to some extent in 
supporting the opposite side by the 
latter's steadfast adherence to the 
principle of the League of Nations. 
To thinking men and women every- 
where this principle is certainly 
worthy of serious consideration. 

Whatever may be the outcome of 
the election we are certain that the 



members of Bowdoin College have 
cast their votes carefully and con- 
scientiously. 



TO SUBSCRIBERS. 



All subscribers to the "Orient" 
have probably wondered that the 
issues of October 13, 20, and 27 arrive 
together. Owing to a complication of 
causes, mechanical and otherwise, it 
has been impossible for us to have 
the mailing list revised and printed 
until last week. Consequently, we 
have been unable to mail the "Orient" 
as we would have desired. Many in- 
quiries regarding this have been re- 
ceived and it is hoped by the busi- 
ness management that this note may 
serve as an explanation and an 
apology. K. S. B. 



"That Unconstrained 

Bowdoin Hullo" 

A propos of a recent editorial in the 
'Orient," Mr. William M. Warren '01, 
of Bangor, calls our attention to the 
following poem, published in the 
"Orient" in 1898, by John Wilbur Con- 
don '98: 



From campus to post-office, daylight or dark, 
In sunshine, slush, mud, rain, or snow, 

You always can tell when those college chaps 
meet, 
By their patent-applied-for "hullo!" 

No formal agonized "How do you do ?" 
As cold as the bleak winds that blow, 

But a genial good-fellowship warms you clear 
through 
In that happy-go-lucky "hullo!" 

The Senior, the Junior, the Soph, and the 
Fresh, 

In ages can never outgrow 
The friendly emotion that seizes the breast 

In response to that hearty "hullo!" 

From campus to post-office — no matter where 
Our life work may call us to go. 

May memory still throw its tendrils around 
That unconstrained college "hullo!" 

J. W. C. '98. 



Weekly Meeting of 
the "Orient' 



Board 



In an endeavor to secure a more 
active co-operation among the mem- 
bers of the "Orient" Board, weekly 
meetings will be held every Thursday 
at one o'clock in the "Orient" office 
in Bannister Hall. The purpose of 
these meetings is to discuss each 



"Orient" as it appears and to offer 
suggestions for its improvement. 
These meetings will be a success only 
if all members are present and ready 
to do their share. 



BATES GAME RALLY 



The night before the Bates game a 
very enthusiastic rally was held in 
Memorial Hall. John Young '21 pre- 
sided over the meeting, and, speaking 
in his usual vivid manner, asked, 
begged, and ordered the students to 
go to Lewiston the next day and back 
up their team. 

Professor Stanwood was the chief 
speaker of the evening. He told the 
men that he could not go with them 
to Lewiston for he had classes in the 
morning, but he hoped that not a soul 
would be in one of his classes, that 
"every mother's son" of them would 
be in Lewiston. Then, narrating some 
interesting incidents of the football 
playing of the Carlisle Indians, he 
went on to say that "the idea of sport 
is to excel," and to urge the men to 
stand back of the team and help it 
excel. 

The Bowdoin fighting spirit mani- 
fested itself throughout the evening, 
especially in the songs and cheers 
which rose to the roof again and 
again. The line of students that 
marched in the streets of Lewiston 
the next afternoon, showed that the 
rally had been a successful one, as did 
the empty class-rooms at Bowdoin. 



BOWDOIN MEN IN 

NEW YORK PARADE 



Bowdoin was assigned a place in 
line in the College Men's Division of 
the great Harding-Coolidge parade, 
held in New York Thursday, October 
28. Mr. John W. Frost '04, was 
marshal of the Bowdoin section, which 
was near the head of the column 
as the colleges marched in the order of 
the dates of their foundation. 



"Patrick," said the priest, "how 
much hay did you steal?" 

"Well, I may as well confess for the 
whole stack, your riverence, for it's 
going bpek I am for the rest tonight." 
— Mass. Tech Voo Doo. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



203 



THE GOOD OLD 

DAYS IN TOPSHAM 



The phrase, "busy as a Topsham 
grocer," once coined by a Bowdoin 
graduate, could not have been applied 
in his sense of the word to the 
methodical accountant of an interest- 
ing volume lately received at the 
library. For this well preserved 
leather bound folio volume, the library 
is indebted to Mrs. Clara S. Patten 
of Brunswick, who received it from 
her uncle, Dr. Asher Ellis. The book 
bears on its first page the inscription: 
"Ezra Smith's Ledger, No. 1 Topsham, 
Nov. 1, 1797." Mr. Smith was an 
overseer of this college from 1800 to 
1811. He was born in New Hamp- 
shire about 1764 and died in Hanover, 
Maine, in 1846. 

The three or four hundred pages of 
this ledger are completely filled with 
the accounts kept by Mr. Smith at 
his store from November, 1797, to 
September, 1801, and constitute au- 
thentic evidence of many of the so- 
cial and economic habits of our an- 
cestors in these regions some hun- 
dred and twenty years ago. Mr. 
Smith kept a general store and dealt 
in a great variety of articles from all 
kinds of groceries, vegetables, meats, 
and ardent spirits, to shoes, dress 
goods, stationery, dictionaries, and 
almanacks, but no other books. 

Money was evidently scarce in those 
days. Relatively few accounts were 
settled with cash, most of them with 
commodities produced by the custom- 
ers, such as wood, lumber, farm pro- 
duce, and labor. Many of them 
worked off their bills by hard labor 
for Mr. Smith at long hours and at 
the rate of 75 cents a day. Miss 
Martha Fitts is credited with $12.54 
for twenty-five weeks' work. An- 
other customer settled a long stand 
ing account in part by surrendering 
"one share in schoolhouse," valued at 
$4. In fact, his store seems to have 
resembled a miniature produce ex- 
change or a mediaeval barter station 
rather than the thing we know to- 
day as a store. 

The first account runs against a 
man who in nine days, charges gal- 
lons and gallons of brandy at 38 
cents a quart, rum at 25 to 28 cents, 
besides lamb at 3 and 4 cents a pound, 
sugar at 14 and 15 cents, also a "yard 



of pigtail" (whatever that may be) 
it 4 cents. For these goods he de- 
livers boards at $5 a thousand. 

With two or three exceptions Mr. 
Smith's customers were hearty drink- 
ers. Most of the accounts deal chiefly 
with rum and brandy with occasional 
charges for "syder." This, however, 
is not so difficult for us to understand 
when we consider that life hereabouts 
was then exceedingly monotonous and 
offered virtually none of the substi- 
tutes for alcohol that the highly or- 
ganized society of today presents. 

Of chief interest to us are the prices 
then prevalent. We note the follow- 
ing: 

Sugar, 14 to 20 cents; molasses, 75 
cents a gallon; "bisket," 17 cents a 
dozen; coffe, 28 to 38 cents; cheese, 

13 and 14 cents; butter, 15 to 20 cents; 
lard, 9 cents; flour, 6 to 8 cents; pork, 

14 cents; lamb and beef, 3 to 4 cents. 
Considerable difference in the prices 
of the same articles on the same day 
seem to indicate that this was no one 
price store. Tobacco, 15 to 35 cents 
a pound; brandy, 38 cents a quart; 
ram, 25 to 28 cents. Eggs figure rare- 
ly in these accounts; possibly every 
family was expected to keep hens. 
However, on September 17, 1798, eggs 
were sold at 13 cents a dozen; apples, 
42 cents a bushel; corn, 75 cents a 
bushel; shoes, 92 cents to $1.25; "knit- 
ting pins," 2 cents a pair; "chizzels," 
17 cents each. There is a detailed 
record of the cost of building a brig, 
$5,633.54. 

One gets the impression that life 
was not easy in those good old days. 
Although most articles of food seem 
cheap, cloth and clothing were high, 
and labor at seventy-five cents for a 
long day must be regarded as ex- 
ceedingly unproductive when compared 
with present day accomplishments. 



Saturday's Football Scores 

Bowdoin 0, Bates 
Maine 22, Colby 0. 

Harvard 24, Virginia 0. 
Yale 21, Colgate 7. 
Princeton 10, West Virginia 3. 
Holy Cross 3, Syracuse 0. 
Penn State 28, Pennsylvania 7. 
Pittsburgh 14, Lafayette 0. 
Dartmouth 34, Tufts 7. 
Georgia Tech 24, Centre 0. 
Cornell 24, Rutgers 0. 



Navy 47. Western Reserve 0. 

Notre Dame 27, Army 17. 

Brown 35, Vermont 0. 

Boston University 28, Connecticut 
State 0. 

Boston College 12, Springfield Y. 
M. C. A. 0. 

Amherst 30, Hamilton 7. 

Columbia 20, Williams 14. 

New Hampshire State 9, Massachu- 
setts A. C. 0. 

Wesleyan 20, Rochester 0. 

Union 7, Rhode Island State 7. 

Georgetown 28, Johns Hopkins 7. 



New Recruiting Plan 

For State of Maine 

An advance notice of a recruiting 
plan for the new army of 280,000 has 
been sent to all newspapers for pub- 
lication. Each town and city to sup- 
ply its qu'ota for this army is the 
present plan of the Army Recruiting 
Service. Maine's quota is 1800 and 
New Hampshire's 1000. If each town 
and city keeps its quota in the army, 
there will be no recruiting problem, 
and taxpayers will be saved millions 
of dollars. Cumberland county's quota 
is 276. 



OUmpus jftetos 

All men who wish to join the winter 
track squad must report at once to 
Coach Magee for light fall practice. 
Those who do not report now will not 
be allowed to join the squad later. 

All men attending the Bates game 
at Lewiston Saturday were excused 
from chapel and classes. 

Dexter White, president of the 
White Studio of New York City was 
on the campus last week to make ar- 
rangements for Junior class pictures. 

The formation of an Out-Door Club 
is now under consideration. If the 
plans materialize, skating, snow-shoe- 
ing, skiing, and tobogganing will be 
in order here at Bowdoin next winter. 

The athletic council is at present 
considering the possibility of entering 
the cross-country team in the New 
England meet. 

P. J. Mundie, Medic-'20, was on the 
campus last week. 

Freshman caps arrived last week, 
Tuesday. The caps are much the same 
as last year, the usual black skull cap 
with a large white button. 

Last Tuesday evening the Psi 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Upsilon fraternity held a special national Law and Common Law are to 



initiation for Hugh McCullock Marsh- 
all '24, of East Walpole, Mass. Sev- 
eral weeks ago Marshall met with a 
painful accident when his foot was 
caught in the chain of his motorcycle, 
breaking several bones of the foot. 
After the initiation the members en- 
joyed a hallowe'en party. The room 
was decorated in appropriate colors 
and refreshments were served. 

The college pictures have arrived. 
They may be seen and purchased at 
the Chi Psi House. 

The first hour exams of the year 
are now taking place. To many of 
the men they are mortal terror in 
prospect, but the Freshmen have 
found that the professors are human 
after all, just as upper-classmen al- 
ready know. Professor Cram sur- 
prised his men by not springing the 
surprise which they had expected, 
while Professor Mitchell turned out a 
long and comprehensive questionaire, 
and the fellows had no reason to com- 
plain that it did not cover the ground. 
The first set of quiz papers in gov- 
ernment had warned the students of 
the prime necessity in this course for 
organization, thereby preparing them 
for the hour examination. 

Rev. Howard Gilpatric '£6 was on 
the campus last week. 

The Biology Club field trip, sched- 
uled for last Tuesday was postponed 
until yesterday. 

The Athletic Council had a lengthy 
meeting last week and various mat- 
ters were discussed. 

Last Tuesday there was a meeting 
of the "Orient" Board at which plans 
were made for entering the Eastern 
Intercollegiate Journal Association. 
It was also decided to have weekly 
meetings to discuss the current issues. 
There were two meetings of the 
"Bugle" Board last Thursday to make 
arrangements about Junior pictures. 
A third meeting was held Monday 
night. 

The college has a sample of every 
catalogue that has been issued, with 
the exception of three. One of these, 
that of 1810, was recently given to 
the college by Roger S. Warner of 
Boston. 

Lyman A. Cousens '02 was on the 
campus last Wednesday. 

Handy '23 is in the infirmary with 
an abscess in his throat. 

The monthly examinations in Inter- 



be held in Banister Hall on Thursday, 
November 6. The first is to be held 
at 10.30 a. m., while the second is to 
be held at 11.30. 

Coach Magee has arranged for an 
indoor track and field competition. 
This competition started last Wednes- 
day and will continue throughout the 
fall. 

An article has come down from the 
"Maine Campus" which states that the 
University of Maine is going to 
swamp the Bowdoin campus on No- 
vember 6. It also says that after the 
game the whole Maine student body 
is to go down to Portland and cele- 
brate. We don't expect this to hap- 
pen, so let's prove to them that it 
won't. 



The Place of the Classics in Educa- 
tion." 

Professor Bell spoke in Thomaston 
last week on the League of Nations. 



jFacultp Jftotes 

The complete letter regarding the 
League of Nations written to Pro- 
fessor Woodruff by William J. Curtis 
'75," which was printed in part in last 
week's "Orient," appeared in full 
in the "Brunswick Record" Friday. 

Professor Woodruff who is giving 
a series of six lectures at the School 
of Religious Education in Bath, gave 
his first lecture Monday night on "The 
Gospel of Mark." 

President and Mrs. Sills and Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. Burnett left last Wed- 
nesday to pass the remainder of the 
week in Boston and other Massachu- 
setts cities. President Sills and Pro- 
fessor Burnett on Thursday and Fri- 
day attended the meeting of the As- 
sociation of New England Colleges, 
which was held at Wesleyan Univer- 
sity. 

President Sills was to visit Smith 
and Amherst last Saturday. 

Dean Nixon and Professor Mitchell 
attended the Bowdoin Club dinner at 
Bangor last Friday evening. 

Professor Brown is one of a com- 
mittee of three making plans for the 
purchase of the old Free Baptist 
Church as a capitalized community 
house for the town. 

Professor Charles Forbes of An- 
dover was a guest of Dean Nixon 
Thursday. 

Dean Nixon attended the Bangor 
State Teachers' Association meeting 
last Friday. The presidents of the 
four Maine colleges read papers on 



ASSIGNMENTS 

ENGLISH HISTORY. 
History 5. 

Nov. 8. Lecture XIII. Henry II 
and the Church. 

Nov. 10. Lecture XIV. King John. 

Reading : 

Cheyney, Short History, pp. 161-184. 

Cheyney, Readings, No. 110 (Ex- 
tracts from the Great Charter). 

In addition each student will read 
one of the following selections: 

Ramsay, The Angevin Empire, chs. 
xiii-xv or xvi-xvii. 

Stubbs, The Early Plantagenets, ch. 
vii. 

Stubbs, Constitutional History of 
England, I, sections 151-156. 

Norgate, England under the Ange- 
vin Kings, II, ch. x. 

Norgate, John Lackland, ch. vi. 

Gneist, English Constitution, I, pp. 
204-311. 

Davis, England under the Normans 
and Angevins, chs. xiv-xv. 

Adams, Political History of Eng- 
land 1066-1216, chs. xx-xxi. 

Green, History of English People, 
I, 189-249. 

Taylor, Origin and Growth of the 
English Constitution, pp. 366-3S6. 

Taswell-Langmead, Constitutional 
History, PP- 107-148. 

McKechnie, Magna Carta, pp. 3-57. 

Creasy, The English Constitution, 
chs. X-XI. 

Smith, United Kingdom, I, ch. vi. 

Pearson, History of England, II, ch. 
iii. 

Freeman, Norman Conquest, V, pp. 
466-481. 



EUROPE SINCE 1915. 

History 7. 

Seventh Week. 

November 8. Lecture XIII. Lib- 
eralism vs. Metternich's System in 
Austria and Germany to 1848, I. 

November 10. Lecture XIV. Liber- 
alism vs. Metternich's System in 
Austria and Germany to 1848, II. 

Reading: 

Hazen, pp. 23-44 and 145-159, and 
thirty pages from the following: 
Metternich: Memoirs vols. Ill and IV 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



205 



(pages to be selected by reference to 
table of contents). 

Lcger-Hill: Austria, pp. 491-588. 

Sandeman: Metternich (any pages). 

Sybel : Founding of the German Em- 
pire, pp. 28-141. 

Cambridge Modern History X, pp. 
340-382; XI, pp. 43-64. 

Seignobos: pp. 374-412 and 424-454. 

Ward: Germany, .vol. I. 

Treitschke: Germany in the Nine- 
teenth Century, vols. I-V. 



POLITICAL HISTORY OF THE 

UNITED STATES. 

History 9. 

Nov. 8. Lecture XIII. Organiza- 
tion of the Federal Government. Part 
II. 

Nov. 10. Lecture XIV. The Fed- 
eralist Regime. 

Reading: 

Bassett, A Short History of the 
United States, ch. XII. 

MacDonald, Documentary Source 
Book of American History, Nos. 55, 
56, 57. 



GOVERNMENT I. 
Seventh Week, Beginning, Nov. 9. 

Lecture. Nov. 9. Ballot Reform. 
Lecture. Nov. 11. Citizenship and 
Suffrage. 
Assignment: 

1. Munro, Government of the U. S., 
Chap. VI. 

2. Report on library topics. 
Group A. Conferences. 
Group B. Quiz section. 



SOCIOLOGY. 

Economics 5. 

Week Beginning Nov. 9. 

Lecture: Physical Factors Affecting 
Social Organization. 

Suggested readings: 

Herbert Spencer: Principles of 
Sociology, Vol. 1, pp. 17-35. 

W. Z. Ripley: Races of Europe, pp. 
560-589. 

Ellen C. Semple: Influences of 
Geographic Environment, pp. v.-viii; 
1-49; 607-635. 

Ellsworth Huntington: The Pulse 
of Asia, pp. 106-132; 223-238; 359- 
385. 

Kelsey: Physical Basis of Society. 



ECONOMICS. 

Week Beginning Nov. 9. 

Economics 1. 



