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90352 



TIT 



ANNIVERSARY NUMBER 



. )p ion 




BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



VOL. LI. 



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 1921. 



Number 1 



The 50th Anniversary of 
The Bowdoin Orient 



For a college journal to be fifty 
years old is a distinction, and the 
College is very glad to extend its best 
wishes to the "Orient" upon its an- 
niversary. 

As one looks over the early issues 
of the "Orient" he is struck by the 
fact that in many details the College 
has changed veiy much; but that in 
all essential qualities it remains very 
much the same. Personally I cannot 
help feeling that there was much bet- 
ter writing in the early days than 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Medical School Bill 

Passes Both Houses 



Measure Now Awaits Governor's Sig- 
nature — School To Be Co- 
educational. 



On Tuesday morning, March 29, the 
Maine House of Representatives sub- 
stituted the bill establishing the Maine 
Medical School for the unanimous re- 
port, ought not to pass, of the joint 
Judiciary and Financial Committees. 
The bill was passed to be engrossed 
and $50,000 for each of two years for 
the support of the school was ap- 
propriated. On Wednesday morning 
the Senate concurred with the House. 
An amendment was also passed ad- 
mitting women to the school. 
(Continued on Page 2) 



PRINCETON AND PENNSYLVANIA 

BOTH WIN BY NARROW MARGINS 



Jinx Follows Team On First Trip — Both Games Lost 
By One Score — Columbia Game Cancelled. 



Launching of The Bowdoin 



The 110-ton auxiliary schooner, 
"The Bowdoin," which is being built 
at East Boothbay for Donald B. Mac- 
Millan, who will lead an expedition 
to Baffin Land, starting from Boston 
in July, will be launched at noon, 
April 9. It will be christened by Miss 
May Fogg of Freeport, a niece of Mr. 
MacMillan and now a senior at the 
Sargent School for Physical Training 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Calendar 



April 7 — Presentation of "Little 
Lord Fauntleroy" at Cumberland 
Theatre, for Wellesley Fund. 

April 9-10 — Preliminary matches of 
golf tournament. 

April 9 — Informal dance in the 
Gymnasium. 

April 9 — Launching of Professor 
MacMillan's schooner, "The Bow- 
doin," at East Boothbay. 

April 16— Baseball: Fort Williams 
at Brunswick. 

April 19 — Baseball: Bates at Lew- 
iston (exhibition). 

April 27 — Baseball: Amherst at 
Amherst. 



In spite of excellent playing Bow- 
doin lost the two first games of the 
baseball season. On Wednesday the 
team played at Princeton and lost in 
the ninth inning, the final score be- 
ing 4-3. The game scheduled with 
Columbia University for Thursday 
was postponed until Friday because 
of the weather and was finally can- 
celled because of wet grounds. Sat- 
urday the University of Pennsylvania 
won over Bowdoin, the score again be- 
ing 4-3. 

Bowdoin scored her first run against 
Princeton in the first inning. W. 
Needelman started things. Smith 
singled and Needelman scored on two 
sacrifice hits. Needelman again 
scored in the third and fifth innings. 
Princeton scored her first run in the 
last of that inning. The Tigers came 
through again in the sixth when Cook 
scored from second. McNamara hit 
to short and in trying for a double 
play W. Needelman threw wild. 

In the seventh Fisher walked and 
was sacrificed to second. Gotschalk 
sent him to third, and he came in on a 
single. Fisher drew a pass in the 
ninth, and sacrificed to second. Got- 
schalk was hit by Walker, Jefferies 
popped to third, but Morrill fumbled 

(Continued on Page 3) 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Musical Clubs Make 

Trip to New York 



The Bowdoin Musical Clubs pre- 
sented a concert in New York City on 
Saturday evening, March 26. The 
concert was the feature of an enter- 
tainment given by the Liberty Bank 
Club to the new New York City 
Trust Company of which Harvey D. 
Gibson '02 is president. The concert 
was given in the Grand Ball Room of 
the Hotel Astor. 

Preceding the concert a banquet 
was served. About 600 guests were 
present. The concert was in the main 
the same as that given in Brunswick 
two weeks ago. The program began 
with a group of Bowdoin songs, each 
club then put on numbers, Sprince, 
Medic '23, played a banjo solo, and 
quartets from each club gave special 
selections. Every number was en- 
thusiastically received. The surprise 
number of the program was a solo 
with the Glee Club sung by Mr. Gib- 
son. The program showed that 
Turgeon '23 was to sing Coombs' 
"Skipper of St. Ives," but when the 
time came for this number, Mr. Gib- 
son was requested to render the solo 
which during his college days he had 
sung with the Glee Club. He had 
served in a triple capacity then, be- 
ing leader of the Glee Club, leader of 
the Mandolin Club, and manager. As 
the speaker who introduced him so 
aptly said, "He showed then the 
ability to lead which he has displayed 
since in his financial career." Mr. 
Gibson quickly recovered from his 
surprise and sang the solo beautifully. 
Round after round of aplpause filled 
the room when he had finished and he 
was compelled to return to the stage 
and sing the number through again. 

Following the concert and banquet 
was a dance. The concert was in 
every way a success, for after weeks 
of consistent training the members of 
the clubs were at the height of their 
development for this year. Too much 
praise cannot be given to Professor 
Wass who has spent hours with the 
Glee Club, nor to the leaders and the 
manager. 

There will probably be three more 
concerts this season, in Lewiston, 
Portland, and Bath. This season will 
certainly be remembered as one of the 
very best in the history of the clubs. 



Worcester Alumni Meeting 



The Worcester Alumni Association 
met on March 29th at Hotel Warren 
with about twenty-five members 
present. L. M. Erskine '07, presided 
at the dinner, and short informal 
speeches were made by various mem- 
bers of the association. Mr. O. P. 
Cook '85 gave an interesting and vivid 
account of the famous thirteen-inning 
baseball game when he was in College 
in which Bowdoin beat Colby 7 to 6. 
Chester A. Bavis '07 was elected 
president for the ensuing year. 

President Sills represented the Col- 
lege and spoke of the work of the 
College during the year. 



Maine Medical School 

(Continued from Page 1) 



The news of the substitution of the 
bill for the unfavorable report came 
as a surprise to the many friends of 
the Maine Medical School, who had 
almost given up hope. It was ex- 
pected that after a century of active 
service the school would be allowed 
to die for lack of funds. Bowdoin 
College could no longer assume the 
yearly deficit and provide the ad- 
ditional money necessary to keep the 
school in Class A standing. Now it 
appears that there is still hope. The 
measure awaits the signature of Gov- 
ernor Baxter as the "Orient" goes to 
press. 

The measure was taken from the 
table by Representative Mcllheron of 
Lewiston, who yielded to Representa- 
tive Hussey of Blaine. The latter out- 
lined the history of the school. "It 
must not be thought that Bowdoin is 
not interested in this proposition," he 
said, "but it has become necessary for 
her to give up the Medical School and 
devote her entire energies to the arts 
and sciences. Not only is Bowdoin 
interested in a moral manner but she 
is decidedly so in a material way, for 
she has offered to the State buildings, 
equipment, and endowments for the 
establishment of the Maine Medical 
School in Portland, the logical loca- 
tion for the school, valued at more 
than $100,000." While the trustees 
of Bowdoin are willing to turn over 
the endowments, Mr. Hussey said that 
it would be necessary to secure the 
opinion of the Supreme Court before 



it could be done. He did not question 
that it would be possible. He said 
that 800 of the 3,200 graduates of 
the school now live in Maine and that 
250 were practicing in small com- 
munities. 

Representative Gerrish of Lisbon 
presented figures concerning the 
actual running expenses of the school. 
Moody of York and Wiseman of Lew- 
iston supported the motion. Dodge of 
Portland questioned whether the State 
would not be overburdened with an- 
other institution of learning. He 
doubted that the existence of the 
school brought many doctors to rural 
communities. Brewster of Portland 
also opposed the bill. 

The vote was 98 to 44 in favor of 
the bill. Both of the Brunswick rep- 
resentatives, Masse and Woodruff, 
voted "yea." 

Representative Wing of Auburn 
proposed an amendment to the bill, 
providing that it should be open to 
women students, and the amendment 
was adopted. 



Launching of 

"The Bowdoin" 

(Continued from Page 1) 



at Cambridge, Mass. The party on 
the craft as it goes down the ways 
will include Governor Baxter, a class- 
mate of MacMillan at Bowdoin in 
1898, and President and Mrs. K. C. M. 
Sills. 

"The Bowdoin" will remain at East 
Boothbay to be rigged and will then 
be given a tryout along the New Eng- 
land coast. The vessel will be 
equipped in Boston and will sail July 
6. One of the main objects of the 
expedition will be to explore and chart 
the thousand of miles of the western 
shores of Baffin Land of which virtual- 
ly nothing is known. Mr. MacMillan 
has just returned from a lecture tour 
to the Pacific coast. 

It is hoped and expected that many 
of the alumni and undergraduates of 
the college will take advantage of the 
opportunity to see the launching of 
this ship. In spite of the time of year 
the roads are in good condition. 
Boothbay is easily reached by auto- 
mobile from Portland and Bangor, for 
it is on the Atlantic Highway. From 
Portland the road runs through 
Brunswick, Bath, and Woolwich; from 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Bangor through Belfast and Rock- 
land. It is merely a question whether 
the alumni are awake to the import- 
ance of this event. There should be 
a good representation from the College 
to put enthusiasm into the affair, to 
show Mac, as he is called, and his 
many friends outside the college that 
his Alma Mater is behind him heart 
and soul in this great undertaking 
of his. "The Bowdoin" is going 
north. Let's give her our support. 



Baseball Trip 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Bolting's grounder long enough to let 
in the winning run. 

W. Needelman starred for Bowdoin, 
securing three hits out of the seven 
in five times at bat, and securing all 
three runs. 

Box score and summary: 

PRINCETON 

ab r bh po a e 

Mcllvaine, cf 1 1 

Botting, cf 3 1 

Cooke, lb 4 1 2 9 1 

Watson, rf 2 

Gorman, rf 1 1 

McNamara, If 4 1 1 

Gilroy, 3b 3 1 1 1 2 1 

Fisher, 3b 2 2 10 2 2 

Cooper, 2b 2 1 1 

Keyes, 2b 1 

Gotschalk, ss 3 2 3 1 1 

Jefferies, p 4 2 2 

Totals 29 4 8 27 8 7 

BOWDOIN 

ab r bh po a e 

W. Needelman, 2b 5 3 3 3 1 1 

Smith, 3b 3 1 3 2 

A. Morrell, ss 2 1 6 5 2 

Hill, If 2 1 

D. Needelman, rf 4 1 

Holmes, cf 4 

Clifford, lb 4 2 8 1 

Handy, c 4 4 

Walker, p 4 2 

Totals 32 3 7* 26 11 3 

*Two out when winning run was scored. 

Iinnings 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

Princeton 1 1 1 1—4 

Bowdoin 1 1 1 0—3 

Two-base hit, McNamara. Stolen bases, 
Fisher, Mcllvane. Sacrifice hits, Keyes 2, 
Morrell 2. Hill 2, Smith. Base on balls, by 
Walker 4. Struck out, by Jefferies 9. by 
Walker 4. Double plays, Morrell to Clifford 2 ; 
Smith to W. Needelman. Passed ball, Fisher. 
Wild pitch, Walker. Hit by pitched ball, by 
Walker (Gatschalk). Time, 2 hours. Umpires, 
Casey and Fi 



U. of P. Game a Whizz 

In a hard fought game Bowdoin 
again down to defeat to a score of 
4-3. The game was played on Frank- 
lin Field, Philadelphia, and had it not 
been for the Quaker rally in the 
eighth the game would probably have 
gone on for extra innings. Flinn 
pitched a wonderful game, striking 



out six men. Bowdoin got twelve 
hits to Penn's six. W. Needelman 
sent out the longest hit of the year 
to deep center for a homer in the 
seventh, bringing in Handy. 

Penn made a flying start, scoring 
three runs in the first inning. The 
game seemed a settled affair. But 
in the third Smith scored, and in the 
seventh Needelman smashed out his 
home run, tying the score. In the 
eighth Penn again added a score, and 
the game ended 4-3. 

McNichol started the game by 
waiting for Flinn to give him four 
bad ones. Shriver went out on strikes, 
McNichol stole second, Conrey sent a 
hot liner to short. McNichol was 
playing far off the bag and had al- 
most reached third before Morrell got 
the ball. Morrell hesitated long 
enough so that when he tossed to first 
to catch Conrey, the runner was safe 
and McNichol scored. Mouradian 
walked, and a Texas leaguer from 
Harvey, coupled with a chase of 
Harvey between first and second, 
brought in two more runs. The 
Quakers were firmly entrenched. 

Bowdoin wasted two perfectly good 
hits in the first round and did not 
score until the third. Smith doubled 
to deep left field and scored on Hill's 
single to short center. Bowdoin hit 
safely in every inning but could not 
get a man beyond second base. 

But the seventh tied the score. 
Handy opened with a single. Flinn 
fanned. Needelman then sent out the 
longest hit of the year to deep center 
field for a homer. Harvey, the Penn 
center-fielder, started to run with the 
crack of the bat, but the ball sailed 
far over his head and he finally re- 
covered it at the gate in deep center 
field. Smith singled to right, and Hill 
followed with his second two-bagger 
into the right field stands. Things 
looked pretty promising for Bowdoin 
when Mouradian, the Penn left- 
fielder, made a beautiful catch of D. 
Needelman's long fly. This catch was 
one of the sensations of the game. It 
was a real "lucky seventh" for Bow- 
doin. 

McNichol opened the eighth with a 
very scratchy hit to Morrell, who was 
slow in sending to first. Shriver and 
Conrey fanned, but Handy lost the 
third strike on Conrey, McNichol took 
second and Conrey had to be thrown 



out at first. McMullin, who took 
Myer's place, followed with a line hit 
to left field, on which McNichol tal- 
lied from second with the score that 
broke the tie. Flinn threw out Moura- 
dian and Penn scored no more. 

Bowdoin's hitting and pitching were 
remarkable. Bowdoin got one homer 
(W. Needelman), three doubles (Hill 
2, Smith), and eight singles. But the 
safeties were widely separated. Flinn 
fanned six men. 

Box score and summary: 

PENN 

ab r bh po a e 

McNichol, 2b 3 2 1 3 4 1 

Shriver, ss 4 1 2 4 

Conrey, lb 4 1 1 8 2 

Myers, rf 2 2 1 

McMulIen, rf 2 1 

Mouradian, If 3 1 6 

Harvey, cf 3 1 1 

Sullivan, 3b 3 1 1 

Hinkle, 3b 

Maher, c 3 4 

Sheffey, p 3 1 2 2 

Totals 30 4 6 27 14 3 

BOWDOIN 

ab r bh po a e 

W. Needelman, 2b 5 1 2 2 2 

Smith, 3b 5 1 2 2 

Morrell, ss 4 1 1 6 2 

Hill, If 4 3 2 

D. Needelman, rf 4 

Clifford, lb 4 112 1 

Handy, c 4 1 2 5 2 1 

Flinn, p 3 1 2 

"Davis 1 

Totals 38 3 12 25 15 3 

*Batted for Flinn in ninth inning. 

Iinnings 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

Penn 3 1 x— 4 

Bowdoin 1 2 0—3 

Two-base hits : Hill 2, Smith. Home run : 
W. Needelman. Double play: Myers to Con- 
rey. Stolen Bases: Conrey, Sullivan, Mc- 
Nichol. Left on bases: Bowdoin 8, Penn 4. 
First base on balls: Off Flinn 2. Struck out, 
by Flinn 6, by Sheffey 4. Wild pitch, Flinn. 
Passed balls. Handy 4. Umpire, Baetzel. Time, 
1 hour, 36 minutes. 



Conference of 

Liberal Students 



Notices of a conference for the 
establishment of an Intercollegiate 
Liberal Society to be held at Harvard 
on April second and third were re- 
ceived too late for publication in the 
last "Orient" before the holidays. In- 
vitations were issued by the Univer- 
sity Liberal Club to all colleges in 
the East to send delegates to the con- 
ference. 

The principles of the organization 
are "the cultivation of the open mind; 
the development of an informed stu- 
dent opinion on social, industrial, po- 
litical, and international questions; 
the encouragement of inquiry; the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



presentation of facts; subservience to 
no isms; and the education of the col- 
lege youth in the problems of citizen- 
ship." In scope the organization 
plans to national and affiliated with 
similar groups abroad, "with a view 
to an eventual international league of 
college liberals." 

Among the speakers on the pro- 
gram were Senator Ladd of North 
Dakota, President McCracken of Vas- 
sal-, Walter Lippmann of the "New 
Republic," and Francis Neilson of the 
"Freeman." At the time the notices 
were received representatives of 
twelve colleges had already signified 
their intention of being present. 



50th Anniversary 

(Continued from Page 1) 



there is today, and that the old classi- 
cal training was seen to good effect 
in the style of "Orient" editors and 
contributors. 

The "Orient" has been effective in 
bringing about many changes and re- 
forms in the College, both in its in- 
ternal and in its external administra- 
tion. It can be still very effective in 
the future if more of the alumni will 
write for it, and if the undergraduates 
will express themselves clearly and 
frankly. 

As a newspaper, the "Orient" has 
never been better than it was last 
year, which may be consoling when 
one reflects on the deterioration of 
style. 

The College would be very much 
poorer without the "Orient," and I 
always urge the alumni to read it 
carefully. Loyalty that is based on 
sentiment without knowledge is al- 
ways vapid and airy; but an alumnus 
who reads his "Orient" regularly and 
knows what the College is doing can 
base his devotion to Bowdoin upon an 
intelligent understanding of what the 
College is about. 

KENNETH C. M. SILLS. 



GOLF TOURNAMENT 



The qualifying round of the golf 
tournament will be played this week, 
on Friday and Saturday. The entries 
may be given to Pickard '22 at the 
Theta Delta Chi house on or before 
Thursday. The entrance fee is 
twenty-five cents. 



Professor Shorey 
Lectures on Aristophanes 
and Dante 



Professor Paul Shorey of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, delivered to the 
students of Bowdoin College, two in- 
teresting and scholarly lectures on 
Aristophanes and Dante on the nights 
of March 21 and 22, respectively. 
Professor Shorey is beyond a doubt 
one of the most eminent classical 
scholars in this country. He has 
studied at the Universities of Har- 
vard, Leipzig, Monn, and Munich, and 
has received honorary degrees from 
numerous colleges and universities of 
the United States. He was for a 
time the head of the Greek depart- 
ment at Bryn Mawr College, a 
lecturer at Johns Hopkins University, 
and the Roosevelt professor at the 
University of Berlin. He is the editor 
of "Classical Philology," and the 
president of the American Philology 
Association, and also the author of 
many books on the classics. Pro- 
fessor Shorey has fought all his life 
for the classics and what they mean. 
It was very fitting, therefore, that the 
Winthrop fund, which was left to 
Bowdoin to be used to show the col- 
lege what the classics mean and what 
they stand for, should this year be 
employed in obtaining such an in- 
teresting and leading scholar as a 
lecturer to the College. 

On the evening of the 21st Profes- 
sor Shorey lectured on Aristophanes. 
In this lecture Professor Shorey as- 
sumed the spirit of the plays of the 
great Greek dramatist, and did this 
so successfully that time after time 
throughout the evening Memorial 
Hall was filled with bursts of up- 
roarious laughter and applause. 
Especially were his translations (two 
of which were more or less free) of 
passages from the ancient plays, ap- 
preciated. 

The Attic comedy, Professor 
Shorey explained, was a unique 
phenomenon in the literature of the 
world. It was a peculiar mixture of 
social, political, and literary satire, 
and of the filth of the licentious wor- 
ship of Bacchus. The rites and cere- 
monies attending the worship of the 
ancient god of the still and wine- 
press, were filled with scurrilous 



license happily unknown at the 
present day. The Attic comedy, not- 
withstanding its vile qualities, lived 
on and developed through the age of 
Pericles, and through the following 
and more quieting ages of Athens. 
It probably reached its greatest 
height during the Peloponnesian War. 
Unfortunately many of the modern 
classical scholars pay much more at- 
tention to studying the causes and 
conditions that produced these come- 
dies than to the comedies themselves. 
A study of the comedies of Aristo- 
phanes show that, as a whole, they 
are composed of two elements, the one 
being a gross and vile indecency, the 
other an exuberance of wit and non- 
sence. This latter delightful quality 
swept away the first unpleasing one, 
and made the Greek audience highly 
appreciative of the plays. But prob- 
ably the novels which lay on the table 
of a young American girl, would 
shock the ancient Greeks more than 
the plays of Aristophanes shock us. 
Nothing, however, loses its point so 
quickly as a local gibe or hit, and so 
many of the keenest bits . of wit are 
unappreciated today. 

Taken as a whole an Attic comedy 
is merely a happy thought, a topsy- 
turvey fancy. A large part of the 
comedy consisted, of course, of argu- 
ments against the happy thought — 
this constituted the plot. Very ex- 
cellent examples of this are the 
comedies of "The Birds," "The Frogs" 
(which is not the National drama of 
France), and "The Wasps." The sec- 
ond half of the comedy was always 
of a looser and lighter form, (Pro- 
fessor Shorey's lecture, he asserted,) 
was composed on the same plan). The 
hymns and topical songs inter- 
spersed throughout the comedies, of 
which Professor Shorey read several 
translations, were screamingly funny. 
These comedies did not, however, meet 
with the approval of all the Greeks. 
Aristotle thought them nonsense, and 
from Plutarch to Pope there has been 
a widespread contempt for Aristo- 
phones. There was no appreciation, 
or if it existed at all it was very 
slight, fo r the "happy thoughts," for 
the opprobrious farce, and for his 
higher flights of fancy. 

The literary talent of Athens was 
quite conservative, today the literary 
talent of the world is radical. Thus 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Aristophanes was forced to swim 
against the tide. He was a brave 
mortal, even daring to satirize Peri- 
cles, and to lampoon the profiteers and 
ward-bosses of his time. He was 
such a fiery pacifist, as you can see 
in his drama, "The Place," that his 
propaganda would make our greatly- 
advertised Bolshevik and I. W. W. 
propaganda appear as skim milk and 
altogether baby blue in contrast. Even 
though there are vast differences be- 
tween Aristophanes and the modern 
dramatists, the age of Pericles is 
much nearer to us in its spirit than 
the sixteenth century or the Middle 
Ages, so that the people of the 
twentieth century are capable of a 
real and whole-hearted enjoyment of 
the comedies of Aristophanes. 

Professor Shorey's second lecture, 
the one on Dante, was Bowdoin's ob- 
servance of the 600th anniversary of 
Dante's death. 

Signor Verrena, the Italian Vice- 
Consul at Portland, was present as 
the representative of the Italian Gov- 
ernment. 

Bowdoin College has a special 
claim and right to observe this an- 
niversary, for two of the three great 
English translations of the "Divine 
Comedy" have been by Bowdoin pro- 
fessors. The first of these transla- 
tions, the one by Henry Wadsworth 
Longfellow, both a Bowdoin graduate 
and professor, gained for itself inter- 
national reputation. The other trans- 
lation by Henry Johnson, which was 
made when he was a professor at the 
college, has also won international 
fame and appreciation because of its 
faithfulness to the spirit of the "Di- 
vine Comedy," and because of its in- 
trinsic beauty. Bowdoin has still an- 
other claim to its celebration of 
Dante's death, in that it was one of 
the first institutions in this country 
to teach the Italian language. In- 
struction in Italian was first given at 
Bowdoin by Longfellow and has con- 
tinued down to the present day. 

Professor Shorey dealt particularly 
with Dante as a poet. Dante's "Di- 
vine Comedy" was a history of the 
world in that it was a history of the 
human spirit. In reading the "Divine 
Comedy" one is constantly impressed 
with the quantity of things, with the 
prodigious list of names. Many poets 



have likened the "Divine Comedy" to 
a Gothic Cathedral. Certainly it is 
as complex and as beautiful. 

Underneath it all, Dante was un- 
deniably a great humorist. It is only 
his poetical caprice that made him 
deal with the awful and horrible de- 
tails of hell. Again and again we see 
Dante as a humorist triumph over 
Dante as a mediaeval theologian. 

It is inevitable that the "Divine 
Comedy" should be compared to 
Pilgrim's Progress," for both these 
masterpieces are allegories. However, 
one never quite believes in the 
allegory of "Pilgrim's Progress," 
while the historic characters of burn- 
ing flesh and blood make the "Divine 
Comedy" a living book. Carlyle 
claimed that there was no book quite 
as moral as the "Divine Comedy," 
that it was the very essence of 
Christianity. 

"The Divine Comedy," however, al- 
ways has and always will defy ade- 
quate translation into the English 
language. The sheer loveliness of its 
sound, the beauty of its musical ef- 
fects and language can not be 
brought out in this language. The 
richness of the ingenious scheme of 
verse and the triple rhyme are also 
lost in the English language. The 
chief difficulties of Dante's rhymes 
are that they consist of eleven 
syllables, and that the rhymes are 
double. When this versification is 
carried out in our language it seems 
strained. 

Probably the key to Dante's char- 
acter is his emotionalism. His whole 
nature is summed up in the line, "I 
love and hate, and it tortures my 
spirit." Dante lived at a very ex- 
citing period of the world's history, 
and was able to give full play to his 
emotions. He lived among the con- 
stant broils of Florence, and during 
the war between the Papacy and the 
Empire. He was banished from his 
beloved Florence for twenty years, so 
that there was much to justify his 
hate and indignation towards the 
world. He took part in many move- 
ments of the day, and even then, like 
certain people of today, railed against 
those wanton women who displayed 
their "unkerchiefed bosoms to the 
gaze of men." Yet, as his hate was 
bitter, his tenderness was of ex- 
quisite softness and sweetness. 



Dante was undoubtedly one of the 
world's two or three greatest artists 
in words, probably he was the great- 
est. The vividness and the pictures- 
queness of his words and phrases, and 
the weath of his similes have even 
tempted artists to picture passages 
from his works. His psychological 
imagery is worth a special study by. 
itself. Many of his single lines are 
exquisite and filled with great en- 
chantment and charm, but these 
glorious lines are still more alluring 
in their proper setting. 

These are the things that made 
Dante immortal. His works and his 
fame verify the lines of Keats. 

"A thing of beauty is a joy forever. 
Its loveliness increases, it will never 
Pass into nothingness." 

(F. K.) 



The Bear Skin 



The Bowdoin "Bear Skin," which 
made its initial appearance at the 
time of the Sophomore Hop, is to have 
its second issue on Ivy Day, June 3. 
The first issue was handicapped by 
lack of time for preparation. In fact, 
there were only three weeks between 
the day the Student Council voted to 
have this paper and the day the 
Sophomore Hop number went to press 
in final form. 

It seems we have much more time 
for the next issue, but there is never 
any time to lose. The board is ready 
to receive contributions from under- 
graduates and Alumni. The draw- 
ings must be in before May 5 and 
literary material before May 10. 

In order to make the "Bear Skin" 
an established institution here at 
Bowdoin it must receive support from 
the student body as a whole. There 
must be a lot of. humor, distinctly 
Bowdoin and otherwise, which 
escapes the observation of the men on 
the board. 

Besides sending contributions, the 
Alumni can help the paper along by 
subscribing to the next issue. The 
price is fifty cents. Advertising is 
also wanted. Let's make this a Bow- 
doin magazine, not a magazine pub- 
lished by a few students. 

RYO TOYOKAWA, 

Manager. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Edward B. Ham '22 Editor-in-Chief 

F. King Turgeon '23 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

George H. Quinby '23 Intercollegiate News 

George T. Davis '24 Alumni Department 

Fredric S. Klees '24 Faculty Notes 

J. William Rowe '24 Athletics 

P. Dennison Smith '24 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
W. R. Ludden '22 F. A. Gerrard '23 

R. L. McCormack '22 K. R. Philbrick '23 
V. C. McGorrill '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 
Eben G. Tileston '22 Business Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
he given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $3.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 15 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials only; the Managing 
Editor for news and make-up; the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 

Vol. LI. April 6. 1921. No. 1 

Entered at Post Office in Brunswick as 
Second-Class Mail Matter. 



OEDitotial 

In this anniversary number of the 
"Orient," it is the particular privilege 
of the present board of editors to be 
able to extend its hearty greetings to 
Marcellus Coggan '72 of the first 
board. Mr. Coggan is the only living 
editor of those five enterprising mem- 
bers of the class of 1872 who had the 
initiative and the ability to establish 
the "Orient" and to start it on its 
successful course of the past fifty 
years. 



The Bowdoin "Orient," 1871-1921. 

With this issue the Bowdoin 
"Orient" is celebrating its semi-cen- 
tennial anniversary. The first num- 
ber, so different in its personal quality 
from the matter-of-fact record of 
news today, made its appearance on 
April 3, 1871, fifty years ago last 
Sunday. During these fifty years the 
"Orient" has undergone change after 
change in order to keep pace with the 
times. 

In the seventies the dominant char- 
acter was that personal touch which 



entered into nearly every sentence of 
the paper. As time went on, this was 
gradually, very gradually, lost. It was 
still a prominent element in the 
"Orient" during the fifteen years 
when the paper was appearing with 
the fanciful cover introduced in 1884. 
The change has become more and 
more noticeable in the volumes of the 
twentieth century in that we have be- 
come accustomed to consider small 
personal items in many ways crude 
and "countrified." 

Fifty years ago the editors were 
producing an unusually readable col- 
lege paper, replete with a pleasant 
rippling humor (rarely of an up- 
roarious nature) which we seem to 
avoid today as something insipid and 
colorless. At the present time the 
editors are striving to record every 
item of news accurately, but the 
literary quality of college papers in 
general has suffered somewhat on ac- 
count of the present day style of 
journalistic writing which so rarely 
reveals humor or personal interest. 

The first "Orient" begins with three 
pages of editorials, followed by three 
more of locals, corresponding to the 
campus news of today. There was an 
Alumni Record of three columns and 
then over three pages of remarkably 
well selected exchanges. 

A number of notes from this first 
number are quoted below, showing not 
only the personal quality of the paper 
but also that style which was in those 
days recognized as humorous. 

"The 'Williams Review' hopes 'The 
Orient' will not rise before the sun 
or shine too bright.' " 

"Next term Plato's Phaedo is an 
optional study for the juniors. Prob- 
ably but few of the class will study 
it." 

"Will the memorial hall be finished 
before '72 graduates?" 

"One of the Seniors recently under- 
took to advance the prospects of his 
coal fire by an application of kerosene 
oil. Although no funerals have taken 
place in that class, the gyrations of 
said Senior's stove proved that the 
above plan is neither sound in theory 
nor safe in practice." 

"Prof. Perry, the author of the text 
book in political economy which is 
used this term, has failed to convince 
all of the utility of his theory on the 
free trade question." 



"The raising of the walks on the 
college grounds was a most excellent 
idea. They are now high and all the 
more likely to be dry." 

"The rumor which has been rife 
for several days that a certain mem- 
ber of the faculty had received a call 
to a professorship in Michigan, was a 
heartless hoax." 

"It is said that all the Seniors in- 
tend, when they graduate, to go into 
either law or matrimony." 

" '69 — Mr. C. A. Stephens seems de r 
termined to show that he can write 
something besides hunting stories, and 
so tells 'Our Young Folks,' this 
month, how he started to catch a coon 
but was overtaken by a meteor, which 
he describes with great care and in a 
wonderfully vivacious and interesting 
manner. He is going to tell in the 
next number 'How we Hung the May 
Baskets.' " 

"It is stated that while the Presi- 
dent of Harvard College gets $3,200 a 
year, the cook of the Parker House 
has $4,000." 

"The 'Madisonian' theatens that the 
funeral of three promising lads, chil- 
dren of Prof. will be attended, 

unless they desist from insulting the 
college students." 

"Rev. Dr. McCosh of Princeton Col- 
lege, has been lecturing against the 
anti-christian philosophies of the day, 
to large audiences. There were 
twenty-four conversions at Dartmouth 
College, during the past year." 

"Playing marbles is the favorite 
pastime among the Seniors at Yale 
this season." 

"Harvard has laid out a new ad- 
vanced course for those who desire 
more mathematics, thus elevating the 
whole standard of the college." 

For the first nine volumes of the 
"Orient" there was a board of editors 
which had no officers corresponding to 
the present editor-in-chief, managing 
editor, and so on. The first board con- 
sisted of five members of the class of 
1872: Marcellus Coggan, John G. Ab- 
bott, George M. Whitaker, Osgood W. 
Rogers, Herbert M. Heath. 

Frederick C. Stevens '81, the man- 
aging editor of the tenth volume 
(1880-81), was the first officer to be 
elected on the board. The head of 
the board was called the managing 
editor until the 25th volume (1895- 
I 96), of which John Clair Minot '96 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



was editor-in-chief. Until the be- 
ginning of volume 34 (1904-05) there 
was an assistant editor-in-chief, who 
served somewhat as the managing 
editor does today. During the next 
three volumes the editor-in-chief and 
business manager were the only 
officers. In volume 37 (1907-08) the 
assistant editor-in-chief was again an 
officer, but his title was changed to 
managing editor beginning with the 
issue of May 8, 1908. This system 
remained the same until last year, 
when the election of officers was 
turned over to the student body. 

During the first forty-one years of 
the existence of the "Orient," it was 
published by the "Lewiston Journal," 
but in April, 1912, the place of pub- 
lication was changed to the "Bruns- 
wick Record," owing to the easier ar- 
rangements for turning in copy. 

In the first years of the "Orient," 
the outside page was the first page 
of the editorials. The "Orient" ap- 
peared on October 1, 1884, for the 
first time with a special cover which 
was used until March 29, 1899. This 
cover, which would hardly appeal to 
the undergraduates of today, repre- 
sented the letters of "Bowdoin 
Orient" in the form of branches of a 
tree, with some thirty or forty birds 
flying about. The date was printed 
in elaborate type in the lower right- 
hand corner. Shortly after this cover 
had been discarded, the table of 
contents was printed on the outside 
page, in practically the same form as 
last year. 

During the first twenty-eight years 
of the "Orient," it was published 
every fortnight. Beginning in April, 
1899, the "Orient" was published 
weekly, owing to the fact that after 
the establishment of the "Quill," lit- 
erary articles were no longer printed 
in the "Orient." 

The "Orient" has changed very lit- 
tle in appearance since 1912 until 
last spring, when the table of con- 
tents was eliminated and regular 
news was started on the first page. 
This fall for the first time in the his- 
tory of the paper a three-column page 
has been used. Smaller type for copy 
and larger head-lines have also been 
introduced. These latest innovations 
have been made largely at the sug- 
gestion of Arthur G. Staples '82, edi- 
tor of the "Lewiston Journal," and 



editor of the 11th volume of the 
"Orient." 

At present the "Orient" is larger 
(on account of the recent innova- 
tions) that it has ever been before. 
To be sure, some of the special num- 
bers in former days, — when a Com- 
mencement "Orient" of fifty pages 
was no uncommon thing, — printed 
considerably more material than now, 
but at the present time we have the 
best facilities for publishing news 
each week that the "Orient" has yet 
had. 

In these fifty years the "Orient" 
has varied greatly in form and style, 
but whether or not it has been im- 
proved by the different boards, is a 
question for a reader to decide for 
himself. However much we neglect 
the simple wit and human interest of 
the "Orient" of the seventies in our 
desire for cold accurate facts, surely 
we can but admire the accomplish- 
ment of those first editors in their 
attempt to approximate to the ideal 
college paper of their time. 



The Baseball Trip. 

The Bowdoin baseball nine has 
opened its 1921 season with more than 
ordinary success. This is the first 
time that Bowdoin has met Princeton 
since 1911, and the first time in its 
history that the White has clashed 
with the University of Pennsylvania 
on the diamond. The first game with 
Princeton in 1908 resulted in a 
triumph for Bowdoin by the score of 
5 to 2, but in the three games played 
subsequently, the Tigers registered 
easy victories. 

Both the games played last week 
proved beyond a doubt that Bowdoin 
has a team that must unquestionably 
make a fine record for itself this 
spring. Princeton and Pennsylvania 
were both forced to the limit to win 
these games, particularly the latter 
team, which had been so completely 
successful in its recent Southern trip. 
The fact that in this contest a Bow- 
doin man made the longest hit ever 
seen on Franklin Field (according to 
the "Boston Herald") is something of 
which we all can well be proud. After 
this performance by the White 
against two large universities, let the 
other Maine colleges dismiss surplus 
confidence, and prepare well for the 
State series! 



The Recently-Received 
Gilbert Stuart Portraits 



Through the munificent bequest of 
the late Miss Mary J. E. Clapp of 
Portland, the college has just received 
two highly interesting portraits by 
Gilbert Stuart. These works — the 
likenesses of General Henry Alex- 
ander Scammell Dearborn and his 
first wife, Hannah Swett Lee, were 
by Miss Clapp's direction to remain 
in the keeping, during her lifetime, of 
Miss Dearborn, of Boston; Miss Dear- 
born, however, has disinterestedly 
waived her life claim, and permitted 
them to pass into the immediate 
possession of the college, and they ar- 
rived safely at the Walker Art Build- 
ing on March 17. 

General Dearborn was a prominent 
citizen of New England during the 
first half of the 19th century. Bom 
in 1783, at Exeter, New Hampshire, 
he was, at twenty, graduated from 
William and Mary College, studied 
law with Judge Story in Salem, Mass., 
and succeeded his father as Collector 
of the Port of Boston in 1812 — a post 
which he retained until 1829. A 
sufficiently detailed account of his 
career is to be found in Appleton's 
Cyclopedia of American Biography, 
which, somewhat abridged, runs as 
follows: he superintended the forts 
at Portland, and was appointed 
Brigadier-General of militia, com- 
manding the defences of Boston 
Harbor in 1812; was a member of the 
State constitutional convention of 
1820; of the State House of Repre- 
sentatives, 1829; of the State Senate, 
1830. He served in Congress from 
Dec. 5, 1831, till March 2, 1833; acted 
as Adjutant-General of Massachu- 
setts, 1834 to 1843, when he was re- 
moved for loaning the State arms to 
the State of Rhode Island to be used 
in the suppression of the Dorr Re- 
bellion. He served as Mayor of Rox- 
bury, 1847-51. He was a strenuous 
advocate of internal improvements, 
the construction of the Great Western 
Railroad of Massachusetts, and the 
tunneling of Hoosac Mountain being 
largely due to his labors. He was 
fond of horticulture and landscape 
gardening, and the cemeteries of Rox- 
bury and Mount Auburn owe much 
to his taste, industry and skill. He 
led a busy public life, yet his literary 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



activity was great, though few of his 
works have been published. Among 
these are "Memoir on the Black Sea, 
Turkey and Egypt," "Letters on the 
Internal Improvements and Com- 
merce of the West," and a "History of 
Navigation and Naval Architecture." 
General Dearborn was a close per- 
sonal friend of James Bowdoin, the 
son of Governor Bowdoin, who was 
Minister Plenipotentiary of the United 
States in Spain, 1805-8, and in Eu- 
rope amassed the collection of paint- 
ings and drawings of which he made 
Bowdoin College residuary legatee — 
a collection at that time "considered 
the finest in the country" (Ency. 
Brit.) "The Honorable James Bow- 
doin died in 1811, and his widow be- 
came the second wife of General 
Dearborn." The fact that the por- 
traits of James Bowdoin and Mrs. 
Bowdoin by Gilbert Stuart are in the 
collection of the college of course 
greatly enhances the interest, unusual 
in itself, of the acquisition of these 
Dearborn portraits. 

As to the characteristics of the 
works themselves — both figures are 
life-sized, and each figure is turned, 
three-quarters, each face almost fully 
to the front; the figure of Mrs. Dear- 
bom, which has the right shoulder 
advanced, is a completed half-length, 
extending to the frame; that of the 
General, with the left shoulder ad- 
vanced, is merged in the background 
above the frame. 

Mrs. Dearborn has a blooming com- 
plexion, and snapping dark brown 
eyes. Her hair, parted slightly to 
the right, is arranged with artfully 
unsymmetrical effect in flat curls 
down the brows, with a frill of curls 
about the coiffure on the crown and 
at the back of the head. An earring 
of carnelian, flat, nearly lozenge- 
shaped, bordered with pearls, echoes 
with its pink note the bloom of her 
cheeks. She wears a white dress of 
unspecified texture, close-fitting, un- 
girdled, and wrinkling across the body 
beneath the line of the bosom; the 
square-cut low neck and short puffed 
sleeves are trimmed with white ruch- 
ing, simply plaited. A red scarf hangs 
from the left shoulder to the frame, 
and emerges on the other side of the 
canvas to enwrap the right elbow. The 
background consists of two brown 
columns, rising from a parapet; 



against the central column is drawn 
up a curtain of a lighter, yellowish 
brown tone, with stiff cords depend- 
ing, an ornamented or weighted end 
of which is dumped naturalistically 
upon the parapet. The impression of 
this portrait as a whole is one of en- 
gagine vivacity, sparkling piquancy. 

The portrait of General Dearborn 
is darker, richer, mellower in tone. 
The complexion is of a slightly em- 
browned ruddiness. The face, smooth- 
shaven except for side whiskers, 
shows little modelling, since the 
planes are naturally lost in an all- 
pervading plumpness. The eyes are 
light brown, pleasant, placid. The 
hair mounds centrally over the fore- 
head in a careless mass of curl, such 
as one sees in pictures of Commodore 
Peary; an end of hair ribbon, scarce- 
ly more than suggested against the 
dark background, shows it is tied be- 
hind. The General has on a deep 
brown coat, with a handsome brown 
fur collar, above which, at breast and 
neck, show the edges of his elegant 
buff waistcoat, angled, lapel-fashion, 
but not turned down; and he wears a 
loosely knotted neckcloth that fills the 
V of the waistcoat. The background 
is a dark clouded brown, modulated, 
particularly about the right cheek, 
into gobelin blue. 

The two portraits together are ap- 
praised at $20,000. With them the 
college now possesses seven examples 
of the work of the master portraitist 
of American art. 

(H. E. A.) 



ences. 

Blackmar— pp. 523-537. 



Assignments 



ECONOMICS 2 
Week of April 11 

Seager— Chaps. 23. 
Materials — Chap. 7 (Section B — pp. 
299-340). 



ECONOMICS 4b 
Week of April 11 

Conference reports on the market- 
ing of beef, fish, and coffee. 
April 12 — Duncan, chs. 14, 15. 
April 14 — Duncan, ch. 16. 



ECONOMICS 8 
Week of April 11 

Topic — Growth of Unionism in the 
United States. Carlton, chs. 4, 5. 

Commons — History of Labour in the 
United States, esp. vol. 2. 

Hoxie — Trade Unionism, ch. 4. 

Groat — Organized Labour in Amer- 
ica, chs. 1, 6, 7. 

Adams and Sumner — Labor Prob- 
lems. 

Beard — The American Labor Move- 
ment. 

Class reports on Company Houses 
and Company Stores, and Pension 
Systems. 



ECONOMICS 6 
Week of April 11 

The Survey — April 2 and April 9. 
Semester essay reports in confer- 



GOVERNMENT 2 

Eighth Week, Ending Saturday, 
April 9 

Lecture XII — April 5. The State 
Executive. 

Lecture XIII.— April 7. State Ad- 
ministrative Organization. 

Assignment: 

Munro, Government of the United 
States, chaps. 30-31. 

Group A — Quiz section, Sat. 8.30. 

Group B — Quiz section, Fri. 1.30. 

Ninth Week, Ending Saturday, 

April 16. 

Lecture XIV.— April 12. Financial 
Administration. 

Lecture XV.— April 14. The 
Budget. 

Assignment : 

1. Munro, Government of the United 
States, chap. 32. 

2. Reports on library topics. 
Group A — Quiz section. 
Group B — Conferences. 



ENGLISH HISTORY 
(History 8) 
Ninth Week 

April 11— Lecture XVI. The French 
Recolution. 

April 13— Lecture XVII. England 
and Napoleon. 

Reading: 

Cheney— Short History, pp. 604-615. 

Cheney— Readings, Nos. 395, 396, 
401-404 and 40 pages from the fol- 
lowing: 

Robertson — England under the 
Hanoverians, pp. 357-488. 

Rose — William Pitt and Napoleon. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



9 



Rose— William Pitt and the Na- 
tional Revival. 

Rose — William Pitt and the Great 
War. 

Hall — British Radicalism, 1791- 
1797. 

Laprade — England and the French 
Revolution. 

Martineau — History of England, 
1800-1815. 

Stanhope — Life of Pitt. 

Creevey Papers. 

Buckingham — Memoirs of the 
Courts and Cabinets of George III. 

Massey — History of England in the 
Reign of George III. 

Hunt — Political History of England, 
vol. X. 

Broderick and Fotheringham — Po- 
litical History of England, vol. XI. 



EUROPE SINCE 1870 
(History 10) 
Ninth Week 

April 11— Lecture XVI. Turkey 
and the Balkans, 1856-1914, I. 

April 13— Lecture XVII. Turkey 
and the Balkans, 1856-1914, II. 

Reading: 

Hazen, pp. 615-655 and 40 pages 
from the following: 

Argyll — Eastern Question, vols. I 
and II. 

Petrovitch — Serbia. 

Whitman — Turkish Memories. 

Gibbons — New Map of Europe, chs. 
X-XIII. 

Marriott — The Eastern Question. 

Temperley — Serbia. 

Emin Ahmed — Development of 
Modern Turkey. 

Miller— The Balkans. 

Cassavetti — Hellas and the Balkan 
Wars. 

Villari — The Balkan Question. 

Odysseus — Turkey in Europe. 

Murray — Making of the Balkan 
States. 



HISTORY 12. 
Political History of the United States 

Lecture 16. April 11 — Last of the 
American Frontier. 

Lecture 17. April 12 — American 
Diplomacy 1856-1877. 

Reading : 

Bassett, 660-683, and 50 pages from 
the following: 

Turner, F. J. — Significance of the 
Frontier in American History (in 



American Historical Association An- 
nual Report, 1893). 

Oberholzer — History of the United 
States since the Civil War, I, chs. V- 
VI. 

Porter, P. P.— The West from the 
Census of 1880. 

Rhodes— United States (1877-1896), 
chs. I-X. 

Stanwood — History of the Presi- 
dency, chs. XXVI-XXVII. 

Bryce — The American Common- 
wealth, II, ch. LXV. 

Roosevelt — Autobiography, ch. V. 

Sparks — National Development, chs. 
II-X, XVIII. 

Powderly, T. V.— Thirty Years of 
Labor. 

Paxson — The Last American 
Frontier. 

Davis, J. P. — Union Pacific Railway. 

Seward, G. F. — Chinese Immigra- 
tion in Its Social and Economic 
Aspects. 



Alpha Delta Phi 

War Memorial 



An event of international interest 
took place recently at the Alpha Delta 
Club, 136 West 44th street, New York 
City, when a statue commemorating 
the American and Canadian members 
of the fraternity who gave up their 
lives in the Great War, was unveiled. 
The president of the Alpha Delta Phi 
Club, Walter C. Teagle, who is also 
president of the Standard Oil Com- 
pany, presided. Other speakers were 
Canon W. L. DeVries, Washington, 
D. C, vice-president of the fraternity; 
and Lewis Perry, headmaster of Phil- 
lips Exeter Academy. Three hundred 
members of the fraternity were pres- 
ent, including a large proporation of 
ex-service men. 

The statue is of bronze and is the 
work of Captain Robert Aitken. It 
represents two first lieutenants re- 
turning wounded from the front. The 
Alpha Delta Phi fraternity has chap- 
ters in Canadian colleges as well as 
in American, and one of the figures 
wears the uniform of the American 
army, the other that of the Canadian. 
They are supporting one another and 
at their feet lies a crushed German 
helmet. A fund is being subscribed 
among the alumni of the fraternity to 
provide each active chapter in the 



United States and in Canada with a 
replica of the statue. All of the 
speeches at the unveiling ceremony 
emphasized the spirit of the comrad- 
ship, understanding and friendship 
existing between the two countries. 



Biology Club Meeting 



The Biology Club held a meeting 
at the Alpha Delta Phi house on the 
evening of March 23 to initiate new 
members and to make plans for the 
spring. Five new men were taken 
into the club: M. O. Waterman '22, 
B. F. Brown '23, F. B. Hill '23, R. B. 
Love '23, W. P. Yemprayura '23. 

It was decided to take the annual 
spring field trip early some week end 
this term to Orr's Island. There was 
also discussion concerning an open 
lecture to be given under the auspices 
of the club by Mr. Herbert Jobe. It 
is expected that the next meeting will 
be held this month. 



dLampus jftetos 

William Angus '19, Frederick 
French '20, and Henry Lamb '20 were 
on the Campus just before the Easter 
vacation . 

Karl R. Philbrick '23, manager of 
the Masque and Gown, has made ar- 
rangements to present the Ivy play, 
"Stop Thief," at Camden on April 8, 
at Skowhegan and Augusta the week 
following, and at Westbrook on April 
22. 

Clarence Rouillard '24 was forced 
to be absent from College several 
days previous to vacation, because he 
was stricken with an attack of neu- 
ralgia in the twelfth nerve. 

Jere Abbott '20, now a student at 
the Harvard Graduate School, was on 
the Campus the week-end previous to 
the Easter vacation. 

"Woodrow Wilson: His Net 
Achievement," by Maurice S. Coburne, 
the essay which won honorable men- 
tion at the 1868 Prize Speaking, was 
printed in the Lewiston "Journal" for 
March 21, and was characterized as 
"indicating unusual maturity of 
thought, and of more than academic 
interest." 

In the Fine Arts Department of the 
Boston "Transcript" for March 24,. 
there appeared an article by F. S. 



10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Klees '24 on "Bowdoin's New 
Stuarts." 

On Thursday evening, March 31, at 
the invitation of the Bowdoin Chapter 
of Delta Upsilon, about twenty-five 
couples enjoyed dancing. The chaper- 
ones were Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Stetson. 

Coach Magee appeared before the 
Legislative hearing on the proposed 
boxing commission bill recently. 

The Bowdoin chapter of Sigma Nu 
sent Easter greetings to the other fra- 
ternities on the Campus and to the 
faculty. 



jFacultp Jl3ote$ 

Professor and Mrs. Glenn R. John- 
son are receiving congratulations over 
the birth of an eight-pound son on 
Wednesday, March 30, in Portland. 

Professor Alfred O. Gross spoke be- 
fore the Natural History Society of 
Portland on Monday evening, March 
28, on the subject of the Heron Colony 
at Sandy Neck. Last week he ad- 
dressed a meeting of the Men's and 
Boys' Club at Cumberland on Audubon 
Societies. On the evening of April 
6 he will speak in the Biology Lecture 
Room before the Brunswick Audubon 
Society on "Birds of Brunswick." 

A handsome Chelsea ship clock 
which has been purchased by Lincoln 
Lodge, F. and A. M., of Wiscasset, 
to be presented to Professor Donald 
B. MacMillan for him to take north 
in the schooner "Bowdoin" when he 
leaves on his expedition this summer, 
has been placed on exhibition in the 
store window of S. Holbrook of Wis- 
casset. 

Professor Orren C. Hormell gave a 
talk on City Management at the meet- 
ing of the Biddeford Rotary Club Fri- 
day, March 25th. 

Professor Warren B. Catlin spoke 
at the hearing before the Committee 
on Taxation of the Maine Legislature 
Tuesday afternoon in favor of the re- 
solve providing for a state income tax. 



alumni Department 

1899 — The New York newspapers 
have been giving much publicity to 
the wonderful Orthopedic surgical 
operation performed recently by Dr. 
Fred H. Albee, a native of Wiscasset, 
gi-aduate of Bowdoin in 1899 and Har- 
vard Medical School. A New York 
woman, a cripple for six years, will 



be made as "good as new." The oper- 
ation was based on the knowledge that 
bony structures weakened by frac- 
ture are reinforced by natural pro- 
cesses, and it was correctly assumed 
that a section of bone from the tibia 
being transferred to above the knee, 
the inlaid pieces would grow to 
natural proportions. 

1900— Albro S. Burnell, United 
States Consul at Lille, France, died 
recently, according to a message re- 
ceived by his relatives in Portland. 
Mr. Burnell graduated from Bowdoin 
in 1900. He was a member of the 
Beta Theta Pi fraternity. Following 
his graduation he was for six years 
a teacher in the government schools 
in the Philippines. In 1908 he be- 
came Vice-Consul at Barrankuila, Co- 
lumbia, and in 1912 he was trans- 
ferred to Rio Janeiro, Brazil. He had 
been in consular service in France 
for the past seven years. 

CLASS NOTES— 1900 

H. A. Beadle, principal, Brewer 
Normal School, Greenwood, South 
Carolina. 

C. S. Bragdon, principal, New 
Rochelle High School, New Rochelle, 
N. Y. 

H. S. Clement, superintendent of 
schools, Redlands, Calif. 

B. M. Clough, real estate broker 
and operator, treasurer of Clough & 
Maxim Co., Fidelity Building, Port- 
land, Me. 

H. W. Colb, dean, and professor of 
education, Tougaloo College, Touga- 
loo, Mississippi. 

R. S. Edwards, consulting chemical 
engineer, 30 Osborne road, Brookline, 
Mass.; 82 Devonshire street, Boston, 
Mass.; president and director, Bay 
State Refining Co., Boston, Mass. 

P. C. Giles, no information. 

H. H. Mamlen, president and gen- 
eral manager, Colonia Building and 
Development Co., Colonia, N. J. 

J. A. Hamlin, superintendent of 
schools, Dexter, Garland and Ripley 
district. Address, 68 Maple street, 
Dexter, Me. 

E. B. Halmes, rector St. Stephen's 
Church, Middlebury, Vt. 

E. L. Jordan, no information. 

J. F. Knight, assistant manager, 
Penobscot Fish Co., Rockland, Me. 

A. W. Levensaler, special agent in 
charge of New Hampshire, Bureau of 
Investigation, U. S. Department of 



Justice Office, Post Office Building, 
Concord, N. H. 

H. M. McCarty, secretary, Ameri- 
can Republics Corporation, 25 West 
43rd street, New York City. 

I. F. McCormick, head master, The 
Albany Academy, Albany, New York. 

F. B. Merrill, assistant cashier, 
Bethel National Bank, Bethel, Me. 

J. R. Parsons, no information. 

J. C. Pearson, chief, cement section, 
Bureau of Standards, Washington, 
D. C. 

W. V. Phillips, pulp and spool wood 
business, Orrington, Me., P. O. ad- 
dress, South Brewer, Me. 

E. B. Stackpole, in foreign trade 
department, National Association of 
Manufacturers, New York City. 



1915 — Robert P. Coffin has been ap- 
pointed to a teaching position in 
Wells College, Aurora, N. Y. He is 
finishing his Rhodes Scholarship term 
at Oxford this year, and his poems are 
appearing with frequency in Ameri- 
can and English magazines. 

1919 — It was recently announced in 
Lewiston that through a reorganiza- 
tion of the firm of E. S. Paul & Co., 
Shepley Paul '19 would be brought 
into active participation in the execu- 
tive end of the business. The com- 
pany will be incorporated under the 
name of E. S. Paul Co. and will con- 
tinue to carry on dry goods trade. 
Shepley Paul is one of the youngest 
business men in Lewiston. The "Lew- 
iston Journal" says, "He is very popu- 
lar and well schooled in the business, 
coming as he does of a family in 
which this particular kind of mer- 
chandizing is becoming traditional. He 
will have charge of the 'ready-to-wear 
section.' " Mr. Paul was a commis- 
sioned officer in the infantry during 
the war. 

1920 — The following notes have 
been sent to the "Orient" by Stanley 
M. Gordon, the class secretary: 

Miss Irma H. Emerson of Auburn, 
Maine, and Kenneth B. Coombs were 
married at Auburn, Maine, Dec. 29. 
Mr. Coombs is a teacher in St. Louis. 

McPartland, Justin S., is in the 
newspaper advertising business with 
J. P. McKinney & Son, 334 Fifth ave- 
nue, New York City. 

Smith, Samuel A., is reporter for 
A. G. Dunn & Co., Boston, Mass. 

Moses, Leland H., is a Deputy Col- 
lector in the Internal Revenue Service 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



11 



at Lawrence, Mass. 

Rounds, Ezra P., is an instructor in 
Mathematics, Phillips Exeter Acad- 
emy, Exeter, N. H. 

McLellan, J. Houghton, Jr., is with 
the Connecticut General Life Insur- 
ance Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Cook, Willard M., is instructing in 
St. George's School, Newport, R. I. 

Houston, George G., is with the 
Kinsley Steamship Lines, Inc., 17 
Battery Place, New York City. 

Berry, Wendell Hinds, is a student 
at the Harvard Business School. 

Davies, Henry H., is with the New 
York Telephone Co., 15 Dey street, 
New York City. 

Cousins, Sanford B., is in the 
Traffic Department, American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co., 24 Walker 
street, New York City. 

Ellms, Edward H., is pursuing 
graduate work at M. I. T. 

Richan, Avard Le Roy, is learning 
the textile business at Harrisville, 
R. I. 

Adams, Robert H., is with the 
Cushman-Hollis Shoe Co., Auburn, 
Me. 



Crockett, Philip D., is at Trinity 
College, Oxford, England. 

Goodhue, Philip E., is engaged in 
social work in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Le May, Harold E., is a clergyman 
at Searsport, Me. 



Resolution 



Hall of the Kappa of Psi Upsilon. 

It was with very great sorrow that 
we learned of the death of Brother 
Francis Robbins Upton of the class 
of 1875. During his life he was a man 
"foursquare to all the world" and a 
devoted member of his fraternity. His 
passing has left a golden chain of 
memories to all who knew him. A 
better tribute could not be paid to 
his memory than the saying of 
Thomas A. Edison, with whom Brother 
Upton was long associated. Mr. Edi- 
son said, "He was a fine man." Truly 
few could aspire to a more splendid 
epitaph. 

JOSEPH L. BADGER, 
EDWARD A. HUNT, 
GEORGE H. QUINBY, 

For the Chapter. 



Twenty-third Session of the Summer Term 

of the 

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

JUNE 27-AUGUST 5 

Courses in Chemistry, Economics, Education, English, French, History, 
Latin, Mathematics, Physics, and Spanish. 

Credit is given when courses are completed. Social and athletic activities 
are a feature. 

For Bulletin address 

JAMES S. STEVENS, Director 

ORONO, MAINE 



Do You Need Extra Courses? 

Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages, Economics, 
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire 
how credits earned may be applied on present college program. 

2ty? Intermix of flUjfragn 



HOME STUDY DEPT. 



CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 



ANA/ 



THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

Trains students in the principles of the 
law and in the technique of the profes- 
sion so as to 'best prepare them for 
active practice wherever the English 
system of law prevails. 

America's new place in international 
politics and commerce challenges the 
young American. 

He must equip himself for new 
world conditions, with a knowledge 
of legal fundamentals. 

LAW — Its principles and application 
to all business is almost as necessary 
to the coming business man as it is 
indispensable to the lawyer. 

Special scholarships ($75 per year) 
are awarded to college graduates. 

Course for LL.B. requires 3 school 
years. Those who have received this 
degree from this or any other approved 
school of law may receive LL.M. on 
the completion of one year*s resident 
attendance under the direction of Dr. 
Melville M. Bigelow. Several $25 and 
$50 scholarships open in this course. 
For Catalog, Address 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 



HOMER ALBERS, Dean 



YOU HAVE WRITTEN POEMS! 

Do you care to have them revised 
or constructively criticised by success- 
ful authors? If you do, then send us 
your manuscript (stories, articles or 
poems). We will criticise, and place 
them should they prove to be accept- 
able for publication. 

There is no actual charge for our 
services. If, however, you have not 
previously enrolled with the advisory 
department of this association, we re- 
quest that you enclose the initial fee 
of two dollars, which we must ask of 
each new contributor. There is no 
additional expense, no further obliga- 
tion. 

It must be realized that we can only 
be of aid to those of serious intent. If 
you do mean to strive for literary suc- 
cess, we can help you in many ways. 
Our services are yours until we have 
actually succeeded in marketing at 
least one of your manuscripts. Send 
something to-day! 

Please enclose return postage with 
your communications. 

NATIONAL LITERARY 
ASSOCIATION 

131 W. 39th St. 

New York City 

Advisory Department 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




Who Was Moseley? 

HE was a young Oxford man, only twenty-seven when he 
was killed at Gallipoli. Up to his time, man had never 
seen the inside of an atom. He turned the X-rays on 
matter — not figuratively but literally — and made them disclose 
the skeleton of an atom just as certainly as a surgeon makes 
them reveal the positions of the bones of the body. Mose- 
ley proved that all atoms are built up of the same kind of matter. 
He saw, too, just why an atom of copper is different from an 
atom of gold. 

Atoms are built up of electrons. Each atom consists of a 
nucleus, a kind of sun, with a certain number of electrons grouped 
about it, like planets. Moseley actually counted the number of 
electrons of all the metals from aluminum to gold. 

When you discover what gold is made of or a new fact about 
electricity, you open up new possibilities for the use of gold or 
electricity. For that reason the Research Laboratories of the 
General Electric Company are as much concerned with the 
"how" of things — atoms and electrons, for instance — as they are 
with mere applications of the electric current. 

Hence Moseley's work has been continued in the Research 
Laboratories, with the result that more has been learned about 
matter. How does water freeze? What is lead? Why are lead, 
iron, gold and tungsten malleable? Such questions can be an- 
swered more definitely now than ten years ago. And because they 
can be answered it is possible to make more rapid progress in 
illumination, in X-ray photography, in wireless telegraphy, and 
in electrical engineering as a whole. 

There would have been no coal-tar industry without the vast 
amount of research conducted in organic chemistry, and no 
electro-chemical industry without such work as Sir Humphrey 
Davey's purely scientific study of an electric current's effect on 
caustic potash and caustic soda. Sooner or later research in pure 
science always enriches the world with discoveries that can be 
practically applied. For these reasons the Research Labora- 
tories of the General Electric Company devote so much time to 
the study of purely scientific problems. 



General Office 




Schenectady, N.Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



13 



CITIZENS LAUNDRY 

College Agent Auto Service 



A SHORTER 
SHORTHAND SYSTEM 



Bowdoin Dairy Lunch 

Open Day and Night 



IN TEN EASY LESSONS CORDOVAN BOOTS 



This course covers ten easy lessons 
which will enable the Student, Pro- 
fessor, Journalist, Doctor, Lawyer or 
anyone seeking a professional career, 
to go thru life with 100 per cent 
efficiency. 

THIS COURSE 

Is short and inexpensive, and is 
given with a money back guarantee if 
not satisfied. 

SEND THIS CLIPPING TO-DAY 



PUBLISHERS 



PYRAMID PRESS: 
1416 Broadway, 
New York City 

Gentlemen : — Enclosed herewith is $5.00 
for which kindly send me your shorthand 
course in ten easy lessons by mail. It is 
understood that at the end of five days, if 
I am not satisfied my money will be gladly 
refunded. 

Name 

Street 

City and State 



YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 



"Herman's" Tan Cordovan $13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan. .$15.50 
"Florsheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 

TENNIS SHOES, INDOOR AND 

OUTDOOR MOCCASINS, RUBBER 

BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 



OH BOY! 

Have You Tried Our 

49^ CHOCOLATES 

There is nothing cheap about our 
place but the price. 

BUTLER'S 



THE 

COLLEGE 

BOOK STORE 



The place to buy everything from 
a Thumb Tack to a Wedding Present. 
Take a look at our new line of Kay- 
woodie Pipes. These are of real 
Italian Bruyere with the Aluminum 
Inbore tube. All models $4.50 each. 



F. W. CHANDLER 
&SON 

150 MAINE STREET 



WHEN IT COMES TO THE MATTER OF 



HATS 
GLOVES 
SHIRTS 
HOSIERY 

SHOES 
TIES, Etc. 



CLOTH ES 

CALL US THE OLD STAND-BY 

Many a young man has come to Benoit's as a sort of last 
resort, and stuck around ever since, because' he^ found 
at Benoifs everything that was to be had in Clothes. 

We have the goods — we have the values — 
we have the reputation and you can't go 
wrong. 

Mr. Jack Handy '23 of the Zeta Psi House is our repre- 
sentative. Just tell him your needs, and he will see you 
get prompt and careful attention. 



Monument 
Square 




Portland 
Maine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



A GREAT GAME 

There's a game played by students 
From June until Fall, 

That is finer than tennis, or golf, or baseball. 
It develops the brain as football does grit: 
It calls for courage, and patience, and wit; 
But the fellows that win are fellows to cheer, 
For they come back with funds for the next college year. 
The Map Selling Game is the best recreation 
A hustler can find for his summer vacation. 
If to enter this game you ever should want, 
Write THE NATIONAL SURVEY, Chester, Vermont. 

(H. C.) 

COLLEGE REPRESENTATIVES: 
S. H. Carter, 24 Winthrop St.; Hugh Nixon, D. U. House. 



DOUBLE-BREASTED 

OXFORD GRAYS 

The Suit that Young Men 
want — All wool and finely 
tailored 

$34 $36 $39 



E. S. BODWELL 
& SON 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



JUD, The Barber 

was going to use this space 
but thought it wasn't neces- 
sary. 



DURING THE GAME 

BETWEEN CLASSES 

ON THE HIKE 




A "MUNCH" WHILE STUDYING 

A SNACK BEFORE RETIRING 

IN FACT— EVERY OLD TIME 




lart SeJiaflTner 
V Clolhw J 

CONSERVATIVE CLOTHES 

FOR 

COLLEGE MEN 

In stock and made to measure. 
Imported Fabrics. Lower prices for Spring 1921. 



HASKELL & JONES COMPANY 

PORTLAND .... MAINE 



BOWDOIN CANTEEN 

8 a. m.-12 m.; 1.30-6; 7-11 

Sundays, 12-5 p. m. 

A. PALMER, 19 North Winthrop 



P. J. MESERVE'S 

Drug Store 
Opposite Town Hall 



"We carry a large assortment of 
Olives, Pickles, Cheese, and Fancy Cookies. 

DAVIS' MARKET 

Next to Star Lunch 



A. W. HASKELL, D. D. S. 

W. F. BROWN, D. D. S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Postoffice. Brunswick, Maine 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 Maine Street 



Pressing and Cleaning 

ORDERS TAKEN FOR DYEING 

SECOND HAND CLOTHING 

BOUGHT 

DAN ROSEN 




SPUR- A New Narrow 

Arrow 

Collar 

Cluett.Peabody &• Co. In a Troy, N.Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




YOUR GAME 

"y^HATEVER your "game," whether 
in sport or serious activity, MACUL- 
LAR PARKER CLOTHES lend fin- 
ish to your performance, and are as 
individual as your own way of doing 



things. 



MA«;ark ER 

400 WASHINGTON STREET 
The Old House with the Young Spirit 



Bowdoin men are invited to visit our shop 
when in Boston 



BOYS! 



Have you tried our new drink, 

BOWDOIN BREW? 

Our Candy, too, is right through and 
through 

THE SPEAR FOLKS 

119 Maine Street 



CARL H. MARTIN 

Cleansing and Dyeing 
Pressing and Alterations 

4 Elm Street 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. 
Surplus and Profits, $100,000. 
Student Patronage Solicited. 



PRINTING 

of Quality 

Always in the lead 
for snap and style 

Wheeler Print Shop 

Town Building, Brunswick, Maine 



We carry the largest assortment of 

Olives, Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and 
Biscuits of all kinds east of Portland 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street Tel. 136-137 

Branch Store — 2 Cushing St. — Tel. 16 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 Washington Street 

Boston 



J6 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CUMBERLAND 

Wednesday and Thursday 
BILLIE BURKE 

IN 

"THE EDUCATION OF ELIZABETH" 



Friday and Saturday 
BERT LYTELL 

IN 

THE MISLEADING LADY" 



Next Week — Monday and Tuesday 
BEBE DANIELS 

IN 

"OH, LADY, LADY" 



PASTIME 

Wednesday and Thursday 
DOROTHY GISH 

IN 

'THE GHOST IN THE GARRET 



Friday and Saturday 
MACK SENNETT'S "MARRIED LIFE" 

and 

PEARL WHITE in "THE THIEF" 



Next Week— Monday and Tuesday 
"BEHOLD MY WIFE" 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 






VOL. LI. 



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 1921. 



Number 2 



The "Bowdoin" Is Launched 



Great Enthusiasm as MacMillan's 
Craft Leaves Ways. 



Last Saturday at noon Professor 
MacMillan's sturdy little schooner in 
which he will dare the perils of the 
wilderness of the north slipped into 
the water. Miss May Fogg of Free- 
port, a niece of Dr. MacMillan, ehirst- 
ened her, "Bowdoin," and as she slip- 
ped down the ways the band struck 
up "Bowdoin Beata." Many loyal 
voices joined in the song, and cheer 
after cheer greeted the boat of which 
so much is expected. True Bowdoin 
spirit was as manifest as on an ath- 
letic field, for Bowdoin men were help- 
ing one of their number to accomplish 
a difficult feat, to go in, fight, and win. 
The launching is the start. The "Bow- 
doin" will bear with it on its trip 
that same Bowdoin spirit. 

The launching took place at the 
yard of Hodgdon Bros, in East Booth- 
bay, where she has been built. Many 
friends of the explorer and of the 
College were on board when she was 
lunched. More than 500 people were 
present to witness the event, and 
moving picture men were busy reeling 
off yards of films. The boat was 
towed to the shore by motor boats and 
Miss Elizabeth Steffin of Mexico City 
presented a bell to Dr. MacMillan on 
behalf of the Whittier School for 
Girls in Merrimac, Mass., where she 
is a student. 

Many members of the faculty, 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Rally Tonight 



Baseball Results 



A rally will be held tonight for the 
purpose of presenting the true condi- 
tion of the finances of the activities 
of the College, and of finding out the 
sentiment of the student body regard- 
ing methods of raising money to meet 
the deficit. This rally is vitally im- 
portant to the welfare of the College. 
The facts of the case are clearly set 
forth in an editorial in this issue. 
Every man who has the interest of 
Bowdoin at heart must be present. 
That means every man in College. 
Snap out of it. 



Anniversary of 

Peary's Discovery 

On April sixth, twelve years ago, 
Robert E. Peary '77 "hoisted the na- 
tional ensign of the United States of 
America" at 90 degrees north latitude. 
This date should never pass by un- 
noticed by Bowdoin men. The fol- 
lowing article reprinted from the 
"New York Times" of April 6 gives 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Harvard 6, Bates 2 (six innings). 
University of Pennsylvania 5, 
Swarthmore 2. 

Princeton 3, Vermont 1. 
Holy Cross 11, Columbia 1. 
Navy 15, Williams 1. 



Calendar 

. . April 15 — Masque and Gown pre- 
sents "Stop Thief" at Skowhegan. 

April 16 — Masque and Gown pre- 
sents "Stop Thief" at Augusta. 

April 16— Baseball: Fort Williams 
at Brunswick. 

April 19 — Patriots' Day. Baseball: 
Bates at Lewiston (exhibition). 

April 20— Math. Club Meeting at 
Beta house. 

April 27 — Baseball: Amherst at 
Amherst. 

April 28 — Baseball: Wesleyan at 
Middletown. 

April 29— Baseball: Trinity at 
Hartford. 

April 30 — Baseball: Boston College 
at Boston. 



Governor Baxter Vetoes 

Medical School Bill 

Governor Baxter vetoed the bill to 
establish a State Medical School in a 
message sent by him to the House of 
Representatives on March 5th. He 
gave five fundamental and four sec- 
ondary reasons for his veto. The five 
fundamental reasons for his opposi- 
tion were: 

First, that the object for which the 
school would be established, "the edu- 
cation of physicians who would be 
willing to practice their profession in 
rural communities of the State," 
would not be attained if this resolve 
becomes a law; 

Second, that the State should not 
commit itself to the founding of this 
institution because our citizens do not 
thoroughly understand the questions 
at issue, and do not realize what 
financial and other problems, of the 
present and future, are involved by 
this proposed action; 

Third, that the State should not 
embark upon an enterprise of this 
magnitude unless it is prepared to 
maintain a medical school of the 
highest grade, as this would call for 
an expense far in excess of any ap- 
propriation provided for by this re- 
solve : 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Student Conference 

AtM. 



I.T. 



An intercollegiate conference on un- 
dergraduate government is to be held 
at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology this week. The purpose 
of this conference is fully covered in 
an editorial in this issue. Bowdoin 
is to be represented by five under- 
graduates, each one having a particu- 
lar interest in one branch of college 
activities. 

(Continued on Page 8) 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Intercollegiate 

Liberal Meeting 



A conference of liberal college stu- 
dents for the organization of an In- 
tercollegiate Liberal League was held 
at Harvard Union, Cambridge, Mass., 
on April 2nd and 3rd. Delegates rep- 
resenting forty-five colleges and uni- 
versities were present at this two 
days' conference. Bowdoin was rep- 
resented by Frederick W. Anderson 
'21 and Frederic S. Klees '24. Most 
of the Eastern colleges were repre- 
sented and there were delegates pres- 
ent from some of the Western uni- 
versities, and even from the Univer- 
sity of Cambridge, England, and the 
University of Upsala, Sweden. 

Dean Briggs of Harvard delivered 
the opening speech to the delegates, 
welcoming them with words of sup- 
port for their ideal of "the square 
deal and the open mind." "Radicals 
may be liberal," he said, "but liberal- 
ism does not mean radicalism; Socia- 
lists may be liberal, but liberalism 
does not mean Socialism. There are 
bigoted conservatives and equally 
bigoted radicals." Dean Briggs 
thought the aim of the students an 
excellent one, or as he said, "The 
quest is noble, for the end is the wel- 
fare of humanity." 

Walter Lippman, the editor of the 
"New Republic," entreated the stu- 
dents to maintain an inquiring mind. 
He said that no one cause would re- 
deem mankind, but that an inquiring 
mind, a fearless criticism of assump- 
tions, would help to defend freedom 
against hysteria, and hold in check 
greed, arrogance, snobbishness, and 
swagger. Man, he declared, is always 
a wayfarer following his visions. The 
conservative gives him a map of his 
home town, when man wishes to set 
out on his journey, while the Bolshe- 
vik gives him a map oh which there 
is only one road and a brightly colored 
illustration of his destination. What 
man needs is to be taught to be able 
to pick out the best path, and to ex- 
plore and find the best way on which 
to travel. 

President Emeritus Eliot of Har- 
vard gave practical advice to the col- 
legians for their service in the out- 
side world. He declared that the 
study of history is the foundation for 
future progress, in that a safe future 



is built on the achievements of the 
past. 

Senator Edwin F. Ladd of North 
Dakota, a non-partisan, brought to 
the attention of the students the situ- 
ation of the farmer, which faces the 
thinkers of the immediate future. 

Other speakers of the first day of 
the convention, included Walter G. 
Fuller and Francis Neilson of "The 
Freeman;" Donald Winston of "Young 
Democracy;" Charlotte Perkins Gil- 
man, author of "Women and" Eco- 
nomics," and Andrew Furusetly, 
president of the International Sea- 
men's L T nion of America. 

John Hayes Holmes of the New 
York Community Church, was the 
first speaker on the second day of the 
convention. He asserted that at this 
time when the world seems to believe 
in nothing but force, the liberal is 
badly needed to preach the gospel of 
liberty tempered by love. 

Other speakers called upon the stu- 
dents to think clearly and to - turn 
their attention to this or that liberal 
movement in the outside world. Many 
of them declared against the muzzling 
of faculty expression by the financial 
interests that run many of the col- 
leges. 

President H. N. MacCracken of 
Vassar, was the chief speaker of the 
afternoon. 

"You organize in self defence," he 
said, "caught in a wave of increasing 
conservatism and a movement to in- 
troduce propaganda into the colleg: 
from the outside. Your task is to 
create among the entire student body 
a desire to get the facts themselves. 
The other ninety-nine per cent, of the 
undergi-aduates are the ones you must 
reach, and your goal is not reached 
till you get a hundred per cent, stu- 
dent membership, create a student 
field of public opinion and make it 
trust in you. Your aim should be to 
go out and win a hearing from all the 
groups in the different colleges." 

The business sessions of the con- 
ference resulted in the appointment 
of executive committees, election of 
officers, and the adoption of a consti- 
tution. Miss Muriel Morris of Welles- 
ley was chosen president of the -new 
league. The other officers are: vice- 
presidents, Donald J. Mayser of Co- 
lumbia, and George O. Arken of New 
York University; secretary, John 



Rothschild of Harvard; executive sec- 
retary, Mary Switzer of Radclilt. 

The aim of the league, as finally 
stated in its constitution is, "to bring 
about the fair and open-minded con- 
sideration of social, industrial, po 
litical, and international questions, by 
groups of college students. It will 
esponse no creed or principle other 
than that of complete freedom of as- 
sembly and discussion in the colleges. 
Its ultimate aim will be to create 
among college men and women an in- 
telligent interest in problems of the 
day." 

Liberal clubs will be formed in 
various colleges and universities all 
over the country as a result of this 
meeting. Only ten students in a col- 
lege are required to form a Liberal 
Club, and if eighty per cent, of the 
club are in favor of joining the Inter- 
collegiate Liberal League, the club 
will become a part of that organiza- 
tion. 



Commencement Parts 

At Chapel on Saturday morning 
Dean Mitchell announced that the 
members of the Senior class who arc 
to deliver Commencement paits ai*2 
Maurice Sydney Coburne, Harry Kel- 
son, Robert Winthrop Morse, anl 
Alexander Thompson. 



The Stanley Plummer 

Prize Competition 

Although various new prize com- 
petions have been established at Bow- 
doin in recent years, no new one en- 
volving a public exhibition has been 
among them. Last year, however, a 
member of the Class of 1867, Stanlry 
Plummer, established a valuable prize, 
the income of $1,000 to be awarded 
"for excellence in original and spoken 
composition on the English language 
on the part of the members of the 
Junior Class." The prize will be 
awarded this year for the first time. 

The competition, which will of 
course be open to the public and which 
will take place at an early date, will 
this year include informing or enter- 
taining rather than impressive or 
oratorical speaking. The time and 
place will shortly be announced, to- 
gether with the program of the oc- 
casion. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Chapman Memorial 

A movement has been instituted on 
the Campus to establish a memorial 
to the late Raymond Chapman, popu- 
lar shortstop of the world champion 
Celeveland baseball team, who died 
last summer in New York from the 
effects of a fractured skull, sustained 
when he was hit by a pitched ball in a 
game with the Yankees. This me- 
morial would take the form of a cup 
to be awarded to the shortstop in the 
American League who is of the 
greatest value to his club during the 
season. It would be awarded annual- 
ly by vote of the Baseball Writers' 
Association of America or by some 
equally unprejudiced group. 

Mason '23 has been very instru- 
mental in starting sentiment for such 
a memorial. It is believed that such 
a trophy would add a touch of senti- 
ment which would be beneficial to the 
game, and that it would be an honor 
for which any baseball player would 
strive. It is planned to raise the 
money by volunteer contributions. 

Launching of The Bowdoin 

(Continued from Page 1) 

alumni, and student body were present 
and many close friends of the Colleg 
were aboard the "Bowdoin" as she 
took the water. Among them were: 
President and Mrs. Kenneth C. M. 
Sills, Professors Cram and Meserve, 
W. W. Thomas '60 of Portland, Mr. 
Ellis Spear, Jr., '98, Mrs. Ellis Spear, 
Jr., and Abbott Spear, E. Curtis 
Mathews '10, and the following under- 
graduates: Berry '21, Gibson '21, 
Noyes '21, Pendexter '21, Cobb '22, 
Fletcher '22, Howard '22, Thomas '22, 
and Vose '22. 

The little vessel, having a total dis- 
placement of only 115 tons, is one of 
the oddest looking crafts that ever 
took the water. Yet she is adapted 
for her task, according to the esti- 
mates of MacMillan, as no ship ever 
was before, and is depended on to 
yield the greatest achievement in 
Arctic exploration since Peary, with 
MacMillan as his chief lieutenant, dis- 
covered the pole. 

Her design embodies all the struc- 
tural ideas dsveloped by MacMillan 
during his many years of Arctice ob- 
servations. She is egg-shaped of hull, 



with nothing to which ice can cling, 
Under pressure of flanking ice floes 
she should rise from the water and 
be carried along with the pack. On 
the surface of the ice she should keep 
upright, and be ready to slip back 
into the water when the ice breaks. 
Her bow is sloped so that if she runs 
against a floe she will slide up on to 
it. 

She will start on her expedition in 
July, according to present plans. She 
will be fitted out for a two years' 
voyage, with reserve stores permit- 
ting the extension of the stay if 
deemed desirable. The ship is named 
for the College, from which both Mac- 
Millan and Peary were graduated, and 
the expedition will be under the 
auspices of the MacMillan Arctic As- 
sociation, composed largely of Bow- 
doin alumni. The ship cost $25,000 
and her equipment will cost about 
$15,000 more. 

In the party, besides MacMillan, 
will be an engineer, three scientists 
and a cook, all to be selected with 
care. The ship will remain here 
through May and a part of June for 
finishing touches. She is to be 
stocked and provisioned toward the 
end of June and will start north the 
first week in July. 

So confident is MacMillan of the 
schooner's ability to cope with the 
frozen channels of the far north that 
he plans to pass through the danger- 
ous Fury and Hecla strait on the west 
side of Baffin Land, where former ex- 
peditions have been lost or turned 
back. His plans include also either a 
return by the strait or the circum- 
navigation of Baffin Land after ex- 
ploring a stretch of 1 : 000 miles of its 
western shore on which it is believed 
no white man has ever set foot. It is 
said to be the longest strip of unex- 
plored coast in the world. 

Studies made by Dr. MacMillan of 
the narrow strait on previous visits 
to the north figured somewhat in fix- 
ing the size of the new vessel, as there 
appears to be only a rift in the ice 
there even at the most favorable sea- 
son. 

The "Bowdoin" is of about the size 
of the "Discovery," William Baffin's 
ship, which in 1616 was the first to 
reach Baffin Land. She is 80 feet 10 
inches in length, 19 feet 7 inches 
beam, and 9 feet 6 inches draft. She 



is of the knockabout auxiliary 
schooner type, equipped with a 45- 
horsepower crude oil burning engine, 
an installation which the explore r 
hopes will insure him a cruising 
radius virtually unlimited by the use 
of whale oil to supplement the regu- 
lar fuel supply. If the plan to use 
whale oil proves practicable, he says 
the expedition will have a clear ad- 
vantage over former ones, as the fuel 
supply has always presented a serious 
problem in Arctic exploration plans. 
The schooner will have a generous 
spread of canvas to enable her to sail 
home when clear of ice should the fuel 
supply give out. 

The staunchness of the hull is as- 
sured by a heavy frame planked with 
three-inch white oak to which has 
been added at the waterline a five- 
foot belt of greenheart of ironwood. 
This armor is said to withstand the 
grinding actions of ice better than 
steel or any other material, as the ice 
merely polishes the hard surface. 
When winter sets in, a three-foot 
covering of snow and ice will be placed 
over the entire ship with snow houses 
after the Eskimo style to cover the 
hatchways. 



Track Prospects 



With the athletic field rapidly 
rounding into shape the attention of 
the fellows in college naturally turns 
to the great spring sports, baseball 
and track. The college nine has al- 
ready opened its season with the 
Southern trip, but thus far little has 
been heard of track prospects. Of 
course we know that our indoor team 
made a very good showing at the 
winter meets, but no just estimate of 
the outdoor team may be made from 
the record of the board runners. After 
a painstaking survey of our rivals for 
the state chapionship title, Coach 
Jack Magee feels justified in saying 
that Maine and Colby are more for- 
midable than ever and that it will 
require a strenuous season of hard 
training to get the Bowdoin material 
into condition to clean up the May 
meet on Whittier Field. The College 
is not particularly lacking in good ma- 
terial this year but so far there have 
been several of the men who should 
be good for points in the meet, with 
proper training, who have not re- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ported for practice. Maine is making 
every effort to avenge her practical 
loss in last fall's football classic and 
unless every man on the White squad 
goes out and fights for his position 
and for prospective points every day, 
Maine is liable to go home from 
Brunswick next May with a victory. 

Bowdoin will meet Vermont soon 
and then there is also the annual 
Pcnn Relay Carnival to be held April 
29 and 30, in which Bowdoin has been 
placed in a class with Tufts, Carnegie 
Tech, Rochester, Hobart, Vermont, 
and Harvard. 

No man on the squad wants to see 
Bowdoin defeated and no man will as 
long as the fellows are determined to 
win. Now is the time to make a 
championship team; let's talk and 
think and act championship from now 
on. 



Medical School 



(Continued fr 



Page 1) 



Fourth, that the present condition 
of the State finances and the heavy 
tax burdens now borne by our people 
do not justify the expenditure of this 
money required to found a new State 
institution especially in view of the 
fact that the requirements of a State 
medical school would increase with 
each passing year; 

Fifth, that the State should not es- 
tablish a State medicine any more 
than a State religion and notwith- 
standing the language of the bill, that 
the school is for "all branches of medi- 
cine," it is understood that the course 
of study would be such as is usually 
provided for by one particular school 
of medicine. The individual should 
be free to select his own method of 
treatment and the taxpayers' money 
should not be used for the advance- 
ment of any one medical or religious 
faith. 

His secondary reasons were: 

The above reasons I consider fund- 
amental, my secondary reasons are: 

That the unanimously unfavorable 
report on this resolve made by the 
joint committee on Judiciary and Pub- 
lic Health composed of 20 members of 
this Legislature, is at least strong 
prima facie evidence that the bill 
ought not to pass, especially in view 
of the fact that the joint committee 
referred to, conducted exhaustive 



hearings on the subject; 

Second, that certain gifts to the 
proposed school are contingent upon 
its being maintained as a class "A" 
school which means a school of the 
highest grade and this classification 
is determined by a board over which 
the State of Maine has not control. 
If the school should fall below the 
required grade, some question might 
be raised as to the State being able 
to retain the gifts regardless of the 
fact that the State might have done 
all in its power to maintain the high- 
est standards; 

Third, that should this resolve be- 
come a law, a judicial decision would 
be necessary in connection with cer- 
tain endowment funds and there is 
some doubt whether the State would 
receive the benefit of the funds re- 
ferred to, which if not received would 
place upon the State an unexpected 
burden. 

Fourth, that the opinion of the 
medical profession of Maine is di- 
vided as to the desirability or the 
necessity for a State medical school. 

Governor Baxter's veto was sus- 
tained by the House by a vote of 67 
to 63. This definitely removes any 
hope of the State's taking over the 
medical school. 

President Sills made public on April 
5th the following statement concern- 
ing the Medical School: 

"The action of the Legislature of 
the State of Maine in concurring with 
Governor Baxter's veto of the Medical 
School bill makes it probable that 
Maine will have no medical school 
after June of this year. 

"The position of Bowdoin College 
was that on account of the great in- 
crease in the cost of medical educa- 
tion it could no longer maintain the 
Medical School creditably, and that it 
was therefore obliged to return to the 
State the management and direction 
of the school. The college, mainly on 
account of certain provisions in its 
charter, was not willing to apply for 
State aid, and probably for the same 
reason could not have accepted such 
aid had it been offered. Bowdoin Col- 
lege was not responsible for the bill, 
nor did it take any part in the dis- 
cussion except to indicate its willing 
ness to assist the State in the estab- 
lishment of the school by offering 
buildings, equipment and apparatus if 



the Legislature believed that the 
maintenance of the school was a 
proper State function. 

"Personally, I favored the bill, and 
on Monday sent Governor Baxter a 
telegram urging him to sign it. 

"There has apparently been some 
misunderstanding with regard to the 
income of the Garcelon-Merritt Fund, 
now used by the Medical School. As 
I endeavored to make clear at the 
hearing in Augusta, the disposition of 
the income of that fun, in the event 
of the closing of the school, will rest 
entirely with the courts, and prior to 
the decision of the courts neither the 
college nor anybody else can tell how 
the fund is to be used. However, the 
college will very probably ask to be 
allowed from the income of this fund 
to establish certain medical scholar- 
ships for Maine boys who would thus 
have an opportunity perhaps other- 
wise denied to them of studying medi- 
cine. Holders of such scholarships 
might also be required to return to 
Maine for a period to practice in the 
smaller communities. It is possible 
that sixteen men might hold reason- 
ably large scholarships each year, an 
arrangement that would make avail- 
able four physicians a year. The sug- 
gestion current in some quarters that 
the college wished to use this fund 
for its own academic work is entirely 
erroneous. 

"This statement is issued to correct 
misapprehension and to make clear to 
the people of the State that unless 
aid is received from unexpected quar- 
ters the Medical School will finally 
close its doors in June." 



Peary Anniversary 

(Continued from Page 1) 



a vivid picture of Peary's whole- 
hearted devotion to the cause of 
science. 

"The secular quest was ended. The 
incredible adventure undertaken by so 
many gallant hearts for more than 
three hundred years was achieved by 
an American. He had all the cour- 
age and endurance of his predecessors, 
and he had devised a practical plan. 
He had accommodated himself to 
Eskimo conditions. By scientific 
method he realized his dream. On that 
culminant day, after weeks of forced 
marches, privations, sleeplessness and 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



'racking anxiety,' he had no disposi- 
tion to indulge in a just sense of his 
victory- He wanted nothing but sleep. 
After a few hours of that, he tells us 
in words that paint the man and his 
history: 

" 'there succeeded a condition of 
mental exaltation which made further 
rest impossible. For more than a 
score of years that point on the 
earth's surface had been the object of 
my every effort. To its attainment my 
whole being, physical, mental and 
moral, had been dedicated. Many 
times my own life and the lives of 
those with me had been risked. My 
own material and forces and those of 
my friends had been devoted to this 
object. This journey was my eighth 
into the Arctic wilderness. In that 
wilderness I had spent nearly twelve 
years out of the twenty-three between 
my thirtieth and my fifty-third year, 
and the intervening time spent in 
civilized communities during that 
period had been mainly occupied with 
preparations for returning to the wild- 
erness. The determination to reach 
the Pole had become so much a part 
of my being that, strange as it may 
seem, I long ago ceased to think of 
myself save as an instrument for the 
attainment of that end. To the lay- 
man this may seem strange, but an 
inventor can understand it, or an 
artist, or any one who has devoted 
himself for years upon years to the 
service of an idea.' 

"He was possessed and inspired by 
his idea. After long labor he made it 
fact. 'I have the Pole, April 6.' Such 
was his message to The Times from 
Indian Harbor, Sept. 6. He had it and 
he kept it through one of the most 
extraordinary storms of shallow im- 
posture and sentimental gullibility 
that ever raged. Of the passion and 
the cruelties of those days of delusion 
we can now think ironically or toler- 
antly. Fact and science overcame the 
legend and the lie. To him who had 
already won so much from the dark- 
ness, who had added Heilprin Land 
and Melville Land and continental 
Greenland to the world, came, after 
years of thought and effort, an honor 
wide as the world and as enduring. 
He was a great American. His story 
and his service are among the most 
precious records of American civiliz- 
ation." 



The March "Quill' 



The first paper in the March "Qilll" 
is of so slight and fragmentary a na- 
ture as not to admit of extended 
notice. The writer's feeling for books 
is expressed with affectionate en- 
thusiasm but with youthful exagger- 
ation. His personification of books 
would apply to fiction, to autobio- 
graphy, to intimate biography and to 
scattered examples in other fields, but 
it would rule out whole regiments of 
books in other lines. And of course 
the declaration that "Human experi- 
ence ... if not backed by the 
learning culled from books is almost 
valueless," cannot maintain itself for 
a moment in the light of every day 
facts. 

Literary criticism has never at- 
tained to a first rank among the 
activities of American writers. Con- 
ditions have been such as to make a 
secondary and subordinate position in- 
evitable; but it is also to be said that 
the progress of the last twenty-five 
years has decidedly strengthened and 
dignified this department of Ameri- 
can literature. In a thoughtful and 
discriminating paper on this subject, 
entitled "From the Note-Book of a 
Literary Critic," Mr. Rodick, of the 
class of 1912, discusses the functions 
and the equipment of a literary critic. 
He enumerates four requirements in 
the work of the critic: First, disin- 
teredness; second, wide knowledge of 
books; third, intellectual freedom; and 
fourth, style — "a clear and joyous 
style." The inclusion of style — "a 
clear and joyous style" — permits one 
to infer that Mr. Rodick wants the 
critic to approach his work in a sym- 
pathetic and appreciative spirit, and, 
as he later says, "to make the report 
of a sojourn among books glow with 
a spirit of intellectual adventure." 
This is a just observation. It is a 
critic's function to discover faults; it 
is no less his function to discover 
virtues and beauties; and 'it is some- 
times his function to act as plain in- 
terpreter of the writer to the reader. 
This paper is a pretty good one — good 
in itself and still better as testifying 
to the survival of the literary im- 
pulse. 

Mr. Anderson raises the curtain on 
the second act of his detective story, 



and shows us a field thick-strewn with 
the seeds of mystery which presum- 
ably will blossom and bear fruit in the 
final chapter next month. The dis- 
cussion of a mere fragment of an in- 
volved story, all by itself, is unjust 
alike to the writer and the reviewer. 
So .we shall let the matter go over to 
the April number when the tension of 
"Quill" readers will be relieved and 
it will be possible to consider the story 
as a work of art — or artifice. 

An excellent article is contributed 
by Mr. Robert Morse on "The Poetry 
of the Under Dog" — excellent in 
thought, in spirit, and in style. It is 
his purpose to trace the development 
of poetry during the last quarter of 
the nineteenth century and the first 
quarter of the twentieth. He finds 
the most significant feature of this 
development to be the growth of the 
spirit of humanitarianism. His illus- 
trations of this thesis, both by quota- 
tion and by reference, are admirably 
chosen and go far to justify his claim. 
One or two of the names that he has 
included we might drop and sub- 
stitute others, but this is a matter of 
individual judgment and, as such, sub- 
ject to revision and reversal. But the 
spirit of the paper is right, its opin- 
ions generally sound, and its style has 
the blessed touch of spontaneity and 
the warmth of personal feeling. 

This number of The "Quill" is smal- 
ler than usual. It contains two seri- 
ous papers on literary subjects, the 
second chapter of a continued story, 
and an introductory essay so frag- 
mentary as to be almost paragraphic. 
It contains no poetry. This table of 
contents, taken in connection with the 
other issues of The "Quill," leads the 
reviewer to say that the undergradu- 
ates of Bowdoin are doing only half 
their duty by The "Quill," and the 
alumni less than half their duty. As 
the recognized organ and representa- 
tive of the_ intellectual interests of 
Bowdoin students and alumni it should 
be used for the discussion of all sorts 
of subjects touching upon the philoso- 
phy of education and problems of col- 
lege policy as well as for purely liter- 
ary papers and poetry. Its pages 
should, especially, represent the seri- 
ous literary ambitions of the student 
body. 

JOHN E. CHAPMAN '77. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Edward B. Ham "22 Editor-in-Chief 

F. King Turgeon '23 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

George H. Quinby '23 Intercollegiate News 

George T. Davis '24 Alumni Department 

Fredric S. Klees '24 Faculty Notes 

J. William Rowe '24 Athletics 

P. Dennison Smith '24 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. R. Ludden '22 F. A. Gerrard '23 

R. L. McCormack '22 K. R. Philbrick '23 
V. C. McGorrill '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Ebcn G. Tileston '22 Business Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
mon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
commun-'cations regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Biwdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $3.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 15 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials only; the Managing 
Editor for news and make-up; the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 

Vol. LL April 13, 1921. No. 2 

Entered at Post Office in Brunswick as 
Second-Class Mail Matter. 