Nov. 8. Enterprise. Seager, Ch. 10, 
Nov. 10. Hour examination. 

Economics 9. 
Nov. 8. Cost Accounting, Jones. 
Ch. 9. 

Nov. 10. Hour examination. 



BATES GAME 

(Continued from page 201) 

soared to a landing on the 50-yard line 
and it bounded and rolled twenty 
yards further before Woodbury re- 
trieved it. Bowdoin failed to make 
first down and punted back. Davis 
hit the line in vain and his team lost 
fifteen yards for holding. He hit 
center twice for a total of six yards 
before the punt went down to Wood- 
bury, who stopped on the 30-yard line 
just as the whistle blew. 
Third Period. 

The teams lined up for the second 
half with Canter back in for Canty. 
The kick-off went to Dahlgren who 
ran it back ten yards to the 31-yard 
line. Turner made four through 
tackle but Woodbury and Smith were 
detained without gains and Mason 
punted to Kelley who dodged five 
yards to the 50-yard line. He then 
sprinted around right end for a 7-yard 
gain, closely followed by a 6-yard gain 
through center, engineered by Davis. 
Joe Smith Intercepts Pass. 

Finnegan dropped back to toss a 
forward but Joe Smith wormed 
through and brought him down for a 
loss of thirteen yards. Wiggin shot a 
forward and Joe Smith, dodging 
through the tangle, finally snatched 
the flying oval almost from the op- 
posing end's hands, coming down on 
the 35-yard line. Woodbury skimmed 
around right end for seven and 
Turner's two through center netted 
only a 15-yard penalty for holding. 
Dahlgren took the ball but failed to 
gain and Al Morrell, coming in for 
Woodbury lifted the ball down to mid- 
field. Kelley went around right for 
two and Finnegan circled left for four, 
stopping only at the urgent request 
of Al Morrell who dropped him neatly. 
Farley came in for Finnegan, starting 
with a yard through center which 
Davis bettered by three yards to first 
down. 

Turner's 18- Yard Line Plunge. 

Farley vainly tried the left wing 
and an attempt at forward passing 



met with a repulse that sent the 
Garnet back eight yards. Kelley 
could make no more than a yard 
through right tackle so Gormley 
placed another punt in White terri- 
tory. Turner started off with a won- 
derful line plunge, tearing through 
the Bates line like a cyclone, shaking 
off his pursuers for an 18-yard run. 
Smith followed with a dash around the 
right wing for three and Turner again 
hit center for two. Dahlgren, driv- 
ing through left tackle, met Davis and 
failed to gain. Wiggin received Al's 
punt and ran off-side on the thirty- 
five mark. Miller relieved Dahlgren. 
Davis spun through right tackle for 
four, and then Al Morrell walked 
through the line and pegged Farley 
for a 5-yard loss, after which he 
stopped Wiggin before he could gain. 
The punt went to Smith on the Bow- 
dain 43-yard mark. He made twelve 
yards around the Bates left, then Mil- 
ler failed to gain, leaving the ball on 
the Bates 45-yard line when the 
whistle blew. 

Fourth Period. 

Finnegan reappeared at the begin- 
ning of the fourth period and Perry 
went in for Miller. 

Perry's Splendid Pass Ruled Out. 

On a fake play Smith failed to gain 
but when the ball went back to Perry 
on the next play he deftly dodged the 
Bates men who were bearing clown on 
him and spiralled an arrow-like 40- 
yard forward straight to Gibbons who 
carried it down to the Bates 3-yard 
scratch. Unfortunately the offensive 
had interfered and Bowdoin was ob- 
liged to trudge sorrowfully back to 
the starting point of the play, while 
the ball went to Bates. The prompt 
punt-out went to Joe Smith who ran 
it back to the Bates 38-yard line. 
Moulton went in for Finnegan. Smith 
and Perry tried forwards and lost 
some twenty yards which Smith's 15- 
yard pass to Gibbons failed to make 
up. Al punted to Kelley who carried 
it to the 18-yard line before he was 
landed. Moulton carried it through 
center for three and another penalty 
took Bates back to the 10-yard line. 
Moulton and Kelley combined to make 
seven yards, then failing to gain more 
punted to Smith who ran it back fif- 
teen yards to the 28-yard mark. Perry 
and Turner in three rushes through 
center reached the 16-yard line. 



206 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Bowdoin's Last Chances. 
Smith circled the left end for two 
and after Turner had made another 
five, bringing the ball to the Bates 
8-yard line, he was removed and Bis- 
son took his place. The Bates field 
marked him and his dash at center 
was indeed ill-fated for a high snap- 
back had given him an insecure hold 
on the ball and he lost it as he was 
tackled. Bates recovered the fumble 
and after three small gains booted to 
Joe Smith who made a fair catch on 
the 48-yard line. Mason drop-kicked 
nicely but the ball went a few inches 
wide and another chance was gone. 
Bates took the ball on her 20-yard 
line and after Kelley had made a vain 
^effort at the line, Mason recovered a 
fumble, carrying it to the 13-yard line. 
Again he tried a drop-kick but the ball 
went low into the enemy line and after 
Bates had advanced the pigskin a few 
yards the whistle blew. 

The summary: 
BOWDOIN— —BATES 

Gibbons, re le, Canter 

le, Canty 

Dudgeon, rt It, Guiney 

Eames, rg Ig, Stonier 

Guptill, c c, Luce 

Haines, Ig . rg, Newman 

Mason, It rt, Scott 

Parent, le re, Gormley 

Woodbury, qb qb, Wiggm 

Smith, qb. 

Kirkpatrick, rhb lhb, Finnegan 

M. Morrell, rhb lhb, Farley 

Dahlgren, rhb lhb, Moulton 

Miller, rhb. „ 

Swinglehurst, lhb rhb, Kelley 

Perry, lhb. 

A. Morrell, lhb. _ 

Woodbury, lhb. 

Turner, f b f b, Davis 

Bisson, fb. 

Officials — Referee, Murphy, Har- 
vard. Umpire, O'Connell, Portland A. 
C. Head linesman, Farnsworth, West 
Point. Time — Four 15-minute periods. 



alumni Department 

The "Orient" desires to be of the 
greatest possible service to Alumni in 
keeping them informed of one an- 
other's activities. Alumni, and 
especially class secretaries, are earn- 
estly requested to support the 
"Orient" in this work by sending items 
about themselves or their brother 
Alumni. 



1891— Fred J. Simonton of Rock- 
land, past exalted ruler of Rockland 
Lodge, B. P. O. Elks, has been ap- 
pointed district deputy grand exalted 
ruler, Maine West, for the year 1920- 
21. 

1910 — Clyde L. Deming served in 
various capacities between 1915 and 
1920 on the staff of the New Haven 
Hospital, and the staff of the Hospital 
of Yale University until he finally be- 
came Resident Surgeon. This was 
during the time of the complete re- 
organization of the Yale Medical 
School. During the last year he has 
been Assistant Resident Surgeon in 
the Department of Urology at the 
Johns Hopkins Hospital. As a result 
of his good work he has been made 
Resident Urologist for next year un- 
der Dr. Hugh Young. This is one of 
the most coveted positions in the 
country, and it is a source of satisfac- 
tion to know that Dr. Deming was 
chosen over several men who had had 
larger connections with that institu- 
tion. 

1914 — Rev. Joseph Cony McDonald 
was installed in the Wilton Congrega- 
tional Church on October 20. This is 
Mr. McDonald's first pastorate. 

1916 — A son, Sydney MacGillvary, 
Jr., has been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
S. M. Brown at Oxford, England. 

1916 — Lew M. Noble is studying law 
in Washington, D. C. 

1917 — Lafayette F. Dow is studying 
for a Master's degree in Romance 
Languages at Cornell, and together 
with this work, he is teaching some 
language courses. 

ex-1918— Lester T. Wallace of 
Woodfords is the Republican candi- 
date for councilman in Ward Eight 
Portland. 

1920 — Rev. Alexander Henderson, 
secretary of Religious Education for 
the Baptists of the State of Maine, 
spoke Sunday morning and evening at 
the Berean Baptist Church. 



Class Notes 



1878. 



Clarence A. Baker is a physician 
in Portland. Hartley C. Baxter is in 
the canning business in Brunswick. 
John M. Burleigh has retired from 
business and is now living in South 
Berwick, Me. Alfred E. Burton is 
dean of Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. Isaac W. Dyer is a 



lawyer in Portland. Daniel H. Felch 
died recently in Washington, D. C. 
Steven D. Fessenden is an expert in 
the U. S. Agricultural Bureau of Sta- 
tistics. 

John F. Hall has retired from busi- 
ness and is living at Atlantic City, 
N. J. Carson M. Jacobs is a rancher 
at Chinook, Montana. Barrett Potter 
is a lawyer in Brunswick. Sanford P. 
Record has retired and is living at 
East Braintree, Mass. Samuel E. 
Smith has retired from business and 
is living in Thomaston, Me. John W. 
Thing is a farmer in Limerick, Me. 



RESOLUTION 



Hall of Alpha Delta Phi. 



In the death of Dr. Frederic Henry 
Gerrish the Bowdoin Chapter of Alpha 
Delta Phi has lost one of its oldest 
and most faithful brothers. Graduat- 
ing in the Class of 1866, from that 
time to the day of his death he was 
ever alert to promote the interests of 
his beloved fraternity. He was loyal 
to her traditions in great things and 
in small. His life exemplified the 
spirit of her teachings. Graduates 
and under-graduates alike turned to 
him for counsel and advice, and in the 
labors of an exacting and responsible 
profession he was never too busy to 
respond whole-heartedly to their ap- 
peal. His heart and his hand were al- 
ways at our service. 

Wherefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Bowdoin Chap- 
ter of Alpha Delta Phi hereby ex- 
presses its sense of profound sorrow 
in the death of Brother Gerrish, and 
extends its sincere sympathy to his 
family and friends in this hour of 
their affliction. 

Resolved, That a copy of this 
minute be sent to the family of our 
departed brother, and that it be spread 
upon the records of the Bowdoin Chap- 
ter. 

MILTON JEWELL WING, 
EDWARD BILLINGS HAM, 
EMERSON WILSON HUNT, 

For the Chapter. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. 
Surplus and Profits, $100,000. 
Student Patronage Solicited. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



207 



DANCING 
JENNIES. HARVEY 

EVERY TUESDAY EVENING, 

BEGINNING OCTOBER 26th 

TOWN HALL, BRUNSWICK 

Class at 7.30 p. m. Assembly, 8.30. 

Monday Evenings, Armory Hall, Bath, 
beginning October 18th. 

These classes are open to college 
students. 

Private lessons and classes on appli- 
cation. 

Address 
897 Middle St., Bath, Me. 

Pho-e 151-W. 



10^ 



REDUCTION ON 

SUITS FELT HATS 

NEGLIGEE SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR NECKWEAR 



E. 



S. BODWELL 

& SON 

Brunswick, Maine. 



THE 

COLLEGE 
BOOK STORE 



The place to buy everything from 
a Thumb Tack to a Wedding Present. 
Take a look at our new line of Kay- 
woodie Pipes. These are of real 
Italian Bruyere with the Aluminum 
Inbore tube. All models $4.50 each. 



F. W, CHANDLER 

& SON 

150 MAINE STREET. 



PRINTING 

OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

Town Building Brunswick 



BOWDOIN CANTEEN 

8 a. m.-12 m.; 1.30-6; 7-11 

Sundays, 12-5 p. m. 

A. PALMER, 19 North Winthrop. 



Pressing and Cleaning 

Orders Taken for Dyeing 
SECOND HAND CLOTHING 

BOUGHT 

DAN ROSEN 



Win 
her 
with- 




This quaint Sampler package is America's most famous 
box of candy— a gift that "registers" every time. 

FOR SALE BY 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



208 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



JUD, The Barber 

was going to use this space 
but thought it wasn't neces- 
sary. 



CHOCOLATES 

OF DISTINCTION 

AT 

A. W. BUTLER'S 



WRIGHT &DITS0N 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 Washington Street 
Boston 



Arrow 




s~c 




119 MAINE STREET 
BRUNSWICK 



Macullar Parker Co, 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Makers of Conser- 
vative Clothes for 
College Men, will 
show frequently at 
Bowdoin College. 

YOUR PATRONAGE IS 
EARNESTLY SOLICITED 

G. L. GOODWIN, Representative 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



209 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 Maine Street 



CORDOVAN BOOTS 

IN 

YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 



"Herman's" Tan Cordovan $13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan . . $15.50 
"Florsheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 

TENNIS SHOES. INDOOR AND 

OUTDOOR MOCCASINS, RUBBER 

BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 



CARL H. MARTIN 

Cleansing and Dyeing 
Pressing and Alterations 

4 Elm Street 



A. W. HASKELL, D. D. S. 

W. F. BROWN, D. D. S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Postoffice Brunswick, Me. 



Featuring 

the newest productions in 
garments for fall wear made 
for us by 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 

Haskell & Jones Company 



PORTLAND, 



MAINE 



"The Store of Progress and Service" 
This is the season of the year when College men are considering the matter of 

Warm Outdoor Coats 

and we know that they are especially interested in the Sheep Lined and 
Sport Coats, so we call attention at this time to these Coats which we 
know will appeal to the College Chap. 

Sheep Lined Coats 

three-quarter length. This is a Moleskin, and a good, warm, serviceable Coat just what you want 
when you go out on a long hike or want to keep real warm at the football or other outdoor sports. 

Sport Coats 

We have got a fine line of these Coats in reversible leather. They have raglan shoulder; belt all 
around, and they come in the popular brown shade. 



Don't forget that Mr. Jack Handy '23 of the Zeta Psi House is still our represent- 
ative, and he will be glad to attend to all your requirements for Furnishings or 
or/ierwise. 



Monument 
Square 




Portland 
Maine 



210 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




ow Large is an Atom? 



ATOMS are so infinitesimal that to be seen under the most 
L powerful microscope one hundred million must be grouped. 
The atom used to be the smallest indivisible unit of matter. 
When the X-Rays and radium were discovered physicists found 
that they were dealing with smaller things than atoms — with 
particles they call "electrons." 

Atoms are built up of electrons, just as the solar system is 
built up of sun and planets. Magnify the hydrogen atom, says 
Sir Oliver Lodge, to the size of a cathedral, and an electron, in 
comparison, will be no bigger than a bird-shot. 

Not much substantial progress can be made in chemical and 
electrical industries unless the action of electrons is studied. For 
that reason the chemists and physicists in the Research Labora- 
tories of the General Electric Company are as much concerned 
with the very constitution of matter as they are with the devel- 
opment of new inventions. They use the X-Ray tube as if it 
were a machine-gun; for by its means electrons are shot at tar- 
gets in new ways so as to reveal more about the structure o 
matter. 

As the result of such experiments, the X-Ray tube has been 
greatly improved, and the vacuum tube, now so indispensable in 
radio communication, has been developed into a kind of trigger 
device for guiding electrons by radio waves. 

Years may thus be spent in what seems to be merely a purely 
"theoretical " investigation. Yet nothing is so practical as a good 
theory. The whole structure of modern mechanical engineering 
is reared on Newton's laws of gravitation and motion — theories 
stated in the form of immutable propositions. 

In the past the theories that resulted from purely scientific re- 
search usually came from the university laboratories, whereupon 
the industries applied them. The Research Laboratories of the 
General Electric Company conceive it as part of their task to ex- 
plore the unknown in the same spirit, even though there may be 
no immediate commercial goal in view. Sooner or later the world 
profits by such research in pure science. Wireless communication, 
for example, was accomplished largely as the result of Herz's 
brilliant series of purely scientific experiments demonstrating the 
existence of wireless waves. 




General Office 



OOWDOIN ORIENT 



211 




U. S. Golf Balls 

— for lasting service 

You don't have to worry about the 
way a U. S. golf ball will wear. 
Covers and paint withstand the 
roughest play. Balls hold their 
shape. Moreover, they are made 
with a scientific exactness that 
assures uniformity. 

There's a size and weight to suit 
yo' jame. 



U. S. Royal 

$1.00 each 

U. S. Revere 

85c each 

U. S. Floater 

65c each 



Keep your eye on the ball— be sure it's a U. S. 




United States Rubber Company 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CUMBERLAND 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 
" THE GIFT SUPREME " 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 
ALICE LAKE 

. . . IN . . . 

" THE MISFIT WIFE " 



NEXT WEEK— MONDAY AND TUESDAY 
BRYANT WASHBURN 

. . . IN . . . 

"THE SINS OF ST. ANTHONY" 



PASTIME 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 
LOUIS BENNISON 

. . . IN . . . 

THE ROAD CALLED STRAIGHT" 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 
CORINNE GRIFFITH 

. . . IN . . . 

" THE GARTER GIRL " 



NEXT WEEK-^MONDAY AND TUESDAY 
LOUISE GLAUM 

. . . IN . . . 

" THE LEOPARD WOMAN " 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



VOL. L. 



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1920. 



No. 18 



OVER-CONFIDENT MAINE TEAM TIED 

7-7 IN SPLENDID EXHIBITION 



Maine's Championship Hopes Ruined By Bowdoin's Faster Gamer Play — Parent 
Scores Touchdown On Perfect Pass By Woodbury — Small Dashes Over 80 
Yards For Maine Score — Turner, Fighting Every Minute, Puts Up Fine 
Game — Morrell's Punting of Unusually High Order — Other Stars, Smith, 
Dudgeon, and Miller. 



In the final game of the State series, 
Maine strength was unable to over- 
come Bowdoin skill. Starting with 
2-1 odds in her favor, Maine was sure 
of an easy victory over the light Bow- 
doin eleven; so sure in fact that one 
of Maine's backfield men wanted to 
bet that Maine would score in the first 
three minutes. With five thousand 
spectators intensely excited every 
minute, the White matched Maine play 
by play, showing a defence and of- 
fence which surprised even Bowdoin 
supporters. 

Maine's claim to the State cham- 
pionship, with a clear conscience, was 
stopped by the fighting Bowdoin team. 
The Maine student body did not go to 
Portland, as had been expected, but 
went back to the northern Maine in- 
stitution realizing that the light Bow- 
doin team had out-played and out- 
fought them; and thinking that they 
were lucky to have tied the score in- 
stead of being beaten 14-7. 

Maine's overwhelmingly heavy line 
ran into a stonewall twice, when the 
Orono team was within striking dis- 
tance of the Bowdoin goal. In the 
third quarter, Maine had the ball on 
the 3-yard line and third down. They 
very unwisely tried a run around Bow- 
doin's right end and Small was forced 
back by Dudgeon for a 12-yard loss. 

(Continued on page 217) 



BATES LEADS 
CROSS-COUNTRY FIELD 



Friday the four Maine colleges met 
in the annual cross-country classic on 
the Bowdoin course. Each college 
started its full quota of seven men, 
making a big and impressive appear- 
ing field as the twenty-eight toed the 
scratch at the east end of Whittier 
Field. The day could hardly have 
been improved upon for the severe 

(Continued on page 214) 



Maine Football Dance 



An informal dance was held in the 
Gym Saturday night after the Maine 
game. The dance lasted from 7.30 to 
11.30 and was a splendid success. 
There were about two hundred couples 
present. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Kenneth 
C. M. Sills, Mrs. Manton Copeland, 
Mrs. Alfred O. Gross, Mrs. Edward 
H. Wass, Mrs. Frederick S. Nowlan, 
and Mrs. Glenn R. Johnson. 

The committee in charge was com- 
posed of Roderick L. Perkins '21 
(chairman), Paul H. Eames '21, and 
Waldo R. Flinn '22 and they deserve 
a great deal of credit for the success 
of the dance. Music was furnished 
by a college orchestra. 



The West Point Game 

Bowdoin journeys far from home 
next Saturday and plays the last 
game of her schedule. It is West 
Point's- last game before her scrim- 
mage with the Navy. We all know 
that the White's warriors will make 
a showing worthy of their college and 
even if defeated will certainly have 
no reason to be discouraged. While 
none of us can very well get to West 
Point we can at least support the team 
by encouragement and a hearty send 
off. 

Coach Greene plans to send about 
eighteen men on thetrip. They will 
be the pick of Bowdoin's gridiron war- 
riors. 



Dr. Wilfred T. Grenf ell 

Lectures at Bowdoin 

Last Friday morning Dr. Wilfred 
T. Grenfell lectured to the student 
body and the public in Memorial Hall 
at 10.30 o'clock. The hall was well 
filled and Dr. Grenfell held the at- 
tention of his audience very closely 
with the explanation of his work in 
Labrador. 

President Sills introduced Dr. Gren- 
fell. In his speech of introduction he 
emphasized two facts; first, that at 
the present time Dr. Grenfell is rais- 
ing an endowment fund of $1,500,000 



214 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



for his work in Labrador and, second, 
that his work has always made a par- 
ticular appeal to Bowdoin students, 
many of whom have been with him 
after their graduation. 

Dr Grenfell, who has spoken here 
before, explained his work and the 
conditions in Labrador in a very in- 
teresting manner. He said that life is 
worth only what one puts into it and 
that work is just as worthy and 
deserving of praise here, as in the 
North. 

The history of his life as he told it 
was unusually fine. He began the 
practice of surgery in London but 
soon came to the conclusion that he 
would have a better opportunity 
among people who needed a doctor 
rather than among doctors who needed 
a fee. And so he started a floating- 
hospital for seamen along the Eng- 
lish coast. 

In 1901 he sailed for America and 
reached land at Labrador. He de- 
scribed vividly the conditions there 
and the great needs of the people, how 
poor and ignorant they were although 
they could go into the forest and 
come out with a schooner while a more 
civilized person would come out with 
a coffin. He told of the work of estab- 
lishing the first two hospitals in the 
country and how today there are six 
hospitals in all. 

He said that the appearance of 
machinery in a community is to be re- 
gretted for it lessens the physical 
power and desire of men to work. And 
since he has been in Labrador for 28 
years he has had a fine opportunity to 
watch these conditions. 

The establishment of an institute 
for men returning from sea, the send- 
ing of boys and girls to schools and 
colleges in New England, the pro- 
curing of proper food to prevent 
diseases among the natives, and his 
work during the war, were all dis- 
cussed by Dr. Grenfell. 

He gave his definition of religious 
service thus: "To do what we think 
Christ would do if he were in out- 
place." And he said that only by this 
religious service would one find the 
enduring pleasure of life. 

At present Dr. Grenfell is endeavor- 
ing to raise a yearly budget of $8,000. 
It is for this purpose that he is tour- 
ing the country and Bowdoin was in- 
deed fortunate in hearing him describe 
his life and work in Labrador. 



BATES SCORES BRILLIANT 

WIN IN CROSS-COUNTRY 



Maine, Over-Confident As Usual, Very Poor Second— 
Bowdoin But Two Points Behind Much Touted 
Orono Harriers— Buker Brothers Breast Tape To- 
gether—Bill Hart Strong Third. 



(Continued from page 213) 
conditions of a hill and dale run. The 
rain of a few days before had left the 
course firm and resilient, yet not wet 
enough to be troublesome, while the 
bracing air, keen and exhilirating be- 
neath the overcast sky, lent the finish- 
ing touch to keep the harriers on 
edge. 

3-1 Odds On Maine. 

Maine was a pronounced favorite 
at the start, her supporters placing 
three to one odds for first place, and 
substantial odds that three of the first 
six runners would wear the university 
blue. The up-state team, confident of I 
running the rest of the pack off its 
feet, dashed across the field at a ter- 
rific pace as the pistol cracked, but 
proved unable to hold the gait. The 
Bates delegation, leaving the field at 
the edge of the pack, gradually worked 
its way behind the Buker brothers 
towards where George Goodwin and 
Bill Hart were showing the others 
their heels, and when, at the top of 
the mid-course hill, George was strick- 
en with cramps and obliged to drop 
back, the Buker boys forged into the 
lead which they held to an easy finish. 
The judges awarded first place "by 
three inches" to Raymond Buker, the 
winner of last year's race. 
Hart Finishes After Buker Brothers. 

These phenomenal twins jogged 
down the stretch nearly a half lap 
ahead of Bill Hart, the next man to 
finish, and broke the tape together 
just twenty-seven minutes, twenty-one 
and two-fifths seconds after the start. 
Hart was some twenty-five seconds 
later, striding into a fighting finish 
ahead of Kane, a third Bates man, 
who tried hard to reach the long 
legged Bowdoin man. Mercer of 
Colby followed, then Perkins of Bates. 
Goodwin, struggling gamely in spite 



of the pain of his cramps fought Bat- 
ten of Bates all around the final lap 
for seventh place and took it. Batten 
was followed by his team-mate, Clif- 
ford, who was far ahead of Mayo, the 
second Colby runner. 

Maine Outfit Bunched at Finish. 

Six Maine men followed in close 
succession, among them the much 
touted Raymond, who had been ex- 
pected to be among the first three. 
Williams of Colby came just ahead of 
three Bowdoin representatives, Hatch, 
Towle, and Renier. 

Bates, with first, second, fourth, and 
eighth places took the meet with a 
total score of twenty-one points. By 
bunching her men between eleventh 
and fifteenth places, Maine took sec- 
ond with sixty-five points, a scant two 
ahead of the home team whom they 
had fully expected to swamp. Colby 
held the remaining seventy-five points. 

The general opinion was that the 
time might easily have been bettered 
by nearly a minute had the Bukers 
chosen to uncork a little speed, but 
the time was sufficiently fast as it 
was to make a good mark and every- 
body agreed that Bates had won in a 
game, hard race. 

The officials were as follows: 

Starter and referee, William 
O'Connell, Portland A. C. Judges, J. 
S. Brooks, Maine; Professor L. E. 
Pomeroy, Bates; Professor H. C. Bell, 
Bowdoin; and Reginald Sturtevant, 
Colby. Timers, Stanley Atwood, A. 
M. Goodwin, Dr. Whittier. 

Following is a list of the order in 
which the men finished: 

1. Raymond B. Buker, Bates. 

2. Richard S. Buker, Bates. 

3. Hart, Bowdoin. 

4. Kane, Bates. 

5. Mercer, Colby. 

6. Perkins, Bates. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



215 



7. Goodwin, Bowdoin. 

8. Batten, Bates. 

9. Clifford, Bates. 

10. Mayo, Colby. 

11. Berg, Maine. 

12. Laughlin, Maine. 

13. Barnard, Maine. 

14. Herrick, Maine. 

15. Pease, Maine. 

16. Raymond, Maine. 

17. Williams, Colby. 

18. Hatch, Bowdoin. 

19. Towle, Bowdoin. 

20. Renier, Bowdoin. 

21. Conary, Colby. 

22. Perkins, Colby. 

23. Peterson, Bates. 

24. Varney, Bowdoin. 

25. Wilson, Maine. 

26. Marden, Colby. 

27. Wallace, Colby. 

28. Kenniston, Bowdoin. 

Biology Club Meeting 

Last Thursday night, the Biology 
Club held its second meeting of the 
year, at the Delta Kappa Epsilon 
house. Cook '21, president of the 
club, had charge of the meeting. 
Seven new men were initiated into the 
club: M. F. Ridlon '21, W. R. Brewer 
'22, G. L. True, Jr., '22, E. B. Ham '22, 
L. I. McLellan '23, H. C. Reed '23, and 
C. W. Robinson '23. 

After the initiations Anderson '21 
was elected secretary-treasurer to suc- 
ceed Nixon '21 who had resigned. 
Thompson '22 was elected .'sergeant- 
at-arms.' 

Prospects and plans for the year 
were discussed, particularly a number 
of excellent field trips to various 
places near Brunswick. Professor 
Copeland and Dr. Gross are hoping to 
have a trip sometime this month. 
Names of prospective members were 
voted on and accepted. 

After the regular meeting had been 
completed, refreshments were served, 
and there was informal discussion of 
the field trips and other affairs of the 
club. 



IBIS MEETING 



On Tuesday night, November 2, the 
Ibis was entertained at the Zeta Psi 
house. Professors Bell, Cram, and 
Elliott were present. There was a 
short business session, at which the 



constitutional purpose of the society 
was discussed. It was voted to main- 
tain the original aim of the society, 
which places membership and ac- 
tivity on a basis of intellectual attain- 
ment in any field. Hatch '21 was 
elected a member. 

At the next meeting, which will be 
held November 16, at the Psi Upsilon 
house, Helson '21 will read a paper 
on "Methods of Testing Intelligence." 



The Maine Game Rally 



A splendid rally, full of pep, en- 
thusiasm and high spirits was held 
in Memorial Hall on the ,eve of the 
battle for the football championship 
of Maine. Not once this year has old 
"Mem" Hall seen the crowd that as- 
sembled for this all-important occas- 
sion. The fellows lifted the roof with 
cheers, the band crashed out Old Bow- 
doin's songs, and a list of speakers 
carried Bowdoin spirit so high that 
it was predominant throughout the 
game on the following day. 

John Young, as usual presided, and 
addressed the students in his very 
characteristic manner: "Men! We're 
on the eve of our biggest game, and 
we've got to win — that's all there is to 
it! This is the game you've been 
looking forward to all the year, and 
some of us have been looking forward 
longer than that — two, or three, or 
four years. And men! you've got to 
show some sure enough pep now, 
we've got to win. Punch your room- 
mate, drink some cider, do anything 
but show some fight! Now men, 
Maine is coming down here and 
they're going to Portland after the 
game, and men, we're going to send 
them — beaten! We've got to win! 
That's all there is to it!" 

"Larry" Wilson, the next speaker, 
told how the team had been taken 
away to rest for the game. He 
promised the men that the team would 
put all it had in the morrow's game, 
and asked them to put all they had in 
their cheering and stand back of the 
team. 

Following "Larry" was Professor 
Bell, who said that although the bear 
had lost several teeth, including those 
the faculty dentist had pulled, that 



bear kept right on going and was 
bound to get the Maine elephant the 
next day. He also told of the fine 
spirit of the old clays when the game 
was followed up with a torch-light 
procession, in which the students 
visited each player and cheered him, 
finally ending up in the middle of the 
night at the President's house when 
they obliged the President to come out 
on his steps and address them. He 
told of the way the student body ac- 
companied its team t'o the station 
when they went away to play a game, 
and the way the students met the 
team when it returned from a game. 
He suggested that these customs 
might well be revived. 

Jack Magee, who had just returned 
from taking the team away for the 
night, was the next speaker. He re- 
marked how luck had been against 
the Bowdoin team the entire season, 
as in the case of the extraordinary 
forward pass of the Bates game, 
which had been called off on a vague 
technical ruling. He then went on 
telling the men that if ever they saw 
a football game they would see it on 
the morrow, that just as the Maine 
cross country team was unable to win, 
neither would the football team win. 
He promised that every man on the 
Bowdoin team would fight, fight, fight, 
till the last whistle blew. "There is 
not a quitter on the team," he said, 
"Quitter? I wouldn't give a picayune 
for a quitter!" he cried, accompanying 
it with a contemptuous snap of his 
finger. 

Captain Archie Dostie '20 of last 
year's team, the next speaker, said 
that although he knew little of this 
year's eleven, he knew that every man 
on it had the Bowdoin spirit of hard 
fighting, which was all they needed 
for success. 

Coach Greene was the last speaker. 
He urged the fellows not to criticise 
the team, to back them up at all times 
and to be careful what they said in 
public concerning the team or its 
chances. He expected Maine to start 
the game — "over-confident," "sure of 
winning," "a 2 to 1 favorite." The 
coach wondered — "How do they get 
that way?" Now the game is over, 
more than one Bowdoin man repeats 
that question. 

Such was the rally before the finest 
football game a Bowdoin team has 
played in years. 



216 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Campus Activities 

Cumberland County 



About half of the men from Cum- 
berland County who were not in- 
cluded in last week's issue are 
sketched below. There are also one 
or two from Portland whose accounts 
were unintentionally omitted before. 

Class of 1921. 
Harold E. Beach of Brunswick is a 
graduate of Brunswick High School 
and a member of the Theta Delta Chi 
fraternity. After completing his first 
year at Bowdoin he won an appoint- 
ment to the Naval Academy at 
Annapolis. A year ago he came back 
to Bowdoin, joining the class of 1921 
again. 

Philip R. Lovell graduated from 
Brunswick High School and is a mem- 
ber of Alpha Delta Phi. During his 
Freshman and Sophomore years he 
was a member of his class track team. 
Last year he was en the "Bugle" 
Board, the student council, and presi- 
dent of his class. This year he is 
again on the student council and also 
proctor in South Winthrop. He is a 
member of both U. Q. and the Friars. 
Jackson G. Merriam of Yarmouth is 
a graduate of North Yarmouth 
Academy. He is a member of the 
Kappa Sigma fraternity. 

Lawrence W. Pennell of Brunswick 
is a graduate of Brunswick High 
School, in the class of 1917. 
Class of 1922. 
Philip Abelon of Brunswick gradu- 
ated from the Brunswick High School 
in 1918. 

Samued J. Ball is a member of the 
Delta Upsilon fraternity and a gradu- 
ate of Westbrook High School. He 
was on his class football team last 
year and on the varsity squad this 
year; also on the S.A.T.C. team in his 
first year. He is a member of the 
Mandolin Club. 

Stanwood S. Fish is a graduate of 
Freeport High School and a member 
of the Delta Upsilon fraternity. He 
is in the college band and was also a 
member in his Freshman and Sopho- 
more years. He is in the college or- 
chestra. He was on the varsity track 
squad last year and his class squad in 
both Freshman and Sophomore years. 
He managed his Sophomore baseball 
Ernest M. Hall is a graduate of 



Brunswick High School. He is a mem- 
ber of the Chi Psi fraternity. This 
year he is on the "Bugle" Board. 

Edward B. Ham of Brunswick is a 
graduate of Brunswick High School 
and a member of Alpha Delta Phi. 
Last year he won the Smyth Mathe- 
matical Prize and the Sewall Latin 
Prize. In his first year he made the 
"Orient" board, and last year was 
elected managing editor. Las't year 
he became a member of the Classica 
Club, and in the spring was elected t< 
the "Bugle" Board. This year he ha: 
become a member of the Biology Club 
Class of 1923. 
C. Warren Bean of Freeport gradu- 
ated from Freeport High School in 
1918. He entered Bowdoin with the 
class of 1922, became a member of 
Chi Psi, and in the spring term of 
1919 received straight A's. Last year 
he stayed out of college, coming back 
this fall with the present sophomore 
class. 

Harvey P. Bishop, a member of 
Beta Theta Pi, graduated from Cari- 
bou High School. During his Fresh- 
man year he was a member of his 
class track team and of the college 
tennis team. This year he played on 
the Sophomore baseball team. 

Lloyd W. Bishop graduated from 
Caribou High School and is a mem- 
ber of Beta Theta Pi. Last year he 
was a member of the band, varsity 
tennis team, and Freshman Y. M. 
C. A. This year he played on the 
Sophomore baseball team. 

George E. Davis, a member of 
Delta Upsilon, graduated from Free- 
port High School. During his first 
year he was on the track and football 
squad. This year he is still on the 
football squad. 

John F. Handy is a graduate of 
Westbrook Seminary and is a mem- 
ber of Zeta Psi. During his Fresh- 
man year he was on his class track 
team and was catcher on the varsity 
baseball team. During both his first 
two years he has played on his class 
baseball team. Last spring he was 
elected Sophomore member of the 
Athletic Council. Before he came to 
college he had been in the war in over- 
seas service for nearly two years. 
Class of 1924. 
Francis P. Bishop graduated from 
Brunswick High School last year and 
is a member of Beta Theta Pi. He 



has already made the band in his first 
year. 

Donald D. Blanchard of Cumberland 
Centre, is a member of the Sigma Nu 
fraternity. He is a graduate of 
Greely Institute. 