OBDitorial 

The A. S. B. C. Assessment. 

Shall we admit our inability to sup- 
port college activities at Bowdoin, or 
shall we loyally come forward this 
spring and give our organizations the 
necessary support? This is the vital 
problem which the students of Bow- 
doin are to decide tonight. We all 
know the situation as it stands at this 
time, and we all know that some im- 
mediate action is absolutely required, 
if we are to continue with our ac- 
tivities on their present scale. 

In a recent issue of the "Orient" 
the details of the financial condition 
of all the activities were clearly ex- 
plained to the student body. Accord- 
ing to that statement, there is at 
present a total deficit exceeding 
two thousand dollars, nearly three- 
quarters of which is for track. 

Clearly, the track deficit has been 
brought about by the large expenses 
n'ecssary to maintain this branch of 
athletics at its present high standard. 
Bowdoin's record in track is far bet- 
t-r known among the othsr colleges 



than her record in any other sport. 
For example, remember the nine 
po'nts which Savage '18 and Goodwin 
'21 scored in the I. C. A. A. A. A. 
games two years ago for Bowdoin, 
which was by far the smallest col- 
lege entered in the meet. Many other 
things could be referred to, such as 
relay victories, state championships, 
and numerous _ brilliant individual 
records. 

If money cannot be collected in 
some way this spring, the college will 
inevitably be deprived of any oppor- 
tunity to increase this list of victories, 
and what real Bowdoin man is willing 
to let this happen ? 

To meet this deficit, the Student 
Council has thought of a direct ap- 
peal to the Alumni, the formation of 
an Alumni Athletic Association or the 
securing of an appropriation from the 
Alumni Fund. These methods have 
not been favored owing to their inter- 
ference with the college endowment 
fund now being sought. 

On account of the inadvisability of 
these three methods, it has been found 
possible to raise the necessary money 
j solely through the undergraduate 
body. Many will, no doubt, object to 
the payment of five dollars in addition 
to the fifteen dollar blanket tax. The 
smaller sums required in some of the 
others colleges will unquestionably in- 
fluence many against the assessment. 
Some students, not actively engaged 
in athletics, would prefer to have 
some of the baseball and football 
trips eliminated. 

The most important factor to be 
considered, however, is loyalty to the 
college. Is it loyalty to stand out and 
try to prevent Bowdoin from being 
represented in collegiate contests 
which are bound to give the college 
more athletic success, more promi- 
nence, and more recognition? It is 
loyalty to prevent Bowdoin from hav- 
ing a fair chance for consideration 
among prospective students? Each 
man should think of these questions 
carefully and then arouse in himself 
a keen enough desire for Bowdoin's 
welfare to do his share in relieving 
this present critical situation. Let the 
real Bowdoin spirit decide for us to- 
night! 



Launching of the "Bowdoin." 

In behalf of the undergraduates of 



the college, the "Orient" takes this 
opportunity to congratulate Dr. Don- 
ald B. MacMillan 'E8 on the successful 
launching of the '"'Bowdoin," the 
unique craft with which the well 
known explorer plans to make his ex- 
pedition alcng the western coast of 
Baffin Land. 

This expedition is particularly sig- 
nificant for Bowdoin in that it main- 
tains the tradition established by Bow- 
doin men in Arctic exploration, not 
only by Admiral Peary in h:'s dis- 
covery of the pole, but also by numer- 
ous others. The expeditions to Labra- 
dor and Cape Born by Dr. Leslie A. 
Lee, professor of geology and biology 
at Bowdoin for more than thirty 
years, were the first achievements in 
exploration to have any connection 
with the college. Later on, in rela- 
tion to Peary's work, the part played 
by General Thomas H. Hubbard '57 
was of vital importance to the suc- 
cess of the great explorer. General 
Hubbard was for several years presi- 
dent of the Peary Arctic Club, and 
furnished a large portion of the funds 
for Peary's expedition. 

It is especially to be realized that 
Dr. MacMillan's explorations of the 
next two or three years will be con- 
ducted for the sole object of acquiring 
scientific knowledge, without any con- 
sideration or desire of material return. 
If this expedition is a success, it 
means that the geography and char- 
acter of the western coast of Baffin 
Land will be revealed to the world for 
the first time. Certainly this will be 
a splendid result for Dr. MacMillan 
to obtain, and all members of the col- 
lege wish him every success. 



Student Government Conference at 
Technology. 

The intercollegiate conference on 
undergraduate government to be held 
at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology this week is the first con- 
vention of this nature which has ever 
been held. As previously announced, 
the purpose of the conference is "to 
bring together representatives of 
various universities and colleges at a 
meeting to discuss the problems of 
undergraduate government and stu- 
dent activities." 

According to present indications, 
the conference will be attended by a 
large number cf d-legates from the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



forty or more institutions represented. 
All the colleges will have an excellent 
opportunity to view their problems in 
new aspects, to discover solutions for 
many of them, and to establish more 
satisfactory relations with each other 
in every respect. 

Bowdoin is sending five delegates to 
represent the different branches of 
student activities to be discussed in 
the conference. There will be four 
separate, but simultaneous meetings 
one for problems of student govern- 
ment, one for athletics, another for 
publications, and another for musical 
clubs and dramatics. 

Technology has originated a plan, 
which if successful, will be repeated 
every year henceforth. It is for the 
Other colleges, in view of the splendid 
opportunity which is being offered 
them, not only to send representative 
delegations, but to take an active part 
in the discussions, to contribute sug- 
gestions and ideas which will be really 
profitable, and thus make this con- 
vention a real success. 



Communication 

Regarding Major Examinations 



There are those connected with the 
College who favor the newly in- 
stituted Major Examinations. Some 
of our Alumni have expressed them- 
selves as favorable to the theory. 
Some have expressed themselves as 
oposed to the theory and very seri- 
ously opposed to the theory in prac- 
tice. 

(1.) Is the Major Examination a 
success ? 

(2.) What is its purpose? 

(3.) Does it serve its purpose? 

(4.) Are they fairly and equally 
given by every department? 

(5.) Are they the best plan for 
the College? 

(6.) The students' viewpoint, is it 
in accord with the theory? 

(7.) Will the Major Examination 
I rovide for Bowdoin in the future ? 

(1.) Is the Major Examination a 
Success? 

If success is taken to mean only the 
application to a few students of the 
Ian, mainly to subject them to a 
Ilajor Examination, it is a success. 
- hit if considered from the results ob- 
t Jncd, tho manner given, the atmos 



phere created, the future outlook, 
then it most decidedly is not a suc- 
cess. A major exam which is merely 
the summation of six final exams in 
a course which is a theoretical course, 
and with these six final exams in one, 
all containing the details of each 
course, dates, names, places and smal- 
ler occurences which are counted as 
fit for a final exam at the end of a 
semester, but not on a major exam 
which should be a general exam cover- 
ing the subject, if this is considered 
a success then we fail to see it. 

(2.) What is the Purpose of the 

Major Examination? 

The examination was planned 
to be a general examination, 
a sort of crystalizing of facts and 
thoughts obtained in six or more 
courses, a co-ordinating and relation- 
combining examination which should 
leave out details not rememberable, 
and instead deal in principles and the 
thought chain which should permeate 
each department. This seems to be 
the logical purpose for the major ex- 
amination and if this purpose is 
reached, then well and good, other 
things being considered in relative im- 
portance. The other things are: at- 
mosphere created, effect on student 
body now, in the future and on future 
prospective students. Also the effect 
on the departments of the College and 
the courses persued by the students. 

(3.) Does it Serve This Purpose? 

From our standpoint it does not. 
But there are those who claim for it 
that its best purposes are met. 

Six final examinations printed and 
given together are not a general ex- 
amination and should not be con- 
sidered as being the purpose of the 
major. An example: A student vitally 
interested in History, Government or 
Economics who has planned on having 
a minor in a language is met with 
this proposition: whether it is not 
better for him to take two more 
courses in the language and his major 
exam rather than risk the possibility 
of meeting six or seven final exams 
all crowded into one in, say History. 
This is not a far fetched example, it 
has happened already and is happen- 
ing now and will happen in the 
future. The student goes to graduate 
school and takes one of his choice 
courses, History or Economics, but he 



took his major exam in a language. 
With all fairness and truth it can be 
said that students are being driven 
from one department to another in 
their major work by nothing other 
than the major examination. Is this 
the purpose of the examination? If so 
it is admirably served. 

(4.) Are These Exams Equal in Each 
Department? 

The very asking is sufficient. In a 
language, for example, it is one of 
progress along the same line for three 
years. If one can pass Language 8, 
then Language 1 and 2 are a "cinch," 
so to speak. But when one is major- 
ing in Science, History or Economics 
or some others there is a radical dif- 
ference. Each course is new, each 
takes up a different time and subject. 
On the face of it an exam covering 
three years' work in one of these sub- 
jects is more difficult and dangerous to 
a student than one in six language 
courses. Result: all flock to the easy, 
less worrying and less dangerous 
ones. 

(5.) Are They the Best Plan for the 
College? 

A few facts will give a start. There 
are now several students — good stu- 
dents, good Bowdoin men, who wish 
to major in one of the so named 
"difficult majors" who are planning on 
transferring elsewhere. Can they be 
blamed ? To take four years' work, do 
good work, average "B's," and at the 
end be in danger of failing on the 
major exam and so losing the degree 
for a year at least — this is not a 
bright outlook. Perhaps one will say 
that the College will be just as well 
off without them if they are afraid 
of a major exam. But the College will 
not be, for they are students, good 
men, and a credit to any college. 

This is only one phase of the sub- 
ject. Others are that it is not best 
for the College from a departmental 
standpoint — most concentrate on a 
few departments with the result that 
in some departments very few will 
major. Should Bowdoin adopt a plan 
because some other college has it on 
a different working basis than here ? 
(6.) The Student's Viewpoint. 

The Bowdoin College student is not 
so much a "shirker," is not afraid of 
work, wants the best instruction and 
is as proud of Bowdoin's scholastic 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



standard as is the most ardent pro- 
fessor. But there is a feeling of un- 
certainty about a major exam taken 
the Senior year and necessary to pass 
before graduating. 

If the Bowdoin student were afraid 
of just work he would have gone else- 
where to college long ago. So that 
can be counted out. Hard courses are 
filled with students and seem to be 
relished. But the major exam never. 
The uncertainty, the seeming useless- 
ness, the fact that this uncertainty 
is minimized in some departments he 
does not care to major in and is the 
maximum in other he wishes, all 
these together with so much average 
college activity and the manner ad- 
ministered tend to concentrate stu- 
dent sentiment against the major 
exam. 

(7.) Will the Major Exam Provide for 
Bowdoin in the Future? 



ing. Should the faculty decide to act 
on the matter all Bowdoin students 
would welcome it. 

JOHN G. YOUNG, 

ALEXANDER THOMPSON, 

LOYD H. HATCH, 

For the Council. 



M. I. T. Conference 

(Continued from Page 1) 



who gave their services. They were 
Claff '21, Battison '22, Dahlgren '22, 
Norton '22, Butler '23, Eames '23, 
Kimball '23, and Whitman '23. 



Assignments 



John Young '21, as president of the 
Student Council, will represent stu- 
dent government. Flinn '22 will rep- 
resent the athletic interests of the 
College. Woodbury '22, as assistant 
manager of the Musical Clubs, will 
represent musical clubs and dramatics, 
Ham '22, as Editor-in-Chief of the 
"Orient," will represent the literary 
activities and the editorial part of 
publications; and Tileston '22, the 
What Bowdoin student is going to I manager of the Bowdoin Publishing 



tell the prep school man of the major 
exam and explain its workings to him 
as a string to get him to Bowdoin ? 
A few facts will aid in this point. 
Already this year there have been men 
in preparatory schools decline to con- 
sider Bowdoin, men who were very 
amply prepared and for no reason 
which they stated but the danger of a 
major exam. This has occurred more 
than once and may occur numerous 
times. This is just an example of the 
future outlook. 

In closing, the Bowdoin College stu- 
dent is for Bowdoin ever, for Bow- 
doin in the future and for what is 
best for Bowdoin. He is not afraid 
of work, nor of hard work, for he is 
in Bowdoin. 

But at the present time and with 
the present outlook the student sees 
that this major exam is not best for 
Bowdoin. The purpose is not met, the 
working is theory only, the College 
suffers, the departments are discrimi- 
nated against, the future lacks to say 
the least. 

But we welcome discussion on the 
subject. We welcome more light and 
all we wish is for the best for Bow- 
doin College and her students. Othej- 
letters are wecomed. 

The Student Council has considered 
this for a long time and this is the 
outgrowth of that. It is not the 
opinion of a few but of many and 
for this reason should be given a hear- 



Company, will represent the business 
side of publications. 

Delegates from 35 colleges and uni- 
versities will be be present. Among 
the New England colleges to be rep- 
resented are Harvard, Yale, Dart- 
mouth, Brown, Williams, Wesleyan 
Trinity, and Maine. Many Southern 
and Western colleges will also send 
men. It is expected that there will 
be an attendance of over 130 men. 
The visitors will be entertained at 
fraternity houses. In addition to the 
regular program there will be a dance 
in Walker Memorial Building on Fri- 
day evening and a dinner on Satur- 
day evening. It is hoped that this 
conference will develop into a periodic 
if not an annual affair. 



ECONOMICS 2 
Week of April 18 

Seager — Chap. 24. 
Materials — Chap. 7 (Section A- 
259-298). 



ECONOMICS 4b 
Week of April 18 

Conference reports on the market- 
ing of wool, sugar, and coal. 

April 21, all reports due. Duncan, 
ch. 17. 



ECONOMICS 6 
Week of April 18 

The Survey— April 9 and April 16. 

See library bulletin board for 

bibliographies for conference reports. 



Informal Dance 



An informal dance was held on Sat- 
urday evening, April 9, to raise money 
for the Student Council. This money 
will be devoted to sending delegates 
to the Intercollegiate Conference at 
M. I. T. this week-end. The dance 
was under the direction of the Stu- 
dent Council. It was a success in 
every way. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Wilmot 
B. Mitchell, Mrs. William H. Davis, 
Mrs. Alfred O. Gross, and Mrs. Fred- 
erick S. Nowlan. 

The orchestra which furnished the 
music was made up of undergraduates 



ECONOMICS 8 
Week of April 18 

April 21 — Reports due. Class re- 
ports on The Padrone system, and The 
Consumer's League. 

April 23— Carlton, ch. 6. 

GOVERNMENT 2 

Tenth Week 

Ending Saturday, April 26 

(April 19, Patriots' Day) 

Lecture XVI. April 21— State Fi- 
nances (concluded). 
Assignment: 

1. Munro — Government of 
United States, chap. XXXIII. 

2. Reports on library topics. 
Group A — Conferences. 
Group B — Quiz section. 



the 



ENGLISH HISTORY 
(History 8) 
Tenth Week 

April 18— Lecture XVIII. The Strug- 
gle for Reform, 1815-1835. 

April 20 — Lecture XIX. Economic 
and Political Development, 1835-1865. 

Reading: 

Cheyney — Short History, pp. 616- 
649. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Cheyney— Readings, Nos. 405, 408, 
411, 415, 416, 421, 423, 428, 430, 434, 
439, 440. 



EUROPE SINCE 1870 
(History 10) 
Tenth Week 

April 18— Lecture XVIII. Europe 
and Africa. 

April 20 — Lecture XIX. Europe 
and Asia. 

Reading: 

Hazen: pp. 318-9, 371-375, 551-563, 
681-705. 



HISTORY 12 
Political History of the United States 

Lecture XL March 14 — Political 
Readjustment in the Administration 
of Grant. 

Lecture XII. March 16 — End of 
Political Reconstruction. 

Reading— Bassett, ch. XXIX. 



Campus Betos 



Smiley '21, McGorrill '22, and Webb 
'22, were in Boston last week on the 
occasion of the district reunion of 
Beta Theta Pi at the Technology 
chapter. 

On last Sunday Rev. Albert J. Lord 
'94, who received an honorary degree 
of Doctor of Divinity a few years ago 
from the College, was the preacher in 
Chapel. Dr. Lord is now minister at 
the Congregational Church of Mary- 
land, Conn. In his address he spoke 
of his own college days and paid 
tribute to the memory of President 
Hyde. 

Members of the second year Medical 
Class have already moved to Port- 
land for intensive work this spring 
before the school closes its doors. 

On Wednesday evening of April 6, 
at a meeting of the Masque and 
Gown. Clifford Parcher '23, was 
elected assistant manager and Magnus 
F. Ridlon '22 stage manager. 

L. J. Hart '17 was on the Campus 
the last of the week. 

It has been recently reported that 
Maine is to have a new paper similar 
to the "Bear Skin." It will be called 
the "Maniac." 

At the request of the Student Coun- 
cil Bowdoin songs were sung in 
Chapel several times last week. 



Freshman caps are again to be seen 
on the Campus. The Freshmen are 
to wear them until Ivy Day. 

Chase '24, a transfer from Harvard, 
who has been at Bowdoin since the 
beginning of this semester, was forced 
to give up his studies this year on ac- 
count of ill health. 

The tennis court in the rear of 
Winthrop Hall is being put in con- 
dition for spring practice. 

Patterson ex-'24 was on the Campus 
last week. He is studying at Hebron 
Aacademy this semester. 

Kirkpatrick '24 returned to his 
studies after the recess. He had been 
at his home in Portsmouth, N. H., on 
account of ill health. 

James '24 is on the Campus again. 



Ibis Elections 



At a meeting of the Ibis on Sun- 
day evening the following men from 
the Junior class were elected to mem- 
bership : Cobb, Freeman, Ham, Knight, 
Pickard, Simpson, Towle, and White. 
These men will probably be initiated 
sometime in May, and two others will 
be elected next fall. 



Mathematics Club Meeting 



The Mathematics Club met last 
Wednesday evening, April 6, at the 
Alpha Delta Phi house. About twelve 
members were present. Welch '22 
read a very interesting paper on the 
fourth dimension. General discussion 
followed. Refreshments were served. 
The next meeting will be held at the 
Beta Theta Pi house on Wednesday 
evening, April 20, at eight o'clock. 
There will be a paper on the subject 
of trisecting an angle. 



jfacultp J13otes 



Professor Hormell spent the latter 
part of last week in Skowhegan as- 
sisting the town in arranging a finan- 
cial system. 

On April 17 Professor Wass will 
deliver the final lecture of the Bow- 
doin faculty series. The lecture, one 
on "Historic Hymns," will treat of the 
wealth of history and musical art em- 
bodied in these hymns. It is hoped 
that a quartet of singers will be there 
to sing some of the hymns about 
which Professor Wass will speak. 



Ivy Play in Camden 



The first presentation of the Ivy 
Play, "Stop Thief," took place before 
a large audience in Camden last Fri- 
day night. The play was warmly re- 
ceived and ran smoothly despite the 
fact that several of the actors had 
filled in at short notice. The work of 
Ingraham '21 and Daviau '23 in the 
leading rolls was excellent, while Rid- 
lon '21 and Black '23 as the absent- 
minded old gentleman and his deaf 
wife received much applause. The 
personnel of the cast follows: 

Joan Carr, daughter of the house of Carr, 

Miguel '24 
Mrs. Carr, mistress of the house of carr, 

Black '23 

Caroline Carr, daughter of the house of Carr, 

Ferguson '24 

Madge Carr, bride elect Clymer '22 

Nell, a lady's maid Daviau '23 

William Carr, master of the house of Carr, 

Ridlon '21 

James Cluney, groom elect Quinby '23 

Mr. Jamison, a speculator Hall '21 

Doctor Willoughby. interested in Joan, 

Kileski '21 

Rev. Mr. Spelvin Klees '24 

Joe Thomson, the best detective in Rhode 

Island Parcher '23 

Sargeant of Police Fillmore '23 

Police Officer O'Malley Jewett '24 

Police Officer Clancy Lee '24 

The play will be presented at Skow- 
hegan next Friday night and at Au- 
gusta Saturday night. 



Notes From Oxford 



Below are selections from an inter- 
esting letter written by Edward Har- 
lan Webster '10, formerly supervisor 
in the Springfield (Mass.) High 
Schools, who last July refused a posi- 
tion in the education department of 
one of our largest universities in order 
to go to Oxford for further study. 

"Oxford city has been a glorious 
place since the first of February. For 
weeks the crocuses have been up, the 
almond trees have been out, and the 
grass has been as green as in late May 
at home. And the sun! I had be- 
lieved from my visit to England in 
1912 that it rained here every day. 
But not so! We have had wonderful 
sunshine, and yet not the kind that 
glares and makes everything as bril- 
liant as in a modern poster. From 
our back room up stairs we have been 
able to look off on great stretches of 
gardens, many times only half dis- 
cernible through golden and pinkish 



10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



mists. I suppose it is because of this 
haze in the air that Oxford seems to 
all of us at times like a veritable land 
of visions. And the birds! Really it 
is hard to believe that there can be so 
many different kinds of birds in one 
small town. And how they sing! I 
think I shall miss them more than the 
gardens, more than the wonderful old 
buildings, more than even the inspir- 
ing lectures of Sir Walter Raleigh. 

"And that brings me to what I 
really came over here for. The 
lectures have been delightful. If only 
our men in America had the time to 
give (and they haven't) to the prepar- 
ation of their lectures, our boys might 
be induced to do many of the things 
that we want them to do. A stupid 
lecture is rarely heard here. The 
dons and professors both seem to 
study every possible method of pre- 
senting interesting material in such a 
vivid way that it strikes. I have been 
especially impressed with the form 
and finish of the lectures in the Eng- 
lish department. Professor Raleigh 
attracted great crowds during the first 
term to his lectures on Chaucer. D. 
Nichol Smith, the Goldsmith reader, 
has a contented following. He usual- 
ly deals with minor periods, stupid 
times like the fifteenth century, but 
he manages to make his message 
count. I think it is because he looks 
for the human qualities in a writer 
always and because he has the rare 
gift of selecting those characteristics 
in a work that will make the fellows 
wish to go to the original and read 
the whole. Dr. Carlyle with whom I 
am taking European literature 1300- 
1800 has given us some very thought- 
provoking talks on Italian, Spanish, 
French, and English tendencies, he 
calls them 'movements' — in poetry 
(prose occasionally) since the days of 
Dante. He always has a following 
with the advanced American students. 
Professor Gilbert Murray is simply 
delightful. He has such a calm, peace- 
ful exterior but a mind that radiates 
energy all the time. I am studying 
Aristotle's 'Poetics' with him. 

"After the first term we went on a 
trip through southern England 'do- 
ing' cathedrals, and devoted part of a 
week to the King Arthur countries 
at Camelford and Timbagel, Cornwall. 
The pleasantest experience was a visit 
to Ache House, the home of the 



Drakes, ancestors of both my mother's 
and father's. The house is in a very 
remarkable state of preservation and 
is now occupied by a Colonel Pelly of 
the British Army. He showed us all 
over the estate and proved a most 
gracious host. The Colonel's own 
room is the one in which the great 
Duke of Marlborough was born in 
1650. 

"By the way, we of Oxford have 
been honored thrice of late by visits 
of royalty. In February the Prince of 
Wales, a most charming fellow, was 
given his D. C. L. He was two years 
here (1912-1914) and now the Univer- 
sity gives him an honorary degree. I 
suppose for his 'heavenly smile.' The 
Queen 'came up' on the eleventh to 
get hers! She looked very majestic 
as she walked up the aisle to the blare 
of trumpets. She nodded and smiled 
as the English cheered." 



Campus Activities 



Massachusetts 

CLASS OF 1921 

Frederick W. Anderson of Newton 
Center, Mass., graduated from New- 
ton High School. He is a member of 
Chi Psi fraternity. He was a mem- 
ber of the Freshman Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet. He became a member of the 
Biology Club his Junior year and this 
year is secretary of that organization. 
He is also a member of the Debating 
Council and took part in the Bradbury 
Debate. He is an assistant in Eng- 
lish. 

Chester E. Claff of Randolph, 
Mass., is a graduate of Thayer 
Academy. He played on his class 
baseball team, played in the college 
band, and gave a response at the 
Freshman banquet during his first 
year. He became a member of the 
Musical Clubs his Sophomore year 
and has played banjo with them ever 
since. He became a member of the 
Classical Club his Junior year. 

H. A. Dudgeon of New Bedford, 
Mass., is a graduate of New Bedford 
High School and a member of Delta 
Upsilon fraternity. In his Freshman 
year he played on his class football 
team, and was on the varsity football 
squad. During his Sophomore year he 
was on the Sophomore Hop Commit- 
tee and in the Commencement Play. 
Last year he was on the varsity foot 



ball team, the rifle team, and was a 
member of the Classical Club, the 
Masque and Gown, and Ivy Day Com- 
mittee. This year he was captain of 
the varsity football team, and is a 
member of the "B" Club, Student 
Council, Masque and Gown, Classical 
Club, Rifle Club, and Glee Club. 

Alonzo B. Holmes of Braintree, 
Mass., prepared for Bowdoin at 
Thayer Academy. He is a member 
of the Delta Upsilon fraternity, the 
"B" Club, and the Biology Club. In 
his Freshman year he was a member 
of his class baseball and track teams, 
and of the varsity baseball squad, 
and of this latter organization in his 
Sophomore and Senior years. He has 
been cheer leader throughout his 
Junior and Senior years, and a mem- 
ber of the varsity hockey team and 
the Senior's Class Day Committee in 
his Senior year. 

CLASS OF 1922 
Clyde Congdon of Springfield, 
Mass., is a graduate of the Spring- 
field Technical High School. He is a 
member of the Delta Upsilon fra- 
ternity. He has been a member of 
the College Choir ever since his Fresh- 
man year, and a member of the Musi- 
cal Clubs during his Sophomore and 
Junior years. He is also the vice- 
president of the Bowdoin Y. M. C. A. 
E. A. Hunt of South Braintree, 
Mass., prepared for Bowdoin at 
Thayer Academy. He is a member 
of Psi Upsilon fraternity. In his 
Freshman year he was a member of 
U. Q. Society, on his class relay team, 
the varsity relay team, and the 
varsity track squad. Last year he 
played on the Sophomore baseball 
team; he won a place on the varsity 
cross country team, was again on the 
varsity relay team, and on the 
varsity track team. This year he is 
on the varsity relay team, and on the 
varsity track team. Just before the 
B. A. A. meet on February 5, at the 
trials held for the relay team, he 
equaled the record for the 390-yard 
distance, being one-fifth of a second 
faster than the two next men. He 
is also a member of the Friars and 
on the Board of Union Managers. He 
is majoring in Economics. 
CLASS OF 1923 
Howard E. Crawford is a member 
of the Zeta Psi fraternity and a 
graduate of Maiden High School. Ho 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



played on his class football team 
against the Freshmen this fall. 

S. R. Dudgeon of New Bedford, 
Mass., transferred from Norwich Uni- 
versity. He is a member of Delta 
Upsilon fraternity. 

George Noah is a graduate of Mel- 
rose High School and a member of 
the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. 
He transferred from the University 
of Maine this fall. He is a member 
of the fencing squad. 

CLASS OF 1924. 

R. G. Badger, Newton, is a gradu- 
ated of Newton High School, and a 
member of Sigma Nu fraternity. He 
was on his class football team and 
track team, and on the varsity track 
squad. 

E. A. Beals of Lowell prepared for 
Bowdoin at Hebron Academy. He is 
president of the Freshman class, and 
a member of Alpha Delta Phi frater- 
nity. He is on the varsity track 
squad and represented his class in the 
Freshman-Sophomore track meet. 

Lindsey C. Churchill of Winthrop, 
Mass., is a graduate of Winthrop 
High School and a member of the 
Kappa Sigma fraternity. 

H. K. Dow of Needham, is a 
graduate of Newton High School. He 
is a member of Zeta Psi fraternity 
and of the Glee Club. 



Year after Year 

The Lenox 

is a cordial host — the Boston 
headquarters for college teams 
and college men. 
Year after Year 

The Brunswick 

is the high place of Boston's fas- 
hionable night life, famous for 
Egyptian Room Dinner Dances. 



In Boston 



on either side of Copley Square, close 
to the Back Bay stations, near the 
theatres, neighbors with fine shops — 
two hotels that share the traditions of 
of every campus. 

THE LENOX THE BRUNSWICK 

Boylston St. Boylston St. 

at Exeter at Copley Sq. 

L. C. PRIOR, Managing Director 



HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

Graduate School of Business Administration 

A two-year course in business leading to the degree of Master 
of Business Administration. 

Open to college graduates. 

Courses offered in the following fields: Accounting, Busi- 
ness Law, Banking and Finance, Marketing, Advertising, 
Retail Store Problems, Sales Management, Industrial Manage- 
ment, Labor Problems, Business Statistics, Foreign Trade, 
Transportation, Lumbering, Office Organization. 



I I I I I I I 

Enrolment since the establishment 

of the School In 1908. 
13S Colleges are now represented. 




ce-09 09-10- lo-n 



15-Zi 14-C5 15-25 16-i7 17- 



18-19 19-SO E0-E1 



Nineteen graduates of Bowdoin College have attended the 
School, two during the present year. 

The registration for 1921-'22 is limited to three hundred in 
the first-year courses. Application after May 1st should be 
accompanied by a certified transcript of the college record. 



Dean W. B. Donham, University 131 

Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 



BOWDOIN CANTEEN 

8 a. m.-12 m.; 1.30-6; 7-11 

Sundays, 12-5 p. m. 

A. PALMER, 19 North Winthrop 



DAVIS' MARKET 

Next to Star Lunch 

A 12J per cent, reduction on all Cigarettes 
n carton lots. 



B CLUB PINS 

HAVE COME 

COURSON & MORTON 



P. J. MESERVE'S 

Drug Store 
Opposite Town Hall 



A. W. HASKELL, D. D. S. 

W. F. BROWN, D. D. S. 



DENTISTS 



Over Postoffice. 



Brunswick, Maine 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 Maine Street 



12 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Delicious sweets in a 
quaint box! 




Give an original touch to your candy gift! 
In the Sampler every girl recognizes the good 
taste of the man who sent it. A candy package 
so unlike any other that it never fails to make 
«• hit. 

FOR SALE BY 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



Do You Need Extra Courses? 

Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages, Economics, 
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire 
how credits earned may be applied on present college program. 



HOME STUDY DEPT. 



CHICAGO. tLLINOIS 



ANA/ 



THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

Trains students in the principles of the 
law and in the technique of the profes- 
sion so as to best prepare them for 
active practice wherever the English 
system of law prevails. 

America's new place in international 
politics and commerce challenges the 
young American. 

He must equip himself for new 
world conditions, with a knowledge 
of legal fundamentals. 

LAW — Its principles and application 
to all business is almost as necessary 
to the coming business man as it is 
indispensable to the lawyer. 

Special scholarships ($75 per year) 
are awarded to college graduates. 

Course for LL.B. requires 3 school 
years. Those who have received this 
degree from this or any other approved 
school of law may receive LL.M. on 
the completion of one year's resident 
attendance under the direction of Dr. 
Melville M. Bigelow. Several $25 and 
$50 scholarships open in this course. 
For Catalog, Address 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 



HOMER ALBERS, Dean 



YOU HAVE WRITTEN POEMS! 

Do you care to have them revised 
or constructively criticised by success- 
ful authors ? If you do, then send us 
your manuscript (stories, articles or 
poems). We will criticise, and place 
them should they prove to be accept- 
able for publication. 

There is no actual charge for our 
services. If, however, you have not 
previously enrolled with the advisory 
department of this association, we re- 
quest that you enclose the initial fee 
of two dollars, which we must ask of 
each new contributor. There is no 
additional expense, no further obliga- 
tion. 

It must be realized that we can only 
be of aid to those of serious intent. If 
you do mean to strive for literary suc- 
cess, we can help you in many ways. 
Our services are yours until we have 
actually succeeded in marketing at 
least one of your manuscripts. Send 
something to-day! 

Please enclose return postage with 
your communications. 

NATIONAL LITERARY 
ASSOCIATION 

131 W. 3Cth St. 

New York City 

Advisory Department 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



13 



CITIZENS LAUNDRY 



College Agent 



Auto Service 



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course in ten easy lessons by mail. It is 
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refunded. 

Name 

Street 

City and State 



Bowdoin Dairy Lunch 

Open Day and Night 



CORDOVAN BOOTS 



IX 



YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 



"Herman's" Tan Cordovan $13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan. .$15.50 
"Florsheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 

TENNIS SHOES, INDOOR AND 

OUTDOOR MOCCASINS, RUBBER 

BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 



OH BOY! 

Have You Tried Our 

49c CHOCOLATES 

There is nothing cheap about our 
place but the price. 

BUTLER'S 



F. W. Chandler & Son 

HAVE 

Tennis Rackets 

from $1.50 to $1.60 each 

Championship Tennis Balls 

60c each 

1 920 Tennis Balls 45c each 

Baseballs & Baseball Supplies 

25 Kinds of Golf Balls 

Golf Bags and Clubs 

The College Book Store 



FOR GOLF ENTHUSIASTS 



HATS 
GLOVES 
SHIRTS 
HOSIERY 

SHOES 
TIES, Etc. 



WE CARRY EVERYTHING NECESSARY 

In fact there is nothing this "Live Store" cannot 
supply in the way of wearing apparel. Special at- 
tention is called to a fine line of 

Golf Suits in Homespuns and Herringbone weaves 
attractively priced. 



Sport Oxfords for golf or other occasions, made 
by Wright & Ditson. The leather is a smoked elk 
with rubber sole and has a tan strip across the 
throat of the shoe 



$10 



Fine Golf Hose in a mixture of grey and green and 
plain brown and grey. 



Monument 
Square 




Portland 
Maine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



DURING THE GAME 

BETWEEN CLASSES 

ON THE HIKE 



■-$ge#** 



*5* 



Vc* - * 



A "MUNCH" WHILE STUDYING 

A SNACK BEFORE RETIRING 

IN FACT— EVERY OLD TIME 



WE CAN MAKE YOU A 

VERY NOBBY SUIT 

TO MEASURE 

$30 to $50 



E. S. BODWELL 
& SON 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



SUMMER WORK 

We still have room 
For a few LIVE men 
Provided they want to 
Earn a lot of MONEY 
This summer. 

This isn't a Gamble 

It is a SURE THING 

For the man who HUSTLES 

And besides 

We pay a SALARY. 

NOW is the time 
To get on the Band Wagon 
So see one of our local men 
Or write us direct and 
Ask for the dope. 

Local representatives: 

S. H. Carter, 24 Winthrop 

Hugh Nixon, D. U. House. 

THE NATIONAL SURVEY CO. 

Topographical Offices, 
Chester Vermont 



JUD, The Barber 

was going to use this space 
but thought it wasn't neces- 
sary. 




CONSERVATIVE CLOTHES 

FOR 

COLLEGE MEN 

In stock and made to measure. 
Imported Fabrics. Lower prices for Spring 1921. 



HASKELL & JONES COMPANY 

PORTLAND .... MAINE 



TUFTS 
COLLEGE 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

Offers to the student who has 
had one year of college training, a 
four year course leading to the de- 
gree of D. M. D. 

Being located in Boston, Tufts 
College Dental School enjoys ex- 
cellent clinical advantages. 

Students in the Dental School 
Course have the privilege of clin- 
ics at the Forsythe Dental Infirm- 
ary, Boston City Hospital, Mass- 
achusetts Homeopathic Hospital, 
Boston Dispensary, Vernon St. 
Hospital, and the Massachusetts 
Home for Feeble-Minded. 

Tufts Dental School is co-edu- 
cational. 

Registration begins at 9 a. m., 
on June 21, and ends on Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

School session begins Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

For further particulars write to 
F. E. Haskins, M. D., Secretary. 

416 Huntington Avenue, 

Boston, Mass. 

WILLIAM RICE. D.M.D., Dean 



Pressing and Cleaning 

ORDERS TAKEN FOR DYEING 

SECOND HAND CLOTHING 

BOUGHT 

DAN ROSEN 




SPUR- A New Narrow 

Arrow 

Collar 

Cluett.Peabody t-Co. Inc. Troy. N.Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




^ Q 



YOUR GAME 

Y\f HATEVER your "game," whether 
in sport or serious activity, MACUl - 
LAR PARKER CLOTHES lend fin- 
ish to your performance, and are as 
individual as your own way of doing 



thin 



gs. 



MA«;ark E r 

400 WASHINGTON STREET 
The Old House with the Young Spirit 



Bowdoin men are invited to visit our shop 
when in Boston 



BOYS! 

Have you tried our new drink, 

BOWDOIN BREW? 

Our Candy, too, is right through and 
through 

THE SPEAR FOLKS 

119 Maine Street 



CARL H. MARTIN 

Cleansing and Dyeing 
Pressing and Alterations 

4 Elm Street 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

ef Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. 

Surplus and Profits, $100,000. 

Student Patronage Solicited. 



PRINTING 



of Quality 

Always in the lead 
for snap and style 

Wheeler Print Shop 

Town Building, Brunswick, Maine 



We carry the largest assortment of 

Olives, Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and 
Biscuits of all kinds east of Portland 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street Tel. 136-137 

Branch Store— 2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 

344 Washington Street 

Boston 



16 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




CUMBERLAND 

Wednesday and Thursday 
THOMAS MEIGHAN 

IN 

"FRONTIER OF THE STARS" 



Friday and Saturday 
NORMA TALMADGE 

IN 

"THE BRANDED WOMAN' 



Next Week — Monday and Tuesday 
HENRY B. WALTHALL 



IN 



"A SPLENDID HAZARD" 



PASTIME 

Wednesday and Thursday 
ETHEL CLAYTON 

IN 

'THE PRICE OF POSSESSION" 



Friday and Saturday 
KATHERINE MacDONALD 

and 

"CURTAIN" 



Next Week— Monday and Tuesday 
MAE MURRAY 



IDOLS OF CLAY" 



„£ vr 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



■ 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



VOL. LI. 



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 1921. 



Number 3 



BASEBALL HOME SEASON 



OPENS WITH A VICTORY 



Student Conference 

At M. I. T. 



Walker Pitches One Hit Game — Fort Williams On 
Small End of 15-3 Score. 



The Bowdoin baseball team opened' 
its home season on last Saturday with 
a victory over Fort Williams. Walker 
held the visitors to one hit and fan- 
ned fourteen men. Lappin of the 
Fort team got the only hit, a home 
run. The grounds were wet and the 
weather was not favorable for base- 
ball, and therefore even this score 
cannot be taken for a fair indication 
of what the team can do. 

In this game Smith was changed 
to shortstop and A. Morrell to third 
base. This arrangement seemed to 
work well, and Coach Ben Houser was 
much pleased. This interchange of 
positions ought to work out a stronger 
defence. Smith, Hill, and Clifford 
each got a three-bagger. Needelman 
was the only Bowdoin man to fail to 
hit. 



Students Vote Assessment 



(Continued 



3) 



Outing Club To 

Perfect Plans 



At a mass meeting held last Wed- 
nesday evening the student body voted 
unanaimously to assess each of its 
members five dollars to relieve the 
temporary deficit in the treasury of 
the A. S. B. C. Among the speakers 
were Badger '21, Eames '21, and 
Young '21. The details of the need 
were presented, and the reasons why 
there was no other available source 
for the money were explained. If any 
of the alumni care to contribute five 
dollars to help the cause along their 
spirit will be appreciated. Collectors 
have been appointed for every under- 
graduate group, and it is now abso- 
lutely urgent that the money be 
turned in as soon as possible. 



Calendar 



Bowdoin Delegates, Bring Back Sug- 
gestions for Activities. 



Thursday, April 21, there is to be a 
meeting of all those interested in an 
Outing Club for Bowdoin College. 
This is the second meeting and this 
time definite plans are to be pre- 
sented and the organization perfected. 

An Outing Club will fill a needed 
place in Bowdoin College. There 
have been advocates of such a plan 
among students, faculty and alumni 
for a long time. The Student Coun- 
cil which has taken the matter in 
hand to perfect organization is 

(Continued on Page 3) 



April 20— Math Club Meeting, Beta 
House, 8 o'clock. 

April 21 — Outing Club Meeting. 

April 21 — Interscholastic Champion- 
ship Debate, Debating Room. Hubbard 
Hall, 7.30 o'clock. 

April 22 — Masque and Gown, "Stop 
Thief," Westbrook. 

April 22 — Stanley Plummer Prize 
Speaking Contest, Hubbard Hall, 8 
o'clock. 

April 25 — Forum Meeting, McCann 
'02, speaker. Debating Room, Hub- 
bard Hall, 7.30 o'clock. 

April 27 — Baseball : Amherst ■ at 
Amherst. 



Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology entertained on last Friday and 
Saturday delegates from over thirty- 
five colleges and universities at an 
Intercollegiate Conference on Student 
Government. Four separate meetings 
were held at the same time, each one 
for the purpose of discussion and 
thrashing out the troubles of one 
branch of undergraduate activities. 
Bowdoin was represented by the fol- 
lowing: Athletics, Dudgeon '21, and 
Flinn '22; Publications, Ham '22, and 
Tileston '22; Student Government, 
Young '21, and Eames '21; Dra- 
matics and Musical Clubs, Woodbury 
'22. The men participated actively 
in the discussion and were able to 
bring back with them many new ideas 
and suggestions for the improvement 
of our undergraduate activities. 

The first session of the Conference 
opened on Friday in Walker Memorial 
Hall. At four separate meetings the 
delegates discussed their problems. 
That evening a dance was held for the 
delegates. They were entertained 
that night at the various fraternity 
houses. The second session was held 
on Saturday morning, and the Con- 
ference closed with a banquet on Sat- 
urday evening. President Leonard 
Metcalf '92, of the M. I. T. Alumni 
Association, was the toastmaster, and 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Baseball Results 



Bowdoin 15, Fort Williams 3. 

Princeton 5, Tufts 4 (10 innings). 
Bates 8, Pilgrims 2. 
Army 9, Williams 4. 
Boston University 11, Boston Col- 
lege 7. 

Yale 4, Pennsylvania 2. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Bowdoin Receives Bequest 



According to the will of Mr. Ed- 
mund C. Converse, the New York 
capitalist, who died in Pasadena, Cali- 
fornia, on April 5, Bowdoin is one of 
ten colleges to receive bequests. The 
will was made public on April 12th, 
and it provides $700,000 to go to ten 
different colleges. The amount desig- 
nated for Bowdoin is $50,000. The 
exact conditions relative to the be- 
quest will soon be known. 

The will provides that Amherst 
shall receive $200,000 for the upkeep 
and development of the Converse 
Memorial Library and $50,000 to 
establish an E. C. Converse scholar- 
ship fund. The eight other colleges 
to receive $50,000 each besides Bow- 
doin are: Dartmouth, Leland Stan- 
ford, Oberlin, Smith, Trinity, Tuske- 
gee, Wells, and Williams. Gains- 
borough's famous portrait of Count 
Rumford is left to Harvard and $25,- 
000 is given to the Rumford His- 
torical Society of Woburn, Mass. 



Golf Tournament 



The medal for the low qualifying 
round in the Spring Championship 
Tournament was won by Ryo Toyo- 
kawa '21 with a score of 100. The 
qualifications are as follows: 

Toyokawa '21 100 

Ryder '21 101 

Richards '22 102 

Dudgeon '21 104 

Crowell '21 106 

Pendexter '21 106 

Rochon '21 106 

Perkins '21 107 

Pickard '22 107 

Drake '22 110 

Miguel '24 Ill 

St. Clair '21 112 

Boardman '21 163 

The second round and the semi- 
finals are to be played before April 
23. The date of the 36-hole final 
round will be announced later. 

At a meeting of those qualifying, 
Richards '22 was elected captain and 
Pickard '22 manager for this spring. 
Immediate action will be taken to ar- 
range some matches. 

The results of this tournament will 
have no effect on the make-up of the 
team, so everyone has a chance. There 
are many who play golf, who have 



not yet come out. It is to be hoped 
that they will shine up their clubs 
and get out on the links soon, even 
if they did not get out in time for 
the qualifying round. There are 
plenty of places left on the team. 

Don't forget that there is to be a 
handicap tournament later in the year. 
If everyone is to have a fair chance 
then he must get out and play now 
and turn in to Pickard his three best 
18-hole scores. It is up to you to co- 
operate so that handicaps may be fair. 
Get busy now. 



Lecture By Herbert K. Job 



At a public lecture under the 
auspices of the Biology Club, and the 
Audubon Society of Brunswick, Mr. 
Herbert K. Job, the well-known 
naturalist, spoke on wild bird life, on 
Monday evening, April 11. The lec- 
ture was well attended and proved 
very interesting. He told how he 
came to take up ornithology as his 
life work, and went on to describe our 
native birds. He showed many pic- 
tures to illustrate his lecture. Mr. 
Job urged his audience to take an in- 
terest in bird study, explaining meth- 
ods of protecting the birds. The pic- 
tures which he showed are considered 
to be the finest set of pictures ever 
produced of bird life, and have been 
characterized by leading students as 
having reached the high water mark 
in bird photography. 



Tennis Prospects 

According to the schedule recently 
announced by Manager Freeman, the 
tennis team will this year face one 
of the hardest seasons in years. There 
are six dual tournaments and two in- 
tercollegiate tournaments in the list, 
a longer and harder schedule than 
ever. But with the material there is 
in College, the season ought to prove 
successful. 

On May third, Bowdoin meets Colby 
in a dual tournament here. On the 
eleventh Bates will be the opponent at 
Lewiston and on the 16th and 17th the 
Maine Intercollegiates will be held in 
Lewiston. The New England trip will 
follow this meet. Brown is slated for 
the 19th and Springfield the 21st. On 
May 23 Bowdoin will enter the New 
England Intercollegiate Tennis Tour- 



nament at Longwood Courts, Chestnut 
Hills. This will last through two or 
three days. On Thursday of that week 
Bowdoin meets Boston University 
here. The final contest will be here 
against Springfield on June six. 

There are three Varsity men left 
from last year: Captain Partridge 
'22, H. Bishop '23, and L. Bishop '23. 
In the freshman class, Fisher shows 
much promise. He will be remembered 
as the champion of last year's inter- 
scholastic tournament. Linn '22 and 
Kimball '23 are showing up well. 
There promises to be much competi- 
tion for berths on the team this year. 



S. T. Dana '04 To Be 
State Forest Commissioner 



Last week Governor Baxter nomi- 
nated Samuel T. Dana '04 to Forest 
Commissioner and Land Agent of 
Maine. All Bowdoin men will be par- 
ticularly pleased to note that this im- 
portant office is to be given to a man 
of unusual ability and fine character. 
After graduating here with highest 
honors Mr. Dana took the course in 
Forestry at Yale and has since made 
a distinguished record in the forestry 
service of the Government. 



Masque and Gown Trip 

The Ivy play, 'Stop Thief," was 
presented in Skowhegan last Friday 
night, and in Augusta last Saturday 
night. The play made quite a hit in 
Skowhegan and was well received in 
Augusta. The actors had improved 
their parts and the play went off even 
more smoothly than it had the preced- 
ing week at Camden. Black '23 was 
really the star of the play. His act- 
ing in the part of a deaf old lady, 
could not easily have been improved. 
Ridlon '22, in the role of the excitable 
and absent-minded old gentleman, also 
came in for much praise, while In- 
graham '21 and Daviau '23, played 
their parts as the thieves so skilfully 
and so realistically that it is rumored 
that the people whose guests they 
were in Skowhegan sat up all night 
to watch the house. As is usual on 
all Masque and Gown trips, it rained 
both in Skowhegan and Augusta, but 
nevertheless the trip was a successful 
one. This Friday the play will be 
presented in Westbrook. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



First Home Game 



( Continued fr 



Page 1) 



The last of this month the team 
starts on its second long trip, playing 
Amherst, Wesleyan, Trinity, Boston 
College, and Harvard. The latter 
game has been recently added to the 
schedule. By the time the Maine 
series starts, Bowdoin ought to have 
a team that will startle the fans. 

The box score and summary: 

Bowdoin 

ab bh po a e 



A. Morrell. 3b 4 

Hill. If 4 

Davis, rf 4 

Holmes, cf 5 

Clifford. 



M. Morrell. c 5 

Walker, p 4 

Totals 40 



FORT WILLIAMS 

ab bh po 



Lappin. lb 
Payne, rf . 
:;: Wyeher . . . 
Dragon, cf 
Williamson. 
Puloski. 3b 
Collette. 2b 
PilVra'k, c 

Kallock, ss 



McKnight, 



follows : 

LEAGUE A 

Alpha Delta Phi Drake '22 

Theta Delta Chi Howard '21 

Delta Upsilon Whitman '23 

Kappa Sigma Bisson '23 

Sigma Nu McCrum '21 

Phi Delta Psi Wilson '22 

LEACUE B 

Psi Upsilon Varney '23 

Delta Kappa Epsilon McClellan '21 

Zeta Psi Hanscom '23 

Beta Theta Pi Harmon '22 

Chi Psi Marston '21 

Non-Frat Canter '22 

The committee in charge of the 
leagues and schedule consists of Hunt 
r 22, McCurdy '22, and Buker '21. 
Delta Upsilon 8, Sigma Nu 5. 

In the first game of the interfra- 
ternity series Delta Upsilon won from 
Sigma Nu by a score of eight to five. 
The D. U. team rolled up a large num- 
ber of their points in the first few in- 
nings. Errors were costly for both 
sides. 



o 



o 



10 



o 2- 



Totals 28 

'Batted for Payne in ninth. 

Innings 1 2 3 4 5 

Bowdoin 1 1 4 1 

Fort Williams... 10 

Runs made, by Needelman 4. Smith 2, A. 
Morrell 2. Hill 3, Clifford 2, M. Morrell, 
Walker. Two-base hits, A. Morrell, Clifford 2. 
Three-base hits, Smith, Hill, Clifford. Home 
run, Lappin. Stolen bases, Needelman. Smith, 
A. Morrell 2, Hill, Davis 3, M. Morrell. 
Walker. Puloski. Base on balls, off Walker 3. 
off Williamson 3. Struck out. by Walker 14, 
by Williamson 8. Sacrifice hit, Needelman. 
Double plays, Needelman to Smith to Clifford ; 
Collette to Lappin to Billeback. Left on bases. 
Bowdoin 7. Fort Williams 2. Hit by pitched 
ball, A. Morrell, Walker, Payne. Wild pitch. 
Williamson. Passed balls, Billeback, M. Mor- 
rell, Umpire. Markthaler. Time. 2h. 3m. 



Outing Club 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Interfraternity Baseball 

Several games have already been 
played this year in the intramural 
baseball competition. Each fraternity 
and the non-fraternity group has a 
team, making twelve in all. The 
schedule has been drawn up by a 
committee of the "B" Club and regu- 
lar games will be played. The win- 
ners of the two leagues will meet in 
a three game series to decide the 
championship of the college. A suit- 
able trophy will doubtless be awarded 
as in the past. 

The division into the two leagues 
and the captains of each team are as 



anxious to co-operate with all those 
interested, and it is hoped that there 
are those among the Student Body 
who desire such a club and have the 
interest and enthusiasm to carry it 
en. The faculty is interested in this 
and some members are especially ex- 
perienced in outing. 

The general plan is to create and 
foster a love for and a desire to get 
into the great outdoors, and in 
furtherance of this to conduct hikes, 
canoe trips and general expeditions 
throughout the year, specializing in 
winter sports with a carnival at the 
peak; with canoeing, camping, hunt- 
ing and fishing in the fall and spring. 
This club is to be a distinct organiza- 
tion, and distinct in purpose, not 
copied after any other club anywhere, 
but using all our resources all the 
year round for the good of ourselves 
in the outdoor life. Cabins, camps 
and canoes are to be secured eventual- 
ly, and a very stable and permanent 
organization will be the essential out- 
come. 

All who are really interested 
should go to the Debating Room in 
Hubbard Hall at seven o'clock on 
Thursday, April 21. Let's go! Stu- 
dents of Bowdoin and make this club 
a grand success; now is the time to 



start so we will be all set for next 
fall. Having an Outing Club will give 
us all a chance to spend our spare 
hours and to enjoy the outdoor life. 
The Outing Club will also be of in- 
terest to men, who are planning to 
come to College. It will help in every 
way. So, let's go! 

Here are a few remarks given by 
different members of the faculty: 

"The proposed Outing Club seems 
to me an excellent plan. There are 
many interesting places around 
Brunswick for the students to visit. 
It will also do the students a great 
deal of good physically." Kenneth C. 
M. Sills. 

"The proposal of an Outing Club 
has my hearty approval. The ordi- 
nary individual has so little acquaint- 
ance with out-of-doors that he is un- 
aware of the immense satisfaction to 
be found in a closer intimacy of all 
the varied and beautiful features that 
nature has to offer. 

"Whatever a man's taste may be, 
something can be found to please and 
attract. 

"The smallest beginning, I feel sure 
would grow into something of great 
importance and profit to every college 
man." C. C. Hutchins. 

"The proposed Outing Club seems to 
me to be very desirable. There are 
interesting places within easy walk- 
ing distance of the College, which are 
unknown to the majority of students. 
If the proposed club proves a success 
it will promote excursions to more dis- 
tant points and I believe stimulate in- 
terest and knowledge in natural 
science." W. A. Moody. 

Professor Copeland states that he 
is very much in favor of the proposed 
Outing Club, and will de everything in 
his power to make it a success. The 
Biology Club is also interested and 
will be glad to conduct members of 
the Outing Club to places of interest 
and will help in every way. 

J. G. Y. 



Kappa Sigma 

Wins Championship 

In a fast and interesting game the 
Kappa Sigma basketball team de- 
feated the Chi Psi team in the final 
game of the Inter-Fraternity basket- 
ball league. During the first half the 
Chi Psi warriors had a decided edge 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



on their rivals, having the larger side 
of an eight to seven score when the 
whistle blew. The Kappa Sigs seemed 
to lack team work during this period 
and did little remarkable playing, but 
when Coach Magee tossed up the ball 
at the beginning of the second period 
the fireworks started and the heavy 
Kappa Sigma players proceeded to 
pile up a big lead. The Chi Psi play- 
ers fought valiantly but they were 
outweighed and couldn't seem to get 
near enough the iron rim to cage a 
tally for some minutes. Late in the 
period they staged a rally that 
brought the score up to fifteen but 
by that time the winners were border- 
ing the thirty mark. 

As winner in its league, each team 
will receive a cup, the winner's cup 
to be appropriate to show the added 
distinction of the college champion- 
ship. 

The summary: 

KAPPA SIGMA— —CHI PSI 

Davis (9) If If, Johnson 

If, Walker 

Perry (8) rf rf, Marston (7) 

Clifford (8) c c, Philbrook (8) 

McCurdy (4) lg lb. Staples 

Dahlgren (2) rg......'. rg, Knight 

Score: Kappa Sigma, 31, Chi Psi 15. Goals 
from floor: Kappa Sigma, Clifford 4, Perry 4, 
McCurdy 2, Davis 2, Dahlgren 1 ; Chi Psi, 
Philbrook 4, Marston 2. Goals from foul: 
Kappa Sigma, Davis 5 ; Chi Psi, Marston 3. 
Referee, Coach Jack Magee. Umpire, George 
Noah. Timer. V. C. McGorrill '22. Scorers, 
Gerrard '23, Bisson - 23. Time, Two 20-minute 
periods. 

M. I. T. Conference 

(Continued from Page 1) 

there were several speakers. 

It is expected that many of the sug- 
gestions which the Bowdoin delegates 
received will be tried out. A complete 
report of every branch cannot be pub- 
lished in this issue. This week the 
"Orient" is able to give accounts only 
on Athletics and Publications. Some 
of the points discussed in the Ath- 
letics conference were: Organization, 
Eligibility Rules, Financial Support, 
Insignia, Cheerleaders, Inducements to 
Athletes, Training Table. 

It was thought that Bowdoin's sys- 
tem of Athletic Council compared 
very favorably with others. In some 
colleges a certain number of Juniors 
are elected for a two-year term to 
prevent a complete change in the 
Council in one year. In some colleges 



the students entirely control athletics 
in others, the faculty, or the alumni. 
The best system was thought to b; 
one where each group has its share 
in the control. 

Bowdoin's Elanket Tax is fairly lov> 
in comparison with those of other col 
leges. Amherst, for instance, has one 
of twenty-five dollars. In some col 
leges the alumni bear practically all 
the burden, others are supported by 
gate receipts. Harvard, for example 
makes football pay for all the other 
sports. In other colleges, basketball 
pays well. Entertainments are given 
throughout the year by some colleges 
to raise money for athletics. Season 
tickets are sold to alumni in some 
cases. One particularly good sugges- 
tion is the sending of printed sched- 
ules to all the alumni. 

The matter of stirring up spirit 
seems to be mainly a matter of edu- 
cation. Some colleges practice cheers 
regularly once every two weeks. 
Rallies are held often. Bowdoin is 
one of the few colleges to have com- 
pulsory gym work. Our method of 
selecting coaches is in the main the 
same as that of other colleges. 

Most colleges now have rules 
against freshman participation in ath- 
letics. Amherst, Williams, and Wes- 
leyan, colleges of Bowdoin's size, have 
one term rules, thus keeping fresh- 
men out of football. They, however, 
have freshman teams, necessitating 
an extra coach. 

Most colleges now give a single 
letter for all sports, with the initials 
of the sport attached. Cornell has 
the same system that we have. It is 
thought that the size of these letters 
should be according to the rules. Many 
Bowdoin men do not observe these 
rules. The letter clubs in many col- 
leges play a very important part, en- 
forcing traditions, keeping records, 
and recommending seniors for letters 
for deserving work. In many colleges, 
certificates are given every time a 
man wins his letter, and a certificate 
is given at graduation showing all the 
letters that have been won. The cheer 
leaders are chosen from a group of 
managers and captains, in some 
places. In others there is competition 
among juniors until the last baseball 
game. 

Among the inducements offered men 
who show promise are athletic 



scholarships, college jobs, and help 
from alumni. Some collcg-s have 
prep school clubs similar to our sec- 
tional clubs. A particularly good idea 
is the holding of second team games 
at home, in order to bring promising 
athletes to the college. 

The training table is endowed by 
alumni at Penn. At Harvard the cost 
of maintaining a training table is $16 
per week per man. Of this the men 
pay $9 each and the alumni pay the 
remainder. 

Other branches of student activities 
were discussed at equal length. An 
account of the Publications confer- 
ence is to be found in the editorial 
column, but it will be necessary to 
postpone reports of the student gov- 
ernment and theatricals conferences 
until next week. 



Tales of Old Bowdoin 



There recently appeared in a local 
paper an article by Dr. Edward E. 
Briry of Bath relating many in- 
teresting tales of the College forty 
years ago. Dr. Briry was in the 
Class of 1881, which will have its 
fortieth reunion at Commencement 
this June. He says he does not ex- 
pect his class will win the trophy fcr 
having the largest number of living 
members present because his class- 
mates are so widely scattered. In the 
procession there will be a flag of the 
class bearing these words: 

Passed On Ahead, But Not Forgotten 

CHAMBERLAIN 

GRAY 

HATHAWAY 

HITCHCOCK 

MERRILL 

SMITH 

SHAW 

WALKER 

The article reads in part: 

Fifty-six men passed in some kind 

of shape the Bowdoin 1877 entiance 

examinations. Dr. Briry fitted for 

college at the Bath High School and 

was one of the fifteen who entered 

that year without a single condition. 

He says it was no picnic to face 

papers on twenty different studies, 

ten cuiestions to a subject, and keep 

your grey matter running off the end 

of your pencil, from eight in the morn- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ing to six at night with but a few- 
minutes for noon refreshments. Had 
to be prepared to your finger tips. 

Although the Class of 1881 was the 
largest class of its time, there was a 
time in its Sophomore year when it 
bid fair to be the smallest class that 
ever graduated. During the Thanks- 
giving recess of the year 1878, forty 
parents received letters from Profes- 
sor Henry L. Chapman, then acting 
president of Bowdoin, telling them to 
remove forty sons from college, be- 
cause the sons had refused to answer 
a civil question, "Were you out of 
your rooms hazing Freshmen on a cer- 
tain night?" In explanation, we will 
say, the Class of 1881 had been up- 
holding college traditions and all "Phi 
Chi was in her ancient glory," and 
they had all agreed to a man if ques- 
tioned to reply, "We have nothing to 
say about it." Looking backward 
now, more than two score years, Dr. 
Briry says: "We can recall in our 
hazing days nothing that can compare 
in meanness and downright lowness 
with the public hazing of Freshmen 
by Sophomores as described in The 
Bowdoin "Orient" in an October num- 
ber, as taking place in daytime in the 
gymnasium, before an audience of 
upper classmen, faculty and other 
spectators. The Freshmen were put 
through a lot of paddling, crawling 
and other silly stunts fully as cruel 
as if those Freshman with hands tied 
to a post had received lashes on their 
barebacks. 

"That is not hazing as we look upon 
college pranks. Midnight hazing in 
the years of long ago did give a strong 
Freshman some show and chance to 
resent much familiarity. But not so, 
this public exhibition in the Bowdoin 
gymnasium." 

Dr. Briry says there is to him a 
certain amount of sadness whenever 
he now attends a Bowdoin Commence- 
ment. Except Rev. Samuel V. Cole, 
now president of Wheaton College, 
all the professors and tutors of his 
time at Bowdoin are dead. 



Assignments 

ECONOMICS 4b 
Week of April 25 

Conference reports to be selected 
from those handed in April 21. 
Duncan, ch. 18, 19, 20. 



ECONOMICS 8 

Reports on the Blacklist, Strike- 
breakers, and the Steel Strike of 1919. 
Carlton, ch. 7, 8. 



GOVERNMENT 2 
Eleventh Week 
Ending Saturday, April 30 
Lecture XVII. April 26— Stato 
Judiciary. 

Lecture XVIII. April 28— The 
Laws Delay. 
Assignments : 

1. Munro, Government of the 
United States, chap XXXIV. 

2. Reports on library topics. 
Group A — Quiz section. 
Group B — Conferences. 



HISTORY 8 

Lectures : 

April 25— Lecture XX. British 
India and the Indian Mutiny. 

April 27— Lecture XXI. Gladstone 
and Disraeli in Domestic Affairs. 

Reading: 

Cheyney: Short History, pp. 64C- 
666. 

Cheyney: Reading, Nos. 435, 436, 
437, 441, 444, and 40 pages from the 
following: 
India: 

Lyall: Rise of the British Dominion 
in India, chs. XI-XII. 

Seely: Expansion of the English, 
pp. 179-234. 

Dutt: Economic History of India, 
chs. III-IV. 

Malleson: Clive, chs. XII-XV. 

Macauley: Essays, Lord Clive. 

Macauley. Essays, Warren Hast- 
ings. 

Hutton: Wellesley, chs. VI-IX. 

Lyall: Hastings (any 40 pages). 

Wolseley: Story of a Soldier's Life. 

Anderson & Subedar: Expansion of 
British India. 

Jones: Warren Hastings in Bengal. 

Muir: Making of British India. 

Hunter: History of British India. 

Smith: Akbar the Great Mogul. 
Domestic Affairs: 

Bonner: Life of Charles Bradlaugh. 

Smith: Life of John Bright. 

Trevelyan: Life of John Bright, 
chs. XV-XXI. 

Stephen: Life of Henry Faucett. 

Buckle and Monypenny: Life of 
Disraeli. 

Morley: Gladstone. 

Walpole: History of England, 1815- 



1856, vol. VI. 

Walpole: History of Twenty-five 
Years. 

Bright: History of England. 



HISTORY XII 
Political History of the United States 

Lecture 20— April 25. Second Ad- 
ministration of Cleveland. 

Lecture 21— April 27. Political Re- 
form in the Nineties. 

Reading: 

Bassett, 712-730. Also see reading 
list on bulletin board, due April 29. 



JFacuItp JI3otes 



Professor Wilmot B. Mitchell spoke 
before the Schoolmasters' Associa- 
tion of Lewiston, last week. 

Professor Alfred O. Gross gave a 
talk on bird life before the pupils 
of the Brunswick High School on Fri- 
day, April 8, in observance of Bird 
Day. 



Stanley Plummer 

Prize Speakers 

The Stanley Plummer Prize Speak- 
ing Contest will be held in the De- 
bating Room of Hubbard Hall on Fri- 
day evening, April 22. The following 
Juniors were chosen last week to 
speak: Eldridge, Knight, Thayer, 
Towle, Welch, and Putnam, alternate. 
The judges who selected the speakers 
were: Professor Brown, Assistant Pro- 
fessor Meserve, and Miss Anna E. 
Smith. 



Campus Jftetos 



Arthur Linn '22 was initiated into 
Alpha Delta Phi at a recent meeting. 

Dr. Albert T. Parkhurst '13 of 
Beverly, Mass., was on the Campus 
last Saturday. 

Trials for the Commencement play 
parts were held last week. The an- 
nouncement of the cast will be made 
in the next issue of the "Orient." 

Rev. Minot Simon, Harvard '91, 
spoke in Chapel last Sunday on the 
call of the ministry. Mr. Minot is the 
Chief Executive of the American Uni- 
tarian Association. 

Jere Abbott '20 was on the Campus 
last week. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Edward B. Ham '22 Editor-in-Chief 

F. King Turgeon '23 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

George H. Quinby '23 Intercollegiate News 

George T. Davis '24 Alumni Department 

Fredric S. Klees '24 Faculty Notes 

J. William Rowe '24 Athletics 

P. Dennison Smith '24 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. R. Ludden '22 F. A. Gerrard '23 

R. L. McCormack '22 K. R. Philbrick '23 
V. C. McGorrill '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 
Eben G. Tileston '22 ..Business Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $3.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 15 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials only; the Managing 
Editor for news and make-up; the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 



Vol. LI. April 20, 1921. No. 3 



OEOitonal 

The Publications Conference at M.I.T. 

The various discussions at the in- 
tercollegiate conference on under- 
graduate government held last week 
at Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology gave the delegates from all the 
colleges a wealth of valuable infor- 
mation concerning the management of 
every kind of student activity. Many 
excellent ideas and facts were ex- 
changed, and each college must un- 
questionably have discovered new 
methods for removing defects in its 
present system. 

The Bowdoin delegates derived par- 
ticular satisfaction from the merits of 
our student organizations as com- 
pared with the systems of many other 
colleges. Bowdoin's methods were 
found to be fully as effective for the 
conditions here as those employed in 
nearly all the other colleges. 

As is generally known, the confer- 
ence was divided into four sections; 
for student government, publications, 
athletics, and musical clubs and dra- 



matics. In this column the topic of 
Jiscussion is necessarily confined 
primarily to a description of the con- 
ference on publications. An account 
of the athletic conference is to be 
found elsewhere in this issue, while 
the others will be reported later. 

The discussion on publications was 
divided into comments on literary 
magazines, professional periodicals, 
press clubs, comics, year-books, and 
newspapers. Thomas C. McEachin, 
Jr., chairman of the "Daily Prince- 
tonian^' presided over the meeting. 

The chief problems of the literary 
publications were the questions of 
finance and of arousing interest for 
contributions. With the exception of 
Yale, all the colleges are apparently 
unable to make financial successes of 
such publications. Amherst and 
North Carolina support their maga- 
zines with endowment funds; the Uni- 
versity of Maine by means of a con- 
tributors' club. Regarding contribu- 
tions, it is consoling for Bowdoin that 
nearly all the other colleges have our 
difficulty in creating enough interest 
among undergraduates to obtain 
articles of a sufficiently high standard. 

The chief topic of discussion on 
Friday afternoon was the matter of 
press clubs. Numerous systems of 
controlling disagreeable publicity 
were set forth, most of which seemed 
more complicated and more difficult to 
operate than the plan used here. The 
different methods of organizing and 
managing press clubs in the various 
colleges were compared in consider- 
able detail. 

Friday's conference was concluded 
with a comparison of the management 
of humorous publications. Censorship, 
financial support, organization, and 
feature numbers were talked over 
more or less at length. Some comics 
have faculty censorship, others a 
special committee for this purpose, 
and others merely hold the editors 
responsible for the quality of their 
papers. A number of amusing com- 
ments were brought out in connection 
with this discussion. It appeared, 
that in a large number of the col- 
leges the comics are run independ- 
ently, but in some the humorous 
papers are connected directly with col- 
lege publishing companies. 

Saturday morning's conference 
centered on the annuals and the 



newspapers. First the different 
systems of election to year-book 
boards were described. Most of 
the larger colleges have compli- 
cated systems in which it is more 
difficult to eliminate fraternity poli- 
tics. Bowdoin's system is very satis- 
factory in nearly every respect and is 
much less complicated than that of 
other colleges. 

Grind sections in the year-books of 
different places were explained, the 
undesirable catalogue effect of an an- 
nual in a large institution was dis- 
cussed, and dates of publication were 
compared. Explanations of methods 
of financial support completed the dis- 
cussion. A few of the colleges, par- 
ticularly Amherst, raise money for 
their annuals by means of dances and 
other entertainments. In the univer- 
sities it is apparently much easier to 
obtain advertising, and there is also 
far more opportunity for selling the 
year-books. For example, the "Tech- 
nique" for 1921 had expenses of ap- 
proximately thirteen thousand dollars 
and receipts of seventeen thousand, 
with a resulting profit of four thou- 
sand dollars. The "Illio" (University 
of Illinois) received $27,200 to cover 
expenses amounting to $24,000. At 
Washington and Lee each one of the 
eighteen fraternities is assessed fifty 
dollars in addition to payments by in- 
dividual men. The Princeton method 
is to tax each member of the class 
publishing the year-book an assess- 
ment of fifteen dollars, and to sell the 
book at five dollars per copy. 

The morning discussion on the 
newspapers was devoted chiefly to de- 
partment columns, special humorous 
issues, and schemes of organization. 
The book reviews and the dramatic 
column were the two most distinctive 
aspects of the Harvard "Crimson." 
Humorous columns were given more 
or less comment. The "society" 
column of the Columbia "Spectator," 
the "Lounger" department of the M. 
I. T. "Tech," and the campus activities 
column of the "Orient" were found 
to have no analogues in other papers. 

Methods of organization of edi- 
torial and business boards were ex- 
plained by the delegates from Co- 
lumbia, Harvard, Yale, Michigan, 
Princeton, M. I. T., and a few others. 
These systems, however, applied more 
to the daily newspapers than to the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



weeklies. 

In the afternoon the question of 
editorials was taken up, and then the 
conference was concluded with a dis- 
cussion of numerous general subjects. 
Editorials were treated from the view- 
points of scope, frankness, and ex- 
pression and moulding of campus 
opinion. In general editorials are 
limited to subjects of purely college 
interest. Occasionally national poli- 
tics are introduced. Two editors said 
that their papers had adopted the 
Democratic side in the recent presi- 
dential campaign, and consequently 
stirred up much enthusiasm among 
the students on both sides. Regard- 
ing campus opinion, numerous editors 
of dailies explained their respective 
policies. N. M. McKnight of Columbia 
stated that the "Spectator" first 
"moulded student opinion, and then, 
having done so, expressed it." 

Among the general questions, 
methods of arousing interest in all 
publications, arrangements for re- 
muneration for editors, social func- 
tions of boards, journalistic fraterni- 
ties, and numerous other topics were 
discussed. 

Regarding financial remuneration, 
it was found that in about half of the 
colleges represented, the profits of the 
publications are divided among the 
members of the boards. At Illinois 
some of the less important editors re- 
ceive eighty dollars a year, while the 
others, up to the editor-in-chief, re- 
ceive more in proportion to their 
work. Scholastic credit merely for 
work on the college paper is given in 
none of the institutions represented 
at the conference. 

Most of the larger colleges and uni- 
versities have important social func- 
tions in connection with their publi- 
cations. Yale has an annual banquet 
of which the expenses approximate a 
thousand dollars. M. I. T., University 
of Pennsylvania, and others hold simi- 
lar banquets on a somewhat smaller 
scale. Some institutions, particularly 
M. I. T. have "editorial" athletics — 
such as football games between 
"Tech" and "Technique," — which are 
followed by humorous write-ups. 
Dances, secret societies, and so on, 
play a considerable part in some 
cases. Harvard especially, has an in- 
teresting series of social events. 

The two journalistic fraternities 
Pi Delta Epsilon and Sigma Delta Chi, 



were described for the benefit of dele- 
gates from colleges where there are 
no chapters. The first of these fra- 
ternities is for college men who have 
served on college publications for two 
years or more while the second is 
primarily for those who plan to enter 
journalism for a life career. 

Numerous other problems of minor 
importance were taken up, some of 
which had no particular application to 
Bowdoin. As a result of these gen- 
eral questions and the discussion of 
newspapers, the delegates from the 
smaller colleges having the weeklies 
received some unusually interesting 
information concerning the manage- 
ment of the dailies — their highly de- 
veloped organization, their elaborate 
methods, their policies and standards. 

Among the delegates who took the 
most active part in the two days of 
the conference were Nicholas McD. 
McKnight (Columbia), W. C. Root 
(Yale), George O. Brophy, Jr. (Michi- 
gan), H. D. Smith (Harvard), A. J. 
Browning (M. I. T.), and T. M. Kod- 
ding (Pennsylvania). 

In the editorial comments of some 
of the Boston newspapers, the confer- 
ence was cited as a striking example 
of the power of students to manage 
their own activities. It seems here 
that an account of this conference 
would be insufficient without an al- 
lusion to the significant address at the 
banquet Saturday evening by Presi- 
dent Aydelotte of Swarthmore. He 
reminded the delegates of the Eng- 
lish system of making the students 
entirely responsible for their scholas- 
tic work, which, as it is sometimes 
well for us to remember, is fully as 
desirable as interest in campus ac- 
tivities. 

All the delegates have undoubtedly 
concluded that the conference as a 
whole has been one of the most ex- 
cellent projects in connection with stu- 
dent activities that any institution has 
yet carried out. The conference has 
accomplished its purpose entirely — an 
especially satisfactory amount of im- 
portant information has been given 
and received by the various colleges, 
and their undergraduate representa- 
tives have had a splendid opportunity 
to meet one another, to know one an- 
other, and to improve friendly inter- 
collegiate relations in many ways. 
Technology has originated an unusual- 



ly fine event, and all the other col- 
leges may well congratulate her upon 
the success of this first convention. 



Deferred Initiatiors. 

A subject worthy cf consideration 
for fraternity men which has been 
suggested and discussed to some ex- 
tent this spring is the question of de- 
ferred initiations. This proposal is 
by no means one which is being 
treated of now for the first time. 
Other colleges have experimented 
with various pledging and initiation 
systems which have been successful in 
some cases and which have failed in 
others. Bowdoin men have often 
thought of similar arrangements, al- 
though there has rarely been any 
serious possibility of abolishing the 
present system. 

The chief reason for changing the 
present system is the objection of 
all the fraternities to the admission 
to membership of students who are 
unable to stay in college for more 
than a short time. To eliminate such 
men, initiations might be postponed 
until after the first Freshman warn- 
ings or until after the mid-term warn- 
ings. In this manner only students 
apparently able to remain in college 
would be admitted to fraternities. 
The pledging system would remain 
as it is now, and pledges would have 
all the advantages of assistance from 
the upper-classmen in the respective 
groups. 

Such a plan as this, of course, 
solves one problem in a manner de- 
sired probably by every fraternity 
man. On the other hand, however, 
the effect of such a system upon the 
fraternity life of the first weeks of 
the year is an important argument 
against modifying the present ar- 
rangement. A number of serious dis- 
advantages would immediately be- 
come manifest in a fraternity group 
consisting of ten or twelve Freshman 
pledges and twenty or twenty-five 
initiated upper-classmen. 

The proposition of deferred initia- 
tions has been successfully handled in 
some colleges, and very possibly it 
might succeed here. In coming to a 
decision in the matter it is best 
merely to answer this question: will 
the higher scholastic standard of a 
fraternity outweigh the undesirable 
effects upon the fraternity life for a 
large part of the first semester? 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Bowdoin Interscholastic 

Debating League 



The final debate of the Bowdoin In- 
terscholastic Debating League will be 
held in Hubbard Hall on Thursday, 
April 21st at 7.30 p. m. Jordan High 
School upholds the affirmative and 
Portland the negative of the follow- 
ing question: Resolved, that before 
the next presidential election a system 
of direct voting shall be substituted 
for that of the electoral college. Two 
cups are being offered in the league 
this year. One to the winner of a 
dual debate between Brunswick and 
South Portland High Schools, has al- 
ready been won by Brunswick. The 
other is to be awarded in a triangular 
league consisting of Cony, Portland, 
and Jordan High Schools. As Port- 
land has defeated Cony, the winner 
of this cup will be decided Thursday 
night. The debate is open to the pub- 
lic. 



Forum Meeting 

The Forum will hold the closing 
meeting of the season on Monday, 
April 25, at 7.30 p. m., in the Debating 
Room, Hubbard Hall. The speaker for 
this meeting will be H. K. McCann 
'02, of the H. K. McCann Advertising 
Company of New York, Cleveland, 
San Francisco, and Toronto. Mr. Mc- 
Cann will talk on the place which the 
modern advertising agency occupies 
in American business. Professor Wil- 
mot B. Mitchell will preside as chair- 
man of the meeting. 



Campus Activities 
Massachusetts 

Class of 1921. 
George Russell Goodwin cf Melrose 
prepared for Bowdoin at Wakefield 
High School. He is a member of 
Kappa Sigma. As a miler of national 
repute he has done much to advance 
Bowdoin's track reputation. He won 
his B in Varsity track and cross- 
country in his Freshman year and has 
continued to lead the distance men 
ever since. He ran for his class in 
his first two years and in his Sopho- 
more and Junior years was chosen to 
compete in the I. C. A. A. A. A. meet. 
In his Junior year he made the 
Varsity relay team, and this year he 



was a member of the relay team 
which outran all other Maine colleges 
in the B. A. A. meet and completely 
outclassed its opponents in the Mil- 
rose A. C. games. During his Junior 
and Sophomore years he was a mem- 
ber of the Union Board, and last year 
| was elected to the Athletic Council 
and the Friars. This year he is a 
member of the Student Council and 
the "B" Club. He wore the United 
States colors with the Olympic team 
at Antwerp last summer, he being 
Bowdoin's only representative. 

G. E. Houghton of Natick, Mass., 
prepared for Bowdoin at Newton High 
School and Natick High School. He 
is a member of Psi Upsilon fraternity, 
and is majoring in Psychology. In 
his Freshman year he played in the 
college band. During his Sophomore 
year he was assistant in Spanish; 
since his second year he has been on 
the "Orient" Board. This year he is 
a member of the Masque and Gown. 
He was awarded the Charles Carroll 
Everett Scholarship; and holds a Pro- 
visional Commencement appointment. 
He earned straight A's the second se- 
mesters of his Sophomore and Junior 
years. 

F. G. Kileski, Lowell, Mass., is a 
graduate of Stone School, Boston, and 
a member of Psi Upsilon fraternity. 
In his Freshman year he was a mem- 
ber of U. Q. Society, and of the Glee 
Club. During his first, third, and 
fourth years he has sung in the 
Chapel Choir. This year he is on the 
fencing squad, the rifle team, the 
Senior Cane Committee, and is a mem- 
ber of Ibis. During the war he served 
as a lieutenant in the Army. He is 
making Government his major course. 

Russell M. McGown is a graduate 
of the Central High School of Spring- 
field and is a member of Kappa Sigma. 
In his Freshman year he was a mem- 
ber of the Freshman Cabinet and of 
the "Orient" board. As a Sophomore 
he was recor-ding secretary of the Y. 
M. C. A. cabinet, and has since that 
time been extremely active in Y. M. 
C. A. work, both on the campus and 
in the New England Intercollegiate 
Council, being secretary of that body 
last year and president this year. 
During the last two years he has also 
been general secretary of the college 
"Y." He was secretary and treasurer 
of his class in his Sophomore and 



Junior years, a member of the Brad- 
bury Prize Debating team and of the 
Intercollegiate Debating team in his 
Sophomore year, a member of the 
Debating Council since his second 
year, and secretary of that organiza- 
tion his last two years. In his Junior 
year he was acting managing editor 
of the "Orient," and is this year a 
member of the Board of Proctors. His 
major subject is English. 

Harold Frost Morrill of Amesbury, 
Mass., graduated from Amesbury 
High School. He won the Smyth 
Mathematical Prize during his Sopho- 
more year, was on the football squad 
during his Sophomore and Senior 
years, and on the track squad his 
Freshman and Sophomore years. 

Robert W. Morse of Andover pre- 
pared for Bowdoin at Phillips Andover 
Academy. He was the secretary- 
treasurer of his class in his Fresh- 
man year. He has been a member 
of the "Quill" board throughout his 
college career, and was chairman of 
it during his Sophomore and Junior 
years. He took part in the Alexander 
Prize Speaking Contest in his Fresh- 
man and Sophomore years, and won 
the first prize in his Sophomore year. 
He won the Hawthorne Prize in his 
Sophomore year, and the Forbes 
Rickard, Jr., Prize in both his Sopho- 
more and Junior years. He has been 
assistant in English during his Sopho- 
more, Junior, and Senior years, and 
is majoring in that subject. He was 
elected class poet in both his Junior 
and Senior years. This year he has 
taken part in the Class of '68 Prize 
Speaking Contest, been appointed a 
Commencement speaker, and won the 
Longfellow Scholarship. He is a 
member of the Ibis, Phi Beta Kappa, 
and the Delta Upsilon fraternity. 

Hugh Nixon of Brookline prepared 
for college at Quincy (Mass.) High 
School. During his Freshman year he 
was a member of his class debating 
team, the varsity debating team, and 
took part in the Bradbury debate and 
the Alexander Prize Speaking Contest. 
He has been a member of the Masque 
and Gown during his four years in 
college, and a member of the Biology 
Club for the last two years. In his 
Freshman year he played on his class 
football team. He was a member of 
the Mandolin and Glee Clubs and of 
the chapel choir in both his Junior 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



9 



and Senior years. He won first prize 
in the Bradbury Debate last year and 
in the Class of '68 Prize Speaking 
Contest this year. He was elected 
Class Orator this year and was one 
of the provisional speakers for Com- 
mencement. He is a member of the 
Ibis and the Delta Upsilon fraternity. 
His major is Economics. . 

Class of 1922. 

E. A. Lewis of Amherst, Mass., 
graduated from Amherst High School 
and transferred here last year from 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
He is a member of Beta Theta Pi 
fraternity; a member of the fencing 
squad, and of the baseball squad. 
During the war he was in the S.A.T.C. 
Government is his major course. 

Hugh G. McCurdy of Springfield is 
a member of Kappa Sigma. He ran 
on his class track team his first year, 
has played center on the Varsity grid 



Mass., prepared for college at the 
Houlton High School. He is a mem- 
ber of the Delta Kappa Epsilon and 
of the "B" Club and of the Debating 
Council. He was a member of the 
Glee Club in his Freshman year, and 
the College Choir in his Sophomore 
and Junior years. He played on his 
class football team and ran on his 
fraternity's track team in the second 
year of his college career. He has 
also played on both the varsity foot- 
ball team and the varsity hockey team 
in his Sophomore and Junior years. 

Stuart F. Richards of Reading is a 
graduate of Reading High School and 
a member of the Zeta Psi fraternity. 
He had a response at the Freshman 
Banquet and was a member of the 
U. Q. Society in his first year. In 
his Sophomore year he played on his 
class baseball team. He is a member 
of the Abraxas. 

Hollis S. Smith of Natick, Mass.. 



squad during his second and third | tl . ansferred to Bowdoin from Tufts 
years, winning his B last year. He 



is a member of the "B" Club. He is 
majoring in Zoology. 

Malcolm E. Morrell of Wayland is 
a graduate of the Huntington School 
of Boston. He is a member of the 
Sigma Nu fraternity. This year he 
was a member of the Varsity foot- 
ball team and is now a member of 
the Varsity baseball team. He was 
also a member of the Christmas Dance 
Committee. 

A. E. Morrell of Wayland is a 
graduate of Wayland High School and 
a member of the Sigma Nu fraternity. 
Last year he transferred from Tufts 
College. He was a member of the 
Varsity baseball team last year, also 
a member of his class football team. 
He was a member of the Varsity 
hockey team. This year he was cap- 
tain of the hockey team, a member of 
the Varsity football team, and has 
been elected captain for next year's 
football team. This year he is a mem- 
ber of the baseball team, a member 
of the "Bugle" board and also secre- 
tary-treasurer of the Republican Club. 
He is a member of the Abraxas So- 
ciety. His major is Economics. 

Theodore Nixon of Brookline is a 
graduate of Quincy High School and 
a member of the Delta Upsilon fra- 
ternity. He played on his class base- 
ball team in his second year. He is 
a member of the Classical Club. 

Raymond G. Putnam of Danvers, 



College at the end of his Freshman 
year. He is a graduate of Natick 
High School, a member of Phi Delta 
Psi fraternity and of the Biology 
Club. He is a pre-medic student and 
is taking his major in Zoology. 

Eben G. Tileston of Dorchester is a 
graduate of Hebron Academy and a 
member of the Beta Theta Pi fra- 
ternity. He is manager of the Bow- 
doin Publishing Company and on the 
editorial staff of the "Orient" and 
"Quill," and the "Bugle." 

Class of 1923. 

E. W. Hunt of Newtonville is a 
graduate of Newton High School and 
a member of Alpha Delta Phi fra- 
ternity. Last year he was a member 
of the Masque and Gown and in the 
Commencement Play. This year he 
was on the Sophomore track team; 
he is on the Varsity track team, a 
member of the Masque and Gown, and 
the "Bear Skin" board. 

W. B. Jacob of Amesbury prepared 
for Bowdoin at Moses Brown School 
at Providence, R. I. Last year he was 
on the Freshman debating team, the 
Freshman track team and the Varsity 
track squad. This year he played on 
the Sophomore football team; he was 
on the Varsity football squad, his class 
^rack team, Proclamation Night Com- 
mittee, Sophomore Hop Committee 
and is assistant managrr of tennis and 
of debating. He is a member of Delta 



Upsilon fraternity. 

Stephen Palmer is a graduate of 
Newton High School and a member 
of the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity. In 
his freshman year he was chairman 
and toastmaster of the Freshman 
Banquet Committee. He made the 
class relay team and was captain of 
Freshman track as well as a member 
of the varsity track squad. He was 
also a member of the U. Q. Society. 
At the beginning of the second se- 
mester he was elected president of 
his class. In his second year he was 
elected chairman of the Sophomore 
Hop Committee and a member of the 
Christmas Dance Committee. He also 
made the Sophomore relay team. He 
was chairman of the Proclamation 
Committee. 

Wallace J. Putnam of Newburyport 
is a graduate of Traipp Academy and 
a member of the Alpha Delta Phi fra- 
ternity. He was a member of the 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet in his Freshman 
year. He is assistant manager of 
baseball. . He is also manager of the 
second team and of his class team. 

G. H. Quinby of Wellesley Hills, 
is a graduate of Wellesley High 
School and a member of Psi Upsilon 
fraternity. Last year he was a mem- 
ber of the "Orient" Boaid, the fencing 
squad, the Masque and Gown, and was 
?n the Ivy play and Commencement 
play. This year he is Intercollegiate 
Editor of the "Orient" and on the 
fencing squad. Last fall he played on 
his class football team. 

Class of 1924. 

A. E. Gibbons of Reading is a mem- 
ber of the Zeta Psi fraternity and a 
graduate of Reading High School. He 
is a member of the U. Q. Society. 
This spring he is on the baseball 
squad. Last fall he made his letter 
in football and was a member of the 
All-Maine football team. He is a 
member of the "B" Club. 

Elmer Grenfell of Fall River is a 
member of the Zeta Psi fraternity 
and a graduate of Durfee High School. 
He made the Glee Club this fall and 
sings in the chapel choir. 

Morrison C. James of Chelsea is a 
member of the Beta Theta Pi fra- 
ternity and a graduate of Frycburg 
Academy. He is a member of the 
U. Q. Society. He played on the 
Freshman football team last fall, was 
on the Varsity track squad, and was 



10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



an alternate en the Freshman relay 
team. 

H. McC. Marshall of East Walpole 
graduated from Powder Point School. 
He is en the Varsity track squad and 
took part in the Freshman-Sophomore 
meet. He is a member of Psi Upsilon 
fraternity. 

Arthur J. deS. Miguel of Man- 
chester, graduated from Story High 
School and is a member of Psi Up- 
silon. He played an excellent game 
of hockey this winter, when he played 
the position of goal. He was also on 
the Freshman baseball team, and is 
an active member of the Masque and 
Gown. 

Preston M. Putnam of Danvers is 
a graduate of Danvers High School 
and a member of the Delta Kappa 
Epsilon fraternity. He is a member 
of the Varsity baseball squad and this 
year played on his class football team. 



alumni Department 

1897 — Henry E. Dunnack has been 
renominated to the office of State 
Librarian. 

1898— Dr. W. W. Lawrence, Profes- 
sor of English Literature in Columbia 
University, published in the New 
York "Times" Book Review of April 
17, an extensive review of "Thought 
and expression in the Seventeenth 
Century," by Henry Osborn Taylor, 
the author of "The Medieval Mind." 

1899 — The engagement is an- 
nounced at Woburn, Mass., of Miss 
Edith Lillian Smith to Hanson Hart 
Webster. Miss Smith as a graduate 
of Mt. Holyoke College and is a mem- 
ber of the faculty of the Boston 
Normal School. Mr. Webster is the 
editor of the educational department 
of Houghton, Mifflin Co. The wed- 
ding is to take place in June. 



Class Notes 1910 

William E. Atwood— 1912-17 Treas- 
urer of Hebron Academy; 1918 Public 
Auditor in Service Department of 
Maine Railways Light & Power Com- 
pany, Portland; 1919 Assistant Audi- 
tor, East Coast Fisheries Company, 
Rockland, Maine. Married in 1910. 
Two sons. 

George H. Babbitt — General Man- 
ager, Babbitt & Co., Inc., clothiers. 
Married Margaret Boshart of Low- 



ville, N. Y., in 1914. One daughter. 
Home address: 711 Myrtle Avenue, Al- 
bany, N. Y. Business address: 67 
Pearl Street, Albany, N. Y. 

Ralph E. G. Bailey— Held at differ- 
ent times principalship at High 
School, Easton, Maine; Granby, Mass.; 
Anson Academy; High School, Lubec, 
Me.; and head of Science Department, 
Deering High School, Portland. Since 
February, 1920, been associated with 
the Travelers' Insurance Company, as 
special agent. Married Mary E. 
Kateon, son born 1913, daughter born 
1916. Home address: 30 Elmwood 
Street, Portland, Me. 

Harold -B. Ballard — Insurance and 
hotel work, 1919-17. World War, 
Aviation Department active service. 
At present connected with the Co- 
lonial Steel Company, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Married. 

Chester A. Boynton— Lumber busi- 
ness, treasurer of the Hanks Manu- 
facturing Co., also town treasurer and 
collector of North Whitefield, Me. 
Member of State Senate. Married Ad- 
die F. Knight. Four children. Present 
address: North Whitefield, Me. 

Stuart F. Brown — Graduate work in 
Worcester Polytechnic. Entered the 
employ of the Whitin Machine Works 
At present Production Manager. Trus- 
tee of the Whitinsville Savings Bank 
Married Ruth Trowbridge. Home ad- 
dress: Linwood, Mass. 

Harrison C. Chapman — Treasurer of 
Saco Valley Canning Company, Port- 
land, Maine. Married Virginia Wood- 
bury in 1912. One son, one daughter. 
Address: Columbia Hotel, Portland, 
Me. 

John D. Clifford, Jr.— Graduated 
from Georgetown University, Wash- 
ington. Practicing law under firm 
name of Clifford & Clifford, 138 Lis- 
bon Street, Lewiston, Maine. One 
daughter bom 1916, one son born 1920. 
Henry J. Colbath — Located at the 
Hill School, Pottstown, Penn., since 
graduation. At present head of the 
Science Department, head coach of 
track and Sixth Form master. Part 
owner and manager of summer tutor- 
ing school, Woleboro, N. H. Married 
Marion Patts of Pottstown. One son. 
Second Lieutenant C. A. A. in World 
War. Present address: Hill School, 
Pottstown, Penn. 

Gardner W. Cole — Educational work 
Mitchell Military School and Foxcroft 
Academy, also Superintendent of 




ROBERT HALE, 

Representative U. S. Government on 
Special Mission to Balkan States. 



Schools at Raymond, Casco and Otis- 
ville. At present progressive farmer. 
Address: Raymond, Me. 

John L. Crosby — Connected with 
various branches of the New England 
Telephone & Telegraph Company 
since graduation. Married June 3, 

1913, to Britomarte Emerson of Ban- 
gor, Maine. One son born March 13, 

1914. Home address: 209 Belmont 
Street, Wollaston, Mass. Business ad- 
dress: New England Tel. & Tel. Co., 
50 Oliver Street, Boston, Mass. 

Ralph C. Crowell — Formerly con- 
nected with the Eastern Steamship 
Company and the Kenduskeag Trust 
Company. Since 1912 treasurer of the 
Rice & Miller Hardware Company, 
Bangor, Me. Married Helen L. Miller, 
1911. One daughter (class baby). 
Home address: 77 James Street, Ban- 
gor, Me. Business address: 30 Broad 
Street, Bangor, Me. 

Harold Davie — Since leaving college 
connected with several business con- 
cerns, including William Filene's, 
American Optical Company, T. A. 
Wilson & Company, Vanity Fair Slik 
Mills and Butterick Company. At 
present connected with the George 
Batten Company, advertising agency. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



11 



Married Miriam Phinney of West 
Medford, Mass. One son. Home ad- 
dress: 410 West End Avenue, New 
York City. Business address: 381 
Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Clyde L. Deming — Graduate work 
Yale Medical School with honors. 
Graduating cum laude, 1915. Since 
connected with the New Haven Hos- 
pital. Instructor of French Yale Uni- 
versity. Surgeon, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital. At present Resident Uro- 
logyist at John Hopkins Hospital and 
James Buchanan Brady Urological In- 
stitution. Unmarried. Address, care 
of Johns Hopkins Hospital, North 
Broadway, Baltimore, Md. 

James B. Draper — 1908-14 employ 
of the American Woolen Company 
part time at Maynard, Mass., Old- 
town, Me., Burlington, Vt., and Rock- 
dale. 1917 formed partnership, Ball 
& Draper, shoe findings, Boston, 
Mass. At present employed by Crim- 
mins & Pierce Tool Company, 281 
Summer Street, Boston, Mass. Mar- 
ried Helen Dana, 1919, one son 1910, 
daughter 1917. Address: 1422 Wash- 
ington Street, Canton, Mass. 

Frank Evans — Graduate work in 
chemistry at Bowdoin and the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. Since that time 
in the chemical department with the 
DuPont Company. Present time in 
Chemical Department of the main 
office staff. Married in 1917 to Clara 
M. Eckhardt of Toledo, Ohio. Present 
address, care of DuPont Company, 
Wilmington, Del. 