Thornton L. C. Burnell of West- 
brook graduated from Westbrook 
High School. He is a member of the 
Zeta Psi fraternity. This fall he was 
elected secretary-treasurer of his 
class. In last week's issue it was 
stated that J. M. Keniston held this 
office. Instead Keniston is manager of 
the Freshman baseball team. 

George E. Cobb of Gorham is a 
graduate of Gorham High School and 
a member of the Sigma Nu fraternity. 

Adelbert H. Merrill graduated from 
Deering High School in 1916 and is 
a member of Alpha Delta Phi. He 
served in the war for two years be- 
fore he came to college. 

David D. Needelman graduated 
from Portland High School in 1918. 
This fall he played on his class base- 
ball team. 



Small '24 Leads Cross 
Country Field, But E. 
L. H. S. Wins On Points 



Thursday the Freshman cross coun- 
try team tasted defeat at the hands 
of the Edward Little harriers, school- 
boy champions of the State. Joe 
Small, one of the coming distance 
men in the Freshman class, led the 
pack the whole way, setting a pace 
that brought him in a scant winner 
in twenty-three minutes, fourteen and 
two fifths seconds. The other mem- 
bers . of the White team bunched be- 
hind Small and ahead of the high 
school men for nearly half the course 
but the Edward Little men seemed to 
have a shade on the home team in 
the line of endurance and finally 
grouped four men behind the winner. 
Hamilton, a Freshman, who has been 
showing rather well in trials, would 
doubtless have been well in the fore 
had he not suffered from cramps 
which so affected him that he finished 
his trip across the campus and around 
the track in a sort of stupor, stagger- 
ing in to the tape completely ex- 
hausted. The other men finished much 
stronger, but none gave less than his 
best. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



217 



Small had a hard fight to pass 
Robertson at the head of the stretch 
as the two men sprinted the whole 
final lap but Robertson was forced to 
take second some four yards behind 
the Bowdoin runner. Stronach fol- 
lowed close behind and Hooper and 
C. Small of Edward Little came in 
nearly a lap behind him. Fernald the 
second Bowdoin runner, beat Bennett 
by a few yards and Weymouth, 
Lavigne, and Hamilton strung in soon 
after. Hayes and Cobb finished in the 
next two positions. 

The score was, Edward Little 21; 
Bowdoin Freshmen 34. Time, 23 
minutes, 14 2-5 seconds. 



CONFIDENT MAINE 

TURNED BACK 



(Continued from page 213) 
There were thrills aplenty for the 
5,000 onlookers who thronged Whittier 
Feld. The whole Bowdoin team did 
excellent work throughout the game, 
Turner, Smith, Parent, Al Morrell, 
Dudgeon, Woodbury, and Miller being 
the most noteworthy stars. Turner 
played a remarkably plucky game, be- 
ing especially strong at line bucking 
and end runs. He was by far the best 
defensive backfield man in the game. 
Smith piloted his team through more 
than three-quarters of the game in 
splendid fashion. His generalship and 
all-round work aided in Bowdoin's suc- 
cess to a great extent. Al Morrell 
drew many rounds of applause from 
the Bowdoin followers by his long 
spiral punts, some of which went for 
sixty yards and more. On all of his 
punts the line held so well that the 
ends rarely had difficulty in nailing 
the Maine backs after very short run- 
backs. Captain Dudgeon never let a 
man get by him when plays were di- 
rected at his position. Woodbury's 
brilliant passes, particularly the one 
that gave Bowdoin its score, together 
with his end runs, made him one of 
the most prominent figures on the 
field. Miller played an unusually fast 
game at right end, and his showing 
was all the more creditable in that he 
has always played in the backfield 
hitherto. His getting into nearly every 
play caused not a little comment from 
the stands. 

For Maine the big stars were Small, 
Ginsberg, and Hussey. Small made 



many long gains, particularly his 18- 
yard sprint to a touchdown. The light 
quarterback, Ginsberg, played a heady, 
scrappy game throughout, which was 
worthy of a great deal of credit. Hus- 
sey, the powerful guard, was a tower 
of strength in the line, — easily Maine's 
best defensive player. 

After Parent went into the game, 
Al Morrell completed a long forward 
to him, which he fumbled upon being 
thrown to the ground hard by the 
Maine defence. Mason picked up the 
ball and ran the rest of the way to a 
touchdown. The play was cancelled 
by the referee, who decided that 
Parent had started down the field be- 
fore the play began. 

The most brilliant run of the game 
came early in the third quarter when 
Small of Maine broke away around 
the end and slipped through the en- 
tire Bowdoin team for a touchdown. 
The play started on Maine's 19-yard 
line. A number of Bowdoin backs, 
headed by Miller, chased the Maine 
man in vain for over fifty yards. 

After Maine's touchdown Parent re- 
covered a Maine fumble on his 25- 
yard line, and ran some fifty odd yards 
down the field, only to have the referee 
once more call the ball back for an 
off-side penalty. By this time the 
Bowdoin supporters would have 
needed but little prodding to go onto 
the field. The referee was probably 
fair enough, but his decisions certainly 
hit Bowdoin at the worst possible 
times. 

On the fourth down and the goal 
line to go, Woodbury threw a beauti- 
ful pass over the cross-bar to Parent, 
who was standing ready to receive 
the ball some yards behind the line. 
It was the first time since the first 
game of the season that that play 
had been used and, as Coach Greene 
said, was the only play that would 
have accomplished the desired result. 
This is only one example of Wood- 
bury's generalship, and he should be 
highly praised for using it at a mo- 
ment when so much depended on ex- 
actly the right play. 

First Period. 

Roemer kicked off for Maine. It 
was a poor kick. The ball went 
scarcely eight yards, and was fumbled. 
It was Maine's ball on the 48-yard line. 
Smith made five yards off tackle. 
Small, Maine's speedy backfield man 



ripped off four yards more around 
Bowdoin's right end. Captain Smith 
pushed the ball over for first down. 
Al Morrell Intercepts Pass. 

Small made four yards and Smith 
added two more. An attempted pass 
by Ginsberg was intercepted by Al 
Morrell. It was Bowdoin's ball on the 
40-yard line. Smith made four yards 
through tackle. Turner made two 
more and then Morrell kicked. Gins- 
berg was downed with the ball on his 
own . 45-yard line. Foster went 
through for four yards. Smith could 
not make more than three. Small 
made another attempt, and was 
thrown for a 1-yard loss. Bowdoin's 
line was a stonewall defence. Small 
punted. 
Morrell Goes Around for 15 Yards. 

"Pick" Turner ran the kick back for 
ten yards. He was downed amongst a 
heap of blue-jerseyed players on his 
own 30-yard line. Morrell took the 
pigskin and skirted Maine's left end 
for fifteen yards. It was a pretty 
play, but the gain went for nothing 
when Bowdoin was penalized fifteen 
yards for holding. Smith was tackled 
for no gain on the next play. Morrell 
pulled off a beautiful punt that skim- 
med through the air for 45 yards. 
Ginsberg received the ball and was 
downed before he had taken three 
steps. 

Good Gains By Foster and Small. 

Foster made four yards off tackle. 
Smith squirmed through for three 
yards more. Maine was penalized 
fifteen yards for holding. The ball 
was now on the 20-yard line, but 
Foster tore eleven yards off around 
Bowdoin's left end before he was 
downed. Small went around the other 
end for ten yards more. He again 
took the ball and pushed it over for 
first down on the 43-yard line. Smith 
added four yards on a center plunge. 
Maine tried it again, but Small could 
not make more than two yards. Gins- 
berg's forward was incomplete. Bow- 
doin was penalized five yards for off 
side. 

Bowdoin Holds Firm at Critical 
Moment. 

Foster made four yards, bringing 
the ball to Bowdoin's 18-yard line. 
Foster took the ball again, but could 

(Continued on page 221) 



218 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Norman W. Haines '21 Editor-in-Chief 

Edward B. Ham '22 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Floyd A. Gerrard '23 Athletics 

Karl E. Philbrick '23 Faculty Notes 

George H. Quinby '23 Alumni Department 

F. King Turgeon '23 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

John L. Berry '21 Crosby E. Redman '21 

Harry Helson '21 Frank A. St. Clair '21 

George E. Houghton '21 William R. Ludden '22 
Russell M. McGown '21 Virgil C. McGorrill '22 
Roland L. McCormack '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. Boardman '21. . Business Manager 
Wilfred R. Brewer '22 Assistant Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials; the Managing Editor 
for the news department; and the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 



Vol. L. November 10, 1920. No. 18 



Entered at Post Office 
Second-Class Mail Matter. 



"ON to Portland." 

A certain item in "The Maine 
Campus" received considerable pub- 
licity on the Bowdoin campus by be- 
ing pasted on the chapel bulletin 
board. The slogan of the article re- 
ferred to was "On to Portland"; this 
expression to be used in connection 
with an anticipated victory over the 
White last Saturday. The Maine fol- 
lowers evidently expected an easy 
victory over a light and less confident 
team. 

It gives the editor considerable 
pleasure to emphasize the fact that 
Maine received a double setback as a 
result of the week-end contests. In 
the first place Maine's cross country 
team was heralded as an easy winner 
in the Maine Intercollegiate race over 
the Brunswick course. Instead of 
finishing a strong first the Maine run- 
ners were lucky to find themselves a 
poor second place. Maine's margin 
over Bowdoin was but two points. 

It was in Saturday's game, however, 
that Maine came closest to losing her 
laurels. Instead of running through 
the Bowdoin aggregation at will as the 



betting odds might have indicated, 
Maine left the field after the first half 
without a score. The Blue's success- 
ful end run was followed by an at- 
tack by the White that proved irre- 
sistible and terminated in the beauti- 
ful goal line pass from Woodbury to 
Parent. 

While Maine has technically an 
edge on Bowdoin in both cross coun- 
try and football, Bowdoin has the 
right in each case to claim a moral 
victory. In both contests Bowdoin en- 
tered as the "under dog" and, in both, 
she showed the traditional Bowdoin 
"fight" that never says die. We are 
confident that the most ardent of the 
Maine supporters are sportsmen 
enough to admit that they had no oc- 
casion for the demonstration planned 
in Portland. Their slogan had better 
been — "Back to Orono." 



Dr. Grenfell's Address. 

Last Friday the College had the 
privilege of listening to Dr. Grenfell 
speak in Memorial Hall. Seldom have 
Bowdoin men had the opportunity of 
hearing such a distinguished figure in 
the field of practical social service as 
Dr. Grenfell. This sort of service is 
the type that naturally appeals to the 
average college man. In fact, Dr. 
Grenfell observed in the course of his 
talk that many of his assistants were 
drawn from the ranks of American 
universities and colleges. It is a sig- 
nificant fact that Dr. Grenfell was a 
student at Oxford, when he was in- 
fluenced by a talk of Mr. Moody's to 
make his life work that of a mission- 
ary. From the pleasant picture that 
the doctor drew of a life of such ser- 
vice it is by no means unlikely that 
at least one Bowdoin man may "go 
and do likewise." 



"By tieing Maine yesterday Bow- 
doin practically won a moral victory. 
She entered the game the under dog, 
but by sheer fight outgamed Maine. 
Maine individually was the stronger 
team, but Bowdoin fought every inch 
of ground and came back. 

"That pass to Parent which tied up 
the battle for Bowdoin was a peach 
and had the Maine secondary de- 
fence puzzled completely. There was 
not a man within ten yards of the' tall 
Bowdoin end when he caught the ball. 
It was fourth down and about the only 
play that Bowdoin had a chance tc 



use and the Maine secondary defence 
was caught off guard." — Portland Sun- 
day Telegram. 



BASEBALL PROSPECTS 

The final arrangements for the com- 
pletion of the baseball schedule are 
now being made and it is expected 
that the final schedule will be in print 
soon. 

The Massachusetts trip is all settled. 
The team will make the trip there to 
play Wesleyan, Amherst, Trinity, and 
Boston College. 

The Southern trip is still pending. 
Nothing definite can be said concern- 
ing the games to be played as yet. 

Tufts will play Bowdoin here on 
Whittier Field. It should be a big at- 
traction. And finally we will meet our 
rival, Bates, on Ivy Day. There is a 
fine schedule planned and it is hoped 
that things will come along as ex- 
pected. Here's to a successful base- 
ball season. 



Saturday Football Scores 



Bowdoin 7, Maine 7. 

Colby 7, New Hampshire College 7. 

Harvard 14, Princeton 14. 

Harvard '24, 17; Princeton '24, 17. 

Boston College 34, Boston Univ. 0. 

Dartmouth 14, Cornell 3. 

Syracuse 14, Washington and Jef- 
ferson 0. 

Union 9, New York University 7. 

Swathmore 21, Columbia 7. 

Yale 14, Brown 10. 

Massachusetts A. C. 7, Rhode 
Island State 7. 

Wesleyan 7, Amherst 0. 

Pennsylvania State 20, Nebraska 0. 

Western Maryland 21, St. Johns 0. 

Pittsburgh 27, Pennsylvania 21. 

Springfield 35, Trinity 0. 

Detroit 65, Tufts 2. 

Navy 21, Georgetown 6. 

Army 53, Lebanon Valley 0. 

Rensselaer 12, Hobart 2. 

Illinois 3, Chicago 0. 

Ohio State 14, Michigan 7. 

Centre College 34, De Pauw 0. 

Notre Dame 28, Purdue 0. 

Williams 81, Hamilton 7. 

Norwich 16, Univ. of Vermont 7. 

Rochester 21, Colgate 14. 

Johns Hopkins 17, Haverford Col- 
lege 10. 

Lafayette 10, Bucknell 7. 

Georgia Tech. 7, Clcmson 0. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 











'O^EH"P'CK'Tl>RHeR (jRRggEJ^'g rA-T j AE>{ Sloppei?'. 



^rmui- Took THB BAl-U. 



(Sketched for the Orient by Harry J. Stone, Cartoonist, "Lewiston Journal.") 

(Publication made possible by special arrangement with the Editor, Arthur G. Staples, '82.) 



220 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BETA THETA PI 

INFORMAL DANCE 



Beta Sigma of Beta Theta Pi held 
an informal dance at the chapter 
house on Friday evening, November 5. 
The patronesses were Mrs. Clara D. 
Hayes, and Mrs. Willis T. Roberts, 
both of Brunswick. 

Among those present were: Mrs. 
E. R. Hobbs of Watertown, Mrs. H. A. 
Sampson of Bridgton, the Misses Ber- 
nice B. Butler, Leona Drew, Eleanor 
Kenniston, Helen Durrell, of Portland; 
Evelyn Anderson, Elizabeth Hamilton, 
Doris Hayes, Yvette Lapointe, of 
Brunswick; Eleanor Scribner, of Tops- 
ham; Helen Bickle, Gladyse Preble, of 
Rockland; Vera Harmon, of Stoning- 
ton; Maud Barker, Thelma Damren, 
Alice Stevens, of Augusta. 

The committee in charge consisted 
of Partridge '22 (chairman), Perkins 
'21, and McGorrill '22. 

Among the alumni visiting the 
house during the week-end were: 
George R. Gardner '01, William T. 
Johnson '06, William S. Linnell '07, 
Willis T. Roberts '07, Elmer R. 
Hobbs ' 10, Charles E. Allen 
'15, William D. Ireland '16, Leigh Web- 
ber '16, Harold A. Sampson '17, Ray- 
mond W. Swift '17, Myron R. Grover 
'19, Almon B. Sullivan '19, and Bur- 
leigh S. P. Jones '20. Visitors from 
the University of Maine chapter in- 
cluded: Frank Gould '01, Howard G. 
Philbrook '07, George Lamb '07, Ray- 
mond D. Stephens '21, and Stanley 
Hanson '22. 



ASSIGNMENTS 



SIGMA NU SMOKER 



An informal smoker was held at the 
Sigma Nu house Tuesday evening, 
Nov. 2, for the purpose of hearing 
the election returns. A large number 
of students were present together with 
several members of the faculty. Dur- 
ing the evening refreshments were 
served, and as fast as the news came 
in it was read to those present. The 
group found out that Harding had 
won at about 11.30. 



GOVERNMENT 1. 
Eighth Week, Ending Saturday, No- 
vember 20. 

Nov. 16, Lecture XIV. The Presi- 
dent. 

Nov. 18, Lecture XV. War Powers 
of the President. 

Assignment: 

1. Munro, Government of the U. S. 
Chaps. VII, VIII. 

2. Report on library topics. 
Group A. Quiz section. 
Group B. Conferences. 



'S Not In Our Line. 

AEF — I suppose you've heard of 
TNT? 

AWOL — No, all we carry is For- 
mosa and Oolong. — Jack-o'-Lantern. 



ENGLISH HISTORY. 
History 5. 

Nov. 15. Lecture XV. Rise of the 
English Universities. 

Nov. 17. Lecture XVI. Hour ex- 
amination. 

Reading: 

Cheyney, Short History of England, 
pp. 186-195. 

Cheyney, Readings, Nos. Ill, 115, 
116. 

Note: — There will be no meetings 
of the conference groups for the week 
beginning Nov. 15. 



EUROPE SINCE 1815. 

History 7 

Eighth Week 

Nov. 15. Lecture XV. The GroW' 
ing Ascendancy of Prussia. 
Nov. 17. Hour examination. 



POLITICAL HISTORY OF THE 

UNITED STATES. 

History 9. 

Nov. 15. Lecture XV. Fall of the 
Federalist Party. 

Nov. 17. Lecture XVI. Jefferson 
Democracy, Part I. 

Reading: 

Bassett, Short History of the United 
States, pp. 276-300. 

MacDonald, Documentary Source 
Book of American History, Nos. 60-64 
inclusive. 



Economics 9. 

Nov. 16. Hour examination (de- 
ferred from Nov. 11). 
Nov. 18. Jones, ch. 9, 10. 