R. Edgar Fisher — Educational work 
in several high schools, 1910-18. Dur- 
ing war connected with the Atlantic 
Ship Corporation, Portsmouth, N. H. 
At present instructor in high school, 
Andover, Mass. Married Margaret 
Adlington, Eliot, Me. One son. Pres- 
ent address: 56 Whittier Street, An- 
dover, Mass. 

William S. Guptill — Has held prin- 
cipalship of several high schools and 
academies since graduation. At pres- 
ent instructor at Crosby High School, 
Waterbury, Conn. Married Lelia 
Weatherbee of Lincoln, Me. Two sons. 
Present address: 36 Farmington Ave- 
nue, Waterbury, Conn. 

Robert Hale — Graduate work at Ox- 
ford, England (Cecil Rhodes Scholar- 
ship), Harvard Law School, 1913-14. 
Passed Massachusetts Bar, practicing 
in Boston. World War, U. S. In- 



fantry. Service in France under war 
risk unit. Second Lieutenant Infantry 
March, 1918. Later served in 163rd 
Infantry Replacement Division. 
Special mission to Finland, Esthonia, 
Latvia and Lithuania, under Ameri- 
can Commission to negotiate peace. 
Discharged from service September, 
1919. At present practicing law in 
the firm of Verrill, Hale, Booth & 




HON. R. BURLEIGH MARTIN, 
Ex-Mayor of Augusta, Maine. 



Ives. Unmarried. Business address: 
57 Exchange Street, Portland, Me. 

James F. Hamburger — (Class 
President). Glue manufacturer. Presi- 
dent of the Keene Glue Company, 
Keene, N. H. Married Dorothy Ab- 
bott of Portland. Two daughters, one 
son. Business address: 67 Summer 
Street, Boston, Mass. Home address: 
Dorchester, Mass. 

Henry Q. Hawes — Graduate work 
Columbia University. Formerly con- 
nected with the W. H. McCann Com- 
pany, New York, now located in San 
Francisco as general manager of com- 
pany. World War, 2nd Lieutenant A. 
E. F. overseas service. Present ad- 
dress: McCann Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

Merrill C. Hill — Graduate work Uni- 
versity of Gottingen, Germany. M. A. 



degree, Harvard, 1914. Has held in- 
structorships at Lafayette and Tufts 
College. At present Junior Master in 
English High School. Married Phoebe 
D. Goodwin of Portland in 1915. One 
daughter. Present address: 324 Lin- 
coln Street, Stoughton, Mass. 

Elmer H. Hobbs — On leaving col- 
lege entered lumber business; 1912 en- 
tered monument business in Water- 
boro, Maine. Present business granite 
and monument in Sanford (Maine), 
and Waterboro (Maine); 1918-19 
theasurer of town of Waterboro. Sum- 
mer baseball team, town of Sanford. 
Married Natalie N. Knight October, 
1912, daughter born 1913 and son in 
1916. Present address: Waterboro, 
Maine. 

Frank E. Kendrie — A. M. in Har- 
vard 1912, member of St. Louis Sym- 
phony orchestra 1915; 1917 professor 
of violin, Valparaiso University Con- 
servatory. 1921 professor and con- 
ductor of University orchestra, Uni- 
versity of Kansas and professor and 
conductor of Iowa State University 
orchestra, Iowa City, Iowa. Married 
Helen P. Wolcott of Radcliff, 1914. 
One daughter born 1917. 

Fred H. Larrabee — Formerly lo- 
cated at the Marshall, Field Company, 
Chicago. At present salesman with 
Monroe Shoe Company, Lewiston, Me. 
Present address: 17 Oakland Street, 
Auburn, Me. 

Leon S. Lippincott — Graduate Bow- 
doin Medical School, 1913. Instructor 
Bowdoin Medical School, 1913-17. 
World War, Medical Corps U. S. 
Army. At present with the rank of 
Major. Present address: Vicksburg 
Sanitarium, Vicksburg, Miss. 

Harry B. McLaughlin — Truck sales- 
man Packard Motor Car Company, 
New York. World War, Captain 
Field Artillery, U. S. A. Married 
Beatrice Werhan, 1918. One son. 
Home address: 2636 University Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. 

Harold P. Marsh — Extensive farm- 
ing in Northern Vermont. Married in 
1915 to Mildred French of Manchester, 
N. H. One son. Present address: 
Sheldon, Vt. 

Burleigh Martin — Graduate work 
Harvard Law School, graduating 1913. 
Member of Augusta City Council, City 
Clerk of Augusta. Mayor of Augusta 
1919-1920. At present practicing law 
in Augusta. Married Frances Pur- 
inton, 1915. Two sons. Present ad- 



12 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



dress: Augusta, Me. 

E. Curtis Matthews, Jr., (Class Sec- 
retary) — Banking at Portsmouth. At 
present treasurer of the Piseataqua 
Savings Bank, also treasurer of the 
Piseataqua River Towing Company. 
Four years member of the City Coun- 
cil. Chairman of Finance Committee. 
Member of Governor's Staff. Mar- 
ried Beatrice Henley, Wellesley, 1914. 
One son and one daughter. Business 
address: Piseataqua Savings Bank. 
Home address: 736 Middle Street, 
Portsmouth, N. H. 

Robert D. Morss — Since graduation 
held several responsible positions with 
the Ginn & Company, publishers. At 
present in charge of London office. 
Married Marion Stevens (now de- 
ceased). Twins born March, 1917. 
Present address: 7 Queen Square, 
South Hampton Row, London. 

Colby L. Morton— 1910-14 Assistant 
Superintendent of Colonial Works, 
Inc., 1914 elected Superintendent. 
Special courses since graduation In- 
dustrial Chemistry, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
factory management New York Uni- 
versity and business administration, 
New York University. In charge of 
athletic contests of Y. M. C. A. A. F. 
A. M. Reliance Lodge, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Married Alice Couklin in July, 1914. 
One son born 1916. Home address: 
154 Monitor Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Business address: 225 Norman Ave- 
nue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

William P. Newman — After leaving 
'college connected with First National 
Bank of Bar Harbor; 1913 became 
manager of Kineo Trust Company, 
Milo, Me. Married Gertrude B. Soper, 
1913, of Mount Holyoke '08. Two sons 
and one daughter. 

Parker T. Nickerson — Has held 
several Government positions. Dur- 
ing the war connected with Depart- 
ment of Commerce, Bureau of Census, 
Washington, D. C. At present in the 
summer hotel business, Boothbay Har- 
bor, Me. 

William B. Nulty— Formerly on the 
teaching staff of the Portland High 
School, studied law, passed Maine 
Bar. At present practicing law under 
firm of Bradley, Linnell & Jones. Mar- 
ried. One son. Present address: 188 
Middle Street, Portland, Me. 

Thomas Otis — Graduate work Yale 
University receiving degree LL.B. 
Practicing law at New Bedford. Clerk 



to the First District Court at Barn- 
stable County and Public Administra- 
tor for the County of Barnstable. 
Married Elsie W. Makepeace, West 
Barnstable, Mass. One daughter. 
Present address: Hyannis, Mass. 

Clinton N. Peters — Graduated from 
Bowdoin Medical School 1914. Post- 
graduate, Harvard, 1915. Since prac- 
ticing medicine in Portland, Me. Con- 
nected in various capacities Maine 
General Hospital, Portland City Hos- 
pital, U. S. Marine Hospital, and U. 
S. Public Health Service, Portland, 
Me. Instructor Bowdoin Medical 
School. Business address: 205 Tre- 
lawng Building, Portland, Me. 

A. Perry Richards — Graduate work 
Boston University Law School. Passed 
Massachusetts Bar. Representative to 
the Legis latur e. World War, 42nd 
(Rainbow) Division. Practicing law 
at Plymouth, Mass. Engaged to Le- 
mira Hobbs of North Hampton, N. H. 
Ira B. Robinson — Graduate work in 
University of Gena, Germany. In 
business 1913-16. At present head of 
the German Department in the Irv- 
ington High School, Irvington, N. J. 
Married Pearle Orgelman of Jamaica 
Plains. One son and one daughter. 
Present address: 68 Linden Avenue, 
Irvington, N. J. 

Warren E. Robinson:— 1911 Mass. 
Cavalry. 1914 married to Anne 
Louise Johnson of Brunswick. A. M. 
from Harvard, teacher in High 
Schools of Watertown and Quincy. 
1916 Military Services on Mexican 
Border, 1917-1918 service in France 
with 26th Division, commissioned 
First Lieutenant, died of wounds re- 
ceived on Nov. 5, on Nov. 6. 

Rodney E. Ross — Graduate work 
Harvard Law School, degree LL.B., 
1913. Passed Massachusetts Bar. 
Practicing law in Boston. Passed 
Maine Bar 1914. President and 
treasurer of the Hyde Windlass Com- 
pany, Bath, Maine. Director in Bath 
Trust Company, incorporator Bath 
Savings Institution. Married Lina C. 
Andrews, 1914. One son and one 
daughter. Business address: Bath, 
Me. 

Harold E. Rowell — Principal of sev- 
eral high schools in defferent parts of 
New England. For the past five years 
principal of Collinsville High School, 
Collinsville, Conn. Married Nettie B. 
Pollard, 1912. One son, one daugh- 



ter. Present address: 132 Madison 
Avenue, Skowhegan, Me. 

Henry L. Russell — Entered leather 
business after leaving college. At 
present time president of his own Rus- 
sell Sinn Tanning Company, general 
leather business, Blaney Street, Salem, 
Mass. Married. One child. Home ad- 
dress: 19 Oliver Street, Salem, Mass. 
William H. Sanborn — Graduate 
work Harvard Law School, degree 
1913. Practicing law at Portland, Me. 
Councilman, City of Portland, 1915. 
Alderman 1917. World War, Captain 
of Infantry 78th Division, transferred 
to air service. Service overseas. 
Present address: Portland, Me. 

Harold W. Slocum — Graduate work 
Union Theological School and Andover 
Theological Seminary. At present 
executive secretary of the Vermont 
Tuberculosis Association, also director 
of the Tuberculosis Department of the 
Vermont State Health Department. 
Married Mary Miller of Brooklyn. 
Two daughters and one son. Home 
address: 18 Adsit Court, Burlington, 
Vt. Business address: 233 Pearl 
Street, Burlington, Vt. 

Leon H. Smith — Member of the firm, 
Blackstone & Smith, general contrac- 
tors and constructors, Portland, Me. 
At present General Manager. (Suc- 
cessful bidder on the remodeling of 
the old gymnasium.) Treasurer of 
the Contractors' Association, Port- 
land, Me. Married Helen Ward of 
Kennebunk, Me. One son. Present 
address: 187 Middle Street, Portland, 
Me. 

Ralph W. Smith — Connected with 
the piano and musical business under 
the name of Melville Smith & Son, 
Augusta, Me. Married Lillie R. John- 
son, Hallowell, Me. One daughter. 
Present address: 185 Water Street, 
Augusta, Me. 

Winston B. Stephens — Educational 
work, Holdemess School, Plymouth, 
N. H., Jonesport High School. 1912-13 
Prussian Exchange Teacher, Kolberg, 
Germany. Graduate work Harvard 
University A.M. degree. Assistant 
Professor of languages Colgate Uni- 
versity. World War, Private in Am- 
bulance Company, No. 33. U. S. fenc- 
ing team in interallied games. At 
present head of Modern Language De- 
partment, Rivcrdalc Country School, 
New York City. Married Mademoiselle 
Edmee Band. One daughter. Present 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



13 



address: 116 Saratoga Avenue, Yonk- 
ers, N. Y. 

Alfred W. Stone — Secretary for 
High School Students, Y. M. C. A., 
Detroit, Mich., 1911; Student Bangor 
Theological Seminary 1912-14; Stu- 
dent Andover Theological Seminary 
and Harvard University 1914-16; S. 
T. B. Andover 1916; Assistant Min- 
ister Eliot Congregational Church, 
Newton, Mass. Summer 1913, also 
1914-1916; Minister, West Concord 
Union Church 1916-1921. Treasurer, 
Boston Congregational Ministers' 
Meeting 1918-1921. Moderator, Mass. 
Conference of Union Churches, 1920- 
21. Address: 29 Central St., Concord 
Junction, Mass. 

Ralph L. Thompson — For seven 
years associated with the Loring, 
Short & Harmon Company, Portland, 
Me. World War, 1917, surgeon in 
Medical Department of the 47th In- 
fantry. In action, Chateau Thierry, 
St. Mihiel and was in the Army of 
Occupation. Soldier student Univer- 
sity of Grenoble, French Alps. Un- 
married. Present address, care of E. 
B. Draper, Bangor, Me. 

Frank S. Townsend— 1910-14 con- 
nected with the New England Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Company. Since 
that time connected with the Bell 
Telephone Company of Canada as ser- 
vice engineer. Married Dorothy John- 
son of Brunswick in 1917. Present ad- 
dress: 732A De L'Epee Avenue, Mon- 
treal, P. Q. 

Raymond A. Tuttle— 1910-17- with 
the R. & Y. Company, manufacturers 
of jewelry, Attleboro, Mass., and New 
York City. World War, U. S. Army, 
12th Division. At present with the 
R. & Y. Company, Attleboro, Mass. 
Married in 1915, Harriet S. Kelsey. 
One daughter. Present address: 25 
East Fourth Street, Attleboro, Mass. 

Charles W. Walker — Lumber busi- 
ness, Skowhegan, Me. Married Eva 
LeCasu of Skowhegan. Two children. 
Present address: Skowhegan, Me. 

Alfred Wandke— Ph.D. at Harvard 
1917, private in U. S. Army June to 
December, 1918. Geologist for sev- 
eral large copper companies up to 
1920. At present instructor in eco- 
nomic geology, Harvard University. 
Married Alice Dinsmore, 1920. Busi- 
ness address: Foxcroft House, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. Home address: 14 
Forest Road, Grenwood, Mass. 





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LIEUT. WARREN E. ROBINSON, 
Killed in Action, World War. 



Herbert E. Warren— It 10-18 in- 
structor in modem languages at 
Riverview Military Academy and 
Lawrenceville School. World War, 
Railway Transportation Officer in 
France and Germany. At present in 
the Foreign Department of the First 
National Bank of Boston. Unmar- 
ried. Home address: 169 Naples Road, 
Brookline, Mass. 

S. Sewall Webster — Formeily con- 
nected with the Augusta Ice Company. 
World War, First Maine H. F. A., 56th 
Division. Active service with the A. 
E. F. At present accountant with the 
Texas Steamship Company, Bath, Me. 
Married Weltha B. Thompson of Au- 
gusta in 1914. One daughter and one 
son. Present address: 163 Oak Street, 
Bath, Me. 

G. Cony Weston — Insurance busi- 
ness, Augusta, Me., under the name of 
Macomber, Farr & Whittier. Married 
Mary Stimpson, 1916. Present ad- 
dress: 103 Winthrop Street, Augusta, 
Me. 

Thomas W. Williams — Six years in 



New England Telephone Company, 
Boston; four years in American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Company, New 
York; at present with the New York 
Telephone Company. Married Doro- 
thy Trexleur of Allentown, Pa., one 
daughter. Home address: 60 Marteuse 
Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Earl L. Wing — Graduated from 
University of Maine Law School 1915. 
Practicing law at Kingfield, Maine, as 
well as being engaged in the lumber 
business in the same district. Mar- 
ried in 1918, one daughter born 1919 
and one son born 1920. Home ad- 
dress: Kingfield, Maine. 

H. W. Woodward, M. D.— 1911 Uni- 
versity of Colorado, Colorado Springs; 
1915 graduated Cum Laude from Har- 
vard Medical School. Entered Peter 
Brigham Hospital, surgical house 
officer. Six months in same capacity 
at Boston Lying-in Hospital; 1917 
left for France with the Harvard 
Surgical Unit with the rank of cap- 
tain in the British Army in the Royal 
Army Medical Corps of the British 



14 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Expeditionary Forces. At present 
practicing medicine at Colorado 
Springs on the staffs of the Bethel 
Hospital and Glockner Hospital and 
Sanitorium. 

Deceased. 

Warren Robinson, Philip Morse, 
Harold Small, Sumner Edwards, 
Richard Eastman, Harlan F. Hanson. 
Blacklist. 

(Members of 1910 who for reasons 
unknown failed to answer correspond- 
ence.): George R. Ashworth, last ad- 
dress, Ridlonville, Me.; Edward S. 
Bagley, last address, Sanpa del Com- 
mercio 417, Habanna, Cuba; Rev. Ed- 
gar Crossland, last address 81 Rock- 
dale Street, Mattapan, Mass.; Samuel 
H. Dreer, last address St. Louis, Mo.; 
Carleton W. Eaton, last address 
Calais, Me. (understand now located 
in Canada) ; Ralph B. Grace, last ad- 
dress Everett, Mass.; Allen Lander, 
last address East Maiden, Mass.; Law- 
rence G. Ludwig, last address Houl- 
ton, Me.; Arthur A. Madison, last ad- 
dress 111 West 137th street, New 
York City; Lewis L. Mikelsky, last 
address Fort Worth, Texas; Daniel J. 
Ready, last report wounded in World 
War and located in some hospital in 
Boston; Charles A. Smith, last address 
Los Angeles, Cal.; Fred P. Webster, 
last address Portland, Me.; Edward H. 
Webster, last address Springfield, 
Mass.; Harold E. Weeks, last address 
Fairfield, Me. 



Side Lights of 1910 



Puss Newman, one of 1910's emi- 
nent bankers is seeking for the kind 
of prohibition that will prevent money 
from getting tight and "J. B." Cary 
now located in the Kentucky mountains 
pretending to be interested in hy- 
draulic mining, is using his position 
in an endeavor to manufacture suffi- 
cient moonshine to supply the needs 
of our 15th reunion. 

Come classmates lets give a one 
hundred per cent, subscription to the 
"Orient." $3.00 per year will not 
make or break any 1910 man. Be 
loyal to our Alma Mater. Don't wait 
to send your own son to Bowdoin but 
send someone else's son in the mean- 
time. 

Why should Dan Rosen purchase 
another business block shortly after 
our 10th? Ask Mose. 



Hobbie's letter head reads: "Elmer 
H. Hobbs, Marble and Granite," 
"Everything for the cemetery." Quite 
true, Hobbie, we will all be there some 
time but why remind us of it. There 
also appears on the letter head "tele- 
phone connections." Most of us had 
hoped that when that time came we 
would be away from the telephone. 

When any 1910 man goes through 
the hustling town of Portsmouth he 
should drop in at the Piscataqua Sav- 
ings Bank, right on the Square and 
look over the 1910 letter file. It would 
do his heart good to read over letters 
that the secretary has received from 
his classmates. This opportunity of 
keeping in touch with the 1910 men 
well repays the secretary for all time 
spent in such work. So don't forget, 
drop in when you go through the 
former beer town and the reading of 
this correspondence will be more ap- 
preciated than the mony in the vaults. 

Colby Morton gives us his psychol- 
ogy of life: 

"For when the one great score comes to write 

against your name, 
He writes not that you won or lost but how 

you played the game." 

Colby also enumerates in his statis- 
tics "one son born Sept. 27, 1916, 
(Bowdoin, 1938)." Well said Colby, 
let's not forget the strain, "We'll send 
our sons to Bowdoin in the fall." 

Fellows, don't kick if you do not get 
what you consider to be your proper 
obituary for it is your own fault. If 
you don't come across with the class 
information as requested don't blame 
the secretary, but as Tom Williams 
puts it "blame your own d pro- 
crastination" and you will admit this 
usually strikes the nail on the head. 

Jimmie Draper signs his letter 
"James B/Draper, per H. D. D." Tell 
us the secret Jimmie of educating your 
wife to handle your correspondence. 

John Clifford acknowledges the sec- 
retary's request as an ultimatum. Be- 
lieve me! it takes more than an ulti- 
matum to get a response out of some 
of our brethren. If only I could offer 
my delinquent classmates a case of 
"Jones' best" there would be no need 
of ultimatums or other communica- 
tions but I would receive personal 
calls from each and every member. 

If any of the class have received 
a communication from Jimmie Ham- 
burger of late it means that you have 
not yet come across for a subscrip- 



tion to the Alumni Fund and surely no 
1910 man can afford not to have his 
name in the list of subscribers. 

It is to be regretted that our Class 
baby has neither brothers nor sisters. 
How about it Diz ? 

Frank Evans states that the last 
time he was on the scales they tipped 
at 245 pounds. Newman and Ken- 
drie, send in your weight for com- 
parison. 

To read "Tower" Ballard's experi- 
ences in the World War would alone 
repay a man for a call on the secre- 
tary. 

Fat Townsend writes from his home 
in Canada: "There are only two places 
in North America today suitable for 
conferences and reunions, one is Ha- 
vanna and the other is Montreal." 
Good suggestion. If arrangements 
can be made our 15th will be pre- 
ceded by a trip across the line, so 
start now boys to save up your 
ducats. 

"Diz" Crowell writes under Po- 
litical Honors, "carried torch in Re- 
publican parade." 

"General" Slocum states that he 
was married in the same week that 
Woodrow Wilson was first inaugur- 
ated President. In the opinion of most 
of us the fact of your marriage was 
the more important event in that par- 
ticular week. 

Harry Mac. states "it is cheaper to 
move than pay rent," he having moved 
three times within the last few 
months. Is it any wonder that Gerald 
Wilder is kept busy ? 

One of our members writes under 
heading of Ambition "To have Bow- 
doin men stand pre-eminent among 
college men." Certainly, fellows, that 
is the star to which we should hitch 
our Henry Fords. 

"Hoot" Davie writes "have in the 
past and will in the future, be glad 
to help locate any Bowdoin men who 
have brains and are not afraid of 
doing dirty work at the start." If 
this category fits any 1910 man he 
had better apply to Hoot for a job. 

As some of you well know your 
secretary did carry out his ultimatum 
in sending 23 collect telegrams to de- 
linquents only one of which was re- 
turned with the advice "refused to ac- 
cept charge." Some good sport; what 
say you all? 

Gardner Cole writes he is sending in 



BOWDOIX ORIENT 



15 



an "epitome" of his life. Good work 
Gardner. Mitch will be proud of you. 

"Weary" Walker wishes to convey 
to the class that his only claim to dis 
tinction :s that he hrs never yet been 
arrested. 

It is a singular coincidence that 
both the names of Sam Dreer and Ar- 
thur Madison appear in the blacklist. 

Here's hoping that Bob Hale mar- 
ries that girl before our next reunion 
so that he may devote a little of his 
time to his class mates. 

Our stolen 1910 Reunion costumes 
have not as yet been located. Bruns- 
wick sleuths are still watching for the 
appearance of new union overall suits 
before making an arrest. 

If any one desires the position of 
class secretary, kindly apply, and the 
job will be yours. 

"Cy" Rowell writes under date of 
Dec, 1920, "Am sending class files in 
a few days." Nothing arrived as yet 
"Cy." 



In Memoriam 



It is with the deepest regret that 
Beta Sigma Chapter of Beta Theta 
Pi learns of the death of Brother Al- 
bro Leonard Burnell of the Class of 
19C0, a charter member of th ; s 
chapter. During his college course he 
was prominent in many activities, be 
ing president of his class his Junioi 
year. Following his graduation he 
was for six years a teacher in the 
government schools in the Philippines 
In 1908 he became Vice Consul at Bar- 
ranquila, Columbia, and in 1912 he 
was transferred to Rio Janerio, Bra- 
zil. For the past seven years he has 
been in the consul service in France 
having been stationed at Rouen and 
at Lille where his death occurred. 

The Chapter takes this opportunity 
to extend its deepest sympathy to his 
family and friends, and expresses its 
sorrow at the loss cf a beloved 
brother. 

LESLIE E. GIBSON, 

LEON M. BUTLER, 

F. KING TURGEON, 

For the Chapter. 




Harvard University 

Graduate School of 
Business Administration 



A two-year course in business 
leading to the degree of Master of 
Business Administration. 

Open to college graduates. 

Courses offered in the following 
fields: Accounting, Business Law, 
Banking and Finance, Marketing. 
Advertising, Retail Store Problems. 
Sales Management, Industrial 
Management, Labor Problems. 
Business Statistics, Foreign Trade, 
Transportation, Lumbering, Office 
Organization. 

Nineteen graduates of Bowdoin 
have attended the School, two dur- 
ing the present year. 

The registration for 1921-'22 is 
limited to three hundred in the 
first-year courses. Applications 
after May 1st should be accom- 
panied by a certified transcript of 
the college record. 

For information writ* to 
Dean W. B. Donham. University 132 

Harvard Graduate School of 

Business Administration 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 



Year after Year 

The Lenox 

is a cordial host — the Boston 
headquarters for college teams 
and college men. 
Year after Year 

The Brunswick 

is the high place of Boston's fas- 
hionable night life, famous for 
Egyptian Room Dinner Dances. 

In Boston 

on either side of Copley Square, close 
to the Back Bay stations, near the 
theatres, neighbors with fine shops- 
two hotels that share the traditions of 
of every campus. 

THE LENOX THE BRUNSWICK 

Boylston St. Boylston St. 

at Exeter at Copley Sq. 

L. C. PRIOR, Managing Director 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, MAN- 
AGEMENT, CIRCULATION, ETC., RE- 
QUIRED BY THE ACT OF CON- 
GRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912, 

Of the Bowdoin "Orient," published weekly 
during* college year at Brunswick, Maine, for 
April 1, 1921. 

State of Maine, County of Cumberland, ss. 

Before me, a Notary Public in and for the 
State and county aforesaid, personally ap- 
peared Eben G. Tileston, who, having- been 
duly sworn according to law, deposes and says 
that he is the Business Manager of the Bow- 
doin "Orient" and that the following is, to the 
best of his knowledge and belief, a true state- 
ment of the ownership, management (and if a 
daily paper, the circulation), etc., of the afore- 
said publication for the date shown in the 
above caption, required by the Act of August 
24, 1912, embodied in section 443, Postal Laws 
and Regulations, printed on the reverse of this 
form, to wit : 

1. That the names and addresses of the pub- 
lisher, editor, managing editor, and business 

Name of— Post Office Address- 

Publisher, Bowdoin Publishing Co., Brunswick, 
Maine. 
Editor, Edward B. Ham, Brunswick, Maine. 
Managing Editor, F. King Turgeon, Bruns- 
wick, Maine. 
Business Manager, Eben G. Tileston, Bruns- 
wick, Maine. 

2. That the owners are : (Give names and 
addresses of individual owners, or, if a cor- 
poration, give its name and the names and 
addresses of stockholders owning or holding 1 
per cent, or more of the total amount of 
stock.) 

Bowdoin Publishing Co., mutual association. 
No member receiving share of the profits. 

3. That the knewn bondholders, mortgagees, 
and other security holders owning or holding 
1 per cent, or more of total amount of bonds, 
mortgages, or other securities are: (If there 
are none, so state.) None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next above, giv- 
ing the names of the owners, stockholders, 
and security holders, if any, contain not only 
the list of stockholders and security holders 
as they appear upon the books of the company 
but also, in cases where the stockholder or 
security holder appears upon the books of the 
company as trustee or in any other fiduciary 
relation, the name of the person or corpor- 
ation for whom such trustee is acting, is given ; 
also that the said two paragraphs contain state- 
ments embracing affiant's full knowledge and 
belief as to the circumstances and conditions 
under which stockholders and security holders 
who do not appear upon the books of the com- 
pany as trustees, hold stock and securities in 
a capacity other than that of a bona fide 
owner ; and this affiant has no reason to be- 
lieve that any other person, association, or cor- 
poration has any interest direct or indirect in 
the said stock, bonds, or other securities than 
as so stated by him. 

5. That the average number of copies of each 
: ssue of this publication sold or distributed, 
through the mails or otherwise, to paid sub- 
scribers during the six months preceding the 
date shown above is (This infor- 
mation is required from daily publications 
only.) 

Eben G. Tileston. Business Manager. 
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 1st 
day of April, 1921. 

Samuel B. Furbish, Notary Public. 
(Seal.) 
(My commission expires April 26, 1923.) 



We carry a large assortment of 
Olives, Pickles, Cheese, and Fancy Cookies. 

DAVIS' MARKET 

Next to Star Lunch 



A 12* per cent, reduction on all Cigarettes 
n carton lots. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The Steward Rejoices when his "food crabbers" praise. 



W. N. Clark Co.'s Fancy Canned Fruits and Vegetables 
make them smack their lips. 



THE HOLMES-SWIFT COMPANY 

SOLE AGENTS 
Augusta, .... Maine 



BOWDOIN CANTEEN 

8 a. m.-12 m.; 1.30-6; 7-11 

Sundays, 12-5 p. m. 

A. PALMER, 19 North Winthrop 



P. J. MESERVE'S 

Drug Store 
Opposite Town Hall 



Twenty-third Session of the Summer Term 

of the 

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

JUNE 27-AUGUST 5 

Courses in Chemistry, Economics, Education, English, French, History, 
Latin, Mathematics, Physics, and Spanish. 

Credit is given when courses are completed. Social and athletic activities 
are a feature. 

For Bulletin address 

JAMES S. STEVENS, Director 

ORONO, MAINE 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 Maine Street 



A. W. HASKELL, D. D. S. 

W. F. BROWN, D. D. S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Postoffice. Brunswick, Maine 



Do You Need Extra Courses? 

Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages, Economics, 
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire 
how credits earned may be applied on present college program. 

®Ij? Intorjsttg of fflfjirago 



HOME STUDY DEPT. 



29th 
CHICAGO. ILLINOIS Tear 



LAW 

THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

Trains students in the principles of the 
law and in the technique of the profes- 
sion so as to best prepare them for 
active practice wherever the English 
system of law prevails. 



America*s new pi. 
politics and 
young Ami 



i international 
challenges the 



He must equip himself for new 
world conditions, with a knowledge 
of legal fundamentals. 

LAW — Its principles and application 
to all business is almost as necessary 
to the coming business man as it is 
indispensable to the lawyer. 

Special scholarships ($75 per year) 
are awarded to college graduates. 

Course for LL.B. requires 3 school 
years. Those who have received this 
degree from this or any other approved 
school of law may receive LL.M. on 
the completion of one year's resident 
attendance under the direction of Dr. 
Melville M. Bigelow. Several $25 and 
$50 scholarships open in this course. 
For Catalog, Address 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 



YOU HAVE WRITTEN POEMS! 

Do you care to have them revised 
or constructively criticised by success- 
ful authors? If you do, then send us 
your manuscript (stories, articles or 
poems). We will criticise, and place 
them should they prove to be accept- 
able for publication. 

There is no actual charge for our 
services. If, however, you have not 
previously enrolled with the advisory 
department of this association, we re- 
quest that you enclose the initial fee 
of two dollars, which we must ask of 
each new contributor. There is no 
additional expense, no further obliga- 
tion. 

It must be realized that we can only 
be of aid to those of serious intent. If 
you do mean to strive for literary suc- 
cess, we can help you in many ways. 
Our services are yours until we have 
actually succeeded in marketing at 
least one of your manuscripts. Send 
something to-day! 

Please enclose return postage with 
your communications. 

NATIONAL LITERARY 
ASSOCIATION 

131 W. 39th St. 

New York City 

Advisory Department 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CITIZENS LAUNDRY 

College Agent Auto Service 

A SHORTER 

SHORTHAND SYSTEM 
IN TEN EASY LESSONS CORDOVAN BOOTS 



Bowdoin Dairy Lunch 

Open Day and Night 



This course covers ten easy lessons 
which will enable the Student, Pro- 
fessor, Journalist, Doctor, Lawyer or 
anyone seeking a professional career, 
to go thru life with 100 per cent 
efficiency. 

THIS COURSE 

Is short and inexpensive, and is 
given with a money back guarantee if 
not satisfied. 

SEND THIS CLIPPING TO-DAY 



PYRAMID PKESS: PUBLISHERS 
1416 Broadway, 
New York City 

Gentlemen : — Enclosed herewith is $5.00 
for which kindly send me your shorthand 
course in ten easy lessons by mail. It is 
understood that at the end of five days, if 
I am not satisfied my money will be gladly 
refunded. 

Name 

Street 

City and State 



IN 



YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 



"Herman's" Tan Cordovan $13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan. .$15.50 
"Floi'sheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 

TENNIS SHOES, INDOOR AND 

OUTDOOR MOCCASINS, RUBBER 

BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 



OH BOY! 

Have You Tried Our 

49c CHOCOLATES 

There is nothing cheap about our 
place but the price. 

BUTLER'S 



F. W. Chandler & Son 

HAVE 

Tennis Rackets 

from $1.50 to $1.60 each 

Championship Tennis Balls 

60c each 

1 920 Tennis Balls 45c each 

Baseballs & Baseball Supplies 

25 Kinds of Golf Balls 

Golf Bags and Clubs 

The College Book Store 



FOR GOLF ENTHUSIASTS 



HATS 
GLOVES 
SHIRTS 
HOSIERY 

SHOES 
TIES, Etc. 



WE CARRY EVERYTHING NECESSARY 

In fact there is nothing this "Live Store" cannot 
supply in the way of wearing apparel. Special at- 
tention is called to a fine line oi 

Golf Suits in Homespuns and Herringbone weaves 
attractively priced. 



Sport Oxfords for golf or other occasions, made 
by Wright & Ditson. The leather is c, smoked elk 
with rubber sole and has a tan strip across the 
throat of the sho: 



$10 



Fine Golf Hose in a mixture of grey and green and 
plain brown and grey. 



Monument 
Square 




Portland 
Maine 



18 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



DURING THE GAME 

BETWEEN CLASSES 

ON THE HIKE 






A "MUNCH" WHILE STUDYING 

A SNACK BEFORE RETIRING 

IN FACT— EVERY OLD TIME 



GOLF SUITS 

GRAY AND TAN 
HOMESPUN 

$28.00 



E. S. BODWELL 

& SON 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



SUMMER WORK 

We still have room 
For a few LIVE men 
Provided they want to 
Earn a lot of MONEY 
This summer. 

This isn't a Gamble 

It is a SURE THING 

For the man who HUSTLES 

And besides 

We pay a SALARY. 

NOW is the time 
To get on the Band Wagon 
So see one of our local men 
Or write us direct and 
Ask for the dope. 

Local representatives: 

S. H. Carter, 24 Winthrop 

Hugh Nixon, D. U. House. 

THE NATIONAL SURVEY CO. 

Topographical Offices, 
Chester Vermont 



JUD, The Barber 

was going to use this space 
but thought it wasn't neces- 
sary. 




V Clothes J 

CONSERVATIVE CLOTHES 

FOR 

COLLEGE MEN 

In stock and made to measure. 
Imported Fabrics. Lower prices for Spring 1921. 



HASKELL & JONES COMPANY 

PORTLAND .... MAINE 



TUFTS 
COLLEGE 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

Offers to the student who has 
had one year of college training, a 
four year course leading to the de- 
gree of D. M. D. 

Being located in Boston, Tufts 
College Dental School enjoys ex- 
cellent clinical advantages. 

Students in the Dental School 
Course have the privilege of clin- 
ics at the Forsythe Dental Infirm- 
ary, Boston City Hospital, Mass- 
achusetts Homeopathic Hospital, 
Boston Dispensary, Vernon St. 
Hospital, and the Massachusetts 
Home for Feeble-Minded. 

Tufts Dental School is co-edu- 
cational. 

Registration begins at 9 a. m., 
on June 21, and ends on Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

School session begins Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

For further particulars write to 
F. E. Haskins, M. D., Secretary. 

416 Huntington Avenue, 

Boston, Mass. 

WILLIAM RICE, D.M.D., Dean 



Pressing and Cleaning 

ORDERS TAKEN FOR DYEING 

SECOND HAND CLOTHING 

BOUGHT 

DAN ROSEN 




SPUR- A New Narrow 

Arrow 

Collar 

Cluett.Peabody &-Co.lncTroy. N.Y. 



BO W DO IN ORIENT 




YOUR GAME 

YX/'HATEVER your "game," whether 
in sport or serious activity, MACUL- 
LAR PARKER CLOTHES lend fin- 
ish to your performance, and are as 
individual as your own way of doing 



things. 



400 WASHINGTON STREET 
The Old House with the Young Spirit 



Bowdoin men are invited to visit our shop 
when in Boston 



BOYS! 



Have you tried our new drink, 

BOWDOIN BREW? 

Our Candy, too, is right through and 
through 

THE SPEAR FOLKS 

119 Maine Street 

CARL H. MARTIN 

Cleansing and Dyeing 
Pressing and Alterations 

4 Elm Street 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. 

Surplus and Profits, $100,000. 

Student Patronage Solicited. 



PRINTING 



of Quality 

Always in the lead 
for snap and style 

Wheeler Print Shop 

Town Building, Brunswick, Maine 



We carry the largest assortment of 

Olives, Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and 
Biscuits of all kinds east of Portland 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

37 Maine Stieet Tel. 130-137 

Branch Store— 2 Cushing St.— Tel. 16 



WRIGHT & DITS0N 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 
Boston 

344 Washington Street 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CUMBERLAND 



Wednesday and Thursday 
MONTE BLUE 

IN 

THE KENTUCKIANS 



Friday and Saturday 
JEWEL CARMEN 

IN 

THE SILVER LINING 



Next Week— Monday and Tuesday 
JUSTINE JOHNSTONE 

IN 

THE PLAYTHING OF BROADWAY 

PASTIME 

Wednesday and Thursday 
MILDRED HARRIS 

IN 

OLD DAD 



Friday and Saturday 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

IN 

THE KID 



Next Week— Monday and Tuesday 
HOUSE PETERS 

IN 

LYING LIPS 



UBflAKY ' 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



&WH 



VOL. LI. 



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2<f, 1921. 



Number 4- 



Conference at M. I. T. 



Reports of Student Council and 
Musical Club Delegates. 



Bowdoin was represented at the Stu- 
dent Government Division of the re- 
cent conference at Technology by 
Young '21. General problems con- 
fronting the student bodies of the 
various colleges were discussed at 
length, and valuable suggestions were 
offered. 

Dean Burton of M. I. T. opened the 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Outing Club Meeting 



The second meeting of the Outing 
Club was held on last Thursday in 
Hubbard Hall. Young '21 presided, 
and the committee presented the con- 
stitution which was accepted. Officers 
for the year were elected. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



WANTED ! 



Contributions for the "Bear Skin." 
Jokes, stories, poems, drawings, of a 
humorous nature are badly needed to 
fill the Ivy number. This magazine 
was started in response to a demand 
from the students of College. It was 
expected that they would support it, 
not only by subscriptions, but by 
actually helping to publish it. The 
first number was written almost en- 
tirely by the board of editors. This 
cannot be done again. If this paper 
is to be a credit to* the College, one 
that will compare favorably with the 
comic publications of other colleges no 
larger than Bowdoin, the student body 
must show more interest. The Uni- 
versity of Maine has just started a 
humorous periodical. Is Bowdoin go- 
ing to show that she can lead in this 
field as well as in many others, or 
will the "Bear Skin," through want of 
interest, die a natural death? 



Stanley Plummer 



Prize Speaking 



Towle Wins in First Annual Contest. 



Bowdoin Loses Annual 
Exhibition Game 

With Bates 



The first annual competition for the 
Stanley Plummer prize of the income 
of a fund of $1,000, awarded "for ex- 
cellence in original and spoken com- 
position in the English language on 
the part of the members of the Junior 
Class," was held last Friday evening 
in Hubbard Hall. 

President Kenneth C. M. Sills was 
the presiding officer; and the judges 
were the Rev. H. H. Bishop, Mr. Al- 
gernon S. Chandler, and Mr. John E. 
Chapman. Before introducing the 
speakers President Sills gave a brief 
sketch of the donor of the prize. Mr. 
Plummer was in the class of 1867; 
and it is interesting to note that the 
class of 1868 gave a fund for an an- 
nual prize to be given under similar 
conditions to a member of the Senior 
class. Mr. Plummer was deeply in- 
terested in public speaking, and be- 
came a lawyer of some local distinc- 
tion. He served his State in both 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Calendar 



April 27 — Baseball: Amherst at 
Amherst. 

April 28 — Baseball: Wesleyan at 
Middletown. 

April 29— Baseball. Trinity at Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

April 30 — Baseball: Boston College 
at Boston. 

April 29-30 — Penn Relay Carnival. 

May 1 — Ibis Meeting; Psi Upsilon 
House, 8 p. m. 

May 3 — Tennis: Colby at Bruns- 
wick. 

May 3 — Baseball: Worcester Poly- 
technic at Worcester. 

May 4 — Baseball: Brown at Provi- 
dence. 



Both Teams Showed Weak Fielding- 
Errors Costly for Bowdoin. 



Bowdoin lost to Bates at Lewiston 
in the Patriots' Day exhibition game, 
taking the small end of a 4-2 score. 
Although the visitors slugged three 
hits more than the home team could 
get from Flinn, the sport-writers felt 
it allowable to call the game a pitch- 
ers' battle. The main difficulty 
seemed to be that the jinx put in a 
bit of holiday labor highly beneficial 
to the Garnet team. Time after time 
the Bowdoin hitters got around within 
reaching distance of a run only to be 
denied. In the seventh inning Bow- 
doin, with full bases, was unable to 
hit and consequently to score. Jack 
Spratt, the Bates twirler, pitched a 
fine game and was backed up by note- 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Athletic Teams Have 

Busy Week Ahead 



Baseball Team Starts on New England 

Trip — Track Stars to Compete at 

Penn — Dual Meet With Brown. 



This week will be a busy one for 
the baseball and track teams. With 
seven baseball games, a relay race 
against seven other colleges, and a 
dual meet the next week, Bowdoin 
sport fans will have their fill. 

The baseball team left last night 
for its tour of New England. Today 
it meets Amherst at Amherst, tomor- 
row Wesleyan will be the opponent 
at Middletown, Friday the team will 
meet Trinity at Hartford, and will 
then journey back to Boston to play 
Boston College on Saturday afternoon. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Bowdoin Receives Bequest 



Notice has just been received from 
the Probate Court in Connecticut that 
Mrs. Annie Louise Raymond, better 
known as Annie Louise Cary, the 
noted singer, has bequeathed to Bow- 
doin College a portrait of Henry 
Wadsworth Longfellow. This will be 
hung in the entrance hall of the 
Walker Art Building. 

Mrs. Raymond was born in Wayne, 
Maine, in October, 1842. She studied 
in Milan and made her operatic debut 
in Copenhagen in 1868. She appeared 
with great success abroad and first ap- 
peared in America in 1870 in New 
York. At the -time of her retirement 
upon her marriage to Charles H. Ray- 
mond in 1882 she was without doubt 
the most popular singer in America. 
The portrait will have special signifi- 
cance aside from itself, being the gift 
of so noted a woman. 



Track Prospects 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Sunday will be a day of rest before 
the game with Harvard on Monday. 
Tuesday Holy Cross will be met at 
Worcester, and for the final game, the 
team will play Brown at Providence 
on Wednesday. This is a stiff sched- 
ule, and the players will have seven 
opponents who are worth while de- 
feating. Coach Houser will take prac- 
tically the same team that made the 
Southern trip a few weeks ago. 

On Saturday a picked relay team 
will be pitted against representatives 
of seven other colleges at the biggest 
athletic event in the country today, 
the Penn Carnival. Bowdoin will run 
Carnegie Tech., Tufts, Rochester, 
Renssaelar Polytech., Hobart, Ver- 
mont, and Hamline College of St. 
Paul. The relay team has had won- 
derful success so far this year, and 
it is to be hoped that Bowdoin can 
repeat her performance of last year 
at Penn. The Alumni will entertain 
the team in Philadelphia. 

This carnival at Penn. is to be one 
of the most spectacular meets in 
years. Not only will nearly all Ameri- 
can colleges of the East and many of 
the West be represented, but a picked 
team of French athletes will run 
against a similar team of American 
stars. These French students will 



compete in other events besides the 
relays. 

Negotiations have just been com- 
pleted for a dual meet with Browr. 
to be held here on Wednesday after- 
noon, May 4. Brown has a strong 
team according to all indications. L 
will be remembered that she took sec- 
ond place in the New England Meet 
last year. Bowdoin will do well tc 
win, but after the steady training and 
the spirit that has been exhibited this 
year, the team is in good condition 
With fight Bowdoin can win, and 
Bowdoin has fought in the past. 



Richard M. Hallett 

Addresses Ibis 



Noted Author Speaks On Short Story 
Writing. 



The Ibis met at the Zeta Psi House 
on the evening of April 18, when the 
members were addressed by Richard 
Matthews Hallett, the story writer. 
President Sills, and Professors Bell, 
Cram, and Davis were present, as 
were also those members of the so- 
ciety recently elected from the Junior 
class to form the nucleus of next 
year's organization. 

Mr. Hallett spoke upon Creative 
Composition, Practical and Applied. 
He prefaced his talk with numerous 
instances of the diffidence, one might 
almost say contempt, which writers 
have expressed for their own trade, 
the business that deals in "Words, 
words, words." Seldom, if ever, does 
a writer's own work satisfy him. 
Again, the words not infrequently 
fail to materialize out of the first at- 
tempt to summon them from the deep. 
In this case Mr. Hallett recommends 
writing at least a page at pure ran- 
dom, for the purpose of warming up. 
much as one pours a little water into 
a refractory pump and thereby re- 
ceives bucketsful. 

Mr. Hallett, like Hamlin Garland 
on his recent visit to Bowdoin, ob- 
served that present-day editors de- 
mand a stereotyped form of story 
from each contributor. One man 
writes negro stories, another man sea 
stories, and everything outside his 
"field" is rigidly excluded. So, too, 
the public will support no more than 
a limited amount of consciously ar- 
tistic writing, especially such as 



shows the influence of the psychologi- 
cal Russian school. Hergcsheimer 
and Henry Milner Rideout were cited 
by Mr. Hallett as artists in style 
whom the "Saturday Evening Post" 
occasionally includes in its pages to 
hold the allegiance of its few thou- 
sand readers who have taste above the 
average of its other millions. 

Mr. Hallett would not answer the 
question whether plot or flavor were 
of first importance. Both of neces- 
sity must be considered. Sinclair 
Lewis's recent success "Main Street" 
would be better for a plot, as would 
much of the work of Joseph Conrad. 
Mr. Hallett feels, however, that a 
story is above all else a picture or 
series of pictures, and that disaster 
lies in wait for the story writer who 
becomes chiefly introspective. A cer- 
tain amount of comment upon life, 
ironic or otherwise, may be carried 
by the tale if deftly launched. 

Mr. Hallett's frank, friendly, and 
masculine manner added pleasure to 
the substance of his address. There 
is about him something of the tang 
of the open sea of which he writes, 
and the original humor of his char- 
acters appears strongly in his speech. 
A man who has both experienced the 
primitive vigor of life and thought 
deeply upon it, he left the impression 
of a personality more interesting even 
than his work. 

The next meeting of Ibis will be 
at the Psi Upsilon House at 8 p. m., 
May 1, when Francis W. Jacob '17 w:'ll 
speak of his experiences and obser- 
vations in war-time Russia. 

R. W. M. 



New Rules for Pre- 

Medic Students 



All men who are at present in Col- 
lege who have registered at the Dean's 
Office their intention to study medi- 
cine, or who shall so register before 
September 22, 1921, will be recom- 
mended to the Boards for the degree 
of A.B. or B.S., provided: 

First — That they have completed 
three years' work, or twenty-six 
courses, in Bowdoin College; and 

Second — That they have completed 
one year's work in a Class A medical 
school. 

The present rules concerning majors 
and minors and major examinations, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



and also concerning grades (namely, 
that every student must secure grades 
of "C" or better in more than one-half 
his courses) shall apply to these stu- 
dents as to all others. 

Special arrangements for major ex- 
aminations for these students will be 
made this year. 



Baseball Game 

(Continued from Page 1) 



worthy batting. Bowdoin's seven 
errors look rather bad but the breaks 
are bound to come both ways and 
this first game with a State college 
team will doubtless be all the lesson 
needed. 

Bates made two runs in the second, 
Bowdoin tieing the score with two in 
the fourth, then in the sixth a pair 
of errors and a couple of long center 
field hits won the game for Bates. 

The box score and summary: 

BOWDOIN 

ab r bh po a e 

Needelman, 2b 5 2 3 4 2 

Smith, ss 5 1 2 

A. Morrell, 3b 4 1 1 1 1 

Hill, If 4 1 

Davis, rf 3 1 

*M. Morrell 1 1 

Holmes, cf 4 1 1 2 1 

Clifford, lb 3 2 11 1 1 

Handy, c 3 1 6 2 

Flinn, p 4 1 1 3 1 



two hits. The score was two to noth- 
ing until the eighth when Gardiner 
scored three runs, on one hit and two 
errors. The batteries were: Bowdoin 
2nd, Marston and Miller; Gardiner, 
H. Hildreth and Kelly. 



Plummer Prize Speaking 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Totals 36 2 10 24 13 17 



ab 



bh po 



Cogan, 2b 3 2 6 

Kennelly. 3b 4 1 2 2 

Wiggin, cf 4 1 4 1 

Langley, rf 4 1 1 

Jordan, lb 4 2 1 9 

Finnegan. ss 1 1 2 

Ebner, If 4 1 2 

Partridge, c 4 1 2 8 2 1 

Spratt. p 3 1 

Totals 31 4 7 27 12 4 

"Batted for Davis in ninth. 

Innings 1 2 3 4 B 6 7 8 9 

Bowdoin 2 0—2 

Bates 2 2 x— 4 

Earned runs. Bates 1, Bowdoin 2 ; two- 
base hits. Holmes. Needelman : runs driven 
in by Partridge, Spratt, Flinn. Needelman, 
Finnegan, Ebner. Sacrifices, Clifford, Finne- 
gan 2. Base on balls off Flinn 2, Spratt 5 ; 
first base on errors, Bowdoin 1, Bates 3 ; left on 
bases. Bowdoin 13, Bates 7 ; double play, 
Needelman and Clifford ; struck out by Flinn 
4, Spratt 8 ; passed balls, Handy 2. Stolen 
bases, A. Morrell, Holmes. Umpire, J. Carri- 
gan. Time, 2h. 15m. 



SECOND TEAM LOSES 

TO GARDINER 



Last Saturday the second team met 
Gardiner High School at Gardiner 
and lost with a score of 3 to 2. The 
weather was extremely bad, the game 
being played in a pouring rain. Mars- 
ton allowed the Gardiner team but 



branches of the Legislature. 

The judges commended each man on 
his work. The prize was awarded to 
Carroll S. Towle. Each speech was 
worthy of high praise. This marks 
a fine beginning and foretells a keen 
competition annually for the Stanley 
Plummer Prize. 

Ralph B. Knight, in "Prison Re- 
form," sincerely urged the improve- 
ment of prisons. He pictured prisons 
of the past, Sing Sing for example, 
with their low walls, wretched beds, 
and breeding places of filth and 
disease; and even in Maine, the first 
prisons were merely holes dug in the 
ground, covered with iron plates, and 
entered by a ladder. In the past there 
was no employment for prisoners. 
Many kept from going insane by 
throwing out handfuls of pins into 
the darkness of their place of confine- 
ment and passing their time in hunt- 
ing for them, by spelling scores of 
words backwards, or similar forms of 
employment to occupy their minds 
Now conditions have changed to a 
large extent. Forms of employment 
have been instituted. Reformers, such 
as Osborne, have done much to make 
prisons clean and to introduce educa- 
tional benefits. But it is indeed 
strange that ideas of retribution still 
exist. Mr. Knight declared that 
striped suits ought to be done away 
with and opportunities for Christian 
worship be established. Prisons should 
be reformatories for the sake of the 
individual and for society. 

"The Modernity of Franklin," by 
Dean S. Eldridge, portrayed Franklin 
not as a strict Puritan of the eight- 
eenth century, but as a liberal man 
who might easily re-accustom him- 
self to the conditions of today. He 
passed his Sunday much as Bowdoin 
students pass theirs now, in study, rest. 
and enjoyment. He had the idea of 
an ideal high school, on a hill with 
a river in front, separated by a field 
or two, — a school with a library, and 



athletics. All students should not be 
taught the same. Each one should be 
instructed in those subjects he liked 
and was best fitted for. And women, 
who were little educated at that time, 
he believed should receive liberal edu- 
cations in business principles, and in 
the fine arts. 

Carroll S. Towle took his audience 
back to "Bowdoin in the First Year 
of This Century." He pictured the 
campus, without the library, the 
Science Building, Hyde Hall, the Hyde 
Gymnasium, and with only two fra- 
ternity houses, those belonging to 
Alpha Delta Phi and Delta Kappa Ep- 
silon. Several of the professors here 
today held classes in the same rooms 
then. Each had his joke to the amuse- 
ment of the old time students. And ath- 
letics roused Bowdoin spirit as today. 
In 1901 both Harvard and Yale de- 
feated us by small scores; but Colby, 
Bates, and Maine suffered heavy de- 
feat at our hands. And also in track 
did Bowdoin claim the championship 
of the State, and even defeated M. I. 
T. at the B. A. A. meet. The musical 
clubs had a successful year, as did 
the debating teams. In this year the 
Bradbury Prize was given for the 
first time. In baseball Bowdoin won 
over Maine and Bates, but lost to 
Colby. 

Albeit R. Thayer in "A Persisting 
Form of Slavery," showed that pay- 
ment of wages does not end slavery. 
But in industry today there are mil- 
lions of slaves, girls, toiling in fac- 
tories, who should be in school, and 
families striving to live on salaries 
as low as $14 a week. The poor battle 
from day to day to live, they cannot 
think of the future. These problems 
should be solved; for if a man cannot 
secure enough education to earn a 
living we must take care of him, or 
provide him with education to enable 
him to earn his family's living. Mr. 
Thayer urged college men to take the 
lead in improving industrial condi- 
tions. 

The last speaker, George B. Welch 
showed how "Psychological Tests of 
Intelligence" are being successfully 
adopted in business, juvenile courts, 
and schools. Such tests were success- 
fully used in the Army during the 
war, and can be applied to persons of 
all ages; but are especially beneficial 
to children. All children should be 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



given tests on entering school. Then 
they could be placed in three divisions, 
each division receiving its proper in- 
struction, and not being held back by 
the other two. First would be the 
normal division; second, those of su- 
perior intelligence; and third, those 
of lower intelligence. The latter di- 
vision would be given special atten- 
tion and be taught some industry so 
that they could take care of them- 
selves. The difficulties aristing are, 
first, every mother would not consent 
to tests unless her children were 
placed in the superior class; but in a 
few years parents would be educated 
to see the true value of this system; 
and second, the expense; but the 
lessening of crime and poverty would 
take care of this. This system would 
surely improve the condition of the 
world today. 



Outing Club 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Young began by explaining the pur- 
pose of the club. It is proposed to 
organize a group which shall create 
and foster love for outdoor sports all 
the year round. It is hoped every 
Bowdoin student will join to make this 
purpose realized. After the club be- 
comes well established, it intends 
to acquire such property as canoes, 
camps and other aids to an outdoor 
life. The Biology Club has signified 
its intention of aiding the new club 
by every means in its power. The 
faculty are behind the movement 
which will help the students physical- 
ly, and provide a means of enjoying 
outdoor life. It was pointed out that 
it is merely a question of co-operation 
on the part of the students. 

The constitution was presented by 
the committee appointed for that pur- 
pose, consisting of Professors Bell and 
Gross, Haines '21, Buker '21, and 
Lovell '21. The constitution was ac- 
cepted. The following officers were 
elected: Pickard '22, president; 
Knight '22, vice-president; and Phil- 
brick '23, secretary-treasurer. The 
dues were set at one dollar a year. 

Pine spirit was shown at this meet- 
ing, and it appears that Bowdoin will 
soon realize her desire for outdoor 
life fostered and maintained by an 
outing Club. 



Tech Conference 

(Continued from Page 1) 



conference on Friday afternoon, ex- 
pressing his hopes for the results of 
the conference. His ambition in plan- 
ning the conference had been to make 
the property of all colleges what he 
characterized as the "spirit of Tech- 
nology." This spirit means that the 
undergraduates control, manager and 
succeed in all the undergraduate ac- 
tivities. - It is the feeling that under- 
graduate life is for the undergradu- 
ates, and should be their possession. 
The faculty should control the courses 
and the buildings, the rest should be 
in the hands of the students, controlled 
by their chosen representatives. He 
hoped that Technology might con- 
tribute that idea — undergraduate life 
for the undergraduates, controlled by 
them through officers answerable only 
to them. 

The discussion began with the ques- 
tion of the composition of the govern- 
ing body. The method of selection 
varies in the different colleges, some 
having ex-officio members from every 
club and activity, others with the 
class presidents, managers of teams, 
editors of publications, and managers 
of other activities. Some have mem- 
bers from the three upper classes 
only, others, such as Vermont, have 
faculty members. Purdue has five 
continuing members so that the per- 
sonel never changes entirely. 

In discussing the powers of the body 
many interesting points were brought 
out. In some colleges the faculty has 
a veto power. In others the council 
is the last board of appeal. All have 
a decided amount of authority and 
freedom from restriction. Some have 
the entire discipline of the college to 
enforce, others recommend punish- 
ment of the faculty. In the matter 
of social affairs, many councils con- 
trol the number given, their dates, and 
length. In no case was mention made 
of the faculty supervising such mat- 
ters beyond limiting the number, 
which was very large in some col- 
leges. 

Saturday morning the control of 
finances came up for discussion. Most 
of the colleges represented have 
blanket taxes as does Bowdoin. The 
amount collected depends largely upon 
the size of the institution. Tech with 



no baseball or football makes an as- 
sessment of nine dollars a year. Co- 
lumbia with her thousands of students 
gets twenty, while Amherst collects 
twenty-five, added into the college bill. 
Columbia's tax includes class dues, as 
well as admission to all home games. 
Nearly all the colleges have a budget 
system to apportion the amount col- 
lected. 

The Board of Managers at Bow- 
doin appeared to be a distinct inno- 
vation at the conference. Most of 
the colleges have a budget commit- 
tee, which may or may not have all 
interests represented. This results in 
frequent friction and injustice. Our 
Board of Managers with each man- 
ager trying to get his share and act- 
ing as a check upon the others ap- 
pears to be by far the better plan. 

The distribution of student activi- 
ties came up for discussion next. The 
point system for limiting activities is 
used in some colleges. Each activity 
is graded and no one man is allowed 
to exceed a certain number of points. 
In the larger institutions this serves 
a good purpose for it distributes the 
work, and causes a man to give more 
time to his chosen branch. Technology, 
Pennsylvania, Chicago, Ohio State, 
and others have this plan. It is 
heartily approved by the institutions 
which have.it. 

Interfratemity relations came in 
for their share of time. Rushing 
agreements were hashed out. Most of 
the larger colleges have second se- 
mester rushing with very complicated 
rules and regulations concerning the 
relations of the upperclassmen and 
the Freshmen. The smaller colleges 
similar to Bowdoin have our plan of 
earlier rushing, but most of them do 
not allow high school pledging and 
have deferred initiations. In Mis- 
souri if the scholastic grade of a fra- 
ternity averages below a "B," the 
chapter is dropped from the council 
and is allowed neither to rush or to 
initiate until its standing is again 
"B." This has resulted in very high 
scholarship and is favored by all 
classes at Missouri. 

Many other subjects were discussed, 
including the honor system, interclass 
scraps, dormitory control, relations 
with alumni; promotion of high schol- 
astic standing, and the conducting of 
co-operative stores. In all the dis- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



5 



cussion the freedom of undergraduate 
government was shown to be a vital, 
working spirit. 



MUSICAL 



CLUBS 

AND 



DRAMATICS 



Bowdoin College was represented at 
the Musical Clubs and Dramatics sec- 
tion of the M. I. T. conference by 
Woodbury '22. Various suggestions 
were made and points of view ex- 
plained by the delegates from many 
colleges. From the reports made by a 
large number of delegates it was 
found that the system of management 
of dramatics in the colleges is as 
varied as the colleges themselves. One 
curious feature that was brought out 
was that in a small college where ath- 
letics are stressed, the dramatic or- 
ganization is not usually very elabor- 
ate, but in a small college where ath- 
letics, but are considered so import- 
ant, dramatics are firmly established. 
In many colleges the dramatics are 
controlled by an undergraduate com- 
mittee of some kind, which acts in an 
advisory capacity, having charge of 
the finances. This supervises trips 
and regulates expenditures. In gen- 
eral, however, it was found that the 
control of all dramatic associations is 
through an alumni committee which 
supervises trips and finances. The 
actual producing is in charge of an 
undergraduate member of the associa- 
tion. 

In the case where the play goes on 
the road, it was found that the best 
way for the trip to be managed was 
by the graduate members of the com- 
mittee and the director with a staff at 
home, and by the alumni in the several 
towns. Arrangements are made ahead 
of time and transportation, scenery, 
stage hands, theatre, etc., are all ar- 
ranged by a local committee. One 
important thing decided by the con- 
ference, and Bowdoin can well pay 
heed to this point, is that it is much 
better business for the College to run 
the play itself than to run it on a 
guarantee basis. A college play very 
seldom fails so badly that it is un- 
able to pay for itself, and it was 
found that a much greater financial 
success is made if the play is run by 
the association instead of running on 
the guarantee basis. 

The play must be well advertised 
and this is taken care of in practically 



all colleges through a publicity de- 
partment. They keep in touch with 
the alumni, keep them supplied with 
stories and clippings which the alumni 
in the cities use before a performance. 
The dramatic club usually prints its 
own programs, using them all season 
and carrying them along on the trips. 
These programs are usually made to 
pay for themselves by the advertise- 
ments. At Princeton 100 per cent, 
profit is made on them. When musical 
comedies are produced the scores are 
sold and net a substantial profit. Some 
colleges use their own posters to dis- 
tribute about the towns. 

It was found that a good way to 
arouse interest in dramatics in a col- 
lege was to give a smoker in the fall. 
Here things are talked over and dif- 
ferent suggestions made. A boost- 
the-play evening takes place at these 
smokers, and very often much en- 
thusiasm is stirred up. 

Three methods of producing college 
plays were discussed. The play may 
be produced by a professional coach, 
and in this case a more finished pro- 
duct is usually the result. Most col- 
leges were highly in favor of the 
professional coach, and most of the 
delegates present agreed that it was 
the best method. There is, however, 
something to be said in opposition to 
it: the expense is great and the stu- 
dent does not feel the same amount 
of pride in the work as he does where 
the entire production is handled by the 
students. Then there is the method 
of faculty production with the as- 
sistance of the student at the head of 
dramatics. This has been found of 
value where a particular college has 
a talented man who can act as di- 
rector. 

In most colleges some plays are 
written by undergraduates. At the 
University of North Carolina, where 
there is a course in dramatics, the 
best play is produced during Junior 
week. Scenery is sometimes designed 
by the students. Where a college is 
producing a musical comedy the stu- 
dents are often called upon to com- 
pose music. 



concerts given at home and in nearby 
cities are generally used to defray the 
expenses of the longer trips which are 
taken from time to time. 

The Musical Clubs are usually di- 
vided into two departments, the busi- 
ness and the musical. Usually a gen- 
eral manager is in charge, and under 
him a business and publicity manager, 
and a treasurer. They are responsi- 
ble to the general manager for their 
respective departments. The musical 
direction is generally under a leader 
and an assistant leader for each club. 
The leader, who is in most cases re- 
sponsible to some faculty manager or 
coach, arranges for the try-outs, cuts, 
and selection of the music. Most of 
the clubs have professional coaches. 

Publicity campaigns are handled by 
the manager and his assistants 
through the newspapers, posters, 
alumni associations and clippings sent 
to the alumni and reprinted by them. 
L T sually the committee in charge in 
the cities has almost full control. All 
programs are sent out from the col- 
lege and are not prepared by the 
alumni associations. 

In discussing the music it was dis- 
covered that programs of purely 
classical or purely popular music were 
much more successful than programs 
of mixed selections. At Princeton and 
some other colleges, the members 
wear tuxedos at an informal concert 
where popular music is played. Very 
likely this idea will be carried out at 
Bowdoin next year. 

It was thought that it was to the 
advantage of both Musical and Dra- 
matic organizations to award cer- 
tificates of membership and charms 
to the members of the clubs. The 
best plan is to award a certificate of 
membership for one year's service, a 
bronze charm for two, a silver for 
three, and a gold charm for four. 

The conference was extraordinarily 
successful and all the delegates were 
highly pleased by the suggestions 
made, the discussions entered into, and 
the ideas gained. It is hoped that 
Bowdoin will be able to profit by 
some of them. 



In taking up the Musical Clubs it 
was learned that, as a rule, they are 
under the supervision of the faculty. 
The trips are usually financed by 
guarantees from alumni associations 
in various cities. The profits from 



"Who can tell me the meaning of 
leisure?" asked the teacher. 

"It's the place where married peo- 
ple repent," replied the boy who kept 
his ears opened. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 

year by the students of Bowdoin College. 
Edward B. Ham '22 Editor-in-Chief 

F. King Turgeon '23 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

George H. Quinby '23 Intercollegiate News 

George T. Davis '24 Alumni Department 

Fredric S. Klees '24 Faculty Notes 

G. William Rowe '24 Athletics 

P. Dennison Smith '24 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. R. Ludden '22 F. A. Gerrard '23 

R. L. McCormack '22 K. R. Philbrick '23 
V. C. McGorrill '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 
Eben G. Tileston '22 Business Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $3.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 15 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials only; the Managing 
Editor for news and make-up; the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 

Vol. LI. April 27, 1921. No. 4 

Entered at Post Office in Brunswick as 
Second-Class Mail Matter. 



EDITORIALS 

The Major Examination. 

No problem is being discussed more 
at this time by the student body than 
the question of major examinations. 
The communication which appeared in 
the "Orient" two weeks ago gave a 
clear and detailed account of the at- 
titude of the students and their rea- 
sons for opposing the present require- 
ments. Last Thursday evening the 
Student Council met with President 
Sills and various members of the 
faculty and this problem formed the 
main topic of discussion. 

A suggestion to give the students 
a choice between the comprehensive 
examination and two extra courses in 
their major subjects was received very 
favorably by the members of the Stu- 
dent Council. Of course it must be 
clearly understood that this additional 
woik would not be included in the 
thirty-four points required for gradu- 
ation. 

This modification would unquestion- 
ably provide a far more satisfactory 
arrangement than the present system. 



First of all, students would major in 
their favorite subjects instead of de- 
partments in which they felt better 
able to meet the requirements. This 
result alone ought to be a sufficient 
reason for having the present scheme 
changed. 

If a man is specializing in the de- 
partment he likes, he will almost in- 
evitably take more than the minimum 
six courses, provided there is not 
some additional requirement in con- 
nection with all his work like a diffi- 
cult examination which he thinks he 
cannot handle. Thus if this alter- 
native is offered to the students there 
will be all the more inducement to 
get more and more from the major. 

In the departments of languages or 
mathematics, in which the advanced 
courses necessarily develop a thorough 
knowledge of the pre-requisites, it 
would probably be easier to take one 
examination over the whole field than 
to take extra courses. On the other 
hand, in those departments such as 
history, chemistry, and economics, in 
which an advanced student can hard- 
ly remember all the major details of 
| his elementary work, the additional 
courses, which would involve consid- 
erable review matter, would give much 
better results. From these differ- 
ences in the several departments it 
seems more reasonable to offer an 
alternative rather than to require 
either the major examination in all 
subjects, or the additional two courses 
in all subjects. 

In deciding upon this modification, 
the faculty will doubtless consider the 
sentiment of practically all the stu- 
dents in college against the major ex- 
amination and its effect in driving 
men out of the majors they really 
want. It may be well enough to have 
additional requirements in a major 
subject, but not such a requirement 
which is so poorly adapted to certain 
departments. The proposed alterna- 
tive adapts itself to all the depart- 
ments and it will undoubtedly be wel- 
comed as a much fairer method by 
the student body. 

In spite of the many objections raised 
'>y the students to the present plan 
if major examinations, it is well for 
ihem to realize fully that the system 
has been tested very little as yet, and 
that if it is modified and developed 
in a satisfactory manner, it will in 
the near future probably attain it 



original purpose; one which under- 
graduates surely have no cause to re- 
bel against: — namely, to require care- 
ful intensive study in a given field, 
and to give a good command over at 
least one branch of learning. 



The Stanley Plummer Prize. 

Last Thursday evening competition 
was held for the first time for a new 
prize, which will eventually have all 
the significance and prestige of the 
Alexander prize and the Class of 1868 
prize. The Stanley Plummer Prize 
Speaking has become a definite thing, 
an important annual event in the af- 
fairs of Bowdoin. For each Junior 
class this contest, instituted by the 
late Colonel Stanley Adelbert Plum- 
mer of the class of 1867, will be in 
every respect fully as important as 
the " '68" for the Seniors. 

By winning this competition, Car- 
roll S. Towle '22 has gained a par- 
ticular distinction, not only for his 
own performance, but also for being 
the first of a long line of men who 
will doubtless rank high among Bow- 
doin alumni together with the win- 
ners of the 1868 prize. 



COMMUNICATION 



THE RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS 



April 19th, 1921. 
To the Editor of the Orient : 
Bowdoin College. 

Dear Sir: — Due to the temporary 
absence of Dean Nixon, I have been 
requested to occupy myself with the 
advertisement of the Rhodes Scholar- 
ships and to set before the students 
of Bowdoin College any and all mat- 
ters relating to the system. Accord- 
ingly I respectfully request the privi- 
lege of your columns to call atten- 
tion to the question. 

About twenty years ago one John 
Cecil Rhodes, a millionaire of South 
Africa, died, leaving in his will cer- 
tain stipulations regarding the selec- 
tion of students to be sent to Oxford 
University from all parts of the Eng- 
lish speaking world; and, what is 
more to the point, he left funds, the 
interest of which are to defray the 
expenses of these Rhodes Scholars. 

The headquarters of "The Rhodes 
Trust" are located at "Seymour 
House, Waterloo Place, London, S. W. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



1, England." The American secretary 
to the Rhodes trustees is Frank 
Aydelotte, professor of English at 
Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, Cambridge, Mass., and presi- 
dent-elect of Swarthmore College. 
The State Secretary for the State of 
Maine is Robert Hale, Esq., (a mem- 
ber of the class of 1910, Bowdoin), 
First National Bank Building, Port- 
land, Maine. I myself have been re- 
quested to serve in the capacity of a 
committee of one to present the situ- 
ation here at Bowdoin. 

The situation is as follows: On or 
before October 29, 1921, there will be 
selected from among the eligible can- 
didates presenting themselves from 
Bowdoin a maximum possibility of 
two men to compete in the State 
election. The actual Bowdoin election 
will probably be made under the direct 
personal guidance of Dean Nixon. 

On December 3, 1921, there will be 
a meeting at Augusta of all ac- 
credited candidates from the four col- 
leges of Maine. From this group 
there will probably be selected a rep- 
resentative from Maine who will pre- 
sent himself at Oxford on or about 
October 1, 1922, to prosecute his 
studies as a Rhodes Scholar. The 
State committee of final selection is 
in the hands of Mr. Hale. 

Two and only two scholars from 
Maine in the past have not been Bow- 
doin men. Nearly any man now in 
college is eligible. It is the largest 
and most famous academic prize to 
be had. It provides a fund of £350 per 
annum per scholar. (The rate of ex- 
change can be determined at any 
bank any day.) The tenure is three 
years. The recipient must reside in 
Oxford three terms per annum of 
eight weeks each. The other half of 
each year is at his own disposal for 
European travel and study. 

To quote from the current memor- 
andum, "a candidate to be eligible 
must: 

(a) "Be a citizen of the United 
States, with at least five years' domi- 
cile, and unmarried. 

(b) "By the 1st of October of the 
year for which he is elected have 
passed his nineteenth and not have 
passed his twenty-fifth birthday. 

(c) "By the 1st of October of the 
year for which he is elected, have 
completed at least his Sophomore year 



at some recognized degree-granting 
university or college of the United 
States of America. 

"Candidates may apply either for 
the State in which they have their 
ordinary private domicile, home, or 
residence, or for any State in which 
they may have received at least two 
years of their college education before 
applying." 

The basis of the qualities which 
will be considered by the State Com- 
mittee in making the final selection 
are: 

"1. Qualities of manhood, force of 
character and leadership. 

"2. Literary and scholastic ability 
and attainments. 

"3. Physical vigor, as shown by in- 
terest in outdoor sports or in other 
ways." 

"The qualifying examination form- 
erly required of all candidates for the 
Rhodes Scholarships has been aban- 
doned. The abandonment of this ex- 
amination does not grant to Rhodes 
Scholars exemption from examinations 
required by Oxford University for any 
of its degrees. As a result of recent 
legislation, no candidate for an Ox- 
ford degree is required to show a 
knowledge of the Greek language. No 
restriction is placed upon a Rhodes 
Scholar's choice of studies. 

In the College Library, on the 
further bulletin board is pinned a 
copy of "The Rhodes Scholarships' 
memorandum. The United States of 
America, 1921." Copies of the same 
will be given at the Dean's Office to 
whoever may apply for the same. 
This leaflet furnishes clues to various 
other questions arising about the 
scholarships. 

This is a matter which should be 
taken up very seriously by the student 
body at large. One need not consider 
himself a paragon or a genius to war- 
rant his applying for or even con- 
sidering the project. No one has ever 
perfectly fulfilled the requirements. 
But in addition to a limited number of 
seriously minded, able and ambitious 
individuals there should be represen 
tatives from the different fraternities 
from the different classes, and from 
the various academic clubs, whose 
names should be submitted in compe- 
tition to make the winner a truly 
selected man, and possibly provide an 
alternate worthy of a "Scholarship- 



at-large." 

Names should be handed either to 
the Dean's Office or to myself. It is 
my purpose, later in the term to hold 
a meeting of all men interested and 
answer in informal conference some 
of the thousand and one questions that 
necessarily are in the minds of the 
undergraduates. 

In closing, I would make a public 
expression of my thanks, sir, to you 
for the courtesy of your publication, 
not merely on my own behalf, but for 
the Rhodes Trust whose purposes you 
are helping to fulfil. 

I remain respectfully yours, 

THOMAS MEANS. 



Campus iftetos 



At the debate between Jordan High 
School of Lewiston and Portland High 
School held last Thursday evening in 
Hubbard Hall, under the auspices of 
the Debating Council, the Jordan High 
speakers were declared the winners. 
This completes the series of inter- 
scholastic debates held this year. 
Brunswick High was the victor over 
South Portland High several weeks 
ago. 



HOCKEY LETTER MEN. 

At a recent meeting of the Athletic 
Council the following men were 
granted their hockey letters: Handy, 
Holmes, Miguel, A. Morrell, Provost, 
R. Putnam, Stonemetz, Whitman, and 
Vose, manager. 



RIFLE CLUB DEFEATS MAINE 

Bowdoin defeated LTniversity of 
Maine, 935-817, April 13. 

Standing Prone Total 

Ingraham 94 99 193 

H. Dudgeon S9 99 188 

Strout 89 97 186 

Standish 86 99 185 

W. Blanchard 87 96 183 

Total 935 



NEW RULING REGARDING 

HOUSE PARTIES 

By vote of the faculty last week 
all house parties during Ivy Week are 
to begin not before Wednesday after- 
noon, June 1st, and are to close not 
later than six o'clock in the afternoon 
of Saturday, June 4th. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Plans for Golf 



The date of the final match of the 
spring championship will be an- 
nounced soon. The second round 
matches have been played and the 
semi-finals are to be played this week. 

A new plan is to be inaugurated 
this week. The success of it depends 
on the co-operation of the students 
interested. A handicap, medal-score 
match will be held each week; any 
one and everyone is invited to com- 
pete. All that is necessary is to see 
either Richards or Pickard about a 
handicap. The idea is to play an 
eighteen hole round sometime during 
the week, hand the card to Richards 
with a quarter. As many golf balls 
as possible will be bought and 
awarded as prizes. 

With the handicaps everyone will 
have a chance to increase his supply 
of golf balls at small expense and 
have some sport besides. A quarter 
isn't much for an afternoon's amuse- 
ment — no more than the movies, and 
more interesting. There's no reason 
why there shouldn't be a big crowd 
out there every week. You play any- 
way; why not let your scores work 
for you? Just tell us about your 
scores so you can get a fair handi- 
cap. 

The Athletic Council, at a recent 
meeting, recognized golf as a minor 
sport, so there's a chance to make the 
team and take some good trips. Don't 
forget the big handicap tournament 
next month. 



Assignments 



ECONOMICS 2 

Seager: The Labor Movement — 
Chap. 29. 

Materials: Labor Problems — Chap. 
16. 



ECONOMICS 4b 
Week of May 2 

May 2 and 3, short reports on the 
principal methods and media for ad- 
vertising certain commodities. 

May 4, Duncan, chs. 21-22. 



ECONOMICS 6 

The Survey— April 23-April 30. 
Conference reports. See biblio- 
graphies on library bulletin board. 



ECONOMICS 8 
Week of May 2 

May 3. Report on Industrial Union- 
ism. Carlton, ch. 9. 

May 5. Report on the Kannas In- 
dustrial Court. Carlton, ch. 10. 

May 7. Carlton, pp. 329-360. 



GOVERNMENT 2 
Twelfth Week 
Ending Saturday, May 7 
Lecture XIX. May 3— The Direct 
Primary. 

Lecture XX. May 5 — Direct Legis- 
lation. 

Assignments: 

1. Munro: Government of the U. 
S., chaps. XXXV-XXXVI. 

2. Reports on library topics. 
Group A — Conferences. 
Group B — Quiz section. 



HISTORY 8 
English History 

Lectures: 

May 2— Lecture XXII. British 
Colonies and Dependencies. 

May 4 — Lecture XXIII. Foreign 
Affairs. 

Reading : 

Cheyney: Short History, pp. 666- 
674. 

Cheyney: Readings, Nos. 752, 753, 
762, 766, 767, and fifty pages from the 
following : 

Argyll: Autobiography, vol. II. 

Lucas: Historical Geography of the 
British Colonies. 

Keith: Selected Speeches and Docu- 
ments on British Colonial Policy. 

Cramb: Origins and Destiny of Im- 
perial Britain. 

Buckle and Mony Penny: Life of 
Disraeli. 

Morley: Gladstone. 

Fitzmaurice: Life of Lord Gran- 
ville. 

Granville: Private Correspondence. 

Walpole: History of Twenty-five 
Years. 

Bright: History of England. 

Newton: Lord Lyons. 

Letters of Queen Victoria. 

Siegfried: Democracy in New Zea- 
land. 

Wise: Making of the Australian 
Commonwealth. 

Martin: Lord Selkirk's Work in 
Canada. 

HISTORY 12 
Political History of the United States 



Lecture 20— April 25. Second Ad- 
ministration of Cleveland. 

Lecture 21— April 27. Political Re- 
form in the Nineties. 

Reading: 

Bassett, 712-730; also see reading 
list on bulletin board, due April 29. 



Musical Clubs To 

Appear in Portland 



The combined Musical Clubs will 
put on a concert in Portland on Mon- 
day evening, May 9, in Frye Hall. 
Now near the end of the season the 
clubs are in the best of condition, and 
will doubtless present an unusually 
excellent concert. Rehearsals have 
been held regularly since December, 
and concerts have been given in Ban- 
gor, Augusta, Brunswick, Rockland, 
Camden, Vinal Haven, Saco, Ports- 
mouth, Boston, and New York. Every 
concert has been a huge success in 
every sense of the word. Here is an- 
other opportunity for Bowdoin men, 
undergraduates and alumni, to hear 
not only classical and popular pieces, 
but also the good old songs of Bow- 
doin sung and played with the spirit, 
enthusiasm, and respect that they de- 
serve. Tickets are on sale at Stein- 
ert's in Portland, or may be obtained 
from the manager. A dance will fol- 
low the concert, with music that is 
guaranteed to make everybody happy. 



Masque and Gown 

Trip to Westbrook 



The Masque and Gown presented 
the Ivy play, "Stop Thief," last Fri- 
day night before a packed house in 
Westbrook. The play was produced 
under the auspices of the Westbrook 
troop of Boy Scouts, who were con- 
ducting a drive that week. The audi- 
ence was a very appreciative one, and 
the play went off very well indeed. 
The feminine roles were particularly 
well played. So attractive was their 
appearance, so winning their manner, 
and so exquisite their beauty, that 
the female charmers gained for them- 
selves much applause and praise from 
the audience. But when one sees the 
play and lovely Caroline (Ferguson 
'24) with a blush upon her fair soft 
cheeks, when one gazes at Joan's 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



(Miguel '24) raven locks, and the win- 
some grace of the bride, the shapely 
Modge (Clymer '22), and when one 
has been attracted by the charm of 
Mrs. Carr (Black '23) and the vi- 
vacity of Nell (Daviau '23), then one 
can easily understand why this pro- 
duction of "Stop Thief" is making 
such a tremendous hit wherever it 
is played. 



JFacuItp JI3otes 



Professor Mitchell preached at the 
Winter Street Church, Bath, Sunday, 
April 17. 

The last in the series of Sunday 
afternoon lectures by members of the 
faculty was delivered at the Court 
Room by Professor Edward H. Wass, 
on April 17. His subject was His- 
torical Hymns. 

Professor MacMillan gave an ad- 
dress at the meeting of the New Eng- 
land alumnae of Whittier School for 
Girls, held at the Parker House, Bos- 
ton, Tuesday evening. Mr. MacMil- 
lan in a short talk told of the things 
that he hoped to accomplish on his 
coming trip to the frozen Arctic. He 
thanked the school for the bell which 
was given him and declared that it 
will sound all of the watches and sig- 
nal calls on the ship. "Whenever the 
bell rings, it will be saying to me, 
'Whittier and the girls of the Whit- 
tier School,' " he said. 

Bowdoin will be represented at the 
Centennial of Amherst by Professor 
Burnett. The exercises will be held 
the first three days of our own Com- 
mencement week. On Tuesday of that 
week, Professor Ham will represent 
the College at the inauguration of Dr. 
Angell, the newly elected president 
of Yale. 



Math. Club Meeting 



The Mathematics Club met last 
Wednesday evening at the Beta Theta 
Pi house. Professor Moody gave a 
talk on mathematical puzzles and gen- 
eral discussion followed. The fallacies 
in the "proofs" for trisecting an arc, 
recently published in newspapers, 
were pointed out. The next meeting 
of the club will be held in May at the 
home of Professor Moody on Federal 
street. 



Commencement Play 



The following is the cast as se- 
lected for the present by the coach, 
Mrs. Arthur Brown, Mr. Arthur 
Brown, and Professor Frederic Brown, 
for the Commencement play, "The 
Taming of the Shrew." 

Baptista, a rich Gentleman of Padua. 

Smiley, '21 
Vincentio, an old Gentleman of Pisa. 

Ridlon,'22 
Lueentio, his Son, in love with Bianca, 

Kileski '21 
Petmchio, a Gentleman of Verona, 
Gremio, Hortensio, Suitors to Bianca, 

Goff '22. Turgeon '23 
Tranio, Biondello, Servants to Lueentio, 

Rowe '24. Merrill '24 
Grumio, Curtis, Servants to Petruchio, 

Badger '21. Clymer '22 
A Pedant, set up to personate Vincentio, 
Katharina, Bianca, daughters to Baptista, 

Redman '21, Black '23 

A Widow 

Tailor 

Nathaniel 

The parts to which no man has as 
yet been assigned will be taken by 
Ferguson '24, Mushroe '24 and Young 
'24. It is hoped that the play may be 
presented once or twice before the 
Commencement performance. 



alumni Department 



1857 — Henry Dame, who died 
last week at his home, 150 Sycamore 
Street, Somerville, Mass., was a gradu- 
ate of Bowdoin College, in the class 
of 1857. He was born at Biddeford, 
Me., on Dec. 7, 1836. Following his 
graduation, he was principal of the 
Southbridge High School from 1858 
to 1860, and from there he went to 
Nantucket as principal of the high 
school, remaining until 1864, when he 
went to the Peabody High School as 
principal, where he w T as until 1869. 
He then went to the Plymouth High 
School until 1870, when he was made 
principal of the high school at Ban- 
gor, Me., which position he held until 
1877. His last principalship was that 
of the Westfield High School, where 
he was until 1884. He then retired 
from teaching and entered the insur- 
ance business, which he was in until 
about seven years ago, when he re- 
tired. He was a member of the Theta 
chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon of 
Bowdoin College, and of the Broad- 
way Winter Hill Congregational 
Church of Somerville, Mass. Mr. 
Dame is survived by two daughters, 
who reside in Somerville, Mass., and 
two brothers, George Dame of Ros- 



lindale, Mass., and Augustus Dame of 
Mattapan, Mass. In 1860 Mr. Dame 
received the degree of A.M. from Bow- 
doin College. 

1899 — Francis W. Briggs, business 
manager and treasurer of the Chip- 
ley Oil Company and several other 
oil companies of the South, died at his 
camp at Chipley, Fla., at 4.45 Thurs- 
day morning, April 13. The cause of 
death was heart trouble, brought on 
by poisoning from bad tonsils. Mr. 
Briggs was born in Pittsfield 41 years 
ago. Twenty years ago he married 
Miss Margaret Goodwin, daughter of 
the late Mrs. Russell B. Shepherd. 
Seven years ago the family moved 
from Pittsfield to Skowhegan to the 
Shepherd masion, Water street. Mr. 
Briggs was treasurer of the Pitts- 
field Poultry Farm Company, besides 
his interests in the oil companies. He 
was a former chairman of the Repub- 
lican State Committee. 



Class Notes of 1903 



Edward F. Abbott is one of the di- 
rectors of the Bowdoin Alumni Fund; 
he is also a member of the Alumni 
Council of the College. 

Dr. H. C. Barrows, after returning 
from service abroad, has resumed his 
practice at Boothbay Harbor, Maine. 

Philip G. Clifford, a member of the 
Board of Overseers of the College, is 
a member of the Maine Board of Ex- 
aminers for admission to the bar. He 
practices law in Portland. 

Luther Dana acted as class agent 
during the drive for the Bowdoin 
Fund last year. He was also founder 
and first president of the Republican 
Club of Westbrook. 

Edward F. Merrill, with law offices 
in Skowhegan, Maine, has just finished 
a strenuous term as County Attorney 
for Somerset County. 

Henry A. Peabody was re-elected 
Register of Probate for Cumberland 
County at the September election. 

James B. Perkins is the Federal 
Officer for the enforcement of the Pro- 
hibitory Law for the State of Maine 
with offices at Bath. 

Dr. M. J. Shaughnessy has moved 
his family from Wabasha, Minn., and 
taken up the practice of medicine at 
Framingham, Mass. 

Clement F. Robinson was elected 
Prosecuting Attorney for Cumberland 
County at the September election. 



10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Carl W. Smith has associated him- 
self with Philip F. Chapman '06 and 
Ralph O. Brewster '09, for the prac- 
tice of law with offices in Portland. 

Blaine S. Viles is a member of the 
present Maine Legislature and is be- 
ing prominently mentioned as a can- 
didate for Congress from the Second 
District two years hence. 

The members of the Class extend to 
Congressman-elect Carroll L. Beedy, 
a former member of the class and a 
graduate of Bates (1903), their hearty 
congratulations on his election from 
the First District of Maine at the 
September election. Beedy won after 
a spirited fight which necessitated a 
recount against five other candidates. 



OBITUARY 

On behalf of the class the secretary 
wishes to express the deep sense of 
loss which the class has suffered in 
the death of Dr. Malcolm Sumner 
Woodbury. The fact that even his 
most intimate friends in the class had 
no knowledge of the seriousness of 
his illness makes the shock of his tak- 
ing off the greater. To those of us 
who knew "Mac" best the success 
which he has attained in his chosen 
profession was no surprise. After 
leaving Bowdoin he studied medicine 
at the Jefferson Medical College at 
Philadelphia, graduating at the head 
of a class of two hundred and taking 
first prize in obstetrics and surgery, 
two of the three prizes offered by 
the college. He then studied neu- 
rology in Berlin and London for two 
years during 1912 and 1913. In the 
meantime he had been appointed to 
the staff of the Clifton Springs Sani- 
tarium at Clifton Springs, N. Y., a 
position which he held at his death. 
From 1906 to 1910 he was assistant 
surgeon and in 1914 became superin- 
tendent. 

The many glowing tributes that 
have come to the attention of the 
writer since his death only emphasize 
how deeply he had impressed his per- 
sonality on those with whom he was 
associated. 

Above all thing "Mac" was a noble 
example of the Christian physician. 
We can pay no better tribute to his 
memory than to quote from an article 
in the current number of "The Con- 
gregationalist" under the caption "A 
Beloved Physician" and signed by "D. 



E. E.": "From the first his influence 
was marked. Gifted with a large, 
sympathetic nature, his relation to 
the hundreds of patients was never 
perfunctory. He treated every pa- 
tient as a personality that deserved 
his sympathy, respect, and devotion. 
He was skilled in his special depart- 
ment as a psychologist. He knew the 
human soul — he knew it as a Chris- 
tian physician; and he was trusted be- 
cause he was trustworthy. His pres- 
ence inspired confidence; his presence 
was healing. With his fellows on the 
medical staff he was a loyal coworker; 
he was a big brother. He was a scien- 
tific man in the truest sense; but the 
science was penetrated with the glory, 
beauty, kingship of the Master of all." 
To his devoted wife and children, 
to his beloved mother, and to the 
members of his family, the members 
of the Class of 1903 extend their 
deepest sympathy and do thus public- 
ly pay tribute to the memory of their 
beloved classmate. 
(Signed) Donald E. MacCormick, 

Class Secretary. 



Resolution 

Hall of Theta of Delta Kappa Epsilon: 
It is with extreme sorrow that 
Theta Chapter learns of the death of 
John W. Butterfield of the Class of 
1851. 

He graduated with Phi Beta Kappa 
honors and in 1854 he received a 
Masters Degree from Bowdoin. Im- 
mediately after graduating he taught 
for six years and then entered the 
United States Civil Service in which 
he remained until 1876. Since that 
time he has had a very successful 
law practice in Washington, D. C. 

Theta Chapter extends its deepest 
sympathy to the family and friends 
of Brother Butterfield. 

SANGER M. COOK, 
BRUCE H. M. WHITE, 
RAYNHAM T. BATES, 

For the Chapter. 



Resolution 

Hall of Theta of Delta Kappa Epsilon: 
The sudden death of Brother Fran- 
cis W. Briggs of the class of 1899, 
occuring so early in life, comes as a 
great surprise and his loss is one that 
will be keenly felt by the members 
of Theta Chapter, by his classmat-s, 
and by a large circle of friends made 
since graduation. 

At Bowdoin he was associated with 
the literary life of the College, he 
won his Phi Beta Kappa appointment 
and was graduated with the degree 
of A.B. Immediately after graduat- 
ing from College he entered businesr 
and soon became associated with s'v 
eral large enterprises in which h 
was very successful. Although moft 
of his time must have been occupied 
with business he accepted a grea' 
many opportunities to help his Collrg 
and his fraternity, both of which he 
held very dear to him. 

Theta Chapter extends its deepest 
sympathy to the family and friends 
~>{ Brother Briggs. 

SANGER M. COOK, 
BRUCE H. M. WHITE, 
RAYNHAM T. BATES, 

For the Chapter. 



New Library Books 

The library has received a number 
of new books within the last few 
weeks, some of which are listed be- 
low : 

"The Memoirs of Joseph Fouche." 

"American Foreign Trade," by C. 
M. Pepper. 

"Exporting to the World," by A. A. 
Preciado. 

"The Meaning of Socialism," by J. 
B. Glasier. 

"Ralph Waldo Emerson, How to 
Know Him," by S. McC. Garland. 

"Birth," by Zona Gale. 

"Christian Thought to the Reforma- 
tion," by H. B. Workman. 

"Frontier of Control," by C. B. 
Goodrich. 

"Straight Business in South 
America," by J. H. Collins. 

"First Book of Jurisprudence," by 
F. Pollak. 

"Elements of Jurisprudence," by 
W. E. Robinson. 

"Creative Chemistry," by E. E. 
Slosson. 

"What's on the Worker's Mind?" 
by Whitney Williams. 

"High Prices and Delegation," by 
E. W. Kammerer. 

"Pronunciation of English in Scot- 
land," by W. Grant. 

"Ballads of Books," by Andrew 
Lang. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



11 



FORDHAM LAW SCHOOL 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING 



CO-EDUCATIONAL 



CASE SYSTEM 
THREE-YEAR COURSE 



AFTERNOON CLASS 
EVENING CLASS 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 



CHARLES P. DAVIS, Registrar 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING 

NEW YORK CITY 



We carry a large assortment of 
Olives, Pickles, Cheese, and Fancy Cookies. 

DAVIS' MARKET 

Next to Star Lunch 
A 12J per cent, reduction on all Cigarettes 
in carton lots. 



BOWDOIN CANTEEN 

8 a. m.-12 m.; 1.30-6; 7-11 

Sundays, 12-5 p. m. 

A. PALMER, 19 North Winthrop 



YOU HAVE WRITTEN POEMS! 

Do you care to have them revised 
or constructively criticised by success- 
ful authors? If you do, then send us 
your manuscript (stories, articles or 
poems). We will criticise, and place 
them should they prove to be accept- 
able for publication. 

There is no actual charge for our 
services. If, however, you have not 
previously enrolled with the advisory 
department of this association, we re- 
quest that you enclose the initial fee 
of two dollars, which we must ask of 
each new contributor. There is no 
additional expense, no further obliga- 
tion. 

It must be realized that we can only 
be of aid to those of serious intent. If 
you do mean to strive for literary suc- 
cess, we can help you in many ways. 
Our services are yours until we have 
actually succeeded in marketing at 
least one of your manuscripts. Send 
something to-day! 

Please enclose return postage with 
your communications. 

NATIONAL LITERARY 
ASSOCIATION 

131 W. 39th St. 

New York City 

Advisory Department 



HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

Graduate School of Business Administration 

A two-year course in business leading to the degree of Master 
of Business Administration. 

Open to college graduates. 

Courses offered in the following fields: Accounting, Busi- 
ness Law, Banking and Finance, Marketing, Advertising, 
Retail Store Problems, Sales Management, Industrial Manage- 
ment, Labor Problems, Business Statistics, Foreign Trade, 
Transportation, Lumbering, Office Organization. 




08-09 09-10- lO-n. 11-1* la, 3 1W4 14-05 IS-lfi 1&J.7 17-1S 18-19 19-20 20-21 



Nineteen graduates of Bowdoin College have attended the 
School, two during the present year. 

The registration for 1921-'22 is limited to three hundred in 
the first-year courses. Application after May 1st should be 
accompanied by a certified transcript of the college record. 

For information write to 

Dean W. B. Donham, University 131 

Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 



New York University 

SCHOOL OF RETAILING 

OFFERS 

LIMITED NUMBER 

SERVICE FELLOWSHIPS 

$700 -$800 

Class work in morning 

Store service in afternoon 
Particulars write 

Dr. Norris A. Brisco, Director 

32 Waverly Place 

New York City 



P. J. MESERVE'S 
Drug Store 

Opposite Town Hall 



A. W. HASKELL, D. D. S. 

W. F. BROWN, D. D. S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Postoffice. Brunswick, Maine 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 Maine Street 



12 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Delicious sweets in a 
quaint box! 




Sampler 





Give an original touch to your candy gift! 
In the Sampler every girl recognizes the good 
taste of the man who sent it. A candy package 
so unlike any other that it never fails to make 
« hit. 