OUmpus jftetos 

The result of the preliminary re- 
views shows the class of 1924 to have 
far surpassed its predecessors of las; 
year in the early scholastic efforts. 
While last year the Freshman warn- 
ings numbered thirty-four majors and 
fifty-three minors, this year's class 
has received only ten majors and 
twenty-seven minors. Perhaps this 
may be taken as good evidence that 
the world is really improving. 

Visitors were much in evidence dur- 
ing the latter part of the week, the 
three-fold attraction of the Edward 
Little-Freshman race, the State cross 
country meet, and the Maine game 
proving a veritable magnet to bring 
spectators from many parts of New 
England. 

There has been a record sale of 
tickets for the Bowdoin-Maine game. 
At one time there was a line extend- 
ing out to the doors in the Gym. 

There were adjourns in all 10.30 
classes Friday to give the students a 
chance to hear Dr. Grenfell at 
Memorial Hall Friday morning. 

A great deal of interest is being 
shown in the approaching chess tour- 
nament, the purpose of which is to 
select a team to participate in a prob- 
able Maine Intercollegiate Match. The 
following have already given their 
names as candidates: Blanchard '21, 
Anderson '21, L. W. Bishop '23, 
Clymer '22, Strout '23, R. B. Phillips 
'24, and R. T. Phillips '24. 

Every Freshman must have a 
Freshman cap. If one is lost he must 
buy another from Buker '21 at 23 
North Maine. 

Juniors and Seniors who wish teach- 
ing positions during the year for a 
few weeks at a time will please leave 
their names at the Dean's office. 



ECONOMICS. 

Week Beginning November 16. 

Economics lv 

Nov. 16. Hour examination (de- 
ferred from Nov. 11). 

Nov. 18. Materials, ch. 6. 



Question in Government Exam. — 
"What were the principal problems 
which faced the constitutional conven- 
tion of 1787? How was each solved?" 

Budding Government Shark. — "The 
principal problem before the conven- 
tion was bad roads and the delegatc;- 
solved it by starting early in the 
spring." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



221 



A visitor on the campus last week 
found it necessary to inquire from 
three fellows before he could learn 
what the college publications are. Is 
it possible that two out of every three 
fellows do not know the "Orient" and 
the "Quill"? 

Blake Clark ex- '23 has been elected 
president of his class and captain of 
his class football team at Tufts. 

Orville Orcutt ex-'23 has a position 
in the confectionery business at Houl- 
ton. 

John Clair Minot '96, Sunday editor 
of the "Boston Herald," was on the 
campus last week. 

Evidently a couple of members of 
the entering class have been started 
upon the wayward path already by 
certain upper-classmen. Believing 
that it was an old Bowdoin custom 
for the members of the Freshman 
class to ring the Universalist Church 
bell on Hallowe'en night at 12.30, they 
loyally did their part in attempting 
to uphold the tradition. Chief Ed- 
wards, however, failed to appreciate 
their loyalty and probably because he 
had just been awakened from slumber, 
overtook them and conducted them to 
the police station. According to the 
"Brunswick Record," "their tears 
melted his heart," however, and he 
let them off with a stern reprimand 
and a warning that their future con- 
duct in college would be watched by 
members of the force. 

Workmen have been busy eliminat- 
ing the traces of the numerical decor- 
ations which the Freshmen placed on 
the various benches and posts around 
the campus. 

"Peewee" Swinglehurst '23, who 
broke his ankle in the Bates game a 
week ago, and was for some days in 
the hospital at Lewiston, is back on 
the campus, walking on three legs in- 
stead of two. 

The benches between the dormitories 
have received a new coat of paint 



which improves their appearance 
greatly. 

A wireless club is being formed for 
all men interested in such work. The 
club will have the use of a sending 
and receiving outfit in the Science 
Building. All those seriously inter- 
ested should attend the first meeting, 
which will be held in the basement of 
the Science Building Friday, Novem- 
ber 12, at 7.30 p. m. 



"One enjoys a good grind now and 
then," remarked the humorous can- 
nibal, as he swallowed the valedic- 
torian. — Burr. 



Down To Her Level. 

Wrathful Co-ed (during quarrel) — 
"You talk like an idiot." 

Blase Ed. — "I have to talk so you 
can understand me." — Scalper. 



jFacultp Ji3otes 

On Thursday morning, October 28, 
President Sills spoke at the assemblies 
in the three Springfield (Mass.) High 
schools: Central, Technical and School 
of Commerce. 

President Sills spoke at the Men's 
Club, Grace Church, Bath, on Wednes- 
day evening, November 3. 

On Friday evening, November 5, at 
the meeting in which Dr. Grenfell 
gave a lecture, President Sills was one 
of the speakers. The meeting was 
held in Portland. 

Professor Davis has been appointed 
faculty advisor to the Beta Sigma 
chapter of Beta Theta Pi. 

Professor Mitchell preached at the 
Williston Church in Portland Sunday. 

Mrs. Paul Nixon and little daughter 
left last week for a trip to California. 



BOWDOIN 7, MAINE 7 



(Continued from page 217) 
not gain. However Small took the ball 
over for first down on the next scrim- 
mage. He made two more yards off 
tackle. 

Bisson went in for "Mai" Morrell. 
The ball was dangerously near Bow- 
doin's line. But Foster found he was 
bucking an adamantine wall when he 
attempted to tear off a gain through 
the line. Ginsberg attempted two for- 
ward passes in succession but Bow- 
doin men were everywhere and both 
were incomplete. It was Bowdoin's 
ball at last on the 30-yard line. Turner 
went around Maine's right end for a 
gain of seven yards. Bisson made it 
first down when he added six more 
around the other end. Al Morrell 
tried an end run but was downed be- 
fore he could make more than two 
yards. 

Morrell's Splendid 60-yard Punt. 

Turner was caught behind the line 



and thrown for a 5-yard loss. Al Mor- 
rell kicked the prettiest punt seen on 
Whittier Field for many a day when 
he booted the pigskin for a total of 
sixty yards. Ginsberg received the 
ball. He was brought to earth im- 
mediately. Small was unable to gain 
around left end. Foster made one 
yard. Ginsberg made three yards 
through center. Small tore off 7 yards 
for first down. He added two more 
on the next play. The period ended 
with the ball in Maine's possession on 
her own 40-yard line. 

Second Period. 

Smith started this period with an 
end run, reeling off six yards. Gins- 
berg could only make two. Both 
Foster and Small tried to gain, but 
Bowdoin's line was not to be pierced. 

Turner Smashes Line Superbly. 

Small was forced to kick. Turner 
received on the 15-yard line. He 
crashed through Maine's defence for 
eight yards. Joe Smith could not 
gain. Bisson carried the ball three 
yards for first down. Smith made two 
yards off tackle. Turner took the ball 
around the end on a sprint and reeled 
off seventeen yards before a Maine 
man could tackle him. Morrell made 
one yard on a center plunge. Joe 
Smith reeled off ten yards on a fast 
end run. Bisson fumbled the ball, and 
Maine took possession of it. 
Maine Unable To Gain Consistently. 
Foster made three yards off tackle, 
but his team was penalized three 
yards because the coach was on the 
field. Captain Smith went around for 
five yards on an end play and Foster 
made four more. Small pushed 
through tackle for four yards, and 
took the pigskin on the next play, but 
was stopped in short order before he 
could gain. Bowdoin spoiled a forward 
pass, after which Maine was penalized 
five yards for off-side. Small punted 
to Bowdoin's 12-yard line, where 
Turner received it and ran off-side in 
running it back. Jordan went in for 
Roemer. Smith made one yard 
through Maine's line. Turner carried 
the ball through for first down. Al 
Morrell made four yards around right 
end. Joe Smith placed the oval two 
yards further on in the next play. 
Ginsberg Runs Punt Back 20 Yards. 
Morrell punted. The ball skimmed 
through the ether for forty-five yards 



222 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



before Ginsberg gathered it in. Foster 
gained three yards. Kirkpatrick went 
in for Bisson. Smith on the next two 
plays could total only three yards and 
Small kicked the ball over the goal 
line, making it Bowdoin's ball on the 
20-yard line. Turner crashed through 
for three yards. Kirkpatrick was sent 
around Maine's left end but was 
downed when he had made two yards. 
Morrell got off a rather poor punt, 
which Ginsberg ran back twenty yards 
before Bowdoin's linesmen fell on him. 
Young went in for Finnegan. Small 
could not break through for more than 
two yards. Ginsberg attempted a for- 
ward, but it was incomplete. Small 
tore through on a center plunge foi 
three yards. Another forward was 
incomplete and it was Bowdoin's ball 
on the 41-yard line. The White's de- 
fenders attempted some aerial work 
but Small intercepted the pass, and 
Ginsberg made three yards in the fol- 
lowing scrimmage. Maine attempted 
another forward which was spoiled by 
Turner. The whistle blew, with Maine 
in possession of the ball on her own 
45-yard line. 

Third Period. 

The second half started with the 
Bowdoin lineup unchanged but with 
two changes in the Maine assortment. 
Roemer was back at his old position, 
replacing Jordan, and Tinker for 
Young at left end. 

The teams lined up for Bowdoin's 
kick-off, a fine soaring kick that drop- 
ped into the hands of the waiting 
Foster on the 20-yard line. He ran 
it back to the 35-yard line before the 
defenders connected with him. Cap- 
tain Smith then started to plough 
through the Bowdoin center, but his 
first play netted only a 5-yard penalty 
for off-side, putting Maine back on 
the 30-yard mark. Smith's second at- 
tempt regained only a yard and Gins- 
berg sent Small around left end where 
Al Morrell dragged him to earth after 
a 3-yard gain, which Foster followed 
with a yard around right end. Small 
dropped back to punt and spiralled 
it neatly down to the 25 -yard line 
where it eluded Pick Turner's grasp 
to be captured by Tinker, the Maine 
end. 

Dudgeon Breaks Through and Stops 
Touchdown. 

After a futile line buck, Smith and 
Small in two plunges made first down, 



then Foster tried again only to be 
stopped on the scrimmage line with- 
out a gain. Then after Smith and 
Foster had brought the ball down to 
the 3-yard line Ginsberg decided to 
change tactics, sending Foster on a 
long circuit of the right wing. He 
never got there, for Captain Dudgeon, 
tearing through the Blue line, grabbed 
the Maine back and ran him back 
seven yards before the ball was 
clowned. Ginsberg's attempted for- 
ward pass went for naught and Bow- 
doin took the pigskin under the 
shadow of her own goal posts. Al 
Morrell immediately booted the 
leather out of danger, Ginsberg bear- 
ing it to the mid-field chalk. Smith's 
drive at center brought in two yards 
but when Small started over towards 
the Bowdoin left wing Perry dropped 
him without a gain. Again Small 
tried in vain, then tossed the ball to 
Smith who promptly went down with 
a 15-yard gain. 

The next play looked more like 
hand ball than football as the ball 
bounced all over the line finally land- 
ing in Bowdoin arms on the 15-yard 
mark. Mai Morrell made four yards 
in a dash through the Maine left and 
Turner followed with eight yards 
through center. Time was allowed to 
restore Pick's equilibrium and in the 
meanwhile the ball went fifteen yards 
nearer the Maine goal as a penalty 
for Maine's holding. With the ball 
on the 42-yard line the prospects were 
brightening. Turner made a yard 
through center, then Joe Smith trotted 
through the same gap for gains of 
three and four yards. Al's punt went 
down on the Maine 10-yard line where 
Smith and Small in three rushes ad- 
vanced only five yards. 

Bowdoin's Touchdown Cancelled. 

Small punted to the Bowdoin 40- 
yard scratch where Joe Smith caught 
it and advanced to the 45-yard line. 
The next play will go down in the 
state's athletic history as one of the 
most unlucky deals in Maine football. 
Bill Parent dashed around to the right 
wing, behind the line, at the signal. 
Al Morrell, well behind the line, 
hurled the ovoid to Bill, now some 
twenty yards away. Parent dashed on 
a few yards, stumbled and lost the 
ball, but Mason was on it in a flash 
and almost as soon was over the goal 
line for what seemed to be and should 
have been a touchdown. The referee 



allowed a claim that Parent, in run- 
ning behind the line of scrimmage 
before the ball was snapped, was off- 
side, and the ball came back to mid- 
field. Al Morrell sprinted around left 
end for five yards only to lose his 
gain and five yards more as an off- 
side penalty. 

Needless to say, the Bowdoin fight- 
ing spirit was immediately roused to 
the highest pitch and in the next play 
Al made the same tactics yield him 
seven yards while the younger Mor- 
rell circled the right end for two 
yards, but when Al tossed a forward 
pass in the next attempt the wiry Blue 
quarterback speared it and ran it back 
eight yards to the 30-yard line. 
Fourth Period. 

Smith's first try at center made five 
yards which were nullified by a 5-yard 
off-side penalty. 

Small's 81-yard Dash to Score. 

With the ball on Maine's 19-yard 
line the ball went back to Small, who, 
with a splendid interference swamp- 
ing a path for him dashed eighty-one 
yards to the goal. While the Maine 
bleachers rocked beneath the tumult of 
applause, Pat Hussey kicked the goal 
and the tally stood; Maine 7, Bowdoin 
0. 

Joe Smith's 30-yard Run Back. 

McCurdy went in for Guptill as the 
teams lined up for the kick off. Joe 
Smith caught the pigskin on the 5- 
yard line and dodged through the field 
thirty yards before he was dropped 
fifteen yards from mid-field. The first 
play attempted' was an aerial which 
Small intercepted and carried to the 
23-yard line. 

Parent's 45-yard Run on Fumble 
Nullified. 

The next play was mussed and as 
the snap back rolled from the Maine 
back's hands Parent swooped down on 
it and bore it in a mad flight forty- 
five- yards to the Maine 30-yard 



"Henry, did your soldier son get any 
medals?" "Say, dat boy was de mos' 
meddlesome lad in de whole regi- 
ment." — New York World. 



As the old darkey said, "A chicken 
am de mos' usefullest animule dere 
am. Yo can eat him befoah he am 
bohn an' aftah he am dead." — Farmer 
and Breeder. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



223 



scratch. Again the powers that be 
ruled that Bowdoin had no right to 
the ball and the White team went 
back to the line more full of fight than 
ever. 

Bowdoin's 77-yard March to Touch- 
down. 

The defence stiffened so that no 
gains were made in three attempts 
before Ginsberg tossed a pass straight 
to McCurdy who was landed on the 
Bowdoin 23-yard line. Woodbury 
went in for Smith at the helm and 
promptly romped around the Blue 
right for five yards which Turner 
followed by making first down. Al 
Morrell, not to be outdone, dashed 
around the Maine extremity for nine 
more, then, after a time out to bring 
Al back to usefulness and after a yard 
loss Woodbury made the distance. 
"Pick" Turner took the left detour for 
three then shifted to the right for four 
more and Woodbury followed in the 
latter groove for first down. Dazzling 
the Maine men by a quick shift to the 
left tackle the speedy quarter made 
another eight yards and the second try 
made the distance. With the ball now 
in striking distance of the goal Dahl- 
gren, the sensation of last season, 
came in to replace Mai Morrell and 
took an off tackle play through for 
two yards. 

Woodbury's Forward Over the Cross- 
Bar. 

The next play, an attempt at the 
right extreme, lost two yards but an 
off-side penalty on Maine brought the 
ball down to the 7-yard mark. 
"Dumpy" carried the leather five 
yards to the 2-yard line but Bowdoin 
was again penalized ten yards. Two 
rushes made six yards, then Wood- 
bury signalled a short pass, and as 
the ball was snapped Parent went 
down beyond the goal posts and re- 
ceived the quarterback's pass for a 
touchdown that was adjudged legal. 
The earth fairly shook with the ap- 
plause of the Bowdoin supporters as 
Mason booted a perfect goal and tied 
the score. 

Captain Smith received the kick-off, 
bringing it up to the 35-yard mark. 
Then Small banged the line for four 
and Foster sprinted around the Bow- 
doin wing for a good first down. The 
gain was too much for Blue nerves 
as the ball was fumbled on the next 
play and went to Bowdoin. Wood- 



bury made four yards in two attempts 
and then, after unsuccessfully trying 
a forward, Al Morrell tried a goal 
from field, kicking from near mid-field. 
Maine retrieved the ball on the 20- 
yard line where she stayed for three 
downs, finally punting to Woodbury 
on the mid-field line as the whistle 
blew. The last part of the period was 
played in semi-darkness. 
• The summary: 
BOWDOIN— —MAINE 

Perry, le re, Finnegan 

Parent, le. 

Mason, It it, Roemer 

rt, Jordan 

Haines, lg rg, Hussey 

Guptill, c c, Lord 

McCurdy, c c, McLeod 

Eames, rg rg, Mulvaney 

Dudgeon, rt It, Murray 

Miller, re re, Finnegan 

re, Young 
re, Tinker 

J. Smith, qb qb, Ginsberg 

Woodbury, qb. 

M. Morrell, Ihb rhb, Small 

Bisson, lhb. 
Kirkpatrick, lhb. 
Dahlgren, lhb. 

A. Morrell, rhb lhb, Foster 

Turner, fb fb, R. Smith 

Score by quarters: 12 3 4 

Bowdoin 7 — 7 

Maine 7 — 7 

Touchdowns — Small, Parent. Goals 
from touchdown — Hussey, Mason. 
Referee — J. H. Crowley of Boston. 
Umpire— W. S. Cannell of Tufts. Head 
linesman — Roderick Beebe of Yale. 
Time — Four 15-minute periods. 



alumni Department 

Medic-1866— Dr. John Randolph 
Ham died in Palmer, Mass., on Oc- 
tober 31. He was born at Dover, 
N. H., on October 23, 1842, and pre- 
pared for college at Franklin Academy 
in Dover. He spent the second year 
of his medical course at Harvard 
Medical School but returned to Bow- 
doin for the two years before his 
graduation. He practiced at Dover 
from 1866 to 1902 when he moved to 
Malabar, Florida, where he practiced 
till 1912. 