FOR SALE BY 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



I- ANAS 



THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

Trains students in the principles of the 
law and in the technique of the profes- 
sion so as to best prepare them for 
active practice wherever the English 
system of law prevails. 



America's new plac< 


in internati 


onal 


politics and commer 


ce challenges 


the 


young American. 







Do You Need Extra Courses? 

Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages, Economics, 
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire 
how credits earned may be applied on present college program. 

©lie Intorattg of (Mjirann 



HOME STUDY DEPT. 



CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 



He must equip himself for new 
world conditions* with a knowledge 
of legal fundamentals. 

LAW — Its principles and application 
to all business is almost as necessary 
to the coming business man as it is 
indispensable to the lawyer. 

Special scholarships ($75 per year) 
are awarded to college graduates. 

Course for LL.B. requires 3 school 
years. Those who have received this 
degree from this or any other approved 
school of law may receive LI.M. on 
the completion of one year's resident 
attendance under the direction of Dr. 
Melville M. Bigelow. Several $25 and 
$50 scholarships open in this course. 
For Catalog, Address 

. 11 Ashburton Place, Boston 

HOMER ALBERS, Dean 



Year after Year 

The Lenox 

is a cordial host — the Boston 
headquarters for college teams 
and college men. 
Year after Year 

The Brunswick 

is the high place of Boston's fas- 
hionable night life, famous for 
Egyptian Room Dinner Dances. 

In Boston 

on either side of Copley Square, close 
to the Back Bay stations, near the 
theatres, neighbors with fine shops — 
two hotels that share the traditions of 
of every campus. 

THE LENOX THE BRUNSWICK 

Boylston St. Boylston St. 

at Exeter at Copley Sq. 

L. C. PRIOR, Managing Director 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



13 



CITIZENS LAUNDRY 



College Agent 



Auto Service 



A SHORTER 

SHORTHAND SYSTEM 
IN TEN EASY LESSONS 

This course covers ten easy lessons 
which will enable the Student, Pro- 
fessor, Journalist, Doctor, Lawyer or 
anyone seeking a professional career, 
to go thru life with 100 per cent 
efficiency. 

THIS COURSE 

Is short and inexpensive, and is 
given with a money back guarantee if 
not satisfied. 

SEND THIS CLIPPING TO-DAY 



PYRAMID PRESS: PUBLISHERS 
1416 Broadway, 
New York City 

Gentlemen: — Enclosed herewith is $5.00 
for which kindly send me your shorthand 
course in ten easy lessons by mail. It is 
understood that at the end of five days, if 
I am not satisfied my money will be gladly 
refunded. 

Name 

Street 

City and State 



Bowdoin Dairy Lunch 

Open Day and Night 



CORDOVAN BOOTS 

IN 

YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 



"Herman's" Tan Cordovan $13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan. .$15.50 
"Florsheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 

TENNIS SHOES, INDOOR AND 

OUTDOOR MOCCASINS, RUBBER 

BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 



OH BOY! 

Have You Tried Our 

49c CHOCOLATES 

There is nothing cheap about our 
place but the price. 

BUTLER'S 



F. W. Chandler & Son 

HAVE 

Tennis Rackets 

from $1.50 to $1.60 each 

Championship Tennis Balls 

60c each 

1920 Tennis Balls 45c each 

Baseballs & Baseball Supplies 

25 Kinds of Golf Balls 

Golf Bags and Clubs 

The College Book Store 



FOR GOLF ENTHUSIASTS 

WE CARRY EVERYTHING NECESSARY 



HATS 
GLOVES 
SHIRTS 
HOSIERY 

SHOES 
TIES, Etc. 



Monument 
Square 



In fact there is nothing this "Live Store" cannot 
supply in the way of wearing apparel. Special at- 
tention is called to a fine line of 

Golf Suits in Homespuns and Herringbone weaves 
attractively priced. 

Sport Oxfords for golf or other occasions, made 
by Wright & Ditson. The leather is a smoked elk 
with rubber sole and has a tan strip across the <M A 
throat of the shoe ▼ 

Fine Golf Hose in a mixture of grey and green and 
plain brown and grey. 



Portland 
Maine 




BOWDOIX ORIENT 



DURING THE GAME 

BETWEEN CLASSES 

ON THE HIKE 




&#%£? -" 



A" MUNCH" WHILE STUDYING 

A SNACK BEFORE RETIRING 

IN FACT—EVERY OLD TIME 



We are showing an especially 
attractive line of 

SPORT SUITS 

$30 to $40 

Come in and try them on 



E. S. BODWELL 
& SON 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



SUMMER WORK 

We still have room 
For a few LIVE men 
Provided they want to 
Earn a lot of MONEY 
This summer. 

This isn't a Gamble 

It is a SURE THING 

For the man who HUSTLES 

And besides 

We pay a SALARY. 

NOW is the time 
To get on the Band Wagon 
So see one of our local men 
Or write us direct and 
Ask for the dope. 

Local representatives: 

S. H. Carter, 24 Winthrop 

Hugh Nixon, D. U. House. 

THE NATIONAL SURVEY CO. 

Topographical Offices, 
Chester Vermont 



JUD, The Barber 

was going to use this space 
but thought it wasn't neces- 
sary. 




CONSERVATIVE CLOTHES 



FOR 



COLLEGE MEN 

In stock and made to measure. 
Imported Fabrics. Lower prices for Spring 1921. 



HASKELL & JONES COMPANY 



TUFTS 
COLLEGE 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

Offers to the student who has 
had one year of college training, a 
four year course leading to the de- 
gree of D. M. D. 

Being located in Boston, Tufts 
College Dental School enjoys ex- 
cellent clinical advantages. 

Students in the Dental School 
Course have the privilege of clin- 
ics at the Forsythe Dental Infirm- 
ary. Boston City Hospital, Mass- 
achusetts Homeopathic Hospital, 
Boston Dispensary, Vernon St. 
Hospital, and the Massachusetts 
Home for Feeble-Minded. 

Tufts Dental School is co-edu- 
cational. 

Registration begins at 9 a. m.. 
on June 21, and ends on Septem- 
ber 22. 1921. 

School session begins Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

For further particulars write to 
F. E. Haskins. M. D., Secretary. 

416 Huntington Avenue, 

Boston, Mass. 

WILLIAM RICE, D.M.D.. Dean 

Pressing and Cleaning 

ORDERS TAKEN FOR DYEING 

SECOND HAND CLOTHING 

BOUGHT 

DAN ROSEN 



PORTLAND 



MAINE 




SPUR-A New Narrow 

Arrow 

Collar 

CluettPeabody &Co. IncTroy, N.Y. 



B O W D O I N ORIENT 




YOUR GAME 

"^/"HATEVER your "game," whether 
in sport or serious activity, MACUL- 
LAR PARKER CLOTHES lend fin- 
ish to your performance, and are as 
individual as your own way of doinj 



things. 



400 WASHINGTON STREET 
The Old House with the Young Spirit 



Bowdoin men are invited to visit our shop 
when in Boston 



BOYS! 



Have you tried our new drink, 

BOWDOIN BREW? 

Our Candy, too, is right through and 
through 

THE SPEAR FOLKS 

119 Maine Street 



CARL H. MARTIN 

Cleansing and Dyeing 
Pressing and Alterations 

4 Elm Street 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, §50,000. 
Surplus and Profits, $100,000. 
Student Patronage Solicited. 



PRINTING 



of Quality 

Always in the lead 
for snap and style 

Wheeler Print Shop 

Town Building. Brunswick. Maine 



We carry the largest assortment of 

Olives, Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and 
Biscuits of all kinds east of Portland 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street Tel. 136-137 

Branch Store— 2 Cushing St.— Tel. 16 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 
Boston 

344 Washington Street 



16 BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CUMBERLAND 

Wednesday and Thursday 
DOUGLAS McLEAN 

IN 

CHICKENS 



Friday and Saturday 
WESLEY BARRY 


IN 

DINTY 



Next Week — Monday and Tuesday 
THE DEEP PURPLE 

PASTIME 

Wednesday and Thursday 

813 

An Arsene Lupin Story 



Friday and Saturday 
THE LURE OF YOUTH— THE STEALERS 



Next Week— Monday and Tuesday 

MACK SENNETT'S 

SMALL TOWN IDOL 



■v upnn"T 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




BRUNSWICK, MAINE 






ORIENT V 



*v»r 



VOL. LI. 



WEDNESDAY. MAY 4, 1921. 



Number 5 



Sherwood Eddy 

Speaks in Chapel 



BASEBALL TEAM STARTS VICTORIOUSLY 



Noted Christian Worker Gives Ad- 
dress on Social Problems. 



New England Trip Begins With Three Wins — Am- 
herst, Wesleyan and Trinity Go Down To Defeat. 



Doctor George Sherwood Eddy was 
the chapel speaker last Sunday after- 
noon at a special service. He came to 
Bowdoin after a series of addresses 
in many of the Eastern colleges on 
social problems. On Saturday and 
Sunday he spoke in Portland where 
he was greeted by large audiences. 
His subject was: "The Challenge of 
the Present World Situation." 

Doctor Eddy is known throughout 
the country as a remarkable speaker 
and a most interesting man. He has 
just returned from Europe where he 
saw life in all its different conditions. 
He came to Bowdoin with a message 
aimed directly at the problems which 
now confront the world. He was in 
Europe until the armistice was signed. 
He then went to Asia, thence back to 
Europe. Everywhere he found crises 
of one sort or another. In every 
country there was unrest caused by 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Track Meet Near at Hand 



Speediest Contest Ever, Expected On 
May 14th. 



On May 14th the four Maine col- 
leges will clash again in the annual 
Maine Intercollegiate Track Meet. 
One of the speediest and most hotly 
contested meets ever held is expected. 
University of Maine has been mak- 
ing an unusual effort this winter, and 
if Bowdoin wins it will be by a nar- 
row margin. It would be vain to look 
for a walk away for Bowdoin, con- 
sidering the stars who are fighting 
for the other colleges. 

A record-breaking crowd is ex- 
pected and provisions for caring for 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Calendar 



Relay a Disappointment 



Bowdoin Fails to Place in Penn Race. 



The relay race in which Bowdoin 
was entered at Penn on last Satur- 
day was won by Howard University of 
Alabama. Bowdoin failed to place. 
Although full details could not be ob- 
tained at the time the "Orient" went 
to press, it was reported that the 
first two Bowdoin runners, Parent and 
Turner, showed up well, but that the 
last two, Palmer and Hunt, were 
badly defeated. The time of the race, 
3 minutes 33 2-5 seconds, was not 
especially fast. Rennselaer Polytech 
placed second and Carnegie Institute 
third. 



May 4— Meeting of Math. Club, 60 
Federal street, 8.00 p. m. 

May 7 — Baseball: Maine at Bruns- 
wick. 

May 9 — Musical Clubs, Concert and 
Dance, Frye Hall, Portland. 

May 11 — Tennis: Bates at Lewis- 
ton. 

May 11 — Baseball: New Hampshire 
State at Brunswick. 

May 14 — Track: Maine Intercol- 
legiate Meet at Whittier Field; trials 
10.00 a. m., finals 2.15 p. m. 

May 14— Baseball: Tufts at Med- 
ford. 

May 14 — Informal Dance, Gym- 
nasium, 8.00 p. m. 

May 16 — Baseball: Norwich at 
Brunswick. 

May 16-17 — Tennis: Maine Inter- 
collegiate Meet at Lewiston. 



The baseball team made a glorious 
start last week on its New England 
trip. On Wednesday it met and con- 
quered Amherst in her first home 
game, Thursday saw Wesleyan de- 
feated, and on Friday Bowdoin hearts 
were again delighted with a win from 
Trinity. The game scheduled for Sat- 
urday with Boston College was can- 
celled on account of rain. 

The work of the team was remark- 
able. Every man did his share and 
deserves great praise. If the pace 
can only be continued Bowdoin will 
certainly be the favorite for the State 
championship. Last week Maine and 
Colby were both defeated several 
times in Massachusetts. The State 
series was opened last Saturday by a 
win by Maine over Bates. Bowdoin 
plays her first game next Saturday 
when Maine is the opponent. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Harvard Wins Fast 

Game From Bowdoin 



Crimson Nine Helpless Before Pitch- 
ing of Flinn — Harvard's Rally in 
Third Against Walker Wins Game. 

Monday afternoon at Soldiers' Field, 
Harvard defeated Bowdoin 4 to 1 in a 
fast and well played contest. Walker 
started on the mound for Bowdoin, 
and Harvard found him for a run in 
the first inning and three more in the 
third. These four runs turned out to 
be enough to win the game, as Goode 
of Harvard kept Bowdoin's five hits 
scattered. 

Flinn relieved Walker in the fourth 
inning, and from that time on the 
Crimson batters were unable to do 
Continued on Page 9 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Track Meet 

(Continued from Page 1) 



the spectators are now in progress. 
Bleachers are being erected on Whit- 
tier Field to accommodate the thou- 
sands of expected visitors in Bruns- 
wick. Each of the competing colleges 
will bring a crowd of supporters and 
a band to help the contestants along. 
The trials will be held at ten o'clock 
in the morning and the finals at 
quarter past two in the afternoon. 
Alumni desiring seats in the grand 
stand may obtain them in advance 
from Manager McGorrill. 

The U. of M. team is especially well 
rounded and will furnish stiff compe- 
tition. It includes some very fast m; n 
in the dashes, some new finds for the 
distance events, besides extra strong 
competitors in the field events. 
Stearns, the former Hebron star, is 
said to be doing over eleven feet in 
the pole vault, and is also out for the 
discus. Pratt, former high-point man 
and quarter miler, will present diffi- 
culties. Thomas and Pinkham were 
prominent in the dashes last year. 
For weight men Maine has Strout and 
Bishop. Others who will uphold the 
honor of the State University are: 
Herrick, Wood, and Lawrence, be- 
sides numerous new finds. 

Bates will probably show up strong- 
er than last year. Her team has two 
star sprinters, Wiggin, who won the 
100-yard dash last year and took third 
in the 220, and Farley, the former 
Huntington School star in the 100 and 
200. Then there are the Buker twins 
who have gained such a reputation 
during the past year. R. B. Buker 
won the intercollegiate two mile race 
at Penn last Saturday with a time of 
9 minutes, 25 2-5 seconds, while the 
Maine record is only 9 minutes, 54 
2-5 seconds, established by Frank P. 
Pretti of Maine. Buker will doubtless 
beat this record. His brother, R. S. 
Buker, is starring in the half-mile. 

Colby will also be stronger than 
usual. Captain Haines is a sprinter 
of known worth, Weise is a crack 
hurdler, Cook is a good weight man, 
and the Colby team will have other 
men who will star. 

Bowdoin is depending for her points 
on Captain Thomson, Parent, Goodwin, 
Hunt, Partridge, Cook, the Bishops, 
Hardy, Tootell, Philbrook, Mason, 



Bisson, Clark, Worsnop, and many 
others well know to Bowdoin men. 
There is no use dwelling on their 
good points. After looking over the 
entries there can be no doubt that 
this meet will be one of the fastest 
and most hotly contested in the his- 
tory of the event. Buker and Good- 
win will battle in the mile and two 
mile. The sprints will be especially 
fast. In the pole vault the Bishop 
boys and Cook will struggle for Bow- 
doin in what is expected to be the 
best exhibition of its kind in years. 
The weight events will be strong. 
Bowdoin and Maine will fight for 
honors, and the fight will be close. 



Ibis Meeting 



Francis W. Jacob '17 Gave Interesting 
Talk on Russia. 



Ibis met for the last time this year 
at the Psi Upsilon house on Sunday 
evening, when Francis W. Jacob '17, 
addressed the society upon his experi- 
ences in war-time Russia. Mr. Jacob 
went to Russia in the summer of 1917, 
and remained there ten months. Dur- 
ing this time he lived in Petrograd 
and Moscow, and visited Japan. The 
Kerensky government was then in 
control at Petrograd, and Mr. Jacob 
was witness of the Korniloff revolt, 
and of the November revolution in 
Moscow. 

The morbidness and abnormality of 
the Russian temperament is, in Mr. 
Jacob's opinion, overemphasized. No 
other European people will be found 
to resemble so closely the American 
type. The lower classes are more 
ignorant than in America, the upper 
classes considerably more cultivated 
as a rule than here. History, lan- 
guages, and the arts have been highly 
esteemed, and much theoretical knowl- 
edge of science displayed, though in 
the application of science America 
leads. Business methods remain 
primitive, such devices as personal 
cheques and the adding machine hav- 
ing but very recently been introduced 
in the large cities. 

Mr. Jacob expressed his apprecia- 
tion of the brilliant and little-known 
work of the Russian historical paint- 
ers, and of the perfection of Russian 
ballet and opera. 

R. W. M. 



Student Council Meeting 

The Student Covncil held a meeting 
Thursday night at the Beta Theta Pi 
house. The matter of deferred 
initiations was discussed and it was the 
opinion that the matter should be left 
as it is, that the college and frater- 
nities would be better served by leav- 
ing the matter as at present. Plans 
were perfected for the dance to be 
held in the Gym after the Maine In- 
tercollegiate Track Meet on May 14th. 
This spring Juniors are to try out for 
cheer leaders at the rallies and games. 
It is hoped that there will be keen 
competition for these positions. All 
Juniors interested see Buker '21. Now 
is the time, Juniors. If you havn't 
done anything for Bowdoin or if you 
want to do more, and you all clo, come 
out and show your spirit and pep as 
a cheer leader. College songs and 
rallies are to be held on the Campus 
this spring, so get ready everybody. 



Glee Club Scores Hit in Bath 



Concert Enthusiastically Received On 
April 26th. 



The Glee Club appeared in Bath a 
week ago Tuesday evening before a 
crowded house. This concert was the 
first of its kind attempted for several 
years, possibly in the history of the 
club. As a rule the Banjo Club takes 
its share of the program, but in Bath 
the Glee Club alone presented the con- 
cert. 

The concert was given in Armory 
Hall. There was a large audience 
which greeted every number enthusi- 
astically. The program was of neces- 
sity a little shorter than is usual. As 
is the custom, the first number was a 
group of Bowdoin songs. This was 
followed by a part song, "Jolly Fel- 
lows." The quartet, consisting of 
Black '23, Butler '22, Mitchell '23, and 
Turgeon '23, gave two selections dur- 
ing the evening, Edward German's 
"Rolling Down to Rio," and Mac- 
Dowell's "Thy Beaming Eyes." These 
were both enthusiastically encored. 
Other numbers by the Glee Club were: 
"Tobacco," "Close Harmony," "Pales- 
teena," and "Mammy." Turgeon '23 
sang as a solo with chorus, "The 
Skippers of St. Ives," which was so 
popular in New York when Harvey D. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Gibson sang the solo part. The pro- 
gram ended with "Bowdoin Beata," 
and "Phi Chi." 

This concert in Bath, the first since 
the New York trip, was a success in 
every way. Much credit is due Pro- 
fessor Wass for his coaching and to 
the leader, Lyseth '21. The next ap- 
pearance of the clubs will be in Port- 
land in Frye Kail on Monday, May 9. 
Tickets are on sale at Steinert's Music 
Store. On Thursday of this week the 
quartet will sing in Bath at a Red 
Cross Benefit Concert, assisting the 
Duchess of Richelieu. The concert is 
supported by Mme. Emma Eames, the 
famous prima donna, who is the 
teacher of the Duchess. 



Golf Team Loses 

To Brunswick 



Last Saturday the golf team was 
defeated four matches out of six by 
members of" the Brunswick Country 
Club. The score was as follows: 

Sadler won from Perkins, 3 and 1. 

Erswell won from Richard, 3 and 1. 

St. Clair won from Forsaith, 4 and 3. 

Toyokawa won from Smith, 2 and 1. 

Ferrai won from Ryder, one up. 

Daly won from Lyseth, 3 and 2. 



ing down five base hits to Amherst's 
four. Flinn's pitching was admirable. 
He struck out nine men and passed 
only one, while the opposing twirler 
struck out only six, passed five, and 
hit another. Mai Morrell showed up 
well behind the plate as well as get- 
ting two of Bowdoin's runs, while 
Ducky Holmes added another pair. 
Joe Smith and Pete Flinn each got 
two hits and Hill pulled down the 
fifth. 

The summary: 

BOWDOIN 

ab r bh po a e 

Needelman, 2b 3 1 1 

Smith, 3b 5 1 2 2 1 

A. Morrell. ss 5 1 1 

Hill, rf 4 1 2 

Davis. If 4 1 1 

Holmes, cf 2 2" 1 

Clifford, lb 3 1 8 1 

M. Morrell, c 4 2 9 1 1 

Flinn, p 4 2 2 2 



Totals 34 6 5 27 7 2 

AMHERST 

ab r bh po a e 

Eveleth, 2b 4 1 1 2 2 1 

Eames, lb 4 1 1 11 1 

Brick, 3b 3 1 3 1 

Palmer, If 4 

Leete. rf 4 2 

Wood, cf 4 3 1 

Booth, ss 4 2 2 

liams, c 3 8 4 3 

Clark, p 2 4 

Elliott, p 1 



the initial score. Holmes star- 
red for the Bowdoin team by steering 
clear of errors, making two of the 
six runs and two base hits, one a 
three bagger in his four times at bat. 
Clifford also did fine work with the 
bat, slamming a two bagger and a 
triple. Connolly knocked in Wes- 
leyan's two runs with a pretty three 
bagger in the second. 
The summary: 

BOWDOIN 

ab r bh pa a e 

W. Needelman, 2b 3 1 2 5 1 

Smith, 3b 3 1 1 3 1 

A. Morrell, ss 4 1 2 1 

Hill, If 4 2 1 

Davis, rf 2 2 1 

Holmes, cf 4 2 2 1 

Clifford, lb 4 1 2 6 2 

M. Morrell, c 3 111 

Walker, p 2 1 1 1 



Totals 



29 6 11 26 10 4 



WESLEYAN 
ab r 



bh pa 



Baseball Victories 



The Bowdoin pitchers showed up 
especially well. Walker, Flinn and 
Dave Needelman are a group that it 
is hard to beat. Holmes did some 
very good work in the field. The bat- 
ting was also very good as a little 
study of the box scores will show. 
The team should be congratulated on 
these victories. 



BOWDOIN 6, AMHERST 2 



Bowdoin made a flying start on her 
New England trip by defeating the 
Amherst nine by a score of 6 to 2. 
The White team led off and did not 
disturb the tally keeper during the 
first inning, although the home team 
piled in their two runs of the game. 
Bowdoin scored one in the second and 
another in the fifth, tieing the score, 
then proceeded to build up their four 
run lead. Neither team did excep- 
tionally heavy hitting, Bowdoin lay- 



Bateman, cf 1 1 

Jacobs, lb 4 1 8 

Peck, ss 2 1 1 1 

Camp, rf 3 1 4 

Raines, If 3 1 

Stewart. 3b 3 1 2 

er, c 4 1 9 

Hartshorn. 2b 1 1 

Bubeineck. p 

Crowell, p 4 1 3 

Fricke, 2b 1 

Connolly, cf 4 2 3 

Belcher, 2b 2 1 1 



Totals 33 2 4 27 17 5 

Bowdoin 1 1 2 1 1 0—6 

Amherst 2 0—2 

Two-base hits, Leete, Flinn. Three-base hit. 
Eveleth. Double play, Clark to Eames to 
Eveleth. Left on bases, Bowdoin 7, Amherst 
5. Base on balls, off Flinn 1. off Clark 5. 
Struck out by Flinn 9. by Clark 6. Hit by 
pitcher, by Clark, 1. Stolen bases. Brick. 
Davis, Hill 2. Umpire, O'Donnell. Time, 2 
hours. 

BOWDOIN 6, WESLEYAN 2 



Bowdoin again won a six to two 
victory in the second game of the 
trip, this time with Wesleyan. The 
home team was handicapped by the 
loss of their captain, Bateman, who is 
out of the game with a sprained ankle. 
The Wesleyan pitcher, Bubieneck, 
who started the game, was batted out 
of the box in the first inning by the 
heavy hitting White nine. Walker 
pitched remarkably well, striking out 
ten men to his opponent's six. Bow- 
doin's slugging was the outstanding 
feature of the game, since the visitors 
banged out eleven hits, two of which 
were three base hits, and two others 
carried the batters to the second sack. 
Clifford, Holmes, Hill, and Al Morrell 
each got two hits in four times at 
bat, Al's two bagger in the first bring- 
ing in Captain Billy Needelman with 



Totals 31 2 5 27 7 4 

•Umpleby batted for Belcher in eighth. 

Bowdoin 2 1 1 2 0—6 

Wesleyan 2 0—2 

Three-base hits, Clifford, Holmes, Connolly, 
Heuer. Two-base hits, A. Morrell, Clifford, 
Crowell. Earned runs, Bowdoin 5 ; Wesleyan 
1. Hits off Bubeineck 2, off Crowell 9. off 
Walker 5. Stolen base, Hill. Sacrifice hit, 
Stewart. Base on balls, off Bubeineck 2, off 
Crowell 1. off Walker 4. Struck out by Crowell 
6, by Walker 10. Hit by pitcher, by Walker 
(Camp), by Crowell (Smith). Left on bases, 
Bowdoin 10, Wesleyan 8. First base on errors, 
Bowdoiii 4, Wesleyan 3. Umpire, Murphy. 
Time, 2.05. 



BOWDOIN 4, TRINITY 1 



Bowdoin kept up the good work in 
the third game of the trip by defeat- 
ing Trinity four to one in a six inning 
game. The game was called at the 
end of the sixth to give the visiting 
nine time to catch a train for the Hub. 
Dave Needelman and Jack Handy 
were the battery, and the freshman 
pitcher showed no small ability on the 
mound. The closest point in the game 
came in the fourth inning when, with 
the bases full and two out, Bolles, the 
slashing back on last fall's eleven, 
came to the plate to be fanned by the 
clever White twirler. Needelman 
struck out four, passed two, hit one, 
and made one wild throw, showing 
somewhat better form than the op- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



posing moundsman. The Trinity 
fielders were principally responsible 
for the six errors which brought in 
Bowdoin's four tallies, two in the first 
and another pair in the second. The 
batting was not exceptional, each team 
making three hits. 
The summary: 

BOWDOIN 

ab r bh po a e 

W. Needelman, 2b 2 1 2 

Smith, 3b 4 1 1 

Morrell, ss 3 2 2 2 3 

Hill. If 3 1 1 1 

Davis, rf 3 

Holmes, cf 2 

Clifford, lb 2 11 

Handy, c 3 4 

D. Needelman, p 2 4 1 

Totals 24 4 3 18 11 1 

TRINITY 

ab r bh po a e 

Hall, cf 2 1 1 

H. Ortgies. 2b 3 3 

Crane, ss 2 .0 2 1 

Reynolds, lb, rf 3 3 2 2 

Jones, c 3 5 

Makinnon, 3b 2 1 4 

Sutcliffe. If 

Browbridge, rf 

Bolles. lb 2 6 1 

J. Ortgies, p 2 1 4 

Totals 19 1 3 18 9 6 

Bowdoin 2 2 — 4 

Trinity 1 — 1 

Two-base hits, Reynolds, Morrell. Sacrifice 
hit, Sutcliffe. Stolen bases, Davis 2, W. 
Needelman. Handy. Struck out by Needelman 
4, by Ortgies 4. Bases on balls off Needelman 
2, off Ortgies 3. Hit by pitcher, by Needelman 
(Hall), by Ortgies (Clifford, W. Needelman). 
Wild pitch, Needelman. Passed ball, Jones. 
Umpire, korty. rime, 1.35. 



Dr. Eddy's Address 

(Continued from Page 1) 



hunger, famine, revolution, war, and 
strikes. The only possible solution, 
said Doctor Eddy, is Christianity. 

The world today has three needs: 
(1) bread, (2) peace, (3) religion. If 
we can satisfy these three needs we 
can solve all the problems now facing 
us. Is the solution to be found in 
evolution or in revolution? There are 
two poles in the problem, the personal 
and the social. A new social order is 
needed, and Christianity will supply 
it. 

To show the crying need for bread, 
for economic help, Dr. Eddy told in- 
cidents of his travel in Armenia, 
Hungary, Russia, and China. He 
showed the horrors of famine. China 
has the most pressing need today. He 
heartily endorsed the appeal for funds 
for China. The need for bread is the 
greatest physical need in the world. 

The second need, peace, is still more 
important. Everywhere Dr. Eddy 
found strife, war, revolution, and 



strikes. The war was fought for de- 
mocracy against autocracy, and he 
believes that eventually light will 
shine over the present darkness. All 
great struggles are followed by 
periods of darkness. We have now 
free, republics in Europe in place of 
monarchies. But we are in the tran- 
sition period. 

More vitally concerning us are the 
strikes, the social and class strife. 
England is having her troubles as we 
are. These troubles arise from the 
fact that one-tenth of the people con- 
trol more than nine-tenths of the 
wealth, and from the great estates 
granted in past centuries. In America 
also we have this dangerous concen- 
tration of wealth and land. Here as 
in Europe we find the two ex- 
tremes in the social scale, immense 
wealth, and miserable poverty. 

For the solution of the problem we 
are driven back to the great prin- 
ciples of Jesus. These, he said, are 
appreciation of the worth of the in- 
dividual, brotherhood, service, liberty, 
justice, responsibility, all summed up 
in the Golden Rule. Their opposites 
are summed up in the Rule of Gold. 
Here is unselfishness vs. selfishness, 
idealism vs. materialism. 

The English laborer demands four 
things, a living wage, reasonable 
hours, protection against unemploy- 
ment, and a fair share in the profits. 
Capitalists are coming to realize that 
these demands are merely fair and 
just, and that the answer to the prob- 
lem of social unrest is found in them. 

To obtain the result we must real- 
ize the human factor in industry. He 
showed the results of co-operation in 
England. He sited examples of the 
men Who have made millions and 
done inexpressable harm to their fel- 
low men, and of men who have given 
everything for the good of humanity. 
Among the latter is Herbert Hoover, 
loved not for his money, but for his 
deeds. 

The world is entering the greatest 
decade ever. America is approaching 
her third great crisis. How will she 
emerge ? 

The result of this crisis depends 
much upon the students. Mr. Eddy 
told of the groups of students who 
are planning next summer to go into 
industries to study conditions as they 
really are. Over fifty such groups of 



college men will be formed. Bowdoin 
men will be welcomed. These men 
will give trained and reasonable lead- 
ership in later life to labor and the 
church. These two must be united. 
Where the church becomes controlled 
by the few, disaster is sure to follow. 

Russia presents an example. 

The third need of the world is re- 
ligion, religion that is the foe of ma- 
terialism, no neo-pagan affair. The 
present problems can be solved only 
through the principles of Christ. 
Christianity shows the way. 



McCann '02 Speaks 

On Advertising 



On Monday evening, April 25, H. K. 
McCann '02, of the H. K. McCann Ad- 
vertising Company of New York ad- 
dressed the last Forum Meeting of 
the year on the subject of advertising. 
He has made advertising his life work 
and is considered one of the most in- 
fluential men in the business at the 
present day. He outlined the history 
of the business, and gave much very 
interesting information. After the 
lecture a smoker was held in his 
honor at the Theta Delta Chi house. 



Interfraternity Baseball 



ZETA PSI DEFEATS 

DELTA KAPPA EPSILON 

Last Friday the Zetes won their 
first game of the interfraternity 
series by defeating the Dekes 8-1. 
Batteries: D. K. E., Cook and Ferris; 
Zeta Psi, Gibbons and Webb. 



THETA DELTA 13 

PHI DELTA PSI 1 

The Theta Delta Chi team suc- 
ceeded in winning an easy game last 
Thursday by defeating the Phi Deltas 
13-1. Batteries:. Phi Delta Psi, Young 
and Waterman; Theta Delta Chi, Hebb 
and Kemp. 



KAPPA SIGMA 7, SIGMA NU 5 
The Sigma Nu's lost their second 
game of the season last Tuesday by a 
score of 7-5. The game was loosely 
played by both teams. Batteries: 
Sigma Nu, Gorham and Morrell; 
Kappa Sigma, Dahlgren and Bisson. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ALPHA DELTA PHI 6 

DELTA UPSILON 1 

The Alpha Delta Phi team won from 
Delta Upsilon last Thursday after- 
noon with a score of 6-2. The bat- 
teries were: Alpha Delta Phi, Miller 
and Wing; Delta Upsilon, Whitman 
and Albert. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI 21 

PHI DELTA PSI 6 

Alpha Delta Phi won from Phi 
Delta Psi with a score of 21 to 6 re- 
cently. The batteries: Alpha Delta 
Phi, Sellman, Miller and Wing; Phi 
Delta Psi, Young, Poor, Jacques. 



ZETA PSI 6, PSI UPSILON 2. 



On the afternoon of April 26, Zeta 
Psi won from Psi Upsilon 6-2. The 
batteries were for Zeta Psi, Gibbons 
and Webb; for Psi Upsilon, Watson, 
Ricker and Varney. 



332. 

Ward, H. 
Order, chaps. 



F.— The 
1 and 12. 



New Social 



Assignments 



ECONOMICS 2 

Seager — Labor Legislation, chap. 30. 

Materials — Labor Problems, chap. 
16. 

Hour examination — Tuesday, May 
10. 

Make-up examination — Saturday, 
May 7. 



ECONOMICS 4b 
Week of May 9 



May 10, 
Principles 
ch. 1-6. 



-Johnson and Huebner, 
Ocean Transportation, 



ECONOMICS 8 

May 10 — Report on British Labor 
Party. Carlton, pp. 360-84. 

May 12— Carlton, ch. 18-19. Re- 
port on Boot and Shoe Workers. 

May 14 — Morris Hillquit, Socialism, 
ch. 1-4. Reports en Seamen and 
Amalgamated Clothing Workers. 



GOVERNMENT 2 
Thirteenth Week 
Ending Saturday, May 14. 
Lecture XXI. May 10— Types of, 
Local Government. 

Lecture XXII. May 12— The County. 
Assignments: 

1. Munro, Government of the 
United States, chaps. XXXVII- 
XXXVIII. 

2. Reports on Library Topics. 
Group A — Quiz section. 
Group B — Conferences. 



also 50 pages from 



World 



ECONOMICS 6 

Survey — April 30 and May 7. 

Conference reports. 

Hour examination — Tuesday, May 
10. 

Make-up examinations — Saturday, 
May 7. 

Readings: 

Ellwood, Charles A. — Modern So- 
cial Problems, chaps. 11-15 inclusive. 

Wells, H. G.— Mankind in the Mak- 
ing, chap. 1. 

Cooley, Charles H. — Human Nature 
and the Social Order, chap. 11. 

Cooley, Charles H. — Social Process, 
chap. 18. 

Kelsey, Carl — The Physical Basis of 
Society, chap. 1-6. ' | 

Bristol — Social Adaptation, pp. 324- 



American War. 

Reading: 

Bassett, 764-'/ 
the following: 

1. Latane, America as 
Power, chs. I-IV. 

2. Peck, Twenty Years of the Re- 
public. 

^3. Chad wick, The Relations of the 
United States and Spain (see section 
on diplomacy). 

v 4. Benton, International Law and 
Diplomacy of the Spanish-American 
War. (Any part.) 

5. Roosevelt, The Rough Riders. 
*- 6. Davis, The Cuban and Porto 
Rican Campaigns. 

^7. Olcott, Life of William McKin- 
ley (Relations with Spain). 
.. 8. Long, The New American Navy. 
^/9. Latane, The Diplomatic Rela- 
tions of the United States and 
Spanish America. (See Cuba and 
Cuban Relations.) 

10. Flack, Spanish-American Dip- 
lomatic Relations preceding the War 
of 1898. (In Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity Studies, vol. XXIV.) 



HISTORY 8 
English History 
Thirteenth Week 

Lectures : 

May 9. Lecture XXV— Recent So- 
cial and Economic Questions. 
• May 11. Lecture XXIV— Chamber- 
lain and the Boer War. 

Reading: 

Cheyney — Short History, pp. 674- 
690, and 40 pages from the following: 

Lipson — Introduction to the Econo- 
mic History of England. 

Hayes — British Social Politics. 

Bland — English Economic History. 

Prothero — English Farming, Past 
and Present. 

Hasbach — The English Agricultural 
Laborer. 

Markbam — South Africa, Past and 
Present. 

Sully — History of South Africa. 

Cony — Rise of South Africa. 

Annual Registers for 1898, 1899, 
1S00, 1901, 1902. 

Worsfold — Lord Milner's Work in 
South Africa. 



Campus JBeto0 



Maurice Jordan '23 has left College. 

Phillips '24 is in the infirmary with 
bronchitis. 

The Freshman class held a meet- 
ing in Memorial Hall last Wednesday. 

Preliminary trials for Freshman 
candidates for the Alexander Prize 
Speaking Contest were held in Me- 
morial Hall last Wednesday evening 
from 8 to 10 o'clock. 

Nearly the whole student body 
turned out Tuesday afternoon, last 
week, and gave the ball team a royal 
send-off on its Massachusetts trip. 



HISTORY 12 
Political History of the United States 

Lecture 24, May 9 — A new Era in 
American Diplomacy. 

Lecture 25, May 11— The Spanish 



jFacultp fl3otcs 



Professor Orren C. Hormell spoke 
last week before the Community 
Forum of Dover and Foxcroft on the 
"Business of Town Government." 

At the recent meeting of the Bruns- 
wick Benevolent Society, Professor 
Woodruff was elected president, and 
Professor Mitchell secretary. 

At the April meeting of the Bow- 
doin Club of Portland at the Falmouth 
Hotel Professor Whittier was one of 
the speakers. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Edward B. Ham '22 Editor-in-Chief 

F. King Turgeon '23 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

George H. Quinby '23 Intercollegiate News 

George T. Davis '24 Alumni Department 

Fredric S. Klees '24 .Faculty Notes 

G. "William Rowe '24 Athletics 

P. Dennison Smith '24 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. R. Ludden '22 F. A. Gerrard '23 

R. L. McCormack '22 K. R. Philbrick '23 
V. C. McGorrill '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Eben G. Tileston '22 Business Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $3.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 15 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials only; the Managing 
Editor for news and make-up; the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 



Vcl. LI. May 4, 1921. 



No. 5 



EDITORIALS 

The China Famine Fund 

Among the numerous causes which 
are in urgent need of willing support 
at this time is the China Famine Re- 
lief Fund. In addition to the various 
organizations of the college itself 
which we have been maintaining this 
year, there are other things, which, 
although we rarely give them serious 
thought, demand of us just as much 
aid, or even more. 

Bowdoin recently decided to con- 
tribute particularly to the Armenian 
Relief Fund, and it is planned to can- 
vass the college for this work in the 
near future. At present a drive is 
being carried on in Brunswick for the 
Chinese fund and the college is to be 
solicited also. We have little or no 
conception of the desperate conditions 
in many of the large provinces of 
China. Some idea of the situation 
may be obtained from the following 
statements in a communication (dated 
April 1, 1921), to the Brunswick 
"Record" from Dr. Charles S. F. Lin- 



coln, Bowdoin, 1891, who is at St. 
John's University in Shanghai : 

"It is difficult to imagine a more 
striking contrast than that between 
the flat dry desolate country in a 
large part of the affected provinces, 
and our own green beautiful and pro- 
ductive central China. 

"My colleague, Professor Remer, of 
the Economics Department, tells me 
that while one district in which 
he had done relief work was not one 
of the worst, 50 per cent, of the popu- 
lation was in desperate condition, and 
probably would not have lived two 
months without help. 

"The only available food was corn 
cobs, the husks of millet, a kind of 
sorghum, willow leaves, and grass. 
These the people ground up and made 
into a kind of soup, or baked into 
hard cakes. A more unnourishing 
diet or one harder on the digestive 
tract could hardly be imagined. There 
were practically no farm animals, 
they having been killed for food or 
sold, as there was nothing on which 
to feed them. Before relief work 
started some little grain had been 
brought in, but the price was four 
times that in normal years, and only 
those families that had money could 
afford to buy it. 

"Relief work in that particular dis- 
trict will have to be done until about 
the last of May, when the spring 
harvest will be ready and the worst 
will be over." 

The quota for the State of Maine 
for this fund amounts to $75,000, of 
which Brunswick is to raise $814.75. 
This total shows clearly that the aver- 
age contributions from the students 
need not be large. Mrs. Frank N. 
Whittier is in charge of the work in 
Brunswick and all contributions 
should be sent to her. 

There is no doubt as to the critical 
needs of the Chinese and surely the 
Bowdoin student body ought to give 
hearty support to this meritorious 
cause, and to make as satisfactory a 
record in this as it has in so many 
other causes in the past. 



This week Friday and Saturday the 
annual convention of delegates from 
the various colleges in the Eastern 
Intercollegiate Newspaper Associa- 
tion is being held at Columbia Uni- 
versity. It is impossible for Bow- 



doin to send a representative this 
year, but it is to be hoped that our 
publications will have delegates at all 
future conferences of this important 
organization. 



The splendid success of the base- 
ball team last week in its first games 
of the New England trip has been 
a fine thing for the college, and for 
its athletic reputation. The decisive 
victories over Amherst, Wesleyan, 
and Trinity, and the excellent 
showing against Harvard have 
already given the team a more 
than enviable and satisfactory 
position among successful Bowdoin 
nines of the past. Surely, barring 
over-confidence and injuries, we can 
depend on the team to take possession 
of the mythical Maine pennant this 
spring, especially in view of the de- 
feats of Maine, Colby, and Bates thus 
far. 



Once more Bowdoin may well con- 
gratulate Ray Buker of Bates; this 
time for his sensational work at the 
Pennsylvania Relay Carnival in which, 
contrary to all expectations, he came 
through and won the two-mile run 
from a field containing some of the 
most brilliant college stars in the 
country. 



Fifty years ago this week, the 
"Orient" delivered itself of the fol- 
lowing in regard to the publication at 
Trinity: "The 'Trinity Tablet' in its 
last issue mentioned one respect in 
which the 'Orient' might be im- 
proved, viz: By the publication of 
more 'general literary matter.' If the 
editors of the 'Orient' were to set 
themselves up as critics, they could 
suggest many ways in which the 
'Tablet' could be improved. 'General 
literary matter' makes too many col- 
lege papers — the 'Tablet' of course 
excepted ( ?) — a bore and a nuisance." 
In this connection it is interesting to 
note that the "Tablet" has only re- 
cently been discontinued after a long 
and highly creditable existence. 



In the second issue of the "Orient" 
fifty years ago, there is an editorial 
which is applicable to the average un- 
dergraduate of today. The quotations 
from it which follow refer to the read- 
ing of standard literature outside of 
the regular class-room work. In the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



typical quaint style of the seventies, 
the editor made some remarks which 
might possibly amuse those students 
of today to whom they apply. 

" 'Reading maketh the full man,' 
and he who neglects this important 
branch of his education, though at- 
tending to all the requirements of 
text books, only lays the foundation 
and erects the walls of his edifice, 
leaving the structure roofless, unfur- 
nished, and unadorned. 

"Instead of loafing around the build- 
ings in the sunshine, or as the warmer 
months come on, stretching at full 
length in the shade of some broad- 
spreading elm in careless, swine-like 
contentment; wasting the priceless 
hours of the day in dreamy reverie, 
the best authors might be read, and 
a good literary taste cultivated." 



Communication 



April 26th, 1921. 
Editor-in-Chief, Bowdoin "Orient," 
Brunswick, Maine. 

Dear Sir: — I was much interested 
to read in the "Orient" for April 13, 
1921, a communication from the Stu- 
dent Council regarding Major Exami- 
nations. I was particularly struck 
with the following passage: 

"A major exam which is merely the 
summation of six final exams in a 
course which is a theoretical course, 
and with these six final exams in one, 
all containing the details of each 
course, dates, names, places and 
smaller occurrences which are counted 
as fit for a final exam at the end of 
a semester, but not on a major exam 
which should be a general exam cov- 
ering the subject, if this is considered 
a success then we fail to see it." 

If the above collocation of words is 
a sentence then I should like very 
respectfully to say that I fail to see 
it. The ancient cult of subject and 
predicate is perhaps languishing in 
the college of which one seems to re- 
member hearing that Hawthorne and 
Longfellow were graduates. That 
perhaps is neither here nor there, and 
yet the inability of college under- 
graduates to write intelligible English 
scarcely argues perfection for our 
existing methods of education. 

I am not familiar with the way the 
system of Major Examinations has 
worked out at Bowdoin. But does the 
Student Council realize that a good 
many very intelligent people uncon- 
nected with the Bowdoin faculty and 



unconnected with any college faculty 
have for some time entertained the 
feeling that American education was 
of too diffuse and helter-skelter a 
character and that if undergraduates 
did more thorough work in one major 
subject they would be better fitted to 
cope with life and the affairs of the 
world than they at present are? I 
take it that the major examination is 
an attempt to make education more 
thorough. It is not very impressive 
to be told that inequalities have been 
found in the way the plan operates in 
different departments, e. g., that 
"majors" in French are easier than 
in chemistry or history. Those in- 
equalities, almost inevitable at the out- 
set, can certainly be eliminated by 
trial and experience. It is suggested 
that when the knowledge of these 
major examinations trickles into the 
preparatory schools they will not send 
their output to Bowdoin in the fall. I 
should like to say in all seriousness 
that if Bowdoin College cannot make 
a sincere effort to raise the standard 
of the training which it gives to its 
undergraduates without losing its pro- 
spective students to other institutions 
then it is time for the trustees and 
overseers to inquire if the college 
plant and endowments should not be 
devoted to other purposes than those 
which they have served in the last 
century. 

In the English universities of Ox- 
ford and Cambridge one may take a 
"pass degree" after passing examina- 
tions in a certain number or group 
of studies or an "honors degree" after 
one series of examinations taken at 
the end of three or four years devoted 
exclusively to the study of one of 
about a dozen major branches of 
learning, e. g., Classics, Modern His- 
tory, Law, etc. The "pass" degree 
of Oxford or Cambridge is sub- 
stantially equivalent to the American 
B.A. degree as given at Bowdoin and 
elsewhere. I doubt if there is any 
B.A. degree in this country the 
equivalent or anything like the 
equivalent of the honors degree of Ox- 
ford or Cambridge. If Bowdoin Col- 
lege could inaugurate something like 
the honor school of the Britsh uni- 
versities it would be doing a great 
service to American scholarship and 
an invaluable service to its own un 
:lergraduates. The Bowdoin man, I 



read in the "Orient," "is not afraid of 
work nor of hard work." But soft. I 
wonder if after the lapse of so few 
years my haunting memories of un- 
dergraduate days are become so woe- 
fully inaccurate. 

Yours very truly, 

ROBERT HALE, 1910. 



Masque and Gown Trip 

The Ivy play, "Stop Thief," was 
presented by the Masque and Gown 
in Saco last Thursday night, and in 
Portland last Friday night. Dances 
followed the performance at both 
towns. The acting was quite smooth 
and finished, especially in Portland, 
where the actors seemed to lack any 
self-consciousness that would have 
marred the effectiveness of their act- 
ing. As usual the feminine roles made 
the biggest hits, but the male roles 
also deserve a great deal of praise. 
Ridlon '22 as the old absent-minded 
and excitable gentleman was truly ex- 
cellent. Quinby '23 took the part of 
the bride-groom to perfection, and 
Kileski '21 made a very distinguished- 
looking physician. Fillmore '23 was 
a bold, arrogant and realistic sergeant 
of police, and Klees '24, a laughable 
parson. Parcher '22 as a detective, 
and Jewett '24 and Lee '24 as police- 
men, acted their parts admirably. 
Probably the best acting of all was 
done by Ingraham '21 in his portrayal 
of Jack Doogan, the thief of the play. 
He is realistic to say the least, and 
his acting is a very clever piece of 
work. 



Chess Club 

The Bowdoin Chess Team justified 
its existence last Saturday by defeat- 
ing the Bowdoin Club of Portland 
Chess Team, 6-3. 

The individual results of the tour- 
nament were as follows: 

Clymer, Bowdoin '22, defeats Leath- 
erbarrow, Portland. 

Philbrick, Bowdoin '23, defeats Tib- 
betts, Portland. 

Blanchard, Bowdoin '21, defeats 
Sayward, Portland. 

Clymer defeats Tibbetts. 

Philbrick defeats Sayward. 

Blanchard defeats Tibbetts. 

Leatherbarrow defeats Philbrick. 

Leatherbarrow defeats Blanchard. 

Sayward defeats Clymer. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



alumni Department 



1878 — The resignation of Dean Al- 
fred E. Burton of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, effective at 
the end of the present school year, 
was announced last week. He has 
held the post of dean since 1902, 
when the office was created. Dean 
Burton resigned because of con- 
cern for the health of his -wife, 
who is now in California, where he 
will join her when relieved of his 
duties at the institute. He has been 
connected with the institute since 
1882. Since 1905 he has been an over- 
seer of Bowdoin College, where he 
was graduated in 1878. He was the 
room-mate of the late Admiral Peary 
at college and his lifelong friend and 
scientific associate. At the suggestion 
of Peary he organized in 1896 an ex- 
pedition to North Greenland where 
he took valuable pendulum and mag- 
netic observations. In 1901 he or- 
ganized an expedition of M. I. T. men 
who went to Sumatra to observe the 
total eclipse of the sun. He became 
connected with the United States 
coast and geodetic survey in 1879 and 
in 1880 went as a volunteer to Mem- 
phis, Tenn., to assist in the laying out 
of a sewerage system after a yellow 
fever epidemic. During the war he 
was in charge of instruction in the 
free naval schools of the United 
States Shipping Board recruiting ser- 
vice. 

1903 — An announcement of the mar- 
riage of Seldon O. Martin to Miss 
Emily Haven Beasley of Summit, 
N. J., was recently received. The 
marriage took place at Calvary 
Church, Summit, N. J., on April 19. 
Mr. Martin received his A.M. from 
Harvard in 1£04 and since 1910 has 
been teaching commercial organiza- 
tion at Harvard. 



Class Notes 1914 



Hebron M. Adams is engaged in 
fruit culture at North Sebago, Maine. 
His home address is 558 Main Street, 
Westbrook, Maine. 

Horace A. Barton is a lawyer at 
Greenwich, Conn. His home address 
is Putnam Avenue and Field Point 
Road. 



Charles H. Bickford is in business 
in Portland, Maine. His residence is 
388 Sawyer Street, Portland, Maine. 

Clarence A. Brown is an attorney- 
at-law, being associated with the firm 
of Bradley, Linnell & Jones at 188 
Middle Street, Portland, Maine. 

Lewis T. Brown is the general sup- 
erintendent of the Bates Manufactur- 
ing Company of Lewiston, Maine. 

Ralph L. Buell is editor and part 
owner of the Mercedes Tribune at 
Mercedes, Texas. 

Kendrick Burns is assistant to the 
purchasing agent of the S. D. Warren 
Co., Westbrook, Maine. 

Francis X. Callahan is with Rowe 
& Donahue, General Insurance Agents, 
at 404 Press Building, Portland, 
Maine. 

Samuel W. Chase is instructor in 
Biology at the Western Reserve Medi- 
cal School, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Alan R. Cole is with A. McKim, 
Limited, General Advertising Agents, 
at Phillips Square, Montreal, Canada. 

Warren C. Coombs is principal of 
the Livermore Falls (Maine) High 
School. 

William H. Cunliffe, Jr., is in the 
lumber business at Fort Kent, Maine. 

Henry C. Dixon is a physician at 
Danielson, Conn. 

Louis A. Donahue is a member of 
the firm of Rowe & Donahue, General 
Insurance Agents, at 404 Press Build- 
ing, Portland, Maine. 

Paul E. Donahue is a lawyer at 120 
Exchange Street, Portland, Maine. 

George F. Eaton is a lawyer in 
Bangor, Maine. His business address 
is the Eastern Trust Building. 

Warren D. Eddy is with the Ameri- 
can Can Company, Portland, Maine. 

William H. Farrar is assistant 
cashier of the First National Bank, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

Philip R. Fox is a salesman for the 
American Radiator Company at 54 
Exchange Place, Providence, R. I. 

Elwyn C. Gage is teaching history 
at the Melrose (Mass.) High School. 

Francis T. Garland is a correspond- 
ent in the Alexander Hamilton Insti- 
tute at 13 Astor Place, New York. 

Eugene B. Gordon, when last heard 
of, in June, 1919, was the manager of 
the Portland (Maine) Day School. 

Alfred E. Gray is an assistant 
~ ;aster in French at Milton Academy, 
Milton, Mass. 



Henry L. Hall is an assistant sup- 
erintendent at the Great Northern 
Paper Company, Millinocket, Maine. 

Maurice W. Hamblen is with the 
Wales & Hamblen Company, hard- 
ware merchants, at Bridgton, Maine. 

Harold M. Hayes is a lawyer in 
Foxcroft, Maine, and county attorney 
of Piscataquis County. 

Roswell E. Hubbard is a physician 
at Waterford, Maine. 

Harold F. King is teaching at the 
Pelham (N. H.) High School. 
Pelham (N. Y.) High School. 

Elroy O. LaCasce is a teacher and 
athletic coach at the Laconia (N. H.) 
High School. He is also director of 
the Wawenock Camps, South Casco, 
Maine. 

Robert D. Leigh is a lecturer in 
Government at Columbia University, 
New York. 

Frank R. Loeffler is manager of the 
Cebu Branch of the International 
Banking Corporation at Cebu, P. I. 

Francis W. McCargo has a position 
with the Standard Oil Company at 
Colombo, Ceylon. 

Vernon W. Marr is with the United 
Drug Company at Boston, Mass. 

Wallace E. Mason, Jr., is associated 
with the E. A. Strout Farm Agency 
at Greenfield, Mass. 

Arthur S. Merrill is community sec- 
retary at Westbrook, Maine. 

Percy D. Mitchell is a certified pub- 
lic accountant with Jordan & Jordan, 
810 Fidelity Building, Portland, Maine. 

Reginald A. Monroe is assistant 
special agent for the Standard Oil 
Company at Coalinga, California. 

Sumner L. Mountfort is vice-princi- 
pal of the Arlington (Mass.) High 
School. 

Evan A. Nason is teaching at the 
Albany Academy, Albany, N. Y. 

Alfred W. Newcombe is assistant 
professor of History at Knox College, 
Galesburg, 111. 

Edgar R. Payson, Jr., is in the 
credit department of the Merchants 
National Bank, Boston, Mass. 

Philip H. Pope is an instructor in 
Biology at the University of Pitts- 
burgh, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Arthur L. Pratt is with the Texas 
Steamship Company at Bath, Maine. 

Leo W. Pratt is assistant manager 
of Swift & Co., at Bangor, Maine. 

Kenneth A. Robinson is professor 
of English at Dartmouth College, Han- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



over, N. H. 

Clifford L. Russell is the Maine rep- 
resentative of Bodell & Co. Home ad- 
dress 306 Brackett Street, Portland, 
Maine. 

Edward H. Snow is principal of the 
Putnam (Conn.) High School. 

Myles Standish, Jr., is a statistican 
with Estabrook & Co., Boston, Mass. 

Ermond L. Sylvester is credit man- 
ager for the Foreign Credit Corpor- 
ation, 30 Pine Street, New York. 

James O. Tarbox is attending the 
Infantry School at Camp Benning, Ga. 
His rank is Captain, 46th Infantry, 
U. S. A. 

Earle S. Thompson is a bond sales- 
man for Hornblower & Weeks, 78 Ex- 
change Street, Portland, Maine. 

Neal Tuttle is a Rhodes Scholar at 
Trinity College, Oxford, England. He 
is studying for a Ph.D. in organic 
chemistry. 

Ray M. Verrill is teaching English 
at the Gilman Country School, Balti- 
more, Md. 

Robert T. Weatherill is in charge 
of the acid plant of the Braden Cop- 
per Company at Camp Sewell, Ran- 
cagua, Chile. 

Paul L. White is an instructor in 
European History at Yale University, 
New Haven, Conn. 

James P. Wright is teller of the Old 
Bank, Hanford, Cal. 

The class secretary has no infor- 
mation concerning the following men: 
Almon L. Peters, Joseph Schwey, Her- 
bert M. Shea, Charles F. White, and 
Earl F. Wilson. 



(Mass.) High School. 

William B. Williamson is treasurer 
and manager of the Edgar Jones Pro- 
ductions, Inc., producers of the Hol- 
man Day pictures, at Augusta, Maine. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Herbert W. Ashbey, Oct. 17, 1918. 
Omar P. Badger, M.D., Sept. 25, 1918. 
Leonard H. Gibson, Jr., Sept. 28, 1918. 
John Heywood, August, 1918. 
Richard E. Simpson, Aug. 11, 1920. 



FORMER MEMBERS 

Walter Brown is production and 
stores manager of the Packard Motor 
Company, Boston, Mass. 

Harold W. Cote is an accountant 
with Price, Waterhouse & Co., 60 
State Street, Boston, Mass. 

Henry A. Nichols is with Houghton- 
Mifflin Company, Chicago, 111. 

Robert G. Severance is senior ac- 
countant with L. K. Watkins, 15 West 
Swan Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Prentiss Shepherd is with Paine, 
Webber & Co., Bankers, Boston, Mass. 
Clarence H. Tapley is an insurance 
engineer with the Underwriters' 
Bureau of New England, 141 Milk 
Street, Boston, Mass. 

Philip T. Towle is director of Busi- 
ness Education at the Medford 



HARVARD GAME 

(Continued from Page 1) 

anything. In the five innings that 
Flinn pitched, Harvard registered only 
one hit, and just one other man 
reached first. 

The "Boston Herald," of May 3, 
which declared Flinn to be the best 
pitcher who has twirled against Har- 
vard this season, made the following 
comment on the game: 

"Only two Crimson batters reached 
first base during the five innings Flinn 
toiled. With one out in the fourth 
Austin Blair singled to centre, and 
Capt. Bobby Emmons was safe on 
First Baseman Clifford's error in the 
eighth. All the others merely took 
their turn at bat. 

'The chunky little Brunswick pitch- 
er had excellent control and ability to 
keep the ball low in that zone which 
prohibits consistent hitting. He had 
a good hook and a snappy delivery and 
looked like the best pitcher that has 
faced Harvard this season." 

Bowdoin's score came in the fourth 
when Holmes reached first on a base 
on balls, stole second, and crossed the 
plate on Clifford's hit to left field. 



According to the "Herald," the 
"hair-raising play of the game was 
injected in the eighth by Catcher Mal- 
colm Morrell, who skidded almost un- 
der the canopy of his own dug-out to 
grab Owen's foul close to the ground 
while off balance. It was a thrilling 
clutch." 

The summary: 

HARVARD 

ab bh po a e 

Conlon, ss 4 2 2 4 

Emmons, 2b 2 2 4 

Lincoln, 3b 3 1 2 1 1 

Owen, lb 2 10 1 

Hallock, cf 3 1 4 

Janin, If 3 1 

Crocker, rf 3 

Blair, c 3 2 6 

Goode, p 3 1 

Totals 26 6 27 10 3 

BOWDOIN 

ab bh po a e 

W. Needelman, 2b 4 1 2 

Smith, 3b 3 1 2 

A. Morrell, ss 4 3 1 

Hill. If 4 1 

Davis, rf 4 

Holmes, cf 3 0. 3 

Clifford, lb 4 2 9 1 1 

M. Morrell, c 4 1 7 3 

Walker, p 1 2 1 

*D. Needelman 1 

Flinn, p 1 1 2 

Totals 33 5 24 12 2 

Harvard 1 3 x— 4 

Bowdoin 1 — 1 

Runs, Conlon 2. Lincoln, Owen, Holmes. 
Two-base hits, Conlon, Lincoln. Stolen bases, 
Conlon, Owen 2, Lincoln, Hill, Holmes. 
Sacrifice hits. Emmons 2, Lincoln. Left on 
bases, Harvard 3, Bowdoin 7. First base on 
balls, off Goode 1, off Walker 2. Hits, off 
Walker, 5 in 3 innings ; off Flinn, 1 in 5 
innings. Hit by pitched ball, by Goode 
(Smith). Struck out, by Goode 6, by Walker 
2, by Flinn 3. Wild pitch, Flinn. Losing 
pitcher, Walker. Umpire, Stafford. 

"Batted for Walker in 4th inning. 



cJfohiv\\&jd Treves Skoes 




The latest Spring styles wil be shown by 
A. M. SHIMMON at 

BOWDOIN, MAY 6-7-9 

q "7oKrv\\kl€l Stores in New York, Brooklyn and Philadelphia 
^^erj&jSkoes General Offices : 121 Duane street, New York 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




What Makes the Firefly Glow? 

YOU can hold a firefly in your hand; you can boil 
water with an electric lamp. Nature long ago evolved 
the "cold light." The firefly, according to Ives and 
Coblentz, radiates ninety-six percent light and only four 
percent heat. Man's best lamp radiates more than ninety 
percent heat. 

An English physicist once said that if we knew the fire- 
fly's secret, a boy turning a crank could light up a whole 
street. Great as is the advance in lighting that has been 
made through research within the last twenty years, man 
wastes far too much energy in obtaining light. 

This problem of the "cold light" cannot be solved merely 
by trying to improve existing power-generating machinery 
and existing lamps. We should still be burning candles if 
chemists and physicists had confined their researches to the 
improvement of materials and methods for making candles. 

For these reasons, the Research Laboratories of the 
General Electric Company are not limited in the scope of 
their investigations. Research consists in framing questions 
of the right kind and in finding the answers, no matter 
where they may lead. 

What makes the firefly glow? How does a firefly's light 
differ in color from that of an electric arc, and why? The 
answers to such questions may or may not be of practical 
value, but of this we may be sure — it is by dovetailing the 
results of "theoretical" investigations along many widely 
separated lines that we arrive at most of our modern 
"practical" discoveries. 

What will be the light of the future? Will it be like that 
of the firefly or like that of the dial on a luminous watch? 
Will it be produced in a lamp at present undreamed of, or 
will it come from something resembling our present incan- 
descent lamp? The answers to these questions will depend 
much more upon the results of research in pure science than 
upon strictly commercial research. 




SIC 

Schenectady, N. Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



11 



FORDHAM LAW SCHOOL 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING 



CO-EDUCA TIONAL 



CASE SYSTEM 
THREE-YEAR COURSE 



AFTERNOON CLASS 
EVENING CLASS 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 



CHARLES P. DAVIS, Registrar 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING 
NEW YORlt CITY 



A\AA 



THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

Trains students in the principles of the 
law and in the technique of the profes- 
sion so as to best prepare them for 
active practice wherever the English 
system of law prevails. 

America's new place in international 
politics and commerce challenges the 
young American. 

He must equip himself for new 
world conditions, with a knowledge 
of legal fundamentals. 

LAW — Its principles and application 
to all business is almost as necessary 
to the coming business man as it is 
indispensable to the lawyer. 

Special scholarships ($75 per year) 
are awarded to college graduates. 

Course for LL.B. requires 3 school 
years. Those who have received this 
degree from this or any other approved 
school of law may receive LL.M. on 
the completion of one year's resident 
attendance under the direction of Dr. 
Melville M. Bigelow. Several $25 and 
$50 scholarships open in this course. 
For Catalog, Address 

11 Ashburton Place, Boston 



HOMER ALBERS, Dean 



New York University 

SCHOOL OF RETAILING 

OFFERS 

LIMITED NUMBER 
SERVICE FELLOWSHIPS 

$700 -$800 

Class work in morning 

Store service in afternoon 
Particulars write 

Dr. Norris A. Brisco, Director 
32 Waverly Place 
• New York City 



Year after Year 

The Lenox 

is a cordial host — the Boston 
headquarters for college teams 
and college men. 
Year after Year 

The Brunswick 

is the high place of Boston's fas 
hionable night life, famous for 
Egyptian Room Dinner Dances, 

In Boston 

on either side of Copley Square, close 
to the Back Bay stations, near the 
theatres, neighbors with fine shops — 
two hotels that share the traditions of 
of every campus. 

THE LENOX THE BRUNSWICK 

Boylston St. Boylston St. 

at Exeter at Copley Sq. 

L. C. PRIOR, Managing Director 



Twenty-third Session of the Summer Term 

of the 

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

JUNE 27-AUGUST 5 

Courses in Chemistry, Economics, Education, English, French, History, 
Latin, Mathematics, Physics, and Spanish. 

Credit is given when courses are completed. Social and athletic activities 
are a feature. 

For Bulletin address 

JAMES S. STEVENS, Director 

ORONO, MAINE 



HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

There is unlimited demand for skilled 
dentists and specialists in dentistry. This 
school offers a most thorough and efficient 
training in this interesting profession. For 
those who wish to specialize there are 
courses in Oral Surgery, Orthodontia 
(straightening the teeth) and other 
branches. Instruction by leading dentists 
of Boston and vicinity. Up-to-date equip- 
ment with unusual opportunities for prac- 
tical work. A college certificate indicat- 
ing one year's work in college English, 
Biology, Chemistry, as well as high school 
or college Physics, required for admission. 
Write for particulars. 

EUGENE H. SMITH, D. M. D„ Dean 
Boston, Mass. 



SALESMEN WANTED 

The Twin State Gas & Electric Company 
serving with electric light and power a 
population of 105,000 in New Hampshire, 
"Vermont and Southwestern Maine, needs 
bright, energetic men to sell its 7% Prior 
Lien Stock, permanently or for vacation 
period. This Company has been operating 
successfully for fifteen years, has been 
paying dividends on its preferred and com- 
mon stock for twelve years and has earned 
for many years an amount equivalent to 
three or four times the annual dividend 
on the Prior Lien Stock outstanding. 

There are good opportunities for ad- 
vancement in this and affiliated organiz- 
ations, and with associated investment 
bankers. 

Apply in person or by letter to the office 
of the Company, 55 Congress Street, Bos- 
ton, Mass.. or A. H. Bickmore & Co., Ill 
Broadway. New York. 

TWIN STATE GAS & 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 



Harvard University 

Graduate School of 
Business Administration 

A two-year course in business 
leading to the degree of Master of 
Business Administration. 

Open to college graduates. 

Courses offered in the following 
fields: Accounting, Business Law, 
Banking and Finance, Marketing, 
Advertising, Retail Store Problems, 
Sales Management, Industrial 
Management, Labor Problems, 
Business Statistics, Foreign Trade, 
Transportation, Lumbering, Office 
Organization. 

Nineteen graduates of Bowdoin 
have attended the School, two dur- 
ing the present year. 

The registration for 1921-'22 is 
limited to three hundred in the 
first-year courses. Applications 
after May 1st should be accom- 
panied by a certified transcript of 
the college record. 

For information write to 
Dean W. B. Donham, University 132 

Harvard Graduate School of 
Business Administration 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Give a quaint touch to 
your candy gift! 




S®mpl er 





Chocolates and confections so good that they 
show how much you think of her. She will like 
them all the more because of the exquisite beauty 
of the old-fashioned box. 

FOR SALE BY 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



Do You Need Extra Courses? 

Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages, Economics, 
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire 
how credits earned may be applied on present college program. 

Sty? lltttorjstftj of fflfjtrago 



HOME STUDY DEPT. 



CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 



We carry a large assortment of 
Olives, Pickles, Cheese, and Fancy Cookies. 

DAVIS' MARKET 

Next to Star Lunch 

A 12! per cent, reduction on all Cigarettes 



BOWDOIN CANTEEN 

8 a. m.-12 m.; 1.30-6; 7-11 

Sundays, 12-5 p. m. 

A. PALMER, 19 North Winthrop 



YOU HAVE WRITTEN POEMS! 

Do you care to have them revised 
or constructively criticised by success- 
ful authors? If you do, then send us 
your manuscript (stories, articles or 
poems). We will criticise, and place 
them should they prove to be accept- 
able for publication. 

There is no actual charge for our 
services. If, however, you have not 
previously enrolled with the advisory 
department of this association, we re- 
quest that you enclose the initial fee 
of two dollars, which we must ask of 
each new contributor. There is no 
additional expense, no further obliga- 
tion. 

It must be realized that we can only 
be of aid to those of serious intent. If 
you do mean to strive for literary suc- 
cess, we can help you in many ways. 
Our services are yours until we have 
actually succeeded in marketing at 
least one of your manuscripts. Send 
something to-day! 

Please enclose return postage with 
your communications. 

NATIONAL LITERARY 
ASSOCIATION 

131 W. 39th St. 

New York City 

Advisory Department 



P. J. MESERVE'S 

Drug Store 

Opposite Town Hall 



A. W. HASKELL, D. D. S. 

W. F. BROWN, D. D. S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Postoffice. Brunswick, Maine 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 Maine Street 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



13 



CITIZENS LAUNDRY 



College Agent 



Auto Service 



A SHORTER 

SHORTHAND SYSTEM 
IN TEN EASY LESSONS 

This course covers ten easy lessons 
which will enable the Student, Pro- 
fessor, Journalist, Doctor, Lawyer or 
anyone seeking a professional career, 
to go thru life with 100 per cent 
efficiency. 

THIS COURSE 

Is short and inexpensive, and is 
given with a money back guarantee if 
not satisfied. 

SEND THIS CLIPPING TO-DAY 



PYRAMID PRESS: PUBLISHERS 
1416 Broadway, 
New York City 

Gentlemen: — Enclosed herewith is $5.00 
for which kindly send me your shorthand 
course in ten easy lessons by mail. It is 
understood that at the end of five days, if 
I am not satisfied my money will be gladly 
refunded. 

Name 

Street 

City and State 



Bowdoin Dairy Lunch 

Open Day and Night 



CORDOVAN BOOTS 



YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 



"Herman's" Tan Cordovan $13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan. .$15.50 
"Florsheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 

TENNIS SHOES, INDOOR AND 

OUTDOOR MOCCASINS, RUBBER 

BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 



OH BOY! 

Have You Tried Our 

49c CHOCOLATES 

There is nothing cheap about our 
place but the price. 

BUTLER'S 



F. W. Chandler & Son 

HAVE 

Tennis Rackets 

from $1.50 to $1.60 each 

Championship Tennis Balls 

60c each 

1 920 Tennis Balls 45c each 

Baseballs & Baseball Supplies 

25 Kinds of Golf Balls 

Golf Bags and Clubs 

The College Book Store 



FOR GOLF ENTHUSIASTS 



HATS 
GLOVES 
SHIRTS 
HOSIERY 

SHOES 
TIES, Etc. 



WE CARRY EVERYTHING NECESSARY 

In fact there is nothing this "Live Store" cannot 
supply in the way of wearing apparel. Special at- 
tention is called to a fine line of 

Golf Suits in Homespuns and Herringbone weaves 
attractively priced. 



Sport Oxfords for golf or other occasions, made 
by Wright & Ditson. The leather is c, smoked elk 
with rubber sole and has a tan strip across the 
throat of the shoe 



$10 



Fine Golf Hose in a mixture of grey and green and 
plain brown and grey. 



Monument 
Square 




Portland 
Mains 



14 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



DURING THE GAME 

BETWEEN CLASSES 

ON THE HIKE 




A "MUNCH" WHILE STUDYING 

A SNACK BEFORE RETIRING 

IN FACT—EVERY OLD TIME 



We are showing an especially 
attractive line of 

SPORT SUITS 

$30 to $40 

Come in and try them on 



E. S. BODWELL 
& SON 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



SUMMER WORK 

We still have room 
For a few LIVE men 
Provided they want to 
Earn a lot of MONEY 
This summer. 

This isn't a Gamble 

It is a SURE THING 

For the man who HUSTLES 

And besides 

We pay a SALARY. 

NOW is the time 
To get on the Band Wagon 
So see one of our local men 
Or write us direct and 
Ask for the dope. 

Local representatives: 

S. H. Carter, 24 Winthrop 

Hugh Nixon, D. U. House. 

THE NATIONAL SURVEY CO. 

Topographical Offices, 
Chester Vermont 



JUD, The Barber 

was going to use this space 
but thought it wasn't neces- 
sary. 




Hart Schaffner 

vSgy 
CONSERVATIVE CLOTHES 

FOR 

COLLEGE MEN 

In stock and made to measure. 
Imported Fabrics. Lower prices for Spring 1921. 



HASKELL & JONES COMPANY 

PORTLAND .... MAINE 



TUFTS 
COLLEGE 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

Offers to the student who has 
had one year of college training, a 
four year course leading to the de- 
gree of D. M. D. 

Being located in Boston, Tufts 
College Dental School enjoys ex- 
cellent clinical advantages. 

Students in the Dental School 
Course have the privilege of clin- 
ics at the Forsythe Dental Infirm- 
ary, Boston City Hospital, Mass- 
achusetts Homeopathic Hospital, 
Boston Dispensary, Vernon St. 
Hospital, and the Massachusetts 
Home for Feeble-Minded. 

Tufts Dental School is co-edu- 
cational. 

Registration begins at 9 a. m., 
on June 21, and ends on Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

School session begins Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

For further particulars write to 
F. E. Haskins, M. D., Secretary. 

416 Huntington Avenue, 

Boston, Mass. 

WILLIAM RICE. D.M.D., Dean 



Pressing and Cleaning 

ORDERS TAKEN FOR DYEING 

SECOND HAND CLOTHING 

BOUGHT 

DAN ROSEN 




SPUR- A New Narrow 

Arrow 

Collar 

Cluett.Peabody t Co. Inc. Troy. N.Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




YOUR GAME 

Y^HATEVER your "game," whether 
in sport or serious activity, MACUL- 
LAR PARKER CLOTHES lend fin- 
ish to your performance, and are as 
individual as your own way of doing 



things. 



400 WASHINGTON STREET 

The Old House with the Young Spirit 



Bowdoin men are invited to visit our shop 
when in Boston 



BOYS! 

Have you tried our new drink, 

BOWDOIN BREW? 

Our Candy, too, is right through and 
through 

THE SPEAR FOLKS 

119 Maine Street 



CARL H. MARTIN 

Cleansing and Dyeing 
Pressing and Alterations 

4 Elm Street 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. 
Surplus and Profits, $100,000. 
Student Patronage Solicited. 



PRINTING 



of Quality 

Always in the lead 
for snap and style 

Wheeler Print Shop 

Town Building, Brunswick, Maine 



We carry the largest assortment of 

Olives, Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and 
Biscuits of all kinds east of Portland 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street Tel. 136-137 

Branch Store— 2 Cushing St.— Tel. 16 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 
Boston 

344 Washington Street 



16 BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CUMBERLAND 

Wednesday and Thursday 
Monte Blue 

IN — 

The Kentuckians 



Friday and Saturday 
May Allison 
— in — 
The Marriage of Wm. Ashe 



Next Week — Monday and Tuesday 
Bebe Daniels 

IN 

You Never Can Tell 



PASTIME 

Wednesday and Thursday 
Pearl White 

IN 

The White Moll 



Friday and Saturday 
Tom Mix 

IN 

The Texan 



Next Week— Monday and Tuesday 
Otis Skinner 

IN 

Kismet 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



U8RAR 



12 MAY 



VOL. LI. 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 1921 



Number G 



Brown Wins Track 

Meet By Scant Margin 



Score 64 2-3 to 61 1-3— Meet in Doub'. 
Until Last Event — Bowdoin Not At 
Full Strength— Hardy. Tootell, and 
Butler Win Letters. 



In one of the most exciting dual 
meets that Bowdoin has been in for 
years, Brown succeeded in finishing a 
scant 3 1-3 points ahead of the White 
last Wednesday on Whittier Field. 
The meet was in doubt every minute 
until the last man had been eliminated 
from the pole vault. With Brown in 
the lead by a point and a third, the 
meet hung on the battle between West 
of Brown and Francis Bishop '24 of 
Bowdoin. The younger pole vaulter, 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Department Club Elections 



Mathematics and Biology Clubs Hold 
Finals Meetings — Dr. Gross Gives 
Illustrated Lecture for Biology 
Club. 



BIOLOGY CLUB 

Last Tuesday evening the Biology 
Club held its last meeting of the year, 
at the Zeta Psi house. Dr. Gross gave 
a most instructive talk on birds, 
which was illustrated with excellent 
slides. He spoke particularly about 
the black-crowned night heron. He 
showed a series of slides representing 
the important stages in the develop- 
ment of this bird, from egg to adult. 

The appearance, habits, and charac- 
teristics of the young heron were 
amusing in many respects as well as 
interesting from a scientific view- 
point. In addition to his description 
of this one bird which he studied in- 
tensively last summer, Dr. Gross 
showed pictures of a large number of 

(Continued on Page 3) 



BRILLIANT SEVEN-RUN RALLY 

CRUSHES MAINE IN EIGHTH INNING 



Bowdoin Overcomes Five-Run Lead With Smashing 
Come-back in Last Stages of Game — Dave Needel- 
man Leads Attack With Timely Triples — Al Mor- 
rell and Bill Needelman Hit Effectively — Sargent 
and Stearns Star for Maine. 



Baseball and Track Rallies 



Last Tuesday evening, there was a 
short rally under the Thorndike Oak, 
preparatory to the dual meet with 
Brown. The chief speaker was Ro- 
land H. Peacock '18, a former captain 
of football. He spoke of the ever 
vital need of support from the stands 

(Continued on Page 3) 

Calendar 



May 11 — Tennis: Bates at Lcwiston. 

May 11 — Baseball: New Hampshiie 
College at Brunswick. 

May 12-13 — Presentation of "Miss 
Bob White" at Brunswick Town Hall, 
8.00 p. m. 

May 14 — Maine Intercollegiate 
Track and Field Meet at Whittier 
Field; trials at 10 a. m., and finals at 
2.15 p. m. 

May 14— Baseball: Tufts at Med- 
ford. 

May 14 — Informal Dance at Gym- 
nasium, 8.00 p. m. 

May 16 — Baseball: Norwich Univer- 
sity at Brunswick. 

May 16-17 — Maine Intercollegiate 
Tennis Tournament at Lewiston. 

May 18— Baseball: Holy Cress at 
Portland. 

May 21— Baseball: Colby at Water- 
ville. 



1 With the score 8 to 3 in favor of 
our rivals from Orono, Bowdoin came 
through in the eighth inning of last 
Saturday's game on Whittier Field 
with a crushing and spectacular rally 
which swept the Maine team off its 
feet and won the game for Bowdoin 
by a count of 10-8. The first five 
batters in this inning pounded out 
five clean hits, sent the Maine pitcher 
out of the game; the next three bat- 
tors put Bowdoin in the lead, and sent 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Successful Conclusion of 

New England Trip 



Worcester P. I. Easy for the Bowdoin 
Nine — Brilliant Victory Over Brown 
in Fast Game — Clifford Scores 
Homer With Two On. 



Bowdoin 7, Worcester P. I. 1 

A week ago yesterday, Bowdoin 
won its fourth game of the brilliant 
New England trip from Worcester P. 
I. in easy fashion by a score of 7 to 1. 
Walker held his opponents hitless for 
seven innings, but was touched for 
two singles in the eighth, the sum 
total of hits scored by the losers. 
Bowdoin made only four hits, but the 
eight errors of the Worcester team 
gave the White an easy time all 

(Continued on Page 5) 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Maine Game 



(Continued fr 



i) 



the second Maine pitcher off the field; 
and finally the third pitcher was 
touched for another hit and another 
run. 

This game was very similar to the 
victory won over Maine just two years 
ago, when, with the score 7 to 1 in 
the sixth inning, Bowdoin scored six 
times, tied the score, and then two in- 
nings later tallied twice more for a 
final score of 9 to 7. 

Maine opened up the scoring in this 
game with a two-run rally in the sec- 
ond inning. Bowdoin came back in 
the fourth with three counters, by 
means of three hits and an error. Al 
Morrell singled, but Bill Needelman 
ran for him, stole second, and scored 
when Holmes drove a single through 
the left fielder. Dave Needelman hit 
a low liner to deep centre which was 
good for three bases, and then scored 
when A. Johnson's throw-in went by 
the catcher. 

Maine hit Walker rather hard in 
the fifth and sixth, scoring six runs 
and thus accumulating a five-run lead. 
After that Walker allowed only two 
hits, and kept the Maine runners a 
good distance from the plate. Cap- 
tain Needelman and Joe Smith opened 
up the eighth with clean singles, 
which were followed by a long three- 
bagger to left by Al Morrell. Hill 
scored Morrell with a clean hit to 
centre. Clifford singled to left, and 
reached second on Johnson's error, 
while Hill went to third. At this 
point Jowett retired from the contest, 
and Nichols replaced him. While 
Holmes was being put out on an in- 
field hit, Hill crossed the plate and 
only one more run was needed to tie 
the score. Then Dave Needelman 
came up and smashed the ball far over 
Johnson's head in left field for his 
second timely triple of the game. Clif- 
ford drifted in with the tying score, 
and then a minute later Needelman 
crossed the plate on a wild pitch, and 
Bowdoin was one run in the lead. 
After Walker had flied to Johnson in 
left, Captain Needelman delivered his 
second hit of the inning, scoring Mai 
Morrell, who had walked and stolen 
second. The inning ended when Joe 
Smith popped up a high foul to Pres- 
cott. Nichols left the game just be- 



fore Walker came up, and was relieved 
by Rusk. 

Maine out-hit Bowdoin, but all of 
Bowdoin's hits were bunched in the 
two big innings, whereas six of 
Maine's fourteen hits went for noth- 
ing. There were few brilliant field 
ing plays during the contest. In the 
sixth inning, after Stearns had 
singled, Dave Needelman made a 
pretty catch of Lunge's hot drive, and 
then relayed the ball to Clifford, com- 
pleting a fast double play. Wood of 
Maine robbed Walker of a hit when 
he made a brilliant catch of a fast 
liner. 

Too much credit cannot be given 
Needelman for his two long hits, 
which played such an important part 
in the Bowdoin victory. It is seldom 
that the same player comes up in two 
pinches in one game and both times 
delivers the goods in such successful 
fashion. 

Captain Needelman's two hits in the 
eighth helped out a great deal in that 
particular rally, and his playing all 
through the game was of high order. 
The work of Al Morrell, Smith, and 
Holmes deserves much commendation 
also. 

For Maine the best individual per- 
formances were turned in by Sargent 
and Stearns. The former scored four 
hits out of as many times at bat, 
while his team-mate hit safely three 
times. Lunge and Wood each got 
two hits. 

Following is a play-by-play account 
of the game: 

First Inning 

Maine — Wood grounded out to 
Smith, after which Sargent walked 
and stole second. P. Johnson struck 
out and Young flied to Hill. 

Bowdoin — Captain Needelman and 
Smith walked. Al Morrell advanced 
them one base on a sacrifice, Jowett 
to Prescott. Hill was out, A. John- 
son to Prescott, and Needelman was 
caught at the plate in at attempt to 
score on the play. 

Second Inning 

Maine — A. Johnson walked and 
went to third on Stearns' single to 
left. Both runners scored when 
Lunge hit safely past second. Pres- 
cott sacrificed Lunge to second, but 
Jowett was out, Smith to Clifford, and 
Wood grounded out to Needelman. 

Bowdoin — Sargent handled Clif- 



ford's grounder, and Holmes flied to 
Wood. Dave Needelman reached first 
on A. Johnson's error, but Mai Mor- 
rell flied to left. 

Third Inning 

Maine — Sargent singled to centre, 
but was soon caught off first by a 
quick throw from Mai Morrell. P. 
Johnson fanned, and Young sent an 
easy grounder to Al Morrell. 

Bowdoin — Walker fanned, W. Need- 
elman flied to P. Johnson, and Smith 
popped up a high one to Stearns. 
Fourth Inning 

Maine — A. Johnson struck out, but 
Stearns reached first on a scratch in- 
field hit. Lunge flied to Morrell and 
Prescott to Hill. 

Bowdoin — Al Morrell got a single 
off Lunge's glove, and then Bill 
Needelman running for him stole 
second. Hill flied to centre, and Clif- 
ford fouled out to Prescott, but Holmes 
sent Needelman in with a hard single 
to left, which went through Johnson. 
Holmes reached second, and then 
scored handily when Dave Needelman 
pounded out his first triple, past the 
centre fielder. On the throw-in Johnson 
heaved the ball past Prescott while 
the latter was trying to block the 
Bowdoin runner, and the result was 
Bowdoin's third score. The inning 
was over when Mai Morrell flied to 
A. Johnson. 

Fifth Inning 

Maine — Jowett was safe when D. 
Needelman dropped his fly. Wood 
and Sargent singled, filling the bases. 
Jowett then scored on a passed ball, 
and Wood and Sargent advanced to 
second and third respectively. While 
Joe Smith retired P. Johnson, Wood 
crossed the plate and Sargent went 
to third. Young hit to Walker, who 
threw to Smith to get Sargent. Smith 
sent the ball to Mai Morrell, and the 
Maine runner was put out. Young 
reached second, but he was stranded 
there when A. Johnson was out, Smith 
to Clifford. 

Bowdoin — Walker lined to Wood, 
and Captain Needelman was retired 
the same way. Smith sent a long 
foul which was pulled in by P. John- 
son in left field. 

Sixth Inning 

Maine — Stearns scored his third hit, 
only to be caught off first in a double 
play after Dave Needelman had 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



stabbed a line-drive by Lunge. With 
two out Maine proceeded to score four 
runs. Prescott walked and took sec- 
ond on Jowett's single to left. Wood 
singled, advancing Prescott to third. 
Jowett started from second and Wood 
from first. With two runners at 
third, the Bowdoin infield started 
throwing the ball around, and the 
final outcome of a bone-play on the 
part of the Maine pitcher was a score 
by Prescott. Jowett was safe on 
third, and Wood on second. Sargent's 
scratch hit advanced each runner one 
base, after which the Maine third- 
sacker stole second. With men on 
second and third P. Johnson drove a 
triple to left, scoring two more runs. 
Young fried to Hill. 

Bowdoin — Al Morrell flied to Young, 
and Hill was out, A. Johnson to Lunge. 
Clifford walked, but Holmes struck 
out. 

Seventh Inning 

Maine — A. Johnson fouled out to 
Joe Smith, and Stearns struck out. 
Lunge pushed a single through Dave 
Needelman. Prescott hit to Smith, 
who threw to Clifford to get the third 
put-out. Meanwhile Lunge rounded 
third and started for the plate. Pres- 
cott was not retired, as Clifford threw 
to Morrell to catch Lunge, who was 
the third man out. 

Bowdoin — D. Needelman grounded 
out to Jowett, and then Mai Morrell 
and Walker fanned. 

Eighth Inning 

Maine — Jowett and Wood struck 
out, after which Sargent scored his 
fourth hit, a rather scratchy offering. 
He stole second, but P. Johnson flied 
to Hill. 

The account of Bowdoin's half of 
this inning has been given above in 
full. 

Ninth Inning 

Maine — Walker was invincible in 
this last act of the game. Young hit 
a feeble grounder right into his 
hands, and then A. Johnson and 
Stearns struck out in rapid order. 

The summary: 



1 9 




D. Needelman, rf . . 

M. Morrell, c 

Walker, p 

Totals 33 10 10 27 15 2 

MAINE 

ab r bh po a e 

Wood, cf 5 2 2 4 

Sargent, 3b 4 1 4 1 

P. Johnson, If 5 1 4 2 

Young, rf 5 1 

A. Johnson, 2b 4 1 1 3 2 

Stearns, ss 5 1 3 1 

Lunge, lb 4 2 6 1 

Prescott, c 2 1 7 

Jowett, p 4 2 1 2 

Nichols, p (I 

Rusk, p 



ab 

*W. Needelman, 2b 4 

Smith, 3b 4 

A. Morrell, ss 3 

Hill, If 4 

Clifford, lb 3 

Holmes, cf 4 



bh po 



Totals 38 8 14 24 7 4 

Innings: 123456789 

Bowdoin 0003 007 x— 10 

Maine 02002400 0— S 

Three-base hits, D. Needelman 2, A. Morrell, 
P. Johnson. Stolen bases, Sargent 3, W. 
Needelman, M. Morrell. Sacrifice hits, A. 
Morrell, Prescott. Earned runs, Bowdoin 9, 
Maine 7. Left on bases, Bowdoin 4, Maine 7. 
First base on errors, Maine 1, Bowdoin 1. 
Hits off Jowett, 8 in 7 innings (none out after 
5 hits had been scored in 8th) ; off Nichols, 1 
in 1-3 inning ; off Rusk, 1 in 2-3 inning. 
Struck out, by Walker 8, by Jowett 4. Bases 
on balls, off Walker 3, off Jowett 3, off 
Nichols 1. Double plays, D. Needelman to 
Clifford ; A. Jchnson to Lunge to Prescott. 
Passed ball, M. Morrell. Wild pitch, Nichols. 
Umpire. Corey of Portland. 



~W. Needeln 



for A. Morrell in 4th. 



Baseball Rallies 

(Continued from Page 1) 



at any athletic contest, and of the 
added success which football teams in 
his day had derived from good en- 
thusiastic cheering. 

Captain Thomson of the track team, 
and John Young '21 also spoke about 
the meet. Young in addition an- 
nounced the plans for the reception 
to the baseball team on Thursday 
morning at half past two. 



The student body gathered in front 
of the chapel at two o'clock Thursday 
morning, already to meet the second 
midnight. The baseball team was 
greeted with tremendous cheers, and 
an exciting celebration full of splen- 
did spirit lasted for an hour or more. 
A great bonfire had been prepared by 
the Freshmen behind the chapel, and 
around it the student body assembled, 
cheered every man on the team, and 
gave a real demonstration of its 
recognition of the successes of the 
nine. The celebration ended after the 



students had induced Professor 
Mitchell, Professor Burnett, and 
Coach Magee to give short speeches. 



Special Notice 



Economics Major. 



The major examination in Eco- 
nomics will be held on the afternoon 
of Monday, May 16 from 2.30 to 5.30 
at the Library conference room. 



Department Club Elections 

(Continued from Page 1) 



other birds, mosi of which are com- 
mon around Brunswick. 

The officers elected at the meeting 
were: President, Wilfred R. Brewer 
'22; vice-president, Justin L. Ander- 
son '22; secretary-treasurer, Arthur 
T. Whitney '22; sergeant-at-arms, 
Herbert C. Webb '23. 

At the regular business meeting, 
plans for the annual spring trip of 
the club were discussed, and it was 
decided to invite members of the Out- 
ing Club to go on this trip together 
with the Biology Club. Dr. Gross sp;k p 
in detail regarding the work on the 
log cabin which the Biology Club and 
the Audubon Society have been build- 
ing this year. S. M. Cook '21, the 
retiring president of the club, spoke 
briefly on the work of the past year, 
and gave some good suggestions as to 
obtaining more and more success in 
the future. 

MATHEMATICS CLUB 

The Mathematics Club met at the 
residence of Professor Moody on 
Wednesday evening, for its final meet- 
ing of the present year. Bernstein '22 
read a paper on the trisection of the 
angle. He explained several at- 
tempted solutions by means of Eu- 
clid's tools, that is, the circle and the 
straight line. He further showed the 
modern methods of trisecting an angle 
by means of higher curves, such as 
the conchoid. All Euclidean methods 
have some fallacy, whereas the mod- 
ern method of introducing a curve of 
more than the second degree gives a 
legitimate proof. 

The following officers were elected 
for next year: President, Edward B. 
Ham '22; vice-president, George B. 
Welch '22; secretary, F. King Turgeon 
'23. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Brown Meet 

(Continued from Page 1) 



when taking his second try at 11 feet, 
fell back onto the hard ground in- 
stead of into the pit, and was hurt 
just enough to make his third try un- 
successful. West cleared the bar on 
his last attempt. 

Bowdoin scored most of its points 
in seconds and thirds, as Brown won 
nine firsts to Bowdoin's five. The 
losers presented a better balanced 
team, but lacked the individual stars 
in places to turn the contest into a 
victory. Without Goodwin and J. T. 
Small, the White was badly handi- 
caped in the distance events. 

The best individual performance 
was in the broad jump, when W. I. 
Reid, Brown '24, set up a mark of 
23 feet, 4 inches, the best jump ever 
made in Maine, or by a Brown man. 
Carter of Brown won both sprints, 
and was thus high point winner of the 
day. Parent scored nine points, finish- 
ing second to the Brown runner. 
Fast time was impossible owing to 
the high wind across the track. 

Hardy, Butler, and Tootell won let- 
ters for their successes of the after- 
noon. Hardy won the high hurdle 
event, and Tootell won the hammer 
throw. Butler tallied six points by 
finishing second in both the century 
and the furlong. The other first place 
winners for Bowdoin were Parent, 
Towle, and Philbiook. 

In the hundred, Butler and Palmer 
of Bowdoin, and Carter and Williams 
lined up for the final after two trials 
had been run off. Carter won the 
event, followed closely by Butler and 
Williams. 

In the 220 Carter and Butler were 
again the first two across the line, 
and Parent placed third. 

Bowdoin won each hurdle event by 
the score of 5 to 4. Hardy led 
Addoms and Jones of Brown all the 
way over the high timbers, while Par- 
ent came through in the lows, finish- 
ing ahead of Williams and Smith. 

The chief fi.ature of the two-mile 
run was the plucky work of Bill Hart, 
who ran about three-quarters of the 
race with a bad foot, limping all the 
way. Towle accumulated a long lead 
and won the race handily, while Hart 
had punch enough to finish second, 
some fifteen yards ahead of O'Brien 



of Brown. 

Forstall of Brown outclassed the 
field in the quarter, but Hunt and 
Turner showed their heels to the 
other Brown quarter-milers. This 
race was won in 52 seconds. 

Nutter and Torstall took first and 
second respectively in the half, while 
Hunt was the only one of the three 
Bowdoin men to place. Brown had 
things her own way in the mile, ow- 
ing to the absence of Goodwin and 
Small, either of whom could have 
bettered 4-59. Towle, tired out by his 
work in the two-mile, was unable to 
place, but Renier succeeded in finish- 
ing third. 

Philbrook won the high jump, while 
Jones of Brown took second. There 
was a triple tie for third, between 
Fish of Bowdoin and Addoms and 
Mathues of Brown. Parent and Cook 
finished second and third respectively 
after Reid in the broad jump. 

Bowdoin scored seventeen points to 
Brown's ten in the weights. Green 
and Hill each won a first for the 
Providence team, while the other 
seventeen points were divided between 
Tootell, Bisson, Mason, Parsons, Kirk- 
patrick, Waldo Weymouth, and Wagg. 



Event. Brown. Bowdoin. 

Two mile run 1 8 

440 yard run 5 4 

100 yard dash 6 3 

120 yard hurdles 4 5 

Mile run 8 1 

380 yard run 8 1 

220 yard dash 5 4 

220 yard hurdles 4 5 

Shot put 5 4 

High jump 3 2-3 5 1-3 

Hammer throw 9 

Broad jump 5 4 

Discus throw 5 4 

Pole vault 5 4 

Totals 64 2-3 611-3 

100 Yard Dash 

First Trial Heat— Won by J. F. S. Carter. 
Brown ; second. S. Palmer. Bowdoin. Time, 
10 2-5 seconds. 

Second Trial Heat— Won by G. V. Butler. 
Bowdoin ; second. J. M. Williams, Brown. 
Time, 10 4-5 seconds. 

Final— Won by J. F. S. Carter, Brown ; sec- 
ond, G. V. Butler, Bowdoin ; third, J. M. 
Williams, Brown. Time, 10 2-5 seconds. 

220 Yard Dash 

Won by J. F. S. Carter, Brown; second, G. 
V. Butler, Bowdoin ; third, W. L. Parent, Bow- 
doin. Time, 23 3-5 seconds. 

440 Yard Dash 

Won by W. C. Forstall, Brown ; second, E. 
A. Hunt, Bowdoin ; third. P. S. Turner, Bow- 
doin. Time. 52 seconds. 



880 Yard Run 

Won by J. Nutter, Brown ; second, W. C. 
Forstall, Brown ; third, E. A. Hunt, Bowdoin. 
Time, 2 minutes, 5 4-5 seconds. 

Mile Run 

Won by C. E. Martin, Brown ; second. J. 
Nutter, Brown ; third. J. U. Eenier, Bowdoin. 
Time. 4 minutes, 59 seconds. 

Two Mile Run 

Won by C. S. Towle, Bowdoin ; second, H. 
S. Hart, Bowdoin ; third, J. J. O'Brien, Brown. 
Time, 10 minutes, 50 2-5 seconds. 

120 Yard High Hurdles 

7irst Trial Heat— Wen by R. N. Addoms. 
Brown. Time, 17 1-5 seconds. 

Second Trial Heat— Won by M. E. Hardy. 
Bowdoin ; second, J. E. D. Jones, Jr., Brown. 
Time, 17 2-5 seconds. 

Final Heat— Won by M. E. Hardy, Bowdoin : 
second. R. N. Addoms, Brown ; third, J. E. D. 
Jones, Brown. Time, 17 3-5 seconds. 

220 Yard Low Hurdles 

First Trial Heat— Won by H. S. Smith, 
Brown ; second, A. Thomson, Bowdoin. Time, 
29 seconds. 

Second Trial Heat— Won by W. L. Parent, 
Bowdoin ; second, J. M. Williams, Brown. 
Time, 28 4-5 seconds. 

Final Heat— Won by W. L. Parent, Bow- 
doin ; second, J. M. Williams, Brown : third. 
H. S. Smith, Brown. Time, 27 seconds. 

16 lb. Shot Put 

Won by A. D. Green, Brown ; second, C. A. 
Bisson, Bowdoin ; third, R. J. Kirkpatrick, 
Bowdoin. Distance, 35 feet 8.8 inches. 
Running High Jump 

Won by C. S. Philbrook, Bowdoin ; second, 
J. E. D. Jones, Brown ; third, tie between R. 
N. Addoms, Brown ; A. R. Mathues, Brown ; 
S. S. Fish, Bowdoin. Height. 5 feet, 6 3-4 
inches. 

16 lb. Hammer Throw 

Won by F. D. Tootell, Bowdoin ; second, 
G. T. Mason. Bowdoin : third. E. J. Wagg, 
Bowdoin. Distance, 132 feet, 9.2 inches. 

Running Broad Jump 

Won by W. I. Reid, Brown ; second, W. L. 
Parent, Bowdoin ; third, S. M. Cook. Bowdoin. 
Distance, 23 feet, 4 inches. 

Discus Throw 

Won by J. G. Hill, Brown; second, W. G. 
Parsons. Bowdoin ; third, W. G. Weymouth, 
Bowdoin. Distance, 109.62 feet. 

Pole Vault 

Won by J. West, Brown ; second, F. P. 
Bishop, Bowdoin ; third, S. M. Cook, Bow- 
doin. Height, 11 feet. 



President Sills Re-elected Head of 
U.S.N.A. Visiting Board. 



Last week President Sills was re- 
elected as president of the board of 
governors and visitors to the U. S. 
Naval Academy. At the same time 
the board was conducting the annual 
inspection of the institution. In con- 
nection with this trip, President Sills 
also attended some college meetings 
in Washington and Philadelphia. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Baseball Trip 

(Continued from Page 1) 

through the game. 

Bowdoin scored three runs in the 
third, and three more in' the sixth, 
while the other tally came in the fifth. 
In the third, Clifford walked, but was 
forced at second by D. Needelman. 
Handy singled and Walker was hit by 
a pitched ball, filling the bases. Three 
errors were made on Captain Needel- 
man's hit to Meyer, one by Meyer and 
two by J. Mason. The three runners 
crossed the plate, and Needelman 
reached third. 

In the fifth, W. Needelman was hit 
by a pitched ball, went to second on 
Smith's sacrifice, to third on Mason's 
fumble of Al Morrell's hit, and finally 
stole home. 

Holmes walked in the sixth inning, 
took second on F. Mason's error, and 
scored when Spongberg fizzled 
Handy's hit. Handy went to third on 
another error by J. Mason, and then 
scored on Walker's single. Needel- 
man walked and Joe Smith singled, 
filling the bases. Walker scored Bow- 
doin's last run on a fielder's choice. 

Worcester's only run came in the 
second, as a result of a couple of er- 
rors. 

The summary: 

BOWDOIN 

ab r bh po a e 

W. Needelman, 2b 3 1 1 4 

Smith, 3b 3 1 1 3 1 

A. Morrell, ss 5 5 3 2 

Hill, If 5 2 1 

Clifford, lb 4 10 

Holmes, cf 2 1 1 

D. Needelman. rf 4 1 2 

Handy, c 3 2 1 3 1 

Walker, p 3 2 1 

Totals 32 7 4 27 8 4 

WORCESTER P. I. 

ab r bh po a e 

Meyer, 2b 2 2 1 1 

Spongberg, 2b 1 1 2 1 

Stoughton, 3b 4 2 

Higgins, If 3 4 

F. Mason, c 4 9 1 

J. Mason, ss 3 1 5 

Campbell, cf 3 1 2 

Kittredge. rf, p 3 110 

Murphy, lb 3 1 10 1 

Bagley, p 1 3 

Curran, rf 1 

Totals 28 1 2 27 10 8 

Innings: 123456789 

Bowdoin 03001300 — 7 

"Worcester 01000000 0—1 

Three-base hit, W. Needelman. Stolen bases, 



W. Needelman, Hill. Sacrifice hits. Smith. 
Stoughton. Earned run, Bowdoin 1. Left on 
bases, Bowdoin 7. Worcester 3. First base on 
errors, Bowdoin 4, Worcester 3. Hits, off 
Bagley, 4 in 8 innings : off Kittredge. in 1 
inning. Struck out, by Walker 4, by Bagley 4. 
Bases on balls, off Walker 2 ; off Bagley 4. 
Hit by pitched ball, W. Needelman and Walker 
by Bagley, Smith by Kittredge. Losing pitcher, 
Bagley. 



Bowdoin 7, Brown 5 

Bowdoin ended the New England 
trip with a well earned victory over 
Brown University at Providence last 
Wednesday. The game was hard 
fought from start to finish, with Bow- 
doin leading all the way, except at 
the end of the seventh inning. 

Clifford and Flinn proved to be the 
batting stars for the winners. In the 
first inning, after Smith had walked 
and Al Morrell had singled, Clifford 
drove out a long circuit clout which 
netted Bowdoin a three run lead. 
Again in the fourth inning, before 
Brown had been able to advance be- 
yond second base, Flinn scored 
Holmes and M. Morrell with a timely 
three-bagger. 

With the score 5 to in Bowdoin's 
favor, Brown opened up a little in its 
half of the fourth. Peckham led off 
with a triple, and after Leddy had 
fanned, Dana likewise hit for three 
bases. The Brown left-fielder scored 
the second run on Oden's sacrifice fly. 
A single by Dana and a double by 
Oden in the sixth brought in another 
run for the Providence nine. 

Brown tied the score in the seventh 
inning. Samson and Merrewether 
walked, and the former scored on 
Peckham's single. Leddy's sacrifice 
fly scored Merrewether from third. 

In the eighth Bowdoin scored the 
winning run when Hill singled, went 
to second on Clifford's sacrifice, took 
third on a passed ball, and crossed 
the plate when Holmes lifted a fly to 
Leddy in right field. 

Bowdoin's final score came in the 
first half of the ninth. Mai Morrell 
walked, took second on Walker's sac- 
rifice, and scored when Samson 
fumbled Captain Needelman's hit. 

In Brown's half of the eighth, Ful- 
ler walked, and after Standish was 
retired, Samson was also passed. At 
this point Walker relieved Flinn, and 
the Brown hitters were unable to 
touch him. Merrewether struck out 
and Peckham pushed an easy grounder 



into Walker's hands. In the ninth 
Walker fanned Leddy, Dana, and 
Oden, one after another, and ended 
the game. 

The summary: 



ab 



bh po 



W. Needelman, 2b 5 3 

Smith, 3b 4 1 1 1 

A. Morrell, ss 4 1 2 1 1 

Hill, If 5 1 1 3 

Clifford, lb 3 1 1 5 

Holmes, cf 2 1 1 1 

D. Needelman, rf 4 1 

M. Morrell, c 2 2 1 14 

Flinn, p 3 1 2 

Walker, p 1 



Totals 32 7 8 27 5 1 

BROWN 

ab r bh po a e 

Standish, cf 5 

Samson, 3b 3 1 1 1 1 1 

Merrewether, 2b 4 1 2 2 

Peckham, lb 5 1 2 12 1 

Leddy, rf, p 4 1 2 

Dana, If 4 2 2 1 

Oden, ss 4 1 5 2 2 

Kneeland, c 4 1 7 

Fuller, p 2 1 

'•Bleakner 



Totals 35 5 9 27 9 3 

Innings: 123456789 

Bowdoin 3 2 1 1—7 

Brown 00020120 — 5 

Two-base hit. Oden. Three-base hits, 
Flinn, Peckham. Dana. Home run, Clifford. 
Stolen bases. Holmes, M. Morrell, Fuller. Sac- 
rifice hits, Clifford, Walker. Sacrifice flies, 
Holmes, Leddy, Oden. Hits, off Flinn, 9 in 
7 1-3 innings : off Walker, in 1 2-3 innings ; 
off Fuller, 8 in 8 innings: off Leddy, in 1 
inning. Struck out, by Flinn 10, by Walker 
4, by Fuller 6. Bases on balls, off Flinn 6, 
off Fuller 3, off Leddy 1. Hit by pitched ball, 
A. Morrell by Leddy. Earned runs, Bowdoin 
6, Brown 5. Left on bases, Bowdoin 7, Brown 
10. First base on errors, Bowdoin 2, Brown 
1. Passed ball, Kneeland. Umpire, Graham. 
Time, 2h. 28m. 



*Ran for Fuller in 8th. 



INTER-FRATERNITY BASEBALL 



Delta Upsilon 5, Phi Delta Psi 1. 
Kappa Sigma 10, Alpha Delta Phi 2. 



Lunch Hound — "Well, old straw- 
berry, howsa boy? I just had a plate 
of oxtail soup and feel bully." 

Counter Fiend — "Nothing to it, old 
watermelon. I just had a plate of 
hash and feel like everything. — 
Virginia Reel. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Edward B. Ham '22 Editor-in-Chief 

F. King Turgeon '23 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

George H. Quinby '23 Intercollegiate News 

George T. Davis '24 Alumni Department 

Fredric S. Klees '24 Faculty Notes 

G. William Rowe '24 Athletics 

P. Dennison Smith '24 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. R. Ludden '22 F. A. Gerrard '23 

R. L. McCormack '22 K. R. Philbrick '23 
V. C. McGorrill '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 
Eben G. Tileston '22 Business Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $3.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 15 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials -only; the Managing 
Editor for news and make-up; the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 



Vol. LI. 



May 11, 1921. 



No. 6 



Brunswick as 



EDITORIALS 

The Baseball Victories. 

Many a Bowdoin team has had a 
glorious season on the diamond in 
years past, state championships have 
been won often before this year, Bow- 
doin has defeated Harvard and Prince- 
ton and other large colleges and uni- 
versities; but no baseball team from 
Bowdoin has ever attained such suc- 
cess on an out of state trip as this 
year's team has during the last two 
weeks. 

Easy victories from Amherst, Wes- 
leyan, Trinity and Worcester Poly- 
technic, a brilliant win over Brown 
University, and a fine exhibition 
against Harvard — this record within 
the space of one splendid week is 
something for us to think of often 
with great satisfaction and to re- 
member always. And at the same 
time the game with Maine last Sat- 
urday should likewise be regarded as 
an excellent (and typical) example of 
Bowdoin's willingness and spirit to 
fight to the end against any odds. A 
team does not often force seven runs 



across near the end of a game when 
a five run lead is held by its opponent. 

The team showed remarkable early 
season form, and played together in 
fine style in all the games of the trip. 
This is all in very pleasant contrast 
with the work of the other Maine 
colleges thus far. For example, Bow- 
doin was the only one of the four to 
be victorious on Saturday. All three 
of the other teams have taken some 
bad defeats, and we expect them to 
take a few more. 

An interesting comparison of rela- 
tive strength on out of state teams 
may be made from the following four 
scores: Bowdoin 6, Wesleyan 2; Wes- 
leyan 2, Amherst 0; Dartmouth 2, 
Amherst 1; Dartmouth 9, Harvard 2. 
Question — Bowdoin ?, Dartmouth ?. 

The individual members of the 
Bowdoin nine have acquitted them- 
selves very creditably indeed. Flinn 
deserves praise particularly for his 
high-class pitching in the Amherst 
and Harvard games; Walker's com- 
plete power over Wesleyan and Wor- 
cester, and his brilliant two innings 
against Brown made him one of the 
major factors in Bowdoin's success; 
while Clifford's long and timely hits 
against Wesleyan and Brown did 
much toward breaking up two games. 
Needelman '24 was by far the chief 
figure in the Maine game with his 
two three-base hits, involving four 
runs which Bowdoin needed badly. 
The work of Captain Needelman and 
A. Morrell was also worthy of high 
commendation. 

Bowdoin has lost only four games 
(three of them by close scores to 
large universities) of the eleven which 
have been played to date. By just 
these first games alone, the nine 
could hardly have won a more desir- 
able rank among past Bowdoin teams. 
The players are surely doing their 
part to help the college, but the stu- 
dent body should never lose sight of 
its duty to support this team at all 
times, to show every kind of en- 
thusiasm in cheering, to back the 
players always, and to manifest that 
same spirit which made Thursday 
morning's reception so memorable an 
occasion. 



cent issue of the "Boston Herald:" 

"Bowdoin undergraduates had a 
band and a bonfire and all the fixings 
when the nine arrived in Brunswick 
at 2 a. m. the other morning after a 
trip that netted five clean-cut victories 
and only one defeat. You cannot 
blame them for a little celebration, 
for the scalps brought home were 
those of Amherst, Brown, Wesleyan, 
Trinity, and Worcester Poly, while the 
one defeat was at the hands of Har- 
vard after a fast game. Naturally 
the Bowdoin nine is the favorite in the 
four-cornered fight for the Maine col- 
lege championship which now opens, 
as no one of the other three has 
shown any such early season form." 



The following paragraph in connec- 
tion with Thursday morning's base- 
ball celebration is copied from a re- 



Payment of A. S. B. C. Assessment. 

Four weeks ago tonight the Bow- 
doin student body voted unanimously 
to stand behind its organizations and 
to give them the support which is ab- 
solutely necessary to continue their 
existence. At the present time the 
greater part of the students have 
loyally paid the assessment, but there 
are still a few, — probably about 
twenty per cent, as far as can be 
ascertained, — who have as yet failed 
to do their share in this matter. 

All the arguments on this subject 
have been brought out before, but it 
will be well for those who have made 
no arrangement for paying the as- 
sessment to think again of what this 
small sum from each man means to 
the college. Whoever refuses to pay 
is trying to prevent Bowdoin, his own 
college, from entering into things 
which are bound to give it more 
prominence and recognition in the out- 
side world. Whoever refuses to pay 
is hurting our athletics, is making it 
harder and harder to obtain such 
games as the baseball team played on 
its recent trip. 

It is hoped that all the assessments 
will be paid before Friday noon, par- 
ticularly because the track manage- 
ment needs funds as soon as possible 
in connection with the state meet. It 
is just as easy to pay this week as 
next, and it means everything for the 
success of Saturday's track games. 

The majority of the students have 
done their part, — only a few, who 
have failed to realize the importance 
of this subject, are still failing to sup- 
port campus activities as they should. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



If they have any loyalty at all to their 
college, now is the time to show it, 
when they have such a fine oppor- 
tunity to perform a real and neces- 
sary service for Bowdoin. 



Assignments 

ECONOMICS 2 

Seager — Profit Sharing and Labor Copart- 
nership, chap. 31. 

Materials — Some Problems of Reform, chap. 
20. 



ECONOMICS 4b 
Week of May 16 

Conference discussion of Johnson and 
Huebner, Part i. 

May 17, "Ocean Freight Service," Johnson 
and Huebner, ch. 11, 12. 

May 19, "Passenger and Mail Services," 
Johnson and Huebner, ch. 13, 14. 



ECONOMICS 6 

Survey — April 30 and May 6. 

Conference reports. 

Semester essays due Thursday, May 24. 



ECONOMICS 8 
Week of May 16 

Hillquit, Socialism. 

Reports on Socialists and the War, and 
Negro Labor. 



GOVERNMENT 2 

Fourteenth Week 

Ending Saturday, May 21 

Lecture XXIII. May 17— The Town and 
Township. 

Lecture XXIV. May 19 — Status of the City. 

Assignments : 

1. Munro, Government of the United States. 
Chaps., XL-XLII. 

Group A — Quiz section. 

Group B — Quiz section. 

HISTORY 8 

May 16 — Lecture XXVI. The Budget and 
Parliament Bill. 

May 18 — Lecture XXVII. Woman's Suffrage, 
Labor Questions and Irish Home Rule. 

Reading : 

Cheyney — Short History, pp. 690-715, and 50 
pages from the following : 

Turner — Ireland and England in the Past 
and Present. 

Smith-Gordon — Rural Reconstruction in Ire- 
land 

Hayes — British Social Politics. 

Murray — Ireland and Home Rule 

Annual Register for 1909, 1910, 1911. 1912, 
1913. 

Rosenbaum (ed.) ; Organist Home Rule. 

Cambray — Irish Affairs and the Home Rule 
Question. 

Hobson — Irish Home Rule. 

Barker — Ireland in the Last Fifty Years. 



Reading : 

Bassett, 809-832 ; also 60 pages from the 
following (due Friday, May 27). 

1. Peck, Twenty Years of the Republic, ch. 
XV. 

2. Thayer, Life of Roosevelt. (Any part 
covering his presidency.) 

3. Stanwood, History of the Presidency, II. 
ch. II. 

4. Latane, America as a world Power, chs. 
IX-XVI. 

5. Ogg, National Progress, chs. I-IX. 

6. Roosevelt, The New Nationalism. 

7. Thayer, John Hay. II. chs. XXVIII- 
XXXII. 

8. Johnson, Four Centuries of the Panama 
Canal. 

9. Williams, Anglo-American Isthmian 
Diplomacy. 

10. Croly, The Promise of American Life. 

11. Bishop, Theodore Roosevelt and his 
Times, (beginning in Scribner's Magazine, 
September, 1909). 

12. Croly, Marcus A. Hanna. 

13. Haworth, The United States in Our 
Own Times, ch. XV. 



HISTORY 12 

Lecture 26, May 16 — Theodore Roosevelt, 
Part I. 

Lecture 27. May 18 — Theodore Roosevelt, 
Part II. 



Musical Clubs Close Season 



Tennis Team Trims Colby 



Last Tuesday the Bowdoin tennis 
team beat Colby 3 to 2 in a series of 
matches played at Brunswick, on the 
Beta Theta Pi and Delta Upsilon 
courts. In the morning both double 
teams won their matches in straight 
sets. Partridge and Fisher had no 
trouble in beating Smith and Gowe. 
H. P. Bishop and D. W. Young de- 
feated Sackett and Song in three sets, 
each one 7-5. The Colby men led in 
the first set 5-1, only to lose the next 
six games. Fisher had an easy time 
with Smith in singles, while Part- 
ridge and Young lost. The match be- 
tween Gowe and Partridge was by 
far the most interesting in the series. 
After each player had taken two sets, 
the fifth set went 12-10 to the Colby 
man after a hard fight. 
The summary: 

SINGLES 
Fisher (B) defeated Smith 

(C) 6—2 6—1 6—4 

Gowe (C) defeated Part- 
ridge (B) 7—5 2—6 3—6 6—1 12—10 

Sackett (C) defeated Young 

(B) 6—3 6—3 6—3 

DOUBLES 

Bishop and Young (B) de- 
feated Sackett and Song 

(C) 7—5 7—5 7—5 

Partridge and Fisher (B) 

defeated Smith and Gowe 

(C) 6—2 6—3 6—4 



The Glee and Banjo Clubs ended 
their season last night with a concert 
in Lewiston before an appreciative 
audience. On Monday evening a con- 
cert was given in Frye Hall, Port- 
land, where it was very well received. 
Last Thursday evening the quartet 
from the Glee Club appeared in Bath 
at a Red Cross Benefit Concert with 
La Duchesse de Richelieu, the only 
pupil of Mme. Emma Eames. The 
quartet made a very fine impression. 

These last concerts bring to a close 
one of the most successful seasons 
the clubs have known. Fourteen con- 
certs have been presented, in Bangor, 
Augusta, Lewiston, Brunswick, Bath, 
Rockland, Camden, Vinal Haven, Port- 
land and Saco, Maine; Portsmouth, 
N. H.; Boston and New York City. 
The concerts have been a success 
financially and musically due to the 
efficient work of the manager, leaders, 
and coach. There is a large nucleus 
for next year's team and prospects are 
very bright. With a little effort, next 
season will be as successful as this. 



The State Meet 



This week Saturday track athletes 
from the other three colleges of the 
State are coming to Brunswick to 
wrest from Bowdoin the laurels that 
have been ours for the past two years. 
All the advance speculation gives 
every indication that this meet is to 
be one of the closest ever contested 
in Maine. 

Last week Maine, Bates, and Bow- 
doin each contested in a dual meet. 
The glaring weakness of Bates in the 
weight events gave New Hampshire 
College a 71-55 victory over the Gar- 
net at Lewiston last Saturday. At 
the same time Maine was overwhelm- 
ing Tufts by a score of 107-19 at 
Orono. Of course we all know of 
Bowdoin's hard fight against Brown 
last Wednesday. 

This week Bowdoin will probably 
face the Maine colleges without the 
services of either of the star long 
distance runners, Goodwin and Hart. 
In spite of this handicap, Bowdoin 
expects to put up a good battle and 
the chances for a White victory are 
not thought to be at all slight. 

In the dashes, Bowdoin has Butler 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



and Parent, both of whom ought to 
come through well. Captain Thom- 
son, Parent, Hardy, and Clark should 
make the hurdles a pair of Bowdoin 
events. For the middle distance runs 
there are Hunt, Turner, Palmer and 
Partridge. Towle is the White's best 
bet in the mile and two-mile, which 
the Buker brothers of Bates ought to 
have pretty well to themselves. Phil- 
brook ought to come through in the 
high jump, and Parent and Cook in 
the broad jump. Francis Bishop and 
Cook are picked to do well in the pole 
vault, while in the weights Bowdoin 
has Tootell, Bisson, Parsons, and 
others. 



Campus Activities 
Massachusetts 



CLASS OF 1921 

Herman Davis Gaffney, a graduate 
of the Gloucester High School, is a 
member of Kappa Sigma. During his 
first year he was a member of the 
Freshman Cabinet. 

Frank H. Ormerod of New Bedford 
is a graduate of New Bedford High 
School, and is a member of the Delta 
Upsilon fraternity. In his Freshman 
year he was in the Ivy Play, and won 
the Goodwin French Prize. In his 
Sophomore year, he was a member of 
the Sophomore Council, and a member 
of the Masque and Gown. Last year 
he was also a member of the Masque 
and Gown and was elected art editor 
of the "Bugle." 

Louis Osterman of Boston, Mass., 
is a graduate of Boston English High 
School. He is a member of Delta 
Kappa Epsilon. He was on the cross 
country squad his Freshman year, 
track squad and class track team in 
his Sophomore year, on the fencing 
team during his Junior year. This 
year he is manager of the fencing 
team. 

Wilfred Leo Parent of Boston is a 
graduate of Boston Latin School. He 
is a member of Kappa Sigma, and 
during his first three years was active 
in the Monday Night Club and the 
Mandolin Club. He has starred at the 
wing position on the Varsity eleven 
ever since he first won his letter in 
his Freshman year. As a Freshman 
he was also prominent in class af- 
fairs, being chairman of the Fresh- 



man Banquet Committee and a 
speaker at the banquet. In his first 
year he was also a member of the 
Varsity baseball squad. During his 
Sophomore year he was chairman of 
the "Proc" Night and Sophomore Hop 
committees and in that year he gained 
a position on the Varsity track team. 
Last year he was elected to the Friars 
and to the Athletic Council, during 
the indoor track season making a 
place on the Varsity relay team. The 
offensive he displayed in football last 
fall needs no comment, while his 
speed at the low hurdles in track 
should be good for something to Bow- 
doin's cedit in the State meet next 
month. He is a member of the newly 
formed "B" Club. He is majoring in 
French . 

J. Maxim Ryder of Fairhaven, 
Mass., is a graduate of the New Bed- 
ford High School. He is a member 
of Delta Upsilon. He gave a response 
at the Freshman Banquet. During 
his Sophomore year he made the 
Musical Clubs and was elected As- 
sistant Manager during his Junior 
year. He has managed the clubs this 
year. He was Editor-in-Chief of the 
"Bugle" in his Junior year. He is a 
member of the Biology Club. 

Alexander Standish, Boston, Mass., 
graduated from New York Military 
Academy. He is a member of Delta 
Kappa Epsilon fraternity. In his 
Freshman year he was a member of 
the Freshman Banquet Committee. 
His second year he was one of the 
cast of the Commencement play. This 
year he is a member of the rifle team. 
He served as a lieutenant during the 
war. Economics is his major course. 

John E. Woodward is a graduate of 
Maiden High School. He is a mem- 
ber of Zeta Psi, U. Q. and Abraxas. 
He gave a response at the Freshman 
banquet. During his first year he 
managed his class track team. He 
was a member of the Sophomore Hop 
Committee. 

CLASS OF 1923 

Howard Clinton Reed is a gradu- 
ate of Whitman High and a member 
of the Chi Psi fraternity. In his 
Freshman year he made the College 
Glee Club and Chapel Choir. This 
year he is also a member of the Glee 
Club and Chapel Choir. He is a mem- 
ber of the Biology Club. 

Harold T. Stonemetz of West New- 



ton is a member of the Theta Delta 
Chi fraternity. He is a graduate of 
Newtonville High School, and a trans- 
fer from Colgate College. He was a 
member of the hockey squad last 
winter. 

Dewees F. Tice of Dorchester, is a 
member of Theta Delta Chi and a 
graduate of Horblit's Preparatory 
School. He made his letter in hockey 
in his Freshman year. 

CLASS OF 1924 

Richard B. Phillips of Boston is a 
graduate of Dummer Academy. He is 
a member of Kappa Sigma. He 
played on the Freshman football 
team. 

Robert T. Phillips of Boston is a 
graduate of Dummer Academy, and a 
member of Kappa Sigma. He played 
on the Freshman football team and on 
the Freshman baseball team and on 
the Varsity football squad. 

Bradley B. Ross of Danvers is a 
graduate of Danvers High School and 
a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon 
fraternity. He is a candidate for as- 
sistant manager of track. 

Frank H. Sellman of Wellesley 
Hills is a graduate of Phillips An- 
dover Academy and a member of the 
Alpha Delta Phi fraternity. He was 
captain of the Freshman baseball 
team last fall and is now a member 
of the Varsity baseball squad. He is 
a member of the U. Q. Society. 

H. A. Simon, of Salem, Mass., is a 
graduate of Salem Classical High 
School. 

D. S. Smith of Dorchester is a 
graduate of Dorchester High School. 
He plays in the College Band. 

P. D. Smith of Methuen is a mem- 
ber of the Zeta Psi fraternity and a 
graduate of Methuen High School. 
He is on the "Orient" Board. He 
made the Musical Clubs this fall and 
is a member of the Press Club. He 
is a candidate for assistant manager 
of hockey. 

Paul H. Upton of Lynnfield pre- 
pared at Lynn English High School 
and Chauncey Hall School. He is a 
member of Beta Theta Pi. 

John Watson of Jamaica Plain is a 
graduate of Powder Point School and 
a member of Psi Upsilon fraternity 
and U. Q. Society. He is out for as- 
sistant manager of baseball. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



9 



New York and New England 



CLASS OF 1921 

William W. Blancharcl of Highland 
Falls, N. Y., is a member of the Delta 
Kappa Epsilon fraternity. In his 
Freshman year he made his class track 
team. In his second year he made the 
class football and track teams. In his 
Junior year he was a member of the 
Biology Club. This year he is vice- 
president of the Biology Club and 
also a member of the Rifle and Chess 
Clubs. 

George B. Granger of Rockville 
Center, N. Y., is a graduate of Stevens 
High School and a member of the 
Sigma Nu fraternity. He is a trans- 
fer from Stevens Tech. He is a mem- 
ber of the Biology Club. He was on 
the football squad last fall. He is a 
member of the Rifle Team. 

Norman W. Haines of Greenland, 
N. H., is a member of the Theta Delta 
Chi fraternity, and a graduate of the 
Portsmouth High School. He has been 
on the "Orient" Board throughout his 
college career, having filled the office 
of managing editor in his Junior year, 
and the office of editor-in-chief in his 
Senior year. He served on the Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinet in his Sophomore year 
at which time he was treasurer, and 
also during his Junior year when he 
was president of that organization. 
He was elected manager of tennis in 
his third year, and was then a member 
of the Board of Managers. He played 
on the S. A. T. C. football team in his 
second year and on the Varsity Foot- 
ball Team during his last two years. 
He served on the Freshman Banquet 
Committee during his Freshman year, 
and on the Seniors' Last Gym Commit- 
tee during his Senior year. He was a 
member of the Debating Council his 
second year, when he was chosen as an 
alternate for the annual Freshman- 
Sophomore debate. He was also the 
alternate on the varsity team during 
his Junior year, at which time he won 
the Bradbury Debating Prize. He has 
been a member of the Classical Club 
for the last three years. He is major- 
ing in Latin. He is a member of the 
Ibis and the "B" Club. 

CLASS OF 1922 

William F. Ferris, Jr., of Rock- 
away Beach, N. Y., is a graduate of 
Goodwill High and a member of the 
Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. In 



his Freshman year he was on the foot- 
ball and baseball squads and sang in 
the college choir. In his Sophomore 
year he made the class baseball, foot- 
ball, and debating teams. He was 
also a member of the choir in his 
Sophomore and Junior years. He 
has played in the College Band in his 
three years at the College. This year 
he is also a member of the Glee Club. 
W. W. Knowlton, of North Wood- 
stock, N. H., prepared for Bowdoin 
at Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, 
N.H. He is a member of Phi Delta 
Psi fraternity, he is majoring in 
Chemistry and has been elected to the 
"Quill" Board. 

CLASS OF 1923 

R. T. Bates, East Rochester, N. H., 
is a graduate of Rochester High 
School, and a member of Delta Kappa 
Epsilon fraternity. Last year he 
played on the Freshman Football 
Team; he was on the Freshman Track 
Team, the Varsity Track Squad, and 
a member of U. Q. Society. This 
year he was on the Varsity Football 
Squad, the Sophomore Football Team, 
the Varsity Track Squad, and the 
Sophomore Track Team, and is a 
member of the Mathematical Club. 

Philip H. T5isson, of Barre, Vt., pre- 
pared for college at Barre High 
School. He is a member of the Kappa 
Sigma fraternity. Last year he was 
a member of his Class Baseball Team. 

Allen Q. Christie, of Riverpoint, 
R. I., prepared for college at West 
Warwick High School. He is a mem- 
ber of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fra- 
ternity. He is a member of the Fenc- 
ing Squad and the Varsity Track 
Squad. He gave a response at Fresh- 
man Banquet. 

Pierce U. Clark of Plainville, Conn., 
is a graduate of Hebron Academy and 
a member of the Alpha Delta Phi fra- 
ternity. He is on the track squad this 
spring. He is planning to major in 
Economics. 

J. B. Dunlaevy, of Neponsit, N. Y., 
transferred to Bowdoin from Williams 
College. He is a member of Theta 
Delta Chi fraternity. 

Floyd A. Gerrard, of Barre, Vt., is 
a graduate of Barre High School. He 
is a member of the Kappa Sigma fra- 
ternity. He is on the "Orient" Board. 

Ralph B. Kemp of Kingston, N. H., 
prepared for Bowdoin at Sanborn 
Seminary. He was a member of his 



class track team in his Freshman 
year, and a member of the Varsity 
Track Squad this year. His fraternity 
is Theta Delta Chi. 

W. M. Kimball of New York City, 
transferred to Bowdoin this year from 
New Hampshire State College. He is 
a member of Psi Upsilon fraternity 
and plays in the Musical Clubs. 

Robert J. Kirkpatrick, of Ports- 
mouth, N. H., is a graduate of Ports- 
mouth High School. He is a member 
of the Zeta Psi fraternity. This 
year he played on his Class Football 
Team and was also a member of the 
Varsity Squad. He is also a member 
of the Freshman Track Team and a 
member of the U. Q. Society. 

James A. Kunkel, of Utica, N. Y., 
graduated from the Utica Free 
Academy. He is a member of the 
Phi Delta Psi fraternity. He was on 
the Proclamation Night Committee 
this year. 

CLASS OF 1924 

James Demmons of New Haven, 
Conn., is a graduate of New Haven 
High School and a member of the Psi 
Upsilon fraternity. He is a transfer 
from Yale. He is a member of the 
track squad. He made the Masque 
and Gown last fall. 

George E. Hill is a graduate of Col- 
linsville High School, Collingsville, 
Conn., and a member of the Zeta Psi 
fraternity. He made the Freshman 
Debating Team and this spring he 
made his class baseball team. 



alumni Department 



1876— The class of 1876 is mak- 
ing plans to observe the forty-fifth 
anniversary of its graduation this 
Commencement. At present there 
are thirty-four living graduates from 
a class of forty-five. Among the 
members of the class are Judge John 
A. Morrill and Tascus Atwood, Esq., 
of Auburn; Franklin C. Payson, Port- 
land; Osman C. Evans, South Port- 
land; Howard E. Hall, Damariscotta; 
Charles T. Hawes, Bangor; John S. 
Leavitt, Gorham; Walter H. Marrett, 
Standish; George B. Merrill, Yar- 
mouthville; Rev. Charles A. Perry, 
Bowdoinham; Horace R. Sturgis, Au- 
gusta; Charles G. Wheeler, Topsham; 
Rev. George F. Pratt, Sanford. 



10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



1908— Dr. Carl M. Robinson read a 
paper on blood transfusion at the 
regular monthly meeting of the Port- 
land Medical Club, held at the Co- 
lumbia Hotel, Thursday evening, May 
5th. 

1909 — Ralph O. Brewster, Esq., has 
been nominated by the Governor as 
a member of the State Water Power 
Commission. 

1909 — The appointment of official 
medical examiner of Somerset County 
ex-service men by the United States 
Public Health Service and the Bureau 
of War Risk Insurance, has been 
given to Dr. C. E. Richardson, pro- 
prietor of Somerset Hospital at Skow- 
hegan. His hospital has been desig- 
nated as an approved hospital for all 
United States public health cases in 
this district. The appointment meets 
with public favor, for Dr. Richardson 
las already done a great deal of good 
■work for service men in Skowhegan, 
and in several instances has given 
medical treatment to men and their 
families free of charge. Dr. Rich- 
ardson took both academic and medi- 
cal courses at Bowdoin College. His 
old home was in Strong, Me., and he 
was formerly a high school principal. 

1914 — A daughter, Anne, was born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Paul Lambert White 
April 24 at New Haven, Conn. 

1917— Hal S. White has been ap- 
pointed auditor of the Port of Bristol, 
England, for the U. S. Shipping 
Board. 

1919 — Frank A. Hilton, Jr., who has 
been studying at Harvard as Everett 
Scholar has been made an assistant 
in Chemistry for 1921-22 at Harvard. 

Class Notes— 1913 



Chester G. Abbott — Maine manager 
of Henley-Kimball Automobile Co. 
Class agent for Bowdoin Alumni 
Fund. Married. Daughter, Nancy 
Sylvester. 380 Forest Avenue, Port- 
land, Me. 

Robert W. Belknap — Physician at 
Cambridge Hospital, Cambridge, 
Mass. Married Martha Chapman of 
Damariscotta, Maine. 

Josiah Brown — Business. 72 Mid- 
land Avenue, Highland Park, Michi- 
gan. 

Percy C. Buck — Assistant superin- 
tendent of the Acheson Oildag Co., 
Port Huron, Mich. Married Eliza- 



beth Rice of Worcester. 

Edwin C. Burleigh — City editor of 
the Kennebec Journal, Augusta, 
Maine. Married Catherine Currier of 
Hallowell, Maine. 

Rensel H. Colby — Clergyman, Scar- 
borough, Maine. Married Ida Mc- 
Pheters of Bangor. Two children. 

Reginald O. Conant — Banking, Na- 
tional City Company. Married Marion 
Drew of Brunswick. 370 Wadsworth 
Avenue, New York City. 

Frank I. Cowan — A. Harney, 85 Ex- 
change Street, Portland, Maine. Mar- 
ried Helen Casper of Lisbon Falls, 
Maine. Two sons. 

Vurnyer A. Craig — Manufacturer of 
flavoring extracts. Married Verna 
Larrabee of Starks, Maine. Two sons. 
48 McRae Street, Niagara Falls, 
Canada. 

Lawrence A. Crosby — Lawyer, 49 
Wall Street, New York City. 

Cedric R. Crowell — General man- 
ager of Doubleday-Page Book Shop 
Co., Lord and Taylor Shop, 38th 
Street and Fifth Avenue. Married 
Hester Flynn of New York. 1107 
Main Street, Peekskill, N. Y. 

George O. Cummings — Physician. 
Married Sybil Kemp of Kingston, 
N. H. Daughter. 699 Congress 
Street, Portland, Maine. 

Albert P. Cushman — Banking, Mer- 
rill Trust Co. Married. 31 Parkview 
Avenue, Bangor, Maine. 

Theodore W. Daniels — Metallurgist, 
Wheeling Mold and Foundry Co., 
Wheeling, West Virginia. Married. 

Leon Dodge — Banking, Newcastle, 
Maine. Married. Christine Huston. 
One child. 

Willis E. Dodge — Principal of high 
school, Princeton, Maine. Married. 

Stanley Dole— U. S. Navy. Has 
served on several important commis- 
sions in Russia as representative of 
the Navy. Permanent address: 4 
Walker street, Portland, Maine. 

Paul H. Douglas — Professor of Po- 
litical Economy, University of Chi- 
cago. Has published recent articles 
in "Quarterly Journal of Economics" 
and the "Journal of Political 
Economy." Married Dorothy Wolff 
of New York. One child. 

John E. Dunphy — Accountant. 52 
Bramhall Street, Portland, Maine. 

Walter F. Eberhardt— Publicist for 
Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, 
485 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 



Theodore E. Emery — Has recently 
resigned his commission in the navy. 
Now at 508 Eldorado Street, Callejo, 
Calif. Permanent address: Maine 
Avenue, Gardiner, Maine. 

Neil A. Fogg — Surgeon, Rockland, 
Maine. 

Daniel E. Gardiner — Teacher of 
Modern languages, Riverdale Country 
School, Riverdale-on-the-Hudson, New 
York City. Permanent address: 11 
Germain Street, Calais, Maine. 

Harold D. Gilbert — Bond salesman, 
Blodgett & Co., 60 State Street, Bos- 
ton, Mass. Permanent address: 
Farmington, Maine. 

Winthrop S. Greene — Insurance, 340 
Main Street, Worcester, Mass. 

Mark Hogan — U. S. Navy. Now at 
Constantinople with U.S.S. St. Louis. 

Raymond K. Hagar — Pharmacist, 
12 Lisbon Street, Lewiston, Maine. 
Widower. Permanent address: Pat- 
ten, Maine. 

Harry H. Hall — Automobile sales- 
man, Burnett and Sherman, Inc., 1019 
Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, 
Mass. Married Mildred Allan of Bos- 
ton. Two children. 

Charles B. Haskell — Teacher, high 
school, South Portland, Maine. Mar- 
ried Elizabeth Day of Bellows Falls, 
Vt. One child. 

Stanley Hinch — Lumber business, 
Danforth, Maine. Widower. 

Benjamin D. Holt — Lawyer, 1319 
Williamson Building, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Married Annie Payson of Portland, 
Maine. One daughter. 

Leon E. Jones — Bond salesman, S. 
W. Straus & Co., Boston, Mass. Per- 
manent address: 89 Summit Avenue, 
Winthrop, Mass. 

Raymond D. Kennedy — Teacher, 
Huntington School, Boston, Mass. 
Married Anna Smith of Harrisburg, 
Pa. 

Verd R. Leavitt — Connecticut man- 
ager of Paine, Webber & Co. Married. 
One child. 45 Evergreen Avenue, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Paul Lunt — Business, Portland, 
Maine. Married Helen Thompson of 
South Portland, 52 Pine Street, South 
Portland, Maine. 

Douglas H. McMurtrie — Research 
chemical engineer, Brown Co., Berlin, 
N. H. Married Madeline Tempereur 
of Paris, France. One son. 

Eugene McNealley — U. S. Deputy 
Marshal. Married Evelyn Hall of 
Portland. 130 Neal Street, Portland, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



11 



Maine. 

Bryant Moulton — Physician, 180 
State Street, Portland, Maine. 

William J. Nixon— With Henry C. 
Kelley Co., 35 Worth Street, New 
York City. Address: 143 East 39th 
Street, New York City. 

James A. Norton (Class Secretary). 
Eecently returned from Europe, where 
he has been associated for two years 
with the head commission of the 
Friends Society in their war relief 
work. For a time he assisted in 
directing the work in the Balkan 
States, and later was engaged in in- 
vestigating the needs and supervising 
the relief work in northern Fiance, 
Germany, and Russia. At the same 
time Mrs. Norton assisted in the work 
in Germany. At present they are at 
North House, 864 Randolph Street, 
Philadelphia. Permanent address : 
119 Westbrook Street, Portland, 
Maine. One son, James, Jr. 

Clifton O. Page (Acting Secretary). 
Master at Country Day School, New- 
ton, Mass. Married Dorcas Allen of 
Swanton, Vt. One son. 16 Brainerd 
Road, Allston, Mass. Permanent ad- 
dress: 434 Middle Street, Bath, Maine. 

Ray E. Palmer — International 
Banking Corp., Lyons, France. Mar- 
ried. One child. 

Albert E. Parkhurst — Physician. 
163 Cabot Street, Beverly, Mass. 
Married. 

James E. Philoon — Lawyer, 59 Sum- 
mer Street, Auburn, Maine. Married 
Alice Rowe of Auburn. 

Sumner T. Pike — Vice-President, 
Rupert Cox Equipment Co. Address: 
1927 Main Street, Kansas City, Mo. 
Unmarried. 

Henry Rowe — Bond salesman, Old- 
town, Maine. Married Irene Stevens 
of Georgetown, Maine. One child. 

Daniel Saunders — Lawyer. 362 An- 
dover Street, Lawrence, Mass. Mar- 
ried. 

Paul C. Savage — Wholesale fruit 
and produce. Married Elizabeth Sul- 
livan of Bangor. Two children. 29 
Grove Street, Bangor, Maine. 

Lester B. Shackford — Executive of 
Ault-Williamson Shoe Co., Aubum, 
Maine, 52 Summer Street. Unmar- 
ried. 

George L. Skolfield — Plant engineer, 
Merchant Shipbuilding Corporation. 
Married. 1410 Williston Street., 
Chester, Pa. 



John A. Slocum — Business, 251 
Minot Avenue, Auburn, Maine. Mar- 
ried Jennie Olmstead of Niagara 
Falls, N. Y. 

Lawrence W. Smith — Lewis Mfg. 
Co., 70 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 
Married Frances Skolfield of Bruns- 
wick, Maine. 

William R. Spinney — Life Insur- 
ance, 30 State Street, Boston, Mass. 
Married. 477 La Grange Street, 
West Roxbury, Mass. 

Alfred H. Sweet — Associate pro- 
fessor of History, University of Colo- 
rado, Boulder, Colo. Married. One 
child. 

Albert D. Tilton— Plumbing, heat- 
ing, and hardware. Married. One 
son. Residence, 155 High Street, 
South Portland, Maine. 

Elmer E. Tufts, Jr.— Lawyer, 15 
Westminster Street, Providence, R. I. 
Unmarried. Permanent address: 
Kingfield, Maine. 

Curtis Tuttle — Farming at Colusa, 
California. Married Elizabeth Scott 
of Brunswick, Maine. 

Eaiie B. Tuttle — Business: School 
books. Married. P. 0. Box 372, Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 

William F. Twombly — Chemist. 
Married Esther Dallett of Wilming- 
ton, Del. Address: 49 Summerill Ave- 
nue, Pennsgrove, New Jersey. 

Luther E. Whittier — Farming, 
Farmington, Maine. Unmarried. 

Fred D. Wish — Teacher of Civics, 
Hartford, Conn., High School. Execu- 
tive secretary of Connecticut State 
Teachers' Association. Married Retta 
Morse of Peak's Island, Maine. Ad- 
dress: 409 Broad Street, Windsor, 
Conn. 

Philip S. Wood— Captain U. S. 
Army, Recruiting Office, Portland, 
Maine. Married. Address: 15 High 
Street, Bar Harbor, Maine. 

Ex-'13 Harold D. Archer — Manu- 
facturers' agent, Apartado 20, Cara- 
cas, Venezuela. Married Freda Gore. 

Ex-'13 Harold Carney — Physician, 
Texas. 

Ex-'13 John Childs — Business, 
Standard Box Co., Auburn, Maine. 
Address: 78 Horton Street, Lewiston, 
Maine. 

Ex-'13 John Lewis — Lawyer, Skow- 
hegan, Maine. Married Mildred 
Chute of Skowhegan. 

Ex-'13 Aaron Madlen— Pilot, South 
Harpswell. Married. Three children. 



Ex-'13 Ralph A. Powers— Wool 
dealer, 263 Summer Street, Boston, 
Mass. Married. Address: 287 Kent 
Street, Brookline, Mass. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Charles R. Bull (died of influenza 
at Camp Lee in fall of 1918). 

Herbert Haines (died January, 1919, 
directly after leaving service as First 
Lieutenant in Medical Reserve Corps, 
Carmp Wadsworth, S. C). 



AMONG THE MISSING 

Having received no reply to his let- 
ters of inquiry, the acting secretary 
of 1913 is unable to give the present 
address or activities of these in the 
following list. If you can supply in- 
formation regarding any of them, will 
you please notify C. O. Page, Country 
Day School, Newton, Mass. 

Howard C. Abbott, Edward O. 
Baker, Manning Busfield, John C. 
Carr, Sanford B. Comery, Paul 
Emery, Edwin V. Fuller, Charles A. 
Hatch, Wilmot C. Lippincott, William 
B. McMahon, Harold Miller, Robert 
Morris, Harry B. Walker, Frederic S. 
Wiggin. 



GIFT TO ALUMNI FUND 

The Class of 1913, through its 
treasurer, recently contributed $250 to 
the Bowdoin Alumni Fund. 

CLIFTON O. PAGE, 

Acting Secretary. 



A. W. HASKELL, D. D. S. 

W. F. BROWN, D. D. S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Postoffice. Brunswick, Maine 



We carry a large assortment of 
Olives, Pickles, Cheese, and Fancy Cookies, 

DAVIS' MARKET 

Next to Star Lunch 

A 12J per cent, reduction on all Cigarettes 
in carton lots. 



BOWDOIN CANTEEN 

8 a. m.-12 m.; 1.30-6; 7-11 

Sundays, 12-5 p. m. 

A. PALMER, 19 North Winthrop 



12 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

Graduate School of Business Administration 

A two-year course in business leading to the degree of Master 
of Business Administration. 

Open to college graduates. 

Courses offered in the following fields: Accounting, Busi- 
ness Law, Banking and Finance, Marketing, Advertising, 
Retail Store Problems, Sales Management, Industrial Manage- 
ment, Labor Problems, Business Statistics, Foreign Trade, 
Transportation, Lumbering, Office Organization. 




Oe-09 CO-IO 1<W1 l-- 13 - 13,3 13-04 U-3S 15-16 16^17 17-1B 18-19 19-EO 20-21 



Nineteen graduates of Bowdoin College have attended the 
School, two during the present year. 

The registration for 1921-'22 is limited to three hundred in 
the first-year courses. Application after May 1st should be 
accompanied by a certified transcript of the college record. 

For information write to 

Dean W. B. Donham, University 131 

Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 Maine Street 



P. J. MESERVE'S 

Drug Store 

Opposite Town Hall 



Do You Need Extra Courses? 

Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages, Economics, 
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire 
how credits earned may be applied on present college program. 

5tfp> Intormtjj of (Kfirago 



HOME STUDY DEPT. 



CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 



FORDHAM LAW SCHOOL 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING 



CO-EDUCATIONAL 



CASE SYSTEM 
THREE-YEAR COURSE 



AFTERNOON CLASS 
EVENING CLASS 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 



CHARLES P. DAVIS, Registrar 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING 
NEW YORK CITY 



New York University 

SCHOOL OF RETAILING 

OFFERS 

LIMITED NUMBER 
SERVICE FELLOWSHIPS 

$700 -$800 

Class work in morning 

Store service in afternoon 
Particulars write 

Dr. Norris A. Brisco, Director 

32 Waverly Place 

New York City 



YOU HAVE WRITTEN POEMS! 

Do you care to have them revised 
or constructively criticised by success- 
ful authors? If you do, then send us 
your manuscript (stories, articles or 
poems). We will criticise, and place 
them should they prove to be accept- 
able for publication. 

There is no actual charge for our 
services. If, however, you have not 
previously enrolled with the advisory 
department of this association, we re- 
quest that you enclose the initial fee 
of two dollars, which we must ask of 
each new contributor. There is no 
additional expense, no further obliga- 
tion. 

It must be realized that we can only 
be of aid to those of serious intent. If 
you do mean to strive for literary suc- 
cess, we can help you in many ways. 
Our services are yours until we have 
actually succeeded in marketing at 
least one of your manuscripts. Send 
something to-day! 

Please enclose return postage with 
your communications. 

NATIONAL LITERARY 
ASSOCIATION 

131 W. 39th St. 

New York City 

Advisory Department 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



13 



CITIZENS LAUNDRY 

College Agent 



Auto Service 



A SHORTER 

SHORTHAND SYSTEM 
IN TEN EASY LESSONS 

This course covers ten easy lessons 
which will enable the Student, Pro- 
fessor, Journalist, Doctor, Lawyer or 
anyone seeking a professional, career, 
to go thru life with 100 per cent 
efficiency. 

THIS COURSE 

Is short and inexpensive, and is 
given with a money back guarantee if 
not satisfied. 

SEND THIS CLIPPING TO-DAY 



PYRAMID PRESS: PUBLISHERS 
1416 Broadway, 
New York City 

Gentlemen : — Enclosed herewith is $5.00 
for which kindly send me your shorthand 
course in ten easy lessons by mail. It is 
understood that at the end of five days, if 
I am not satisfied my money will be gladly 
refunded. 

Name 

Street 

City and State 



Bowdoin Dairy Lunch 

Open Day and Night 



CORDOVAN BOOTS 



IN 



YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 



"Herman's" Tan Cordovan $13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan . . $15.50 
"Florsheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 

TENNIS SHOES, INDOOR AND 

OUTDOOR MOCCASINS, RUBBER 

BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 



OH BOY! 

Have You Tried Our 

49 c CHOCOLATES 

There is nothing cheap about our 
place but the price. 

BUTLER'S 



F. W. Chandler & Son 

HAVE 

Tennis Rackets 

from $1.50 to $16.00 each 

Championship Tennis Balls 

60c each 

1920 Tennis Balls 45 c each 

Baseballs & Baseball Supplies 

25 Kinds of Golf Balls 

Golf Bags and Clubs 

The College Book Store 



FOR GOLF ENTHUSIASTS 



HATS 

GLOVES 

SHIRTS 

HOSIERY 

SHOES 

TIES, Etc. 



WE CARRY EVERYTHING NECESSARY 

In fact there is nothing this "Live Store" cannot 
supply in the way of wearing apparel. Special at- 
tention is called to a fine line of 

Golf Suits in Homespuns and Herringbone weaves 
attractively priced. 



$10 



Monument 
Square 



Sport Oxfords for golf or other occasions, made 
by Wright & Ditson. The leather is a smoked elk 
with rubber sole and has a tan strip across the 
throat of the shoe 

Fine Golf Hose in a mixture of grey and green and 
plain brown and grey. 



Portland 
Maine 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



DURING THE GAME 

BETWEEN CLASSES 

ON THE HIKE 




'MUNCH" WHILE STUDYING 
A SNACK BEFORE RETIRING 

IN FACT—EVERY OLD TIME 



STRAW HATS 

Young Men's Sennits 

$3.00, $4.00, $5.00 



White Flannels 

$8.00 



E. S. BODWELL 
& SON 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



SUMMER WORK 

We still have room 
For a few LIVE men 
Provided they want to 
Earn a lot of MONEY 
This summer. 

This isn't a Gamble 

It is a SURE THING 

For the man who HUSTLES 

And besides 

We pay a SALARY. 

NOW is the time 
To get on the Band Wagon 
So see one of our local men 
Or write us direct and 
Ask for the dope. 

Local representatives: 

S. H. Carter, 24 Winthrop 

Hugh Nixon, D. U. House. 

THE NATIONAL SURVEY CO. 

Topographical Offices, 
Chester Vermont 



JUD, The Barber 

was going to use this space 
but thought it wasn't neces- 
sary. 




CONSERVATIVE CLOTHES 

FOR 

COLLEGE MEN 

In stock and made to measure. 
Imported Fabrics. Lower prices for Spring 1921. 



HASKELL & JONES COMPANY 

PORTLAND .... MAINE 



TUFTS 
COLLEGE 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

Offers to the student who has 
had one year of college training, a 
four year course leading to the de- 
gree of D. M. D. 

Being located in Boston, Tufts 
College Dental School enjoys ex- 
cellent clinical advantages. 

Students in the Dental School 
Course have the privilege of clin- 
ics at the Forsythe Dental Infirm- 
ary, Boston City Hospital, Mass- 
achusetts Homeopathic Hospital, 
Boston Dispensary, Vernon St. 
Hospital, and the Massachusetts 
Home for Feeble-Minded. 

Tufts Dental School is co-edu- 
cational. 

Registration begins at 9 a. m., 
on June 21, and ends on Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

School session begins Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

For further particulars write to 
F. E. Haskins, M. D., Secretary. 

416 Huntington Avenue, 

Boston, Mass. 

WILLIAM RICE, D.M.D., Dean 



Pressing and Cleaning 

ORDERS TAKEN FOR DYEING 

SECOND HAND CLOTHING 

BOUGHT 

DAN ROSEN 




SPUR-ANew Narrow 

Arrow 

Collar 

Cluett.Peabody &Co. IncTroy. N.Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



15 




YOUR GAME 

\\7'HATEVER. your "game," whether 
in sport or serious activity, MACUL- 
LAR PARKER CLOTHES lend fin- 
ish to your performance, and are as 
individual as your own way of doing 



things. 



40O WASHINGTON STREET 
The Old House with the Young Spirit 



Bowdoin men are invited to visit our shop 
when in Boston 



BOYS! 



Have you tried our new drink, 

BOWDOIN BREW? 

Our Candy, too, is right through and 
through 

THE SPEAR FOLKS 

119 Maine Street 



CARL H. MARTIN 

Cleansing and Dyeing 
Pressing and Alterations 

4 Elm Street 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. 
Surplus and Profits, $100,000. 
Student Patronage Solicited. 



PRINTING 



of Quality 

Always in the lead 
for snap and style 

Wheeler Print Shop 

Town Building, Brunswick, Maine 



We carry the largest assortment of 

Olives, Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and 
Biscuits of all kinds east of Portland 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street Tel. 136-137 

Branch Store— 2 Cushing St.— Tel. 16 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 
Boston 

344 Washington Street 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CUMBERLAND 

Wednesday and Thursday 
THOMAS MEIGHAN 

IN 

THE EASY ROAD 



Friday and Saturday 
LIONEL BARRYMORE 

IN 

THE DEVIL'S GARDEN 



Next Week — Monday and Tuesday 
CONSTANCE TALMADGE 

IN 

GOOD REFERENCES 



PASTIME 

Wednesday and Thursday 
THE CALL OF YOUTH 



Friday and Saturday 
ANITA STEWART 

IN — 

HARRIET AND THE PIPER 



Next Week— Monday and Tuesday 
ROSCOE (Fatty) ARBUCKLE 

IN 

THE LIFE OF THE PARTY 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



VOL. LI. 



WEDNESDAY. MAY 18. 1921. 



Number 7 



BOWDOIN AGAIN RUNS AWAY WITH M. I. C. A. A. MEET 

"Record Crowd Sees Bowdoin Trackmen Win. Heavy Rain Ruins 

Time In Track Events. Colby A Surprise. Pole Vault 

Record Smashed By Bowdoin Freshman. 



New Hampshire Wins Fast 
Eleven Inning Game 

Bowdoin met defeat to the score of 
3 to 1 at the hands of New Hamp- 
shire State last Wednesday. The in- 
vaders were not a heavy hitting team 
nor was the pitching they had to offer 
particularly brilliant but they had a 
happy faculty of laying out ground 
balls in the places where they were 
most useful and with the aid of a 
bad throw to home in the eleventh in- 
ning managed to win. 

The Bowdoin batsmen were batting 
Anderson, the N. H. twirler, hard, but 
they had the ball in the air so much 
that eleven of the visitors' put outs 
were made in the outfield, and of 
these, seven were made in the center 
lot. In contrast to this it is worthy 
of note that the Bowdoin outfielders 
made only two put outs and had only 
three chances. It is at least highly 
possible that the slugging tendencies 
of the home team lost the game, there 
being only eight base hits where there 
might well have been fifteen. The 
N. H. batters used discretion along 
with their strong right arms and so 
made their hits good. Anderson, the 
visiting pitcher, was probably the star 
performer for his team, his hitting 
being extremely good and his pitch- 
ing tolerably capable. Haggerty, the 
invaders' shortstop also played an ex- 
cellent game. Joe Smith led the bat- 
ting for both teams with his four hits 
out of five times at bat. 

Bowdoin's one score came in the 
eighth when, with the bases full, An- 
derson walked Mai Morrell, forcing 
in Clifford. Pete Flinn pitched good 
ball, striking out eight men to Ander- 
son's four and walking only two while 
the visiting moundsman sent six down 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Bowdoin Wins Over 

Bates in Tennis 

Bowdoin defeated Bates in a dual 
tennis tournament held on the Bates 
courts last Wednesday. The two 
Maine colleges shared equal honors in 
the double matches in the morning, 
but Bowdoin took three of the four 
single matches in the afternoon, thus 
winning the tournament by the score 
of four to two. The total score in 
games was Bowdoin 57, against Bates 
48. 

Matches went in two straight sets, 
only two of the twelve sets being 
deuce sets and both those being 
finished up at 7 — 5. 

The first contest of the day was 
won by Fisher and Partridge of Bow- 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Calendar 



May 19 — Tennis: Brown at Provi- 
dence. 

May 21— Baseball : Colby at Watei - 
ville. 

May 21 — Tennis: Springfiel:! at 
Springfield. 

May 20-21 — Maine Interscholastic 
Tennis Tournament at Brunswick. 

May 23— Tennis: N. E. I. C. Tour- 
nament at Longwood Courts, Chestnut 
Hill, Mass. 

May 25— Baseball: Colby at Bruns- 
wick. 

May 26 — Tennis: Boston University 
at Brunswick. 

May 28 — Track: Maine Inter- 
scholastic Meet at Brunswick. 

May 28 — Baseball: Maine at Orono. 



Bowdoin's track athletes romped 
through mud and water in a driving 
rain to their third successive victory 
in the Maine Intercollegiate games 
last Saturday. The White won by a 
very comfortable margin, having won 
the meet before the beginning of the 
pole vault competition, the event 
which had been predicted to be the 
deciding factor. To those outside the 
college who have not watched the 
phenomenal progress of Francis 
Bishop in this event, his remarkable 
feat in breaking the State record and 
completely shattering the track record 
seems almost unbelievable. Certainly 
this freshman star deserves the high- 
est honor for such a performance 
against veterans in the game. With 
the 6 and 1-3 points won by Bishop 
and Cook in the last event, Bowdoin's 
score amounted to 44 1-3 points 
against Maine's poor second of 28 1-3, 
while Colby barely nosed out Bates 
for third with 26 1-3 to the 26 won by 
the Garnet. Bowdoin's victory was a 
big surprise to most of the dopesters, 
since all the advance information 
pointed to a close win by Maine with 
Colby and Bates dividing a few points. 

The heavy rain which started Fri- 
day continued all the day of the meet. 
By the time the call was issued for 
the jumps and pole vault the track 
was almost completely under water 
and the approaches to the jumping 
pits were so heavy that these events 
had to be postponed until the last of 
the afternoon and transferred to the 
Athletic Building, with the agreement 
that if any records were broken in- 
side they were to stand as meet 
records. The condition of the track 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



precluded the possibility of any fast 
running, but, considering the fact 
that the events were run off under 
the worst conditions within the his- 
tory of the State meet, the time was 
not at all bad. Eay Buker, probably 
the greatest runner at his distance 
in the country, paced Paine, the Colby 
freshman, for seven laps, doing the 
pistol lap in beautiful style but finish- 
ing nearly a minute slower than 
record time. Given decent conditions 
Buker would undoubtedly have set a 
record that would stand for many 
years to come. The Colby yearling 
who followed the Bates star for seven 
laps and finished an easy second looks 
like a comer in the distance field and 
certainly deserves much credit for his 
fine performance. 

The sensations of the meet were 
furnished largely by men of whom the 
advance dope had said little or noth- 
ing. Weise and Paine, both Colby 
freshmen; Glenn Butler, the Bowdoin 
sprinter, and his team mate, Francis 
Bishop; Kane, the Bates half miler; 
and Strout, the Maine hammer 
thrower, none of whom were picked 
as winners, all came through in de- 
cisive style. 

Yearlings figured prominently in 
the sensations. The masterly hurdler, 
Weise, took the lead in both the high 
and low fences against a field of vet- 
erans. 

There was no possibility of George 
Goodwin's breaking the record in the 
event in which he has starred during 
his whole four years in college, and 
he started only in the 880, much to the 
surprise of the experts. Kane, the gar- 
net runner took the pole in this event 
at the first turn and was never headed. 
Bowdoin supporters and friends were 
despondent when they saw the fam- 
ous Goodwin gradually fall back from 
a poor third to a scant fifth but when 
on the last half lap, with the Garnet 
leader some fifty yards ahead, the 
doughty runner began to sprint, pass- 
ing the men in front of him as if 
they were tied, the stands went wild. 
Goodwin put up a scorching fight to 
the finish but Kane's lead was too 
great and the Bowdoin star came in 
fifteen feet behind his opponent. 

Ted Hunt and Steve Palmer com- 
pletely upset the prophecies in the 
440 taking the lead at the very start 
and holding it successfully to the 



finish, Pratt, the Maine captain ; 
finishing a scratchy third. Ted Hunt's 
entry in this event was a complet 
surprise and his terrific pace won hir.i 
a good first with Palmer close be- 
hind. 

The sprints had been conceded to 
Maine on the strength of the reports 
of her remarkable time in the recent 
dual meet with Tufts, but the battle 
in both 100 and 220 was between 
Butler and the Bates sprinter, Wig- 
gin. This pair divided the honors, 
Wiggin taking a very close first in 
the hundred and Butler nosing out a 
yard lead in the longer distance. 
With the sprints went most of 
Maine's hope, although they did make 
second in points. The Blue runners 
were able to dig up only two firsts 
and four seconds, one a three way 
split. 

Colby proved the real dark horse 
of the meet, her runners raking in 
four firsts, as did those of both Bates 
and Bowdoin. Coach Mike Ryan 
pulled a surprise when he started his 
one armed runner Mercer in the mile 
along with the Bates captain, Dick 
Buker. Mercer had been looked to 
to furnish the thrills in the 880 but 
his mentor saw fit to place in the 
longer distance and he more than 
made good in the event. Mercer took 
the lead in the mile early and when, 
a hundred and fifty yards from the 
tape, Captain Buker set sail for him, 
he started a sprint that brought him 
to the finish with a comfortable mar- 
gin. There was some disappointment 
over the fact that Goodwin was not 
started in this race. The pack was 
large but was far hehind the two 
leaders, although Ames of Maine, an- 
other freshman runner, pulled out of 
the crowd and finished a good third. 

Pinkham and Thomas, the Maine 
speedsters who were timed at ten 
flat in the dual meet with Tufts, 
were unable to get through the mud 
for more than thirds. The best time 
in the 100 was made by Butler in the 
first trial heat which was won in 10 
4-5 seconds. Wiggin of Bates easily 
won the second trial from King and 
Pinkham of Maine and when it came 
to the finals it was one terrific drive 
from gun to tape, the Garnet 
sprinter barely edging out a win over 
Butler. 

Tootell of Bowdoin should have 



been an easy winner in the hammer 
throw but he was disqualified and 
Strout came through with a winning 
mark ten feet shorter than the Bow- 
doin star's performance but almost 
ten feet more than that of Jeff Mason, 
his nearest competitor. Cook of Colby 
picked up a first in the shot put and 
third in both discus and hammer. Bis- 
son and Kirkpatrick took second and 
third for Bowdoin in the shot put, 
while the White failed to place in the 
discus throw. Luce of Bates hurled 
the disk two feet farther than did 
Bishop of Maine, while Cook was only 
a foot behind the Maine man. 

After paddling through the mud all 
day Parent was unable to equal his 
last mark in the broad jump and was 
defeated by Libby of Maine who 
jumped 21 feet 5 inches, three inches 
less than Parent's mark in the Brown 
meet. Hep Pratt took third in the 
event. 

Charley Philbrook was about the 
only man who came through accord- 
ing to specifications, since he won his 
event by jumping 5 feet 8 inches, 
which was 3 inches better than Ackley 
of Maine, his nearest opponent, could 
do and which beat his mark in the 
Brown meet by an inch and a quarter. 

The events were witnessed by a 
crowd that filled grandstand and 
bleachers as well as the parking space 
for automobiles around the track. 
Most of the crowd adjourned to the 
gymnasium when the jumps began, 
remaining until nearly seven o'clock 
to see the record breaking event cf 
the afternoon in which Frank Bishop 
soared over the bar at 11 feet S 
inches, while Cook of Bowdoin, 
Stearns of Maine, and Kemp of Colby 
tied for second at a height of 11 feet. 
Stearns was a pronounced favorite 
beforehand, and Kemp, who had never 
before vaulted over 10 feet showed 
his gameness by sticking through and 
winning third place in the meet foi 
Colby by virtue of his 1 1-3 points. 

The summary: 

FINALS 

440 Yard Dash — Won by Hunt, Bowdoin ; 
second, Palmer, Bowdoin ; third, Pratt, Maine. 
Time, 57s . 

120 Yard High Hurdles— Won by Weis«, 
Colby ; second, Thomson, Bowdoin ; third, dis- 
qualified. Time, 17s. 

220 Yard Dash— Won by Butler, Bowdoin ; 
second, Wigfgin, Bates ; third, Thomas, Maine. 
Time, 24 l-5s. 

220 Yard Hurdles— Won by Weise, Colby. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



second, Kelly. Maine ; third, Parent, Bowdoin. 
Time, 27 4-5s. 

100 Yard Dash— Won by Wiggin, Bates; 
second, Butler, Bowdoin ; third, Pinkham, 
Maine. Time, lis. 

One Mile Run — Won by Mercer, Colby ; sec- 
ond. B. S. Buker, Bates ; third, Ames, Maine. 
Time, 5m 4-os. 

880 Yard Run— Won by Kane, Bates ; sec- 
ond, Goodwin, Bowdoin ; third, Herrick, Maine. 



Tin 



Two Mile Run — Won by Buker, Bates ; sec- 
ond. Paine, Colby ; third, Raymond, Maine. 
Time, 10m S3 l-5s. 

Running High Jump — Won by Philbrook, 
Bowdoin, height 5 ft. 8 in. ; second, Ackley, 
Maine, 5 ft 5 in. ; third. Wood, Maine, 5 ft. 
4 in. 

Shot Put— Won by Cook, Colby, 36.72 ft. ; 
second, Bisson, Bowdoin, 35.5 ft. ; third, Kirk- 
patrick. Bowdoin, 35.22 ft. 

Hammer Throw — Won by Strout, Maine, 
124.82 ft. : second. Mason, Bowdoin, 115.31 ft. ; 
third, Cook, Colby, 112.63 ft. 

Discus Throw — Won by Luce, Bates, 112.7 
ft. ; second, J. Bishop, Maine, 110.89 ft. ; third. 
Cook, Colby, 109.41 ft. 

Running Broad Jump — Won by Libby, 
Maine. 21 ft. 5 in. ; second. Parent, Bowdoin, 
21 ft. 1-4 in. ; third, Pratt, Maine, 20 ft. 9 
1-8 in. 

Pole Vault — Won by F. Bishop, Bowdoin, 
11 ft. 8 in. (record) ; tied for second, Cook, 
Bowdoin. Kemp, Colby, Stearns, Maine, 11 ft. 



lips '24, George H. Quinby '23, Car- 
roll S. Towle '22, and Frederick K. 
Turgeon '23. The other alternates 
were as follows: Ralph B. Knight '22, 
Forrest Butler '24, and Harold A. 
Small '24. 



James Phinney Baxter 



N. H. State Game 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Citizens' Military 

Training Camps 



Announcements have been received 
by the "Orient" concerning Citizens' 
Military Training Camps for the sum- 
I mer of 1921. These camps will be 
free of charge and will give training 
in the elementary duties of the soldier. 
Stress will be laid on physical de- 
velopment and there will be the usual 
social recreation. The camps will be 
maintained for a period of four weeks. 
All citizens between the ages of 16 and 
35 who meet the physical require- 
ments are eligible. For additional in- 
formation write the Military Train- 
ing Camps Association, 210 Mailers 
Building, Chicago. 



Alexander Prize 

Speaking Contest 



At the trials held yesterday after 
noon and last evening for the Alex 
ander Prize Speaking, the following 
men qualified and will speak at the 
final contest which comes in Com- 
mencement week in June: Joseph M. 
Brisbois '24, Theodore W. Cousins '23, 
Leo A. Daviau '23, George E. Hill '24, 
James E. Mitchell '23, Robert T. Phil- 



the baseline on balls and hit Captain 
Billy Needelman. Mai Morrell went 
in for Handy in the eighth and in the 
eleventh missed a bad throw that 
brought in the winning runs for the 
visiting nine. In justice to Morrell 
it should be said that the throw came 
directly in front of the plate and over 
the third base line, reaching the 
catcher just as the runner slid for 
the rubber so that Mai was put off 
his balance and the ball got away 
from him, rolling so far that he was 
unable to retrieve it in time to catch 
the second runner. The opposing 
catcher was weak in his throws to 
second, allowing men to pass who 
could have been easily caught between 
the bases. 

The summary: 

NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE 

ab r bh po a e 

Perry, If 4 2 

Broderick, 2b 4 1 1 1 

Butler, 3b 4 1 1 

Haggerty, ss 5 2 3 4 4 2 

Champaigne, c 4 1 6 1 

Lundholm. rf 5 2 

Connor, cf 5 1 7 

Bailey, lb 4 10 1 1 

Anderson, p 4 2 2 



Overseer of the College Dies in 
Portland. 



Totals 



39 3 S 33 9 3 

BOWDOIN 

a'j r bh po a e 

W. Needelman. 2b 5 1 2 6 

Smith, 3b 5 4 1 6 1 

A. Morrell, ss 1 4 1 

Hill. If 6 1 1 

Clifford, lb 5 1 1 21 

Holmes, cf 3 1 ft 

D. Needelman, rf 4 1 

Handy, c 3 /5 3 

M. Morrell, c 1 1 

Flinn, p 5 1 2 



Totals 42 1 8 33 21 i 

Ir.n'ngs: 123456789 10 11 

New Hampshire.... 010000000 2—3 

Bowdoin 000000010 0—1 

Two-base hits, Anderson, W. Needelman. 
Stolen bases, Butler 2, Haggerty, Champaigne, 
Hill. Clifford. Base on balls by Anderson 6 ; 
by Flinn 2. Struck out by Anderson 4 ; by 
Flinn 8. Sacrifice hits, Butler, Champaigne. 
Double play. Bailey to Haggerty. Hit by 
.pitched ball. W. Needelman. Passed balls, 
Champaigne 2. Umpire, Corey of Portland. 
Time, 2h. 10m. 



James Phinney Baxter, historian, 
poet, capitalist, six times mayor of 
Portland and father of Governor Per- 
cival P. Baxter of Maine, died at his 
home in Portland, May 8, after an 
illness of several months. He was a 
native of Gorham and was born there 
March 23, 1831. Mr. Baxter was edu- 
cated at Gorham and Lynn, Mass., 
academies. He received the honorary 
degrees of master of arts in 1881 and 
doctor of laws in 1914 from Bowdoin 
College. He was an overseer of the 
College since 1894. He began life as a 
merchant and later engaged in the 
packing business. He was the author 
of several historical works relating to 
the early history of New England, 
the result of his personal investiga- 
tion here and abroad. His compiled 
books on the history of Maine filled 
20 volumes. He was president of the 
Maine Historical Society, the New 
England Historic-Genealogical So- 
ciety and member of various other 
historical societies in this country and 
England, where he lived two years 
studying British records appertaining 
to Maine. His philanthropies included 
gifts of public library buildings to 
Portland and Gorham. He was the 
author of many poems distinguished 
by a vein of mysticism and imagery. 
He believed "Shakespeare" was writ- 
ten by Bacon. He was a member of 
the Massachusetts and Rhode Island 
Historical societies, the Old Colony 
Historical Society and several other 
societies and a distinguished member 
of the Masonic order. He is survived 
by five sons, of whom Governor 
Baxter is the youngest, and three 
daughters. 



Washington Alumni 

Elect Officers 



Representative Peters of Maine Heads 
Capital Graduates. 



The annual meeting of the Bowdoin 
Alumni Association of Washington 
was held Thursday evening, May 5, at 
the residence of Representative Wal- 
lace H. White of Maine, at 2011 Wy- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



oming Avenue, with President Ken- 
neth C. M. Sills as the principal guest. 
President Sills came over from An- 
napolis where he was a member of the 
Board of Visitors. 

Representative John A. Peters '85, 
president of the association, presided, 
and after a buffet supper the follow- 
ing officers were chosen for the en- 
suing year: President, Representa- 
tive Peters '85; vice-president, Repre- 
sentative White '99; secretary, Lieut. 
Harold N. Marsh '09; corresponding 
secretary, Dr. Howard F. Kane '09, 
and treasurer, T. F. Hurphy '99. 

In his remarks on the history and 
present condition of the college, Presi- 
dent Sills said that Bowdoin stood 
well-nigh alone among the older col- 
leges of New England in its observ- 
ance of old traditions. Harvard, Yale, 
Dartmouth, Amherst, Williams and 
others, with their larger student 
bodies, had departed from many such 
traditions, while Bowdoin remained 
steadfast, as in the days of Haw- 
thorne, Longfellow, Fessenden, Frank- 
lin, Pierce and other illustrious names. 
The curriculum of course, had been 
changed in a degree and added to, to 
meet modern conditions, but Bowdoin, 
he said still retained its old and high 
reputation as a belles lettres institu- 
tion of earning. 

The Bowdoin Alumni Association is 
one of the oldest and most prominent 
of its kind in Washington. At one 
time it comprised among its members 
Chief Justice Fuller of the United 
States Supreme Court, William P. 
Frye, president of the Senate, and 
Thomas Brackett Reed, Speaker of 
the House of Repres:ntatives, and 
other distinguished men in public and 
private life. 



Tennis 



I Continued fr. 



1) 



doin against Woodard and Lessieur 
of Bates by the scores of 6 — 1, 6 — 3. 
In the second double match Ireland 
and Purington of Bates defeated 
Fisher and Young of Bowdoin by the 
score of 7 — 5, 6 — 0. In the afternoon 
Fisher won his match with Lesieur by 
a score of 6 — 4, 7 — 5, although the 
Bates man gave Fisher a hard battle. 
Partridge of Bowdoin had little 
trouble in defeating Roberts, the 
Bates star, the score being 6 — 2, 6 — 2. 



The summary: 

SINGLES 

Partridge, Bowdoin, defeated 

Roberts, Bates 6 — 2 6 —2 

Fisher, Bowdoin, defeated Lesieur, 

Bates 6—4 7—5 

Woodward, Bates, defeated Bishop, 

Bowdoin 6 — 2 6 — 1 

Young, Bowdoin, defeated Puring- 
ton, Bates 6 — 3 6 — 3 

DOUBLES 

Ireland and Purington, Bates, de- 
feated Bishop and Young, Bow- 
doin 7 — 5 6 — 

Fisher and Partridge, Bowdoin, de- 
fated Woodward and Lesieur, 
Bates 6 — 1 6 — 3 



President Sills' 

Southern Trip 

President Sills returned last week 
from a journey to Washington, An- 
napolis, and Philadelphia. At Wash- 
ington, where he was the guest of 
Senator Hale, he attended a dinner 
of the Alumni of the College, and 
had a consultation with the president 
of the National Geographical Society 
concerning the MacMillan expedition. 

He spent three days at Annapolis 
as the president of the Board of 
Visitors to the Naval Academy. The 
Board of Visitors consists of five sena- 
tors, five representatives, and seven 
university educators appointed by the 
President. The duty of the board is 
to inspect the academy and make 
recommendations to the Secretary of 
the Navy. As president of the board, 
President Sills writes a report and 
personally interviews the Secretary of 
the Navy. Among the educators on 
the board are Benjamin I. Wheeler, 
president of the University of Cali- 
fornia, and Professor Irving Fisher 
of Yale. 

In Philadelphia President Sills con- 
sulted the deans of various medical 
schools in that city about the transfer 
of students from the Bowdoin Medi- 
cal School. 



First Outing Club 

Trip a Success 



Fifteen men made the first trip un- 
der the auspices of the Outing Club, 
on Saturday, May 7th, immediately 
following the ball game. The ob- 
jective was Pleasant Point, some seven 
and a half miles down the liver. The 
trip was made in six canoes, loaned 



through the kindness of several of the 
faculty members. A beautiful sunset 
added to the enjoyment of paddling 
down the placid Androscoggin. 

The camp was located on a wooded 
grove, running out into the bay and 
providing an ideal place for the pur- 
pose. An appetizing supper was pre- 
pared under the expert direction of 
Dr. Gross. A rousing camp fire was 
built, and the evening was spent in 
general socialibility and a realizing 
sense of well-being in the great out- 
doors. The party, by common con- 
sent, turned in early, and passed a 
more or less satisfactory night under 
the open sky. 

The "Zoo" class had an exciting 
time the next morning in pursuing the 
elusive bird under the tutelage of Dr. 
Gross. Others took hikes, and still 
others spent their time in quenching 
the ever-rising fires that developed 
around the camp. 

In attempting to show their skill 
in canoe manoeuvring three of our 
worthy members added amusement to 
the occasion by taking an involuntary 
ducking. Strout deserves mention for 
the masterly manner with which he 
acquitted himself. 

Under the direction of Dr. Gross, 
still acting in his capacity as Chief 
cook and adviser to amateurs, a third 
excellent repast was prepared and de- 
voured at noon. After the meal the 
canoes were lined up in fleet forma- 
tion, and several excellent pictures 
were taken. The return trip was then 
made up the river on the full of the 
tide. 

All agreed that it was one of the 
most pleasurable diversions that" they 
had enjoyed since being in college, and 
for most of us that's saying a lot. 
Much credit should be ascribed to Dr. 
Gross, who was the leading spirit of 
the expedition, and to H. R. Smith, 
who managed the commissary. 

The next trip to be taken is to be 
in the direction of Harpswell on May 
20th. From the keen interest and en- 
thusiasm that has been manifested as 
a result of the late trip, this will be a 
record-breaking cruise, so get your 
applications in early to the secretary, 
Karl Philbrick at the Deke House. 

A further trip will be taken over 
Memorial Day to Whaleboat Island. 
This also ought to be interesting and 
well attended. For those who prefer 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



to repeat the original trip down the 
river there will be an opportunity to 
make application for either of the 
week ends mentioned. 

The Outing Club is with us in fact, 
not theory. It is a going concern. 
Get behind it, undergraduates and 
alumni, and push! 

PICKARD '22. 



Salvation Army Drive 

A drive for funds for the Salvation 
Army will be held during the week 
of May 23. Professor Catlin is chair- 
man of the local advisory board. This 
drive is endorsed by leading business 
and professional men and women all 
over the country, and it is hoped that 
Brunswick will raise its quota for 
this well established organization for 
charitable work as it has in the past. 
Bowdoin students will be asked to 
contribute to help swell the total. 



Nominations for Overseers 
and Alumni Officers 



Ballots have recently been sent out 
to all the alumni containing the names 
of nominees for overseers of the Col- 
lege, members of the Alumni Coun- 
cil, and directors of the Alumni Fund. 

The nominees for overseers, from 
whom two are to be elected, are as 
follows: William W. Thomas '94 of 
Portland, Carleton P. Merrill '96 of 
Skowhegan, William W. Lawrence '98 
of New York City, Alfred B. White 
'98 of Boston, Fred H. Albee '99 of 
New York City, Harold L. Berry '01 
of Portland, E. Farrington Abbott '03 
of Auburn, and Chester B. Emerson 
'04 of Detroit, Mich. 

The nominees for members of the 
Alumni Council, from whom four will 
be elected, are as follows: Frank G. 
Farrington '94 of Augusta, Hoyt A. 
Moore '95 of New York City, Ripley 
L. Dana '01 of Boston, Harrison K. 
McCann '02 of New York City, Don- 
ald C. White '05 of Lewiston, William 
S. Linnell '07 of Portland, Dwight H. 
Sayward '16 of Portland, and Sher- 
man N. Shumway '17 of Skowhegan. 

The nominees from directors of the 
Alumni Fund, from whom three are 
to be elected, are as follows: Charles 
H. Gilman '82 of Portland, Frederick 
W. Pickard '94 of Lansdowne, Pa., Al- 



fred B. White '£8 of Boston, Harrison 
K. McCann '02 of New York City 
George R. Walker '02 of New York 
City, and Ralph 0. Brewster '09 of 
Portland. Any name or names may 
be substituted in voting for directors 
of the Alumni Fund. 

All returns must be sent to the sec- 
retary of the General Alumni Associ- 
ation before the eleventh of June. 



OUmpus I3etos 



The chapel address last Sunday 
was given by President Sills. His 
subject was "Leadership." There 
are three kinds of leadership, that 
which is positively vicious, that which 
sacrifices everything for popularity, 
and the highest form, that which 
stands steadfastly for right and duty 
regardless of personal feeling. We 
cannot all be leaders but we should 
always follow the leaders who stand 
for the best. It was one of the most 
inspiring chapel talks that has been 
heard in the last few weeks. 

An enthusiastic rally was held in 
Memorial Hall last Friday evening in 
preparation for the Maine Track 
Meet. Among the speakers were 
Doctor Whittier, for the Faculty; Jack 
Magee and Captain Thomson for the 
team; George R. Walker '02 for the 
Alumni; and John Young for the Stu- 
dent Body. The band was present 
and Old Bowdoin Spirit ran high as 
the songs and cheers were thundered 
forth. 

Many alumni were on the Campus 
last week-end to be present at the 
Track Meet. 

Members of the Bowdoin chapter of 
Beta Theta Pi joined with the Uni- 
versity of Maine chapter in a joint 
banquet and meeting in Augusta last 
Friday. 



Program For Com- 
mencement Week 



Informal Dance 

An informal dance was held in the 
Gymnasium last Saturday evening un- 
der the direction of the Student Coun- 
cil. About a hundred couples danced 
in celebration of the afternoon's vic- 
tory. The patronesses were Mrs. 
Sills, Mrs. Whittier, Mrs. Ham, and 
Mrs. Burnett. 



SUNDAY, JUNE 19 

The Bassalaureate address by Presi- 
dent Sills, in the Congregational 
Church, at 5 p. m. 

MONDAY, JUNE 20 
The Alexander Prize Speaking in 
Memorial Hall at 8 p. m. 

TUESDAY, JUNE 21 

The Class Day Exercises of the 
Graduating Class under the Thorn- 
dike Oak at 2 p. m. Senior Dance in 
the Gymnasium at 8 p. m. 

Annual Meeting of the Maine His- 
torical Society, in the Lecture Room, 
Hubbard Hall, at 3 p. m. 

Meeting of the Trustees in the 
Classical Room, Hubbard Hall, at 2 
p. m. 

Meeting of the Overseers in the 
Lecture Room, Hubbard Hall, at 7 
p. m. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22 

Meeting of the Alumni Council in 
Massachusetts Hall at 9.30 a. m. 

The annual meeting of the Phi Beta 
Kappa Fraternity, Alpha of Maine, in 
the Alumni Room, Hubbard Hall, at 
11 a. m. 

Baseball Game, Alumni vs. Varsity, 
Whittier Field, at 11 a. m. 

The annual meeting of the Alumni 
Association at 1.30 p. m., in Memorial 
Hall, preceded by a Buffet Lunch at 
12.30. 

Out-door presentation of The Tam- 
ing of the Shrew by the Masque and 
Gown of Bowdoin College, at 4.30 
p. m. Tickets, 80 cents (including 
war tax), by mail of Karl R. Phil- 
brick, manager; after June 20 at 
Thompson's Music Store. 

Band Concert on the Campus from 
7.30 to 9.30 p. m. 

Reception by the President and 
Mrs. Sills in Hubbard Hall from 9 to 
11 p. m. 

THURSDAY, JUNE 23 

Organ Recital in the Church at 10.00 
a. m. 

The Commencement Exercises of 
the College and Medical School in the 
Congregational Church at 10.30 a. m., 
followed by Commencement Dinner in 
the Gymnasium. 

All exercises are scheduled on Day- 
light Saving Time. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Edward B. Ham '22 Editor-in-Chief 

F. King Turgeon '23 Managing Editor 

' DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

George H. Quinfcy '23 Intercollegiate News 

George T. Davis '24 Alumni Department 

Fredric S. Klees '24 Faculty Notes 

G. William Rowe '24 Athletics 

P. Dennison Smith '24 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. R. Ludden '22 F. A. Gerrard '23 

R. L. McCormack '22 K. R. Philbrick '23 
V. C. McGorrill '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 
Eben G. Tileston '22 Business Manager 

E. R. Latty '23 Assistant Manager 

J. U. Renier '23 Assistant Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $3.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 15 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials only; the Managing 
Editor for news and make-up; the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 

Vol. LI. May 18, 1921. No. 7 



Entered at Post Office in Brunswick 
Second-Class Mail Matter. 



EDITORIALS 

The Track Championship. 

Bowdoin's splendid fight and game- 
ness came to the fore again in last 
Saturday's track games. For the third 
successive time the championship has 
come to the proper place, and this 
time just as decisively as ever. 

Friday evening Coach Magee gave 
a number of our track representa- 
tives some of the praise which they 
have deserved for all their months of 
hard and faithful training. Too much 
praise cannot be given both to Bow- 
doin's point-winners and to Coach 
Magee for the brilliant results of the 
meet. 

The only record-breaker of the af- 
ternoon, Francis P. Bishop '24, has 
stamped himself as one of the best 
pole vaulters in New England, a per- 
formance all the more creditable, of 
course, in that he has begun his career 
in this event just this year for prac- 
tically the first time. 

G. V. Butler '23, Bowdoin's high- 



point scorer, and E. A. Hunt '22, win- 
ner of the quarter-mile, were the other 
two, who together with Bishop, 
achieved the most spectacular results 
for Bowdoin. The excellent perform- 
ance of C. S. Philbrook '23 in the 
high jump also deserves much com- 
mendation. 

The track team and the baseball 
team have both done especially well 
for Bowdoin this spring. Everyone 
knows this, and it is always to be 
kept in mind, but at the same time 
our enthusiasm for giving Bowdoin 
athletics the best of support in every 
way should never once be allowed to 
flag. A little more of that spirit 
which prevailed in the recent welcome 
to the baseball team will do much 
not only towards furthering the cause 
of our athletics and towards a better 
unification of the members of the col- 
lege, but also towards the highly es- 
sential development of a more active 
interest in the concerns of the college 
and of a deeper feeling and admir- 
ation for Bowdoin. 



Notes of Fity Years Ago. 

In the "Orient" of May 15, 1871, 
there are four lengthy editorials on 
subjects little thought of by present 
day undergraduates. The first of 
these gives a sharp criticism of the 
general course of instruction at Bow- 
doin at that time. It sets forth the 
question, "will some kind advocate of 
the classics please to state a good rea- 
son why we should devote four years 
to ancient literature and four weeks 
to our own? or why we should devote 
two years of our course to simply 
two branches — classics and mathe- 
matics ? How can this ill-regulated 
course make men better, when stu- 
dents are driven snail-like over the 
lifeless remains of a heathen tongue, 
depreciating on the scale of ten at 
each mis-step, and forced like a rifle 
ball through every practical and pleas- 
ant branch?" 

The other three of these editorials 
deal with teaching by under-gradu- 
ates, spending money on buildings, 
and the poor pronunciation of the 
English language. 

Regarding college buildings, the 
"Orient" contains this daring com- 
ment: "Beautiful and much admired 
as is our chapel, we are inclined to 
the opinion that were the worth of it 



a fund to procure a professor in 
oratory, if possible one who should be 
unsurpassed as an elocutionist, the 
college would then be much better, 
even if it could not boast of having 
one of the finest college chapels in 
the country." 

Following are some of the "locals" 
of this issue, which are typical of the 
first volumes of the "Orient." 

"The 'ethereal mildness' is now 
making its annual visit to Brunswick, 
and the college campus is assuming 
its most beautiful garb. 

"The Freshman Base Ball nine re- 
cently received from Bath a challenge 
to play a match game. As the class 
has no 'nine' and hardly that number 
who can play at all — the game will 
not be likely to take place. 

"One of the daily papers says that 
Prof. Goodale's analysis of the con- 
tents of Mary McCarty's stomach has 
been communicated to the coroner. 

"The Yale marking system certain- 
ly has its faults, but it is not so un- 
just as to lower the rank earned by 
a brilliant scholar, because he violates 
the college rules of decorum or 
morality, nor to exalt that of a poor 
one, because he is pious. — College 
Courant. 

"Because the Juniors in their bo- 
tanical studies have attained to a 
considerable knowledge of the bud, it 
does not follow that they are Budd- 
hists. 

"The compiler of the history of the 
class of '71 at Yale says the men 
lied with the usual unanimity. 

"Every person who writes for a 
prize at Yale receives $10 for his 
'honorable intentions.' 

"The students at Albion College 
hail with delight the completion of 
the new chapel, so that they can go 
to prayers. 

"The moral influence of morning 
prayers is shown by the remark made 
by a pious student to his talkative 
neighbor: Shut up, will yer? damn 
it, I want to hear the prayer! — Har- 
vard Advocate. 

"The Rau library has arrived at 
Michigan University. The Freshman ( 
who astonished the librarian of this 
college by calling for the works of 
Ibid, to which, in the course of his 
reading he had found numerous ref- 
erences in foot notes, will now pursue 
his investigations in a new field. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



'The President of a Western female 
college thinks the true idea of 
woman's education should include 
croquet and calculus, tatting and 
Tclemachus, Homer and home. 

"A rich person recently visited a 
poor Western college, and offered to 
finish a new building — then being 
elected — if the college would grade 
the grounds. The grave professors 
left their Greek roots for oak stumps; 
and hard labor and blistered hands on 
the part of Profs, and students put 
the grounds in fine condition. 

"For solid articles upon live issues 
give us the New York 'Nation.' Its 
review of the week, its editorial 
articles, and its literary notes are all 
readable and usually have considerabl : 
merit." 



This week a slight modification is 
being introduced in the make-up of 
the front page of the "Orient." Some 
helpful criticism towards solving the 
problem of publishing the news of the 
college week in magazine form has 
brought about this change. In the 
issues of the last few months it has 
been the plan to give all the chief 
events of the week some notice on 
the front page, and to have the de- 
tailed accounts of each continued else- 
where in the paper. With a view to 
improving the appearance and ma- 
terial of the front page, the incon- 
venience to the readers in finding con- 
tinued articles has apparently been 
overlooked. It is hoped that the 
present modification will provide a 
more satisfactory arrangement of the 
news in the future issues of the 
"Orient." Such suggestions and criti- 
cisms as this are always desired by 
the editors for their value in raising 
the general standard of the "Orient" 
to as high a point as possible. 



Communication 

To the Editor of the "Orient." 

The news of the bequest to Bowdoin 
by Mrs. Annie Louise Cary Raymond 
of a portrait of Longfellow must 
awaken unusually pleasant memories 
in the minds of alumni of the period 
of the mid-'70's. At the Commence- 
ment exercises of 1875, on the evening 
of the day when Longfellow read 
Morituri Salutamus," for the semi- 
centennial exercises of his class, the 



annual Commencement concert was 
held in the Congregational Church, 
the artists being Miss Annie Louise 
Cary, Miss Henrietta Beebe, William 
H. Fessenden, W. H. Beckett, and the 
Philharmonic Club of Boston. The 
presence of the great Maine singer, 
"the charming cantatrice," as the 
Boston "Journal" of that day called 
her, drew a brilliant assemblage, and 
it is no disparagement to the poet to 
say that Miss Cary fully shared the 
honors of the week with Longfellow. 
Doubtless the college library contains 
a program of that celebrated concert. 
The enthusiasm of the audience at 
Miss Cary's singing knew no bounds, 
especially when in honor of Longfel- 
low she sang his famous song: 

"The day is done, and the darkness 
Falls from the wings of Night." 

Few who heard her could ever for- 
get the magnificent beauty of the 
closing strain: 

"And the night shall be filled with music. 
And the cares that infest the day. 

Shall fold their tents, like the Arabs, 
And as silently steal away." 

And so, after a lapse of 46 years, 
there is an especial appropriateness 
in this gift to Bowdoin of the portrait 
of the great poet by the great singer, 
both of whom graced the memorable 
Commencement of 1875. 

ALUMNUS. 



Communication 



May 16, 1921. 
To the Editor of the "Orient." 

An educator, writing in a late issue 
of one of the leading magazines, be- 
gins his article with a paragraph 
having these words: "In the average 
American college, the able student — 
the student best endowed to become a 
leader — is not only robbed of the 
guidance he merits, but is actually 
hindered in making progress on his 
ito initiative." I am not prepared 
to say to what extent I think this 
observation, coming as it does from a 
college professor, holds true, but in 
articular the closing phrase of his 
remark impresses me — "making prog- 
ress on his initiative." 