1891— Samuel H. Erskine of Roch- 
ester, Vermont, has bought out the 
"Lincoln County News" which is pub- 
lished at Damariscotta, from the 



estate of the late Leon A. Gray. Since 
his graduation from Bowdoin Mr. 
Erskine has taught school at Limerick 
Academy, Lincoln Academy, Rutland 
(Vt.) High School and Lancaster 
(Mass.) High school and is now sup- 
erintendent of schools in Rochester, 
Vt. 

1906.— Dr. E. G. Abbott arrived at 
his home in Portland October 31, after 
a trip to France in the interests of his 
medical profession. 

1907 — An article on "Cluttering the 
Ballots," by William A. Robinson, ap- 
peared on the editorial page of the 
"Boston Herald" of November 1. 

1912 — A daughter, Joan Holt, was 
born to Dr. and Mrs. William Holt 
on October 8. 

1914 — Paul L. Wing is in the pro- 
duction department of the Worcester- 
Pressed Steel Co. 

1916 — Edward C. Hawes is sales 
manager of the Worcester Pressed 
Steel Co., Worcester, Mass. 

1918— Richard T. Schlosberg has 
reported to Camp Benning, Ga., an 
infantry school for line officers. Here 
he will take a basic course for com- 
pany officers. 

Ex-1918— Philip M. Johnson has re- 
turned to complete his course at 
Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology. 

1919 — Daniel J. Mahoney is assist- 
ant to the efficiency manager of the 
American Can Co. of Portland. 



CLASS NOTES 

1881. 

Edgar O. Achorn is a lawyer in 
Boston, Mass. Clinton L. Baxter is in 
the packing business in Portland. 
Edward E. Briry is a physician in 
Bath. William M. Brown is general 
superintendent of the Bangor and 
Aroostook Railroad and lives at Ban- 
gor. Albert C. Cobb is a lawyer in 
Minneapolis, Minn. William I. Cole 
is a professor at Wheaton College, 
Norton, Mass. Charles H. Cutler is a 
clergyman at Waban, Mass. John 
Dike is a physician in Melrose, Mass. 
Frederic A. Fisher is a lawyer in 
Lowell, Mass. William A. Gardner is 
a salesman for the Cooke Linoleum 
Co. in New York City. Henry God- 
dard is a clergyman in Boston, Mass. 
Robert H. Greene is a physician in 
New York City. 

Charles Haggerty is a lawyer at 



224 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Webster, Mass. Carroll E. Harding 
is a clergyman at Baltimore, Md. Fred 
LaF. Johnson is a druggist at Wichita, 
Kan. Herbert L. Johnson is a phy- 
sician at Hadley, Mass. Albert L. 
Joyce is in the oil business in San 
Francisco, Cal. Edgar W. Larrabee 
is paymaster of the Jackson Com- 
pany at Nashua, N. H. Frank H. 
Little is a merchant in Portland, Me. 
Hon. Daniel J. McGillicuddy is a 
lawyer at Lewiston, Me.; he has been 
in the National House of Representa- 
tives from Maine. George F. Manson 
is a lawyer at Boston, Mass. John W. 
Manson is a lawyer at Pittsfield, Me. 
Ferdinand B. Merrill is a civil en- 
gineer at Yarmouthville, Me. John 
W. Nichols is a physician in Farming- 
ton, Me. Arthur G. Pettingill is a 
clergyman in Portland, Me. Albion Q. 
Rogers is a lawyer at Pembroke, Me. 
Carleton Sawyer is a physician at 
Foxboro, Mass. Henry L. Staples is 
clinical professor of medicine at the 
University of Minnesota at Minne- 
apolis, Minn. Frederick C. Stevens is 
a lawyer at St. Paul, Minn. William 
W. Towle is a lawyer in Boston, 
Mass. John O. P. Wheelwright is a 
lawyer in Minneapolis, Minn. John 
W. Wilson is a bank examiner at Los 
Angeles, Cal. 



rO 




Bullseyed. 

Chappie — "What would you say if 
I were to kiss you?" 

Femmie — "How could I say any- 
thing — if you were a good marks- 
man?" — Jester. 



"Look here, I ask you for the last 
time for that five dollar bill you owe 
me." 

"Thank heavens, that is the end of 
that foolish question." — Burr. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. 
Surplus and Profits, $100,000. 
Student Patronage Solicited. 



BOWDOIN CANTEEN 

8 a. m.-12 m.; 1.30-6; 7-11 

Sundays, 12-5 p. m. 

A. PALMER, 19 North Winthrop. 



Pressing and Cleaning 

Orders Taken for Dyeing 
SECOND HAND CLOTHING 

BOUGHT 

DAN ROSEN 



WILLIAM F. FERRIS 

COLLEGE AGENT 

Citizens Laundry 

Auto Service 9 South Appleton 

PRINTING 

OF QUALITY 

WE AIM TO PLEASE 

WHEELER'S 

Town Building Brunswick 



10% 



REDUCTION ON 

SUITS FELT HATS 

NEGLIGEE SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR NECKWEAR 



E. 



S. BODWELL 

& SON 

Brunswick, Maine. 



DANCING 
JENNIES. HARVEY 

EVERY TUESDAY EVENING, 

BEGINNING OCTOBER 26th 

TOWN HALL, BRUNSWICK 

Class at 7.30 p. m. Assembly, 8.30. 

Monday Evenings, Armory Hall, Bath, 
beginning October 18th. 

These classes are open to college 
students. 

Private lessons and classes on appli- 
cation. 

Address 
897 Middle St., Bath, Me. 

Phone 151-W. 



THE 

COLLEGE 

BOOK STORE 

The place to buy everything from 
a Thumb Tack to a Wedding Present. 
Take a look at our new line of Kay- 
woodie Pipes. These are of real 
Italian Bruyere with the Aluminum 
Inbore tube. All models $4.50 each. 



F. W, CHANDLER 

& SON 



150 MAINE STREET. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 Maine Street 

CORDOVAN BOOTS 

IN 

YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 



[ CARL H. MARTIN 

Cleansing and Dyeing 
Pressing and Alterations 



"Herman's" Tan Cordovan $13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan. .$15.50 
"Florsheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 

TENNIS SHOES INDOOR AND 

OUTDOOR MOCCASINS. RUBBER 

BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 



4 Elm Street 



A. W. HASKELL, D. D. S. 

W. F. BROWN, D. D. S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Postoffice Brunswick, Me. 



Hart Schaffner 



Featuring 

the newest productions in 
garments for fall wear made 
for us by 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 

Haskell & Jones Company 



PORTLAND, 



MAINE 



"The Store of Progress and Service" 
This is the season of the year when College men are considering the matter of 

Warm Outdoor Coats 

and we know that they are especially interested in the Sheep Lined and 
Sport Coats, so we call attention at this time to these Coats which we 
know will appeal to the College Chap. 

Sheep Lined Coats 

three-quarter length. This is a Moleskin, and a good, warm, serviceable Coat just what you want 
when you go out on a long hike or want to keep real warm at the football or other outdoor sports. 

Sport Coats 

We have got a fine line of these Coats in reversible leather. They have raglan shoulder; belt all 
around, and they come in the popular brown shade. 



Don't forget that Mr. Jack Handy '23 of the Zeta Psi House is still our represent- 
ative, and he mil be glad to attend to all your requirements for Furnishings or 
otherwise. 



Monument 
Square 




Portland 
Maine 



226 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



JUD, The Barber 

was going to use this space 
but thought it wasn't neces- 
sary. 



TO THE CLASS OF 

19 2 4 

Do you like Hot Chocolate ? 



BUTLER'S 



WRIGHT &DITS0N 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 Washington Street 
Boston 



.THE FALL 

Arrow 

OLLAIL 




s~c 




119 MAINE STREET 
BRUNSWICK 



Macullar Parker Co. 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Makers of Conser- 
vative Clothes for 
College Men, will 
show frequently at 
Bowdoin College. 

YOUR PATRONAGE IS 
EARNESTLY SOLICITED 

G. L. GOODWIN, Representative 



BO WDOIN ORIENT 



227 




It takes many golfers longer to play the 19th hole 
than it does to play the other eighteen combined 

U. S. Golf Balls are never used as an alibi at the 
nineteenth hole. They come in for praise only. 

These balls are winning favor on merit alone — 
their extreme durability, speed, and accuracy in 
flight and roll. Try them. Buy them from your 
pro or at your dealer's. 




U. S. Royal $1.00 each 

U. S. Revere 85c each 

U. S. Floater 65c each 



Keep your eye on the ball — be sure it's a U. S. 



United States Rubber Company 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CUMBERLAND 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 
"CHILDREN OF DESTINY" 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 
CONSTANCE TALMADGE 

. . . IN . . . 

IN SEARCH OF A SINNER 



NEXT WEEK— MONDAY AND TUESDAY 
BILLIE BURKE 

. . . IN . . . 

"AWAY GOES PRUDENCE" 



PASTIME 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

EUGENE O'BRIEN 

. . . IN . . . 

"HIS WIFE'S MONEY" 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 
GEORGE WALSH 

. . . IN . . . 

"SINK OR SWIM" 



NEXT WEEK— MONDAY AND TUESDAY 
MARY PICKFORD 

. . . IN . . . 

"HEART 0' THE HILLS" 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIEN 



* Mam $s 
4 4pf> 7927 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE \^9 



'*/CK. *£ 



VOL. L. 



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1920 



ARMISTICE DAY 

CHAPEL SERVICE 



Address by Lt. Robert Hale '10. 



A special service was held at chapel 
in commemoration of Armistice Day. 
Professor Mitchell presided and the 
address was delivered by Lieut. 
Robert Hale '10, of Portland, who 
served with distinction in France, 
Germany, and Russia during and after 
the war. His address in part is as 
follows : 

Other anniversaries which we are 
accustomed to observe commemorate 
events beyond our memories — beyond 
the memory of any living men. And 
so it results that to many of us the 
tradition of the commemoration is apt 
to be more vivid than the event which 
we commemorate. 

But with Armistice Day it is dif- 
ferent. The intervening years have 
not dimmed our memories. I suppose 
they can never dim the memories of 
those who are here. To each one of 
you the day evokes some particular 

(Continued on page* 230) 



Date of Cole Lecture 



The Annie Talbot Cole lecture will 
be given on Tuesday, December 7th, by 
Paul Elmer More, on "The Spirit of 
Early New England." 



Calendar 

Nov. 20 — Football: Freshmen vs. 
Sophomores. 

Nov. 24 — Thanksgiving recess be- 
gins at 12.30. 

Nov. 29— College opens at 8.20 after 
Thanksgiving recess. 

Dec. 1 — Date of next issue of the 
"Orient." 

Dec. 6 — Debate: Freshmen vs. 
Sophomores. 

Dec. 7 — Lecture by Dr. Paul Elmer 
More. 



Splendid Offer From 
General Education Board 



President Sills announced in chapel 
Monday morning of this week that 
the General Education Board, of New 
York City, had expressed its willing- 
ness to give to Bowdoin College to- 
ward additional endowment, the in- 
come to be used for the increase of 
teachers' salaries, the sum of $150,000 
toward $600,000 for endowment, and 
that it had also voted a grant to the 
college of $7,500 a year for the next 
three years, as the equivalent of the 
income of the fund. The President 
stated that later on an announcement 
would be made as to the time required 
for the raising of the supplemental 
sum; but that the work that had been 
started through the Alumni Fund 
would be continued. It is the object 
of that fund to secure a large number 
of small gifts for the current ex- 
penses of the college and a small num- 
ber of larger gifts for the permanent 
endowment. For the latter purpose 
the gifts and pledges amount already 
to about $100,000. 



FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE 
DEBATE 



Trials for the Freshman-Sophomore 
debate were held in the debating room 
November 8. The Freshman team is 
composed of George E. Hill, Donald 
W. MacKinnon, and Clarence D. Rouil- 
lard, with Glenn W. Gray as alternate. 

The Sophomore team is composed of 
Theodore W. Cousens, Clifford O. 
Small, and Leo A. Daviau, with Roy 
M. Fitzmorris as alternate. The de- 
bate will be held December 6. The 
subject is : "Resolved, That before the 
next Presidential election a method of 
direct voting shall be substituted for 
that of the electoral college." 



Amendment To 

A. S. B. C. By-Laws 



Tomorrow afternoon (Thursday) 
from one to five the members of the 
A. S. B.'C. will vote on an amend- 
ment to the by-laws. The proposed 
amendment reads as follows: "In all 
major and minor sports three candi- 
dates for assistant managership shall 
be nominated from the candidates 
trying out; the two receiving the high- 
est number of votes shall be declared 
assistant managers and shall so serve 
for one year. The two assistant man- 
agers shall be nominated and voted 
on for manager the succeeding year." 

This proposal has the unanimous 
approval of the members of the stu- 
dent council. It is the method em- 
ployed at a number of colleges where 
it has been successful, 



West Point Crushes 

Bowdoin 90-0 



Bowdoin Team Helpless Before Power- 
ful Army Eleven — Record Score for 
Winners — French and Smythe Star. 



Bowdoin realizes now how Governor 
Cox felt after the election returns had 
drifted in. An irresistible landslide 
hit the Bowdoin warriors last Satur- 
day in the shape of the West Point 
football team. The soldiers rolled up 
thirteen touchdowns and missed but 
one of the goals for a final count of 
90-0. There was a touchdown scored 
almost every four minutes, through- 
out the game. Bowdoin has never 
been so heavily scored upon in its 
history, nor has West Point ever 
totalled such a score. Bowdoin had 
very little hope at any time during 
the game, its farthest advance being 
to its own 35-yard line. 

The game was featured by the long 
runs of French. One of his dashes 
for a touchdown was an 80-yard run, 



230 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



and two others were 65-yard sprints. 
He was in the game but little. The 
Army coaches used him only during 
a part of two periods, in which the 
former Rutgers back flashed these 
several long runs for scores. In the 
third period, after his second touch- 
down, he duplicated his 65-yard dash, 
but was called back for holding, 
whereupon he went through on the 
next play for his third tally. 

Smythe, a heavy, aggressive back, 
also did good work, scoring three 
touchdowns. Mulligan's line play 
stood out among the features of the 
game. He blocked one of Bowdoin's 
punts and fell on the ball for an Army 
touchdown. 

The Cadets used numerous substi- 
tutes, putting in their third and fourth 
string men for the final quarter. 
The summary: 
WEST POINT— —BOWDOIN 

D. Storck le re, Bates 

Meyers, le re, Guptill 

L. Storck, It it, Mason 

Pilzer, It. 

Clark, Ig rg, Haines 

Greene, c c, McCurdy 

Enderton, c c, Parsons 

Goodman, rg Ig, Eames 

Mulligan, rt It, Dudgeon 

Stewart, rt. 

Doyle, re . .le, Philbrook 

White, re. 

Wilhide, qb qb, Woodbury 

Ogden, qb. 

Lawrence lhb rhb, A. Morrell 

Dodd, lhb. 
Eberse, lhb. 

Smythe, rhb lhb, Smith 

Whitson, rhb lhb, Bisson 

French, fb fb, Whitney 

Richards, fb. 

Score by quarters: 12 3 4 

West Point 21 34 28 7—90 

Bowdoin . . 0—0 

Touchdowns — Smythe (3), French 
, (3), Whitson (2), D. Storck, Law- 
rence, Richards, Mulligan, Wilhide. 
Goals from touchdown — French (7), 
Mulligan (4), Richards. Referee — J. 
C. McDonald, Trinity. Umpire— A. C. 
Tyler, Princeton. Head linesman — C. 
Haan, Harvard. Time — Four 15- 
minute periods. 



"Dat baby of yours am the perfect 
image of his daddy." 

"He suah am. He am a reg'lar 
carbon copy." — Dallas Morning News. 



History Club Meeting 



Last Thursday evening the History 
Club met with Professor Bell and Pro- 
fessor Van Cleve to organize and to 
make plans for this year. There arc 
three members from last year's group 
L. H. Hatch '21, G. 0. Prout '21, and 
R. Toyokawa '21. Five new men were 
elected to the club: P. R. Lovell.'21, 
Alexander Thomson '21, M. A. Eld- 
ridge '22, H. F. Simpson '22, and C. S. 
Towle '22. The number of members 
is limited to eight men, five seniors 
and three juniors. 

This year the club plans to follow 
the scheme of last year except in one 
respect. At each meeting there is to 
be a paper by one of the members re- 
garding some prominent figure in his- 
tory. Last year these prominent men 
were selected from any period of his- 
tory, but this year they will be chosen 
entirely from the time of the French 
Revolution. In this way the papers 
and discussions of different evenings 
will supplement each other very much 
more than before. 



Dean Nixon Speaks for 
the Placement Committee 



Tuesday evening, November 9, 
members of the Senior and Junior 
classes filled the debating room in 
Hubbard Hall to capacity when Dean 
Nixon gave a talk on the work of 
the Placement Committee. The Dean 
spoke in his usual interesting man- 
ner, outlining the organization and 
purpose of this important alumni 
body The organization has the sim- 
plicity which goes hand in hand with 
greatest effectiveness. Alumni in 
each of the larger lines of endeavor, 
both professional and commercial, are 
continually on the watch for openings 
for graduates. On finding opportuni- 
ties these men notify the central com- 
mittee which has on file the names, 
preferences and records of all men 
who apply for situations through the 
committee. It is then the duty of the 
committee to suit the job to the man 
and vice versa, a task which, success- 
fully effected, cannot but add to the 
fame and credit of Bowdoin. The up- 
per-classmen seemed very much inter- 
ested in the proposition. 



Public Lectures 

By the Faculty 



In response to a request for inform- 
ing talks which shall be open to the 
public, a series of lectures will be pro- 
vided on certain Sunday afternoons by 
members of the faculty. It is in- 
tended that these lectures, while 
necessarily on technical topics shall be 
popular in form. Each lecture, unless 
otherwise announced, will be given in 
the Court room beginning at 3.30 p. m. 
The first lecture of the series will be 
by Professor Hormell on "Popular 
Government and Political Parties," on 
November 28. 



Address by Lieut. Hale 

(Continued from page 229) 

association. To some of you there 
comes the memory of the silence after 
fifty-one months of cannonade. 

Others of you think of the moment 
when the bugles sounded recall after 
morning drill and the company fell 
into formation and the message came 
from the major down through the 
Company Commanders to the whole 
battalion. You see that long line of 
steel helmets covering heads that were 
thinking nothing but soft thoughts 
of home. You remember the 
French peasant women who cried out 
to you as your company marched by 
"Finie la Guerre" or "Vivent les 
Americains." You remember the old 
lady at your billet who wept and got 
out her best cognac and thanked you 
in a choking voice that made you feel 
ashamed. You remember the hilarity 
of a Paris cafe, or the horns and 
whistles and firebells of some New 
England village. Yes, these and a 
thousand other memories make armis- 
tice clay for you. You need no spokes- 
man to come and interpret the mean- 
ing of it. It is written on your hearts. 

And yet it is fitting that the day be 
publicly remembered and even that we 
try to formulate its meaning. The 
armistice closed the war and ushered 
in peace. Today we pay our homage 
to those who fell, and reconsecrate 
ourselves to the responsibilities of 
those who survived. To them the 
glory; to us the burden. 

So they live transfigured and we 
return to take up the old life, the 
romance and the glamour largely 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



gone. The bright eyes of danger have 
lost their lustre. We have regained 
old liberties that we feared might 
never come again. We thank God in 
all reverence that the war is over. 

And yet there are things we miss. 
We miss that spacious companionship 
of strong youth, that almost world- 
wide unity of purpose that made us 
something more than kin to Cossack 
Horsemen on the Polish plain, to the 
firemen in some stifling stokehold be- 
tween Iceland and the Hebrides, to 
the Britishers who thirsted before 
Kut and Bagdad and Jerusalem. We 
miss the consecration of life to one 
great end, the ordered effort toward 
a common goal, the exemption from 
the why and wherefore in simple 
obedience, and carrying on, the sub- 
mergence of self and the exaltation 
of country and the everlasting job. 
Life is aDt to seem stale and profitless 
after the great adventure; issues ap- 
pear trivial; individuals with their 
ailments, their small desires and petty 
ambitions seem ridiculous. Things 
that appeared once momentous we de- 
spise. Classrooms I am sure have to 
some of you assumed the guise of a 
childish punishment. A man who has 
commanded a battery or a company 
in France had perhaps as soon play 
dolls as go to lectures, and write ex- 
aminations and take a college degree. 
He has already as he things gradu- 
ated at a greater university. 

This is right in its way. It would 
have been wrong if war had not 
stirred us to the depths, had not 
wrenched us from our small content- 
ments and wrested from us the last 
vestige of our complacency. It should 
have taught us to despise pettiness, 
and abhor self seeking. But it should 
teach us too that we need discipline 
to preserve peace and order as well 
as to wage war. For every hour on 
the battlefield, most of us did days of 
squads right and squads left, squads 
right about and squads left about un- 
til we thought the heavens were 
bounded by the Infantry Drill Regu- 
lations, that wars were fought "by 
the numbers," and that life all mili- 
tary was an idiotic piece of formalism. 
And yet for most of you the time 
came even if it was not on the battle- 
field, when you saw the reason and 
inevitableness of it all. And you in 
your turn set other men to doing 
squads left and squads right and 



squads right about and squads left 
about. 

Let us take this lesson back to the 
college and the university. These are 
the great training camps whence are 
to come our citizens and never has 
the world needed more than today 
steady, trained, thinking minds. Let 
us guard the vision we have had of 
great ideals, let us cherish the memory 
of great events. Many of you can 
bless God and say "Quorum pars fui." 
Let us remember however that victory 
seldom comes to the brave revolu- 
tionaries but rather to the patient ad- 
herents of duty even when they march 
with a heavy pack in the rear rank. 
You cannot avoid the humdrum. It 
crops up in squads right, or the bi- 
nomial theorem or the second aorist 
optative or the office filing system. 
What we cannot avoid let us there- 
fore conquer. Our prayer must be for 
the courage to face the commonplace 
and the spirit to exalt it. 



Revival of the Press Club 



Last Wednesday there was a meet- 
ing in the library for the purpose of 
reviving the Press Club, which had 
gone out of existence at Bowdoin in 
1917 on account of the war. The pur- 
pose of the club is precisely the same 
as it was originally, "to give the pub- 
lic the most accurate and consistent 
news possible in regard to Bowdoin 
College;" also, "to afford the college 
press correspondents an opportunity 
for co-operation." 

The members of the club are Ed- 
ward B. Ham '22 (chairman), Norman 
W. Haines '21, Luke Halpin '21, Oliver 
G. Hall '21, Virgil C. McGorrill '22, 
and Carroll S. Towle '22. 



Chess Tournament 



The following pairings have been 
drawn up for the fall chess tourna- 
ment, in which the one winning the 
best three out of five, excluding draw 
games, has a decision: 

Anderson '21, Strout '23. 

Williams '21, R. T. Phillips '24. 

Clymer '22, Bishop '23. 

R. B. Phillips '24, Philbrick '23. 

Houghton '21, Blanchard '21. 

Additional entries may be made by 
notifying Anderson '21 or Blanchard 
'21. 



Organization of 

Mathematical Club 



A week ago Monday the three 
upper classes in the department of 
Mathematics met with Professor 
Moody and Professor Nowlan in 
Adams Hall to discuss the formation 
of a Mathematical Club, similar to 
the Biology Club and other such 
groups on the campus. It was voted 
to organize, and a committee was ap- 
pointed to draw up plans for the or- 
ganization of the club. 

In addition to this, Rogers '23 de- 
scribed the methods of checking the 
simple processes of multiplication and 
division by casting out nines. His dis- 
cussion was followed by informal talk 
by the other members of the club. 

At a second meeting held this week 
Monday, officers were elected (too late 
to have their names appear in this 
issue of the "Orient") and further 
plans were made. It is the purpose 
of this club to have meetings fre- 
quently during the year for informal 
discussion of interesting aspects of 
mathematics. Usually two or three 
members will present definite prob- 
lems or theories around which the 
general discussion will be centered. 

The members are: (From Mathe- 
matics 7), Philip Pollay '21, 
H. M. Springer '21, E. E. 
White '21, P. D. Wilkins '21; (from 
Mathematics 5), S. J. Ball '22, L. 
Bernstein '22, S. S. Fish '22, E. B. 
Ham '22, J. G. Merriam '21; (from 
Mathematics 3), R. T. Bates '23, C. 
W. Bean '23, S. W. Colburn '23, H. E. 
Crawford '23, F. E. MacDonald '23, W. 
0. Rogers '23, S. H. Stackhouse '23, 
Roger Strout '23, E. N. Swinglehurst 
'23, J. C. Tibbitts '22, F. K. Turgeon 
'23, P. S. Turner '21, G. D. Varney 
'23, G. B. Welch '22. 



One of our coming professors of 
Political Science has discovered a new 
reason for the holding of presidential 
elections in November. He says that 
it is to be sure that rural voters have 
finished haying. 



T. D. Freshman — "Well, anyway, 
you can tell I have brains by the 
shape of my head." 

August Sophomore — "Huh! only 
way you can tell it!" 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The New Heating and 

Lighting Station 

[By Felix A. Burton '07] 

The Building and Grounds Commit- 
tee, President Sills, Professor Hutch 
ins, Professor Mitchell, and Mr. Fur- 
bish, treasurer, met on February 18th, 
after the old combined Heating Sta- 
tion and Union burned down, and de- 
cided to rebuild the building as a heat- 
ing station alone, "using as much of 
the present wall as necessary. The 
type of architecture to fit into the 
landscape as well as possible." 

Several sketches were received by 
the committee, and those submitted by 
Felix A. Burton '07 were adopted. 
Working drawings were made and ap- 
proved, and the contract for the con- 
struction of the building awarded to 
Leon Smith '10, of the firm of Black- 
stone & Smith in Portland, on a cost 
plus fixed sum basis. 

The building was commenced 
promptly July 7, and comv.1 ted Sep- 
tember 24, just six months after the 
committee selected the architect. 

The work was a conspicuous ex- 
ample of Bowdoin team work and co- 
operation. Thanks to the efficiency 
of the contractor and many savings 
effected through the assistance of Mr. 
Horace Litchfield, an employee of the 
College, the total cost amounted to 
some $6,000 less tha"n the price 
originally estimated. This was ac- 
complished at a time when many 
building operations were being de- 
layed through inability to procure 
cement and other materials, and in 
spite of the fact that unforseen ob- 
stacles necessitated extra steel and 
brick work. 

The building is designed along the 
lines of modern power and lighting 
stations, having large steel sash win- 
dows with ventilating sections. These 
seven windows form the main motive 
in the design, the cornice emphasizing 
the appearance of strength recalling 
the contour of the chimney top. 

It might be well to note that this 
old chimney is almost unique in Maine, 
having been built by Mr. Charles E. 
Hacker of Brunswick of moulded 
brick made at the old brick yard near 
the present golf links. The especially 
noteworthy feature about the chimney 
being the graceful entasis of the 
shaft, and the fact that the top brick 




THE NEW HEATING STATION. 
Designed by Felix A. Burton '07. 



courses are not merely corbelled out, 
one row horizontally beyond the other, 
but each brick is "rolled," that is to 
say, the outside face of each brick 
pitches outward slightly to conform 
to the silhouette of the chimney. A 
difficult thing to accomplish as the 
spirit level could not be used to level 
the bricks, and it was necessary to 
lay them accurately against a form 
pivoted about the center of the chim- 
ney. 

To those who remember the old 
"coal mine" appearance of earlier 
days, the interior now, spacious and 
light, with wide spans of six course 
row lock arches of Roman strength 
framing each window, is even more 
pleasing than the exterior. 

The new heating station looks to- 
ward the future — faces west. 

Stand on the entrance platform just 
inside the doors. At your left are 
four water tube steam boilers of ap- 
proximately 125 horsepower each, 
easily capable of handling all present 
demands of the college for heat and 
light — not content with that, the col- 
lege leaves space for two future 
boilers. 

In front of you is the coal supply 
system, a narrow gage railroad with 
coal car operating through a tunnel 
directly from the coal pile to the 
boiler fronts. A reserve coal supply 



is provided for in a covered coal 
pocket. All coal is weighed as it 
enters the building. Again, this sys- 
tem is so designed that eventually a 
spur track may be run in for the 
electric road on Harpswell street and 
coal brought on a trestle directly 
above the coal pile, and provision has 
been made for a mechanical ash re- 
moving device in the future. 

On your right, the dynamos and en- 
gine room with small locker room and 
shower bath. Here is located the 
main switch board controlling the 
lighting in the main College buildings, 
and emergency connection with the 
town current. Ample room for a 
future dynamo, and a plan for 
gradually putting into underground 
conduit, all the heavy overhead wires 
which now disfigure and menace the 
safety of the campus. 

Below the engine room is a sub- 
basement to be used as a repair shop, 
giving easy access to the various 
pumps and heat ducts which radiate 
to the various buildings. 

The roof is a "Barrett Specification" 
tar and gravel roof, its future "guar- 
anteed" for twenty years. 

The construction in general is what 
is known as "slow burning mill con- 
struction," but so arranged that the 
building may henceforward be con- 
sidered fireproof. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



233 



Campus Activities 

Cumberland County 

In this week's issue the sketches of 
men from Cumbeiland County are 
concluded. The men this week are in 
the second alphabetical half of each 
class, not including the Portland stu- 
dents, who were written up two weeks 
ago. 



Class of 1921. 

Philip Pollay of Portland, prepared 
for Bowdoin at the Boston Latin 
School and at Brunswick High School, 
from which latter institution he 
graduated in 1917. He is majoring in 
German. He is a member of the new 
Mathematical Club. 

Don T. Potter of Brunswick is a 
graduate of Brunswick High School. 
He served in the Navy during the 
war. He is majoring in Economics. 

Philip S. Stetson is a member of the 
Kappa Sigma fraternity and a gradu- 
ate of Brunswick High School. He is 
a member of the college band. His 
major subject is Economics. 

Carroll E. York is a member of 
Alpha Delta Phi, and a graduate of 
Brunswick High School in' the class 
of 1913. He entered Bowdoin with 
the class of 1920, but left college 
shortly before the end of his Fresh- 
man year to enter the war service. 
He returned from the service in 1919 
and came back to college a year ago 
this fall. His major is in the depait- 
ment of Chemistry. 

Class of 1922. 

Morris Smith of Brunswick pre- 
pared for Bowdoin at the Brunswick 
High School. Last year he played on 
his class baseball team in the annual 
Sophomore-Freshman series. His 
major is in the department of Biology. 

George L. True, Jr., of Brunswick, 
graduated from Brunswick High 
School in the class of 1918. He en- 
tered New Hampshire College the 
following year. A year ago this fall 
he transferred to Bowdoin. This year 
he has become a member of the 
Biology Club. His major is in the 
department of Biology. 

Rufus C. Tuttle is a graduate of 
Freeport High School and a member 
of the Sigma Nu fraternity. He had 
a response at his Freshman banquet. 
He made his letter in baseball in his 



Freshman year and is now one of the 
pitching staff. He is majoring in Ger- 
man. 

James H. Wetherell of Gorham is a 
graduate of South Paris High School 
and a member of the Psi Upsilon 
fraternity. He played on his class 
team in the Sophomore-Freshman 
football game last year. He is major- 
ing in Economics. 

Class of 1923. 

E. Gordon Hebb is a graduate of 
jJridgton High School and a member 
of the Theta Delta Chi fraternity. He 
played on his class football team last 
year. He was on his class relay team 
and track squad. 

Frank E. MacDonald is a graduate 
of Windham High School. He is a 
member of the newly organized 
Mathematical Club. 

Elmer S. Ridlon of Gorham, pre- 
pared for college at Gorham High 
School. He is taking pre-medical 
courses and is a member of the Kappa 
Sigma fraternity. 

Joseph I. Smith of Brunswick is a 
graduate of Brunswick High School. 
During his Freshman year he was a 
member of the varsity back field until 
injuries put him out of the game. He 
was also captain and quarterback of 
his class football team and in the 
spring played at third throughout 
every game on the varsity nine. He 
has played the full season at varsity 
quarterback this year and has un 
doubtedly won his second letter in a 
major sport. 

Roger Strout of Brunswick went to 
Brunswick High School for three 
years after which he gained entrance 
to Bowdoin without needing to finish 
his preparatory course. He is a mem- 
ber of the newly organized Mathe- 
matical Club, and also of the Wireless 
Club. 

Class of 1924. 

E. Harold Coburn prepared for col- 
lege at Brunswick High School, gradu- 
ating last spring. 

R. Fulton Johnston graduated from 
Brunswick High School in the class of 
1920. 

Rollan E. Files prepared for college 
at Gorham High School and West- 
brook Seminary. He graduated from 
the latter school and is now a member 
of Kappa Sigma. 

William F. Muir of Brunswick is a 



graduate of Brunswick High School. 
He was in the war service, before en- 
tering college, for several months in 
1918. During the war he was especial- 
ly active in working for the Knights 
of Columbus. He is a special stu- 
dent, doing work in Physics, and is 
regularly employed in an important 
position with the Maine Central Rail- 
road. 

Lawrence L. Page graduated from 
Gorham High School and is a mem- 
ber of Sigma Nu. 



American Field 

Service Fellowships 

Twenty-five fellowships for the year 
1921-22 of the value of $200 plus 10,- 
000 francs, will be awarded by the 
committee on American Field Service 
Fellowships for French Universities. 
President Sills, who is a member of 
the advisory board for the award of 
these fellowships, will be glad to dis- 
cuss them with any student who may 
be interested. To be eligible a candi- 
date must be a citizen of the United 
States, preferably between the ages of 
twenty and thirty, a graduate of a col- 
lege of recognized standing, and must 
have a practical knowledge of French. 



MANDOLIN CLUB ORGANIZED 



The following twenty-eight men 
have been selected for the first re- 
hearsal of the Mandolin Club, from 
whom the final members of the club 
will be chosen in the near future:- 
Claff '21, Parent '21, B. H. M. White 
'21, Ball '22, Bartlett '22, Battison '22, 
Dahlgren '22, Doe '22, Ludden '22, 
Perry '22, M. R. Young '22, C. W. 
Bean '23, Dannis '23, Hussey '23, W. 
M. Kimball '23, Lothrop '23, Mitchell 
'23, Pierce '23, H. C. Webb '23, Bald- 
win '24, Blaisdell '24, F. E. Cousins 
'24, G. T. Davis '24, Kenniston '24, Mc- 
Mennamin '24, Margesson '24, R. B. 
Phillips '24, P. D. Smith '24. 



There was more than one player < 

Who felt decidedly lame, 

And was quite indisposed 

To turn up his nose 

At Bowdoin long after the game. 



There was a young man from Maine. 

From betting he could not refrain, 

But at Brunswick, 1 fear, 

His bets cost him dear. 

Ana >ils words were a wee bit profane. 



234 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Norman W. Haines '21 Editor-in-Chief 

Edward B. Ham '22 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Floyd A. Gerrard '23. . Athletics 

Karl R. Philbriek '23 Faculty Notes 

George H. Quinby '23 Alumni Department 

F. King Turgeon '23 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

John L. Berry '21 Crosby E. Redman '21 

Harry Helson '21 Frank A. St. Clair '21 

George E. Houghton '21 William R. Ludden '22 
Russell M. McGown '21 Virgil C. McGorrill '22 
Roland L. McCormack '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Kenneth S. Boardman '21. . .Business Manager 

Wilfred R. Brewer '22 Assistant Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $2.00 
r>er year, in advance. Single copies, 10 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials; the Managing Editor 
for the news department; and the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 



Vol. L. November 17, 1920. No. 19 



Entered at Post Offic 
Second-Class Mail Matter. 