I think none of us can complain 
whether we are endowed to become 
leaders or not, that here in Bowdoin 



we are robbed of the guidance we 
merit. The accessibility of first-rank 
professors to each undergraduate is 
one of the outstanding merits of the 
institution. If guidance is wanted, if 
advice or explanation is requested, the 
professors here are in a way, if not 
in a mood, to respond to such appeals 
for assistance. I think it will be 
granted that not all Brunswick col- 
legians avail themselves of this op- 
portunity, — most of them are so 
modest, so shy, so considerate of their 
instructors' craving for leisure; but 
there is a sneaky feeling lurking in 
ourselves somewhere that very possi- 
bly a department head would react to 
some stimulus of an intellectual sort 
should a student make bold enough to 
supply that sort of thing. Not only, 
however, are our instructors willing 
and altogether able to lend us a hand 
when we ask it, but they guide us in 
certain matters whether we will or no. 
That is their right, and their duty. 
We have no brief there: we tacitly, if 
not literally, agreed to it upon 
matriculation. And now we are ob- 
liged to be guided in this matter of 
major examinations. 

I do not think that the major ex- 
amination is a seven headed monster. 
Although I am not in favor of it ab- 
solutely, I was inclined to endorse the 
thing upon its inception. I endorse 
and advocate the idea now. Surely a 
college man, in electing his major 
subject, is guided by considerations 
bearing not only upon "the best four 
years of his life" but also upon the 
worst that is to come after; and if he 
cannot, after two years' stay, find a 
subject here to which he is willing to 
give his life's best, it is my frank 
opinion that he had better go else- 
where, or to stay out until he has 
sufficiently come to himself to know 
what he wants. I do not mean posi- 
tively to advocate specialization, often 
times immature and ill advised, to the 
prejudice or exclusion of a liberal edu- 
cation which Bowdoin College is emi- 
nently fitted to provide. Quite the 
contrary. A specialist myself, — if an 
undergraduate may be called such, — 
I have been brought to recognize the 
superiority of the more ancient kind 
of discipline. What I wish to mak? 
clear, then, is this: Every man should 
find some field of thought into which 
he can throw himself with that "g:n- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



erous enthusiasm" which President 
Hyde tried to generate while he was 
here. He should not be "hindered in 
making progress on his own initi- 
ative," by such a quantity of work, ad- 
ministered upon him, as will monopo- 
lize his time; but should be held to a 
few well considered courses the 
quality of which should be so dynamic, 
so charged with fresh and vital in- 
terest, and so exacting in their re- 
quirements that the average student 
will become conscious of a real 
nucleus of power within himself which 
he will be more than willing to de- 
velop and reveal in extra-curriculum 
work undertaken by himself and sug- 
gested by nobody else. There is a 
wholesome quality of fascination and 
real worth in work initiated by the 
ego, — even when guided by trained 
minds, — which somehow is lacking if 
the work is imposed by someone else. 

It is mainly because of this soit 
of imposition, — if I may put it that 
way, — that I do not regard the major 
examination with great favor. And 
yet the idea of it is fundamentally so 
practical and sensible that I should be 
loathe to condemn it altogether. I 
would condemn it for over-guidance 
at the expense of individual initiative; 
I would endorse it for whatever of a 
cohesive and unifying effect its ap- 
plication would produce in the sub- 
ject involved. 

That this sense of unity and the 
interrelationship of all parts of a sub- 
ject is needed here, I do not for a 
moment question. But I think it can 
best be realized, not by the major 
examinations, but by the system of 
honor examinations which have been 
elective at Harvard, wherein each man 
is given the opportunity to win a cer- 
tificate of honor in his chosen subject. 
Here is a chance for voluntary compe- 
tition, individual initiative with its 
feeling of personal responsibility, and 
a realization of efficiency. 

I do not like the compulsion of a 
major examination. I wish it could 
be changed to the election of the 
honor examination above described. 
But if we cannot get the honor, I 
think we had better keep the major 
and make the best of it, for it is, at 
least, a step in the right direction. 
May I hazard a prediction that when 
the grandsons of '21 are Seniors in 



Bowdoin, they will be electing these 
honor examinations which their sires 
had to endure as "majors?" 

R. W. N. '21. 



Assignments 



ECONOMICS 2 
Week of May 23 

Seager — Social Insurance, chap. 32. 
Materials — Read selections bearing upon the 
question of Social Insurance in chapters 16 and 



ECONOMICS 4b 
Week of May 22 

Johnson and Huebner, ch. 15-17. 



ECONOMICS 6 
Week of May 23 

Conference reports. 
Surney — May 14 and May 21. 
Semester essays to be handed in by May 14. 
Write summaries of chapters assigned for 
outside reading. 



ECONOMICS 8 
Week of May 22 

Hillquit, Socialism, ch. 5-7. 

Library Readings in Criticism of Socialism. 



GOVERNMENT 2 

Fifteenth Week 

Ending Saturday, May 28 

Lecture XXV. May 24 — Charters and 
Charter-Making. 

Lecture XXVI. May 26— Forms of City 
Government. 

Assignments : "Sources of Municipal Revenue 
in Maine," Bowdoin College Bulletin, Mu- 
nicipal Research Series, No. 3. 

Group A — Conferences. 

Group B — Quiz section. 



HISTORY 8 
Fifteenth Week 

Lectures : 

May 23— Lecture XXVIII. The Triple En- 
tente. 

May 25 — Lecture XXIX. Great Britain and 
the War. 

Reading: 

Cheyney— Short History, pp. 715-721. 

Each member of the class will hand in an 
outline covering the work of any four weeks 
since the hour examination. The outline will 
represent a combination of information ob- 
tained from lectures, text, and source-book 
reading. References to outside reading should 
be introduced where possible. 



HISTORY 12 
Political History of the United States 

Lecture 28, May 23 — The Progressive Move- 
ment. 

Lecture 29, May 25 — American and the 
Great War. 

Bassett, 832-852 ; also each student will read 
one of the following selections : 

1. Willis, H. P., The Tariff of 1913, in 



Journal of Political Economy, Vol. XXII, pp. 
1-42. 

2. Ogg, National Progress, chs. XII-XXI 
(any 2 chapters). 

3. Taussig, The Tariff Act of 1913. in 
Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol. XXVIII, 
1-30. 

4. Mussey, The New Freedom in Commerce, 
in Political Science Quarterly, Vol. XXIX, pp. 
600-625. 

5. Willis, The New Eanking System, in 
Political Science Quarterly, Vol. XXX, pp. 591- 
617. 

6. Sprague, The Fedeial Reserve Banking 
System in Operation, in Quarterly Journal of 
Economics, Vol. XXX, pp. 627-644. 

7. Young, The Sherman Act and the New 
Anti-Trust Legislation, in Journal of Political 
Economy, Vol. XXIII, pp. 201-220. 

8. McMaster, The United States in the 
World War, I, chs. I-XII. 

9. Pollard, A Short History of the Great 
War. (American Participation.) 



Spring Handicap 

Golf Tournament 

Lyseth and Toyokawa Win Annual 
Golf Feature. 



The annual spring golf handicap 
tournament which was played off 
last week showed Lyseth and Toyo- 
kawa winners with net scores of 69 
each. The lowest gross score was 
made by Richards with 82. The re- 
sults were as follows: 

Gross Handicap Net 

H. C. Lyseth 99 30 69 

R. Toyokowa 92 23 69 

F. A. St. C!a-:r 95 25 70 

S. L. Richards 88 17 71 

R.H.Fogg 110 36 74 

J.M.Ryder 100 26 74 

C. S. Towle 110 30 SO 

F. O. Stack 112 27 65 

W. K. Hall 118 32 88 



Androscoggin Valley 

Alumni Dinner 

On Monday evening, May 9, over 
seventy of the alumni of Lewiston, 
Auburn, and vicinity gathered in New 
Odd Fellows Hall, Auburn, for their 
annual business meeting and banquet. 
Many sub-freshmen were entertained 
as the guests of the association. The 
following officers were elected: Presi- 
dent, Arthur G. Staples '82; first vice- 
president, Dr. D. A. Barrell '00; sec- 
ond vice-president, Dr. W. E. Webber 
'95; fourth vice-president, E. Farring- 
ton Abbott '03; secretary and tregs- 
urer, Lester B. Shackford '13; chor- 
ister, George Bower '07. 

Among the speakers were Dr. W. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



9 



W. Bolster '08, Arthur G. Staples '82, 
Phillip Dana '96, John Young '21, for 
the Student Body, L. E. Moulton, 
principal of Edward Little High 
School, P. H. Pierce, principal of Lew- 
iston High School, Jack Magee, the 
coach of the Track Team, and Pro- 
fessor Ham of the Faculty, Bow- 
doin spirit ran high. The 

speeches were unusually good and the 
listeners were enthusiastic. Bowdoin 
songs were sung during the banquet. 



Official Announcement 

Examinations for entrance into the Diplo- 
matic and Consular Services of the United 
States will be held at Washington. D. C. in 
June and July next. The examination for en- 
trance into the Consular Service will be held 
beginning June 27. That for entrance into the 
Diplomatic Service will be held beginning 
July 11. 

The diplomatic examination is held to ob- 
tain men eligible for appointment as Third 
Secretaries in the Diplomatic Service. The 
consular examination is held to obtain eligibles 
for the positions of Consul, Vice Consul of 
career, Consular Assistant, and Student Inter- 
preter. These positions are starting points in 
the diplomatic and consular careers. Appoint- 
ment as Student Interpreter is the beginning 
of a somewhat specialized service, affording 
an opportunity to learn an Oriental language 
(Japanese, Chinese, or Turkish). 

Full particulars may be obtained with re- 
spect to both the Diplomatic and Consular 
Services and the entrance examinations by ad- 
dressing the Secretary of State, Washington, 
D. C. 



jFacuItp Jftotes 



Professor Ham represented the col- 
lege at an alumni dinner given in 
Lewiston last week. 

Professor Elliot writes from Ox- 
ford of interesting days there, where 
he is meeting many men well known 
in English scholarship and letters. 

Last Friday there was a meeting at 
college of the Visiting Committee, 
which consists of President Cole of 
Wheaton College, ex-Govemor Cobb 
of Maine, Mr. Philip Dana of West- 
brook, Dr. Ernest B. Young of Bos- 
ton, and Mr. George R. Walker of 
New York. 



alumni Depattmcnt 



tions were passed favoring the same 
and the secretary was instructed to 
forward to President Harding and to 
members of the Maine delegation in 
Congress a copy of the resolutions of 
endorsement. 

Col. Plummer has become recog- 
nized as an authority on shipping 
matters and was selected to present 
at Washington the needs of the in- 
dividually owned vessels of Maine, 
and so ably did he perform this work 
that he soon came to represent the 
bulk of American vessels on the At- 
lantic coast. He has served on the 
Maine State Board of Trade on mat- 
ters pertaining to maritime character 
before the U. S. Chamber of Com- 



Class of 1912 



1887— Col. Edward C. Plummer of 
Bath has been unanimously endorsed 
for appointment as a member of the 
United_States Shipping Board by the 
Bath Metal Trades Council. Resolu- 



Adams, Charles F., Lawyer, 53 
Court St., Auburn, Maine. Residence: 
71 School St., Auburn, Maine. 

Ashey, Harold, 3rd Vice President 
of Rockwood Sprinkler Co., Worcester, 
Mass. Residence: 14 Whitman Road, 
Worcester, Mass. 

Bryant, Herbert L., Teacher of 
English, High School, 63 Fifth Ave., 
New Rochelle, N. Y. Residence: 
Round Pond, Maine. 

Bosworth, Bernard D., Manager of 
Cushing Co., Leominster, Mass. Resi- 
dence: 44 Blossom St., P. O. Box 122, 
Leominster, Mass. 

Connant, Richard O., Buyer at 229 
Commercial St., Portland, Me. Resi- 
dence: 131 Neal St., Portland, Me. 

Cressey, George F., Salesman at 
534 Congress St., Portland, Me. Resi- 
dence: 64 Carleton St., Portland, Me. 

Gray, Maurice H., Agent for Woolen 
Mill, Guilford, Maine. Residence: 
Guilford, Maine. "Saw Jack, Reggie, 
Johnnie Joy, Bud Brooks at Boston 
Bowdoin dinner in January. Cupe and 
I frequently have a reunion here 
(Guilford) by ourselves." 

Harrington, Francis E., State Di- 
rector, State Board of Education, 
State Capitol. Residence: 71 Warren- 
ton Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

Henry, George Rann, Statistician at 
95 Madison Ave., New York City. 
Residence: 950 Stebbins Ave., The 
Bronx, N. Y. C. "Still going strong 
with the same company. Do not make 
much noise, but manager to hold the 
job." Comment — Henry leads the 



class with $1,000 pledged to Alumni 
Fund. Five dollars per month till it's 
paid measures his way of paying it 
up. Who's with him on such a propo- 
sition ? 

Holt, Wm,M.D, Assitant to Supt., 
City Hospital, Providence, R. I. Resi- 
dence: 28 Pinehurst Ave., Providence, 
R. I. Dr. William Holt is in for con- 
gratulations: "Am full time assist- 
ant to Dr. D. L. Richardson, Supt. of 
City Hospital (Providence, R. I.), have 
nine out patient clinics a week and in 
charge of hospital every other night. 
You have my pledge for the Bowdoin 
fund; also have one for my old Prep, 
school. Last but not least, I started 
housekeeping six months ago, so will 
know I can do no more at present." 

Joy, John H., Real Estate and In- 
surance at 24 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 
Residence: 14 Glen Road, Winchester, 
Mass. 

Leigh, Ed. O., Sec'y-Treas. Uni- 
versal Index Tab Co., 435 Central 
Bldg. Residence: 2435 10th Ave., 
West, Seattle, Washington. 

Locke, Herbert Edson, Attorney at 
283 Water St., Augusta, Me. Resi- 
dence: 7 Spring St., Augusta, Maine. 

Marsh, Seward J., Salesman of Na- 
tion City Co., Portland, Maine. Resi- 
dence: 15 Cushman St., Portland, Me. 

MacCormick, W. A., kindly note class 
secretary's new addresses. Home: 20 
Walnut street, Montclair, N. J. Busi- 
ness: 49 Halsey St., Newark, N. J. 
News from the other 85 per cent, of 
the class would be good reading. 

Mitchell, I. Arnett, Head, Academic 
Dept., Southern Univ., Scotlandville, 
La. Residence: 75 Spruce St., Galli- 
polis, Ohio. 

Mores, Edward L., Editor, 15 Ash- 
burton PL, Boston, Mass. Residence: 
159 Warren St., Newton Centre, Mass. 

Purington, E. S., Radio Engineer, 
Cruft Laboratory, Cambridge, Mass. 
Residence: Mechanic Falls, Maine. 

Churchill, Kenneth, M. D., Phy- 
sician, 46 Green St., Lebanon, N. H. 
Residence: Same as above. 

Smith, Frank A., M.D., Physician 
and surgeon at Gorham, Maine. Resi- 
dence: Same as above. Frank A. 
Smith, Jr., arrived Feb. 25, 1921. His 
"old man" writes: "He is very new 
and fresh, Bill, and 8 lbs., well dis- 
tributed, that will be 180 lbs. on a tow 
headed half back at Bowdoin before 
many years." Here's hoping he'll be 



10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



as good as his dad! 

Tibbetts, Geo. A., M.D., at 521 Cum- 
berland Ave., Portland, Maine. Resi- 
dence: Same as above. 

Timberlake, Carl B., Principal of 
High School, Berwick, -Maine. Resi- 
dence: Lancaster, N. H. 

Torrey, Edward Wadsworth, Ac- 
countant, Int. Banking Corp., Shang- 
hai, China. Residence: 11 Kosciusko 
St., Peabody, Mass. Ed. Torrey was 
recently home for a nine months' fur- 
lough but returned to Shanghai in 
February. 

Vannah, H. P., Chemist, Brown Co., 
Berlin, N. H. Residence: Gorham, 
N. J. 

Weston, A. Donald, of Mechanic 
Falls, Maine. 



Campus Activities 



Roderick L. Perkins, of Bartlett. 
N. H., is a graduate of Fryeburg 
Academy and a member of the Beta 
Theta Pi fraternity. In his first year 
he was a member of the U. Q. Society, 
a member of the Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 
and on his class track team. In his 
second year he was assistant man- 
ager of baseball and manager in his 
Junior year. He was on the Procla- 
mation Committee in his Sophomore 
year. He was a member of the 
Varsity Track Squad in his second 
and third years. In his Junior year 
he was on the. Union Governing Board, 
the Board cf Managers, Assistant 
Treasurer of the A. S. B. C, and 
chairman of the Ivy Day Committee. 
He is a member of the Student Coun- 
cil this year and Proctor in South 
Winthrop. He is also a member of 
Abraxas and the "B" Club. He is 
taking his major in Economics. 

M. L. Willson is a member of the 
Psi Upsilon fraternity and a gradu- 
ate of Irving School, Tarrytown, N. Y. 
In his Freshman year he was a mem- 
ber of the U. Q. Society and a mem- 
ber of his class track team. In his 
Junior year he was a member of 
Abraxas, assistant manager of foot- 
ball. He was manager last fall, on 
Varsity Hockey Squad, and vice-presi- 
dent of his class. 

H. F. Simpson, of Tilton, N. H. 
prepared for Bowdoin at Tilton 
Academy. He has had straight A's 
during his college course. He has 
been elected to the Ibis; and is a 



member of the History Club, and of 
the Delta Upsilon fraternity. He is 
making History his major course. 

Albert R. Thayer of Collinsville, 
Conn., is a member of the Zeta Psi 
fraternity and a graduate of Collins- 
ville High School. He was on his 
Class Debating Team in his first and 
second years and has been on the De- 
bating Council for three years. He 
has been a member of the Varsity De- 
bating Team since his Freshman year. 
He won the Intercollegiate Debating 
Medal this year as well as last. He 
was chosen as Ivy orator this year. 
He won a first prize in the Bradbury 
Prize Debate in his first and third 
years and a second prize in his second 
year. He won the Hiland Lockwood 
Fairbanks Prize this year. He was a 
Stanley Plummer speaker this year. 
He is assistant in Economics in which 
subject he is majoring. 

Frederic D. Tootell, of Salem Depot, 
N. H., is a graduate of Salem High 



School. He is a member of the Sigma 
Nu fraternity. Last year he was a 
member of the Varsity Football 
Squad, and a member of his class 
football team. He was also a mem- 
ber of the Varsity Track Squad. This 
year he is a member of the Varsity 
Track Squad and also of his Class 
Track Team. He was high point 
winner of the Freshman-Sophomore 
meet and tied for second place at the 
Interfraternity meet. He is a pre- 
medic student. 

Victor S. Whitman, of Laconia, 
N. H., is a graduate of Laconia High 
School, and a member of Delta Up- 
silon fraternity. Last year he played 
on the Freshman Baseball Team, the 
Second Baseball Team, and on the 
Varsity Hockey Team. This year he 
played on the Sophomore Baseball 
and Football teams, and the Varsity 
Hockey Team; he is a member of the 
Sophomore Hop Committee, and the 
"Bear Skin" Board. 



BOWDOIN 

RAZ-BO 



College men everywhere wear the RAZ-BO. It's the latest style 
feature for young men— the nifitiest, jauntiest bow tie made. 

Just the tie for soft collar or soft shirt with collar attached— and 
convenient—on in a jiffy-it will save many a Chapel cut. 

Made in black and white for Bowdoin Men. 

BE SURE AND GET YOUR BOWDOIN RAZ-BO 
TODAY. 

The Price Only 50c 



PAUL H. UPTON, Agt. 

3 South Maine Hall 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



11 



WILLIAMS' 

Shaving Cream 

for the 
Carefully Groomed Man 




Williams' Shaving Cream gives the 
cleanest possible shave and leaves the 
skin soft, smooth and delighfully re- 
freshed. 

A STUNNING PERFUME-EVERY MAN LIKES IT 

All Brunswick Dealers Carry 
Williams' Shaving Cream. 

THE J. B. WILLIAMS' CO. 
Glastonbury, Conn. 



12 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FORDHAM LAW SCHOOL 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING 



CO-EDUCATIONAL 



CASE SYSTEM 
THREE-YEAR COURSE 



AFTERNOON CLASS 
EVENING CLASS 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 



CHARLES P. DAVIS, Registrar 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING 
NEW YORK CITY 



P. J. MESERVE'S 

Drug Store 
Opposite Town Hall 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 Maine Street 



The Steward Rejoices when his "food crabbers" praise. 

W. N. Clark Co.'s Fancy Canned Fruits and Vegetables 
make them smack their lips. 



THE HOLMES-SWIFT COMPANY 

SOLE AGENTS 



Augusta, 



Maine 



Twenty-third Session of the Summer Term 

of the 

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

JUNE 27-AUGUST 5 

Courses in Chemistry, Economics, Education, English, French, History, 
Latin, Mathematics, Physics, and Spanish. 

Credit is given when courses are completed. Social and athletic activities 
are a feature. 

For Bulletin address 

JAMES S. STEVENS, Director 

ORONO, MAINE 



BOWDOIN CANTEEN 

8 a. m.-12 m.; 1.30-6; 7-11 

Sundays, 12-5 p. m. 

A. PALMER, 19 North Winthrop 



We carry a large assortment of 
, Pickles, Cheese, and Fancy Cookies. 

DAVIS' MARKET 

Next to Star Lunch 

all Cigarettes 



Do You Need Extra Courses? 

Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages, Economics, 
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire 
how credits earned may be applied on present college program. 

uty? Inter0ttg of GUjtrano 



HOME STUDY DEPT. 



CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 



Harvard University 

Graduate School of 
Business Administration 

A two-year course in business 
leading to the degree of Master of 
Business Administration. 

Open to college graduates. 

Courses offered in the following 
fields: Accounting, Business Law, 
Banking and Finance, Marketing, 
Advertising, Retail Store Problems, 
Sales Management, Industrial 
Management, Labor Problems, 
Business Statistics, Foreign Trade, 
Transportation, Lumbering, Office 
Organization. 

Nineteen graduates of Bowdoin 
have attended the School, two dur- 
ing the present year. 

The registration for 1921-'22 is 
limited to three hundred in the 
first-year courses. Applications 
after May 1st should be accom- 
panied by a certified transcript of 
the college record. 

For information write to 
Dean W. B. Donham, University 132 

Harvard Graduate School of 
Business Administration 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 



A. W. HASKELL, D. D. S. 

W. F. BROWN, D. D. S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Postoffice. Brunswick, Maine 



YOU HAVE WRITTEN POEMS! 

Do you care to have them revised 
or constructively criticised by success- 
ful authors ? If you do, then send us 
your manuscript (stories, articles or 
poems). We will criticise, and place 
them should they prove to be accept- 
able for publication. 

There is no actual charge for our 
services. If, however, you have not 
previously enrolled with the advisory 
department of this association, we re- 
quest that you enclose the initial fee 
of two dollars, which we must ask of 
each new contributor. There is no 
additional expense, no further obliga- 
tion. 

It must be realized that we can only 
be of aid to those of serious intent. If 
you do mean to strive for literary suc- 
cess, we can help you in many ways. 
Our services are yours until we have 
actually succeeded in marketing at 
least one of your manuscripts. Send 
something to-day! 

Please enclose return postage with 
your communications. 

NATIONAL LITERARY 

ASSOCIATION 

131 W. 39th St. 

New York City 

Advisory Department 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



13 



CITIZENS LAUNDRY 

College Agent Auto Service 



A SHORTER 

SHORTHAND SYSTEM 
IN TEN EASY LESSONS 

This course covers ten easy lessons 
which will enable the Student, Pro- 
fessor, Journalist, Doctor, Lawyer or 
anyone seeking a professional career, 
to go thru life with 100 per cent 
efficiency. 

THIS COURSE 

Is short and inexpensive, and is 
given with a money back guarantee if 
not satisfied. 

SEND THIS CLIPPING TO-DAY 



Bowdoin Dairy Lunch 

Open Day and Night 



PYRAMID PRESS: PUBLISHERS 

1416 Broadway, 
New York City 

Gentlemen :— Enclosed herewith is $5.00 
for which kindly send me your shorthand 
course in ten easy lessons by mail. It is 
understood that at the end of five days, if 
I am not satisfied my money will be gladly 
refunded. 

Name 

Street 

City and State 



CORDOVAN BOOTS 

IN 

YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 



"Herman's" Tan Cordovan §13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan. .$15.50 
"Florsheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 

TENNIS SHOES, INDOOR AND 

OUTDOOR MOCCASINS, RUBBER 

BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 



OH BOY! 

Have You Tried Our 

49c CHOCOLATES 

There is nothing cheap about our 
place but the price. 

BUTLER'S 



F. W. Chandler & Son 

HAVE 

Tennis Rackets 

from $1.50 to $16.00 each 

Championship Tennis Balls 

60c each 

1 920 Tennis Balls 45 c each 

Baseballs & Baseball Supplies 

25 Kinds of Golf Balls 

Golf Bags and Clubs 

The College Book Store 



INDIVIDUALITY 

— the idea of service to our customers, 
which we try to make a ruling idea in all 
our transactions, is the most important fact 
about our new 

SPORT CLOTHES SHOP 

Here the sportsman will find 
outing apparel of every kind, 
and he can be absolutely sure 
of finding all the new styles 
in materials and novel ar- 
rangements. 



Monument 
Square 




Portland 
Maine 




14 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



DURING THE GAME 

BETWEEN CLASSES 

ON THE HIKE 







A "MUNCH" WHILE STUDYING 

A SNACK BEFORE RETIRING 

IN FACT—EVERY OLD TIME 



STRAW HATS 

Young Men's Sennits 

$3.00, $4.00, $5.00 



White Flannels 

$8.00 



E. S. BODWELL 

& SON 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



SUMMER WORK 

We still have room 
For a few LIVE men 
Provided they want to 
Earn a lot of MONEY 
This summer. 

This isn't a Gamble 

It is a SURE THING 

For the man who HUSTLES 

And besides 

We pay a SALARY. 

NOW is the time 
To get on the Band Wagon 
So see one of our local men 
Or write us direct and 
Ask for the dope. 

Local representatives: 

S. H. .Carter, 24 Winthrop 

Hugh Nixon, D. U. House. 

THE NATIONAL SURVEY CO. 

Topographical Offices, 
Chester Vermont 



JUD, The Barber 

was going to use this space 
but thought it wasn't neces- 
sary. 




CONSERVATIVE CLOTHES 

FOR 

COLLEGE MEN 

In stock and made to measure. 
Imported Fabrics. Lower prices for Spring 1921. 



HASKELL & JONES COMPANY 

PORTLAND .... MAINE 



TUFTS 
COLLEGE 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

Offers to the student who has 
had one year of college training, a 
four year course leading to the de- 
gree of D. M. D. 

Being located in Boston, Tufts 
College Dental School enjoys ex- 
cellent clinical advantages. 

Students in the Dental School 
Course have the privilege of clin- 
ics at the Forsythe Dental Infirm- 
ary, Boston City Hospital, Mass- 
achusetts Homeopathic Hospital, 
Boston Dispensary, Vernon St. 
Hospital, and the Massachusetts 
Home for Feeble-Minded. 

Tufts Dental School is co-edu- 
cational. 

Registration begins at 9 a. m., 
on June 21, and ends on Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

School session begins Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

For further particulars write to 
F. E. Haskins, M. D., Secretary. 

416 Huntington Avenue, 

Boston, Mass. 

WILLIAM RICE, D.M.D., Dean 



Pressing and Cleaning 

ORDERS TAKEN FOR DYEING 

SECOND HAND CLOTHING 

BOUGHT 

DAN ROSEN 




SPUR- A New Narrow 

Arrow 

Collar 

Cluelt.Peabody &.Co.IncTroy. N.Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




YOUR GAME 

Y^HATEVER your "game," whether 
in sport or serious activity, MACUL- 
LAR PARKER CLOTHES lend fin- 
ish to your performance, and are as 
individual as your own way of doing 



things. 



400 WASHINGTON STREET 
The Old House with the Young Spirit 



Bowdoin men are invited to visit our shop 
when in Boston 



BOYS! 



Have you tried our new drink, 

BOWDOIN BREW? 

Our Candy, too, is right through and 
through 

THE SPEAR FOLKS 

119 Maine Street 



CARL H. MARTIN 

Cleansing and Dyeing 
Pressing and Alterations 

4 Elm Street 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. 
Surplus and Profits, $100,000. 
Student Patronage Solicited. 



PRINTING 



of Quality 

Always in the lead 
for snap and style 

Wheeler Print Shop 

Town Building, Brunswick, Maine 



We carry the largest assortment of 

Olives, Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and 
Biscuits of all kinds east of Portland 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street Tel. 136-137 

Branch Store— 2 Gushing St.— Tel. 16 



WRIGHT & DITS0N 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 
Boston 

344 Washington Street 



16 BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CUMBERLAND 

Wednesday and Thursday 
WILLIAM S. HART 

IN 

OMALLEY OF THE MOUNTED 



Friday and Saturday 
VIOLA DANA 

IN 

THE OFFSHORE PIRATE 



Next Week— Monday and Tuesday 
ALICE BRADY 

IN 

THE NEW YORK IDEA 

PASTIME 

Wednesday and Thursday 
BEAU REVEL 



Friday and Saturday 



William Farnum 
The Scuttlers 



Lionel Barrymore 

IN 

The Great Adventure 



Next Week — Monday and Tuesday 
HELIOTROPE 



SPECIAL EDITION FOR THE ALUMNI (FUND 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



3* 



«S 



VOL. LI. 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1921. 



Number 8 



REPORT OF THE ALUMNI ENDOWMENT FUND COMMITTEE 



Bowdoin wishes to extend its thanks 
to all who have so generously con- 
tributed towards its income and en- 
dowment, through the Bowdoin 
Alumni Fund. Your loyalty has 
meant much to the College. 

Bowdoin gave you a welcome and 
an opportunity to grow and to de- 
velop such talents as you may have 
possessed. It matched every dollar 
that you paid it with two of its own 
and spent them all on your welfare 
— not its own. A college lives for 
others. You have probably often 
been glad that it lived one time for 
you. 

Each generation of graduates has 
left the College stronger and richer 
for service because of its investment 
in them. 

THE SITUATION 

This generation of alumni is facing 
its testing time. The world moves 
and so do colleges. Consider these 
figures of funds: Amherst, $3,000,- 
000; Wesleyan, $2,000,000; Smith, $4,- 
000,000; Colby, $600,000. So the 
record goes. 

Bowdoin needs a fund, too, — $600,- 
000. Of this the General Education 
Board will give the last $150,000. 
Bowdoin men, and Bowdoin friends, 
during the past year through the 
Bowdoin Alumni Fund, have given 
or pledged the first $180,000. Two 
hundred and seventy thousand more 
is needed to fill the gap during the 
present year in gifts or pledges pay- 
able by July 1, 1925. 

Four hundred and fifty thousand 
means $200 from each of the 2,200 
alumni. Many can do more. Many 
must do less. You must rate your- 
self. 



© 



NOT A "DRIVE" 

No quotas have been assigned to 
localities or classes. All our dollars 
are volunteers. 

Some localities have, however, 
actually given themselves a quota for 
this Fund. That is the spirit of Bow- 
doin and of the Bowdoin Alumni 
Fund. 

THE BOWDOIN ALUMNI FUND 

Get two things clearly in mind as 
to the meaning of the Bowdoin 
Alumni Fund. In brief it means this: 

1. Many small annual contribu- 
tions to income for current expenses 
with any surplus carried into en- 
dowment. 

2. Gifts as opportunity offers to 
the permanent funds. 

Last year contributions to income 
were particularly emphasized and 
the salary crisis of last year was 
safely met. As a result a new in- 
terest in the College was gained by 
many of the alumni and the biggest 
and best Commencement in its his- 
tory came to Bowdoin last June. 

This year gifts to principal are 
particularly emphasized in order to 
furnish and finish the $600,000 fund 
already so well begun. 

Contributions to income are still 
welcome and needed and any surplus 
of these contributions over current 
needs will go into endowment. 
Twenty-two thousand dollars for pro- 
fessors' salaries and $2,500 for a 
faculty athletic instructor in order 
that Bowdoin may lead the way into 
the really college athletics of the 
future is the current income story of 
the budget. 

Bowdoin means something to you. 
Do you mean something to Bowdoin ? 



For over a century Bowdoin men have 
been doing what they could as they 
could for their college. You know 
that not a cent is wasted in fads or 
fancies. The overhead of the Col- 
lege is absurdly inadequate. Any 
modern business establishment for 
instance would stand aghast at the 
amount of detail exacted of the 
President, Treasurer, and Dean in 
their supervision of the college af- 
fairs with entirely insufficient cleri- 
cal help. 

About 43% of the Alumni have con- 
tributed so far. Each one doing his 
part as he is able will bring the per- 
centage of givers up to nearly 100% 
and will assure the success of the 
Fund. 

Most men plan to leave something 
besides their heirs behind them. This 
modern world has given us a great 
deal in civilization and culture and 
opportunity. Would it not be well to 
leave the world permanently richer 
in return for its gifts to us ? 

Can you leave any wiser or better 
investment — can you more graceful- 
ly express your gratitude for civil- 
ization in general and your education 
in particular — can you leave a more 
permanent memorial — than a gift of 
such amount as you are now able, to 
the endowment of Bowdoin College? 



On the following page you will find 
tabulated in detail the present status 
of our fund as figured by the College 
Treasurer. 

Following this financial table is a 
series of important articles generous- 
ly contributed by men whom you all 
know and esteem. These articles 
state in convincing words the purpose 
and meaning of the fund and the 
vital importance of raising it. 

For the Committee, 

PHILIP DANA '96. 



Total Alumni Fund, Both Endowment and Income, to May 1, 1921 



Unpaid Pledges - 
1922 1923 



Total 



(John Marshall Br 



1861 
1863 
1864 
1866 

1867 

1869 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873 ' 

1874 

1875 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1S78 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

18S4 

1885 

1886 

1887 



i o£ 1875 Endowment) . 



(C. B. Burleigh Memorial). 



1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1895 (Memorial to Ella M. Ingraham). 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 



1902 

1903 

1901 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1907 (Frank G. Weed Memorial). 

1908 

1909 

1909 
1910 
1911 



(Special Fund). 



1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 



$5.00 

35.00 

90.00 

500.00 

370.00 

2.500.00 

240.00 

55.00 

25.00 

1,230.00 

2,800.00 

300.00 

290.00 

180.00 

1,770.00 

435.00 

5,325.00 

25,000.00 

2,502.00 

800.00 

185.00 

2,657.08 

2,420.00 

811.66 

682.00 

587.00 

431.54 

520.00 

70.00 

185.00 

25.00 

346.00 

435.00 

737.00 

471.08 

185.00 

491.00 

1,159.25 

2,665.00 

2,500.00 

4,165.00 

385.50 

2,603.50 

755.00 

1,637.50 

2,623.97 

3,313.00 

2,703.99 



1,2 



1.00 



1,523.50 
613.00 

1,495.00 
50.00 
328.50 
977.00 
500.00 
750.00 
573.00 
710.00 
742.00 
790.50 
266.50 
405.13 
420.00 
180.00 
201.00 
25.00 



25.00 
100.00 



37.50 
75.00 



75.00 
20.00 
25.00 



210.00 
100.00 
50.00 
174.00 



115.00 
65.00 



40.00 
25.00 



$25.00 
500.00 



$2.50 $2.50 
25.00 25.00 



$2.50 
25.00 



300.00 
2,200.00 



2,000.00 

25,000.00 

110.00 



250.00 
50.00 



100.00 
205.00 

35.00 
130.00 

10.00 



505.00 
65.00 



750.00 
1S2.50 
165.00 
171.00 
325.00 
160.00 
470.00 
375.00 
710.00 
335.00 
186.00 
250.00 



237.50 
352.50 



10.00 
130.00 
130.00 
50.00 
82.00 
70.00 
47.00 
45.00 
40.00 
55.00 



25.00 
150.00 

250.00 



.66 



100.00 
75.00 
25.00 
85.00 



50.00 



100.00 
225.00 

35.00 
155.00 

10.00 

10.00 
305.00 

85.00 



1,375.00 
205.00 
665.00 
395.00 
300.00 
370.00 
380.00 
415.00 
860.00 
395.00 
221.00 
460.00 



20.00 
210.00 
175.00 
135.00 
142.00 
78.00 
127.62 
40.00 
75.00 
65.00 
25.00 



20.00 10.00 



300.00 300.00 



100.00 100.00 

50.00 50.00 

1,000.00 1,000.00 



10.00 



25.00 
150.00 
250.00 
181.66 
100.00 
75.00 
25.00 



50.00 



100.00 
225.00 

35.00 
155.00 

10.00 

10.00 
305.00 

85.00 



1,275.00 
165.00 
665.00 
395.00 
300.00 
360.00 
380.00 
415.00 
860.00 
360.00 
221.00 
360.00 



245.00 245.00 

307.50 297.50 



20.00 
210.00 
140.00 
135.00 
142.00 

78.00 
133.25 

40.00 

75.00 



100.00 

50.00 

1,000.00 



25.00 

250.00 
165.00 
100.00 

75.00 
25.00 
85.00 



50.00 



100.00 
75.00 
10.00 

155.00 
10.00 
10.00 

305.00 
85.00 



1,250.00 
115.00 
665.00 
395.00 
300.00 
300.00 
380.00 
615.00 
845.00 
172.00 
221.00 
260.00 



245.00 
202.50 



20.00 
160.00 
85.00 
110.00 
117.00 
78.00 
102.00 
30.00 
50.00 
65.00 
25.00 



50.00 
1,000.00 



250.00 
165.00 

75.00 
25.00 
85.00 



100.00 
45.00 
10.00 

155.00 
10.00 
10.00 

305.00 
85.00 

1,250.00 
115.00 
645.00 
355.00 
100.00 

360.00 
555.00 
620.00 
85.00 
221.00 
260.00 

100.00 
182.50 

20.00 
155.00 
70.00 
35.00 
117.00 
78.00 
62.00 
30.00 
45.00 
55.00 
25.00 



$15.00 

160.00 

90.00 

1,000.00 

370.00 

2,500.00 

300.00 

55.00 

25.00 

2.730.00 

5,000.00 

300.00 

290.00 

185.00 

2,170.00 

635.00 

12,325.00 

50,000.00 

2,652.00 

800.00 

335.00 

2,957.08 

3,770.00 

1,554.98 

982.00 

912.00 

531.54 

860.00 

70.00 

385.00 

25.00 

846.00 

1,210.00 

862.00 

1,221.08 

235.00 

531.00 

2,921.75 

3,145.00 

2,500.00 

10,140.00 

1,188.00 

5,433.50 

2,466.00 

3,172.50 

3,913.97 

5.333.00 

5,252.99 

5,177.00 

2,985.50 

1,748.00 

3,085.00 

50.00 

1,401.00 

2,954.50 

840.00 

1,438.00 

1,310.00 

1,207.00 

1,390.50 

663.50 

877.00 

645.00 

490.00 

506.00 

125.00 



Other gifts, $14,927.00 fron 



$92,035.20 
nds of Bowdoin. 



1,291.50 $36,973.50 $11,060.28 $10,725.90 $9,830.00 



$8,333.00 $171,249.39 
14,927.00 



During the weeks of May 2 and May 9 $15,625.04 has been given or pledged. 

Notice— Pledge blanks are printed in this issue with the hope that all who have not pledged will do go promptly. 



Total, $186,176.39 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The Purpose of the Fund 

Ut Aquila — 

Once more Bowdoin College appeals 
to her alumni and friends for aid in 
time of need. If the work of the 
College is not to be seriously cur- 
tailed in the next few years, we must 
have an additional yearly income of 
at least $25,000. We have already 
committed ourselves to an adequate 
salary scale and we cannot allow the 
physical property of the College to 
deteriorate. The College has a na- 
tional reputation for doing sound 
work and for training men well. The 
necessity for more funds is so patent 
that he who runs may read. Had it 
not been for the substantial but by 
no means permanently adequate raise 
in salaries made last Commencement, 
we should have lost several of our 
best instructors. The primary pur- 
pose of the College is to educate 
youth. The quality and character of 
instruction is the best means of judg- 
ing whether or not a college is ful- 
filling its function. It is impossible 
to run a college in 1921 on a budget 
that would have been generous for 
1911. Furthermore, we greatly need 
the added interest that a large num- 
ber of contributions from very many 
friends makes. 

We do not desire to expand, and 
we have set our face rigidly against 
inflation. The College is run on 
sound business principles and pre- 
sents its record and its accomplish- 
ment as warrant for similar care in 
the future. At a Commencement 
dinner some years ago General Hub- 
bard, the greatest benefactor the Col- 
lege ever had, stated in very simple 
language that he was glad to con- 
tribute himself to the College and to 
urge his friends to contribute also 
because he had convinced himself by 
personal investigation that the trust 
funds were well managed and that 
the College was doing its business 
and educating youth soundly and un- 
pretentiously. 

To day we make our appeal to all 
those who believe in the small college 
with New England traditions unim- 
paired on the same grounds that 
actuated General Hubbard in his gen- 
erous gifts. 

KENNETH C. M. SILLS. 



My Personal 

Appreciation 

Of Bowdoin 



Strictly speaking, to appreciate 
is to recognize the value of an ob- 
ject. The world at large, as well as 
every Bowdoin alumnus, recognizes, 
in a general way, that the college has 
more than ordinary value as an edu- 
cational institution and as a power- 
ful factor in the progress of civiliza- 
tion and humanity. Every alumnus, 
however, is naturally influenced in 
his appraisal of the college by senti- 
ments of association and loyalty. He 
must, therefore, specially guard him- 
self against this influence in express- 
ing his opinion. In no event can an 
accurate appreciation be formed un- 
less some standard of valuation is 
adopted. By what token, then, may 
the value of a college be recognized ? 

The value of a college as an edu- 
cational institution lies not so much 
in the extent and variety of learning 
which it seeks to impart as in its 
success in developing in its alumni 
a capacity to apply what is taught 
to the conditions of after-life, — a 
desire to continue to learn, ability 
to think straight, courage to act 
upon one's convictions, and to one's 
own self be true. Judged by 
this test, it seems to me Bowdoin 
is pre-eminent. It produces sturdy 
men and sturdy minds. It lays the 
broadest foundation for intellectual 
development, yet, at the same time, 
avoids those extremes of speculative 
refinements which can not be put 
into practice, and which hamper, 
rather than aid, intellectual expan- 
sion. I think Ingersoll somewhere 
said that a college is a place where 
pebbles are polished and diamonds 
are dimmed. This is not so at Bow- 
doin. Pebbles, if such there be, are 
sifted out if too small, and, if large 
enough to serve some purpose in the 
conglomerate of life, have their 
angles rubbed off. Diamonds — and 
there are many of them — are so cut 
along their natural planes as to be 
best adapted to receive the polishing 
which postgraduate contact with the 
world alone can give. In short, the 
value of the college, to my mind, lies 
principally in the fact that it pro- 
duces healthy minds in healthy bodies 



— the essence of education in the 
highest sense of the word. Bowdoin 
fosters and inculcates ideals, yet 
gives due recognition to the fact 
that these ideals must be pursued 
amid the everyday, practical condi- 
tions of a world, which, while never 
wholly bad, can never be made wholly 
good. It seems to me that the trend 
of modern education is to overlook 
the fact that knowledge without 
sanity and sense is quite as likely 
to become an influence for evil as 
for good. I predicate the pre-emi- 
nent worth of Bowdoin largely upon 
the fact that the college stands out 
as one which has not been led astray 
by this sinister tendency in the 
modern system of education. 

E. U. CURTIS '82. 



Bowdoin Spirit 

You men who fought so hard to 
keep the sophs from stopping the 
chapel bell which told of your fresh- 
man victory; who have won clean cut 
athletic contests; fought with won- 
derful grit or cheered a crippled 
team that did not know the word de- 
feat; who remember the teams trained 
by true sportsmen (like Ross Mc- 
Clave) who stuck to your Whittier 
Field motto. 

You fellows who were under the 
efficient, scholarly guidance of noble 
men of the faculty, men of inspiring 
example who will always live in our 
hearts, you will never forget how as 
undergraduates you watched your 
first Commencement procession, 
thrilled with pride and inspiration at 
the sight of that long line of splendid 
men. 

You who have loafed around the 
ends on those early, lazy spring days, 
strolled across the campus Ivy Day, 
browsed around those beautiful build- 
ings some rainy afternoons, dozed 
off during study hours on a cold 
winter night in a warm room of the 
ends, sang the old college songs and 
fraternity marches with a lively crowd 
of brothers after supper, assisted 
King Mike (on bended knee) to spring 
a cake, or receive the Royal Kiss; 
been awakened some early spring 
morning by Joe Boyd's noisy lawn 
mower, that was so well lubricated 
with tobacco juice. Maybe you gath- 
ered in a crowded room the night 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



before exams while one of the "Few 
Better Cribbers" stuffed your heads 
with knowledge sufficient to help you 
swim safely through one of the 
trials of college life. These mem- 
ories make vivid the association of 
beloved room-mate, jolly class mates, 
and loyal fighting team mates. 

Your college expenses may have 
caused you no worry, but some fel- 
lows could not have gone through 
the best college in the world if that 
institution had not been kind to the 
poor man. Tuition and general ex- 
penses have always been low at Bow- 
doin in comparison with the actual 
cost to the college. It is desired 
to keep it a place where poor as 
well as rich can have all the ad- 
vantages offered. Perhaps your boy 
may have to help himself or you may 
know some boy of limited means 
who should go to Bowdoin. You want 
all these fellows to enjoy what you 
enjoyed, to have the same chance 
you had; then to make this possible 
we must do our utmost to keep Bow- 
doin a college where the poor man 
can get an education, social life, ath- 
letic training, noblest tradition, and a 
preparation for life fit for a prince. 
Bowdoin up and hands in your 
pocketbooks. 

FRANK A. SMITH '12. 



them that what the College most de- 
sires is participation to some extent 
by all rather than large gifts by a 
few. Our College is crying for help 
and every loyal son, young and old, 
should rush to her rescue by giving 
the maximum he personally can af- 
ford. 

SHERMAN N. SHUMWAY '17. 



The Younger Alumni 

Bowdoin College is passing through 
a great crisis and if she is to main- 
tain the same position she has held 
in the past, of which we have all 
been so proud, it means that each 
and every one of us must take off 
his coat and go to work. Today as 
never before there is a demand for 
college-trained men. Bowdoin in the 
past has fulfilled her obligation by 
giving her sons as thorough and as 
inspiring a training as could be had, 
but today the burden rests upon us 
to enable her to continue to do so. 
We cannot, as Bowdoin men, permit 
her standards to be lowered. There 
is but one way to prevent it, and that 
is for all of us to 'Give! Give! Give! 
until it hurts.' To the younger 
alumni who have the will to give but 
feel themselves unable to contribute 
to the extent which they desire and 
of which the older men are capable, 
there need be only a word to remind 



Financial Policy 

I have been asked to write a few 
lines relating to the financial con- 
dition and methods of the College. 
I shall do so on broad lines, and 
without encumbering the statement 
with any detailed figures. Those can 
be obtained from the Treasurer's re- 
ports by any one who desires them. 
The income-bearing funds of the 
College, applicable to general pur- 
poses, (not including scholarship and 
other restricted funds), amount to 
something more than two million 
dollars. That is far less than 
enough to meet our constant needs. 
That it is insufficient to meet the 
needs of the College for its present 
activities, and the present salaries of 
the teaching force is proved by the 
fact that every year it is necessary 
to draw upon the capital for a sum 
varying in amount, but averaging 
more than ten thousand dollars, to 
balance the books. In the past a con- 
siderable share of the deficit has been 
due to the drain by the Medical 
School. Although that drain will 
cease with the closing of the school, 
it is hopeless to expect that the 
deficit will be less in the future, un- 
less either the College makes its 
past the measure of its future use- 
fulness and continues its meagre 
scale of salaries, or greatly increases 
its endowment. We all admit that a 
College must expand and broaden it- 
self if it is to be worthy of con- 
tinued life. Indeed, a college that 
has attained its growth is already 
beginning to die. 

The funds of the College are ad- 
ministered by the Finance Committee 
of Trustees and Overseers. Three of 
the four members constituting the 
committee are bankers and trustees, 
experienced in the handling of trust 
funds. Their policy is conservatively 
progressive. They neither tie up the 
funds in securities paying extremely 
low rates, on the theory that they are 



the only safe investments, nor take 
risks by investing in bonds that 
promise large returns but offer doubt- 
ful security. Every change of invest- 
ment, and every reinvestment of 
funds falling due, is fully discussed; 
and it has long been the rule of the 
committee that no purchase of securi- 
ties is made unless the vote of the 
committee is unanimous. Conditions 
in the financial world have lately 
been favorable for an increase of in- 
come from funds, and the committee 
has taken advantage of it so far as 
was possible and wise. In a quarter 
of a century there have been very 
few losses by default of companies 
whose bonds the College held; and 
there has been no loss of that sort 
on any investment made within the 
last ten years. 

The problem how to ensure the 
growth of the College and neverthe- 
less to "make ends meet" is one for 
the alumni and friends of Bowdoin. 
Money is not all that is required, 
but it will go a long way toward 
solving the problem, and every dol- 
lar contributed to the alumni fund 
will render the final solution easier. 
EDWARD STANWOOD '61. 



Bowdoin Graduates 



The Quality and Temper of the Men 

Bowdoin is Contributing to 

the Country. 



Knowing of my anxiety to have 
Buffalo represented among the under- 
graduates of Bowdoin, a couple of 
young men asked me the other day 
my reasons for recommending it. I 
replied that Bowdoin's specialty was 
making men of high character and 
training them for success in the 
world's work. 

Although the rule of higher educa- 
tion has always been discipline, Bow- 
doin enlarges the application of the 
system by giving each individual the 
personal, magic touch that fits him for 
outside life. The modest and sensi- 
tive as well as the careless and for- 
getful, unfold beneath its influence. 
It not only guides the mind of the 
undergraduate in the studies which 
he shall pursue, but it disciplines the 
irrepressible tendencies of youth into 
a motor that makes for high ideals. 
Reality displaces dreamy, castle- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



building thoughts, and they come to 
know as undergraduates that real 
work is the only source of real pleas- 
ure and certain success. As gradu- 
ates they take with them the Bow- 
doin spirit and the Bowdoin pluck, 
and at once begin to strive for the 
best in honors, in position, and in 
power, and to insist upon administer- 
ing affairs better than anyone else. 

And how well they fulfil their 
promise is attested by the fulness of 
their lives. In proof of this, it is 
with a bit of pride that we often 
mention a few names selected from 
a long list of distinguished alumni 
who have given the College character 
and distinction from the time of its 
birth. Hawthorne and Longfellow; 
Sargeant S. Prentiss, of whose elo- 
quence Daniel Webster declared: "No 
one can equal it;" Jonathan Cilley, 
the fearless, who preferred death in 
a duel than bow the knee to slavery; 
George Evans, of whom Mr. Blaine 
said: "As a debater he is entitled to 
rank next to Mr. Webster;" George 
B. Cheever, the eloquent divine, whom 
President Lincoln sent to England to 
interpret the cause and the purpose 
of the Civil War; William Pitt Fes- 
senden, caustic and stern, who, in Sen- 
ate and Cabinet, found no superior, 
and few if any equals; Egbert C. 
Smythe, the divine seer, the accom- 
plished scholar, who could respond in 
an extemporaneous speech in Latin; 
Franklin Pierce, President of the 
United States; Melvin W. Fuller, Chief 
Justice of the United States Supreme 
Court; Thomas B. Reed, the peerless 
Speaker; Robert E. Peary, the in- 
vincible traveller to the North Pole; 
William Le Baron Putnam, New Eng- 
land's ideal judge; and Henry John- 
son, the beloved teacher, who gave us 
the latest and best translation of 
Dante. 

But these alumni are not ex- 
ceptional. Hundreds of others of like 
character, if not so widely known, are 
now scattered over the country. Ob- 
servation rather than hearsay attest 
the truth of this statement. During 
fourteen years of service on a Com- 
mittee of Congress, my duties took 
me into every section of the country, 
and wherever I found Bowdoin men 
they were among the most active, re- 
spected citizens, adorning journalism, 
medicine, schools, colleges, the pulp't. 



the bar, the library, and every depart- 
ment of industrialism. Especially 
were they leaders in benevolent enter- 
prise, and in everything which pro- 
motes the culture and the art re- 
sources of the town. In a word, they 
belong to the progressive, aggressive, 
forceful factors who do things. In 
critical situations, political, religious, 
or social, they are never found on the 
fence. Their flag is nailed to the 
fundamental principles learned in the 
classic, historic shades of old Bow- 
doin, which possesses the priceless 
legacy of more than a century of con- 
tribution to the highest statemanship, 
the deepest research, the most inspir- 
ing spirituality, and the most valuable 
work in every department of human 
endeavor. For none of them did the 
clock strike twelve when they received 
their diplomas. 

It is to this body of virile alumni 
that the College now appeals with 
confidence to secure the greatly 
needed conditional gift so generously 
offered by the General Education 
Board. I say with confidence because 
Bowdoin men never fail. That word 
is not found in Bowdoin's dictionary; 
but the immortal axiom of Captain 
David Crockett, "Pick your flint and 
try again," is familiar. With this 
spirit they have met every crisis in 
the history of their country. When 
the summons came to preserve the 
Union, they rushed to the colors, set- 
ting in Bowdoin's firmament a bril- 
liant star cluster. The jewels in 
Orion's belt never shone more bright- 
ly than does the galaxy in Bowdoin's 
Memorial Hall, marshalled by the in- 
trepid Howard and Chamberlain and 
Hubbard and Spear. 

In a similar manner was the Bow- 
doin spirit exhibited in the World 
War. Even when some, for paltry 
reasons, were denied preliminary 
training in the officers' camps, they 
quickly volunteered as privates and 
graduated in the Argonne Forest with 
the high honors that belong only to 
immortal achievement. Who has not 
heard of Major William Dunning Ire- 
land and Lieutenant-Colonel Sherman 
Nelson Shumway, whose cool courage 
added tremendously to the proud 
record of their comrades, who form 
another clearly defined constellation 
in the Bowdoin heavens. 

It is incredible that this spirit of 



self-sacrifice can now desert us in 
the hour of our Alma Mater's great 
need. We admit the bigness of the 
stunt. As one contemplates it alone 
in the sleepless hours of the night it 
tends to discouragement. The prophet 
Elijah had similar forebodings when, 
overwhelmed with the responsibility 
of restoring the worship of Jehovah, 
he complained that "I, even I only, 
am left." But he soon learned that 
Jehovah expected him to do only one 
man's work, since seven thousand 
other prophets, as consecrated as him- 
self, still lived. So we, whose in- 
comes scarcely come within reach of 
a Government tax, will find help 
enough to complete the endowment, 
provided each gives according to his 
means. Don't let assumed inability 
blind us. To the College the need 
is as great as was America to the 
world's civilization, and every alum- 
nus should make a personal sacrifice 
for the dear old mother. Send in a 
subscription if it be only for five dol- 
lars. Then "pick your flint and try 
again," adding two or three ciphers. 
We've got five years in which to pay 
it. Not to make some subscription 
will be a confession of life's failure, 
and no Bowdoin man thus far has 
ever approached the scrap-heap. 
D. S. ALEXANDER '70, 

Buffalo, New York. 



The Academic Problem 



Bowdoin is a college that is living 
up to her past by trying to realize 
the best educational ideals of the 
present. She has not yielded to the 
lure of large numbers. She has not 
sought to attract by the familiar de- 
vices of lowered requirements and 
abnormally developed intercollegiate 
athletics. But neither has she been 
content to abide by the aims and 
methods of past college generations 
where experience has suggested pos- 
sible betterment. She has realized 
that it is no longer enough that she 
give merely the preliminary training 
that men bound for the professional 
schools must have, or the courses 
that assure a "gentleman's educa- 
tion" to men of undetermined bent. 
Grafted to the ancient and sturdy 
stock of her well-tried classical cur- 
riculum are new branches for ripen- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ing the business man. Through the 
commoner languages, ancient or mod- 
ern, through mathematics, natural 
sciences, history and philosophy, the 
student may progress, not only to 
higher branches of these funda- 
mentals, but to mechanical drawing 
and surveying, to Spanish and Rus- 
sian, to concrete problems of state 
and local government, to contempor- 
ary politics, or to business law. 
Courses such as these highly 
specialized, yet drawing their sap 
from the old roots, give a new and 
specially developed fruit. And the 
fruit, whether old or new, does not 
lack bloom. For, with the develop- 
ment of what modern utilitarianism 
and efficiency demand, the college has 
not lost sight of that other side of 
education which men regard more in 
later than in earlier life, the so- 
called cultural side, which teaches 
not so much how to acquire as to 
enjoy. She is giving to her under- 
graduates wide facilities for learning 
to appreciate the best in literature, 
in music and in pictorial art. The 
dean would see no inconsistency in a 
schedule which included at once 
Latin, musical appreciation and busi- 
ness law. 

But the College stands above all 
for soundness in the fundamentals; 
and her great task is to see that 
such soundness is maintained. Its 
maintenance of course demands 
policy and resources. Policy in 
academic matters must emanate from 
a scholarly president, advised and 
supported by a cabinet of faculty 
members who, by the very princi- 
ples governing their choice, may be 
relied upon to stand for soundness. 
With these things the college has 
been, and still is, most fortunately 
endowed. No faculty vacancy is 
filled until the country has been 
scoured for the best man to be had 
at the price which the college can 
afford to pay; for a man whose 
training forbids the easy relapse into 
slip-shod "popular" education, and 
who brings with him the standards 
and methods of some acknowledged 
leaders in his field. 

But this raises the question of 
resources, since many college presi- 
dents with largely increased re- 
sources to command are searching 
for instructors of the proper type to 



teach their growing numbers of un- 
dergraduates. Nor is the supply of 
good instructors adequate to the de- 
mand. The labor market of college 
teaching is only too well supplied 
with unskilled, inefficienc workers; 
but skilled men, men with brains and 
training that make them something 
better than phonographs, and with 
personality that raises them from the 
ranks of dreary pedagogues, seem to 
grow scarcer every day. Those who 
are to be found do not stand with 
straws in their mouths waiting to be 
hired. They must be sought at auc- 
tion in the open market, in a market 
that is nation-wide and in which the 
richest buyer, he who bids highest 
in salaries, sabbaticals, and oppor- 
tunities for research work, will carry 
off most of the few real prizes to 
be had. Bowdoin, with wise and 
genial presidents, with fine traditions, 
a well stocked library, and a pleasant 
college life, has bid successfully to 
the present time against colleges bet- 
ter placed financially. One may pre- 
dict with every confidence that her 
alumni and her friends will not allow 
increasing financial handicaps to rob 
her of her honorable place. 

Stray Thoughts On 

The Alumni Fund 



By this time every Bowdoin man 
knows what the Bowdoin Alumni 
Fund is and what purpose it is de- 
signed to serve. As finances are the 
sinews of war in the Nation, so they 
are the sinews of peace in the Col- 
lege. The College did not ask us to 
pay for our education when we got 
it. It made us merely a nominal 
charge for service rendered and sent 
us out into the world to support the 
responsibility of showing our con- 
temporaries what manner of man 
Bowdoin fashioned. Many of us un- 
fortunately have not grown rich. 
Many of us unhappily do not seem 
likely to get rich. And yet do we 
often stop to realize what propor- 
tion of the modest pittances we earn 
comes from the training we got al- 
most gratuitously in College? Of 
course some men will say, "Our Col- 
lege days were wasted, we should 
have done better to go from school 
to work." Well, if men honestly 



think the College is not doing a use- 
ful work, then the College asks them 
for nothing. They are conscientious 
objectors and should be exempt. But 
I do not think the world is fond of 
conscientious objectors. They dwell, 
somehow, under rather a shadow; 
they are not mentioned in the 
Beatitudes. The thing one notices 
about the Conscientious Objector is 
generally not his Conscience but his 
Objections. The non-objector gives 
more to the world with no impairment 
of his conscience. 

Few men, I think, will care to be 
Conscientious Objectors to the Alumni 
Fund. But they will ask why they 
must give and they have a right to 
know. I want to suggest a few rea- 
sons. Permit me first an example 
from abroad. 

A graduate of Oxford University 
pays a fixed sum annually for the 
privilege of being carried as a gradu- 
ate on the books of the University 
and an additional fixed sum for the 
privilege of being carried as a gradu- 
ate on the books of his particular 
college in the University. These an- 
nual payments may be commuted for 
a life membership or else the gradu- 
ate may be dropped from the college 
books. In other words, by receiving 
a degree from the University one be- 
comes ipso facto a member, so to 
speak, of the Oxford Graduates' Club 
and subject to payment of dues as 
such, though there is no tangible 
club of this sort in existence. The 
membership for which one pays is 
really a membership in the invisible 
fraternity of Oxford men. 

It seems to me this analogy of the 
club puts the fund in its proper per- 
spective. And the Bowdoin system is 
at once fairer and harsher than the 
Oxford system because the Bowdoin 
system makes every man the judge 
of his own capacity to pay the dues. 
And honourable men being judges in 
their own cause should lean over 
backwards against themselves. 

After all, what a great and in- 
spiring thing it is when one comes 
to think of it, this invisible fraternity 
of Bowdoin men. One can feel its 
existence at all times, but perhaps 
most vividly at Commencement when 
the procession winds its way up to 
the Chapel with Gowns and giay 
hairs and all the dignity of accom- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



plishment at its head, then middle 
age in all its vigour and competence 
and the scarce graduated youngster 
in the rear to catch from elder broth- 
ers the inspiration of those who have 
trod the path before. And even the 
youngest class is enriched by some 
unseen presence. They never fail us 
in the hours of our companionship. 

What is the price at which we 
assess the College's significance to us ? 
Ask him in the forward rank to part 
with his memory of Smyth and Young 
and Packard. Ask him to forget the 
ponderous hewgag in the palmy days 
of Sodom and Gomorrah and the epic 
tradition of Gul Allen who 

Swamavit the Androscoggin 
Snappoo, Snappoo 
Snappooter, Snappeter 
Snappanteryteter, Snappoo. 

Inquire further along the line of 
the first race of the immortal Tri- 
angle, the victories of the river, the 
comradeships of the gridiron, the 
triumphs of the Delta. Ask a later 
generation of Henry Johnson, Chap- 
man and Robinson and Lee. Have 
they been forgotten ? Does no one re- 
call that serene, almost saint-like, per- 
sonality who taught us "A man's a 
man for a' that" and told us as our 
undergraduate days were drawing to 
a close 

"Go, lose or conquer as you can : 
But if you fail, or if you rise 
Be each, pray God, a Gentleman." ■ 

If these memories are all dead, the 
Alumni Fund does not matter. If 
they are living memories, then let us 
ask ourselves, Are like memories to 
be perpetuated through the years for 
generations yet unborn ? And if so, 
are we to ask the men who devote 
their lives to the training of our 
heirs and successors in this world's 
burdens to work at stipends such as 
no other employer would have the 
temerity to offer? 

But perhaps you say this idea 
of a great invisible fraternity to 
which and for the perpetuation 
of which we are asked to pay 
dues is a sentimental idea. Then 
let us see what the College has really 
given us. After all what dis- 
tinguishes the Bowdoin man of today 
from the Neanderthal man of the 
day before yesterday? It is not so 



much a matter of the cephalic index 
as it is a matter of human experi- 
ence. The Bowdoin man has the ac- 
cumulated wisdom of humanity 
(which is human experience) placed 
at his finger tips or rather at his 
retina by a few under-valued people 
we call the Faculty. Look at what 
the College does for us from that 
point of view. The College might 
make a charge of say a thousand dol- 
lars a term for the privileges of 
Hubbard Hall and still be giving 
value received many times over. And 
the men entrusted with the great task 
of passing on this priceless heritage 
of experience might be the highest 
paid men in the country without any 
impropriety. And yet the College 
exacts nothing or next to nothing 
for the privileges of its library and 
pays its faculty less than the rail- 
roads have lately been paying their 
engineers. Can anybody say it is 
fair to treat teachers in this way? 
And if the present College Endow- 
ment does not permit us to treat 
teachers in any other way, (which 
it does not) then there is but one an- 
swer. Raise the endowment. There 
is but one means to that end now 
apparent. That is the formed habit 
of steady annual giving from every 
living alumnus according to his 
capacity. 

Our gifts elsewhere are charity. 
Our gifts to Bowdoin are a repay- 
ment. 

ROBERT HALE '10. 



New York Alumni Get Busy 

The work of the New York and 
New Jersey Regional Committee for 
the Alumni Fund is well under way 
and every effort is being made to put 
the drive over successfully. The ob- 
jective is to get subscriptions from 
100% of the men in this territory, 
and the advance has been planned so 
that no Bowdoin man could escape 
even if he wanted to. "Pledges From 
100%" is our battle cry. 

The machinery works something 
like this: First, a letter has been 
sent to every Bowdoin man in the 
territory explaining the drive and, by 
the use of subtle words that "sing to 
the pocketbook," urging him to sub- 
scribe generously and to return his 
pledge promptly. Next comes the 



"follow up" program. The Alumni 
list for New York and New Jersey 
has been divided up and each com- 
mitteeman has been given the names 
of a number of men for whom he is 
responsible. If after a week the 
initial letter does not bring any re- 
sponse, the follow-up man gets on 
the job. He begins with a personal 
note or a ring on the wire just as 
a reminder to get that subscription 
blank started on the way. If after an- 
other week no results have been ob- 
tained the follow-up man must see 
his man personally and not leave till 
he has landed him securely on the 
dotted line. This means has been de- 
vised to secure a pledge from every 
man, and it is working out success- 
fully. The committee is at present 
on the "follow-up" and a general 
check-up of results is planned for 
about June 1st. 

The committee for New York and 
New Jersey consists of Henry Hill 
Pierce '96 (Chairman), Fred H. Albee 
'99, De Alva S. Alexander '70, Lau- 
rence A. Crosby '15, John W. Frost 
'04, Harvey D. Gibson '02, Frank H. 
L. Hargraves '16, Roscoe H. Hupper 
'07, Phillips Kimball '07, William M. 
Lawrence '98, Harrison K. McCann '02, 
Hugh A. Mitchell '19, Hoyt A. Moore 
'95, George T. Ordway '£6, Charles D. 
Robbing '11, Donald S. Walker '04, 
George R. Walker '02, Harrison At- 
wood '09, Secretary, Room 1318, 61 
Broadway, New York. 

At one of the recent meetings of 
this committee the desirability was 
discussed of bringing Bowdoin more 
closely to the notice of wealthy men 
generally, particularly those without 
any college affiliation, and of getting 
them interested in our college. It 
was suggested that a concerted effort 
in this direction would be materially 
aided by a booklet telling the Bow- 
doin story. Such a booklet should 
be made up in an attractive style and 
no pains should be spared to make it 
the finest possible piece of work of its 
sort. It must be of "The McCann 
Quality" is the suggestion. It should 
be of dimensions great enough to in- 
sure its commanding the attention of 
the man who receives it, and should 
perhaps deal with the founders of 
Bowdoin, some of our many tra- 
ditions, our Presidents, Longfellow, 
Hawthorne, the famous Class of 1825, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



our Arctic explorers, and contain a 
bit about our campus and buildings. 

It was thought better, however, 
rather than to dwell at any length 
upon the material aspects of the Col- 
lege, to recount the work she has 
done, to tell of her democratic spirit, 
of her high standard of work and 
sportsmanship, of the record of her 
graduates, of her ideals and her 
future. 

No definite plan for the publica- 
tion of this booklet has been pro- 
posed. It is at present simply a sug- 
gestion of a suitable means of pub- 
licity which can perhaps be used to 
advantage. The "Orient" offers an 
opportunity of putting this thought 
before the College and the Alumni, 
and it is hoped that it will bring 
forth some expression of opinions 
and ideas for the execution of this 
work. 

HUGH A. MITCHELL '19. 



Facts To Be Considered 



The campaign of American colleges 
for endowment funds is due chiefly 
to the recent shrinkage in the value 
of the dollar. It is an act of recon- 
struction, an adjustment to new con- 
ditions. 

A high type of industrial de- 
mocracy, such as that of America, is 
dependent for its existence upon the 
presence throughout its ranks of a 
large number of highly educated men. 
To produce these men is a primary 
function of our colleges, especially 
of colleges like Bowdoin. In fact 
America at present recognizes no 
other agency as capable of perform- 
ing this indispensable service. 

Our civilization is based on the 
principle of the freedom of thought 
and its expression, on the belief that 
only in the freest competition of 
ideas good and bad is healthy prog- 
ress to be expected, and further on 
the faith that on the whole and in 
the long run we shall be able to per- 
ceive and accept what is good and 
to reject what is bad. But the in- 
dividual is beset by currents of 
thought and opinion so multitudinous, 
so complex, so bewildering, that only 
under the guidance of well trained 
minds can he hope to find the prob- 
able truth in a given problem of 
social or political importance. 



To produce broad-minded critics, 
equipped to analyze and appraise 
these conflicting ideas, these currents 
of thought and opinion, to train up 
men with well-furnished and re- 
sourceful minds to take positions of 
leadership in all phases of our com- 
plex national life is a necessary duty 
of our nation — and this duty must 
inevitably be performed by the col- 
lege. 

The question before us is, shall 
Bowdoin College do its part in this 
vital work? In the past and down 
to the recent present it has made to 
the leadership of our American life 
contributions which can be character- 
ized only as phenomenal. Shall it 
now receive the support which is 
obviously necessary, if the college is 
to continue to deliver to the country 
its fair share of strong men? 



alumni Department 



Commencement Reunions 



CLASS OF 1896 



' The Class of 1896 will hold its 25th 
reunion at Commencement and Class 
Secretary John Clair Minot of Boston 
reports that he expects an attendance 
of at least thirty members, which was 
the mark reached at both the 10th 
and 20th reunions. For that matter, 
this class has had a reunion every 
year, with anywhere from half a 
dozen or more at the dinner. The 
class has forty living members. Six 
have died since graduation. 

The headquarters of the class this 
year, as five years ago, will be at 
the home of Mrs. Woodward, 11 Noble 
Street. The class dinner will be held 
at New Meadows Inn early Wednes- 
day evening, June 22nd. The class 
has had its reunion dinner at the same 
place ever since the Inn was built 
about twenty years ago. It is ex- 
pected that a clam-bake on the Harps- 
well shore will also be a feature of 
the week. Many members of the class 
will bring their wives and the ladies 
will participate in this part of the 
program. Webber will take a picture 
of the class under the Thorndike Oak, 
Thursday morning, after the class has 
marched in the Commencement pro- 
cession. 

Distance is likely to keep some 



members of '96 from the reunion, 
as three are now in foreign countries, 
and two live in California. Five pres- 
ent undergraduates at Bowdoin are 
sons of members of 1896. 

Class of 1916 



The Class of 1916 will celebrate its 
fifth reunion this Commencementr 
The class has engaged a house on 
Cleaveland Street for G. H. Q. and 
will be "at home" to other classes 
on Wednesday afternoon of Com- 
mencement week. The program in- 
cludes the usual reunion parade with 
uniforms that are unusual, and a 
shore dinner at Dingley's Island. 

The committee in charge of the 
fifth is composed of Foster, Ireland, 
Wood, Bruce, Chase, Hawes, Bird, 
Edwards, and Sayward. 



The Bowdoin Alumni Association of 
Androscoggin County contributed 
fifty dollars towards the fund that 
Bates College is raising to send its 
debating team to England to debate 
against Oxford. 

1898 — On Thursday evening, May 
19, Donald B. MacMillan delivered a 
lecture at the Copley-Plaza, under 
the auspices of the Massachusetts- 
Maine Daughters. This is Professor 
MacMillan's last lecture before his 
long exploration trip to Baffin Land. 
He is to start in July in his new 
schooner, the "Bowdoin." 

The students of Worcester Academy 
have purchased a steering wheel 
which they will present to Donald B. 
MacMillan for his new exploration 
vessel, the "Bowdoin." Professor 
MacMillan was a former member of 
the faculty of Worcester Academy. 

1906— Dr. Edville G. Abbott of 
Portland has gone to New York City 
to attend a dinner in honor of Mme. 
Curie whose remarkable success with 
radium is the chief topic in medical 
and surgical circles of the world. 



jFacuItp Jftotes 

Professor Mitchell last week at- 
tended at Presque Isle the State Con- 
gregational Conference of which he 
is president. 

Professor Nowlan has been ap- 
pointed Professor of Mathematics and 
Science in the summer school of 
Bates College. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



NEWS SECTION 



The Tennis Team 
Brings Another Cham- 
pionship To Bowdoin 



Cleans Up State Meet— Splits Tour- 
nament With Brown. 



On Monday and Tuesday of last 
week the tennis team came through in 
fine style at Bates, bringing the cham- 
pionship of this sport to Bowdoin. 
This gives Bowdoin two legs on both 
singles and doubles trophies which 
will remain in the Gymnasium if the 
team is again successful next season. 

Fisher, the Freshman star, won the 
singles championship, defeating Cap- 
tain Partridge, last year's champion, 
at the end. The singles were all 
Bowdoin at the finish. In the doubles 
Partridge and Fisher were an un- 
beatable pair. This makes the second 
state championship for Bowdoin this 
year, besides a tie in football. It now 
remains for the baseball team to 
come through to make this a perfect 
year athleticly. 

On Thursday the team faced Brown 
at Providence and split even, each 
team taking three matches. A de- 
tailed account follows: 



Bowdoin Team Wins One Game, Loses Two 



THE INTERCOLLEGIATE 

TOURNAMENT 



On Monday and Tuesday Partridge 
and Fisher cleaned up the State In- 
tercollegiate Tennis Tournament at 
Bates, winning both doubles and 
singles. Fisher won the singles 
championship from Partridge, last 
year's champion. The meet was all 
Bowdoin at the end. 

Maine was eliminated Monday, 
Bates placed both her doubles teams 
and Bowdoin and Colby each placed 
one doubles team. Bowdoin got two 
men in the singles, Bates and Colby 
each placing one. 

The semi-finals were played Tues- 
day morning and the finals Tuesday 
afternoon. The Colby doubles team 
defeated one Bates team while Part- 
ridge and Fisher had little difficulty in 
eliminating the other pair. In the 
(Continued on Page 11) 



Colby Defeated; Holy Cross Held to 3-2; Norwich Wins 
in Weeks Record 



Last week's record of the baseball 
nine was on the whole commendable 
in spite of the poor showing made 
against Norwich. Monday's game 
against the Vermont outfit was char- 
acterized by the newspaper writers as 
the most poorly played game of the 
season and the criticism was justified. 
On Wednesday the players staged a 
comeback that more than made up for 
the defeat on Monday. In Portland 
before a record crowd the plucky 
team fought hard to the last and it 
was with difficulty that the Holy 
Cross team, one of the fastest teams 
in the East, if not in the country, won 
by one lone score. Saturday saw 
Colby defeated in a slugfest at Water- 
ville to the tune of 10-7. 

Norwich University 11, Bowdoin 8 
Norwich University won a loosely 
played game on Monday 11-8. Bow- 
doin had the lead until the seventh 
inning when the infield went wild and 
Norwich scored three runs on errors. 
In the same inning Bowdoin made two 
runs trying the score. Again in the 



Calendar 

May 26 — Tennis: Boston University 
at Brunswick. 

May 28 — Track: Maine Intei scho- 
lastic Meet at Brunswick. 

May 28 — Baseball: Maine at Orono. 

May 28— Track: I. C. A. A. A. A. 
at Harvard Stadium. 

May 30 — Memorial Day. 

June 1 — Fraternity Receptions and 
Dances. 

June 2— Ivy Play, "Stop Thief," 
Cumberland Theatre. 

June 3 — Ivy Day, Baseball: Bates 
at Brunswick, Ivy Exercises, Senior's 
Last Chapel, Ivy Hop. 

June 4 — Baseball: Tufts at Bruns- 
wick. 

June 9 — Final Exams begin. 

June 19-23 — Commencement Week. 



ninth Bowdoin made five errors, and 
with three hits, one a double, Norwich 
scored five runs, puting the game on 
ice. 

The Bowdoin players chalked up 
four runs in the early part of the 
game, and things looked prosperous. 
In the fifth Norwich scored three runs. 
The sixth saw no runner cross the 
plate. Then came the fatal seventh. 
Walker, A. Morrell and Holmes tossed 
the ball everywhere except where it 
should have gone. Norwich got a 
base on balls and two singles, result- 
ing in three runs. In Bowdoin's half 
W. Needelman singled and scored on 
Smith's homer, tying the score. 

During the eighth neither team 
could break the tie. Then in the 
ninth five errors by A. Morrell, Smith, 
Walker, and Needelman proved costly. 
Styles and Mayer got singles and Sul- 
livan a double, allowing Norwich to 
score five tallies. Bowdoin tried to 
redeem itself in the last half but was 
able to score but twice. 

The summary: 

NORWICH 



bh po 



Harrington, 2b 4 

Maher, 3b 4 

Whetton. ss 5 

Waite, If 4 

Laird, lb 4 

Sullivan, rf 5 

Hyland, c 5 

Beamish, cf 4 

Styles, p 3 







Totals 



38 11 9 27 15 4 

BOWDOIN 

ab r bh po a e 

W. Needelman, 2b 5 1 2 3 3 1 

Smith, 3b 5 3 4 1 2 2 

A. Morrell, ss 5 1 2 1 2 2 

Holmes, cf 4 1 1 1 

Davis, rf 5 1 3 1 

Hill, lb 5 1 1 6 2 1 

D. Needelman, If 4 1 3 

M. Morrell, c 2 1 12 1 

Walker, p 4 2 3 



Totals 



15 27 12 10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Innings: 123456789 

Norwich 3 3 5—11 

Bowdoin 21010020 2—8 

Two-base hits, Hyland, Sullivan, W. Needel- 
man. Home runs, Smith. Stolen bases, Har- 
rington, Holmes, Davis 2. Base on balls, by 
Styles, by Walker 4. Struck out, by Walker 
9. Sacrifice hits, Harrington, Holmes, M. 
Morrell. Double play, Maher to Laird. Left 
on bases, Norwich 5, Bowdoin 1. Hit by 
pitched ball, by Walker (Laird). Wild pitch, 
Walker. Passed balls, M. Morrell 3. Umpire, 
Corey of Portland. Time, 1.55. 



Holy Cross 3, Bowdoin 2 

Over three thousand fans saw one 
of the most spectacular ball games 
ever played in the State when Holy 
Cross defeated the College team by 
one score in Portland last Wednes- 
day. With the score three to noth- 
ing at the middle of the ninth Bowdoin 
staged a batting rally that brought in 
two runs and threatened to turn the 
tide decisively for Bowdoin. 

Both teams played wonderful ball. 
Every minute was featured by tight 
playing. The rally in the ninth was 
like one reads about but seldom sees. 
The honors of the day go to Dave 
Needelman for the running catch off 
Santoro's bat he made, robbing Holy 
Cross of a sure three-bagger. 

At the start Bowdoin took the out- 
field. Gill of Holy Cross pitched a 
fine game for the first eight innings 
and was admirably supported by his 
team-mates. In the third inning Holy 
Cross scored her first tally when Leo 
Dugan came home on O'Connor's two 
base hit. Neither side scored again 
until the eighth. Flynn walked Gag- 
non, O'Connor sacrificed and Simen- 
dinger was hit by a pitched ball, mak- 
ing two on bases. Maguire with two 
strikes and three balls on him slam- 
med out a long drive to right field 
which stood him good for three bases. 
These were the last runs made by the 
Holy Cross team. 

Then came the big rally in the last 
of the ninth. Gill walked Smith, A. 
Morrell was safe. Handy hit for 
Holmes, singled and the bases were 
full. Swinglehurst ran for him, and 
Clifford singled, scoring Smith and 
Morrell. With two men on bases the 
Holy Cross coach saw fit to change 
pitchers to Tunney, his mainstay. Hill 
flied out to Murphy. Dave Needel- 
man drove out a long hit to center 
which Simendingcr stabbed and slam- 
med home quick enough to catch 



Swinglehurst at the plate. 
The summary: 

HOLY CROSS 

ab r bh po a e 

Leo" Dugan, If 5 1 1 

Len Dugan, rf 3 

Doherty, rf 2 1 

Gagnon, ss 3 1 4 1 

O'Connor, lb 4 2 10 1 

Santoro, 3b 4 1 1 

Simendinger, cf 3 1 2 1 

Maguire, 2b 4 2 1 4 

Murphy, c 4 1 9 1 

Gill, p 4 1 3 

Totals 36 3 7 27 11 2 

BOWDOIN 

ab r bh po a e 

Needelman, 2b 3 1 4 

Smith, 3b 3 1 2 4 1 

A. Morrell, ss 4 1 1 2 1 

Holmes, cf 3 1 

Clifford, lb 3 1 11 1 1 

Hill, rf 4 1 

D. Needelman, If 4 1 2 

M. Morrell, c 2 .0 1 7 1 

Flynn, p 3 1 4 

"Handy 1 1 

i'Swinglchurst 

Totals 30 2 3 27 16 3 

"Handy batted for Holmes in 9th. 

fSinglehurst ran for Handy in 9th. 

Innings: 123456789 

Holy Cross 10 2 0—3 

Bowdoin 2 — 2 

Two-base hits, O'Connor 2, Murphy. Three- 
base hits, Maguire. Stolen bases, Gagnon. 
Sacrifice hits, Flynn 2, Len Dugan, O'Connor. 
Double plays, Flynn to Smith, Simendinger to 
Murphy. Left on bases, Holy Cross 7, Bow- 
doin 6. Base on balls, off Flynn 1, off Gill 1. 
Hits, off Flynn, 7 in 9 innings ; of Gill, 3 in 
8 innings ; off Tunney, in 1 inning. Hit 
by pitcher, by Flynn (Gagnon. Simendinger) ; 
by Gill (W. Needelman). Struck out, by 
Flynn 5, by Gill 7, by Tunney 0. Umpires, 
Hassett and Corey. 



Bowdoin 10, Colby 7 
In a loose game Bowdoin won from 
Colby last Saturday the second of its 
games for the ^tate title. The game 
was a slugfest throughout, but the 
Bowdoin team played the better all- 
round game. Five runs in the second 
inning took the fight out of Colby. 

Colby started off with a score in 
the first inning. Then Bowdoin 
started off to slam in five runs. 
Holmes doubled, then Clifford and 
Hill each knocked three baggers. 
Needelman singled, bringing in Hill. 
Handy was out, Morin to Willis. Then 
a pass put two men on bases. Walker 
stole second, and when W. Needelman 
singled, D. Needelman and Walker 



both scored. Smith flied out to 
center. 

Bowdoin scored again in the third, 
and Colby brought in two men in the 
fourth when Walker loosened up. He 
passed two and hit a third, filling the 
bases. Porter singled, scoring two 
men. In the fifth Bowdoin scored two 
more runs on two errors and three 
singles. Morin doubled and Colby 
scored another tally. 

In the seventh both teams succeeded 
in adding two runs to their scores. 
In the eighth Colby tried to stage a 
rally but succeeded only in tallying 
one more run. The ninth was score- 
less. 

The summary: 

BOWDOIN 

ab r bh po a e 

W. Needelman, 2b 5 3 1 

Smith, 3b 5 1 4 

A. Morrell, ss 5 2 3 2 1 

Holmes, cf 5 4 4 3 1 

Clifford, lb 5 1 3 6 1 

Hill, rf 4 1 1 

D. Needelman, If 5 1 2 1 

Handy c 4 12 2 

Walker, p 3 1 

Totals 41 10 16*26 9 3 

COLBY 

ab r bh po a e 

Taylor, cf 4 4 

Williams, If 5 1 1 2 

Morin, ss 4 2 2 3 5 1 

Lanpher, c 4 2 2 3 2 

"Fitzgerald, 2b 3 1 2 2 

Wills, lb 3 1 11 1 

Azzara, rf, 3b 3 1 1 

Good, 3b 1 2 

R. Daniels, rf 2 1 2 

M. Daniels, p 1 1 

Porter, p 3 2 1 2 

fFerguson . .' 1 

Totals 33 7 9 27 14 5 

"Fitzgerald out, bunting on third strike. 

fBatted for Azzara in 9th. 

Innings: 123456789 

Bowdoin 5 1 2 2 0—10 

Colby 1 2 1 2 1 0—7 

Two-base hits, W. Needelman 2, Holmes, R. 
Daniels, Taylor, Azzara. Three-base hits, 
Clifford, Hill, Holmes. Home runs, Morin. 
Stolen bases. Holmes 2, Walker, Williams, 
Wills, Porter. Sacrifice hits, Wills, Goode, 
Hill. Left on bases, Colby 9, Bowdoin 6. 
First base on errors, Colby 1, Bowdoin 3. 
Base on balls, off Daniels, 6 in 2 1-3 innings, 
off Walker, 9 in 9 innings, off Porter, 7 in 
6 2-3 innings. Balk, Walker. Struck out, by 
Walker 10 ; by Porter 2. Umpire, Corey. 
Time, 2h 39m. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



11 



Tennis Championship 

(Continued from Page 9) 

singles Partridge defeated Roberts of 
Bates while Fisher met Gowe of 
Colby who won from Partridge in the 
dual tournament, a few weeks ago. 
In the finals Partridge and Fisher 
Fisher won the first set easily but 
had to play sixteen games to win the 
second. 

defeated Smith and Gowe of Colby 
three sets out of five, taking the first 
fourth and fifth games. Fisher then 
defeated Partridge, three sets out of 
five, making him State champion. 
The summary: 

Monday 

SINGLES 

Roberts of Bates defeated 

Libby of Maine 6—0 6—1 

Gowe of Colby defeated 

Lesieur of Bates 6 — 4 6 — 3 

Partridge of Bowdoin de- 
feated Smith of Colby 6—3 3—6 6—2 

Fisher of Bowdoin defeated 

Trafton of Maine 6 — 2 6—3 

DOUBLES 

Woodward and Purinton of 

Bates defeated Wass and 

Littlefield of Maine 6—0 5—7 6—4 

Roberts and Lesieur of Bates 
defeated Bishop and Young 

of Bowdoin 6—3 6—1 

Fisher and Partridge of 
Bowdoin defeated Sackett 

and Odon of Colby 6 — 1 6—4 

Smith and Gowe of Colby 
defeated Libby and Traf- 
ton of Maine 6—1 6—3 

Tuesday 

DOUBLES 

Semi Finals 

Smith and Gowe of Colby 

defeated Roberts and 

Lesieur of Bates 1 — 6 6 — 3 6 — 2 

Partridge and Fisher of 
Bowdoin defeated Purinton 
and Woodward of Bates.. 6 — 2 6—2 
Finals 
Partridge and Fisher de- 
feated Gowe and Smith, 

6—1 3—6 4—6 6—1 6—3 

SINGLES 
Semi Finals 
Partridge of Bowdoin de- 
feated Roberts of Bates.. 6—4 6—2 
Fisher of Bowdoin defeated 

Gowe of Colby 6—0 9—7 

Finals 
Fkher defeated Partridge. 



6—4 4- 



6—3 6- 



THE BROWN TOURNAMENT 

On Thursday the Tennis team met 
Brown at Providence and split even, 
each team taking three games. Part- 
ridge and Fisher won their singles 



and doubles, while Bishop and Young 

lost. The matches went best two out 

of three. 

The summary: 

SINGLES 

Fisher of Bowdoin defeated 

Jones of Brown 1—6 6—3 7—5 

Partridge of Bowdoin de- 
feated Stearns of Brown.. 6 — 1 6—0 

Bennett of Brown defeated 

H. Bishop of Bowdoin 1—6 6—1 6 — 4 

Ryno of Brown defeated 

Young of Bowdoin 6 — 3 6 — 4 

DOUBLES 

Fisher and Partridge de- 
feated Jones and Webb 6—1 6 — 1 

Ryno and Bennett defeated Bishop 

and Young 6—1 6—3 



Freshman Banquet 

Annual Celebration Held in Port- 
land. 



The Freshman banquet was held in 
Portland in the Congress Square 
Hotel last Wednesday evening. The 
committee in charge consisted of Gib- 
bons (chairman), Savage, and Sell- 
man. H. A. Small was toastmaster. 

Among the speakers whose gems of 
wit and wisdom conculsed the as- 
sembly were: Beals, Hill, Merrill, 
Savage, J. H. Johnson, Southard, 
Gonya, Cousins, Rowe, R. G. John- 
son, Hardy, Needelman, and Fernald. 

After the banquet the class attended 
the hop in Frye Hall where the Holy 
Cross-Bowdoin reception was held. 



Bowdoin Scores But Three 
Points in N. E. Meet 



Seven Men Qualify For Finals, But 
One Places. 



Bowdoin took but three points in 
the New England Meet in Boston last 
Friday and Saturday. Tootel '23 
threw the hammer 133 feet 10 inches 
for a second place, and was the sole 
man to score for the College. M. I. 
T. easily won the meet with 46 points. 

In the trials held on Friday Bow- 
doin succeeded in placing seven en- 
tries, being the fifth in number of 
men qualifying. Butler qualified in 
both 100 and 220, making the fastest 
time in the latter. Hunt took second 
in his heat in the 440. Parent and 
Thomson placed in the 220 yard hurd- 
les trial, and Hardy did likewise in 



the lows. Tootel was the only man 
to place in the trials for the field 
events. Bishop, who was the sensa- 
tion of the State Meet, and Philbrook, 
winner of the high jump, both failed 
to show up. Conditions were not the 
best for the jumps, there being a wind 
blowing. 

In the finals on Saturday the dope 
was upset and Bowdoin won but three 
points. Both Bates and Colby who 
finished poorly in the State Meet bet- 
tered this mark by considerable. The 
Bukers starred for Bates, bringing 
her ten points on two firsts, tying 
with Brown for fifth place. Weise of 
Colby, the Freshman star, surprised 
the fans by taking first in the 120 
yard hurdles and third in the high 
fences. Bowdoin without the indi- 
vidual stars was lost in the big meet. 
It is expected that several men will 
represent the College at the I. C. A. 
A. A. A. Meet to be held next Satur- 
day at Harvard, possibly Bishop and 
Tootel. The pole vault was won at 
the meet last Saturday on 11 feet 6 
inches, while Bishop broke the State 
record two weeks ago with 11 feet 8 
inches. 

At the business meeting of the As- 
sociation, Assistant Manager Eames 
was elected Secretary of the New 
England Track Association. 



'B" Club Elects Officers 



Several Important Resolutions Passed 
At Last Meeting. 



The "B" Club met at the Zeta Psi 
house on Monday evening, May 16, 
for the election of officers for the 
coming year. About thirty members 
were present. After a dinner the 
business meeting was held. The club 
went on record as favoring several 
innovations in athletic customs at the 
College, among them the use of a uni- 
form letter and the establishing of a 
training table. 

The officers elected were as follows: 
President, Flinn '22; vice-president, 
A. Morrell '22; secretary-treasurer, 
Woodbury '22; executive committee, 
Flinn '22, A. Morrell '22, Dahlgren 
'22, and Hunt '22. 

The club passed a resolution to the 
effect that a training table for such 
athletes or athletic teams as should 
need supervised training food should 



12 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



be established next year. It voted to 
bring the matter to the attention of 
the Athletic Council at the next meet- 
ing. 

The second important resolution 
had to do with the form of the letters 
awarded athletes. The club went on 
record as favoring an eight-inch block 
letter for all three major sports and 
a six-inch block letter with the initials 
of the team for the minor sports. 
This will also be recommended to the 
Athletic Council and will be voted on 
at the next election if the Council 
agrees. 

Work for next year was discussed. 
The club voted to stand firmly behind 
coaches of all athletic teams in their 
efforts to keep men in training, and 
to try to use its influence to prevent 
breaking of training. 



Nominations For 

Student Officers 



The following men have been nomi- 
nated by the Student Council for next 
year's officers and are to be voted 
upon at the general student elections 
to be held Tuesday, June 7, from 1 to 
5 p. m. in the manager's room of the 
Gymnasium: 

For Student Council 

1922— Vote for ten (10)— Brewer, 
Dahlgren, Fish, Flinn, Freeman, Ham, 
Hunt, Knight, Ludden, McGorrill, 
Morrell, Partridge, Perry, Pickard, 
Ridley, Thayer, Tileston, Towle, 
White, Woodbury. 

1923— Vote for two (2)— Butler, 
Eames, Palmer, Sheesley. 
Athletic Council 

1922— Vote for two (2)— Flinn, 
Hunt, Morrell, Woodbury. 

1923— Vote for two (2)— Eames, 
Hill, Mason, Miller, N. F. 

1924— Vote for one (1)— Bishop, 
F. P., Morrell, M. E. 

Y. M. C. A., President and 
Vice-President 

Vote for two (2)— Bishop, H. P., 
Cousens, T. W., Philbrick. 
Treasurer 

Vote for one (1)— Lee, R. H., 
Rouillard, C. 

Ballots not marked with the num- 
ber of names indicated will not be al- 
lowed nor counted. One voting must 
mark his ballot for the number indi- 



cated above the candidates' names in 
order to have the ballot counted. Ex- 
ample: Vote for 10 from 1922 for 
Student Council; vote for 2 from 
1923 from Student Council, etc. 

Also on the ballots will appear 
nominations for managers and assist- 
ant managers of baseball, track and 
hockey. It has been ruled that no 
ballot will be counted that is not 
marked for the entire number allowed 
and indicated to be voted for. 



Ivy Play 

This year the Masque and Gown 
has prepared a play suited far better 
than usual to Ivy and the festivities 
of that week. Every Bowdoin man, 
whether he is attending the house 
parties or not, will surely find it 
worth while to witness the ability of 
Bowdoin College students in dra- 
matics. The cast this year has re- 
hearsed and played on the road since 
Christmas vacation and as a result 
each man is familiar with his part, 
both in action and interpretation. The 
costumes are unusually good. The 
Masque and Gown purchased five new 
gowns for the female parts this year 
and we dare venture the statement 
that few of our guests during Ivy 
will be more becomingly attired. 

"Stop Thief," by Carlyle Moore, is 
one of the brightest, cleverest and 
most enjoyable comedies ever writ- 
ten. There isn't a dull moment in it. 
From start to finish the audience is 
in a continuous state of laughter. The 
plot centers around the activities of 
Doogan, a crook, and his accomplice, 
the maid in a wealthy family of 
Rhode Island. This pair steal every- 
thing they can lay their hands upon, 
principally jewelry and wedding pres- 
ents, and when they find themselves 
unable to make a get-a-way, they 
plant the articles on members of the 
family. When these missing presents 
are found upon the father and the 
groom-elect the suspicion is aroused 
that these two are kleptomaniacs. The 
elaborate wedding ceremony is de- 
layed first by the theft of a valuable 
ruby ring and then a diamond brace- 
let, gifts from the bride's parents. A 
detective is called, but is met by the 
crook and dismissed after his pockets 
have been rifled. Then the part of 
the detective is played by the crook 



and the clever manner in which he 
finds the location of all the valuables 
in the house would elicit the admir- 
ation of a professional. Finally, as a 
last resort, the police are called into 
the case and amidst much excitement 
the sergeant loses his search warrant, 
his patience, and his self-assurance. 
Justice, however, is finally secured,, 
the crooks apprehended, the property 
returned, and the marriage ceremony 
performed. It is impossible to do the 
play justice on paper; it has to be 
seen to be appreciated. Each part is 
played naturally and with a high de- 
gree of skill. There are no waits be- 
tween the acts. Music will be fur- 
nished by the college orchestra, com- 
posed of twenty of the best musicians 
in Bowdoin. 