It has been decided to omit the 
issue of November 24, and to have the 
next "Orient" appear on December 1. 
In previous years the issue immediate- 
ly after Thanksgiving has been 
omitted, but it seems more practical 
now to drop the one before, owing 
to the fact that the vacation begins 
at noon of the day when the "Orient" 
comes out. 



The Proposed System for Electing 
Managers. 



This week' the student body is to 
decide upon a most radical change in 
the A. S. B. C. by-laws. If this 
measure is passed, in each sport there 
will be two assistant managers from 
whom one is to be elected manager. 

There is little doubt that the new 
system will bring about much more 
efficient work on the part of all 
aspirants for a managership. Now 
there is only one assistant manager 
in each sport, who is almost invariably 
elected manager, merely as a matter 
of course. This inevitably tends to 
make the assistant manager careless 



at least to some extent. Obviously 
the new method will require both as- 
sistant managers to live up to a much 
higher standard in their departments. 
Furthermore the manager will have 
two men making earnest efforts in- 
stead of one, who may or may not be 
a conscientious worker. 

Another advantage will be the prob- 
ability of a larger number of fresh- 
man candidates, owing to a consider- 
ably stronger chance for a nomination. 
The success of the scheme in other 
colleges and its unanimous endorse- 
ment by the student council are ad- 
ditional reasons for favoring the 
measure. 

Some voters may think it more de- 
sirable to have the system remain un- 
changed, partly on account of its long 
standing, but more because the suc- 
cess or failure of a candidate is 
definitely determined early in his col- 
lege course. Further than this, there 
appear to be no objections to the new 
method. 

In conclusion, the question to be de- 
cided tomorrow is a choice between 
the possible undesirability of post- 
poning the real election of the 
manager and doubled efficiency in the 
management of every sport. 



Communication 



To the Editor of the "Orient": 

The Intercollegiate Socialist Society 
takes this opportunity through the 
columns of your magazine, to issue a 
challenge to the members of your 
faculty or to prominent citizens of 
your community to a debate on 
Socialism. A number of well known 
men and women have consented to 
debate on the affirmative side of the 
subject in the more prominent col- 
leges of the country. 

Socialism is one of the most import- 
ant problems in the world today and 
an understanding of its principles is 
essential to an understanding of the 
age in which we live. We feel that 
one of the best ways to promote this 
understanding among college men and 
women is to give students an oppor- 
tunity to hear the arguments for and 
against Socialism presented from the 
same platform. The debate, if possi- 
ble, should be held in one of the large 
halls on the campus. 

The society will greatly appreciate 
the assistance of all collegians in the 



arrangement of a debate in your in- 
stitution. All communications rela- 
tive to the debate should be addressed 
to the Intercollegiate Socialist Society, 
70 Fifth avenue, New York City. 
Very truly yours, 

HARRY W. LAIDLER, 

Secretary. 



Editor's Note. — Although the work 
of this society is endorsed by many 
men of distinction, the "Orient" hard- 
ly expects that the challenge will be 
accepted by anyone at Bowdoin, par- 
ticularly since there is grave doubt 
as to the good that would come from 
such a debate. 



Orono Sentiment After 

The Maine Game 

Various articles and comments in 
the "Maine Campus" of November 10 
leave little doubt as to the reaction 
of the Maine student body after the 
tie game with Bowdoin. For the en- 
tertainment of Bowdoin men the fol- 
lowing selections are reprinted ver- 
batim : 

"The Campus representative could 
not help from noticing the poor 
sportsmanship that the Bowdoin en- 
thusiasts showed when Maine had the 
ball, by the continuous cheering and 
the Bowdoin cheer-leader did not try 
to stop them." 

"Have you noticed the price of ad- 
mission to Whittier Field?" 

(From the cross-country write-up) 
— "The student body may expect an 
entirely different showing when the 
team goes over a real cross-country 
course at the New England's." 

We note that Bates showed the way 
to the Orono outfit again last Satur- 
day. 

(The entire editorial column) — "At 
all games Maine has always had the 
courtesy to reserve the best section 
of the grandstand for the supporters 
of the visiting team. And other col- 
leges have done the same for Maine. 
Whether it was mere numbness on 
the part of the Bowdoin management 
or an intended insult in not reserving 
a section for the Maine supporters in 
Saturday's game, we do not know. 
But Bowdoin lost the respect of many 
Maine followers thru the lack of 
courtesy shown the visitors at Whit- 
tier Field." 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The seating arrangement of the 
Maine supporters was neither an in- 
sult or the result of "numbness," but 
merely the following out of an old 
custom. Maine has always been 
seated in this manner at Whittier 
Field, just as Bates and Colby have 
been. Bowdoin supporters have al- 
ways had places, reserved for them in 
bleachers either opposite or beside the 
grandstands both at Bates and at 
Colby. No complaints have ever been 
received until this game and we fail 
to see any reason for complaints now. 

In the column headed "Looking 
Back," Maine's victories over Bow- 
doin one year ago and five years ago 
are duly referred to, also the tie game 
of 1910. What about twenty years 
ago, when Bowdoin trimmed Colby 
68-0, and Maine 38-0? 



Enrollment in Courses 

It is thought that a list of courses 
in college with the number of men in 
each may be of interest to readers of 
the "Orient," as a means cf showing 
the general trend of selection by pres- 
ent undergraduates. Below is printed 
a list of the enrollment in all courses 
in the academic department of the 
college. 

Art 3 28 

Art 7 15 

Astronomy 1 13 

Chemistry 1 75 

Chemistry 3 52 

Chemistry 5 8 

Chemistry 7 8 

Common Law 46 

Economics 1 100 

Economics 5 83 

Economics 9 77 

English 1 114 

English 3 24 

English 13 24 

English 15 15 

French 1 9 

French 3 s 104 

French 7 52 

Geology 1 8 

German 1 56 

German 3 29 

German 5 ,15 

Government 1 105 

Government 3 26 

Greek A . 17 

Greek 1 1 

Greek 7 17 

History 5 48 



History 7 24 

History 9 32 

History 11 8 

Hygiene 118 

International Law 23 

Italian 3 3 

Latin A 8 

Latin 1 28 

Latin 3a 5 

Latin 5a 2 

Mathematics 1 86 

Mathematics 3 14 

Mathematics 5 5 

Mathematics 7 4 

Music 1 42 

Music 3 5 

Music 5 2 

Philosophy 1 51 

Philosophy 3 7 

Physics 1 47 

Physics 3 4 

Physics 7 2 

Psychology 1 40 

Psychology 3 12 

Psychology 5 4 

Russian 1 1 

Spanish 1 52 

Spanish 3 18 

Zoology 1 34 

Zoology 3 45 

Zoology 7 1 

Zoology 9 42 

Assistants in Departments 

Biology — Arch H. Morrell '21. 

Chemistry — Carroll L. Bean '21, 
Oliver G. Hall '21, Harrison C. Lyseth 
21. 

Economics — Carroll L. Bean '21. 

English — Frederick W. Anderson 
'21, Robert W. Morse '21. 

French — Reginald W. Noyes '21, 
Frank A. St. Clair '21. 

Government — Lloyd H. Hatch '21 
(in Government 1), Donald W. Mac- 
Kinnon '24 (in municipal research 
work) . 

History— Lloyd H. Hatch '21, 
George O. Prout '21. 

Hygiene — Plympton Guptill '20 
(Medic-'23). 

Latin— Clifford R. Tupper '21. 

Mathematics — Percy D. Wilkins '21. 

Physics— George B. Welch '22. 

Sociology — A. Rudolph Thayer '22. 

Spanish — Luke Halpin '21, Frank A. 
It. Clair '21. 



Saturday Football Scores 

West Point 90, Bowdoin 0. 

Bates 21, New York Univ. 18. 

Holy Cross 36, Colby 0. 

New Hampshire College 47, Univ. of 
Maine 7. 

Harvard 27, Brown 0. 

Princeton 20, Yale 0. 

Boston College 37, Tufts 0. 

Dartmouth 44, Univ. of Pennsyl- 
vania 7. 

Univ. of Maryland 10, Syracuse 7. 

Cornell 34, Columbia 7. 

West Virginia 17, Rutgers 0. 

Navy 63, South Carolina 0. 

Michigan 14, Chicago 0. 

Springfield 28, Massachusetts A. C. 
0. 

Pittsburgh 7, Washington & Jeffer- 
son 0. 

Union 20, Hobart 7. 

Williams 50, Wesleyan 14. 

Dickinson 7, Haverford 7. 

Amherst 14, Trinity 0. 

Northwestern 14, Purdue 0. 

Notre Dame 13, Indiana 10. 

Wisconsin 14, Illinois 9. 

Worcester P. I. 10, Rhode Island 
States 0. 

Middlebury 6, Vermont 0. 

Johns Hopkins 41, St. Johns 0. 

Bucknell 45, Gettysburg 0. 

Lehigh 7, Pennsylvania 7. 

Allegheny 0, Westminster 0. 

Kenyon 17, Western Reserve 14. 

Centre 49, Kentucky State 0. 

Rochester 7, Hamilton 0. 

Colgate 80, St. Bonaventure 0. 

Georgia Tech 35, Georgetown 6. 



Lewiston Journal 

AllMaine Eleven 



In spite of Saturday's disaster on 
the gridiron, Bowdoin has the satis- 
faction of placing five men on the 
mythical All-Maine eleven, as selected 
by the sport editor of the "Lewiston 
Journal." 

The following is the line-up of this 
team: 

Left end — Gibbons, Bowdoin. 

Left tackle — Guiney, Bates. 

Left guard — Stonier, Bates. 

Centre — Enholme, Colby. 

Right guard — Hussey, Maine. 

Right tackle — Dudgeon, Bowdoin 
(Captain). 

Right end— Pulsifer, Colby. 

Quarterback — Wiggin, Bates. 



236 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Left half back — A. Morrell, Bow- 
doin. 

Right half back — Smith, Maine. 
Full back — Turner, Bowdoin. 
The write-up of the individual se- 
lections contains some interesting 
notes of the Bowdoin team, which are 
printed below. 

"Harold Dudgeon, the Bowdoin 
captain, at right tackle, developed into 
a tearing, slashing tackle. He made 
an ideal leader for Bowdoin, a cool, 
intelligent player who sized up things 
about as they were. He'd make a 
good captain for the phantom eleven. 
He's equally good on defense and of- 
fense. 

"Replacements for the forwards are 
not difficult to find. 

"On the ends, Mickey Finnegan of 
Maine, Stan Perry and Wilfred Par- 
ent of Bowdoin and Gormley of Bates 
would be valuable. Parent, probably 
the most valuable of the lot, because 
of his speed and reach on the tie-up 
of a forward passing game. Parent 
would have been considered and never 
questioned for permanent end had he 
developed his defense more. 

"Al Morrell of Bowdoin kicked his 
way to fame. He was the best punter 
without question in Maine. He is a 
wonderful forward passer and has the 
faculty of throwing where the player 
will be, borrowed from his baseball. 
He carries the ball well, although not 
rugged. He punts close to 45 yards. 
In the Maine game he lifted one for 
60 yards over scrimmage. 

"Pick Turner of Bowdoin figured so 
prominently in the" Bowdoin scoring 
and defense in the three State games 
that he could not fail to be nominated. 
He is a power on defense, plugs the 
line, runs the ends and is big. 

"Backfield men in reserve would in- 
clude Joe Smith and Woodbury of 



According to the "London Sunday 
Express," Hodson, the principal of 
Brasenose College, Oxford, complained 
of a student's repeated absence from 
morning chapel. 

"It's too late for me," said the stu-' 
dent. 

"Too late?" said the astonished 
Hodson. "Seven o'clock is too late?" 

"Well," said the student, "I'm a 
man of regular habits. I can't sit up 
till seven. Unless I'm in bed by four 
or five I'm no good for the next day." 



Bowdoin at quarter; Davis of Bates 
at half; Small and Foster of Maine. 
These men are fast, are likely to turn 
tricks at any point in the game. 

"Joe Smith and Woodbury are drop 
kickers in addition. 

"Dahlgren and Bisson of Bowdoin 
through injuries did not appear often 
enough and in condition good enough 
to display their abilities. Newman 
Young of Maine has also been on the 
cripple list too much to develop." 



Y. M. C. A. Notes 



The president of the Y. M. C. A. 
ias appointed the following cabinet: 

President— Carroll S. Towle '22. 

Vice-President — Clyde T. Congdoi 
'22. 

Recording Secretary — Theodore W. 
Cousens '23. 

Treasurer — Karl R. Philbrick '23. 

Chairman Campus Service — Nor 
man W. Haines '21.. 

Chairman Community Service- 
George J. Cumming '21. 

Chairman Religious Activity — Jonn 
G. Young '21. 

The cabinet holds its meeting regu- 
larly every noon. 

There is a drive being carried on 
now for active members. For $1.50 
.•ou will receive cards which are good 
for one year and will entitle you to 
all the privileges in nearly every city 
association in the country. There is 
a man in every house and dormitory 
selling tickets. If you believe that 
the Y. M. C. A. is doing a good work, 
join and give the organization your 
support. The membership ticket is 
worth much more than the $1.50 and 
every man should buy one not onlv 
for his own benefit but to help a very 
worthy cause. 



Brunswick-Born Books 



In an address before the Maine 
Library Association at Bangor recent- 
ly Professor Mitchell stated that 
"more books had been born in Bruns- 
wick than in any other Maine town." 
He narrated from the beginning the 
very early history of Brunswick in 
which the art of Indian fighting was 



much more highly cultivated than the 
art of letters. The chief event in 
Brunswick literary life was the found- 
ing of Bowdoin College. Three years 
after its founding Parker Cleaveland 
became a member of the faculty and 
in 1816 published his "Elementary 
Treatise on Mineralogy and Geology" 
which was styled "the most . useful 
work on mineralogy in our language" 
by a foregoing review. Then William 
Smith, professor of mathematics, pub- 
lished the first edition of his algebra 
in 1830. He afterwards wrote a num- 
ber of mathematical books, of which 
his "Differential and Integral Calcu- 
lus" is the one best known. 

About this same time Professor 
Thomas Upham published "Compila- 
tions of Intellectual Philosophy" which 
had a large circulation particularly in 
many colleges, being even translated 
into German and into Armenian for 
use in Roberts College in Turkey. 
Then followed "Treatment of the 
Will," "Manual of Peace," and many 
other books mostly of a religious 
nature. He wrote a number of poems 
under the title of "American Cottage 
Life," but probably the writings of his 
which will perpetuate his name the 
longest, are his hymns, many of which 
are in use today. 

William Allen, president of Bowdoin 
from 1820 to 1839, wrote many re- 
ligious books, and also a biographical 
dictionary and "A Collection of 10,000 
Words Not in Any English Diction- 
ary." 

Jacob Abbott, Bowdoin 1820, was 
the most prolific of any Brunswick 
writers, "turning off books at a ter- 
rific speed." He is the author of 180 
books, not including 31 more in colla- 
boration, making 211 in all. 

Hawthorne wrote part of his first 
novel, "Fanshawe," in Brunswick, and 
also some verse. Longfellow wrote 
many poems while in college, and 
while a professor at Bowdoin wrote 
"Outre Mer." 

Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote that 
most famous of all American books, 
"Uncle Tom's Cabin," in Brunswick. 

President Hyde wrote various books 
while he was the head of Bowdoin, 
which were a considerable addition to 
"Brunswick-born books," as was also 
Professor Henry Johnson's remarkable 
translation of "The Divine Comedy," 
the best in the English language. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



237 



ASSIGNMENTS 



ENGLISH HISTORY. 
History 5. 

Nov. 22. The English Manor. 
Nov. 24. Development of the Eng- 
lish Towns. 
Reading: 

Cheyney, Short History, pp. 195- 
204. 

Cheyney, Readings, Nos. 120-124. 
In addition each student will read 
one of the following selections: (The 
outlines for this reading may be 
turned in at the conference hour for 
the week beginning Nov. 29.) 

Cheyney, Industrial and Social His- 
tory of England, chs. I-II. 

Cunningham and McArthur, Out- 
lines of English Industrial History, 
chs. III-V. 

Traill, Social England, Vol. I, pp. 
429-490. 

Ashley, English Economic History, 
Middle Ages, ch. III. 

Bateson, Medieval England, chs. V, 
XI, XVII. 

Gibbins, Industrial History of Eng- 
land, pp. 10-67. 

Gross, The Gild Merchant, Vol. I, 
chs. ii-iv. 

Davis, England under the Normans 
and Angevins, ch. xix. 

Green, Short History of the Eng- 
lish People, ch. Ill, sections 4-7, ch. 
IV. section 4. 

Andrews, The Old English Manor, 
pp. 97-146. 

Pauli, Pictures of Old England, chs. 
vi, xii. 

Warner, Landmarks in English In- 
dustrial History, chs. iii-v. 

Cunningham, Growth of English In- 
dustry and Commerce. I. Bk. Ill, chs. 
i, ii, v. 

Cunningham, Growth of English In- 
dustry and Commerce. I. Bk. II, ch. 
vi; Bk. Ill, chs. iii-iv. 

Cheyney, Industrial and Social His- 
tory of England, chs. iii-iv. 



Reading : 

Hazen, pp. 169-186. 

Men will be responsible for the 
lectures and reading of the ninth week 
in the conferences of the tenth week. 



POLITICAL HISTORY OF THE 

UNITED STATES. 

History 9. 

Nov. 22. Hour Examination. 

Nov. 24. Jeffersonian Democracy, 
Part II. 

Reading: 

Bassett, Short History of the United 
States, pp. 300-321, 335-338. 

MacDonald, Documentary Source 
Book, Nos. 65, 69. 



H. C. EMERY '92, TREASURER OF 

COMMITTE IN RELIEF WORK 

IN CHINA. 



ECONOMICS. 

Assignments for the Week of Nov. 22. 

Economics 1. 

Conferences, Nov. 22, 24. Special 
Topic: Paper. 

Nov. 23. Materials, ch. 6 (cont.). 
Economics 9. 

Conferences, Nov. 22, 23,