Tickets for reserved seats will be 
on sale for the students in the man- 
ager's room of the Gymnasium at 8 
o'clock, Saturday, May 28; at Thomp- 
son's Music Store at 9 o'clock, Tues- 
day, May 31; and at the box office 
on the evening of the performance. 
Prices: 50, 75 cents, and $1.00. No 
war tax. Curtain at 8.15. 



Send Off For Track Team 



Late last Thursday afternoon a 
rally was held under the Thomdike 
Oak as a belated celebration of the 
track victory of the preceding week, 
and as a send-off to the track team 
to the New England meet. 

There were several speeches in- 
cluding a very spirited and construc- 
tive one by McCormack '15, and more 
than several cheers and songs. 

Then followed a march to the sta- 
tion to the tune of Phi Chi, the band 
at the head of the line doing nobly. 
There the rally was continued until 
the train pulled out. It was truly 
an unusual send-off, an unusually 
good one, but after the showing the 
track team has made, it was by no 
means too good. 



Baseball Results 



Bowdoin 10, Colby 7. 

Maine 3, Bates 2. 

Tufts 11, Mass. Aggie 0. 

Yale 4, Cornell 1. 

Williams 21, Trinity 5. 

Harvard 8, Princeton 2. 

Holy Cross 18, Boston College 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



13 



Stage All Set For 

School Boy Meet 



More Than Twenty Schools To Send 

Teams To Annual Outdoor event 

Next Saturday. 



Everything is in readiness for the 
annual outdoor interscholastic meet to 
be held on Whittier Field next Satur- 
day. Over twenty schools have sig- 
nified their intentions of entering 
teams. But one out of state team will 
compete, Winthrop High, of Win- 
throp, Mass., so the fans who wish to 
see a contest between Maine schools 
will be satisfied. Deering High, which 
cleaned up the U. of M. meet last Sat- 
urday, is looked upon as the probable 
winner. 

Hebron will be strong as usual, but 
many dopesters give Deering the vic- 
tory. There is certain to be a hot 
battle between the two schools. Many 
of the smaller schools will have 
strong teams and individual stars. 
The weight events are the big ques- 
tion, since little is known of the abili- 
ties of the various entrants. At all 
events, given good weather, a record 
breaking meet is probable. Many of 
the local schools will bring rooters 
and preparations are now under way 
to entertain the visitors to the Col- 
lege. 



Abbott School Player 
Wins Interscholastic 
Tennis Championship 

Hebron Takes Doubles From Jordan 
High in Annual Schoolboy Event. 



At the annual Interscholastic Ten- 
nis Tournament here last Friday and 
Saturday, Charles Wotton of Abbott 
School won the championship. He- 
bron, Smith and Weiner, won the 
doubles championship from Jordan 
High, Purinton and Byron. Purinton 
won from Weiner, but lacked endur- 
ance to defeat Wotton after playing 
all day in the broiling sun. Wotton 
displayed fine form, and showed re- 
markable endurance. Ten teams were 
entered and some very creditable 
playing was staged. 

During the last two sets, Purinton 
suffered acutely from cramps in the 



stomach, but he played a gritty game. 
Being a Sophomore at Jordan High, 
he is sure to make a good showing 
next year. Webber of Gardiner High, 
Wotton's semi-final opponent, also 
played a fast game. 
The summary: 

DOUBLES 

Purinton and Byron, Jordan 

High, defeated Hayes and 

Walch, Brunswick High. . 6—3 7—5 

Robinson and Russell, Gor- 

ham, defeated Mitchell and 

Woodman, Biddeford 6—2 7 — 5 

Cushman and Tolman, Port- 
land, defeated Sullivan 

and Wotton, Abbott 5—7 6—1 8—6 

Tasker and Webber, Gardi- 
ner, defeated Fogg and 
Williams, Edward Little.. 0—6 6—2 6—2 
Smith and Weiner, Hebron, 
defeated Cross and Pierce, 

Cony High 6 — 1 6 — 2 

Gorham defeated Portland . . 5 — 7 6 — 3 7 — 5 
Hebron defeated Gardiner.. 6 — 3 6 — 2 
Jordan defeated Gorham .... 6 — 3 6 — 4 

Hebron defeated Jordan 7 — 5 3—6 11—9 

SINGLES 
Tolman, Portland, defeated 

Walch, Brunswick 7—5 9—7 

Robinson, Gorham, defeated 

Mitchell, Biddeford 7—5 8—6 

Woton, Abbott, defeated 

Cross, Cony. 
Webber, Gardiner, defeated 
Byron. Jordan, on default. 
Smith, Hebron, defeated Wil- 
liams, Edward Little 6 — 2 6 — 2 

Cushman, Portland, defeated 

Sullivan, Abbott 9—7 6—2 

Purinton, Jordan, defeated 

Pierce, Cony 6 — 6 — 1 

Russell, Gorham, defeated 

Woodman, Biddeford 6—1 6—0 

Hayes, Brunswick, defeated 

Fogg, Edward Little 6—3 6—4 

Weiner, Hebron, defeated 

Tasker, Gardiner 3—6 6—2 6 — 1 

Wotton defeated Robinson . . 5 — 7 6 — 4 6 — 4 

Webber placed on default. 

Purinton defeated Russell. . 6—2 6—1 

Weiner defeated Hayes 10—12 6—0 6 — 1 

Wotton defeated Tolman 7 — 5 6—3 

Purinton defeated Cushman 6 — 1 6 — 4 
Wotton defeated Webber. . . 7—9 6—1 6—0 
Purinton defeated Weiner. . 6 — 4 6 — 2 
Purinton defeated Weiner. . 6 — 4 6 — 2 
Wotton defeated Purinton . . 3 — 6 6 — 3 6—3 



Assignments 

ECONOMICS 2 
Week of June 1 

Seager — Socialism, chap. 33. 
Economic Progress, chap. 34. 

ECONOMICS 4b 
Week of May 30 

No conferences will be held because of the 
holiday. 

May 31, "Combinations and Agreements," 
Johnson and Huebner, chs. 19, 20. 



June 
ger Far 



"Oc 



Freight Rates and Passen- 
n and Huebner, chs, 21, 22. 



Johi 

ECONOMICS 6 
Week of June 1 

Survey — May 27 and June 3, Conferences 



ECONOMICS 8 
Week of May 30 

Library Assignments on the criticism of 
State Socialism and Gild Socialism. 



HISTORY 8 
Sixteenth Week 

June 1, Lecture XXX.— Great Britain 
the Treaty of Versailles. 

Campus Jftetos 



Psi Upsilon 9, Non-Fraternity 4 

In the first of the two interfrater- 
nity games played last week, Psi 
Upsilon won from the Non-Fratemity 
nine by a score of 9 to 4. Batteries 
for Psi Upsilon were Ricker and 
Varney; for Non-Fraternity, Belli- 
veau and Canter. 



Delta Upsilon 11, Theta Delta Chi 2 

Last Friday afternoon Delta Up- 
silon won from Theta Delta Chi by a 
11 to 2 victory. Batteries for Delta 
Upsilon were Whitman, Albert and H. 
Dudgeon; for Theta Delta Chi, Hebb 
and Blanchard. 



BOWDOIN CONTRIBUTES 

TO DANTE MEMORIAL 



Last week members of the Italian 4 
class and others in the college inter- 
ested in Dante's works gave contri- 
butions for a bronze memorial tablet 
which is to be placed by the great 
poet's tomb in Ravenna next August. 
All the colleges which have con- 
tributed for this will be listed in a 
document to accompany the tablet. 

This summer a number of under- 
graduates from American colleges 
are to make a tour of the famous 
cities of Italy under the guidance of 
one or two American instructors. In 
August these representatives will be 
present at the ceremony in connec- 
tion with the tablet at Ravenna. The 
undergraduate who writes the best 
essay on Dante will have his trip to 
Italy free. 

R. W. Noyes '21, who expects to 
be in France this summer, may go to 
Italy as a representative from Bow- 
doin in connection with the tour. 



BOWDOIX ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Edward B. Ham '22 Editor-in-Chief 

F. King Turgeon '23 Managing Edito' 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

George H. Quinby '23 Intercollegiate News 

George T. Davis '24 Alumni Department 

Fredric S. Klees '24 Faculty Notes 

G. William Rowe '24 Athletics 

P. Dennison Smith '24 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
"W. R. Ludden '22 F. A. Gerrard '23 

R. L. McCormack '22 K. R. Philbrick '23 
V. C. McGorrill '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 
Eben G. Tileston '22 Business Manager 

E. R. Latty '23 Assistant Manager 

J. U. Renier '23 Assistant Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $3.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 15 cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials only; the Managing 
.Editor for news and make-up; the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 



Vol. LI. May 25, 1921. 



No. 8 



Entered at Post Office in Brunswick 
Second-Class Mail Matter. 



EDITORIALS 

Orient Subscriptions From Alumni. 

At the present time scarcely more 
than a quarter of Bowdoin's two 
thousand Alumni are subscribing to 
the "Orient." There is no logical rea- 
son why there are not seventeen hun- 
dred Alumni at least giving active 
support to the publication of their 
college. 

During the past year or two the 
Alumni department has been de- 
veloped more than it has ever been 
before, and far more material has 
come to the "Orient" from class sec- 
retaries than in any previous year. 
Not only has the "Orient" invariably 
accepted all copy that Alumni have 
sent to it, but also the Alumni Editor 
of the last board has been very suc- 
cessful in soliciting complete and de- 
tailed accounts of the activities of 
members of a large number of 
classes. 

The "Orient" is striving all the 



time to publish every possible item of 
news, both concerning under-graduates 
and concerning Alumni. If the edi- 
torial board can succeed in this, in the 
best way possible, then it will have 
developed a publication which will be 
of equal interest to student and gradu- 
ate alike, a publication which will be 
of the greatest service to Bowdoin. 

During the past year the Bowdoin 
Publishing Company, which finances 
the "Orient" and the "Quill," has been 
in a very critical position, but through 
the highly commendable work of the 
present business manager, the 
' Orient" is expected to be on a satis- 
factory financial basis in the near 
future. In order to help the "Orient" 
at this time, more active support from 
the Alumni is absolutely necessary, 
not only in the important matter of 
sending in news and communications, 
but in materially increasing the sub- 
scription list. 

In connection with the forms relat- 
ing to the filling of vacancies on the 
governing boards, the business man- 
ager has recently had subscription 
blanks sent to all the Alumni. The 
list of graduate subscribers has ad- 
vanced to about six hundred and 
twenty-five, from a number some- 
what under five hundred. This leaves 
approximately fifteen hundred Bow- 
doin graduates who are not in any 
direct touch with their Alma Mater. 
Surely their loyalty to their college 
cannot be so superficial that they 
have lost all interest since graduation. 
The "Orient" is a complete record of 
college events and it is the one 
medium through which an Alumnus 
can know the details of a college life 
which must unquestionably be of 
some concern to him. Finally, we ask 
these fifteen hundred Alumni, not 
only to do Bowdoin the service of 
giving their support to its paper, but 
also to think of their own connection 
with Bowdoin and to use this means 
to become acquainted with the affairs 
and problems of their college. 



The Alumni Fund and the 
Undergraduates. 

In this special issue of the "Orient," 
devoted primarily to the Alumni En- 
dowment Fund, it seems fitting to set 
forth one or two plans, which have 
already been discussed to some extent, 
regarding the part that the present 



undergraduates might take in help- 
ing the college in this matter. The 
students now in college should be in 
every way as anxious as the Alumni 
for the successful conclusion of a pro- 
ject which means so much to the wel- 
fare of Bowdoin. Just now the un- 
dergraduates are the ones who are 
receiving the chief benefits which the 
college has to offer. The question, 
then, is: are we or are we not going to 
do our share in making this appeal 
to Bowdoin men a success ? 

There are various ways in which 
undergraduates can be of service in 
the raising of this fund. One method 
would be to have every member of a 
class pledge a moderate sum to be 
paid periodically after his graduation, 
and after he has begun to earn a liv- 
ing. This plan is not complicated and 
it would not be a difficult one to carry 
out. 

A second method would be to have 
each member of a class take out an 
endowment policy in favor of the col- 
lege, which could be made payable 
after a reasonable period of time. If 
each policy amounted to two or three 
hundred dollars, plainly the sum total 
of all such policies in any one class 
would be large enough to furnish a 
satisfactory class fund, similar to the 
decennial funds which are being 
started more and more among the 
Alumni. 

There is a particular advantage in 
starting one of these plans before 
graduation, since no class will ever 
have any opportunity as alumni to 
organize for such a scheme so com- 
pletely as it can while its members 
are still undergraduates. The classes 
now in college have an excellent 
chance to establish for themselves far 
better records in regard to endowment 
funds than any of the classes of past 
years. 

The annual expense of running the 
college is well over two hundred 
thousand dollars at the present time, 
and to meet this the student body pro- 
vides only sixty thousand. Further- 
more the students are "paid back" ap- 
proximately fifteen thousand dollars 
in prizes and scholarships. Thus 
every student in college is actually 
receiving about four times as much 
as he is obliged to pay. In view of 
this one fact alone, should not we all 
be willing to pledge our support in 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



15 



come manner, even if no more burden- 
some than the methods described 
above, to a cause which is of such 
vital importance to our Alma Mater? 



Communications 



THE FIRST COMMENCEMENT 



Editor "Orient:" 

While looking over some old Port- 
land papers to obtain material for a 
book on Maine from 1760-1815, that 
I am planning to write, I came across 
certain references to the beginnings 
of Bowdoin which may amuse some 
of your readers. There was much 
dispute over the location of the col- 
lege. One gentleman wrote that 
learned and ingenious Massachusetts 
should have it or Portland, else it 
might prove a failure "like all at- 
tempts to raise southern fruit in a 
northern climate." A college must be 
located in a city, philosophers may 
meditate wisely in a desert but "stu- 
dents at college have yet no ideas or 
very few" and need the mental stimu- 
lus of other minds. The representa- 
tive from North Yarmouth urged that 
his town was located in a good farm- 
ing district where provisions would 
be cheap, that the people were moral 
and that most of them were pious. 

The first Commencement was held 
in 1806 but the authorities deemed 
it wise to have a sort of full dress 
rehearsal the year before. The Port- 
land "Gazette" of September 9, 1805, 
said: "On Tuesday last, being the 
third anniversary of the Commence- 
ment (opening) of Bowdoin College, 
the Trustees and Overseers assembled 
at Brunswick and several specimens 
of the improvement of the students 
were exhibited to a small but re- 
spectable audience. 

"No parade was designed, it being 
the wish of the governours of the 
College, that this first exhibition 
should not be very public. Those 
however who were so fortunate as to 
be present, were highly gratified and 
somewhat surprised at the very man- 
ly and sensible compositions of the 
young gentlemen concerned in the 
performance of the day. 

"Their style of oratory was animated 
and correct; free from that frippery 
which is so frequently esteemed orna- 
mental and which has hitherto been 



considered essential to college oratory. 
Upon the whole, the writer of this, 
who has seen many brilliant Com- 
mencements at Cambridge, believes 
from the specimen exhibited last 
Tuesday, that the first grand Com- 
mencement at Brunswick, which will 
be in September, 1806, will afford as 
strong marks of improvement in 
science, and in polished oratory, as 
that antient and respectable seminary 
will exhibit." 

The "first grand Commencement" 
although postponed a day by a fear- 
ful storm, appears to have been other- 
wise successful. After the exercises, 
in which all the seven members of the 
graduating class took part, "the pro- 
cession . . . repaired to the hall 
and partook of an excellent enter- 
tainment given by the Corporation. A 
large concourse of ladies and gentle- 
men from Boston, and other citizens 
partook of the entertainment of the 
day. Splendid entertainments were 
given, and notwithstanding the most 
violent storm which this season ever 
produced raged for a great part of 
the time, as much hilarity and rational 
mirth was found as the most lively 
anticipate on such occasions." 

On Wednesday evening, the exer- 
cises having been postponed to Thurs- 
day on account of the storm, a sub- 
scription ball was given, and on 
Thursday evening the graduates gave 
a Commencement ball which "was at- 
tended by more fashion and beauty 
than ever before appeared in the Dis- 
trict of Maine. 

One hundred and twenty ladies and 
a greater number of gentlemen were 
present on this occasion, and a 
stranger would have imagined him- 
self in Boston or New York, rather 
than in a humble village, had he 
taken a view of this splendid as- 
semblage." 

Yours very truly, 

LOUIS C. HATCH '95. 



May 16, 1921. 
A friend of the College who owns 
an island with a small house on it at 
the mouth of the New Meadows River, 
will be glad to offer the use of the 
island and house to any students who 
may wish to use it for a summer va- 
cation. There will be ample oppor- 
tunities for roughing it and for 
healthful recreation. 

K. C. M. S. 



The "B" Club Functions: 

There has been some criticism on 
the campus that the "B" Club, which 
was organized during the present col- 
lege year, has clone nothing as an 
organization in the way of college 
activity except to have its picture 
taken and to authorize its members 
to wear pins. We would remind 
those who see fit to criticize the or- 
ganization that it is still in the 
embryo stage and that many of its 
policies are "in the making." 

It is not generally known on the 
campus that the "B" Club was re- 
sponsible for and sponsor of the send- 
offs of the baseball and track teams 
and for the celebrations in honor of 
the noteworthy victories of the re- 
spective teams. These events were 
very valuable in raising the college 
spirit to the high pitch it has reached 
this spring. 

At its last meeting the Club took 
a stand in favor of two programs, 
with the provision that they should 
be brought to the attention of the 
Athletic Council at its next regular 
meeting. Both these matters should 
receive the utmost consideration on 
the part of the alumni and the stu- 
dent body; namely, the uniform let- 
ters for major and minor sports re- 
spectively, and the support of the 
coaches in keeping men in training. 

The uniform letter for the major 
sports has often been discussed, but 
no decisive action has thus far been 
taken. Not only do the men in the 
major and minor sports wear letters 
of a varied and nondescript char- 
acter, but letters even in the same 
sports show a tendency toward 
divergence in size and appearance 
that is scarcely commendable. The 
"B" Club went on record as favor- 
ing a uniform block "B" for the three 
major sports, baseball, football, and 
track, and a uniform block "B" of 
slightly smaller size for the minor 
sports, with letters signifying the 
respective teams accompanying the 
letters. 

The other matter, brought up at 
the meeting, that of training, has also 
often come up in times past. The 
Club, by definitely committing it- 
self to a policy of strict training on 
the part of its members in season, 
ought to be able to do much in the 
way of lending its moral support and 



1G 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



suasion to the better condition of 
Bowdoin athletes. The Club can soon 
make a recalcitrant member in the 
matter of training feel like a "piker," 
if the right attitude is taken. It was 
understood that this motion as passed 
gave support to coaches training their 
teams, but was not to be interpreted 
as applying to individual cases which 
might arise between coach and men 
individually. 

Another matter, closely related to 
that of training, is that of a training 
table. The Club also went on record 
as favoring a training table at Bow- 
doin for whatever branches of ath- 
letics it might be deemed advisable. 
While the fraternity dining clubs may 
be trie best-intentioned in giving their 
athletic representatives suitable food, 
it must be admitted that due to neg- 
ligence and ignorance the men have 
sometimes suffered. A common eat- 
ing place would certainly be an asset 
to Bowdoin teams during the training 
season, and would tend to put our 
athletics on a firm and business-like 
basis. 

In submitting these matters to the 
attention of the alumni and the stu- 
dent body, it would be well to bear 
in mind the fact that the "B" Club 
can only suggest and go on record 
as favoring or opposing certain 
plans of action. The rest is mainly 
up to the Athletic Council and the 
student body. If the "B" Club can 
aid in any way in improving the 
athletic situation at Bowdoin Col- 
lege, it will be doing something de- 
cidedly worth while. 

K. G. W. '22. 



Letter From Chief 

Justice White 



The following is a letter from the 
late Chief Justice White, who was 
asked to be the guest of the College 
this Commencement: 



Washington, D. C, 

May 3, 1921. 
Kenneth C. M. Sills, Esq., 

President Bowdoin College, 
Brunswick, Maine. 
My dear Mr. President: — 

Your very generous letter of April 
25th last has remained some days un- 
answered because of my very great 
reluctance to say to you that it will 



be impossible for me to give myself 
the privilege of availing of the oppor- 
tunity you offer me, since for the day 
you name, June 23rd next, I have al- 
ready formed such engagements as 
absolutely preclude my going then to 
Bowdoin. 

The memories of the Chief Justice 
which your note so vividly recalls and 
the friendship I have always enter- 
tained for the sons of Bowdoin, to 
whom you refer, add cogently to the 
regret I naturally feel. 

Permit me, please, to express my 
warm wishes for the prosperity of 
Bowdoin and the happiness of those 
who go out from her halls to uphold 
and perpetuate the principles of civil 
liberty, and also to say to you how 
warmly I feel your kindness and how 
grateful I am to you for the very 
considerate and generous manner in 
which you have manifested it. 

May I not, therefore, say that I am 
indeed always, with respect and re- 
gard, 

Faithfully yours, 

E. D. WHITE. 



'New England's Bead" 



The poem printed below was recent- 
ly asked for by a correspondent of the 
Notes and Queries column of the 
Boston "Transcript" and was re- 
printed there. It was in the Fourth 
Reader used in schools in the sixties. 
It is by the friend of Longfellow, 
Isaac McClellan, of the class of 1826. 

Its insertion here, as Memorial 
Day approaches, is fitting now that 
Bowdoin and all New England have 
so much greater cause to commemor- 
ate the fallen. 

New England's dead ! — New England's dead ! 

On every hill they lie ; 
On every field of strife, made red 

By bloody victory. 
Each valley, where the battle poured 

Its red and awful tide. 
Beheld the brave New England sword, 

With slaughter deeply dyed. 
Their hones are on the northern hill, 

And on the southern plain. 
By brook and river, lake and rill, 

And by the roaring main. 

The land is holy where they fought, 

And holy where they fell ; 
For by their blood that land was bought 

The land they loved so well. 
Then glory to that valiant band, 
The honored saviors of the land I 
They left the ploughshare in the mold. 



Their flocks and herds without a fold, 
The sickle in the unshorn grain, 
The corn, half-garnered on the plain, 
And mustered in their simple dress, 
For wrongs to seek a stern redress ; 
To right those wrongs, some weal, come wi 
To perish or o'ercome the foe. 

Oh, few and weak their numbers were — 

A handful of brave men ; 
But to their God they gave their prayer. 

And rushed to battle then. 
The God of battles heard their cry, 
And sent to them tha victory. 



Pre-Medic Courses 



The closing of the Medical School 
will not curtail in any way the in- 
struction given at Bowdoin College 
in the pre-medical courses. In fact, 
these courses will be strengthened 
and amplified in the near future. No 
student of medicine can now go into 
a reputable medical school without at 
least two years of preparatory work 
in a good college, and most medical 
schools desire and encourage men to 
have their Bachelor's degree. At 
Bowdoin, thanks to the close associa- 
tion that there has been in the past 
between College and Medical School, 
the pre-medical courses in Physics, 
Biology and Chemistry have been un- 
usually well co-ordinated and are to- 
day adequate to prepare for admission 
to any medical school in the country. 
Certain changes have been made in 
the courses in Chemistry with the aim 
of meeting the most exacting require- 
ments, and next year Dr. Whittier 
will give for properly qualified men 
a course in Elementary Bacteriology 
and Pathology that will be of assist- 
ance in medical work. Any inquiries 
regarding the pre-medical course 
should be addressed to the Dean of 
Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine. 
K. C. M. S. 



Campus Activities 



CLASS OF 1921 
Gordon R. Howard of Albion, Ne- 
braska, is a graduate of Albion High 
School, and a member of the Theta 
Delta Chi fraternity. In his Fresh- 
man and Sophomore years, he ran on 
his class track teams. Last year he 
became a member of the "Bugle" 
board, and of the Biology Club. This 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



17 



year he is one of the assistants in 
Chemistry in which department he is 
taking his major. 

Lea A. Reiber, of Bunkie, Louisiana, 
is a graduate of Rice Institute and a 
member of the Sigma Nu fraternity. 
He transferred from Louisiana Uni- 
versity last year. He was formally a 
versity last year. He was formerly a 
student at Colorado University. Last 
year he was a member of the College 
Choir, the Glee Club and the Masque 
and Gown. This year he is a member 
of the Choir, the Masque and Gown 
and has also represented Bowdoin in 
many Y. M. C. A. conferences. 

Ryonosuke Toyokawa of Tokio, 
Japan, - graduated from the Fuzuko 
School. He is a member of the Delta 
Upsilon fraternity. In his Freshman 
year he played on his class baseball 
team, and became a member of the 
Masque and Gown. For the last two 
years, he has been a member of the 
History Club, being secretary last 
year and president this year. He is 
the business manager of the "Bear 
Skin" this semester. His major is in 
History. 

John G. Young of Paris, Texas, is 
a graduate of Cleburne (Texas) High 
School, and a member of the Sigma 
Nu fraternity. During his first year 
he was out for track, football and de- 
bating. He was a member of the 
Varsity Relay Team, Class Relay 
Team, and also a member of the Class 
Track Team. He was a member of 
the Varsity Debating Team, the Class 
Debating Team, and elected as a 
member of the Debating Council. 
During his first year he was awarded 
second prize in the Bradbury Prize 
debate. Besides participating in these 
various activities he played on his 
Class Football Team. During his 
Sophomore year he was a member of 
the Proclamation Committee. He rep- 
resented his class in the Freshman- 
Sophomore debate, again on the Var- 
sity Debating Team, and on the De- 
bating Council. He again won one of 
the second prizes in the Bradbury de- 
bate. He was chosen as a member 
of the Varsity Track Team, the Var- 
sity Relay Team, the Class Track 
Team, and Class Relay Team. During 
his Sophomore year he was also active 
in Y. M. C. A. work and a member 
of the Cabinet. He was chosen vice- 
president of the Debating Council. 



Last year he was elected president of 
the Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, again chosen 
as a member of the Debating Council, 
and a member of the "Bugle" Board. 
Last year he was elected Ivy Day 
orator by his class. He became a 
member of the Biology Club and was 
elected secretary and treasurer. In 
athletics he was also prominent and 
was a member of the Varsity Track 
Team. Last June he was elected 
president of the Student Council. He 
is chairman of the Union Governing 
Board and a member of the "B" Club. 
He was again elected a member of 
the Y. M. C. A. Cabinet and is one 
of the college proctors. He is also a 
member of the Outing Club. During 
the recent elections, he was elected 
class president. At the recent M. I. 
I. Conference he was the representa- 
tive of the student body. He has also 
represented the student body at vari- 
ous Alumni meetings. This year he 
is taking his first year in the Medical 
School and is a member of the Phi Chi 
fraternity. 



CLASS OF 1922 

Herman R. Ames, of Keene, New 
Hampshire, transferred from Nor- 
wich University. He is a member of 
Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. He 
plays in the College Band. He is 
majoring in Economics. 

Warren E. Barker of Biddeford is a 
graduate of Thornton Academy and a 
member of the Theta Delta Chi fra- 
ternity. He is majoring in Economics. 

George A. Blodgett of Chicago is a 
graduate of the Calumet High School 
of that city. He is a member of the 
Outing Club, and is taking his major 
in Chemistry. He is the son of Homer 
R. Blodgett, Bowdoin '96. 

Arthur T. K. Linn of Peking, 
China, transferred to Bowdoin at 
mid-years this year from the Har- 
vard School of Business Administra- 
tion. He is a member of the Alpha 
Delta Phi fraternity. Previous to his 
work at Harvard, he had graduated 
from St. John's University, at 
Shanghai. This spring he is a mem- 
ber of the varsity tennis team, and 
of the track squad. He is taking his 
major in Economics. 

John C. Pickard, of Lansdowne, Pa., 
prepared for Bowdoin at Shady Side 
Academy (Pittsburgh), and Phillips 
Exeter Academy. In his Freshman 



year he was a member of the Fresh- 
man Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, and had a 
part in the Commencement play. In 
his Sophomore year he was elected 
manager of his class football team, 
and won the Hiland Lockwood Fair- 
banks prize for public speaking and 
debating. He was also made a mem- 
ber of the Debating Council, which po- 
sition he has held ever since. In his 
Junior year he was chosen class 
marshal, elected to the "Bugle" 
Board, and became the manager of the 
golf team and the president of the 
Outing Club. He has also been elected 
to the Ibis. He is a member of 
Theta Delta Chi fraternity. 

Jonathan C. Tibbitts, of Alameda, 
California, transferred to Bowdoin 
from the University of California. He 
is a member of Phi Delta Psi frater- 
nity, the Mathematical Club, the Wire- 
less Club, and the Outing Club. 



CLASS OF 1923 

Hubert V. Davis of New York City 
is a graduate of Loomis Institute 
(Windsor, Conn.), and a member of 
the Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He 
has been on his class track and fqot- 
ball teams during his first two years, 
and this year he is on the varsity 
track squad. 

Geoffrey T. Mason, of La Jolla, 
California, prepared for college at 
Chestnut Hill Academy (Philadel- 
phia). He is a member of the U. Q. 
Society and the Delta Kappa Epsilon 
fraternity. He has played on the 
Varsity Football Team in both his 
Freshman and Sophomore years, and 
has also been a member of the Varsity 
Track and Baseball Squads. He is a 
member of the Classical Club and the 
"B" Club. 

Jay R. Sheesley, of Johnston, Pa., 
is a graduate of Kiskiminitas Springs 
School and a member of Beta Theta 
Pi fraternity and the U. Q. Society. 
He was elected assistant manager of 
football this year. 

Scott H. Stackhouse of Springfield, 
Ohio, is a graduate of the Springfield 
High School, and a member of Delta 
Upsilon. In his Freshman year he 
won the Goodwin French Prize, and 
became a member of the Masque and 
Gown. This year he has become a 
member of the Mathematics Club. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



H&. 



2^ 



w 



ALUMNI 

YOU CAN NOT KEEP POSTED ON COLLEGE 
AFFAIRS IF YOU DON'T TAKE THE 

ORIENT! 



DO YOU READ YOUR CLASS NOTES ? 



THE ALUMNI DEPARTMENT IS LIVE- 
LY AND GETS GOOD NEWS FOR YOU. 

LET US HAVE AT LEAST 1000 SUBSCRIBERS 

BY COMMENCEMENT. SPECIAL RATE 

OF $2.50 IF RECEIVED BY JUNE 20 



SEND THE BLANK TODAY 



EBEN tS. TILESTON, Manager 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING CO. 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

Dear Sir:- Enclosed find check for $2.50 in payment of 1 year'; 

subscription to the Bowdoin Orient. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 19 





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Bo^vdoin Alumni Fund 

Subscription Blank— Endowment Fund 



Date 



To aid Bowdoin College to increase her Endowment $600,000, thereby enabling the President and Trustees of 
Bowdoin to place on a permanent basis the salaries of the instructing staff of the College, I hereby contribute to the 
Bowdoin Alumni Endowment Fund in the manner and amounts as specified below. 

Cash payment - Dollars ($ ) 

(or) In installments of Dollars ($ ) each, 

Payable - for three years, making the 

(Insert annually, semi-annually, quarterly or monthly) 

total amount of Gift 

Dollars ($ ) Cash. 

Dollars ($ ) in Liberty Bonds at par issue. 

First payment ( Date) , 192 

Name Class 

Street City or Town State 



This subscription obtained by i Class A gent- 

I Regional Com. 



Bowdoin Alumni Fund 

Subscription Blank— Income Fund, 1 92 1 

Date 

To aid Bowdoin College to meet her Current Expenses, I hereby contribute $ to the Income, for 

which check is herewith enclosed. I hope to contribute yearly in the future at least $ to the Income of 

the Fund. 

— OR— 

I hereby subscribe $ - - to the Income of the Fund. This is for 1921, and I agree to pay this 

subscription in three installments, on or before June 30, September 30, and December 31, 1921. I hope to contribute 
yearly in the future at least $ to the Income of the Fund. 



20 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




Duplex Automatic Hair Cutter 

Not a tool nor a toy, but a tonsorial instrument of 
the highest merit. You are making a mistake in not 
sending or calling for a "Duplex' ' in order to enjoy 
the comfort, speed and economy of a Hair Cut at home. 
Every purchaser of the "Duplex" becomes its en- 
thusiastic sponsor and prizes it as an old friend 
Comfort Speed. Economy a)ways stanmn g by ready to give a perfect Hair Cut 
or a Shave fit for a king. .Every man, young or old everywhere, should 
own a "Duplex," and every housewife should own a "Duplex," to cut 
the children's hair. The truth is the "Duplex" is a houaehold necessity 
in the interest of Comfort, Progress and economy. Price $2.00 but for 
a limited time, if you return this ad and gl.00, you will receive the 
"Duplex" post-paid. Send or call to-day! 

Agents wanted everywhere; especially students both now and for 

vacation. Correspon dence solicited. __^__^_„_„ 

308 WEST 56th ST., N. Y. C. 
"THE HOUSE OF EXCELLENCE" 



UPTODATE SUPPLY COMPANY 



HAVE YOU PAID YOUR SUBSCRIPTION ? 



FORDHAM LAW SCHOOL 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING 



CO-EDUCATIONAL, 



CASE SYSTEM 
THREE-YEAR COURSE 



AFTERNOON CLASS 
EVENING CLASS 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 



P. J. MESERVE'S 

Drug Store 
Opposite Town Hall 



CHARLES P. DAVIS, Registrar 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING 
NEW YORK CITY 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 Maine Street 



BOWDOIN CANTEEN 

8 a. m.-12 m.; 1.30-6; 7-11 

Sundays, 12-5 p. m. 

A. PALMER, 19 North Winthrop 



We carry a large assortment of 
, Pickles, Cheese, and Fancy Cookies. 

DAVIS' MARKET 

Next to Star Lunch 

all Cigarettes 



Do You Need Extra Courses? 

Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages, Economics, 
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire 
how credits earned may be applied on present college program. 

3Hp XmtfKBitjj of (Mjfrann 



HOME STUDY DEPT. 



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FILL OUT COUPON ON 

PAGE 18 



A. W, HASKELL, D. D. S. 

W. F. BROWN, D. D. S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Postoffice. Brunswick, Maine 



YOU HAVE WRITTEN POEMS! 

Do you care to have them revised 
or constructively criticised by success- 
ful authors ? If you do, then send us 
your manuscript (stories, articles or 
poems). We will criticise, and place 
them should they prove to be accept- 
able for publication. 

There is no actual charge for our 
services. If, however, you have not 
previously enrolled with the advisory 
department of this association, we re- 
quest that you enclose the initial fee 
of two dollars, which we must ask of 
each new contributor. There is no 
additional expense, no further obliga- 
tion. 

It must be realized that we can only 
be of aid to those of serious intent. If 
you do mean to strive for literary suc- 
cess, we can help you in many ways. 
Our services are yours until we have 
actually succeeded in marketing at 
least one of your manuscripts. Send 
something to-day! 

Please enclose return postage with 
your communications. 

NATIONAL LITERARY 

ASSOCIATION 

131 W. 39th St. 

New York City 

Advisory Department 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



21 




YOUR GAME 

Y^HATEVER your "game," whether 
in sport or serious activity, MACUL- 
LAR PARKER CLOTHES lend fin- 
ish to your performance, and are as 
individual as your own way of doing 



things. 



MA« A * RK ER 

400 WASHINGTON STREET 
The Old House with the Young Spirit 



Bowdoin men are invited to visit our shop 
when in Boston 



BOYS! 

Have you tried our new drink, 

BOWDOIN BREW? 

Our Candy, too, is right through and 
through 

THE SPEAR FOLKS 

119 Maine Street 



CARL H. MARTIN 

Cleansing and Dyeing 
Pressing and Alterations 



4 Elm Street 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. 
Surplus and Profits, $100,000. 
Student Patronage Solicited. 



PRINTING 



of Quality 

Always in the lead 
for snap and style 

Wheeler Print Shop 

Town Building, Brunswick, Maine 



We carry the largest assortment of 

Olives, Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and 
Biscuits of all kinds east of Portland 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street Tel. 136-137 

Branch Store— 2 Cushing St.— Tel. 16 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 
Boston 

344 Washington Street 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



DURING THE GAME 

BETWEEN CLASSES 

ON THE HIKE 



I 



•SSwSJS' 






A "MUNCH" WHILE STUDYING 

A SNACK BEFORE RETIRING 

IN FACT— EVERY OLD TIME 



STRAW HATS 

Young Men's Sennits 

$3.00, $4.00, $5.00 



White Flannels 

$8.00 



E. S. BODWELL 

& SON 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



SUMMER WORK 

We still have room 
For a few LIVE men 
Provided they want to 
Earn a lot of MONEY 
This summer. 

This isn't a Gamble 

It is a SURE THING 

For the man who HUSTLES 

And besides 

We pay a SALARY. 

NOW is the time 
To get on the Band Wagon 
So see one of our local men 
Or write us direct and 
Ask for the dope. 

Local representatives: 

S. H. Carter, 24 Winthrop 

Hugh Nixon, D. U. House. 

THE NATIONAL SURVEY CO. 

Topographical Offices, 
Chester Vermont 



JUD, The Barber 

was going to use this space 
but thought it wasn't neces- 
sary. 




CONSERVATIVE CLOTHES 

FOR 

COLLEGE MEN 

In stock and made to measure. 
Imported Fabrics. Lower prices for Spring 1921. 



HASKELL & JONES COMPANY 

PORTLAND .... MAINE 



TUFTS 
COLLEGE 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

Offers to the student who has 
had one year of college training, a 
four year course leading to the de- 
gree of D. M. D. 

Being located in Boston, Tufts 
College Dental School enjoys ex- 
cellent clinical advantages. 

Students in the Dental School 
Course have the privilege of clin- 
ics at the Forsythe Dental Infirm- 
ary, Boston City Hospital, Mass- 
achusetts Homeopathic Hospital, 
Boston Dispensary, Vernon St. 
Hospital, and the Massachusetts 
Home for Feeble-Minded. 

Tufts Dental School is co-edu- 
cational. 

Registration begins at 9 a. m., 
on June 21, and ends on Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

School session begins Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

For further particulars write to 
F. E. Haskins, M. D., Secretary. 

416 Huntington Avenue, 

Boston, Mass. 

WILLIAM RICE, D.M.D., Dean 



Pressing and Cleaning 

ORDERS TAKEN FOR DYEING 

SECOND HAND CLOTHING 

BOUGHT 

DAN ROSEN 




SPUR-A New Narrow 

Arrow 

Collar 

Cluett.Peabody &-Co. Inc. Troy. N.Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



23 



CITIZENS LAUNDRY 



College Agent 



Auto Service 



A SHORTER 

SHORTHAND SYSTEM 
IN TEN EASY LESSONS 

This course covers ten easy lessons 
which will enable the Student, Pro- 
fessor, Journalist, Doctor, Lawyer or 
anyone seeking a professional career, 
to go thru life with 100 per cent 
efficiency. 

THIS COURSE 

Is short and inexpensive, and is 
given with a money back guarantee if 
not satisfied. 

SEND THIS CLIPPING TO-DAY 



PYRAMID PRESS: PUBLISHERS 
1416 Broadway, 
New York City 

Gentlemen:— Enclosed herewith is $5.00 
for which kindly send me your shorthand 
course in ten easy lessons by mail. It is 
understood that at the end of five days, if 
I am not satisfied my money will be gladly 
refunded. 

Name 

Street 

City and State 



Bowdoin Dairy Lunch 

Open Day and Night 



CORDOVAN BOOTS 

IN 

YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 



"Herman's" Tan Cordovan $13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan. .$15.50 
"Florsheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 

TENNIS SHOES, INDOOR AND 

OUTDOOR MOCCASINS, RUBBER 

BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 



OH BOY! 

Have You Tried Our 

49c CHOCOLATES 

There is nothing cheap about our 
place but the price. 

BUTLER'S 



F. W. Chandler & Son 

HAVE 

Tennis Rackets 

from $1.50 to $16.00 each 

Championship Tennis Balls 

60c each 

1920 Tennis Balls 45c each 

Baseballs & Baseball Supplies 

25 Kinds of Golf Balls 

Golf Bags and Clubs 

The College Book Store 



INDIVIDUALITY 

— the idea of service to our customers, 
which we try to make a ruling idea in all 
our transactions, is the most important fact 
about our new 

SPORT CLOTHES SHOP 

Here the sportsman will find 
outing apparel of every kind, 
and he can be absolutely sure 
of finding all the new styles 
in materials and novel ar- 
rangements. 



Square 




Portland 
Mainn 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CUMBERLAND 

Wednesday and Thursday 
AVALLACE REID 

IN 

"THE LOVE SPECIAL" 



Friday and Saturday 
ALICE LAKE 

IN 

THE GREATER CLAIM 



Next Week — Monday and Tuesday 
WANDA HAWLEY 

IN 

"HER FIRST ELOPEMENT" 



PASTIME 

Wednesday and Thursday 
"BURIED TREASURE" 



Friday and Saturday 
Dustin Farnum 

IN 

' Big Happiness " 



Mack Sennett's 
Love, Honor and Behave " 



Next Week— Monday and Tuesday 
"TO PLEASE ONE WOMAN" 



— 




TS^ BOWDOIN 
ORIENT 




KSTABLIKIIK1) 18T1 



BRIT>'SWICK, MAIM-: 



IVY NUMBER 
1922 




JUNE H. ism 



# 

♦y 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



VOL. LI. 



FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1921. 



Number 9 



Bowdoin Continues 

Baseball Victories 



Makes Fcurth Consecutive Win In 
State Series. 



Maine College Standing 

Won Lost P. C. 

Bowdoin 4 1.000 

Maine 3 2 .600 

Colby 1 3 .250 

Bates 3 .000 

The Bowdoin baseball team had an- 
other bright week last week when it 
succeeded in trimming Colby and 
Maine each for the second time. These 
make the third and fourth consecu- 
tive victories for Bowdoin in the 
State series. Bowdoin is the only col- 
lege to have a clean slate, and now 
even if the remaining two games 
should be lost, Bowdoin could not 
come out worse than a tie for the 
championship. Just one more game is 
needed to clinch the third State 
championship for the year, track, ten- 
nis, now baseball. And don't forget 
the tie for football! A record year 
for Bowdoin's athletes. 

BOWDOIN 9, COLBY 5 



Bowdoin played her second game 
with Colby last Wednesday afternoon 
on Whittier Field, and was again vic- 
torious. The game was featured by 
an eighth inning rally in which Bow- 
doin came up from behind, tied the 
score and on an error succeeded in 
securing a four run lead. 

Bowdoin started the scoring with 
three runs in the second when Holmes, 
Hill, and Dave Needelman crossed 
the plate. Colby pulled down one run 
in each of the next three innings, ty- 
ing the score, three to three. The 
sixth was scoreless, but the seventh 
saw two more Colby men take the 
circuit of the bases. 

Then in the eigth Bowdoin pro- 
ceeded to make things hum. Holmes 
(Continued on Page 4) 



ANNUAL IVY WEEK FESTIVITIES 



Fraternity Receptions and House Parties, Juniors Plant Ivy, 
Seniors' Last Chapel, Ivy Hop This Evening. 



Orient Extends Welcome to Guests. 



Again the campus is turned over to 
the guests of the undergraduates for 
the annual Ivy Week festivities. On 
Wednesday afternoon several of the 
fraternities held receptions, and in the 
evening they all arranged formal 
dances, a detailed account of which 
follows. Thursday was devoted to 
excursions to nearby resorts, and in 
the evening the Masque and Gown 
presented its customary comedy in the 
Cumberland Theatre. This morning 
there was the ball game with Bates, 
this afternoon came the Ivy Day 



Calendar 



Tonight — Ivy Hop, Gymnasium, 9 
p. m. 

June 4— Baseball: Tufts, Whittier 
Field, 2 p. m. 

June 9-17 — Final examinations. 

June 19 — Baccalaureate Address, 
Congregational Church, 5 p. m. 

June 20 — Alexander Prize Speaking 
Contest, Memorial Hall, 8 p. m. 

June 21 — Class Day Exercises under 
Thorndike Oak, 3 p. m.; Senior Dance, 
Gymnasium, 8 p. m. Meetings of 
Maine Historical Society, Board of 
Trustees, and Board of Overseers. 

June 22 — Meetings of Alumni Coun- 
cil, Alpha of Maine of Phi Beta Kap- 
pa, and Alumni Association. Base- 
ball: Alumni vs. Varsity. Outdoor 
production, "Taming of the Shrew." 
President's reception. (See Com- 
mencement program for hours.) 

June 23 — Commencement exercises, 
Congregational Church, 10.30 a. m., 
followed by dinner in Gymnasium. 



exersises and the planting of the 
ivy by the Junior class. The 
Seniors left the Chapel for the last 
time. Tonight the Ivy Hop will be 
held in the Gymnasium. 

IVY EXERCISES 

The Ivy exercises are being held 
this afternoon in Memorial Hall. The 
program includes the oration by Al- 
bert R. Thayer, the poem by Arthur 
C. Bartlett, the prayer by Carroll S. 
Towle and the presentation of gifts. 
The presiding officer of the day is 
George A. Partridge who will intro- 
duce the speakers and make the pre- 
sentations. The customary serious 
gift, the wooden spoon, is to be pre- 
sented to the popular man, Allen E. 
Morrell. 

After the exercises the ivy is to be 
planted by Memorial Hall, accom- 
panied by the singing of the class ode, 
written by Bruce H. M. White. 

The class marshal is John C. Pick- 
ard. The committee in charge con- 
sists of Wilfred R. Brewer (chair- 
man), J. Walter Dahlgren, Hervey R. 
Fogg, Virgil C. McGorrill, Roliston G. 
Woodbury. 

SENIORS' LAST CHAPEL 

The Senior class will hold the tra- 
ditional last chapel services in King 
Chapel directly after the Ivy Day ex- 
ercises. The usual Sunday service is 
to be used with a special anthem by 
an augmented choir. After the ser- 
vice the class will march out of the 
Chapel singing appropriate words to 
the melody of "Auld Lang Syne." The 
class marshal is Perley S. Turner. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



IVY HOP 

The annual Ivy Hop is to be held 
this evening in the Gymnasium. It 
is expected that over a hundred and 
fifty couples will be present. The 
patronesses as usual will be the wives 
of members of the faculty. Music 
will be provided by Lowe's Orchestra 
of Boston. 

FRATERNITY DANCES 

The following are the accounts of 
the various fraternity house dances 
and receptions: 

ALPHA DELTA PHI 

The Bowdoin chapter of Alpha 
Delta Phi held its annual Ivy house 
dance at Pythian Hall Wednesday 
evening. The patronesses were Mrs. 
William A. Moody, Mrs. Charles C. 
Hutchins, Mrs. Roscoe- J. Ham of 
Brunswick; Mrs. Warren S. Lothrop 
and Mrs. Frederick H. King of Port- 
land. Lovell's Orchestra of Portland 
furnished music for an order of 
twenty dances. The committee in 
charge consisted of York '21 (chair- 
man), Drake '22, Palmer '23, Blatch- 
ford '24. 

Among the guests present were the 
Misses Doris Freeman of New 
Britain, Conn.; Kathryn Beck of Way- 
land, Mass.; Winnifred Patriquin of 
Boston, Mass.; Dorothy Caldwell of 
Island Falls; Louise Cahill and Phyl- 
lis Wyman of Bath; Ruth Goss of 
Kingfield; Dorothy Elms of Auburn; 
Leona Esponette of Gardiner; Alice 
Goodridge of Augusta; Ruth Peter- 
son of Rollinsford; Myra Cole of Kit- 
tery; Dorothy Coburn of Lewiston; 
Alice Alden, Doris Dyer, Irene Hellier, 
Lottie Smith of Portland. 

PSI UPSILON 

On Wednesday afternoon, June 1, 
the Kappa chapter of Psi Upsilon be- 
gan its Ivy house party with a recep- 
tion from three to five. The following 
poured: Mrs. C. T. Burnett, Mrs. Man- 
ton Copeland, Miss Carrie Potter, 
Miss May Potter, Miss Leila Elliott, 
Mrs. Arthur Brown, Mrs. Milton Kim- 
ball, Miss Ellen Baxter, Miss Belle 
Smith, Miss Bessie Smith. In the 
receiving line were Miss Anna Smith, 
Mrs. Eben W. Freeman, Mis. Kimball, 
Mrs. Mary S. Boardman, Mrs. Ricker, 
and Mrs. C. C. Parcher. 

Wednesday evening a formal dance 
was held in the chapter house. The 
patronesses were Mrs. Carl C. Parcher 



of Saco; Mrs. Mary S. Boardman of 
Beebe River, N. H.; Mrs. Kimball cf 
New York City; and Mrs. Ricker cf 
Castine. The guests present were the 
Misses Venus Ochee of Boston, Mass.; 
Hazel Crawford of Melrose High- 
lands, Mass; Rose Erskine of Maiden 
Mass.; Emily Seaber of Wellesley 
Mass.; Catherine Maxwell, Edna De 
Merritt of Braintree, Mass.; Beulah 
Haven of Newton Center, Mass.; 
Hazel Maxwell, Dorothy Taylor, 
Phyllis Bridger of Saco; Gladys Olm, 
Margaret Hanson of Bath; Rachael 
Connor of Bangor; Ellen Baxter, Win- 
nifred Brehaut of Brunswick; Ruth 
Woolley of Portland; Alma Walters 
of Franklin, N. J.; and Marjory 
Bellamy of Wilmington, North Caro- 
lina. 

The committee in charge was Will- 
son '21 (chairman), F. P. Freeman '22, 
C. P. Parcher '23, and L. W. Towle. 
Emerson's Orchestra of Portland fur- 
nished music for an order of twenty- 
four dances. 

Thursday the party enjoyed a sail 
down the river to Gurnet, and had a 
shore dinner at the Gurnet House. In 
the evening, after the Ivy play, there 
was an informal dance in the chapter 
house with the Alpha Delta Phi fra- 
ternity, for which Keniston's Orches- 
tra furnished the music. 

DELTA KAPPA EPSILON 

The annual Ivy dance of Theta 
chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon was 
held at the chapter house Wednesday 
evening. On Thursday a trip to the 
Gurnet House was enjoyed. In the 
evening after the Ivy play an in- 
formal dance was given at the house. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Charles 
S. Christie of Riverpoint, R. I.; Mrs. 
Joseph B. Drummond of Portland; 
Mrs. John Clair Minot of Watertown, 
Mass.; and Mrs. Kenneth C. M. Sills 
of Brunswick. The committee in 
charge consisted of Brewer '22 (chair- 
man), Thomas '22, and Vose '22. 

Among the guests were Professor 
and Mrs. Means; the Misses Marjorie 
Ryan of Jamaica Plain, Mass.; Mona 
Asth of Oakfield; Beulah Staples of 
Melrose, Mass.; Elizabeth Haynes of 
Pesque Isle; Catherine Clarke of 
Portland; Mona Ames of Boston; 
Gladys Morehouse of Houlton; 
Katherine Pletts of Brunswick; Helen 
Emmons of Brunswick; Berniece 
Young of Portland; Charlotte Vose of 



East Eddington; Belle Anstad of 
Tarrytown, N. Y. 

CHI PSI 

Eta of Chi Psi held its annual Ivy 
dance at the chapter house on Wed- 
nesday evening. A. H. Thomson's Or- 
chestra furnished music for an older 
of twenty dances. The patronesses 
were Mrs. F. P. Rounds of Waterford, 
and Mrs. G. F. Leighton of Dexter. 

Among those present were Mrs. 
Lloyd H. Hatch, the Misses Laura 
Barker, Geraldine Barker of Bingham; 
Margaret Staples of Pittsfield; Lill'an 
Palmer and Grace Pembroke of Port- 
land; Mildred Thompson of Kingfield; 
Agnes Jordan of West Bridgeton; 
Katherine Hickey of Gardiner; Doro- 
thy Cushing of Melrose Highlands, 
Mass.; Molly Noyes and Eulah Mitch- 
ell of Brunswick; Alice Altercamp of 
Boston, Mass.; Margerite Marston of 
Brownfield; and Madeline Desmonds 
of Bath. 

THETA DELTA CHI 

Eta Charge of Theta Delta Chi held 
its annual Ivy dance on Wednesday 
evening. The patronesses were Mrs. 
Frederick W. Pickard of Lansdowne, 
Pa.; and Mrs. Alaric W. Haskell, Mrs. 
G. Allen Howe, and Mrs. William R. 
Porter, all of Brunswick. 

Reisman's Orchestra of Boston fur- 
nished music for an order of twenty- 
dances. On Thursday a clam bc.ke 
was arranged on the coast. 

Among those present were Misses 
Bertha Merrill of Augusta; Maybelle 
Beach of Brunswick; Ruth Wheeler, 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania; Elaine 
Bartlett of Oklahoma City, Okla.; 
Marjorie Hawley of Rumford; Gladys 
Willey of Saco; Alice Bartlett and 
Virginia Hall of Norway; Marion Mc- 
Lon and Idamae Wotton of Rockland; 
Emily Bramlett of San Antonio, 
Texas; Louise Baker, Elsie Linde, 
Ruth Johnson, Helen Nissen, Eleanor 
Russell, all of Portland. 

ZETA PSI 

The Bowdoin chapter of Zeta Psi 
held its annual Ivy house party on 
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of 
this week. On Wednesday evening a 
formal dance was held at the house, 
Clan" s Orchestra furnishing music for 
an order of twenty-four dances. On 
Thursday a trip down the river to 
Cundy's Harbor was enjoyed. A 
cabaret party was arranged for 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Thursday evening and was a pleasing 
feature. 

The patronesses were Mrs. S. F. 
Richards of Reading, Mass., and Mrs. 
S. L. Fogg of Augusta. 

Among those present were the 
Misses Helen Enemark, Marjorie 
Mathis, Mary Hamilton, Charlotte 
Fowler of Portland; Kathlyn Hager- 
man, Avory Munro, Helen Yerxa of 
Houlton; Louise Bragdon, Margaret 
Kirkpatrick of Portsmouth, N. H.; 
Kathryn Cooper, Katherine Wilson of 
Reading, Mass.; Louise Folsom of Au- 
gusta; Maude Jennings of Bridgeport, 
Conn.; Yvonne Fortin of Brunswick; 
Harriet Jackson of Bath; Ruth Cro- 
well of Bangor; Maxine Perry of Fort 
Fairfield; Ernestine Philbrook of 
Bethel; Dorothy Tufts of Wakefield, 
Mass.; Marguerite Richards of 
Springfield, Mass. 

The committee consisted of Hall '21 
(chairman), Towle '22, Crawford '23, 
and Jewett '24. 

DELTA UPSILON 

The hostesess at the reception 
given by the Bowdoin Chapter of 
Delta L'psilon Wednesday afternoon 
were Mrs. Kenneth C. M. Sills, Mrs. 
Frederick W. Brown of Brunswick; 
and Mrs. Austin J. MacCormack of 
Portsmouth, N. H. 

The patronesses at the dance given 
Wednesday night were Mrs. Joseph 
Stetson of Brunswick, and Mrs. Aus- 
tin J. MacCormack. 

Music for the dance was furnished 
by Jefferson's Orchestra of Boston. 

Among those present were the 
Misses Isabelle Pollard, Alice Fortin 
and Mary Cairns of Brunswick; Helen 
Harris and Anna Adamson of Au- 
busta; Mary Rogers of Fairhaven, 
Mass.; Marguerite Peaslee of Cape 
Elizabeth; Ursula Ryan of Maiden 
Mass.; Miriam Cobb of Mansfield, 
Mass.; Martha Ford of Simsbury, 
Conn.; Priscilla Brewster of Camden; 
Frances Russel of Saco; Doris Wake- 
ley of Lisbon Falls; Vivi Johnson of 
Portland; and Betty Sawyer of Au- 
burn. 

Thursday was spent at Mere Point 
at Mrs. Stetson's cottage. 

KAPPA SIGMA 

The Bowdoin chapter of Kappa 
Sigma held its house dance on Wed- 
nesday evening, arranging tables on 
the porch for a dinner dance. On 



Thursday they went to Cape Elizabeth 
for the day, having dinner at the 
Cape Cottage Hotel and a dance at 
the Casino in the evening. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Lloyd 
Lawrence and Mrs. William Rhodes of 
Rockland, Maine. The committee in 
charge consisted of Dahlgren '22 
(chairman), Parent '21, Perry '22, 
Whitney '23, and Hamilton '24. Mona- 
hon '22 was caterer. 

Among those present were the 
Misses Grace Murphy and Doris Van 
Loon of New York City; Marie Mar- 
den and Katheryn Fallon of Boston, 
Mass.; Ruth Burdon of Gilbertville, 
Mass.; Margaret Cusick and Margaret 
Winchester of Gloucester, Mass.; 
Huldah Boron of Bangor; Lucy Fuller 
and Frances Flanagan of Rockland; 
Ruth Montgomery of Camden; Vir- 
ginia Currier of Portland; Grace Mor- 
rell of Saco; and Elizabeth Jordan of 
Auburn. 

BETA THETA PI 
Beta Sigma of Beta Theta Pi held 
its annual house party on Wednesday, 
Thursday and Friday of this week. 
On Wednesday afternoon the annual 
reception was held. The hostesses 
were: Mrs. Arthur P. Abbott, Dexter; 
Mrs. Arthur H. Tileston, Dorchester, 
Mass.; Mrs. William D. Ireland, Port- 
land; Mrs. Charles C. Hutchins, 
Brunswick; Mrs. William H. Davis, 
Brunswick. Mrs. Roscoe J. Ham, Mrs. 
Charles T. Burnett, Mrs. Manton T. 
Copeland, Mrs. Dwight W. Pierce, 
Mrs. Clara D. Hayes, Mrs. Willis D. 
Roberts, and Mrs. Joseph Rohr, all of 
Brunswick, poured. 

On Wednesday evening Lovell's 
Orchestra of Portland furnished 
music for an order of twenty dances. 
The patronesses were: Mrs. Arthur 
P. Abbott, Mrs. Arthur H. Tileston, 
and Mrs. William E. Ireland. 

On Thursday a clam bake on Long 
Island was enjoyed. Among those 
present for the party were the Misses 
Maude Barker, Thelma Damren, 
Frances Ellingwood, Alice H. Stevens, 
and Katherine Wyman of Augusta; 
Elizabeth Hamilton of Brunswick; 
Edna Chamberlain of Fort Fairfield; 
Lillian Ramsdell of Farmington; Ber- 
niece B. Butler, and Mary Perkins of 
Portland; Shelby Freethey of Rock- 
land; Gwendolin Lewis of Amherst, 
Mass.; Kathleen Haskell of Newton - 
ville, Mass.; Ruth Williams of Wel- 



lesley, Mass.; Virginia Carten of West 
Peabody, Mass.; and Helen Pratt of 
New York. 

The committee in charge consisted 
of Gibson '21 (chairman), Smiley '21, 
Webb '22, Sheesley '23, and McMen-' 
namin '24. 

SIGMA NU 
Delta Psi chapter of Sigma Nu held 
its annual Ivy dance at the new Com- 
munity Hall on Wednesday, June 1. 
The Peerless Orchestra of Brunswick 
furnished music for an order of eight- 
een dances. On Thursday an outing 
and shore dinner was held. Thursday 
evening the party attended the Ivy 
Play, "Stop Thief," after which an in- 
formal dance was held. 

The Patronesses were Mrs. Orren C. 
Hormell of Brunswick; Mrs. Richard 
G. Badger of Newton, Mass.; Mrs. 
Freeman Palmer of Woodsfords, Mrs. 
George H. Noyes of Stonington; and 
Mrs. Wilfred M. Peabody of Topsham. 
The committee in charge consisted of 
Martin '22 (chairman), Morrell '22, 
Jardine '24, and Southard '24. 

Among the guests were the Misses 
Agnes Bishop of Fort Fairfield; 
Marion Forsythe and Dorothy Badger 
of Newton, Mass.; Julia Barbarick of 
Chicago, 111.; Marion Griffin of Port- 
land; Marjorie Morrell of Wayland, 
Mass.; Louise Johnson of Atlantic 
City, N. J.; Esther Hall of Bath; 
Edna Groves of Bowdoinham; Eloise 
Ford of Sanford; Marjorie Blagdon of 
Wiscasset; Madolyn Davis of Bath; 
Marion M. Wood of St. Johns, N. B.; 
and Edith Sturgis of Portland. 
PHI DELTA PSI 
On Wednesday evening the Phi 
Delta Psi fraternity held its Ivy dance 
in the Dirigo Grange Hall. The com- 
mittee for the dance were George L. 
True '22 (chairman), Harold E. 
Healey '23, and Maurice 0. Waterman 
'22. Music was furnished by the 
Colonial Orchestra of Portland. 

The patronesses were Mrs. A. O. 
Gross, Mrs. Hartley Baxter, and Mrs. 
A. E. Litchfield of Brunswick. 

Among those present were the 
Misses Edna Hubbard of Kennebunk; 
Blanch Cassista, Antoinette Saucier of 
Lewiston; Rachel Smith of Natick, 
Mass.; Reta Moore of Portland; Doris 
Creamer of Augusta; Gladys Walker, 
Emily Baxter, Dorothy Stimpson, 
Susie Palmer of Brunswick; and Mil- 
dred Batchelder of Sanford. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Baseball Games 

(Continued from Page 1) 

led off with a single. Clifford and 
Hill filled the bases with two more 
base hits. D. Needelman sent out a 
hot liner which Fitzgerald, the Colby 
second baseman, fumbled. Holmes 
scored. With the bases still full, 
Handy got a walk and Clifford scored. 

Walker, the next man up, sent out 
a long, low fly to left field. Williams 
failed to come through and Walker 
had reached second before the ball was 
recovered. The grandstand went wild 
when Needelman tried to round third. 
He claimed that Azzara tried to 
block him and several blows were ex- 
changed before the runner continued 
to the home plate. Bowdoin now had 
a lead of two runs. For a few minutes 
the ball was flying around in every 
direction, giving both Handy and 
Walker a chance to score, bringing 
Bowdoin's lead to four runs. These 
last two were occasioned by a wild 
throw by Morin in fielding the ball 
in to the plate. The next three run- 
ners flied out, and the last inning was 
scoreless. 

Each team got ten hits during the 
game. Errors were costly for Colby, 
six being chalked up against her. 
Walker struck out seven men. 

The summary: 

BOWDOIN 

ab r Ik po a r 

W. Needelman, 2b 4 1 

Smith, 3b 5 4 2 2 

A. Morrell, ss 5 3 

Holmes, cf 4 2 2 1 

Clifford, lb 3 1 1 9 1 

Hill, rf 4 2 3 1 

D. Needelman, If 3 2 2 1 

Handy, c 3 1 2 9 6 

Walker, p 3 1 1 6 

Totals 34 9 10 27 18 2 

COLBY 

ab r bh po a e 

Taylor, cf 4 2 1 

Williams, If 3 2 2 1 

Morin, ss 5 1 3 5 3 2 

Lampher, c 5 2 4 

R. Daniels, rf 2 1 1 

Fitzgerald, 2b 4 1 2 3 2 

Wills, lb 4 2 9 

Azzara, 3b 4 1 1 

M. Daniels, p 4 

Howard, p 3 2 

Totals 34 5 10 24 12 6 

Innings: 12 3456789 

Bowdoin 03000006 x— 9 

Colby 1110 2 0—5 

Two-base hits. D. Needelman, Morin, Three- 



base hit. Wills. Stolen base. Handy. Base on 
balls, off Walker 5. off Howard 3. Struck out, 
by Walker 7, by Howard. Hits, off Walker 
10 in 9 innings, off Howard, 6 in 6 2-3 in- 
nings. Sacrifice hits, Clifford, D. Needelman, 
Williams, Fitzgerald. Double plays, Morin to 
Fitzgerald to Wills. Left on bases, Bowdoin 
6, Colby 10. Hit by pitched ball, by Walker 
3, Daniels 2. Wild pitches, Walker 2. Passed 
balls, Lampher. Umpire, Dailey of Lewiston. 
Time, 2.25. 



BOWDOIN 7, MAINE 

Last Saturday the Bowdoin team 
whitewashed the U. of M. team at 
Orono and amassed seven runs to its 
own credit. The game was loosely 
played but Flinn kept the Maine hits 
so widely scattered that not a run 
could the Orono aggregation put 
across. On the contrary, the Bow- 
doin men were able to bunch their 
hits, not many more in fact than the 
Maine players got, in order to put 
seven men across the plate. Flinn 
fanned nine men, and was ably as- 
sisted. 

In the second inning Bowdoin got 
her first three runs. Clifford started 
things with a homer to deep center 
field. Hill reached first on Jowett's 
error but was thrown out at second 
on a fielder's choice when D. Needel- 
man reached first. M. Morrell 
doubled and Flinn singled with Need- 
elman and Morrell scoring. 

In the third two more runs were 
harked up. Morrell reached first on 
Johnson's error and stole second. 
Holmes flied out. Morrell advanced 
to third on Prescott's error. Clifford 
was out, Hill reached first on an error, 
and Morrell scored. Needelman then 
hit to deep center scoring Hill but be- 
■ng himself thrown out for not having 
touched the bag in running. 

In the eighth Needelman drove out 
the second homer of the day after 
Hill had singled, scoring both men. 

The score: 

BOWDOIN 

ab r bh po a e 

W. Needelman. 2b 5 1 6 1 

Smith, 3b 4 2 2 

A. Morrell, ss 5 1 2 3 1 

Holmes, cf 5 

Clifford, lb 5 1 1 15 2 

Hill, If 4 2 1 1 

D. Needelman, rf 3 2 2 

M. Morrell. c 2 1 1 9 2 1 

Flinn, p 4 2 3 

Totals 37 7 10 27 17 5 



MAINE 

ab r bh po a e 

King, cf 4 1 

Sargent, ss 3 2 4 5 

P. Johnson, If 4 1 

Young, rf 4 1 

A. Johnston, 2b 3 2 4 1 

Stearns, 3b 4 2 2 1 

Lunge, lb 3 9 1 

Prescott, c 3 6 1 1 

Jowett, p 2 1 1 2 

Nichols, p 

Munroe, p 1 

Totals 31 5 26 11 6 

Innings: 123456789 

Bowdoin 03200002 — 7 

Holmes out bunting foul on last strike. 
Batted for Jowett in eighth. Home runs, Clif- 
ford, D. Needelman. Three-base hits, King, 
W. Needelman. Two-base hits, M. Morrill. 
Stolen bases, A. Morrell. Bases on balls, off 
Jowett 3, off Flinn 1. Struck out, by Flinn 9. 
by Jowett 1 in 8 innings, by Nichols 2 in 1 
inning. Sacrifice hits, M. Morrell. Double 
plays, Bowdoin 3. Hit by pitcher, M. Morrell. 
Umpire, Allen. Time, 1.50. 



Ivy Ode 

(To be sung to the tune of "Holly") 

Plant the Ivy here to show 
Bowdoin, how we cling to thee. 
May it ever stronger grow, — 
Symbol of our loyalty. 

May your spirit, old and fine. 
Like the Ivy, reaching higher. 
Fill yours sons with thoughts divine. 
Noble aims and high desire. 

And these ancient vineclad towers 
When again, years hence, we meet, 
Will recall the happy hours 
Spent in college, mem'ries sweet. 

As the leaves to scarlet turn 
Glowing warm 'neath Autumn's sky 
Warm with love our hearts will turn 
True to Bowdoin 'till we die. 

B, H. M. WHITE '22. 



Ivy Poem 

When all the world was young, 

And gods sojourned with men upon the earth, 

earth, 
Fair Semele gave birth 
To Dionysius, guardian of the vine, 
Lord of the vintage, and the new-pressed 

Of youth and joy — the ecstacy divine, 
Of inspiration, and the boundless wealth 
Of fruitful health. 

Upon his brow he wore 

Not vine leaves, nor the rich 

Grape clusters, nor yet pale tendrils of green 

To twine within his hair. 

Not these, but still more fair 

The darker chaplet pressed 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Upon his regal head, 

Of ivy leaves was wrought, and he, caressed 
By clinging ivy, and by ivy crowned, 
Over the wine-soaked ground 
A vast procession led 
Of all the young and ardent soul: 
By inspiration's madness, and the 
The never quenched desire 
For joy and truth and beauty unej 
Spirits of those who dream and hopelessly 
aspire. 

And we, who live today. 

Find in each life the world's life, mirrored 
clear ; 

And in each year 

That, in these stately halls, so old and gray. 

We spend, we dedicate to Bowdoin's work 
and play, 

Our golden age, when gods are always near. 

Within each one of us, this Ivy day, symbo- 
lized all youth, divinity, 

The joy, the aspiration and the power 

That Dionysius gave, in his ecstatic hour. 

And so may this, the crowning hour of the 

year. 
Our ivy chaplet be, 

A wreath of honor, fading not away, 
For all eternity. 

—ARTHUR CHARLES BARTLETT. 



Memorial Day Services 



Bowdoin's Dead Commemorated a* 
Chapel Service. 



Bowdoin observed Memorial Day 
this year on Sunday by a special 
chapel service. President Sill's read 
again the list of those Bowdoin men 
who gave their lives in the last war, 
and said that the best way to learn 
patriotism was through the lesson 
presented by the deeds of these men, 
many of whom were so recently in the 
College halls. He spoke of the Col- 
lege men who served in the Civil War 
and of the four generals who came 
from the College. Special music was 
sung by the choir. 



Nominees For Managers 



The following men have been nomi- 
nated for election this coming Tues- 
day, June 7. The nominees for Stu- 
dent Council, Athletic Council, and Y. 
M. C. A. appeared last week. 

For Assistant Manager of Track: 
Ross '24, J. H. Johnson '24 (vote for 
one). 

For Assistant Manager of Baseball: 
Savage '24, Jewett '24, Rowe '24 (vote 
for two). 

For Manager of Baseball: Putnam 



'23, Black '23 (vote for one). 

For Assistant Manager of Tennis: 
Burnell '24, Blatchford '24, Blanchaid 
'24 (vote for two). 

For Assistant Manager of Hockey: 
P. D. Smith '24 and Stone '24. 

Ballots must be marked with num- 
ber of votes called for in order to be 
counted. 



Abraxas Initiates 

Honorary Society Takes in 1923 D:l2- 
gation. 



The Abraxas, Honorary Junior So 
ciety, initiated six men a week ago 
Thursday evening from the class of 
1923 who will comprise the active 
members of next year. The initiates 
were Butler, Eames, Miller, Palmer, 
Sheesley, and Stonemetz. 



Bowdoin Places in 

National Meet 



Tootell Puts Bowdoin On the List at 
I. C. A. A. A. A. 



Tootell '23 threw the hammer 140 feet 
1 1-2 inches for a fifth place for Bow- 
doin at the National Intercollegiate 
Meet at the Harvard Stadium last 
Saturday. Bowdoin was the only 
small college to place on the list of 
point winners at the meet, and there 
were many larger institutions which 
failed to place. The meet was a 
thriller, Harvard and California bat- 
tling for honors. The latter won by 
a half point. 

Tootell was not only the sole Bow- 
doin man to place but was also the 
only representative from the State to 
get in at the finish. The other Bow- 
doin men who went to the big meet 
were Captain-elect Hunt and F. 
Bishop, the yearling pole vault cham- 
pion. Their performance was very 
crediable. Tootell's feat was remark- 
able and he deserves great praise. 



Alumni vs. Varsity 

Advance News of Annual Commence- 
ment Week Feature. 



June 22, 11 a. m., daylight saving 
time. Don't forget this date or con- 
fuse the hour with your country time- 



piece. There is no part of the game 
that you want to miss. From 10.45 
when Webber takes a shot at the 
Alumni team in their new regalia un- 
til the ninth when Squanto and Co. 
put over the winning run on a squeeze 
play there will be something doing. 

The following will appear on the 
Alumni team: Game Gibson '02, 
Hungry Bly '03, Don White '05, Ed 
Files '08, Birl Clifford '11, Sqi aivto 
Wilson '12, Leland Means '12, E. O. 
La Casce '14, A. R. Caspar '19, Paul 
Mason '20 (pitcher). 

A write-up for each of the above 
was desired but they were all too 
modest. Evidently Scraanto did not 
want it known that he had to buy up 
half of Winthrop to give his boys and 
himself room enough for batting 
practice. Perhaps Bly '03 is trying 
to keep it from his wife that he has 
been practicing with the Bates Co-eds 
all the spring. Bill Clifford's return 
post card speaks for itself, "I'll play 
on your team if you will have shoes 
big enough for me." 

All the above is just another way 
of saying that the Alumni have a real 
ball team with all the fixings and will 
stage a ball game that will give the 
Varsity a run for their money. 

LUTHER DANA '03 



Boston University 4, 

Bowdoin 2 



The tennis team met its first de- 
feat of the season in a dual meet 
when it came against Boston Uni- 
versity last Thursday on the Bruns- 
wick courts. Fisher lost to Davis 
after a hard fight in which excellent 
playing was exhibited by both men. 
Partridge took his singles from P. 
Richardson, and Partridge and Fisher 
took their doubles. H. Bishop and 
Young were defeated after hard play- 
ing. 

SINGLES 
Davis, B. U. defeated Fisher, 

Bowdoin 6 — 3 6 — 2 

Partridge. Bowdoin. defeated P. 

Richardson 6 — 2 6 — 2 

Backman, B. U, defeated Young, 

Bowdoin 8 — 6 6 — 2 

D. Richardson, B. U., defeated E. 

Bishop, Bowdoin 6 — 4 6 — 2 

DOUBLES 
Partridge and Fisher defeated D. 

Richardson and P. Richardson.. 6 — 4 6 — 2 
Backman and Davis defeated 

Bishop and Young 6 — 3 6 — 2 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Edward B. Ham '22 Editor-in-Chief 

F. King Turgeon '23 Managing Edito* 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

George H. Quinby '23 Intercollegiate News 

George T, Davis '24 Alumni Department 

Fredric S. Klees '24 Faculty Notes 

G. William Rowe '24 Athletics 

P. Dennison Smith '24 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. R. Ludden '22 F. A. Gerrard '23 

R. L. McCormack '22 K. R. Philbrick '23 
V. C. McGorrill '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Eben G. Tileston '22 Business Manager 

E. R. Latty '23 Assistant Manager 

J. U. Renier '23 Assistant Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, $3.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, 15 cents- 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials only; the Managing 
Editor for news and make-up; tin- 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 



Vol. LI. 



June 3, 1921. 



No. 9 



COitouals 

Ivy Day, 1865-1921. 

In this semi-centennial volume of 
the "Orient," numerous quotations 
from the fortnightly of fifty years ago 
have been reprinted this spring. The 
"Orient" takes pleasure in raking up 
a few memories of some past Ivys. 

The first Ivy exercises in the his- 
tory of the college were held by the 
class of 1866 in the chapel on Oc- 
tober 26, 1865. At this ceremony the 
program was much the same as to- 
day except for the presentations. The 
oration was delivered by George Wil- 
liam Kelley, the poem by George True 
Sumner, while the ode was written by 
the late Professor Henry Leland 
Chapman. 

After 1865 there were no Ivy ex- 
ercises until 1874, when the class of 
1875 revived the plan inaugurated by 
1866. Ever since 1874 each class has 
had an Ivy Day with exercises and 
other events such as "field day" and 



Seniors' Last Chapel. 

The Ivy days of 1889 and 1890 were 
very eloquently and ornately de- 
scribed in the "Orient" of that time. 
In addition to the more important 
parts in the Ivy exercises, the pre- 
sentation speeches were also printed 
in full as a rule. In the "Orient" of 
June 12, 1889, a long account of the 
presentations is written in that rare 
and radiant style of the early volumes 
of Bowdoin's fortnightly paper. Note 
the following sentence regarding the 
acceptance of the fan by the class 
"social man:" "He advanced with 
that calm and placid smile for which 
so many of the Brunswick ladies are 
pining, and in a speech in which de- 
livery and diction combined for the 
most taking effect we have ever wit- 
nessed upon that stage, he held the 
audience captive." 

Or admire the following taken from 
the account of the Ivy Hop of the 
class of 1890: "The dance floor was 
thronged with '90's shapely gallants, 
each with a vision of fragile loveli- 
ness clinging with palpitating, yet 
serene, confidence to his well-nerved 
arm. The reposeful dignity of the 
Senior added character to the scene; 
the rich-blooded, living, kicking 
Sophomore, aflood with animal life, 
with his uniformly red-cheeked, 
bouncing dame contributed vivacity 
and spirit to the company. 

"It was a most gorgeous symposium 
of changing color and shade, costumes 
of the rarest fabrics of the East, 
sparkling gems and radiant woman- 
hood — all this being strengthened and 
supported by the noblest gentry of 
the Pine Tree State; and there was 
just enough of sound wafted up on 
the perfume-laden atmosphere to sug- 
gest the rippling of a summer sea in 
grottoes of opaline basalt." 

(Can the undergraduate of today 
visualize this dance, held in the Town 
Hall of Brunswick ? ) 

From the "Orient" of June 11, 1890, 
it seems of interest to reprint part of 
the dance order for the Ivy Hop of 
the class of 1891, and likewise the 
menu of the "Ivy Hop Lunch" for the 
translation of which the "Orient" de- 
cided to "refer the reader to the head 
of the French department." 
"Order of Dances" 

Waltz "The Lilac" 

Polka "The Oolah" 

Lanciers . "The Gondoliers" 



Schottische 

Waltz 

Portland Fancy 

Galop 

Schottische 

Quadrille 

Saratoga Lanciers 



"Marie" 

"Santiago" 

"Operatic" 

"Venice" 

"Amor" 

"Invasion" 

"Ruddygore" 



"Ivy Hop Lunch" 



Cla 



Potage de tortue verte 

En tasses a la Victoria 

Celeri en Rameaux Lives a la Reine 

Pyramide de Dinde aux Truffles 

Salade d'Homade Salade de Laitue 

Creme Glacee a la Naples 

Doigts des Dames Baisers 

Macaroons 

Tablet d'Ange Tablet de Chocolat 

Tablet de Noix 

Charlotte Russe a la Chantilly 

Bon-bons en Paniers 
Cafe Noir 



Melvin Smith Holway. 

In the earlier days of Bowdoin until 
fairly recent years, undergraduate life 
here apparently provided far more op- 
portunity than now for the formation 
of the splendid and lasting friend- 
ships which so enriched the lives of 
most of the real college men of the 
last century. Such a friendship 
existed between the late Melvin Smith 
Holway '82 and his class-mate, Arthur 
G. Staples. In an appreciation of Mr. 
Holway printed in a recent issue of 
the "Lewiston Journal," Mr. Staples 
gives a simple and affectionate sketch 
of this intimacy. He describes the 
noteworthy characteristics of his 
friend in striking and sympathetic 
language and pays him high tribute 
for the fineness which he recognized 
in him. 

Mr. Holway is the fifth member of 
the governing boards and also the 
fourth overseer of the college who 
has died since last Commencement. 
The other four were Judge Lucilius 
Alonzo Emery '61 of the Trustees, and 
Dr. Frederic Henry Gerrish '66, Hon. 
James Phinney Baxter (Litt.D. '04), 
and James Louis Doherty '89 of the 
Overseers. 

The "Orient" prints below some ex- 
cerpts from the account of Mr. Hol- 
way by Mr. Staples: 

"The writer recalls the day in 1878, 
when he first met Mr. Holway. It 
was in one of those sun-checkered 
spaces of the pines of Bowdoin in the 
early autumn. He was only seven- 
teen, as was the writer, and both be- 
ing timid, youthful, and not at all ath- 
letic, we drifted together and wr.nd- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



ered that day about the college 
campus and down by the river to 
watch the falls come tumbling down. 
. . . We were in the same frater- 
nity. We edited the "Orient" to- 
gether. We wrote to each other in 
vacation time. And then and there 
began a life-long friendship. . . . 
"Mclvin Smith Holway had the 
most amazing intuitive sense of cul- 
ture, unaffected, unsought by him, but 
born of him. He came to college 
from the Augusta schools and soon 
demonstrated that he was no 'average 
scholar.' He had that capacity for 
thoroughness, and the purpose to 
achieve the leadership in scholarship 
of the class. 

" . . . He knew how to write 
wonderfully and should have been a 
great essayist and authority on liter- 
ature rather than a lawyer. He had 
the qualifications for such work as 
that of William Lyon Phelps. He 
died working for others. 

"... I have lost a brother cf 
the sunny days, a brother of the old 
Fraternity; a brother of the hedge- 
rows, of friendly roads, of adventures 
in contentment. ... I am very 
sure that Mr. Holway's life is an ex- 
ceeding great lesson and that his 
beneficent influence must go on 
through many years, and that he has 
made the best of a life of tremendous 
value to society; a scholar, a gentle- 
man, a soldier of the cross." 



including the various college organiza- 
tions together with some photographs 
of the college buildings and other 
scenes. This year the group pictures 
of the fraternities are being omitted, 
in spite of the fact that this may be a 
disappointment to some. 

The "grind" section is somewhat 
shorter than usual, but it contains a 
number of clever articles and com- 
ments, including some characteriz- 
ations of certain members of the 
faculty from a strictly undergraduate 
point of view. 

The editorial board consists of Car- 
roll S. Towle, editor-in-chief; Allen E. 
Morrell, business manager; Wilfred R. 
Brewer, assistant business manager; 
William R. Ludden, art editor; Fran- 
cis P. Freeman, Ernest M. Hall, Ed- 
ward B. Ham, Henry H. Merry, John 
C. Pickard, Hartley F. Simpson, Eben 
G. Tileston, George B. Welch, and 
Roblev C. Wilson, associate editors. 



The 1922 Bugle. 

A number of modifications and 
changes in the 1922 "Bugle" have 
made it considerably better than some 
of the past volumes in various re- 
spects. Before the statistics of each 
class, for example, is a brief "his- 
torical" sketch written by a member 
of the class. The athletics depart- 
ment has been modified with a view to 
making the accounts of the major 
sports more detailed and more than 
mere chronicles of scores. 

The "Bugle" is dedicated to William 
Albion Moody, A.M., of the class of 
1882, "Wing Professor of Mathematics 
at Bowdoin, who for thirty-five years 
has so faithfully served his Alma 
Mater." 

The design of the chapel towers for 
the cover gives the "Bugle" an un- 
usually attractive appearance. There 
is the usual large number of pictures, 



Hebron Wins 

Interscholastic Meet 

Marsters of Deeiing Lowers O.vn 

Record in 440 by a Fifth cf 

a Second. 



Contrary to all predictions, Hebron 
won the twenty-third annual Inter- 
scholastic Track Meet. Hebron proved 
to be particularly strong in field 
events, while Deering, the prospective 
winner, was weak in the weights. Red- 
man, of Westbrook Seminary, was 
high point winner. In all he gathered 
13 points. Soule, of Hebron, ran a 
close second with 12 1-2 points. 
Marsters, of Deering, broke the only 
record to pass by the board. He 
lowered the record which he set last 
year in the 440 by one-fifth of a sec- 
ond, establishing a new record of 
52 2-5 seconds. In many respects this 
year's meet was an exceptional one. 
The points were more evenly divided 
than ever before, and many of the 
smaller schools scored. Also there 
was an unusual number of entries, 
over .200. So many men were entered 
in the 100 yard dash that semi-final 
heats had to be run, which had not 
been planned. Thirty men were en- 
tered in the quarter mile, which re- 
quired three heats; twenty-four ran 
the half mile, and twenty-nine th° 



mile. Tilton Seminary, New Hamp- 
shire, was the only school outside 
Maine to be represented at the meet. 
Ward of Gardiner High won the 
mile run. As he is a junior, and made 
good time without being hard pressed 
by close competition, he should show 
up well in next year's meets. Red- 
man, of Westbrook Seminary, won the 
100 yard dash. He made the best 
time that has been made for some 
years, coming within one-fifth of a 
second of the record, which is 10 1-5 
seconds. Hebron secured first and 
second places in the hammer throw; 
third and fourth in the shot put; and 
second and fourth in the discus throw. 
Marsters, of Deering, made a good 
showing in taking the 440 and 880. 
He made good time in the 880, and 
undoubtedly would have made better 
had he not been saving himself for 
the 440. 

Point Summary: Hebron, 31 1-4; 
Deering High, 22 7-12; Gardiner High, 
20 2-3; Edward Little High, 18; West- 
brook Seminary, 16; Wilton Academy, 
'); Leavitt Institute, 6; Foxcroft 
Academy, 5; Hilton Seminary, 4 3-4; 
Morse, and Kennebunk High, 3; Port- 
land and Brunswick High, 1; Farm- 
ington High, 3-4; Yarmouth Academy, 
South Portland, Sanford, Gorham, 
Cony High failed to score. 

Finals 

120-yard Hurdles— Won by Soule of Hebron ; 
second, H. Hildreth of Gardiner ; third. C. 
Hildreth of Gardiner; time, 17 1-5 seconds. 
Linnell of Deering, who would have placed, 
was disqualified for knocking down three 
hurdles. 

880-yard Run — Won by Marsters of Deer- 
ing ; second, Walter of Leavitt Institute ; third, 
C. Hildreth of Gardiner High; fourth, Rich- 
mond of Portland; time, 2 minutes 8 2-5 sec- 
onds. 

100-yard — Won by Redmond of Westbrook 
Seminary ; second, Fitz of Edward Little High ; 
third, Gamage of Edward Little High ; fourth, 
Reynolds of Deering; time, 10 1-5 seconds. 

440-yard Dash — Won by Marsters of Deer- 
ing ; second, Webber of Kennebunk ; third, 
Keogh of Hebron ; fourth, Coykendall of West- 
brook Seminary ; time, 52 2-5 seconds, break- 
ing the record. 

220-yard Dash — Won by Fitz of Edward 
Little High ; second, Annis of Deering : third, 
Reynolds of Deering ; fourth, Nichols of 
Hebron ; time. 23 1-5 seconds. 

Mile Run — Won by Ward of Gardiner High ; 
second. Stover of Morse High; third, Smith 
of Tilton Seminary ; fourth, Patten of Bruns- 
wick High ; time, 4 minutes 49 2-5 seconds. 

220-yard Hurdle — Won by Soule of Hebron ; 
second, Linnell of Deering ; third. Gray of 
Gardiner : fourth, H. Hildreth of Gardiner ; 
time, 27 4-5 seconds. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Running High Jump — Won by Costello of 
Edward Little High ; second, Rowe of Edward 
Little ; third, Smith of Totten ; fourth, tie 
between H. Hildreth and C. Hildreth of Gardi- 
ner and Ward of Deering ; height, 5 feet 6 
inches. 

Throwing Discus — Wen by Barrows of Fox- 
croft : second. Prince of Hebron ; third, Graves 
of Westbrook Seminary ; fourth, Pettingill of 
Hebron ; distance, 100.05 feet. 

Running Broad Jump — Won by Redmond of 
Westbrook Seminary ; second, tie between 
Ward of Deering and Soule of Hebron ; fourth, 
Dale of Gardiner ; distance, 20 feet 10 1-4 
inches. 

Throwing 12-Pound Hammer — Won by Allen 
of Hebron ; second, Pettingill of Hebron ; third, 
Wheeler of Leavitt Institute ; fourth, Brad- 
ford of Leavitt Institute ; distance, 121.35 feet. 

Putting 12-Pound Shot— Won by Davenport 
of Wilton ; second, Redmond of Westbrook 
Seminary; third, Prince of Hebron; fourth. 
Pettingill of Hebron ; distance, 41.8 feet. 

Pole Vaulting — First place tied between 
Moore of Gardiner and Pierce of Wilton 
Academy ; third place, tied between Booth of 
Tilton Seminary, Higgins of Hebron, Lunt of 
Farmington High and Ward of Deering High ; 
height, 9 feet 6 inches. 



Track Letter Men 

Twenty Letters Awarded Track Men 
— Hunt Elected Captain 



At the meeting of the Athletic 
Council on May 23, twenty letters 
were awarded to the track men. Seven 
of these went to Seniors, three to 
Juniors, seven to Sophomores and 
three to Freshmen. 

The men who won their letters this 
last year were: from 1921, Captain 
Thomson, Cook, Parent, Goodwin, 
Turner, Hatch, Hart; from 1922, Cap- 
tain-elect Hunt, Towle, and Manager 
McGorrill; from 1923, Butler, Bisson, 
Mason, Palmer, Philbrook, Renier, and 
Tootell; from 1924, Bishop, Hardy, 
and Kirkpatrick. 

At a meeting of the letter men last 
Wednesday noon Hunt '22 was elec- 
ted captain for the coming year. 



jFacuItp Jl3otc 



Several lectures in the course in 
common law which is being conducted 
by Mr. Clement F. Robinson of Port- 
land in the absence of Professor Stan- 
wood have been given by other at- 
torneys when Mr. Robinson's duties as 
County Attorney have prevented his 
holding a class. Mr. Raymond S. 
Oakes of Portland, a graduate of 
Bates College, gave two lectures on 
Partnerships and Corporations. Frank 



I. Gowan '13, president of the Port- 
land Common Council, gave two lec- 
tures on Commercial Paper. Arthur 
L. Robinson '08, recently a member of 
the Industrial Accident Commission, 
gave a lecture on Workmen's Compen- 
sation, and another on Wills. Walter 
S. Glidden of Bath gave two lectures 
on Torts. 



Final Examinations 



June, 1921 



Definitive Schedule 



Thursday, June 9 — 8.30 A. M. 

Art 8 Walker Art Building 

Chemistry 2 Memorial Hall 

German 6 Memorial Hall 

Greek B Memorial Hall 

Zoology 10 Memorial Hall 

Thursday, June 9—1.30 P. M. 

Botany 1 Adams Hall 

Geology 2 Adams Hall 

Philosophy 2 Memorial Hall 

Physics 2 Memorial Hall 

Physics 4 Memorial Hall 

Friday, June 10—8.30 A. M. 

Economics 2 Memorial Hall 

Government 6 Adams Hall 

Friday, June 10—1.30 P. M. 

Astronomy 2 Adams Hall 

English 2, Div. A, B ...Memorial Hall 

English 2, Div C Adams Hall 

English 6 Adams Hall 

Saturday, June 11 — 8.30 A. M. 

Chemistry 7a Memorial Hall 

Latin B Memorial Hall 

Latin 2 Memorial Hall 

Latin 4 Memorial Hall 

Philosophy 4 Memorial Hall 

Surveying 1 Memorial Hall 

Saturday, June 11—1.30 P. M. 

Mathematics 2 Memorial Hall 

Mathematics 4 Adams Hall 

Mathematics 6 Memorial Hall 

Mathematics Sp Adams Hall 

M nday, June 13—8.30 A. M. 

Government 2 Memorial Mall 

Government 12 Adams Hall 

Fhysics 10 Adams Hall 

Monday, June 13—1.30 P. M. 

Italian 4 Memorial Hall 

Spanish 2 Memorial Hall 

Spanish 4 Memorial Hall 

Tuesday, June 14—8.30 A. M. 

Literature 2 Memorial Hall 

Psychology 4 Memorial Hall 

Tuesday, June 14—1.30 P. M. 

Chemistry Sp Adams Hall 

French 2 Adams Hall 

French 4 Memorial Hall 

French 8 Adams Hall 

Wednesday, June 15—8.30 A. M. 

Art 4 Walker Art Building 

Mineralogy 1 Chemical Lecture Room 

Music 2 Memorial Hall 

Psychology 2 Memorial Hall 

Psychology 6 . . Memorial Hall 

Psychology 8 Memorial Hall 

Russian 2 Memorial Hall 



Wednesday, June 15 — 1.30 P. M. 

Economics 6 Memorial Hall 

Economics 8 Memorial Hall 

Thursday, June 16—8.30 A. M. 

Economics 4b Memorial Hall 

English 10 Memorial Hall 

Thursday, June 16 — 1.30 P. M. 

German 2 Memorial Hall 

German 4 Memorial Hall 

Music 6 Memorial Hall 

Friday, June 17—8.30 A. M. 

Chemistry 6 Memorial Hall 

Music 4 Memorial Hall 

Friday, June 17—1.30 P. M. 

Zoology 2 Memorial Hall 

Zoology 4 Memorial Hall 

Note. — Appointments for examinations in 
courses not here scheduled are made by the 
instructors. 



OLampus jftEtos 



On Wednesday, Thursday and Fri- 
day of this week there has been an 
exhibition of the work of the students 
of Biology in the Biology Laboratory 
under the direction of Professors 
Copeland and Gross. 



Interfraternity Baseball 



Delta Kappa Epsilon 3, Psi Upsilon 2. 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 9, Non-Frater- 
nity 6. 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 14, Beta Theta 
Pi 4. 

Chi Psi 2, Psi Upsilon 0. 

Chi Psi 2, Beta Theta Pi 1. 



Coach Receives 

Handsome Present 



Gibson '02 Presents Stop Watch to 
Jack Ma gee. 



Last week Jack Magee received 
from Harvey D. Gibson '02 a very fine 
stop watch engraved on the back as 
follows: "To Jack, in appreciation of 
the results of his efforts on May 14, 
1921.— Harvey D. Gibson." 

The watch is of very fine make, a 
Paul Breton split second watch. It 
was given to show the recognition of 
Jack's fine work with the track team 
this year which largely due to him 
succeeded in winning the state cham- 
pionship against powerful odds. 



Ottnra of Jug Wnk JtobliratumB 



Saglr 




Simpson Merry Wilson Welch Ham Freeman 

Tileston Ludden Brewer Towle Morrell Pickard E. M. Hall 























Star Mitt 

Sinarii 




■>■ 












^l i, ™ 






ml ■ " ' 
1 1^.1 -J 




^L ^* 















0. G. Hall Klees 

Hunt Toyokawa 



Butler W. K. Hall 

White Hatch 



©rirttt 
Uuarii 




Houghton Gerrard Philbrick Quinby 

Berry Wadsworth Ludden St. Clair McGown 

Redman Turgeon Ham Haines Boardman McGorri 





Allen Everett Morrell 

Popular Man and Captain-elect of 
Football. 



Ralph Brown Knight 

Class Vice-President. 




George Allen Partridge 

Class President, 
and Captain of Tennis. 





Edward Billings Ham 

Class Secretary-Treasurer and 
Editor-in-Chief of the "Orient." 



John Coleman Pickard 

Class Marshal. 





Wilfred Reginald Brewer 

Chairman Ivy Day Committee. 



Arthur Charles Bartlett 

Class Poet. 




Albert Rudolph Thayer 

Class Orator. 





Bruce Hugh Miller White 

Class Odist and Editor-in-Chief of 

the "Bear Skin." 



Carroll Sherburne Towle 

Editor-in-Chief of the "Bugle" and 
Class Chaplain. 




Virgil Courtney McGorrill 

Manager of Track. 




Francis Ruthven Ridley 

Manager of Baseball. 




Edward Atherton Hunt 

Captain-elect of Track. 





William Robinson Ludden 

Manager of Football. 



Eben Gordon Tileston 

Business Manager Bowdoin 
Publishing Company 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



alumni Department 



1882— Melvin Smith Holway, an 
overseer of the College, died sudden- 
ly at the home of his brother, Charles 
O. Holway, in Augusta on May 21. 
Mr. Holway has been a prominent at- 
torney in Kennebec County for many 
years, having begun his practice in 
Augusta in 1885. He was a former 
president of the Christian Civic 
League of Maine and a former city 
solicitor. Mr. Holway was born in 
Augusta sixty years ago, the son of 
Oscar Holway, a prominent business 
man. He graduated from Bowdoin in 
1882 and during the next two years 
he attended the Harvard Law School. 
He received the degree of Master of 
Arts in 1885, and in the same year he 
began his practice. He has been an 
overseer of the College for a number 
of years. He was a member of the 
Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. 



Class Notes 1918 



Robert G. Albion is intiuctor in 
History at Harvard and is to do re- 
search in that line in Europe this sum- 
mer. 

Amos L. Allen is with the General 
Electric Co. at Pittsfield, Mass. 

Calvin L. Batchelder is assistant 
chemist in the Forest Products Lab- 
oratory at Madison, Wisconsin. 

Bradbury J. Bagley is teaching at 
Colby Academy, New London, N. H. 

Murray M. Bigelow is in the gar- 
age business at Bridgton, Maine. 

George H. Blake is teaching at New 
Hampshire State College, Durham, 
N. H. 

Hugh Blanchard is located in Au- 
gusta, Georgia. 

Vernon L. Brown is in the insur- 
ance business in Philadelphia, Pa. 

C. Lloyd Claff is at present located 
in Newark, N. J. 

Joseph F. Clark is in the insurance 
business with Brown Bi'os., Boston, 
Mass. 

Lloyd 0. Colter is in business in 
New York City. 

Neil E. Daggett is associated with 
the Union Paper Bag Co., at Hudson 
Falls, N. Y. 

Archibald Sweetland Dean is study- 
ing medicine at Johns Hopkins, Balti- 
more, Md. 



George S. Demott is with the Times 
Co., Bath, Me. 

Orren S. Donnell is associated with 
F. J. McKenney '15 in th<= oil business 
at Denison, Texas. 

Glenn Farmer is in the oil business 
at Bartlesville, Okla. 

Elliott Freeman is in business at 
Portland, Me. 

A. S. Gray is with the Macallen 
Company, Boston, Mass. 

The Hamlin brothers, O. L. and J. 
P. are with the American Thread Co. 
at Milo, Maine. 

Harlan L. Harrington, Class Secre- 
tary, is Director of the Continuation 
School at Quincy, Mass. 

Henry C. Haskell is an operating 
engineer with the United States 
Aluminum Co., at Pittsburg, Pa. 

Marshall W. Hurlin is located at 
Schenectady, N. Y. 

Linwood H. Jones is engaged in 
chemical work at Kenvil, N. J. 

Gerald S. Joyce is in the Research 
Department of William Filene & Sons 
at Boston, Mass. 

Franklin D. MacCormick is now lo- 
cated at the Boston office of the John 
Hancock Mutual Life Ins. Co. 

John B. Matthews is instructor of 
History at the Maiden, Mass., High 
School. 

Arthur H. McQuillan is studying at 
Harvard Medical School. 

Tobey Mooers is now American 
Vice-Consul at Fayal, Azores. 

Clyde S. Murch is located at South 
Casco, Maine. 

William Needelman is a student at 
Bowdoin Medical School. 

Bela Norton is in business in New 
York City. 

Howard T. Pierce is teaching at 
Maine Central Institute, Pittsfield, 
Maine. 

Ralph Pendleton is in the insurance 
business in New York. 

Albert L. Prosser is an officer on 
the U. S. S. Hunt. 

John T. Reynolds has been a stu- 
dent at Yale Law School since gradu- 
ation. 

Percy S. Ridlon is doing graduate 
work in philosophy and theology at 
Boston University. 

Robert C. Rounds has been teach- 
ing French at Bowdoin this year. 

Richard T. Schlosberg is a 1st 
Lieutenant in the regular army. 

Edward S. C. Smith is doing gradu- 



ate work in geology at Harvard. 

Milan Smith holds a pastorate at 
Kent's Hill, Maine. 

William W. Simonton is teaching at 
Portland High School this year and 
coaching the track team. 

Timothy R. Stearns is with the 
Hood Rubber Co. at Watertown, 
Mass. 

Robert S. Stetson is doing advanced 
work in music at the Massachusetts 
Conservatory. 

Norman D. Stewart is teaching in 
the High School at Plattsburg, N. Y. 

Boyce A. Thomas is teaching at the 
William Penn Charter School at Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. 

William H. Van Wart is a student 
at Harvard Medical School. 

Manfred L. Warren is teaching 
mathematics in the High School at 
Summit, N. J., and doing graduate 
work in education at Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Frank E. Whalen is in business with 
headquarters at Bath, Maine. 

Paul Woodworth is a student at 
Harvard Law School. 

Leland C. Wyman is taking gradu- 
ate work in the department of Bi- 
ology at Harvard. 

Paul C. Young has transferred 
from the University of Minnesota to 
Harvard this year. 



Campus Activities 



Class of 1923 

Elmer N. Swinglehurst of Orange, 
N. J., is a graduate of the Orange 
High School and a member of Delta 
L T psilon. In his Freshman year he 
played on his class football team, and 
was on the varsity squad. He also 
made a response at the Freshman 
banquet. This year he played on his 
class baseball team, and in addition 
was a member of the varsity football 
squad and of the hockey squad. 

Waht P. Yemprayura, of Bangkok, 
Siam, prepared for Bowdoin at Wil- 
braham Academy, Massachusetts. He 
is a member of the Phi Delta Psi fra- 
ternity, the Fencing Squad, the Wire- 
less Club, and the Biology Club. 



CLASS OF 1924 

Joseph M. Brisebois of Sandown, 
N. H., is a member of the Theta Delta 
Chi fraternity and a graduate of San- 
born Seminasy. He played on his 



10 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



class football team in his Freshman 
year. 

Fredric S. Klees, of Fleetwood, Pa., 
is a graduate of Souderton (Pennsyl- 
vania) High School, and a member of 
the Theta Delta Chi fraternity. He 
has made the editorial board of the 
"Orient," and the art staff of the 
"Bear Skin." He is a member of the 
Masque and Gown, having a part in 
the Ivy play. 

Archie Mason, of Amherst, N. H., 
is a graduate of Amherst High School. 
He is a member of the Kappa Sigma 
fraternity. 

Anson B. Moran of Bernardsville, 
N. J., graduated from Bernardsville 
High School. He is a member of 
Delta Upsilon. He is candidate for 
the "Orient" Board and for Assistant 
Manager of the Masque and Gown. 

Robert F. Smythe, of Benton Har- 
bor, Michigan, is a graduate of Ben- 
ton Harbor High School. He is a 
member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity, 
and on the Varsity Track Squad, and 
the Rifle Team. 

Lawrence W. Towle of Saco is a 
graduate of Thornton Academy and a 
member of the Psi Upsilon fraternity. 

Douglas W. Young .of New London, 
Conn., is a graduate of Waltham High 
School and a member of the Alpha 
Delta Phi fraternity. This winter he 
played in several of the hockey games. 
This spring he is one of the chief can- 
didates for the tennis team. He is a 
member of the cast of the Commence- 
ment play. 



How's This As An Incentive To 
Produce Humor? 

"The first weekly competition for 
the brightest topical paragraph suit- 
able for the Passing Hour begins to- 
day. The prizes are (1) 300 Abdulla 
Cigarettes and (2) 150 ditto. Contri- 
butions to be in by Monday's first post 
at latest; the devil take the hindmost 
and the front man take the cigar- 
etters." — "Isis" of Oxford University. 



"Jack is a well colored man." 

"Not a negro, old chap?" 

"No; but Jack is well read and 
thinks himself in the pink of condi- 
tion, but gets green with envy, and 
when he is blue he has nothing but 
black looks. You can easily see that 
there is a streak of yellow in him." 



HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

Graduate School of Business Administration 

A two-year course in business leading to the degree of Master 
of Business Administration. 

Open to college graduates. 

Courses offered in the following fields: Accounting, Busi- 
ness Law, Banking and Finance, Marketing, Advertising, 
Retail Store Problems, Sales Management, Industrial Manage- 
ment, Labor Problems, Business Statistics, Foreign Trade, 
Transportation, Lumbering, Office Organization. 




0e-09 09-10- 10-H 



13-16 16J.7 17-13 IMS X9-20 Zo-21 



Nineteen graduates of Bowdoin College have attended the 
School, two during the present year. 

The registration for 1921-'22 is limited to three hundred in 
the first-year courses. Application after May 1st should be 
accompanied by a certified transcript of the college record. 

For information write to 

Dean W. B. Donham, University 131 

Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 



The Steward Rejoices when his "food crabbers" praise. 

W. N. Clark Co.'s Fancy Canned Fruits and Vegetables 
make them smack their lips. 



THE HOLMES-SWIFT COMPANY 

SOLE AGENTS 
Augusta, .... Maine 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE ORIENT*"! 



Special Rate Until June 20 



IF YOU NEED 

Letterheads Cards 
Invitations Folders 
Statements Circulars 
Envelopes Billheads 

or anything else in the print- 
ing line, come in and see us. 



THE RECORD PRESS. BRUNSWICK, ME. 



HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

There is unlimited demand for skilled 
dentists and specialists in dentistry. This 
school offers a most thorough and efficient 
training in this interesting profession. For 
those who wish to specialize there are 
courses in Oral Surgery, Orthodontia 
(straightening the teeth) and other 
branches. Instruction by leading dentists 
of Boston and vicinity. Up-to-date equip- 
ment with unusual opportunities for prac- 
tical work. A college certificate indicat- 
ing one year's work in college English, 
Biology, Chemistry, as well as high school 
or college Physics, required for admission. 
Write for particulars. 

EUGENE H. SMITH, D. M. D., Dean 
Boston, Mass. 



FORDHAM LAW SCHOOL 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING' 



CO-EDUCATIONAL 

CASE SYSTEM 
THREE-YEAR COURSE 



AFTERNOON CLASS 
EVENING CLASS 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 



CHARLES P. DAVIS, Registrar 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING 
NEW YORK CITY 



P. J. MESERVE'S 

Drug Store 
Opposite Town Hall 



A. W. HASKELL, D. D. S. 

W. F. BROWN, D. D. S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Postoffice. Brunswick, Maine 



BOWDOIN CANTEEN 

8 a. m.-12 m.; 1.30-6; 7-11 
Sundays, 12-5 p. m. 

A. PALMER, 19 North Winthrop 



We carry a large assortment of 
Olives, Pickles, Cheese, and Fancy Cookies. 

DAVIS' MARKET 

Next to Star Lunch 

all Cigarettes 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 Maine Street 



oivie: good valu 

... IIM 

SECOND HAND 

CAMERAS 

. . AT . . 

WEBBER'S STUDIO 



Do You Need Extra Courses? 

Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages, Economics, 
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire 
how credits earned may be applied on present college program. 

Stye Htttormtij of dUftrago 



HOME STUDY DEPT. 



CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 



YOU HAVE WRITTEN POEMS! 

Do you care to have them revised 
or constructively criticised by success- 
ful authors? If you do, then send us 
your manuscript (stories, articles or 
poems). We will criticise, and place 
them should they prove to be accept- 
able for publication. 

There is no actual charge for our 
services. If, however, you have not 
previously enrolled with the advisory 
department of this association, we re- 
quest that you enclose the initial fee 
of two dollars, which we must ask of 
each new contributor. There is no 
additional expense, no further obliga- 
tion. 

It must be realized that we can only 
be of aid to those of serious intent. If 
you do mean to strive for literary suc- 
cess, we can help you in many ways. 
Our services are yours until we have 
actually succeeded in marketing at 
least one of your manuscripts. Send 
something to-day! 

Please enclose return postage with 
your communications. 

NATIONAL LITERARY 
ASSOCIATION 



131 W. 39th St. 
New York City 



Advisory 



Department 



12 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 




What Is Research? 



UPPOSE that a stove burns too much coal for the amount of 

heat that it radiates. The manufacturer hires a man familiar 

with the principles of combustion and heat radiation to make 

experiments which will indicate desirable changes in design. The 

stove selected as the most efficient is the result of research. 

Suppose that you want to make a ruby in a factory — not a mere 
imitation, but a real ruby, indistinguishable by any chemical or 
physical test from the natural stone. You begin by analyzing rubies 
chemically and physically. Then you try to make rubies just as 
nature did, with the same chemicals and under similar conditions. 
Your rubies are the result of research — research of a different type 
from that required to improve the stove. 

Suppose, as you melted up your chemicals to produce rubies and 
experimented with high temperatures, you began to wonder how hot 
the earth must have been millions of years ago when rubies were first 
crystallized, and what were the forces at play that made this planet 
what it is. You begin an investigation that leads you far from 
rubies and causes you to formulate theories to explain how the earth, 
and, for that matter, how the whole solar system was created. That 
would be research of a still different type — pioneering into the 
unknown to satisfy an insatiable curiosity. 

Research of all three types is conducted in the Laboratories of the 
General Electric Company. But it is the third type of research — 
pioneering into the unknown — that means most, in the long run, 
even though it is undertaken with no practical benefit in view. 

At the present time, for example, the Research Laboratories of 
the General Electric Company are exploring matter with X-rays in 
order to discover not only how the atoms in different substances are 
arranged but how the atoms themselves are built up. The more you 
know about a substance, the more you can do with it. Some day 
this X-ray work will enable scientists to answer more definitely than 
they can now the question: Why is iron magnetic? And then the 
electrical industry will take a great step forward, and more real 
progress will be made in five years than can be made in a century 
of experimenting with existing electrical apparatus. 

You can add wings and stories to an old house. But to build a 
new house, you must begin with the foundation. 




General Office 



Schenectady, N. Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



13 




YOUR GAME 

"y\/"HATEVER your "game," whether 
in sport or serious activity, MACUL- 
LAR PARKER CLOTHES lend fin- 
ish to your performance, and are as 
individual as your own way of doing 



things. 



HARssaw 

40O WASHINGTON STREET 
The Old House with the Young Spirit 



Bowdoin men are invited to visit our shop 
when in Boston 



BOYS! 

Have you tried our new drink, 

BOWDOIN BREW? 

Our Candy, too, is right through and 
through 

THE SPEAR FOLKS 

119 Maine Street 



CARL H. MARTIN 

Cleansing and Dyeing 
Pressing and Alterations 

4 Elm Street 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. 
Surplus and Profits, $100,000. 
Student Patronage Solicited. 



PRINTING 



of Quality 

Always in the lead 
for snap and style 

Wheeler Print Shop 

Town Building, Brunswick, Maine 



We carry the largest assortment of 

Olives, Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and 
Biscuits of all kinds east of Portland 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street Tel. 136-137 

Branch Store— 2 Cushing St.— Tel. 16 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 
Boston 

344 Washington Street 



14 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



DURING THE GAME 

BETWEEN CLASSES 

ON THE HIKE 







A "MUNCH'' WHILE STUDYING 

A SNACK BEFORE RETIRING 

IN FACT—EVERY OLD TIME 



STRAW HATS 

Young Men's Sennits 

$3.00, $4.00, $5.00 



White Flannels 

$8.00 



E. S. BODWELL 

& SON 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



SUMMER WORK 

We still have room 
For a few LIVE men 
Provided they want to 
Earn a lot of MONEY 
This summer. 

This isn't a Gamble 

It is a SURE THING 

For the man who HUSTLES 

And besides 

We pay a SALARY. 

NOW is the time 
To get on the Band Wagon 
So see one of our local men 
Or write us direct and 
Ask for the dope. 

Local representatives: 

S. H. Carter, 24 Winthrop 

Hugh Nixon, D. U. House. 

THE NATIONAL SURVEY CO. 

Topographical Offices, 
Chester Vermont 



JUD, The Barber 

was going to use this space 
but thought it wasn't neces- 
sary. 




CONSERVATIVE CLOTHES 



FOR 



COLLEGE MEN 

In stock and made to measure. 
Imported Fabrics. Lower prices for Spring 1921. 



HASKELL & JONES COMPANY 

PORTLAND .... MAINE 



TUFTS 
COLLEGE 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

Offers to the student who has 
had one year of college training, a 
four year course leading to the de- 
gree of D. M. D. 

Being located in Boston, Tufts 
College Dental School enjoys ex- 
cellent clinical advantages. 

Students in the Dental School 
Course have the privilege of clin- 
ics at the Forsythe Dental Infirm- 
ary, Boston City Hospital, Mass- 
achusetts Homeopathic Hospital, 
Boston Dispensary, Vernon St. 
Hospital, and the Massachusetts 
Home for Feeble-Minded. 

Tufts Dental School is co-edu- 
cational. 

Registration begins at 9 a. m., 
on June 21, and ends on Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

School session begins Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

For further particulars write to 
F. E. Haskins, M. D., Secretary. 

416 Huntington Avenue, 

Boston, Mass. 

WILLIAM RICE, D.M.D., Dean 



Pressing and Cleaning 

ORDERS TAKEN FOR DYEING 

SECOND HAND CLOTHING 

BOUGHT 

DAN ROSEN 




SPUR- A New Narrow 

Arrow 

Collar 

Cluett.Peabody &Co. Inc. Troy, N.Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



15 



CITIZENS LAUNDRY 



College Agent 



Auto Service 



A SHORTER 

SHORTHAND SYSTEM 
IN TEN EASY LESSONS 

This course covers ten easy lessons 
which will enable the Student, Pro- 
fessor, Journalist, Doctor, Lawyer or 
anyone seeking a professional career, 
to go thru life with 100 per cent 
efficiency. 

THIS COURSE 

Is short and inexpensive, and is 
given with a money back guarantee if 
not satisfied. 

SEND THIS CLIPPING TO-DAY 



Bowdoin Dairy Lunch 

Open Day and Night 



PYRAMID PRESS: PUBLISHERS 
1416 Broadway, 
New York City 

Gentlemen : — Enclosed herewith is $5.00 
for which kindly send me your shorthand 
course in ten easy lessons by mail. It is 
understood that at the end of five days, if 
I am not satisfied my money will be gladly 
refunded. 

Name 



City and State. 



CORDOVAN BOOTS 



YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 



"Herman's" Tan Cordovan $13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan. .$15.50 
"Florsheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 

TENNIS SHOES, INDOOR AND 

OUTDOOR MOCCASINS, RUBBER 

BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 



OH BOY! 

Have You Tried Our 

49c CHOCOLATES 

There is nothing ehrap about our 
place but the price. 

BUTLER'S 



F. W. Chandler & Son 

HAVE 

Tennis Rackets 

from $1.50 to $16.00 each 

Championship Tennis Balls 

60c each 

1 920 Tennis Balls 45c each 

Baseballs & Baseball Supplies 

25 Kinds of Golf Balls 

Golf Bags and Clubs 

The College Book Store 



INDIVIDUALITY 

— the idea of service to our customers, 
which we try to make a ruling idea in all 
our transactions, is the most important fact 
about our new 

SPORT CLOTHES SHOP 

Here the sportsman will find 
outing apparel of every kind, 
and he can be absolutely sure 
of finding all the new styles 
in materials and novel ar- 
rangements. 



Monumen 
Square 




Portland 
Mai n>< 




16 BO WDOIN ORIENT 



CUMBERLAND 

Wednesday and Thursday 
THE GREAT DAY 



Friday and Saturday 
DORALDINA 

IN 

PASSION FRUIT 



Next Week — Monday and Tuesday 
BEBE DANIELS 

IN 

SHE COULDN'T HELP IT 

PASTIME 

Friday and Saturday 



CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

TN 

THE IMMIGRANT 



SHIRLEY MASON 
GIRL OF MY HEART 



Next Week — Monday and Tuesday 
MONTE BLUE 

IN 

THE JUCKLINS 




TS* BOWDOIN 
ORIENT 



ESTABLISHED 18T1 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 

1921 




JUNE 23, 1921 



BOWDOIN 



Established 1871 




ORIENT 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



VOL. LI. 



THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 1921. 



Number 10 



ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT WEEK FESTIVITIES 



One Hundred and Sixteenth Commencement of the College — Class of 
Graduates Amid Festivities — " Orient " Extends Welcome 
To Alumni and Visitors. 



1921 



Today is the one hundred and six- 
teenth Commencement day of the Col- 
lege. About eighty-five members of 
the Class of 1921 are receiving their 
degrees in the First Parish Church. 
The evercises began last Saturday 
with the Baccalaureate Service. On 
Monday evening the annual Alexander 
Prize Speaking contest was held. 
Tuesday was Class Day with the ex- 
ercises under the Thorndike Oak in 
the afternoon and the Commencement 
Hop in the evening. On yesterday 
came the annual meeting of the Alpha 
of Maine, Phi Beta Kappa, and the 
Alumni-Varsity baseball game in the 
morning, the Commencement Play in 
the afternoon and the reception of 
President and Mrs. Sills to the gradu- 
ating class and the alumni and guests 
of the College. Immediately follow- 
ing the exercises this morning the 
Alumni Banquet will be held in the 
Gymnasium. 

Classes that are holding reunions 
this year are 1871, 1896, 1906, 1911 
and 1916. The following is a detailed 
account of the festivities: 

THE ALEXANDER SPEAKING 

The speakers in the Alexander 
Prize Speaking contest held Monday 
evening were Knight '22, Towle '22, 
Cousens '28, Daviau '23, Quinby '23, 
Turgeon '23, Brisebois '24, Hill '24, 
R. T. Phillips '24. 

CLASS DAY EXERCISES 

The Class Day exercises were held 
on Tuesday afternoon under the 
Thorndike Oak. The speeches will be 
found elsewhere in this issue. The 
following is a list of the men who 



had charge of the activities: John J. 
Young, president; Merritt L. Willson, 
vice-president; Samuel C. Buker, sec- 
retary-treasurer; Perley S. Turner, 
marshal; Milton J. Wing, chaplain; E. 
Kenneth Smiley, opening address; 
Hugh Nixon, orator; Phillip R. Lovell, 
closing address, George O. Prout, his- 
torian, Robert W. Morse, poet; Joseph 
L. Badger, odist. The committee in 
charge consisted of Roderick L. 
Perkins (chairman), Lloyd H. Hatch, 
Alonzo B. Holmes, Robert R. Schon- 
land, and Alexander Thomson. 

COMMENCEMENT HOP 

The Commencement Hop was held 
in the Gymnasium on Tuesday eve- 
ning. Wives of members of the 
Faculty were patronesses. About a 
hundred and fifty couples were pres- 
ent. The Class Day Committee had 
charge of the Hop. 

PRESIDENT'S RECEPTION 

The annual reception was held by 
President and Mrs. Sills in Hubbard 
Hall last night. Governor Percival P. 
Baxter '98, and Dr. and Mrs. Whittier 
received with President and Mrs. Sills. 
The ushers included Brewer '22, 
Clymer '22, Freeman '22, Ham '22. 

COMMENCEMENT PLAY. 

On Wednesday afternoon the 
Masque and Gown presented "The 
Taming of the Shrew" on the Walker 
Art Building steps. The play was 
well performed, particularly the major 
parts. Quinby, Black and Redman de- 
serve especial praise. The coaching 
was done by Mrs. Arthur F. Brown. 
The cast of characters was as follows: 

Baptista Smiley '21 



Vincentio Ridlon '22 

Lucentio Kileski '21 

Petruchio Quinby '23 

Gremio Goff '22 

Hortensio Turgeon '23 

Tranio Rowe '24 

Biondello Merrill '24 

Grumio Badger '21 

Curtis Clymer '22 

Pedant Brewer '22 

Katherina Redman '21 

Bianca Black '23 

Widow Clymer '22 

Tailor Saunders '24 

PRIZES AND AWARDS 

The following is a partial list of the 
prizes and awards: 

Summa Cam Laude — Lloyd H. Hatch, Phil- 
lip M. McCrum, Harold F. Morrill, George O. 
Prout. 

Magna Cum Laude — Robert W. Morse, 
Harry Helson, George E. Houghton, Maurice 
S. Coburne, Curtis S. Laughlin. 

Cum Laude — Luke Halpin, Leslie E. Gibson, 
Phillip G. McClellan, Hugh Nixon, Reginald 
W. Noyes, Lawrence W. Pennell, Phillip 
Pollay, Alexander Thomson, Percy D. Wilkins, 
Phillip R. Lovell, Russell McGown. 

Honor Men— Robert W. Morse, Henry W. 
Longfellow Scholar; George E. Houghton, Jr., 
Charles Carroll Everett Scholar. 
PRIZES 

Class of 1868 Prize — Hugh Nixon. 

Smyth Mathematical Prize — Harold F. Mor- 
rill, Edward B. Ham, Scott H. Stackhouse. 

Sewall Greek Prize— Not awarded. 

Pray English Prize— Robert W. Morse. 

Class of 1875 Prize in American History — 
Not awarded. 

Bradbury Debating Prizes — Firsts : Frederick 
W. Anderson, Leo A. Daviau, Clifford O. 
Small, Albert R. Thayer. Seconds: Joseph L. 
Badger. Lloyd H. Hatch, John W. Hone, 
George B. Welch. 

Hiland Lockwood Fairbanks Prizes — Joseph 
Brisebois, Hugh Nixon, Albert R. Thayer. 

Col. William Henry Owen Premium— John 
G. Young. 

Stanley Plummer Prize — Caroll S. Towle. 

Lucien Howe Prize Scholarship — Perley S. 
Turner. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Baccalaureate Address 
1921 



Hope is a much neglected virtue. 
Faith and Charity we regard as es- 
sential to pure and undefiled religion. 
Justice, Temperance, Prudence and 
Fortitude we make the corner stones 
of a good life. But Hope we are in- 
clined to think of as a mere device 
for keeping things going, as a vaguely 
beautiful, but on the whole a senti- 
mental companion of the other 
virtues. Yet Hope conceived of, not 
as happy go lucky optimism that 
trusts in the best, but as an earnest 
expectation of the better, is a positive, 
intellectual force as well as a definite 
Christian duty. Furthermore, the 
strong and manly feeling that we 
should labor on, even if we see no 
immediate results of- our efforts, 
makes of Hope an incentive to noble 
deeds. 

No man who has had a sound 
Christian education has any business 
to despair. If morals and manners 
seem loose and deteriorating, if the 
world itself now and then seems to go 
awry, the good man regards it all as a 
passing phase. Because it is hideous 
to suppose that, endowed as we are 
with free will and with all the other 
glorious attributes of man, we are 
placed in a world where good efforts 
do not prevail. Strong walls 
may surround us, but we are 
prisoners of hope. And hope 
some day will free us. Some men 
who cannot bring themselves to be- 
lief and faith ought to rely far more 
than they do on Hope. If such souls 
will allow themselves to go through 
life, doing the best they know, like 
men, and leaving the result to God, 
as have many other noble spirits, "I 
accept," they can mould not so com- 
plete a life, perhaps, yet a life that 
is sincere and strong. For if a man 
keeps hope alive, he can labor and 
fight on. But a man without hope in 
man or God or immortality does not 
live at all. He has no motive that 
lifts him above the animals. He goes 
through life a mere automaton. A 
man, a country, a civilization without 
Hope is pagan and dead. The wise 
Dante placed over the portal of his 
Hell, "Abandon every hope, all ye that 
enter here." On the other hand, the 
old motto, "While there is life there 



is hope," is true of the spiritual as 
of the physical world. 

Men of faith and vision labor 
ardently in the Lord's vineyard. But 
some credit surely is due the work- 
man who is not certain that he :'s ever 
to see the results of his efforts but 
who toils in the heat of the day, hop- 
ing there will be some reward. If we 
turn for illustration to some common 
phases of life, we can see how im- 
portant a factor this virtue may be. 
The runner in a relay race, exerting 
himself to the utmost, does his level 
best in the hope that he may con- 
tribute to the victory of his team. 
The scientist in his labortory works 
for months at his problem with hope 
rather than faith to inspire him. Many 
a statesman who has striven to build 
up a better order of government for 
mankind, relying on experience, has 
hope rather than faith that some day 
reason and not national prejudice will 
rule. Many of the forward steps that 
man makes on the long track of civil- 
ization are made when there is shin- 
ing Hope, "That star of life's tremu- 
lous ocean." 

In Roman history we read that it 
was the custom of the Senate pub- 
licly to thank those leaders who in 
times of stress had fought and won 
"because they had not despaired of the 
Republic." We need today more men 
of that antique virtue. We hear far 
too much of a lack of faith in our 
democracy and our institutions. We 
are not thanked because we do not 
despair of the republic; we are told 
by shallow men who miscall them- 
selves liberal, that all is wrong with 
the state. Others sneer at our pub- 
lic servants and cheapen public service 
by attributing unworthy motives to 
men who give their best efforts to 
the public weal. During the war we 
sent to jail men who had so little 
faith in what we were fighting for 
that they tried to persuade the youth 
of our land to avoid military service. 
But today we allow complete freedom 
and do not even condemn well dressed 
complacent citizens who have so little 
interest, so little hope in the state 
that in hotel lobbies and smoking 
cars and clubs they with emphasis 
strive to prevent men from taking 
public office by asserting that politics 
is a rotten game and public service, 
graft. And we allow a man to rep- 
resent us abroad who brazenly asserts 



that all our professions of motive in 
the war were false. To despair of 
our country's high aims is to descend 
very far from the patriotic spirit dur- 
ing the war and the high hopes we 
had November 11, 1918. We should 
indeed be desolate if on desperate men 
like these the safety of our state de- 
pended. Their voices are shrill, to be 
sure, but their influence is as thin. 
For the real American citizen from 
his study of Valley Forge and Gettys- 
burg, from his knowledge of Chateau 
Thierry, has an abiding hope in the 
principles of democracy and faith in 
the worth of sacrifice. And believing 
in no narrow or provincial or national- 
istic way that American is the hope 
of the world, he will render political 
service in peace as he bore arms in 
war, and strive to keep her honor, as 
her flag, unsullied by base defeat. 

There is likewise too much said of 
the breakdown of our Christian civil- 
ization. In times of flux and change 
it is inevitable that there should be 
much loose talk. During the past de- 
cade the surface of things has altered 
and shifted and flickered like a land- 
scape in a kaleidoscope. Kingdoms 
and empires have been overturned. 
A great war has been fought and 
won and almost lost again. The 
youngest of us have seen changes in 
our own government so fundamental 
that we are still out of breath. The 
standpatter who considers these 
changes revolutionary gnashes his 
teeth while the radical moans that 
we are not moving fast enough. And 
in the babel of voices it is not sur- 
prising that to the timid it should 
seem that firm foundations were be- 
ing swept away. Perhaps the times 
themselves are made to test our hope. 
The very danger in the situation is 
in itself a challenge. If we nurture 
no reasonable hope of a better order, 
we shall go drifting along in the old 
way building huge navies, maintain- 
ing great standing armies, nursing 
imaginary international grivances, un- 
til a second cataclysm may again 
work ruin, for our civilization may 
easily be destroyed. But if we re- 
member how often only a few years 
ago we heard "This must not happen 
again" we shall strive all the harder to 
turn our hopes into realties. We can, 
for example, work for the friendship 
of all the English speaking peoples, 
not because we thing Anglo-Saxons 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



are ordained to control the destinies of 
other nations, but because, if men of 
the same lineage and language and 
traditions cannot settle all differences 
without resort to aims, ttrrc is n> ho^e 
for the rest of the world. But friend- 
ship between the English speaking 
peoples is not enough. A good nation 
like a good man must broaden and 
extend its influence and its relations 
and rid itself of prejudice against 
creed and caste and color. Much 
that may happen gives us fear; but 
much that has happened has given v.s 
hope. 

When we group together the multi- 
farious activities of the human race 
in politics, in government, in religion 
and in the other relations of mankind 
and speculate on the future, wonder- 
ing if it is true that the world makes 
progress, we need some sort of an 
answer to which we can give our in- 
tellectual assent. And the best an- 
swer to the idea of progress lies in 
the very human word, Hope. As Dean 
Inge of St. Paul's Cathedral, London, 
points out in a very remarkable essay, 
man has not always believed that the 
future holds better things in store. 
The ancient Greeks had little or no 
conception of progress. Their golden 
age was in the past; and they re- 
garded men as the degenerate de- 
scendants of the gods. Christ'anity 
certainly brought in a new idea. But 
in the third century after Christ, 
when civilization was really in danger, 
Pagans and Christians alike, joined in 
a chorus of woe. Patristic literature 
and the poetry of the Middle Ages 
took refuge in a mystic New Jeru- 
salem; and the writers of the Renais- 
sance revived the memories of a Gclden 
Age that was somehow to be impos'd 
upon an expectant world. In the last 
century the doctrine of evolution 
started the worship of progress as a 
cult. Herbert Spencer asserts round- 
ly that progress is not an accident but 
a necessity. "What we call evil and 
immorality," he says, "must disap- 
pear. It is certain that man must be- 
come perfect. The ultimate develop- 
ment of the ideal man is certain — ss 
certain as any conclusion in which we 
place the most implicit faith; for in- 
stance, that all men will die." And 
some writers of the present see in 
the theory of human progress a very 
real religion. To such doctrines the 
candid mind cannot immediately con- 



sent. Those races in the world which 
seem the most unprogressive, the 
Chinese and the Hindoo, for exarnple, 
have survived the whips and scorns of 
time while superior civilizations like 
the Egyptian, the Greek and the 
Roman have gone under. Many brave 
men lived before Agamennon; and all 
we can say is that human nature may 
be capable of further improvement. 
We will be saved if at all by hope. 
The most reasonable conclusion is that 
man progresses, then goes backward, 
than goes forward again; but that 
each hill he reaches is a little higher 
than the one he left. Or, to use 
another figure, progress is more 
like the tide than the river. But 
it is a tide that draws from out the 
boundless deep. It swings to and fro 
to a mighty purpose. What matter 
if we in our generation are on the 
ebb or the flow ? 

"Say not the struggle naught availeth 
The labour and the wounds are vain, 

The enemy faints not, nor faileth 
And as things have been they 



For while the tired waves, vainly breaking 
Seem here no painful inch to gain. 

Far back through creeks and inlets making 
Comes silent, flooding in, the main." 

Into one other realm Hope leads us 
— the realm of immortality. Except 
in the gossipy corners of the ouija 
board and automatic writing, we seem 
today to shy like a nervous steed 
from any discussion of the future of 
the soul. So many men seem to be 
bent on making a good job of this 
present tiny life and so making an 
end of it. But the Christian College 
which deals eternally with the things 
of the spirit ought not to have her 
sons ignorant as those who have no 
hope. Materialism which chokes the 
sources of high motives is making 
some of us cynical, and more of us 
indifferent concerning what is to come. 
But it is as true today as ever that, 
in the words of Bishop Berkeley, those 
who never reflect upon the great prob- 
lems of the end and aim and purpose 
of life may be suitable to belong to a 
colony of industrious animals but 
never can rise to the height of being 
men and women. Or as the first 
Christian poet, Prudentius, puts it: 

"Does not this one thing separate mankind 
From beasts Those things before their very 

eyes 
They deem the good. Fgo contra spero. But 

I hope." 



To those who cannot yet bring 
themselves to a belief in personal im- 
mortality there comes this great 
Christian virtue. "Hope" sings the 
great Catholic poet with whose praises 
on this the six hundredth anniversary 
of his death the whole world rings: 

"Hope is an expectation sure 

Of glory that shall be which is produced 

By grace divine and merit that precedes." 

Thus Hope is not merely a general 
cheerfulness of disposition or the 
antidote to despair; it is a positive 
force which shines through the clouds 
of doubt and illumines the way. 

The great German poet, Schiller, 
expresses all these ideas in his lovely 
lyric, Hoffnung: 



'We speak with the life. 



the 



day, 



Of some better and fair 
Forever behold on our race to a goal 

Shining golden afar on the way. 
The world grows old and the world grows 

young ; yet befall 
What there may still doth men hope the Better 
in all." 



"It is not a smiling delusion that shames ; 

Nor a folly that reason should scorn ; 
'Tis the voice of the heart which so loudly 
proclaims 

That we for the Better were born. 
And that \sh.ch the inner voice bids us believe 

Can never the Hope of a spirit deceive." 



(Bulv 



Lytton's translation adapted.) 



The comfort of a reasonable, re- 
ligious and holy hope thus strengthens 
and inspires. In our daily life here 
and now and in our labors and ef- 
foi ts it does matter what we think 
about personal immortality. For as 
Herbert Spencer reminds us, we can- 
not g^t gulden conduct out of leaden 
instincts. If our ideals are simply of 
this earth, earthy, we may go through 
the motions of life like super-animals 
but we do not really live. "Our lower 
ambitions," says Dean Inge, "partly 
succeed and partly fail and never 
wholly satisfy us; but no pure hope 
can ever wither except that a purer 
may grow out of its roots." 

To lay hold on hope is not then to 
seize a will of the wisp; but to culti- 
vate a quality, an attitude of mind, a 
virtue of the soul which is of prac- 
tical and spiritual value. Youth is by 
nature sanguine; yet as the years go 
on hopes fail and ambitions decay. 
But to hope on, to hope even against 
hope, gives dignity and purpose and 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



strength to life. And such attributes 
we need particularly in an age when 
in so many ways the cynical and ma- 
terial view of life is liable to sweep 
men from their moorings. To have 
confidence in man and in democracy 
and in God is a sure refuge. The 
cheap and easy way is to drift with 
the current, to join in the chorus that 
is being raised to disparage and de- 
stroy political and social and spiritual 
ideals. Men without hope will never 
think that the rule of law will be 
supreme over the rule of might. They 
lay aside as impractical the applica- 
tion of the Golden Rule, of good-will 
to all the problems of life. But men 
of hope believe that, though steep and 
narrow and difficult, there is a path 
that leads to progress, and, though 
few there be that find it, individuals 
and communities and nations may 
climb it, if they will. 

Members of the Graduating Class: 

It is one of the traditions of Bow- 
doin that on this solemn occasion an 
officer of the College should give you 
a final message of what your Alma 
Mater expects you to take forth wuh 
you. You have learned in many ways 
that your education is nothing worth 
unless it is set in a religious back- 
ground and unless it leads to conse- 
crated Christian service. The ideas 
and ideals which you have gained in 
academic halls you will pursue in a 
world, which, while never wholly bad, 
cannot in your generation or for all 
your efforts be made wholly good. 
Remember that knowledge alone with- 
out wisdom or sanity or consecration 
may add to the evil rather than to the 
good. Many of you have labored 
earnestly and effectively these past 
four years to make the College better. 
Take with you that same eager and 
hopeful attitude and carry that won- 
derful college spirit into your life 
work and into service for the nation. 
You will witness some defeats and 
fewer victories; but as in college you 
never dreamed of deserting your team 
because it was losing and never de- 
spaired of the real worth of a college 
degree even if you had moments of 
failure, so in all your relations in 
life as employer or employed, as voter 
or leader, be strong of hope. As sure- 
ly as God reigns in heaven, our coun- 
try will fulfill her high mission if she 
shall be loyal to her traditions and 



not allow her moral fabric to be weak- 
ened by those who despair or those 
who exalt material might alone. In 
the words of one of the great heroes 
of American civic life today and of 
one of Bowdoin's own sons, remember 
that the chief value of a college edu- 
cation consists of "a desire to con- 
tinue to learn, ability to think 
straight, courage to act upon one's 
convictions and to one's own self be 
true." To do that you must be in 
constant touch with the spring of 
faith and hope which Religion offers. 
No problem no matter how compL 
cated whether racial, industrial, social 
or political that affects the relations of 
man with man is incapable of solution 
if there be the real spirit of good will 
and of the will to find a way of peace. 
The old Hebrew prophet was inspired 
with wisdom from on high when he 
wrote : 

"It is good that a man should 
both hope and quietly wait for 
the salvation of the Lord." 



Class Day Parts 



OPENINJ ADBRI 



Mr. President, Ciassmalcs, and 
Friends : 

It is with mingled pleasure and 
gratitude that the Class of 1921 wel- 
comes you to these Commencement 
exercises; pleasure that you are here 
to share in these events so long an- 
ticipated, and so significant to us; 
gratitude that you who have done so 
much to make this day ours have 
manifested a continued interest by 
your presence. 

It has been questioned, frequently 
and fairly, whether or not the college 
man comprehends or appreciates his 
great obligations to his benefactors. 
Too many of us, unhappily, lose sight 
of the fact that our opportunities are 
paid for in sacrifices by our parents. 
Pew indeed are those who pay the 
whole cost of their college courses. It 
may be a financial burden; it may be 
a weight of care; — suffice it to say 
that in every instance a young man's 
college education represents some 
sacrifice on the part of those who 
love him. 

Now, when the time has come for 
us to assume new responsibilities, we 
pause, in order to review the past. 



Have we made our records in accord 
with our privileges ? Have we suc- 
ceeded in direct proportion to our op- 
portunities ? The dread answer is re- 
luctantly made, but it is inevitable, 
we have not. We have failed to make 
the most of our opportunities. 

But, do you say, has not this class 
excelled in scholastic attainments ? 
True, our average grade is creditable, 
but in justice to all, we must re- 
member that that excellence is due to 
the efforts of a small number of our 
members. The fact still remains that 
the greater number of us are debtors. 
We came here with a trust, and in 
so far as we have not made reliable 
and responsible men of ourselves, just 
so far have we neglected to observe 
that trust. Not one among us is 
quite the man he might have been, 
had he begun to assume his responsi- 
bilities four years ago. We have 
fallen into the prevalent indifference 
of our age. We have become "Moral- 
Bystanders," content to avoid the un- 
pleasant issues of life; happy to ac- 
cept as our due the favors bestowed 
upon us; prone to shirk our responsi- 
bilities to our friends and to society. 
That we have absorbed this indiffer- 
ence is not strange when you con- 
sider the dearth of reliable leaders in 
society today, whether social, political, 
or religious. We have succumbed to 
the evil influences of our time. 

That this lamentable tendency to- 
ward indifference is not universal, and 
that it is not due to any fault on the 
part on the college, as such, is dem- 
onstrated by the few exceptions to 
whom I have referred previously. It 
is encouraging to note that some 
among us have brought credit to 
themselves and to the college by their 
work, and that most of us have done 
better during the past year than ever 
before. It remains for us to demon- 
strate that we have but begun that 
which we shall complete. 

Friends, you are assembled to as- 
sist us in celebrating our Commence- 
ment. We propose to make this a 
Commencement in fact as well as in 
name. We, who are so soon to be- 
come the youngest alumni of the col- 
lege, are face to face with the prob- 
lems of life; and with the recognition 
of these problems comes a new real- 
ization of responsibility. Today our 
eyes opened to the sad fallacy of 
that superficial, yet familiar remark, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



"My time and my life are my own." 
Today do we appreciate, as we never 
did before, our obligations to our 
parents, our college, our country, and 
our God. Wretched indeed is our 
estate if we fail to meet these ob- 
ligations. Here, in the presence of 
our creditors, you, who have done so 
much for us as individuals, you, who 
are responsible in so great a measure 
for the availability of a college like 
Bowdoin, — here let us pledge ourselves 
to lives of service. Let us seek no 
greater praise, let us seek no higher 
honors, than to have it said, "There 
is a class of reliable men." Let us 
strive to merit confidence; let us live 
to earn man's trust. Then, when we 
shall have attained that pinacle of ac- 
cepted responsibility, when we shall 
have won confidence and esteem 
among our fellow men, when we 
shall have demonstrated that the col- 
lege man is ever trustworthy, then, 
and not until then, shall we have ful- 
filled our obligations. 

Friends, it is with genuine pleasure 
that I extend to you a most cordial 
welcome to this, our Commencement. 
EARL KENNETH SMILEY. 



ORATION. 



Mr. President, Classmates, Friends of 
the College: 

The race has been run. One more 
test has been met. One more oppor- 
tunity has been grasped. We of the 
Class of 1921 are now gathered to- 
gether for the last time before those 
final moments when we shall be sent 
forth as the youngest sons of Bow- 
doin. This, our Class Day, means to 
us an occasion for joyous celebration, 
for the cementing of friendships, for 
the consideration of mutual hopes and 
purposes. This day also stands as 
the end of a period of preparation 
and the beginning of a period of re- 
sults. We have received our train- 
ing; the tasks are at hand. At such 
a time, we may well pause to take 
account of stock, to appraise that 
which we have received and appreciate 
that which lies before, to consider 
what has been done and what there 
is to do. 

No senior but now looks back to 
the time when he first came here. He 
recalls the various experiences of the 
last four years. He has found this 



^eiioel in h.'s l.'fe one cf : a~id change 
and development. Tcday ho fe'ls 
himself fitted for mo.c enjoyable 
more useful, and more effective liv- 
ing. This cc liege training has bene- 
fitted him in at least three ways. He 
has gained in knowledge, in intel- 
lectual power, and in spiritual power. 

Concerning the fund of knowledge 
which he has acquired, let us be 
frankly conservative in our estimate. 
He has studied steadily for four years 
and in several fields, but, even with 
the closest application, he mastered 
only a fraction of any one branch of 
knowledge. To tell the truth, rather 
than priding himself on what he 
knows, he as probably been humbled 
by the realization of his comparative 
ignorance. He has gained a real ap- 
preciation of how little man knows, 
but with it an eagerness for increased 
enlightenment, and in this desire to 
continue to learn lies part of his re- 
ward. He has laid the foundation of 
scholarship and has acquired a taste 
for learning. He has been introduced 
to the arts and sciences and this intro- 
duction has been thorough. Further 
he must go himself. 

Much more important to him than 
the actual sum of knowledge obtained 
is his increased intellectual power. His 
training here has taught him how to 
work. A familitarity with methods 
and processes has been acquired. He 
has become accustomed to hard and 
continued mental exertion. His 
studies have given him the ability to 
think on and around various subjects. 
The value of an open mind and of a 
willingness to see both sides of any 
question has been borne home to him. 
Were he to forget almost all that he 
has learned, he would still have a rich 
compensation in an increased mental 
power. 

But of greater worth, far greater 
worth, than either knowledge or in- 
tellectual power is character, person- 
ality, spirit, — call it what you will. 
If the senior were not richer in this 
respect, he would be poor indeed, in 
spite of any mental proficiency. But 
he is richer as a man. Here, away 
from the home environment, he has 
come in contact with standards, be- 
liefs, problems which were new and 
confusing. Here all the influences 
and ideas of the ages have been 
brought to bear upon him. In search- 



ing for the truths of life, he has had 
to elcal with the errors also. Here 
he has had to think and decide for 
himself. For instance, he could care- 
lessly throw aside the religion and 
rules of condict to which he had form- 
erly held, or he could soberly review 
such standards in the light of this new 
experience. He could give himself 
up to excessive and dehumanizing 
study or he could go to the other ex- 
treme of ceaseless frivolity. He 
could look upon a college education 
solely as a chance to better his own 
fortunes or he could regard it as also 
a preparation for helping others. In 
other words, he has gained in power 
from having had to make decisions 
from so many possibilities, from hav- 
ing had to adjust himself to new in- 
fluences and conditions. 

Not only thus have we of the Class 
of 1921 profited, but we have also 
gained in the associations and friend- 
ships which we have formed. With us 
today are teachers who have given to 
us of themselves. The very books 
which we have used are quickened 
with the life-blood of master-spirits. 
We are the recipients of a heritage of 
learning accumulated through the 
ages. Neither money nor pains have 
been spared in bettering us. The stir- 
ring times in which we have been 
getting this training have served to 
give us a stronger sense of responsi- 
bility and to make us recognize more 
clearly the duties before us. 

This is a day when we make an 
appraisal of that which we have re- 
ceived. It is also a day when our 
minds turn to a consideration of that 
which lies before us. The period in 
which we live presents a challenge. 
Never before has the call for trained 
and responsible leaders been so urg- 
ent. Look back over the last seven 
years! Wars, revolutions, economic 
and social crises! Look ahead and 
consider the work to be done! We 
have been educated to an end, and 
that end is that we may play a worth 
part in the greatest period of the 
world's history. There is no more 
fitting time than the present for mak- 
ing an appraisal of some of the prob- 
lems before us. 

Perhaps the most conspicuous ques- 
tion of the times is that of interna- 
tional relations. All of us vividly re- 



( Continued 



7) 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Published every Wednesday during the College 
year by the students of Bowdoin College. 

Edward B. Ham '22 Editor-in-Chief 

F. King Turgeon '23 Managing Edito* 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

George H. Quinby '23 Intercollegiate News 

George T. Davis '24 Alumni Department 

Fredric S. Klees '24 Faculty Notes 

G. William Rowe '24 Athletics 

P. Dennison Smith '24 Campus News 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. E. Ludden '22 F. A. Gerrard '23 

E. L. McCormack '22 K. E. Philbrick '23 
V. C. McGorrill '22 

BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 
Eben G. Tileston '22 Business Manager 

E. E. Latty '23 Assistant Manager 

J. U. Eenier '23 Assistant Manager 

All contributions and communications should 
be given to the Managing Editor by Saturday 
noon preceding the date of publication. No 
anonymous contributions will be accepted. All 
communications regarding subscriptions should 
be addressed to the Business Manager of the 
Bowdoin Publishing Co. Subscriptions, 53.00 
per year, in advance. Single copies, IB cents. 

The Editor-in-Chief is responsible 
for editorials only; the Managing 
Editor for news and make-up; the 
Business Manager for advertisements 
and circulation. 



Vol. LI. June 23, 1921. 



No. 10 



Entered at Post Office 
Second-Class Mail Matter. 



Brunswick as 



OEDitonal 



The College Year. 

Bowdoin is today completing a year 
which has been marked by some 
vitally important events in the his- 
tory of the college and also by the 
increased activities of undergraduate 
organizations. Another Commence- 
ment with its exercises, class re- 
unions, and other festivities, is com- 
ing to a close, and another class is 
joining the ranks of the Alumni. 

The closing of the Medical School 
is unquestionably the chief occurrence 
of the present college year. As 
President Sills has stated in his re- 
port, "the action was taken with great 
regret; but there was nothing else to 
do. The College was unwilling to con- 
tinue the management of the School 
unless we were sure of funds sufficient 
to run it in adequate fashion." 

By far the most important new de- 
velopment in undergraduate affairs 



was the establishment of the "Bear 
Skin" through the efforts primarily 
of Bruce H. M. White '22 and Ryon- 
osuke Toyokawa '21. The editorial 
board is indeed to be congratulated 
for the Ivy number, which, though 
only the second issue of this publica- 
tion, must surely rank high among 
other collegiate humorous magazines. 

The present year has also witnessed 
the formal introduction into the cur- 
riculum of major examinations, con- 
cerning which numerous elaborate 
and at times, circumlocutory and 
therefore enjoyable, arguments have 
appeared in these columns. This 
year for the first time competition 
has been held for the Stanley Plum- 
met - prize in public speaking. 

Bowdoin has had unusual success 
this year in her already established 
activities, particularly in athletics. 
No other state college has excelled 
Bowdoin in any championship sport. 
Bowdoin has been overwhelmingly 
victorious in track, baseball, and ten- 
nis, and has tied for first in football. 
Surely every Alumnus as well as 
every undergraduate cannot be too 
proud of his Alma Mater's athletic 
successes during the past year, par- 
ticularly of those in baseball. And in 
all this it is well to remember the 
great share of work done by our three 
coaches, "Jack" Magee, "Ben" 
Houser, and Roger Greene. 

The college has had a number of 
noted lecturers since September, 
among them Dr. Paul Elmer More, 
Professor Paul Shorey of the Univer- 
sity of Chicago, Mr. D. Sherwood Eddy 
of the International Y. M. C. A., and 
Professor Douglas Gordon Crawford 
of Boston University. A large por- 
tion of these lectures were arranged 
by undergraduate organizations, par- 
ticularly the Student Forum and the 
Ibis. 

With this Commencement the class 
is graduating which entered Bowdoin 
in the year when the United States 
entered the war. Its college course 
was violently interrupted by the con- 
fusion of the S. A. T. C, after which 
nearly a year was required to re- 
store normal conditions, but the Class 
of 1921 has made an unusual scholas- 
tic record for itself; — for this reason 
a member of the class who is the 
winner of a Phi Beta Kappa key has 
an added distinction. The "Orient" 



gives its most cordial welcome to re- 
turning Alumni at this time, and of- 
fers heartiest congratulations to the 
Class of 1921. 



Marcellus Sumner Coggan. 

As a testimony of the esteem in 
which Bowdoin graduates are held in 
the world at large, it is of interert to 
note the various newspaper comments 
regarding Marcellus Sumner Coggan 
'97, whose untimely death occurred en 
June 9. In one editoiial it is said 
that "Mr. Coggan was a man of the 
highest calibre, an exemplar citizen, 
an able lawyer, and, above all, a true 
and staunch friend. In his life he was 
conscientious, efficient, working ever 
for the best interests of the com- 
munity he served." 

Mr. Coggan was the son of Marcel- 
lus Coggan '72, who is the only sur- 
viving editor of the five members of 
his class who established the "Orient" 
fifty years ago. The "Orient" offers 
its sincere sympathy to his father and 
also to his fraternity, the Zeta Psi. 



College Elections 

Morrell To Head Student Body, Class 
and Club Elections. 



During the last week of the College 
year general College elections were 
held as well as the elections of many 
Of the clubs. The following is a de- 
tailed account of the elections. 

A. S. B. C. Elections: Student Coun- 
cil, president, Morrell '22; vice-presi- 
dent, Flinn '22; secretary, Hunt '22; 
members from 1922, Dahlgren, Fish, 
McGorrill, Partridge, Pickard, Towle, 
and Woodbury; from 1923, Eames 
and Palmer. Athletic Council, Flinn 
'22, Morrell '22, Eames '23, Hill '23, 
and M. Morrell '24. Y. M. C. A., 
president, H. Bishop '23; vice-presi- 
dent, Philbrick '23; and secretary- 
treasurer, Rouillard. Manager of 
Track, Eames '23; assistant manager, 
J. H. Johnson '24. Manager of Base- 
ball, Putnam '23, assistant managers, 
Jewett '24 and Savage '24. Manager 
of Tennis, Jacob '23, assistant man- 
agers, Blanchard '24 and Burnell '24. 
Manager of Hockey. R. I. Small '23, 
assistant manager, Stone '24. 

The baseball team met last week 
and elected for its captain Flinn '22. 

The Sophomore Class met last week 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



and elected to its "Bugle" Board the 
following: Butler, Cousins, Hunt, 
Jacob, Latty, Mitchell, Perkins, Phil- 
brick, Quinby, Smith, Whitney and 
Wmg. Palmer was elected art 
editor. At a meeting of the board 
the following officers were elected: 
Editor, Philbrick, business manager, 
Butler. 

The Masque and Gown elected the 
following officers: President, Quinby 
'23, manager, Parcher '23, assistant 
manager, Dow '24. 

The Classical Club elected the fol- 
lowing officers: President, Ham '22, 
vice-president, Wilson '22, secretary, 
Ferris '22, and treasurer, T. Nixon '22. 

The Press Club elected Mallet '23, 
Parcher '23 and Turgeon '23 to mem- 
bership and elected Turgeon '23 presi- 
dent. 

The Ibis initiated the following 
from 1922 to membership last week: 
Cobb, Freeman, Ham, Knight, Simp- 
son, Towle, and White. White was 
elected president and Ham secretary. 



Class Day Parts 

(Continued from Page 5) 

member the Great War. All of us 
have tasted the fruits of war. Every 
conflict is more terrible, more far- 
reaching than the last. More and 
more the victor suffers with the van- 
quished. Stronger and stronger is 
the yearning for some means of pre- 
serving peace between nations. He 
who, in answer to this yearning, says 
that there never will come a time 
when civilized peoples will cease from 
this self-destruction can, logically, 
take but little comfort in living. A 
mocking scepticism has driven from 
his breast man's greatest gifts, hope 
and faith. On the other hand, may 
we all be among those who refuse 
to judge the future so narrowly by 
the present, who have the courage to 
toil on toward a goal maybe centuries 
distant. Progress will be made as 
the scene of hostilities is gradually 
narrowed, as the period between wars 
becomes longer, as men are educated 
up to the prevention of the condi- 
tions which lead to war. Associations 
of nations, limitation of armaments, 
arbitration are some of the tools with 
which we must at present work. We 
of the Class of 1921 must take our 
stand either among those who hope 



and work or with those who mope and 
shirk. 

Other questions of the times are 
the labor movement, the growth of 
socialism, increasing class-conscious- 
ness, general social and economic tin- 
rest. Surely something is wrong 
somewhere, and the finger of accusa- 
tion points to an individual selfishness 
incompatible with the public welfare. 
Progress will be made only as un- 
social human instincts are more wise- 
ly checked and directed, and to this 
progress college graduates can con- 
tribute much by bringing a more un- 
selfish and a broader spirit into busi- 
ness. We have been educated not 
merely for the easier attainment of 
our own personal ends, but for ser- 
vice, and we must, therefore, hope 
and aim to work with, rather than 
against others. We must dignify our 
daily work by devotion to a cause, 
and that cause the constant bettering 
of the conditions under which the toil 
of the world is carried on. 

Nor must we overlook the demands 
which education and culture make 
upon us. As we have benefited, so 
must we aid others to do likewise. 
Learning is not properly the privilege 
of the few nor a selfish means to still 
more selfish ends, but a noble heritage 
to be shared by all. Morever, those 
who have had the best training in the 
arts and sciences must assume leader- 
ship in the building of an American 
civilization and culture which has been 
retarded by the struggle to gain a 
foothold on this new continent. These 
are some of the tasks which confront 
us as new graduates, some of the 
movements in which we will be called 
upon to take part. 

The Class of 1921 has been born 
and bred in mighty and inspiring 
times. We, its members, have spent 
the most influential four years of our 
lives in a period of soul-trying stress, 
amid a gigantic conflict of ideas and 
ideals. As surely as pessimism and 
scepticism are prevalent, so surely 
must we arm ourselves with hope and 
courage. Mocking materialism must 
be met with an idealism burning 
steadily in the hearts of strong and 
practical leaders. In our years here 
at Bowdoin, we have gained in ability 
and power to meet the demands, 
claims, wants, challenges of the com- 
munity, the nation, the world. Be- 



fore us lies a new epoch, an epoch in 
which each of us must play his part. 
On this, our Class Day, let us resolve 
to use our powers to the end that we 
may show by life and deed how mani- 
fold are the benefits of this college 
training, not merely to ourselves, but 
to all men. Much have we received 
and of us much is required. 

HUGH NIXON. 



Class Ode 



Air : Stein Song. 

As we gather here in parting, 

And our college life is done, 

As en Life's highway we're starting, 

Hearts in sorrow beat as one. 

But we still will be brothers. 

Sons of the best of mothers, 

With our hands clasped in friendship, 

Till our day of life is done. 

Other altars may be burning. 
Future days may promise gold, 
But they cannot still the yearning, 
For the college days of old. 
And we still will be brothers, 
Sons of the best of mothers. 
With our hands clasped in friendship, 
Till our day of life is done. 

Yet, Oh Comrades, still together. 
We'll be loyal till we die, 
Be it fair or stormy weather. 
Lift the Bowdoin banner high, 
And we still will be brothers. 
Sons of the best of mothers, 
With our hands clasped in friendship, 
Till our day of life is done. 

JOSEPH LINWOOD BADGER. 



CLOSING ADDRESS 



We are leaving Bowdoin at this 
time after a period of four years 
which now seem to have passed with 
incredible swiftness, although that 
first September a college course ap- 
peared to us to be of long duration. 
We are loath to go forth from this 
peaceful environment where friend- 
ships to endure a lifetime have been 
found, and where we have been taught 
to appreciate knowledge. But on the 
other hand we are eager to try our- 
selves, to see if we shall measure up 
to the standard set by our great 
Alumni. 

And we must not for a moment 
forget that we in particular have a 
greater obligation to fulfill than to 
our College. Most of us entered Bow- 
doin when our fellows were enlisting 
for war. Were we justified ? That is 
what we must prove. In addition to 
the duty every man owes to his coun- 
try we must justify in our oun eyes 
and to the world our remaining in 
college. 

There seems to be one particular 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



field in which we may find congenial 
woik, especial opportunity for the ap- 
plication of our college training, and 
the fullest service to cur country — 
that is, in foreign service. This field 
is demanding attention and yet is re- 
ceiving little. Those who would de 
nounce "entangling alliances" and 
such, cannot ignore the fact that our 
affairs are now mingled closely with 
those of our European neighbors 
Practically every nation in the world 
is involved to a greater or less extent 
financially with us. While this con- 
dition lasts we must at least be con- 
cerned as to the most advantageous 
method of collecting our debts. Even 
to do this and deal successfully with 
them we must know them. To know 
them we must go to them and live 
among them. 

This amounts to a temporary exile 
for some fo us. But it is not uncom- 
pensated exile. If the service to oui 
flag and our own enjoyment is not 
enough, there is the material reward 
— business opportunities, and this is 
very important for it is often true- 
that through business relations a 
mutual respect is built up which 
paves the way for an interchange of 
higher ideals between the two coun- 
tries, we receiving some of their old- 
world wisdom, and giving them our 
open-faced, straight-forward, demo- 
cratic manner of dealing. 

From these who go to foreign lands 
and come to know their people and 
customs, be it for pleasure or busi- 
ness, must come those who will make 
us great in trade and sure-footed in 
diplomacy. 

In speaking of foreign service in 
particular, I do not mean to minimize 
the importance of the work of those 
of us (the great majority) who re- 
main at home will perform. 

Do each what he sees fit, there 
will always be opportunity for us to 
lend ourselves to the service of the 
community and nation if we seek it. 
But it would seem peculiarly appro- 
priate if we who have had the op- 
portunity for college work and thus 
have possibly grasped the situation 
more clearly, should justify ourselves 
in those same countries where our fel- 
lows who chose the other path "made 
good" four years ago. 

However it may be and wherever 
we go, we shall never forget that 
we are indisolubly held together by 
this bond of four years' work and 
pleasure at Bowdoin, and if it be that 
the majority of us do measure up to 
the standard as we go on and a few 
may excel it, we shall feel that we 
have done well. 

PHILLIP ROBINSON LOVELL. 



jfacultp JRotes 



Professor Burnett is representing 
the College at the Centenial celebra- 
tion of Amherst College. 



Professor Ham is representing the 
College at the inauguration of Presi- 
dent Angell of Yale. 



Campus JI3etus 

Bernard C. Carroll '89 was on the 
Campus last week. 

Have you noticed the illustrated 
articles on Bowdoin undergraduate 
life in the Portland "Evening Ex- 
press" by Parcher '23 ? 

Through the exceptionally good 
management the chairman of the Ivy 
Day Committee was able to make a 
refund to members of the Junior 
Class, an action almost unprecedented. 

Perkins '21 won the golf cup for 
the College championship, winning 
from Richards '22 in a thirty-six hole 
final, one up. 



Commencement Parts 

(Abstracts) 



THE ARTISTIC SIDE OF 
LITERATURE 



Paul Elmer More, the distinguished 
American critic, describes the func- 
tions of literary criticism as twofold: 
to serve as a fillip to the intellect, 
and as an authority in taste. Mr. 
More's essays indicate the admirable 
balance of these two qualities which 
he himself achieves. Great as his 
stimulus is to the mind, he would be 
less convincing, less invincible, if the 
speech in which he expresses his 
ideas were not so attractive. The 
lover of letters cannot help feeling 
that in no respect does Mr. More 
render a greater service to literature 
than by the stress he places upon its 
artistic side. The rarity of artistic 
literature at all times is only too 
obvious. The battle for literary art is 
as old as the cuneiform, for many 
people seem not to realize that ideas, 
in order to prevail, must be presented 
clearly, forcefully, and appealingly. 
Just as the whole history of war re- 
solves itself in the end into a con- 
flict between leaders of men, so the 
whole history of education and culture 
; s made by the men who have power 
to speak and to write so persuasively 
hat they stir others to envy and emu- 
lation. 

Today there arc strange fashion? 



abroad in literature. Poets are seek- 
ing unparalleled freedom in rhythm 
and sense, until many of them have 
become unintelligible by all the old 
standards so carefully formed upon 
the study of twenty-five hundred 
years' work. The Imr gists frankly 
give us color alone, choosing to ig- 
nore that poetry has always been 
primarily a matter of sound. Story 
writers are for the most part imbued 
with the rebellious flippancy or the 
sketchy symbolism of the poets, 
throwing such old fashioned consid- 
erations as taste and simple clarity 
to the winds. Others seem to hope 
that sensationalism will recompense 
for commonplace wording, or that 
bizarre wording will take the place 
of an interesting story. All these 
writers hail themselves and each 
other as the founders of new schools, 
and ransack the dictionary to sing 
each other's praises. They have their 
little day, and are gone. 

The three elements of literary art, 
clearness, force, and elegance, can 
never be disregarded by the man who 
seeks to convince. It is true that 
great writers have frequently sinned 
against one or the other require- 
ment, and yet have made their mark 
by the originality of their thought, 
or even by some lucky accident of 
fate. On the other hand, the 
archives of literature overflow with 
the records of craftsmen who were 
not only born artists but herculean 
workers after perfection. In the vast 
majority of cases the great works of 
literature, the permanent moulders of 
the world's thought, are the highly 
artistic creations. If a thought is 
worth phrasing, it is worth phrasing 
well, and only when so phrased will 
it be likely to endure. 

There is, to be sure, a danger in- 
herent in conscious artistry. There 
are certain authors so devoted to 
style that they have almost forgotten 
their thought or their heart. Such 
men were Flaubert, and Walter Pater, 
and Henry James, who wrote so slow- 
ly and revised so pedantically that the 
milk of human kindness seemed too 
well strained when it reached us in 
certified glass jars. Alphonse Daudet 
was one of those who knew this 
tyrannous desire for perfection which 
makes an artist correct too much, and 
for this reason he was accustomed to 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



9 



send off the early chapters of a story 
to the publishers before he had 
finished the book, lest he should stop 
his creative work in mid-course, and 
lose himself in overpolishing what he 
had already written. 

What is needed, then, is a happy 
juxtaposition of thought and form, in 
about equal measure. Ever we re- 
turn, in all walks of life, to the an- 
cient and familiar Greek ideal: Noth- 
ing in Excess. The trouble with the 
literature of today is that we have 
an excess of thought, and not enough 
form. Our time is one of revolution 
and expansion. Our twentieth cen- 
tury is teeming with splendid new 
ideas, some of them worthy of echo- 
ing down the hollow corridors of time 
to all eternity. Our development of 
humanitarian brotherhood alone is an 
achievement to tax the poet's highest 
art. But where is the Chaucer or 
Shakspeare to record it for us ? Form 
Shakespeare to record it for us ? Form 
is everything as a shaper of thought, 
and we cannot expect our descendants 
to interpret us adequately if we have 
not left them the means. In the 
generations to come our civilization 
will be judged chiefly by its written 
record, as we judge in the same way 
of the civilization of the past. Un- 
less we give to the artistic side of 
literature its just cultivation, we must 
be content to be forever known as 
half-men. 

In cultivating art we shall do well 
to give our appreciation to the per- 
fect work in any field, regardless of 
its particular theme. In literary art 
there is the grand style and the light 
style. The light style is a very 
special gift, and by its few successful 
examples would seem as hard to 
manage as the grand style. To con- 
noisseurs it gives keen pleasure, 
sometimes whimsical, sometimes on 
the verge of tears, and as an in- 
terpreter of life it should have, if not 
the throne of the grand style, at least 
a place on the footstool. There are 
people who feel that Stevenson's 
"Travels With a Donkey" is a greater 
work than any of his moralizing 
essays. 

In short, our inquiry should not be 
whether a man flies with Pegasus or 
travels with a donkey. It should be: 
Has he done his work well? Finally : 
always, and above all, that should be 



our earnest, our affectionate question 
— has the man done his work well? 
Few and far between are the great 
masters of literary art, the men 
gifted with keen sensibility to beauty, 
plus harmony and poise, plus absolute, 
unflinching honesty, plus willingness 
to work themselves blind to prove 
man's magic ability to create out of 
things unseen the perfect form. 
These craftsmen, half mortal, half 
gods, these workers in the stuff of 
the soul that is the only reality, need 
our sympathetic and discriminating 
support. Let us by no means neglect 
the intellectual stimulus in literature, 
but let us remember, too, that the 
artistry of the composition is the 
essence that makes it prevail. Art is 
the soul of literature, given that men 
may rejoice in the eternal principle of 
beauty that is the very image of God. 
ROBERT WINTHROP MORSE. 



AMERICA'S DEBT TO FRANCE 



French aid to the thirteen colonies 
in their revolt against Great Britain 
has ever remained in the minds of 
most Americans as a grievous debt 
which the United States, grown to 
power, must sometime pay. When 
America entered the Great War in 
1917 these people patriotically 
shouted "LaFayette we're here," and 
believed that the debt was being re- 
paid. 

But was this debt really so great as 
it has been pictured? Did France 
intervene in the American Revolution 
merely because of sympathy for the 
insurgent colonies and a real desire 
to aid them in their fight for liberty ? 
Of course, a great many liberal 
minded men in France, influenced by 
the movement of intellectual freedom, 
hastened to give their support to a 
cause which had as its ultimate aim 
the overthrow of a despotic and op- 
pressive rule, and their sentiment to 
a certain extent directed the course 
of the official action of the French 
Government. We must, however, dis- 
count this influence, as from time im- 
memorial, men have rallied to the sup- 
port of revolutions, wherever they 
might be. But what then, were the 
all-impelling motives which led the 
French Government to grant aid to 
the far off colonies in America? 
Simply the ordinary motives cf 18th 



century diplomacy, the balance of 
power. 

The French Government fell from 
its high position during the Seven 
Years' War. For the first time in 
more than a century, it had to ac- 
knowledge Great Britain as the Power 
of Europe. And the First Partition 
of Poland in 1772 showed that French 
influence in the affairs of Europe was 
dead. 

In spite of this slump, French 
statesmen still held to the idea, in- 
herited from the glorious days of 
Louis XIV, that their country must 
be dominant in Europe. 

Therefore the French problem re- 
solved itself into the breaking down 
of Britain's colonial trade, and 
especially that with America, as this 
was the biggest source of her wealth. 
No time was more propitious to the 
French ambition than in 1776. As 
France had withdrawn from Canada, 
the colonies had nothing to fear from 
her; the family compact with Spain 
guaranteed her the assistance of the 
Spanish marine; and the Austrian al- 
liance went a long way towards 
guaranteeing peace on the continent. 
France could never find a better op- 
portunity to tear down her hated 
rival, whose power she thought would 
topple over at the slightest push. Con- 
sequently she adopted a policy of se- 
cret aid to America which proved to 
be of little expense and tremendously 
fruitful in results. 

Why after Sartoga did France 
abandon this successful policy for 
open intervention, especially when 
she was on the brink of bankruptcy? 
The reason was not so much in the 
belief that the American cause 
seemed sure of success and that the 
French Government was fearful lest 
Great Britain should acknowledge 
American independence, and France 
thus lose American gratitude, as it 
was the fear that England would 
offer independence to the colonies on 
condition of their uniting with her 
against France and Spain. 

That this all given by France fer- 
tile American colonies hastened their 
independence cannot be denied, but to 
accredit it to her support and to place 
it as an absolute debt is an utter mis- 
understanding of the facts. These 
facts, as has been shown, put the 
French aid strictly in the line of 



10 



BOVVD01N ORIENT 



French policy. 

Just as American independence was 
hastened by French intervention, so 
was the revolt in France against 
Bourbon absolutism hastened by the 
American influence. The reason that 
it was not immediately successful lies' 
in the fact that the people departed 
from the American system of divid- 
ing the powers of government into the 
executive, the legislative, and the 
judiciary, and they were soon to real- 
ize that the sovereignty of the peo- 
ple could be every whit as onerous 
as the sovereignty of the king. And 
so, the germ of constitutional gov- 
ernment, sown by the French philoso- 
phers, given definite form and shape 
by the Americans; checked for a time 
by Napoleon Bonaparte, and again by 
his emulator, Louis Napoleon, has 
grown into the present day system of 
Republican government in France. It 
is a heritage of the French Revolu- 
tion. Yes, but just as much of the 
American Revolution. And when the 
United States turns in gratitude to 
France for her part in establishing 
American independence, Frenchmen 
should not forget America's part in 
the establishment of constitutional 
government in France. 

ALEXANDER THOMSON. 



DEMOCRACY AND THE LIBERAL 
COLLEGE. 



The rise of democracy has been the 
rise of the average man in the po- 
litical, economic, and social life of the 
world. Since the latter part of the 
18th Century an ever-increasing ma- 
jority has molded the institutions un- 
der which we now live. The influence 
of numbers has made itself felt in 
every form of human activity. The 
greater political and social power now 
enjoyed by the masses, means that the 
wishes of the majority are now a 
most important factor in the life of 
the world at large. And this coming 
into power of the majority has 
brought with it new methods, new 
ideas, and a new order. 

No longer do a few feudal barons, 
title aristocrats, or benevolent princes 
impose their wills upon the people. 
Rather the impulse is now from be- 
low; it is fast becoming true that the 
public, the great mediocre mass of 
mankind, is dictating the standards 



and ideals of our age. It is these 
which history will judge us by when 
the outward vestiges of our era are 
gone. 

But if we analyze the psychology 
of the crowd, of the mass of mankind, 
whether together in space as a mob, 
or dispersed as a public, we shall find 
that certain traits are at once evi- 
dent. Direct, quick results are sought 
by the majority of people. Especially 
are we in America suspicious and in- 
tolerant of roundabout, remote, ideal- 
istic attempts which involve a future 
pregnant with uncertain possibilities. 
Quick success is the watchword of our 
age and whatever contributes to that 
is in vogue with us. We are an in- 
tensely practical people and are in- 
terested in the particular things that 
are near to our hands and our pocket- 
books. 

With the industrial revolution and 
the rise of the average man has come 
an era of specialization. It has been 
found that when a man specializes 
on one thing he can do it faster and 
better. While it is true that the 
division of labor is more efficient than 
the old way of each man's doing all, 
yet we find even in industry, over- 
specialization results in atrophy and 
decreased mentality. Though the stu- 
dent who specializes immediately 
after leaving High School may be able 
to earn the largest first or second 
year's salary, yet outside his chosen 
field, he is no better off for under- 
standing and appreciating the broader 
phases of life and human activity 
than the man who has not had the 
benefit of that special training. He 
has merely amassed a body of facts 
for a special purpose and apart from 
his work he differs in no essential re- 
spect from the tradesman or clerk. 

To combat the over-emphasis upon 
narrow specialization, for which the 
rapid progress along economic lines is 
to blame, the liberal college attempts 
to fit men, not merely for the getting 
f a living, but more properly for the 
msiness of living. The liberal college 
intends to fit the person for human 
activity as a whole. Its method is 
intellectual but the end is practical. 
The difference is not between the 
practical and the intellectual or the 
: deal, but between the immediate and 
the remote. The liberal college sees 
far into the future of a man's life. 



Not mere proficiency in a profession 
or science or business, but an epitome 
of human life and human progress is 
given by the liberal college. The 
liberal college believes that the man 
is worth more than he can bring to 
market. The crying today is not for 
machines, but for men and women 
whose wills and emotions have been 
trained so that they can bring "sweet- 
ness and light" to a mechanical and 
materialistic civilization. 

The difference in ideals between the 
vocational or professional schools and 
the liberal college is easily seen by 
contrasting the claims made by many 
of the professional schools in the 
country and the purposes of the 
liberal college as our own president 
has stated them: "Our aim is not vo- 
cational; our goal is not efficiency. 
We hold that the real object of edu- 
cation is to make men free intel- 
lectually and spiritually, to develop 
the resourceful mind in a strong 
Christian character." Centuries ago 
a great Eastern prophet said: "If I 
had two loaves of bread, I would sell 
one of them to buy white hyacinths 
for myself." This is in keeping with 
what Jesus meant when he said: 
"Thou shalt not live by bread alone." 
Democracy is in danger of losing 
some ideals of civilization which are 
as necessary for survival in the long 
run as commerce and industry. 
Human life is a complex thing. If 
we neglect its inner, spiritual forces 
our fate must be the fate of all ma- 
terialistic, evanescent empires which 
were founded on brute fact but which 
perished for lack of intellectual and 
moral stamina. 

How then can the liberal college 
best serve democracy ? Is it by fitting 
men to go forth better equipped to 
survive merely in the business or pro- 
fessional world with no perspective 
of human experience as a whole ? No. 
The liberal college must teach what 
can be known about our moral ex- 
periences, our common speech, our 
social relations, our political institu- 
tions, our religious aspirations and 
beliefs, the world of nature which sur- 
rounds and molds us, our intellectual 
strivings, all these, the human things 
that all men share, the liberal school 
attempts to understand, believing that 
if they are understood men can live 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



11 



them better than they could if they 
followed blind custom or tradition. 
But the sad thing about our gener- 
ation is that the principle it accepts 
so eagerly in the field of the voca- 
tion, it refuses and shuns in the deeper 
things of human living. 

Many people have the notion that 
the student in the liberal college is 
unproductive and merely amassing 
useless knowledge. If the truth be 
known, he is living in history, in the 
arts, in the sciences, in philosophy and 
literature, not as the man of the 
world is living to be sure, but in a 
far different way for a short period 
of his life. He is living for four 
years in the realm of the imagination, 
in the mental and spiritual worlds, in 
the ideal world, if you please, pre- 
paring thus for the actualities that 
are to come. We cannot create judg- 
ments, imagination, self-control and 
morality. These are the result of the 
organization as well as the content of 
the mind. They come only from a 
view of life seen from the proper 
angles, and having the right perspec- 
tive. Some has said: "All the values 
of life, all the things worth while in 
life are to be found in the feelings, 
the emotions and sentiments of men." 
It is these which the liberal college 
would train through the intellect of 
its students so that the time spent in 
this ideal world for four years may 
be the most profitable in the man's 
life. And I venture to affirm that the 
dynamic forces that make for righte- 
ousness and progress are to be found, 
not in the counting-house, the market- 
place, or the field, but in the places 
where men are doing the intellectual 
work of the world. 

The function of the liberal college 
is then to provide the leaven for a 
better way of living. If democracy is 
to stand the test of time and not sink 
into mediocrity and degeneration, 
then it must raise the standards of 
its desires and tastes. William James 
says very aptly: "Our liberal collegss 
ought to have lit up in us a lasting 
relish for the better kind of man, a 
loss of appetite for mediocrity and a 
disgust for cheap jacks. Expertness 
in this might well atone for our awk- 
wardness at accounts and our ignor- 
ance of dynamos." Critics no long r 
assert of democracy that it encourages 
fickleness and violence, but it is faced 



by a far graver charge, namely, "that 
its preferences are inveterately for 
the inferior." We are told by Eu- 
ropeans that the aristocracies of old, 
with all their iniquities, did at least 
preserve some taste for the higher 
human qualities, and they honored 
certain refinements by their tradi- 
tions. We are to blame for many of 
our people are short-sighted, mater- 
ialistic, and intensely prosaic. Yet I 
believe that the heart of democracy 
is understood. There is still a "sav- 
ing remnant" in our democracies and 
it is made up largely, I dare say of 
college men and women. 

HARRY HELSON. 



THE STRUGGLE WE NEED. 



Matthew Arnold believed that what 
the Anglo-Saxon peoples need in their 
pursuit of perfection and harmonious 
development is further progress, not 
so much in the direction of Hebraism 
as in that of Hellenism; that is, we 
need development more along the lines 
of beauty and intelligence than along 
those of conduct and obedience. Hell- 
enism, Arnold explains, gave way to 
the more emotional and spiritual 
Christianity. This stream of Hebraic 
influence held sway until the Renas- 
cence, when it was crossed by a re- 
birth of Hellenism; and that Hellen- 
ism, he believes, should still obtain. 
The Puritan movement, interrupting 
the Renascence influence, he regards 
as but a negligible stream across the 
main current of Hellenistic tendency. 
We are sufficiently imbued as a race 
with moral firmness, with Puritanic 
religious intensity, with Hebraism; 
what we need now is not so much at- 
tention to conduct according to our 
best light as more new light. 

Were Arnold living today, would he 
not shift his emphasis? Do the de- 
scendants of the Puritan fathers — at 
least the American descendants — hold 
the main temple of moral righteous- 
ness in sufficiently good repair so that 
they are justified in concentrating 
their attention on building a graceful 
portico of pillars of the fine arts? In 
the time of Matthew Arnold and up to 
1914— up to 1918 — the latter cuestion 
might have been answered in the 
affirmative with apparent truth. The 
world, and especially the Anglo- 
Saxons, since the Franco-Prr.ssian 



War was apparently about to fulfill 
the prophecy of Isaiah that speaks of 
nation not lifting sword against na- 
tion, nor learning war any more. 

In 1914 the war broke out; and we 
among others girded the sword to up- 
hold the belief that a nation could run 
amuck among other nations with no 
more impunity than could an in- 
dividual break the peace in a society 
of individuals. We fought with a re- 
ligious fervor whose profoundness no 
crusader had ever before sounded. It 
was a Christian war to prevent war. 
The nations were to disarm. The 
sword was to be beaten into the 
ploughshare, and the spear into the 
pruning hook. A true comity of na- 
tions was to be established. We 
fought that Hebraism might prevail. 
Were Matthew Arnold living on No- 
vember 11, 1918, he might have con- 
gratulated himself that the truth of 
his opinion of a few decades earlier 
was prevailing. 

It is true, we made a heroic effort 
to crush the devil out of Germany; 
but (Oh, the pity of it!) in the pro- 
cess we have become obsessed with 
him ourselves. And he is now work- 
ing in us through our romantic de- 
sires as he did in Germany prior to 
1914. A war to make the world safe 
for democracy, to make war impossi- 
ble and peace universal, a league of 
nations — sentiment, now mere senti- 
ment all. War preparations have 
merely shifted their scene of action, 
have become vaster in their scale, and 
in their possibilities deadly beyond 
imagination to the non-miljjary mind. 

This harvest of whirlwind we are 
now reaping we can fairly under- 
stand if we examine the wind that 
was sown. The last quarter of the 
Eighteenth Century, in revolt against 
the conventionality and false classic- 
ism of the period immediately preced- 
ing, goaded to a passion of frenzy by 
the miseries resulting from the doc- 
trine of the divine right of King?, 
started a change which proved to be 
the first sowing. 

The romantic movement arose. The 
American and the French Revolutions 
were fought. Mankind began to ex- 
pand, geographically, politically, 
scientifically. The policies of mutual 
competition, laissez-faire, received an 
impetus, and individualism became 
rampant. The new scientific knowl- 
edg?, especially biological and geo- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



logical, confused human-kind in its 
ethical and spiritual aspects. 

The Victorian period, in uncertainty 
and doubt, yet tried to get a firm 
grip on what was real and true, and 
save it for mankind. 

With the beginning of this century, 
however, a reaction to this salutary 
movement set in, and the new move- 
ment has many of the marks of the 
Romantic period of a century ago. 
The word "Victorian" has become a 
derisive term. We have almost be- 
come conventional in our scoffing at 
and desire to be freed from conven- 
tion, free to follow our whims and 
fancies. 

Our extreme individualism — the' 
sort that caused the cataclysm cf 
1914 — may best be observed objective- 
ly in our literature, which is but the 
reflection of our life. These are mani- 
festations of the romantic spirit in 
individuals. The same hold true of 
the nation composed of these in- 
dividuals. The volume of business 
done in the divorce courts, the cases 
of burglary and murder and other in 
numerable crimes committed through 
the length and breadth of our land 
the refusal in our legislative bodies of 
a voice to representative opinion of a 
small but disliked minority, deporta- 
tion, acriminious commercial compe- 
tition, the largest navy in the world, 
—all these show in one or another 
that nationally, too, all thought of 
controlling the beasts of our evil de- 
sires is generally repudiated. 

There is^a seeming paradox in our 
life today. With all this intense in- 
dividualism we yet profess a demo- 
cratic idealism. Individualism means, 
the following of one's own natural 
desires; democratic idealism that is 
real means tolerance, and some self- 
abnegation for the sake of the other 
fellow. Without the sacrifice and 
control the idealism becomes mere 
sentiment; and mere sentiment the 
last seven years have manifestly 
proved it to be. 

We need today more of the 
Eighteenth Century and Victorian 
spirit. Nationally and individually, to 
avoid bringing our world to an un- 
timely and self-inflicted crack of 
doom, we must struggle against our 
romantic, our naturalistic tendencies. 
We are, to be sure, preparing for 
struggle, for what else mean our 



huge armaments. And we need 
struggle. But the struggle we need 
is different from the one we are pre- 
paring for. The struggle we need is 
ethical, an inward one. It is a strug- 
gle against selfishness and baseness, 
struggle for self-control, struggle 
against a spirit complacent to a low 
materialism. 

MAURICE SYDNEY COBURNE. 



Commencement Poem 



KING ARTHUR DREAMS. 

O King, great King, Arthur the King! 
What are thy dreams where no bi^ds sing? 
In Avalon where sleep is long, 
And no sound comes of martial song, 
Where lapping waves with ceaseless beat 
Make music in thy far retreat, 
And moving winds upstir the leaves 
Beneath the spell that Merlin weaves. 
What are thy dreams, O King? 

Sir Tristram perished, and Gawain, 
Sir Bors will never arm again, 
The peasant tramples down the place 
Where rests the clay of Mordred base. 
The Breton coast sees but the wraith 
Of Launcelot's proud broken faith, 
Guinevere is only a name, 
Lovely and frail and sad of fame. 
What are thy dreams, O King? 

Though courage, pride, desire fail, 
And love itself may not avail, 
Though crumbling vows betray high trust, 
And all that wisdom wrought is dust — 
The vision of thy great emprise 
Yet gleams before men's eager eyes. 
And still that Honor shall be sought 
For which not vainly thou hast fought. 
These are thy dreams, O King! 

ROBERT WINTHROP MORSE. 



Reunion of 1871 



Of this class there are only five 
survivors, James- F. Chaney of Bruns- 
wick, Edmond C. Cole of Warner, 
N. H., William S. Dennett of New 
York, Edward P. Mitchell of Glen 
Ridge, N. J., and the undersigned. 
Four of them have promised to be at 
the next Commencement, our fiftieth 
anniversary, and we expect the fifth. 
All subscribe to the sentiment of the 
following lines, which may be sung 
to the base solo running through a 
portion of the Mountain Echo Waltz, 
that some of us used to dance, when 
we were in college. 

"Amici veterrimi optimi," said 

An eminent sage whom he long ago read ; 

Old friends are the best, ev'ry Bowdoin grad 



knows ; 
We needed not Cicero that to disclose. 

To go through a college and fill up the head 
With classical knowledge is useful, 'tis said 
The learned professors and president dear 
Can't make us possessors of friendships sin 

Chorus 

Bowdoin, thou art our beautiful queen, 
Ihroned in thy bower of pines ever green ; 
Queen of our hearts thou wilt evermore be. 
Years only strengthen allegiance to thee. 

EVERETT S. STACKPOLE. 



alumni Department 

1895— Phillip D. Stubbs has recent- 
ly been appointed Assistant Attorney 
General for Maine. Mr. Stubbs is a 
member of the Franklin County bar 
and has served in the Legislature in 
1907 and again in 1915. He has held 
several important town offices. 

1893— William S. Briry of Melrose, 
Mass., has been appointed assistant 
appraiser of customs at Boston. He 
will be in charge of drug inspection. 

1897 — M. Sumner Coggan of Boston 
and Maiden, Mass., died on June 9. 
He studied law at Boston University 
and in 1900 entered the firm of his 
father, Marcellus Coggan '75. He had 
been a member of the Massachusetts 
Legislature, and was active in sev- 
eral fraternal orders. His wife and 
two children survive him. Mr. Cog- 
gan was a member of the Zeta Psi 
fraternity. 

1911 — An announcement has been 
received of the birth of a son, Law- 
rence Franklin, to Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
Hine on May seventh. 

1915 — On the twenty-third of last 
month the wedding of Miss Mary 
Young Holden and Roger Kimball 
Eastman was performed in Lowell, 
Mass. Mr. Eastman was of the Class 
of 1915 and his best man was Rev. 
Joseph McDonald of the same class. 

1918— Edward S. C. Smith, A.M. 
(Harvard, 1920), a Townsend scholar 
at Harvard, has been awarded a 
George H. Emerson scholarship for 
the coming year at Harvard where 
he is studying Geology. 

1920 — Leland M. Goodrich has been 
awarded the Ozias Goodwin Memorial 
Fellowship at Harvard University for 
next year. He is a candidate for the 
degree of A.M. in Government. 
Maurice W. Avery has been awarded 
a University Scholarship at Harvard 
where he is studying the Classics. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



DURING THE GAME 

BETWEEN CLASSES 

ON THE HIKE 




A "MUNCH" WHILE STUDYING 

A SNACK BEFORE RETIRING 

IN FACT— EVERY OLD TIME 



STRAW HATS 

Young Men's Sennits 

$3.00, $4.00, $5.00 



White Flannels 

$8.00 



E. S. BODWELL 

& SON 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE 



JUD, The Barber 

was going to use this space 
but thought it wasn't neces- 
sary. 



BOWDOIN CANTEEN 

8 a. m.-12 m.; 1.30-6; 7-11 

Sundays, 12-5 p. m. 

A. PALMER, 19 North Winthrop 



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TUFTS 
COLLEGE 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

Offers to the student who has 
had one year of college training, a 
four year course leading to the de- 
gree of D. M. D. 

Being located in Boston, Tufts 
College Dental School enjoys ex- 
cellent clinical advantages. 

Students in the Dental School 
Course have the privilege of clin- 
ics at the Forsythe Dental Infirm- 
ary, Boston City Hospital, Mass- 
achusetts Homeopathic Hospital, 
Boston Dispensary, Vernon St. 
Hospital, and the Massachusetts 
Home for Feeble-Minded. 

Tufts Dental School is co-edu- 
cational. 

Registration begins at 9 a. m., 
on June 21, and ends on Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

School session begins Septem- 
ber 22, 1921. 

For further particulars write to 
F. E. Haskins, M. D., Secretary. 

416 Huntington Avenue, 

Boston, Mass. 

WILLIAM RICE, D.M.D., Dean 



Pressing and Cleaning 

ORDERS TAKEN FOR DYEING 

SECOND HAND CLOTHING 

BOUGHT 

DAN ROSEN 




SPUR-ANew Narrow 

Arrow 

COLLAR 

Cluett.Peabody &Co. Inc. Troy, N.Y. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Give a quaint touch to 
your candy gift! 




Sampler 





Chocolates and confections so good that they 
show how much you think of her. She will like 
them all the more because of the exquisite beauty 
of the old-fashioned box. 

FOR SALE BY 

ALLEN'S DRUG STORE 



Do You Need Extra Courses? 

Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages, Economics, 
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire 
how credits earned may be applied on present college program. 

®lj? Itttormtij of CUjtragn 



HOME STUDY DEPT. 



CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 



SUMMER WORK 

We still have room 
For a few LIVE men 
Provided they want to 
Earn a lot of MONEY 
This summer. 

This isn't a Gamble 

It is a SURE THING 

For the man who HUSTLES 

And besides 

We pay a SALARY. 

NOW is the time 
To get on the Band Wagon 
So see one of our local men 
Or write us direct and 
Ask for the dope. 

Local representatives: 

S. H. Carter, 24 Winthrop 

Hugh Nixon, D. U. House. 

THE NATIONAL SURVEY CO. 

Topographical Offices, 
Chester Vermont 



P. J. MESERVE'S 

Drug Store 
Opposite Town Hall 



We carry a large assortment of 
Olives, Pickles, Cheese, and Fancy Cookies. 

DAVIS' MARKET 

Next to Star Lunch 

all Cigarettes 



A. W. HASKELL, D. D. S. 

W. F. BROWN, D. D. S. 

DENTISTS 

Over Postoffice. Brunswick, Maine 



COLLEGE HAIRCUTS 

A SPECIALTY 

SOULE'S BARBER SHOP 

188 Maine Street 



BOW DOIN ORIENT 




YOUR GAME 

"V^HATEVER your "game," whether 
in sport or serious activity, MACUL- 
LAR PARKER CLOTHES lend fin- 
ish to your performance, and are as 
individual as your own way of doing 



things. 



400 WASHINGTON STREET 
The Old House with the Young Spirit 



Bowdoin men are invited to visit our shop 
when in Boston 



BOYS! 

Have you tried our new drink, 

BOWDOIN BREW? 

Our Candy, too, is right through and 
through 

THE SPEAR FOLKS 

119 Maine Street 



CARL H. MARTIN 

Cleansing and Dyeing 
Pressing and Alterations 



4 Elm Street 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Brunswick, Maine 

Capital, $50,000. 
Surplus and Profits, $100,000. 
Student Patronage Solicited. 



PRINTING 



of Quality 

Always in the lead 
for snap and style 

Wheeler Print Shop 

Town Building, Brunswick, Maine 



We carry the largest assortment of 

Olives, Pickles, Fancy Cheeses and 
Biscuits of all kinds east of Portland 

TONDREAU BROS. CO. 

87 Maine Street Tel. 136-137 

Branch Store— 2 Cushing St.— Tel. 16 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS TO 

BOWDOIN TEAMS 
Boston 

344 Washington Street 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



CITIZENS LAUNDRY 



College Agent 



Auto Service 



A SHORTER 

SHORTHAND SYSTEM 
IN TEN EASY LESSONS 

This course covers ten easy lessons 
which will enable the Student, Pro- 
fessor, Journalist, Doctor, Lawyer or 
anyone seeking a professional career, 
to go thru life with 100 per cent 
efficiency. 

THIS COURSE 

Is short and inexpensive, and is 
given with a money back guarantee if 
not satisfied. 

SEND THIS CLIPPING TO-DAY 



PYRAMID PRESS: PUBLISHERS 

1416 Broadway, 
New York City 

Gentlemen : — Enclosed herewith is $5.00 
for which kindly send me your shorthand 
course in ten easy lessons by mail. It is 
understood that at the end of five days, if 
I am not satisfied my money will be gladly 
refunded. 

Name 

Street 

City and State 



Bowdoin Dairy Lunch 

Open Day and Night 



CORDOVAN BOOTS 



YOUNG MEN'S STYLES 



"Herman's" Tan Cordovan $13.75 

"Co-operative" Best Cordovan. .$15.50 
"Florsheim" Top Grade Cordovan, 

$17.50 
"Florsheim" Tan Boarded in Calf 

"Duck Bill" Brogue $16.00 

You will find here 

TENNIS SHOES, INDOOR AND 

OUTDOOR MOCCASINS, RUBBER 

BOOTS AND RUBBERS. 



ROBERTS' 
SHOE STORE 

W. E. Roberts '07 



OH BOY! 

Have You Tried Our 

49c CHOCOLATES 

There is nothing cheap about our 
place but the price. 

BUTLER'S 



F. W. Chandler & Son 

HAVE 

Tennis Rackets 

from $1.50 to $16.00 each 

Championship Tennis Balls 

60c each 

1 920 Tennis Balls 45c each 

Baseballs & Baseball Supplies 

25 Kinds of Golf Balls 

Golf Bags and Clubs 

The College Book Store 



WEAR ONE OF 

BENOIT'S STRAWS 

NOTHING BETTER IN A 

STRAW TO BE HAD 

ANYWHERE. 

Saw and Cable edge 
and flat foot sennits 
in wide brim - also 
leghorns and 
Panamas. 

$3. $4. $5. 



The Store 

of Progress 

and 

Service 



Monument Square 



Fraternity Hat Bands 

FOR THE FRATERNITY MEN 

NOW IN STOCK 

$1.00 




Portland, Maine 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

CUMBERLAND 

AND 

PASTIME 

THEATRES 

BRUNSWICK - ■ MAINE